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Full text of "Water resources survey, Lake County, Montana"

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Part I: 

HISTORY OF LAND AND WATER 

USE ON IRRIGATED AREAS 

and 
Part II: 

MAPS SHOWING IRRIGATED 
AREAS IN COLORS DESIGNAT- 
ING THE SOURCES OF SUPPLY 




^,a6e (Z&outty, Tttwttatta 



Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana, June 1963 



WATER RESOURCES SURVEY 



LAKE COUNTY 



MONTANA 



Part I 

History of Land and Water Use 
of Irrigated Areas 



MONTANA 




Counties Surveyed 



Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana 

June, 1963 



STATE ENGINEERS OFFICE 

Fred E. Buck (Retired March 7, 1963) State Engineer 

Everett V. Darlinton (Effective March 8, 1963) State Engineer 

Director of Water Resources, Ground and Surface Water 

Hans L. Bille Assistant State Engineer 

Water Resources Survey and Publication of County Reports 

C. Sumner Heidel (Retired April 1, 1963) Deputy State Engineer 

Donald D. Sullivan (Effective May 1, 1963) Deputy State Engineer 

A. D. McDermott Accountant for State Engineer 



CO-OPERATING AGENCIES 
STATE WATER CONSERVATION BOARD 

Governor Tim M. Babcock Chairman 

C. H. Raymond Vice Chairman and Secretary 

Everett V. Darlinton (Effective March 8, 1963) Member 

Fred E. Buck (Retired March 7, 1963) Member and Consultant 

H. J. Sawtell Member 

Wilbur White Member 

George F. Sahinen Chief Engineer 

A. D. McDermott Assistant Secretary 



MONTANA STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

C. C. Bowman, Irrigation Engineer and Consultant, Bozeman 



Honorable Tim M. Babcock 

Governor of Montana 

Capitol Building 

Helena, Montana June, 1963 



Dear Governor Babcock: 



Submitted herewith is a consolidated report on the Water Resources 
Survey of Lake County, Montana. 

This work was accomplished with funds made available to the State 
Engineer by the 37th Legislative Session, 1961, and in co-operation with the 
State Water Conservation Board and the Montana State Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

The report is divided into two parts: Part I consists of history of land 
and water use, irrigated lands, water rights, etc., and Part II contains the 
township maps in the County showing in colors the lands irrigated from 
each source or canal system. 

Work has been completed and reports are now available for the follow- 
ing counties; Big Horn, Broadwater, Carbon, Carter, Cascade, Custer, Deer 
Lodge, Fallon, Gallatin, Golden Valley, Granite, Jefferson, Judith Basin, 
Lake, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Meagher, Missoula, Musselshell, Park, 
Powder River, Powell, Ravalli, Rosebud, Silver Bow, Stillwater, Sweet 
Grass, Teton, Treasure, Wibaux, Wheatland and Yellowstone. 

The office files contain minute descriptions and details of each individ- 
ual water right and land use, which are too voluminous to be included here- 
in. These office files are available for inspection to those who are interested. 

The historical data on water rights contained in this report can never 
become obsolete. If new information is added from time to time as new 
developments occur, the records can always be kept current and up-to-date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT V. DARLINTON, State Engineer 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

A survey and study of water resources involves many phases of both 
field and office work in order to gather the necessary data to make the in- 
formation complete and comprehensive. Appreciation of the splendid co- 
operation of various agencies and individuals who gave their time and as- 
sistance in aiding us in gathering the data for the preparation of this report 
is hereby acknowledged. 



COUNTY OFFICIALS 

Ralph Maxwell, Commissioner H. M. Hendrickson, Commissioner 

George Davis, Jr., Commissioner 

Mrs. Margaret Seines, Clerk of the District Court 

Mrs. Hazel Kinnick, Clerk and Recorder C. W. Reynolds, Assessor 



Robert G. Dunbar Professor of History, Montana State College 

Dr. M. G. Burlingame. ...Department Head of History, Montana State College 

R. A. Dightman Meteorologist in charge, U. S. Dept. of Commerce, 

Weather Bureau 

David R. Cawlfield State Soil Scientist, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, S.C.S. 

Wayne Gibson County Extension Agent 

H. D. Hurd State Soil Conservationist, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, S.C.S. 

Harold W. Cooper Assistant State Conservationist, U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, S.C.S. 

Frank Stermitz District Engineer, U. S. Geological Survey 

Robert D. Geach... Economic Geologist, Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology 

Roger Fliger State Fish & Game Department 

E. F. Barry Assistant Regional Forester, U. S. Dept of Agriculture, 

Forest Service 

George L. Moon Project Engineer, Flathead Irrigation Project 

The State Engineer's Office, Water Resources Survey, hereby expresses 
sincere appreciation to the many ranchers, farmers and stockmen who have 
given their helpful co-operation in this survey. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Foreword 1 

Surface Water 
Ground Water 



Method of Survey 8 

Lake County 

History and Organization 9 

Climate 15 

Soils 17 

Crops and Livestock 18 

Snow Survey 20 

Stream Gaging Stations 21 

Mining 28 

Soil Conservation District 29 

Fish and Game 32 

National Forest 33 

Summary of Irrigated Land 

Counties Completed to Date 35 

Lake County 36 

Irrigation Projects 

Flathead Irrigation Project 40 

Jocko Valley Irrigation District 
Mission Irrigation District 
Flathead Irrigation District 

Water Right Data 

Appropriations and Decrees by Streams 45 



FOREWORD 



SURFACE WATER 



Our concern over surface water rights in Montana is nearly a century old. When the first 
Territorial Legislature, meeting in Bannack, adopted the common law of England on January 
11, 1865, the Territory's legal profession assumed that it had adopted the Doctrine of Riparian 
Rights. This doctrine had evolved in England and in eastern United States where the annual 
rainfall is generally more than twenty inches. It gave the owners of land bordering a stream 
the right to have that stream flow past their land undiminished in quantity and unaltered in 
quality and to use it for household and livestock purposes. The law restricted the use of water 
to riparian owners and forbade them to reduce appreciably the stream flow, but the early min- 
ers and ranchers in Montana favored the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation which permitted di- 
version and diminution of the streams. Consequently, the next day the legislature enacted an- 
other law which permitted diversion by both riparian and non-riparian owners. Whether or not 
this action provided Montana with one or two definitions of water rights was not settled until 
1921 when the Montana Supreme Court in the Mettler vs. Ames Realty Co. case declared the Doc- 
trine of Prior Appropriation to be the valid Montana water right law. "Our conclusion," it said, 
"is that the common law doctrine of riparian rights has never prevailed in Montana since the 
enactment of the Bannack Statutes in 1865 and that it is unsuited to the conditions here. . ." 

The appropriation right which originated in California was used by the forty-niners to di- 
vert water from the streams to placer mine gold. They applied to the water the same rules that 
they applied to their mining claims— first in time, first in right and limitation of the right by 
beneficial use. Those who came to the Montana gulches brought with them these rules, apply- 
ing them to agriculture as well as to mining. 

The main points of consideration under the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation are: 

1. The use of water may be acquired by both riparian and non-riparian landowners. 

2. It allows diversion of water regardless of the reduction of the water supply in the 
stream. 

3. The value of the right is determined by the priority of the appropriation; i. e., first in 
time is first in right. 

4. The right is limited to the use of the water. Stream waters in Montana are the property 
of the State and the appropriator acquires only a right to their use. Moreover, this use 
must be beneficial. 

5. A right to the use of water is considered property only in the sense that it can be bought 
or sold; its owner may not be deprived of it except by due process of law. 



The State Legislature has provided methods for the acquisition, determination of priority 
and administration of the right. No right may be acquired on a stream without diversion of 
water and its application to a beneficial use. On unadjudicated streams, the Statutes stipulate 
that the diversion must be preceded by posting a notice at a point of intended diversion and by 



— 1— 



filing a copy of it within 20 days in the county clerk's office of the county in which the appro- 
priation is being made. Construction of the means of diversion must begin within 40 days of 
the posting and continue with reasonable diligence to completion. However, the Montana Su- 
preme Court has ruled that an appropriator who fails to comply with the Statutes may still 
acquire a right merely by digging a ditch and putting the water to beneficial use. 

To obtain a water right on an adjudicated stream, one must petition the District Court hav- 
ing jurisdiction over the stream for permission to make an appropriation. If the other appropria- 
tors do not object, the court gives its consent and issues a supplementary decree granting the 
right subject to the rights of the prior appropriators. 

Inasmuch as the Montana laws do not require water users to file official records of the 
completion of their appropriations, it becomes advisable as soon as the demand for the waters 
of a stream becomes greater than its supply, to determine the rights and priorities of each 
user by means of an adjudication or water right suit. This action may be initiated by one or 
more of the appropriators who may make all the other claimants parties to the suit. There- 
upon the Judge of the District Court examines the claims of all the claimants and issues a de- 
cree establishing priority of the right of each water user and the amount of water he is en- 
titled to use. The court decree becomes in effect the deed of the appropriator to his water 
right. 

Whenever scarcity of water in an adjudicated stream requires an allocation of the supply 
according to the priority of rights, the Judge, upon petition of the owners of at least 15 per- 
cent of the water rights affected, must appoint a water commissioner to distribute the water. 
Chapter No. 231, Montana Session Laws 1963, Senate Bill 55 amended Section 89-1001 R.C.M. 
1947, to provide that a water commissioner be appointed to distribute decreed water rights by 
application of fifteen per cent (15'/; ) of the owners of the water rights affected, or, under cer- 
tain circumstances at the discretion of the judge of the district court— "provided' that when 
petitioners make proper showing they are not able to obtain the application of the owners of 
at least fifteen per cent (15$ ) of the water rights affected, and they are unable to obtain the 
water to which they are entitled, the judge of the district court having jurisdiction may, in his 
discretion, appoint a water commissioner." After the Commissioner has been appointed the 
Judge gives him full instructions on how the water is to be apportioned and distributed in ac- 
cordance with the terms of the decree. 

The recording of appropriations in local courthouses provides an incomplete record of 
the water rights on unadjudicated streams. In fact, the county records often bear little rela- 
tion to the existing situation. Since the law places no restriction on the number or extent of 
the filings which may be made on an unadjudicated stream, the total amount of water claimed 
is frequently many times the available flow. There are numerous examples of streams becom- 
ing over appropriated. Once, six appropriators each claimed all of the water in Lyman Creek 
near Bozeman. Before the adjudication of claims to the waters of Prickly Pear Creek, 68 par- 
ties claimed thirty times its average flow of about 50 cfs. Today, the Big Hole River with an 
average flow of about 1,000 cfs has filings totaling 173,912 cfs. A person is unable to distin- 
guish in the county courthouses the perfected rights from the unperfected ones since the law 
requires no official recordation of the completion of an appropriation. Recognition by the 
courts of unrecorded appropriations adds to the incompleteness of these records. To further 
complicate the situation, appropriators have used different names for the same stream in 

—2— 



their filings. In Montana many of the streams flow through several counties; consequently, 
water right filings on these inter-county streams are found distributed in two or more county 
courthouses. Anyone desirous of determining appropriations on a certain river or creek finds 
it difficult and expensive to examine records in several places. In addition, the records are 
sometimes scattered because the original nine counties of 1865 have now increased to 56. As 
the original counties have been divided and subdivided, the water right filings have fre- 
quently not been transcribed from the records of one county to the other. Thus, a record of 
an early appropriation in what is at present Powell County may be found in the courthouse of 
the original Deer Lodge County. 

It can be readily seen that this system of recording offers little protection to rights in the 
use of water until they are determined by an adjudication. In other words, an appropriator 
does not gain a clear title to his water right until after adjudication and then the title may not 
be clear because the Montana system of determining rights is also faulty. In the first place, 
adjudications are costly, sometimes very costly when they are prolonged for years. It is esti- 
mated that litigation over the Beaverhead River, which has lasted more than twenty years, has 
cost the residents of the valley nearly one half million dollars. In the second place, unless 
the court seeks the advice of a competent irrigation engineer, the adjudication may be based 
upon inaccurate evidence. In the third place, if some claimant has been inadvertently left 
out of the action, the decree is not final and may be reopened for consideration by the ag- 
grieved party. Another difficulty arises in determining the ownership of a water right when 
land under an adjudicated stream becomes subdivided in later years and the water not ap- 
portioned to the land by deed or otherwise. There is no provision made by law requiring the 
recording of specific water right ownership on deeds and abstracts. 

The Legislative Session of 1957 passed Chapter 114 providing for the policing of water re- 
leased from storage to be transmitted through a natural stream bed to the place of use. The 
owner of the storage must petition the court for the right to have the water policed from the 
storage reservoir to his place of use. If there are no objections, the court may issue the right 
and appoint a water commissioner to distribute the water in accordance therewith. This law 
applies only to unadjudicated streams. 

Administration of water on an adjudicated stream is done by the District Court, but it 
has its drawbacks. The appointment of a water commissioner is often delayed until the short- 
age of water is acute and the court frequently finds it difficult to obtain a competent man for 
a position so temporary. The present administration of adjudicated streams which cross the 
county boundaries of judicial districts creates problems. Many of the water decrees stipulate 
head gates and measuring devices for proper water distribution, but in many instances the 
stipulation is not enforced, causing disagreement among the water users. 

Since a water right is considered property and may be bought and sold, the nature of 
water requires certain limitations in its use. One of the major faults affecting a stream after 
an adjudication is the failure of the District Court to have some definite control over the 
transfer of water rights from their designated places of use. The sale and leasing of water is 
becoming a common practice on many adjudicated streams and has created serious compli- 
cations. By changing the water use to a different location, many of the remaining rights along 
the stream are disrupted, resulting in a complete breakdown of the purpose intended by the 
pdiudication. To correct this situation, legal action must be initiated by the injured parties as 
it is their responsibility and not the Court's. 

—3— 



At one time or another all of the other Western Reclamation States have used similar 
methods of local regulation of water rights. Now all of them except Montana have more or 
less abandoned these practices and replaced them by a system of centralized state control such 
as the one adopted by the State of Wyoming. The key characteristics of the Wyoming system 
are the registration of both the initiation and completion of an appropriation in the State En- 
gineer's Office, the determination of rights and administration by a State Board of Control 
headed by the State Engineer. These methods give the Wyoming water users titles to the use 
of water as definite and defensible as those which they have to their land. 

When Montana began to negotiate the Yellowstone River Compact with Wyoming and 
North Dakota in 1939, the need for some definite information concerning our water and its 
use became apparent. The Legislature in 1939 passed a bill (Ch. 185) authorizing the collec- 
tion of data pertaining to our uses of water and it is under this authority that the Water Re- 
sources Survey is being carried on. The purpose of this survey is six fold: (1) to catalogue by 
counties, in the office of the State Engineer, all recorded, appropriated and decreed water 
rights including use rights as they are found; (2) to map the lands upon which the water is be- 
ing used; (3) to provide the public with pertinent water right information on any stream 
thereby assisting in any transaction where water is involved; (4) to help State and Federal 
agencies in pertinent matters; (5) to eliminate unnecessary court action in water right dis- 
putes; (6) and to have a complete inventory of our perfected water rights in case we need to 
defend these rights against the encroachments of lower states, or Wyoming or Canada. 

GROUND WATER 

Ground water and surface water are often intimately related. In fact, it is difficult in 
some cases to consider one without the other. In times of heavy precipitation and surface 
runoff, water seeps below the land surface to recharge underground reservoirs which, in turn 
discharge ground water to streams and maintains their flow during dry periods. The amount 
of water stored underground is far greater than the amount of surface water in Montana, and 
without seepage from underground sources, it is probable that nearly all the streams in the 
State would cease to flow during dry periods. 

It is believed that Montana's ground water resources are vast and only partly developed 
Yet this resource is now undergoing an accelerating development as the need for its use in- 
creases and economical energy for pumping becomes available. Continued rapid development 
without some regulation of its use will cause a depletion of ground water in areas where the 
recharge is less than the withdrawal. Experience in other states has shown that once overuse 
of ground water in a specific area has started, it is nearly impossible to stop, and may result in 
painful economic readjustments for the inhabitants of the area concerned. 

Practical steps aimed at conserving ground water resources as well as correcting related 
deficiencies in surface water laws have become necessary in Montana. Prior to the Legislative 
Session of 1961, there was no legal method of appropriating ground water. Proposed ground 
water codes were introduced and rejected by four sessions of the Montana Legislative As 
sembly, in 1951, 1953, 1955, and 1959. 

In 1961, during the 37th Legislative Session, a bill was introduced and passed which cre- 
ated a Ground Water Code in Montana. (Chapter 237, Revised Codes of Montana, 1961). This 
bill became effective as a law on January 1, 1962, with the State Engineer of Montana desig- 
nated as "Administrator" to carry out provisions of the Act. 

—4— 






Some of the important provisions contained in Montana's New Ground Water Law are: 
Section 1. DEFINITIONS OR REGULATIONS AS USED IN THE ACT. 

(a) "Ground water" means any fresh water under the surface of the land including the 
water under the bed of any stream, lake, reservoir, or other body of surface water. Fresh 
water shall be deemed to be water fit for domestic, livestock, or agricultural use. The Admin- 
istrator, after a notice and hearing, is authorized to fix definite standards for determining 
fresh water in any controlled ground water area or sub-area of the State. 

(b) "Aquifer" means any underground geological structure or formation which is capa- 
ble of yielding water or is capable of recharge. 

(c) "Well" means any artificial opening or excavation in the ground, however made, by 
which ground water can be obtained or through which it flows under natural pressures or is 
artificially withdrawn. 

(d) "Beneficial use" means any economically or socially justifiable withdrawal or uti- 
lization of water. 

(e) "Person" means any natural person, association, partnership, corporation, munici- 
pality, irrigation district, the State of Montana, or any political sub-division or agency there- 
of, and the United States or agency thereof. 

(f) "Administrator" means State Engineer of the State of Montana. 

(g) "Ground water area" means an area which as nearly as known facts permit, may 
be designated so as to enclose a single and distinct body of ground water, which shall be de- 
scribed horizontally by surface description in all cases and which may be limited vertically by 
describing known geological formations should conditions dictate this to be desirable. For 
purpose of administration, large ground water areas may be divided into convenient adminis- 
trative units known as "sub-areas." 

Section 2. RIGHT TO USE. Rights to surface water where the date of appropriation pre- 
cedes January 1, 1962, shall take priority over all prior or subsequent ground water rights. 
The application of ground water to a beneficial use prior to January 1, 1962, is hereby recog- 
nized as a water right. Beneficial use shall be the extent and limit of the appropriative right. 
As to appropriations of ground water completed on and after January 1, 1962, any and all rights 
must be based upon the filing provisions hereinafter set forth, and as between all appropri- 
ators of surface or ground water on and after January 1, 1962, the first in time is first in right. 

Montana's Ground Water Code provides for four different types of forms that may be 
filed. 

Form No. 1. "Notice of Appropriation of Ground Water" — shall require answers to such 
questions as — (1) the name and address of the appropriator; (2) the beneficial use for which 
the appropriation is made, including a description of the lands to be benefited if for irriga- 
tion; (3) the rate of use in gallons per minute of ground water claimed; (4) the annual period 
(inclusive dates) of intended use; (5) the probable or intended date of first beneficial use; (6) 
the probable or intended date of commencement and completion of the well or wells; (7) the 
location, type, size and depth of the well or wells contemplated; (8) the probable or estimated 

—5— 



depth of the water table or artesian aquifer; (9) the name, address, and the license number of 
the driller engaged; and (10) such other similar information as may be useful in carrying out 
the policy of this Act. This form is optional, but it has an advantage in that after filing the 
Notice of Appropriation, a person has 90 days in which to commence actual excavation and 
diligently prosecute construction of the well. Otherwise, a failure to file the Notice of Ap- 
propriation deprives the appropriator of his right to relate the date of the appropriation back 
upon filing the Notice of Completion (Form No. 2). 

Form No. 2. "Notice of Completion of Ground Water by Means of Well"— this form shall 
require answers to the same sort of questions as required by Form No. 1 (Notice of Appropria- 
tion of Ground Water), except that for the most part it shall inquire into accomplished facts 
concerning the well or means of withdrawal, including (a) information as to the static level 
of water in the casing or the shut-in pressure if the well flows naturally; (b) the capacity of 
the well in gallons per minute by pumping or natural flow; (c) the approximate drawdown or 
pumping level of the well; (d) the approximate surface elevation at the well head; (e) the cas- 
ing record of the well; (f) the drilling log showing the character and thickness of all forma- 
tions penetrated; (g) the depth to which the well is drilled; and similar information. 

It shall be the responsibility of the driller of each well to fill out the Form No. 2, "Notice 
of Completion of Ground Water by Means of a Well," for the appropriator, and the latter 
shall be responsible for its filing. 

Form No. 3. "Notice of Completion of Ground Water Appropriation Without a Well" — is 

for the benefit of persons obtaining (or desiring to obtain) ground water without a well, such 
as by subirrigation or other natural processes so as to enable such persons to describe the 
means of using ground water; to estimate the amount of water so used; and requiring such 
other information pertinent to this particular type of ground water use. 

Form No. 4. "Declaration of Vested Ground Water Rights" — shall be used by persons 
who have put ground water to a beneficial use (including sub-irrigation or other natural 
processes), prior to January 1, 1962 and will require the person within two (2) years after Jan- 
uary 1, 1962, to file a declaration in the office of the county clerk of the county in which the 
claimed right is situated and shall contain the following information: (1) Name and address 
of the claimant; (2) the beneficial use on which the claim is based; (3) the date or approxi- 
mate date of the earliest beneficial use, and how continuous the use has been; (4) the amount 
of ground water claimed; (5) if the beneficial use has been for irrigation, the acreage and de- 
scription of lands to which such water has been applied and the name of the owner thereof; 
(6) the means of withdrawing such water from the ground and the location of each well or 
other means of withdrawal; (7) the date of commencement and completion of the construc- 
tion of the well, wells or other works for withdrawal of ground water; (8) the depth of the 
water table; (9) so far as it may be available, the type, size and depth of each well or the gen- 
eral specifications of any other works for the withdrawal of ground water; (10) the esti- 
mated amount of ground water withdrawn each year; (11) the log of the formations encoun- 
tered in the drilling of each well; and (12) such other information of similar nature as may 
be useful in carrying out the policy of the Act. 

Failure to comply with this requirement shall in nowise work a forfeiture by not filing 
form No. 4, "Declaration of Vested Ground Water Rights," or prevent any such claimant 
from establishing such rights in the courts, but he must maintain the burden of proving such 

—6— 



unrecorded rights. The law provides, however, that the court shall accept the filing of a 
"Declaration of Vested Ground Water Rights" as prima facie evidence of the right. This 
means that if a user has failed to make a filing and a case comes up in court to adjudicate the 
rights, the one who has not made a filing must prove his case by witnesses. 

It shall be recognized that all persons who have filed a Water Well Log Form as provided 
for under Section 1 and 2 of Chapter 58, Sessions Laws of Montana, 1957, shall be considered 
as to having complied with the requirements of this Act. 

Copies of the four types of forms used in filing on ground water are available in the Coun- 
ty Clerk and Recorder's office in each of Montana's 56 counties. It shall be the duty of the 
County Clerk in every instance to file the original copy for the county records; transmit the 
second copy to the Administrator (State Engineer) ; the third copy to the Montana Bureau of 
Mines and Geology; and the fourth copy to be retained by the appropriator (person making 
the filing). 

Accurate records and the amount of water available for future use are essential in the 
administration and investigation of water resources. In areas where the water supply be- 
comes critical, the ground water law provides that the administrator may define the bound- 
aries of the aquifer and employ inspectors to enforce rules and regulations regarding with- 
drawals for the purpose of safeguarding the water supply and the appropriators (see the 
wording of the law for establishing a "controlled area"). 

The filing of water right records in a central office under control of a responsible State 
agency, will provide the only efficient means for the orderly development and preservation of 
our water supplies and will protect all of Montana's use — on both ground and surface waters. 



—7— 



METHOD OF SURVEY 

Water Resources data contained in Part I and Part II of this report are obtained from 
courthouse records in conjunction with individual contacts with landowners. A survey of 
this type involves extensive detailed work in both the office and field to compile a comprehen- 
sive inventory of water rights as they apply to land and other uses. 

The material of foremost importance used in conducting the survey is taken from the files 
of the county courthouse and the data required includes; Landownership, water right records 
(decrees and appropriations), articles of incorporation of ditch companies and any other legal 
papers in regard to the distribution and use of water. Deed records of landownership are re- 
viewed and abstracts are checked for water right information when available. 

Aerial photography is used by the survey to assure accuracy in mapping the land areas 
of water use and all the other detailed information which appears on the final colored town- 
ship maps in Part II. Section and township locations are determined by the photogrammetric 
system, based on government land office survey plats, plane-table surveys, county maps and 
by "on the spot" location during the field survey. Noted on the photographs are the locations 
of each irrigation system, with the irrigated and irrigable land areas defined. All the infor- 
mation compiled on the aerial photo is transferred and drawn onto a final base map by means 
of aerial projection. From the base map color separation maps are made and may include 
three to ten overlay separation plates, depending on the number of irrigation systems within 
the township. 

Field forms are prepared for each landowner showing the name of the owner and opera- 
tor, photo index number, a plat defining the ownership boundary, type of irrigation system, 
source of water supply and the total acreage irrigated and irigable under each. All of the ap- 
propriated and decreed water rights that apply to each ownership are listed on the field 
forms with the description of intended place of use. During the field survey, all water rights 
listed on the field form are verified with the landowner. Whenever any doubt or complica- 
tion exists in the use of a water right, deed records of the land are checked to determine the 
absolute right and use. 

So far as known, this is the first survey of its kind ever attempted in the United States. 
The value of the work has become well substantiated in the counties completed to date by 
giving Montana its first accurate and verified information concerning its water rights and 
their use. New development of land for irrigation purposes by State and Federal agencies is 
not within the scope of this report. The facts presented are as found at the time of completion 
of each survey and provide the items and figures from which a detailed analysis of water and 
land use can be made. 

The historical data contained in these reports can never become obsolete. If new infor- 
mation is added from time to time as new developments occur, the records can always be kept 
current and up-to-date. 

Complete data obtained from this survey cannot be included in this report as it would 
make the text too voluminous. However, if one should desire detailed information about any 
particular water right, lands irrigated, or the number and amount of water rights diverting 
from any particular stream, such information may be obtained by writing the State Engi- 
neer's Office in Helena. 

Every effort is being made to produce accuracy of the data collected rather than to speed 
up the work which might invite errors. 

—8— 



HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION* 

The earliest history of white men inhabiting the area of what is now Lake County tells 
of the fur traders and trappers in 1807. Prior to that time, in 1804-1805, the Lewis and Clark 
Expedition had crossed the mountains south of Lake County in search of a route to the Pa- 
cific Ocean and also to gather information about the Indians and the Far West country. 

Many years before the Indians occupied the area, it was covered by a huge glacial ice 
mass. The change to warmer climatic conditions resulted in periods of freezing and thawing 
to form the topographic characteristics of the region, which included its mountains, valleys, 
lakes and streams. Because of its natural scenic beauty, Lake County is often referred to as 
"God's Country." 

Before the arrival of the white settlers, the area was a paradise for the early-day Indians. 
It was a haven for wild game, and the lakes and streams were well supplied with fish. The 
Indians never knew hunger, for the land supplied them with all their needs. 

When the first white men came to the Flathead country, they found three major Indian 
tribes: the Salish, commonly known as the Flatheads; the Kalispel, known as the Upper Pen 
d'Oreille; and the Kootenai. In 1805, when Lewis & Clark first met the Flatheads in what is 
now Ravalli County they described them as friendly and exceptional Indians. 

Although the Flathead Indians had a few small wars with other tribes, they were gener- 
ally peaceful. An exception to their friendly nature occurred only when they crossed the 
mountains to the plains to hunt buffalo. Here they would usually encounter a hunting party 
of Blackfeet, their hereditary enemies, and a skirmish would result. It is said that the Flat- 
head tribes never took the life of a white man in war. 

Among the early fur traders in the Flathead region were David Thompson, Jocko Finlay 
and Angus McDonald. David Thompson was one of the first white men to see the Flathead 
Indian country which was in the year 1808, when he was sent into the area as an employee of 
the Northwest Fur Company to explore the region and establish trade with the Indians. One 
of the first trading posts he established was where the present-day town of Libby now stands. 
In 1812, Thompson built another post near the present site of Thompson Falls. His fair trad- 
ing with the Flathead Indians earned him their friendship as well as a thriving business in 
the fur trade. Making a trip one day to the present-day site of Dixon, Thompson was told 
about Flathead Lake and the surrounding country. Becoming interested in seeing the lake, 
the Indians provided him with a guide and ontic beauty of Flathead Lake, 
became the first white men to view the majes March 1, 1812, David Thompson and his party 

Jocko Finlay, another fur trader, was associated with Thompson and assisted him in 
building the Kalispel House on Flathead Lake. Jocko Finlay was born in Montreal, Canada 
in 1768, the son of James Finlay, one of the founders of the Northwest Fur Company. The 
Jocko River and valley were named in honor of this popular fur trader. 

The competition for the fur trade increased when the Hudson Bay Fur Company estab- 
lished posts in the Montana territory at Fort Hall and Fort Colville and also at Fort Boise in 
Idaho. The chief trader in charge of the forts for the Company was Angus McDonald. He was 
born on October 15, 1816 and after graduating from college as a lawyer he emigrated to 
America, entering the employ of the Hudson Bay Fur Company in 1838. When Fort Connah 

—9— 



was estbal.shed in 1845, the Company put Angus McDonald in charge to complete construe 
boo of the buddings. Fort Connah was located six miles north of the present town of St Ig" 
natius and one of the buildings still stands as a memorial to McDonald and the fur trade He 
was in charge of the thriving fur business at Fort Connah for many years enioytae his noou 
anty with the Indians to such an extent that they included him to mos 'of th ^ tdba a'ctfvt 

Sing 111 tine "e C gio°n naId "" "^ * "" -*» <* ■—« — - ^ 

,rv f ^ kirmiSheS betWe , en th u e Blackfeet and the Flathead tribes harassed the fur trading indus- 
try for many years after the establishment of the trading posts. In an effort to control the 
war-like tendencies between the tribes, the Flatheads were told stories of the white medi- 
cme men (Back Robes, who might help them overcome difficulties with toBMfe 
enemies^ In April, 1840, Father Pierre Jean DeSmet, a young Jesuit Priest left We tpo ttow 
Kansas City) with a party of American Fur Company traders to fulfill his promise rf the year 
before to meet with he Indians of the great northwest. He was met at Green River Wyoming 

y t i g M ? d ° f Fl3theadS Wh ° had been Sent t0 meet this «"» <* God- They escorted him 
nin t M h ° ntan t, te t ', rit0ry Where the ^ Were J° ined »y m ^bers of the Nez Perce and Kalis P d 
Indian tribes until they numbered about sixteen hundred After two month, „/!,•!■ 

we°nt baTf S f"^ ™ ^^ *°* «* adU " S -« » Tathe De"hen 
went back to St. Louis, promising to return the next year. In the spring 1841, DeSmlt maae 

Itlr I T,T\ t0 retU, L n> 3nd ln Se P temfa er the first Catholic Mission in the terrHory was 
established 28 miles south of Missoula, between Stevensville and Fort Owen. Many other mfs 
sionanes came into the region during the next decade. On September 24, 1854 Father Ho™k" 
en and his party officially founded the St. Ignatius Mission in what is now Lake C ou "ty A 
log hut was erected for the missionaries and before the end of the year, 82 Indians had been 
baptized; a chapel, two houses, a carpenter and blacksmith shop were constructed Within th^ 
year over 1,000 Indians, Kootenai, Flathead, Kalispel and Pe'nd d'Ored rived to mk 

heir homes near the new mission. A new church was built in 1910, the interior of whTch con- 
tains frescoes, requiring many months of work by J. Canignano, a coadjutor Brother of "he 

ttr g y htt u ut™ ious art work today is admired by -i "-* -£5 

The agreement creating the Flathead Indian Reservation was completed on July 16, 1855 
at a place called Council Grove, six miles west of the present city of Missoula. Signers of the 
agreement were: Governor Isaac Stevens, representing the United States Government, Chief 
Alexander of the Kalispel, Chief Michelle of the Kootenai and Chief Victor of the Salkh 
(F athead) Indian tribes. It was agreed that the Kalispel and Kootenai tribes would b 'located 
within the present boundaries of the Flathead Indian Reservation and Chief Victor and his 
Flatheads would settle in the Bitterroot valley. An alternate clause in the agreemln empow 
ered the President of the United States to make surveys which would determine whefteHt 
was better for the Flatheads to remain in the Bitterroot or be moved to the Jocko Agency on 
the Reservation. s y 

* / n 185( t Dr " R x f ^f ndsdale ' the first Indian A gent, established the Jocko Agency. Later 
that year, Major John Owen was appointed Indian Agent for the Flatheads, which position he 

A, r e V ncv Tn ^7' n" T ^ *"?*"* * ^ ^ but m3de ^^ ^ S to the ^cko 
Agency In 1871 a presidential order was issued decreeing that the Salish tribe move from 

the Bitterroot valley to the Jocko Agency on the reservation. Chief Chariot (Charlo), who 



—10— 



had followed in the footsteps of his father, Chief Victor, as leader of the Salish tribe, refused to 
leave and began a resistance that was to last for twenty years. After many investigations and 
attempts were made to move Chief Chariot and his people to the Jocko, he finally consented 
to leave the Bitterroot. On October 17, 1891, after consulting with the Indian agent Major Ro- 
nan and his friend Amos Buck, a Stevensville merchant, Chariot and his people, totaling less 
than three hundred, moved to the Jocko. The government built the old Chief a nice home in 
the square near the Agency. Chief Chariot, broken in health and spirit died on January 10, 
1910. 

In the early 1860's and 70's many white men came to the northwest seeking their fortunes. 
Some became discouraged and moved on, but those who remained had enough vision to see a 
bright future in the Flathead country. The people who remained were of high caliber and 
played a vital part in the agricultural development of the Flathead. Many of their descend- 
ants, from the second to fourth generations, live on the reservation at the present time. Space 
will not permit an individual history of each, but among some of the more prominent pio- 
neers were: Angus McLeod, Sr.; Joseph Ashley, Sr.; Louis Clairmont; Camille Dupuis, Sr.; 
Alexander Morigeau, Sr.; Dave, Louis and Octave Couture, Raphael Bisson; Louis Courville, 
Sr.; Joe Greiner, Sr.; Edwin Dubay; Joe Houle, Sr.; Jean B. Jette; Frank Jette; Isaac and Eli 
Pauline; Fred W. Glover, Sr.; August Finley; George Ledoux; Fred Roullier; Mike Matt; Joe 
Matt, Sr.; Garcon Demers; Bob Vinson and many others. Most of those named were engaged 
in agriculture, raising grain, cattle and horses. 

In 1887 Congress passed the Dawes Act that would open the lands of the Flathead Indian 
Reservation to white settlement. The best of the lands were to be allotted to the Indians with 
the surplus lands to be sold to homesteaders. Several years passed, until April 23, 1904 when a 
bill was passed in Congress authorizing surveys to be made of the reservation lands and al- 
lotments made to the Indians. Work was begun under the administration of a new Indian su- 
perintendent, Major Samuel Ballew and completed in 1908. On May 22, 1909, President Taft 
issued a proclamation opening the balance of the reservation lands to white settlement. Out 
of 3,000 names drawn, only 403 people at that time chose to homestead on the reservation. 
Each person had to meet certain qualifications and after selecting the land, a down-payment 
of one-third the appraised price was required, with the balance to be paid in five equal in- 
stallments. 

In the 1904 Bill, Congress authorized a preliminary survey to determine whether or not 
an irrigation project was feasible on the reservation, and in 1907 an arrangement was made 
between the Office of Indian Affairs and the Reclamation Service whereby the latter fur- 
nished the engineering organization to make the surveys and carry on the construction work. 
Engineer Robert S. Stockton was detailed to the reservation in 1907 to make the preliminary 
! i rvey and report on the feasibility of an extensive irrigation devlopment. His report was 
completed in 1908. Construction was begun in 1909 and has been carried on continuously since 
that date. Until April, 1924, the engineering work was done by the Reclamation Service and 
submitted to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for approval, but since then, all of the work 
en the project has been under the Bureau of Indian Affairs. 

The development of the Flathead Irrigation Project provides the basic economy for the 
majority of the Lake County residents. Briefly, the present irrigation system consists of fif- 
teen storage reservoirs, having a total of 148,725 acre-feet of stored water. There are approxi- 
mately 1,300 miles of feeder and distribution canals in the irrigation system. The water users 

—11— 



are organized into three irrigation districts; the Flathead, Mission and Jocko Valley. For a 
detailed account of the project see the "Flathead Irrigation Project" of this report. (Page 40) 

There are industrial and recreational developments in Lake County, in addition to agri- 
culture that make this county one of the important areas in Western Montana. 

Kerr Dam, with a total capacity of 180,000 Kilowatts, is located five miles below Poison on 
the Flathead River and is the largest electrical generating power plant in the Montana Pow- 
er Company system. The dam is a concrete arch 204 feet high anchored deep in a solid rock 
base, which extents to either side. Kerr Dam stores water in Flathead lake amounting to 
1,217,000 acre-feet and the water level of the lake is kept at an elevation between 2,883 and 
2,893 feet above sea level. Kerr Dam was named in honor of Frank M. Kerr, President of the 
Montana Power Company from 1933 to 1940. 

The lumber industry is second to agriculture in the amount of income derived from Lake 
County. Sawmills located north of Pablo are the Tom Wheeler, Danielson Brothers and Plum 
Creek Lumber Company No. 2; at Poison are the James Lumber Company, Inc., Dupuis 
Brothers Lumber Company and the U. S. Plywood Corporation Plant. The U. S. Plywood 
Corporation is the largest manufacture of plywood in the world, having plants in many 
other areas of the United States. A by-product, consisting of two and a half carloads of wood 
chips are shipped from the plant each day to the Waldorf-Hoerner Paper Products Company, 
near Frenchtown, for paper manufacturing. Another source of income connected with the 
lumber industry is the market for Christmas trees. Although seasonal, only during the months 
of October and November, the average harvest per year is about 150,000 bales. The source of 
supply comes mostly from tribal lands and brings in approximately $75,000 annually to the 
tribes. 

In 1908, Congress at the request of President Theodore Roosevelt, appropriated $40,000 
to purchase 19,000 acres of land from the Flathead tribes for a National Bison Reserve. It is 
located in the southern part of the Flathead Indian Reservation with about one-third of the 
land in Lake County and two thirds in Sanders County. The original foundation herd of 41 
buffalo has now increased to 342 head. To maintain a herd consistent with the grazing area, 
about 100 head are butchered in November each year. The buffalo meat is sold by the quarter 
to the lucky individuals who register for the drawing that is held each summer. In addition 
to buffalo, there are seventy-five elk, 300 mule deer, 100 white tail deer, 35 bighorn sheep and 
12 to 25 prong-horn sheep on the reserve. 

The picturesque Flathead Lake and surrounding area is noted as a summer vacation land. 

Poison, on the south end of Flathead lake, offers fishing, swimming, boating, water skiing, 
and golfing for the vacationing tourist. Nearby attractions are the Mission Mountain Range, 
Blue Bay Resort, Yellow Bay, St. Ignatius Mission, Kerr Dam and the National Bison Re- 
serve. The annual Copper Cup Regatta is held at Poison during the third week-end in August. 
This event is a highlight of the boating season and attracts boat racing enthusiasts from all 
over the northwest. 

The real estate development around Flathead Lake began soon after 1923, when Colonel A. A. 
White envisioned the Villa Sites and other lake shore properties as prospective sites for sum- 
mer homes and tourists resorts. In 1924, prices for lake shore property were listed at $50-$100 

—12— 



an acre, which people thought too high. Since that time real estate development along the 
lake shore has been spectacular. Many beautiful summer homes have been built and lots that 
once sold for $50 now sell for $5,000 and more. 

The east and south land areas bordering Flathead Lake are particularly adaptable to the 
growing of fruits and vegetables. Grown abundantly are several varieties of sweet cherries 
and apples. Yellow and red Delicious apples are raised commercially; other species are Mcin- 
tosh, Wealthies, Ben Davis, Yellow Transparent and Crab apples. Plums, pears, strawberries 
and sour cherries grow equally well. One fruit which has been developed and always finds a 
ready market is the Flathead sweet cherry. This popular fruit arrives on the market after the 
Washington sweet cherries have been harvested and due to its superiority in color, firmness 
and size, commands a premium price. Carloads of the fruit are shipped yearly to the eastern 
market. The average price received for the cherry crop provides a real stimulus to the econo- 
my of the area in the amount of $250,000 annually. 

Towns and small rural communities in Lake County are: Poison, Ronan, St. Ignatius, 
Charlo, Arlee, Pablo, Ravalli, Proctor, Rollins, Moiese, Dayton, Elmo, Big Arm, Radio and 
Round Butte. 

Poison the county seat of Lake County, was originally known as Lamberts Landing and is 
located at the southern end of Flathead Lake. According to the last census in 1960, it had a 
population of 2,314 people. The town was named after David Poison, an early-day settler in 
the vicinity. The first post office was established there in 1898. Prior to the creation of Lake 
County in 1923, an election was held to determine which of the towns, Poison or Ronan would 
become the county seat. Results of the election gave Poison the honor by a margin of 674 
votes. 

Ronan, the second largest town in Lake County, with a population of 1,334 is located in the 
center of the rich agricultural area of the Lower Flathead and Mission valleys. In 1883, the 
town was a small trading post known as Spring Creek. When the government constructed a 
flour mill and saw mill at the post in 1885, the name was changed to Ronan Springs in hon- 
or of Peter Ronan, who was Indian agent from 1873 to 1892. A few years later in 1894, a post 
office was established and the name shortened to Ronan. 

St. Ignatius is by far the oldest town in the county, being founded in 1854 by the Jesuit 
Fathers who established the St. Ignatius Mission. Located at St. Ignatius is the U. S. Indian 
Irrigation Service for the Flathead Project. It is the third largest town in the county and has 
a population of 940. 

Charlo, known as Tabor in the early 1900's was named in honor of E. F. Tabor, a Recla- 
mation Service Engineer. The name was changed to Charlo when a post office became estab- 
lished there in 1918, to honor the great Indian Chief Chariot (Charlo) and his descendants who 
were allotted acreage in the area. The population of Charlo, according to the 1960 census, was 
200. 

Arlee began as a community with the establishment of the Jocko Agency by the govern- 
ment in the spring of 1856. Jocko Agency was located about three miles east of the settle- 
ment of Arlee. The route of the Northern Pacific Railway to the west coast missed Jocko 
Agency by two miles and when a post office was established at the settlement on the railroad, 
April 27, 1882, it was named for the Indian Chief Arlee. This small community had a rich early- 
day pioneer history and had a population of 20) people in 1960. 

—13— 



Pablo is the youngest town on the reservation, becoming a townsite on September 13, 
1917. When the Northern Pacific branch line from Dixon was nearing completion through the 
area to Poison, the U. S. Government held a public lot sale to establish the present town of 
Pablo. Today, Pablo has a population of about 100 people. 

Ravalli was believed to have been named in honor of the popular Jesuit Father, Anthony 
Ravalli, who founded the St. Mary's Mission church in the Bitterroot. It is located on the pas- 
senger line of the Northern Pacific Railway and near the south boundary of the National Bi- 
son Reserve. 

Proctor and Rollins are the only two towns in Lake County located outside the boundaries 
of the Flathead Indian Reservation. Both of these communities have populations of about 100 
people. 

Big Arm takes its name from its location on the big arm of Flathead Lake. It is a small 
community which depends upon vacationers and tourist business for its livelihood. 

Moiese started as a small rural community in 1910, when the Moiese valley became well 
populated with settlers and the establishment of the bison range nearby created the need for 
a general store and post office. On May 4, 1918 James D. Sloan became the first postmaster of 
Moiese and proprietor of the new general store. 

Dayton and Elmo are small resort communities located on the big arm of Flathead Lake. 
Each of these resort towns contain a post office, general store and lodging accommodations for 
the vacationing traveler. 

Radio and Round Butte are now just rural farming areas. The post office and stores that 
were once a part of these communities, no longer exist. 

Lake County was created in Montana on August 11, 1923. It was formed from the northern 
part of Missoula County and the southern portion of Flathead County and has a total land area 
of 1,654 square miles. 

Transportation facilities in Lake County consist of the Northern Pacific Railway, U. S. 
Highways 93 and 10A, and State highways 35, 212, 28 and 209. In the southern part of the coun- 
ty, the main line of the Northern Pacific Railway passes through the towns of Arlee and Rav- 
alli on its route to the west coast. At Dixon, in Sanders County, a branch freight line from 
the Northern Pacific Railway enters Lake County south of the community of Moiese and fol- 
lows a northerly course through the towns of Charlo, Ronan, and Pablo, terminating at Pol- 
son. In addition to the main highways, there are many improved county roads to all of the 
outlying rural areas in Lake County. Passenger buses and auto freight lines serve the area. 
Poison has a local airport that will accommodate small private aircraft and chartered planes 
for those people who prefer air travel into and from the Flathead area. 



♦Historical information and facts are taken mostly from the manuscript "The Fabulous Flathead," by J. 
F McAlear. Copyright 1962, by the Reservation Pioneers, Inc. Also consulted was Major John Owen's 
Diary, 1850-1870, and other writings. 



—14— 



CLIMATE 

Located well west of the Continental Divide, Lake County is nevertheless quite moun- 
tainous, a feature shared with all of Western Montana's counties. Although some of the val- 
leys, particularly that of the Flathead River in some sections, are fairly broad with compara- 
tively level bottoms, the fact that most of the county's area is either hilly or mountainous pro- 
duces marked differences in climate within short horizontal distances. The area is well sup- 
plied with lakes, the largest of which is Flathead, situated in and occupying much of the 
northern end of the county. The lakes also produce local climate influences, but here the 
main effects are found along the shores of Flathead Lake, and are observed mainly during the 
winter season. By noting that elevations within the county vary from about 2,500 ft. above 
sea level where the Flathead River flows into Missoula County near Dixon, to 9,255 ft. on 
Swan Peak of the Swan Range — a change in elevation of nearly 7,000 ft. — the differences in 
climate can be better understood. 

The larger drainages are the Flathead (flowing generally southward from the lake at 
Poison), the Swan (flowing north-northwestward and entering the lake south of Bigfork), 
and the Jocko (flowing westward across the south edge of the county — into Missoula County 
near Arlee). Located as it is, west of the Continental Divide but well within "mountain" coun- 
try, Lake County climate can best be classified as modified Continental. This means that al- 
though the climate in general has continental characteristics, there are periods during which 
these characteristics are interrupted by invasions of Pacific Maritime air masses. These peri- 
ods can last for days and may recur several times a year, although the more important Pacific 
weather effects occur during the winter season. It should be remembered, too, that there are 
large differences between valley floors and mountains — the mountains generally are much 
wetter than the valleys, with the greatest differences during the winter. 

The area generally averages a little warmer than Montana East of the Continental Di- 
vide, due mainly to the sheltering effect of the Divide on polar cold air invasions from the 
North during the winter. While cold waves of this type can occur when the polar air masses 
develop enough vertical depth to spill westward over the Divide, such cold spells occur only 
about half as often as in the more typical continental climate of Eastern Montana. The cold- 
est observed in 51 years at St. Ignatius was -36°, while along the shores of Flathead Lake, 
lowest of record at several points ranges from -20° to -30°. The warming effect of Flathead 
Lake perhaps has been exaggerated at times but it does exist, mainly on clear, still, winter 
nights when cool air drainage from surrounding hills moves onto the lake water surface and 
can there be warmed to a sufficient depth at times to reach a few hundred feet inland from the 
shore. That this effect may be important climatically is underlined by the fact that during 
recorded history, Flathead Lake has "frozen over" during the winter only about one winter 
out of seven. Summer temperatures average warm, but seldom become oppressive, having 
reached a county maximum as warm as 104° only at Poison (53 years of record). It should 
be noted that higher elevations run cooler most of the time than the valley bottoms where 
most weather observing stations are located. 

The wettest month of the year is June, over the valleys, but it is thought (although ac- 
tual measurements are lacking) that late fall, winter, and early spring mountain precipitation 
is heavier than in summer over the mountains. This substantial mountain cold season snow- 
fall (largely from Pacific Ocean moisture sources) is stored on the slopes, and produces most 

—15— 



of the spring season runoff observed in all major streams almost every year. Over the main 
valleys about 55 to 60 per cent of the annual average precipitation falls during the April-Sep- 
tember so-called growing season, but east and southeast of Flathead Lake along Mission and 
Swan Ranges, most of an average year's moisture falls during the October-March half. The 
latter effect shows up especially where precipitation has been measured at some higher points, 
such as Upper Holland Lake in northeastern Missoula County, where it takes more than 60 
inches to produce an average year — most of which (perhaps as much as 80 per cent) falls during 
the snow season. 

Over the county as a whole the sun shines about half of the possible time during an aver- 
age year (estimated from Missoula) ; from about 80 per cent of the time in July to about 25 per 
cent in December. Cloudy days outnumber partly cloudy and clear, but on most cloudy days 
the sun breaks through for short periods. The freeze-free period averages about 140 days 
around Flathead Lake to less than 100 days over many of the higher valleys. Valley fog is ob- 
served occasionally during the fall season, mainly in November and December. High rela- 
tive humidity rarely occurs with high temperature, and the combination of these elements, 
therefore, is rarely oppressive. 

Really severe weather seldom occurs. Instances of timber "blow-down" have been re- 
ported from high winds but not often. Summer thunder - showers produce occasional local 
hail or wind gust damage but here again the phenomenon is unusual. Severe cold (-10° to 
-20°) can occur once a year or so, usually with some snow, but real blizzard conditions are 
practically unknown. The following tabulation of weather data observed in and near Lake 
County will illustrate some of points made in the preceding paragraphs. 



Selected Temperature and precipitation data for Lake County are listed in the following 
tables: 

TEMPERATURE 

Highest Lowest January July Annual 

Station of Record of Record Average Average Average 

Big Fork (1939-1960) 100 

Poison (1907-1960) 104 

Poison Kerr Dam (1951-1960) 104 

St. Ignatius (1909-1960) 103 



-20 


26.2 


67.5 


46.0 


-30 


25.1* 


67.4* 


45.5* 


-23 


25.9 


68.1 


46.2 


-36 


25.1* 


67.6* 


46.0* 



*1931-1960 



-16— 



PRECIPITATION 

Per Cent 

Growing Falling in . 

Yearly Seasont Growing Wettest Driest 

Station Average Average Season Year Year 

Big Fork (1939-1960) ....Z ... 22.01 11.57 53% 28.79 (1951) 16.10 (1952) 

Poison (1907-1960) 15.03* 8.53* 57% 21.90 (1958) 10.17 (1931) 

Poison Kerr Dam (1951-1960).. 15.28 8.81 58% 19.93(1959) 10.03(1952) 

St. Ignatius (1909-1960) 15.10* 9.31* 62% 25.15 (1916) 8.77 (1935) 

Round Butte (1941-1960) 12.92 7.66 59% 17.39 (1948) 7.46 (1952) 

Swan Lake (1941-1960) 28.19 11.41 40% 37.33(1959) 17.23(1952) 

♦1931-1960 

* April-September 

SOILS 

The character of soils is determined by parent material, relief, vegetation, climate, and the 
length of time the soil has been developing. In Lake County the soil forming factors, except 
parent materials, are highly variable and there are numerous distinctly different soils. The orgi- 
inal source of parent materials is chiefly quartzites and argillites of the Belt Formation. These 
recks are pre-Cambrian in age. Most of the farming and grazing lands are developed from 
glacial till alluvium or lacustrine deposits derived from the Belt rocks. Some of the forested 
soils are also derived from these reworked deposits, but many of them are weathered in 
place from the hard Belt rocks. The wide variation in elevation and climate (both in tempera- 
ture and precipitation) is the chief contributing factor to soil variation. Variation in soil tex- 
ture and in the amount of gravel, cobble, and stone in the soil also contributes to soil differ- 
ences. Of common occurrence in Lake County are soils belonging to Alluvial, Regosol, Litho- 
sol, Brown, Chestnut Chernozem, Solonetz, Humic Gley, Gray Wooded and Brown Podsolic 
great soil groups with minor areas of Alpine soils at elevations above 8,000 feet. There are also 
large areas of barren rockland in the higher mountains. 

Agricultural soils are largely confined to Alluvial, Brown, Chestnut, Chernozem and 
Solonetz soils. They include, however, some Regosols, Gray Wooded and Brown Podsolic soils 
from which timber has been cleared. Soils developed in glacial lacustrine deposits make up 
about half of the farming and grazing soils. A large portion of the irrigated cropland is on 
soils derived from these lacustrine deposits. The remainder are developed in glacial till or al- 
luvial deposits on fans, terraces and on bottomlands in narrow stream valleys. The lacustrine 
deposits range from sandy loam to clay in texture with clay loam and clay textures predomi- 
nating. Glacial till and alluvial materials are of clay loam to sandy loam texture but contain 
varying amounts of gravel, cobbles, or stones throughout the soil. 

Problems associated with irrigated soils include impeded drainage and salinity on the 
more clayey materials with the additional problems of slow water intake rate on the Solonetz 
soils. Some irrigated soils developed in alluvium are of coarse texture or overlie loose gravel 
and sand at shallow depths. Such soils can stcre only limited soil moisture for use by plants. 

The published soil survey of the Lower Flathead Valley shows the location and relative 
extent of the more important soils in the irrigated and dry farmed lands in Lake County. 
More detailed soil surveys are being made on individual farms and ranches as they are needed 
for conservation planning. 

—17— 



CROPS AND LIVESTOCK 

Lake County consists of approximately 960,000 acres of land, of which 162,397 acres are 
Federal lands and 18,503 acres are taken up by towns, roads, water and etc. There is a great 
deal of variation in the climate as well as the soil types located within the county. Flathead 
Lake, which lies predominately in Lake County, helps to regulate the weather in the area 
around the lake, making possible the raising of many fruit crops. The Mission Mountain 
Range split the county from north to south, thereby helping to hold some of the moisture in 
the productive Flathead Valley. 

Due to the mild climate within the valley, a variety of all types of crops are produced 
abundantly. There are no main crops because of the tremendous variety raised. In 1959, there 
were 103,430 acres of cropland harvested. Included in the cropland harvested were 49,860* 
acres of irrigated land and 53,570 acres of non-irrigated land. Crops taken from the irrigated 
land totaled $3,219,900 with an average value per acre of $64.48. The non-irrigated land crops 
had a valuation of $1,828,700, for an average of $34.14 per acre. (See table for major crops 
raised and their valuation). 

The U. S. Indian Irrigation Service has a project located in Lake County covering nearly 
all the Lower Flathead Valley. This project has a storage capacity of about 148,725 acre-feet 
of water in its system of fifteen reservoirs. There are about 1,300 miles of canals and laterals 
on the project. 

According to the 1960 Agricultural Statistics there has been a steady increase in the num- 
ber of cattle, calves and hogs over the past few years. Dairy animals, horses and sheep have 
steadily but slowly declined. In 1959, the total receipts of livestock and livestock products 
sold, totaled $6,094,900. A table included at the end of this section gives valuation and number 
of livestock in the county. 

Lake County is broken into several definite communities. These include the East Shore, 
Valley View, Round Butte, Charlo, Mission, Moiese, Arlee, Irvine Flats, Ronan and Poison. 
These communities are based primarily on the type of agriculture, which in itself, is based on 
the soil types. 

The people living on the East Shore of Flathead Lake are basically horticulturists, cher- 
ries being the main crop raised there. Most of these cherries are sold through the Flathead 
Cherry Growers' Association. 

Farmers located in the Valley View and Irvine Flats area are basically dryland and live- 
stock men. Most of these farms and ranches are larger than the county average. 

Dairying is the most important enterprise of farmers living in the Round Butte, Charlo 
and Mission areas. These farms are located within the Irrigation Project and are quite diversi- 
fied. Many other areas are too diversified to list a major crop. 

Lake County has one of the most active weed control districts in the State. The entire 
county is within the district boundaries and generally the farmers' attitude toward the dis- 
trict is excellent. 



*Figure does not correspond with the irrigated acreage compiled by Water Resource Survey. 

—18— 



Weed control is a major problem in Lake County with serious infestations of Spotted 
Knapweed, St. Johnswort, White Top, Canada Thistle, Field Bindweed, Dalmation and Yel- 
low Toadflax, Leafy Spurge and several other weeds. Due to the large amount of hay and 
feed grains which are transported from out of state and counties within the state, it is very 
hard to do an effective job of eradication. One of the major expenses of many farms is weed 
control. 

The Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District includes nearly all of Lake Coun- 
ty. The District owns some machinery and does a considerable amount of work each season. 



Listed below is a table showing the crops, their acreages, yields and value, with a total 
of livestock and livestock products sold during the year 1959. 

CROPS PRODUCTION, 1959, HARVESTED ACRES 



Irrigated Non-Irrigated 

Yield Yield 

CROPS Acres Per Acre Acres Per Acre 

Rye 100 19.0 

Winter Wheat 700 38.0 15,000 27.0 

Spring Wheat 2,200 27.0 5,300 21.0 

Corn 200 40.0 

Oats 4,400 52.0 2,900 30.0 

Barley 4,200 31.0 8,800 29.0 

Potatoes 

(Certified Seed ) 790 180 cwt 70 50 cwt 

Alfalfa Hay 

(@ $18 per ton) 24,200 2.10 ton 16,100 1.50 ton 

Wild Hay 

(@ $12 per ton) 1,600 1.3 ton 1,800 1.00 ton 

Alfalfa Seed 200 70 lbs 

Red Clover Seed 100 200 lbs 

Crested Wheatgrass 

Seed 100 100 

Sugar Beets 470 13.0 



Acres 



TOTALS 

Yield 
Per Acre 



Value 



100 


1,900 bu 


$ 1,200 


15,700 


431,600 bu 


703,500 


7,500 


170,700 bu 


273,100 


200 


800 bu 


10,400 


7,300 


315,800 bu 


202,100 


13,000 


385,400 bu 


323,700 


860 


145,700 cwt 


502,700 


40,300 


75,000 ton 


1,450,000 


3,400 


3,900 ton 


46,000 


200 


1,400 lbs 


4,000 


100 


20,000 lbs 


5,800 


100 


10,000 lbs 


2,400 


470 


6,100 ton 


76,900 



—19— 



LIVESTOCK, 1960 CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE 



Horses and Mules 2,800 head $ 280,000 

Sheep and Lambs 16 000 

Hogs and Pigs 8 | 800 

Chickens 60J00 

Dairy Animals 3 500 

Cattle and Calves 53 900 



401,200 

273,680 

75,125 

1,963,500 

9,270,800 



Total Cash Receipts, 1959 



Livestock & Total Marketing Government 

Lr °P s Livestock Products Receipts Payments Total 



$2,396,500 $6,094,900 $8,491,400 $117,700 $8,609,100 

SNOW SURVEYS 

Snow surveys are made annually in Lake County for the purpose of predicting the prob- 
able streamflow from the winter snowpack which will be available for use during spring and 
summer months. This information is useful to farmers and ranchers who irrigate, reservoir 
operators, power companies and other water management agencies. With water forecast in- 
formation, farmers and ranchers can plan crops for the year, amounts of water for each crop, 
number of irrigations, etc. Other water users can plan economic operation of reservoirs and 
flood control structures. 

Snow surveys consist of measuring the snow water equivalent, depth and density* of the 
snowpack. Thirty five snow survey courses are measured to serve the Flathead River drain- 
age contiguous to Lake County. The seven high elevation stations used to prepare seasonal 
forecasts of water used on agricultural land are: 

SNOW COURSE 



VT M U w,, Yeai " DateS 

Name Number Elevation Established Measured' 



Mission Valley drainage 

North Fork Jocko 13-B-7 

Big Creek 13-B-3 

TV Mountain 14-B-l 

Little Bitterroot River drainage 

Brush Creek 14-A-4 

Logan Creek 14-A-5 

Griffin Creek 14-A-9 

Bassoo Peak 14-B-3 



6330 


1941 


3, 


4, 5, 6 


6750 


1941 


3, 


4, 5, 6 


6800 


1956 


1. 2, 


3, 4, 5 


5000 


1937 




3, 4, 5 


4300 


1937 




3, 4, 5 


5150 


1960 




3, 4, 5 


5150 


1961 




3, 4, 5 



Current season information predicting probable streamflow from the winter snow pack is 
available at the Soil Conservation Service, Bozeman, Montana. 



1 Numerals 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 refer to January 1, February 1, March 1, April 1, May 1 and June 1 measurements. 

—20— 



STREAM GAGING STATION 

The U S. Geological Survey measures the flow of streams, co-operating with funds supplied 
by several state and federal agencies. The results have been published yearly in , bod : form 
by drainage basins as Water Supply Papers through the year 1960. Beginning with 1961 the 
streamflow records are being published annually by the U. S. Geological Survey for the entire 
state under the title "Surface Water Records of Montana". Data for 1961-65 and subsequent 
five year periods will be published in Water Supply Papers. Prior to general issuance ad- 
vance copies of station records may be obtained from the U. S. Geological Survey. That 
agency's records and reports have been used in the preparation of this resume. 

Data given below cover the stream gaging records which are available for Lake County 
from the beginning of measurements through the water year 1961. The water year begins 
October 1 and ends September 30 of the following year. The irrigated acreage figure for di- 
versions above the gage on Swan River near Bigfork are taken from the results of the Water 
Resources Survey. Acreage figure for irrigation above other gaging stations were estimated 
by the U. S. Geological Survey at the date of operation. 

Following are equivalents useful in converting from one unit of measurement to another: 

(a) In Montana, one cubic foot per second equals 40 miner's inches. 

(b) One acre-foot is the amount of water required to cover an acre one foot deep. 

(c) One cubic foot per second will nearly equal two acre-feet (1.983) in 24 hours. 

(d) A flow of 100 miner's inches will equal five acre-feet in 24 hours. 

(e) One miner's inch flowing continuously for 30 days will cover one acre 1% feet deep. 
For reference purposes, the stream gaging stations are listed in downstream order. 

Swan River near Bigfork* 

The water-stage recorder is at outlet of Swan Lake, 1,000 feet downstream from Johnson 
Creek and 5 miles southeast of Bigfork. The drainage area is 671 square miles. Records are 
available from May 1922 to date (1963) and gage heights only from October 1910 to May 1911. 
The maximum discharge computed was 8,400 cfs (May 24, 1948) and the minimum observed, 
193 cfs (January 26-29, 1930). The average discharge for 39 years (1922-61) was 1,127 cfs or 
815 900 acre-feet per year. The highest annual runoff was 1,350,000 acre-feet (1928) and the 
lowest 439,300 acre-feet (1941). There are diversions for irrigation of about 360 acres above 
the station. 

Hell Roaring Creek (Big Creek) near Polsont 

The water-stage recorder was just downstream from the power plant, three-quarters of 
a mile upstream from mouth, and 7 miles east of Poison. The drainage area is 6.41 square 
miles Records are available from June 1917 through September 1932, and crest-stage records 



♦This gaging station is now in operation (1963). 
tName officially changed from Big Creek in 1932. 

—21— 



from 1960 to date. The maximum discharge observed was 104 cfs (June 9, 1917) and the mini- 
mum, no flow at times during November and December, 1932 when power plant was shut 
down. The average discharge for 15 years, (1917-32) was 6.64 cfs or 4,807 acre-feet per year. 
The highest annual runoff was 7,420 acre-feet (1928) and the lowest 3,180 acre-feet (1920). 
Records include water diverted by the Flathead irigation project canal for irrigation of lands 
downstream and the Poison municipal water-supply pipeline. The flow is regulated by the 
power plant and two reservoirs with a combined capacity of about 200 acre-feet. 

Flathead River near Poison* 

The water-stage recorder is half a mile downstream from Kerr Dam, 4 miles west of Pol- 
son, and 5 miles downstream from Flathead Lake. The drainage area is 7,096 square miles. 
Records are available from July 1907 to date (1963). The maximum discharge was 82,800 cfs 
(May 29, 1928), the minimum, probably less than 5 cfs (April 13, 1938) and the minimum daily, 
32 cfs (April 12, 1938). Flood of June 1894 was about 110,000 cfs, from lake elevation-dis- 
charge study. The average discharge for 54 years (1907-1961) was 11,610 cfs or 8,405,000 acre- 
feet per year, adjusted since October 1, 1952 for change in contents in Hungry Horse Reser- 
voir and Flathead Lake. The highest annual runoff was 12,500,000 acre-feet (1927) and the 
lowest 3,762,000 acre-feet (1941) not adjusted for Flathead Lake regulation. There are diver- 
sions above the station for irrigation of about 10,000 acres. Flathead Projects pumps can divert 
up to 12,000 acre-feet per month when required for irrigation of lands downstream from sta- 
tion. Flow has been regulated by Flathead Lake (Kerr Dam) since April 1938 and Hungry 
Horse Reservoir since September 1951. 

Crow Creek near Ronan 

The staff gage was 500 feet upstream from bridge on former St. Ignatius-Ronan highway, 
a quarter of a mile upstream from bridge on present route, and 3 miles south of Ronan. The 
drainage area is 46.1 square miles. Records are available from September 1906 through Sep- 
tember 1917 except for winter months. The maximum discharge observed was 1,400 cfs (June 
6, 1908) and the minimum observed, 2.0 cfs (April 4-9, 1913). There were diversions above gage 
for lands below the station during 1913-17. 

Mud Creek near Ronan 

The staff gage was at Jeffrey's Ranch, 3 miles northwest of Ronan. The drainage area is 
30.4 square miles. Records are available for open-water periods from August 1908 through De- 
cember 1910. The maximum discharge observed was 40 cfs (discharge measurement June 27, 
1908) and the minimum observed, 1.6 cfs (April 7-8, 1909). There were diversions for irrgation 
above the station. 

Crow Creek at Lozeau's Ranch near Ronan 

The chain gage was at private bridge about 1 mile downstream from Mud Creek, 2% 
miles upstream from mouth, and 8 miles southwest of Ronan. The drainage area is 139 square 



*This gaging station is now in operation (1963). 

—22— 



miles. Records are available from April 1911 through September 1916 with those for many 
winter months missing. The maximum discharge observed was 960 cfs (June 29, 1911) and the 
minimum observed, 4 cfs (March 21, 1913). There were diversions above the station for irriga- 
tion on lands below. 

Dry Creek near St. Ignatius 

The staff gage was at Felsman Ranch, 4 miles downstream from St. Marys Lake (now 
called Tabor Reservoir), and 5 miles southeast of St. Ignatius. The drainage area is 19.5 square 
miles. Records are available from May 1908 through September 1916 with those for many win- 
ter months missing except for 1910-14 when there was no winter flow. The maximum dis- 
charge observed was 220 cfs (June 19, 1916) and the minimum, no flow during most winters. 
There was one small diversion above the station. Flow is regulated by Tabor Reservoir (St. 
Marys Lake). 

Mission Creek near St. Ignatius 

The staff gage was about 1 mile northwest of St. Ignatius. The drainage area is 74.8 square 
miles Records are available from October 1906 through September 1917 except for a few 
missing months during winters of 1911-12 and 1914-15. The maximum discharge was 1,700 cfs 
(June 10, 1908 from floodmark and rating curve extended above 340 cfs), and the minimum 
observed,' 5 cfs (March 2, 3, 1911). The average discharge for 9 years (1906-11, 1912-14, 1915-17) 
was 71.7 cfs or 51,910 acre-feet per year. The highest annual runoff was 76,500 acre-feet (1908) 
and the lowest, 30,900 acre-feet (1910). There are several diversions above the station for irri- 
gation. 

Post Creek at Fitzpatrick's Ranch near Ronan 

The staff gage was at bridge near house of J. A. Fitzpatrick, 2 miles upstream from Marsh 
Creek, (formerly North Fork Post Creek), 7 miles southeast of Ronan, and 9 miles north of St. 
Ignatius. The drainage area is 28.4 square miles. Records are available from October 1906 
through May 1911. The maximum discharge was 2,800 cfs (about June 10, 1908 from flood- 
mark and rating curve extended above 210 cfs) and the minimum, not determined. The high- 
est annual runoff (1907-10) was 107,000 acre-feet (1908) and the lowest 50,200 acre-feet (1910). 
There were two small diversions for irrigation above the station. 

Post Creek at Deschamps' Ranch near Ronan 

The staff gage was 600 feet upstream from Marsh Creek (formerly North Fork Post 
Creek), 7V 2 miles southeast of Ronan, and 6V2 miles northeast of St. Ignatius. The drainage 
area is 29.7 square miles. Records are available from April through November 1911. The 
maximum discharge observed was 546 cfs (June 25) and the minimum observed, 16 cfs (April 
20). There were a few small diversions for irrigation above the station. 

Post Creek near St. Ignatius 

The chain gage was on highway bridge on road between St. Ignatius and Ronan 2 miles 
downstream from Marsh Creek (formerly North Fork Post Creek) and 5 miles north of St. 
Ignatius. The drainage area is 47.6 square miles. Records are available from October 1911 

—23— 



through September 1917 with some winter months missing. The maximum discharge observed 
was 680 cfs (June 29, 1916) and the minimum observed, 20 cfs (September 3, 1914). There 
were diversions above the station for the irrigation of several hundred acres. 

Middle Fork Jocko River near Jocko 

The staff gage was 300 feet upstream from South Fork, 10 miles northeast of Jocko and 
11% miles east of Arlee. The drainage area is 14.9 square miles. Records are available from 
May 1912 through September 1916 with winter months missing. The maximum discharge ob- 
served was 134 cfs (June 1, 1912) and the minimum, not determined. There were no diver- 
sions or regulation above the station. 

Touth Fork Jocko River near Jocko 

The staff gage was 300 feet downstream from Middle Fork, 10 miles northeast of Jocko, 
and 11% miles east of Arlee. The drainage area is 72.3 square miles. Records are available 
from June 1912 through September 1916 except for winter months. The maximum discharge 
observed was 782 cfs (May 31, 1913) and minimum observed, 28 cfs (December 7, 1912). 
There was no diversions or regulation above the station. 

North Fork Jocko River near Jocko 

The staff gage was three-quarters of a mile upstream from Falls Creek, 11 miles north- 
east of Jocko, and 11% miles northeast of Arlee. The drainage area is 19.5 square miles. Rec- 
ords are available from May 1912 through September 1916, with winter months missing. The 
maximum discharge observed was 492 cfs (May 31, 1913) and the minimum, not determined. 
There was no diversions or regulation above the station. 

Falls Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was a quarter of a mile upstream from mouth, 10 miles northeast of Jocko, 
and 11 miles northeast of Arlee. The drainage area is 3.57 square miles. Records are available 
from May 1912 through September 1916 except for winter months. The maximum discharge 
observed was 110 cfs (June 17, 1916), and the minimum was not determined. There were no 
diversions or regulation during period of record. 

Jocko River near Jocko 

The staff gage was 500 feet upstream from headworks of Jocko "K" Canal, 800 feet up- 
stream from Big Knife Creek, 2 miles northeast of Jocko, and 4V2 miles east of Arlee. The 
drainage area is 140 square miles. Records are available from May 1918 through September 
1919. The maximum discharge observed was 2,720 cfs (June 11, 1918) and the minimum ob- 
served, 48 cfs (March 7, 1919). The flood of May-June, 1948 reached a discharge of 2,660 cfs, 
from slope-area measurement. There was no diversion above the station. 

Big Knife Creek above Big Knife Canal near Jocko 

The staff gage was 200 feet upstream from Big Knife Canal headgate, 1 mile upstream 
from mouth, 2 x k miles northeast of Jocko, and 5% miles east of Arlee. The drainage area is 
7.16 square miles. Records are available from August 1910 through September 1916 except 

—24— 



for the winter periods. The maximum discharge observed was 78 cfs (June 30, 1916) and the 
minimum observed, 4.3 cfs (April 17, 1911). There were no diversions or regulation above the 
station. 

Big Knife Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was 25 feet upstream from county bridge, about a quarter of a mile upstream 
from mouth, and 2 miles northeast of Jocko. The drainage area is 7.44 square miles. Records are 
available from May 1909 through November 1910 except for December through February. A 
fragmentary gage-height record is available for August to November 1908. The maximum dis- 
charge was 52 cfs (June 19, 1909) and the minimum observed, 0.9 cfs (September 28, October 
24, 29, and 31, 1910). Water was diverted above the station for irrigation by Big Knife Canal 
since August 1, 1910. 

Jocko River below Big Knife Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was on the bridge pier 1 mile north of Jocko, about 2 miles downstream 
from Big Knife Creek, and 3 miles east of Arlee. The drainage area is 154 square miles. Records 
are available from May 1909 through September 1916 with many winter months missing. A 
fragmentary gage-height record is available for August to November 1908. The maximum 
discharge observed was 1,630 cfs (June 20, 1916) and the minimum observed, 21 cfs (August 
1, 1910). The flood of June 6, 1908 had a discharge of 6,200 cfs (by float measurement). There 
were several diversions for irrigation above the station. This station was referred to as Jocko 
River near Jocko in the early reports. 

Agency Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was just above the intake of Matt ditch, 1M> miles southeast of Jocko, and 
5 miles southeast of Arlee. The drainage area is 4.00 square miles. Records are available for 
most of the open-water months from May 1909 through September 1916. Occasional gage 
heights are available for August to November 1908. The maximum discharge observed was 
228 cfs (June 20, 1916, from rating curve extended above 110 cfs) and the minimum observed, 
2.0 cfs (December 12, 1913). There were no diversions or regulation above the station. It is 
in Missoula County about a mile north of the county boundary line, but data were omitted from 
the report for that county. 

Blodgett Creek Near Jocko 

The staff gage was a third of a mile upstream from mouth, IV2 miles northeast of Jocko, 
and 4 miles east of Arlee. The drainage area is 5.48 square miles. Records are available from 
June through November 1909. Gage heights only have been reported from March to Novem- 
ber 1910. The maximum discharge observed was 3.5 cfs (June 11) and the minimum observed 
0.4 cfs at times in November. 

East Finley Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was 100 feet upstream from intake of Indian ditch, 200 feet downstream 
from crossing of Jocko "N" Canal, 3 miles southwest of Jocko, and 5 miles southeast of Arlee. 
The drainage area is 8.35 square miles. Records are available from May 1909 through Septem- 

—25— 



ber 1916 with those for most winter months missing. The maximum discharge observed was 
165 cfs (June 20, 1916 from rating curve extended above 65 cfs) and the minimum observed, 
no flow at times during irrigation season. The Jocko "N" Canal diverts the entire flow at times 
for irrigation. This station is in Missoula County, but data for it were omitted from the re- 
port for that county. 

Finley Creek near Jocko 

The staff gage was an eighth of a mile downstream from confluence of East and West 
Forks, 4 miles southwest of Jocko, and 5 miles southeast of Arlee. The drainage area is 36.7 
square miles. Records are available from May 1909 through September 1916 with those for 
most winter months missing. Occasional gage heights and discharge measurements are avail- 
able for August to November 1908. The maximum discharge observed was 518 cfs (June 20, 
1916 from rating curve extended above 170 cfs) and the minimum, not determined. Jocko "N" 
Canal, Indian Ditch and several smaller irrigation ditches divert water above the station. This 
station is in Missoula County, but data for it were omitted from the report for that county. 

Valley Creek near Ravalli 

The staff gage was 25 feet upstream from highway bridge near mouth, 2 miles south of 
Ravalli and 7 miles northwest of Arlee. The drainage area is 64.1 square miles. Records are 
available for open water months from May 1909 through June 1910, and some gage heights and 
discharge measurements in 1908 and 1911. The maximum discharge observed was 302 cfs 
(June 3, 1909) and the minimum, not determined. There were a few small diversions for irri- 
gation above the station. 

Jocko River at Ravalli 

The chain gage was near the railroad station at Ravalli. The drainage area is 348 square 
miles. Records are available from October 1903 through March 1911. The maximum discharge 
was 7,500 cfs (June 10, 1908 from rating curve extended above 1,900 cfs) and the minimum, 
not determined. The highest annual runoff for the three years of complete record was 310,000 
acre-feet (1908) and the lowest 201,000 acre-feet (1910). There were several diversions for irri- 
gation above the station. 

Partial Record Stations and Miscellaneous Discharge Measurements 

In order to provide information on more streams than are covered by stream gaging sta- 
tions the U. S. Geological Survey has for several years been collecting some partial records. 
These are in addition to the miscellaneous discharge measurements which have always been 
reported. These partial records when correlated with simultaneous discharges of nearby con- 
tinuous-record stations give fair indications of available flow. 

There are two dozen crest-stage partial-record stations in the Clark Fork Basin in Mon- 
tana. Operation of most of these began in 1959. Crest-stage stations are now being operated 
in Lake County on Teepee Creek near Poison, Hell Roaring (Big) Creek near Poison and on 
Dayton Creek near Proctor. 

The partial-record stations as well as the miscellaneous discharge measurements are 
listed at the end of each U. S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper or Surface Water Rec- 
ords report. 

—26— 



/\ 



RESERVOIRS 

Details of operation records of the following reservoirs are available in U. S. Geological 
Survey publications. 

Flathead Lake at Somers 

The water stage recorder is at the steamboat dock at Somers. The drainage area is 7,086 
square miles. Records are available from January 1910 to date. They were published as "at 
Poison" prior to April 1923. Staff gage readings were reported prior to 1924. Some supple- 
mental readings were obtained in 1900, 1908 and 1909. The Poison readings were obtained at 
the south end of the lake at Poison in Lake County, while Somers is in Flathead County. The 
maximum contents was 2,208,000 acre-feet (June 19, 1933) and the minimum 347,000 acre-feet 
(December 5, 1936). The lake was nearly 4 feet higher during the flood of June, 1894. Natural 
storage was increased by construction of Kerr Dam 4 miles downstream from natural lake 
outlet. Storage began April 11, 1938. The usable capacity is 1,791,000 acre-feet. Water is 
used for power, flood control and irrigation. 

Mission Valley Reservoirs 

A group of eight reservoirs in an area tributary to Flathead River from the east extending 
from Flathead Lake to Jocko River has been operated for irrigation and recreation. Records 
for December 1939 and from September 1940 to date have been furnished by the U. S. Bureau 
of Indian Affairs. They are: 

Twin Reservoir 

4 miles southeast of Poison, fed by canals, has a usable capacity of 899 acre-feet. 

Pablo Reservoir 

i 

3 miles south of Poison, fed by canals, some water supplies by Flathead pumping plant, 
has a usable capacity of 27,100 acre-feet. 

Lower Crow Reservoir 

On Crow Creek 6 miles west of Ronan, has a usable capacity of 10,350 acre-feet. 

Mission Reservoir 

On Mission Creek 4 miles east of St. Ignatius, has a usable capacity of 7,250 acre-feet. 

Tabor Reservoir 

On Dry Creek 8 miles southeast of St. Ignatius, fed by water diverted from Jocko River, 
has a usable capacity of 23,300 acre-feet. 

McDonald Reservoir 

On Post Creek 9 miles east of Charlo has a usable capacity of 8,220 acre-feet. 

Kicking Horse Reservoir 

5 miles south of Ronan, fed by canals, has a usable capacity of 8,350 acre-feet. 

—27— 



Ninepipe Reservoir 

2 miles northeast of Charlo, fed by canals, has a usable capacity of 14,870 acre-feet. 

Lower Jocko Lake 

The staff gage is at dam on Middle Fork of Jocko River 15 miles east of Arlee. The drain- 
age area is 7.39 square miles. Data for most of the month-end reservoir contents since 1940 
have been furnished by the U. S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Transmountain diversion takes 
water from Placid Creek in the Clearwater basin to Upper Jocko Lake, thence to Lower Jocko 
Lake. The usable capacity is 6,380 acre-feet. The station is in Missoula County about 3 miles 
east of the Lake County boundary, but the data were omitted from the report for Missoula 
County. 

MINING 

The geomorphic form of Lake County originated in early Tertiary time (70,000,000 years 
ago) when the land area of western Montana was involved in massive uplift and deforma- 
tion. After a period of relative quiescence and erosion, lasting perhaps 10 to 20 million years, 
deformation in the form of block faulting took place forming large northwestward-trending 
intermontane valleys and mountain ranges similar to the present Flathead Valley and its 
nearby mountains. 

This valley of the Flathead is part of what is known in geologic literature as the Rocky 
Mountain trench and is described as a "narrow wonderfully straight depression". It con- 
tinues north from Lake County 800 miles to the Laird River in British Columbia, and is an 
orogenic depression of great magnitude. 

In Pleistocene time (1,000,000 years ago) vast sheets of ice and their lobes (valley gla- 
ciers) advanced and retreated in successive stages during periods of climatic change. One such 
lobe or glacier from the Cordilleran ice sheet advanced southward through the Flathead Val- 
ley, leaving glacial debris strewn along its path upon melting; another such lobe advanced 
similarly along the Burcell trench near the Montana-Idaho border. Its consequence was of 
extreme importance as it blocked the westward drainage of the Clark Fork River whose wa- 
ters then inundated the land, creating a glacial lake known as Lake Missoula. This vast gla- 
cial lake covered an area of 2,900 square miles, including much of Lake County, and contained 
an estimated 500 cubic miles of water. Evidence of its former existence can still be seen today 
by the faint shorelines preserved on grassy slopes and by local deposits of glacial lake sedi- 
ments. 

Glacial lake deposits and glacial drift occupy most of the valley floors in Lake County 
whereas the predominant rock types in the mountains are quartzites, argillites, limestones, and 
dolomites of the Precambrian Belt Series. Noteworthy is the absence of exposures of igneous 
rocks within the county as contrasted with most other counties in western Montana. As it is 
firmly and widely established in geologic literature that metallic mineralization is genetically 
associated with igneous rocks, the lack of such rock exposures accounts for the paucity of me- 
tallic lode deposits in the area. As a result, metal mining has been of little importance in Lake 
County. 

—28— 



Only two mining properties, the Chief Cliff and Silverstone lead-silver mines, are known 
to have been worked— neither one has been a significant producer of ore nor active in recent 
years. 

The real mineral wealth of Lake County, however, may eventually come from the ex- 
ploitation of the nonmetallic or industrial mineral type of natural resource, such as clay, sand, 
and gravel. Deposits of glacial clay occur extensively throughout the countryside, though as 
yet no deposits are known to contain clay of quality useful for ceramic purposes. The best 
known clays are suitable for blending with other higher-quality clays or for use as low-firing 
bonding material; many of the other clays are much too silty and low in plasticity to be used 
even as bonding material. 

Lake County undoubtedly contains enough sand and gravel deposits to be self-sufficient in 
its needs. The best sources may be from the gravel terraces along the Flathead valley from 
Ravalli northward to Poison. 



SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS 

Lake County is served by three soil conservation districts, but the major portion is served 
by the Lake County Soil Conservation District, which was organized in 1945. 

Areas that are not included within the district are about 6 sections of land in T. 26N, R. 
18W; and T. 26N, R. 19W; which were included in Flathead Soil Conservation District and 68 
sections of land in T. 22N, R. 23W; and T. 23N, R. 23W; which were included in the Eastern 
Sanders County Soil Conservation District. Lake County has an area of 960,000 acres of which 
920,000 acres are within the Lake County Soil Conservation District. 

Each district is governed by a board of five supervisors who are elected by the land occu- 
piers of the respective district. They carry out a program in erosion control, water conserva- 
tion, soil fertility management, land improvement and land adjustment to proper land use. 

Under state law, the supervisors have the power to call upon local, state and federal agen- 
cies to assist in carrying out a soil and water conservation program. The Lake County Soil 
Conservation District has memoranda of understanding with the Soil Conservation Service, 
State Forestry Department and Extension Service to provide technical assistance to district co- 
operators in carrying out a sound soil and water conservation program. Close working rela- 
tions are maintained with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Farmers Home Administration, 
the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Committee and the United States Forest 
Service. 

The Soil Conservation Service assists the district by furnishing and interpreting basic 
data on soils and plant cover and other features of the land. Technical data are interpreted in 
terms of accepted alternative land uses and treatments to help guide the farm and ranch opera- 
tors in developing sound conservation plans. It also aids district co-operators in performing op- 
erations requiring technical skills beyond the experience of the individuals involved. 

The Office of the State Forester and U. S. Forest Service co-operate with the district by 
co-ordinating the programs in timber management, tree planting, forest and range fire con- 
trol and watershed management on federal, state and private lands. 

—29— 



The Extension Service assists the district with its education and information program. An 
important function of each district is to inform landowners and occupiers of the benefits de- 
rived from wise use of the communities soil and water resources. 

One of the major problems of these districts is to acquaint the urban people who comprise 
a large percentage of the total population of the districts, with the need for conservation. 

Technical phases of the district's program include detailed soil surveys, forest site and uti- 
lization investigations, range site and condition surveys, ground water investigations, topo- 
graphic and other engineering surveys. By a careful analysis of this basic resource informa- 
tion, proper land use and needed conservation treatment of each field can be determined. The 
technician interprets the surveys and provides the district co-operator with alternatives in 
land use and treatment that will enable him to treat the hazards and limitations that occur 
on each tract of land. With this information and by counseling with the technician the farm- 
er or rancher makes the final decisions. These decisions are recorded in the Conservation 
Plan. The co-operator determines what will be done on his place and when it will be carried 
out. 

When the plan is completed the co-operator is given further technical assistance on lay 
out work essential in establishing conservation practices on the land as called for in the con- 
servation plan. This technical assistance is provided without cost to the co-operating farmer 
or rancher. 

There are 162,397 acres of federal lands in Lake County. Approximately one third of the 
total area is held in trust for the Indians of the Flathead Indian Reservation. Of the total area 
approximately 128,500 acres are cropland. It is estimated that about 111,208 acres are irrigated 
and 50,000 acres are dryland. Approximately 225,100 acres are devoted to pasture and range 
use of which 186,000 is native range, 28,500 acres seeded dryland pasture and 10,000 rougher ir- 
rigated lands permanently seeded to pasture. There are 564,397 acres of wooded land of which 
162,397 are federally owned, 56,000 small private ownerships, 90,000 large corporate owner- 
ships and 255,000 controlled by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. There are approximately 42,003 
acres of land considered other land such as townsites, roads and highways, railroads and like 
lands. 

The major enterprise on agricultural lands is livestock production. Beef cattle, dairy cat- 
tle, sheep and swine are produced. Cash crops produced are potatoes, sugar beets, grains and 
sweet cherries. 

Work done since the organization of the district on irrigated lands consists largely of im- 
provement of irrigation systems within the farm boundaries, installation of sprinkler systems, 
land leveling, construction of permanent ditches, installation of water control structures, farm 
drainage systems, improved cropping and pasture management systems, soil management and 
improvement of wildlife habitat. On dryland pasture and range the work done has been im- 
provement of vegetative cover through seeding, deferred-rotation grazing, fencing, livestock 
water development and improvement of wildlife habitat. On private woodlands the emphasis 
has been toward stand improvement for long term timber production plus production of high- 
er quality Christmas trees. Pruning, thinning and weeding have been emphasized along with 
improved harvest methods. 

—30— 



Since the district was organized assistance has been given on proper cropping systems on 
over 32,000 acres, improved water application 25,000 acres, land leveling and grading 2,500 
acres, 130 sprinkler systems installed, drainage installed on 4,000 acres requiring nearly 110 
miles of ditch, over 500 structures installed, 100 miles of irrigation ditch construction, range 
improvement on 27,000 acres, pasture improvement on 37,000 acres, seeding of hay and pas- 
ture on 20,000 acres, 70 stock ponds constructed, 40 springs developed, 55 wells developed, 
1 500 acres of land cleared, 7 ponds stocked with fish, 1,600 acres improved wildlife habitat, 100 
acres of trees planted, improved methods of harvest cutting on 4,700 acres of woodland, 900 
acres woodland trimming and pruning, 1,900 acres woodland thinning and other approved con- 
servation measures. 

An inventory of soil and water conservation needs in Lake County has recently been com- 
pleted. This inventory is a part of a National Inventory and estimates remaining conservation 
needs by land uses. The inventory is based upon statistically expanded data obtained from 
randomly selected 160 acre samples on which detailed soil surveys were completed. The inven- 
tory estimates that approximately 64'/< of the non-irrigated cropland and approximately 807c of 
the irrigated cropland needs additional treatment and is feasible to treat; that approximately 
61 'A of native range, 70 % of tame pasture and IS'/, of irrigated native grassland is in need of ad- 
ditional conservation treatment. It estimates that approximately 80,000 acres of private wood- 
land needs planting, 135,000 acres need improvement of the existing stand and most of the pri- 
vately owned woodland needs protection from fire, insects, disease and from animals. The 
needed treatment consists primarily of a combination of practices to adequately control ero- 
sion and conserve moisture. 

A considerable amount of conservation work has been accomplished through efforts of or- 
ganized groups and this is encouraged wherever possible. 

The most of the irrigation water used is delivered to the farm by the United States Indian 
Irrigation Service. Some is from private water rights. 

The Lake County Soil Conservation District owns equipment consisting of D-7 Cat, TD-14 
tractor, dragline, land plane, ripper, scraper and truck-transport which is available to dis- 
trict co-operators on a rental basis to carry out needed conservation measures. 

Co-operative efforts of landowners and operators, other groups and agencies have con- 
tributed to the overall success of the district. 



—31— 



FISH AND GAME 

Lake County is richly gifted with a wide variety of wildlife. The Mission area is one of 
the last great strongholds of the grizzly bear. Other big game animals in the county include 
white-tailed and mule deer, elk, moose, mountain goat, mountain sheep and black bear. 

The National Bison Range is located near Moiese where remnants of the once great herd 
can be studied and photographed. 

For years, big horn sheep have been live-trapped on Wild Horse Island at Flathead Lake 
and have been transplanted to many areas of the state by the Montana Fish and Game Depart- 
ment. 

The cultivated lands in the lower Flathead Valley have produced bird hunting that com- 
pares with the best in the nation. The ring-necked pheasant has found the cover and culti- 
vated fields to be ideal. 

Waterfowl hunting is excellent in the pot-holes that dot the lower Flathead Valley. 

Kicking Horse Reserve, Ninepipe and Pablo all produce ducks and geese. The bays and 
sheltered areas of Flathead Lake provide excellent hunting for mallards, pintails and scaup as 
well as the Canada goose. The Flathead River also provides excellent goose hunting. 

Mountain grouse are found throughout the forested areas of the county. Blue, Franklin's 
and Ruffed grouse all inhabit the area. Hungarian and Chukar partridge provide added sport 
to the shot gunner. 

Furbearing animals that once coaxed mountain men in this area are still present. They 
include: marten, coyote, beaver, muskrat, mink and otter. 

There are probably few places in the nation where a mixed bag of upland game birds 
waterfowl and mountain grouse can be taken within a few miles distance that can compare 
with Lake County. 

Fishermen needn't look far to enjoy their favorite sport. Flathead Lake produces Koka- 
nee salmon, Mackinaw and Dolly Varden trout in record size. Large Cutthroat trout also add 
to the bag. Perch and large-mouth bass are warm-water species that are enjoyed by the 
sportsmen on Ninepipe and Kicking Horse Reservoir. 

Kokanee salmon spawn on the rocky edges of Flathead and Swan Lake and are taken by 
snagging during a special season. Lake Mary Ronan, Swan Lake and the Flathead are all fa- 
mous fishing spots for bass, trout and Kokanee. The Swan and Flathead rivers produce a va- 
riety of fishing to test the angler. Pablo Reservoir is managed for rainbow trout. 

Winter fishing is becoming more popular every year and Pablo and Ninepipe produce 
bumper crops of yellow perch for the warmly-clothed fisherman. 

With its wealth of wildlife and scenic beauty, Lake County attracts visitors from every 
state and many nations. It provides unparalleled outdoor recreation for people who like to boat 
fish, hunt or just look. 



—32— 



NATIONAL FORESTS 

Most of the 148,614 acres of National Forest land in Lake County are on the Flathead Na- 
tional Forest. A small acreage of Lolo National Forest land is in Lake County just north ot 
Frenchtown. The majority of National Forest lands in this county are in the Swan Valley and 
about 17,000 acres are along the east shore of Flathead Lake. These National Forest lands in 
Lake County are managed under a multiple use concept by Forest Rangers and their staffs at 
the Condon, Bigfork, Swan Lake, and Ninemile Ranger Stations. 

A large area of wild lands, in what is now Lake County, was set aside by President Cleve- 
land as a Forest Reserve in 1897. Eleven years later, in 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt 
designated part of this Forest Reserve as National Forest. 

Topography on National Forest land in Lake County ranges from flat, level land in the 
Swan Valley bottom to rugged, mountainous terrain in the Swan and Mission Mountain ranges. 
Elevations vary from 3,100 feet to 9,300 feet. Wide valleys are flanked by parallel steep, rocky 
ridges The Swan Valley is four to five miles in width; thirty miles of this valley is m Lake 
County. Drainages to the Swan River flow westward from the Swan Divide and eastward 
from the Mission Divide. These drainages are five to eight miles in length; the upper three to 
five miles are steep and rugged. 

While water is undoubtedly the most valuable resource on these public lands in Lake 
County, it is difficult to assign a dollar value and measure this important resource. Water 
stored in the heavy snows on National Forest land is released into the Columbia River system 
in warmer months and makes significant contributions to irrigation, power production, do- 
mestic needs, and industrial demands in the local area as well as throughout the Columbia 
River Valley. 

Along the east shore of Flathead Lake residents depend on water originating on National 
Forest lands in the west slopes of the Mission Mountains. Because of dependence on this 
source of domestic water, the Mission Mountain water shed must be managed as would any 
municipal water supply water shed. 

The National Forest lands in Lake County have stable soils. Watershed conditions are 
considered good. Recognizing the importance of favorable soil-water conditions as the foun- 
dation for all other uses and resource management, the Forest Service gives first considera- 
tion to soil and water in all planning. Timber is cut and roads are built only when adequate 
provision is made to prevent harmful erosion and stream pollution. Fire prevention and sup- 
pression balancing the number of livestock against available forage, maintaining wildlife 
numbers within the support capacity of these public lands and insect and disease control all 
contribute to watershed protection of these National Forest lands. 

Water is but one of the basic resources managed by the Forest Service under the multiple 
use concept. Wildlife, wood, recreation, forage, as well as water, contribute to the economy 
of Lake County. In addition to their impact on the local economy, Lake County receives 25 
percent of Forest Service revenue from National Forest lands within the county. These funds 
are made available to the county for local schools and roads. 

Grazing on National Forest land in this county is transitory. In the past year temporary 
grazing permits allowed 206 cattle and 36 horses to be grazed on these public lands. 



—33— 



National Forest lands are playing a big part in the growing outdoor recreation activity in 

t i i;°u Unty ' There 1S heavy and increasin S recreational use of the East Shore of Flathead 
Lake. The recently completed Swan Valley highway is contributing to a recreational boom 
throughout the Valley. Indications are that increased recreational use of this area will con- 
tinue for many years. 

An estimated 40,000 recreational visits were made to National Forest lands in Lake Coun- 
ty in 1962. Camping and picnic facilities are available at several popular sites. Forest Service 
plans include more and improved recreational facilities in Lake County. 

A part of the Mission Mountain Primitive Area is within the county. The Bob Marshall 
Wilderness Area is adjacent to the county on the east. These two popular recreational areas 
bring many tourists and vacationers to Lake County. These two areas and other National For- 
est lands offer beautiful mountain lakes, quiet mountain trails, and excellent hunting and 
fishing. & 

National Forest fish and game resources are important to the local economy and recrea- 
tion. Big game animals in the area include white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose, elk, mountain 
goat, black bear and grizzly bear. Fishing and hunting attracted an estimated 20,000 visits to 
the National Forest lands in Lake County in 1962. Indications are that this number will in- 
crease each year. 

There is extensive timber on the Swan Lake Ranger District and the Condon Ranger Dis- 
trict in the county. Since World War II there has been considerable commercial logging and 
road construction into these timber stands. Prior to 1945 there was significant timber har- 
vesting in the Swan Lake area. On January 3. 1913, fifty-two million board feet of National 
Forest timber in the Swan Lake area was sold to the Somers Lumber Company. This tim- 
ber was harvested over a 3-year period, 1914-1917. 

The first harvest of Flathead National Forest timber using anything other than horse- 
power was in 1918-19. A ledgerwood skidder was used in skidding thirty-four million board 
feet of timber to the railroad. These logs, harvested from 5,719 acres in the Swan Lake area, 
were transported by railroad to the banking ground on the lake. 

During this period of logging on National Forest lands in Lake County, a wagon road was 
completed through the Swan Valley. This road was completed before Lake Countv was cre- 
ated in 1923. 

Today National Forest lands in Lake County have a sustained yield annual allowable tim- 
ber cut of approximately twenty million board feet. This stabilized sustained timber produc- 
tion capacity is important to the local economy. 



—34- 



SUMMARY OF IRRIGATED LAND BY RIVER BASINS IN THE 

FOLLOWING COUNTIES COMPLETED TO DATE 

Big Horn, Broadwater, Carbon, Carter, Cascade, Custer, Deer Lodge, Fallon, Gallatin, Golden 
Valley, Granite, Jefferson, Judith Basin, Lake, Lewis & Clark, Madison, Meagher, Mis- 
soula, Musselshell, Park, Powder River, Powell, Ravalli, Rosebud, Silver Bow, 
Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Teton, Treasure, Wheatland, Wibaux and 

Yellowstone 

Irrigable 

Present Acres Under Maximum 

Irrigated Present Irrigable 

Acres Facilities Acres 

RIVER BASIN 

Missouri River Drainage Basin 

•Missouri River 98,430.50 22,286.50 ^MS.* 

Jefferson River 61,291.00 9,713.00 7 i<°? 4 -°° 

Beaverhead River 40,771.00 6,076.00 48,847.00 

Big Hole River 23,775.00 1,950.00 25,725.00 

Madison River 39,445.00 7,660.00 47,105.00 

Gallatin River 111,914.00 21,097.00 133,011.00 

Smith River 32,934.00 19,679.00 52,613.00 

Sun River 124,474.58 4,385.00 128,859.58 

MariasRiver 1,724.00 1,724.00 

Teton River 61,228.00 14,255.00 75,483.00 

Musselshell River 64,789.00 57,870.00 122,659.00 

Little Missouri River 42,513.00. . 1,499.00- 44,012.00 

Grand Total Missouri River Basin 703,289.08 166,470.50 869,759.58 

Yellowstone River Drainage Basin 

Yellowstone River 303,501.00 96,148.00 399,649.00 

Stillwater River 27,489.00 16,403.00 43,892.00 

Clark Fork River 91,768.00 24,195.00 115,963.00 

Bis Horn River 65,395.00 25,579.00 90,974.00 

Tongue River 28,170.00 7,762.00 35,932.00 

Powder River 35,948.00 2,299.00 38,247.00 

Grand Total Yellowstone River Basin 552,271.00 172,386.00 724,657.00 

Columbia River Drainage Basin 

Clark Fork (Deer Lodge, Hellgate, 

Missoula) River 145,804.70 14,934.20 160,738.90 

Bitterroot River 111,102.43 3,200.00 114,302.43 

Flathead River 111,208.61. 1,702.82. 112,911.43 

Grand Total Columbia River Basin 368,115.74 19,837.02 387,952.76 

Grand Total in the Counties Completed 

t Date 1,623,785.82 358,706.52 1,982,492.34 



♦Names of streams indented on the left-hand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream 
named above which is not indented. 

—35— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LAKE COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN 

Columbia River 

:: Clark Fork Columbia River 

Flathead River 

Flathead Lake 

Swan River (Below Lake) 

Johnson (Tinkle) Creek 

School Meadow Creek 

Karney Creek 

Swan Lake 

Bond Creek 

Unnamed Creek 

Swan River (Above Lake)... 

Kaser Creek 

Lost Creek 

North Fork Lost Creek 

Stopher Creek 

Unnamed Lake 

Unnamed Stream 

Dads (Crow) (Mosai) Creek 

Porcupine Creek 

Unnamed Creeks & Springs 

Big Lodge Creek 

Birch (Louie) Creek 

Rock Spring Creek 

Howsley Creek 

Unnamed Creek & Spring 

Hutchins Creek 

Michaels Creek 

Michaels Springs 

Springs & Seepage 

Henry Creek 

Springs (3) 

Parker (Glen) (Logan) Creek.... 

Alma (Yellow Bay) Creek 

Unnamed Stream 

Proctor (Spring) Creek 

Miller Creek 

Indian Springs 

Spring Creek 

Dayton Creek 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 



0.. 

0.. 

185.00. 

0.. 

0.. 

14.00. 

13.00.. 

0. 

8.00.. 

15.00.. 

0. 

100.00. 



35.00.. 

0. 

1.00.. 

38.00. 

25.00. 

0.. 

23.00. 

44.00. 

14.00. 

1.00.. 

10.00.. 

9.00. 

19.00.. 

0.. 

2.00.. 

5.00.. 

38.00. 

2.00. 

60.00 

138.00.. 

5.00.. 

0.. 

47.00.. 

11.00.. 

24.00.. 

363.00. 



Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 



0. 




0. 

31.00. 

5.00. 

0. 



o. 

7.00. 
0. 



o. 

6.00. 

19.00. 

9.00. 

0. 



0. 

0. 

14.00. 

0. 



0. 



0. 

o 


o 



3.00. 
0. 

0. 
0. 
0. 




Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 







185.00 



31.00 

19.00 

13.00 



8.00 

22.00 



100.00 



41.00 

19.00 

10.00 

38.00 

25.00 



23.00 

58.00 

14.00 

1.00 

10.00 

9.00 

19.00 



2.00 

5.00 

38.00 

2.00 

60.00 

141.00 

5.00 



47.00 

11.00 

24.00 

363.00 



♦Names of streams indented on the left-hand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream 
named above which is not indented. 

—36— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LAKE COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN— (Continued) 



Ronan (Irvine) (Ervin) 

(Gardner) Creek 

Lake Mary Ronan 

Donaldson Creek 

Kootenai Creek 

Well 

Blue Boy (Meadow) Creek 

Sunset Spring 

Starvation (Four Mile) Creek 

Boulder (Five Mile) Creek 

Station Creek 

Mann Springs 

Spring 

Unnamed Creek & Spring 

Mahood Creek 

Skidoo (Big) (Hellroaring) 

Creek 

Holmes Creek 

Weishair Spring 

Gingras Springs (3) 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Stream & Springs.. 

Unnamed Creek 

Ducharme (Smith) (Centipede) 

Creek 

Moss Creek 

Springs 

Twin Reservoir (Turtle Lake).. 

Dupuis Creek 

White Clay Creek 

Irvine (White Clay) Creek 

North Fork White Clay Creek.. 

Springs (2) 

Little Bitterroot River 

Sullivan Creek 

Artesian Wells 

Crow Creek - 

North Crow Creek 

Middle Crow Creek 

Drainage 

Lost (Rainbow) (Koupal) 

Creek 

Courville Creek 



. 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 


Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 


Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 


208.00 


60.00 


268.00 











17.00.... 








1.00 


17.00 


56.00 


56.00 


17.00 


17.00 


4.00 


5.00 


6.00 





6.00 


3.00 





3.00 


9.00 







9.00 


27.00 


27.00 


3.00 





3.00 


3.00 





3.00 


6.00 





6.00 


1.00 





1.00 


102.00 





102.00 


1.00 





1 00 


16.00 





16.00 


26.00 





26.00 











16.00 


0... 


16.00 


18.00 





18 00 





108.00 


108.00 





70.00 


70.00 


97.90 


0. 


97.90 














40.00 


40.00 











131.00 





131.00 


3.00 


0.. 


3.00 


20.00 





20.00 











53.00 





53.00 


561.00 





561.00 











510.30 


5.60 


515.90 


7.00 





7.00 


11.00 





11.00 


46.00 





46.00 


7.00 





7.00 



—37— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LAKE COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN— (Continued) 

Spring Creek 

Well 

Courville Creek 

South Fork Courville 

(Rock) (Spring) Creek 

Mud Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Meinsinger Spring & Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Drain Ditch 

Big Creek 

Bisson Creek 

Spring 

Mission Creek 

Spring 

Dry Creek 

Mikes Creek 

Sabine Creek 

Thorne Creek 

Post Creek 

Mollman (Marsh) Creek 

Unnamed Stream (Seepage) 

Unnamed Creek 

Poison Oak (Lantow) 

(Beachmin) Creek 

Dimmick Spring 

Ashley (Dry) Creek 

Ashley Creek 

Unnamed Creek & 

Spring 

Unnamed Streams 

Matt Creek 

Big (Dublin) Gulch 

Well & Pond 

Jocko River 

North Fork Jocko River 

Unnamed Creek 

Big Knife Creek 

Agate Stevens Creek 

Moiese Creek 

Pellew Creek 

Barnaby Creek 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 

0. 

33.00. 

103.00. 

18.00. 

459.80. 

10.00. 

40.00. 

6.00. 

130.00. 

78.20.. 

87.02.. 

8.00.. 

968.00.. 

5.00.. 

222.90.. 

95.50.. 

680.00.. 

23.30.. 

974.50.. 

338.50.. 

8.00.. 

40.00.. 

289.50.. 

7.00.. 

428.46.. 

31.70.. 

6.70.. 

263.10.. 

18.00.. 

0.. 

19.00.. 

241.50.. 

0.. 

58.00.. 

0.. 

8.50... 

10.40... 

2.40.. 

23.40... 



Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 





10.20 

10.00 

34.00 



























30.20 

17.00 















10.40 







47.43 



7.00 

20.50 



5.30 







Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 





33.00 

113.20 

28.00 

493.80 

10.00 

40.00 

6.00 

130.00 

78.20 

87.02 

8.00 

968.00 

5.00 

222.90 

95.50 

680.00 

23.30 

1,004.70 

355.50 

8.00 

40.00 

289.50 

7.00 

428.46 

31.70 

6.70 

273.50 

18.00 



19.00 

288.93 



65.00 

20.50 

8.50 

15.70 

2.40 

23.40 



—38— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LAKE COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN— (Continued) 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 



Finley Creek 403.70. 

Agency Creek 367.70 

Adams Creek 0. 

Alkali (Flat) Creek 25.00. 

Spring Creek 290.00. 

Lamoose (Big) Creek 81.30. 

Valley Creek 677.80. 

Swamp & Seepage 13.00. 

Total Private Irrigation 10,830.08 

Flathead Irrigation Project* 

Flathead Irrigation District 75,526.28. 

Mission Irrigation District 18,953.74. 

Jocko Valley Irrigation District 5,898.51. 

Total Project Irrigation 100,378.53 

Total Irrigation in Lake County 111,208.61 



Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 


Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 


19.60 


423.30 


173.37 


541.07 











25.00 





290.00 


43.00 


124.30 





677.80 





13.00 


806.60 


11,636.68 


90.68 


75,616.96 


8.60 


18,962.34 


796.94 


6.695.45 




896.22.... 


101,274.75 


1,702.82 


112,911.43 



♦Due to the mingled water supply, irrigated acreage totals from each stream were not determined for the 
Flathead Irrigation Project. 

—39— 



FLATHEAD IRRIGATION PROJECT 

(Including Jocko Valley, Mission and Flathead Irrigation Districts) 



HISTORY 



Irrigation was practiced in the region of what is now Lake County as long ago as 1854 to 
flood small areas for the production of garden crops and grain. Shortly after the mission was 
founded at St. Ignatius in 1854, water was taken from Mission Creek by the Jesuit Priests for the 
irrigation of lands adjacent to that stream. This was the first record of irrigation on the pres- 
ent Flathead Indian Reservation. 

In 1904, Congress authorized a preliminary survey of the reservation lands to determine 
whether or not an irrigation project was feasible. Three years later, in 1907, an arrangement 
was made between the Office of Indian Affairs and the Reclamation Service whereby the 
latter would furnish the engineering service for the survey and to carry on the construction 
work. Engineer Robert S. Stockton was in charge of the first preliminary survey. His report 
on the feasibility and irrigation development was completed in 1908. Actual construction of 
the project began in 1909 and has been carried on continuously to the present time Until 
April, 1924, the engineering work was done by the Reclamation Service, but since then all of 
the work in connection with the Flathead Irrigation Project has been under the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs. 

The water users on the project are represented by three Irrigation District Boards the 
Confederated Kootenai and Salish Tribal Council, and the Flathead Agency Superintendent 
The irrigated lands are located in Lake, Sanders and Missoula counties; and extend along the 
Jocko River from above Arlee to below Dixon, along the Flathead River from the Bison Range 
to Poison, and along the Little Bitterroot River from below Hot Springs to above Lonepine. 

Organized under the Flathead Irrigation Project are Flathead, Mission and Jocko Valley 
Irrigation Districts. All three districts were created by a district court decree on August 26 
1926. (For the exact location of the land under the three districts see Maps in Part II of this 
report) . 

In Lake County, the Jocko Valley Irrigation District is served mainly from the "K" ca- 
nal complex with the major diversion in the Jocko River north of Arlee. 

The Mission Valley, which includes all of Flathead and Mission Irrigation Districts in 
Lake County totals 114,900 acres and is a unified and highly interrelated complex of nine 
storage reservoirs, two pumping plants and the Pablo Feeder Canal. By the way of the Placid 
Creek trans-mountain diversion canal, water is brought from Placid Creek on the Clearwater 
River drainage into the North Fork of the Jocko above the Jocko Lakes. This water and 
Jocko River water are then diverted through the Tabor Feeder Canal into Tabor Reservoir 
(St. Mary's Lake) on Dry Creek. Tabor Dam and Reservoir stores Placid Creek Jocko and 
Dry Creek water and regulates that supply into the Pablo Feeder Canal heading in Dry Creek 
and ending in Pablo Reservoir, approximately 30 miles north. Two mountain reservoirs Mis 
sion and McDonald, store Mission and Post Creek water which they then supply to the Pablo 
Feeder or for direct diversion from the creeks. Enroute to Pablo Reservoir, the Pablo Feeder 
Canal also supplies water to three valley floor reservoirs, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe and Crow 
and to several main canals. The Pablo Feeder also supplies water to part of the Poison area 



of the Pablo Division. The balance of the Poison area is supplied by flows from Big Creek 
and other creeks through Twin Reservoir about 5 miles southeast of Poison. 

The 216 cfs Flathead pumping system supplies water to Pablo Reservoir and to the western 
part of the Poison area. The pumps are operated only when there is a need to supplement 
gravity supplies. The pump supply has averaged about 15,000 acre feet per year. The small 25 
cfs Crow Creek pump lifts water from Post Creek which is primarily return flow from irriga- 
tion above, into a sub-main canal in the Post Division. This is also used only to supplement 
short supplies from the gravity system as the occasion demands. 

A small acreage of irrigated land of the Camas Division extends into Lake County. The 
water supply for the Camas "B" canal enters Lake County from the Little Bitterroot drainage. 
Included in the Camas Division water supply are the Little Bitterroot River, several of its 
tributaries and storage in four reservoirs. Two of the reservoirs are located in Flathead Coun- 
ty and two in Sanders County. 

PRESENT STATISTICS 

Location: The location of the irrigated land areas of the three districts under the Flat- 
head Irrigation Project are: 

Jocko Valley Irrigation District; Township 16 North, Ranges 19 and 20 West; Township 17 
North, Ranges 19 and 20 West; and Township 18 North, Range 20 West. 

Mission Irrigation District; Township 18 North, Ranges 19 and 20 West; Township 19 
North, Ranges 19 and 20. 

Flathead Irrigation District; Township 19 North, Ranges 19, 20, 21 and 22 West, Township 
20 North, Ranges 19, 20, 21 and 22 West, Township 21 North, Ranges 19, 20 and 21 West, Town- 
ship 22 North, Ranges 19, 20, 21 and 23 West. 

Length and Capacity of Canals: Under this project there is estimated 1,300 miles of ca- 
nals and lateral ditches in the distribution system. There are approximately 16 miles of con- 
crete lining on some of the major canals of the project. This was necessary in certain areas 
to eliminate excessive water loss due to seepage and ditch bank erosion. The capacities of 
some of the main canals are: For the Jocko Valley Irrigation District, Jocko "K" canal at the 
intake has a capacity of 231 cfs. Capacities of major canals affecting both the Mission and 
Flathead Irrigation Districts are: the Tabor Feeder Canal, 200 cfs, Pablo Feeder Canal, 500 cfs 
and the Pablo "A" canal 485 cfs. 

Reservoirs: The following are reservoirs of the project and their capacities: Tabor 23,300 
ac. ft., Mission 7,250 ac. ft., McDonald 8,225 ac. ft., Kicking Horse 8,350 ac. ft., Ninepipe 14,870 ac. 
ft., Crow 10,350 ac. ft., Pablo 27,270 ac. ft., Twin 836 ac. ft., Horte 260 ac. ft., Hillside 95 ac. ft, 
Little Bitterroot Lake 24,000 ac. ft., Hubbart 12,125 ac. ft., Upper Dry Fork 2,700 ac. ft., and 
Dry Fork 4,000 ac. ft. 



—41 — 



Operation and Maintenance: The water charge per acre on this project includes both op- 
eration and maintenance and the cost of pumped water. The charges for the different types 
of land ownership on the Flathead Reservation are as follows: 

WHITE OWNED LAND (1962) 

Jocko Valley Irrigation District $3.50 per acre 

Mission Irrigation District $3.30 per acre 

Flathead Irrigation District $3.50 per acre 

INDIAN OWNED LAND (1962) 

Jocko Valley Division $2.75 per acre 

Mission Valley Division $3.36 per acre 

Camas Division $4.57 per acre 

Water charges for the Non-District White Owned Land are the same as those listed above 
for Indian Owned Land. Non-district white owned land is land sold by an Indian that requires 
a time period before the transaction is completed to become legally included in an irrigation 
district. 

Present Water Users: On the Flathead Irrigation Project in 1962 there were approximately 
73 water users listed under the Jocko Valley Irrigation District, 227 for the Mission Irrigation 
District and 1,040 under the Flathead Irrigation District. 

Acreage Irrigated: In 1962, the three districts of the project had the following irrigated 
acreage: Jocko Valley 5,898.51 irrigated acres with 796.94 irrigable acres; Mission 18,953.74 ir- 
rigated acres with 8.60 irrigable acres and Flathead has 75,526.28 irrigated acres with 90.68 ir- 
rigable acres. 

WATER RIGHT DATA 

The water rights applicable to the Flathead Irrigation Project were filed by the United 
States of America and are as follows: 

An appropriation from Agency Creek, dated 1-22-10 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, 
Page 46) ; from Agency Creek, dated 4-2-10 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 52) ; 
from Agency Creek, dated 10-10-13 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 290); from 
Agency Creek, dated 10-9-13 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 286) ; from Ashley 
Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 20,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 14); from Ashley Creek, 
dated 2-8-18 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 327); from Barnaby Creek, dated 
1-22-10 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 42); from Big Creek (Flood), dated 7-21-32 
for 3,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 5, Misc. Records, Page 179); from Big Knife Creek, dated 
1-22-10 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 35) ; from Big Knife Creek dated 4-2-10 for 
4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 59) ; from Big Knife Creek, dated 8-1-10 for 4,000 min- 
er's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 282) ; from Crow Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 80,000 miner's inches 
(Ref. Book A, Page 7) ; from Crow Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 160,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 
A, Page 8) ; from North Fork Crow Creek, dated 4-4-12 for 80,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, 

—42— 



Page 240) ; from South Fork Crow Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 
A, Page 5) ; from Dry Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 80,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 15) ; 
from Dry Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 18) ; from Falls 
Creek, dated 7-27-11 for 8,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 73); from Finley Creek, dated 
1-22-10 for 20,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 40) ; from Finley Creek, dated 4-2-10 for 
200,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 57) ; from Finley Creek, dated 10-10-13 for 4,000 
miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 288) ; from East Branch Finley Creek, dated 1-22-10 for 
20,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 38) ; from Flathead River, dated 3-15-13 for 800 min- 
er's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 99) ; from Griffin Creek, dated 9-28-54 for 8,000 miner's inches 
(Ref. Book 18, Misc. Records, Page 173) ; from Jocko River, dated 1-22-10 for 200,000 miner's 
inches (Ref. Book A, Page 34) ; from Jocko River, dated 5-21-13 for 16,000 miner's inches (Ref. 
Book A, Page 268) ; from Jocko River, dated 9-7-20 for all miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 
371); from Middle Fork Jocko River, dated 11-23-11 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, 
Page 81); from North Fork Jocko River, dated 7-27-11 for 16,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, 
Page 72); from South Fork Jocko River, dated 11-23-11 for 8,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, 
Page 79) ; from LaMoose Creek, dated 1-22-10 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 45) ; 
from Marsh Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 20,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 30) ; from Marsh 
Creek, dated 6-22-12 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 248); from Branch Marsh 
Creek, dated 6-22-12 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 246); from Mikes Creek, 
dated 12-27-09 for 800 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 16) ; from Mission Creek, dated 12- 
27-09 for 120,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 12) ; from Mission Creek, dated 3-8-10 for 
160 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 49); from Mission Creek, dated 7-1-10 for 8,000 min- 
er's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 264) ; from Mission Creek, dated 3-13-13 for 8,000 miner's inches 
(Ref. Book A, Page 91); from Mission Creek, dated 3-14-13 for 6,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 
A, Page 232) ; from Mission Creek, dated 4-2-13 for 12,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 
260); from Moise Creek, dated 1-22-10 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 41); from 
Mud Creek, dated 4-4-12 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 242) ; from Pellew Creek, 
dated 1-22-10 for 2,400 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 44) ; from Pellew Creek, dated 4-2-10 
for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 64) ; from Post Creek, dated 12-27-09 for 200,000 
miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 4) ; from Post Creek, dated 5-9-12 for 20,000 miner's inches 
(Ref. Book A, Page 254); from "S-14" Creek, dated 7-27-11 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 
A, Page 70); from Sabin Creek, dated 8-8-11 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book A, Page 75). 

The above appropriations may be found in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office, Pol- 
son, Montana. 

An appropriation from Big Creek, dated 10-2-09 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, 
Page 382); from Big Creek, dated 9-25-15 for 4,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 129, Page 386); 
from Big Creek, dated 9-17-18 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 129, Page 432); from Hell 
Roaring Creek, dated 10-2-09 for 20,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 367); from Hell 
Roaring Creek, dated 2-10-20 for 800 miner's inches (Ref. Book 129, Page 463) ; from Flathead 
River, dated 1-22-10 for 4,000,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 403); from Little Bitter- 
root River, dated 9-1-09 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 364); from Little Bitter- 
root River, dated 10-2-09 for 400,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 376); from Mud Creek, 
dated 12-27-09 for 8,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 397); from Branch Mud Creek, dated 
12-27-09 for 2,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 391); from Branch Mud Creek, dated 12- 
27-09 for 800 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 392); from Little Bitterroot River, dated 12- 

—43— 



21-13 for 400,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 500); from Little Bitterroot River, dated 
12-20-13 for 400,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 71, Page 502). 

The above appropriations may be found in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office, Kalis- 
pell, Montana. 

An appropriation from Jocko River 12-27-09 for 1,600 miner's inches (Ref. Book D, 
Page 524) ; from Placid Creek, dated 5-9-31 for 8,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book J, Page 287) ; 
from Placid Creek, dated 5-7-34 for 200 miner's inches (Ref. Book J, Page 324). 

The above appropriations may be found in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office, Mis- 
soula, Montana. 

An appropriation from Alder Creek, dated 7-19-32 for 3,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 3, 
Page 118); from Little Bitterroot River, dated 10-2-09 for 200,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 1, 
Page 341); from Little Bitterroot River, dated 12-22-13 for 200,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 1, 
Page 591); from Little Bitterroot River, dated 3-8-17 for 400,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 3, 
Page 18); from Mill Creek, dated 12-23-13 for 40,000 miner's inches (Ref. Book 1, Page 588). 

The above appropriations may be found in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office, 
Thompson Falls, Montana. 

In addition to filings listed above, there are more than 100 other filings made by the 
United States for this project on surplus and flood water from unnamed creeks and coulees 
too numerous to mention here. A list of these other recorded filings and their location may 
be obtained from the State Engineer's Office, Water Resources Survey. 

See Maps in Part II, Pages 1-2, 4-12, 14-20. 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



Case No. of Miner's 
No. Decrees Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN 

*CIark Fork 

Columbia River 0... 

Big Blackfoot River 0... 

Clearwater River 0.... 

Owl Creek 0.... 

Placid Lake 0.... 

Placid Creek 2.... 

Flathead River 

(Below Lake) 37.... 

Flathead Lake 11.... 

Flathead River 

(Above Lake) 0.... 

Stillwater River 0.... 

Logan Creek 0.... 

Griffin Creek 2.... 

Swan River 

(Below Lake) 0.... 

Johnson (Tinkle) 

Creek 5.... 

North Fork Johnson 
(Tinkle) (Schmidt) 

(Lost) Creek 4.... 

South Fork Johnson 

(Tinkle) Creek 1.... 

Horseshoe Lake 0.... 

Unnamed Creek 1.... 

School Meadow Creek.. 4.... 

Karney Creek 3.... 

Unnamed Spring 2.... 

Swan Lake 0.... 

Bond Creek 5... 

Spring Creek 1.... 

East Branch 

Spring Creek 1 — 

Groom Creek 4 .... 

Unnamed Spring 1.... 

Small Spring Branch A.... 

Unnamed Spring .... 1.... 

Hall Creek 3... 

Unnamed Spring 1.... 

Unnamed Creek 2.... 

Six Mile Creek 2.... 

Camp Creek 1.... 

Swan River 

(Above Lake) 0.... 

Lost Lake 

(& Swan River) 1.... 

High Park Lake 

(& Swan River) 1.... 

Gray Wolf Lake 

(& Swan River) 1~~ 

Glacier Creek & 

Turquoise Lake 1— 



0.... 
0.... 
0.... 
0.... 
0.... 
8,200.00.... 







205.00 


94,473,520.00.... 
2,180.00.... 


2,361,838.00 
54.50 


0.... 
0.... 
0.... 

16,000.00.... 








400.00 


0.... 





796.00.... 


19.90 



1,100.00.... 



27.50 



60.00.... 


1.50 


0.... 





AIL... 


All 


1,060.00.... 


26.50 


140.00.... 


3.50 


100.00.... 


2.50 


0.... 





4,080.00.... 


102.00 


20.00.... 


0.50 


13.00.... 


0.32 


360.00.... 


9.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


200.00.... 


5.00 


100.00.... 


2.50 


180.00.... 


4.50 


1,000.00.... 


25.00 


300.00.... 


7.50 


800.00.... 


20.00 


2,000.00.... 


50.00 


0.... 





14,000.00.... 


350.00 


20,000.00.... 


500.00 


18,000.00.... 


450.00 


14,000.00.... 


350.00 



*Names of streams indented on the left-hand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream 
named above which is not indented. 

—45— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



Kaser Creek 2.. 

Pony Creek 1.. 

Jim Creek 1„ 

Piper Creek 1.. 

Lion Creek 3 

Cedar Creek 1.. 

Squeezer Creek L. 

Soup Creek 2.. 

Cilly Creek 0.. 

Southwest Branch 

Cilly Creek 1.. 

Lost Creek 0.. 

North Fork 

Lost Creek 2.. 

Stopher Creek 1.. 

North Fork 

Stopher Creek 2.. 

Lime Creek 1„ 

Total Swan River & 

Tributaries 69.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Boulder Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Springs 2.. 

Shearers Creek 1.. 

Canyon Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Lakes 1.. 

Hunger Creek 2.. 

Dads (Mosai) 

(Crow) Creek 3.. 

Lost Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Crane Creek 7.. 

Unnamed Spring 6.. 

Porcupine Creek 2.. 

Unnamed Creek 2.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 6.. 

Big Lodge Creek 6.. 

Unnamed Springs 5.. 

The North Spring L. 

Birch (Louie) Creek 1.. 

Unnamed Springs 4.. 

Unnamed Stream 1... 

Rock Spring Creek 3.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Creek 2... 

Howsley Creek 3... 

Unnamed Spring 1... 

Unnamed Creek 1... 

Unnamed Spring 5... 

Fred T. Purvis Spring.. 2... 

Hutchins Creek 8... 

Unnamed Spring 1... 

Two Unnamed Springs.. 1... 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 

Per Sec. 



Case No. of Miner's 
No. Decrees Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



6,100.00... 


152.50 


80.00.... 


2.00 


10,000.00.... 


250.00 


80.00.... 


2.00 


1.960.00.... 


49.00 


240.00.... 


6.00 


1,000.00.... 


25.00 


190.00.... 


4.75 


0.00.... 


0.00 


All.... 


All 


0.00.... 


0.00 


320.00... 


8.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


160.00.... 


4.00 


100.00.... 


2.50 


98,619.00... 


2,465.47 


2,000.00.... 


50.00 


20.00. ... 


0.D0 


20.00.... 


0.50 


40.00.... 


1.00 


All.... 


All 


80.00.... 


2.00 


8,000.00.... 


200.00 


160.00.... 


4.00 


172.00.... 


4.30 


40.00.... 


1.00 


5.00.... 


0.12 


l,13tt.4U.. 


2d.i« 


120.00.... 


3.00 


65.00.... 


1.62 


126.80.... 


3.17 


40.00.... 


1.00 


444.80.... 


11.12 


5,050.00.... 


126.25 


720.00... 


18.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


200.00.... 


5.00 


10.00... 


0.25 


40.00.... 


1.00 


460.00... 


11.50 


20.00... 


0.50 


20.00.... 


0.50 


140.00... 


3.50 


280.00... 


7.00 


160.00... 


4.00 


All.... 


All 


235.00... 


5.87 


15.00.... 


0.37 


355.00... 


8.87 


40.00... 


1.00 


20.00... 


0.50 



-4fi- 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of 
Decrees 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



Michaels Creek 2.. 

Michaels Springs 1.. 

Seepage 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 2.. 

Henry Creek 2.. 

Unnamed Spring 2.. 

Parker (Glen) 

(Logan) Creek 9.. 

Loten Creek 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Lolo (Reds) Creek 8.. 

Alma (Yellow Bay) 

Creek 11.. 

Unnamed Creek 2.. 

Meredith Spring 1.. 

Malmo Creek 1.. 

Malmo Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Creek L. 

Big Willow Spring 1.. 

Little Willow Spring L. 

Poplar Spring Creek 1.. 

Poplar Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Stream 0.. 

Unnamed Spring 2.. 

Bickford Spring 2.. 

Chief Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Springs 2.. 

Spring (Clear) Creek 1.. 

Unnamed Spring 2.. 

Foss Springs 1.. 

Unnamed Springs 2.. 

Proctor (Spring) Creek.. 5.. 

Miller Creek 1.. 

Indian Springs 1.. 

Spring Creek 1.. 

Unnamed Springs 1.. 

Mikes Pond 1.. 

Dayton Creek 16.. 

Middle Fork 

Dayton Creek 1.. 

South Fork 

Dayton Creek 0.. 

Unnamed Creek 1.. 

Gillard Spring 2.. 

Ronan (Ervin) (Irvine) 

(Gardner) Creek 12.. 

Lake Mary Ronan 2.. 

Donaldson Creek 2.. 

Unnamed Springs .... 1... 

Little Spring Creek.... 1... 

Red Lake 1... 

Kootenai Creek 2.. 

Unnamed Springs 2.. 

Unnamed Creek 1... 

Blue Bay (Meadow) 

Creek 20.. 

Unnamed Creek 1... 

Black Lake 0.. 



160.00.... 


4.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


25.00... 


0.62 


820.00.... 


20.50 


400.00.... 


10.00 


200.00.... 


5.00 


534.00.... 


13.35 


150.00.... 


3.75 


80.00.... 


2.00 


32,240.00.... 


806.00 


41,920.00.... 


1,048.00 


200.00.... 


5.00 


20.00.... 


0.50 


40.00.... 


1.00 


20.00.... 


0.50 


200.00.... 


5.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


0.... 





40.00.... 


1.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


0.... 





40.00.... 


1.00 


100.00.... 


2.50 


300.00.... 


7.50 


160.00.... 


4.00 


240.00.... 


6.00 


All.... 


All 


40.00.... 


1.00 


120.00.... 


3.00 


820.00.... 


20.50 


60.00.... 


1.50 


40.00.... 


1.00 


20.00... 


0.50 


11.57.... 


0.29 


160.00.... 


4.00 


6,438.00.... 


160.95 


80.00... 


2.00 


0.... 





20.00.... 


0.50 


106.00.... 


2.65 


8,380.00... 


209.50 


All.... 


All 


70.00... 


1.75 


400.00.... 


10.00 


50.00.... 


1.25 


40.00... 


1.00 


200.00... 


5.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


120.00... 


3.00 


39,600.00.... 


990.00 


200.00... 


5.00 


0.... 






2476. 



10. 



All. 



All 



-47- 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



Case No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 
No. Decrees Inches Per Sec. 



Unnamed Spring 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Sunset Spring 1. 

Unnamed Creek 2. 

Starvation (Four Mile) 

Creek 7. 

Boulder (Five Mile) 

Creek 11. 

Laugh A Way Creek L 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Bear Track (Dee) 

(Six Mile) Creek 11. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 

Mclntire Springs 1. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Rock Creek 1. 

Unnamed Creek 2. 

Station Creek 9. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 

Unnamed Spring 4. 

Mann Springs 2. 

Unnamed Springs 2. 

Mahood Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 5. 

Skidoo (Big) 

(Hellroaring) Creek .... 21.. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Holmes Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 2. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Weishair Spring 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Jette (Turtle) Lake 3. 

Unnamed Spring 3. 

Gingras Springs (Three) 1. 

Unnamed Springs 4. 

Unnamed Creek 7. 

Unnamed Spring 4. 

Unnamed Springs 6. 

Rosenberger Spring .... 2. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Leader Spring 1. 

Unnamed Spring 6. 

Hellroaring (Big) 

(Deep) Creek 17. 

Unnamed Spring 2. 

Ducharme (Smith) 

(Centipede) Creek 4. 

Unnamed Spring 2. 

Moss Creek 2. 

Unnamed Springs 2. 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Unnamed Stream 2. 

Unnamed Spring 6. 

Addison M. Sterling 

Spring 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 



All... 


All 


500.00.... 


12.50 


10.00... 


0.25 


10.00... 


0.25 


32,410.00.... 


810.25 


48.700.00... 


1,217.50 


400.00... 


10.00 


20.00... 


0.50 


18,280.00.... 


457.00 


13.33.... 


0.33 


40.00.... 


1.00 


20.00.... 


0.50 


5,000.00.... 


125.00 


55.00.... 


1.37 


32.480.00... 


812.00 


80.00.... 


2.00 


140.00.... 


3.50 


120.00... 


3.00 


All.... 


All 


105.00... 


2.62 


540.00... 


13.50 


64,835.00.... 


1,620.87 


10.00... 


0.25 


80.00.... 


2.00 


80.00.... 


2.00 


80.00... 


2.00 


100.00.... 


2.50 


All.... 


All 


20.00.... 


0.50 


1,400.00.... 


35.00 


240.00... 


6.00 


160.00.... 


4.00 


260.00.... 


6.50 


451.39.... 


11.28 


42.00.... 


1.05 


256.00... 


6.40 


100.00.... 


2.50 


40.00.... 


1.00 


6.00... 


0.15 


626.00.... 


15.65 


121,080.00... 


3,027.00 


160.00.... 


4.00 


290.00.... 


7.25 


26.00. . 


0.65 


30.00... 


0.75 


160.00.... 


4.00 


40.00.... 


1.00 


160.00... 


4.00 


245.50... 


6.13 


10.00... 


0.25 


5.00... 


0.13 



1600... 



80.00... 



2.00 



-48— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 







APPROPRIATIONS 










(Filings of Records) 


DECREED RIGHTS 




STREAM 


No. of 
Filings 


Miner's 
Inches 


Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 


Case No. of Miner's 
No. Decrees Inches 


Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 


Twin Reservoir 
(Turtle Lake) 


0... 
0— 

1.... 

1.... 

1 — 
1— 

3.- 
2... 
3.... 
2— 
3.... 
1 — 

3.... 
6— 
1.... 

1 — 
1— 
4.... 
1.... 
1.... 

1.... 
2.... 
1.... 
1.... 
1... 

4.... 
1.... 
2.... 
3.... 
1— 
4... 

1.... 
1.... 

4.... 
2... 
1 ... 
1 ... 
2.... 
2... 
2— 
2.... 
1— 
4.... 
1.... 
3.... 
1.... 
2... 
1 — 

1 — 
1.... 


0.... 

0... 
40.00— 
50.00... 

20.00— 
20.00.... 

580.00— 

40.00— 

40.00— 

440.00— 

40,000.00— 

40.00.... 

280.00— 
110.00.... 

20.00.... 

20.00.... 

40.00.... 
320.00— 

80.00.... 

10.00.... 

120.00.... 
80.00. ... 

All— 
100.00.... 

All... 

840.00.... 

All.... 

400.00— 

260.00— 

80.00— 

85.21.- 

200.00... 

All.... 

440,130.00— 

120.00.... 

150.00.... 

All.... 

600.00— 

1.16... 

240.00— 

60.00.... 

1.16.... 

250.00.... 

40.00— 

80.00.... 

240.00.... 

240.00.... 

200.00.... 

60.00.... 
40.00.... 






1.00 

1.25 

0.50 
0.50 

14.50 

1.00 

1.00 

11.00 

1,000.00 

1.00 

7.00 
2.75 
0.50 
0.50 
1.00 
8.00 
2.00 
0.25 

3.00 
2.00 

All 
2.50 

All 

21.00 
All 

10.00 
6.50 
2.00 
2.13 

5.00 
All 
11,003.25 
3.00 
3.75 
All 
15.00 
0.03 
6.00 
1.50 
0.03 
6.25 
1.00 
2.00 
6.00 
6.00 
5.00 

1.50 
1.00 






Dupuis Creek 




Poison Spring 

Grandview Drainage 

Flume 

Killdeer Spring 

Unnamed Springs, Seeps, 

Potholes 

Unnamed Springs 








White Clay Creek 

Mary's Springs 

Irvine (White Clay) 

Creek 

Unnamed Soring 

Little Bubbler Spring.. 

Hillside Spring 




Unnamed Spring 




Unnamed Springs 

Holt Spring 

& Creek 

Unnamed Springs 
Burton Spring 




Unnamed Spring 
North Fork White 

Clay Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Vinson Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Buffalo Springs 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Creek 

& Tributaries 




Little Bitterroot River 
Sullivan Creek 




Jansen's Spring 

Big Creek 

Unnamed Springs 




Unnamed Spring 
Suny-Side Springs .... 

Mary's Springs 

Grant's Spring 

Unnamed Spring 








Minesinger Creek .... 
Unnamed Spring 

Creek 

Unnamed Spring 





—49— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAM 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


No. Decrees 


Inches Per Sec 


Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


Case No. of 


Miner's Cu. Ft. 


2... 


120.00.... 


3.00 






2... 


400.00.... 


10.00 






1.... 


200.00.... 


5.00 






L... 


120.00... 


3.00 






1.... 


80.00. ... 


2.00 






1.... 


20.00... 


0.50 






2... 


86.00... 


2.15 






1.... 


200.00. ... 


5.00 






84 


637,216.00 


15,930.40 




1„. 


100.00. ... 


2.50 






1... 


40.00... 


1.00 






38... 


328,392.00.... 


8,209.80 






7... 


201,110.00.... 


5,027.75 






1... 


All... 


All 






1.... 


1,600.00.... 


40.00 






2.... 


840.00.... 


21.00 






1.... 


All.... 


All 






2.... 


204.00.... 


5.10 






25... 


35,420.00... 


885.50.... 


2167... 2... 


Ditch Decree 


1... 


20.00... 


0.50 






1.... 


60.00.. 


1.50 






1.... 


100.00... 


2.50 






1.... 


2,000.00... 


50.00 






3... 


440.00... 


11.00 






L... 


150.00.... 


3.75 






1.... 


All... 


All 






6... 


440,800.00.... 


11,020.00 






2... 


850.00... 


21.25 






4.... 


28,120.00... 


703.00 






1.... 


40.00... 


1.00 






1.... 


80.00... 


2.00 






1.... 


All.... 


All 






1.... 


80.00.... 


2.00 






1.... 


6.00... 


0.15 






1.... 


200.00... 


5.00 






1.... 


All.... 


All 






1 .... 


150.00... 


3.75 






3... 


280.00. ... 


7.00 






1.... 


50.00... 


1.25 






5.... 


200.00... 


5.00 






l.„. 


2,000.00.... 


50.00 






1.... 


120.00.... 


3.00 






0.... 


0.... 









1.... 


40.00... 


1.00 






1.... 


80.00.... 


2.00 






0... 


0.... 









I.... 


40.00... 


1.00 






41. 


444,872.32. 


11,121.81 





Poirier Creek 

Bisson Creek 

Bishop Creek 

Underground Stream 

(Artesian Well) 

West Miller Coulee ... 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Springs 

Drainage 

Total Crow Creek and 
Tributaries 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Springs 

Mission Creek 

Dry Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Cold Creek 

Mike's Creek 

Unnamed Spring .... 

Unnamed Spring 

Sabine Creek 

Thorne Creek 

Unnamed Stream 

McCollum Creek 

Unnamed Stream 

Pistol (Johnson) 

Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

& Pond 

Unnamed Springs ... 

Post Creek 

Seepage Water 

(Unnamed Creek) ... 
Mollman (Marsh) 

Creek 

Unnamed Spring .... 

Unnamed Stream .... 

Unnamed Spring .. 

June Creek 

Samathy Well 

Valentine Creek .... 
Deschamp's Spring 

Baker Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Stream 

Unnamed Springs .... 

Crystal Spring 

Dan Springs Creek 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Spring .... 
Unnamed Springs .. 

Coyote Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Total Little Bitterroot 
& Tributaries 



—50— 






WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Mahoney Spring 1. 

Spring Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

A Gulch 

(Waste Water) 1. 

Crow Creek 3. 

North Crow Creek 9. 

Waste Water 1. 

Middle Crow Creek 2. 

Unnamed Stream 1. 

Lost (Rainbow) 

(Koupal) Creek 4. 

Courville Creek 1. 

South Crow Creek 4. 

Spring Creek . 3. 

Huckleberry Spring .... 1. 

Courville Creek 2. 

Unnamed Stream 1. 

South Fork Courville 
(Rock) (Spring) 

Creek 4. 

South Fork Soring. ... 1. 
Unnamed Springs 

(3) 1. 

Mud Creek 12. 

Branch of Mud Creek 3. 

South Fork Mud Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 3. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Unnamed Springs 

(3 or more) 2. 

Meinsinger Spring 

Creek 2. 

Meinsinger Springs .... 1. 

Unnamed Spring 2. 

Big Creek 3. 

Poison Oak (Lantow) 

(Beauchmin) Creek .. 5. 

Poison Oaks Spring... 1. 

Big Spring 1. 

Red Home Springs.... 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Ashley (Dry) Creek... 9. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 

Ashley Creek 1. 

Dishman Spring 1. 

Unnamed Streams 101. 

Unnamed Spring 4. 

Unnamed Stream 14. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 



40.00. 

420.00. 

100.00. 

120.00. 

1,900.00. 

664.00. 

24.00. 

100.00. 

24.00. 

40.00. 

44,620.00. 

100.00. 

100.00. 

100.00. 

4,000.00. 

60.00. 

85,800.00 

290.00. 

12,800.00. 

80.00. 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



200.00.... 


5.00 


600.00.... 


15.00 


20.00... 


0.50 


200.00.... 


5.00 


00,000.00.... 


10,000.00 


94,760.00.... 


2,369.00 


80.00.... 


2.00 


160.00.... 


4.00 


2,000.00.... 


50.00 


220.00... 


5.50 


120.00.... 


3.00 


91.000.00.... 


2,275.00 


3.360.00.... 


84.00 


60.00.... 


1.50 


160.00.... 


4 00 


80.00. ... 


2.00 


300.00.... 


7.50 


160.00... 


4.00 


100.00... 


2.50 


36,090.00.... 


902.2^ 


2,400.00.... 


60.00 


440.00... 


11.00 


200.00... 


5.00 


160.00... 


4.00 



1.00 

10.50 
2.50 
3.00 

47.50 

16.60 
0.60 
2.50 
0.60 
1.00 

1,115.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
100.00 
1.50 

2,145.00 

7.25 

320.00 

2.00 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. Decrees Inches 
Case No. of Miner's 



Per Sec. 
Cu. Ft. 



—51— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LAKE COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Records) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



No. Decrees Inches 
Case No. of Miner's 



Per Sec. 
Cu. Ft. 



Matt Creek 22. 

Camp Spring 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Dry Lake Creek 1. 

Unnamed Gulch 1- 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Total Mission Creek 

& Tributaries 275 

Jocko River 17. 

North Fork 

Jocko River 4. 

Falls Creek 5. 

S-14 Creek 4. 

Middle Fork 

Jocko River 4. 

South Fork 

Jocko River 4. 

Big Knife Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Moiese Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 2. 

Pellew Creek 2. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 

Unnamed 2. 

Unnamed Springs 1. 

Barnaby Creek 3. 

Spring Creek 2. 

Unnamed Sorings 1. 

Finley Creek 9. 

Agency Creek 1. 

Blodgett Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Waste Water 1. 

Mary Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 

& Creek 1. 

Adams Creek 3. 

Unnamed Spring 3. 

Alkali (Flat) Creek 2. 

Spring Creek 6. 

Unnamed Srring 1. 

Lamoose (Big) Creek.. 2. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Valley Creek 9. 

Copper Creek 2. 

Unnamed Springs 

(Four) 1.. 

Total Jocko River 

& Tributaries 103 

Grand Total Lake County 1,088 



16.500.00 

30.00 

80.00 

All 

100.00 

25.00. 



412.50 
0.75 
2.00 
All 
2.50 
0.62 



1,206,049.00... 


30,151.22 


421,610.00... 


10,540.25 


48,500.00... 


1,212.50 


40,000.00... 


1.000.00 


16,000.00... 


400.00 


16,000.00.... 


400.00 


32,000.00... 


800.00 


44,000.00... 


1.100.00 


10.00... 


0.25 


4,000.00.... 


100.00 


18.00... 


0.45 


4,400.00... 


110.00 


All.... 


AH 


160.00... 


4.00 


86.00... 


2.15 


4,010.00.... 


100.25 


660.00... 


16.50 


All. 


All 


1,430.00... 


35.75 


160.00.... 


4.00 


200.00... 


5.00 


50.00. ... 


1.25 


160.00... 


4.00 


50.00.. 


1.25 


350.00... 


8.75 


45.00... 


1.12 


20.00... 


0.50 


60.00... 


1.50 


6,600.00.... 


165.00 


10.00... 


0.25 


4,000 00 


100.00 


80.00... 


2.00 


13.600.00. 


310.00 


140.00.... 


3.50 


160.00.... 


4.00 



658,569.00 
98,074,897.32 



16,464.22 
2,451,872.43 



—52— 



DRAINAGES IN LAKE COUNTY NOT LOCATED 



STREAM 



No. of 
Filings 


Miner's 
Inches 


Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec 




300.00 


7.50 




400.00 


10.00 




All 


All 




3.00 


0.07 




50.00 


1.25 




8,000.00 


200.00 




2,000.00 


50.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




1,600.00 


40.00 




1,600.00 


40.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




800.00 


20.00 




100.00 


2.50 


18 


20,453.00 


511.32 



Morrow Creek 

Waste, Seep 

Spring, Near Arlee. 

Spring 

Spring 

Unnamed Stream.... 
Unnamed Stream.... 
Unnamed Stream... 
Unnamed Stream. ... 
Unnamed Stream... 
Unnamed Stream... 
Unnamed Stream... 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Stream.... 
Unnamed Stream. ... 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Stream... 

Unnamed 

Total 



—53— 



WATER RESOURCES SURVEY 

Lake County, Montana 



Part II 
Maps Showing Irrigated Areas 



Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana 

June, 1963 



RI9W 



RI8W 



FLATHEAD COUNTY 



R22W 



T25N 



T23N - 



T22 N 




DRAINAGE MAP OF 

Lake County TI7N 

Showing Irrigated Areas 



R20W 



RI9W 



MISSOULA COUNTY 



MAP INDEX 



Township Range Page 

16 North 19 West 1 

16 North 20 West 2 

17 North 18 West 3 

17 North 19 West 4 

17 North 20 West 4 

18 North 19 West 5 

18 North 20 West 6 

19 North 19 West 7 

19 North 20 West 8 

19 North 21 West 9 

19 North 22 West 9 

20 North 19 West 10 

20 North 20 West 11 

20 North 21 West 12 

20 North 22 West 12 

21 North 17 West 13 

21 North 19 West 14 

21 North 20 West 15 



Township Range Page 

21 North 21 West 16 

21 North 23 West 17 

22 North 19 West 18 

22 North 20 West 19 

22 North 21 West 20 

22 North 23 West 17 

23 North 19 West 21 

23 North 20 West 22 

23 North 22 West 23 

23 North 23 West 24 

24 North 19 West 25 

24 North 21 West 26 

25 North 18 West 27 

25 North 19 West 28 

25 North 20 West 29 

25 North 21 West 30 

25 North 22 West 31 

26 North 19 West 32 



ALL MAPS HAVE BEEN MADE FROM AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS 



g- 



MAP SYMBOL INDEX 



BOUNDARIES 

COUNTY LINE 

NATIONAL FOREST LINE 

DITCHES 

^-^ CANALS OR DITCHES 

► DRAIN DITCHES 

►PROPOSED DITCHES 



TRANSPORTATION 

= PAVED ROADS 
=== UNPAVED ROADS 
+■*■+ RAILROADS 
Q53 STATE HIGHWAY 
053 U.S. HIGHWAY 
O AIRPORT 



STRUCTURES 3 UNITS 



\ DAM 

^ DIKE 

N+> FLUME 

*1ihk SIPHON 

^/^ SPILL 

-fr SPRINKLER SYSTEM 

Nq WEIR 

mm PIPE LINE 

• PUMP 

O PUMP SITE 
RESERVOIR 

WELL 



-* SPRING 

± SWAMP 

O GAUGING STATION 

□ POWER PLANT 

STORAGE TANK 
if"! CEMETERY 

© FAIRGROUND 

■ FARM OR RANCH UNIT 

£ LOOKOUT STATION 

k RANGER STATION 

<--> RAILROAD TUNNEL 

1 SCHOOL 



+ + 4- NATURAL CARRIER USED AS DITCH ^ SHAFT, MINE, OR DRIFT 



-JOCKO "K" CANAL 
4 lh 



Mo i est Creek Agate Stevens Creek 

standard/ parallel 



z 



Jocko River 



Jocko River 



JOCKO "R" CANAL 



)OCKO "R" CANAL LATERAL 

Agency Creek 



MATT DITCH 




LEGEND 

Jocko Valley Irrigation Dist. 
Private Irrigation 



PROJECT LATERAL 
E CANAL 

LUMPRY OITCH 

VANDERBERG DITCH 



T I5N-R. 20W 



Big Knife Creek 



Twp 16 North 

Rge. LSJUeJLt— 




LEGEND 

| Jocko Valley Irrigation Dist. 
| Private Irrigation 

JOCKO "k" canal laterals 



Agency Creek 

PROJECT "R" CANAL LATERALS 



LUMPRY DITCH 

N. P R. R. 

PROJECT "E" CANAL LATERAL 

Fin ley Creek 
MATT DITCHES 



T. 15 N - R. 21 W 



Tw P . 16 N o r t h 
Rge. 20 West _ 



DRY CREEK LINING 
Dry Creek 




Pistol Creek 



LEGEND 

I Private Irrigation 



Middle Fork 
Jocko River 



South Fork Jocko River 



JOCKO "S" CANAL 
-Jocko River 



Twp 17 Nnrth 

Rg* 18 West 



-Mcdonald ditch 
site of montana rainbow trout co.* 



?\ \ V. 



LEGEND 

Jocko Valley Irrigation Dist. 
Private Irrigation 



La/noose or Big Creek 




LOWER S CANAL 

N. P.R.R. 

Jocko River 



Rge. 19 Q 2Q West 



Ashley (Dry) Creek 

MISSION C CANAL- 



MISSION B CANAL 
MATT DITCHES 



PABLO FEEDER CANAL 

Ashley (Dry) Creek 



ST. IGNATIUS WATER LINE 



FISH PONDS 

Mission Creek 

FATHERS DITCH 
SISTERS DITCH 

MATTIX DITCH 

Sabine Creek 

FATHERS DITCH 



MISSION F CANAL 




Sabine Creek 



MCCONNELL DITCH 

^ Thome Creek 



ITCH 



LEGEND 



Mission Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



DRY CREEK LINING 



Dry Creek 



Twp 18 North 
Rge. 19 West 



FATHERS DITCH 



Mission Creek ' -Mall Creek 
\ 



FINLEY DITCHES . ENEAS DITCH 



Jocko River 
N.P R.R. 

LOWER JOCKO "j" CANAL 




LEGEND 



I M Jocko Valley Irrigation Dist. 
I Mission Irrigation District 
nV VJH Private Irrigation 



MISSION "C" CANAL 



CITY WATER LINE 

OLD POWER DITCH 
(NOT IN USE) 
Mission Creek 

FATHERS DITCH 

SISTERS DITCH 

MATTIX DITCH 



So Dine Creek 



FATHERS DITCH 



MISSION "F" CANAL 



Copper Creek 

N.P R R 
MCDONALD DITCH 



Mc Coll urn Creek 



Twp. 18 N orth 
R gfi 20 West 



UANAL 



PABLO FEEDER CANAL 



Mc DONALD DITCH 




**Mw (Dry) creak 



M'SS/ON "C" CANAL 



MISSION "B" CANAL 



***** (Dry) Creek 



LAROSE DITCH 
PABLO FEEDER CANAL 



LEGEND 

JEJ Ratheod ""•atlon Oistrle, 
^ M'ssion irrigation Djstrfct 









POST "D" LATERAL 
POST "B" LATERAL 



MARSH CREEK "A" CANAL 

POST "D" CANAL POST "g" CANAL 

POST "E" CANAL POST "A" LATERAL- 



POST C LATERALS 



POST C LATERAL 



POST F CANAL 



N.PR.R 



Mission Creek — 




T I9N-R. 21 W 



T 18 N-R. 21 W 



LEGEND 

Flathead Irrigation District 
Mission Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



Post Creek 



POST F CANAL 
Mc DONALD DITCH 



Mc DONALD DITCHES 

Poison Oak (Laniow)(Beauchmin) Creek 



Ashley (Dry) Creek 



'ission Creek- Matt Creek 



ENEAS DITCH 



Tw P 19 North 
Rge. 20 West 



8 



POST "C" LATERALS 



Flathead River 




LEGEND 

[Z I Flathead Irrigation District 



T I9N- R. 22W 



T. I8N - R. 2 2W 



Flathead River 



-MISSION "H" CANAL 
-N.PRR. 



Mission Creek 



Twp 19 North 
Rge. 2/ 3 22 West 



Middle Crow Creek 

POWELL PUMP a SPRINKLER- 



RONAN A CANAL 



RONAN "A" CANAL- 



Crow Creek 



KICKING HORSE 
FEEDER CANALT 



-PABLO FEEDER CANAL 

-OTTER WASTE DITCH 

i — COULTER DITCH 



Lost (Rainbow) (Koupal) Creek 
1ALLEL 



NORTH 




POST "G" CANAL 

T. 20N — R. 2QW 
T I9N — R. 20W 

MARSH CREEK "A" CANAL- 

Mollman (Marsh) Creek 



PABLO FEEDER CANAL 



LEGEND 



Flathead Irrigation Project 
(Flathead District) 

Private Irrigation 



-WALRATH -JOHNSON DITCH 
-KICKING HORSE FEEDER CANAL 



Twp 20 North 
Rge.„Z2_iEM*_ 



Mud Creek 



POST A CANAL 



POST B CANAL 
POST "C" CANAL 



PABLO "50A" CANAL LATERALS 

STAND APO 



Spring Crtak-y 

RONAN "B" LATERAL 




RONAN "A" LATERAL 

RONAN "A" CANAL 



LEGEND 

I Flathead Irrigation District 
| Private Irrigation 



RONAN "A" LATERAL 



Crow Cree' 



POST "C" LATERAL-^ 
POST "B" LATERAL 

POST "D" LATERAL 



— POST "C" CANAL 
POST "E" CANAL 
POST "D" CANAL 



POST 6 CANAL 
POST "A" LATERAL 



Tw P 20 North 



Rge. 20 West 



ii 



71 A CANAL 
70 A CANAL 




LEGEND 

Flathead Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



Mud Creek 



POST A CANAL 



POST B CANAL 



POST C CANAL 



MOIESE 30 CANAL 



POST C CANAL 
POST A CANAL 



Twp. 20 N orth 



12 



Jim Creek 



Swan River 
Pony Creek 




T. 2 I N — R. 1 8 W 



T. 20N-R. 18 W 



5^ 



COUNTY 



Smith Creek 
S\wan River 



STANDARD 



PARALLEL 



^ 
^ 



I 









NORTH 



LEGEND 

Private Irrigation 

Dog Creek 



Twp. 21 North 

Rge. A?_..Wm&L- 



13 



ALPHONSE CLAIRMONT DITCH 

Mud Creek 



PABLO FEEDER CANAL 
-South Fork Mud Creek 



Mud Creek 

Mud Lake 



Meinsinger Spring 



fe in singer Spring Creek 



RONAN B CANAL 




LEGEND 

Flathead Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



Spring Creek 

T. 21 N — R. 20 W 



T. 20N-R.20^CD| * y. 



RONAN A CANAL 



PABLO FEEDER CANAI> 

Middle Crow Creek > LOST (RAINBOW) (KOUPAL) CREEK 

North Crow Creek 



Twp. 21 N or t h 
Rge. 19 W est 



PABLO "50A" CANAL 



50A — II CANAL 



PABLO "lOA'^NAL Mein singer Spring - 



T. 2 I N — R. 2 



T. 20 N — R. 2 




LEGEND 



I I Flathead Irrigation District 
| Private Irrigation 

Meinsinger Spring Creek 



FLEMING PUMP 

Mud Creek 

DUPUIS SPRINKLER 



RONAN B CANAL 



RON AN 



PABLO 50A CANAL LATERALS 



N.P.R.R. 
RONAN "B" CANAL LATERALS 



Tw P . 21 N orth 



15 



3IA-4I CANAL 



3IA-37 CANAL 



3IA-06 CANAL 



Flathead River 



SANDERS 



COUNTY 




Flathead River 



73 "A" CANAL LATERALS 



70A CANAL 
-71 A CANAL 



LEGEND 



Flathead Irrigation District 



3IA- 06 CANAL 



'A' CANAL 



50A CANAL 



50A-II CANAL 



Tw P 21 Nort h 
Rge . 21 West 



16 



SEDERSTROM DITCH 



Little Bitter root River 



BAXTER WELL 8 DITCH 



HUGHES Dl 



KEMP 



DITCH a WELL 



GOSSETT 
CAMAS 



CAMAS "B" CANA 



CHES S WELLS 



DITCH a WELL 
"B" CANAL- 



KOPP WELLS 



Warm Spiings Creek 
T. 22 N-R. 24 W 



T. 2 1 N - R. 2 4 W 



WHITE DITCHES 



CHRISTENSEN 



DITCHES 8 ARTESIAN WELL'S 




LEGEND 

Flathead Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



SANDERS \ COUNTY 

Little Bitterroot River-^ 



Dan Springs Creek 



Twp 2 1 S 22 North 
Rge. 23 West_ 



17 



Hellroaring (Deep) Creek 



DUCHARME DITCH 



POLSON "A" CANAL 



POLSON CANAL 



DUPUIS DITCH 



DUBAY-MINESINGER DITCH -^0 

NOT IN USE BEYOND HERE 
PABLO FEEDER CANAL 




T.2 2 N-R.2 0wJ[ m v Xl I 

:h— ^ x / 



Mud Creek 



LEGEND 

Q Flathead Irrigation District 
Private Irrigation 



PICKUP DITC 



'—Mud Creek 



PABLO/FEEDER canal 

I— South Fork Mud Creek 



Twp. 22 North 
Rge. 19 West- 



18 



POLSON"B" CANAL 



Flathead River 



TO KERR DAM 



3IA-0- 7 CANAL 




3IA CANAL 



Poison Spring LEGEND 

Flathead Irrigation District 



T. 21 N — R. 21 W 



POLSON "A" CANAL 



POLSON "D" CANAL LATERAL 



POLSON "Z" CANAL 



PABLO FEEDER CANAL 



N.P.R.R. 
PABLO "lO"A CANAL 



Twp. 22 North 
Rge. 20 West 



BUFFALO CROSSING 



Flathead River 




LEGEND 

| FJathead Irrigation District 



PENSTOCK 



T. 21 N — R. 2 2 W 



Flathead River 



3IA-0-7 CANAL 



31 A CANAL 



31 A-41 CANAL 



31 A-37 CANAL 



31 A-06 CANAL 



Tw P . 2 2 N prtti 

Rge. 21 West 



20 



Bear Tract (Dee) (Six Mile) Creek 




o 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 



_ © 



Hellroaring (Deep) Creek 



LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



W. Slaves (Pump) 

M. Madsen ( Pump) 

M Hansen ( Pump) 

J. Torgerson (Pump) 

S. Thurston (Pump) 

R. Wellin (Pump) 

S. Burfening (Pump) 

H. Hort (Pump) 

A. Culver ( Pump) 

I. Foreman (Pump) 

R. Lawin (Pump) 

H. Welch (Pump) 

G. Lewis 

L. Heddon 

E. Cartmell 

C. Adams 

D Moser 

J. Hosking 

M. Goldston 

Union Bank a Trust Co. 

V. Hintzman (Pump) 

A. Hamilton ( Pump) 

E. Blake (Pump) 

E. Klepetko (Pump) 
L. Sheridan (Pump) 
M. Leigh ( Pump) 
T Marlowe (Pump) 
C. Lindsey ( Pipe) 
M. Mann 

A. Hoefert, H. Tanglin, J.Richards, 
R.Benson, M.Anderson (Pipe) 
w Lane 
V. vankic (Pipe) 

F. Leinard 

© G. Scott— W. McNeil (Pipe) 
© O. Buchman (Pipe) 
© L. Wise (Pump) 
© G.Rogers (Pump) 
© B.Gilman (Pump) 
© R. Grimm (Pump) 
© G. Herzel " (Pump) 
© L. Heddon (pump) 
Note: .<> All Above Have Sprinkler Systems 

Tw P . 23 Nort tL 

Rge. 19 West— 



® 
© 
© 



2 I 



GINGRAS SPRINGS 




T. 22 N.-R. 21 W. 



Uj 



Uj 
<0 



U. 



LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Tw P P3 North 
Rge. ZCLJtLASt— 



22 



FLATHEAD 
COUNTY 



Irvine (White Clay) Creek 




I22N-R 23W i\ 



LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



White Clay Creek 



Twp 23 North 
R ge. 22 West_ 



23 



Sullivan Creek 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 



Sullivan Creek — ,(J 




T. 22 N-R. 24 W 



LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Irvine (While Clay) Creek 



Twp 2s 

Rge. 23 WesJL 



24 



ROUSELLE DITCH 

STANDARD 



I BOHANNON-TRENTON DITCH 

Alma (Yellow Bay) Creek 
PA RAUL EL \ NORTH 




LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Boulder (Five Mile) Creek 



Bear Track (Dee) (Six Mile) Creek 



Tw P 24 North 
Rge. .13-W*JSt— 



25 



Ronan (Irvine) Creek 

sn 



ELMO 



T. 24 N— R. 22 W 



*& ' h l\ 



Proctor (Spring) Creek 
— Spring (Clear) Creek 
PARALLEL 



FLATHEAD STATE 



Poplar Spring Creek 
\NCyRTH 



T. 23 N— R. 22W 




LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Twp. 2 4 _ No r t h 
Rge. __2JL_We$t . 



26 



Wyman Creek 



MORTH BOUNDARY FLATHEAD 
INDIAN RESERVATION 




LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Bond Creek 



VOGEL DITCH 



NORTH 
North Fork Lost Creek 



Tw P . 25 N or t h 
Rge. 18 W est 



27 



FLATHEAD COUNTY 



WEBERG DITCH 
(NOT IN USE) 



•r — Bug Creek 



j) Perry Beebe Pipeline 

D Adoms a Gregoire Pipeline 

s) Lyons a Greenup Pipeline 
5 Henry Vonderpos Pipeline 
s) Horry Thompson Pipeline 
jjP Ben Slronohon pipeline 
m Mobel Tesky Pipeline 
5) Geo. Bruffey a — 

E. Hindermon Pipeline 
s) Proden Fellon Pipeline 
io) Robert Stocking Pipeline 
m) Maude Larson Pipeline 
T3) A.V. Lake Pipeline 
© Allen Seymour Pipeline 
© Denton Deedon 
© Heber Mognuson Pipeline 
© W.S. Sanders Pipeline 
© N.E. Solonder Pipeline 
© Ronald Dundas Pipeline 
© Marjorie M c Kenzie Pipeline 
© Henry Larson Pipeline 
© Sylvia Johnson Pipeline 
© G.C. Allen Pipeline 
@ Louis Ratterman 
© J.G. Webber Pipeline 
© Jerome Podbielski Pipeline 
© Morshall M c Connell Pipeline 
@ Henry D.Brown Pipeline 
@ I. H. Rodgers Pipeline 
@ L.Diestler Pipeline 
© Chris Evenson 
© Adam Bowman 
@ Eby Bowmon 
© Paul Beebe 
@ Leonard Ehlang 
@ Ernest Townsley 
@ Harold Orr 
© Walter Jenni son 
© Harold Olson Pipeline 
© C.F. Shade Pipeline 
© Floyd Wolker Pipeline 
©lone Shidler Pipeline 
@ C. Dixon Pipeline 
@ L. Larson Pipeline 
© B. Boerner Pipeline 
© Nat Boyd Pipeline 
@ E. Nolan Pipeline 
©Jim Browne Pipeline 
© D. Milliren Pi peline, Pump 
©J.Mcintire Pipeline, Pump 

©J.Hubbard Pipeline 
©Fred Larson Jr. Pipeline 




LEGEND 



I Private Irrigation 



PARALLEL 

BOHANNON-TRENTON DITCH 
ROUSSELLE DITCH 



NORTH 



@ Maude Bolton Pipeline 


* 


© Cecil Miller Pipeline 


-ft 


© John Molone Pipeline 


ft 


@ E.J. Ober Pipeline 


ft 


@ Mory Orser Pipeline 


ft 


© Noel Dolven Pipeline 


ft 


@ B.J. Krogstod Pipeline 


ft 


© T.Moore Jr. Pipeline 


ft 


@ R. Wilder McDonald 


ft 


© Harriet Robbin 




© Rudy Robbin 




© Albert Hixon 


ft 


© Ivo Dornoll 


ft 


@ Ernest Allen 


ft 


© George Britton 


ft 


@ Covington a Butler 


ft 


© John Olsen 


ft 


@ Lindo Nixon 


ft 


© Fred Kelso 


ft 


© John Shields 


ft 


© Swan Swanson 


ft 


@ Leonard Kohlmier 


ft 


© Donaven Rognlie 


ft 


@ Chos. Keim Pipeline, Pump 


ft 


@ McDonald P i pel i ne , Pump 


ft 


@ Geo. Gilpin 


ft- 


© T. R. Willson 


ft 


© Anno Walchi 


ft 


© Anno Storfo 


ft 


© Dorthy Robbin 


ft 


© Edna Robbin 


ft 


@ Delia Dickerson 


ft 


© L. Ratterman a E.Lake 


ft 


@ Thomas Cahill 


ft 


@ Carl Carlson 


ft 


© William Bolton 


ft 


@ Rousselle B Vogt Pipeline 


Pump ft 


@ Mary E. Sullivon 




© Dorothy Schermerham 


ft 


© Robert Elliott 


ft 


© Leonard Tiensvoid 


ft 


© John W. DeYoung 


ft 


Twn 25 NO 



Rge. 19 West 



28 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 




Big Lodge Creek 



MCBURNEY DITCH 
(NOT IN USE) 



ROLLINS DITCH 

The North 
Birch (Louie) Creek 

MONGRAIN DITCH 

NORTH BOUNDARY FLATHEAD 
INDIAN RESERVATION 



i. go n — n. c\ w 
T. 24N-R. SI W 



LEGEND 

H Private Irrigation 



Tw P ._^5 No r t h 
Rge. 2JLWest 



29 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 



Ronan (Irvine) Creek 




LEGEND 



Private Irrigation 



Big Lodge Creek 



NORTH BOUNDARY FLATHEAD 
INDIAN RESERVATION 



Spring (Clear) Creek 
Proctor (Spring) Creek 
Dayton Creek 



WH Tw P 2 5 Nort h 

Poplar Spring Creek Rge 21 West 



30 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 




T. 24 N — 



LEGEND 

Private Irrigation 



JENSEN (HAWKINS) DITCHES 



Ronan (Irvine) Creek 



Twp 25 North 
R ge 22 West 



31 



FLATHEAD 



COUNTY 



School Meadow Creek 



FLATHEAD 




T. 25N-R. 20W 



LEGEND 

| Private Irrigation 



Johnson (Tinkle) Creek 



Bug Creek 



Twp. 2 6 N orth 
Rge. 19 West 



32