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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 10, 1992 – April 29, 1993"

Vol. 74, nos. 1-22 

andl -17 



September 10, 1992- 

April 29, 1993 

and 
September 9, 1993 

May 5, 1994 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 





A 


B 


C 


1 


Title 


Date 


Page 


2 


AAUW: unversity women speak out 


February 4, 1993 


11 


3 


Accreditation: Middle States finish final site visit 


April 22, 1993 


1 


4 


Accreditation: Middle States update 


November 19, 1992 


5 


5 


Activities Day: out door concert to rock 


September 17, 1992 


11 


6 


Advisors are more than just schedulers 


April 22, 1993 


5 


7 


African American Caucus presents a series of guest lectures 


September 24, 1992 


3 


8 


African American Culture 


April 1,1993 


11 


9 


African Art: learning 


September 24, 1992 


15 


10 


African night planned 


February 25, 1993 


10 


11 


AIDS Awareness: service planned 


November 19, 1992 


8 


12 


Alcohol awareness at CUP 


October 15, 1992 


8 


13 


ALF parade: what to look for 


October 15, 1992 


13 


14 


ALF parking Announcements 


October 15, 1992 


9 


15 


Andrew Relief Clarion Aids 


October 15, 1992 


8 


16 


Angle, Kurt: takes Gold 


February 18, 1993 


20 


17 


Angle, Kurt: wrestled in World Cup 


November 19, 1992 


19 


18 


Animal Rights: new group to form on campus 


February 18, 1993 


6 


19 


Another true story: mini concert is major success 


September 24, 1992 


15 


20 


Appropriations request: chancellor goes before state senate 


March 4, 1993 


1 


21 


Athletes: recognized for academic achievement 


March 4, 1993 


16 


22 


Autum Leaf Festival: a growing tradition 


October 8, 1992 


11 


23 


Baldwin, Robert: to receive Service Award 


April 22, 1993 


6 


24 


Band: welcomes back alumni to perform 


September 24, 1992 


14 


25 


Baseball: hoping to spring into 1993 PSAC 


March 25, 1993 


19 


26 


Baseball: Injuries hard luck leaving clarion in role of spoiler 


April 22, 1993 


19 


27 


Baseball: wins three of four in weird week 


April 29, 1993 


21 


28 


Basketball: Women on the road to a solid start 


January 21, 1993 


16 


29 


Basketball: 80 percent clip to open season 


December 10, 1992 


20 


30 


Basketball: Accolades round up for 


April 1,1993 


21 


31 


Basketball: capture 3rd straight PSAC West crown 


March 4, 1993 


15 


32 


Basketball: clarion.edinboro battling for PSAC West crown 


February 25, 1993 


17 


33 


Basketball: defeat Cal in divisional shootout 


February 11, 1993 


21 


34 


Basketball: eagles approach crossroads in conference play 


February 4, 1993 


18 


35 


Basketball: late season slump bounces 


March 4, 1993 


16 


36 


Basketball: men grapplers fighting through injury plague season 


January 21, 1993 


17 


37 


Basketball: parity of conferences finds 


January 28, 1993 


19 


38 


Basketball: playoff hopes 


February 18, 1993 


15 


39 
40 


Basketball: quest for top spot 


February 11, 1993 


19 


Basketball: Shipp injures CUP playoff hopes 


February 25, 1993 


20 


41 


Basketball: sponsors hoop shoot 


October 15, 1992 


25 


42 


Basketball: survives early quizzes, face test verus 


December 10, 1992 


19 


43 


Basketball: team gamers exhibition win 


November 19, 1992 


20 


44 


Basketball: teamwork and defense are keys 


January 28, 1993 


22 


45 


Basketball: women first PSAC West Loss 


February 18, 1993 


16 


46 


Basketball: women win two more conference games 


February 4, 1993 


16 


47 


Basketball: women's team want another title 


November 19, 1992 


21 


48 


Battle of the Bands: 1993 


January 28, 1993 


14-15 


49 
50 


Beredino, Joe shows rare talent 


April 29, 1993 


14 


Berry, Ron: student sentate VP resigns 


September 17, 1992 


5 


51 


Biology dept holds workshop 


September 24, 1992 


7 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 





A B C 


52 

53 


Bolland, Herbert: once met cult predecessors 


April 1,1993 


7 


Books banned 


September 24, 1992 


8 


54 


Boyd, Edgar remembering Martin Luther King jr 


January 21, 1993 


9 


55 


Boyd, Greg: to give two speaches on campus this week 


November 12, 1992 


15 


56 


Bryson, Jeanie quintet brings unique jazz style 


February 4, 1993 


10 


57 


Budget proposal: casey unveils education 


February 11, 1993 


7 


58 


Budget: 1992-93 ready for SSHE approval 


October 1,1992 


1 


59 


Budget: casey releases funds for improvements 


April 1,1993 


8 


60 


Budget: Clarion projecting $2.7 million shortfall for 1993-94 


March 25, 1993 


1 


61 


Budget: personnel reductions to offset projected 2.7 million deficit 


April 1,1993 


1 


62 


Buildings: Trustees approve construction of Presidents Residence 


January 28, 1993 


1 


63 


Buildings: Opposition grows to new residence 


February 4, 1993 


5 


64 


Buildings: president's house estimate increased 


February 25, 1993 


6 


65 


Buildings: proposed presidents residence put on hold 


March 25, 1993 


5 


66 


CABS future is up in the air 


September 17, 1992 


14 


67 


CABS: is staying 


September 24, 1992 


12 


68 


Call, Sequelle participate in media convention 


March 25, 1993 


9 


69 


Career Services plans for future 


October 1, 1992 


6 


70 


Career Services: job searching made easy 


April 1,1993 


12 


71 


Carlson Library: adds new index 


February 4, 1993 


14 


72 


Carlson Library: check it out 


February 4, 1993 


11 


73 


Carlson Library: check it out 


February 11, 1993 


18 


74 


Carlson Library: IMC 


February 18, 1993 


10 


75 


Cathead, Andrea: elected new senate VP 


September 24, 1992 


6 


76 


CBAA: to host drive 


January 28, 1993 


12 


77 


Cheerleaders up in the air over funding 


October 15, 1992 


7 


78 


Christmas Carol comes to CUP 


November 19, 1992 


15 


79 


Clarion enters second season 


January 21, 1993 


15 


80 


Class Canceled: foul weather plans considered 


February 18, 1993 


6 


81 


Class registration: problems 


November5, 1992 


5 


82 


Clintn becomes president 


January 21, 1993 


1 


83 


Concord won't build aste incinerator in Clarion 


April 29, 1993 


6 


84 
85 


Construction Projects: casey releases fund for state school 


October 15, 1992 


1 


Courses: 3 language minors to be offered 


April 1,1993 


7 


86 


Creasap, Susan marches her way into Clarion 


September 10, 1992 


11 


87 


Crime: blaze guts house 


November 19, 1992 


6 


88 
89 


Crime: campuses combat crime 


September 17, 1992 


5 


Crime: clarion falls prey to violent crime 2 students victimized by armed 


February 11, 1993 


1 


90 


Crime: Fire ousts six clarion students 


January 28, 1993 


7 


91 
92 
93 


Crime: public safety car trashed 


October 8, 1992 


9 


Crime: Stahlman, Christopher fire kills alumnus 


January .21, 1993 


5 


Crime: student bound over for trial for rioting and trespassing 


March 4, 1993 


6 


94 


Crime: student charged in public safety vehicle damage 


October 22, 1992 


8 


95 


Crime: Theta Chi damaged car 


October 29, 1992 




5 


96 
97 


Crime: two arrested in Nair 


February 4, 1993 


6 


Cross Country: finishes season at PSACS 


November 5, 1992 


17 


98 


Cross Country: opens season 


Septembers, 1992 


20 


99 
100 
101 
102 


Cross Country: team fares well at 1UP 


September 24, 1992 


20 


Cross Country: teams improving 


Octobers, 1992 


25 


Cross Country: teams prepare for PSACS 


October 22, 1992 


18 


CSA 1993-94 Budget 


April 29, 1993 


5 





A 


B 


c 


103 
104 


Cultural Diversity week: 


Novembers, 1992 


9 


Cultural diversity: AASU schedules conference 


October 22, 1992 


9 


105 


Cultural Diversity: experience different cultures 


October 29, 1992 


11 


106 


Cultural Night: a taste of the middle east 


October t, 1992 


12 


107 


Dance concert scheduled for tonight 


December 10, 1992 


18 


108 


Day, Anne: history prof wins award 


September^, 1992 


9 


109 
110 


Day, Nancy: gives concert against rape 


October 1, 1992 


14 


Dennis, Amy: Alumni works in Japan 


September 17, 1992 


7 


111 


Disabilities in Education 


November 12, 1992 


7 


112 


Diversity: clarion strives for 


April 1,1993 


5 


113 


Diversity: dealing with 


February 11, 1993 


18 


114 


Diversity: Otway, Gemma striving for student 


April 1,1993 


15 


115 


Diversity: students speak out on minority status 


March 4, 1993 


5 


116 


Earth Day: campus turns green 


April 22, 1993 


15 


117 


Education reform rebuffed 


February 11, 1993 


8 


118 


Eicher, Jeffery & Vanlandingham, Marguerite: running for AT&T investm 


December 10, 1992 


7 


119 


Elinsky, Hasselrig to join EWL Hall 


March 4, 1993 


17 


120 


Emerency Phones: add to campus safety 


April 22, 1993 


7 


121 


EMT program: students want 


October 29, 1992 


18 


122 


Enrollment: new student - up 


■ ■ — i 

September 17, 1992 


— — '■'• ■ 

7 


123 


Enrolment: universities see drop 


December 10, 1992 


4 


124 


Escort Service: planned for next semester 


November 12, 1992 


4 


125 


Exchange Students expand minds and cultures 


October 15, 1992 


17 


126 
127 


Express Shop may close fall semester weekends 


March 4, 1993 


5 


Faculty recital, brass quartet 


October 22, 1992 


13 


128 


Faculty: pay up last year 


February 11, 1993 


6 


129 


Family Day: Jones , Scott to perform 


Septembers, 1992 


14 


130 


Financial Aid forms here 


February 4, 1993 


6 


131 


Financial Aid: community service may be future repayment 


February 18, 1993 


1 


132 


Financial Aid: new scholarship added 


February 18, 1993 


7 


133 


First cultural night is a trip 


October 8, 1992 


16 


134 


Flex dollars and Cash allowance: 


October 15, 1992 


16 


135 


Football: final golden eagle 


December 10, 1992 


22 


136 


Football: 2-1 in PSAC West 


October 29, 1992 


19 


137 


Football: eagles looking ahead to promising season 


September 10, 1992 


19 


138 


Football: eagles team loses a heartbreaker 


September 24, 1992 


19 


139 


Football:jjolden eagles run all over lock haven 


October 22, 1992 


15 


140 


Football: hold on to lead for first victory 


October 15, 1992 


23 


141 


Football. I UP won't beat Clarion on reputation alone 


Novembers, 1992 


20 


142 


Football: Level IUP 


November 19, 1992 


1 


143 


Football: offense sputters in loss to Westminister 


October 1,1992 


19 


144 


Football: PSAC honors Myers 


November 19, 1992 


22 


145 


Football: PSAC West championship 


November 19, 1992 


22 


146 
147 


Football: still alive in PSAC playoff 


November 5, 1992 


15 


Football: team loses fourth in a row 


October 8, 1992 


23 


148 


Football: win battle with Rock 


November 12, 1992 


19 


149 
150 


Football; gridiron home opener this Saturday 


Septembers, 1992 


21 


Frantemity/Soroities: TKE Members face charges charter tost 


January 21, 1993 


6 


151 
152 
153 


Franternity/Sororities: Alpha Phi Omega dedicated to the 


April 29, 1993 


12 


Fraternity/Sororities: battle erupts TKE 


December 10, 1992 


6 


Fraternity/Sororities: Gamma Theta Kappa one with nature 


March 4, 1993 


10 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 





A 


B 


C 


154 
155 


Fraternity/Sororities: police raid party 


February 25, 1993 


5 


Fraternity/Sorority: Kappa Theta Phi fails to meet requirements 


Octobers, 1992 


16 


156 


Fraternity/Sorority: New Mr. CUP crowned 


November 19, 1992 


14 


157 


Fuget, Charles: commencement committee welcomes 


January 28, 1993 


6 


158 


Gemmell computer lab aids students 


October 8, 1992 


9 


159 


Gemmell Student Center completed 


September 17, 1992 


1 


160 


Gemmell Student Center dedicated 


September 24, 1992 


8 


161 


Giving Campaign: kicks off 


October 1,1992 


5 


162 


Golf: eagle team on the right course 


September 17, 1992 


20 


163 


Golf. Linkster shooting for strong finish 


April 22, 1993 


21 


164 
165 


Golf: taking part in Fall PSAC today 


October 8, 1992 


24 


Golf: team finishes third at Fall PSAC 


October 15, 1992 


24 


166 
167 


Golf, team heading toward PSAC's 


October 1,1992 


20 


Golf team impressive at Hal Hanson Tournament 


September 24, 1992 


21 


168 


Gorgan, Jack: US army field band marches into Tippin 


October 1,1992 


11 


169 
170 


Gospel fest 92 shining 


November 19, 1992 


11 


Graduation Fee: council of trustees pass for 1993 


October 8, 1992 


1 


171 


Greek week: 1993 


April 1, 1993 


19 


172 


Greek Week: is is really a friendly competition 


April 22, 1993 


9 


173 


Greek: choosing a fraternity 


January 28, 1993 


12 


174 


Greek: rush what the sororities have to offer 


January 28, 1993 


12 


175 


Greeks: getting the most out of rush 


September 24, 1992 


11 


176 


Greeks: new fraternity knocks at the door while old soroity is let back in 


ApriM, 1993 


12 


177 


Gridiron campaign: Myers and Reinhart chosen 


September 10, 1992 


19 


178 


Hart Chapel: ghost haunts 


October 29, 1992 


7 


179 


Hazardous Waste: Concord fighting for new application 


September 10, 1992 


4 


180 


History: Celebrating 125 years of Clarion 


April 29, 1993 


13 


181 


History: Clarion University celebrating 125 years 


November 12, 1992 


1 


182 


History: CUP 125 years, my how you've grown 


November 12, 1992 


9 


183 


Hockey Team: yes there is a clarion team 


February 11, 1993 


22 


184 


Hodder, Kane: brings Jason to clarion 


October 29, 1992 


12 


185 


Homecoming court chosen 1992 


October 15, 1992 


13 


186 


Homosexual be allowed in the miltary 


February 25, 1993 


1 


187 


Hufssey, Billy: to teach acting 


March 25, 1993 


14 


188 


Instructional Support Fee Increase 


November5, 1992 


1 


189 
190 
191 
192 


Into the Streets: helping the community 


October 1,1992 


12 


Jack o latem slam fest set 


October 29, 1992 


21 


Janke, Bernice: riding the roller coaster of life 


March 25, 1993 


12 


King, Deborah: takes over women studies 


Novembers, 1992 


6 


193 


Kline, Brad & Brown Tim: athletes receive awards 


January 21, 1993 


20 


194 


Kordrick, William receive award 


April 29, 1993 


8 


195 


Kunkler. Heather gets a head start in broadcasting world 


April 29, 1993 


14 


196 


Kvak, Joe and Miller, Mike: sharing college experience 


March 4, 1993 


11 


197 
198 
199 
20C 
201 


Laser shows beaming down 


October 15, 1992 


17 


Latin American night at Gemmell 


March 25, 1993 


15 


Leadership conference: sparks at 


October 8, 1992 


8 


Letter Drive: senate sponsors 


October 1,1992 


6 


Library Science co sponsor conference 


November 5, 1992 


6 


202 


Lindsay, Mary: music department welcomes opera singer 


Novembers, 1992 


15 


202 


i Loans: are campaign issue 


October 8, 1992 


7 


204 


Love, Ruth: to speak tonight 


February 25, 1993 


9 



205 



206 



207 



208 



209 



210 



Madrigal dinner: a night of food, song, and fun 
MalgojggXdajjjhter to s peak 
M alcolm X: shabazz talks " 

McCabe, Gerald: 



211 



212 



213 



214 



215 



216 



217 



218 



219 



220 



221 



222 



223 



224 



225 



226 



227 



228 



McCluskey, Mamie: meet your queen ~ 

Meal Plan: trustees take action on some personal decisions 



Moore, Robert receive award 



Morton, Kwame: recieveshonors 



Movie Re view: S ex90 's style 



M ovie Review: consenting adul ts 

Movi e Review: Jack Nicholson movie blitz 



Movie Revi ew: Mochicans striving for an oscar 



Movie Re view: Punxsutawney makes it to the biglcree n 



Movie Review: The unforgiven 



Mulit Cultural magic of S. Asia 



Music Marketing Association invades New York 



Music: Army Band plays at CUP 



Music: education workshop 



Music: recital scheduled 



Musical: Pippin to open 



NAFSA: clarion receives $1,000 co-op grant 



National Broadcasting Society has a busy mo ntrT 
Noel Levitz Faculty Workshop 



229 



230 



231 



232 



233 



234 



235 



236 



237 



238 



239 



240 



241 



242 



Novak, Rebecca: save the day for cranberry stude nts 



Parsons, Margaret: recieves award 



Pell Grants: senate joins house in approving cut 



Pezek-Bums, Jodi: named t fill two coaching positions at Clarion 



Pitman, Sylvia: performes insp irational 



Pittburgh Ballet " Tip toe" the night away 



Pittman, Sylvia: soprano to p erform 



Printz, Robbie: hosts battle of the bands 
Professors teach less and research more 



PRWRCja rion hosts writing project 



Public safety: cars booted 



Public S afety: Martinazzi respons 



Pu blic Safety: n o exceptions on restriction of parking spaces 
Public safety: on the beat 



243 



244 



245 



246 



247 



248 



249 



250 



251 



252 



253 



254 



255 



R acquetba ll to urney held at Tippin and Gemmell 
Reaccreditation: CUP evaluated 



Rec ruiter to aid e nrollments 

Reed^Eric: m aking the most out of^ iarigrT 

Reinh ard, D: we jcomesb ack faculty 



Rein hard.D: a ddress 

Residence Life: inconsistencies irF 

Robinson Randall: visiting scholars series open 

Romm , jtonny : brings ESP t o CUP 

Rumbaugh.Curti s: mu sic ma^ofClarion 

SAAC: striving to unite athletes 

Sanderson, William: questions incinerator impact on Clarion community 

Sandford Gallery: new exhibit features a host of artists 

Sandford Gallery: photography exhibit opens 



B 



December 10, 1992 
February 11, 1993 



February 18, 1993 



September 24, 1992 



October 22, 1992 



April 1,1993 



April 29, 1993 



November 5, 1992 



April 22, 1993 



October 29, 1992 



January 28, 1993 



October 8, 1992 



February 25, 1993 



September 10, 1992 



April 29, 1993 



April 29, 1993 



April 22, 1993 



October 1,1992 



October 1, 1992 



February 18, 1993 



February 11, 1993 



November 19, 1992 



October 8, 1992 



ApriM, 1993 



September 17, 1992 



October 8, 1992 



September 10, 1992 



April 29, 1993 



March 4, 1993 



February 18, 1993 



January 21, 1993 



September 24, 1992 



September 10, 1992 



September 24, 1992 



Novembers, 1992 



February 11, 1993 



September 24, 1992 



February 18, 1993 



September 24, 1992 



December 10, 1992 



April 22, 1993 



September 10, 1992 



October 15. 1992 



January 28, 1993 



October 8. 1992 



November 12^1992 
February 25, 1993 



October 29, 1992 
September 24, 1992 
January 21, 1993 
March 25. 1993 



18 
11 



9 



8 



16~ 



10 



14 



11 



13 



11 



12 



J6 

16 



11 



12 



11 



8 



15 



15 



21 



20 



13 



14 



8 



20 



8 



11 



10 



14 



20 



10 
14 






Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 





A 


B 


C 


256 


Sanford Gallery: Odyssey: a family from slavery T< 


Dctober 1,1992 


14 


257 


Sanford Gallery: opens with faculty exhibition 


September 17, 1992 


15 


258 


Sanford Gallery: Senior exhibits on display 


December 10, 1992 


12 


259 


Sanford Gallery: Time Pieces on display 


February 11, 1993 


15 


260 


Saturday classes: a real nightmare 


November 12, 1992 


7 


261 


Scholarship tax appealed 


September 24, 1992 


4 


262 


Scholarship: Chen Aharrah Ried Awarded 


September 10, 1992 


12 


263 


Science Education: recieves grant 


September 10, 1992 


8 


264 


Seagull flies high and spells success 


November 19, 1992 


11 


265 


Seagull" russina play due to open 


November 12, 1992 


10 


266 


SEC owes postseason bonanza to PSAC 


December 10, 1992 


22 


267 


Self defense clinic held 


October 15, 1992 


10 


268 


Sexual Assault seminar on campus 


October 15, 1992 


8 


269 


Shropshire, John: to appear on WQED 


September 10, 1992 


15 


270 


Signs: new campus signs posted 


September 10, 1992 


9 


271 


Siler Complex: accreditation received 


March 4, 1993 


6 


272 


Siler Complex: changes 


November5, 1992 


8 


273 


Sister Soujah : controverial 


November 12, 1992 


5 


274 


Sister Souljah: to lecture at Gemmel Center 


October 29, 1992 


1 


275 


Social Equity office sponsors luncheon 


September 24, 1992 


3 


276 


Society /Advancement of Management places 


October 29, 1992 


6 


277 


Softball: eleven game plunge drowns eagles 


April 22, 1993 


20 


278 


Softball: Hayward, Jeannine win 5 in the sun 


March 25, 1993 


20 


279 


Softball: team goes for April 


April 29, 1993 


22 


280 


Softball: team splits with Westminster 


April 1,1993 


21 


281 


Spencer, Kevin & Cindy: entertain 


October 29, 1992 


12 


282 


Sports Hall moved to Chandler on April 30 


April 22, 1993 


21 


283 


SSHE aids charities 


February 25, 1993 


6 


284 


SSHE answers questions 


October 8, 1992 


5 


285 


SSHE asks stae for future appropriations 


October 29, 1992 


18 


286 


SSHE board elects officers 


September 10, 1992 


9 


287 


SSHE board: committee finds fault with 


December 10, 1992 


5 


288 


Stafford Loan: limits set 


February 25, 1993 


7 


289 


STAR: presents first sexual assault awamess week 


September 17, 1992 


4 


290 


STAR: program helps prevent crime 


October 1,1992 


8 


291 


Stiles, Bill: mind reader come to CUP 


October 15, 1992 


14 


292 


Student Aid rises 


November 19, 1992 


5 


293 


Student loans become campaign issue 


October 15, 1992 


6 


294 


Student Senate: installed amid election controversy 


December 10, 1992 


1 


295 


Student Senate: Jewart, Michael 


November 12, 1992 


5 


296 


Student Senate: officers elected 


December 10, 1992 


5 


297 


Student Senate: pictures 1993 


November 12, 1992 


12-14 


298 


Student Senate: shakeup three resign 


February 18, 1993 


5 


29$ 


Student Senate: Smith Gara 


January 21, 1993 


4 


30C 


Student Senate: success and goals 


April 29, 1993 


7 


301 


Student Senated: time capsule 


April 1,1993 


8 


302 


. Suk, Mykola: concert pianist to play at Gemmell 


September 10, 1992 


14 


303 


\ Swimming: enjoying fast start 


November 12, 1992 


22 


304 


\ Swimming: men looking to repeat as PSAC champs 


February 18, 1993 


17 


305 


i Swimming: men second PSAC 


February 25, 1993 


16 


306| Swimming: preparing for PSAC 


February 4, 1993 


17 



307 



308 



309 



310 



Swimm ing: results 



Swimming : successful a t the Rock 



Swimming: team prepared to continue recent dominance 



311 



312 



313 



314 



315 



316 



317 



318 



319 



320 



321 



322 



323 



324 



325 



Swimming: underrated success achieved 



Swimming: women capture 18th straight PSAC title 



Swimming: women finish second men sixth at nationals 



Swimming: women seeking 18th PSAC crown 



Swimming: women's team seeks 18th straight conference title 



Tamburitzqans to perform 



Taylor, M i chael: s tudent killed 



Tennis: team downs St Francis 



Tennis: team downs two PSAC rivals 



Tennis: team falls to Shippensburg 



Tennis: team places seventh at PSAC 



Tennis: winding down fall season 



B 



January 28, 1993 



January 21, 1993 



Novembers, 1992 



March 4, 1993 



February 25, 1993 



March 25, 1993 



February 18, 1993 



November 12, 1992 



January 21, 1993 



September 10, 1992 



September 24, 1992 



October 8, 1992 



October 1, 1992 



Tennis; team opens against mercyhurst 



Textbook prices rise 



Theater Review: You just may love the play I hate Hamlet 



326 



327 



328 



329 



330 



331 



332 



333 



334 



335 



336 



337 



338 



339 



340 



341 



Theater: the rainmaker takes the stage 



Tonini, Jay: PSAC honors 



Track Team: comes of age 



Track team: headed in the right direction 
Track Team: indoor results 



Track: results 



Trip: re-enactment 



Tuition : new proposal 



Tuition hike: SSHE approves another annual 



TV 5 heats up with faces of desire 



TV 5 now brings clarion the news 



UBA: the best bargin in town 



Venango Campus: mission statement should be in place for MSA review 



Vento, Frank: looks for ancient life 

Visual Arts to be a part of the Gemmell Complex" 



Volleyball: earn talis to Slippery Rock 



342 



343 



344 



345 



346 



347 



348 



349 



350 



351 



352 



353 



354 



355 



Volleyball: Spikers enjoy two season ending wins 



Volleyball: team down Lock Haven 



VojIeyba H: team downs Indiana 
Volleyball: team downs three non conference opponets 
Volleyball: team hanging with PSAC elite 
Voll eyball: team hosts tour ney 



Volleyball: team is setting their sigts on PSAC a ccolades 



Volleyball: team rolling along 

Volleyball: team wins tourney downs Rock 

Votim^oJIege^g^o^ 



Wa tkins, Ralph: re signs 



Watkin s, Ralph: returns to CU 



WCCB - green radio 



Weingrad, Jeff: live from Clarion ifs Saturday nigjhtjive 
Wellness Fair: relax 



356 



357 



Wome ns confe rence: 10th annual 

Womens conference: ceiebratJona" smashing success 



October 22, 1992 



October 15, 1992 



September 17, 1992 



October 1, 1992 



April 22, 1993 



October 15, 1992 



October 22, 1992 



April 29, 1993 



April 22, 1993 



February 11, 1993 



March 4, 1993 



February 25, 1993 



October 29, 1992 



September 10, 1992 



September 24, 1992 



February 11, 1993 



February 4, 1993 



April 1, 1993 



November 19, 1992 



January 28, 1993 



October 29, 1992 



November 12, 1992 



October 8, 1992 



October 22, 1992 



Novembers, 1992 



October 1, 1992 



October 15, 1992 



September 10, 1992 



September 17, 1992 



September 24, 1992 



October 22, 1992 



February 4, 1993 
April 29, 1993 



October 29, 1992 



September 10, 1992 



April 1, 1993 



March 25, 1993 



April 1,1993 



22 

20 



16 



20 



16 



24 



17 



14 



21 
25 



21 



16 



25 
19 



10 



14 



16 



22 



20 



24 



20 



14 



8 



11 



11 



8 



21 



21 



24 



17 



17 



20 



2A_ 
20 



19 



22 



15 



20 



11 



11 



J 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1992/93 





A 


B 


C 


358 
359 


Womens conference: university host 10th annual 


February 25, 1993 


7 


Women's Studies : premier newsletter 


February 18, 1993 


3 


360 
361 


Wrestling: clarion finishes fourth at PSAC 


February 4, 1993 


15 


Wrestling: coaches clinic set 


September 24, 1992 


22 


362 


Wrestling: gain experience at nationals 


March 25, 1993 


20 


363 


Wrestling: grapplers impressive at Rock 


December 10, 1992 


21 


364 


Wrestling: open against Arizona State 


November 19, 1992 


19 


365 


Wrestling: panthers keep golden eagles below .500 mark 


February 18, 1993 


18 


366 


Wrestling: PSAC title defended 


January 28, 1993 


20 


367 


Wrestling: recuiting class announced 


September 10, 1992 


21 


368 


Wrestling: to take part in Blue/Gold match 


November5, 1992 


18 


369 


Wrestling: to travel for EWL 


March 4, 1993 


17 


370 
371 


Wrestling: top ranked Nittany lions visit Tippin 


February 25, 1993 


15 


Wrestling; PSAC strikes gold in Barcelona 


September 17, 1992 


22 


372 


Wrestling; Sintobin plays key role 


February 11, 1993 


20 


373 


Yanks are coming to Tippin 


March 4, 1993 


9 



i 



Welcome Back Issue 






Volume 74, Issue 1 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 10, 1992 




News Clips.,. 



-National- 



metropolis, III. (AP) This southern Illinois city bills itself 
as Superman's hometown, and folks aren't pleased with DC 
Comics for announcing the cartoon hero's imminent death. 

ss No matter what they do with him, there is, was or will be a 
character named Superman from Metropolis," said Mike Kimmel, 
a local police officer. 

The comic book company said last week that the Man of Steel 
will meet his end, in an edition due out Nov. 18, in an epic battle 
with an escaped lunatic named Doomsday. Rumors abounded that 
Superman would somehow be resurrected. 

- Stat IS 



NORRISTOWN, PA (AP) President Bush says it's time for a 
revolution in American education. And, he says he's the only 
presidential candidate who will tell the nation what it needs to hear, 
riot just what it wants to hear. 

Bush used a speech to high school students in Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, Wednesday to make another pitch for his GI bill for 
children. 

The president says his proposal would give $1,000 scholarships 
to low and middle income kids to be used at the schools of their 
parents' choice. Be it public or private. 

The president also advocated setting higher standards and getting 
government off teachers' backs. 

The president claims democrat Bill Clinton is opposed to change 
and just wants to spend more money on the same old educational 
system. 



In This Issue... 



CAMPUS 

NEWS 



- STUDENT KILLED 
PG.5 

- CLINTON COMES TO AREA 
PG.6 






FEATURES -weird news 

P(j. 14 

SPORTS " G0LDEN EAGLES OPEN 

SEASON 



•Clarion's Weather Outlook- 



TODAY> SUNNY, HIGH OF 80 
FRIDAY> PARTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 85 
SATURDAY> POSSIBLE RAIN, HIGH 75 
SUNDAY> PARTLY CLOUDY, HIGH 83 
MONDAY> CLOUDS AND SUN , HIGH 85 
TUESDAY> CLEAR AND SUNNY , HIGH 78 
WEDNESDAY> RAIN, HIGH 75 



SSHE approves another 
annual tuition hike 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 



The Board of Governors of the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) approved a 25 percent 
tuition increase for out-of-state 
students at their July quarterly 
meeting. This is- an annual 
increase of $1,230 for the 9,000 
out-of-state residents. In-state 
students only received a 3.8 
percent increase or $100, effective 
in the spring semester. 
The tuition hikes were, in part, a 



increase. 

"I would have liked to have seen 
a $200 to $250 increase," said 
Clarion student and board member, 
Monica Douglas. Douglas felt that 
rather than cut library hours and 
resources, overcrowd classrooms 
or cut classes altogether, a greater 
tuition increase would be preferred. 

"The board didn't want to do it to 
the students again, since they did it 
last year," said Douglas. She felt 
that graduating on time due to open 
classes would be better than 
staying an extra semester because 



students," said student board 
member Patrick J. Geho, a 
Slippery Rock University senior. 
"It's too much." 

Even the president of the 
Association of Pennsylvania State 
College and University Faculties 
(APSCUF), Dr. James W. White, 
felt the decision was "insensitive" 
to the out-of-state students. 

Others, however, were pleased 
with the decisions made and 
supported the move, which White 
described as "unsound public 
policy." 




Out-of-state students are affected 
percent this year. 

response to the $13 million, or 3.5 
percent decrease in funding in the 
state budget signed by Gov. Robert 
P. Casey in June. 

The in-state tuition increase 
passed with a 13-4 vote with all 
three student members and one 
board member casting the 
dissenting votes. The students felt 
the increase was not high enough 
and pushed for at least a $150 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
the most by the new tuition increase. Their tuition was increased 25 



of a lack of funds. 

"You want to graduate with an 
education you feel satisfied with," 
said Douglas, "and if you can't get 
that then what is the point of it 
all?" 

Other board members expressed 
dissatisfaction over the out-of-state 
tuition increase. 

"Twelve-hundred dollars is half a 
summer's employment for many 



"I am pleased that the Board has 
approved a tuition level which 
maintains the affordability of 
attending the state-owned 
universities," Board Chairman F. 
Eugene Dixon, Jr. said. "This 
modest increase recognizes not 
only the economic condition of the 
Commonwealth, but the economic 

(Cont. on Pg.4) 



Pa^e ij^Tht .Clarion Ca|l - 9-1Q-92 

PINION 



The 'cia'rion Call - 9-'i6-92 -'VaRe 3' 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Debbie Huffman 

Managing Editor 

Alan Vaughn 

News Editor 

Dan Parrish 

Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 
Sports Editor 
A.J. Meeker 
Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

Tara Sheesley 

Ad Design 

Amy Conner 

Advertising Manager 

Ted Howard 

Business Manager 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from 'any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch. ..$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$ 12.00 

Academic Year...$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 




w 




The way I see it 



Editor-in-chief 



SALUTATIONS 



Welcome! 

Once again, we participate in 
the rites of Autumn — a unique 
academic experience. 

For the freshmen (now there's a 
term that bears examination) it's 
exhilaration and fear, all in the 
same sensation — such great 
expectations replete with the 
vexing temptations. 

For the returning sophomores, 
juniors and seniors, it's the 
sharing of summer's experiences 
and the pleasures of familiar 
faces and places. 

For the faculty and staff it's 
new opportunities and a 
bittersweet strain of ancient 
music. But we keep coming 
back; drawn away from the 
farthest realms to serve a 
common purpose. Some begin 
their new year with the armor of 
cynicism. Some have nurtured 
and renewed their idealism; 



Contributions 

to the weekly 

Hide Park 

column can 

be dropped off 

at the Clarion 

Call office in 

270 Gemmell 

Center during 

regular 

business 

hours. 



A. H. Barlow 

however, 1 fear, the latter are 
becoming an endangered 
species, but not as sweet as a 
baby-white harp seal or as darkly 
mysterious as the spotted owl. 

In any event, we have all come 
from afar trailing private 
property. Now we gather for the 
collective purpose of Education. 
Sometimes that's the last little 
creature flitting from our travel 
chest. 

A. H. Barlow is a member of 

the Communication department 

and self-appointed 

groundskeeper of Hide Park 



Greetings fellow students and 
welcome back to another year in 
Clarion. Freshmen take note: 
the weather here is as 
unpredictable as the next LCB 
raid; so, take an umbrella when 
the sun shines and snow boots 
when it calls for rain. 

Sorry, I digress. There are a 
lot of new changes happening 
this year. We have a brand new, 
fully accessable student center. 
A number of faculty members 
have retired and new faces are 
now among the masses. And the 
Clarion Call staff is virtually 
new and ready to take on the 
rigours of day-to-day life at the 
Call. 

For those of you who haven't 
heard and may have cause for 
rejoicing, Harry Hartman, former 
editor of the Call, has graduated 
and moved to some remote town 
in. the middle of the state. 

For those of you who admired 
Harry for his wit and sarcasm 
and often times good work, he 
will be greatly missed but 
certainly not forgotten. 

But the past is done and over 
with, and I am now the editor-in- 
chief of a promising newspaper. 

The staff and I will be 
implementing a few changes 
within the course of the next 
year. If your favorite weekly, 



must read first, can't do without 
column, is not where it should 
be, don't panic. Look a little 
harder and you will probably 
find it. 

One of the bigger changes will 
be this particular column. I will 
not be writing it every single 
week. Occasionally, another 
Call editor will take over and 
write what's on their mind. 
Putting the paper out each week 
is a team effort. Because of that, 
I feel the editorial staff should 
have the opportunity to express 
what's on their minds as well. I 
like to deviate from the norm. 

If this year is anything like 
those in the past, I am sure you 
will be faithful in pointing out 
our numerous grammatical errors 
and other faux pas that we are 
sure to make. Please keep in 
mind, however, that we are a 
new staff and we are bound to 
make mistakes our first couple 
times out. Also, remember that 
we are students, just like many 
of you, who have more than one 
job in order to pay for college. 
And many of us are carrying a 
full course load of 18 credits. 
Therefore, if some week we tend 
to spell potato, "potatoe," it's 
because we've been up most of 
the night studying for an exam 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



wiCPf^t u>im.tiotfa>or*iui/te ur v ■— 





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Page 4 - : The Clarion Gall - 9-10-92 



luition increase. . . 



(Cont. from pg. 1) 



realities of the citizens of 
Pennsylvania and their ability 
to obtain a college 
education." 

State System Chancellor 
James H. McCormick also 
agreed with the move saying 
that, "By adopting this 
minimal tuition increase, the 
Board has reaffirmed the 
System's commitment to 
providing an economical 



education." 

Chancellor McCormick, 
however, expressed concern 
over the future if this lack of 
support from the state and the 
poor economic climate 
continue. He is fearful that 
the quality of education may 
suffer as a result. 

According to John 
Shropshire, Dean of 
Enrollment Management and 



Academic Records, out of 
state enrollment at Clarion 
University does not seem to 
be affected this year due to 
the tuition increase. "There 
is not a big impact right now. 
Over a period of years we 
will see a decrease in out of 
state students." Shropshire 
feels that since tuition has 
gone up at such a fast rate 
over the last few years, 



we are almost certain we will 
fail. Or perhaps it will be a 
paper that we waited till the last 
minute to write. 

I'm not making excuses for 
errors because there is certainly 
no excuse for them. I am, 
however, trying to impress upon 
you that we are students with 



The Way. . . 

(Cont. from pg. 2) 

many student worries and 
problems, goals and homework 
deadlines. We are after all, only 
students struggling in a 
professional world. 

As Shakespeare said, "To ere is 
human; to forgive, divine." 

On that note, may I wish you 
luck this year especially you 



freshmen who are testing the 
waters. Don't worry, you will 
fall in occasionally-we all do. I 
hope this year is a good one--for 
all of us. 

So, this space this week was 
the, "Hi! My name is Michelle," 
space. Next week we get to the 
good stuff. Until then. . . 



Concord fighting for new application 



oy ueooie tiujjman 
Managing Editor 



Concord is still fighting to put 
a hazardous waste treatment and 
disposal complex in Clarion 
County. 

This summer, the DER 
(Department of Environmental 
Resources) denied Concord's 
Phase I application for a site in 
MillCreek Township. 

DER would deny the 

application if water supply, 

wetlands, exceptional value 

waters, and/or oil and gas areas 

« were present. 

On August 23, the DER found 
wetlands present on the site. 



Concord is appealing the DER's 
decision to deny Phase I siting. 
A meeting held by the DER's 
Environmental Hearing board 
will be held in the future to hear 
Concords appeal. 

Even if the DER refuses the 
appeal, Concord is not done. 
They can still submit a new 
application. 

Concord's current plan 
involves an operation that would 
accept 135,000 tons of hazardous 
waste a year, plus a rotary kiln 
incinerator would be used to 
burn up to 60,000 tons of waste a 
year. 

Pennsylvania's hazardous 



waste production is expected to 
decline by 35,000 tons over the 
next five years, says the DER 
Waste reduction by efforts to 
recycle will lead to the decline. 
But the state still needs 
commercial facilities to discard 
the waste. Currently, 

Pennsylvania has no such 
facilities. 

In 1989, industries reduced 
hazardous waste production by 
almost 30,000 tons. About 
172,000 tons of waste material 
was recycled in that year. 
Despite improvements, 42,000 
more tons of waste is supposed 
to be produced by 1997. 



The Clarion Call 
staff would like to 

thank the 

advertisers who 

support this 

paper. Your 

support helps 

provide the 

students of 

Clarion University 

with an open 

forum for the free 

expression of facts 

and opinion. 



STUDENT 
DAYS 



■MMM)| 




$10 Haircuts 
on Tuesdays 







535 Main Street 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Mon.-Thurs. 9-9 
Fri. 9-8 
Sat. 9-4 

814-226-5323 






Clarion will eventually lose 
its edge over other state 
schools whose tuition is 
higher for in state residents 
than if they went out of state 
in search of education. 

"People arc looking at the 
board as the bad guys and 
actually we have to look at it 
in terms of who are the bad 
guys and it's the state 
legislature," said Douglas. 



"They're not giving us the 
money so the board has to 
make the decision of what we 
have." 

Despite the estimated $17.2 
million to be generated by the 
increases, the system still 
faces a $26 million budget 
shortfall because of inflation, 
employees' health coverage, 
utility costs and contractual 
salary increases. 




-■----— 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Students sit outside the new Gemmel complex and 
enjoy the last days of summer. 



Count your garden By the f Cowers, 

9\fever By the leaves that fait; 
Count your days By golden hours, 

(Don't retnemBer clouds at all. 
Count your nights By the stars, not shadows; 

Count your life By smiles, not tears, 
Count the rainbows, not the raindrops, 

Count your life By friends not years. 

In memory ofMikg Taylor 

your friends at Alpha Sigma Tau 
love and miss you dearly. 



t 



*^ 



% 



Clarion Call - 9-10-92 - Page i 

New 




C.U.P. student killed 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



A Clarion University student 
was shot and killed and his 
girlfriend wounded early 
Saturday morning by the 
woman's ex- boyfriend. 

Detectives said Michael 
Taylor, 21, of the North Side and 
Patricia Kroll, 22, were on a park 
bench in Riverview Park near the 
Allegheny County Observatory 
shortly before three a.m. when 
they were shot by George Vargo, 
27, of Shadeland Avenue, North 

Side. 

The Allegheny County 
Coroner's office said Taylor died 
at the scene of single gunshot 
wound to the head. 

Kroll, also of the North Side, 
was shot twice in the chest and 
taken to Allegheny General 
Hospital. She was listed in 
serious condition by hospital 
personnel, Tuesday night. 
Police Detective Jim Diskin 



said Vargo was arrested at his 
mother's home and charged with 
the shooting. 

According to Diskin, Vargo 
and Kroll had broken up about 
four weeks prior to the incident. 

Taylor and Kroll, who is the 



Wolfe said that Ms. Kroll 
identified Vargo as the assailant. 

Three police officers were 
treated at the hospital after their 
cars crashed while chasing 

Vargo. 

Taylor had been active on 



"[He was a] great man, and well 
liked by all who knew him. His loss 
will be deeply regretted and felt. " 
--TKE President Gary Fleegal 



daughter of a city police officer, 
had worked together as 
lifeguards at a swimming pool in 
Riverview Park, where they were 

shot. 

Police Sargeant Fred Wolfe 
said Vargo was charged with 
criminal homicide, and also 
arraigned on charges of 
aggravated assault and a 
weapons violation. 



campus, holding the position of 
Chaplain in the Tau Kappa 
Epsilon Fraternity. 

Cards sent to the fraternity 
should be mailed to: Tau Kappa 
Epsilon Fraternity house, 
Clarion, PA 16214. 

Information provided by the 
Pittsburgh Post Gazette and the 
Associated Press. 









Photo courtesy of TKt 
Michaei Taylor, a C.U.P. student, was murdered over the 
weekend in Pittsburgh. A suspect has been charged. 



Reinhard welcomes back faculty 




by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Clarion president Diane L. Reinhard welcomes back 
campus faculty during her address In Hart Chapel. ^ 



"We can turn adversity to 
advantage," said Clarion 
University President, Diane L. 
Reinhard, in a welcome back 
address to university faculty in 
Hart Chapel on September 1 . 

According to the president, 
Clarion has lost 3.5% in 
appropriation, amounting to a 
loss of about one million dollars 
from Clarion's budget. In 
addition, costs have risen 
approximately 8%. 

By the 1993-1994 academic 
year, the university will need 
about $3 million to cover salary 
increases already included in 
contracts. 
As a result of this, lay-offs may 
be possible in the next academic 
year. Appropriations are not 
enough to cover the raise in 
salaries. 

According to Dr. Reinhard, 
Clarion has already cut $2.6 
million in personnel costs, and 
she claims that operational 
expenses cannot be cut any 



more. 

Although tuition has not 
increased for in-state students 
this semester, a rise is expected 
for the spring term. Also, 
according to Reinhard, student 
members of the board of 
governors of the State System of 
Higher Education voted against a 
proposed increase in tuition 
because the hike was not large 
enough. 

Dr. Reinhard mentioned that 
there is a chance that the 
legislature may restore some 
money this fall, but she was not 
optomistic. 

In response to increased 
pressure to reduce operating 
costs, she said the university has 
commissioned a study on the 
efficiency in order to try to cut 
expenses more. 

Clarion will become more 
reliant on outside grants to 
fullfill its monetary needs. To 
help accomplish this goal, Dr. 
Reinhard said she will take a 
more active role in the 
fundraising process of the 
university. 

Reinhajd^asked^tjw.facully to 



address four main issues this 
year, consisting of resource 
management, enrollment 
management, ethnic diversity, 
and reclamation of the public 

trust. 

As part of the enrollment 
management objeclibe, she cited 
the statistic that freshman and 
transfer enrollment is up nine 
percent, with transfer students 
increasing their numbers by 60 
percent. 

The university will also 
increase its attempts to promote 
ethnic diversity in its students. 
She called for a five year 
affirmative action plan, entitled, 
"Reality '92- Vision "97." 

Dr. Reinhard said that, 
although Clarion has one of the 
smallest number of minority 
students out of the state schools, 
it is second in retention rate of 
minority students. 

Provost and Vice President of 
academic affairs John Kuhn and 
Dr. Robert Batough, president of 
Clarion University Association 
of State College and University 
Faculties (APSCUF), also spoke 
at the event . . 



Page 6 -.The .Clarion Call - 9-10-92 



^" 



The Clarion Call - 9-10-92- Page 7 



Clinton stops at local fair 



by Ray Henderson 
Photo Editor 



Arkansas Governor Bill 
Clinton and Senator Al Gore 
made a short campaign stop at 
the Lawrence County Fair on 
Saturday August 22 as part of 
the democratic presidential 
nominee's "On the Road to 
Change America" bus tour. 

Introductory remarks were 
offered by democratic U.S. 
Senate candidate Lynn Yeakel. 

Yeakel condemned the 
Republican Party for using what 
she called the "politics of 
division," and said that the 
democratic convention in New 
York had ended with feelings of 
"unity, purpose, and a spirit of 
hope. M 

Other speakers included 
congressional candidate Ron 
Klink, formerly of KDKA-TV in 



Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania 
Attorney General candidate Joe 
Cohn. 

Clinton's running mate, 
Senator Al Gore of Tennesse 
also condemned Republicans for 
"not telling the whole story." 

"Under Bill Clinton, Arkansas 
has produced new jobs at ten 
times the national average, and 
the people of Arkansas have the 
second lightest tax burden of all 
fifty states," Gore said. 

"You didn't hear that at the 
Republican convention." 

Clinton himself concentrated 
his remarks mostly on the issues 
of health care, employment, and 
education. 

"George Bush talks about the 
importance of family values," 
said Clinton, "but then he vetoed 
the Medical and Family Leave 
Bill." 

This bill would have insured 



job security lor workers on 
maternity or paternity leaves. 

Clinton also suggested forming 
a program for college-bound 
students that is similar to the G.I. 
Bill. 

Using money saved from cuts 
in the defense spending, any 
student could borrow money 
from the government in order to 
attend college. 

This money could be paid back 
after the student has graduated, 
entered the work force, or by 
working for a period of time as a 
teacher, health care worker, or 
other public servant. 

"Under this plan," said 
Clinton, "we could educate a 
generation and create new jobs at 
the same time." 

He finished by saying, "We've 
got to look after our children. 
We should see the future opening 
up for them instead of closing 
down on them." 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Bill Clinton and Al Gore make a stop at the Lawrence 
County Fair as part of their U.S. bus tour. 



Don't miss your chance to vote 



by Carrie Lengauer 
News Writer 



With the General Election and 
the presidential election race, 
less than two months away, time 
is running out for anyone who 
isn't registered to vote. 

If you aren't registered by 
October 5, you miss your chance 
to make your voice heard in a 
special elction held only once 



every four years on Election 
Day, November 3. 

In order to vote in the state of 
Pennsylvania, a person must first 
register. 

Anyone can register who has 
been a U.S. citizen for at least 
30 days preceding the election. 

You also must be at least 18 
years of age on the day after the 
election, and you must have 
lived in the election district for at 



least 30 days preceding the 
election. 

Registering to vote can be 
done in person at any County 
Courthouse or through a mail-in 
form available at County 
Courthouses, many post offices, 
and public libraries. 

To register, a person simply 
has to complete the application 
and drop it in the mail. 

Students who are registered to 



Miss America contestant set apart 



courtesy of 

the Associated Press 



Any little edge in the Miss 
America Pageant helps, so 
contestants try to set themselves 
apart with an intriguing fact or 
two. Some of the details are 
difficult-if not impossible- to 
verify. 

Take, for example, Miss 
Mississippi, who claimed in her 
one-page biography to be "a 
descendent of Julius Caesar and 
a second cousin to Kenny 
Rogers." 

The one-page biographies are 
supposed to include interesting 
tidbits, goals, and dreams that 
the judges of the Sept. 19 
pageant can use when 
interviewing contestants. 

Most aren't as juicy as the one 
submitted by Kandace Williams, 



Miss Mississippi. 

Williams, 23, did not return 
answering machine messages left 
in Tulepo, Miss. Miss America 
officials said the women cannot 
be interviewed until they arrive 



in Atlantic City Monday and 
would not comment on her 
biography. 

A spokeswomen for Kenny 
Rodgers said her name doesn't 
ring a bell 



vote in their home districts have 
the opportunity to vote through 
an absentee ballot. 

They can obtain an absentee 
ballot through their County 
Board of Elections or at the 
Clarion Court House. 

The last day to apply for an 
absentee ballot is October 27, 
and it must be received by the 
voter's home County Board of 
Elections by October 30. 

The Student Senate will be 
making the whole registration 
process easier for Clarion 
students. 

From September 14-25, Student 
Senate's Legislative Affairs 
department will hold voter 
registration drives through the 
campus residence halls and also 
through campus organizations, 



Greek Life, and athletics. 

On September 28, students will 
be able to register to vote at the 
rotunda of the Gemmcl 
Complex, Chandler Dining Hall, 
and Carlson Library. 

In an effort to determine the 
number of students already 
registered, Legislative Affairs 
will conduct a phone-a-thon to 
students. 

They will be recording the 
county and district in which each 
student is registered. 

To make this process easier, 
Legislative Affairs would like 
registered voters to contact their 
office and supply the 
information they need. 

Remember, Super Tuesday is 
on November 3. 



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Page 8 - The Clarion Call - $-10-92 



Clarion receives grant 



by Mike Buser 
News Writer 



Clarion University has 
received a $7000 grant from the 
Academy for the Profession of 
Teaching to continue a 
collaborative project, "A Phase 
II Collaborative Curriculum 
Study Project on Science 
Education for Elementary 
Education Pre-Service Majors." 

The project is directed by Dr. 
Kathleen Smith, professor of 
education, and Dr. George 
Wollaston, professor of 
chemistry. Providing 

administration on the project are 
Dr. Charles Duke, Dr. James 
Scanton, and Dr. David Arnold. 

The goal of the project is to 
explore curriculum development 
between the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the College of 
Education and Human Services. 

Discussions are intended to 
lead toward revisions in 
curriculum content, sequence, 
and science requirements, to 
better prepare the elementary 
education student in science. 

Phase II includes: the 
development/testing of suitable 
experimental activities; review 



of innovative curriculum now in 
use at other colleges/ 
universities; revision of the 
course syllabi for existing 
courses at Clarion University; 
development/testing of 

demonstrations to illustrate 
concepts; and to better prepare 
the elementary teacher in the 
sciences. 

In Phase I, dialogue was 
initiated between the two 
colleges, a science advisory 



Phase II led to better 
understanding of mutual 
concerns. For example, some 
discussion was held as to 
whether the conceptual depth 
and breadth of knowledge in 
certain science courses was 
scaring some students away from 
wanting to teach science in the 
classroom. "We hope by the 
spring semester to have two pilot 
sections of courses in place," 
said Smith. She said that the 



" We want to work together 
to establish a program... " 



committee was formed, and a 
portfolio of relevant science 
education reform literature was 
gathered. "This summer we 
worked on chemistry and 
physics," said Wollaston. "We 
want to work together to 
establish a program that 
strengthens both areas." 

Open discussions by the 
committee during Phase I and 



main goal is to make students 
understand that what they learn 
in science class can be applied to 
the classroom. 

Both Wollaston and Smith feel 
that this project will provide the 
bond to develop a collaborative 
effort between the two colleges 
and the students who are 
preparing to become elementary 
school teachers. 



CATHOLIC 

CAMPUS MINISTRY 



WORSHIP 

Weekend Masses at I.C. Church: 

Saturday - 5:30 p.m. 

Sunday - 730, 9:00 and 11:30 a.m. 

The 1:00 p.m. mass has been discontinued. 

NEWMAN ASSOCIATION 

meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. 

in the Gemmell Student Center. 

Join this group weekly to share 

faith, fellowship and fun. 

Fr. Monty's on-campus office hours at the 

United Campus Ministry Office 

266 Gemmell -2711 

Tuesday - 1 .00-4:00 p.m. and 730-9:00 p.m. 

Other times by appointment. 

Call 226-6869 anytime! 

Dates to Remember 



<^2$vi* rES 



CATECHUMANATE ON CAMPUS 

Join other students curious about the 

Catholic faith and those involved in the Rite 

of Christian Initiation of Adults (R.C.I.A.) 

for a weekly period of faith 

sharing and instruction. 

Call for details. 

"PEOPLE ARE PEOPLE" 

R.A.'s - Sororities - Fraternities - Campus 

Organizations - Looking for a program to 

satisfy the educational requirements of the 

University or your national? 

Then contact us about 

"People Are People". 

This video/discussion presentation 

focuses on students attitudes in six key 

areas of campus life: 

ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE - RACISM • SEXISM - 

ACQUAINTANCE RAPE HOMOPHOBIA THE PHYSICALLY 

CHALLENGED 



9-12 



9-13 



9-19 



Newman Car Wash at I.C. Church 
Parking Lot 10-1 p.m. 
Cook Forest Canoe Trip 
leaving Gemmell at 1:30 p.m. 
Family Day - Join us after the fotball 
game for 5:30 mas at I.C. 



9-20 



10-4 



Activities Day - visit the Newman 
Association and United Campus 
Ministry tables and sign up for... 
Take a Hike...For Habitat 

Walkathon to benefit habitat for 
humanity 



ALUMNI NEWS 



C.U.P. grad gets perfect score 



by Jenny Ebersole 
News Writer 



After Clarion University 
graduated a record 749 
students in May, these talented 
students moved on to either 
successful jobs or advanced 
education. Some of these 
graduates offered insight as to 
their experiences at Clarion, 
their lives, and their futures. 

Linda Cherry, the first 
Clarion student in 14 years to 
receive a degree in philosophy 
from the College of Arts and 
Sciences, plans to take a year 
off before attending either 
Princeton or Yale to attain a 
Ph.d. in Philosophy. 
Eventually, she hopes to attain 
a teaching license. 

Cherry attained a perfect 
score of 800 on the analytical 
portion of the Graduate Record 
Exam (GRE), the college 
equivalent of the SAT 
examination. The GRE 
contains three sections- 
analytical, mathematics and 
verbal. 

The perfect analytical score 
places her in the 97th 
percentile of all graduating 
college students in the country. 
"I came to Clarion 
University as a 

Communication Major," said 
Cherry. 

"The communication 
department was why I chose to 
come to Clarion. But, I took 
three of the four classes 
offered in philosophy and 
loved it." 

Cherry said, "I considered 
Philosophy as a major, but 
decided I needed a field that 
was more stable and went into 
Chemical Engineering for a 
year. I decided I hated science 
and came back to my first 
love, philosophy. I like 
philosophy because I like to 



look at the way people think. 
There are infinite sides to 
everything. I also found out 
what was going on in my own 
head." 

Cherry eventually hopes to 
help students in the classroom 
learn to think using analytical 
and critical methods. 

"I would like to teach at a 
state related university because 
of the personal attention they 
give to students," she said, "I 
love people. People are what 
you get out of life . The more 
people I get to meet, the better 
off I am." 

Michael Herbert returned to 
college after a 15 year leave 
and received a degree in 
accounting from the College of 
Business Administration. 

He entered accounting due to 
a personal interest in the field, 
friends and relatives who were 
CPA's and because he didn't 
have to repeat any courses. 

"In the 1970s, I completed 
two years at a community 
college and all of my credits 
transferred to Clarion. I 
intended to go through as 
quickly as I could," Herbert 
said. 

"Including two summer 
sessions, I earned 77 credits in 
two years and graduated with a 
4.0Q.P.A* 

Now relocated to Texas, 
Herbert accepted an 
assistantship to attend graduate 
school at the University of 
Baylor. 

"I found a lot of opportunity 
was available to students. I 
was able to get an internship 
with the Keystone School 
District. I also learned that the 
College of Business was 
excellent," said Herbert. 

"Clarion provided an 
excellent education, but I feel I 
have only scratched the 
surface. There is still so much 
more to learn." 



Attention: 

All students in the College of Education and 

Human Services. 

If you expect to complete an 

externship/intemship or student teach in 

spring 1 993, registration is Wed. Sept. 1 6 in 

127 Stevens, from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. 



* * 



> 






i 



CUP hosts writing project 



The Clarion Call - 9-10-92- Page 9 



by LisaRecker 
News Writer 



Clarion University was the 
recent host of the Penn Rivers 
Writing Project (PRWP), which 
trains teachers at all grade levels 
and in all subject areas, ways to 
strengthen the teaching of 
writing in schools. 

The PRWP is one of eight sites 
in Pennsylvania which have been 
approved by the National 
Writing Project headquartered at 
the University of California at 
Berkeley. 

The 10 participants, who were 
nominated by their school 
districts, participated in an 



intensive five weeks of training 
where they focused on ways to 
incorporate the writing process 
into their teaching. The teachers 
also worked with national 
consultants, made presentations, 
and developed writing 
applications and inservice 
approaches for use in their 
schools. 

In addition, the participants are 
required to conduct inservice in 
their school districts upon their 
return and serve as resources and 
catalysts for improving writing 
instruction. 

Local schools that participated 
in the program included: 



Ernlenton Elementary School, 
Redbank Valley High School, 
North Clarion Elementary 
School, Keystone Elementary 
School, West Forest High 
School, and DuBois Area Junior, 
Senior, and Central Christian 
High Schools. 

The PRWP will be offering 
inservice Saturday seminars 
throughout the year for any 
interested teachers. This 
association is headquartered at 
Clarion University and co- 
directed by Dr. Charles Duke, 
dean of the College of Education 
and Human Services, and Dr. 
Lois Green, professor of English. 



New campus signs posted 



by Jenny Ebersole 
News Writer 



The visual identity program, 
implemented in May, created 42 
signs across campus. The signs 
include directional signs, 
selected building signs, three 
campus map signs, and the 
Gemmell Park Clarion 
University directional sign. 

These informative additions 
were funded by a $45,000 grant 
approved by the Clarion 
University Foundation. 



The program committee, 
organized in October 1991, 
decided that the signs should 
feature the Clarion University 
wordmark and the school colors 
of blue and gold. The design 
was then to be placed on an 
ivory background. 

The signs guide both vehicular 
and pedestrian traffic on campus, 
identify buildings which are not 
adequately rnarked, and draw 
attention to areas of vital interest 
to students and the admissions 
process outside of classrooms. 

If funding permits, additional 



signs will be added in areas of 
high priority. 

Large campus maps will be 
located at the entrance to the 
Gemmell Student Complex, the 
Carlson Library, and the Public 
Safety building. 

The committee responsible for 
this improvement includes Ron 
Wilshire, director of university 
relations, Mary Bragg, director 
of publications, Clare Heidler, 
director of facilities 
management, and Nancy Lewis, 
graphic artist. 



Clarion grads do well in job search 



by Sean Boileau 
News Writer 



A new survey shows that 
Clarion University graduates are 
doing well in their search for 
employment. 

According to Clarion 
University's Career Services 
center, 91% of the respondents 
from the class of '91 are either 
working in their field, or 
continuing with their education. 
Of those surveyed at the 
Venango Campus at Oil City, 
95% qualify for the same status, 



as well as 94% of the graduate 
students from the class of '91. 

Of the 857 students who 
answered the survey, 64% are 
employed in full or part-time 
jobs in their chosen fields. 

Even more impressive is the 
fact that only 9% were still 
seeking employment. 

Connie Laughlin, director of 
Career Services, stated that the 
statistics "do reflect the state of 
the economy and the job 
market". Laughlin also 
encouraged the various 
departments with access to the 
survey results to share them with 



their students. 

"It shows the entry level and 
advanced positions achieved by 
our graduates, the employers 
hiring them, and the average 
salaries they are receiving", said 
Laughlin. 

She also stressed the 
importance of using their college 
experience to their advantage. 

"Doing well academically, 
participating in campus 
activities, and taking on 
leadership roles is important. 
Communication skills, both 
written and oral, are vital". 



SSHE board elects officers 



coutesy estate System of 
Higher El *ation 



The Board of Governors for 
the State System of Higher 
Education unanimously re- 
elected the chair and vice chairs 
for the 1992-93 academic year 
during the board's July quarterly 
meeting. 

Board Chairman F. Eugene 



Dixon,jr.,Lafayette, was re- 
elected to his tenth consecutive 
term. A member of the board 
since 1983, Mr. Dixon maintains 
membership on numerous 
boards, serving a s president of 
the Fairmount Park Commission, 
chairman of the board of trustees 
of Widener University, and 
honorary chairman of the Maine 
Coast Hospital. He is also the 



chairman of the Pennsylvania 
State Horse Racing Commission. 
"During the upcoming 
academic year, the State System 
will begin celebrating the tenth 
anniversary of its creation. I am 
proud to have played a part in 
making Pennsylvania's public 
university system one of the 
top... in the nation," Mr. Dixon 
said. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Workers labor on the new commemorative wall, located at 
Gemmell Center. Dedication is on September 19. 







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Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 

Outside Clarion 



Breakthrough transplant patient dies 



AP stories compiled by 
Dorilee Raybuck 

State News 



Transplant 
patient dies 

The first person to receive an 
animal's organ has died of 
bleeding in the brain. 

The 35-year old man received 
a baboon's liver June 28. 
Hepatitis B was destroying his 
own liver and likely would have 
attacked any transplanted human 
liver. 

Dr. Howard Doyle, at the 
University of Pittsburgh medical 
center says doctors were trying 
to wean the man from a 
respirator Sunday afternoon 
when they discovered his brain 
was bleeding. 

The patient's name was 
withheld from the public at his 
own request 



Activists protest 
pigeon shoot 

About 100 animals-rights 
advocates were arrested Monday 
at an annual pigeon shoot as 
they heckled participants and ran 
onto a firing range to free the 
birds. 

About 1 ,500 protestors in a 
crowd of more than 12,000 
cheered when birds escaped 
during the Fred Coleman 
Memorial Shoot, which raises 
money for area parks and is 
named for a local marksman. 

"This kind of violence is sick , 
just like pulling the wings off 
flies is sick," said Steve Hindi of 
Piano, 111. 

State police sargeant Richard 
Morris said there were 112 
arrests, including several non- 
protestors. Some of those 
arrested during the shoot bolted 
past police to free the birds. 



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National 

Workers pitch in 
in Florida 

Officials in hurricane ravaged 
south Florida are hoping 
bureaucratic red tape won't stall 
their efforts to provide relief to 
hurricane victims. 

Hurricane Andrew roared 
ashore early Monday morning 
August 24. 

Disaster officials have put in 
12 hour work days in order to get 
government assistance checks 
out in record time. 

But they acknowledge they 
still can't keep up with the 
demands for checks for 
temporary living expenses. 

Some displaced people will 
end up waiting longer than 
others for assistance. 

President Bush is asking 
congress for over 7.6 billion 
dollars to aid rebuilding. 



White collar 
salaries fall 

A new study says wages of 
college educated white collar 
workers and women are in a 
downward spiral. 

The nonprofit Economic 
Policy Institute says between 
1987 and 1991 the inflation 
adjusted wages of college 
educated workers experienced a 
steeper decline of 4.4 percent. 

Security guard 
pleads guilty in kidnapping 

A former Exxon security gaurd 
faces up to 95 years in prison in 
the kidnapping death of Exxon 
international president Sidney 
Reso. 

Arthur Seale has pleaded 
guilty to federal charges in the 
case. Seale told the federal court 
in Trenton, New Jersey he never 
meant to kill Reso - and that the 
executive died in his arms. 



Clinton welcomed home 

Democratic presidential 
candidate, Bill Clinton, recently 
received a warm welcome upon 
returning to his home state of 
Arkansas. 

The welcome contrasted with 
the nominees' earlier visit to 
South Carolina where he was 
echoed and booed at a stock car 
raceway. 

Speaking with reporters, 
Clinton was asked about 
President Bush's apparent 
reluctance to debate him under a 
format proposed by a bipartisan 
panel. 

Clinton said Bush had 
indicated during their NBC 
interviews that he wanted "a 
debate with a more controled 
format." Clinton expressed 
preference for the panels 
proposal and said of Bush, "He's 
a good debator. He always does 
well. I don't know why he 
doesn't want to do it." 




Campus 



News 



■i i 



compiledfrom 

the Associated Press service 



Stores sell safe sex 

Selling with sex isn't new to 
retailers, but at least two stores 
in Michigan college towns are 
trying to sell safe sex. 

Condoms are the specialty of 
the stores near Michigan State 
University and the University of 
Michigan. Both take a 
lighthearted approach to the 
serious problem of sexually 
transmitted diseases. 

"We hope that we create a 
comfortable atmosphere so kids 
will buy the products that they 
need to stay healthy," said 
Evelynn Applebaum. 

Applebaum and Phyllis Cohen 
officially opened Condom 
Notions in East Lansing on 
Friday. But interest was so high 
they kept the doors open while 
stocking shelves for a week in 
advance. 

"Everybody's laughing. There's 
lots of things, little funny 
sayings. We have a camouflage 
condom," said Applebaum. 



Student missing 

The roommate of a missing 
Emporia State university woman 
says rumors are flying all over 
the place and she doesn't know 
what to believe. 

"I don't know fact from Fiction 
anymore," said Becky Abram, 
19. "So, I just sit tight and wait 
for any leads to pop up." 

Authorities say they suspect 
wrongdoing in the Aug. 21 
disappearance of 19-year-old 
Angie Benton, a sophomore 
from Gamett, whom friends and 
family described as naive and 
trusting. 

"She might have been a little 
too trusting, and that got her into 
deep water," Ms. Abram said. 

Ms. Abram last saw her friend 
the afternoon of Friday, Aug. 21. 

"She said she was leaving with 
friends for the weekend;" Ms. 
Abram said. Ms. Benton stuffed 
some clothes into a duffel bag 
and left, saying she would return 
Sunday afternoon. She didn't say 
where she was going or with 
whom. 



Russian students 
study here 

It might have been their high 
test scores in English, or the 
small classes at Moscow State 
Institute of International 
Relations that improved their 
chances. 

Whatever the reason, 19-year- 
old Andrey Lisin and 18-year- 
old Konstantin Korolev consider 
themselves fortunate to have 
been selected from among 500 
students for one-year 
scholarships to study business at 
Wichita State University. 

Wichita State President Warren 
Armstong offered the 
scholarships to Russian 
President Boris Yeltsin during 
his June visit to Wichita. 

Lisin says his plans include a 
career as a foreign trade expert. 

"It's a great opportunity to 
study language in a country 
where it's the native language," 
he said. And as for business 
studies "There are things we can 
study here that no one has ever 
heard of in our country/' , 



The Clarion Call - 9-10-92- Page 11 



c 



I 



H 



Features 




Susan Creasap marches her way into Clarion 



by Drew Richards 
Features Writer 



For the first time in 31 years, 
the Golden Eagle marching band 
will not be appearing under the 
leadership of the beloved Dr. 
Stanley Michalski. Susan 
Creasap is the new leader of the 
band, and she brings with her 
some impressive credentials. 

Creasap's musical interests 
began when she was very young. 
She started taking violin lessons 
in the second grade, and by the 
time she was in fourth grade, she 
played in the Cleveland All-City 
Elementary Orchestra in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

By the time she was in high 
school, the violin was replaced 
by the instrument she specializes 
in today, the french horn. It was 
in high school that Creasap first 
made up her mind that she 
wanted to be a band director. 

Creasap received her 



bachelor's degree in Music 
Education from Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania and 
her master's degree in Music 
Education, Magna Cum Laude 
from the University of 
Minnesota. From there, she 
became an instructor of French 
Horn at Allegheny College in 
Meadville, Pa. and an 
instrumental music teacher in 
Crawford Central Schools in 
Meadville from 1973 to 1980. 

She taught in three districts in 
Memphisjennessee for a large 
part of the 1980's. One of the 
schools was Colonial Junior 
High, an inner city magnet 
school, with a band consisting of 
40 students. Having no prior 
musical knowledge, they went 
from nowhere to national 
recognition, winning first place 
and superior ratings at large 
festivals and competitions. 

Clarion is the latest step for 
Creasap. "Ever since I started 



teaching, my dream was to 
become a college band director, 
and that's not the easiest thing 
for a woman to do," Creasap 
said. For Creasap, the only thing 
that she had to get used to is the 
size of the operation. "The 
mechanics of directing a band 
are the same. I'm not doing 
anything differently here," 
Creasap said. 

She plans to continue the 
marching band program at all 
home and away football games, 
concentrating on movie and 
musical themes, such as "Beauty 
and the Beast," "Robin Hood" 
and "Phantom of the Opera." 

Judging from Creasap's past 
successes, the tradition of one of 
the finest college bands around 
should remain in Clarion for 
years to come. "I am looking 
forward to this year," Creasap 
said. "Everyone has been very 
cooperative and the students 
have been very helpful. 





1 




Ray Henderson / Clarion Cal! 
Sitting with the band, Susan Creasap is experiencing her 
first year as Clarion University marching band director. 



Tasty tips for a healthy college diet 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



What did you have for 
breakfast? Did you even have 
breakfast? What are you going 
to have for lunch or dinner? 
What do you consider a healthy 



snack? How can you pick out a 
healthy and balanced meal in the 
dining hall when deep inside you 
crave an artery- clogging, caloric 
packed, greasy cheeseburger? 
Do you live in tear of the 
dreaded "freshman fifteen," the 




Ray Henderson /Clarion Call 
Many college students enjoy fatty diets without realizing 
the effects. 



fabled unavoidable weight gain 
that strikes and sticks to new 
students? 

Fear not, distressed reader, you 
can control your diet away from 
home, according to Lisa 
Taormina, a dietition from 
Thomas Jefferson Univesity. 
Eating regular meals is crucial, 
skipping meals tends to let you 
over-indulge during later meals. 
Having a candy bar or a handful 
of cookies instead of a meal will 
give you a quick burst of energy, 
but you may only feel worse 
later. Taormina suggests eating 
regular meals centered around 
high complex-carbohydrate food 
such as pasta, whole grain 
breads, rice, cereal, beans, 
potatoes, fruits, and vegetables 
deliver longer lasting energy 

In real life, the fast paced life 
of a college student does 
Increase the tendency to skip 
; . . - because of time 
constraints. A good plan would 
include stocking your room with 
nutritious snacks to help guide 
you away from the vending 
machines when the afternoon or 
late night munchies hit. 
Taormina also suggests replacing 
chips and candy with hard 



pretzels, bagels, low or non-fat 
yogurt, breadsticks, dried or 
fresh fruits, raw vegetables and 
low-fat microwave popcorn that 
has no more than three grams of 
fat per 100 calorics. But beware, 
she warns, peanut butter, a good 
source of protein, is extremely 
high in fat. It should be eaten in 
moderation. 

When ordering out, try to order 
from places that offer a variety 
of food. This will not be easy in 
a town the size of Clarion, so try 
not to over-indulge on pizza by 
complimenting it with a salad. 
Other tips include having a 
turkey sub instead of the 
traditional Italian sub. Avoid 
batter dipped and fried Chinese 
food. Looking instead for 
vegetable, chicken and shrimp 
dishes with starchy bases like 
rice or noodles. 

With no malice toward the 
dining hall, beware when you 
finally get there; nutrition pitfalls 
await. "Students think, 'O.K., 
I'm going to eat healthy today 
and have a salad." said 
Taormina. "But depending on 
what they put on it, that salad 
could be higher in fat and 
calories than a plain burger and 



fries." Sunflower seeds, nuts, 
dressings, croutons, and 
mayonnaise based pasta salads 
quickly add calories because of 
their high oil and fat content. 
Taormina recommends choosing 
lower-fat options like fresh 
vegetables, fruit, garbanzo 
beans, breadsticks, and lean 
meats like turkey and tuna. Top 
it off with a light, low-calorie • 
dressing or a vinegar and oil 
combination where you control 
the amount of oil. 

Getting off to a good start in 
the morning is very important; 
eating a breakfast high in 
complex-carbohydrates will help 
you get that good start. Bagels, 
English muffins, hot and cold 
cereals with milk, yogurt, low- 
fat muffins, and fruit are 
energizing breakfast foods. 

Making healthier food choices, 
adding exercise into your routine 
and dealing with stress the right 
way instead of binging will 
result in a well-rounded, 
balanced lifestyle that gives you 
energy to concentrate on 
calculating you G.P.A., not your 
calories. 



» 9 V « V V 



Page 12 - The Clarion Cal! - 9-10-92 



Movie Review: 

"The Unforgiven" -.Bringing the western back to the screen 



by Matt Niemla 
Features Writer 



"The Unforgiven" 
Starring: Clint Eastwood 
Gene Hackman 
Produced and Directed by: 

Clint Eastwood 
Rated R 
*** stars 



When movie fans think about a 
good stereotypical American 
movie, the western often comes 
to mind. With the exception of 
the old "Spaghetti Westerns," 
Hollywood has pumped out 
hundreds of westerns with stars 
ranging from Jimmy Stewart to 
Ronald Reagan. However, one 
man with a rugged look and 
unmistakable voice stands out 
from all the rest, Clint Eastwood. 
It has been quite a while since 
Eastwood had a film worth 
signing his name to (i.e. Pink 
Cadillac, the Rookie, etc.), but 

with "The Unforgiven" 



Eastwood proves that he is a film 
icon, basically able to make and 
be the movie himself. 

One thing "The Unforgiven" 
conveys is just how old 
Eastwood is, and it's not because 
the script required it. Let's face 
it, he's been around for a while. 
His last western, "Pale Rider," 
was one of the better westerns 
of the past decade and was a 
shade better than "The 
Unforgiven." 

The story opens in Wyoming, 
where Eastwood's character is 
left alone and poor with his two 
children after the death of his 
wife. Once slated as a horrible 
killer and villian, Eastwood is 
asked to help hunt down some 
men who cut up a prostitute 
living in Kansas. Although he 
has left his treacherous past, he 
decides to go ahead with the 
hunt to receive the reward 
money that will help feed his 
family. What stands in his way 



Scholarship Awarded 



by Lisa Lepre 
Features Writer 



The Cheri Aharrah Reid 
Memorial Scholarship has been 
awarded to Marion Russell. The 
scholarship was established with 
the Clarion University 
Foundation by Dr. Ernast and 
Peggy Aharrah in memory of 
their daughter. Its purpose is to 
assist freshman students 
majoring in the field of speech 
communication and theater 

Russell is a graduate of North 
Clarion High School where she 
was a member of the theater 
group. Russell performed in 
such productions as "Oklahoma" 
and "Steel Magnolias." Russell 
also participated in the 1990 
production of "The Sound of 
Music," at the Clarion University 
Summer Theater with Dr. 
Aharrah. The scholarship should 



come as no surprise to Russell, 
who also received the "Senior 
Music Award," and participated 
in both the district and regional 
chorus in high school. 

"I am honored to have 
received this scholarship named 
for the Aharrahs' daughter. lam 
touched," Russell said. 




PREGNANT? 
NEED HELP? 

Free pregnancy test 
Confidential 
Counseling 



AAA PREGNANCY 
CENTER 

For appointment call: 
226-7007 

open Mon.-Wed.-Fri. 10-2 
Mon. 7-9 PM 



226-2121 

Health Center Hours 

Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 
Saturday-Sunday 1-5 pm 

C.R.N.P. & Doctor Hours 

Monday-Friday by appointment 



SERVICES 



Pregnancy Counseling 

GYN Counseling and Referral 

Assessment of Health Need? 

& Treatment 

Health Education Information 

Blood Pressure Screening 

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Staff available as speakers 
on Health Issues 



CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



is everything from the local 
crooked law man (played by 
Gene Hackman) to Eastwood's 
oath of humanitarianism to his 
deceased wife. 

Don't look for the usual shoot- 
em-up, kill them all Clint 
Eastwood film; it is quite lame 
until the end. It is unlike "Pale 



Rider," where he plays a minister 
and still manages to waste quite 
a few. You can expect, though, 
to see some breathtaking 
scenery, as well as many good 
performances. What made "Pale 
Rider" a better film is the fact 
that it didn't seem to drag as 
much as "The Unforgiven." 



"The Unforgiven" ensures us 
that the western will never die, 
and Eastwood seems to ensure 
that he won't either. Perhaps 
that is for the best. Eastwood 
has made a good film for us to 
see, but I don't think he plans to 
have Mctallica do the soundtrack 
just yet. 



CAMPUS E VENTS 

Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Dan Parrish 



Thurs Sept. 10 



-UAB movie "Fried Green 
Tomatoes" (Gem M-P) 
8 p.m. 



Fri Sept. 11 



- Freshman Dance 
(Gem M-P) 8 p.m. 



-IFCyPanhel Retreat 



Sat Sept. 12 



-CABS Dance 
(Gem M-P) 10 p.m. 



Sun Sept. 13 

•UAB white water rafting 
trip to Ohiopyle 



-UAB Movie "Fried Green 
Tomatoes" (Gem M-P) 
8 p.m. 



Mon Sept. 14 

-UAB Week begins 

-Mykola Suk, piano concert, 
(Chap) 8 p.m. 

-Credit / no record begins 



Wed Sept. 16 



•Jeff Weingrad from "Saturday 
Night Live" (Gem M-P) 
8 p.m. 



Tues Sept. 15 

-Athletic time-out luncheon 

-United Campus Ministry 
lecture (Gem) rm 252 



Thur Sept. 17 



■Sorority Rush Orientation 



-UAB Movie "J.F.K." 
(Gem M-P) 9 p.m. 



Fri Sept. 18 



■Bedrock Cafe "Mark Eddie 
comedian" (Gem M-P) 
8 p.m. 



*u 



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CZ3 




The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 - Page 13 







V 



^J 



What do you like most 

about the new Gemmell 

Student Center? 



CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Ray Henderson 




Michele PicciriHo 

Junior, Communication 

"Aerobics classes that fit into everyone's 

schedule." 








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Sheila Fitzgerald 

Junior, Communication 

"The TV lounge, so I can watch the 

Guiding Light on campus." 



Larry Allen 

Sophomore, Business Management 

"I like the racquetball courts." 



Keith Rigby 

Senior, Communication 

"The racquetball courts and the fitness 

center." 




Ron Romeo 
x Senior, Accounting 

"Fitness center and racquetball courts." 




Jusan Drayer 

Freshman, Undecided 

"I like the quiet, casual 

atmosphere." 



Joyce Parker 

Junior, Psychology/Philosophy 

"The new bookstore is much 

more convenient." 



il.» 



i, >t ■ ' I 



Page 14 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 



n 



w 



o f 



t h e 




by Chuck Sheperd 



-In May, the Missouri Court of 
Appeals turned down David 
Turner's appeal of the automatic 
suspension of his driver's license 
for refusing to take a blood 
alcohol test. Turner's argument 
to the court was that, when 
arrested, he was too drunk to 
realize that he should have 
submitted to the test. 

-Channel 5 in Nashville, 
Tennessee, held a "Mission: 
Bermuda Triangle" trivia contest 
in May offering viewers a 
chance to win a seven-day 
vacation in Florida. The contest 
had to be restarted after the 
"hundreds" of initial entries 
disappeared from the station. 

-The nudist organization, 
American Sunbathing 



Association, along with several 
individual nudist camps, initiated 
a drive recently to donate used 
clothing to organizations for the 
homeless and to dislocated 
victims of the Los Angeles riots. 

-Billy Milligan, 37, was 
recently hired to direct a $3 
million film based on the life of 
a serial rapist who plagued 
Columbus, Ohio, in the late 
1970s and who is now in prison. 
Milligan has never directed 
before. His only qualifications 
for the job are that he was a 
serial rapist himself in the 1970s 
and was on hand when 
Hollywood director James 
Cameron shot Milligan's own 
life story, "The Crowded Room." 
(Milligan was found not guilty 
by reason of insanity and served 
10 years in mental institutions 



until his 20 multiple 
personalities "integrated" into 
one.) 

-Shawn O'Neill, 42, was 
arrested in Escondido, 
California, in March and charged 
with robbing Hussar's Jewelers. 
He had already been convicted 
of robbing it twice in January 
and was awaiting sentencing 

-In July, New Orleans Police 
arrested Donald Simmons, 53, 
and Cheryl Collins, 38, for 
breaking into parking meters, 
after videotaping the couple's 
crime. The police said the two 
would walk along a street and 
passionately embrace every few 
yards but that was a trick. In 
reality, there was a parking meter 
between them, and Simmons 
would open it with a key and slip 



the money to Collins, who would 
put it into a bag under her skirt 
— all in about 12 seconds' time. 
Simmons admitted to practicing 
the scheme since 1985 

-Emoke P. Auams, 53, filed a 
lawsuit in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 
in April for $25,000 against 
neighbor Theresa Bartlett for 
negligently squirting her with a 
garden hose. Adams cited 
"permanent" physical problems 
and emotional trauma resulting 
from the incident. 

-In June, the student-written 
newspaper at the Parker 
elementary school in Billerica, 
Massachusetts, published an 
article, "15 Ways to Kill Your 
Sister." The paper is supervised 
by a female teacher with 20 
years' experience, who 
reportedly thought the story was 
very creative. 

-Janie A. Coleman was 
arrested in Columbia, Missouri, 
in January after being accused of 
trying to pass counterfeit $5 bills 
in the purchased of perfume. 
The bills were merely 
photocopied fronts and backs of 



bills, taped together. 

-Matthew Strong, a George 
Washington University student, 
was arrested in Alexandria, 
Virginia, in June with 90 
handguns jammed into three 
duffel bags. "It's not like I am a 
criminal," Strong told the 
Washington Post. "I scored 1400 
on my SAT." 

-Jenny Soukup, 17, was 
charged with conspiracy to assist 
in a drive-by shooting in Russell, 
Kansas, in February. Several 
hours later, out on bail, she was 
crowned winter sports queen at 
Russell High School as a result 
of a vote taken before the 
shooting incident. 

-Des Moines, Washington, 
police, frustrated by their 
inability to convict prostitutes in 
sting operations unless sex 
actually occurred -- yet 
prohibited themselves from 
having sex with prostitutes -- 
revealed in April that they had 
hired convicted rapist Robert 
Berdue, 29, to do the dirty work 
for them. 



Concert pianist to play at Gemmeli 



by Lisa Recker 
Contributing Writer 



Music majors, piano players or 
anyone who just can't resist the 
sounds of extraordinary piano 
playing, have the opportunity to 
see, Mykola Suk, an 
internationally recognized 
pianist on Monday, September 
14 at 8 p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

The Ukranian pianist was born 
in Kiev, into a family of 
musicians. He studied at the 
Kiev Special Music School and 
later at the Moscow 
Conservatory. "I've been 
playing piano as long as I can 
remember. I believe I started 
somewhere around the age of 5 
and I've been playing ever 
since," recalled Suk. 

Part of Suk's reputation as a 
performer stems from his 
monographic programs: 

programs dedicated to the works 
of one particular composer. He 
often performs works by 20th 
century masters and by 
contemporary composers. For 
his concert in Clarion, Suk plans 
to perform works by Ludwig von 
Beethoven, Bela Bartok, and 
Franz Liszt. 

Suk has played other 
universities before in the United 
States and feels that American 
students like his music. "Being a 
concert pianist is my job. It is 




really nothing special. I have 
good relations with the students 
because I am friendly and easy 
to get along with," commented 
Suk. 

Suk's artistry became apparent 
to the world after his first prize 
and gold medal performance at 
the International Liszt and 
Bartok competition in 1971. 
Following his American debut at 
Weill Recital Hall in 1991, Suk 
has appeared with orchestras and 
in solo recitals in the U.S., 



western Europe, and the near 
East. In addition, Suk has been 
awarded the title of Merited 
Artist of the Ukranian SSR for 
having done great service in the 
field of performing arts. 

When asked about any goals 
for Ihe future, Suk commented, 
"My only goal for the future is to 
play long and play well." 

This event is sponscred by 
UAB and free to students and 
the public. 



photo courtesy of UAB 
Mykola Suk will play an arrangement of classical music 



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from Clarion, it's Satur 



The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 - Page 15 



by Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 



It was a crazy night in October, 
1975 that changed television 
forever. On that night, NBC 
launched Saturday Night Live 
with its innovative comedy 
sketches and tasteless satire. 
The show was an instant success 
and has since introduced some of 
today's biggest stars. 

But have you ever wondered 
about the show. How was it 
conceived? What goes on 
behind the scenes? What is it 
like having a cast of that 
magnitude? If you have, then 
you don't want to miss Jeff 
Weingrad when he speaks to the 
campus on September 16 at 8 
p.m. in the new Gemmeli 
Complex multi-purpose room. 

Weingrad is co-author with 
Doug Hill of "Saturday Night: A 
Backstage History of Saturday 
Night Live." In the book, the 
two men trace the history of the 



show, from its beginning to the 
behind-the-scenes battles with 
network executives. They also 
uncover the chaotic rewrites, 
tantrums and rivalries among 
cast members. 

The lecture will focus on the 
early years of Saturday Night 
Live with such skits as "the 
Coneheads," "the Samurai 
Warrior," "Weekend Update," 
"Roseanne Roseannadanna" and 
"the Blues Brothers." Weingrad 
will also discuss how the show 
has become a comedy institution, 
making stars of Chevy Chase, 
Gilda Radner, John Belushi, Dan 
Aykroyd, Garrett Morris, Bill 
Murray, Joe Piscopo and Eddie 
Murphy. And as far as personal 
and private information about 
the stars, he will discuss why 
Garrett Morris rarely appeared as 
a leading man and Eddie Murphy 
did, why Chevy Chase was 
resented by the cast, why Bill 
Murray once punched out Chevy 



Chase, why Dan Akroyd trashed 
a wall on the 17th floor of the 
NBC building, why John Belushi 
disliked everything and why Joe 
Piscopo had trouble adapting to 
Eddie Murphy's success. 

Saturday Night Live was part 
of the tradition of underground 
comedy, full of knowing drug 
references, casual profanity, a 
permissive attitude toward sex, 
deep disdain for show business 
convention, blistering political 
satire and a bitter distrust of 
corporate power. 

Weingrad is the television 
editor of the New York Daily 
News. He previously was the 
editor of Women's World 
magazine's celebrity page, and a 
reporter for the New York Post. 
Weingrad has also been 
published in the New York Daily 
News, Esquire and the Toronto 
Globe and Mail. 

The lecture is sponsored by 
UAB and free to the public. 




UAB photo 
Jeff Weingrad will speak on the cultural phenomenon that 
is Saturday Night Live. 



WQED 



by Shawn P. Seagriff 
Contributing Writer 



Clarion Dean of enrollment 
and academic records, John 
Shropshire, is scheduled to 
appear on "Black Horizons," a 
television program by WQED in 
Pittsburgh. 

Shropshire is the western 
regional director for the 
Pennsylvania Black Conference 



on Higher Education 
(PBCOHE). During the show, 
he intends to discuss the 
upcoming PBCOHE state 
conference scheduled for 
February24-27 in Pittsburgh. 
The theme of the conference is 
"Out of the Malaise, The Case 
for a New Militancy for the 
90 1." Speakers at the 
conference will include: Dr. 
Leon Haley, president of the 



Pittsburgh Urban League; Dr. 
Ruth Love from San Francisco; 
and Vincent Hughes, chair of the 
Pennsylvania Legislative Black 
Caucus. 

The PBCHOE states its main 
concerns as working to improve 
the impact of education on the 
lives of Black Americans in 



particular and the educational 
climate of America in general. 

Both at the conference and on 
"Black Horizons," the stagnacy 
of the civil rights movement 
during th Reagan/Bush years and 
the lack of minority persons on 
the staff of public universities 
will be discussed. 



They also plan to issue a 
challenge to look at new ways to 
change the fortunes of the 
African-American community 
focusing on: the economical, 
social, educational and political 
plight of African- Americans. 

The program will air on 
WQED on September 12. 



Attention poets: money for poems 



Part-Time Sales 




by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



-To be a poet, I do aspire 

-of rhyming words, I'll never 

tire 



-alas as a poet, not far I've 
gotten 

-for as you see, my verse is 
quite rotten. 

That verse won't win any 



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prizes, but yours could. The 
National Library of Poetry will 
award 12,000 dollars in prizes to 
over 250 poets in this year's 
North American Open Poetry 
Contest. 

Any poet, whether previously 
published or not, can win. 
Poems can be of any subject and 
of any style, and all poems 
entered have a chance to be 
published in a deluxe, hardbound 
anthology. 

Your entry should be no longer 
than 20 lines and your name and 
address should appear at the top 
of the page. The contest is open 
to everyone, and entry is free. 
Entries must be postmarked by 
September 30, 1992. 

To enter, send only one 
original poem to the National 
Library of Poetry, 11419 
Cronridge Dr., P.O. Box 704-ZK, 
Owings Mills, MD 211 17. 

If you miss this year's deadline 
another contest opens October 1, 
1992. 



fc»OTB»a««fiWSfittMKOB^^ «J 



- ■- c I 






Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 



Entertainment 



PEACE CORPS world wise Pu\ 

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in nearly 80 nations around the 
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries. 

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce 
the name of the country darkened on the map at the right. 

Landlocked South 
American country which 
Is roughly the size of 
California and Texas 
combined. 





1. 



3. 



4. 



i>Mi/"i/ = l!">jg p /DMWflO ( Jifoijivj uowojf -J mitiujHj\f i :uomil<>S 



Adjacent country which had a First Lady 
who, after her death, became the topic of 
an American musical. 

Religion of more than 90% of this nation's 
population. 

A type of geological plain comprised of 
clay silt, sand or gravel, or similar material 
deposited by running water. 

Neighboring country, which is the largest 
in South America. 



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POSITIVE ASPECTS.. 
ELIMINATE NEGATIVES 

WEEKLY OVERVIEW 

A wock when things we wish for could 
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and Mercury fo Jupiter increase possi- 
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conclusions. Make full use of influen- 
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tors important to vW Best dav for love 
and social: Sal. » or luck: Thiirs. 



THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 

ARIES March 21-April 20 

Makes firm bid. I lome improvement!! 
now can mean extra profits later 
TAURUS April 21- May 21 

As long as you're sure of vour position. 
prtVCM according to plan 

GEMINI May 22 June 21 

Your own inshnds mav provide the 
bw»t guidance Don't be led astray by 
others 

CANCER June 22 • July 23 

Hon t tush to judgement' It m.iy help to 
tali things over with a trusted friend 

LEO July 24 ■ August 23 

It •. often when we think we vo readied 

. '■■.id.'Mid a happv solution appears 
VIHGO August 24 . Sept 23 

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eivurh to Change with the times 

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23-Dec 21 

Undertakings that are contrary to con 
•■erv.itive practice*, should be shunned. 
CAPRICORN Dec22-Jar»20 

I'res-ing for results might work in re- 
verse Patience i* needed now. 
AQUARIUS Jan 21 Feb 19 

Solutions to problems can always be 
fount I A new approach could work. 

PISCES Feb20-March20 

Reserve judgment until you have had 
more time to gather all of the facts 



WUEHEVEfc t HEAR. ABOUT 
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REvTSONER THE. "CHILD 
WITHIN!' I WANT TO SCREfyM 



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btrihdate and long sell-addressed stamped envelope to " COSMIC COLLEGE PER 
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Weekly Crossword 



□ king 

□ SLAUGHT 



■ Occupational 

ACROSS 

1 Hurried 

S Men only parties 
10 Come again? 
U Have a crush on 

15 Bird daw 

16 Shatter 

17 Enthusiasm 

18 Tehran inhabitant 

19 French islands 

20 Hospltalim 7 
22 Newspaporltas 7 

24 Officeholders 

25 Greek Island 

26 " byany 

other name ..." 

29 Arts cousin 

30 Push a pencil 

34 Saucy 

35 Librarian's word 

36 COBOL's cousin 

37 Gerund ending 

38 Agriculturalists 

40 Yalaioik 

41 Stellar 

43 league 

44 Maverick 

45 Sonja 

46 Vane Initials 

47 Obsolete 

48 Drop by 

50 Mr. Quayle 

51 Churchists 7 

54 Demonstrationists 

58 Your uncle's wife 

59 The woman 

61 Cupid 

62 Noun suffix 

63 Pee Wee 

64 Rave's cousin 

65 Word with Admiral or 
window 

66 Mistake 

67 French saints 

DOWN 
i Iditarod need 

2 Word with water or shirt 

3 MASH type team 

4 Tooinist? 



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Ms. Truehean 

A single thing 

■Ted alike 



13 
21 
23 

25 Laboratorist 7 

26 Silly 

27 French pension 

28 Church fixture 

29 Belonging to us 

31 Peggy Fleming and 
45 across 

32 Cliff-hangers at times 

33 Select group 

35 Dennis or Doris 

36 Nose around 

38 liberates'' In Munich 

39 First mate 
42 Factoryite 7 



44 Financlalists 

46 Sibling 

47 D. C. political org 

49 Warehouse 

50 More dreadful 

51 Former "Tonight Show 
host 

52 incantation 

53 Peruvian indian 

54 Pedro's coin 

55 Ero. eras lollower 

56 Hue 

57 Supersonic jets 
60 His companion 



O 1992 Ail rights retcrved CKK AssocUtcs 
P.O. Box 461, Schenectady, NY 12301 



Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 



I He V^iai iv/ii v^aii - s-m.\j-sh m mj,-. 




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Despite loss at Youngstown State, Golden 
Eagles looking ahead to promising season 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports writer 



The 1992 Clarion University 
football team opened its season 
on Saturday and although the 
defending Division I-AA 
champion Youngstown State 
Penguins soundly defeated the 
Golden Eagles, a promising 
campaign seems to be on the 
horizon. 

The old cliche, "The game was 
much closer than the score 
would indicate," has never been 
more evident than it was last 
Saturday night in Youngstown, 
Ohio. The final score flashed 
48-7, but the Golden Eagles 
showed the 10,856 spectators 
that they could match the 
Penguins hit for hit. 

Youngstown State mustered 
only four first downs and 25 
more passing yards than did 
Clarion. The big statistic that 
loomed on the night was 
Clarion's five turnovers, YSU 
only had one. 

For the Eagles to improve 
upon this performance, as well 
as upon their 5-5 record of a year 
ago, they must get solid play and 
leadership from their 31 
letterwinners and 15 returning 
starters. Coach Gene 

Sobolewski, who enters his 10th 
season at the helm of the Golden 
Eagles and carries in a career 
mark of 49-42, believes the '92 
squad will be improved. "On 
offense we Have the talent to run 
the football, a quality passing 
quarterback, and speed at the 
skill positions," Sobolewski 
said. "The offense could be an 
explosive one, but we must limit 
the turnovers to be successful." 

The quality passing 
quarterback to which Sobolewski 
is referring to is senior signal 
caller Tim Myers. In 10 games, 
Myers passed for 2,149 yards 
and 17 touchdowns. He ranked 
22nd in total offense for all of 
Division II with a 213.3 yard per 
game average, and he also 
ranked 24th in quarterback 
efficiency in route to a PSAC- 
West second team selection. 

The Eagle backfield will be led 
by junior tailback Damien 



Henry. Henry gobbled up 698 
yards on the ground, caught 242 
yards worth of passes, and 
reached paydirt ten times in '91. 
At Westminster last year, Henry 
left 209 yards worth of vapor 
trail in leading the Eagles to a 
28-14 victory over a strong 
Westminster team. Sophomore 
tailback Art Gregory should see 
a few more carries in '92 after an 
inaugural season of 104 yards, 
while senior Jay Tonini (225 
yards, 2 td's) and sophomore 
Tom Lumadue will share the 
duties at fullback. 

All four of Clarion's premier 
wide receivers are sophomores, 
and all four are lightning quick. 
Marlon Worthy, who already has 
one touchdown to his credit in 
'92, ranked seventh in Division 
II in returning punts last season 
averaging 13.3 yards per return, 
as well as averaging more than 
21 yards each time he returned a 
kickoff. Worthy, Jess Quinn, 
Kevin Harper and Kirk Morris 
are sure to provide oohs and aahs 
for Clarion fans throughout the 
course of this season. 

Junior tight end Tim Brown 
rounds out the plethora of 
talented targets Myers will have 
at his disposal. Brown, a 
honorable mention All-Amcrican 
and a first team PSAC-West 
selection, caught 38 passes for 
4% yards and three touchdowns 
in '91. 

Four starters return to the 
trenches to lead the powerful 
Clarion offensive line into battle. 
Second team PSAC-West center 
Willie Hunter, Guard Russ Klein, 
and tackles John Espy and Glenn 
Yetter, have earned nine letters 
between them and average 6'2 
1/2" and 257 pounds. 

The offense appears to be one 
of the most talented units in all 
of Division II. The defense will 
answer the question as to how 
good this team will be. 

The Clarion defense showed 
signs of brilliance last year in 
holding California to 173 yards 
of total offense and six points, 
but overall consistency will 
determine whether or not the 
1992 campaign will be a 



successful one for the Golden 
Eagles. 

The defensive front four will 
be led by three-year starting 
tackles Carlos Warner and Jason 
Reinhart. At the ends, Chris 
Haycock, who led the "D" with 
nine sacks last year, and junior 
Eric Acord will attempt to 
brutalize opposing quarterbacks 
and ball carriers again in '92. 

The strongest part of the 
Clarion defense seems to lie in 
the linebacking corps. Two year 
starters Damon Mazoff and 



Frank Andrews led the team in 
tackles a year ago with 141 and 
120, respectively, and along with 
Clint Terza, they complete a 
strong front seven on the 
defensive side of the ball. 

The entire secondary graduated 
in 1991, but the Eagles have 
made moves to alleviate this loss 
by moving Brad Kline, a three- 
year starter at tailback, to strong 
safety. Newcomer Sean Spencer 
has already made himself known 
by recording 17 tackles against 
Youngstown State, while 



Eldridge Ponder and Pat Span 
seem to be more than adequate at 
the corncrback positions. 

Coach Sobolewski is 
optimistic going into this season, 
"The ingredients are here, we 
simply have to put them all 
together," he says. Sobolewski 
will have another week to put the 
ingredients together as Clarion is 
idle on Saturday. 

The Golden Eagles next game 
is at home (Memorial Stadium) 
versus New Haven on 
September 19 at 2 pm. 




Sports Information photo 
Tim Myers and Jason Reinhart, shown here with Clarion University's head coach Gene 
Sobolewski, were recently voted co-captains for the 1992 football season. 

Myers and Reinhart chosen as co- 
captains for 1992 gridiron campaign 



Quarterback Tim Myers and 
defensive tackle Jason Reinhart, 
both seniors, were recently 
chosen as co-captains for Clarion 
University's 1992 football 
season. Captains are chosen by a 
vote of the players. 

" I believe they certainly have 
the athletic ability, playing 
maturity and motivational 
qualities necessary to handle this 
important job," said head coach 
Gene Sobolewski. 



Myers, a quarterback out of 
Wilcox, PA. and Johnsonburg 
High School, returns to direct the 
Golden Eagle offense. In 1991, 
Myers connected on 141 of 280 
passes for 2,149 yards (second 
highest single season total) and 
17 touchdowns , while being 
named to the PSAC-West second 
team. 

As the Golden Eagle punter in 
1991, Myers averaged 32.6 yards 
per punt. 



Reinhart, a defensive tackle 
from Lititz, Pa. and Ephrata 
High School, returns for his 
fourth season of anchoring the 
defensive line. Already a three- 
year starter, Reinhart notched 78 
tackles, six sacks, and broke up 
two passes in 1991. A "College 
Football Preview" All-American 
in 1991, Jason is looking for his 
best season in 1992. 

•Story courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Paui 20 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 



I 

y 



A younger women's volleyball team is 
setting their sights on PSAC accolades 



by Mike Jewart 
Sports writer 



Hey, volleyball fans, it's lime 
for another exciting year of lady 
Golden Eagles volleyball. After 
a rebuilding year in 1991, where 
the team finished 10-18, head 
coach Sue Flaherty seems quite 
optimistic about her team's 
chances of winning this season. 

"We still have a young team 
with only two seniors, four 
players with sophomore 
eligibility and three freshmen, 
but our skill level has really 
improved," said Flaherty. Based 
on their improvements and 
optimism, the lady spikers have 
set their sights on a return to 
PSAC dominance. 



"We're excited to be getting the 
season underway," said Flaherty. 
"The team is much improved, 
skill wise, over our 1991 team, 
and we have set some high goals 
for 1992." 

Flaherty's first season leading 
the Golden Eagles was a very 
successful one. In 1990, the lady 
Eagles posted a 24-15 record, 
finished second in the PSAC- 
West and third at the PSAC 
Championships. Hit hard by 
graduation, the 1991 season was 
a rebuilding year. Featuring six 
first-year players, the team 
finished with a losing record. 
The team's 1992 goal is simple. 
They want to get back to the 
PSAC Final Four. 




Christopher Horner/Clarion Call 
Wendy Ellenberger was an "assist machine" in 1991. 



ft* 

11-1 a.m. Mon.-Thurs. 




11-2 a.m. Fri. & Sat. 

Dough is made daily 

in store. Sauce and 

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in the store 

with only the 

freshest 

Ingredients. 

FREE 
DELIVERY 

227-9111 II 




The Lady Golden Eagles will 
be anchored this season by 
senior co-captains Wendy 
Ellenburger and Tammi Bills. 

Ellenberger was named to the 
PSAC-West first team and the 
PSAC All-Division second team 
as a setter last season. She also 
led the team in assists and digs in 

1991. 

Bills is a defensive specialist 
and has earned three letters in 
three years at Clarion University. 
Last year, she was third on the 
team in digs and fourth in 
service aces. 

The lady spikers have four 
other experienced returners from 
last years squad: Suzanne 
Sheldon, Meghan Kelly, Barb 
Mel linger and Gerri Condo. All 
four of these ladies had solid 
seasons in 1991. 

The Lady Golden Eagles also 
have three new faces to mix in 
with their experienced veterans: 
Jennifer Betters, Nicole 
Flambard and Bobbi Simpson. 
All three are highly talented 
freshmen and are battling for 
starting positions. 

Coach Flaherty seems quite 
excited about the talent of her 
squad. "This team is so well- 
balanced that it is like having 
nine starters, " said Flaherty. 

Flaherty was able to get a 
good look at the "new and 
improved" Golden Eagles at the 




Christopher Horner/Clarion Call 
Tammi Bills gave us a little of everything last season. 



IUP Invitational Tournament 
held over the Labor Day 
weekend, but the real fireworks 
started Tuesday night when they 
battled PSAC rival Lock Haven. 
The Golden Eagles will clash 



tonight with defending PSAC 
champion California at Tippin 
Gymnasium (7 pm). The Golden 
Eagles are looking to avenge 
their two losses they suffered at 
the hands of the 1991 Vulcans. 



Pezek-Burns named to fill two 
coaching positions at Clarion 



Jodi Pezek-Burns, an 
outstanding women's volleyball 
player at Clarion University 
from 1987-90, was recently 
named the head Softball and 
assistant women's volleyball 
coach at Clarion. She replaces 
Diana Schwartz, who stepped 
down from the same positions 
this summer. 

"We feel very fortunate to have 
recruited such an outstanding 
person and coach as Jodi," said 
Athletic Director Bob Carlson. 
"She was a talented and 
dedicated student-athlete and 
we're happy to welcome her 
back to Clarion. We're sure Jodi 
will do an excellent job in both 
positions." 

At Clarion University, Pezek 
was a four year starter with the 



Golden Eagle volleyball team. 
A versatile player who 
performed as a middle and 
outside hitter, she was a first 
team PSAC choice in 1987, 89 
and 90, and a first team Atlantic 
Region selection in 1989 and 90. 

In 1990, she led the team with 
522 kills, 145 solo blocks, 102 
assisted blocks, plus collected 
232 digs and 58 service aces. In 
1989, Pezek led the team in kills 
with 431, solo blocks with 120 
and service aces with 60. In her 
outstanding career, she totalled 
1,444 kills, 786 digs and 171 
service aces. 

As a team captain her senior 
season, Pezek led the team to a 
third place finish at the PSAC's 
and a final season record of 24- 
15. In 1989, the Golden Eagles 



were 27-10 and second at the 
PSAC's, while the team won 
their first PSAC Crown in 1988 
with an overall slate of 23-13. 
Posting a team mark of 25-14 in 
1987, Pezek played on Clarion 
teams that had a combined 
record of 99-52, a winning 
percentage of 65.6%. 

Graduating from Clarion in 
December of 1991 with a degree 
in Elementary Education, Pezek 
was the assistant men's 
volleyball coach at Juniata 
College in the Spring of 1992 
before returning to her alma 
mater. 



-Story courtesy of Sports 
Information 



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1992 wrestling recruiting class announced 

±SSM T T . . P : _ „ . ™ ^ and placed second at PIAA* _ Joe! Gilbert who attended 



Clarion University head 
wrestling coach Jack Davis, who 
will begin his first season as the 
Golden Eagle mentor in the 
1992-93 season, announced his 
first recruiting class over the 
summer. 

The assistant coach at Clarion 
under former head coach Bob 
Bubb for seventeen seasons, 
Davis knows all about past 
recruiting classes. As Bubb's 
assistant, Davis was Clarion's 
recruiting coordinator. 

Davis' first official recruiting 
class as head coach has success 
written all over it. The class 
features four high school Ail- 
Americans (rated by Amateur 
Wrestling News) and six state 
champions, plus some very 
talented wrestlers to go with 

them. 

"We're very pleased with our 
signings for the 1992-93 
season," said Davis. "We 
believe that we've been able to 
recruit some very talented 
student-athletes. They have the 
talent, athletic ability and work 
ethic to become quality wrestlers 
at Clarion. Certainly on paper, 
it has to be one of the best 
recruiting classes we've ever 
had, but that's on paper." 

The four high school All- 
Americans, in order of weight 
class, are Sheldon Thomas (119 
lbs.), Dan Fox (145 lbs.), Bryan 
Stout (189 lbs.) and Stephan 
Terebienec (Heavyweight). 

Also signing on with Clarion 
are former PIAA State 
Champion Dave Thomas (145 
lbs.), PIAA runner-up Mike 
Guerin (171 lbs.), Steve Black, 
Matt Fearing, John Midmore, 
Joel Gilbert and Brad Slagle. 
Sheldon Thomas, a Im- 



pounder from St. Marks High in 
Newark, Delaware, was ranked 
#1 in the nation at 119-pounds 
by Amateur Wrestling News. A 
four-time Delaware State 
Champ, Thomas was crowned 
champion at 103 -pounds in 1989 
and 1990, at 112-pounds in 1991 
and at 119-pounds in 1992. He 
posted a career high school 
record of 132-2-1, plus has won 
USA Junior National Titles in 
1989 (at 98-pounds) and in 1991 
(at 105-pounds). He also has 
international experience, and has 
earned 26 AAU Junior National 
Titles in his career. He has a 
lifetime record of 1, 413 
victories, 68 losses and 1 draw. 
All of these honors and statistics 
were tallied before he added yet 
another honor to his credit. 
Thomas won another Junior 
National Title at 114 pounds this 
year. Thomas is projected at 
118-pounds for Clarion. 

Dan Fox, a 140-pounder from 
Fryeburg Academy, was ranked 
#11 at 145-pounds by Amateur 
Wrestling News. A three-time 
Maine State Champ, Fox posted 
a senior record of 43-0 with 24 
pins. He was crowned a state 
champion as a sophomore at 
135-pounds, and repeated that 
feat at 135-pounds as a junior. 
He has a career mark of 158-16- 
2, with 77 pins. He is projected 
at either 142 or 150 pounds for 
Clarion. 

Bryan Stout, a 189-pounder 
from Southern Regional High, 
was ranked #2 at 189-pounds by 
AWN. A New Jersey State 
Champion his senior year, Stout 
posted a 32-0 record with 28 
falls, two technical falls and two 
major decisions. He placed 
second at states as a junior and 



fifth as a sophomore. He also 
placed at Junior Nationals in 
1992, with a second place finish. 
Stout posted a career record of 
117-14-2, and is projected at 
190-pounds. 

Stephan Terebieniec, a 
heavyweight from St. Edward 
high was ranked fifth in the 
nauon by AWN. An Ohio State 
Champion as a senior, Stephan 



and placed second at PlAA's. 
He was third in 1990 (34-4) and 
was a PIAA State Champion as a 
sophomore in 1989 (30-1). He 
had a career record of 119-12 
and is projected as a 142- 
poundcr at Clarion. 

Mike Guerin, a 171 -pounder 
from Lake Lehman High, placed 
second at the PI A As his senior 
year, mounting an overall record 



Joel Gilbert, who attended 
Dubois Area High, is projected 
at 167 or 177 pounds. As a suae 
qualifier his junior year, Gilbert 
posted a junior record of 22-3-2 
and a senior mark of 22-5. A 
District 9 champ in 1991 and 
1992, he has a career mark of 
63-13-4. 

Brad Slagle, who attended 
Grove City High, was a two-time 




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Raymond Henderson/Clarion Call 
(From left to right) Bryan Stout, Sheldon Thomas and Stephen Terebienec make up part of 
the second best recruiting class In the nation for 1992 (as ranked by AWN). 




was 35-2 his final season. As a 
junior, he notched a 29-5 record 
but did not compete at states due 
to injury. As a sophomore, 
Terebienec posted a 32-8 overall 
record and qualified for states. 
In his high school career, 
Terebienec carved a 110-21 
record featuring 92 falls. He 
placed second at Junior 
Nationals in 1991 in Greco- 
Roman, and was fourth at Junior 
Nationals the same year in 
freestyle. This year, he placed 
first at Junior Nationals in the 
Greco-Roman category. He is 
projected at heavyweight for 
Clarion. 

Dave Thomas, 145-pounder 
from Waynesburg High, 
graduated in 1991 and sat out the 
past year. In 1991, he was 29-1 



of 35-1. He placed fourth his 
junior season with a 33-2 mark. 
Guerin notched a career slate of 
113-19-1, and is projected as a 
167-pounder here at Clarion. 

Steve Black, from 
Curwensville High, is projected 
as a 150-pounder at Clarion. As 
a two-time PIAA qualifier, he 
posted an overall record of 78-19 
with 38 falls. 

Matt Fearing, from Chaminade 
College Preparatory, is projected 
at 167-pounds at Clarion. 
Fearing had a senior record of 

25-8. 

John Midmore, who attended 
high school in Canada, is 
projected as a 167-pounder at 
Clarion. His top effort was a 
third place finish at the Canadian 
Nationals. 



PIAA qualifier and is projected 
as either a 150 or 158-pounder. 

Clarion University's NCAA 
Division I Wrestling team posted 
a 13-5 dual meet record in 1991- 
92, won its 12th PSAC team 
title, finished the season ranked 
ninth as a dual meet team in the 
AWN/Coaches Poll and placed 
eighth at the NCAA Division 1. 
Tournament. Coach Bob Bubb, 
who retired at the close of the 
season, finished his 26-year 
career with a dual meet record of 
322-121-4. Since the program 
restarted in 1959, the Golden 
Eagles have a dual meet record 
of 383-133-4. 

-Story courtesy of Sports 
Information 



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to. 



Page 22 - The Clarion Call - 9-10-91 

Sports Spotlight 



l ne uianon can 



v-iu-vz- rage zj 



Marlins beginning legacy with former Clarion standout 



by Jon Q. Siller 
Sports Editor 

For most college students, 
finding a summer job is 
necessary. Unfortunately, many 
of us find ourselves working for 
a terrible wage in a grocery store 
or at a gas station. A lucky few 
can find jobs that arc, at least 
somewhat, enjoyable. But for 
Clarion native Brad Frazicr, luck 
had nothing to do with it. 

Frazicr \s tremendous pitching 
abilities and his dominant senior 
season for the 1992 Clarion 
University Golden Eagle 
baseball team earned him the 
summer job of a lifetime - as a 
professional baseball player. 

The left-handed Frazicr, a 
former pitcher at Clarion 
University, was drafted by the 
National League expansion 
Florida Marlins in the 40th round 
of the major league baseball 
draft last spring. 

Frazier reported to the Marlins 
camp in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 
on June 6 for about one week 
then received his assignment to 
play in Erie, Pa in the New York- 
Penn League. The Erie Sailors 
contended in the Stedler 
Division in their first season 
affiliated with the expansion 
Marlins. 

Frazier and the Marlins 
received a lot of press over the 
summer for being the Marlins' 
first active professional baseball 
club. 



Among the top names who 
played in the NY-P League are 
Pete Rose, Phil Niekro, Dwight 
Goodcn, Doug Drabck, Wade 
Boggs, Don Mattingly, Robin 
Yount, Bobby Thigpcn, Bill 
Madlock, Tony Perez, Jim Rice, 
Kent Tckulvc, Omar Moreno and 
Dclino Dcshiclds. 

Frazicr was excited to be 
signed professionally and his 
major concern was to prove that 
he could pitch at that level. 

For most of the summer, he 
was not only proving that he 
could pitch but proving that he 
could be great. 

Frazicr was sporting a nifty 
ERA of just over two runs a 
game with only two weeks to go 
in the season. That's when 
Frazier admitted that the long 
season and heavy work load got 
to him. He ended the season 
with a 1-3 won-loss record and 
an ERA of around five runs a 
game. 

There is no doubt that Frazier 
made good impressions on the 
organization over the season. 
His most impressive statistics 
included an opponents batting 
average of only .230 against him. 
He allowed an average of less 
than one hit per inning while 
striking out 36 hitters in 31 
innings. 

When Brad Frazier wasn't 
pitching, the rest of his summer 
might have best been compared 
to the movie "Bull Durham". 



Jameswa u 



Monday-Saturday 9AM-9PM 
Sunday 11 AM-5PM 

WELCOMES BACK 
COLLEGE STUDENTS! 

Receive a 



\m 







Discount 

with your 
Student I.D. Card 



One Time Only Coupon 

Student Name: 

I.D. #: 



Offer now thru Sept. 17. 1 W2 
Offer good on everything in Hie siure (does not include tobacco item, 

layaway balances, or sales lax) 

Rte 322E, Clarion, PA 16214 
814-226-8723 



The Sailors often travelled on 
long bus rides, only to reach a 
motel at 2 am. They travelled to 
play teams from all over 
Pennsylvania, New York and 
even Canada. Frazicr claims to 
know just about every card game 
ever invented and often found 
himself sitting in a motel room, 
watching free HBO. 

As far as instruction, Frazicr 
said that it isn't that different 
than at the college level, just a 
little more on an individual 
basis. 

The instruction that Frazicr 
received while at Clarion 
University helped him to be 
named the PSAC's "Co-Player 
of the Year" and the PSAC-West 
"Player of the Year" in 1992. He 
compiled an overall record of 5- 
3 for the Golden Eagles last 
spring, winning his last five 
games. In 52.1 innings, Frazier 
yielded only 22 hits, posted 73 
strikeouts and had a seven- 
inning ERA of 0.80 and a nine- 
inning ERA of 1.03. He 
finished the season with a 
Clarion record of 26 scoreless 
innings, plus yielded only two 
runs in his final five games. In 
those last five games, he tossed 
36 innings, gave up nine hits, 
had 50 strikeouts and only 
walked ten for a five-game, nine- 
inning ERA of only 0.50. 

Frazier's hot hand at the end of 
the 1992 season helped the 
Golden Eagles win seven of their 
final ten games and five of their 
last six PSAC contests. Clarion 
finished with a 12-17 record, 
while placing fourth in the 
PSAC-West with a 8-12 mark. 




Scott Shoaf/Clarion Call 
Now property of the Marlins, Brad Frazier is shown here 
when he pitched for his alma mater, Clarion University. 

In 1991, Frazier compiled an inning ERA of 1.74. 



overall record of 4-4 while 
pitching 51.1 innings. During 
this junior campaign, Frazier 
gave up 50 hits, struck out 60, 
had a seven-inning E.R.A. of 
1.91 and a nine-inning E.R.A. of 
2.45. 

In his two seasons at CUP, 
Frazier tossed 103.2 innings, 
yielding 72 hits, struck out 133, 
had a record of 9-7 with a seven- 
inning ERA of 1.35 and a nine- 



"Brad is an outstanding person 
and player," said baseball coach 
Rich Herman. "He's dedicated, 
hard working and extremely 
unselfish, the ingredients of a 
winner." 

Frazier said that his goal is to 
continue playing baseball and to 
continue advancing in his career. 
He also hopes to receive his 
degree in Elementary Education 
at Clarion. 



Catch the Golden Eagles in action... 



Thursday September 10 



Saturday September 12 - 



Monday September 14 
Tuesday September 15 ■ 
Thursday September 17 
Friday September 18 - 
Saturday September 19 



Volleyball vs. California at 7 p.m. (Tippin 
Gymnasium). 
Golf at Slippery Rock 

Tennis vs. Mercyhurst at noon (courts behind 
Campbell Hall) 

X-Country at St. Bonaventure Invitational 
(folf at Gannon 
Volleyball at IUP 
GoIfatEdinboro 

Volleyball at East Stroudsburg Tournament 
Tennis Blue/Gold Match at 10:30 a.m. (behind 
Campbell) 

X-Country at IUP Invitational 
Volleyball at East Stroudsburg Tournament 
Football vs. New Haven at 2 p.m. (Memorial 
Stadium) 



n 



I 



1 




Y»}f 



Roommate Needed 



Looking for responsible 
female roommate, -rent 
$162.50/month -2 
bedrooms (own room) - 
utilities paid Call Sharon 
affter 9:00 pm. or before 
noon at 227-2990. 



Help Wanted 



Gymnastics Instructors 
needed. Experience 
preferred. Call Amy - 
677-3000. 



Spring Break '93 - Sell 
Trips, Earn Cash and Go 
Free!!! Student Travel 
Services is now hiring 
campus representatives. 
Skipaackages also 
avaible. Call 1-800-648- 
4849. 



Looking for student groups 
to sponsor us on campus. 
Fast, easy, big $,$, $'s! 
Call at (800) 592-2121 
extension 309. 



$200 - $500 Weekly 
Assemblee products at 
home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid direct. Fully 
Guaranteed. Free 
Information - 24 Hour 
Hotline. 801-379-2900. 
Copyright#PA10KDH 



Sales 



Cheap! FBI/U.S. Seized 

89 Mercedes. . .$200 
86VW. . . $50 87 
Meercedes. . . $100 65 
Mustang. . . $50 Choose 
from thousands starting 
$25. Free Information - 
24 hour hotline. 801-379- 
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$100 86 Bronco. . . $50 
91 Blazer. ..$150 77 Jeep 
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FREE Information - 24 
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Personals 



Stop Abuse For Everyone, 
Inc. (SAFE), Clarion 
County's Domestic 
Violence Agency, is 
seeking sincere adults to 
become members of the 
volunteer staff. The 
training program will 
include instruction in crisis 
intervintion and 
communication/listening 
skills. Training will begin 
on Tuesday, September 15. 
Sessions will meet on 
Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings through October 
22. Interested individuals 
should call 226-8481 for 
more information. You 
can help by being a 
volunteer! 



Delta Phi Epsilon would 
like to wish everyone good 
luck for the Fall 92 
semester. 



Happy Birthday to all of 
the summer birthdays of D 
PhiE. 



Happy 21st Birthday to Jill 
and Robin. See you at the 
bars girls! 



To the brothers ofTau 
Kappa Epsilon. You have 
our deepest sympathy. 
Mike ment something 
special to all of us. Love, 
the sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Tau. 



Welcome back everyone! 
Have a great semester! 
Love the sisters of AST. 



Tri-Sigma would like to 
welcome all students back 
to school and wishes 
everyone a successful 
semester. 



Tri-Sigma extends our 
deepest sympathy to the 
family and friends, and 
TKE brothers of Mike 
Taylor. Our prayers and 
thoughts are with you. 



Welcome back Kappa 
Delta Rho brothers- best 
wishes for a successful 
year. Love Michelle. 



Phi Sigma Sigma- Oh. the 
Places You'll Go! Get 
siked for the best year yet! 
Let's get 'em girls! Rush, 
Rush, Rush! 



Tiger, So sorry things had 
to work out this way. 
We'll always have Paris. I 
can't help being human. 
Love always, The Bear 
and me! 



To the relocated members 
of Nair Hall Candy Shop, 
It's gonna be a great year. 
Who loves ya babe? Study 
hard now! The Great 21. 



Happy 20th Birthday to 
Wesley, from the one who 
loves you most, Edith. 



Hey, C-Dub! We've got to 
keep the tradition going! I 
didn't make Milt one, so 
you don't make me one. Of 
course, I could use $10. I 
gave my money away. -Sit 



Clarion Call 
Classifieds 



270 Gemmell Hall Clarion University Clarion, Pa. 

16214 226-2380 



Classifieds must be turned in by 12:00 Tuesday, the 
week of publication. 



10 words = $1.00 

Every 5 additional words= $0.50 



Date of 
publication 



Bill 
to 



Address 

Phone 
number 



Signature 



***Classifieds will not be printed if there is no signature 
or phone number. Classified ads under $5.00 require 
prepayment. 



'. 



Message (please print clearly): 






k 



FREE 

Membership with this coupon 

Wilkinson TV & Video 

44 1st Avenue (Across from the stadium) 

TV'S VIDEO'S SEGA 

VCR'S NINTENDO GENESIS 

M-TH: VCR Rentals $5.99 + 2 FREE Movies 



Page 24 v - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 




What's NEW at the 



nfversity Book Center 



& 




Send a little 
special magic to 
someone special 

from the 

University Book Center 

Gemmd! Complex, Payne Street 

We will deliver: 

Flowers! Boxed Candy! 

Balloons! 

Special gift packages designed to your 

specifications! 

Let us make an ordinary day extra special! 
FREE DELIVERY, on or near campus, with a $5.00 

purchase. 



Never carry cash again - Just your ID! 

Open an EXPRESS PLUS ACCOUNT 

and use your ID for any purchase in the 

Rook Center or Express Shop 

CASH FOR BOOKS 
EVERY WEEK DAY! 



Sell your books back 

ANY weekday 
from 8:30am - 4:30pm 

at our Service Counter 




Uniuersity Book Center 
ELECTRONICS DEPARTMENT 



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The UBC will be open Family Day, 
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Shop the UBC, where y our $$$ 



?/ In a hurry? 
Stop in the 

NEW CLARION EXPRESS SHOP, 

a special convenience for the students, faculty 

and staff. 
EXPRESS SHOP HOURS: 

Monday - Thursday: 8:30am - 10:00pm 

Friday: 8u30am - 12 Midnight 

Saturday: 10:00am - 12 Midnight 

Sunday: 11:00am - 10:00pm 

continue to work for you! 



m 




mKtHmm *#&>-■» -•&** 




Volume 74, Issue 2 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 17, 1992 




who will \participate is tn< 

ribbon cutting, . Ffee 

i nmen*>rauve Wail" w 

SBbHH|^bHHL 

o made <Jot^ ;:-.•••: -o help aid 
in the corssiractiois df i^cente 
on veiled at lh 
; ceremony. 

ITie late Dr. GemmeU (191 < 
1 1986>'4ed .Cteten to its ge 
j increase in enrollment, gukk 
most dramati 
academic 



oug 



addition in term* 
facilities and new construct 
The dedication ceremony 
recognize Gemmel! foi 

>u islanding educati 
leadership and servi 
university . : ' 



acil 
reaming 
Gesame! 




xnpiex 



GemmeU student center completed 
after two years of construction 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features writer 



The fall 1992 school year 
brings many new and exciting 
features to Clarion University. 
But the one feature that has 
many people buzzing is the new 
James GemmeU Student 
Complex. 

The $6 million construction 
and renovation project was 
entirely funded by student fees. 
It involved the construction of a 
two-story, steel frame addition of 
approximately 48,000 square 
feet to Reimer Student Center 
and renovations of 17,700 square 
feet of the original 24,000 square 
foot center. 

One of the main facilities of 
GemmeU is the new book center, 
featuring an expanded line of 
books, clothing, souvenir items 
and a Greek store. The adjacent 
Express Shop is also a handy 
convenience store for the 
studenis. 



The newly remodeled snack 
bar, located across from the 
game room, is operated by 
Service America Corporation 
and seats approximately 200 
people. It offers food in a 
modified food court setting. 
Students can pay for their food 
through the flex dollar program 
or with cash. Therefore, every 
student has access to the food 
court. 

Other new facilities offered at 
the GemmeU Center include 
three raquetball courts, an 
aerobics center, a fitness center, 
three meeting/conference rooms 
and a multi-purpose room 
capable of hosting a catered 
banquet or dances. The room 
also has a fixed stage suitable for 
small performances, lectures and 
band concerts. 

Offices located within the 
complex include: University 
Center Director, Clarion Student 
Association, Credit Union, 
Greek Life, Student Activities, 




«'iO 




Public Affairs file photo 
Construction was started on the GemmeU student center in 
December of 1990. 



-i.JBii 



iriairti&taw 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The finishing touches were placed on GemmeU this past 
summer. 



United Campus Ministry, 
University Activities Board, and 
special activities programs. 

Student offices include: 
WCCB radio, the Clarion Call, 
the "Sequelle," African- 
American Student Union and 
Returning Adults and Commuter 
Students (RACS). There is also 
a lounge for RACS, a TV lounge 
outside the book center and a 
computer laboratory. 

The GemmeU Center project 
began in 1980. The main reason 
was to serve students' needs. 
Because of increased enroUment, 
student groups expressed interest 
in expanding the center and 
obtained permission from the 
university to research the project. 
During the spring of 1987, a 
feasibility study was completed 
for the expansion of Reimer 
Student Center and a pre- 
liminary design was developed. 
The following fall semester, 
students voted to pay for the 
expansion. 



During the next two years, 
further planning was spent on the 
GemmeU complex and actual 
construction began on December 
17, 1990. The GemmeU Center 
became an addition to the 
Reimer Center, which still exists 
on the old part of the building. 

President Reinhard, former 
Student Senate President 
Jennifer Yaple, and Dr. Dana 
Still broke ground for the the $6 
million student center. 

Dave Tomeo, director of 
University Centers, said that 
students need to be aware and 
use these facilities because this 
"complex is for the students and 
they paid for it." 
According to Tomeo, the 

complex is available on a rental 
basis for conferences or 
workshops. Those interested in 
using space in GemmeU should 
contact Tomeo at 226- 2312. 

GemmeU photo layout 
on pages 12 and 13 



Page 24 v - The Clarion Call - 9-10-92 







M 



'■Y^ 






Send a little 
special magic to 
someone special 




from the 



Gemmdl Complex, Payne Street 



We will deliver: 

Flowers! Boxed Candy! 

Balloons! 

Special gift packages designed to your 

specifications! 

Let us make an ordinary day extra special! 

FREE DELIVERY, on or near campus, with a $5.00 

purchase. 



Never carry cash again - Just your ID! 

Open an EXPRESS PLUS ACCOUNT 

and use your ID for any purchase in the 

Book Center or Express Shop 




Sell your books back 

ANY weekday 
from 8:30am - 4:30pm K*& 

at our Service Counter ^ 





a 



Uniuersity Bouk Center 
ELECTRONICS DEPARTMENT 





Beep* rles*- Remote 
Telephone Answerer 



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■ Ttiepfwitfi, Antwert'l and ACHMOtttl 
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The 1 BC 1 will be open Family Day, 

September 19th, from 10am - 6pm. 

Shop the I BC. where 



In a hurry? 
Stop in the 

NEW CLARION EXPRESS SHOP, 

a special convenience for the students, faculty 

and staff. 
EXPRESS SHOP HOURS: 

Monday - Thursday: 8:30am - 10:00pm 

Friday: 8:30am - 12 Midnight 

Saturday: 10:00am -12 Midnight 

Sunday: 11:00am - 10:00pm 

von r $SS eon t in ne to work for you! 



The Clarion Call 

Volume 74, Issue 2 The student newspa per of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 17, 1992 

Gemmell student center completed 



Gemmell 

dedication 

ceremony 

planned 

The new student complex will 
be dedicated in honor of Dr 
James Gemmell, the 12th 
president of Clarion University. 
A dedication ceremony for 
Gemmell will be held on 
Saturday, September 19 at 11 
a.m. All students are invited to 
attend and refreshments will be 
served. Members of the 
Gemmell family are expected to 
attend. 

The ceremony will be opened 
by President Diane L. Reinhard, 
who will participate in the 
ribbon cutting. The 

Commemorative Wall," which 
recognizes students since 1989 
who made donations to help aid 
in the construction of the center, 
will be unveiled at the 
ceremony. 

The late Dr. Gemmell (1914- 
1986) led Clarion to its largest 
increase in enrollment, guided it 
through its most dramatic 
growth in academic programs 
and oversaw a significant 
addition in terms of physical 
facilities and new construction 
The dedication ceremony will 
recognize Gemmell for his 
'outstanding educational 
leadership and service at the 
university ." 

The Clarion University 
Council of Trustees approved 
naming the complex in honor of 
Gemmell in January, 1991. The 
ceremony is one of the first 
events scheduled this academic 
year in recognition of the 125th 
anniversary of the founding of 
Clarion University. 

Family Day is also scheduled 
for Saturday. These events will 
include university sports, a 
comedian and a dance. 

Activities Day will be held 
Sunday, September 20 which 
will include exhibits, a mini- 
concert, a movie and other 
activities. All will be held at the 
Gemmell Center. 



after two years of construction 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features writer 



The fall 1992 school year 
brings many new and exciting 
features to Clarion University. 
But the one feature that has 
many people buzzing is the new 
James Gemmell Student 
Complex. 

The $6 million construction 
and renovation project was 
entirely funded by student fees. 
It involved the construction of a 
two-story, steel frame addition of 
approximately 48,000 square 
feet to Reimer Student Center 
and renovations of 17,700 square 
feet of the original 24,000 square 
foot center. 

One of the main facilities of 
Gemmell is the new book center, 
featuring an expanded line of 
books, clothing, souvenir items 
and a Greek store. The adjacent 
Express Shop is also a handy 
convenience store for the 
students. 



The newly remodeled snack 
bar, located across from the 
game room, is operated by 
Service America Corporation 
and seats approximately 200 
people. It offers food in a 
modified food court setting. 
Students can pay for their food 
through the flex dollar program 
or with cash. Therefore, every 
student has access to the food 
court. 

Other new facilities offered at 
the Gemmell Center include 
three raquetball courts, an 
aerobics center, a fitness center, 
three meeting/conference rooms 
and a multi-purpose room 
capable of hosting a catered 
banquet or dances. The room 
also has a fixed stage suitable for 
small performances, lectures and 
band concerts. 

Offices located within the 
complex include: University 
Center Director, Clarion Student 
Association, Credit Union, 
Greek Life, Student Activities, 




'■'ftjtfi^* 




Public Affairs file photo 
Construction was started on the Gemmell student center in 
December of 1990. 



The finishing touches were 
summer. 

United Campus Ministry, 
University Activities Board, and 
special activities programs. 

Student offices include: 
WCCB radio, the Clarion Call, 
the "Sequelle," African- 
American Student Union and 
Returning Adults and Commuter 
Students (RACS). There is also 
a lounge for RACS, a TV lounge 
outside the book center and a 
computer laboratory. 

The Gemmell Center project 
began in 1980. The main reason 
was to serve students' needs. 
Because of increased enrollment, 
student groups expressed interest 
in expanding the center and 
obtained permission from the 
university to research the project. 
During the spring of 1987, a 
feasibility study was completed 
for the expansion of Reimer 
Student Center and a pre- 
liminary design was developed. 
The following fall semester, 
students voted to pay for the 
expansion. 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
placed on Gemmell this past 

During the next two years, 
further planning was spent on the 
Gemmell complex and actual 
construction began on December 
17, 1990. The Gemmell Center 
became an addition to the 
Reimer Center, which still exists 
on the old part of the building. 

President Reinhard, former 
Student Senate President 
Jennifer Yaple, and Dr. Dana 
Still broke ground for the the $6 
million student center. 

Dave Tomeo, director of 
University Centers, said that 
students need to be aware and 
use these facilities because this 
"complex is for the students and 
they paid for it." 
According to Tomeo, the 

complex is available on a rental 
basis for conferences or 
workshops. Those interested in 
using space in Gemmell should 
contact Tomeo at 226- 2312. 

Gemmell photo layout 
on pages 12 and 13 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 

Opinion 



The Clarion Call- 9-17-92 - Page 3 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-Chief 
Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 
Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 
Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 
Sports Editor 
A.J. Meeker 
Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

Tara Sheesley 

Ad Design 

Amy Conner 

Advertising Manager 

Ted Howard 

Business Manager 

Art Barlow 
i Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revpnnp 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$ 12.00 

Academic Year...$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 




W 



J 



Hide Park 






Four more 
years 



On November 3 of this year, 
the American people are going to 
make a decision concerning the 
country's future. Can the nation 
stand another four years with 
conservatism? Can this country 
withstand another four years of 
an unemployment increase? 

During the republican 
convention this year, Americans 
heard a segment on "family 
values," which doesn't 
necessarily pertain to the major 
issues facing our nation today. 
So far, Bush has done the 
opposite of everything he claims 
he believes and stands for 
especially his topic of family 
values. After the Persian Gulf 
War, Bush has done nothing 
except veto all of the "family 
value" issues. Whatever 
happened to Congress' proposal 
on child health care? It was 
vetoed by a man claiming strong 
family values. And what about 
the Iran Contra Scandal? 
President Bush denies any 
involvement. Unfortunately, 
something has gone wrong 
because recently a tape has been 
found of President Bush 
agreeing to go along with selling 
weapons for the hostages. Plus, 
Bush, around this time just four 
years ago, promised not to raise 
taxes. Promises should be kept, 
not broken. But, if there is a 
promise broken, then it shouldn't 
have been made. 

Americans should take a stand 
on the abortion issues. Here it is 
again: old news. In the First 
Amendment, Americans have 
the freedom of speech, of public 
media, and also the freedom to 
make a decision. This country is 
a democracy. Now, President 
Bush decides to change the 
constitution by trying to regulate 




Kelley Mahoney 

what is written, read, listened to 
and heard. Women are allowed 
to vote, but if this persists, in 
another four years, that may also 
change. Abortion is a personal 
issue, not a women's liberation 
issue. Privacy and a human right 
is being violated by taking that 
right away. 

Education is another issue that 
is being ignored. The American 
middle class finds it difficult to 
earn the money necessary to 
send their children to college. 
Financial Aid only covers a 
certain amount if the 

(Cont. on pg.4) 



During the past two weeks, I 
have had the opportunity to 
overhear quite a few 
conversations among students. 
And what I heard rather 
surprised me. 

Many of you expressed anger 
and discontent over the 42 new 
signs on campus. The common 
argument seems to be, "If the 
state has such a lack of money to 
put towards education, then why 
in heaven's name has so much 
money gone into appearances on 
our campus?" 

That's a good question. 
Tuition increased 25 percent for 
out-of-state students. Programs 
are being cut from the 
departments. Classes are 
overflowing. Everyone is 
crying, "Education is suffering!" 
Yet, there is money available 
from some source to put up 
illuminated maps of Clarion's 
campus. 

Forty-five thousand dollars 
was spent on those signs. Isn't 
that a bit much for something 
that has absolutely no affect on 
my education? They might be 
beneficial if I were a geography 
student or a graphics art student, 
but I have no aspirations to be 
either of those. 

If you really think about it, a 
person or an institution could do 



a lot with $45,000. I was all 
fired up about this outrageous 
amount of money. How dare 
they spend that much on campus 
appearance when my graduating 
on time is hanging in the 
balance. 

I made a few phone calls and 
what I discovered is frustrating. 
The money for the signs did not 
come from the state. Instead, it 
came from private contributions 
through the Clarion University 
Foundation. In 1988, the money 
was specifically set aside by the 
board for the purpose of 
implementing a visual identity 
program. This would aid in 
promoting the university's image 
for recruitment and enhance 
campus appearance. 

Funds from the Foundation are 
distributed at the request of the 
donators, or if no request is made 
they go into a general fund. This 
money is not used in conjunction 
with state aid and is totally 
separate from it. 

I went along with that, but I 
still felt the Foundation should 
help students get through these 
financially difficult times instead 
of spending money on signs 
which have no bearing on 
education. I struck out on this 
reasoning, as well. Last year, 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 




CHPgKHJJER'j 




WAY I SEE IT •• 



* 



Bush: It's time to tip balance in owl debate toward more jobs 



COLVILLE, Wash. (AP) 
Saying it is time to balance the 
scales in the northern spotted 
owl debate, President Bush said 
Monday he won't sign a new 
Endangered Species Act unless it 
contains provisions for more 
timber jobs. 

The president told a cheering 
crowd at the Vaagen Bros. 
Lumber Co. mill that he wants to 
put an end to injunctions that tie 
up timber sales on federal lands, 
and would support legislation to 
require that all raw logs cut on 
publicly owned lands are 
processed in the United States. 

"I will not sign an extension 
of the Endangered Species Act 
unless it gives greater 
consideration to jobs ... families 
and communities," Bush said. 



"It is time to put people ahead 
of owls," he told a crowd 
estimated at 3,500, about half the 
number state Republican 
officials had hoped would turn 
out. Officials last week passed 
out 7,000 free tickets to mill 
workers and others. 

"The president has come 
somewhat late to this problem," 
House Speaker Tom Foley, D- 
Wash., told reporters outside the 
U.S. Capitol as Bush was 
making the remarks in Foley's 
home district. 

"We need to worry about jobs 
today. We also need to worry 
about preservation of the forests 
tomorrow," Foley said, adding 
lawmakers must be sure that in 
seeking to protect endangered 
species, "we also consider other 



values in the community and 
society." 

Sara Folger of the Inland 
Northwest Public Lands Council 
of Spokane said Bush "was 
simply pandering to the 
audience. We've heard the jobs 
rhetoric before." 

Bush was introduced by Sen. 
Slade Gorton, R-Wash., as "the 
most important factor standing 
between you and the 
preservationists' hurricane." 

The president canceled a 
planned Aug. 31 stop here to 
visit Florida after Hurricane 
Andrew. 

The president blamed the 
Endangered Species Act and 
efforts made to protect the 
threatened northern spotted owl 
for the loss of thousands of 




327 W. Main St. 

Clarion, PA 

Sun-Thurs 

11AM-12AM 

Fri-Sat 

11AM-2AM 

Delivery 

within 

30 minutes 




i 








timber-industry jobs. 

He said he wants Congress to 
submit a plan with specific 
harvest levels for national forests 
"to keep people working in 
1993 and beyond." 

Bush said he would fight to 
end injunctions that are tying up 
sales of federal timber and called 
for 2.6 billion board feet of 
timber to be cut in the region 
next year. That's down from the 
2.96 billion board feet cut in 
Washington and Oregon this 
year. 

Bush used the Olympic 
Peninsula town of Forks, about 
300 miles west of Washington, 
as an example of the economic 
crisis that spotted owl-protection 
measures have created. '•- 

He said the shutdown of the 
town's lumber mill increased the 
unemployment rate there to 20 
percent. 

"Forks is in crisis because the 
balance has been lost," Bush 
said. 

He said the requirement to 
domestically process all logs cut 
on public lands is needed 
because "it's time to put mills 
back to work." 

Currently, 75 percent of raw 
logs from public lands must.be 
processed in the, United States. 
The proposal for 100 percent 
domestic processing has been 
opposed by the Commerce 
Department because of its 
potential impact on trade 
relations. 

Bush said the Endangered 



Species Act "is being used by 
people with extreme views to 
achieve in the courts what no 
sane official ever dreamed." 

He called Democrat Bill 
Clinton's proposed summit on 
timber issues "doublespeak." 

"I will not stand for a solution 
that puts 32,000 people out of 
work," Bush said, referring to 
projected timber-industry job 
losses. "That solution will not 
stand." 

The Vaagen Brothers mill 
employs about 200 and until 
recently had a fairly steady 
supply of federal timber, 
president Duane Vaagen said. 

The Colville National Forest, 
where Vaagen Brothers gets 
most of its timber, is not a 
spotted-owl protection area. 

But 13 of 15 proposed timber 
sales in the forest have been 
appealed in the last 18 months _ 
two of them by a group of 
college students in Connecticut, 
forest planning chief Warren 
Current said. 

Bush, who did not get the 
endorsement of unions 
representing 125,000 timber 
workers, last week signed an 
order allowing the Forest Service 
to speed up sales of dead timber, 
without the usual environmental 
studies and citizen appeals. 

After his speech, Bush flew by 
helicopter to Spokane, where he 
met with Republicans at a 
$5,000-a-head reception before 
flying to Medford, Ore. 



I 



Dotors discover new 
drug for AIDS virus 



TUCSON (AP) University of 
Arizona doctors say a drug they 
helped develop could replace 
AZT as life-prolonging drug for 
people who gets the AIDS virus. 

The drug, spavudine, or D4T, 
is the latest in a limited number 
of medications that apparently 
stop the progress of HIV, the 
human immunodeficiency vims 
that causes AIDS. 

"It's not the final answer, but 
it looks promising," said Dr. 
Eskild Petersen, an infectious 
disease specialist who has 
directed the university's study of 
D4T since July 1990. 

D4T is an anti-retroviral drug 
which has been used with others 
to prolong the lives of people 
with the virus. Without a cure, 
doctors have used the drugs to 
slow the ability of the virus to 
weaken and destroy the immune 
system. 



The most common of these 
drugs is AZT, but it causes 
serious side effects, including 
blood problems. 

But D4T appears to be less 
toxic and more effective than 
AZT, doctors said. 

The university was one of 
seven centers to test D4T and 
has tried it on about 45 patients, 
Petersen said. 

He and Dr. Kevin Carmichael, 
a family practice specialist with 
the university AIDS program, 
think D4T may become the drug 
of choice for people with HIV. 

The federal Food and Drug 
Administration is expected to 
make D4T widely available to 
patients with HIV and AIDS in 
another month through a 
program that allows drugs to be 
distributed to patients while 
studies are still being conducted. 



l- 



** 



Page 4 -^The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 

S.T.A.R. presents 'First Sexual Assault- Awareness Week 1 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 - Page 5 



By Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 



S.T.A.R. ( Students Together 
Against Rape) is ready for 
another semester to administer to 
students needs and alert first year 
students about rape on campus. 

The organization has planned a 
"First Sexual Assault- Awareness 
Week" on September 21-25, 
1992. The week will consist of 
meetings, speakers and open 
forums for students. 

Dr. Franklin Takei, Professor of 



philosophy, will speak at 8 p.m. 
in Carter Auditorium, in Still 
Hall. Takei's lecture 

"Confessions of a Male 
Chauvinist Pig" will tell the 
story of a man's relationship with 
his "significant other" who saw 
and conquered his male 
chauvinism, in turn helped to 
build a better human being. 

Tuesday S.T.A.R. will hold its 
first meeting at 4 pm in 250 
Gemmell. Then on Wednesday, 
there will be an open discussion 



on how race impacts sexual 
assault. This will be at 7 p.m. in 
Multicultural Center Becht Hall. 

Finally on Thursday, it is the 
Nancy Day Concert. Day is a 
sexual assault survivor. She is a 
composer and performing artist 
who expresses her experience 
and recovery of sexual assault. 

Day's songs range in emotion 
from the "desperate" to the 
"triumphant" and include her 
signature song "Without Music." 
She also composed the theme 



Four more years 

(Contt. from pg.2) 



parents make over a certain 
amount of money annually. Even 
with aid, both the families and 
graduates are faced with tuition 
fees, which leads into another 
important issue, unemployment. 
Over nine million Americans 
are unemployed today many of 
those who do work aren't making 
enough to survive. Why isn't 
anything being done to take care 
of these people issues? Are they 
not important? What about those 
who have a college degree, but 
aren't able to find a job 
anywhere? What is being done to 



make jobs available? Also, Bush 
feels that the public school 
system should be dropped in 
order for children to attend a 
private one. Nice thought. But if 
nine million people are 
unemployed, how can they be 
expected to pay for a private 
school? In this "Land of 
Opportunity," this shouldn't be 
happening. It's ironic how Bush 
claims to be the "education 
president" when the educational 
issues have been placed on the 
backbumer. 

On November 3, American's 



have a choice. Both candidates 
are right when they say that the 
United States needs a change. 
Instead of the Republican's being 
more concerned with Mr. 
Clinton, they should start being 
concerned with the real issues. If 
these issues are put off any 
longer, this land of plenty will be 
considered the land of the poor. 



Kelley Mahoney is a senior 

Communication major at 

Clarion University 



The Way. . . 

(Cont. from pg.2) 



the Foundation awarded over 
$420,000 to 420 students in the 
form of scholarships. 

So, knowing what I know, how 
come I don't feel better about 
those $45,000 signs? It's 
probably because the campus 
map is not going to help me get 
an "A" in my classes. The signs 
with the building names are not 
going to put any more resources 
at my fingertips that what are 
already available. 

If you come right down to it, 
those signs have absolutely no 
bearing on my life and for that 
kind of money, it bothers me. I 
guess it's much easier to vent my 



frustration and anger at signs 
worth thousands of dollars than 
it is to say, "Look Governor 
Casey, I've got a bore to pick 
with you." 

Sometimes it's annoying to see 
those signs every day and know 
that I will probably never meet 
Governor Casey and express just 
what I think of his priorities. 

That much money spent on 
signs seems like a waste. I 
realize some people felt it was 
necessary. 

And I realize the money was 
specifically for that and nothing 
else. That in itself is frustrating. 

This institution desperately 



Attention all SCJ 
members: 

A mandatory 

meeting will be held 

lYiesday, September 

22 at 7:00 p.m. in 

248 Gemmel. 

Elections will be 

held. If you cannot 

attend call Michelle 

at 226-2380. 



Muslim 

Students 

Association 

The Juma meeting 

will occur in 40 

Campbell every 

Friday, at 1:50 

p.m. The 

executive election 

will take place this 

Friday after the 

Juma meeting. 



needs money. And, because of 
the system, beauracratic red tape 
and the way the Foundation's 
board allots funds — teachers will 
not be hired and new programs 
will not be instituted through this 
source. 

This is the ultimate in 
frustration. The money is 
there — it just can't be used for 
those things which seem most 
important, right now. 



News editor, Alan Vaughn, will 
write next week's editorial. 



Jtozvers n ,f Bozvs 

*Full line of 
fresh 
flowers, 
balloons, 
and plants 



"Friendly service 
We deliver mn/ivhere! 



625 Wood St. 

226-7171 




song for the National Children's 
Network telethon and in 1986 
was voted Pittsburgh Pianist of 
the year. 

Day's work has earned her a 
citation by the Pennsylvania 
Coalition Against Rape for her 
contribution to anti-violence 
work as an artist. 

S.T.A.R. was founded in the 
fall of 1991 by students who 
were concerned with rape on 
campus. The purpose of this 
organization is to make the 
college community more aware 



of the issues of sexual 
harassment, date rapes and 
sexual assault. Focus is being put 
on the treatment of both the 
assailant and the victim by 
counseling them. 

This semester, S.T.A.R. needs 
new members for different 
committees such as, peer 
counseling, peer education, 
publicity and legislative 
research. And it's open to all the 
people "who want to be more 
than just aware of the problem 
and want to make a difference" 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Tri Sigma Sigma raised funds for Hurricane Andrew 
victims in front of Carlson. They would like to thank 
those who donated. 



^■■■■■■■■■■i^ia^iiiiiliiililiiil^ililiiiliBiliiiliB. 




DESicnmG miriDS 



STUDEI1T 
DAYS 



$10 Haircuts on Tuesdays 

535 Main Street/Clarion, PA 16214 

Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Friday - 9 to 8 Saturday - 9 to 4 



* 



1 * 

! 




Student Senate Vice President resigns 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 



Ron Berry, Vice President of 
Student Senate, resigned from 
his elected position Monday 
night at the weekly Senate 
meeting. Berry gave up the 
position due to financial 
difficulties. He explained his 
actions in the following 
statement released to the Call, 
Tuesday night. 

"The reason for my 
resignation is quite simple: my 
financial resources have been 
exhausted, and I must now work 
to pay for my tuition. To be 
honest, I feel betrayed by both 
the university and by the state of 
Pennsylvania for making it so 
difficult for a middle-class 
student to continue his or her 
education after high school. 
During my lifetime, universities 
have been for the upper class 
(who can afford the costs) and 
for the lower class (who are sent 
to college for free). What about 
the middle class students? 

I would like to take a 



moment and publicly apologize 
to Governor Casey for my 
parents being employed. I would 
like to apologize for coming 
from a home where my parents 
are still married and not 
divorced. 

I would also like to apologize 
for not selling drugs, holding up 
liquor stores or stealing old 
ladies' purses so that I can afford 
to pay for that part of my tuition 
that my parents cannot afford. I 
guess what I'm trying to say to 
Governor Casey is I would like 
to apologize for being average; 
the middle-class student needs 
more money from the state and 
from the university. 

I was told at the Financial Aid 
office that the only way for me 
to get a loan or grant would be if 
I joined the military or received 
money from my parents. 
Unfortunately, the only way to 
get money from my parents 
would be to kill them, since it 
costs one-third of their gross 
income to send my brother and 
me to college every year." 



Berry's announcement came as 
a surprise to many of the student 
senator's at Monday night's 
meeting. 

Berry is still acting as a student 
senator and will fulfill the duties 
as befitting the position. 

Berry did not receive a full 
loan this year because he 
borrowed his alloted amount for 
his junior year, last year. 

He is a few credits shy of senior 
status and is, therefore, 
technically considered a junior 
and not eligible for a full loan 
this semester. 

Berry does have a job to 
support some of his college 
expenses, and he is still active in 
many of his other extracurricular 
activities. 

"I had a choice, either to resign 
from everything except work, 
senate and classes or to resign 
from one of these things and to 
keep everything else," said 
Berry. 

He is still actively involved in 
the Sigma Chi fraternity and the 
soap opera aired by TV 5. 



Campuses combat crime 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



A Tionesta man was arrested 
Tuesday evening following a 
chase involving Clarion Borough 
Police, Pennsylvania State Police 
and Clarion University Public 
Safety. 

According to Tom Schott of 
Clarion University Public 
Information, a suspicious person 
was reported outside Wilkinson 
hall. The individual was 
identified as James T. Brown, a 
non-student, and was asked to 
leave campus by Public Safety. 

Later in the evening, Brown 
was again found on campus 
grounds. While being escorted 
from campus by public safety 
officers, Brown fled the scene in 
his automobile. 

Brown was pursued by Clarion 
Borough Police along route 322, 
where Brown crashed his car and 
fled the scene on foot. 

Pennsylvania State Police 
arrested Brown, and he is 
currently being held in Clarion 
County Jail in lieu of $3,000 



■f 'll ' l'l 'l 'l 'll' l' l' l' l 'l' l'l ■■■■■■ ■■'■'■■■■■'■'■■■'■ r 



vrrrra j t n * 



bond. Public Safety has charged 
Brown with defiant trespass, 
prowling and loitering at night. 

Clarion University is not the 
only school facing disturbances 
on its campus. Other schools 
across the nation are seeing 
similar problems occuring on 
their campuses. 

According to the College Press 
Service, one in every four 
college women has been raped or 
sexually assaulted. In 1990, 
Clarion University reported no 
rapes on campus and two sex 
offenses. 

The most dangerous place on 
campuses are the dorms, where 
more crime takes place than 
other areas on campuses, said 
Clarinda Raymond, co-director 
of the Campus Violence 
Prevention Center at Towson 
State University in Baltimore. 

These include, "a lot of low- 
level crime, such as stealing 
from dorm rooms, which doesn't 
get reported. In cases of sexual 
assault, there is also a low level 
of reporting by students and 
colleges," said Alan McEvpy, 



chair of the Sexual Assault on 
Campus conference, to be held 
in Orlando, Fla. in October. 

Most campus crimes are 
related to drugs or alcohol. The 
College Press Service reported 
that 95% of campus crime is 
related to drugs or alcohol. 

In his studies on campus 
crimes, McEvoy said the most 
frequent crimes on college 
campuses are underage drinking 
and substance abuse. In 1990, 
Clarion University reported 39 
violations of liquor laws, eight 
cases of drunkenness, two cases 
of driving under the influence 
and one case of drug abuse 
violations. 

"Students should avoid 
alcohol. It is involved in almost 
every acquaintance rape," said 
Andrea Parrot, a professor at 
Cornell University. 

It's not really that campus 
crime is rising, but colleges are 
finding more violent crime, said 
Raymond. 

Information provided by the 
Associated Press and the 
College Press Service. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Student Senator Ron Berry resigned from his position of 
Vice President due to lack of time and financial difficulties. 

Berry is a Finance major from nominations and elections for the 
Emporium, Pennsylvania. s^Vice President's position this 

Student Senate will hold coming Monday night. 



Inmate escapes 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



A prisoner escaped from the 
Clarion County jail early 
Saturday evening, according 
to a jail officer. 

Charles Edward Shankosky, 
a 33 year old white male 
broke put of prison by 
climbing the fence 
surrounding the facility about 
7:30 p.m. He is described as 
six feet tall, weighing 190 
pounds, with brown shoulder 
length hair, hazel eyes and a 
thick, stocky build. 
Shankosky is known to wear 
black leather jackets and 
cowboy boots. He may have 
blood on bis clothing from 
wounds received when 
climbimg the prison fence. 

Shankosky was in jail 
awaiting trial for burglary and 
theft He is still at large and 
considered dangerous. 
Shankosky has used firearms 
in the past, and has had access 



to numerous weapons, 
including "assault" style 
rifles. 

According to State Police 
Shankosky is suspected of 
involvement in many illegal 
acts starting in November 
1991. The acts include home 
and convenience store 
robberies, burglaries, motor 
vehicles thefts, cashing stolen 
checks and flight from police 
officers. Shankosky was 
arrested in Alabama on 
January 4, 1992 and, at the 
time, be was in possession of 
a handgun. He was 
extradited to Pennsylvania 

In order to prevent future 
escapes from the jail, the 
Clarion County Prison Board 
voted to require a guard to be 
present and armed while 
prisoners are outside in the 
facility's exercise yard. The 
guard will be required to first 
fire a warning shot in the air 
before firing at an inmate 
attempting to escape. 



i «o 



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Page 6 - The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 




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4 i 



Student saves feline 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92- Page 7 



by Tarry Burlingame 
News Writer 

Scott True, 23, is a junior at 
Clarion University. His home is 
located in Dedham, 
Massachusetts. 

This past summer, True had the 
opportunity to be a "hero." 
There was a fire next door and 
True did what he thought had to 
be done. 

True and his two brothers, Tun 
and Jonathon, were playing an 
afternoon game of basketball 
outside their home. True had left 
the game to go inside to do some 
homework, when one of his 
younger brothers entered and 
told him of the smoke they 



spotted coming from their 
neighbor's house next door. 

True went out to take a look. 
With little hesitation, he and Tim 
started kicking in locked doors, 
in fear that Catherine Walsh, 
their elderly neighbor, was 
inside. True went in through the 
back as Tim entered the front. 
Meanwhile, Jonathon had called 
the fire department for help. 

Once inside, they noticed 
smoke and water damage filling 
most of the house. The fire, 
however, had been mainly 
confined to the kitchen. True 
said their shouting raised no 
response from within the house. 
They wanted to check the 
second floor, but due to the 
volume of smoke, they couldn't 



get any farther than the first few 
steps. 

True crawled into the kitchen 
calling for Mrs. Walsh, but 
again there was no response. 
True, at a glance, spotted one of 
the Walsh family's cats on the 
floor, dying. The cat was 
gagging and covered in soot. He 
quickly picked it up and threw it 
outside. The cat was then taken 
to be treated at the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals. Later, 
another cat was found stuck in 
the couch. 

Thanks to True's immediate 
attention, both cats are alive and 
well. Although there was that 
split moment of hesitation, True 
knew what had to be done and 
did it. 



New student enrollment up 



by Dorilee Raybuck 
News Writer 



Clarion University's 
enrollment of freshman and 
transfer students has increased 



for the 1992 fall semester. 

Although Clarion University 
will not officially freeze the 
enrollment count until October 
15, the goals set by the 
university for the number of 



Attention all students: 

Vehicles illegaly parked in a 

handicapped spot will be 

immobilized and ticketed. A 

fee of $25 will be charged to 

remove the immobilizing 

device. 



BOOKSMITH TRADING, INC. 



BOOKS GIFTS CARDS CLOTHING 

"when it comes to textbooks, 
we've got you covered" 



WE BUY BOOKS FROM 
STUDENTS AND FACULTY 



i 



ALUMNI NEWS 



first-time freshmen and transfer 
students enrolled have been 
exceeded. 

First-time freshman admission 
stands at 1181. The admissions 
goal for freshman admission was 
1000. 

The admissions goal for 
incoming transfer students was 
250. The total number of 
transfer students whose 
applications were accepted and 
deposits paid is 361. 

Clarion University has 
increased freshman enrollment at 
a time when the number of 
Western Pennsylvania high 
school students graduating has 
dropped. 

John Shropshire, Dean of 
Enrollment Management and 
Academic Records, believes that 
one reason for the increase is the 
experimental recruiting that a 
regional representative of the 
university is doing in the 
Harrisburg vicinity. A large 
population base of potential 
college students exists in this 
area. 

However,total enrollment is 
believed to have decreased. The 
official figures will be made 
available on October 15. 

Fox's Pizza Den 

226-5555 

2 WHOLE WEDGIES™ 

$6.50+tax only 

with coupon 

All Day Delivery 

exp 12/15/92 



Alumni works in Japan 



by Dawn Nobles 
News Writer 



Amy Dennis, a 1990 graduate 
of Clarion University, had made 
plans upon graduation to attend 
graduate school. Instead Dennis 
found a unique job opportunity 
in Japan. 

Upon asking Clarion English 
professor, Martha Campbell, for 
advice, Dennis was referred to 
Dr. C. Darrel Sheraw and Dr. 
Darlyn Fink. The two professors 
arranged an interview with 
Yamate Business College in 
Japan. Dennis was soon offered 
a job as an English teacher. 

Since Dennis' degree was in 
Humanities, she was initially 
unsure of her capabilities to do 
the job. In the long run, though, 
Dennis felt that Clarion had 
prepared her for the challenge, 
and she accepted. 

Yamate is an English College, 
and that fact comforted Dennis 
some, but she knew little else 
about Japan, including the 
language. 

Dennis, originally from 
Williamsport, Pa., ran headlong 
into cultural shock. The city of 
Yokohama, which is home to 
Yamate, has a population of 
about three million people. 

"All the buildings are high rise 
industries with all of the space 
taken because there isn't that 
much land," said Dennis. 
Actually, there is no campus to 
Yamate College; it is housed on 
the second and third floors of a 
twelve story building. 

Dennis was able to find a one 
room apartment with a western 
style bathroom, one burner, and 
a toaster oven for cooking. 

Dennis said that the food in 
Japan is much different from 
American cuisine. "Their menus 
are full of fish , other seafood, 
and rice," said Dennis. She was 
glad to fmd that she lived near an 
Italian restaurant, a McDonald's 
and a Kentucky Fried Chicken. 

Dennis teaches a range of 
pupils, from beginners to 
advanced students. Included are 
ordinary citizens, business 
people, and junior high and 
senior high school students. 
She works a five day, fifty hour 




Alumni affairs photo 
Yamate college English 
professor Amy Dennis. 

week. Of those hours, 26 
include actual English 
instructing. 

In her early days on the job, 
Dennis relied much on the 
Japanese-English dictionary, 
using basic phrases and 
speaking very slowly. 

Now, she understands much 
of the Japanese language, but 
still doesn't speak it very 
well. 

Dennis said that her 
professors from Clarion have 
been very encouraging. 

She said, "I've received 
letters of advice from some of 
them while I have been in 
Japan... Clarion helped prepare 
me for the challenge. I didn't 
have a teaching degree, but I 
was prepared to do a good 
job." 

This August, Dennis began 
her second year at Yamate. 
She came back to Clarion in 
July with 40 students from 
Yamate for an English 
program at the University. 

Said Dennis, "I knew Japan 
had kimonos and temples and 
not much else. I didn't know 
the language. I took some 
classes, but by the time I got 
there I forgot the little I had 
learned. I took comfort from 
the fact that I was going to 
teach at an English college." 



Page 8 -The Clarion CaH - 9-17-92 
Cable Channels 



THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 17, 1992 



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21 



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25 



26 



4:00 



(230) Movie: 



Afterschool Special 



Cur. Affair Edition 



4:30 



Tintin 



Oprah Winfrey l; 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Goof Troop Tom, Jerry 



People Ct, [Cur. Affair [News q 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



Movie: *** "Doc Hollywood" (1991) Michael J. Fox, g 



News q News q 



Cheers q 



Who's Boss? Who's Boss? 



News 



Newsq 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Tiny Toon | Batman q 



(3:00) Movie: Prince-Showgirl 



Global Supercard Wrestling Trucks 



Pyramid Press Luck | Cartoon Express 



(2:30) Movie: 



OWL/TV (R) 



Underdog 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



Hard Copy 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q Strangers 



7:00 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



Movie: »»» "Days of Thunder" (1990) Tom Cruise, q 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Night Court 



Newsq I NBC News [Jeopardy! q I Wh. Fortune | Cosby Show (In Stereo) q 



Ent, Tonight Delta q 'Room-Two 

Ufk Cni4nnis i^Arki. CIihiii /In Clnr.iAi r 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married... 



Cosby Show (In Stereo) q 



Top Cops (In Stereo) q 



Top Cops (In Stereo) q 



Simpsons q [Martin q 



Movie: **** "The Great Escape (1963, Adventure) Steve McQueen, James Garner. (In Stereo) 



Th'breds 



Senior Tour Up Close 



Movie: **Vi "Soapdish "(1991) Sally Field PG-13' q 



MacGyver "The Coltons q| Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: *** "Dusty" (1982) Bill Kerr. NR 



Yogi Bear | Arcade 



Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: »»'■; "Safes Motel" (1987, Suspense) Bud Cort. 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



Movie: »t; "Cover-Up (1990, Drama) 'R 



Homefront q 



Cheers (R) (In Stereo) q 



Street Stories (In Stereo) q 



Street Stories (In Stereo) q 



Heights On the Nickel" q 



Cheers (R) (In Stereo) q [Night Court (R) q 



10:30 



Primetime Live q 



Comedy Jam 



Night Court (R) q 



Middle Ages (In Stereo) q 



Middle Ages (In Stereo) q 



Hunter 



Movie: *** "Elvis: That's the Way It Is" (1970) G 



Sportscenter I College Football: Pittsburgh at Rutgers From New Brunswick, N.J. (Live) 



t* 



"The Bad News Bears Go to Japan 



Movie: •* "Little Nikita" (1988) Sidney Poitier. 'PG' 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



China Beach "Ghosts 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Movie: »'/2 "Ernest Goes to Camp" (1987) Jim Varney 



M ovie: *»*V? "The Commitments (1991) Robert Arkms 



Movie: »»V? "The First Power (1990) FT Boxing 



M.T. Moore M.T. Moore 



L.A. Law 



M.T. Moore M.T. Moore M.T. Moore IM.T. Moore 



11:00 I Tl?30" 



Inside the NFL q 



Newsq 



News 



Cheers q 



News 



Newsq 



Married... 



12:00 



Dice Rules 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Silk Stalkings 



Edition 



Stalkings 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: ***V 2 "The Pink Panther' (1964) 



Baseball [Sportscenter 



Movie: »'/2 "Deadly Bet (1991) R' 



MacGyver "Fire and Ice q [Equalizer 



| "The Haunting of Morella" 



Movie: »»» "The Doctor " (1991) William Hurt. PG-13 q 



Movie: ** "Killer instinct " (1988, Drama) Melissa Gilbert. 



M.T. Moore M.T. Moore 



Thirtysomething 



Dead On IT 



M.T. Moore 



Ullman 



FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 18, 1992 



10 



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14 



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18 



21 



22 



25 



4:00 



4:30 



(330) Movie: "Lovesick 



Golden Girls Golden Girls 



Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. [Cur. Affair 



Tom, Jerry 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



Movie: »»» 1 /2 "Arthur" (1981) Dudley Moore. 'PG q 



News q News q News q ABC News 



Cheers q 



Who's Boss? 



News 



Who's Boss? 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Tiny Toon | Batman q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



News q 



Full House q Strangers 



News q 



NBC News 



(2:00) Movie: Great Esc." [Movie: »** "Elvis: That's the Way It Is" (1970) G 



PGA Golf: Hardee's Classic (Live) 



Pyramid | Press Luck | Cartoon Express 



Movie: **» "Only the Lonely (1991) John Candy, q 



Rhino-Camel 



Movie: "In Search of Golden Sky' (1985) 



Underdog [Yogi Bear | Arcade 



Hey Dude (R) 



26 [Movie: *» California Girls (1985) Robby Benson. 



Motoworld | Up Close 



MacGyver "Hind-Sight" q 



7:00 



7:30 



Inside the NFL (R) q 



Hard Copy Ent. Tonight 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Night Court 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married... 



Jeopardy! q [Wh. Fortune I Final Appeal 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



Movie: *** Quick Change 



Family 



Final Appeal 



St ep by Step Dinosaurs q | Camp Wilder 1 20/20 q 



G. Palace 



G Palace [Bobq 



Bobq 



America's Most Wanted q 



Movie: »*» "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1982) 



(1990) Rq 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



Movie: *Vi "The Super" (1991) Joe Pesci. 



Round Table Yesterday We Were Playing Football" q 



Picket Fences "Pilot (Series Premiere) (In Stereo) q 



Picket Fences "Pilot" (Series Premiere) (In Stereo) q 



Sightings q | Suspects | Hunter 



Round Table "Yesterday We Were Playing Football' q 



Sportscenter [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Movie: **Vz "Tough Guys Don't Dance" (1987) R |Movie: •+» "Which Way Is Up?" (1977) 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: »»* "Hour of the Gun" (1967) James Garner. 



Movie: *»'/2 "Company Business "(1991) PG-13' 



What You Do Crazy Kids Looney 



Supermarket [Shop-Drop [China Beach 



Bullwinkle 



11:00 



11:30 



Comedy Hour Roseanne 



News q Cheers q [Nightline q 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Married... 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Kids in the Hall 



Edition 



Kids in Mall 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Murder, She Wrote q [Movie: »» "Big Top Pee-wee " (1988) Pee-wee Herman. |Movie: "Hamburger... The Motion Picture 



Movie: *»» "The Dead Zone' (1983, Suspense) R' 



Movie: "Devlin (1992, Drama) Bryan Brown. R 



M.T.Moore M.T.Moore M.T. Moore |M.T. Moore M.T. Moore [M.T. Moore M.T. Moore M.T. Moore 



L.A. Law 



Movie: »»» "Dark Obsession (1991) I "Popcorn and Ice Cream 



Movie: »*'/2 "Eve of Destruction (1990) Gregory Hines 



Movie: •» "The Game of Love' (1987) Ed Marinaro. 



Thirtysomething 



Super Dave 



M.T. Moore 



Ullman 



SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 19, 1992 



10 



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25 



26 



4:00 



Baby-Sitters 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



NeverEnding Story ll-Next Chapter' 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



(3:30) College Football: Notre Dame at Michigan State. (Live) q 



Movie: •»* "Home dfone (1990) Macaulay Culkin. PG 



Sportsworld 



Major League Baseball: Regional Coverage 



Major League Baseball: Regional Coverage 



Movie: *»• "The Savage Bees" (1976) Ben Johnson. 



Sportsworld 



News 



News 



Newsq 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



American Gladiators 



News q I NBC News 



(2:30) Movie: "Hello, Dolly!" [Movie: *+* "Obsession" (1976) Cliff Robertson. PG 



PGA Golf: Hardee's Classic. (Live 



Double T. Just Us 



(3:10) Movie: »» "Dutch" q 



(2:30) Movie: Sat Night 



Nick News 



Get Picture 



China Beach 



Magic" 



News 



Cappelli 



Hee Haw (R) (In Stereo) 



Star Search 



Star Search 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: »» Double Impact " (1991, Adventure) R q 



Here-Now Out All Night 



Frannie 



Frannie 



Cops q 



Jeopardy! q [Wh. Fortune | Here-Now [Out All Night 



Brooklyn 



Brooklyn 



Cops (R) q 



Movie: **Vt "The Golden Seal" (1983) Steve Railsback. 



10:00 



Dream On q 



10:30 



Sanders 



Covington Cross (In Stereo) Movie: »*'/2 "Tightrope" (1984) Clint Eastwood, q jNews q |Movie: "An Early Frost 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: ** "Body Parts' (1991) R q 



Empty Nest |Nursesq [Miss America Pageant (In Stereo Live) q 



News 



Movie: »* 1 /2 "Crocodile' Dundee II" (1988) Paul Hogan. 



Movie: **'/2 "Crocodile Dundee It" (1988) Paul Hogan 



Code 3 q 



Empty Nest 



Nurses q 



Edgeq Comic Strip Live (In Stereo) | Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q TBA 



News 



Newsq 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Lifestyles-Rich 



Miss America Pageant (In Stereo Live) q 



Scoreboard [College Football: Ohio State at Syracuse. From the Carrier Dome. (Live) q 



Movie: *** "The Red Badge of Courage (1951, Drama)|Movie: »» "Author! Author!" (1982) PG 



Two Dads | B. Buddies [Counterstrike (In Stereo) [Quantum Leap (In Stereo) Swamp [Beyond [Bradbury 



Movie: "Manneguin: On the Move" (1991) [Movie: * "Scavengers' (1988) 'PG-13' |Movie: *** "Crocodile" Dundee" (1986) Paul Hogan. q 



Movie: »+» "Dick Tracy" (1990) Warren Beatty. PG' q 



Double Dare G.U.T.S. 



L.A. Law 



Salute 



I Freshmen 



News q 



College Football: Nebraska at Washington. From Seattle. (Live) 



Hitchhiker 



Movie: *Vi "Return to the Blue Lagoon" (1991) PG-13 



Doug 



Rugrats 



Clarissa 



Roundhouse 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q I Movie: "/ Was a Teenage Sex Mutant 



* "Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare" 



Movie: •* Ultimate Desires' (1991) R' q|Movie: •* "Angel in Red" 



Movie: *** "Chiefs" (1983, Drama) Wayne Rogers, Charlton Heston, Brad Davis. 



Ren-Stimpy [You Afraid? 



A. Hitchcock 



Freddy 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: * "Joy: Chapter Two "(1990) R 



M.T. Moore I Dragnet 



Seize the Power: Women of America 



A. Hitchcock 



Ullman 



SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 20, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



Movie: * "A Fine Mess (1986) PG' q [Mr. Bean q 



5:30 



Movie: ***V2 "The Westerner" (WO) Gary Cooper. 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: **V2 "Vice Versa" (1988) Judge Reinhold. 'PG' q 



News 



[ABC News 



NFL Football. Pittsburgh Steelers at San Diego Chargers. (Live) 



NFL Football: Detroit Lions at Washington Redskins. From R.F.K. Stadium. (Live) 



NFL Football: Detroit Lions at Washington Redskins. From R.F.K. Stadium. (Live) 



Movie: * "Shanghai Surprise" (1986) Sean Penn. 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



NFL Football: Pittsburgh Steelers at San Diego Chargers. (Live) 



(3:00) Movie: "Author!" [Movie: ••'/? "Mother, Jugs & Speed" (1976) Bill Cosby 



PGA Golf: Hardee's Classic. (Live) 



(2QTj) Movie: I Just Ten [Two Dads |B. BuddieT 



Movie: •• "Author! Author!" (1982) Al Pacino. PG 



(3:30) Movie: "Teenage 



Can't on TV 



Disease 



Get Picture 



Endocrin. 



Baseball Tonight 



Sci-Fi 



Stories 



Life Goes On q 



Secret Service (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



BUI & Ted Parker Lewis 



Fifth Quarter | Secret Ser. [I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: *** "Madonna: Truth or Dare" (1991) Madonna. ]One Night [Movie: "Teamster Boss: The 



Videos 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



Am. Funniest Movie: "Somebody s Daughter" (1992, Drama) q 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Murder, She Wrote q 



In Color 



jRocq 



Movie: *** 1 /2 "The Miracle IVor/rer" (1962, Drama) 



NFL Primetime 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Movie: **V2 "Big Business" (1988) Bette Midler. PG' q 



Double Dare 



Medical 



G.U.T.S. 



Medical 



Fifteen 



Medical 



Wild Side 



NSAIDS 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: "Danger Island" (1992) Richard Bevmer. q 



Movie: "Terror on Track ff' (1992) Richard Crenna. q 



Movie: "Terror on Track 9 "(1992) Richard Crenna. q 



Married... [Herman l Flying Blind lDown Shore 



Movie: "Danger Island" (1992) Richard Beymer. q 



Movie: **+ "Diner" (1982) Steve Guttenberg. R' 



Major League Baseball: Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants. (Live) q 



Movie: "Indecency "(1992, Drama) Jennifer Beals. q 



Movie: **» 1 /2 "China Syndrome" (1979) Jack Lemmon. |Movie: ** "Iron Maze" (1991 , Drama) Jeff Fahey. R' [Movie: * 1 /2 "Netherworld" (1991) 'R' O 



Movie: »» "Ishtar "(1987) Warren Beatty. PG-13 



Looney 



Journal 



Looney 



Milestones 



Looney 



Medicine 



F-Troop 



Family 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Paid Prog. 



News 



Jackie Presser Story" q 



Cheers q Ent. Tonight 



Night Court 



TBA 



Love Con. 



Paid Prog- 



Suspect 



Cur. Affair 



New WKRP 



Love Con. 



Perspective 



New WKRP 



Movie: **Vi "FM" (1978, Comedy) PG' 



Sportscenter 



Silk Stalkings 



Movie: **Vi "Red Heat" (1988) Arnold Schwarzenegger 



Mork 



Cardiology 



Van Dyke 



Medicine 



Lucy Show 



OB-Gyn. 



Hi, I'm Home 



Family 



Comedy 



M.T. Moore 



Physicians 



(In Stereo) q 



NFL 



Hollywood 



** "A Climate for Killing" 



Movie: "The Sleeping Car 



Dragnet 



Family [Paid Prog 



A. Hitchcock 



MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 21, 1992 



10 



11 



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18 



21 



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25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



(3:30) Movie: "Planet of the Apes" (1968) 



Design. W. Cheers q 



Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



(2:30) Movie: 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



Newsq 



Cheers q 



Design. W. 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



Movie: »**'/2 "Awakenings 



Newsq 



News 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon 



Newsq 



Batman q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



(1990) Robin Williams, q 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Movie: **Vi "The Miracle Worker" (1979, Biography) 



Pyramid 



Press Luck 



(3:30) Movie: "Bananas" q 



Sports 



Cartoon Express 



Reporters 



Ch. Flag 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Night Court 



Jeopardy! q 



7:30 



Tintin 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married., 



You Bet-Life 



Married., 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



Movie: *Vi "Feds" (1988) PG-13' q 



Young Indiana Jones 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Married.. 



Fresh Prince 



Blossom q 



Hearts Afire 



Hearts Afire 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



Movie: »*» "Doc Hollywood" (1991) Michael J. Fox, q 



11:30 



Roseanne 



NFL Football: New York Giants at Chicago Bears. From Soldier Field. (In Stereo Live) 



Movie: "Miss America: Behind the Crown" (1992, Drama) 



Murphy Brown q 



Matlock q 



Murphy Brown q 



Blossom q 



Movie: *** x h "Splendor in the Grass" (1961, Drama) Natalie Wood 



Up Close 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Sportscenter iSchaap Talk 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: "Somewhere Tomorrow (1983) 



Movie: *** 1 /? "Sleeper" (1973) 'PG q |Movie: »» 1 /2 "Dream House" (1981) 



Bullwinkle [Bullwinkle [Bullwinkle 



Winkle 



Bullwinkle 



Movie: *Vi "Trouble in Paradise" (1989) Raguel Welch. 



Movie: ••» "Not Without My Daughter" (1991) PG-13 



Bullwinkle 



Supermarket 



Bullwinkle 



Shop-Drop 



Bullwinkle Bullwinkle 



China Beach "China Men" 



NFL Monday |Mon. Mag- 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Movie: *Vi "Concrete War "(1991) R 



Movie: **Vz "Peacemaker (1990) R 



Get Smart I Superman 



L.A. Law 



[(Off Air) 



Love and War "Pilot" q 



Love and War "Pilot" q 



Hunter "The Big Fall" 



Movie: "Miss America: Behind the Crown" (1992, Drama) 



Movie: *»* 1 /; "The Long Good Friday" (1980) 'R 



Water Skiing: U . S . Open I Beach Volleyball 



WWF Prime Time Wrestling 



M.T. Moore 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Married.. 



Newsq 



12:00 



"Cover-Up" 



Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Picket Fences "Pilot ' (R) q 



Edition 



Fences 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: "Elvis: That's the Way It Is" (1970) 
Baseball I Sportscenter 



Movie: **Vz "Toy Soldiers" (1991) Sean Astin. R' q 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q I Equalizer 



Sat. Night 



Van Dyke 



Movie: **Vz "Company Business" (1991) 



Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



'Christine Cromwell: Things That Go Bump in the Night' 



Lucy Show 



"Lady Chatterley in Tokyo' 



Movie: "Ruthless People 



Green Acres 



Thirtysomething 



Mister Ed 



Ullman 



TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 22, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) Movie: 



Design. W. 



Cur. Affair 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



Movie: *** "Days of Thunder" (1990) q 



Cheers q 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



(3:00) Movie: "Elvis: That's' 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



Press Luck 



Newsq 



Cheers q 



Design. W. 



Newsq 



News 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon | Batman q 



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6:30 



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News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



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Full House q 



Newsq 



Movie: ** "Violets Are Blue" (1986) 



Trucks 



NFL Yrbk. 



Cartoon Express 



Movie: »»» "The Deep "(1977) Jacqueline Btsset. "PG" 



OWL/TV (R) 



Underdog 



Matter of Conscience (R) ql Henry's Cat 



Yogi Bear [Arcade 



[Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: »•* "The Ryan White Story" (1988) Judith Light. 



Running 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Night Court 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



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You Bet-Life 



Married... 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: »» "Double Impact" (1991 , Adventure) R' q 



Full House q I Mr. Cooper 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Rescue 911 (In Stereo) q 



Rescue 911 (In Stereo) q 



Roseanne q | Coach q 



Reasonable Doubts (R) q 



Movie: "With a Vengeance 



Movie: "With a Vengeance 



Movie: »»* "Purple Rain" (1984, Musical) Prince 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: »•»'/; "The Magnificent Seven" (1960, Western) Yul Brynner. 



Up Close 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Reasonable Doubts (R) q 



10:00 



Sanders 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Going to Extremes q 



Movie: * »* "Madonna: Truth or Dare "(1991) Madonna. 
Golden Girls |NightlineqT 



Dateline (In Stereo) q 



1992, Suspense) q 



1992, Suspense) q 



Hunter 



Dateline (In Stereo) q 



Sportscenter I Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Movie: •** "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1982) 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



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Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Forever Knight (In Stereo) 



Edition 



For. Knight 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: **** "Raging Bull" (1980) R' 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: ** "Breakout" (1975) Charles Bronson. PG 



Movie: **** "The Maltese Falcon" (1941, Mystery) q 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



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Movie: ** "Dutch "(1991, Comedy) Ed O'Neill. PG-13' 



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[MacGyver (In Stereo) q [Equalizer 



Get Smart [Superman 



L.A. Law 



M.T. Moore I Van Dyke 



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Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



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Lucy Show 



Movie: "/ Come in Peace 



Freddy 



Green Acres 



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"Eve-Pest. 



Mister Ed 



Ullman 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 23, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



1 



5:30 



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Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon 



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6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



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Newsq 



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News 



ABC News 



NBC Newt 



CBS News 



Newsq 



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Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



: ***V2 "The Magnificent Seven" (1960, Western) Yul Brynner 



Pyramid [Press Luck 



Trucks 



Yearbook 



(3:30) Movie: 



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*** 



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Movie: *** "Cowboys Don't Cry" (1988) Ron White. 



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I Hey Dude (R) 



Movie:A«. Gojorndfltte UQtlf (1988) Linda Hamilton 



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11:00 



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11:30 12:00 



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The Clarion Call - 9-17-92- Page 9 



History prof, wins award 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



Dr. Anne Day, professor of 
history at Clarion University, has 
been honored by the American 
Association for Higher 
Education (AAHE) for her work 
with the Clarion Area Academic 
Alliance for International 
Education (CAAAIE), after 
being nominated for that award 
by Dr. Saundra McKee, associate 
professor of education and 
CAAAIE coordinator. 

In awarding Dr. Day the 



certificate last month, the AAHE 
recognized her as a person 
"whose vision has enriched and 
informed the activities of her 
Alliance; whose commitment to 
excellence and equity has moved 
the shared agenda forward; 
whose generosity of spirit has 
helped give clarity and meaning 
to the term Academic Alliance; 
who has helped in the 
development of higher standards 
of excellence in the planning and 
delivery of curriculum; and who 
has done the most to strengthen 
the bond of mutual respect and 
ongoing intellectual inquiry 



among school and college 
faculty." 

The CAAAIE brings students 
from kindergarten through 
college and their teachers 
together to infuse international 
issues into their studies. 
Meeting once a month over the 
past two years, the group has 
studied cultures of many nations, 
including Greece and Spain. 
The role of international students 
has also been discussed. 

"My academic training is in 
foreign affairs," said Dr. Day. " I 
sincerely believe that the citizens 
of tomorrow will need to be 



Minnesota combats drugs 



ST. PAUL (AP) Minnesota 
has made great strides in its war 
on drugs and alcohol in the 
classroom, home and 
community, according to a 
survey released Monday by 
education officials. 

The survey of 131,000 
youngsters in the sixth-, ninth- 
and 12th grades shows the 
number of Minnesota students 
using drugs and alcohol has 
dropped considerably from three 
years ago. 

"I think the trend is very 
encouraging," said Barbara 
Yates, supervisor of the 
prevention and risk reduction 
unit in the state Department of 
Education. "We still have some 
serious problems, but it looks 
like we're going in the right 
direction and we're having some 
success." 

The survey last spring showed 
that alcohol and other drug use 
among high schools seniors had 
dropped from 54 percent in 1989 
to 41 percent this year. Use 
among ninth-graders dropped 
from 26 percent in 1989 to 19 



percent this year. Usage among 
sixth-graders was reported at 2 
percent, a decline from 3 percent 
in 1989. 

Yates said the survey offers 
"some pretty solid evidence that 
looks like our prevention efforts 

are working." 

The voluntary survey was 
administered last spring in all but 
one of the state's 400-plus school 
districts. Slightly more than 90 
percent of the districts 
participated in 1989. 

State Education Commissioner 
Gene Mammenga said the latest 
survey results are "rather 
dramatic" when compared with 
the first survey in 1989. 

"This survey is evidence that 
prevention programs in 
Minnesota are working," Gov. 
Arne Carlson said. "Minnesota 
schools, parents and 
communities can take pride in 
the survey results because they 
show that their comprehensive 
programs have been extremely 
successful." 

Mammenga also praised 
parents and community efforts 
for combating drug and alcohol 



Images of the West | 

1 




use among youngsters. 

"When their message and our 
message coincide, it has a very 
decided effect, a very decided 
positive effect," he said. 

Yates said a large influx of 
federal funds, beginning in the 
1987-88 school year, gave 
school districts the financial 
ability to develop drug education 
programs. 

She said Minnesota public 
schools will receive about $7 
million in federal drug education 
and awareness funds during the 
current school year, which will 
be augmented by an estimated $1 
million in state and local 
resources. 

The report said the declines in 
alcohol and other drug use 
cannot be attributed to an overall 
reduction in antisocial behavior 
among young people. The latest 
survey shows that the frequency 
of vandalism, fighting and 
shoplifting has changed very 
little. 

And a slight increase was 
shown in the number of students 
who report serious emotional 
problems, low self-esteem and 
alienation from their families. 

'The survey suggests that we 
need to continue our prevention 
efforts and do a better job of 
targeting resources." 



informed and involved with 
international events and people. 
We now live in a global village. 
We are all part of the same earth. 
A great deal can be gained by 
learning about international 
people's customs and problems." 

During 1991-92, the CAAAIE 
sponsored five programs, all 
open to the public, pertaining to 
international education. 

Speakers were obtained from the 
Clarion University faculty, 
Clarion University's 

international students, and the 
community. 

Dr. Day sights Dr. Saundra 



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McKee for securing grants from 
the Pennsylvania Academy for 
the Profession of Teaching and 
from the American Association 
for Higher Education/MacArthur 
Foundation. These funds and the 
efforts Dr. Day and Dr. McKee 
have made the project possible. 

CAAAIE will continue to be 
housed and supported by the 
Center for Educational 
Leadership at Clarion University. 
Dr. Day plans to continue also, 
saying, "It is interesting to have 
teachers and students from all 
grade levels mingle and learn 
together." 




Scott Dillon/Clarion Call 
Dr. Anne Day recently won an award from the American 
Association for Higher Education for local work. 

Give for kids 



by Dorilee Raybuck 
News Writer 



Northwest Savings Bank, 
WWCH/WWCR Radio, Long's 
Dry Cleaners, and Clarion 
County Children and Youth 
Services are sponsoring a Coats 
for Kids program in Clarion 
County. 
The program was developed for 
the purpose of distributing warm 
winter coats to local children 
who are in dire need of them. 
Clairon County residents are 



mark eddie 

"Rock n' Roll 
Unplugged" 

Comedian 

Bedrock Cafe 

8 pm 

Gemmell MP Room 

UAB event/Bacchus 



asked to participate in the 
program by donating warm, 
usable fall and winter coats in 
any and all children's sizes. 

"Over 100 coats have already 
been gathered," said Bill Hearst 
of WWCH/WWCR Radio, "and 
we hope to gather many more." 

With the support of the public, 
the four sponsors will act 
together to collect, clean and 
distribute warm winter coats. 

Coats may be deposited at any 
time in the marked container at 
Northwest Savings Bank, located 
at 537 Main Street, Clarion. 

The coats will then be cleaned 
by Long's Drycleaners at the 
Wash House, and distributed to 
area children in need of winter 
coats by Clarion County 
Children and Youth Services. 

Bill Hearst from WWCH 
Radio was responsible for 
organizing the first-time Coats 
for Kids program in Clarion 
County. 

The program will run through 



Page 10 - The Clarion Call 9-17-92 

Outside Clarion 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92- Page 11 



Talks se t to continue in newspaper strike 



.. „ ___ __^ _«_________———————— — ^i 



compiled by Dorilee Raybuck 
from the AP service 



International 

News 

Britian tries to strip 
Yugoslavia's voting rights 

Britain is leading a campaign to 
strip Yugoslavia of its United 
Nations voting rights. Diplomats 
are working to line up support as 
the 47th General Assembly 
prepares to open. 



U.N. spokesman blasts 
Serbian leader 



The co-chairman of this week's 
Yugoslavia peace conference had 
some harsh words for the leader 
of Bosnia's Serbs. 

A United Nations spokesman 
said U.N. special envoy Cyril 
Vance and the European 
Community's Lord Owen have 
sent a protest to condemn Serb 
air attacks on the Bosnian town 
of Bihac. 



LEVI HEADQUARTERS 



it *N5 FOK 

WOMfK 




JUNIOR 

DEPT. 

HAYLOFT 




20-25% 

OFF 

ALL DENIM 

ALL YEAR 

LONG 



'Wans 

Clarion 

I Daily 9-5:30 Frl. 9-9 Sat. 9-5 




Somalian airlifts begin 

A United Nations official 
confirms that airdrops of food to 
rural areas of Somalia have 
begun. 

The deliveries started Sunday 
afternoon, but officials didn't 
make any announcements 
because they didn't want to let 
potential thieves know where the 
food would be. 

Looting is a big problem for 
the relief operation in Somalia. 
Some officials estimate as much 
as half of all the aid delivered to 
starving Somalis this year has 
been stolen. 

The United Nations is 
dropping food to rural areas so 
starving people won't flock to 
towns and overwhelm feeding 
centers. 



National 

Army denies unit's return to 
Saudi Arabia 

A freelance column in a 
Washington, D.C. newspaper is 
raising eyebrows at the 
Pentagon. The Army is denying 
a claim that an army reserve unit 
from Greensburg is returning to 
Saudi Arabia. 

Writer Thomas Dahlberg said 
in the Washington Times that the 
14th Quartermaster Detachment 
is being mobilized in the desert 
for at least six months. Thirteen 
members of the unit were killed 
and many more were injured 
during the Persian Gulf War 
when an Iraqui SCUD missile 
leveled their barracks. 



State 

Talks continue in 
newspaper strike 

Mediators gave negotiators 
Tuesday and Wednesday off 
before talks resume in the 
Pittsburgh newspaper strike. 
Representatives of the Pittsburgh 
Press Company and striking 
Teamsters delivery drivers met 
on Monday. 

Mediator John Pinto said an, 
"exhaustive amount of time" was 
spent working out details for the 
talks. 

Teamsters local president 
Joseph Molinero said "big 
stumbling blocks" will be on the 
table when the talks get 
underway again on Thursday. 




compiled by Alan Vaughn 
from the IP service 



Asian Culture fund established 
at Bowdoin 

President Robert H. Edwards 
recendy announced that Stanley 
F. Druckenmiller, a member of 
the Governing Boards, will 
establish a fund to endow a chair 
in Asian Culture at Bowdoin. 

The gift marks the first time 
since its inception that the Asian 
Studies Department is on a solid 
foundation, said Asian Studies 
Professor Kidder Smith. 



DePauw changes graduation 
requirements 

After three years of discussion 
and debate, the Depauw 
Committee of Academic Policy 
and Planning has developed a 
draft proposal for changes in 
graduation requirements. 

Dept. chairs have copies of the 
eleventh hour draft of the 
proposals, which deal with 
distribution requirements and a 
seminar for first year students. 
"This is a draft made to be a 
focus of discussion," said 
English Professor Martha 
Rainbolt. 






Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations conducted 
by Public Safety for the week of September 7 through September 13. 

On September 9, a tractor trailer struck a vehicle in parking lot "M" 
and departed the scene. Public Safety made an idntification and the 
company was notified. The company will pay all damages. 

On September 11, a student was cited for public intoxication after 
being transported to the Clarion Hospital. The individual registered 
.25 on a blood alcohol test administered by the hospital. 

If anyone has any information concerning these and other 
crimes, please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



"F" grade eliminated at 
Carleton 

Carleton's Educational Policy 
Committee recently passed a 
proposal to eliminate the 
administrative "F." In the past, 
the administrative "F" would be 
given to any student failing to 
complete the work required to 
fulfill a "W" regardless of what 
grades the student had received 
up until that point. 

The new policy leaves the 
decision up to individual 
professors. Associate Dean of 
the College, Elizabeth Cinder, 
proposed the new policy on 
behalf of the Academic Standing 
Committee, an EPC 

subcommittee. 

She said that their reasoning for 
the proposal is that in no other 
circumstance does the College 
determine the grade of the 
student, and that grading should 
be the full responsibilty of the 
faculty. 

"Under the proposed change, 
the student might earn an F, but 
might not," Cinder said, "The 
faculty member may still decide 
to award an 'F to a student that 
does not complete the work; 
however, the faculty member 
also has the choice of giving that 
specific assignment an F.' It is 
up to the faculty [member], not 
the registrar." 



ti] 



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j 




Outdoor concert to rock Activities Day 



by Shawn P. Seagriff 
Features Writer 



On Sunday, September 20, 
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., the UAB 
is sponsoring the Student 
Activities Day concert. The 
concert will be featuring four 
western Pennsylvania bands: 
Whiskey High, ATS, Ask A 
Stranger and Inside Out. 

Whiskey High is a "hard and 
heavy" rock and roll band from 
Pittsburgh. The band is led by 
veteran guitarist from the Los 
Angeles circuit, Mike Palone. 
Other members included are 
Scott Boyd- vocals, Rich Palone- 
drums and Mike Ekis- bass. 

Whiskey High was the winner 
of the 1991 Pittsburgh Battle of 
the Bands, where they received 
40 hours of recording time from 
a local studio, which they are 
using to work on their upcoming 
compact disc due out sometime 
this fall. 

ATS, "Another True Story," 
started as a Pittsburgh country 
band and has evolved into a post 
industrial, urban rock/cow funk 
fusion band. 

They have been showcased in 
New York, Chicago, Boston and 
will be appearing in the College 
Music Journal in October. 



ATS has appeared on WDVE's 
Morning Coffee Shop Hour and 
will be interviewed later this 
month on the Homegrown Show. 
They also will be appearing on 
Guidewire, a national college 
radio program that is affiliated 
with 42 stations across the 
United States. 

The band has two CD releases 
called, "Sepco" containing 50 
songs, with one CD in acoustic 
and one is electric. It has 
reached number one statis at 
WRYW in Cleveland. 

The five-man band includes: 
Evan Knauer- vocals and guitar, 
Mike Marcinko- bass, Kip 
Ruefle- drummer, Kevin 
Forsythe- tenor sax and Steve 
Heineman- alto sax. 

The progressive power rock 
band Ask A Stranger hails from 
Clarion. They play extensively 
in Pennsylvania, Cleveland, 
Youngstown and Lake 
Chattaqua. 

Aside from playing in several 
different towns, Ask A Stranger 
is presently airing on fifteen 
regional stations such as WDVE, 
Rocket 101 and 102 Jet. They 
are also working on pre- 
production for a video shoot and 
second album due out in the 
spring of 1993. 




Ask A Stranger, with members from Clarion, will be one of the 
weekends Activities Day concert. 

The bands debut album, Hawk- keyboards and vocals, 



"Stranger Things Have 
Happened", is on sale at 
National Record Mart, and will 
soon be available in the Clarion 
Book Store. 

Ask A Stranger's members are: 
Jeff Powell- vocals, David 









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Photo courtesy of UAB 
Another one of the four groups appearing in Sundays concert is Whiskey High. They were 
supposed to open for Kix last year, but that concert was cancelled. 



Dave Buzzard- guitars, Kurt 
Grotenthauler- bass, Willy 
Bauer- drums and Michele 
McElhinny and Julie Findlan- 
backing vocals. 

Inside Out is a young band not 
only in the fact that they just 
came together two years ago, but 
the ages of the members range 
from 18 to 23 years old. 

This melodic rock band is from 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where 
they are currently working on a 
CD due out in spring. All their 
songs are original including 
ballads such as ,"Tell Me" and 
rock tunes such as ,'T'll Be 
There" and "Better Days." 

Not only is Inside Out busy 
recording, but they are also 
working on the pre-production of 
the video for "Just One Touch 
and have just completed a 
summer tour across the United 
States hitting Michigan, the 
Dakotas, Indiana and Colorado. 

The band members include: 
Tim Frick and Dave Cost on 
guitars, Ben Frick on drums, Ron 
Galucci on bass, and vocalist 
Jason Riek. 

The Student Activities Day 
Concert is promoted by Dorian 
Sweet Productions, a manage- 
ment company out of Clarion. It 



Photo courtesy of UAB 

bands featured in this 

■ 

was founded by Sean Brennen 
and Jeff Powell, both CUP 
students. 

They are marketing the 
Western Pennsylvania Original 
Rock Showcase to over 400 
colleges in the New York, 
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, West Virginia, Ohio and 
Indiana areas. 

The Western Pennsylvania 
Originial Rock Showcase is four 
bands playing all original songs, 
each with 30 to 40 minutes to 
preform. 

The purpose, as stated by Sean 
Brennen, "We want to help 
bands go from the club scene to 
the next level." 

The Student Activities Day 
concert will be on Sunday, 
September 30, from 1 p.m. to 
4 p.m. at the Gemmell Student 
Center outside stage. 

In case of rain, the concert 
will be held in the Gemmell 
multi-purpose room. 

Merchandise from the bands 
will be available at the show. 

If you are planning to attend 
the concert you may want to 
bring a blanket to sit on while 
you enjoy the afternoon of 
Pennsylvania style rock-n-roll. 



' I '-w' I * 'I ''I I 



I 



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Page 12 - The Clarion Call 9-17-92 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 - Page 13 



12 -The Clarion uaiiv-i/-^ ^^^^ *mm~m»~- ~-~ ~ 

The Gemmell Student Complex J A Brief History in Pictures 




« t] 



Groundbreaking, 1990. The first 
step of a construction project 
that took nearly two years to 
complete. 



Clarion Call file photo 




Clarion Call file photo 
Work on the complex continued steadily for 
almost two years. The building was completed 
in mid-1992, just in time for the beginning of 
the fall semester. 







Clarion Call file photo 
One of the most striking features of the 
building is the central rotunda, complete with 
spiral staircase, which is shown here under 
construction. 



i 



J 




Kari Ambrass/Clarion Call 
The fitness center, located on the ground floor, 
includes various types of exercise equipment, 
such as exercise bikes, nautilus equipment and 
step machines. 



« 




Stephanie Vogus/Clarion Call 
The Gemmell Center also includes a fully- 
stocked game room with video games and pool 
tables, and three racquetball courts on the 
ground floor. 



:■:•: ■:•:•:•:•:•:■:■:■»:■'.•«>«■:•:•:•»:•:•:•:•: 




The new James 
Gemmell Student 
Complex, a welcome 
addition to the Clarion 
University campus! 



Clarion Call file photo 



•WW 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 - Page 15 

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N^Sty taown comedian to perform for Family Day Sanford G allery opens with "F aculty Exhibition" 

«/ A * ** nm h» Kvm nnwd James Flahaven features oil on surface, process and material, 



by Tricia Egry 
Features Writer 



Comedy clubs from San 
Francisco to Neptune, Florida 
have featured his unique brand 
of humor which combines stand- 
up, a slide show, electronic 
keyboards, acoustic guitar, 
exotic toys, Mac N. Tosh, The 
Computer and singing. Scott 
Jones has performed over 1,000 
concerts at universities in 49 
states, plus Canada. He's shared 
the stage with Richard Belzer, 
David Bromberg, James Cotton, 
Steve Landesberg, Leon 
Ridbome and Al Stewart. 

Lights, a room, a stage, and a 
huge audience. . . sit back and 
enjoy. Jones was nominated 
National Campus Entertainer of 
the Year five years in a row. His 
music ranges from blues to jazz. 
. . rag to rock. Mac N. Tosh and 
a variety of electronic 
instruments form an orchestrated 
affair. This versatility has driven 
him towards 16 nominations for 
NACA Campus Entertainment 
Awards in four categories: 
Entertainer of the Year, Comedy, 



Novelty/Variety and Coffee- 
house. In 1985 and 1988, Jones 
received the NACA Association 
Member Promotion Award for 
outstanding graphics. 

Jones' camera is always ready. 
His slide show is a bizarre 
collection of "Signs from the 
Twilight Zone," "Foods That 
Should Never Be Eaten," 
"Things People Put on Their 
Lawn" and other related topics. 
It's comedy with pictures. 

A member of NACA, 
since 1977, Jones served on their 
Board of Directors and Associate 
Member Advisory Board. Jones 
was presented the NACA 
Founders Award in 1989. 
Currently, he's writing a monthly 
humor column for Programming 
Magazine. 

Scott Jones will be 
contributing his many talents to 
Clarion University at 7 p.m. in 
the Gemmell Center on Family 
Day, 1992. He provides an 
abundance of promotional 
activites "to get the word out and 
the audience in." 




The wacky act of Scott Jones is due to hit CUP on Saturday in Gemmell Center. 



UAB photo 



CABS future is up in the air 



by Megan Casey 
Feature Writer 



CABS is back, but for how 
long? CABS, also known as 
Clarion's Alternative to the Bar 
Scene hosted its first dance this 
past Saturday. 

The dance drew about 600 



people and was the fust held in 
the new Gemmell Student 
Complex. This was also to be 
the first of the weekly dances, 
since they were held sporadically 
after being called off last 
semester. The dances were 
called off for a variety of reasons 




last year. Among these reasons 
were fights, and the students 
were coming to the dance 
intoxicated. After calling off the 
dances, CABS met with Public 
Safety, other campus 
organizations and concerned 
students to talk through the 
problems and find a way to bring 
the dances back. 

Changes for this year include a 
fifty cent admission fee, and 
hand stamping at the door. 
These changes were made in 
order to regulate the people 
attending the dance. 

Unfortunately, these changes 
may not be enough. Although 
the enthusiasm of the students 
was evident, and there were no 
security problems, several 
incidents occurred that may 
threaten the continuation of the 
dances. These incidents 
basically, "showed disrespect to 



the Gemmell complex," 
according to Union Activities 
chairperson Amy Donahue. Due 
to these problems, this week's 
CABS dance will be cancelled. 

"CABS is for the students. A 
lot of people put a lot of work 
into this activity and we would 
like it to continue with the help 
of the student body," said 
Donahue. 

The Union Activities Board 
met on Tuesday, September 15, 
and started working on a new 
format for CABS. CABS will 
resume Saturday, September 26. 

Some basic guidelines that 
should be followed for those 
going to CABS dances in the 
future are as follows: 

The Gemmell Student 
Complex is a non-smoking 
building, a fact that some 
students choose to ignore by 



smoking and extinguishing 
their cigarette butts on the floor. 

Please dispose of snuff and 
chewing gum properly. 

Respect yourself and others 
attending the dance. 

When leaving Gemmell, do so 
quietly after the dance ends. 

"UAB wants everyone to come 
out, dance and have a good time, 
but without some of the 
problems CABS has been faced 
with," said Donahue. 

The new time and format for 
CABS will be announced some 
time next week. Anyone with 
suggestions can address them to 
the UAB office, which is located 
at 273 Gemmell. The office is 
open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday- 
Friday. 

CAB.S has been around since 
1983. It started with 35 people 
at the Reimer snack bar. 



Scott Webster/Clarion Call 
Pianist Mykola Suk gave an exhilarating concert on 
Monday, playing an array of classical music including 
Beethoven; Bartok and Lis*. He : also h3d one encore. 



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by Kym Dowd 
Features Writer 

The Sanford Gallery has 
opened its 1992-93 exhibit series 
with a "Faculty Exhibit." The 
faculty art exhibit can be 
observed in Marwick-Boyd Fine 
Arts Building in the Sanford 
Gallery until September 25. 

The exhibit features works by 
four new faculty members: M. 
Joeliene Schaffer, Sherry Best, 
Gary Greenberg and Christopher 
Lambl. Returning faculty 
members include Charles Dugan, 
James Flahaven, Catherine 
Joslyn, April Katz and Emily 
Williams. 

Sherry Best features 
photography entitled "Black 
Pond Summer, 1990," "Black 
Pond Woods, Winter 1991" and 
"Black Pond Woods, Fall 1990." 
Best chooses photography for its 
immediacy, mobility and 
indexical reference. Best's 
works revolve around land, 
nature and natural forms. She 
tries to bring the beauty and 
energy of living spaces into a 
still moment of art. She loves to 
follow a path to see where it 
leads. It is along these walks 
that she becomes aware of the 
growth and decay that has to 
happen to all things, and to the 
relationship between human 
beings and our environment. 
This awareness is vital to her, as 
people have always tried to find 
patterns and rules that make 
sense of the world. 



James Flahaven features oil on 
canvas in works "Greetings from 
Western PA," "Coal Hill" and 
"Kingfisher." Flahaven 

discovered that his favorite art 
museums contained works of 
natural history. When he grew 
tired of looking at paintings he 
would wander over to examine 
the birds, ancient tools and 
mummies. He found that he 
spent more time in this section at 
the museum than with the art. 
The art provided a stimulus, but 
left him wanting more 
information about animals, the 
world and civilization. This gap 
could only be filled by looking at 
fragments of the real world. To 
fill this gap he decided to 
incorporate artifacts or pictures 
of artifacts into his paintings. 

April Katz features lithograph 
and chine colle with the works of 
"Just Another Just War" and 
"Just War." Her works reflect 
the issues that she is concerned 
with. Her concern of the 
destruction of the Middle East is 
shown in these works. She 
became aware of the many 
parallels between current and 
ancient visual forms and 
incorporated them into her works 
by layering of graphic. She uses 
jnedia-provided images of war 
with the pictures from the 
ancient Mesopotamiam cultures. 
M. Joeliene Schaffer features 
works entitled "Encapsulations" 
and "Series 1: Rythmic 
Successions." She is interested 
in synthesis of image and 



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surface, process and material, 
form and shape. Her works 
explore organic motif that are 
reference objects found in 
nature. Her intent is to develop 
and invent images that engage in 
the familiar and the obscure. 

Catherine Joslyn's work is 
entitled "Dreamscape." This 
piece of work came out of a 
transitional time in Joslyn's life. 
As a transitional work it is not 
part of a series, but stands alone. 
At the time of naming this work 
it signified a lost dream of 
visiting Afghanistan, but has 
acquired many other meanings 
over time. 

Emily Williams features her 
work entitled "Sanctuary." This 
work represents Williams' 
interest in history and her 
exposure to ancient and foreign 
culture. The places and objects 
which seem most strange and 
sacred have affected her most, 
and this is seen in her work. 




Scott Dillon/Clarion Call 
The Sanford Gallery "Faculty Exhibit" can be admired until 
September 25. 



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by Chuck Sheperd 



■■■■■ 



Part-Time Sales ":j 



$11.25 /Hour 



-Gary Blantz, 29, was arrested 
for kidnapping a bar owner near 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 
February. Police reported later 
that Blantz shot himself in the 
foot with his .45-caliber revolver 
to show the victim what would 
happen to him it he were 
disobedient. 

-Kenner, Louisiana, police 
arrested Lavalle Williams, 20, in 
July and charged him with 
robbing a convenience store, 
armed only with a can of Off! 
insect repellent, which he 
sprayed into the face of the clerk 
before snatching $50 from the 
cash register and fleeing. 

-A 16-year-old Freetown, 
Massachusetts, boy was arrested 
in July after attempting to rob 
the Town Line General Store and 
being wrestled to the ground by 



the 60-year-old clerk. According 
to the local Taunton Daily 
Gazette, the boy "pointed his 
index finger at the clerk, and 
said, 'This is a stickup.' The 
clerk asked, 'Is this a joke?' and 
the boy looked down and said, 
'Oops.' The boy left and 
returned minutes later with a 
revolver." 

-The Niagara County, New 
York, sheriff's office reported in 
March that a 38-year-old man 
from Wheatfield, New York, had 
been taken to Degraff Memorial 
Hospital suffering from the 
effects of a do-it-yourself 
castration performed with 
clamps, a scalpel and a local 
anesthetic. He said he needed to 
reduce his sex drive. 

-A keynote speaker at a 
November international lung 
cancer conference in Melbourne, 
Australia, reported that as many 



as a fourth of the 1,200 delegates ' 
were smoking during breaks in 
the program. 

-The Ring magazine reported 
that boxer Daniel Caruso, 
moments before the bell to begin 
his New York City Golden 
Gloves fight in January, tried to 
psyche himself up by using the 
method imployed by former 
champion Marvin Hagler: 
pounding his gloves into his 
face. Caruso broke his own 
nose, forcing cancellation of the 
fight. 

-In a recent poll reported in Le 
Point magazine in France, 20 
percent of females (analyzing 
hypothetical employment 
situations) said they would not 
consider it sexual harassment if 
they were asked to undress 
during a job interview 

(c) 1992 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



^^^^MmilEtVMIM 





INDIANA SPORTS CENTER 



Order Your Fraternity and Sorority 

Jackets/Trophies and more. 

Check us First 



Clarion Mall 



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Students Welcome. 
at the 

Church oj Christ 

Grand Ave., Clarion 
-Across from the Glass Factory- 
Sundays: 

Bible Class 9:45am 

Worship 10:30am + 6pm 
Wednesdays: 

Bible Study 7:30pm 



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The Clarion can - y-i *•» - ras* * » 



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Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 



Entertainment 



PEACE CORPS world wise Pu\ 

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526 



INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in nearly 80 nations around the 
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries. 

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce 
the name of the country. 

A nation off 150 islands situated East 
of the Fiji Islands in the South 
Pacific. 




1. Type of government of this country, in 
which executive authority is 
constitutionally vested in the sovereign. 

2. Country which at one time was protector 
of this nation. 

3. Primary religion of this nation. 

4. Former name of this island chain: the 

Islands. 



n»m>i = <ipu»uj /■ uiuwmiJi/J ( uiniuff MMg I ii/jjiminu / wi/"/";, 



Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 




UM... OKAY. WE'RE yyp? pujc, 

RJCKANPI tmUW 

HAVEBEENHAP- tSbthk, 
PtLYMARRJEPFVR 
WHAT, TWELVE 
YEARS, HONEY? 




well, see, 

I HAP TO Be 

5UR3.1V 

8EBNDI- 



ALSO.SHE 
WAS TRYING 
TOGETHER 
CAREER GOING.. 
/ 





HlCELOOKING COUPLE. LETS 
CHECK OUT THEIR VALUES. 



YOU BET. WE 
TIEPTHEKNOT 
JUST THIS 
YEAR. 



AMP NOW 

WE'RE 

LOOKING 

FORWARP 

TDRAJ5IHG 

A FAMILY' 




GREAT. WHERE?) 



RIGHT HERB I'M IN SHOO 
IN MALI BU. BUSINESS. I 
\ WANT TO WORK 

CLOSET0 
HOME! 




\ H0LLYW00P ELITE. NEXT! | 

NO...NO.ITSNOT HE'S 
LIKBTHAT! WE'RE GOT A 
FROM THE CHARWN GUN! 60 
HBSTON 6UlrJ6! 6ET YOUR 
\ „ ^ 6UN,H0NEY! 




ROUTINE FAMILY VALUES CHECK, 
FOLKS. WONT TAKE A MINUTE. 



} 



NO PROBLEM. STOP SUCKING 
FIRE AWAY.' UP, MIKE. 




GOT A FAMILY* 



SURBPO' A UHICHPOESNT 

%S2l, TJX 

uSlZ\" RJ6HTT0 CHOOSE. 




TOO BAP. YOU'RE OUT OF HEREJk 



WHAT? JUST WHAT IS THIS, 

BECAUSE CULTURAL 

WE'RE PRO- PURIFICATION 

OOCS* WEEK 1 / 



AFTER 22 
YBAR5? 

^%<L^ 



HEY, YD, WHOSE 
NAME IS UP 
THERE* HE'S 
THEFRANCHlSe! 




. 




THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



Calvin and Hobbes 



by Bill Watterson 



— — — — — — 



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NAMNGS 
FALL OFF 




Fumbling for his recline button, Ted 
unwittingly instigates a disaster. 




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Near misses of the Old West 







" You've Got Class ! 


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OWBRELLA AND 
BACKPACK' 



\M WOTTO IS 
BE PREPARED." 





i've got a dart qon., fwe 
comic books, some <sm, 
a y&ench, a book on 
Bugs, a map of montaha, 
ah eraser, 
. and a Rock. 



GEE, BVEkYoM: 
5WO0L0 CAWtf 
A KIT UKE THIS. 



TUE 
UMBRELLA 
DOUBLES 

AS A 
WMOWTE 




WHY ME? 



by &OJ& f$. (fpcLn^jumh. 




. . .but I don't want to be one of the crowd. 




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Your Horoscope 
Sept 20 thru 26 



WEEKLY OVERVIEW: All Interested In the arts and ttw pursuit of thalr abllltias will 
clemehelplromtheplanetsasSunandManurybomnnvaintoUbrasignolcntativlty. 
Utilize the support ol Manas and Influential backars from 26th whan Moon becomes 
Haw again. Mercury square Mars: Retrain from being critical. 



EVEN THOUGH ML BORN 
JNPEK THE SI<jN OP 
Uftl?A AREN'T ARTiSTS 
MOST HAVE* ARTISTIC 
S6NS6'. THEY WILL 
ALWAYS LEAVE THING'S 

serrgR looking than 

THE WAY THEY FIRST 
FOUNP THEM. 




THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 

ARIES March 21-aprll 20 

All's well that ends well" is for those 
who havefacedthar problems squarely 
In partnerships or close relationships 
avoid sharp words or hasty decisions. 
TAURUS April 21- Msy 21 

A good penod for intimate relation- 
ships and the pursuits that are of mu- 
tual interest. New Moon activates sec- 
tor of romance and social good rimes. 
GEMINI ltoy22.Jun.21 

Soaal good times, romance, creative 
endeavors and speculation opportuni- 
ties are favored. Co for what you want 
now. You have a good chance to get it! 
CANCER Jun»22-Juty23 

Opportunities linked to short joumevs 
or educational matters could bring ben- 
efits. All new jobs or ventures started 
now have mucii success potential. 
LEO Juty24-Auguat23 

It's not always necessary to travel to far 
a wa v places fo find opportunities. "Acres 
of diamonds" can often be found under 
your feet if you dig deep enough. 
VIRGO August 24 -S«*2J 

Adaptable Mercury moves to SSS sec- 
tor. Changing times causes many to seek 
greener pastures. Redirect ambitions to 
make productive use of abilities. 
UBRA Sapi24-Octn 

Happy Birthday Libra! Sun moves into 
your sign on 23rd. If there s something 
you've been hoping for don't be afraid 
ioask. You just may receive it! 

SCORRO 0ct24-NovH 

New Moon focuses on job related group 
activities. Neglected talents blended 
with career interests could help bring 
greater reward and recognition. 

SAGITTARIUS Nov23-Oac21 

Career or community opportunities are 
enhanced as New Moon activates 10th 
sector. Dealing with those in authority 
could make hopes and wishes happen.. 

FREE Numerology 'Personal Year' report of what to expect in your year ahead. Send 
birthdate and long self-addressed stamped envelope to 'COSMIC COLLEGE PER- 
SONAL YEAR'(Name of this Publication) PO. Box 717, Manchester, N.H. 03105 



wV|i7g 



PROFESSOR COSMO 



CAPRICORN Dac22J«n20 

Have faith in yourself! Give vour abili- 
ties all the room they demand. Don't be 
like the prize fighter that never got out of 
the locker room. 

AQUARIUS Jan21-fab1» 

An appraisal of the current economic 
trends with dose advisors you trust in- 
sures the security of yourself and your 
family. Be alert to new opportunities. 
PISCES. Fab2Mtoreh20 

Favorable New Moon aspects pave the 
way (or closer relationships including 
partnerships. Changing circumstances 
may mean improved conditions. 



Weekly Crossword 



" You've Got Class ! 



i 

5 
10 
14 
15 
16 
17 



ACROSS 

Bridle pan 
Greek ending 
Newts 
Sea eagle 
Russia's 



buro 



Bart's sister 
Students' concern 

19 European sea 

20 Electrically charged 
particle 

21 Failed to win 

22 Horse operas 
24 Weather word 
26 Deserved 
28 Travels 
30 Perfect 1 
33 Romance language 
36 Follows fire & Morse 

38 Wrath 

39 Matures 

40 Board game 

41 Charles Lamb's pen 
name 

42 Meadow 

43 Viennese cake 

44 Woody 

45 Prolessor's speech 
47 Holler 

49 Cum Laude & magna 

cum laude 
51 Elementary school text 
55 Get up & go guy ? 
57 At a great distance 
59 mode 

60 Outlaws 

61 arts 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 Elizabeth Newber 




Egg on 
Tamalue 

Comedian Johnson 
Ms Trueheart 

Elizabeth 

ry winner 
69 Ogles 

DOWN 

1 TV'sPhilbin 

2 Actor Flynn 

3 Silly 



4 Actor Beatty 

5 Resist 

6 Barnyard sounds 

7 Upper crust 

8 Whitney's claim to fame 

9 LLB holder 

10 Beetle 

1 1 School exercise 

12 Former Russian ruler 

13 Ride and Rand 
18 Singer John 

23 Chemical endings 
25 Sponsorship 
27 Actress Hepburn 
29 Recorder of points 

31 Ontario's cousin 

32 College administrator 

33 Speech teacher's con- 
cern 

34 Author/critic James 

35 The of Cons- 

cious 
37 Bread crumbs 
40 Sigma Chi, eg 



41 Singer Fitzgerald 

43 Melody 

44 Vigilant 

46 Moves to & fro 

48 Obliterates 

50 Anwar 

52 Milk producer 

53 Exhilarate 

54 Chest rattles 

55 Adjoin 

56 Uncommon 
58 Unite 

62 Teachers org 

63 Acttess Charione 



C 1VV2 Allrij[lil» rtstn.tdC.l-K Associates 
CO Bui 461, Schtuectady. NY UMI 



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Page 18 - The Clarion Call'- 9-17-92 

"Bedrock Cafe" opens to 
the comedy of Mark Eddie 



by Dan Parish 
Features Editor 



He performed at over 100 
colleges last year. He appeared 
in concert with the likes of 
Kansas, The Hooters, Damn 
Yankees, Bad Company and 
many others. The Pittsburgh 
Press called him "A highlight of 
Pittsburgh Rock-n-Roll in 1992" 
His name is Mark Eddie and 
Clarion is included in his 1992 
tour. 

He will be appearing one night 
only at the "Bedrock Cafe" in 
Gemmell's multi-purpose room 
on Friday, September 18 at 8 
p.m. 

Mark Eddie is a singer- 
songwriter/comedian. He 
delivers his music with an 
acoustic rock style. His 



spontaneous antics touched with 
humor are known to get 
everyone involved. Scott 
Paulson and Jim Krenn of 
WDVE in Pittsburgh said, "Mark 
is an incredible performer and a 
favorite on our morning show!" 

For those of you who don't 
know, Bedrock Cafe is scheduled 
for selected Friday's throughout 
the semester. It is designed to 
give a "night club" atmosphere 
with tables and a mock bar 
sponsored by BACCHUS. 
Slated for the semester are many 
comedians and bands. 

The concert on Friday is 
sponsered by UAB and 
BACCHUS and is free to the 
public, however there is a charge 
on drinks. So come out and 
enjoy the unplugged talents of 
Mark Eddie. 



by Drew Richards 
Features Writer 



Band Review: 

88 AD more than just a long time ago 

from personal experience. This 

attitude to lyrical content should 
be most welcome in this age of 
bands who try to change the 
world with didactic lyrics, 
singing the praises of organic 
gardening or how U.S foreign 
policy should be dictated by 
UNICEF. 

The low point of the band 
takes us to sometime in the 
spring of 1991 when the band 
broke up for eight months. In 
January of 1992, Clarion's 
Sigma Chi nedded a band. 
Mundok was contacted for this 
performance, which was to last 
three hours. Faced with the 
realization that he didn't have 
three hours of music, Mundok 
contacted Patrick, who agreed to 
play. Within a week, they 
learned 15 new songs and played 
a successful show. 

Mundok says that the high 
point of being in this band, so 
far, is the people that were 
singing along with "Temporary" 
at one of their recent shows. 

As for the future, 88AD has a 
demo set for a November release 
and some shows in town. One 
of those will be at the Roost, 



Hearing a band play live is 
usually the best way to become 
acquainted with their music. 
However, this being my second 
week at this school, I am 
attempting to write this piece 
about a local band that many of 
you (I'm sure) are quite fond of. 
Right now, you're probably 
saying to yourself, "Who's this 
guy talking about?" Well, I'll 
tell you. 88 AD is the band in 
question, and from talking with 
J.C. Mundok on the phone, 
this band should be pretty good. 
The other half of this band is 
Patrick Buzzard who was just 
leaving when the interview 
started, so the following story is 
provided by Mundok. 

The name 88AD comes from 
the addresses of the apartment 
on Greenville Avenue, where the 
members lived at one time. One 
of the guys lived at 88 A, and the 
other at 88 D. 

In May of 1990, Mundok was 
asked by Neil Azler, a friend of 
Patrick's to join the band. 
Mundok accepted under the 
condition that he sing. The 
condition met, 88AD was born. 

The kind of music the band 
plays varies. While it is all 
acoustic, it ranges from The 
Allman Brothers and The Eagles 
to REM, Jane's Addiction and 
Lenny Kravitz. In addition to 
covering bands, they have a host 
of their own songs. The most 
famous of these is 'Temporary." 

Mundok said that most of the 
ideas for the original songs come 



CAMPUS EVENTS 


Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Dan Parrish 


Thurs Sept. 17 


Fri Sept 18 


Sat Sept 19 


-Sorority Rush Orientation 


-UAB/BACCHUS 


-FAMILY DAY 


(Gem M-P) 8 p.m. 


Bedrock Cafe presents 


-Book Center open extended 




"Mark Eddie, comedian" 


hours, 10 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. 


- Movie J.F.K. 


(Gem M-P) 8 p.m. 


-Tennis Blue/Gold match 


(Gem M-P) 9 p.m. 




10:30 a.m. 
-Dedication: James C. Gemmell 

Student Complex - 11 a.m. 
-Football vs. New Haven 

- 2 p.m. 


Sun Sept. 20 


Mon Sept. 21 


T\ies Sept. 22 


-ACTIVITIES DAY 


-Register for Yearbook pictures 


-Register for Yearbook pictures 


-Exhibits (Gem) 1 - 4 p.m. 


(277 Gem) 


(277 Gem) 


-Button Factory and Caricature 


-Student Senate Meeting 


-Athletic Timeout Luncheon 


Artist (Gem) 1 - 5 p.m. 


(248Gem) 7 p.m. 




-Mini-Concert (Gem) 2 p.m. 


-Koinonia "Meet the Pastors" 




-Movie (Gem) 7 p.m. 


Night (Chap) 7:30 p.m. 




-Fraternity/Sorority Rush 






begins 






Wed Sept 23 


Thur Sept 24 


Fri Sept. 25 


-Register for Yearbook pictures 


-Register for Yearbook pictures 


-Register for Yearbook pictures 


(277 Gem) 


(277 Gem) 


(277 Gem) 




-IS AAN Conference 


-Koinonia Fall Retreat begins 




(250/250 Gem) 


-Bibliography Instruction 




-Nancy Day Concert (Chap) 


Workshop (Gem M-P) 




8 p.m. 


-ISAAN Conference 




-Bibliography Instruction 


(250/252 Gem) 




Workshop (Gem M-P) 





The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 - Page 19 



■M 



tl 



W 



Teachers beware, facts about the "flu bug" 



Student teachers did you know 
that people who live or work 
with school-age children are 
more likely to catch a cold or the 
flu? Young school-age children 
are the most susceptible to and 
are the prime spreaders of cold 
and flu viruses. Parents of 
young children experience a 
sharp jump in colds when their 
children are young, but as the 



children and parents age, the 
frequency of colds drops. In 
families with school-age 
children, an average of one-third 
of family members are infected 
with the flu virus every year, 
which is higher than the rate of 
infection for other families. 
Those who spend considerable 
time with children, such as 
elementary school teachers and 



day care staff, are also more 
vulnerable to catching colds and 
the flu because they are exposed 
to so many children's viruses. 

-Story courtesy of 
Keeling Health Center 



l\\ 



Attention Local Bands: 

Would you like to get your band 
reviewed? Contact Dan Parrish 
at the Clarion Call at, 

226-2380 . 



Keeling Health Center hours: 
-Monday through Friday: 

8 a.m.- 8 p.m. 
-Saturday and Sunday: 

1 p.m.- 5 p.m. 







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Access 7 days a week 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



.,, 




Women's tennis team opens against Mercyhurst 



by Amy Rae 
Sports Writer 



Determined to carry on a 
winning tradition, Clarion 
University's women's tennis 
team is once again opening 
another season full of 
excitement. The Golden Eagles 
defeated Mercyhurst on Saturday 
in a non-conference match, 5-4. 
Both Marianne Martin and 
Darcy Ingham won three sets on 
the afternoon. 

Third year head coach Terry 
Acker seems quite optimistic 
about the upcoming season. 
Acker has six seasoned players 
that will give any team a run for 
the PSAC (Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference) crown. 

The Golden Eagles won a 
record of five consecutive PSAC 
championships from 1986 
through 1990. In the last six 
years, Clarion has a combined 
dual meet record of 77-3. Last 
year's Golden Eagles finished 
with a 7-1 dual meet record and 
a fourth place finish at the 
PSAC's. 

Coach Acker has high goals 
for his team of mostly all 
returning veterans. "Keeping the 
basic goals we have had every 
year, improving on last years 
performance, then moving 
forward," were the goals that 
Acker stressed for the upcoming 
campaign. "We're trying to take 
off from where the girls ended 
last season. If we are lucky 
enough and fortunate enough to 
win the state championship, then 
we'll work on going to 



Nationals. But we're first 
focusing on the regular season," 
said Acker. 

Leading the way for the 
Golden Eagles this season will 
be junior Shara Wolkomir, who, 
along with being the #1 singles 
player three years running, has 
compiled a 26-4 career singles 
record. 

"I want to try to make it to 
Nationals, and I am going to 
push myself as hard as I can to 
get there," said Wolkomir. 

"Shara has an aggressive 
attitude towards the game. She 
goes after every point and 
refuses to let up on any ball 
during the entire match," said 
Coach Acker. 

Also supporting this team- 
oriented cast of players is the #2 
singles player, senior Marianne 
Martin. Martin, a three-year 
starter, has a career singles 
record of 38-8. She ended the 
1992 season as the #2 seed with 
a record of 17-2 in singles play. 
She also has recorded two PSAC 
doubles championships (1989- 

90). 

The women's tennis team has 
four other talented returners 
from last year's season: seniors 
Darcy Ingham, Roxanne Milton 
and Jennifer Keil, plus 
sophomore Jennifer Simonsen. 

Ingham is anticipating a return 
to a top singles position. In 
1991, she carried an 8-2 record 
at the #4 singles position. 

"Darcy is definitely our most 
improved player," said Acker. 
"She has dedicated herself to 



tennis and has improved all 
facets of her game. She will 
surprise a lot of people this 
year." 

Milton was 8-2 at the #5 
singles position last year. 
Milton, who has a career record 
of 11-2, advanced to the PSAC 
semifinals at the #5 position, 
before losing. 

Keil was 5-0 at the #6 singles 
position. She was a participant 
in the PSAC's at the #3 doubles 
position and finished die season 
with a 6-2 doubles slate. 

Simonsen gained valuable 
experience as a spot-doubles 
player in 1991. She carved a 3-0 
doubles mark in 1991 and is 
looking for more court time in 
1992. 

Terry Keiper and Melodi Deiss 
are both freshmen who are red- 
shirting the 1992 season. Both 
will be ready to compete in 
future matches. 

"We're priming ourselves for 
the state championships," said 
Acker. The long range goal 
would be getting to Nationals. 
Clarion has the athletes that 
could get them there. 

The Golden Eagles are getting 
ready this week for matches on 
Saturday against California, at 
home on the Campbell courts 
(starting time is 11 a.m.) and on 
Sunday, also at home, against St. 
Francis College (starting time at 
3 p.m.). California is the 
defending PSAC champion, but 
has seen PSAC and Division II 
singles champ Shi-Min Li 
transfer to Washington State. 




John Rickard/Clarion Call 
Jen Keil shows no "mercy" against her Laker opponent. 



Clarion University women's volleyball team 
rolling along, next at East Stroudsburg tourney 



by Mike Jewart 
Sports Writer 



Over Labor Day weekend, the 
majority of Clarion University 
students went home to see their 
family and friends, but not the 
Golden Eagles volleyball team. 
Instead, they traveled to IUP for 
the Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania Invitational 
volleyball tournament. 

Clarion opened the tournament 
against a powerful Gannon team, 
which is ranked #1 in the 



Atlantic Region. The Golden 
Eagles gave them a fight, but fell 
short in dropping three straight 
sets, 15-0, 15-11 and 15-8. 

The Golden Eagles then took 
on host and PSAC-West rival 
IUP. The Indians won the first 
set 15-9, but Clarion showed 
their poise by sweeping the next 
three sets 15-9, 15-8 and 17-15, 
for their first 1992 victory. 
Senior, co-captains Wendy 
Ellenberger and Tammi Bills 
were the catalysts in the victory. 



Ellenberger had 32 set assists, 
while Bills contributed with 16 
digs. Gerry Condo paced the 
spikers with 11 kills, while 
Nicole Flambard chipped in with 
nine more. 

Clarion's third match of the 
weekend was against Juniata. 
The Golden Eagles were not able 
to handle the powerful squad as 
they dropped three straight sets, 
15-3, 15-1 and 15-7. With their 
second loss, they were 
eliminated from the tournament. 



it 



On September 8, the Golden 
Eagles traveled to Lock Haven 
for their first official PSAC 
contest of the season. CUP was 
eager to even their record, and it 
didn't take them long to do so. 
They swept the Bald Eagles in 
three sets by scores of 15-11, 15- 
9 and 15-9. Ellenberger again 
led the team in assists with 23. 
Meghan Kelly added nine digs to 
the winning effort. 

The women had a tough task in 
their home opener on September 

• : -' - " % * I 



10 against the defending PSAC 
champion California Vulcans. 
The Golden Eagles dominated 
Cal at times but fell to the 
visitors in three sets, 15-6, 15-13 
and 15-11. Flambard had seven 
kills and eight digs. With the 
loss, the Golden Eagles fell to 1- 
1 in the conference and 2-3, 
overall. 

The Golden Eagles fell on 
Tesday night to IUP, three games 
to one. The loss dropped them 
to 1-2 in the PSAC conference. 



■a« 



Page 20 - The Clarion CalU 9-17-92 



Th ,» Clarion Call - 9-17-92 raue^i 



n 



Golden Eagle golf team on the right 
course for a successfull 1992 campaign 



by Jon Q. Sitler 
Sports Editor 



The 1992 Clarion University 
golf team opened its season at 
the Lakeshore Country Club in 
Erie (Gannon) on Monday. 

The team did not play as well 
as they would have liked, but 
still finished ninth out of 19 
teams. 

"It was a difficult course to 
start the year off on, and we 
would have liked to play much 
better," said Clarion's Todd 
Corbeil. "We are looking 
forward to the Edinboro 
Invitational, which is on 
Thursday, to make a better 
showing." 

The Golden Eagles were led by 
Brian Fiscus, who shot a 79. 
Corbeil and senior, Rich Grafton 
were right behind, both scoring 
an 81. Tom Kellgran and Chris 
Brocious rounded out the field 
for Clarion with an 87 and 88, 



respectively. 

The Clarion University Golf 
team is coached by Bob Carlson, 
who is also Clarion's Athletic 
Director. Carlson has been 
looking forward to the spring 
season. "This year's team has 
more depth, which will improve 
the team overall," said Carlson. 

It's easy to be optimistic about 
1992, after Clarion's strong 1991 
season. The team finished third 
at the Fall 1991 PSAC's, eight 
strokes behind second place 
Slippery Rock and 17 strokes 
behind the winner, IUR 

Clarion's early season ninth 
place finish need not worry 
anyone, knowing that the team 
improved their standing at every 
tournament they played in 1991. 

The Clarion linksters placed 
ninth out of 14 teams in their 
1991 season opener at Slippery 
Rock but went on to finish fourth 
by the season ending 20-.team 



Allegheny Invitational. They 
finished third out of nine teams 
at the 1991 PSACs. 

If this year's team hopes to 
continue their success, they must 
overcome the loss of one of their 
best golfers in 1991, Joel Young. 
They seem to have enough 
weapons to do just that. The 
Golden Eagles will be led by 
Grafton, who led the team in 
1991 with an average of 79.8, 
Corbeil (81.2) and Broscious 
(84.1). 

Other Clarion golfers striving 
to bring Clarion their best are 
Don Turowski, Jason Tutich, 
Greg Greska, Mike Bickart, 
Chris Williams and Jim Knecht. 

Clarion head coach Bob 
Carlson promises one thing: 
"We will be a very competitive 
and exciting team this year," he 
said. 

If 1992 is anything like 1991, 
he will be right! 



X-country opens 
1992 season at Cal 



by Karen Ruud 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University cross 
country teams opened their 
seasons at the California 
Invitational, last weekend. The 
men's team placed fourth, while 
the women's team placed 
seventh. 

The top five finishers for the 
men were Chris Singleton, with 
a time of 29:58.04 for a 15th 
place finish, Russ Breindel, with 
a time of 30:15.01 for a 16th 
place finish, Bill Belfield, with a 
time of 30:46.7 for a 20th place 
finish, Mark Kinch, with a time 
of 32.26.03 for 23rd and Shawn 
Hoehn, with a time of 32:35.6 
for 24th. Also finishing for 
Clarion were Mike Bufalini and 
Chris Myers, in 26th and 33rd 
places, respectively. 

The Clarion Women's team 
was led by Nicole Yahres, who 
ran the course in 22:30.0 to place 
21st. Other top finishers for the 
women's team were Jen 
Dansberger with a time of 
24:39.5 to plate 37th and Lynn 
Baluh with a iime of 24:42.8 to 
place 39th. Other Clarion 



finishers were Marcy Gross and 
Nicole Weaver. 

On the men's side, Clarion 
placed fourth out of five teams, 
finishing with 98 points. 
Slippery Rock dominated the 
Invitational, winning with only 
23 points. 

The women placed seventh out 
of eight teams at California. 
Ohio State won the Invitational 
with 18 points. 

Third year head coach Ron 
Wiser said that the main goal for 
his 1992 teams was to finish in 
the middle of the conference. 
"We are still rebuilding and it 
takes time," Wiser said. "We 
have a few up-and-coming 
runners, but, again, we have to 
wait it out." 

1991 was a successful year for 
the rebuilding cross country 
team. Nancy Fullerton, who 
graduated, was an 

Academic/Athletic Ail- 

American. Also, the men's team 
participated in the United States 
Peace Race in Youngstown, 
Ohio and finished first. 

Wiser said that the athletes 
who run Cross-Country are 



actually two sport athletes; they 
all participate in track. 

"Cross country is really an all- 
year sport," said Wiser. "Many 
people don't realize the 
dedication that these athletes 
have for this sport." 

The men's team also includes 
Eric Mackenelder, Matt Winger 
and Chad Briggs, who is a 
sophomore. 

For the women, the other 
runners include Jennifer Selba 
and Disa Ruiz. The women's 
team is at a disadvantage this 
year, because two of their top 
runners in 1991, Megan Steckler 
and Brandy Payne, have taken 
their studies to Europe. 

Upcoming meets include IUP, 
Grove City Invitational, the 
Allentown Invitational and the 
PSAC's, which are being held at 
California. 

The two teams are not setting 
their goals too high, but making 
the PSACs would be thrilling. 
Their immediate concern is just 
running well. 

The teams will be in action 
this Saturday when they travel to 
Indiana for the IUP Invitational. 







DJ Parrish/Clarion Call 
Todd Corbeil will be asked to improve his game in 1992. 






(Intramurals office located in Tippin) 

Deadlines are approaching 
for the following sports: 

Men's football 

Women's powder-puff football 

Women's Softball 

The due date for all three is September 23. 



Rosters are to be put in the roster box across 
the hall from the Intramurals office near the 
upstairs entrance of Tippin. 



■*, 



Gridiron home opener this Saturday 



by Eric Feigel 
Sports Writer 




The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles Football team plays their 
first contest at home this 
Saturday against New Haven. If 
this game is anything similar to 
their 1991 battle, it will surely be 
a barn-burner. 

Early in last year's campaign, 
the New Haven Chargers 
defeated Clarion in a slugfest, 
48-42. The game was decided 
on a fumbled onside kick that 
was recovered by the Chargers. 
The two explosive offenses 
could very well put up similar 
numbers this time around. 

Two weeks ago, the Golden 
Eagles lost to host Youngstown 
State, 48-7, but there were bright 
spots in the defeat. The Golden 
Eagles congered up 310 total 
yards against the defending 
NCAA I-AA Champions of a 
year ago. They also had 164 
yards rushing, an average of 4.3 
yards a carry. Damien Henry led 
the Golden Eagle running game 
with 98 yards on 19 carries. He 
averaged 5.2 yards per carry. 
When it's time to go to the air, 
Tim Myers has to be the man 
again for Clarion this season. He 
was only nine of 19 for 80 yards 
last week, but did complete a 



pass to Marlon Worthy for 
Clarion's only score against 
YSU. Worthy and Tight End 
Tim Brown were both 
impressive in the opener. 
Worthy did the job returning 
both kicks and punts and caught 
four passes for 51 yards. Brown 
led the receiving corp with eight 
catches for 52 yards. 

Defensively, Clarion will be 
ready to bounce back from the 
YSU contest. Clarion 

linebackers Frank Andrews, 
Damon Mazoff and Clint Terza 
all played excellent defense 
against YSU's explosive 
Division I offense. Terza 
collected 12 tackles, Mazoff had 
11 stops and Andrews had seven. 
The relatively new secondary of 
the Eagles also played well. 
Free Safety Sean Spencer led the 
team with 17 tackles, 11 of those 
were solo. 

Last year's contest between the 
Chargers and Clarion grinded 
out more than 1150 total yards of 
offense (New Haven-617, 
Clarion-562). Nearly 700 yards 
of that was through the air. 
Myers had a sensational day 
completing 20 of 33 passes for 
375 yards and three touchdowns. 
Much of that yardage was to Tim 
Brown, who had 114 yards 



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10-6 DAILY 



CORNER OF 5TH & WOOD CLARION 




File photo 

Linebackers Frank Andrews (5) and Clint Terza (96) will have their work cut out for them in 
trying to stop the explosive offense of the New Haven Chargers. 



The Clarion University 

Football team hosts New Haven 

Saturday at Memorial Stadium. 

klckoff time is set for 2 pm. 

Go Eagles! 

Parsons receives award 



receiving. 

Considering that the Golden 
Eagle offense is coming on 
strong and that New Haven 
scored 69 points last week to go 
2-0 overall, this could be a 
contest worth watching. If that 
is not enough, Saturday is also 
"Family Day" to boot. 



TrTrT^W^^r^^^^^^ 



Margaret "Gie" Parsons, 
Clarion University's outstanding 
women's basketball coach, was 
presented a prestigious award 
over the summer. 

On Friday, July 3, Parsons was 
honored by the Greater 
Pittsburgh Chamber of 
Commerce as the recipient of a 
"Lifetime Achievement Award". 
Parsons was chosen for the 
award by the Women in Sports 
selection committee celebrating 
Women in Sports Awards. An 
official reception in the 
Allegheny Club at Three Rivers 
Stadium was followed by an on 
the field presentation ceremony 
prior to a Pirates game. A total 
of 13 awards were presented, 
while Blue Cross of Western 
Pennsylvania, Blue Shield and 
Pittsburgh Trophy sponsored the 
awards. 

Parsons earned the "Lifetime 
Achievement Award" based on 
her contributions as an athlete 
and a coach for 20 years. 

Parsons, 42, recently finished 
her third season at Clarion 
University and has a remarkable 
success story. Hired late and 



unable to have a recruiting class 
for the 1989-90 campaign, 
Parsons inherited a 3-23 record 
from the previous season and 
coached the Golden Eagles to an 
8-18 season. In 1990-91 Parsons 
displayed her outstanding 
coaching talents by leading the 
team to a 24-8 overall record and 
to their first PSAC 
Championship. The talented 
team also advanced to the Elite 
Eight in the NCAA Division II 
Playoffs before bowing out. In 
1991-92, Clarion was ranked as 
high as seventh in Division II 
during the year, won its first 18 
games enroute the PSAC-West 
Title and earned another berth in 
the 1992 NCAA Division II 
Playoffs. PSAC-West "Coach of 
the Year" in 1992, she was voted 
Converse District 2 and PSAC- 
West "Coach of the Year" in 
1991. 

Parsons graduated from 
Gateway High in 1967 and was a 
player/coach there her senior 
season. She attended Slippery 
Rock University and played 
basketball her first two seasons. 
Earning her B.S. Degree in 1971, 



she taught at Lakeview High and 
coached girls basketball and 
gymnastics from 1971-74. She 
then went to Australia and was 
the women's basketball coach 
and a teacher at Dovetown 
Technical School from 1975-77. 
She also spent three years 
teaching and coaching in New 
Zealand. Parsons also played 
basketball internationally for six 
years, and, while in New 
Zealand, was a starter for the 
team that won the New Zealand 
Club Championship in 1979. An 
All-Tournament and All-Star 
selection, she was nominated to 
play for the New Zealand 
Women's National Team. 

In 1980-81, she was a graduate 
assistant at Slippery Rock 
University as an assistant 
women's basketball coach, then 
took the head women's coaching 
position at Thiel College. She 
took over a losing program and 
turned them into annual winners. 
She carved a mark in her final 
six years at Thiel of 97-46, a 
winning percentage of 67.8%. 

-Story courtesy of Sports 
Information 



«**•*• 



Page 22 - The Clarion Cali - 9-17-91 

Sports Spotlight 



The Clarion Call - 9-17-92- Page 23 



PSAC strikes gold in Barcelona 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Writer 



Many Clarion students, faculty 
members and alumni watched 
hours up i hours of exciting 
Olympic coverage this past 
summer Unfortunately, they 
never realized how many 
participants hailed from 
universities in the Pennsylvania 
State Athletic Conference. 

These participants from our 
own PSAC were nowhere to be 
found, if tuning in to the judo 
competition on the triplecast 
blue network. They always 
seemed to be the centers of 
attention among a veritable 
bouillabaisse of talent on 
showcase at the 25 th Olympiad. 
Two men in particular were 
Chuck Daly and Bruce 
Baumgartner. 

Daly, perhaps the most famous 
State System alumnus 
participating in the 1992 
Olympic games, was the head 
coach of the U.S. Men's 
Basketball Team, better known 
to all as "The Dream Team." 
The 1952 graduate of what was 
then Bloomsburg State Teacher's 
College, did the PSAC proud by 
bringing home a gold medal. He 
had previously coached the 
Detroit Pistons to back-to-back 
NBA championships in 1989 and 
1990. Daly begins the 1992 
NBA campaign at the helm of 
the New Jersey Nets. 

Baumgartner, Edinboro's head 



wrestling coach, became the first 
United States wrestler to win 
medals in three different 
Olympic games by capturing the 
gold in Barcelona. The 31 year 
old from Cambridge Springs, 
Pennsylvania, defeated Jeff Thue 
of Canada 8-0 in the final of the 
heavyweight freestyle event to 
capture the coveted prize. He 
added this medal to his 1984 
gold and 1988 silver medals. 

Another PSAC wrestling coach 
took home hardware at the 25th 
Olympiad. Larry "Zeke" Jones, 
Bloomsburg's assistant wrestling 
coach, brought back a silver 
from Barcelona. Jones was 
defeated by Li Hak Son, of 
North Korea, 8-1 in the final of 
the 114.5 pound match. Jones 
had previously been the reigning 
world champion at that weight. 

A 1990 graduate of East 
Stroudsburg University also 
competed in the freestyle event. 
Anidal Nieves, a former All- 
American, represented Puerto 
Rico in the 136.5 pound weight 
division. 

We had to wait until the final 
day of Olympic competition to 
see the 1985 Shippensburg 
University graduate Steve 
Spence run in the Olympic 
Marathon. The PSAC-West 
alumnus was the highest U.S. 
finisher in the event, placing 
12th overall. Spence had 
previously won the U.S. 
Olympic Marathon trial in April 



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AP photo 
Bruce Baumgartner is the first U.S. wrestler to win medals in three straight Olympics. 



and had finished third in the 
World Championships held in 
Tokyo in 1991. This made him 
the first U.S. runner to win a 
medal in international 
competition since 1976. 

Chuck Daly was not the only 
PSAC alumnus on the hardwood 
in Barcelona. Bloomsburg 
University alumnus Alex Nelcha 
started at forward for the 
Venezuelan National Basketball 
team. In the Tournament of the 
Americas, he scored 8 points and 
yanked down 7 rebounds against 
the U.S. squad. 

There was one participant in 
which Clarion students, staff and 
alumni should have taken special 
interest in. He was Clarion 
University's own Julian Boiling. 
The 1992 alumnus represented 
his home country of Sri Lanka as 
a member of their swimming 
team. 



Also in swimming, 
Shippensburg University 
freshman Chris Flook competed 
for the Bermuda Olympic team. 
In the 100 meter breaststroke, 
Flook won the Bermuda 
National Championship with a 
time of 1:03.6, less than two 
seconds off the world record. 

An Edinboro University 
student and a faculty member of 
that school participated in 
international athletic competition 
during the Paralympics, which 
are being held in Barcelona this 
month. The Paralympics are 
athletic events for disabled 
people and are modeled after the 
Olympic games. Suzanne 
Collett, a social work major from 
Pittsburgh, is swimming in the 
50 meter and 100 meter freestyle 
events as well as the 50 meter 
backstroke. Robin Boyd, a 
physical activities coordinator 



with the Edinboro Office of 
Disabled Student Services has 
been selected to coach the U.S. 
wheelchair shooting team. 

Pennsylvania's State System of 
Higher Education is made up of 
14 universities throughout the 
Commonwealth. Even though 
the PSAC may not match up 
with Division I conferences, 
such as the Big 10 or the Big 
East, it certainly placed its mark 
on the 25th Olympiad. The 
successes of these certain 
participants has shown present 
and future PSAC athletes that the 
size of the school has nothing to 
do with the size of the heart. 

Former Clarion University 
wrestling great Kurt Angle has 
the heart to bring Clarion 
University Olympic fame. 
Angle was just short of making 
the 1992 Olympic team. He is 
probably already thinking 1996! 



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Help Wanted 



♦♦♦Campus Reps Wanted*** 
Heatwave Vacations Spring Break 
1993 The best rates & the Biggest 
Commissions. For more 

information, Call 800-395-WAVE. 



Spring Break '93 Panama City 
Beach, Florida Sales Representative 
needed to work with the #1 Spring 
Break Team. Travel Associates and 
Tour Excel Sell the Best properties 
on the beach. Summit 

Condominiums Miracle Beach 
Resort Holiday Inn, Peir 99. Earn 
top commission and free trips. For 
more information call: Jenny 1-800- 
558-3002. 



Telemarketers: Work your own 
hours at your own phone. No long 
distance calls, no sales involved. 
Call 226-4469 or 1-800-248-4297. 



Spring Break '93- Sell trips, Earn 
Cash & Go FREE!!! Student Travel 
Services is now hiring campus 
representatives. Ski packages also 
avaible. CA11 1-800-648-4849. 



$200 - $500 Weekly Assemble 
products at home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid direct. Fully 
Guaranteed. Free Information - 24 
Hour Hotline. 801-379-2900. 
Copyright #PA10KDH. 



***WANTED*** Campus 

Representatives to promote Spring 
Break and Ski trips. Earn free trip + 
cash!!! Call 1-800-862-7325. 



Sales & Services 



GT Mt. Bike Frame and Fork Set. 
Girvin Flex Stem Brakes and Seat 
Post included, call 226-0614. 



For Sale: Wooden Dining Room 
Table and 4 Chairs; $60, Steel Blue 
area carpet; $50, Older model 
vaccum cleaner; $15, Steel Cage for 
small animal with water bottle and 
removable tray; $25, Steel Clothing 
rolling rack; $10. Call 227-2204. 



Druglord Trucks! $100. 86 Bronco 
...$50 91 Blazer... $150 77 Jeep 
CJ . . . $50. Seized Vans, 4x4's, 
Boats. Choose from thousands 
starting $25. FREE Information- 24 
hour hotline. 801-379-2930. 
Copyrights PA 10KKC. 



Cheap! FBI/U.S. seized '89 
Mercedes . . . $200 86 VW . . . $50 
'87 Mercedes ... $100 65 Mustang . 
. . $50. Choose from thousands 
starting $25. FREE Information- 24 
hour hotline. 801-379-2929. 
Copyright* PA10KJC. 



Looking for student groups to 
sponsor us on campus. Fast, easy, 
big $, $, $'s! Call at (800) 592-2121 
Extension 309. 



True Color Tatoo. Professional 
steralization Fine lines & cover ups. 
Choose from 50 colors. Located in 
Sligo, PA, 10 miles S. of Clarion. 
Call for appointment after 5:00 pm. 
358-2715. 



Teacher Education Program 
Admission Forms For All students 
in the College of Education and 
Human Services who will have 
completed 30 credits of more at the 
end of this semester. Where: 
Office of Field Services, 127 
Stevens Hall, Between 8:30 am and 
4:30 pm. 



P.E.A.C.E. is sponsoring a public 
auction at 6:30 pm on September 22 
at the Immaculate Conception 
Gymnasium. Celebrity items, gift 
certificates, and items from local 
merchants (just to name a few) will 
be auctioned off. 



Bios Club Plant Sale: Brighten up 
your room or apartment with a 
beautiful, reasonably-priced, live 
plant! Thurs. and Fri. Sept. 17 & 18 
10:00am - 3:00pm in the 
Greenhouse behind Peirce Science 
Center. 



/hot dog 

_iouse 



17th S. 6th Avenue 



SPECIAL 
3 HOT DOGS $1.88+ tax 

ALL THE TIME 



Day: 11 a.m. -3 p.m., Mon.-Fri. 

Night: 10p.m.-1:45 a.m., Sun.-Wed. 

10 p.m.-2:30 a.m., Thurs.-Sat. 

For the 12th year... NO INCREASE in hot dog prices! 



The Clarion University Data 
Processing Management Association 
(D.PM.A.) will hold a general 
meeting on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in 
124 Becker. The guest speaker will 
be Jerry Nath, Account Manager 
from Sun Microsystems. Donald 
Coulter, Systems Manager will also 
be joining us. They will be 
discussing Sun Workstations using 
the operating system UNIX. 
Following the presentation, a brief 
meeting will be conducted and 
refreshments will be available. 
There will be a $5.00 lottery 
drawing. All students and faculty are 
welcome. 



Personals 



9/19/91 - 9/19/92 It's been one year 
already and a great one at that! I 
hope this will be just one of many to 
come. I love you. 



It's getting hard to fine someone at 
CUP! SWM, 21, warmhearted cynic 
with literary aspirations seeks 
female with strong artistic/and 
empathic senses. Reply to P.O. Box 
845, Clarion. 



Sig Eps- Thanks for the reggae 
mixer, It was definitely dope! The 
sisters of ASA. 



The sisters of ASA would like to 
extend our deepest sympathies to the 
brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon. 



The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha 
would like to wish everyone a good 
luck during Rush! 



The sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha would 
like to invite all students to our Rush 
parties. They will be held on Sept. 
21 and 22 from 4:30-6 and 6:30-8. 
Everyone is welcome, we hope to 
see you there! 



The sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha would 
like to send Congratulations to Tara 
Wojtzak, the new Theta Chi Dream 
Girl! We're so proud of our Zeta 
sister! 



The sister of Zeta Tau Alpha would 
like to welcome everyone back to 
the fall semester. We wish everyone 
the best of luck! 



KDR Brothers, "Did you find your 
matches yet?" Thanks for the great 
mixer! We had a Blast! Maybe next 
time you won't need to wear animal 
noses! Love Theta Phis. 



Attention All Interested In Rush: 
Come meet Theta Phi Alpha on 
Monday the 21st for a "casual" look! 
Then come back again for our theme 
party, Sunken Treasure, the very 
next day, Tuesday the 22nd! Both 
parties will begin at 9 o'clock and 
end at 10:30 in rooms 106 and 107 
Still. Good luck with Rush, and we 
hope to see you there! Theta Phi 
Alpha sisters. 



Congratulations Steph Scott and 
Amy Stamm, new vice-president 
and secretary! We love you! Your 
Theta Phi sisters. 



Congratulations Claudine & Val for 
being elected President and Vice- 
President of NSSHLA. We're so 
proud of you! Love, your Phi Sig 
sisters. 



To our Phi Sig sweetheart, Just 
wanted you to know that we're so 
happy you're part of us! We love 
you, John! Love, the sisters of Phi 
Sigma Sigma. 



To the brothers of Theta Xi, You 
were our handyman, and we brought 
the tools, but we forgot about the 
work and danced the night away like 
fools. Thanks for the awesome 
mixer guys! Love, Phi Sigma 
Sigma. 



Tri-Sigma would like to invite all 
rushees to our parties and we wish 
you the best of luck during rush. 



Congratulations Renee on becoming 
the new Vice-President of Panhel. 
Way to go! Sigma's in the office! 
Love, your Tri-Sigma sisters. 




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Thanks Theta Chi for starting off 
our semester with an awesome 
mixer. We had a blast! Love, Tri 
Sigma. 



Hey, Tri-Sigma: The bets are 
placed. It's time to race. Let's see 
whose the first, to fall on their face. 
Here's to the second time around of 
sleeping on the ground. 



Happy Birthday Tim, are you 
surprised? Hope your celebration is 
a Blast- but remember you're not as 
young as you used to be! Love G. 



Delta Zeta would like to welcome 
everyone back this semester! We're 
going to have a great year! 



Happy 20th Birthday Michelle. 
Hope you have a great day. Love 
Fabian. 



Phi Sigs and Friends, Thanks for the 
Awesome time last Thursday! Let's 
do it again soon Love, the sisters of 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 



Congratulations Jen Triplet on 
snagging the sweetheart spot! We 
love you! Love, the sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Tau. 



The brothers of Delta Chi would like 
to send their deepest sympathy to the 
brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon for 
the loss of their Brother. He will be 
in our prayers. 



The brothers of Delta Chi would like 
to thank "BZ" and his family for a 
great time at his Pig Roast. We 
really appreciated the invitation. 
Thank you. 



Happy late Birthday to my roomies 
Mik and Cindy. Sorry I forgot 
Kinda!!! And Jenna, we'll have 
some fun when your 21! Lots of 
Love and stuff, Melis. 



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Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 




MJy Mono, 5he 4\ir\k$ a// 1 ever do if go 
through pfta/e*.' ' You changed yoivr major 
again ? Nov/ f# EHWc Pance &m^?Wfwfi 
are you going +o come to your fetifes and 

pick Something feMi'ble ? (%4 M I 
guetf if j JUrt another g/fite. 1 fo I Wd Aer, 
v G'Ve me a treakMa.I mean I kep+ Me 

ra™e phone company a// €ur year/!.. 
She waj impressed." 




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The Clarion Call 

Volume 74, Issue 3 T he student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 24, 1992 

Professor questions incinerators 
impact on Clarion community 



Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 



A professor at Clarion 
University conducted an indepth 
study to demonstate that 
Clarion would be economically 
hurt if a hazardous waste facility 
was installed. 

Dr. William Sanders, an 
economics professor, studied 
several waste incinerators after 
Concord Resources Group 
announced their plans to build an 
incinerator in Clarion. Sanders 
surveyed 30 sited counties as a 



activity in Clarion resulted in a 
12 percent decrease in payroll, a 
four percent decrease in the 
number of establishments and a 
four percent decrease in 
employment. 

Sanders said counties with 
waste incinerators display "poor 
economic growth." If the same 
pattern emerged in Clarion 
County ,as it did in the other 
counties he studied, then 
economic activity could be 
reduced up to 18 percent 
annually in this county. 
Sanders said, "The reason for 



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ay. 





Kari Ambrass/Clarion Call 
Or. William Sanders an Economics professor Clarion 
University studied the economic impacts of toxic waste 

basis of comparison for this plan was to find out the 



Clarion's sited area. 

The studies have led to some 
conclusions about the nature of 
counties that have sites and the 
growth of the counties. 

Some of the effects concluded 
that large incinerators are 
associated with population loss. 
It is estimated that there is a 1.2 
percent population loss per year. 
The 1980 levels of economic 



capacity within the state and 
whether we need them at all." 

The economy would be hurt 
the most in an area 10 to 25 
miles from the site, Sanders said. 
He said plant operators should be 
forced to post a bond against 
which neighbors could make 
claims for lost wages, business 
or property values. 

Concord spokesman, William 






w . 



•.*• • !£*&. 



DONl" BREATHE 



YOU'RE 8*2 Ml. DOWNWIND 

FROM /V PROPOSED 

TOXIC WASTE 
INCINERATOR 

HELP PEACE STOP THIS P0I80N\ 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The community displays signs throughout Clarion in 
protest against Concord's waste incinerator. 



Green, believes the site will 
bring employment and industrial 
development to communities. 

"There's a demonstrated need 
for these facilities," Green said. 
"It's impossible to produce no 
waste. You can't recycle 100 
percent of any product, and you 
need the technology of a landfill 
or incineration." 

As of now, the Departmental of 
Environmental Resources 
(DER) has not accepted any of 
the three applications submitted 
for approval from Concord. 

Sanders also went to 
Harrisburg to testify against 
Concord's plan. Sanders said, 
"[Concord's] plan was poorly 
done, and there was no evidence 
that we need any more 
incinerators." 

The Environmental Quality 
Board (EQB) will give 
statements in six weeks if the 
incinerator will put into effect. 

The EQB decides whether any 
disposals should be put in 
throughout the state. They were 



supposed to accept the plan to be 
put in Clarion but postponed 
their decision. Because of 
Sanders proposal, further 
investigation was called for. 
Sander's plan brought up many 
questions that the EQB felt 
needed to be answered and dealt 
with carefully. 

Last week, DER denied 
Concord's third application to 
put the disposal facility in Mill 
Creek Township. 

DER denied the first 
application after finding an 
active gas well within the 
facility's boundaries. The second 
application was rejected because 
wetlands were found on the site. 
Concord may appeal DER's 
decision to the Environmental 
Hearing Board by submitting a 
new application. For this to 
happen, all criteria that has been 
set by DER to put in wastelands 
must be met Wetlands and gas 
wells are among some of the 
criteria that prohibits Concord 
(cont. onpg. 4) 



m 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 9-17-92 




IHJy Mom, 5^e ffifnks a// 1 ever do // go 
+hrougk pfia;e$.' You chafed your major 
again ? A/ow />; 0hh/c fence R>r/n/ ? vV/ie/i 
are you going +o come to your fen/e; and 
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gu«S tfj Jur* another pftafe.'fo 1"^ Aer, 

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i Volume 74, Issue 3 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 24, 1992 



Decision on hazardous 
waste plan delayed 

The Environmental Quality 
Board (EQB } has recently 
decided to postpone a decision 
on a plan which deals with 
hazardous waste because several 
state senators feel the proposal 
is full of mistakes. 

The plan is "riddled with 
unwarranted bias, (insupportable 
documentation, factual errors 
and completely erroneous 
assumptions," six lawmakers 
said in a letter to the EQB last 
Tuesday. 

The proposal details methods 
of handling the waste including 
treatment, recycling, cutting 
production and disposal. 

The decision on the plan was 
delayed for 60 days by the EQB 
at a 15*5 vote. "It's something 
that we need to do with great 
deliberation, * Sen. David 
Brightbill told the board, which 
reviews regulations for the 
Department of Environmental 
Resources (DER). 

The senators feel the DER 
failed to make "an honest effort" 
to involve the public in hearings 
around the state on the plan. 

The plan predicts the amount 
of waste the state will have to 
handle in coming years. 

Director of the Bureau of 
Waste management, James 
Snyder, rebuffed criticism of the 
DER by saying the public was 
very much involved in the 
proposal The new plan predicts 
the state will produce 143,000 
more tons of waste than it has 
disposal space for each year 
until 1997, Snyder said, 
compared to 650,000 excess 
ions a year projected in 1986. 

In their letter, lawmakers said 
the new plan overestimates the 
amount of waste the state needs 
to dispose of, and they also 
questioned the agency's claim 
that the plan includes only waste 
generated in Pennsylvania. Hie 
senators also feel that inflated 
waste statistics could result in 
unnecessary landfills and 
incinerators in the state. 

The lawmakers who signed 
the letter are pleased at the 
postponement 

Information courtesy of Ike 
Associated Press 



Professor questions incinerators 
impact on Clarion community 



Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 



A professor at Clarion 
University conducted an indepth 
study to demonstate that 
Clarion would be economically 
hurt if a hazardous waste facility 
was installed. 

Dr. William Sanders, an 
economics professor, studied 
several waste incinerators after 
Concord Resources Group 
announced their plans to build an 
incinerator in Clarion. Sanders 
surveyed 30 sited counties as a 



activity in Clarion resulted in a 
12 percent decrease in payroll, a 
four percent decrease in the 
number of establishments and a 
four percent decrease in 
employment. 

Sanders said counties with 
waste incinerators display "poor 
economic growth." If the same 
pattern emerged in Clarion 
County ,as it did in the other 
counties he studied, then 
economic activity could be 
reduced up to 18 percent 
annually in this county. 
Sanders said, "The reason for 




Kari Ambrass/Clarion Call 
Dr. William Sanders an Economics professor Clarion 
University studied the economic impacts of toxic waste 

basis of comparison for 
Clarion's sited area. 

The studies have led to some 
conclusions about the nature of 



counties that have sites and the 
growth of the counties. 

Some of the effects concluded 
that large incinerators are 
associated with population loss. 
It is estimated that there is a 1.2 
percent population loss per year. 

The 1980 levels of economic 



this plan was to find out the 
capacity within the state and 
whether we need them at all." 

The economy would be hurt 
the most in an area 10 to 25 
miles from the site, Sanders said. 
He said plant operators should be 
forced to post a bond against 
which neighbors could make 
claims for lost wages, business 
or property values. 

Concord spokesman, William 



J*\ IS 



&A~ 



■■£&& 



* **-'V^;' 









YOU'RE 8 Ml. DOWNWIND 

FROM A PROPOSED 

TOXIC WASTE 
INCINERATOR 

HELP PEACE. STOP THIS POISON 



■>, m 



m 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The community displays signs throughout Clarion in 
protest against Concord's waste incinerator. 



Green, believes the site will 
bring employment and industrial 
development to communities. 

"There's a demonstrated need 
for these facilities," Green said. 
"It's impossible to produce no 
waste. You can't recycle 100 
percent of any product, and you 
need the technology of a landfill 
or incineration." 

As of now, the Departmental of 
Environmental Resources 
(DER) has not accepted any of 
the three applications submitted 
for approval from Concord. 

Sanders also went to 
Harrisburg to testify against 
Concord's plan. Sanders said, 
"[Concord's] plan was poorly 
done, and there was no evidence 
that we need any more 
incinerators." 

The Environmental Quality 
Board (EQB) will give 
statements in six weeks if the 
incinerator will put into effect. 

The EQB decides whether any 
disposals should be put in 
throughout the state. They were 



supposed to accept the plan to be 
put in Clarion but postponed 
their decision. Because of 
Sanders proposal, further 
investigation was called for. 
Sander's plan brought up many 
questions that the EQB felt 
needed to be answered and dealt 
with carefully. 

Last week, DER denied 
Concord's third application to 
put the disposal facility in Mill 
Creek Township. 

DER denied the first 
application after finding an 
active gas well within the 
facility's boundaries. The second 
application was rejected because 
wetlands were found on the site. 
Concord may appeal DER's 
decision to the Environmental 
Hearing Board by submitting a 
new application. For this to 
happen, all criteria that has been 
set by DER to put in wastelands 
must be met. Wetlands and gas 
wells are among some of the 
criteria that prohibits Concord 
(cont. on pg. 4) 



Page 2 • The Clarion Call ■ 9-24-92 




The Clarion Call- 9-24-92 - Page 3 



The Clarion 
Call 



Hide Park 



Eagles Staff TS^^-^s, S^^ 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Debbie Huffman 

Managing Editor 

Alan Vaughn 

News Editor 

Dan Parrish 

Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 

Sports Editor 

A.J. Meeker 

Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Brksitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

Tara Sheesley 

Ad Design 

Amy Conner 

Advertising Manager 

Ted Howard 

Business Manager 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
a^vpi-Hsinp revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814)226-2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$ 1 2.00 

Academic Year.. .$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 




W 




The way J see it 




"News Editor 



Legitimate 



Fear is a natural human 
emotion. David L. Sermon, a 
professor in Ball State 
University's Anthropology 
Department describes it thusly: 
"If any human emotion is as old 
as our species it must surely be 
fear, and the end of its hold on us 
is not in sight" This observation 
appears on page seven of a 
recent book Scruton edited 
"Sociophobics, the Anthro- 
pology of Fear," Boulder, CO, 
Westview Press, 1986. The 
anthropologist Scruton and some 
of his colleagues believe that 
Sociophobics, which he 
describes as a new field, 
provides another point of view of 
human emotions as opposed to 
the viewpoint of psychologists. 

By contrast Wladylaw Sluckin 
of the University of Leicester, 
England offers another edited 
work "Fear in Animals and 
Man," New York, Van Nostrand 
Reinhold Company, 1979, 
wherein a group of psychologists 
discourse on fear. The treatment, 
of course, differs from that of the 
preceding book. Regardless of 
the disciplinary approach, 
neither book treats of the kind of 
fear which is the subject of this 
short article. 

Some fears are legitimate and 
natural, some are not. Some 
fears have been with humanity 
since its beginning. In Sluckin's 
book, P. A. Russell mentions a 
few commonly known to us such 
as fear of snakes, height, the 
dark. Today a fear pervades 
world society, not just American, 
but all civilized society; it is 
natural, understandable, very 
real. For a technical name, 
dictionaries give us nosophobia , 
the fear of disease. For human 
society today that fear is fear of 




Gerard McCabe 



AIDS (acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome). Yes, fear 
of contracting AIDS, the 
destructive disease that 
eliminates all resistance to 
infection, to viral attack, and so 
kills remorselessly, relentlessly - 
this is the common fear humans 
share now. Probably, humanity 
has not experienced a similar 
feeling since the days of typhus 
and bubonic plague of the 
European Middle Ages. In 
America just a few decades ago 
even the terrible threat of 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



While looking over the 
Interfraternity/Panhellenic 
councils' new policy on 
Alcohol, a few points stuck in 
my mind. 

First, it's tough to argue with. 
Many of the points are already 
state or federal law. Whether or 
not these laws are feasible or 
even possible to enforce is 
another matter entirely. 
However, IFC/Panhel should not 
bear the brunt of the blame for 
adopting a policy combating the 
misuse of alcohol, most 
prevalently by underage 
drinking. 

Not that underage drinking is 
the fault or a result of the Greek 
system or its social emphasis. 
The laws and regulations have 
long been established by higher 
powers than the university on 
this subject. These stipulations 
have been established ages ago, 
long been known and long been 
ignored. 

The new policy treads on 
ground previously covered. All 
fraternities and sororities have 
FIPG (Fraternity Insurance 
Purchasing Group) insurance, 
which already directly has 
policies in place governing 
alcohol at Greek events. No 
matter what stipulations are 
proposed, good or bad, positive 
or negative, strict or lax, 



babysitting is not possible. 

A problem exists in the fact 
that Clarion University is far 
behind its SSHE cousins in 
adopting an alcohol policy for 
off-campus circumstances. A 
policy should be adopted, and 
drafted to cover all students, not 
only the minority of students 
who are associated with the 
Greek System. 

While the councils, and the 
university are to be commended 
for its attempt to confront a 
problem it obviously considers at 
the forefront of the collegiate 
agenda, it should hardly rush 
into a quick-fix solution. 

At a time when alarming new 
statistics are emerging revealing 
the depth of alcohol abuse in 
college, the university needs to 
take the time to evaluate all 
circumstances and alternatives 
and provide a consistent policy 
to blanket the entire student 
body, not just the few it 
considers at the root of the 
problem 

Enlarge this admirable attempt 
to provide for the entire student 
body and not just those with the 
tacked-on stigma of a society 
wide reputation. 

Then and only then will Clarion 
University be on the right track 
to an equitable and realistic 
policy. 




* * *r i . n *n u » w > & *tAi&'&- 



55SS 






The voice of 
the student 



Dear Editor: 

Many students on campus 
complain that they do not have a 
voice in campus decisions. On 
an immediate level this is not 
true. For example, students had 
an active role in designing and 
developing the student center, 
they bring in most of the 
entertainers, they set campus 
organization budgets, and they 



advise the faculty council and 
aid with administrations. 
However there is one position 
that is held by a student that can 
be argued to be the most 
important. That position is on 
the Council of Trustees. 

One student sits on this 
Council to give the board the 
opinion of the students. The 
Council of Trustees governs the 
university on a local level. They 
designate local rates, 
maintenance projects, and 
expansion. This one student is 
to be the voice of both the 
Clarion and Venango campuses. 
Who is this trustee? Maybe the 



better question is where is this 
Trustee. Who is it: Crystal 
Knorr. Where is she: Harrisburg 
working as an intern. How does 
this make you feel. It infuriates 
me! How can Crystal have a 
feel on what is happening on 
Clarion campus, let alone on 
Venango campus, when she is 
almost three hours away. The 
ironic part of this is Crystal ran 
on the philosophy that the past 
Student Trustee (a returning 
adult from Venango Campus) 
was not the proper choice. Why 
you might ask? Crystal felt this 
person was not aware of what 




was happening on main campus, 
where there is the bulk of 
students. Is Crystal more aware 
by being in Harrisburg? Is she 
effectively talking with 
students?, Listening to them?, or 
is she giving her opinion and 
speaking for each and every one 
of us. 

It would not be fair if I did not 
print that myself and one other 
student were nominated for this 
position, and Crystal was picked 
over us. However, this editorial 
is not written with vengeance. 
The committee felt Crystal was 
the better choice and there is 



where it stands. I write this out 
of frustration, disappointment, 
and concern. An important 
voice of you, the student, and 
you, the staff, has been lost. 
Your voices are not being heard 
by one of the most influential 
committees on this campus. 
Clarion students need to claim 
back their voice. If not now, 
make the effort to assure our 
voice will be heard once again. 
Eric D. Reed 
Senior Psychology Major 



Editor's note: Crystal Knorr 
will finish her internship at the 
end of the semester. 

African American Caucus 
presents a series of guest lecturers 



A successful grant proposal 
submitted to the Office of the 
Chancellor of the State System 
of Higher Education by the 
African American Caucus of 
Clarion University will be 
having a series of "Visiting 
Scholars to Clarion." 

Randall Robinson, Executive 
Director of Trans Africa, A 
powerful Washingtom-based 
lobby for Africa and the 
Caribbean will be the first 



speaker. 

Robinson is a graduate of 
Harvard Law School. 
TransAfrica conducts con- 
ferences designed to discuss key 
foreign policy issues and provide 
information generally unavail- 
able to the public on Third 
World countries. Robinson will 
speakv in Hart Chapel on 
October 1, 1992 at 7:00 p.m. 

courtesy of the 
Admissions Office 



Social Equity Office 
sponsors luncheons 



The Clarion University Office 
of Social Equity announces the 
implementation of an "Equity 
Forum Luncheon Series" to 
begin this Friday . 

This series will be focusing 
around equipping the university 
community in becoming more 
understanding and sensitive to 
the issues of equity and diversity. 

Dr. Leon Haley, president and 
CEO of the Urban League of 
Pittsburgh, will be guest speaker. 
His topic will be on "Equity and 
Diversity: A vision for 2000." A 
question and answer session will 
follow after lunch. 

The luncheon is open to the 
Clarion University community, 
by reservation. 

Prior to his appointment to his 
present position, Haley was 
associate dean and acting dean 
of the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs from 1975 
to 1985. He has also served as 
research associate for the 



Brookings Institution. He 
earned his B.A. degree from the 
university of Pittsburgh, M.A. 
from Boston University, and 
Ph.D. in political science from 
the University of Pittsburgh. 

He has served on the board of 
directors of the Citizens League 
of Southwestern Pennsylvania, 
Governor's Appellate Court 
Nominating commission, the 
boards of directors of the Boy 
Scouts of Allegheny County, the 
Pittsburgh Public Theatre, the 
Pittsburgh Historical Landmarks 
Society, and QED 

Communications. He is also a 
member of the board of visitors 
of the Afro-American Studies 
Program at the University of 
Maryland, and chair of the 
National Urban League's 
Educational Initiative Task 
Force. 

courtesy of 
University Relations 



Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 



Hide park 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 - Page 5 



(cont. from pg. 2) 



Poliomyelitis did not generate 
this level of apprehension. 

This fear is legitimate; the 
threat is serious, but an irrational 
development has occurred. 
What has arisen appears to be 
another overpowering fear, 
namely that of donating blood. 
This fear has become so 
pervasive in American society 
that is has affected the blood 
supply. Americans are not 
donating blood in sufficient 
quantities to meet the needs for 
transfusions for people who are 
ill, injured, of hereditary bearers 
of conditions requiring blood 



such 



as 



replenishing, 
hemophiliacs. 

What can be done to dispel this 
unreasoned aspect of this fear? 
The American Red Cross, 
collector of about half the blood 
donations in the United States, 
has a serious interest in 
dispelling this aspect of fear. In 
a very straight forward brochure, 
"AIDS: the Facts," the Red 
Cross informs readers that blood 
donors cannot contract AIDS 
through donation. All of the 
supplies used in the donation 
collecting process are not only 
sterile to begin with but 



discarded never to be used again. 
If this is not enough, the 
brochure clarifies the fact that 
people who just might be carriers 
of this dreadful disease are 
discouraged form being donors. 
As a further safeguard, all 
donated blood is tested, before 
being used, for not only the 
AIDS virus but hepatitis B virus 
as well. The Red Cross takes 
every precaution to protect the 
blood donor and the patient who 
may be the eventual recipient of 
that donation. 

So, there is a legitimate, 
rational fear with an irrational 



side effect that is causing 
hardship and suffering for many 
people. This terrible 

misapprehension must be 
corrected before more serious 
harm occurs to American and 
world society. Blood donations 
must increase; as our national 
population grows so does the 
need. These are the facts: it is 
safe to donate blood and the 
blood supply is safe. American 
Society must not let the last 
phrase of Sermon's quotation in 
the opening paragraph become a 
prophecy. The end of this fear's 
hold on us must be in sight! 



You are a university student, a 
well informed American, a 
rational human being; be a 
blood donor if you can, and 
encourage others to donate. 
Face this irrational fear and 
defeat it. 

Mr.McCabe is 
Director of Libraries 
at Clarion University 

The Red Cross blood mobile 
will be held on October 5 from 
11:00 a.m. till 5:00 p.m. in 
Tippen Gymnasium. 



Students want scholarship tax repealed 



(CPS) House bill that would 
rescind a 17 percent tax on 
graduate and professional 
students' stipends, scholarships 
and fellowships faces little 
chance of passing this year 
because of Congress' reluctance 
to eliminate taxes. 

"It's all over for this year. The 
president is talking about vetoing 
anything that looks like a tax 
increase," said Thomas Linney, 
director of government relations 
for the Council of Graduate 
Schools. "My fear is that the 
political season is upon us." 

The 1986 Tax Reform Act put 
a 17 percent tax on all 
scholarships and other money 
awarded to post-baccalaureate 
students in graduate and 
professional schools. The 
Internal Revenue Service is 



expected to begin actively 
enforcing the tax this year, 
officials said. 

Revenues from the tax was 
expected to produce about $550 
million from 1986-91, if the tax 
had been fully enforced. 
Scholarship money used for 
tuition and fees, books and 
supplies remains tax-free, while 
money used for living expenses 
and travel is taxed under the act. 

"We opposed the bill at the 
time because we knew it would 
be a hardship on graduate 
students," Linney said. 
"Congress, in its fervor for its 
tax reform, saw college graduate 
students as privileged people. 
But we know graduate students 
live on very little money." 

The bill, co-sponsored by U.S. 
Rep. Tom Lewis, R-Fla., and the 



National Association of 
Graduate and Professional 
Students (NAGPS), was 
introduced in March and hasn't 
been scheduled for a hearing 
yet." 

Perceptions are that graduate 
students are wealthy. We aren't. I 
don't know if its anti- academic 
or what, but it's sad," said Joy 
Ward, executive coordinator for 
NAGS P. "The tax is not on a 
wealthy segment of the 
population. To tax the bottom 
population is absolutely 
ridiculous." 

Ward, who is working on her 
master's degree in management 
at Memphis State University in 
Tennessee, said the graduate 
student population has changed 
in the past 15 years. The norm 
used to be that a college or 
university graduate went directly 



Professor questions. . . 



(cont. from pg. 1) 



from putting in the waste site. 

Arthur Davis, secretary of 
DER said, "In a trip to Clarion 
County last year, I promised 
residents that no hazardous 
waste facility would be cited 
unless it clearly meets our 
stringent regulations to assure 
protection of the environment 
and the health and safety of the 
nublic." 



According to an update of the 
state hazardous waste facilities 
plan, industries reduced 
hazardous waste production by 
almost 30,000 tons in 1989. 
About 172,000 tons, or 26 
percent of waste material, was 
recycled in that year. 

Despite the improvements, the 
state is expected to produce 



42,000 more tons of waste than it 
can dispose of by 1997. 

Hazardous wastes are non- 
radioactive wastes that can cause 
severe illness or death or which 
threaten the environment if they 
are stored improperly. 

Concord said it could treat 
5,000,000 tons of waste at the 
plant annually if it opened in 
1997. 



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to graduate or professional 
school, when more stipends and 
assistantships were available 
than there are currently, she said. 

Now, Ward said, there are 
more non-traditional students 
going to graduate school who 
can't rely on their parents for 
financial assistance, and they are 
competing for stipends, 
scholarships and assistantships 
from an ever-shrinking pool of 
available fund. 

There are approximately 1.8 
million graduate and 
professional students in post- 
baccalaureate programs. There 
are no estimates available on the 
number of students receiving 
financial assistance through 
awarded monies. 

"There was a lot of funding 
available, so many 

undergraduates went right away 
because money was available," 
Ward said. "We're seeing less 
money now, so people are not 
going to graduate school." 



Many graduate programs 
prohibit students from holding 
secondary jobs, so they either 
have to break rules or depend on 
loans, stipends and other awards, 
or savings to pay for school. 
That's why the 17 percent tax 
hurts, said Richard Knaub, who 
is working on his Ph.D. in 
zoology at Clemson University 
in South Carolina. 

"It's a major devastation. I 
haven't gone on food stamps yet, 
but I'm eligible. What disturbs 
me is that when we as a country 
do not value education enough to 
support it, then I see us slipping 
into a second-rate status as far as 
the nation goes," he said. 

Knaub broke graduate school 
rules and held four part time jobs 
last year. He said tuition, room 
and board at Clemson cost him 
$9,000. He received a 
department stipend of $8,500, 
before taxes and $7,200 after 
taxes. 



STUDENTS... 

Pamper your parents at the 

Clarion House Bed and Breakfast 






i 




77 South Seveth Avenue 
For Information Call 

226-4996 




On the beat with public safety 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



After my self-deserving run-in 
with the Emlenton police 
department last Friday night, I 
was ready for Saturday night's 
assignment, chronicling a night 
with public safety. What 
questions would they refuse to 
answer? What would they refuse 
to let me see? What exactly do 
they do all night, anyway? 

I arrived at the public safety 
building at 8:45 p.m. Student 
officer Taruq Murtaza, a 
graduate student originally from 
Pakistan and working on his 
Master's degree in Finance here 
at Clarion, was taking incoming 
calls and dispatching the shifts of 
two full time officers to areas of 
need. Officer Mark Williams, 
working on a Bachelor degree in 
Communication when he can, 
and Sgt. Larry Eisenman were 
heading into the last two hours 
of the three to eleven shift, and I 
would ride with Sgt Eisenman. 

Only a few minutes had passed 
when a call came from 
Wilkinson Hall. An elevator was 
stuck on the fifth floor and 
several people were stuck inside. 
During the three minutes that 
passed before we arrived at 
Wilkinson Hall, the people 
inside the elevator had forced 
open the doors themselves and 
had gone on with their business. 
The elevator was still not 
working, and Eisenman would 
later fax a message to the 
maintenance department, 
requesting repairs. As we were 
leaving Wilkinson Hall, 
Eisenman noticed a sign 
announcing a dance in the 
basement to replace the 
cancelled CABS dance. Sgt. 
Eisenman said he was unaware 
of the dance at Wilkinson, and 
while the hall is not required to 
notify public safety of such 
events, knowledge of the dances 
helps public safety to be ready if 
any trouble should arise. 

I had noticed a different sign 
beside the dance poster 
concerning opinion on whether 
public safety officers should 
carry guns or not. When asked 
his opinion, Sgt. Eisenman told 
me that he has not carried a gun 
in the 14 years he has worked at 



Clarion. Currently, officers do 
not carry firearms, but guns are 
available if needed. 

Leaving Wilkinson Hall we 
travelled to the alley behind 
Founders Hall to ensure proper 
doors were shut and locked. He 



with Clarion borough, public 
safety and the Clarion police 
work together. Though public 
safety patrols the campus and the 
stadium, they also have powers 
of arrest in town. Public safety 
officers may be asked by Clarion 



campus as dangerous, but 
warned against traveling in any 
dark areas alone. That may 
sound old and tiresome, but I 
was surprised at the number of 
female students that were 
walking alone as late as three or 




Lois Oertei/Clarion Call 
Public safety officers work out of their headquarters, located on Wood Street. 



closed the back door of the 
unattended pottery shop and 
locked both it and the front door. 
While checking the doors at 
Founders Hall, Eisenman 
mentioned "space requests" are 
for scheduling certain buildings 
and doors to be open at 
requested times and dates for 
various clubs and activities. 
Some are for one time only, 
some are regular re-occurring 
events. "Space requests are a 
major function of public safety," 
said Sgt. Eisenman. 

After checking parking lot W, 
Sgt. Eisenman parked the car 
behind the library and went on 
foot patrol. Meanwhile, Officer 
Williams was patrolling 
elsewhere on campus. On the 
walk around the library, Ralston 
Hall and President Reinhard's 
residence, I had the chance to 
ask some of the questions 
suggested by friends and 
classmates. I was surprised, 
most of all, to learn that public 
safety's jurisdiction is not 
limited to the University campus. 
Through a mutual agreement 



and/or state police to assist in 
emergencies such as the recent 
escape of a prisoner from the 
Clarion County Jail. Clarion and 
public safety officers both have 
the option of declining requests 
for assistance from each other, 
but usually try to help each other 
as much as possible. Public 
safety officers go through the 
same training as other local law 
enforcement officers. Clarion 
University currently has an 
officer enrolled at a training 
academy. 

Sgt. Eisenman also discussed 
the department's policy on 
parking tickets. No tickets are 
issued for failure to display a 
parking permit after 4:15 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, or on 
weekends. No one is exempt. 
Sgt. Eisenman himself was once 
ticketed when he forgot to 
display his permit. He also said 
that money from tickets goes to 
the general fund, and officers 
have no quotas on the numbers 
of tickets to issue. 

Sgt. Eisenman did not define 
any one particular area on 



four o'clock in the morning. The 
dirt "road" between Ralston Hall 
and the road up the hill to 
Chandler Dining Hall is a prime 
example. 

Sgt. Eisenman explained that 
the fear of vandalism and abuse 
has kept phone boxes with direct 
lines to public safety from being 
installed. I asked what someone 
should do, if they need help and 
can't access a phone. "Make as 
much noise as possible" he said, 
adding that Clarion students are 
quick to report suspected 
violence. 

I wanted to know about his 
hardest situations to deal with, 
and he did not hesitate to answer. 
"Drunks... dealing with drunks, 
because you never know how 
they will react," he said. His 
worst situations involve people 
who have passed out. "You are 
never sure, it could be medical, 
alcohol, drugs or a 
combination." He added it can 
make for some scary situations. 

Back in the car, a call from 
Murtaza took us back to the 
office. A caller from Oswego 



University in New York wanted 
Dr. Reinhard's phone number. 
Sgt. Eisenman offered to deliver 
a message, as public safety does 
not give out such information. A 
message was later taken and 
delivered to Dr. Reinhard. 

Returning to the office, it was 
time for a shift change. Officers 
Denny Hagan and Graciano 
Lopez replace SgL Eisenman and 
Williams. Todd Geer replaced 
Murtaza at the desk. 

First things on the list were 
letting two students, working 
late, into TV5, followed by 
driving out to the stadium. 
Riding with Hagan, the next two 
hours consisted mainly of 
building checks. Several doors 
left open or unlocked by 
departing students and professors 
were found and secured. A 
heavy fog rolled in and campus 
seemed devoid of life until 
around 1:15 a.m. "Foot traffic" 
seemed to pick up a little bit 

Around 1:30, officer Lopez 
radioed officer Hagan for 
assistance on Greenville Avenue. 
The quick trip from parking lot 
B took less than a minute, and 
we found Lopez talking with a 
student. Lopez said the man 
appeared to be staggering 
slightly and seemed to have 
dropped something when Lopez 
first drove by. The student 
claimed that the stagger was 
caused by tendentitis and denied 
dropping anything. Proclaiming 
respect for the law and a 
willingness to cooperate, the 
student then refused to take a 
breath test and became selective 
about which question to answer. 
Lopez, citing concern for the 
student's safety in getting home, 
escorted him the short distance 
home. A search of the area for 
the alleged dropped object 
turned up a "No Left Turn" sign 
in the grass. The sign was taken 
back to the office for later return 
to the proper department. 

Returning to building checks 
and short patrols, Hagan locked 
the studio in Becker Hall around 
3:15 a.m. Open or unlocked 
doors were found in Peirce, 
Marwick-Boyd, and one of the 
Thorn buildings. 

Hagan said Friday night was 
busy, and called this Satursay 
night pretty calm. 



Page 6 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92- Page 7 



Cathca rt elected ne w Senate V.P. I RiologV dept. holds workshop 

, ... , „ „ The vice president elections and I now must work to pay for ^7t/ A. «. » K 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 

Senior, Andrea Cathcart, was 
elected vice president of Student 
Senate Monday night as a result 
of Ron Berry's recent resignation 
of the position. 

Luis Almeida, Chrissy Gribus, 
Andrea Cathcart and Ralph 
Godbolt were nominated for vice 
president at the senate meeting. 
Each nominee gave a speech 
before the election and the vote 
was decided through secret 
ballot. 

In her speech, Cathcart 
mentioned that she wants to 
ensure proper running of the 
student senate committees since 
she feels their is a problem with 
attendance. Cathcart also wants 
to implement a revision of 
student senate's constitution. 

"I feel I have the confidence 
and the ability to serve as your 
vice president," said Cathcart in 
closing to the senators present. 



The vice president elections 
came as a result of Berry's 
resignation Monday, September 
14, due to financial difficulties. 

Berry blames the state for his 
lack of finances since he cannot 
get enough funding through 
loans or grants for this semester. 



and I now must work to pay for 
my tuition." 

Berry is continuing his duties 
as a student senator, even though 
he has resigned his vice- 
presidency. 

Cathcart was pleased with the 
result of the election and is ready 



"I feel I have the confidence 
and ability to serve... " 

•Andrea Cathcart 



Berry's resignation was also due 
in part to a lack of time to fulfill 
the duties of the office because 
of a job he must now hold in 
order to pay tuition. 

In a statement released to the 
Call last week Berry said, "The 
reason for my resignation is 
quite simple: my financial 
resources have been exhausted, 



to assume her new role of vice 
president. 

"I would like to thank the 
student body for giving me the 
opportunity to do this because 
you are the ones who elected me 
(to student senate)," said 
Cathcart. 

Cathcart is a psychology major 
and expects to graduate in May. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Andrea Cathcart was recently elected to student senate 
vice president, replacing Ron Berry, who resigned last 
week due to financial troubles. 



* 



CUP evaluated for reaccreditation 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 



Dr. Steve Weber, chair of the 
Middle States evaluation team 
which is analyzing Clarion 
University for reaccreditation, 
was on campus Tuesday, 
meeting with various members 
of C.U.P. Clarion is currently 
conducting a self-study for 
reaccreditation which is a normal 
process occurring at higher 
education institutions every ten 
years. 

Clarion has implemented a 
steering committee, made up of 
12 subcommitties, which has 
been evaluating various aspects 
of the university. The 
committees have spent over a 
year identifying the university's 
strengths, weaknesses and goals. 
The self-study detailing these 
items was partially compiled by 
Dr. Ron Shumaker of the English 
department during the summer. 

"The steering committee is 
currently reviewing the first 
draft," said Dr. William Sharpe, 
chair of the steering committee. 

The report should be made 
public by the end of September. 
Public hearings will be held 
concerning the draft around the 
end of October or the first part of 
November so that questions and 
concerns can be raised. The 
hearings will be announced 



through various 
channels. 

According to Arthur Barlow, 
communication professor and 
member of the steering 
committee, reaccreditation is 
simply a "bill of good health" for 
institutions. It is a process which 
ensures quality education 
standards are being met. 

"Every five years, a school has 
to submit a self-study," said 
Barlow. "Every ten years there 
is a site visitation by the Middle 
States Committee. 

The Middle States team will be 
visiting campus from April 18 
till April 21, 1993. The eight 
member team is made up of 
colleagues who are from 
institutions similar to Clarion's. 

They will have read the final 
draft of the self-study and will be 
prepared to interview people on 
campus in order to compare the 
steering committee's assesment 
with the opinion of those 
interviewed. Those who might 
be interviewed are students, 
faculty members and directors of 
departments. 

Weber's preliminary visit to 
campus was to ensure that the 
self-study is on track and 
everything is moving along as it 
should be. 

His next visit will probably be 
the April meeting. 
"Our job," said Weber, "is to 



campus determine if Clarion University 



is, in fact, what it says it is. 
Data and evidence will be 
provided by the steering 
committee in their report to 
substantiate their claims. 

"Our purpose is to be helpful 
and constructive to the campus," 
said Weber. "We aren't here to 
tell you how to run the campus. 
We will try to balance and be fair 
in the positives as well as the 
negatives." 

Weber went on to say there are 
many standards that have to be 
met in order to be reaccredited. 
These standards are broad in 
nature so as to fit every 
institution. 

Most institutions pass the 
reaccreditation process without 
any major problems. 

If any problems do arise, the 
school is given a time period, 
possibly years, in which to 
correct it. If the school still does 



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not correct the situation it will 
probably be put on probation. 
The worst case scenario is that 
reaccreditation will be denied 
which almost never happens. 

Weber met with faculty 
members, deans, students, 



President Reinhard, Provost 
Kuhn and the steering committee 
on Tuesday. He was also given a 
tour of the campus. 

Weber will meet the other 
Middle States team members for 
the first time on April 18. 



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by Paul Levy 
News Writer 



The biology department will 
sponsor a workshop on the field 
of molecular biology and 
biotechnology on Friday, 
September 25. The workshop is 
being offered for high school 
guidance counselors, but anyone 
interested in the fields is invited. 

Four speakers will talk on the 
field of molecular biology, its 
future and careers in the field. 

Jeffery Dunkle, president of 



Pittsburgh Biomedical Develop- 
mental Corp., is the first speaker. 
Dunkle will talk about 
opportunities in the field, where 
it is now and how the field is 
expected to grow over the next 
ten years. Dunkle's company is 
concerned with fostering the 
development of new biomedical 
companies. 

Paul Reed, a Clarion graduate 
and Associate Senior 
Investigator for SmithKline 
Beecham Animal Health, will 
speak on what SmithKline is 



doing in the field of 
biotechnology. He will also 
focus on the expectations of his 
company when they are looking 
for new employees. 

Dr. Douglas McNeal will 
speak on the same subject as Mr. 
Reed, only from the aspect of his 
company. Dr. McNeal is a group 
leader of molecular biology and 
microbial genetics for Merck, 
Sharp, and Dohme Research 
Laboratories. 

The final speaker is the 
Director of the Clarion 



University molecular 

biology/biotechnology program, 
Dr. William Barnes. 

Dr. Barnes will speak about 
what classes high school 
students should take in 
preparation for college study in 
molecular biology and 
biotechnology. 

Dr. Barnes says of the 
workshop, "It allows (high 
school) counselors to learn about 
opportunities in the industry so 
they can help their students." 
Clarion's biology department 



College profs teach less, 



CPS- As tuition increases and 
classes get crowded, public 
universities and colleges are 
relying more on teaching 
assistants and not full-time 
professors to teach 
undergraduate classes, a 
congressional report said. 

"Parents are paying ever 
increasing tuition to have 
students teach students," said 
U.S. Rep. Pat Schroeder, 
chairwoman of the House Select 
Committee on Children, Youth 
and Families, the panel that 
investigated the situation. 

According to the report, the 
problem is two-fold. As 
professors at public universities 
spend more time in research, the 
institutions rely more on 
teaching assistants to instruct 
undergraduates. At the same 
time, tuition and fees are rising 
steadily, classes are bigger and 
the result is that undergraduates' 
education is less than desirable, 



said Schroeder, D-Colo. 

Linda Pratt, national president 
of the American Association of 
Professors, said the report was 
"just nonsense." Pratt, an 
English professor at the 
University of Nebraska at 
Lincoln, said the panel's findings 
were too vague. 

"Statistics won't bear this out. 
So they decide it is the fault of 
the teachers," she said. "I am 
dismayed at the simplicity of it" 

Schroeder said that it is the 
undergraduate students who are 
taking the brunt of the cutbacks. 

"The recession of the past 
several years has created some 
tough times for higher education 
in a number of states," she said. 
"(Undergraduates) are the ones 
who are taking the cutbacks on 
the chin in the form of T.A.'s 
posing as professors, fewer class 
sections, overenrolled required 
courses, shorter library hours and 
eliminated departments." 



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The report found that from 
1980 to 1990, tuition and fees 
increased 141 percent at public 
four-year universities and 
colleges, and by 12 percent for 
the 1991-92 school year. 

Professors' teaching loads have 
decreased to as little as six 
credits a semester. "A number of 
faculty avoid teaching altogether 
by buying out their teaching time 
with proceeds from research 
grants or outside consulting," 
Schroeder said. 

The average salary for a public 
university professor is $63,000, 
and the average school year is 
now 30 weeks, or 71/2 months. 

Lecture classes are getting 
bigger. As an example, a 
marketing class at the University 
of Colorado has 618 students, 
and a political science class at 
theUniversity of Indiana-Urbana 
has 1,156 students. 

"Enrollment is up, but faculty 
is not growing," Pratt said. "The 
reality is that professors are 
teaching more students. In light 
of this investigation, I'm finding 

it almost Kafkaesque." 

Robert Iosue, former president of 

York College of Pennsylvania, 



said he wants an audit of what 
proffessors do with their time, 
focusing on what they do in the 
classroom and how much time 
they spend on research. "I am 
convinced that what you would 
find is that the actual time a 
proffessor spends in the 
classroom is considerably less 
than many people think," Iosue 
said. "There is not too much 
research, but just not enough 
time spent in the classroom." 

Universities and colleges rely 
on teaching assistants and 
adjuncts too much, he said, so 
that full-time proffessors can do 
research, or choose not to teach 
classes they don't want to, such 
as required freshmen courses. 

However, Pratt said, it is 
wrong to assume that teaching 
assistants are bad instructors. 
"This is not substantiated. 
Beginning teachers can be more 
interesting and fresh," she said. 
"The enthusiasm of teaching 
assistants sometimes puts me to 
shame. I think it's a bad rap." 

She also said the "average" 
professor is a teacher and does 
not necessarily do a lot of 
research, a view Schroeder 
disagrees with. 



now offers a new program with a 
bachelor of sciences degree in 
molecular biology and 
biotechnology. The program 
includes opportunities for 
student internships with both 
SmithKline and Merck, Sharp, 
and Dohme. 

The workshop begins at 9:15 
a.m. with coffee and doughnuts 
and concludes at 2:30 p.m. 

An informal question and 
answer session with the day's 
featured speakers will follow at 
3:00 p.m. for anyone interested. 

hmore 

"The focus in higher education 
today is on research, not 
teaching," Schroeder said. "The 
fact has not been lost on the 
professors. If you don't believe 
me, go ask one yourself. 
However, don't look for a 
proffessor in a classroom; it's 
unlikely you'll find one." 

The committee found an 
example of "how far out of 
control" the use of assistants has 
gotten. During a two-day 
walkout of teaching assistants in 
1989 at the University of 
California-Berkeley, nearly 75 
percent of all classes were 
canceled. 

"Ironically, even though 
faculty teaching loads have been 
drastically reduced across the 
board in order to persue 
research, a suprisingly large 
number of faculty have yet to 
publish an article, book, or other 
measurable output of research 
work," Schroeder said. "More 
than half of all professors devote 
fewer than five hours a week to 
research." 

Schroeder said that higher 
education in the United States is 
at a crossroads between research 
and teaching. 



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Voter registration 

M.W9-12 
Carlson Library 

M,W 4:30-9 
Gemmell Rotunda 

T,R 9:30-12 
Carlson Library 

T,R 4:30-9 
Gemmell Rotunda 



IV 



Page 8 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 



Gemmell Student Center dedicated 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92- Page 9 



by Kathleene Mullany 
News Writer 

On Saturday, September 19, 
1992, the James Gemmell 
Student Complex was dedicated 
to the impressive memory of 
Clarion's former president. 

President Reinhard stressed 
James Gemmell's ability to 
respond creatively to the needs 
of the people he served when she 
opened the dedication with 
heartfelt warmth for the 
Gemmell family and all else 
present. 

She especially gave praise to 
those students who helped to 
fund the complex without use of 
it. 

Again and again, every speaker 
reminded those who attended 
that the entire complex began as 
a student senate project, and that 
without student initiative, there 
would have been no dedication. 

Also during the ceremony, the 
Gemmell student Leadership 
Awards were presented to two of 
December's graduates, Jay Elias 



and Monica Douglass. 

The actual dedication address, 
made by Robert Crawford, was 
interrupted by the fire safety 
system, later found out to have 
been a wayward four-year-old 
attracted to the pretty red box on 
the wall. 

"We also know that the new 
student complex will contribute 
greatly to the students' lives. We 
thank all of those people who 
worked so hard to make it a 
reality. And we will forever 
remember James Gemmell and 
his impact at CUP whenever we 
enter the newly completed 
building." said Crawford. 

Dr. James Gemmell was 
president of Clarion University 
from 1960 to 1976. He led the 
university through some of its 
most drastic changes, including 
the change from a state teachers' 
college to a state college. 

Also during his administration, 
enrollment increased from about 
1,000 students to approximately 
5,000. 

Gemmell doubled the size of 



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the Clarion's physical plants, to a 
grand total of 15 buildings, 
including an athletic stadium 
complex. The Venango campus 
was established, as well as the 
McKeever Environmental 
Center. 

Gemmell increased the 
academic programs offered, 
creating the School of Business 
Administration, now known as 
the College of Business 
Administration. 

Before presiding over Clarion, 
Gemmell was professor of 
economics and chairperson of 
the division of business 
education at Penn State. 
Gemmell had also instructed at 
New York state high schools and 
at the New York State College 
for Teachers. 

Dr. Gemmell received an 
undergraduate degree from the 
University of Wyoming, a master 
of Science degree from the State 
University of New York at 
Albany, and a doctorate from 
New York University in business 
and higher education. 




Stephanie Vargus/Clarion Call 
Dr. Reinhard speaks at the Gemmell Student Center 
dedication ceremony held this past weekend. 

Books still banned 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



Somewhere in America, the 
Holy Bible is banned. 

It is just one of approximately 
104 that were either challenged 
or outright banned in libraries 
across the nation in 1991-92, 
according to Jennifer Bertovich 
of the Library, Media, and 
Information Science Soceity 
(L.M.I.S.S.). 

L.M.I.S.S., the American 
Library Association and the 
AmericanBooksellers 
Association are sponsoring 
Banned Books Week from 
September 25 through October 3 
in an attempt to raise awareness 
about the censorship issue. 

Some other commonly banned 
books according to "Teachers 
and Librarians Working 
Together" by Linda Sparks and 
Barbara Sorrow include "Brave 
New World" by Aldous Huxley, 
"The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. 
Salinger, "Catch 22" by Joseph 
Heller, "Death of a Salesman" by 
Arthur Miller, "1984" by George 
Orwell, and "Where the 
Sidewalk Ends" by Shel 
Silvers te in. 

Reasons listed for the 
censorship range from 
"undermining of adult authority" 



in the case of "Where the 
Sidewalk Ends" to "vulgarity 
and occultism" in "The Catcher 
in the Rye," and from "violence" 
in the Holy Bible to "pro- 
Communist views and sexual 
content" in "1984." 

A colloquium sponsored by 
L.M.I.S.S. will be held October 



1 at 3:30 p.m. in Walter L. Hart 
Chapel, covering the topic of 
censorship and banned books. 

Graduate library science major 
Clare Booth Luce said, in a 
report about censorship, " Like 
charity, censorship begins in the 
home. But unlike charity, it 
should end there." 



Cars "booted" 



by Sean Boileau 
News Writer 



Although they don't set 
campus rules and regulations, 
one of the many duties of 
Clarion University's Public 
Safety department is the 
control of traffic and parking 
on campus. 

An issue of concern that has 
recently surfaced is the 
growing number of 
unauthorized vehicles parking 
in spaces designated and 
marked only for vehicles 
equipped with a handicapped 
parking sticker. 

Dr. Ronald Martinazzi, 
Director of Public Safety, said 
there has been an increase in 
the number of complaints this 
year about parking violations. 



Due to this jump in 
complaints, the use of "wheel 
boots" has been instituted on 
campus as a deterrent to future 
violations. 

When in place, the "boot" 
completely immobilizes the 
vehicle. It then can only be 
removed by a member of the 
Public Safety department for a 
service fee of $25, in addition 
to the cost of the parking 
ticket. 

Dr. Martinazzi hopes that 
this new penalty will make 
people think twice about 
parking in a space reserved for 
people who need it due to a 
physical impairment. 

"We don't want to have to 
use [the boots] at all, but if we 
have to, we definitely will," 
said Dr. Martinozzi. 



I 



t I 






a 






i 



>K 



Outside Clarion 

Jurors selected for Brookville murder trial 



compiled by Dorilee Raybuck 
from the AP service 



State 

Brookville trial begins 

Two more jurors have been 
seated for the trial of a man 
accused of the 1991 murder of 
Punxsutawney radio personality 
Bob Curry. 

Twenty year old Joel Davis is 
charged with first degree murder 
as well as burglary, felonius 
assault and making terroristic 
threats. 



Prisoner at large 

A prisoner with a record of 
violent criminal charges who 
bolted from a holding cell at the 
Dauphin County courthouse 
remained at large Tuesday. 

40 year old Antonio Noquerol 
escaped yesterday with fellow 
inmate Lin wood Stevens when 
they were placed in a cell with a 
brocken lock. The two pushed 
open the door, overpowered a 
deputy sheriff and escaped. 

Authorities did not realize the 
cell lock was broken before the 
two were placed in the cell. 
Their handcuffs were removed. 



Worker's comp bill stalled 

More than 500 Pennsylvania 
business managers shouting, 
"We can't afford to wait," 
jammed the state capitol tuesday 
to push for a bill that would 
overhaul the worker's 
compensation system. 

Members of several groups 
rallied for the reforms. 

A bill to remodel worker's 
comp. insurance and stop a 
proposed 52 percent rate hike 
stalled in the state legislature. 

The compromise is sponsored 
by senate minority leader Robert 
Mellow, D-Lackawanna. 




Campus 



New 



compiled by Alan Vaughn 
from CPS 



SAT scores rise, 
ACT stay steady 

For the first time since 1987, 
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores 
rose by one point in verbal skills 
and two points in math, 
according to a recent report by 
the College Board. 

SAT scores help predict the 
college academic performance of 
individual students. 

Scores on the verbal section 
averaged 423, one point above 
last year's record low, reversing 
five years of decline. Since 
1969, scores that reflect 
comprehension and word 
meanings have dropped 40 
points. 
In math, the average was 476. 



Dickinson to hold 
24 hour reading 

A 24 hour reading was held at 
Dickinson College as part of a 
national fund raising event to 
combat hunger and 
homelessness. 

Share Our Strength, a non- 
profit agency in Washington, 
D.C., coordinated the national 
event, in which nearly 200 
writers participated in the 
"National Reading:Writers 
Harvest for the Homeless" on 
Sept. 22, the first day of fall. 
Dickinson is one of 60 sites 
where readings took place. 

While most readings took an 
hour or two, Dickinson planned 
the only 24 hour reading, said 
Robert Olmstead, the college's 
senior writer in residence. 
About 40 writers participated. 



Images of the West 

Experience the culture 
of the Americans! 



Visiting Russian 
lecturer dies 

A visiting Russian lecturer 
died in the home of his host of 
an apparent heart attack, officials 
at the University of Arizona said. 

Viennamin Chebotayev, 53, an 
atomic physicist, died in the 
home of Peter Franken, a 
University of Arizona optical 
sciences and physics professor. 

"He seemed in good health," 
Franken told the Arizona Daily 
Wildcat. "He was a super guy, a 
super scientist." 

Chebotayev, who was doing 
research at Yale University, was 
being considered for a post at the 
University of Arizona. 

"I'm very sorry that his new 
life couldn't have begun," said 
Richard Powell. 

Powell is the director of the 
University of Arizona's Optical 
Sciences Center. 







§ Good taste and the real thing are % 






always in style, you can find 

both at 

Images of the West 

625 Main St, Clarion Ph. # 226-5513 



I 



■xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx^xxxxxxx^i 



Students Welcome 
at the 

Church of Christ 
Grand Ave., Clarion 
-Across from the Glass Factory- 
Sundays: 

Bible Class 9:45am 
Worship 10:30am 4 6pm 
Wednesdays: 

Bible Study 7:30pm 



National 

RR park supporters stalled 

Supporters of a controversial 
railroad park worked behind the 
scenes in Washington Tuesday to 
secure 14 million dollars to 
complete its construction. 

Meanwhile, a sister bill that 
would formally authorize the 
federal park in Scranton 
unexpectedly stalled in a senate 
committee. That bill would also 
set strict guidelines for the park's 
development and operation. 

The funds are being sought for 
exhibit buildings, a main 
entrance road and a parking lot 
at the Steamtown National 
Historic Site, where a collection 
of vintage steam trains and 
equipment is already on display. 

The partly-completed park has 
figured prominently in the 
debate over congressional pork- 
barrel spending and the changing 
role of the U.S. Park Service. 

Some critics say Steamtown 
and other parks outside the 
service's traditional mission 
drain funds from Yellowstone, 
Yosemite, and other wilderness 
preserves. 



Bush still wants debates 

The Bush campaign said it still 
wants two presidential debates, 
but with a panel of reporters 
rather than the single moderator 
suggested by the bipartisan 
presidential debate commission. 

In a letter to the commission, 
Bush campaign chairman Robert 
Teeter reiterated the campaign's 
readiness to talk with the Clinton 
campaign about the debates. 

The commission's latest 
proposal calls for the first 
presidential debate to be 
September 29 in Louisville. 

Judge upholds 
abortion ruling 

A federal appeals court in New 
Orleans has upheld a judge's 
order blocking Louisiana's anti- 
abortion law, one of the most 
stringent in the nation. 

The 1991 law provides for 
prison sentences of up to ten 
years for doctors who perform 
abortions. It prohibits abortion 
except to save the life of the 
mother and in certain 
circumstances of rape and incest. 

The U.S. supreme court upheld 
Pennsylvania's abortion 

restrictions in June. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations conducted 
by public safety for the week of Sept. 13 through Sept. 18, 1992. 

A non-student was cited for defiant trespass, prowling and loitering 
at night on September 14. This individual was instructed to depart 
campus and not return; however, the person returned and was seen by 
public safety. The person was lodged in the Clarion County jail. 

On September 14, a pizza was stolen from the Fox Pizza truck, 
parked outside Nair Hall. The driver was inside making a delivery. 
An investigation is pending. 

A hit and run vehicle accident was reported in parking lot "F on 
September 15. An investigation is pending. 

At approximately 6:00 p.m. on September 17, two individuals were 
cited by public safety for attempted theft while trying to remove two 
45 pound weights and a curl bar from the stadium. An investigation is 
pending. 

On September 17, a student was asked for identification by public 
safety after he was observed urinating on the sidewalk, but fled the 
scene on foot. The student was later located and was given the blood 
alcohol test, which registered .09. The case is under investigation. 

If anyone has any information concerning these and other 
rimes, please contact PubMc Safety at 226-2111. 






Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 

Cable Channels 



THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 24. 1992 



111 DATA 



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Cur. Affair I Edition 



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"Clara's Heart" (1986) Whoopi Goldberg, g 



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Goiden Girls 



CBS Newt 



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9:00 



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Movie: •*'/; "Black Mage Woman" (1990) 



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(3:30) Movie: *»*• "The Great Escape" (1963, Adventure) Steve McQueen, James Gamer. Richard Attenborough. (In Stereo) 



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Movie: ** "Masters of Menace' (1990) Catherine Bach 



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Yogi Bear | Arcade I Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: ** Wo Blame (1988, Drama) Helen Shaver. 



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Movie: ** "Author! Author!" (1982) Al Pacing. PG' 



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Movie: **'/2 "The Curse of Frankenstein 



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Murder, She Wrote g [Movie: **V 2 "Adventures in Babysitting" (1987, Comedy) 



Movie: *V? "Ambition "(1991) Lou Diamond 



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Edition IStalfcingt 



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Phillips. 'R' IMovie: •* "Angel in Red" (1991) R' I*** "The Reflecting Skin' 



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FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 25, 1992 



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Movie: "Devlin "(1992) Bryan Brown. R 



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Thirtysomething 



Mister Ed 



Ullman 



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(3:30) Movie: **V; "Draw' 



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Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



(2:30) Movie: 



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Cur. Affair 



5:00 



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Newt 



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NBC Newt 



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Movie: *** "The Prince and the Showgirl 



Newtg 



Wonder Yrt. 



NBC Newt 



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(2:30) Movie: 



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Trucks 



Yearbook 



Cartoon Express 



(1957) Laurence Olivier. 



Motoworld | Up Close 



MacGyver "Last Stand' g 



Movie: •* "Dutch" (1991, Comedy) Ed O'Neill. PG-13 [Movie: *** "The Cheap Detective" (1978) 



Movie: "Alice Through the Looking Glass" 



Underdog [Yogi Bear I Arcade 



"RedBalln' 



Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: **V; "Cracked Up (1987, Drama) Ed Asner. 



7:00 



7:30 



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Jeopardy! g 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



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Ent. Tonight 



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Married.. 



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Married.. 



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8:00 



8:30 



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Movie: ** "Predator 2" (1990) Danny Glover. 'R' g 



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10:30 



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Movie: •• "Mr. Billion" (1977) Terence Hill PG' 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: ** "Little Nikita "(1988) Sidney Poitier. PG' 



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Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



[Bullwinkle 



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Comedy Jam 



Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Dark Justice 



Edition 



[Dark Justice 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Movie: »** "The Red Badge of Courage 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Murder. She Wrote g [Movie: ** "Fear City" (1984, Drama) Tom Berenger. [Movie: ** V; "The Personals" (1982) n 

lliuii*. J.J.U. "Al,„».» Ch.fi /! QOOl U- IIC.I.I.. in, I... •'..,, ,,r> j . ,. , , «U. . „ .. _. . . ... 1 .1. . ■ T | 



Movie: **V? "Night Shift "(1982) Henry Winkler. R 



Movie: *** 



Get Smart 



LA. Law 



77» Doctor' 
I Superman 



(1991) William Hurt. PG-13' g 



M.T.Moore I Van Dyke 



Movie: •*'/; "Soapdish" (1991) Sally Field. 'PG-13' g 



Movie: "The Fear Inside" (1992) Christine Lahti. 'R 



Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: •*• "After Hours" (1985, Comedy) Griffin Dunne. 



Lucy Show IGreen Acres 



SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 26, 1992 



Thirtysomething. 



"Netherwld. 



Sat. Night 



Mister Ed 



Ullman 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



Playhouse 



4:30 



5:00 I 5:30 I 6:00~ 



Movie: •* "Wicked Stepmother" (1989) Bette Davis, g 



(3:30) College Football: Houston at Michigan. (Live) 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: ** "Dream Machine "(1991) PG' 



College Football 



[Sports Showcase 



(3:00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced 



(300) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. 



Movie: **V2 "Johnny Be Good" (1988, Comedy) 
College Football I Sports Showca se 



Newt 



Newtg 



NBC Newt 



CBS Newt 



CBS Newt 



American Gladiators 



Newtg 



(3:00) Movie: IMovie: •**% "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (\%1) 



Tennis: Davis Cup -- Sweden vs. USA 



Double T. |Ten of Us [2 Dads 



IB. Buddies 



Movie: **'/; "Police Story: Cop Killers "(1988) Ken Olin. 



Movie: *•• "LA. Story" (1991) Steve Martin. PG-13' 



Nick Newt ]Get Picture 



China Beach 'Nightfall 



Freshmen |5alute 



LA Law 



NBC News 



News 



Hee Haw Silver 



iCappelli 



Star Search (In Stereo) 



Star Search (In Stereo) 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Jeopardy! g |Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: *•* "Dead Again "(1991) Kenneth Branagh. R 



Covington Croat "Outlaws 



Here-Now 



Frannie 



Frannie 



Copsg_ 



Here-Now 



Out AH Night 



Brooklyn 



Brooklyn 



Cop* MO 



Out AB Night 



Movie: **** "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) Mark Hamill. PG' 



Sportscenter 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) 



Crossroads "Amanda" g 



Empty Nest | Nurses g 



Raven "Prey" g 



Raven "Prey' 



Code 3 g 



Empty Nest 



Edjeg_ 



Nurses g 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



Boxing: Simon Brown vs. Terry Norris. g 



Commishg 



Sisters "Sunstroke g 



Angel Street (In Stereo) g 



Angel Street (In Stereo) g 



Comic Strip Live (In Stereo) 



Sitters "Sunstroke" g 



Scoreboard ICoHoge Football: Ctemson at Georgia Tech. (Live) p 



Movie: *** "Pct/c"(1956, Drama) William Holden. 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: ** "Pink Cadillac" (1989) CHnt Eastwood, g 



Movie: *•% "Company Business" (1991) PG-13' 
Dare IG.U.T.ST IDoug iRugrats 



Swamp | Beyond I Bradbury 



Movie: **Vt "I Come in Peace" (1990) 'R' 



Movie: *• "Child's Play 2" (1990) 'R' g 



Clarissa | Roundhouse [Ren-Stimpv 



SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 27, 1992 



Movie: *•'/? "Bare Essence (WW, Drama) Gente Francis, Linda Evans, Bruce Boxlettner 



Scoreboard 



Hitchhiker I Silk Stalkingt (In Stereo) g 



Newtg 



Newt 



Newt 



Newtg 



11:30 



Dream On g 



Detign. W. 



12:00 



Sanders 



"Money" 



Saturday Night Live 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) g 



Ufestylet-Rich 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) g [TBA 



[Saturday Night Uve 



Movie: *** "Diner" (1982, Comedy) R 



Baseball I Sporttcenter |Auto Racing 



Movie: * "Bikini Summer" (1991) 



Movie: •** "Only the Lonely" (1991) John Candy, g | "Dead On: Relentless II 



Jokers 



You Afraid? 



Movie: ***• "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) PG 



A. Hitchcock 



Confessions 



A. Hitchcock 



Hidden 



M.T. Moore I Dragnet 



LA. Law 



"Retrn-Jedi" 



A. Hitchcock 



Ullman 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



Movie: ***Vi "Awakenings " (19%) Robin Williams. O 



Senior PGA Golf: Nationwide Championship. (Live) 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: •** "Days of Thunder" (1990) Tom Cruise, o 



News | ABC News 



NFL Football: Pittsburgh Stealers at Green Bay Packers. From Lambeau Field. (Live) 



NFL Football 



NFL Football 



Gimme B. 



Emergency 



To Be Announced 



Love Con. IFreetand 



Movie: **ft "The Morning After" (1986) Jane Fonda. 



Design. W. 



CBS Newt 



CBS Newt 



Newtg 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



NFL FootbaH: Pittsburgh Stealers at Green Bay Packers. From Lambeau Field. (Live) 



(2:30) Movie 



Auto Racing 



Swamp 



(2:30) Movie: 



Movie: ***Vi "Splendor in the Grass" (1 961 , Drama) I Movie: ***% 



Life Goes On "Exposed" p 



Secret Service (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) g 



60 Minutes (in Stereo) g 



TBA 



Fifth Quarter 



Ben Staler g 



Secret Ser. 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: *• "Road House" (1989) Patrick Swayze. R' g 



Videos 



I Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



Murder. She Wrote p 



Murder, She Wrote g 



In Color 



iRocg 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



Tennis: Davis Cup •- Sweden vs. U.S.A 



Just Us 



I Two Dads [B. Buddies 



(3:00) Movie: "Not Without" 



Movie: "Killer Klowns From Outer Space' 



Cent on TV 



Disease 



Get Picture 



Endocrin. 



Beyond 



I Hitchhiker 



"Return of the Jedi" (1983) Mark Hamill. 'PG 



NFLPrimetime 



MacGyver "The Heist" g 



Movie: •**'/; "Return of the Jedi" (1983) Mark Hamill 



Movie: **% "Taps" (1981, Drama) Timothy Hutton. PG 



Wild Side 



Medical 



Fifteen 



Medical 



Double Dare 



Medical 



G.U.T.S. 



NSAIDS 



Baseball Tonight 



10:00 



One Night 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: "Obsessed" (1992. Suspense) Shannon Doherty. 



Movkt: *** "Doublecrossed" (1991) Dennis Hopper, p 



Movie: »*Vi; "King Ralph" (1991) John Goodman, p 



Movie: "A House of Secrets and Lies" (1992, Drama) g 



Movie: "A House of Secrets and Lies" (1992 Drama) p 
" TFIying BHnd IWoopsI p 



•* 1 /2 "King Ralph" (1991) John Goodman, p 



Movie: •*•!£ "California Suite" (1978) Maggie Smith 



Horse Racing: Super Derby 



Movie: "&/nsfro»e" (1992, Suspense) Jane Seymour, p 



Hetton Shooting Town. 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) 



Paid Prog. 



Newtg 



Cheers g 



Night Court 



Gimme B. 



Love Con. 



Paid Prog- 



Suspect 



Ent Tonight 



Cur. Affair 



New WKRP 



Love Con- 



Perspective 



New WKRP 



Movie: "Tough Guys Don't Dance" (1987) 



Sportscenter 



Silk Stalkingt (In Stereo) g 



NFL 



Hollywood 



Movie: *** "pick Tracy" (1990) Warren Beatty. PG' g 



Movie: *% "The Unborn" (1991) R' IMovie: **% "Sleeping With the Enemy" (1991) 'R' g I Movie: » ♦% ■ TovSoldmrs' 

kQAl \ki"irmr\ DaaMw 'D/V i— i Uah:*. -*.j_1/_ i< A :. A .--'mAAiM aj'i a-l . * M TT I ' ' T -- . 7* ST^ !— ' ■ _ '■ ■'■' ■ ■■ 



Looney 



Journal 



Looney 



Milestones 



LoonejL 



mCQICIflC 



F-Troop 



Family 



Movie: **V2 "Air America" (1990) Mei Gibson. R 



Mork 



MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 28. 1992 



Cardiology 



Van Dyke 



Medicine 



Lucy Show 



OB-Gyn. 



Hi, I'm Home 



Family 



Movie: "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 



MX Moore 



Physicians 



Dragnet 



Family 



A. Hitchcock 



Paid Prog. 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



Movie: ••'/; "Praw/" (1984. 



Detign. W. [ Cheert g 



Cur. Affair [Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Goof Troop 



People Ct 



Tom. Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



Western) Kirk 



Newtg 



3ouglas. p 



Cheers 



Design, 



*■ 



5:30 



Newtg 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon I Batman g 



Newtg 



6:00 



6.30 



7:00 



Movie: ** "Bingo" (1991) Cindy Williams 



Newtg 



Newt 



ABC Newt 



NBC Newt 



CBS News 



Full House g 



Newtg 



Movie: ***V; "California Suite" (1978, Comedy) Maggie Smith. PG' 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



[Prett Luck 



Sports | Reporters 



Cartoon Exprets 



(3:30) Movie: **Vz "Rocky V" (1990) g 



Movie: •** "Dusty "(1982) Bill Kerr. NR' 



Muppett iMuppett [Muppets 



Movie: *** 



Ch. Flag 



Wonder Yrt. 



NBC News 



Herd Copy 



■fcoPMMO 



Goiden Girls 



CBS News 



Roseanneg 



Jeopardy! g 



7:30 



Tintin 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



You Bet-Life 



Married... 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: *•*% "Presumed Innocent" (1990, Drama) R' g 



Cheers g 



Froth Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Panther 



Blossom g 



Hearts Afire 



Hearts Afire 



10:00 



10:30 



Tom Arnold: Naked Truth 2 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: •* "Double Impact" (1991) R' g 



NFL FootbaH: Los Angeles Raiders at Kansas City Chiefs. From Arrowhead Stadium. I Newt p 



Movkt: "Fergie and Andrew: Behind the Palace Doors" p 



Murphy B 



Murphy B. 



Catwalk (Series Premiere) (In Stereo) 



Love 6 War 



Love 6 War 



Fresh Prince [Blossom g 



Movie: ***'/2 "Hello. Dotty! "(1969, Musical) Barbra Streisand. G" 



Up Close 



MacGyver "Hellfire" g 



Sportscenter [Schaap Talk 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: •*** "Red River" (1948, Western) John Wayne, g 



Rhino-Camel 



Muppets 



'Ruby and Oswald" (1978) Michael Lerner 



Movie: ••'/; "Big Business 



Muppett 



Supermarket 



Muppett 



Shop-Drop 



(1988) Bette Midler. PG' g 



Muppets | Muppets 



China Beach "Souvenirs ' 



NFL Monday |Mon. Mag- 



Murder, She Wrote g 



Northern Exposure g 



Northern Exposure g 



Hunter "The Setup" 



Movie: "Fergie and Andrew: Behind the Palace Doors" a 



Newtg 



Married.. 



Newtg 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) p 



Sweating Bullets 



Edition 



[Bullets 



Arsenio HaH (In Stereo) p 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) P 



Movie: •••• "77w Great Escape" (1963, Adventure) Steve McQueen. (In Stereo) [ "Brewster 



Auto Racing: FIA Formula One - Portuguese Grand Prix. 



Movie: *V? "Deadly Bet" (1991) R 



WWF Prime Time Wrestling 



* "Freddy's Dead: The Final 



Get Smart I Superman 



LA. Law 



Nightmare" 



M.T. Moore 



Movie: *Vi "Netherworld" (1991) R' p 



Freddy 



Van Dyke 



Baseball I Sportscenter 



MacGyver "Kill Zone" g [Equalizer 



Movie: ** "D ead On: Relentless II 
[A. Hitchcock" 



Movie: *• "Steel and Lace "(1990) 'R' 



Dragnet 



TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 29, 1992 



Movie: ** "Christine Cromwell: In Vino Veritas' \1990) 



(1991) 



Lucy Show 



Movie: ** "Mirror, Mirror' 



Green Acres I Mister Ed 



Thirtysomething "Legacy lUllman 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



(2:30) Movie: [Movie: **• "The Witches " (1990) PG' p 



Design. W. [Cheert p 



Cur. Affair 1 Edition 



Oprah Winfrey p 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Goof Troop 



People Ct 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



(230) Movie: "Magnif. 7" 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



(3:00) Movie: 



OWL/TV (R) 



Underdog 



Movie: 



Prett Luck 



Newtg 



Cheert g 



Design. W. 



Newtg 



Newt 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon [Batman g 



Newtg 



6:00 



6.30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: •** "Doc Hollywood" (1991) Michael J. Fox, g 



Newtg 



Newt 



Newt 



ABC Newt 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newtg 



Full House g 



Newsg 



Wonder Yrt, 



NBC News 



Movie: ** "Breakin' 2 Electric Boogaloo" (1964) PG 



Trucks 



Yearbook 



Cartoon Express 



Movie: * "Scavengers' (1988) PG-13 



Top Kid (R) 



Yogi Bear I Arcade 



"RedBalln" 



*Vi "I Love N. Y. " (1987) Scott Baio. 



Hey Dude (R) 



Running [Up Close 



MacGyver "The Prodigal" 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! g 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Roseanneg 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: **• "Dead Again " (1991) Kenneth Branagh. 'R' 



Full House g [Mr. Cooper 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Rescue 911 (In Stereo) g 



Roseanneg ICoachg 



10:00 



Sanders 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



Reasonable Doubts "Lifelines" g 



Going to Extremes g 



** "Puppet Master III: Toulon's Revenge' 



Movie: "Child of Rage " (1992, Drama) Mel Harris, g 



Major League Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field. (Live) 



Movie: *•* "Escape From Alcatraz" (1979, Adventure) I Hunter "Fagin, 1986 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: **Vz "FM "(1978) Michael Brandon. PG 



Reasonable Doubts "Lifelines"' g 



Sportscenter I Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Movie: ** "The Bride'' (1985, Horror) Sting. PG-13 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: *»* "The Horse Soldiers " (1959) John Wayne, g 



Movie: ***+ "Casablanca" (1942) PG' p 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



China Beach 



Casablanca 



Bullwinkle 



Murder, She Wrote p I Boxing: Virgil Hill vs. Frank Tate. (Live) 



Newtg 



Newt 



Newt 



Newtg 



Married- 



News g 



Goiden Girls 



12:00 



The Super' 



Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Forever Knight "Hunters" 



Edition I For. Knight 



Arsenio Hell (In Stereo) g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Movie: ***'/; "Dead Ringers (1988) R' 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Movie: *• "Masters of Menace" (1990) Catherine Bach. 



Movie: ••• "Mermaids" (1990, Comedy) Cher. PG-13' 



Get Smart | Superman 



LA. Law 



M.T. Moore I Van Dyke 



MacGyver (In Stereo) g [ Equalizer 



Movie: *Vi "Street Hunter" (1990) NR' IMovie: "The Dead Zone 



Movie: "Devlin "(^2, Drama) Bryan Brown. R 



Dragnet [A. Hitchcock I Lucy Show 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992 



Movie: **Vz "Tfte Mosouito Coast" (1986, Drama) Harrison Forfl 



Green Acres 



"77?e Doctor 



Mitter Ed 



Thirtysomething 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) Movie: 



Design. W. 



Cur. Affair 



4:30 



5:00 



I 



5:30 6:00 



Movie: **'/; "My Blue Heaven" (1990) Steve Martin, g 



Cheers g 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 
Goof Troop | Tom, Jerry" 



People Ct. 



Cur. Affair 



(3 00) Movie: Author! 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



(2:30) Movie: 



Press Luck 



Newtg 



Cheers g 



Design. W. 



Newtg 



Newt 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon | Batman g 



Newtg 



Newtg 



Newt 



Newtg 



6:30 



7:00 I JW 



Movie: * "A Fine Mess" (1986) PG' p 



ABC Newt 



NBC Newt 



CBS Newt 



Full House g 



Newsg 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC Newt 



Movie: **% "FM'IWB) Myhael Brandon PG 



Truckt | Glory Days 



Cartoon Express 



Movie: "Brotherhood of Satan" (1971) 



Movie: **V; "Anna to the Infinite Power" (1983) NR' 



Underdog [Yogi Bear I Arcade iHoyDudo(R) 



Movie: **'.; Bndge to Silence (1989) Lee Remick 



Inside PGA lUp Close 



MacGyver "Deathlock p 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! g 



Goiden Girts 



CBS News 



Roseanneg 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



*** 



Wonder Y. IDoooie H. 



'Madonna: Truth or Dare " (1991) Madonna 



Unsolved Mysteries g 



Hat Squad (In Stereo) g 



Hat Squad (In Stereo) g 



Beverly Hills, 90210 (R) g 



Unsolved Mysteries g 



Movie: *** "7ne Red Badge of Courage" (1951 , Drama) 
Sportscenter |Ma)or League Baseball Team s to Be Announced 



lmp_ 



Seinfeld g 



Laurie HMg 



Mad-You 



10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



Dream On g 



Civil Wars (In Stereo) O 



Law 6 Order "Conspiracy 



Country Music Association Awards (In Stereo Live) g 



Country Music Association Awards (In Stereo Live) q 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) g 



Seinfeld g I Mad-You 



Hunter "Death Machine" 



Law 6 Order Conspiracy' 



Movie: ***V; "The Pink Panther" (1964) Peter Sellers 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: **% "Cahill, U.S. Marshal' (1973) John Wayne 



"The Search for Signs of Intefflgent Life in the Universe 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



[Bullwinkle 



China Beach 



(Live) 



Baseball 



Murder, She Wrote g IMovie: ** "The Haunting of Sarah Hardy" (1989) g 



*** "Or/wr"(1982) Steve Guttenberg. R 



: ** "ChUds Play 2" (1990) R' g 



Get Smart I Superman 



LA. Law 



M.T. Moore 



S. Hodge 



Van Dyke 



11:00 



One Night 



Newtg 



News 



Newtg 



Married.. 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: ** "Road House' 



Goiden Girls I Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Dangerout Curvet 



Edition 



I Curvet 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Movie: "The Prince and the Showgirl 



Sportscenter 



MacGyver (In 



Movie: ' ' The Haunting of Morella (1990) 



Stereo) g 



Movie: **Vi "Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects 



Dragnet 



I A. Hitchcock 



Movie: "A Cry for Help: The Tracey Thurman Story 



Lucy Show 



Drag Racing 



Equalizer 



Movie: "Ultimate Desires 



* "The Object of Desire" 



Green Acres 



Mister Ed 



Forever James Dean iRi 'Ullman 



r 



s. ] 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92- Page 11 




TV 5 heats up with " Faces of Desire" 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Writer 



Last semester, not only were 
people buzzing about the new 
student center, but a new soap 
opera was to be filmed by 
students, starring students, for 
students. 

What happened? Did everyone 
disappear? Not quite. The soap 
opera, "Desire" had to overcome 
many facelifts (no pun intended). 
Besides many of the scenes that 
needed to be changed, the name 
did, too. Originally called 
"Desire," the soap was renamed 
"Faces of Desire" to avoid a law 
suit. According to executive 
producer John Zenone, "The 
show has been with me since the 
eighth grade, and two years ago 
a book and a movie came out 
with the same name and was 
copyrighted." 

This was very disappointing to 
the writers, also. Melissa 
Caraway comments, "I was 
unaware that such a common 
word could by 'bought'." 

The name wasn't the only 
thing that has changed. The 



scripts, five of which gave been 
turned in for TV-5's advisor Dr. 
Henry Fueg's approval, needed 
to be rewritten. Therefore, 
during that delay, senior actors 
graduated in the spring, and new 
actors had to be cast. 

Finally, the soap is underway. 
Filming began last week with a 
"teaser", which is to be aired 
soon. The first show will be an 
hour, with half-hour shows 
airing twice a week, thereafter. 

The soap takes place in 
fictitious Ridgecrest, New York, 
and centers around three 
families. The storylines deal 
with real-life situations such as 
interracial relationships, eating 
disorders, AIDS and the HIV 
virus, and the popular soap opera 
love triangles, young love, and 
all the pleasantries and trouble 
that accompany them. 

All of the producers, writers, 
cast and crew are anxious and 
ready to film this season's 
episodes. So warm up the 
television set, Clarion, because 
"Faces of Desire" will definitely 
melt the cold. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
This is just a small portion of the cast that will appear on the new soap opera airing on 
TV5. The show is titled "Faces of Desire," and should be heating up this semester. 



Getting the most out of rush 




by Lisa Recker 
Features Writer 



Ray Henderson/Clarion 
A lot of people put many hours of work into making the 
rush experience a fun and exciting time tor the rushees. 



Call 



Rush week. The week when 
all Greeks fight for attention in 
order to prove what makes them 
different and even better than 
their competition. 

To some Gosh Darn 
Independants (G.D.I.'s), this 
week of posters, banners, and 
letter-wearing seems pushy and 
petty; but, to Greeks, rush week 
is the most important time of the 
semester. 

If you're interested in "going 
Greek," now is the best time. 
Many sororities and fraternities 
graduated several members last 
spring. Therefore, there are 
many openings available to 
rushees. 

Although rush week is almost 
over, Countinous Open Bidding 
(COB) System, will be in effect 
throughout the semester. So, if 
you feel you've missed your 



change, don't worry. Sororities 
and fraternities have the option 
to hold open bid parties anytime 
this fall. 

Although Greek organizations 
try their best to influence 
potential rushees, it is hard to 
reach everyone. If, by chance, 
you're interested in a particular 
organization, feel free to ask a 
member. They're as interested 
in you as you are in them. 

The best way to go through 
rush is to see as many fraternities 
or sororities that you can before 
you actually decide which is 
right for you. 

Regardless of which 
organization you may be 
interested in, be reminded that 
the Greek system is not just the 
big party it's cracked up to be. 
Service projects, fundraising for 
philanthropies, community 
service and good academic 
standing are requirements for 



many Greek organizations. 

So, if you're interested in 
helping the community, 
maintaining good grades and 
building everlasting friendships, 
keep your eyes and ears open for 
open bid parties this Fall and 
rush in the Spring. It just may be 
one of the best decisions of your 
college career. 

The greek life on campus is 
very strong with approximately 
nine fraternities, amounting to 
over 300 active members. There 
are also nine recognized 
sororities on campus with a total 
of 450 active sisters. 

The fraternities and sororities 
at Clarion are all connected by 
the interfraternity and 
panhellenic councils. These two 
groups are comprised of 
members of each greek 
organization and act as the 
governing body, making the 
rules for all greeks. 



Page 12 - The Clarion Call ■ 9-24-92 

CABS is staying 



by Megan Casey 
Features Writer 



CABS is back, at least for one 
more week. After being canceled 
last week, the annual Saturday 
night dances will resume on 
September 26. 

CABS was canceled last 
Saturday after complaints of 
mistreatment of the Gemmell 
Student Center during and after 
the first dance, held on 
September 12. 

These complaints ranged from 
cigarette butts on the floor to the 
destruction of restroom stalls. 
Cleanup from the dance was 
extensive, with the janitors 
spending one hour on cleaning 
the stage alone. Fortunately, the 
University Activities Executive 
Board, who made the decision to 
cancel last week's dance, also 
decided to bring CABS back 
with a new format 

In addition to the changes 
made at the beginning of the 
year, which included a fifty-cent 
entrance fee and hand stamping 
at the door, several new 
measures have been added to 
protect Gemmell Student Center. 
The most significant change is 
the time of CABS. The dances, 
starting this Saturday, will be 
held from 9:00 to 12:00. The 
doors will be locked after 11:30 
in order to discourage students 
from entering intoxicated. 

Also, there will be more 
bouncers to handle the crowd. 
At the last CABS dance, there 
were only four bouncers to 
approximately 600 students. 
Lighting will also be increased 



These changes were decided 
upon after taking suggestions 
from DJ's and bouncers who 
have had prior experience with 
activities similar to CABS. 

If this week's dance is a 
success, the new format will be 
used in future dances. But if the 
changes the Board designed do 
not make a difference in the 
behavior of the students, CABS 
will be gone for good. "CABS is 
a privilege," said one Board 
member. 

Dave Tomeo, Director of 
Gemmell Student Center, at this 
weeks Executive meeting about 
what effect the change in time 
could have on CABS, said, "The 
people who want to come and 
dance, will." 

Amy Donahue, who is the 
chairperson of the Union 
Activities committee in charge 
of CABS, would like to see the 
dance continue. "I'd like to see 
CABS work and continue, but it 
really depends on the way the 
students act" 

Ms. Donahue would also like 
to remind students of a few 
guidelines in order to make 
CABS a success. These are no 
smoking, no snuff or chewing 
gum on the floor and respect for 
everyone that is attending the 
dance. 

When all is said and done, 
Clarion students will decide the 
fate of CABS. That decision 
will be made on September 26, 
when the doors of CABS open 
for what could be the last dance. 



CAMPUS EVENTS 

Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Dan Parrish 



Thurs Sept. 24 

-Registration for Yearbook 
pictures (277 Gemmell) 

- ISAAN Conference (250/252 
Gem) 

-Nancy Day Concert (Chap) 
8p.m. sponsored by STAR 



Sun Sept. 27 



-Koinonia Fall Retreat ends 



-Tennis vs. Shippensburg 1 p.m. 



Wed Sept. 30 

-College Fair (Gem M-P) 
7 a.m.-9 p.m. 

-Yearbook pictures talen today 
(262 Gem) 



Fri Sept 25 

-Registration for Yearbook 
pictures (277 Gem) 

-ISAAN Conference (250/252 
Gem) 

Koinonia Fall Retreat begins 



Mon Sept. 28 

-Rosh Hashanah 

-Yearbook pictures taken today 
(262 Gem) 

-Student Senate mtg. (248 Gem) 
7p.m. 



Thur Oct 1 

-Yearbook pictures talen today 
(262 Gem) 

-Tennis vs. IUP 3 p.m. 



Sat Sept. 26 

-Sexual Assault Awareness 
Weeks ends 

UAB CAB's Dance (Gem M-P) 
9-12 p.m. 



Tues Sept. 29 

-Yearbook pictures taken today 
(262 Gem) 

-Public Lecture: Emma Amos, 
artist (Chap) 7p.m. 

-UAB presents Superstar Studio 
(Gem) 1 p.m. 



Fri Oct 2 

•Yearbook pictures taken today 
(262 Gem) 

-Credit/No ffecord ends 4 pirn. 

-Clarion Internationl Association 
"Middle East,'* Culterat Program 
(Gem M-P) 7 p.m. 



for security reasons. 



Families enjoy busy weekend 



by Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 



This past weekend Clarion 
University students had the 
chance to participate in two 
event-filled days. The first of 
which, on Saturday, marked the 
14th Annual Family Day. 
Families of Clarion University 
students took over the campus 
for a day and had a chance to 
see, in most cases, where their 
money goes. 

The day started off with coffee 
and donuts in Gemmell for those 
who made the trip up. Tours 
went on throughout the day in 
various buildings on campus 
including: Gemmell, Carlson 
Library, WCUC-FM, Channel 5 
and the micro-computer lab. 

At 11:00 a.m., the dedication 



of the newly constructed 
Gemmell Student Center took 
place, complete with speeches 
and ribbon cutting. The 
unveiling of the commemorative 
wall which was comprised of 
people who donated to the 
construction also took place. 

Shortly after the ribbon 
cutting, at noon, was the pre- 
game picnic at the stadium. The 
picnic has been a tradition since 
1986, and plays a big part in 
Family Day activities. When 
finished eating, families and 
friends of CUP watched the 
home opener football game 
against New Haven. . . and what 
a game they saw. Clarion was 
edged out at the last second 48- 
47(story on pg 19-20). 
Following the game was the 



Golden Eagle Band Review at 
the stadium. 

On Sunday, Clarion had its 
annual activities day outside of 
Gemmell to bring UAB week to 
an end. It included everything 
from a button factory and 
caricature artists to a mini- 
concert outside of Gemmell. 
Also on hand was every 



organization this campus has to 
offer. They had tables set up and 
were there to answer any 
questions a student possibly 
might have. 

Sunday was also "Meet the 
Greeks" outside Gemmell. It was 
a chance for every fraternity and 
sorority to show stuedents what 
they have to offer. 



The two days combined made 
it a busy weekend for those who 
participated, and one anyone 
would be sorry to have missed. 



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What are you going 
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CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Raymond Nice 




The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 - Page 13 



s:SssS;: :: *3JiS 




Beth Hildebrand 
Senior, Psychology 
Sleeping in on days I don't have to work." 





Cashaw 

Sophomore, Undecided 

"Mini-skirts, shorts, and bathing suits." 



Vinnie Tavoiario 

Senior, Biology 

"I'm going to miss the afternoon Pirates 

games in 80-degree weather." 





Shamishia Reddick 

Sophomore, Business Management 

"Being home with my family." 



Shinichi Yamashita 

Freshman, Communication 

"My friends and my cat" 






Robert Janeski 

Sophomore, Psychology 

"My family, my girlfriend, and warm 

weather." 



♦ r » 



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,„¥•■% .. .»-» 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 - Page 15 



Page 14 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 

news 



o 



t h e 




by Chuck Sheperd 



-Joseph J. Kim, a physician on 
the staff of the University 
Hospital in Columbia, Missouri, 
was charged in May with sexual 
assault against at least two 
female patients whom he told he 
was "preparing for surgery." He 
told one that, to prepare her to 
breathe properly during the 
operation, he would have to 
blindfold her and insert four 
objects down her throat. The 
third object allegedly was his 
penis. 

-USA Today reported in July 
that doctors in China performed 
a direct internal sex organ swap 
between a man and a woman, 
who were strangers to each 

Movie Review 



other. The surgeons constructed 
all external sex organs, but 
further operation is necessary to 
complete the job, and neither 
will be able to have kids. 

-New Zealand scientists, 
studying tooth decay, built a 20- 
inch glass mouth to observe how 
plaque grows when fed saliva 
and sugar, but later reported a 
drawback in the experiment: 
massive halitosis. 

-Two Czechoslovakian 
scientists, writing in the August 
Journal of Addiction, reported on 
three patients addicted to carrots. 
The three had eaten so many 
carrots that their skins turned 
orange, and when they were 
deprived of carrots, they 
experienced withdrawal 



symptoms. 

-Polish photojournalist Czarek 
Sokolowski, proclaiming his joy 
at the opening of the first 
McDonald's restaurant in 
Warsaw in June: "I've been 
waiting for this day for 35 years. 
This is what we were fighting 
for." 

-Dexter Manley, who retired 
from the National Football 
League in December after failing 
his fourth drug test and who now 
plays in Canada, told reporters in 
July that he talks to Mackenzie 
King, the deceased Canadian 
prime minister. "I'm sincere. 
Whether people believe me or 
not, my vision is real to me. I 
tell you, I talked to (King). We 



talked about thunder and 
lightning." 

-Sam F. Stewart, 17, was 
arrested for burglary in Waskom, 
Texas, in April, after he had 
broken into a van housed in a 
residential garage and then 
inadvertently activated the 
electric locks while trying to 
start the car. As he hit various 
controls in an attempt to get out 
of the car, he awoke the owners. 
Stewart was still trapped inside 
the car when police arrived. 

-The San Francisco Chronicle 
reported in June that the U.S. 
Environmental Protection 
Agency's executive fleet of cars 
averages only 6.2 miles per 
gallon, less that one-fourth the 
federally mandated average of 
27.5. 

-In Noblcsville, Indiana, Judge 
William Hughes agreed to move 
his courtroom one night in June 
to a van outside the Deer Creek 
Music Center so that the 
expected rowdy fans arriving for 
the Grateful Dead concert could 
be processed immediately upon 



their arrest for drug possession 
and other crimes, rather than 
having to wait overnight. "It's 
almost a courtesy to them," said 
the judge. 

-Kenny Shells, 31, was jailed 
in April in Memphis when he 
failed to complete his sentence. 
Judge Joe B. Brown had 
suspended Shells' 90-day jail 
time provided he would write "I 
will never again write or issue 
any bad checks" 100,000 times. 
Shells, citing a heavy work load 
and his wife's recent surgery, fell 
98,000 short and was thrown in 
the slammer. 

-Dietrick Mitchell, 16, was 
charged with the vehicular 
murder of pedestrian Daniel 
Goetsch, 16, near Aurora, 
Colorado, last October. 
According to a passenger in 
Mitchell's car, Mitchell had 
aimed for Goetsch, whom he did 
not know, on the street and 
announced "three points" for 
hitting him. 

(C) 1992 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Coming soon to a theater near you 



by Matt Niemla 
Features Writer 



No, that's not CBS you're 
watching on the silver screen, 
but the latest from the film 
industry. Both CBS and the film 
industry have been producing 
entertainment targeting older 
audiences. Since the recent 
success of such films as Fried 
Green Tomato's and the 
Unforgiven, many movie 
companies are making films to 
entertain the more mature movie 
goer. 

Starting this weekend is the 
directorial debut of Billy Crystal 
"Mr. Saturday Night," about a 
struggling comedian. An 
independant release by director 
Hal Hartley, "Simple Men," will 



also be new this weekend. The 
next weekend brings out the big 
stars. Andy Garcia and Dustin 
Hoffman decide who's the real 
brave man in "Hero," Al Pacino 
and Jack Lemmon star in David 
Mant's "Glendarry Glen Ross." 
Tom Selleck shaves his lip and 
circles the bases in Japan in "Mr. 
Baseball." 

Later in October, "Christopher 
Columbus-The Discovery," 
starring Gerard Depardicu and 
Sigourney Weaver will help to 
draw better response about the 
explorer than the previous 
"1492," released last month. It's 
the clash of the Kevin's .when 
Kevin Kline and Kevin Spacey 
star in "Consenting Mults" 
where there is some wive- 
swapping afoot. 



Also due out in October is a 
film from the two big stars of 
"Cape Fear," Robert DeNiro and 
Jessica Lange. They're in for 
another remake, this time the 
1950 melodrama "Night and the 
City." And if it's violence you 
like Harvey Keitel and Tim Roth 
star in "Reservoir Dogs," which 
will probably have to be edited 
because of a pending NC-17 
rating for extreme violence. 

Sometimes movies adapted 
from books sink like a Lead 
Zepplin, but these could be 
exceptions; Daniel-Day Lewis 
stars in James Fenimer Cooper's 
"The Last of the Mohicans." 
Other successful movies made 
from books are "Rich in Love" 
from Josephine Humphrey's 
novel, "The Lover," adapted 



from Marguerite Dura's story 
and also John Steinbeck's classic 
"Of Mice and Men." 

November promises some big 
releases. Francis Ford Coppola 
who last directed "Godfather III" 
comes out with the long awaited 
"Bram Stoker's Dracula," also 
from the novel which stars 
Winona Ryder and Keanu 
Reeves. Spike Lee finally shows 
us what all the X's are about 
when his over-budget "Malcom 
X 1 ' hits theaters on November 
20. But if you're looking for the 
feel-good hit of the fall, 
checkout "Alive" which tells of 
the soccer team stranded in the 
Andes and had to resort to 
cannibalism for nourishment. 

If your too young for these 



"serious" features, don' t worry. 
Such detours include the lame 
"Home Alone II: Lost in New 
York," with the annoying 
Macauley Culkin. Emilio 
Estevez coaches a children's 
hockey team in "The Mighty 
Ducks." 

If your money is burning a 
hole in your entertainment 
pocket and you can't wait until 
the fall, the best movies out right 
now are Woody Allen's 
"Humbands and Wives" and the 
story of a Jewish football boy, 
"School Ties." Check them out. 
What's showing in Clarion: 
Garby:Unforgiven- Rated R 
Single White Female- Rated R 
Orphium:Housesitter- Rated PG 
Batman Returns- Rated PG 13 



Marching Band welcomes 
back alumni to perform 



Dan Parrish 
Features Fditor 



This Saturday Clarion 
University marching band 
Alumni will get the chance to 
perform once again at the 
Clarion-Westminster football 
game. 

It's the 18th annual Alumni 
Day hosted by the marching 



band. Some 25 musicians will 
be welcomed back to perform 
with the band under the direction 
of Susan Creasap and Dr. 
Lawrence Wells during the 
halftime show. The day will also 
include a morning rehearsal and 
a post-game social gathering. 

The show at Saturday's 
football game will include the 



theme from the movie Robin 
Hood - Prince of Thcives 
followed by two selections from 
Beauty and the Beast. 

Future endevors for the band 
include the Autumn Leaf 
Festival parade on October 17 
and the annual marching band 
revue concert on Saturday, 
November 14. 



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Mini-concert is major success 



by Ijarry McEwen 
Features Writer 



Clarion University's version of 
Lollapalooza took place last 
Sunday as the UAB sponsored 
Activities Day outside of the 
Gemmell Student Center. 

Activities Day is a chance for 
campus organizations to 
showcase what they do and what 
they are about. 

A wide array of organizations 
turned out to try to recruit new 
members and imform students 
about the opportunities here at 
Clarion. 

The organizations ranged from 
academic clubs like the Biology 
club and Accounting club to 
social organizations including 
many of Clarion's fraternities 
and sororities. 

Other attractions at Activities 
Day were the Amazing Button 
Factory and the Caricature 
Booth. The Amazing Button 
Factory took pictures of students 
and then transferred them onto 
buttons. The Caricature Booth 
offered students the chance to 
have a caricature of themselves 
done for free. 

The main attraction was the 
Activities Day Concert 
sponsored and organized by the 
UAB Concert Committee. Four 



bands played throughout the day 
and the hillside outside of 
Gemmell was filled for most of 
the afternoon. 

First up was Inside Out, a band 
from Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
that played straight forward 
rock-n-roll. The group had just 
finished up a summer tour and is 
preparing to shoot their first 
video for the song "Just One 
Touch". 

Band members included: Ron 
Galucci on bass, Tim Frick on 
guitars, Jason Riek on vocals, 
Ben Frick on drums and Dave 
Cost on guitars. 

Next up was Whiskey High, a 
hard rock band that hails from 
Pittsburgh. They are currently 
working on a new album that is 
due out sometime in the fall. 
Their hard driving music had the 
audience on their feet 

Members of Whiskey High 
include Mike Palone on guitar, 
Rich Palone on drums, Scott 
Boyd on vocals, and Mike Ekis 
on bass. 

Ask A Stranger was the third 
band to play and had the biggest 
following of any of the bands. 
Their progressive power rock 
was a fitting compliment to the 
day and many fans were on hand 
to take in the show. 



The band's second album is 
due out in the spring of 1993 and 
they are preparing to shoot a 
video. They are also enjoying 
extensive airplay on fifteen 
regional radio stations in the 
western Pennsylvania area. 

Members include: Dave Hawk 
on keyboards and vocals, Jeff 
Powell on vocals, Kurt 
Grotenhauler on bass, Dave 
Buzzard on guitars, Willy Bauer 
on drums and Michele 
McElhinny and Julie Findlan on 
backing vocals. 

The last band to play was 
Another True Story (ATS). This 
was definitely the most 
interesting band of the day. 
Described as a post industrial, 
urban rock/cow funk fusion 
band, the three members cranked 
out a number of weird yet 
intelligent songs. 

Unfortunately, because of the 
late start time, most of the crowd 
had already left but those who 
didn't were treated to something 
special. 

ATS was definitely the 
highlight of the afternoon and 
the band was not phased at all by 
the lack of spectators. Band 
members included: Mike 
Marcinko on bass, Kip Ruefle on 
drums and Evan Knauer on 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The last band to play on the day was Another True Story. 
They played their brand of post Industrial, urban rock/cow 
funk fusion music. 



vocals and guitar. 

Sharon Illeg, Concert 
Committee Chairperson, was 
pleased with the results of the 
show. "Everything went very 
smoothly, the bands were great 
to work with and the committee 
did a great job in putting the 



concert together," said Illeg. 

Also on hand on Activities 
Day was WQED. They were 
shooting a promotional video for 
the University, getting shots of 
the campus and talking to 
students about the university. 



JAB Concert uommiwee. rum 

Charity walk planned in Clarion 

if L. .„ P m ^ll Tanlnr onfl finH tf\ "twin rflft nftftrfV. Tl 



by Drew Richards 
Features Writer 



On October 4, United Campus 
Ministry and Habitat for 
Humanity International will 
sponsor a four mile fundraiser. 



"Take a hike for Habitat," is to 
benefit Habitat for Humantiy. In 
case you didn't know, Habitat for 
Humanity is an ecumenical, 
grass roots Christian ministry 
with the goal of eliminating 



poverty housing, using as much over to Gemmell Center and find 

volunteer labor and donated United Campus Ministry (266 

materials as possible. It was Gemmell) pick up a pledge 

founded by Reverend Millard sheet, and order a fine quality T- 

Full er> shirt. You can also call (814)226- 

If you'd like to walk around 2711 to do these aforementioned 

town to support a fine cause, get things. Four miles isn't far to go 



to tielp the needy. The goal of 
this walk is to make some money 
to put towards renovating some 
of the less fortunate homes in 
Clarion County. 



African 



}■' 



The Sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha ^ 
Would Like to Welcome Their 
Spring 1992 Pledge Class: 

Kristen Brown 
Christine Csuhta 
Christie Grimplin 
Carrie Lengauer 
Kris Milner 
Lori Nelson 
Kelli Smith 
Melissa Snyder 
WE LOVE YOU! Michelle Timko 



by Tricia Egry 
Features Writer 



From the Ashanti Tribe in the 
Ghana of West Africa, students 
taking African Traditions in Art 
with Professor Cathy Joslyn are 
gaining a new and uniaue_j>ense_ 



of design. 

These new creations brought 
with them, a new face to the 
university's art department. 
Gary "Greeny" Greenberg is 
devoting many hours to defining 
the critique and skill that must 




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go in to such a masterpiece. 

The African Casting Technique 
primarily consists of intertwining 
beeswax, a charcoal and alcohol 
mixture, a clay mixture and a 
bronze casting. Together, they 
create different pieces such as 
beads and small figures. 

Creativity is unlimited as you 
endeavor great amounts of 
possibilities. Though seemingly 
difficult, the task is quite 
elementary once understood. 

The workshops took place on 
September 15 and 22 in the Fiber 
Studio, Founders Hall east 
basement, and observers were 
welcome to attend. 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 - Page 17 



Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 



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of which mis nation is an associate 
member. 

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protectorate over this country. 

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Sept 27 - Oct 3 



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right, but ain't that Henry Morgan's chicken ridin* 

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tAig-v 



PROFESSOR COSMO 



WEEKLY OVERVIEW 
Venus makes a good aspect to Mars 
planet of assertion. Pursuit of love or 
social relationships that may have 
cooled down may show signs of warm- 
ing up again. An uneasy aspect be- 
tween SuH and Mars cautions all not to 
lose patience and to use self-restraint 
in dealings with others. 



THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 

ARIES March 21 -April 20 

You're the only one who can guarantee 
serious consideration of future security. 
TAURUS April 21 - May 21 

Get together with others who share your 
interests to begin ambitiousproiects. 
GEMINI May22.Jun.21 

Take a new look at the job on hand and 
give it your very best! 
CANCER Junt22-Juhf23 

Renewambition.Success comes totnose 
who try and try... and try again! 
LEO July24-Auguit23 

Make no radical changes until you are 
certain. Act in haste, repent in hesure! 
VIRGO Auguat24-S«pt 23 

Important social connections are assets 
to those who have high ambitions. 
LIBRA S«pt24-Oct23 

Plans, hopes and wishes can come to 
pass with a bit of action from you. 
IboRPlO Oct 244toy 22 

Thoughts and actions directed to 
changW times should be productive 
SAGTTTARIUS Nov23-Dec21 

Realize that when you help others you 
are certain to help yourself! 
CAPRICORN. Dtc22-Jan20 

Share your professional interests witn 
those who share your affections. 
AQUARIUS 0an21-Fabl9 

Once minds have been made up it s 
decisive action that makes winners. 

PISCES F«b20-March20 

Distant interests are emphasized. Tal- 
ents and abilities can bring profit. 



FREE Numerology -Persona, ^^^^^^ISS^SSe %t 

oirthdate and k>ng "***~*^*tt$7 ^SS^Th Th 03105 
SONAL YEAR '(Name of this Publication) P.O. Box 717, Manchester, rv.n. uo 



Weekly Crossword 



" Doggone It ! " 



By Gerry Frey 



ACROSS 

1 Dogs' resting spot 

5 Prevent 

1 o Dogs' mortal enemies 
H Press 

1 5 Ms. Verdugo 

16 " God's Uttle " 

17 Teacher's manual 

18 DOGGONE n\ 

20 NYC time zone 

21 Ayn The 

Fountainhead" author 

22 Urns 

23 Right a wrong 
25 Jet's Mr Eubank 
27 Goters run 
29 DOGGONE IT! 

33 Jules 

34 Fortune-telling card 

35 Exist 

36 French triend 

37 Plate 

38 Mr Kazan 

39 No in Glasgow 

40 Bargain events 

4 1 Equipped with weapons 

42 DOGGONE IT! 

44 Rips off 

45 Obit wordsPI 

46 Perch 

47 Speak pompously 
50 Trig's cousin 

5i Suffix meaning doctrine 
54 DOGGONE IT I 

57 Dorothy's dog 

58 Divisible by 2 

59 Beau 

60 Seth's son 

61 Dweeb'' 

62 Fragrant floral oil 

63 Botanist Gray & others 

DOWN 

1 Location 

2 Underground assets 

3 DOGGONE IT! 

4 Picnic visitor 

5 Supply's antithesis 




6 African antelope 

7 Care tor 

8 Steno's abbrev 

9 Cheerleader's word 

10 Sweet melon 

11 Play parts 

12 Dogs' Mend? 

13 Sun. talks 

19 Chris 

21 Mr Descartes 

24 Lion's pride & joy 

25 Merchandise 

26 Black 

27 Dale or Linda 

28 Change the atlas 

29 See ya ' 

30 DOGGONE ITS < 

31 Bay window 

32 Studies history 
34 Yarns 

37 Messenger 

38 Poets words 

40 Smile scornfully 

41 Tiny bit 



43 Plan 

44 Oklahoma lootball player 

46 Lariat 

47 Word with French or 
Australian 

48 Wander 

49 Part of N A 

50 Sum & substance 

52 Greek portico 

53 Hart: US Playwright 

55 Turkish title of nobility 

56 Word with profit 

57 English social occasion 



C 1W2 All right* reserved GFR Associates 
P.O. Box 461, ScbenecUd), NY 12301 



Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 




&iy-riry'|j|j|; ■■■-'* 



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With onV a canc ^ rv>ach, ' ne ano ' m / 
ca 11/05 card for rec re at/on. 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 - Page 19 



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Golden Eagle football team loses a 
heartbreaker to New Haven, 48-47 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Writer 



To steal a phrase from 
Pittsburgh Penguins announcer 
Mike Lange, "If you missed this 
one, shame on you for six 
weeks." 

The Clarion Golden Eagles and 
the New Haven Chargers staged 
a back and forth offensive 
bonanza that produced 94 points, 
999 total yards and could not be 
decided until the final minute of 
play. 

This game, which resembled a 
UNLV-Loyola Marymount 
college basketball tilt more than 
a football game, was ultimately 
decided by a two-point 
conversion attempt with 39 
seconds to play. Clarion had 
driven eighty yards in under five 
minutes concluding in a 
touchdown pass from Tim Myers 
to Jay Tonini from six yards 
away; Down by one, the 
Clarion coaching staff made the 
decision to go for the win instead 
of settling on the tying extra 
point. 

With two Chargers' lineman in 
his face, Myers lofted a pass 
towards the left corner of the end 



zone. As the ball softly glided 
over the out-stretched arms of 
tight end Tim Brown, every 
Clarion fan let out a moan of 
distress while New Haven 
breathed a sigh of relief and 
survived 48-47. 

From the outset, fans could see 
they were in for a treat. Clarion 
received the opening kickoff and 
drove the ball down to the New 
Haven 43 yard line before they 
were forced to punt it away. But 
Tim Myers' kick deflected off of 
an unsuspecting Charger player, 
and Brad Kline quickly pounced 
on Clarion's good fortune at the 
20. Damien Henry took over 
from there. One reception and 
three carries later Henry had 
reached paydirt, and Clarion had 
drawn first blood, 7-0. 

New Haven's first drive 
sputtered after three plays, and a 
Marlon Worthy's 24 yard punt 
return placed Clarion in 
excellent position for a second 
score. Unfortunately, that would 
be the last time New Haven 
would punt. Henry and Tonini 
marched the ball to the Chargers' 
20 and a pass interference call 
brought it fifteen yards closer. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Damien Henry collected 145 yards on the ground vs. NHU 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Back-up quarterback Chris Zak is shown here scrambling for yardage, with Jay Tonini to 
his right. Zak left the game on a stretcher in the 4th quarter of Saturday's contest. 

From there, Myers found Ryan but Roger Graham scampered 26 school opened an eight point 



Alleman for the score and the 
Eagles had ideas of a blowout. 

A missed extra point kept the 
score at 13-0 when New Haven 
began to show its offensive 
prowess. On third down and 14 
from their own 40, quarterback 
Ken Suhl seemed to have no 
place to go as the Clarion pass 
rush forced him within inches of 
the sideline. Somehow, the 
New Haven signal caller located 
John Raba and sixty yards later it 
was 13-7. 

After a Clarion fumble had 
given New Haven the ball back, 
the Chargers embarked on a 14 
play, 68 yard drive captivating in 
a ten yard touchdown jaunt by 
Roger Graham. Clarion's Carlos 
Warner rejected the extra point 
and the game was tied at 13 all. 

Fullback Jay Tonini took over 
on the next Clarion possession. 
Tonini plowed over 31 yards 
worth of Charger carcass, but the 
drive stalled at the New Haven 
fourteen, and the Eagles settled 
on a 31 yard field goal from Paul 
Cramer. Eagles 16, Chargers 13. 

Another Cramer field goal 
gave Clarion a six point spread, 



yards around the left end, and 
with the point after, New Haven 
had claimed their first lead of the 
game 20-19. It was short-lived. 

On the first play from 
scrimmage after the kickoff, 
Myers looked short, looked 
medium, and went deep for 
Marlon Worthy. Worthy sprinted 
past two defenders and hauled 
in a perfect Myers throw for a 
gorgeous 67 yard touchdown. 
Fourteen seconds after New 
Haven had taken the lead, 
Clarion reclaimed it, 26-20. 

New Haven still had four 
minutes to work with before the 
half. It only took them three. 
Eight plays, 67 yards, and a one 
yard plunge by A.J. Livingston 
gave the Chargers a 27-26 lead 
going into the lovely halftime 
festivities. 

The offenses continued to 
cause nightmares for the stat 
keepers in the second half. New 
Haven received the kickoff to 
open the new half and 
immediately went to work. A 
41 yard pass from Suhl to Tony 
Ranoldo capped off an eight play 
drive, and the Connecticut 



cushion, 34-26. 

Myers started the second half 
by completing a dismal one out 
of seven passes for four yards 
and was lifted in favor of 
sophomore Chris Zak late in the 
third quarter. The team 
responded. On Zak's first play 
from scrimmage, Damien Henry 
blew through a gaping hole and 
soared 49 yards to the one yard 
line. Two plays later, Henry had 
his second score of the 
afternoon, and coupled with 
Zak's two point run, Clarion was 
even at 34, going into the final 
stanza. 

New Haven's next drive 
seemed to stall at the Clarion 17. 
On fourth and nine, the Chargers 
lined up for a go-ahead field 
goal. But Suhl, taking a page 
from Lucy in the Peanuts comic 
strip, took the snap and darted 
around right end for the first 
down. Graham scored on the 
next play, and New Haven led 
41-34. 



(Cost, on pg. 20) 



Page 20 ■ The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 




Clarion football... 



(Cont. from page 19) 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Clarion University's "lethal leg", Paul Cramer, was put to good use on Saturday, but he 
had to sit it out during crunch time as Clarion went for the two-pointer that failed. 



Zak led Clarion right back on a 
10 play, 72 yard drive that was 
capped off by a 23 yard 
touchdown reception to Worthy, 
and the game was tied. 

But soon after, Graham scored 
his third TD of the day, and New 
Haven led 48-41. 

Five minutes and eleven 
seconds remained for Clarion to 
mount one last rebuttle. The 
Eagles began at their own 20, 
and Zak led them to the 39 
before he was laced with a 
punishing hit and had to be 
helped from the field. Myers re- 
entered and connected for 12 
yards to Jess Quinn, 18 more to 
Worthy, and finished it off by 
hitting Tonini to set up the 
dramatic ending. This will be a 
battle worth remembering. 

The Golden Eagles entertain 
the powerful Westminster Titans 
this Saturday at Memorial 
Stadium. The kickoff is set for 1 
p.m. 
The Titans represent the third 



straight nationally ranked team 
that the Golden Eagles have 
faced. Youngstown State was 
the 1991 NCAA Division I-AA 
National Champions, and New 
Haven was ranked 13th in 
Division II before last Saturday's 
war. 

Westminster enters the game 
with a 2-0 record. They are 
ranked sixth in NAIA Division 
II. 

Including Westminster, 
Clarion's first three opponents 
have a combined record of 8-0 
this season. Next weeks 
opponent, Edinboro, is also 
undefeated at 3-0 and has this 
week off to prepare for the blue 
and gold. 

Clarion will try to combat the 
Titans with an offense that is 
averaging 27 points a game, 
including 413 yards of total 
offense per game. 

The Golden Eagle "D" will try 
to regroup after facing two 
straight powerful offenses. 



X- Country team fares well at IUP 



by Karen Ruud 
Sports Writer 



The men's and women's cross 
country teams participated this 
past weekend at the IUP 
Invitational in Indiana, 
Pennsylvania. The men placed 
second out of five teams in the B 
Division with 238 points. The 
women placed second out of four 
B teams with 233 points. 

Leading the way for the men's 
team was Chris Singleton with a 



time of 29:16 for a 36th place 
finish. Bill Belfield finished 
43rd with a time of 29:42. Russ 
Briendel was 44th with a 29:46 
mark. Mike Bufalini was 57th 
and Eric Hackwelder was 58th. 
Chris Myers also finished for the 
Golden Eagles. 

Nicole Yahres led the way for 
the women with a time of 23:00, 
coming in 36th. Lynn Baluh ran 
the course in 23.49 to finish 
46th. Jennifer Calla finished 



Catch the Golden Eagles inaction: 



Thursday September 24 - Tennis at Lock Haven 
Friday September 25 - Volleyball at Seton Hill 
Saturday September 26 - Volleyball at Fairmont State 

Tourney 

Football vs. Westminster 

(Memorial Stadium, 1 p.m.) 
Sunday September 27 - Tennis vs. Shippensburg 

(Campbell courts, 1 p.m.) 
Monday September 28 - Golf at Mercyhurst 
Tuesday September 29 - Volleyball vs. Edinboro 

(Tippin, 7 p.m.) 
Wednesday September 30-Tennis vs. Edinboro 

(Campbell courts, 3 p.m.) 
Thursday October 1 - Tennis vs. IUP 

(Campbell courts, 3 p.m.) 
Friday October 2 - Volleyball at Slippery Rock 

Tournament 



three seconds behind Baluh. Jen 
Dansberger and Disa Ruiz 
finished 52nd and 57th, 
respectively. Other finishers for 
the Golden Eagles were Stacey 
Jacobson and Nicole Weaver. 

The men were at a 
disadvantage over the weekend 
due to the fact that they were 
without Chad Briggs, Matt 
Winger and Mark Kinch. Had 
the Eagles been at full strength, 
they may have fared much better. 

Other teams involved were 
Robert Morris, Ohio State, St. 
Vincent, Allegheny, Baldwin 
Wallace and Lock Haven. 

Head coach Ron Wiser said 
that the team is coming along 
and they are where they want to 
be. "The season is still very 
young," said Wiser. "If you push 
the runners too hard now, they 
can tire out, causing injuries." 

The 1992 cross country team is 
made up of young runners. "It's 



hard to make the transition from 
high school to collegiate 
athletics," said Wiser. "But the 
runners are enthusiastic and 
getting better as a team." 

The goal is for both teams to 
get to States, injury free. 

Coach Wiser's teams must be 
commended for their enthusiasm 
and hard work in their sport. 
They must also be congratulated 
for their work in the classroom! 
It needs to be said that, overall, 
the men's and women's teams 
combined for over a 3.0 g.p.a. 
last semester. 

"My cross country teams have 
combined to have a very good 
grade point average," said Wiser. 
"And before I took over, under 
Bill English, they did too." 

Coach Wiser also believes that 
there may be a correlation 
between high grades and success 
on the track. 

"I think so," said Wiser. "The 



discipline that these student 
athletes have in the classroom 
carries over to their running and 
vice versa. On road trips, for 
example, never once do I have to 
have a room check. I know that 
these kids are focused to run the 
meet." 

Thus far, Singleton has been 
the top runner for Clarion. He 
finished first among the Golden 
Eagles at the California 
Invitational and over the 
weekend at IUP. His time also 
improved by nearly a minute 
from the first to second meet 

Yahres has led the women so 
far, being the first Golden Eagle 
across the line the first two 
meets. 

The Golden Eagle runners are 
next scheduled at Grove City on 
October 3. 

They may travel to St. 
Bonaventure this weekend. 



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Clarion, Pa. 16214 

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Sunday hours: noon-11:00 

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The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 Page 21 



t 



i 



Golden Eagle tennis team downs St. Francis 



by Amy Roe 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University 
women's tennis team split two 
matches this weekend. The 
Golden Eagles were defeated on 
Saturday by the defending 
conference champs of California, 
Pa., 7-2, but rebounded on 
Sunday to dominate St. Francis, 
9-0. 

Clarion played a hotly 
contested match against PS AC 
rival California, Saturday, on the 
Campbell courts. Coach Terry 
Acker said that, heading into the 
match, the players may have 
been intimidated by the recent 
success of the Vulcans. This 
may have affected the Golden 
Eagles since they did not play as 
consistently as usual. 

Saturday's results yielded only 
one Clarion win in singles play. 
This came from the #6 position 
and freshman Melodi Dess. She 
defeated California's Arrigoni in 
two sets, 6-1, 6-2. 

All five of Clarion's remaining 
players fell to their Cal 
opponents. The Golden Eagles 
#1 singles player Shara 
Wolkomir was defeated in 
straight sets, 2-6, 1-6. Marianne 
Martin fell at the #3 position, 1- 
6, 1-6. Darcy Ingham fell at #3, 
4-6, 4-6. Roxanne Milton fell at 
#4, 1-6, 2-6. Jennifer Keil had a 
better afternoon but still dropped 



a hard-fought match in three 
sets, 4-6, 6-3, 3-6. 

In doubles play, Wolkomir and 
Ingham lost in straight sets, 5-7, 
4-6. Keil and Dess were 
defeated 6-3, 6-2. Martin and 
Milton added one bright spot in 
doubles action by defeating their 
Cal counterparts from the #3 
doubles position, 6-3, 6-2. 

Coach Acker said that the 
players felt better with 
themselves knowing that they 
played a high-grade team. 

The Golden Eagles took out 
Saturday's loss on a visiting St. 
Francis squad the following day. 
They defeated the Red Flash, 9- 
0, in a rout. 

"The team played with a lot 
more fire on Sunday," said 
Acker. "(They were) definitely 
more aggressive." 

Wolkomir led the way from the 
#1 position by destroying her 
opponent, 6-0, 6-0. Martin was 
victorious from the #2 position, 
6-3, 6-1. Ingham won from the 
#3 position, 6-1, 6-3. Milton 
won from the #4 position, 6-1 , 
6-1. Keil won from the #5 
position 6-1, 6-1. Dess made it 
a clean sweep, winning her 
second match of the weekend, 6- 
1,6-1. 

In doubles play, the #1 team of 
Wolkomir and Ingham won in 
straight sets, 6-2, 6-0. Keil and 
Dess won in two sets from the #2 



1992 Fall Intramurals 

(Intramurals office located in Tippin) 

Deadlines are approaching 
for the following sports: 

Due date: September 28 

Co-rec soccer 

Men's water basketball 

Due d ate; Septe mbe r 3 Q 
Men's volleyball 
women's volleyball 
Co-rec volleyball 

-Put rosters in roster box across the hall from Intramurals office. 



Red Stallion Nite Club 

For The Best In Nite Club 
Entertainment 

Appearing Saturday Sept. 26 



Easy Out 



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Sports Information photo 
1992 Golden Eagle tennis team: (from left to right) Shara Wolkomir, Melodi Dess, 
Marianne Martin, Roxanne Milton, Darcy Ingham, Jennifer Simonsen and Jennifer Keil. 



position, 6-1, 6-1. Martin and 
Milton ended the match with a 
bang, 6-0, 6-0, for CUP's second 
victory of the season. 

The 2-1 Golden Eagles will 
next be at Slippery Rock on 
Wednesday and at Lock Haven 
on Thursday for two PS AC 



match-ups. The women will be 
back home this Sunday when 
they host Shippensburg (at 1 
p.m. on the Campbell Courts). 

Early last season, the Golden 
Eagles faced the same stiff 
competition early in the season. 
They defeated both Slippery 



Rock and Lock Haven in late 
September of 1991 by 9-0 
counts. That was before 
Shippensburg handed CUP their 
first loss of the 1991 season and 
their first regular season loss in 
three seasons. Clarion will be 
looking to avenge the 8-1 defeat. 



Clarion golf team impressive 
at Hal Hanson Tournament 



by Eric Feigel 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University golf 
team played this past weekend in 
the Hal Hanson Memorial 
Tournament at Treasure Lake. 
The tournament was sponsored 
by Clarion University in memory 
of their former golf coach, Hal 
Hanson, who passed away three 
and a half years ago. The 
tournament consisted of ten 
teams and two different Golden 
Eagle squads, both placing in the 
top five. 

Indiana University of Pa. won 
the tournament with 313 points. 
Allegheny finished second with 
319. Slippery Rock finished 
third with 323 points. Clarion's 
first team finished fourth with 
329 points. Clarion's second 
team rounded out the top five 
with 337 points. 

Clarion University head golf 
coach Bob Carlson brought the 



second team to give them some 
more collegiate experience and 
they fared very well. 

The tournament was played on 
the silver course the first day and 
continued on the gold course the 
next day. Play was halted twice 
on day two , however, due to 
lightening. The tournament was 
eventually halted due to poor 
fairway conditions. The second 
days scores were thrown out and 
the tournament was decided by 
day one. 

"It was unfortunate because the 
teams really look forward to 
playing in this tournament," said 
Carlson. 

Individually, the Clarion 
linksters were impressive. 
Sophomore Don Turowski led 
the team with a score of 79. 
Ironically, Turowski started the 
tournament on the second team, 
but will be on the first team for 
the next tournament, according 
to Carlson. Also scoring well for 



Clarion was sophomore Chris 
BrociOus with an 81, while 
seniors Rich Grafton and Todd 
Corbeil both finished with and 
82. The rest of the Golden Eagle 
golfers finished in the 80's. 

Coach Carlson was pleased 
with his team's showing in the 
tournament. "We have a solid 
team, they'll just be a little slow 
on the week," said Carlson. 
"We'll improve as the year 
comes along and we'll be ready 
for the spring championships. 
That's were it really counts." 

Even though IUP, Slippery 
Rock and Allegheny put a lot of 
money into there program, 
Carlson feels that Clarion can 
still compete with the top 
schools and are, at least, the next 
best team. 

Clarion continues their season 
this weekend at the Arco 
Country Club. The tournament, 
sponsored by Slippery Rock, 
will have 20 teams competing. 



Page 22 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-91 



Clarion volleyball team wins tourney, downs Rock 



by Mike Jewart 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles volleyball team traveled 
to the East Stroudsburg tourney 
last weekend. The Clarion 
women went into the tournament 
with a 2-4 overall record, but 
when the smoke cleared, they 
were soaring at 6-4 and had a 
tournament championship under 
their belts. 

Clarion's first game of the 
tourney was against Kutztown. 
The ladies from Kutztown were 



no match for the Clarion women 
as the Golden Eagles swept them 
in three straight matches, 15-12, 
15-8 and 15-8. Leading the way 
for CUP was Wendy Ellenberger 
with 20 set assists. Tammi Bills 
contributed seven digs and 
freshman Bobbi Simpson 
chipped in with seven service 
aces and six kills. 

The Golden Eagles next victim 
was Long Island University. 
LIU gave Clarion a little 
competition but the Golden 
Eagles won again in three sets, 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Strong net play has keyed Clarion's winning streak. 



15-11, 15-3 and 15-3. Simpson 
was again the leader in kills with 
eight. Co-captains Ellenberger 
and Bills again led by example. 
Ellenberger added 26 more set 
assists and Bills had five digs. 
Freshman Jennifer Betters added 
four more digs. 

American International 
College was the next team to fall 
to the red-hot Golden Eagles. 
The high-powered Clarion attack 
easily overpowered AIC, 15-3, 
15-4 and 15-4. Suzanne Sheldon 
rose to the occasion with 10 
kills. Betters added seven more 
for Clarion. Ellenberger was her 
usual self, adding 20 assists. 
Bills and Meghan Kelly each 
contributed six digs to the team 
effort. Simpson, with her 
powerful serve, again led the 
team in service aces with five. 

With the victory over AIC, 
Clarion moved into the 
championship game against host 
East Stroudsburg. After CUP 
opened the first game, winning 
15-6, ESU rebounded to tie the 
match at one set apiece with a 
15-12 mark. The third game was 
a tight one but the Golden 
Eagles pulled it out, 15-13. In 
the third game, the women wore 
down East Stroudsburg with a 
15-7 win and the championship, 
3-1. Ellenberger led the way 
with an awesome 37 assists. 
Bills and Kelly were sweeping 
up the floor again with 29 and 20 
digs, respectively. Simpson once 
again acted as "Super Frosh" 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Wendy Ellenberger had 37 assists in a game last weekend. 



with 14 kills and teammate 
Nicole Flambard added 12 of her 
own missies. Simpson was 
awarded "PSAC-West Co-Player 
of the Week" for her weekend 
heroics. 

The Golden Eagles continued 
their hot streak last Tuesday 
night at Tippin by defeating 
PS AC rival Slippery Rock, 3-1. 

Clarion beat the Rock soundly 
in game one, 15-7, only to have 
Slippery Rock fight back to 
make things even, 11-15. 
Clarion took the third game 15- 
11. In the fourth, with Clarion 



up 14-9, the Rock battled back to 
tie the game at 14 apiece. The 
Golden Eagles put them away 
scoring the last two for a 16-14 
nail biter. 

Simpson continued to 
dominate at the net with 17 kills. 
She also had four service aces. 
Bills secured the defense with 28 
digs. Ellenberger added 18 more 
along with three service aces. 

The women (7-4 overall and 2- 
2 in the PSAC-West conference) 
will play Seton Hill on Friday 
and then travel to the Fairmont 
State Tournament on Saturday. 



Wrestling coaches clinic set for November 12-14 



The Clarion University "Eagle 
Wrestling School for Coaches", 
which will feature its 26th 
edition in November, has an 
impressive list of instructors for 
the three-day event. 

Scheduled at Clarion's W.S. 
Tippin Gym from Thursday, 
November 12 through Saturday, 
November 14, the theme of the 
1992 clinic is "Pin to Win." 
Following that theme, former 
Clarion great Wade Schalles and 
former Syracuse wrestler Gene 
Mills headline a coaching staff 
that is designed to wet the 
appetite of all coaches who 
attend. 

Three plans are available to 
coaches who wish to attend the 
clinic. Plan A, which costs 
$130, includes all 15 hours of 
instruction at the clinic, two 
nights lodging and five meals. 
Plan B costs $106 and provides 
12 hours of instruction (Friday 
and Saturday), one night lodging 



and three meals. Plan C is a 
commuter plan which includes 
the clinic instruction and three 
meals for $65. 

Along with Schalles and Mills, 
Bald Eagle Area High School 
coach Richard Rhoades, 
Lakewood St. Edward High 
strength coach Joe Terebienec, 
former Clarion wrestlers Kurt 
Angle and Erik Burnett plus 
Davis make up the 1992 clinic 
staff. 

Schalles, attended Clarion 
from 1970-74 and shattered 
NCAA and Clarion University 
records. He amassed an 
unbelievable career record of 
153-5-1 and an NCAA record of 
106 pins. Schalles was four-time 
NCAA National Champion 
(twice Division I). He went on 
to collect career totals of 821 
wins and 530 pins, both listed in 
the Guiness Book of World 
Records. He was inducted into 
the inaugural Clarion University 



"Sports Hall of Fame" in 1989 
and into the National Wrestling 
"Hall of Fame and Museum" in 
1991. 

Mills, also an outstanding 
collegiate and freestyle wrestler, 
is currently in his tenth season as 
an assistant coach at Syracuse 
University. Mills was a two- 
time NCAA Division I National 
Champion at 118-pounds at 
Syracuse (1979 and 81). He 
compiled a collegiate record of 
144-5-1 and registered 107 pins. 

Rhoades will be the featured 
instructor in the "Junior High- 
Elementary School" part of the 
clinic. Rhoades has led his 
teams to seven Central 
Conference Titles, three Big 7 
Crowns, seven District VI 
Championships and one 
Regional Crown. He has 
coached 39 individual District 
winners, 20 Regional Champs 
and four State Champions. 

Terebienec possesses 30-years 



of experience in the field of 
"strength training," 20 years of 
coaching experience and the last 
ten of that as strength coach at 
Lakewood St. Edward High. 
Terebienec has developed a 
system of "Total Body Training" 
strength training which applies 
directly to wrestling. 

Angle, a 1992 graduate of 
Clarion University, also posted 
some incredible numbers during 
his wrestling career as a 
collegiate heavyweight. A four- 
time EWL and three-time PSAC 
winner, Angle won the NCAA 
Division I heavyweight crowns 
in 1990 and 92, with a second 
place finish in 1991. He 
compiled a career record of 116- 
10-2. 

Burnett, also a former Clarion 
wrestler, fashioned a strong 
collegiate career. He compiled 
an overall record of 89-31-5 and 
was 25-4-2 in the 1991-92 
season. That same season, he 



finished fifth at 118-pounds. at 
the NCAA Division I Nationals, 
earning him All-American 
honors. Burnett was a 1992 
PSAC Champion. 



•Story courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Geo f s Pizza 

Free 16 OZ. 

drink with 

purchase of 

a 

medium pizza 

Formerly Domino's Pizza 

Free Delivery 

227-9111 



The Clarion Call - 9-24-92- Page 23 




Roommate Needed 



Female Roommate needed this 
semester to share apartment near 
campus. If you are unhappy or need 
a place, call 764-3690. 



Help Wanted 



Looking for devoted guitarist, 
drummer & bass player. Inquire at 
227-2358 ask for Shawn. 



Entertainers and comedians needed. 
Please call 226-9027 for info. 



Earn $50.00 Free merchandise and 
lots more by having a "Decor and 
More" party. In home or book- call 
Marie Schwab 814-354-2726. 



Travel Free! sell quality vacations 
for the most reliable spring break 
company! Jamaica, Cancun, 
Bahamas, Margarita Island, 
Florida. Best 

commissions/services. 
SUNSPLASH Tours 1-800-426- 
7710. 



Looking for student groups to 
sponsor us on campus. Fast, easy, 
big S,$,$*s! Call at (800)592-2121 
extension 309. 



Spring Break '93 Panama City 
Beach, Florida Sales Representative 
needed to work with the #1 Spring 
Break Team Travel Associates and 
Tour Excel Sell the Bast properties 
on the beach Summit 
Condominiums Miracle Beach 
Resort Holiday Inn Pier 99 Earn 
top commission and free trips For 
more information call Jenny 1-800- 
558-3002. 



$200 • $500 Weekly Assemble 
products at home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid direct. Fully 
Guaranteed Free Information- 24 
Hour hotline. 801-379-2900 
Copyright #PA10KDH. 



***Campus Reps Wanted*** 
Heatwave Vacations Spring Break 
1993 The best rates & the biggest 



GREEKS & CLUBS 
RAISE A COOL 
$1,000.00 

IN JUST ONE WEEK! 
PLUS $1000 FOR THE 
MEMBER WHO CALLS! 
And a FREE HEADPHONE 
RADIO just for calling 1-800- 
932-0528, Ext 65. 



commissions for more information, 
call 800-395-Wave. 



***Wanted 



*** 



Campus 



Representatives to promote Spring 
Break and Ski trips. Earn free trip + 
cash!!! Call 1-800-862-7325. 



Sales and Services 



Diamond Engagement Trio Set: 
Marquise Diamond Engagement 
Ring, Matching Lady's and Man's 
Wedding Rings. AH three rings for 
only $395. Use layaway, credit card, 
check, or cash. Only at James 
Jewelers, Downtown Clarion. 226- 
8711. 



For Sale: Electric Smith Corona 
SL80 typewriter Good Condition. 
$75. Price Negotiable. Call Lynn 
226-9624. 



Diamonds: .44 carat marquise 
diamond. Special purchase: $868. 
Layaway or credit payments easily 
arranged to suit you. Only at James 
Jewelers, 614 Main St. Clarion. 
226-8711. 



* * * True Colors Tattoo 
Professional Steralization, Fine lines 
and cover ups. Choose from 50 
colors. Located in Sligo, PA, 10 
miles S. of Clarion. Call for 
appointment after 5:00 p.m. 358- 
2715. 



Druglord Trucks! $100. 86 

Bronco. . . $50. 91 Blazer. . . $150. 
77 Jeep CJ. . . $50. Seized Vans, 
4x4's, Boats. Choose from 
thousands starting $25. Free 
Information- 24 hour hotline. 801- 
379-2930. Copyright # PA10KKC. 



Rooms for rent across frorn Tippen 
Gymnasium. $105/month. Call 
226-8010, 



Cheap! FBI/U.S. Seized 89 

Mercedes. . . $200. 86 VW. . . $50 
87 Mercedes. . . $100. 65 Mustang. 
. . $50. Choose from thousands 
starting $25. Free information- 24 
hour hotline. 801-379-2929. 
Copyright # PA10KJC. 



Teacher Education Program 
Admission Forms. For: All students 
in the college of Education and 
Human Services who will have 
completed 30 credits or more at the 
end of this semester. Where: office 
of Field Services, 127 Stevens Hall, 
between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 



Photographer for hire. Modeling 
Portfolios, Group shots, copies, etc. 
Reasonable prices. Call Ray at 
(412) 526-5377 after 6 pm. 



Seniors: Careers '93 is a college 
recruitment conference sponsoring 
job fairs in Jan. & Feb. in these 
cities: NYC, Atlanta, Dallas, DC, 
and Chicago. Many gov't agencies 
and Fortune 500 compainies recruit 
at these fairs. If you're interested in 
attending one, pick up a brochure in 
Career Services, 114 Egbert. 



There will be a Blood Mobile at 
Tippen Gymnasium on Monday 
October 5 from 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 
p.m. So come out and give- you 
may be saving a life! 



Confirmation Classes for Catholic 
students who have not been 
confirmed will begin soon. Call Fr. 
Monty (226-6869) to register or for 
more information. 



Car wash, Friday, Sept 25th form 11- 
4p.m. at Seven-Eleven Sponsored 
by student Alumni Ambassadors 
Spirit (Rain date 10/2/92). 



Personals 



Chrissy, Happy Birthday! I love 
you. Dave. 



To the D. Phi E's, you guys are #1 in 
my heart Love, your sweetheart. 



Theta Phi Alpha- Our night of 
"Bonding" was a memorable one. 
Let's tie each other up again soon! 
Phi Sigma Kappa 



Yo! C-U-P! Are you ready for 
Autumn Leaf '92? Well here's your 
chance to get this years coolest 
Autumn Leaf T-shirt! Just come on 
down to Book Smith Trading this 
Saturday, Sept 26th. Orders will be 
taken form 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. "There 
is only one shirt" "Z-shirts." Get 
them while you can! 



The Brothers of Delta Chi would 
like to thank De Phi E for a great 
time at the mixer. Once again it was 
a blast. We'll have to do it again 
real soon. 

TKE, Sig Tau Gamma, and Zeta Tau 
Alpha- Double Trouble could have 
never been better! We loved it! 
Count us in on the next one! Love, 
the sisters of Delta Zeta. 



Hey AXP- Thanks for such an 
awesome mixer! Let's do it again 



very soon! Love, the sisters of Delta 
Zeta 



Congratulations, Andrea Leslie 
Cathcart on being elected as the 
vice-president of Student Senate. 
We wish you the best of luck and 
support... Student Senate. 



Congratulations to Monica Douglas 
and Jay Elias for receiving the James 
Gemmell Student Leadership Award. 
You make Clarion University proud! 



A very belated but heartfelt Birthday 
to Katie, Beth, Shannon, Betsy, 
Love, your D Phi E sisters. 



D Phi E welcomes our new Co- 
Advisor, Dr. Gredja. We are looking 
forward to working w/ you. 



Good Luck to all Rushees during 
this busy week. Love, the sisters of 
DPhiE. 



DX- The mixer was great the 
tattoos were Fine. We would like to 
scribble on you anytime. Love, D 
PhiE. 



Tom Collins: Roses are red. Violets 
are blue. Our Sigma love, is always 
with you! Thanks for a great 2 years 
of being our sweetheart. Love, the 
Tri-Sigma sisters. 



Tri-SIgma would like to congratulate 
Jason Delp on becoming our new 
Sigma Sweetheart . Welcome to a 
bunch of wild and crazy girls! Love, 
the Tri-Sigma sisters. 



Sig Eps: Who ever thought we 
could have such a blast with Blatz 
andBLT's! Thanks a lot! Don't be 
strangers, love, the sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Tau. 



Jill- Thanks for all of your hard 
work during fall rush. You and your 
committee did an awesome job! We 
love you- the sisters of AST 



Colleen- what a beautiful voice! 
Thanks for being so thoughtful. 
Love, your sisters of AST. 
Rochelle, Congratulations on your 
engagement! We couldn't be 
happier for you and Matt. Best of 
Luck with everything, honey. We 
love you! Your sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Tau. 



Jennifer Pilarski Congrats on 
placing third in the Hot Legs 
contest. Love, Hildred 



The Alpha Chi Rho Fraternity would 
like to thank God and Clarion 
Borough for the Sewer Water 
Olympics in our basement on 
Monday night. 



The Alpha Chi Rho Fraternity would 
like to invite all men to participate in 
the fall Rush process. Joining a 
Fraternity can be a very valuable 
experience. Good luck to all Greeks 
during Rush. 



To the sisters of Delta Zeta, Thanks 
for the great Tie-Dye mixer! You 
girls made us Rock Hard! The 
brothers of Alpha Chi Roh. 



Alpha Chi Rho would like to 
welcome and congratulate our New 
Sweetheart, AST Triplet. 



Thanks Sig Tau Gamma, TKE's and 
Delta Zeta it was great mixing with 
you guys Saturday . Hope to do it 
again sometime. Zeta's 



Thanks Sigma Chi We had a blast 
mixing with you guys Thursday. 
Maybe we can Bond again soon! 
Zetas 



Good luck to all of our Sweetheart 
candidates! We love you! Love, 
Theta Phis 



The Sisters of Theta Phi Alpha 
would like to wish all of our rushees 
good luck! 



Phi Sigma Kappa, thanks for the 
great "bondage" mixer. There's no 
one else we'd rather be tied up with! 
Love, Theta Phis 



/i«d 



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Super Lunch Special 

one hot dog 
small drink 
small nachos 

$1.27 + .08 tax 
Mon.-Fri, 11 AM- 3 PM 



Night Hours Start 10 PM 
Seven Days a Week. 



Nite Owl Special 3/$1 .88 
Available At All Times 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 9-24-92 



Sports opinion 

Tall Cliffy predicts: From the cheap seats 



A funny thing happened to me 
this week. The illustrious sports 
editor for this fine paper asked 
me to write a weekly column 
predicting victors and losers in 
the NFL and CFA. At first, this 
struck me as being stupid. A 
gambling man, I am, but football 
expert, I am not. 

However, I liked the idea of 
trying to predict the future, so I 
said yes. I figure I can't be any 
worse than those gypsies telling 
futures on 900 numbers. 

So my fate as a man with 
premonitions is now open for 
public ridicule. If I am 
successful, I will move to Las 
Vegas and join the gambling 
elite. If I fail, it's back to being a 
bom loser. 
NFL 
Buffalo at New England* 16 

Buffalo (3-0) still has, 
arguably, the best quarterback in 
the league. And Kelly can go to 
any number of talented receivers 
for the big play (i.e. Thurman 
Thomas and Andre Reed). Their 
defense was 27th last year, but 
that was without Mr. Smith. But 
Bruce proved last week that he 
was back, collecting 11 tackles 
and 2 1/2 sacks against the much 



improved Colts. 

The Patriots (0-2) have a future 
in quarterback Hugh Millen, but 
the future is not now. Coach 
Dick MacPherson needs more 
than six days to prepare his 
defense for a Buffalo onslaught. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: Buffalo 

Denver at Cleveland (1-2) +3 

Denver (2-1) is way overrated. 
John Elway does not have the 
offensive line he once had and 
the Broncos running game is on 
empty. This means that Elway 
cannot be an efficient 
quarterback, as evident in last 
week's spanking by the Eagles. 

Cleveland (2-1), however, is 
on the rise. They narrowly lost to 
the Dolphins two weeks ago, 
which was one of the most 
exciting games this season. Last 
Sunday, the Browns proved that 
they are legit by beating a good 
(no matter what their record 
says) Raider team. Backup QB 
Todd Philcox is no Joe Montana, 
but he showed last week (10-20; 
200 yards; 3 TD's; int.) that 
Kosar shouldn't be missed 
against Denver. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: Cleveland 



Pittsburgh at Green Bay +3 

Why isn't Pittsburgh getting 
any respect. The first three 
weeks of the season, the Steelers 
(3-0) have been underdogs. This 
week, they are only favored by 
three. I'm telling you, ladies and 
gentlemen, Neil O'Donnell is for 
real. The Steel Curtain is also for 
real. I don't know if rookie 
coach Bill Cowher has anything 
to do with it, but this is not the 
dismal Steelers of the 80's. 

Green Bay (1-2) will be 
without Don Majkowski, who 
suffered strained ligaments in his 
ankle against Cincinnati, last 
week. Backup Brett Favre 
(ironically rhymes with Starr) 
did an incredible job in relief last 
week, but his success will be 
short-lived. The Steelers' 
defense is much better than the 
aging Bengal defense, and will 
force Favre to make mistakes of 
an inexperienced play-caller. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Pittsburgh 

College 

California at Kansas -6 1/2 

The 1992 Bears (1-1) are not 
the same team that surprised 
their Pac-10 rivals in 1991. 
California does boast, however, a 



Sports opinion 



The fan speaks out 



by Charles Mignanelti 
Guest Columnist 

I believe the year was 1944, 
the setting Campbell Stadium in 
Tallahassee, Florida and the 
match-up was FSU vs. Florida. 
Sometime during the game, the 
FSU band started playing a drum 
beat. Fans were prompted to 
bend their arms back and forth at 
45 degree angles and start to 
blurt out a "war chant." 

This, so-called, "war chant" is 
still done during Florida State 
football games while Chief 
Oceola and his horse Renegade 
look on from the sidelines. If 
I'm correct with the year, this 
would mean that the chop and 
chant has been going on for 
some 48 years now. I believe 
that Seminole fans share with us 
one of the most entertaining and 
original gimmicks to come to the 
world of sports. Unfortunately, 
nowadays, their are some thieves 
in the sports world. There are 
some imitators, who call 



themselves the "Chop Shop." 
Yes, I'm talking about you, 
Atlanta fans! 

Now, this is a laugh. Here is a 
team that couldn't draw a crowd 
with a pencil about four years 
ago, but now these faithful fans 
come to every game with 
ridiculous foam hatchets and 
mimic the FSU war chant. Hey, 
Atlanta fans, allow me to let you 
in on a secret, Tallahassee is 
about 250 miles south of you. 
But wait a minute. Atlanta fans 
say that "Neon Deion" prompted 
them to adopt the chop. Well, if 
Deion told you to shove metal 
rods under you're finger nails, 
would you do it? Another thing, 
the fans of Fulton County 
Stadium don't make the chop 
look like an awful thing. They 
don't even stay together. They 
look like they are directing 
traffic on the run-way of the 
Atlanta Hartsfield Airport. 

Atlanta fans, do me and the 
rest of Florida State's fans a 



favor and STOP THE CHOP! 
Give it back to who it really 
belongs to! 

Wait one more second, hold 
the tomahawk, there is yet 
another group of followers. The 
Kansas City Chiefs also decided 
to get some old band together 
(which, by the way, sounds like 
something off of the Lawrence 
Welk Show) and they are taking 
FSU's history away for 
themselves, too. 

Isn't there such a thing as 
originality anymore? Oh, let me 
guess, the Chief's fans do it 
because Bobby Bowden's third 
cousin, twice removed is a 
vendor at Arrowhead Stadium. 

Well, I've said enough. The 
fans of Atlanta and Kansas City 
are a bunch of followers who 
couldn't originate something 
new if their season tickets 
depended on it. The Florida 
State Seminoles are the 
originator of the "Chop Shop", 
so GIVE IT UP! 



Heisman hopeful in running 
back Russell White. But the 
Bears are going up against a very 
strong Jayhawk team. 

Kansas (3-0) is ranked 24th, 
but that's deceiving. . . they are 
much better than 24th. The 
Jayhawk offense leads the nation 
in average points-per-game, and 
they held last week's opponent, 
Tulsa, to just seven points. Look 
for another Kansas blowout. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Kansas 

San Diego St at UCLA -5 1/2 

UCLA (2-0) is ranked 12th and 
proved last week that they 
rightly deserve to be in the top 
25. Relief QB Rob Walker 
(starting in place of injured 
starter Wayne Cook) threw for 
two touchdowns against BYU 
last week and should prove to be 
a real threat against the Aztecs. 

However, San Diego State (1- 
0-1) has the best runner in 
America, period. Sophomore 
phenom Marshall Faulk is the 
definite favorite to win this 
year's Heisman trophy. In his 
first two games, Faulk rushed for 
a combined 519 yards. I don't 
think that UCLA has the defense 
to stop this super-human. I know 



it's risky, but I like the Aztecs in 

an upset. 

Tall Cliffy 's pick: San Diego 

State 

N.C. State at North Carolina -1 

The Wolfpack (3-1) is ranked 
23rd in the nation, but fell last 
week to #3 Florida State, 34-13. 
However, N.C. State is a very 
talented team that thoroughly 
beat Iowa in the Meadowlands 
and held their own with the 
Seminoles until near the end of 
the first half. 

I don't know much about the 
Tarheels(3-0), except that they 
beat Army last week and they 
have a back (Natrone Means) 
that scored three touchdowns in 
the victory. Army is a very weak 
team, though. N.C. State should 
definitely out-man the Tarheels. 
Tall Cliffy' spick: N.C. State 

Well, those are the picks of the 
week. I ask you to not take this 
as doctrine, but have fun praising 
me or ridiculing me. I also hope 
to have guest columnists in the 
next few weeks to aid in my 
fortune telling or babbling 
(whichever you choose). Until 
next week. . . 



If IT ISN'T FUN, 
WHAT GOOD IS IT? 




gear 



MOUNTAIN BIKES 
CAMPING 
ROCK CLIMBING 
INLINE SKATES 
KAYAKS 
XC SKIING 

Stop and talk to an expert about clothing and 
footwear that performs like you want it to. 

Guaranteed. 



226-4763 



10-6 DAILY 




* Volume 74, Issue 4 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 1, 1992 



CORNER OF 5TH & WOOD CLARION 



• 



I 



In this issue. . . 



News 

Giving Campaign 

Clarion kicks off it 
annual campaign fo 
donations to support 
student projects pg. 5 



Features 

U.S. Army field ban 

The U.S. Army fiel 
band of Washington Dd 
will entertain Clarion] 
October 7 pg. 11 1 



Sports 



Third loss - 

The Clarion Universit) 
Eagles football team 
falls to Westminster 
Titans pg. 19 



Index 



Commentary. pg. 2 

News pg. 5 

TV listings pg. 10 

Features pg. 11 

Campus events pg. 12 

Entertainment pg. 16 

Sports pg. 19 

Classifieds pg. 23 



Clarion f s 

Weather Outlook 



TODAY>Partly cloudy, high 

50's 
FRIDAY>ParUy sunny, high 

60's 
SATURDAY>Partly sunny 

high 70's 
SUNDAY> Cloudy, high 70s 
MONDAY> Cloudy, high 60s 
TUESDAY>Sunny, high 70's 
WEDNESDAY>Partly cloudy, 
high 60s 



1992-93 operating budget 
ready for SSHE's approval 



The Clarion University 
Council of Trustees recently 
approved a resolution to submit 
the 1992-93 university operating 
budget to the State System of 
Higher Education Central Office. 
The resolution was approved 
on September 9 at the regular 
Wednesday evening meeting. 

The $45.2 million budget 
calls for major cuts in operating 
and personnel costs because of a 
3.5 percent decrease ($13 
million) in state funding and 
increases in operating and 
personnel costs. 

Tuition revenue this year will 
not increase dramatically due to 
last year's substantial tuition 
' increase. Instead, tuition for in- 
state students only went up $100 
for the spring semester and 
increased 25 percent for out of 
state students. 

University officials prepared 
for the tight budget by planning 
carefully and reviewing 
personnel costs and operating 
expenses during the past year. 
Budget decisions made in 1991- 
92 led to a $2.6 million reduction 
in anticipated personnel costs 
and operating expenses for the 
1992-93 fiscal year. This was 
achieved through a decrease in 
faculty and staff positions as a 
result of the Mellow Bill and a 
hiring freeze on all but necessary 
positions. 

In a letter addressed to the 
faculty, Clarion University 
President Diane L. Reinhard 
recognized the difficulties the 
university must deal with 
concerning budgetary problems. 
"Budget constraints continue to 
plague us and underscore our 
need for becoming more 
purposeful, more focused and 
more efficient in everything we 
do." 

President Reinhard went on to 
say that added responsibility has 
been requested. "While these 
conditions test both the stamina 
and the cohesion of our 



academic community, they 
present opportunities for 
critically examining priorities 
while sustaining educational 
quality in the most efficient 
manner," she said. 

According to the Fall Faculty 
Meeting handbook, money has 
also been cut from the planned 
non-personal costs. This $1 
million cut will probably result 
in less money being spent on 
deferred maintenance, travel, 
library resources, purchase of 
new equipment, and support for 
new program initiatives. 

Another reduction of $1.2 
million in personnel costs is 
planned for the current fiscal 
year. This will be achieved 
through review of vacancies and 
attrition, with furloughs as the 
last resort. 

The Council of Trustees has 
also approved an increase from 
four to six percent in the 
Instructional Support Fee. "The 
impact of that was around 
$340,000 lor this year," said 
Wayne C. Key, interim Vice 
President for Finance and 
Administration. 

The 1993-94 capital budget 
request was also approved for 
submission to SSHE's Central 
Office. The capital budget 
request is a "wish list" of 
projects for consideration over a 
long-term period. 

"There were three projects 
submitted for the wish list," said 
Key. "The addition and 
renovation of Carlson; the 
renovation of Peirce Science; 
and me extension of Carrier." 

According to Key, there are 
projects from the past that are 
still waiting to be funded. 

The trustees also unanimously 
approved an application fee 
increase and the establishment of 
a graduation fee. The 
application charge was increased 
from $15 to $25 effective as of 
September. 
A $15 graduation fee, effective 




Public Affairs photo 
"Budget constraints. . .underscore our need for becoming 
more purposeful. . ." - President Diane L. Reinhard 



this fall, was also approved. The 
money generated through this 
fee will be used to offset costs of 
diplomas and other related 
graduation expenses. 

Dr. George Curtis, Vice 
President for student Affairs, 
reported that during 1991-92 
there was a ten percent increase 
in total aid funds amounting to 
$18,092,081 which were 
awarded to 4,503 students. Also, 
a preliminary federal audit for 
the 1990-91 and 1991-92 
academic years was conducted 
for the Financial Aid Office with 
no monetary findings. 



Key agreed mat the financial 
situation Clarion University is 
faced with will be difficult. 
"The budget is very tigh,t but we 
will survive." 

Key went on to say that no" 
actual decisions concerning 
personnel for next year has been 
made, but that it has been 
discussed. 

Information courtesy of Public 

Affairs and the Fall Falculty 

Meeting handbook. 



TB 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Hide Park 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Debbie Huffman 

Managing Editor 

Alan Vaughn 

News Editor 

Dan Parrish 

Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 

Sports Editor 

A.J. Meeker 

Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 
Brigitte Josefczyk 
Circulation Editor 
Tara Sheesley 
Ad Design 
Amy Conner 
Advertising Manager 
Ted Howard 
Business Manager 
Art Barlow 
Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 1200 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revenue.. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

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words after are $.50 

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The Clarion 

Call Is 

printed on 

recycled 

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w 




The way I see it 



Pictography Editor 



The age of 

Exploration; 

or, Exploitation? 

This year of 1992 has been 
marked by some for festivities 
celebrating the quincentennial 
encounter between the 
"explorer," Christopher 
Columbus, and the "new" world. 

Only recently has a semantic 
retraction been offered by the 
Department of Education 
concerning the way students are 
to be instructed on this issue. 

Previously, this erroneous 
concept that Columbus 
discovered North America was 
actively endorsed in almost 
every textbook utilized by 
teachers in this country. 

It was only after historically- 
accurate individuals generated 
extensive publicity was that the 
change occured. Fortunately 
now, students are made aware 
that a world of many different 
cultures was already flourishing 
and doing quite well for itself 
when Columbus' contact 
symbolically bridged two 
distinct, old worlds in October of 
1492. 

I am a small legacy of one of 
the cultures which radically 
changed after that contact. As a 
member of the Mohawk Nation 
of the Iroquois Confederacy, I 
am motivated to dispute the 
reasons that otherwise rational 
human-beings have chosen for 
celebrating this year. Instead of 
dwelling here on outright 
misrepresentation, though, I 
would like to highlight the 
dangers of accepting the 
consequences of such 
inaccuracy. 

When old cowboy movies 
show the taking of scalps by 
Native Americans, the origin of 
this practice is never properly 
attributed to the French trappers, 
who used it to identify the tribal 




Charles J. Kader 

affiliation of unknown Natives 
who might be intruding upon 
"their" hunting grounds in the 
process of seasonal movement. 
Indeed, it was the scalps of 
Native Americans which were 
taken first, perhaps leading some 
tribes to think that it was a 
common practice of the 
Europeans, whose ways were 
quite unknown to many inland 
tribes. 

The usage of the vulgar term 
"squaw" refers not to woman but 
rather to their genitalia. The 

(ConL on pg. 4) 



He's back? 
Well, ladies and gentlemen, 
prepare yourselves for Act II. 
America's favorite media 
phenomenon, H. Ross Perot, is 
back and he's got something 
really nifty up his sleeve this 
time. 

Now, don't get me wrong here. 
I have no problem with having 
H. Ross's name on the ballot, 
and I don't mind if he runs. That 
is his right as an American, to 
run for president. The problem 
is, he's not running. Well, he 
was running, but now he's not, 
although he still might, but he 
probably won't unless he decides 
to. Go figure. 

My problem with H. Ross is 
the fact that he is holding "secret 
meetings" with representatives 
from both the Bush and Clinton 
camps. This past summer, he 
actually rejuvenated the 
democratic process a little bit by 
running his own campaign, 
which kind of lit a fire under all 
the other candidates. But H. 
Ross is no longer messing with 
that petty stuff. He's no longer 
rejuvenating the democratic 
process, he's attempting to 
circumvent it altogether! 

This week in Texas, H. Ross is 
holding a series of meetings with 
groups from both the Democratic 
and Republican parties, at the 



end of which he will either 
decide to restart his campaign 
give his blessing (and his 
constituency) to either Bush or 
Clinton. 

All week, H. Ross has spent 
his hours locked away with the 
two camps, emerging 
sporadically to throw a few 
metaphors at the pollsters and 
pundits who wait eagerly outside 
for whatever crumbs he may toss 
them. This is not right. Frankly, 
I think it is downright disgusting. 
President Bush and Governor 
Clinton, two very able, 
competent (and declared) 
candidates, are going out of their 
ways to cater to, as journalist 
Molly Ivins puts it, a "loopy, 
right-wing Texas billionaire". 
Why are they caw-towing to 
him, when both parties claim 
that he can have no significant 
I effect on the election? More 
importantly.. What is going on 
behind those closed doorsTV/bai 
hidden agendas are being 
discussed? Why aren't the 
American people being let in on 
what's going on? 

This goes beyond odd and into 
the realm of dangerous. One of 
the men being represented at 
these secret meetings will be the 
next President of the United 
States of America, and we, the 
(Cont. onpg. 4) 







JV, n&tS r~& i i^s**' ^y-^r^. 






The Clarion Call- 10-1-92 - Page 3 




i 



Doing my 
job 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to respond to the 
article written by Eric Reed last 
week. I am afraid that he may 
have given my fellow peers, the 
faculty, and the staff of this 
University a misconception of 
my dedication to Clarion as a 
student and a member of the 
Council of Trustees. 

Eric was correct to say that I 



am in Harrisburg for the 
semester as an intern; however, 
he neglected to explain how I 
received the internship or what 
my internship consists of and 
how it effects my leadership role 
at the University. I think that it 
would be beneficial, to those 
who are concerned, for me to 
explain the internship that I am 
participating in. This is not a 
typical internship that students 
go out and solicit on their own. I 
am involved in "The Harrisburg 
Internship Semester" (THIS), 
which is sponsored by the State 
System of Higher Education, of 
which Clarion University is a 



member. The program allows 
each State University to send a 
student to Harrisburg to 
participate in a program 
involving policy procedures and 
the State Government. 

The selection process for this 
program begins at the University 
level. An application can be 
completed by any student, in any 
major, with a GPA of 3.0 or 
better. A committee of faculty 
members reviews the 
applications and nominates a 
student for approval by the 
president of the university. I 
applied for the internship before 



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the decision was final as to who 
would be the student member of 
the Council; however, I received 
the appointment by Governor 
Casey to the Council of Trustees 
before I was awarded the 
internship. I guess anyone could 
say that I could have declined 
the internship so that I could 
dedicate all of my energy to the 
university. This may seem like 
the best decision for the 
university; however, I disagree. 
The placement that I received for 
my internship is with the House 
Majority Education Committee 
under Representative Ronald 
Cowell. This could not have 
been a more perfect placement, 
not only for my own experience, 
but for the opportunity to 
enhance my representation of the 
students on the Council. Being 
in Harrisburg and working with 
the members of the House of 
Representatives every day has 
given me an opportunity to 
lobby for the State System, 
which includes Clarion. 
Working with the Education 
Committee has given me the 
opportunity to give a student s 
opinion on policies that will 
iffect all universities in 
'ennsylvanta. And finally, I have 
>een given an opportunity to 
liscuss the concerns of students 
it other State System schools. I 
>ersonally feel that being in 
iarrisburg has given me the 
>pportunity to be an educated 
nember of the Council of 
Trustees; therefore, I believe 
hat you are being well 
epresented. This, of course, is 
ny opinion. 

There is a list of powers and 
duties of the Councils of 
Trustees of the State System of 
Higher Education on page 12 of 
Act 188 of 1982. If anyone 
chooses to question my 
dedication to my position, they 
can look to this document as a 
reference for my responsibilities 
as a member of the Council. I 
would like to note that your 
comments and concerns are 
always welcome, and I am 
always willing to talk to anyone 
about the university. I would 
like to cordially invite everyone 
to the next Trustee meeting on 
November 11 at 7:00 p.m. 
These meetings are open to the 
general public. It would be nice 
to see that others, in addition to 
Eric Reed, are genuinely 
concerned about their education, 



Clarion University, and the State 
System of Higher Education. 

-Crystal A. Knorr 



Keep your 
garbage to 




iMMMtaMIMMMMIi 



Dear Editor: 

Things are getting out of hand 
and there is no excuse for it. It 
seems there are students on this 
campus who use the entire 
campus as their personal garbage 
dump. Everyone on this campus 
is an adult and old enough to 
know how and why to use the 
garbage cans. They are 
conveniently placed all over 
campus. It shows a complete 
lack of respect towards everyone 
who must spend time on 
campus, including themselves. I 
am tired of it, and I am sure I'm 
not alone. Saturday was the last 
straw. There was a tampon on 
the sidewalk out side the 
cafeteria. I've also seen such 
disgusting things as apparently 
used condoms. There is no 
excuse for it. The beer bottles, 
cigarettes, candy wrappers, and 
food tossed carelessly all over 
campus is disgraceful. It is not 
just carelessness either. Last 
semester I watched with horror 
as a student threw an ice cream 
cone up on the street light to see 
if it would stick. I witnessed this 
more than once. I also saw 
students using apples as 
baseballs. This kind of waste is 
ridiculous. Can't we show a 
little respect for each other and 
for the rest of the world by 
cleaning up our act? It's time to 
start taking pride in our 
environment. 

-J ulianna Kenawell 



UJatch TU 5 for 

Clarion Hot Trax, 

Talk Around 

Town, 

Sports Center 5 

and City Beat 



Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



Hide park. . . 



(cont. from pg. 2) 



word has been traced to 
missionaries who were not 
above practicing population- 
control among Native women 
through sterilization performed 
during childbirth, particularly 
non-converted Native females. 

These examples have served 
as reinforcements, albeit dated 
sterotypes, to the acceptance of 
false portrayals of those 
Aboriginals habituating North 
and South America. 

These practices continue even 
today. 

The use of the "Crazy Horse" 
name and depiction to promote 
a high alcohol malt liquor 
beverage is a very recent 
addition to this historical Hall of 
Shame. 



The real man named Crazy 
Horse was a proud warrior, and 
spiritual leader of the Oglala 
Sioux Nation in the 1870s. He 
would literally shake in his 
resting place to realize the 
reprehensible concept of his 
character being used to adorn the 
whisky-bottle shape of this 
upscale brewing product. (G. 
Heileman Brewing, maker of the 
"Crazy Horse" brand has the 
monopoly of racially slurred malt 
liquor name-brands. "Mickies" 
malt features the shamrock and 
drinking stereotype of Irish 
immigrants.) 

It was the widespread 
introduction of low grade, cheap 
whiskey (often called Fire Water 
due to the propensity of added 



tobacco juice which induced 
vomiting) that helped 
unscrupulous European traders 
gain the trust of Native 
American populations. This 
generated huge profits for these 
"businessmen" through precious 
metals exchange for trinkets, as 
well as small-pox laced blankets. 
Tactics such as these weakened 
the resolve of Crazy Horse's 
people. 

When we as human beings do 
not think that we harm society 
by accepting false images, we, in 
essence, downplay our own 
existence. The monikers of 
several unnamed professional 
sports franchises bear witness to 
the reluctance of society to 
admit! past mistakes. Through 



insensitivity to other cultures 
that exist in concurrence to our 
own, we, as society, impede the 
progress of peaceful cohabitation 
of this planet. And by failing to 
correct blatant disrespect, we, as 
a society, allow injustice to 
continue unhindered in its own 
progress. 

Within 100 years of the 
Columbus encounter, over 92% 
of the Native populations living 
within 100 miles of the Atlantic 
coast were annihilated by 
encounter-related disease, 
famine and catastrophe. 92% of 
25 million. 

I am in favor of celebrating, 
this quincentennial year, for 
survival of multi-culturalism in 
spite of the events which 



followed the 1492 encounter. 
My own existence is testament to 
the durability of the Iroquois 
Confederacy, as well as all 
Aboriginal culture. 

Only through perseverance 
alone will an interglobal, multi- 
National 1992 society existing 
today survive the next 500 years. 
We must learn to live together, 
before it is too late. Change 
must come now . 



Charles J. Kader is a senior at 

Clarion University with a 

Communication major 



The post- Andrew landscape: devastation everywhere 



by Amy Marchese 
Miami, FU.(CPS) 



Try to envision a guard rail 
rolled and twisted up like a ball 
of yam, a piece of metal lodged 
permanently into an aim tree or 
one half of a Little Caesar 
restaurant. 

Try to envision entire 
condominium developments with 
roofs completely gone or caved 
in, storage facilities with walls 
tom enough to see four levels of 
goods or hollowed-out strip 
malls. 

Try to envision scrap piles of 
trees, couches, roof shingles and 
cars, power lines snaked along 
streets or windows blown out of 
skyscrapers. 

Try to envision every house in 
sight with the name of its 
insurance company and policy 
number spray-painted on it, 
helicopters constantly flying 
overhead or the smell of propane 



gas, rotten garbage and dead 
animals. 

Welcome to Dade County, Fla. 
home to Hurricane Andrew, land 
of American an disaster. 

Think back for a minute to a 
time in your life when you 
experienced something you just 
couldn't explain. That's what 



of my experience. 

Seeing for the first time 
disaster at 360 degrees and not 
through the confinements of my 
television set. That, too, was part 
of my experience. 

And people. Real people. 
Americans, homeless and 
poverty-stricken literally 



'7 tried to imagine what it would be 

like if a natural disaster as horrible 

as Hurricane Andrew had torn 

throu gh my town. " 

overnight. That also was part of 




Florida was like for me. 

When I returned to campus, my experience, 
several people asked me if I had Anyone who thought that we 

"fun" in Florida. I wouldn't went down for a relaxing 

exactly call it "fun" I would just getaway in Florida is terribly 

call it an "experience." mistaken. The students who were 

Students, Greek or not, man or willing to travel 941 miles to an 

woman, everyone bonding- unknown area, a disaster-stricken 

something that is rarely seen at area, an unsafe area, traveled to 

Marietta College. That was part actually do something. To do 



The Way ... 

(Cont. from pg. 2) 



people, have no idea what deals 
are being made. The Clinton 
delegation, led by campaign 
manager Mickey Kantor, claims 
to be in 90% agreement with H. 
Ross's economic proposals, 
while the Bush delegation, led 
by God knows who, claims 75% 
agreement. All we know for 



sure is that H. Ross seems to be 
having a lot of fun. 

Be wary, America. Many an 
oppressive government has been 
forged behind the closed doors 
of the*ich and powerful. Watch 
out, or you may wake up in a 
Perocracy. . . 



whatever was in our power to 
make any kind of a difference 
to the less fortunate. And we 
did. 

Our duties at the Miami 
Dade Community College 
North Campus were to clean 
the grounds of fallen trees, 
branches and brush and sweep 
the streets. Intense yard work. 

Our duties at Cutler Ridge 
were to unload semis, 
distribute goods under a tent, 
transfer the seperated goods 
into the strip mall that we were 
operating from and pass out 
goods to the victims that kept a 
continuous line along the 
building. 

Often, I found it difficult to 
reach some of the victims. I 
felt badly for them and wanted 
them to know that I wanted to 
help, which is a difficult 
message to convey when your 
better off than they are. I 
nearly felt guilty for taking hot 
showers every night we stayed 
in Dade and having the luxury 
to wear clean clothes each day. 
But the victims that we 
encountered seemed to be very 
receptive to our efforts and it 
became easier to interact with 
them. 

If, for just a moment, a 



Marietta student wasn't in view, 
it felt like being in another 
country. The kind of country 
where devastation and poverty 
run rampant, and the military is 
always present. The kind of 
country that I have only seen on 
CNN. The kind of country that I 
never thought America would 
look like. 

I tried to imagine what it 
would be like if a natural 
disaster as horrible as Hurricane 
Andrew had torn through my 
town. I tried to imagine my 
family and friends without a 
home, without a job, and without 
hope. I couldn't. 

Now, try to imagine being with 
all types of personalities for an 
entire weekend and all being 
able to work together to 
accomplish a similar goal. 
Working so hard that your body 
odor would normally be 
offensive but everyone smells as 
bad as you do, so you don't even 
care. And the feeling of giving 
so much to someone who has so 
little that you actually feel warm 
inside. 

Students from a number of 
colleges throughout the country 
have contributed their time and 
efforts to help hurricane 
victims. 




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The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 -Page 5 



i 







Annual Giving Campaign kicks off 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 



A campaign goal of $565,000 
was announced at this year's 
Clarion University Annual 
Giving Campaign, which was 
launched at a reception last 
Wednesday at the Holiday Inn in 
Clarion. The purpose of this 
annual drive is to raise funds in 
support of Clarion University's 
student scholarships and special 
projects. 

"In the past, Clarion University 
has always had a kickoff for its 
community campaign to solicit 
gifts for scholarship programs," 
said Bill Speidel, director of 
development at Clarion. 

The reception brought together 
all the 1991-92 campaign 
volunteers who generated over 
$525,000 last year. This is a 15 
percent increase over the 
previous year in alumni annual 
gifts. The special gifts program 
witnessed financial support last 
year with major gifts accounting 
for $235,203, planned giving 
bringing in $396,254 and the 
campaign for the student center 
raising $293,500. 

Annual giving, special gifts 
and other project income brought 
the private gifts total to 
$1,812,500. 

Clarion University President 
Diane Reinhard noted, however, 
that all public institutions are 
feeling the effects of 
Commonwealth budget 

reductions and that contributions 
are vital to the welfare of the 
university. "In this time of 
reduced finances and budgets, 



the support of private gifts 
becomes critical to our 
university. Budget constraints 
continue to plague us and 
underscore our need for 
becoming more purposeful, more 
focused and more efficient in 
everything we do." 

Goals for the year include: 
greater involvement of 
volunteers; the creation of a 
prospect research program; 
increased donor cultivation 
activities; and an active special 
gifts program matching campus 
needs with donor interests. 

Several of the speakers at the 
reception included President 
Diane Reinhard, Dr. Kathleen 
Smith, chair of the education 
department and Hal Wassinck, 
coordinator of student activities. 

Contributions over the years 
have played an important role in 
Clarion University's well being. 
The first classroom building, 
Seminary Hall, was made 
possible through a donation. 

In recognition of the 125th 
Anniversary of Clarion 
University this yeai, a special 
gift club level, the Anniversary 
Club, was added to recognize 
donors that increase their annual 
gift by $125. The Annual 
Giving club levels are: 
University Club, $1,000 or more; 
President's Club, $500-$999; 
Clarion Investors, $250-$499; 
Century Club, $100-$249; and 
Foundation Associates, $50-$99. 
Those who donate into one of 
these clubs will gain recognition 
in the annual report for their 
generosity. 



Contributions to Clarion 
University can be made through 
annual gifts and through planned 
gifts of will, bequests, trusts, 
gifts made in memory or honor 
of a special individual, endowed 
scholarships, and gifts of 
property, securities or gifts in 
kind. 

The annual campaigns include 
alumni, community, university, 
Venango and parents. It covers a 
wide area extending from 
Jefferson and Clarion counties, 
Oil City and Franklin in Venango 
County and to DuBois in 
Clearfield County. 

Fundraisers and smaller 
campaigns will be held 
throughout the year as part of the 
giving effort. The Phone-A- 
Thon which solicits 15,000- 
16,000 alumni begins this 
month. 

Approximately 15,000 alumni 
were solicited last year and about 
$170,000 was raised through this 
avenue. 

"A campaign will be launched 
within the next two weeks to 
solicit employees of the 
university," said Speidel. 

The community campaign will 
be held in January and February 
and will petition donations from 
local merchants and friends of 
the university. 

A fundraiser was previously 
held as part of the giving 
campaign in September and 
generated thousands of dollars. 
The Fifth Annual Integra Bank/ 
Pepsi Golf Classic raised 
$26,000 for Clarion's athletic 
scholarship fund. 



CLARION UNIVERSITY 1992-93 PROJECTED 
USE OF ANNUAL GIFTS 



University Major Grants 

Departmental Support 

Project Grants 
Program Support 




Student Scholarships 




Ray Henderson/clarion Call 
Dr. Reinhard speaks to help launch the annual fund drive. 



Call to D.C. 



by Ray Henderson 
Photo Editor 



Four Call staff members 
attended a media law 
conference in Washington, 
D.C. on Friday September 18. 
The conference, sponsored by 
the Student Press Law Center, 
dealt with various aspects of 
the law as they pertain to 
media and journalists. 

Student journalists from all 
over the northeast United 
States attended the conference. 
Representing Clarion were 
Editor-in-chief Michelle 
Sporer, Managing Editor 
Debbie Huffman, Photography 
Editor Ray Henderson, and 
Assistant Photography Editor 
Scott Dillon. 

Among the featured speakers 
was Lee Levine, a nationally 
known press law attorney. 
Levine's presentation covered 
libel and how collegiate 
journalists can avoid 
potentially libelous statements. 
During the lecture, Levine 
cited several lawsuits against 
news organizations, some of 



which yielded settlements in 
excess of $28 million. 

Other speakers included Paul 
Rodriguez, a reporter for The 
Washington Times. Rodriguez 
spoke on the topic of reporter's 
privilege. Reporter's privilege 
is the right of a reporter to 
withhold sources' names. 
Rodriguez had previously been 
subpoenaed in a lawsuit and 
been told to reveal the identity 
of a source he used in 
controversial story. 

Rodriquez defied the judge's 
order and refused to reveal his 
source, thereby risking the 
possibility of jailing on 
contempt charges. 

"Never, ever bum a source," 
said Rodriguez, "as soon as 
you do, your career in 
journalism is over, because 
you'll never get another source 
to trust you." 

Mark Goodman, director of 
the Student Press Law Center, 
was also on hand to answer any 
question posed by the students. 
Goodman gave information 
about the cento- and ways that 
it can serve the student press. 



L 



J 



Page 6 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



OM-0I ■ HfiD RoHaO mIT - b wnH 
The Clarion Call - 10-1-92- Page 7 



g^{ O * 1 f» f» I The clarion Cal1 " I " 1 " 92 - pa 8 e 

Career Services plans for futures Textbook prices on steady rise 



by Kelley Mahoney 
News Writer 

Planning for tomorrow is a 
lifelong process that doesn't just 
take care of itself. 

"Students need to be well 
prepared and start planning early 
for their job search," said Connie 
Laughlin, director of Career 
Services. 

"No one gives a graduate a job 
or even guarantees them one," 
she says. "Seniors need to take 
advantage of the opportunities 
that are available to them here at 
career services." 



These opportunities consist of 
various workshops, interns and 
assistants who provide practice 
interviews and critique rough 
drafted resumes. 

There are resume writing 
workshops, various job fairs and 
decisions on graduate school 
options. 
Workshops are also provided by 
career services for the benefits of 
those seniors seeking job 
placement. 

"So far we've had good 
workshop turnouts," said 
Laughlin. "I think that through 
talking to those who have 



already graduated, seniors are 
realizing that it is difficult to find 
jobs." 

The next scheduled workshop 
for this fall on resume writing is 
already full, and one scheduled 
for Novemeber 10 is filling up 
rapidly. 

Workshops such as this one are 
offered again in the spring for 
concerned seniors. 

"It's important to take 
advantage of your senior year," 
advises Laughlin. "Take 
advantage now of career 
services. We are here to help." 

Laughlin also offers advice to 



graduating seniors preparing for 
the job search. Aside from being 
active on campus, in the 
community, and having 
leadership positions, she feels 
that seniors should talk to career 
services prior to just a few weeks 
from the graduation date. 

"By setting short term mini- 
goals throughout the year, 
graduation can become less of a 
frustration," said Laughlin, "the 
problem is that students put off 
the job search and miss the 
opportunities." 

Career services is sponsoring 
a program on graduate school 



decisions on October 6. On 
October 8, at Penn State, another 
program entitiled "Grad Fair 
'92" deals with seniors and their 
future plans. 

"Students need to be aware of 
where to look for career services 
information," Laughlin said. "It 
is important to make individual 
appointments with our staff to 
talk about these tentative 
graduation plans." 

"Students of all ages who are 
concerned with their futures may 
set up appointments with 
available staff members of career 
services," said Laughlin. 



Senate sponsors letter drive 




by Mike Buser 
News Writer 



Terri Steigelman/Clarion Call 
A student displays voter registration material. 



Addresses of Legislators 

The Honorable Robert P. Casey 

Governor, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Room 225, Main Capitol 

Harrisburg, PA 17120 

The Honorable David R. Wright 

Member, House of Representatives 

21 North Sixth Avenue 

Clarion, PA 16214 

The Honorable Patrick J. Stapleton 

Member, Senate of Pennsylvania 

9E, East Wing, Box 8 

Main Capitol 
Harrisbug, PA 17120 



"Only through a joint effort of 
students, faculty, administration, 
and community will the pleas for 
supplemental funding and 
restoration of all line items be 
heard," said Gara L. Smith, 
chairperson of the Legislative 
Affairs Committee of Student 
Senate. 

Smith is referring to certain 
funding cuts that affect the 
general student population of 
Clarion University, and the State 
System of Higher Education as a 
whole. 

The State System's educational 
and general appropriation has 
been reduced by 3.5%. Also, 
Governor Casey continued his 
educational cuts by blue-lining 
other SSHE line items such as 
deferred maintenance, 

Pennsylvania Academy for the 
profession of Teaching, post- 
secondary learning, and 
operating funds for the 
McKeever Environmental 
Learning Center. 

Among projects eliminated 
under the veto of deferred 
maintanence is the renovation of 
Founders Hall. 

A $3.7 million budget 



scheduled for deffered 
maintenance in the state system 
universities was eliminated from 
the Pennsylvania budget. Of that 
amount, $394,440 would have 
been sent to Clarion, including 
$263,960 in appropriations from 



University and the need of the 
SSHE to continue to provide the 
best resources possible for 
higher education. 

The letter writing campaign 
proposed by Student Senate is 
part of a joint effort of all 14 



"Only through a 
joint effort., will the 
pleas... be heard" 



the state and $131,480 from the 
university match. 

As a direct result of the cuts, 
operating and personnel costs 
have been cut dramatically from 
Clarion's $45.2 million budget. 

The state legislature may opt 
this fall to restore some of the 
items cut under the line-item 
veto. 

However, this does not have to 
be final. Student Senate asks 
that students make contact with 
Governor Casey and the State 
Budget Secretary to express 
sutdents' needs at Clarion 



state universities. 

Names and addresses of our 
local legislators can be found in 
the local phone book. Letters 
can be returned to the Student 
Senate office in Gemmell Center 
by Wednesday, October 7, 1992 
at 3 p.m. 

Sample letters are available 
from Student Senate. 



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CPS-It's not your imagination- 
the price of college textbooks is 
rising. 

A study by the National 
Association of College Stores 
backs up statistically what 
bookstore managers and students 
at the checkout line already 
know: Book prices keep edging 
up. 

Increases in publishers' 
production costs, shipping and 
freight and other costly elements 
in the industry all add up, and 
students and campus bookstores 
are feeling the pinch as costs are 
passed along. 

"A university bookstore is a 
place where the faculty orders 
books and publishers send the 
books to us," said Ron Hatley, 
director of the University of 
Houston-Clear Lake Bookstore. 
"We're happy warehouses that 
people are unhappy with." 

One study published by the 
association found that of 100 
widely used freshmen and 
sophomore textbooks, the 
average percentage increase 
from 1991 to 1992 was 4.3 
percent; from 1987 to 1992, 37.6 
percent; and from 1982 to 1992, 
104 percent. 

Another study the association 
cited was a survey that studied 
the price increases of 85,000 
textbooks. Nearly 22,000 had a 
price increase from publishers 
from February through July 1992 
of an average $1.75. Other price 
increases from the study (the 
yearly figures are based on a 
February to February time 
period) include: 1991 to 1992, 
$2.65 or 9.1 percent; 1990 to 
1991, $2.70 or 10 percent; and 
1989 to 1990, $2.54 or 9.5 
percent. 

While the yearly figures may 
not induce sticker shock, the 
cumulative effect can be 
disheartening, bookstore 



managers said. 

"It is starting to be a hardship. 
Our bookstore is expected to 
make money, so it could impact 
profits," said Susan Moore, who 
is manager of the Mesa State 
College Bookstore in Grand 
Junction, CO. 

School officials are seeing 
more students who buy a book, 
copy the needed pages, and 
return the book for a refund. In 
other cases, several students may 
buy one copy of the book and 
share it among themselves. 

"I know there are students who 
go to dad's copy machine and 
copy the book," Moore said. 
"Whether it's legal or not, it's 
happening." 

Charles Moss, who is the 
course book buyer at Missouri 
Southern State College in Joplin, 
said the school's campus 
bookstore has a textbook rental 
system. Students generally pay 
$5 per credit hour to rent up to 
three books, and receive $2 back 
when they return the books in 
good condition. 

"Students aren't aware of the 
price of a book unless they lose 
\U " he said. Most students rent 
books, although some purchase 
the texts, he said. „. ». 

Moss, who has been employed 
at the bookstore for 15 years, 
said book prices have risen 8 to 
10 percent annually. "I see no 
solution. It seems like the trend 
is increasing prices for 
everything, " he said. 

Textbook prices are generally 
adjusted twice a year, once in the 
winter and once in the summer. 
And this adjustment, made by 
publishing companies, is usually 
higher. Moore said she ordered a 
book for a summer semester 
class in May that was priced at 
$43, and six weeks later the price 
went over $50. 

Moore said that since Mesa 



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State is a growing school, book 
sales are constantly going up. 
"It's too new in this semester, 
but we have a lot of books sitting 
on the shelves, " she said. 

Books can be ordered two 
ways. A department can adopt 
standard books that the 
bookstore orders for each 
semester, or professors can order 
books for their classes as needed. 

And for some bookstore 
managers and students, the rub 
enters when professors order 
books without taking students' 
budgets into mind. "Professors 
don't know the costs. The ones 



will check with the bookstore," 
said Moore said. 

Gisela Keller, who is a book 
buyer for Varsity Mart at North 
Dakota State University, told the 
National Association of College 
Stores about a professor who 
ordered a book for a pharmacy 
class that cost $110. The 
instructor wanted to order 50 
books, and Keller said despite 
the bookstore's hesitancy, "he 
was insistent. Sometimes, the 
instructors seem not to have the 
welfare of the students in mind," 
she told the Campus 
Marketplace, a trade journal. 



anthologies for their classes, and 
getting publishers' permission to 
copy sections of books and 
compile them into one "course 
pack," an increasingly popular 
alternative to buying a number of 
textbooks. 

Students also can buy used 
textbooks, but books are now 
updated every three to four 
years, so the lower price doesn't 
last long. 

"Students are sharing, copying 
and doing without," said Hartley, 
at the University of Houston. 
"There's a lot of price resistance 
out there." 



who are concerned about price Some instructors are creating 

Music education workshop 



by Jodi Seely 
News Writer 



Music was the main attraction 
at the Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium on Friday, Sept. 25. 
The third annual workshop of the 
Pennsylvania Music Education 
Association of District Three 
(PMEA) was planned by the 
Curriculum/Instruction 
Committee of PMEA, and Susan 
Daniels who is coordinator of 
Rockey Grove Schools. The 
host was Grace E. Urrico of 
Clarion. 

The Conference covered a wide 
range of topics between the 
hours of 9:00 A.M. and 1:00 
P.M. Just a few items on the 
agenda were lecture discussions, 
actual participation, the playing 
of Orff instruments, movement 
activities, and songs and chants. 

A turnout of 83 eager people 
participated in this event, 
including public school 
personnel and college students. 
Grace E. Urrico, Faculty Advisor 
for Music Educators National 
Conference, was pleased with 
the number of students who 
attended. Music Majors, as well 
as other interested students 
participated. "It was very 
successful and lots of people 
were in attendance. Everyone 
seemed happy with the 
presentations and had lots of 
ideas to take home to try," said 
Urrico. 

The National Conference is 
held annually between Clarion 
University and Indiana Univ. of 
PA. Next year, the Student 
Chapter will be held at IUP. 

The workshops consisted of 
three sessions. 

The first session was conducted 
by Bill Pearce, music teacher in 



Purchase Line. It was designed 
to help teachers 'adapt to the 
various students ranging from 
the gifted to the impaired. 

Natalie Ozeas, President of 
PMEA, was the spokesperson of 
the second session. The focus 
was on developing music for 
schools based on new objectives 
and outcome goals. 

In the last session, the 
individual could choose between 
two activities to attend. 



elementary music specialist in 
the Oil City School District, 
represented "Cats and Kids." 
Cats were used as the alternative 
for controversial Halloween 
topics for October lessons. 

The other third session option 
featured McKean Music and 
Keyboard Center Inc. of 
Bradford, PA. 

They demonstrated the 
instrumental materials for the 
elementary band and orchestra 



Beth Orris, who is an program. 



Speech ban lifted 



CPS-The University of 
Wisconsin Board of regents 
established a committee to study 
discriminatory harrassment after 
it voted to repeal a rule against 
hate speech directed at 
individuals. The regents, which 
oversee the 26-campus 
University of Wisconsin system, 
voted 10-6, September 11, to 
repeal the ban because of recent 
court decisions that raised the 
question that such bans may 
violate students' rights to 
freedom of speech, which is 
protected under the First 
Amendment. 

"The issue was divided 
between freedom of speech vs. 
the right to harrassment-free 
education," said Maureen Quinn, 
a spokeswoman for the Board of 
Regents. "It was a cogent debate 
since they were dealing with 
such emotional issues." 

The roots of both the rule and 
the recent repeal go back to 
1988, when the regents wrote a 
discriminatory harrassment 
policy that was installed in the 
student code of conduct. This 
action was taken after a 



fraternity on the Madison 
campus held a "slave auction." 

"There were also verbal 
harrassments throughout the 
university system, so the regents 
felt there had to be a stronger 
student code of conduct," Quinn 
said. About 40 students were 
cited under the rule. 

A student newspaper at the 
Milwaukee campus challenged 
the rule under First Amendment 
violations, and in 1991 a U.S. 
district judge said the rule was 
constitutionally vague. 

The rule was redrafted with 
narrower parameters, and was 
approved in May of this year. 
The rule, as amended, was 
limited to direct confrontations 
between students. However, 
some of the regents began to 
doubt the constitutionality of the 
rule, Quinn said, so it went to a 
legislative hearing, which ended 
up in a deadlock, and then went 
back to the regents for review. 

After voting to repeal the rule 
in early September, the regents 
voted to form a committee to 
come up with ideas. 



Page 8 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



Program helps prevent crime 



by Jenny EbenoU 
News Writer 



In an attempt to combat the 
rising number of incidents of 
crime and assault on college 
campuses, the Department of 
Public Safety, Students Together 
Against Rape (S.T.A.R.), and the 
Clarion University Bookstore 
have joined forces with colleges 
and universities across the nation 
in a safety awareness campaign. 

The "For Safety's Sake..." 
program attempts to protect 
potential crime victims by 
deterring crime and accidents 

Outside Clarion 



wherever possible. 

"We prefer sponsoring 
programs to prevent crimes 
rather than having to investigate 
crimes after they have 
happened," commented Dr. 
Ronald Martinazzi, director of 
public safety. 

The program involves the sale 
of safety whistles and an 
educational brochure containing 
personal safety information. 

This information pamphlet 
contains basic safety tips 
compiled from the American 
Red Cross, International 
Association of Campus Law 



Enforcement Administrators, 
U.S. Coast Guard, Royal Life 
Saving Society Canada, The 
Sexual Assault Care Centre at 
Women's College in Toronto, 
Personal Safety Awareness 
Officer at the University of 
Toronto and the Saanich Police 
Department. 

The safety whistle, the Fox 40, 
is specially designed to attract 
attention in an emergency 
situation or can function simply 
as a reminder of the importance 
of personal safety strategies. 
The whistle emits a shrill tone of 
approximately 150 decibels. 



"The whistle won't prevent a 
rape, but it will serve as a 
deterrent," added Dr. Martinazzi. 

Use of a personal safety whistle 
as a crime prevention and 
awareness tool was tested at 
Camosun College in Victoria, 
British Columbia. 

The concept of a safety whistle 
was brought to Camosun College 
by Constable Barry McLachlan 
while he was serving as a 
community liaison officer to the 
college. 

"The loudness of the whistle 
can startle, frighten away or even 
stop an attacker or alert a 



passerby," McLachlan said. 
"More importantly, people who 
carry the whistle are much more 
aware. Their awareness level is 
at a peak. They are aware of 
their surroundings [and] they're 
taking that extra precaution. 
We've found that people who 
carry the whistle are less apt to 
be bothered." 

Although the initial focus at 
Clarion University is campus 
safety, public safety hopes 
others in the surrounding 
communities will soon become 
involved with the "For Safety's 
Sake..." initiative. 



Victims say "stalking 1 ? laws not enough 



compiled by Dorilee Ray buck 
from the AP service 



State 

Prisons Implement 
TB policy 

A federal judge ordered the 
state prison system on Tuesday 
to implement its new policy 
against tuberculosis, examining 
inmates and guards on a regular 
basis for the disease. 

The State Department of 
Corrections instituted the new 
policy earlier this month, but an 
attorney for the American Civil 
Liberties Union said the 
injunction offers an added 
guarantee that the state will 
follow through on the policy. 

U.S. District Judge Jan Dubois 
directed, on Tuesday, that the TB 
policy to be put in effect at all 15 
state prisons. 

A spokesman for the State 
Department of Corrections, Ben 
Livingood, said the department 
was already putting the new 
policy into effect, but the 
executive director of the ACLU 
said he believed the injunction 
was necessary because the old 
policy wasn't being followed. 

Key points of the new TB 
policy are that everyone who 
enters the department will be 
tested for the disease, including 
new employees. 

The test results will be read 
within 48 hours, with annual 
tests to follow. 

If the tests show signs of 
infection, treatment and possibly 
quarantine will follow. 



Yeakel in tough race 

Democrat Lynn Yeakel 
captured a wave of voter anger 
in the April primary for U.S. 
Senate, but she finds herself 
awash in tough fall currents. She 
facetwo term republican 
incumbent Aden Specter in the 
fall general election. 

Specter started television and 
radio advertising in July, telling 
voters how he has fought for 
senior citizens, farmers, coal 
miners and steelworkers. 

Yeakel, making her first run 
for elective office, started her ads 
only last week. 

A political analyst at Penn 
State-Harrisburg, Michael 
Young, said it's a traditional race 
right now with the challenger 
trailing the incumbent 

But Yeakel's campaign 
spokesman, Bob McCarson, said 
talk of her stumbling in the race 
doesn't square with reality. 
McCarson also said she will start 
to catch up to Specter now that 
her television advertising 
campaign has started. 

Specter has attacked Yeakel on 
television for being late with tax 
payments owed to the city of 
Philadelphia. 

Yeakel has said she made the 
payments when she became 
aware she owed the city money, 
just before she declared her 
candidacy in February. 

Yeakel's campaign said Specter 
is using the attacks to dodge the 
issue of the economy. 

Specter's campaign said the 
information is important for 
voters. 



House gives TV access 

House leaders have given the 
local public television station 
unlimited access to film floor 
sessions beginning this week, but 
so far Senators don't appear 
ready to offer the same 
privilege. 

House Speaker Robert 
O'Donnell, a Philadelphia 
democrat, said Tuesday that 
allowing WITF-TV of 
Harrisburg to film house 
proceedings would help increase 
awareness of state government. 

Under an agreement between 
the House and the station, 
commercial television stations 
will be able to ask WITF for 
footage. 

Previously, cameras were only 
allowed on the House floor with 
the House speaker's permission. 

Nancy Nowicki, O'Donnell's 
spokeswoman, said it was still 
unclear whether the WITF 
cameras would be able to film 
the House Vote Board, which has 
long been off limits to 
photographers. 

Nowicki said that in most 
cases, the television station 
would have the freedom to film 
what it wanted. 



National 

Dems attempt to override 
Bush's veto 

Representative Bill Goodling 
of York County led the 
opposition forces yesterday in 
the democrats attempt to 
override President Bush's veto of 
a bill which would guarantee 
workers time off to deal with 
newborns or sick family 
members. 

The task of marshalling the 
opposition fell to Goodling 
because of his position as the 
Ranking Minority member of the 
House Education and Labor 
Committee, where the bill was 
reviewed. 

For Goodling, the legislation 
holds out false hope for workers 
while intruding into 
management-employee 
relationships. Moreover, 
Goodling sees the vote as a 
political maneuver. 



"Stalking" victims say laws 
not adequate 

"Stalking" victims are telling a 
senate committee that current 
laws may not be adequate to 
protect them. 

One woman said a man who 
had been harrassing her told her 
he would buy the house next 
door to hers and that there was 
nothing she could do about it. A 
mother tells of a man stalking 
her daughter for eight years. 

The committee is looking at 
what would direct the 
government to come up with 
model legislation for states to 
implement. Many law 

enforcement agencies cannot 
take action against stalkers 
because they haven't committed 
any crime. 

In the last few years, 28 states 
have implemented an ti- stalking 
laws. 

Attention has focused on the 
phenomenon since the death of 
actress Rebecca Shaeffer. 



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The Clarion Call - 10-1-92- Page 9 



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* * 



4 




Campus 



compiled by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



IUP prof, testifies 
The Penn 

Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania professor 

Benjamin Chan supported the 
use of the book "Dragonwings" 
in an Apollo Ridge School 
District book-banning case 
because he said it promotes 
culture, not religion. 

Pentecostal minister Sylvia 
Hall first sought the book's 
removal last spring when it was 
assigned in her son's eighth- 
grade reading class, according to 
district superintendent David 
Leckvarcik. Hall claimed the 
school district was promoting a 
religion by including it in the 
curriculum. 

"Dragonwings," by Laurence 
Yep, is a historical fiction about 
a Chinese family that 
immigrated to San Francisco to 
work on the intercontinental 
railroad in 1903. 

It is a children's story dealing 
with the cultural problems facing 
a young Chinese boy. 



Security tightens at Univ. of 
Scranton. 

The Aquinas 

In an attempt to solve security 
problems, the University of 
Scranton will enforce policies 
pertaining to residence halls and 
houses this year, said Ted 
Nichols, director of residence 

life. 

Visitation rules in campus 
residences state that students 
may have no visitors of the 
opposite sex in their rooms after 
midnight on weeknights and 2 
a.m. on weekends. 

In addition, resident students 
may not provide combinations to 
outside doors or to their rooms to 
friends, fellow students, pizza 
deliverers or other unauthorized 
persons. 

Those who violate visitation 
rules and those who provide 
others with combinations will 
now be reffered to Student 
Affairs. 

If a pizza deliverer is seen on 
the floor of a university 
residence, the person who 
ordered the pizza could be fined 
$100, Nichols said. 



rr 



Habitat for Humanity is a 

grass-roots organization 
with the goal of eliminating 
poverty housing. Consider 
becoming a member! 
Dues are $2 for students, 
$4 for non-students. You can do as little or 
as much as you choose to as a member. You 
might want to be a part of the board of direct- 
ors, or maybe you want to help renovate 
homes in the Clarion area. Our first fund- 
raiser will be held on Sunday, October 4 as 
we "Take A Hike for Habitat." Registration will 
be at 1 :30 at the Gemmell Student Complex. 
We will walk approximately 4 miles around 
Clarion. 

For walk info, membership and T-shirt forms, 
and pledge sheets call the United Campus 
Ministry office at 226-271 1 or stop by the 
UCM office in room 266 in Gemmell. 

IT S A MATTER OF CONSCIENCE. 



News 



Shippensburg prof, writes 
book 

The Slate 

Dr. John Offner views 
international relations from his 
perspective as an historian with 
expectation as foreign officer 
with the state department. 

Offner, a history professor, 
used this unique view to write 
"An Unwanted War: The 
Diplomacy of the United States 
and Spain over Cuba, 1895- 
1898. 

Offner's findings put into 
perspective the Spanish- 
American War and its place in 
history. Offner said that was 
inevitable. 

Cuban Nationalism and 
Spanish Colonialism were 
irreconcilable forces allowing for 
no compromise, Offner said. 

In the final analysis, he said, 
"Republicans made war on Spain 
in order to keep control of 
Washington in the 1898 
election." 

Bungee idea stretched at IUP 
The Penn 

The location of bungee 
jumping during Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania's 
Homecoming is still up in the 
air, despite discussion during a 
recent borough council meeting. 
At Tuesday night's Indiana 
Borough Council meeting, Frank 
Quarato and Patrick 
Kochanowski, owners of Aqua 
Bungee of Spring Church, 
proposed bringing their 
establishment to Indiana for 
added entertainment. 

Quarato suggested the team set 
up shop behind Kangaroo's 
Outback Cafe in downtown 
Indiana. Council had some 
concern over that initial location 
because of it being so close to 
several bars, the local noise 
ordinance and crown control, 
which could lead to blocking off 
several streets. 

Quarato then offered another 
location, in the parking area of a 
fraternity house. Again, council 
dissuaded the idea for the same 
reasons. 

After further discussion 
concernig location, council 
members suggested a parking 
lot on Eighth Street. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations conducted by 
Public Safety for the week of September 18 through September 27. 

On Sept. 18, at approximately 1:10 a.m., a non-student was cited for 
public drunkenness while in front of Nair Hall. The person registered .25 
on the BAC. 

At approximately 12:30 a.m on Sept. 19, a student was cited for public 
drunkenness in the lobby of Nair Hall. The person was released into the 
custody of a friend. 

On Sept. 19, a wallet was reported stolen from a locker at the stadium 
during the Clarion/New Haven football game. The case is under 
investigation. 

An order of chicken wings and wedges were stolen from a delivery 
truck parked on the service road near Wilkinson Hall at approximately 
12:20 a.m. on September 22. An investigation is pending. 

A clock was reported missing from the conference room in the basement 
of the Haskell house on September 23. Under investigation. 

At about 1:15 a.m., three unknown males entered a room of another 

male in Nair Hall and started to physically harass the person. An 

investigation is pending. 

I 

On Sept. 24, a student reported that a seat and seat bag were removed 
from his bicycle locked to a bike rack in Campbell Hall. The seat is black 
and the bag is black canvas trimmed with suede. The items are valued at 
approximately $60. The case is under investigation. 

A student from Wilkinson Hall reported items stolen from her room on 
Sept. 24. Several items, of clothing, with a total value of $50, were 
missing. An investigation is pending. 

On Sept. 24, officers received a report of an intoxicated female near 
Givan Hall. The female was found lying in the bushes outside Givan 
Hall, and registered . 17 on the BAC. She was cited for minors 
consumption. 

A fire alarm was pulled around 1:00 a.m. on the thrid floor of Campbell 
Hall on Sept. 25. The case is under investigation. 

Around 1:30 a.m on Sept. 25, a fire alarm was pulled near the stairwell 
on the third floor of Campbell Hall. Under investigation. 

On Sept. 25, at around 5:30 p.m., a non student, visiting a friend in 
Wilkinson Hall attempted to commit suicide by cutting his wrists and 
neck. Officers subdued the individual after a struggle and he was 
transported to COCH by ambulance. 

A fire alarm was pulled on the east side of the thrid floor of Campbell 
Hall. An investigation is pending. 

On Sept. 26, unknown actors caused damage to a public safety vehicle 
parked on Thorn Street. Actors attempted to remove the police radio after 
gaining entrance by smashing the side window. The case is under 
investigation. 

Unknown actors attempted to steal a state vehicle parked in the 
McEntire lot on Sept. 26. An attempt to hot wire the vehicle was 
unsuccessful. 

A fight was reported outside Gemmell Center on Sept. 27, after the 
CABS dance. Public Safety is investigating. 



Public Safety officers noticed restroom signs unlawfully removed from 
Gemmell Center on Sept. 27. The "Men's" and "Women's" signs are 
bluish green over white in color. Under investigation. 

If anyone has any information concerning these and other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 

Cable Channels 



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6:30 



Design. W. I Cheers q 



Movie: ***Vi Return of the Jedi" (1983) Mark Hamill. POq 



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Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



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Tom, Jerry 



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Tiny Toon | Batmen q 



Newtq 



Globe! Supercard Wrestling 



Movie: «»» "Don't Cry, It's Only Thunder' 



Newtq 



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News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newtq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



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NBC News 



Pyramid 



(2:30) Movie: 



Press Luck 



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Movie: ««'/; "The Magnificent Seven Ride 



(1982) Dennis Christopher. 



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7:00 



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Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS Newt 



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Jeopardy! q 



7:30 



8:00 



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Movie: *»'/2 "The Outsiders (1983) PG 



Ent. Tonight 



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Delta q 



Dif. World 



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Top Cops (in Stereo) q 



Simpsons q 



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Movie: *» "Mr Billion (1977) Terence Hill. PG 



9:00 



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Movie: "Interceptor (1992) Andrew Divofl 



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Middle Ages (In Stereo) q 



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Word From Our Sponsor q 



11:00 



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Newsq 



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12:00 



Double I. 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) 



Edition [ Stalking t 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



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Sportscenter [College Football: Florida at Mississippi State. From Starkville, Miss. (Live) 



Movie: +»+ "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad. Mad World" (1963, Comedy) Spencer Tracy. G | "Heartland 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



: ** x /i "The Ratings Game" (1984) Danny DeVito 



Underdog I Yogi Bear I Arcade 



Movie: *** 



Hey Dude (R) 



(1972) PG IMovie: *V2 Ski Patrol (1990) PG 



Movie: »+»'/? A World Apart' (1988) Barbara Hershey 



A Stoning in Fulham County" (1988) 



What You Do [Crazy Kids 



H'! -?-!m!1i!t|[l 



Shop-Drop 



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Murder, She Wrote q IMovie: »Va "Party Line" (1988) Richard Hatc h 



Movie: ** "Watchers //"(1990, Horror) Marc Singer. R' 



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M.T.Moore 



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Movie: »'/? "Dream Trap" (1990) NR' 



MacGyver "The Spoilers [Equaliier 



Movie: » » V* Eve of Destruction (1 990) 



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Movie: **Vi "Murder in Black and White (1990) 



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(1990) 
Show 



Movie: "Death Spa (1989) 



Movie: Smal l Kill 
Green Acres 



Thirtytomething Pilgrims 



(1992) 
Mister Ed 



Ullman 



FRIDAY EVENING 6ct6BER 2, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



4:00 



4:30 



(3:00) Movie: Only-Lonely" 



Design. W. I Cheers q 



Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



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Tom, Jerry 



People Ct. | Cur. Affair I News q 



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Movie: ** Regarding Henr 



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Winfrey q 



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Tiny Toon I Batman q 



(3:00) Movie: "Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963) 



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(3:30) Movie: 



6:00 



6:30 



' (1991) Harrison Ford, q 



News 



ABC News 



nov news 



CBS News 



FuH House q Wonder Yrs 



News q INBC News 



Movie: ***V? "The Group' 



Motowortd | Up dote 



MacGyver Nightmares" q 



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Dial M for Murder" (1954) [Movie: *** The Blue Max' (1966, Drama) George Peppard 



(230) Movie: Movie: Breslins Neighborhood ' (1979) "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum 



Yogi Bear I Arcade iHeTBude 



26 IMovie: »« Deadly Care (1987, Drama) Cheryl Ladd~ [Supermarket [Shop-Drop [China Beach 



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Inside the NFL (R) q 



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CBS Newt 



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Naked Gun 2 1/2: Fear' 



Family 



Final Appeal 



G. Palace 



Step by Step Dinosaurs q 



Happened 



Major Dad q | Design. W 



Round Table 



9:30 



10:00 10:30 



11:00 



Movie: *** "Hot Shots!' (1991) Charlie Sheen. PG-13 



Camp Wilder 20/20 q 



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Bobq 



I'H Fly Away (In Stereo) q 



Picket Fences (In Stereo) q 



Major League Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at New York Mets. From Shea Stadium. [Major Dad q 



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Jeopardy! q |Wh. Fortune [Final Appeal I Happened 



America's Most Wanted q I Sightings q [Suspects 



1966, Drama) Shirley Knight, Elizabeth Hartman. 



Round Table (In Stereo) q [I'H Fly Away (In Stereo) q 



Hunter (Part 2 of 2) 



Sportscenter |Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Movie: ** "Breakout" (1975) Charles Bronson. PG 



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Newsq 



Married.. 



11:30 



Crypt Tales 



Golden Girls 



12:00 



One Night 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Dark Justice (In Stereo) 



Edition 



Dark Justice 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



News q ITonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: »»* "Picnic (1956. Drama) 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



What You Do Crazy Kids 



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Movie: »'/? "Final Impact" (1991) R 



[Mc 
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Murder, She Wrote q [Movie: ** Knight Rider 2000" (1991) David Hassethoff. 

Movie: ** "Lower Level" (1991) W~ 



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Movie: »*'/? "Johnny Be Good" (1988) R 



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Movie: »'/; "Sftfcnes" (1985, Comedy) 
Movie: »»% "Hang Em H/g/T d966yM' 



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Dragnet 



A.Hitchcock 



Movie: ** Final Judgement" (1989) Michael Beck. 



Lucy Show [Green Acres 



Thirtytomething 



Mister Ed 



Ullman 



SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 3, 1992 



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TW 



Movie: **Vi Soapdish" (1991) Sally Field. PG-13' q 



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6:00 



6:30 



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7:30 



*** 



(3 .30) College Football: Southern California at Washington. (Live) 



Doc Hollywood" (1991) Michael J. Fox, q 



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[Boxing: Dorsey vs. Leija 



(3 00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. 



(3:00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. 



Movie: »«fr "Back to School "(1986, Comedy) 



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Boxing: Dorsey vs Leija 



Movie: **** "The Apartment "(1960, Comedy) Jack Lemroon 



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American Gladiators 



Horse Ra. 



Gossip! 



(2:30) 



(235) 



NCI Iwws 



Senior PGA Golf: Vantage Championship. (Live) 



Ten of Ut I Two Dads [B. Buddies 



"The Outside Chance of Maximilian GUck" 



Super Dave 



Get Picture 



China Beach "Souvenirs" 



** 



Sheena "(19841 



NBC News 



Political Debate 



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Star Search (In Stereo) 



Political Debate 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Jeopardy! q ]Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: +* 1 /; "Ofner Peoples Money" (1991, Drama) R 



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Here-Now 



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Copsq 



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Out All Night 



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Movie: *** "Birdman of Alcatraz" (1962, Biography) Burt Lancaster 



Sportscenter 



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Crossroads (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest [Nurses q 



Raven (In Stereo) q 



Raven (In Stereo) q 



Code 3 q 



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10:00 



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Dream On q [Larry Sanders (In Stereo) q 



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Angel Street (In Stereo) q 



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Movie: "Hangfire" (1991) 



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LA. Law 



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SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 4, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



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26 



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Lite Goes On (In Stereo) q 



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Movie: "Exclusive" (1992, Drama) Suzanne Somers. q 



Movie: *** "Dead Again" (1991) Kenneth Branagh. R 



Movie: **V; "My Blue Heaven" (1990) Steve Martin, q 
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Movie: +»*% "Prizzi's Honor" (1985, Comedy) Jack Nicholson. R 



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Movie: »»» "29th Sfreef (1991) Danny AieHo. R' q 



Movie: **Vi "Paradise" (1991) Melanie Griffith. PG-13' 



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Movie: "Mr. Billion (1977) 



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M.T. Moore 



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Dragnet 



Family 



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4:30 



(2:30) Movie: [ Movie: »»* "The Freshman 



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Golden Girls 
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Movie: *» Stepping Out" (1991) Liza MinnelH. 'PG' q 



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10:00 



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Movie: **'/; "UnfaJthhOy ttwrs"(1984) Dudtey Moore 



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TUESD AY EVEN ING 
4.-00 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



Game II 



OCTOBER 6, M2 
4:30 I 5:00~ 



Movie: »»'/? "A Case of Deadly Force" (1986, Drama) 



Lucy Show [Green Acres 



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Movie: *** "The Red Badge of Courage 



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Movie: *'-; Goodbye Charlie (1964) Tony Curtis 



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8:00 



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9:00 



9:30 



Movie: ** x h "Other People's Money "(1991, Drama) R' 



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Movie: **Vi "Stone Cold" (1991) R 



(In Stereo) q" 



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Movie: ** "Bachelor Party " (1984, Comedy) Tom Hanks 



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Movie: »*» "Heartland' (1981, Drama) Rip Torn PG 



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Sportscenter [NHL Hockey: Flyers at Penguins. Alternate 'game: Capitals at Maple Leats 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Incredible Ida Early (R) q 



Movie: *» "Funny About Love" (1990) Gene Wilder, q 



**V2 "Cherry 2000 (1988) Melanie Griffith. 



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Movie: *» "Fists of Fury "(1972, Drama) Bruce Lee. R' 



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M.T. Moore IVanDyke 



I MacGyver (In Stereo) q I Equalizer" 



Pram of the RoUerboys "(1991) Y'Postman Rings Twice" 



Movie: ** "Liebestraum' (1991) Kevin Anderson. R q 



Dragnet 



I A. Hitchcock 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 7, 1992 



Movie: »*» "Wildflower (1991. Drama) Beau Bridges. 



Lucy Show [Green Acres 



Thirtytom ething 



Child s-2 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



Movie: «»'/? The Poseidon Adventure " (1972) PG 



Design. W 



Cur. Affair 



Cheers q 



Edition 



Newsq 



Cheers q 



Newsq 



News 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Two 



Major League BasebaH Playoffs: NLCS Game Two 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



Tiny Toon [Batman q 



Newsq 



Movie: *«« Heartland (1981, Drama) Rip Torn PG 



(3 30j PGA Golf: Las Vegas Invitational First round 



Pyramid 



(300) Movie: 



(2:35) Movie: 



Underdog 



Press Luck [Cartoon Express 



Movie: ** Nothing but 7fODDfe"(1991)q 



6:00 



6:30 I 7T0Q~ 



Movie: »» "Honeymoon Academy" (1990) 



Newsq 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC 



Movie: »+»''; "7ne Group 



Inside PGA [Up Close 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girts 



CBS News 



Roseanneq 



Jeopardy! q 



7:30 



1st Lk.: River 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: »»* Die Hard 2 "(1990. Drama) Bruce Willis. R 



Wonder Y. iDoogie H. 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



Baseball '92 



BasebaH '92 



Home Imp 



Seinfeld q 



Laurie HHIq 



Mad-You 



10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



Dream On q 



Civil Wars "Oboe Phobia" 



Law 6 Order "Forgiveness" 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game One Teams TBA 



Beverly HiHs, 90210 q 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game One Teams- TBA 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



1966, Drama) Shirley Knight, Elizabeth Hartman. 



Sportscenter [BA Bowling: Naples Senior Open (Live) 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: *** 'to/rfa" (1962. Comedy) James Mason (In Stereo) 



Movie: »»V; The Buddy System (1984. Comedy) PG 



Yogi Bear | Arcade 



Hey Dude (R) 



Trouble in Paradise (1989) F quel Welch 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Murder, She Wrote q 



** 



Looney 



"Men at Work (1990) PG-13 



Movie: ** % /2 Dying Young 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) q 



Seinfeld q | Mad-You 



Catwalk No Returns" 



Law 6 Order "Forgiveness 



Movie: *** The French Connection II (1975) R' 



Boxing Ray Mercer vs. Mike Dixon. (Live) 



Movie: "Invasion of Privacy (1992) Robby Benson, q 



11:00 



One Night 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Married.. 



Newsq 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: "Running Mates q 
Golden Girls [Nightline q 



Tonight Show (in Stereo) q 



Dangerous Curves (R) 



Edition 



Curves 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: »»'/? 'Tfte Buddy System (1984) 



Speedweek [Sportscenter 



[BuHwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Get Smart 



Boxing 



L.A. Law 



Superman 



(1991) Julia Roberts. R' q |Movie: »» Dragonfight (1990) R 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Movie: »»»'/? Tne Fisher King (1991) Robin Williams. R' q 



M.T. Moore [Van Dyke | Dragnet [A. Hitchcock [ Lucy Show 



Movie: ««' ? Mary Jane Harper Cried Last Night (1977)[Thirtysomething 



Volleyball 



Equalizer 



Movie: »'? "Final Impact 



* "Affairs of the Heart R 



Green Acres 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



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The Clarion Call - 10-1-92- Page 11 




The U.S. Army Field Band marches into Tippin 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Writer 



""The internationally famous 
United States Army Field Band 
of Washington, D.C. will 
perform for a patriotic audience 
here at Clarion University, in 
Tippin Gymnasium, Wednesday, 
October 7. 

The band is under the 



The Field Band was organized 
on March 21, 1946 when 
General Jacob L. Devers issued 
an order to Chief Warrant 
Officer Chester E. Whiting, the 
commander of the Army's First 
Combat Infantry Band. General 
Devers wanted a band that would 
"carry into the grass roots of our 
country the story of our 
magnificent army, its glorious 



"It's a great instrument 

for stirring 

patriotic emotions. " 



operational control of the 
Army's chief of public affairs at 
the Pentagon. Known as the 
"musical ambassadors of the 
Army," the field band travels 
thousands of miles each year on 
at least two major concert tours 
and is considered by -music <j 
critics to be one of the most 
distinctive musical organizations 
now appearing before the public 
free of charge. 



traditions and achievements and 
that great symbol of American 
manhood — the ground soldier." 
In more than 45 years, the band 
has traveled over five million 
miles performing for millions of 
people. 

General Devers' creation of the 
Army Ground Forces Band 
ultimately led to the change in 
name of the Band when, in 1950, 
the band was renamed the United 



States Army Field Band and 
declared the official touring 
musical representative of the 
United States Army. A 
distinguished member of 
Congress aptly described the 
band, "It is a great instrument for 
stirring patriotic emotions." 

The band is composed of the 
Army's finest soldier-musicians. 
Many have studied at the 
country's leading conservatories 
and schools of music; many have 
performed with major 
symphonies and leading dance 
orchestras before entering the 
service. All of the musicians 
have been specially auditioned 
and selected for assignment to 
the field band. 

The soldiers' chorus is an 
intregal part of the band and is 
made up of 29 highly-trained and 
talented vocalists under the 
direction of Major Finley R. 
Hamilton. 

The Chorus presents its own 
arrangements of well-known 
compositions at each field band 
performance. 

The field band's early years 





Public affairs photo 



The United States Field Band, here In Its entirety, wil! perform in Tippin Gymnasium on 
Wednesday. 



Colonel Jack H. Grogan, Jr. is 
ductor of the field band. He's 
the band's history. 

included performances at the 
Royal Festival Hall in London, 
Luxembourg Gardens, Paris; the 
Olympic Stadium in Berlin; and 
in Austria, Belgium and France. 
By 1954, the Band had 
performed in all 48 states. 

Other special performances 
included the King and Queen of 
Greece, five Presidential 
inaugural parades and other 
appearances world-wide. 
The field band also produced an 
album entitled "We The People" 
with printed music arrangements 
that were distributed to every 
high school throughout the 
United States to assist them in 
commemorating the 

Constitution's Bicintennial. 

As the musical voice of the 
United States Army, the field 
band is authorized to carry and 
display the Army flag, which 
bears 168 streamers representing 
campaigns in which the Army 
has participated since its 



UAB Photo 
the commander and con- 
only the seventh director in 

incepton. 

As impressive as the 
performance of their music is, 
the outstanding appearances of 
the bandsmen attired in the 
distinctive Army dress blue 
uniform, which has a tradition 
dating back to the early 1800's 
when it was worn by the then 
young U.S. Army. 

The band's concert repertoire 
is designed to appeal to all 
audiences, offering classical, 
semi-classical and popular 
selections, choral arrangements, 
novelty numbers and military 
marches on each of its programs. 
On tours of other nations, the 
field band has performed the 
works of American composers as 
well as music indigenous to that 
country. 

Admission is free to the public, 
but you must pick up a ticket at 
the information desk at Gemmell 
in order to get in the door. The 
concert begins at 7:30 p.m. 



Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 

Recital scheduled 



by Monty Mudry 
Features Writer 



The Music Department of 
Clarion University will present a 
faculty recital featuring Dr. Lisa 
Johnson, clarinetist. The recital 
is scheduled for Sunday, October 
4, at 3:15 p.m. in the Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium of the CUP 
campus. Dr. Johnson is 
beginning her second year as a 
music professor at CUP. Her 



solo recital will consist of works 
such as Brahms' "Trio," 
Poulencs' "Sonata," 

Lutoslawskis' "Dance Preludes," 
as well as other works. Assisting 
artists include: CUP faculty 
members Grace E. Urrico on the 
piano, Paula Amrod also on the 
piano and Vahe Berberian, who 
is a mezzo-soprano. The public 
is cordially invited to attend the 
first factulty recital of the year. 
Admission is free. 



Cultural night: A taste of the 
middle east right here in Clarion 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writing 



The Clarion International 
Association will presnt their first 
"Middle Eastern Cultural Night," 
Friday, October 2nd, at 7 p.m. in 
the Gemmel Multi-purpose 
room. 

In an effort to give exposure of 
the region to the university and 
the Clarion community, the event 
will include traditional dances, 
music and a short film 
concerning the modernization of 



Saudia Arabia. Also scheduled 
are exhibits from the other 
countries including Kuwait, 
Saudi Arabia and Turkey, to be 
displayed. Following the 
presentation, samples of food 
and beverages from the region 
such as roasted lamb, Middle 
Eastern style rice, desserts such 
as Kunafa and Buklava and 
traditional coffee and tea will be 
served. 

Admission is free and 
everyone is invited to participate 
in this cultural event. 



University students 
helping the community 



by Lisa Lepre 
Features Writer 



Into the Streets is a national 
initiative designed to introduce 
more students to thoughtful 
community service and to 
provide a learning experience 
that will challenge them to 
volunteer on a regular basis. 
Although Into the Streets is a 
nationwide organization, it's 
focus is on area communities. 
The purpose of the organization 
is to bridge the gap between the 
lack of communication many 
universities experience with their 
communities. 

Into the Streets offers Clarion 
University students the 
opportunity to support this 
community by being involved. 
Student involvement is the key 
to making sure that Clarion and 
this community operate as one, 
to the benefit of all. 

Not only will the student watch 
the community of Clarion 



flourish but they will also 
experience the personal 
satisfaction that comes from 
helping those who need it. 

This program is worthwhile for 
anyone with the desire to make a 
difference and the time to make a 
meaningful commitment that 
will result in a life long love of 
active community service. 

Anyone interested in becoming 
a member of Into the Streets, or 
wants to find out other ways to 
volunteer community service is 
asked to attend a meeting on 
Monday, October 19 at 5 p.m. in 
248 Gemmel. For further 
information please contact Lynn 
Harrialdson, Denise Bume or 
Andrea Cathcart at 226-27 1 1 . 

Into the Streets will also be 
represented on Saturday, October 
3, at the Leadership Workshop. 



CAMPUS EVENTS 

Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Don Crotsley 



Thurs Oct. 1 

Yearbook pictures taken 
today (262 Gem) 



Sun Oct. 4 

Faculty Recital: 
Lisa Johnson, clarinet 
(Aud) 3:15 pm 



Fri Oct. 2 

High School Visitation Day 

Yearbook pictures taken 

today (262 Gem) 

Credit/No Record ends 

4pm 

Clarion Int. Assoc. Cultural 

Program (Gem M-P) 7pm 



Wed Oct. 7 

YOM KIPPUR 
UCM Lecture Series 
(252 Gem) 12 noon 
U.S. Army Band 
Concert (Tp) 7:30 pm 



Learn the basics of 
job interviewing 

Where: Givan Hall side 
lobby. 

When: October 6 and 7 at 
8:45 p.m. 

Tuesday : Learn hairstyles, 
make up and jewelry, from 
Regis Hair Care Center. 
Wednesday : a panel 
discussion consisting of 
local business managers on 
qualities in employee 
candidates. Both are free 



Dining and 

residence hall 

meeting, Monday 

October 5 at 3:00 

in Chandler. 
All are welcome. 



Red Stallion Nite Club 

For The Best In Nite Club 
Entertainment 

Rppearing Saturday Oct. 3 

88 fl.D. 

10pm-2am 



Mon Oct. 5 

Bloodmobil e (Tp) 
11 am - 5 pm 
GolfatPSAC 
Championships 
Policy Committee mtg. 
(B-8 Chap) 4 pm 
Student Senate mtg. 
(248 Gem) 7 pm 



Sat Oct. 3 

- Koinonia Hay Ride 

- 1992 Student Leadership 
Conference 

- Archery Season opens 



Tues Oct. 6 

Athletic Timeout 
Luncheon 



Thur Oct. 



Sorority "Welcome 

Social" (250/252 Gem) 

6:30 pm 

Sorority Candlelight 

Ceremony (Ralston 

Field) 8 pm 

UAB MOVIE "Final 

Analysis" (Gem M-P) 



r $ 



ft 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 - Page 13 




J<~j?St 



-** \Cmmm£> 




'U ISi 




Jy v* 



What will happen if 

Ross Perot gets back in 

the presidential race ? 



* 



CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Raymond Nice 




Sandy Hawkins 

Junior, Computer Science 

"Ross Perot will split the Democratic vote in 

half and Bush will win." 



Fri Oct. 9 

Dec. Grad. apps due 
fron Deans (Registrar's 
office) 

UAB/BACCHUS 
Bedrock Cafe 
(Gem M-P) 8 pm 



ml 



UAB Dinner Theater 
cancelled 

"The Star Spangled Girl" 
scheduled for October 3 and 4 in 
Gemmell multipurpose Room 
has been cancelled. 



Scavenger Hunt! 

Where: Ralston Hall 
When: October 7 
open to anyone interested- 
contact Ann at 3616. 






&aut*J&. Weavet getvefe* 




606 MAIN STREET, • CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 16214 
Phone 814/226-8272 



Brett Whitekettle 

Sophomore, Undecided 

"He won't win, and he will look stupid." 



Donyeau Bruce 
Freshman, CIS 
He still won't win, no matter how much 
money he has." 



Jean Barsotti 

Grad student, Library Science 

"It will take votes away from Bush and 

Clinton and make it closer." 






Stacy Oman 
Senior, Secondary Earth Science 
"I think hell win by a landslide." 



Cheryl Beichner 
Freshman, Business Administration 
I'm afraid he'll make Congress have to 
choose the president" 



Hit 



Kristen Iden 

Grad student, Library Science 

"He may influence some people to vote, but 

he doesn't have much of a chance." 



Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 

Recital scheduled 



by Monty Mudry 
Features Writer 



The Music Department of 
Clarion University will present a 
faculty recital featuring Dr. Lisa 
Johnson, clarinetist. The recital 
is scheduled for Sunday, October 
4, at 3:15 p.m. in the Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium of the CUP 
campus. Dr. Johnson is 
beginning her second year as a 
music professor at CUP. Her 



solo recital will consist of works 
such as Brahms' "Trio," 
Poulencs' "Sonata," 

Lutoslawskis' "Dance Preludes," 
as well as other works. Assisting 
artists include: CUP faculty 
members Grace E. Urrico on the 
piano, Paula Amrod also on the 
piano and Vane Bcrberian, who 
is a mezzo-soprano. The public 
is cordially invited to attend the 
first factulty recital of the year. 
Admission is free. 



Cultural night: A taste of the 
middle east right here in Clarion 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writing 



The Clarion International 
Association will presnt their first 
"Middle Eastern Cultural Night," 
Friday, October 2nd, at 7 p.m. in 
the Gemmel Multi-purpose 
room. 

In an effort to give exposure of 
the region to the university and 
the Clarion community, the event 
will include traditional dances, 
music and a short film 
concerning the modernization of 



Saudia Arabia. Also scheduled 
are exhibits from the other 
countries including Kuwait, 
Saudi Arabia and Turkey, to be 
displayed. Following the 
presentation, samples of food 
and beverages from the region 
such as roasted lamb, Middle 
Eastern style rice, desserts such 
as Kunafa and Buklava and 
traditional coffee and tea will be 
served. 

Admission is free and 
everyone is invited to participate 
in this cultural event. 



University students 
helping the community 



by Lisa Lepre 
Features Writer 



Into the Streets is a national 
initiative designed to introduce 
more students to thoughtful 
community service and to 
provide a learning experience 
that will challenge them to 
volunteer on a regular basis. 
Although Into the Streets is a 
nationwide organization, it's 
focus is on area communities. 
The purpose of the organization 
is to bridge the gap between the 
lack of communication many 
universities experience with their 
communities. 

Into the Streets offers Clarion 
University students the 
opportunity to support this 
community by being involved. 
Student involvement is the key 
to making sure that Clarion and 
this community operate as one, 
to the benefit of all. 

Not only will the student watch 
the community of Clarion 



flourish but they will also 
experience the personal 
satisfaction that comes from 
helping those who need it. 

This program is worthwhile for 
anyone with the desire to make a 
difference and the time to make a 
meaningful commitment that 
will result in a life long love of 
active community service. 

Anyone interested in becoming 
a member of Into the Streets, or 
wants to find out other ways to 
volunteer community service is 
asked to attend a meeting on 
Monday, October 19 at 5 p.m. in 
248 Gemmel. For further 
information please contact Lynn 
Harrialdson, Dcnisc Bume or 
Andrea Cathcart at 226-27 1 1 . 

Into the Streets will also be 
represented on Saturday, October 
3, at the Leadership Workshop. 















Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Don Crotsley 


Thurs Oct. 1 


Fri Oct. 2 


Sat Oct. 3 


- Yearbook pictures taken 


- High School Visitation Day 


- Koinonia Hay Ride 


today (262 Gem) 


- Yearbook pictures taken 


- 1992 Student Leadership 


< 


today (262 Gem) 


Conference 




- Credit/No Record ends 


- Archery Season opens 




4pm 






- Clarion Int. Assoc. Cultural 






Program (Gem M-P) 7pm 




Sun Oct. 4 


Mon Oct. 5 


Tues Oct. 6 


- Faculty Recital: 


- Bloodmobil e (Tp) 


- Athletic Timeout 


Lisa Johnson, clarinet 


11 am - 5 pm 


Luncheon 


(Aud) 3:15 pm 


- GolfatPSAC 
Championships 

- Policy Committee mtg. 
(B-8 Chap) 4 pm 

- Student Senate mtg. 
(248 Gem) 7 pm 




Wed Oct. 7 


Thur Oct. 8 


Fri Oct. 9 


- YOM KIPPLR 


- Sorority "Welcome 


- Dec. Grad. apps due 


- UCM Lecture Series 


Social" (250/252 Gem) 


fron Deans (Registrar's 


(252 Gem) 12 noon 


6:30 pm 


office) 


- U.S. Army Band 


- Sorority Candlelight 


- UAB/BACCHUS 


Concert (Tp) 7:30 pm 


Ceremony (Ralston 


Bedrock Cafe 




Field) 8 pm 


(Gem M-P) 8 pm 




- UAB MOVIE "Final 






Analysis" (Gem M-P) 





} 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 - Page 13 






* 



What will happen if 

Ross Perot gets back in 

the presidential race? 



CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Raymond Nice 




Sandy Hawkins 

Junior, Computer Science 

"Ross Perot will split the Democratic vote in 

half and Bush will win." 



.' * 



Learn the basics of 
job interviewing 

Where: Givan Hall side 
lobby. 

When: October 6 and 7 at 
8:45 p.m. 

Tuesday : Learn hairstyles, 
make up and jewelry, from 
Regis Hair Care Center. 
Wednesday : a panel 
discussion consisting of 
local business managers on 
qualities in employee 
candidates. Both are free 



UAB Dinner Theater 
cancelled 

"The Star Spangled Girl" 
scheduled for October 3 and 4 in 
Gemmell multipurpose Room 
has been cancelled. 



Scavenger Hunt! 

Where: Ralston Hall 
When: October 7 
open to anyone interested- 
contact Ann at 3616. 



« 
* 1 






Brett Whitekettle 

Sophomore, Undecided 

"He won't win, and he will look stupid." 



Donyeau Bruce 

Freshman, CIS 

'He still won't win, no matter how much 

money he has." 



Jean Barsotti 

Grad student, Library Science 

"It will take votes away from Bush and 

Clinton and make it closer." 



Dining and 

residence hall 

meeting, Monday 

October 5 at 3:00 

in Chandler. 
All are welcome. 



Red Stallion Nite Club 

For The Best In Nite Club 
Entertainment 

Appearing Saturday Oct. 3 

88 R.D. 

1 0pm-2am 



&€U£/^.We€H*etJfee€w6n4 




606 MAIN STREET. • CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 16214 
Phone 814/226-8272 






Stacy Oman 
Senior, Secondary Earth Science 
"I think he'll win by a landslide." 



nit 



Cheryl Beichner 
Freshman, Business Administration 
I'm afraid he'll make Congress have to 
choose the president" 



Kristen Iden 

Grad student, Library Science 

"He may influence some people to vote, but 

he doesn't have much of a chance." 



1 M4I • HftT) aoh*ri 
Page 14 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



New ex hibit opens at Sandford Gallery 



new 



o 



t h 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 - Page 15 

that items that had washed up on wanted to beat the man up 



by Shawn P. Seagriff 
Features Writer 

Opening the new Sandford 
Gallery, exhibit artist Emma 
Amos delivered a public lecture 
to the campus. Amos is an 
associate professor of art at the 
Mason Gross School of Arts at 
Rutgers University, New 
Brunswick, New Jersey. She 
presented "Odyssey: A Family 
from Slavery 1860's-1960's," on 
September 29. 

Amos is the third of four 
prominent African-American 
scholars to speak at Clarion as a 
participant in the visiting 
scholars program. 

The visits are supported by a 
grant obtained by the Clarion 
University College of Arts and 
Sciences from the State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE) 
Office of Social Equity with 
matching funds provided by 
Clarion University. 

Amos explains "Odyssey" in 
the following fashion, "This 
exhibition is my homage to the 
family, friends, mentors, heroes 
and stories that formed me in 
Atlanta." 
The ten "Odyssey" prints trace 



Amos' family to the beginning 
of the 1960's and the emergence 
of the new south. 

The prints are large scale 
works on Sekishu rice paper with 
printer's oil-based colored ink, 
hand painted by the artist on 
oversized plates printed with the 
assistance of master printer 
Kathleen Caraaccio on an 
etching press. The paintings 
were registered to photographs 
reproduced by Cannon color 
laser transfers with some hand 
painting. 

At age eleven, Amos was 
enrolled in an oil painting class 
at Morris Brown College and 
exhibited at Atlanta University's 
annual art shows until she left 
for Antioch College, in Ohio, at 
age sixteen. She also studied at 
the Long School of Art and 
earned her masters degree in art 
from New York University in 
1965. 

Along with in-depth studies of 
art, Amos' works have been 
displayed internationally at 
shows at the Bronx Museum, the 
Newark Museum, the William 
College Museum of Art, the 
Zimmerman/Saturn Gallery, the 



Museum of Modern Art, the Dia 
Foundation, the Clocktower and 
the National Museum of Women 
in the Arts. 

She also has received 
fellowships from the National 
Endowment for the Arts, the 
New York Foundation for the 
Arts and an NAACP Honor 
Award for achievement in art. 

Her paintings and prints are 
included in collections of the 
Schomburg Collection, the 
Studio Museum of Harlem, the 
Newark Museum, the Museum 
of Modern Art, the Museum of 
African Art, the New Jersey 
State Museum, the Jane 
Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum 
and Johnson & Johnson. 

The Sandford Gallery exhibit 
is scheduled from September 29 
to October 30. The exhibit is 
sponsored by the college of arts 
and sciences, the art department, 
the Office of Social Equity, the 
Sandford Gallery and the Clarion 
University Foundation. 

The Gallery is located on die 
2nd floor in upstairs from the 
Marwick-Boyd main auditorium. 
Mon.-Fri 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. 




Kari Ambrass/Clarion Call 
At the UAB Superstar Studio on Tuesday students had the chance to show off their 
beautiful singing voices, while the control worker (pictured here) was busy trying to 
make it sound as good as mechanically possible. 




"Odyssey: A Family From 
on display at Sandford Art 



public affairs photo 
Slavery 1860's-1960*s," will be 
Gallery until October 30. 



Day gives concert against rape 



by Megan Casey 
Features Writer 



Chances are that if you 
attended Thursday's Nancy Day 
concert you came out of 
Founders Hall with a message of 
hope and courage. 

The star of the concert was 
Nancy Day, a Pittsburgh 
musician who was also a victim 
of sexual abuse. Day's songs 
range from "It Wasn't Me", 
which is about the myths used to 
suggest that the victim somehow 
asked to be sexually assaulted, to 
"Surivior", a tune about 
overcoming sexual assult and 
going on with life. Before 
performing each song, Day told 
the audience what that particular 
number meant to her. According 
to many members of the 
audience, Day did a good job in 
relaying her message of hope 
and courage. 

The concert was the 
culminating event of Clarion 
University's first Sexual Assault 
Awareness Week and was 
sponsered by S.T.A.R., which 
stands for Students Together 
Against Rape. The group chose 
an early date to make students 
aware of sexual assault, which is 
one of the most wide-spread 
problems on college campuses 



today. The group has met with 
some success. "For the first 
week, it's gotten more attention 
than expected, but it's still not 
really enough," said Joy Pryke, a 
member of S.T.A.R.'s Executive 
Board. 

CUP student Debra Stiles 
summed up her feelings about 
the concert and the issue, "I 
think it's a wonderful 
opportunity to educate the 
public. It's time for people to 
begin listening to people who 
have suffered from sexual 
assult." Hopefully, with groups 
like S.T.A.R. and women like 
Nancy Day, the public will have 
to take notice. 






I 



Geo f s Pizza 

Free 16 OZ. 

drink with 

purchase of 

a 

medium pizza 

Formerly Domino's Pizza 



} 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



JJFree Delivery 

■L227-9111 



w 






± 




by Chuck Sheperd 



-Local Detroit legislator Gil 
DeNello proposed a ban recently 
of the Super Soaker water gun, 
but refused to back down on his 
opposition to control of real 
guns. Asked by the Detroit 
News to explain the apparent 
contradiction, DeNello said, 
"Real guns are intended to kill. 
The Super Soaker is intended as 

a toy." 

-United States Department of 
Agriculture scientists announced 
in June that pumping cottage 
cheese whey onto sloping fields 
could cut soil erosion 65 percent 
to 75 percent. The scientists 
identified whey's milky 
stickiness as the characteristics 
that made it effective, and they 
noted that other whey attributes 
replenish nutrients in the soil. 

-In May, because of a 
misunderstanding about an 
earlier court order, a county 



court clerk in Tavares, Florida 
authorized sheriff's deputies to 
carry out a second repossession 
order against James Scarmardo's 
ex-girlfriend. Included in the 
second order, which supposedly 
was to recover items Scarmardo 
had bought for the woman, 
which were his property, 
included 12 pairs of underpants, 
described in such sufficient 
detail that deputies thought the 
underwear the woman was 
wearing at the time were 
included. She removed them in 
another room and handed them 
to deputies. 

-An April issue of the Gaston, 
North Carolina Gazette, 
featuring local "People Who 
Made It" (artists, teachers, 
business leaders, athletes, etc.), 
included Virgil Griffin for his 
prominence in the state Ku Klux 
Klan. 

-Criminal justice professor 



Rock News 



by Amy Whittaker 
Contributing Writer 



Rock news is going to be a by- 
weekly column featuring what's 
new on the college radio scene. 
It is coordinated for the Call by 
WCCB. 

REM will be releasing its latest 
album "Automatic for the 
People" on October 6. The new 
album, produced by the band 
with Scott Liu, is said to contain 
several intricate orchestral 
ballads, with former Led Zepplin 
bassist John Paul Jones arranging 
string ensembles. The single 
"Drive" has already received 
considerable airplay from 
alternative stations and a top 40 
push is planned for early 
November. 

New Vice President of A&R 
records at Warner Brothers, 
Prince will be gracing listeners 



with a new album on October 13. 
Along with the New Power 
Generation, Prince has created a 
conceptual rock opera. The new 
single, "My Name is Prince," 
will be hitting the air waves 
soon. 

If you're in touch with the 
techno scene, look for Prodigy's 
U.S. debut on October 16 with 
"Experience." This British act 
recently headlined a rave in 
Winchester, playing to more than 
30,000 people. 

Body Count has been dropped 
from two Los Angeles- area 
Guns 'N 1 Roses/Metallica bills by 
promoter Avalon Attractions. 
Body Count was asked by GNR 
to open shows at the Memorial 
Coliseum and the Rose Bowl in 
Pasadena. The group was 
deemed" inappropriate" by 
Avalon. 




Route 322 East Shippenville 
Ph. 782-3482 



Monday Nite 

Pitcher and 10 wings for $5.50 

Tuesday "Wing Nite " 25c wings 

Wednesday "Ladies' Nite" 

Draft and 3 wings for $ 1 .25 $ 1 Tacos 

Thursday "Men's Nite Out" 

Bud Draft 50c (Ladies Welcome) 

Friday Shrimp Basket for $2.99 



Michael Petrick, 30, who taught 
the "alternatives to prison" 
course at Nassau County 
Community College in New 
York, was arrested in May for 
helping two inmates escape from 
a correctional facility in 
Warwick, New York. A former 
student said, "He made class 
very interesting. I guess 
everybody has their own little 
secrets." 

-Spartanburg, South Carolina 
mayor Bob Rowell changed his 
mind in April about publicizing a 
proclamation dedicated to 
Holocaust survivors. He 
admitted that the reason was his 
fear of offending the German 
BMW car company, which was 
then deciding between Spartan- 
burg and Omaha as the site for a 
new U.S. plant. In July, BMW 
selected Spartanburg. 

-The Center for Marine 
Conservation reported in May 



beaches from recent ocean 
dumpings included: a 

refrigerator in North Carolina, a 
washing machine in California, a 
car in Deleware, medical 
syringes in double the quantity 
from 1990, 59 packages of 
debris from 15 different cruise 
lines, and a container the size of 
a semi-trailer-full of melting ice 
cream. The average weight of 
all trash collected per mile of 
beach was 667 pounds. 

-Blaine Johnson, 22, who 
accidentally blew his right hand 
off while fooling around with the 
gunpowder from small rockets 
earlier this year in Mat-su- 
Borough, Alaska: "It was just 
something to do. We don't have 
TV. When you live in the 
woods, you blow stuff up." 

-A 12-year-old boy was 
arrested in Fort Lauderdale, 
Florida in May and charged with 
auto and bicycle theft. It was his 
25th arrest since he turned 9. 

-Sean Lee Quails, 21, walked 
into 4th District police 
headquarters in Washington, 
D.C. in July and asked by name 
for the officer who had arrested 
him the day before for disorderly 
conduct. When the desk officer 
asked why, Quails said he 



Quails and his companion then 
jumped over the front desk and 
began beating the two desk 
officers, but were soon subdued. 

-In June, a woman, described 
only as in her 40's, spent five 
hours off and on shopping at a 
Des Moines, Iowa convenience 
store, buying scratch-off lottery 
tickets, stopping only when her 
paycheck of $60 had been 
exhausted with just one winner. 
A few minutes later, she returned 
to the store and robbed it 

-In April, Velma Ann WanUin, 
28, was given a citation by 
police in Houma, Louisiana for 
improper use of the 911 line after 
she called to report that her 
husband was preventing her 
from watching the season finale 
of "Knots Landing." 

-Shauna Raisch filed a lawsuit 
in Tampa, Florida in July against 
the National Cos-metology 
Association, alleging that she 
was unfairly denied her rightful 
place on the 1992 U.S. Ladies 
Hairstyling Team bound for The 
Cosmetology Olympics in Tokyo 
in October. 

(C) 1992 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



DISPATCH FROM 



MAGAZINE 



Some of the Stupidest College Courses in America. Pt. 

You don't have to leave America on some fraudulent foreign program to either eat chevre or take 
ridiculous courses. Listed below are some actual courses you can take for credit from actual 
American universities. So pop open a Grolsch, pick your schedule for the fall semester, and have that 
worthless junior-year-abroad experience without waiting in a long line to renew your passport. 



Leisure: The Individual Society "Students 
formulate their own philosophy of leisure and 
develop an understanding of their own leisure 
behavior." University of Georgia 

UFOs in American Society "Films such as The 
Day the Earth Stood Still and The Thing will 
be shown." Temple University 

The Aesthetics of Science Fiction "An 
examination of significant works of science 
fiction.... Among authors and critics studied 
are Asimov, Clarke, Wells, Zamyatin, Lem, 
Smith, Blish, Capek, and LeGuin. The course 
will also examine a number of science-fiction 
films." Skidmore College 

Household Equipment "Selection, 
construction, operation, and care of household 
equipment." Brigham Young University 

Fame and Fortune: Materialism, Business 
Values, and the American Success Ethic 
"Since there is, in fact, a life after Trinity 
College, what is its purpose? What should ' its 
purpose be?..." Trinity College 



Men and Masculinity "This course allows men 
and women to come to a deeper understanding 
of men as men." Hobart and William Smith 
Colleges 

Basic Mime "Emphasis will be given to such 
areas as movement illusions, group illusions, 
and comedic technique for mime." Loyola 
University of Chicago 

Badminton I "Helps students acquire the 
fundamental skills of badminton.. ..Content 
includes offensive and defensive skills, singles 
and doubles strategy and play, rules and 
etiquette." Ithaca College 

Meal Management "Organization and 
management of time, energy, finance, and 
nutrition in planning and preparing family 
meals." Brigham Young University 

Pleasure Horse Appreciation and Use "Open 
to all... students interested in pleasure horses. 
The principles of horse management are 
included as well as instruction in riding." 
University of Connecticut 



X\ mrM - £P.i.0l . Ho' j nohftlD hHT 



Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 - Page 17 






' : ' X *P 




PEACE CORPS WORLD wise PuZzLe 

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in nearly 80 nations around the 
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries. 

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce 
the name of the country darkened on the map at the right. 

A landlocked country 
four-fifths the size of 
Alaska, lying in the 
Sahara Desert. 





1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 



European country which subjugated this 
nation in the 19th century. 

Principal religion of this nation. 

A cereal grass cultivated in this country 
and other countries with warm climates. 

A large, neighboring country known in 
ancient times as Numidia. 



;/l>jy * rijjUiy p aajy [ uid/s/ •; iouojj 7 uoiin/o^ 



Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



6UESSWH0INAILEP 
TOCW ON THE VENTURA 
FREEWAY- — SIP! 




HAP TO. FOOL 
$/P?Y0U BLSMJ BY ME 
6AV5SIP AT105M.RH..' 
A TICKET? \ 




BUT HE'LL LOSE HIS 
LICENSE! HE WON'T 
BEABLETODPJVETO 
WORK! HE'LL HAVE- 
TO TAKE THE BUS! 



DON'T YOU SEE? 

YOUSTF1PPEPHM 

OFHISMAHHOOP.' 

/ 



OF COURSE 
I PIP! 
THAT'S 

MY JOB! 




BR, HOW 

COUU? YOU TICK- 
ET POOR SIP? 
YOU'VE KNOWN 
HIM FOR YEARS! 
,/ 



WHAT, YOU 
HAVEA 
QUOTA? 
\ 




LET ME 6ET THIS 
STRAIGHT. YOU 
LBTOFFALL 
BABES? 

OF COURSE 
NOT. BABES 
WITHAWTUPE 
6ETQTATIONS. 




S/n- AS A COURTESY! BABES 
%£ ARE IMPORTANT V THE 
rikj STATE ECONOMY. BE- 
& r SI PES, ITS A LON6 
A pass* CHIP TRADITION. LOOK 
AT THIS PHOTO IN THE 
RECRUITMENT BROCHURE... 



W\^\\ rim? 






Your Horoscope 
Oct 4 thru 10 



WEEKLY OVERVIEW: Venus planet of creativity and relationships makesagood 
aspect to Mars. A week thai can attract new romance, companionship and artistic 
endeavors. Thinking planet Mercury moves Into Intuitive Scorpio. Best days tor 
Luck: Monday and Wednesday. For Love: Thursday. 
THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 



113 U1 JWUI l*«i»» un__ 

studying all of the pros and cons be/ore 
und«rttwng»nythlngunportai»l.Thosc 
who »ct in haste may repent in leisure 



Andre Lafteur: cactus tamer 
(later killed in central Arizona) 





-Mey" 

> forces 

» not 

llcll 

you when it's time to move ahead. 
GEMINI Hay 22 -June 21 



I THIHK MOW LETTERED 
IN SHOT PVJf HER 
JUNIOR ^EAR. 

\ 



A helpful higher up at workplace may 
step into your picture now. Make the 
most of your talents, skills and knowl- 
edge to attain your goals. 
CANCER June 22- Jury 23 

Mercury moves into your "enjoyment 
sector". Your creativity and social plans 
should be carried a step further. Best 
days for speculation: Sunday and Wed. 
LEO Jury24.Augu*23 

Shift interests to family surroundings 
and what It may take to make them 
more pleasant & comfortable. A Thurs- 
day home social shows good vibes. 
VIRGO fcajuatHS-ptn 

Friendly visits with neighbors could be 
worthwhile You could adopt • course 
of action that would be mutually bencfi - 
dal for the two of you. 
UBRA 8*p»2*Oet2i 

A sideline could become a money- 
maker! Mercury moves thru your money 
sector indicating a side business could 
bring profit as well as pleasure. 
SCORPIO Octz*-Nov» 

Mercurymoveslntoyoursunsign. Flow 
with the favorable tides destiny has for 
you Don'taUownegauvcdoubtstosink 
in. You are better than you think! 
SAGITTARIUS Mc*2M>ec21 

Sleep on It! Once you have consulted 
your deepest levels, the conclusions 
retched should be acted on. Be wiling 
to reverse a decision previously trade. 



PLANET JUPITER IS THE 
•LUaCV STAR' FOR MANY 
THE 2 OR 3 PAYS EACH 
MONTH WHEN THE MOON 
IS !N THE. SAME SIGN 
JUPIT6R WAS IN AT 
YOUR BIRTH COULP 
BRING YOU FORTUNATE 
OPPORTUNITIES.. 
AN EPHEMIRlS 
SHOWS POSITIONS 




PROFESSOR COSMO 



CAPRICORN D«22>|an» 

By mingling with work related soaal 
groups you could obtain some valuable 
information. Career results you have 
been socking should be doser. 
AQUARIUS J«t2l^eb19 

Job seekers take note; Mercury moves 
thru career sector. Extra efforts in new 
areas could jnove worthwhile. Others: 
Anticipate better trends forthcoming. 
PISCES. F*c2v-Harch20 

Stretch your mind to benefit from intel- 
lectual pursuits. One Is never to old to 
learn something new. Good news could 
come from a far away ptaor. 



Indispensable workers on any porcupine ranch, 

these amazing dogs will sometimes run 

across the backs of their charges. 









"Hats Off To You ! 


X 








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□ bugs 

□ PETUNIA 

□ tweety 



□ daffy 

□ porky 
□ yosemite 



□ elmer 

□ SPEEDY 



□ FROGHORN 
□ SYLVESTER 



Weekly Crossword 



n Hats Off To You! " 



By Gerry Frey 



ACROSS 

1 Smaller portion 

5 Chair person, eg 

10 Messrs. Mai one & 
Spade 

14 Burn medicine 

15 Cognizant 

16 Racetrack 

17 Scottish hat 

19 Phone and bucks 
lead in 

20 Succulent 

21 Type ol hat 
23 Greek portico 

26 Winged 

27 Sixth sense 
30 Ms. Ferber & others 
32 Flower part 
36 Brand ot lelt hats 

38 Dance light 

39 Surfeit 

40 Straighten the ball 

42 Heraldic term 

43 Incidents 

45 Signed on 
47 Suit material 

46 Hat pans 

49 Draft org 

50 Wager 

S2 Mr Carnegie 

54 Burns without flame 

SB A Lewis Carroll heroine 

62 Knell 

63 John Paul ll's hat ' 

66 Therefore 

67 Sardinia's mainland 

68 Ms Turner 

69 Middle point 

70 Thick 

71 Superlative endings 

DOWN 

1 Yellow or black followers 

2 Ms Fitzgerald 

3 Consomme 

4 Oozes 

5 Red chairman 

6 Wheat beard 




7 Messrs Quayle & Rather 46 

8 Sports palaces 

9 Heavy 



10 Pedro's hats 

11 Affirm 

12 Gift bearing kings 

13 Bridge coup 
1 8 Computer measurements S7 



22 Long ago 

24 Stenches 

25 Ms. Bancroft 

27 Dangerous curves 

28 Barrel part 

29 Paul & Mary's partner 
31 Daisy-like flower 

33 Wines & harbors 

34 Do follower At 
tainabies 

35 City in Northern 
England 

37 Hop-a-longs hat 

38 Alabama city 

41 City in Oklahoma 
44 Care fo' 



59 
GO 
61 
64 
65 



Muslim religion 
Bawl out 
Lukewarm 
Cream of the crop 
Flower pan 
Greater portion 
Ms Korbut 
Bridge pan 
Flammatory suffix 
Penny 
Epochs 

Messrs Hirt & Bundy 
Soap ingredient 



C 1V« All righti r«erv«d (JKK Aiiocutes 
P.O. Bon 461, Schenectady. NY 12301 



mi 4t§q , UM-01 - ill/) norml!) **riT 
Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 




V g)o I ta/fefte M/crofc/o/ogy J p W/a//y 
Pa+hogen/c Beta - Hemolytic f+reptoCocci! 
Or 'The £ vol (j+/on of tfie tffuat/on Comedy! 
Do I really want to live with Judy the 

neat f reakr aga/D . I can' + be We I've 

got Uht/I MorWay t decide if I'm 'a Biology 
or a Theatre major. Have I Completely lo$t 

it ? Wf" lever be able to wake 3 decfjYon, 
agafn? V/a/Y a m/hute, ju/f ye/ferdayjwar 
able to pick a phone company with 
absolutely no proWer*...^ there ir hope* 



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AT&T Long Distance, no matter where and when you call. Call AT&T Student Saver Plus. It's the one college decision that's 

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Clarion offense sputters in loss to Westminster 




The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 - Page 19 



What a difference a week 
makes! 

The Clarion University Golden 
Eagle offense, which appeared 
invincible just one week ago, 
was humbly returned to 
mortality last Saturday afternoon 
against Westminster. A tough 
Titan defense thoroughly stifled 
Clarion's offensive game plan. 
By the time the Eagles finally 
crossed the goal line, the 
outcome had already been 
determined: Westminster 21, 
Clarion 11, 

The Titan defense led 
quarterback Tim Myers into one 
of his most frustrating games as 
a collegiate. After forcing 
numerous third and long 
situations, the Titans would drop 
six or seven men into pass 
coverage, leaving the senior with 
nobody to throw to. Myers' final 
numbers read 15 of 37 for 186 
yards. He had one touchdown, 
but also had two interceptions. 
Seven of those completions and 
104 yards came in the 
meaningless fourth quarter when 
the Titans were just keying on 
the big plays. 

Ironically, the Golden Eagles 
appeared to have the football 
gods on their side as the game 
got under way. After a Clarion 
possession died at their own 20, 



Myers' punt caromed off of a 
Westminster body and Brad 
Kline pounced on it at midfield. 
Receptions by Jess Quinn of 
eight and seven yards followed 
by nine yards from Jay Tonini 
provided the yardage necessary 
for a 35 yard field goal from 
Paul Cramer. Clarion led 3-0. 

With just over a minute 
remaining in the opening stanza, 
the Golden Eagles' high- 
powered offense found their 
engine belts beginning to snap. 
On first and ten from their own 
seven yard line, Myers looked 
deep for Marlon Worthy, but 
found a Titan defensive back 
instead. One play later, 
Westminster running back Kyle 
Hetrick danced 15 yards around 
the right end and the NAIA 
powerhouse college never 
looked back. 

Myers' second interception 
placed Westminster inside the 
Clarion 15. From there, Hetrick 
moseyed 13 yards for his second 
score of the half, and the Titans 
walked into the locker room 
leading 14-3. 

The inefficient Clarion offense 
mustered only three first downs 
and 97 yards of offense through 
two periods. To put it in 
perspective, Myers had more 
punts than completions in the 
first half. 

Midway through quarter 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 

Eldridge Ponder (2) and the Clarion "D" played well on Sat. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Quarterback Tim Myers had a rough day on Saturday, throwing two interceptions that both 
led to Westminster scores. 



number three, Westminster put 
together their third touchdown 
drive of the contest. The visitors 
balanced 48 yards on the ground 
with 36 yards in the air and used 
up enough of the clock to put the 
game away. 

Clarion finally broke through 
the Titan defense in the fourth 
quarter. Myers spread the wealth 
around by completing passes to 
four different receivers en route 
to a nine play, 81 yard scoring 
drive. The drive was capped off 
by a 31 yard touchdown strike to 
Damien Henry. Worthy made a 
splendid catch of Myers' two- 
point conversion pass to set the 
final at 21-11. 

Every Golden Eagle opponent 
has been undefeated. Clarion 
must have been asking 
themselves if Washington was 
coming to town next weekend. 
No, but the Golden Eagles will 
open their PSAC-West contests 
at Edinboro University this 
Saturday at 2 p.m. Edinboro, by 
the way, is undefeated at 3-0 and 
ranked seventh in the NCAA 
Division II polls. The Fighting 
Scot defense is ranked #1 in the 
PSAC and #2 in the nation. 
Edinboro has won the last four 
meetings between these two 
teams. 

This battle will be the start of 
six PSAC-West collisions that 



will determine the PSAC-West 
champion. 



Westminster 
Clarion 



7 7 7 0-21 
3 8-11 



FIRST QUARTER 

Clarion: FG Cramer 35, 7:09. 
Drive: 7 plays, 21 yards. Key play: 
Myers' punt hits Titan, recovered by 
Kline at 50 yard line. Clarion 3, 
Westminster 0. 

Westminster: Hetrick 15 yard run 
(Woods kick), 0:54. Drive: 1 play, 
15 yards. Key play: Myers pass 
intercepted by Jones, returns to C15. 
Westminster 7, Clarion 3. 

SECOND QUARTER 

Westminster: Hetrick 13 yard run 
(Woods kick), 4:16. Drive: 3 plays, 
15 yards. Key play: Myers 
intercepted by Dick, returned to 
C30. Clarion personal foul moves 
ball to C15. Westminster 14, 
Clarion 3. 

THIRD QUARTER 

Westminster: Buggey 1 yard run 
(Woods kick), 5:01. Drive: 11 
plays, 83 yards. Westminster 21, 
Clarion 3. 

FOURTH QUARTER 

Clarion: Henry 31 yard pass from 
Myers (Worthy pass from Myers for 
2-point conversion), 9:34. Drive: 9 
plays, 81 yards. Key play: 16 yard 
pass from Myers to Worthy on 3-7 at 
W31. Westminster 21, Clarion 11. 



TEAM STATISTICS 

West. Cla. 

FIRST DOWNS 20 13 

3RD-DOWNEFF. 6-15 4-15 

NET YDS RUSH 207 89 

attempts 53 26 

NET YDS PASS 156 186 

attempts 19 37 

PUNTS/YARDS 7-215 8-307 

RETURN YDS. 46 56 

FUMBLES/LOST 3-3 2-1 



KEY PLAYER STATISTICS 

Westminster rushing: Hetrick 18- 

98, Buggey 17-96. 

Clarion rushing: Henry 12-40, 

Tonini 7-27. 

Westminster passing: ()' Shea 12 

for 19 (156 yards), o TD and 1 INT. 

Clarion passing: Myers 15 for 37 

(186 yards), 1TD and 2 INT. 

Westminster receiving: Sofran 5- 

77, Aeppli 3-55. 

Clarion receiving: Brown 5-57, 

Worthy 4-55. 

Clarion tackles-assists-sacks: 

Mazoff 18-9-0, Reinhart 15-9-1, 

Andrews 13-10-1, Kline 13-7-0. 

Clarion interceptions: Kline (1). 



EXTRA POINTS 

-Clarion fullback Jay Tonini 
has rushed for 149 yards on 
only 32 carries (almost five 
yards a carry). 

Tight end Tim Brown is 
averaging 63 catches a game, 
tops in the PSAC. 



fi$%B<\ W-I4H - He ) nohuD irfT 
Page 20 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



Women's volleyball team hanging with PSAC elite 



by Mike Jewart 
Sports Writer 



After a romp through the East 
Stroudsburg tournament and the 
destruction of arch rival Slippery 
Rock, the Clarion University 
Golden Eagles volleyball team 
landed at Seton Hill University 
and at the Fairmont State 
tournament last weekend. 

Last Friday, the CUP women 
took a 2-0 lead over Seton Hill 
with 15-5 and 15-12 scores. 
"The Hill" recovered slightly by 
taking game three, 15-12. 
However, the Clarion spikers 
proved too mighty as they won 
game four, 15-10, and took the 
match, 3-1. Leading the way for 
the Clarion women were senior, 
co-captains Wendy Ellenberger 
and Tammi Bills. Ellenberger 
had the offense flying with 42 
set assists, and Bills was the 
cornerstone of the defense with 
29 digs. Sophomore Meghan 
Kelly added 20 digs and Nicole 
Flambard chipped in with 12 
kills. 

On Saturday and Sunday, the 
Golden Eagles set their sights on 
the Fairmont State tourney. The 
Clarion attack was grounded in 



the first match of the tourney 
against West Virginia Weslyan. 
The CUP women were defeated 
in three straight sets, 15-8, 15-12 
and 15-10. Ellenberger again led 
the team in assists with 28 and 
also in kills with nine. Bills and 
Kelly led the defense with 11 
digs each. 

It didn't take Clarion long to 
regain their winning ways in 
their second match of the 
tourney, winning against West 
Virginia-Charleston in three sets, 
15-9, 15-9 and 15-9. Jennifer 
Betters had a team-high nine 
kills. Suzanne Sheldon added 
eight more. Bills and Kelly 
again led the defense with 18 
and 14 digs, respectively. 
Ellenberger turned in her usual 
stellar performance with 30 set 
assists. 

The CUP spikers kept on 
rolling as they met Glenville in 
their third game of the tourney. 
Clarion set the tone of the match 
early with a 15-4 thrashing of 
Glenville in game one. Glenville 
gave Clarion a little suffer test in 
game two, but CUP prevailed 
16-14. Clarion was simply too 
much for Glenville as they won 



1992 Fall Intramurais 

(Intramurab offke located in Tlppin) 

Intramural roster due dates have 
been extended until Monday, 
October 5 for the following sports: 

Men's volleyball 
Women's volleyball 
Co-rec volleyball 
Men's water basketball 
Fall golf 
Mixed doubles tennis 

Fall golf will take place the week of October 5. 
Check the IM bulletin board for the date, time 
and price. 



■*¥»vw»wr w w»»» »i 



If you have any questions, please contact the 
intramural office at 226-2349. 

Additional roster forms can be picked up in 
the shelves by the Intramural office (between 
the doors). 

Completed roster forms go in the roster box 
located directly across from the intramural 
office. 



15-8 in game three and took the 
match in three straight sets. 
Ellenberger had 26 set assists 
and Kelly was the "D" stopper 
with 16 digs. 

The victory over Glenville 
landed the Eagles in the semi- 
finals and a chance for revenge 
against West Virginia Weslyan. 
They never got on track as they 
dropped three straight sets, 15-6, 
1 5-6 and 15-11. Ellenberger had 
18 assists. Bills contributed 10 
digs and Bobbie Simpson had six 
kills. 

On Tuesday night, the CUP 
women dropped to 10-7, overall, 
and 2-3 in the PSAC-West with a 
loss to visiting Edinboro. 'Boro 
swept Clarion in three sets, 15- 
12, 15-13 and 15-8. This gave 
'Boro a sweet 4-1 PSAC-West 
mark, thus far. Flambard led 
Clarion with eight kills and 
Simpson chipped in seven of her 
own. Ellenberger had 23 set 
assists and Tammi Bills had 14 
digs. 

Clarion will attempt to get 
back on the winning track at the 
Slippery Rock Tournament this 
weekend, playing even more 
games against stiff competition. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Get up, Girl!: Co-captain Tammi Bills is looking to score 
during Tuesday night's match against Edinboro. 



GOLDEN EAGLE LEADERS: 

Assists: Wendy Ellenberger 

412. 

Kills: Nicole Flambard 126, 

Bobbie Simpson 116. 



Service Aces(through 

Monday): Bobbie Simpson 38. 
Block Solos( through Monday): 
Bobbie Simpson 22. 
Digs: Tammi Bills 223, Meghan 
Kelly 161. 



Golf team heading toward PSAC's 

. ' i 



by Eric Feigel 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University golf 
team participated in two 
tournaments this past week. 
They were in the Slippery Rock 
Invitational last Thursday and 
the Mercyhurst Invitational last 
Monday. 

At the Armco Country Club, 
last Thursday, Clarion finished 
ninth at the Slippery Rock 
Invitational with 410 points. 
The host team, Slippery Rock, 
won with 368 points. IUP turned 
in another great tournament 
showing with only 382 points. 

For Clarion, senior Rich 
Grafton led with a 76. Junior 
Todd Corbeil and sophomore 
Chris Brocious both shot 82's. 
Brian Fiscus also did well 
shooting an 83. Don Turowski 
and Greg Greska finished out the 
pack, shooting in the high 80's. 

Things really turned around, 
however, in the Mercyhurst 
tourney at the Lakeview Country 
Club in Erie on Monday. 

"We played much better on the 
tougher course last week," said 
head coach Bob Carlson. 

IUP won the tournament with 
314 points. Malone came in 
second with 322 points followed 
by Gannon with 325. The 
Golden Eagles finished fourth 



with 326 points. 

Clarion was led by Grafton, 
who shot an 80. He finished 
sixth overall in the tournament 
out of 75 golfers. Coach Carlson 
said that Grafton has been 
displaying tremendous 

leadership in his performances. 
Brocious and Fiscus both shot an 
81. Turowski shot an 84 and 
Corbeil shot an 86. 

Coach Carlson said that the 
scores were very impressive if 
you consider the fact the 
Lakeview course was difficult. 
'To shoot an 86 on this course is 
a job well done, to shoot an 80 is 
exceptional," said Carlson. 
Carlson was pleased that the 



golfers all played well at the 
same time. 'To be competetive, 
we have to be consistent," said 
Carlson. "We all have to play 
well at the same time." 

Junior Todd Corbeil, who is 
being counted on as one of the 
team leaders, has been struggling 
of late. But Carlson is showing 
great faith in Corbeil and knows 
that Corbeil will be needed in the 
fall PSAC championships. 

The team will see action next 
at the Allegheny tourney on 
Tuesday, October 6. The fall 
PSAC Championships will take 
place on October 8 at Lock 
Haven. Coach Carlson is 
hoping to peak at just that time. 



Stehle's 



Mini-storage 

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Shippenville, Pa 16254 

5x7' space - $21.20 per month 
5x10' space - $26.50 per month 

Deposit required - Larger spaces available 
Access 7 days a week 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 Page 21 



$ 



ft 



.-. 



Tennis team falls to Shippensburg 



by Amy Roe 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University 
women's tennis team notched 
two more victories last week 
defeating PSAC rivals Slippery 
Rock and Lock Haven. 
However, the women dropped a 
match over the weekend to 
powerful Shippensburg. 

The Golden Eagles pulverized 
Slippery Rock last Wednesday, 
9-0. 

Shara Wolkomir, in the #1 
position, defeated her Rock 
opponent, 6-2, 6-3. Marianne 
Martin triumphed in the #2 
position with a 6-2, 6-0 win. 
Darcy Ingham won in the #3 
position, 6-3,6-1. Roxanne 
Milton won in two sets from the 
#4 position, 6-3, 6-1. Jennifer 
Keil won 6-4, 6-0 in the #5 
position. Melodie Dess had the 
most competition from the #6 
position but still prevailed, 5-7, 
64, 6-3. 

Fiona Koiners, a former #1 
seat at Slippery Rock, has been 
assisting head coach Terry Acker 
while doing graduate work here 
at Clarion. She was with the 
Golden Eagles last Thursday as 



they downed her alma mater. 
"The match against Slippery 
Rock was very aggressive in 
singles play," said Koiners. 
"Marianne Martin had a great 
game in the singles competition 
and Roxanne Milton and 
Jennifer Keil both added 
outstanding matches." 

In doubles play, #1 Wolkomir 
and Ingham won in three sets, 4- 
6, 7-5, 6-3. Dess and Keil 
defeated their opponents, 6-2, 6- 
2. Martin and Milton took the 
courts and capped off the 
onslaught with a 6-1,6-0 victory. 

On Thursday, the Golden 
Eagles defeated the Bald Eagles 
at Lock Haven, 9-0. 

"Melodi Dess played an 
outstanding match on Thursday," 
said Coach Acker. "Shara and 
Darcy played very aggressively; 
it showed in their quick 
matches." 

In singles play, Wolkimir 
defeated her opponent in the #1 
seat, 6-1, 6-0. Martin won from 
the #2 position, 6-4, 6-0. The 
third seat, Ingham, grabbed the 
upper hand in a 6-2, 6-1 win. 
Milton victimized her opponent 
in two sets (6-1, 6-2) in the #4 



position. In the fifth seat, Keil 
had a 6-1, 6-2 win, and Dess 
won in #6 singles, 6-1, 6-2. 

In #1 doubles, Ingham and 
Wolkimir earned a 6-2, 6-3 
victory. Dess and Keil won 6-0, 
6-1 in the #2 position and Martin 
with Milton defeated their 
opponents 6-0, 6-2. 

The Eagles were defeated by 
their opponents from 
Shippensburg, 8-1. Sunday's 
results yielded with #2 seat 
Martin earning the only win 
against Clarion's opponents. 
Martin defeated her adversary in 
three sets, 0-6, 6-4, 6-2. Top seat 
Wolkimir fell 3-6, 4-6. Ingham, 
in the #3 position, was defeated 
0-6, 0-6. Milton lost, 2-6, 3-6 in 
the #4 position. Keil fell in the 
#5 position, 2-6, 1-6 and #6 
singles Dess lost to her 
opponent, 1-6, 3-6. 

In #1 doubles, Ingham and 
Wolkimir lost, 5-7, 0-6. Dess and 
Keil were defeated, 5-7, 0-6 and 
Martin and Milton fell at the #3 
position, 4-6, 3-6. 

Clarion will be hosting 
Edinboro on Wednesday (at 3 
p.m.) and IUP on Thursday (at 2 
p.m.) at the Campbell courts. 




Lois Oertel/Clarion 
Clarion's Roxanne Milton attempts to ace her opponent 
Milton plays at the #4 position. 



Call 



PSAC school involved in historic re-enactment 



Mansfield, Pa. (AP) - When 
you talk night football, you have 
to talk Mansfield University and 
Wyoming Seminary. One 
hundred years ago, that's all 
there was. 

The two schools met Monday 
night on the same field where 
they met the night of September 
28, 1892. It was just the second 
night game in the town's history. 



"Fifty years ago, nobody did 
anything. It occulted to me 
some time after that, they missed 
the 50th anniversary," said 
Chester Bailey, Tioga County's 
80-year-old historian. "I wasn't 
going to let them miss the 100th. 
I was just concerned that I 
wouldn't make it," he said. 

Bailey was director of the 
county's national bicentennial 



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celebration in 1976, when the 
town erected a plaque (with the 
wrong date), marking Smythe 
Field as the site of the first night 
football game. 

Mansfield University's Alpha 
Chi Rho fraternity re-enacted the 
original game Monday night at 
halftime of a real rematch of the 
Mansfield-Wyoming Seminary 
game. 

In the real rematch, a group of 
Mansfield sophomores and 
freshman put together 
specifically for Monday night's 
game beat the Wyoming 
academy's varsity team 27-8. 
The Mansfield players were 
older than Wyoming's. 

"This is the big game of the 
season for us," said Bob Timko, 
a Mansfield philosophy 
professor who is coaching his 
school's team. "It's Texas- 
Arkansas, Oklahoma-Texas and 
Army-Navy, all in one." 

The NCAA prohibited 
Mansfield from using redshirt 
players from its Division II 
football team, so school 
spokesman Scott Miller put 
together a team for Timko to 
coach. 

"I'll go down in history as 
someone with the best record in 



Mansfield history or someone 
with the worst record," said 
Timko. 

Ken Sweet scored the first night 
touchdown. The original game 
played 100 years ago ended in a 
tie after being called at halftime 
because of poor lighting. Just 20 
bulbs lit the field then - the 
equivalent of four street lights 
today. 

That game, already rough 
because players ran headlong 
into one another, was made 
rougher with a light standard 
erected in the middle of the field. 

The first game also featured 
the flying wedge and a play in 
which the ball carrier was hurled 
over the line of scrimmage. At 
the time, teams only had to gain 
five yards in three "carries." 

For the Wednesday night 
attraction at the 1892 Mansfield 
Fair, the university decided to 
exhibit both its football team and 
electric lights, something the 
town wouldn't be wired with for 
another five years. 

Most people came to see the 
lights in 1892, but on Monday 
night, more than 7,000 people 
showed up to watch the rematch 
and the re-enactment. Two 
weeks after the original game, 



Wyoming took out an 
advertisement in the Mansfield 
newspaper, challenging the 
university to a rematch. 

Miller published a response in 
area newspapers just this past 
August, accepting the challenge. 

The Wyoming team travelled 
from Kingston, Pa., 100 miles 
southeast. Actually, travel for 
the team was easier in 1892, with 
the trains. Monday, they had to 
take back roads. The train 
doesn't come here anymore. 

"We're delighted to be playing 
under the lights because in the 
last 100 years we haven't done it 
that often," Wyoming 
spokeswoman Mary Francis 
Donley said. "And for the team 
that is on the average 2-3 years 
younger than most of the 
students we're playing, we didn't 
do that badly." 

At the turn of the century, 
Mansfield sent along many 
players who starred in pro 
football and baseball, but few 
names that would be 
recognizable. Night football, 
however, has become its real gift 
to the world. 

"Is it a good gift? I think so," 
Bailey said. 



The Clarion Call - 10-1-92- Page 23 



Page 22- The Clarion Call- 10-1-92 



Lock Haven University avoids severe penalties 



Lock Haven, Pa. (AP)- The 
failure of an NCAA investigative 
staff to prepare a full report on 
violations in the Lock Haven 
University wrestling program 
helped the school avoid two 
years of severe penalties. 

The NCAA placed the 
program on two years' 
probation, but its infractions 
committee suspended severe 
penalties, since the violations 
were never presented to them as 
a whole. 

In its report, the NCAA said 
former coach Neil Turner had a 
"general lack of awareness of 
recruiting rules" and failed to 
seek advice from school 
officials. The failure resulted in 



major violations. 

The school reported a series of 
problems to the NCAA in 1990, 
but the NCAA's investigative 
staff never presented the full 
report to the infractions 
committee. Finally, the 
university asked the NCAA what 
had happened to the full case. 

Last November, the committee 
agreed not to impose severe 
sanctions, because its 
investigators did not process the 
complaint in a timely manner. 

"If the case had been submitted 
to the committee in its entirety. . 
. the committee would have 
imposed serious penalties upon 
the university, including a two- 
year ban on post-season 



competition and suspension of 
all paid recruiting visits for two 
years," the NCAA report said. 

"We'd be mistaken if we 
thought this was not a severe 
situation," Lock Haven athletic 
director Sharon Taylor said. 

Lock Haven reassigned 
Turner after discovering the 
violations and accepted his 
subsequent resignation. An 
assistant, Norm Palovczik, also 
resigned. It also brought a 
booster organization under 
university control. 

The NCAA said Lock Haven 
boosters illegally contacted 
potential recruits and that the 
team paid for trips by recruits' 
parents, held tryouts for 



scholarships and intermingled 
booster club money with 
university funds. 

Turner also granted eligibility 
to wrestlers who did not meet the 
NCAA's academic requirements. 

"The violations basically 
involve a successful Division I 
wrestling program that was not 
being properly controlled by the 
institution. And as it became 
more successful, it needed more 
guidance than it had," said Allan 
Williams, the immediate past 
chairman of the NCAA sanctions 
committee. 

The school was ordered to 
vacate its team records in the 
1988, 1989 and 1990 post-season 
and file compliance reports with 



the NCAA for the next two 
years. It also faces the NCAA 
"death penalty" if they have 
another major violation in any 
program in the next five years. 

Brad Lloyd and Craig Corbin 
were NCAA All-American 
wrestlers during those years. 
Taylor said she didn't believe 
they would be forced to return 
their honors. 

Turner now coaches at 
Messiah College in 
Pennsylvania, which must 
require that he attended NCAA 
rules compliance seminars and 
"recertify" its wrestling program 
and any summer camps or 
booster clubs he is associated 
with. 



Sports Opinion "The Q Awards" 



Something to tell my grandchildren about 



byJonQ.SUler 
Sports Editor 



Ladies and gentlemen, it's time 
to roll out the red carpet once 
again. It's time to celebrate what 
need not be celebrated, to rejoice 
over absolutely nothing. Yes, 
you know exactly what I'm 
talking about! If you don't, 
don't worry. The point is moot. 
But now that I have your 
attention, I will introduce the 
2nd Annual "Q Awards." ' 

The "He's not just a dumb 
jock" award goes to Earvin 
"Magic" Johnson for the second 
time. He announced earlier this 
week that he would be returning 
to the NBA for yet another 
season. I don't care what anyone 
thinks he should do. "Magic" 
wants to play basketball, so he 
will. His doctors okayed it, the 
Lakers okayed it and even 
Cookie okayed it. The man is 
6'9" and weighs 235 pounds, are 
you gonna try to stop him from 
playing? Go for it, Earvin! 

The "Their gonna lose for the 
third time just like the Denver 
Broncos" award goes to the 
Pittsburgh Pirates. In the last few 
years, they've had Steve 
Buechele, Bobby Bonilla, Bill* 
Landrum and John Smiley and 
they never made it to the World 
Series. These guys are now 
gone. So is Pittsburgh's chances 
of beating the Braves. 

The "Mr. October" award 
doesn't go to Barry Bonds. If 
Bobby Bonilla couldn't protect 
Bonds, how can Jeff King? 

The "Please don't ever pick 
up a fumble and run with it" 
award goes to the Steelers' Greg 
Lloyd. It's almost frightening! 



The "Dukes of Hazard" 

award goes to Koy and Ty 
Detmer. Or was that Bo and 
Luke? Or Luke and Koy? At 
least I'm sure of Daisy! 

The "Your'e a real man" 
award goes to Jimmy Conners. 
He beat Martina Navratalova in 
two sets to take home a $500,000 
prize. Hey Jimmy, it's too bad 
that you couldn't beat up 
Martina in a fight, you little runt 
She's more of a man than you. 

The "Better than Bo" award 
goes to San Diego State running 
back Marshall Faulk. He is an 
apartment complex, folks! I 
read that he was limited to 118 
yards against UCLA last week. 
How can you be limited to 118 
yards? What would 200 yards 
be? A pretty good game? 

The "He didn't inhale" award 
goes to Steve Howe, formerly of 
the Yankees. He never once 
inhaled. Honorable mention: 
Bill Clinton. 

The "No respect" award goes 



to former commissioner Fay 
Vincent. He found out that the 
only way a commissioner can get 
respect is to die. 

The "Most unusual hockey 
game ever played" award will 
go to the Pittsburgh Penguins 
and the Philly Flyers. The Pens 
just signed Mario Lemieux to a 
$42 million dollar contract. The 
Flyers, I believe, traded their 
whole team, $100 million 
dollars, Rocky Balboa's statue 
and the Philadelphia Spectrum to 
get Eric Lindros. So when the 
Pens and Flyers meet on October 
6, it will be Lemieux vs. Lindros. 
Neither team can possibly have 
enough money left for any other 
players. 

The 'He's the "Great one'" 
award goes to Eric Lindros. The 
man hasn't played one minute in 
the NHL and he is already better 
than Gretzky and Lemieux? 
Not. 

The "Odd couple of the 
week" award goes to Andre 



Agassi and Barbra Streisand. 
How big are those beer goggles, 
Andre? Damn! 

The "Julio Cesar Chavez" 
award goes to no one. The man 
can't weigh much more man my 
little brother. I say we throw out 
all the titles and have one 
championship belt. "Pound for 
pound, he's the best fighter in the 
world" is just crap. Put two 
fighters in the ring and let them 
decide who's best. For the 
championship! Chavez vs. Mike 
Tyson? 

The "Pay per view event of 
the century" award could go to 
Rob Dibble and Lou Piniella in a 
15-round exhibition. "Mr. 
Perfect" would be in Dibble's 
comer! Honorable mention: Bo 
Jackson or Dan Quayle at a 



spelling bee. 

The "What a complete 
travesty" award goes to the Far 
East entry in the Little League 
World Series for having 17 and 
18 year old players in the 
tournament. It was for 11 and 12 
year olds, by the way. I should 
have known by their cleanup 
hitter's 6'1", 190 pound build 
that he wasn't 12 years of age. 

At some high school in 
Pittsburgh, right now, there is an 
argument going on about how 
long a cheerleader's skirt should 
be. I only have one thing to say 
about that, "Is it the length of the 
skirt or the height of the girl?" 

That topic is as stupid as 
saying that cheerleading is not a 
sport! Oh, I'm sorry. I'll save 
that topic for a later date. Next! 




D Phi E would like to welcome our 9 
new pledge class of Fall 92 



LarinaShumbres 

Sharla Wright 

Cathie Jlaherty 

Chrissy (Bracken 

9(eary Joyce 

Heidi <BCaiT 

Wendy Spicuzza 




Tracey Sauer 

Molly Sena 

LisaSpeziaie 

Janette Perretta 

%glly 'English 

Mindy Qbil&h 

Angela Wilkinson 



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Druglord Trucks! $100 86 

Bronco. . . $50 91 Blazer. . . 
$150 77 Jeep CJ. . . $50. Seized 
Vans, 4x4's, Boats. Choose from 
thousands starting $25. Free 
information-24 hour hotline. 
801-379-2930. Copyright* 
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♦♦♦Jjuie. Colors I&lifiO.*** 

Professional Steralization. Fine 
lines & Cover ups. Choose from 
50 colors. Located in Sligo, PA 
10 miles S. of Clarion. Call for 
appointment after 5:00pm. 358- 
2715. 



Leam American Sign Language 
for only $35! Beginning 
Tuesday, October 6th at 7-9pm 
in room B62A Carlson & will 
continue every Tuseday 
thereafter. For more info, call 
Mary at 226-3354. 



There will be a Blood Mobile at 
Tippin Gymnasium on Monday, 
October 5 from 11:00 a.m. until 
5:00 p.m. Food for the canteen 
will be provided by Geo's pizza 



Personals 



To "Our Boys" Good luck 
Saturday against Edinboro. We 
know you guys can do it & we 
will be there for you, as always. 
Love ya, Jill and Rhonda. 



Happy Birthday to Amy Belan, 
We love you. Love your D Phi E 
sisters. 



O Sig Eps you are so keen. 
Thanks for helping us pick up 
our fabulous 14. 



Sig Eps- The air was cold and 
the water was warm and there 
was always room for just one 
more! Thanks for the awesome 
Hot Tub Rush Party! We'll 
splash around with you anytime. 
Love, the sisters of Tri Sigma. 



To the sisters of Tri Sigma- 
Thank you for all pulling 
together, especially Teresa and 
Deb, for making this an 
incredible Rush! Good Job! 



To the sisters of Tri Sigma and to 
all my friends: Thank you for all 
the flowers, cards, and words of 
support. Your thoughtfulness 
will never be forgotten. Sigma 
Love and Friendship, Lisa. 



To Lisa, Heather, and Jen our 
deepest sympathy is with you 
and your families. You know 
we'll always be here for you! 
Love your Tri Sigma sisters. 



KDR- It was great twisting the 
night away with all of you! Let's 
do it again. Love, the sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 



Just when you thought fall rush 
was over... Zeta Tau Alpha is 
having an open bid party for all 
interested CUP women- 
Wednesday, Oct. 7th at 8:30pm! 
Call 227-2804 about details. 
Please stop by and visit the 
Zetas! Going Greek could be the 
best decision you've made this 
semester... don't miss out! 



FREE 

Membership with this coupon 



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Wilkinson TV & Video 

44 1st Avenue (Across from the stadium) 

TVS VIDEO'S SEGA 

VCR'S NINTENDO GENESIS 

M-TH: VCR Rentals $5.99 + 2 FREE Movies 



Hey Delta Chi, you guys sure 
are sly! The Reach Party was 
great! At least this time we 
didn't get "Burnt" Love the 
sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha. 



We would like to thank Alison 
Muck and Tammie Snyder for all 
your work thru Rush. You both 
were great and we love you! 
Love, your Zeta sisters. 



Congratulations to our new 
associate members: Sara 
Cottone, Mellony Marsh, 
Michelle McDonald, Ami Miller, 
Fran Spadafora and Tracy 
Wolfe! We love you, ThetaPhis 



Hey Diane!- Great Rush! We 
had such a good turn out. 
Thanks for all of your time and 
hard work. Love, your Delta 
Zeta sisters. 



Congratulations to Fall 92 Delta 
Zeta Pledges! We are looking 
forward to becoming closer with 
all of you! Love, the sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 



Congratulations to the D Phi E 
Fall '92 pledge class. Love your 
sweetheart. 



To our sweetheart Gina, Thank 
you for the hugs and kisses. The 
cups were cool. You're all right. 
Love the brothers of Theta Xi 



GREEKS & CLUBS 
RAISE A COOL 
$1,000.00 

IN JUST ONE WEEK! 
PLUS $1000 FOR THE 
MEMBER WHO CALLS! 
And a FREE HEADPHONE 

RADIO just for calling 1-800- 
932-0528, Ext 65. 



For homecoming '92, Phi Sigma 
Kappa will be bringing home the 
Bacon.- in more ways than one! 
Details soon. 



Traci Showers, Thanks for 
another great rush! You did a 
great job once again! We love 
you! Love, Theta Phi Alpha 
sisters. 



Phi Sigma Sigma proudly 
welcomes the Fall '92 Teddy 
Bear Pledge class!! They are; 
Kelley Mahoney, Deb Zehner, 
Colleen Standifur, Kristie Ritter, 
Dee Maretti, Kristen Warner, 
April Gallagher, Georgann 
Torchia, Laura Stufft, Melissa 
Welty, Stella Gary. We love you 
all!!!! 



To Phi Sigma Sigma, Sorry this 
is late, but our house just got 
finished, so we thought we'd 
wait. We had a good time at the 
mixer. Theta Xi 



The Brothers of Theta Xi would 
like to congratulate our brother 
Lyle Gardner on the birth of his 
son, and Ron Craig for getting 
engaged to Steph. Good Luck. 
The brothers of Theta Xi. 



To the residents of 70 N.5. AVE. 
We should party more often. 
How do we keep people from 
jumping off the roof though 
(Donny). ALF week is just 
around the corner. Who is 
bringing the BBQ sauce??? The 
Great 21. 



Zetas! The mixer wasn't just 
another day at the beach. It was 
sunsational! Thanks, The 
Brothers of Delta Chi 



Tri-Sigma would like to 
congratulate our new pledges! 
We can't wait till you're sisters! 



Phi Sigma Sigma invites you to 
hop aboard the Phi Sig Railroad! 
Anyone interested is welcome to 
our open bid party on Tuesday, 
October 6 from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. 
See ya at our house! (110 Grand 
Avenue) 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 10-1-92 



SmrtLOBimm- Tall Cliffy predicts: 

Seminoles to dismantle Miami defense 



Okay, Okay. . .so I didn't 
exactly do well last week. 
Alright, so I did god awful, but I 
told you this wasn't an exact 
science. Besides, who would 
have thought that Cleveland 
backup Mike Tomczak would be 
color-blind and throw to the 
hapless Denver defense instead 
of his entourage. I also didn't 
receive much help from Rod 
Woodson, who completely 
buggered a punt at his own eight 
yard line, thus, resulting in a 
Green Bay touchdown. Kansas 
finally proved to me and 
everybody on Earth that they are 
overrated. And Marshall Faulk 
"only" rushed for 118 yards 
against UCLA, blowing another 
prediction from an obvious 
amateur (i.e. me). 

Now, I must regain my 
composure and try this again. So 
without further ado. . . 
ML 
New Orleans at Detroit Even 

The Saints (2-2) had a good 
game against the Niners last 
Sunday, but that is only if you 
looked at the stats. If you 
watched the game, New Orleans 
looked flat. San Francisco 
averaged 4.8 yards per rush, 
which is not typical for the 
Saints' defense to allow. Bobby 
Herbert had 259 yards passing 
against the 49ers and should 
have just as good a game against 
the Lions. But the Saints' 
defense needs to hold Barry 
Sanders to under 100 yards in 
order for a New Orleans win. 

That is very unlikely, because 
the Bucs did that last week. 
Sanders had just 70 yards on 20 



carries; this just won't happen 
two weeks in a row. Rodney 
Peete had a tremendous day 
passing against Tampa, but his 
line gave up three sacks for 25 
yards. The Lions (1-3) need for 
their offensive line to give Peete 
more time against the Saints, 
who have a better "D" than the 
Bucs. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: Detroit 

Kansas City at Denver +1 

This spread is unbelievable. 
Denver (3-1) proved nothing 
against the Browns last week, 
except that David Treadwell can 
kick field goals. John Elway was 
10-17 for just 157 yards passing. 
His line has allowed more sacks 
than any other NFL team, and 
Denver has the worst offense 
(yardage-wise) in the league. I 
don't expect them to wake up 
against the Chiefs. 

Kansas City (3-1) looked very 
impressive Monday night against 
the Raiders. Dave Krieg proved 
that he can lead the Chiefs this 
season. Krieg threw for just 61 
yards, but ran for two 
touchdowns, something that 
hasn't happened in a few years. 
Barry Word ran for 125 yards, 
and he isn't even KC's best back. 
Christian Okoye saw limited 
playing time, but still gained 35 
yards on eight carries. The 
Chiefs also have running back 
Harvey Williams, who was never 
used against the Raiders. Look 
for Williams to have his share of 
carries against the Broncos. And 
don't look for the Broncos to 
stop him. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Kansas City 



Dallas at Philadelphia -4 1/2 

What a great game this is 
going to be! The Cowboys (3-0) 
had a week off to prepare for this 
game. And, believe me, they will 
be prepared. Michael Irvin is the 
best receiver in the NFC, and he 
has a very good passer throwing 
to him, Troy Aikman. Emmitt 
Smith is a great back, but might 
find trouble with the awesome 
Eagle defense. The Cowboy 
defense is getting better, but they 
will definitely get burned by the 
versatile offense of the Eagles. 

Philly (3-0) also had last week 
off, which means that they will 
be just as prepared for this game. 
Randall Cunningham has proven 
that Eagle fans should not worry 
about his knee. Keith Jackson 
will be missed, but the loss will 
not throw off Philly's offense 
that much. The Eagle defense is 
playing for their former leader, 
the dearly departed Jerome 
Brown. This means that they will 
be tougher than their #1 ranking, 
last year. This could be the year 
that Philly goes all the way. 
Tall Cliffy'spick: Philadelphia 

CaSm 

Florida St at Miami -3 

The Seminoles (4-0) have 
something to prove after last 
year's disappointing loss to the 
'Canes. Head coach Bobby 
Bowden also has to prove that he 
is not a conservative coach. FSU 
was not a conservative team, 
until the last minutes of the 
Miami game last year. That not 
only allowed Miami to come 
back and win the ball game, but 



it also lost me tons of dinero. 
However, Florida St. now has 
Freddie Ward behind center. 
Ward passed for 240 yards last 
week with one TD and no INT's, 
the first time he hasn't thrown a 
pick this year. He is steadily 
improving and should display 
against Miami just how much 
talent he really has. 

Miami (3-0) is running scared 
right now. They were nearly 
upset by a less talented Arizona 
team last week, proving that they 
did not deserve the #1 ranking. 
Washington is now the top 
ranked team in the country and 
Miami is probably feeling like 
they have to play catch-up the 
rest of the season. Miami has 
won the last four out of five 
meetings between these two 
teams, but those were much 
better Hurricane teams. This will 
be a close contest, but the 
Seminoles will be on top in the 
end. 
Tall Cliffy'spick Florida St 

Boston College at WVU +2 1/2 
This spread is also incredible. 
Boston College (4-0) has shutout 
three opponents. Their defense 
has forced 13 turnovers, held 
opposing quarterbacks to well 
under 45% in completion ratings 
and last week, they did not allow 
the Michigan State offense past 
the 22 yard line. BC also has one 
of the better quarterbacks in the 
nation, Glenn Foley. And they 
had two 100+ yard rushers in 
their last three ball games. 

WVU (3-0-1) entered the Top 
25 (#25) this week, but they are 
no match for their Big East 



counterparts. Look for this to be 

a landslide. 

Tall Cliffy 's pick: Boston 

College 

Tennessee at Louisiana St. +7 

I have not seen either of these 
teams this year, but I like taking 
chances (as shown in last week's 
dismal predictions). I'm going to 
go with Tennessee. I've always 
liked the Vols (4-0) and they are 
trying to win game for their ailed 
head coach Johnny Majors. 
Tall Cliffy'spick: Tennessee 

Well, that's all for this week. I 
only hope that I can even my 
record at .500, or go 0-6 so you 
can have the time of your life 
running me into the ground with 
rude comments about my sports 
knowledge. Believe me, it 
wouldn't be the first time. . . Mr. 
Sitler is already laughing at my 
very presence. 

Tall Cliffy's record 
2-4 



There will be a column 
entitled ''The fen speaks 
out" in most 1992 issues 
of the Ca//. If you are 
interested in having your 
sports opinion heard, on 
any topic, call the office 
at 226-2380 about your 
idea and ask for Jon (or 
just leave a message at 
270 Gemmell and I will 
get back to you). Thanx 
very much. -"Q" 




16" pepperoni 
only 



4PM-9PM Sun-Fri 



Gemmell CTR Snack Bar 
Not Valid on Deliveries 




w/ cash allowance 



i 



i i 






Volume 74, Issue 5 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 8, 1992 



In 



This 



Issue 



News 



Annual meeting 

SSHE holds an annual 

IStudent Meeting Day in 
Harrisburg pg 5 



Features 



ALF history 

A historical look at the 
Autumn Leaf Festival 
both past and 
present pg 11 



Sports 



Fourth loss 

Clarion Golden Eagles 
football team loses fourth 
in a row to Edin 
boro pg 23 



Clarion's 

Weather Outlook 



Thursday> Sunny, high 60 
Friday> Cloudy, high 65 
Saturday> Hazy, high 68 
Sunday> Cloudy, high 63 
Monday> Rain, high 58 
T\iesday> Sunny, high 65 
Wednesday> Cloudy, 
high 69 



Index 



Commentary. pg.2 

News pg.5 

Features pg. 11 

TV listings pg. 12 

Campus events pg-17 

ALF events pg. 18 

Entertainment pg. 21 

Sports pg. 23 

Classifieds pg. 27 



Council of Trustees passes 
$15 graduation fee for 1993 



by Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 



Council of Trustees recently 
voted Clarion University for a 
$15 graduation fee for the 1993 
May graduates. 

Clarion is now among the 11 
of 14 state universities that have 
decided to charge this fee. 

Other universities charge from 
$5 to $30. The University chose 
a fee that was in the middle to 
cover graduation expenses. The 
fee will pay for diploma jackets, 
postage to send out the diplomas, 
the commencement program, 
possible speakers and for tickets 
expenses. 

This will generate approxi- 
mately $16,500 over the next 
three years, which will be $5,500 
annually. 

The fee was suggested by the 
administration because the 
university is in financial need. 

Mr. J. Douglas Bills of the 
Registrar's Office helped design 
the content of what students need 
to know about the fee. He also 
surveyed the 14 state institutions 
to get estimates on prices they 
charged their students to 




Students at Clarion University 
difficulties and budget cuts. 

we have enough money." 

He said, "There used to be a 
Drop/Add fee, but it was 
dropped." Bills doesn't think 
they will drop the graduation 



Scott Dilbn/Clairon Call 
will be paying a $15 graduation fee next May due to financial 



We are in financial need 
right now. I don't think $15 
will be that much when you 
graduate." 



graduate. 

Originally this fee came out of 
the budget but there was a 
budget cut. Because the 
university graduates 1,200 to 
1 ,300 students a year, postage 
was getting too expensive to 
send out the diplomas. Bills said, 
"This is a labor intense project to 
send out all the diplomas." 

Bills also said, "We're not 
trying to inconvenience students. 
We're just trying to make sure 



fee and does not believe the fees 
will rise in the future. 

Mr. Paul Weaver, a member of 
the Council of Trustees who 
voted for this fee said, "I agree 
with the fee because there are 
budget restraints. There is never 
enough money to go around." 

He also said that the student 
body will benefit from this fee 
for graduation. "We are not the 
only institution doing this, other 
schools are doing it, too. Penn 



State is paying around $35." 

Weaver also said he agreed 
with the fee because the 
university could have raised 
tuition to $200 next spring, 
instead of $100. The extra $15 
dollars will make up for the 
budget restraint that the 
university feels. 

Crystal Knorr, the student 
trustee of Clarion, voted for the 
fee for next semester, also. 

Knorr said, "We are in 
financial need right now. I don't 
think $15 will be that much 
when you graduate." She also 
feels the fee will definitely not 
increase in the next three years. 

"I'm sure that the students are 
going to be upset. I would like 
my diploma to be worth 
something when I graduate." She 
also went on to say that the 
graduation fee would free up 
other money for educational 
purposes. 

Many students on die campus 
are not happy about the fee. 
They feel they should not be 



paying all this money for the 
increase in student activites, the 
increased tuition next semester 
and now the graduation fee. 

"Students have enough 
expenses to pay for outside of 
classes.", said one student 

The Counsel of Trustees is an 
advisory group to the president 
of the university. They discuss 
proposed issues from the 
administration and decide what 
is in the best interest for the 
university. The council also 
approves budgets that are passed. 
Mr. Weaver has been a 
member of the Council of 
Trustees for seven years. 

Knorr is a senior and is this 
year's student trustee. She will 
graduate this May. 

Applications for graduation 
will be available beginning 
October 12 at the Accounts 
Receivable Office, B-16 Carrier 
Administration. 

Students graduating this 
December will not be affected by 
the fee, only 1993 graduates. 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



The Clarion Call- 10-8-92 - Page 3 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Hide Park 



Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-Chief 
Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 
Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 
Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 
Sports Editor 
A.J. Meeker 
Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

Tara Sheesley 

Ad Design 

Amy Conner 

Advertising Manager 

Ted Howard 

Business Manager 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 1200 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revenue 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$l .00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...! 12.00 

Academic Year...$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 





w 



The way I see it 

Editor ' 



38 more 
years 



We all agree that America 
needs a change. But don't let 
Bill Clinton fool you. He wants 
to change the wrong end of 
Pennsylvania Avenue; the real 
problems of this country have 
been caused by a belligerent 
Democratic Congress. In the 
September 7, issue of the Clarion 
Call . Ms. Mahoney raised 
several points that must be 
refuted to allow students on this 
campus to make the choice that 
is so desperately needed for 
America's future. As a 
Democrat concerned with the 
state of this nation, a balanced 
view must be presented. 

Unemployment, a pressing 
issue for people across the 
nation, has been attributed to the 
Bush administration. However, 
unemployment is lower now 
than when Carter, the last 
Democratic president, left the 
oval office. Ms. Mahoney 
wanted to know why nothing is 
being done to take care of 
"people issues," such as 
unemployment. For some time 
now, President Bush has had an 
economic recovery bill before 
Congress. In their attempt to 
halt economic growth until 
November 4, the Congress has 
delayed passing any of the 
President's proposals for fear of 
their success. If the economy 
gets better because of the 
President's plan, the Democrats 
fear that Bill Clinton has no 
chance of winning the 
presidency. Once again, they 
would have to face a president 
who refuses to rubber stamp 
their spending increases. 

Ms. Mahoney stated that 
education is an issue being 
ignored. President Bush's 
Education 2000 Plan has been 




Melissa Mayes 

accepted and implemented by 
several states. This policy 
allows parents to make 
educational choices for their 
children- choices Mr. Clinton 
wants to place in the hands of 
government. This country relies 
on free enterprise and 
competition to produce the best 
products. It is proven that 
competition creates better 
quality. If the Education 2000 
plan was implemented on a 
national level it would insure 
higher standards in all our school 

(Cont, on pg. 4) 



You are now expected to pay 
for your diploma, literally! It's 
not just the education part 
anymore that you have to hand 
out the bucks for, it's the actual 
diploma. Fifteen whole dollars 
worth. 

Frankly, I'm angry. First, they 
raise tuition every single year 
that I've been here. Then they 
spend $45,000 on signs that I'm 
never going to use and finally 
they tell me I have to fork over 
$15 of my hardearned cash just 
for the piece of paper that sums 
up four years of hard work. 

Doesn't this sound a little bit 
greedy to you? 

Where's the "thank you" for 
working so hard for four or more 
years and making a name for 
Clarion. Instead of sending me 
off with good wishes and fond 
farewells, I get insulted. 

I'm sick and tired of paying 
an endless amount of bills to this 
university. Extra tuition money, 
an increase in activity fees, 
parking permits, books and now 
a graduation fee. I know I pay 
for more than those I've just 
listed but at the moment I can't 
think of them all-there are so 
many. 
When is it going to stop? 
This graduation fee is supposed 
to pay for the actual costs 
incurred by my diploma. Who 



cares what the darn thing looks 
like or what it comes in. Just 
give it to me; I've earned it! 

I've tolerated the extra 
expenses that seem to keep 
increasing each year. I've even 
planned for some of these extras 
but this one last fee was the last 
straw. I'm broke! I can't afford 
$15, which I feel is for a 
ridiculous cause anyway. 

I realize it is the budget and the 
lack of money which is at fault 
here, but surely some money can 
be scraped together for a piece of 
paper. I don't need anything 
really fancy, because I'll 
probably just stick it in a 
drawer with other memoirs. 

With this new development, 
the university's attitude towards 
graduation seems to be almost 
cold. The biannual goodbye 
ceremony has turned into a 
moneymaker which is sad. 
When I finally have my diploma 
in hand, my feeling will be that 
this piece of paper is mine 
because I paid for it. That 
feeling will overshadow the fact 
that I've earned it. 

If I am forced to pay this fee 
and if you intend to insult me as 
I walk out the door, then don't 
call me and ask for donations 
when I am officially called 
alumna. 

I've given all that I can afford. 



,..A (Mmio 




— c-wse* s=&<nvee&>t*& 



'•*r*t»%r**<t ...,*-.,.._, w,v,t w ,,.MMT» T «IM|ltti 



—'■« IHWI IWW»IIIIK«K« 






■::-■:*:■:•■: 



EADER Response 



Getting to 

know Bill 

Clinton 



Dear Editor- 
In response to the issue of the 
integrity and character of 
Governor Bill Clinton, my 
husband and I wish to provide 
the American people with our 
personal reflections upon 
Governor Clinton's background. 
First I would explain that my 
husband and I have spent our 
lifetime in the field of Arkansas 



public education. I have a 
professional degree in guidance 
and counseling. 

My husband, Henry, holds a 
master of education degree in 
educational administration and is 
a veteran of World War II, 
having received a purple heart 
for wounds crossing the Saar 
River into Germany. 

We both retired in 1977 after a 
forty five year career working 
with young people in our state. 

Having interacted with tens of 
thousands of students, one of 
which was Governor Clinton, we 
feel well qualified to provide 
insight into his character. 



We would like to relate a 
touching account of the "real" 
Bill Clinton, a person who 
respects people, unconditionally. 

This anecdote was related to 
me by one of my students whom 
I met while shopping for 
housewares. It was election day, 
and she was imploring me to 
vote for Bill Clinton. 

"I came by bus to Hot Springs 
High School from a small rural 
area. As I approached the 
building I was frightened, not 
knowing where to go to register. 
I walked slowly, very slowly up 
the steps. 



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Once inside the building, a 
nice young man came to greet 
me with his hand extended to 
shake my hand. He said, 
'Welcome to Hot Springs High 
School— the best school in 
Arkansas! My name is Bill 
Clinton, how may I help you?' I 
need to enroll, I answered 
timidly. He took me to the 
office, helped me enroll, and 
then went with me to show me 
my classrooms. 

As we walked, he discussed 
the activities of the school and 
said, 'If you need anything, you 
let me know.' 

"All throughout high school I 
saw Bill in the halls, cafeteria 
and at assemblies. He was a 
perfect gentleman and the 
kindest person I have ever 
known. Had it not been for Bill 
Clinton, I would not have 
graduated from Hot Springs 
High." 

I was deeply moved as this 



young lady described the Bill 
Clinton we all know. I said to 
her, "I voted for him." 

As Bill's high school 
counselor and an observer of his 
personal and professional 
accomplishments, it is clear to 
me that he cares about people 
and has an understanding of the 
issues relevant to most 
Americans. 

Bill Clinton is a highly 
intelligent, optimistic and 
truthful person who loves God, 
his family and his country. 

He has our trust and we want 
all Americans to carefully 
consider his plans to deal with 
the serious problems our country 
faces. 

-Henry L. Irons 

& Edith B. Irons 

are from Hot Springs, 

Arizona 



Jobs vs. environment is a 
concern to the youth 



(CPS) The presidential 
candidates differ sharply in how 
they would deal with the specter 
of global warming, the declining 
ozone layer and air pollution and 
other environmental issues that 
are of obvious concern to young 
people. 

The Republicans charge that 
Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton 
and his running mate, U.S. 
Senator Al Gore of Tennessee, 
would put the environment first 
and jobs second with their 
proposals in dealing with 
environmental concerns. 

On the flip side of this 
argument, the Democrats 
maintain that President Bush and 
Vice President Dan Quayle are 
more concerned with appeasing 
big business and pushing 
environmental issues aside in 
favor of looser controls. 

"The environment is really 
important to young people. We 
have to make sure there is 



something left for us," said 
Jamie Harmon, president of the 
College Democrats. "Bush's 
claim to the environmental 
president is just a campaign 
tactic." 

Bill Spadea, who is the 
national youth director for the 
Bush-Quayle campaign, said the 
Democrats and liberals are 
"blowing out of proportion" 
environmental concerns such as 
the ozone hole and other issues. 

"The tree huggers are trying to 
dismantle progress. They are so 
radical in protecting the 
environment they have forgotten 
the idea of protecting 
individuals," Spadea said. 

"Through our firm commitment 
and our substantial investments, 
we have improved significantly 
the quality of our air, land and 
water resources," the president 
said. "The United States leads 
the world in environmental 
protection." 



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systems and promote equal 
opportunities for all students in 
America. 

Mr. Clinton claims President 
Bush has raised taxes, yet 
refused to act on national health 
care bills. The President has had 
a health care bill before 
Congress for quite some time, 
but the Congress has refused to 
pass this bill. The House held a 
spending hostage, refusing to 
relinquish this ban until the 
President raised taxes. The 
President raised taxes. The 
President was then forced to 
sign bills concerning: an 
unemployment extension, a 



quota bill regarding affirmative 
action, and a tax increase with 
which he did not agree. The 
biggest mistake the President 
made in regard to tax increases 
was to not make his intentions 
public, so the people would know 
who was truly responsible for the 
policies that were implemented. 
He chose to believe that the 
Congress would make good on 
their promises. Congress chose 
to deceive the American people 
at the expense of the President's 
reputation. 

Ms. Mahoney's opinion reflects 
a contradictory attitude which 
creates a demand for government 



(cont.frompg.2) 

funding, yet criticizes a president 
for raising taxes. The people are 
not taxed too little: the 
government spends too much! 
We are taught in junior high that 
the legislative branch carries out 
those laws. Yet, in the last 12 
years, we have seen what 
happens when the executive 
branch's power gets usurped by 
an over-zealous legislative 
branch trying to single-handily 
run the country. The nation holds 
many bitter reminders of what 
unbridled Democratic tax 
increases and spending control 
can do. Pennsylvania, under 
Democratic Governor Bob Casey, 
is a reality for every member of 



this university. We have all felt 
the brunt of Casey's 
overspending and subsequent 
budget cuts. Look at America 
during the Carter administration, 
and you will we a sad education 
budget, coupled with 
unemployment and inflation at 
record highs. Mr. Clinton, a 
failed governor of a small state, 
tells you he's going to correct the 
wrongs of a Democratic 
Congress. Since when have two 
wrongs made a right? 

America does need a change. 
It has been 38 years since the 
Republicans have had a real 
chance to implement their 
policies. As a Democrat, I've 



watched in horror as a 
Democratic Congress has 
continued to cause this country 
to fail economically. Bill 
Clinton, 38 years ago, was a 
seven-year-old boy with about as 
much ability to bring about 
change as he has now. 38 years 
is a long time to control this 
nation. And the Democrats say 
Republicans are running the 
country. 

Melissa A. Mayes is a 

sophomore Speech 

Communicaiotn and 

English major. 



Senate joins house in approving cut in Pell Grants 



(CPS) A budget-conscious 
U.S. Senate, this month, 
approved a $100 reduction in 
the maximum Pell Grant next 
year, virtually assuring final 
congressional approval of the 
plan. 

Meanwhile, financial aid 
advisers are warning that 
broader eligibility for the 
grants, coupled with lower 
funding levels, means that the 
competition will be greater 
than ever for smaller amounts 
of money. 

The Senate bill would reduce 
the maximum grant in the 
fiscal year 1993 from $2,400 to 
$2,300. Lawmakers blamed 
some of the problems on 
previous shortfalls in the 
program, and the committee 
that developed the bill said it 
"deeply regrets" having to 
lower the award. 

Nonetheless, the $2,300 
maximum grant is far below 
the $3,700 Pell grant 
envisioned in the recent Higher 
Education Act reauthorization 
bill. 

Congress enthusiastically 
approved the reauthorization 
bill earlier this year, although 
members now admit they lack 
the money to support many of 
its goals. 

During the summer, the 
House voted for the $100 cut in 



the maximum Pell grant, also 
citing budget constraints. 

In addition to the Pell 
reductions, the Senate bill cuts 
funding for several other higher 
education programs, including a 
small reduction in aid to 
historically black colleges and 
universities. But the Senate and 
House did vote to save the State 
Student Incentive Grant 
program, which was singled out 
for elimination by the Bush 
administration. 

Coming on the heels of the 
HEA reauthorization bill, the Pell 



to erode access for low income 
students," Martin said. "People 
with the greatest need should get 
served first." 

Still, he said a major goal of 
the expanded eligibility is to 
build greater national support 
for Pell. "If you have fewer 
students eligible, people will not 
feel they have a stake in it," 
Martin said. "But if they can get 
even a grant of $200 or $300, 
people will consider it an 
important program." 

About 13.8 million students 
will receive Pell grants in 1992, 



"People with the greatest need 
should get served first. " 



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grant cut could substantially 
alter the nation's major student 
grant program. 

Under HEA, more middle- 
class families will become 
eligible for aid next year, which 
could create a scramble for the 
available aid for next year. 

"We know there will be 
expanded eligibility," said Sallas 
Martin, president of the 
National Association of Student 
Financial Aid Administrators. 
Yet Martin expressed hope that 
the program -with its limited 
funds- will continue to support 
low income youth. 

"I think there's a real 
commitment (in Congress) not 



the Education Department says. 
The average grant award is 
$1452. 

He also created a new system 
to judge a student's need for 
financial aid. Already, some 
colleges have complained that 
this new simplified needs 
analysis may hurt independent 
students who lack family 
resources for college. 

Martin said this issue- and 
many others in HEA- may be 
left until after the November 
election. 

The Senate also approved a 
provision in the spending bill 
that would make part time 
students eligible for Pell grants 



for the first time. Previously, 
part-time students could not 
qualify for the awards. 

The full Senate approved the 
bill Sept. 18, after three days of 
floor debate in which members 
talked about the merits of 
transferring more money from the 
Pentagon for use in education. 

Senator Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) 
wanted to transfer $4.1 million 
from defense spending to 
education and human services 
programs. 

The windfall would have been 
used to increase funding for Pell 
grants, child care, health care and 
several other key programs, but 
the plan failed by a 62-36 vote. 

Action now moves to a 
conference committee that will 
meet to resolve discrepancies 
between the House and Senate 
bills. 

With both chambers in 
agreement on Pell grants, aides 
say it is unlikely that lawmakers 
will revisit the issue this year. 

Patricia Harris, director of the 
University of Texas-Austin's 
Office of Student Financial 
Services, said she was skeptical 
of the HEA bill, calling it "smoke 



and mirrors." 

"It means that while more 
students will be eligible for Pell 
grants, the total amount of 
money available per student will 
go down," Harris told The Daily 
Texan. "It does make the grants 
more available to middle-income 
students, but it does so at the 
expense of lower-income 
students." 

Others said the bill won't help 
the student who need assistance 
the most. 

"The government has to put 
together an appropriate program 
for needy students," Mary 
Haldane, director of the Ohio 
State University Office of 
Financial Aid, told the Ohio 
State Lantern. 

Orlo Austin, director of the 
University of Illinois Office of 
Student Financial Aid in 
Champaign-Urbana, estimated 
that 10 percent more students at 
his school would be eligible for 
Pell grants- "meaning more 
students will receive less 
money," he told The Daily Illini. 



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CLARION, PA 




SSHE answers questions 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



"I don't think there is one 
solution," said Clarion student 
and member of the Board of 
Governors Monica Douglas, in 
answer to State System of 
Higher Education's (SSHE) 
woes. 

SSHE held an annual Student 
Media Day last Friday in 
Harrisburg. The goals and 
problems were discussed 
between attending campus media 
from 8 of the 14 state-owned 
schools, student members of the 
Board of Governors, Chancellor 
John McCormick and his staff. 

Many policies and problems of 
the board were brought up and 
batted around. 

An enrollment cap has been 
placed on all the state system 
schools; whereby if school 
enrollment exceeds the set 
amount, the tuition money from 
those excess students is taken 
away from that school. The 
Board of Governors as of yet, 
does not know where the money 
will go. The university, 
effectively, pays the extra 
students tuition. 



A 5% leeway is built into the 
system. 

Enrollment at the state schools 
has risen 20,000 students, or 
26% between 1983 and the fall 
of 1991. 

"We could, system wide, 
afford to take fewer students," 
said Scott Shewell, press 
secretary for the state system. 

A report of the 1989-90 
planning commission to 
Chancellor James H. 
McCormick said an enrollment 
band shall be implemented for 
each university and that, "until 
the 1995-96 [academic year], the 
system allocation formula should 
provide no additional allocation 
of enrollment above the 
enrollment band." 

Covering the issue of possible 
faculty cutbacks in the future, 
Chancellor McCormick said that 
the board can't predict down the 
road, but that he has long been 
an advocate for personnel 
autonomy for the presidents of 
the 14 schools. He said so far 
the policy has generally been to 
not fill a position left vacant, but 
not to retrench faculty. But 
Edward P. Kelley, Jr., Vice 
Chancellor for Employee and 
Labor Relations added that it is, 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Cal 
Student members of the Board of Governors field 
questions during a session in Harrisburg. 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
State System Chancellor John McCormickJeft, answered questions along with his staff at 
State System Student Media Day in Harrisburg on October 2. 



"always a possibility." 

Due to the nature of the 
contract for tenured faculty, there 
is a long time between 
notification of retrenchment and 
termination of employment. 
This length of time, said 
McCormick, is to develop 
alternatives. 

It is more likely that faculty 
leaving will be replaced with 
part-time or temporary faculty. 
McCormick said the president of 
the university has a large amount 
of leeway in personnel decisions, 
and that there is not much central 
direction from SSHE. 

Board of Governors member 
Patrick Geho said, though, "I 
think a lot of these problems 
could be solved." 

The Board of Governors of 
SSHE consists of 20 members, 
the governor or his designee, the 
Secretary of Education, one 
senator appointed by the 
President Pro Tempore of the 
Senate, one senator appointed by 
the minority leader of the Senate, 
one representative appointed by 
the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, one 

representative appointed by the 
minority leader of the House of 
Representatives, 14 members 



appointed by the Governor with 
the approval of Senate. Six of 
the 14 are ordinary citizens of 
Pennsylvania. Three members 
are students in the 
commonwealth. Five members 
are trustees at SSHE institutions. 
The board members' terms last 
four years, except for the 
students, the Governor, and the 
Secretary of Education. The 
Governor and Secretary of 
Education remain on the board 
until their term in office ends. 
Student members' terms expire 
upon their graduation or 
withdrawal from school. 

The three student members are 
Monica Douglas from Clarion 
University, Kimberly Allen from 
Shippensburg University and 
Patrick Geho from Slippery 
Rock University. As with all 
other members, the student 
members are appointed by the 
Governor and approved by the 
Senate. 

The Board of Governors hires 
the Chancellor and has the 
overall authority for planning 
and implementing policies for 
the State System as a whole. 
The board also appoints 
presidents when necessary at one 
of the 14 state schools. 



Functions that the board 
performs include the 
establishment of admissions 
policies and the determination of 
tuition fees for the state schools, 
except for student activity fees. 
The board can only allocate to 
the schools the money approved 
by the state Legislature and the 
Governor. 

This year, the funds for the 
state system were cut 3.5 
percent, or about $13 million. 
Clarion University reduced costs 
approximately $2.6 million. 
There is a possibility that some 
money may be returned this fall 
by the state Congress. 

The chancellor is the chief 
executive officer of the State 
System and is responsible for 
administering policies set by the 
board. Since the formation of 
the State System of Higher 
Education in 1983, the 
chancellor has been John H. 
McCormick. The chancellor's 
contract must be renewed every 
five years. 

In addition to his other duties, 
the chancellor is also en ex- 
officio member of the Board of 
Governors. An ex-officio 
member is one who is a member 
by virtue of their office. 




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The Clarion Call - 10-8-92- Page 7 




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Visiting Scholars" series opens 

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by Usa Cornelius 
Sews Writer 



Mr. Randall M. Robinson was 
the guest speaker at a recent 
lecture held at Hart Chapel 
October 1, 1992. 
Robinson greetedClarion area 
residents and university students, 
and enlightened those present 
with a talk on world democracy. 

Robinson, who serves as 
Executive Director of 
TransAfrica, began a series of 
lectures to be held at the 
university under the theme 
"Visiting Scholars to Clarion." 

Mr. Robinson informed the 
crowd as to the present situation 
of struggling African countries, 
saying, "We need to stand for 
what we say we stand for." 

He mentioned that the United 



States government was wrongly 
aiding those countries that were 
not even trying for democracy, 
while several countries, mainly 
located in Africa, were 
desperately struggling to turn 
their governments into 
democracies. 

Robinson also mentioned that 
in order for the United States to 
help these countries, the 
education of each country's 
culture needed to be reinforced 
in the classrooms of America. 

Robinson supported this 
statement by adding that on 
several occasions both former 
President Ronald Reagan and 
President George Bush 
erroneously commented on 
several countries while in the 
public eye. 

Robinson, who is also a 
graduate from Harvard Law 



School, has traveled around the 
world, and has made 
acquaintances with such world 
figures as Nelson Mendella and 
Fidel Castro. He has played a 
key role in the struggle for 
American support for the 
African Anti-Apartheid 

movement. 

Presently, he is working with 
TransAfrica to inform the United 
States about many of the African 
countries attempting to 
overthrow their present 
dictatorship governments, and 
has been working on improving 
the immigration laws toward 
Haitians. Through TransAfrica, 
Robinson and his associates hold 
conferences designed to debate 
current foreign policy issues and 
inform modern-day countries 
about the struggles of third- 
world countries. 




Hon/Clarion Call 

Stephen Jones gave the key note address at the leadership 
conference on Saturday. See related story on page 8. 



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last Thursday. 



Loans are campaign issue 



CPS- Financial aid is emerging 
as a major campaign issue for 
college and university students 
as President Bush and his 
Democratic rival Arkansas 
Governor Bill Clinton actively 
court the youth vote. 

Representatives of college 
organizations for the Democratic 
and Republican parties agree that 
student loans and funding for 
higher education are 
fundamental issues facing both 
candidates. What they disagree 
about is how to make college 
more accessible to more people. 

"The biggest problem students 
face right now is funding and 
student loan debt," said Jamie 
Harmon, president of the College 
Democrats. "We now have a 
situation where some people 
aren't able to go to their school 
of choice or school at all 
because of lack of money. If 



people can get through, they're 
burdened with debt." 

Tony Zagotta, president of the 
College Republicans, agreed that 
loans are a major issue facing 
students, but defended Bush's 
administration and its higher- 
education programs. Bush has 
proposed increasing the 
availability of student loans, but 
wants to cut back the funding for 
grants. 

"Democrats charge that this 
administration has been 
unfavorable to student loans. 
This is simply false," he said. 
"More is being given out than 
[in] any other administration." 

Zagotta also slammed Clinton's 
proposed national trust for 
higher education. 

Clinton has proposed a two- 
fold program to make higher 
education affordable. Students 
taking out government- 



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off through payroll deductions, 
or they could perform 
community service for two 
years. 

"These don't have a lot of 
appeal. Young people want to 
enter the job market when they 
get out of college. They want 
choices and opportunity," 
Zagotta said. "While community 
service may sound fine, many 
would want to do other things." 

Harmon described Clinton's 
plan as "revolutionary," saying 
the plan could "harness student 
idealism." If the plan is enacted, 
students could get jobs they 
really want to take after 
graduating from school, rather 
than feeling pressured to take a 
high-paying job thay don't want 
in order to pay off school debts. 

"Debts affect their first jobs," 
he said. 

Also looming for Bush and the 
Republican Party are national 
polls that indicate young people 
are favoring the Democratic 
ticket, although some of the 
President's supporters refute 
those findings. 



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Page 8 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



Sparks at conference 



by Scott Dillon 
Assistant Photo Editor 

Clarion University's annual 
Leadership Conference was held 
on Saturday, October 3 in Still 
Hall. 

The 1992 conference, entitled 
"Creating Sparks," dealt with 
various aspects of leadership and 
team-building skills that were 
presented in three hour-long 
workshops throughout the day. 

Keynote speaker, Stephen 
Jones, Director of Minority 
Concerns Programs at the Ohio 
State University, opened the 
conference by saying 
"...[leaders] create sparks and we 



that we are creating. Sparks 
create fire that can either warm 
someone or burn them. Create 
positive, equitable sparks." 

Following the keynote address, 
several small workshops were 
facilitated by Clarion University 
faculty, staff, and students. 
Participants were free to choose 
among four sessions at 10:00 
a.m. and four sessions at 11:00 
a.m. 

Topics covered included: 
leadership theory and 
application, team building skills, 
ethics in leadership, professional 
etiquette, and goal setting and 
time management. 

Sessions continued at 1:00 



need to be aware of the sparks p.m. and covered : identification 



of personal leadership qualities, 
community service, and greek 
chapter liability and alcohol 
policies. 

An additional session entitled 
"Multiculturalism — is it a 'Buzz' 
Word or a Necessity?" was 
facilitated by keynote speaker 
Jones. Closing remarks were 
made at 2:15 p.m. 

The conference, held annually 
by Clarion University's 
Department of Student Life 
Services, was co-chaired by 
University Resident Directors 
Jamie Johnson and Jamie Bero. 
"I believe that all of the students 
attending this year's Leadership 
Conference will leave here with 
valuable skills," said Bero. 



Advisers get advice 



by Jodi Seely 
News Writer 



A new way of advising 
students was the topic at the 
Noel Levitz Faculty Workshop, 
held September 25 at Gemmel 
Student Complex. 

The meeting was held by the 
Intra-System Academic 

Advising Network 

Organization (ISAAN), founded 
by Dave Arnold, Deborah King, 
and Donna Poljanec, all of 
Clarion University, and Bruce 
Skolnik of Edinboro University. 

This organization recognizes 
that a student's learning and 
success is based on advising. 
The ISAAN's inner-office memo 
states that their primary goal is 
"to better enable faculty to 
provide quality academic 
advising to students." 

According to one of the 
founders, Dr. Donna Poljanec, 
the Advising Network 
Organization was given a 
Faculty Professional 

Development Council grant. 
This helped to create an all-day 
faculty workshop featuring Lee 
Noel and Randy Levitz. 



Noel and Levitz are well- 
known for the consulting of 
affective academic advising and 
retention research. 

Noel and Levitz addressed 
advising needs of the state 
universities within the entire 
Pennsylvania State System of 
Higher Education. Eleven of the 
14 school representatives 
attended, and of those 11 schools 
were 85 registrants. 

One strategy suggested for 
advising was working more with 
students, as opposed to just 
figuring out a schedule. The 
adviser would look at a broader 
perspective of the student. Life, 
education, and career goals 
would be taken into 
consideration before the classes 
were chosen. 

This plan is already 
incorporated at Slippery Rock 
University. The Student 
Senators started an awards 
program which recognizes 
effective advisers. 

President of Clarion's Student 
Senate, Brian Hoover, spoke to 
the Slippery Rock representative 
about the possibility of 
recognizing advisers here at 
Clarion. 



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Another of ISAAN's founders, 
Deborah King, stated the plan's 
primary goal: "Make 

relationships between students 
and advisers a mutually 
responsible and productive one 
in the eyes of both individuals." 

King stated that if this plan 
would be put into effect here at 
Clarion, some questions would 
need to be addressed. 

Some of those questions 
include: On the part of the 
adviser, what are the rewards 
for time and commitment? On 
behalf of the student, is there 
willingness to become involved 
in building a relationship with 
the adviser and making the most 
of the advising? 

The workshop ran from 
September 24 through 
September 25, and was funded 
by PA-SSHE Faculty 
Developmental Council and the 
PA-SSHE Office of Social 
Equity. 

Noel and Levitz have worked 
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The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of September 28 through 
October 4. 

Several off-campus students went to Nair Hall and harrassed several 
students living in the dorm on Sept. 25. The investigation has been 
completed and charges of Disorderly Conduct have been filed with 
the local district magistrate against the off-campus students involved 
with the incident 

A blue, stone-washed extra large jacket was reported missing on 
Sept. 28. A student forgot the jacket in a weight room locker on Sept. 
23 

A student reported her leather jacket missing from either room 162 A 
Carlson or 118 Stevens Hall. The jacket was dark brown in color, a 
size small, with an approximate value of $120. 

On Sept. 29, a student on the fourth floor of Wilkinson Hall reported a 
50 dollar bill missing from an envelope on her desk between the hours 
of 3:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. The dorm room door was not locked 
while unattended for short periods of time during the day. 

Another student from the fourth floor of Wilkinson Hall reported $10 
missing from her purse, which was hanging on the back of the door at 
the time of the theft. 

On Oct 1, a student reported his bicycle stolen from the bicycle rack 
in front of Founders Hall between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. The 
bicycle is a black and yellow Panasonic DX 3000 12 speed racing 
bike. A small black pouch is behind the seat and the bike has a water 
bottle holder without a water bottle. Clarion Borough police were 
also notified of the theft. The bicycle was unlocked while unattended. 

On the morning of Oct 2, at around 12:40 a.m., a student was cited 
for public drunkenness in the vicinity of Nair Hall. The student 
registered .16 on the BAC. 

A fire alarm was activated on the first floor of Nair Hall around 
3:15 a.m. on Oct 2. 



A student from the fourth floor of Wilkinson Hall reported the theft of 
a $20 bill from a small pouch which was in the top drawer of her 
dresser, between 11:00 p.m. Oct. 1 and 6:00 p.m. Oct. 3. The room 
was unlocked most of the time. 

A bicycle was reported stolen from the side entrance, near the 
basketball office of Tippin gym between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on 
Oct. 2. The bicycle was unlocked and described as a black and gray 
10-speed BAJA mountain bike. 

On Oct. 2, several students attempted to steal a picnic table adjacent 
to parking lot "W." The investigation has been completed and several 
criminal and motor vehicle violations have been filed with the local 
district magistrate. 

If anyone has any information concerning these and other crimes 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 




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The Clarion Call - 10-8-92- Page 9 



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New computer lab aids students 



by Kelley Mahoney 
Sews Writer 



Many students are unaware of 
the new computer lab on the 
second floor of the Gemmell 
Center in room 278. 
Incorporated in the plans for the 
new student center was the 
realization of the need for a new 
computer room, a room big 
enough to permit adequate 
student use of the advantages of 
the facility. The present 
location of the new lab was once 
a quiet lounge with just five 
computers before the Gemmell 
Center renovation. 

"We knew that more 
computers were needed," said 
Hal Wassink, director of student 
activities. "But we needed to 
have a system that also fit into 
our budget." 

The need for a quality security 
system to protect the computers 
from theft and damage and the 
need for experts to care for the 
computers were main concerns. 

"We needed expertise and a 
way to insure our equipment's 
safety when the lab is 
unsupervised," said Wassink. 

It was decided that 12 Digital 
IBM compatible personal 
computers, six Apple Macintosh 
personal computers, six printers 
and one laser printer were to be 
placed in the lab, with a security 
system installed. 

"We needed a good security 

system that would allow students 

to use the lab even when it is 

unsupervised," said Wassink. 

The computer lab offers 



software, including WordPerfect 
5.1 word processing program on 
the 12 Digital computers. 

Digital is a brand name, "like 
Ford or Chevy," said Steve 
Selker, manager of systems and 
networks at Computer Service. 
Selker also helped to install the 
lab's set-up. 

"We have an integrated lab 
environment with the same 
service provided for Macintosh 
and IBM [Digital]," Selker said. 

This lab also provides Claris 
Works for Macintosh, Aldus 
Page Maker desk top publisher 
for both Macintosh and Digital 
units, Digital 386 class (an 
explanation of the computer 
processes) and the university 
Course View, which is used to 
show class and section 
availability. 

Also in the works, is the 
addition of the Lotus 3.1 Plus 
spreadsheet program on the 
Digital computers. 

New to the lab, to the 
university, and to the entire State 
System of Higher Education is 
the introduction of the 
SSHENET system, which will 
connect Clarion's computer 
systems to the systems at other 
state schools as well as to 
national networks. 

"It connects all 14 state 
institutions together and allows a 
connection to the academic 
computer system," said Selker. 

Other software packages may 
be added depending on the need 
for them. 

In the first few weeks of the 
semester, more students are 



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becoming aware of the computer 
lab, but the Student Activities 
Office wants the "greater campus 
community to know of the 
service and hours of the lab," 
said Wassink. 

The lab is available Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 11 
p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 
from 1 p.m. to 1 1 p.m. 

Supervisors are available 
Monday through Friday form 11 
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 11 
p.m. and on Saturday and 
Sunday form 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 
and 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. 

"This lab is available to 
students to use when other labs 
aren't available," said Wassink. 
"It fills the void of the other 
labs." 

The lab is available to any 
currently enrolled Clarion 
University student. 




Terri Steigelman/Clarion Call 
Student Rodney Sherman uses the computer facilities in 
Gemmel Student Center. 



Public safety car trashed 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



Vandals seriously damaged a 
Clarion University Public Safety 
vehicle Saturday, September 26. 
A portable breath testing device 
was removed from the car during 
the incident. 

Sgt. Larry Eisenman parked 
the marked car on Thorn street, 
next to Becker Hall around 5:45 
p.m. and was away from the 
vehicle conducting a building 
check. 

Eisenman returned to the car to 
discover the right front window 
was shattered, the glovebox was 
ripped from the vehicle interior, 
the gearshift knob was broken, 



and the police radio was 
damaged. 

A police hat and the portable 
breath tester were discovered to 
be missing from the car. 
Perpetrators also apparently spit 
throughout the interior of the car. 

Eisenman was away from the 
car for about 30 minutes. 

At the request of Eisenman, 
Clarion Borough police assumed 



damage to the police radio has 
been repaired, but a bill for those 
repairs has not been received. 
Damage to the patrol car was 
estimated at 700 dollars and 
Martinazzi figures the total of all 
damage, labor costs, and 
replacements at close to 1000 
dollars. 

Clarion Borough police 
reported additional damage to 



A police hat and 
portable breath tester 
were discovered to be 



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Monday-Tuesday 

BUCK 

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Wednesday & Saturday 

2 pieces of chicken, 
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missing 



the investigation of the incident. 
Pennsylvania State Police were 
asked to process the scene for 
additional evidence. 

An anonymous tip led to the 
identification of several suspects, 
all of which allegedly are 
students at Clarion University. 
Recovery of some of the stolen 
items was also made. 

Dr. Ron Martinazzi, director of 
Public Safety, said the recovered 
items included the breath testing 
device and the police hat. 
Martinazzi further reported the 



public and private property in the 
same area and believe the same 
suspects are involved. 

Arrests in the case are expected 
in the near future. 

Clarion District Magistrate 
Tony Lapinto said no charges 
had been filed as of 3:00 p.m., 
October 5. 

Anyone with information 
regarding this incident is asked 
to contact Public Safety at 226- 
2111 or Clarion Borough police 
at 226-9140. 



-* *^% #• % » ■ 



Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 

Outside Clarion 



Scripps to sell Pittsburgh Press 



compiled by Dortiee Ray buck 
from the AP Service 

State 

Philly workers reach 
tentative agreement 

Leaders of Philadelphia's 
white-collar workers union 
unanimously approved a 
tentative agreement Tuesday 
afternoon to end a strike, 
although the union leaders said 
they wanted to continue to 
negotiate over technical 
language. 

Earlier in the day, Tuesday, the 
board of the blue-collar District 
Council 33 voted 15 to 6 to 
accept the pact. 

The city's 15,000 municipal 
workers walked off the job at 
midnight, shutting down nearly 
all non-essential services. 

James Sutton, president of 
District Council 33, called on his 
workers to return to their jobs 
with their next scheduled shift. 

It was the first strike in six 
years. The last one ended after 
three weeks when a judge 
declared garbage rotting in the 
July sun a health hazard. 

The tentative agreement covers 
the next four years, freezes 
wages for the next two years and 
provides increases in the 
remaining two years. 



Volunteers picking litter find 
cocaine 

Authorities said a package of 
cocaine found by volunteers 
picking up trash may have been 
thrown out of a car being chased 
by police. 

Two men were cleaning up 
along highway 220 near Bedford 
on September 21 when they 
found a wrapped package 
containing a powder. 

The drugs, worth about 
$100,000, were confiscated by 
State Police and destroyed. 

Police are investigating the 
possibility that the package was 
thrown by a couple chased by 
police down the two-lane road 
on September 6. 

Troy Buckmon and Felisia 
Evans, both of Washington D.C., 
were arrested south of Bedford 
after a chase that began on the 
Pennsylvania Turnpike and 
reached speeds of 120 miles per 
hour before they were stopped. 

The two were charged with 
possession of marijuana and 
other charges and released on 
$50,000 bail. 

During the chase, the couple 
exited the turnpike through the 
entrance booth at Bedford and 
turned south on route 220. 
Police said the two sped through 
Bedford with police in pursuit. 



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National 

Hill has no regrets about 
Testifying 

Law professor Anita Hill said 
she doesn't regret going public 
with the sexual harassment 
allegation that nearly derailed 
Supreme Court Justice Clarence 
Thomas' Senate confirmation 
last year. 

Interviewed on NBC's "Today" 
show Tuesday morning, one year 
after the initial reports of her 
allegation, Hill said people have 
become more aware since then 
about sexual harassment. 

Hill was asked about recent 
remarks by Arlen Specter that he 
now understands more about 
sexual harassment. 

Hill said she's skeptical about 
Specter's remark. 



Father pleads innocent to 
kidnapping of son 

The attorney for a suburban 
Philadelphia man charged with 
abducting his son said his client 
will plead innocent. 

John Markham, an attorney for 
Edgar Newbold Smith, said 
Smith will enter his plea during 
an October 13 appearance in 
U.S. District Court in 
Alexandria, Virginia. 

Smith is accused of plotting to 
abduct his son, an heir to the 
DuPont Chemical fortune, so 
that he could be 
"deprogrammed" of his support 
for political extremist Lyndon 
LaRouche, Jr. 

Smith and others were arrested 
last week on charges they were 
preparing to abduct Lewis 
DuPont and his wife. 



Paper strike 
proves costly 

A securities analyst said the 
delivery drivers strike against the 
Pittsburgh Press has cost owner 
E.W. Scripps $11 million this 
year after taxes. 

Merrill Lynch said the loss 
could total $15 million for the 
year, but the financial company 
maintains that Scripps is a good 
buy. 

The stock trades in the range of 
$24 per share. 

Scripps announced last week 
that it plans to sell the Press 
because of the strike, which is 
nearing the five month mark. 
The company said it has several 
interested buyers. 

Pittsburgh community leaders 
are calling for teamsters to work 
while negotiations continue. 




Campus 



News 




compiled by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



Police tough on underage 
drinking 

The Slate 

The number of fraternity 
parties at Shippensburg 
University that get raided by 
police is always higher in the 
first month, but many people are 
worrying that this year will be 
even worse. 

"The other night, [police] 
stopped by when we weren't 
even having a party. . . " said Jeff 
Simpson, president of Kappa 
Sigma. Police said that if there 
were alcohol violations they 
would intervene. 



Dylan to perform at 
Lock Haven 

The Eagle Eye 

Legendary singer Bob Dylan 
will perform October 10 as part 
of Lock Haven University's 
Homecoming celebration. 

Student Cooperative Council 
President Steve Madrak urged 
students to buy tickets early, 
explaining that people from as 
far away as Washington D.C. 
have called for tickets to the 
show. 

Madrak said the SCC plans to 
start advertising Dylan's concert 
more aggressively. He also said 
Thomas Field House should 
easily be filled. It has a capacity 
of 3,000. 



We Love Our Pledges 

Stephanie Calli Andrea Hawk 

Lori Denne Jodi Schultz 

Dineen Dick Kim Sherry 

Rochelle Engler Andrea Toto 
Sonya Hanzes s\ 

Zeta Tau Alpha XJ 

Fall Pledge Class of 1992 <0 



UPJ's enrollment 
causes crowding 

Advocate 

The former health center has 
been converted into a five person 
dorm room and some three 
person rooms in dormitories now 
house four students. 

As of September 10, 517 
students were on a waiting list to 
be moved from crammed rooms- 
rooms designed for two and 
holding three, three-person 
rooms holding four and four- 
person rooms holding five 
people. 

Residence Services Director 
Jake Stiffler said enrollment 
hasn't increased. Stiffler said 
there are more residents than 
commuters this year, because 
there are fewer students living in 
the Johnstown area. 

Provisions have been made for 
the five-person room. The 
students each get their own 
closet, they also get micro- 
fridges and a double sink. 

The room is equipped as a four 
person suite. The residents will 
receive $2 a day until there are 
four people in the room. 



The Clarion Call - 10-8-92- Page 11 



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*> 




The Autumn Leaf Festival, a growing tradition 



by Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 



Just in case you haven't 
noticed by all the work on Main 
Street, the town of Clarion is 
preparing for its annual fall 
foliage extravaganza. Autumn 
Leaf Festival time is here again, 
and this year it's looking bigger 
than ever. 

For those of you who don't 
know about ALF or don't know 
what all goes on, by the end of 
this story you will have a better 
understanding of the festival, 
both of this year and years past. 

First, for a little history of 
ALF. It started in 1954 at a 
meeting of young Clarion 
businessmen. Someone 

mentioned the attraction of the 
autumn foliage for tourists from 
metropolitan areas, and from that 
idea, the first festival was born. 

Born along with it was the 
Clarion Chamber of Commerce 
to put the festival together and 
make it work. Since then, and 
especially in the last 15 years, 
the Autumn Leaf Festival has 
grown from a one-day parade 
event, to this year's eight day 
program. 

Clarion State College, as it was 
known then, became involved in 
the festivities. With fraternities 



and sororities competing with 
one another, creating some of the 
most impressive and imaginative 
floats ever seen in Pennsylvania. 
The Clarion University 
Homecoming football game has 
also become the climax of the 
parade-day. 

The parades themselves have 
grown also, from a few units to 
over 135 or more floats, bands, 
drill teams, marching units and 
cars. 

The festival was once paid for 
by local contributions, but the 
festival has become so big that 
souvenir sales and advertising 
are needed to meet the mounting 
expenses. 

The event still continues to 
grow. This year is the first year 
it will run eight days. In the past, 
it lasted only five days. Along 
with the festival itself growing, 
so have the crowds that attend. 
They have become so large that 
short wave radio control and 
mini-transit vehicles have 
become essential for 
communication. 

State, county and local police 
all flock to Clarion in scores to 
keep any disorders to a 
minimum. But, for the most 
part, disorders have been 
unheard of. Clarion's thousands 




Clarion Call file photo 
Clarion University always has a strong showing in the 
parade, with floats made by greek organizations and other 
campus groups. 




Clarion Call file photo 
Always a favorite in the Autumn Leaf Parade, the Zem Zem units will be out once again in 
full force. To quote a great line from "Batman" the movie, "Where do they get those 
wonderful toys?" 



\ 



of visitors have always been 
well- behaved. The only real 
problem during ALF is the 
traffic and parking with so many 
visitors. 

But probably the most 
impressive statistic of ALF is 
the hours upon hours of 
volunteer work by hundreds of 
people. Without their time the 
festival would never get off the 
ground. 

ALF activities take place on 
Main Street and the surrounding 
areas. Some of the events you 
may not want to miss include: 

The concession stands every 
night in Memorial Park, with 
every kind of food imaginable. 
There is also the carnival that 
lasts the entire week, with games 
and prizes to be won. Also 
offered all week are sight seeing 
airplane rides, so you can get the 
overall view of the beautiful 
scenery that makes ALF the best 
fall foliage festival around. 

Friday, October 9 is the 9th 
Annual ALF Open tennis 
tournament. The tournament 



will be behind Campbell Hall at 
5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Entry fee is 
$10 for first event, $5 for the 
second event 

On Saturday, October 10, the 
Tug-Of-War will be heating up 
with a division just for college 
students at the Clarion High 
School practice field. There is a 
ten dollar entrance fee, and 
trophies will be awarded for the 
champions. Also on Saturday is 
the volleyball tournament at the 
practice field at 11 a.m. with a 
ten dollar fee to enter. 

Tuesday brings live exotic 
animals to the Clarion Mall. The 
show will be set up inside the 
mall. 

Wednesday, October 14 is the 
Battle of the Bands at Gemmell 
Center at 6 p.m., with a two 
dollar charge. Local bands will 
battle it out to see who is the best 
band in Clarion. Also on 
Wednesday is the fire truck rides 
through the streets. There is no 
charge for the ride. 

Saturday at noon is the 
Autumn Leaf Festival Parade on 

I 



Main Street. It will include 
bands, clowns, floats, VIP's, 
antique cars, zem zem shrine 
units and much, much more. It 
will be followed by the 
Homecoming football game 
versus Lock Haven at 2 p.m. 

Also appearing on Saturday 
and Sunday is the United States 
Navy "Leap Frogs" parachute 
team. On Saturday they will be 
making a dive at 1:45, just prior 
to the football game at Memorial 
stadium. On Sunday, they will 
be jumping at the Clarion Mall. 

Sunday brings the autorama to 
Clarion at 9:30 a.m. Main Street 
will be taken over by an array of 
classic and antique show cars for 
you to look at. 

Everyone is going to come to 
Clarion for ALF this year, 
including Elvis!! That's right, the 
king himself will be at the 
Clarion Mall on Sunday at 1:30 
p.m. 

For a complete schedule of 
events, you can look at pages 18 
and 19 of this issue. 



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Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 

Cable Channels 



111 DATA 



THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 8, 1992 



10 



11 



14 



17 



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21 



22 



25 



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4:30 



5:00 



Movie: *** "Talent for the Game" (1991) 



Design. W. Cheers g 



Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



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People Ct. 



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Movie: »'/2 "Quest for the Mighty Sword 



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Tiny Toon | Batman q 



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News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



(330) PGA Golf: Las Vegas Invitational Second round 



Movie: **^2 "The Buddy System (1984, Comedy) PG 



Pyramid | Press Luck [Cartoon Express 



(3 15) Movie: "The King and I" (1956) G' 



(330) Movie: "Dommick and Eugene" □ 



Underdog | Yogi Bear [Arcade 



Senior Tour [Up Close 



MacGyver "To Be a Man' 



7:00 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



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Hard Copy 



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CBS News 



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Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Straight Talk 



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You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



Delta q 



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Dif. World 



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9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



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Homefront (In Stereo) g 



Cheers q |Wings q 



10:30 



First Look 



Primetime Live q 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Two 



First Person: Exposure 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Two 



Martin q 



R&B 



Movie: »*»'/; 'California Suite (1978) Maggie Smith. 



Edge Pilot" 



Cheers q 



Flying Blind 



Wings q 



Hunter 



First Person: Exposure 



11:00 



11:30 



Inside the NFL q 



News q 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Married.. 



Sportscenter | College Football: Colorado at Missouri. From Columbia. Mo. (Live) 



Movie: +»*» "The Apartment "(1960, Comedy) Jack Lemmon 



Newsq 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: ***Vi "The Magnificent Seven" (1960, Western) Yul Brynner 



Movie: *» "Pleasures' (1986, Drama) 



Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: «» "Daughters of Privilege "(1991, Drama) 



What You Do 



FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 9. 1992 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Murder, She Wrote q | Movie: ** "Silhouette" (1990, Suspense) Faye Dunaway. 



Movie: **Vi "Used Cars (1980) Kurt Russell. R 



Golden Girls 



12:00 



Dead Agn. 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) 



Edition 



Stalkings 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: *** "Silver Streak 



Sportscenter 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Movie: *»'/2 "Paradise (1991) Melanie Griffith. PG-13 



Pete & Pete Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Get Smart | Superman 



L.A. Law 



Freddys Dead: The Final Nightmare' 



Movie: ** "Diplomatic Immunity" (1991) [Movie: "Double Trouble" 



M.T.Moore ] Van Dyke | Dragnet 



Freddy 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: ** "Ski Lift to Death (1978) Howard Duff 



Drag Racing 



Equalizer 



Movie: ** Double Trouble (1991) R 



Lucy Show [Green Acres 



Thirtysomething 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



10 



11 



14 



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4:30 



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Design. W. I Cheers q 



Cur. Affair Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



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(2:00) Movie: 



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5:00 



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CBS News 



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(3:30) PGA GoH: Las Vegas Invitational. Third round 



Pyramid [Press Luck [Cartoon Express 



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Up Close 



MacGyver "Ugly Duckling" 



7:00 



7:30 



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Family 



Final Appeal 



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9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



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Camp Wilder 



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America's Most Wanted q 



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Final Appeal [Happened 



Movie: ** "Author! Author!" (1982) Al Pacing. PG' 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



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Movie: «»'/; The Qt/esf"(1976, Western) 



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Movie: **'t Desperate Lives (1982) Diana Scarwid 



Movie: »*V2 "The Ratings Game' (1984) Danny DeVito 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



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Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING OC TOBER 10, 1992 



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Movie: ** "Fatal Exposure 



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Newsq 



Married.. 



Newsq 



11:30 



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12:00 



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Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Dark Justice "Deadline 



Edition 



Dark Justice 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Sportscenter |NHL Hockey: New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers From the Spectrum. (Live) I Harness Racing 



20 Years of Rock 'n' Roll 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Sportscenter |Coll. Football 



Movie: *** "Paper Mask" (1990) Paul McGann. R 



Movie: »»* "Outrageous Fortune" (1987) 



Get Smart [Superman 



LA. Law 



M.T. Moore 



Comedy 



Van Dyke 



(1991) Mare Winninghartiq [Movie: i "Roller Blade Warriors" (1989) 



Movie: ** "Night Eyes 2 (1991) R' q 



Joan Rivers: London 



Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: »*'/2 "Acceptable Risks" (1986) Cicely Tyson. 



Super Dave 



Lucy Show 



Movie: ** "Carnal Crimes 



** 



Messenger of Death" 



Green Acres 



Thirtysomething Post-Op 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



Movie: ** "Sheena" (1984) Tanya Roberts. PG' q 



College Football: Regional Coverage 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: *** "The Princess Br«fe" (1987) Cary Elwes. q 



Volleyball [Horse Racing (Live) 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Three 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Three 



Movie: *** "All the Right Moves" (1983) Tom Cruise. 



Volleyball [Horse Racing (Live) 



News 



News 



Newsq 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



American Gladiators 



Newsq 



NBC News 



20 Years of Rock 'n' Roll | Movie: *** "Pont Cry, It's Only Thunder (1982) PG 



PGA GoH: Las Vegas Invitational. Fourth round. (Live) 



Gossip! 



Ten of Us |Two Dads B. Buddies 



Movie: **Vi "Hang Em High" (1968) Clint Eastwood 



Movie: +** "The Hospital' 



Nick News Get Picture 



1971) George C.Scott. PG 



Freshmen Salute 



Movie: **Vi "Reckless Disregard '" (1985) Tess Harper. 



I Sportscenter 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) 



News 



Hee Haw Silver 



ICappetli 



Star Search (In Stereo) 



Star Search (In Stereo) 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Jeopardy! q |Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Michael Jackson in Concert: The Dangerous Tour 



Covington Cross (In Stereo) 



Here-Now 



Frannie 



Frannie 



Copsq 



Here-Now 



Out All Night 



Crossroads (in Stereo) q 



Empty Nest | Nurses q 



10:00 



Dream On q 



10:30 



Sanders 



Commish "Guns and Sons 



Sisters "A Promise Kept" 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Four. Braves at Pirates 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Four. Braves at Pirates 



Cop»(R)Q 



Out AH Night 



Movie: *** "Conrack" (1974, Drama) Jon Voight. PG 



Code 3 q 



Empty Nest 



Edgeq 



Nurses q 



Hunter "The Contract" 



Sisters "A Promise Kept" 



Scoreboard | College Football Notre Dame at Pittsburgh (Live) 



Movie: *»» "Jesus Christ Superstar" (1973) Ted Neeley. 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: +*Vz "Stone Cold" (1991) R 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Design. W. | "Cry-Help" 



Saturday Night Live 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Lifestyles-Rich 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q | Comic Strip 



News q [Saturday Night Live 



Movie: ***Vi "Prizzi's Honor" (1985) R 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: »• "The Sluggers Wife "(1985) Michael O'Keefe. 



Movie: ••» "The Doctor" (1991) William Hurt. PG-13 q 



Double Dare G.U.T.S. 



I Doug 



[Rugrats 



SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 11, 1992 



Movie: **Vi "Death Dreams" (1991) Christopher Reeve. 



Swamp [Beyond [Bradbury 



Hitchhiker 



Movie: **» "The Accused ' (1988) Jodie Foster. R q 



Movie: *** "City Slickers" (1991) Billy Crystal. PG-13 



Clarissa | Roundhouse |Ren-Stimpy | You Afraid? 



College Football: Stanford at UCLA. (Live) 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q [Rock Video Girls 



Movie: »»* "29th Street" (1991) R' q |Movie: »» "Class of 1999 



*V2 "Wimps' 



Movie: »»» "Thelma & Louise" (1991) Susan Sarandon 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: **»'/; "The Day Aftei (1983, Drama) Jason Robards 



Green Acres 



Confessions 



M.T. Moore [Dragnet 



Unsolved Mysteries 



"Ob-Desire" 



A. Hitchcock 



"China Bch" 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) Movie: 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



Movie: **V; "The Outsiders" (1983) Matt Dillon. 'PG' q 



(3:00) Movie: "Down-Out" | Sweating Bullets (In Stereo) [News 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** "Rock "n" Roll High School Forever" 



ABC News 



NFL Football: Houston Oilers at Cincinnati Bengals. From Riverfront Stadium. (Live 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Four. Brewers or Blue Jays at Athletics 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Four Brewers or Blue Jays at Athletics 



Movie: *• "Light of Day (1987, Drama) Michael J. Fox. [Star Trek: Next Gener 



NFL Football 



Houston Oilers at Cincinnati Bengals. From Riverfront Stadium. (Live) 



(2:00) Movie: [Movie: *+* "Jesus Christ Superstar (1973, Musical) Ted Neeley G 



Horse Racing: Spinster St 



Swamp 



Ten of Us 



PGA Golf: Las Vegas Invitational Final r ound 
Hitchhiker 



Two Dads [Beyond 



Movie: **+ "g<q"(1988, Comedy) Tom Hanks. PG' q 



(3:00) Movie: "Men- Work 



Can't on TV 



Disease 



Get Picture 



Endocrin. 



(Live) 



Gossip! 



Life Goes On (In Stereo) q 



Secret Service (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



Great Scott! | Ben Stiller q 



Secret Service (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



Movie: **Vi "Livin" Large! 



Videos 



Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



Baseball '92 



9:00 



1991) R' 



9:30 



One Night 



10:00 



Kids in Hall 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



Movie: "Overexposed" (1992, Drama) Marcy Walker, q 



Movie: »• "White Light "(1991) R 



Baseball '92 



In Color 



Movie: "Lady Boss" (1992, Drama) Kim Delaney. q 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Five. Braves at Pirates 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Five. Braves at Pirates 



Rocq 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



Movie: **Vi "Five Days One Summer (1982) PG' 



NFL 



Chck. Flag 



MacGyver "The Hood" q 



Movie: +*** The Empire Strikes Back (1980) PG 



Movie: **Vz "Young Guns II" (1990) Emilio Estevez. q 



Wild Side 



Medicine 



Fifteen 



NSAIDS 



Double Dare 



Medical 



G.U.T.S. 



Medical 



Auto Racing 



Married... |Herman [Flying Blind |Woops! q 



Movie: "Lady Boss "(1992, Drama) Kim Delaney. q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Paid Prog. 



Newsq 



Movie: **V2 "Caravans" (1978, Adventure) Anthony Qumn. PG 



Amazing Games: Indonesia 



Movie: "Invasion of Privacy" (1992) Robby Benson, q 



Movie: *** 



Movie: **** "Dances With Wolves" (1990 



"Wall Street" (1987) Michael Douglas. R q 



Belief 



Journal 



Looney 



Milestones 



Looney 



Medicine 



Western) Kevin Costner. 'PG-13' q 



F-Troop 



MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 12, 1992 



Family 



Mork 



Cardiology 



Van Dyke 



Medicine 



[Games 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) |Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



P 
I 



Cheers q 



Night Court 



Design. W. 



Love Co.i. 



Paid Prog- 



Suspect 



12:00 



Other-Mny 



Ent. Tonight 



Cur. Affair 



Kate& Allie 



Love Con. 



Perspective 



New WKRP 



portscenter 



Movie: "Breakout "(1975) 



Movie: »'/? "Pale Blood" (1991) R 



Hurricane Relief Concert 



Lucy Show 



Ob/Gyn 



Hi, I'm Home 



Family 



NFL 



Hollywood 



Movie:.**'/2 "True Colors 



Movie: *'/2 ""Child's Play 3 



M.T. Moore 



Physicians 



Dragnet 



Family 



1991) Rg 



A. Hitchcock 



Paid Prog. 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



(3:45) Movie: "Defending Your Life "(1991) 



Design. W 



Cur. Affair 



Cheers q 



Edition 



Newsq 



Cheers q 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: **** "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) Mark Hamill. PG' q 



Newsq 



News 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Five 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Five 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



(2:00) Movie: |Movie: **h 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



Tiny Toon [Batman q 



Newsq 



Newsq 



News 



News 



News q 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Five Days One Summer" (1982) Sean Connery. PG 



Pyramid 



(3:00) Movie: 



Press Luck 



Sports 



Cartoon Express 



Reporters 



Dracula Has Risen From the Gra ve ' 



(3:30) Movie: **h Cadence "(1990) 



Doug 



Doug 



Doug 



Boy Soldiers 



Doug 



Movie: *** "Why Me 7 " (1984) Glynnis Connor 



Chck. Flag [Up Close 



MacGyver "The Escape" q 



Movie: ** 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



Movie: *** "Picnic "(1956. 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



Movie: ***Vz "Return of the Jedi" (1983) Mark Hamill. PG' g 



Young Indiana Jones 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Blossom q 



Hearts Afire 



Hearts Afire 



10:30 



1st Lk.: River 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: *** "Dead Again" [WW] 'R' q 



NFL Football: Denver Broncos at Washington Redskins. From R.F.K Stadium, q [News q 



Movie: "Lady Boss' (1992, Drama) Kim Delaney. q 



Murphy B 



Murphy B. 



Love & War 



Love & War 



Movie: *''? "Feds' (1988. Comedy) Rebecca De Mornay 



Fresh Prince | Blossom q 



Sportscenter [Schaap Talk 



Drama) William Holden 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



"L 



'Flight of the Intruder" (1991) Danny Glover. 



Doug 



Supermarket 



Movie: ** "The Other Lover (1985) 



Doug 



Shop-Drop 



Doug 



Doug 



TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13. 1992 



Unsolved Mysteries 



NFL Monday |Mon. Mag 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Northern Exposure q 



Northern Exposure q 



Hunter 



Movie: "Lady Boss' (1992. Drama) Kim Delaney. q 



Movie: "The Duchess and the Dirtwater Fox" (1976) PG 



Beach Volleyball 



WWF Prime Time Wrestling 



Expedition Earth: Rafting 



Movie: *»*'/? "latie Danielle' (1990) Tsilla Chelton. 



Movie: **** "The Silence of the Lambs' (1991) R' q 



Get Smart [Superman 



L.A. Law "Leapin" Lizards 



M.T. Moore [Van Dyke 



News 



News 



News q 



Married.., 



Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Sweating Bullets (In Stereo) 



Edition 



Bullets 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: **** "The Apartment (1 960) 



Timber TSportscenter 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q [Equalizer 



Movie: Poison (1991) Larry Maxwell. |Movie: ** "Lower Level 



Movie: *** "Misery "(1990 Suspense) James Caan R 



Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



Lucy Show [Green Acres 



Movie: ** ■Choices (1986, Drama) George C. Scott .Thirtysomething 



"Fisher K. 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) Movie: 



Design. W. 



Cur. Affair 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



Movie: *»* Scrooged (1988) Bill Murray PG-13 q 



Cheers q 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



(2 30) Movie: 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



News q 



Cheers q 



Design. W. 



Newsq 



News 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon | Batman q 



Movie: »*** 



Newsq 



News q 



News 



News 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: ** "Honeymoon Academy ■" (1990) 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Wonder Yrs. 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid [Press Luck 



The Apartment" (1960. Comedy) Jack Lemmon 



NBC News 



Trucks 



Cartoon Express 



Sports 



Movie: +»'2 She (1965, Fantasy) Ursula Andress 



(3.30) Movie: **» "The Freshman" (1990) 



Underdog [Yogi Bear [Arcade 



Running [Up Close 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



Movie: 



8:00 8:30 



9:00 



Full House q 



"Running Mates" (1992, Comedy) 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Rescue 911 



Rescue 911 



Mr. Cooper 



Roseanne q 



9:30 



Lifestories 



Coach q 



Reasonable Doubts q 



10:00 



Sanders 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



Going to Extremes q 



Movie: »»v? "Delusion' (1991) R 



Dateline (In Stereo) q 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Six. Pirates at Braves 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Six Pirates at Braves 



Movie: •*'/? "77?e Flamingo Kid" (1984) Matt Dillon 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Rolling Stone Magazine's 20 Years of Rock 'n' Roll 



Sportscenter [Auto Racing 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: **h Memphis Belle" (1990) Matthew Modine. q 



How to Succeed r Business Without Really Trying 



Hey Dude (R 



Movie: "For Us the Living: The Medgar Evers Story 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Super Dave 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Auto Racing: IMSA 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Reasonable Doubts q 



Hunter 



Dateline (In Stereo) q 



News q 



News 



News 



News q 



Married... 



News q 



Movie: *** "The Misfits " (1961 , Drama) Marilyn Monroe. Clark Gable 



Auto Racing 



Boxing (Live) 



[Drag Racing: NHRA 



Movie: »» "Double Trouble ' (1991) R 



Get Smart | Superman 



LA. Law 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 14, 1992 



M.T. Moore 



Auto Racing 



Golden Girls 



12:00 



Madonna' 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Forever Knight (In Stereo) 



Edition [For. Knight 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



**« Birdman of Alcatraz 



Sportscenter 



Movie: *» Scanners It: The New Order" (1991) R |Movie: *Vz "Happy Hell Night (1991) NR 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q [ Equalizer 



Movie: **Vi Johnny Be Good (1988) R 



Van Dyke |Dragnet [A. Hitchcock" 



Movie: ** Mac and Me" (1988) Jade Category. 



Red Shoe 



Lucy Show 



Movie: "The Two Jakes 



Movie: "Wed Near" (1988) 



Green Acres 



Thirtysomething 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3 00) Movie: 



Design. W. 



Cur. Affair 



4:30 



Pen Pals q 



Cheers q 



Edition 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



Movie: «»*'? The Mission' (1986. Drama) Robert De Niro. 'PG' q 



Newsq 



Cheers q 



News q 



News 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Six 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Six 



Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



Tiny Toon | Batman q 



Newsq 



News q 



News 



News 



News q 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Full House q 



News q 



Movie: »»» "The Misfits' (1961. Drama) Marilyn Monroe. Clark Gable 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



(3 30) Movie: 



Press Luck 



Trucks 



Tempest 



Cartoon Express 



Hydroplane 



(300) Movie: Way-Were' 



Underdog [Yogi Bear 



Movie: *** 



(1982) John Cassavetes 



Princess 



[Heroes 



Arcade 



Hey Dude (R) 



The Women of Brewster Plafc_4}W&-.-A%mMmiteiii 



Inside PGA 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Hard Copy 



Jeopardy! q 



Golden Girls 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! g 



7:30 



First Look 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Movie: *** "Guilty by Suspicion (1991, Drama) PG-13 



Wonder Y. [Doogie H. 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



Baseball '92 



Baseball '92 



Home Imp 



Seinfeld q 



Laurie Hill q 



Mad-You 



10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



Dream On q 



Civil Wars Drone of Arc 



Law & Order (In Stereo) q 



Beverly Hills, 90210 (R) q 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Seven Pirates at Braves 
Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game Seven Pira tes at Braves 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



Movie: *»'; Taps' (1981, Drama) Timothy Hutton. Sean Penn PG 



Up Close Sportscenter [PBA Bowling Suncoast Senior Open 



MacGyver The Assassin [Quantum Leap (In Stereo) iMurder, She Wrote q 



Movie: *» Lenas Holiday 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) q 



Seinfeld q | Mad-You 



Movie: *** 



Catwalk "First Gig 



Law 8 Order (In Stereo) q 



Semi-Tough (1977) Burt Reynolds R 



Boxing: Bruce Seldon vs Tony Tubbs (Live) 



Movie: ** Writers Block (1991) Morgan Fairchild q 



Enemy Among Us (R) 



What You Do 



Crazy Kids 



imfff-f 



(1990) Felicity Waterman [Movie: »* Hangfire (1991) Brad Davis. [Movie: ** "Class of 1 999 (1990 ) R 



Movie: »*» The Gods Must Be Crazy II 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Get Smart 



Comedy 



-tArfcnr, 



11:00 



One Night 



Newsq 



News 



News 



News q 



Married... 



News q 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: White Light" (19911 



Golden Girls | Nightline 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Dangerous Curves 



Edition 



Curves 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Movie: *** Bob & Carol & Ted S Alice 



Speedweek [Sportscenter 



MacGyver The Outsiders 



PRCA Rodeo 



Equalizer 



Movie: **Vi Paradise (1991) Melanie Griffith. PG-13 



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The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 13 




by Chuck Shepherd 



-Clint Lenz, 10, took first 
place in the Invent America 
contest in July with a glow-in- 
the-dark toilet seat for those 
middle-of-the-night forays. He 
won $1,000, computers for his 
class, and a spot in the 
Smithsonian Institution. 

-Third grader Andrew S. 
Meredith of Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, won first place in a 
national inventors contest with 
Toilet Targats, floating doodads 
to improve a male's aim. He said 
he got the idea because the boys' 
room at school smelled bad, 
presumably from all of the 
misfiring. 

-Delta airlines, coming off a 
$180 million quarterly loss, 
reported in July an annual 
savings of $1.4 million in labor 
and food costs based on a single 
decision: eliminating the 
decorative piece of lettuce under 
the vegetables served on in-flight 
meals. 

-For its grand opening in June 
in Bartlett, Tenn., Dyer's Cafe 
brought in cooked grease its 
owners said was 80 years old, 
transported from Dyer's flagship 
hamburger restaurant in 
Memphis by sheriff's deputies 
on motorcycles. Said owner Jim 
Marshall, "The grease is our 



secret, and it's got to be 
protected." 

-The final hours of the now- 
closed Belk Lindsay store in 
Tampa Fla., in July were marked 
by clothing discounts so deep 
that women, tired of waiting for 
a dressing room, changed in and 
out of clothes in the middle of 
the store. Said one employee, of 
a middle-aged woman, "she had 
most of her clothes off and was 
trying to pull on a pair of pants 
when I got there and told her she 
just couldn't do that" 

-In July, Danny Fouts, his wife 
and her sister, in New York City 
to appear on the "Sally Jessy 
Raphael" show to discuss their 
arrest for shoplifting their 
wedding supplies on their 
wedding day in March, were 
arrested for stealing things from 
the New York Ramada hotel that 
the TV show had booked them in 
for their stay. 

- In September, the 
management of a farm in the 
former Soviet Republic of 
Kyrgystan announced it had cut 
off electricity in the area in order 
to tear workers away from 
television. Too many were 
skipping work to watch episodes 
of the 249-part Mexican soap 
opera 'The Rich Also Cry." 

-Kenneth Jeffries, 24, was 



rP University Book Center rP _ 
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OFF! 
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arrested in West Haven, Conn., 

in August for robbing a 

convenience store. Police 

reported that he had first offered 

the clerk $1 for a pack of gum as 

a ruse and then taken $40 in the 

robbery. However, said police, 

Jeffries returned a minute later 

and asked, uncertainly, "Did I 

pay for the gum?" By that ume 

the clerk had summoned police, 

and Jeffries was soon 

apprehended. 

-Joseph Fallat Sr., 61, was 

charged with killing his wife, 

Florene, 50, in Harrison City, 

Pa., in August. Said a 

patrolman, "[Fallat] said she 

would stack the refrigerator full 

of vegetables, hiding the milk, 

and he wasn't going to take that 

anymore." Fallat allegedly 

chased his wife through the 

house and stabbed her 219 rim^« 
- To get a "specific use permit" 

for a building in San Marcos, 

Texas, the occupier must qualify 

for a certain number of points. 



Among the ways San Marcos 
State Univerity fraternity houses 
can qualify: one point for 
notifying the police 48 hours 
before a social event, three 
points for posting a "maximum 
occupancy" sign, and six points 
for passing formal rules against 
doing things that result in death 
or sexual assault. 

- A Los Angeles Times story 
on fear of height in July featured 
an interview with the 
psychotherapist who heads the 
Anxiety Disorders Association. 
He reported that one of his 
partients could cross the 200- 
foot-high Chesapeake Bay 
Bridge in Maryland only if his 
wife drove the car and locked 
him in the trunk. 

- The European reported that a 
wildlife park in Somerset, 
England, booked a 60-piece 
symphony orchestra to serenade 
an elephant in order to encourage 
him to mate with one of the five 
females that have been available 
to him for several months, but in 
which he had not shown interest 
Costs reached about $18,000. 

-The most popular video in 

Ch/pHaii porlior »hi« v#»ar u/a« a 

60-minute fireplace fire, shown 
from the point of ignition until it 
burns into cinders, and featuring 
a sound track of fire-crackling 



wood. Price: about $35. 

- Library officials in Sidney, a 
town north of Victoria, British 
Columbia, reported that a 
"mystery editor" has been 
stalking the library this year, 
compulsively "correcting" text 
of which he disapproves. For 
example, long notes hand written 
in margins of books explain why 
"the British Isles" is not the 
same thing as "Great Britain." 

- As of July, the Pentagon has 
awarded nearly four million 
National Defense Service 
Medals for work in Desert Shield 
and Desert Storm, even though 
only 500,000 troops actually 
served in the Persian Gulf. The 
medal will be routinely awarded 
to everyone in uniform until the 
conflict officially ends. 

-Alfred Abadie, 37, was 
arrested in New Orleans in 
September and charged with the 
murder of his neighbor, Kurt 
King. According to neighbors, 
the two had been arguing 
because King had run his edging 
machine three inches into 
Abadie's yard. 



(C) 1992 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Movie Review: 

The Mohicans: striving for an Oscar 



by Matt Niemla 
Features Writer 



"The Last of the Mohicans" 
Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis 
Madeleine Stowe 
Directed: Michael Mann 
Rated R 
**** stars 



When someone says that the 
book was better than the movie, 
they haven't seen "The Last of 
the Mohicans," which was 
adapted from the James 
Fenimore Cooper novel of the 
same name. This is the second 
movie adapted from the novel. 
In 1936, Randolph Scott used a 
more war-like view toward the 
story, while the present day 
movie tips toward a more 
romantic aura. 



Picture yourself in 1757 in the 
middle of the French-Indian war, 
where the French are fighting the 
British. America is quite young 
f and the only true inhabitants are 
the Native Americans and a few 
farmers of English descent, 
which are forced to take sides. In 
the middle of this is "Hawkeye," 
(Daniel Day-Lewis) a white man 
who is raised by the Mohicans 
after the death of his parents. His 
love interest is "Cora" 
(Madeleine Stowe), who is an 
English colonel's daughter, and 
also attracted to the long-haired 
Mohican. The only thing in their 
way is the colonel and about 100 
angry indians hungry for the 
blood of Cora and her family. 

Along with this "perfect script" 
the movie goer also enjoys some 



Red Stallion Nite Club 

For The Best In Nite Club 
Entertainment 

Appearing Saturday Oct. 9 

Blues SI Us 

10pm-2am 



ti= 



— i— 



breathtaking scenery and some 
brilliant cinematography. 
Michael Mann, the creator of 
"Miami Vice," wrote and directed 
the screenplay. At many times 
during the film, this is evident by 
the use of those all too familiar 
Jan Hammer-like synthesized 
tones and melodies that were 
used throughout the "Miami 
Vice" episodes. Except this time, 
instead of Don Johnson with a 
suit and automatic pistol, we see 
Daniel Day-Lewis dressed in the 
height of eighteenth century 
Mohican fashion, complete with 
musket. 

The only flaw of "The Last of 
the Mohicans" is it's sometimes 
confusing plot and its inability to 
be easily followed. Stuffing a 
huge novel into 107 minutes is 
difficult to achieve. 

The battle scenes are a 
spectacle of the 1987 civil war 
film "Glory," which are quite 
explosive and true to their time. 
Mann goes to the limit, making 
sure each detail from the 
wardrobe to the artillery are 
perfect to the period. What he 
creates for us is a beautiful film 
to experience, worthy of an 
Oscar nomination, if not the 



w+, .. 



Page 14 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 
Construction update: 



Main Street getting back to normal 



by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writing 



Work continues on Main Street 
to replace the building leveled by 
last year's May 4 fire. 
Businesses lost in the blaze 
included Collegio's Pizza and 
the China Town restaurant. 
Several apartments rented by 
Clarion University students were 
also lost. 

The three new structures 
should be completed by the end 
of the year. Two different 
contractors are erecting the 
buildings. W.E. Branson of 
Pittsburgh is constructing the 
building next door to the 
American Legion and also the 
new Vinny's Pizza shop. Delta 
contracting is in charge of the 
building which will house the 
new Chinese restaurant. All 
three buildings will have 
windows and doors installed by 
Abbie Glass of Plum Borough. 
Dick Campbell, foreman of the 
Abbie Glass Crew, hopes to have 
all window and door installations 
finished by the end of this week. 

According to W.E. Branson, 
his work should be done by 
Christmas. The new building 



next to the American Legion will 
have rental space downstairs. 
The area will be a large social 
hall, available for rent to 
wedding parties, receptions, 
meetings and other gatherings. 
Branson estimated the cost of the 
two buildings his company built 
at around $900,000. 

The new structure in the 
middle will be the new Chinese 
restaurant. The building is 
owned by Dr. Wong, and the 
restaurant is leased by a separate 
operator. Melvin Kifer of Delta 
contracting is hoping for his 
work to be finished by the end of 
October. Upstairs will be four 
new apartments. Kifer declined 
to estimate the cost of the 
structure. 

Price estimates of all buildings 
did not include furnishing costs. 
Kifer said the cost of furnishing 
the restaurant could be close to 
half of the cost of the building 
itself. 

Both contractors hoped to have 
finished fronts before the start of 
the Autumn Lesf Festival Week, 
to try to get Main Street back to 
normal. 



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The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 15 



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How do you think the 

Pirates will do in the 

playoffs? 



CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Ralond Nice 





I wr 


• ,. • 










J*tfk\ "^^1 



Matt Madigan 

Freshman, Accounting 

"The Buccos will not accomplish anything." 



Lois Oertel/Clarion Call 
One of the buidings due to be finished soon is the Chinese restaurant, Chinatown seen 
above. The restaurant burned down last May along with Collegio's pizza. 



Yom Kippur: a brief history of the meaning behind the Jewish holiday 



by Shawn P. Seagriff 
Features Writer 



From sundown on October 6 to 
sundown October 7, Jewish 
people everywhere will be 
celebrating Yom Kippur. 

Yom Kippur is the Day of 
Attonement and is considered by 
people of the Jewish religion to 



be the holiest day of the year. It 
also marks the cimination of the 
ten Penitential Days. 

The day is observed by fasting 
and prayer, and by rededication 
to a religious belief. 

Although Yom Kippur is 
regarded as judgement day, it is 
not mournful in character 



because it is also a period of 
grace and offers an opportunity 
for one to seek forgiveness for 
sins committed against God. 

The liturgy for the day is very 
elaborate. The eve of Yom 
Kippur begins with the chanting 
of the Kol Nidre, a famous 
prayer, a plea for absolution 



Get ready, it's Bedrock Cafe time again 



from religious vows which 
cannot be kept. Prayers are 
offered throughout the whole of 
the following day, the Torah is 
read twice and Yizkor, the 
memorial prayer for the dead, is 
recited. The end of the day is 
marked by the blowing of the 
shofar or rams horn. 

Yom Kippur is one of two 
principal Jewish holidays. It is 



the most sacred Jewish festival 
of the year and is the only fast 
day prescribed in the Torah. It 
also is the approximate 
beginning of the Jewish new 
year. 

Yom Kippur is believed by 
some scholars to be dated back 
to Mosiac times as a day of 
fasting and dates from the 
religious revival under Ezar. 








by Megan Casey 
Features Writer 



What are your plans for this 
Friday night? A party? A hot 
date? Just hangin'? If you're 
looking for something 
entertaining, check out the 
Bedrock Cafe. 

Tommy Belmont will join the 
ranks of Bedrock Cafe 
headliners at 8 o'clock, Friday. 



Belmont's show consists of well- 
known rock songs. 

Belmont hails from 
Woodstock, New York. He was 
originally born in the town of 
Monticello, New York and began 
playing in clubs at the age of 
fourteen. Belmont says he has 
been inspired by a broad range 
of artists, including the Beatles, 
Sting and Little Feat. He has 



opened for such well-known 
musicians as Cheap Trick, 
Richard Marx, The Fixx and 
Melissa Ethridge. 
The show will start at 8 p.m. 



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404 Main St. Clarion, PA (814) 226-9444 

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$2 OFF Haircuts 

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Waxing. Foil Highlights • Conditioners • Sculptured Nails 

Manicures • Ear Piercing • Tanning • Facials 




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Graphic Drawings by: 
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Mugs, Puzzles, Posters, 
T-shirts and More!! 

10% DISCOUNT! 

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Daily Mon. thru Sal 1 pm to 9 p.m. 
Sun 1? (noon) to S p m 



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Ron Stokes 

Sophomore, Biology 

"I think the odds are in their favor and 

they have good chances to win." 



Jennifer Gill 

Sophomore, English 

"I'm not a psychic, but I do hope they do 

well since I live in Pittsburgh." 



Denise Bump 

Junior, Special Education 

"Considering their performance so far, 

they'll do awesome!" 



«ftj 




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! - ' a 


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Tracey J. Austin 

Sophomore, Undecided 

"They're going to take it all the way." 



MM 



Mike Jewart 
Junior, History 
"Ray, I have two words for you. 
da Bucs'!" 



Ben "Jimmy Hat" Morton 

Sophomoi • l , History 

The Yankees will take it in 5, and Mattingly 



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Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



First cultural night is a trip 



by Lisa Keeker 
Contributing Writing 



Clarion International 
Association hosted phase one of 
its cultural program on Friday, 
October 2. Countries in the 
Middle East, such as, Turkey, 
Egypt, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia 
were featured. 

"This particular cultural 
program was designed to show 
people what life is like in the 
Middle East, because few people 
know about it," said Abanmi 
Abdelaziz, a program 
participant. 

The program featured short 
films on Saudi Arabia, Kuwait 
and Turkey. These films served 
as educational visual aids and 
took the viewer through 
everyday life in a foreign 
country. 

Some highlights of the night 
consisted of an Arabic language 
demonstration. During this 
segment, the audience 
participated by learning how to 



speak and write common 
American phrases and words in 
Arabic. 

To wrap up the evening, a 
buffet of Middle Eastern foods 
was served. This buffet carried 
foods that ranged from two types 
of rice and vegetable salads, to 
Middle Eastern flaked pastries 
and good-old fashioned kool-aid. 

"I found tonight to be a lot of 
fun. There are so many different 
cultures in the world, and I feel it 
is our duty to learn as much as 
we can about other countries and 
their lifestyles," said Jennifer 
Taylor, a senior english major. 

The Clarion International 
Association will be holding 
additional culture programs 
throughout the semester. The 
next program features Europe 
and is scheduled for November 
1, at 7 p.m. 

These events, which are to be 
held in Gemmell Student Center 
Multi-Purpose Room, are free 
and open to the public. 




Scott Dillon/Clarion Call 

Among the many scheduled events on cultural night, people had a chance to enjoy 
cuisine from many Middle East countries. This was the first of many cultural nights 
scheduled for this semester. 



"V t 



Kappa Theta Phi fails to meet requirements 



by Laura Navas 
Features Writer 



Kappa Theta Phi, a local 
sorority, lost campus recognition 
when their appeal for associate 
membership with the university's 
Panhallenic Council failed. 

The sorority first appeared on 
Clarion's campus two years ago 
after meeting all necessary 
requirements for starting a new 
sorority for women. The group 
was then granted the traditional 
one year associate membership 
status. Diana Anderson, the 
Panhellenic advisor described 
associate membership as a 
process to determine if the 
members of the group display a 
willingness to cooperate and 
participate in Panhellenic 
Council, participate in all Greek 
activities, adhere to all the rules 
and regulations of Panhel, 
Student Senate and Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and 
maintain a Quality Point Average 
of 2.0 or better for each active 



member and pledge. 

In a regular meeting prior to 
the end of that one year associate 
membership period, a vote to 
determine full Panhel 
recognition was to be taken. 
However, due to the fact that the 
sorority did not meet all of the 
necessary requirements, an 
appeal was made to continue the 
associate membership for 
another year. That appeal failed 
with a two-thirds majority vote. 

This summer the sorority again 
asked that associate membership 
status be given for another year. 
Again , the appeal failed, this 
time due to the introduction of a 
new criteria. The criteria being 
that associate membership 
cannot be granted without 
backing of a national panhellenic 
conference or national pnhellenic 



council. 

Kappa Theta Phi, Panhel 
representative, Denise Bump 
describes the new criteria as a 
catch twenty two. "It is hard to 
achieve national backing without 
the panhellenic associate 
membership status", says Bump. 
Overall, Bump feels that Kappa 
Theta Phi was given a fair 
opportunity. However, Bump 
says that the Panhellenic Council 
could have offered more help in 
finding a national sorority. 

Although the memberts of 
Kappa Theta Phi will no longer 
be recognized as a sorority, they 
still share a common bond of 
friendship) — and that is the true 
meaning of sisterhood. 



SUB EATING CONTEST 

Sponsered by: Clarion Subway 

Apple Computers 
CU Book Center 



Scheduled for: Thursday, October 15 

Time: 12:00 noon 

Location : Gemmell performance area 

Prizes awarded to the five fastest contestants. 
Entry forms due by October 9, at 4:00 p.m. 
Free drinks for all spectators Hi! 

—For information call Kevin at 2815 



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small nachos 

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Mon.-Fri, 11 AM- 3 PM 



Night Hours Start 10 PM 
Seven Days a Week. 

HE Owl Special 3/$1.88 
Available At All Time* 



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Images of the West 

Experience the culture 
of the Americans! 




Just arrived: 

New Selection of Crystals, 

Mexican Blankets, and rings 

starting at $3.75!! 



Hours: 10 a.m. -5 p.m. 
Mon. - Sat. 



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(814) 226-5513 






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606 MAIN STREET, • CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 16214 
Phone 814/226-8272 



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Get a piece of the Commemorative Wall 

$250 for organizations. The 



The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 17 J 



by Kim Do wd 
Features Writer 



Students can permanently leave 
their mark on Clarion University 
to recognize their achievements 
and university spirit. The 
Student Alumni Association is 
encouraging students to purchase 
a brick to be placed on the 
Commemorative Wall, which is 
located at the main entrance of 
the Gemmell Center. The bricks 
are engraved with the student's 
name and year of graduation. 

The cost of the bricks are $75 
for students, $150 for alumni and 



money raised from the sales of 
the bricks will be used to pay for 
continuing maintenance of 
Gemmell. 

The university began the brick 
sales in 1989, since then 87 
bricks have been placed in the 
wall. The Student Alumni 
Association has a goal of adding 
at least 100 new bricks to the 
Commemorative Wall this year. 

Anyone interested are 
encouraged to purchase a brick. 
Contact Gretchen Hertel or 
Theresa Bostic at 226-2637. 



A DISPATCH FROM 



MAGAZINE 



Some of the Stupidest College Courses in America. Pt. 

You don't have to leave America on some fraudulent foreign program to either eat chevre or take 
ridiculous courses. Listed below are some actual courses you can take for credit from actual 
American universities. So pop open a Grolsch, pick your schedule for the fall semester, and have that 
worthless junior-year-abroad experience without waiting in a long line to renew your passport. 



Advanced Mime "Emphasis will be given to 
such areas as variations in mime styles, 
control of weight in space, and creation of solo 
mimes." Loyola University of Chicago 

Stream Fishing "Designed to provide an 
understanding of angling as a wholesome 
outdoor activity with long-range, carry-over 
value....Student must provide own chest 
waders or hip boots...." Ithaca College 

Leisure Education "The recreation 
professional is considered a facilitator of 
his/her clients' expanded leisure awareness. 
Focus is on enabling clients to evaluate the 
individual and social dynamics of leisure, and 
assess their leisure attitudes, skills, and 
options." Ithaca College 

Rope Jumping (Single Rope) "...Theory and 
techniques progress from basicto fapcy, 
developing hand-to-foot coordination essential to 
all sports." University of Nevada at Las Vegas 

The Virtues of Vice "We will discuss 
competing conceptions of some alleged vices — 
among them, lying, lust, cowardice, jealousy 
and avarice — in an effort to articulate the 



relationship between ethics and ideology...." 
Hampshire College 

Driving Range Instruction "Methods and 
techniques-including tracking, turns, parking 
and turnabouts with a special emphasis in 
accident avoidance; all in a controlled 
environment." St. Joseph's College 

Science Fiction Film "This course focuses on 
post-war American science fiction film as a 
cultural and ideological product.. ..Screenings 
may include: Them!, The Thing, Invasion of the 
Body Snatchers, The Incredible Shrinking 
Man, Blade Runner, The Terminator, and La 
Jetee." Hobart and William Smith Colleges 

J.R.R. Tolkien "Tolkien's theories of the 
fantasy or 'faerie' story are studied in his short 
stories, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings 
trilogy ." Alfred University 

Camp Counseling "Designed to give 
prospective camp counselors an understanding 
of the total camp program, duties and 
responsibilities of camp counselors. 
Techniques of camp leadership will be 
considered." University of Georgia 




The Rainmaker is coming!! 



The Clarion University Theater will open its 1992-93 
season on October 13-17, at the Marwick-Boyd Little 
Theatre. Look for the review in next weeks issue of 
the Call. 



BOOKSMITH TRADING, INC. 



BOOKS GIFTS CARDS CLOTHING 

. "when it comes to textbooks, 
we've got you covered" 



WE BUY BOOKS FROM 
STUDENTS AND FACULTY 



CAMPUS EVENTS 


Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Don Crotsley 


Thurs Oct. 8 


Fri Oct. 9 


Sat Oct. 10 


- Sorority "Welcome 


- Today is Deadline: 


- X-Country at Pa ! 


Social" (Gem 250/252) 


Dec. Grad. Apps. due 


Short In vitationa 


6:30 pm 


from Deans 


(Bethlehem, PA) 


- UAB MOVIE 


(Registrar's Office) 




"Final Analysis" (Gem 






M-P) 8 pm 


, 




Sun Oct. 11 


Mon Oct. 12 


Tues Oct. 13 


- ALF WEEK 


- COLUMBUS DAY 


- ALF WEEK 


- UAB Moive 


- ALF WEEK 


- American Chemical 


"Final Analysis" (Gem 


- Faculty Senate mtg. 


Society Conference 


M-P) 8pm 


(B-8 Chap) 4 pm 


(Gem M-P) 6 pm 




- Student Senate mtg. 


- Drama Production 




(248 Gem) 7 pm 


"The Rainmaker" 

(LT) 8 pm 


Wed Oct. 14 


Thur Oct. 15 


Fri Oct. 16 


- ALF WEEK 


- ALF WEEK 


- ALF WEEK 


- American Chemical 


- Drama Production 


- National Boss's Day 


Society Conference 


"The Rainmaker" 


- Minority Affairs/ 


(Gem M-P) 6 pm 


(LT) 8 pm 


City Beat Talent how 


- Drama Production 


* '.-'■■ '-..!.' 


(Chap) 6 pm 


"The Rainmaker" 


; 


- Drama Production 


(LT) 8 pm 




"The Rainmaker' 
(LT) 8 pm 



Into the Streets 

(a community service organization) 

First meeting 

When: Monday Oct. 19 
5:00 p.m. 

Where: Rm 248 Gemmell 
-The meeting is open to 
all interested in 
volunteering time for 
community service. 



CASH PAID FOR OLD COMIC BOOKS 

1930s 1960s (10c and 12« original cover ones) 







*p COMIC 
f^BOOKS*^ 
101 

Comics, Cards, & Collectibles 

1 5 S. 6th Ave. 

Clarion, PA 16214 

227-2544 

Open: Mon.-Sat. 10-6 
Fri. till 8:00 




Scott Dillon/Clarion Call 
If you can't stand the sight of blood, you may not want 
to look at this picture. Many people came out to give 
blood on Monday, as the bloodmobile was here. 



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Page 18 - The Clarion CaU ■ 10-8-92 



Autumn Leaf Festival 1992 



Wcek-Lonsi Activities 



ART SHOW - The Bi-County 
Artists Associations will be 
sponsoring the 34th 
Annual ALF Art Show to be 
held October 14 through October 
18. The show opens at 8 p.m. on 
Wednesday with a professional 
critique and continues from 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through 
Saturday and 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. 
on Sunday. The show is open to 
all artists 18 years or older in 
categories of painting, sculpture, 
photography and crafts. A 
critique is a $2 donation. 

CARNIVAL - If you are ready 
for fun, come down and visit the 
annual ALF carnival. Try our 
thrilling rides, like the Pirates 
Ship, bumper cars and 
Paratrooper just to name a few. 
The carnival will be located near 
the courthouse. It starts Sunday, 
October 10 and will continue 
through Sunday, October 18. 

CONCESSIONS - When you 
are ready for a snack or looking 
for a great souvenir, the 
concession stands will be 
waiting. Located in Memorial 
Park, across the street from the 
carnival, the stands will feature a 
large variety of food and 
keepsakes. Welcomed back this 
year will be Bamboo Palace, J & 
K Veggies, Molnars Cinnamon 
Rolls and french fries from the 
Kiwanis, just to name a few. 
New this year year will be Han's 
German Foods, Buffalo Burgers, 
Hot Roasted Almonds and Soft 
Pretzels with Sauces. 

CLARION UNIVERSITY 
,, STORYTELLERS M 

Featuring storytellers Marcia 
Bowers, Trina Tjersland, Anne 
Creany and CUP students. This 
event will be held in the 
evenings from October 12 
through October 18 and all 
through the weekend. Tent 
locations will be announced at a 
later date. 

CLARION COUNTY 

HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
MUSEUM: The Clarion 
County Historical Society 
Museum at 18 Grant Street will 
be open the following times 
during ALF: Sunday, October 
11, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., Tuesday 
through Thursday, 1:00 to 4:00 
p.m. and Sunday, October 18, 
1:00 to 4.00 p.m. 



AIRPLANE RIDES: Clarion 
County Airport will be offering 
sightseeing tours throughout the 
week of ALF. For more 
information on departure times 
or to arrange rides, call 226- 
9993. 

SOUVENIRS AND INFOR- 
MATION: Information and 
comemorative items can be 
found at the Gazebo in Memorial 
Park or at the Chamber of 
Commerce, 41 South 5th 
Avenue. Items offered for sale 
include sweatshirts depicting 
1992 ALF logo, hats, glasses 
and limited edition prints. 

AIRSTREAM TRAILER 
SPECIAL EVENTS RALLY: 

Located at Penn Wood Airstream 
Park, home of the Pennsylvania 
Unit of WBBCI, Inc. , Box 7, 
Limestone, Pa 16234. 

CLARION MALL: There will 
be a Sport's Card Show in the 
Clarion Mall on Saturday, 
October 10 and Sunday, October 
11. There will be live exotic 
animals on display from 
Tuesday, October 13 through 
Saturday, October 17. On 
Wednesday, October 14 through 
Saturday, October 17, there will 
be a craft show and on Sunday, 
October 18, Elvis will perform. 



Friday, October 9 



9TH ANNUAL ALF OPEN 
TENNIS TOURNAMENT: 

The event will be held at the 
CUP tennis courts from 5 p.m. to 
10 p.m. A $10 fee will be 
charged for the first event and $5 
for the second event. Pre- 
registration is required. 



Saturday, October 10 



ALF TUG-OF-WAR: This 
event starts at 11:00 a.m. at 
Clarion High School. There are 
four divisions: community 
business, college and youth. 
Pre-registration is required. 226- 
9161 

ALF VOLLEYBALL TOURN- 
AMENT: The tournament starts 
at 11:00 a.m. at Clarion High 
School. There is an adult 
category (post high school). Pre- 
registration only. 226-9161 

OPEN TENNIS TOURNA- 
MENT: See listing for Friday, 
October 9. Time: 9 a.m. to 9 
pjn. 



FARMERS MARKET: The 

market will be held in Memorial 
Park from 8:30 a.m. until early 
afternoon. Participants are 
welcome. 

ALF AUTUMN TEA AND 
FASHION SHOWCASE: The 

showcase will be held at the 
Holiday Inn of Clarion at 11 a.m. 
Participating Main Street 
clothing stores only. The cost is 
$7.50 per person and it is by 
reservation only, since seating is 
limited. Call 226-79 1 3 for more 
information. 

FIFTH ANNUAL BOWLING 
TOURNAMENT: The event 
will be held at Mt. Joy Lanes, 
Exit 7 1-80. This year's event 
will be a "Doubles No-Tap." It 
will be open to men and women 
and will be a handicap 
tournament. The entry fee is $12 
per peson or $24 per team. 
Squad times will be 6:00 p.m. 
and 9:00 p.m. Pre-registration is 
required. For more information, 
call 797-5312 or 226-9161. 

GOLF TOURNAMENT: The 

tournament will be held at the 
Mayfield Golf Course with a 
10:00 a.m. start. The play will 
be a four man amateur scramble. 
All players must have a certified 
handicap of 10 or above. It is 
$180 per team to register. Call 
226-8888 for more details. 

SPORTS CARD SHOW: The 

show will be held at the Clarion 
Mall from 10:00 a.m. until 9:00 
p.m. 



ALF SQUARE DANCE: The 

dance will be from 8 p.m. until 
11 p.m. at the Keystone 
Elementary School cafeteria in 
Knox, PA. Callers will be Tom 
Miller and Tom Mohney. 
Fiddle- A-Rounds Square Dance 
Club will sponsor the dance. 
The Texas Two-Step will be 
showcased between squares. All 
western square dancers 
welcome. 



Sunday, October II 



HUNTERS TRAIL 3'D 
ARCHERY COURSE: 

Registration is from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. There will be 28 McKenzie 
targets. Prizes will be awarded. 
Call the Sportsman's Cove at 
226-6272 for more information. 

JUNIOR OLYMPICS: This 
event will be held at CUP 
stadium for children ages 5 to 12 
years, grades K through sixth. 
Pre-registration is required. 
Entry forms are available at 
Elementary schools in Clarion 
County. Entry fees are $2. 
Starting time is 1 p.m. Awards 
will be presented. 

UNITED WAY OF CLARION 
COUNTY 10K RACE AND 
3M WALK-A-THON: This 
event is the kick off for ALF and 
Junior Olympics. It will begin at 
CUP stadium and will end at the 
back of the stadium. For more 
information, call 226-8760. 

9TH ANNUAL ALF TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT: See listing 
for Friday, October 9. It will be 
held from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 



GOLF TOURNAMENT: The 

tournament will be held at the 
Mayfield Golf Course. There 
will be a four man open * 
scramble with a 10 a.m. shotgun 
start. The cost is $220 per team 
to register. Call 226-8888 for 
more information. 



Monday, October 12 



MISS TEEN ALF PAGEANT: 

The pageant will be held at the 
Clarion Area High School 
auditorium from 8 p.m. to 10 
p.m. Advanced ticket sales only! 
Tickets are on sale at the Clarion 
Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 
South 5th Avenue. Ticket prices 
are $5 and $6. It will be one 
night only. 



Tiiesdav, October 13 



ALF VARIETY SHOWCASE: 

The fifth annual showcase will 
be held at the Clarion Area High 
School auditorium. The doors 
will open at 6:30 p.m. and the 
show will begin at 7 p.m. The 
variety show is open to all ages, 
5 and over. Pre-registration is 
required for all participants. 
Medals and certificates will be 
awarded. 

CLARION COUNTY 

CAREER CENTERS FREE 
ROLLER SKATING PARTY: 

The skating party is open to all 
Clarion County High School 
students in grades 7 through 12. 
It will be held at Skateland from 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. For more 
information call 226-4391. 



pari of the CLARION AREA 




POMTS OF ALF ACTIVITY "•. 

A Clarion Mall 

B Mayfield Golf Course 

C Holiday Inn (with Tourist In- 
formation Booth) 
Knights Inn and Days 
Inn 

Strattan Homes 

AM Clarion Co. Airport 

fW Penn Wood Airstream INTERSTATE 80 EXITS 9 AND 10 will be the most congested on 

Oct 12 and 13 Consider using EXITS 7, 8. or 11 when arriving in or 



LOCATION OF ALF 
SCHEDULE SPONSORS 

CH Clarion Hospital 
McO McDonald's 



Park 



Kf Keystone High School leaving the Clarion Area 



^he Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 19 






* 



v 



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Schedule of events 



FREE SCREENING OF PRE- 
SCHOOL CHILDREN: 

Screening will take place in 
downtown Clarion in front of the 
courthouse from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
The process takes approximately 
45 minutes and includes speech, 
language, hearing, general 
development and vision. 
Children from birth to age 5 will 
be accepted. Appointments are 
appreciated but walk-ins will be 
accepted as time permits. Call 1- 
800-672-7123 for more 
information. 



\W'(liK-s(la\, Oi-lohcr 14 



ALF BATTLE OF THE 
BANDS: This year's Battle of 
the Bands competition will be 
held at CUP Gemmell Center. 
Doors open at 6 p.m. with tickets 
available at the door of the 
Clarion Area Chamber of 
Commerce office. The 
categories are High School and 
College. Sound equipment will 
be provided and pre-registration 
is required. There is no fee to 
enter a band. Cash prizes and 
trophies will be awarded. For 
more information call 226-9161 
or 782-3863. 



27TH ANNUAL FOREST 
AREA CRAFT ASSO- 
CIATION SHOW: The show 
will be located at the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars building, on the 
corner of 6th Avenue and Liberty 
Street from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Hand-crafted articles will be 
available for purchase. For more 
information call 226-5289. 

KIDDIES PARADE: The 

Clarion Area Jaycees, 
McDonald's and the Clarion 
County Humane Society are 
sponsoring the 17th annual 
children's parade. Line-up is at 



FARMERS AND CRAFTERS 
DAY: From 7:30 a.m. until 
dusk, over 150 crafters will 
display their homemade crafts 
and goods and fresh foods in 
downtown Clarion. Call 226- 
9161 for more information. 

2ND ANNUAL QUAINT 
QUILTED CREATIONS: St. 

Joseph School of Lucinda will 
sponsor a competition quilt show 
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the 
school which is located on route 
66 north, in Lucinda. Eight 
categories will be on display and 
judged. There will also be a 



SIDEWALK SALES: Many 
sales will be going on in 
downtown Clarion from 9 a.m. 
to dusk. A shuttle bus service 
will be provided between 
downton Clarion and the 
Clarion Mall. 

FIRE TRUCK RIDES: The 

Clarion Fire & Hose #1 
Company will be sponsoring fire 
truck rides. Rides depart from 
the fire hall, located at 525 Wood 
Street in Clarion at 6 p.m. until 
dusk. 

OWENS-BROCKWAY 
GLASS FACTORY TOURS: 

Tours start at the O-I Clubhouse, 
151 Grand Avenue. Tours are 
available from 1 to 3 p.m. You 
must be at least 12 years of age 
to participate. Flat, closed-toed 
shoes only. Call 226-0506 for 
more information. 

STRATTAN HOMES TOURS: 

Tours will take place at the Knox 
plant in the morning. Parking 
space is available. Call 226- 
9161 foynore information. 

CLARION MALL CRAFT 
SHOW: Wall to wall crafters 
will line the Clarion mall. Items 
on display include doll clothes, 
handwoven rugs, baby quilts, 
wood items, Christmas items, 
ceramics and leather goods just 
to name a few. For more 
information call 226-5180. 

HEALTH FAIR: A Health Fair 
will be held at Klingensmith's 
Drug Store in the 800 Center 
mall from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Testing of pulse, blood pressure, 
cholesterol screening, hearing 
and mammography will be 
offered. For more information 
call 226-8288. The fair is 
sponsored by Allegheny Manor 
and Klingensmith's health care. 




Mellon Bank Aulorama: 
on Main SI.. Sth to Slh. 



f Wendy'* 

F CUP Chapel 

I CUP Stadium 

N Clarion High School 

I Integra Bank 

J Melton Bank 

(Carnival 

I County Court Houaa. 

Reptile Show 
m Clarion Cart Center 



a Clarion Fraa Library 
• Notthweal Saving* 

Bank 
f Metunger Canter 

(I C Pariah) 
I Clarion Co. Mam Park 

(conteaione) 
I Historical Society 

Muteum 
I Fire Hall 



w Maintenance Geraget 

Bus Parking Area 
I C 93 Radio WCCR 
y CUP Tennii Count 
I Chamber ol Commerce 
• Public Toilet! 



27TH ANNUAL FOREST 
AREA CRAFT ASSOCIA- 
TION SHOW: The show will 
be held at the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars building, on the 
corner of 6th Avenue and Liberty 
Street, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Hand-crafted articles will be 
available for purchase. For more 
information call 226-5289. 



Thursday. October L-> 



BUSINESS SEMINAR: A 

seminar will be held at the 
Clarion Days Inn from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:00 p.m. on "Improve Your 
Small Business Bottom Line 
by... Becoming a More Skillful 
Salesperson." This workshop is 
open to anyone who would be 
interested in improving their 
small business sales revenues. 
For more information call 226- 
2060. 

TEEN DANCE: Tentative 
location is in front of the 
courthouse from 8 p.m. to 11 
p.m. It is sponsored by TCI of 
Pennsylvania. C-93 WCCR is 
providing the music. 



5:30 p.m. in Integra Bank 
parking lot. Starting time for the 
parade is 6 p.m. Children in 
grades K through 6 are eligible 
for participation. Children are 
encouraged to dress in costume 
or decorate their bicycles and 
wagons. For more information 
call 226-9161 or 226-8006. 

MODEL RAILROAD DIS- 
PLAY: Trains, trains and more 
trains can be seen at the model 
railroad display sponsored by the 
Clarion Model Railroad, Inc. 
The display will be held in the 
Clarion Masonic Lodge building 
on Main Street Clarion. 
Admission for adults is $1 and 
children 12 and under will be 
$.50. Open hours are from 6 
p.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 9 
a.m. to noon and 2 pjn. to 5 p.m. 
and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 
pjn. 



CODES: (F) Free Admlaelon 

(O AdmlMlon/Partlcipallon Charge ] 
(0) Donation Requested 



quilting bee running throughout 
the day and quilting supplies and 
refreshments will be available. 
For more information call 226- 
889, 226-7877 or 226-4202. 

ALF "BEST OF THE 
MUMMERS" PER- 

FORMANCE: Clarion 

University is sponsering the 
"Best of the Mummers" special 
performance. The Philadelphia 
Strutters A/K/A Italian- 
American String Band show is to 
be held at Tippin Gymnasium on 
the CUP campus at 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets will be sold at the 
Clarion Area Chamber of 
Commerce and Clarion 
University. This event is 
sponsored in part by kriebel 
Wells, Captain Loomis Inn, 
Northwest Savings Bank, Crooks 
Clothing and Clarion Ford 
Mercury. 




I.C. GUILD CRAFT SHOW: 

The show is sponsored by the 
I.C. Guild. It will be held from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. in the I.C. 
Gymnasium on Main Street. 




CUP HOMECOMING FOOT- 
BALL GAME: Golden Eagles 
host Lock Haven at 2 p.m. at 
Memorial Stadium. 



ALF PARADE: The parade, 
sponsored by Bell of 
Pennsylvania, A Bell Atlantic 
Company, will start at noon on 
Main Street. The pre-parade 
begins at 11 a.m. The 
Philadelphia Mummers will put 
in a special appearance. Parade 
seats are now available for $3 
per seat. 

US NAVY "LEAP FROGS" 
PARACHUTE TEAM: The 

team will start off the CUP 
homecoming football game at 
1:45 p.m. at the stadium. The US 
Navy hot air balloon will also be 
available for tethered rides. The 
team will jump at the Clarion 
Mall on Sunday. 

PANCAKE^ BREAKFAST: A 

pancake breakfast will be held at 
Meisinger Center from 8 a.m. 
until 11:30 a.m. "All you can 
eat." The breakfast benefits 
Immaculate Conception School. 

ANTIQUE MARKET: The 

market will be held at County 
Warehouse, Exit 8 of 1-80, north 
66 for 3/4 mile across from 
Charles Tool. It will be open 
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On display 
and for sale are large mining 
artifacts, antique horse drawn 
equipment, potpourri of antiques 
and collectibles. 

ALF "SCOOT N' BOOT" 
DANCE SHOW: The show 
will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 
p.m. in front of the courthouse 
on Main Street in Clarion. 
Participate and leam Texas Two- 
Step, Cowgirl Boogie, "Sleezy" 
Slide and others. 



Sunday, October IS 



MELLON BANK AUTO- 
RAMA: It will be located on * 
Main Street from 5th to 8th 
Avenue. Streets will be closed 
by police to public traffic from 8 
a.m. until 4:45 p.m. Absolutely 
no cars will be registered or 
accepted on show day. 

BACK TO THE 50S WITH 
ELVIS: Jitterbug contest, 
performances and much more 
will happen at the Clarion Mall. 
Times will be announced at a 
later date. 

TURKEY & HAM SUPPER: 

The St Joseph's Rosary Society 
is sponsoring a supper from 5 
p.m. to 7 p.m. at the ST. Joseph 
Center in Lucinda. 



Page 20 -The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



NTERTAINMENT 



,;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;,;.;.;,;,;.;,;.;.;,;.•,•,•,•,•.• 



PEACE CORPS WORLD wise PuZzLe 

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



1 



I 

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I 



INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in nearly 90 nations around the 
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries. 

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce 
the name of the country darkened on the map at the right. 




The second largest nation 
in South America 





w 




vuvu»Sjy = oXvmm; > iwf.i/n^y ( uaitj i mods 7 ."mwot/oj 



1. European nation which discovered this 
country in 1516. 

2. Name of famous leader of this nation 
whose wife was the topic of a Broadway 
musical. 

3. Spanish name for the Falkland Islands. 

4. Capital of the neighboring country of 
Chile. 



I 
I 
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I 



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The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 Page 21 



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Your Horoscope 
Oct 11 thru 17 



WTEKMWBP S\&HS 

AKE KNOWN TO BE IBO, 
AaUARlU9, TAURUS ANP 
StORPIO. ALL MAV6 A 
VERY 'RygP 1 NATURE. 





EJN A3UNPANCE 
OF PLANETS 
IN THESE 
SICjNS WILL 
ALSO CrlVE 
YOU SAME 
QUALITIES 






PROFESSOR COSMO 



WEEKLY OVERVIEW 

Many may have new paths to follow as 
early week Full Moon moves through 
Aries, sign of new beginnings. Airand 
Fire signs should take advantage of 
Jupiter's beneficial vibrations as it 
moves into Libra for a 13 month transit 
(Air Gemini Libra fc Aquarius) (Fire: 
Aries, Leo it Sagittarius). 



THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 

ARIES March 21 -April 20 

Jupiter moves into 7th sector. Favorable 
transit for all meaningful relationships. 
TAURUS April 21- May 21 

Pursue aims but it may be wise not to 
broadcast changes you have in mind. 
GEMINI May 22 -June 21 

Enjoy Jupiter's transit in 5th sector. Can 
bring success in speculation St new love 
CANCER June 22 • July 23 

For Moonchildren: Emphasis of Jupiter's 
new position will be on home, family it 
favorable real estate transactions. 
LEO July 24 -August 23 

Wishes may soon become reality as a 
result of beneficial influences of Jupiter. 
VIRGO August 24 -Sept 23 

Lucky you! Jupiter's new accent for you 
will be on mating extra money! 
LIBRA. Sspt 24-0*23 

Lucky period to start anything new. 
Jupiter transits sunsign next D months. 
SCORPIO Oct24-Nov22 

Educational updates provide benefits 
to long term interests in times of change. 
SAGITTARIUS Nov23-Dec2l 

Wishes may be fulfilled. Very favorable 
period to form enduring friendships. 
CAPRICORN. Dec22-Jan20 

Jupiter transits career sector. Success is 
due for all who have done homework. 
AQUARIUS Jan2VFebi9 

Keep communication lines open to dis- 
tant places. Jupiter transits 9th sector. 

PISCES Fsb20-March20 

Mutual investments may be given prof- 
itable update during Jupiter transit. 



FREE Numerology 'Personal Year" report of what to expect in your year ahead. Send 
birthdate and long self-addressed stamped envelope to ' COSMIC COLLEGE PER- 
SONAL YEAR "(Name of this Publication) P.O. Box 717, Manchester, N.H. 03105 



Weekly Crossword 

" Video Rentals ! " Bv Ge "y Fr ^ r 

ACROSS 

1 Female's partner • 

8 Scandinavian god at 
thunder 

9 Librarian's warnings 

13 Typeofexam 

14 Mother 

15 Sword 

18 Michael J. Fax movl* 

19 Cunning 

20 Butter substitute 

21 Habituated 

22 Beer 

23 Brat 

24 Monkeyshines 

27 Expectorate 

28 ac. lobby org, 

31 Ms. Doom 

32 Eng's. Prince 

33 New York college 

34 Kevin Kostntr movit 
37 Mkjhtytrees 
38 beOum 

39 TantallM 

40 Aves. cousins 
"41 Former spouses 

42 Commences 

43 LouisvUe sluggers 

44 Skid row 

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49 Broadway sign 
62 Uenyl Strup movit 
65 Challenge 

56 Hit the road 
67 Fork part 

58 French fern, saints 

59 River to the. North Sea 

60 Mimics 

DOWN 

1 Crowds 

2 Russian sea 

3 Netlike 

4 B.P.O.E. member 

5 Portable galoshes 

6 Same's greeting 

7 Sweet ending 



O 1991 AUrlghU 
P.O. Box 461, 



8 Update the furniture 

9 Sting 

10 Urge on 

11 Notthere 

12 Sow 
14 Olympic triumphs 

17 Brilliantly colored bird 

18 College credit 

22 Skull cavity 

23 NASA frontier 

24 Female choir members 

25 Bareheaded? 

26 Difficult trips 

27 Closes 

28 Type of bear 

29 "Tis good to keep _ 

•go" 

30 Lawsuits 

32 Ice cream containers 

33 Steel bar 

35 Paymaster's need 

36 Harmonize 

41 Per capita 

42 Mississippi mud 

GFKAtsodatM 

Ay, NY 12301 



43 Morsels 

44 Push 

45 Sums 

46 Notable deed 

47 As numerous as chicken 
tips 

48 Strikebreaker 

49 Liner 

60 Lacoste of tennis 

fame 
51 Underground assets 

53 Moray 

54 RR Depot 



Page 22- The Clarion CaIl-10-8-92 



* * 



• « 



10 



University Book Center 

Grand Opening 

K\e full week of exciting special evenrsl 

Monday Oc\o\>e-r 12 - Saturday C?&tobeH7 
Q*P£Ai t~l omeco mm cj Day 9am - 6;30pm 

•* Paddington Bear will be here to 






The Clarion Call - 10-8-92- Page 23 

vjf-.'v.'iViSt.v fc ■ , 






help us celebrate with a 
storytelling hour 



Tuesday, October 13, 
from 10am - 11am 

Friday, October 16, 
from 10am - 11am 




«r *SHOOT FOR THE RING! - 

Monday through Thursday, from 10am 

until 4pm, Jostens is having a 

basketball shoot. THE FOUR top 

scorers (two ladies & two men) will 

£S$bk receive a 

FREE CLASS RING! 

*rules listed by Jostens. 






On 



m- THURSDAY enter our SUB EATING CONTEST! 
12 NOON UNTIL 1PM - Sponsored by SUBWAY & APPLE COMPUTER. 
PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED CALL KEVIN 226-2815 FOR DETAILS. 
Thursday the Macintosh representatives will be in the Gemmell Complex from 






Everyday sign up for our special giveaway prizes, including: 
All Terra Bicycle Energizer Bunny 

VCR Bugs Bunny 

Wool & Leather Jacket Kodak 35mm Camera 

Large CU Bear Old World Porcelain Sani 

4" B/W TV Portable Am/Fm Stereo CD Player 

Toshiba am/fm Radio CassettePlayer 

********and many more******** 

*all prizes subject to giveaway rules. Drawing to be held on Monday Oct. 19. 
Shop the UBC, where your $$$$ continue to work for you! 





Clarion football team loses fourth in a row 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Writer 



For three quarters on Saturday, 
the 8,521 observers of the 
Edinboro University 

Homecoming game were 
witnessing a major upset in the 
making. The sixth-ranked 
Division II team in the nation 
was being outplayed in every 
facet of the game, and the 
Fighting Scots number one 
ranked defense was being 
humiliated. Unfortunately for 
Clarion, three quarters does not 
make up a game, as a nineteen 
point fourth quarter explosion 
sent the Golden Eagles home 
winless for a fourth consecutive 
time, 26-17. 



bulldozed his way for 26 yards 
on four punishing carries and 
helped set up a 23 yard field goal 
by Paul Cramer to surge the 
Eagles ahead 3-0. 

Clarion drove holes through 
the number one ranked defense 
in Division II on their next 
possession as well, but Tim 
Brown fumbled at the 'Boro 20 
and the Scots recovered. Four 
times the Eagles were inside the 
Edinboro 35 yard line, and they 
only had three points to show for 
it. 

Meanwhile, the Clarion 
defense was nothing short of 
spectacular in the first half. 
Edinboro had not even crossed 
the Golden Eagles 35 yard line, 



passes during the drive, 
including a one yard touchdown 
strike to Derrick Russell with 
just nine ticks left on the clock. 
Clarion had thoroughly 
dominated play in the first half, 
but somehow found themselves 
trailing 7-3 at the intermission. 

The third quarter showed the 
same type of Golden Eagle 
domination, except this ume the 
offense was finishing what it had 
started. Nine of the first ten 
plays from scrimmage were 
handoffs as Tonini, Damien 
Henry and Art Gregory ate up 
chunks of yardage. With the 
Edinboro defense looking for a 
way to stop the Eagles ground 
attack, Myers found the air 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Swarming "D": Free Safety Sean Spencer makes the stick as two other Golden Eagle 
defenders look on. The defense held Edinboro to just one score through three quarters. 



The first quarter was a brutal 
battle for field position, and after 
the first fifteen minutes had 
expired, neither team could boast 
of a score. 

Clarion took over at the 'Boro 
34 yard line to open frame 
number two. The Eagles had 
penetrated to the Edinboro 27 
and 32 yard lines on their 
previous two possessions, but 
had come up empty on both 
occasions. Fullback Jay Tonini 
decided that history would not 
repeat itself on this drive. Tonini 



thanks in part to two 
interceptions from safety Brad 
Kline. The Clarion "D" forced 
'Boro quarterback Jody 
Dickerson into misfiring on 
seven of his first eight passes. 
Dickerson had actually 
completed more passes to Kline 
than to his own team in the Scots 
first five possesions. 

With less than three minutes to 
play in the half, Dickerson and 
the Edinboro offense began to 
click. The Fighting Scot signal 
caller connected on five of six 



waves a lot more friendly than 
they were a week ago. First, he 
hit Henry for 34 yards, and then 
he found his favorite target, Tim 
Brown, for 21 more. That strike 
set up a two yard touchdown 
jaunt by Henry, and Clarion led 
10-7. 

Edinboro took the ensuing 
kickoff and drove the ball down 
to the Clarion 30, but 
consecutive sacks by Frank 
Andrews and Jason Rinehart 
pushed the Scots back to 
midfield, forcing them to punt 



Myers and the Eagles' offense 
continued their relentless assault 
on the Edinboro defense. Two 
crucial third down completions 
by Myers set the stage for the 
second Clarion scoring drive of 
the period. On third and three 
from his own 48, Myers spotted 
Brown for eleven yards and the 
drive was kept alive. Then, on 
third and 8 from the Scots' 39 
yard line, Myers hit Henry for 
35, and the Eagles were knock, 
knock, knockin' on heaven's 
door. Moments later, Henry 
scored his second touchdown of 
the quarter, and with 58 seconds 
left in the third, Clarion had the 
Fighting Scots by their kilts. 

Panic had set in on Edinboro. 
The Scots only had one 
possession of the ball in the first 
14 minutes of the third quarter. 
The offense saw their four point 
lead at the half turn into a ten 
point deficit and could do 
nothing but sit on the bench and 
watch. 

Edinboro's next possession 
saw Dickerson go deep three 
times and come up empty. 
Edinboro was forced to punt, and 
the Scots chances for victory 
seemed slim. Unfortunately for 
Clarion, slim just happened to 
pop up in the fourth quarter. 

A perfectly designed screen 
pass had "big play" written all 
over it for Clarion, but Jay 
Tonini fumbled after his 26 yard 
scamper, and the Scots had new 
life. 

It didn't take long for Edinboro 
to capitalize as Larry Jackson 
scored from a yard away to close 
the lead to 17-13. 'Boro's 
attempt for two points failed, but 
the Scots received the boost they 
needed and the result was 
inevitable. 

The Scots got the ball back 
after a Clarion punt and were 88 
yards from a win. On third 
down and six, the Eagles 
gambled with a blitz and lost. 
Dickerson found Wrentle Martin 
in a single coverage, and the rest 
is football folklore. 

After a failed Clarion fourth 
down attempt, Edinboro's 
Russell scored from 23 yards 
away, and the final was set at 26- 
17. 

The Golden Eagles are at 
Bloomsburg this Saturday. 



rKrTon 
Edinboro 



~~o run — rr 

7 19 26 



SECOND QUARTER 

Clarion: FG Cramer 23, 11:58 



^^W^WWJMMMWWWMMWW^^ A 



Drive: 11 plays, 47 yards. Key 
play: Edinboro stops Clarion from 
scoring touchdown with I st down 
and goal to go from the four yard 
line. Clarion 3, Edinboro 0. 
Edinboro: Dickerson 1 yard TD 
pass to Stone (Rupert PAT), 00:09. 
Drive: 10 plays, 51 yards. Key play: 
15 yard pass from Dickerson to 
Heebsh on 3rd down and 12 to go 
from the E48. Edinboro 7, Clarion 
3_ 

THIRD QUARTER 

v» W v W vy > v>wwvw»y»vi<www»vviwvw v ww»vw»yi n w 



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Clarion: Henry 2 yard TD run 
(Cramer kick), 9:22. Drive: 13 
plays, 86 yards. Key play: 2 passes 
totaling 54 yards from Myers to 
Henry and Brown, respectively. 
Clarion 10, Edinboro 7. 
Clarion: Henry 4 yard TD run 
(Cramer PAT), 0:58. Drive: 12 
plays, 80 yards. Key play: Myers 
35 yard pass to Henry on 3-8 from 
the E39. Clarion 17, Edinboro 7. 

FOURTH QUA RTER 

Edinboro: Jackson 1 yard TD run 
(kick failed), 12:07. Drive: 6 plays, 
48 yards. Key play: Tonini fumble, 
Edinboro recovers at C48. Clarion 
17, Edinboro 13. 

Edinboro: Martin 27 yard TD pass 
from Dickerson (Rupert PAT), 4:27. 
Drive: 11 plays, 88 yards. Key 
play: The TD pass on 3-6 from C27. 
Edinboro 20, Clarion 17. 
Edinboro: Russell 23 yard TD run 
(kick failed), 2:04. Drive: 2 plays, 
25 yards. Key play: Myers pass 
broken up by Edinboro on 4-5 from 
C25. Edinboro 26, Clarion 17. 

TEAM STATISTICS 

Cia. Edin. 
FIRST DOWNS 20 19 

3RD DOWN EFF. 8-15 6-13 
YDS RUSH 140 299 

YDS PASS 327 116 

TOTAL YDS 435 391 

FUMBLES 7 1 

lost 3 

INTERCEPTIONS 3 2 

SACKS 3 2. 

KEY PLAYER STATISTICS 

Clarion rushing: Henry 14-48, 

Tonini 15-67 

Edinboro rushing: Jackson 22-182, 

Dickerson 12-72 

Clarion passing: Myers 17-36 (327 

yards) 

Edinboro passing: Dickerson 10- 

21 (116 yards) 

Clarion receiving: Brown 9-105, 

Henry 3-89, Harper 3-77 

Edinboro receiving: Martin 5-67 

Clarion tackles-assists-sacks: 

Terza 11-6-0, Rinehart 6-1-1, Giles 

7-1-0, Warner 6-3-0 

INTERCEPTIONS: Kline (2) 



f * i 4 * * - 

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mm%mm 



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§ 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 25 



Clarion volleyball team downs Lock Haven 




by Mike Jewart 
Sports Writer 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Fly in high: Tammi Bills reaches a new level with her play. 



The Clarion Golden Eagle 
volleyball team travelled to 
Slippery Rock to participate in 
the Slippery Rock Invitational 
tournament last weekend. 

Their first draw of the 
tournament was host and PS AC 
arch rival Slippery Rock. This 
was the same team that Clarion 
spanked one week earlier, 3-1. 
This time around SRU took the 
early lead with a 15-11 decision 
over the Golden Eagles. 
However, Clarion soared back 
into the lead with victories in 
games two and three, 15-13 and 
17-15. It looked as though the 
women of Clarion were on their 
way to another victory until the 
Rock surged back to take the 
next two games, 15-9, 15-9, and 
the match three games to two. 
Leading the way for the Clarion 
offensive attack was freshman 
Bobbie Simpson, who had 17 
kills. Nicole Flambard and 
Suzanne Sheldon contributed 13 
kills apiece. Wendy Ellenberger 
had an astronomical 58 set 
assists, while Tammi Bills and 
Meghan Kelly anchored the 
defense with 33 and 24 digs, 
respectively. 



Clarion's next opponent in the 
tourney was Millersville 
University. The Golden Eagle 
spikers got off to a quick start 
with a 15-7 victory in game one. 
Millersville tightened up their 
defense in game two, but it 
wasn't enough. Clarion won 
game two, 15-11. In the third 
game, MU took the Clarion 
spikers to the limit, but the 
Golden Eagles stayed poised and 
pulled out a 17-15 victory. 
Ellenberger had the Clarion "0" 
flying high again with 27 set 
assists and eight kills. Gerri 
Condo led the team with 10 kills 
and Simpson chipped in with 
eight more. Bills and Condo 
were the defensive stoppers with 
12 digs apiece. 

The Golden Eagles set their 
sights on Michigan Tech in the 
third match of the tournament. 
Clarion was never quite able to 
get rolling as they lost in three 
straight sets, 15-5, 15-7, 15-0. 
There were few highlights in the 
match for Clarion. Ellenberger 
was held to a season low 13 set 
assists. Bills could muster only 
eight digs against the tough 
Michigan Tech squad. Simpson 
did manage to crush nine kills 
for CUP. 



Clarion played Gannon in their 
fourth match of the tourney. The 
Golden Eagles had fallen earlier 
in the season to the Knights and 
were looking for revenge. 
Unfortunately, the Clarion attack 
was grounded again and they lost 
in three quick games, 15-5, 15- 
10, 15-7. Ellenberger had 14 set 
assists for Clarion. Bills had 
eight digs and Suzanne Sheldon 
had a team high eight kills. 

The Golden Eagles regained 
their winning form on Tuesday 
night as they whipped the 
visiting Lock Haven Bald Eagles 
in four sets, 15-6, 9-15, 15-8, 15- 
5, to take a three set to one 
victory. Simpson led the way 
with 12 kills. Co-captains 
Ellenberger and Bills continued 
to lead by example. Ellenberger 
had 30 set assists, while Bills 
contributed seven kills and 10 
digs. Flambard had 14 digs to 
aid Bills and the defense. 

The Clarion Women's 
volleyball team is now 12-10 
overall and 3-3 in the PSAC- 
West. They will have to spend 
another weekend hard at work 
hosting the Clarion Elite 
tournament on October 9 and 10, 
here at the Tippin Gymnasium in 
Clarion. 



Golden Eagle golfers taking part in Fall PSAC's today 



by Eric Feigel 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University golf 
team ends their fall season today 
at the Fall Championships. 

The tournament is not 
sanctioned by the PS AC but is 
still regarded by the clubs 
involved as the unofficial PSAC 
Fall Championships. 

The tournament will be hosted 
by Lock Haven University at the 
Clinton Country Club. The 
seven teams that will compete 
include IUP, Slippery Rock, 
Millersville, Edinboro, Lock 
Haven, West Chester and 
Clarion. IUP is the defending 
champion of the unofficial 
tournament and will be the 
favorite again this time around, 
but Clarion will be looking for 
the upset. 

At this fall's championship, for 
the first time, seven golfers will 
compete for each team instead of 
the usual five. This is a concern 
for head coach Bob Carlson. 
"(With seven golfers), I don't 
know how well we'll stack up as 
far as depth is concerned," said 
Carlson. 

Five Clarion golfers have 
already been selected to go; 
Rich Grafton, Todd Corbeil, 



Chris Brocious, Brian Fiscus and 
Don Turowski. These five have 
pretty much been the core of the 
team all year long. Jason Tutich, 
Tom Kellgren, Mike Bickert, 
Greg Greksa and Chris Williams 
will play for the last two spots on 
the tournament team. Coach 
Carlson is sure that the seven 
golfers that participate will all be 
ready to play. 

Coach Carlson's only concern 
is that the team will not be 
consistent. "We have not been 
able to get good scores from all 
of our golfers at the same time 
this season," said Carlson. "One 
day Rich is playing well, the 
next day it's Todd or Chris." 
Carlson emphasized that the 
team needed to be consistent at 
the championships in order to 
fare well. Carlson is aiming to 



place at least second. Clarion 
has already defeated Slippery 
Rock this season and they have 
been predicted to finish in the 
top three. "Realistically, we 
should at least be able to place 
third," said Carlson. 

With all of the pressure in the 
sport of golf, Carlson realizes 
that it will be difficult for all 
seven men to play well at the 
same time. "Golf is a game of 
total concentration," said 
Carlson. "Little things can 
throw off a person's game. The 
key for us is to stay focused." 
Carlson is worried that his young 
golfers may not be able to stay 
focused enough but is confident 
that they will eventually learn 
how to. 

Carlson is looking for 
leadership in the veterans 



Grafton and Corbeil. He hopes 
that the two can provide the 
leadership to not only provide a 
strong finish at today's PSAC 
unofficial Fall Championships, 
but one that will also be strong 
enough to lead a fully developed 
team to the championships in the 
spring. 

Clarion warmed-up for the 
unofficial Fall PSAC's by 
competing at the Allegheny 
Invitational on Tuesday. 
However, the results were not 
overwhelming as they placed 
tenth out of 18 teams with 323 
points. IUP continued to 



dominate all competition by 
winning the tourney with 298 
points. 

Brocious led the Golden 
Eagles with a sparkling score of 
76. Corbeil got back on track 
with a 78. Turowski also played 
well and finished with an 82. 
Fiscus and Grafton contributed 
an 87 and 88, respectively. 

The Clarion linksters will 
attempt to place around or better 
than their 1991 finish of third at 
the Fall PSAC's. Clarion will 
attempt to dethrone IUP and the 
Rock, who both finished above 
CUP in the 1991 fall campaign. 



Red Stallion Nite Club 

For The Best In Nite Club 
Entertainment 

Appearing Saturday Oct. 10 

Rnthem 

1 0pm-2am 



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Mini-storage 

3mi from CUP - Intersection 322 & 66 
Shippenville, Pa 16254 

5x7' space - $21.20 per month 
5x10* space - $26.50 per month 

Deposit required - Larger spaces available 
Access 7 days a week 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



* 



Golden Eagle tennis team dow ns two PSAC rivals 

..... .. « . • : „ tnnm tine kopn 



tyyAmy Rae 
Sno rts Writer 



The Clarion University 

Women's tennis team won two 

PSAC matches last week, 

defeating rivals Edinboro and 

fjUP at home. 

The Golden Eagles downed the 
visiting Edinboro Lady Scots last 
Wednesday with a 5-2 victory. 

In singles play, Shara 
Wolkomir needed everything she 
had to win as the #1 seed, 6-2, 4- 
§*6, 7-6 (7-1). The #2 seed, 
Marianne Martin, followed her 
leader's example and also pulled 
out a tough win, 6-1, 3-6, 7-6 (7- 
1). The #3 seed, Darcy Ingham, 
victimized her opponent by 
winning in two straight sets, 7-5, 
6-1. Jennifer Keil won in the #4 
position, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. Melodi 
Dess, in the #5 position, fell to 
her Lady Scot foe, 1-6, 6-1, 2-6. 
Roxanne Milton lost by default 
in the #6 position due to an 
illness. 
In doubles play, the #1 seed of 
f K Wolkomir and Ingham won in 
two sets, 6-1, 6-3. Dess and Keil 
lost in two sets in the #2 doubles 
position, 3-6, 2-6. Jennifer 



I 



Simonsen teamed with Martin to 
take the #3 doubles victory, 6-4, 

6-3. 

Last Thursday, fresh off their 
PSAC triumph over 'Boro, the 
Golden Eagles defeated another 
PSAC rival in Indiana. 

In singles play, Wolkomir 
triumphed in the #1 position, 7- 
5,6-1. The #2 seed, Martin, also 
won in straight sets, 6-1, 6-2. 
Ingham had a tougher time of it, 
falling 3-6, 4-6 to her IUP 
opponent. But Keil picked the 
Golden Eagles right back up 
defeating her foe, 6-0, 7-5, in an 
aggressive match. Seeded #5, 
Dess was victorious in two sets, 
6-4, 6-4. Seeing more playing 
time in the absence of the ill 
Milton, Simonsen fell in two sets 

4-6, 2-6. 

In doubles play, the #1 seeded 
team of Wolkomir and Ingham 
won an exciting match, 1-6, 7-6 
(7-4), 7-5. Keil and Dess won in 
straight sets, 6-4, 7-6 (7-1). 
Simonsen and Martin capped off 
the victory with a 6-0, 6-3 

victory. 

Fast approaching the PSAC's 
(October 16-17), the Golden 



Eagle tennis team has been 
showing off the talent that is 
going to get them there again. 
From the #1 seed, Wolomir has 
contributed with a singles record 
of 5-2. Martin has proved to be 
dominant with a singles record 
of 7-1. More impressively, she 
has won six straight singles 
matches. This has mostly been 
accomplished from the #2 
position. Mostly from the #3 
position, Ingham has added a 5-3 
singles record. Keil began as the 
number four seed on the year, 
moved to five, but has been back 
at number four for three straight 
weeks. She is 5-3 on the year in 
singles play, with two victories 
in a row. Dess, who has 
switched back and forth from #5 
and #6 seed is also 5-3 on the 
year. From the middle of the 
pack, #3 or #4 seed, Milton has 
contributed a 4-3 singles record. 
Simonsen is 0-2 in 1992 singles 

play. 

Clarion battled Pitt Tuesday 
afternoon. The Golden Eagles 
schedule takes them to Duquesne 
University today (3:00) and to 
Bloomsburg on Saturday (1:00). 





Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Roxanne Milton missed a match last week, due to Illness. 



position, 3-6, 2-6. Jennifer (October 16-17), the uoiaen ™uu»uu.s «— , *.~, # _ •^^ 

Clarion University cross-country teams improving 

. o. e;„«i«»™ ha* hppn Chad Brie es, who has been ou 



by Jon Q. Sitler 
Soorts Editor 



«i 



The Clarion University men's 
and women's cross-country 
teams participated in the Grove 
City Quadrangular last Saturday. 

Both Clarion teams finished 
in the middle of the pack of five 
teams that attended the meet. 
Host Grove City was joined by 
Clarion, Allegheny, Westminster 
and Thiel on the day. 

For the Clarion men, Chris 
Singleton continued to improve 
by finishing second overall. His 
time of 27:52 was only 18 
seconds behind the overall 
winner from Thiel. Russ 
Briendel and Bill Belfield also 



placed well at the meet, both 
finishing in the teens. Briendel 
finished 15th overall with a solid 
time of 29:25, while Belfield 
finished 19th with a time of 
29:37. Eric Hackwelder finished 
21st overall with a time of 29:47. 
Shawn Hoehn rounded out the 
top five for Clarion as he 
finished 23rd overall with a time 
of 29:52. 

For the Clarion women, Nicole 
Yahres finished seventh overall 
with a time of 22:52. She 
finished exactly one minute off 
the pace. Lisa Griffo finished 
second for Clarion with a time of 
23:43 (12th overall). Jen 
Dansberger finished 13th overall 
and 3rd for the Clarion runners 



with a 23:59 time. Stacey 
Jacobson and Cindy Hippensteel 
rounded out the pack for the 
Clarion women. Jacobson 
finished 22nd overall and fourth 
for the Clarion women. She had 
a time of 26:44. Hippensteel 
finished 24th overall, a 27:59 

clip. 

Head coach Ron Wiser has 
been very pleased with Clarion's 
gradual improvement and has 
high hopes for the remainder of 
the season. He said that, for the 



men, Singleton has been 
improving every single meet. 
He has improved from a 15th 
place finish in the season's 
opening meet at California, Pa. 
to a second place finish last 
week at Grove City. "I'm 
looking for a big day soon from 
Chris, maybe even this 
weekend," said coach Wiser. 

The Clarion men have been 
hampered by the departure of 
Matt Winger to the graduate 
program and by the absence of 



a 



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Grand Opening 
Oct. 9th 

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Between 4 P.M. and 6 P.M. 

Greenville Ave Ext. ® 227-9 111 



Absentee ballots are 

available in the Student 

Senate office- Must be 

received from home county 

by 10/30/92- 



A INDIRNR SPORTS CENTER 

jl WELCOME BACK ALUMNI 

/ \ Check Out Our Autumn Leaf Sale 

Oct. 15-18 

Clarion Mall 226-9090 



Chad Briggs, who has been out * 
due to an injury. Wiser said that 
Briggs has been sorely missed 
because he is one of the best 
runners the Clarion men have. 
He might have been their #1 
runner had he not suffered the 
injury. Briggs may be close to 
coming back and finishing the 
campaign. 

Coach Wiser has had the goal 
right from the start to do well at 
the PSAC's. Early in the season, 
Wiser said, "Realistically for the 
men, I believe that we can finish 
in the top five at the PSAC's. 
The PSAC is, historically, one of 
the toughest conferences in the 
nation. But I do think that this is 
an obtainable goal for the men." 
The goal may be even more 
obtainable knowing now that 
Slippery Rock has lost their #1 
and #5 runners for the season. 
Wiser believes that Clarion could 
possibly upset the #5 ranked, 
Division II team with Singleton 
coming on and Briggs possibly 
coming back. 

For the women, it has been 
more like a rebuilding year, but 
coach Wiser still believes that 
they could come close to or 
surpass their 1991 PSAC ninth 
place finish. 

The Golden Eagles are 
scheduled to run at the Paul 
Short Invitational this weekend. 



Page 26 - The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 



Four women sue IUP athletic program 



I 



Pittsburgh, Pa. (AP)- Four 
female athletes at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
alleged that the school 
discriminates against women on 
the playing field. 

The women's gymnastics and 
field hockey teams were 
eliminated this year, as were the 
men's soccer and tennis teams. 

Four women- Dawn Favia of 
Centerrich, N.Y., Wendy 
Schandelmeier of Altoona, Kim 
Dalcamo of Butler and Amy 
Phaehler of Elverson, Chester 



County- sued IUP on Monday in 
federal court. 

A hearing on the matter will 
begin October 21 before U.S. 
District Judge Maurice Cohill Jr. 
in Pittsburgh. 

During the 1991-92 school 
year, IUP awarded $300,171 in 
athletic scholarships, the lawsuit 
said. Of that, male students 
received $239,162. Female 
athletes received $61,009. 

One-fourth of 160 students 
who received athletic 
scholarships were women, but 56 



percent of IUP students are 
female, said Jon Pushinsky, the 
students' attorney. 

University spokesman Bill 
Swauger said that funding cuts 
forced IUP to end field hockey 
and gymnastics. He said that the 
most painful decision was 
dropping the gymnastics team, 
which won a national 
championship two years ago. 

The team's travel costs were 
too high, and there was little 
competition in the region, 
Swauger said. 



The lawsuit asked IUP, a state- 
funded school and member of 
the Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference, to revive the two 
women's teams. 

A judge should force IUP to 
provide equal opportunities for 
both sexes in all athletic 
programs, the women said. 

"All we want is what we are 
entitled to - equal opportunity 
and equal treatment," said Favia 
who like Schandelmeier and 
Delcamo, was recruited in 
gymnastics. 



Phaehler, who plays field 
hockey, said that one of the 
reasons she chose IUP was 
because of the field hockey 
team. It is now a club that 
competes with junior varsity 
squads at other schools. 

"This is my senior year as a 
college student," Phaehler said. 
"To go from a varsity status 
basically strips you of any rights 
within the athletic program." 

Phaeler said that the field at 
IUP is inadequate for field 
hockey. 



Outside Clarion Sports 



It's Scotty Bowman once again for Pens 



AP stories compiled by 
Jon Q. Sitter 

PA SPORTS 



Erie makes pitch for new 
stadium 

Erie Mayor Joyce Savocchio 
recently said that she'll make her 
pitch to turn the former Sears 
building in downtown Erie into a 
new baseball stadium. 

The mayor says that she will 
focus on obtaining up to ten 
million dollars in financing, 
preferably from the state. 

The mayor's comments came 
at the conclusion of a meeting 
last week, at which officials of 
the Erie Sailors minor league 
baseball team outlined the steps 
necessary to keep professional 
baseball in the city. 

The Sailors urged the creation 
of a community group to 
spearhead the baseball project 
and the development of a master 
plan that would set deadlines for 
steps leading to the construction 
of the stadium. 

Skip Weiman, president and 
general manager of the Sailors, 
would like to see a new stadium 
by 1994. The Sailors current 
stadium, Ainsworth Field, does 
not meet major league standards. 



Pitt plays Notre Dame 

Pitt coach Paul Hackett says 
that he may make some slight 
adjustments in the game plan but 
will not overhaul the team before 
this weekend's game with Notre 
Dame. 

Both the Panthers and the Irish 
are going into the Pitt Stadium 
matchup after losses to 
underdogs. The 2-3 Panthers 
blew a 10-nothing lead and lost 
to Maryland 47-34. Notre Dame 
saw its record fall to 3-1-1 in a 
33-16 loss to Stanford. 

Foster top rusher 

Pittsburgh Steelers running 
back Barry Foster still leads all 
NFL rushers in yardage, despite 
the fact that the Steelers did not 
play last weekend. Foster's 450 
yards on 92 carries is far ahead 
of the NFL's next closest rushers. 
Emmit Smith of the Dallas 
Cowboys has 408 yards, and 
Barry Word of Kansas City is 
third with 406 yards on the 
season. His 33-carry, 190-yard 
performance against the Jets in 
week number two still stands as 
the best outing by an NFL 
running back this season. 

The Steelers also lead the NFL 
in interceptions with 12. 



■:■:■ 
:•:■ 






L 



FREE 

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Pens ink Lemieux 

Mario Lemieux, on Monday, 
became the richest player in 
NHL history when the Pittsburgh 
Penguins announced that they 
had signed the team captain to a 
seven-year contract worth 42 
million dollars. The deal 
replaces the last two years of a 
five year, 12 million dollar 
contract Lemieux previously had 
with the Pens. This is Lemieux's 
ninth season with the Penguins, 
the only NHL team he has 
played for since being selected in 
the 1984 entry draft. 

Bowman back 

The Pittsburgh Penguins now 
have a new coach to go with 
their multi-million dollar 
superstar, and they named him 
just in time for Tuesday night's 
opener. 

One day after signing Mario 
Lemieux to a league record 
seven-year, 42 million dollar 
contract, the team announced 
that Scotty Bowman will return 
as the coach for the 1992-93 
season. 

Bowman served as interim 
coach last year and led the Pens 
to their second straight Stanley 
Cup. 



Fox's Pizza Den 

226-5555 
SPECIAL FOR TWO! 

small pizza, one topping 

2 small salads and 

2 small drinks 

$5.49 + tax 

only with coupon 
offer expires 10/31/92 



Tough Philly defense 

It has now been 50 consecutive 
regular season games since an 
opposing back has rushed for 
more than 100 yards against the 
Philadelphia Eagles' defense. 
Last Monday night, Reggie 
White and the gang held one of 
the top NFL rushers, Emmit 
Smith of the Cowboys, to only 
67 yards on the ground. The 
Eagles crushed Dallas 31-7. 



"The Great One", Book II 

The Philadelphia Flyers are 
expecting a lot from Eric 
Lindros, their new 19-year-old 
center. The team gave up several 
good players, future draft picks 
and 15 million dollars for him, 
after fighting the New York 
Rangers for the right to make the 
deal. In the NHL pre-season, 
Lindros had eight goals in eight 
games. 



The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 - Page 27 







Help Wanted 



***Wanted*** Campus 

Representatives to promote Spring 
Break and Ski trips. Earn free trip + 
cash!!! Call 1-800-862-7325. 



$200 - $500 Weekly Assemble 
products at home. Easy! No selling. 
You're paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. 
Free information- 24 hour hotline. 
801-379-2900. Copyright# 

PA10KDH. 



Spring Break '93 Panama City 
Beach, Florida Sales Representative 
needed to work with the #1 Spring 
Break Team Travel Associates and 
Tour Excel. Sell the Best properties 
on the beach, Summit 

Condominiums, Miracle Beach 
Resort, Holiday Inn, Pier 99. Earn 
top commission and free trips. For 
more information call: Jenny 1-800- 
558-3002. 



Be a Spring Break Rep! Earn FREE 
Trips and the Highest Commissions! 
Cancun, Daytona, & Jamaica from 
$159. Call Take A Break Student 
Travel today! (800) 32-TRAVEL. 






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If IT ISN'T FUN, 
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MOUNTAIN BIKES 
CAMPING 
ROCK CLIMBING 
INLINE SKATES 

KAYAKS 
XC SKIING 

Stop and talk to an expert about clothing and 
footwear that performs like you want It to. 

Guaranteed 



***Campus Reps Wanted*** 

Heatwave Vacations Spring Break 
1993. The Best rates & the Biggest 
Commissions. For more information 
call 800-395-WAVE. 



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TRAVEL FREE! SELL QUALITY 
VACATIONS FOR THE MOST 
RELIABLE SPRING BREAK 
COMPANY! JAMAICA, CANCUN, 
BAHAMAS, MARGARITA 

ISLAND, FLORIDA. BEST 
COMMISSIONS/SERVICES. 
SUNSPLASH TOURS 1-800-426- 
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226-4763 



10-6 DAILY 



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$$$$, FREE Travel and Resume 
Experience!! Individuals and Student 
Organizations wanted to promote 
SPRING BREAK, call the nations 
leader. Inter-Campus Programs. 1- 
800-327-6013. 



Earn $2,000 and Free Spring Break 
Trips. North America's number one 
student tour operators seeking 
motivated students, organizations, 
fraternities and sororities as campus 
representatives promoting Cancun or 
Datona beach destinations. Call 1- 
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Attention: National Marketing firm 
seeks dynamic student clubs, teams 
and/or organizations to participate in a 
promotion for a major retailer that is 
coming to your campus. Earn big 
money- no investment. Call Rick for 
more information on this exciting 
event. 1-800-592-2121 Ext. 119. 



Comedians needed for Mr. CUP 
entertainment. Please call Stacie at 
226-9027. 



Sororities! Fraternities! All campus 
Organizations! Sponsor your favorite 
male for Mr. CUP. Call Stacie for 
details at 226-9027. 



Sales and Services 



Diamond Engagement Trio Set: 
Marquise Diamond Engagement Ring, 
matching Three Diamond Ladies and 
Mens Wedding Rings. All three rings 
with 3 diamonds in each ring for only 
$450. Use layaway, credit card, check, 
or cash. Only at James Jewelers, 
Downtown Clarion. 226-87 1 1 . 



Autumn Leaf '92 T-shirts will be 
available at BookSmith Trading during 
Autumn Leaf while supplies last! If 
you have already placed an order, your 
shirts will be delivered during the first 
few days of Autumn Leaf! 



Druglord Trucks! $100. 86 Bronco. 
. . $50. 91 Blazer. . . $150. 77 Jeep 
CJ. . . $50. Seized Vans, 4x4's, 
Boats. Choose from thousands starting 
$25. FREE information- 24 hour 
hotline. 801-379-2930 Copyright* 
PA10KKC. 



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*«»True Colors T*ttPO 

Professional Sterilization, Fine lines 
& cover-ups. Choose from 50 colors. 
Located in Sligo, PA, 10 miles S. of 
Clarion. Call for appointment after 
5:00 p.m. 358-2715. 



Diamonds: .51 carat round diamond 
solitaire engagement ring. Special 
value: $690. Layaway or credit 
payments easily arranged to suit you. 
Only at James Jewelers, 614 Main St. 
Clarion. 226-8711. 



Cheap! FBI/US. Seized 89 

Mercedes . . . $200 86 VW ... $50 
87 Mercedes ... $100 65 Mustang . . . 
$50. Choose from thousands starting 
$25. Free Information- 24 hour 
hotline. 801-379-2929. Copyright* 
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,4 NORTH FIFTH AVENUE 
CLARION, PA 16214-1102. 



CHRIS HAWKINS 
PHONE: (814) 226-4079 BARRY MILLER 

Watch for in-store ALF Specials 



Fall Retreat Weekend- Oct. 23-25. 
Sponsored by Catholic Campus 
Ministry Call 226-6869 for more 
details. 



Roommates 



1 or 2 Female Roommates needed for 
Spring. 226-6563. 



Desperately needed- 1 female 
roommate for South St. Apartment. 
Rent $150./month puis 1/3 utilities. 
Lease runs until end of May. Call 227- 
2521 or 227-2409. 



Personals 



Phi Sigma Sigma wishes their 
nominees for homecoming co irt the 
best of luck. They are Desiree 
Wassam, Beth Eaton, Tonya Schmidt, 
and Leslie Cathcart. We know you'll 
represent us well ! 



Kappa Delta Rho: We washed some 
cars and the water flew, but better than 
those suds was partying with you!! 
Thanks for splashing around with us! 
Love Phi Sigma Sigma 



D Phi E would like to thank Kelly for 
the wonderful Rush parties. You did a 
great job! Love, your sisters. 

Happy Birthday to Patty Zehner. 
Love, your D Phi E sisters. 



D Phi E would like to thank Tri-Sigma 
for the awesome picnic. We had a 
blast. Let's get together again 
sometime soon. 



Sigma Chi: The theme was to 
"Barter" and of course we had a blast. 
Too bad the night had to end so fast. 
We love you. Love, DPhiE. 



Delta Zeta, Thanks for twisting the 
night away, it was a blast. We'll have 
to do it again soon. Kappa Delta Rho. 



Congratulations Kurry on becoming 
Theta Phi Alpha's new sweetheart. 
You look good in your Penguin 
uniform. Kappa Delta Rho. 



Delta Zeta, Happy belated Founders 
Day. Kappa Delta Rho. 



Theta Phi Alpha, Thanks for the 
mixer, it was swell. Kappa Delta Rho. 



Phi Sigma Sigma, The car wash was a 
great success, that is because we 
choose the best. Thank you for your 
help. Kappa Delta Rho. 

GREEKS & CLUBS 
RAISE A COOL 
$1,000.00 

IN JUST ONE WEEK! 
PLUS $1000 FOR THE 
MEMBER WHO CALLS! 
And a FREE HEADPHONE 
RADIO just for calling 1-800- 
932-052#,Bft.65.' 



Phi Sigma Sigma, We never knew the 
50's and 60's were so exciting. 
Having you over again sounds very 
inviting. Kappa Delta Rho. 



Kappa Theta Phi, The punch was 
great, but the ponies were better! 
Ladies, you deserve your letters! 
Thanks for a great Toga mixer. Phi 
Sigma Kappa 



Phi Sigma Kappa announces its first 
annual "Bringin' Home the Bacon 
Blowout!" Pig Roast/Bar-B-Q and 
Live Band - featuring "Kamotion". 
B.Y.O.B. - $5.00. Sat. Oct. 17- 3:00 
p.m. Get tickets from any brother. BE 
THERE!! 



To the Sigma Chi Pledges- Thanks so 
much for the party Monday night. We 
had a great time. Let's do it every 
semester! Love, the sisters of Delta 
Zeta. 



To the brothers of Delta Chi- thanks 
for the trip around the world. It is a 
tradition we will always enjoy! Love, 
the sisters of Delta Zeta. 



Happy Birthday Marcia! ! We love you 
Shroomer watch out for the sidewalks 
this weekend. Love, Cristine, 
Kristine, Melissa, & Glenna. 



Mario, Congratulations and Good 
Luck with pledging. Don't forget I 
love you. Love, Cristine. PS. Center 
Held? 



Congratulations Fall 92 associate 
members: Gretchen, Kristen, Kirisa, 
Carrie, Erin, Amy, Missy, Heidi, 
Bridget, & Robbin. Keep up the good 
work! We love you- the sisters of 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 



The handcuffs were real, the night was 
young, who would have thought 
Bonding could be so fun!!! We love 
you Sig Tau Gamma Lets mix again 
soon!!! Love, the sisters of AST. 



Theta Xi: thanks for the great mixer! 
Haying golf was fun to say the least, 
but we thought pitchers were in 
baseball! Let's try it again sometime 
and keep playing that great dancing 
music. Love, Theta Phi Alpha. 



Traci Showers, Happy Birthday! 
Congrats, you Finally turned 21 ! Now 
you can keep an eye on Tara and 
Danielle! Ya Right! We love you 
Traci! Your Theta Phi Sisters 



Happy Belated Birthday to our Theta 
Phi sisters: Kelly Hoffner, Amy 
Woodmansee, Holly Neely, Steph 
Scott and Tara Stahler. 



Theta Phi Alpha would like to 
congratulate our two newest associate 
members, Jenn Wilson and Lisa 
Muzzey. 



To the Theta Xi pledge class of Fall 
92. Congratulations and Good Luck to 
you! You 15 are the best. Theta Xi 
picked you apart from the rest. I love 
ya. Your sweetheart Gina 



Snack : Roses are red, and CUP is 
blue, 1 cannot wait, to turn 21 with 
you! Happy Birthday to a true friend- 
thanks for everything- I love you!- 
Brooke 



Killer, I love you . Please don't 
destroy me. M 



SWM, seeks companion, Leslie. Must 
like ducks, Ministry and weird men. 



Congratulations to our new associate 
members: Terri Dodson, Michelle 
Handa, Jodie Jackson, Robyn Kline, 
Chrissy Komoroski, Jen Milius, and 
Rhonda Wirfel. Love, the sisters of 
Alpha Sigma Alpha. 



The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha 
would like to thank Kris Milner for all 
her hard work during rush. You did a 
great job. We love you ! 



The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha 
would like to thank the brothers of 
Alpha Chi Rho for making our pledges 
pick-up a fun and memorable evening! 



Happy 21st Birthday Jen Frey!! 
You're the best- see you at the Bars!! 
Love, Becky. 



Around the world we went with you 
sly guys- oh you crazy Theta Chi's. 
We had a blast, too bad it couldn't last! 
Time went too fast. Love, the sisters 
of Zeta Tau Alpha 



Congratulations to our new associate 
members. We wish you the best of 
luck and we look forward to becoming 
closer friends! Love the sisters of Zeta 
Tau Alpha 



Delta Zeta, any mixer with you is a 
trip around the world. It was a blast. 
Let's do it again sometime. Delta Chi. 



To the Sigma Chi pledge class of Fall 
1992: Good Luck with pledging. You 
know I am always here for you. Love 
TriciaXOXO. 



To the brothers of Sigma Chi: I want 
to thank all of you for a Wonderful 2 
years. All of you are very special to 
me. I Love you, XOXO Love, 
Tricia. 



The Brothers of AXP would like to 
congratulate our fall '92 postulants: 
SUm, Pretty Boy, Chuckles, Cold Cut , 
Meatball and JP. Welcome guys. 



,.4 .*# *-*• 



Thanks to the sisters of ASA for the 
great pickup mixer. We had a 
wonderful time. The Brothers of AXP. 



Page 28- The Clarion Call - 10-8-92 

Sports Opinion - Tall Cliffy predicts: 



Penn State has greatest coach ever 



i 



Well, I did tons better my first 
week, but it's still not what I 
expected. Then again, this hasn't 
exactly been a year to start 
predicting; no one is playing 
with any consistency, except for 
the Eagles. Was that a game or 
what! 

Detroit, however, disappointed 
me and most football fans. What 
is happening to this team? I 
guess a good offensive line is the 
key to offensive success in this 
league. The Lions have a great 
quarterback and one of the 
greatest running backs in the 
game. But with the tragic loss of 
two starting linemen, the Lions' 
run and shoot attack is sterile. 

K.C. pushed for me, but I 
thought that they would destroy 
Denver. I guess the Chiefs can't 
fight off the jinx at Mile High 
Stadium. 

The Seminoles also pushed, 
but, once again, it was head 
coach Bobby Bowden's 
conservativeness that did FSU 
in. 

Boston College was a 
disappointment, also. WVU is 
not that good. . . good enough to 
stop two great backs. 

Tennessee did live up to 
expectation, routing LSU 20-0. 

Enough talking about the past; 
let's talk about the future. . . 

BEL 

Atlanta at Miami -7 1/2 

Atlanta (2-3) looked strong 
against the Packers last week. 
Quarterback Chris Miller threw 
for three touchdowns, but the 
defense allowed more than 330 
yards by Packers' offense. This 
week they will also have trouble 
stopping Dan Marino and his 
squadron of talented receivers. 
But if the Falcon defense can 
come up with the big plays, 
Atlanta should win. 



Miami (4-0) was unstoppable 
against the Bills, which surprised 
everyone. Marino threw for 282 
yards and is excited about having 
the addition of tight end Keith 
Jackson in the offensive scheme. 
The Dolphin defense was 
incredible. They gave up 400 
yards of total offense, but forced 
five turnovers (4 int., 1 fumble) 
and sacked the Bill's quarterback 
three times. Because of their 
great performance, I think that 
they will still be on a high. They 
might beat the Falcons, but not 
by eight points. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Atlanta 

Phoenix at NY Giants -7 

The Giants (1-3) lost a close 
game to the Raiders, but this 
game showcased two of the 
worst offenses in the league. 
New York's defense is aging. 
Let's face it, LT will probably be 
the best linebacker to ever put on 
a uniform, but he has a bad 
shoulder and hasn't been doing 
the job. Phil Simms is still a 
good QB, but hasn't been getting 
any support from his line. Then 
again, he never did. 

Phoenix (1-3) is on the rise, as 
apparent in last week's upset of 
Washington. QB Chris Chandler 
proved last week that he can take 
a licking and still keep ticking. 
Chandler threw for almost 200 
yards with one TD toss. The 
Cardinals held Washington's 
ground game to just 107 yards, 
forcing the Skins to go to the air. 
Simms will have problems 
throwing against a young and 
talented Cardinal secondary. 
Look for another upset. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Phoenix 

NY Jets at Indianapolis +3 

The Jets (1-4) beat the hapless 
Pats, but a win is a win. Jet 




quarterback Browning Nagle 
completed 20 passes, two for 
scores. He is a good quarterback, 
but is still far, far away from 
becoming the league's top play 
caller. The Jet's secondary gave 
up 259 yards passing and three 
touchdowns by Hugh Millen. 
The Jets must now face Jeff 
George, as talented as Millen, 
but with better receivers (Reggie 
Langhorne and Jesse Hester). 

The Colts (2-2) came from 
behind to defeat a much 
improved Tampa team, with the 
help of George. George threw 
for two touchdowns in the 
second half to rally the Colts. 
The only question will be Indy's 
passing defense. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Indianapolis 

Cvllm 

Rutgers at Syracuse -11 

The Rutgers (3-2) were no 
match for the Nittany Lions last 



week, but they will be a match 
for their Big East opponent. 
They scored 24 points against 
Penn State, but gave up 38 points 
and 303 yards passing to 
sophomore QB John Sacca. But I 
still think that they can handle a 
questionable Orangemen 
offense. 

Syracuse (3-1) beat an 
unknown Louisville team by a 
very narrow margin, 15-9. They 
just aren't as good as their #15 
ranking. They may be at Rutgers, 
but it will be a narrower margin 
than last week. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Rutgers 

Miami at Penn State -1 

Joe Paterno is world's better at 
coaching than Dennis Erickson. 
Miami may have the more 
talented team, but with JoePa. . . 
enough said. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Penn State 



Stanford at UCLA +3 

Okay, Bill Walsh and the 
Cardinal upset the Fighting Irish 
last week. And Bill Walsh is a 
great coach, probably one of the 
best ever. But Stanford (4-1) is 
going to L.A. His boys just 
aren't lucky enough to win two 
in row away from home. 

UCLA (3-1) proved that they 
have a great defense two weeks 
ago, stopping super-human 
Marshall Faulk. They should do 
the same against Stanford's good 
passing attack. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: UCLA 

I know that all of these are 
upsets, but this would not be as 
much fun if I didn't take 
chances. Have fun and see ya 
next week. 

Tall Cliffv's record 
4-6-2 



Delta Zeta Sorority 

Philanthropy Fundraiser for Speech & Hearing research at 

GaUaudet University 

Delta Zeta is sponsoring a volleyball tournament 
Wednesday, October 21 through Thursday, 
October 22. Registration fee is $15 per team. 
Registraion will be from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., 
today, in front of the library and in the cafeteria. 

Prizes awarded to first, second and third place 
winners. Teams may consist of any organization or 
group, as long as they have at least six players. 
Come have some fun for a good cause! ! ! 



DAN ESTADT'S SPORT SHOP 



GETY 



HE(R[ 



3REEK SUPPUE 
Jackets, Shirts, Caps 
Custom Lettering & Embroidery 
Our Specialty is 

Service. Service. Service 



Main Street, Clarion 



226-4871 



rtiree-point shootout 

Clarion Courthose 

parking lot 

sponsercd by the Clark* 

University Hoops teaai 

During ALF Week, starting 

October 12 

Monday-Thursday, 6 p.m. to 

10 p.m. 

prizes awarded 




! Volume 74, Issue 6 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 15, 1992 



It 



Issue 



News 

Jquor control wants ID's 

he state has asked colleges 

md universities in 

'ennsylvania for false student 

D cards for liquor control 



agents. 



Pg-7 



Features 

lomecoming 1992 

vleet the candidates for 
lomecoming queen to be 
crowned on Saturday. . .pg. 
3 



Sports 



Yin number one 

polden Eagle football team 
tarns first victory at 
ploomsburg pg. 23 

Clarion's 

Weather Outlook 

Thursday: Cloudy with a 
ihance of rain, high 65 
4 (WYiday: Sunny, high 63 

Saturday; Partly cloudy, high. 
J>5 

Sunday: Cloudy with 
Clearing skies, high 65 
Monday: Sunny, high 68 
Tuesday: Sunny, high 66 
|Vednesda-': Partly cloudy, 
igh62 



Index 

Commentary pg. 2 

^ews pg. 7 

V listing pg. 12 

eatures pg. 13 

Campus events pg. 17 

ntertainment pg. 20 

^Ports pg. 23 

'lassifieds pg. 27 



Casey releases funds for state 
school construction projects 



by Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-chief 



Governor Robert Casey 
announced last Thursday that 
state funds would be released for 
a new Higher Education Capital 
Construction Program, which 
would aid in State System 
universities' construction 
projects. Of the S3 13.7 million 
released, Clarion University will 
receive $7,851,000 for its 
renovation of Founders Hall, 
Montgomery Hall (Venango 
campus) and Harvey Hall. A 
utility project, the second phase 
of steam line renovations, was 
also part of the projects 
approved. 

The state will provide 75 
percent of the base construction 
cost with the universities raising 
the remaining 25 percent. The 
utility project will receive 100 
percent funding. 

President Diane Reinhard feels 
that Clarion is up to the 
challenge of raising the 
necessary funds. "The local 
match required in the Higher 
Education Capital Construction 
Program will present a challenge 
for Clarion University, but 
Clarion has a strong history of 
private giving from our various 
constituencies. Plans are now 
being developed to determine the 
best way to meet our 
requirements for the 25 percent 
match." 

Casey's capital construction 
program is part of "Operation 
Jump Start," an accelerated 
effort to undertake vitally needed 
public works projects and create 
construction jobs during a time 
of national recession.According 
to the Derrick, Casey estimated 
that about 16,000 construction 
jobs would be created through 
this program. "Thousands of 
new jobs. Millions of spin-off 
dollars pumped into local 
economies. An investment in 



the future. especially an 
investment in the future of our 
children," he said. 

State System Chancellor James 
H. McCormick was also on hand 
Thursday to announce the plan. 
"[This] component of 'Operation 
Jump Start' represents a 
significant step toward 
preserving the future of the State 
System by addressing the serious 
capital facilities' needs on the 
14state owned universities' 
campuses." 

Though the state-related 
universities also are participating 
in the program, Chancellor 
McCormick's strong advocacy of 
priority funding for the state- 
owned universities resulted in 
the State System receiving a 
more favorable distribution of 
state dollars to private dollars for 
this one-time capital program for 
academic facilities. State related 
schools have a 60-40 split. 

When asked if he thought the 
75-25 split was fair, Philip D. 
Rowe Jr.,chair of capitol 
facilities committee within the 
Board of Governors replied, 
"Yes, I think it's fair. It's a one 
time shot to get things moving." 
President Reinhard also feels 
the arrangement is the best 
possible solution. Governer 
Casey's Higher Education 
Capital Construction Program 
provides Clarion University with 
an excellent opportunity to move 
ahead with capital and utility 
projects that have not been 
possible, because of lack of 
funding. These projects will 
improve our ability to meet 
pressing demands for the 
renovation of these three 
buildings, which provide 
classroom and office space, 
along with meeting other 
institutional needs." 

President Reinhard felt the 
situation called for action 
because the alternative was to do 




AP photo 

Governor Casey announced that he is releasing money 
for building and renovation projects for SSHE universities 
and state-related universities. 



nothing. 

Others were optimistic about 
the timeliness of Casey's 
announcement. "I think he was 
using this as a political strategy," 
said student board member 
Monica Douglas. "It's an 
election year. It's a Democratic 
House and so many in the House 
are up for re-election" Douglas 
went on to say that many people 
will probably associate this new 
development with the 
Democratic party and it will only 
aid their cause. She also said 
that this is not a new idea and 
that it was discussed in the 
distant past. 

"It had been proposed eight or 
ten months ago," said Rowe. 



Celebrating aver 70 years as a student newspaper 



"The decision was expected 
sometime this year." 

Douglas was also against the 
75-25 split. "I don't think it's 
fair in any way. I think they (the 
state) should have picked up the 
entire tab, since we are state 
owned." Douglas said that much 
of the 25 percent the university 
must now raise will come out of 
the Clarion University 
Foundation and private 
fundraising — money which was 
used in the past for scholarships 
and "academic enhancement." 

"I think people will be very 
hesitant to donate money, 
knowing that it is going towards 
the refurnishing of a state owned 
building." said Douglas. 

(cont. on pg 5) 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 




The Clarion Call- 10-15-92 - Page 3 



iiiiliilll::lililll 



The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in-Chief 
Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 
Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 
Dan Parrish 
Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 

Sforts Editor 

A.J. Meeker 

Copy/Design Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

TaRa Sheesley 

Ad Design 

Amy Conner 

Advertising Manager 

Ted Howard 

Business Manager 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 1 2 00 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Kates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$ 12.00 

Academic Year...$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 




Hide Park 



W 




The way I see it 

f * J ' it 

Managing Editor 




Diversity 

in 
Cultures 



At Clarion, the student body, 
the faculty and some University 
programs sponsor events the aim 
of which is to present us with a 
view of different cultures, 
nationalities and ethnic groups. 
The various foreign organi- 
zations in coordination with the 
International Office hold, for 
example, such events African, 
Asian, European and Latin 
American nights that feature 
various aspects of the respective 
cultures. The office itself works 
hard to make these events a 
success. The students do the 
attire and costumes of their 
countries, serve the local foods, 
sing, dance and try their hardest 
to explain their local cultures. 
Afterwards, the audience goes 
home with the feeling that they 
have learned something. But I 
often wonder what it is that they 
have learned. . . that Japanese 
traditional dress is quite 
elaborate? that Indian food is 
spicy? that Latin-Americans like 
to dance? Do they believe, 
finally, that deep down inside 
everyone is just like us, and that 
with a few minor changes in 
their cuisine, we shall all get 
along in a more peaceful and 
gentle world? 

If this is the belief, however, 
we are all in for a shock, and the 
issue of diversity on this campus 
will never be faced, much less 
resolved. The costumes we see 
on those nights, the food we 

taste, the dances, the music 

express an ethos as profoundly 
culture bound as the American 
Sunday roast and as profoundly 
different. And before we can 
reach any truism about how we 
are the same under the skin, 
"difference" must be faced; the 
truth of our differences must be 




Dr. V. Spina 

acknowledged and felt. For 
some this idea is to be rejected 
out-right. They are too 
scandalized to believe that an 

African dance celebrating sex 
may be as profoundly religious 
as the Catholic mass. Others are 
more "liberal" in their reaction. 

After the function, they will ask 
questions of the dancers; they 

may even read a book about the 
country. But will they ever do 
more than patronize a foreign 
colleague who actually shows a 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



Imagine a hot summer day, 
where all you want to do is lay in 
front of a fan. The perspiration 
runs like a raging river from 
your overworked pores. Dog 
Days... 

The Gemmell Complex is a 
place for students to relax, gather 
for meetings, eat, shop, exercise 
and work. I work at the Call 
every Tuesday night, and for the 
past week I and my fellow 
employees have been 
uncomfortably warm. Warm is 
not even the word for it. Does 
the "Towering Inferno" make a 
clear enough picture for you? 

Last week, I called Public 
Safety and asked them if they 
could turn down the heat because 
it was 85 degrees in this 
windowless room. We also 
talked to the janitors who came 
in about 1:00 in the morning. 
And all they said was they know 
it was hot, but they couldn't do 
anything. The next day Mr. 
Tomeo said they were having 
problems with the air 
conditioning on this side of the 
building and would get it fixed. 
Well, it's Tuesday again and it's 
45 degrees outside and all the 
editors are in shorts and T-shirts 
in an 85 degree room. Our poor 
photography editor is going to 
suffocate in his darkroom 
because his chemicals are 



making him high. 

I'm quite displeased with the 
lack of service we have received 
regarding this situation. We paid 
all this money to work in a 
comfortable atmosphere. I can't 
work because I am so miserable. 

Our wing is suffering from the 
heat. We paid $6 million for this 
building and the air conditioning 
doesn't work. What else can go 
wrong? Well the the ceiling in 
the Call office was leaking. But 
to top that off, part of the ceiling 
caved in. 

Since I'm miserably hot, I have 
to stock up on pop down at the 
snack shop, which closes at 
10:00 p.m. There are no vending 
machines in this building! I don't 
think the restaurant downstairs 
will go out of business if they 
put a vending machine in the 
building. Someone will be 
making money no matter what. 

I wonder if it is just the Call or 
if other offices also have the 
same discomforts? 

We can't control the thermostat 
in the room because it is 
controlled by maintenance, so 
where is maintenance when we 
need them? 

Maybe we should rename the 
paper "The Clarion Cauldron." 



fc 



Thank 
you 

■ — 

Dear Editor. 

Autumn Leaf Festival is upon 
us once again. It's a beautiful 
time of year, and I thought I 
might write in to express some 
of my views on the happenings 
of the year so far. 

I would like to thank the 
council of trustees for passing a 
fifteen dollar graduation fee. 
Seeing as I'll be in debt about 
$10,000 anyway, what's another 
15 bucks. 

The second issue I would like 



to address is that of public 
safety petitioning for firearms. 
This is not a large metropolitan 
area. I've been at Clarion for a 
few years and have never heard 
of anyone being shot or held up 
at gun point. I empathize with 
public safety and understand that 
their job is not the easiest. But is 
there really any need for 
firearms? Every year the Call 
prints the crime statistics, how 
many violent crimes are there? 
Let's look at those statistics 
before we dole out the 
firearms. One other thing, who's 
going to pay for these guns? 
With the budget in such horrible 
shape where 's the money going 
to come from? 
Why is the Gemmell Student 



4* 



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REPUBLICANS'^ 



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Clarion REG: 12.98 to 19.98 

Imprinted T-'jhirb Now: 7.99 to 13.99 



Sho^bo/ 
Greeting Cards 

by Hallmark 

Aborted Greeting 
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Gift Wraps, Bows 
and Coloring 
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with connections throughout the 

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Center closed on Saturday? It's 
not like anyone would want to 
use it on one of the only days 
that they don't have classes. It's 
a very fine facility and should be 
open every day of the week. 

I would also like to thank 
whatever committee purchased 
those useful and informative 
maps. The $45,000 was well 
spent. Clarion is such a large 
campus, and those maps really 
help everyone to find their way. 

Well, I guess that's it. Maybe 
I'll write in again, but I'll 
probably be run out of school 
after this is printed. I'd like to 
thank Dr. Hunter S.Thompson 
for the inspiration and insight in 
writing this. 

Karl L. Laszlo 
An assumed name 



i£ 



Wright 
Influences 

vuuLnjTfiJLfu lAt An. i v nniyn-ri-r ■••-•"-""""-■ m » »« ««««w««w««»w«»«^ 

Did you ever stop to consider 
how many influences we 
confront everyday that try to 
sway us to do certain things. 
Advertisers spend millions of 
dollars to get us to buy their 
products or to give to a 
special cause, and as we all are 
aware of by now, to elect their 
candidate to office. 

As I was watching a political 
ad recently, I wondered what 
influences the candidates. We 
certainly hope that an elected 
official is greatly influenced by 
the people who have elected him 
to office, the people who have 
entrusted him to have their "best 
interest at heart" when voting on 
legislation. 

As I reviewed the list of 
campaign contributions to 
candidates for representative for 
the 63rd District during the 
primary campaign, I had to 
wonder who has been 
influencing David Wright. 

A total of 57 contributors were 
listed to Wright's campaign. Of 
the 57 contributors, a total of 30 
contributions were from political 
action committees (PAC'S). 
These are the groups designed to 
influence politicians in order to 
keep their organization's "best 
interest at heart" when voting on 
legislation affecting them. 

Upon closer examination, I 
noticed that only two 
contributions were from people 



in the 63rd District. Both of 
these contributors were residents 
of Armstrong County, and to my 
surprise, there were no 
contributions from residents of 
Clarion County. 

When it comes time to vote 
on legislation in Harrisburg, I 
wonder whose "best interest" 
David Wright is representing. Is 
it the PAC's from Philadelphia or 
the people of the 63rd District. 

After 16 years in office, it 
seems obvious that David Wright 
can no longer afford to represent 
the people of the 63rd District. 
He is now obligated to represent 
the people of the 63rd District. 
He is now too obligated to 
represent those who supply the 
greatest influence. 

When you vote on November 3 
for State Representative, think 
about who will have your "best 
interest at heart" in Harrisburg. 

Randy Rhoades 



Money 
Wasted 

When we talk about money 
being wasted on campus it is not 
an understatement. Students- do 
you know where your student 
activity fee money goes? Of 
course, one area where the 
money goes is quite obvious- 
student organizations. 

The Student Seriate 
appropriates money every spring 
to campus organizations based 
on a limited budget from the 
money you pay in a student 
activity fee. Second in this day 
of financial constraints it is 
important to conserve every 
penny. Money used for 
legitimate purposes is fine but 
what about the money that is 
needlessly thrown away? Case 
in point, the student directories. 
The money for the student 
directories also comes from 
student activity fee funds. That 
is all good and fine if the money 
benefits the students. 

However, why is it necessary 
to print student directories for 
every faculty member and 
administrator on Clarion and 
Venango Campus. Would it not 
be more prudent to print enough 
directories for the students first 
and those that are left over go to 



the faculty? 

Students living on campus are 
allotted one directory per room 
why not limit the directory per 
departmental office? And 
another thing, when was the last 
time a faculty member or 
administrator called you? 
Professors do have the 
opportunity to obtain your 
phone number on the first day of 
class if they need to get ahold of 
you. 

So, the next time your 
organization needs funding from 
the Student Senate and the 
money just isn't there, think 
about all the student directories 
sitting unused in the bottom 
drawer of your professors desk! 

A concerned student 

Cliffy, use 

correct 

grammar 

Dear Editor: 

After reading "Tall Cliffy's" 
football predictions for the first 
five editions of the 1992-93 
Clarion Call we feel compelled 
to offer our fearless 
prognosticator some suggestions. 
While we often disagree with his 
selections and usually find his 
reasoning both erroneous and 
laughable, such differences are 
part of the diversity, the conflict, 
which make discussing sports so 
enjoyable. What we find 
unsettling, however, is Tall 
Cliffy's annoying and rather 
frequent tendency to include 
within his pieces incomplete 
sentences and heinous 
grammatical errors. Last week's 
column, for example, was nearly 
unreadable. In his "analysis" 
(and we use the word here very 
loosely) of the up-coming 
Rutgers-Syracuse game, Cliffy 
begins his argument with the 
incoherent sentence: "The 
Rutgers (3-2) were no match for 
the Nittany Lions last week. . ." 
Perhaps Cliffy means to say 
"The Scarlet Knights were no 
match. . ." but, in his burst of 
creative energy and gifted 
insight, simply commits an 
editorial mistake. Fine. 

In his next paragraph he claims 
that Syracuse is overrated in the 

(Cont. on pg.4) 



Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 -Page 5 



Hide park. . . 



(cont. from pg. 2) 



real emotion at one of our 
innumerable committe meetings, 
instead of sitting there with that 
affabble, albeit inscrutable, smile 
of the chronic committee member 
born and bred in these here 
United States. In the last of cases, 
what will the reaction be of both 
"liberals" and "conservatives" 
when they are confronted with 
the shame and rage of ghettoes as 
it is depicted in the works of such 
writers as Emiri Baraka and 
Luzma Umpirere. 

But to return to the 
international nights. Obviously 
the purpose, not to mention the 
intention of the participants, is 
excellent: to foster understanding 
of cultures and ways of living 
quite diverse form our own. And 
the audience is by and large 
pleased if they are introduced to 
new dances, songs, foods, and 
friendly international students 
eager to explain how certain 
costumes are worn or how certain 
dishes are prepared. The feeling 
afterwards- at least as it seems to 
me- is "Hey, these people aren't 
too different from us. And with, 
say, just a little more 
undrstanding they could be like 
us. After all, doesn't everyone 
want a nice car, a house, the end 
of poverty, social justice, etc.?" 

Well, yes: I guess everyone 
wants all that stuff, but something 
went wrong when some West 
Indian students presented a 
reenactment of a Voodoo 
ceremony last year, the sacrfice 
of a chicken. People were 
appalled. Conservatives, I could 
imagine, considered the 
ceremony nothing less than 
satanic. I noticed a few were 
ready to leave the auditorium. 
Nor could liberals involved in the 
humane treatment of animals 
have been very much impressed. 
Voodoo, however, along with 
Cuban "Santismo", Puerto Rican 
"Esperitismo", and Brazilian 
"Macumbe" is a religion with as 
an opposong world view from 
that of Christianity, and of the 
West in gemeral, as can possibley 
be imagined. Based primarily in 
African beliefs, and those the 
African slaves learned from the 



Tune 


into 


WCCB 


640 


am 


We 


re 


green! 



native-cultures, then given a 
Christian overlay of saints, Jesus 
and the Virgin Mary, Voodoo 
proclaims the essental 
sacredness of the earth itself and 
believes profoundly in the 
essential role the goddess plays 
in universal creation. Humanity's 
role is almost as profound in 
relation to the gods: We honor 
them by nourishing them: their 
nourishment is blood. 

We have only to compare this 
with monotheistic Christianity, 
its male-centered ideology of 
creation, its distrust of all things 
earthly to realize that we have a 
real problem of diversity here. 
Which is not that every West 
Indian you meet practices 
Voodoo. In fact, few do. But 
who could come from the 
Islands without feeling its effect. 
It is in the air. Its name may 
change from Island to Island. 
But everyone there knows 
someone who practices. It may 
be an old grandmother, honored 
in her town, proud of her sex 
and the role of the goddess. We 
have only to compare to see the 
opposition, the antagonism 
between thse two systems of 
belief, each with its own logic, 
each with its own praxis and 
ethos, each coloring the 
imagination, the very thinking 
processes of those born within 
its sway. So what to do ? Preach 
fire and brimstone to the 
natives? Get the recipe for 
Island curried Chicken? Or 
perhaps just not invite any of 
them to the next faculty 
Christmas party? 

As for the foreign colleague 
we left showing his emotions 
like the hem of a slip at a 
committee meeting, the case is 
interesting. It was one of those 
meetings between faculty and 
administration, when faculty 
members- I don't understand 
why- felt that their point of view 
was not only being ignored but 
also that the policy to be decided 
upon would be both detrimental 
to them and students who would 
be involved. The rest of us sat 
there and smiled. Some smiled 
in loyal opposition, some smiled 
out of boredom, some out of old 
vinegary cynicism- thing was, 
we all smiled. Except our 
foreign colleague. As I soon 
reconized from having seen it in 
other countries, he was being 
himself in a way Americans do 
not allow themselves to be The 
passion roused by his 
intellectual understanding of the 
wrong-headedness of the policy 
had become an integral part of 
his words of opposition; it 
became the very fabric of his 



theoretorical stance. In other 
words, he was not separating 
emotion from intellect. In other 
words, he was committing the 
number one "faux pas" of 
American committee meetings. 

The result was inevitable. Not 
only the faces of the 
administrators but those of 
faculty, the very faculty who 
were on his side, went blank, and 
you didn't have to be too 
intuitive to understand what was 
taking place behind all those 
blanknesses: "another emotional 
outburst by him of the 
unpronounceable last name". 
And because of this, because he 
was doing what he'd seen done a 
million times in his own country, 
here , his message went unheard 
and we can rest asssured that he 
won't be showing up a many 
faculty Christmas parties either. 

Is this only one instance, 
though? Well, if foreign or even 
minority faculty members are 
fully integrated, where do they 
go after classes? Admittedly 
(and probably for good reasons) 
we are rather a herimetic bunch 
here at Clarion, but when was an 
Asian or even a European 
faculty member last seen at an 
informal social gathering at 
someone's home? 

Finally, what about African 
and Latin Americans? Last 
semester among others, Emiri 
Baraka and Luz Maria Umpierre 
spoke on this campus. Their 
messages were different in 
regard to details. But the rage 
and the shame that colored each 
one of their deliveries was the 
same. We heard, in some cases 
for the first time, the rage and 
shame of the ghetto and the 
triumph over these very same 
emotions. But to understand 
them one must understand what 
it means to be bom Isand raised 
in a ghetto. To a ghetto child 
there is really nothing to 
understand. By and large the 
experience is one of love. The 
homes are full with the aroma of 
the child's first foods; on the 
street he or she makes his or her 
first friends: the "cugines", the 
"panas", and" homies". Things 
are natural: they are beautiful 
too, despite the present-day 
crime. During the day, there are 
the city parks: at night, there are 
the stoops where you sit, talk or 
play music until someone who 
has to get up early the next 
morning calls the cops, or, worse 
still, is bit enough to chase you 
away. 

But this changes soon 
enough. It changes in school and 
with teachers who are too burned 
out to do more than put their 



time in, and who come from 
neighborhoods too far away to 
know or even care about what 
happens in yours. It comes from 
the gazes shot from patrol car 
windows, gazes of a disdainful, a 
distrusting occupying force. And 
the result is almost ineluctable: 
feelings of rage and shame- rage 
when the very foundations of our 
childhood (our foods, the smells 
of our homes, our skins, our 
loved ones ) are mocked: shame, 
because it is the very culture to 
which we wish to aspire that 
mocks us, tells children who 
naively believe what the adult 
world tells them that they are not 
good enough. 

The rhetoric of Baraka and 
Umpierre is a reflection, a raw 
image of these conflicting 
emotions. It is a harsh image 
expressed in the forms of a 
culture that is wounded and hurt, 
one that finds no escape for the 
hurt and strikes out aggressively 
as do all creatures who are hurt. 
But this rhetoric is also a triumph 
because the word is always a 
triumph. The word channels the 
rage and delivers it from the 
violence of the streets: it gives a 
voice to the defeated, those many 
who in the face of the battle 
silently surrender and disappear 
behind ghetto walls. The word 
transfigures the chaos of the 
emotions and gives it form, a 
form we can eventually 
understand and with which some 
day come to terms. The word 
finally, is love, for , no matter 
how harsh the word may sound, 
it must be nursed to come alive; 
it must be cared for so that it may 
mature and be heard. It is the 
triumph of human order over 
human chaos. 

But was their word ever 



heard? Many who should have 
been listening weren't even 
there. Some who atteded 
Baraka's lecture walked out 
outraged at the speaker's 
belligerence before they could 
hear the message.With Umpierre 
there were similar reactions. She 
was accused of being lewd 
because in a poem about her 
lover, she dared ot touch her 
thigh where she could still feel 
the imprint of her lover's head. 
She was accused of necromancy 
because in another work 
dedicatd to Sylvia Plath, who 
now lies in a forgotten tomb in 
England, Umpierere writes that 
she kissed the ground that now 
covered the dead poet- a Latin 
expression of love, perhaps too 
graphic for this phlegmatic 
climate. 

Naturally these two 
personalities will not be showing 
up for many get-togerhers in 
these parts. But if that is the 
case, what about our students? 
What about the exchange 
students who after their 
respective nights, seem to 
disappear into the woodwork, 
who are sometimes threatened in 
the bars because they are 
speaking their own language? 
What about African-Americans, 
Americans whose culture, its 
modes of expression, its ethos 
are as enigmatic to us as those of 
any Asian culture, and who have 
the disadvantage of not being 
liked or trusted by many in the 
first place? Shall we not invite 
them this Christmas either? Oh, 
but we have to because they are 
already here and the party is 
America 

Dr. V.Spina is Assistnat 

Professor in the Modern 
Language Department 



STUDENTS... 

Pamper your parents at the 

Clarion House Bed and Breakfast 




77 South Seventh Avenue 
For Information Call 

226-4996 



Casey releases funds. . . 



Douglas used the analogy of a 
landlord and a tenant to stress her 
point. "If you are renting from 
somebody and if your roof is 
leaking, your landlord fixes it. 
The state owns the building and 
we are basically here as renters. 
Our roof is leaking and we have 
to pay for it." 

When asked what would 
happen if a school could not 
* r come up with their 25 percent 
share, Scott Shewell, press 



secretary for the State System of 
Higher Education replied, "They 
(the schools) have 15 or more 
months to raise that funding. All 
the schools anticipate that they 
can raise the money." 

"We now ask that the broad 
State System university 
community— our councils of 
trustees, our alumni, our faculty 
and our staff, as well as the 
Commonwealth's corporations 
and foundations to join together 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
A joint in one of the pipes was not soldered properly 
causing a leak and eventual collapse of part of the 
ceiling in the Call office late Monday night. 



• . 



*5* 



McgoniMdis 



#1 



-———-— -*- — — — « — — -^ 

Big Mac 

Lg. Fry 

Medium Soft Drink 



$2.99 



♦ TAX 



#2 



Two Cheeseburgers 

Lg. Fry 

Medium Soft Drink 



$3.15 



♦ TAX 



Halloween Gift Certificate On Sale! 



Breakfast Served 6:30 AM-10:30 AM Daily 
REAL VALUE - ONLY AT M c DONALD*S 




(Cont. from pg. I) 

to support this bnck and mortar 
campaign. We cannot do it 
alone," said Chancellor 
McCormick. 

Renovation of Founders Hall 
will include replacement of 
heating, plumbing, electrical and 
structural systems. Fire alarms 
and other safety systems will be 
upgraded to accommodate 
current building codes and an 
elevator will be added to 
accommodate individuals with 
disabilities. The facility will be 
configured for classrooms, art 



studios, seminar rooms and 
supporting office areas. 

Electrical, heating, ventilating 
and air conditioning renovations 
are called for Montgomery Hall. 
The facility will be configured 
for classroom space, computer 
laboratories, meeting rooms and 
supporting office areas. 

Harvey Hall will be 
restructured for instructional use 
in several academic disciplines. 
Heating, electrical, structural and 
ventilating components will be 
replaced. Exterior renovations 



will include roofing and masonry 
repairs. "It has not been 
determined at this time what 
Harvey will eventually be used 
for," said Dr. Reinhard. 
"Different groups are interested 
in the building." 

If the university has 
construction authority, Dr. 
Reinhard plans for the work to 
begin next year. But if the 
Division of Governmental 
Services takes over, then 
construction may be delayed 
indefinitely. 



Reader responses. . . 



(Cont. from pg. 3) 



Cliffy, use. . . 



#15 position they hold in the 
anonymous poll Cliffy consults. 
He sensibly asserts that 
Syracuse's 15-9 victory over 
Louisville the previous week was 
hardly an impressive 
performance. Yet in the 



understand his mysterious logic, 
his obfuscatory prose, is quite 
another. 

Even more disturbing than the 
logic lesson Cliffy sorely needs is 
his shoddy sentence structure and 
severe misunderstanding, or 
perhaps ignorance, of English 
grammar. The schedules for the 
spring semester will soon be out, 
Cliffy, and we urge you to take a 



Hide Park 
approval 



following sentence he remarks 

that Syracuse "may be (as good ^rious look at registering for an 

as that ranking) at Rutgers, but it En S lish g rammar c,ass ' 

will be a narrower margin than 

last week." This is confusing, 

poorly written, and simply 

illogical. If Cliffy possibly 

expects Syracuse to justify their 

ranking "at Rutgers" (the game 

was played at the Orangedome 



Mike McDermott 
James Coll 



Dear Editor 

I applaud Melissa Mayes' 
article in the October 8, 1992, 
issue in Hide Park. She is correct 
in saying "don't let Bill Clinton 
fool you." She brought out 
information that should not be 
overlooked. It is easy to get a 
one-sided picture of what is 
going on in the political race 
because the TV media is so one- 
sided in Clinton's favor. I hope 
faculty, staff and students will 
look at the whole picture of what 
is best for our country. 

Anonymous 



by the way) then it would seem 

unlikely and indeed contradictory MalCOimS ITlCSSage lOSt Oil yOUtH 

for Cliffy to pick an 11 point can be 

unranked underdog to win such ^ > *_ kids 

difficult road game. His 



game 

mentioning of the "narrower 
margin" is similarly unclear. It 
would appear, from the tone of 
his babbling, that he would be 
picking Syracuse to win the 
game. Yet he not only forecasts 
Rutgers to somehow keep the 
contest close, an improbable 
conclusion considering Cliffy's 
harsh criticism of the Scarlet 
Knights at the article's beginning, 
but also remarkably predicts 
them to win the game. Again, 



wearing Malcolm X caps and T- 
shirts. But the brother of the slain 
civil rights leader says Malcolm 
X's message is largely lost on 
today's youth. 

Abdul Aziz Omar, a 69-year- 
old Highland Park resident, said 
his brother would be distressed 
by the condition of Michigan's 
cities, and would admonish the 
black community "to do 
something for itself." 

"You have young people in X f 



.. . t . f. „ '. ,- -l caps walking around stoned and 

disagreeing with his selection is . . „ ^ tJ „,. ^ 

.. r »;i7, t „,; nn t n drunk" Omar told The Detroit 
one matter; futiley trying to 



TT<§Jlffiitoi I 

15 Sessions 



DESicninG minos 



iurs. 9-9, Firday 9-1 
535 Main Street, Clarion 



aturday 9 
814-226-5323 



News. "I saw one brother in an 
"X' cap who was so stoned he 
couldn't even walk. They don't 
have the slightest idea what 
Malcolm was about 

"(Malcolm) would say the 
African-American would never 
raise himself as long as he 
smokes and as long as he drinks" 

Malcolm X was assassinated in 
New York on Feb. 21, 1965. He 
lived in Lansing from ages 2 to 
16, and discovered Islam as a 27- 
year-old ex-convict living in 
Detroit. 

Malcolm X left Michigan in 
the 1950s, but returned to Detroit 
often in the time before his death. 
Director Spike Lee's three-hour 
movie about his life opens Nov. 
20. 

If the black leader toured 
today's cities, said Stanford 
University Professor Clayborne 
Carson, he wouldn't hesitate to 
denounce "liberal rhetoric" and 
the fact that things have not 
improved substantially for the 
nation's blacks. 



ii •<» | 

J liadJ luq fiBfij otom ob ol luo ,iri lo jhdel \13' sriJ 'jmrjjd Ii 



J 



Page 6 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



'"-"fnc dlarion WIV I&Zfe* 7 



President Reinhard address 



The week of October 18-24 has 
been designated as National 
Collegiate Alcohol Awareness 
Week at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania in connection with 
its nationwide observance. 
However, this is not just a routine 
link with a national event. I am 
concerned with the apparent 
increase in alcohol-related abuses 
by students this semester, both on 
and off campus. 

The tale/ tell signs of alcohol- 
related episodes can be found in 
the Clarion area with the rise in 
the number of fights, vandalism, 
and other related incidents. 

The lives of some young 
people are already permanently 
changed by events of recent 
weeks. The entire university 
community should be concerned 
with alcohol abuse, because it 
affects both our safety and 



reputation. The many positive 
accomplishments of Clarion 
University students should not be 
dimmed by these unfortunate 
occurrences. 

We want to promote 
understanding of intelligent and 
responsible decision making in 
regards to alcohol, because it is 
not only what you do to yourself, 
but it is also what you do to 
others. 

In order to help students make 
responsible decisions about 
alcohol, campus services are 
available on an on-going basis, 
which assist students in dealing 
with alcohol concerns. 

Students with questions about 
these services can contact either 
the Office of Alcohol and Drug 
Awareness Education/Training or 
the Counseling Center. Copies of 
Clarion University's alcohol 
policy are also available.' 



CUB-TV5 FALL SCHEDULE 
MONDAY TUES. WEDS. THURS. FRIDAY 



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Early Registration Dates October 26- 
November 27, 1992 

[Students will become eligible to use the telephone 
[registration system based on the number of credits 
learned and the first letters of last name. 



[Monday, October 19: 

|The telephone Registration appointment schedule will 
[be posted at the Wood Street entrance of the Carlson 
[Library Building. Copies of the Spring semester 
[schedule of classes will be available at the University 
|Book Center and Office of the Registrar, 122 Carrier. 



Monday, January 11 

[Students who do not register by Friday, November 27, 
will be required to report on registration day of Monday,) 
January 1 1 to schedule classes 



I encourage you to take part in 
the special activities that are 
planned as part of "Natonal 
Collegiate Alcohol Awareness 
Week" at Clarion University, as 
well as the on-going educational 
activities offered on campus. 

I would welcome any 
suggestions from the campus 
community on how to further 
assist in curbing alcohol abuse at 
Clarion University and resulting 
incidents that have taken place. 

President Diane L Reinhard 



See related story on page 8 
in the News section. 




President Reinhard wants to promote 
to students on Clarion University. 



Public Affairs photo 
alcohol awareness 



Student loans become campaign issue 



I 



(CPS) Financial aid is emerging 
as a major campaign issue for 
college and university students 
as President Bush and his 
Democratic rival, Arkansas 
Governor Bill Clinton, actively 
court the youth vote. 

Representatives of college 
organizations for the Democratic 
and Republican parties agree that 
student loans and funding for 
higher education are fundamental 
issues facing both candidates. 
What they disagree about is how 
to make college more accessible 
to more people. 

"The biggest problem students 
face right now is funding and 
student loan debt," said Jaimie 
Harmon, president of the 
Democrats. "We now have a 
situation where some people 
aren't able to go to their school of 
choice or school at all because of 
lack of money. If they can get 
through, they're burdened with 



debt" 

Tony Zagotta, president of the 
College Republicans, agreed that 
loans are a major issue facing 
students, but defended Bush's 
administration and its higher- 
education programs. Bush has 
proposed increasing the 
availability of student loans, but 
wants to cut back on the funding 
for grants. 

"Democrats charge that this 
administration has been 
unfavorable to student loans. This 
is simply false, " he said. "More 
is being given out than (in) any 
other administration." 
Zagotta also slammed Clinton's 



proposed national trust for 
higher education. 

Clinton has proposed a two- 
fold program to make higher 
educaton affordable. Students 
taking out government- 
guaranteed loans could pay them 
off through payroll deductins, or 
they could perform community 
service for two years. 

"These don't have a lot of 
appeal. Young people want to 
enter the job market when they 
get out of college. They want 
choices and opportunity," 
Zagotta said. "While community 
service may sound fine, many 
would want to do other things." 



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Available At All Times 




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Liquor control wants LD.'s 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



The state Liquor Control 
Enforcement bureau (LCE) has 
requested fake student 
identification cards from 
colleges and universities 
throughout Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Wayne G. Faylor, vice 
chancellor of Finance and 
Administration for the State 
System of Higher Education and 
Dr. Rob Orndorff, vice president 
of Student Affairs at 
Shippensburg University met 
with representatives from liquor 
control in September. 

A memo was sent from the 
chancellor to all presidents of 
state owned universities saying 
that SSHE wanted to cooperate 
with the Liquor Control 
Enforcement bureau, said 
Clarion vice president for 
Student Affairs George W. 
Curtis, Jr. 



The letter also asked the 
universities to work with LCE to 
meet the objective of curbing 
underage drinking. The decision 
on whether or not to issue the 
false identification cards will be 
left up to the presidents of the 
individual schools. 

Curtis said Clarion University 
president Diane Reinhard has 
received the letter that was sent 
to all 14 SSHE schools. 
According to Curtis, the letter 
said liquor control enforcement, 
now under the direction of the 
Pennsylvania State Police, will 
be aggressive in the enforcement 
of underage drinking laws. The 
LCE, according to the letter, is 
viewing underage consumption 
as a severe problem and will be 
seeking cooperation from 
colleges and universities. 

As of yet, no requests for the 
false I.D. cards had been made 
of Clarion. 

A letter from the state to the 



University of Pittsburgh said the 
liquor control agents desire the 
cards to "gain access to the 
university and fraternity parties 
to which they are now being 
denied." Student I.D. cards are 
often checked at parties to 
determine if the person is a 
university student. 

Pitt, Duquesne University and 
Pennsylvania State University 
have all turned down requests for 
the cards. Dennis Donham, 
assistant vice chancellor for 
Student Affairs at Pitt said a 
university I.D. card would not 
necessarily provide agents access 
to parties. 

Corp. Kenneth Jones of the 
Liquor Control Enforcement 
bureau said the cards aren't a 
must for the agents to enforce 
laws on underage drinking, but 
told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 
News Fax, "It doesn't help us not 
to have them." 




Call file photo 
The Liquor Control Enforcement bureau has asked several 
schools in the state for false identification cards. 



Cheerleaders up in the air over funding 




by Rodney Sherman 
Contributing Writer 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The Clarion University cheerleaders will no longer be 
funded by the athletic department and will have to file 
forms with Student Senate to be officially recognized. 



Clarion University 
cheerleaders are facing 
uncertainty in the funding of 
their activities. 

The squad is currenUy funded 
by an interim agreement with the 
athletic department, but future 
sources of budgeting are unclear 
as responsibility for the 
cheerleaders is currently 
undetermined. 

In the past, the cheerleaders 
were funded by a Student Senate 
appropriation as a student 
organization. However, at the 
start of the 1987-88 budget year, 
funding was assumed by the 
athletic department which was 
under the direction of the athletic 
director. 

The latest change comes about 
as budget cuts campus wide 
force spending cuts in almost 
every department. 

According to Hal Wassink, 
coordinator of student activities. 



"an ad-hoc committee was 
formed last year to look at 
funding and expenditures of the 
athletic department at the request 
of the athletic director. The 
committee was formed "in an 
attempt to cut costs and meet the 
requirements of a shrinking 
budget," said Wassink. 

After about two months of 
study, the ad-hoc committee 
sent a set of proposals to 
President Diane Reinhard. The 
proposals were in the form of 
phases; as budget restraints 
tighten the university could 
consider proceeding to the next 
phase to meet needs. 

One part of the first phase was 
to return the cheerleaders' status 
to that of a recognized student 
organization, no longer under the 
athletic department. The move 
was approved by President 
Reinhard. Wassink stressed that 
the university had not "left the 
cheerleaders out to dry." When 
asked if CUP will continue to 
have cheerleaders in the future, 
he replied "Absolutely. . . we 
will have the cheerleaders." 



Funding from the university 
comes from a combination of 
student tuition and from state 
support, the latter having been 
cut 3.5 percent this year. 
Funding from Student Senate 
comes from the student activities 
fee, over which the state has no 
control. Student Senate 
allocates the amount of money to 
contribute to the various campus 
organizations applying for funds. 

The cheerleaders must now 
attempt to re -charter through the 
Student Senate to become a 
recognized student organization. 

While verbal support for the 
cheerleaders is high, there is no 
assurance of approval. The 
squad will now get together with 
Student Senator Ralph Godbolt 
to file the proper forms. 

The issue was not before the 
Senate during the October 12 
meeting, and Godbolt said the 
process has not started yet. 

Attempts to reach cheerleading 
coach Lara Reish were 
unsuccessful. 



Page 8 - The Clarion Call - 10-15- r 



Sexual assault seminar on campus 



by Kelley Mahoney 
News Writer 



The PA Commission on Crime 
and Delinquency, known as the 
PCCD, and the Office of Social 
Equity sponsored a one-day 
sexual assault awareness seminar 
last Thursday. 

"It was a success," said Kathy 
Spozio, assistant director of 
Social Equity. "It showed an 
overall concern from everyone." 
The seminar consisted of 
experts from both colleges and 
communities within 100 miles 
of Clarion and provided 
important information on 
personal safety and prevention of 
sexual assault strategies. 

"The opportunity to be 
educated on sexual assault is out 
there," said Spozio. "It's not 
only an issue concerning 
Clarion, but all canpuses in 
general." 

The seminar began at 10:15 
a.m. with four workshops on 



policies, victim's rights, 
education and staff training. 
Included in the sessions was a 
guest speaker who is a 
"survivor" of sexual assault. Her 
name is Allison and she felt that 
"it's important to open people's 
lives. There is so much more to 
sexual assault than most of us 
realize." 

There were 160 participants in 
the seminar and 30 student 
attendants. "It was a nice male 
population and I was surprised," 
said Allison. "That's important, 
because men sometimes tend to 
see sexual assault as a woman's 
responsibility. The male 
attendance here shows that there 
is more to it and it's not the 
woman's fault." 

Among the participants were 
Public Safety and the Sexual 
Harrassment Panel of Advisors. 
"It was a good turnout," said 
Spozio. 

Information was also provided 
to those looking for help, but are 
unsure of where to find it. 



CUP alcohol aware 



by Jodi Seely 
News Writer 



The week of October 18-24 
has been designated National 
Collegiate Alcohol Awareness 
Week at Clarion. 

For the past nine years, over 
3000 campuses across the United 
States and Canada participated in 
NCAAW. According to Leslie 
Kriebel, Senior Rehabilitative 
Science Major and President of 
BAACHUS, NCAAW is in its 
fourth year at Clarion. 

Kriebel also said that each 
year, more student organizations 
are taking an active part in 
NCAAW. 

This year, many organizations 
will be holding various activities 
that will remind students to make 
wise decisions concerning 
alcohol. 

Just a few of these activities 
include: the "Crash Dummies" 
from the television commercial, 
the Velcro Wall made famous on 
David Letterman, the 
"Convincer" seat belt machine 
and Kareoke singing in the 
Gemmell Complex rotunda. 
Also present will be lifeflight, 
local fire departments and area 
ambulance services at a mock 
accident in front of Chandler 
Dining Hall. 

There will be more activities 



around campus that students can 
be involved in. 

Kriebel said that the primary 
goal of NCAAW here at Clarion 
is "to develop an environment 
which encourages and supports 
responsible decision-making by 
CUP students and emphasizes 
the legal, moral and ethical 
components of responsibility in 
the decision making process." 

Clarion University president 
Diane L. Reinhard signed a 
proclamation on Monday, 
officially declaring "National 
Collegiate Alcohol Awareness 
Week" on Clarion's campus. 

Reinhard said in an open letter 
to the Call, " The tell-tale signs 
of alcohol related episodes can 
be found in Clarion with its rise 
in the number of fights, 
vandalism and other related 
incidents. The lives of some 
young people are already 
permanently damaged by events 
of recent weeks." (See page 5 
for the complete letter.) 



"There is help," said Allison. 
"Those who are victimized 
should contact the Rape Crisis 
Center immediately for silence is 
the deadliest part." 

It is a fact from recent surveys 
that those who are victims knew 
their assailant. This type of 
information can be used to 
safeguard against those crimes. 

"This isn't an issue that can be 
swept under the rug," Spozio 
said. "It's important to be well 



informed." 

These seminars are held 
throughout the states and on all 
college campuses sporadically in 
the hope that this information 
will change college policies and 
to secure and strengthen these 
prevention techniques on 
campus. The hosts also hope 
these seminars will change the 
campus goals relating to sexual 
assault. 
"Showing awareness is so 



important to the victim's coping 
mechanisms," Allison said. 

The seminar also gave a list to 
staff members, displaying 
various training locations 
throughout the state. This 
training will help the staff in 
dealing with victims of sexual 
assault. 

According to the College Press 
Service, one out of every four 
college women has been raped or 
sexually assaulted. 



Clarion aids Andrew relief 



by Lisa Cornelius 
News Writer 



After days of heavy rain and 
winds, many towns and cities 
were destroyed by a natural 
phenomenon known as 
Hurricane Andrew. National 
news stations immediately 
broadcasted footage of the 
wreckage. Houses, businesses 
and even schools were 
demolished by the wind and 
water. Citizens are still without 
proper clothing, shelter or food. 
Countless children have been left 
without proper school facilities. 

Recently, the deficiency in aid 
to all afflicted by the disaster 
was brought to the attention of 
Clarion University faculty and 
administration. 

After a brief letter to 
coordinators for supprt of the 
cause, Clarion University 
officially adopted two middle 
schools in the state of Florida 
through the "Adopt- A-School" 
program. Under the direction of 
Dr. Kathleen Smith, P.S.E.A. 
advisor Barbara Grugel, Linda 
Payne and through the efforts of 
several campus organizations, 
"Project Andrew" was put 
together to raise the money and 
supplies needed to support these 
two schools. 

The organizations involved 
include: the Association for 
Childhood Education 

International (A.C.E.I.), the 
Council for Exceptional Children 
(C.E.C.), Kappa Delta Pi , the 
Pennsylvania State Education 



i 



Name: 



Address: 



Amount Enclosed: 



Make Checks Payable to: 

lm mmm mi mm mm M 



CSA: Project Andrew 



l 

l 
j 



Association (P.S.E.A.) and the 
National Student Speech Hearing 
and Language Association 
(N.S.S.H.L.A.). 

The cause is already well 
underway. Donations from 
students, faculty and the 
community have been received 
and continue to pour in. 
P.S.E.A., with the help of Alpha 
Phi Omega, raised money 
through a car wash two weeks 
ago. The fundraiser was a 
success and made an ample 
amount of money. 

Each organization has been 
represented by appointed 
members to form an executive 
board. 

The board members are 
responsible for informing the 
organization they represent of 
their assigned activities and 
duties. 

The representatives involved 
are Karen Callahan (A.C.E.I.), 
Billie Jean Wise (N.S.S.H.L.A.), 
Shelly Shreckengost (Kappa 
Delta Pi), Dawn Miller (C.E.C.), 



Julie Harris (P.S.E.A.), Tonya 
Daniels (P.S.E.A.), Tammy 
Ludwig (P.S.E.A./Alpha Phi 
Omega) and Tracey Trautman 
(P.S.E.A.). 

The two schools recently 
adopted are Campbell Drive 
Middle School in Homestead, 
Florida and Cutler Ridge Middle 
School in Miami, Florida. 

Any supplies received will be 
shipped to Dade County directly 
from Clarion by 

Clarion community service 
organizations. 

Monetary donations will be 
deposited in a special account 
designed to directly send money 
to Florida. 

Anyone who wishes to help to 
drop off their donations at 117 
Stevens Hall, Monday through 
Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., 
before October 21. 

The students in south Florida 
hurt by the hurricane need 
money, library books, 
educational games, educational 
supplies and athletic equipment. 





PROJECT ANDREW 
ADOPT-A-SCHOOL PROGRAM 

PLEASE HELP US ADOPT TWO 

FLORIDA SCHOOLS! 

THE STUDENTS 
OF THE 
HURRICANE ANDREW 
DISASTER NEED: 
'MONEY 'LIBRARY BOOKS 
'EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES 
'EDUCATIONAL GAMES 
'ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
Donations are being accepted at 117 Stevens Hall, M-F 
9:00-4:00 (Sept. 30-Oct. 21). Make checks payable to: CSA: Project 
Andrew. Sponsored by: ACEI, CEC, KDP, NSSHLA & PSEA 
(The College of Education & Human ServicesStudents Organization) 
ADOPTED SCHOOLS ARE: 



Campbell Drive Middle School 
3110 S.W. 157 th Ave. 
Homestead, FL 33033 



Cutler Ridge Middle School 
19400 S.W. 97th Ave. 
Miami, FL 33157 



The Clarion Call ■ 10-15-92- Page 9 



ALF parking announcements 



i 



Pursuant to Clarion Borough 

Ordinance #565, in order to 

facilitate the movement of traffic 

during the 1992 Autumn Leaf 

festival, the following 

regulations will be in effect: 

Monday, October 12 through 

Sunday, October 18, between 

5:00 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. 

Main Street, between 4th 

f Avenue and 5th Avenue is closed 
to traffic for the carnival. 
Borough police may restrict 
parking on Wood Street and 4th 
Avenue, as needed to allow 
trucks to turn. Trucks will 
detour onto 2nd Avenue and may 
utilize Wood Street when east- 
bound on Route 32. 

Thursday, October 15, 5:30 
pm through 7:00 p.m. 

Main Street between 8th 
Avenue and 5th Avenue; 6th 
Avenue between Main Street and 
Liberty Street; and Madison 
Road between 5th Avenue and 
7th Avenue will be closed to 
traffic for the Jaycees Kids 
Parade. 

Friday, October 16, 7:00 am 
through 7:00 pm 

6th Avenue will be closed to 
traffic between Merle Road and 
Madison Road for Farmers and 
Crafters Day. 
§ |» Saturday, October 17, 7:00 am 
through 3:00 p.m. 

The following areas are 
declared "No Parking" to 
facilitate the Autumn Leaf 
Parade: 

-Main Street, 2nd Avenue 
through 8th Avenue. 



4 



|»-Wood Street, 7th Avenue 
through Grand Avenue. 
-South Street, 2nd Avenue 
through 8th Avenue. 
-Liberty Street, entire length. 
-9th Avenue, enure length. 
-4th Avenue, Wood Street to 
Liberty Street. 
-5th Averue, Wood Street to 

9i 4* Liber ty Street. 

-6th Avenue, Wood Street to 



Liberty Street; 
-Firehall parking lot. 

The following roads are closed 
to thru traffic during the same 
period: 

-Main Street, 1st Avenue to 8th 
Avenue. 

-Wood Street, 2nd Avenue to 
Grand Avenue. 

-3rd Avenue, from Wood Street 
to Liberty Street. 
-4th Avenue, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-5th Avenue, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-6th Avenue, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-7th Avenue, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Center Place, from Wood Street 
to Liberty Street. 
-Weaver Place, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Haskell Place, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Wencil Road from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Keatley Place, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Jefferson Place, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Ditz Place, from Wood to 
Liberty. 

-Madison Road, from 2nd 
Avenue to 9th Avenue. 
-Merle Road, from 2nd Avenue 
to 9th Avenue. 

-9th Avenue, from Wood Street 
to Main Street. 

-2nd Avenue, from Liberty Street 
to Borough Line. 
-South Street from 2nd Avenue 
to 5th Avenue. 

Liberty Street shall be a two- 
way roadway from 9:00 am 
through 3:00 pm. No parking is 
permitted. 

Sunday, October 18, 1992, 
7:00 am through 5:00 p.m. 

The. following areas are 
designated "No Parking": 
-Main Street, 4th Avenue to 8th 
Avenue. 
-5th Avenue, Wood Street to 



■ L *tr* 



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i0 *s 



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'70J 



WOLFS DEN 

RESTAURANT 
*- ... * 

Let us 6c a part of your 

fall festival CeSeSratwru 

Come enjoy our specials and our version* 

of the Autumn Leaf 'festival Season 

Octotetieti-lSti 

SPECTALSf 

• Autumn Harvest Platter 

• Scallops' Allegheny 

• Tournedos Clarion 

• And much more 



Liberty Street. 

-6th Avenue, Wood Street to 

Liberty Street. 

-Madison Road, entire length. 

-Merle Road, enure length. 

-7th Avenue, entire length, east 

side. 

-7th Avenue, Main Street to 

Wood Street, west side. 

The following roads are closed 
to through traffic during the 
same period: 

-Main Street, 4th Avenue to 8th 
Avenue. 

-5th Avenue, Wood Street to 
Liberty Street. 
-6th Ave., Wood to Liberty. 
-7th Ave., Wood to Liberty. 
-Jefferson Place, Wood to 
Liberty. 
-Center Place, Wood to Liberty. 



-Wencil Road, Wood to Liberty. 
-Ditz Place, Wood to Liberty. 
-Weaver Place, Wood to Liberty. 
-Madison Road, 9th Avenue to 
1st Avenue. 
-Merle Road, 9th to 2nd. 

Clarion Borough wishes to 
remind the public that vehicles 
which are parking in the various 
no parking areas will be issued a 
citation and will be towed at the 
owner's expense. Residents 
along the parade route and local 
business are encouraged to 
advise neighbors of these 
parking restrictions. 

Visitors to Clarion on the days 
of the Parade and the Autorama 
should plan to arrive prior to 
8:00 am each day. Parking is at 



a premium, and traffic becomes 
very congested once the events 
begin. Delays of at least an hour 
are routine. 

The Borough of Clarion has an 
ordinance which prohibits the 
possession of alcohol on public 
sidewalks, streets, parking lots, 
and parks. The ordinance is 
enforced. Please leave your 
alcohol at home or consume it 
indoors. 

Parents are requested to keep a 
close watch on their little ones. 
Each year, firemen and police 
must interrupt their other duties 
to help locate children who have 
wandered away and become lost. 
Children are at risk among 
strangers and they depend on 
adults for their safety. 



Experts link alcohol, rape 



CPS- Men and drinking can be a 
potentially dangerous mix for 
women, researchers of sexual 
assault said recently at a 
conference on campus rape. 

More than 500 deans, faculty 
members and campus security 
personnel met for a three-day 
conference in early October to 
discuss sexual assault on 
campuses. 

"Rape is an emotionally 
charged issue that colleges can 
deal with," said Bernice Sandler, 
who works at the Center for 
Women Policy Studies in 
Washington, D.C. "Campus rape 
affronts women who haven't 
been raped. All women are 
vulnerable. It also has an impact 
on men. They need to have 
better relationships with 
women." 

Indeed, there were several 
presentations that focused on 
men and why they rape. Mary 
Koss, who works at the College 
of Medicine at the University of 
Arizona, presented some 
statistics from a poll done at an 
upstate New York college. The 
survey found that 80 percent of 
the male respondents wanted to 
dominate a woman; enjoyed the 
conquest; and had the attitude 



that some women look like 
they're "just asking" to be raped. 

"Men are attracted to the idea 
of them being the sexual 
aggressor. Men negotiate 
relationships based on myths, so 
men can misinterpret 
information," she said. "Rape is 
an anger crime. Rape can infer a 
desire to dominate." 

There are demographic 
characteristics in males who 
rape, including being hostile to 
women, hyper masculinity, 
aggressive behavior, drug use 
and being a dangerous driver, 
Koss said. Additionally, the date 
rapist tends to have had more 
sexual partners than other men. 

In studies Koss did, she found 
that 75 percent of the 
perpetrators had been drinking 
when the date rape occurred and 
that 50 percent of the victims 
had been drinking. Alcohol 
itself won't lead to arousal, since 
it is a depressant, she said; 
rather, it builds the expectation 
of sex. A man who is drunk is 
likely to be directly aggrressive 
with women and after a rape 
occurs, blame the alcohol and 
not his own actions. 

Of 460 men Koss surveyed at 
the University of Arizona, five 



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percent said they had raped a 
woman and nine percent said 
they had tried. 

What is important to 
remember, said Jay Friedman, 
who gave a lecture on how the 
media depicts sex, alcohol and 
power, is that "rape is never, 
never, never the woman's fault. 
Men will force a woman to have 
sex to prove he's heterosexual. 
Men become more physical 
when their hormones rage. 
Women want emotional and 
verbal support." 

Although alcohol is a factor in 
date rapes, Koss discounts th , 
notion that fraternities are filled 
with potential rapists. 

"The place of residence does 
not predict sexual aggression. It 
is people who are aggressive and 
not the environment," she said. 

However, an environment 
which does foster sexual 
aggression is sports, she said, 
especially such revenue sports as 
football and basketball. 

Athletes tend to feel elite and 
special and live in an 
environment that "reinforces 
dominance on another person. 
They can be insensitive to body 
size," Koss said. 



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Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



Self defense clinic held 



by Jodi Seely 
News Writer 



At 9:00 p.m., October 7, 
approximately 40 women 
students piled into the Nair Hall 
basement. 

Waiting for them was Glen 
Harrison, third-degree blackball, 
to teach them bow to defend 
themselves against a potential 
attacker. 

Harrison demonstrated self- 
defense last year in Becfat Hall. 
He was so successful, he was 
asked back to Clarion this year. 

While he stretched, he 
explained how he felt women 
were the weaker sex. But with 
knowledge, he said, women 
don't have to be helpless. 

He teaches women not to use 
strength-against-strength, 
because it's inevitable that the 
attacker will overrule. But he 
urges women to use their 
strength against an attacker's 
weakness. 

Harrison became interested in 
Martial Arts in 1977 through 
watching tevevision and movies. 
In his past 15 years of learning, 
he's studied under Grand Master 
Gerrard Durant. Durant brought 
the Goshin Jutsu sytle from 



Okinawa. He also studied under 
Master Capela from Union City 
and Master Popieski from 
Titusville. 

Before Harrison started his 
lesson, he gave some advice. 
He said, "For personal 
protection, learn as much as you 
can; even if you never use it. 
And practice the techniques you 
know so it's a reflex instead of a 
thought." 

Harrison first made his 
introduction to the women. 
Then he told them that there 
were a couple of points to know 
before using the techniques he 
was about to show them. 

One is to prepare yourself 
mentally for an attack. Ask 
yourself how far you will go to 
defend yourself. 

The other is to avoid potential 
situations. Instead of taking a 
short-cut through an ally at 
night, use a few extra minutes to 
take the well-lighted main street. 
Also, be sure to walk with 
friends whenever possible. As 
Harrison said, "There is safety in 
numbers" 

The women were told to pair 
off with someone, and they 
would switch roles as the 
attacker and the victim. 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION, 

CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY 

AND THE NEWMAN ASSOCIATION 



WELCOME 
BACK 

CLARION UNIVERSITY 

ALUMNI, PARENTS, AND 

FRIENDS TO 

HOMECOMING AND 
A.L.F. 1992 



JOIN US FOR MASS AJLF WEEKEND: 
SATURDAY . 6:30 P.M. 

SUNDAY AT 7:30, 9*0 AND 1 1 .30 AM. 




The prime objective for 
escaping someone's grasp is 
called "shooting the gap." The 
weakest part of the grip is 
between the thumb and 
forefinger. You always want to 
pull against that gap. All of the 
excercises taught are based on 
this technique. 

Here are just a few responses 
that Harrison demonstrated for a 
woman approached by an 
attacker. These techniques make 
the attacker more likely to let go 
of you while you take advantage 
of his weak points. 
If the attacker grabs your: 

-wrists from the front, bring 
your arms either inside or 
outside the gap. It doesn't 
matter which way, because both 
ways take advantage of the 
"shooting the gap" theory. 

-wrist with both hands, bring 
your arms either inside or 
outside the gap. This technique 
works both ways. 

~ shirt, reach with the same side 
hand, put your fingers in the 
meat of the attacker's hand and 
thumb on the back of attacker's 
hand, then pull down. 

--hair, trap the attacker's hand on 
your bead with one hand to save 
to the pain. With your other 
hand, jam your thumb into the 
attackers armpit. 

-neck in a headlock, pinch his 
inner thigh or punch the inner 
knee. 

-neck in a front choke, dig your 
fingers into his clavicle bone or 
cup your hands to box his ears. 
Boxing the ears is a way to make 
your attacker dizzy. 

But whatever position you are 
in, never give up. Use every 
body part you have to gain 
advantage. If your hands are 
restrained, you always have a 
foot, knee or elbow to use. 

If each woman left the session 
with just one idea, they could 
pass that idea on to others, said 
Harrison. 

Women could then protect 
themselves better, making 
themselves more confident. 

"Self defense is training to 
learn and use appropriate and 
effective physical actions if there 
j is no alternative," says an 
advertisement for Goshin Jutsit 
Kyo Juj, Harrison's form o( 
martial arts. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of October 5 through 
October 11. 

On Oct. 5, a student was cited for minor's consumption outside of 
the CABS dance. The student registered .10 on the BAC 

A student reported being harassed on Oct. 5. Another person 
wanted papers in the first student's possession. The person chased the 
student and grabbed her by the arm, using foul language. The person 
was cited for harassment. 

Around 1 1:35 p.m. on Oct. 7, a report was received by Public Safety 
that unknown actors damaged a fire alarm horn on the first floor of 
Nair Hall. 

A theft of two VCRs was reproted by Venango Campus on Oct. 8. 
The machines were missing from a classroom in Montgomery Hall 
and are valued at $600 

A student was seen smashing a florescent light around 11:35 p.m. on 
Oct. 9 outside on the first floor of Nair Hall. The light was damaged 
with the actor's shoe. 

Clarion Borough reports 

An officer on patrol checked a suspicious vehicle parked on North 
6th Avenue near Liberty Street. A routine check of the registration 
revealed that the vehicle had been reported stolen from Forest Hills, 
Allegheny Co., PA, on 09/25/92, by a known suspect The suspect is 
described as a W/F, 57", 130 lbs., brown hair. She is believed to have 
since departed the area. The vehicle, a black Oldsmobile Regency, 4 
door was impounded and has been returned to the owner, Arthur J. 
Vancara of Forest Hills, PA 

Brenda Armstrong of 339 Wood Street reported the theft of a Huffy 

White Heat" 12-speed mens bike, white in color, from her front yard 

between 10:00 p.m., Saturday 10/03/92 and 3:00 p.m., Monday, 

10/05/92. The bicycle is valued at $219.00 

Borough Police are investigating entries into and thefts from area 
soft drink vending machines. The machines are located outdoors 
Three machines at various locations have been damaged or entered 
into in the last two weeks. Police believe the unknown actors are 
using a power tool to gain entry. There are no suspects. 

Borough Police responded to a report of a simple assault which 
occurred at 5:35 pm by a known suspect. Pamela J. Clawson, 20, a 
CUP student residing at 195 Wilson Avenue reported that she was 
slapped, knocked to the ground, and scratched by a B/M suspect. 
Clawson suffered abrasions to her knees and scratches to her throat 
and nose. She refused medical treatment. A suspect is identified and 
charges are pending. 

Borough Police responded to a report of a fight in progress at 527 
1/2 Main Street. Upon arrival, the suspects left the area. 
Complainants reported that a party was "crashed" by four unknown 
males. During the party, the uninvited persons began throwing 
appliances out the window and the occupants attempted to stop this 
and eject the rowdy persons. A fight ensued. A tenant, Charles 
Kader, 22, received a bloody nose. Suspects are being identified. 



If anyone has any information concerning these and other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



Outside Clarion 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92- Page 11 



Auditor general gets critical report 



compiled by Dorilee Raybuck 
from the AP service 






State 



• 



* 



1 



tl 



Review critical 
of Auditor General 

A closely guarded review of 
the state auditor general's 
performance shows the office's 
work is sometimes slow and 
poorly documented. But it also 
points out improvements under 
incumbent Barbara Hafer's 
administration. 

Craig Lewis, Hafer's 
Democratic challenger in the 
November election, released the 
report this week by the 
accounting firm of Coopers and 
Lybrand. 

At a news conference on 
Tuesday, Lewis said, "There are 
still big problems in the auditor 
general's office. If this report 
were about a private accounting 
firm, they would be out of 
business tomorrow." 

Philadelphia native appointed 
auxiliary bishop 

Monsignor Joseph Galante, a 
Philadelphia native who has 
served in Rome the past six 
years, has been appointed by 
Pope John Paul II to serve as 
auxiliary bishop in San Antonio, 
Texas. 

The appointment was 
announced Tuesday and 
welcomed by Philadelphia 
prelates. 

Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua 
of Philadelphia said in a 
statement that Galante, "brings 
many human and priestly gifts to 
his new role." 



Candidates marred 
in state races 

Races for Pennsylvania state 
auditor general, attorney general 
and state treasurer have been 
marked with accusations of 
plagairism, hypocrisy and 
dishonesty. 

Candidates and their allies not 
only criticize opponents' 
professional records, but launch 
personal attacks, and issues have 
taken a back seat as candidates 
step up the mudslinging as the 
November third election nears. 

For example, Republican 
auditor general candidate has 
suggested that her Democratic 
opponent, state Senator Craig 
Lewis, was involved in a break- 
in this summer at her office. 

One of Lewis' allies, Senator 
Vincent Fumo, said Hafer is an 
idiot in need of psychiatric care. 

Meanwhile, the Democratic 
candidate for attorney general, 
Joe Kohn, has targeted 
Republican incumbent Ernie 
Preate for alleged ethics 
violations. 

Preate denies the accusation 
and has tried to paint Kohn as a 
lazy rich kid who never has had 
to work hard . Preate also has 
accused Kohn of padding his 
resume and plagairism in legal 
briefs. 

The state treasurer's race is 
also heated. 

Democratic incumbent 
Catherine Baker Knoll and 
Republican challenger Lowman 
Henry interrupted and insulted 
each other during a 30 minute 
television debate taped last 
week. Knoll called Henry a 
hypocrite and Henry accused 
Knoll of covering up a budget 
deficit in 1990. 



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National 

Two charges dropped against 
fromer C.I.A. chief 

A federal court has dropped 
two of the nine charges against 
former chief of C.I.A. covert 
operations Clair George. 

U.S. District Judge Royce 
Lamberth acted on a motion by 
prosecutors working for 
independent counsel Lawrence 
Walsh. The prosecution said it 
wants to streamline the evidence. 
George faces retrial next week in 
an Iran-contra case. 

George originally was charged 
with covering up White House 
aide Oliver North's secret 
resupply network and concealing 
his knowledge of the Reagan 
White House's arms, sales to Iran. 
George's first trial ended in a 
hung jury in August 

Lamberth dropped two counts 
charging George with 
obstructing congress. The 
accounts accused him of 
directing former C.I.A. operative 
Alan Fiers to keep information 
from congressional committees 
at 1986 hearings. 

Fiers is expected to be the 
chief prosectuion witness against 
George, as he was in the first 
trial. 

F.B.I. arrests six 
in dumping scandal 

Six people, including two 
reputed organized crime 
associates were arrested Tuesday 
on charges of mail fraud and 
wire fraud in connection with 
alleged illegal dumping in 
Pennsylvania. 

The F.B.I, said the six were 
arrested without incident based 
upon charges outlined in a 
criminal complaint filed in U.S. 
district court in White Plains, 
New York. 



Town 
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A— y Cleaners 




Costume Rental 

and 

Formal Wear Rental 

226-4781 

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compiled by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



Students rally 
at Edinboro 

The Spectator 

Students representing 
Edinboro University's 
minority population staged a 
rally September 27, after 
campaign signs for the 
minority homecoming 
candidate were defaced. 

Darrin Rankin, president of 
Minority Students United 
(MSU) and co-organizer of the 
rally said the demonstration 
was organized to make more 
students aware of the 
vandalism that had occurred. 

Two campaign boards being 
displayed by MSU were spray 
painted, according to EUP 
police chief David Vamer. 

After campus police were 
contacted, the signs were 
cleaned and put back in place 
so that the candidates lost only 
minimal campaign time. 

Anonymous woman to 
donate to UPJ library 

Advocate 

Pitt-Johnstown is in line to 
receive a substantial donation. 

An unidentified woman 
school teacher, who spent her 
career teaching in greater 
Johnstown, has pledged to 
donate a large, unspecified 
amount of money to UPJ. She 
wants the money to be used 
for the library. 

University administration 
has been looking for an 
opportunity to name the 
library. The area woman will 
have the library named for her 
in a future ceremony to take 
place sometime before 
Thanksgiving. 

The school teacher has been 
acquainted with UPJ for 
several years. 



Lock Haven gets 
slight health scare 

Eagle Eye 

A small health scare hit tLe 
University on September 29, 
when several students and 
three infirmary staff were 
referred to Jersey Shore 
Hospital to test for exposure to 
a hazardous cleaning agent, 
according to Leota Lauer, 
evening supervisor at the 
hospital. 

"There was no health hazard 
to the rest of the campus," said 
Deborah Jackson, the 
University's director of public 
relations. 

"There really was no danger 
to those exposed because of 
the minute amount of time 
they were exposed. It was just 
a precautionary measure to 
have the students checked," 
she said. 

Mercyhurst counselor 
protests fraternity's actions 

The Merciad 

For over two years, Charles 
Kennedy, Act 101 counselor, 
has tried to work with Gannon 
University officials. The 
Gannon chapter of Pi Alpha 
Kappa is located in Kennedy's 
neighborhood. He claims that 
members of the fraternity, also 
known as the "pikes," have 
failed to be responsible 
neighbors. 

Kennedy said that, in the 
past, he has also tried to work 
with the mayor of Erie and 
with local police. Their 
response 'has been terrible." 
Kennedy said that when he 
moved into the area, he was 
"shocked" by the lack of 
cooperation from police. "I 
was used to such a good 
response in our old 
neighborhood," he said. 
A group Kennedy chairs held 
a protest across the street. 



Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 

Cable Channels 



ill DATA 



THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 15. 1991 



(3:30) Movie: "The Poseidon Adventure' 



Design. W, [Cheers q 



Cur. Affair 1 Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



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26 



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5:00 



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Goof Troop 



People Ct 



Tom. Jerry 



(1:30) Movie: 



Cur. Affair 



Nqwsq 



Movie: *»» ■Judgment "(1990) 'PG-13' q 



Cheers g 



Design. W 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



Lifestories 



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Murphy B. 



News 



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j! 



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News 



Newsq 



Pres. Debate: President Bush, Gov 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Debate: Bush, Clinton, Perot 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Wonder Yrs. 



NBC News 



Global Supercard Wrestling 
Pyramid I Press Luck 



Movie: **Vi 'Taps'' (1981, Drama) Timothy Hutton, Sean Penn. 'PG' 



(3:00) Movie: 'Assault' 



Trucks 



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Cartoon Express 



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Clintonj oss Perot 



Pres. Debate: President Bush, Gov. Clinton Ross Perot 



9:00 



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10:00 



Movie: ** "Circuitry Man (1990) R IComedy Jam 



ABC News Special: Missiles of October 



10:30 



Inside the NFL q 



Debate: Bush, Clinton, Perot 



Debate: Bush, Clinton, Perot 



Cheers q IWingsq |Mad-You ISeinfoldq 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game Seven 
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Pres. Debate: President Bush, Gov. Clinton, Ross Perot 



Movie: *»'/; "Five Days One Summer" (1982) PG 



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Sportscenter |Ch. Rag 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: 



(3:30) Movie: «»'/; "Hannas War" (1988) Ellen Burstvn 
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Voces From the Front" (1992) VThe Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick 

I.. — '. ' „n\. kiiiuiit. n.k—rf,. 'DT>' 



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Movie: »** "The Women of Brewster Place (1989) 



Movie: »* "Sheena" (1984) Tanya Roberts^ PG 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Crazy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



iBullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



SuperBouts 



Martin q 



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Movie: ***ft "The Group 



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M.T.Moore | Van Dyke I Dragnet 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: ** "Notorious" (1992, Suspense) John Shea. 



Red Shoe 



Lucy Show 



Movie: "29th Street" (1991) 



Movie: ** "Liebestraum" 



Green Acres 



Thirty something 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 16. 1992 



4:00 



4:30 



(2 30) Movie: [Gunplay 



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Movie: ** "Th? Cannonball Run' (1961) Burt Reynolds 



Cur. Affair I Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



10 



11 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 
Goof Troop Tom. Jerry 



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People Ct. I Cur. Affair 



17 



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(3:00) Movie: "Five Days" 



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Hard Copy 



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Senior PGA Golf: Transamerica Championship. (Live; 



Movie: *** 'Conrack'' (1974, Drama) Jon Voight PG 



Pyramid 



(300) Movie: 



Press Luck ICartoon Eipress 



W§L 



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Motoworid iUp Close 



Movie: »* "Take a Hard Ride" (1975) 



Movie: *»* "The Nasty Girl" (1990) 



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26 [Movie; »» "Nowhere to Run (1978) David Janssen. 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



7:00 



7:30 



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Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Movie: **V2 "Stone Cold" (1991) R' 



Wh, Fortune 



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You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



6:00 8:30 



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Movie: ** "Crackdown" (1990) 'R' 



Family 



Final Appeal 



G. Palace 



G. Palace 



Step by Step 



Round Table 



Dinosaurs q 



Major Dad q 



In Stereo) q 



Major Dad q 



America's Most Wanted q Isightingsq 



Movie: **Vi "FM" (1978) Michael Brandon. PG 



Final Appeal I Round Table (In Stereo) q 



Sportscenter |W. Series 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: »» "The Slugger's Wife" (1985) Michael O'Keefe 



Movie: *»»% "A World Apart" (1988) Barbara Hershey 



What You Do 



Supermarke 



Craiy Kids 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



IBullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Design. W. 



Design. W. 



9:30 



10:00 



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Crypt Tales 



Camp Wilder 1 20/20 q 



I'll Fly Away (In Stereo) q IRoss Perot 



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Murder. She Wrote o IMovie: "A Night in the Life of ^ 7"foff^l?ffi 



11:00 



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11:30 



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12:00 



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■ ■■!■■■■ _..'.— ''. *"" n-.J cu.a "CrArlstu'c" 



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Thirtysomething 



■Freddy 



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SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 17. 1992 



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(330) College Football: Michigan at Indiana (Live 



Tennii: ATP Senior's Championship. 



(300) College Football: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 
Movie: • * "Murder at the World Series (1977) 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



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4:00 



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5:30 



Movie: "Running Mates" (1992, Comedy) 



6:00 



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Movie: •*» "Best of the Best" (1989) Eric Roberts, q 



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Movie: ** "Sword of the Valiant" (1984) Mites Q'Keeffe. 



Tennis: ATP Senior's Championship. 



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Star Search (In Stereo) 



American Gladiators 



News q I NBC News 



(3:00) Movie: "Jesus" IMovie: ** "Breakout" (1975) Cha rles Bronson. PG 



College Football: Florida State at Georgia Tech. (Live 
Gossip! I Ten of Us I Two Dads 



Counterstrike (In Stereo) 



Hee Haw Silver 



[Cappelli 



Movie: *+ 1 /2 "Necessary Roughness "(1991) PG-13 q 



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Here-Now |0ut All Night 



10:00 



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ABC News Special: Missiles of October 



10:30 



Sanders 



Movie: "Interceptor" (1992) Andrew Divoff. 



Empty Nest INurses q ISisters "And God Laughs- 



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W orld Series: Game One. Athletics or Blue Javs at Braves or Pirates 



World Series: Game One Athletics or Blue Jays at Braves or Pirates 



Cops(R)P 



Here-Now 



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Code 3 q 



Movie: *+V2 "Unfaithfully Yours' (1984) Dudley Moore 



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Scoreboard ICoHeoe Football" Oklahoma at Colorado. (Live 



Movie: "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" (1978) 



Hunter 



Sisters "And God Laughs" 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



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Newsq 



Design. W. Y'Down-Out" 



Saturday Night Live (R) 



Arsenio HaH (In Stereo) q 



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I Comic Strip 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 

News q I Saturday Night Live (R) 

Movie: **% " Caravans" (1978) PG' 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie- «*+ ■■Gftosf" (1990. Fantasy) Patrick Swavze. PG-13" n IMovie: »+ "Bullseye* (1989) "PG-13" q 



Swamp IBeyond [Bradbury IHitchhiker 



(3:30) Movie: "PascaHs Island" (1988) 



Nick News I Get Picture IFreshmen 



Super Dave 



Salute 



Movie: »»* "The Freshman" (1990) Marlon Brando, q 



Double Dare IG.U.T.S. IDouo [Rugrats 



Movie: »*+ "Desperate Hours" (1990) Mickey Rourke 



Movie: *»% "Guncrazv" (1992) R 



Clarissa iRoundhouse iRen-Stimpy 



26 IMovie: ** "For the Love of It" (1980) Deborah Ratlin. 



Movie: 



♦ »i : -Blind Faith (1990. Drama) Robert Unch, Joanna Kerns. Dennis Farma 



Comedy 



You Afraid? 



, Football Scoreboard I Sportscenter I Sr PGA Golf 

Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g IMovie: *Vz "Princ ess Warrior" (1989) 

Movie: »» "Timebomb" (1990) R' "Carnal Crimes' 



Joan Rivers: London 



Hitchcock 



Hidden 



Green Acres 



Movie: * "Affairs of the Heart" (1992) 'R' 



Confessions 



M.T.Moore I Dragnet 



Unsolved Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



"China Bch" 



SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 16. 1992 



4:00 



National 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



Lifestories IMovie: ** "Stepping Out" (1991) Liza Minnelli. PG' q 



M*A*S 



NFL Football. New York Giants at Los Angeles Rams. From Anaheim Sta dium. (Live) 

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10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



m\ Geographic 
i'H IA-Team 



I Sweating Bullets (In Stereo) 
[Strangers 



News 



Wh. Fortune 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Movie: «»V? "Almost an Angel' (1990) 



ABC News 



NBC News 



NFL Football. Atlanta Falcons at San Francisco 49ers. From Candlestick Park 



(Live) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



Movie: *** '•About Last Night... " (1986) Rob Lowe 



Sports Super I Suspect I Search for Scarlett 



m 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



News O I NBC News 



(3O0) Movie: * ^"'Caravans ' (1978) IMovie: *** "The Red Badge of Courage 7 " 



Horse Racing: Bud Internal 



Swamp 



Ten of Us 



Senior PGA GoH: Transamerica Championship. (Live) 



Two Dads I Beyond 



Movie: »* "Funny About Love" (1990) Gene Wilder q 



(3:30) Movie 



** 



Cant on TV 



Disease 



"Lena's Holiday" (1990) 



Get Picture 



Endocrin. 



Wild Side 



Medicine 



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Life Goes On (In Stereo) q 



Movie: ♦*% "Soaodish" (1991) Sallv Field. PG-13' q 
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I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



Great Scott! I Ben Stiller q 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



One Night 



10:30 



Kids in Hall 



Movie: ** "Circuitry Man" (1990) R 



When Harry Met Sally" (1989) q 



Movie: 



Jewels" (1992, Drama) (Part 1 of 2) Annette OT oole. Premiere. (In Stereo) q 



World Se ries: Game Two. Athletics or Blue Javs at Braves or Pirates 



News 



world Series: Game Two. Athletics or Blue Javs at Braves o r Pirates 

in Cate r iRocq iMarried- IHerman [Flying Blind IWoopsI q 



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f^ . l . . f. 1^ I I T C iDilijil I (UUtAW 



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Medical 



Double Dare 



NSAIDS 



G.U.T.S. 



Medical 



Belief 



Journal 



Looney 



Milestones 



NFL's Greatest Moments 



Movie: *** "Fail-Safe" (1964. Suspense) Henry Fonda. 



Auto Racing: IndvCar ■- Monterey Grand Prix. 



Movie: *» "Lower Level" (1991) R 



Movie: »» "Shattered" (1991) R' g 



Green Acres 



Medicine 



Green Acres 



Family 



Green Acres 



Cardiology 



Movie: •* "Night Eves 2" (1991) NR' q 



Boxing 



Green Acres 



Medicine 



11:00 



11:30 12:00 



Newsq 



News 



Night Court 



Newsq 



Paid Prog- 



News q 



Cheers q 



Magnum, P.I. 



Ent. Tonight 



Cur. Affair 



Love Con 



Paid Prog- 



Suspect 



Love Con- 



Perspective 



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Movie: ** "The Slugger's Wife" (1985) 



Sportscent er 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



NFL 



Hollywood 



:: *'/2 "American Kickboxer 1" (1991) 



Movie: *** "P a per Mask" (1990) R 



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Ob/Gyn 



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Family 



Physicians 



Movie: "One Good Cop " Q 



Green Acres 



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Paid Prog. 



MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 19. 1992 



(3:00) Movie: Movie: »»» "Crossing Delancev' (1988) 



Design. W. [Cheers q 



Cur. Affair I Edition 



10 



11 



14 



17 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 I 5:30 



Oprah Winfrey q 



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People Ct. 



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(2:30) Movie: 



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Movie: **Vi "The Outsiders' (1983) Matt Dillon. PG' q 



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Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon I Batman q 



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i 



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ABC News 



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Wonder Yrs. 



Newsq 



NBC News 



18 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Movie: »» "The Sluggers Wife" (1985) Michael O'Keefe 



21 



22 



25 



26 



Pyramid I Press Luck 



Trucks I Reporters 



Cartoon Express 



Movie: ** "Audrey Rose' (1977) Marsha Mason. PG 



MacGyver (In Stereo) q 



(2:30) Movie: 



Ren-Stimpy 



Movie: "Breslins Neighborhood ] " (1979) 



Ren-Stimpy | Ren-Stimpy | Ren-Stimpy 



Movie: »» "Wedding Day Blues' (1988, Comedy) 



Sports 



8:00 



8:30 



Movie: »»Vz "Livin Large!' 



Pres. Debate: President Bush, Gov. Clinton, Ross Perot 



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Blossom q 



Debate: Bush, Clinton, Perot 



Shade 



Debate: Bush, Clinton, Perot 



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9:30 



First Look 



10:00 



Movie: 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



. merPebples Money" (1991) 'R' [Movie: "Crackdown" (1990) 
N"t''F ft0 mall: l crnc'innati Bengals at Pittsburgh Stee lers. From Three Rivers Stadium. |News g 



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Murphy B. 



Love & War 



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P— — 1 . r ■ ' . ' I... «'-!-. IIP! >1.-J... IU.. 



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Hunter "High Noon in LA." 



Movie: "Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted (1992) q 



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Sportscenter IW. Series 



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Movie: *»* "The Hospital 



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Expedition Earth: Mt Cook lAmazing Games: Finland. 
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Movie: »»'/2 "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1981) 



Movie: *»'/; "The Ratings Game' (1984) 



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k "Little Vegas" UW K IMovie: "Pate 8/ood" (1991) 



Movie: »»'/? "Paradise" (1991) Melanie Griffith. 'PG-13 



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LA. Law "SPOTiinator" IMovie: ** "Triplecross" (19 86) Ted Wass. MarkiePost 



Thirtysomething 



Outrageos 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 20, 1992 



Movie: *•*'/? "A Cry in the Dark " (1988) Meryl Streep 



Design. W: [ Cheers q 



Cur. Affair I Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



10 



Schoolbreak Special 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



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Goof Troop 



People Ct. 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



(3:00) Movie: »*» "Picnic 



Global Supercard Wrestling 



Pyramid 



(245) Movie: 



Press Luck 



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News q 



Design. W. 



Movie: *** "Defending Your Life" (1991) Albert Brooks 



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Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon I Batman q 



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1 



6:00 



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News 



News 



Newsq 



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CBS News 



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Jeopardy! q 



CBS News 



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Newsq 



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NBC News 



Movie: ♦♦»'/; "California Suite" (1978) Maggie Smith 



Trucks 



I Yearbook 



Cartoon Express 



Movie: "All Poos Go to Heaven (1989) q 



(330) Movie: "Young Detectives 



Underdog I Yogi Bear I Arcade 



Running I Up Close 



MacGyver "Twice Stung" q 



Ent. Tonight 



Golden Girls 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Movie: *»V2 "Necessary Roughness" (1991) PG-13 q 



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Full House q I Mr. Cooper 



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Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Roseanne q I Coach q 



10:00 



Sanders 



10:30 



11:00 



Conv. With a Killer 



Going to Extremes q 



Movie: "Jewels" (1992, Drama) Annette OToole q 



Newsq 



World Series: Game Three. Braves or Pirates at Athletics or Blue Jays 



World Series: Game Three. Braves or Pirates at Athletics or Blue Jays 



Movie: »»* "Cocoon" (1985) Don Ameche 



Hunter 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Movie: *** "Jesus Christ Superstar" (1973) Ted Neeley 



Sportscenter I Auto Racing: SCCA 



Movie: "Jewels" (1992, Drama) Annette OToole. q 



Movie: »*» "Conrack" (1974, Drama) Jon Voight PG 



News 



Golden Girls I Niqhtline q~ 



News 



Newsq 



Married. 



Newsq 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: *Vi "Legal Tender 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Forever Knight (In Stereo) 



Edition iFor. Knight 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q 



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Movie: "The French Connection II" (1975) 



Drag Racing: Keystone iSportscenter 



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Movie: *« v z "Supergirl (1984) Helen Slater. PG q 



Auto Raci ng: American 400 trom Nashville, Tenn. 
Murder. She Wrote g IMovie: »»» "Bodily Harm (1990. Susrjense jJoe Penny. WacGW"MaJ3alton^[ 



Movie: **Vi "The Quest (1976, Western) 



Hey Dude (R) 



Movie: »« impulse (1984, Suspense) Tim Maiheson, 



What You Do Craiy Kids 



Supermarket I Shop-Drop 



Movie: «»'.'2 "Ouigley Down Under (1990) Tom Selleck. 



M« u i». **v, "Above t he Law" (1988) Steven Seagal R IMovie : *** "29th Street" (1991) "R q 

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IBullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Get Smart I Superman 



L.A. Law 



Movie: »»» "The Borrower" (1989) R 



M.T.Moore I Van Dyke I Dragnet 



Movie: «» 1 /2 "Guncrazv (1992) R 



Equalizer 
| Movie: "Poison" (1991) 



A. Hitchcock 



Movie: **h "in the Spirit (1990) Mario Thomas 



Lucy Show I Green Acres 



Howie Mandel: Howiewould 



Jeff Cesario 



Mister Ed 



China Beach 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 21, 1992 



(3.30) Movie: "Banzai R 



Cur. Affair 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



Design. W 



Cheers q 



Movie: ♦* Modem Problems' (1981) 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Goof Troop 



People Ct 



2:00) Movie: 



Tom, Jerry 



Cur. Affair 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



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Design. W. 



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Oprah Winfrey q 



Murphy B. 



Tiny Toon I Batman q 



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gri 



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6:30 



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Movie: "Running Mates (1992, Comedy) 



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NBC News 



Hard Copy 



CBS News 



Jeopardy! q 



Full House q 



Wonder Yrs. 



Newsq 



Global Supercard Wrestlwg 



Movie: ** "Breakout (1975) Charles Bronson PG 



Trucks 



Pyramid Press Luck 



12 30) Movie: Death On 



Just Friends (R) 



Underdog I Yogi Bear 



Powerboats 



Inside PGA 



Cartoon Express 



NBC News 



Wh. Fortune 



Golden Girts 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Married., 



You Bel-Life 



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Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



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9:30 



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10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



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Civil Wars (In Stereo) q 



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Law 6 Order (In Stereo) q 



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Newsq 



11:30 



12:00 



Movie: "The Road Warrior 



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**T-Ten Little Indians (1966) IMovie: *«W "Shaker Run (1985) NR 



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(1990) 



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imble. (Live) jSpe edweek ISportscenter [Volleyball 

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Movie: * "Valentina (1990) 



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Thirtysomething 



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*J 



-:• :■! (H ffglrn,; ji f\ 

The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 - Page 13 



;'l 







'92 Homecoming court chosen 



by Lisa Recker 
Features Writer 



Autumn Leaf Festival 1992 is 
presently underway, and this 
week is full of amusement rides, 
games, craft stands, and good 
eating. 

One ALF event that is tradition 
at Clarion Uiversity, is the 
parade. One part of the parade is 
the homecoming queen and her 



r 



A 



^ 



Still Hall. Printouts were then 
given to Diana Anderson, and 
based on those printouts, the 
court was formed. 

"Overall, voting went very 
well. I only wish it had been 
advertised more, then we would 
have a better turn out. We plan 
to advertise more next year," 
commented Heather Owens, 
Special Events Committee 
chairperson for UAB. 



"Overall, voting went very 

well. I only wish it had 
been advertised more. . ." 



attendants. 

A total of 69 girls were 
nominated for homecoming 
court. All girls were sponsored 
by a particular campus 
organization. 

Voting took place on Monday, 
October 5, and Tuesday, October 
6, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. in 
Gemmell Student Complex. 
Each voter was asked to vote for 
three seniors, two juniors, two 
sophomores, and two freshmen. 

A total of 621 ballots were 
totalled in the computer lab of 

Parade preview: 



The following women are the 
members of the 1992 
Homecoming Court. Seniors 
are: Sharon Grove, sponsored 
by Alpha Sigma Tau; Mamie 
McCluskey, sponsered by Sigma 
Phi Epsilon; Andrea Maitland, 
sponsered by Sigma Sigma 
Sigma. 

Junior attendants are: Sandy 
Kane, sponsered by Sigma 
Sigma Sigma; Merrilyn 
Murynack, sponsered by Alpha 
Sigma Tau. 

Sophomore attendants are: 




Public affairs photo 

The 1992 Clarion University Homecoming Court is (from left): Sharon Grove, Larina 
Shumbres, Merrilyn Murnyack, Shelly Eisenman, Sandra Kane, Mamie McCluskey, Andrea 
Maitland, Tonya Harteis and Jenifer Janoss. 



Shelly Eisenman, sponsored by 
Sigma Sigma Sigma; Tanya 
Harteis, sponsored by Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 

Freshman attendants are: 
Jennifer Janoss, sponsored by 
Clarion University Dance Team; 
Larina Shumbres, sponsored by 
Delta Phi Epsilon. 



Homecoming queen will be 
announced on Thursday, October 
15, at the Homecoming Dance. 
The dance will be held in the 
Gemmell Complex Multi- 
purpose room from 9:30 p.m. to 
1 a.m. 

Crowning of the queen will be 
at the football game, Saturday, 



October 17, during halftime. 
Brian Hoover, president of 
Student Senate, will present the 
crown. 

"I feel very honored to have 
made it this far. I'm graduating 
in December and this is a great 
way to end the semester," said 
Andrea Maitland, senior. 



What to look for in the ALF parade this year 



by Tricia Egry 
Features Writer 



Rounding out Autum Leaf 
Festival week is the Festival 
Parade, sponsored by Bell of 
Pennsylvania, Integra Bank and 
Pepsi. Saturday, October 17, 
marks the 39th annual parade in 
Clarion, with seating available 
for a mere three dollars. 

This year, the parade promises 
to be as spectacular as ever, with 
106 seperate units all 
participating to give people 
another reason to flock to 
Clarion for ALF. 

The parade line-up marches 
onward with hometown 
specialties like the CUP band, 
cheerleaders, and dance team. 



Following them are some town 
and state celebrities such as 
Grand Marshall Jon Burnett, 
State Senator Tim Shaffer, 
Congressman William F. Clinger 
and Mayor Elaine Moore. 
Closer to home, riding with 
dignity and pride throughout the 
streets of Clarion, is CUP's 
President Dr. Diane Reinhard 
and "Citizens of the Year" Bob 
Bubb and Kurt Angle. Also, 
honorable mentions are extended 
to ALF Chairman Randy Stroup, 
Co-Chainnan Glenn Watson, and 
Secretary Gary Kriebel. 

Much time and preparation is 
put into creating effects that will 
be remembered year after year of 
Autumn Leaf. Combining 



talents from both sororities and 
fraternities shape unique designs 
into their own emblems of unity 
in the form of floats. Phi Sigma 
Sigma and Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Delta Phi Epsilon and Sigma Tau 
Gamma, and Sigma Sigma 
Sigma and Sigma Chi are just 
three of the many representatives 
of college life at Clarion 
University. 

Along with greek 
organizations, other campus 
organizations wtH be 
represented, as well, such as TV 
5 and the Art Association of 
Clarion County. We as a 
family, community, and society 
come together to share good 
friends, good times, and good 



food. 

Also appearing on a float this 
year is Elvis. The big question 
to that is will it be the young 
good-looking Elvis, or will it be 
the end-oi-career, overweight, 
drugged-out Elvis? 

In the way of beauty queens 
we have the Dairy Princes, Miss 
Teen ALF and CUP's 
Homecoming court. High school 
bands from as close as Clarion 
High School, and as far away as, 
from Pittsburgh, Carlynton High 

School. 

International foods, 
outrageous music, antique cars, 
beautiful floats, comical clowns, 
Zem Zem Shrine Units, and a 
special appearane from the 



Philadelphia Mummers provide 
plenty of entertainment for all. 

Along with Clarion's 
atmosphere of an array of Fall 
colored leaves, sounds of 
cheering families of students, 
faculty, and alumni, scents of 
different cultural foods and tastes 
of cotton candy and caramel 
apples is enough to engage 
anyone to enter Clarion's zones 
of Autumn. 

The festivities begin at noon 
with pre-parade starting at 11 
a.m. Immediately following, 
Clarion University Golden 
Eagles host Lock Haven for the 
1992 Homecoming football 
game. Also at the stadium, 
check out the hot air balloon. 



Page 14 - The Clarion Call -' 10-15-92 

Theater opens first production; "The Rainmaker" takes the stage 



•rt 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Writer 



The Clarion University 
theater opened its 1992-1993 
season with "The Rainmaker," a 
romance by N. Richard Nash, 
this week as part of the Autumn 
Leaf Festival week. 

"The Rainmaker" tells 
the story about the Curry family 
and their neighbors in a western 
town suffering through a 
drought, which is killing both 
cattle and crops. The Curry's are 
also suffering from another type 
of drought; just as there is no 
rain, their lives have no romance, 
no dreams and no magic. 

Especially hit by these 
circumstances is Lizzie, played 
by Ariadne ter Haar, a freshman 
exchange student from the 
Netherlands. Growing up in a 
household of men, Lizzie has 
become good at cooking and 
cleaning, but she has lost other 
things. When the stranger 
Starbuck (played by John 
Rickard) comes to town, he 
claims he can make it rain — for a 
price. But he also has a chance 
to restore magic and romance 
into the Curry home. 

"This is a solid, 
standard American play," said 
Dr. William Kennedy, director of 
the production. "It is often 
performed in community theatres 
and schools. This play says 
some things I wanted to say, 
things that are very important to 
me. 

Dr. Kennedy, who 
joined the speech 

communication and theatre 
faculty this fall, is also 
impressed with other aspects of 
the play. "One of the things that 
amazes me is how balanced the 
parts are. Each of the roles have 
a driving passion, which offers 
each actor a solid performance 
experience." 

Although the cast of 
seven was small, they gave a 
very strong and solid 
performance, as well. Included 
in the Curry family were John 
Moffet as the father H.C., 
Michael Hiller as Noah and Bill 
Howell as Jimmy (who stole the 
show). Michael Ames played 
the town sheriff, and Mark 
Tachna played the sheriff's loyal 
and dedicated deputy. 

One of the most 
interesting aspects of this play 
was the idea of using real food 
and drinks as props, something 
that is not ordinarily done. Yet 
that, and the additional props, 
made the play more believable 
and real. 



Both cast and crew did 
a wonderful job, and to quote Dr. 
Kennedy from the program, "A 
person comes into our lives and 
claims he or she can work a 
miracle. Now, we've got a 
problem. Miracles require faith 
and, while we may be perfectly 
willing to spend our money, sell 
our possessions or give our gifts, 
we are reluctant to risk our faith. 
We have so precious little of it. 
What we forget is that the only 
way for faith to grow is to risk it. 
And that might mean risking it 
on a man who claims he can 
make it rain. Or it might mean 
risking your faith on love — the 
greatest miracle of all." 

"The Rainmaker" will 
continue tonight, Friday and 
Saturday in the Marwick-Boyd 
Little Theatre at 8:00 p.m. 
Tickets can be obtained at the 
door or at the Gemmell 
Information Desk and are $5 for 
adults, $4 for children and free 
for students with valid ID. 




* 



*v 



Public affairs photo 
The cast of the Rainmaker includes back row (L-R) Mark Tachna, Mike Ames, Mike Hiller, 
John Moffett and John Rickard. Front row, Bill Howell and Ariadne ter Haar. The play will 
run through Saturday. 



Mind reader comes to CUP 



by Craig Thomas 
Features Writer 



Bill Stiles, a mentalist who 
reads the thoughts of his 
audience, will be entertaining the 
students of Clarion, Tuesday, 
October 20 at 8:00p.m. in the 
Gemmell Complex multipurpose 
room. The event is being co- 
sponsored by Residence Life, 
UAB and Interhall. 

Mr. Stiles has predicted 
headlines of newspapers, weeks 
before the event has happened. 
He uses his extrasensory ability 
to read unspoken thoughts of the 
audience and will tell the 



audience what another person 
has written on a piece of paper in 
a sealed envelope. Mr. Stiles 
also experiments with numbers; 
he will place the numbers 1 to 9 
on a board with three numbers 
across and three numbers down. 
He will then let a volunteer from 
the crowd scramble the numbers 
in any order and will predict the 
three sums. 

Mr. Stiles claims he is not a 
mindreader. "As far as I know, 
there is no such thing as a 
mindreader", he says. "I have 
never known anyone to read a 
persons mind like one would 
read a book. It takes great effort 



and concentration on my part, 
and on the part of the participant 
to receive the singular thoughts 
that have made my 
demonstration such a success." 



Homecoming Dance 

-with "Electric Video Company" 
Where; Gemmell Multi- 
purpose room 
When: Thursday 10 p.m. 
-Come see who the 1992 CUP 
Homecoming queen will be. 
Sponsored by UAB. 



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The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 - Page 15 



v~^ 



How do you feel about 
the new $15 graduation 

fee? 



CALL-ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Raymond Nice 




Paul Levy 

Junior, Communication 

"Don't you think we pay enough already?" 



A 



^ Sigma Sigma Sigma would like (f^ 
^D to welcome our new (f ^ 

^D Associate Members of Fall 92 ([K 



Tonya Fleming 



^m Kathleen Grillo 
^j) Georgia Cypher 

<3D 




Jody Bender 
Jennifer Esposito 



Jessika Malek Gina Snyder 

Melissa Morris 



flngel Napolitano ([^ 

Jennifer Pascucci lf^ 

Lisa Pfeifer ^-^ 

Pam Pellegnno rtjv 

Sharon Slater ( ^ 



NEW YORK 






Mon-Sun 1-9 
Sun. 12-5 

ph. #226-6680 



,to 2C*lr 




WfffffWff 




WjM 



20% OFF STOREWIDE! 

Expires: 10/21/92 

Jewelry 

Hollogram Watches... 

Keyrings, Titanium Rings, Bracelets 

Ear Piercing, 

Blankets, Mugs, Puzzles, Posters 

Cards, 
Concert T-shirts, Risque T-shirts, 



rcfiuTtitcMaFnifal 



[ViiWSJl ■WV.VvK 1 IMK1 



Tapastries, 

Skirts, Dresses, Vests, 

Rainsticks, Hats, Incense, Bajas, 

and MORE!! 






Damian Dourado 

Senior, Communication 

"I could use the money for other things." 



Craig Thomas 

Sophomore, Communication 

"I'll wait till I'm one credit from 

graduation;then, I'll transfer." 



Chris Heinze 

Senior, History 

"Next thing you know, they'll charge us 

for the catalog." 









tt' ] ^B 






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JKM 





^ 



Amy Gerkin 

Junior, Communication 

"Fifteen dollars is nothing major." 



Amy Hetrick 

Freshman, Political Science 

"I think it's unfair, because we pay 

enough already." 



Dawn Sams 

Sophomore, Communication 

"They should be able to scrape up $15 from 

the thousands we pay every year." 



IF I 



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'!••' I nniipl 1 « H • 



Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



li 



Everything you wanted to know on flex dollars 
and cash allowance, but were afraid to ask 



This question and answer 
segment is designed to help you 
get a better understanding of the 
new flex plan with cash 
allowance new at the cafeteria 
and Gemmell Complex this year. 
Q: What are flex dallars? 
A: Flex dollars are just like 
cash, except they allow you to 
enjoy the convenience of dining 
on campus without the worry of 
carrying cash. 

When you purchase one of the 
optimum meal plans, an initial 
balance of $50, $75 or $100 is 
placed in your account. 
Everytime you use your flex 
dollars, the price of your food is 
subtracted from the balance of 
your account. Flex dollars can 
be used at both dining service 
location on campus. 

Q: Are flex dollars carried over 
from one semester to the next? 
A: Flex dollars can be carried 
over from the fall to the spring 
semester. But any remaining 
balance is forfeited at the end of 
the academic year. 

Q: What meal plans have flex 

dollars? 

A: Only the optimum meal 

plans have flex dollars. 

These meal plans are as follows: 

20 meal plan with $75 flex - on 

and off campus. 

15 meal plan with $100 flex - on 

and off campus. 

10 meal plan with $50 flex - off 

campus. 

Q: What happens when my 
initial flex dollar balance gets to 



zero? 

A: You can increase your flex 
dollars in increments of $25 at 
Student Accounts, B-16 Carrier, 
at any time. 

Q: Where can 1 check my flex 

dollar account balance? 

A: You may check your flex 

dollar balance at any card reader 

station. 

Q: Do I need a separate 
indentification card for flex 
dollars? 

A: Your oficial university 
indentification card can be 
encoded to access your flex 
dollar account. A meal or flex 
dollar amount will be deducted 
from your balance, 

automatically. 

Q: What is cash allowance? 
A: Let's say you decided to eat 
lunch at the Snack Bar. The 
lunch equivalency is $2.75. You 
decided on the cash allowance 
menu, one meal will be deducted 
from your board plan. However, 
if your purchase exceeds the 
cash allowance rate, you may 
pay the remainig balance with 
flex dollars or cash. 
The cash allowance rates are as 
follows: 

Breakfast: $1.70 
Lunch: $2.75 
Dinner: $3.10 

Q: When I use my cash 
allowance at the Snack Bar, am I 
only allowed the "Cash 
Allowance Special?" 
A: No! The specials are 



designed for convenience and 
value. However, you may create 
your own puchase; and if there is 
any amount over the cash 
allowance, you may pay cash or 
use flex dollars. 

Q: What if my purchase is 
under the "cash allowance" 
amount? 

A: The cash allowance figure is 
a one time point-of-sale value 
figure, not to be confused with a 
monetary figure. If your 
puchase is under the cash 
allowance price, only one meal 
has been taken off your board 
plan. No dollars have been taken 
off your flex dollar account. 

Q: Who is eligible for pizza 
delivery? 

A: Students who have 

purchased the optimum meal 
plans with flex dollars are 
eligible to have pizza delivered 
to their campus address and pay 
with their flex dollars. Students 
without the optimum meal plans 
may have pizza delivered and 
pay cash. 

Q: My friend wants a pizza, but 
I want a sandwich. May the 
sandwich be delivered with the 
pizza? 
A: Yes! 

Q: What do I do if I lose my 
I.D. card? 

A: Lost identification cards 
should be immediately reported 
to 228 Egbert Hall, Residence 
Life Office. Your card will be 
disabled to prevent unauthorized 
use. There is a replacement fee 



for a new card. 

Q: I would like to treat a friend 
or a family member to a meal, 
can I use flex dollars? 
A: Yes, you have two options 
available to you. 

1 . Eat at Chandler Dining 
Hall. Use your board plan for 
your meal and pay the remaining 
meal costs with your flex dollars 
or pay cash. 

2. Eat at the Snack Bar. Use 
your cash allowance rate for the 
meal and pay the balance with 
your flex dollars or pay cash. 

Q: My friend and I would like 
to split the cost of a pizza. Can 
we use our flex plans for this 
cost? 

A: If both of you have flex 
dollars, you may split the cost 
and have it taken off both of 
your accounts. 

If only one has flex dollars, 
only the individual with flex can 
have half the cost taken off 
his/her account. The other 
individual would have to pay 
cash for his/her share. 

Q: I would like to have a party 
for my friends and purchase the 
items from the snack bar. Can I 
use my flex. 

A: Yes, any items offered at the 
Snack Bar are available in large 
quantities. Please contact Denise 
Gilbert, Snack Bar Manager, on 
the procedure for placing an 
order. 

Q: Can I purchase an entire 
giant hoagie? 



A: Yes! 

Q: Do I need to be on a meal 
plan to enter or purchase food 
from the Snack Bar? 
A: No! The Snack bar operates 
like a fast food operation. 
Anyone may purchase food at 
the Snack Bar with or without a 
meal plan. 

Q: When can I purchase an 
optimum meal plan? 
A: Whenever you receive your 
university tutition bill, there is an 
area where the meal plans are 
listed. You may choose the 
appropriate optimum meal plan 
at that time and add the cost to 
your tuition bill for paymnt with 
your other fees. 

Q: Can I cancel my meal plan? 
A: You will have until the week 
prior to the beginning of each 
semester to make a decision to 
make a change or cancel the 
meal plan you' have chosen. 
After the beginning of the 
semester, meal plans cannot be 
changed or canceled. 

Q: Why can't I return for 
seconds at the Snack Bar at no 
charge. I can eat all I want at 
Chandler? 

A: The Snack Bar is a retail 
operation quite different than a 
board operation like Chandler. 
The Snack Bar is operated for 
convenience, flexibility and an 
alternative, not a substitute. 



-courtesy of Student Affairs 




i w 



2 slices of pepperoni pizza 
Whole Fruit 

Fries 

3 Otis Cookies 

Cash Allowance 
Only 



Riemer Center Snack Bar / Gemmell Student Center 

4 p.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday through Friday 




"Autumn Harvest Buffet" 

TONIGHT 
OCTOBER 15TH 

Chandler Dining Hall 

4p.m. - 7 p.m. 



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Exchange students expand minds 
and cultures at Clarion University 



by Lisa Lepre 
Features Writer 



courses. 



I live in an 



The International Student 
Exchange Program has brought a 
quartet of young women from 
around the world to attend and 
live on Clarion Campus this fall. 

Giovanna Pia Mifsud Bonnici 
is from Cospice, Malta. She is 
studying artificial intelligence 
and decision making through the 
College of Communication. "I 
am studying law at home" 
Bonnici said. "I intend to go 
back and get my law degree after 
my semester here." 

This in not the first time 
Bonnici has been in the United 
States. She has visited 
Washington, D.C. and New York 
City. Bonnici chose Clarion 
because of the environment. She 
explained, "Malta does not have 
mountains and rivers. Here there 
is green all around and it is 
beautiful." 

Jeannette Hamping is from 
Lohoom, Sweden. She is 
visiting the U.S. for the first 
time. Hamping is taking "both 
undergraduate and graduate 
courses in marketing, which I 
can use at home to complete my 
degree" she says, "ISEP picked 
Clarion for me, and I thought it 
would be a nice place to be after 
reading about it." Hamping 
explained. 

Teresa Sanga Gomasevic of 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, is also 
visiting the U.S. for the first 
time. At home she is studying 
psychopedagogy, a major only 
offered inArgentina and Spain 
that relates to psychology 
education. 

Here at Clarion Sanga- 
Gemasevic is taking phychology 



overcrowded city, and I tried to 
chose a small college here," she 
explained. "I read about 
Pennsylvania and the Allegheny 
Forest and how America starts 
here." 

Terese Planting is from 
Ekenas, Finland. She was a 
previous Rotary club exhange 
student in New Hampshire. At 
Clarion Planting is taking 
business courses that she can use 
as credits for home. "I am 
excited with the courses I can 
take here," she said. "I want to 
earn my MBA and persue 
international/industrial 
marketing," Planting explained. 
After her first visit to the United 
States, she decided she wanted to 
return again. 

Three Clarion Juniors are 
studying aboard this year as well 
as part of the International 
Student Exchange Program 
(ISEP). 

Jennifer Johnson of Linesville 
is a Junior Spanish/ business 
major and Brandee Payne of 
Kane, a Junior 

marketing/Spanish major are 
both attending Instituto 
Technologico Y De Estudiow 
superiore De Monteriey in 
Monterry, Mexico. 

Mesan Stecklair of Jacobus, is 
a Junior German/Spanish major. 
She is attending the Katholische 
Universidad - Eichstat in 
Eichstatt, Germany. 

Clarion studentjapplying to 
ISEP must have Junior standing 
and a minimum 2.75 quality 
point average and must submit 
essays in English and the 
language of the country where 
they want to attend school. 



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:LA8ION800Cehter 



pay 

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ar only 
$2.29 

Latex only 50 d 



KLINGENSMITH'S 

DRUG' STORES Inc. 



CAMP 


The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 - Page 17 

ȴ TS FVF.NTS 


Information provided by Student Activities Office. Compiled by Don Crotsley 


Thurs Oct. 15 


Fri Oct. 16 


Sat Oct 17 


- ALF WEEK 


- ALF WEEK 


- ALF Parade (Main St) 


- Drama Production 


- Drama Production 


12 noon 


"The Rainmaker" 


"The Rainmaker" 


- HOMECOMING 


(LT) 8 p.m. 


(LT) 8 p.m. 


- Drama Production 


- UAB Homecoming 


- Minority Affairs/ City 


"The Rainmaker" 


Dance" Electric Video 


Beat Talent Show 


(LT) 8 p.m. 


Company" 


(Chap) 6p.m. 


- AASU Cabaret (Gem 


(Gem M-P) 10p.m. 


- "Murmmers" (Tp) 8:30 


M-P) 11 p.m. 


Sun Oct. 18 


Mon Oct 19 
- Student Senate mtg. 


lues Oct. 20 


- ALF WEEK 


(248 Gem) 7 p.m. 


- IFC/Panhel Anti-Hazing 


- AUTORAMA 


- Koinonia presents"God 


Workshop (Gem 250) 


- National Collegiate 


on Trial" (Chap) 8 p.m. 


6:30 p.m. 


Alcohol Awareness 


- UAB Laser Light Show 




Week Begins 


(M-B) 8-10 p.m. 
- IFC/Panhel Anti-Hazing 
Workshop (Gem 250) 
6:30 p.m. 




Wed Oct 21 


Thur Oct. 22 


Fri Oct. 23 


- IFC/Panhel Anti-Hazing 


- IFC/Panhel Anti-Hazing 


- UAB/BACCHUS 


Workshop (Gem 250) 


Workshop (Gem 250) 


Bedrock Cafe 


6:30 p.m. 


6:30 p.m. 


"Tommy Belmont, 




- UAB MOVIE "Far and 


pianist" (Gem M-P) 




Away" (Gem M-P) 


8 p.m. 




8 p.m. 


^^^^^^ 



Laser shows "beaming down" to Clarion 



by Larry McEwen 
Features Writer 



The Saturn V Laser Light 
Show will roll into Clarion 
Monday October 19, as part of 
its 1992 tour. 

The show features a high tech 
laser light show and is 
accompanied by a soundtrack 
that includes bands such as U2, 
The Cure, The Grateful Dead 
and Led Zeppelin. 

This year there will be two 
shows with an alternative music 
show taking place at 8 p.m. and a 
classic rock show at 10 p.m. The 
show will be held in the 



Marwick-Boyd auditorium. 

The show uses two high 
powered laser systems, plus a 
whole bank of computers and 
laser projectors. One laser is 
used to project full color images 
on a 500 square foot screen. 
The other lasers shoot beams out 
over the audience. 

Many of the songs are pre- 
programmed and choreographed 
with the effects. A new strobe 
and special lighting package that 
actually beams the audience is 
new to the show this year. 

New York state laserist Lewis 
Eig and sound engineer Mark 



Decker are the men behind the 
music and lasers. The show has 
been touring for eight years and 
has appeared in over 500 cities. 

Decker described the features 
of the show, "It's the first time 
ever that a touring laser concert 
has flown a rearprojection 
screen. This means that during 
the show, we can raise up the 
screen and shoot full-color 
beams and tunnels out over the 
audience. The possibilities are 
limitless." 

Admission is S3 for students 
and $5 for the general public. 
Tickets are $5 at the door. 



5 th Ave. Restaurant 

Cold 6pks/Qts 
to go 



Monday - Special 

Hot Wings/ Pitchers 

All Day 



226-8512 

Full Menu 
Daily Specials 

Wednesday Nite 

"Touch of Class" 
New - DJ 



Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 

Rock news 



by Amy Whittaker 
Contributing Writer 



Robert Smith of The Cure is 
bearing quite the black eye after 
being pelted by a large, heavy 
unidentified flying object during 
a concert in Mexico City. He 
was tackled on stage by a 
rambunctious fan. The band 
only sold 35,000 of the 100,000 
seats of Los Angeles' Rose Bowl 
despite massive promotion and 
radio blitz. 

Following up 1989's "Brain 
Drain," the Ramones have 
released a new album. "Mondo 
Bizarre" marks the studio debut 
of C. J. Ramone, who joined up 
with Joey, Johnny and Marky 
after bassist DeeDee stopped 
performing with the band three 
years ago. DeeDee hasn't 
severed all ties, though. He 



wrote three of their new tracks 
on the album including, 
"Strength to Endure," "Main 
Man" and "Poison Heart." Joey 
meanwhile, wrote seven new 
numbers, with Marky co-writing, 
"The Job That Ate My Brain" 
and "Anxiety." In addition to the 
thrill of a new album the 
Ramones have also been 
honored by the independent lable 
Triple X, who has recently 
released a various-artists record 
of Ramones coversong entitled 
"Gabba Gabba Hey." Motorhead 
also has recently wrote and 
recorded a tribute tune called, 
"Ramones." 

If you are a fan of Galaxie 500, 
the Chills or the Feelies, check 
out Luna. Dean Wareham, Justin 
Harwook and Stanley Demeski 
have gotten together and 
released one stellar debut album 



entitled "Luna Park." Also on 
the new music horizon, keep 
your eyes open for Suzanne 
Vega's latest, "99.9 degrees 
Farenheit." 

The Throwing Muses also have 
a new album that's just itching to 
be heard. "Red Heaven" is the 
latest effort from the Muses and 
includes tracks entitled, 
"Firepile," "The Visit" and 
"Dio." It does not ,however, 
include Tanya or Fred Aboing. 
The two former Muses have 
broken off to form Belly, whose 
"The Sow Dust" EP is out on 
4AD import right now, with the 
proper full-length release due out 
in a few months. 

And finally, on a Seattle note 
Mudhoney's reprise debut, 
"Piece of Cake" is due to be 
released in mid-October. Caught 
up in a tidal wave of Seattle 
based music, Mudhoney is still 
sticking with the same producer 
and artist they used on "Every 
Good Boy Deserves Fudge." 



"M'">>K>'»"""' > ' " 




Jim Schulze/Clarion Call 
Pictured here is the U. S. Army Field Band with 
conductor Colonel Jack H. Grogan, Jr. just moments 
before giving their patriotic performance last week. 



■» 



Please 



so I can buy 




Mom! 



end money 

« 

a computer from Digital 



% 



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4 ¥ 



to help me with my schoolwork. My teaching assistant in French 



I look into getting one 





. She says it's a real value 




suggested 



for the money. I 



can use it as a word processor for English literature fcfttu 






for engineering class 



crank up my GPA in no time 




, as a CAD/CAM platform 
or as a spreadsheet for economics jjj?||gg J • I* 



;'s sure to 




. Say hi to Grandma 




. Love ya. Bye. Oh 



by the way, all the smart kids on campus already have one. 



d i g jilt ail 



FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT THE CLARION STUDENT ASSOCIATION, UNIVERSITY BOOK CENTER. 



ft 



■*l k 




by Chuck Sheperd 



-Recently arrived on the market 
is a new computer toy, SimAnt, 
whose purpose is to put players 
in charge of an ant colony. The 
goal is to conquer a suburban 
back yard and drive the residents 
from their home. Says the 
advertising brochure, "SimAnt is 
more than just a game. It's a 
way of life." 

-In March, Steven A. DeFoor 
was arrested in Warren, Ohio, 
moments after allegedly robbing 
a downtown Bank One branch. 
According to police, DeFoor 
planned to exit the bank building 
through an elevator. Actually, 
the elevator operator had stepped 
down the hall to help move some 
furniture. As DeFoor waited in 
the elevator for the door to close, 
bank employees pointed him out 
to arriving officers. 

-A Japanese rancher told 
reporters in Tokyo in July that he 
herds cattle by outfitting them 
with pocket pagers (beepers), 
which he calls from his portable 
phone. After a week of training, 
the cows associate the beeping 
with eating and hustle up for 
grub. 

-An Australian government 
research organization announced 



in December that it is on the 
verge of creating sheep whose 
wool is moth-proof because it 
secretes insect-killing proteins. 
The same organization recently 
developed sheep with wool loose 
enough to be pulled off by hand. 

-TV evangelist Robert Tilton, 
weary of having lawsuits filed 
against him by former followers 
who claimed to have paid him to 
revive dead relatives: "If you 
want to be mad at somebody, get 
mad at God; don't sue me." 

-A topless woman, interviewed 
by The New York Times while 
taking advantage of a state court 
of appeals ruling permitting non- 
lewd, non-commercial 
toplessness, said she thought the 
ruling would not have made 
much impact: "There are a lot of 
things not conducive to being 
topless. You can't run topless, 
you can't barbecue topless, you 
can't fry fish." 

-Snake-handling expert Larry 
Moor died very quickly in July 
after being bitten by an Egyptian 
cobra in Vancouver, Canada. He 
had staged classes and started an 
organization to teach the public 
that they have nothing to fear 
from poisonous snakes. 
However, he had often said that 
only two snakes are really 



dangerous and that the Egyptian 
Cobra is one of them. 

-Reverand Edward Mullen of 
the St. Edward Catholic Church 
in Providence, Rhode Island, 
told parishioners in July that 
because he believes the United 
States Supreme Court is too 
strict on the separation of church 
and state, he would no longer 
permit any government official 
to be prayed for in his church. 

-David Rodgers, 22, was 
charged with animal cruelty after 
a neighbor said Rodgers had 
flushed his pet python down the 
toilet. The python survived, and 
Rodgers staged a re-enactment 
of the incident in an Ottawa, 
Canada, courtroom in January to 
prove his innocence. Rodgers 
said he normally tries to keep the 
snake in warm water in the 
bathtub but it prefers the toilet 
and had slithered in voluntarily. 
In the courtroom re-enactment, 
the snake quickly slithered to the 
toilet, and Rodgers was 
acquitted. 

-In An nandale, Virginia, in 
August, two men wearing 
bandanas and with handguns 
poised, rushed the front door of 
the First American Bank seconds 
after manager Dwight Smith 
entered at 8 a.m. to open up. 



Unknown to the men, the door 
had locked automatically behind 
Smith. The first robber to reach 
the door bounced off it and 
reeled backward, hitting the 
second man, who knocked the 
first man back against the door. 
The men then called it a day, 
staggered back to their van, had 
trouble starting it, but finally 
sputtered away. Neither has 
been captured. 

-Among the pricing abuses that 
came to light as a result of the 
July settlement of a lawsuit 
against American Medical 
International hospitals in Florida 
were: $54.30 for a sponge and 
$7.80 for an antiseptic swab. In 
a separate dispute, a Humana 
hospital in St Petersburg agreed 
to lower some of the prices it 
was charging, including $50 
each for Advil and Tylenol 
tablets. 

-On July 1, the city of East St. 
Louis, Illinois, began municipal 
garbage pickup for the first time 
since 1985, when the city ran out 
of money for it. Mayor Gordon 
Bush estimated that in the 
ensuing seven years about one- 
third of residents arranged 
private pickup, but that two- 
thirds dumped their garbage 
illegally. 

-Relatives of Dargan Suther, 
who died in 1990, are fighting 
over an estate worth more than 
$600,000 in Birmingham, 
Alabama. Before his death at 
age 73, Suther had taken to 
living in a tent in his yard 
because his house was so filled 
with possessions that it was 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92-Page 19 

impossible to walk through it. 
Most of the possessions were 
decades-old newspapers and 
items acquired, said authorities, 
only because he thought the 
price was right. 

-Prosecutors in Chicago 
decided in July to put a certain 
bank employee on the stand to 
identify an accused bank robber, 
despite the fact that, in a lineup, 
she had picked out the FBI agent 
standing next to the accused. 
This time, when the employee 
took the stand and was asked to 
point out the alleged perpetrator, 
she looked right past him and 
picked out Chicago Tribune 
reporter Matt O'Connor, 
covering the trial from the first 
row. (The defendant was 
convicted, based on the 
testimony of other witnesses.) 

-In August, sheriff's detectives 
in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 
accused Orrette Moore, 39, of 
killing two men and wounding 
two others in a restaurant 
because he had just lost $5 in a 
card game. 

-The husband and wife coaches 
of the University of Minnesota's 
celebrated women's gymnastics 
team were fired in May after 
team members were given a 
videotape of a gymnastics meet 
(for training purposes) that had 
five minutes' worth of sex 
between the couple accidentally 
spliced onto the end. 



•(C) 1992 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



ALF Battle of the Bands heats up Hart Chapel 



by Shawn P. Seagriff 
Features Writer 



On Wednesday, October 14, at 



6:00 p.m. the Hart Chapel 
Theater opened it's doors to 
several awaiting rock-n-roll 
lovers. The fans paid two dollars 



j*%#*"* Welcomes 

Clarion University Students 

To Our "Autumn Leaf Festival" 

Featuring 




Lunches From $2.95 

Dinners ; Starting At $ 5.45 

Weekend Buffett and Sunday Brunch 
10 % Off Entree with Student ID. 




RT. 322 TWO MILES 



RESTAURANT 

■ - : 

EAST OF CLARION, PA 



(814)764-3311 



a person to watch the Battle of 
the Bands. 

With help from chairperson, 
Michelle Smith, and sound work 
by C.J. Sound, the Wendy's 
sponsored Battle of the Bands 
proved to be a successful 
performance. 

The concert involved seven 
bands, each playing fifteen 
minute sets. Every band was 
judged in four categories, each 
category worth twenty-five 
points. The categories were: 
stage performance, musical 



ability, origanal/mimoegraphy, 
and audience response. 

The performing bands were: 
Public Alarm, Outcast, Simon 
Says, Teazer, H.P. Thunder 
Bongs, Brethren, and Epilog. 

The winning band from last 
year, Epilog, broke up after last 
year's concert, but half of the 
band's members stayed with 
Epilog, and the other half 
formed Brethren. Both of the 
bands performed at this year's 
concert. 

The top three bands each 



received a trophy and various 
cash awards. The first place 
band recieved one hundred 
dollars, second place received 
seventy-five dollars, and the 
band coming in third received 
fifty dollars. 

From heavy metal to older and 
acuostic rock-n-roll, the Battle of 
the Bands covered all stops, and 
once again, the concert proved to 
be a big success. 



Ifie Looking gCass Scuon 

404 Main St. Clarion, PA (814) 226-9444 

$5 OFF Acrylic Nails 
$2 OFF Haircuts 

Perms • Color • Sunglitz • Frosting . Nail tips • Pedicures 

Waxing. Foil Highlights -Conditioners • Sculptured Nails 

Manicures • Ear Piercing . Tanning • Facials 




The Clarion Call 
would like to make a 
correction. In last 
weeks issue, we 
quoted Denise Bump 
as a representative of 
the Kappa Theta Phi 
sorority. She had, in 
fact, resigned her 
position three weeks 
before the Panhellenic 
council vote. 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 Page 21 



Page 20 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 




PEACE CORPS WORLD WISE PuZzLe 

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



•" 



INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in nearly 90 nations around the 
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries. 

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce 
the name of the country darkened on the map at the right. 

One of the first three of the 
former republics of the 
Soviet Union to gain 
independence 



ft 





owmiijir] = w.vui/;r> > puo/oj •( f $fyj C J ."/"S 7 ■'•WW 



Sea on the northern coast of this nation. 

Initials which commonly denoted the 
nation to which this republic belonged for 
more than 40 years until 1991. 

Large nation to the southwest of this 
country where the trade union Solidarity 
got its start in the early 1980s. 

Under communism, this belief in the 
nonexistence of God replaces religion. 



Doonesbury 



MR. PEROT ITS BEEN REPORTED 
RECENTLY THAT YOU TRIED V PIS- 
CREDIT YOUR Q0U6HTB& JEWISH 
FIANCE BECAUSE, AS YOU PUT IT, 
"YOUPOHT THINK THAT IP 1ST 
MYPAUOHWRIrlARRYA JEW. " 





Calvin and Hobbes 



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BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



"Oh, it's just Hank's little cross to bear — 
he's allergic to down and that's that." 




I'm 9ohr\a pound you 
in gym c\<v>5, Twnty. 




cHKBWVltlKE 

T&SEEWWrr/ 





by Bill Watterson 

Mi BRMN WISHES M EfiO 
HAD CALL-WAITING. 




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BOOKS ON WUH GIRL3 
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Years later, Harold Zimmerman, the original 

"Hookhand" of campfire ghost stories, tells his 

grandchildren the Tale of the Two Evil Teen-agers. 




LOOK, PEOPLE WERE CALLING 
PALLAS TO SAY, "HJE'VE 60T 
CRIMES GO/NO ON DOWN HERE, 
THEFT, PEOPLE ARE STEALING 
FROM US!" WHAT WAS I 
SUPPOSE? TO DO? 



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I'll give you knowledge you've only 

dreamt of. Secrets to the cosmos, and 

it won't cost you $15 to graduate. 



nterstellar University Recruiter 




Your Horoscope 
Oct 18 thru 24 



ALL S\GH9 OF THE 
ZODIAC ARE EMOTIONAL 
BUT THE PEPTH OF 
FeeUNGS OF WATER 

6\6HS... CkNCfZ 

*cowioi»*pPisce$> 

5URFACB F{\$T£R 
THAN ALL OTHERS 




PROFESSOR COSMO 



WEEKLY OVERVIEW 

Good Jupiter aspects indicates week 
events shou Id give a boost to hopes and 
aspirations. Sun moves into Scorpio. 
New position could help improve in- 
vestment opportunities. Love planet 
Venus moves into freedom loving Sag- 
ittarius. Those who are wise will give 
relationships more space to grow. 



THIS WEEK FOR ALL SIGNS 



ARIES March 21 -April 20 

Take advantage of any financial offer- 
ings (hat may add to your interests. 
TAURUS April 21- May 21 

One you meet thru a job related matter 
could become important in your life. 
GEMINI . May 22 -June 21 

Openings to secure a better or more 
interesting job should be reviewed. 
CANCER June 22 -July 23 

As soon asone recognizes one'sabilihes, 
one should see to it thev are developed. 
LEO July 24 - August 23 

Planets bring new friendships and pos- 
sible benefits in speculative matters. 
VIRGO August 24 -Sept 23 

Venus moves into domesticsector. Cood 
time to fix-up, to buy or sell a home. 
LIBRA. Sept24-Oct23 

Opportunities to make use of talents in 
nearbv places if you look closer. 
SCORPIO Oct24-Nov22 

Happy Birthday! Sun moves into your 
sign. Look ahead with optimism. 
SAGITTARIUS Nov23-0ec21 

Great ideas, even solutions come when 
you pause and reflect. Why not try it! 
CAPRICORN. Dec 22-Jan 20 

It should be easier now to combine busi- 
ness with pleasure. 

AQUARIUS Jan2l-Feb19 

New ideas, positive attitudes & re- 
newed ambition can lead to near- 
miracles. 

PISCES Feb 20-March 20 

Some may be projected into the lime- 
light, willingly or otherwise. 



FREE Numerology 'Personal Year' report of what to expect in your year ahead. Send 
bkthdate and long self-addressed stamped envelope to ' COSMIC COLLEGE PER- 
SONAL YEAR '(Name of this Publication) P.O. Box 717, Manchester, N.H. 03105 



Weekly ( 

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40 Weeping 

41 Object of Python's 6 Scents 41 IntestlnaHortitude 
t g, rch 7 Hazes 43 Manufacturers 

42 Sections 8 s P anlsh Odd 44 Gander 

44 Subsidies 9 Communist ? 46 Fried cake 

45 Social Insects 10 Subservient 47 Grows up 

46 Performing 11 " Homo":"8ehold 48 Made a carpet 

47 Conscious th " nan " 4B lncile 
50 Type of beer 12 PrM - Artnur ,0 "** ,rt9nd » M Ra,ax 

5, §010 13 d'oeuvres 52 Aborted mission 

54 Negotiators 19 Fr9d Astalrs's sister 53 Some vane initials 

57 MGM mascot 21 Wofd wtth r00m w wear M Spider's snare 

58 Continuously 24 Ages ago 56 AJfonzo's queen 

59 To follow m order ** Contrite 57 Prevaricate 

60 "Bus Stop" author x B,anl « and Kwbrero 

61 Tennis untts * 27 Happiness 

62 Crazy 28 Weird 

63 Freud's hang up M Comers cousin 

1 Sl"*-^!. •. -i~.k— 32 Rings the bell 

2 Word with bus or clothes ™ -.J* .„. 
.... 34 Notable deeds 

S£*« 37 Bowed 

inoekefoMM 38 Breakfast cereal 
5 nock ot geese m princlp| , ^ ^^ 

O 1992 All rights reserved CFR Associates 
P.O. Box 4(1, Scbeaectedy, NY 12301 





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The Clarion Call - 10-15-92- Page 23 



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card and I head down +o the local pool ha//, 
(which I happen to know ha; a paypUe) 
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Golden E agles hold on to lead for first victory 

byBenVessa and 27 total yards, while for an injured Damien Henry, Unfortunately for Clarion, the Clarion 7 16 23 

Sports Writer allowing them less than four provided the kev vardaee on the second half would he a mmnlete Bloomsbure 6 14 20 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Writer 

After facing teams with a 
combined record of 20-1, 
Clarion's visit to winless 
Bloomsburg appeared to be the 
perfect remedy to the Golden 
Eagles four game losing 
sickness, and, when the Eagles 
coasted out to a 23 point' 
halftime cushion, a Clarion 
victory seemed painless. 
However, just as Edinboro had 
done one week before, 
Bloomsburg fought back from a 
seemingly insurmountable fourth 
quarter deficit, and forced the 
Eagles to require the jaws of life 



and 27 total yards, while 
allowing them less than four 
-minutes of possession time. 

As the second quarter began, 
Bloomsburg mounted their first 
successful drive of the day. Ten 
out of the first 11 plays were 
runs, as the Huskies pushed the 
ball inside the Clarion 15 yard 
line. On second and 11, a good 
Clarion pass rush flushed 
Bloomsburg quarterback Jeff 
King from the pocket. Out of 
nowhere, Clint Terza leveled 
King, forcing him to cough up 
the ball, and fellow linebacker 
Frank Andrews gobbled up the 
loose pigskin and rambled 68 



for an injured Damien Henry, 
provided the key yardage on the 
ground, but a fourth and three 
situation with under two minutes 
to play caused coach Gene 
Sobolewski to celebrate 
Halloween a few days early. 
Sobolewski reached deep down 
into his bag of goodies and came 
up with a reverse to Marlon 
Worthy for this crucial fourth 
down call. The trick turned out 
to be a thirteen yard treat, and it 
set the stage for a Myers 
touchdown strike to Tim Brown 
with just 46 seconds remaining. 

The half was far from over. 
Bloomsburg was not complacent 




Bulldozer 



Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Jay Toninl, shown here two weeks ago vs. 'Boro, is averaging 4.8 yards a carry. 



to escape with their first victory 
of the season, 23-20. 

The Eagles wasted no time in 
taking command of the first half. 
Three key third down 
conversions set the stage for a 
scoring drive on Clarion's very 
first possession of the contest. 

The Golden Eagle offense 
drove down to the ten yard line 
and faced another third down 
situation. For the third time in 
the drive, the "O" converted on 
third down as Damien Henry 
galloped ten yards off the left 
tackle and Clarion grabbed a 
quick 7-0 lead. 

The defense of the Golden 
Eagles enjoyed a virtually 
flawless first quarter as it held 
the Huskies to one first down 



yards for a Clarion touchdown. 
Bloomsburg had held the ball for 
more than six minutes, but one 
miscue had changed the entire 
complexion of this game. 

A botched two point 
conversion attempt kept the 
score at 13-0 when Bloomsburg 
mounted another impressive 
drive. Again, the Huskies found 
themselves inside the Clarion 15, 
and again, they fumbled. This 
time, Brad Kline pounced on the 
gift, and for the first time in the 
quarter, the Clarion offense took 
the field. 

With just under five minutes to 
play until intermission, the 
Clarion offense drove its way 
towards a third score. Jay Tonini 
and Art Gregory, who took over 



with a 20 point deficit at the half. 
With 35 seconds remaining and 
the ball deep inside their own 
territory, Huskies' coach Pete 
Adrian elected to put the ball in 
the air. His thinking backfired as 
Kline came up with his second 
turnover of the game, this time 
intercepting King's pass and 
returning it 19 yards to the 
Bloomsburg 30. Four plays 
later, with one second to play, 
Paul Cramer was called upon to 
put the finishing touches on a 
Clarion dominated 23-0 halftime 
lead. 

The Eagles outgained 
Bloomsburg 288-104 and 
accumulated nine more first 
downs than the Huskies through 
the first 30 minutes. 



Unfortunately for Clarion, the 
second half would be a complete 
turnaround. 

A 27 yard pass from King to 
Buck Eardley on third and 17 
seemed to provide the spark 
Bloomsburg needed to turn this 
fiasco into a game. Later in the 
drive, Tom Pajic put the Huskies 
on the scoreboard with a 15 yard 
TD reception, and Bloomsburg 
was showing signs of life, but 
were running out of time. 

With the Huskies trailing 23-6 
and facing a third down and nine 
dilemma from the Clarion 17 
yard line, Adrian reached so far 
down into his bag of tricks that 
he may never find his hand 
again. The old "Fumblerooskie" 
play where, instead of snapping 
the ball to the quarterback, the 
center leaves the ball on the 
ground. The QB pulls out from 
under center as if it was snapped 
Mo him. Then an offensive 
lineman scoops up the lonely 
pigskin and lumbers towards the 
end zone while the unsuspecting 
defense is busy chasing the 
quarterback. The lumbering 
lineman was Tim Ronan, and the 
result was six points, as 
Bloomsburg closed the gap to 
23-12. 

Clarion immediately responded 
as the versatile Worthy returned 
the ensuing kickoff 59 yards to 
the Huskies' 36 yard line. The 
Eagles went nowhere on offense, 
but Myers punt was downed at 
the Bloomsburg one, and, with 
only 7:38 to play, it seemed 
hopeless for the Huskies to go 99 
yards and still have time to score 
again. 

Well, it seemed hopeless. On 
BU's first play from scrimmage, 
King found Eardley for 73 yards, 
and instead of needing the whole 
quarter to go the length of the 
field, the Huskies needed only 
one minute and 20 seconds. 
King found Eardley for the 
touchdown, then found Pajic for 
the two point conversion, and all 
of a sudden, it was 23-20. 

The Clarion offense didn't 
grant Bloomsburg another 
opportunity to come onto the 
field and secured a 23-20 
victory. 

Clarion's own Homecoming 
game will be Saturday. The 
kickoff set for 2 p.m. vs. Lock 
Haven. 



VESSm 

Bloomsburg 

FIRST QUARTER 

Clarion: Gregory 10 yard TD run 
(Cramer PAT), 9:32. Drive: 15 
plays, 76 yards. Key play: 33 yards 
from Myers to Henry on 3-19 from 
the CU 15. Clarion 7, Bloomsburg 
0. 

SECOND QUARTER 

Clarion: 68 yard fumble return by 
Andrews (failed two-point 
conversion), 8:01. Drive: -. Key 
play: QB sack by Terza causing 
fumble. Clarion 13, Bloomsburg 0. 
Clarion: TD pass from Myers to a 
wide open Brown (Cramer PAT), 
0:46. Drive: 11 plays, 69 yards. 
Key play: Reverse to Worthy for 
first down on 4-3 from BU 38. 
Clarion 20, Bloomsburg 0. 
Clarion: FG Cramer 24, :00. 
Drive: 4 plays, 24 yards. Key play: 
King pass intercepted by Kline with 
:24 to play. Clarion 23, 
Bloomsbure 0. 

THIRD QUARTER 

Bloomsburg: 15 TD pass from King 
to Pajic (failed two-point 
conversion), 6:31. Drive: 8 plays, 
58 yards. Key play: TD on 4-3 
from CU 15. Clarion 23, 
Bloomsburg 6. 

FOURTH QUARTER 

Bloomsburg: Ronan runs the 
Fumblerooskie for TD(failed two- 
point conversion), 9:14. Drive: 6 
plays, 30 yards. Key play: Myers 
pass intercepted by Kirby at CU 33. 
Clarion 23, Bloomsburg 12. 
Bloomsburg: 17 TD pass from King 
to Eardley (two point conversion 
good), 6:18. Drive: 6 plays, 99 
yards. Key play: from BU 1 yard 
line, King connects on 73 yard strike 
to Eardley. Clarion 23, 

Bloomsburg 20 



TEAM STATISTICS 




Cla. Bloom. 


FIRST DOWNS 


25 


13 


3RD DOWN EFF. 


10-17 


7-14 


YDS RUSH 


216 


81 


YDS PASS 


241 


240 


TOTAL YDS 


457 


321 


FUMBLES-LOST 


1-1 


5-3 



KEY PLAYER STATISTICS 

Clarion rushing: Gregory 21-95, 

Tonini 13-81. 

Bloomsburg rushing: only 81 yds. 

Clarion passing: Myers 19-33 (241 

yards). 

Bloomsburg passing: King 11-25 

(222 yards). 

Clarion receiving: Brown 5-52, 

Harper 4-54. 

Bloomsburg receiving: Eardsley 3- 

117. 

Clarion tackles-assists-sacks: 

Andrews 11-7-2, Terza 10-6-1, Kline 

12-6-0, Mazoff 9-6-0. 

Interceptions: Kline 1 (4). 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call ■ 10-15-92 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 - Page 25 



k 






t 



Clarion golf team finishes third at Fall PSAC's 



by Eric Feigel 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University golf 
team completed their fall 1992 
season this past week with a 
respectable third place finish at 
the unofficial PSAC Fall 
Championships. 

The tournament took place at 
the Clinton Country Club at 
Lock Haven. The eight teams 
that competed were IUP, 
Slippery Rock, Clarion, East 
Stroudsburg, Millersville, 
Edinboro, West Chester and host 
Lock Haven. 

IUP won the tournament, as 
expected, with 392 points. The 
Rock was right behind with a 
score of 398 points and a second 
place finish. The Golden Eagles 



came in a distant third place with 
421 points. Millersville finished 
fourth with 424 points. 
Edinboro finished fifth with 429 
points. West Chester, Lock 
Haven and East Stroudsburg 
rounded out the field of eight 
teams. 

Clarion University had reason 
to be proud of their performance 
as they accomplished their 
season-long goal of finishing 
third at the Fall Championships. 
The Golden Eagles are looking 
forward to the spring season 
when they will attempt to close 
the gap between themselves and 
the two powerhouse clubs from 
IUP and Slippery Rock. 

The Clarion linksters had to 
overcome two obstacles at the 



Fall PSAC's, held last Thursday. 
The first obstacle was 
overcoming the absence of their 
head coach Bob Carlson, who 
was unable to attend. The 
second was doing battle with the 
difficult course ahead of them. 

The Golden Eagles were 
accompanied by Mike Powers, 
who is an assistant basketball 
coach, on the trip. According to 
the interim coach, the playing 
conditions were excellent despite 
the difficult course. "It was 
cloudy and foggy upon arrival, 
but by the time play started, the 
clouds broke and it turned out to 
be a great day," said Powers. 

The difficult course caused a 
wide variety of scores 
contributed by the Clarion 



linksters. The best score was 
contributed by Brian Fiscus, who 
shot an 80. Other scores 
included an 83 from Don 
Turowski, an 84 from Chris 
Brocious, an 85 from Rich 
Grafton, and an 89 from Todd 
Corbeil. "Some of the more 
experienced players had 
problems, but the younger 
players really came through," 
said Powers. 

The Golden Eagle golfers 
equaled their 1991 finish at the 
Fall PSAC's with another third 
place finish, bettering their 1991 
output by more than 10 strokes. 

Like 1991, the Clarion golfers 
improved their standing and 
scores throughout the 1992 fall 
campaign. Grafton led the team 



during the fall by averaging a 
team low 81 strokes a match. 
Brocious was right behind with 
an 81.5 average. Corbeil and 
Fiscus both contributed average 
scores of 82.5. Turowski 
averaged an 83. 

The best score on the entire 
campaign was a 76, shot once 
each by both Grafton and 
Brocious. Cornell's best effort 
on the season was a 78. Fiscus' 
season best was a 79. 

The Clarion golf team has 
shown a lot of character by 
improving throughout the last 
couple of seasons. They will be 
looking to take another step 
forward during the spring 1993 
season, with their clubs looking 
to catch the elite. 



Clarion volleyball team hosts tourney, falls to Cal 



by Mike Jewart 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University 
women's volleyball team did not 
have far to travel this past 
weekend as they hosted the 
Clarion Elite tournament, going 
3-1 for a second place finish. 

The Golden Eagles hosted 
Shaw University in their first 
match of the tourney. The 
visitors were overwhelmed by 
the explosive Clarion offense in 
the first game of the match, 15-4. 
The second game was even more 
lopsided with Clarion winning, 
15-2. Finally, in game three, the 
women of Shaw University were 
able to give the Golden Eagles 
some competition. However, 
Clarion still prevailed, 16-14, to 
take the match. The Golden 
Eagles were led by Suzanne 
Sheldon, who had eight kills. 
Nicole Flambard and Barb 
Mel linger added six kills apiece. 
Wendy Ellenberger had 22 set 
assists. Meghan Kelly and 
Flambard led the defense with 
nine digs apiece. 

Gannon University was 
Clarion's next opponent. The 
Golden Eagles had already been 
on the losing side of three 
straight matches against Gannon 
in 1992. They came out 
scrapping for points in game one 
but were not able to get control 
of any game as they lost in three 
straight games, 15-7, 15-10 and 



15-8. The Golden Eagle women 
have yet to win a game in any 
match against Gannon this 
season. Tammi Bills led the 
team in kills (five) and digs (16) 
for the match. Ellenberger added 
15 set assists and 10 digs. Kelly 
contributed nine digs in the loss. 

The Golden Eagles were 
looking to rebound from the loss 
to Gannon in their third match of 
the tourney. Wisconsin-Portside 
stood in their way. Clarion was 
playing with fire in their eyes 
and exploded for a three game 
sweep, 15-4, 15-4 and 15-5. The 
defensive effort was unreal, as 
four players reached double- 
digits in digs. Sheldon led the 
team with 17 digs and 
Ellenberger added 12 more. 
Bills and Jennifer Betters 
chipped in 10 digs apiece. 
Betters also led the team with six 
kills, while Bills added four 
more. Ellenberger again led the 
team in set assists with 10. 

The Clarion women were 
fly in '-high again in their fourth 
match of the tourney. The 
women defeated North Carolina 
Central University in three 
straight games, 15-4, 15-2, and 
15-0. Ellenberger paced the 
club, as usual, with 15 set assists. 
Kelly and Bills anchored the 
defense, as usual, with 10 and 
seven digs, respectively. 
Sheldon continued her hot play 
of late with eight kills, while 



Bills and Flambard both had six 
kills apiece. 

For their weekend effort, the 
Golden Eagles finished in 
second place. Gannon 

University was the overall 
winner. Clarion co-captain 
Tammi Bills was named to the 
All-Tournament team for her 
versatile defensive and offensive 
performance. 

On Tuesday night, the Golden 
Eagles travelled to California, 



Pa. to take on the rival Vulcans. 
The Vulcans remained 
undefeated in PSAC-West play 
as they dropped Clarion in three 
games, 15-4, 16-14 and 15-1. 
Ellenberger led the Golden 
Eagles with 11 digs. Bills had 
nine digs, while Bobbie Simpson 
added seven kills. 

The Golden Eagles will next 
see action at home this weekend 
in their annual match against the 
Clarion alumni. That match will 



take place at Tippin on Saturday 
(11 a.m.). The Golden Eagles 
will begin a tough slate next 
week when they battle PSAC 
rival IUP on Tuesday. That 
weekend they will visit Gannon 
for the Flagship Open volleyball 
tournament. Clarion has been 
unable to defeat host Gannon in 
four matches this season (as 
stated earlier) so Clarion will be 
pumped. Slippery Rock and 
Shippensburg also await Clarion. 








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Geo's Pizza and the 
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Be sure to catch the action on Monday 
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Golden Eagle tennis team winding down fall season 



by Amy Rae 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University 
women's tennis team won two 
matches last week, defeating Pitt 
and Duquesne, before falling to 
Bloomsburg over the weekend. 

The Golden Eagles defeated 
the Pitt Panthers in an aggressive 
match, 5-4, last Wednesday. 

In singles play, Clarion's #1 
seed Shara Wolkomir fell in 
straight sets, 4-6, 3-6. The #2 
seed, Marianne Martin, lost in a 
very exciting match to her 
Panther opponent, 6-7 (6-8), 6-2, 
6-7 (3-7). The #3 seed, Darcy 
Ingham, won in straight sets, 6- 

0, 6-2. The #4 seed, Jennifer 
Keil won in straight sets, 7-5, 6- 

1. The #5 seed, Melodi Dess 
won in straight sets, 6-4, 6-1. 
The #6 seed, Jennifer Simonsen, 
fell to her Panther opponent in a 
very difficult match, 4-6, 7-6 (7- 
2), 2-6. 

Head coach Terry Acker 
pointed to the doubles slate as 
the key to the victory over Pitt. 
"We played outstanding doubles 
matches," said Acker. "We won 
all three doubles matches to 
come from behind." 

From the doubles positions, the 
teams of #1 seeded Wolkomir 
and Ingham, #2 seeded Dess and 
Keil and the #3 seeded Simonsen 
and Martin all defeated their Pitt 
opponents to come from behind 
for a 5-4 match victory. Dess 
and Keil earned the hardest 



victory, defeating their 
opponents in three frustrating 
sets, 6-7 (4-7), 7-5, 7-6 (7-5). 

Coach Acker said that host Pitt 
definitely had an advantage with 
their indoor, artificial turf courts. 

Last Thursday, the Golden 
Eagles defeated Duquesne 
University by a solid 8-2 count. 

Wolkomir continued her solid 
play from the #1 position as she 
defeated her opponent in straight 
sets, 6-2, 6-1. Martin lost her 
second match of the week from 
the #2 seed for Clarion, 0-6, 2-6. 
Ingham also fell in a tough 
match, 4-6, 3-6. Keil triumphed 
from the #4 position, 6-3, 6-1. 
Dess won in the #5 position, 6-3, 
6-0. Simonsen fell in the #6 
position, 1-6, 1-6. 

The Golden Eagles continued 
their dominant doubles play by 
winning all three matches. The 
#1 seeded team of Wolkomir and 
Ingham squeaked by with a three 
set victory, 6-3, 0-6, 7-6 (7-3). 
Both the #2 team of Dess and 
Keil and the #3 team of Martin 
and Simonsen won in straight 
sets. 

The Golden Eagles fell over 
the weekend to their PSAC-East 
opponent, Bloomsburg, by a 6-3 
margin. 

Wolkomir fell in three sets, 0- 
6, 6-2, 1-6. The only Eagle to 
win in singles play, Martin 
defeated her opponent in straight 
sets, 6-2, 6-2. Ingham fell 3-6, 
4-6. Keil lost two sets by 




Lois Oertel/Clarion Call 
#1 seed Shara Wolkomir will lead the team into battle today, looking for PSAC honors. 



identical 3-6 scores. Dess fell 3- 
6, 4-6. Simonsen managed to 
win only one game in losing, 1- 

6,0-6/ 

Clarion dropped only one of its 
three doubles matches. 

"We didn't play well at all," 
said Acker. "Bloomsburg had 
their best match of the year. It 
may been a combination of our 
not playing aggressively and 
Bloomsburg being pumped up 
for their homecoming that 
contributed to the loss." 

Senior Marianne Martin's 



match against Bloomsburg was 
her last match of the season. 
Martin has a family commitment 
and will not be able to attend the 
PSAC Championships taking 
place today and tomorrow. 
Martin had a tremendous season 
and ends the fall 1992 season 
with an 8-3 singles record and 6- 
1 doubles mark. 

Since Martin cannot attend the 
conference championships, this 
moves every player up one 
position in the lineup. "This 
definitely makes us underdogs at 



the championships," said Acker. 
"Fortunately, everyone is excited 
and has been playing 
aggressively. We're going in 
with a positive attitude and are 
going to give it everything we 
have." 

The PSAC Championships are 
being held today and tomorrow. 
Clarion has an 8-3 overall- 
record, 4-2 in the PSAC-West (as 
of last Monday). Clarion placed 
fourth at the 1991 fall PSAC's. 
Cal was the overall winner in a 
very close competition. 



Clarion University men's basketball sponsors hoop-shoot 



by Karen Ruud 
Sports Writer 



The 1992-93 Clarion 
University men's basketball team 
sponsored its second annual 
Autumn Leaf Festival Three- 
Point Shoot-out this past week at 
the Clarion County Courthouse 
parking lot. 

Cost to enter the event is $1 
and half of the proceeds will go 



to assist the family of Vern 
Shingledecker. 

Shingledecker, a Clarion 
resident, was one of four men 
involved in a hunting accident in 
which the men were overcome 
by propane fumes while staying 
at a cabin in southwestern 
Quebec. 

Two of the four men were 
killed in the incident that 



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occurred last May. 

Shingledecker is still receiving 
medical treatment. 

Shingledecker is the father-in- 
law of Clarion University 
assistant football coach Dave 
Katis. Katis was one of the four 
individuals that were involved in 
the incident. His father, John 
Katis, was one of the two men 
killed. 

The first annual ALF Three- 
Point Shoot-out was held last 
year during ALF week and half 
of those proceeds went to the 
Ryan Evans Foundation. Last 
year's event raised over $700 



with over $350 going to the 
family of Ryan Evans to help 
pay for medical expenses. 

The shoot-out has been held 
daily at the courthouse since 
Monday. The shoot-out event 
will continue tonight from 6 p.m. 
to 10 p.m. On Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday the event will run 
throughout the day beginning 
each day at around 9 a.m. 

Individuals of any age can 
participate. Each entry will have 
30 seconds to make as many 
baskets as they can. Prizes will 
be awarded to winners of each 
age group. 



Age brackets are broken down 
into four age groups for both 
males and females. The age 
groups are 7-and-under, 8-12, 
13-16, and 17 and older. The 
winner at their respective age 
groups will receive a prize at the 
conclusion of the event on 
October 18 and a grand prize 
will be awarded to the entry who 
has made the most three-pointers 
overall. 

Daily awards have been 
presented if a contestant makes a 
set number of shots in a row. 

The basketball team and 
coaches will officiate the event. 



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Page 26 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



The Clarion Call - 10-15-92- Page 27 






■: 






Sports Opinion - Tall Cliffy predicts: 



Eagles ' secondary to stop Rypien 



What started out as a joke to 
amuse Call readers has now 
turned into a serious artecle. I 
have gone from obscurity to 
notorious fame. I now have 
english majors breathing down 
my neck (this weeks letter to the 
editor on page 3). The two 
asailants verbally abused my 
abilites as a writer. 

Alright, I'm not Woodward 
and I'm not Burnstein. Should 
that be cause for a linching? 
What is so ironic is the fact that 
for the past four years that I have 
been associated with the Call, I 
have seen many gripes by 
students of the english 
department. What I haven't seen 
is one single english major come 
into the office and volunteer or 
apply for a position with this fme 
newspaper. Seems that all they 
want to do is bitch. Oh well. . . 
its a free country, I guess they 
have the right to bitch. Besides, 
its not totally my fault. Copy and 
Design Editor A.J. Meeker is 
sopposed to find my 
grammatical errors. . . blame 
him. 

How many grammatical errors 
can you find above, boys and 
girls? 

Okay, now that I have made 
my English friends happy, let's 
get on with the predictions: 
NFL 
Philly at Washington -1 1/2 

The Eagles (4-1) suffered their 
first loss of the season against a 
strong Kansas City squad. The 
defense let down their guard and 
Dave Krieg entered and 
conquered, throwing three 
touchdown passes. Randall 
Cunningham and company had a 
very good game topping the 
Chiefs in first downs and were 
not far behind in total yardage. It 
was the defense that was the 
problem. This week should be 
different; the top rated Eagle 
defense should regroup and stop 
the Redskins' offensive attack. 

The 'Skins (3-2) had a 
tremendous game against the 



Broncos on Monday night, but 
upset many fans betting on the 
O/U. The O/U was 38 and 
Washington was threatening to 
score again, driving the ball 
down, inches from paydirt. 
Coach Joe Gibbs decided to 
down the ball, letting time run 
out on a 34-3 final. Wow! Mark 
Rypien had a great game, 
throwing for 245 yards and one 
TD. But I think the loss at the 
hands of KC will waken the 
Eagles' secondary. They will not 
allow Rypien to perform as well 
as Krieg did against them. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: Philly 

San Diego at Indianapolis -2 

San Diego (1-4) was off last 
week. I think they needed the 
rest after beating Seattle for their 
first win of the season. This team 
needs serious help and I don't 
think that Bobby Beathard 
(Charger GM) has all the 
answers. Oh, how San Diego 
fans dream of yesteryear, when 
Don Coryell, Dan Fouts, Charlie 
Joyner and Kellen Winslow still 
ruled the NFL air waves. 

Indianapolis (3-2) came 
through for me in the clutch last 
week, but they still blew plenty 
of scoring chances to blowout 
the Jets. They can't squander the 
opportunities this week. If the 
Colts offense gives Charger 
linebacker Junior Seau (the most 
underrated defensive player in 
the league) any slim chance of 
making a big play, he will. But 
hey, maybe the Colts can do it. 
Tall Cliffy 's pick: Indy 

Houston at Denver +2 

The Oilers (4-1) have finally 
given Lorenzo White the chance 
to carry the ball, and he hasn't 
let them down. Last week, 
against the Bengals, White 
rushed for nearly 150 yards (a 
personal best). This will open up 
Moon's aerial attack, which 
needed the help. After a 
disappointing performance 
against the Steelers in week one, 



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Moon has since progressed back 
to his old self. He threw five 
touchdown passes in last week's 
win. The only question will be 
the defense. They can't give 
John Elway time to find his 
receivers, and they must keep 
him in the pocket. If they don't, 
Elway will always find the first 
down marker. 

The Broncos (4-1) are the 
worst-best team in the league. 
What do I mean? I mean I can't 
believe that they are 4-1. They 
are awful. The offense is still the 
worst in the league, as seen by 
the. humiliating loss to 
Washington. Eventually, their 
record will show just how bad 
this team is. I believe Houston 
might be the second in a series of 
embarrassments for Denver. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Houston 

College 

Alabama at Tennessee +1 

'Bama (6-0) moved to #5 
(CNN/Coaches poll, for all those 
curious) after a win against 
Tulane and a Penn State loss. To 
tell you the truth, I have not seen 
this team, but at 6-0, they must 
be as good as their ranking. 

Tennessee looked past last 
week's match against Arkansas 
and were thinking about this 
game. Arkansas upset the Vols, 
25-24. They will be at home for 
the 'Bama showdown, which is 
definitely a plus for Tennessee. 
They can't let their fans or 
Coach Majors down two weeks 
in a row. 
Tall Cliffy 'spick: Tennessee 

VU at North Carolina +6 1/2 

I read in the USA Today that 
Virginia back Terry Kirby, an 
integral part of the Cavs' 
offense, is out with a shoulder 
injury. Without him, I think that 



Z/ 



s" 



UVA (5-1) will suffer an upset 

loss to the Tarheels. After all, 

UNC (4-2) almost defeated a 

very talented NC State team. 

With the points, I'll take North 

Carolina. 

Tall Cliffy's pick: : UNC 

Syracuse at West Virginia +3 

Alright, the Orangemen (4-1) 
definitely proved me wrong, last 
week, crushing the Rutgers. . . 
no, scratch that. I was rudely 
informed that it's just plain 
Rutgers. Anyway, Syracuse 
pummeled Rutgers, 50-28. But 
once again, I'm going to show 
no faith in the Orangemen. 

West Virginia (3-0-2) had a 
week off and will be ready for an 
explosive Syracuse offense. 
WVU should have fans yelling, 
"How 'bout them 'Eers?" after 
this close game. 



Tall Cliffy's pick:: WW 

That's all for this week. I 
would like to remind readers that 
my record is based on the point 
spread system. I thought it was 
obvious, but apparently, I was 
wrong (again, see page 3). I do 
encourage you to write and offer 
advice or just write to bitch. I 
promise not to ridicule you. . . 
unless, of course, you're an 
English major. Oh, by the way, I 
have taken exactly eight English 
courses (3 A's, 4 B's and a C). 
Maybe Dr. Caesar was right. 
Maybe this is a second rate 
university. . . I don't think so. 



Tall Cliffy's record 
6-10-2 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
The anonymous Tall Cliffy, adding to his vocabulary. 






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Monday 

Wednesday 
Thurs and Fri 
Saturday 



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in town for the Pirate playoffs! 
All the tacos you can eat for only $2.00!. Pitcher 
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The weekend begins! Dance to your favorite jams 
every Friday and Saturday with DJ. Franklin! 
Special Happy Hour 8-10. 
Draft and Pitcher Specials Monday -Friday! 



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Help Wanted 



Bed star!! 

CLARION HOT TRAX will be 
holding VJ tryouts for one female 
VJ Tuesday, October 20 at 7:00 
p.m. Studio B, Becker Hall. 



Will pay for one or two gorgeous 
guys to make an "appearance" at a 
bachelorette party on October 24. 
226-6563 



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Prefer those who have some tools 
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interior/exterior. Leave message. 
379-3735. 



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Sales and Services 



GREAT BUY: Lamb-skin, 
caramel colored leather blazer. 
Size: 12 — fits like an 8. Never 
been worn — price tag stiH on 
(purchased at Crooks Clothing). 
Call 764-3690. 



For sale: Electric Smith Corona 
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condition — $75. Price negotiable. 
Call Lynn 226-9624. 



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for appointments after 5:00 p.m. 
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Roommates & Rentals 



Needed: female roommate for 
spring '93. Furnished two 
bedroom trailer located right next 
to campus. For more information 
please call 226-5449. 



Need one or two female 
roommates for Spring. Close to 
campus! $750/semester. 226- 
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Desperately needed — one female 
roommate for South Street 
Apartment. Rent $150/month plus 
1/3 utilities. Lease runs until end 
of May. Call 227-2521 or 227- 
2409. 



Two bedroom trailer available 
second semester. Prefer three or 
four students. Call 365-5455. 



Personals 



Alpha Chi Rho, The surf was up, 
so we came down; Your beach 
scene was the best in town. The 
popcorn cushioned our hot dance 
floor; And jello, we couldn't ask 
for more! Thanks for the fun 
under the sun!! Love, The Sisters 
of Phi Sigma Sigma. 



To the Zetas, Happy Founders 
Day!! I hope you all have a Great 
ALF Weekend ! ! Love, Chris. 



Phi Sigma Sigma welcomes 
Melina Zocherl and Angie 
Daugherty into the Fall '92 Teddy 
Bear Pledge Class. We wish you 
and the rest of the girls the best of 
luck!! Love, Your Phi Sig Sisters 



Kurry, Congratulations on 
becoming our new sweetheart! 
We promise to not make you wear 
a penguin uniform even though it 
would look "absolutely darling" on 
you' Love, Theta Phi Alpha. 



Delta Phi Epsilon would like to 
welcome back their alumnae. We 



miss all of yo u very much. 
Cheerleaders and Dance Team, 
Thank you for the mixer. It was 
great! Lets do it again this 
semester. 



DARTH for President 



Phi Sigma Kappa announces its 
Fall '92 associate members: James 
Brunelli, Dominic Bruzzese, 
Corey Burns, James Constable, 
Micheal Donahoe, Robert Drost, 
Nathan Flanagan, Scott Delval, 
Fred Haberger, Mark Kinch, Dana 
Nastropietro, Gary Nicklas, Kevin 
Nulph, Alvin Sallack, Brad 
Saltzgiver and David Scappe. 
Congratulations and good luck, 
fellas! 



Delta Zeta, In your jammies you 
sure looked fine. You can tuck us 
in anytime! Have we ever had 
more fun? We can't tell you when! 
The Pink & Green army strikes 
again! Thanks for an excellent 
Pajama mixer. Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Hey Scott Shoaf, Have a very 
Happy Birthday. Its only a short 
drive to get crazy! (Hint) Take it 
E-Z. Sigma Phi Epsilon. P.S. 
We'll mail you some Sam Adams. 



To our neighbors Sigma Chi, 
Thanks for the awesome time last 
week. Even last minute parties 
can be fun! Love, The Sisters of 
AST P.S. -Ni ce Note Boyer! 
Theta Phi Alpha would like to 
wish our new associate members 
the members the best of luck on 
your journey towards sisterhood. 



Theta Phi Alpha, Sisters are 
forever. We need to show this 
now more than ever. Remember 
what TPA means to you. 



Sig Eps - "Swinging into ALF" 
with you guys couldn't be better! 
Thanks for all your hard work! 
Love, the Sisters of AST. 



A special thanks to Dawn Bezilla 
and Whendy Gahring for their 
creativity and patience concerning 
our float. You girls are doing a 
terrific job! We love you, The 
Sisters of AST. 




HOT! HOT! HOT! 
See You On The Beach 

SPRING BREAK 1993 

with 

CAMPUS GET-AWAYS 

^800-2-CANCUN 

CALL NOW TO BE A REP AND EARN A FREE TRIP 



G.R. Wasn't it. 
Congratulations. US 



NEAT! 



Congratulations on a great season 
of tennis to Roxann and Marianne. 
Good luck at States! Love, AST. 



The sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau 
would like to Congratulate Sharon 
Grove and Merrilyn Murnyack on 
being chosen for Homecoming 
Court. We couldn't be prouder of 
you girls! We love you! 



TKE - The theme didn't stick but 
that's okay. We always love 
mixing with you anyway. Love, D 
PhiE. 



Hey Sig Tau Gamma. We love 
working on the float with you. 
Let's make it a win for year #2. 
Love, D Phi E. 



Bear, Through the water and the 
rain, by the Fire and the Pain; I 
know that I will always feel the 
same. Tiger 

Happy birthday Scott "Shorty" 
Shoaf. We hope to see you soon. 
From your Sig Ep brothers. 



Kappa Theta Phi: Thanks to you, 
our letters are here. We hope you 
enjoyed the song and the beer, and 
hope to see you back next year. 
Sig Eps. 



PSEA Meeting, Wednesday, Oct. 
21st at 7 p.m. in 252 Gemmell. 
Guest speaker: Susan Creasap. 



Flounder and Brian, Elmo was 
taken, the House was shaken. The 
shoes were cruisin and we weren't 
snoozin. So boys, no more 
boozen! Donna, Kimmy and 

Snuffy. 

Merrilyn and Sharon: Congrat- 
ulations on making Homecoming 
Court. Good Luck - Love, Monica 



Phi Sigma Kappa: Thanks for 
sponsoring me during 

homecoming. I really appreciated 
the support. Love, Valerie. 



To the residents of 70 N.5. AVE.- 
ALF week is here!! We had better 
start getting ready for the CBB! 
Should we put a mattress under the 
awning? Maybe we should ask 
Donny. Have a Great Weekend! 
Love, Mik. 

GREEKS & CLUBS 
RAISE A COOL 

$1,000,00 

IN JUST ONE WEEK! 
PLUS $1000 FOR THE 
MEMBER WHO CALLS! 
And a FREE HEADPHONE 
RADIO just for calling 1 -800- 
932-0528, Ext 65. 



Page 28 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 



From the backpages 

Lindros receives rude awakening from Quebec 



AP stories compiled by 
Jon Q. Sitter 
Sports Editor 

PA Sports 

Lindros visits Quebec 

Rookie center Eric Lindros 
made his NHL debut on the 
Quebec Nordique ice on 



Tuesday, only he was wearing 
the orange and black of the 
Philadelphia Flyers. Lindros 
snubbed Quebec after the 
Nordiques picked him number 
one, overall, in 1991. Refusing 
to sign with Quebec, he was 
eventually traded to the Flyers 
for first-round draft picks in 
1993 and 1994, six players and 
15 million dollars. 



Lindros was led into the stadium 
through the back door by extra 
security, Monday night for 
practice. 

The city didn't forget Lindros' 
snub. CHIK FM radio, which 
broadcasts the Nordiques' 
games, urged fans to show up 
with baby pacifiers and bibs to 
razz Lindros for what they feel 
was his spoiled brat approach to 



I 



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I L 1 1 



the Nordiques' situation. The 
station handed out three- 
thousand pacifiers at the door. 
The pacifiers found there way 
onto the ice at times and Lindros 
was razzed all night. He barely 
seemed phased by all of the 
hoopla, though. For the night, 
the rookie scored two goals, and 
even shrugged off a Nordique 
who was looking for a fight. 

Why so mad? 

The trade with Philadelphia 
has changed Quebec from a 
listless club, a non-playoff team 
for the last five seasons, into one 
of the NHL's most explosive 
offensive teams - They are 3-0 
and have scored 20 goals. 

Monday Night debut 

Pittsburgh Steelers rookie head 
coach Bill Cowher will make 
another debut next week - on 
Monday Night Football. The 
Steelers host the Bengals at 
Three Rivers Stadium, in a batde 
of two teams that started fast, but 
have collapsed of late. The 
Steelers have lost two straight 
games against teams playing 
their back-up quarterback. 



Boomer is questionable 

The Cincinnati Bengals may be 
without their starting QB 
Boomer Esiason when they 
battle the Pittsburgh Steelers 
next Monday. He is listed as 
questionable with a severely 
bruised passing arm. He took a 
helmet just below the elbow in 
the fourth quarter, Sunday, 
during the Bengals 38-24 loss to 
Houston. When Esiason came 
off of the field holding his left 
arm on Sunday, many of the fans 
at Riverfront Stadium cheered. 

Finale of WVU - Penn St. 
series 

The kickoff for the October 24 
game between #9 Penn State and 
#24 West Virginia has* been 
shifted from 1:00 p.m. to 3:38 
p.m. to accomodate television. 
The game will be the last 
scheduled in the 88 year-old 
series between the two schools. 
The universities say it will be 
telecast by ABC. Penn State 
leads the series 47-9-2. It is 
dropping West Virginia from its 
schedule next season, when it 
joins the Big Ten. 



IF IT ISN'T FUN, 
WHAT GOOD IS IT? 




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CAMPING 

ROCK CLIMBING 
INLINE SKATES 

KAYAKS 
XC SKIING 

Stop and talk to an expert about clothing and 
footwear that performs like you want it tc5. 

Guaranteed. 



226-4763 



10-6 DAILY 



CORNER OF 5TH & WOOD CLARION 






* 








Volume 74, Issue 7 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 22, 1992 



In 
This 
Issue 



News 

Group questions politicians 

A local group, known as 
Rally, sent questionaires to 
state congress and 
candidates pg. 5 

Features 

Queen Crowned 

1992 Homecoming Queenl 
Mamie McMluskey was 
crowned this past] 
weekend............. pg. 9 



Sports 



Eagles take second win 

Golden Eagle football team I 
earns homecoming victory! 
over Lock Haven pg.15 



Clarion's 

leather Outlook 

Thursday: Cloudy with aj 
chance of rain, high 55 
Friday: Partly sunny, high 34 
Saturday: Cloudy, high 50 
Sunday: Partly sunny, high 55 ] 
Monday: Sunny, high 55 
Tuesday: Cloudy, high 43 
Wednesday: Partly cloudy] 
some snow, high 46 



Index 



Commentary pg. 2 

News pg. 5 

Features pg. 9 

ALF. pg. 10 

TV listing.. pg. 14 

Sports pg.15 

Classifieds pg.19 



College age voters major focus 
for presidential campaigns 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



As the election comes down 
to the wire, a segment of the 
population that has traditionally 
been ignored by politicians is 
now being courted on the 
national scene. 

The 18 to 24 year-old age 
group, of which only 36 percent 
went to the polls in 1988, is 
expected to reach 86 percent 
participation in this year's 
election, according to a survey 
by U. The National College 
Magazine. 

The interest of the college age 
voters has varied through the 
years. In 1972, the first year 18 
year-olds could vote, 49.6 
percent participated in the 
election, according to U. But by 
1988, the percentage had 
plummeted by 13.4 points, over 
two times the decline in all 
American voters in the same 
time frame. 

"Smart politicians are 
refocusing efforts on campus, 
especially to bring in a new and 
empowered electorate," said 
Mike Dolan, field director for 
Rock the Vote, a non-profit 
organization promoting student 
voter registration drives 
nationwide, in a College Press 




AP photo 
Presidential candidates Governor Bill Clinton (L), Ross Perot (C) and President George 
Bush laugh October 19 after the conclusion of the third and final debate, held at the 
Wharton Center of Michigan State University. 



"Both campaigns are reaching 
out to young people. There is 
anxiety about the future of our 
country," said Tony Zagotta, 
president of College 
Republicans, in article. 
"America is in a transitional 
period. This election will decide 



"Both campaigns are reaching 
out to young people. " 



Service (CPS) article. 

According to Census Bureau 
figures in the same story, 26 
million men and women of 
college age are eligible to vote, 
with about 40 percent of this 
population currently registered. 
In comparison, approximately 
40.7 million people are between 
the ages of 25 and 44, with 58 
percent registered to vote. 
Americans aged 65 years and 
older have the highest 
percentage registered, at 76 
percent. 



what path the U.S. will take into 
the 21st century." 

While both the Republican and 
Democratic parties claim to have 
the majority of college voters, 
the U. poll shows 39 percent of 
college students registered align 
with the Democratic party, 25 
percent registered Republican 
and 23 percent reported no party 
affiliation. 

The three issues of most 
concern to college students, the 
poll said, were the Job Market, 
the environment and the abortion 



issue. Closely following were 
higher education, economic 
growth and health care. 

Shots have been fired back and 
forth over these issues in the 
presidential race. 

Some in the Democratic camp 
have charged that President Bush 
failed as the environmental 
president. However, according 
to a Newsweek article, that is 
only the perception, not the truth. 

The article said in his four 
years as president, Bush passed 
the breakthrough Clean Air Act, 
designed to abolish smog in 
urban areas; reduced oil 
exploration in offshore areas; 
increased abolition of CFC's and 
enacted protective measures. 
The sum of Bush's 
environmental accomplishments 
exceeds those of the Carter 
administration. 

Conversely, Republicans have 
charged that if Clinton were 
elected, he would trade jobs for 
conservation. Newsweek said 



this is a possibility, but not a 
likelihood. Claims that 
environmental protection takes 
away jobs is hard to justify with 
evidence. According to 
Newsweek, "Environmental 
protection was a growth industry 
during the late 1980 s, booming 
at 15 percent a year. As many as 
a million jobs have been created 
in this sector." 

In the Pacific Northwest, 
center of the Spotted Owl 
controversy, the owl protection is 
forcing the loss of some jobs, but 
more unemployment in the 
logging industry is caused by 
automation, which has been 
assisted by Bush and Reagan tax 
helps for capital investment, 
Newsweek reported. 

H. Ross Perot, the third 
candidate for president, has 
made virtually no reference to 
this issue, said Newsweek, and 
has no identifiable record to 
evaluate. 



Celebrating over 70 years as a student newspaper 



Page 28 - The Clarion Call - 10-15-92 

From the back pases 

Lindros receives rude awakening from Quebec 



,4/* stories compiled by 
Jon Q. Sitler 
Sports Editor 



PA Sports 

Lindros visits Quebec 

Rookie center Eric Lindros 
made his NHL debut on the 
Quebec Nordique ice on 



Tuesday, only he was wearing 
the orange and black of the 
Philadelphia Flyers. Lindros 
snubbed Quebec after the 
Nordiques picked him number 
one, overall, in 1991. Refusing 
to sign with Quebec, he was 
eventually traded to the Flyers 
for first-round draft picks in 
1993 and 1994, six players and 
15 million dollars. 



Lindros was led into the stadium 
through the back door by extra 
security, Monday night for 
practice. 

The city didn't forget Lindros' 
snub. CHIK FM radio, which 
broadcasts the Nordiques' 
games, urged fans to show up 
with baby pacifiers and bibs to 
razz Lindros for what they feel 
was his spoiled brat approach to 



**** 



four Star Pizza 




IT'S YOUR CHOICE! 



226-8881 



327 W. MAIN ST. 
CLARION, PA 



Sun-Wed 11 AM- 12AM 
Thurs 11AM-1AM 
Fri-Sat 11AM-2AM 



Delivery 
within 30 minutes 



A.L.F. Special 

2-16" one-item Pizzas 



n r - 



i : - . 



EXP 10/31/92 



FOUR 
STAR 
PIZZA 

mm 



Dinner 
for four 



PLUS TAX 

Includes 16" one-item pizza 
plus 4 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only EXP 1031/92 



FOUR 
STAR 
PIZZA 

mm 



Sub 
for two 



PLUS TAX 

Includes 12"-SUBplus 
2 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only EXP 10/31/92 



star Dinner 
for two 



PLUS TAX 

Includes 12" one-item pizza 
plus 2 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only EXP 10/31/92 



the Nordiques' situation. The 
station handed out three- 
thousand pacifiers at the door. 
The pacifiers found there way 
onto the ice at times and Lindros 
was razzed all night. He barely 
seemed phased by all of the 
hoopla, though. For the night, 
the rookie scored two goals, and 
even shrugged off a Nordique 
who was looking for a fight. 

Why so mad? 

The trade with Philadelphia 
has changed Quebec from a 
listless club, a non-playoff team 
for the last five seasons, into one 
of the NHL's most explosive 
offensive teams - They are 3-0 
and have scored 20 goals. 

Monday Night debut 

Pittsburgh Steelers rookie head 
coach Bill Cowher will make 
another debut next week - on 
Monday Night Football. The 
Steelers host the Bengals at 
Three Rivers Stadium, in a batUe 
of two teams that started fast, but 
have collapsed of late. The 
Steelers have lost two straight 
games against teams playing 
their back-up quarterback. 



Boomer is questionable 

The Cincinnati Bengals may be 
without their starting QB 
Boomer Esiason when they 
battle the Pittsburgh Steelers 
next Monday. He is listed as 
questionable with a severely 
bruised passing arm. He took a 
helmet just below the elbow in 
the fourth quarter, Sunday, 
during the Bengals 38-24 loss to 
Houston. When Esiason came 
off of the field holding his left 
arm on Sunday, many of the fans 
at Riverfront Stadium cheered. 

Finale of WVU - Penn St. 
series 

The kickoff for the October 24 
game between #9 Penn State and 
#24 West Virginia has been 
shifted from 1:00 p.m. to 3:38 
p.m. to accomodate television. 
The game will be the last 
scheduled in the 88 year-old 
series between the two schools. 
The universities say it will be 
telecast by ABC. Penn State 
leads the series 47-9-2. It is 
dropping West Virginia from its 
schedule next season, when it 
joins the Big Ten. 




If it isn't 
what good 



FUN, 
IS IT? 




gear 



MOUNTAIN BIKES 
CAMPING 
ROCK CLIMBING 
INLINE SKATES 
KAYAKS 
XC SKIING 

Stop and talk to an expert about clothing and 
footwear that performs like you want it to. 

Guaranteed. 



226-4763 



10-6 DAILY 



CORNER OF 5TH & WOOD CLARION 







Clarion 





Volume 74, Issue 7 The student newspaper 



of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 22, 1992 



<» 



In 
This 
Issue 



News • 

Group questions politicians 

«A local group, known asj 
Rally, sent qucstionaires to] 
'state congress and! 
candidates pg- 5 



Features 

Queen Crowned 

1992 Homecoming Queenj 
Marnie McMluskey was! 
crowned this past] 
weekend pg-9 



Sports 



Eagles take second win 

Golden Eagle football teamj 
earns homecoming victory] 
over Lock Haven pg.15 



Clarion's 

Weather Outlook 

Thursday: Cloudy with a] 
chance of rain, high 55 
'Friday: Partly sunny, high 34 
Saturday: Cloudy, high 50 
Sunday: Partly sunny, high 55 
Monday: Sunny, high 55 
Tuesday: Cloudy, high 43 
Wednesday: Partly cloudy 
some snow, high 46 



Index 

Commentary pg. 2 

News Pg- 5 

Features pg- 9 

ALF. pg- 10 

TV listing pg- 14 

Sports pg!5 

Classifieds pg*9 



College age voters major focus 
for presidential campaigns 



by Alan Vaughn 
News Editor 



As the election comes down 
to the wire, a segment of the 
population that has traditionally 
been ignored by politicians is 
now being courted on the 
national scene. 

The 18 to 24 year-old age 
group, of which only 36 percent 
went to the polls in 1988, is 
expected to reach 86 percent 
participation in this year's 
election, according to a survey 
by U. The National College 
Magazine. 

The interest of the college age 
voters has varied through the 
years. In 1972, the first year 18 
year-olds could vote, 49.6 
percent participated in the 
election, according to U. But by 
1988, the percentage had 
plummeted by 13.4 points, over 
two times the decline in all 
American voters in the same 
time frame. 

"Smart politicians are 
refocusing efforts on campus, 
especially to bring in a new and 
empowered electorate," said 
Mike Dolan, field director for 
Rock the Vote, a non-profit 
organization promoting student 
voter registration drives 
nationwide, in a College Press 




AP photo 

Presidential candidates Governor Bill Clinton (L), Ross Perot (C) and r^Gtorge 
Bush laugh October 19 after the conclusion of the third and final debate, held at the 
Wharton Center of Michigan State University. 



"Both campaigns are reaching 
out to young people. There is 
anxiety about the future of our 
country," said Tony Zagotta, 
president of College 
Republicans, in article. 
"America is in a transitional 
period. This election will decide 



"Both campaigns are reaching 
out to young people. " 



Service (CPS) article. 

According to Census Bureau 
figures in the same story, 26 
million men and women of 
college age are eligible to vote, 
with about 40 percent of this 
population currently registered. 
In comparison, approximately 
40.7 million people are between 
the ages of 25 and 44, with 58 
percent registered to vote. 
Americans aged 65 years and 
older have the highest 
percentage registered, at 76 
percent. 



what path the U.S. will take into 
the 21st century." 

While both the Republican and 
Democratic parties claim to have 
the majority of college voters, 
the U. poll shows 39 percent of 
college students registered align 
with the Democratic party, 25 
percent registered Republican 
and 23 percent reported no party 
affiliation. 

The three issues of most 
concern to college students, the 
poll said, were the Job Market, 
the environment and the abortion 



issue. Closely following were 
higher education, economic 
growth and health care. 

Shots have been fired back and 
forth over these issues in the 
presidential race. 

Some in uie Democratic camp 
have charged that President Bush 
failed as the environmental 
president. However, according 
to a Newsweek article, that is 
only the perception, not the truth. 
The article said in his four 
years as president, Bush passed 
the breakthrough Clean Air Act, 
designed to abolish smog in 
urban areas; reduced oil 
exploration in offshore areas; 
increased abolition of CFC's and 
enacted protective measures. 
The sum of Bush's 
environmental accomplishments 
exceeds those of the Carter 
administration. 

Conversely, Republicans have 
charged that if Clinton were 
elected, he would trade jobs for 
conservation. Newsweek said 



this is a possibility, but not a 
likelihood. Claims that 
environmental protection takes 
away jobs is hard to justify with 
evidence. According to 
Newsweek, "Environmental 
protection was a growth industry 
during the late 1980 s, booming 
at 15 percent a year. As many as 
a million jobs have been created 
in this sector." 

In the Pacific Northwest, 
center of' the Spotted Owl 
controversy, the owl protection is 
forcing the loss of some jobs, but 
more unemployment in the 
logging industry is caused by 
automation, which has been 
assisted by Bush and Reagan tax 
helps for capital investment, 
Newsweek reported. 

H. Ross Perot, the third 
candidate for president, has 
made virtually no reference to 
this issue, said Newsweek, and 
has no identifiable record to 
evaluate. 



v 



\l 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 10-22-92 

Opinion 



The Clarion Call- 10-22-92 - Page 3 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Debbie Huffman 

Managing Editor 

Alan Vaughn 

News Editor 

Dan Parrish 

Features Editor 

Jon Sitler 
Sports Editor 
A.J. Meeker 
Copy/Design Editof 
Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 
Brigitte Josefczyk 
Circulation Editor 
Tara Sheesley 
Ad Design 
Amy Conner 
Advertising Manager 
Ted Howard 
Business Manager 
Art Barlow 
Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advi-rlisirm revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion,*PA 16214 

(814)226-2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$ 12.00 

Academic Year...$20.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 



Hide Park 



W 




The way I see it 



Copy/Design Editor 



Leave me alone 

in the 

mornings 



I am not a morning person by 
any stretch of the imagination. 
One of my staunchest beliefs as 
a human being is: people have 
the right to stay up until the wee 
hours of the morning, arise 
moments before a scheduled 
class (breakfast and shower 
optional) and to go about your 
morning business as cranky as a 
wild-cat caught in a clothes dryer 
because you didn't get enough 
sleep the night before. 

Number two on my list of 
staunch beliefs is: people have 
the right to be undisturbed in 
their state of the morning 
grouchies by cheery, happy-go- 
lucky, so darned friendly that 
you'd like to choke that smile 
right off their beaming faces, 
MORNING PEOPLE. Yes, more 
dreaded than a second coming of 
the black death or another 
"Honey I Shrunk the Kids" 
movie is the Morning Person to 

me. 

As I see it, there are different 
ways that people deal with 
mornings-here defined as those 
hours of the day between legal 
sunrise and lunch. How a person 
deals with the morning 
determines which of three 
personality categories that he or 
she may fall into. 

1. Regular People: regular 
people are defined as that 
segment of the population that is 
generally on time and can be up 
and running with less than three 
cups of donut-shop coffee. 
Basically, these are your status- 
quo people, covering roughly 3/4 
of the worlds population and 
who probably would never 
knowingly antagonize 
personality type number two. 

2. People like me: this is a hard- 
core category, folks- things will 
start to get ugly here, people like 




Scott Dillon 

me are, thankfully for the rest of 
you, rare, but we're out here. I 
guarantee that you know a 
couple of us. We never make it 
to any scheduled class on time 
until after 10 a.m., because we 
never went to sleep until after 3 
a.m. Instead, we were up 
studying, chatting about affairs 
of state, or out exercising 
staunch right number three: 
people have the right to over- 
indulge in merry making. 
Generally our appearance 
resembles that of unkempt ogres 



{Conl. on pg. 4) 



I would like to commend a 
certain group of people for their 
work during the Autumn Leaf 
weekend. 

The various police departments 
of Clarion were very lenient with 
parties hosted by university 
students. In fact, I noticed that 
police were simply driving 
through Clarion, telling 
pedestrians to stay off the roads. 
They were simply making sure 
that no drunk driving disasters 
occurred. Very commendable. 

The different police 
departments handled this* once a 
year 'festival with great tolerance. 
I am not stating that underage 
drinking should be condoned by 
law enforcement, but the various 

officers simply knew that 
underage drinking is just 
something that happens 
everywhere during ALF. They 
were more concerned with 
saving lives. Very commendable. 
Something, however, happened 
to me this weekend that still 
causes me to feel inferior as a 
college student. Saturday 
morning I was scheduled to 
work in the press box at 
Memorial Stadium during the 
Golden Eagles' football game. I 
had to inform a state trooper of 
my business in order to get into 
the stadium. This is where my 



problem began. 

"Well, Mr. Press Box, did you 
know that your inspection sticker 
has expired?" he asked 
sarcastically. 

Anyway, he asked me to pull 
over. To make a long story short, 
I was given a ticket. He made it 
sound like he was doing me a 
favor when he stated that I was 
only being fined two dollars. 
However, he had a huge smile on 
his face when he handed me the 
$61 dollar ticket ($10 E.M.S., 
$30 C.A.T., etc.). 

Now, I know that I am wrong. 
I deserve the fine. But it is the 
way in which the officer 
(unnamed to protect those 
involved) handled the situation. 
He didn't have to call me "Mr. 
Press Box." He didn't have to 
say I was only getting fined two 
dollars. 

This is exactly what has 
happened during my tenure at 
Clarion. It has always been 
"Cops vs. Students." Why is 
this? Because someone looks to 
be between the ages of 18-25, 
police think the worst. 
Stereotyping someone is wrong, 
no matter what the situation is. 

So I would like to say to both 
parties, respect each other. If you 
don't, Clarion might find itself in 
a situation similar to what 
happened in L.A. last spring. 



EADER Responses 



t 



Wright, Mechling 
Step/Itec 

9999999 

• • • • • « • 

Dear Editor- 
Freedom of the press is a 
concept we, as Americans, think 
we enjoy. Disturbingly, that 



freedom can be suppressed by 
forces of power and influence, 
and the fear of reprisal. 

There is a story happening 
here, on this campus, and yet I 
doubt many of you are aware of 
it. Coverage of this story has 
appeared in the Harrisburg 



t 




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News-Patriot, the Erie Times 
News, the Leader-Vindicator, the 
Leader -Times, the Brookville 
American, the Oil City Derrick, 
and the Clarion News. 

As a contributing writer for 
this paper, I must now step 
outside that position. I submit 
this piece as a letter to the editor, 
the entire content is of my own 
opinion and of previously 
published news articles from The 
Clarion News. I write this 
because the bulk of the story 
broke over the summer, while 
most of my fellow students were 
out of the area. 

Clarion University, at one 
time, was the base for two state 
programs, Pennsylvania Science 
Teachers Education Program 
(Pa. STEP) and Information 
Technology for the 

Commonwealth (ITEC). The 
director of these two programs 
was Dr. Kenneth Mechling, chair 
of the CUP Biology department. 
Now consider these items: 
Pa.STEP/ITEC were 
programs administered by 
PHEAA, of which, Rep. David 
Wright, D-63, is chair of the 
board of directors. (Clarion 
News, 7-9-92) 

An Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) report "indicates 
the OIG investigation develop 
'substantial evidence' that 
Mechling as both an independent 
contractor and in his capacity as 
director of these PHEAA-funded 
programs, made, signed and 
renewed numerous contracts 
with School Science Services 
Inc., a company he owns and of 
which he is president. This 
appears to constitute (an alleged) 
violation of the State Adverse 
Interest Act . . . which prohibits 
state employees such as Dr. 
Mechling from benefiting from 
programs which they 
administer." (Clarion News, 7- 
23-92). 

David Wright, (D-63) was 
the author of the legislation 
which created Pa.STEP/ITEC. 

Dr. Mechling was a manager 
for previous Wright campaigns 
for public office. (Clarion News, 
7-9-92) 

In my opinion, and apparently 
in the states' opinion, there are 
some conflicts of interest here on 
both men's part. But hold on, I 
have more for you to consider; 
on-going OIG investigations are 
studying the following 
ALLEGATIONS; 



- "Considerable evidence has 
been obtained to support the 
allegation that political activity 
occurred 'within Pa.STEP and 
ITEC. A number of current and 
former employees have stated 
that they participated in a variety 
of policical activities in support 
of David Wright."' (Clarion 
News, 9-23-92) 

- "The allegations contend 
employees of the two programs 
were paid to put up Wright 
campaign signs during working 
hours and that staff members 
were allegedly asked to donate 
evening hours to help prepare for 
Wright campaign mailings. 
(Clarion News, 9-23-92) 

- "several current and former 
employees have allegedly 
admitted 'participating in other 
political activity during normal 
work hours at Dr. Mechling's 
direction. These activities 
(allegedly) included circulating 
petitions, hanging signs, 
producing political materials for 
mailings and using Common- 
wealth PANET telephones to 
solicit votes in support of Rep. 
Wright's campaigns.' "The OIG 
report also alleges investigators 
discovered evidence that PSTEP 
and ITEC owned equipment also 
used for Wright campaigns. 'A 
former Clarion University 
Graduate Assistant and employee 
in these PHEAA-funded program 
areas has admitted that she was 
put in charge of a political 
compaign project to (allegedly) 
support Rep. Wright (allegedly) 
at the direction of Dr. Mechling 
in 1986. The employee reported 
(allegedly) utilizing program area 
computers, printers and copy 
machines to compile large 
volumes of mailings in "Wright 
Campaign" letterheads. The 
employee (allegedly) was also 
responsible for merging PSTEP 
and ITEC address information of 
participants and staff into a 
database for use in mailing of 
Rep. Wright campaign materials.' 
The OIG report also alleges 
former program employees 
alleged PSTEP Assistant 
Director Bruce Smith and 
program area clerk John 
McCullough 'utilized normal 
work hours to (allegedly) hand 
Rep. Wright campaign signs in 
the Clarion, PA community. 
When interviewed by the OIG 
both Smith and McCollough 
admitted to this activity, but cited 
a verbal makeup time agreement 



authorized by Dr. Mechling, 
whereby, programs area time 
missed for political activity 
. during normal working hours 
would allegedly be made up 
later,' alleges the report. 
'McCullough (allegedly) stated 
that this makeup time policy 
operated on an "honor system" 
and admitted that there were no 
records reflecting the actual time 
spent hanging campaign signs, 
or that the time was actually 
made up later.'" (Clarion News, 
9-23-92) 

- "that personnel within the 
biology department of Clarion 
University (allegedly) utilized 
Commonwealth PANET tele- 
phones for the purpose of 
soliciting votes for Rep. Wright 
at the instruction of Dr. 
Mechling. A former program 
area employee (allegedly) 
complained about the 
inconvenience of making 
telephone campaign calls and 
told OIG investigators that the 
staff felt that if they refused to 
participate in this telephone 
campaigning they would be 
putting their jobs in 
jeopardy."'(Clarion News, 9-23- 
92) 

"The Attorney General's office 
has declined to comment on the 
specifics of the investigation, but 
has confirmed it is under way." 
(Clarion News, 9-23-92) 

I think this is a major news 
story on this campus. Both Dr. 
Mechling and Rep. Wright work 
on this campus. Clarion 
University is in Wright's 63rd 
district. It involves our state's 
money. Yet you have, until now, 
read nothing about it in this 
newspaper. A student-run 
newspaper should not operate 
under pressure to print only good 
PR stories and fluff. If 
something involves students, 
professors, university policy, 
taxpayer money, or possible 
wrongdoing by any of the 
aforementioned, it should be 
published without fear of 
reprisals 

Power, influence, and lawsuits 
are factors that can squelch free 
press if left unchecked. DON'T 
LET IT HAPPEN. . . DEMAND 
TO KNOW WHAT IS GOING 
ON AROUND YOU!! 

-Rodney Sherman 

Soph. Communications. 

Editor's note: The Attorney 

General's office is still 

investigating the case. 



Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 10-22-92 



* 



Hide park. . . 



(cont.frompg.2) 



until mid-afternoon because we 
are not capable of transmutating 
back to our friendly human 
forms until 10:30 or 11 a.m. at 
the earliest. Needless to say, 
speech, if any, is monosyllabic at 
best and most likely 
unintelligible. Note that this 
article is pertinent to over 3/4 of 
the world's population because 
the lines between regular people 
and people like me are not cast 
in stone. We all move between 
the two categories at times, so 
listen up all of you regular 
people out there! As the crucifix 
is to the vampire or the silver 
bullet is to the werewolf, so is 
personality type number three to 
us. 

3. Morning People: the 
percentage of the world's 
population that is member to this 
vile and sinister clan is 
unknown: these people are just 
too annoying to study. At a 
glance, the term "Morning 
Person" seems simple enough: a 
person who enjoys the morning 
and who needs one cup or less of 
donut shop coffee to be up and 
running. But as read, this 
popularly accepted definition of 
the term is not all encompassing 
and must be expanded. 



Dear Editor- 
Students- would you like to 
save $600 next year? Sure, you 
can work some extra hours next 
semester, or save the money that 
you recieve for your birthday or 
Christmas, but there is another 
way to save money that is 
actually much easier. It is as 
simple as writing a letter or 
making a telephone call to the 
Governer of this great state- 
Robert Casey. As you read this 
letter the 1993-1994 state system 
appropriations request is being 
forwarded to the Governors 
office for his consideration. 

On October 15, the Board of 
Governors of the SSHE, which I 
am a member, voted on the 1993- 
94 appropriations request. In 
layman's terms- this is the money 
that the 14 state schools needs to 
operate in the 1993-94 fiscal 
year. To meet its mandatory and 
inflationary cost increases the 
Board voted on a request of 
$783,783,417. Of this amount, 
$13,000,000 is a special 
component which restores the 
3.5% reduction in the system's 
base 1992-93 appropriation. The 
appropriation will support an 



You see, it's not just the sunrise 
and a big bowl of grape Nuts 
that makes these demons so 
jolly, oh no. I have come to the 
conclusion that the Morning 
Person derives a significant 
amount (most?) of their 
demented morning pleasure by 
antagonizing, in terrorist- like 
fashion, everyone in their rose- 
scented wake who has the 
misfortune of being a Non- 
Morning Person. 

A typical 8 a.m. attack goes 
something like this: 

MP: "Hey Scott, how ya doin 
buddy? Beautiful Morning isn't 
it?" 

ME: (spoken through unbrushed 
teeth, unshaven beard and with 
eyes open barely enough to 
avoid being run over by milk 
truck) "Arfle-shmarfle...ack- 
ack-ack...filfendimple." 

MP: "Your're gonna have to 
speak up old pal, old buddy, old 
chum of mine, because I can't 
hear you through your hood. 
You've got your sweat-shirt on 
backwards." 

ME: "I'm fine," I grunt and start 
to stagger off in the general 
direction of the class I'm already 
five minutes late for. 

MP: "Oh that's just wonderful! 



I'm soooo glad to hear it. It's 
soooo nice to see you. It just 
made my morning. By the way, 
I'm doing 300 hours of 
community service next week- 
me and some of my buddies are 
going to clean up a medical 
waste dump and turn it into a 
play groundgroum 1 for 
underprivileged squirrels in the 
area, and I was just wondering if 
you would like to help and ...hey, 
where are you going? Wait up! 
Hey, come back... Don't run so 
darn fast! Well at least have a 
nice day! (Then laughing 
demonically, he speaks to 
himself) Heh-heh-heh-heh- 
heh...Boy did I ever get him 
good! I thought he was going to 
be violently ill when I mentioned 
community service! It's too bad 
that I didn't make him vomit, 
then I would've been able to 
carry on today without 
emotionally battering anyone 
else but hey, you win some, you 
lose some. ( Then to the next 
poor vititm) Hey Jeff. How ya 
doin old buddy, old pal of mine?" 
And so the beat goes on and on 
and on, seemingly ad infinitum. 
Well darn it. I'm sick of it! 
Something must be done to stop 
this primeval, torturous abuse! 



Letters. . . 

(ConL from pg. 2) 



increase of $49,141,823 or 6.93% 
over 1992-93s planned 
expenditures. If the state does 
not appropriate the money that is 
needed it could mean a $600 
tuition increase next year. 

You might wonder how your 
letter or phone call will help. If 
500 students from Clarion, 500 
students from Edinboro and 
every other state school sends 
500 letters maybe- just maybe 
Governor Casey will realize that 
students in the Commonwealth 
and especially within the State 
System of Higher Education, are 
concerned about their education. 

The president of the National 
Association of Independent 
Colleges and Universities could 
not have said it better, "We've 



simply got to do a better job of 
getting people to understand the 
investment in education has a 
greater payoff than almost 
anything else we could do in our 
country." Wake up Clarion! 
Voice your opinions now! It is 
never to early to start planning. 

Please stop by the Student 
Senate office or feel free to 
contact me if you have any 
questions or if you would like to 
get involved. 



Monica Douglas is a 

Member of Board of Governors 

State System of Higher 

Education 



CESSNAS NEW YORK 
CONNECTION 



<*S^ 






L o eV See you soon.., 7 

10% DISCOUNT for Students and Staff! 



Mon-Sat. 1-9 
Sun. 12-5 



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Trying to talk sense to these 
weirdos is about as productive as 
trying to gain legislation for an 
open-season/no bag limit varmint 
season on them. I suppose that I 
will have to resort to begging. 

So to all of you Morning 
People out there: (I'll try to be 
rather civil as I am writing this at 
2 a.m., my friendly time of the 
day) please, please, in the name 
of all that is not so holy but 
occurs before 10 a.m. leave me 
the heck alone. Please! If you 
should see me staggering across 
campus looking like something 
the cat dragged in, make way! I 
am undoubtedly late for class and 
have no time to exchange verbal 
pleasantries with you. Gun-shots 
yes. Verbal pleasantries never! If 
I look cranky in class, don't you 
dare say, "Smile!" If I were lo see 
you getting taken out by a pit- 
bull, OK, but otherwise you're 
just asking for trouble. And 
heaven help you if you say to me, 
"My aren't you just a wee bit 
cranky this morning. Did you 
wake up on the wrong side of the 
bed or did you just forget to take 
your happy pills?" I don't even 
want to talk about the 
consequences of that one. And 
hey, any time after 10 a.m., I'll 



be more than glad to shoot the 
breeze with you and be a 
wonderfully polite and articulate 
human being (well, most of the 
time anyway). 

I guess that I can give all of 
you Morning People out there 
the benefit of the doubt. Perhaps 
you are not the vindictive little 
troglodytes that I think you arc, 
but rather you are just a little 
misdirected with your morning 
mirth. You may think the rest of 
us are as overjoyed to see 8 a.m. 
roll around as you are. Well, let 
me be the first to enlighten you 
and suggest how people make 
me feel. Getting up for an 8 a.m. 
class is only somewhat less 
amusing than spending the 
morning in the electric chair, and 
that you "wake up" (ha-ha-ha). 
You should leave those of us 
who are obviously still semi- 
comatose the heck alone. 

Well, it's now 2:45 a.m., and 
my article is finally done. I'm 
going to get some sleep now 
because I have to get up for an 8 
a.m. class. I will see you all 
tomorrow. Goodnight, and bear 
in mind what you have 
read.. .Please! 

Scott Dillon is a junior 
Communication Major. 



Editor's note: The Clarion Call would like to acknowledge Mr. 
Clare Heidler and Mr. Dave Fagan for their rapid response to last 
week's Call editorial. Although it is still warm in the Call office 
in the evenings, we appreciate the attention to the pro-blem. 
We would also like to note that the repairman in last week's issue 
was a contractor, not a maintenance man of the university 




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The Clarion Call - 10-22-92 -Page 5 



1* 



> * 




tt 



Rally" questions politicians 



by Debbie Huffman 
Managing Editor 



On September 28, 1992, the 
candidates for Pennsylvania state 
senator and representative were 
given a questionnaire asking 
whether they would support 
amendments to Act 108. They 
were also asked whether or not 
they would vote for a $12,000 
per year increase in legislation 
salaries. 

Dr. Robert W. Barrickman, 
leader of a Clarion 
headquartered coalition called 
Rally, devised the questionnaire. 

During a public rally held on 
August 9, 1992, Barrickman 
asked Senator Tim Shaffer to file 
legislation to amend Act 108. 
Shaffer agreed to the legislation. 
The amendment changes would 
ensure proper health, safety and 
welfare, quality air and water to 
citizens, wildlife and aquatic life 
if waste incinerators were placed 
in the destinated areas in 
Pennsylvania. 

The exisiting Act 108 does not 
protect animals and humans 
from being contaminated from 
heavy metals and many other 
poisons. Many animals are free 
to go in and out of the hazardous 
waste sites. The animals would 
be contaminated game for those 
who hunt wildlife. 

The second question asked 
whether or not state senators and 
representatives would vote for a 
$12,000 per year increase in 
legislator's salaries. 

Barrickman said, "We mailed 
questionnaires to all the 
candidates for state senator and 
representative for the purpose of 
polling politicians on voting 
themselves another raise in 
salary." 

Barrickman emphasized, 
"Taxpayers can't afford any 
more tax burdens, especially in 
these trying economic times. The 
legislators must be held 
accountable by their voting 
constituents." 

Of the 445 questionnaires 
mailed to candidates, a total of 
77 completed questionnaires or 
replies were received by October 
12. Candidates were asked to 
mail their completed 



questionnaires by October 7. 

Of the 196 questionnaires 
mailed to incumbent candidates, 
only 14 completed the 
questionaires and a total of 249 
questionnaires were mailed to 
challengers. They accounted for 
77 completed questionnaires 
received. 

Barrickman said, "It is clear a 
large percentage (93%) of the 
incumbents avoided answering 
the questionnaire. Voters should 
consider holding them 
accountable at the election polls 
in November." 

Barrickman added, "Now the 
voter, especially the undecided 
voter, has more criteria to 
determine how he or she will 
vote because two top issues have 
been addressed in the 
questionnnaire." 

"I had hoped the legislature 
would convene before November 
to pass Senator Shaffer's Senate 
Bill 1951, so we could hold the 



politicians accountable at the 
November election ballot box. 
However, we obtained the 
candidate's pledges to vote 
against increases in salaries and 
to vote for certain amendments 
to Act 108," said Barrickman. 

The results of the questionnaire 
were made available to general 
assembly, conservation and 
outdoor organizations 

throughout Pennsylvania, the 
news media and other concerned 
organizations. 

This was for the purpose of 
informing the public of the 
results before the November 
general election. 

Barrickman was defeated in his 
quest for the Republican 
nomination for state 
representative in the 63rd district 
by Fred Mcllhattan in this past 
spring's primary elections. 

Some respondents to the 
survey answered with 
explanations, neither a yes or no. 




^ |^W'':v ^"' v^:;'.::? 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Dr. Robert Barrickman, head of a local group known as 
"Rally," questioned politicians about their actions. 



SCJ initiates new members 



by Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 



Clarion University's chapter of 
the Society for Collegiate 
Journalists (SCJ) held their 
annual initiation banquet on 
Thursday, October 15, at the 
Holiday Inn in Clarion. 

Opening remarks were given 
by the student president of 
Clarion's SCJ, Michelle Sporer, 
who is also editor-in-chief of the 
Call. 

The first speaker was the 
chapter advisor, Ms. Susan 
Hilton. Hilton said that now is a 
critical time for all jounalists, 
due to the negative image of 
journalists in the eyes of the 
public. She also pointed out the 
fact that most news coverage in 
the United States now focuses on 
domestic rather than 
international news. 
"Since we are moving towards a 
more international society," 
Hilton said, "we should stress 
internationalism in the news we 
cover." 

Hilton also stated that most 



people today want to hear "news 
that is useful rather than news 
that is important," using Ann 
Landers' syndicated column as 
an example. 

"I notice a disturbing lack of 
interest in issues that you, as 
citizens, must deal with," she 
said. 

The keynote speaker for the 
evening was Mr. Arthur Barlow, 
national executive director of 
SCJ. 

"This is the best of times and 
the worst of times for this 
organization," said Barlow, "and 
we need to enlist your aid to 
shore up this organization. . . and 
get the Clarion chapter on line." 

Barlow went on to speak of 
some of the organizations that 
SCJ is involved with on the 
national level and what they do. 

First, he spoke about the 
Society of Professional 
Journalists, which is a national 
organization for working 
journalists. According to 
Barlow, the Society for 
Professional Journalists will 
accept members of SCJ after 



they graduate, provided that they 
are working within the field of 
journalism. SCJ advises them 
annually about graduating 
members. Barlow says that this 
helps to "pipeline SCJ members 
into the professional Society." 

He then talked about the 
Student Press Law Center, which 
advises student journalists across 
the nation as to what can be 
printed or broadcast without fear 
of legal repercussion. He said 
the Center is a valuable aid to 
student journalists, due to their 
"front-line" approach and easy 
accessibility. 

"At the Student Press Law 
Center," said Barlow, "every 
student journalist has a lawyer 
on retainer. If you ever have any 
quavers, any doubts, any 
worries, call them." 

He produced a copy of the 
Report, the Center's quarterly 
national publication, which 
included the results of a libel suit 
brought against the Clarion Call 
by former Athletic Director 
Richard Besnier. 

With the help of the Student 



Press Law Center, the Call was 
able to have the case dismissed 
from court. "Fear of litigation 
has had a chilling effect on the 
press," he commented. 

Finally, Barlow mentioned the 
First Amendment Congress, an 
organization which was formed 
to interpret and defend the rights 
given to Americans in the First 
Amendment to the Bill of 
Rights. 

SCJ is currently an associate 
member, with hopes of moving 
up to the rank of full voting 
member. 

After his speech, Barlow 
presented a plaque to Inez Baker, 
a retired Clarion faculty member, 
who has been an active helper 
with Clarion's SCJ chapter. 

Following dinner, the initiates 
stood to recite the initiation 
pledge of the SCJ, led by chapter 
vic