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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 12, 1996 – May 1, 1997"

Vol.77, nos. 1 -2 



Septembers, 1996- 
September19, 1996 



UbllA 



n> . 



ClAR',0 UMVtRSHYOFPA 
CLARION, PA 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



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Title 



Accoun t ing club offic ers recognized 



Activity day to be a big hit 



Adopt-A-School program 



ALF parade broadcast over Internet 



All-star wrestling in Tippen 



All-stars to wrestle at Tippin Gym 



Alumni association adds to board of directors 



Amahl and the night visotors 



Angle and Eiter at t he Holiday Inn 



Angle and Either: Clarion's finest 



Angle, Kurt, receives PSAC's "Award of Merit" 



Annoying ads that make you want to shout 



Anthropology school to take place in summer 



APSCUF vote ratifies contract 



APSCUF: mediator being called in to speed up contract negotiatoins 



Army offers alternatives to higher education 



Ashland, Cal sweep CUP softball team 



Ask Mr. Language person if you dare 



Athletic trainers - more than just taping ankles 



Auman, Benj, music reviews 



Average college costs increase across the nation 



Bald eagle menace 



Barometer of the wierd 1 996 



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35 



36 



37 



38 



39 



40 



41 



42 



43 



44 



45 



46 



47 



48 



Barry unloads his pet peeves 



Baseball playoffs: it must be October 



Baseball's best: the RAFY awards 



Benj's music review 



Benj's music review 



Bettis, Jerome, Steelers run over Rams 



Bios club does various service projects 



BISCITS approved for third year 
BISCITS progr am opened second year 



Blessid Union of Souls 



Blood comes from the heart in Clarion 



Borough land purchased to alleviate problems 



Braves and Yanks battling in October 



Brown, Denise fights against violence 



Brown, Denise, to speak at Clarion 



Building better communities 

Business college on line for accreditation 



Can anyone stop micheal and the bulls 



Candidates should leave their leadership on the beach 



Carlson and Suhr libraries ass SearchBank 



Carlson library adds new editions to the old 



Carlson Library renovations considered 



Carone, Particia, state representa tive presents forum at CU 



Carone, Patricia, to hild presentation at CU 



B 



Date 



December 5, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



October 10, 1996 



October 10, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



January 30, 1997 



April 24, 1997 



November 21, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



September^, 1996 



February 6, 1997 



September 19, 1996 



May 1,1997 



February 27, 1997 



October 24, 1996 



March 13, 1997 



April 17, 1997 



May 1, 1997 



September 26, 1996 



April 17, 1997 



March 13, 1997 



October 10, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



October 3, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



October 10, 1996 



April 10, 1997 



April 24, 1997 



November 7, 1996 



December 5, 1996 



Septembers, 1996 



September 26, 1996 



April 17, 1997 



September 26, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



April 10, 1997 



March 20, 1997 



October 10, 1996 



February 13, 1997 



May 1,1997 



September 26, 1996 



November 14, 1996 



February 20, 1997 



October 3, 1996 



November 21, 1996 



(November 14, 1996 



Page 



12 



19 



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17 



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ii 

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11 



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22 



10 



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8 



8 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 





A 


B C 


49 


Ceramics accepted for exhibit 


January 30, 1997 


14 


50 


Childcare opportunities in the community 


February 6, 1997 


9 


51 


Chuck Shepherd's news of the wierd 


December 5, 1996 


13 


52 


Clarion athletes achieve academic awards 


March 20, 1997 


21 


53 


Clarion basketball falls to Mansfiels in PSAC championship game, 94-80 


March 13, 1997 


18 


54 


Clarion basketball on top of PSAC-West 


January 30, 1997 


21 


55 
56 


Clarion basketball season openers show glimpse of future 


November 21, 1996 


20 


Clarion basketball team ready for season 


October 31, 1996 


17 


57 


Clarion beats Westminister - still undefeated 


September 19, 1996 


17 


58 


Clarion defeats Lady Indians 60-46, loose to Lady Vulcans 57-55 


February 13, 1997 


17 


59 


Clarion downs Ferris State; hosts Northern Colorado 


December5, 1996 


1 


60 


Clarion earns breathing room in PSAC West 


February 6, 1997 


16 


61 


Clarion football crushes Lock Haven 


October 10, 1996 


16 


62 


Clarion football earns post-season honors 


January 30, 1997 


22 


63 


Clarion golden eagle intramural notes 


April 24, 1997 


20 


64 


Clarion hosts Bloomsburg in the first round 


November 21, 1996 


17 


65 


Clarion hosts Lock Haven in homecoming game 


October 3, 1996 


17 


66 


Clarion is most livable 


February 27, 1997 


12 


67 


Clarion linksters tqake fifth at Edinboro Tourney 


September 19, 1996 


20 


68 


Clarion men's swimming team hopes to defend PSAC title this weekend 


February 20, 1997 


17 


69 


Clarion softball splits with Mercyhurst, Lock Haven 


April 24, 1997 


16 


70 


Clarion splits with SRU, gets swept by Lock Haven 


April 17, 1997 


20 


71 


Clarion sports hall of fame to honor six inductees 


April 10, 1997 


18 


72 


Clarion student association seeks student representatives 


February 6, 1997 


1 


73 


Clarion students begin third year in inner city 


September 19, 1996 


6 


74 


Clarion students dance the night away in Marwick-Boyd 


December5, 1996 


10 


75 


Clarion summer program comes under fire 


April 24, 1997 


1 


76 


Clarion swimming and diving teams finish fourth 


March 20, 1997 


21 


77 


Clarion tennis serves an ace 


September 19, 1996 


20 


78 


Clarion trach and field teams await national ranking 


April 24, 1997 


17 


79 


Clarion track and fiels finish second at Slippery Rock open 


April 10, 1997 


20 


80 


Clarion University "Building Bridges" enters second year 


September 19, 1996 


8 


81 


Clarion University computer network planned 


September 12, 1996 


8 


82 


Clarion University Economic Center reaccredited 


October 24, 1996 


7 


83 


Clarion university honored by Russian academy 


November 21, 1996 


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84 


Clarion University improves equipment 


September 12, 1996 


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85 


Clarion University to host special Olympics event 


April 24, 1997 


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86 


Clarion wins Subway-KFC classics behind Frist 


December5, 1996 


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87 


Clarion Women's track takes first, Men's finish 4th 


April 17, 1997 


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88 


Clarion wrestlers take fifth palce in EWL wrestling tournament 


March 13, 1997 


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89 


Clemson student arrested for roofies 


November 7, 1996 


6 


90 


Clinton chooses presidential library site 


March 20, 1997 


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91 


College basketball hurt by NBA deflections, complain officials 


February 27, 1997 


20 


92 


College Board doesn't discriminate 


October 17, 1996 


8 


93 


College players vie for NFL draft slots 


February 13, 1997 


20 


94 


Colors of Nations cultural night at CU 


November 14, 1996 


12 


95 


Comet can be seen in February 


January 30, 1997 


11 


96 


Commercials we hate most 


February 6, 1997 


10 





A 


B 


C 


97 


Communications students express opinions 


February 20, 1997 


6 


98 


Community service fair 


-■ — — — — „ 

September 19, 1996 


9 


99 
100 


Community service fair does good for Clarion 


September 26, 1996 


9 


Community student tax still under negotiations 


February 20, 1997 


7 


101 


Concert choir to hold concert 


April 24, 1997 


10 


102 


Contract negotiations making progress 


December 5, 1 996 


6 


103 


Contract ratification vote taken 


February 20, 1997 


8 


104 


Cornerstone celebration offers informal workshop 


November 14, 1996 


9 


10b 


Crisis intervention in Clarion 


January 30, 1997 


12 


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107 


Cross country off and running 


September 19, 1996 


18 


Cross country teams finish season at regionals 


November 14, 1996 


17 


108 


Cross-country team heads to Dickinson Invitational 


October 10, 1996 


16 


109 


CU debaters advance to quarterfinals 


March 20, 1997 


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110 


CU faculty recognized for achievements 


October 3, 1996 


5 


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113 


CU graduates successful at in job search 


October 24, 1996 


6 


CU hosts a collegiate choral festival 


October 24, 1996 


11 


CU library undergoes changes 


November 14, 1996 


7 


114 


uu men and wonen's swimming teams named PSAC Champions, again 


February 27, 1997 


18 


115 


CU organizations winners in weekend festival 


October 10, 1996 


5 


116 


CU sets 1996 SECA goal 


October 10, 1996 


6 


11/ 


CU students pick homecoming royalty 


September 26, 1996 


1 


118 


CU students to oerform in Pittsburgh 


January 30, 1997 


14 


119 


CU supports homelessness and hunger month 


October 24, 1996 


9 


120 


CU/Keystone SMILES awarded AmeriCorps positions 


October 10, 1996 


8 


121 


CUP baseball team looks to finish strong season 


April 24, 1997 


20 


122 


CUP softball team splits with Slippery Rock, loses to Edinboro 


April 10, 1997 


17 


123 


Cyber soap introduction 


October 10, 1996 


11 


124 


Cyberspace seminar held 


February 6, 1997 


5 


125 


DAKA food service and meal plans 


October 10, 1996 


9 


12b 


Dees, Morris kicks off MLK speakers 


January 30, 1997 


9 


127 
128 


Distance education hits CU 


February 27, 1997 


7 


Distance learning becomes a reality at CU 


November 7, 1996 


7 


129 
130 


Distinguished alumni award winners are named 


April 24, 1997 


7 


Dos and Don's of table manners by Dave Barry 


December5, 1996 


10 


131 


Eagles roll Glenville St. - await Youngstown St. 


September 26, 1996 


16 


132 


Ebonics rocks Clarion 


February 20, 1997 


7 


133 


Editor's conference held in Bloomsburg 


November 14, 1996 


6 


134 


English honorary fraternity holds annual induction 


October 3, 1996 


6 


13b 


Excessive tanning proves health risk 


April 17, 1997 


5 


136 


Exclusive interview with the band Face to Face 


February 27, 1997 


11 


13/ 


Experience the many flavors of ALF 


October 3, 1996 


8 


138 


Facilities planning committee debates possible locations 


November 21, 1996 


1 


139 


Facutly concerns adderssed 


October 31, 1996 


5 


140 


Farewell to Pittsburgh's finest #66 


April 10, 1997 


20 


141 


Feicht, Jennifer, uses services to find employment 


September 12, 1996 


9 


142 


Fiberoptic network being implemented at CU 


February 13, 1997 


1 


143 


Financial aid increases at CU 


February 27, 1997 


6 


144 


First Wives Club 

— ' - ■ L 


October 10, 1996 


12 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



145 



146 



147 



148 



149 



Flirting with disaster 
Flu shots in season 



150 



151 



152 



153 



154 



155 



156 



Food servi ce stands up s tudent body 
Fourth annual Plunge hit the streets 
GIS open house held 



Golden eagle baseball prepares for PSAC-W est 



Golden Eagle football off to flying start 



Golden eagle football wins again 



Golden eagle s oftball features PA talent i n '97 



Golden eagle softb all looks ahead 



Golden Eagle spikers start season 



157 



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159 



160 



161 



Golden Eagle tennis team strong at PSAC 



Golden eagle wrestling ready to take on the best 



Golden eagles advance in PSAC playoffs 



Golden eagles beat "Boro, crushed by SRU^ 



Golden eagles beat Cal, fall to Indiana 



Golden Eagles crush California 



162 



163 



164 



165 



166 



167 



168 



Golden eagles fall to YSU, sweep Edinboro 



Golden eagles loo se game to Edinboro 



Golden eagles pound tough IUP squad 



Golden eagles swim past Allegheny 



Golden eagles win PSAC-Wezt crown 



Golf team takes fifth 



169 



170 



171 



172 



173 



174 



Government adopts policy for student learning 



Governor releases funding to continue Founders renovations 



GWU student EMTs Bike to accidents 



Hager, Tammy, from Australia 



Hager, Tammy, student studies with kangaroos 



Hetrick, Royce, new director of CUP jazz band 



Holiday offers change to volunteer 



175 



176 



177 



178 



179 



180 



181 



182 



In Sweden staying clean is a real art 



Independence day 



Instructional support fee retained 



Internship opportunities available 



Intramural hoops comes to an end 



Intramural/Recreation program hires new graduate assistant 



Intramurals Champs named... other notes 



183 



184 



185 



186 



187 



188 



189 



190 



191 



192 



Intramurals off and running 



Intramurals rolling along, new activities 



Intramurals rolling along, new activities starting 



Is dating dead o n campus 



It's time to admit our mistakes 



Jack, a movie for everyone 



Jazz: lifting of spirtis 



Johnson, Kayshawn gives his two conts worth 



Keeling health center self care clinic 



Keeling implements change 



Key question: is it fat-free? 



B 



April 10, 1997 



October 10, 1996 



April 17, 1997 



October 17, 1996 



March 13, 1997 



March 13, 1997 



September 12, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



March 13, 1997 



May 1,1997 



October 24, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



Decembers, 1996 



February 27, 1997 



May 1, 1997 



February 13, 1997 



October 24, 1996 



April 10, 1997 



November 14, 1996 



November 7, 1996 



February 6, 1997 



February 20, 1997 



October 3, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



October 17, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



September 19, 1996 



Septembers, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



November 21, 1996 



April 24, 1997 



September 12, 1996 



November 21, 1996 



March 20, 1997 



April 17, 1997 



February 6, 1997 



February 13, 1997 



September 12, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



February 13, 1997 



March 20, 1997 



September 19, 1996 



April 10, 1997 



April 17, 1997 



November 14, 1996 



! February 13, 1997 



November 7, 1996 



12 



10 



17 



18 



16 



16 



20 



20 



20 



17 



16 



22 



17 



16 



16 



15 



17 



16 



20 



11 



8 



11 



12 



10 



12 



14 



22 



20 



18 



18 



20 



16 



12 



11 



12 



24 



10 



10 



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194 



195 



196 



197 



198 



199 



200 



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209 



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A 



Keysto ne proje ct held at CU 



Ku Klux Klan member, David D uke, to speak at Cal-State 



Lady Eagle volleyball back on track 



Lady eagle volleyball ends season 



Lady eagle volleyball kills California 



L ady Eagle volleyball team in full swing 



Lady eagle volleyball upsets F airmont St. 
Lady Eagles at Juniata torney 
Lady Eagles defeated by Edinboro 



Lady Eag les fall to Lock Haven 



Lady golden eagels are eliminated by West Chester 



Lady golden eagels topple East Stroudsburg, 71-67 



Lady golden eagles carry momentum into str etch run 



Lady golden eagles drop two conference games 



Last minute tourney tips 



Laying out the line again 



Leadership series begins 



Leadership series closes 



Learning a thing or two from race car drivers 



Leave your mark on the Clarion wall 



Less funding from state results in college 



Lethal threats are everywhere 



Live from Scotland, CU student studies abroad 



217 



218 



219 



220 



221 



222 



223 



224 



225 



226 



227 



228 



229 



230 



231 



232 



233 



234 



235 



236 



237 



238 



239 



240 



Living smart, Dave's way 



Local Candidates debate campaign issues in Gemmell 



Local community shuts down artist 



Lot changes affect parking 



Major renovations to be made at dining hall 



Making life better at Clarion 



Marshall, Kristin, Clarion professor heads western DebateWatch 



Martinazzi, Ronald, addresses student concerns officer performance 



Master plan focus groups look to university's future 



B 



April 17, 1997 



.September 19, 1996 



Master planning committee meets to investigate student concerns 



Master planning committee meets to investigate student concerns 



Meeting educational challenges 



Middle states report needed for CU 



More parking and building renovations in the works this fall 



Most-hated commercials deal with bo dily functions 



Music multicultural day 



Music reviews by Benj Auman 
Music reviews by Benj Auman 



Muslim struent association held lecture 



NAACP chair begins social equity week 



National coming-out day 



National condom day 



National red-out day to be he ld nationally 



NBA action just around the corner 



NBA western conference preview 



October 10, 1996 



November 14, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



September 19, 1996 



November 7, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



February 27, 1997 



February 6, 1997 



February 20, 1997 



January 30, 1997 



March 13, 1997 



November 7, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



April 17, 1997 



February 27, 1997 



November 14, 1996 



September 19, 1996 



Septembers, 1996 



September 26, 1996 



October 10, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



February 13, 1997 



January 30, 1997 



October 17, 1996 



April 17, 1997 



September 26, 1996 



March 13. 1997 



October 3, 1996 



September 19, 1996 



February 13, 1997 



October 3, 1996 



November 14, 1996 



September 19, 1996 



February 13, 1997 



November 14, 1996 



February 20, 1997 



May 1, 1997 



November 7, 1996 



November 21, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



November 21, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



18 



20 



17 



17 



17 



18 



18 



17 



20 



17 



17 



22 



20 



20 



10 



11 



10 



8 



1 



1 



8 



10 



11 



10 



12 



8 



14 



8 



18 



20 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



241 



242 



243 



244 



245 



246 



247 



NCAA allows student-athletes to hold jobs 



NCAA displays wrestling talent at CU 



NCAA offers baseball players draft deal 



New AmeriCorps members named at ceremony 



New board takes over 



New cookbook - help my apartment has a kitchen 



248 



249 



250 



251 



252 



New DAKA representative 



New drug causes stir on campuses 



New election message boards proposed 
New parking lot near completion 



New parking lot plans underway 



New residence being built for president 



253 



254 



255 



256 



257 



258 



259 



New student identification cards have many uses 



New technology hits Peirce 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



260 



261 



262 



263 



264 



265 



266 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



267 



268 



269 



270 



271 



272 



273 



News of the Weird by Chuc k Shepherd 
News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 
News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 
News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



News of the Weir d by Chuck Shepherd 



274 



275 



Next year new and improved Chandler 



NFL week #1 key match ups 



276 



277 



278 



279 



280 



281 



282 



NFL week #3 predictions and thoughts 



NFL week #7 highlights continued 



NHL fans expect 1997Colorado team to win Lord Stanley 



Nittany Lions too much for golden eagle wrestlers 



NYNEX creates job services 



Official student enrollments for university show ans increase 



Open road 



Opportunities for Malta extended 



283 



284 



285 



286 



287 



288 



Passing the hat by Dave Barry 



Pencils used to cheat on standardized tests 



Perot, sues to be included in debates 



Police invesitgate incident, four students arrested 



Politicians are too busy, so I'll save Social Security 



Postlewait, John, receives award 



B 



April 10, 1997 



February 6, 1997 



May 1,1997 



October 31, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



November 21, 1996 



September 26, 1996 



October 10, 1996 



November 7, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



May 1,1997 



September 26, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



January 30, 1997 



September 19, 1996 



September 26, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



November 7, 1996 



November 14, 1996 



November 2 1,1996 



January 30, 1997 



February 6, 1997 



February 13, 1997 



February 20, 1997 



February 27, 1997 



March 13, 1997 



March 20, 1997 



April 10, 1997 



April 17, 1997 



April 24, 1997 



May1, 1997 



October 17, 1996 



October 31, 1996 



Septembers, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



April 17. 1997 



February 20, 1997 



February 6, 1997 



October 17, 1996 



February 20, 1997 



January 30, 1997 



April 24, 1997 



November 14, 1996 



October 3, 1996 



May 1, 1997 



March 13, 1997 



January 30, 1997 



17 



21 



10 



12 



8 



10 



11 



10 



10 



11 



10 



10 



13 



11 



11 



10 



10 



11 



13 



10 



14 



11 



18 



20 



20 



24 



20 



12 



12 



8 



10 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 





A 


B 


C 


289 


President's residence on line for completion this summer 


February 20, 1997 


1 


290 
291 


Professor contract negotiotions for state universities-slow pace 


September 19, 1996 


7 


PSEA supports traveling library 


April 17, 1997 


5 


292 


R.E.M and Face to Face reviewed 


September 19, 1996 


12 


293 
294 
295 


Rafy Awards recognize NFL talent 


January 30, 1997 


24 


Rafy returns... with a few suggestions 


February 27, 1997 


20 


RAKS Day 


February 13, 1997 


12 


296 
297 


Ratica, Tillotson pace golden eagle swimmers 


January 30, 1997 


20 


Reaccreditation for masters program is passed 


September 19, 1996 


8 


298 
299 


Rec center site planned 


January 30, 1997 


9 


Recital to feature workd premiere performance 


October 24, 1996 


9 


300 
301 


Recreation center financing approved by trustees 


September^, 1996 


8 


Recruitmant goes high tech 


March 20, 1997 


5 


302 
303 


Reinhard, Diane, Clarion president, addressed student body 


December 5, 1996 


6 


Re-opening of Forest Manor being considered 


November 14, 1996 


1 


304 


Reorganization of colleges causes changes 


September^, 1996 


5 


305 
306 


Research semester provides cutting edge research 


September 26, 1996 


7 


Return to sweet games of childhood 


January 30, 1997 


15 


307 
308 


Ridge legislation restricts advertising in PA schools 


February 27, 1997 


1 


Rigas, John, cable giant scheduled to speak at ceremony 


April 24, 1997 


1 


309 


Righter, Brown claims post-season honors 


March 13, 1997 


20 


310 


Ritter and Wilburn crowned as CU royalty 


October 10, 1996 


1 


311 


Road R.A.L.L.Y. continues to race on 


February 6, 1997 


9 


312 


Saturday night fever 


April 17, 1997 


15 


313 


Scholarships offered and presented at Clarion 


January 30, 1997 


10 


314 


Scouting for the community 


February 20, 1997 


9 


315 


Scouting the major league coaching situation 


March 20, 1997 


24 


316 


Self exams are not just for women 


April 17, 1997 


15 


317 


Senator Arlwn Spector answers student questions 


October 24, 1996 


1 


318 


Senator White to speak at commencement 


December5, 1996 


7 


319 


Senioritis plague hits campuses all over America 


April 10, 1997 


4 


320 


Setting the record straight 


October 10, 1996 


18 


321 


Setting the record straight 


November 14, 1996 


18 


322 


Setting the record straight... one last time 


December 5, 1996 


20 


323 


Shepard, Chuck, news of the world 


Septembers, 1996 


10 


324 


Social equity activities held at university 


November 14, 1996 


6 


325 


Soho-rrible 


April 17, 1997 


11 


326 


Some insights from the Pick Master 


October 17, 1996 


20 


327 
328 


Speaker schedules for mathematics department 


October 10, 1996 


7 


Spring break is here again 


February 27, 1997 


9 


329 


Spring series begins at CU 


February 6, 1997 


6 


330 


SSHE and APSCUF reach new level in negotiations 


November 14, 1996 


1 


331 


SSHE elaborates on first step 


February 13, 1997 


6 


332 


SSHE funding creates first step 


February 6, 1997 


7 


333 


SSHE makes appropriations request to Ridge 


March 20, 1997 


8 


334 


SSHE publishes new vision statement for the system 


November 7, 1996 


8 


335 


SSHE takes survey of satisfied PA students 


April 10, 1997 


8 


336 


State and local campaigns reaching out to students 


October 10, 1996 


1 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 



Clarion Call Sept.-May 1996-1997 





A 


B C 


337: 


State schools set to take contract ratification vote 


January 30, 1997 


1 


338 


Steelers continue their winning ways, with defense I 


November 21, 1996 


18 


339 


Steelers go after conerback as expected / 


\pril24, 1997 


17 


340 


Steelers loose to Bengals, look forward to this week 


November 14, 1996 


20 


341 


Steelers, Tomczak getting the job done 


Dctober 10, 1996 


20 


342 


Stern promotes his "private parts" 


March 20, 1997 


4 


343 


Stout, Thomas earn all all-american honors 


tyril 10, 1997 


16 


344 
345 


Student involvement proves necessary for development 


January 30, 1997 


8 


Student murdered at Penn State University 


October 3, 1996 


6 


346 


Student recreation center committees formed 


October 17, 1996 


7 


347 


Student senate changes structure 


April 10, 1997 


7 


348 
349 


Student senate executive board named 


May 1,1997 


7 


Student senate votes to raise activity fee to $100 


April 10, 1997 


1 


350 


Students give up meals for needy 


March 20, 1997 


12 


351 


Students participate in hate speech debate 


April 24, 1997 


5 


352 


Students provide outreach 


October 31, 1996 


7 


353 
354 


Students RALLY behing new program 


September^, 1996 


9 


Students will suffer room and board price hike 


April 10, 1997 


8 


355 


Stuffing? No thanks, by Dave Berry 


November 21, 1996 


9 


356 


Substance-free housing catches on with campuses 


September 26, 1996 


8 


357 


Surviving the Everglades by Dave Berry 


November 14, 1996 


11 


358 


Survivor recounts Rohypnol encounter 


March 13, 1997 


9 


359 


Sweeny Todd closes theater season 


April 17, 1997 


14 


360 


Swimmers and divers ready to repeat as champs 


October 24, 1996 


16 


361 


Swimmers and divers swim past Allegheny 


November 7, 1996 


18 


362 


Swimming and diving teams kick past Edinboro 


November 21, 1996 


17 


363 


Targeted tax cuts aimed at helping people 


October 24, 1996 


3 


364 


Tax plan becomes effective 


March 13, 1997 


6 


365 


Tennis not for the poor, or the squeamish 


October 17, 1996 


11 


366 


Tennis team prepares for PSAC's 


October 10, 1996 


17 


367 


Theater to present "The Baltimore Waltz" 


November 7, 1996 


9 


368 


Thomas and Stout closeout storied careers 


March 20, 1997 


20 


369 


Top of the line tax advise from an expert 


April 10, 1997 


11 


370 


Tough week for lady eagles volleyball team 


September 26, 1996 


20 


371 


Tucker, James, CU student acquitted of charges 


September 26, 1996 


6 


372 


UC-Greeley, other campuses shaken by violence 


October 31, 1996 


8 


373 


United States propaganda affects citizens 


April 24, 1997 


3 


374 


University enrollment up from last year. 


Septembers, 1996 


6 


375 


1 University faculty plan strategies for new minor 


September 26, 1996 


7 


37C 


i Vaccine Clinic to be held at Keeling 


September 19, 1996 


12 


377 


' Vegetables' heyday by Dave Barry 


February 20, 1997 


11 


37* 


1 Virginia takes down Clarion wrestlers, 25-13 


February 27, 1997 


16 


37< 


) Visiting Germany with Lynn Anderson 


May 1,1997 


11 


38( 
38' 


) Volunteer opportunities available 


November 7, 1996 


9 


Vuckovich, Pete, Clarion grad joins Pirates staff 


October 17, 1996 


18 


38i 


> Walters, Scott, man arrested at football playoff game 


Decembers, 1996 


7 


38: 


J WCUC radion rocks Clarion 


March 20, 1997 


6 


384|Weezer and the Descendants 


September 26, 1996 


10 





A B 


c 


385 
386 


We'll still win again, claims intramural floor hockey title 


February 20, 1997 


20 


Western Pa sports hall of fame to induct Miller, Cloherty 


April 24, 1997 


16 


387 


When you go on break, don't forget to pack the common sense 


February 27, 1997 


11 


388 
389 
390 


Who will you vote for in 1996? 


September 26, 1996 


3 


Who's who at CU 


April 17, 1997 


7 


Wild card race comes down to the wire 


September 26, 1996 


17 


391 
392 
393 
394 


Witte, Steve, named scholar athlete of the week by Burger King 


October 3, 1996 


18 


Women swimmers seek another PSAC title 


February 20, 1997 


18 


Women who lift weight on the rise 


February 6, 1997 


17 


Women's conference held at CU 


March 20, 1997 


6 


395 


Women's tennis serves past Shippensburg 


September 26, 1996 


16 


396 


Woods, Tiger: golfs newest superstar 


September 19, 1996 


18 


397 


Wrestlers battle #6 Edinboro, Pittsburgh 


February 13, 1997 


20 


398 


Yale students sign up for bartending course 


March 20, 1997 


3 



September 12, 1996 



Clarion ggnttacrgity of ffettngptoama 



Clarion, $& 16214 






X&ht Clarion Call 



W\m'* Sn^ibe 




Turn to page 17 for 
an exclusive inter- 
view with Kurt and 
Rob, also Golden 
Eagle football kicks 
off with a victory 
for the details see 
page 18! 



Contents 



Opinion: Pg 2 

Reader Responses: Pg- 3 

News: Pg * 

Lifestyles: H 9 

Callon You: Pg- 13 

Entertainment: Pg- M 

Sports: Pg- W 

Classifieds: .. ? Pg- 19 



VohxmtJTfMim I 



Weather 



Todays weather... 

Partly cloudy, possi- 
bility of showers 

high in the upper to 
mid 60s. 



Angle and Eiter grapple in Atlanta 



Clarion University strikes gold 




* 



UMromr Stork to Clanou (Llniurrs'itP! 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



OPINION 



Editorial 




"...it is the time 
that a few people 
dedicate to uphold- 
ing our proud tradi- 
tion that makes it 
all worthwhile." 



Mary Beth Curry/ Editor-in-Chief 



Now thai Volume 77, Issue 1 of 
the Clarion Call is on the stands 
it's only fair to look baek on the 
past couple of weeks and report 
on the changes the Call has been 
experiencing. This is my first 
solo experience as the "chief, 
but thankfully 1 was trained well 
by my predecessor Ms. Zaikoski 
and our ever-present advisor Mr. 
Barlow, for that I would like to 
say thank-you. 

The new face of the paper has 
come as a shock for me, as a vet- 
eran of two years I have seen 
many great people come and go, 
but this year the turnover is 
unlike any I have experienced. 
The new semester has meant a lot 
of work for the new executive 
board and I would like to (hank 
them for stepping up to the task. 
Some of them know nothing 
about the newspaper business. 



some know quite a bit, but no one 
is afraid to learn, and that is a 
quality that, as editor, I truly 
appreciate. 

With this open-minded outlook 
I hope that we will do everything 
that you as students expect from 
your newspaper. We are always 
looking for both help and sugges- 
tions from those that we serve. 
Our Hide Park column and 
Reader Responses section will 
always be available for you to fill 
with your opinions, ideas, com- 
plaints, and praise. 

We also open our doors to stu- 
dents of all majors to write, sell, 
take pictures, and proofread. It is 
your paper as a student of Ckirion 
University and you must lake 
action to ensure the survival of 
the Call. 

Judging by die turnout of our 
organizational meeting earlier 



diis semester, I am pleased to see 
that many of you are ready to 
lake on that task. 

We have made it our mission to 
inform you with both tasteful 
and accurate news reporting, as 
well as entertain you with the lat- 
est in features and sports. This 
job is one that we accept with 
pride as we begin our publication 
for this fall. 

As Mr. Barlow often points out 
.we are the first record of the his- 
tory of Clarion University, and to 
me that seems like an awesome 
responsibility, but we are pre- 
pared to face die task head on and 
preserve this record for the 
future. As the year progresses it 
will fall upon die people in 270 
Gemmell to defend the honor of 
the Cad and to uphold the princi- 
ples of die 1st amendment. This 
has been the hardest part of being 
a student journalist. It is very 
frustrating to deal with uncooper- 
ative people and to always be 
afraid that your professors will 
hold your right to free speech 
against you. However, there are 
a few people who dedicate their 
time to uphold our proud tradi- 
tiona and this makes it all worth- 
while. When I walk across cam- 
pus and hear someone say "Have 
you seen what's in the Call ?" I 
realize that the purpose we serve 
is still very necessary and that on 
some level our efforts are appre- 
ciated. 

This semester die Cad is proud 
to serve you with 12 editions 

Continued on page 4 



{Ehe Clarion Call 



270 lemnull Complex 
(814)226-2380 



Cxentttoe $oarfa 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor. ...Brian Piclrandrea 
News Editor.... Matthew Gcesey 
Lifestyles Editor ...Denise Barney 
Sports Editor .. ..Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design ...Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager ...Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor. ...Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager. ...Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor....Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager. ..Kevin Miko 

Advisor.. ..Arthur Barlow 



Clarion, $9 16214 
f&X (814)226-2557 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body. 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica- 
tion, letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 



Hide Park 




***>, 




»* 



»♦ 



( looked at dam 
aged Photo albums 
with Pictures that 
can't be replaced. 



Dr. Jeanne 

Slattery 



Welcome to a new year at 
Clarion, the Clarion Call , and 
again, Hide Park. Just when I 
begin to believe the column has 
run its course, I find an article in 
my mailbox, or under the door: 
an article written to share a 
meaningful experience with our 
readership. As long as this news- 
paper and this column can pro- 
vide an opportunity for civil dis- 
course, I believe the work is wor- 
thy! Onward to autumn and ALE 

Art Barlow 
Caretaker, Hide Park 

"Flood Response" 
This summer, very briefly, I 
worked as a member of the Red 
Cross' Disaster Relief Team fol- 
lowing the floods devastating 
parts of our county and adjacent 
ones. 

My job was to listen, be sup- 
portive and address severe stress 
reactions as Red Cross team 
members from around the coun- 
try helped families get food, 
clothing, furniture and shelter. 

While it's true that I did Uiese 
things, it's also true that these 
families gave me much in return. 
Five of six families told us to go 
down the road, that there was a 
family that had really been hurt 
by the flood. They said this as I 
looked around their yard and saw 
damaged goods, piled as high as 
my head, as they pointed to the 
places at the lop of their stairs 
where the creek finally stopped 
rising. My neighbor was really 
hurt, and I looked at damaged 
photo albums with pictures that 
can't be replaced. I listened to 
them talk about the new trailer or 
home they hoped they'd be able 
to afford because their old one 
had been destroyed. A former stu- 
dent whose husband had lost his 
business told me that she had 
been helping people who had lost 
their homes, We d been real lucky 



and didn 7 lose much. 

Instead, she and others talked 
about neighbors who yelled to 
them in the early morning light, 
ensuring they left their home for 
safety. They talked about a fami- 
ly who had taken them into their 
small homes- maybe for weeks - 
following the floods. They talked 
about friends who helped them 
clean and repaint. I saw people, 
many of whom were probably 
strangers, helping others burn the 
belongings that had been dam- 
aged in the flood and begin to 
rebuild. 

It was inspiring for me to listen 
to these people working together, 
helping each other, being helped 
by their employers. I listened to 
them make meaning of then- 
lives. I often just highlighted the 
things they were already doing. 
My pain is bearable with the sup- 
port of nix friends and family. 

As 1 listened to them, I thought 
about how we make meaning for 
our lives. Our society is frequent- 
ly described as individualistic, 
autonomous, and materialistic. 
However, we also work well 
together. These connections dur- 
ing a time of extreme stress keep 
us sane in a crazy world. They 
cause us to think about ourselves 
and others in a more optimistic 
light. 

I have a small clinical practice 
in town. Many of my clients have 
experienced some sort of trauma 
in their lives, frequently at the 
hands of their relatives. While 
they are often angry at the parent 
or sibling who hurt them, they are 
often just as angry at the parent 
who "should have known" and 
failed to help. The people who 
were flooded learned that others 
are there to support and help 
them. My clients often conclude 
that no one is there for them. No 

Continued on page 4 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



-READER RESPONSES! 



$100 flex, school spirit, and greek life... Do something Clarion! 



Dear Editor, 

What's going on here? $100 
flex? That's nuts! How can one 
eat $100 flex? What happened to 
the $50? I don't need $100 nor 
do I want $100! 

The food isn't good. If you like 
"Grade D edible" I guess it's 
okay, but I've had enough of it. I 
have no meal plan, I save $5$, 
and the food I eat is pretty good. 
SUGGESTION: C.U.P. could 



look into the possibility of using 
our IDs to get food around town. 
Another thing, do we have a 
football team? You can't tell 
walking around campus. From 
what I hear, the team is pretty 
good. I believe it's the school's 
job to let us know of the sports 
here at C.U.R Hang up some 
banners, offer some prizes, be 
proud of the teams! I realize that 
a new house is being built over 
the hill by Nair Hall, and that 




takes precedence. We, the stu- 
dents, know where we stand in 
the eyes of the University. That 
may sound harsh, but it seems 
like the truth. 

Now, for the Greek system, the 
school does not help out. They 
want Greeks gone. Let the 
Greeks hang banners; let them be 
proud of their differences. 

Don't shun them, for they bring 
notoriety to your school. This 
school is lucky to have Greeks - 



they help the community, they 
do volunteer projects, and they 
help various other organizations. 
Let them display their colors and 
symbols. HEY CLARION UNI- 
VERSITY- It's the '90s. Let's 
treat the students like people. 
Give them options, information, 
and backing. 



Name withheld 



"Where is all the money going around Clarion University?" 



Dear Editor, 

Where is all of the money going 
around Clarion University? For 
the past couple of years the price 
of everything has gone up with 



for the extra cost. Plus, the state 
is giving the University about 
$100,000 to build the president a 
new house. What's wrong with 
the one that she lives in now? 
Couldn't that money be used to 



little or no improvements to show improve academics, or go copy. 



towards getting more updated 
equipment? A near-by school has 
laser printers that students can 
use free of charge. When you 
have to use a laser print around 
here it costs up to twenty cents a 



The price of living in the dorms 
this year went up. They 
promised that there would be 
new furniture, well, ttfere is no 
new furniture in my dorm room, 
and I still paid the increased rate. 

Clarion needs to stop wasting 



my money, and then they will not 
need to buy a rec center to attract 
new students! 

Signed, 
An annoyed student 



Courting first-years: The business behind orientation 



Courtesy of 
College Press Service 

They wine you, they dine you. 
They take you to the top of a 
Rocky Mountain peak at mid- 
night. They gather you around a 
quad of ivy-covered buildings for 
a candle-lighting ceremony. They 
send you off with disposable 
cameras to take photos around 
the city with your new class- 
mates. 

After all, you're a freshman. 

And some universities will do 
just about anything during orien- 
tation to make sure first-year stu- 
dents form a bond with their 
institution especially in the face 
of national statistics that say 
more and more students are drop- 
ping out or transferring alter their 
freshman year. 

According to a recent report 
from the American College 
Testing program, the number of 
students who leave after fresh- 
man year is 26.9 percent, an 
increase of about 2.5 percent over 
the rale first reported in 1083. 

That means if this year's fresh- 
man class size is 500. a college 
can expect about 135 .students to 
drop out or transfer before sopho- 
more year. If the class size is 
2,000, on average 538 freshman 
will not be on campus the follow- 
ing year-. For a class size of 5,000. 
about 1 ,345 students will not 
return. 

Education experts blame the 



increase on an improving econo- 
my, which tempts some students 
away from academia and into the 
work world. 

Also to blame, experts say, are 
rising tuition costs, especially at 
private schools, where a four- 
year stay can total more than an 
entire showroom of Ford 
Explorers, and as always, there's 
the loss of students due to home- 
sickness or academic troubles. 

So for many schools, freshman 
orientation, whether it occurs 
during the summer or before 
classes start, is the perfect lime 
for officials to pitch the universi- 
ty's strengths and prompt stu- 
dents to bond widi new friends 
and a new home. 

Any freshman orientation you 
can do dial blows them away . . 
is absolutely necessary." said 
Diana McNab. director of well 
ness at the University of Denver. 
I honestly think these orienta- 
tions are probably the biggest 
impact we can have. We got to 
get diem right away.'* 

The first weekend at l)U, all 
600 freshman head to a resort in 
the Rockies, where diey join fac- 
ulty for a few days of square- 
dancing, crafts and story-telling 
around the bonfire. Then there's 
the bonding experience of scaling 
a mountain peak at midnight. 

"It's just a great icebreaker," 
said McNab. "You can't not have 
a good time, hiking up the moun- 



tain with a glowstick, laughing 
your ass off as you go up." 

The special attention to fresh- 
man seems to be paying off at 
DU: the attrition rate is 10 per- 
cent-far less than the national 
average. 

DU's "Pioneers in the Rockies" 
program is more than 30 years 
old. But more schools now are 
choosing to "bond" first-year stu- 
dents by sending them off on a 
camping, canoeing, kayaking or 
backpacking adventure before 
classes start. 

Dartmouth College has a four- 
day Outing Club trip that ends at 
the school's Ravine Lodge, 
where students can enjoy singing 
and contra-dancing in the New 
Hampshire wilderness. Marlboro 
College freshman hike into the 
Vermont woods. Students at 
Whitman College in Walla Walla, 
Wash., have "Scrambles," in 
which they head to Yellowstone 
National park for a backpacking 
uip. 

For some students, the adven- 
ture is closer to campus. At St. 
Lawrence University in ("anion. 
N.Y.. all 500 freshman gather 
around the main quad at night to 

light candles. 

"The Quad Experience is a way 
to make the freshman class 
feel as if they all were pad of an 
adventure together, explained 
Lisa Cania, director of university 
relations, "that they can count on 



one another, that they would 
have experiences that would bind 
them together." 

Boston university holds an event 
called CasUe Cafe, where first- 
year students can play Twister, 
Chutes & Ladders and other 
board games. 

Many colleges offer volunteer 
or service projects during orien- 
tation to help students feel con- 
nected with their new communi- 
ty- 

For instance, at Gettysburg 
College, students head to the his- 
toric Civil War battlefields at 
Gettysburg National Military 
Park to clear brush. Freshman at 
Rockhurst College in Kansas 



City, Mo., clean neighborhood 
streets; Huntington College 
freshman take the "Volunteer 
Plunge" with a number of com- 
munity service projects; 
American University students 
tutor refugees from Central and 
South America. 

Other colleges rely on more 
unusual orientation traditions. 

All 450 freshman at Davidson 
College in North Carolina are 
invited to run the 1.7 mile "Cake 
Race." The first 80 students to 
cross die finish line pick from an 
assortment of cakes baked by the 

Continued on page 4 



if you have a complaint idea/praise, or 

criticism... 

Write a Letter to the 

Editor! 

Letters must be submitted to the Can office 
at 270 Gemmell Center on the Monday 
before publication. All letters must be 

signed, but the name can be withheld upon 
request. The £ai! reserves the right to 

refuse Publication to any letter that may be 

libelous, and to edit any copy for libel, 

grammar, and length. 



?32e4 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



r 



% 




News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



WORLD 



U.N. approves nuclear 
test ban treaty 



The General Assembly voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to endorse 
a global treaty that would ban all nuclear test blasts. 

The endorsement opens the door for the treaty to be signed by 
U.N. member states, although it must overcome strong oppostition 
from India if it is ever to take effect. 

India, which carried out its only test blast in 1974, voted against 
die agreement and said it would not endorse the treaty, blocking it 
from becoming law. Libya and Bhutan also voted against the treaty. 

India has said the treaty is flawed because it does not include pro- 
visions for disarmament. India also said the major powers could 
refine their arsenals despite the treaty by using highly advanced 
tests that did not involve nuclear explosions. 



London phases out 
famous buses 

It's the original. The bright-red, two-tiered, open-backed London 
city bus. And it's out of here. 

London Transport has announced that four decades alter it hit 
the pavement, the original model of the city's trademark 
double-decker buses will be phased out over the next five years. 

But tourists and other bus-lovers need not (ear: There will still 
be plenty of red doubledeckers trolling London's streets. They'll 
just be newer models vvidi closed rear ends. 

The open-backed Routemaster bus first entered service in the mid- 
1950's to electric trams. It was heralded as pointing the way to a 
more prosperous future for Britian. 

Burundian archbishop 
feared dead 



Burundi's Roman Catholic archbishop was missing Tuesday and 
feared dead at the hands of Hutu rebels alter soldiers found the 
burned-out husk of his car. some blood, and the charred body of one 
of his six passengers. 

The military government blamed the rebels for the itmbush an 
apparent slaving Monday afternoon of Joachim Ruhuna, whose offi- 
cial title is archbishop ofGitega. 

Asked how he knew I lulus staged die ambush, military spokesman 
Ft. Col. I.ongin Minani said: "I don't know how you can ask such a 
quest ion. (io up there yourself." 

©> Courtesy of the Associated Press 



v 



Hide Park continued... 



one listens to them. People who 
love them, hurt them. They draw 
these conclusions because Mom 
doesn't see. Grandpa doesn't 
believe, their neighbors think 
they're bad. their teachers think 
they're stupid and wonder why 
diey don't concentrate at school. 
I think most of us are willing to 
help someone else when we 
know what to do. I saw that 
everywhere I went in the floods. 
However, most of us don't know 
what to do in situations where 
others are in emotional pain. We 



are uncomfortable being around 
sick or dying people, people who 
are hurt or traumatized, those 
who are scared. I smile thinking 
about one Of the Red Cross work- 
ers who waved me into houses to 
"deaf with people. In the short 
period of lime we were there we 
couldn't do more than hold 
someone's hand, listen to them, 
marvel at their strength and the 
generosity of friends and neigh- 
bors, normalize their reactions 
and, when necessary, make a 
referral to another agency. She 



could have done these things — 
she was a kind and thoughtful 
woman — but she didn't recog- 
nize that these skills were ones 
she had. 

These are skills many of us 
have. Listening to someone in 
pain, being there, are all it lakes 
to help someone in pain draw a 
different meaning about them- 
selves and the nature of their 
world. 

»Dr. Jeanne Slatteiy is a member of 
the Psychology Department 



Editorial continued 



• •• 



from now until December 5. We 
will distribute your views 
throughout the campus (both 
main and Venango), the commu- 
nity, and to those who cannot be 
here, but purchase a subscription. 

Often, it seems as though the 
collegiate media must fight to 
end the radical stereotype associ- 
ated with university newspapers. 
It is true that the college experi- 
ence does allow for a certain 
amount of tolerance that might 
not be available in the "real 
world," but this does not take cre- 
dence away from the Clarion Call 
or any other college paper. 
Instead, it opens up the forum to 
debate. 

Our paper has brought about 



debate on a number of issues that 
range from underage drinkinu to 
homosexuality. It has inspired 
both anger and tolerance, and if 
it has not always pleased, at least 
it has helped educate. 

It is with these views that I face 
the new academic year. I want to 
thank Jen, Bobbi, Kraig, Julie 
and Katie for all they have taught 
me. 

I would also like to welcome 
Brian, Denise, Ben, Robin, and 
Kristen to the Call and wish them 
the best of luck. It has been my 
pleasure to work with these peo- 
ple over the last few weeks, and I 
feel confident that every one of 
them will contribute to the Call in 
a way that no one before them 



has. 

Steph. Matt. Jeff. Jen and 
Kevin you guys decided to stick 
it out, whcdier it be for the love 
of journalism or the monthly pay- 
check, I appreciate all the help 
you have given me in preparing 
for the new year. 

Training is very hard, but with 
your help everything has run 
smoothly, and I look forward to 
our continued association in the 
future. 

Finally, I just want to give my 
word that I will do my best to run 
the paper in a way that will not 
always please, but at least benefit 
the student body. The Call is 
your voice, do not be afraid to 
use it. 




school's faculty and townspeo- 
ple. 

Loyola University of Chicago 
encourages its freshmen to do 
things as a group, such as explor- 
ing die city with disposable cam- 
eras. 

Incoming students also can buy 
opera or ballet tickets for the 
price of a movie ticket, as long as 
they go as a group. 
"Rather than lounging around 
watching television and not talk- 



ing," said Stephanie Kerch, man- 
ager of media relations, "[such 
events] force you to have to inter- 
act as a group. 

Such traditions reflect die 
importance given to freshman 
orientation-especially at private 
colleges, where the number of 
students who leave before sopho- 
more year has increased- from 
22.8 percent in 1983 to 25.9 per- 
cent in 1996. according to ACT 
statistics. 



"When the economy is strong . 
. more people choose not to go to 
college, or choose to leave col- 
lege," said David Merkowilz. 
director of public affairs at the 
American Council on Education. 
"More students . . . see more 
opportunity in the job market." 

As a result, "non-selective pri- 
vate institutions are digging 
deeper into the pool." he said. 
"Schools . ... have been taking 
more at-risk students." 




Clarion Call Publication Schedule 
1996-97 Academic Year 



Fall Semester 

September 12 

September 19 

September 26 

October 3 

October 10 

October 1 7 

October 24 

October 3 1 

November 7 

November 14 

November 2 1 

December 5 



Spring Semester 
January 30 
February 6 
February 13 
February 20 
February 27 

March 13 

March 20 

April 10 

April 17 

April 24 

May 1 



Letters to the Editor are due by 5:00pm the Monday before publication. Display Advertisments must be submitted by 5:00pm on 
the Friday before publication, and Classified Ads must be submitted by 2:00pm on the Tuesday before publication. 



=*ai 



September 1 2, 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



NEWS 



College Campus News 




What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



U. oFGeorgia Closes Six 
Fraternities 

Days after a May 12 fire destroyed a University of North Carolina 
fraternity house and killed five students, the University of Georgia 
announced a crackdown on fire safety violations in its Greek houses. 

"We are not going to put up with this nonsense any longer," President 
Charles B. Knapp said, of continuing fire violations by some UGA fra- 
ternities. "They're going to be in compliance with the fire code or 
they're going to be on the street." 

Less than a month later, a fire started at UGA's Sigma Nu fraternity 
house , which had been cited for 85 fire-code violations in April. 

The university stuck to its word and proceeded to close Sigma Nu 
and five other fraternity houses- Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Tau Omega, 
Chi Pi, Phi Delta Theta and Pi Kappa Alpha- all for fire-code viola- 
tions. 

Broken stairways and emergency lights, insufficent exits and non- 
operational fire alarms were some of the problems, university officials 
said. 

The fraternities were to be closed from June 19, the first day of sum 
mer quarter, until members could bring the houses into fire code com 
pliance. 

Four other houses, Tau Epsilon Phi, Kappa Alpha, Chi Psi and Kappa 
Sigma, were given time to correct less serious fire-code violations. 

Students planning to stay at the fraternity houses for the summer 
quarter had to quickly make different living arrangements, although 
the university said fewer than 50 people would be displaced. 

Citadel Opens Doors to Women 

In a landmark sex discrimination decision, the U.S. Supreme Court 
ruled June 26 that the slate-supported, all-male Virginia Military 
Institute must open its doors to women. 

Two days after the decision. The Citadel in South Carolina 
announced that it, too would accept women into its Corps of Cadets. 

The Supreme Court's 7-lol ruling ended a discrimination case that 
began in 1990, when the Justice Department sued the 157-year old mil- 
itary college-vvhich has produced some of the nation's outstanding 
military leaders-to force it to admit women. 

The Court ruled that the exclusion of women from VMI's prestigious 
educational opportunities violated the Constitution's equal protection 
guarantee. 

"However [well] this plan serves the state's sons, it makes no provi- 
sion whatever for her daughters. That is not equal protection," 
Ginsburg wrote for the majority. 

The Court also rejected a separate program for women at private 
Mary Baldwin College, charging that it was not a suitable remedy to 
VMI's all-male policy. 

Justice Antonin Scalia. the only dissenter, wrote in his opinion, "I do 
not think any of us. women included, will be better off for [VMI's] 
destruction." 

Ginsburg wrote that VMI would not be destroyed by the inclusion of 
women, merely altered and noted die school's ability to successfully 
manage change when it admitted blacks in the 1960s. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



Reorganization of colleges causes changes 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 



The College of Arts and 
Sciences and the College of 
Education and Human Services, 
as a whole, have acquired three 
additional departments. During 
the summer, the College of Arts 
and Sciences integrated the 
Communications and Computer 
Information Sciences depart- 
ments into the college. The 
College of Education and Human 
Services has implemented the 
Library Science department. Last 
year, these three departments 
were included in the College of 
Communications, Computer 
Information Sciences, and 
Library Sciences. The changes 
have occurred due to the resigna- 
tion of the former college's dean, 
Dr. Rita Flaningham, and short- 
age of funds to appoint a new 
dean. 

Dr. John Kuhn, Provost and 
Academic Vice-President, 

devised the plan to move the 
departments upon hearing of the 
plans of resignation by 
Flaningham. Meetings were held 
with the three departments heads 
to discuss the decision. The three 
department heads are Dr. Carmen 
Fellicetti, communications 
department; Dr. Dana Madison, 
computer information sciences 
department; and Dr. Ahmad 
Gamaluddin, library science 
department. Kuhn insisted the 
reason for splitting up the college 
would include a savings to the 
university by not hiring an addi- 
tional dean. Kuhn sent a memo to 
President Diane Rheinhard over 
the summer detailing the reorea- 
nization of the departments. The 
recommendations were accepted 
and the changes were implement- 
ed. 

Dr. Kuhn outlined the compar- 
isons between the departments 
and the new colleges in his pro- 
posal. Through integration of the 
communications and computer 
information sciences departments 
into the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Kuhn stated." linkages 
will exist between computer 



information science and mathe- 
matics and between communica- 
tions and speech communication 
that can foster collaboration 
between departments in the col- 
lege." Pertaining to the library 
science department being imple- 
mented in the College of 
Education and Human Services, 
he concluded that, "there are nat- 
ural linkages between these units 
because of the undergraduate 
program in school librarianship, 
the development of reading and 
related research, especially for 
the young, and the connection 
with children's literature." 

One of the reasons Kuhn cites 
for the separation of the College 
of Communications, Computer 
Information Sciences, and 
Library Science, is for conserva- 
tion of resources. There were 
only 28 faculty members work- 
ing in the college last year so he 
didn't see the need to fill the 
dean's vacant position. Due to the 
additional money saved by the 
vacant position, there has been an 
increase in graduate assistance 
stipends and more professional 
journals have been purchased for 
Carlson Library. 

Dr. Arnie Cooper, dean of the 
College of Education and Human 
Services, is very optimistic about 
the addition of the library science 
department to the college. He 
feels that the knowledge that both 
deparunents contain can be uti- 
lized to meet a common purpose. 
Dr. Stanton Green, dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, 
agrees with the changes in the 
college. He feels that they are 
subtle enough that they would go 
unnoticed. Green said he met 
with die three department chairs 
and will meet with department 
faculty in the upcoming weeks. 
"The additional departments will 
create new opportunities for 
other deparunents within the col- 
lege to overlap with each other, " 
concluded Green. 

Fellicetti also feels that die new 
changes are good. Some con- 
cerns of the communications 
department are the existence of 



enough money for equipment 
requests and enough faculty to 
replace retiring faculty. Fellicetti 
also hopes that in the future no 
plans will be made to try to com- 
bine the department with other 
departments within the college. 

Madison feels that there are 
several pros and cons to being in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Some of the pros are the exis- 
tence of the larger college and 
better resources to work with 
when acquiring additional 
staffing and equipment. A big 
concern of the computer informa- 
tion sciences department is die 
creation of an identity crisis as a 
science department which isn't 
efficiently recognized as a sci- 
ence department. Madison 
explained, "When Green 
addresses the science depart- 
ments, will he only include 
chemistry, biology, and other 
physical sciences, and not com- 
puter information sciences? If we 
aren't a science and we definitely 
aren't an art, then what are we? 
The college is too casual about 
their distinction." 

One concern that has been 
expressed by both administrators 
and students are since there is a 
change in administration, will 
there eventually be a change in 
curriculum as well? All parties 
involved stated that there would- 
n't be any additional changes in 
curriculum. Fellicetti expressed 
major concerns about the com- 
munications department's cur- 
riculum being changed from non- 
traditional to a more traditional 
format accepted by other depart- 
ments within the college. With 
the communications depart- 
ment's non-traditional curricu- 
lum is the existence of hands-on 
technology dial wouldn't be used 
in a traditional method. The lon«- 
range changes are anticipated, 
but are supposedly a long way 
off. 

Dr. Kuhn concluded. " The 
dean and associate dean of each 
college will make sure students 
are accurately served in their 
education process." 



There will be a TV-5 organizational meeting in G-17 

Becker Hall on Monday, September 1 6 at 7 P.m. If you 

have any questions or you can't make the meeting and 

would still like to participate, call Cindy or Rachel at 226- 

3692. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



Student 




Senate 



Compiled by Sandee Siford, Student Senate reporter 

The firsl Student Senate meeting of the semester was held on 
Monday, September 9, 1996. President Cox called the meeting to 
order. 

Dr. Curtis passed out the Act 88-1982 to the senators. Mr. Krull 
announced that there will be a meeting for all treasurers of organiza- 
tions which are funded by the activity fee. The meeting will be held at 
4 p.m. in 250 Gemmell. 

President Cox held a moment of silence in honor of Professor Gary 
Merz who died this summer. 
William Caugherty will take Senator Fletcher's place on the senate 
This week is rush week for fraternities and sororities. Meet the 
Greeks will be held on Thursday, September 12 at 6:30 p.m. in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose room. 

Interhall Council announced that the semi-formal will be held on 
November 23. All homecoming applications have to be turned in by 
September 22. 

Senator Mathis announced that there is $12,000 in the Supplemental 
account and $88,064 in the Capitol account. 

Senator Lytle moved to create an adhoc committee entitled the 
Campus Safety Committee. The purpose of the committee is to ensure 
the safety of students on this campus. Under this category, the com- 
mittee will investigate the affects of local businesses on this campus 
and the safety of the physical surroundings on this campus. The com- 
mittee will also address the relations between students and Public 

Safety. 

Senator Swenson moved to appoint Senator Lytle to the Campus 
Safety Committee. The motion passed. 



■Break Out Of Your Shell and Try Something Different. 

DELTA ZETA 



9/12 6:30-9:00 Meet the Greeks-Gemmell MP 
9/14 5:00 Watermelon Blast & Cookout 
9/15 8:00 Casino Night 
9/16 9:00 Open Bid 

9/14, 9/15, & 9/16 Activities are at the AZ House at 1054 

Wood St. 

*ALL WOMEN WELCOME* 



9{pt <your Ordinary Image 
Images of ' tfic "West 

^Jc\\'c\yy/ "P>ec\c\s/ CJncence, Oils 




6J»f> A^«" S*., CUw4iw L'LYi- !>!>'! 3 



■ .'•• — -f— 




University enrollment up from last year 



by Bill Evans 
News Writer 



Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania increased its enroll- 
ment for the second consecutive 
year, according to preliminary 
figures released at the conclusion 
of its drop/add for classes. 

Total university headcount 
enrollment increased by 40 stu- 
dents compared to the same tune 
last year. The current total head- 
count enrollment is 5,844 stu- 
dents compared to last year's 
total of 5,804 students. 
Admissions preliminary figures 
show that 1,294 freshmen stu- 
dents are enrolled this semester. 
This is a moderate rise from the 
past semester. 

Full-time enrollment is up by 
80 students, but a decrease of 40 
part-time students produced a 
lower net gain of 40. The 
increase in full-time students has 



resulted in a gain of 71 full-time 
equivalent students over the same 
period as last year. The number 
of graduate students has also 
increased 12.7 percent, rising 
from 393 to 443 students. 

Clarion University conducted a 
study of twenty colleges with 
which the university shared the 
greatest number of jointly admit- 
ted students. There were 411 
cross admitted students to 
Clarion University and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania and 
Clarion University enrolled 63 
percent of those applicants. Other 
schools that were used in the 
study were Slippery Rock 
University, Edinboro University, 
and the University of Pittsburgh. 
The percentages of enrollment at 
Clarion for these schools were 65 
percent. 60 percent, and 59 per- 
cent, respectively. 



The increase of students has 
been a concern for administration 
in charge of housing. The semes- 
ter began with several students in 
temporary housing waiting for a 
room to become available. 
Parking is also at full capacity 
and is another concern for the 
administration to handle. 

John Shropshire, Director of 
Admissions, is optimistic on the 
continual growth of students. 
Shropshire hopes to match this 
year's number and to add about 
350 new students next fall. Next 
year, the university will adapt a 
more selective admissions 
process to help select a wider 
range of students. In preparation 
for technological advances. 
Shropshire wants to see the appli- 
cation process move to the World 
Wide Web which should result in 
more applications. 



New student identification cards have many uses 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania will soon be using 
identification cards for students 
and employees that can serve 
purposes from key card to debit 
card. 

All of this is possible through 
the addition of a digital camera 
and a C-Board software comput- 
er program by the office of stu- 
dent affairs. Many of the uses for 
these cards are now under con- 
sideration according to Dr. 
George Curtis, vice president for 
student affairs. 

" The cards are now being used 
for identification, meal plans, as 
a debit card for "Flex Dollars" 
used for food purchased at the 
Gemmell complex and "Hagle 
Dollars" used at the book store, 
, library circulation, and activity 
pass." says Curtis. "We will look 
at other possibilities for its use 
during the upcoming year." 

The digital camera equipment is 
nearly identical to that used at 



Pennsylvania driver's license 
center. With the old photo style 
equipment, a photo was taken, 
trimmed to size, glued into a spot 
on a blank card , and then lami- 
nated. The turnover time from 
photograph to completed card 
could be several days. 

Now the person's image is sent 
to the computer where an opera- 
tor inserts it into a computer 
designed card. The process is 
completed in minutes. During 
summer orientation approximate- 
ly 160 incoming students were 
processed each session. 

The primary computer storage 
area for this information is 
Egbert Hall. The Egbert comput- 
er is linked to Carrier 
Administration Building, 

Chandler Dining Hall, and the 
Book Store and Snack Bar in the 
Gemmell Complex. 

"This academic year we expect 
to use the identification cards as a 
key card for the residence halls." 
says Curtis. "The system would 
allow only those living in a spe- 





Igh gear 



V> 




AN OUTDOOR ADVENTURE STORE 

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CAMPING - CLOTHING - HIKING BOOTS 

KAYAKS - AUTO RACKS 

VISIT OUR INDOOR CLIMBING WALL 

34 S. 5th Avenue, Clarion 226-4763 








cific residence halls access to the 
building at all times. Campbell 
Hall and Givan Hall have a card 
security system in place now and 
we will be expanding it." 

Curtis also wants to see the use 
of the cards expanded to allow 
students to use it to check out 
equipment at the Gemmell 
Student Complex and Tippin 
Gymnasium. Portable readers are 
being considered so there would 
be no need for an additional 
sticker on the card to prove activ- 
ity fees have been paid. 

Consideration is being given to 
use the identification card as a 
full debit card that can be used in 
vending machines. copy 
machines, and laundry rooms on 
campus. It can also be encoded to 
be used as a phone card and a 
bank card, 

A final advantage of the new 
system is that lost or stolen cards 
can be reproduced more quickly. 
The encoded information would 
be changed through the computer 
immediately rendering the miss- 
ing card useless. 



The Clarion Call 
news staff 
would like to 
congratulate 
Mary Beth 
Curry on being 
the new Editor- 
in-Chief. Good 
luck. MB! 



September 12, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



Clarion University improves equipment 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Students of Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania will see more 
improvements in academic 
equipment this year because of 
new projects. Many of the pro- 
jects will meet a list of concerns 
and suggestions obtained from 
students in an open forum held in 
May. 

During 1995-1996, $205,900 in 
instructional fee support funds 
were used for various academic 
equipment purchases. This 
amount was supplemented by 
more than $270,000 in central 
academic equipment and renova- 
tion funds, in addition to more 
than $20,000 in purchases made 
by way of individual academic 
department budgets. 

These amounts do not include 
approximately $300,000 allocat- 
ed to a new library operating sys- 
tem and $400,000 directed to the 
implementation of a fiber optic 
system to connect major academ- 
ic computing laboratories to the 
Internet and to provide other 
broad-band connectivity services 
during 1996-97. 

Several initiatives have been 
created to help all of the science 
departments housed in Pierce. 
This includes a $72,000 annual 
equipment fund for the hard sci- 
ences initiated through instruc- 
tional support funds. In addition 
to this annual amount, academic 
affairs has committed $240,000 
to a six-phase program to 

improve the Pierce Hall instruc- 
tional labs. The first three phases 
have been allocated and the pro- 
jects for the fourth phase will be 
identified in the fall. The recent 



renovation to the molecular biol- 
ogy lab was funded by the initial 
stage of this effort. The new 
$90,000 geography information 
sciences lab is funded by a com- 
bination of grant money and uni- 
versity equipment money. 

Discussions have been held to 
improve the insuuetional envi- 
ronment in the Peirce Hall 
Auditorium, possibly adding a 
"smart" podium and associated 
wiring within two years or less. 
The podium offers the instructor 
the opportunity to access a vari- 
ety of computerized multimedia 
teaching tools from one control 
panel. The project also includes a 
study of the heating and cooling 
system as well as the general 
atmosphere of the facility. 

Major upgrades of the comput- 
er labs in Stevens, Harvey, and 
Still Halls on the Clarion campus 
were completed during the past 
academic year or are in the 
process of being completed. 
Frame Hall at the Venanso 
Campus is also being upgraded. 

Scheduled for November, the 
completion of the Clarion 
Network Jr. project will provide 
broad-band, high speed Internet 
connectivity in the academic 
computer labs. It will connect 
existing student labs in academic 
buildings, Carlson Library, and 
the Admissions Building on the 
Clarion campus and Suhr Library 
on the Venango Campus. 

This is the first part of the larg- 
er CNet project that is scheduled 

to be completed about two and 
one-half years. 

At the July meeting of the 
Clarion University Council of 
Trustees, approval was given to 
request $440,450 from the State 



System of Higher Education for 
the first phase of the CNet pro- 
ject. A loan through the State 
System will be paid from the 
operating budget. 

The project will cost approxi- 
mately $3 million, plus at least 
another $1 million for the 
upgrade of computer equipment 
needed to access and make full 
use of the high speed system. 

A number of renovations to the 
classroom and performing areas 
used by music, theater, and art 
students and faculty are complet- 
ed, underway, or scheduled. 

Extensive work has been done 
on the kilns and associated equip- 
ment and facilities in the ceram- 
ics studio. The work will contin- 
ue as funds become available. 

During the past year, funding 
for new drums and other band 
instruments was allocated, and 
new raincoats and some band 
uniforms were purchased. 

The process of installing a new 
full-text database in Carlson and 
Suhr Libraries, which will enable 
students and faculty to electroni- 
cally access hundreds of periodi- 
cals previously not readily avail- 
able is underway. 

At the request of students and 
librarians, library printing costs 
associated with ProQuest and the 
micro-form reader/printers was 
reviewed during the summer. The 
decision was made to lower costs 
for copies from 25 cents to 10 
cents beginning with the 1996 
fall semester. 

By the end of the 1996-97 aca- 
demic year, a new library operat- 
ing system will be purchased at 
the cost of approximately 
$300,000 and installed. 



BISCITS program opened second year 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



BISCITS. the program started 
by the largest grant ever received 
by Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, started its second 
year on Monday, July 8, with 24 
participants from 22 school dis- 
tricts. The month-long program 
ended August 3. 

Biotechnology initiative for 
Systematic Change in the 
Teaching of Science or BISCITS 
is a $1.4 million program funded 
by several sources.Nearly SI mil- 
lion is coming from a competit- 
ive National Science Foundation 
grant, successfully applied for by 
Dr. Edward Zielinski, professor 
of biology and die project direc- 
tor, and Dr. Douglas Smith, assis- 
tant professor of biology and co- 
principal investigator. The 
remaining portion is coming 



from Clarion University, inter- 
mediate Units, and Pennsylvania 
Public Schools. A second year of 
BISCITS received a go-ahead 
from the National Science 
Foundation in December 1995. 

The class topics included lab- 
based workshops and implemen- 
tation instruction concerning 
basic DNA techniques, DNA 
technique applications, biochem- 
ical and cellular techniques, and 
implementation workshops. The 
participants receive laboratory 
manuals and supportive teaching 
materials, societal and ethical 
symposia, academic year follow- 
up workshops, access to equip- 
ment for implementation, class- 
room and in-service implementa- 
tion support, and a S50 per day 
stipend plus travel costs, meals, 
and housing. 

The BISCITS participants had 



an immediate opportunity to gain 
classroom experience with their 
new skills before leaving cam- 
pus. BISCITS overlaps with both 
the Science and Technology 
Integrated with Mathematics 
with Minorities program and the 
Talent Search Programs held 
annually at Clarion University. 
During the week of July 29, the 
BISCITS participants taught 
these students. 

Some of BISCITS's objectives 
are helping teachers become cur- 
rent and more fluent about mole- 
cular biology and biotechnology 
subject matter and the types of 
employment open to those stu- 
dents wishing to pursue these 
areas as careers and teaching 
teams returning to their home 
districts and providing extended 
inservice using materials and 
ideas gained from the program. 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between August 26 and September 6. The blotter is 
compiled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim 

Hall. 

•On Aug. 26 at 11:45 p.m., officers responded to a report of a large 
explosion and fire in the field near Lot W. Upon arrival at that location, 
officers found what appeared to be a homemade explosive device. 
Clarion Borough police dept. and Clarion Fire Company were dis- 
patched to assist at the scene. No further information is available at this 
time. Anyone with any information should contact Public Safety at 
226-2111. 

•A report was filed on Aug. 26 that a car had the rear window smashed 
with a rock while the vehicle was parked unattended in parking lot J 
•If anyone witnessed a hit and run accident in parking lot B on the 
evening of Aug. 26 and the morning of Aug. 27, please contact Public- 
Safety at 226-2111. 
•Campus police officers are investigating a theft of a laptop computer 
from Campbell Hall on Aug. 28. 
•On Aug. 29 at 1:37 a.m., unknown persons pulled the fire alarm on 
the first floor of Nair Hall. Anyone with any information is asked to 
contact Public Safety. 
Clarion University police officers are investigating a report of a theft 
and criminal mischief that occurred in Lot J on Thursday, Aug. 29 or 
early Friday, Aug. 30. Anyone with any information should call Public 
Safety at 226-2111. 

An unknown person or persons let the air out of a student's car tire 
while the car was parked in parking lot W. The incident occurred 
between the times of 6 p.m. on Sept. 1 and Sept. 5. The investigation 
is continuing. 

A female student from Becht Hall reported receiving harassing phone 
calls from a male student in Ballentine Hall on Sept. 2. 
•On Sept. 2 at approximately 12:12 a.m., Public Safety officers 
responded to a fire alarm at Nair Hall. The incident is being investi- 
gated. Charges could be fded at a later time. 

•A female student reported that between the hours of 7:00 p.m. Sept. 2 
and 9:30 p.m. Sept. 3. An unknown actor or actors removed a parking 
permit from her vehicle that was parked in parking lot B of the uni- 
versity. 

•A report was filed on Sept. 6 that an unknown person or persons 
removed the anti-theft panel from a soda machine in the main lobby in 
Ralston Hall. The criminal mischief occurred at an unknown time. 
•On Sept. 6, Chester M. Fletcher Jr. from Curwensville. PA was 
stopped for a traffic violation and was charged with a DUI. 
•Campus police officers are investigating a report of the harassment of 
a student in Givan Hall as of Sept. 7. 



The Clarion Call news staff 

would like to wish everyone a 

productive and rewarding 

semester. 



Ke S 



Crate 

782- 
3482 



Daily Drafts: 4-6pm 50 tf Drafts 

{Tuesday: 50t Wings, 

1 6 oz Bush $ 1 8pm- 1 Opm 

{Wednesday: Drafts 50^ (Bud & Coors 
Light) 8- 10pm 

Thursday: Mixed Drinks 10-1 2pm $1 
| Friday: Domestic Bottled Beer 8- 10pm $1 

Fli & Sat: Karaoke Might 9:30pm-l :30am 
"Clarions best kept secret!" 



Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 12. 1996 



Recreatio n center financing approved by trustees 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Financing for a proposed new 

Mudent recreation center was a 
topic of discussion at the most 
recent meeting of the Clarion 
University Council of Trustees. A 
student fee to fund the new build- 
ing and a request for financing 
through a state System of Higher 
Education bond issue was 
approved by the Trustees. 
The $6.1 million two-story cen- 
or will include multi-use courts, 
multi-purpose room, aerobics 
and weight rooms, and a run- 
ning/jogging track. 

State policy requires that a 
recreation center be self-support- 
ing as an auxiliary building. 
Students approved the project in 
a referendum held earlier this 
year. "It is clearly evident more 
facilities are needed on campus 



for recreation," said Student 
Senate President Michael Cox. 
Concerns were also raised about 
student's ability to pay the new 
fees by Cox and Trustee John 
Drayer. 

A recent survey of comparative 
costs at other State System of 
Higher Kducation universities 
revealed that Clarion University 
is the 10th lowest in terms of stu- 
dent fees with the new fee. 
according to Dr. George Curtis, 
vice president for student affairs. 
However, other schools are 
expected to increase fees which 
may bring Clarion back to 13lh 
lowest in total costs. 

The Student Recreation Center 
fee will fund the debt service for 
the construction, operation, and 
life-cycle renovation of the cen- 
ter which is projected to open in 
the fall of 1998. Trustees have 
approved a graduated fee sched- 
ule. The approved schedule per 




Jason Murphy/Clarion Call 
Chandler Dining Hall has seen some changes this summer. 
The replacement of the original ceilings and lights in the 
main two dining rooms is complete. Some potted plants 
have also been added for your dining experience. Designs 
are expected to be ready in early 1997 for a new serving line 
setup and lobby. 




McDonald* 



49* 




SMILE 

AND 

SAY 

CHEESEBURGER! 

CHEESEBURGERS 
4-8 PM TUESDAY NIGHTS 



J 



semester for 1996-97 is fresh- 
men. S20; sophomores. S10; 
juniors. $5: and seniors, $5. For 
1997-98. the schedule is fresh- 
men, $40: sophomores. $20: 
juniors, $10: and seniors. $5. All 
students will be required to pay 
an $80 per semester fee with the 
start of the 1998-99 academic 
year. The fee structure also 
requires students to pay 100 per- 
cent of the fee if they are enrolled 
for more than 12 credits, 50 per- 
cent for 9-11 credits, 25 percent 
for 6-8 credits, and 12.5 percent 
for 1-5 credits. 

An earlier proposal for the 
recreation center would have set 
a $100 per semester fee. but the 
project was revised to lower 
costs. Additional revenue for the 
project is expected to be generat- 
ed by rental fees and member- 
ships. 

Voting for the new center fee 



Harvey, Michael Keefer. Kim 
Kesner, Fred Mcilhattan. and 
Paul A. Weaver. II. John Drayer 
voted against the proposal and 
abstaining were Dr. Syed Ali- 
Zaidi and Ken Ciaudi. 

The trustees also voted to 
rename the Auxiliary Support 
Fee for students as the Student 
Center Fee and the Health Center 
Fee. There is no change in the 
amount of the current fee of 10.5 
percent of Pennsylvania resident 
tuition. The Student Center Fee is 
6.6 percent and the Health Center 
Fee is 3.9 percent. Venango 
Campus students will pay a fee of 
3.9 percent of tuition . The 
change was necessary due to the 
policy shift of Health Center 
operations from an auxiliary 
enterprise. 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker. vice 
president for finance and admin- 
istration, announced that Sasaki 



MA, was retained for compre- 
hensive master planning activi- 
ties at Clarion University. Sasaki 
is one of the premier college 
master planners in the United 
States and has been hired at a 
base cost of $276,000. Sasaki 
representatives met with univer- 
sity officials on Tuesday and 
Wednesday and will next meet on 
campus Sept. 24-26 

Meetings have been scheduled 
for Sept. 11, Nov. 14, Jan. 9, 
March 13, and May 8. 

Attending the meeting were Dr. 
Syed Ali-Zaidi of Shippenville, 
Delphine Djossou of District 
Heights, MD, H. John Drayer of 
RD1 Clarion, Ken Gaudi of 
Jeannetle. Joseph Harvey of Oil 
City. Michael Keefer of RD2 
Summerville. Kim Kesner of 
Clearfield, Fred Mcilhattan of 
Knox, and Paul A. Weaver of 
Clarion. 



were Delphine Djossou, Joseph Associates, Inc. of Wattertown, 

Clarion Univer sity computer network planned 

They include installation of 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 

Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania will improve its 
instructional capabilities, student 
services, and library and Internet 
access through the installation of 
a campus-wide communication 
network infrastructure, according 
to Karen DeMauro, director of 
computing services. 

A request for funding for the 
first phase of the Clarion 
Network (CNet) project was 
approved by the Clarion 
University Council of Trustees. 

The request will be forwarded 
to the State System of Higher 
Education for the $440,450 first 
phase of the project. 

A loan through the State System 
will be paid from Clarion's annu- 
al operating budget. 

A phased approach for the CNet 
project was due to the total cost 
of the $3 million project and the 
complex requirements for design 
and installation. 

The entire project is expected to 
take 18 months. 

Due to the extreme demand for 
high-speed Internet access and 
network services. Phase one 



identifies acute academic net- 
working needs and takes advan- 
tage of campus networks. 

Phase one, or C-Net, Jr., will 
connect existing student labs in 
academic buildings, Carlson 
Library, and the Admissions 
Building on the Clarion campus, 
as well as Suhr Library on 
Venango Campus. 

The connections will provide 
graphical access to the Internet as 
well as campus library services 
for students and faculty. 
"An implementation committee, 
with representation from all 
major constituencies of the insti- 
tution . was formed to address the 
issue." said Demauro. 

"The committee identified the 
major technology needs as per- 
ceived by the campus communi- 
ty. These needs include user 
friendly Internet e-mail, easy and 
fast access to a graphical Internet 
Web browser. Internet bulletin 
boards and listservs, access to 
academic and administrative 
applications, group calendaring 
and conferencing." 

c 

Four network initiatives to 
accomplish die goals have been 
identified. 



fiber optic backbone cabling sys- 
tem to all campus academic, 
administrative, and residence 
buildings and the installation of 
Category 5, twisted pair copper 
network wiring to all offices, 
classrooms, and residence rooms 
within these buildings. 

The other two initiatives are 
installation of state-of-the-art 
communication hub, switch and 
router electronics to support 
Ethernet connectivity to critical 
computing, network and Internet 
resources and installation of 
computer services to facilitate 
central access to Internet ser- 
vices, databases, and instruction- 
al applications. 

DeMauro noted that another 
request for financing the remain- 
der of the project would be pre- 
sented to the Trustees at a future 
meet ins!. 

The project will cost approxi- 
mately $3 million, plus at least 
another $1 million for the 
upgrade of computer equipment 
needed to access and make full 
use of the high speed system. The 
service will provide a network of 
interactive classroom settings. 



%, 




PEACE TREE 
P.O. Box 2454 
DOYLESTOWN, PA 18901 

Celebrating The 60's Experience 

Write Us For A Free Catalog 

or CALL (215)794-2865 






Clarion University's 

annual Activities Day 

will be held on 

Wednesday, 

September 18 at 4 

p.m. outside of the 

Cemmell Student 

Complex. 



September 12, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 



LIFESTYLES 



CU stud ent uses service to find employment 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service-Learning Office 

Jennifer Feicht is a Clarion 
University graduate with a 
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
and a minor in Womens Studies. 

As she was finishing up her 
degree, she, like every student 
looked to her future with uncer- 
tainty. 

Would she be able to get a job? 
Would the job be in her field? 
Would she get to do something 
that she would love? 

All of these questions follow 
most students as they finish their 
undergraduate degrees, but 
thanks to her volunteerism and 
work study experiences through 
the Community Service Learning 
Office, Jen got a job. 

Jen fbegan to volunteer at the 
Rape Crisis Center, now PAS- 
SAGES, Inc., her first semester 
freshman year in the Fall of 1992. 

She continued to be involved 
her entire time at school, and 
became a work-study office 
assistant for the 1994 and 1995 
school years, and even did a co- 
op for her major in the office dur- 
ing the summer of 1995. 

With all of this experience 
under her belt, she was a shoe-in 



when a part-time position 
became available in Spring of 
1996. 

Jen -continued to be a work- 
study student, took the job 
of part-time Prevention 
Education Coordinator, and held 
15 credits for her final semester 
as a Clarion student. 

All of her dedication and 
hard work paid off in July of 
1996 when fundinn came through 
and Jen was hired full-time at 
PASSAGES, Inc. 

PASSAGES is an acronym that 
stands for Prevention and Service 
for Sexual Assault throuuh 
Guidance, Empowerment and 
Support. 

The office is located in the 
basement of the Family Health 
Council, Inc. (formerly Family 
Planning) building which is 
about a five minute walk from 
Nair and Wilkinson Residence 
Halls. 

The office deals with survivors 
of rape and sexual assault by 
helping them with the medical 
and legal aspects of their ordeals. 
Volunteers staff a 24 hour crisis 
hotline in order to provide coun- 
seling and also provide services 
in accompanying survivors to the 




Todd Walsh/Clarion Call 
Jennifer Feicht, a former Clarion University student, works at PASSAGES, Inc. where she 
educates people about rape and sexual assault. 



hospital or the courtroom if the 
need is there. 

The center also attempts to stop 
rape and sexual assault before it 
starts. 

Prevention Education programs 
are done throughout the area in 



Students RALLY behind new program 



by Julie Barletta 
Lifestyles Writer 

Road Rally-just what is it? 
That seems to be a common 
question asked all over campus 
these days. Road Rally is a new 
program started this semester by 
die Office of Residence Life. 

The program's goal is to make 
the residence halls more appeal- 
ing to students. 

This is where the Rally part of 
the name comes in. It stands for 
Residence Activities- Living, 
Learning, & You. 

The Road Rally Program is 
very simple, and can be very 
worth your while to get involved. 

Here's how the program works: 
for every Road Rally sponsored 
program that you attend, you 
receive a raffle ticket. 

Once you gel your raffle ticket, 
you fill it out and return it to the 
front desk of your residence hall 
between the hours of 7:30p.m. 
and 12 midnight to be put in the 
drawing box. 

Then, every week, the inter-hall 



council will combine all of the 
tickets and have drawings for 
things such as pizzas, subs, soda, 
and gift certificates to local 
establishments. At the end of the 
semester, the names will be 
drawn for the final prize winners. 
Even if you win one of the week- 
ly drawings, your name will still 
be put back in the box for the 
final drawing. 

This way, everyone that has a 
ticket will have a chance at the 
final prizes. 

Now. you are probably wonder- 
ing just what the final prizes are. 
Well, here they are: 1st Prize: 
Residence Hall Room Grant for 
the Spring Semester, valued at 
$930.00 (not including board ) 
2nd Prize: Mountain Bike 3rd 
Prize: $200.00 Gift Certificate to 
the University Bookstore. 

In every residence hall. Uiere 
will be a bulletin board that has 
all of the times and activities for 
the Road Rally Program. 
However, the activities on the 
lists are not the only ways to get 
involved in the program. 



Other ways include attending 
any of the wellness programs in 
the residence halls, visiting your 
advisor during the week of 
September 23-27, completing 
designated quizzes in the Clarion 
Call , and using the career assess- 
ment tool. "Guidance Approach 
to Discover." in the counseling 
office. 

Also for every three hours of 
community service that you reg- 
ister at the Office of Community 
Service by December 2nd, you 
receive one ticket. 

As you can see, there are many 
ways that you can get involved in 
the Road Rally Program. 
Remember, the more sponsored 
programs that you attend and 
take part in, the better your 
chances of winning. 

A SPECIAL NOTE: EIND THE 
ROAD RALLY TABLE AT 
ACTIVITIES DAY. THEY'LL 
BE GIVING OUT FREE RAF- 
FLE TICKETS. 

If you have any question, ask 
your RA, GA, or call the Office 
of Residence Life. 



schools, community groups, 
campus organizations, and any- 
where else that there is a need. 
Jen is in charge of this aspect of 
the program. * 

She has presented programs to 
all age groups, including local 
children in the Head Start 
Program whose ages range from 
3-5 years of age and senior citi- 
zens. 

PASSAGES will begin their 
training program for new volun- 
teers on September 16th. 

The sessions will be held every 
Monday and Thursday starting at 
5:00 (except for the Thursday of 
ALF week) and will include two 
Saturday sessions which will run 
from 9:00am until 3:30pm. 

Forty hours of training must be 
completed to be a volunteer at the 
center if you wish to work direct- 
ly with the survivors. 



However, if you cannot attend 
training you can volunteer to do 
clerical duties within the office. 
If you are interested in applying 
you can stop by the office for an 
application, or call at 226-7273. 

If you are interested in becom- 
ing a volunteer at PASSAGES or 
need information on other volun- 
teer opportunities, stop by the 
campus clearinghouse for volun- 
teerism. the CSL office in room 
247 Gemmell Center or call at 
226-1865. 

"...Being in the Community 
Service-Learning program was a 
very important factor in finding 
permanent employment," Feicht 
said "and it was also a great 
hands on learning experience in 
my field." This experience is 
available to everyone on campus, 
it's just a matter of taking the 
time to make the difference. 



PASSAGES, Inc. will be 
accepting applications for 

crisis training until 

Sepfmeber 1 5th. You can 

obtain one by caKing 

226-7273. 









J 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



September 12. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepard 



— The Classic Middle Name: 
Cotutn Wayne Male, 20, a uiple- 
homicidc suspect who allegedly 
confessed lo a priest in Portland. 
Ore., has been lighting tor three 
months now to have the confes- 
sion ruled inadmissible in court 
on freedom Of religion grounds. 
An escaped convict. Wayne 
Thompson was recaptured in July 
near Farmersburg, Ind. A a few 
days later, Danny Wayne Owens, 
38, was arrested in Birmingham, 
Ala., for allegedly murdering a 
neighbor. (Among other promi- 
nent middle-name Waynes: seri- 
al killers John Wayne Gacy of 
Illinois and Elmer Wayne Henley 
of Texas: recently executed 
Arizona murderer Jimmy Wayne 
Jeffers: sadistic Louisiana mur- 
derer Robert Wayne Sawyer: the 
Ohio Aryan Nations member 
caught last year with freeze-dried 
bubonic plague bacteria, Larry 
Wayne Harris; the Oklahoma . 
rapist recently sentenced to 
21,000 years in prison, Allan 
Wayne McLaurin; and of course 
John Wayne Bobbitt.) 

— Monika and Mark Skinner 
filed a $35 million lawsuit in July 
in Newport News, Va., in connec- 
tion with the 1994 death of their 
son, age 16, who was riding in a 
car that drove off a road and 
plunged into a lake. Among the 
defendants: Kmart, which sold a 
computer cleaning product to the 
car's driver, which he and the 
Skinner boy used to get high by 
"huffing"; two ensrineerinu con- 



sulting finns that designed the 
road the car was traveling on 
because it should have been far- 
ther away from the lake. 

— In August, the St. Louis Art 
Museum filed a S2.5 million law- 
suit against the Whitney Museum 
of Modern Art in New York City, 
and other parties, because a 
Whitney guard damaged a Roy 
Liechtenstein painting while it 
was on loan to the Whitney. 
According to the lawsuit, guard 
Reginald Walker, 21 at the time, 
drew a heart and "Reggie + 
Crystal 1/26/91" on the painting 
with a felt-tip marker and wrote, 
"I love you Tushee, Love, Buns." 
THE CONTINUING CRISIS 

— The Austin (Texas) 
American-Statesman reported 
that writer-actor Stephen Grant, 
who staned in a film based on 
gunman Charles Whitman's 1966 
assault from the University of 
Texas tower (and who bears an 
uncanny physical resemblance to 
Whitman) was himself shot by a 
stray bullet on a street near the 
tower in March on his first visit 
to Austin. 

— According to a May report in 
The New York Times, one of 
Argentina's most popular radio 
programs is"Loony Radio," pro- 
duced by and featuring patients at 
the Borda Psychiatric Hospital in 
Buenos Aires. One presents "The 
Bolivian Minute" show but usu- 
ally giggles uncontrollably until 
the producer reminds him that he 
is on the air. Another man deliv- 



0OA Rush 

Theta Phi Alpha 

Meet the Greeks.. Thursday, September 12th, 7 PM 
in the Gemmell Muti-Purpose Room 

Events happening at the 0OA House: 

A Golucd Paxlif 

Friday September 13th, 7 PM 

A Theme Party 

Monday September 16th, 9 PM 



;A IP revere wee 



Pa rry 




Tuesday September 17th, 9 PM 

ALL WOMEN WELCOME! 

For a ride, meet in front of Carlson Library 15 minutes before 

the party starts. 
The Theta Phi Alpha house is located on 5th Avenue. 



ers philosophy lectures claiming 
to be "more schizophrenic than 
anyone" and says he is anxious 
with every incoming patient 
because he tears losing his title. 
One of Argentina's best-known 
talk radio hosts says the patients 
are often more insightful than his 
callers are. 

— In May. Harlan County (Ky.) 
prosecutor Alan Wagers said his 
office would help Denise Rush, 
27, appeal a trial court's denial of 
her lawsuit to get the father of her 
child to pay support. The father 
was 14 at the time, making Rush 
apparently guilty of statutory 
rape, but she was never prosecut- 
ed. 

— The Winston-Salem (N.C.) 
Journal reported in April that pri- 
vate security officer David 
Anderson Jones, 51, who is fully 
certified by the state to be capa- 
ble of physical work such as 
breaking through barriers and 
crawling in confined spaces, 
among other physical tasks, was 
granted a handicapped parking 
permit by another state office 
because of a sinus problem. 

— The Broome, Australia, town 



council recently required that die 
camels that carry tourists on 
commercial nighttime rides along 
Cable Beach be outfitted with 
Hashing, battery-operated tail- 
lights, according to a July 
Associated Press story. 
CLICHKS COME TO LIFK 
— An entire 86-mcmber jury 
pool for a criminal case in 
Centerville. Tcnn. (population 
16,000), in July had to be dis- 
missed because, according to 
prosecutor Ron Davis, too many 
members of the pool were related 
to each other. 

— Jim Baen. publisher of Newt 
Gingrich's novel "1945," told 
reporters in August that almost 
100,000 copies are stockpiled in 
a warehouse in Bristol. Pa., and 
that if they are not bought soon, 
they will suffer the usual fate of 
surplus books — to be converted 
to pulp and used for such things 
as toilet paper. 

— Davenport, Iowa, police 
arrested a 34-year-old man in 
April and charged him with inde- 
cent exposure along a busy city 
street. The police were alerted by 
two women in a car who said 



Break the Silence Week 

Sponsored by S. T.A.R. 

Sept 16-7 p.m. Hart Chapel- "Men students 

speak out on rape 
Sept. 16 - 9 p.m. Nair Hall "The Accused" (movie) 
Sept. 16 - 9 p.m. Wilkinson "Burning Bed" (movie) 
Sept. 17- 9 p.m. Power players 7 p.m. Hart Chapel 
Sept. 18-9 p.m. Campbell Hall open discussion 
Sept. 19- 9 p.m. Ralston open discussion 




Your Advisor 
<§<§lk of S©pt©mb©r iSiral 



v Meet your advisor 

v Pick up your Blue General 

Education Folder 
v Pick up your check sheet 

V Ask Questions 

V Check with your department for 

additional information 




they first spotted the man, then 
drove by again to confirm what 
they had seen. 

— In the Journal of Abnormal 
Psychology released in August, a 
University ot Georgia researcher 
concluded that a group ot homo- 
phobic men (men who feared and 
haled homosexuals and dreaded 
being close lo them) contained 
twice as many men who were 
sexually aroused by erotic photos 
of men as did an equal group of 
non homophobic men. 

— In Sri Lanka, where 
monogamy is the law, Mr. 
Pavulupitiyage Gunapala, 35, 
was jailed in May on the com- 
plaint of the latest of his 15 cur- 
rent wives. (Police also found 
love letters to another 54 
women.) 

The basis of the complaint was 
that the man was not faithful. 
LEAST JUSTIFIABLE 

HOMICIDES 

— In July, college president John 
Upton was arrested in Allegan, 
Mich., for murdering his wife, 
allegedly because, he said, "She 
was flemanding a great number 
of things that weren't feasible." 
And in June, Ross Horton admit- 
ted at his trial in Honolulu that he 
killed his business partner in 
1993 after the man criticized his 
ability to lay tile, which Horton 
takes seriously as "an art form." 
On the same day, according to 
police in Sauk Centre, Minn., 
Paul Crawford shot four neigh- 
bors and himself to death to cul- 
minate a feud over a 5-foot strip 
of land that separates their prop- 
erties. 
UPDATE 

— The virtually semi-annual 
student cheating riots in 
Bangladesh were first reported in 
News of the Weird in September 
1988. 

Then, students so adamant and 
blatant about the right lo receive 
outside help when taking nation- 
al placement exams sparked a 
rampage in which more than 500 
people were injured. This year, 
in March, in Kanpur. India, all 
high school final exams had to be 
taken barefoot to discourage stu- 
dents from carrying notes in their 
shoes. 

And in Phnom Penh. 
Comnodia. in July, hundreds of 
children scaled walls to pass 
notes to their friends taking high 
school entrance exams despite 
the presence of more than 100 
police officers who ringed the 
school in anticipation of the 
cheatiiii!. 






. 



Lethal Threats Are Everywhere by Dave Barry 



We here at the Bureau of 
Medical Alarm hope you had a 
restful, carefree, fun-filled sum- 
mer. 

But before you get back into 
"the swing of things" for fall, 
we'd like to take just a moment 
to remind you that practically 
everything can kill you. 

At the moment we are particu- 
larly concerned about: 

LATEX GLOVES OF DEATH. 
We have here a Health Advisory 
issued June 27 by the U.S. Food 
and Drug Administration (motto: 
"We have Not Yet Determined 
That Our Motto is Safe"). 

This advisory , which was sent 
in by several alert medical peo- 
ple, begins with the following 
statement: "In the spring and 
summer of 1995. the spontaneous 
combustion of powder-free latex 
patient examination gloves 
caused four fires in different 
states." 

The advisory states that all four 
fires involved large quantities of 
gloves stored in hot warehouses. 

But we here at the Bureau of 
Medical Alarm are asking our- 
selves: What if a single glove 
(this is sometimes called the 
"Lone Glove" theory) were to 
burst into flames? 

What if this happened while the 
glove was on a doctor's hand? 



And what if the doctor's hand 
was, at that particular moment. 
INSIDE YOUR PERSONAL 
BODY? One thing that would 
happen, of course, is the doctor 
would charge you a lot of money. 
The underlying philosophy of our 
entire health-care system is that 
the more scary, painful, danger- 
ous and unnecessary a medical 
procedure is, the more it should 
cost. 

So you would definitely pay top 
dollar to have a flaming glove 
thrust into what is technically 
known as the Booty Region. 

Once word of this lucrative new 
procedure got around, doctors 
would be prescribing it for ath- 
lete's foot. 

Around here there is a related 
item to be concerned about: An 
alert dental surgeon named Ian 
Hamilton sent me the June 1996 
newsletter of the Canterbury 
Branch of the New Zealand 
Dental Association, which con- 
tains a letter to the editor, accom- 
panied by a photograph, concern- 
ing a latex medical glove that 
was found to have MOTH 
embedded in one of the fingers. 
Yes. 

This means you could wind up 
with a BURNING RUBBER- 
IZED INSECT inside your body. 

Imagine the bill you'd get for 



THAT: Flaming Booty Moth 
Treatment (FBMT) — $578,000: 
Recharge Fire Extinguisher — 
S23; Damage To Doctors' Golf 
Grip — $54,000,000,000. We 
know what you're wondering at 
this point. 

You're wondering : "Wouldn't 
'The Flaming Booty Moths' be a 
great name for a rock band?" 
Yes, it would. 

But right now you have other 
important medical things to 
worry about, such as: 

DEADLY ITEMS UP YOUR 
NOSE- We have here a news 
item from The Denver Post, writ- 
ten by Jim Kirksey and sent in by 
many alert readers, concerning a 
man who arrived at a hospital 
"with a device in his sinus cavity 
that potentially had the explosive 
force of five powerful M-80 fire- 
crackers." 

The device was a trigger used to 
deploy automobile air bags; the 
man worked at a factory that 
manufactures the triggers, and an 
explosion had caused one of 
them to become — in the words 
of a surgeon — "lodged in his 
nose." 

Fortunately, the device was 

safely removed, but the doctors 

were nervous that it might go off 

during the surgery. 

Here at the Bureau of Medical 



Student studies with the Kangaroos 



Hello Mates, 

My name is Tammy Hager and 
I am currently studying at Deakin 
University in Victoria. Australia. 
I am on a semester exchange 
through Clarion and having the 
time of my life. 

This is such a great experience 
I have only been here for a month 
so far and I absolutely love it... 
There are so many sites to see in 
Australia and they are all very 
unique. 

I have hiked down the Great 
Ocean Road. This is a strip of 
road running along the coast 
which goes for miles. 

There are some fascinating 
scenic spots along this road; like 
the London Bridge (which did 
fail), the Blowhole, the 12 apos- 
tles, Torquay Beach (where Point 
Break was filmed), and some 
amazing sun sets. 

There arc also some unique ani- 
mals here. Of course there is the 
kangaroo, which like to hang out 
on golf courses, and the koalas 
(THEY ARE NOT BEARS!!!). 
I did get to see both of these ani- 
mals, although not in a preferred 



*ii 



t ' IsAt * <*sr "■ 

A\ i I TV* •' * 



tfMfefc 




:X ^.-J 



MRA Wut 



with TAN&1YH ACER 



way. I had 

a run-in with a wallabee. literal- 
ly when I was bush walking with 
a mate: he nearly ran me over! 

That same night. I was koala 
hunting in the dark in die bush 
(which is not very safe) and final- 
ly after hours of search found a 
koala in a tree. They are cute lit- 
tle suckers, but not very' friendly. 

My future plans are to see Avers 
Rock. Alice Spring, and experi- 
ence life in the outback. Y'all 
have a G'day in Clarion PA... 

•Author is a Clarion stu- 
dent studying abroad this 
semester. 



■Buy one Quarter Pounder with Cheese Sandwich 



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Alarm we are wondering: Why 
doesn't the the federal govern- 
ment require auto manufacturers 
to warn us that air bags contain 
devices that could be deadly if 
we get them up our noses ? 

This is especially critical if we 
have very young children, who 
can get ANYTHING up their 
noses. 

Very young children can get 
things up their noses that are larg- 
er than their BODIES. 

We think the government should 
require that the following state- 
ment be printed on automobile 
steering wheels: WARNING DO 
NOT ALLOW VERY YOUNG 
CHILDREN TO DISASSEM- 
BLE THE AIR BAG AND 
INSERT THE EXPLOSIVE 
TRIGGER DEVICE WAY UP 
THEIR NOSE. AS THIS 
COULD RESULT IN HAVING 
TO SPEND THE REST OF 
YOUR MORTAL LIFE TRYING 
TO EXPLAIN THINGS TO 
YOUR INSURANCE COMPA- 
NY. ALSO YOU SHOULD 
NOT ATTEMPT TO READ 
THIS WARNING WHILE 
OPERATING THIS! 

LOOK OUT!! (CRASH) TOO 



LATE. 

On a related medical note, we 
received a letter from Gail White 
, who works at a large hospital 
that shall remain nameless, and 
who relates the following inci- 
dent: 

'*A man appealed at the emer- 
gency room with his hands over 
his face, demanding to see a 
MALE doctor, and to see him 
ALONE. 

A doctor (dreading to see some 
horrible disfigurement) complied 
with these wishes. 

When the man removed his 
hands, he was revealed to have a 
u.?«Jsiere caught in his nose by 
the hoo.." 

No, we do . it know the how 
the brassiere got caught there. 
Nor do we know how many men 
are, right now, suffering from 
Brassiere Nose, but are too 
embarrassed to seek medical 
treatment. 
Our best guess is: thousands. 
If you are one of those unfortu- 
nate people, we urge you to seek 
medical help; your doctor can tell 
you about a revolutionary new 
procedure to correct this condi- 
tion. 



MEET THE CREEKS 



it i iin.-m^ K 



THURSDAY, 

SEPTEMBER 12TH, 

6:30 PM 

GEMMELL MP ROOM 



ALL WOMEN WELCOME! 



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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 1 2, 1 996 



New director for CUP jazz band 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 



Royce I letrick has joined the 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania music deportment 
as director of the Jazz Band, lie 
is replacing Dr. Lisa Johnson, 
who recently accepted the posi- 
tion of dean of music at the 
Mannes School of Music, New 



York City. 



Hetrick will continue to he the 
director of elementary hands for 
the Brookville Area School 
District, where he works with 
three concert hands, one jazz 
hand, and gives 180 weekly 
lessons. For the past eight years 
he was an adjunct faculty at 
Grove City College teaching 
trumpet and horn. 

A native of Punxsutawney. 
Hetrick received his B.S. in 
music education from Clarion 



Independence Day 



University in 1981. He received a 
master of music degree in trum- 
pet performance from 
Youngstown State University's 
Dana School of Music. 

He was hand director and 
music department chair at 
Rcdhank Vallev High School 
from 1985-89, taught at Peters 
Township in South Hills from 
1989-92, and has been at 
Brookville since 1992. 

"Jim Colonna, my high school 
band director, ran a high quality 
program and pushed me toward 



music." says Hetrick. "When I 
came to Clarion, Dr. Rex 
Mitchell and Dr. Stanley 
Michalski continued to develop 
my abilities and talents. 
"The Dana School of Music, one 
of the finest in this area, was the 
factor that turned me toward jazz. 
It led me to include jazz as am 
important part of my life and to 
understand the influences jazz 
made on America." 

Most recently, Hetrick per- 
formed professionally with The 
Manhattan Transfer, Aretha 



hy Holly Gerlock and Karin 

Huebner 

Lifestyles Writers 

Aside from the usual routine of 
summer work and partying, we 
occasionally needed to relax and 
take to one of the many movies 
that were being shown this sum- 
mer. 

Among some of the top block- 
buster hits were, the Rock, 
Courage Under Fire, A Time to 
Kill, and of course, Independence 
Day. 

Starring such talented actors as 
Will Smith, Randy Quaid, Bill 
Pullman, and Jeff Goldblum, 
Independence Day was definitely 
a two thumbs up. 

This action packed, science fic- 
tion movie was at times, rather 
unrealistic and often fictitious. 
However, the special effects that 
were used throughout the movie. 



such as alien spaceships taking 
over much of the world, greatly 
contributed to making some 
scenes appear to be true to life. 

The details and graphics of 
many of the scenes were meticu- 
lously done so that those scenes 
alone, make this movie worth 
seeing. 

Not only was this film about 
alien life, as some may call it, but 
it also drew upon other plots such 
as love, family, and relationships. 

To our surprise, the acting in 
itself was wonderful and Will 
Smith was able to maintain his 
crazy sense of humor, just as he 
did in the Fresh Prince of Bel- 
Air. 

Independence Day, which can 
still be seen in theaters (call 
Garby for show times), is a 
movie full of action,, and talent 
that is worth seeing. 




Courtesy of University Relations 
Royce Hetrick, new jazz band director. 



Franklin, and Johnny Mathis 
during their tours of the 
Pittsburgh area. 

He has also performed with The 
Temptations, The Four Tops, Jim 
Nabors, Liberate, Kay Starr. 
Carol Lawrence, the Tommy and 
Jimmy Dorsey Orchestras, the 
Les Flgart Orchestra, and widi 
Myron Floren and the Stars of the 
Lawrence Welk Show. 

On occasions Hetrick performs 
as lead trumpet for the Balcony 
Big Band in Shadyside. He is 
also principal trumpet of the 
Slippery Rock Musicians 
Concert Band and is presently the 
section leader, lead trumpet, and 
featured trumpet soloist for Jazz 
Transitions, a summer big band 
performing in the 

Clarion/Brookville area for the 
last five years. He is an active 
conductor, clinician, and trumpet 
soloist throughout Pennsylvania 
over the past 15 years. 

"Lisa Johnson built a well 
rounded jazz program at Clarion 
University," says Hetrick. "She 
provided new music and estab- 
lished a "Big Band" night. 

I want to continue to build the 
programs she has solidly estab- 
lished. I like all styles of jazz and 
I am very excited to work with 
the students. Rex Mitchell and 
Lawrence Wells conducted me 
when I was a student at Clarion. 
They were very strong conduc- 
tors and established a level I 
would like to build toward." 



Activity Day to be a big hit 



by Alicia Sprenkle 
Lifestyles Writer 



With the enthusiastic beginning 
of the fall semester upon us. 
many organizations are looking 
for new members to join their 
team. To help the new students 
become aware of the 142 diverse 
campus organizations.the annual 
Activities Day will be held at the 
(iemmell Student Center on 



Wednesday. September 18th. 
from '4:00-6:00 P.M. 

Approximately fifty-five differ- 
ent organizations will be holding 
exhibits outside of the student 
center. 

If any new students have 
received letters and invitations 
from various organizations con- 
cerning Activities Day. This 
event will give the students of the 
University a chance to listen to 



r 



Angels • Critters • T-Shirts 





408 Main Street 
(across from Uni-Mart) 
226-5060 

"Have an Angel of a Day" 



the representatives of these 
groups and understand more 
about them. 

Some of the organizations that 
will be on hand for this event are: 
African American Student 
Union, IABC, United Campus 
Ministry, Proud, The Accounting 
Club, WCCB, and the Marching 
Band, just to name a few.- Others 
that will be attending are the 
numerous Greek, Honorary, and 
Special Interest organizations. 

1 here are openings available for 
any organization that feels they 
would be interested to represent 
themselves at Activities Day. 

Activities Day has been moved 
to the middle of the week from 
previous years, when it was on 
die weekend. 

This change was, "utilized to 
see a better turnout of students 
interested," says Mr. Hal 



Wassink. Coordinator of Student 
Activities. Students will be able 
to slop by Gemmell Student 
Center anytime during 4:00 to 
6:00. and see what inspires them 
to become involved with the 
campus. This new lime also 
gives the students 
who aren't around campus on the 
weekends, a chance to become 
involved. 

Wassink believes, '"The more 
informal Atmosphere will let the 
students feel more comfortable, 
and let them have a good time." 

In addition to the different orga- 
nization's exhibits, other exciting 
giveaways will be available for 
the students. 

The B(K)k Center- will have spe- 
cial sales from 9:00 a.m. until 
7:00 p.m. 

Also, UAB will have give-a- 
ways and different activities. One 



activity that will be sponsored by 
UAB are "Fun Fotos." "Fun 
Fotos" are superimposed pictures 
that are made into magazine cov- 
ers, that are free to all CUP stu- 
dents. The give-a-ways and other 
activities will be held in the 
Gemmell Performance Area. 

In past years the Activities Day 
has proved to be a huge success. 
and unlike those years this 
Activities Day should be as well. 
All students are invited to meet 
with different campus organiza- 
tions and join in on the give-a- 
ways, fun activities, and the 
Book Center sales. 

Activities Day will be held out- 
side of Gemmell Student Center. 
In the case of bad weather the 
event will be moved inside. 

All are encouraged to come to 
Activities Day and participate in 
the fun. See you there! 



September 12, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 3 




CALL 



What Is Your Favorite Class 

That You Have Taken At 

Clarion So Far? 




YOU 







^^^mm^^ 




BY 
JEFF LEVKULICH 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
EDITOR 



Lisa Malinky, Senior, Indust. Relations. 

"Walking for fitness, it was better than being 

cooped up in a hot stuffy classroom/' 






Erica Powell, Freshman, Account & Pre-Law 
"My favorite class so far would be psychology. I 
find it really interesting, the teacher really teach- 
es, everything is described in great detail." 



Greg Scbmieler, Freshman, Account/Marketing 
"Chemistry, because I like science." 



Diane Wbitesides, Freshman,Sec. Ed/Math 

"Intro to music, because Scott is such an efficient 

roll taker, and I love seeing his gleeming face 

every morning." 






Joe Keinsel, Senior, El. Education 

"Probably one of my literature classes, because of 

the different environments it has opened me up 

to, through the eyes of the various authors." 



Lisa Sante (Kight):"Educational pyschology with 

Dr. McLaughlin, because she is very bubbly in 

the morning!" 

Kelley Lobaugh(Left):"I like all my psych, class- 
es this semester, because I love all my Proffs." 



Paul Downey, Senior, Psychology 

Psychology Personality, because it is the most 

interesting class out of all of them." 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



September 12, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



ENTERTAINMENT. 



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ACROSS 
1 Hurried 
5 Masculine 
9 Sinew 

13 Busy place 

14 New 

15 Stratagem 

16 Tavern brews 

1 7 Come up 
1.8 Pay up 
19 Merited 
21 Shed 

23 Regret 

24 Seeger or 
Fountain 

25 African fly 
28 Came in 

32 Tilting 

33 Endure 

35 Whitney or 
Wallach 

36 Cover 

37 Campers 
homes 

38 Transgress 

39 Pindaric work 

40 Sunbeams 

41 Stockholm 
resident 

43 Tense 

46 Exultantly proud 

47 Other 

48 Period 

49 Seal 

52 Conquered 

57 Wan 

58 Size of type 

60 — avis 

61 Chills and fever 

62 Artist's item 

63 Mild oath 

64 Activist 

65 Building place 

66 Printing direction 



DOWN 

1 — roe 

2 Heap 

3 Holiday times 

4 Strands 

5 Additional 

6 Enthusiastic 

7 " — Miserables" 

8 Components 

9 'The Rose of — " 

10 Diligent search 

1 1 Punto del — 

1 2 Garden growth 
14 "And now I am 

the ruler of the 
Queen's — ..." 

20 Corrode 

22 Former baseball 
star 

24 Annoying ones 

25 Bird's weapon 

26 Playground 
equipment 

27 Large sea duck 

29 Adjust a clock 

30 Omit syllables 

31 Ate 

33 Rent 

34 Indefinite 
number 

37 Guardians of a 
kind 

41 Opening for a 
coin 

42 Irrigated 

44 Surface layer 

45 Corrida cheer 

46 Car of old 

49 Nail 

50 Shakespearean 
villain 

51 Adhesive 

52 Spray 



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54 Anger 

55 Of a historic time 

56 Miami's county 
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an eav4h. 



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PAVE, NEXT T/ME 
WE 60 TO THE 

leave ewuet. 




Anyone Interested in Contributing 
Cartoons to THE CALL Please 
contact Kristen at 226-2380 or 
stop in 270 Gemmed!! 






University Theatre 



1996 DANCE CONCERT 

AUDITIONS! 



Monday, September 16 and Tuesday, 

September 17 6:30 PM 

Tippin Gymnasium Dance Studio 

ALL LEVELS ©F DANGERS WELG®I 

For more information: Call Marilouise (Mel) Michel at X2284 



_0 r J. - j- •. '"! V. 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



ENTERTAlNMENt 






Us 'MAJESTY 

PWNCKS WiT^HY 







(21 ST CENTURY') 






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Jfc&lSfEREP IRWEMARK rf the. WiMD&oR Family 



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by Bill Watterson 




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Can you find the hidden Ancient Greeks? 




AESCHYLUS 


HESIOD 




ABSOP 


HIPPOCRATES 




ANAXAGORAS 


HOMDR 




ARCMMBDBS 


PINDAR 




ARISTOPHANES 


PLATO 




ARISTOTLE 


PLUTARCH 




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PYTHAGORAS 




DIONYSIUS 


THEOCRITUS 




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September 12. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pafie 17 



SPORTS 



Boasting the best in the world 



Angle and Eiter: Clarion's finest 




Hi w& 



********* 



s / 




Photo Courtesy of Sports Information 
Kurt Angle Olympic Gold Medalist. 

outstanding the coaches were and 



By Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



There are ten positions on the 
United States Olympic Wrestling 
Team. This summer two of those 
positions were filled by former 
Clarion wrestlers, Kurt Angle 
and Rob Eiter. 

Kurt Angle, who won two 
NCAA championships while here 
at Clarion, won the gold medal in 
the heavyweight division and 
Rob Eiter took eighth amongst an 



Clarion had a good business and 
education departments, that was 
important to me as well." said 
Angle in a telephone conversa- 
tion I had with him on Tuesday. 
The native of Pittsburgh said, 
"Winning the gold was the best 
feeling I have ever felt in my life. 
To hear the national anthem 
being played and knowing how 
much hard work and dedication 
I've put in, it was my one touch 



"All you can do is be 

prepared and wrestle 

like a warrior." 

-Kurt Angle 



extremely competitive field at 
105 1/2 lbs. 

For two of the ten Olympic 
wrestlers to be from Clarion says 
a lot about the quality of the 
Clarion wrestling program, but 
there is much more to be said 
about the two wrestlers who rep- 
resented Clarion and the United 
States. 

It was the students that brought 
Kurt Angle to Clarion. 

lie was verbally committed to 
Pitt, but alter attending a Clarion 
wrestling match he knew he had 
found his home. 

"I saw how the crowd reacted to 
the wrestlers and I knew how 



of glory." 

Wrestling the best wrestlers in 
the world can shake a man's con- 
fidence, but not Angle's. "I've 
never entered a tournament I 
didn't think I could win," said 
Angle. 

"All you can do is be prepared 
and wrestle like a warrior." 
Wrestle like a warrior he did as 
he beat the lop heavyweights in 
the world. 

"I went to the Olympics to win 
a gold medal. Thai's why I was 
so emotional when I won it. I 
wasn't considering how much 
money I could make or what 
endorsements I might get. I was 



focused on winning the gold." 
said Angle. 

Since winning the gold, Angle 
has received considerable media 
attention. He has appeared on the 
Tonight Show with Jay Leno and 
is currently working on two tele- 
vision shows and he has numer- 
ous movie offers. 

It is hard to believe the celebri- 
ty status Angle has achieved con- 
sidering he used to walk this 
campus like everyone else. 

"I spent a lot of time with my 
girlfriend. We used to go to all 
the theatre plays. I don't think I 
missed one," said Angle of his 
days at Clarion. 

"I didn't do too much drinking 
because I didn't feel it was posi- 
tive. I tried to surround myself 
with positive people and positive 
activities, and in doing so, I 
thought positive things would 
happen to me," Angle said. 

If you call winning a gold 
medal a positive, then I would 
say his theory was right. Kurt 
Angle has been given a lot of 
deserved credit, but is not shy 
about giving out credit to those 
who have helped him along the 
way. "My family has been very 
supportive and I could not have 
done it without them. 

I have also been blessed with 
the best coaches a wrestler could 
ever have; from high school to 
college. Especially at Clarion. 
They are not heavyweight coach- 
es but they broadened their 
coaching skills and it helped me 
broaden my skills." said Angle. 
Angle's future in wrestling is not 
certain. "Winning the gold 
medal has opened a lot of doors 
for me. and I want to take advan- 
tage of those opportunities. I 
want to pursue a career in acting 
but I will never leave wrestling 
completely, it's been too good to 
me," stated Angle. 

Another wrestler that might say 
wrestling has been good to him is 
Clarion's assistant wrestling 
coach and Olympian Rob Eiter. 

Rob is the defending U.S. 
Champion for his weight class 



and he placed eighth this summer 
in Atlanta. To be one of the top 
eight wrestlers in the world, for 
your weight, is quite an accom- 
plishment. 

He lost two matches in Atlanta, 
one to the eventual silver medal- 
ist and the other to the defending 
world champion. "I wasn't too 
happy with my performance. I 
made a couple of mistakes I wish 
I had back." said Eiter of his 
Olympic performance. 

If he had those back, things 
might be different. "On an inter- 
national level ,the wrestlers are 
so close, Rob could beat any of 



them on 



a given 



day." said 



Having wrestled in the 
Olympics Eiter brings a lot of 
experience to Clarion's coaching 
staff. "I can show the wrestlers 
how to handle the pressure of a 
big meet. I can relate to them and 
know what their going through. I 
also know new techniques and 
new ways of conditioning and 
practicing." I asked Rob what his 
future was in wrestling. 

He told me that the Olympic 
Committee just voted to reduce 
the Olympic team from ten mem- 
bers to eight. They have not 
decided what the weight classes 
will be yet, though. 

"It would be tough for me to 



"...Rob could beat any 

of them on a given 

day." 

-Jack Davis 



Clarion wrestling coach Jack 
Davis. 

Rob Eiter did beat a lot of 
wrestlers. He won the National 
Championships where the top six 
wrestlers advance to the Olympic 
trials. 

At the Olympic trials, he was the 
man to beat. 

The other five wrestlers have a 
"wrestle off and the winner of 
that faced Eiter in a best two out 
of three match to decide who 
would represent the United States 
at 105 1/2 lbs. Eiter won. 

After all the weight classes had 
been decided, they brought the 
Olympic team out on a stage and 
introduced them as the 1996 
Olympic wrestling team in front 
of over 8.000 fans. 

"That was really special to me, 
when you realize your wrestling 
for your country, but you don't 
want to dwell on it and put the 
added pressure on yourself. You 
have to look at it as just another 
tournament." said Eiter. 



make weight at 105 lbs. in four 
years and if they move the next 
weight class to 114 lbs. it's too 
heavy for me to wrestle at. 

If the new weight class is at 1 10 
lbs. it would be perfect and I 
would commit for another four 
years," stated Eiter. 

It was a busy summer for the 
Clarion wrestling program and it 
shows what a quality program we 
have here. 

"If you look at what Kurt and 
Rob have done it shows a lot to 
the incoming wrestler. 

If your goals are to win nation- 
al championships and go to the 
Olympics as a wrestler it can be 
done here." said .lack Davis. 

"Kurt and Rob have represented 
Clarion and the United States in 
fine fashion," Davis said. 

Indeed they have. 

It is not often that Clarion gets 
the respect they deserve, but on 
the mat. Clarion has established 
themselves as a force to be reck- 
oned with. 



r 




Way to So Kurt and Rob! 





Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 1996 



Golden Eagle Football off to flying start 



by Krai g A. Koelsch 
Guest Columnist 

Oil and running are the Clarion 
Golden Eagles after a very 
impressive 38-14 win over the 
West Virginia Wesleyan Bobcats 
last Saturday. 

In a game that saw the Golden 
Eagle oi tense rack up 606 yards 
of total offense, three running 
backs rushed for 100 yards. 

Steve Witte picked up 142 and 
aid. Ron DeJidas rolled for 117 
yards and a td, and Godfrey 
Bethea ran for 102 yards on only 
five carries. 

Quarterback Chris Weibel com- 
pleted 11 of 20 passes for 217 
yards. Mark Witte had three 
catches and a touchdown, and 
Chris Skultety had two for 43 
yards and a touchdown. 

Kim Niedbala led the defense 
with 15 tackles. Thomas 
Williams each had nine tackles. 
Erik Baumener had seven tackles 
and an interception, while Justin 
Miller and Mike Maguire each 
had two sacks. 

In a game where the Golden 
Eagle offense was supposed to 
dominate throughout, just the 
opposite happened and Clarion 
headed to the locker room with 
only a 10-0 lead. 

Although no one quite knew 
what to expect from the Golden 
Eagle defense stepped up and 
answered the call and .pitched a 
shutout. It was clear that the 
defensive players understood 



defensive coordinator Aubrey 
Kelly's game plan and were able 
to execute it to perfection in the 
first half. 

In the second half. Clarion's 
offense continued to struggle, 
and West Virginia Weslevan sol 
on the scoreboard first to narrow 
the margin to 10-7. The Golden 
Eagle lead was 17-14 after three 
quarters, but that's as close as the 
Bobcats would come. 

The Clarion offense exploded 
for 21 points in the fourth en 
route to the 38-14 thumping of 
West Virginia Wesleyan. 

The mammoth offensive line 
consisting of: Chris Kiker, Derek 
McKay. Chris Martin, Tim 
Sohyda, and Mike Sipos ate the 
Bobcats for lunch most of the 
day. but they way they manhan- 
dled the Bobcats in the late third 
and entire fourth quarter was 
simply awesome. ■ 

Clarion moves on this Saturday 
against coach Gene Nicholson 
and the Westminster Titans. 

Westminster opened their 1996 
campaign with a solid 13-7 victo- 
ry over West Liberty State. 

"Westminster is a very well- 
coached and disciplined football 
team," praised Clarion head 
coach Malen Luke, who himself 
is a 1976 Westminster graduate. 
"They have a great football tradi- 
tion and we know we'll be in for 
a tough, hard-nosed football 
game this week. We know they 
will be ready for us and we'll 



have to have flawless execution 
to win die game." Luke added. 
The Wesuninsteroffen.se gained 
110 rushing yards and 23 passing 
yards against West Liberty Stale 
last Saturday. 

The Titan offense will likely gel 
a big boost with the return of 
1994 All- American running back 
Andy Blatt. Blatt. who sat out 
the 1995 season with knee 
surgery, sat out the West Liberty 
game. 

In 1994 at Clarion, Blatt rushed 
for 197 yards and 3TD's on 20 
carries, plus caught seven passes 
for 62 yards and a TD and more 
importantly, embarrassed the 
Golden Eagle defense. 



He will be joined in the back- 
field by 1995 tailback Denny 
Flora. Ron gained 101 yards on 
31 carries last week. Fullback 
Jason Hilovsky gained 17 yards 
and found the end zone once last 
week. 

Quarterback Todd Huda returns 
to guide the offense. He com- 
pleted two of seven passes last 
week for 23 yards. Last season 
he completed 72 of 156 passes 
for 846 yards and three TD's. 

Receivers Matt Dvorsak, Tom 
Alexander, and Chris Snyder will 
be hauling in Huda's passes. 

Snyder caught 2 passes for 23 
yards last Saturday. 

Anchoring the Titan defense is 



linebacker Craig Mills. Mills had 
two interceptions last week. Last 
season. Mills had 121 tackles and 
nine break-ups. 

He is joined at linebacker by 
veteran Harold Starghill on the 
inside and Casey Hancox out- 
side. Starghill had 61 stops last 
year, while Hancox posted 64 
hits. 

Up front the Titans feature 
returnees John PetrocelIi(62 tack- 
les) and Gary Lyons(57 stops) at 
tackles and Phil Park (89 tackles, 
5 sacks) and Craig Villwock(2 
sacks) at the ends. The secondary 
is anchored by safety Andy Barry 
who had 94 jolts and three inter- 
ceptions in 1995. 




Clarion plays host to Westminster this Saturday at 1pm. 



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By Tina Ijusky 
Sports Writer 



Expires 10/3/96 



Plus lax. Present coupon when ordering One coupon per party per visit at participat- 
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The new school year has arrived 
and a new season of intramurals 
is well underway. Doug Kncpp. 
InmunuraJ Director is extremely 
excited about this years new ath- 
letic activities. "1 encourage stu- 
dents to take advantage of all the 
activities and new programs that 
are going on this year."said 
Knepp.One of the intramurals. 
beach volleyball has already 
started and will continue until 
September 23 when single elimi- 
nations will begin. The 9 volley- 
ball teams can be seen in action 
weekdays at 4:(X) on the courts 
beside Campbell Hall. Another 
exciting intramural, Hag 
Football, will start on September 
1 1 . This year, a "passing only" 
concept similar to that of ESPN, 
will be used. The games may 
have started, but it is never too 
late to gel involved. Presently, 



more women teams are needed to 
liven up the games. For more 
information call x2349. 

One new addition to Uiis year's 
athletic schedule of events is the 
"Women's Power Hour." This 
program is designed for women 
who are interested in strength 
training. Experienced lifters as 
well as beginners are welcome. 
Those of you who want a 
strength training program but are 
intimidated by the equipment can 
now have this opportunity to 
work with a certified coach on a 
program suuetured just for you. 
The "Power Hour" is scheduled 
to take place on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 5-6 in the Tippin 
Fitness Center. Many more intra- 
murals will be starling soon 
Tennis will be the next to begin, 
rosters for this should be turned 
in by September 15. Anyone 
interested in having some extra 
fun and playing in these games 
should gather up some of their 



friends, think of a team name, 
and sign-up for an intramural. To 
sign-up for intramurals, pick up a 
registration sheet outside of 
Room 117 in the Tippin Gym. fill 
it out. and make sure that it is 
returned bv the deadline. 



CUP Men's 
Basketball Team 
seeking man- 
agers for the 
1 996-7 season. 
Inquire within 
basketball 
office. 102 
Tippin Gym 

X2458 



September 12, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



HELP WANTED 



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dent representatives are already 

earning FREE TRIPS and LOTS 

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CreditCard fundraisers for fra- 
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Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
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LARGEST STUDENT TRAVEL 
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HOME CARE AIDS WANT- 
ED: To assist elderly in 
Clarion, Shippenville, Leeper, 

Vowinckel, Marianne, 

Marienvillc. Brookville, and 

throughout Clarion County. 

Need flexible hours and days? 

We can meet your needs. No 

experience? We are willing to 

train. 226-7910. 



Handicapped faculty member 

needs assistance in swimming 

therapy twice per week. $7 per 

swim session. Contact Dr. Lynn 

Smith. Phone: 226-6675 



Telemarketing-PART-TIME 
POSITIONS, Sunday-Thursday, 
6:30 till 9:30. Late September 

through November. Annual 
Alumni Phonathon for contribu- 
tions. Must be outgoing with 
pleasant telephone personality, 
and currently enrolled as a stu- 
dent. Applications available- 
Clarion University, Alumni 
Relations Office, 2nd Floor 
Haskell House, Clarion, PA 
16214. Personal interviews will 
be set upon favorable review of 
applications. Deadline-9/ 18/96. 



HAVE A JOB OPENING 
THAT YOU NF2ED FILLED? 
THE CLARION CALL CAN 

HELP. CALL 226-2380. 



Summer Job Opportunity 

Run your own summer business 

with College Pro Lawn Care. 

Excellent pay and bonuses. 

Excellent for resume. 

Sharpen Managerial and Human 

Resource Skills. 

To set up an interview, call Jeff 

@ 227-2588. 



FOR RENT 



Apartments available for fall '97 
and spring '98 semesters. One 
block from campus. Furnished 

at four person occupancy. Leave 

message @ 226-5917. 



DON'T LET YOUR APART- 
MENTS GO UNFILLED. A 
CLARION CALL CLASSI- 
FIED ADVERTISEMENT 
CAN HELP. CALL 226-2380. 



PERSONALS 



To our cuddle bunny Pete: We 

look forward to spending the 

year with you. 

Love, the Zeta sisters 



Happy belated Birthday Maria 

and Alissa! 

Love, your Zeta sisters 



Happy Birthday to Renata and 

Kelly S.! 

Love, your Zeta sisters 



The Zetas would like to wel- 
come everyone back and wish 
them a great semester! 



Welcome back, and have a great 

semester. 

Love, the sisters of AIT 



Good Luck to everyone during 

rush! 

Love, AST 



CLASSIFIEDS 



The sisters of AOE would like to 

welcome everyone back and lots 

of luck through the semester. 

Cheers to Cara and Amber on 

your 20th Birthdays! Only one 

more year to go! 

Love, your AOE sisters 



Happy 21st Birthday Maria! 

Hope it was great. See you at 

the bars. 

Love, your AOE sisters 



The sisters of AOE would like to 

wish ail the summer Birthdays a 

Happy belated Birthday! 



I hope the lovely ladies of Delta 

Zeta enjoyed their summers. 
Now that we are here, I extend a 
WELCOME BACK to all the 
Dee Zee's. I am looking for- 
ward to a fun and exciting year. 
Love, YOUR TURTLEBUDDY 



Ty, Happy 23rd Birthday! I Love 

You Sweetheart! 

Love, Lisa 



Phi Sigma Sigma wishes every- 
one a successful semester. 



Congratulations to Donald 
Biertempfel for becoming our 

new sweetheart! 

Love, the sisters of Phi Sigma 

Sigma 



Ronaldo! Pick up the phone 

Ronaldo! I know you're there. 

Don't play games with me! 

Ronaldo! 

From Veronica 



Welcome back to the brothers of 

ITr! I would like to thank you 

for choosing me to be your New 

White Rose. I will do my best 

to represent your fraternity and 

to help you in any way I can. 

Have a great semester! 

Love, Courtney 



Welcome Back Theta Xi, 

I hope you all had a wonderful 

summer, & I wish you all the 

best of luck this semester. Party. 

drink, and have a blast, but don't 

forget to study. 

Love Your Sweetheart, Diana 



Theta Phi Alpha hopes everyone 

had a great summer and wishes 

everyone a great semester. 



Congrats to Rayna Leigey and 
Robin Cepikoff on their engage- 
ments. 
Love your 00 sisters 



Good Luck to all the Rushees 
this semester. ©OA 



To the Sisters of ©OA. I 

missed you this summer! It's 

great to be back! You ladies are 

the best! Love, Gig 



Good luck to all the OIK 

Brothers in your upcoming 

semester!!! I'm looking forward 

to another great year. 

Your Sweetheart, Mindy 



Daria, Welcome back. We look 

forward to spending the school 

year with you. Thanks for the 

cookies. Love, KAP 



WANT TO GET PERSONAL ? 
YOU CAN DO IT FOR AS 
LITTLE AS .10 A WORD. 

CALL THE CALL : 226-2380 



Attention Communication 

Majors and Photographers: 

Pentax K-100 camera, like new, 

for sale. Comes with lenses & 

case. Perfect for Intro, to 

Images Class. Value $250. Sell 

for $175 or best offer. Call at 

226-6334, Jen B. 



Happy 21st Brynn! Be careful 

of that rib! Love your ©O 

Sisters 



Gig- We missed you Sweetheart! 

Have a great semester! Love, 

©OA 



Congratulations DJ! Glad to 

have you as my assistant ! Love, 

Amy D. 



Tina- Keep your chin up! You'll 

get pledge sisters soon. Can't 

wait to call you sister! Love, 

©OA 



Melissa- Thanks for all your 
hard work. Love, ©OA Amy D. 



Happy Birthday to all our sum- 
mer Theta Phis. Love, your ©O 
sisters 



Heidi and Matt: Congrats on 

your engagement 

Love, AIA 



Annie, Happy B-day! 
Love, your AIA sisters 



AIA would like to welcome 

everyone back and wish them a 

great semester! 



Tiny: Loose weight, feel great! 
Sincerely, Beanpole 



Happy 25th Birthday 
to Craig A. Schaffran 

You're an old vet! 

Peace. Ben & Jil 

Geesey : 1 1 appy 2 3 id Birthday. 

You don't look a day over 22. 

Love, The Call staff 



Cooper (Tires): 
Happy 22nd Birthday. 
Hove yababe!!-Sleph 



Hey Katie & Pat 
Great Party-there is more 
killing to occur mis year- 
Just Wait!! 



To our Sweetheart, Mindy: The 
Phi Sigs hope you had a great 

summer, and we look forward to 
another wonderful year with 

you. 
Love, the Brothers of OIK 



To the Brothers of OUT We 

will have our first meeting of the 

semester on 9/16/96 @ 8:00pm 

in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose 

room. This is a very important 

meeting. All are expected to 
attend. 



The sisters of BAR would like 
to wish everyone a good semes- 
ter at the bar and to thank our 
new advisor, Daddy Ed. 



Koelsch, The CaJ] isn't the same 
without you! Rusty 



Thanks to Mary Bern and the 
Call staff and. also. Jen Founds 
for helping me out in the begin- 
ning stages of being copy & 
design editor. I am both excited 
and honored to be working with 
you guys. 
Love, Kristen 



Congratulations Mary Beth and 

the Call staff. You all did a 

great job. 



Orientation Buddies, I had a 
blast with you guys this summer. 

Never forget sex trivia at the 

Dew Drop with the Big Johnson 

and Lumpy!!! Love, MB 



To my roommates Kelly. Jaime, 
and Liz- Our house is finally 

back to normal ! 

No thanks to Ralph and Gary! 

Love, Dcnise 



You, this place just isn't the 

same without you. 

Life goes on. 

The Bad Guy 



Page 20 



The Clarion Calf 



September 12, 1996 



NFL Week #3 predictions and thoughts 



By Tun Rafalski 
Sports Writer 

FOUR STAR (iAMIM Wi 

miss! 

Buffalo! 2-0) at PitishnrghM-Q 

Monday Night 

I. ike I've been saying all along, 

Mike Tomc/ak is the man lor the 

job. Well, those might not have 

been my exaet words. Along as 

he plays mistake free, the 

Steelers running game and 

defense will carry them to a win. 

The Bills need quarterback Jim 

Kelly to improve upon his four 

interceptions if they are going to 

have a chance to win. 

Prediction: Pittsburgh 27 

Buffalo 20 

IH&EE STAR CiAMHS -Bener 

than watching Jenny McCarthy, 

maybe. 

San Picgo( 2-0) at Green Ray 

am 

With the first rated offense and 
fifth rated defense in the league, 
Green Bay is hands down the 
best team in football. In his last 
nine games quarterback, Brett 
Farve has thrown an unbelievable 
28 touchdowns and only two 
interceptions. San Diego should 
be able to keep it close with the 
second rated offense in the 



Golden 



league. 

Prediction: Green Bay 27 San 
Diego 20 

Detroit(l-l )at Phil;ulclphiM(l-h 
The Eagles will be trying to 
rebound alter their 39-13 drub- 
bing by the Packers. Standing in 
their way will be Lions running 
back Barry Sanders, who is aver- 
aging 144 yards a game. 
Prediction: Detroit 31 
Philadelphia 24 

Minnesotaf 2-0) at Chiraont 1 . ) ) 
The Health of Vikings quarter- 
back Warren Moon and Bears 
running back Rashaan Salaam 
will have a lot to do with the out- 
come of this game. Bom players 
are key components to their 
team's offense. 
Prediction: Chicago 23 
Minnesota 17 

BaltimoreM -Hat HonstonM-p 
Houston rookie running back 
Eddie George exploded for 143 
yards rushing and one touchdown 
in a 34-27 win over Jacksonville. 
In order to win, the Ravens will 
have to improve a rush defense 
that is giving up 133 yards a 
game. 

Prediction: Baltimore 23 
Houston 17 

Indianaix)lisf2-0) at Dallas fi-n 
The Cowboys managed to crawl 



By Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



Hey volleyball fans, the Spikers 
are back! head coach Jodi Bums 
and her team of Golden Eagles 
return this season to face a new 
challenge. No upper classmen ate 
standing by to help mold the 
team into experience. 
Only eight sophomores return to 
be the veterans of this youthful 
team. One thing that can make up 
for the lack of experience, how- 
ever, is talent, and die Spikers 
seem to have plenty of it. Just a 
glimpse into the past of these 
players put the Lady Eagles in 
good shape. For example, the 
veteran starters Mindy Conley. 
Mandy Kirby, and Christy Boes 
were a strong part of last years 
learn. Conley. a setter, leads 
Clarion with 957 assists and had 
38 kills, 352 digs, and 16 service 
aces her freshman year. Boes is a 
defensive specialist and struck 37 
aces last season, leading the 
team. Kirby, another great impact 
player, has 446 digs, second in 
the record book. 30 service aces, 
and 194 kills. Several other 
returning players that will help 
build the team are Tracy Bamett, 



Dani Konchan, Jami Bzorek. 
Maria Buckley and Jamie 
Soboleski. 

The new players suddenly find 
themselves back in the leadership 
role they just left, only in a high- 
er level of competition and a new 
team. Despite their inexperience 
widi the Golden Eagles, coach 
Burns is expecting powerful 
results from the freshmen. "We 
have worked really hard in the 
pre-season. and I think that will 
pay dividends when we head into 
conference play." Bums stated 
earlier this season. " Our goal is 
to be in the top two of the PSAC 
West," she says, "Inexperience 
will not be a big problem." 

The new names on the team are 
Beth Brandstaiier. Jessa 
Canfield, Curtisy Hilton. Mandi 
Ilryckowian. Yvonne Kastner. 
Lindsey Kuruzovieh. Brooke 
Paxton and Jill Platlerbor/.e. 
Some of this groups' talents 
include Brandstatter. a section 
MVP who helped her team take 
the section 7 title widi a record of 
17-1. Canfield. a Fust Team All- 
Conference player. Kuruzovieh 
and Platteborze who are both 
three time First Team All-State 



out of the grave Sunday with a 
resounding 27-0 win over Hie 
Giants. Dallas' air attack came 
out of hibernation as quarterback 
Troy Aikman threw for 228 yards 
and three touchdowns. 

That's bad news for a Colts pass 
defense that is surrendering 258 
yards a game. With Marshall 
Faulk's status uncertain (sprained 
toe), look for "America's Most 
Wanted" team to notch another 
win. 

Prediction: Dallas 31 
Indianapolis 17 

TWO STAR GAMFS -Siill better 
than studying. 

Jacksonville(l-l) at Oakland 
IM1 

With the quarterback Jeff 
Hosteller still listed as question- 
able, as of press time, Oakland's 
air attack may remain deflated 
for another week. 

A key for the Jaguars will be 
improving a run defense that's 
getting trampled for 141 yards a 
game. 

Prediction: Jacksonville 27 
Oakland 23 

Kansas Citv (2-0) at Seattle (0-7) 
Unless Seahawks running back 
Chris Warren can break out of his 
slump, Seattle will have no 
chance against a defense that 



held Oakland to three points. 

Prediction: Kansas City 27 

Seattle 16 

Arizona (0-2) at New Fn» l;iml 

iQi2} 

Willi both teams averaging less 

lhan 72 yards rushing a game. 

establishing a ground attack will 

be very crucial for a win. Look 

for Patriots running back Curtis 

Martin to have a big game in 

route to a victory. 

Prediction: New England 27 

Arizona 17 

New Orleans(0-2) at Cincinnati 

(0-2) 

Cincinnati running back Ki-Jana 

Carter has been a disappoinunent 

so far, rushing for just 27 yards in 

two games. 

Carter is not totally to blame, 
though, as his offensive line has 
looked more like a wall of Swiss 
cheese than Mockers. 
The Bengals have too much tal- 
ent on offense to keep putting up 
dismal numbers. 

Prediction: Cincinnati 27 New 
Orleans 24 

NY Jets(0-2) at Miami (2-0) 
The Dolphins have been winning 
games on the ground, averaging 
137 while giving up only 28 
yards a game. All those millions 
of dollars the Jets spent during 



the off-season art paying off, 
they've scored a whopping 13 
points in two games, while their 
opponents have managed a mea- 
ger 52 points. 

Prediction: Miami 31 New York 
16 

Tampa Bav(0-2) at Denvci(?-0) 
Instead of installing the ever pop- 
ular "West Coast" offensive, the 
Buccaneers opted to go with the 
"No Score" offense and thus far 
have run it to perfection. 
They've been outscored 55-9 and 
have yet to reach the endzone. 
Smart money will take the 
Broncos this week. 
Prediction: Denver 34 Tampa 
Bay 16 (with a TD) 
ONE STAR GAME -Wairh dur- 
ing Baywatch Commercials. 
Washington(l-l) at NY Giants 
£f>2) 

The Giants anemic offense 
gained just 93 yard in a 27-0 
thrashing by the Cowboys. 
Washington hasn't been much 
better with Terry Allen's three 
touchdowns their only source of 
scoring. There really isn't any- 
way to hype a game between the 
27th and 29th ranked offenses in 
the league. 

Prediction: Washington 24 New 
York 13 



spikers start season 



players. Paxton made First Team 
All-State her senior year and 
Hryckowian helped her team to 
an undefeated season and a sec- 
tion championship. Hilton and 
Kastner were both red-shirts, but 
Hilton was WPIAL's most valu- 
able player. "The team worts 
bard, but we also have a lot of 
fun." says Burns. So far this sea- 
son the Golden Eagles have 
played in a tournament, an invita- 
tional, and games against 
Allegheny and Edinboro. The 
stats show that talent has won 



over inexperience. At the 
California (PA) Tournament, the 
Spikers played Juniata. Lock 
Haven, Shippensburg and 
Ashland. Although defeated by 
Juniata, Lock Haven and 
Ashland, the Golden Eagles 
swept Shippensburg with scores 
of 15-5, 15-10, and 15-1 1. Also a 
personal victory was made when 
Christy Boes came home as All- 
Tourney. 

The team Uien traveled to 
Allegheny and played a rigorous 
game that was almost too close to 



call. Eventually they were defeat- 
ed 15-12, 10-15, 12-15. 15-9, 15- 
17. 

At the Ashland Invitational 
Clarion dominated. They were 
beaten only by Ashland. The 
Lady Eagles swept Indiana 15-8. 
15-12, and 15-8. and beat UIPUI 
in four games 7-15, 15-2. 15-8. 
and 15-11. They also rallied with 
Indianapolis and won in five with 
scores of 15-12. 10-15. 12-15. 
15-9, and 15-13. Coach Burns 
was more than pleased with these 
results. 



The #1 Beatles 

Show in the 

world!!! 




Friday, 
September 13th 

@ 8:00 at 

Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium 



CUP. Students - FREE 

Adults $5.00 
Children under 12 -$2.00 




♦ »**»»♦**»♦♦»»» - ♦ » » 



' m i 



September 19, 1996 



Clarion ©mtoertttp of $enntf?lbania 



Clarion, $S 16214 



i 



XEtye Clarion Call 



( 



What's Simile 




Football going 
strong after a 

big win on 

Saturday, for 

the story see 

page 17. 



€ontents 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 9 

Entertainment: Pg. 13 

Call on You: Pg. 15 

Sports: Pg. 17 

Classifieds: ^ Pg. 19 

%tamt 77, J**w 2 



Wcatljer 



Today, mostly 
cloudy with a 
60 percent 
chance of show- 
ers. High in the 
mid 60s. 



More parking and building renovations in the works this fall 



by Susan Hartman 
News Writer 






Clarion University has many 
new construction projects which 
have just been started or are near 
completion. "It has been a busy 
summer, " said Clare Heidler, 
Director of Facilities 
Management and Planning when 
speaking of the improvement 
projects that have taken place. 

Students may have already 
noticed the replacement of ceil- 
ings and lights in the two main 
dining rooms of Chandler Dining 
Hall. Designs are expected to be 
ready in early 1997 for a new 
serving line setup and lobby. 

With cold weather coming to 
Clarion, settled and uneven con- 
crete walkways between Becht 
Hall and Wood Street are being 
replaced. 

A sturdier safety barrier will be 
installed as well. The deteriorat- 
ing areas result in damage and 
treacherous icing during the win- 
ter. 

Work is in progress between 



Carrier and Nair Halls where 
handicapped access is being pro- 
vided along Main Street. 

The construction of a new 76 
car parking lot between 
Campbell Hall and McEntire 
Maintenance Building should 
begin in October. 

Phase I of the remodeling pro- 
ject of Founders Hall has begun. 
This phase consists of demoli- 
tion, hazardous material abate- 
ment, and a structural investiga- 
tion. Once started, the project is 
expected to take a total of 15 
months. 

Work is underway on the instal- 
lation of a geography and earth 
science laboratory in Peirce 
Science Center. Electrical sys- 
tems in the chemistry and physics 
laboratories are being modified 
as authorized by the Clarion 
University laboratory renovation 
program. 

The steam tunnel project is 
Bearing completion of Phase II 
which started on May 30. 1995. 
The project included the con- 
struction of 4.100 feel of under- 




Clarion Call/Bonnie Fisher 



The steamline construction project has been in the works on Clarion University campus 
since last summer. The project will reduce problems with heating in the residence halls 
and other buildings on campus. 



ground tunnels for steam and 
other utility lines. Only exterior 
paving and landscaping remains 
to complete the work ahead of 
schedule. 

Memorial Stadium has also 
undergone chances. The deterio- 



rating track surface was removed 
and repairs were made. A new 
track was installed. The bleachers 
were painted and the wood/fiber- 
glass seating was removed for 
replacement with vinyl covered 
aluminum seating. 



"Much of the work is being 
completed by our own mainte- 
nance and grounds staff. We have 
an excellent staff, and we are for- 
tunate thai we are able to so 
much of this work in-house." 
concluded Heidler. 



\ 
f 



Master Planning Committee meets to investigate student concerns 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 



Facilities master planning 
efforts for Clarion University and 
Venango Campus in Oil City 
have been initialed by the univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Heather I Iaberaecker. Vice- 
President of Finance and 
Administration: Dr. Joseph 
Gruncnvvald. the dean of the 
College of Business 

Administration and chairman of 
die Facilities Planning commit- 
tee: Mr. Clare Heidler, director of 
Facilities Management, and Mr. 
Ron Wilshire, University 



Relations attended a Monday 
morning press conference in 
Carrier Hall. Several representa- 
tives from various local media 
organizations also attended the 
press conference. The schedule 
for the Uiree days of meetings 
with members of the Clarion 
University community and the 
master planning team was dis- 
cussed at the press conference. 

The meetings will be held on 
September 24-26, and a total of 
40 meetings have been scheduled 
for the three days. 

"The development of a facili- 
ties master plan for Clarion 



University is expected to result in 
the complete assessment of our 
facility utilization and depart- 
mental needs," said Haberaecker. 
"The plan will also provide a 
blueprint for future facilities 
planning based on an approved 
development concept, and pro- 
vide specific products which will 
enable Facilities Management 
stall to operate in a more efficient 
manner." Sasaki Associates, Inc. 
of Wattertown, MA. has been 
retained for the master planning 
efforts. 

Starting in early July, Sasaki 
met, wi^h. .university, administra- 



tion officials and plans numerous 
meetings with a variety of uni- 
versity and constituent groups 
until the formal presentation of 
the final plan to the Clarion 
University Council of Trustees 
on November 21. 1997. 

"Of particular importance." 
said Haberaecker. "the 
University will be looking at 
future library needs, parking, res- 
idence halls, and the siting of the 
new student recreation center." 
The Master Plan is expected to 
provide the following products 
and information about land use 
and restrictions, an archaeologi- 



cal survey, a vehicular and pedes- 
trian circulation plan, sub-surface 
utility plans, exterior lighting 
plans, telecommunications and 
fire alarm systems plans, build- 
ing environmental surveys, land- 
scape plans, recreation, and a 
project phase plan. 

Other supporting products that 
will be involved in the master 
plan are a list of issues needed to 
be addressed for expansion, rec- 
ommendations of proposed major 
rehabilitation projects, budget 
estimates, a graphic illustration 

Continued on page 5 



WSSS/AWA* 



4 * t 4 • « « * * . 






Pa^e 2 



The Clarion Call 



May 2, 1996 



| OPINION 




Editorial 



agf" 




1 want you to get 

more involved in 

your student 

government/* 



/7 

7 



Matt Geesey/ News Editor 



I would like to take a few 
moments of your time to wel- 
come everyone (or welcome 
-back) to Clarion University. I 
hope everyone had a good sum- 
mer and is ready for a great year 
at this institution. 

My name is Matt Geesey, and 
this is my second semester as the 
News Editor of The Clarion Call. 
As News Editor, it is my duty to 
inform you, the university's stu- 
dent body, of several issues that 
are being addressed on our cam- 
pus. 

The legislature of the universi- 
ty consists of the Council of 
Trustees as the governing body of 
the university, the Faculty Senate 
as the legislative body that gath- 
ers concerns from faculty, and the 
Student Senate mat gathers con- 
cerns from the students. The 
Faculty Senate consists of a stu- 



dent representative and faculty 
representatives. The Student 
Senate consists of student repre- 
sentatives that the student body 
votes into office. 

The new Student Senate is what 
I would like to talk about this 
week. The Senate consists of 
twenty students; sixteen of those 
students are new representatives. 
The Senate has a student presi- 
dent, vice-president, and treasur- 
er and an advisor from the 
administration of the university. 
Reports are given from various 
standing committees that serve 
the university's student needs. 
Remember this statement. 

A new committee was formed 
recently called the Campus 
Safety committee. The official 
mission statement for this com- 
mittee is "to ensure the safety of 
students on this campus and to 



address the relations between stu- 
dents and public safety". 

Included under the first item in 
the statement is the committees 
need "to investigate the affects of 
local businesses on mis campus 
and to investigate the safely of 
the physical surroundings on Uiis 
campus". In layman terms, the 
committee plans to address vari- 
ous safely needs on campus 
including additional lighting, 
more emergency phones, and a 
better relation between Public 
Safely and the student body. 

One stated goals of the com- 
mittee is "to investigate the 
affects of local businesses on 
campus." One of the committee's 
objectives will be to investigate 
the emergence of a sexually-ori- 
ented business near campus. 

The chairman of the Campus 
Safety committee has already 
done research into this matter. 
Statistics have shown that sexual 
crimes increase on college cam- 
puses with sexually-oriented 
businesses near them. 

According to sources that will 
remain anonymous, personal val- 
ues and beliefs have gone into the 
formation of this committee. I am 
all in favor of a committee that 
helps provide safety to the stu- 
dent body, but I will not stand 
idly by while people try to run a 
business out of town that is help- 
ins the communitv's alreadv fal- 
tering economy. 

The Student Senate was formed 
to serve the needs of die student. 

Continued on page 3 



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The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion ol" the uni- 
versity or oi' the student body. 
Display advertising copy is due 
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Monday before publication The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 



I Hide Park I 




"As citizens of this 

fine democracy it is 

our right to 

know..." 




1 Sean A. McDonald 1 

| and Tau/ana Day | 





"Just Another History Lesson" 

To: Mr. William Clinton, 
President of the United States 

From: Sean A. McDonald, Dir. 
of Marketing and Dist., 
DaGhetto Tymz Magazine 

Re: Just another history lesson: 
at the end of the 2nd millennium 

Date: September 3, 1996 
Dear Mr. President: 

We personally want to applaud 
your effort, talent, and charisma 
for effectively wearing the hat as 
Chief of Staff. Your responsibili- 
ties are tremendous and your 
duty is unwavering. It is under- 
stood that many times during 
your first term of office you have 
been required to wear masks of 
different sons. The issue of your 
part in the New World Order has 
never been questioned or 
assessed by your constituents 
until now. The question that has 
never been asked until now is 
whether or not you are a con- 
scious pawn in the game? This 
question by no means is intended 
to be derogatory. It is in fact a 
preliminary documentation of 
our democracy's involvement in 
the New World Order. It is. 
important to also mention no one, 
especially democrats, can blame 
you for a question never before 
asked. 

In this brief yet concise history 
lesson you will be presented with 
a few questions and issues which 
seem to be puzzling for some, 
quite simple for others, and never 
crossed the minds of most. As we 
inch towards the last days and 
hours in this millennium, we are 
encouraged to take a look back 
on history so that it isn't repeated 
if given the opportunity. A prima- 



ry definition that needs to be stat- 
ed is democracy', its root, origin 
(including date), translation (lan- 
guages), and its most current 
meaning. Another very important 
issue to discuss is the year 1776 
and all of the events that shaped 
the world including the consum- 
mation of the New World Order. 
This lesson will conclude with 
current events happening in 1996 
and a forecast for the three years 
remaining in the millennium. 

The definition of democracy as 
written in the World Book 
Dictionary is: DEMOCRACY 
the common people, distin- 
guished from the privileged 
class, or their political power. 
The word is translated from 
[<Middle French de'mocraiie, 
learned borrowing from 
Medieval Latin democratia< 
Greek demokratia< demos peo- 
ple + kratos rule, power]. This 
definition is still however a trans- 
lation from what is documented 
as Medieval Latin. The original 
Latin word and its meaning is 
still needed for a more accurate 
definition. 

The United Stales, as we know 
it. was established in 1776. with 
the signing of the Declaration of 
Independence. Ironically, this is 
the same year of the signing of 
the Declaration of the Luceferian 
Conspiracy or the Uluminati. The 
famous American year 1776, also 
saw the birth of Phi Beta Kappa 
the tirsi American society bear- 
ing a Greek letter name. Are all 
three of diese historically renown 
events coincidences, or are they 
part ol a bigger brothers plan. As 
citizens ol this fine democracy it 
is our right to know and our 
responsibility to question what is 
true. Hopefully, for all of us his- 
tory is wrong. 

During the inception of the 

Continued on page 4 



September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSES 



"Keep writing that tuition check- it gets worse." 



Students, as well as parents of 
students, of our State System of 
Higher Education will soon be 
forking over additional dollars 
because of the recently approved 
4.5 percent tuition increase at our 
state-owned universities. 

Yes, the State System of Higher 
Education Board of Governors 
voted 13 to 2 to raise tuition. 

Well, as you sit at your kitchen 
table and write out those tuition 
checks to West Chester, 
Kufztown, Lock Haven, 
Millersville, Shippensburg, 
Mansfield, Slippery Rock. 
Cheyney, Clarion, California, 
Indiana, Bloomsburg, East 
Stroudsburg and Edinboro, the 
pigs at the trough are consuming 
your tax dollars faster than ever. 

First example: Are you aware 
that our State System Board of 
Governors requires the president 
of each of our universities to live 
on campus? 

On the surface, one would pre- 
sume that this is a logical con- 
cept. 

However, did you know that we 
provide these six-figure, ivory 
tower elitists with museums for 
homes? 

Currently, the State System is 
renovating the president's home 
at Shippensburg University. 

Keep in mind, the key word 
here is RENOVATING. 

This renovation will cost us 
taxpayers and students in excess 
of $650,000. No. you have not 
just read a typo containing loo 
many zeros. 

According to the 1996 
Pennsylvania Abstract', the 



median value per housing unit in 
Cumberland County, where 
Shippensburg University is locat- 
ed, is $85,000. 

So you see, while the average 
resident taxpayer of the 
Shippensburg area lives in a 
home worth $85,000, the presi- 
dent of the university resides in a 
taxpayer-provided home which is 
currently receiving renovations 
in excess of $650,000. What's 
wrong with this picture? 

Keep writing that tuition check 
- it gets worse. There are three 
additional universities whose 
presidents' homes are being reno- 
vated or built, all with price tags 
exceeding $650,000. 

Oh, and by the way after you 



Letters to... 




and housekeepers. 

Don't ask me why the State 

System gives these presidents a 

yearly cost-of-living raise — we 

pay their living expenses. 

My second example of the lav- 



back to school after a weekend at 
home. 

Kissing Mom as I got out of the 
car, grabbing my clean laundry 
and watching Mom drive off into 
the night, I was happy to return to 
my modest living accommoda- 
tions in my dormitory, Wayne 
Hall, and Mom was more than 
happy to retreat to her home in 
suburban Philadelphia. 

This is the way it was for a col- 
lege student in the late 1970s. 
But, times definitely have 
changed. 

Presently, Slippery Rock 
University, situated in Butler 
County, is expending nearly $9 
million to construct 48 apartment 
sfor students on campus. 



"Don't ask me why the State 
System gives these presidents 
a yearly cost of living raise- 
We pay their living expenses. " 

-State Representative, John A. Lawless 



write that tuition check and begin 
to confront your monthly utility 
bills, keep in mind that we lax- 
payers also pay the utility bills 
for these presidents' homes, not 
to mention their groundskeepers 



ish spending practices of our 
State System of Higher 
Education is even more thought 
provoking: As a graduate of the 
State System (West Chester - 
1979). I remember being driven 



That is nearly $190,000 per 
apartment. Referring back to the 
1996 Pennsylvania Abstract, the 
median value per housing unit in 
Butler County is S62.90fl 

Given the above scenario, the 



working people of Butler County 
would live three times belter if 
they enrolled as students at 
Slippery Rock University. In fact, 
most Pennsylvania taxpayers 
reside in housing which costs 
much less than $190,000 per unit. 

Perhaps the parents should visit 
the students on holidays. 

Meanwhile, the spin doclors in 
higher education are attempting 
to defend this latest tuition 
increase with rhetoric designed to 
make one believe that his or her 
tuition payments are being uti- 
lized for educational purposes. 
The U'uth of the matter is that the 
money is not reaching the stu- 
dents. 

As an elected official in the 
Pennsylvania General Assembly, 
I will persist in providing you, 
the taxpayers, parents and stu- 
dents, with data such as this in 
order to ensure that you are keen- 
ly aware of just why the cost of a 
college education continues to 
escalate to such exorbitant levels. 

This type of squandering must 
cease before I vote to dole out 
one more of your tax dollars to a 
System that believes it is above 
the people it serves. 



John A. Lawless 
Member House of 

Representatives, 

Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania 



This letter was submitted 
as a guest column 



Concerns for the environment spark Clarion ex-proffessor to speak out 



Very thorough research by 
Population Institute. Inc. empha- 
sizes these serious facts: 

• Of the world's 5.7 billion peo- 
ple. 1 ( ) percent live in the poorest 
countries. 

• Some 600.000 square miles ol 
forest have been eul in 10 years. 



mostly either to make living 
space or for firewood, which is 
still the main source of cooking 
and heating fuel in the poor 
regions. 

• Twenty-six billion ions of lop- 
soil have been lost. 

• Regional fresh water supplies 
are dangerously low. Rivers are 



drying, and many lakes are at 
their lowest levels in history. 

• All 17 of the world's major 
fisheries are being exploited at or 
beyond their capacities. 

• Eighty-eight nations have been 
classified by the U.N. World 
Food Program as low-income, 
food-deficit countries, unable to 



grow and/or buy enough food to 
accommodate their inhabitants. 

• There are nearly 960 million 
illiterates today, of whom 130 
million children — including 90 
million girls — are DENIED 
access to primary schooling. 

• Approximately a half million 
women die every year of preg- 



nancy related causes. 

And all of this in a world grow- 
ing by nearly 100 million more 
people a year. 

Sincerely. 

Lee W. Heilman 
Ex Professor 



"...Get more involved in your student government, cont.... 



to serve the needs of the student 
not the needs of a person with a 
hidden agenda. 

The new committee also con- 
sists of three females and one 
male.. Is this politically correct? 



Campus safety is not supposed to 
be a battle of the sexes. With .this 
committee, equal representation 
should be used to avoid bias of 
important issues. Maybe a hidden 
agenda is prevalent after all. 



My main reason for writ- 
ing this editorial Uiis week is not 
to step on anyone's feel. 

I want you to get more 
involved in your student gov- 
ernment. Student Senate meet- 



ings are open to the public 
and are held on Monday 
evenings at 7:30 p.m 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

When elections are held in the 
Spring for Student Senate, 



please vote. 

Without your vote, your voice 
will not be heard. You have your 
own values and beliefs. Don't let 
the Student Senate or me 
impose our values and beliefs. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 19, 1996 




^ 



News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



WORLD 



Hungary leads in world 

chess 

The Hungarian team, fielding its strongest player despite a weak 
opponent, routed Moldova 

4-0 on Tuesday, taking the lead in the World Chess Olympiad with 
7.5 points. 

The first rounds of play put the high-ranked teams against the low- 
ranked ones, so many teams saved their best players for greater 
challenges ahead. Russian Garry Kasparov the world's top-ranked 
player, has not yet played. 

The Hungarian team's strongest asset is Judith Polar, a 2 year-old 
woman who is No. 9 in the men's rankings and plays only against 
men in international tournaments. She helped her team defeat 
Moldova on Tuesday. 

Russia, China, Argentina, France and Germany were tied in sec- 
ond place after Tuesday's games with 7 points each. 



Yeltsin to remain 
in hospital 

Boris Yeltsin's stay in the Kremlin hospital has been extended, 
possibly until the end of the week, while he undergoes tests in 
preparation for heart surgery. 

Yeltsin. 65, has been in the Central Clinical Hospital since Friday 
night, when he was admitted without public announcement. 



Reports: Kidnapping 
was experiment 

Spain's main intelligence agency kidnapped mice street peo- 
ple in 1988 to test an experimental tranquilizer they hoped to use on 
a fugitive Basque separatist leader, a Madrid daily reported 
Tuesday. 

The EI Mundo newspaper, citing documents obtained from the 
intelligence agency CESID, said a beggar and two drug addicts 
were kidnapped off Madrid streets and given the anesthetic. 

One of the three men later died from complications caused by 
the drug, the newspaper said. 

The Basque separatist leader Josu Ternera was captured by 
French police in January 1989 at a hideout of the armed Basque sep- 
aratist group ETA. The tranquilizer was not used on him. 

Heading the kidnapping operation was CFSID's former chief 
Gen. Hmilio Alonso Manglano. 



e>Courtesy of the Associated Press 



V 



Hide Park 




September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pages 



-y 



United States with its newly 
founded democracy there were 
plans, great plans for this young 
country. What were those plans, 
what are those plans and how 
many have already manifested 
themselves before our very eyes, 
the place where most of us tend 
to miss the most? It is reasonable 
to believe the forefathers of the 
United States of America with its 
democracy (demon-gracia) were 
actually thanking the devil 
(Satan/Lucifer) for their power 
over tiie people. The simple pass- 
ing on of a baton for an attempt at 
total world domination. World 
War I and World War II were not 
accidents. They both were strate- 
gic plans for the same outcome 
and still the powers that be are, 
whether consciously or uncon- 
sciously, chipping away at their 
plan. Is our government part of 
this catastrophe waiting to hap- 
pen, or are you an innocent pawn 
in die game? 

While the subject of whether or 
not our government is an active 
participant in this conspiracy or 
unconscious pawns in this game 
is debatable, it is important to 
mention William Guy Carr's 
book, "Pawns in the Game", in 
which the sixth edition was pub- 
lished in October, 1967. This 
book, which is non-fiction, actu- 
ally gives an intrinsic and 
detailed scope of the internation- 
al conspiracy; other historical lit- 
erature is also used in confirming 
this evil deed, including the Holy 
Bible. 

However, for the purpose of 
enlightenment, this history lesson 
will start in 1770 with the recent- 
ly organized House of 
Rothschild. During this time. 
"Adam Weishaupt, a trained pro- 
fessor of canon law, defected 
from Christianity, and embraced 
the Luciferian Ideology while 
teaching in lngoldstadl 
Universily"(Carr, X). Adam 
Weishaupt was recruited to revise 
and modernize the protocol of the 
Synagogue of Satan in order to 
continue and complete the plight 
of Satan, which is total world 
domination. His mission of com- 
pleting the plan of destruction 
was May 1st, 1776. The signing 
of the Declaration of 
Independence is July 4th. 1776. 
and the first American fraternity 
was founded October. 1776. The 
point of mentioning the fraternity 
is this: '"The plan required the 
destruction of ALL existing gov- 
ernments, and religions." Tub 
objective was to be reached by 
dividing the masses, whom he 



termed Goyim (meaning human 
cattle) into opposing camps in 
ever increasing numbers on polit- 
ical, racial, social, economic, and 
other issues. The opposing sides 
were then to be aimed and an 
'incident' provided which would 
cause them to light and weaken 
themselves as they destroyed 
National Governments and 
Religious Institutions. In 1776. 
Weishaupt organized the 
Illuminati to put the plot into exe- 
cution. The word illuminati is 
derived from Lucifer, and means 
'holders of the light'. 

Using the lie that his objective 
was to bring about a One World 
government to enable men with 
proven mental ability to govern 
the world, he recruited about two 
thousand followers. 

These included the most intelli- 
gent men in die field of Arts and 
Letters. Education, the sciences, 
finance and industry. He then 
established Lodges of the Grand 
Orient to be their secret head- 
quarters (Carr, X). When young 
men- educated young men- enter 
colleges and universities they are 
'rushed' into pledging a fraterni- 
ty- 

Whether the 'Big Brothers' 

know consciously what they are 
recruiting for is relevant, howev- 
er, the plan and the conspiracy is 
still going to continue. 

The college campuses and their 
historical secret societies called 
fraternities are all intrinsically 
linked to this recruitment of 
Luciferian Conspirators. The pro- 
fessional conspiring organiza- 
tions have elected to be known as 
'Knights. Free & Accepted, 
Fraternal Order of, etc.'. It is 
assumed we were all unknowing- 
ly pawns in this game. 

American: Are You? 

The Year is nineteen-hundred 
and ninety-six. 
Black people! Better realize 
we're in a helluva fix. 
lake a moment! Or borrow that 
which is not yours. 
Who was it... Lincoln that start- 
ed, "Four-score. . 
I'm still waitin' for the emanci- 
pation Proclamation. 
The only real emancipation is 



eternal salvation. 

You've must've already arrived, 

I'll see you when I get there. 

As a matter of fact, vvhere'd you 

come from? Or who brought you 

here? 

Forty acres-and a mule. 

promised alter emancipation. 

But when our numbers grew 

thick, they started immigration. 

American: Are You? 

One fifth of a man, a NF-GROS 

only so high. 

The other four-fifths of me you 

deemed to deny. 

No rights were given and 

thought to be inhumane. 

We asked to be respected and 

treated the same. 

Civil Rights, huh. if you will: 

I am a Bill yes I'm only a Bill. 

And I'm sitting here on Capitol 

Hill. 

Oh-oh say if you will, But you 

dare I am still, 

Just a Bill. 

But let me retract, Civil Rights 
is not a bill. 

It is only amendments and can 
be concealed. 

American: Are You? 

There's a war outside trying to 
enslave our minds. 
Is this another sign of the times? 
They call us minorities made up 
of assimilations. 
Look to die word American: 
Are Minorities Ever Represented 
in Creating A Nation? 
Life, Love, and the pursuit of 
Happiness! 

Just who did they mean when 
they said this? 

Aren't you bi-lingual. or Did 
you forget about Black-English? 
The language is "THE 
POWER" is in the language. 
No matter who we are. We all 
need to be a soldier. 
'Cause only knowledge can pro- 
tect us from the New World 
Order. 

• Sean McDonald is a senior 
Secondary Education English Major 
and Tawanda Day is a graduate 
with master degrees in Physics and 
Education 



(f you have anything to say, say it in a letter 

to the editor, or hide park column. Both 

forums are open to students, faculty, and 

community members. Brine all submissions 

to the Clarion Gall office in room 270 
Gemmell student complex, for further infor- 
mation call x2380. 



NEWS 



Ccllege Campus News 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 




UW Fraternity Goes Substance-Free 

After years of trouble with alcohol and hazing violations, f heta Chi 
fraternity at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has decided to shed 
its "Animal House" image by adopting a substance-free policy. 

The fraternity, whose membership has dwindled over the last few 
years, hopes to attract a new breed of college men: those who can do 
without the alcohol and tobacco at house parties. 

That doesn't mean Theta Chi brodiers need to mke on a completely 
chaste lifestyle. 

The substance-free policy applies only to events at the fraternity 
house itself, said Dave Westol, executive director of Theta Chi's 
national headquarters in Indianpolis. 

Members can go out somewhere and have an event and have alcohol 
or tobacco there," he said. 

That's what fraternity members are allowed to do at University of 
Iowa, University of Colorado and Utah State University, where simi 
lar substance-free policies have met with success, he said. 

The policies are catching on across the nation for a number of rea 
sons, including lower insurance rates, better living conditions, and the 
academic improvement of its members, he said. 

But with rush season set to begin later this month at Wisconsin, it 
remains to be seen how popular the new policy will be with freshmen. 
Already, Theta Chi has sent letters to more than 3,000 first-year male 
students to encourage them to visit the substance-free house. 

"I think we're going to attract some guys who might not think about 
a fraternity normally," Westol said. "There were guys who joined for 
the wrong reasons: for a social-athletic club." 

Purdue Student Acquitted in Hazing 

Incident 



A former Purdue University student accused of beating a pledge dur- 
ing a hazing incident last year was acquitted August 31. 

Donald Frazier. 26. had been charged with four counts of battery, five 
ounts of criminal recklessness, and one count of intimidation with a 
deadly weapon. 

Luis Algarin had accused Frazier and 1 1 oilier members of Alpha Phi 
Alpha of beating him during a weeklong hazing incident last year. He 
told the court that he suffered a seperated shoulder, internal bleeding, 
and severe bruises as a result. 

Algarin also revealed, however, that he had not reported the alleged 
incident until the end of the semester when he was about to flunk sev- 
eral classes. 

Prosecutors told the court that Algarin had lied to poice. telling them 
he had been recruited for Purdue's track team and was on an athletic 
scholarship. 

A jury deliberated about 1 1 hours before finding Frazier innocent, 
according to reports. Charges against the other 1 1 fraternity members 
had been dismissed in March. 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 



Master planning article 



of assets and constraints to devel- 
opment, a utility and infra-struc- 
ture needs analysis, and prelimi- 
nary engineering schematic 
drawings of utility needs and 
traffic circulation improvements. 
Many universities are utilizing 
master planning in their long- 
range plans. In December 1993, 
the State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) announced 
plans to develop and implement 
the Capital Facilities Planning 
and Programming Process 
(CFP3). 

The puipose of the process is to 
provide universities with guide- 
lines and assistance in develop- 
ing plans and budgets for future 
capital facility needs. 

Included in this process was the 
integration of a university master 
plan for use in guiding develop- 
ment of each university. 

Clarion University is one of the 
schools in the SSHE system, and 
the university has recendy corn- 




File Photo 
Dr. Joseph Gruenwald 

Meetings have been scheduled 
with university administration 
officials, deans, department 
heads, committee chairs, stu- 
dents, and the local communities 
and community leaders. 



be held for any student who has a 
concern or a suggestion for die 
planning committee. 

On September 26 at 9:00 a.m.. 
a session on parking will be held. 
At 10:00 a.m., a session for stu- 
dents about outdoor athletic and 
recreational needs will be pre- 
sented. 

A session on landscaping and 
campus boundaries will be held 
at 11:00 a.m. 

The last student session will be 
held at 2:00 p.m. and will address 
student housing, 

Included in the session will be 
Bob Regan, a housing official for 
the Borough. 

After the initial meetings are 
finished, Sasaki Associates, Inc. 
will proceed with the creation of 
the university's master plan. 
More meetings have been set up 
for the future to continue to com- 
municate with the administradon 
about the progress of the project. 
The end result will consist of a 



"We encourage members of the community 

and students to participate in the sessions. 

The functionality of the facilities will make 

Clarion University competitive with other 

universities." - Dr. Joseph Gruenwald 



pleted the other documents used 
in the planning process. 

The total cost of the master plan 
conception will reach a total of 
$226,000. 

Even though the cost seems to 
be excessive. Haberaecker 
assures the university that Sasaki 
Associates. Inc. is one of die best 
planning firms in the country and 
the price that has been quoted by 
the firm is a good price. 

The money for the project will 
come from the university contin- 
gency funds. A total ol SI 00. 000 
has been placed in the fund every 
year just for this purpose. 

The September 24-26 meetings 
will include interviews between 
the Sasaki team and all parties 
related to the master planning 
process. 



Several meetings have been set 
up to address certain needs of the 
student body, and the student 
body is welcome to attend these 
sessions and voice their opinions. 
On September 24 at 5:30 p.m. in 
Chandler Dining Hall, student 
orientation leaders and university 
tour guides are asked to meet 
with die planning team for an 
informational session. 

All other student sessions will 
be held in Room 250/252 in the 
Gemmell Student Complex. On 
September 25 at 2:00 p.m.. stu- 
dents are asked to attend the ses- 
sion on student life and the stu- 
dent center 

This session will help planners 
with concerns about increased 
activities on campus. At 3:00 
PPk- a.general.open meeting will 



17 month process. After the mas- 
ter plan is finished, some facili- 
ties may have to have major ren- 
ovations or none at all. 

If renovations are needed, the 
moneys for these repairs will 
come from a variety of different 
university budgets and a capital 
budget request will be made to 
the state. Private funding also 
could be used for some of the 
renovations. 

Gruenwald stressed the impor- 
tance of full cooperation with the 
planning meetings. 

"We encourage members of the 
community and students to par- 
ticipate in the sessions. 

The functionality of the facili- 
ties will make Clarion University 
competitive with other universi- 
ties, "he said. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 19, 1996 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 

between September 8 and 15. The blotter is compiled 
by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim Hall. 

•A vehicle was keyed while parked in Lol J between the hours of 4:00 
p.m. and 5:00 p.m. on Sept. 8. 

•On Sept. 8 at 5:10 p.m., police received a report of a hit and run in 
parking lot R of Clarion University. The victim's vehicle, a red 1993 
Toyota, sustained damage to the passenger front fender and bumper. 
Investigating officers request that anyone that may have been in the 
area at the time of the incident or who may have seen the accident to 
contact Public Safely at 226-2111. 

•At approximately 12:40 a.m. on Sept. 8. three intoxicated males were 
on the fifth floor of Campbell Hall without an escort. They were act- 
ing very disorderly. The three males ran out of the building before 
Public Safety arrived. 

•On Sept. 8 at approximately 4:46 a.m., an unknown person pulled a 
fire alarm on the first floor of Nair Hail. The incident is being looked 
into as charges are pending. 

•A male and a female were cited for harassment on Sept. 8. There was 
physical contact (striking or hitting) between them both in the stairwell 
of Campbell Hall. The two perpetrators were Brian Rethage and Karen 
Porter, both of Campbell Hall 
•Clarion University police are investigating the activation of a fire 
alarm at Nair Hall on Sept. 9 at approximately 2:35 a.m. Anyone with 
information about this incident should contact the Public Safety office 
•Between 8:15 p.m. on Sept. 9 and 1:00 p.m. on Sept. 10, an unknown 
person or persons threw a piece of cement block through the window 
at the ceramics lab 
•An unknown person or persons removed a wallet which did not 
belong to them from an unsecluded locker in Tippin Gym. The theft 
occurred on Sept. 10 between 12:10 p.m. and 12:35 p.m. The investi- 
gation is continuing. 
•Between the times of 9 p.m. on Sept. 10 and 10 a.m. on Sept. 11, an 
unknown person or persons entered Room 304B of Campbell Hall and 
removed a book. The investigation is continuing 
Campus police officers responded to a fire alarm at Gemmell Student 
Complex on Sept. 12. 
•On Sept. 12. Nicholas R. MacGregor was found not guilty on a pre- 
vious charge cited by Public Safety. At die summary appeal bearing, he 
was charged with criminal mischief. 

On Sept. 13. a pull station on the first floor of Nair Hall was pulled 
intentionally by unknown persons causing the entire hall to evacuate. 
A unknown person keyed a vehicle in the loading zone of Gemmell 
Student Complex on Sept. 14. The incident is under investigation. 
•On Sept. 14 at 2:41 a.m.. Amy M. Myer was arrested for DUI, going 
through a stop sign, and under age drinking. 
A Clarion University student. Jason Shugar was arrested for public 
drunkenness, under age drinking, and for drinking from an open con- 
tainer in a vehicle on the property of Clarion University on Sept. 15. 
•On Sept. 16 at approximately 8:30 p.m.. Public Safety was given a 
report of a stolen bike from Tippin Gym. 




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Less funding from state results in college tuition increases 



by Mate Stack, 
NewsWriter 



The Board of Governors for the 
State System of Higher 
Education (SSI 110 approved a 
4.5 percent increase in tuition for 
Pennsylvania residents at Uieir 
summer meeting. Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania is 
included in the SSI IK system of 
schools. 

The 4.5 percent increase will 
set the yearly tuition for full-time 
undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents who are Pennsylvania resi- 
dents to S3.368. The tuition per 
credit has been increased six dol- 
lars from last year. 

A tuition increase is a four- step 
process. In the fall of every year, 
the Board of Governors compiles 
budgets for the fourteen schools 
in the system. 

The Board of Governors then 
takes this information to the 
Chancellor's Office. 

He puts together a budget pro- 
posal that the Board of 
Governors will send to the gover- 
nor's office. 

The Board of Governors will 
explain the financial situation of 
the university in question to the 
governor. 

If there is any short fall, the 
university will request additional 



appropriations from the state to 
balance their budget. 

If the state gives the university 
the appropriations, the Board has 
to go back and think of possible 
alternatives to the situation. 
The Board will then uy to cut 
expenses for that university and 
refine their projections. 

If the Board still believes dial 
the university's revenues are 
going to be less than its expenses, 
they would propose a tuition 
increase. 

Dr. John W. Francis, the 
Comptroller for Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, pre- 
dicted that there will not be an 
increase in tuition for next 
semester "but every year they 
[the Board of Governors] go 
through the same analysis and 
almost every year there has been 
an increase." 

The increase varies from year 
to year but has been a consistent 
4 percent to 4.5 percent increase 
each year. 

A number of students have 
expressed concerns about if the 
tuition increase benefits the stu- 
dent body. 

Francis said, "Probably not, 
because there isn't a lot of new 
initiative in the budget, these are 
pretty much bare bone bud- 



gets... we are just asking for what 
is needed for basic operation." 

II there is excess money, it 
would be put into a student fund. 
The leftover tuition may be used 
to expand die fiberoptic network 
on campus. The linkup would be 
integrated into all student com- 
puter labs and the dormitories. 

The Board of Governors also 
approved non-resident student 
tuition rates. 

Non-resident undergraduate 
tuition for the State System uni- 
versities rises to $8,566 per acad- 
emic year. This is an increase of 
$368 or 4.5 percent. 

Graduate non-resident tuition 
advances to $6,054 per academic 
year, an increase of $260 or 4.5 
percent. 

The 14 SSHE system schools 
are Bloomsburg University, 
California University of 
Pennsylvania, Cheyney 

University, Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, East Stroudsburg 
University, Edinboro University, 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania, Kutztown 

University, Lock Haven 
University, Mansfield University, 
Millersville University, 

Shippensburg University, 

Slippery Rock University, and 
West Chester University. 



Clarion students begin third year in inner city 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



There will be a new focus group 
for Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania students, who on 
Sept 14 will start a third year of 
an outreach program to inner-city 
Pittsburgh. 

When the 1 1 Clarion University 
students make the first of their 
monthly visits, they will be meet- 
ing with 14 to 17 African- 
American males referred to them 
by the Community Intervention 
Supervisors Project. 

These males are directed 
through the court system to 
churches in Wilkinsburg. 
Homewood. Garfield, and the 
Hill District and on to the Clarion 
volunteers. 

'"Our students will focus on 
mentoring from a Christian per- 
spective and developing life 



skills," says Rogers Laugand, 
director of Minority Student 
Services at Clarion University. 

The life skills include topics 
such as money management, 
skills needed to find a job, and 
developing talents to help reach 
goals in life. 

The program also links to the 
second year of a "think tank" 
operated by Laugand. 

"Our "think tank' talks about 
how to deal with issues so people 
don't become part of the criminal 
justice system." says Laugand. 

"We discuss how to deal with 
concerns that affect us or hinder 
our success and how to make 
these experiences more success- 
ful." 

"We also discuss economics, 
politics, and academia. It helps us 
assess what education means to 
us. that we don't take education 



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lightly but make the best use of it. 
We stress education's role in 
reaching other people to give a 
sense of hope that there is anoth- 
er way. We also try to maintain a 
spiritual component in our dis- 
cussions." 

The inner-city work is being 
conducted through Christian Life 
Skills Inc. of Pittsburgh led by 
executive director Barbara 
Rogers and operated through die 
Church of God, Lincoln Ave.. 
Hast Liberty. 

Laugand and a few students 
made an initial visit to Pittsburgh 
in die spring of 1994 with sever- 
al additional visits added later in 
dial year and throughout 1995- 
96. 

"This is a program I believe in 
and that is why I participate in 
it." explains Laugand. 

"Many students here at Clarion 
University also find it worth- 
while enough to want to do it on 
a regular basis. We are focusing 
on die African-American com- 
munity and many of these volun- 
teers come from the same back- 
ground, but have grown distant 
from this community since com- 
ing to college. They are the same 
individually, but with broadened 
horizons. 






September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Cad 



Page 7 



Professor cont ract negotiatons for state universities continue at slow pace 



by Matt Winger, 
News Writer 



Negotiations are heating up as 
the Association of Pennsylvania 
Slate College and University 
Faculties (ASCUF) and the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) as both parties head to a 
new bargaining meeting on 
September 19. Professors in the 
SSHE system are heading into 
their fifth week of classes and are 
working without a contract. Their 
last collective bargaining agree- 
ment with SSHE went into effect 
on July 4, 1994 and was binding 
through June 30, 1996. The 



agreement is an exact copy of the 
contracts that have been effective 
since 1970. 

According to Dr. William 
Fulmer, the president of the 
Clarion University chapter of 
APSCUF and a professor in the 
administrative science depart- 
ment, members and faculties at 
Clarion University and other col- 
leges in the SSHE system have 
been frustrated by SSHE and its 
unwillingness to budge on certain 
issues. SSHE has proposed sig- 
nificant changes from the origi- 
nal contracts and APSCUF repre- 
sentatives aren't willing to agree 



to these changes. 

"APSCUF is unhappy wiih the 
current proposals SSHE is 
putting on the table, "said 
Fulmer. "We consider them a 
broad assault on what we've been 
comfortable with for 25 years." 

On September 19. talks will 
resume as faculty and administra- 
tors will try to decide on various 
changes proposed by SSHE and 
will uy to find a common ground 
on which to settle. If a contract 
isn't done by the end of the 
semester, the possibility of a 
strike could become a reality. 
More bargaining meetings after 



the Thursday meeting have been 
set up to prevent a strike. 

All state schools have a presi- 
dent of their- APSCUF chapter 
who will serve on the negotia- 
tions team. The chief negotiator 
is James Covvden, attorney at 
law. The team is looking at a 
multi-year contract similar to 
their current contract which was 
implemented in 1994. 

The chief negotiator for SSHE's 
negotiation team is Thomas 
Giotto, an attorney from 
Pittsburgh. Included on the nego- 
tiation team is Dr. Joseph 
Gruenwald, dean of the College 



of Business Administration at 
Clarion University. The SSHE 
team reports back to die Board of 
Governors of the SSHE system in 
Harrisburg. The Board of 
Governors is presided by 
Governor Tom Ridge and has 
every state university president 
on the board. 

Through continued negotia- 
tions, APSCUF eventually hopes 
to have (he support of the univer- 
sity students. "Some of the things 
SSHE is proposing will cause the 
students to side with the faculty 
when they finally come out," 
concluded Fulmer. 



Ku Klux Klan member, David Duke, to speak at Cal-State 



Courtesy of 
College Press Service 

In a controversial vote, the stu- 
dent senate at California State 
University-Northridge decided to 
pay former Ku Klux Klan mem- 
ber David Duke $4,000 to debate 
affirmative action on campus. 

The senate voted 12-11 to invite 
the former Louisiana legislator to 
a Sept. 25 debate with Joe Hicks, 
a civil rights activist and execu- 
tive director of the Los Angeles- 
based Multicultural 
Collaborative. 

"We seem to forget this is a uni- 
versity," explained senate presi- 



dent Vladimir Coma, whose vote 
broke an 11-11 deadlock. 

"If you can't discuss these 
issues here, where can you do 
it?" 

During an open forum, a num- 
ber of students questioned 
whether Duke should be allowed 
to debate Proposition 209, a 
November ballot measure that 
would ban affirmative-action 
policies in all state hiring and 
college admissions. 

"David Duke shouid come here, 
because we need students to 
express their views," said Tamara 
Benefield, a 20-year old philoso- 
phy junior. 



"This type of tolerance is the 
main pillar of a multiculturalist 
society, without which we would 
be relegated to narrow-minded, 
egocentric, dictatorial views," 
she said. 

Others disagreed. 

Marc Powell, a member of the 
senate, called Duke "a pest in our 
society" who should not be invit- 
ed to speak at CSUN. 

Powell also voiced his concern 
that Powell might use the $4,000 
in his campaign for the U.S. 
Senate. 

Duke, who lost to Democratic 
Sen. J Bennett Johnston in 1990, 



will face 14 other candidates in 
Louisiana's open primary Sept.. 
21. 

"He is not a reputable person," 
Powell said. "We would not 
invite a rapist to speak." 

The money to pay Dave and 
Hicks, who will receive about 
$1,000, comes from student fees 
tiiat support activities such as lec- 
tures. 

Kirsten O'Brien, a member of 
CSUN's lesbian and gay student 
center, said, "There's a difference 
between allowing free speech 
and encouraging hatred." 

O'Brien said of Duke's sched- 



uled appearance: "I plan on 
attending , and I plan on protest- 



ing. 



Gov. Pete Wilson's office con- 
demned the senate's decision, 
however, saying that Duke was 
not an appropriate choice at a dis- 
cussion on Proposition 209. 

"To equate the civil rights mea- 
sure, an initiative that seeks to 
end discrimination, with a racist 
like David Duke is an outrage," 
Sean Walsh, the governor's press 
secretary, told reporters. 



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Page 8 



Student 




Compiled by Student Senate reporter, Sandee Siford 

The Student Senate met on September 16. 1996 at 7:30 p.m.. in the 
Gemmell Multi- Purpose Room at the Gemmell Student Complex. 

President Reinhard welcomed the new Senate this night. Alter 
September 30, 1996, there will be an accountability report Tor the ISF 
fund. Founder's Hall will be going into the first stage of renovation on 
September 17. 1996. It should be ready for use in January of 1999. A 
program is in the process of being set up for students who have con- 
cerns on campus. 

Dr. Haberacker discussed the Facilities Master Planning with the 
Senate. The Faculty Planning Committee will be meeting next week 
with the master planners on September 25, 1996 at 5 p.m. in Room 248 
of the Gemmell Student Complex. An assessment is going to be done 
on the current facilities on campus. There will be an open meeting for 
students at 3:30 p.m. on September 24. There will be special attention 
to the library, student housing, parking, and the siting on the new recre 
ation center. 

Homecoming voting was held Monday through Wednesday this 
week. 

Activity Day is September 18, 1996 from 4-6 p.m. People are need- 
ed to assist in set-up and break-down. 

The Rules and Regulations Committee Chair, Senator Leonard made 
motions to approve the revised constitutions of Koinania Christian 
Fellowship and the African American Student Union. Both motions 

were passed. 

The ad-hoc Campus Safety Committee appointed Senator llosford. 
Senator Gould, and Senator Dando to the committee. 



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The Clarion Call 



September 1 9. 1 9% 



September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pafie 9 



Reaccreditation for masters program is passed 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion University's Master of 
Science in Library Science 
(MSLS) program was reaccredit- 
ed over the summer by the 
Committee on Accreditation 
(COA) of the American Library 
Association (ALA). 

The accreditation decision was 
made during ALA's annual con- 
ference in New York. 

The decision was brought about 
by a two-year self study process 
by the department and a visit to 
campus by a panel of librarians 
representing COA. 

"Both the reaccreditation deci- 
sion by COA and the evidence in 
our self-study indicate that we 
have a healthy and vibrant pro- 
gram that is responding to the 
growing need for library and 
information professionals at the 
regional, national, and interna- 
tional levels." said Dr. James 
Maccaferri, the chairman of the 
department. 

Maccaferri noted that several of 
the department's graduates go on 
to hold important regional posi- 
tions, including the directorships 



of the Oil City. New Bethlehem, 
and Rimersburg public libraries. 
They have also gone on to posi- 
tions in national and international 
levels including a graduate who 
is a divisional director at Harvard 
University and another who is 
director of reference services at 
the King Fahd National Library 
in Saudi Arabia. 

Clarion's MSLS program is one 
of only 50 such programs accred- 
ited by ALA in the U.S. and one 
of only drree in Pennsylvania. 
The odier Pennsylvania universi- 
ties with ALA accredited pro- 
grams are Drexel in Philadelphia 
and the University of Pittsburgh. 
In its letter of notification to 
Clarion. COA commended the 
university for its focus on dis- 
tance learning, including the 
MSLS classes currently being 
offered in Harrisburg, and 
applauded its efforts to support 
the faculty's scholarship and pro- 
fessional activities. 

Maccaferri noted that the facul- 
ty's scholarly activities are sig- 
nificant and that in the 10 years 
covered by the self-study, the 
department's seven faculty mem- 
bers collectively produced 81 



journal articles, reports, and book 
chapters; authored 21 books; pre- 
sented 88 speeches and lectures 
outside the university: and won 
grants totaling more than 
$400,000. 

"Reaccreditation is an impor- 
tant reaffirmation of Clarion's 
graduate library science pro- 
gram," continued Maccaferri. 
noting that it serves as a vehicle 
to assure the community that die 
program has educationally appro- 
priate goals, is continuing to meet 
those goals, and can reasonably 
be expected to continue meeting 
the goals. 

"While the reaccreditation deci- 
sion certainly suggests that 
Clarion's MSLS program is 
deserving of its national reputa- 
tion for excellence, it is also a 
challenge for the department to 
continue to provide the leader- 
ship that is necessary to keep the 
library profession at the forefront 
of the rapidly evolving informa- 
tion revolution," said Maccaferri. 
People who are interested in 
more information on the depart- 
ment or career information about 
the library profession should con- 
tact Maccaferri at 814-226-2271. 



Clarion University "Building Bridges" enters second year 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



The Innovative "Building 
Bridges" program, with double 
the Participants and an expanded 
focus area, enters its second year 
with the opening of the 1996 Fall 
semester at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Seventeen stu- 
dents will be associates in this 
program designed to increase 
communication and understand- 
ing between Clarion students of 
diverse racial and ethnic back- 
grounds. 

This intergroup communication 
program, designed to reduce 
intergroup conflict, came to the 
attention of Clarion University 
students when they attended a 
Conference on Students of Color 




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and brought the idea back to 
Clarion University President 
Diane L. Reinhard, leading to the 
establishment of the program 
directed by Rogers Laugand. 
director of Minority Student 
Services, and Dehorah King, 
director of the Women's Studies 
Program. 

"President Reinhard. the admin- 
istration, and the faculty are very 
supportive of this effort." says 
Laugand. "We received a lot of 
positive feedback and we hope to 
do more sessions this year than 
during 1995-96." 

In Building Bridges the student 
associates arc invited into class- 
rooms by the Professor. They 
seek to begin deeper dialogue 
concerning intergroup issues. 
Taking this effort to the class- 
room, the most obvious educa- 
tional setting on a college cam- 
pus, is designed to bring this real- 
ity into clearer focus. 

Last year, Building Bridges vis- 
ited 24 classes and conducted a 
session will all of the resident 
assistants. They reached approxi- 
mately 900 students. 

"We already have four class- 



room visits scheduled during 
September," says Laugand. "We 
are also planning to go to 
Venango Campus in Oil City this 
year and would like to eventually 
go to the West Penn Hospital pro- 
gram in Pittsburgh." 

The primary focus is race and 
ethnicity, but other topics that 
may arise include gender, class, 
sexual orientation, and disability 
concerns. Professors entertaining 
the associates prepare the class 
by collecting anonymous ques- 
tions/topic^ from students in 

advance. These questions are 
used as the starting point for class 
discussion. 

The associates selected to 
Participate in Building Bridges 
go through an interview process. 
Once selected they complete a 
three day training session to 
develop skills such as effective 
listening, nondefensive commu- 
nication of feelings, creating a 
supportive and open atmosphere 
rather than a competitive debate, 
and handling difficult group 
members. Ongoing training will 
continue throughout the year. 



The Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
College of Business Administration, located 
in Still Hall on the Clarion University cam- 
pus, will host an open house on Saturday, 
September 21 from 9 a.m. - 1 2 p.m. 



LIFESTYLES 



Tammy Hager from Australia 




I thought I could write and tell 
everyone in Clarion a little about 
Uni Life over in Australia. First 
of all. college is called Uni, not 
college or school, and 
Ausualians don't have majors, 
they have studies. 

I learned all of the differences 
pretty quickly when everyone 
started looking at me weird when 
I asked them questions. 

They all basically shrugged and 
knew I was an American who 
really did not know the differ- 
ence. 

It gets quite embarrassing when 
that happens, but you learn quick 
enough. 

Another difference is that they 
do not classify themselves as 
freshman, sophomore, and so on. 
They go by years. 

Although the freshman do szet 
classified as Freddies, which 
means something that probably 
would not be suitable to write. 

Not only are the phrases differ- 
ent, but die housing is definitely a 
change. I live in a unit (an apart- 
ment type house) with 11 other 
people: there are 7 girls and 5 
boys. Everyone gets their own 
room, which is nice, but I share a 
bathroom with both girls and 
boys. There is not loo much pri- 
vacy in these living conditions. 
There is also a living room and 
kitchen and maids to clean (real 
nice to have). 

Australian University's are very 
laid back on their alcohol politics 
too. It was such a suiprise to me 
to see people drinking alcohol in 
the cafeteria. 

That is so unlike-like the U.S. 
campuses, as we all know.. The 
school even seems to promote 
alcohol more than studying. 
Don't get me wrong, Uni is very 
competitive and studying is nec- 
essary, of course, but alcohol is a 
prominent thing here. 

All their sporting events are fol- 
lowed by drinking and there is a 



bar on campus. 

Every day in the afternoon there 
is a different band playing in the 
center of the activities building, 
and on Thursdays, beer is free. 
This was definitely a culture 
shock for me and the other 
American students. 

Just in case anyone is wonder- 
ing, the drinking age here is 18! 
Well, the social life is great, 
except there are classes and 
homework to do! The courses 
arc also very different. You are 
only required to take the courses 
that you will need for your major. 
No other electives are required. 
There are only 3 buildings here 
for classes, science, arts and edu- 
cation. 

As a science major, I find it nice 
that you only have to go to prac- 
tical (lab) every other week. The 
level of difficulty of the classes 
are comparable to Clarion. I find 
most things they teach here are 
based on the U.S. or on someone 
that is American. 

I did not realize how much the 
U.S. influenced other countries 
until now. I am actually learning 
more about the U.S. now than I 
did when I was there! 

There is another thing, every- 
one over here can tell who the 
Americans are! I do not know 
how they know because we do 
not look any different. The only 
way is by our accents, of course. 
I already acquired a nickname 
over here by my roommates. 
"Yank." I get introduced to 
everyone by, "this is our new 
Yank." Oh well. 1 guess it is 
expected. 

One more thing before I go. I 
would not recommend traveling 
to another country during the 
Olympics. Even though the 
Americans kicked bull, the U.S. 
got ripped on left and right. I had 
to defend America when there is 
only one of me and 20 
Australians. Do not gel me 
wrong. Australians are cool peo- 
ple, so I didn't rub it in too much 
when die U.S. won!! 

By the way. If anyone wants to 
e-mail me, my address is 
hager@tlcakin.edu.au. Hope to 
hear from you! 
G' day! 

•Author is a Clarion Student 
studying abroad. 




Community Service Fair 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service-Learning Office 

Students will be given die 
opportunity to meet approximate- 
ly 20 representatives of local ser- 
vice organizations at this year's 
Community Service Fair. 

For the fifth year, the 
Community Service-Learning 
office has organized this opportu- 
nity for students of Clarion 
University to access agencies ;md 
learn about volunteer opportuni- 
ties that they offer. 

"Our objective in holding die 
Community Service Fair is to 
encourage the students of Clarion 
University to take part in mean- 
ingful volunteer opportunities." 
said Heidi Bower, coordinator of 
die fair. 

"College is nol only about 
books and classes, it's also about 
serving others through volunteer- 
ing. 

At the Community Service 
office we try to hook students up 
with agencies in die community 
that are seeking volunteers," 
Bovver continued. 

"One of me ways to accomplish 
this is through our annual 



-s^J oV^tntee. 



<r 



^L- 




*Vor 



Community Service Fair in 
which we invite the area agencies 
to meet our students." 

The fair will feature booths at 
which each agency will display 
materials about the volunteer 
opportunities they have to offer. 

In order to make sure students 
are exposed to as many different 
organizations as possible Bower 
has devised a game of "SERVE" 
bingo. 

Students that play will get a 
chance to win a gift certificate to 
the Book Center, also refresh- 
ments will be available. 

The agencies participating in 
this year's fair are; AAA 
Pregnancy Center, the American 
Cancer Society, YMCA, Area 



Agency on the Aging. 
Jefferson/Clarion I leadstart. 

Jefferson/Clarion Community 
Action, PASSAGES, SAFE, the 
Literacy Council. Clarion Area 
Elementary PTO, Drug and 
Alcohol Administration. Clarion 
County Mental Health. March of 
Dimes, Northwest Rural AIDS 
Alliance. American Lunn 

c 

Association. Goodwill and the 
United Way of Clarion County. 

The fair will be held at the 
Gemmell Outdoor Performance 
area from 12 - 4 p.m. on 
September 25. In case of rain 
that day, it will be in the 
Gemmell Multi-purpose room. If 
you have any questions call, 
xl865. 



' ""Minmti ■ ■ ■ *'^ "^*i^ft^i TllWtVtnjrtrYYTrjrWVYWVVV> * - - 



AViWMM»\%W^Hmi 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 19, 1996 



News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



September 19. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



LEAD STORIES 

— The London insurance bro- 
kerage Cioodfcllovv Rebecca 
Ingrains Pearson announced in 
August it would begin to offer 
policies to cover people worried 
about alien abduction. A premi- 
um of about SI 55 a year would 
pay off about S160.CXX) to an 
abductee (provided the abductor 
was not from Harth) and -double 
that if the insured is impregnated 
during the abduction. 

Since alien powers are 
unknown, men can purchase the 
impregnation rider, also. Said 
Goodfellow director Simon 
Burgess. "I personally would not 
buy [this] policy." 

-Pushing the Envelope in Police 
Sex Stings: In April, a sheriffs 
spokesman in Fort Collins. Cob., 
admitted that police officers actu- 
ally engaged in sex with prosti- 
tutes during a January sting 
instead of making the arrest at the 
point at which the women agreed 
to have sex for money. 

Said the spokesman, -The offi- 
cers thought they needed to do 
what they did to make the case." 
And in June, North Carolina's 
Alcohol Law Enforcement agents 
in Jacksonville made similar 
admissions. 

One agent testified that he put 
his fingers on a woman's genitals 
in order to "feel it occurring." 
Said ALE's lawyer, "If this was- 
n't die proper role of law enforce- 
ment, I don't know what is." 

— Contest Mania: In July, Pepsi 
Cola was sued by a Lynnwood. 
Wash., man who took seriously 
die company's lighthearted offer 
to redeem 7 million premium 
points for a Harrier fighter jet in a 
"Pepsi Stuff" promotion. 

And in August, a federal 
appeals court in St. Louis forced 
Nationwide Insurance Co. to 



award a slogan-contest-winning 
ex-employee "his-and-hers" 
Mercedes-Benzes despite the 
company's claim that it was just 
kidding. 

And in July, David Lee filed a 
lawsuit against the Cafe Santa Fe 
in Rogers. Ark., alter it denied 
him a Kawasaki Jet Ski because 
he failed to write a reason why he 
liked a certain menu item on his 
prize-winning entry form. Lee 
contends that the required "25 
words or less" includes "zero 
words. 

QUESTIONABLE JUDGE- 
MENTS 

— Amid howls of protest, John 
Crulehley. 49. Florida's "vampire 
rapist" and a beneficiary of the 
state's early-release prison pro- 
gram, was let out on 50 years' 
probation in August after serving 
only 10 years in prison for a 
heinous, blood-drinking rape in 
1985. 

However, Crutchley violated 
probation by testing positive for 
marijuana use on the day of his 
release. 

Thus, he lost the benefit of early 
release, and for drug use during 
probation, he was returned 
to.serve the 50 years behind bars. 
— In Ottawa, Ohio, in May, 
church secretary Linda Siefer 
was sentenced to two years in 
prison for a scheme in which she 
systematically removed all 20 
bills from the collection plates at 
St. Michael's Catholic Church in 
Kalida. Ohio, over a four-year 
period. 

Ms. Siefer and her husband 
lived well above their combined 
S32.000 income, but the scheme 
did not come to light until a bank 
employee thought it odd that 
there were never any S20 bills in 
the church's deposits. 
— In April in Bedford. Va.. John 



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M. Kirby decided to show off to 
his passengers as he drove by a 
group of police officers demon- 
strating drug bust techniques to 
reporters. Kirby yelled some 
trash talk, and the officers, seeing 
Kirby's faulty taillight, chased 
him. According to police, Kirby 
had marijuana in the truck and a 
suspended driver's license. 
— In June, after an investigation 
in Montreal, Quebec, coroner 
Teresa Sourour criticized the 
Fleury Hospital for its judgment 
in January not to come immedi- 
ately to the aid of a 75-year-old 
man who had suffered a heart 
attack just outside the building. 
Hospital employees reportedly 
discussed whether to go out in 
die minus-20-degree weather to 
help the man but finally decided 
just to call an ambulance. The 
man died a few minutes later. 

— William Keith former. 35. 
whom a judge put on probation 
last year for sending three nude 
photos of himself to a nurse, 
pleaded guilty in St. I. ouis in July 
to sending another one to die 
judge who gave him the proba- 
tion. After the probation ended 
in februarv. Former left a mes- 



sage on the female judge's voice 
mail that said: "I really like you. 
I hope you don't get upset with 
the picture I [am sending]. I hope 
you remember me." 

— After a major riot in April at 
the Winnipeg, Manitoba, jail, 
supervisors hired many tempo- 
rary workers to clean up, and 
among those who applied and 
was hired, according to the 
Winnipeg Sun, was Stephen Lee 
Gressman, 30, who was at the 
time on Manitoba's 10 Most 
Wanted list for extortion and 
assault. Me worked a few days 
and left town just before being 
identified. 

— In July, Richard Gallagher 
was arrested in Mineola, N.Y., 
and charged with aggravated 
harassment after making a tele- 
phone call to get help in blowing 
up die high school where he had 
just lost his job as custodian. 

The call he made was to a 
"Peter King." whose number 
Gallagher had obtained from a 
friend. Unknown to Gallagher. 
Peter King is a U.S. congress- 
man. Said Gallagher to police. "'I 
thought he was one of the boys." 




Students! Faculty! 
Which is More Important? 



Come Decide! 

Clarion's Debate Team Holds Its First Public Debate 
of the Year, as Two Students Debate Two Faculty 

Members. 



PWWfWW*W|WWW 



7:30 PM 

Tuesday, September 24, 1 996 

Gemmeil Rotunda 



*e^ 



Sponsored by the Clarion University Forensics Union 
L and the Department of Residence Life 

^ i 



THE DEMOCRATIC 
PROCESS 

— Albuquerque. N.M., sehool- 
teaeher Scott Glasrud failed by 
two votes (1.170 to 1.168) in the 
Republican primary for a state 
senate seat in June, and the next 
month realized that his father-in- 
law's and mother-in-law's votes 
for him had not been counted 
because a death in the family had 
delayed their mailing in their 
write-in ballots. 

— In August, Julian Carlo 
Fagotti. 30, kicked off his TV ad 
campaign for a seat on the city 
council of Curitiba, Brazil, by 
standing before the camera nude 
except for one of his brochures 
held in a strategic spot. Said 
Fagotti. "[My opponents] are the 
ones to be ashamed [for how they 
treat the voters]." 

— In June, the Los Angeles 
Times profiled California chiro- 
practor and state assemblyman 
Martin Gallegos, who said he 
cheerfully offers free chiropractic 
adjustments to his legislative col- 
leagues and staff members in his 
office and has treated at least a 
dozen assembly members of both 
parties. 
UPDATE 

News of the Weird reported in 
1991 that the Avon, Colo., town 
council had resorted to a contest 
to name the new bridge over 
Eagle River linking 1-70 with 
U.S. Highway 6. Sifting through 
84 suggestions (such as "Eagle 
Crossing"), the council voted, 4- 
2. to give it die official name 
"Bob." 

In August 1996, the Globe and 
Mail newspaper reported that 
"Bob" is running in second place 
in an official eonlest to rename 
Canada's Northwest Territories 
province after Nunavut becomes 
a separate jurisdiction in 1999. 
COD'S WILL 

In July. 58 worshipers, seeking 
divine protection on an astrologi- 
cally unlucky day. were crushed 
to death by other stampeding 
worshipers at two Hindu shrines 
in the eities of Haridwar and 
Ujjain, India. And in August, a 
9-yeai-old boy was crushed to 
death when a granite tombstone 
fell over on him at a Bible school 
in Summerville, Ca. 

Also in August, according to 
police in New Orleans, Melvin 
llitehens. 66. who had been read- 
ing die Bible on his front porch, 
put it down, fetched his gun, and 
shot to death a neighbor woman 
with whom he had been feuding 
about the cleanliness of theiF 
yards. 



Annoying ads that make you want to shout by Dave Barry 



So I turned dn my car radio, and 
the first thing I heard was the 
Shouting Car-Dealership jerk. 
You know die one I mean. He 
sounds like this: "BELOW 
DEALER COST!! MAX 
SNOTWICK FORD DODGE 
ISUZU CHEVROLET NISSAN 
STUDEBAKER TOYOTA IS 
SELLING CARS AT BELOW 
DEALER COST!! WE'RE 
LOSING MONEY ON THESE 
CARS!! WE HAVE TO MAKE 
ROOM FOR MORE CARS!! 
SO WE CAN LOSE MORE 
MONEY!! WE HAVE 

PROCESSED CHEESE FOR 
BRAINS!! THAT'S WHY 
WERE SELLING CARS FOR 
BELOW DEALER..." I immedi- 
ately did what I always do when 
the Shouting Car-Dealership Jerk 
comes on: I changed the station. 
I will listen to ANYTHING— 
including Morse Code, static and 
the song "A Horse With No 
Name" — before I will listen to 
those commercials , and I think 
most people feel the same way. 
So the question is: Why are they 
on the air? Why are car dealer- 
ships paying good money for 
commercials that people hate? 
My theory is that these commer- 
cials are not paid for by- the car 
dealership; they're paid for by 



competing radio stations, who 
hope you will switch to them. I 
developed a similar theory years 
ago about the infamous "ring 
around the collar" commercials 
for Wisk. Remember those? 
They always featured a 
Concerned Housewife who tried 
and Uied to get her husband's 
collars clean; but when her hus- 
band, who apparently didn't 
wash his neck, would put on a 
shirt, people would point out that 
his collar was dirty. You'd think 
he'd have punched them in the 
mouth but instead he just looked 
chagrined, and these extremely 
irritating voice — voices that 
would kill a laboratory rat in sec- 
onds — would shriek: "RING 
AROUND THE COLLAR!! 
RING AROUND THE COL- 
LAR!!" And the Concerned 
Housewife would be SO embar- 
rassed that the only thing pre- 
venting her from lying down 
right on her kitchen floor and 
slashing her wrists was the fear 
that the paramedics might notice 
that she had waxy yellow 
buildup. There was a time when 
the " ring around the collar" cam- 
paign was arguably the single 
most detested aspect of American 
culture. Many people that, 
because of those commercials 



Jack, a movie for everyone 



by Holly Gerlack and Karin 

Huebner 

Lifestyles Writers 

Robin Williams stars as Jack 
Powell in this lighthearted come- 
dy about a ten year old boy who 
ages four times quicker than nor- 
mal people. 

Having been born only ten 
weeks into his mother's pregnan- 
cy. Jack's appearance, weight and 
healdi were fully developed, as 
diough he had lived in the womb 
for nine mondis. 

The only problem was that 
Jack's body was mat of a forty 
year old man at the age of ten. 

Portraying the part of Mrs. 
Powell. (Jack's mother) Diane 
Lane does a superb job of caring 
and loving her son, who's fifth 
grade peers are not accepting of 
him. 

This movie was written with 
pure passion, and a great deal of 
comedy. Playing the role of 
Jack's tutor is Bill Cosby, who 
persuades Jack's parents to allow 
Jack to attend school. Ms. 
Marque/., played by Jennifer 
Lopez, is Jack's fifth grade 
teacher who makes his experi- 
ence at school worthwhile. One 
of the other well known stars in 
this film is Fran Drescher, who's 
ignorance of Jack's real age 



makes for an extremely funny 
storyline. 

Jack, leaches young children in 
a sincere, but often humorous 
way. to be accepting of every- 
body even if they are different. 

This film educates the audience 
about how precious life can be 
and the importance of living for 
today and not for tomorrow. 

This is a great movie for all 
ages. Children will enjoy it just 
as much as adults. This was def- 
initely a great pick! 

We both give it two enthusias- 
tic thumbs up and tell everyone 
on die Clarion University campus 
that this is one movie experience 
that you cannot afford to miss 
this fall. 

Jack is currently playing at a 
theatre in town. 




stayed on the air for YEARS. 
Why? Because SOMEBODY 
was buying Wisk. The question 
is: Who? My theory is that it 
was the Soviet Union. These ads 
ran during the height of the Cold 
War. when the Soviets would 
stop at nothing to destroy 
America. I believe they sent 
agents over here with the mission 
of purchasing huge quantities of 
Wisk; this convinced the Wisk 
manufactures that the "ring 
around the collar" campaign was 
working, so they kept it on the 
air, thereby causing millions of 
Americans to conclude that they 
lived in a nation of complete 
idiots, and thus to become 
depressed and alienated. I 
believe that virtually all the neg- 
ative developments of the '60s 
and 70s — riots, protests, crime, 
drug use, "The Gong Show" — 



were related, directly or indirect- 
ly, to Wisk commercials. 

I also believe diat to this day. 
somewhere in the former Soviet 
Union, there are giant under- 
ground caverns containing mil- 
lions of bottles of Wisk. 
I'll tell you another kind of ad 1 
hale: The ones where they give 
you information that could be of 
no conceivable use to you. For 
example, there was a series of ads 
for_a chemical company, I forget 
which one, where they'd show 
you, say, a family watching tele- 
vision, and the announcer would 
say something like: "We don't 
make televisions. 

And we don't make the plastic 
thing that hold the wires inside 
the televisions. We make the 
machines mat stamp the numbers 
on the little plastic things that 
hold the wires inside the televi- 
sions." When I saw those ads, I 
wanted to scream: WHY ARE 
YOU PAYING MILLIONS OF 
DOLLARS TO TELL ME 
THIS?? WHAT DO YOU 
WANT ME TO DO?? I do not 
care for: Any ad featuring a 
demonstration of a product 
absorbing an intimate bodily 
fluid. Any ad where a singer 
sings with deep emotion about 
something nobody could feel 




Todd Walsh/Clarion Cal 



Holly Gerlack and Karin Huebner 



deeply emotional about, such as 
COitOO, Hoover vacuum cleaners, 
and Jiffy Lube. 

Builders Square has a commer- 
cial wherein die singer bleats this 
hvper-pauiotic song that makes it 
sound as though die people shop- 
ping there are actually building 
America, whereas in fact diey are 
looking for replacement toilet 
pails. Any of the endless series of 
ads by long-distance companies 
accusing other long-distance 
companies of lying. LISTEN, 
LONG-DISTANCE COMPA- 
NIES: WE DON'T BELIEVE 
ANY OF YOU ANYMORE. 
WE'RE THINKING OF GOING 
BACK TO SMOKE SIGNALS. 
Excuse me for shouting like the 
Car-Dealership Jerk; I get emo- 
tional about this. I'm sure you 
do. too, which is why I'm invit- 
ing you to write me at One 
Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 
33132, and tell me — briefly — 
what advertisements, past or pre- 
sent, that you really hate, and , 
why. I'll write a column about 
this, which will benefit humanity 
general by enabling me to write 
yet another column without 
doing any research. Don't thank 
me: I do it all for you. At WAY 
below dealer cost. 



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"Clarion's best kept secret!" 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 19. 1996 



M. and Face to Face reviewed 



by Henj Auman 
Lifestyles Writer 



Howdy, Benj Auman here. 
Hope you all had an enjoyable 
and eourl trial free summer! This 
is my first time ever writing lor 
the Call (as you'll be able to tell 
real quick), and this year I'll be 
keeping you up-to-date on all the 
latest album releases, eoneerts. 
and other weird, wild, and possi- 
bly illegal goings-on!! 

This week, I'll be reviewing 
two brand spanking new album 
releases, one a bloekbuster popu- 
lar release, and the other my per- 
sonal piek of die week. So. here 
we go... 

R.E.M, " New Adventures in 
Hi-I'i" . Warner Bros. Records. It 
hasn't taken R.E.M very long to 
follow-up their 1994 smash 
"Monster," their most "alterna- 
tive rock friendly" album to date. 
But if you 're expecting a sequel 
to it, you may be waiting another 
two years. 

If you're like me (and I'd be 
scared if you were), you like an 
album to start out with a BANG!! 
Something to get you pumped for 
the whole album. 

And here we have a song 
called "How the West Was Won 
and Where it Got Us," a song that 
is as boring as the title is long. 
Very slow, very unmelodic. If 
R.E.M were looking to write a 
song unlike one they've ever 
done, they've succeeded here. It 



left me baflled and confused, as 
did the whole album. 

In stark contrast to the first 
track, the following track "The 
Wake-Up Bomb" is a cheerful, 
up tempo, catchy and very 
R.H.M. A foot-lappin'. energetic 
piece. It woke me up from my 
near sleep widi "I low the West 
Was Won..." 

The best way to describe this 
album is "manic depressive." It 
belongs in both your record store 
and the Warren State Hospital, 
4th Floor. R.E.M has given us 
two extremes here, either really 
good quality rock, or really dis- 
jointed and tired pieces. 

The good is really good, and 
the bad is really bad. Not much 
more in between. 

Songs like "Undertow," 
"Leave," and "So Fast. So 
Numb,"give it its high points. 
Then there's songs like "E-Bow 
the Letter," "Zither," and "Be 
Mine," which leave you wonder- 
ing what went wrong. 

" New Adventures in Hi-Fi " 
is great for the die hard R.E.M 
fan looking for something differ- 
ent. But if you're just a fan of 
their previous releases "Green," 
"Monster," or "Eponymous," this 
new one may just be too much 
for you to handle. 

Finally, my pick of the week 
is the self-titled album by " Face 
To Face " on A&M Records. 
After seeing these guys headline 
the Vans Warped Tour this sum- 
mer. I consider this band one of 




Benj Auman does music reviews for the Clarion Call 







the premier power pop punk 
bands out there today. 

Plus, after owning their 
awesome debut album "Don't 
Turn Away," on Fat Wreck 
Chords (Fat Records) and their 
equally awesome major label 
debut "Big Choice," I had big 
expectations for this new one. 
Once again, Face To Face didn't 
fail me. 

This album reaches out and 
grabs you right from the Mart 
with "Resignation." a classic 
Face To Face opener (if you con- 
sider a band that has been around 
for five years as "classic"). 

Blazing guitars and memo- 
rable harmonies highlight this 
one. which leads right into die 
albums" catchiest tune. "Walk die 



Walk." 

I guarantee you tliis one will 
have you singing along and 
annoying everyone around you in 
no Ume. 

Other standouts on the album 
include "Ordinary," "Can't 
Change the World," and the first 
single, "I Won't Lie Down," a 
slower-paced, but also very 
catchy tune. 

Almost all of the twelve 
tracks on Face To Face keep the 
energy flowing throughout. 

Raw melodies and emotion 
at its finest, in the vein of such 
bands as Jawbreaker, NOFX. and 
Down By Law. 

Face To Face offers fast- 
paced, catchier-than-a-cold. in- 
vour-face rock -n -roll. I recom- 



Todd Walsh/Clarion Call 



mend this album highly to all 
fans of groups like the above 
mentioned. 

I also recommend it for all of 
you out there who need some- 
thing different in your CD player, 
something that will get you out of 
bed in the morning and keep you 
going all day long. 

Curious to hear either of 
these new releases? 

Either take a large chunk of 
Mom and Dad's weekly check 
down to the NRM' or you can 
just give WCCB 1610 A.M. a call 
@ 226-2479 to hear these or any- 
thing else new and on the cutting 
edge. 

Mv show is Thursday night 
from 9-12. and 1 take all requests. 
See vou next week!! 



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Center 

Did you know thai (here are 
about a dozen vaccine pre- 
ventable diseases? Some ol 
these diseases could disrupt your 
college experience if you are not 
properly immunized. 

Measles is one of these dis- 
eases that has been a problem on 
college campuses. 

Other vaccine preventable 
diseases mat have been seen are 
meningococcal meningitis and 
hepatitis B. You need to be 
aware of the vaccines that are 
available and what immuniza- 
tions you have. 

Vaccines are usually prepara- 
tions of weakened or killed 
germs that will cause your body 
to form antibodies or protection 

ainst that specific disease. •*.-_--" 



Because of vaccines, smallpox 
and polio have virtually been 
eliminated from the Americas. 
Measles cases have dropped dra- 
matically since the development 
of die vaccine in 1963. 

Despite a very sale vaccine, 
there is still a long way to go to 
protect everyone from hepatitis 
B. 



Are You Prepared? 

To be properly immu 

nized you should 

have: 

TB test Prior to college 
Tetanus shot every 10 

years 
2 doses of Measles, 

Mumps and German 
l&epslesUaccme 




The vaccine clinic will be 
held by Keeling Health ('enter at 
(icmmell in room 240 on 
Saturday 21 from 9 a.m. — 12 
noon. 

They will offer TB tests, MMR 
and Tetanus/Diphtheria vaccines. 
The cost of these vaccines will 
be billed through student 
.'accounts v»* 



September 19. 1996 



THE Crossword 



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199S Tribune Madia Services. Inc 
All rights reserved. 



ACROSS 

1 Gwynneor 

Astaire 
5 Hit, old style 
10 Cook a certain 

way 

14 Georgia city 

15 A fabric 

16 Semicircular part 
of a church 

17 Of the ear 

18 Letters 

19 Derogatory word 

20 Most joyous 
22 Aquiline birds 

24 A deadly sin 

25 Gunner's need 

26 Splendid 
dwelling 

29 Free 

33 Disconcert 

34 Chicago players 

35 With heavy 
heart 

36 Jab 

37 Strained food 

38 Casino items 

39 Name in 
Genesis 

40 Barked 

41 Hard seed 

42 Detoured 

44 Oil colors 

45 Employer 

46 Personal inter- 
est 

47 Persecuted one 
50 Not alee 

54 Sorrowful cry 

55 New 

57 Leisure 

58 "— Like It Hot" 

59 Battery terminal 

60 Ceremony 

61 Try 

62 Move down 

63 Winter toy 



0) 
JQ 
-Q 

O 



DOWN 

1 By reason of 

2 Repetition 

3 Arab VIP 

4 A lessening 

5 Garment part 

6 Familiar term for 
a girt 

7 Part of MIT: 
abbr. 

8 Ball stand 

9 Ballet cast 

10 City in Maine 

11 Hyalite 

12 Woe— !" 

13 Lighthorse Harry 
etal. 

21 Edge 

23 Ed the singer 

25 Felt poorly 

26 Stationery 

27 Overhead 

28 L.A. player 



29 Attracted, in a 
way 

30 Chinese or 
Japanese 

31 Implied only 

32 Paradises 
34 Customer 

37 Pertaining to 
fathers 

38 Rootless ones 

40 In use 

41 Festive 

43 Beginning 

44 Kitchen gadget 

46 Stockholm 
native 

47 Upright spar 

48 — vera 

49 Butts 

50 Acknowledge 

51 Weather word 

52 Punta del — 

53 Marsh plant 
56 Lennon's widow 



|— Crossword Answers—* 

Is p E dMm aleMthew 
h i v e|n o vei|rus E 


ALE $Ia R 
DIIIRVI! 

m iru e| 

|T S E|T S El 


t s eHa n t e 

)Mm ok ted 

|P E T El 

Ie N T EJR E 

* T Si Is 1 N 

1 sjjs'w E D E 


A L 1 S Tl|L 1 

,1 i ol It e i 

oo e| Ir a < 

N E R JV U S| 

■Ie l s eJ 

S 1 G N E TWft 
PAL E|E L 


■ ELATED 

Id o Tjp 

II A S T E R E D 

t eBr A R A 


A G U eIe A ! 

IDOE R|S 1 1 


i E lIeIg A D 

r E^pJ^plE l e 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



ENTERTft[NMENT| 




CLINTON 
STRATEGIST 
JAMES 
CARVILLE 



P$&~FfcEE AMERICA 




AGE Q-+ 



H-\Z 



IZ-I8 



18-Z+ £¥-3g 38-65 <j>5- 



RiliL'M AfP£TT7£: No-DoZ 






by Bill Watterson 



A BfcLT OF FIE.RN CRiMSOM 
STRESS ACROSS THE SVCi .' 
iTS STVPEHDOUS MAH 7 



c 
o 

C 
O 

u 



THE FIENDISH BW SITTER GIRL 
WAS A LOCAL HOUSEHOLD IN 
HER IRON GRIP OF TERROR/ 
"WE MAN OF MEGA MIGHT 
ZOOMS TO THE RESCUE .' 




I'M IN LUCK.' BABYSITTER 
GIRL IS MOMENTARILY 
DETRACTED.' 




UI CHARLIE, ITSROSALVN. 
^EAH, I'M OVER W Wl L\T[IE 
MONSTER'S HOUSE AGWN . 
HMM' NO, NCTUAltf HE'S KEN 
PRETN GOOD TONIGHT. ^EAH, 
I CANT BF.UEVE IT 




♦•♦»«»»»»»#»♦•» 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 1 9. 1 996 



ENTERTAINMENT 






DAVE 

by David Miller 





I , i > i 







DAVEtoondaol . com ^ ' /"~ 




Code word 

TRANSLATIONS 

-for the 
relationship 
challenge^ 



REtf^eP. I DO THE 
(?«f/\pCH... "50 Y«J 



L0f4 6£T THiS APWfc IT'S 
CRlTiOUiY ACOAlMtV-' 



, PAVE, FPOA1 NOW 

ANP P£Ml /V\oof?e H°LPif^ ["CfT f\ LIFE"... ( 
HANE76- AT MY CWN H<?aY-\ ( >m noT TALKW' / 



wpop Movie pnemzpe . 



VICTUAL, Ok? Id' 






u. 



B 





w/«. v&u ptewe #> 6pt 

f?£APY ANP PeweMP^P IMS 
I* A SpgCML <*a$lON 



A«- I'M A4M6 tf THAT 
Next Tim? ybu at UAST 
CHBCK IN WITH /ME. 

rr 




ft WWCKftWWNfr 
1MEMIMI0 OFFICE,,. 



WHY MM 
©111 

Because... 

•We' re completely student run . 

•We let our DJ's pick their 

own formats, 
•We're conveniently located in 

Gemmell Student Complex. 
•DJ-ing at WCCB is fun{ 
•We're the OTHER place you 
can get your FCC license. 

If you have some spare time 
and are interested in getting 
Involved in the radio biz stop 
by WCCB Wednesdays at 8 
PM^orcaH v&%X22e&4?9: * * ' 

mil iliVlliMliii li l.«^'*i'iiWi*.i»l HlYl I 




September 19. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pa^e 15 




CALL 



Do You Feel That President 

Clinton Did The Right Thing 

By Attacking Iraq? 




YOU 




BY 
JEFF LEVKULICH 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
EDITOR 



Albert Buyer, Senior, Communication 
"No Comment." 






Trade Math is, Senior, Communication 
"No, is it really our job to control the world?" 



Phil Pegher, Senior, Elementary Education 

"Yes, we need to Finally step in and take control 

of the situation before it gets out of control." 



Dani Close, Freshman, Psychology 

"Yes, We need to let Saddam Hussein know he's 

not in control." 





** 






* 



Tim Gilara, Sophomore, Undecided 

"Yes, because if Iraq controls the Middle East, 

the United States will lose one of it's main 

oil supply." 



D.J. Washington, Junior, Communication 

"Yes because we need to lower 

gas prices in Clarion." 



Kevin Fricko, Junior, Undecided 
"No! Build Ramps not bombs!" 



ivMrtW** > 



T-^ 



■¥■ 



, J ,, J 1 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 1 9, 1 996 



r 



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September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



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SPORTS 



Clarion Beats Westminster - still undefeated 



by Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



The weather conditions were 
less than perfect for football on 
Saturday due to a week plagued 
with rain. It was cloudy and cold 
and the field wasn't perfect but 
that didn't stop the Golden Eagle 
football team from rolling over 
Westminster 13-6 to keep their 
undefeated season alive. 

It was a defensive battle all day 
as Clarion's offense struggled. 
Westminster's defense kept 
Clarion's running game to a min- 
imum. A touchdown by Clarion's 
Mark Wine was the only scoring 
in the first half. After halftime 
Westminster scored their first 
touchdown, but missed the extra 
point. With time running out in 
the fourth quarter Westminster 
was driving and faced a 3rd and 
10 at the Clarion 40. Then Brad 
Geer came on a safety blitz and 
made the sack leaving 
Westminster with a 4th and 26 
which they couldn't, convert. 
Clarion got the ball back and ran 
out the clock. This Saturday is 



"family day" as the Golden 
Eagles play host to Glenville 
State at 2:00. Glenville State is 
off to a deceiving 0-2 start under 
seventh year coach Rich 
Rodriquez, but are looking to get 
on track. Glenville, co-champi- 
ons of the WVIAC last season, 
brings a high powered air attack 
led by quarterback Rod Smith 
and a core of quality receivers. 
Their offense is averaging 416 
yards per game and should be the 
strongest test so far for the 
Clarion defense. They run a one 
back, four receiver set and like to 
air it out. They are averaging 52 
pass attempts per game. Their 
receivers are led by Carlos 
Ferralls who has 24 catches 
already for 264 yards and 3 
touchdowns. He is joined by 
Kenny Hinton, Trent Sherman , 
and Robert Talley. Leading the 
way on the ground for Glenville 
is Willie Dodson who has rushed 
for 135 yards on 22 carries this 
season. If Glenville State has a 
weakness it is their defense 
which is giving up 465 yards per 



game and 44 points. Clarion will 
look to exploit the defense with 
Ail-American Steve VVitte and 
the mammoth offensive line. 
Junior quarterback Chris Weibel 
and his main target Chris 
Skultety (6 catches, 83 yards, 1 
TD) will also look to put Clarion 
on the board. The story of the 
season, however, may be 
Clarion's defense which is 
ranked first in the PS AC, only 
allowing 190 yards a game. It 
will take the most from this 
defense to stop Glenville on 
Saturday. 

Clarion's secondary, led by All- 
America free safety Kim 
Niedbala, will have to play tight 
if they are going to stop 
Glenville's passing game. 
Niedbala will be joined by strong 
safeties Brad Geer and Carter 
Woodson, while the corners will 
be protected by Chad Wissner 
and Jason Drayton. The line 
backers for Clarion are very good 
as well and they, too, will be 
called on to cover the middle and 
also get some pressure on the 




Clarion hosts high powered 

quarterback. 

The defensive line led by nose- 
guard Jason Slizofski will have to 
get in the face of Glenville's 
quarterback and not allow him 
time to throw the ball if the 
Golden Eagles are to keep their 
undefeated season alive. Clarion 
head coach Malen Luke said, 
"Glenville has a very strong 



File Photo /Clarion Call 
Glenville St. Saturday at 2 

team. They have talented, skill 
players and are very explosive 
offensively. Our defense, espe- 
cially our secondary, will get the 
strongest test of the year." The 
game has a 2:00 kick-off time 
and is at home. It's also "family 
day" so call up Mom and Dad 
and tell them to get up here and 
take you to the football game. 



Lady Eagle Volleyball Team in full swing 



by Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



Hello again volleyball fans! A 
word of caution, if your not 
attending the home volleyball 
games-your really missing out! 
Just so you can't say you didn't 
know. I'll tell you right now that 
die next home match is October 
first against California, make 



plans to be there! 

To fill you in on what you may 
be missing the Golden Eagles are 
really moving. Currently at 6 and 
8, these girls show that they have 
what it lakes when they're on the 
court. They were defeated by 
Edinboro in a rough game by the 
scores of 9-15. 12-15. and 1-15. 
but it won't be long before they 
catch up to these top conference 




File Photo/Clarion Call 
Clarion will play in the Gannon Tournament this weekend 



players. How do I know this? 
Well, look at the Mercyhurst 
Invitational. The spikers rolled 
in, on, and over Mercyhurst (15- 
7, 7-15, 10-15, 15-7, 15-10) and 
Millersvillc (8-15. 15-11, 7-15, 
15-6. and 15-8). They did lose to 
Juniata 2-15. 9-15, and 7-15 but 
hev. 2 out of 3 are definitely good 
odds. 

And then there was the first 
home game of the season. 
Tuesday night (I was there, were 
you?) against Lock Haven. The 
first time the Golden Eagles met 
the Bald Eagles at the California 
tournament they lost the match 3- 
1 . Tuesday also ended up a loss, 
but this time it was out of five 
games and Lock Haven never 
had a chance to breathe until it 
was all over. As a matter of fact. 
LIIII looked pretty distraught 
through most of the match. "It 
was a disappointing loss, we 
should have won the fourth 
game," says coach Jodi Bums. 
"But we are doing well, we just 
have to learn to take it over the 
top because we are already play- 
ing up at the top of the confer- 



ence." 

Another plus for the Lady 
Eagles is that out of six 5th 
games (which is very intense, fast 
playing, every side out counts no 
matter which team served), they 
have only lost 2. Four out of six 
is equal to two out of three Good 
odds, remember? Good talent- 
too. Here's one more clue to 
show you who belongs at the top 
of the conference with Edinboro. 
At the Mercyhurst Invitational 
tournament. Clarion won more 
games than Lock Haven and tied 
with Edinboro for wins. 

So now lets look at some of the 
people who are making this hap- 
pen. 

If there is one thing, you can 
hear from the echoing announcer 
in the gym it is "And Boes is up 
to serve" Christy Boes. the 
spunky sophomore steps up to 
sail a ball over the net that often 
times is not returned. 

She has 27 service aces, the 
most on the team. Mandy Kirby 
is right behind her, with 18 ser- 
vice aces. She is also strong in 
the front with 77 kills. Tracy 



Bamett has 84 kills. Some new 
faces showing up, the first will 
have to be Jessa Canfield who 
has 140 kills, the most on the 
team. Lindsey Kuruzovich is the 
top percentage hitter right now. 
Jill Platteborze has 8 service 
aces, 44 kills and 254 assists, the 
most on the team. Brooke Paxton 
has 133 assists and 11 service 
aces. 

Along the sidelines and on the 
court there is a lot of cheering 
and excitement going on. Much 
of this is started by Beth 
Brandstatter and Curtisy Hilton, 
who has, along with lots of 
encouragement, power behind 
her 43 kills. If you don't see their 
names here, its only because I 
don't have enough room. These 
girls are all excellent players and 
extremely fun to watch. Coming 
up this weekend, they are head- 
ing to the Gannon Tournament 
where they will meet Gannon. 
Slippery Rock, and Alaska 
Fairbanks (yes, Alaska). Come 
out and support the team and 
catch some great volleyball 
action as well. 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 19, 1996 



Cross Country off and running 



by Aaron Kapner 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles cross country team looks 
strong alter their season opener 
with Allegheny College. Alfred 
University. California University, 
and Juniata College. The women 
finished in first place with 37 
points, while the men took sec- 
ond behind Allegheny with 56 
points. 

With the PS AC Championships 
around the corner (November 
12), the Eagles needed a strong 
start to gel them going. Head 
Coach Pat Mooney said, 
"Although there were only five 
teams competing. I think we had 
strong competition," giving a 
boost to the team's confidence. 
"We needed to get out and com- 
pete early in order to be prepared 
later in the season when we head 
to the PSAC Championships." 



This is Pal Mooney's 3rd season 
as head coach, as well as 
Assistant Coach Ginny Mooney. 
who is also in her 3rd season. 

The men's team is manned by 
seven veterans, co-captain junior 
Brad Alderion 

(Brookville/Chu ion-Limestone), 
seniors Scotl Refiner 

(Erie/Mcdowell) and Mike Cox 
(Catasaqua), juniors Tom Brady 
(Erie/Iroquois), Craig Carlson 
(New Castle/Shenango). and Eric 
Lowry (Erie/McDowell ), and 
sophomore T.J. Wellington 
(Erie/Mcdowell). 

Alderion finished 28th at 
PSAC's with a time of 27:33. he 
was Golden Eagles' top finisher 
last year. Refiner, a three-year 
letlerman. finished in 59th place 
at last year's PSAC with a time of 
28:31. while Brady finished a lit- 
tle: higher, placing 52nd at the 
Championships. Cox has ran well 
the past two seasons, finishing 



78th at the PSAC Championships 
last season. 

Also running for Clarion are 
senior Jeff Yurcak 

(Wesleyville/McDowell). sopho- 
mores Jason Brady (Cochranton) 
and Sean Craig (Alioona), and 
freshman David Ellwood 
(Harrison City/Penn Tafford). 
Troy Eee 9Alioona). Jon Eox 
(Shinglehouse/Oswayo Valley). 
Ryan Tate (New Brighton), Mark 
Trzyna (Reynoldsville/Dubois), 
and Michael Walters (Altoona). 

On the women's side. Clarion 
returns seven strong runners, and 
seven recruits who are expected 
to be immediate impacts in the 
Golden eagle lineup. Seniors 
Lisa Benlock (Pitlsburgh/Penthel 
Park) and Karen Reinking 
(Dover) are back to captain 
Clarion. 

Benlock finished 28th on 
Saturday with a time of 25:51, 
while Reinking had to drop out of 



the race due to illness. 
Reinking's best time in a 3. 1 mile 
course is 20:46 at the Dickinson 
Invitational last season. 

Also returning to the lineup are 
sophomores Brigette Lailin 
(Wells. Mli/Wells), Cristina 
Slamm (Spring Mills/Penns 
Valley). Roxanne Wilson 
(Leeper/North Clarion) and 
Cherie Zurko 

(Hermitage/Hickory). 

Although she was under the 
weather, Laflin finished in 15th 
place on Saturday. 
Brigette has been Clarion's most 
consistent runner the past two 
seasons. Stain, hampered by an 
injury, did not run on Saturday, 
but was Clarion's top runner 
most of the 1995 season. 

Wilson opened her season 
strong with an eighth place finish 
on the Mayfield course. 

"Rocky" was a pleasant sur- 
prise last season, and finished 



38lh at the PSAC 
Championships. Zurko, who adds 
depth to a strong lineup, finished 
23rd on Saturday with a lime of 
25:17. 

Others running for the Golden 
Eagles are sophomore Danielle 
Graver (garrison City/Penn 
Tafford), and a strong group of 
freshmen including Devon Ban 
(Garrison City/Penn Tafford). 
Daria Deaz (Dubois), Melissa 
Betz (Erie/General McLane), 
Maureen Long (Pittsburgh/Seton 
LaSalle), Kristie Runk Altoona), 
Bobbi Ryan (Williamsport) and 
Amy Wolfe 

(Summerville/Brookville). 

i'm very confident in our 
team, " praised Mooney. "We 
have been through a lot of 
rebuilding in the last threee sea- 
sons, but there is more work to be 
done. If we can continue improv- 
ing, I feel that we can become 
strong competitors in the PSAC." 



Tiger Woods : Golfs Newest Superstar 



by Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



From time to time in the sports 
world there are athletes who 
change their sport. Their game is 
great, but they have a larger-than- 
life quality about them that fans 
just can't resist. Michael 

Jordan's game is good but what 
makes him so famous that over 1 



million people in the world wear 
a shirt with his face on it every- 
day. Eric Lindross can play 
hockey but is he good enough to 
occupy the front page of every 
hockey magazine? Football is 
now riding the back of Brett 
Favre, the one time pain killer 
addict, turned NFL superstar. 
One could make an arguement 
that their are players better than 



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Lindross in the NHL. One could 
make an arguement that their are 
better quarterbacks than Favre in 
the NFL. And as for Jordan, well 
he's Jordan. 

But their is a new superstar in 
the world of sports and he plays 
in a sport were superstars are few 
and far between. His name is 
Tiger, Tiger Woods. 

His mammoth drives, his silky 
smooth putting stroke, his charis- 
matic smile, his humble, yet con- 
fident attitude and the color of his 
skin have propelled him into the 
superstar category of profession- 
al sports. Not since Phil 



Mickelson has any golfer had 
such an impeccable amatuer 
career, but now he's a pro. 

He placed 60th in his first tour- 
nament as a pro, he tied for 14th 
in his second, and after leading 
the first three rounds he took 4th 
in only his third tournament as a 
pro. 

For his troubles he has earned 
a little over $ 80,000. Not bad for 
a nineteen year old. Not to men- 
tion the sixty million he has in 
endorsements. Nike has a 30 sec- 
ond commercial plastered all 
over TV asking Americans. "Are 
vou readv for Tiger?" Well vou 




Paul A. Weave/i jj&uteleAA, 




I BUY i 
! 12 WINGS, j 
; GET 6 FREE! j 
j Mondays ONLY j 

Si Coupon per visit per person' 






f 

'l 1 ! , ! '. '. I' 'I 



606 MAIN STREET 

CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 16214 

Phone 814/226-8272 




better be because he's not going 
anywhere. He must place in the 
top 150 on the PGA Tour money 
list to qualify for next years tour. 
This will take about $125,000. 
Since he has over half of that fig- 
ure in just three tournaments 
chances are he's going to make it. 

Tiger has become a spokesman 
for golf and a role model for kids, 
well kids younger than him. 
There have been only two black 
golfers on the PGA Tour until 
Tiger but he will open the doors. 
That's what I'm talking about. 

An athlete that opens doors for 
others to come behind him. Tiger 
has broken the myth that golf is 
for white folks. 

Tiger has broken the myth that 
blacks can't play golf. Tiger has 
done what Jackie Robinson did 
for baseball and what 
Muhammad Ali did for boxing. 
He has done what Arthur Ashe 
did for Tennis. 

He has penetrated a sport that 
was supposed to be for whites 
and showed the world, he can 
play, and win. And when an ath- 
lete docs something like this 
everyone must stand up and 
cheer, black and white. 

He gives hope to all of us who 
were told we weren't good 
enough, or we weren't smart 
enough. He has overcome adver- 
sity to reach the lop and that is 
the mark of all champions. Tiger 
is ready for us, and the world of 
golf has been waiting for him. 



September 19, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



***FREE TRIPS &CASH!*** 
Find out how hundreds of stu- 
dent representatives are already 
earning FREE TRIPS and LOTS 
OF CASH with America's #1 
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TAKE A BREAK STUDENT 
TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK! 



FREE T-SHIRT 
+ $1000 

CreditCard fundraisers for fra- 
ternities, sororities & groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 
65 Qualified callers receive 
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SPRING BREAK '97-SELL 
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FREE. STS is hiring CAMPUS 
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to promote trips to Cancun, 

Jamaica, and Florida. Call 800- 

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joining America's #1 Student 

Tour Operator. 



HOME CARE AIDS WANT- 
ED: To assist elderly in 
Clarion, Shippenville, Leeper, 

Vowinckel, Marianne. 

Marienville, Brookville, and 

throughout Clarion County. 

Need flexible hours and days? 

We can meet your needs. No 

experience? We are willing to 

train. 226-7910. 



Handicapped faculty member 

needs assistance in swimming 

therapy twice per week. $7 per 

swim session. Contact Dr. Lynn 

Smith. Phone: 226-6675 



HAVE A JOB OPENING 
THAT YOU NEED FILLED? 
THE CLARION CALL CAN 

HELP. CALL 226-2381). 



FOR RENT 



Apartments available for fall '97 
and spring '98 semesters. One 
block from campus. Furnished 

at four person occupancy. Leave 
message @ 226-5917. 



DON! LET YOUR APART- 
MENTS GO UNFILLED. 



A CLARION CALL CLASSI- 
FIED CAN HELP FILL THE 
VOID. CALL 226-2380. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Health Nurition and Prevention 
presenting Enos Yoder on the 
use of safe and natural herbs for 
the relief of virtually every ail- 
ment known to mankind. Come 
and hear God's best health plan 
and also featuring John Smith, 

water distillation; Mark 
Anderson, iridology; v Joanne 
Sushereba, muscle testing; 
Connie Sterrett, massage thera- 
py. September 26, 6:30pm, 
Liberty St. Church of God, 
Clarion. Donations accepted. 



GOT AN ANNOUNCEMENT 
YOU WANT ALL OF CLARI- 
ON TO HEAR? WHY NOT 
VOICE IT IN THE CLARION 
CALL'S CLASSIFIEDS? 
CALL 226-2830. 



Attention Brothers of OZJT: 
We will be having a meeting on 

Monday, September 23 @ 
8:00pm in room 248 Gemmell. 

All are expected to attend. 



Word processor for sale- 
Excellent condition- 1.5 years 

old. Disks and cartridges 
included. $200 or best offer. 
Call 226-8892: Leishann 



Attention Freshmen Accounting 
Majors: There will be a fresh- 
men social on Tuesday, 
September 25 @ 3:30 in Carter 
Auditorium. Still Hall. This will 
be an opportune time to get to 

meet your advisor. 
Refreshments will be served. 
Also, if you have not already 

done so. you may join the 

Accounting Club at this time. 

For further info., call Brian @ 

x2873. 



PERSONALS 



The Sisters of Delta Zeta would 
like to welcome everyone back 
and wish you a good semester. 



Happy Birthday to our Turtle 

Buddy. Scott Kale. 
Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta! 



Happy 21st Birthday to Amy R. 

and Janet. See you at the bars! 
Love, vour Sisters of AZ 



One more week till ALFH! 



Happy Belated Birthday! 

Holly Eisenman 

Sara Miller 



Sony we missed you this sum- 
mer. Happy Belated Birthday! 

Kimberly McAdams, Sarah 

Krensavage, JoRae Richardson, 

Karrah Yerage, Amy Meyer, and 

Carrie Payne 

Love, your III Sisters 



Rock the Homecoming Court- 
Good Luck! 
Sarah Krensavage, Colleen 
Winters, Holly Eisenman, and 
Sherry Hoover. 
Love, your III Sisters 



Thanks for a good time at Rush! 

Good luck to all Sororities and 

all the Rushees. 

Ill 



Happy 20th Birthday! 

Jennifer 

Caroline 
Love, your III Sisters 



WANT TO GET PERSONAL ? 
YOU CAN DO IT FOR AS 
LITTLE AS .10 A WORD. 

CALL THE CALL : 226-2380 



Mary Wilson: 
We hope we can show you what 
Sisterhood really is. Thanks for 

becoming our advisor. 

Love, the III Sisters 



Three miles wasn't bad! Thanks 

to all the III who participated 

in the Walkathon. 



Happy B-day to our Sweetheart 

Gig. THREE WORDS. ..We 

love you! 

Love, vour 6M>s 



Congrats to Melissa.Tina. Jaime, 
and Janine, our newest pledge- 
sisters. Glad to have you with 
us. 
Love, 04>A 



Your doing a great job with 

Rush, Amy D. 

Love, vour 0$ Sisters 



D.J.: I called Ronaldo from 

Carlson Library! Why won't he 

pick up the phone? Ronaldo! 

Love. Veronica 



Pat-It's just not the same being a 

call girl's B#@*% without you! 

Miss you-Amber 



Good Luck Golden Eagles! 



To the Brothers of 0X. 

Thanks for the blast in the past 

with the 80's! It was a lot of 

fun! 

Love, the Sisters of A<I>E 



D.J. and V. no more suprise 
notes ladies. Love. Grande 



Congrats Alyssa and Megan for 

a great Rush and Sisters of the 

Week! 

Love, your A<J>E Sisters 



The sisters of BAP would like to 

wish everyone at the Roost 

tonight a good time and to 

encourage them to go out on 

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 

also. Remember, Rehab is for 

quitters. 



Happy belated 21st birthdays to 

the following: Megan, Jen M., 

Shawna, Jen F, Veronica, and 

Nicole. 

Love, your AOE Sisters 



Happy Birthday Gigolo, you 
owe me! Love, your roomie 



Lisa & Flick-Congratulations! 

You are both now official freaks. 

At least now, I know where to 

find you two. 



Tiny: You didn't follow my 

advice... dropping ten to fifteen 

sure would be nice. 

Yours truly. Slim Jim 



To Chippy at Pitt, 

I got a little wild and took my 

sweety's tooth when he smiled. 

Thank goodness he wasn't mad 

at me. ...but, I will be his slave 

from now until eternity! 

Love, Me. 



Hey big B! 

Be good this weekend. I will 

miss you! 

Love, D 



The Brothers of OIK would like 
to thank Dr. English for becom- 
ing our new advisor. 



Dear Brothers of KAP, 

I want to wish you all a great 

semester, and I am excited to 

spend the next year with you! ! 

Love, your Sweetheart, 
Daria 



Welcome back to all my friends! 

Have a great semester, and I'm 

looking foreward to many fun 

times with everyone! Sorry for 

forgetting my bar buddies Dawn 

and Leslie at Pref! I'll tuck you 

in tonight! Hey litUe!-Less than 

a month! Love you guys! 



To the Brothers of Theta Xi" 


ruuuus 


We had a great 


The Cowboys will be 14-2 


time drinking from " 


that's not too bad. 


anything but 


I'm getting my money back 


a mug" with you! 


from the Pick Master! 


Love the Sisters of Phi Sigma 


Peace, Kane 


Sioma 






fflVlf A imon \A 



Good Luck Courtney and Jodi 
for Homecoming. 
We love you, ITf 



Congrats on being pinned. 
Love, Jenn & Christy 



Way to go Alicia. 22 on your 

21st! 

Love, your III Sisters 



To Dance Team: 

Thanks for all your help with 

Rush and a great mixer. 

Love, ITT 



Dear Phi Sigma Sigma, 

Thank you for the thoroughly 
enjoyable mixer. It was neat. 
We think that your Sisters are 

swell. 
Love, the Brothers of Theta Xi 



House of Pain Wayne. 

I missed your assistance 

this week. 

I better see your butt 

next week!! 

Sleph 



Way to go Kita! 

22 on your 21st! 

Love, your III Sisters 

Good Luck Justin Miller 

and the Golden Eagle Football 

Team ! 

Love. Kristcn 



To the Call Staff: 

Was this a good week or what? I 

knew we would get better!!! 

It's smooth sailing now! 



Hey Shelle, Sarah, Danielle. 
Shanky, and Slirzy-Here's 

to a great year! I love 

my little "G-Thangs". 

Love, Kristcn 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 19. 1996 



Clarion tennis serves an ace 



by Tina Uisky and Bill Bates 
Sports Writers 

The women's tennis team and 
seventh-year head eoaeh. Terry 
Acker, are ready to challenge for 
the PS AC crown. 

The teiun hopes to return 
Clarion to the top of the confer- 
ence with help from four return- 
ing starters and many new 
recruits. 

Topping the roster this year arc 
juniors Amy O'Neal, Kristen 
Golia, Brooke Drayer, and 
Maureen "Mimi" Williams. 
Each of these girls have experi- 
enced the PSAC in the past two 
seasons and they are ready for the 
competitive season that awaits 
ihem. 

O'Neal was 1-1 at the PSAC 
championships last year. Amy is 
expected to start at #2 again this 
season. 

Golia won 10 consecutive 
matches in 1995. She is now 16- 
12 in her collegiate career, and is 
expected to move to #3 singles 
this year. 

Drayer is 12-14 in her career, 
and is expected to be #4 this sea- 
son. The biggest finisher at the 



"95 championships was Maureen 
Williams. 

Mimi has an overall mark of 
18-7 and is expected to stay at the 
#6 singles spot this season. 

Coach Acker also expects 
incoming freshmen players to 
make an immediate impact and 
increase the competition for the 
team. 

"We have worked really hard to 
prepare for this season, but that 
should pay off when we open our 
season and move towards the 
PSAC Championships," stated 
Coach Acker. 

Clarion opened the 1996 season 
Saturday with a 6-1 victory over 
cross-state conference foe 
Shippensburg. 

Kristen Golia buried Shipp's 
Julie Sheere in two sets, 6-0, 6-0. 
Amy O'Neal, Brooke Drayer 
Rachael Link, and Maureen 
Williams all notched singles wins 
for the Eagles. 

Golia and Drayer dropped the 
Red Raiders Cathy Baird and 
Kelly Kress, 8-4 in #1 doubles 
competition. Baker and O'Neal 
rolled 8-3 at #2, while Link and 
Williams won 8-6. The Golden 
Eagle netters traveled to Grove 



Cilv College on Mondav and fell 
5-4. 

Kristen Golia. Rachael Link, 
and Mimi Williams all improved 
to 2-0 in singles competition. 
Golia and doubles teammate 



Brooke Drayer also jumped to a 
2-0 record. 

The women's next match at 
home will be on Tuesday. 
September 24 when the Golden 
Eagles host Indiana. 



The match will begin at 3:00 
p.m. Come out and catch the 
action and support the team. 

The women will then travel to 
Edinboro on Wednesday. 
September 25. 



Congratulations 



to tennis 
player 
Kristen Golia 
and cross 
country run- 
ner Scott 
Reffner on 
being named 
PSAC Players 
of the Week! 



IN THE BLEACHERS 



By Steve Moore 




Clarion linksters take fifth at Edinboro Tourney 



by Tim Rafalski 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion golf team opened 
the 1 996 season by taking fifth at 
Uie Edinboro Fall Invitational on 
September 4th. 

The Golden Eagles golfer com- 
bined to shoot a round of 318 
while Mercyhurst lead all teams 
with a 297. 



Freshman Brian Luepold paced 
Clarion with a round of 75. 

Ben Baker was the only other 
Golden Eagle with a sub-80 as he 
finished with a round of 79. 

Rounding out Clarion's squad 

were Terry Tidball (81). Man 

Black (83). and Matt Honacki 

(86). 

The colters next traveled to the 



Gannon Invitational on 
September 9th and proceed to 
finish 12th out of the 19 teams. 
Cleveland State was the overall 
winner with Allegheny College 
lakiiiii home the silver. 

Clarion's team was composed 
of five freshman and combined to 
shoot a round of 323. 

The Golden Eagles top scorer 



was once again Leupold, who 
finished the day with a 78. 
Honacki and Matt Black weren't 
far behind with rounds of 80 and 
81 respectively. 

Steven Witcoski (84) and Barry 
Byers (89) rounded the Golden 
Eagle squad. 

The Clarion golfers return to 
action today at the Slippery Rock 



Invitational. 

The Golden Eagle golf team is 
under the direction of second 
year head coach Dr. Richard 
Couch. 

Final Note: The Clarion Golf 
team holds all their home match- 
es at Mayfield Country Club, 
near Interstate 80 exit 9. 



NKL Wee 


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* home learn in caps 


l-'avoiile 


Pis 
31/2 


Undeidosz 
Denver 


CHIEFS 


Green Bav 


61/2 


VIKINGS 


JETS 


even 


Giants 


RAMS 


1 


Redskins 


SAINTS 


61/2 


Arizona 


San Fran 


9 


CAROLINA 


Seattle 


1 


TAMPA 


BAY 






N.E. PAIS 


7 


Jaquars 


Dallas 


21/2 


BUPTALO 


RAIDERS 




San Diego 


DETROIT 


41/2 


Chicago 


ATLANTA 


2 


Eagles 


COLTS 


21/2 


Miami 


Bve Week: 


Pittsburgh. 


Houston. Cincinatd 


, Baltimore 


Courtesy of the Pick Master 



Blue & Gold Day 
Friday Sept. 20 

* wear all blue and eold clothes and be eli- 

gible to win prizes! 

* support the football team as they prepare 

to battle Glenville St. the next day. 
* look out for the roving photographer! 



CUP Men's Basketball Team is seeking 

managers for the 1996-97 season. Male 

or Female. Inquire within basketball 

office, 1 02 TiPPin Gym x2458. 



• A' 



9{pt your Ordinary Image 

J7ewel^y y T3c?<3<rls,, Jnc.ensc/ Oils 

Images of the "West 



62b Main St., Onnon 



L>LY.-!V>'i:-* 




gear 




AN OUTDOOR ADVENTURE STORE 

MOUNTAIN BIKES - CLIMBING - XC SKIS 

CAMPING - CLOTHING - HIKING BOOTS 

KAYAKS - AUTO RACKS 

VISIT OUR INDOOR CLIMBING WALL 

34 S. 5th Avenue, Clarion 226-4763 



\ 



% 



Vol. 78, nos. 3-23 



September 26, 1996- 

May1, 1997 



£k 

/^£ #eptember 26, 1996 



D^rto 9rt 



Tt,„ /"*»„•«;.->. r*^n 



Clarion JHnrtereitp of $enn«plbanta 



Clarion, $3 16214 



tEIie Clarion Call 



Wlhit s J//rs i& 




President's new 

residence is 
under construc- 
tion behind Still 
Hall, see page 5 
for the story. 



Contents! 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 9 

Entertainment: Pg. 13 

Call on You: Pg. 15 

Sports: Pg. 16 

Classifieds: Pg. 19 

Volume 78, 3**ite 3 



Wcatljtr 



Partly cloudy with a 
chance of rain show- 
ers in the afternoon. 
High in the low to 
mid 70s. 



The results are in 



CU students pick homecoming royalty 



Megan O' Grady 
News Writer 



The 1996-97 Homecoming 
Court for Clarion University has 
been elected. The 18 members of 
the court consist of 9 men and 9 
women. 

The freshman representatives 
are Gina Donati, Erika Nichols, 
Eric Kemp, and Jeffrey Marak. 

The sophomore representatives 
are Shannon Bean, Rochelle 
Ross, Nick Chervenak, and Mark 
Watts. 

The junior representatives are 
Gina Bottomley, Amy Meyer, 
Greg Bostick, and Richard 
Greggs. 

The senior representatives are 
Nicole DelBonifro, Rebecca 
Rilter. Slacey Sylvester. Scott 
Cafe, Ryan Hitchman, and Drew 
Wilburn. Approximately 470 
students voted in last week's 
election. 

The crowning ceremony will be 
held next Thursday on October 3 
at the University Activities Board 
(UAB) sponsored pep rally on 
the Gemmell outdoor perfor- 
mance platform beginning at 
6:30 p.m. 

The lead vocalist of the pop 
band. Blcssid Union of Souls, 
will be crowning this year's 
queen. The vocalist is HIiot 
Sloan. 

Last year's king and queen. 
Candice Bostick and Malcolm 
Moscly will be on hand for the 
crowning of the new royalty. 
Several events have been planned 
at the university and in die com- 
munity for the Homecoming 
Court lo participate in. 

As part of Clarion's Autumn 



Leaf Festival, the members of the 
court and UAB invited all of the 
residence halls to decorate their 
lobbies in accordance with this 
year's theme, "Carousel of 
Colors". 

The Homecoming court will 
judge each hall, starting with 
Campbell Hall, on Wednesday, 
October 2 at 7:00 p.m. 

Residents of the halls are invit- 
ed to greet the court. One of the 
judging categories is for resi- 
dence halls with the most spirit. 
The Queen, King, and their 
court will ride in the Autumn 
Leaf Festival Parade on then own 
float. 

The members will be intro- 
duced at half-time of the 
Homecoming football game 
against Lock Haven on Saturday, 
October 5. 

Lori Cisek. chairman of the 
UAB Homecoming Committee, 
was very optimistic about the 
homecoming activities. 

"The elections went well. The 
court is very excited about the 
parade and the pep rally. I hope 
all the activities go as well as the 
election did, " said Cisek. 

Gina Donati is from Lower 
Burrell. PA and is sponsored by 
the students of Clarion 
University. 

Erika Nichols is from Frederick, 
PA and is sponsored by the 
African American Student Union 
(AASU). 

Fiic Kemp is from Wexford. PA 
and is sponsored by die Kappa 
Delta Rho fraternity. 

Jeffrey Marak is fiom Wexford. 
PA and is sponsored by the cheer- 
leading squad. 




Photo Courtesy of University Relations 
The 1996 Clarion University homecoming court are front from left to right: Mark Watts, 
Rochelle Ross, Gina Donati, Erica Nichols, Amy Meyer, Stacey Sylvester, Shannon Bean, 
Rebecca Ritter, Gina Bottomley, and Nicole DelBonifro. Back from left: Eric Kemp, Jeff 
Marak, Ryan Hitchman, Drew Wilburn, Richard Greggs, Nick Chervenak, and Scott Cale. 
Absent from photo, Greg Bostick. 



Shannon Bean is from 
Middlesex. PA and is sponsored 
by the Clarion University Dance 
Team . 

Rochelle Ross is from Lower 
BuitcII. PA and is sponsored by 
the cheerleading squad. 

Nick Chervenak is from 
Cranberry Township, PA and is 
sponsored by the cheerleading 
squad. 

Mark Watts is sponsored by 
Nair Hall. Gina Bottomley is 
from Avalon. PA and is spon- 
sored by Givan Hall Council. 



Amy Meyer is from Lebanon, 
PA and is sponsored by the Beta 
Beta Beta biology honorary fra- 
ternity. 

Greg Bostick is from West 
Mifflin. PA and is sponsored by 
Nair Hall Council. 

Richard Greggs is from 
Stoneboro, PA and is sponsored 
by the Alpha Sigma Tau sorority. 

Nicole DelBonifro is from 
Ardmore, PA and is sponsored by 
the Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania students. 

Rebecca Ritter is from 



Pittsburgh, PA and is sponsored 
by the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. 

Stacey Sylvester is from Oil 
City. PA and is sponsored by the 
Wilkinson Hall Council. 

Scott Cale is from Sarver. PA 
and is sponsored by die Sigma 
Chi fraternity. 

Ryan Hitchman is from 
Greensburg. PA arid is sponsored 
by the Clarion University stu- 
dents. 

Drew Wilburn is from Beaver, 
PA and is sponsored by die cheer- 
leading squad. 



Page 2 



The Clarion Cad 



September 26, 1 996 



OPINION 



September 26, 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSES 



Editorial 





"One incident in 
particular brought 
me to my major dis- 
like of the snack 



bar. 



»» 



> 



r\^)J^ [ Yfc-fcrfU-' 



Denise Barney, Lifestyles tditor 



I am noi writing this to try to rip 
on the snack bar as much as I can 
(even though I could), but so 
many things have been said by so 
many people, and I myself have 
noticed so much that I feel some 
things cannot go without saying. 
Granted, the snack bar in 
Gemmell is liked by most stu- 
dents because it is something dif- 
ferent from the monotonous caf 
food, but I feel some improve- 
ments could be made. 

To get the main things out of 
the way, I will just mention a few 
tilings that I and others have seen. 
I guess the main thing is that the 
set-up is not very feasible for the 
intentions. 

Things are crammed together so 
tightly that there is not room for 
anyone to move when it is 
crowded. Why is there only one 
condiment section? Why does it 



have to be so hot for the people 
waiting? Sure, these are all petty 
little things, but when looked at 
as a whole, they make the picture 
look very inconvenient. 

Last year, I did not have a meal 
plan at all, and this year I got the 
5 meal with SI 00 flex plan. I got 
the five meals, because I was 
going to be spending a lot of time 
at Gemmell working at the news- 
paper, and I thought it would be a 
nice, convenient change. 
But so far, to my dismay, I have 
found that my previous thoughts 
were a bit premature. Yes, it is 
convenient for me to run down- 
stairs to get food while I am 
working, but I have found that 1 
really do not want to go down 
there. 

It is not that I think Gemmell is 
horrible or that die workers don't 
do their jobs, but 1 just think a 



few more conveniences should 
be made. 

One incident in particular 
brought me to my major dislike 
Of the snack bar. 

Mary Beth Gurry and I went to 
the snack bar to cat and take a 
break from working. The lines 
were extremely long, so we knew 
we were in for the long haul. We 
both decided to get subs, so we 
patiently began waiting in line 
behind about 8 people. 

We finally ordered our subs and 
wailed for them to be heated. 

The lady taking my order 
couldn't hear a word I said to her 
because of the plethora of fake 
grapes and tin boxes on the 
counter. 

These decorations are directly 
in the line of communication 
between the workers and the per- 
sons ordering. As we waited, 
only one other guy was waiting 
in front of me for his sub — we 
will call him Joe. Mary Beth and 
I were talking as we waited when 
we noticed a ton of food coming 
out of the bottom oven. 

Among these were our subs and 
Joe's sub. The workers kept on 
waiting on other people and no 
one noticed the pile up of subs. 
As the subs were piling over each 
other and falling off their trays 
onto the oven racks, Mary Beth 
was screaming, "Sub back log! 
Sub back log!" The workers just 
ignored her ,as usual, and Joe's 
sub fell in the crack at the end of 
the Oven. 

Someone finally picked it up 

Continued on page 4 



Wht Clarion Call 



270 6enuiuII Complex 
(814)226-2380 



Cxeratfoe 2Boarb 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor. ...Brian Pietrandrca 
News Kditor. ...Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Kditor.. ..Denise Barney 
Sports Kditor. ..Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design. ..Stephanie Mick 
Advertising Manager. ..Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Kditor... Jeffrey Eevkulich 
business Manager... .Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor... .Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager. ..Kevin Miko 

Advisor.. ..Arthur II. Barlow 



Clarion, $3 16214 
fg* (814)228-2557 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editor! accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body. 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica- 
tion, letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue 




"When fun is a fiasco" 

The popular question on cam- 
pus at the beginning of each fall 
semester is "What did you do this 
summer?" Most people reply 
with answers such as "I went to 
the beach." or "I worked." These 
replies are standard and normal. 
No one would really question 
these replies. Yet, when I came 
back to campus this semester, I 
had a very unusual reply, "I was 
kidnapped!" Most people's reac- 
tions would be, first, to laugh, 
then disbelieve, and finally, they 
would want to know more. 

The morning of Saturday, July 
28 started out as any other day. 
The bright sunlight shone 
through the windows as I got up 
and got ready to go to work. My 
summer job was waitressing at a 
pizza restaurant. As I left for 
work. I told my mom I would 
probably be home early since we 
hadn't been busy on Saturday 
afternoons lately. I got to work 
and began preparing the store for 
opening. Eleven o'clock (am) 
arrived: The restaurant was now 
open for business: Yet, no cus- 
tomers were arriving. At 11:30 
a.m. the shift supervisor decided 
to send a waitress home since 
there were no customers. I told 
the other waitress she could leave 
because she had to come back 
later that evening to work. 

Around noon, a few customers 
started to arrive. A group of five 
men came in. and the shift super- 
visor seated them in my section. 
I went back to lake dieir order. 
As soon as I arrived at their tabic, 
they quickly informed me one of 
them was getting married that 
afternoon: Could they have a 
discount.' They continued to be 
obnoxious and rude, but I finally 
got their order. I went to the shift 
supervisor and complained. 

She said she would go talk to 



them. I went about my job, pret- 
ty much ignoring those five 
obnoxious individuals, except 
serving them their food. 

Finally. diey left. I let out a 
sigh of relief. Around 1:00p.m., 
the shift supervisor asked if I 
wanted to go home since busi- 
ness had died down again. I said 
"no," I would wait until 2:00 p.m. 
Little did I know what a mistake 
I was making. 

At 1:30 p.m., the five men 
returned, all decked out in their 
tuxedos. The shift supervisor had 
told them to return in their tuxe- 
dos, not thinking that they would. 
They said they wanted to take a 
picture with her (the shift super- 
visor) and me. I reluctantly 
agreed. I thought these guys 
were real jerks. After they fin- 
ished taking the picture, the two 
guys I was standing between 
grabbed me and said "You're 
coming with us to die wedding." 
They proceeded to drag me out of 
the restaurant and to their car. I 
was in shock. I couldn't believe 
this was happening! They then 
pushed me out of the restaurant 
and to their car. They then 
pushed me into their car and sped 
off. 

You may be diinking. this hap- 
pened in a public place why did- 
n't anybody stop them? Why 
didn't she fight and scream? 
Well, here are the answers. 

First, no one seriously believed 
the five men were going to take 
me until they actually drove off. 
At first it just seemed like a joke. 
Second. I was in shock, nothing 
like liiis had ever happened to me 
before, and I didn't know how to 
react. 

To continue: the realization that 
they were serious about taking 
me to this wedding didn't hit 
until we actually left die parking 

Continued on page 4 



"It's you Public Safety. You annoy me." 



Dear Editor, 

I would just like to vent my 
feelings on the issue of people 
who really annoy me on this 
campus. 

The reason that my name is not 
going to be published is so that 
when I actually lose it, like the 
girl at Penn Stale, there will be no 
hard evidence that I have been 
mad about this for such a Ions 
time. 

Well, the Penn State example is 
a bit drastic. I am not an unrea- 
sonable person, just annoyed. 

It's you Public Safety. You 
annoy me. Do you think that 
you are actually cool riding 
around on those bikes? Do you 
know that everytime I see one of 
you that I actually cringe because 
I have such ill feelings toward 



you. Do you feel that you have 
real power over us with your lit- 
tle ticket writing machine? 

Does it feel like an accomplish- 
ment when you write one for me? 
I know all you officers get a big 
smile when you slap one of those 
babies on my car. I can hear you 
sigh as you walk away. Yes, 
another one ! 

I have had so many parking 
tickets in my college career that I 
could actually paper my apart- 
ment. But, to me yellow just 
ain't my color. 

Here's a story about my prob- 
lem. 

After I got two tickets during 
the second week of school, I 
went to the MAC machine and 
took out my lovely ten dollars 
which I had just made that week- 




Virginia 

Mititary 

Institute 

admits women 



' 



I know that this week in poli- 
tics could not possibly top the 
Arizona State crushing of 
Nebraska, but I will try. A 157 
year tradition, just shy of 
Nebraska's consecutive win 
record, of not admitting women 
will end next fall when Virginia 
Military Institute will begin 
admitting women. 

This comes after a hard fought 
Supreme Court battle thai is forc- 
ing tax -supported institutions to 
admit women. 

VMI, die last such school to 
open its doors, will not make 
many accommodations however. 
Aside from building separate 
showers and installed a few cur- 
tains, women will be treated the 
same as the men. The freshmen 
women will also receive the 
same "buzz" haircut dial the men 
do, and they will be required to 
meet the same physical qualifica- 
tions. 

Also in the news this week. 
Russian President Boris Yeltsin 
and his doctors will announce 
whether or not he will undergo a 
uiple bypass surgery to improve 
the blood supply to his heart. The 
surgery would be risky, especial- 



ly politically. 

Communist leader Gennady 
Zyuganov, whom Yeltsin recent- 
ly defeated in the presidential 
election, is standing by calling 
Yeltsin "a living corpse." pro- 
claiming that he is now best 
placed to become Russia's next 
leader. 

IBM just recently announced 
that they will begin to offer 
health care' benefits to the part- 
ners of gay and lesbian employ- 
ees. IBM is following die lead of 
Microsoft and American Express 
who already offer benefits. 

The tactic is not without risk 
however, as the Southern Baptist 
Convention asked its 16 million 
members to boycott Disney 
for adopting a similar policy in 
June. 

IBM employees will be asked 
to sign an affidavit saying that 
they are financially and emotion- 
ally interdependent with their 
partner. 

So far. IBM says that no one 
has tried to commit fraud, 
although there has been concern 
that roommates will try to enroll 
as domestic partners for the ben- 
efits. 




end at my 'job which puts me 
through college. I walked into 
public safety to pay my tickets. 
The secretary took my money, 
and I was on my way. 

I drove up to the library and ran 
in. Not more than 7 minutes later 
I ran back out. What did I find to 

Choices, voices, and votes: 



my surprise but a parking tick- 
et? I laughed because I knew I 
was in the wrong (but I had my 
tlashers on!!) 

Then I drove to an undis- 
closed destination and went on 
my merry way. I came back 
and holy hell, I had another 
ticket. Now. this one made me 
mad. I diought I was in the 
right, but boy you public safety 
officers are quick. After look- 
ing, yep- once again I was in 
the wrong. 

After looking closely at my 
two new tickets, I noticed that 
they were written 15 minutes 
apart by the same officer. I 
won't mention any names 
(Officer #8). 

Officer, I bet you went back 
and told all your public safety 



buddies your big accomplish- 
ment. Ha Ha the joke's on me. 

I just wish you people would 
leave me alone... and all the oth- 
ers. Sometimes we just have to 
run in for a minute. Cut us a 
break. PLEASE! 

Ok, I know you can't it's your 
job.. .sometimes even your liveli- 
hood. I just needed to let you 
know that you are all really 
annoying to us students, as we 
are to you, but at least I will be 
out of here in a few months. I 
will look back on your acquain- 
tance without laughing . 

You will then have to go alter 
some other student to annov. 



Name Withheld 



Who will you vote for in 1996? 



by Matthew Broderick and 

Sarah Jessica Parker 

Celebrity Op-Ed Writers 

This election is the most impor- 
tant of our lifetime. 

Why? 

Because we care deeply about 
the freedom of artistic expres- 
sion. We believe diat. in a free 
society, it is crucial that actors 
and artists are allowed to express 
themselves without limitation 
and especially without govern- 
ment censorship. 

Because we care about protect- 
ing a woman's right to choose. 
Whether or not to bring a child 
into this world is. perhaps, die 
most intensely private decision a 
woman can make. The decision 
should be made by her and her 
partner, and her physician- not 
by some cold government 
bureaucrat or politician. 

Because we care about protect- 
ing our environment. Widiout 
clean air and clean water, what 
son of world do we live in and 
what sort of future do we face? 
We must continue to protect our- 
selves from polluters and those 
who would relax environmental 
protection for political gain. 

This fall you've got to lake the 
time to decide for yourself. 
What makes this election impor- 
tant to you? 

Do you agree with us that 
unless our people are educated 



and fully participate in our 
democracy, that our quality of 
life will cease to improve? If so, 
you must care about the quality 
of education and about the avail- 
ability of student loans. With 
raising tuition costs and an 
increasing number of students 
attending college, student loans 
are becoming more and more 
important. We need a President 
who will work to make a college 
education affordable and acces- 
sible. 

Do you want to live and work 
in a world where you can make a 
decent living and afford to raise 
a family? Do you care about 
getting a job? Eventually you're 
going to graduate and you're 
going to have to hit the job mar- 
ket. We're guessing you'll want 
a President who creates good 
jobs at good wages, and keeps 
unemployment low. 

Do you care about your per- 
sonal safety and that of your 
family, friends, and neighbors. 
Everyone has a right to feel sale 
and secure in their community- 
even if it's a campus community. 
The person you vote for in 1996 
should be for putting more cops 
on the street, banning assault 
weapons, and making it more 
difficult for felons to buy hand- 
guns. 

We know what we care about 
and we know for whom we're 



voting. President Clinton will 
protect artistic expression, a 
woman's right to choose, and 
the environment from other's 
efforts to weaken them. 
President Clinton has consis- 
tendy worked to create more 
opportunity for students to 
attend college, he has created 
more than 10 million new jobs 
and kepi unemployment unusu- 
ally low. and he has worked to 
put 100.000 new cops on the 
streets and maintain a ban on 
assault weapons. Our candidate 
will be for the Violence Against 
A Woman Act- he won't 
oppose it. 

November 5di is right around 
die corner. You've got until 
dien to decide what you care 
about if you don't know already. 
No time like the present to start 
evaluating the candidates. 



• Matthew Broderick is current- 
ly starring in Infinity. He also 
produced and directed the 
movie. He was previously fea- 
tured in The Cable (iuy and 
Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Sarah 
Jessica Parker is currently star- 
ring in both The First Wives 
Club and Extreme Measures. 
Last xear the couple starred in 
the Broadway Int How to 
Succeed in Business Without 
Really Trying. 



Pase4 



The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1996 




% 



News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



Nation 



Clinton gets bill mandating 
maternity stay 

Legislation assuring two-day hospital stays tor new mothers 
passed Congress Tuesday night as pari of a broader bill financing 
veterans, housing environmental and space programs. 

A 388-25 vote by the House sent the measure to president Clinton 
for his expected signature. The Senate had approved it by voice 
vole earlier in the evening, without debate. 
The legislation is seventh and probably last - of the 13 spending or 
fiscal 1997 to make it separately to the White 
I louse. 

Legislators debate immigration 

bill 

New partisan bickering erupted Tuesday over a plan to slow ille- 
gal immigration, with some Democrats accusing Republicans of 
trying to rush extreme legislation through Congress just weeks 
before the presidential election. 

But Republican^ said the bill - scheduled for final House and 
Senate approval this week - could stand as one of the 104th 
Congress' most significant achievements. 

"This is going to be a uemendous victory." said Rep. Lamar 
Smith R-Texas. who introduced the bill. "This will be dramatic and 
landmark legislation. I expect president Clinton to sign it." 

But Clinton's signature was not assured. "We'll have to look at 
the final product." spokesman Mike McCuny said. 

Simpson jurors split along racial 

lines 

Prospective jurors in the O.J Simpson civil case split hugely along 
racial lines Tuesday, with whites saying he was probably guilty and 
blacks suggesting he was innocent. 

"We all realized this case had divided America, but not as stark- 
ly as we are seeing it injury selection." said Loyola Law School 
professor Laurie Levenson. who is observing the selection process. 
"It's not just the media reading something into a verdict." 

Three blacks, two whiles and one Asian were excused from the 
wrongful death case for laving strong opinions one way or the other 
about his role in the murder of ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and 
Ron Goldman. 

Two people. an Asian and a black, made it past the initial screen- 
ing to join 10 others awaiting further questioning in the selection 
process, 

<b> Courtesy of the Associated Press 




until we actually left the parking 
lot. Instantly, my mind began to 
race. I knew I had to remain 
calm and not panic. I just stalled 
talking a mile a minute. "Please 
take me back" and "I'm going to 
get in a lot of trouble." were 
some of the phrases I uttered. All 
this time I kept hoping that some- 
body had decided to follow inc. 
livery time I turned around. 
though, I saw no one. 

Finally. I blurted out. "Do you 
realize how much trouble you 
could get in for kidnapping me?" 

Reality hit them hard. "We did- 
n't kidnap you. did we?" they 
responded. At this point, we 
were almost to the site of the 
wedding. It was deliberation 
time. If they took me back, 
they'd be late for die wedding, if 
ihey didn't they could be in a lot 
of trouble. They opted to return 
me. Altogether, my kidnapping 
adventure lasted a mere half 
hour, yet it seemed like an eterni- 
ty. 



The whole aftermath of die 
ordeal was worse than the actual 
event. When my captors returned 
me to the restaurant, the shift 
supervisor and two of my co- 
workers came rushing out of die 
store yelling that die police had 
been called. 

They now realized how much 
trouble they were really in. So 
they sped off. Putting die whole 
incident out of their minds. 
Meanwhile. I was left to be inter- 
rogated, and made to feel as if the 
whole event was my fault. My 
life became a living hell. 

They way the incident was han- 
dled was catastrophic. The 
police never did show up: I later 
suspected that they were never 
called. My parents were never 
contacted and told mat I had been 
taken. I had to relate the story to 
them. What if I had been molest- 
ed or not brought back' 
Apparently the shift supervisor in 
charge never thought about these 
possibilities. 



I'd like to say diat I came out of 
this ordeal unscarred, but I can't. 
Physically, I was unharmed, but 
emotionally I was scarred for life. 
I will never be able to fully trust 
anyone ever again. 

Last, I didn't press charges 
aiiainst the live men. I didn't feel 
I could handle going through a 
court case. Besides, to diose five 
guys the whole event was a joke. 
They've probably forgotten 
about it by now. To me, it was a 
lesson. I always thought that 
since I lived in a small town, 
nothing like a kidnapping could 
ever happen. Unfortunately, it 
did. and I became the victim. 



• Mamie Voge I graduated from 
Clarion University with a degree 
in Communication and was the 
former Features Editor of the 
Clarion Call. This Hide Park 
was originally run in the 
February 7. 1991 edition of the 
Clarion Call. 



Editorial continued 



••• 



and asked Joe if he wanted any- 
thing on it. He asked her if his 
sub had fallen into the crack and 
she said no, that she had caught it 
before it fell. I could not believe 
she said that because we all had 
seen that it did fall. 

Despite the portrav-d of die 
workers at the snack bar that day, 
I believe that the workers do a 
pretty good job. They work hard 
every day. but they work in 
unsuitable conditions. From 
what I hear the temperature in the 
worker's area is usually in die 
90's. 

I also heard that Uiey just pur- 
chased 3 or 4 fans. I mean I 
understand that they can not have 
cold air blasting on the food, but 
come on. diat heat is unbearable! 
Even as a customer, standing in 
line for 15 minutes I diink I 
might pass out sometimes! 



To be working in this kind of 
heat you would think that they 
would not have to wear what they 
do. I would bet you any money 
they would be more comfortable 
wearing T-shirts. 

I have worked in many food 
preparation areas before and T- 
shirts are what most people this 
day and age wear — because of 
heat and comtbrl. 

I think it is ridiculous that they 
have to wear ties and hats or 
visors with that hideous food 
print all over them. I don't know 
if the people in charge are trying 
to make them look as presentable 
as possible or what, but if so, it 
isn't working. 

I won't waste my lime or yours 
talking about the food. I think we 
all know what it is like. We hear 
it every day. I would like to men- 
tion diat the onlv thing there I 



think is could actually be classi- 
fied as good is the subs. 

I have asked many people and 
the general consensus is that the 
subs are the best. We only wish 
that they could come up with a 
much more efficient way of 
preparing them. The amount of 
time to wait is out of control! 

But hey, I guess the wait is well 
worth it if you want to get any- 
thing that tastes good. 

I mean I don't know what qual- 
ity of products they use for all 
their other food, but you would 
think the quality would be much 
higher for the cost. 

I guess my main point in writing 
this editorial is dial the operation 
of die snack bar is in dire need of 
improvements. Spend some 
money and make some conve- 
niences — for die workers as 
well as die customers. 



(f you have something to say... 

Why not write a letter 
to the Editor ? 

The Clarion Call accepts letters to the Editor from students, faculty. 

administration, alumni, and the Clarion community. Letters must be 

submitted to the Clarion Cal l office in room 270 Cemmell Student 

Center on the Monday before publication. All materials received by the 

Clarion Call are subject to editing for libel, grammar, spelling and length. 



September 26. 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 






NEWS 



it liege Campus News 




What 's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Teacher Prep Needs Overhaul, Report Finds 



Not just students, but teachers must achieve higher standards i! 
school reform is going to succeed, according to a report released Sept. 
12. 

The report, issued by the National Commission on Teaching & 
America's Future, said colleges must do a better job of training per- 
spective teachers so they can handle such tasks as computer instruction 
and working with children with learning disabilities. 

The report, "What Matters Most: Teaching For America's Future," is 
the result of a two-year study of school, college and state-government 
practices that hinder children's learning. It urges colleges to make 
teacher education a five-year program, which would require four years 
of study in a particular discipline followed by a year of intensive work 
in schools. 

It also asks that legislators and educators require all colleges of edu 
cation to meet the standards of the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education by 2006 or be closed. 

According to the report: 

•More than 40 states allow districts to hire teachers who have not met 
basic requirements. 

•More than 12 percent of new teachers begin without any training, 
while another 14 percent have not met state standards. 

•Thirty percent of beginning teachers leave the profession within 
three to five years of entering. 

Fewer than 75 percent of all teachers have studied child development 
and have degrees in their subject areas. 

According to the report, because of changing demographics, the 
nation must replace half of teacher workforcewithin 10 years. The 
Education Department predicts the public school teaching force will 
grow from 2.8 million teachers in 1991 to 3.3 million by 2002. 

Catholic University Ditches Satanic Prefix 



Thanks to the miracles of modern technology, a Catholic university 
has finally been able to ditch its satanic 666 phone prefix and start 
using 422 instead. 

For years, die University of San Francisco has been the butt of jokes 
because of the prefix 666. which the Bible says is the mark of the devil. 
But the technology to change the number wasn't available until recent- 
ly. 

"We've been getting calls on it for 10 years, ever since I've been 
here. 'Do you know that your prefix is the sign of the beast?"' univer- 
sity spokesperson Mel Taylor told UPI. "That's all that avilable at the 
time... and financially it would have been very expensive, in the ten.* 
of thousands of dollars, to change it." 

But Pacific Bell technicians figured out a way to do it. and the uni- 
versity says it's happy to be rid of the prefix. 

The number's association with the devil comes from the Bible's 
Book of Revelations, which says: "Then I saw another beast dial rose 
out of the earth: it had two horns... and spoke like a dragon... Its num- 
ber is six hundred sixty-six." 

Officials at the private Jesuit university note, however, that the num- 
ber didn't seem to bring the university any bad luck. A lundraising 
campaign recently raised $75,000 and enrollment is up. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



New residenc e being built for president 



by Sue Hart man 
News Writer 



A new residence is in the 
process of being built for the 
president of Clarion University, 
President Diane Reinhard. It is 
expected to be completed and 
available for the president by the 
Summer of 1997. The work is 
nearly one -quarter completed and 
is proceeding on schedule. 

The site of the new house was 
cleared by the university in May. 
It is a post Colonial house behind 
Still Hall and Parking Lot F, 
located near Route 322. 

The need for a new house was 
decided by the Board of 
Governors for the State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE). 
Housing is a provision that is 
contained in all SSHE institu- 
tions. SSHE assumed responsi- 
bility for the residence project, 
including its financing, last 
October. Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania has also spent 
$70,000 on consultant and archi- 
tect fees, prior to the time SSHE 
stepped into the project. 
Originally, the State System ruled 
on a plan for the new residence to 
total $1.2 million containing 
nearly 5,000 square feet. The 
plans were ruled unacceptable. 
Clarion University's Council of 
Trustees voted to rework the 
plans to lower the cost to a more 
reasonable level. 

The current residence of 
President Reinhard, an apartment 



located on the second floor of 
Moore Hall, needed to be 
replaced because loo many reno- 
vations were needed to make the 
place livable. The heating and air 
conditioning systems are includ- 
ed in the renovation process. 

The new house will be paid 
with a float bond issue. The max- 
imum amount of money allotted 
for building the new residence is 
$650,000. An amount of $60,000 
will be paid a year over a 20 year 
period in accordance with the 
float bond issue. No university 
funds will go directly into pur- 
chasing the president's new 
house. The money for the fur- 
nishings in the house will be 
obtained through private funding. 
Most of the construction is 
being completed by university 
employees. Clare Heidler, facili- 
ties management director, is serv- 
ing as construction manager and 
the university is serving as con- 
tractadministrator. 
Subcontractors have been hired 
to handle site preparation, heat- 
ing, ventilation and air condition- 
ing and elevator installations. A 
subcontractor has also been 
added to handle plastering. The 
two subcontracts have consumed 
$28,641 of the project's budget. 
Ron Wilshire, University 
Relations, reported to Lisa C. 
Caylor of the Clarion News . 
"They [workers] do expect to 
have it protected from the weath- 
er by the last of September so 



they will be able to work on die 
interior during the winter 
months. Things appe;u to be 
moving on schedule." 

Temporary workers have been 
hired to perform die usual duties 
of the university workers who are 
building the house. 

The house's budget will include 
$200,000 to cover the costs of the 
university personnel being used 
in this project. Wilshire said 
maintenance employees have 
logged approximately 1,700 
hours of work on this project. 

Altrax Paving of Strattanville 
performed the site work and 
Marshall Elevator of Pittsburgh 
has been given the contract to 
install the elevator. The house has 
been designed by architect Ralph 
R. Alster of Pittsburgh. 

The house will be approximate- 
ly 5,500 square feet and 3 and a 
half stories high. It will contain 
four bedrooms, a family room, a 
study, a kitchen, a reception 
room, a dining room which will 
be able to seat 20 guests, a two- 
car garage, a storage/mechanical 
room, laundry facilities, and 
three bathrooms. One of the bed- 
rooms and baths will meet the 
Americans with Disabilities Act 
regulations. 

New residences are also being 
planned for the presidents at 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and Shippensburg 
University. 




JasonMurphy/Clarion Call 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania's president, Diane Reinhard, will soon be living in this 
new house being built behind Still Hall and Parking Lot F. The house will cost approxi- 
mately $650,000. The furnishings for the house will be paid for through private funding. 
The house is being built by the university's maintenance personnel. 



Pafie 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1996 



September 26, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between August 21 and September 20. The blotter is 
compiled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim 

Hall. 

•On Aug. 21, T. Wilson Clark pled guilty to a prior theft by unlawful 
taking charge and was placed on A.R.D. probation tor one year. On the 
same date, the other defendant in this incident pled guilty to a charge 
of unlawful taking and was sentenced to probation under supervision 
of Clarion County adult probation office for a period of two years. The 
other defendant was Douglas Smith. 

At approximately 8:30 p.m. on Sept. 18. an unknown person or per- 
sons stole a 26 inch Schwinn bicycle, red and silver in color from the 
Snack Bar area of Gemmell Student Complex. The investigation is 
continuing. 

On Sept. 19. a student reported three pairs of shorts and a T-shirt were 
stolen from the laundry room in Nair Hall on Sept. 8. 
•Campus police officers are investigating a report of a theft of a text- 
book from Peirce Science Center. 



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Borough land purchased to alleviate problems 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion University is proposing 

the purchase of three properties 
totaling 1.9 acres on Greenville 
Avenue adjacent 10 Tippin 
Gymnasium and Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium for expansion pur- 
poses at a cost of $379,750. The 
properly acquisition was 
approved by the Council of 
Trustees at their meeting last 
Wednesday. The plan must now 
be approved by the Slate system 
Board of Governors and the 
Pennsylvania Attorney General. 

The purchase will lake effect 
June 16. 1907. it all conditions 
are satisfied and approved. 

'In reviewing our future facili- 
ties and related needs such as 
parking, it again became appar- 
ent just how land-locked the uni- 
versity is." said Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker. vice-president for 
finance and administration. "The 
need to build a student recreation 
center and issues surrounding 
where to site it really motivated 
us to seriously look at some prop- 
erty acquisitions. However, I 
would also tell you that even 
without this particular identified 
need, we would have needed to 



start acquiring property soon just 
to keep up with the increasing 
demand for parking." 

Funding for this project has 
been identified by the university, 
according 10 Haberaecker. but the 
specific source of the funding 
will be dependent on (he use of 
the space. If the space is used for 
a project involving general park- 
ing or expansion, funding would 
come from the education and 
general (E & G) Budget. If the 
space is used for the student 
recreation center or related park- 
in", funding would come from 
the self-supporting Auxiliary 
Budget. 

A specific use of the properly 
has not yet been determined, but 
Haberaecker noted there may be 
zoning variances or changes to 
accommodate such projects as 
parking on a student recreation 
center. The purchase options are 
conditional upon receiving the 
necessary approvals from Clarion 
Borough to proceed with a pro- 
ject. Without any necessary 
approvals to proceed with a pro- 
ject, the university can cancel its 
purchase plans. 

"The properties include a very 
old trailer park and several older 
multi-tenant houses which are 



primarily occupied by students." 
said Haberaecker. noting the 
location is one of the few places 
where the university could pur- 
chase almost two acres adjacent 
to the university and only 
involved three property owners. 
The site is also expected to be 
flexible enough to accommodate 
a site for a student recreation cen- 
ter, replacement parking if a 
recreation center is built on top of 
an existing parking lot, or a site 
for additional parking or expan- 
sion. 

The three properties are owned 
by three different stockholders. 
W and W Holding Co. own 1.39 
acres which include three houses. 
15 mobile homes owned by the 
company, and three rental lots for 
trailers, one of which was recent- 
ly vacated. The selling price is 
S3 10,000. Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas 
of Gibsonia own 0.35 acres 
which included two older homes 
and one trailer. The selling price 
is $55,000. H and H Builders 
owned 0. 1 5 teres which includes 
a vacant lot. The selling price is 
$14,750. In addition to the costs 
of acquisition, demolition costs 
are estimated at $25,000. None of 
the sales agreements are mutual- 
ly exclusive. 



CU student is acquitted of charges 



by Matt Geesey 
News Editor 



Felony charges of rape and sex- 
ual assault against a former 
Clarion University student. 
James Lee Tucker, were dropped 



after a preliminary hearing that 
was held last Tuesday. 

The 19-year-old female, the 
alleged victim, wept several 
times during the graphic testimo- 
ny in Clarion County Central 
Court. 



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Defense Attorney H. Ray Pope 
III argued that there was no rape, 
because the woman consented to 
the sexual activity at first the 
night of February 23 at 
Ballentine Hall on the Clarion 
University campus. 

"We don't believe there's any 
precedent to establish that a rape 
can occur alter the woman has 
consented," he told District 
Justice Norman Heasley. Measly 
noted he believed there was no 
force and dismissed the two 
counts. 

Assistant District Attorney 
Ronald Elliot maintained in court 
dial it makes no sense to argue 
that women can never object 
once sex begins. Elliot objected 
several times when Pope pursued 
all aleiiations and their details, 
including whether the woman 
resisted him or was afraid of him. 

The woman testified she will- 
ingly had sex with Tucker 
February 21 in his room in 
Ballentine Hall and spent the 
night there. 

Two nights later on February 
23. the two of them had went to 
three parties and she had been 
drinking, she said. They then 
went to Tucker's room again. 

She said midway through 
mutual sex. she wanted him to 
stop but he wouldn't. 



University facu lty plan strategies for new minor 



Courtesy of 
University Relation s 

Faculty representatives from 
eight Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania departments and a 
student representative gathered 
recently to plan strategies for a 
new minor in environment and 
society. The four hour meeting 
was held in Moore Hail. 

Judy Wagner served as the out- 
side facilitator to help identify 
linkages among the courses and 
to help both faculty and students 
make topicaJ connections. She 
led the group through a series of 
discussions and exercises 
designed to help establish learn- 
ing styles across disciplines, col- 
laborative skills, and lead to the 
development of a "capstone" 
course for the minor. 

Among the discussions held 
were identifying available skills 
and resources relevant to the 
minor, confronting the barriers 



that need to be crossed for disci- 
plinary learning, and building a 
foundation for future work 
together. Students, professors 
from all departments, the com- 
munity, future students, and the 
families of students were estab- 
lished as the wide-range of 
groups which this minor will 
influence. 

The newly approved minor in 
environment and society is trans- 
disciplinary and designed lo cre- 
ate a learning community in 
which students can study multi- 
faceted environmental concerns, 
become knowlegable about envi- 
ronmental research, explore solu- 
tions, and confront environmen- 
tal challenges. The major is being 
offered for the first time this fall. 
Several courses in the first and 
second tier offerings from 
throughout the university are 
already in place. 

Students who complete the 



major will be prepared to under- 
stand the social, political, and 
ethical aspects of environmental 
issues, so they can participate in 
society as informed individuals. 
For non-science majors, the 
minor presents an opportunity to 
gain familiarity with some of the 
scientific and technical factors 
underlying key environmental 
issues. For science majors, the 
minor offers a chance to explore 
social sciences and the humani- 
ties from a perspective directly 
related to environmental science 
disciplines. 

Attending the strategy session 
were representatives from 
anthropology, geography, and 
earth science, biology, computer 
science, economics, education 
history, music, political science, 
sociology. and philosophy 
departments; the office of the 
dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences: and the Venanso 



Research semes ter provides cutting-edge research 

Courtesy of PRISE waste technology, nuclear medi- assist in making this 

The U.S. Department of Energy 
(DOE) is sponsoring a program 
to encourage undergraduate stu- 
dents to continue their studies in 
science and engineering. The 
program is called the Science and 
Engineering Research Semester 
(SERS) and is open to sopho- 
mores, juniors, or seniors who 
are studying computer science, 
engineering, physics, environ- 
mental and life sciences, mathe- 
matics, or physical science. The 
semester offers the student to do 
hands-on research with some of 
the nation's top scientists at one 
of seven national research labora- 
tories during the academic year. 

More than 400 students annual- 
ly receive SERS appointments at 
one of the participating laborato- 
ries. The laboratories include 
Argonne located outside of 
Chicago: Brookhaven on Long 
Island. N.Y.: Lawrence Berkeley 
near San Francisco; Lawrence 
Livermore at Livermore. CA: 
Los Alamos National Laboratory 
in New Mexico; Oak Ridge 
National Laboratory located in 
Tennessee; and Pacific 
Northwest in Washington state. 

Participants become members 
of research teams engaged in 
long-range, intensive investiga- 
tions at these outstanding facili- 
ties. Fields of study include but 
are nol limited to artificial intelli- 
gence, biomedicine, basic and 
applied chemistry, earth and 
space sciences, environmental 
and life sciences, mathematics 
and computer science, high ener- 
gy and nuclear physics, reactor 
physics, engineering, geophysics. 



waste technology, nuclear medi- 
cine, and automatic inspection 
and measurement systems. A 
more detailed listing of research 
areas at all participating laborato- 
ries is available in the application 
brochure. 

The SERS program offers an 
attractive financial package in 
addition to the valuable laborato- 
ry contacts and experience. 
Housing, including utilities, is 
furnished, thereby bringing the 
total value of the award to 
approximately SI. 600 per month, 
depending on location. 
Transportation expenses are 
reimbursed for one round trip to 
the research facility. 

in addition to research partici- 
pation, most laboratories offer 
courses on site or at nearby uni- 
versities to help students fulfill 
graduation requirements while 
participating in the program. The 
tuition for one course per student 
may be paid by the program, 
adding to the value of the 
appointment. The majority of 
past participants have also 
received credit from their home 
university for the research expe- 
rience. Participating laboratories 
are happy to work widi schools to 



arrange- 
ment. 

To be eligible for participation 
in SERS, students must have 
completed the sophomore year at 
an accredited U.S. community 
college or a four-year college or 
university. Applicants must be 
U.S. citizens or permanent resi- 
dent aliens interested in pursuing 
a degree in a science, mathemat- 
ics, or engineering field. 
Guidelines suggest an overall 
grade point average of 3.0 or 
higher, based on A=4.0. 

For more information on the 
SERS program, contact: Science 
and Engineering Research 
Semester: P.O. Box 23575. 
Washington. DC 20026-3575 or 
call (202) 488-2426. SERS appli- 
cation information is also avail- 
able over the Internet. It can be 
found on the World Wide Web at 
http://www.orau.gov/seed/sers/se 
rsgi.htm. A student can download 
the application form and then 
print it out. Interested students 
may also find more information 
by E-mail at SERS@orau.gov. 
The application deadline for the 
1997 spring semester is October 
21. 1996. The 1997 fall term 
deadline is March 15. 1997. 




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by Sandee Siford, Student Senate reporter 



The Senate met on September 23. 1996 at 7:30 p.m. President Cox 
discussed the Board of Governors Presidents (BSGP) meeting drat 
Cox, Vice President Swenson and Senator Mathis attended at Dixon 
University this past weekend. 

Interhall Council announced their plans lo hold a banner competition 
during Autumn Leaf Festival (ALE), along with hall decorations for 
the celebration. 

University Activities Board (UAB) will sponsor a trip to see the 
Penguins play on Oct. 12. Kurt Angle and Rob Eiter will be at the 
game. The cost is $25, bus included. 

Senator Mathis, chair of the Appropriations Committee, announced 
that the Supplementary Account holds $12,000, and the Capitol 
Account holds $88,064. 

Senator Stoops, chair of the Legislative Affairs Committee, 
announced that voter registration will be held Sept.30 thru Oct.l from, 
11- lpm in the cafeteria. 

Senator Forney, chair of the Committee on Subcommittees, moved 
to appoint Senator Thomas Brady to the conduct board pending the 
approval of President Reinhard. Motion passed. Senator Brady then 
moved lo appoint Senator Forney to the conduct board as well pend- 
ing the approval of President Diane Reinhard. Motion passed. 

President Cox announced that he was looking into attending a 
National Leadership Conference in November. Senators who want to 
attend must notify him this week. 

Senator Brady, chair of the Recycling Committee, is looking into an 
Adopt-a-IIighvvay program for the Senate. 

The debate team asked to be alloted S4000 to attend the World 
Tournament in South Africa. The trip costs $7000, and they were able 
to come up with $3000 themselves, but need $4000 more. After a 10 
minute recess. Senator Mathis announced that her committee turned 
the request down. The debate team will have to resubmitt a revised 
request eliminating the expenses of the coach. 



On Tuesday, Oct. 1 watch "Behind the 

Scenes". "Clarion: Get a Life" and the Clarion 

Borough Council starting at 6 P.m. on TV-5 

Clarion University Broadcasting. Make sure 

you catch Wednesday's shows, too. 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1996 



Clarion professor heads western Debate Watch 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Dr. Kristin Marshall, assistant 
professor of speech communica- 
tion and theater at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, is 
heading the western 

Pennsylvania DebateWatch '96 
project . 

Debate Watch is a national pro- 
gram striving to get American 
voters talking about the candi- 
dates and issues and not just lis- 
tening. 

The project is designed to get 
small groups of people together, 
in any setting, to watch the presi- 



dential debates followed by dis- 
cussions of the debate, the cam- 
paign, the candidates, and the 
issues. 

"Any individual or group can 
participate." says Marshall. "I 
will help individuals form groups 
and provide the DebateWalch 
materials to the groups facilita- 
tor; After watching a debate they 
will lead a discussion about the 
debate and the issues and how the 
group reacted to the views." 

Presidential debates are sched- 
uled for September 25. October 
9, and October 16. The vice-pres- 
idential debate is scheduled for 



October 2. All of the debates will 
begin at 9 p.m. 

Group leaders are encouraged 
to fax or e-mail summaries of 
their discussions immediately 
afterwards to DebateWatch head- 
quarters at the University of 
Kansas where researchers will 
compile the results and release 
them to the public. 

Marshall expects to have at 
least four groups participating in 
the Clarion area. 

The project is a natural exten- 
sion for her because of her inter- 
est in political communication. 
"I was selected to head 



DebateWatch in western 
Pennsylvania because of my 
recent research and writings on 
the use of small group discussion 
and focus groups in presidential 
campaigns." says Marshall. 

"Pennsylvania is one of the key 
states in this presidential elec- 
tion." 

DebateWatch was suggested by 
voters in the 1992 presidential 
election who participated in a 
national focus group study. 

Seventeen stales participated in 
the first DebateWatch. 

This year there will be partici- 
pants in all 50 states. U.S. territo- 



ries, and overseas. 

DebateWatch is sponsored by a 
grant from the Ford Foundation 
and co-sponsored by the League 
of Women Voters and the Speech 
Communication Association. 

Individuals or groups interested 
in participating should contact 
Marshal] by telephone at 814- 
226-2478 or 814-226-2284. or by 
e-mail at marshall@vaxa.clari- 
on.edu. 

Participants should provide 
name, address, and phone num- 
bers for home and work. 



Substance-Free Housing Catches on with Campuses 



Courtesy of 
College Press Service 

In the last three years, sub- 
stance-free halls, dorms and even 
fraternity houses have surged in 
popularity. Colleges and univer- 
sities that offer substance-free 
housing include Arizona Stale 
University, State University of 
New York Binghamton, Colorado 
State University, Connecticut 
College, Dartmouth College, 
Denison University, Iowa State 
University, Michigan State 
University, Ohio State University, 
Pennsylvania State University, 
Purdue University, Rice 
University, University of 
California-Los Angeles, 

University of Colorado, 
University of Nebraska. 

University of Wisconsin- 
Madison and numerous others. 
The headq nailers of Sigma Nu 
fraternity has helped 12 of its 2 14 
chapters become substance- free. 

At the University of Mary land, 
the number of students living in 
substanofree dorms has risen 
from 120 in 1993 to about I .OCX) 
today. 

"Basically it's an extra nice 
environment to live in. It's 
great," says J. R. Rosenberg. 19. a 
sophomore at Maryland. 

"You don't have people throw- 
ing up all over the stalls and leav- 



ing it." he explains. "You don't 
have drunk people coming in and 
urinating all over. Stupid things 
like that do go on elsewhere". 

He lives on the sixth floor of 
Denton Hall, which has been des- 
ignated as substance-free: no 
alcohol, drugs or tobacco 
allowed. But what you choose to 
do outside the hall is your busi- 
ness, Rosenberg stresses. 

"I am in a fraternity, so I see 
both sides of the world on cam- 
pus," he says. "A lot of people 
who live in the substance-free 
dorms don't see all of what goes 
on, so they don't appreciate the 
environment they live in." 

At Maryland, substance-free 
housing was launched three years 
ago with a grant from the U.S. 
Department of Education, says 
Kail a Shepherd, coordinator of 
programs and orientation. The 
idea, she says, is to prevent drug 
and alcohol abuse on campus. 

Students have latched onto it 
because "they want more choic- 
es." she explains. "They might 
not abstain from alcohol and 
drugs, but they still want to live 
in a substance-free residence 
hall. Others are committed to a 
substance-free lifestyle." 

"Many students just want to 
avoid temptation by keeping 
away from the party." she adds. 
'They're here for an education." 




McDonald* 



49* 



SMILE 
AND 
SAY 
CHEESEBURGER! 




she says. "You could basically 
blow it by abusing alcohol and 
drugs." 

At many colleges, students say 
the temptation to get "toxxed." 
"zoned," "blotto" or otherwise 
"unsobcr" is definitely there. 
According to a study released last 
year by Harvard University's 
School of Public Heath and 
Social Behavior, a survey of 
more than 1 7.500 students at 140 
colleges and universities showed 
that 44 percent of students report 
binge drinking. Forty-one per- 
cent of entering freshmen who 
reported not binge drinking in 
high school began binging short- 
ly after arriving at college. 

The same researchers showed 
that widespread binge drinking 
on America's college campuses 
had serious "secondhand'' effects 
on students who do not binge. 
Eighty-seven percent of college 
students reported secondary 
binge effects from drunk stu- 
dents, ranging from insults to lost 
sleep to cases of sexual assault. 

Binge drinking is defined as 
consumption of five or more 
drinks in a row tor men or four or 
more drinks in a row for women 
on one or more occasions during 
a t wo- week period. 

"Heavy drinking can cause or 
eonuibule to a number of prob- 
lems for youth," says Steven 
A. Schroeder. president of the 
Robert Wood Johnson 

Foundation, "such as pixir acade- 



mic performance and school fail- 
ure, assault, automobile accidents 
and resulting fatalities, recre- 
ational injuries, violence and 
risky behavior like early and 
unprotected sex." 

So whether students are search- 
ing for quieter living quarters or 
want to avoid the potential pit- 
falls of partying, campuses report 
greater number of students are 
choosing substance-free living. 
Maryland's program is based on 
the first substance-free housing 
program started in 1989 at the 
University of Michigan.Ann 
Arbor. There, the number of stu- 
dents living in substance-free 
housing has jumped from 500 to 
2,600 today. 

"Substance-free housing is real- 
ly a lifestyle choice," says Alan 
Levy, director of housing at 

Michigan. Students think it will 
be the most academic supportive 
life in a residence hall that they 
can obtain." 

When surveyed, students also 
say they chose to live in a sub- 
stance-free environment because 
"in high school, they knew some- 
one who paid a serious conse- 
quence for alcohol abuse." Levy 
says. 

The soaring cost of tuition has 
played an important factor, too. 
With more students taking out 
larger loans to pay for college, 
"they better use the time effi- 
cient I v." he says. 



CHEESEBURGERS 



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Tuesday: 30tf Wings, 

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Wednesday: Drafts 50* (Bud & Coors 
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Thursday: Mixed Drinks 10- 1 2pm $1 
Friday: Domestic Bottled Beer 8- 10pm $1 

Fri & Sat: Karaoke Might 9:30pm-l :30am 
"Clarion's best kept secret!" 



According to Maryland's J.R. 
Rosenberg, an added bonus to the 
substance-free hall is that resi- 
dents often are more courteous to 
their neighbors. 

"It's very quiet. If you want to 
study and someone's playing 
their - radio loud, they'll lower it 
for you," he says. "On other 
floors, it doesn't happen." 

" Substance-free housing, how- 
ever, has yet to gain universal 
acceptance," he says. Outsiders 
tend to stereotype hall residents 
as "people who don't go out, peo- 
ple who study all the time," he 
says. "The main word that comes 
out is 'dorks' or 'nerds'." 

That's been a national concern 
for fraternity members, who 

worry that shedding the "Animal 
House" image might drive mem- 
bers away. But at the University 
of California-Berkeley, the first 
fraternity to go substance -free. 
Sigma Nu. has attracted 30 
pledges this rush season, among 
the best turnout on campus for a 
Greek house. 

Stalling this year, no alcohol, 
smoking or illegal drugs will be 
allowed at the Sigma Nu house. 
Instead, the 104-year-old chapter 
has sought out a new crop of 
recruits who are interested in "a 
fraternity for the *90s-a clean, 
well-lighted place to study and 
make friends." says Bob fuck, a 
Sigma Nu alumnus who is presi- 
dent of the fraternity's governing 
board. 

In addition to being substance - 
free. the new Sigma Nu offers 
rooms that arc wired for modems 
and an online study area. 

Theta Chi fraternity at the 
University of Wisconsin- 
Madison is adopting a similar 
substance-free policy, alter years 
of U'ouble with alcohol and ha/- 
iiiii violations. 



September 26, 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Pafie 9 






LIFESTYLES 



Community Service Fair does good for Clarion 



Courtesy of Community Service 
Learning Office 

The Community Service Fair 
gave students the opportunity to 
make a difference in the Clarion 
Community. The fair took place 
on Wednesday, September 25. 
1996 in the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room. 

"We had an excellent turnout 
from both the agencies and the 
students participating," said 
Heidi Bower, project coordinator. 

"It is so refreshing to see stu- 
dents leaving their residence 
halls and taking an active part in 
the University volunteer experi- 
ence." 

The fair featured 20 agencies 
from the Clarion campus and 
community. 

Representatives from the agen- 
cies set up tables where students 



could go to find out about the 
volunteer opportunities that they 
offer. 

In order to make sure students 
got a chance to check out all the 
agencies, Bower devised a game 
of SERVE BINGO. 

Students who discovered which 
agency fit the clue on their bingo 
card, got a chance to receive a 
SI 5 gift certificate for the 
University Book Center. 

"The fair was both fun and use- 
ful to students," said Bower. "I 
received such a positive response 
to the whole thing that I cannot 
wait until the Into the Streets 
Plunge in October." 

The Plunge is another volunteer 
opportunity from the Community 
Service-Learning office. 

The fair not only provided stu- 
dents with a chance to find out 



about the agencies, but many stu- 
dent volunteers jumped in and 
helped run the actual fair. 
Volunteers served refreshments, 
blew up balloons and helped 
agencies set up their tables. 

Agencies that participated in 
the fair were: AAA Pregnancy 
Center, The American Cancer 
Society, YMCA, Area Agency on 
the Aging, Jefferson/Clarion 
Headstart, Jefferson/Clarion 
Community Action, PASSAGES. 
SAFE, The Literacy Council. 
Clarion Area Elementary Parent 
Teacher Organization, The Drug 
and Alcohol Administration. 
Clarion County Mental Health, 
March of Dimes. Northwest 
Rural AIDS Alliance, American 
Lung Association, Goodwill 
Industries, and the United Way of 
Clarion County. 



Blessid Union of Souls 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

"Blessid Union of Souls" will 
add to Autumn Leaf Festival 
Week at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania with a concert on 
Oct. 3 at 8 p.m. in Tippin 
Gymnasium. 

Tickets for the concert are $8 in 
advance for Clarion University 
students with valid identification 
cards and $12 for all others. 

All tickets at the door will he 
$12. For tickets contact the ticket 
office in Room 123 of the 
Gemmell Student Complex or 
phone 814-226-2459. 

Eliot Sloan and Jeff Pence stall- 
ed as a duo preforming as an 
anonymous cover band along the 
east coast. 

These trips together resulted in 
them writing their own songs, 
leading to a soulful mix of folk 
rock, gospel, and romantic vibes. 
Their music continues in Blessid 
Union of Souls which also 
includes Eddie Hedges and C.P. 
Roth. 

The band creates much of its 
rural soul music during regular 
visits lo Pence's lOO-acre farm 
outside of Cincinnati. Ohio. 

The ballad "I Believe." a piano 
driven work deals with homeless- 
ness and interracial love, reached 
the top ten of the pop singles 
chart and sold 300.000 records. It 
also become the opening track of 



Blessid Union of Souls debut 
album "Home," which received a 
Gold Certificate for sales reach- 
ing over 500,000. They followed 
the "I Believe" success with two 
more hit singles "Let Me Be The 
One" and "Oh Virginia " 

Blessid Union of Souls has per- 
formed on "Regis and Kathy 
Lee." "Friday Night Videos," 
"FX." "Entertainment Tonight," 
"Extra." "Weekend Today," 
"Late Night with Conan 
O'Brien." "Stephanie Miller 
Show." "Lifetime." "CBS This 
Morning," and "All Mv 
Children" They were also select- 
ed to record a cover version of 
Carole King's "Way Over 



Yonder," an album project 
remaking the "Tapestry" album 
by King. Blessid Union of Souls 
was the only debut act selected 
for this project. 

They were also featured on the 
soundtrack of the movie "Ace 
Ventura II: When Nature Calls." 

Make sure to make time in your 
busy schedules to get to this con- 
cert! 

Remember to purchase your 
tickets in advance to take advan- 
tage of the special student rates. 
Also remember to tell all your 
friends! 

The concert is sure to be a def- 
inite crowd pleaser. Enjoy the 
concert and enjoy ALE! 





Jeff Levkulich/Uianon Call 



Students take time out of their busy schedules to sign up 
at the Community Service fair. 



Registration for 

the Into the Streets Plunge begins on 

September 26 and ends on October 7. 

You can register in room 247 

Gemmell or call at Hi 865 



Live from Scotland 

CU student studies abroad 



Courtesy of University Relations 
Blessid Union of Souls 



If anyone would have told me 
five years ago that I would be 
studying in Scotland, I would 
have laughed at mem. 

Not the idea of studying 
abroad, but of studying in 
Scotland. England, a country of 
Shakespeare and culture, yes: 
Scotland, a country of bagpipes 
and men in skirts, no. 

I admit, when I found out I 
would be studying in Glaskow, I 
was a little dubious. But as I 
thought about it. 1 decided that it 
would be a great experience. 

I was reading about kilts and 
ceilidhs, pubs and football (soc- 
cer) and it stalled sounding like a 
fun place to be. But nothing 
about Scotland prepared me for 
die reality. 

I lived in a tlat widi five other 
girls. We were of six different 
nationalities. 

While it often made for a fun 
time, it could also present diffi- 
culties when cultures clashed. It 
certainly taught me diplomacy 
and patience. 

One of the best things about 
having a Scottish flatmate was 



having an instant source of 
important information. This was 
especially crucial in the area of 
language. 

It never occurred to me that the 
word pants could have another 
meaning, it wasn't till I com- 
mented on a guy's purple pants 
that I was informed dial what I 
had actually commented on was 
his underwear. 

Pants are called trousers ihere 
and alter having experienced 
total humiliation as my error was 
shared around the block, I 
learned to think before I spoke. 
There is also the difficulty of the 
traffic being on the other side of 
the road. 

It seems like a cliche, but idler 
a few narrow escapes. I learned 
alertness, and the talent of dash- 
ing across the road like a mad 
women to avoid the traffic i did- 
n't see because I was looking the 
wrong way. 

A great source of fun in 
Scotland is the Ceilidh (pro- 
nounced kay-ly). These are 
sponsored by many different 

Continued on page 11 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1996 



September 26, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



Candidates should leave their leadership on the beach by Dave Barry 



This summer, while drinking a 
frozen drink on the island of 
Lanai. in Hawaii, I came up with 
a plan for saving ihe democratic 
process, If anyone still wants to. 

The democratic process was on 
my mind because I attended both 
Ihe Republican and Democratic 
conventions (motto of both par- 
ties: "Building' A Better 
America By Mindlessly Waving 
Signs"). 

1 also watched on TV as the 
Ross Perot Party, founded and 
paid for by Ross Perot, made the 
surprising decision of nominating 
Ross Perot. 

This means I spent 10 solid 
days watching men in suits 
explaining why they want us to 
elect them president. 

Of course, the obvious reason 
why they want us to elect them 
president is mat they just really, 
desperately want to be president. 
But they never say this. 

They say: "Please vote for me 
because I have an obsessive, all- 
consuming need, bordering on 
mental illness, to live in the 
White House and fly around in 
Air Force One and have a vast 
entourage of lackeys." 

Instead, they say they want to 
provide Leadership. The way 
they they do this is by taking 
weekly polls to find out what 
kind of Leader we voters think 
we want that week, then claiming 
thai they have been that person 
all Uieir lives. 

So these men have learned to be 
extremely flexible about what 
kind of Leadership they provide. 
Gumby is rigid, compared to 
these men. 

This is why Bob Dole staged a 
convention that featured a prime- 
time speech by every leading 
moderate and minority -group 
Republican (for a total af four 
speeches) while Pat Buchanan 
lay bound and gagged in the 
basement. 

This is whv Bill Clinton, who 



last time around was Mr. 
Government Activist 

II oily wood- Star- Schmooze r 
Rock-'n'-Roll Saxophone 

Hipster, is suddenly Dwight 
Eisenhower (if the polls call for 
it. Bill will be bald by Election 
Day). 

This is also why Ross Perot has. 
through a tremendous exercise of 
will power, refrained from pub- 
licly expressing his deep-seated 
belief that (TA-controlled ham- 
sters are putting radioactive 
M&M's up his nose when he 
sleeps. 

These men will do anything to 
make us like them. 

If we tell the pollsters that we 
believe our president should 
resemble a Warner Bros, cartoon 
character, then we will see 
Clinton. Dole, and Perot present- 
ins! their visions for America 
through the mouth holes of 
Tweetie Bird costumes. 

And of course we will be 
repulsed. 1'hat's the problem 
with our current democratic 
process: The more these desper- 
ate, needy men, contort them- 
selves to look like leaders, the 
less presidential they look, and 
fewer of us bother to vote for any 
of them. 

Is there a solution? Is there 
some way to make them for 
God's sake STOP trying to lead, 
and start just acting like humans'? 
Yes. 

It hit me during my second 
frozen drink: Wc need to pass a 
law requiring that all candidates 
for president must spend the 
entire campaign in Hawaii. 

You cannot lake anything, 
including yourself, too seriosly 
for very long in Hawaii. 
Consider the Big Island of 
Hawaii, which is basically an 
active volcano. 

Even as you as you read these 
words there is actual lava flowing 
down the mountain there: it 
occasionally covers highways 



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and towns. 

If such a thing were to happen 
in, for example. New Jersey, it 
would be HUGE news. 

It would be on CNN day and 
night, and 58 committies of 
Congress would be holdinn hear- 
tags. 

All the presidential contenders 
would be demonstrating leader- 
ship by helicoptering over the 
Mta and frowning down at the 
volcano through their Tweetie 
holes. 

But the Hawaiians honestly do 
not seem to view it as a big deal. 
They avoid the lava, of course, 
but for them it seems to represent 
the same level of hazard as an 
Amway representative. 

They don't seem to spend much 
time fretting about it. 

Because conditions in Hawaii 
are just too relaxing: The islands 
are lovely; the weather is superb; 
the music is gentle. 



Even the language is soothing: 
All the words sound like 
"aaaaahhhh." 

So I think the presidential can- 
didates should have to spend the 
campaign in Hawaii, alone, with- 
out their pollsters and their 
wingtipped entourages. 

Maybe they should be confined 
to the island of Lanai. which has 
about 2.500 residents, some 
sheep, some turtles. 700 gazillion 
fish and a couple resorts serving 
excellent frozen drinks. 

You could not conduct a tradi- 
tional campaign on Lanai; you 
could reach some voters only by 
snorkeling up to them and indi- 
cating your policies via underwa- 
ter hand gestures. 

Under those conditions, maybe 
even the candidates — even those 
frantic, twitching, driven men — 
would eventually mellow out. 
Maybe one day, lying on the 
beach, they'd announce: "Hey! I 




can't remember my economic 
program!" 

Maybe they'd realize that the 
country would get along without 
their leadership. 

Maybe Ross would get swal- 
lowed by a tuna. 

Maybe I'm dreaming. But 
those drinks sure were good. 



Weezer and the Descendants 



by Benj Aumcin 
Lifestyles Writer 



FREE BEER!!! CLASSES 
CANCELED FOR THIS MON- 
DAY!!! DANCING GIRLS!!! 
OK, now that I have your atten- 
tion, we can get started... 

Hey, how's it goin' ?? Benj here 
again to culturally enlighten the 
Clarion area with my weekly 
album reviews. 

It's not as exciting as Dave 
Barry, and is less intelligent than 
die comics, but give me a chance 
anyway. Please?? 

This week, you'll bear me bab- 
ble about two brand new albums, 
so new dial they aren't even in 
stores at the time of this writing. 

First up is the new one from 
Weezer. Pinkerton. on DGC 
Records. 

Well, the masters of fuzzy, gut- 
tural, noise-distorted power 
chords are back, with 10 new 
blasts of tunes about the normal 
stuff, like good times, the bur- 
dens of getting too much sex (and 
there are many of us out there 
wondering right now if that's 
actually possible )< relationship 
problems. Hying insects and les- 
bians. 

Weezer followed the old saying 
of. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," 
on this outing. 

The first single. El Scorchu, is 
a goofy, apathetic sounding 
piece, but strangely likable just 
die same. 

Lots of tempo changes, and a 
cool punk rock interlude high- 
light this one. Addictive is the 



best word for it. 

The opening track, Tired of Sex, 
is just plain FUN! Its catchy riffs 
set a great tone for the rest of the 
album. 

Other highlights on Pinkerton 
include Why Bother, another fun 
one that is like a Monkees record 
on amphetamines. 

With its silly backing vocals, 
and Across the Sea, a cool little 
ditty with plenty of tempo 
changes and crunchy guitar pails. 
Weezer offers us a very consis- 
tent album, no real curveballs to 
speak of. 

More groves than a valley, and 
more hooks than a fisherman's 
tackle box. 

Each tune consist of basic rock 
power chords, but Weezer is tal- 
ented enough to make it unique. 

Despite a couple less-than-live- 
ly songs. I was quite impressed. 

Next up is one from a band that 
has resurrected itself from the 
grave (well, kind of). Its 
Descendants, Everything Sucks, 
on Epitaph Records. 

Even a punk rock novice knows 
diesc guys, as they've influenced 
everyone from Green Day to 
Soul Asylum. 

Unfortunately, the closest they 
ever got to mainstream popula- 
tion is a 10 second sound bite in 
die movie. Pump up the Volume. 
Everything Sucks is the first 
Descendants album since P)87 
(three of their members had been 
the band known as ALL up until 
this year), and they haven't 
missed a single beat. 

They've pick-up where 1987s 




Benj Auman does weekly music 
reviews 

ALL alhum left off. Everything 
from 40 second sonic blasts 
(Coffee Mug), to melodic punk 
rock sounds {Everything Sucks, 
Doghouse), to slower, sappy love 
songs (I'm The One), all in the 
formula which made the 
Descendants one of the most 
influential punk bands of all lime. 
It's amazing how fresh these 
guys sound after not making any 
new music for 9 years. 

It proves lhat the old punkers 
can .still rock with the best of 
them. 

These and many other fine 
musical endeavors can be heard 
daily on WCCB 1610 am (yes. 
this is a shameless plug) from 12- 
12 daily. 

My show (shameless plug part 
two) is called "The Caring and 
Sharing Show" and can be heard 
Thursday nights from 9-12. 

We lake all requests, so make 
sure you call. 






News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



LEAD STORIES 

— Willie King, 37, was arrest- 
ed moments after he had alleged- 
ly mugged a 94-year-old woman 
in a housecoat just outside her 
from door in New York's 
Greenwich Village in July. The 
woman is the mother of Vincent 
"Chin" Gigante, the reputed god- 
father of the Genovese crime 
family. (As this issue of "News of 
the Weird" goes to press, King is 
still alive.) 

— According to a report in The 
People newspaper in London in 
July, British spies who set up 
high-tech clandestine cameras to 
gain intelligence on the Irish 
Republican Army discovered that 
the cameras also recorded much 
kinky sex. The newspaper said 
the British government is plan- 
ning to use some sex scenes, 
including episodes in which IRA 
leaders have sex with the wives 
of their jailed comrades, in an 
upcoming propaganda campaign. 

—Kids Lacking "Quality 

Time": Brian Smith, 42, was 

charged in Cassville, Mo., in July 

with locking his three kids in 55- 

gallon drums during the day 

while he was at work. And 

Jeffrey Hoveland, 50, pleaded 

guilty in St. Paul, Minn., in July 

to using an electrified dog collar 

to punish his two sons, ages 9 and 

11. And Jan and Joyce Duplantis 

were arrested in New Orleans in 
June and Charged with forcing 

their two female wards, ages 8 

and 9, to live outside in a crude 

playhouse so as not to mess up 

their apartment. 

THE CONTINUING CRISIS 

— In June, the Houston Health 
and Human Services Department 
warned of a local diarrhea out- 
break caused by cyclospora. The 
department said two clusters of 
cases had been reported, die first 
among a group of executives of 
the natural gas industry meetinsi 
at a local club. 

— In June, die Arkansas State 
Medical Board ordered Waldo, 
Ark., family physician Jewel 
Byron Grimmett Jr. to start keep- 
ing written records. At a hearing. 
Grimmett told board members 
that he has kept all patient histo- 
ries, including prescription 
records, only in his head for the 
35 years he has been practicing 
medicine. Grimmett avoided 
license revocation because he is 
Waldo's only doctor and because, 
according to him, he treats about 
half his patients for free. 

— In March, alter die parents 
of Huang Pin-jen, 27, and Chang 
Shu-mei, 26, of Kaohsiung, 



Taiwan, refused to bless their 
wedding, the couple opted for 
suicide. 

They drove a car off a cliff 
(but survived), tried to hang 
themselves (but survived), and 
leaped from atop a 12-story 
building (but survived, landing 
on an adjacent roof, suffering 
multiple fractures). 

In April, the patents reconsid- 
ered. 

— On May 23, the bodies of 
two Dominican Republic nation- 
als were discovered, one near 
JFK Airport in Long Beach, 
N.Y., and the other about 10 
miles from Miami (Fla.) 
International Airport. 

Both had grease marks, and 
after investigations, police in 
both places said they believed the 
men had fallen from the wheel 
wells of airliners, where they had 
stowed away hoping for illegal 
entry into the United States. 
LEAST COMPETENT PEO- 
PLE 

— Fifteen New York City police 
officers were indicted in July and 
as many as 700 other city 
employees are under investiga- 
tion for not paying federal taxes. 
The cops had bought fake-legal- 
gibberish documents (for $900 to 
$2,000 each) from scam artists 
who had convinced them that, 
despite the fact that they were 
police officers, they could legally 
claim not to be subject to govern- 
ment jurisdiction. (In the docu- 
ment, the officers were "nonim- 
migrant nonresidents" who are 
"alien to the United States.") 

In each case, the city payroll 
office unquestioningly accepted 
the form and did not withhold 
federal tax. in some cases for up 
to four years. 

— Oslo. Norway, police inspec- 
tor Leif Ole Tonnes admitted in 
July that "our body-search tech- 
niques aren't good enough." He 
was commenting on a male pris- 
oner's having been locked up for 
two weeks in the women's jail 
despite having been "body- 
searched" at the Sola Airport and 
then "strip-searched" at the jail. 
The man was wearing female 
makeup and had hormone-treat- 
ment breasts, but Topnes admit- 
ted that otherwise he was obvi- 
ously a man and should have 
been detected as such. 

— Jeffrey J. Pyrcioch. 19. and 
an alleged accomplice were 
arrested in West Lafayette, Ind.. 
in May on theft and fraud 
charges. Pyrcioch allegedly 
cashed checks that he had written 
with disappearing ink, apparently 



believing the checks would be 
blank by the time they were pre- 
sented to the bank for collection. 
However, traces of ink remained, 
and police said Pyrcioch would 
have a better chance of getting 
away with it if he had not used 
checks pre-printed with his name 
and account number on them. 

— In April. Edward Lopez. 19, 
and Eric Harb, 18, were arrested 
in Lincolnwood, 111., after police 
were called to a Suinmit depart- 
ment store. 

According to a clerk, the two 
men had approached him and 
asked politely if he would permit 
them to pay for clothes with a 
stolen credit card. 

— Columbus, Ohio, police 
arrested Timothy E. Lebo, 39, 
and Charles J. Kinser, 32, around 
5 a.m. on June 5 and charged 
them with ripping an ATM out of 
a bank's wall and attempting to 
carry it away in the trunk of their 
car. When questioned by police, 
the pair tried to convince officers 
that the ATM was a washing 
machine. 

— In March, in Clawson, Mich., 
and in January, in Federal Way, 
Wash., parents mistakenly 
packed cans of Bud Ice beer in 
their elementary schoolchildren's 
lunchboxes. They said they con- 
fused the Bud Ice with a 
Hawaiian Punch can (Clawson) 
and a holiday can of Pepsi 
(Federal Way). 

THE WEIRDO-AMERICAN 
COMMUNITY 

— Ms. Terry Klemann. 42, 
received several traffic citations 
and was ticketed for filing a false 
report after her car rammed two 
pickup uucks in Belleville. III., in 
July. An apparently serious 
Klemann steadfastly maintained 
that her cocker spaniel. Mutzie 2, 
had gotten behind the wheel and 
maneuvered the car into the 
trucks. Later, she told the 
Belleville News-Democrat that 



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several years ago the original 
Mutzie had driven Klemann's 
friend's car into a tree in New 
York City. 

— Although Los Angeles police- 
beating victim Rodney King was 
convicted in Alhambra. 
California, in July of misde- 
meanor hit-and-run for injuring 



his estranged wife by driving 
away while her aim was still 
reaching into his car, he was 
acquitted of more serious 
charges, including assault with a 
deadly weapon. Outside the 
courtroom, a triumphant King 
told reporters. "I'm going to 
Disneyland." 



Scotland from page 9 



organizations, but the most 
important one is the Kilt Society, 
in which I am a proud member. 
A Ceilidh is a night full of tradi- 
tional Scottish dancing. 
Although I am not usually a keen 
dancer, I have managed to learn a 
few things and have actually 
been complimented by a 
Scotswoman on my skills. 
Amazing! Another Scottish tra- 
dition I got to experience was the 
Burn's Night supper. Robert 
Burns is Scotland's national poet 
and January 25, his birthday, is 
celebrated with a traditional din- 
ner of haggis, neeps, and taties. 
Haggis is the heart, liver, and 
lungs of a sheep, mixed with 
suet, oatmeal, and onion, highly 
seasoned and sfuffed into a 
sausage casing, or more tradi- 
tionally, a sheep stomach. Neeps 
are turnips, and taties are pota- 
toes. Haggis is pretty good once 
you stop thinking about what you 
are REALLY eating, and I've 
become strangely addicted to 
turnips. 
Scotland also had its downside. 



I never thought I'd find a place 
which received more rain than 
Clarion, but I was wrong. We 
probably got at least three days of 
rain each week. Even in the win- 
ter, as it never got cold enough to 
snow in Glaskow. University 
beaucracy was also a bit frustrat- 
ing, but my tlatmates were 
always ready to help. Scotland 
contains some of the most beauti- 
ful country I have ever seen. The 
Highlands, especially, are almost 
haunting in their attraction. 
Being able to do quite a bit of 
traveling around Scotland was a 
great experience. Traveling 
alone meant that I got to meet 
many new people and I was also 
able to gain independence. And 
no, I didn't see the Loch Ness 
monster, although I did take a 
tour around the loch. 
By going to Scotland, I was able 
to enjoy many new experiences 
and meet many people, an oppor- 
tunity I wouldn't have had if I 

hadn't investigated studying 

abroad. 

• Krislen Trzciankci is a CU student 



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Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1 996 



September 26. 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



Candidates should leave their leadership on the beach by Dave Barry 



fhis summer, while drinking a 
frozen drink on (he island of 
Lanai, in Hawaii. I came up with 
a plan for saving the democratic 

process, II anyone slill wants to. 

The democratic process was on 
my mind because I attended both 
the Republican and Democratic 
conventions (motto of both par- 
ties: "Building A Belter 
America By Mindlessly Waving 
Signs"). 

I also watched on TV as the 
Ross Perot Party, founded and 
paid for by Ross Perot, made the 
surprising decision of nominating 
Ross Perot 

This means I spent 10 solid 
days watching men in suits 
explaining why they want us to 
elect them president. 

Of course, the obvious reason 
why they want us to elect them 
president is that they just really, 
desperately want to be president. 
But they never say this. 

They say: "Please vole for me 
because 1 have an obsessive, all- 
consuming need, bordering on 
mental illness, to live in the 
White House and fly around in 
Air Force One and have a vast 
entourage of lackeys." 

Instead, they say they want to 
provide Leadership. The way 
they they do this is by taking 
weekly polls to find out what 
kind of Leader we voters think 
we want that week, then claiming 
thai they have been that person 
all then lives. 

So these men have learned to be 
extremely flexible about what 
kind of leadership they provide, 
(nimby is rigid, compared to 
these men. 

This is why Boh Dole staged a 
convention that featured a prime- 
time speech by every leading 
moderate and minority-group 
Republican (lor a total al four 
speeches) while Pal Buchanan 
his bound and gagged in the 
basement. 
This is win Bill Clinton, who 



last time around was Mr. 
Government Activist 

Holly wood- Star-Sehmoozer 

Rock-'n'-Roll Saxophone 

Hipster, is suddenly Dvvight 
Eisenhower (if the polls call for 
it. Bill will be bald by Election 
Day). 

This is also why Ross Perot has. 
through a tremendous exercise ol 
will power, retrained from pub- 
licly expressing his deep-sealed 
beliel that CIA-controlled ham- 
sters are pulling radioactive 
M&M's up his nose when he 
sleeps. 

These men will do anything to 
make us like them. 

If we tell the pollsters that we 
believe our president should 
resemble a Warner Bros, cartoon 
character, then we will see 
Clinton. Dole, and Perot present- 
ing their visions for America 
through the mouth holes o\ 
Tweetie Bud costumes. 

And of course we will be 
repulsed. That's the problem 
with our current democratic 
process: The more these desper- 
ate, needy men, contort them- 
selves to look like leaders, the 
less presidential they look, and 
fewer of us bother to vote for any 
of them. 

Is diere a solution? Is there 
some way to make them for 
God's sake STOP trying to lead, 
and start just acting like humans? 
Yes 

It hit me during my second 
frozen drink: We need to pass a 
law requiring that all candidates 
for president must spend the 
entire campaign in Hawaii. 

You cannot lake anything, 
including yourself, lot) seriosly 
tor very long ill Hawaii. 
Consider the Big Island of 
Hawaii, which is basically an 
active volcano. 

Even as you as you read these 
words there is actual lava Bowing 
down the mountain there: it 
occasionally covers highways 



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and towns. 

It such a thing were to happen 
in. for example. New Jersey, it 
would be HUG I: news. 

It would be on CNN clay and 
night, and 58 cominiltics ol 
Congress would be holding hear- 
ings. 

All the presidential contenders 
would he demonstrating leader- 
ship by helicoptering over the 
area and frowning down at the 
volcano through (heir Tweetie 
holes. 

But the llawaiians honestly do 
not seem to view it as a big deal. 
They avoid die lava, of course, 
but for (hem it seems to represent 
the same level of hazard as an 
Amway representative. 

They don't seem to spend much 
time fretting about it. 

Because conditions in Hawaii 
are just too relaxing: The islands 
are lovely: the weather is superb: 
the music is gentle. 



Even the language is soothing: 
All the words sound like 
"aanaahhhh." 

So I think the presidential can- 
didates should have to spend the 
campaign in Hawaii, alone, with- 
out their pollsters and their 
wing tipped entourages. 

Maybe they should be confined 
to the island ofl.anai. which has 
about 2.500 residents, some 
sheep, some turtles, 700 ga/illion 
fish and a couple resorts serving 
excellent frozen drinks. 

You could not conduct a tradi- 
tional campaign on Lanai; you 
could reach some voters only by 
snorkeling up to them and indi- 
cating your policies via underwa- 
ter hand gestures. 

Under those conditions, maybe 
even the candidates — even those 
frantic, twitching, driven men — 
would eventually mellow out. 
Maybe one day. lying on the 
beach, they'd announce: "Hey! I 




News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd 



can't remember my economic 
program!" 

Maybe they'd realize that the 
country would get along without 
their leadership. 

Maybe Ross would get swal- 
lowed by a tuna. 

Maybe I'm dreaming. But 

those drinks sure were tiood. 



Weezer and the Descendants 



by Be nj An man 
Lifestyles Writer 



FREE BEER!!! CLASSES 
CANCELED FOR THIS MON- 
DAY!!! DANCING GIRLS!!! 
OK. now that I have your atten- 
tion, we can get started... 

Hey, how's it goin'?? Benj here 
again to culturally enlighten the 
Clarion area with my weekly 
album reviews. 

It's not as exciting as Dave 
Barry, and is less intelligent than 
the comics, but give me a chance 
anyway. Please.'.' 

This week, you'll hear me bab- 
ble about two brand new albums, 
so new that they aren't even in 
stores at the time of this writing. 

First up is the new one from 
Weezer. Pinkerton. on DGC 
Records. 

Well, the masters of fuzzy, gut- 
tural, noise-distorted power 
chords are back, with 10 new 
blasts of tunes about the normal 
stuff, like good times, the bur- 
dens of getting too much sex (and 
there are many of us out there 
wondering right now if that's 
actually possible), relationship 
problems. Hying insects and les- 
bians 

Weezer followed the old saying 
ol. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." 
on this outing. 

The Inst single. El Scorchv, is 
a goofy, apathetic sounding 
piece, but strangely likable just 
die same. 

Lots of tempo changes, and a 
cool punk rock interlude high- 
light this one. Addictive is the 



best word for it. 

The opening track. Tired of Sex, 
is just plain FUN! Its catchy riffs 
set a great tone for the rest of the 
album. 

Other highlights on Pinkerton 
include Why Bother, another fun 
one that is like a Monkees record 
on amphetamines. 

With its silly backing vocals, 
and Across the Sea. a cool little 
ditty with plenty of tempo 
changes and crunchy guitar parts. 
Weezer offers us a very consis- 
tent album, no real curveballs to 
speak of. 

More groves than a valley, and 
more hooks than a fisherman's 
tackle box. 

Each tune consist of basic rock 
power chords, but Weezer is tal- 
ented enough to make it unique. 

Despite a couple less-than-live- 
ly songs. I was quite impressed. 

Next up is one from a band thai 
has resurrected itself from the 
grave (well, kind of). Its 
Descendants. Ever) thing Sucks, 
on Fpitaph Records. 
Even a punk rock novice knows 
these guys, as they've influenced 
everyone from Green Day to 
Soul Asylum. 

Unfortunately, the closest they 
ever got to mainstream popula- 
tion is a 10 second sound bite in 
the movie. Pump up the Volume. 
Everything Sucks is the first 
Descendants album since 1 ( ->N7 
(three of their members had been 
the band known as ALL up until 
this year), and they haven't 
missed a single beat. 

They've pick-up where l ( )87s 




Benj Auman does weekly music 
reviews 

ALL afbum left off. Everything 
from 40 second sonic blasts 
(Coffee Mug), to melodic punk 
rock sounds (Eveiylhing Sucks. 
Doghouse), to slower, sappy love 
songs (I'm The One), all in the 
formula which made the 
Descendants one of the most 
influential punk bands of all time. 
It's amazing how fresh these 
guys sound after not making any 
new music for 9 years. 

It proves that the old punkers 
can still rock with (he best of 
them. 

These and many other line 
musical endeavors can be heard 
daily on WCCB 1610 am (yes. 
this is a shameless plug) from 12- 
12 daily. 

My show (shameless plug part 
two) is called "The Caring and 
Sharing Show" and can be heard 
Thursday nights from 9-12. 

We lake all requests, so make 
sure you call. 



LEAD STORIES 

— Willie King, 37, was arrest- 
ed moments after he had alleged- 
ly mugged a 94-year-old woman 
in a housecoat just outside her 
front door in New York's 
Greenwich Village in July. The 
woman is the mother of Vincent 
"Chin" Gigante, the reputed god- 
father of the Genovese crime 
family. (As this issue of "News of 
the Weird" goes to press, King is 
still alive.) 

— According to a report in The 
People newspaper in London in 
July. British spies who set up 
high-tech clandestine cameras to 
gain intelligence on the Irish 
Republican Army discovered that 
the cameras also recorded much 
kinky sex. The newspaper said 
the British government is plan- 
ning to use some sex scenes, 
including episodes in which IRA 
leaders have sex with the wives 
of their jailed comrades, in an 
upcoming propaganda campaign. 
— Kids Lacking "Quality 
Time": Brian Smith, 42, was 
charged in Cassville, Mo„ in July 
with locking his three kids in 55- 
gallon drums during the day 
while he was at work. And 
Jeffrey Hoveland, 50, pleaded 
guilty in St. Paul, Minn., in July 
to using an electrified dog collar 
to punish his two sons, ages 9 and 
11. And Jan and Joyce Duplantis 

were arrested in New Orleans in 
June and cnarged with forcing 
their two female wards, ages 8 
and 9. to live outside in a crude 
playhouse so as not to mess up 
their apartment. 
THE CONTINUING CRISIS 

— In June, the Houston Health 
and Human Services Department 
warned of a local diarrhea out- 
break caused by cyclospora. The 
department said two clusters of 
cases had been reported, die first 
among a group of executives of 
the natural gas industry meeting 
at a local club. 

— In June, the Arkansas State 
Medical Board ordered Waldo. 
Ark., family physician Jewel 
Byron Grimmett Jr. to start keep- 
ing written records. At a hearing, 
Grimmett told board members 
that he has kept all patient histo- 
ries, including prescription 
records, only in his head for die 
35 years he has been practicing 
medicine. Grimmett avoided 
license revocation because he is 
Waldo's only doctor and because, 
according to him, he treats about 
hall his patients for free. 

— In March, after the parents 
of Huang Pin-jen. 27. and Chang 
Shu-mei, 26, of Kaohsiuns, 



Taiwan, refused to bless their 
wedding, the couple opted for 
suicide. 

They drove a car off a cliff 
(but survived), tried to hang 
themselves (but survived), and 
leaped from atop a 12-story 
buildim: (hut survived, landing 
on an adjacent roof, suffering 
multiple fractures). 

In April, the parents reconsid- 
ered. 

— On May 23, the bodies of 
two Dominican Republic nation- 
als were discovered, one near 
JFK Airport in Long Beach, 
N.Y., and the other about 10 
miles from Miami (Fla.) 
International Airport. 

Both had grease marks, and 
after investigations, police in 
both places said they believed the 
men had fallen from the wheel 
wells of airliners, where ihey had 
stowed away hoping for illegal 
entry into the United States. 
LEAST COMPETENT PEO- 
PLE 

— Fifteen New York City police 
officers were indicted in July and 
as many as 700 other city 
employees are under investiga- 
tion for not paying federal taxes. 
The cops had bought fake-legal- 
gibberish documents (for $900 to 
$2,000 each) from scam artists 
who had convinced them that, 
despite the fact that they were 
police officers, they could legally 
claim not to be subject to govern- 
ment jurisdiction. (In the docu- 
ment, the officers were "nonim- 
migrant nonresidents" who are 
"alien to the United States.") 

In each ease, the city payroll 
office unquestioningly accepted 
the form and did not withhold 
federal tax. in some cases for up 
to four years. 

— Oslo. Norway, police inspec- 
tor I.eil Ole Topnes admitted in 
July that "our body-search tech- 
niques aren't good enough." He 
was commenting on a male pris- 
oner's having been locked up for 
two weeks in the women's jail 
despite having been "body- 
searched" at the Sola Airport and 
then "strip-searched" at the jail. 
The man was wearing female 
makeup and had hormone-treat- 
ment breasts, but Topnes admit- 
ted that otherwise he was obvi- 
ously a man and should have 
been detected as such. 

—Jeffrey .1. Pyrcioch. 19. and 
an alleged accomplice were 
arrested in West Lafayette. Ind.. 
in May on theft and fraud 
charges. Pyrcioch allegedly 
cashed checks that he had written 
with disappearing ink. apparently j 



believing (he checks would be 
blank by the time they were pre- 
sented to the bank for collection. 
However, traces of ink remained, 
and police said Pyrcioch would 
have a better chance of getting 
away with it if he had not used 
checks preprinted with his name 
and account number on them. 

— In April. Edward Lope/, 19, 
and Eric I hub. 18, were arrested 
in Lincolnwood. 111., alter police 
were called to a Suinmit depart- 
ment store. 

According to a clerk, the two 
men had approached him and 
asked politely if he would permit 
them to pay for clothes with a 
stolen credit card. 

— Columbus, Ohio, police 
arrested Timothy F. Lebo, 39, 
and Charles J. Kinscr, 32. around 
5 a.m. on June 5 and charged 
them with ripping an ATM out of 
a bank's wall and attempting to 
carry it away in the trunk of their 
car. When questioned by police, 
the pair fried to convince officers 
that the ATM was a washing 
machine. 

— In March, in Clawson, Mich., 
and in January, in Federal Way, 
Wash., parents mistakenly 
packed cans of Bud Ice beer in 
their elementary schoolchildren's 
lunchboxes. They said they con- 
fused the Bud Ice with a 
Hawaiian Punch can (Clawson) 
and a holiday can of Pepsi 
(Federal Way). 

THE WEIRDO-AMERICAN 
COMMUNITY 

— Ms. Terry Klemann. 42, 
received several traffic citations 
and was ticketed for filing a false 
report after her car rammed two 
pickup trucks in Belleville. III., in 
July. An apparently serious 
Klemann steadfastly maintained 
that her cocker spaniel. Mut/ie 2. 
had gotten behind the wheel and 
maneuvered the car into the 
trucks. Later, she told the 
Belleville News-Democrat that 



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BIS DADDY PIZZA - 1 TOPPING 

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$10.49 + TAX 

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$6.00 + TAX 

Specials good after 5:00 PM 



several years ago the original 
Mut/ie had driven Klemann 's 
friend's car into a tree in New 
York City. 

— Although I .os Angeles police- 
beating victim Rodney King was 
convicted in Alhambra. 
California, in July ol misde- 
meanor hit-and-run lor injuring 



his estranged wile by driving 
away while her arm was still 
reaching into his car. he was 
acquitted of more serious 
charges, including assault with a 
deadly weapon. Outside the 
courtroom, a triumphant King 
told reporters. "I'm going to 
Disneyland." 



Scotland from page 9 



organizations, but the most 
important one is the Kilt Society, 
in which I am a proud member. 
A Ceilidh is a night full of tradi- 
tional Scottish dancing. 
Although I am not usually a keen 
dancer, I have managed to learn a 
few things and have actually 
been complimented by a 
Scotswoman on my skills. 
Amazing! Another Scottish tra- 
dition I got to experience was the 
Burn's Night supper. Robert 
Burns is Scotland's national poet 
and January 25, his birthday, is 
celebrated with a traditional din- 
ner of haggis, neeps, and taties. 
Haggis is the heart, liver, and 
lungs of a sheep, mixed with 
suet, oatmeal, and onion, hiuhlv 
seasoned and stuffed into a 
sausage casing, or more tradi- 
tionally, a sheep stomach. Neeps 
are turnips, and taties are pota- 
toes. Haggis is pretty good once 
you stop thinking about what you 
are REALLY eating, and I've 
become strangely addicted to 
turnips. 
Scotland also had its downside. 



I never thought I'd find a place 
which received more rain than 
Clarion, but I was wrong. We 
probably got at least three days of 
rain each week. Even in the win- 
ter, as it never got cold enough to 
snow in Glaskow. University 
beaucracy was also a bit frustrat- 
ing, but my flatmates were 
always ready to help. Scotland 
contains some of the most beauti- 
ful country I have ever seen. The 
Highlands, especially, are almost 
haunting in their attraction. 
Being able to do quite a bit of 
traveling around Scotland was a 
great experience. Traveling 
alone meant that I got to meet 
many new people and I was also 
able to gain independence. And 
no, 1 didn't see the Loch Ness 
monster, although I did take a 
tour around the loch. 
By going to Scotland, I was able 
to enjoy many new experiences 
and meet many people, an oppor- 
tunity I wouldn't have had if I 

hadn't investigated studying 

abroad. 

• Kristen Trzcianka is a CU student 



Anyone who wishes to submit 
something in the weekly calen- 
dar can drop it off at the Call 
office, 270 Gemmell or call 
Denise at x2380 



404 /l>f a,* SCf-ce-C 226-9444 



\ CUP discount with I.D. 

\ Our specialty is acrylic nails 

\ A certified Therapeutic Massage 

Technician 
\ A certified Estheticial Technicial 

specializing in complete skin care 
\ Ask about our "Referal Plan" 
\ Tanning Bed Package- Buy 10 get 5 for 

Free only $35 for CUP 

students 




•Perms 

•Color 

•Sunglitz 

•Frosting 

•Pedicures 

•Waxing 

•Foil Hi-lights 

•Conditioners 

•Electrology 

•Acrylic Nails 

•Manicures 

•Ear Piercing 

•Tanning 

•Nail Tips 



A Full Service Salon 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 26, 1996 



AKOUJVD -M- AV$OU<l in Clarion 



Thursday 



•Goll at Davis & 
KIkins Invitational 
•Shared Uniqueness 
Presentation by Freda 
Hxtcr-LodUeaf in 
Gemmell 7:30 p.m. 
•Shared Uniqueness 
I'ilm (Chap) 8:30 p.m 
GARBY THEATER 
Eraser (R) 7 & 9 p.m. 
Maximum Risk (R) 
7:10 & 9:25 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Jack (PG- 13) 
74 9 

TWISTER (PG-13) 
7 & 9:30 




Jriday 



Admissions Day (248 
Gem) 9 a.m. 

Credit/No Record 
ends 4 p.m. 
•Tennis at Geneva 3 
p.m. 

•Goll at Davis & 
HIkins Invitational 

AASU Theme Parly 
(250/252 Gem) 9 p.m. 

Shared Uniqueness 
film (Chap) 8:30 p.m. 
GARBY THEATER 
Eraser (R) 7 & 9 p.m. 
Maximum Risk (R) 
7:10 & 9:25 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Jack (PG-13) 
7&9 

TWISTER (PG-13) 
7 & 9:30 



Saturday 



ALFWEEK! 

Football at 
Younsistovvn State 7 
p.m. 

►Lambda Sigma Pie 
Throwing Conlest 
•Cross country at 
Hiram College 
Invitational 
GARBY THEATER 
Eraser (R) 7 & 9 p.m. 
Matinee 4:30 p.m. 
Maximum Risk (R) 
7: 10 & 9:25 p.m. 
Matinee 4:30 p.m. 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

jack (PG-13) Matinee 
4:30 p.m. 7 & 9 p.m. 
Twister (PG-13) 7 & 
9:30 p.m. Matinee 
4:30 p.m. 



Sunday 



ALF WEEK 

•Autorama - Main 
Street 12 noon - 5 
p.m. 



Monday 



•ALF WEEK 

•Sign up lor group pic- 
tures (277 Gem) 
•Policy Committee 
Meeting (B-8 Chap) 4 
p.m. 




Luesday 



•ALF WEEK 

Volleyball vs 
California 7 p.m. 

Tennis at Pittsburgh 3 
p.m. 

•Tennis Luncheon at 
Holiday Inn 3 p.m. 
• Higher Education 
Month ot Service 



Wednesday 



•ALFWEEK 
•Sidewalk sales 

• Sign up for Group 
pictures (277 Gem) 
•UAB Res. Hall lobby 
judging 7 p.m. 

• Runacuna. traditional 
Andean music spon- 
sored (Chap) 7 p.m. 




New DAKA representative 



by Stacey Henninger 
DAKA representative 



Hi everyone! 

The following article is just the 
first of many written simply to 
inform you of the new, terrific, 
crazy things that Daka has 
planned for this year. 

For those of you who are clue- 
less and don't know what Daka 
is. read on! 

Daka is the food service here at 
Clarion University. 

Daka provides students with the 
Chandler Dining Hall, the 
Riemer Snack Bar. and the 
French Quarter Coffee Cart in 




Gemmell. 

Until last week, Daka really 

didn't mean anything to me. 
They were just those people who 

ran the places to eat on campus. 

But everything has changed 

now... 

My name is Stacy Henninger 
and I'm a junior communications 
major here at CUP. 

Right about now. you're proba- 
bly wondering why I'm writing 
this article. Well... BRIAN 
HOOVER HAS LEFT THE 
BUILDING! 

That's right. Brian has moved 
onto bigger and better things, and 
has left an opening in the Daka 
Food Service for some lucky, 
young student. 

That's me!! Last week Daka 
hired me to pick up where Brian 
left off. 



I've only been in this position 

for a week, but I can already see 

the drastic changes Daka is tak- 
ing. 

c 

It's going to be so exciting 
working for a company who is 
truly concerned with its cus- 
tomers. 

Daka wants to satisfy us. They 
want the students to be happy 
with what they are receiving. 

And if we're not happy, they 
want to know. Daka is willing to 
change with us. but they need to 
be told what to do. 

Thai's where you and I come 
in! I'm here to serve all of you. to 
be the 'middle man" who deliv- 
ers your concerns. 

Please. Clarion is your 
University... let's keep it that 
way. 
Tor right now, continue to voice 



your desires on the comment 

boards, or feel free to call my 

boss, Dave Henry at 226-2794. 
My very own phone number and 

special e-mail address are in the 

works as we speak, so keep your 

eyes open! If you would like to 

get even more involved, there are 

several openings on the Food and 

Housing Committee associated 



with Clarion's Student Senate, so 
call them at 226-2318. Talk to 

Heather. 

Are you contused by tne com- 
bos in Gemmell??? I'll tell you 
everything you need to know 
next week. 

Remember, your voice can't be 
heard until its said. 'Til next time, 
eat up!! 



ujo core hoir 

lix II *KX III t^lIM 1 1 V MHVII | i. I'ailll|ll1> 

800 Center - 843 Main St.. Clarion 

226-7977 

Mon-Fri 9-9. Sat 9-6, Sun 10-5 



NEW AT 

SHEETZ: 

•Cupo'cino 

French Vanilla 
Irish Coffee 

•Phone Cards 
•$3.99 12" Subs 

(4-12 Only) 
•Schmuffins 



1 J>heetz 


[__[open 24 hours 


226-4510 
Looking lor something different? 
Visit your local SHEETZ store! 



ALL TIME 
FAVORITES: 

•Nachos 
•Sheetz Famous 

hot dogs 
•Salads 
•Deli 
Sandwiches 



E.M-nsu-1 MINIMUM CIGARETTE PRICES! a™*, 




September 26, 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 3 



, 






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entertainment] 



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THE mi FACES OF BOB DOLE 



©1996 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 
AH Rights Reserved. 



ACROSS 
1 Silent one 
5 Use a wash- 
board 
10 Large amount 

14 Hawaii city 

15 Snapshot 

16 Knowledge 
handed down 

1 7 Opposing one 

18 Ohio or 
Missouri, e.g. 

19 — Karenina 

20 Poet Sara 
22 Look-alike 

24 Labor 

25 Cry of an owl 

26 Roman god 
29 Place to get a 

loan 

33 Fear 

34 Factions 

35 Time before 

36 Juice-filled fruit 

37 Wild prank 

38 Bird 

39 A letter 

40 Fellows 

41 Cut off 

42 Make an effort 

44 Abundance 

45 In a little while 

46 French cheese 

47 Sign 

50 Gnomelike crea- 
tures 

54 — S. Gardner 

55 Mystical card 

57 Baal 

58 Rend 

59 Poet T.S. 

60 Fiddling despot 

61 Entertainment 
award 

62 Fop 

63 Sport 



DOWN 

1 Converse 

2 Wrinkle 

3 Edmonton's 
province: abbr. 

4 Wetness 

5 Sports injury 

6 Refrigerate 

7 Wander 

8 Western Indian 

9 Library patron 

10 Leans 

1 1 Drawn out 

12 Sea eagle 

13 Have on 

21 Campus build- 
ing, briefly 

23 Charged parti- 
cles 

25 The underworld 

26 Soothe 

27 Foreign 

28 Domesticated 

29 Certain musician 

30 Egret 

31 Manifest 

32 Change purse 
item 

34 Parlor 

37 Pranced about 

38 W. Virginia city 

40 Big cat's thatch 

41 Meager 

43 Restaurant 

44 Attractive 

46 Children, collec- 
tively 

47 Sampras of ten- 
nis 

48 Utah city 

49 Hit hard 

50 Smile 

51 Mental object 

52 Standard 

53 — gin fizz 
56 A state: abbr. 







DEPRECGED 



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MERRIES Tl| E A G i. E S 


|ENV Y||A M M ofcH 


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[abas h|b u l l sMs a d 


P O K EjlP U R E eJIdI 1 C E 


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£0 M eIa NOD eIr 1 T E 


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MWWM CUARUE, mSQRH 
VIE Q0ULDNT 90 OUT TONIGHT, 
BUT TH15 UTTIE CREEPS 
PARENTS ARE SO DESPERATE 
TO GET AWM FROM HM OHCE 
IN A W.UILE THAT THEY... 




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LISTEN CUARUE, 
I'M GOING TO HAVE 
TO CALL fti BACK 
YOU WOULDN'T 
BELIEVE. WHAT 
THIS CRETIN IS 
. WEARING . 



WITH 
fAUSCLES OF 
MA&KlT\)DE, 

stuknws 

MM FIGHTS 

WITH HEROIC 
RESOLVE I 






EXCITED 



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CALVIN, V0U 
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LET GO.' 
QUIT \T 



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STUPENDOUS 

AMY HAS THE 
STRENGTH OF 
A MILLION 
MORTAL MEN. 
GIVE UP 







Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 26, 1 996 



ENTERTAINMENT- 






Leold 

by Roger & Salem Sallooni 

Everybody knows that things 
are not always what they seem. 

Did you ever leave an orange 
out lor a long time? Green mold starts 
to grow in little spots at first, but 
eventually, it completely covers the 
orange. 

Basically the orange dis- 
appears. The living mold is the only 

thing that remains but the mold 

has nothing left to eat so it dies . 

We think the earth was 
created for us, but what if.... we are 
only a growth on the earth. We eat 

the earth, then the earth lets us 

die. 

Sometimes the mold-orange- 
earth thing reminds me of my girlfriend 
and me. ..except I'm not sure which 
one of us is the mold. 




TH£ INHERENT PPOgt-fM 
Of HAVIN6 A MALE 



6 



DAVEtoon@aol.com 




TJmv? 



M-9 

Is 



'Jm.fr *» 



_0> 

LU 2 

Q £ 




ypefore 

mentioning 
the "A\*word, 
mate sure 
you really 

know Mr or Ms - . 

"ftghty 



SfPARAIF.? WHAT po 
THEY M€AN &Y THAT? 



...IHfRf WA<5 THIS ONB 

Lime ensope i^rm 

THF UPS. 6UY... 






Dear Ate. Locklear, 

You are <So awesome/ my 




K1VA HAN Coffee House & Bagel Bakery 

20% off any drink with 
this ad and a student ID. 





expires 10/5/% 



M l Main Street 
Dow nlow n — Clarion 



Coffee 9 Bdj',oI 

House ® Bukory 




October 3, 1996 

8:00 PM - Tippin Gym 

Tickets $8 student with valid ID 

$12 public/day-of 



Featuring from their album 

HOME 

"I BELIEVE," 

"LET ME BE THE ONE," 

& "OH VIRGINIA" 




September 26, 1 996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



Call On You 




Photography 
Editor 



Do You Feel That President 

Reinhard Should Have A New 

House Built For Her? 




Jennifer Daniels, Freshman, Elementary Ed. 
"No, I think the house is fine that she lives in 
right now. The money should go for a better 



cause 



i»» 




Tony Madoskey, Senior, Psychology 

"No, because there are alot more things that can 

benefit the University more than building the 

President a new house." 




John Spinada, Freshman, Communications 

"No, the money could be used for University 

programs and activities." 




Leslie Allan, Graduate Student 
"I feel that the money should be used to modern- 
ize the library." 




Karl Singleton, Senior, Secondary Education 

"Yes, Because it would bring our University up a 

step in appearance with another landmark. All 

other Universities have one, so whv shouldn't 



ours?' 



^s»* 


fue^i 




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f 







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Km^i 


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Jennifer Zdarko, Senior, Soc/Psych 

"Yes, because the house she lives in now doen't 

have much privacy." 




Brandy Raptiste, Freshman, Sec. Education 

"No, I think the money should go to the library 

for new books or something." 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



< ■ 
September 26. 1 996 



SPORTS 



Eagles roll Glenville St. - await Youngstown St. 



by Brett Skovera 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The Clarion Golden Ragles 
extended their perfect season lo 
3-0, lasi Saturday, with a 49-23 
victory over non-conference 
Glenville State on Family Day. 
Earning PSAC-West offensive 
Player of the Week status, junior 
quarterback, Chris Weibel, com- 
pleted 14 of 27 passes for 191 
yards and 2 touchdowns. 

lie also ran for 81 yards and 
one touchdown. 

"Chris played his best game of 
the season," complimented 
Clarion head coach. Malen Luke, 
"lie ran the option extremely 
well and hit some big passes. He 
is certainly deserving of this 
reward." 

The Golden Eagles struck first 
at 6:30 of the opening quarter 
when Weibel scored from 3 yards 
out. 

With 11 seconds remaining in 
the first, junior Godfrey Bethea 
went off left tackle from 4 yards 
out. 

Tyler Palisin's kick made it 14- 
0, Clarion. 

Still in the first half, the Golden 
Eagles opened up a 21 point lead 
when on 3rd and ten. junior Alvin 
Slaughter hauled in a 23 yard 
Weibel pass in the comer of the 
end zone. 

With 6 seconds remaining in the 
half. Glenville State got on the 
hoard compliments of ii Smith lo 
l'crralls 6 yard strike. 

Leading 21-6 alter one half. 
Clarion wasted no time getting 
back on the board. Alter a 
"House Of Pain" Wayne Ailing 
fumble recovery. Weibel struck 
again, only this lime lo senior 
Chris Skultety. Skulicty's 8 yard 
iirab made it 28-9 with 5:48 



remaining in the third quarter. 

In the fourth quarter. (Marion's 
high powered offense scored 
again. 

On I first and goal from the 
Glenville State 5 yard line. Ail- 
American all-purpose back Steve 
Wine went off right tackle for 5 
yards making it Clarion 35. 
Glenville State 9. 

lour plays later. Kejuan 
Culbreth intercepted a Smith pass 
and raced 43 yards giving the 
Golden Eagles a 42-9 lead. 

With 3:24 remaining in ihe 
game. sophomore Dave 
Cabrera's second effort from the 
two yard line rounded out 
Clarion's offensive stats for the 
game, 49-23. Clarion remains 
undefeated at 3-0. 

The Golden Eagles are current- 
ly averaging 484.3 yards and 
33.3 points per game in 1996. 
Clarion has 273 yards coming on 
the ground and 21 1.3 through the 
air. 

Weibel's main targets include 
wideouts Chris Skultety (9 catch- 
es, 138 yards, 2 TDs), Alvin 
Slaughter (9 receptions, 136 
yards, 2 TDs), Mark Witte (7 
grabs, 81 yards, 2 TDs), and tight 
end Chad Speakman (6 catches, 
91 yards). 

The back field features the one- 
two punch of All- American Steve 
Wine and junior Ron DeJidas. 
Wine has carried a total of 41 
times for 225 yards and 2 TDs. 
while DeJidas leads the team 
with 269 yards on 42 attempts. 

Clarions defense will definite- 
ly gel its toughest test of 1996. 
Overall, the Golden Eagles are 
yielding 259.7 yards per game, 
including 60.7 on the ground and 
199 through the air. 

Tackles Joe Bzorek (19 hits. 2 
sacks). Wayne Ailing (6 stops). 



and Justin Miller ( 12 slops) along 
with nosegaurd Jason Sli/ofski 
(12 hits) lead the way. 
While on the inside, linebackers 
Thomas Williams (32 slops). 
Keith Koehert (14 hits. 1 inler- 



the corners. 

This weekend the Golden 

Lagles take their undefeated 

record to talented Division l-AA 

Youngstown Stale. 

With a record of 2-2 overall, the 




Photo by Jeff Levkulich 
Quarterback Chris Weibel leads Clarion against Div. I-AA 
Youngstown St. on Saturday 



ception). and Erik Baumener (14 
hits. 1 interception) prepare for 
plenty of action. Alim Kamara 
(18 tackles. 1 pick. 1 sack) and 
Mike Maguire (3 sacks) guard 
the outside. 

Clarion's All-American free 
safely Kim Niedbala leads the 
secondary with a team high 34 
tackles. 

Niedbala is joined by Kejuan 
Culbreth at safety, while Jason 



Penguins are led by 11th year 
head coach Jim Tressel. After 
posting wins against Wofford 
(28-0)^ Slippery Rock (22-0). 
die Penguins dropped two con- 
secutive games at the hands of 
Kent Stale (28-12) and Illinois 
State (31-28). 

"YSU has a great football tradi- 
tion and an outstanding football 
program." complimented Clarion 
Head Coach, Malen Euke. 



physically strong up front and 
likes to feature a punishing run- 
ning attack." he continued. 
"Defensively they are very 
aggressive and come right alter 
you." 

The Penguins offensive attack 
is directed by quarterback 
Demon Tidwell. Tidwell has 
connected on 35 of 61 passes for 
392 yards and 1 I'D. 

The baekfield features Jake 
Andreadis. Brian Cottom. and 
Adrian Brown. 

Ihe three have combined for 
632 yards and 9 touchdowns so 
far in '96. The receiving corps 
are led by Willis Marshall and 
Renauld Ray. 

Playing a 3-4 defense. 
Youngstown State is permitting 
only 264.8 yards of total offense 
per game, having posted 2 
shutouts in both wins. The 
Penguins are yielding 142.3 rush- 
ing yards and 122.5 passing 
yards. 

Leading the way are tackles 
Jarritt Goode and Andre Jethoe. 

Phillip Woods and Mike Stanec 
protect the perimeters while Tom 
Paolucci and Kawonza Swan 
anchor the defense in the middle. 

Clarion Notes: this is the sec- 
ond meeting between the two 
schools... YSU is 2-0 against the 
Golden Eagles, defeating Clarion 
48-7 in the 1992 season opener, 
the same year Clarion won its 
final 6 games capturing Ihe 
PS AC- West crown... 

The other meeting came in 
1938 with Youngstown winning 
46-0... Golden Eagle head coach 
Malen Luke posted his 50lh win 
at the helm in last Saturday's 
game against Glenville Stale... 
He won 37 ai Defiance and now 
13 games here at Clarion. 



Drayton and Chad Wissner play "Offensively Youngstown is 



Women's Tennis serves past Shippensburg 



by Hill Hates 
Sports Writer 



The women's tennis team began 
a rintgh week traveling lo 
Shippensburg University on 

Saturday to take pari in the 
Shippensburg Tournament. 

Ihe lady Lagles dropped their 
opening round match lo 

km/town. 6-1. and then bounced 
back lo defeat host Shippensburg. 
6-1. 



Sunday's final rounds of the 
tournament were rained out. can- 
celing the Golden Lagles' thud 
round meeting with Slippery 
Rock. 

Against Kut/town. freshmen 
RaChael Link moved to a 3-1 
record in singles competition 
with a 6-1. 6-3 victory over Liz 
I low aid. 

Clarion's #1 doubles tandom 
Krisien (iolia and Brooke Drayer 
remained undefeated, edging 



Meg Ldwards and Margo Avers. 

8-6? 

Clarion defeated Shippensburg 
for die second lime Ihis season 
wilh another big performance 
from RachacI Link 

Link dropped Ship's Kelly 
Kress 6-2. 6- 1 . jumping to 4- 1 on 
the year as Mimi Williams 
learned with Link to defeat Carie 
Burrows and Kim Sawicki 8-1. 

Williams also recorded her 
fourth win of die year in singles 



competition over Burrows 6-3. 
6-1. 

Last week's PS AC Player of Ihe 
Week. Kristen Golia. beat the 
Red Raiders' Julie Scheerer 6-2, 
6-2. while Brooke Drayer won 6- 
I. 2-6, 6-1. against Dana Sloudt. 
Golia and Drayer also moved to 
an incredible 5-0 start in doubles 
competition by defeating Baird- 
Stoudt. 8-6. 

Freshman Cassie Baker notched 
her first victory of the season 



against Ship's Caith Baird by 
scores of 7-5. 6-3. Baker and 
doubles teammate junior Amy 
O'Neal upped their record to 3-2 
with a doubles victory on 
Saturday. 

The girls were rained out 
Tuesday at home against Indiana, 
and face three straight road, 
matches against Ldinboro. 
Geneva, and University of 
Pittsburgh on October 1st. 



September 26.. i 996 



The Clarion Calf 



Pafie 1 7 



Wild card race comes down to the wire 



by Tim Rafalski 
Sports Writer 



(All standings are as 9/24/96) 

One hundred and fifty-some 
odd games all lead up to this crit- 
ical moment in the Major League 
Baseball season, the final week. 
And wilh the final week comes 
one thing, that which makes 
every baseball fan as happy as a 
beer distributor during ALL 
week: PENNANT RACES. 

Three teams, the Atlanta 
Braves, Cleveland Indians, and 
St. Louis Cardinals, have already 
reserved their spots in the play- 
offs by winning division titles. 

That leaves three division 
crowns and two wild card spots 
to tight over. So ladies and gen- 
tleman, let's get ready to rumble: 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

East 

The Braves wrapped up their 
fifth straight division title with a 
3-1 win over the Montreal Expos 
on Sunday. 

The addition of Denny Neagle 
to baseball's best pitching staff 
makes the defending world 
champion, once again, the team 
to beat in the NL. 
Central 

With a 7-1 win over Pittsburgh 
on Tuesday, the Cardinals sealed 
up their first division crown since 
1987. 

They were running neck and 
neck with Houston until the 
Astros pulled Greg Norman 
(sorry Norman fans, I've been 
dying to use that metaphor since 
April) and lost eight straight 
games down the stretch. 
West 

Now this is what baseball in 
September is all about. The Los 
Angeles Dodgers lead the San 
Diego Padres by one and a half 
games with one week to go. 
Nothing like a "down to the 
wire" pennant race to gel your 



testosterone going (as George 
Constanza's father, oops, I mean 
Vince Lombardi would say.) 

What makes this race even 
more exciting is that the Padres 
travel to LA for the final three 
games of the season. Nothing 
would be better than for them to 
be tied going into the last game. 
Wild Card Race 

If the Padres can't catch LA. 
they still own a one and a half 
game lead over the Montreal 
Expos for the wild card spot. 
Montreal has the advantage in the 
schedule department, having two 
games against Philadelphia than 
finishing up against a Braves 
team mat will be playing a lot of 
back-ups. 

Playoff Match-ups 

Here's where it gets complicat- 
ed. Thanks to the rotating host 
scheduling, the Braves will start 
the playoffs on the road, even 
though they had the best record 
in the league. 

If San Diego wins the wild card 
they will host AUanta and the 
Cardinals will host the winner 
out of the West. 

If Montreal pulls out the wild 
card berth they will host the West 
winner while the Braves travel to 
St. Louis. If you got all of that 
we'll now move onto the 
American League. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

East 

The New York Yankees enter 
the final stretch wilh a four and a 
half game lead over the 
Baltimore Orioles with each team 
having seven remaining games. 
Two wins for ihe Bronx Bombers 
will give them their first, non- 
strike year, division crown since 
1980. ' 

The deciding factor in this race 
may well be the Boston Red Sox 
as ihe boys from beantown will 



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play host to Baltimore for two 
games before finishing the sea- 
son with four games against New 
York. 
Central 

The Indians have won their sec- 
ond straight divison title and are 
four wins shy of getting 100 for 
the second year' in row. Once 
again, the Tribe's bats will lead 
their charge towards a return trip 
to the World Series. 
West 

It's another battle to the end in 
the Wild Wild West, or in the 
words of immortal Yogi Berra, 
"It's like deja vu. all over again." 
In less than two weeks, the 
Seattle Mariners have narrowed 
the Texas Rangers lead from nine 
games to three and arc hoping for 
a repeat performance of last sea- 
sons heroics. 

As you'll recall, the California 
Angels held a commanding 10 
and a half game lead over Seattle 
with a little over a month to play. 
The Mariners battled all the way 
back to tie the Angels on the last 
day of season and eventually beat 
them in a playoff game. 

The Rangers and Mariners will 
both play California and the 
Oakland As, in their final two 
series of the season. Seattle also 
has one make-up game with 
Cleveland if it becomes neces- 
sary. 
Wild Card Race 

The battle for the AL wild card 
spot is as crowned as a dorm ele- 
vator on mpving-in day. 



Sitting at the top is Baltimore, 
who holds a one and a half game 
lead over Seattle and the Chicago 
White Sox. 

The Red Sox have made one of 
the most remarkable comebacks 
in recent years lo pull themselves 
into wild card connection. 
Boston was a disastrous 36-50 at 
die all-star break, but, they have 
managed to claw themselves all 
Ihe back to within three games of 
the Orioles. 

Also added into the mix are the 
Yankees and Rangers if either of 
them blow their lead in the divi- 
sion. 

The "Pale Hoses" have die eas- 
iest schedule out of the bunch, as 
they finish up with two games 
against Kansas City and three at 
Minnesota. 

Playoff Match-ups 

The way it is scheduled, the 
East Division winner and the 



wild card team will boih host the 
first two games of the playoffs. 
The wild card team will host ihe 
team with the best record, which 
is the Indians, unless they are in 
the same division. 

So. if die While Sox win the 
wild card they will play (he West 
winner and Cleveland will play 
the winner from the East. . 

If Chicago is knocked out, the 
wild card team will host the 
Indians, and the West champion 
will travel to the Hast champion. 
Whem! And you thought 
Calculus was hard. 

Well, there you have it. the 
entire playoff picture laid out and 
ready to roll. 

But. before I leave you I have 
just one finally bit of advice I'd 
like to give to all of the profes- 
sors on campus. 

Classes may seem a little small- 
er in the coming week due to a 
severe outbreak of pennant fever. 



The Holiday (nn Clarion is hosting a 

"Tribute to Kurt Angle and Rob Eiter" 

Sunday, September 29. 1 996 at 5 pm. The 

reception is free to the public and families 

are welcome to bring their own cameras for 

photos. Autographs will also be given. It's 

a great chance to see a gold medal. At 

6:30 there will be a question and answer 

session with Kurt and Rob. Free hot dogs, 

popcorn, soda and cookies f 5-6 pm) 



Autumn Leaf Llama & Alpaca Festival 




CLARION COUNTY PARK 

Hands on Learning 



SEPT 28 & 29 SHIPPENVILLE, PA 

Talk to owners from many farms! 



FREE ADMISSION - Rain or Shine 



DEMONSTRATIONS 

Basic Care • Grooming 

Spinning • Felting • Packing 

Guarding • Lead-A-Llama 

Obstacle Course* and much morel 



«*<#• 



ONE MILE OFF 1-80 Exit #8 

Shippenvills Exit 

OR FOLLOW RT J22 WEST TOWARD 

CLARION COUNTY AIRPORT 

Follow Lama Signs to County Park 



Come see why llamas & alpacas... 

wTKa&e ancat freU tCkCu need an acne {pn (om w^naduce (ate Qnfoi 
write eaty to feed i cane fan write a Ufettyte uute&tment 



********************** 



SOME LLAMAS & ALPACAS FOR SALE! 
Refreshments, Shopping, and Lamas! Come Join in the Fun!! 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 26, 1996 



Athletic Trainers- more than just taping ankles 



by Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



When most of us ihiiik of ath- 
letic trainers we think about those 
individuals who come running 
onto die field during a time-out to 
give the athletes water. If you 
have ever played in a high school 
sport you might know them for 
taping an ankle or knee. Still oth- 
ers think of personal trainers like 
"body by Jake". At the colle- 
giate level athletic trainers do 
much more than most of us have 
ever realized. Since September 
22nd through September 28lh is 
Athletic Training Week I thought 
it would be a good opportunity 
for you to get to know die athlet- 
ic trainers and what exactly they 
do. I recently had the opportuni- 
ty to talk to Jim Thornton, or as 
most people know him. Thunder. 
Jim is the Men's Athletic Trainer 
here at Clarion, and he explained 
to me the daily activities of an 
athletic trainer, and what a 
demanding job it is. "Our job is 
about 10% taping ankles," said 
Thornton. "We counsel athletes 
on their fitness level, their diet, 
their training, we provide analy- 
sis of an injury, give treatment 
and rehabilitate." The job of an 
athletic trainer is much different 
than a physical therapist. A phys- 
ical therapist just provides physi- 
cal therapy or rehabilitation. The 
athletic trainer, on the other hand, 
goes from start to finish. Once an 
injury has occured, they evaluate 



the injury, then provide treatment 
and then rehabilitate. They are 
wiUi the athlete in every step of 
the process. The trainers typical 
day starts early. They give treat- 
ment to athletes from 7:30 to 
11:30 every morning. After 
lunch it's weight training and get- 
ting ready for the afternoon prac- 
tice session. After practice they 
treat any injuries dial occured 
that day and gel ready to do it all 
again the next day. The athletic 
trainer is there long before the 
athletes get there and hang 
around long after the athlete has 
left. There are three certified ath- 
letic trainers here at Clarion and 
eight student athlete trainers. 
With all die sports at Clarion I 
asked Jim how Uiey prioritize 
what team or teams get the train- 
ers. "First there arc three differ- 
ent kinds of sports: collision, 
contact, and noncontacl. We try- 
to be where the most potential for 
injury will be." said Thornton. 
Now days you can find the uain- 
ers at the football field. I would 
definitely consider football a col- 
lision sport, and we all know the 
potential for injury that exists 
there. When wrestling rolls 
around the trainers spend a lot of 
their time there as well. 

Many people may be interested 
in athletic training and wonder 
how you go about becoming an 
athletic trainer. There are two 
ways to become an athletic train- 
er. One way is the internship 
route. The candidate must have a 



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four year degree in sports medi- 
cine or a related major and then 
do the internship which consists 
of 1500 hours of clinical study. 
Then they can take the national 
certification test which they must 
pass to be a certified ahtletic 
trainer. The other way to become 
an athletic trainer is the curricu- 
lum route. The individual majors 
in athletic training from an insti- 
tution that offers it. Then they 
must complete 750 hours of clin- 
ical training before they can take 
the national test. If you pass the 
test and become NATA (National 
Athletic Trainers Association) 
certified you must aquire eight 
continuing education units every 
3 years: This translates into 80 
contact hours of education. 
Neither route is easv. but it is 



Thornton, Leann Hewitt, B.J. 

very rewarding. 

With over 400 student athletes 
at Clarion the athletic trainer is 
somewhere between the athlete 
and the coach. They provide for 
the athletes medical needs as well 
as their emotional needs. They 
help the athlete deal with the fact 
that they may miss the season 
because of injury. They help the 
athlete with drug or alcohol prob- 
lems, or just helping the new stu- 
dent athlete handle all the pres- 
sures and the busy schedules. 
The athletic trainer is bound by 
medical confidence so an ath- 
lete's problem stays between the 
athlete and the trainer or the 
trainer will let it go as far as the 
athlete wants, to provide the right 
help. It is a fine line that the ath- 
letic trainer must walk. Thev are 




Photo by Jeff Levkulich 
Offensive lineman Chris Kiker recieves some attention 
from trainers Jim Thornton and Leann Hewitt 



HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS! 

Monday - Thursday 7 9 PM LOUNGE ONLY! 

1 lb. Wines, f plain, garlic butter, hot or hot - . 

hot J I lb. Seasoned Fries, & a Pitcher of Beer ^Or 0"*^ 



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9" I -topping Pizza &• a Pitcher of Beer 



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Proper Id Required 

No Take Outs 

No substitutions, please 



Dominic's 

in the Clarion Mall 226-7664 



Photo by Jeff Levkulich 
Rykaia and Alena Cassella 

also responsible for giving the 
injury report to the coaeh. These 
are those little pieees of paper 
that gamblers wait on. They say 
who can play for that week and 
who can't. It also updates any 
condition that an athlete might 
have. For instance the injury 
report for the Dallas Cowboys 
might read: Emmitt Smith will 
play on Sunday but his left ham- 
string is only about 75% . Charles 
Haley will not play on Sunday 
due to a back injury, etc, etc. The 
athletic trainer is responsible for 
putting out the injury report and 
making the call on whether or not 
an athlete can play. Often times 
the athlete thinks they are ready, 
but the trainer knows they are not 
and can't let them play for their 
own siood. This can be very hard 
to do sometimes, especially when 
the athlete is sitting right there 
saying. "Come on Thunder I can 
play, 1 can play." It is the ath- 
letic trainers job to look out for 
• the best interest of the athlete, 
both for the short and long run. as 
well as look out for the best inter- 
est of the team. 

Now that you know something 
about what athletic trainers do. 
you can see it's much, much 
more than taping ankles. 
"When we refer to athletic train- 
ers, we need to call them athletic 
trainers. We are highly educated, 
diverse, and prepared to take care 
of all medical aspects." said 
Thornton. 

From my conversation with 
Thunder, to seeing what the train- 
ers do on a daily basis, athletic 
training is a profession that is 
underpaid and overworked. 
Hopefully in the future 
Pennsylvania will recognize 
these individuals for their value 
to an athletic program and give 
them the respect they have 
earned and deserve. 



September 26. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 




CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



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SPRING BREAK '97-SELL 

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to promote trips to Cancun, 

Jamaica, and Florida. Call 800- 

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joining America's #1 Student 

Tour Operator. 



HOME CARE AIDS WANT- 
ED: To assist elderly in 
Clarion, Shippenville, Leeper, 

Vowinckel, Marianne, 

Marienville. Brookville. and 

throughout Clarion County. 

Need flexible hours and days? 

We can meet your needs. No 

experience? We arc willing to 

train. 226-7910. 



HAVE A. JOB OPENING 
THAT YOU NEED FILLED? 
THE CLARION CALL CAN 

HELP. CALL 226-2380. 



FOR RENT 



Apartments available for fall '97 
and spring '98 semesters. One 
block from campus. Furnished 

at four person occupancy. Leave 
message 8 226-5917. 



DON'T LET YOUR 
APARTMENTS GO 
UNFILLED. A CLARION 
CALL CLASSIFIED ADVER- 
TISEMENT CAN HELP. 
CALL 226-2380. 



For Rent; Fall 97-98 term. 2 
extremely nice apis.. 1-4 bed- 
room, & 1-2 bedroom, next to 
campus, utilities included, must 
be willing to sign full 1 yr lease. 
Call 226-7316, ask for Andrew. 



Student Rental/No Show 
Female roomate needed for 
second semester. $600 plus 
utilities. You get your own 

bedroom. For more info, 
call 227-4247. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Are you registered to vote in 
Clarion County? Must be regis- 
tered by Oct. 4th, call Shirley C. 
Hager@ 226-8315, 226-8526. 

or 226-7316 for information. 



GOT AN ANNOUNCEMENT 
YOU WANT ALL OF CLARI- 
ON TO HEAR? WHY NOT 
VOICE IT IN THE CLARION 
CALLS CLASSIFIEDS? 
CALL 226-2830. 



Attention Brothers of OUT: 
We will be having a meeting on 

Monday, September 30 @ 
9:00pm in room 246 Gemmell. 



Shirley C. Hager, candidate for 

State Representative of this 63rd 

District, encourages you to vote 

on Nov. 5Ui, and would deeply 

appreciate your vote. 



The 4th. somewhat annual, 

OIK Pig Roast will be 

held on Saturday. October 5th 

beginning after die football 

game at the Phi Stg House. 

There will be a DJ and lots to 

eat. including a pig. 

The party is BYOB.^and 

the cost is S5.00. Call Brian fc 

.\2873 for more 

information and tickets 



PERSONALS 



Tracy A. and Mandy: 

T hanks for all your help during 

Rush. We love you! 

Love, vour Zeta Sisters 



To our Cuddlebunny Pete: 

The Sisters of ZTA would 

like to thank you for your 

generous gift! 



Congalualions and good luck to 

the newest members 

of Oil: Amy. Carolyn. 

Christy. Dara. Jen. and Nicki. 



WANT TO GET PERSONAL ? 
YOU CAN DO IT FOR AS 
Lin LEAS .10 A WORD. 

CALL THE CALL: 226-2380 



Happy belated Birthday. Sherry. 
Love, your AIT Sisters 



Flora, Many sympathies to you 
in the loss, in the passing of Mr. 

Theodore Bartholemue Fish. 

Your heart broken roommates 



Congratulations to Amv R. and 

Rachel on getting lavaliered. 

Love, the Sisters of AZ 



Congratulations to Jenn Cook on 
getting engaged! Good Luck. 
Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta 



To the Sisters of AOE: 
Dare we say it! The mixer with 
you lovely ladies was En Fuego. 

Can't wait to do again. 
Love, the Brothers of OIK 



To the Brothers of AX: We had 
a blast at the mixer. We'll have 

to do it again soon. 
Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta 



Good Luck to the new members 

of AZ. They are Kristi V, 

Heather K., Amy G., Bobi Joe 

G., Jennifer M., Megan H., 

Stacy H., and Susan W. 



Thanks for all of your hard 

work, Kim and Rachel, on Rush. 

You did a great job! 

Love. AZ 



Lela. Welcome to AIT! 

You are an awesome addition 

to the family! 

Love, your Big ! 

Mindy. Congrats on AIT! Your 
Bin loves vou!! Smile! 



Chrissy. Congratulations on 
AST! Have fun and remem- 
ber.. .I'm watching over you! 
Love, your Big 



D. Happy 23rd Birthday! 
Are you ready for another 
'roast? YUM! 
Love, vour Roomies 



Lb- You're going to do a 

great job as pledge mom. 

I'm so proud ol you! 

Love-Joy 



Wendy-Thanks for 

always being there for me. 

You're the best! 

Love-Joy 



To the Brothers of KAP. Thanks 

for a great mixer! 

Love. 0OA 



To Amy D. and DJ., You guy 

did a great job. Thank you 

Your 00 Sisters 



To our new Theta Phi Guy, 
Marcus: We are looking for- 
ward to a great year. We love 
you! 
Love, 00 A 



It's been a great year. Gig! 

You'll always be our 

Sweetheart! 

Love. 0OA 

Thanks to Jackie David for 

becoming our new Sweetheart. 

We know it will be a great year. 

Love, the Brothers of Phi Delta 

Theta 



Sisters of AST, Thanks for the 
great mixer! We'll ride 

your train anytime! 

Love, the Brothers of 

Phi Delta Theta 



Chiodo-Stop going bananas! 
Love, The Monkeys 



Colleen-Thanks for another 
great job through Rush! 
Love, your III Sisters 



To the Brothers of in, Can't 

wait to Float with you! 

Love, III 



Welcome to the Bunch! Fall '96 

Janna. Andrea. Melanie. Nikki, 

Trisha. and Tammy 

Lose. Ill 

IX Brothers-The pinning 

party was right on...Thanx for 

inviting us! 

Love. Ill 



Thanks to the superheros of 
Theta Xi who saved us this 

weekend! Next time we won't 
use knives! We love you. 

Love, the Sisters of the Delta 
Zeta house. 



Lisa. It's about time you made 
those' cookies! 



Congratulations to our new 

associate members: Erica 

Logero. Sparrow Affrica, 

Mary Magec, Annie Mikulich. 

J^enee Skaggs, Jen Mumford. 

Heather Liti. and Sheryl 

Graczyk. 

Love, your future AOE Sisters 



Thanks for the great 

mixer, OIK. 

Let's do it again! 

Love, die Sisters of AOE 



The Sisters of AOE would like 

to wish everyone a happy and 

safe ALT'. 



The Brothers of Sigma Pi would 

like to congratulate Tracy 

Campbell on running in the 

marathon. Good job. way to 

nans in there. 



The Brothers of Sigma Pi would 
like to thank the Sisters of Phi 
Sigma Sigma for the graffiti 
mixer. We had a great lime writ- 
ing all over you. Can't wait to 
do it again. 



Happy Birthday to 

Heather and Sherry. 

Love, your AST Sisters 



Erin Bowser, 

I Love You!!!! 

"McQuillan" 

Sigma Pi: Thanks for the 
great graffiti mixer-Let's 

do it again soon! 
Love, Phi Sigma Sigma 



Tiny , You thought I was 

going to let you off the 

hook this week. I almost 

did. But, after you ate 

150,000 wings at the 

Lube on Tuesday. 

I have come to the 

conclusion that you 

have a dietary problem. 

Happy Eating. Toothpick 

To the Sisters of AZ, 

We had a great time at the 

mixer. We will do the pitcher 

dance with you anytime. 

Love, the Brothers of AX 



Parly MB and Beer Maniac. 

party on. See you at the Roost, 

Loomis, and UI this weekend. 

Your BAP Sweetheart, Leftv 



The Clarion Call would like to 

wlecome back Clarion 

University's Alumni, and would 

like to wish everyone a fun and 

side ALF. 



Congratulations to our new 
associate memebers: Kara. 

Tara. Sara, Jen. Nancy. 

Christina. Hayley, Wendy. 

Molly, Sheri. Stephanie, and 

Christy! 
Love, your future Zeta Sisters 



Pa*e 20 






The Clarion Call 



September 26. 1996 



Tough week for Lady Eagle Volleyball team **>*« * *** 



Clarion Wmbertitp of ftenitfplbania 



Clarion, $S 16214 



by Amy Martini er 
Sports Writer 



Hello Volleyball fans! You may 
be reeling a little down hearted 
this week alter some rouah 
games for the Golden Ragles. 
But if the team can stay positive, 
so can we! 

Remember, wins and losses 
don't tell all about a team. 

There is a lot more to volley- 
ball than the scoreboard, just like 
any other 
sport. 

It's nice to win. but it is more 
fun to wateh the ball rally back 
and forth, building excitement 
and then getting those moments 
of greatness that have the room 
on its feel. 

The spikers do that a lot and 
win or lose they are great to 
watch, as many of you know. 
Fans help out a lot at games by 
showing their support and giving 
confidence to the team. 

n o don't you think you aren't 
important as a fan. OK, lecture's 
over. 
Let's look at this last week. The 
Lady Eagles played at Gannon 
and lost 3 of 3 games. 

Tuesday night they played 
Indiana and lost in 4 matches. 

They aren't losing because of 
the lack of talent, but the lack of 
confidence. 

"We have confidence in our 
players," says head coach Jodi 
Bums, "but they don't have con- 
fidence in themselves. 

This is where their inexperi- 
ence and youth shows-they have 
the talent." 

Although dissapointed in these 
recent losses, coach Burns only 
looks at what lies ahead. 



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Courtesy of The Pick Master 




The Lady Eagles host Cal Tuesday at 7pm 



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"This is the team of the future. 
Once they click and gain confi- 
dence and experience, they will 
annihilate the competition." 

At Gannon, the Lady Eagles 
met Slippery Rock. Gannon, and 
Alaska Fairbanks. 

Meeting each of these teams for 
the first time, they didn't know 
what to expect. 

They lost to Slippery Rock in 
four, but the first match was close 
13-15 and they won the second 
by a lot, 15-6. 

The third match was 10-15 and 
the deciding match was 2-15. 
Against Gannon, the spikers also 
were defeated in four. 

They won the first match 16-14, 
but then were overrun 0-15. The 
remaining scores were 4-15 and 
7-15. 

Alaska Fairbanks swept Clarion 
2-15. 9-15. and 8-15. 

Tuesday night the team traveled 
to Indiana. 

The game began good with a 



strong match ending in a win. 15- 
8. 

But. like in the tournament 
games, their confidence faltered 
and they lost their momentum. 

The next two matches were 4- 
15 and 8-15. 

The fourth match looked as 
though it may have been a come- 
back but IUP still pulled out the 
win 13-15. 

Next Tuesday, October 1 is a 
Home game against California. 
Bring your support and cheer on 
the team! 

Next Friday is the Clarion 
Alumni match. 

This game consists of former 
Clarion University Volleyball 
players matched up against this 
years Lady Eagle staff. It should 
prove to be a very exciting game 
and it's guaranteed to be lots of 
fun. 

Stay tuned next week for per- 
sonal achievments and informa- 
tion about your favorite players. 



Coneafulafions to Clarion 

Quarterback Chris Weibel for being 

named PSAC Player of the Week. 

Way to go Chris! Good Luck to the 

Golden Eagle football team against 

Youngsfown St. this Saturday. 



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Neck? Knee? ... He blinked! I think it's his knee." 



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'Rirn to pages 10 

and 11 to see an 

exciting photo essay 

of the Autumn Leaf 

Festival and Clarion 

University 

Homecoming! 



€ontent$ 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 8 

Entertainment: Pg. 14 

Call on You: Pg. 16 

Sports: Pg. 17 

Classifieds: Pg. 19 

Volume 78, 3fe in* 4 



Weather 



Today 's high 54 

degrees, partly 

cloudy and cold. 

Weather for the 

parade, cold in the 

morning with a high 

of 60 degrees for the 

day. 



Clarion students discuss issues 



Master Plan focus groups look to University's future 



Amy O'Keefe 
News Writer 



The Master Planning 
Committee of Clarion University 
met to investigate student con- 
cerns last week, September 24- 
26. A total of 40 meetings took 
place during the three days of 
meetings and much progress 
toward a better university was 
made. 

The Master Planning 
Committee, a committee contain- 
ing members from the Sasaki 
Associates, Inc. of Wattertovvn, 
MA were open to administration 
concerns as well as student con- 
cerns. 

Several meetings were set up to 
listen to the needs of the student 
body. 

There was a total of eight ses- 
sions involving student which 
included issues of student life, 
the student recreation center, stu- 
dent concerns and suggestions, 
parking, outdoor athletics and 
recreational needs, landscaping 
and agricultural needs, campus 
boundaries, and a session on stu- 
dent housing. 

The Master Plan is expected to 
provide the products and infor- 
mation about land use and 
restrictions. 

Some of the information will 
include an archaeological survey, 
a vehicular and pedestrian circu- 
lation plan, sub-surface utility 
plans, exterior lighting plans, 
telecommunications, and fire 
alarm systems plans, building 
environmental surveys, land- 
scape plans, recreation, and a 
project phase plan. 

Other supporting products that 
will be involved in the master 



plan are a list of issues needed to 
be addressed for expansion, rec- 
ommendations of proposed major 
rehabilitation projects, budget 
estimates, a graphic illustration, 
of assets and constraints to devel- 
opment, a utility and infrastruc- 
ture needs analysis, and prelimi- 
nary engineering schematic 
drawings of utility needs and 
traffic circulation improvements. 
Many universities are utilizing 
master planning in their long- 
range plans. 

In December 1993, the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) announced plans to 
develop and implement the 
Capital Facilities Planning and 
Programming Process (CFP3). 

The purpose of the process is to 
provide universities with guide- 
lines and assistance in develop- 
ing plans and budgets for future 
capital facility needs. 

Included in this process was the 
integration of a university master 
plan for use in guiding develop- 
ment of each university. 

Clarion university is one of the 
schools in the SSHE system, and 
the university has recently com- 
pleted the other documents used 
in the planning process. 

The total cost of the master plan 
development will reach a total of 
$226,000. 

Even though the cost seems to 
be excessive, Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, vice-president of 
finance and administration, 
assures the university staff and 
student body Sasaski Associates, 
Inc. is one of the best planning 
firms in the country, and the price 
that has been quoted by the firm 
is a good price. 
The money for the project will 




_. Jeff Levkulich/Clarion Call 

Master plan focus groups met last week to discuss the future of Clarion University. The stu- 
dents gave input on issues such as parking, the rec center location, and the library. 



come from the university contin- 
gency funds. A total of $100,000 
has been placed in the fund every 
year for this purpose. 

Master planning meetings were 
scheduled with university admin- 
istration officials, deans, depart- 
ment heads, committee chairs, 
students, and the local communi- 
ties and community leaders. 

Ron Wilshire, director of 
University Relations, comment- 
ed. " I was, overall, very pleased 
with the turnout. There was an 
excellent response for the student 
senate hearings." 

Many of the major concerns 
were the issues of parking and 
residence life. 

Sasaki Associates, Inc. exam- 



ined the concerns and speculated 
a plan for renovations may be 
made in the future. 

Dr. Joseph Gruenwald, dean of 
the College of Business 
Administration and the chairman 
of the university's Facilities 
Planning Committee, comment- 
ed, "The eight sessions were very 
well attended. The input was very 
effective. The meetings were on 
schedule and the consultants 
were busy and energetic over the 
three days." 

Nicole DeFrank, member of the 
university's Student Senate com- 
mented on the creation of the uni- 
versity's master planning com- 
mittee. She said, "The commit- 
tee on campus will include two 



students along with administra- 
tion and faculty. They, in turn, 
will report to Sasaki Associates, 
Inc. about the reactions to the 
suggestions of renovations on 
campus." The university's plan- 
ning committee will also present 
their own plan to the master plan- 
ning committee. The master plan- 
ning associates will then present 
the final report to the university's 
Board of Trustees on November 
21, 1997. 

In conclusion, Gruenwald stat- 
ed during the original press con- 
ference announcing the Master 
Plan, "The functionality of the 
facilities will make Clarion 
University competitive with 
other universities." 



Pafie 2 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 4 996 



2f 6cto6ePl'V996 



TtafclVriinCaif" 



>arfe3 



OPINION 



Editorial 




"To my amazement, 
( have not heard 

anything else about 

the Autumn Leaf 

Festival besides 

drinking/* 



Jennifer frown. Business Manager 



CW*^ 



The magical week of the 
Autumn Leaf Festival has once 
again rolled around the corner. 

It is a time when thousands of 
people come out of the wood 
work for a weeklong Mardi Gras 
style party. The week is full of 
events from craft shows to carni- 
val food to the parade. 

It is a time for everyone to relax 
and have fun. As I have sat in my 
classes and listened to people 
preparing for the Autumn Leaf 
Festival I have heard one general 
theme: " Yeah, we are going to 
get five kegs on Saturday," or, "I 
will be wasted Thursday through 
Sunday.' 



To my amazement, I have not 
heard anything else about the 
Autumn Leaf Festival besides 
drinking. 

Why do these people think the 
Autumn Leaf Festival began? 

Do they think that a long time 
ago people needed an excuse to 
drink so they decided to start 
ALF? 

My guess is that our predeces- 
sors decided to start the Autumn 
Leaf Festival so they could cele- 
brate the awesome beauty of the 
fall foliage. 

Clarion is a beautiful part of 
Western Pennsylvania. Many of 
the wooded areas and parts of the 



Clarion River are protected by 
the Western Pennsylvania 
Conservancy. 

With Cooks Forest and 
Allegheny National Forest just 
minutes away it surprises me that 
I have not heard a single soul 
mention taking a day trip to enjoy 
the colors of Autumn. 

Don't these people realize that 
they can drink any weekend? 

By their excitement one would 
think that the Autumn Leaf week- 
end is the only weekend they are 
allowed to drink all semester. 

Besides the beauty of the land 
there is plenty of low cost enter- 
tainment available during the 
Autumn Leaf festival. 

There is not any reason why 
these people should only stand 
around and guzzle down beer. 
The members of the town and 
certain members of Clarion 
University have worked hard to 
put together the floats and the 
other events of the Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

I am not saying that these peo- 
ple should not drink at all if that 
is what they want to do, but at 
least they could work on diversi- 
fying their weekend. So, maybe 
some of these people will take 
time out of their party schedule to 
participate in the events or take a 
ride to tne tire tower to really 
appreciate Autumn Leaf. 



Any one wishing to submit a letter to the 

Editor or Hide Park can stop by the Call office 

in Room 270 Gemmell. or call at x2380. 



%\\t Clarion Call 



270 Gemnull Complex 
(814)226-2360 

Cxetuttbe $oart> 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor. Brian Pictrandrca 
News Editor.... Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Editor.. ..Denise Barney 
Sports Editor.... Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design.. ..Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager.. ..Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor... Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager.. ..Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor....Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager.. .Kevin Miko 

Advisor. ...Arthur 11. Barlow 



Clarion, $9 16214 
JftS (814)226-2557 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with die school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of me writers and 
not necessarily die opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica- 
tion. Letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm die 
Monday before publication. The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 




"The customer is always right" 

When I was asked to write for 
this column this summer I 
thought of a variety of subjects I 
could address. They included- 
Autumn Leaf Festival, working 
at Clarion University, a compari- 
son between Western 
Pennsylvania and the rest of the 
world, the stars, and numerous 
other revelations I have encoun- 
tered. Wrestling with these 
thoughts, I could not decide upon 
a story I thought would be 
thought-provoking- until this 
week. If by coincidence or by 
almighty power, I had the honor 
of meeting the person who 
inspired me to write this. 

Before I begin, I must explain 
mat 1 am a big fan of customer 
service, and I believe that the 
way a business approaches their 
customers shows the quality and 
character of the organization. 
This covers the entire spectrum 
from giant corporations to Mom 
and Pop shops in local communi- 
ties. Also. I grew up in a family 
where manners and common 
courtesy to others were a basic 
way of life. You said "please", 
"thank you", and held the door 
open for people. You took your 
hat off in a building and when 
you said "Have a nice day," you 
meant it. Simple, yet profound. 
One would think that others 
would carry these common val- 
ues and courtesies with them, 
especially in the business com- 
munity; that they would remem- 
ber customer service. But, alas, 
common sense and manners do 
not seem to prevail in our society. 

But I suppose you arc aware of 
this, so, on to my story. Let me 
tell you about my encounter with 
a woman who could be the poster 
child for rude service. 

I was hungry. It was about 2:00 
p.m., and I had not eaten lunch. 



My hunger took me to a small 
community with all the usual fast 
food places. But instead of tak- 
ing my business to these estab- 
lishments, I decided that I was in 
the mood for a good sub. The 
town had a few Mom and Pop 
shops, and since I was parked 
across from one that looked okay 
from the outside, I decided to go 
in. I strolled over, went in, and 
found the place to be empty. I 
figured that I had missed the 
lunch crowd. 

It was your typical place with a 
few plastic booths, and chairs 
lined up against both walls. The 
set-up created a nice dividing line 
down the middle and quite a bit 
of space between the rows of 
booths. At the far end of the 
room there was a counter, and a 
menu board from which to order. 

The place seemed clean, it was 
well lit. and seemed inviting. 
When I strolled up to the counter 
I was met by a friendly "hello" 
from the woman who would take 
my sub order. "Light on the oil 
and vinegar, extra onions and 
black olives, and give me a medi- 
um Pepsi," I said. She took it all 
down, and I paid her. So far, so 
good. 

She told me that I could go 
ahead and take a seat, and that 
she would bring my food to me 
when it was done. 

I turned and surveyed the seats. 
Like most restaurants, the room 
was divided into sections for 
smokers and non-smokers. I 
chose the first booth in the non- 
smoking section. I sat facing the 
counter as I read my paper and 
waited for my food to arrive. 

Now, here comes the good part. 
The woman who had taken my 
order comes out from behind the 
counter and takes a seat on a ran- 
dom chair in the non-smoking 

Continued on page 4 



READER RESPQNSES| 



"Attend the events that your activities fee pays for..." 



Dear Editor; 

Does anyone know that 
there is a concert going on 
tonight? Does anyone care? 

Does anyone on this campus 
care about anything? No one 
wants to go to the activities put 
on by the University, but every- 
one complains about them. 

They yell but don't try to 
change things. So what really is 
going on here at Clarion? 

My theory is that people either 
don't know, although it seems 
highly unlikely to me that people 
never hear about things that are 
happening on campus, or don't 
care. 

Unfortunately, it seems we have 
an entire generation like this. 
This was proven in a recent 



"USA Today" Poll which asked 
high scholars what was cool. 

The scary thing is that "not car- 
ing" came up on this poll. Is this 
the way we want to live? 

Even worse than the campus 
apathy is the total lack of knowl- 
edge about things on a national 
level. 

This is where we can truly see 
the dumbing of America. Ask 
college students at Clarion to 
name the Lieutenant Governor. 
Heck, get easier and most won't 
know the name of the Governor. 
I wouldn't be surprised if people 
thought Hillary Clinton was the 
Vice President. 

Outraged? I hope you are. 
Further, I hope you choose to do 
something about it. I would be 
surprised if anyone takes the time 




6-year old 
suspended for 

sexual 
harassment 



As any fan of Casablanca knows, the lyrics to "As Time Goes By" 
insist that "a kiss is just a kiss." Apparently, this maxim no longer 
holds true. 

Take the case of six-year old Johnathan Prevette of Lexington. N.C. 
Last week Johnathan got suspended from school for a day. 

What he did to merit this punishment brought network satellite dish- 
es, television helicopters, and talk show hosts to his door. Johnathan, 
it seems, kissed a little girl on the cheek. 

His (mis)fortune was that this act occurred in an elementary school 
which has a student- to -student sexual harassment policy. 

My first reaction was to chuckle at the absurdity of a child so young 
being accused of a "sex crime." 

Perhaps this is an unexpected consequence of attempting to be 
"Politically Correct." 

I questioned what six-year-old would even begin to understand the 
concept of sexual harassment. 

Then it occurred to me that it is the children of this society who are 
oftentimes the unfortunate victims of sex crimes and worse. 

This week, Polly Klaas' convicted murderer received the death 
penalty - a reminder of what can and does, happen to our children. 

So maybe it's not so amusing when put in perspective. 

It's never too early to begin lessons that teach us respect for each 
other and for each other's bodies. 

Johnathan learned in a big way that sometimes a kiss is much more 
than a kiss. 

None of us who just paid this Fall's CUP bills should be surprised at 
the news that nationwide, tuition is rising faster than inflation. 

At a four-year public college like ours ,that amounts to an average of 
six percent for the current school year. Well, cheer up campers. 

We could be at Princeton, Harvard or Yale. The same College Board 
survey informs us that costs at an elite private college are averaging 
well over $20,000 a year. Now add 6% to THAT! 




to write a rebuttal to this column. 

Actually, the way things are 
going, I would be surprised if 
anyone reads this column. 

Well Clarion, this is my chal- 
lenge to you. 

Attend the events that your 
activities fee pays for, get 
involved with things on campus, 
whether it be Greek life or other- 
wise, and try to learn a little more 
about things that are happening 
around us. 

We are in an election year, and, 



believing it or not, your vote 
does count. 

Last election, in this county 
alone, seats were won and lost by 
just a few votes. 

Yours could be the one that 
makes the difference, so I urge 
you to take an active stance on 
something, ANYTHING! 

There are ways to improve the 
campus we live in and the world 
around us. Need an example? 

Ask Student Senate, which is in 
the process of compiling a sur- 
vey of campus complaints as we 
speak. 

Also, is it just me or does this 
campus try so hard to achieve 
diversity that it actually alienates 
the people it is trying to serve? 
Other than M. Stanton Evans, 
who is the only moderately con- 
servative speaker I've ever heard 
here, has there been another con- 
servative viewpoint expressed? 

I don't think there has, but I can 
tell you that there is a lot about 
Shared Uniqueness, Martin 



Luther King, Jr., and getting in 
touch with your touchy, feely, 
innermost thoughts on how 
you've been a victim of some- 
thing. 

Can't they bring in someone 
who doesn't have a horrible past 
that we can "learn" from. 

How about a good and upstand- 
ing citizen who has made the best 
of his life? My own personal sug- 
gestion would be former Vice 
President Dan Quayle. 

Oh well, what was I thinking? 

At a college that doesn't care 
you probably haven't noticed 
any of these things, and if you 
have, I'm sure you don't care 
about them anyway. 



Jennifer Pelly 

Junior 

Political Science Major 



Appalled at the Republicans 



Dear Editor; 

I submit the following letter 
in as much as The Clarion 
News and The Derrick could 
not bring themselves to publish 
a slightly different version. 

House Majority Leader Dick 
Armey. Republican of Texas, 
made several appearances in our 
Congressional district stumping 
for his party's candidate. 

His rhetoric called to mind his 
boast that a minimum wage 
increase would "come over my 
dead body," but typical of the 
savage mean-spirited objectives 
of this Republican Congress. 

These far right-wing extremists, 
posting as conservatives, brazen- 
ly shut down the federal govern- 
ment for 37 days in a desperate 
attempt to slash 270 billion dol- 
lars from Medicare and an equiv- 
alent sum from Medicaid. At the 



same time they fought to win a 
huge tax cut for the wealthy. 

These slashers did succeed in 
making major cuts in school 
lunches, welfare, child care, 
affordable housing, nutrition pro- 
grams for pregnant women and 
infants and fuel assistance. 

This reactionary Republican 
Congress butchered budgets for 
Public Broadcasting, the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
and even the United Nations, but 
added eleven billion dollars for 
the Pentagon, apparently to 
defend us from the Eskimos. 

Gingrich's Republicans cut the 
Environmental Protection 

Agency's budget. In the name of 
"de-regulation" Corporate 
America will be able to increase 
destruction of the environment 
and contaminate our land, air, 
water and food. 



At the same time Republicans 
CUT ELEVEN BILLION DOL- 
LARS FROM THE STUDENT 
LOAN PROGRAM. 

One would reasonably expect 
that women, the elderly, teachers, 
educators, union members, work- 
ing people and minorities will 
overwhelmingly vote against 
Republican candidates and end 
the reign of Speaker Gringrich, 
who would have Medicare "with- 
er on the vine." 

As one who grew up in a rock- 
ribbed Republican family I am 
appalled at the unbelievable turn 
of the party in the last twenty 
years. 



. Sincerely, 

Kenneth F. Emerick 

Retired Clarion professor 



BLESSID UNION OF SOULS CONCERT! 

TODAY IN TIPPEN GYM! 

TICKETS: J 12.00 THE CONCERT STARTS AT &00P.M. 

The concert is a Clarion University Activities Board Event 



L 



Pafie 4 



The Clarion Call 



\> 






October 3. 1996 



i > 




^ 



Octobers 1996 



The Clarion Call 



News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



World 



U.N. lifts sanctions from Yugoslavia 

The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Tuesday to lift 
sanctions imposed against Yugoslavia in 1992, a sign pf interna- 
tional recognition of Serbia's role in helping to bring peace to the 
Balkans. 

The council suspended the sanctions in November after Serbia, 
which forms the bulk of what remains of Yugoslavia, signed the 
peace accord last year that ended 3112 years of fighting in 
Bosnia. Tuesday's action formally removes the sanctions. 

The measures were imposed because of Serbian president 
Slobodan Milosevic's role in fomenting Serb separatist move- 
ments in neighboring Croatia and Bosnia as part of his dream of 
a "Greater Serbia." 

But last year Milosevic played a crucial role in moves toward a 
Balkan peace, signing the Dayton accord on behalf of Bosnian 
Serbs -a treaty they had opposed. 

Yeltsin wants more money for military 

President Boris Yeltsin, intent on avoiding a political crisis 
while he is hospitalized indicated Tuesday he wants more gov- 
ernment funding for Russia's angry, cash-strapped military. 

Yeltsin addressed the sensitive issue during a meeting with 
Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin at the Central Clinical 
Hospital, where the ailing president has been staying since Sept. 
13. 

The Kremlin says he is working two to three hours a day under 
a limited work schedule imposed by doctors. 

Footage aired on Russian television showed Yeltsin dressed in 
a sweater and slacks, speaking slowly but clearly. 

U.S. gives Fort Amador to Panama 

To the blare of trumpets and cries of "Viva Panama!" the United 
States turned over a military fort Tuesday it has held for 80 years, 
the latest phase of its gradual withdrawal from Panama. 

The Panamanian government plans to covert Fort Amador into 
seven hotels, a commercial center, cruise-ship docks and two 
marinas, creating an estimated 3,000 jobs and drawing S150 mil- 
lion in investment. 



©Courtesy of the Associated Press 



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1 



Page 5 



section. 

The area was clearly marked 
with signs that proclaimed it to 
be a non-smoking area. 

When she sat down, I looked up 
and smiled, figuring that she had 
sat down to rest, or to do some 
work, but that was not her inten- 
tion. 

Before I go on, I want you to 
know that I can appreciate a good 
cigarette to relax. 

As a matter of fact I used to be 
a two pack a day man myself, but 
when I sit in the non-smoking 
section I expect that it will be 
smoke free (especially when 
there is a whole row of seats 
available in smoking). 

When she sat down to have her 
cigarette, she turned to me and 
said, "Do you mind if I smoke?" 
Well, I usually have no kind of 
timing or comebacks to say when 
things like this happen, but for 
once I said something that I heard 
Steve Martin say in a comic rou- 
tine when asked the same ques- 
tion. 

I looked at her, and with elo- 
quent ease replied, "Do you mind 
if I fart?" This is not something 
I would usually say- maybe the 
stars were lined up right, or 
maybe I was just feeling a little 



peculiar, I don't know, but I am 
proud of myself. 

It took the lady a while to 
process the information. 

She just kind of gave me a 
blank stare, as if to say, what are 
you talking about? 

When she finally came to her 
senses, she said, "What did you 
say?" 

I said, "You asked me if I mind- 
ed you smoking, and I said, do 
you mind if I fart?" 

At this point she told me that I 
was disgusting. Instead of just 
sitting there, I began to make a 
case for my comment. 

I asked her why she was smok- 
ing in an area that was clearly 
marked no smoking. 

And, I pointed out that there 
was plenty of room available in 
the smoking section. 

She still refused to get my 
point. Instead of apologizing for 
her behavior, she once again 
called me disgusting, and went 
behind the counter. 

After she left, I felt good inside. 
It was too bad no one else was 
there to hear that line. 

"Great timing" I thought to 
myself- I hope that she never 
forgets this one; I know that I 
won't. 



A few minutes later, she 
brought me my food, and once 
again had the nerve to tell me that 
I was disgusting. 

At this point I explained to her 
that I would have taken a seat in 
the smoking side of the room if I 
had wished to be exposed to cig- 
arette smoke. 

I told her that I did not think her 
boss would appreciate this kind 
of behavior in front of the cus- 
tomers. 

I quoted the old adage, "The 
customer is always right," and 
even took the initiative to suggest 
that her boss might want her to 
offer me a free sub coupon to 
secure my business in the future. 

"Wrong, I own the place," was 
the answer I got for my concern. 

As I was driving home, laugh- 
ing to myself about the absurd 
incident, I wondered, what it is 
that motivates people to do the 
things that they do? 

And then I wondered to myself, 
did she spit in my sub? 



'The author is a the Residence 
Director for Wilkinson Hall and 
one of the assistant directors of 
the summer orientation program 



Celebris Op-Ed 

Meeting educational challenges 



i 



by Richard Riley 
Secretary of Education 

One of the most difficult chal- 
lenges a Presidential administra- 
tion faces is keeping the public 
aware of its accomplishments 
and informed about its proposals. 
As the Secretary of Education for 
President Clinton, I face this 
challenge almost every day. 

That's why I'd like to take a 
moment of your time to tell you 
some of the things the 
Department of Education has 
done for college students over the 
last four years, and what we have 
planned for the future. 

In 1993, President Clinton 
signed the Student Loan Reform 
Act which created the Direct 
Student Loan Program. 

Direct lending has made it pos- 
sible for students to bypass the 
maze of big banks and middle- 
men they normally face and bor- 
row money directly form the fed- 
eral government through their 
student aid office. 

We're very proud of the Direct 
Student Loan Program. It uses a 
one page application form that 
reduces paperwork. 



It transfers funds to colleges 
and universities electronically so 
students don't have to wait in 
long lines to sign loan checks. 
And. perhaps most significantly, 
it offers more flexible repayment 
options so fewer students go into 
default. Overall, direct lending 
has increased competition in the 
student loan field- improving ser- 
vice to all students. 

We plan on continuing to make 
college more accessible and more 
affordable for students in the 
future. President Clinton's HOPE 
Scholarship plan is designed to 
make two years of higher educa- 
tion as universal as a high school 
education. 

To accomplish this, the HOPE 
Scholarship plan will give stu- 
dents a $1500 tax credit they can 
apply to their first year of college 
tuition. 

In their second year, if the stu- 
dents work hard, maintain a "B" 
average, and stay drug free, they 
can expect another $1500 tax 
credit. $1500 is $300 more than 
the national average for a com- 
munity college education and 
would, therefore, make a com- 



munity college education free for 
the majority of students. The 
SI 500 tax credit can also be 
applied to a more expensive four- 
year institution. 

Additionally, the HOPE 
Scholarship tax credit is paid for 
in Presidents Clinton's balanced 
budget. More and more, students 
are working during college to 
finance some or all of their 
tuition and expenses. 

We are working to expand the 
federal work-study program to 
allow more students to find better 
paying jobs. By the year 2000, 
President Clinton expects that 
this will help more than 1 million 
students pay their own way 
through college. I don't need to 
tell you that a college degree is 
more important now than ever 
before. 

You wouldn't be in college now 
if you didn't believe that you 
need that advantage to face the 
challenges of the 21st century. I 
want you to know that, as the 
Secretary of Education, I intend 
to make sure that this administra- 
tion continues to help you meet 
those challenges. 



NEWS 



College Campus News 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 




The Best College Buy For The Buck 

Students get the best education for their buck at California Insitute 
of Technology and Indiana's Wabash College, according to U.S. News 
& World Report. 

The magazine recently released its rankings of the best values in edu- 
cation, or schools that offer the best quality education at the most rea- 
sonable cost. 

That's the third straight year that CalTech tops the best value among 
national universities. The average discounted cost of attending 
CalTech is $13,550 per year. University of Rochester and Rice 
University round out the top three universities. 

Wabash College, for the first time, is No. 1 on the list of best values 
among national liberal arts colleges. It's average discounted cost is 
$9,349 per year. After Wabash, Grinnell College and Lawrence 
University offer the best values for colleges. 

The best values are calculated by figuring both the "sticker price" 
and the "discounted price," which is tuition and fees minus the aver- 
age of need-based grants, the magazine said. The discounted price is 
most significant when considering many tuition-heavy private col- 
leges. 

Considering only the sticker price, the University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill and St. Mary's College of Maryland offer the best value 
among national universities and colleges. 

A handful of schools are tuition-free. They are Berea College in 
Kentucky; College of the Ozarks in Missouri; Cooper Union in New 
York; Webb Institute in New York; and the United States Air Force, 
Coast Guard, Merchant Marine, Military and Naval academies. 

Cornell Theme Dorms Under Fire 

Theme dormitories should not segregate students by race, contends 
a New York civil rights leader, who says two Cornell University resi- 
dent halls are doing just that. 

At Cornell University, students can opt to live in one of 10 special 
"theme" dormitories, where residents take part in special programs 
on the performing arts, languages, or even ethnic heritage. 

Two of the so-called "program houses" are Ujamaa Residential 
College, where most of the residents are black, and the Latino 
Learning Center, where most residents are Hispanic. 

The ethnic houses rankled Michael Meyers, executive director of 
the New York Civil Rights Coalition, who charged that the universi- 
ty was practicing racial and ethnic segregation with the dorms. 

The U.S. Department of Education ruled September 22 that Cornell 
did not violate federal civil-rights laws by allowing the ethnic dorms, 
but the department required that the university provide information 
on the "recruitment activities" of the Latino Learning Center. 

Susan H. Murphy, Cornell's vice president for student and academ- 
ic services, said the university was pleased with the ruling, adding 
that all students, regardless of nationality, race, religion or ethnicity, 
are welcome to be residents of the houses. 

"Both units, and indeed all of Cornell's 10 program houses, con- 
tribute to the intellectual, cultural, and social diversity of the entire 
campus," Murphy said. "We look forward to their continued service 
to the university community in the future." 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



CU faculty recognized for achievements 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Many department professors 
have received recognition over 
the past three fteeks. 

The College of Arts and 
Sciences recently held its second 
annual Faculty Recognition 
Night in Hart Chapel. 

Dr. Stanton Green, dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, 
presided over the ceremony 
which recognized faculty promo- 
tions and reaching of tenure. The 
distinguished lecture "Nazi 
Racial Politics: Citizenship" was 
delivered by Dr. Brian Dunn, 
professor of history. 

Five professors were promoted 
to the rank of full professor. They 
were Dr. Brian Dunn, history; Dr. 
Martha Ritter, biology; Dr. Kate 
Eggleton, biology; Dr. James 
Reynolds, mathematics; and Dr. 
Robert Givan, political science, 
sociology and philosophy. 

Seven professors were promot- 
ed to the rank of associate profes- 
sor. The professors are Dr. Steven 
Harris, biology; Dr. G. Michael 
LaRue, political science, sociolo- 
gy and philosophy; Dr. Elizabeth 
MacDaniel, English; Dr. Mary 
Joann Reef, political science, 
sociology, and philosophy; Dr. 
Paul Ryberg, anthropology, geog- 
raphy and earth science; Dr. 
Marilouise Michel, speech com- 
munication and theatre; and Dr. 
Joanne Washington, communica- 
tion. 

Ten professors received their 
tenure in August 1996 and were 
also recognized at the ceremony. 
They are Dr. Joseph Bodziock, 
English; Dr. Christopher Ferry, 
English; Dr. Joan Huber, English; 
Dr. Kristin Marshall, speech 
communication and theatre; Dr. 
Judith McCrary, modern lan- 
guages and cultures; Dr. Patrick 




University Relations 

Some of the professors that were honored at the recent 
College of Arts and Sciences Faculty recognition night are 
front from left: Dr. Joseph Bodziock, Dr. Christopher Ferry, 
Dr. G. Michael LaRue, Dr. James Reynolds, Dr. Elizabeth 
McDaniel, Marilouise Michel, Dr. Kevin Stemmler, and Dr. 
Brian Dunn. Standing back from left are: Dr. Paul Ryberg, 
Dr. Steve Harris, Dr. Kristin Marshall, Dr. Kate Eggleton, Dr. 
Judith McCrary, Dr. Joan Huber, Dr. Martha Ritter, and Dr. 
Phillip Terman 



McGreevy, anthropology, geog- 
raphy and earth science; Dr. 
James Reynolds, mathematics; 
Dr. Beverly Smaby, history; Dr. 
Kevin Stemmler, English; and 
Dr. Philip Terman, English. 

Several of the previously rec- 
ognized professors were also 
announced at the recent meeting 
of the Clarion University Council 
of Trustees. Dr. Diane Reinhard 
made the promotions to the coun- 
cil. 

Two instructors were promoted 
to assistant professor. They were 
Robin Lenox, Academic Support 
Services: and Dr. John Lovelace, 
Academic Support Services. 

Four additonal assistant profes- 
sors were also promoted to asso- 
ciate professors. The professors 



are Lina Benson, nursing; 
Barbara Grugel, education; 
James Maccaferri, library sci- 
ence; and Hallie Savage, commu- 
nication sciences and disorders. 

One additional associate pro- 
fessor was also promoted to full 
professor. She was Sylvia 
Stalker, education. 

Several sabbatical awards for 
faculty were also announced at 
the meeting. Sabbaticals were 
awarded to William Belzer, 
Deborah Burghardt, Terry 
Ceasar, Anne Day, Herbert 
Luthin, Janina Jolley, Kenneth 
Mechling, Richard Nicholls, 
Donna Poljanec, Randall Potter, 
Marite Rodriguez-Haynes, Jean 
Rumsey, David Schlueter, Vicent 
Spina, and Ngo Dinh Tu. 



There will be no parking in Lots G, H, I, J, & 

M from midnight on Friday, October 4 

through 3:00 P.m. on Saturday, October 5 on 

the Clarion University campus. The lots are 

reserved for ALF parade formation. Cars will 

be towed at the owner's expense. Students 

should use the lots near Still Hall. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1 996 



English honorary fraternity holds annual induction 



October 3, 1 996 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Sixteen students and nine fac- 
ulty members were recently 
inducted into Sigma Tau Delta, a 
national honorary society for 
English members, at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Sigma Tau Delta was founded 
in 1924. 

This was the first induction for 
the Clarion University Rho lota 
chapter. 

To qualify for membership, stu- 
dents must have completed two 
years or four courses in English . 

They must have a 3.0 average 
in English. 

Students must also rank in the 
top 35% of their class overall. 

Majors other than English may 
join as associate members. 

The Moore Hall ceremonies 
included the reading of the 
"Seven Masters" and an address 
by Dr. Larry Dennis, chair of the 



English department. 

The English department faculty 
members inducted were Martha 
Campbell, Dr. Larry Dennis, Dr. 
Darlynn Fisk, Dr. Kathryn 
Graham, Dr. Joan Huber, Dr. 
Elizabeth MacDaniel, Dr. 
Deborah Sarbin, Dr. Kevin 
Stemmler, and Dr. Donald 
Wilson. 

The students that were inducted 
are: Renee Baum, a senior 
English major from Ligonier. 

Heidi Branchen, a junior sec- 
ondary education English major 
from Valencia. 

Kristen Byers, a junior sec- 
ondary education English major 
from Knox. 

Kimberly Casper, a junior sec- 
ondary education English major 
from Warren. 

Elisabeth Fulmer, a graduate 
student seeking a master's degree 
in English from Clarion. 

Kristin Gallew, a junior English 



Public Safety 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between September 26 and October 3. The blotter is 
compiled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim 

Hall. 

•On October 1. theft charges were issued on a Clarion University stu- 
dent, Ered Jones, in regards to a stolen textbook. 




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major from Wyalusing. 

Lisa Greeley, a senior English 
major from Brook ville. 



Eric Kemer, a May 1996 grad- 
uate with a degree in English 
from Clarion. 




University Relations 



The recent inductees into Sigma Tau Delta honorary are 
shown here with President Diane Reinhard. 



Melissa Klinginsmith, a junior 
English major from Venango. 

Lisa Kubik, a senior secondary 
education English major from 
Rice's Landing. 

Jessica Mcllvaine, a May 1996 
graduate with a degree in English 
from Slippery Rock. 

Danielle Matis, a senior philos- 
ophy major inducted as an asso- 
ciate member from Butler. 

Myra Miller, a graduate student 
seeking a master's degree in 
English from Clarion. 

Tracy Orr, a senior elementary 
education/secondary English 
major from Glenwillard. 

Nicole Roth, a junior secondary 
education English major from 
Johnstown. 

Deborah Thomassy, a senior 
English major from Pittsburgh. 

Stacy Wells, a junior secondary 
English major from Fairchance. 



Student murdered at Penn State University 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

A Penn State student was killed 
and another was injured Sept. 17 
after a 19-year-old State College 
resident allegedly opened fire 
with a high-power military rifle 
outside the student union. 

Jillian Robbins spread a tarp 
under the trees in the middle of 
Pennsylvania State University's 
campus and fired five shots, said 
David Stormer, a university secu- 
rity official. 

Robbins, who acquaintances 
said had a history of mental prob- 
lems and was known as "Crazy 
Jill," was charged with murder in 
the slaying of Melanie Spalla, a 
19-year-old Penn State junior. 
Spalla, a journalism major, was 
shot from about 138 feet away 
and died at the scene, Stormer 
said. 

Another student, 22-year-old 
Nicholas Mensah, was shot in the 
left side of his abdomen from 
about 300 feet away, Stormer 



said. Another student's life was 
saved when a bullet struck the 
student's backpack, he said. 

Robbins also was charged with 
five counts each of attempted 
murder and aggravated assault. 

The suspect may have killed 
more if not for the quick actions 
of 21-year-old senior Brendon 
Malovrh, who heard the gunshots 
while walking towards his dorm 
room. 

Malovrh, an aerospace engi- 
neering major, approached the 
shrubbery that lines the student 
union, where he spotted a woman 
"hunched over with a rifle," 
Stormer said. 

Malovrh tackled Robbins as she 
stopped to reload and wrestled 
the rifle from her, Stormer said. 
Then Robbins "slashed" at 
Malovrh with a knife, Stormer 
said. 

When Malovrh stepped back, 
Robbins stabbed herself in the 
leg. 

Malovrh had, Stormer said, 



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"intercepted the incident." 
But he wasn't done yet. 

When Malovrh saw Robbins 
stab herself after trying to stab 
him, he removed his belt and 
tried to use it as torniquet to stop 
the bleeding, Stormer said. 

Things happened so quickly, 
Malovrh said, that he did not 
have time to think about what he 
was doing. 

"I'd have to have consciously 
realized what was going on to be 
scared," he said in an interview 
the night of the shooting. "If it 
lasted a little longer, I imagine I 
would have shit my pants." 

Malovrh said the struggle with 
Robbins is not what sticks in his 
mind-it's seeing someone die. 

"Compared with someone 
dying," he said, "it's just a little 
thing." 

"It hasn't really hit me yet," 
Malovrh said. " The emotional 
part, I imagine, will hit me later 
tonight." 

Malovrh 's friends were not sur- 
prised to hear he was being 
hailed as a hero. 

"It's still sort of sinking in," 
said Mike Danes, a senior mathe- 
matics major, who lives near 
Malovrh and has known him for 
about two years. "Brendon's def- 
initely the kind of guy who'd 
come to someone's rescue." 

Another close friend, junior 
Colleen Campbell, said Malovrh 
was more concerned with her 
well-being than his own after the 
shooting. 

Malorvh has been moved from 
his dorm room to an undisclosed 
location, Stormer said. 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



Carlson Libr ary renovations considered 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Clarion University's Master of 
Science in Library Science 
(MSLS) program was reaccredit- 
ed over the summer by the 
Committee on Accreditation 
(COA) of the American Library 
Association (ALA). The accredi- 
tation decision was made during 
ALA's annual conference in New 
York. The decision was brought 
about by a two-year self study 
process by the department and a 
visit to campus by a panel of 
librarians representing COA. 

"Both the reaccreditation deci- 
sion by COA and the evidence in 
our self-study indicate that we 
have a healthy and vibrant pro- 
gram that is responding to the 
growing need for library and 
information professionals at the 
regional, national, and interna- 
tional levels," said Dr. James 
Maccaferri, the chairman of the 
department. 

Maccaferri noted that several of 
the department's graduates go on 
to hold important regional posi- 
tions, including the directorships 
of the Oil City, New Bethlehem, 



and Rimersburg public libraries. 
They have also gone on to posi- 
tions in national and international 
levels including a graduate who 
is a divisional director at Harvard 
University and another who is 
director of reference services at 
the King Fahd National Library 
in Saudi Arabia. 

Clarion's MSLS program is one 
of only 50 such programs accred- 
ited by ALA in the U.S. and one 
of only three in Pennsylvania. 
The other Pennsylvania universi- 
ties with ALA accredited pro- 
grams are Drexel in Philadelphia 
and the University of Pittsburgh. 
In its letter of notification to 
Clarion, COA commended the 
university for its focus on dis- 
tance learning, including the 
MSLS classes currently being 
offered in Harrisburg, and 
applauded its efforts" to support 
the faculty's scholarship and pro- 
fessional activities. Maccaferri 
noted that the faculty's scholarly 
activities are significant and that 
in the 10 years covered by the 
self-study, the department's 
seven faculty members collec- 
tively produced 81 journal arti- 



cles, reports, and book chapters: 
authored 21 books: presented 88 
speeches and lectures outside the 
university; and won grants total- 
ing more than $400,000. 

"Reaccreditation is an impor- 
tant reaffirmation of Clarion's 
graduate library science pro- 
gram," continued Maccaferri, 
noting that it serves as a vehicle 
to assure the community that the 
program has educationally appro- 
priate goals, is continuing to meet 
those goals, and can reasonably 
be expected to continue meeting 
the goals. 

"While the reaccreditation deci- 
sion certainly suggests that 
Clarion's MSLS program is 
deserving of its national reputa- 
tion for excellence, it is also a 
challenge for the department to 
continue to provide the leader- 
ship that is necessary to keep the 
library profession at the forefront 
of the rapidly evolving informa- 
tion revolution." said Maccaferri. 
People who are interested in 
more information on the depart- 
ment or career information about 
the library profession should con- 
tact Maccaferri at 814-226-2271. 




Ross Perot sues to be included in debates 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

President Clinton and Reublican 
rival Bob Dole will spar in two 
televised debates this fall without 
Reform Party candidate Ross 
Perot. 

Clinton and Dole negotiators 
said they agreed to hold presiden- 
tial debates Oct. 6 at Trinity 
College in Hartford, CN, and 
Oct. 16 at the University of San 
Diego. 

Vice-presidential candidates Al 
Gore and Jack Kemp will face off 
at a debate Oct. 9 in St. 
Petersburg, FL, sponsored by the 
University of South Florida. 

Each debate will start at 9 p.m. 
Eastern time, will last 90 min- 
utes, and will cover both foreign 
and domestic policy issues. 

The second presidential debate 
at the University of San Diego 
will be conducted town-hall 
style. 

About 500 students are expect- 
ed to work as volunteers, and' 
some can even question the can- 
didates during the debate, the 
university said. 

The final 1992 debate between 
Clinton, George Bush and Perot 
at Michigan State University 
drew about 97 million viewers, 
the largest for any televised polit- 
ical event in history. Exit polls in 
the 1988 and 1992 elections 
showed that nore americans 



based their votes on the debates 
than on any other event, accord- 
ing to the Commission on 
Presidential Debates. 

On Sept. 23, an angry Ross 
perot filed a lawsuit seeking to 
block the debates unless he can 
participate, in the suit, he con- 
tends that the commission, which 
selects debate participants, "dis- 
criminates based on political 
party membership and thus con- 



stitutes an unlawful viewpoint- 
based discrimination." 

The bipartisan commission had 
recommended that Perot be 
excluded from the debates 
because he has no "realistic 
chance" of winning the presiden- 
tial election. 

"Participation is not extended 
to candidates because they might 
prove interesting or entertain- 
ing," the commission said. 



"AT YOUR DISPOSAL" 



COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL 
OF CLARION 



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in Waste Collection 

1-40 cubic yd. containers available 

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Call us at: 
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County Environmental is proud 

to be a sponsor of the 

Clarion University Men's Rugby Team 




by Sandee Siford, Student Senate reporter 



The Student Senate met on September 30, 1996 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Student Complex. Dr. Curtis handed out the Board of 
Governors policies to each senator along with the proposed calendar 
for the 1998-1999 school year. 

Mr. Lee Krull announced that the book store had placed a pilot store, 
for the Autumn Leaf Festival, in town. The store is located where the 
old Dollar General was located. 

President Cox announced that Secretary Hawk resigned and there 
will be an advertisement in the Clarion Call for those interested to 
apply. 

Interhall Council is in the process of planning a trip to the Century 
III mall in November. University Activities Board will hold a pep rally 
on Thursday night. The Homecoming Queen will be crowned outside 
of Gemmell in the Outdoor Performance Area. 

The Clarion Call is now taking letters to the editor and story ideas 
over the e-mail vaxa system. Type "CALL". 

Senator Forney, the chairman of the Committee on Subcommittees, 
moved to appoint Greg Samios to the University Conduct Board pend- 
ing the approval of Dr. Reinhard. Motion passed. He then moved to 
appoint Nicole DeFrank, Will Caugherty, and Heather Hosford to the 
University Conduct Board pending the approval of Dr. Reinhard. The 
motions passed. Senator Forney then moved to appoint Ryan 
Winkleblech and Scott Shelander to the Parking Committee pending 
the approval of Dr. Reinhard. The motions also passed. Lastly, Forney 
moved to appoint Steve Gabor to the Facilities Planning Committee 
pending the approval of Dr. Reinhard. This motion also passed. 



CROOKS CLOTHING CO. 

the FTfT ocorfhe 

mens store % Jrtree house 



^1 %t ^nntvercary Sale 



Sale Continues Through October 7th 

the fSBfE 
mens store 

ALL SUITS .oyer 500 siz.es .36. tp,6Q 25% Off 

ALL SPORTCOATS 15% Off 

ALL OUTERWEAR up to 50% Off 

CORDUROY SLACKS A CQiors.ip.4Q waist S26 99 

ARROW SPORTSHIRTS Wrinkle Free $ 19 99 

RAGG WOOL SOCKS buy i geti FREE 

FLANNEL SHIRTS m-xl S1599 

Skthe 
rtree house 

ALL DRESSES 20% Off 

ALL OUTERWEAR up to 50% Off 

GROUP FALL LIZ SPORT 25% Off 

GROUP FALL JONES 25% Off 

HUGE REDUCTION IN THE SALE CORNER 
SHOES - SHOES 

VANS for KIDS and TEENS 50% Off 

GROUP DR. MARTENS $** * 9w 50% Off 

GROUP WOMENS SHOES 50% Off And Less" 

i GROUP MENS SHOES 50% Off And Less" 



VISA 



EXTENDED HOURS DURING ALF 

OCTOBER 3RD & 4TH 9-9 

OCTOBER 5TH 9-6 
MAIN STREET. CLARION - 226-8020 • (800)320-6902 




Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1996 



LIFESTYLES 




by Garry Pessia and 
Scott Beblo 
Lifestyles Writers 



Is the Chandler Dining Hall not 
cutting it for you? Is the Riemer 
snack bar too crowded? Do these 
two choices seem too boring day 
in and day out? 
Well for at least one week dur- 
ing the year all you have to do is 
go to the Autumn Leaf Festival 
on Main Street, where you can't 
use flex, but it beats eating Corn 
Chex. 

Yes, it's finally here, ALF is in 
full force. Other than the rides 
and games, there are a number of 
places where different foods are 
available. 

Depending on your budget, and 
what you're hungry for, ALF has 
something for you. Is it Chinese 
you'd like (Chef Strap's "the man 
on the street" personal choice), or 



pizza, or wings, or Italian 
Sausage? Maybe a "Blossoming 
Onion" is on your mind? If so, 
than ALF is for you, it has all of 
this and much more. 

Maybe, just maybe you sud- 
denly have a craving for a native 
Australian bird. Then all you 
have to do is stop in front of the 
University Inn for the "Down 
Under Wonder Burger." 

Yes folks this is the Emu burg- 
er which is 97% fat free, a 
healthy choice for those watching 
those extra pounds. 

For those of you wondering 
what an Emu is, it is a bird that is 
closely related to the Ostrich, 
which both consist of red meat. 
But a lass, the Emu stand has 
much more, say you happen to 
stumble out of the U.I. and your 
legs start acing from walking 
around ALF all day, than don't 
worry because luckily the Emu 



manyl 

stand is tight there. 

The Emu stand also sells an oil 
similar to Ben-gay that offers 
relief from muscle pain. 

Another popular place you 
might try is the Quaker Steak and 
Lube wing booth. 

This offers different styles of 
Buffalo wings that the Quaker 
Steak and Lube restaurant offers. 

If after all this you are still hun- 
gry for dessert, than just stop and 
let "The Poorman's Caramel 
Apple." 

This definitely will fill you up, 
it contains three apples, caramel 
syrup, ice cream, chocolate syrup 
and a cherry all inside a waffle 
dish. 

All of this for just three dollars. 

These are just some of the many 
different tastes to try at ALF, 
other than your standard festi- 
val/amusement park type foods 
such as caramel apples, cotton 



candy and fudge. 

Walk around, smell the grease 
in the air, listen to the music and 



take it all in, for ALF only enters 
our lives for one week until next 
year! 




Garry Pessia and Scott Beblo enjoy 



Jeff Levkulich/Clarion Call 
what ALF has to offer. 



National Coming-Out Day 



by Sandy Ferringer 
Contributing writer 



As I prepared to write this arti- 
cle I was reminded of last year's 
National Coming-Out Day, and 
the flurry of interest it sparked on 
this small rural university cam- 
pus. 

The suggestion to wear blue 
jeans as an outward symbol of 
one's homosexuality, or simply 
in support of gay friends and 
family, was the beginning of the 
sometimes-heated exchanges of 
ideas among students faculty and 
staff. Many were appalled that 
something as normal as "blue- 
jeans" would be used as a symbol 
of gay identity or support. 

Perhaps they fail to understand 
that being gay or lesbian is as 
"normal" as wearing blue jeans! 
As we approach National 
Coming-Out Day, October 11, 
wearing blue jeans has once 
again been chosen as the means 
to express our gay identity or 
support of gay, lesbian, and 
bisexual friends and family. The 
members of ALLIES will be 
working diligently to promote 
open dialogue on this campus 
and throughout the community 



about the issues faced by gay, les- 
bian and bisexual individuals. 
Education and awareness are the 
primary goals of ALLIES, and 
we will continue to strive to those 
ends. 

However as a lesbian student, I 
have even more personal goals. I 
look forward to the time when 
National Coming-Out Day will 
no longer be necessary, to a time 
when heterosexuality is not 
assumed, and when sexual identi- 
ty is not an issue. 

I, like Dr. Martin Luther King. 
Jr., have a dream, a dream that I 
might walk across this campus or 
down the street holding firmly to 
my partner's hand without fear of 
violence. 

I have hope that I might live 
long enough to see gay and les- 
bian unions legally recognized 
and accorded the same sanctity as 
heterosexual marriages. 

I long for the time when we are 
accepted as first-class citizens, 
complete with all the rights and 
privileges given to those of you 
who are "straight". I anxiously 
anticipate an era of acceptance 
and celebration of diversity. 

What merit does education have 
if it does not teach an apprecia- 



tion of all types of diversity? 
How can we respect ourselves if 
we refuse to value others. 

Every human being is worthy of 
dignity and respect. 

Why must those of us who are 
gay and lesbian demand respect 
that is willingly given to our 
straight brothers and sisters? 
Homosexuality crosses all barri- 
ers-ethnicity, culture, creed, reli- 
gion, age, gender... and discrimi- 
nates against none. 
Yet we are discriminated against 
simply because we are gay or les- 
bian. 

We pose no threat to society 
except perhaps to their long- 
guarded caches of fear and hate. 
Creation made me gay but in our 
society, it takes courage to be 
proud! 

This year on National Coming- 
Out Day I will not be standing 
alone on this campus. I will walk 
proudly asserting my right as a 
student, a woman, and a citizen 
of this "free" nation. By virtue of 
my humanity I am entitled to the 
same rights that so many take for 
granted, rights which have been 
denied to those of us who arc gay 
and lesbian. I am not demanding 
special" treatment, only EQUAL 



treatment. 

Yes I have a dream., a dream 
that someday we will all walk 
together as truly free people, no 
longer enslaved by ignorance and 
intolerance, but rather liberated 
by truth and understanding! 
Please, dream with me, walk with 
me, make our dream a reality! 
Wearing blue jeans on October 
11th is symbolic, but educating 
yourself and others is the first 
step toward creating a truly 
"free" nation. 



For more information about 
ALLIES, National Coming-Out 
Day or gay, lesbian and bisexual 
issues or to schedule a speaker 
for a class or special program. 
Contact the following faculty 
and/or student members at their 
e-mail addresses: 
Dr. Randy Potter, Psychology 
Dept. @ rpotter (on VAXA), Dr. 
Jan Grigsby, Psychology Dept. 
@ jgrigsby (on VAXA), Sandy 
Ferringer, Senior @ s_skferringe 
(on VAXA) 




an alternative cover band 
from Erie will be playing at 

69 N. 5th Avenue, 

Thursday October 3 at 8:30 

$3.00 donation 

Driver's ID required 



October 3, 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 






Leadership Series beg 



courtesy oj student Life 
Services 

ine sixin semester ot the 
Leadership Development Series 
begins October 9 at 7:00 p.m. and 
will provide interactive exercises 



and mini-lectures to students 
interested in developing their 
leadership skills. The sessions 
will be held every Wednesday in 
room 250/252 Gemmell. 

The LDS aims to enhance the 



leadership skills for participants 
through a series of workshops. 
These workshops provide infor- 
mation regarding different 
aspects of leadership and tech- 
niques to identify a students lead- 



ership style. 

"Attending the Leadership 
Development Series last year was 
a great decision. I met a lot of 
new people, and learned about 
my own leadership qualities," 



said junior Kara Sherman, an 
Industrial Relations major and 
one of more than 300 students 
who have completed the series 
over the past three years. 

Each session is 11/2 hours and 
allows participants the opportuni- 
ty to network with other student 
leaders as well as learn the tools 
for successful leadership and bet- 
ter communication. 



.^^^^ IV 1 V.W1MI1IUI111 illll HI 

Barry unloads his pet peeves by Dave Barry 



Recently, when I was having a 
hamburger at an outdoor restau- 
rant, two guys started up their 
Harley-Davidson motorcycles, 
parked maybe 25 feet from me. 

Naturally, being Harley guys, 
these were rebels — lone wolves, 
guys who do it Their Way, guys 
who do not follow the crowd. 
You could tell because they were 
wearing the same jeans, jackets, 
boots, bandannas, sunglasses, 
belt buckles, tattoos and (pre- 
sumably) underwear worn by 
roughly 28 million other lone- 
wolf Harley guys. And of course, 
once they got their engines start- 
ed, they had to spend the equiva- 
lent of two college semesters just 
sitting there, revving their 
engines, which were so ear— 
bleedingly loud that I thought my 
hamburger was going to leap 
from my plate and skitter, terri- 
fied, back into the kitchen. I 
believe many Harley guys spend 
more time revving their engines 
than actually driving anywhere; I 
sometimes wonder why they 
bother to have wheels on their 
motorcycles. 



Perhaps you, too, have experi- 
enced an assault of Harley- 
revving; and perhaps you have 
asked yourself: Why do these 
people DO this? What possible 
reason could they have for caus- 
ing so much discomfort to those 
around them? 

As it happens, there IS a reason, 
and it is an excellent one: They're 
jerks. 

I'm not saying that ALL Harley 
guys — some of my friends are 
Harley guys — engage in this 
obnoxious behavior. I'm just 
saying that the ones who DO 
engage in it are jerks. And I am 
not afraid to tell them so, even if 
they are large and hairy and 
potentially violent. I am not 
afraid to say: "OK, Mr. Loud 
Harley Guy, you got a problem 
with me calling you a jerk? You 
want to DO something about it? 
You want to express your dis- 
agreement by tapping out lengthy 
Morse Code sentences on my 
skull with a tire iron? Then why 
don't you — if you have the guts 
— come see me PERSONALLY 
at my place of employment, 



UUft COrO hCMf* ^ More Than a Name 



843 Main St. -- 800 Center. 226-7977 
Gin Carncxra avaoaiu! 



$2 OFF 



il 

ii 
ll 



10% OFF* 



Hiimt, Skmp*. Conditmn 6 Styli i Professional Hair Care Products 

Not wtlU with other ojfm. ,, Not valid with other often. 

il 
t il 1 



$10FF 

Haircut, Shampoo & Conditioner 
Not valid with other offen. 



nr 
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One Free Tanning Session 

First Time Tonnmt Cmtemen Onij. Not 
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utloKonlf. 



ii 1 



PREGNANT? 
NEED HELP? 

Free pregnancy test 

Confidential 

Care 



AAA PREGNANCY 
CENTER 

For appointment call: 

226-7007 

Mon-Wed-Fri 10-2 

Mon 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 



New Location: 

From Campus, 

Take South Street to 
7th Avenue 

Turn Left 

Go two blocks to 
Clarion Office -Complex 

AAA: go through front 
door, take elevator to 
G floor, and then fol- 
low signs 



located at 1600 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, Washington, D.C.? 
Come on if you dare, fat boy! 
Ride right into the lobby!" 

And let me also say, while I'm 
at it, that I'm sick of you people 
who park in spaces reserved for 
the handicapped, even though 
you are not, personally, handi- 
capped. You know who you are, 
Many of you even have those lit- 
tle rearview-mirror handicapped 
signs, which you got from a 
friend or relative, or which you 
once needed because of some 
temporary medical condition that 
has long since been cleared up. 

One of my hobbies is to watch 
when cars pull into handicapped 
parking spots, and see who gets 
out. Very often, in my experi- 
ence, these people appear to be 
totally unhandicapped: No 
wheelchair; no crutches; not even 
a trace of a limp. I realize that 
some of these people have prob- 
lems, such as heart conditions, 
that are not visible. But some of 
them, to judge by the sprightli- 
ness of their walks, are off to 
compete in the decathlon. Their 
only handicap is: they're jerks. 

What we need in this country 
— I would pay extra income tax 



for this — is an elite corps of 
Handicapped Parker On-Site 
Medical Examination SWAT 
Teams. These teams would 
prowl the streets, wearing rubber 
gloves and armed with X-ray 
machines, CT scanners, scalpels, 
drills, saws and harpoon-sized 
hypodermic needles. 

When a team spotted a handi- 
capped-zone parker who could 
not immediately prove that he or 
she was handicapped, that person 
would immediately undergo a 
severely thorough on-the-street 
physical examination conducted 
by burly personnel who have 
attended medical school for a 
maximum of four hours includ- 
ing lunch ("Hey, Norm! Which 
ones are the kidneys again?"). 
These examinations would 
involve full frontal nudity and the 
removal of enough blood, organ 
and tissue samples to form a 
complete new human; also, if the 
SWAT team found Harley guy 
revving his engine in a handi- 
capped-parking zone, it would 
employ tne 250 foot intestinal 
probe nicknamed "Big Bertha." 
The idea would be that if you 
weren't qualified to park in a 
handicapped zone BEFORE the 



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physical examination, you defi- 
nitely would be AFTER. 

And let's talk about you people 
who always send your food back 
in restaurants. (I KNOW this has 
nothing to do with handicapped 
parking; I just can't stop myself.) 
I mean, sure if the food is truly 
BAD, if it has RODENTS run- 
ning around on it, OK, send it 
back; but what about you people 
who ALWAYS insist — even if 
everybody ordered basically the 
same thing — on figuring out your 
exact share ("Well I had the Diet 
Sprite, which is 10 cents less than 
the iced tea..."); and then you 
decide that a 5 percent tip is ade- 
quate, thereby forcing your 
friends, who are embarrassed, to 
put in more money. 

Listen carefully to what I am 
about to tell you. Put your ear 
right down to the page: YOUR 
FRIENDS HATE IT WHEN 
YOU STIFF THE WAITER. IF 
THE SERVICE IS OK, YOU 
SHOULD TIP 15 PERCENT. IF 
YOU DON'T WANT TO TIP 
THEN DON'T EAT AT 
RESTAURANTS. 

Also, you should never, ever, no 
matter what, butt in front of peo- 
ple waiting in line without asking 
their permission. 

Also, if, when you talk to peo- 
ple, they keep backing away from 
you, it's because you're TOO 
CLOSE, all right? So don't keep 
advancing on them like a human 
glacier. 

Thank you, and I apologize for 
using so many capital letters. I 
can be a real jerk about that. 



FOX'S PIZZA DEN 

GREENUU1EAVE.EXT 226 5555 



'MONDAY SPECIAL 

BIG DADDY PIZZA - 1 TOPPING 

+ 2 LITER (Coke, Rootbeer, 7-UP, & 

Diet 7-UP) 

$10.49 + TAX 

'TUESDAY SPECIAL 
LARGE- 1 TOPPING PIZZA 

$6.00 + TAX 

Specials good after 5:00 PM 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



October3. 1996 




October 3. 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



^fel^J *JR 



i 




Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1996 




Studying Abroad in Costa 
IS ii ii by Emily It upper I 



One often fantasizes about 
what it would be like to explore 
foreign lands and the experience 
of living a different lifestyle, yet 
many hesitate to take any action. 
The International Office at 
Clarion University helped me to 
convert such dreams into reality. 

The adventure began when I 
walked into the International 
Office last semester and spoke 
with the Director, Dr. Helen 
Lepke. I knew I wanted to study 
the Spanish language, but I was 
not sure how, when, or where I 
could do this. Dr. Lepke's 
enthusiasm, encouragement, and 
dedication towards an intensive 
Spanish program helped direct 
me towards the summer pro- 
gram in Costa Rica. Little did I 
know that my life was about to 
change. I was now just given 
the opportunity to submerge 
myself into a unique culture, 
lifestyle and language, other 
than my own. I took it... and it 
became the opportunity of a life- 
time. 

Before I knew it my bags were 
packed and on June 1st, I met 10 
other students from Clarion at 
the airport looking just about 
excited as I was. None of us 
knew what to expect, but we 
were all ready to begin our five 
week adventure, living in a 



country, unique from our own. 

I did not know a word of 
Spanish, and I had never taken a 
Spanish class in my life. After 
going to Spanish class, four days a 
week, three hours a day at the 
University of San Jose, I was 
amazed at how quickly I was able 
to become accustomed to this new 
language. Spanish was all around 
me. After class, I would not just 
walk out of the door and forget 
about what I had learned. I had to 
use the language everywhere I 
went: taxis, buses, stores, restau- 
rants, and, most importantly, with 
the families with whom we were 
staying. 

This approach is the best way to 
learn another language because 
you are forced into the challenge 
of using it everywhere you go. 

Traveling around the country 
was also an amazing experience. 
We rode horseback through the 
tropical rain forest, white water 
rafted down Costa Rican rivers, 
swam in crystal clear waters as 
well as hot springs, and, of course, 
learned how to dance the typical 
Spanish dances. ..salsa and 
merengue. 

After my travels to Costa Rica, I 
can truly say that I feel that I am 
on my way to becoming more 
knowledgeable about the Spanish 
language and the Costa Rican 
people. My eyes have also been 
opened to the universal world that 
exists around me. I strongly urge 
anyone with an interest in study- 
ing abroad to contact the 
International Programs Office. 
They will make your dreams a 
reality. 




\#0 



1 



PEACE TREE 
P.O. Box 2454 
DOYLESTOWN, PA 18901 

Celebrating The 60's Experience 

Write Us For A Free Catalog 

or CALL (215)794-2865 



STUDENT SENA TE NEEDS 
NEW SECRETARY! !! 

CONSIDERED WORK STUDY 
MINIMUM 10 HOURS / WEEK 

MORE INFORMATION??? 
CALL 226-2318 




Well Clarion, the annual week 
long beer party (ALF) is once 
again upon us!! And, in the true 
spirit of ALF, I will rate the 
albums by BEERS!! (Hey, it's 
cheesy, but it got YOUR atten- 
tion, didn't it?) ONE BEER- 
Poor, TWO BEERS-Mediocre, 
THREE BEERS-Pretty darn 
good, FOUR BEERS-Spend your 
money on this rather than beer. 

So, without any further annoy- 
ance, here it goes... 
Nada Surf "High/Low" on 
Elektra records. Most of us 
know this band because of their 
big MTV hit "Popular," the song 
that makes it uncool to be just 
that (where was that attitude 
when I was in high school?). 
"Popular" is one of those few 
songs that stand well on its own 
just because of the lyrics, with 
such humorous lines as "Wash 
your hair at least once every two 
weeks," and other lines which 
were taken from an actual guide 
to popularity from years back. 
The slow, basically boring guitar 
parts serve as mere background 
for the words themselves. 



The rest of "High/Low" is not 
much like "Popular." Tracks like 
"Deeper Well," The Plan," and 
"Sleep," are fast, driving num- 
bers, but for some reason fail to 
grab the listener. They have 
potential to be real catchy, fun 
rock songs, but fall short to deliv- 
er anything memorable. Tracks 
like "Stalemate" and "Icebox" 
sound like really bad Blue Oyster 
Cult covers with their slow, 
unmelodic parts. Then there's 
"Psychic Caramel," a cross 
between sped-up Cure and Duran 
Duran, if you could possibly 
imagine that! 

One, though, called 
"Treehouse" shows what Nada 
Surf is capable of with some 
work. It has it all, a cool begin- 
ning, good vocal harmonies, and 
some catchy guitar solo work. 

With a little more experience 
under their belt, Nada Surf has 
the potential to be one of the pre- 
mier rock bands on the scene 
today. But for "High/Low," I'll 
give it TWO BEERS. 

Next up is New Bomb Turks 
"Scared Straight" on Epitaph 



404 /(fa/« £ere.e.C 226-9444 



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V Our specialty is acrylic nails 

V A certified Therapeutic Massage 

Technician 
\ A certified Estheticial Technicial 

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v Tanning Bed Package- Buy 10 get 5 for 
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•Manicures 

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•Tanning 

•Nail Tips 



A Full Service Salon 



SPAGHETTI DINNER 

Sponsored by Delta Zeta 

October 8, 1 996 

First Presbyterian Church 

Tickets $5.00 
Any Questions? Call 226-7516 Ask for Carrie 




Records. I wasn't quite sure 
what to expect from this one. I 
have been hearing about these 
guys from some of my friends for 
quite a while, but never really sat 
down and listened to them until I 
had to (thank God for dead- 
lines!). 

Anyway, I'm glad I finally got 
a chance to hear mem. The open- 
ing track, "Hammerless Nail," 
with its cool, up tempo garage- 
rock style, delivers the energy 
and excitement mat any opening 
track should. The singer sounds 
like die love child of Jerry Lee 
Lewis and Glen Danzig (if that 
were ever truly possible, I'd be 
frightened!). In fact, only a few 
of the album's twelve tunes stray 
from the power and style set forth 
by the opener. Songs like "Jeers 
of a Clown," "Bachelors High," 
and "Hammerless Nail," drive 
right along and give the album its 
identity. 

Not all of "Scared Straight" is 
exactly the same. There's 
"Cultural Elite Sign-Up Sheet" 
(say that fast ten times), which 
includes some ska-like horn 
parts. And there's "Jukebox 
Lean," which sounds like old- 
style 50's rock on a big-time 
sugar high. 

Overall, this album is solid, 
good time rock 'n' roll. Some of 
the tracks do seem a bit repeti- 
tive, but any die hard punk or 
garage rock fan is used to that. 
The album could do even better if 
the New Bomb Turks -would 
experimented some more like 
they did on "Jukebox Lean." 
THREE BEERS with a Pepsi 
chaser. 

Both of these, and many other 
new albums are in the current 
rotation at WCCB 1610 am. Call 
us at 226-2479 to make your 
request. 

Time to say good-bye for this 
week, so have fun, stay sober 
enough to walk, and make sure 
you have plenty of Mylanta with 
you this ALF weekend. Adios!! 



esfed in sub- 
mitting an 

article for the 
Lifestyles 

section con- 

fact Denise 
afx2380 



October 3. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



POP QUIZ 



1 You could get a behind-the-scenes look at the 
Rockand Roll Hall of Fame and Museum by: 

(A) bribing your roommate's mother's secretary's 
gardener's cousin who works there. 

(B) dyeing your hair and covering yourself with tattoos. 

(C) dialing 1 800 CALL ATT for collect calls. 



You could get your hands on $10,000 by: 

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Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1996 



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The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



ENTERTAINMENT 



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Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1996 



uaoDer i, 19% 



The Clarion Cad 



Page 1? 



Call On You 




Photography 
Editor 





Bryan Stout, Senior, Psychology/Sociology 

"Waking up at 6:00 a.m. and running Toby Hill 

all weekend" 




Fred Harteis, Freshman, Marketing 
'I don't know, but Til find out this weekend." 



Kim Baker, Senior, Earth & Space Science, and 

Environmental Education 

'Dodging raindrops on the ©X porch during the 

parade." 



Tracy Heilman, Sophomore, Fine Arts 

"Last year when I demolished my friend Sherri's 

hair in her sleep with kitchen shears after she ate 

all my funnel cake." 






Kraij> Koelsch, Grad Student, Communication 
"Naked chugs at the Fun House." 



Paul Antonio, Senior, Marketing 

"The day I pulled Sheltin Thomas from the 

Clarion River and gave him CPR to bring him 

back to life" 



Carey Fahy, Senior, General Studies 
"Riding on the float in the rain." 



SPORTS] 

Clarion hosts Lock Haven in homecoming game 



by Kraig Koelsch 
Guest Columnist 



The Golden Eagles look to get 
back on track this weekend as 
they host Lock Haven for home- 
coming. Last weekend, powerful 
Division I-AA Youngstown State 
punished the Golden Eagles 51- 
10. 

Third downs killed the Golden 
Eagles all game as quarterbcak 
Demond Tidwell exploited the 
Golden Eagle secondary. The 
offense at times, was able to 
move the ball, but in the end the 
result was the first defeat of this 
season. 

Clarion will take a 3-1 record to 
the field this Saturday to host the 
Bald Eagles who are currently o- 
4. The Bald Eagles have lost to 
Delaware State(66-19), at Kean 
(7-0), at Bloomsburg(64-0), and 
Saturday against Mansfield(6-3). 

Lock Haven is led by first year 
head coach Nick Polk, who him- 
self is a Lock Haven graduate. 
The series between the two 
schools dates back to 1928 with 
Clarion leading 33-11-1. 

In the last ten meetings Clarion 



holds a 9-1 advantage, including 
last year's 49-32 win at Lock 
Haven. 

The Lock Haven offense is 
averaging 165.2 yards of offense 
per game, including 78 rushing 
*yards and 87.2 passing yards. 
The offense is led by option quar- 
terback Carlos Cleckley. 
Cleckley has connected on 40 of 
90 passes for 322 yards and 2td's. 
Cleckley has also rushed 34 
times for 44 yards. 

The Bald Eagle running attack 
is led by fullback Willie Kitt, 
who has rushed for 156 yards on 
44 carries. 

The receiving corps is led by 
1,000 yard receiver Bryan 
McGinty who has only six catch- 
es for 49 yards this season. 

This clearly shows the different 
direction that this year's Lock 
Haven ballclub is heading. Last 
year under head coach Dennis 
Thurrell, quarterback Bobby 
McGlaughlin was given free 
reign to air it out, but this year the 
offense will revolve around the 
very talented Cleckley. 

The Lock Haven defense is giv- 
ing up 390.5 yards per game, 



including 277.8 on the ground 
and 112.3 through the air. The 
Bald Eagles are giving up 35.8 
points per game. 

On defense, the Bald Eagles 
feature tackles Matt 

Hendricks(23 tackles, 3 til's, 1 
sack) and John McDowell, along 
with ends Albert Jones (19 stops, 
2tfl's) Mark Williams (13 hits, 1 
sack) and John Gerst(17 belts, 
5tfl's, and 4 sacks). 

Outside linebacker Brad 
Caldwell leads the team with 37 
tackles, while Corey Jacobs (24 
jolts,2sacks) and Bill Hetler(13 
hits) also protect the outside. 
Inside linebacker Jeremy Crills 
has 19 tackles and 2uTs. 

The secondary has been busy 
with strong safety Rashid Rogers 
(35 tackles, 4 uTs, 1 interception) 
and comers Angelo Moultair (26 
stops, 2 interceptions) and Smith 
Vatel leading the way. 

Chris Weibel and the Golden 
Eagle offense should be able to 
exploit the Bald Eagles and put 
some big numbers up on the 
scoreboard. 

This will only be the case if the 
offensive line holds strong. The 



offensive line consists of Chris 
"Hoss" Kiker, Chris Martin, 
Derek "Sugar Shack" Mackay, 
Mike Sipos, and Tim "Cat in the 
Hat" Sohyda. 

Pete Pirone provides quality 
depth at center, and the versatilty 
of Sohyda and Sipos enable head 
coach Malen Luke to have the 
luxury of too many talented 
offensive linemen. 

Clarion's offense is averaging 
27.5 points and 429 yards of total 
offense per game. Weibel has 
completed 53 of 104 passes for 
704 yards and 6td's. Ron 
Dejidas(313 yards, ltd) and 
Steve Witte(293 yards, 2 td's) 
lead the Golden Eagle ground 
attack. 

Alvin Slaughterdl catches, 151 
yards, 2td's), Mark Witte (11 
grabs, 125 yards, 2 td's), and 
Chris Skultety (10 receptions, 
150 yards, 2 td's) led the receiv- 
ing corps. 

Tight end Chad Speakman is a 
talented blocker, but more impor- 
tantly has six catches for 91 yards 
this season. The Golden Eagle 
defense is once again led by Ail- 
American free safety Kim 



Niedbala who has 49 tackles and 
four broken-up passes. Up front, 
Joe Bzorek, Jason Slizofski. 
Justin Miller, and Wayne Ailing 
have dominated opposing offens- 
es running games. 

The linebacking corps is led by 
Thomas Williams, Alim Kamara, 
Mike Maguire, Erik Baumener, 
and Keith Kochert. These guys 
have stepped up and answered 
the challenge all year and have 
come together as a unit. 

The defensive staff, with the 
exception of the Youngstown 
State game, have answered all 
questions and doubts thus far. 

Defensive coordinator Aubrey 
Kelly, • and assistants Dean 
Walendzak, Shayne Maker, and 
G.A. coach John Tweardy have 
controlled opposing offenses 
admirably so far this season, but 
the challeneges will be even 
greater in the future. 

Kickoff for this Saturday's 
homecoming game is set for 2:00 
p.m. The Golden Eagles travel to 
Shippensburg next Saturday for a 
1 p.m. game. The next home 
game is on October 19th when 
Clarion hosts California at 1pm. 



Lady Eagle Volleyball kills California 



by Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



The time has come, volleyball 
fans, to sample the sweet taste of 
victory. As the Golden Eagle 
Ladies Volleyball team knows, it 
was a glorious and well deserved 
victory on Tuesday night. The 
Lady Eagles swept the California 
University Vulcans back out into 
the street to find some other team 
to prey on. 

As we all know, the volleyball 
team has taken some hard losses 
in the last week. Even though we 
could see that they were talented 
and had what it takes, they just 
weren't reaching the place they 
wanted to be. Although they did- 
n't let it break their spirit, both 
the team and the coaches were 
disappointed. 

This week there is a feeling of 
excitement and achievement. 
Especially from head coach Jodi 
Burns. When asked about the 
game she replied, "Every single 
person did their job and played 
well. They all had a good night." 



Before the game the players were 
pumped; they knew it was their 
time. 

There is another reason that 
Coach Burns and Assistant 
Coach Gerri Condo are excited. 
California is ranked 9th in the 
entire Atlantic region, and the 
Spikers blew them away. Lock 
Haven is 8th and Slippery Rock 
is ranked 3rd. Fairmont State, 
who the Lady Eagles will be 
playing in November, is ranked 
5th. One of Coach Burn's goals 
for the team this year, as I men- 
tioned at the beginning of the 
season, is catching up with 
Edinboro who is tied with West 
Virginia Wesleyan for first place 
in the Atlantic Region. 

Condo believes that it is out- 
standing that 4 out of 6 teams in 
PA have ranked in the Atlantic 
Region. 

Now, on to the game Tuesday. 
The Spikers swept up the home 
court with the California 
Vulcans. It was a fast paced 
game. The Lady Eagles dominat- 
ed the game winning 3 consecu- 




Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
The Lady Eagles will be taking on Clarion Alumni Friday at 7pm in Tippin Gym 



tive matches hands down. The 
scores were 15-9, 15-3, and 15-2. 
The look on the faces of the 
Vulcans relayed frustration with 
the game and each other. 
Hopefully, this is what Clarion 
needed to come together and 
begin a winning streak. 
If you didn't attend this game 



you really missed out! Let's look 
at who's who in volleyball so far 
this season. In the back Christy 
Boes leads with 31 service aces 
and 160 digs. Also strong in the 
back is Mandy Kirby with 223 
digs and 21 aces, and Jessa 
Canfield with 163 digs. 
Up front, the two blockers are 



Jessa Canfield with 67 blocks 
and Lindsey Kuruzovich with 58 
blocks. Lessa Canfield also has 
180 kills and had several smash- 
es against California Tuesday 
night. Tracy Barnett, an all 
around player, has 122 kills. Jill 
Platteborze has 325 assists and 
Brooke Paxton has 225 assists. 



Pa^lS 



Yt'\ f .> -rl 



The Clarion Call 



bctoWVl996 



Baseball Playoffs: It must be October 



by BUI Bates 
Sports Writer 



The boys of summer provided a 
verv memorable regular season 
this year. After a grueling 162 
game schedule, eight teams are 
gearing up to make a run at a 
world championship. Both the 
American and the National 
league divisional series began 
this week, in a midst of a boycott 
by major league umpires. 
American League 

In the A.L., the Baltimore 
Orioles surged into the post sea- 
son overcoming a twelve game 
deficit to take the wild card spot. 
Perhaps this Baltimore team has 
turned more heads than any team 
in the past. The Orioles sent nine 
different players to the plate who 
each had at least 20 homers. 

The New York Yankees made 
the playoffs for the second con- 
secutive season by edging 
Baltimore for the A.L. east 
crown. The Cleveland Indians, 
who were one win shy of a 100 
win season, posted the best 
record in baseball with a 99-62 
mark. The Texas Rangers were 



able to hold off a relentless 
Seattle Mariners club to capture 
the west. Here's a closer look at 
the A.L. matchups. 

Cleveland Indians vs. Baltimore 
Orioles 

The Indians won the regular 
season 7-5 and hopes their previ- 
ous success holds. The tribe will 
ride the bats of Albert Belle and 
Jim Thome and will look to 
Kenny Lofton to provide a spark 
that will put the Indians back in 
the World Series. 

One problem facing Cleveland 
is pitching. With an aging 
Dennis Martinez and Orel 
Hershiser, Charles Nagy (17-5) 
and Jack McDowell (13-9) are 
rested and ready to go. 

Team MVP Rafail Palmero 
leads the Orioles attack that hit 
274 homers this season. This 
team is filled with players who 
carry post -season experience, 
which the O's hope will give 
them the edge. 

Game 1 Cleveland 4 

Baltimore 10 

Game 2 Cleveland 4 



Baltimore 7 

Game 3 Baltimore at 

Cleveland Friday, Oct. 4 

Game 4 Baltimore at 

Cleveland Saturday, Oct. 5 (if 
necessary) 

Game 5 Baltimore at 

Cleveland Sunday. Oct. 6 (if 
necessary) 
New York Yankees vs. Texas 

Rangers 

Both teams bring solid squads 
into October. The Yankees are 
loaded with pitching. David 
Cone, Andy Pettitte, Jimmy Key, 
and Kenny Rogers will most like- 
ly see action. One problem fac- 
ing Joe Torre's team is giving 
both Darryl Strawberry and Cecil 
Fielder at bats in the DH slot. 
Texas's Kevin Elster is having a 
career season at shortstop. MVP 
candidate Juan Gonzalez, Will 
Clark, and Ivan Rodriguez will 
have to post big numbers if Texas 
is to win the A.L. crown. 

Game 1 Texas 6 New York 
2 

Game 2 Texas at New York 
Wednesday, Oct. 2 

Game 3 New York at Texas 



Friday. Oct. 4 

Game 4 New York at Texas 
Saturday. Oct. 5 (if necessary) 

Game 5 New York at Texas 
Sunday, Oct. 6 (if necessary) 

National League 

- In the N.L. the Atlanta Braves 
make their fifth consecutive post 
season appearance by holding off 
the Montreal Expos to win the 
east. Tony Larussa led the St. 
Louis Cardinals back to the post 
season after a dismal start. The 
Cards won their first division tide 
since 1988. 

The Western Division champs, 
San Diego Padres, earned their 
trip to the post season by beating 
the Los Angles Dodgers for the 
crown. The Dodgers did setUe 
for the N.L. wild card bid. 
AUanta Br aves vs. Los Angles 
Dodgers 

The Braves throw John Smoltz, 
Greg Maddux, and Tom Glavine 
at the Dodgers in hopes of slow- 
ing down Mike Piazza and Raul 
Mondesi. AUanta hopes to win 
back to back World Series, but 
have a tough draw in the 



Dodgers. 

. Game 1 Atlanta at Los Angles 

Wednesday. Oct. 2 

Game 2 Atlanta at Los Angles 
Thursday, Oct. 3 

Game 3 Los Angles at Atlanta 
Saturday, Oct. 5 

Game 4 Los Angles at Atlanta 
Sunday. Oct. 6 (if necessary) 

Game 5 . Los Angles at Atlanta 
Monday, Oct. 7 (if necessary) 

San Diego Padres vs. St. Louis 
Cardinals 

Tony Gwynn and the Padres are 
riding the emotion of winning the 
N.L. west title. In Ozzie Smith's 
final season, the Red Birds bring 
a good blend of talent and experi- 
ence into the Division Series. 

Game 1 San Diego 1 St. 
Louis 3 

Game 2 San Diego at St. 
Louis Wednesday, Oct. 2 

Game 3 St. Louis at San 
Diego Saturday, Oct. 5 

Game 4 St. Louis at San 
Diego Sunday, Oct. 6 (if neces- 
sary) 

Game 5 St. Louis at San 
Diego Monday, Oct. 7 (if neces- 
sary) 



Witte named scholar athlete of the week by Burger King 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

Two-time Clarion University 
Football All-American Steve 
Witte (Warren, Pa. Eisenhower 
High), an outstanding scholar 
athlete, will be honored by the 



Burger King Corporation for his 
prominent academic, athletic and 
community efforts this Saturday, 
October 5, at half time of the 
Clarion - Lock Haven football 
game. Kickoff is 2 pm. Burger 
King Corporation has named 



VANDYKE'S 5TH AVENUE 

Family Restaurant & Bar 



SUNDAY 

20c Wings; Big Screen TV. 

Beer Special when home team scores 

MONDAY 

20c Wings; 50c drafts 4- 10PM 

TUESDAY 

Nacho app & Pitcher Beer S3 .00 

WEDNESDAY 

16 oz Beer Special 8- 10PM 

THURSDAY 

500 Draft; $1.00 Shots and 
Mixed drinks 8- 10PM 
Spaghetti Dinner Special 

FRIDAY 

Fish Dinner Special 

SATURDAY j 

Crab Legs/Prime Rib Dinner 
Located on North 5th Avenue 



226-8512 



Witte an NCAA Division II 
College Football "Scholar 
Athlete of the Week", and will 
donate $10,000 to Clarion 
University's general scholarship 
fund. Burger King Franchise 
Representative Randy Bemecky 
and Burger King Operations 
Trainer Larry Podsiadlo will pre- 
sent the award to Witte on 
Saturday. Witte was nominated 
for this award by Clarion 
University Sports Information 



Director Rich Herman. "I'm 
excited and very proud to be 
receiving this award," stated 
Witte. "The award represents the 
best things about being a quality 
student athlete and that makes 
receiving it extra special. A lot of 
people have played a big part in 
my life, but I'd really like to 
thank my mother and father, who 
taught me the values I have 
today. They are a tremendous 
support and are always there for 



L &G 



Angels • Critters • T-Shirts 




408 Main Street 
(across from Uni-Mart) 
226-5060 

"Have an Angel of a Day" 




-— - 1 



BUY 

12 WINGS. 

GET 6 FREE! 



1 Block off Main Street j Mondaj/S ONLY \ 
Reservations Not Necessary J | Coupon per visit per person! 



HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS! 

Monday - Thursday 7 9 PM LOUNGE ONLY! 

1 lb. Wines, f Plain, garlic butter, hot or hot - . 

hot J 1 lb. Seasoned Fries. & a Pitcher of Beer ■ or oniy 



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9" 1 -topping Pizza & a Pitcher of Beer 



$7.00 



Proper Id Required 

ho Take Outs ' 

No substitutions, please 



Dominic's 

in the Clarion Mall 2i?6-7664 



me." Witte, a 6-0, 190-pound, 
senior, running back at Clarion 
University, earned the award by 
excelling on the gridiron as a 2- 
time All-American, as a PSAC 
and Clarion University "Scholar 
Athlete" with a 3.368 cumulative 
QPA, plus volunteering for the 
football team's Elementary 
School Youth Program, as well as 
being a member of the Finance 
Club. Steve has already set 
Clarion career football records 
for career rushing touchdowns 
(27). overall touchdowns (34) 
and points scored (204 points). 
He ranks 5th in career rushing 
yards with 1,784, ranks 7th in 
career receptions with 109 and 
ranks 10th in career receiving 
yards with 1,350. He is one of 
only two running backs in PSAC 
history to run for as many career 
yards, plus catch over 100 passes 
and go bver 1,000 receivng 
yards. In 1996 he has 54 carries 
for 286 yards (5.3 yards per 
carry) and 2 touchdowns, plus 
caught six passes for 102 yards. 
In 1995 he finished the season 
with 753 rushing yards and 13 
touchdowns on 130 tries, plus 
caught 50 passes for 629 yards 
and two touchdowns. In 1994 he 
had 691 rushing yards and 11 td's 
on 128 carries, and caught 50. 
passes for 578 yards and 5 td's. 



October 3, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 9 









CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



••♦FREE TRIPS &CASH!*** 

Find out how hundreds of student 

representatives are already earning 

FREE TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH 

with America's #1 Spring Break 

company! Sell only 15 trips and 

travel free! Cancun, Bahamas, 

Mazatlan, Jamaica or Florida! 

CAMPUS MANAGER POSITIONS 

ALSO AVAILABLE. Call Now! 

TAKE A BREAK STUDENT 

TRAVEL (800) 95-BREAK! 

FREE T-SHIRT + $1000 

CreditCard fundraisers for fraterni- 
ties, sororities & groups. Any cam- 
pus organization can raise up to 
$1000 by earning a whopping 
$5.00/VIS A application. Call 1- 
800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified 
callers receive FREE T-SHIRT 

HAVE A JOB OPENING THAT 

YOU NEED FILLED? 

THE CLARION CALL CAN 

HELP. CALL 226-2380. 

HELP WANTED LARGE 

BOLE TYPE 

Men/Women earn $480 weekly 

assembling circuit boards/electronic 

components at home. Experience 

unnecessary, will train. Immediate 

openings your local area. Call 1- 

520-680-7891 EXT. C200 



HELP WANTED 

Men/Women earn $480 weekly 

assembling circuit boards/electronic 

components at home. Experience 

unnecessary, will train. Immediate 

openings your local area. Call 1- 

520-680-7891 EXT. C200 



ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - 

Students Needed! Fishing industry. 

Earn up to $3,000-$6,000+ per 

month. Room and Board! 

Transportation! Male or Female. 

No experience necessary. Call 

(206)971-3510 ext A5 2462 



FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 
Billion in public and private sector 

grants and scholarships is now 
available. All students are eligible 
regardless of grades, income, or par- 
ent's income. Let us help. Call 
Student Financial Services: 1-800- 
263-6495 ext. F52462 



CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING 

Earn up to $2,000+/month working 
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour com- 
panies. World travel. Seasonal & 
full-time employment available. No 
experience necessary. For more 
information call 1-206-971-3550 
ext. C52464 



Wanted!!! 

Individuals, Student Organizations 

and Small Groups to Promote 

SPRING BREAK TRIPS. Earn 

MONEY and FREE TRIPS. 



CALL THE NATION'S LEADER. 

INTER-CAMPUS PROGRAMS 

http://www.icpt.com 

1-80O-327-6O13 



FOR RENT 



For Rent; Fall 97-98 term, 2 

extremely nice apts., 1-4 bedroom, 

& 1-2 bedroom, next to campus, 

utilities included, must be willing to 

sign full 1 yr lease. Call 226-7316, 

ask for Andrew. 



Apartments available for fall '97 
and spring '98 semesters. One 
block from campus. Furnished at 
four person occupancy. Leave mes- 
sage @ 226-5917. 



Student Rental/No Show 
Female roomate needed for 
second semester. $600 plus utili- 
ties. You get your own 
bedroom. For more info, 
call 227-4247. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Are you registered to vote in 

Clarion County? Must be registered 

by Oct. 4th, call Shirley C. Hager @ 

226-8315, 226-8526, or 226-7316 

for information. 



Shirley C. Hager, candidate for State 

Representative of this 63rd District, 

encourages you to Vote on Nov. 

5th, and would deeply appreciate 

your vote. 



The 4th. somewhat annual. 

OIK Pig Roast will be 

held on Saturday. October 5th 

at the Phi Sig House. Call Brian 

@ x2873 for more 

information and tickets 



IN CONCERT: 

Fury, local band from Erie, on 
Thurday. October 3 from 8:30 - ?. 

69 North 5th Ave. $3.00 
donation. Drivers ID Required 



Attention All girls: 

There will be a Zeta Tau Alpha 

Open Bid Party on October 8 at 

9:00. Please feel free to join 

us at the Zeta house. 



PERSONALS 



Happy Birthday Becca! 
Love, Your ZTA Sisters 



The Brothers of Theta Xi congratu- 
late and welcome our Associate 
members: Richard Diamond. Alex 
Powers. Robert Fox, James 
Christopher, Kevin Schuab, and 
William Evans. 



Kelly and Cris - When's Charlie 
going to give us our next assign- 
ment? I'm ready! 
Love, Sabrina 



Amy, Thanks for all your help with 
the Float. Love, AZA 



Happy Birthday Jen W 
Love. Your AIT Sisters 



To the Brothers of Sigma Chi. 
We just wanted to let you 
know that we didn't forget 
about you. We had a great 
time at the mixer, and we 
hope to do it again soon. 
Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



To the Brothers of Theta Xi, 

Thanks for the great mixer. 

We had a great time, and we 

hope to do it again. 

Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



Kerry, Congratulations on becoming 
Sigma Chi Sweetheart. 
Love, Your ZTA Sisters 



To the Brothers of Sig Tau Gamma, 

Thanks for the great mixer. It was 

a lot of fun, and we hope to 

do it again soon. 
Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



AIA wishes to thank 0E for the 

mixer. We had a great time. Let's 

do it again soon! AIA 



Congrats to our new members: 
Kelly, Melinda, Rachel, 

Stacey and Tahnee. 
Love, Your AIA Sisters 



To the Brothers of Theta Chi. 
We look forward to beginning 

the week building the float 

with you and ending the week 

with a great mixer. 

Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



ZTA would like to wish everyone a 
safe and fun ALF week! 



Leslie. Congratulations on 

your engagement! 

Love. Your Zeta Sisters 



Happy Belated B-day to Rachel. 

Melinda. and Carin. 

Love. AIA 



Good Luck in the Homecoming 

Becky and Rochelle. 

Love, Your ZTA Sisters 



Julie L. and Amanda, Thanks for all 

your hard work during Rush. 

Love, Your Phi Sig Sisters 



To the Brothers of AX. 

Thanks for the great mixer. 

Love, OH 



Leanne - Have any nightmares 

about pomps yet? Thanx for the 

great work on the Float. 

Love, Your III Sisters 



Brothers of QX: 

We had fun at the mixer! 

Lets write on each other again. 

Love, III 



To the Sisters of OH. 
Thanks for the great mixer. 

Let's do it again soon. 
Love, the Brothers of AX 



To the Sister's of OOA. 

Thanks for the awesome mixer. 

Who would have thought that van- 

delism could be so fun? 

Love, the Brothers of OIK 



ZTA's, Thanks for the great mixer. 
Love, ITT 



Amy Meyer, Good Luck on 

Homecoming Court. 

Love, Your III Sisters 



Good Luck on Homecoming. 
Love, AST 



Nicole, Congrats on the Court. 

Good Luck and Best Wishes. 

Love, Your AIT Sisters 



Welcome to AST: Lori AM, Lori 

M., Lela, Jaime, Chrissy, Cheryl, 

Kristen, Parice, Lisa, Mindy, Amy, 

Laura, Melissa, Michelle, Carrie, 

Ana, Fall '96 Rock. 

Love, Your future AIT Sisters 



Good Luck III, Associate Members. 

Keep you heads up! 

Love, the AIT Housegirls 



Laura and Ana, your Rosebuddys. 
Love you... Smile 



Carrie, Welcome to AIT! You're the 
Best! Love. Your Rosebuddy 



Parice. You're the best Little 

I could have asked for. 

Love. Your Bis 



Lori Matachek. Welcome to AIT! 
Your big loves you. 



Jaime. Your Rosebuddy loves you. I 
can't wait till you know who I am. 



The Brothers of SP would like 

to thank the Dance Team and 

Friends for a great mixer. 

Can't wait to do it again. 



Happy Birthday Heather and 
Megan. Love, AZ 



Delta Zeta would like to wish every- 
one a fun and safe ALF! ! 



Sorry Michelle! Good Luck 

through pledging. 

Love, Your future Sisters of AZ 



Happy Birthday Carey Fahy. ZZ at 

the Bar - you know what to do. 

Love, III 



Happy 21st Birthday, Amy. You 

picked a good week to turn 21 ! See 

you at the bars. 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



Congratulations Charlotte and 
Amber on Sisters of the Week. 



Thanks for all your time and 

effort on the float! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



To the Brothers of KAP - Thanks for 

the awesome mixer! 

Love, the Sisters of AOE 



Congratulations to Jackie David on 

becoming OA0 Sweetheart! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



It's your time. Your now 21. Go to 

the bars and have lots of fun! 

Happy 21st Julie! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



To the Brothers of ETT - It's been 

another great year working on the 

float with you guys! Can't wait to 

celebrate on Thursday! 

Love, AOE 



0OA would like to wish everyone a 
terrific ALF week. 



Happy Birthday, Robin! You are 

old and crusty! 

Love, Your 00 Sisters 



OIK, We had a blast at the mixer! 
Love, 00 A 



0E, We're having a great time 

doing the float with you guys. 

Can't wait till next week! 

Love, 0OA 



Dear Brothers of KAP - 1 want to 

wish you all a fun and safe ALF 

week. Good Luck in the parade. 

Love, Your Sweetheart, Daria 



Thanks to the Fall "96 pledge class 
of AZ for decorating my house. You 

definitely put the 'sweets" into 
sweetheart. Also, good luck pledg- 
ing! Love. Your Turtlebuddy 



To the Brothers of IX - Thank you 
for choosing me as your new 

Sweetheart. I'm looking forward to 

spending the year with you. 

Love. Kerry 



AIA - Theta Xi wants you to know 

we had a stupendous time playing 

Greek games with you at the mixer. 

Love, 0E 



Zetas - (Sorry this is late.) But any- 
way, the Brothers of Theta Xi said 
they had one heck of a time playing 
twister with you. 
Love, 0E 



Diana Gleck! Theta Xi welcomes 

you back and wishes you a great 

semester. We are very proud to call 

you Sweetheart. We love you, 

Cloudy! 0E 



Ann, you made the bunch complete. 

Good Luck Fall 96. 

Love, III 



Hey Flick. We Rock the 5th Ave. 
Love, Joy 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1 996 



Angle and Eiter at the Holiday Inn 



by Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



It ever Clarion has had a celebri- 
ty to Call their own, it would have 
to be Kurt Angle. Sunday night 
at the Holiday Inn, lines formed 
fifty or sixty feet long to get an 
autograph or a picture with the 
Olympic Gold Medalist. 

Kids stood in awe of this mam- 
moth of a man, and parents 
looked on with quiet respect as 
flashes lit up the room like a Kurt 
Angle smile. The Holiday Inn 
hosted a tribute to Kurt Angle 
and Rob Eiter where you could 
get an autograph or picture, see 
an Olympic gold medal, get a 
free hot dog and there was also a 
question and answer session with 
the two Olympic athletes. 

It started at 5 PM and for the 
first hour and a half people stood 
in a line in front of Kurt Angle 
and Rob Eiter, who were sitting 
at a long, wooden table. Parents 
snapped pictures of their kids 
standing next to Kurt and Rob 
and got an autograph for them- 
selves. There was also Olympic 
memorabilia that could be pur- 
chased like t-shirts, posters, and 
pictures of the Olympic 



wrestlers. 

After the autograph session the 
crowd moved to the Holiday 
Inn's Magic Forest Ballroom 
were the question and answer 
session was held. Kurt and Rob 
handled all kinds of questions 
from how the bombing of 
Centennial Park affected them to 
one child's question of, "Have 
you ever been to Niagara Falls?" 
If you've never heard Kurt Angle 
speak you are definitely missing 
out. 

He is very motivational and his 
story is quite interesting. Kurt 
told of his early wrestling experi- 
ences when he hated it and used 
to cry every time he wrestled. He 
then got into basketball for a 
while, but soon realized where 
his talents lied. He talked about 
his busy schedule and the dedica- 
tion involved in becoming the 
best heavyweight wrestler in the 
world. 

Most of his stories are tales of 
incredible desire, which he cred- 
its to his success, and aimed at 
teaching or motivating others to 
strive , especially kids. He likes 
to be a role model and serves that 
position well. During the ques- 
tion and answer, I asked Kurt 



what the best advice he could 
give to young wrestlers who 
wanted to be like him would be, 
and his answer was a good one. 
"Everyone has the ability to be 
whatever they want. You just 
have to stay focused and believe 
in yourself." This was after he 
told the story of a speech he was 
giving to youngsters at an ele- 
mentary school. 

He asked the class what they 
wanted to be when they grow up. 
Most of the class said an 
Olympic athlete, but one young 
girl said she wanted to be presi- 
dent. All of the other kids started 
to laugh until Kurt intervened 
and told them not to laugh. 
"What gives you the right to 
laugh at her? You can be what- 
ever you want to be if you put 
your mind to it," said Angle. 
That is his story and what he 
lives his life by. Set a goal, work 
harder than everyone else, 
believe in yourself and you can 
achieve whatever you want. 

You know, I think I've heard a 
lot of successful people say these 
same things before, so there just 
might be something to it. Rob 
Eiters' story is quite interesting 



Golf team takes fifth 



by Tim Rafalski 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion golf team traveled 
to the Davis & Elkins College 
Invitational this past weekend 
and shot a combined, two day 
total of 651 to place fifth out of 
seven teams. 

Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania, the only other 
Pennsylvania team participating. 



NFL Week #6 

home team in caps 
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Patriots 2 RAVENS 

MIAMI 7 Seattle 

Green Bay 7 BEARS 

LIONS 10 Atlanta 

Raiders 3 JETS 

VIKINGS 6 Carolina 
♦San Fran 10 1/2 RAMS 
DENVER 3 1/2 San Diego 
Colts 2 BILLS 

SAINTS 1 Jaguars 

BENGALS even Houston 
CHIEFS 3 1/2 Steelers 

Courtesy of the Pick Master 

Pick Master 1 -0 for the year 



won the overall team title with a 
score of 617. Corey Bierly lead 
all Golden Eagle golfers, shoot- 
ing an 81 on the first day and an 
80 on the second. 

Brian Leupold was one step 
back with an 80 on the first eigh- 
teen holes and an 82 on the sec- 
ond. 

Terry Tidball also had a solid 
performance, shooting an 80 and 
83 for the Golden Eagles. 
Rounding out the Golden Eagle 
squad were Matt Honacki (82. 
85) and Steve Witcoski (85, 83). 



Corey Glass, from West Virginia 
Wesleyan, won the overall indi- 
vidual title with a two day total of 
150. 

The Clarion golfers return to 
action this Sunday at the 
Rhododendron Classic. This is 
another two day tournament held 
in Wheeling. West Virginia. 

They will then wrap up their 
season at the Millersville 
Invitational on Sunday, October 
27th and the West Chester 
Invitational on Monday, October 
28th. 



Bullfeathers 
Restaurant & Lounge 



Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials 
10% Discount on Dinner Menu with Student ID 

Karaoke - Wednesday Nights 
Wing Nights - Mondays & Wednesdays 
Happy Hour - Monday-Thursday, 4-6pm, 
- 75c DRAFTS 



We open Monday- Saturday at 11am, 

and Sunday at noon 

Located 2 miles east of Clarion on Route 322 



as well. He never wrestled colle- 
giately. he only wrestles 
freestyle. It is hard to believe he 
is one of the top wrestlers in the 
world and never wrestled a single 
match in college. Rob had the 
crowd laughing as he gave one 
brutally honest answer alter the 
other. Rob was not in the shadow 
for a second even though he was 
standing next to someone as large 
as Kurt Angle. His wit and light- 
hearted spirit surfaced time and 
time again. As the evening came 
to a close, Kurt Angle gave the 
audience a good note to leave on 
when he said, "I am glad I'm 
from Pittsburgh and Clarion 
because you are the people that 
enjoy it (wrestling) the most." 

I know I'm ready for wrestling 
to get started and am looking for- 
ward to seeing some of the top 
wrestlers in the country compete. 
If you did not get a chance to see 
Kurt and Rob at the Holiday Inn 
they will also be co-grand mar- 
shals of the ALF Parade this 
Saturday at noon. . 



Come out and 

support the foot- 

bal team in the 

homecoming 

game as they 

take on Lock 
Haven. It's sure 
to be a game you 

don't want to 
miss! Also Steve 
Witte will be hon- 
ored at half time 
for being named 

Burger King 
"Scholar Athlete 

of the Week". 



CWNA TOWM R6SIAURANJT 



•SUAJD^V BUFFET VJ - 2 PM 

Adults $7.50 Children under 12 $4.50 

• LUAJCf I SPSCOALS 

MONDAY - SATURDAY 1 - 3 PM 

$3.95 - $4.75 

522 Main St. 226-8229 or 226-8222 






JP[ The Autumn Leaf Party 
Begins tonight at 5:00 and 
continues through Saturday! 

Good Luck to all the 
Fraternities & Sororities with 
their floats! ff 

Have fun and Be Careful BAP! 



#• 



< 



Pa©k Sihop 

226-8890 

•188 Selections • Largest selection 
in Clarion • Weekly specials • 



Open 7 Days A Week--11 AM til 1 AM 
Friday & Saturday till 2 AM 



Located in the basement of the Captain Loomis Building 






eetobtx 10, 1996 



Clarion tHmbeniitp of $etin*plbatua 



Clarion, $S 16214 



Wi>z Clarion Call 



What's Msibi 




The Golden Eagles 
trounced rival Lock 
Haven this weekend 
for a homecoming 
victory check out 
the story on page 16. 



Contents 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg.9 

Call on You: Pg. 13 

Entertainment: Pg. 14 

Sports: Pg. 16 

Classifieds: Pg. 19 

VAumt 78, 3**tte 5 



Weather 



Today's high 

temperature 

will be in the 60s. 

Partly cloudy 

with a chance of 

rain . 



Homecoming king and queen named 



Ritter and Wilburn crowned as Clarion University royalty 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 



Rebecca Ritter of Pittsburgh 
and Drew Wilburn of Beaver 
reign today as the Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
homecoming king and queen. 

The two seniors were crowned 
Thursday night at the annual pep 
rally held at the Gemmell 
Outside Performance Area. 

In addition to the announce- 
ment of the homecoming court, 
the football team and the cheer- 
leaders were also introduced. 

The Golden Eagle Marching 
Band performed several selec- 
tions from their repertoire. 

The queen and king rode in 
Saturday's Autumn Leaf Festival 
(ALF) parade and were recog- 
nized during the halftime cere- 
monies of the Clarion-Lock 
Haven football game. 

Jeff Pence, co-founder and gui- 
tarist for the nationally renowned 
recording artist Blessid Union of 
Souls, crowned the homecoming 
queen. 

The king and queen were 
among the six seniors who were 
on the homecoming court. They 
are joined by four juniors, six 



sophomores, and six freshmen. 
Venango Campus, Clarion 
University's branch campus, in 
Oil City has four representatives 
on the court. 

Only the seniors can be named 
homecoming royalty. The court 
and the reigning king and queen 
were determined by a student 
vote. 

Lori Cisek, chairperson of the 
University Activities Board's 
(UAB) homecoming committee, 
was very happy about the 
achievements of the pep rally. 
"The whole homecoming week- 
end went very well, " said Cisek. 
The homecoming queen for 
this year is Rebecca Ritter, a 
senior speech pathology and 
audiology major She is a daugh- 
ter of Martin and Patricia Ritter 
and is a graduate of Brentwood 
High School in Pittsburgh. 
Rebecca is a member of, and is 
sponsored by, the Zeta Tau Alpha 
Sorority. 

She is also a majorette in the 
Clarion University Marching 
Band. 

"I was really surprised," said 
Ritter. "I was just happy to be 
nominated." 




Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
The 1996 Homecoming king and queen are Rebecca Ritter and Drew Wilburn. They were 
crowned at a pep rally last Thursday by a member of the band Blessid Union of Souls. 



The homecoming king is Drew 
Wilburn, a senior business man- 
agement major. 

He is a son of Al and Helen 
Janicki and is a graduate of 
Beaver High School in Beaver. 

Drew is a member of, and spon- 
sored by, the Clarion University 
Cheerleaders. 

"Three letters- W-O-W," said 
Wilburn. "Honest to God, I did- 



n't expect it." 

The remaining senior represen- 
tatives on the court are Nicole 
DelBonifro, Stacey Sylvester, 
Scott Cale, and Ryan Hitchman. 
The junior representatives are 
Gina Bottomley, Amy Meyer, 
Greg Bostick, and Richard 
Greggs. 

The sophomore representatives 
of the homecoming court are 



Shannon Beam, Rochelle Ross, 
Nick Chervenak, and Mark 
Watts. 

The freshman representatives 
are Gina Donati, Erika Nichols, 
Eric Kemp, and Jeffrey Marak. 

The homecoming representa- 
tives from Venango Campus are 
Heather Pratt, Heather Vogan, 
Kristopher Johnson, and Corey 
Riley. 



State and local campaigns reaching out to students 



Matt Geesey 
News Editor 

The race for the Presidency in 
November is only a part of some 
of the exciting political dramas 
being performed in the state of 
Pennsylvania. The incumbent 
president, Bill Clinton, is the can- 
didate for the Democratic Party. 
The Republicans have also 
nominated a well-known political 



figure for President, Bob Dole. A 
former senator from Nebraska, 
Dole has been very involved in 
Washington's policies on Capitol 
Hill. 

Several offices are also opening 
up on a state and local level. A 
new representative for the 63rd 
Congressional District in 
Pennsylvania is one of the most 
heated races. 



The representative will repre- 
sent the district, which includes 
Clarion, in Harrisburg's legisla- 
tive assembly. The nominees are 
Fred Mcllhattan and Shirley 
Hager. 

The Republican nominee is 
Fred Mcllhattan. Currently, he is 
the executive assistant to State 
Senators John Peterson and Tun 
Shaffer. Formerly, he was the 



Clarion County commissioner 
and mayor of Knox. Mcllhattan 
is a graduate of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and is 
a member of the university's 
Council of Trustees. 

A family man, he is married and 
has two children. 

Several of the issues that 
Mdlhattan plans to work with 
are bringing more jobs to his con- 



gressional district, real tax 
reforms, and cutting through red 
tape to help his constituents to 
get what they need. 

Mcllhattan has been a member 
of the Council of Trustees for 
over a decade and is very sup- 
portive of the university. "Clarion 
University is important not only 

Continued on page 5 



r- v .r« 



Page 2 



•?■» i» 



The Clarion Call 



October 10. 19% 



OPINION 




Editorial 




"1 would hate to see 

an outsider Planning 

Clarion University's 

future. A person who 

has never stood in 
long lines at the cafe 
and only received one 

Piece of chicken..." 




Kevin Miko, Circulation Manager 



**■ 




Joseph Bodziock 



Hide Park 



"An evenf that cele- 
brates to a signifi- 
cant degree the 
obiectication and 
commodity of femi- 
ninity and 
masculinity../* 




Christopher Ferry 



When you hire someone for a 
job you expect that person to do 
that job. Someone obviously 
thought that the Administrators 
we have at Clarion University 
were capable of taking this 
University to new heights. In 
many aspects they have done just 
that. Clarion has increased 
enrollment as well as added new 
and innovated courses to prepare 
students for the working world. 

As with any organization, com- 
pany, or university, our leaders 
must have planning, organizing, 
and implementation skill, just to 
name a few in order to get the job 
done. 

So now Clarion University 
hires a consulting firm to come 
up with "The Master Plan" for a 
tune of $226,000. But wait, isn't 
this the administrators job, to 
plan organize, and implement 



Clarion's future? Don't tell me 
Clarion is wasting money again! 

Many of our top administrators 
are paid a six figure salary. (If 
you don't believe me go to 
Carlson Library, all faculty 
salaries from President Reinhart 
to Joe Plumber of the mainte- 
nance staff are published). 

I would hate to see an outsider 
planning Clarion University's 
future. A person who has never 
stood in the long lines of the cafe 
and only received one piece of 
chicken, a person who has never 
gotten a parking ticket from 
Public Safety, or who has never 
read the Clarion Call or tuned 
into WCUC. These people have 
no place telling us what Clarion 
needs or wants. 

I believe Clarion University has 

Continued on page 4 



"Here at Clarion" 

Let us introduce ourselves. We 
have recently been appointed as 
co-directors of the Sexual Assault 
Network, a joint effort of the uni- 
versity and the community to 
break the silence about sexual 
assault 

We succeed Deb Burghardt, 
who during her tenure as director 
guided us with grace, even-hand- 
edness and vision. She will be a 
tough act to follow. 

If you haven't heard of the 
Sexual Assault Network, you 
need not be surprised. No, we are 
not a covert organization. 

What we have been is less vocal 
and less of a presence than per- 
haps we should be. 

We would be only too happy to 
say that our low profile reflects 
the absence of sexual assault on 
our campus and in our town, you 
and me in gender harmony, 
anchored by a deep-rooted 



TOe Clarion Call 



270 fcnmell Complex 
($14)226 2380 



Clarion, $8 16214 
/S3C (614)226-2557 



Cxeotttoe Uoart 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 



Managing Editor.. ..Brian Pietrandrea 
News Editor... Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Editor... Denise Barney 
Sports Editor.. ..Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design. ..Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager... Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor.... Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager... Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor.... Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager... Kevin Miko 

Advisor... Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica- 
tion. Letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication. The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 



respect for the sexual autonomy 
of other human beings. 

But we are not the world and 
we are not the children. 

What we are is a rape culture. 
Every day we are immersed in 
the images and the messages that 
define gender along lines of 
appropriate masculine behavior 
and appropriate feminine behav- 
ior. 

Every day we encounter a cul- 
ture that reifies aggressive male 
sexuality and passive female 
acceptance. 

Call it male-bashing if you will- 
- but once you're through com- 
plaining about that, deal with the 
ugly cultural truth. 

Perhaps you might like to sug- 
gest, "Not here at Clarion." 

Perhaps, last week, you may 
have noticed the Clothesline 
Project, located in front of Egbert 
Hall: a clothesline hung with t- 
shirts, all bearing messages about 
sexual assault and abuse: mes- 
sages of anger, of hope, of bitter 
and triumphant survival, of 
despair. 

All of the messages were writ- 
ten by those who belong to our 
community. 

Perhaps you may have noticed 
a table near the Clothesline 
Project. At this table students 
could examine the photographs 
of those competing for Clarion 
Homecoming King and Queen. 

It is a curious juxtaposition: An 
event that celebrates to a signifi- 
cant degree the objectification 
and commodity of femininity and 
masculinity, side by side with the 
statements of those who have 
suffered from such objectifica- 
tion. 

We wonder how many assailants 
bought into the myths of power 
and control. 

We wonder how many of the 
assailants of those creating the t- 
shirts perceived their victims as 



consumer goods, bought and paid 
for by the "rights" of being a 
father, of being a husband, of 
being a boyfriend, of being a 
man. 

Perhaps you may remember a 
fraternity rush flier on our cam- 
pus from a few years ago. 

The flier featured a drawing 
of a minotaur-like figure, holding 
up a scantily-clad woman. On 
the surface lay a simple message 
about physical prowess; below 
the surface lay a more disturbing 
message. 

Men are animals, who simply 

can't control themselves— it's 

their nature. Real men don't 

make love with women- they 

gore them. 
Perhaps you may have noticed 

fliers advertising sorority mem- 
bers as "calender girls," a harm- 
less enough phrase, until we real- 
ize that the term conjures images 
of voiceless, passive, two-dimen- 
sional sexuality, hung on a wall 
to be ogled, to be howled at, to be 
stroked over- but never a person 
with whom we communicate. 
Literally, what one sees is all 
that one gets. 

No, projecting beauty and sex- 
uality does not invite rape. But 
when those qualities are project- 
ed as commodities (and aren't 
such calendars and calendar girls 
purchased?) the values that 
inform a rape culture are reaf- 
firmed. 

We wonder whether the women 
who created that flier knew the 
connotations of the phrase. 

If they did not know, that would 
be sad. If they knew, and created 
the flier anyway, that would be 
frightening. 

A community is more than geo- 
graphical boundaries and sets of 
living spaces. It is a group of 

Continued on page 4 



October 10, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 









READER RESPONSES 



Who's calling who dumb- a rebuttal 



Dear Editor, 

As I read Jennifer Pelly's let- 
ter about the so-called "dumbing 
of America" and the rest of her 
dribble, I suddenly felt up to her 
"challenge." 

It seems to me that her test of 
intelligence is based on her 
major and her beliefs. How 
wonderful for her! And how con- 
venient, too. 

Let's see., now it's my turn, 
right? Let me see how "dumb" 
you are, Ms. Pelly. 

Who created the first wireless 
form of communication? Oh, 
that was too easy. What is 
Peyronie's disease? 

Okay, what is the zip code 
for Vandergrift, PA? Sounds to 
me as if somebody else is 
"dumb." Ms. Pelly, you calling 



me "dumb" is much like the pot 
calling the proverbial kettle 
black. 

As far as going to these 
"great" events, I disagree. But, as 
you see, Ms. Pelly, last time I 
checked, I was allowed 
Freedom of Choice. 

Isn't that a part of my con- 
stitutional rights? 

Oh yeah, political science is 
your forte, and I'm "dumb." 
Personally, I didn't want to see 
Blessid Union of Souls. 

I, instead, went to see Orange 
9mm in Pittsburgh, a band that I 
like. You never heard of them? 
Well, you must be "dumb!" 
Besides, why do we pay an 
activity fee when we have to pay 
for tickets to concerts also? 

In my many years here at 
Clarion, I have never gone to any 



mfmmfmmgFmirmmrmiimmmgmrmrmmmmm 



• ' "n..'iii ^^i^i i^u (■ ■■■■■■■I | l,^y IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII III I J I lllllllllllllllllllllllll llllll*lllf« ITTTTT^^^^^nn^^ffT 

I'm begging you- 
Write to me! 

Letters to the Editor are accepted i n 

room 270 Gemmeli Student 
Complex ! 







Did vou see... 



Ik 

'Presidmtiat 

(DeSates 



The '96 Presidential Debate between Bob Dole and Bill Clinton? 
The debate, at 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 6th, involved many 
important issues such as health care and tax cuts. Other topics includ- 
ed Medicare, capital punishment, and abortion. Leading into the 
debate, candidate Bob Dole was trailing the President and democratic 
candidate Bill Clinton in the polls. However, many people believe that 
the debate has not affected the decisions of the voters. 
Abortion Rig hts 



Anti-abortionists rallied in cities and towns across the country this 
past week. Those opposing abortion formed "Lifechairis" or human 
chains to show their views. These peaceful rallies were to show the 
participant opposition to partial-birth abortions, or abortions during 
the third timester of pregnancy. Anit-abortionists are hoping to affect 
the abortion stands of this year's political candidates. 
Mark vour calandar! 



Election Day is Tuesday, November 5th. 

Do your part and VOTE!! 



Letters to... 




sporting events. You want to 
know why? 

I don't like sports, even if 
they're free. I do, however, go 
to some plays., .when I want to. 
It's called "freedom," Ms. Pelly. 
As far as students making a dif- 
ference, I recall awhile back 
when many students and people 



in the community fought to keep 
the Concord proposition out of 
the Clarion area. 

Maybe you weren't here yet, 
Ms. Pelly, but the proposition 
was to put a toxic incinerator 
near the Clarion River. Let's 
see, is it here? No. We took that 
"active stance." 

Everyone takes a stand on 
something. But maybe your def- 
inition of "taking a stand" is 
doing something that you agree 
with and you find importance in. 

And lastly, and most humor- 
ously, there's this thing about 
bringing in Dan Quayle to speak 
at Clarion so we can learn 
something from him. 
"Dumbing of America," huh? 
Learning from a man who tried 
to tell a child that "tomato" was 
spelled with an "e" at the end? 



Yeah, okay. 

I have two requests for you, 
Ms. Pelly. 

Maybe you should consider the 
thought that sometimes the 
things that you learn from liv- 
ing life are more intellectual than 
the things you learn from books. 
The other suggestion is that 
when you truly want to see the 
"Ignorance of America," try 
looking in the mirror. 

You may be surprised that for 
once, in this little instance, you 
may be wrong on who is actually 
a part of the "dumbing of 
America." 



Tina Matthis 

Senior 

Communication Major 



"...why do you drive?" 



Dear Editor: 

I'm writing in response to the 
letter written by the cowardly 
"Name Withheld", entitled "It's 
You Public Safety, You Annoy 
Me." 

I have read some dumb letters, 
but that one takes the cake. 

The author cut down Public 
Safety for doing their job. And 
then thinks they ought to give 
him a break. 



Think again. Some one ought 
to cut idiots like him down. If 
you don't know how to park, 
then why do you drive? 

I don't know what they do with 
all the money collected from 
incompetent drivers who can't 
park, but I think they ought to use 
half the money for a scholarship 
for those who can park. 

One more response to that half- 
brained letter. 

I think it was uncalled for and 



totally ignorant to bring up the 
incident that happened at Penn 
State, and use it in that fashion. 
But let's say the author of that 
letter did snap and try that stunt. 
Judging from the intelligence in 
his letter, He would probably be 
holding the gun backwards. 

Sincerely, 
Tery Haayes 



Student Aid to Colleges & Universities, 1995-96 

(in millions) 



Federal Loans 
($28,707) 



Institutional 
and Other 
Grants 
($9,962) 



Federal 
Grants and 
Work-Study 

($8,657) 




State Grant 
Progams 
($3,021) 



\ ". \r,i *.--*. 



.. - ,. -*'*#»•.■** +*+ 






ource: The College Board 



*-»*Vl*lt*i„. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Cad 



October 10. 1996 



October 10. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



t 



z\ 




News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



World 



Arafat meets with Israeli 
president 

With Palestinian negotiators back at the table after walking off 
in anger, Yasser Arafat made his first public visit to Israel on 
Tuesday and pledged to keep his police from firing again on Is- 
raeli soldiers. 

Sitting in garden chairs on the terrace of President Ezer 
Weizman's villa, Arafat and Weizman traded compliments, shook 
hands for the cameras and agreed there was no alternative to 
peace. The cozy exchange capped Arafat's transformation in two 
years from Israel's arch foe to its most important peace partner. 

Tuesday's meeting came less than two weeks after deadly gun 
battles between Israeli and Palestinian security forces in the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip that left 78 people dead. 

IRA claims responsibility 
for attack 

The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility Tuesday for 
the double car-bomb attack on the British army's headquarters 
here, which wounded 31 and brought Northern Ire-land back to 
the brink of conflict. 

It was the outlawed group's first bomb attack in Northern 
Ireland since mid- 1994. In February, it broke a 17-month cease- 
fire with a deadly bombing in London; attacks followed elsewhere 
in Britain and on a British army base in Germany. 

A telephone caller using a verified codeword told RTE. the 
Irish national broadcasters in Dublin, that the IRA committed 
Monday's strike inside Thiepval Barracks, heart of the 18,000- 
stron£ military presence in the British-ruled province. 

Woman who lost octu- 
plets out of hospital 

The British woman who conceived octuplets after taking fer- 
tility drugs has left the hospital where she lost them all. 

Mandy Allwood's publicist Max Clifford said the 32-year-old 
divorcee and her boyfriend Paul Hudson left London's King's 
College Hospital on Monday night for a secret destination some- 



where in England. 



e>Courtesy of the 
Associated Press 



v 




people who know they are 
responsible for each other, and 
act on that knowledge. If one 
member of the community suf- 
fers, we all suffer. Until we at 
Clarion recognize that, and act 
upon it, phrases like "the Clarion 
community" and "the university 
community" and "the learning 



community" mean little. As long 
as there is rape, as long as there is 
sexual assault and abuse, as long 
as there is one man who feels free 
to violate another human being, 
we are not a community. And as 
long as we continue to accept and 
promote the myths of power and 
sexuality that inform our culture, 



there will be abuse, there will be 
assault, there will be rape. 



•Joseph Bodziock and 
Christopher Ferry are professors 
at Clarion University andxo- 
directors of the Sexual Assault 
Network 



Editoffal continued... 



to return to its roots, which is 
education. 

We are not in the business of 
building million dollar homes or 
hiring a consulting firm to do a 
job that the administrators are 
being paid to do. 

Here is your master plan and it 
won't cost you a dime Clarion 
University. 

The parking problem at Clarion 
has reached alarming levels. We 
need a parking garage, not a new 
presidents house. 

In the area of campus safety we 
need an Escort Service. 

This campus had at least four 
reported rapes last year, up from 
zero in 1995. 

Sadly enough, most students, 
were unaware of the dangers 
until Channel 11 News shoved a 

Celebrity Op-Ed 



microphone in their face. 

Perhaps Public Safety should 
put down their pens, take off their 
helmets, and give their bikes a 
rest. 

While concentrating more on 
spearheading an escort service, 
and thereby working to prevent 
future crimes. 

When it comes to the issue of a 
new recreation center, FORGET 
IT! 

A university with 6,000 stu- 
dents does not need three sports 
facilities. 

Even though the Administration 
should have done it right the first 
time when they built the multi 
million dollar Gemmell Student 
Complex just five years ago. 

So what if a vote of less than 
1,000 students confirmed the 



idea? 

The low voter turnout could be 
because college students, by 
nature, are apathetic. 

Or, more likely, it could be 
because we have accepted that 
what the administration wants, it 
gets: A giving students a voice is 
nothing more than lip service. 

In regards to education, our 
library and computer labs must 
be continually updated every 
year. 

That includes the faculty and 
students who operate the facili- 
ties. 

I hope the administrators take a 
second look at what needs to be 
done, and who should be doing it. 
There is no way to justify money 
spent if it's not spent on what is 
good for Clarion University. 



Building better communities 



J 



by Tipper Gore 
Celebrity Op-Ed Writer 

At the 1996 Democratic 
National Convention, I spoke 
about a civil society. The kind of 
society the Clinton/Gore 
Administration is working to 
achieve in every policy decision 
and every initiative. And as we 
approach election day, I want to 
challenge every college student 
to join together in partnerships to 
achieve better schools, stronger 
communities, and a healthier 
nation. 

During the past four years, I 
have been fortunate to travel the 
country and see how such part- 
nerships are making life better 
for all Americans. From 
Springfield, Missouri, where stu- 
dents and neighborhood coali- 
tions paint over graffiti to prevent 
gangs, to Washington D.C., 
where I joined 15,000 people in a 
march to raise awareness and 
funds for AIDS treatment. All 
across this great country, I am 
constantly inspired by the enthu- 
siasm, energy and commitment 
( pf , th^se L .whp jpjn. .together to 



make a difference. I am proud to 
be a Democrat because our party 
has always sought to create a 
civil society not only in the poli- 
cies we promote, but the politics 
we practice. But, it takes much 
more than elected officials to 
make a difference. We ALL need 
to be better partners in finding 
solutions to the challenges that 
face our families, our communi- 
ties and our nation, because the 
problems of unsafe streets, strug- 
gling schools, and economic dis- 
tress can not be solved by gov- 
ernment alone. The real steps 
made toward meeting our chal- 
lenges are at the local level, and 
college students often lead these 
efforts. 

The President has consistently 
sought community-based solu- 
tions with a program of opportu- 
nity for all and responsibility 
from all. That is why the 
President's AmeriCorps National 
Service program has been such a 
success. We have 45,000 young 
people working all across 
America for a minimum wage, 
earning money for college, and 
L -helping, communities- solve- prob- 



lems. They are doing work that 
badly needs to be done. Work 
that otherwise would not get 
done. With AmeriCorps, we 
renew the ethic of service that 
has always been a key to the 
greatness of this country. 

That is why this 
Administration's Empowerment 
Zone/Enterprise Community ini- 
tiative has been such a success. 
Distressed urban and rural areas 
created a plan of economic and 
community development that met 
their needs, and partnered with 
the federal government to imple- 
ment these development goals. 

That is why the Clinton-Gore 
Administration's community 
policing initiative has been such 
a success. We are adding 
100,000 community policing 
officers to America's streets who 
are in turn partnering with neigh- 
borhood watch groups, parents 
and schools to stop crime and 
prevent drug use among children. 

•The author is the wife of the Vice 
President of the United States of 
America 



NEWS| 



College Campus News 



Y^r^l T-»" 



-^rv 



^0k^k 






What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



AmeriCorps Funded for Another Year 

AmeriCorps survived the budget battle in Congress but will receive 
no funding increases in the coming fiscal year. 

House and Senate negotiators agreed to give AmeriCorps the same 
amount of money as it received in fiscal 1996, voting Sept. 24 to pro- 
vide $402.5 million for the Corporation for National Service, which 
oversees AmeriCorps. 

The House of Representatives voted in June to kill the program. But 
the Senate later voted to give AmeriCorps the same level of funding as 
last year after President Clinton threatened to veto any bill eliminating 
it. 

The funds do not approach the $544 million sought by President 
Clinton in his 1997 budget. But AmeriCorps administrators say they 
are relieved with the outcome. 

"AmeriCorps lives," said Harris Wofford, CEO of the Corporation 
for National Service. "With both sides of the aisle agreeing that the era 
of big government is over, America is calling for an era of great citi- 
zens." 

About 25,000 college students are enrolled in the AmeriCorps pro- 
gram, which provides education vouchers worth $4,725 in exchange 
for one year of community service. 

The program is a "nonpartisan, cost-effective way to engage citizens 
in community problem-solving," Wofford added. 

The 3-year-old AmeriCorps program is recruiting thousands of stu- 
dents to apply for its Class of 1997, which begins its year of service on 
Oct. 25. 

Members perform community service, such as house renovation, 
child immunization and neighborhood watches, in more than 430 pro- 
grams across the country. The educational vouchers can be used to 
cover the costs of college of vocational school and to pay back student 
loans. 

For more information on the AmeriCorps, check out its website at 
http://www.cns.gov. 

Students Protest Appearance of Ex-Klansman 



Police in riot gear were called in Sept. 25 to break up students 
protesting the appearance of former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke 
at California State University-Northridge. 

CSUN's student senate voted 12-11 to invite the former Louisiana 
legislator to a Sept. 25 debate with Joe Hicks, a civil rights activist and 
executive director of the Los Angeles-based Multicultural 
Collaborative. But Duke's paid appearance angered many students and 
minority activists, who were upset that the self-avowed white 
supremacist was given a forum to express his views. 

Dozens of police officers, some on horseback, used batons to dis- 
perse the crowd after fighting erupted outside the student union where 
the debate was held. A few demonstrators pelted police with rocks, and 
several people were injured. According to a Reuters report, some pro 
testors chanted, "Go home, KKK." 

Some of the harshest critics of Duke's appearance were proponents 
of Proposition 209, the Nov. 5 California ballot proposition that would 
ban race and gender preferences in all state hiring and college admis- 
sions. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



State and local campaigns continued from page one 



to Clarion county but to all of 
northwestern Pennsylvania. As a 
state representative, I will be 
strongly committed to supporting 
Clarion University and the State 
System of Higher Education," 
concluded Mcllhattan. 

Shirley Hager is the 
Democrats' choice for represen- 
tative of the 63rd Congressional 
District. This is the first time 
Hager has run for state represen- 
tative. She was the 
Prothonotary/Clerk of Courts of 
Clarion County. Hager was the 
first woman elected to this office. 
Hager has also been the treasurer 
of the Clarion County Chapter of 
the American Red Cross and the 
Garden Club of Clarion County. 
She has also been a member of 
the American Legion Women's 
Auxiliary, the State Association 
of Prothonotaries/Clerk of 
Courts, the Northwest Regional 
Planning Commission, and the 
Rape Crisis Committee, 
Northwest Region. 

Hager is currently a member of 
the First Presbyterian Church in 
Clarion, the Garden Club of 
Clarion County, the executive 
board of the Clarion County 
Democrat Party, and the 
Democratic Women's Club. 

Hager is a strong supporter of a 
public official being involved in 
a public service not as a career. 
Several issues that she takes a 
stand on are a more efficient gov- 
ernment, quality public and pri- 
vate education for children, qual- 
ity jobs for the district, a better 



justice system, and unfunded 
mandates to be removed to help 
lower property, state, and federal 
taxes. Hager feels that a major 
issue for this area is the increase 
of funding for schools in the 
State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE). "That is a big 
issue. We definitely need more 
funding for the universities," she 
stated. She also felt that universi- 
ties need to be responsible about 
spending. "All state schools 
should be accountable for 
expenses and funding. People 
should know where their funding 
is going." 

A race for a state senator for 
Pennsylvania's 21st Senatorial 
District will also be voted on in 
November. The Republican can- 
didate is Mary Jo White from Oil 
City, and the Democratic candi- 
date is Robert Johnson from 
Buder. 

White has been an executive at 
Quaker State for nineteen years, 
most recently as Vice-President 
for Environment and Regulatory 
Affairs. She has also been an 
attorney in private practice and 
has taught business law at the 
University of Maryland and Penn 
State University. White is a board 
member of the Barrow Civic 
Theatre Foundation, the Nursing 
Advisory Board of Clarion 
University, the Blind 

Association, and the Northwest 
Regional Planning and 
Development Commission. 
White is married and has three 
children. 



Johnson is currenUy the busi- 
ness manager/financial secretary 
of IBEW #10. He is also the pres- 
ident of the Butler and Venango 
Counties Building and 
Construction Trades Council, 
secretary of Western 3rd 
Business Managers Association, 
and chairman of Tri-State 
Business Managers Association. 
Johnson is a member of the 
Board of Directors of the United 
Way, the Citizen's Review Panel, 
and the Campaign Steering 
Committee of the YMCA. 

The local seat for U.S. House of 
Representatives is another race 
up for re-election. 

The Republican candidate is 
John Peterson and the 
Democratic candidate is Ruth 
Rudy. 

The two candidates for the State 
House of Representatives and the 
two candidates for the State 
Senate are scheduled to be in 
attendance on October 15 at 
"Meet the Candidates" forum on 
the Clarion University campus in 
Gemmell Student Center. 

The forum will begin at 8 p.m. 
and is being sponsored by the 
Clarion area League of Women 
Voters and the Pre-Law Club on 
the Clarion campus. 

Each candidate will present his 
or her views on selected issues 
and a question and answer ses- 
sion will follow the presenta- 
tions. 

Community members and the 
student body are invited and 
encouraged to attend. 



CU organizatio ns winners in weekend festival 

person Leanne Havely noted, "I 



by Lisa Lawson 
News Writer 



Last weekend, the annual 
homecoming parade was held 
with the theme for this year's fes- 
tivities being "Carousel of 
Colors". Campus and community 
members were invited to display 
their floats for the culmination of 
the Autumn Leaf Festival (ALF). 

The first prize in the university 
float category went to the sorori- 
ty Sigma Sigma Sigma and fra- 
ternity Sigma Pi. The winning 
float consisted of a carousel with 
two horses and two chairs. The 
roof of the carousel was multi- 
colored with alternating stars and 
diamonds in red and blue. The 
float also had a sno-cone stand on 
the back. The float earned a prize 
of $200. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma float chair- 



owe a lot of credit to the brothers 
of Sigma Pi, as well as to my 
sorority because everyone 
worked really hard to make this 
happen." Havely credits the 
design and building of the float to 
the brothers of Sigma Pi, but 
comments that everyone spent a 
great deal of time helping to 
pomp the float. 

When asked how she felt about 
the whole experience, Havely 
remarked, "I was amazed that we 
won. I had an idea that we might 
win something, but I went crazy 
because I was so excited about 
it." 

The second prize winners and 
recipients of a $150 prize were 
sorority Alpha Sigma Tau and 
fraternity Sigma Chi. Their float 
also consisted of a carrousel, as 



well as a tiger jumping through a 
flaming hoop. 

The third place winners of $100 
were sorority Phi Sigma Sigma 
and fraternity Phi Delta Theta 
whose float had a big-top carni- 
val theme complete with an ele- 
phant and a tiger. 

Fourth place and a prize of $50 
was awarded to sorority Theta 
Phi Alpha and fraternity Theta XI 
for their colorful carousel of 
Crayola crayons. 

The university float category 
was sponsored by Clarion 
University's University 

Activities Board (UAB). Lori 
Cisek, the homecoming chairper- 
son for UAB, commented, "I 
thought ALF went really well, 
and all of the floats looked really 
nice." 

Cont. on page 7 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 3. 1996 



October 10,1996 



The Clarion Call 



Public Safety 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between September 26 and October 6. The blotter is 
compiled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim 

Hall. 

Public Safety officers are investigating a bomb threat for Becker Hall 
on September 26. 

•Officers are investigating the theft of a compact disc that was taken 
from WCCB radio station in Gemmell Student Complex. The station 
director reported the disk had been taken from the station on Monday, 
September 30 between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. 
•On October 1, theft charges were issued on Fred Jones in regards to a 
stolen textbook. 

An unknown person or persons entered a vehicle parked in parking lot 
W and caused damage between the times on October 1 at 4:30 p.m. and 
2:00 p.m. on October 2 

A female student having dinner at Chandler Dining Hall had her ID 
wallet taken on October 2. The wallet confined cash, cards, and other 
items. The value of the theft is set at about $44.00.' i 

Between the hours of 12:30 a.m. on October 2 and 3:00 p.m. on 
October 2, an unknown person or persons bent an antenna on a vehi- 
cle while it was parked in parking lot Y. 

Campus police officers responded to a fire alarm in Campbell Hall on 
October 4. The investigation is continuing. 
•On October 4, Clarion University police arrested Ryan Stark for pub- 
lic drunkenness and underage drinking following an incident occurring 
at Ralston Hall. 

A male non-student was harassing a female student at Givan Hall on 
October 5. He was warned at this time to stay away from her. 

On October 6, there was damage done to a vehicle while it was parked 
in lot B. There were also shotgun shells removed from the vehicle. 



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Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 

telephone: 

412 565 1290 or 800 837 1290 

e mail: admissions@chatham.edu 

internet: www.chatham.edu 




ALF parade broadcast over Internet 



by Matt Winger 

News Writer 



Alumni of Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania, who were not 
able to return to Clarion for the 
homecoming festivities on 
Saturday, were still able to catch 
a glimpse of the annual Autumn 
Leaf Festival (ALF) parade on 
the Internet at Clarion 
University's home page. The Bell 
Atlantic Autumn Leaf Festival 
Parade was part of the 1996 
National City Autumn Leaf 
Festival which was held 
September 28 through October 6. 

The broadcast of the popular 
regional parade began at noon on 
October 5. The student operated 
Clarion University Broadcasting 
TV-5 televised the event. The 
web site was planned to show a 
new photo, taken from the TV-5 
broadcast, every 60 seconds for 
the length of the parade. Due to 
technical difficulties, the web site 
only showed footage for a short 
time. 

'The web site actually broad- 



casted only 15 to 20 minutes of 
parade footage," said Ron 
Wilshire, director of University 
Relations, who worked closely 
with Mike Phillips, systems man- 
ager of the Clarion Center for 
Computing Services, to develop 
the idea of placing the parade on 
the Internet. Phillips modified 
some software to take advantage 
of the Communications 
Department and TV-5's broadcast 
of the parade each year. These 
adaptations allowed Phillips to 
show single frames of the live 
feed. 

"We wanted to find a new way 
to reach out to alumni and friends 
of the university," said Wilshire, 
" and we think too many people 
trying to 'log on' to the web page 
may have caused it to shut 
down." 

In spite of the technical prob- 
lems the experiment encoun- 
tered, Wilshire and the office of 
University Relations, along with 
the others involved, believe it to 
be a success. According to 
Wilshire, over 900 people took a 



look at the home page before it 
began to show snapshots from 
the parade. However, because of 
the technical problems, 
Computing Services cannot fig- 
ure out exactly how many looked 
at the page during the broadcast. 

Bill Adams, an engineer for the 
communications department and 
TV-5, also viewed the broadcast 
as a success, explaining how the 
different departments seemed to 
work well together to reach a 
common goal. 

"It was a real learning experi- 
ence for everyone," said Adams, 
"and I'm sure that the students at 
TV-5 were excited to be working 
with Computing Services." 

According to Wilshire, there are 
no plans to do this with any other 
events in the future, but there are 
several alumni services on the 
university's different Internet ser- 
vices which allow alumni to 
update addresses, career moves, 
and similar information. 

The Clarion University home 
page is located at: 
http://www.clarion.edu. 



Clarion University sets 1996 SECA goal 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

A goal of $27,843 and 257 par- 
ticipants was recently announced 
for the 1996 State Employees 
Combined Appeal (SECA) cam- 
paign at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. 

President Diane Reinhard host- 
ed the kickoff for the campaign in 



Moore Hall. The goal, represent- 
ing a modest increase from 1995, 
was announced by Linda 
Hawkins, assistant to the presi- 
dent, who co-chairs the campaign 
with Tom Fogarty, assistant vice 
president for human resources. 
The campaign dates are October 
7 through the 25. 

Last year Clarion had 245 




University Relations 



Linda Hawkins (center) distributes and explains the report- 
ing of SECA contributions to volunteers Dave Tomeo and 
John Lander. 



Angels • Critters • T-Shirts 




408 Main Street 
(across from Uni-Mart) 
226-5060 



^ 



K* "M™. an ^&&9M£>^*. W X-.-.*.-.-. :■ 



employees participate and donate 
$27,567 to support a wide variety 
of agencies providing community 
services. The monetray figure 
exceeded the established goal for 
1995. 

"Volunteerism is a part of 
Clarion University," said 
Reinhard. This campaign allows 
our employees to provide support 
to community, national, state, 
and local programs. Last year in 
addition to the SECA contribu- 
tions, admini stration, faculty, 
staff, and students provided over 
40,000 hours of volunteer service 
in the community." 

Hawkins thanked all campaign 
volunteers for attending the kick- 
off. "SECA provides employees 
with an opportunity to take care 
of all their charitable giving at 
one time," says Hawkins. 
"Employees may designate their 
contributions to any non-profit 
organization of their choice." 

Kim Callender, executive direc- 
tor of the Clarion County United 
Way, thanked Clarion University 
for the number of volunteers who 
annually help in the campaign, 
noting that there are seven 
Clarion University employees 
serving on the Clarion County 
United Way Board. She also dis- 
cussed the needs of community 
agencies of the Clarion County 
United Way, focusing on the 
amount of help provided by^ 
United Way agencies following 
the July 19 floods. 



New drug causes stir on campuses 



Paee 7 



Courtesy of Clarion University 
Drug and Alcohol Programs 

A new illicit drug has surfaced 
primarily in the south and south- 
western states which has been 
suspected in a growing number 
of sexual assault cases along the 
east coast, including some at 
Penn State University in State 
College, Pennsylvania. 

Although not legal in the 
United States, rohypnol (fluni- 
trazepam) is legal in 64 other 
countries. Most of the countries 
are in Europe and Latin America 
including Mexico. It is a pre- 
scription drug for insomnia and 
sedation. Also known as 
"roofies", "ruffles", "roche", "R- 
2", "rib" or "rope", rohypnol 
comes in a tablet form and often 
is contained in its original bubble 
packaging, making it appear to be 
a legitimate legal drug. 

Rohypnol produces a highly 
intoxicating effect including 



slurred speech, lack of coordina- 
tion, swaying, blood-shot eyes 
and temporary amnesia. It will 
initially cause an excited, agitat- 
ed, or uninhibited state. This drug 
will produce a sedative effect 
within 10-30 minutes of inges- 
tion. Adverse effects can be 
severe, especially when com- 
bined with other substances. 

Often combined with alcohol, 
marijuana, or cocaine to produce 
a rapid, dramatic "high", rohyp- 
nol is gaining popularity as the 
"date rape drug". The drug is 
ideal for rapists because of the 
ability of this drug to dissolve 
quickly in beverages, its ability to 
render victims helpless and their 
resulting inability to remember 
the assault. The drug can keep the 
victim asleep for 8-9 hours 
depending on the dosage and if 
alcohol was used with it. The vic- 
tims' inability to recall the assault 
in detail makes prosecution 
extremely difficult, even though 



the victim may come in and out 
of consciousness for brief peri- 
ods. This drug has also been 
known to be used in "gay bars" in 
select locations on both the east 
and west coasts and has become 
popular on college campuses and 
particularly in college fraterni- 
ties. 

In order to keep yourself from 
becoming a victim of rohypnol 
you need to take the following 
precautions: 

Do not accept opened drinks, 
especially from strangers. 

Keep your drinks in view at all 
times. 

Have a friend watch you while 
you are drinking. Have this friend 
make sure you do not leave with 
someone. 

Avoid pre-mixed drinks (punch- 
es, etc.) or drinks made for you. 

Watch your drinks being made. 
Do not leave your drink un- 
attended. 



Speaker scheduled for mathematics department 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Dr. William Dunham, Turman 
Koehler Professor of 
Mathematics at Muhlenburg 
College in Allentown, will be a 
guest speaker for the Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
Mathematics Department on 
October 15. 

Dunham will make a free pub- 
lic presentation "Newton and 
Leibniz: Mathematics at War," at 
8 p.m. in Hart Chapel. In the talk, 
he sketches the careers of 
England's Issac Newton and 
Germany's Gottfied Wilhelm 
Leibniz, who independently 
invented calculus in the late 17th 
century. He will describe the pla- 
giarism controversy involving 
their work and the challenge 
problem of the brachistochrone, 

Cont. from page 5 

In addition to the cash prizes, 
all of the winners will receive 
commemorative plaques from the 
Clarion County Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Awards were also given out by 
the Chamber of Commerce for 
outstanding floats constructed by 
community members and organi- 
zations. The first place winner in 
this category was Baumcratz 
Dairy. Clarion County Career 
Center was awarded second 
place. Third place was awarded 
to Brownie Troop #594. Nate 
Cyphert rounded out the winner's 
list with fourth place. Clarion 
County Career Center's float was 
also named "Best Overall" by the 
Chamber of Commerce. 



which produced a dramatic out- 
come. 

At 4 p.m., Dunham will make a 
presentation "A Tribut to Euler," 
intended for mathematics stu- 
dents, in Peirce Auditorium, this 
presentation will highlight the 
career of Leonhard Euler and 
examine in detail the Eulerian 
proof which began a whole new 
branch of mathematics. 

Dunham received his B.S. from 
the University of Pittsburgh and 
M.S. and Ph.D. from Ohio State. 
Although trained in general 
topology, his interests gradually 
shifted to the history of mathe- 



matics. He received grants from 
the National Endowment for the 
Humanities to direct summer 
seminars on math history at Ohio 
State. He has also spoken on his- 
torical topics at national and 
regional mathematics meetings 
as well at the Smithsonian 
Institution, on NPR's "Talk of the 
Nation/Science Friday," and on 
the BBC. 

His paper "Euler and the 
Fundamental Theorem of 
Alegebra" won the 1991 George 
Polya Award from the 
Mathematical Association of 
America. 



On Monday October 14, watch the 
special broadcast of the ALF Parade 

on TU-5 Clarion University 

Broadcasting. Also on Tuesday and 

Wednesday at 6:00 p.m., catch the 

new episodes of Behind the Scenes, 

Sports Talk Live, The Finish Line, 

and Let's Go! 



CNE LAST CHANCE! 



Come to an Open Bid Party at the 
DELTA lETh house! 



When: October 10, 1996 
Where: Delta Zeta House 
Time: 6:00 PM 



Student 





Senate 




by Sandee Siford, Student Senate reporter 

The Student Senate met on Mon. Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Gemmell 
Student Complex. Mr. Lee Krull, business manager of Gemmell 
Student Complex, announced that the pilot store for the University 
Book Center went pretty well. The store was open during the Autumn 
Leaf Festival (ALF) and was located on Main Street. He did not have 
the exact figures of the store at the meeting. 

President Cox addressed the views of Professor Rao, faculty advisor 
to the university debate team, concerning some members of the Senate 
by reading excerpts of a letter written by Professor Rao. 

The next Council of Trustees meeting will be held on Nov. 14. 

WCCB announced that they will be holding a Halloween Concert on 
October 30. They have two bands and are looking for more. The num- 
ber to call for information is 226-2717. 

Senator Stoops, chairman of the legislative affairs committee, 
announced that he and his committee distributed 500 voter registrations 
for November's election. October 16 will be the next televised debate 
between the candidates. 

Senator Lombardo, chairman of the Student Centers Committee, 
announced that a board has been hung in the recreation room of the 
Gemmell Student Complex for any students who want to list what they 
want to see in the recreation room. 



Eveiyene is Welccme! 




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* * * * * * 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



October 3, 1996 



October 10. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Clarion University/Keystone SMILES awarded AmeriCorps positions 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

The Corporation for National 
Service, the federal administra- 
tive agency for AmeriCorps, is 
funding a collaborative project 
proposed by Keystone SMILES 
and Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. 

This project financially sup- 
ports the services of 24 
Americorps members to promote 
school reform/restructuring in 
nine school districts, Clarion- 
Limestone, DuBois, Franklin, 
Mars, North Clarion, Oil City, 
Punxsutawney, and the Midwest 
Intermediate Union, and at 
Educational Talent Search based 
at Clarion University, stretching 
across five counties. The project 
participants recently attended an 
induction ceremony and banquet 
held at the Wolf's Den, Knox. 

The 24 AmeriCorps employees, 
all certified teachers, will serve in 
the school district for the equiva- 
lent of five hours per day for 180 
days. They will provide support 
to the school district for expand- 
ing educational services which 
the district may otherwise be 
unable to provide. They may not 
perform any service previously 



held by someone who received a 
salary to do the work. 

According to Dr. Bryan Huwar, 
professor of special education 
and rehabilitative science at 
Clarion University, the superin- 
tendents in the participating dis- 
tricts were surveyed to determine 
the district's interests in reform 
and restructuring. This effort, 
called the "Superintendent's 
Initiative" received a strong 
endorsement from the superin- 
tendents. 

From the superintendent's 
input, the following initiatives 
for the collaboration were estab- 
lished: truancy, inclusionary edu- 
cation, study skills, computer ser- 
vices, instructional support ser- 
vices, computer 
laboratory/library services, 
expanding computer laboratory 
hours, reading skills, drug pre- 
vention/education, discipline, 
and .^mathematics tutoring. The 
collaboration is aimed at improv- 
ing services to expand the learn- 
ing outcomes of students. 

Each of the participating school 
districts provides $6,000 per 
AmeriCorps member scheduled 
to work in their district. From this 
amount $3,975 goes directly to 
the education service worker as a 



living allowance. The remaining 
funds cover staff development, 
training, supervision, payroll 
taxes, uniforms, travel, and 
administration. AmeriCorps pro- 
vides each participant with a 
$2,362.50 education benefit 
which must be used to pay back 
past education loans or future 
education expenses and also 
defer loan and pays the interest 
due on any previous loans while 
the member participates in the 
project, a maximum of two years. 

"This collaboration is a fiscally 
responsible way to help school 
districts, teachers, and students 
simultaneously to promote edu- 
cational opportunities for 
Americorp members," says 
Huwar. "This program will be 
one of the few funded by 
AmeriCorps that will he put to 
into expanding education ser- 
vices. This type of financial sup- 
port is very important in rural 
areas, where the funds available 
to school districts is limited." 

The AmeriCorps education ser- 
vice workers were sought 
through newspaper advertise- 
ments across a five county area. 
The 80 applicants were screened 
and referred to the school dis- 
tricts for individual interviews 



and hiring. 

This partnership evolved from 
two enduring collaborations of 
the Clarion University 
Department of Special Education 
and Rehabilitative Science — 
The Partnership in Education 
Project: Success for All Children 
(P.E.P.) and Summer SMILES U- 
Knighted. 

The P.E.P. was initiated in the 
Union School District, 
Rimersburg, during the 1995-96 
academic year by Robert 
McWilliams, Barry Wineland, 
Louis Gurecka, and Bryan 
Huwar. This program provided 
staff development services to 
Union School District teachers 
and assisted teachers in identify- 
ing and solving learning prob- 
lems of children. Through a grant 
by the Pennsylvania Campus 
Compact, three education ser- 
viceworkers were hired to help 
teachers teach and children learn. 
The Summer SMILES U- 
Knighted Program conducted 
during the summer of 1996 pro- 
vided instructional services to 
over 200 children in the 
Keystone and Union School 
Districts. 

This program was open to all 
children throughout Clarion 



County. Clarion University's 
Department of Special Education 
and Rehabilitative Science and 
Keystone SMILES organized and 
operated this program for 
Keystone, Riverview 

Intermediate Unit #6, and the 
Union School District. 

Clarion University special edu- 
cation teacher preparation stu- 
dents and Keystone SMILES 
Americorps workers were pri- 
marily responsible for the 
instruction and activities con- 
ducted. 

This program was conceptual- 
ized and administered by Pamela 
Gent and Louis Gurecka of 
Clarion University and Ted 
Pappas and Joyce Fosdick of the 
Keystone School District three 
years ago and has grown dramat- 
ically in each subsequent year. 

The P.E.P. and Summer 
SMILES U-Knighted were the 
catalysts for the Superintendents 
Initiative. 

Fosdick, Gent, Gurecka, and 
Huwar united the efforts of 
Americorps, the Clarion 
University Department of Special 
Education and Rehabilitative 
Science, school districts, and 
teachers to expand educational 
services for children. 



Average college costs increase across the nation 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

The cost of college tuition will 
continue to outpace inflation this 
year, and students are borrowing 
more than ever to get degrees, 
according to a new study. 

"I had scholarships and parental 
support for college [but] have 
been relying on loans-about 
$50,000-for graduate school," 
said Derek R. Larson, a doctoral 



student in history at Indiana 
University. 

His wife is also a graduate stu- 
dent, and they wonder how 
they'll pay off the loans, he said. 

"I expect we'll be lucky to pay 
off our debt in 10 years after find- 
ing work, assuming we can both 
find jobs in our respective fields 
at all," he said. "I feel quite inse- 
cure about the financial future 
my investment may bring." 




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According to a College Board 
survey released Sept 25, students 
at four-year public colleges and 
universities can expect to pay 
about 6 percent more this year for 
tuition. That's about $155 more 
than last year. 

Four-year private schools 
boosted undergraduate tuition 
this year by 5 percent, which 
means students will have to pay 
about $607 more. 

Room and board also jumped, 
an average 6 percent, or $220, at 
public colleges and universities, 
and about 4 percent, or $195, at 
private schools, the study found. 

Donald M. Stewart, president 
of the College Board, said that 
despite costs that "are daunting to 
many, for most Americans, the 
fact remains that college is still 
accessible-especially in the light 
of financial aid currently avail- 
able." 

Stewart urged students and 
families to keep college costs in 
perspective, noting that a majori- 
ty of students pay less than 
$4,000 per year. Only about 5 
percent of college students attend 
the highest- priced universities 
that charge more than $20,000 a 
year, he said. 

The study by the College 
Board, an association of about 



3,000 colleges, also found that 
federal aid is available to stu- 
dents at a record level — more 
than $50 billion. 

But most student-aid growth 
has come in the form of federal 
loans, said Lawrence Gladieux, 
executive director for policy 
analysis at the College Board's 
Washington office. In 1995-96, 
federal loan programs provided 
$29 billion in aid to students 7 
percent of all available aid. 

In contrast, federal grant sup- 
port continued to decline-despite 
a slight increase of $40 in the 
maximum Pell Grant. Now 
grants represent just 42 percent 
of total federal, state and institu- 
tional aid. 

"Since the mid-70s, the Pell 
Grant has lost ground both to 
inflation and to the rising cost of 
college-a 40 percent decrease 
over 20 years," said Stewart. ■ 

But Jack Joyce, associate direc- 
tor of information at the associa- 
tion's College Scholarship 
Service, points out that half of all 
students enrolled in higher edu- 
cation receive some financial aid, 
often a combination of grants, 
scholarships, loans and work- 
study. 

"Focusing on 'sticker price' or 
allowing 'sticker shock' to influ- 



ence college choice will limit 
opportunities that are out there 
for students," he said. 

Some private schools have 
reacted to "sucker shock" with 
promises not to raise tuition more 
than the inflation rate; others 
have simply cut tuition. The most 
publicized example is 
Muskingum College, which cut 
its tuition more than $4,000 this 
year, from $13,850 to $9,850. 

James B. Appleberry, president 
of the American Association of 
State Colleges and Universities, 
said the good news in the College 
Board report is that there is more 
financial aid available for stu- 
dents to attend college than ever 
before. 

The bad news is that the 
increase is in the form of loans 
rather than grants, which means 
"we are creating a seriously debt- 
burdened society," he said. 

He blames rising costs on state 
legislatures that have "depriori- 
tized" funding for public colleges 
and universities. 

"Historically, most states have 
paid more than two thirds of the 
cost of a college education, and 
the student or their family paid 
the rest," he said. "Now, many 
states pay only 50 percent." 



> 









LIFESTYLES 



The A dopt - A- School Program 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service Learning Office 

"It's fun, I like doing it, and I'm 
having a really good time," said 
Kara Sherman. She wasn't talk- 
ing about partying or going out 
with friends, she was talking 
about volunteering for the Adopt - 
A-School program. "I was really 
surprised," she continued, "I did- 
n't know what to expect when I 
showed up to meet with my stu- 
dent, but Matthew is great. He's 
very talkative and he's got this 
wonderful personality. He asks 
me a ton of questions and is real- 
ly interested in what I have to 
say." 

Kara is just one student who is 
capitalizing on this opportunity 
for college students to develop a 
one-on-one relationship with stu- 
dents in the Clarion Community. 

The program has been in exis- 
tence at the University for three 
years, and in that time has pro- 
vided kids with mentors, tutors 
and role models. The Clarion 
Jr./Sr. High School students are 
chosen by their guidance coun- 
selors to participate, and men 
matched with the free time of the 
volunteers. The sessions take 
place for 40 minutes to 1 hour 



during the student's free study 
period. During this time the 
mentor can talk to the student 
about school and help them with 
the subjects they are having trou- 
ble with. 

"I feel that the program has 
been very positive," said Carter 
Caropreso, Guidance Counselor 
at the high school. "It's another 
nice partnership with the univer- 
sity." 

The program is set up a little 
differently at Immaculate 
Conception Elementary school. 
Clarion Students that are selected 
work as aides to teachers, and to 
help with gym classes and in the 
computer lab. Every student in 
grades Pre-K through 8 have par- 
ticipated in the program. 

"We think Adopt-a-School is a 
wonderful program. All of our 
students at Immaculate 
Conception school have benefit- 
ed from the time and talents that 
the university students have 
shared with them. The experi- 
ences for both our students and 
the Adopt-a-School students have 
been positive and rewarding," 
said Karen Westfall Pesek, 
Principal at IC school. "We 
appreciate the opportunity to 
work with the University through 



the program." 

Clarion University students 
who participate in the program 
complete a Volunteer Interest 
Form in the Community Service- 
Learning Office. On this form 
they indicate an interest in the 
Adopt-A-School program. At 
that point they sign up with the 
office and chose all positions that 
they may be interested in accept- 
ing. 

The positions are in folders that 
correspond to the schools. Both 
the Immaculate Conception 
Elementary School and the 
Clarion Area JrVSr. High Schools 
are involved with the program. 

After a student signs up, their 
application is sent to the school 
district where they indicated 
interests. 

From this point, the school's 
representative contacts the appli- 
cants and sets up interviews. 
Students are then chosen to fill 
the positions. 

However, before the student is 
actually permitted to begin their 
work with the children, they must 
first pass Act 34 Clearance. This 
is Criminal History Check. 
Applications for clearance may 
be obtained in the Community 
Service-Learning Office, 247 



Gemmell. There is a $10 fee 
associated with the clearance. 
Once the clearance is granted, the 
student will begin to work in the 
school. 

The program is conducted on a 
national level and was founded 
by the National Interfraternity 
Conference. 

Even though initially the pro- 
gram was designed for members 
of fraternities and sororities, it is 
now open to all volunteers. 

A student volunteering in the 
program will be asked to sign a 
volunteer agreement which 
pledges support to the kids 



involved. The students are not 
permitted to ride in a car with any 
of the volunteers, or to leave the 
school area. Also, even though 
volunteers are encouraged to fos- 
ter close relationships with the 
students, volunteers are asked to 
refer personal problems to guid- 
ance counselors. 

Volunteers with the program are 
expected to dress respectably and 
to keep up a positive role model 
appearance. 

If you are interested in becom- 
ing a part of the program, you can 
contact the Community Service- 
Learning office at 226-1865. 




Kara Sherman is a volunteer for Adopt-A-School 

Jeff Levkulich/Clarion Call 



DAKA food service and meal 



by Stacey Henninger 
DAKA Representative 



Hey, I'm back. Did you miss 
me?? Just like I promised, this 
article is all about the Snack Bar 
in Gemmell and its new combos. 
If you're a little confused, Daka 
is very sorry. The whole idea of 
putting the prices on the glass 
was to show you the actual 
VALUE of your meal. The prices 
don't really matter if you're a stu- 
dent with a meal plan of some 
sort. People who pay cash, or 
visitors who don't have a meal 
plan must pay the amount on the 
glass. Those combos on the glass 
are what you get for BOARD. 
Wait, let me give you an exam- 
ple... Lunch board is worth $2.95. 
Say you get a six inch turkey sub 
and a 20 oz. drink combo valued 
at $2.99. The extra $0.04 DOES 
NOT come off of flex, instead 
Daka sucks it up and takes a loss. 
Another example? For dinner, 



you decide to get the chicken 
bread bowl and 20 oz. drink 
combo which is valued at $4.25, 
but board is only $3.25. You get 
this for BOARD. Your friend 
visiting from Slippery Rock gets 
the exact same thing. The only 
difference, he/she must pay $1.00 
more. Get it? Good. 

More on DAKA... I had 
always thought that Daka was 
some little, no-name cafeteria 
service from Brookville, or 
something to that effect. But, 
guess what— that's not even 
close. Daka is a major Food 
Corporation! I'm being totally 
serious! They provide their 
food service all over the coun- 
try, not just Clarion. Daka can 
be found at Arizona State 
University, Arkansas Tech, 
University of Miami, Drew 
University, Northeastern 

University, Towson State 
University, and Howard 



University. They do other places 
besides schools too! How about 
the Smithsonian Institution, 
Macy's, The Empire State 
Building Plaza, and all of the 
Fuddruckers Restaurants. Whew, 
what a list! ! Now that I know all 
of this, Daka doesn't seem so 
insignificant anymore. 

How do you like HOUSE- 
ROCKERS???? Because of 
some complaints, the DJ will 
only be at Chandler during 
lunchtimes, not dinners. Don't 
sell yourself short and miss out 
on this new dining experience. 
Enjoy music, win prizes, and 
have tons of fun. 

The DJ will be at Chandler 
Thurs. Oct. 10th, Tues. Oct. 
15th, Wed. Oct. 23rd, and 
Thurs. Oct. 31st. Also, HOUSE- 
ROCKERS will be in the 
Gemmell Snack Bar on Oct. 10th 
from 8:30-llpm!! So, take a 
break from studying, grab some- 



thing to eat, and relax with some 
tunes all brought to you courtesy 
of Daka. Stayed tuned for infor- 
mation on the upcoming 
"Monster Bash" for Halloween! 
Are you sick and tired of the 



way Chandler looks???? 
Don't miss my next article when 
I'll give you a sneak peek at the 
face-lift it will be receiving in the 
near future! ! ! Til next time, eat 
up!! 



i>,VA 



Painter Robert Varber will be 

visiting Clarion University at 

5:00 P.m. on October 16th for a 

slide presentation of his work. 

If will he held in 120 Marwick- 

Bovd. The Public is invited 

and encouraged to come. 

••Mr. Varber's work is shown at the Denver Art 

Museum and the Boston Museum ot Fine Arts. 

•• This event is sponsored by the yizArtz 

Association 



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Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



October 10. 1996 



Living smart, Dave's way by Dave Barry 



tt^v 



October 10. 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



TODAY'S TOPIC IS: Living 
Smart. 

What do I mean by "living 
smart"? Let's look at a simple 
example: 

Suppose that two people - call 
them Person A and Person B - 
are late for appointments in New 
York City and need to cross the 
street. Person A rushes into the 
street without looking; he is 
instantly struck by a taxi going 
146 miles per hour (this taxi has 
engine trouble; otherwise it 
would be going much faster) . 
But Person B - even though he's 
in an equally big hurry - pauses 
on the sidewalk and looks both 
ways. While doing this, he is 
severely beaten by muggers. 

So we see that the choices we 
make affect the quality of our 
lives, and we must always try to 
make the smartest choice, which 
in this case would be the one 
made by Person C, who decided 
to skip his appointment and 
remain in his hotel room watch- 
ing the movie"Laundromat 
Lust." 

I'll give you another example 
of "living smart," from my own 
personal life. On a recent Friday 
night, my son, Rob, and I were in 
the Coconut Grove section of 
Miami, playing laser tag, a game 



wherein you skulk around in a 
darkened maze, wearing a special 
electronic vest attached to a laser 
gun. The object is to shoot your 
opponent in his vest or gun, 
thereby scoring valuable points. 
I was standing in the dark, with 
my back pressed against a wall, a 
few feet from a corner. I knew 
Rob was around that corner. 
Quickly, I ran through my 
options: 

Option One: Run around the 
comer with my gun held out in 
front, thereby exposing it to 
Rob's laser fire. 

Option Two: Protect my gun by 
holding it back and running 
around the corner with my face 
out in front. 

Looking back on what hap- 
pened, I realize that I should have 
gone with Option Three: Find 
some activity more appropriate 
for 'a 49-year-old, such as 
backgammon. ' 

Instead I went with Option 
Two, running around the corner 
face-first, which turned out to not 
be such a great idea, because Rob 
had gone with Option One, run- 
ning around the comer gun-first. 

The result was that my face, 
specifically my right eye socket, 
collided violently with Rob's 
gun. But at least he didn't score 



any valuable points! 

After the collision, I lay on the 
floor for a while, moaning and 
writhing, but eventually I was 
able to get back on my feet, and 
in just a matter of seconds - the 
recuperative powers of the 
human body are amazing - 1 was 
back down moaning and writhing 
on the floor again. 
"You need to go to the hospital," 
said Rob. "Gnhnong," I said, 
Gnhime gnhowaagh." 

That was me attempting to say, 
"No, I'm OK." In fact, I didn't 
feel so hot, but in my experience, 
if you go to a hospital for any rea- 
son whatsoever, including to read 
the gas meter, they give you a 
tetanus shot. 

So my plan was to tough it out. 
Leaning on Rob, I staggered out 
of the laser-tag place onto the 
sidewalk, where I had an excel- 
lent idea: Why not get down on 
all fours and throw up for a 
while? So I did. 

Nobody paid much attention; 
in Coconut Grove on a Friday 
night, it's unusual to see some- 
body NOT throwing up. 

By this point Rob had gotten 
somebody to call a cab, and he 
insisted that we go to a hospital. 
When we got there I attempted to 
explain to a nurse what had hap- 
pened. This was difficult because 



(a) I wasn't totally coherent, and 

(b) the nurse had never played 
laser tag. 

"He shot you in die eye with a 
LASER?" she said. "Onhnong," 
I said. "Have you had a tetanus 
shot recently?" she said. 
"YES!" I said, demonstrating 
the brain's amazing recuperative 
power to lie in an emergency. 

They stuck some kind of needle 
in me anyway (hey, rules are 
rules) . Then various doctors had 
a look at me, and, after a fair 
amount of peeking and probing, 
they determined that I had been 
hit in the face. They also told me 
I'd be OK. 

And I'm sure I will, although at 
the moment part of my face is 
numb, and my right eyeball could 
pose for the cover of a Stephen 
King novel. Also I feel sleepy all 
the time. 

This made me a little nervous, 
so I did what medical experts rec- 
ommend that you do whenever 
you have a question concerning 
your health: I called my friend 
Gene Weingarten, who is a pro- 
fessional newspaper editor and 
probably the world's leading 
hypochondriac. 

Gene spent a day researching 
my symptoms and called back to 
tell me that, in his opinion, I have 
a condition known as "somno- 




lence." "Somnolence" means, in 
lay person's terms, that you feel 
sleepy. 

Gene recommended that I get a 
CT scan, but of course Gene 
would also recommend a CT 
scan for earwax, so I went back 
to bed. 

But forget about my personal 
medical problems. The point I'm 
trying to make is that, by consid- 
ering your options and making 
the right decisions -"living 
smart" - you CAN lead a happy, 
healthy and financially success- 
ful life. 

And if you do, please buy a 
bunch of groceries and have them 
delivered to me, because I really 
don't feel like going out. 



404 /ffa/« gCre^t 226-9444 



V CUP discount with I.D. 

V Our specialty is acrylic nails 

V A certified Therapeutic Massage 

Technician 
\ A certified Estheticial Technicial 
specializing in complete skin care 

V Ask about our "Referal Plan" 

V Tanning Bed Package- Buy 10 get 5 for 
Free only $35 for CUP 
students 




•Perms 

•Color 

•Sunglitz 

•Frosting 

•Pedicures 

•Waxing 

•Foil Hi-lights 

•Conditioners 

•Electrology 

•Acrylic Nails 

•Manicures 

•Ear Piercing 

•Tanning 

•Nail Tips 



A Full Service Salon 



PREGNANT? 
NEED HELP? 

Free pregnancy test 

Confidential 

Care 



AAA PREGNANCY 

CENTER 

For appointment call: 

226-7007 

Mon-Wed-Fri 10-2 

Mon 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 



sHH 



Prom Campus, 

Take South Street to 
7th Avenue 

Turn Left 

Go two blocks to 
Clarion Office Compiei 

AAA: go through tront 
door, take elevator to 
G floor, and then fol- 
low signs 



Flu shots in season 



Courtesy of Keeling Health 
Center 

Yes, it is that time of year again! 
Watch out for the flu! Even 
though most of us have had some 
type of cold at least once since 
we have come back to Clarion 
from summer break, we are all 
still prone to catching the dread- 
ed flu. With the weather we are 
used to in Clarion, we should do 
everything we can to keep that 
flu away! The best way to try to 
keep it from infesting our 
immune systems is to get a flu 



shot. The Keeling Health Center 
will be offering flu shots this 
year, so everybody better get out 
there and get one! 

Did you know that employees 
ages 18-64 who receive flu shots 
have 25% fewer upper respirato- 
ry infections, use 43% fewer sick 
days and make 44% fewer visits 
to the doctor throughout the year. 
These statistics are from a 
research study conducted by the 
New England Journal of 
Medicine. 

Flu shots are more effective if 
given between mid October and 




McDonald's 
■ I. 



MONDAY NIGHT 

FOOTBALL 

SPECIAL 



+ TAX 



20 Piece Chicken McNuggets 

*$2.99 

*With the Purchase of a 32 oz. soft drink 

Mondays from 7-11 PM 



■^"» 



mid November. By giving flu 
shots during this period, immuni- 
ties will peak during the usual flu 
season of late December to early 
March. 

For student's convenience, 
Keeling Health Center will offer 
flu shot clinics in the Residence 
Halls this year. These clinics are 
open to all students on and off 
campus. Cost of the vaccine will 
be $7.50 and this amount will be 
billed through student accounts. 
Any student can receive a flu 
shot at any of these sites, it is not 
limited to that of a particular hall. 
The schedule is as follows: 

•Monday, October 14: 

Wilkinson Hall - 7p.m. -8 p.m. 

Nair Hall - 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. 
•Tuesday, October 15 

Ralston Hall - 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. 

Givan Hall - 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

Campbell Hall- 9 p.m.-lOp.m. 
•Wednesday, October 16 

Becht Hall - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

Ballentine - 10 p.m. -11 p.m. 

••Make sure you take advantagfe 
of this terrific opportunity! 



AROUND -M- A$OIA<l in Clarion 



Thursday 



•Drama Production 
"Reckless" (LT) 8 p.m. 
•Group pictures taken 
(250/252 Gem) 
•IM Backgammon 



begins 



GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire GriU (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 



Jriday 



•Admissions Day (248 

Gem) 9 a.m. 

•"Reckless" (LT) 8 

p.m. 

•Group pictures taken 

(250/252 Gem) 

•Volleyball Clarion 

Classic 

•Student Learn. 

Centers Display (Gem 

MP) 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire Grill (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 



Saturday 



COLUMBUS DAY 
•Football at 
Shippensburg 1 p.m. 

• Graduate Record 
Exam (Pierce Aud) 
"Reckless" (LT) 8 p.m. 
•Volleyball Clarion 
Classic 

•CSL and "Into the 
Streets" Plunge (Gem 
MP) 

• Cross Country at 
Dickinson invitational 
AAsu Movie Series 
(250 Gem) 6 p.m. 
•UAB Paintball trip 
GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 
Matinees @ 4:30 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire GriU (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 Matinees at 4:30 



•Student music Recital 
(Chap) 3:15 p.m. 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 
Matinees @ 4:30 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire GriU (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 Matinees at 4:30 



Sunday JWonday 



•COLUMBUS Day - 
observed 

• THANKSGIVING 
DAY -Canada 
•Admissions Day (248 
Gem) 9 a.m. 
•Policy Committee 
Meeting (B-8 Chap) 4 
p.m. 

•Bloodmobile (Gem 
MP) 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

• May and Aug. stu- 
dents should file Grad 
App(B- 16 Carrier) 



Tuesday 



Cyber soap introduction 



•Volleyball vs. 
Edinboro 7 p.m. 

• Hispanic Heritage 
Month ends 

• IM Tube H20 
Basketball begins 
•Timeout Luncheon 
(Holiday Inn) Noon 



Wednesday 



•National Boss Day 
•UCM Book Review 
Series (246 Gem) 12-1 
p.m. 

•Leadership 
Development Series 
(250/252 Gem) 
6:30-9 p.m. 
• UAB Karaoke 
(Riemer Snack bar) 8 
p.m. 




by Julie Barletta 
Lifestyles Writer 



For years, millions of people 
have tuned in every afternoon to 
watch their favorite soap operas 
on television. Well, soap operas 
are not just for television any- 
more. This past spring, Tune- 
Warner added to its web site the 
East Village. 

The East Village is one of the 
first entertainment properties of 
its kind to arise on the Internet. It 
combines video, audio, pho- 
tographs, and text, giving its 
viewer a totally unique experi- 
ence. The East Village is similar 
to the ordinary television soap 
operas in its plots. It will have 
some of the basic plots such as 
amnesia, alien abduction, preg- 
nancy, affairs, and of that other 
good stuff that keeps us all 
addicted. As some people put it, 
it is kind of like a "Melrose 
Place/90210 meets Slacke- kind 
of show. 

Most of the story takes place in 
the East Village of Manhattan, 
where many writers and artists 
live. The story's main character, 
24-year-old Eve Ramsey, lives in 
the East Village along with her 
friends. Most of the plot evolves 
around Eve, and her diary entries, 
which form the text narrative. 
Other characters include Mick, 



Eve's best friend; Duncan, the 
charmer from Ireland; Daphne, 
Eve's partner in crime; Owen, 
Eve's brother; Joan, the woman 
obsessed with her ex; and many 
others. 

Each episode includes text, 
audio, video, and about 60 pho- 
tographs. The new episodes will 
appear every Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

We no longer have to worry 
about being home in time to 
watch it, because it will be on the 
web twenty-four hours a day. So, 
if you are up at 2 a.m., and want 
to watch your soap, you can. 

•The East Village site not only 
includes the story, but it also 
includes other interesting things. 



It includes things such as family 
trees of the characters, bulletin 
boards, Real Audio interviews 
with the characters, chat rooms, 
music from New York alternative 
bands, and special pet projects by 
the characters. 

Viewers can also join character 
"cliques," through which they 
can receive exclusive bits of 
information. 

Through the "cliques," viewers 
will receive secret e-mail, and 
find out things about the charac- 
ters that even Eve does not know. 

Now, you are probably wonder- 
ing just how you might find this 
on the web. 

The address for the site is 
http://www.castvillage.com. I 
truly advise any avid soap fan to 
check it out! 



Macarena Dance Party to set the world's 
record for the most people doing it at 
once! 3:00 P.m. Saturday October 12 at 
K-Mart* Everybody is welcome to partici- 
pate! The more the better! 



NEW AT 
SHEETZ: 

Cupo'cino 

French Vanilla 
Irish Coffee 

Phone Cards 
•$3.99 12" Subs 
(4-12 Only) 
Schmuffins 



Sheetz 



open 24 hours 



226-4510 
Looking for something different? 
Visit your local SHEETZ store! 



ALL TIME 

FAVORITES: 

•Nachos 
•Sheetz Famous 

hot dogs 
•Salads 
•Deli 
Sandwiches 



E Main Street MINIMUM CIGARETTE PRICES! 



Clarion 




FOX'S PI22A DEN 

GREENUILLE AVE. EXf 226S55S 



******* 



****** 



111 



WCCB 

1610 AM 




ffe*74P) 

810,49 + TAX 



*TU!S BAY SPECIAL 
LARtt-1 TQPPWC PIZZA 

$8.00 + TAX 

Specials good after 5:00 PU I 







v.-i' 



SATISFACTION 
GUARANTIED- 

:,■ ■.■&) % 






COMFORT INN 
CLARION 



• 60 ROOMS 

• SUITES WITH WHIRLPOOLS 

• FREE DELUXE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 
•FREE HBO AND VCR'S 

• MOVIE RENTALS 

• MEETING ROOM 

• KIDS UNDER 11 FREE 

• NONSMOKING ROOMS 

ROYAL SUITE WITH KITCHENETTE, HANDICAPPED 
ROOM AVAILABLE, ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 



1 -800-772-0662 




Page 10 



The Clarion Cad 



October 10. 1996 



October 10. 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



Living smart, Dave's way by Dave Barry 



TODAY'S TOPIC IS: Living 
Smart. 

What do 1 mean by "living 
smart"? Let's look at a simple 
example: 

Suppose that two people - call 
them Person A and Person B - 
are late tor appointments in New 
York City and need to cross the 
street. Person A rushes into the 
street without looking; he is 
instantly struck by a taxi going 
146 miles per hour (this taxi has 
engine trouble; otherwise it 
would be going much faster) . 
But Person B - even though he's 
in an equally big hurry - pauses 
on the sidewalk and looks both 
ways. While doing this, he is 
severely beaten by muggers. 

So we see that the choices we 
make affect the quality of our 
lives, and we must always try to 
make the smartest choice, which 
in this case would be the one 
made by Person C, who decided 
to skip his appointment and 
remain in his hotel room watch- 
ing the movie"Laundromat 
Lust." 

I'll give you another example 
of "living smart," from my own 
personal life. On a recent Friday 
night, my son, Rob, and I were in 
the Coconut Grove section of 
Miami, playing laser tag, a game 



wherein you skulk around in a 
darkened maze, wearing a special 
electronic vest attached to a laser 
gun. The object is to shoot your 
opponent in his vest or gun, 
thereby scoring valuable points. 
I was standing in the dark, with 
my back pressed against a wall, a 
few feel from a corner. I knew 
Rob was around that corner. 
Quickly, I ran through my 
options: 

Option One: Run around the 
comer with my gun held out in 
front, thereby exposing it to 
Rob's laser fire. 

Option Two: Protect my gun by 
holding it back and running 
around the comer with my face 
out in front. 

Looking back on what hap- 
pened, I realize that I should have 
gone with Option Three: Find 
some activity more appropriate 
for "a 49-year-old, such as 
backgammon. ' 

Instead I went with Option 
Two, running around the comer 
face-first, which turned out to not 
be such a great idea, because Rob 
had gone with Option One, run- 
ning around the comer gun-first. 

The result was that my face, 
specifically my right eye socket, 
collided violently with Rob's 
gun. But at least he didn't score 



any valuable points! 

After the collision, I lay on the 
floor for a while, moaning and 
writhing, but eventually I was 
able to get back on my feet, and 
in just a matter of seconds - the 
recuperative powers of the 
human body are amazing - 1 was 
back down moaning and writhing 
on the floor again. 
"You need to go to the hospital," 
said Rob. "Gnhnong," I said, 
Gnhime gnhowaagh." 

That was me attempting to say, 
"No, I'm OK." In fact, I didn't 
feel so hot, but in my experience, 
if you go to a hospital for any rea- 
son whatsoever, including to read 
the gas meter, they give you a 
tetanus shot. 

So my plan was to tough it out. 
Leaning on Rob, I staggered out 
of tne laser- tag place onto the 
sidewalk, where I had an excel- 
lent idea: Why not get down on 
all fours and throw up for a 
while? So I did. 

Nobody paid much attention; 
in Coconut Grove on a Friday 
night, it's unusual to see some- 
body NOT throwing up. 

By this point Rob had gotten 
somebody to call a cab, and he 
insisted that we go to a hospital. 
When we got there I attempted to 
explain to a nurse what had hap- 
pened. This was difficult because 



(a) I wasn't totally coherent, and 

(b) the nurse had never played 
laser tag. 

"He shot you in the eye with a 
LASLR?" she said. "Onhnong," 
I said. "Have you had a tetanus 
shot recently?" she said. 
"YHS!" I said, demonstrating 
the brain's amazing recuperative 
power to lie in an emergency. 

They stuck some kind of needle 
in me anyway (hey, rules are 
mles) . Then various doctors had 
a look at me, and, alter a fair 
amount of peeking and probing, 
they determined that I had been 
hit in the face. They also told me 
I'd be OK. 

And I'm sure I will, although at 
the moment part of my face is 
numb, and my right eyeball could 
pose for the cover of a Stephen 
King novel. Also I feel sleepy all 
the time. 

This made me a little nervous, 
so I did what medical experts rec- 
ommend that you do whenever 
you have a question concerning 
your health: I called my friend 
Gene Weingarten, who is a pro- 
fessional newspaper editor and 
probably the world's leading 
hypochondriac. 

Gene spent a day researching 
my symptoms and called back to 
tell me that, in his opinion, I have 
a condition known as "somno- 




lence." "Somnolence" means, in 
lay person's terms, that you feel 
sleepy. 

Gene recommended that I get a 
CT scan, but of course Gene 
would also recommend a CT 
scan for earwax, so I went back 
to bed. 

But forget about my personal 
medical problems. The point I'm 
trying to make is that, by consid- 
ering your options and making 
the right decisions -"living 
smart" - you CAN lead a happy, 
healthy and financially success- 
ful life. 

And if you do, please buy a 
bunch of groceries and have them 
delivered to me, because I really 
don't feel like going out. 



404 /tfa/^r gCre-cC 226-9444 



V CUP discount with I.D. 

V Our specialty is acrylic nails 

V A certified Therapeutic Massage 

Technician 
\ A certified Estheticial Technicial 

specializing in complete skin care 
\ Ask about our "Referal Plan" 
\ Tanning Bed Package- Buy 10 get 5 for 
Free only $35 for CUP 
students 




•Perms 

•Color 

•Sunglitz 

•Frosting 

•Pedicures 

•Waxing 

•Foil Hi-lights 

•Conditioners 

•Electrology 

•Acrylic Nails 

•Manicures 

•Ear Piercing 

•Tanning 

•Nail Tips 



A Full Service Salon 



PREGNANT? 
NEED HELP? 

Free pregnancy test 

Confidential 

Care 

AAA PREGNANCY 

CENTER 

For appointment call: 

226-7007 

Mon-Wed-Fri 10-2 

Mon6 30p.m. - 8:30 pm. 



New Location: 

From Campus, 

Take South Street to 
7 th Avenue 

Turn Left 

Go two blocks to 
Clarion Office Complex 

AAA: go through front 
door, take elevator to 
Q floor, and then fol- 
low signs 



Flu shots in season 



Courtesy of Keeling Health 
Center 

Yes, it is that time of year again! 
Watch out for the flu! Even 
though most of us have had some 
type of cold at least once since 
we have come back to Clarion 
from summer break, we are all 
still prone to catching the dread- 
ed flu. With the weather we are 
used to in Clarion, we should do 
everything we can to keep that 
flu away! The best way to try to 
keep it from infesting our 
immune systems is to get a flu 



shot. The Keeling Health Center 
will be offering flu shots this 
year, so everybody better get out 
there and get one! 

Did you know that employees 
ages 18-64 who receive flu shots 
have 259c fewer upper respirato- 
ry infections, use 43$ fewer sick 
days and make 44% fewer visits 
to the doctor throughout the year. 
These statistics are from a 
research study conducted by the 
New Kngland Journal of 
Medicine. 

Flu shots are more effective if 
given between mid October and 




McDonald's 
■ I 



MONDAY NIGHT 

FOOTBALL 

SPECIAL 

20 Piece Chicken McNuggets 

*$2.99*™ 

*With the Purchase of a 32 oz. soft drink 

Mondays from 7-11 PM 



mid November. By giving flu 
shots during this period, immuni- 
ties will peak during the usual flu 
season of late December to early 
March. 

For student's convenience, 
Keeling Health Center will offer 
flu shot clinics in the Residence 
Halls this year. These clinics are 
open to all students on and off 
campus. Cost of the vaccine will 
be $7.50 and this amount will be 
billed through student accounts. 
Any student can receive a flu 
shot at any of these sites, it is not 
limited to that of a particular hall. 
The schedule is as follows: 

•Monday, October 14: 

Wilkinson Hall - 7p.m. -8 p.m. 

Nair Hall - 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. 
•Tuesday. October 15 

Ralston Hall - 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. 

Ciivan Hall - 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

Campbell Hall- 9 p.m.-lOp.m. 
•Wednesday, October 16 

Bccht Hall - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

Ballcntine - 10 p.m. -11 p.m. 

••Make sure you take advantage 
of this terrific opportunity! 



AROUND -M- AftOWZ in Clarion 



Thursday 



Drama Production 
"Reckless" (LT) 8 p.m. 

Group pictures taken 
(250/252 Gem) 

IM Backgammon 
begins 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire Grill (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 



Jriday Saturday 



•Admissions Day (248 

Gem) 9 a.m. 

•"Reckless" (LT) 8 

p.m. 

•Group pictures taken 

(250/252 Gem) 

•Volleyball Clarion 

Classic 

•Student Learn. 

Centers Display (Gem 

MP) 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire Grill (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 



Cyber soap introduction 



COLUMBUS DAY 
•Football at 
Shippensburg 1 p.m. 

• Graduate Record 
Exam (Pierce Aud) 
"Reckless" (LT) 8 p.m. 
•Volleyball Clarion 
Classic 

•CSL and "Into the 
Streets" Plunge (Gem 
MP) 

• Cross Country at 
Dickinson invitational 
AAsu Movie Series 
(250 Gem) 6 p.m. 
•UAB Paintball trip 
GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 
Matinees @ 4:30 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire Grill (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 Matinees at 4:30 



•Student music Recital 
(Chap) 3:15 p.m. 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
Extreme Measures 
(R) 7 & 9:30 
Matinees @ 4:30 
ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Spitfire Grill (PG 13) 
7 & 9:30 

Twister (PG13) 7& 
9:30 Matinees at 4:30 



Sunday /Monday Tuesday Wednesday 



•COLUMBUS Day - 
observed 

• THANKSGIVING 
DAY -Canada 
•Admissions Day (248 
Gem) 9 a.m. 
•Policy Committee 
Meeting (B-8 Chap) 4 
p.m. 

•Bloodmobile (Gem 
MP) 11 a.m. -5 p.m. 

• May and Aug. stu- 
dents should file Grad 
App(B- 16 Carrier) 



•Volleyball vs. 
Ldinboro 7 p.m. 

• Hispanic Heritage 
Month ends 

• IM Tube 1120 
Basketball begins 
•Timeout Luncheon 
(Holiday Inn) Noon 



•National Boss Day 
•UCM Book Review 
Series (246 Gem) 12-1 
p.m. 

•Leadership 
Development Series 
(250/252 Gem) 
6:30-9 p.m. 
• UAB Karaoke 
(Riemer Snack bar) 8 
p.m. 




by Julie Barletta 
Lifestyles Writer 



For years, millions of people 
have tuned in every afternoon to 
watch their favorite soap operas 
on television. Well, soap operas 
are not just for television any- 
more. This past spring, Time- 
Warner added to its web site the 
East Village. 

The East Village is one of the 
first entertainment properties of 
its kind to arise on the Internet. It 
combines video, audio, pho- 
tographs, and text, giving its 
viewer a totally unique experi- 
ence. The East Village is similar 
to the ordinary television soap 
operas in its plots. It will have 
some of the basic plots such as 
amnesia, alien abduction, preg- 
nancy, affairs, and of that other 
good stuff that keeps us all 
addicted. As some people put it, 
it is kind of like a "Melrose 
Place/90210 meets Slacke- kind 
of show. 

Most of the story takes place in 
the East Village of Manhattan, 
where many writers and artists 
live. The story's main character, 
24-year-old Eve Ramsey, lives in 
the East Village along with her 
friends. Most of the plot evolves 
around Eve, and her diary entries, 
which form the text narrative. 
Other characters include Mick, 



Eve's best friend; Duncan, the 
charmer from Ireland; Daphne, 
Eve's partner in crime; Owen, 
Eve's brother; Joan, the woman 
obsessed with her ex; and many 
others. 

Each episode includes text, 
audio, video, and about 60 pho- 
tographs. The new episodes will 
appear every Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

We no longer have to worry 
about being home in time to 
watch it, because it will be on the 
web twenty-four hours a day. So, 
if you are up at 2 a.m., and want 
to watch your soap, you can. 

•The East Village site not only 
includes the story, but it also 
includes other interesting things. 



It includes things such as family 
trees of the characters, bulletin 
boards, Real Audio interviews 
with the characters, chat rooms, 
music from New York alternative 
bands, and special pet projects by 
the characters. 

Viewers can also join character 
"cliques," through which they 
can receive exclusive bits of 
information. 

Through the "cliques," viewers 
will receive secret e-mail, and 
find out things about the charac- 
ters that even Eve does not know. 

Now, you are probably wonder- 
ing just how you might find mis 
on the web. 

The address for the site is 
http://www.castvillage.com. I 
truly advise any avid soap fan to 
check it out! 



Macarena Dance Party to set the world's 
record for the most people doing it at 
once! 3:00 P.m. Saturday October 12 at 
K-Mam Everybody is welcome to partici- 
pate! The more the better! 



NEW AT 
SHEETZ: 

►Cupo'cino 

French Vanilla 
Irish Coffee 

►Phone Cards 
•$3.99 12" Subs 

(4-12 Only) 
•Schmuffins 



Sheetz 



open 24 hours 



226-4510 
Looking for something different? 
Visit your local SHEETZ store! 



ALL TIME 

FAVORITES: 

•Nachos 
•Sheetz Famous 

hot dogs 
•Salads 
•Deli 
Sandwiches 



E.MainS.ree, M I Nl M U M CI G AR ETTE PRICES! Cane 



v*!^********** 




WCCB 

1610 AM 



J 



FOX'S PIZZA DEN 

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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 10, T996 




Studying Abroad In 
4iiStrdHa try Mai* 

HacKnel 



It was a beautiful August day, 
the waves were okay (even 
Jersey waves are better than no 
waves), and the sun was shining. 
I found myself dreadfully con- 
templating my annual migration 
back to Clarion University. 

Instantly, a cold draft swept 
down from the heavens, chilled 
me to the core, and disappeared 
as swiftly as it came into the 
bright Jersey sky. "What could 
this strange occurrence be?", I 
thought. 

After several hours of deep 
thought I came to this conclu- . 
sion; it represented the harsh 
winter I would inevitably face in 
Clarion. 

Oh yes, my surfing days were 
numbered, my friends, until "it" 
came to me. "Why not just avoid 
winter all together this year?" 

Having come to this conclu- 
sion, I now had to figure out 
how. It was at this point that I 
remembered a friendly woman in 
the International Programs 
Office, who had spoken to me 
about studying abroad for a 
semester. 

Wait a minute, she had men- 
tioned Australia! 

I acutely recalled Australia is in 
the southern hemisphere, which 
means winter in Clarion equals 
summer in Australia. 

With her help I could surf the 
winter away on some of the most 
unbelievable waves ever seen by 
human eyes. 
And she did, before I knew it 



Thursday, 

October 24, 1996 

8 p.m. 

Westmoreland County 
Community College 

Youngwood Campus 
Founders Hall Gymnasium 

Admission: $8 



For tickets, 925-4264 



the paper work was tilled out and 
I was on my way to the 
University of Sydney, Australia 
No, winter would not wrap its 
ugly white palms around me this 
year. I was flying south for the 
duration. So I packed up my Rip 
Curl, in its finest red travel bag 
and stepped on a 747 for par- 
adise. 

Now, when I say paradise, this 
is no exaggeration. The follow- 



ing points ar e in no wav the opin- 



ions or beliefs of the Office of 



International Programs in any 




wav: GREAT BEER (V.B. not 
Fosters), GREAT WAVES (they 
don't call it surfers paradise for 
nothing), GREAT NATIVES 
(the Australians are fine in all 
respects), GREAT WEATHER 
(35 C), GREAT EXCHANGE 
RATE ($1.40 AU to $1.00 US), 
GREAT WAY AWAY FROM 
CLARION WITH FULL CRED- 
IT (need I say more), GREAT 
PUBS(called locals), GREAT 
ACCENTS (talk about a turn on), 
GREAT BEACHES , (where 
clothing is optional), GREAT 
FOOD (prawns and steak on the 
barbs), GREAT CLASSES (yeah, 
o.k., I don't want to seem to shal- 
low), GREAT LAID BACK 
ATTITUDE (no worries), 
GREAT RUGBY LEAGUE 
MATCHES (these guys wear no 
pads and are as big as my uncle 
Tony), GREAT LEGALIZED 
GAMBLING SCENE (every 
local has a casino), 
GREAT...Well I'll stop there 
before I get myself onto anymore 
trouble. 

In order to be as honest as pos 
sible, the following things may 
be considered bad about 
Australia; GREAT WHITES (15 
foot sharks very close and every 
where, HIGH AIRFARE 
(although financial aid hooks you 
up nicely), YOUR RELATION 
SHIP AT HOME WILL NOT 
LAST (three years down the 
drain), CLASSES ARE ROUGH 
(forget about getting an A), YOU 
NEED AT LEAST A 3.5 G.P.A 
(now remember, this only applies 
to Australia and a few other 
countries), YOU WILL NOT 
WANT TO COME HOME (I 
came very close to staying), of 
course, some of the positives 
mentioned above could also qual- 
ify as negatives if not appreciated 
in moderation. 

I'd be happy to answer any 
questions pertaining to my 
Australian experience and would 
urge everyone to at least talk to 
Dr. Lepke at the International 
Programs Office, 174 Carlson 
Building. 

After all, why should you have 
to suffer through another Clarion 

winter? 



JVIusic Review 




by tfenj Auman 



Hi everyone. Benj here again 
with music reviews which are fun 
for the whole family. And keep- 
ing with that theme we have two 
brand new reviews suitable for 
the family. Well, maybe the 
Manson family anyway... 

First is Marilyn Manson "Anti- 
Christ Superstar", Nothing 
Records. Yes, the number one 
best excuse for the PMRC to be 
around is back, trying to cash in 
on their new pop status after their 
MTV hit video and Eurythmics 
cover tune "Sweet Dreams". 
They're back with more hatred, 
hell, blood, and other fun sub- 
jects! 

But really, If you've never 
actually seen these guys, prepare 
yourself. Here's a brief descrip- 
tion: five guys who dress like 
girls, wear make-up, and have the 
first names of famous women, 
and the last names of serial 
killers (Marilyn Manson and 
Madonna Wayne Gacy are two of 
the members). In short, you 
won't hear them play aloud at 
your parish picnic. 

Marilyn Manson is, like many 
popular acts, 95% image, 5% 
music. 

In fact if it weren't for their 
image, they would be just anoth- 



w& Start© (r-(^» 




*g 






k 


_ : (H 






q ^ 





Diane Keaton, Bette Midler and 
Goldie Hawn work magnificently 
together in this lighthearted com- 
edy about middle aged women 
who struggle to keep themselves 
happy. Known as Annie, Brenda 
and Elise, these characters 
reunite after learning about the 
suicide of one of their college 
friends, Cynthia, played by 
Stockard Channing, (better 

known as "Rizzo" from Grease). 



er Nine Inch Nails rip-off band, 
although the first two tracks on 
the album, "Irresponsible Hate 
Anthem", and the first single 
"Beautiful People", stray from 
the rest of it. 

Both of these two tracks feature 
driving, distorted rock/metal 
power riffs, and deranged, 
screaming vocals. They're 
chunky sounding and damn near 
catchy songs. "Beautiful People" 
features the drum intro from Iron 
Maiden's classic "Running 
Free", and some cool, evil chants. 
Very original stuff. 

But that's the first two tracks. 
After that, the rest of "Anti- 
Christ Superstar" sounds like 
Trent Reznor's (Nine Inch Nails) 
side project. Tracks like "LitUe 
Horn", -"Tourniquet", and 
"Mister Superstar", are much 
more industrial, Nine Inch Nails 
sounding. 

Fuzzy, distorted keyboards, 
guitars, and drum machines reek 
throughout the album. 

The lead vocalist has influ- 
ences of Alice Cooper and Layne 
Staley (of Alice in Chains) in his 
voice. 

In short, fans of industrial rock 
or noise will like this one. But 
it's not recommended for anyone 
looking for someone different 



from Nine Inch Nails-type stuff. 
It's sure to enrage more then a 
few politicians and parents as 
Marilyn Manson continues to 
become more and more popular. 
Next up for your reading enjoy- 
ment is the new one from Tool, 
"Anemia", Zoo Entertainment. 
Tool specializes in ultra heavy, 
slow and driving power riffs, 
much in vein of such acts as 
Quicksand and Rollins Band. 

The opening track on 
"Anemia", "Stinkfest", is a solid 
opening tune, mildly catchy and 
very heavy sounding. So is the 
following track, "Eulogy", high- 
lighted by some funky percussion 
parts. Tracks like "Useful Idiot", 
and "Message to Harry 
Manback" are typically Tool 
tunes. 

In fact, there's not much more 
to say about "Anemia". All the 
tracks are basically the same, and 
are even more similar in the fact 
that each song overstays its wel- 
come. In other words, CUT THE 
DAMN SONGS SHORTER!! 
Now, there's nothing wrong with 
having long songs, but do some- 
thing with them. On each track 
Tool plays the same slow chord 
progression over, and over, and 
over. You get the point. 

Much like cafe food and cheap 
booze, Tool's *rrtilsic is an 
acquired taste that takes a lot of 
getting used to. And just like 
such bands as AC/DC and the 
Ramones, you know just what to 
expect from Tool album after 
album. 

Any suggestions for an album 
want reviewed?? Call the 
Clarion Call and voice your sug- 
gestions. 

That's all for this week. Be sure 
to listen to WCCB 1610 A.M. to 
hear these or any other, brand 
new, popular releases. Adios, 
Amigos! 



First Wives Club 



Although their lives appeared 
to have gone in different direc- 
tions, there was one common 
bond they all shared; a divorce or 
separation from their spouse. 
Each of these women experience 
the pain and agony that occurs 
when a wife realizes their hus- 
bands' infidelity. The movie 
begins with the women realizing 
that something must be done in 
order for the men to suffer as 
much as the women did. 

Diane Keaton plays an intelli- 
gent working woman of the 90's, 
as opposed to Goldie Hawn's 
character who leads the glam- 
orous lifestyle of a Hollywood 
actress. 

Bette Midler on the other hand, 
lives the life of a homemaker 



whose main priority is to bring 
up her 13 year old son the best 
way she can. 

Small appearances are also 
made by Kathie Lee Gifford, 
Heather Locklear, Sarah Jessica 
Parker, Ivana Trump and 
Elizabeth Berkeley. 

Although these actresses are 
extremely talented, we do not 
understand why the film is a 
blockbuster hit. 

The funny scenes are all cen- 
tered around the wives getting 
revenge on their "cheating" ex- 
husbands. (This film may not be 
for the male viewer). 

The First Wives Club is a 
humorous movie, although it was 
dull at parts. It is recommended 
to women who can easily relate. 1 



OcieDer 10, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 3 



n 



** ::*• 






by 

Jeff Levkulich 



Photography 
Editor 



Do You Feel That the Presidential Debate 

Changed Your Mind As to Who You Will 

Vote For In The Upcoming Election? 






—————— . i 




Dr. T u, professor, Political Science 
"No, it has not changed my mind." 



*WVi 





Brian Finney, Junior, Computer Science 
'Dole is scared, he kept avoiding the questions." 



Jen Mumford, Sophomore, Communication 

"No, because they just kept pointing fingers at 

each other." 




Dawn Sams, Grad Student, Communication 

'Absolutely not, I wouldn't vote for Dole because 

he doesn't like peanut butter." 





Leanne Havely, Sophomore, Communication 
"No, because Dole proves to be shrewd and 
relentless and that is exactly the type of leader- 
ship our country needs!" 



Melanie Hamilton; Junior, Marketing 

"No, Dole resorted to childish tactics, while 

Clinton remained mannerly and presidential." 






Page 14 



The Clarion Cad 



October 10, 1996 



ENTERTAINMENT- 






October 10. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Determined 
5 Actress Irene 
10 Competent 

14 Winglike 

15 By oneselt 

16 Salver 

17 Singer Home 

18 Advertising 
lights 

19 Own 

20 Nicolas Cage's 
Oscar-winning 
film 

23 Before 

24 Charged atom 

25 "Lord Jim" 
author 

28 Ruled paper 

33 Ouzo flavoring 

34 Carpenter's tool 

35 Pipe elbow 

36 Split 

37 Blind parts 

38 — Hari 

39 — the line 

40 Masts 

41 Bricklayer 

42 Add 
commentary 

44 Most healthy 

45 Try for office 

46 Table leaving 

47 Eddie Murphy 
film 

56 Writer Kingsloy 

57 Gigantic 

58 Flair 

59 Chuckers game 

60 Arab chieftain 

61 Slangy negative 

62 Roger Rabbit or 
his ilk 

63 Removes, in 
printing 

64 Golf items 



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DOWN 
Game object 
Gen Robert — 
Zola heroine 
Cross 
Criticized 
Not — to stand 
on 

Swimming place 
— Karenina 



© 1996 Tribune Media Services. Inc 
All rights reserved 



9 Meetings 

10 Greek city 

11 Vaunt 

12 Vesuvius output 

13 Looks over 

21 Dies — 

22 Field mouse 

25 Magna — 

26 Tearjerker 9 

27 Former actor, 
David 

28 Get wider 

29 Cereal fixings 

30 Stop 

31 Some singers 

32 Foundry 
34 Town map 

37 Anthem word 

38 Abuse 

40 Daze 

41 Horse 

43 Prayer 

44 Baseball clouts 

47 Army rank: abbr 

48 Melville's South 
Seas adventure 

49 Venus de — 



—Crossword Answers— 


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POP QUIZ 




STAMPEDE 



Hatalie, Vour WoM 
Sen-tyouacare 




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55 Insects 





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Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 10. 19% 



SPORTS 



Clarion football crushes Lock Haven 



by Brett Scovera 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion Golden Eagles 
began their PSAC-West action by 
defeating Lock Haven University 
5 7 -3 la*t Saturday in front of a 
homecoming crowd of more than 
8,000 fans. 

Honored at half time was All- 
American running back Steve 
Witte. Witte was named Burger 
King's Scholar Athlete of the 
Week for his work on and off the 
field. Throughout his career, 
Witte has totaled 38 touchdowns 
and 3,303 all-purpose yards. As 
a Business- Finance major, Witte 
maintains a 3.368 grade point 
average. 

Clarion struck first at 9:57 of 
the first quarter when Steve Witte 
went off right tackle from one 
yard out. Tyler Palisfn's kick 
made it 7-0 Clarion. The Golden 
Eagles second possesion stalled 
at Lock Haven's 8 yard line, 
Palisin's 25 yard field goal made 
it 10-0 with 2:44 remaining in the 
first quarter. 

Clarion wasted no time getting 
on the board in the second. On 
the first play from scrimmage, 
Witte raced 28 yards giving 
Clarion a 17-0 lead. Two min- 
utes later, Golden Eagle corner- 
back Jason Drayton blocked a 
Lock Haven punt and returned it 
1 yard, giving Clarion a 24 point 
edge at the half. 

The Golden Eagles scored on 
their first series in the second half 



compliments of a Witte 3 yard 
run. 

At 10:36 of the fourth quarter, 
junior quarterback Chris Weibel 
hit Witte from 17 yards out mak- 
ing it 36-3, Clarion. After a 
Thomas Williams fumble recov- 
ery, Jamie Sickeri went 27 yards 
on a counter left to increase 
Clarion's lead to 43-3. On the 



offense is averaging 33.4 points 
and 418 yards per game. The 
Eagles are getting 238.4 on the 
ground and 179.6 through the air. 
Running the offense is junior 
quarterback Chris Weibel. 
Weibel has connected on 63 of 
116 passes for 815 yards and 7 
td's. Throughout his career, 
Weibel has totaled 3,112 yards 




Ben Keen/ Clarion Call 
Clarion travels to Shippensburg Saturday at 1 pm 



first play after the kick-off, 
Clarion's Justin Miller returned a 
Lock Haven fumble 19 yards for 
a touchdown. With 8 minutes to 
play, Clarion led 50-3. With 3:53 
left in the game, back-up Mike 
Forney hit sophomore Pete 
Yurisenic for 15 yards and the 
score. Final, Clarion 57, Lock 
Haven 3. 

Through 5 games Clarion's 



and 24 td's. At the other end of 
Weibel 's passes are wideouts 
Alvin Slaughter (14 catches, 173 
yards, 2 td's), Mark Witte (11 
catches, 125 yards, 2 td's), and 
Chris Skultety (10 catches, 150 
yards, 2 td's). Tight end Chad 
Speakman has 7 catches for 98 
yards. 
The running game is paced by 



the tandem of Steve Witte and 
Ron DeJidas. Witte has 382 
yards and 5 td's on the ground 
and 175 yards and 1 td through 
the air. DeJidas is close behind 
with 365 yards on the ground and 
85 though the air. 

The Golden Eagle defense is 
currently ranked third in the 
PS AC giving up 273.6 yards per 
game and 19 points. Clarion is 
yielding 85.4 rushing yards and 
188.2 passing yards. 

Up front, Clarion is led by 
Jason Slizofsk (21 hits, 3 sacks), 
plus tackles Joe Bzorek (27 stops, 
3 sacks, 3 tackles for loss), 
Wayne Ailing (12 tackles, 1 
sack), and Justin Miller (21 hits, 
5 sacks, 2 tackles for losses, 1 
fumble return for a td). 

The outside is protected by line- 
backers Alirn Kamara (34 stops, 

3 tackles for losses, 1 intercep- 
tion) and Mike Maguire (21 hits, 

4 sacks, 3 tackles for losses). The 
inside linebacking combination 
of Keith Kochert (28 hits, 2 tack- 
les for losses, 1 interception), 
Erik Baumener (30 stops, 2 tack- 
les for losses, 1 interception) and 
Thomas Williams (56 tackles, 1 
sack, 1 interception) provide a 
solid middle. 

Kim Niedbala leads this sec- 
ondary with 59 tackles. He is 
joined by Chad Wissner (21 tack- 
les), Carter Woodson (11 hits), 
Kejaun Colbreth (16 stops) and 
Jason Drayton (27 stops). 
This weekend Clarion travels to 



Shippensburg to face a 1-4 Red 
Raider team. "Shippensburg has 
a very good, physical football 
team that plays the entire 60 min- 
utes," said Clarion's Malen Luke. 
"We know we're going to have 
our hands full this Saturday." 

Led by seventh year head coach 
Rocky Rees, Shipp started the 
1996 season with a 33-0 loss to 
James Madison, rebounded for a 
24-22 win against Sheppard, then 
lost three straight to Kutztown 
(37-34), Millersville (34-29), and 
Edinboro (31-17). 

Directing the Raiders Wing-T 
offense is quarterback, Mike 
Carver. Carver has completed 61 
of 134 passes for 889 yards and 2 
tds. Most of Carver's passes will 
be headed for Mike Buglia. 
Buglia has caught 27 passes for 
541 yards and 2 td's. 

Shipp's defense is giving up 
367.2 yards per game and 30.8 
points. Opponents are getting 
189.2 on the ground and 190.6 
through the air. 

Clarion Notes: Shippensburg 

outgained Edinboro last Saturday 

365-286 at Edinboro... Clarion 

returns home next weekend to 

face California at 1:00 p.m.... The 
57 points scored against Lock 

Haven were the second highest in 

school history, as was the 54 

point margin... Clarion defeated 

Lock Haven 69-14 in 1987 at 

Lock Haven. 



Cross-Country team heads to Dickinson Invitational 



by Laurie 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles Cross Country team is 
still looking strong after their 
Invitational in Hiram, Ohio two 
weeks ago. 

The Golden Eagles competed 
against Westminister, John 
Carroll, Mercyhurst, Geneva, 
Hiram. Gannon, Thiel, 
Muskingum, CMU, and Case 
Western. Both womens' and 
mens' teams took second overall, 
giving the women a total of 69 
points and the men 64 points. 

Only four Golden Eagles 
placed in the Top 10. For the 
women, Amy Wolfe placed sixth 
with the time of 22:15.54 and 



Daria Deaz placed tenth with the 
time of 22:28.23. Maureen Long 
just missed the Top 10 as she 
placed eleventh overall with the 
time of 22:31.29. As for the 
men, Co-captain Brad Alderton 
placed fifth with the time of 
29:26.76, and Scott Reffner 
placed seventh with the time of 
29:34.60. 

Head Coach Pat Mooney said 
"This is the beginning of the 
competitive season. October and 
November is when the important 
races begin. We have very good 
team leadership with our Co-cap- 
tains Brad Alderdon, Tom Brady, 
Karen Reinking, and Lisa 
Benlock." 

The Hiram Invitational gave 
Clarions Golden Eagles a run for 



their money. "I thought we had a 
good shot to win it," Mooney 
said. 

With the women's and men's 
team taking an overall second, "It 
proves that we're better than an 
average team and that we're very 
competitive," Mooney added. 

Also, over ALF weekend, an 
Alumni race was held over at the 
Mayfield golf course. Mooney 
said, "It was a lot of fun to see the 
Alumni out there." 

To let you know what's coming 
up for the Golden Eagle Cross 
Country team, this weekend they 
are travelling down to Dickinson 
for an Invitational. The Golden 
Eagles will be competing against 
30 other schools. 

"I'm looking forward to going 



down there this weekend," 
Mooney said. "Everytime we go 
down there, we get good compe- 
tition and we get to see how good 
we really are. We are still a fair- 
ly young team. This is the best 
group of freshman I've seen 
since I've been here. We are 
becoming a very competitive 
team," Mooney added. 

With the new freshman perr 
forming so well, the Cross 
Country team should be competi- 
tive for a few years to come. 
Recruitment of new runners 
would help the program as well. 
The Golden Eagles leave Friday 
and return on Sunday. After tha,t 
it's off to the Gettysburg 
Invitational. Good Luck to all of 
you! 



The Sports 
Editor welcomes 
all letters, com- 
ments, ideas, or 
predictions. I 
want to hear 
trom YOU. 
Selected letters 
will be printed in 
the Clarion Call 



October 10, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 17 



Baseball's best: the RAFY awards 



by Tim Rafalski 
Sports Writer 

First there was Dwight Uooden, 
then it was Darryl Strawberry's 
turn, and now, to complete a sea- 
son of miracle comebacks, the 
RAFY awards make their tri- 
umphant return. 

After months of playing ball, 
weeks of lobbying (I've received 
many calls from George 
Steinbrenner, praising his play- 
ers), and days of tallying votes, 
here you have the 1996 Major 
League Baseball RAFY Award 
winners. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Manager of the Year 
Runners-up: Felipe Alou, 
Montreal; Tony LaRussa, St. 
Louis; Bill Russell Los Angeles. 
Winner: Bruce Bochy, San 
Diego. Bochy did a tremendous 
job this season, leading a team 
who most people picked to finish 
last, to a 91-71 record and a divi- 
sion title. He did that despite loo- 
seing seven-time batting champi- 
on Tony Gwynn for a quarter of 
the season. 

Rookie of the Year 
Runners-up: Alan Benes, St. 
Louis; Todd Hollandsworth, Los 
Angeles; Edgar Renteria, Florida. 
Winner: Jason Kendall, 

Pittsburgh. Kendall was one of 
the few bright spots for the 
Pirates this season, batting .300 
with 42 RBI's and 54 runs 
scored. He was Pittsburgh's lone 
representative at this years All- 
Star game. One impressive stat 
of Kendall's is that he struck out 



only 30 times this season, fifth 
lowest total among all players 
with at least 400 at bats. 

Pitcher of the Year 

Runners-up: Greg Maddux, 
Atlanta; Shane Reynolds, 
Houston; John Smoltz, Atlanta. 
Winner: Kevin Brown, Florida. 
Imagine pitching a complete 
game, giving up only two runs, 
and actually having your earned 
run average rise. That was the 
case with Brown this season as 
he posted a spectacular, major 
league leading, 1.87 ERA to go 
along with 17 wins and three 
shutouts. Glance at the unbeliev- 
able stats hitters put up this sea- 
son and his performance is even 
more amazing. With better run 
support, Brown would have easi- 
ly surpassed the 20-win plateau. 

Most Valuable Plaver 
Runners-up: Jeff Bagwell, 
Houston; Chipper Jones, Atlanta; 
Mike Piazza, Los Angeles. 
Winner: Ken Caminiti, San 
Diego. Caminiti was the absolute 
heart and soul of the Padres' run 
to the N.L. West division title. 
Sure he put up great numbers, a 
.326 average with 40 home runs 
and 130 runs batted in, but there's 
a lot more to him than just num- 
bers. His powerful bat, flawless 
defense, and all-around gutsy 
play were the driving force 
behind the Padres' success. 

Plaver of the Year 
Runners-up: Ellis Burks, 
Colorado; Andres Galarraga, 
Colorado; Gary Sheffield, 



Florida. 

Winner: Barry Bonds, San 
Francisco. This category went on 
stats alone, and nobody has better 
numbers than Bonds. With 42 
dingers and 40 stolen bases he 
joined Jose Canseco as the only 
members of the 40-40 club. He 
also batted .308 with 129 RBI's, 
109 runs scored, all without the 
protection of Matt Williams bat- 
ting behind him, for half of the 
season. Another thing that makes 
those stats so amazing is that 
Bonds set a National League 
record with 151 walks. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Manager of the Year 

Runners-up: Mike Hargrove, 
Cleveland; Lou Pinella, Seattle; 
Johny Oates, Baltimore. 
Winner: Joe Torre, New York. 
Talk about pressure. This guy 
manages for the toughest owner 
in baseball, George Steinbrenner, 
and in the most hostile media and 
fan base in the league. Torre took 
it all in stride and lead the 
Yankees to a 92-70 record and 
their first division crown since 
1980. 

Rookie of the Year 
Runners-up: James Baldwin, 
Chicago; Rocky Coppinger, 
Baltimore; Jose Rosado, Kansas 
City. 

Winner: Derek Jeter, New York. 
Talk about pressure. I know, I 
already used that line, but the 
same goes for Jeter. He showed 
veteran under intense scrutiny 
and put up some very good num- 
bers: .314 average, 78 RBI's, 
104 runs, 14 stolen bases. Jeter 



Tennis team prepares for PSAC's 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Writer 



, 



The women's tennis team rolls 
into the PSAC Tournament after 
an impressive 6-1 victory over 
the California State Vulcans on 
Tuesday. 

Juniors Kristen Golia (6-3), 
Brooke Droyer (5-4), and Mimi 
Williams (7-2) led the Eagles' 
assault by sweeping their oppo- 
nents 6-0, 6-0. Freshman 
Rachael Link also moved to 7-0 
on the year by dropping Cal's 
Megan Musolino 6-0, 6-0. 

In doubles action, Clarions 
Cassie Baker and Amy O'Neal 
whipped Megan Oesterling and 
Rachael Clark 8-2. Williams and 
Link improved to 5-4 on the year 
with an easy 8-1 win over the 
Vulcan's Musolino and Carmen 
Welker. Perhaps the story of the 



year has been the doubles tandem 
of Kristen Golia and Brooke 
Droyer. The duo moved to 8-1 
on the year by beating Martha 
Hall and Kristy Bronson 8-4. 
"They play terrific together," said 
teammate Rachael Link. "They 
can move and read each other 
really well." 

The only defeat for the Golia- 
Drayer team came at the hands of 
Pitt's Fran Davis and Erin 
Shelbrock. After finishing the 
regular season 5-4, the Golden 
Eagles turn their attention to the 
PSAC Tournament, 

IUP will host this years compe- 
tition at the Penn Brior Racquet 
Club in Erie on October 18th and 
19th. 

When die pairings come out 
later this week, look for Golia- 
Droyer to receive a high seed in 



doubles, as well as Mimi 
Williams (7-2) and Rachael Link 
(7-2) in singles. 

Williams suffered a loss to 
Kutztown's Nicole Stoltz at the 
Shippensburg Tournament and 
she is looking for revenge. Link 
may also have revenge on her 
mind in a rematch with Melissa 
Lobosco of Slippery Rock. "I'm 
looking forward to playing her 
again. I feel I can beat her," Link 
added. 

The PSAC Tournament in Erie 
will conclude the Golden Eagle 
tennis season. The season started 
on September 14th and runs until 
October 19th. Good luck ladies 
at PSAC's and congratulations on 
a great season. Also look for 
upcoming award ceremmonies 
honoring the tennis team all- 
stars. 



was also a solid glove and a key 
component to the Yankees title. 

Pitcher of the Year 
Runners-up: Charles Nagy, 
Cleveland; Andy Petite, New 
York; Marino Rivera, New York. 
Winner: Pat Hentgen, Toronto. 
Hentgen was another pitcher who 
put up great numbers with a 
lousy team (see Brown, Kevin 
above). He lead the American 
League with a 3.22 ERA and 
posted a 20-10 record. Hentgen 
also lead the major leagues with 
10 complete games, three of 
which were shutouts. As with 
Brown, better run support would 
have given Hentgen 3-4 more 
wins. 

Most Valuable Plaver 
Runners-up: Juan Gonzalez, 
Texas; Chuck Knoblaugh, 
Minnesota; Frank Thomas, 
Chicago. 

Winner: Alex Rodriguez, Seattle. 
So, what were you doing the year 
you turned 21? Rodriguez was 
winning a batting crown with a 
.358 average, hitting 36 home 
runs with 123 RBI's and 141 
runs, playing in an All-Star game, 
and signing a multi-million dollar 
contract. Not your ordinary sum- 
mer job. In his first full season, 
Rodriguez arguably had the 
greatest year, at the plate, ever by 
a shortstop. It was his explosive 
bat and solid glove that kept the 
Mariners in the playoff hunt 
when Ken Griffey Jr., Randy 
Johnson, and Edger Martinez 
were out with injuries. 

Plaver of the Year 



Runners-up: Brady Anderson, 
Baltimore; Albert Belle, 
Cleveland; Juan Gonzalez, 
Texas. 

Winner: Mark McGwire, 
Oakland. A .312 average, 52 
home runs, 113 RBI's, 104 runs, 
.730 slugging percentage, and a 
.467 on-base percentage. 
McGwire's stats are unbeliev- 
able, buy they move on to mind- 
boggling when you consider that 
he played in only 130 games. 
Projected over a complete season 
he would have blasted 65 home 
runs. If this guy could ever stay 
healthy he'd have his own chap- 
ter in the record books. Could 
you imagine if he played at Coors 
Field? Wow! 
Special Award 

As some of you might recall, in 
last semester's basketball awards, 
Magic Johnson and Nick Van 
Exel won the Dumb and Dumber 
award for their physical con- 
frontations with referees. 

Well, the RAFY committee has 
decided to extend that honor and 
present Baltimore's Roberto 
Alomar with the Dumbest award. 
For those of you who've been 
living in a cave, Alomar took 
arguing with an umpire to the 
next level by actually spitting on 
him. 

There's nothing I can really say 
about this that hasn't been said, 
except that Alomar was our most 
deserving recipient. 

That wraps this year's baseball 
awards presentation. Join us 
again in January when we take to 
the gridiron for the football edi- 
tion of the RAFY awards. 



L &G E 



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Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 10, 1996 



Lady Eagle volleyball back on track 



by Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



If you thought last week was a 
great game volleyball fans, this 
week should have blown you out 
of the water. Clarion vs. Slippery 
Rock-the team who was third in 
the Atlantic Division. 

These two teams have met once 
before in this season at the 
Gannon Tournament. Slippery 
Rock defeated Clarion in four 
matches with scores of 13-15, 15- 
6, 10-15, and 2-15. 

This week, however, the roles 
were reversed. The Lady Golden 
Eagles defeated Slippery Rock, 
once again sweeping the opposi- 
tion off the court. All three 
matches were intense. Each 
point was a lengthy battle as the 
ball rallied back and forth. The 
point total would often be found 
at a standstill as each team 
became more and more deter- 
mined to win. The Eagles' win 
was definitely not because 
Slippery Rock didn't play 
well... Clarion just played better. 

The first match was close as the 



two teams became aquainted 
with each other. The Spikers 
pulled out with the win 15-13. 

Match two wasn't as close as 
the Lady Eagles won 15-6. 
Slippery Rock seemed falter, and 
Sara Baker, for the Rockets was 
hurt and unable to finish the 
game. 

The third and final match was a 
come from behind, close win for 
Clarion 15-13. Many different 
factors were included in this 
match. 

Slippery Rock used the inter- 
mission to build on team work 
and regain their strength. The 
Rockets were ready and edging 
closer and closer to the win. The 
Spikers had more to worry about 
than just playing good. Lindsey 
Kurucovich, although playing 
well, was having back trouble 
and the team was running out of 
subs.- Beth Brandstatter and 
Brooke Paxton stepped in to fin- 
ish off the game. 

"These two were the difference 
in the match. Without them, the 
game would not have ended the 
way it did," says Coach Burns. 




Ben Keen/ Clarion Call 
The Lady Eagles are in the Clarion Classic this weekend 



"The whole team busted their 
butts out there and then those two 
came in to give us a win. It 
shows how solid our bench is and 
how close and competitive the 
entire team is." This victory was 
even sweeter than the last and to 
the entire team, I say congratula- 
tions! 
Also this week, the Lady Eagles 



has a celebrity among their ranks. 
The small setter known as player 
#1 of the Golden Eagles, Jill 
Platteborze, is also known as the 
PSAC-west "Co-Player of the 
Week." 

She tied with Nikki St. Antione 
from Slippery Rock. Jill was 
given this honor because of her 
performance in the game against 



California last Tuesday. She had 
4 service aces, 9 digs, and 2 
blocks. She was 6-14 in kills 
with no errors and 20-40 in set 
assist attempts. Coach Bums is 
excited and congratulated her for 
"becoming a leader in her first 
year." 

Other hot players this week 
were Mandy Kirby who had 13 
digs, 4 service aces and 9 kills 
against Slippery Rock. Jessa 
Canfield had 15 digs and 7 kills. 
She leads the team 187 kills this 
season. Christy Boes leads the 
team with 31 service aces. 
Lindsey Kuruzovich had 7 kills 
against Slippery Rock, Jill 
Platteborze had 10 kills, and 
Curtisy had 6 kills Tuesday night. 

This weekend is the Clarion 
Classic Tournament. Friday 
night at eight, the spikers will 
once again face Lock Haven. 
Next Tuesday is a home match 
against Edinboro. If you can't 
make it to the games, tune in the 
radio to 91.7 and listen as Jason 
Brinkley 4 Co. fill you in on all 
the action. 



Setting the record straight 



by Benjamin Keen 
Sports Editor 



It's time to set the record 
straight. There have been numer- 
ous things going on in sports late- 
ly that I feel I need to address. 
First of all let me tell you about 
my sport team preference. I am 
from southern New Jersey. The 
closest sporting venue is not the 
Meadowlands, but Philadelphia. 
Therfore, I am a fan of all 
Philadelphia teams except for the 
Eagles. Having grown up watch- 
ing the Cowboys every Sunday, I 
am a Cowboy fan. I can see you 
Steeler fans writhing in your 
seats, but that's what I like. This 



is also why you have not seen 
many articles about the Steelers, 
Penguins, or Pirates. If I wrote 
about those teams I would be the 
most wanted man in Clarion, 
because I would not write favor- 
ably. So, Ihave decided to avoid 
them altogether or let one of my 
sports writers handle them. Now 
that we are clear on who my bias- 
es are towards, let me set the 
record straight. 

First of all allow me to give 
credit where credit is due. The 
Steelers looked good Monday 
night against the Chiefs. Big 
Jerome is running on all cylin- 
ders and Tomczak is playing 



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well. They have a fairly easy 
schedule though so I am waiting 
to see them in the playoffs and 
waiting for Tomczak to give up 
his role as greatest overachiever 
in the NFL. 

On to more exciting events. 
Dennis Rodman announced 
Tuesday that he would retire 
from the sport of basketball. 
Many people don't like Rodman 
and say good ridance, but I 
believe he was one of the best 
rebounders ever to play the game. 
Yopu may not like what he does 
off the court but you have to 
respect him on the court. I am a 
big fan of the bruisers that get 
down in the paint and grab 
rebounds, so I am sad to see him 
go and hope he prospers in what- 
ever freaky thing he decides to 
get involved in. 

How about Tiger Woods? In 
just his fifth tournament as a pro 
he beat Davis Love III in a sud- 
den death playoff to win a com- 
petitive Las Vegas Invitational. 
Other noteables there was Fred 
Couples, Phil Mickelson, Fred 
Funk, Lee Jansen, and my 
favorite Bernhard Langer. I think 
it's safe to say we are going to see 
a lot of Tiger. In winning that 
tournament he recieved a two 
year exemption to the PGA Tour. 



He is only 20 years old so we will 
get to watch this gifted golfer for 
many years. 

It's good to see the NHL has 
started up again and I'm looking 
forward to some hard hitting 
action. The Penquins are coming 
off a thrashing at the hands of 
Hartford, but even I know you 
can never count out Mario and 
the boys. Speaking of counting 
out, Eric Lindross will be devast- 
ing players as the Flyers will look 
down the road to the Stanley 
Cup. Florida and Colorado will 
both be good again, but if I have 
to watch another expansaion 
team Stanley Cup someones 
going to get hurt. Yeah like the 
viewers. 

Baseball is down to its' final 
four teams and the action seems 
to be good. I think it's inevitable 
that the Braves will win it all 
again , their pitching is just too 
strong. In a seven game series 
they have the depth to wear 
opposing batters down and they 
give the hitters something differ- 
ent to look at each night. I would 
however like to see an 
Orioles/Braves match-up as they 
are probably the only team with 
enough quality hitters to give the 
Braves a run. But if the orioles 
happen to win the World Series 



give me Roberto Alomar's cham- 
pionship ring so I can spit on it. 

If no one's looking I might do 
more than spit on it. This guy 
should be thrown from the league 
for at least 20 games starting 
immediately and fined enough to 
make him feel it in the wallet. I 
wonder what that might be, 3 or 4 
million? You must punish imme- 
diately though, it's the only way 
to keep others from doing the 
same. If you know you are going 
to be punished swiftly and harsh- 
ly, it will deter all crimes against 
refs, umps, and the like. 

Finally let me return to where 
my heart is and that's the NFL. If 
the playoffs were to start tomor- 
row Green Bay looks like the 
team to beat. Brett Favre is hav- 
ing the season of his life. See 
what you can do when you get off 
drugs. Let that be a lesson to you 
all. The other usual NFC power- 
houses will be in ther also. San 
Fran has a quality team and don't 
count out those Cowboys quite 
yet with Michael Irvin coming 
back this week. In the AFC it 
seems to be a battle between 
Pittsburgh, Denver, and Indy. 
Only time will tell. Until next 
time I'm Ben Keen, setting the 
record straight. 







October 10, 1996 



HELP WANTED 



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HAVE A JOB OPENING 
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HELP. CALL 226-2380. 



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scholarships is now available. 

All students are eligible 

regardless of grades, income, 

or parent's income. 

Let us help. Call Student 

Financial Services: 
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The Clarion Call 



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For Rent; Fall 97-98 term, 2 
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Call 226-7316, ask for Andrew. 



Apartments available for fall '97 
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block from campus. Furnished 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Shirley C. Hager, candidate for 
State Representative of this 63rd 
District, encourages you to vote 

on Nov. 5th, and would deeply 
appreciate your vote. 



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Page 19 



call at 226-3937 (ask for Sara) 
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PERSONALS 



To the Brothers of ITT: 
Thanks for the Homecoming 
mixer. We had a lot of fun! 

Love, the Sisters of AOE 



Thanks for the great Chartering 

Banquet, Michelle and Robin! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



Happy 21st Birthday 

to Sheryl Graczyk! 

Love, Your future A4>E Sisters 



To the Brothers of Theta Chi: 

Thanks for a great ALF week 

and a great mixer. We'll have to 

do it again soon. 

Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



Laurie, Congratulations on 

being lavaliered. 
Love, Your Zeta Sisters. 

Beckie, Congratulations on 

being crowned Homecoming 

Queen. We are all so 

happy for you! 
Love, Your Zeta Sisters 



ASA would like to congratulate 
the following float winners: 
ZIZ,AIT,eOA,andA<DE 



AIA would like to thank the 

Brothers of $IK for all their 

help with the Float and the 

mixer. We had a great time. 

Love, AIA 



Yea, Sigma Pi! I see you 

guys winning the Float! 

Gotta respect the winners! 

Love, III 



Thanks for the acceptance 
Sweetheart. Sam Estill 
Love, III 



Megan, you're Rad w/ the 

Alumnae. Did you find the 

stolen 6 foot sub? 

Love, HI 



84>A, we loved spending ALF 

with you! We had a good time 

mixing and helping build a 

Carousel of Colors. 



-CLASSIFIEDS 



You make great crayons! 
Love, the Brothers of 0E 



To the Brothers of KAP: 
Thanks for the great time 

during ALF! 
Love, the Sisters of AZ 



Jen Sunday, thanks for all your 
help with the Pig Roast. We 

really appreciate it! 
Love, the Brothers of OIK 



Happy 21st Birthday, Jen L! 
Love, Your AIT Sisters 



To our Associate members: 
Jason Hamaker, Anthony Frisoli, 

Tun Pietrandrea, Ryan 

Cummings, Dean Wonders, Josh 

Beatty, and Rob Shindlededer. 

You guys are doing a good job. 

Keep up the hard work! 

The Brothers of 4>IK 



To the Sisters of AXA: 
We had a wonderful time fol- 
lowing the yellow brick road 

and mixing with you. 

Thanks for all the help. 

You ladies are great. 

Love, the Brothers of <DIK 



Happy 21st Birthday, Sandi! 
Love, Your AIT Sisters 

Happy Belated Birthday, Kristy! 
Love, Your AIT Sisters 



The Brothers of Sigma Pi would 
like to thank the Tri Sig Sisters 
for the mixer and the great job 
on the float. Thanks for all the 
help. Can't wait to do it again. 



To the Brothers of Sig Pi: "It's 
so hard being so good." 



The Brothers of Sig Pi would 

especially like to thank: Lean, 

Karrah, Erin, and the Pledges of 

Tri Sigs. You guys are the best. 



Andrea and Lisa Lang: Thanks 
for all your hard work on the 

float. Great Job! 
Love, Your Phi Sig Sisters 



To the Brother of OA0 - Thanks 

for all your work on the float 

and the great mixer. 

We had a blast! 

Love, the Sisters of <DH 



Congratulations Laurie for 

getting lavaliered. 
Love, the Brothers of ITT 



Great job D-Phi-Es on the Float. 
* * liove,*theBrdthefs*of£Tr ■» 



Happy "Finally No Longer 18' 

Birthday, Leanne Havely 

Love, III Sisters 



Sigma Pi Brothers - 

Thanx for a rocken good time at 

the mixer and for the help on 

such a Glorious Float. First 

Place, Baby! 

Love, III Sisters 



FDQ, we didn't forget about 

you guys. Thanks for 

such a great mixer! 

Love, AIT 



Congrats on all the floats who 

participated. They looked great! 

Love, the Sisters of AIT 



IX, we did it! Yes, in only 

3 days of hard pomping 

work! Thanks! 

Love, AIT 



Nicole, you looked wonderful on 
Saturday in the parade! 
Love, Your AST Sisters 

IX, thanks for such a wonderful 

mixer. Can't wait to do it again. 

You guys rock!!. 

Love, the Sisters of AIT 



Tiny - Dooby, Dooby, Doo. 
How was your ALF food? It 

didn't stand a chance. 
Sincerely, Penguin on a diet 



The sisters of BAP would like to 
dennounce Jeff Levkulich as our 
sweetheart, there was no nomi- 
nation, no vote, and he is not our 
bar bitch! 



Patty, Alger, Brandi, Jodi, and 

Carrie! Drink more! Love, your 

BAP big 



Daddy Ed, there is nothing like a 
good shooter in the afternoon! 



BW and FP- Get ready to eat 
some ashes! Love, your bigs 



Amy - Congratulations little. 

Welcome to our AIT family 

Love, Becca 



Founds - Sorry I haven't 

been out little. Just wait 

until initiation. 



Dan Mellon is one 
hot, sexy moma. 

Big thanks to the Clarion Call 

advertising staff. Keep 

up the good work! 



♦ * 



■•• -LovcRobrn 



»**»»* 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 10, 1996 



Steelers, Tomczak getting the job done 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Writer 



Mike is the Man 

Steelers quarterback Mike 
Tomczak silenced his critics once 
again with a 338 yard passing 
performance in an impressive 17- 
7 win over the Kansas City 
Chiefs on Monday night. 

Since getting the call from 
coach Bill Cowher after an 
embarrassing loss to the 
Jacksonville Jaguars on opening 
day, Tomczak has the Steelers 
winners of four straight games, 
and has many Pittsburgh fans 
laughing at Neil O'Donnell. 

In a year where the Steelers' 
youth movement was to take over 
at quarterback with the unproven 
Jim Miller, and fan favorite 
Kordell "Slash" Stewart, 



Tomczak has quietly led the 
Steelers back to the top of the 
AFC. 

Against the Chiefs, Tomczak 
led the Pittsburgh Offense to 436 
yards, and went a solid 8 of 14 on 
third-down conversions. The 
"Bus", running back Jerome 
Bettis ran for his fourth straight 
100- yard game on Monday with 
a 103 yard output and a touch- 
down. Wide reciever Charles 
Johson had six receptions for 125 
yards, marking the first time the 
Steelers had a 100-yard rusher 
and a 100-yard receiver in the 
same game since the legendary 
Barry Foster and Jeff Graham did 
so in 1992. 

In a system where the quarter- 
back is not the center of the 
offense, it is no secret that Mike 
Tomczak is flourishing. Every 



Steeler fan knows that the back- 
bone of this team is maintaining a 
hellacious defense and a solid 
running attack. Even in the glory 
days of Bubby Brister and 
O'Donnell this was true. 

Sorry Jim and Slash, but you'll 
have to wait your turn. 

Stepping Up 

With Rod Woodson still not 100 
percent after ACL surgery last 
season, and losing Gregg Lloyd 
for the season, the Steeler 
defense keeps on rolling. Inside 
linebacker Levon Kirkland and 
cornerback Willie Williams are 
quietly having Pro-Bowl seasons. 
During last years Super Bowl 
run, and through the first five 
games this season, Levon 
Kirkland is everywhere. He is 



currently leading the team in 
tackles and has a team high 3 
interceptions. Not bad for some- 
one 6' 1", 264 pounds. Kirkland 
has produced 100 or more tackles 
in 2 of the last 3 seasons. 

Cornerback Willie Williams is 
turning heads this season as well. 
After battling Alvoid Mays for 
playing time early last season, 
one that saw Woodson's season 
end and Deion Figures miss most 
of the year with knee surgery, 
Willie is come into his own. Last 
season he led the AFC in inter- 
ceptions, and has been a comer- 
stone to the Steelers secondary 
this season. 

Against the Chiefs, the Steeler 
"D" held running back Marcus 
Allen to 69-yards on 18 carries, 
and quarterback Steve Bono to 
170-yards passing and two inter- 



ceptions. Not too bad for having 
lost the best linebacker in the 
game for the rest of the year. 

Brain Dead 

What is going through Bill 
Cowher and Chan Gailey's head 
when the Steelers get in the "Red 
Zone"? The Kordell Stewart 
option thing is just not working! 
I have trouble with Jerome Bettis 
carrying the team down the field, 
and just when the Steelers have 
an opportunity for 6, Kordell runs 
an option. 

Even with Kordell, the option 
does not work in the NFL. GIVE 
IT UP! Give Jerome the ball... 
how about a play action pass 
once in a while? One day the 
reliable Norm Johnson may not 
be able to bail you out. 



Intramurals rolling along, new activities 



Courtesy of Doug Knepp 
Intramural Director 

Flag Football 

As the season reaches the mid- 
way point several teams have 
emerged as serious contenders 
for the championship. "PH. 
Warriors" and "24 Minutes of 
Pain" are bom undefeated. While 
four teams have suffered just one 
loss: "We'll Still Win", 
"Hurricanes", "Sig Tau Gamma", 
and "Next". It's still too early to 
rule anybody out. 
Indoor Soccer 

Indoor soccer season is in full 



swing! We have 12 teams com- 
peting in three divisions- men's, 
women's and co-rec. After the 
first three daays of competition 
"We Call You Herbs" and 
"International Association Team 
Charlie" are both undefeated at 
2-0. You can see the action week 
nights starting at 9:00pm in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

Also due to the overwhelming 
support we have received for 
indoor soccer, the intramural 
department is considering spon- 
soring outdoor soccer in the 
spring. Stay tuned for more 
details. 



Tennis Champions 

Melissa Bartell and Andy 
Weinlein have won the 1996-97 
Intramural Tennis Championship. 
Andy defeated Michael Malec in 
the final round of the men's sin- 
gles on Wednesday, October 2. 
Melissa secured the women's 
division by defeating Amy 
Gelzheiser earlier this season. 
Aqua Aerobics 

Don't miss out on this opportu- 
nity to experience one of the 
newest forms of exercise- AQUA 
AEROBICS! 

For those of you who would 



like to 



give 



it a try, the 



Intramural, Recreation, & Fitness 
Department is offering an intro- 
ductory class to show you what it 
is all about. Dr. Rebecca Leas, a 
professor in the Health and 
Physical Education Department 
will be instructing. There is no 
charge for this session, but space 
is limited. Please reserve a spot 
by calling extension 2349. 

Class is scheduled from 
Sunday, October 20 at 5:00 PM. 
Backpack and Tent Rental 

There is still time to get out and 
enjoy the outdoors before the 
weather turns cold. Remember, if 
you don't have the necessities we 



do! Students may borrow tents 
and backpacks from our depart- 
ment for your recreational use. 
Take advantage of this great deal, 
and do someuiing different for a 
change! 
Beach Volleyball 

The beach volleyball champi- 
onship tournament was held this 
past week. Tournament favorites 
Terry Schrader and Andy Potocki 
of "The Big-N-Skinny" captured 
the title. Second place finishers 
were Jason Powell and Sam 
Swenson. Look for the 

Intramural newsletter to keep you 
up to date. 



NFL Week #7 


home team in 


caps 


* Pick Master's Pick of the 




Week 




Favorite 


Pts 


Underdog 


BILLS 


5 1/2 


Miami 


DALLAS 


13 1/2 


Arizona 


SAINTS 


even 


Chicago 


STEELERS 


8 1/2 


Bengals 


♦PATRIOTS 


4 1/2 


Redskins 


Vikings 


6 


BUCS 


FALCONS 


1 


Houston 


CAROLINA 6 


St. Louis 


JAQUARS 


7 1/2 


Jets 


RAIDERS 


even 


Detroit 


Eagles 


3 


GIANTS 


COLTS 


9 


Ravens 


PACKERS 


5 1/2 


49ers 


By: Week: K.C., San Diego, 


Denver. Seattle 




Courtesy of The Pick Master 


Pick Master '. 


2-0 for the year 



IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve Moore 




Congratulations to Chad 

McCombs for being selected to 

NCAA Division (( Baseball All 

Region Team as an outfielder. 

Chad was selected by the 

American Baseball Coaches 

Association. 



"Oh, wow. This is so typical ... He's up there. 

I can see him. My bait's right under his nose, OK? 

But he won't take it." 



HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS! 

Monday Thursday 7 9 PM LOUNGE ONLY! 

1 lb. Wtofis, f Plain, garlic butter, hot or hot _ . 

hotJ I lb. Seasoned Fries. & a Pitcher of Beer ■ or oniy 



OR 

9" 1 -topping Pizza & a Pitcher of Beer 



$7,00 



Proper Id Required 

No Take Outs 

No substitutions, please 



Dominic's 

rn the Clarion Mali 226-7664 



October 17, 1996 



Clarum qHrntoeraitp of £eim*ptoania 



Clarion, $fl 16214 



tEfye Clarion Call 



Wluit's Jin st be 




The Golden Eagles 

traveled to 

Shippensburg to 

trounce the Red 

Raiders- This week 

California at home 

for more 

see page 17. 



Contents 



Opinion: pg 2 

Reader Responses: pg. 3 

News: pg 5 

lifestyles: pg 9 

Call on You: pg 13 

Entertainment: pg 14 

Sports: pg 17 

Classifieds: pg 19 



Weather 



VAumt 78, I**tt* 6 



Expected completion January 1999 



Forecast for today.. 

High in the upper 

70s, sunny and 

warm.. 



Governor releases funding to continue Founders renovations 



by Amy O'Keefe 
News Writer 

The renovations of Founder's 
Hall on the Clarion University 
campus are about to enter the 
second phase of the project 

Pennsylvania governor Tom 
Ridge has recently released $1.73 
million in capital funding for the 
completion of the Phase n reno- 
vation project. 

The renovations of Founder's 
Hall are expected to be complet- 
ed in January 1999. 

The date is tentative depending 
on the progress of the project. 
The renovation of the building 
began with Phase I which includ- 
ed a structural investigation for 
future references for Phase II. 

Phase I of the project should be 
finished in January 1997. 
Included in Phase I are asbestos 
removal, internal demolition, and 
lead paint abatement. 

Because of the $1.73 million in 
capital funding for the Phase II 
renovations, workers can start 
completing the task as soon as 
possible. 
The project will include sever- 



al changes to make the building 
more adequate to house class- 
rooms and offices. 

"I want to especially thank Fred 
Mcllhattan, executive aid to State 
Senator John Peterson, for his 
efforts in getting the funds 
released," said Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, vice president for 
finance and administration. 

"He has been very involved in 
encouraging the release of these 
funds, and at one point arranged a 
telephone call between Clarion 
University and the 

Commonwealth Budget 

Secretary." 

One of the additions to 
Pounder's Hall will be a comput- 
er lab; Founders has not had one 
before. 

Anew elevator will be installed 
for easy accessibility to anyone 
of the three floors. 

Heating, plumbing, and electri- 
cal wiring will be replaced, and 
the fire alarm systems will be 
upgraded to ensure safety to 
everyone. 

The estimated cost for the entire 
renovation project is $2.8 mil- 




Bonnie Fisher/ Clarion Call 
Pounders Hall has been off line since 1994, but renovations have finally begun the second 
stage. The project is being partially funded by a $1.73 million allocation by the state gov- 
ernment. 



lion. 

Because of the $1.73 million 
allocated for use by Governor 
Ridge, the university will be 
required to provide $1.08 million 
in local funding under the 
Commonwealth's Shared Capital 
Program. 

Private contributors to the 



Investing in Futures Capital 
Campaign, which is conducted 
through the Clarion University 
Foundation, will help raise 
money for the match of funds. 

The campaign's $8 million 
goal includes $3 million in reno- 
vations for Founder's Hall, 
Harvey Hall, and Montgomery 



Hall on the Venango campus. All 
of the renovation projects will be 
completed in about five years. 

Haberaecker concluded, "I am 
delighted that the project will 
continue to move forward 
between Phase I and Phase II. 
The renovations will take place 
soon.' 



Local cand idates debate campaign issues in Gemmell 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 

The state and local political 
race hit close to home last night 
when a candidates' forum took 
place in the Gemmell Student 
Center on the Clarion University 
campus. The forum started at 
7:30 p.m. and was sponsored by 
the Clarion County League of 
Women Voters and the Pre-Law 
Club on Clarion campus. 
The three candidates who are 



running for the state representa- 
tive seat for the 63rd 
Congressional District held their 
forum at 7:30 p.m. The three can- 
didates '-are Fred Mcllhattan, 
Shirley Hager, and Janet Serene. 
At 8:30 p.m., the two candidates 
for the state senate seat for the 
21st Senatorial District held their 
own forum. The two candidates 
are Mary Jo White and Robert 
Thomas. The forum was moder- 
ated by the director of the Clarion 



County League of Women 
Voters, Janice Horn. Members of 
the audience, which consisted of 
community members and several 
students, were asked to submit 
questions for the candidates to 
discuss. 

Each candidate had the chance 
to give a three minute opening 
statement, they were allotted two 
minutes to give an answer to the 
audience's questions, and they 
had two minutes to give a closing 



statement. A timekeeper was pre- 
sent to make sure the candidates 
didn't go over the allotted time 
period. The timekeeper also had a 
orange card which he could raise 
if he felt the candidate was using 
negative campaigning. The 
Republican candidate for the 
state representative seat is Fred 
Mcllhattan. Currently, he is the 
executive assistant to State 
Senators John Peterson and Tun 
Shaffer. Mcllhattan was a Clarion 



County commissioner and the 
mayor of Knox. He is a graduate 
of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania and has been on the 
university's Council of Trustees 
for over a decade. He is married 
and has two children. Several 
issues that Mcllhattan plans to 
work on if he is elected is bring- 
ing more jobs to the congression- 
al district, real tax reforms, and 

Continued on page 5 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



October 17. 1996 



October 17, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



OPINION 




Editorial 



"I would hate to have 
that creeping flesh dis- 
ease that kills you in 

Just a couple of 

days because I would 

be dead before I got 

checked by the 

doctor/* 



Jeff Levkulich. Photography Editor 



Healthcare in Clarion: There are 
many stories floating around the 
campus each year about how bad 
the Keeling Health Center is and 
Clarion Hospital. So where 
should a person go to get treat- 
ment: Pittsburgh? Well that is 
where I felt like going after the 
past couple of weeks. 

A couple of Tuesdays ago at 
about 11:30 a.m. I decided to go 
to the Health Center because I 
needed something for my throat 
and cough. 

As I entered the building it was 
very quiet, nobody was around. I 
asked if a doctor could see me. 
She said they could not. 

When I asked if they were 
booked right now, the lady said 
they were getting ready to go to 
lunch at noon. Okay, 11:30; 
noon, see the problem? 

Why can I not just walk in and 



get a quick treatment? I was then 
told to use the self clinic. 

Now if I even did it right, 
(which I don't think I did) why 
did I just check myself out? Is 
the computer a doctor? Worse 
enough, am I? 

I got even worse that night. It 
was 80 degrees out, and I was 
dressed for the frozen tundra of 
Lambeau Field on a December 
Monday Night football game. 
But the computer says that I am 
not sick enough to see a nurse. I 
was so sick I had to call off work. 
I went in the next day to get a 
doctors excuse, and I was told 
that I was not seen by a doctor so 
there is no excuse. 

Obviously, you were too busy 
thinking about lunch to take care 
of me; or, for that matter, be both- 
ered with me. 

Well, the problem is my sick- 



ness does not revolve around the 
Health Center's hours. 

Why can not the Health Center 
be a walk-in facility? I go to see 
my family doctor with an 
appointment for checkups, not 
because I am sick. 

By the time I can get checked 
out for my illness at Keeling 
Health Center, I am no longer 
sick. 

I would hate to have that creep- 
ing flesh disease that kills you in 
just a couple of days, because I 
would be dead before I got 
checked by the doctor. 

Why is it that it takes four or 
five days to be seen? I must have 
to make an appointment a month 
in advance of my illness. 

Or, maybe, I should guess 
when I will be sick. This is what 
intrigues me even more. I 
thought when you had an emer- 
gency they will take you right 
away. 

Well when I had broken a bone 
I went to the hospital. They did- 
n't even reset it (which is why I 
am not going to Clarion Hospital 
anymore) I paid 300 dollars for 
the doctor to tell me something I 
already know and give me an 
icepack! They told me to go to 
the health center. 

The doctor gave me specific 
orders to go on Monday; no later 
than that. 

I called the Health Center up 
and they said they couldn't fit me 
in until Wednesday or Thursday. 
I told them that the doctor told 
me no later than Monday, and 

Continued on page 4 



ffihe Clarion Call 



270 teanneU Coatpltx 
(814)226-2380 



exettttfoe Poart 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor ...Brian Pietrandrea 
News Editor.... Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Editor.... Denise Barney 
Sports Editor.... Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design... Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager... .Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor.... Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager... Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor. Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager. .. Kevin Miko 

Advisor.... Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Clarion, $fl 10214 
/SX (814)220-2557 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body. 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica 
tion. Letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication. The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 



Hide Park 




"My last ALF" 

Another Autumn Leaf Festival 
has come and gone, and I am 
experiencing all the feelings one 
has after the week of ALF. This 
was my last ALF; it was also my 
best ALF. 

One of the reasons I will 
remember this one is because 
many people I care about shared 
it with me. 

I spent this ALF with family 
and friends, and it was one of 
those friends who made me truly 
appreciate ALF. 

A very close friend of the fam- 
ily decided to come down from 
Buffalo my parents were also 
coming up for their first ALF, and 
my last, and I was looking for- 
ward to it. 

I had a great week, and I was 
excited about the semester break 
and the weekend. 

There are some bad things 
about ALF, there's the $2 cover at 
the Roost, the hassles of the 
downtown traffic, and the greasy 
food, but for the most part ALF is 
always a good time, but I always 
took it for granted as a student. I 
have a new respect about ALF 
now though thanks to a friend. 

I was excited when I heard Mr. 
Marx was going to visit and share 
in the festivities, but he had no 
idea what he was in for. 

He thought he was going to 
come down, spend time with 
some close friends and watch his 
first small college football game, 
but what he described at the end 
of the day was more like the 
cover of a Saturday Evening 
Post or the theme of a "feel 
good" movie. 

The day started beautifully, 
maybe a little chilly for some, but 
with the sun shining and not a 
cloud in the sky; it was the pic- 
ture of an Autumn day as the 
leaves started to show their true 



"...it's the pea- 
Pie* the warmth 
and the fun ( 
have had here../ 



Scott Horvath 



colors all around. It was noon, 
and the parade through town was 
starting. Everyone set a moment 
aside, pulled out their lawn 
chairs, leaned out their windows, 
or took a seat on the sidewalk for 
a parade. 

The streets were filled with 
people of all ages everyone had a 
smile on their face: children were 
waiting to grab some of the 
candy, friends looking for class- 
mates on floats, and proud citi- 
zens of Clarion were enjoy- 
ing the best weekend of the year. 
I have never really thought 
about it; actually, at some 
moments, I have heard people 
talking of the parade as a pain 
and sort of silly, but I realized for 
the first time this year that there 
is something special about those 
two hours on Saturday afternoon. 

Many Clarion students look at 
the town as boring, and ALF as 
nothing but a reason to party, but 
I now understand the special 
meaning of ALF. 

Yes, there are booths full of 
food, a craft show that stretches 
the boundaries of main street, and 
a car show, but I finally discov- 
ered the true meaning of ALF. 

The Autumn Leaf Festival is the 
celebration of a small town. A 
small town that has survived 
metropolis and continues to do 
that. For those who may have 
missed Saturday of ALF for one 
reason or another, I will try to 
recall it the best I can. 

The parade was great, lots of 
great bands, beautiful floats and 
fifty thousand smiling faces. 
Then everyone moved from the 
streets to the stands of Memorial 
Stadium. 

What was the first event? We 
honored our local heroes. The 
tiny town of Clarion was proud to 
welcome its two Olympians. Two 

Continued on page 4 



READER RESPONSES 



46 



...if you can't take it, don't dish it out" 



To' the Editor, 

Last Thursday, to my dismay, I 
found out that I had made a mis- 
take in my Letter to the Editor. 
Many of my friends and acquain- 
tances had pointed out that I had 
said that Dan Quayle has said 
"tomato" was spelled with an "e" 
at the end. 

He actually had misspelled 
"potato". Well, everyone makes 
mistakes, who's just the real 
human beings that admit to them. 

But, I must make another point 
in my on-going argument with 
Ms. Pelly (no, I am far from fin- 

4« 



ished with her). 

She had stated that the people 
that we get to speak to the stu- 
dents are too liberal, too touchy, 
and the like. She apparently 
wants people who have had per- 
fect lives? 

What is there to learn from a 
person who has never come up 
against real problems? 

In order to solve a problem, 
first there must be a problem, 
right? 

Is there really something 
incredibly bad about the people 
discussing the problems with 
violence against women and try- 




ing to solve that problem? 

Or how about the racial ten- 
sion in society today? 



Does Ms. Pelly really expect us 
R) just ignore it? She wants us to 
stand for something, but just as 
long as it's something she 
believes should be fought for? 

Ms. Pelly, you're the prime 
example of a living, breathing 
contradiction. 

In closing, I'd like to thank all 
of the people who have given me 
information of Ms. Pelly's reac- 
tions to last week's letter. 

I understand that she was upset 
about my opposing opinion on 
the "dumbing of America". 

But, I'd like to remind Ms. 
Pelly that she did challenge any- 



body to make a rebuttal^ and I 
did. She is also a Political 
Science major. 

Well, she should get used to 
people criticizing her thoughts 
and her point of view. 

Has she watched the debates 
much? Lastly, Ms. Pelly, if you 
can't take it, don't dish it out. 



Tina Matthis 

Senior 

Communication Major 



regular class room attendance is required of all students'" 



Dear Editor, 

Has anyone else ever wondered 
why Clarion University has an 
attendance policy, even when we 
pay for our education? In the 
Undergraduate Course Catalog 
the attendance policy states that 
"regulai- class room attendance is 
required of all students", "facul- 
ty members determine the 
absence policies for their own 



classes", and "it is understood 
that absence does not excuse the 
student from course work and 
the responsibility to complete 

assignments on time". Doesn't 
it seem like we're back in high 
school again? 

We as students, understand 
that if we fall behind in our 
classwork or perform poorly on 
tests, the blame is placed on 



ourselves. We are always told 
that we are adults. If we are 
mature enough to get into college 
and live by ourselves, then we 
are also mature enough to decide 

whether or not to attend class. 
We are not saying that it is 
acceptable to miss classes all the 
time, but why should our grade 
be penalized when we miss 
class? We have always heard 



about the infamous Clarion 
attendance policy that if you 
miss more than three classes, 
you drop one letter grade. Too 
bad when we looked through the 
course catalog, we couldn't find 
the previous statement any- 
where. Wouldn't it make more 
sense to grade students on how 
much they know, rather than how 
often they attend class? 



We feel that as long as we are 
able to maintain your grades and 
perform well on assignments, 
then there should be no manda- 
tory attendance policy. After all, 
through tuition and taxes WE are 
paying for, our education. .. 



Jennifer Whitehurst 
and Laurie Bennett 



"...many people who wear jeans were wearing sweatpants..." 



Dear Editor, 

I am a member of ALLIES, a 
group on campus which advo- 
cates and supports lesbians, 
gays, and bisexuals here at 
Clarion. It is in relation to my 
membership in this organization 
that I feel compelled to report a 
series of unusual events which 
have been unfolding on our cam- 
pus recently. 

On Thursday, October 3, Sandy 
Ferringer and I put fliers up 
around campus announcing the 
ALLIES meeting on October 8 
and National Coming Out Day 
on October 11. You may have 
seen them: Colorful, with the 
ALLIES rainbow triangle and 
several different fonts and colors 
in the text, the fliers invited 
members of the Clarion 
University community to join us 
at our meeting and/or show sup- 
port for equal rights by wearing 
blue jeans on the 11th. 

Within hours most of these 
fliers had been torn down. Not 
very surprising really. 



Undaunted, we replaced some of 
the fliers immediately. I then 
left campus to enjoy the ALF 
festival. Monday morning I 
arrived at Carlson shortly after 
8 a.m. to find that, out of 6 sets 
of fliers (yes, it takes that many 
to cover that building), only one 
was left up. As far as I could 
ascertain, this was the pattern all 
over campus. Did I give up? No, 
my Irish grandparents passed on 
a legacy of stubborness. I 
obtained one more flier and 
passed the word for others to be 
put up. (My thanks to those who 
helped). That flier was torn 
down again by the time I left the 
building at 1pm. Monday 
evening I put more flyers about 
our meeting up in several build- 
ings around campus. They were 
again torn down. We are not 
talking about bits torn here and 
there haphazardly. Other fliers 
for other campus groups were 
left right next to where ours had 
been. ALLIES fliers disappeared 
so thoroughly that I must con- 
clude they were systematically 



torn down. My question is why 
were these fliers continually torn 
down? Were people that terrified 
of pieces of paper? Or perhaps 
they were jealous of our well 
done and colorful flier? Is a 
meeting of gays, lesbians, bisex- 
uals and the straight people who 
support us that shocking? It is 
said that we hate what we fear. 
Looking inward to my personal 
fears and hates, I find some truth 
to this saying. I challenge those 
who tore down the ALLIES fliers 
to look inward also. Answer the 
question to yourselves. Is it fear 



which brings out such a hate that 
you are compelled to remove 
even announcements of our 
meetings? 

I would say that, despite the 
systematic elimination of our 
fliers, many people became 
aware of National Coming Out 
Day through .various means of -. 
communication. r On Octobet 
11th many people who rarely 
wear jeans had them on. AND 
many people who commonly 
wear jeans were wearing sweat- 
pants, dress slacks or dresses. I 
suppose that we all made our 



points, one way or another. I also 
understand that many individuals 
were upset at the idea of jeans 
being worn as a symbol of sup- 
port because jeans are such a 
common thing. Well, that was 
the point. A common item sym- 
. bolizing the fact thai we_are.pep- 
• -pie too, just like everyone else 
- : >ith our own hopes, dreams and 
aspirations. And with the right to 
live our lives without fear of 
attack. 

Mary G. Gravelle 

Clarion Alumna and Library 

Science Graduate Student 



i±i ifcio I<J 1 HE H3rrOR MUST BE SIGNED WHEN 

THEY ARE SUBMITTED TO 270 GEMMEU STUDENT 

CENTER. IF YOU WKH TO HAVE YOUR NAME WTTH- 

HELD FROM PUBUCAITON PLEASE INDICATE SO ON 

THE SIGNED LETTER AND IT WEI NOT BE PRINTED. 

Correction to October 10, 1996 Clarion Call- The author of the 
Political Science Association article was Hope Guy, not Hope Joy. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 17. 1996 



October 17, 1996 



The Clarion Call 




% 



News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



World 



King Hussein makes 
West Bank visit 

Jordan's King Hussein made his first visit to the West Bank on 
Tuesday since losing the territory to Israel in the 1967 Middle 
East War, and pledged support for Yasser Arafat. "My brother 
Arafat and I are a team," the Jordanian monarch said. 

With the historic visit- the first by an Arab leader to the 
autonomous enclave- Hussein also signaled his public acceptance 
of Palestinian rule in the West Bank and put more pressure on 
Israel to accelerate the pace of the peace process. 

In a veiled warning to Israel, Hussein said he and Arafat would 
cooperate closely to ensure the Jewish state's new hard-line gov- 
ernment keeps promises made in peace agreements with the 
Palestinians. 

Pope John Paul II has 



stitches removed 

Waving to well-wishers and walking with a cane, Pope John 
Paul II left the hospital Tuesday as doctors pronounced him well- 
healed from surgery and cleared him to return to work. 

The pontiff, who had not been seen using a cane since mid- 
1995, following hip-replacement surgery, returned to the Vatican 
exactly a week after his appendectomy. Doctors at Gemelli 
Polyclinic removed the stitches Tuesday and said the operation 
should end the pope's recurring bouts of fever, which they 
blamed on an inflamed appendix. 



Nation 



Judge nixes request for 
all-deaf jury 

A deaf man's unprecedented request to be tried in a rape case by 
a jury fluent in sign language was rejected Tuesday. 

"Why is it any more unique than a defendant or victim both 
speaking Spanish or Russian or Czech?" Superior Court Judge 
Gordon R. Burkhart asked during a hearing on the request by 
Jesse Macias. 

Macias, 19, of San Diego, is accused of raping a 17-year-old 
deaf girl on June 3 at the California School for the Deaf, which 
they both attended. 



<s>Courtesy of the 
Associated Press 



v 




great men who carried Clarion's 
name to Atlanta and represented 
it so well there. Normal men, 
who just happen to be great ath- 
letes, the kind that will shake 
your hand and look you in the 
eyes. Kurt and Rob, that's all you 
have to say, a friendly word, and 
that's what you'll gel in response; 
sort of what you would expect 
from the town of Clarion. Then 
the game started. It was home- 
coming, and the football team 
didn't let a single person down, 
except a few Lock Haven fans. 

They went out, gave the crowd 
a lot to cheer about, and made the 
band play the fight song more 
times than some college bands 
play in a year. Then as the foot- 
ball team went into the locker 
room with a big lead, the crowd 
had the opportunity to watch a 
great player presented with a 
well-deserved and prestigious 
award. It made one realize that 



Clarion University has great stu- 
dents, another fact many people 
don't appreciate. 

The football team came back 
onto the field to continue routing 
the Bald Eagles, and give the fans 
of Clarion a lot to cheer about. It 
was what one dreams about when 
they think of homecoming, and it 
was happening here. 

The whole day reminded me of 
the ending of the Chevy Chase 
movie Funny Farm when the 
town came together to help sell 
a farm. All of the negative 
thoughts of Clarion were 
wiped away as the day became 
everything that makes a small 
town such a great place in which 
to live. That's why I am writing 
this. Many of us go through our 
careers here and never appreci- 
ate what ALF is, but I have. It 
took the eyes of a friend to 
make me realize how great a 
celebration it was. I will 




remember the parties and the 
fun and the many years of rain, 
but, most of all, I will remember 
my last ALF as a Clarion student. 
I will come back some time in the 
future, I am sure of it, thanks to 
ALF 1996. I hope all of the grad- 
uating seniors have had an ALF 
like this year to recall, and I hope 
everyone else makes an ALF of 
the future one to remember for 
ages. 

I hear it a lot, and I have to 
admit, I have thought it a couple 
of times and wondered how I 
ended up in Clarion but it's the 
people, the warmth and the fun I 
have had that confirm my deci- 
sion. It took someone else to 
make me realize all that was 
good here, but I am glad I found 
out before it was too late. 



•The author is a senior 
communication major. 

i iii.i.I 'WIBH'" 




• •• 



^MiWWMi^iiW 



I guess it wasn't much of an 
emergency. Maybe I have to be 
bleeding out of my eyeballs, or 
maybe I have to be impaled by a 
Chandler Dining Hall knife. And 
forget being late even five min- 
utes. 

You had better be there exactly 
on time or you have to make 
another appointment. 



Now I am sure that for some 
people the Health Center has 
helped them, of course I person- 
ally don't know anyone. 

In fact I know more people who 
have been misdiagnosed than 
helped. I think one of the prob- 
lems is that they are not open for 
a long time. 5:00 is not very late. 
Just today I went there, and 



they said they were booked. If 
there are that many people who 
are sick all the time, then extend 
the hours for the health center. 

Maybe then ammoxicillian and 
throat lozenges won't be the eter- 
nal cure for everything. 

And just maybe sick people may 
get the immediate attention they 
deserve. 



More Reader Responses 

"...Mr. Emmerick obviously has his opinions." 



=J 



Dear Editor, 

In response to the October 3, 
1996 letter entitled, "Appalled at 
the Republicans" by Kenneth 
Emmerick, I have heard that 
opinions are like parts of the 
anatomy and Mr. Emmerick 
obviously has his opinions. 
However, Mr. Emmerick's opin- 
ions should at least have some 
basis in fact. 

It was obvious that Mr. 
Emmerick wasn't a professor or 
student in the Business 
Department or he would have 
been aware that Governments 
practice "Base Line Budgeting," 
where every Federal 

Bureaucracy receives an auto- 
matic yearly increase in funding. 
Nonetheless, the Republican 
congress was only attempting to 
reduce these future increases in 
spending in order to preserve 
Social Security for future genera- 
tions. 

So, I really don't see how Mr. 
Emmerick gets off saying, "The 



Republicans' desperate attempt 
to slash 270 billion dollars from 
Medicare." After Mr. Emmerick 
had destroyed his credibility as a 
journalist, it really seems point- 
less to refer to other flaws in his 
logic. However, he was correct 
in saying that the Republicans 
were determined to cut some pro- 
grams. 

But, I personally wouldn't mind 
taking a few cuts to reduce this 
country's five billion dollar debt. 
Nonetheless, I really wasn't sur- 
prised when hearing that Mr. 
Emmerick was a librarian at 



Clarion University and not a pro- 
fessor as he claimed, in his latest 
numerous attempts to base facts 
on fiction. 

As a retired librarian Mr. 
Emmerick should have at least 
researched his topic before mak- 
ing irrational claims, and possi- 
bly destroying the credibility of 
many Clarion professors who 
don't share his extremist views. 

Sincerely, 

Karl Miller 

Junior 

CAIS Major 



The last day to withdraw from 
classes is Friday October 25, 

1996. Anyone wishing to 
withdraw may obtain a form at 

the Office of the Registrar 
in Carrier Hall. 



Pace 5 



,■ 













Cellege Campus News 



r^'er^rn 



iMm 



What 's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Got Milk? Join Spike in an Ad Campaign 



Get your milk mustaches ready. 

The "Why Milk?" campaign, famous for capturing superstars 
Jennifer Aniston, Tyra Banks, and Spike Lee with milk on their faces, 
is searching for a college student to feature in an upcoming milk mus- 
tache ad. 

The Milk College Campus Tour has teamed up with Sports 
Illustrated, Cosmopolitan, RoMng Stone and other magazines to visit 
19 colleges this fall, including Boston University, University of 
Pennsylvania, Michigan State, the University of Iowa, and California 
State University-Northridge. 

Students will get a chance to don a milk mustache and pose for a 
shot. 

The winning photo may also show up on the "Why Milk?" web site, 
which currently features the latest mustached celebrity, Neve 
Campbell from "Party of Five". 

According to the "Why Milk?" campaign, Americans should drink 
three cups of milk each day. For more milk info, check out the cam 
paign's website at www.whymilk.com. 

USF Student Accused of Bomb Hoax 



A University of South Florida student was jailed Oct. 1 on charges 
that he wrote a letter to the student newspaper threatening to blow up 
a university building and kill a professor. 

Damian Conrad Hospital, a 19-year-old sophomore, was indicted on 
two counts of mailing threatening communications. He was jailed on 
$50,000 bond. 

The letter was sent in March to the USF newspaper, The Oracle. In 
it , the writer spelled out plans to detonate a bomb and kill an unnamed 
white female professor on April 29 unless the university aplogized to 
a former faculty member, Ramadan Abdullah Shallah. 

Shallah is now the leader of Islamic Jihad, a terrorist group in the 
Middle East, the university said. 

Not knowing if the letter was a hoax, university officials decided to 
move up final exams, step up security forces, and turn the campus into 
a virtual ghost town on April 29. 

Although the threats were not carried out, Hospital could face a five- 
year prison sentence and a $250,000 fine on each count if convicted. 

"We're very pleased that the investigation continues to move for- 
ward," said Todd Simmons, director of media relations at USF. "It sad- 
dens us any time a student is accused of being involved in any illegal 
activities." 

It is unclear what led the FBI to investigate Hospital who is from 
Tamarac, FL, Simmons said. 



Courtesy of College Press Service 



Local candidates' forum cont. from page 1 



cutting through red tape to help 
the constituents to get what they 
need. 

Shirley Hager is the 
Democrats' choice for the state 
House of Representatives. This is 
the first time she has run as a 
state representative. She was the 
Prothonatory/Clerk of Courts of 
Clarion County. Hager has also 
been the treasurer of the Clarion 
County chapter of the American 
Red Cross and the Garden Club 
of Clarion County. Hager is a 
strong supporter of a public offi- 
cial being involved in a public 
service not as a career. Several 
issues that she takes a stand on 
are a more efficient government, 
quality public and private educa- 
tion for children, quality jobs for 
the congressional district, abetter 
justice system, and unfunded 
mandates to be removed to help 
lower property, state, and federal 
taxes. 
Janet Serene is the candidate for 
the Constitutional Party of 
Pennsylvania. The Constitutional 
Party of Pennsylvania is the 
Pennsylvania affiliate of the U.S. 
Taxpayers' Party. The party also 
has candidates running for 
President of the United States, 
Pennsylvania state treasurer, and 
Pennsylvania auditor general. 
The party is against abortion and 
the practice of assisted suicide or 
euthanasia. The Constitutional 
Party of Pennsylvania is also 
strong in biblical morality and 
constitutional principles. Serene 
has been a kindergarten teacher 
for 30 years. 

Many of the questions that were 
submitted by the audience mem- 
bers dealt with local Clarion 
issues. Some examples were 
more comprehensive flood relief 
for the area, cleaning up the air 
and water caused by strip mining, 
and the building of the new Wal- 
Mart in the Clarion area and the 
decrease of stores on Main 
Street. 



Some of the major issues that 
were covered dealt with educa- 
tion and taxes. A question was 
raised about the state government 
providing more funding for pub- 
lic higher education in the state. 
Hager started the answer session 
by expressing her disbelief at 
Governor Ridge "mortgaging the 
future" of students. She stressed 
if elected that she would try to 
increase funding to the state 
schools. Mcllhattan highlighted 
on the fact that he serves on 
Clarion University's Council of 
Trustees and admits we will have 
a "few tough lean years" while 
legislators figure out how they 
want to handle the state's current 
fiscal situation. Serene stated she 
has grandchildren in college and 
told a story of one of her children 
attending Penn State, with the 
quality of living being very poor. 
"I would like to put education 
with the parents and students 
should try to put themselves 
through school," she stated. 

Another issue that is heavily 
debated in the state this election 
year is the use of public funds for 
vouchers for public and private 
schools. All three candidates are 
opposed to the voucher system. 
"I believe in school choice and 
was raised in the public educa- 
tion system," stated Mcllhattan 
during his answer. Serene added 
several ideas explaining the 
voucher system was started by 
socialists and she is against gov- 
ernment control in the issue of 
vouchers. 

Two issues dealt with real tax 
reforms and the elimination of 
personal property tax. Serene and 
Hager felt that everyone should 
pay their fair share of taxes. 
Mcllhattan felt legislators should 
reduce property taxes to help 
even the burden on everyone. On 
the issue of personal property tax, 
all three candidates agreed to 
decreasing the property tax but 



finding a suitable alternative to 
take its place. 

The Republican candidate for 
Pennsylvania's state senate is 
Mary Jo White. White has been 
an executive at Quaker State for 
nineteen years, most recently as 
Vice-President for Environment 
and Regulatory Affairs. She has 
been an attorney in private prac- 
tice and has taught business law 
at the University of Maryland 
and Penn State University. White 
is married and has three children. 
The Democratic candidate is 
Robert Thomas. He is currenUy 
the business manager/financial 
secretary of IBEW #10. Thomas 
is also the president of the Butler 
and Venango Counties Building 
and Construction Trades Council, 
secretary of Western 3rd 
Business Managers Association, 
and chairman of Tri-State 
Business Managers Association. 
Several issues discussed in this 
part of the forum were outcome- 
based education, the franchise 
and corporate tax, and the issue 
of abortion. 

Thomas started the discussion 
of outcome-based education by 
supporting Ridge's decision of 
eliminating outcome-based edu- 
cation and replacing them with 
academic standards. White also is 
opposed to outcome-based edu- 
cation. 

Both candidates agreed on find- 
ing good ideas to eliminate fran- 
chise and corporate taxes. 
Thomas is in favor of eliminating 
franchise tax but feels that most 
businesses are not affected by 
corporate tax. 

On the issue of abortion, both 
candidates were split. Thomas is 
a Pro-Life candidate and feels 
abortion should only be used in 
the cases of rape, incest, and if 
the mother's life is in danger. 
White takes no endorsements by 
lobbying groups about abortion 
and is a pro-choice candidate. 



Corrections 

In last week's article entitled "State and local campaigns reaching out to 
students", there were three errors. Presidental nominee, Bob Dole is a 
former senator from Kansas not from Nebraska. The Democratic candi- 
date for Pennsylvania's 21st State Senatorial District is Robert Thomas 
not Robert Johnson. The Democratic candidate for the local seat for the 
U.S. House of Representatives is Ruth Roody not Ruth Rudy. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 17, 1996 



Public Safety 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal investi 
gations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between October 4 and October 14. The blotter is com- 
piled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim Hall. 



Clarion University police officers are investigating a theft that 
occurred at Gemmell Student Center French Quarter sometime 
between October 4 and October 10. There were 10 bottles of "All- 
Sport" drinks taken from the machine. 
•On October 5, someone pulled a false fire alarm on the 4th floor of 
Nair Hal), which caused evacuation of the residents. 

Public Safety officers cited Johnie Kennedy of RD-2 Box 237B, 
Williamsburg, PA, with underage drinking of an alcoholic beverage on 

October 5. 

•An unknown person or persons threw an unknown object into the 
window of 310A Campbell Hall, causing it to break on October 9 
between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. 

As of October 10, police officers are investigating a reported theft of 
$60.00 in cash from a resident's room in Ralston Hall. The victim stat 
ed that an unknown actor or actors had removed $60.00 in cash from 
a wallet that was located on a stand in an unsecured room. 

Public Safety officers were called to Wilkinson Hall about harassment 
on October 11. The incident is under investigation. 

A professor reported his office was entered between October 11 and 
October 14. Nothing was taken. This occurred in Peirce Science 

Building. 

•Clarion University police cited Briton Lewis for public drunkenness 

bit October 12. 
An individual from Wilkinson Hall received prank calls on October 

13. i n •■• 

As of October 13, university officers are investigating a report ot 

harassing telephone calls at Campbell Hall. 
An employee reported her paycheck and keys stolen from Stevens 
Hall on October 14. 



Clarion University's College of Business 

Administration f COBAJ wilt be holding an Open 

House, Saturday, October 19, 1996 from 1 1:00 

a.m. to 1:00 pm. in Still Hall lobby. All walk-ins are 

encouraged. 




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Major renovations to be made at dining hall 



by Megan O'Grady 
News Writer 



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Chandler Dining Hall is the 
next university building to under- 
go renovations. 

It was originally built in I960 
and has not been renovated in the 
past 36 years. 

A major renovation project is 
planned for the summer of 1997. 
The long-range planning for the 
project began over the summer 
when a new lighting system was 
installed in Chandler. 

David Henry, the Food Service 
Director of Daka Restaurants, 
says he has a "good handle on 
what's new and exciting" in uni- 
versity cafeteria design. 

The proposal for renovation 
was initiated in March, 1996. 

The scope of the project is to 
change the current four serving 
lines and beverage stations into a 
food court style operation. 

Along with the food court will 
come a viable convenience store, 
similar to the existing "2GO 
D'PO". 

The new store will be more 
accessible. 

Not everything will change. 
"Deb's Diner", "Little Italy", 
and the "Sandwich Shack" will 
remain features of the dining hall, 
with "more energy into their 
design," says Henry. 

The "Sandwich Shack" will be 
renamed the "Sandwich Hut". 

Daka Restaurants teamed up 
with an architectural construction 
and design firm out of Baltimore 
last March to help enhance the 
visual atmosphere and add depth 
to the eating experience at 
Chandler. 

As the present layout of the din- 
ing hall shows, the four serving 
lines and two dining rooms are 
currently invisible from the stu- 



dent ID card checker locations at 
Chandler's two entrances. 

The invisibility makes it hard 
for students to see their choices 
and make quick decisions about 
their meals. 

Two floor plans are being pro- 
posed. 

Henry hopes the "wraparound 
food court" will give the dining 
hall a "better flow" between the 
entrances, the serving lines, and 
the dining areas. 

Current barrier walls will be 
knocked down so students can 
see what their selection is from 
the moment they step inside. 

The four new areas will contain 
new features and old features. 

The area "Little Italy", which 
offers pizza and pasta (among 
other traditional Italian entrees), 
will be set up much like a Italian 
restaurant with the additions of 
more pizza toppings in a pro- 
posed "toppings bar". 

"Deb's Diner" will continue to 
serve traditional main entrees, 
but will have an improved atmos- 
phere, giving the area a 1950's 
motif. 

"The Sandwich Hut" will have 
a Boardwalk motif and will fea- 
ture hot dogs and French fries 
cooked to order. 

The fourth area will be entirely 
new to Clarion University, but is 
growing in interest in many uni- 
versities across the Midwest. 

The "Grist Mill Cafe" is a sort 
of premium line in which stu- 
dents are offered steaks and 



shrimp made to order without 
leaving campus and paying addi- 
tional costs. 

Students can order such entrees 
along with their meal plan and 
can pay with FLEX dollars. 

It will be a separate facility 
inside the dining hall. 

With such a construction pro- 
ject, inconvenience is sure to fol- 
low. 

Henry reassures that the facili- 
ty "will be kept open one way or 
another" during summer renova- 
tion so as to be available for sum- 
mer board students, summer 
camps, and orientation groups. 

Daka is still in the design 
process and does not know all of 
the specifics or the cost of the 
proposal. 

Overall, Henry and Daka 
Restaurants are very excited 
about the renovation project. 

With the additional points of 
service and improved atmos- 
phere, the change is a welcomed 
one. 

Similar plans at Towson State, 
Howard, and Northeastern uni- 
versities, have already proved to 
be a success for Daka 
Restaurants. 

The future renovation project is 
not the only new addition to 
Chandler Dining Hall. Over the 
summer, the ceilings and lights in 
both main dining areas were 
replaced. Potted plants were also 
added to the dining areas to make 
the areas look better to dine in. 



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Chandler Dining Hall will undergo a major renovation pro- 
ject in the Summer, 1997. The four individual serving lines 
and beverage stations are to be converted in a "food court 
style operation". Designs for the renovations are currently 
being discussed. 



October 17. 199$ 



The Clarion Call 



Pa^e 7 






. 



Student recreation center committees formed 



by Sue Hartman 
News Writer 



Two committees have been 
formed for Clarion University's 
new recreation center. The com- 
mittees are the slating committee 
and the selection committee. 

The slating committee consists 
of the chairman, Hal Wassink, 
Director of Student Activities; 
and members, Clare Heidler, 
Director of Facilities 
Management; Dr. Richard Taylor, 
professor in health and physical 
education; Dr. Rebecca Leas, 



professor in health and physical 
education; and Senator Trade 
Mathis, chairperson of the Senate 
Appropriations Committee. 

The purpose of the slating com- 
mittee is to review all of the 
information submitted by all pro- 
fessional firms that are interested 
in completing the project. 

After collecting and reviewing 
all of the needed information, the 
slating committee will select a 
minimum of three qualified firms 
that will perform the work on the 
recreation center. 



When the qualified firms are 
selected, several key points will 
be taken into consideration. The 
points are the distribution of con- 
tracts among qualified architects 
and engineers, the capability to 
perform the design and construc- 
tion services, the geographic 
proximity of the architect to the 
proposed facility, the ability to 
provide the necessary manpower, 
the firm's present workload, 
innovative design capability, the 
professional qualifications of the 
staff, cost control, and if the firm 



has any past experience. 

After the slating committee 
makes their decision on three 
qualified firms, the selection 
committee will then attempt to 
negotiate a fair and reasonable 
fee with the firm. The committee 
will rank the firms into an order 
of preference with the opening 
negotiations beginning with the 
firm of the lowest preference. 
The selections committee is also 
planning to conduct individual 
firm interviews to assist in selec- 
tion and ranking of the profes- 



sional firms. 

The chairman of the selection 
committee is David Tomeo, 
Director of Gemmell Student 
Center; and the members are 
David Fagen, Jr., Maintenance; 
Doug Knepp, Director of 
Intramurals; Jamie Bero- 
Johnson, Assistant Director of 
Gemmell Student Center; Dr. 
George Curtis, Vice-President of 
Student Affairs; and Senator 
Terry Stoops, chairman of the 
Senate's Legislative Affairs 
Committee. 



Official student enrollments for university show an increase 



by Lisa Lawson 
News Writer 



The official enrollment figures 
for Fall 1996 for Clarion 
University have recently been 
tabulated. Enrollment at Clarion 
University has increased for the 
second straight year. These fig- 
ures, which were recently sub- 
mitted to the State System of 
Higher Education (SSHE), show 
that Clarion's total enrollment 
increased by 26 students over last 
fall, a 0.4 percent increase. In 
addition, the number of full-time 
undergraduate students 

increased, illustrating a gain of 
70.41 over the same period last 
year. 



The new figures show the total 
number of undergraduate stu- 
dents to be 5,410, up from 5,390 
in 1995. Graduate enrollment 
also increased from 470 in 1995 
to 476 in 1996. 

Full-time enrollment rose from 
4,778 to 4,860 while the number 
of part-time students has 
decreased from 612 last year to 
550 at present. 

The new undergraduate class 
numbers 1,614, which is the 
same as last year but surpasses 
the Fall 1994 figure of 1,408. 

John Shropshire, the Dean of 
Enrollment Management, notes 
that the admission staff was 
"delighted" by the continuing 



increase in Clarion's enrollment. 
Shropshire pointed out that 
Clarion University is the only 
state school in all of western 
Pennsylvania to report an 
increase in enrollment this year. 
Research has shown that the 
increase in population of high 
school graduates until the year 
2006 will occur mainly in the 
eastern part of the state. Clarion 
needs to get an increase in enroll- 
ment from that part of the state- 
because of the number of stu- 
dents graduating from schools in 
the western part of the state is 
decreasing. In light of the cir- 
cumstances, Shropshire com- 
mented, "Whether or not we'll be 



a part of that picture is the ques- 
tion." 

In order to assure future 
increases in the number of stu- 
dents coming from high schools 
in the eastern part of the state, a 
regional office was recently 
opened in Philadelphia. In addi- 
tion, Shropshire pointed out that 
some faculty members have 
become quite active in the 
recruitment process, which has 
"had a major impact on our suc- 
cess." More open houses are 
being held, and faculty as well as 
the students involved in the 
Ambassador program are making 
an effort to contact prospective 
students through both phone calls 



and letters. 

As far as the future of increased 
enrollment at Clarion University, 
Shropshire stated that the desired 
goal is to have an enrollment of 
6,000 students here at the univer- 
sity. 

He commented, "We want more 
people, but we accept only those 
we expect to graduate. Our goal 
is to make sure all students leave 
here with a degree." 

As a final note, Shropshire 
remarked that the university is 
working toward a more diverse 
population. He said, ;^We also 
want students from out-of-state 
and from other countries. We 
want a world emphasis." 



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The Clarion Cad 



October 17, 1996 



October 17, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



College Board doesn't discriminate 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

The U.S. Department of 
Education ruled Oct. 1 that the 
College Board and the 
Educational Testing Service, 
which administers the 
Preliminary Scholastic 

Assessment Test annually to 1.8 
million high schoolers, do not 
discriminate against girls. 

Still, the College Board and 
ETS have agreed to take steps to 
make the PSAT fairer. 

For years, high school boys 
have outscored girls on the PSAT 
despite the fact that girls tend to 
get better grades in high school. 

That has led to complaints of 
gender bias in the PSAT, which 
determines semifinalists for the 
National Merit Scholarship 
Program. 

But starting next fall, the PSAT 
will include a new writing-skills 
section, intended to narrow the 
gap in test scores between boys 
and girls. 

"I sincerely hope they're able to 
do it," said Pamela Zappardino, 
executive director for the 



National Center for Fair and 
Open Testing, or FairTest. 

Her organization, a non-profit 
group that works to promote 
accurate test assessments, and 
others filed a complaint in 1994, 
charging that the PSAT discrimi- 
nates against girls. 

"You get into that semi-finals 
solely on the basis of your PSAT 
score," she said. 

"About 55 percent of PS AT-tak- 
ers are girls, but only 35-40 per- 
cent are semi-finalists. Girls are 
being screened out." 

In a statement, the College 
Board and ETS said the new mul- 
tiple-choice section had been 
considered "for some time" and 
that it would help '"measure the 
varied talents of an increasingly 
diverse student population." 

The 1997 PSAT will include a 
writing-skills section designed to 
measure students 1 ability to 
express ideas in standard written 
English. 

Students will be asked to iden- 
tify mistakes in usage and 
structure. 

"Whether it will help or not is 
very hard to say," said 



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Zappardino. 

"Boys at this point still outscore 
the girls on the verbal section of 
the PSAT." 

She said Fair Test remains 
skeptical that the new section 
would help remedy the disparity 
between boys' and girls' scores. 

"We would like to have seen the 
test scores not used at all," she 
said. 

"Or at least make them option- 
al." 

Research by the College Board 
"indicates the whole SAT under- 
estimates the prediction of per- 
formance by young men as com- 
pared to young women," she 
said. 

"It's more on target for young 
men." 

Some educators have suggested 
that the PSAT's format of the 
test-timed, multiple-choice ques- 
tions favors boys over girls. 

When considering the PSAT 
and SAT scores of female high 
schoolers, "you would expect 
that they would do much more 
poorly in college," Zappardino 
said. 

"Again, the research shows that 
high school record is still a better 
predictor of how someone will do 
in college than test scores," she 
said. 

But whatever is the outcome of 
the newly revised test, 
Zappardino said test scores alone 
should not be used as the mea- 
sure for who is named National 
Merit scholars. 




by Sandee Siford, Student Senate Reporter 



The Student Senate met on Monday .October 14, 1996 at 7:30 p.m 
in the Gemmell Student Center. Dr. Curtis, advisor to the Senate, dis- 
tributed the minutes from the Board of Directors meeting. 

President Cox announced that the applications for the position of 
Student Senate Secretary are now available in the Senate office. These 
applications will be due on Monday, October 21. 

Interhall Council will have paper pumpkins in the residence halls. 
For a $1 donation you can place your name on these pumpkins and 
they will be hung in the lobbies. The banner contest winners are as fol 
lows: 1st place- Givan Hall, 2nd place- Wilkinson Hall, 3rd place-Nair 
Hall. 

WCCB will hold a Halloween Concert on October 30 at 7 p.m. 
There will be four bands playing and admission is $1, unless you wear 
a costume in which case, admission is free. A Pittsburgh Children's 
Hospital drive will be held 4 on December 2. If you are interested in 
helping please stop by the radio station in Gemmell. 

Senator Mathis, the chairperson of the Appropriations Committee, 
announced that there is $12,000 in the Supplemental account and 
$84,663.06 in the Capitol account. Senator Mathis moved that $1,999 
be allocated to the Men's Basketball team for a Gateway 2000 System 
with the approval of Dr. Reinhard. This upgrade in systems will allow 
them to be more time efficient with recruiting and the basketball camp 
promotions. The motion passed. 

Senator Stoops, the chairman of the Legislative Affairs committee, 
announced that absentee ballots are due on October 28. 

Senator Forney, the chairman of the Committee on Subcommittees, 
moved to appoint Phillip Hagart to the university conduct board pend- 
ing the approval of Dr. Reinhard. The motion passed. 



Directories are available at the 

Gemmell Information Desk. 

Pick up your copy today! 




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LIFESTYLES 



Fourth annual Plunge hit the streets 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service- Learning Center 

"Come on baby do that 
Conga..." rang out in the 
Gemmell multi-purpose room the 
morning of October 12th. As the 
students danced around the room, 
they prepared to hit the streets for 
the fourth annual Plunge. 

The day started out with regis- 
tration at 8:30 a.m. A continental 
breakfast was served at the regis- 
tration site. 

After breakfast students were 
given the opportunity to get to 
know other students who were 
volunteering at the same site they 
had chosen. 

A team leader was assigned to 
each site, and it was her responsi- 
bility to get the participants 
acquainted with each other. 

The groups participated in 
name game, ice breakers, and 
team building activities with each 
other, one of which was dancing 
around the room in a Conga line 
to get them wanned up and ener- 
gized for the upcoming day. 

Also, on the agenda for the 
morning were remarks from 
Community Service-Learning 
director Diana Anderson, Plunge 
coordinator Heidi Bower, and 
Into the Streets president, Tara 
Smith. The office of Community 
Service-Learning and the Into the 
Streets organization co-spon- 
sored the event. 

"Into the Streets is a learning 
experience that will encourage 
mem (students) to volunteer in 



the future," said Smith. 

Into the Streets is a recognized 
student organization and it is on 
this campus to allow students an 
opportunity to enter the commu- 
nity and share the social respon- 
sibilities of Clarion through vol- 
unteering. 

Each semester this organization 
volunteers for activities such as 
"Food for Friends," playing 
BINGO with the residents of the 
Clarion Care Center, and the 
Plunge. 

This year, the students were 
given a choice of four sites at 
which they could volunteer. 

Those sites were: The Clarion 
Area Elementary Parent/Teacher 
Organization (PTO), Clarion 
County Drug and Alcohol 
Administration, Clarion County 
Area Agency on Aging, and 
Goodwill Industries of North 
Central PA, Inc. 

The Goodwill held a 30th 
anniversary celebration at their 
drop-off center by the Clarion 
Mall. 

Plunge participants sold hot 
dogs and soda, painted faces of 
young children, and gave away 

balloons. 

ine Clarion County Drug and 
Alcohol Administration were 
also at the Clarion Mall. 

They set up shop in the former 
Danks store to hold a Fun Theater 
for area children. 

The theater consisted of a 
movie that discouraged children 
from drinking alcohol, a puppet 




Courtesy of the Community 
Service-Learning Office 

Students clean up the playground at the Clarion 



Elementary School 

show that taught about the dan- 
gers of peer pressure, and prize 
giveaways in which every child 
won. 

Student volunteers at this site 
made posters, chaperoned chil- 
dren, and worked at the registra- 
tion table. 

Carrie Parks, a Clarion 
University volunteer at mis site 
said, "It feels nice to be doing 
something for others and making 
the kids happy while they are 
learning important things." 

However, things were not just 
happening at the Clarion Mall. 
Back in Clarion, at the Senior 
Center, student volunteers were 
working hard. 



Students that volunteered at this 
site were given scrub brushes and 
cleaning supplies and sent to 
work. 

Their job- make the senior cen- 
ter spotless. Center director 
Kristi Wolbert was very pleased 
with their efforts. 

"I think it (the Plunge) is great. 
I wish that some of my seniors 
could be here working with the 
young people," Wolbert said. 

The final volunteer site was at 
the Clarion Elementary School. 
Student volunteers at this site 
were given the opportunity to 
help kids in a different way. 

The playgrounds were in need 
of maintenance and repair so 



Clarion University volunteers 
plunged into the project and fixed 
up the children's play area, with 
children and members of the 
Clarion Elementary 

Parent/Teacher Organization. 

The activities concluded at 
approximately 2:00 p.m. and stu- 
dents headed back to the multi- 
purpose room. 

Once again the team leaders 
took charge and helped the vol- 
unteers to reflect upon their expe- 
riences of the day. 

The groups designed murals to 
illustrate their own personal feel- 
ings about their volunteer experi- 
ences and completed evaluation 
forms to provide feedback for the 
Spring Plunge. 

The Plunge concluded with 
recognition for volunteers who 
were rewarded for their efforts 
with a can cooler, a pencil, a cer- 
tificate, and t-shirt. 

"It's just a small thank-you for 
all that they have done to make 
this plunge a success," said 
Bower. "This was a great group 
of volunteers and they really 
showed enthusiasm in all that 
they did today." 

The next Plunge is scheduled 
for Saturday, March 15th. 

If you need more information 
about volunteering, you can pick 
up a Service Opportunity 
Bulletin in the Community 
Service office room 247 
Gemmell. 

Thanks to everyone who helped 
this plunge! 



Next years new and improved Chandler 



by Stacy Henninger 
DAKA Representative 

Hello everyone! ! Last week I 
told you that I had some inside 
information on Chandler's 
facelift to share, so here goes... 

Chandler Dining Hall was built 
in 1960 and since then there has 
never been a major renovation. 
Are you hearing me? Chandler is 
the same as it was 36 years ago 
when it was built! It's no wonder 
why most of us think that 
Chandler is outdated and dare I 
say "lame". But this is all about 
to change. 

A major renovation project- 1 
mean major - Will take place this 
summer (1997). Basically, 



Chandler as you and I know it 
will be no more. When school 
resumes in the fall, and you go to 
Chandler for the first time, you'll 
understand exactly what I'm try- 
ing to tell you. 

The NEW and IMPROVED 
Chandler Dining Hall will be 
structured just like one of those 
food courts in the malls. 

Tfou'rltje able to walk right up 
to the counter and order whatev- 
er you want - no more long lines 
lingering in loops around the lob- 
bies when there is only one 
"good" thing to eat! 

In my next couple of articles I 
would like to focus on the differ- 
ent parts of the renovation pro- 




ject. Let's start first with "Little 
Italy." Yes, the names are going 
to stay... hey, you can't change 
everything! 

"Littie Italy" today consists of 
pizza and some noodles with 
some sauce...mmm... To myself 
and a lot of others, this sound 



like a pretty poor excuse for an 
Italian food line. 

Now, with tomorrow's "Littte 
Italy" everything will be differ- 
ent. No more waiting in line to 
get a piece of pizza when the 20 
people in front of you are waiting 
for them to bring out the next vat 
of noodles. 

You'll be able to make your 
very own personal pan pizzas, by 
picking only the toppings you 
want. You'll be able to get real 
Italian dishes too! 

Everything will be made-to- 
order, exactly how you want it to 
be. 

Sounds great right? So what's 
the catch you ask? Nothing! 



Prices are not going up! Service 
is not going down! Nothing! 
This is what you asked for, so this 
is what you are getting. 

Fear not summer students and 
faculty, even though the renova- 
tion will occur this summer, it is 
most likely it will not affect you 
and your treks to Chandler, but if 
there is some inconvenience, 
DAKA is very sorry. 

Next week... more on the reno- 
vation of Deb's Diner and The 
Sandwich Shack. 

Don't forget to check out the 
drawings on display in 
Chandler's lobby! See the future 
before it begins! Till next time, 
eat up! 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



October 17, 19% 



October 17. 19% 



The Clarion Calf 



News of the weird by Chuck Shepherd 



Page 1 1 



LEAD STORIES 

— Dangerous Minds: In the 
same week in September, 
Southwest Elementary School in 
Lexington, N.C., suspended a 6- 
year-old boy for kissing a girl on 
the cheek ("sexual harassment") 
and the New York Supreme 
Court disallowed the suspension 
of a 15-year-old boy who was 
carrying a loaded gun at William 
Howard Taft High School in the 
Bronx. 

— Wayward Principals: On 
Sept. 3, the principal of Sylvia 
Elementary School in Beckley, 
W.Va., George S. Meadows, 55, 
was suspended after being arrest- 
ed for prostitution (He was wear- 
ing a wig and dressed as a 
woman at the time). On Sept. 4, 
the principal of Charles Brush 
High School in Lyndhurst, Ohio, 
Walter Conte, 50, was arrested 
and charged with clandestinely 
videotaping 16 cheerleaders as 
they changed into swimsuits for a 
party at his lakefront home. 

— In August, the Copenhagen 
(Denmark) Zoo added an exhibit 
to its primate collection, amid the 
baboons and chimpanzees: a 
Homo sapiens couple who will 
go about their daily business in a 
Plexiglas-walled natural habitat 
consisting of kitchen, living 
room, bedroom and workshop, as 
well as a computer, television, 
telephone, stereo and fax 
machine. Said a Zoo official, 
"We are all ... monkeys in a way, 
but some people find that hard to 



accept." . 

LATEST RELIGIOUS MES- 
SAGES 

— The Lazarus Society in 
Cologne, Germany, recently 
released a "Confession by 
Computer" CD, with a menu of 
the 200 most-frequent sins and a 
separate program to allow the 
particularly iniquitous to cus- 
tomize the sins to which they will 
confess. 

Appropriate penances are pre- 
scribed, as well as a link to 
priests via the Internet. 

The German Conference of 
Bishops quickly denounced the 
disk. And in June, Rev. David E. 
Courter of the Independent 
Catholic Church International 
told an Associated Press reporter 
he would soon celebrate Mass 
on-line and allow people to take 
communion via computer by 
placing unleavened bread in front 
of their monitors. 

— In April, Eastern Orthodox 
monks in the former Soviet 
republic of Moldova signed a 
contract with the Exiton corpora- 
tion, one of the leading builders 
of the severely depressed 
Moldovan economy. 

Under the contract, Exiton 
would help support a monastery 
and assist the monks in recover- 
ing lost icons, and the monks 
would pray for Exiton's bottom 
line. 

— Completely separate police 
investigations began in August in 
Lake Helen, Fla., and Woburn, 



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Mass., after parents complained 
that their children had been bap- 
tized without permission at local 
churches (Central Fellowship 
Baptist in Florida and Anchor 
Baptist in Massachusetts). 
Anchor allegedly lured housing- 
project kids with a promise of 
pizza, which the kids say they 
never received. 

— In May, Social Security 
Commissioner Shirley Chater 
went against an agency policy by 
reassigning a Social Security 
number based on a religious 
complaint. 

Eric and Maria Bessem's tod- 
dler had been assigned a number 
containing 666 (the biblical 
"mark of the beast") and protest- 
ed by refusing to claim the child 
on income tax forms. 

A Pentecostal pastor near the 
Bessems' home in Orange 
County, Calif., has a zip code of 
92666 but says he accepts it 
because it is not a personal iden- 
tifier like the Social Security 
number. 

— Recently, the All-Merciful 
Saviour Russian Orthodox 
Monastery realized it needed to 
raise money through an entrepre- 



neurial venture. 

Since the order is located on 
Vashon Island near Seattle, it 
decided to make and market four 
blends of gourmet coffee, at $20 
to- $30 a pound, including its sig- 
nature blend, Abbot's Choice. 

WELL, WHAT DID THEY 
EXPECT? 

— At a preliminary hearing in 
July in Guthrie, Okla., a woman 
said Jimmy Don Branun assault- 
ed her in his mobile home and 
then changed into black panty- 
hose, a garter belt, women's 
underpants, a training bra, and 
white, high-heeled shoes. 

The victim ran out the door and 
escaped when Branun was not 
able to keep up with her in his 
high heels. 

— Tom Murphy of Pittsburgh 
sold his 30 homing pigeons last 
year after an injury left him 
unable to care for them. 

Two were sold to buyers in 
Amarillo and Austin, Texas. In 
August, the two escaped and flew 
back to Murphy, making* the 
1,500 miles in about five days. 

— In August at the Loyal, Wis., 
Corn Fest, Steven Schiller, 24, 



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and Kevin Froba, 25, won prizes 
at the familiar strength game in 
which a contestant slams a mallet 
onto a device that causes a 
weight to ascend and ring a bell. 
However, they later complained 
to the game operator about the 
quality of their prizes, and an 
altercation ensued. Schiller and 
Froba were hospitalized after the 
operator hit each of them in the 
head with the mallet. 

UH-OH 

— In May, Karen Watson, 20, 
gave birth to a baby boy in 
Albany, Ore., which she said took 
her completely by surprise, 
though she said she had been suf- 
fering from anemia. 

Of course, this was not the first 
case of a woman's unexpectedly 
giving birth, but Watson is a pre- 
med biology major at the 
University of California, Davis, 
with plans to go into family prac- 
tice. 

— Latest Postal Service- 
Firearms News: In August in 
New Egypt, N.J., letter-sorter 
Rodger Johnson, 44, was arrested 
after a search of his booby- 
trapped home revealed explo- 
sives, gas grenades, 85 guns and 
thousands of rounds of ammuni- 
tion. 

And in Paterson, N.J., two days 
later, Postal Service mechanic 
Danny Isku was arrested for 
shooting his supervisor in the 
hand, and news reports indicated 
Isku was a member of a Paterson 
postal workers' gun club. 

— In May, an unidentified co- 
pilot on a Danish Maersk airlines 
flight from Birmingham, 
England, to Milan, Italy, with 49 
passengers aboard had an anxiety 
attack over France because he 
was afraid of heights. He later 
resigned. 

THINNING THE HERD 

— In September, a man was 
crushed to death on a stairway at 
the Sammis Real Estate and 
Insurance office in Huntington, 
N.Y., in the process of stealing 
the office's 600-pound safe; he 
apparently violated the cardinal 
rule of stairway-safe-hauling by 
standing on a step lower than the 
one the safe is on. (And it turned 
out the safe was empty.) 

And in Thcson, Ariz., a man 
intending to commit suicide in 
September is still alive. 

He turned on the gas in his trail- 
er home and sat down to go in 
peace, but then decided to smoke 
a last cigarette. 

An explosion followed, and he 
was hospitalized with first and - 
second-degree burns. 



AKOUJQD -M- AY}QWZ in Clarion 



Thursday 



•The MLK Committee 
present "Rethinking 
American Slavery" 7 
p.m. (Gem MP) 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
The Ghost and the 
Darkness (R) 7 & 
9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Flyaway Home (PG) 
7:05 & 9:15 
A Long Kiss 
Goodnight (R) 7 & 
9:30 



3riday 



•Admissions Day (248 
Gem) 9 a.m. 
•Madrigal singers' 
Concert (Chap) 8:15 
p.m. 

•PROUD Disabilities 
Awareness week ends 
•Tennis at PSAC 
Championships (Erie) 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club (PG) 
7:10 & 9:25 
The Ghost and the 
Darkness (R) 7 & 9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 

ATER 

Flyaway Home (PG) 

7:05 & 9:15 

A Long Kiss Goodnight 

(R) 7 & 9:30 



Saturday 



•Football vs. California 
1 p.m. 

•Major Admissions 
Visit (All campus) 
•Tennis at PSAC 
Championships (Erie) 
•Cross Country at 
Gettysburg Invitational 
•IM Tug of war begins 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
The Ghost and the 
Darkness (R) 7 & 
9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Flyaway Home (PG) 
7:05 & 9:15 
A Long Kiss 
Goodnight (R) 7 & 
9:30 



Sunday /Monday 



•Contemporary Music 
Concert (Aud) 3:15 

GARBY THEATER 
First Wives Club 
(PG) 7:10 & 9:25 
The Ghost and the 
Darkness (R) 7 & 
9:30 

ORPHEUM THE- 
ATER 

Flyaway Home (PG) 
7:05 & 9:15 
A Long Kiss 
Goodnight (R) 7 & 
9:30 



•Early Registration 

begins for 1997 Spring 

Semester 

•Faculty Senate 

Meeting (B-8 Chap) 4 

p.m. 

•Women Studies 

"brown bag" luncheon 

(250/252 Gem) 12-1 

p.m. 

•UAB Line Dancing 

(Gem MP) 8 p.m. 



Tuesday Wednesday 



•Volleyball at Lock 
Haven 7 p.m. 
•IM volleyball begins 
•Timeout Luncheon 
(Holiday Inn) Noon 
•UAB Movie Night 
(local theater) TBA 



•UAB Wellness Series 
"Wellness Inventory" 
(248 Gem) 2 p.m. 
•Leadership 
Development Series 
(250/252 Gem) 
6:30-9 p.m. 
•UAB presents The 
Warrens "Seekers of 
the Super Natural" 
(Gem MP) 8 p.m. 




Tennis not for the poor, or the squeamish by Dave Barry 



So I went to the U.S. Open ten- 
nis tournament, which is a big 
tennis event in New York City, 
which by the way has gotten 
much nicer. I say this because, as 
I was getting out of a taxi, 1 was 
startled by the sound of a 
woman's voice, coming from 
somewhere behind me, saying 
something like, "Please check 
for your personal belongings!" 

I assume that this was a record- 
ed announcement, being played 
as part of New York's visitor- 
courtesy campaign. Either that, 
or some poor woman is locked in 
the trunk, and if you keep listen- 
ing she says: "Please get me out 
of here!" 

But getting back to the U.S. 
Open: This is definitely the place 
to be if you want to see the finest 
tennis players in the world throw 
up. (More on this later.) But I 
warn you: You might be intimi- 
dated by the crowd. I was. 

I'm more used to football 
crowds, the type of crowd where 
you can paint your body and 
dance on the seats and blow on a 
giant plastic hom and wear an 
animal-shaped hat the size of a 
fire hydrant and scream insults at 
the officials so loud that traces of 
your saliva wind up in the hair of 
people sitting 38 rows in front of 
you, and you will not even be 
noticed. 



Tennis is not like this. The U.S. 
Open crowd is made up mainly 
of your wealthy, upper-crust, 
wine-snot type of individual, the 
type of individual who is gen- 
uinely concerned about the rising 
cost of helicopter maintenance, 
the type of individual who does 
n#t personally do The Wave 
because he or she has a staff for 
that purpose. 

Tennis has tried to soften its 
elitist image via such public-out- 
reach programs as having the top 
players go into the inner cities 
and donate their used polo ponies 
to the poor. 

But the sport still attracts main- 
ly your conservative, reserved 
fan. The entire U.S. Open crowd 
makes less noise cheering than a 
single New York Jets fan makes 
burping. 

I'll tell you one reason why ten- 
nis doesn't appeal to the masses: 
The rules were invented by 
insane people (specifically, the 
French). 

IX you, look at a normal sport 
such as baseball, you see that the 
rules are very logical: three 
strikes is an out, unless the third 
one is a foul tip (but NOT if the 
catcher catches it), or if the catch- 
er drops the third strike, in which 
case the batter may advance, pro- 
vided that there are runners on 
first or first and second and fewer 



than two outs ... no, wait, that's 
the Infield Fly Rule. 

But my point is that baseball 
makes sense; whereas tennis has 
a virtually random scoring sys- 
tem. 

When players win a 'point," 
most of the time they actually get 
15 points, except sometimes, for 
no apparent reason, they get 10 
points, and sometimes (this is 
during the "tie-breaker") they 
get one point, and sometimes 
they get NO points, which means 
they are at 'deuce," which has 
something to do with "ad." I 
think a big reason why tennis 
crowds are so quiet is that every- 
body's sitting there thinking: 
"What the HELL is the score?" 

This is not to say that tennis 
isn't exciting. I saw a moment at 
the U.S. Open -the tennis world 
is still talking about this moment 
- when Pete Sampras, with the 
score tied (also known as 
"deuce") (or possibly "ad") in 
the fifth set" (or possibly 
"game") of an extremely tense 
"match" (or "furlong"), reached 
deep within himself and - as the 
truly great athletes will - ralphed 
(or, in tennis lingo, "lobbed his 
lunch") right on the court. And 
then he won! The crowd was so 
excited that at the end of the 
match, one fan - 1 swear I am not 
making this up - ran down to 



courtside and got the actual towel 
that had been used to clean up 
after Sampras. 

The fan then left the stadium, 
proudly waving this fabulous tro- 
phy over his head. Imagine: A 
towel containing Pete Sampras' 
actual puke! Everybody at the 
country club is going to be SO 
jealous! 

Let me stress that, despite the 
Sampras episode, tennis is good 
for your health. I know this 
because while I was at the U.S. 
Open, Donna Shalala, the U.S. 
Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, materialized for no 
apparent reason and held a press 
conference at which she revealed 
the startling information that, 
according to a study commis- 
sioned by her and performed by 
the Surgeon General - EXER- 
CISE IS GOOD FOR YOU. I am 
dead serious. They gave out a 
press kit and everything. 

It wasn't made clear why 
Secretary Shalala chose to 
announce this at a tennis tourna- 
ment, where the participants and 
most of the spectators already 
engage in a physical activity (ten- 
nis). 

Wouldn't it have been more log- 
ical for her to make her 
announcement at some locale 
where people mostly just sit 
around doing nothing, such as a 



bar or a golf course? Do you sup- 
pose she really just wanted to 
watch the U.S. Open? Are other 
Cabinet members going to pull 
the same scam? 

Are we going to see, for exam- 
ple, the Secretary of 
Transportation showing up at the 
Super Bowl to announce that, 
according to a study, the Earth is 
round? But never mind that. 

The point is that, according to a 
study paid for by your personal 
tax dollars, exercise is good for 
you. 

Doesn't that make you want to 
get up and DO something? It def- 
initely makes me want to do 
something. Somebody get me a 
towel. 



EMERSON'S 
RESTAURANT 



•Reasonable 

Food Prices 
•Six Packs To Go 
•WOW...6-Packof 

Busch $3.00 
•6-Pack of Old 

Pounders $3.30 



RT.322 - 128S BIST MAIN ST. 

BETWEEN SHOT a BILO 

226-8101 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 




Studytatf Abroad M 
Matta by Carey Best 



My name is Carey Best, and I 
went to Malta for the spring 
semester in 1996. While thinking 
of going on this trip, I had some 
major concerns. Would I be able 
to get everything accomplished, 
would I make friends, would I 
have time to make friends, and 
would I run out of money, to 
name a few. Also, would I feel 
comfortable enough there for five 
months? After arriving, a feeling 
of being "at home" fell over me. 
The Maltese people have a way 
of opening themselves to others 
through their hospitality, and 
experiencing it puts one at ease. I 
started to feel like I had always 
belonged there. I got the same 
feeling from the land itself. Just 
sitting out in nature alone, listen- 
ing to the waves of the sea and 
the birds chirping, brought a 
sense of calm and peace to me 
that I never took time to appreci- 
ate in the United States. I came 
away from Malta with a level of 
quiet within myself that I had not 
experienced before. That's just 
one thing that changed my life 
while I was in Malta. 

Malta has unique history (many 
sites are older than the Pyramids 
of Egypt). Some sites are still 
fortressed in by high walls, and 
some seaside areas appear not to 



have been touched by humans. 
This makes it a great place for 
movies to be filmed (i.e.. The 
Blue Lagoon). There are oppor- 
tunities to do things that you nor- 
mally wouldn't get the chance to 
do here at Clarion like scuba div- 
ing, snorkeling, exploring caves 
in boats, and going to the casino 
which is right on the beach, to 
name a few. 

People of other nationalities 
(Hungarian, Italian, Norwegian, 
Moroccan, etc.) also contributed 
to my experience. It was quite a 
shock to see just how relaxed and 
easy going the Europeans really 
are. They work hard and play 
even harder. 

Money was not a concern for 
most of them and they would not 
let it be a concern for anyone 
else, either. 

We had no problems finding 
things to do that were inexpen 
sive or free. If someone could 
not afford to go out, everyone 
would pitch in to help so that 
they could join in. Most people 
had been in Malta for five to six 
months before I had arrived, so I 
was introduced to many others 
immediately. Being accepted by 
everyone made my self-confi 
dence and self-esteem soar. 

I wish that I had more time to 
see and do many of the things 
that Malta has to offer. In the 
future, I want to go back to make 
up for it. So, if you are looking 
for "fun in the sun", Malta's the 
place. By the way, the classes are 
great, and all of my credits are 
transferring back to Clarion. 

Anyone interested in participat 
ing in the Clarion/Malta 
exchange program should meet 
with Dr. Helen Lepke, Director 
of International Programs, as 
soon as possible. Clarion stu- 
dents spend spring semester in 
Malta, Maltese students are here 




PEACE TREE 
P.O. Box 3454 
DOYLESTON, PA 18901 

Celebrating The 60's Experience 

Write Us For A Free Catalog 

or CALL (215)794-2865 






Where m Clarion are Calvin & Hobbes? 






*.* 



■.-- v 



Last see.n hanging 
around bt floor N. 
Of library. 



Anyoi ie. Knowing their whereabouts 
contact the IMC. PLEASE BftING 
< "AlvrWAJlOiJBFS HOME! 



in the fall. The University ot you'll have good weather while 

Malta offers a great variety of we're shoveling snow in Clarion 

courses, wonderful housing facil- Call ext. 2340 and make your 

ities, and terrific food. And yes, appointment now! 



/Music Review 




by genj/luman 



The state of music these days sur- 
prises me. Six years ago, the two 
bands being reviewed in this 
piece and others like them, would 
have nowhere near the main- 
stream popularity they have now. 
Today, anyone can be on MTV or 
commercial radio and do quite 
well with it. It can be an openly 
gay man like Bob Mould (who I 
saw live in an incredible concert 
last week) or cross dressing, psy- 
chotic nut bars like Marilyn 
Manson (whose new album I 
reviewed last week). Yep, the 
state of music has changed, but 
for the better. 

The norm for many years 
before about 1991 was that 
unless you come from New York 
or L.A., forget about making it 
anywhere. Not so, anymore. 
Today, your band can come from 
East Butt Crack, New 
Hampshire, and if you are good 
enough, talented enough, hard 
working and alittle lucky, you 
have a good chance of making 
that fream come true - or at least 
making a living at what you love. 
Like 'em or not, look at Live 
(from York PA) or Alanis 
Morrisette (from Ottawa, Ontario 
of all places). There are many 
more examples. 

Whether you like the music that 
is out now or not, remember that 
the current state is giving more 
opportunities to people who may 
not have had an opportunity B.C. 
(before Cobain). 

That is a good thing. And with, 
that... 

The new one from Rusted Root, 
Remember on Mercury Records. 
At last, a band from Pittsburgh 
makes it big. I respect them a 
great deal for that (progress)! 

Remember comes to us already 
packaged with multiple personal- 
ities. Here they are: 

Personality #1 : the normal 
state, A.K.A. the Rusted Root 
that appeared on their last album 
"When I Woke," and here in 



Clarion last spring. Songs like 
"Voodoo," "Who Will You Tell It 
To," and "Infinite Space," are all 
what you expect from these guys. 
Funky percussion beats (drums!), 
chanting, flutes, up tempo, inde- 
scribable tunes. 

Personality #2: the "Hootie syn- 
drome." Tracks like "Sister 
Contine" (also the albums' first 
single), "Silver-n-Gold," "Bullets 
In the Fire" and "Heaven," very 
stripped down, rock baMadish, 
high-school slow dance type 
songs. One needs to check twice 
to make sure they are listening to 
the same band. Can you say 
Hootie? 

Personality #3 : the "whatever- 
the-hell-it-wants-to-be 
Syndrome." This includes songs 
like "Virtual Reality," up tempo 
country-pop, ready for the county 
fair at any time. I actually think I 
heard a "yeehaa" in the back- 
ground somewhere. I think I 
heard goats too. 

Next you know, they'll be 
doing the theme for Monday 
Night Football. 

There's also "Faith I Do 
Believe," with its rock bass and 
drum beats, sounds like the band 
Helmet took a wrong turn at the 
home of an African tribe, where 
they proceeded to play a show 
together. 

These are the three sides of 
Remember. Take it whatever 
way you want it. 



October 17, 1996 

And now for something com- 
pletely different. We have Bad 
Brains, Black Dots, on Caroline 
Records. Imagine the surprise I 
fell when I was at Eides in 
Pittsburgh last week and saw a 
NEW Bad Brains (one of my per- 
sonal favorite bands) release. But 
it was not to be. This album is the 
a re-mastered version of the 
bands very first recording session 
from 1979. 

Influencing everyone from the 
Red Hot Chili Peppers to the 
Beastie Boys, the Bad Brains, 
have accomplished a great deal. 
They have been punk rock pio- 
neers with their blitzkrieg style of 
hard-core and reggae. They have 
broken down color barriers. Their 
audience often is a "melting pot" 
of people (where else, in 1982, 
could you have seen four black 
men playing for a crowd of skin- 
heads and mohawk sportin' 
punks?), and they were one of the 
first acts to be physically banned 
from performing in a major met- 
ropolitan a*ea (Washington 
D.C.), for which they wrote a 
song which appears on this 
album, called appropriately 
enough, "Banned in D.C." 

Now they are no more after 
their singer H.R.. did his best 
G.G Allin impersonation and 
nailed a fan with a mike stand at 
a show last year. This album is 
their last will and testament. 

Classic 'Brains like "Pay To 
Cum," "Don't Need It," and 
"Attitude," appear and in a much, 
much slower versions. These 
songs, in their normal stale, are 
hard-core blasts of punk deliri- 
um. Black Dots also features un- 
released reggaeish tracks like 
"How Low can a Punk Get," and 
"Just Another Damn Song," 
which make the album worth 
buying for die-hard fans like me. 
Anyone new to their music are 
best checking out albums like 
Bad Brains or I Against I, 
before checking out Black Dots. 

It's off to yonder pastures for me 
for this week. 

Listen to WCCB 1610 am 
everyday from 12-12 (yes I'm 
going to say this every week) and 

have a good one! 



Anyone wishing to add 
events or hifoimation to 

the weekly calendar, 
please drop infoimaticn 

off at the Call office. 



October 17. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Paee 13 



Call On You 




If you could make improve- 
ment to the Health Center 
what would it be? 




Justin Gvoth, Junior, Business Management 

"You should be able to just go right in and take a 

break and He down for the day. Like in high 

school, and the nurse should call your mom." 





•; ■ : 




Tina Rulewicz, Freshman, Political Science 

"I was really disappointed by the quality of the 

service I received at the Health Center." 



Carissa Ordiway, Sophomore, Business 

"I called for an appointment on Monday and 

they said they couldn't fit me in until Friday! 

They should hire more doctors" 



Veronica Schaffer, Junior, Psychology 

'Hire more doctors because you could be dead by 

the time they fit yOii in." 






Holly Eisenman, Junior, Elementary Education 

"Have the right medicine prescribed- It 's usually 

ammoxicillian for everything." 



Chris Greco, Sophomore, Undecided 

"I think that they should review some medical 

books and learn how to diagnose 

sickness correctly." 



-— . i^— ^— — — 



Wayne Ailing, Senior, Communication 
"Better looking nurses.' 



» 



— — ^ — — 




Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 17, 1996 



ENTERTAINMENT- 





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10 Fail to make 
contact with 

14 Toward shelter 

15 Reddish purple 

16 Roman: abbr. 

17 Fly high 

18 Map within a 
map 

19 Roman ruler 

20 Allow 
22 Send 

24 Accumulate 

26 Army bed 

27 Send forth 
30 Abbreviate 

34 Young boy 

35 Free-for-all 

37 Daring 

38 Distant 

40 Loved ones 

42 Fibs 

43 Used a 
stopwatch 

45 Wooden box 
47 Explosive 



48 Least difficult 




50 Small balls 




52 Bad: pref. 


1 Traveling 


53 Stage 


musician 


54 Outdoor heat 


1 1 Object 


producer 


12 Indian dress 


58 Vendor 


1 3 Coin opening 


62 Bread spread - 


21 Muslim priest 


63 Raccoon relative 


23 Midday 


65 Dell 


25 Choose 


66 Eons 


27 Make happy 


67 TV personality 


28 Tightly knit 


68 Give off 


group 


69 Tardy 


29 John Quincy — 


70 Asparagus unit 


30 Angel 


71 Bodies of water 


31 Banal 




32 Happening 


DOWN 


33 Cozy places 


1 Grating sound 


36 Hearing organ 


2 Medicinal plant 


39 Levy again 


3 Adjacent to 


41 More reliable 


4 Berlin resident 


44 Unable to hear 


5 Aped 


46 Otherwise 


6 Grown boy 


49 Cuts into 


7 Some sculptures 


servings 


8 At any time 


51 Military 


9 Disconnect 


vacations 



Octoberl?. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



ENTERTAINMENT 



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Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 17. 1996 



October 17, 1996 



The Clarion Calf 



Page 17 



ENTERTAINMENT 



STAMPEDE 




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Co^ReIe STEPS 

Warps 






Leold 

by Roger & Salem Salloom 

My dad has this feature on 
our home phone so that if someone 
calls while I'm already talking I can 
answer the new call and tell them to 
wait and I'll be right back to them...or 
whatever I want to say. ...it's called call 
waiting. 

A lot of people have these 
lealuies nowadays. 

So, listen to this 

I'm talking on the phone 
about sports injuries to my triend 
Benny. 

My dad gels a call from his 
mother. So I click the phone so that 
he can talk to my grandmother. 

Dad finishes and somehow 
ends up saying to Benny... 

"I love you very much sweetie 
and you are in my thoughts every night 
just before I go to bed. Goodbye. " 

Benny said, 

'Thanks Mr. Brownie, you're 
in my thoughts too. I'll stop by soon 
to say hi." 

Life is good. 




SPORTS 



Golden Eagles wreck Shipp 



by Brett Skovera 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The Clarion Golden Eagle foot- 
ball team extended their perfect 
record in PS AC- West action to 2- 
with a 59-20 win over 
Shippensburg Saturday. Overall 
the Golden Eagles stand at 5-1 
and play host to California this 
Saturday. 

Against Shipp, Clarion struck 
first at 13:44 in the first quarter 
when fullback Jamie Sicken ran 
it in from ten yards out. Palisin's 
kick put Clarion up 7-0. 

Four minutes later junior quar- 
terback Chris Weibel connected 
with wideout Mark Witte from 
five yards out giving the visiting 
Golden Eagles a 14-0 lead. 
Junior place kicker Tyler Palisin 
opened up the scoring the second 
quarter with a season-long 35 
yard field goal. 

After Shippensburg went three 
plays and out, linebacker Thomas 
Williams recovered a Jason 
Drayton blocked punt and 
returned it 23 yards putting 
Clarion up 24-0. With 3:25 left 
in the half Weibel connected once 
again, only this time to senior 
Chris Skultety. Skultety's 28 
yard grab made it Clarion 31, 
Shippensburg 6. 

In the second half senior all- 
purpose back Steve Witte 
accounted for Clarion's next 
score. Steve's one yard run was 
followed by Mark's 59 yard catch 
from Weibel. 

Witte's grab put Clarion up 45- 
6. Weibel connected again in the 
third from 33 yards out. Alvin 
Slaughter's catch made it Clarion 
52-6 at the end of three. 

Junior Jason Drayton came 



through once again on the defen- 
sive side of the ball. Drayton's 
96 yard fumble recovery, for a 
score, ended the Golden Eagles 
route 59-20. 

Quarterback Chris Weibel 
earned PSAC-West "Offensive 
Player of the Week" honors for 



last two weeks. 

Clarion's offense currently 
ranks third in the PSAC in total 
offense (435.2) and scoring 
(37.7), while getting 229.2 rush- 
ing yards and 206 passing yards 
per game. 
Quarterback Chris Weibel has 



15 passes for 278 yards and 2 
td's. 

Overall, Witte has 703 all-pur- 
pose yards and is averaging 8.2 
yards every time he touches the 
ball. Steve's career totals include 
40 td's, 31 rushing and 9 receiv- 
ing. 




Clarion hosts California this 

his performance. Weibel com- 
pleted 15 passes for 316 yards 
and 4 touchdowns. 

Under third year head coach 
Malen Luke, Clarion is off to a 
fast start in '96. The Golden 
Eagles started off the year with 
three straight victories against 
West Virginia Wesleyan (38-14), 
Westminster (13-6), and 
Glenville St. (49-23), then lost to 
Div. I-AA power Youngstown St. 
(51-10). 

The Golden Eagles rebounded 
by beating Lock Haven (57-3), 
and Shippensburg (59-20) in the 



Saturday at 1 

completed 78 of 136 passes for 
1,131 yards and 11 td's, while 
rushing for 129 yards and 2 td's. 
At the other end of Weibel's 
passes are wideouts Alvin 
Slaughter (16 catches, 244 yards, 
3 td's), Chris Skultety (11 catch- 
es, 178 yards, 3td's), and Mark 
Witte (13 catches, 162 yards, 3 
td's). 

Runningbacks Steve Witte, Ron 
DeJidas, and Jamie Sickeri pace 
the attack on the ground. 

Witte, who is having another 
stellar season, has rushed for 425 
yards and 6 td's while catching 



Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 

Junior Ron DeJidas is also hav- 
ing a strong '96 campaign. So far 
DeJidas has rushed for 422 yards 
on 72 carries, plus caught 8 pass- 
es for 110 yards. 

Sickeri, who moved into the 
starting lineup after Godfrey 
Bethea's season ending knee 
injury, has rushed for 100 yards 
and 2 td's on 1 1 carries. 

Clarion's defense is fourth in 
the PSAC in total defense (302.6) 
and in scoring defense (19.5). 
The Golden Eagles are yielding 
95.2 yards on the ground and 
207.3 through the air. 



Up front nosegaurd Jason 
Slizofski (24 tackles, 3 sacks, 2 
tfl's), and tackles Joe Bzorek (34 
hits, 7 sacks), Wayne Ailing (16 
stops, 2 tfl's), and Justin Miller 
(21 tackles, 5 sacks) lead the 
way. 

Outside linebackers Alim 
Kamara (38 stops, 4 tfl's) and 
Mike Maquire (23 stops, 4 sacks, 
4 tfl's) guard the perimeters, 
while inside linebackers Thomas 
Williams (65 tackles, 1 intercep- 
tion, 1 blocked punt returned for 
td), Keith Kochert (31 tackles, 1 
interception), and Erik Baumener 
(34 stops, 1 interception) anchor 
the middle. 

The secondary is led once again 
by All-American Kim Niedbala. 
Niedbala has 70 tackles, and 2 
fumble recoveries. Cornerback 
Jason Drayton, PSAC-West 
"Defensive Player of the Week", 
has 36 stops, 1 interception, 2 
blocked punts, and scored 2 td's 
on a blocked punt and a fumble 
recover)'. 

Clarion's next opponent, the 
California Vulcans are averaging 
308.8 yards and 15.8 points per 
game. 

The Vulcan offense is led by 
quarterback Mike Yurcich. 
Yurcich has completed 58 of 117 
passes for 685 yards and 3 td's. 

Cal's defense is giving up 315.7 
yards per game, including 156.3 
on the ground and 151.8 through 
the air. 

Clarion Notes: Cal out gained 
Edinboro 398-191 last 
Saturday„.Edinboro's strong run- 
ning game was held to 39 yards 
on the day... Clarion faces confer- 
ence foe I.U.P. on November 
2nd...I.U.P. is currently ranked #1 
in NCAA Division II. 



NFL week 7 highlights. Green Bay shines 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Writer 



Buccaneers 24, Vikings 13 

Trent Dilfer had a career day 
passing for 218 yards and three 
touchdowns to lead Tampa Bay 
(1-5) to their first win of the sea- 
son. Dilfer, who owns the sec- 
ond-worst quarterback rating in 
the league, connected on 22 of 35 
passes and two touchdowns to 
Robb Thomas. He then hit full- 



back Mike Alstott for a 12-yard 
scoring strike in the fourth quar- 
ter. This was the first time in the- 
past 1 1 ^games where Dilfer did 
not throw an interception. Bucs 
head coach Tony Dungy recorded 
his first victory as leader of 
Tampa's ship. 

Cowboys 17, Cardinals 3 

Dallas (3-3) welcomed back 
wide receiver Michael Irvin from 



his drug suspension with a home 
victory over Arizona(2-4). 
Emmil Smith ran for 112 yards 
and two touchdowns, including 
the 100th of his career in the 
Cowboy win. Quarterback Troy 
Aikman completed 23 of 37 pass- 
es for 199 yards and one inter- 
ception. Irvin, back in the Dallas 
lineup after serving a five -game 
suspension for violating the 
NFL's substance abuse policy, 



caught five passes for 51 yards 
on the day. Arizona quarterback 
Kent Graham struggled against 
the Cowboy defense. Graham 
completed just 16 of 31 passes 
for only 141 yards. 

Colts 26, Ravens 21 

After trailing Baltimore (2-4) 
14-13 halfway through the third 
quarter, the Indianapolis Colts (5- 
1) scored two late second half 



touchdowns to squeak past the 
Ravens. Jim Harbaugh threw a 
touchdown pass and Cary 
Blanchard kicked two field goals, 
while running back Marshall 
Faulk scored on a 1 yard run in 
the Colts win. Linebacker Jeff 
Herrod also picked off a Vinnie 
Testaverde pass and returned it 
68 yards for a score. 

continued on p. 20 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 17. 1996 



Lady Eagles defeated by Edinboro 



by Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



Hey, volleyball fans! It's been a 
busy week for the Lady Eagles. 
Last weekend, they hosted the 
Clarion Classic Tournament, and 
then on Tuesday they hosted the 
Edinboro Fighting Scots. 
Although their record for this 
week was 1 and 3, they remain 
fourth in the Western Division. 
Friday night at the Clarion 
Classic, the Spikers faced Lock 
Haven once again this season. 
They played five matches but 
were defeated 3-2. The game 
began on the downside as Clarion 
lost to Edinboro 10-15. Things 
began to look up as the Lady 
Eagles won the next two, 15-13 
and 15-7, but then lost the fourth 
15-3. 

In the fifth match, where every 
sideout is a point no matter who 
served, they lost 12-15. 

Saturday, Clarion had two 
games. In the first game, St. 




Jeff Levkulich/Clarion Call 
The Lady Eagles hosted Edinboro Tuesday night 

Francis swept the Lady Eagles ready. 
10-15, 11-15, 15-17. Coach Jodi The last game of the tourna- 

Burns feels that the loss was ment was against Westminster, 

because the team just wasn't The spikers were back on their 



game and swept Westminster 15- 
11, 15-9, and 15-11. For this 
game thiet was a change up front 
as Brooke Paxton took over as 
the main setter. 

She is second on the team with 
247 assists prior to the Edinboro 
game. Jill Platteborz leads with 
498 assists, including Tuesday 
night numbers. 

Edinboro is the number one 
ranked team in the Western 
Division. 

Coach Burns knew that the bat- 
tle would be rough to hold out 
for more than three matches 
Tuesday night. 

The team didn't show much 
confidence in themselves as they 
were pushed around in the first 
match and lost 0-15. 

Between matches one and two, 
the Lady Eagles did some soul 
searching and came back to 
defeat Edinboro 15-9. Coach 
Burns was pleased with the game 
even though the Scots won the 
last two matches, both with 



scores of 12-15. "This game 
proved a lesson to the team. It 
proved that they can play the best 
and beat them," stated Burns. 
"The entire season has been a 
learning season, but now the girls 
firmly believe in themselves." 
Service aces from Christy Boes 
and Jessa Canfield helped the 
team rack up some points, while 
big blocks in the front from 
everybody held Edinboro back. 
Curtisy Hilton had 8 kills for the 
spikers Tuesday night. 

Mandy Kirby had 7 kills, Tracy 
Barnett and Jessa Canfield both 
had 4 kills. In the back, Tracy had 
10 digs, Jessa and Mandy had 8 
digs, and Christy had 7 digs. As 
Coach Burns said, "The team did 
a fine job." 

Next week, the Lady Eagles 
travel to meet Lock Haven one 
more time on Tuesday. 

Friday and Saturday they will 
be attending a Tournament at 
Juniata. Tuesday, October 29, 
1UP will be in town. 



October 17. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Clarion grad Vuckovich joins Pirates staff 



Courtesy of Sports Information 



\UVJ ii"'i. 



Pete Vuckovich, an All- 
American pitcher at Clarion 
University in 1974 and the 
American League's "Cy Young" 
Award winner in 1982 with the 
Milwaukee Brewers, was named 
October 7 as the Pitching Coach 
of the Pittsburgh Pirates under 
new manager Gene Lamont. 
Vuckovich, 43, was the Assistant 
General Manager/Director of 
Player Personnel of the Pirates 
under General Manager Cam 



Bonifay since September of 
1995, Special Assistant to the 
G.M. for 1994 and 95, and the 
Pirates Minor League Pitching 
Coordinator from 1992-93. "I'm 
really looking forward to this 
opportunity," stated Vuckovich. 
"I think we have some good 
young arms at the major league 
level, but they need to develop a 
firmer understanding of where 
they are and the importance of 
who they are. I had a great expe- 
rience at Clarion University and 
really enjoyed my time there. 
Coach (Joe) Knowles was very 



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instrumental in my progress as a 
pitcher. He taught me self-disci- 
pline and knowledge of ones' 
self. That was instrumental in my 
development and to becoming a 
major league pitcher." 

A 1970 graduate of Conemaugh 
Valley High School, Vuckovich 
came to Clarion University in the 
Fall of 1970, played under former 
Clarion baseball coach Joe 
Knowles and was an Elementary 
Education major. Vuckovich, a 4- 
year starter, played second base 
and pitched as a freshman, was a 
first team NA1A D-18 and second 
team PSAC selection. From 
1972-74 he was a first team 
NA1A D-18 and PSAC selection 
as a pitcher, plus earned AACBS 
and NA1 A All- America honors in 
1974. He also was over a .300 
hitter in his career, and played 
third base primarily when he 
wasn't on the mound. He had a 
career mound mark of 15-6 with 
the Golden Eagles, and in his ' 
senior year (1974), posted an 



ERA of 0.80. He was selected in 
the third round of the June, 1974 
Free Agent Draft by the Chicago 
White Sox. Pete was immediate- 
ly assigned to Appleton, WI 
(Class A), then moved up to 
Knoxville, Tennessee (Class AA) 
of the Southern League that same 
year and helped the team to the 
Southern League Championship 
in 1974. In 1975 he moved up to 
Class AAA Denver (Colorado) of 
the the American Association. He 
pitched in the AAA All- Star 
game, and that same day (August 
1), White Sox Manager Chuck 
Tanner called him up to the 
Chicago White Sox. In Chicago 
through the 1976 season, Pete 
went to Toronto in 1977 in the 
expansion draft and owns the 
first save and first shutout in Blue 
Jay history. He went to St. Louis 
in 1978 and pitched with the 
Cardinals into the 1980 season 
before being traded to 
Milwaukee. He led the Cards in 
strikeouts and wins before going 



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to the Brewers. He pitched with 
the Brewers from 1981-86 and 
retired in 1987 after two shoulder 
surgeries. Pete led Milwaukee to 
the American League playoffs in 
1981 when he led the American 
League in wins with 14 (144), 
then captured the American 
League Cy Young Award in 1982 
when he posted an 18-6 overall 
record. He led the Brewers to the 
American League Title in 1982, 
but the Brewers lost the World 
Series that year in 7 games. Pete 
compiled a career record of 93- 
69 and appeared in 286 games 
while playing for 11 seasons 
(1975-86). 

Vuckovich was honored at 
Clarion University in 1989 by 
being inducted into the first 
Clarion University Sports "Hall 
of Fame". Concerning his style 
as a pitching coach, Vuckovich 
was very candid. "Pitching is a 
very complex trade. You can't 
clone them. Each individual has 
different styles and they have to 
pitch to their strengths. They 
have have to really know them- 
selves first and what they're all 
about. They have to work hard to 
improve their weaknesses and 
continue their strengths, then 
learn how jo get the most out of 
their stuff (pitches). That's where 
it starts, but there's a lot more to 
it from there on to be a succesful 
major league pitcher." 



Dale M. McUuown, Mgr. 



Pa*e 19 



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Shirley C. Hager, candidate for 

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on Nov. 5th, and would deeply 

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PERSONALS 



Congrats Fall '96. 

Your bigs love you!! 

Love, Your future AST Sisters 



ZTT, Thanks for the mixer! ! 
Love, the Sisters of ALT 



AIT Associate Members - You 
guys are wonderful! Keep up 

the good work! 

AT Love, Lori 



Grandlittle - You are doing a 

wonderful job! Keep up the 

great work! 

AT Love, Lori 



To the Sisters of <DII, 

It's been a blast so far. Can't 

wait till Friday! 

We love you girls, 

Jen, Nickie, Cardine, Amy, 

Christy, and Dara 

Let's do shooters again 
sometime soon BAP! 



Congratulations to our newest 

members, Becky and Kelley! 

Love, Your Phi Sig Sisters 



Lori, you're doing a great job. 

I'm always here if you need me. 

AT Love, Your Big 



The Brothers of Sig Pi 

would like to thank D-Phi-E 

and Kappa Alpha Psi for 

the bondage mixer. We 

had a great time. 



The Brothers of 4>A0 - Thanks 

for the great mixer. 

Love, Delta Zeta 



Happy 21st Birthday to Andrea, 

Stacy, and Lorie! See 

you at the bars! 

Love, Your Sisters of AZ 



The Sisters of Delta Zeta would 

like to welcome Allison and 

Lorie, our two newest 

Associate Members. 



Michael, We met the first week- 
end of ALF last year... and you 
stole my heart I love you! 
Love, Beth Ann 



To Beth Ann, 

Roses are red, violets are blue. 

One year ago, I met you. 

Now forget, I will never. 

Because then I knew, 

I would love you forever. 

Love, Michael 



To the Ladies of AOE and 

the Brothers of HI: 

Thanks for having our first 

mixer with us. We had 

a great time. 

From the Brothers of KA¥ 



Derby Daze is on its way! 

Can't wait to play! 

Sisters of III 



Erin and Jo: 

The winners! Great job 

on the Case Race. 

Love, III 



Denise - The Case Race 

was great Good Job! 

We all had fun! 

Love, III 



KAP, Let's do some 

dancing again! 

Love, III 

Happy Birthday to the October 

Theta Phi's: Robin, Amy S., 

Tonya, Mary Beth, Liz, DJ, 

Carrie, and Krista K. 

Sorry if this is late! 

Love, Your 8<D Sisters 



To our pledgesisters: Tina, 
Jamie, Janine, and Melissa. 

Keep up the good work. 

Love, the BOA Sisters 



To the Brothers of Theta Chi, 

We had a great time at the 

mixer. We'll bond with 

you guys anytime! 

Love, 0OA 



0E, Sorry this is late, but we 

had a blast at the mixer. 

Let's do it again soon! 

Love, 04>A 



To the Brothers of 

in and KA¥: 

Thanks for "Bonding" 

with us at the mixer! 

Love, the Sisters of A<E>E 



To my 5th Ave Buddies: 

Last week was a blast! Can't 

wait do it all again tonight! 

Love, Joy 



A4>E, Sorry this is late, 

but it took so long to get the 

marker off. We had a blast. 

Thank - U - gals. 

Love, KAP 

0<DA, Better late than never. 

We're 'tie - dyin' to do it 

again. Thanks a million 

and call us soon. 

Love, KAP 



KDR would like to congratulate 
Wayne, Adam, Ryan, Bob and 

Dave as the Fall '96 pledge 

class. Keep up the good work. 

Brothers of KAP 



Tiny: 

Roses are red, violets are blue 

No one in the world 

is as fat as YOU! 

Sincerely, Strand of Hair 



Daria, Hey Sweetheart, what's 

up? Just thought we'd say 

"Hello". We love you to death. 

Love, KAP 

III, Tri - Sigma? KDR did! 

The night went too fast. We 

hoped it would last. Come 

back and see us sometime. 

Love, KAP 



AZ, We know we're terrible, 

but here it goes: Pink Turtles, 

Blue Brothers, and Purple 

Horse Shoes, ALF wouldn't 

be the same without yous. 

It was great! 

Love, KAP 



To the Sisters of BAP, damn you 

all to Alcoholics Anonymous. I 

didn't want to be the sweetheart 

of your fake sorority anyway. 

See you at the bar this week. 

Remember acceptance of your 

problem is the first step. 

Love, Lefty 



BAP would like to congratulate 

our little brother pledges- we 

will haze you and make you 

drink a lot of beer. 



Emily- sorry about the mix up 
little, I was drunk! 
Love, your BAP big 



Tina, Welcome to the best 0OA 

family! If you need anything 
you can count on me grandlittle! 
Good job sideshow. Love, MB 



Daddy Ed- Our real sweetheart 

will always be Captain Loomis! 

Love, BAP 



Car, Sarah, and Jen, Spoons was 
fun this weekend! Good thing 
nobody got seriosly hurt! Lefty 



DIMES! 
I said Thursday at the 5th Ave 

NOT Sat at the Tavern! 
And I thought J_was drunk! 



Joy — Its Thursday again! 

Thank God for the 5th Ave! 

Love, Steph 



Page 20 






The Clarion Call 



October 17, 19% 



NFL week #7 highlights continued... 



Running back Byron "Bam" 
Morris also appeared in his first 
game with the Ravens after his 
six game drug suspension. 
Raiders 37, Lions 21 

After starting the season a dis- 
mal 0-3, the Raiders are winners 
of three out of four. Jeff Hostetler 
threw for 295 yards and four 
touchdowns as Oakland (3-4) 
beat up the Detroit Lions (4-3). 
The Hoss hit on 27 of 38 passes, 
with two touchdowns to wide 
receiver James Jeff. Jeff caught 
seven balls for 112 yards while 
rookie tight end Ricky Dudly 
added a 62 yard touchdown grab. 
Detroit QB Scott Mitchell threw 
for three touchdowns for a Lions 
team who has dropped eight of 
their last 12 road games, includ- 
ing all of the meetings with the 
Raiders in California. 
Eagles 19, Giants 10 
Gary Anderson kicked a winning 
field goal with 2:12 remaining in 
the game to give the Eagles the 
win over New York (2-4). 
Linebacker William Thomas 
gave Philly some insurance by 
returning a fumble 23 yards later 
in the 4th quarter to secure the 
win. 

Philadelphia's Rick Walters 
rushed for 110 yards on the day 
as the Eagles (4-2) remain one 
game behind first place 
Washington in the NFC East. 
Dolphins 21, Bills, 7 

The Miami Dolphins (4-2) 
moved into a second place tie 
with their AFC East nemesis 
Buffalo (4-2) on Sunday. The 



Dolphins, who broke a two game 
losing streak, tallied seven sacks 
and four turnovers, while starting 
four rookies on defense. 

Miami also won its first game 
in the last eight without Dan 
Marino, dating back to last year. 
Buffalo QB Jim Kelley returned 
to the lineup after missing two 
games with a hamstring injury, 
and was greeted by an intercep- 
tion by rookie linebacker Zach 
Thomas. Kelly finished the day 
21-32 for 247 yards and three 
picks. 

Panthers 45, Rams 13 
Kerry Collins threw three TD's 
and Kevin Greene returned a 
fumble 66 yards as the Carolina 
Panthers (4-2) set a franchise 
record 45 points in the rout of the 
St. Louis Rams. 

Anthony Johnson, playing for 
the injured Tim Biakabutuka, 
carried 22 times for 122 yards, 
while Collins finished 11 of 18 
and 196 yards in the air. Rams 
rookie quarterback Tony Banks 
continued to struggle, completing 
15 of 29 passes for 163 yards. 
Banks left the game in the fourth 
quarter with a bruised right 
elbow. 

Saints 27, Bears 24 
New Orleans (2-5) took posses- 
sion for the winning score with 
3:52 remaining that set up a 
Doug Brien 54 yard field goal. 
Running back Ray Zellars rushed 
for a career high 174 yards for 
the Saints, while Jim Everett con- 
nected on 22 of 31 throws for 223 
yards and two touchdowns. 



After losing their first five 
games, the Saints are on a two 
game win streak. The Bears (2- 
5) have fallen flat on their faces 
after an impressive week one vic- 
tory over Dallas, and have won 
only one game in their last five. 
Jaguars 21, Jets 17 
Mark Brunell threw a pair of 
touchdown passes as 
Jacksonville (2-4) rallied from 11 
points down to beat the winless 
Jets. The Jags pulled out the win 
despite being outgained 367-289 
and earning only 10 first downs 
to the Jets 24. 

Jacksonville also overcame 15 
penalties that cost them 123 
yards. The New York Jets have 
lost a club record 11 straight 
games dating back to last season, 
and have lost to both 1995 expan- 
sion teams. The Jets are without 
starting quarterback Neil 
O'Donnel for at least another 
four weeks with a shoulder sepa- 
ration. 

Oilers 23, Falcons 13 
Houston (4-2), kept pace with 
the Steelers by beating up win- 
less Atlanta. Rookie running 
back Eddie George had his third 
100 yard game with 23 carries for 
109 yards. George boosted his 
rushing total to 575 yards to lead 
all rookies. 

Kicker Al Del Greco booted 
three field goals on the day for 
Houston, and quarterbacks Chris 
Chandler and Steve McNair each 
accounted for a touchdown. The 
Falcons are off to their worst start 
since 1985 and the second worst 



in franchise history, that coming 
in Atlanta's first year in the 
league when they lost their first 
nine games. 
Redskins 27, Patriots 22 

Gus Ferotte threw for 280 yards 
and a pair of third quarter touch- 
downs, giving Washington (5-1) 
their fifth straight win over New 
England(3-3). 

The Redskins who share the 
best record in the NFL, gave up 
164 yards to Pats running back 
Curtis Martin, but stopped him 
on a potential game tying two 
point conversion run. Henry 
Ellard's eight receptions for 152 
yards a touchdown was the dif- 
ference for Washington, who 
stand in first place of the NFC 
East. Drew Bledsoe was 23 of 48 
for 222 yards for the Patriots, 
who had a three game winning 
streak broken. New England is 
winless in its last five meetings 
with the Redskins. 
Packers 23, 49ers 20 (OT) 

Chris Jacke's 53 yard field goal 
in overtime capped an> 11 point 
second half comeback as the 
Packers (5-1) won the most 
hyped Monday night game of the 
year. Packers wide out Don 
Beebe finished with 11 catches 
for 220 yards, and a controversial 
59 yard touchdown. 

League MVP Brett Favre com- 
pleted 28 of 61 passes for 395 
yards, which was good for the 
second best performance of his 
career. The Pack lost wide receiv- 
er Robert Brooks for the year 
with a knee injury on their first 



Some insights from the Pick Master 



Unexpected occurrences tran- 
spire during the course of a sev- 
enteen week season. A surprising 
example, for instance, would be 
the Washington Redskins, who 
are a respectable 5-1, and on a 



five game winning streak. The 
Pick Master ran up an impressive 
undefeated streak before drop- 
ping his first game of the year 
last week. He is looking to get 
back in the win column this 



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week, in impressive fashion. The 
deeper into the season we get, the 
more good games that will be on 
the shedule each week. One of 
the key match-ups for this week 
includes Miami at Philadelphia. 
Miami is coming off a big con- 
ference win at Buffalo, and Philly 
came from behind to beat the 
Giants. Pittsburgh is at Houston 
in a key Central division match- 
up that could gain Houston a 



share of first place with a win. 
After much consideration the 
Master has narrowed it down to 
one pick, the Jaguars at the 
Rams. The Rams rookie running 
back Lawrence Phillips has 
established himself and with 
quarterback Tony Banks running 
the offense, look for the Rams to 
win this week. Go with the Rams 
(+2) at home for this week's hot 
pick of the week. 



If mam 



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play from scrimmage. San 
Francisco (4-2) quarterback Elvis 
Grbac started in place of Steve 
Young, who is still hampered by 
a groin injury. Grbac threw for 

182 yards in the 49er loss. 

Steelers 20, Bengals 10 
The Steeler defense tied a team 
record with 10 sacks in a big win 
over the Bengals (1-5). 
Linebacker Chad Brown record- 
ed 4 sacks and added an inter- 
ception for Pittsburgh (5-1). 
Jerome Bettis racked up his fifth 
straight 100 yard performance by 
rolling for 109 yards on the day. 
Mike Tomczak's 32 yard touch- 
down pass to Kordell Stewart 
was the difference in the game. 
The Bengals' Jeff Blake was 23 
for 30 for 229 yards in the air 
against a second ranked Steeler 
Defense. 

Steelers Notes: Pittsburgh has 
won five straight games since 
losing the opener to Jacksonville. 
The Steelers have outscored their 
opponents 122-56 during this 
span. Linebacker Chad Brown 
did not have a sack this season 
until his 4 1/2 on Sunday against 
Cincinnati. Brown has moved 
from his familiar inside lineback- 
ing post to play outside for the 
injured Gregg Lloyd. Brown was 
1/2 a sack short of the Steeler 
record for sacks in a game held 
by hall of famer Mean Joe 

Greene. The Steelers tied their 
previous record for sacks with 10 

on Sunday. On November 29, 

1992, Pittsburgh hit the Bengals 

for 10 sacks in similar fashion. 



NFL Week #8 

home team in caps 

* Pick Master's Pick of the 

Week 

Favorite Pts Underdog 
CHIEFS 8 1/2 Seattle 
DALLAS 14 1/2 Atlanta 
EAGLES 2 Miami 
COLTS 3 1/2 Patriots 



CAROLINA 


7 Saints 


REDSKINS 


7 Giants 


DENVER 


10 Ravens 


Buffalo 


7 JETS 


SAN FRAN 
Jacksonville 


15 Bengals 
2 *RAMS 


Steelers 


3 OILERS 


ARIZONA 
CHARGERS 


3 Tampa Bay 
3 1/2 Raiders 


Bye Week: Green Bay, 
Chicago, Minnesota, Detroit 


Courtesy of the Pick Master 


Pick Master 2-1 for the year 


This information is for enter- 


tainment use only! 



October 24, 1996 



Clarion fflmbersup of JBetmaptoama 



Clarion, 3gg 16214 



Wt>e Clarion Call 



Wlhit's l\nsibi 




Career 
Services reports- 
Clarion University 
graduates finding 
jobs in the real 
world! 
For the story turn to 
page 6. 



Contents! 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 9 

Call on You: Pg. 13 

Entertainment: Pg. 14 

Sports: Pg. 16 

Classifieds: Pg. 19 



Volume 78, I**tse 7 



Weather 



Today 's weather- mostly 
cloudy with a slight chance 

of early morning 

showers. High in the low to 

mid 50s. 

Friday-Partly cloudy. 

High 55-65. 

Saturday & Sunday-Partly 

Cloudy with Highs ranging 

from the mid-50s to 

mid-60s 



APSCUF meetings in full swing 



Mediator being called in to speed up contract negotiations 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 



Professor contract negotiations 
are becoming a major issue in the 
student bodies of the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) universities. 

Several negotiation meetings 
have been held since January 26 
between the bargaining teams of 
SSHE and the Association of 
Pennsylvania State College and 
University Faculty (APSCUF), 
the professor's union. 

If a new contract is not adopted 
by the end of the semester, pro- 
fessors could end up on the pick- 
et line next semester. 

The two teams last met on 
October 11 in Harrisburg. 
According to Kevin Kodish, rep- 
resentative for APSCUF, several 
issues were discussed at this 
meeting. 

The issues and proposals that 
were discussed were; leaves of 
absence, distance education, 
local agreements, branch cam- 
puses, and SSHE's Dixon 
University Center. 

The next round of talks is 
scheduled for Thursday, October 
25. 

An addition is expected to be 
added to the next round of nego- 
tiation talks. 

A mediator is expected to be 
appointed by APSCUF to help 
both teams proceed with the 
negotiations. 

Dr.. William Fulmer, president 
of Clarion University's APSCUF 
chapter and a professor in the 
administrative sciences depart- 
ment, further explained the addi- 
tion of a mediator. 

"A mediator is someone who 




Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
Dr. William Fulmer, president of Clarion University's 
APSCUF chapter is looking to engage in mediation to speed 
up contract negotiations. 






will facilitate the negotiations 
process. The mediator will be 
appointed by the State Labor 
Board," he stated. 

APSCUF hopes to have the 
mediator by Thursday's talks. 
SSHE also commented on the 
addition of a mediator. 

Scott Shewell, press secretary 
for SSHE, said, "The role of 
mediation in the negotiation 
process is typical. We anticipated 
the need. We welcome the addi- 
tion of a mediator." 

Shewell further explained the 
mediator would be hired through 
the State Mediation Office. 

Most state schools have the 
president of their APSCUF chap- 
ters on the negotiations team. The 
chief negotiator is James 



Cowden, attorney at law. 

The other members of the team 
include Fulmer and William 
Sharpe from Clarion, Sally Ross 
from East Stroudsburg, Marie 
Payesch from Edinboro, Jack 
Kadlubowski from Indiana, 
Donald Mayer from 

Shippensburg, and Steve 
Gagliordo. 

The team is looking at a multi- 
year contract similar to their 
most recent contract which was 
implemented in 1994 and ended 
over the summer. 

The chief negotiator for 
SSHE's negotiation team is 
Thomas Giotto, an attorney from 
Pittsburgh. 

The other members of the team 
are Mary Carr, the acting director 



of labor relations at the 
Chancellor's office; Joseph 
Gruenwald, dean of the College 
of Business Administration of 
Clarion University, and Albert 
Hoffman, dean of the School of 
Science and Management at 
Millersville University. 

Also involved are William 
Schweitzer, Associate Vice- 
President for Human Resource 
Services at West Chester 
University; and Mark 
Staszkievicz, the Provost and 
Vice-President for Academic 
Affairs at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. 

SSHE's negotiation team 
reports back to the Board of 
Governors of SSHE. 

Governor Tom Ridge appoints 
the members of this board. Each 
team discusses their proposals at 
the bargaining table. 

After talks, the teams meet 
together to work on revisions of 
their proposals. 

Eventually, both teams will 
reach a final agreement, and a 
new contract will be signed. 

Even though the current negoti- 
ations are directly involved with 
the faculty and administration, 
the issue has an impact on many 
parties. 

One of the major parties 
involved is the students at the 
state universities. 

Michael Cox, president of the 
Student Senate here at Clarion, 
feels strongly about the idea of 
the student body "trying to get 
involved by not allowing the 
union to strike." 

Cox and several senators met 
with Fulmer to discuss the issues 
concerning the student body. 

Cox poses several questions to 



the student body, "What are you 
going to do? What would you do 
if placed in this situation? We 
should currently be informing 
ourselves on the situation so we 
can make a stand when the time 
comes." 

Cox gave many reasons as to 
why the faculty should be 
reminded of the needs of the stu- 
dent body. "We pay for the facul- 
ty to teach. Their power comes 
from the students who pay facul- 
ty and the administration." 

The Student Senate plans to let 
students know what is going on 
in the current contract negotia- 
tions. 

"The Student Senate is subject 
to the students, and we need to 
get Senate involved to help in the 
process," explained Cox. 

Some plans of the Senate will 
be enacted in the event of a 
strike. 

According to Cox, if the strike 
happens, a walkout or a protest 
rally by the student body may be 
planned. 

He concluded by saying, "Our 
[the students] education should 
not be played as a game by the 
two bargaining teams." 

Both bargaining teams indicat- 
ed there is a possibility of a strike 
but it is still far off. 

Shewell responded by saying, 
"We are not at the point of decid- 
ing on that possibility. Talks 
have just begun." 

Fulmer commented on the slow 
pace of the APSCUF negotia- 
tions. 

"The negotiations are very 
slow. In our 20-year history, we 
have never had talks go on for 
this long and both teams have 
never been this far apart before." 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



October 24. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



OPINION 



Editorial 




"Listen folks, 

this is not 

Allegheny 

General Hospital 

or the University of 

Pittsburgh 
Medical Center/* 



Brian Pietrandrea, Managing Editor 



Play a little Jeopardy with me. 
Here we go. The answer is: I love 
the food at the cafeteria. 

The Keeling Health Center pro- 
vides great medical care. The 
parking situation doesn't bother 
me. 

I couldn't be happier that the 
President of Clarion University is 
getting her private place. 

Now, the question is: 
Statements that you rarely 
hearcome from a Clarion 
University students' mouth. 
Why? 

I'm not sure if it is a national 
trend or if this is exclusive to 
Clarion. I'm beginning to think 
that most students are just unhap- 
py about everything. 

Let me break down each of the 
said answers and offer my solu- 
tions to the problems. 

The cafeteria has probably been 



the most complained about issue 
since I've been here at Clarion. 
From the food quality to the 
smiles on the workers' faces, stu- 
dents have covered all possible 
ground in regards to the cafe. 

This is a situation where I don't 
think DAKA and its employees 
can ever win. 

For example, they brighten the 
place up to improve visibility, 
and now there is too much light 
in the building. The place was 
dull and boring and needed some 
character. 

So, they hung up pictures and 
distributed plants throughout the 
facilities- Can you guess what 
the complaint is? They wasted 
our money. 

My solution: Go to McDonalds 
and eat. This way you can get a 
milkshake with your meal. 
The second of the big com- 



plaining issues is the Keeling 
Health Center. Listen folks. This 
is not Allegheny General 
Hospital or the University of 
Pittsburgh Medical Center. 
Maybe I have been one lucky 
person in receiving prompt and 
accurate service. 

However, I was upset with the 
fact that they could not provide 
me with an EKG. 

The size of the student popula- 
tion at Clarion doesn't warrant 
having another doctor or being 
open twenty-four seven. 

Did you ever call your doctor 
on Monday and he/she could not 
see you until Wednesday? That's 
right. It even happens in the real 
world. 

My solution: Get a HMO. 

The third trendy Clarion 
University complaint has to do 
with parking. 

This, also, must be the most 
boring issue to hear over and 
over again. Wouldn't it be won- 
derful if we had 6,000 parking 
spots on campus? 

We would all be able to sleep 
better at night knowing that each 
and every one of us had our own 
little piece of paved wasteland to 
wake up to the next day. 

More parking lots or a nice big 
parking garage would really add 
to the natural beauty of the uni- 
versity. 

I really feel bad that we have a 
situation unique to Clarion 
University. Then again, we don't. 
In fact, Clarion Borough is strug- 
gling to find enough parking for 

Continued on page 4 



%\\t Clarion Call 



270*ranull Complex 
(SU)226 -2300 



Clarion, JM 16214 
/BX (614)226-2557 



CxenttAe Uoartr 

Editor-in-Chief...Mary Beth Curry 



Managing Editor.. ..Brian Pietrandrea 
News Editor.... Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Editor... Denise Barney 
Sports Editor.. ..Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design.... Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager... .Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor.... Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager... Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor.... Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager... Kevin Miko 

Advisor.... Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




The Clarion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica 
tion. Letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication. The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 





Hide Park 1 


l A 


"At this time of 
year* a male goat 
whose sensitive 
nose detects a fer- 
tile female will make 
a most unearthly 
noise." 


1 Dr. Dean Straffin 1 





"Notes on Goats" 

It is common at this time of 
year to see articles both scholarly 
and not so scholarly on the mean- 
ing of Halloween and its associ- 
ate symbols. 

Last year at this time, the Call 
ran an article on the history of 
Halloween, pointing out its ori- 
gin in the Celtic festival of 
Samhaim. 

The Christian calendar has 
superseded the ancient Celtic 
New Year Day with All Saints 
Day (All Hallows) and All 
Hallows Eve (Hallow Eve) alias 
Halloween. 

Halloween is associated with a 
lot of "pagan," pre-Christian 
imagery that over the years has 
come to represent things scary if 
not downright evil. 

Among the most ancient of 
these pre-Christian survivals are 
representations of the Horned 
Goat. The "Horned Goat God" 
probably represents one of the 
oldest religious images ever 
recorded, showing up on cave 
walls of upper Paleolithic people 
in Europe during the last Ice Age. 
The Homed Goat figure subse- 
quently became common in 
many different cultural belief 
systems and various "horned fig- 
ures" show up all over Europe 
well before the advent of 
Christianity. 

The 9th century church con- 
demned this imagery and accused 
people associated with it as 
reverting to wickedness and evil. 
Goats have appeared in the reli- 
gious symbolism of many cul- 
tures in a more favorable per- 
spective man Christianity. Goats 
are mentioned in the Bible 136 
times, and there are 11 direct ref- 
erences to them in the Old 
Testament which point up their 
worth (Jacob received spotted 
goats as wages). 



.«.»«.«.« « a «. 4 «.<«.«.«*»• * V. '» » ■». » » ■» ' 



One should also note; that the 
Hebrew ritual on the Day of 
Atonement involved a "scape- 
goat" where the priest confessed 
over a live goat the sins of the 
children of Israel and was then 
driven off into the wilderness. 

Goats frequently appear in the 
religious symbolism of widely 
diverse cultures; in ancient Greek 
and Roman mythology the god of 
shepherds; Pan, son of Mercury 
was half goat. 

The chariots of Thor in 
Scandinavian mythology were 
drawn by a pair of goats. Mendes 
is portrayed as the goat-god of 
Ancient Egypt. As a matter of 
fact, the Pharaoh Cephorenes had 
2,234 of these critters entombed 
with him at the pyramid of El 
Gezeh. 

I should also like to point out 
that Capricornus had for cen- 
turies been the 10th sign of the 
zodiac, and Capricorn is a major 
goat constellation in the southern 
skies. 

Aware of these things, and other 
goaty correlations with diverse 
supernatural belief systems, I've 
been surprised to find little schol- 
arly reference or explanation as 
to why goats have played such a 
major world-wide role in reli- 
gious imagery since the earliest 
known times. Few other animals 
have been singled out for such 
attention. 

A little practical experience 
with goats has done much to 
answer my own questions regard- 
ing the focus of goats in religious 
imagery. Since I had been "get- 
ting her goat" for a long while, I 
decided to give my wife a real 
one as an anniversary present. 
That was 10 years ago. I've had 
a small herd around my barn ever 
since. Few people in our society 
today have had any first-hand 

Continued on page 4 



READER RESPONSES| 



44 



... the internet freaks are hogging them all." 



Dear Editor, 

I am not one to complain, but I 
have just about had it with the 
computer labs at Clarion 
University. 

I am so sick to death of going 
to type my papers and discover- 
ing the lab is mysteriously closed 
when the lab hours state that it 
should indeed be open. 

What? Are the labs only open 
when it is convenient for them? 
When I do catch the lab on a 
good day, the internet freaks are 

Celebrity Op-Ed Project 



hogging them all. 

Nothing short of clearing my 
throat a few hundred times and 
waving a disk in their face will 
get them off. 

As for the "attention internet 
users: Be considerate of the stu- 
dents who need to get classwork 
done rule being enforced, forget 
it. 

Lab assistants just offer you a 
cough drop after you are done 
doing the "clear your throat" 
thing. 




And the printers ? 

That is a story in itself. I really 
love when my paper prints out 
half on one page, half on anoth- 
er and no amount of lining the 
computer paper up right will do 
a thing for it. 

And don't bother asking the 
lab assistants. Not that they are 
all incompetent, but when I ask 
a question, I receive enough 
blank stares to last me a lifetime . 

Aren't they supposed to know; 
or, are they there just to make 



the lab more crowded than it 
already is? Something needs to 
be done about this. 

Maybe the school should 
invest the students' money into 
more computers instead of build- 
ing the president a new house 
that she does not need. 

And maybe if we are lucky, the 
computers will actually work. 



Name withheld 
by request 



Targeted tax cuts aimed at helping people 



by Vice President Al Gore 
Celebrity Op-Ed Writer 

When you get down to it, this 
election is about more than a 
choice of people. It's a choice of 
ideas... a choice of vision... a 
choice about your future and 
which direction you want 
America to go. 



WE'RE BETTER OFF NOW 
THAN FOUR YEARS AGO 

The typical family has seen its 
income grow by more than 
$1600 since the president's eco- 
nomic plan passed in 1993. 
After tow decades of stagnation, 
wages and incomes are going up. 

And the poverty rate is way 



down. The African-American 
poverty rate is now at its lowest 
level ever. Because the gains 
have been big and so evenly 
divided, we've just seen the 
largest decrease in the income 
gap between rich and poor in 
almost three decades. We're 
growing together not apart. 



We've seen other measure of 
our new prosperity. Almost 11 
million new jobs. The lowest 
combined rate of unemployment 
and inflation in a generation. 
WOMAN MAKE A DIFFER- 
ENCE 

Woman are contributing to 
America's economic expansion 



in record numbers. They are 
creating new businesses and new 
jobs at twice the national rate. 

Woman now own one of every 
three businesses in the United 
States and employ one out of 
every five workers. 

In fact, the goods and services 

Continued on page 4 




Presidential 

(Debates 

leaving 

questions 

unanswered 



The last of the Presidential debates was held last Wednesday. 
Senator Dole was predicted to be aggressive in the debate and per- 
haps he was, but how effective was this strategy? 

Dole was unable to single out any one character issue in a way that 
really exposed anything the public had not already known. 

His style of attack seemed to be petty, and he could not effectively 
paint Clinton as the immoral, unethical and corrupt leader as the 
press predicted he would. One reason Dole (or perhaps anyone) can- 
not win this game is because of Clinton's way of countering Dole's 
negative attacks. 

Clinton will smile, look at the camera, perhaps even chuckle and 
move on to the next question. Ten minutes later he will even com- 
mend Dole on such things as his service during World War II or his 
participation in a social security commission. 

Unfortunately for Dole, Clinton can say more about nothing that 
sounds like everything you ever wanted to here in thirty seconds. 

His rhetoric is not exceptionally intelligent or flowery; however, 
Clinton knows how to work a crowd, whether it's people or cameras. 

The issues we all waited to hear about were debated in small, 
insignificant, two minute bytes. The townhall format did allow for 
questions from the American public; however, how many of you still 
have unanswered questions? I do. 

The author is a senior Political Science and History Major. 



Questionnaire About Drinking Habits 

Please return the completed questionnaire to the Student Life Services Office, 210 Egbert 
Hall for a R.A.L.L.Y. ticket by Dec. 8, 1996 at 4:30 p.m. 
Direction: If a statement says something true about you, but a check in the space under YES. If 
a statement says something not true about you, put a check in the space under NO. Answer all the 
question. 

1. Have you ever awakened the morning after some drinking the night before an found that you 
could not remember a part of that evening? 

2. Do you parents, friends/roommates over worry or complain about drinking? 

3. Is hard for you to stop drinking after 1 or 2 drinks? 

4. do you ever feel bad about your drinking? 

5. Do you ever try to limit your drinking to certain times of the day or certain places? 

6. Are you always able to stop drinking when you want to? 

7. Have you gotten into fights when drinking? 

8. Has drinking ever caused any problems with you and your parents, friends or roommate? 

9. Have your friends or family members ever gone to anyone for help about your drinking? 

10. Have you ever lost friends or girlfriends/boyfriends because of your drinking? 

11. Have you ever gotten into trouble at work because of you drinking? 

12. Have you ever lost a job because of you drinking? 

13. Have you ever neglected you obligations, your family or your work for two or more days in a 
row because of your drinking? 

14. Do you ever drink before noon? 

15. Have you ever been told you have liver trouble? 

16. Have you ever had delirium Tremens (DT's), severe shaking, heard voices or seen things that 
were not there after heavy drinking? 

17. Have you ever gone to anyone for help about your drinking? 

18. Have you ever been in a hospital because of your drinking? 

19. Have you ever been seen at a psychiatric or mental health clinic, or gone to a doctor, social 
worker or clergyman for help with an emotional problem in which drinking played a part? 

20. Have you ever been a patient in a psychiatric hospital or on a psychiatric work of a general 
hospital, where treatment for drinking was a part of the program? 

21. Have you ever been arrested, even for a few hours, because of drunk behavior? 

22. Have you ever been arrested for drunk driving (D.U.I.)? 

23. Do you drink alone? 

24. Do you have more that two drinks per day? 

25. Have you ever been caught for public intoxication for underage drinking? 

If you answered jja to 3 or more of these questions, you may be a possible or potential abuser of alcohol . 




Yes 



No 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



October 24. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



Hide Park continued cont. from pg 2... 



experience with these animals 
About all they conjure up for 
us is the expression, in poor taste, 
"...horny as a billy goat." Very 
few people have an idea why 
goats have been singled out to 
represent this expression for sex- 
ual readiness. 

Be honest now, have you ever 
actually seen a billy goat, much 
less one that is "sexually 
aroused?" Probably not. If you 
had, you would probably under- 
stand why goats are frequently 
associated with things supernatu- 
rally menacing, semi-human with 
horns. 

Modem biologists know that 
these animals are seasonal breed- 
ers whose sexual behavior is con- 
trolled by hormones produced by 
their endocrine system which is 
activated by the length of the 
days which vary according to the 
season. Another way of saying 



this, is that they are only sexually 
aroused and receptive in the 
autumn of the year. This is 
Mother Nature's way of seeing to 
it that the newborn kids don't 
arrive in a winter snow storm, but 
the springtime 155 days after 
conception when their chances of 
survival are much greater. This 
means that goats start to mate 
around the beginning of 
November- the date on the 
Ancient Celtic Calendar marking 
the start of a new year and the 
mating of animals- Halloween. 

So, what has the phototropical- 
ly triggered endocrine system of 
goats reproductive behavior got 
to do with those ancient religious 
symbols and ceremonies? 

You need to actually observe 
the reproductive behavior of 
goats to fully comprehend. 

No amount of carefully com- 
posed description will suffice. 




Editorial continued... 



______ 



Now that I think of it, just 
about every city, town, borough, 
university, or grassy knoll in the 
world can't find enough places to 
put their vehicles. 

My solution: Save your Pepsi 
Points and get the bike. 

The fourth and final issue is a 
new one. 

This new complaint has to do 
with the President's new living 
quarters. 

What a waste on money! 

Right? 

Wrong. I guess each and every 
one of you who were appalled by 
just the thought of building a new 
house would never think of living 
there. 

You all would be just happy and 
content living in the middle of 
campus in the hub of all the 
activities associated with the 
library and cafeteria. 

You said yes, you are lying. I 
know I would love to have peo- 
ple screaming, smoking, and 
socializing on my steps. 

Those of you who have your 
own places; let me know when I 
can come over and do these 
harmless things at your place. 

After all, why should you be 
entitled to your own privacy. 
One final note. 

If $600,000 dollars sets us back 
educational wise, then this 
University has some real prob- 
lems. 

Because if we can not afford to 
buy computers and educational 
materials because of this small 
endeavor (and yes, when com- 



pared to the overall budget, this is 
small), then we as a University 
need to reevaluate our situation. 
And speaking of budgets, this 
doesn't even come from 
Clarion's own budget. 

But, that is a different topic. 

My solution: Communism 

Well, I'm done doing my share 
of the complaining. 

Now, I feel like a college stu- 
dent. 

I guess the only thing for me to 
do now is wait for those com- 
plainers out there to respond and 
tell me how wrong I am. Until 
then, I think I'm going to take a 
stroll around this fine University. 
You know; Be thankful for what I 
have. 



The expression "horny as a billy 
goat" will forever take on a new 
meaning if you do. 

First of all, goats (particularly 
male goats in the breeding sea- 
son) are capable of standing 
upright balancing on their back- 
legs. 

Their profile is disconcertingly 
human when they do. Very few 
animals on this earth can be con- 
fused with the human profile. 
You will never confuse the sil- 
houette of a person standing in 
the doorway at dusk with another 
creature unless you happen to 
have a goat "standing there." 

More than once I've gone out 
after dark to do chores in my barn 
and missed my billy goat only to 
see him out of the corner of my 
eye standing upright in the shad- 
ows. He is pure white and 
"stands" up to seven feet tall. 
More than once my heart has 
skipped a beat as a result 
That's not all. 

At this time of year, a male goat 
whose sensitive nose detects a 
fertile female will make a most 
unearthing noise. I'm not talking 
about beating and bah-ing of 
nursery rhymes. I'm talking 
about a terribly human 
SCREAM. In the sense of the 
best Hollywood chiller. Words 



simply can't do justice here. I 
can only say that you are missing 
something till you experience it. 
To my mind, it's no wonder that 
goats show up in ancient imagery 
where the anthropomorphic qual- 
ities of a beast are feared and 
sometimes venerated. 

I can't quit here though; that 
would be very unjust to the goats 
of the world who are not per- 
ceived by everyone as "bad"-- 
despite the fact that billy goats do 
have a very musky odor and 
some possibly disgusting habits, 
such as urinating and ejaculating 
in their chin beards. 

Enlightened biologists and 
capri-culturalists wouldn't dream 
of making value judgements 
about the olfactory triggers in the 
sexual behavior of barnyard ani- 
mals. 

Looking beyond these traits 
which may offend some 
"refined" senses, you will dis- 
cover that goats are highly 
regarded by many people. The 
Arab word "Tays" is an expres- 
sion for both goat and "nobility 
of bearing." The Hebrew term 
"atude" also refers to both goats 
and prince. 

Many people besides myself 
have felt that goats are unusually 
compatible with human behavior. 
They should be. 

It turns out that goats are near 
the top of the list, vying for the 
title of oldest domestic animal on 
earth. 

They have been living with peo- 
ple for more than 9,000 years. 
During this vast expanse of time 
they have been selectively bred 
to meet the requirements of their 
keepers. 
Their value for meat, milk, and 




__ ■■■■ —————»———»—————-— 

continued 



now produced by woman add up 

to $2.3 trillion a year. That's 

more than the GDP of most 

countries. 

THE EDUCATION 

PRESIDENT 

President Clinton has gone to 
bat for education in every way. 
He has increased student loans. 
He brought to life an historic 
School-to- Work* program, pro- 
viding the venture capital to help 
move student from the class- 
room to jobs with a future. 

He has long campaigned the 
goal of setting high national 
standards for what our children 
should learn. 

He fought to increase funding 
for Head Start 



He created AmeriCorps, to 
allow young people to earn 
money for school by serving their 
communities. 

President Clinton — the real 
education president — also 
worked tirelessly to take drugs 
and violence out of our schools. 
At the same time, he's committed 
to helping prepare our young 
people for the challenges of the 
next century. 

GET INVOLVED — YOU 
CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE 
I want to close by telling you a 
little story my friend James 
Carville told me. There was an 
old lady who had an incredible 
talking parrot: it spoke five lan- 
guages. 



One day, she asked a boy form 
down the street to come over and 
take care of the parrot when she 
went out. 

That was a big mistake. When 
she got home, she saw a trail of 
feathers. And then she found the 
young boy in the kitchen cooking 
up a big pot of parrot gumbo. 

The lady went crazy. The boy 
didn't understand what he had 
done. 

"How could you have done this 
to my precious parrot?", the lady 
cried. The boy just shrugged. 
"This was the most incredible 
bird in the world. It could speak 
five languages!" 

"Pardon me, ma'am," the boy 

^<L^-H?5!&-^-!i^puja^ IsL 



fiber has been economically very 
important for much of human 
history. It may be stretching it a 
bit to say they have been bred for 
good company, but goats also 
display many of the characteris- 
tics of companionable dogs and 
appear far more responsive than 
most barnyard animals in their 
interactions with humans. 

Times and progress has eroded 
the place of goats from both the 
barnyard and the minds of mod- 
ern people. 

They are no longer signs for us 
of diverse sentiments ranging 
from fear to friendliness. The 
symbolism of goats in religious 
expression along with goats 
themselves has faded away in our 
rapidly changing world. Goats 
are no longer cost efficient. 

Occasionally a glimpse of ear- 
lier understandings will flicker in 
our contemporary society 
through the perspective of rare 
reflective individuals who per- 
petuate them in more secular art. 
Picasso captured some of these 
ancient sentiments when he made 
a lifesize bronze figure of a goat 
which he kept in his own yard. 

As Halloween approaches, 
remember that some things that 
go bump in the night might be 
goats, or they may be surviving 
shadows reflecting the lost senti- 
ment of your early ancestors. 



•The author is a proffessor in the 
Anthropology, Geography and 
Earth Science department. This 
Hide Park was first published in 
the October 1987 issue of the 

Clarion Call 




page 




those five languages, was 
English one of them?' 

"Of course it was," the lady 
said. 

"Then why," asked the boy, 
"didn't he just say something?" 

The moral of the story is clear. 
We have to speak up for our- 
selves. When people try to get 
our commitment to our educa- 
tion, we must speak up. When 
people try to devastate our com- 
mitment to our communities and 
our children, we must speak up. 
In this nation, every one of us has 
a voice. 

Every one of you can make a 
difference. I encourage you to 
add your voice on November 5th. 
JLwjyjnake a difference. 



NEWS 



(f liege Campus News 






feTMva;. 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Morehouse Students Accused of Raping Student 

Four Morehouse College students were charged Oct. 3 with the rape 
of a 17-year-old Spelman College freshman. 

Herman Banks, Tony Clark, and Dadon Dodd, all 20, and Darren 
Marshall, 25, are being held without bond for allegedly raping the 
Spelman student in a Morehouse dorm room on Sept. 28, said John 
Quigley, a spokesman for the Atlanta Police Department. 

All but Clark are members of the Morehouse basketball team. 
Three of the men-Banks, Clark, and Marshall-also are being 
charged with aggravated sodomy, police said. If convicted, each 
charge carries a sentence of one to 20 years. 

According to news reports, the Spelman student was walking back to 
her dorm when she ran into Banks, a recent acquaintance who offered 
to walk her home. Banks reportedly told her that he had to stop at his 
room first. 

The two colleges are located across the street from each other. 
Spelman is all-female and Morehouse is all-male. 

Morehouse provost John H. Hopps told a college- wide assembly Oct. 
7 that the men had been expelled for violating curfew, visitation, and 
"code of decent conduct" but could be readmitted if found innocent of 
charges. 

Hopps also reminded students of the relationship between the two 
schools. 

'As I have said to many of you, you are not only your brother's keep- 
er, you are also your sister's keeper-and she is yours," he said. 



Jordan Donates $1 Million to Alma Mater 

Basketball superstar Michael Jordan has donated $1 million to his 
alma mater. 

Jordan, a 1986 UNC graduate, gave the money for the building of a 
new Institute for Families, to be built on the university's grounds and 
named in his honor. 

Part of the School of Socail Work, the Jordan Institute for Families 
is designed to strengthen families and help children in need. Jordan 
and his mother, Deloris, were in Chapel Hill Oct. 1 to cut the ribbon 
for the building. 

"I feel very blessed and fortunate to have had a family structure 
which nurtured and provided a positive influence for myself and my 
siblings," Jordan said. "Many young people today are not benefiting 
from an environment of this nature, and unfortunately, many parents 
are overwhelmed by the pressures of life, struggling and trying to sur 
vive." 

The Institute will bring together social service professionals and aca- 
demicians from many disciplines to find solutions to problems facing 
families, ranging from inadequate day and elder care to drug abuse, 
teen-age pregnancy, domestic violence, and children living in poverty. 

'We see the Jordan Institute as a mechanism to bring together experts 
from many disciplines and campuses to collaborate on ways to 
strengthen families," said Dr. Richard Edwards, social work dean. 

Deloris Jordan, now of Charlotte, has been active on the School of 

Social Work's advisory board. She recently wrote a book on parenting, 

Family First," and was president of the Michael Jordan Foundation of 

the Carolinas. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



Senator Specter expected to speak 



by Matt Geesey 
News Editor 



Pennsylvania Senator Arlen 
Specter, an exemplary figure in 
American politics, will be hold- 
ing an Open House on Monday, 
October 28. 

The discussion will take place 
in the Carter Auditorium in Still 
Hall on the Clarion University 
campus at 2:15 p.m. Senator 
Specter has been a member of the 
Senate since 1980. His term is 
over in 1998 and he plans to run 
for reelection. 

For the 12 million 
Pennsylvanians Senator Specter 
represents, he has produced sig- 
nificant results. For years, 
Senator Specter has helped the 
coal, steel, and textile industries; 
the labor industry; farmers; veter- 
ans; the elderly; and children. 

Senator Specter has established 
himself as a legislative leader on 
issues such as crime, drugs, and 
terrorism. 

His Armed Career Criminal 
Act, which was signed into law in 
1984 and expanded in 1986, 
makes it a Federal offense with a 
mandatory 15 years to life sen- 
tence for a criminal found in pos- 
session of a firearm. 

He also designed the Terrorist 
Prosecution Act, a tough anti-ter- 
rorism bill, and he has authored 
legislation creating the indepen- 
dent CIA Inspector General, the 
only reform legislation to emerge 
from the Iran-Contra affair. 

In addition, Senator Specter is 



responsible for other major legis- 
lation, such as the Missing 
Children's Assistance Act as well 
as laws on child pornography, 
vocational education, and AIDS. 

In the current 104th Congress, 
Senator Specter is a member of 
the Appropriations, Intelligence, 
Judiciary, and Veterans' Affairs 
Committees and the 

Appropriations Subcommittees 
on Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education; 
Defense; Foreign Operations; 
Agriculture and Transportation. 

He serves as chairman of the 
Select Committee on Intelligence 
and the Appropriations 
Committee's Subcommittee on 
Labor/HHS and Education. He is 
also chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee's Subcommittee on 
Terrorism, Technology and 
Government Information and 
serves on the Antitrust, Business 
Rights, and Competition 
Subcommittee. 

Several regional issues that 
Senator Specter pushed legisla- 
tion on were funding to 
Pennsylvania health centers, 
including the University of 
Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and 
the McGee Women's Hospital 
and Allegheny University of the 

Health Sciences in Pittsburgh; 
aid to families of slain Federal 
law enforcement officers; absti- 
nence and education for teen par- 
ents; privatization of schools; 
economic espionage; and school- 
to-work grants. 

Senator Specter was born to 



immigrant parents in Wichita, 
Kansas on February 12, 1930. 

After graduating Phi Beta 
Kappa from the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1951, he served 
stateside with the Air Force's 
Office of Special Investigations 
for two years during the Korean 
War. 

He attended Yale Law School, 
where he was an editor on the 
Yale Law Journal, graduating in 
1956. 

Senator Specter began his pub- 
lic service career as Assistant 
District Attorney of Philadelphia, 
obtaining the first national con- 
viction of labor racketeers who 
had been investigated by the 
Senate McClellan committee. 

His reputation as a effective 
prosecutor led to an appointment 
in 1964 as assistant counsel to the 
Warren Commission to investi- 
gate the assassination of 
President Kennedy. 

He is credited with a major role 
in . the investigation and with 
developing the single bullet theo- 
ry.-. ' - -.' v. ' •-• -'i'v,' ;M 

He was later elected to the 
office of District Attorney of 
Philadelphia in 1965, the first 
election of a Republican in more 
than a decade. Senator Specter 

was reelected in 1969 by more 
than 100,000 votes. 

Senator Specter lives in 
Philadelphia with his wife, Joan 
Specter, and his two sons, Shanin 
and Stephen, and two grand- 
daughters Silvi and Perri Specter. 



Snack Bar suffers from mechanical difficulties 



by Lisa Lawson 
News Writer 



Problems with the electrical 
and ventilation systems in 
Gemmell Snack Bar this past 
weekend forced a temporary 
closing of the facility. A partial 
shutdown on Thursday led to a 
complete shutdown of the snack 
bar by Friday evening, as temper- 
atures in the kitchen area soared 
to over 100 degrees. 

Two employees had to be taken 
to Clarion Hospital after suffer- 
ing from heat exhaustion. Both 
were treated and released. 

At this time, personnel are 
unsure of just how many factors 
have combined to force the tem- 
peratures in the kitchen to reach 
such a high degree. One of the 
causes has been reported as a bad 



exhaust fan, which was putting 
heat back into the room and caus- 
ing a lack of air circulation in die 
kitchen area. 

Until the problem is solved, the 
snack bar will remain open, but 
will be operating in an unlimited 
capacity. The main dining room 
is fit for use, but certain menu 
items will not be available for 
several days. In addition, there 
may be periods when manage- 
ment feels it necessary to shut 
down the facility again. 

According to the Director of 
Gemmell Student Center, Dave 
Tomeo, "As far as a solution, 
there are people in the mainte- 



nance department looking into 
it." Tomeo also pointed out that 
the problem of increased temper- 
atures is isolated in the grill area, 
and did not impact any of the 
activities which took place in the 
rest of the building over the 
weekend. He remarked that if 
anything, the rest of Gemmell, 
"may only have gotten a little 
warm." 

Dave Henry, from DAK A Food 
Services who operate Gemmell 
Snack Bar and Chandler Dining 
Hall, commented on the present 
facility that the snack bar is locat- 
ed in. 

Continued on page 7 



' / didn 'tfeel like putting employees in-jeopardy 



■Dave Henry, DAKA Food Services 



Pa^e 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



October 24. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



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New figures have been report- 
ed from Clarion University's 
Career Services of the success 
rate of the university's college 
graduates. Ninety-five percent of 
the students who graduated dur- 
ing 1994-95 can be "placed" in 
categories which include 
employment or further education. 
These figures were determined 
through a survey with graduates 
from December 1994, May 1995, 
and Summer 1995. Compared to 
the figures from the graduation 
year of 1993-94, this year's fig- 
ures have improved except in the 
area of part-time work. 

Seven hundred and thirty-six of 
the graduates responded to the 
written survey and to the follow- 
up telephone survey. Sixty-seven 
percent of the respondents are 
employed full-time and another 

II percent are enrolled in further 
education. 

At the Venango Campus, Oil 
City, 90 associate degrees were 
conferred during the same time 
period. 

Seventy-seven of these individ- 
uals responded to the survey and 
92 percent of these people could 
be placed in categories including 
employment or further education. 
Additional figures have been 
compiled for the college of grad- 
uate studies where 159 master's 
degrees have been conferred and 

III graduates responded to the 
survey. 

Connie Laughlin, director of 
Career Services, whose office 
conducted the survey and com- 
piled the information for its 
annual report, said she was 
pleased with the figures which 
reflect the post-graduation activi- 
ties of Clarion graduates. 

The established categories for 
placement that were recognized 
by the survey were employed, 
either full-time or part-time in 
career fields of their choosing; 
employed either full-time or part- 
time in another field of work; and 
continuing education. 

The graduates of 1994-95 
included 398 men and 676 
women. Among those responding 
to the survey, 67 percent were 
employed full-time or part-time 
in their chosen career fields. 
Eleven percent of the graduates 
were continuing their education 
and five percent were still seek- 
ing employment. 

The Venango Campus respon- 
dents showed 68 percent of the 
graduates surveyed were 
employed either full-time or part- 
time in their career field and 3.9 
percent were still seeking 




Jeff Levkulich/Clarion Call 



Connie Lauglin, director of Career Services, talks to a few 
Clarion University students at the Career Services office in 
Egbert Hall. Recently, Career Services released their annual 
report on the success rate of college graduates from this 
university. 

"We hope our annual report is 
used with students," said 
Laughlin. "All departments 
receive a copy and we urge them 
to share it with their students. It 
shows the entry level and 
advanced positions achieved by 
our graduates, the employers hir- 
ing them, and the salaries they 
are receiving. In addition, the 
information may be used by a 
prospective college student and 
their parents in making educa- 
tional and career decisions." 

The Clarion University Council 
of Trustees, the administration, 
the admissions office, and other 
agencies who request data on 
Clarion University graduates also 
receive a copy of the report. 

The report enables Clarion 
University's Career Services to 
share information with the facul- 
ty and administrators who advise 
both prospective and current stu- 
dents. 

It also presents information on 
the career paths of Clarion 
University alumni for students 
who seek to relate academic 
qualifications to career prospects. 
The annual report is one of a 
variety of services offered by 
Clarion University's Career 
Services office to aid students in 
their job search. Other services 
included on-campus interviews; a 
newsletter 
called"Careerline,"which is pro- 
vided to students; job hot line 
listings; job search seminars; 
mock interviews; a resume lab; 
individual assistance; a career 
library; job fairs; a Professional 
Development Series; and infor- 
mation on internships and sum- 
mer employment. 



employment. The remaining 11.7 
percent were continuing educa- 
tion. 

Eighty-nine percent of the mas- 
ters degree recipients responding 
to the survey were employed full- 
time; 1.8 percent were continuing 
their education; and 0.9 percent 
of the graduates were still seek- 
ing employment. 

This is the tenth year Career 
Services has generated this 
report. 

This year's figures are compa- 
rable to last year's figures. In 
1993-94, 64% of the graduates 
surveyed were employed full- 
time while the percentage of part- 
time employees dropped this year 
to 16% compared to 21% in 
1993-94. 

The percentage of graduates 
continuing their education is the 
same for both years. 

Two of the other categories on 
the survey were respondents 
serving in the military or respon- 
dents who weren't employed and 
weren't seeking employment. 
The number of respondents in the 
military rose to 0.1% this year 
from 0% last year. 

The percentage of respondents 
who are not employed and not 
seeking employment also rose 
this year. One and a half percent 
of the graduates are unemployed 
this year while last year the per- 
centage was only 0.8%. 

There was also an increase in 
the percentage of graduates who 
have full-time jobs in their cho- 
sen field. 

Fifty-four percent of the 
respondents this year have full- 
time jobs in their chosen field 
compared to 52% in 1993-94. 

The annual report is designed to 
be more than just a survey. 



Continued on page 7 



Clarion University Economic Center reaccredited 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

The Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania Center for 
Economic Education recently 
received a five-year accreditation 
from EconomicsAmerica, the 
National Council on Economic 
Education. The commendation is 
the highest that an affiliated pro- 
gram can receive. 

"Only a few receive this high- 
est commendation," says Dr. 
William Ross, director of the 
Center for Economic Education. 
"Our center is relatively small 
compared to others in 
Pennsylvania. We work hard with 
the funding available and consis- 
tently rank in the top three pro- 
grams in the state each year." 

EconomicsAmerica noted sev- 
eral strengths in the review of the 
Clarion University Center for 
Economic Education. Some of 
those strengths were outstanding 
center leadership, the quality of 
staff and programs, the university 
in-kind and financial support of 
the program, strong support from 



the university president, dean of 
the College of Business, and the 
economics department, if the uni- 
versity provides excellent office 
space and equipment, and the 
availability of staff to assist with 
the provision of programs. 

"This reaccreditation represents 
certification of the quality of this 
outreach program," says Dr. 
Joseph Gruenwald, dean of the 
College of Business 

Administration . "We feel 
Clarion University is fulfilling 
part of our duty as an educational 
institution by encouraging eco- 
nomic education." 

The Center for Economic 
Education was established at 
Clarion University in 1980. The 
effort to establish the program 
was set in motion by then 
President James Gemmell in 
1977. Ross has been affiliated 
with the program since the begin- 
ning. 

"Gemmell discovered the 
Commonwealth was not affiliat- 
ed with the program," recalls 
Ross. "Clarion applied to partici- 



pate and became one of the char- 
ter centers in the Pennsylvania 
Council. I became a charter 
director." 

Originally, the Clarion center 
served the school districts in 
Intermediate Unit 9 and 
Intermediate Unit 4 covering 42 
schools. Ten years later, a new 
center was established in Butler 
and Clarion was reassigned to 
Intermediate Units 9 and 6 cover- 
ing 34 schools. 

The 1993 Commonwealth 
approved Chapter 5 requirements 
reinforced the need for economic 
education in grades kindergarten 
through 12th grade. Since that 
time, economic education has 
grown along with the work of the 
Clarion center. 

"We prqyide a wide range of in- 
service training," says Ross. 
"Teacher training in economics is 
now required for elementary 
teachers and secondary social 
studies teachers. We also have 
training in economics to meet 
graduate requirements and certi- 
fication and have developed an 



CU graduates article cont. from pg. 6 



"It is important for students to 
take advantage of our services to 
insure progress toward their 
career goals," said Laughlin. "It 
is equally important for them to 
use their college experience to 



develop the qualifications 
employers want. Doing well aca- 
demically, participating in cam- 
pus and community activities, 
and taking on leadership roles is 



Shirlev C. Hager, the Democratic candi- 
date for Pennsylvania's House of 
Representatives, will appear on Your 
Candidates: in Their Own Words on 
WPSX-m Saturday, October 26 at 2:10 
p.m. During the taping of the program, 
Baser discussed the campaign issues of 
term limits, education, gun control, career 
politicians, the PACE program, property 

tax reform, and gasoline taxes. 
WPSX-TV is the public broadcasting sta- 
tion in central Pennsylvania licensed and 
operated as a service of the Pennsylvania 
State University. 



important. So is some kind of 
experience in the field through a 
co-op, field training, or an intern- 
ship. Communication skills, both 
written and oral are also vital." 

Gemmell cont. 
from page 5 

'The facility couldn't handle 
the compacity of heat caused by 
the grills and ovens." Henry feels 
the "university has taken proper 
steps into resolving the situa- 
tion." He reported that industrial 
air conditioners are being deliv- 
ered from Norfolk, VA and 
should be installed before lunch 
on Thursday. 

About the limited hours of the 
snack bar, Henry commented, "I 
didn't feel like putting employees 
in jeopardy." 

Management personnel at 
Gemmell express their apologies 
for any inconveniences caused 
and ask students to be alert for 
notices regarding any changes, in 



Pick up your free 
Legislative Spectrum 
Newsletter at the res- 
idence hall front 
desks, the Gemmell 
Information desk, and 
the Student Senate 
Office 



Angels • Critters • T-Shirts 





408 Main Street 
(across from Uni-Mart) 
226-5060 

"Have an Angel of a Day" 



extensive preservice program. 
All students at Clarion majoring 
in elementary education are 
required to complete an econom- 
ics course." 

One of Ross's major projects 
each year is coordinating the 
playing of the "Stock Market 
Game" in the school systems. 
This Fall, 24 schools with 180 
teams are competing in center- 
based and statewide competition 
for cash prizes. Participating 
local school districts include 
Brookville, DuBois, Immaculate 
Conception in Clarion, Keystone, 
St. Stevens in Oil City, Titusville, 
and Valley Grove. 

The "Stock Market Game" is 
sponsored by the Security and 
Exchange Commission of New 
York City. Each team starts with 
$100,000 and over a 10 week 
period must invest it in the stock 
market by following the actual 
rise and fall of the exchange. The 
team with the most money at the 
end of ten weeks is the winner. 
For the Spring 1996 game, win- 
ning teams from local school dis- 
tricts were Oil City and Clarion- 
Limestone at the elementary 
level from grades 4th through 
6th; Franklin at the middle school 
level for grades 7th and 8th; and 



Franklin, Valley Grove, and 
Cranberry at the senior high level 
from grades 9th through 12th. 

"Generally at least one team 
from our center places in the top 
five in the state each semester," 
says Ross. "This year the game is 
going electronic allowing invest- 
ments and stock market tracking 
to be done on the computer. The 
game teaches application of eco- 
nomic concepts." 

The Clarion University Center 
is also the state coordinator for 
Virtual Economics, a CD-ROM 
teacher tutor program that pre- 
sents economic concepts with 
applications. The CD-ROM 
includes 200 of the most up to 
date teacher aids in economic 
education. Ross trains the 12 cen- 
ters and their field representa- 
tives, who in turn will take the 
program to every school district 
in the state. 

"We currently have an 
EconomicsAmerica partnership 
agreement with 32 of the 34 dis- 
tricts in our service area which 
commits them to teaching eco- 
nomics in K-12," says Ross. "We 
are also serving the Wellsboro 
and Clearfield schools because 
there is not a service center for 
them." 




The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between October 2 and October 11. The blotter is 

compiled by Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim 

Hall. 

•On October 2 at approximately 10:20 p.m., university police issued 
citations to Ms. Elizabeth Brozed of New Kensington, PA. She was 
charged with minors' consumption and public drunkenness. 
•Public Safety officers were called to Wilkinson Hall about harassment 
on October 11. This incident is under investigation. 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



GWU Student EMTs Bike to Accidents 



Student 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

Brad Greenberg kneels by his 
patient, who is arched over the 
rim of a dormitory toilet, groan- 
ing through the onslaught of a 
mighty tequila hangover that 
verges on alcohol poisoning. 

Greenberg, an emergency med- 
ical technician, asks George 
Washington University police 
officials and the sick boy's room- 
mates to wait in the adjoining 
bedroom while he administers 
moral support. He makes the 
decision to let the boy suffer 
through the morning in his own 
bed instead of the hospital's. 

This situation is familiar to all 
college campuses. The difference 
at The George Washington 
University is that EMT 
Greenberg is an undergraduate 
student and a member of the 
school's Emergency Medical 
Response Group. He, like all 
EMeRG volunteers, bikes to the 
scene before District fire medics 
and hospital EMTs arrive, and he 
administrators pre-hospital med- 
ical care from the bags of first- 
aid equipment strapped to his 
bike. If an ambulance has not yet 
been called, he will decide 
whether the student's condition 
warrants a hospital visit. 

Other schools may be serviced 
by student EMTs, and other hos- 
pitals. 

"We noticed that GW was not 
adequately serviced by [the] D.C. 
fire [department]. We saw 
response times of 20, 30 min- 
utes," says GW senior Jay 
Abbott, the program's creator. 
"People went unconscious for 
things they shouldn't be going 
unconscious for." 

Abbott, along with Dr. Ray 



Lucas, a trauma doctor in the GW 
hospital's emergency room, 
developed a manual for the med- 
ical operations. He also worked 
with University Police Director 
Dolores Stafford and her bike- 
bound staff to create a bicycle 
training course for the students, a 
program so unique that the 
International Police Mountain 
Bike Association may use it to 
establish an EMT bicycle certifi- 
cation course of its own. 

EMeRG members estimate that 
the group responds to as many as 
15 calls during its hours of oper- 
ation, from 7 p.m. Thursday to 
Monday at 3 a.m. They hope to 
expand service to 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week as their mem- 
bership increases. The group says 
the average response time is 1-3 
minutes, sometimes 20 minutes 
faster than city emergency ser- 
vices. Sick or injured students 
call university police, who in turn 
notifies EMeRG. 

"The patients know that within 
just a few minutes someone is 
there to help them, to at least hold 
their hand and get through it with 
them," Abbott says. 

What might seem like a minor 
inconvenience to most, says GW 
junior and EMeRG paramedic 
and supervisor Shawn Glinter, 
for some is a large problem. He 
and his fellow EMTs see the level 
of comfort they can provide is 
just as vital as their professional 
skills in providing emergency 
medical care. 

Abbot echoes the'others' senti- 
ments. He is "really glad I could 
provide that kind of care. It feels 
good that we can deal with some 
of these calls that are out of the 
ordinary." 

One freshman panicked at the 
sight of sliver in her finger during 



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the university's move-in day. 
EMeRG experts were there in 
minutes to comfort the girl and 
calmly remove the splinter. 

"A freshman playing basketball 
got an elbow to the front of his 
mouth that knocked out his adult 
teeth," Glinter says. "Thanks to 
our response we saved this kid's 
tooth. If [a tooth] is not put back 
in 30 minutes, the chances of 
keeping the tooth is maybe one in 
100." 

The volunteers also have tend- 
ed to fainting spells, seizures, 
sprains and have applied CPR. 

'To actually touch a patient and 
do anything more than take vital 
signs. . . takes almost a year" of 
paramedic experience at other 
professional emergency service 
providers, says junior Ilan 
Waldman. EMeRG "gives us 
more of an opportunity to do 
stuff. We actually get to run the 
call." 

Lucas agrees, calling the pro- 
gram a "great opportunity" for 
students aspiring to jobs as health 
care professionals. 

EMeRG recently signed a con- 
tract with the Charles E. Smith 
Center, GW's athletic complex, 
as the exclusive providers of pre- 
hospital medical care for every 
activity that occurs there-froin 
treating a professor who may pull 
a muscle while working out in 
the weight rooms to students 
moshing too hard at a concert in 
the building's arena. 

"Everyone wants to do this 
because we want to help," 
Greenburg says. "There's no bet- 
ter thing you can do in a situation 
than what we do. [EMeRG] lived 
up to my expectations and has 
gone beyond UPD's ... It's a real- 
ly novel program." 



The MSA-CUP invites 
all members of the uni- 
versity and the com- 
munity to a program 
featuring Dr. 

Mustansir Mir. On 

Wednesday. October 

30 in the Carter 

Auditorium in Still 
Hall, Or. Mir will speak 
on the topic of "How 
Muslims Look at other 
Faiths". The program 
will start at 7:30 p.m. 
and a fight dinner will 
be served at 8:30 p.m. 

Everything is free. 




X 




Senate 



by Matt Geesey, News Editor 

The Clarion University Student Senate held their weekly meeting 
Monday night in the Gemmell Student Center. 

President Michael Cox made a motion as part of his report to rescind 
the motion from last week's meeting to appropriate $1,999 from the 
capital account to the men's basketball team for a new Gateway 2000. 
According to Robert Carlson, the athletic director of the university, the 
team shouldn't have gone to the Student Senate with a capital request. 
Cox also announced that there will not be a Student Senate meeting on 
October 28. 

A representative from Interhall Council announced a games night 
will be held at Highland Oaks Senior Center on October 28. About 10- 
12 volunteers will be present to play games with the seniors. A bus trip 
is being planned for the Clarion/Edinboro football game which will be 
held in Edinboro on November 9. The residence halls will be selling 
pumpkins for Halloween. All proceeds will go to the March of Dimes. 
Senator David Lytle, Student Senate representative on the Faculty 
Senate, reported the 1997-98 academic calendar was approved at their 
last meeting. Fifteen tenure positions were announced and a new direc- 
tor has been appointed for the library. 

The Black Student Union (BSU) will hold a fashion show on October 
25 in Hart Chapel at 8 p.m. They will also hold their Fall Cabaret on 
October 26 at 8:30 pm. in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 

WCCB announced they would be holding a Halloween concert on 
October 30 at 7 p.m. 
There will be five bands performing during the evening. 

Vice-President Thomas Swenson, in absence of the Appropriations 
Committee chairperson Trade Mathis, made a motion to appropriate 
$1,799 from the capital account for the Clarion Call to purchase a new 
copier. There were representatives from the Clarion Call present to 
answer the questions of the senators. The motion passed. 

Senator Terry Stoops, the chairman of the Legislative Affairs 
Committee, announced that his committee made a newsletter of polit- 
ical issues and facts for the student body to use. Copies of the newslet- 
ter will be available around campus. A night of "Presidents, Politics, 
and Pizza" will be held in the Gemmell Rotunda during the election 
results telecasts. Election absentee ballot applications are due October 
28. 

Senator Heather Hosford, the chairperson of the Dining and 
Residence Halls Concerns Committee, explained to the Senate about 
several of the new ideas at Chandler Dining Hall, including the remod- 
eling and the new premium line. 

Several representatives of the Student Senate, including President 
Cox, Senator Delphine Djossou, Senator William Caughtery, and 
Senator Kelly Gould, met with Mr. William Fulmer, president of the 
Clarion chapter of the Association of Pennsylvania College and 
University Faculty (APSCUF). They discussed the conditions of the 
faculty negotiations. 

Senator Lytle, the chairman of the Public Safety Committee, 
announced a self-defense course for women will be held on Sundays, 
November 10, 17, and 24 at 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The classes will be held 
in the Tippin Gym Dance Studio and it is called Rape Aggressive 
Defense Systems (R.A.D.S.). The class is free but students must sign 
up at Public Safety starting on Monday, October 21 and the class is 
limited to 24 students. The classes are offered through Student Senate 
and Clarion University Public Safety. 



LIFESTYLES 



Recital to feature world premiere performance 



by Scott Behlo 
Lifestyles Writer 



Jack Hall, trumpet instructor at 
Clarion University will present a 
trumpet, drama, and dance recital 
Monday evening October 28, at 
8: IS p.m. in Marwick-Boyd audi- 
torium. 

Donald F. Black, who will 
accompany Hall, holds degrees 
from Wayne State University and 
the University of Michigan. 
Black is currently teaching cours- 
es in music education, applied 
piano, and organ here at Clarion 
University. Along with Black, 
Hall will be assisted by CU 



drama students, dancers and 
fourteen member instrumental 
ensemble. 

As for Hall, he has received 
degrees from the University of 
Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky 
University, and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania. He 
has studied extensively with 
Adolph Herseth of the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra, Louis 
Davidson of the Cleveland 
Orchestra, and Samuel Krauss, 
former solo trumpeter of the 
Philadelphia orchestra. 

Kicking off the recital which 
will include modern and classical 
compositions for trumpet, dance 




Clarion Call File Photo 

Jack Had, CU trumpet 
instructor. 



and theater from 1949 to 1996, 
will be a French composition that 
was written in 1953 by Andre 
Jolivet and entitled Air De 
Broome.. 

Next on the recital agenda is a 
composition titled Two Court 
Jesters which was composed in 
1949 by Albert Beaucamp. 

This work will highlight the 
dancing talents and imaginative 
innovations of Michelle Kilbert 
and Dawn Marie Snyder. 
Colorful and authentic jester cos- 
tumes will set off their creative 
and fashionable routines. Hall 
will then perform Sonatina by 
Arthur Frackenpohl, which was 



published in 1983. 

The Sonatina is constructed 
within the confines of a standard 
three movement format and fea- 
tures the ultrahigh sopranino reg- 
ister of this diminutive and bril- 
liant trumpet. 

This will complete the first half 
of the recital. 

The program will conclude with 
a world premiere of The 
Ascending , with original story 
and music by Jack Hall. 

This work was completed in the 
fall of 1996. 

Students and the public are cor- 
dially invited to attend free of 
charge. 



CU supports Homelessness and Hunger Month 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service-Learning Office 

Have you ever tried to imagine 
what it would be like if you did- 
n't have a home? 

As you sit in your apartment or 
residence hall room, it is hard to 
imagine what it would be like if 
you had to call a box under the 
Toby Bridge your home, that is 
why we sponsor "Out to stop... 

Homelessness and Hunger 
Month." 

During the month of November, 
the Community Service- 
Learning Office (CSL) is chal- 
lenging the students, the faculty, 
the staff of Clarion University 
and the Clarion community to 
make a difference and help stop 
hunger and homelessness. 

"Everyone remembers the less 
fortunate around Christmas," 
said Diana Anderson, Director of 
Community Service-Learning. 
"But they forget their needs earli- 
er in the year." 

This challenge can be met by 
participation in a sleepout, a 
scavenger hunt, a food drive, and 
a clothing drive. 

The second annual 24-hour 
sleepout for the homeless kicks 
off the month. It is scheduled for 
8:00 a.m. November 8th and 9th. 
Volunteers pledge to spend a 
minimum of one hour and will 
sleep in boxes on the comer of 
8th Avenue and Wood Street. 
Monies are raised through spon- 
sorship and the donations of 
passersby. 

It will probably be cold outside, 
but 24-hours is just a small taste 



of what some people live with for 
months at a time. 

"This event makes an often 
invisible problem visible," said 
Cheryl Miller, coordinator of 
United Campus Ministries. 
"Student participants develop an 
empathy for those less fortunate 
while doing something concrete 
to help them." 

Sleepout registration and spon- 
sorship forms are available at 247 
Gemmell, the CSL office or 268 

Gemmell, and the United 
Campus Ministry (UCM) office. 
Volunteers must register by 
November 5th. 

The sleepout is sponsored by 
United Campus Ministry, Habitat 
for Humanity, and Into the 
Streets, and supported by the 
CSL office. 

"From last year's experience I 
know that the sleepout brought in 
a lot of contributions that helped 
the homeless in Clarion County," 
said Linda Elliot a case manager 
at Jefferson/Clarion County 
Economic Opportunity Agency, 
Inc., also known as, Community 
Action. 

This agency receives the funds 
raised during the sleepout, and 
provides vouchers to area fami- 
lies which are used to purchase 
food. Last year's sleepout raised 
over $1,000. 

The next event is the Clarion 
Area Scavenger Hunt. 

Teams are formed to go into the 
community and collect non-per- 
ishable food items between 10 
a.m. and noon, on November 9th. 

To participate in this activity 
you must sign up in the CSL 



office, 247 Gemmell Center, 
before November 5th. 

Some of the items needed are 
canned goods, oodles of noodles, 
tea bags, and other foodstuffs. 

These items will be returned to 
CSL, and then taken to the food- 
bank for distribution. 

If you can't help with the 
Scavenger hunt, volunteers are 
needed to deliver the goods to 
Community Action at 1:00 p.m. 
on November 10th. 

To include the entire university 
community, CSL office encour- 
ages everyone on campus to par- 
ticipate. 

University offices will be chal- 
lenged to donate all items on the 
list to ensure that a variety of 
goods will be selected. 

The Student Athletic Advisory 



Committee will sponsor a friend- 
ly competition among Clarion 
University athletic teams. This 
will be the second year athletics 
have made this contribution to 
the food drive. 

Other campus organizations are 
invited to get involved in the 
month's activities. 

The Interhall Council has been 
approached to coordinate the 
food drive within the residence 
halls, and the Alumni 

Ambassadors will encourage stu- 
dents to give up a meal from 
their meal plans. 

All foods collected in the drive 
will be distributed by 
Community Action. 

The food drive will last from 
November 1st through November 
15th. 



The Panhellenic Council of 
Clarion University will begin the 
9th annual clothing drive on 
November 1st and it will last 
throughout the month. 

Clean, warm winter clothing, 
such as coats, hats, mittens, 
sweaters, boots, and gloves are 
needed. 

Once collected, the items will 
be sent to Community Action for 
distribution. 

Anyone wishing to make a 

donation can drop off clothing at 
room 267 Gemmell, the 
Panhellenic Council Office. 
Persons wishing to donate food, 
clothing, or money, and are 
unable to do so at the collection 
sites, may do so at the CSL office 
or call 226-1865 for more infor- 
mation. 



Ghost and the Darkness 



wtfaHcffly 



aid Karim 




Ghost and the Darkness is a 
must see action packed thriller! 
Val Kilmer stars as Colonel John 
Henry Paterson who was sent to 
Savo, Africa for five months to 
build a bridge. In his attempt to 
unite the people of Africa, his 
passion for the country became 
apparent. Also starring in this 
movie is Michael Douglas as the 
character Charles. Charles trav- 
els to Africa in pursuit of battling 
the blood thirsty lions. These 
two characters venture to kill the 
relentless beasts. These brave 
men have a lot more at stake than 
meets the eye. 
Kilmer and Douglas do a superb 



acting job while hunting down 
the ghosts in the darkness. 
No other two actors could play 
these roles with as much talent 
and courage. The scenes 

throughout this movie create 
extremely vivid images that leave 
you with an overwhelming feel- 
ing of fear and curiosity. 

Although this movie is exciting 
and suspenseful, the bloody and 
gory scenes may not be for 
everybody. 

This movie will have you sit- 
ting at the edge of your seat wait- 
ing to see what happens next! 
We definitely give this movie a 
thumbs up! 



Page 10 



The Clarion Cad 



October 24. 19% 



October 24. 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 



News of the weird by Chuck Shepherd 



Lead Stories 

— On Sept. 19, a branch of the 
large, financially troubled Czech 
Republic bank Agrobanka was 
robbed of about $8,000. The next 
day, Agrobanka head Jiri 
Klumpar praised the robbery as a 
sign of public confidence, signi- 
fying that people now believe the 
bank actually has money in it. 

— More Anal-Retentive 
Suspects: Charinassa Fairley was 
charged in July with killing her 
husband in Baton Rouge, La., 
after police found a checklist that 
included the notations "Make a 
prank call to him; offer food and 
love; make him take a bath with 
you. Put on gloves" and "Make 
love like never before for the last 
time. Lay down after he falls 
asleep. Pop him." And in 
September, former Navy Ensign 
Dana R. Collins, 35, was convict- 
ed of the murder of a colleague 
after police found a to-do list that 
included the items 'Take him 
out," "Cut him up/take head/fin- 
gers and toes," "Put him in 2 
bags," and "Drive body to 
Pennsylvania. Keep head and fin- 
gers and toes — scatter on way 
back." And after Gary Lynn 
Davis, 43, was arrested in July 
and charged with sexual assaults 
on several children around 
Adrian, Pa., police found in his 
home a neatly printed, three-page 
list of 125 "Boys and Girls I've 
Been With" that included abbre- 
viations for the acts committed 
with each. 

— The New York Attorney 
General's office announced in 
September that a new state law 
banning prison inmates from - 
throwing bodily fluids at guards 
did not cover one pressing prob- 



lem: Some inmates recently 
mailed their semen in plastic 
pouches to their wives or girl- 
friends as an expression of love, 
and the envelopes squished open 
when run through mail sorting 
machines, splattering workers. 
However, since the inmates did 
not intend to splatter them, the 
law does not apply. 
THE LITIGIOUS SOCIETY 

— In July, artist Victoria 
Baldwin prevailed in her lawsuit 
against the Sydney, Australia, 
salon Synergy over a bad haircut 
she got last year. She won $750 
plus $234 to compensate her for 
the hats she had to buy to dis- 
guise the cut, which she 
described as so bad that she 
looked like Hillary Clinton. 

— Three Texas residents filed a 
lawsuit in Lufkin, Texas, against 
the Walt Disney Co., objecting to 
three recent films marketed to 
family audiences that they say 
actually contained subliminal 
sexual messages: "The Little 
Mermaid" supposedly has a 
scene in which a minister has an 
erection; a voice-over in one 
scene in "Aladdin" whispers 
"Take off your clothes"; and 
"The Lion King" contains a 
scene in which the word "sex" is 
formed with clouds, grass and 
flower petals. 

— Scott Byron Morrison, 47, in 
jail awaiting trial for the 1995 
murder of his ex-wife, filed a 
$500,000 lawsuit against Calgary 
(Alberta) General Hospital in 
August. Morrison claims that if 
the hospital had properly treated 
him for a mental illness, he 
would not have been released and 
would not, four days later, have 
killed the woman with a shotgun 



Paul A. W&weA, QeweleM, £ 




606 MAIN STREET 

CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 16214 

Phone 814/226-8272 




blast. 

— Earlier this year, unsuccessful 
Puyallup, Wash., school-board 
candidate Dale Washam filed a 
lawsuit against House Speaker 
Newt Gingrich, the Washington 
state Republican party and others 
because, he said, the Republicans 
stole the 1994 "Contract With 
America" idea from him. 
Washam said he originated the 
concept of holding political can- 
didates to their promises when he 
ran in 1991, 1992 and 1993. 

— Customer Jerry Merich filed a 
lawsuit against the Starbucks 
Corp. in July over a 1995 injury 
in which a Starbucks employee in 
the company's Littleton, Cob., 
shop greeted him with a "high 
five" slap of the hand and caused 
a shoulder injury which left 
Merich unable to work for six 
months. 

THE ENTREPRINIURIAL 

SPIRIT 

— In August, Chris Bowdish's 
Chevron gas station in Lake 
Oswego, Ore., offered free mam- 
mograms administered by local 
hospital personnel. Said 
Bowdish, "You can tune up your 
body while you're having your 
car tuned up." 

— A Minneapolis firm is mar- 
keting an electronic device that 
allows people to see whether they 
have the proper temperament to 
become parents in that it "cries" 
at random intervals (more often 
on the "cranky" setting than on 
the "easy" setting) and stops 
only, when the "parent" reacts 
properly. To stop the crying, a 
probe must be held in place for 
up to 35 minutes to simulate the 
time required to feed, bathe and 
comfort the crying infant. 
Shaking or tilting the device 
causes it to register an "abuse" 
signal. 

— At a trade fair in Vienna, 
Austria, in August, body-paint 
artist Karl Machhamer demon- 



FOX'S PIZZA DEN 



Clarion Store 



strated his design for a skin-tight 
latex condom, custom-painted 
onto a penis. He plans to market 
bottles with enough paint for 
three applications, along with 
instructions, for about $8. The 
main drawback is the seven - 
minute wait while the paint dries. 

— In July, Philadelphia inventor 
Bill Killian introduced the Lawn 
Buddy message machine, in 
which a 5-inch- tall mechanical 
animal arises from a flower pot 
placed by the front door, 
announces that the resident is 
away, and invites the visitor to 
say a message. Killian says it will 
be on the market in early 1997 
for about $30. 

— Earlier this year and backed 
by $100,000 in federal, state and 
private grants, Kodiak, Alaska, 
photographer Marion Stirrup 
developed PlanTea, a nutrient- 
rich mix of kelp, fish bone meal, 
dried beet root powder and other 
ingredients, which she touts as a 
superior plant food. Stirrup says 
the list of ingredients came to her 
telepathically from her 16-inch 
palm plant, georgiane (which 
prefers its name spelled with a 
lower-case G, Stirrup said). 

NO LONGER WEIRD 

— Adding to the list of stories 
that were formerly weird but 
which now occur with such fre- 
quency that they must be retired 



2285555 



CHAMP 
PIZZA 

16 Cut • 2 Toppings 



$8 



00 



to 

Hand Tossed Crust 



+ TAX 



Original Crusl 

J 



from circulation: (7) The person 
believed to be missing and dead 
but who attends his own funeral 
and shocks the mourners, as did 
Dulal Chandra Das, who turned 
up in October after having mere- 
ly gone off from his home in 
Calcutta, India, to pray for a 
while. And (8) the episodes of 
just-desserts shootings in hunting 
season, as when Clifford 
Shellman allegedly shot to death 
another hunter in May near 
Blooming Grove, N.Y., after the 
two inadvertenUy coaxed each 
other closer together by sounding 
their turkey lures. 

UNDIGNIFIED DEATHS 

— In August, a 60-year-old 
stray-dog caretaker was killed in 
Los Angeles when four large 
sacks of dog food fell on top of 
her in her home. And in August, 
the Ontario Labour Ministry 
issued a warning after two pro- 
fessional divers drowned in June 
and July in ponds while search- 
ing for golf balls for Sports Quest 
Inc., which runs a $500,000-a- 
year business of reselling "expe- 
rienced golf balls." And Basilio 
Re died in the village of Vigogna, 
Italy, in July, during a party to 
celebrate his 100th birthday, 
when a gust of wind blew off his 
hat and he suffered a heart attack 
chasing it. 



Keeling Health Center will 

host a student forum 

Wednesday, October 30 at 7 

p.m. 

The fomm will be keld at tke ceirre»\ 

Students a^e encoui^acjed to discuss 

tKek concerns c\v\c\ recommendations. 

Clinical and administrative staff will 

participate. All are welcome to 

attend, Leam mora about Keeling and 

Kelp tkem learn more- about yoi\> 






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Clarion < 814 > 226 " 8740 

Office 

Equipment ...equipped for your future! 



BUSINESS MACHINES - SALES AND SERVICE 



FAX • COPIERS •SUPPLIES • FURNITURE • COMPUTERS 
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CCarion CaCendar oj-ILvents 



Thursday 



•UNITED NATIONS 
DAY 

Garby Theater 

The Ghost and the 

Darkness (R) 

7 & 9:30 

First Wives Club (PG) 

7:10 & 9:25 

Orpheum Theater 

Last Man Standing (R) 

7 & 9:30 

A Long Kiss Goodnight 

(R) 

7 & 9:30 




Friday 



Admissions Day (248 
Gem) 9 a.m. 

Volleyball at Juniata 
Tournament 
•Class Withdrawls end 4 
p.m. 

Swimming and Diving 
pre-season Invitational 5 
p.m. 

AASU Fashion Show 
(Chap)8 p.m. 

Garby Theater 

The Ghost and the 

Darkness (R) 

7 & 9:30 

First Wives Club (PG) 

7:10 & 9:25 

Orpheum Theater 

Last Man Standing (R) 

7 & 9:30 

A Long Kiss Goodnight 

(R) 

7 & 9:30 



Saturday 



•Football at Slippery 
Rock 1 p.m. 
•Annual Seminar for 
Strings (Aud) 8 a.m. - 

6 p.m. 

•NTE Core Battery 

Exam 

•National "Make a 

Difference" Day 

•Cross Country at 

Slippery Rock 

Invitational 

AASU Fall Cabaret 
(Gem MP) 8:30 p.m. 

Alpha Phi Omega 
Seminar (TB A) 11a.m. 
till 8 p.m. 
Garby Theater 
The Ghost and the 
Darkness (R) 

7 & 9:30 

First Wives Club (PG) 
7:10 & 9:25 
Orpheum Theater 
Last Man Standing (R) 
7 & 9:30 
A Long Kiss 
Goodnight (R) 



Sunday 



•Daylight Savings Tune 
ends 2 a.m. 
•Student Music Recital 
(Chap) 3:15 p.m. 
•Golf at Millersville 
Invitational 
•Alpha Phi Omega 
Seminar (TBA) 8 a.m. 
till 6 p.m. 

Garby Theater 

The Ghost and the 

Darkness (R) 

7 & 9:30 

First Wives Club (PG) 

7:10 & 9:25 

Orpheum Theater 

Last Man Standing (R) 

7 & 9:30 

A Long Kiss Goodnight 

(R) 

7 & 9:30 



Monday 



•Faculty Recital: Jack 
Hall, trumpet / Donald 
Black, organ/piano 
(Aud) 8:15 p.m. 
•Policy Committee Mtg. 
(B-8 Chap) 4 p.m. 
•Golf at West Chester 
Invitational 



Tuesday 



•Volleyball vs. IUP 7 

p.m. 

•IM Table Tennis begins 

•Timeout Luncheon 

(Holiday Inn) Noon 



Wednesday 



Leadership Series 
(250/252 Gem) 6:30-9 
p.m. 

•Swimming & Diving 
vs. Allegheny 6 p.m. 
•MLK Conference 
"Envisioning 
Sustainable 

Communities: Diversity 
Conflict Resolutions & 
the Future of Rural 
aNorthwestem Penna." 
(Gem MP) 9 a.m. - 8 
p.m. 




CU hosts PA Collegiate Choral Festival 



by Garry Pessia 
Lifestyles Writer 



The Clarion University Choirs 
with its director Mr. Milutin 
Lazich, have the honor to host the 
1996 Pennsylvania Collegiate 
Choral Festival. The Festival 
will be held for three days, 
October 31 through November 2 
at Clarion University. 

The PCC Association is a fifty 
year old prestigious organization. 
It has a membership of approxi- 
mately twenty five public and 
private colleges and universities. 
Clarion University has been a 
member for the past fifteen years. 
Fall of 1984 was the first and the 
last time that the festival was 
here. 

Lazich is pleased to have the 
opportunity to host the festival 
again twelve years later. 

About seventeen universities 
throughout Pennsylvania will be 
attending the event, including: 
Duquesne, Lock Haven, 
Edinboro, Thiel, Geneva, 
Bloomsburg and our own 
Clarion University Choir. 
Throughout these three days, stu- 
dents will be very busy singing a 
selected program of outstanding 
and highly challenging choral 



music under the direction of 
guest conductor Dr. James M. 
Jordan. 

Jordan is the conductor of the 
Westminster Chapter Choir and 
Associate Professor of 
Conducting at Westminster Choir 
College of Rider University in 
Princeton, NJ. 

Before joining Westminster, he 
served on the faculty at several 
well known universities as a con- 
ductor and director of vocal 
ensembles, including Eastman 
School of Music, Pennsylvania 
State University, and the Hartt 
School of Music. 

An authority on the subject of 
group vocal technique, Dr. 
Jordan frequently conducts work- 
shops for conductors across the 
country. 

Culmination of this three day 
festival will be the concert sched- 
uled on Saturday, November 2, at 
2:30 p.m. in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. 

Tickets will be available at the 
door for $3.00. Admission is free 
for college students with a vali- 
dated ID. 

One major problem in the 
preparation for this festival is 
housing for the visiting students. 
Many families and individuals 



from the Clarion community 
have already shown their gen- 
erosity in providing housing for 
these students. 
However, there are still some 

J 



students who need to be housed. 
Anyone who is willing and able 
to do this is kindly requested to 
please contact Mr. Lazich in the 
choral office, Room 230 



Marwick-Boyd at 226-2384. 

If you like choral music, this 
festival is for you. Everyone is 
invited. This will be one you will 
definitely enjoy! 




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Page 12 



. 



The Clarion Call 



October 24. 1996 



October 24, 19% 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 




Studying Abroad in 
Costa Kica bu Sarah 
Steidei 



My experience in Costa Rica 
cannot easily be expressed in 
words. There are so many 
aspects of the time I spent there 
where I learned so much. If I had 
to describe Costa Rica in one 
word it would be "thriving." I 
chose "thriving" because of how 
full of life everything is. The 
land is rich with vegetation. As 
far as the eye can see, there are 
rolling mountains possessing 
every shade of green imaginable. 
The density of this vegetation 
provides superb habitats for a 
massive variety of animals. In 
the short time I spent in Costa 
Rica, I saw toucans, parakeets, 
and two quetzels (an endangered 
species), crocodiles, monkeys, 
wild horses, humming birds, a 
boa constrictor, and sloths. In 
each of these sightings the ani- 
mals were in their natural habi- 
tats. 

Not only is the land thriving, 
but so are the people. I met many 
ticos (Costa Ricans) and each one 
possessed a similar zest for life. 
They are a very relaxed people 
and love to start a party anytime 
and anywhere (even on the 
buses). The salsa and the 



merengue are two very popular 
dances which 1 had a great time 
learning. Ticos are amazing 
dancers. To watch a tico couple 
is truly a beautiful thing. They 
are extremely affectionate at all 
ages and the men are very con 
siderate of the women. There is a 
cameraderie between the ticos 
that you don't find in the U.S. It 
is not rare to see strong embraces 
between men, holding hands of 
same sex friends, and everyone is 
greeted with a kiss. I experi- 
enced no hostility from any 
natives, if anything they were 
proud and wanted to impress me 
with their country. 

Costa Rica is also thriving cul 
turally. There is strong emphasis 
on family unity. Average family 
size is much larger then in the 
U.S. I lived with five beautiful 
children and my host father was 
one of eleven in his family. To 
the Costa Ricans their children 
are their life. As I traveled 
through the country, I couldn't 
help but notice that even though 
most of these people don't have 
much, you don't see many poorly 
kept properties. Every house is 
extremely well taken care of and 
clean. A pride has obviously 
gone into their belongings. The 
same can be said for the fincas 
(farms). Every finca is extreme 
ly well groomed and the crops 
prosperous. With this experi 
ence, I have been able to see and 
do things I've only dreamed of 
doing. Someday I hope to return 
to this beautiful land and I would 
recommend the trip to anyone 
who is open to new ideas and 
adventures. 




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The bald eagle menace 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

It's time once again for our pop- 
ular consumer health feature, 
"You Should Be More Nervous." 
Today we're going to address 
an alarming new trend, even 
scarier in some ways than the one 
we discussed several years ago 
concerning the danger of airplane 
toilets sucking out your intestines 
(if you had forgotten about that 
one, we apologize for bringing it 
up again, and we ask you to 
please put it out of your mind) 

We were made aware of this 
new menace when alert reader 
Edna Aschenbrenner sent us an 
item from an Enterprise, Ore., 
newspaper called - get ready for a 
great newspaper name - The 
Wallowa County Chieftain. The 
Chieftain runs a roundup of news 
from the small town of Imnaha 
(suggested motto: "It's 

'Ahanmi* Spelled Backward!"). 
On March 14, this roundup, writ- 
ten by Barbara Kriley, began with 
the following story, which I am 
not making up: 

"A bald eagle sabotaged the 
Imnaha power line for an hour 
and a half outage Wednesday 
with a placenta from the Hubbard 
Ranch calving operation. The 
eagle dropped the afterbirth 
across the power lines, effective- 
ly shorting out the power." 

This is a truly alarming story. 
We're talking about a BALD 
EAGLE, the proud symbol of 
this great nation as well as 
Budweiser beer. 

We don't know about you, but 
we always TRUSTED eagles; we 
assumed that when they were 
soaring majestically across the 
skies, they were PROTECTING 
us - scanning the horizon, keep- 
ing an eye out for storm fronts, 
Russian missiles, pornography, 
etc. 

But now we fmd out, thanks to 
the Chieftain, that they're not 
protecting us at all: They're up 
there dropping cow placentas. 
They've already demonstrated 
that they can take out the Imnaha 
power supply; it would be child's 
play for them to hit a human. 

NOBODY is safe. Can you 
imagine what would happen to 
our democratic system of gov- 
ernment if, just before Election 
Day, one of the leading presiden- 
tial contenders, while speaking at 
an outdoor rally, were to be 
struck on the head by a cow after- 
birth traveling at 120 miles per 
hour? 

Nothing, that's what would 
happen. First off, your presiden- 



tial contenders do not ever stop 
speaking for any reason, includ- 
ing unconsciousness. Second, 
they're used to wearing ridicu- 
lous headgear to garner support 
from some headgear-wearing 
group or another. 

It would be only a matter of time 
before ALL the leading con- 
tenders were sporting cow pla- 
centas. 

But a direct hit could have a 
disastrous effect on ordinary tax- 
payers. That is why we are issu- 
ing the following urgent plea to 
the personnel at the Hubbard 
Ranch and every other calving 
operation within the sound of our 
voice: PLEASE DO NOT 
LEAVE UNATTENDED PLA- 
CENTAS LYING AROUND. 
This is especially important if 
you see eagles loitering nearby, 
trying to look bored, smoking 
cigarettes, acting as though they 
could not care less. 

Please dispose of your placen- 
tas in the manner prescribed by 
the U.S. Surgeon General; name- 
ly, mail them, in secure packag- 
ing, to "The Ricki Lake Show." 
Thank you. 

We wish we could tell you that 

the Imnaha attack was an isolated 

incident, but we cannot, not in 

light of a news item from the 

Detroit Free Press, written by 

Kate McKee and sent in by many 

alert readers, concerning a 

Michigan man who was struck in 
an extremely sensmve aiea - >uu 

guessed it; his rental car - by a 

five-pound sucker fish falling 

from the sky. 

I am also not making this up. 

The man, Bob Ringewold, was 

quoted as saying that the fish was 

dropped by a "young eagle." 

(The article doesn't say how he 

knew the eagle was young; 

maybe it was wearing a little 

baseball cap backward.) 

The fish dented the roof of the 

car, although Ringewold was not 

charged for the damage (this is 

why you car-renters should 



always take the Optional Sucker 
Fish Coverage) 

And here comes the bad news: 
This is NOT the scariest recent 
incident involving an airborne 
fish. We have here an Associated 
Press item, sent in by many alert 
readers, which begins: 
"A Brazilian fisherman choked to 
death near the remote Amazon 
city of Belem after a fish unex- 
pectedly jumped into his mouth." 

The item - we are still not mak- 
ing any of these items up - states 
that "the six-inch-long fish sud- 
denly leapt out of the river" 
while the fisherman "was in the 
middle of a long yawn." 

Of course, this could be simply 
a case of a fish - possibly a young 
fish, inexperienced or on drugs - 
not paying attention to where it 
was going and jumping into 
somebody's mouth. 

On the other hand, it could be 
something much more ominous. 
It could be that fish in general, 
after thousands of years of being 
hounded by fishermen and 
dropped on rental cars, are final- 
ly deciding to fight back in the 
only way they know how. 

If so, there is trouble ahead. 
You know those Saturday-morn- 
ing professional -bass-fishing 
programs on TV? 

We should start monitoring 
those programs closely, because 
the fish on those programs are 
probably SICK AND TIRED of 

always playing uic tuic ui vic- 
tims. 

It is only a matter of time before 
there is a situation where a cou- 
ple o f televised angling profes- 
sionals are out on a seemingly 
peaceful lake, casting their lures, 
and they happen to yawn, and 
suddenly the water erupts in fury 
as dozens of vengeful bass 
launch themselves like missiles 
and deliberately lodge them- 
selves deep into every available 
angler orifice. 

And we would NOT want to 
miss that. 



The Keeling Health Center mill of fer flu 
shots on Tuesday October 29 from 18 

a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Gemmell lobby. 

The cost Is $7.50 bitted to student accounts. 



On Tuesday, October 29, the Madrigal Singers, 

under the direction of Mr. Milutin Lazich, mil 

-present their fail gala concert. The concert mil 

be held at 8:15p.m. in 9(art Chapel, ftitare 

invited to attend and admission is free. 







Kris ty Valasio, Senior, Early Child/El. Edu. 

'it works for me since I am a Senior. However, 

when 1 was an underclassman, it was hard 

because people save classes for each other." 




Lisa Giacomino, Senior, Early Cbild/Ele. Edu. 
"Since they rearranged the classes for block, it 
was very time consuming to have to get permis- 
sion to take 21 credits and wait for the registrar 

to enter it in the system, when I only need 18" 




Christopher Smith, Sophomore, Geography 

'This is my third semester and I haven't had a 

problem yet. It has worked fine up to this 

point." 




• 




What is your opin- 
ion on Teffieg? Do 

you think it works 
and why? 



f 

Jepf levhdicb 



-«M<~ 



.>■■• at i 
i 



Phorogjwphy 

EdlTOJL 




Thomas Sligh, Senior, CAIS 

"I believe it works because it is a quick way to 

register and get your classes immediately and on 

time. And after you register, you can see your 

advisor to follow up & make sure everything is 

all right with your classes." 





Susan Maslyk, Junior, EITEarly Childhood 

"I think it's hard to get through to schedule your 

classes, but it is easier man what they did in the 

past, by standing in long lines, where now you 

can sit in the comfort of your own home." 



BUI Bates, Senior, Communications 

"Yes, because after four years, I finally got all 

my classes on the first try, without having to beg 

professors to let me in." 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 24. 1996 



ENTERTAINMENT 






THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Bulk 
5 Chief 
9 Meeting abbr 

13 "Waiting for the 
Robert — " 

14 Use a loom 

15 Piece of land 

16 Part of a stoop 

17 Affluent ones 

18 Lamb, to 
readers 

19 Headache relief 
21 Reliable 

23 Pari 

24 Necklace part 

25 Move like the 
world 

28 Lab 

32 Upper crust 

33 Declaim 

34 Exist 

35 To shelter 

36 Antiquing 
materials 

37 Trick 

38 Paving stuff 

39 Valleys 

40 More secure 

41 Pacifies 

43 Soggy ground 

44 Holy women: 
abbr. 

45 Distort 

46 Not as clear 
49 CA city 

53 Winglike 

54 Actor Jeremy 

56 Short news note 

57 Lacquered 
metalware 

58 "— Grows in 
Brooklyn" 

59 Cozy spot 

60 Wise one 

61 Require 

62 Hardy heroine 

DOWN 

1 Disorder 

2 Old man: Ger 

3 Tennis rank 

4 Diverge 

5 Toss 

6 Roof overhang 

7 St 

8 Pie and cake 




© 1996 Tribune Media Services Inc 
All lights reserved 



9 Races 

10 Actress Raines 

11 Spoke 

12 Remain 
14 As long as 
20 Carry 

22 Accept 

24 Wild pigs 

25 Ranch rope 

26 Earthenware 
pots 

27 Rows 

28 Small birds 

29 Israeli port 

30 Shield bands 

31 Equals 

33 Pointed arches 

36 Oran citizen 

37 Cosmetics 7 

39 Portal 

40 Kind 

42 Shylock 

43 Parson's 
residence 

45 Dwindled 



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46 Tubs 

47 — vera 

48 Strong wind 

49 Irritated 



50 Suits to — 

51 Loch — monster 

52 Sums: abbr. 
55 Map abbr. 



53 Serenity 

54 Fuel 

55 Marine plant 

56 Come together 

57 Cavort 



59 Cloth with 
metallic thread 

60 Director Kazan 

61 Soaks flax 
64 Pekoe 



^^^jfm^m^^t^ 





E MAIL NORMAN138 • AOLCOM 



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October 24, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pa^e 15 



ENTERTAINMENT 



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ALL OF THE ABOVE 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



October 24, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1? 



SPORTS 




Still undefeated in PSAC West 



Golden Eagles crush California 



by Brett Skovera 
Assistant Sports Editor 

• Clarion ranked #16 in 
NCAA Division II, head 
to Slippery Rock 

Led by a high-powered offense 
and a stingy defense, the Clarion 
Golden Eagles dismantled the 
California Vulcans 45-14 last 
Saturday at Memorial Stadium in 
PSAC-West play. The victory 
upped Clarion's mark to 6-1 
overall and 3-0 in the PSAC- 
West. 

Clarion wasted no time getting 
on the board when on the first 
play from scrimmage senior 
Steve Witte raced 65 yards giving 
the Golden Eagles a 6-0 first 
quarter lead. California then 
answered, taking their only lead 
of the game on a Keith Miller 6- 
yard run, Cal led 7-6. Junior 
wideout Mark Witte then caught 
his first of four touchdowns on 
the day. Witte's 6-yard grab gave 
Clarion the lead for good, 12-7. 
The Golden Eagles then broke 
things open in the second. After a 
25-yard Cal punt, Clarion took 
over on the Vulcan's 28. Two 
plays later fullback Jamie Sicken 
scored on a 24-yard counter play. 
Leading 18-7, Kejuan Cuibreth 
picked off a Mike Yurich pass 
and returned the ball 23 yards to 
the Clarion 44. Four plays later 
Weibel struck again, this time to 
Alvin Slaughter for a 44-yard 
score. Tyler Palisin hit his first of 
three extra points and Clarion led 
25-7 with 3:09 left in the half. 
Two plays after Clarion's kick- 
off, defensive end Drew Seaman 
intercepted a Yurich pass and 



returned it 7 yards setting up the 
Golden Eagle offense first and 
goal from the California 8-yard 
line. 

After a penalty and an incom- 
pletion, Weibel was on the mark 
again as he hit Mark Witte for an 
8-yard score. Witte finished the 



netted on 90 of 156 passes for 
1,279 yards and 16 TDs, with 
three interceptions. Steve Witte 
led all rushers on the day with 
127 yards on 13 carries. His 
touchdown, the 41st of his 
career, moved him into seventh 
place on the all-time PSAC list 



Rockets team. Led by 9th year 
head coach Dr. George Mihalik, 
the Rockets opened up the 1996 
season losing at Youngstown St. 
(22-0), then won three straight 
over West Virginia Wesleyan (26- 
24), Fairmont St. (34-21), and 
East Stroudsburg (24-10). They 




Clarion travels to Slippery Rock this Saturday at 1 



game with four catches, all for 
touchdowns, tying an all-time 
Clarion University record for 
most TD receptions in a single 
game. In the second half, before 
giving way to backup Mike 
Forney, Weibel hit Witte for his 
fourth and fifth TD pass of the 
day. 
On the season Weibel has con- 



His career totals of 2,051 yards 
rushing and 119 career catches 
for 1,534 yards make him the 
only running back in conference 
history to rush for more than 
2,000 yards and have more than 
100 catches for more than 1,500 
yards. 

Saturday Clarion travels to 
Slippery Rock to face a 4-3 



Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 



then lost to West Chester (31-21), 
returned home to lose a close one 
to IUP (32-31) on a blocked PAT 
late in the fourth, and blocked a 
punt and returned it for a touch- 
down with 39 seconds left at 
Edinboro to take a 35-28 victory 
over the Fighting Scots. "I think 
Slippery Rock has a very talented 
football team," commented 



Clarion's Malen Luke. "They 
play a physical brand on both 
sides of the line and make a lot of 
big plays. Offensively, Chad Vogt 
really makes them go and he 
made a lot of big plays to defeat 
us last year. Defensively they 
swarm to the football and make 
all the key plays. Stats mean 
nothing this week. This is always 
a tough, emotional game that will 
continue on Saturday." Slippery 
Rock's offense is averaging 24.4 
points and 308.4 yards of offense 
per game. 

Doing the play calling is 1995 
PSAC-West all-conference quar- 
terback Chad Vogt. He has com- 
pleted 75 of 163 passes for 1,003 
yards and 8 TDs while rushing 
for 170 yards and 2 TDs on 94 
carries. SRU's defense is giving 
up 389.9 yards and 24 points per 
contest The Rockets are giving 
up 155.3 rushing yards and 234.6 
passing yards per game. Inside 
linebacker Shawn Rohrer leads 
the team with 94 tackles and set a 
school record with 25 tackles at 
Edinboro last Saturday. 

Clarion Notes: In last years 
SRU victory, Vogt completed 17 
of 26 passes for 281 yards and 4 
TDs... Slippery Rock's defense 
held Clarion's rushing game to 
71 yards on 31 carries... Steve 
Witte caught 8 passes for 91 
yards and 1 TD... Chris Weibel 
completed 22 of 33 for 245 yards 
and 1 TD... Clarion returns home 
next weekend, November 2nd, to 
host I.U.P. at 1pm... The Golden 
Eagles travel to Edinboro on 
November 9th, then travel to 
Mansfield on November 16th for 
the season finale. 



Swimmers and divers ready to repeat as champs 



by Lori Matachak 
Sports Writer 



Once again, the Golden Eagles 
Swimming and Diving team are 
ready to pursue the season ahead 
of them in a preseason exhibition 
Invitational this Friday, October 
25. 

Coach Miller said "The team is 
looking very strong this year. We 
have a lot of freshman and also a 
lot of strong returning upper 
classman. Returning this year is 



Conference Champions Andy 
Smearman, Eric Fringer, Sharon 
Conley, Christina Tillotson and 
Lauri Ratica. Returning Ail- 
Americans are divers Ken 
Bedford, Andy Ferguson, Brian 
Ginochetti and swimmers Regan 
Rickert, Kelly Gould, Stephanie 
Wigfield and also Smearman, 
Ratica, and Tillotson. 

To let you know, the men's 
swimming and diving team have 
won the PSAC Division II cham- 



pionships periodically in the last 
21 years. 

As for the women's swimming 
and diving team, they have been 
PSAC champions for the past 22 
years. 

Coach Miller added, "It all 
depends on how soon and how 
well the freshman realize on how 
strong and confident they can 
become." 

In Friday's preseason exhibi- 
tion Invitational, the Golden 



Eagles Men's and Women's 
swimming and diving teams will 
be competing against Slippery 
Rock, Lock Haven, and 
Westminister starting at 5:00. 
And then on Wednesday, October 
30 they will compete against 
Allegheny at home at 6:00. The 
swimming season will run from 
October 25 to March 15. 
Nationals will be held at 
Cleveland St. Good luck to all of 
the swimmers. 



Look for a 

preview of 

Clarion Hoops 

next week in 

the Clarion 

Call 



— > m m * mm^m*+* * 



Lady Eagles fall to Lock Haven 



by Amy Mortimer 
Sports Writer 



It's another week of learning, 
volleyball fans, as the Lady 
Eagles met their season's rivals 
on Tuesday and will meet new 
competitors this weekend. 

Clarion traveled to Lock Haven 
Tuesday night and played the 
team that has become rivals for 
Clarion this season. 

Clarion was defeated in three 
matches, bringing their 1996 
results to 9-16. "They played 
well in spurts, but Lock Haven 
played the best game I've seen 
them play. They were really 
pumped up because of the home 
advantage," says head coach Jodi 
Burns. 

The scores were 12-15, 15-17, 
and 5-15, with Clarion coming 
from behind in each game to 
challenge Lock Haven. 
Unfortunatly it wasn't quite 



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Clarion will host Indiana on Tuesday 



enough to beat them. The second 
game was the best as the spikers 
forced Lock Haven to get 17 
points rather than 15. "The play 
in the second game was good, 
both teams played tough," says 
Burns. "Beth Brandstatter had a 
good game as middle, but the 
whole team has had a great atti- 
tude and excellent practices. This 
loss was disappointing." Coach 
Burns is anxious to see how well 
the Lady Eagles play Friday at 
the Juniata Tournament. They are 
the number one team in the east- 
ern division with a record of 24- 
0. The spikers will also play 
Susquehana Friday at the tourna- 
ment, and other teams, to be 
named, on Saturday. Christy 
Boes still leads the team with 33 
service aces. She also has 185 
digs. She is followed closely by 
Mandy Kirby, who has 31 service 
aces, 139 kills, and has the high- 
est number of digs at 284. Jessa 



Canfield is the top killer on the 
team with 225 kills this season. 
She also has 23 service aces and 
224 digs. Jill Platteborze has 97 
kills, 474 assists, by far the most 
on the team, 19 service aces, and 
155 kills. Tracy Barnett is sec- 
ond on the team with 166 kills. 
Jamie Soboleski has 21 service 
aces, Brooke Paxton is second in 
number of assists with 248, and 
also has 15 service aces. 

Beth Brandstatter has 42 kills in 
only 39 games, and already has 6 
service aces. Curtisy Hilton has 
132 kills, followed closely by 
Lindsey Kuruzovich who has 1 10 
kills. Next Tuesday, October 29, 
Indiana University visits Clarion 
to play some mean volleyball. 
Friday, November 1, Clarion 
plays Fairmont State in another 
home game. Remember, if you 
can't go see the games, turn on 
your radio to 91.7 for all the vol- 
leyball action. 



Braves and Yanks battling in October 



by Damon Mclntire 
Sports Writer 



The Atlanta Braves moved 
within two games of repeating as 
world champions, but the New 
York Yankees are not about to go 
quietly. 

The Yankees won game 3 of the 
world series and eliminated any 
chance of a series sweep at the 
hands of the Braves. 

In game 1 the Braves clobbered 
the Yankees 12-1 behind the 
pitching of probable Cy Young 
awarded winner John Smoltz and 



the bat of rookie Andruw Jones. 
Smoltz turned in a dominant per- 
formance allowing just one run 
on two hits in picking up the win. 
At 19, Jones became the 
youngest player to ever homer in 
a series game eclipsing the for- 
mer mark of ex- Yankee great 
Mickey Mantle. Jones turned on 
an Andy Pettite fastball blasting 
it for into the New York night 
silencing the hostile crowd of 
57,000+. 

The homer was the first of two 
for Jones who also had 5 RBI's. 

The Braves had to work a little 



harder, but still got the same 
results in Game 2. This time 
Greg Maddux baffled Yankee hit- 
ters combining with Mark 
Wohlers in a seven hit complete 
game performance. 

Fred McGriff paced the Braves 
offensively driving in Atlanta's 
first three runs with singles in the 
first and third innings and a sacri- 
fice fly in the fifth. 

The Yankees squandered their 
best opportunity in the sixth. 
Derek Jeter and Tun Raines led 
off the inning with consecutive 
singles, but Wade Boggs ground- 



ed into an easy 4-6-3 double play 
ending the rally. The series then 
shifted to Atlanta's Fullton 
County Stadium for Game 3. 

The Yankees turned to ace 
David Cone to stop the bleeding 
in Game 3. 

Cone reaffirmed his status as a 
big game pitcher by outdueling 
Tom Glavine for six innings in 
the 5-2 win. 

The Yankees were led by the 
clutch hitting of Bernie Williams 
whose RBI single gave the 
Yankees the first inning lead. 
Williams than sealed the win 



The Sports 
Editor wel- 
comes all let- 
ters, com- 
ments, ideas 
or predic- 
tions. 
Selected let- 
ters will be 
printed in the 
Clarion Call. 



Congratulations to 
We'll Still Win on win- 
ning the Intramural 
Football Championship! 



with a two run homer off reliever 
Greg McMichael in the eighth. 
The Yankee win improved them 
to 6-0 on the road in the post sea- 
son. The win definitely sways 
the momentum of the series 
heading into Game 4 Wednesday 
night. 

The Yankees and Braves are 
baseball's premiere teams facing 
off in baseball's showcase event. 
Expect this series to go the full 
seven games with the Yankees 
winning in dramatic fashion. The 
Yankees feel they are a team of 
destiny and will not be denied. 



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Pa^e 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 1996 



NBA action just around the corner 



by Tim Rafalski 
Sports Writer 



Another season of hoops is 
upon us, so let's kick it off right 
with a preview, starting with the 
Eastern Conference. 
ATLANTIC DIVISION 
The Cellar -New Jersey Nets 

The losses of Chris Childs, P.J. 
Brown, and Armon Gilliam to 
free agency and David Benoit to 
injury will ensure new head 
coach John Calipari a season full 
of headaches. The Nets do have 
some talent left with Robert 
Pack, Kendall Gill , and Jayson 
Williams. Remember you heard 
this here first, Williams will beat 
out Dennis Rodman for the 
rebounding title this season. 
6th Place- Boston Celtics 

The G.MVnead coach finally 
made a good off-season move 
when he traded under-achieving 
center Eric Montfoss to Dallas to 
move up in the draft and get tal- 
ented Kentucky forward Antoine 
Walker. Carr then stuck his head 
back in... we'll say the sand, this 
is a family publication, by not 
signing a free agent center. The 
Celtics are now stuck with Pervis 
Ellison, a bigger under-achiever 
than Montross. If Boston wants 
to win, they'll have to improve 
upon the 107 points per game 
they gave up last year. 
5th Place- Philadelphia 76ers 

The Sixers are an explosion 
waiting to happen, The only 
problem is nobody knows if it 



will be a good or bad one. This 
team has plenty of talent, but also 
has its fair share of attitudes and 
me-first players. Derrick 
Coleman has Hall of Fame talent 
wrapped around the personality 
of a spoiled, 10-year-old brat. 
Reports out of Philly say that he 
is down to his rookie weight of 
260 pounds and is ready to play 
like he means it, but we've heard 
that all before. Rookie point 
guard Allen Iverson is a tremen- 
dous talent and will combine 
with Jerry Stackhouse to form a 
strong backcourt. 
4th Place -Miami Heat 

The Heat are definitely a team 
on the rise. They improved by 
ten wins last season and look for 
them to add at least 5 more this 
time around. Alonzo Mourning 
has moved past Patrick Ewing as 
the best center in the Eastern 
Conference and is still only 26- 
years-old. Miami has a solid 
backcourt with a rejuvenated Tun 
Hardaway, the European sharp- 
shooter Sasha Danilovic and 
"thunder" Dan Majerle off the 
bench. 
3rd Place -Orlando Magic 

During the first month of last 
season we got a preview of just 
how good Anfernee Hardaway 
could be. This season, we get the 
whole show. Let's not kid our- 
selves though, Felton Spencer 
won't make anyone forget about 
the loss of Shaquille O'Neal. 
Without Shaq drawing double- 



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teams, Penny, Dennis, Scott, and 
Nick Anderson are going to find 
it harder to get shots off. The 
Magic are definitely going to fall 
some this season, but should still 
stay among the conference's 

elite. 

2nd Place - Washington (the team 

formerly know as the Bullets) 

I know they only won 39 games 
last season, but Washington is 
ready to make the jump into the 
big time. With Juwan Howard, 
Chris Webber, and "big" George 
M uresan, they have the best start- 
ing frontcourt in the conference. 
When playing, point guard Rod 
Strickland is one of the best in 
the game. If he can keep his head 
on straight and Webber can stay 
healthy, Washington will chal- 
lenge for the division title. 
1st Place -New York Knicks 

The Knicks hit the jackpot in 
this summer's free agency 
sweepstakes. Chris Childs, Allen 
Houston, and Larry Johnson will 
ease the burden on Patrick 
Ewing's aching knees. Two 
questions must be answered if the 
Knicks want to contend for the 
conference title. First, how will 
the new guys react to playing 
under the intense scrutiny of the 
New York media? Second, will 
any of their three rookies, John 



Wallace, Walter McCarthy, and 
Dontae Jones, be able to make an 

impact? 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

The Cellar -Toronto Raptors 

With rookie of the year Damon 
Stoudamire and first round pick 
Marcus Camby, G.M. Isiah 
Thomas has the Raptors pointing 
in the right direction. The addi- 
tions of Hubert Davis and Popeye 
Jones will help some, but this 
season is for getting Camby and 
Stoudamire more experience and 
to get another lottery pick. 
7th Place -Cleveland Cavaliers 

Head coach Mike Fratello did 
one of the best coaching jobs 
ever, last season, in leading the 
Cavs to the playoffs. They'll 
come back down to earth this 
season. After all-star Terrell 
Brandon, the Cavs have nothing 
but second tier players. Fratello 
was able to get more out of 
Bobby Phills, Chris Mills, and 
Danny Ferry than anyone thought 
possible. The biggest problem 
will be keeping them at that level. 
6th Place -Milwaukee Bucks 

The Bucks have one of the best 
frontcourts around, with Glenn 
Robinson, Vin Baker, Armon 
Gilliam, and Andrew Lang. The 
question marks are in the back- 
court. Rookie Ray Allen looks 



IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve Moore 



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like a can't-miss, but so did 
Shawn Respert last season. If 
Sherman Douglas can play con- 
sistently at the point, the Bucks 
could move into playoff range. 
5th Place -Charlotte Hornets 

The Hornets had a busy off-sea- 
son. They bid farewell to Larry 
Johnson, Kenny Anderson, and 
schoolboy Kobe Bryant. In 
return, they got a solid center in 
Vlade Divac and an all-round 
player in Anthony Mason. The 
loss of Anderson will hurt the 
most. Now they are stuck with 
Muggsy Bogues or rookie Tony 
Delk running Ihe point. Look for 
Glen Rice to have a tremendous 
year. 
4th Place- Detroit Pistons 

During the off-season, the 
Pistons lost Allen Houston and 
replaced him with Stacy 
Augmon. They substituted a lit- 
tle less offense for a little more 
defense, and did nothing else to 
improve themselves. They still 
have mister everything Grant 
Hill, but who's going to get him 
the ball? Joe Dumars is slowly 
withering away and Lindsay 
Hunter has not been able to get 
the job done. 
3rd Place - Atlanta Hawks 

The addition of Dikembe 
Mutumbo gives the Hawks a top 
notch starting lineup, but then- 
bench seriously lacks depth. 
Christian Laettner will now be 

able to move into the four posi- 
tion, where he is better suited to 
play. Mookie Blaylock and Steve 
Smith give the Hawks an all-star 
caliber backcourt. 
2nd Place - Indiana Pacers 

If Rik Smith gets healthy, the 
Pacers will be solid at every posi- 
tion except point guard. They'll 
either go with last season back- 
up, Travis Best, or Jalen Rose, 
who is talent but lacks pure point 
guard skills. 

1st Place - Chicago Bulls (Boy, 
that's a shocker). 

The Bulls were able to keep 
last year's record breaking team 
intact and are the front-runners to 
win it all again this year. If 
Scottie Pippen's ankles hold up 
and Dennis Rodman can act like 
a semi-adult for one more year, 
the Bulls should be able to win 
their fifth championship in seven 
years. That's what you call a 
dynasty. For those of you who 
have been dying for me to men- 
tion his name. ..Michael Jordan. 

Look for the Western 
Conference preview, in next 
week's Call. 



October 24, 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Pa^e 19 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



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FREE T-SHIRT + $1000 

CreditCard fundraisers for fra- 
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Any campus organization can 
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whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
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65 Qualified callers receive 
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HAVE A JOB OPENING 
THAT YOU NEED FILLED? 
THE CLARION CALL CAN 

HELP. CALL 226-2380. 



HELP WANTED LARGE 

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MenAVomen earn $480 weekly 
assembling circuit boards/elec- 
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Experience unnecessary, will 
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Experience unnecessary, will 
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Students Needed! Fishing 
industry. Earn up to $3,000- 
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Board! Transportation! Male or 
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call 1-206-971-3550 ext. 
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FOR REM 



For Rent; Fall 97-98 term, 2 
extremely nice apts., 1-4 bed- 
room, & 1-2 bedroom, next to 
campus, utilities included, must 
be willing to sign full 1 yr lease. 
Call 226-7316, ask for Andrew. 



Apartments available for fall '97 
and spring '98 semesters. One 
block from campus. Furnished 

at four person occupancy. Leave 
message @ 226-5917. 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FREE FINANCIAL AID! 

Over $6 Billion in public and 
private sector grants and 

scholarships is now available. 
All students. are eligible . . 



regardless of grades, income, 

or parent's income. 

Let us help. Call Student 

Financial Services: 
1-800-263-6495 ext. F52462 



Shirley C. Hager, candidate for 
State Representative of this 63rd 
District, encourages you to vote 

on Nov. 5th, and would deeply 
appreciate your vote. 



PERSONALS 



Nicole, Good Luck this 

semester! Hang in there! Just 

keep thinking, only about three 

months until the Big "21"! 

Luv, Dana 



XTr, The Clarion Dance Team 

would like to send a very 

belated Thank You for mixin' 

and volleying with us! 

Let's do it again! 



ZFI, Thanks for mixin'. Let's do 

it again. Sorry this is sooo late! 

Luv, The Dance Team 



Maureen, I love being 

best friends! 

Denim 

Ana, I am so glad you are 

my little! Keep your chin 

up and remember I am 

always here for you! 

Love, Your Big 



IX, Whay happened to the 

bondage? We still had 

swinging good time! 

Love, IH 



To the Sisters of Theta Phi 

Alpha, We had a great time 

"poppin' the cooie." Let's do 

it again real soon. 
From the Brothers of Delta Chi 



Toga! Toga! Toga! 

Hey, Sisters of AZ 
We had a blast togaing with 
you. Let's do it again soon. 
Love, the Brothers of OIK 



OH congratulates its newest 
member, Nicole 



To the Brothers of ITT: 

We had a great time "bonding" 

with you. Doing the limbo 

will never be the same. 

Love, the Sisters of OH 



Hey Wrestlers, Thanks! - Cause 

the mixer was great. 

Love, The Dance Team 



Tony, Happy 21st Birthday. 
Love, J & K 



D-Phi-E, Thanks for such a 
great mixer we had a blast 

playing drunken jenga, hula 
hooping, and toasting the 

night off with wine. 
Love, the Sisters of AIT 



Whitie, You did a great job plan- 
ning the hayride!! Thanks a lot. 
Love, Your AIT Sisters 



Sisters and dates, The hayride 
was an absolute blast!! - AIT 



To the IX coaches, Thanks for 

all your support! ! 

Love, the Sisters of AIT 



The Sisters of AIT would like 

to give a special thanks to; 

Mark, Tony, Brian F, and Bums 

for all the help at the hayride!! 

Thanks Guys. 



Mark and Tony, Thanks for 

lighting our fire and keeping us 

warm on Saturday night. 

We love you guys. 

Love, Brandy & Niki 



Lela, You're doing good. Keep 

smiling and remember I'm 

always here for you. 

AT-Love, Your Big 



Happy Birthday to you - better 

get to the bar 'cause we'll be 

waiting there for you! 

Happy 21st Jen Newell! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



Happy Birthday, Cara Maudhuit! 
Love, Your AOE Sisters 



Look out Roost!! Nanette Zewe 

is finally 21! Happy Birthday! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



To the Sisters of AIT: 

Thanks for the mixer. We had 

fun just hanging with the girls! 

Love, the Sisters of AOE 



Dear Brothers of KAP, Just 
thought I would remind you 

guys that you are the greatest!! 

Love, Your Sweetheart, Daria 



Congratulations to the KAP fall 

'96 pledge class - Adam, Bob, 

Dave, Ryan, and Wayne on 

getting your Bigs!! 
Love, Your Sweetheart, Daria 



Good Luck to all the Sororities 

participating in Derby Days! 

Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



To the Brothers of Sigma Pi: 
Thanks for a great mixer. We 

can't wait to do it again! 

Love, the Sisters of ZTA 



Happy Birthday, Kristin M.! 
Love, Your Zeta Sisters 



Happy belated 21st, Heather! 
Love, Your Zeta Sisters 



Happy Birthday to Kelly L. 

on October 29th. 

Love, Your Zeta Sisters 



Congratulations on being 1/2 

way finished. You are almost 

there!! Keep on smiling. 

Love, Your Future Sisters of AZ 



OIK - We had a great time 

at the mixer! 

Love, the Sisters of AZ 



Chrissy, Keep smiling! 

You're doing great! 
Love, Your Rosebuddy 

Sigma Pi wants to thank the 

Zeta's for a great mixer. 

We can't believe we 

finished all that beer. 



AX- It was great "popping our 

cooie" with you guys! 

Love, the Sisters of 0OA 



Congratulations to all the 
Sororities competing in Derby 

Daze. Love, GO A 



To our Derby Daze coaches, 

Thanks for all your help. You 

sure are a good looking women, 

Justin. Love, 0OA 

Fall '96 - Keep your chins up. 

You girls are doing well. 

Love, 0O Sisters 

Happy B-day to our Halloween 

Babies, Heidi and Amymen 

Love, AIA 

Congratulations Soda on Lisa 

Lavaliering you. 

Love, AIA 

OA0 - You can steal our hearts 

with flowers any day! 

Love, the Sisters of AIA 

Tmy - Yea, I called you fat. 
Look at me... I'm skinny. 
-Atom Ant- 
Tina, You're doing a wonderful 
job with pledging. Don't worry 
because you are the best. Keep 
poppin'. Love, MB&PJ 



Pa*e 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 24, 19% i 



Golden Eagle tennis team strong at PSAC's 






October 31, 1996 



Clarion fflmberflitp ol jgenmtplbania 



Clarion. $fl 16214 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Writer 



For the first time since 1986, 
the Clarion University Golden 
Eagle tennis team finished in the 
top five at the PS AC 
Championships. The Golden 
Eagles left Pennbrior Raquet 
Club with a third place finish and 
two conference runners-up. 

Freshman Rachael Link ended 
a sensational season as Clarion's 
biggest team point winner, and an 
overall second-place finish at #5 
singles. 

Seeded third, Link received a 
first round bye and then dropped 
Shippensburg's Jamie Rosengurg 
in three sets. Link then avenged 
a loss earlier in the season by 
defeating #2 seed Melissa 
Labosco of Slippery Rock 6-3, 0- 
6,6-4. 

"That was the match I was wait- 
ing for," Link said. "It felt great 
to win against her." 

Link finished her freshman sea- 
son with a 6-3, 6-0 loss to Cara 
Fiore of Bloomsburg in the 
finals, and posting a 9-3 record at 
#5 singles. 

"I pretty much choked," 
Rachael admitted. "It was my 
first tournament and I got ner- 
vous when the pressure was on. 
There's not much else to say." 

Junior Mimi Williams, seeded 
third at #6 singles, earned a first 
round bye and then breezed past 
East Stroudsburg's Ashley Netzer 
6-1, 6-0. 

Williams lost a heartbreaking 
match to #1 seed Lisa Curran of 
Bloomsburg 64, 7-5, in the final 
round. 

"That was a tough match to 
lose. I was up a break, then she 
was up a break, and t hat was it ," 

m 




Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
Mimi Williams 

Williams noted. "I'm not taking 
anything away from her, but I 
think I could beat her if we 
played again." 

Williams finished her singles 
season 8-3 at #6 singles. 

Williams and Link then teamed 
up to make a run at a PSAC 
championship in doubles compe- 
tition as a #4 seed. After a first 
round bye, the tandem won easi- 
ly over IUP's Amy Peretin and 
Amy Westly 8-2, in the semi- 
finals. 

Williams and Link could not 
put it together in the champi- 
onship match and lost to Bloom's 
Cara Fiore and Lee Clare 8-1. 

"We both played some pretty 
tough matches earlier in the day. 
We just got beat," Wiliams 
added. 

Mimi and Rachael finish their 
doubles season at 7-4. 

"Rachael and Mimi played 
great tennis. They volleyed well 
throughout and cut down on 
unforced errors. They were 
strong the entire tournament," 
praised seventh year coach Terry 
Acker. 

Junior co-captain Kristen Golia 
turned a few heads at #3 singles 
for the Golden Eagles. 



Unseeded, Golia blew past East 
Stroudsburg's Jessica 

Kowalcheck 6-0, 6-0, in the first 
round. 

Kristen then upset Slippery 
Rock's #4 seed Andrea 
Campanelli 6-1, 6-4 in advancing 
to the semis. 

Golia had a tough time with 
Bloomsburg 's Amy Koontz and 
eventually lost in three sets, 2-6, 
6-4, 6-2. Kristen ends her junior 
campaign with an 8-4 singles 
mark. 

Brooke Drayer took her third 
seed at #4 singles to the semi- 
finals as well by beating Dana 
Stoudt of Shippensburg, 6-1, 6-2. 
Drayer lost to Margo Ayers of 
Kutztown in three sets to finish 
the year at 6-5 in singles play. 

Kristen Golia and Brooke 
Drayer make up Clarion's #1 
doubles tandem with an outstand- 
ing 8-1 record going into the 
tournament. 

Riding a #2 seed into their sec- 
ond round match against IUP's 
Rebecca Burtz and Kristine 
Rega, Golia and Drayer were 
upset by the Indians 8-3. 

Junior co-captain Amy O'Neal 
faced Shippensburg's Amy Baum 
in a first round PSAC 
Championship match. Splitting 
the first two meetings of the year, 
O'Neal was unable to win the 
rubber match and lost by a 6-1 , 6- 
1 margin. O'Neal finished with a 
3-6 slate at #2 singles for Clarion. 

Freshman #1 singles Cassie 
Baker lost in her first PSAC 
Championship match 6-2, 6-4 , 
to The Rock's Tiffany Gross. 
Baker ended her first year as 
Clarion's top singles player with 
a 2-8 record. 

O'Neal and Baker fared better 




"I knew we could finish in the 
Top 5 if we played the way we 
are capable of playing. Finishing 
third was just our reward for 
working hard all season long and 
being consistent." 

Junior Mimi Williams added, 
"We have four juniors on this 
team, and we have been together 
for a while, finishing third shows 
we're growing up." 



Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
Rachael Link 

in doubles play, advancing to the 
semi-finals by beating 
California's Maggie Hindie and 
Megan Oesterling 8-5 before los- 
ing a tough match to Kutztown's 
Kristen Karl and Lauren Kelley 
8-5. Amy and Cassie ended the 
year with a #2 doubles record of 
7-4. 

Bloomsburg won the PSAC 
team championship by racking 
up an incredible 41 points. 
Millersville came in second with 
24 points. 

With the Golden Eagles scoring 
14 points in a third place finish, 
Kutztown came in fourth with 13 
points, and Slippery Rock was 
fifth with 12 points. 

"We had a lot of surprises dur- 
ing the weekend," stated Acker. 



NFL Week #9 


home team in caps 


*Pick Master's Pick of the 




Week 


Favorite 


Pts Underdog 


RAVENS 


6 Rams 


49ers 


6 OILERS 


Steelers 


6 FALCONS 


LIONS 


10 Giants 


PACKERS 


171/2 Tampa Bay 


REDSKINS 


2 Colts 


EAGLES 


5 Panthers 


♦BENGALS 


2 1/2 Jaguars 


Cowboys 


3 Miami 


DENVER 


3 Chiefs 


Chargers 


3 SEATTLE 


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4 Jets 


PATRIOTS 


3 1/2 BUls 


VIKINGS 


6 1/2 Bears 


Bye Week: Saints, Oakland 


Pick Master 3-1 for the year 


Courtesy of the Pick Master 





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Singers, 

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Musicians & D J.'s 

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Saturday, November 2, 1996 
Point Park College 
Lawrence Hall Lobby 
Auditions: 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. 

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Sunday, November 3, 1996 
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ll!P J 

IKlfUilKMIIII 



W$z Clarion Call 



IVIhit's Jin si tic 




Clarion Golden 
Eagles beat Slippery 

Rock and set 
their sights to a vic- 
tory over IUP on 

Saturday. 

For the details see 

page 16. 



(Contents 



Reader Responses: Pg. 3 

News: Pg- 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 9 

Call on You: Pg. 13 

Entertainment: Pg. 14 

Sports: Pg. 16 

Classifieds: Pg. 19 

fcotom* 78, I**ite 6 



Weather 



Today- Variable 

cloudiness with 

sprinkles or flurries. 

High in the 40s to 

around 50. 

Friday- Chance of 

rain or snow. High 

in the 40s. 



Senator Arlen Specter answers student questions 



by Matthew Winger 
News Writer 



Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania students and resi- 
dents of Clarion and Jefferson 
counties voiced their concerns to 
Senator Arlen Specter at an open 
house forum on Monday, October 
28, 1996 at 2:15 p.m. 

The forum was held in the 
Carter Auditorium in Still Hall. 
The U.S. Congress was in recess 
on Monday after just finishing its 
104th session. 

When Congress is not in ses- 
sion, Senator Specter usually 
travels to Pennsylvania's coun- 
ties in order to stay in touch with 
his constituents. After leaving 
Clarion on Monday afternoon, he 
spoke to residents of Venango 
County before traveling to 
Pittsburgh for a television 
appearance. Senator Specter is 
not up for reelection this year but 
in 1998. 

Speaking to an audience of 
about 100 people, Specter 
addressed about 15 questions 
which the audience had raised at 
the beginning of the session. 

The senator spoke for almost 50 
minutes on issues ranging from 
the elimination of federal pro- 
grams to the problems of profes- 
sional beekeepers. 

He spoke about how important 
guaranteed student loans and 
grants are to starting many 
young people's careers. 

The majority of the audience 
were students enrolled in Clarion 
University. 

Specter also spoke briefly about 
drugs and crime in the U.S., 
expressing his strong belief that 
drugs need to be stopped on sev- 
eral levels at once. 

The death penalty is important 



in the fight against drugs and 
crime, but education is equally 
important, according to Specter. 

"Drugs must be stopped on sev- 
eral levels," said Specter, "and 
early education for young people 
is one of them." 

In response to another question, 
Specter tackled the ever-contro- 
versial abortion issue. According 
to the senator, who was trying to 
not take sides on the issue, par- 
tial-birth abortion is wrong 
because the fetus is ready to be 
bom. This would make partial- 
birth abortion a form of infanti- 
cide. Specter related how he and 
Senator Rick San tor urn from 
Pennsylvania are promoting 
abstinence from sex instead of 
being pro-life or pro-choice. 
Specter also promotes giving tax 
credits for adoption. The senator 
talked about small business and 
what the government could do to 
improve the situation. At this 
point, Specter promoted a few 
ideas. 

"A flat tax and a cutback on 
government regulations will help 
small business to succeed even 
more," reported the senator. The 
state of highways in 
Pennsylvania, restrictions on reli- 
gion, church taxation, campaign 
finance reform, out-of-state 
waste in Pennsylvania, the 
Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill 
hearings which Senator Specter 
helped make a decision, and even 
the senator's health were some of 
the other issues discussed by 
Senator Specter. 

According to the senator, his 
health is fine after recent compli- 
cations. 

In the current 104th Congress, 
Senator Specter is a member of 
the Appropriations, Intelligence, 




Jeff Levkulich/ Clarion Call 
Sen. Arlen Specter was in Carter Auditorium on Monday. 



Judiciary, and Veterans' affairs 
Committees and the 

Appropriations Subcommittees 
on Labor, Health, and Human 
Services, and Education; 
Defense; Foreign Operations; 



Agriculture; and Transportation. 
He serves as chairman of the 
Select Committee on Intelligence 
and the Appropriations 
Committee's Subcommittee on 
Labor/HHS and Education. 



He is also chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee's 

Subcommittee on Terrorism, 
Technology and Government 
Information and serves on the 
Antitrust, Business Rights, and 
Competition Subcommittee. 

Several regional issues Senator 
Specter has provided legislation 
on were: funding to Pennsylvania 
health centers, including the 
University of Pennsylvania in 
Philadelphia and the McGee 
Women's Hospital and Allegheny 
University of the Health Sciences 
in Pittsburgh; aid to families of 
slain Federal law enforcement 
officers; abstinence and educa- 
tion for teenage parents; privati- 
zation of schools; economic espi- 
onage, and school-to-work 
grants. 

Senator Specter lives in 
Philadelphia with his wife Joan 
Specter, his two sons, Shanin 
and Stephen, and two grand- 
daughters Silvi and Perri Specter. 



New parking lot near completion 



by Matthew Geesey 
News Editor 



A new 76 space parking lot 
located between Campbell 
Residence Hall and McEntire 
Maintenance Building is near 
completion. 

The parking lot was built to help 
alleviate the problem created by 
an increase of students, faculty 
and staff with automobiles. A 
decision the administration must 
soon make is: will the lot be 
used for the students or for the 
administration and faculty? 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, Vice- 
President of Finance and 



Administration, assures the uni- 
versity community that the deci- 
sion will be made as soon as the 
parking lot is complete. 

"The parking lot itself is com- 
pleted, but lights need to be 
added to make parking in the lot 
safer. The lights should be 
installed in a couple of weeks," 
she explained. 

"Currently, we don't know who 
the parking lot will be used for," 
said Haberaecker. 

She went on to explain the 
process by which the parking lot 
decision will be made. 

"Public Safety will do an uti- 



lization study of the parking lots 
for all available spaces," she 
explained. 

Public Safety will then give a 
recommendation to Haberaecker 
who will present it to the 
Facilities Planning Committee. 

Mr. Randy Rice, director of 
Keeling Health Center was elect- 
ed chairman of the university's 
Parking Committee. He said his 
committee will meet next week 
to further discuss applications of 
the parking lot. 

The general contractor for the 
parking lot is Clarion local, 
Francis J. Palo, Inc. 



[opinion 



Editorial 





1 don't know about 
you, but there are 
problems that I feel 

the nation faces. 
There is a problem 

with drugs. The 

problem is they are 

not legal/* 



Benjamin Keen, Sports Editor 




It's Halloween, and Halloween 
is scary: all the ghosts and gob- 
lins, scary costumes, and the 
things that go bump in the night. 
I can think of only one day that 
may be more frightening than 
Halloween, and that day is a 
week from now: Election Day. 

It's that scary day when people 
who haven't seen the outdoors 
since the last presidential elec- 
tion, venture out of their homes 
and to the polls to cast their vote. 
And for what? 

To decide the future of our great 
nation? To try and make the 
country a little better for the next 
four years? 

To be able to say, "I voted so I 
did my part, and that guarantees 
me my constitutional right to 
complain." I often wonder why 
people vote. 
Do you really think you are 



making a difference? 
Do you think your one, insignif- 
icant vote really makes a differ- 
ence in the overall shaping of our 
nation? Well, I am here to tell 
you that it can and how you can 
help create change, not compro- 
mise. 

First let's get a little back- 
ground information on the nature 
of a democracy so you can follow 
my rationale. 

A democracy is a representation 
of the people, or at least it used to 
be. 

Politicians used to go to the peo- 
ple who were voting for them and 
say, "I represent you good people 
in Washington; what do you want 
me to say for you? What do you 
want me to vote for?" At that 
time, depending on which part of 
the country you were from, you 
would hear answers like, "We 



want lower taxes; we want better 
education systems; we want to 
protect our farmlands and envi- 
ronment, and most importantly, 
we want a better life for our fam- 
ilies." 

At that point, Joe Politician 
would go to Washington and pro- 
ceed to vote for exactly those 
things, not his own, self-serving 
interests. 

That is how a democracy 
should work. Joe Politician is the 
arm of the body known as the 
majority opinion. Obviously he 
could not please everyone, but he 
pleased the majority of his con- 
stituents, and that is what he is 
supposed to do. 

Well, that was a long time ago 
before politicians voted for what 
they want 

Nowadays you are forced to 
compromise. Now, Joe Politict- 
ian says, "Here is what I stand 
for, if you don't like it, vote for 
the other guy." 

Then we take a look at the other 
guy, and we really don't like 
what he has to say either. So now 
what are we left with? 

We are left to sort through the 
beliefs and morals of a man who 
should have retired years ago, 
and think, "Well, I like the fact 
that he wants to give women the 
right to choose, and he wants to 
get rid of guns, but he doesn't 
like the death penalty." OK, now 
the other guy. He is for the death 
penalty, but he is also pro gun 
and pro life. So now you 
decide to vote for the guy who 

Continued on page 4 



flfl he Clarion Call 



270 ftewauU Complex 
(814)220-2580 

exettttitoe $oart 

Editor-in-Chtef...Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor....Brian Pietrandrea 
News Editor....Matthew Geesey 
Lifestyles Editor.... Denise Barney 
Sports Editor.. ..Benjamin Keen 
Advertising Design....Stephanie Flick 
Advertising Manager... .Robin Cepikoff 
Photography Editor....Jeffrey Levkulich 
Business Manager.... Jennifer Brown 
Copy & Design Editor... Kristen Davis 
Circulation Manager... Kevin Miko 

Advisor.... Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



CUriom, 98 10214 
fBX (014)220-2557 




The n?rion Call is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. 
Editors accept contributions from any 
source, but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, grammar, punctuation, 
and length. Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers and 
not necessarily the opinion of the uni- 
versity or of the student body. 
Display advertising copy is due 
Friday by 5:00 p.m. one week prior to 
publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday at noon the week of publica 
tion. Letters to the editor will be 
received no later than 5:00pm the 
Monday before publication. The 
Clarion Call is funded by the student 



activity fee and advertising revenue. 






f he flanon Call 



Page 3 







"Forever Young" 




The night was silent 
The air became cold 
The memories came creeping 
The memories of old. 

Some said it was a true one 
Some called it a tale 
Others will know it 
When darkness brings its veil. 

It was a brisk night and a dark 

night. 
The moon shone full 
The storytime topic 
Made it unnaturally cool. 

My story begins 
On a night much like this 
Something encircled me 
Like a giant abyss. 

I was frantic at first 
Then I started to go numb, 
Something called to my mind 
And beckoned me to come. 

I followed the voice 

That led to a fire 

As I drew closer 

It bumed higher and higher. 

People started flocking 
To see who had come 
The smell of new blood- 
They all wanted some. 



"Then the drink 

was taken. 
One ( would adore. 

It sank into my 
depth, and I knew 

I wanted more." 



Janna Barrish 



Their teeth were bared 
And eyes glowed bright 
I was too scared to run 
Too paralyzed to fight. 

They were ready to pounce 
And never I knew 
A pain so intense 
Lasting a second or two. 

My skin started to crawl 
My blood began to burn 
All thoughts became jumbled 
As my mind began to churn. 

My insides were like fire 
A hunger then became 
Longing passion so intense 
A desire I couldn't tame. 

The people were still watching 
As I lay there on the ground 
Squirming in my agony 
While my heart was still to 
pound. 

Then someone knelt beside me 
An attempt to ease my grief 
Something pressed onto my lips 
But the healing was only brief. 

At first I didn't realize 
What composed my drink 
Then I began to learn the taste 
And my soul began to shrink. 

I couldn't get enough of it 
The blood coursed in my veins 
Like nothing I've ever felt before 
Relieving all of my pain. 

Then the drink was taken 
One I would adore 
It sank into my very depth, 
And I knew I wanted more. 

It was then that I realized 
Just what I would become 
Be forever thirsting 
Stay forever young. 

•The author is a junior 
psychology major. 



READER RESPONSES 



"...if you really want to know how to use computers; take a class." 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to last 
week's Letter to the Editor in the 
Clarion Call . As a computer lab 
assistant, I felt a need to respond 
to the letter from "name withheld 
by request." I have a few things 
to write to you. Do you look on 
the wall or window for the com- 
puter lab hours? The labs do post 
them. Are you visiting the labs 
when they are open? Are you 
aware that there is more than one 
computer lab on this campus? 

As far as blank stares to ques- 



tions- I try to help to the best of 
my ability and never have I just 
stared at someone when asked a 
question. As far as not knowing 
how to run the computers, we do 
not know everything. I do not 
think anyone can possibly say 
they know a solution to every 
computer problem. So do not put 
lab attendants on some pedestal 
of computer knowledge. 

We are there to assist, not teach 
a course on how to solve com- 
puter problems. Now let's dis- 
cuss "internet hogs". I do not 




Rearing up for 
election day- do we 

need to question 

President Clinton's 

morals? 



Itisttia^m^ and November 5 is rolling around 
quickly. Who will win the race for the presidency next Tuesday? 
Dole sounding his harshest thus far in the campaign told voters to 
"wake up," and he urged them not to "inflict this on America for four 
more years." Right now the polls show Clinton with a lead of 17 per- 
centage points. 

What about the Perot factor? Up until now, Perot has not had a sig- 
nificant impact on the polls, generating a mere 7 points. 

Dole is still hopeful, but I think the real hope for Republicans now 
needs to be focused on the House and Senate races which will be cru- 
cial in deciding the future of American politics for the next four 
years. 

But what about the character issues? Marianne Means of Hearst 
Newspapers doesn't see this as a new issue. 

She claims the President has plenty of historical company when it 
comes to accusations of low moral and ethical standards. 

George Washington was attacked for "padding his war-time 
expense accounts, chasing women, and being a most horrid swearer 
and blasphemer." 

Other Presidents whose morals have been questioned have been 
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. 

Did Jefferson have affairs like the Paula Jones fiasco? Was Adams 
senile and a secret monarchist involved in secret deals with corrupt 
French officials? I don't know, but I am sure President Clintion 
would be relieved to know these great men have been in the same 
position. 

The question to be answered on election day is: Will Clinton fare 
as well as the others in spite of the allegations? 

We shall soon see. 

•The author is a junior Political Science major. 



On Noumber 1, 19%, the Sexual Assault Network and the 
Office of Residence Life will begin collecting articles printed 

in Western Pennsylvania publications on sexual assault, 
domestic violence, and relationship violence. The articles will 
be used to build an "article wall," which will be displayed on 
campus later this spring semester. Collection boxes are locat- 
ed at front desks and in the Women's Studies Center. 




carry cough drops so there is no 
way I could even offer one ( in 
reference to the quote "lab assis- 
tants just offer you a cough drop 
after you are done doing the clear 
your throat thing".) Maybe if 
you ask (that is- speak actual 
words), the internet user to log 
off you may accomplish more 
than just grunting and coughing. 
Or, maybe ask the lab attendant 
for assistance, because, I'm 
sorry, but I just don't know 
grunts and coughing language. 
The last comment I would like 



to make is this- computer lab 
money is distributed by the uni- 
versity. Money for a new 
President's Residence is allocat- 
ed through the Board of 
Governors; therefore, university 
money is not touched. Get your 
information straight, and if you 
really want to know how to use 
computers; take a class. 



Scott Cale 
Gemmell Lab Assistant 



"...consider coming to Venango Campus." 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing in regards to the let- 
ter by Ms. Mary Gravelle that 
was published in last week's 

CtariPP Call, 

I think that it was a good idea to 
have a coming out day for gays 
and lesbians at Clarion 
University, but I must admit that I 
have a few problems with the 
idea. 

1) Why wasn't any informa- 
tion passed along to Venango 
Campus?!? There are those of 
us who might have been willing 
to support the ALLIES cause. I 
don't know if I would be support- 
ive of ALLIES (as I don't know 
enough about the organization 
and its goals) but I do know if 
there were an ALLIES chapter 
started at Venango Campus I 
would at least be willing to go to 
a meeting. 

2) I think the idea of wearing 
jeans is not a good idea. In my 
view (with which you are free to 



disagree) you should have some- 
thing like a pin people could buy 
(something nice, but cheap, 
hopefully around $l-$2) so that 
you can make a little money for 
your organization, promote your 
cause, know who is supporting 
you, and who is not. You can't 
tell when it comes to jeans who is 
supportive of gay rights and who 
isn't. 

3) I think there needs to be 
more information about ALLIES 
available on both campuses. 
When Ms. Gavelle wrote her let- 
ter to the paper, she didn't speci- 
fy what the goals of ALLIES 
include. Does it mandate that 
individuals accept homosexuali- 
ty? Personally I believe that 
homosexuality is wrong, but I 
also believe that it is up to an 
individual to live their lives as 
they see fit. I wouldn't hate 
someone because they are gay, 
but I believe it is my personal 
right to disagree with homosexu- 



ality just as I don't want people 
judging me for the way I live my 
life ("Judge not lest ye be 
judged"). 

As a Christian, I believe that 
it's important to tolerate and 
accept others, even if we do not 
see eye to eye. My view on 
Christianity is that we should 
accept one another at face value 
and let God do all the judging. 
We, after all, have our differing 
opinions and nobody is perfect. 

I hope that I haven't offended 
anyone, but I think that it would 
be nice for organizations, such as 
ALLIES, to consider coming to 
Venango Campus . We are also 
part of Clarion University and 
would like to be involved in dis- 
cussing important issues such as 
gay rights. After all, isn't college 
about learning and growth, 
regardless of which campus you 



belong to? 



Chris Cummins 



Celeb Op-Ed 

Four years from the dawn of a new century 



by President Bill Clinton 
Celebrity Op-Ed Writer 

We are just four years from the 
dawn of a new century. It is a 
time of tremendous hope, excit- 
ing change, and enormous possi- 
bility. We are moving into the 
information age and a global 
economy. I believe that the out- 
come of this fall's election will 
determine how we prepare for 
the future — whether we have 
the courage to build a bridge to 
the 21st century and seize all the 
opportunities of a new economic 
age. 

We must work together and 



build that bridge, to meet 
America's major challenges and 
protect our values; to help parents 
raise their children; to help young 
people and adults get the educa- 
tion and training they need; to 
make our streets safer; to help 
Americans succeed at home and 
at work; to break the cycle of 
poverty and dependence; to pro- 
tect our environment for genera- 
tions to come; and to maintain 
our world leadership for the sake 
of peace and freedom. 

I believe that there are three 
things the American people 
should look at as they decide who 



can best meet these crucial chal- 
lenges: the record, the difference 
between their choices, and our 
plans for the future. Voters 
should begin by taking a look at 
the record. I ran for President 
with three major goals for this 
country: first, to make the 
American dream a reality once 
again for every American; sec- 
ond, to ensure that the US 
remains the strongest force for 
peace and freedom in the world; 
and third, to restore our sense of 
community - the responsibility 

Continued on page 4 




News from 
outside of 
Clarion... 



World 



Ex-president Walesa being probed 

Former president Lech Walesa illegally kept secret documents 
after leaving office and could face up to three years in prison, the 
Polish intelligence service said Tuesday. 

The State Protection Office told prosecutors Walesa did not 
return classified documents after being voted out of office last 
year. 

Walesa called the allegations "ridiculous." 

"I do not have any documents marked as classified," he said. 

Two women pulled from rubble 

For 36 hours, Samantha Miksche was entombed in the darkness 
of a collapsed 12-story apartment building. The Los Angeles teen- 
ager heard the cries of other survivors, the barking of search dogs, 
and the rumble of equipment boring through the ruins. 

On Tuesday, exhausted rescue workers pulled her and a friend 
from the rubble - bruised and bleeding, but alive. 

"I'm very tired," said Miksche, a 17-year-old Australian citizen 
who lives in Los Angeles. 

Her mother was among dozens of people still missing as the 
desperate search for survivors entered its third day. 



Nation 



Jury sides with drunken golfer 

A golfer had 13 drinks before he tripped on his golf spikes and 
fell face first onto a brick path outside a clubhouse, breaking his 
jaw and shattering his teeth. But an appeals court Tuesday said the 
course was mostly at fault, for leaving gaps in the bricks. 

Dale L. Larson - who needed nine root canals, 23 crowns and 
had his jaw wired shut for months - was awarded $4 1,540 in dam- 
ages even though his own lawyer said it was rare for a drunk per- 
son to win a negligence case. 

The appeals court upheld a trial judge's ruling that Indianhead 
Golf and Recreation Inc. of Mosinee was 51 percent negligent 
because of its terra-lock brick ramp that led from the clubhouse 
bar. 

Chicago frees couple of charges 

A couple arrested at a food fair after making a rude remark to 
President Clinton - and then hailed on conservative radio shows as 
victims of an imperial presidency - were freed of disorderly con- 
duct charges Tuesday. 

After misdemeanor charges were dropped in Cook County for 
lack of evidence, city officials surprised the courtroom by saying 
they may file municipal charges against the couple. 

Defense attorney Gus Munoz said the possible city charges 
were an effort by Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a Clinton ally, 
to prevent embarrassment to the president. 



m> Courtesy of the Associated Press 



V. 



has more of your interests in 
mind. 

Not all of your interests, but 
more than the other guy. This is 
where the problem begins. Why 
have we been forced to vote for 
someone whose interests, morals, 
beliefs, and ideas are out of date, 
and they can't even begin to fath- 
om what Generation X would 
like to see. 

Where's the young guy? 
Where's the guy who is willing to 
address some of the real prob- 
lems in our country? Where's the 
guy who will stand up and say, "I 
inhaled, held it in, blew it out, 
and took another?" 

I don't know about you, but 
here are the problems that I feel 
the nation faces. There is a prob- 
lem with drugs. 

The problem is they are not 
legal. By legalizing drugs, ie. 
marijuana and cocaine (Heroin 
might be different) you would 
greatly decrease crimes, especial- 
ly gun related crimes. 

If people are allowed to start 
legitimate, taxable businesses, 
they would not need to shoot 
each other over who's going to 
sell on what corner. 

Forget that, I'm going to open 
my little shop, and people are 
going to come to it because I 
offer better services and cheaper 
prices. 

I no longer need to shoot you 
for taking my business. The 
crime rate would drop in half. 

It did when they ended prohibi- 
tion. Not to mention who the hell 
are we to say what a person can 
do in the privacy of their own 
home without hurting anyone but 
their self? 

The next problem is all of the 
regulations our government has 
put on private businesses and all 
of the agencies they have created, 



taking them from the private sec- 
tor. Thoreau said,"That govern- 
ment is best which governs 
least." 

Who is our government to tell 
a business owner, who pays for 
his rent, and pays his taxes and 
insurance, which countries he 
can sell to and how much he can 
sell to them ? Who is our govern- 
ment to tax that man's imports to 
the point he can no longer afford 
to buy them? 

What happened to the theory of 
"hands off when it comes to 
government and business? The 
U.S. government also has a num- 
ber of agencies that employ thou- 
sands of people and our tax dol- 
lars pay these people. 

Why not turn these government 
agencies into private agencies 
allowing the entrepreneur to 
compete and thrive? 

Some states have already done 
this in privatizing the division of 
motor vehicles. Don't stop there, 
keep going, it will work. 

If you're like me and you're 
sick of the two bozos who do 
nothing but attack one another 
instead of the problems that face 
our great nation, I offer a new 
choice. 

I give you the three party sys- 
tem. Everything we know ofthat 
has to come to a decision has an 
odd number. 

How could the Supreme Court 
come to a decision if there were 
only eight members? Who 
would win the World Series if 
they only played six games? 

And how can a thing get done 
when two parties, the 
Republicans and Democrats, 
constantly vote to the tune of a 
stalemate, for the simple fact that 
they will not let the other side 
win, right or wrong. I offer a new 
party, the Libertarian Party. 



The Libertarian Party and their 
presidential candidate Harry 
Brown, is concerned with getting 
back to the basics, and their solu- 
tions are simple. 

They have real solutions for the 
real problems of this country and 
are as sick of government 
bureaucracy as we are. 

Here's a real quick list of what 
the Libertarians believe. 
They believe in a woman's right 
to choose. They believe in the 
right to bear arms; they believe 
in less government interference, 
especially when it comes to the 
private lives of the citizens they 
serve. They believe in better 
education for our children. They 
believe in Liberty and whatever 
comes along with it, I think it's 
life and the pursuit of happiness. 
That sounds good to me. 

Don't believe me though check 
them out. Call 1-800-682-1776 
and ask them to send you their 
literature. 

Read it, think about it, and see 
if their solutions don't sound bet- 
ter then what we have been 
offered. Then do another thing. 
Next week when you go to 
vote, buck the system. Don't 
compromise your beliefs and 
morals by voting for the two 
major candidates. 

Vote for a change. Send a direct 
message to the White House 
telling them what we think of the 
Republicans and Democrats and 
include specific instructions on 
where they can go. 

Vote for Harry Brown and let's 
start a revolution, a revolution of 
educated, well rounded individu- 
als who are sick of the way our 
government mistreats and misin- 
forms. It is time Generation X 
takes on a new name, and that 
name should be Generation 
Change. 



Page 5 




Celebrity Op-Ed continued... 



J 



we have for each other and to 
ourselves. 

We are beginning to meet these 
goals with a strategy rooted in 
the most profoundly American 
values: offering opportunity to 
all, demanding responsibility 
from all, and coming together as 
a community across the lines 
that too often divide us. 

That is America's basic bargain: 
it is how we have come this far, 
and it is how will move forward 
into the 21st century. 

When I took office, the econo- 
my was drifting. The deficit was 
skyrocketing, unemployment 
was high, and job growth was 



essentially flat. We put into place 
an economic plan to reduce the 
deficit, create more opportunity, 
and get our country moving 
again. 

Four years later, our economy is 
on the right track. The deficit is 
down by 60% and our growing 
economy has created 10.5 mil- 
lion new jobs. We have the low- 
est combined rate of unemploy- 
ment, inflation, and mortgage 
rate since 1968. 

More small businesses have 

been created in the last three 

years than in any comparable 

period in history. 

We have increased exports by 



one-third, creating high-wage 
jobs and making America the 
number one exporter in the 
world. America is manufacturing 
more cars than Japan for the first 
time since the 1970s. 

To ensure that as many 
Americans as possible can suc- 
ceed in our growing economy, I 
am working to increase access to 
college for all Americans. In our 
new economy, higher education 
is the path to high-wage jobs and 
a brighter future. 

We have increased the mini- 
mum Pell Grant scholarship from 
$2,300 to $2,700 — the largest 
increase in 20 years. 






CU faculty concerns addressed 






lvi.\ Vft.- 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Americans Getting Flabbier, Survey Finds 

Feeling flabby? You're not alone. 

A new study shows that Americans are getting flabby— so much so 
that overweight people now outnumber the slimmer, trimmer ones in 
the United States for the first time ever. 

Reasons for the flab phenomenon are not clear, although small reduc- 
tions in physical activity might be to blame, according to Katherine 
Flegal of the National Center for Health Statistics, who presented the 
findings at the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. 

Some of life's little conveniences-such as the televsions remote con- 
trol- keep Americans firmly planted on the couch, and a rising crime 
rate keeps people indoors, she said. 

Roughly 60 percent of men and 50 percent of women have above- 
normal body weights, according to the National Health and Nutrition 
Examination Survey, conducted on 30,000 people between 1991 and 
1994. 

Ten years ago, only 51 percent of men and 41 percent of women 
were heavy. 

Interestingly, though more Americans are tipping the scales, the sur 
vey found that cholestrol levels are falling and blood pressure is hold- 
ing steady or dropping slightly. 

Experts advise, however, that staying thin can help people avoid cer 
tain weight-related ills. Health problems such as diabetes begin to 
emerge as people grow fatter. 

Women Check Out VMI 



Two women and 54 men attended the Virginia Military Institute's 
first co-ed open house Oct. 19, one month after VMI's decision to 
admit women. 

Angelica Garza and Amy Abraham spent the weekend learning about 
what life would be like as sister "rats", a nickname for first-year 
cadets. 

The weekend included a walking tour of the 157-year-old campus, a 
night spent in the spartan barracks, and television cameramen tracking 
it all. Garza, a Virginia resident, refused to answer reporters' questions 
and Abraham, who lives in Tennessee, spoke only briefly. 

"The reason I'm applying to VMI is not because I'm a women's lib 
ber and that women have to go where males are and stuff," Abraham 
said. "VMI's honor and integrity and leadership training, I feel, can 
develop you as a whole person and that's what college needs to do." 

VMI, the last state-supported, all-male military college, reluctantly 
decided Sept. 22 to comply with a Supreme Court order and open its 
doors to women. The school holds six open houses a year, telling 
prospective students about VMI's rigorous physical and mental train- 
ing. Students even get to watch an upperclassman harass a first-year 
rat," although the performance is scripted. 

Female cadets who enroll next August will be required to get the 
same crewcuts and meet the same physical requirements as men. 

"This is obviously a very unusual college," VMI Superintendent 
Josiah Bunting told the students during the open house. 

Garza and Abraham have not yet submitted applications. The first 
woman to do so- 18-year-old Brooke Elliot— said she did so only after 
learning that standards would not be relaxed or altered for women. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



by Dr. William Fulmer 
Clarion APSCUF Pres. 

Many of you have been con- 
cerned about the APSCUF/SSHE 
collective bargaining negotia- 
tions and several of you have 
been hearing rumors and asking 
good questions about what's 
going on. You've been paying a 
lot of money for your education, 
and you deserve some forthright 
answers. I've been unable to 
speak openly about most of the 
issues — for many rational rea- 
sons collective bargaining usual- 
ly takes place "behind closed 
doors". The danger in going pub- 
lic is that once you've announced 
your positions, changes and com- 
promise become more difficult. 
However, the SSHE side has now 
published its proposals on the 
"Net"(http://sshe2.sshechan.edu/ 
9-19cba.html.). Now, at least, I 
can answer many of your ques- 
tions. 

Q: Is the faculty union going to 
strike? 

A: I don't know. I'm very disap- 
pointed with the lack of progress. 
We've never before been so far 
apart, and we've never had nego- 
tiations go on so long after the 
last agreement expired (June 

30,1996). We came very close to 
a strike in 1985, but we settled 
that agreement on October 21 of 
that year. A strike is certainly not 
something we want. A strike has 
heavy costs for everyone - stu- 
dents, faculty, and administra- 
tors. 

A strike cannot legally occur 
until twenty days after mediation 
has started. We (APSCUF) asked 
for mediation and expected it to 
begin on October 24. The media- 
tor was called away at the last 
minute and is now expected to 
meet with both sides on 
November 7th or 8th. That means 
that a strike will probably not 
take place this semester. Beyond 
that I would not bet either way. 

Q: A lot of students feel that fac- 
ulty and managers are playing 
games with negotiations, and stu- 
dents are the ones who will be 
most hurt by it all. What do you 
have to say to that? 

A: Students certainly would be 
seriously inconvenienced by a 



strike, but faculty stand to lose a 
lot more — our jobs and careers 
are on the line. We're certainly 
not going to "play games" with 
those kinds of stakes! The big 
problem that faculty face is that if 
we accepted the current proposal 
also that the administration has 
made, then the quality of our jobs 
and the quality of the education 
that students throughout the 
SSHE receive would be greatly 
diminished. 

Q: Why would the quality of our 
education be diminished? What 
proposals are you talking about ? 

A: There are many ways that 
quality would suffer. For exam- 
ple, their Article 7 proposes using 
graduate students to teach under- 
graduate students, and their 
Article 11 would remove all lim- 
itations for employing temporary 
faculty. Now only 15% of our 
faculty are "temporaries," while 
the national average is, I believe, 
40 to 50%. Temporary faculty 
can't do much student advising, 
and they can't do most of the reg- 
ular faculty work like evaluating 
teaching performances. This 
means that a shrinking regular 
faculty has to do more and more 
And the SSHE Articles 14, 15, 
and 21 would create a "two- 
tiered" re gular faculty - with all 
newly hired faculty having an 
extra year of probation, having 
fewer rights, and having to pay 
30% of their health care (no other 
state employees have to do that, 
not custodians, not secretaries, 
and certainly not managers, leg- 
islators, or the governor and his 
staff). We've already had prob- 
lems around the state; when 
potential candidates for faculty 
positions hear about this, they 
say, "thanks, but no thanks." 
How are we going to recruit 
highly qualified new faculty? 

Q: It sounds like you have some 
problems. But I had a "tempo- 
rary" faculty as a teacher, and she 
was great! How do you explain 
that? 

A: I think that most of our tem- 
porary faculty are good. But 
management overuses and abuses 
"temps." About 83% of our 
temps are women, so there's sex 
discrimination (i.e. a "glass ceil- 
ing" for female faculty) Most are 



well qualified to teach, and many 
have a lot of years of experience. 
Yet management won't make 
them "regular" faculty because 
then they'd get pay increases, 
they'd have grievance rights, and 
they'd be harder for management 
to get rid of arbitrarily. Most of 
our temps are rehired year after 
year at the bottom step of the 
lowest rank — instructor, step A. 
Temporary faculty are supposed 
to be used only to fill in for regu- 
lar faculty who are off sick or on 
leave, and occasionally when a 
new program is started, or when a 
program is funded for only a 
short period of time. But we have 
programs that have been running 
for eight to ten years, like 
Upward Bound and the West 
Penn nursing program, and man- 
agement still insists on using 
only temps. Most of our deans 
and many other managers have 
been here fewer than five years. 
Why aren't they treated as 
temps? 

Management may argue that 
most temps aren't qualified to be 
regular faculty — ■ they don't 
have doctorates, just masters 
degrees. If this is bad, why does 
management want to be able to 
hire unlimited numbers of temps? 

Q: I hear what you're saying 
about quality. But what about 
money? Isn't that always an issue 
in negotiations? 

A: Usually it is, and I will not 
apologize for faculty seeking 
increases in pay and benefits. In 
this case, however, management 
has offered us cuts in all our sup- 
plemental pays (e.g. for teaching 
summers, interns, and individual- 
ized instruction). Management 
offered no increases in pay, 
though it did offer meager sign- 
ing bonuses for years two and 
three. This has been a slap in the 
face to faculty since management 
gave increases to all other staff 
unions (e.g. custodians, secre- 
taries, and maintenance workers), 
and because the Board of 
Governors announced raises for 
all manag ers (a retroactive raise 
to July of 1995 and another raise 
for this coming January). What 
makes it a nasty slap in the face is 
that since 1984 faculty has 
increased only 12.2%, while stu- 
dent enrollment increased 14.4%, 

Cont. on page 6 




Student concerns cont. from page 5 



The follwing is a brief synopsis of the criminal investi 
gations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between October 17 and 25. The blotter is compiled by 
Clarion Call Public Safety reporter Tim Hall. 



•A victim reported that between October 17th and 18th an unknown 

actor or actors removed a parking permit from her vehicle. Officers are 

investigating the incident as a theft. 

•On October 20, an individual was cited for public drunkenness. 

•A resident from Ballentine Hall reported on October 20 that he was 

receiving harassing telephone calls. The incident is under investiga 

tion. 

•On October 21, an unknown male entered a females rest room in Nair 

Hall and was peeping on a female who was taking a shower. There was 

also a second reporting on a "peeping torn" that same night. 

Two chairs were removed from Stevens Hall at an unknown time on 
October 22. 

As of October 22, officers are investigating the report of a "Sony Play 
Station" taken from a room in Campbell Hall. The loss to the victim is 
set at $255.00. 

•A student reported to university police that between 3:00 p.m. and 
5:00 p.m. on October 23, someone stole a bicycle that was secured to 
a bicycle rack outside Tippin Gym. Hie bicycle was valued at $850.00. 
The incident is currently under investigation. 
•Reported on October 22, an unknown person or persons did remove 
two memory boards from computer in Carrier Hall between the times 
of the end of August and the middle of September. 
•An unknown person removed the sign from the Haskell House of 
Clarion University on October 25 at approximately 2:15 a.m. 




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other staff increased 30.1%, and 
management mushroomed by 
115.3% ! So money is an issue to 
the extent that management 
seems to be saying to faculty, 
"We want to take your pay to hire 
more managers and give every- 
body raises but you!" 
Throughout the SSHE we have 
about one faculty member per 19 
students; we also have about one 
manager per 4 faculty! All of this 
makes it harder to recruit and 
retain good faculty. 

Q: Are you saying that all those 
tuition and fee hikes that I've 
been paying are just going to hire 
more managers? 

A: Not entirely. Faculty salaries 
have been increasing too, but 
only one-half as fast as your 
tuition and fees have been 
increasing; and our buildings, 
equipment, libraries, and other 
areas have needed more money. 
But these are largely inflationary 
type increases. You and your fel- 
low students are paying a whole 



lot more because governors and 

the state legislatures have not 

been supporting public higher 

education in Pennsylvania. Our 

State is at the bottom as far as 

financial support is concerned 

(only New Hampshire is worse). 

Governor Ridge actually cut the 

funding for the SSHE this year. 

Fifteen years ago the State paid 

about 60% of the total cost, and 

students paid about 40%. Today 

those figures are reversed! 

And there's another reason, too. 

Look at what our local Council of 

Trustees and Administration have 

done recently: 

•Approved the construction of a 

new president's residence for $ 

650,000. 

•Spent $ 276,000 for out-of-state 

building consultants to ask us 

what we needed. 

•Authorized expenditure of $ 

379,750 to buy land & buildings 

adjacent to campus (purpose or 

use of the land is undecided). 

•Announced that to pay for future 

buildings and renovations (> $ 

400,000/year) they will cut a 

number of faculty (both tempo- 



rary and regular) - thereby mak- 
ing it harder for you to get the 
classes that you need when you 
need them, and/or overfilling 
your classes. 

As a professor of management, I 
am disheartened by such non- 
sense. As the president of the fac- 
ulty union, I am appalled! The 
SSHE is not managing its 
resources very well at all. And 
students and faculty are now pay- 
ing the price of its ineptness. 

Q: What can students do to help 
in all of this? 

A: That's for you and your stu- 
dent leadership to decide. You'll 
want to check the facts that I've 
given to you and you'll want to 
hear the other side's arguments. 
I'm confident that you'll do a 
good job of analyzing the situa- 
tion. I believe that you'll find that 
students interests and concerns 
parallel those of the faculty. In 
any case, I hope that you won't 
remain silent! 



October 31. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



New AmeriCorps members named at ceremony 



by Sue Hartman, 
News Writer 



Several Clarion University stu- 
dents and recent Clarion 
University graduates took an oath 
to become part of AmeriCorps 
and Keystone SMILES at a ban- 
quet and induction ceremony 
which was held on September 30, 
at the Wolf's Den Restaurant in 
Wentlings Comers. 

AmeriCorps is a part of the 
Corporation for National Service, 
a program introduced by 
President Clinton and approved 
by Congress in 1993. 

Keystone SMILES Community 
Learning Center Inc. is an inde- 
pendent, non-profit organization 
operating a variety of education, 
recreation, environmental and 
human service projects from its 
Knox headquarters. Currently, 
SMILES has 25 full-time and 
five part-time AmeriCorps mem- 
bers. 

Over 130 people attended the 
banquet and induction ceremony 
for AmeriCorps members joining 



Keystone SMILES, Clarion 
University's Superintendent's 
Initiative program and Riverview 
Intermediate Unit's "Even Start" 
family literacy program. 

The Superintendent's Initiative 
is a partnership between 
Keystone SMILES, several area 
school districts, and Clarion 
University's Department of 
Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Sciences. 

The school districts that are par- 
ticipating in the Superintendent's 
Initiative include Clarion- 
Limestone, Dubois, Franklin, 
Mars, North Clarion, Oil City, 
Union, and Punxsutawney. The 
Educational Talent Search at 
Clarion University and the 
Midwestern Intermediate Unit in 
Butler are also involved in the 
program. 

Riverview "Even Start" is a 
federally funded family literacy 
program located in Riverview 
Intermediate Unit. 

The "Even Start" program helps 
children succeed in school by 



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helping their families improve 
their literacy as well as parenting 
skills. Riverview "Even Start" 
was in danger of having to reduce 
their services and formed a part- 
nership with Keystone SMILES 
as a way to use AmeriCorps 
resources to continue providing 
its services to those who need 
them. 

AmeriCorps members serve 
terms of one year and receive a 
living allowance during their 
term and at the end of that year 
receive an education award. 

An education award can consist 
of money for tuition or to help 
pay off school loans. Full-time 
members receive a $7,925 living 
allowance and an $4,725 educa- 
tion award. 

Part-time members receive a 
$3,975 living allowance and a 
$2,363 education award. 

Dr. John Kuhn, the Provost and 
Vice-President of Academic 
Affairs at Clarion University, 
praised the people joining 
AmeriCorps and urged them to 
"keep alive the spirit of service. 
You are the promise of a much 
better society for us." 

Dr. Arnold Cooper, Dean of 
Clarion University's College of 
Education and Human Services, 
added that the new AmeriCorps 
members will "never regret the 
service. You'll never be the same, 
and the Commonwealth will 
never be the same." 

Cont. on page 7 



Clarion University students provide outreach 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Five students from Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania have 
received their first experiences of 
outreach from a program involv- 
ing inner-city Pittsburgh youth. 
Joe Hargraves, Sean McDonald, 
Antionette Parker, Tyrone 
Sherrod, and Devidid Woods vis- 
ited the youth on September 14. 
Rogers Laugand, director of 
Minority Student Services, 
accompanied the students. 

They met with four African- 
American males referred to them 
by the Community Intervention 
Supervisors Project. These males 
are directed through the court 
system to churches in 
Wilkinsburg, Homewood, 

Garfield, and the Hill District and 
on to the Clarion volunteers. 

The Clarion students were 
paired with a black male in a big 
brother/little brother style 
arrangement. 

McDonald, who has participat- 
ed in the program for three years, 
reflected on his experience. 
"Being from Pittsburgh, I knew 
this was a way to contribute to 
my home neighborhoods. It is a 
situation where a college campus 
can help in a community service 
outside of its own location." 

Sherrod, a newcomer to the 
project added, "I heard about the 
program last year and decided I 
wanted to be a part of it this year. 
The best part of it is being able to 
go back into a community. Many 
of us never get an opportunity to 



return. This memory will provide 
me with memories I will have for 
the rest of my life." 

'This kind of story demon- 
strates that we need to be there," 
noted Laugand. "The students we 
worked with have limited experi- 
ences. If they were in a different 
environment and met different 
people, they would have different 
perspectives. They have no posi- 
tive role models or exposure to 
new thoughts and ideas. Many of 
the students involved in this pro- 
gram from Clarion came from the 
same conditions and faced simi- 
lar struggles. It was refreshing to 
go and share ideas and time 
which means so much to them." 

One of the activities during the 
day was a visit by the entire 
group to the garden grown by the 
inner-city youth. 

"I was impressed they grew a 
garden," said Sherrod. "Some of 
us from Clarion had never done 
that. It is an interactive project 
for them where they learned 
some life skills that would enable 
them to feed themselves and oth- 
ers. The garden symbolized our 
whole project of nurturing a pro- 
ject from planting to market." 

All of the Clarion students and 
their charges helped in the prepa- 
ration of a church dinner using 
the harvest from the garden. Over 
200 needy people were fed 
through their efforts. 

They also attended a presenta- 
tion by former Pittsburgh Steeler 
defensive back J. T. Thomas con- 
cerning entrepreneurship and 



spirituality in life. 

Even though the participants 
viewed the work of their 
Pittsburgh hosts, the hardest 
work of all was getting the 
desired reaction through commu- 
nication according to Sherrod. 
"My 16-year-old was real closed 
mouth at first and didn't want to 
talk to me," he recalled. "I told 
him about my dream of visiting 
Egypt and Africa and asked him 
if he had any dreams of his own. 
He told me his dream was to go 
to Brooklyn. I live in Brooklyn, 
but he didn't know that. The 
answer really made me think that 
all dreams stem from opportuni- 
ty- 
McDonald found the communi- 
cation lines were a lot easier to 
open and he also found a few sur- 
prises. "I have learned how to 
prompt a person to discover their 
strengths through dialogue," he 
says. "We accessed career goals 
together and got to know each 
other one-on-one. It was a great 
opportunity to exchange ideas. I 
learned that slow motivation does 
not necessarily mean no motiva- 
tion. He wanted to fmish school, 
join the U.S. Army reserve under 
the GI Bill, and eventually 
became an engineer. He actually 
had more goals than I expected 
and I was happy to hear that." 

Sherrod received quick feed- 
back about the impact he made 
on his new friend. 

They exchanged phone num- 
bers and Sherrod told him that he 
could call collect. 



AmeriCorps article cont. from page 6 



Each new AmeriCorps mem- 
ber received a commemorative 
crystal mug and a certificate rec- 
ognizing them as AmeriCorps 
members. 

The initiates then took the 
AmeriCorps Pledge: "I will get 
things done for America — to 
make our people safer, smarter 
and healthier. I will bring 
Americans together to strengthen 
our communities. Faced with 
apathy, I will take action. Faced 
with conflict, I will seek common 
ground. Faced with adversity, I 
will persevere. I will carry this 
commitment with me this year 
and beyond. I am an AmeriCorps 
member and I am going to get 
things done." 
Dr. Horace Darlington, superin- 



tendent of the Keystone School 
District said, "It's a pleasure to be 
a part of AmeriCorps and a plea- 
sure of Keystone SMILES. I 
hope it grows even larger." 
TheKeystoneSMILES/AmeriCor 
ps members are Judith Beichner, 
Sandra Clark, Julie Gagnon, 
Andrea Girvan, Todd Gruber, 
Tina Hicks, Julie Kahle, Heather 
Little, Victoria McDonald, Maria 
McGee, William Nebinski, 
Matthew Neely, Stephen Ochs, 
Jason Papinchak, Kelly Parks, 
Jess Quinn, Melinda Reagle, 
Susan Rodgers, Pamela 
Rossman, Joni Runyan, Andree 
Sclerka, Amy Serbati, Sheila 
Shokoohee, Tracey Siverling, 
Natalie Skalsky, Jennifer S troop, 



Kelly Tobin, Andrew Traister, 
Patricia Wiencek, and Melissa 
Wolfe. 

The Riverview "Even Start" 
AmeriCorps members are 
Caroline Dolby, Marion Halgren, 
Debra Hoffman, Mary Mullen, 
Jennifer Weaver, Donna Yalch, 
Marta Alexander, Daniel 
Bennett, Tracey Bowser, Judy 
Chambers, William Chwalik, 
Diane Conn, Michael Faller, 
Marie Farcus, Stacey Graham, 
Raymond Ishman, Tracey 
Kaschak, Beverly Kirby, Kendra 
Kramer, Anneliese Ledebur, 
Susan McQuade, Susan Painter, 
Debra Pifer, Ronald Radaker, 
Andrea Shuffstalt, Shelly Small, 
and Juliette Wiler. 



Clarion University students who are interested in a career related to envi- 
ronmental public policy should apply to be a Morris K. Udall Scholar. 
Interested sophomores and juniors should contact Dr. Martha Ritter at the 
Venango Campus Biology Department by Dec. 1 3 for more information. 



The call came at noon less than 
a week after the initial visit. "He 
told me what a good day it was 
for him," says Sherrod. 

Although McDonald had not 
heard from his new friend, he 
was confidant that a bond was 
formed. "I believe we will keep 
in touch through some type of 
correspondence," says 

McDonald. "He is interested 
enough to stay with the program 
and probably will share it with 
others." 

Laugand reviews the experi- 
ences of the Clarion students in a 
"think tank" designed to deal 
with concerns that affect or hin- 
der success and how to makew 
the experiences more successful. 
They also discuss economics, 
politics, and academia to help 
them assess what education 
means to them, and that they 
don't take education tightly but 
make the best use of it. 

The think tank stresses educa- 
tion's role in reaching other peo- 
ple to give a sense of hope that 
there is another way. 

The inner-city work is being 

conducted through Christian Life 

Skills Inc. of Pittsburgh led by 

executive director. Barbara 

Rogers and operated through the 

Church of God on Lincoln Ave. 

and East Liberty Ave. in 

Pittsburgh. Laugand and a few 

students made an initial visit in 

the spring of 1994 with several 

additional visits added later in 
that year and throughout 1995- 

96. 



'This is a program I believe in 
and that why I participate in it," 
explains Laugand. "Many stu- 
dents here at Clarion University 
also find it worthwhile enough to 
want to do it on a regular basis. 
We are focusing on the African- 
American community and many 
of these volunteers come from 
the same background, but have 
grown distant from mis commu- 
nity since coming to college. 
They are the same individually, 
but with broadened horizons." 

Upcoming visits are planned 
for October 19, November 16 and 
in 1997 for January 25, February 
22, March 15, and April 12. 

The Pittsburgh participants will 
be invited to Clarion in April for 
the annual Minority Student 
Services picnic. 

Members from Christian Life 
Skills Inc. are also invited to 
Clarion University's annual 
Black Recognition Dinner where 
the director presents awards for 
outstanding service. 

"This was the first chance I had 
to work with low motivated stu- 
dents. It was encouraging to me 
as a future educator to have this 
experience and be able to discuss 
topics pertinent to young people 
from the inner-city," evaluated 
McDonald. "It gave me a chance 
to assess my strengths and weak- 
nesses in dealing with young 
people. It is a situation where a 
college campus can help in a 

community service outside of its 
own location. 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



October 31, 1996 



UC-Greeley, Other Campuses Shaken by Violence 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

Dormitories at the University 
of Northern Colorado in Greeley 
are on heightened security after a 
gunman held a group of freshman 
women hostage in a four-hour 
siege. 

The siege ended when a police 
sharp shooter killed the man, the 
ex-boyfriend of one of the stu- 
dents. The gunman's two-city 
rampage left three men dead, one 
women shot and an entire 
Campus feeling shaken and vul- 
nerable. 

At about 9 a.m. Sept. 24, Joseph 
Edward Gallegos waited at 
UNC's McCowen Residence 
Hall for his ex-girlfriend Heidi 
Hocker to return from class, said 
UNC spokesman Tom Barbour. 
"He just walked in the dormitory 
like any other visitor," he said. 

Hocker broke up with Gallegos 
shortly before she left her home- 
town of lgnacio, Col., to attend 
UNC. "This was a young woman 
going off to college, and she 
wanted to be independent, to date 
other people," Barbour said. 

Gallegos had been sending 
Hocker flowers trying to get her 
to reconcile, according to some 
of her acquaintances. 

But this time Gallegos didn't 
come with roses. 

He was armed with a 9 m.m. 
semi-automatic handgun, accord- 
ing to the Greeley Police 
Department. 

When Gallegos confronted 
Hocker she ran to a room down 
the hall, Barbour said. 

He followed her to the other 
suite, located on the south side of 
McGowan's fourth floor, and 
took Hocker and three other 
women inside as hostages. 

The other students were Lara 
Von Tersch, 17, Robin Adams, 
18, and Ginny Mansfield, 18, 
police said. 

"All hell broke loose," said an 
employee at McGowan who 
asked not to be named. 

Everything happened very fast. 
The R.A. [resident assistant] 



from the fourth floor called the 
Police." 

"Next a Police officer 
appeared." 

"Then more police-Greeley 
Police, campus cops, plainclothes 
ones." 

"Paramedics, firemen and 
administration people started 
coming into the dorm." 

Police started evacuating the 
south side of the 500-student 
dorm, said Paul Osincup, a resi- 
dent assistant for the third floor. 

"Right as things unfolded, I was 
just getting back from class." 

His room was directly beneath 
the one where the hostages were 
being held, Osincup said. 

He rushed to help evacuate the 
south wing, he said. 

Students on the north side of the 
dorm were asked to stay in their 
rooms. 

Gallegos told his hostages he'd 
killed his roommates in Bayfield, 
Col., Police said. 

"Our agency made a call," said 
John Gates, a Greeley Police 
Department Spokesman. "Three 
homicide victims had been dis- 
covered in Bayfield." 

Gallegos had shared a house 
with three other men in the town 
in southwest Colorado. 

Bayfield authorities said his 
roommates, construction workers 
Steven Bates, 20, John Anthony 
Lara 111, 20, and Joshua Turville, 
in his early 20s, were members of 
the same fundamentalist 
Christian church. 

"It would be a stretch to sav 
they were trying to convert him," 
Gates said. 

Yet some town residents have 
been quoted as saying the men 
were trying to reform Gallegos, 
an 18-year-old whom Bayfield 
police said had a five-year crimi- 
nal history, which included 
assault and burglary charges. 

But if his roommates believed 
there's no such thing as a bad 
boy, he may have showed them 
otherwise. 

"He told the hostages and our. 
hostage negotiator (by phone) 




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that he killed those men," Gates 
said. "And the bodies were in the 
house where he said they would 
be." 

After the shootings, Gallegos 
stole one roommate's car and 
drove nine hours northeast to 
Greeley, police said. 

Bayfield authorities said 
Gallegos may have killed his 
roommates to steal a car without 
being reported. 

"You've got to consider his 
state of mind," he said. "This guy 
had gone off the deep end." 

Hocker later told a Denver TV 
station, "He wanted revenge. He 
said I took his life away, and he 
was going to take mine." Then he 
shot me in the foot." 

Police, including a SWAT team, 
positioned themselves- around the 
building and in the hall outside 
the room where Gallegos held the 
women, Gates said. 

"He made demands," Barbour 
said. 

"He wanted pop, cigarettes, a 
lighter and morphine. The gener- 
al thinking is he wanted the mor- 
phine for Heidi's foot" 

Shortly after noon, Gallegos 
left hostage Ginny Mansfield go 
in exchange for a six-pack of 
Pepsi. However, Barbour empha- 
sized the cola was the only con- 
cession. 

"He was never going to get any- 
thing other than that," he said. 
"No way was anyone going to get 
anything combustible or let him 
dispense drugs." 

Negotiations then continued for 
hours, according to Gates. 

"But talks began to deterio- 
rate," he said. 

"Either he wouldn't accept our 
calls or what he said was brief. 
He'd shot someone inside. 
Through the door we could hear 



the victims begging for their 
lives." 

In view of that, police were 
ready for a less than peaceful 
ending, Gates said. 

Sharp shooters readied them- 
selves. 

"Gallegos was increasingly agi- 
tated," he said. "At 1:40 p.m. he 
walked over to a window." 

At that point, "a Greeley police 
marksman shot him in the neck," 
Barbour said. 

"He fell but fired shots through 
the door at the police. Police fired 
shots ^ through the door in an 
effort to shoot off the lock. The 
women were all sitting up hud- 
dled on a bed." Neither the 
women nor police were struck by 
flying bullets, he said. 

Gallegos was transported to 
North Colorado Medical Center, 
where he was Pronounced dead 
at 2:08 p.m., according to police. 

"We are happy that there was- 
n't additional blood shed," Gates 
said. 

For the campus, any lingering 
injuries are of the emotional kind, 
Barbour said. 

UNC dormitories used to be 
unguarded during the day and 
were staffed by security Police 
only at night. 

Now, everyone who enters a 
dorm at any hour must show 
identification. 

"This is an incredible tragedy," 
Barbour said. "When you've got 
a triple murder, a hostage-taking 
and a sniper killing even in a city 
like Denver, it's bad. But in a 
smaller town like Greeley, it 
shakes the place to its very core. 
We're just starting to walk back 
into our lives right now." 

The UNC tragedy is one in a 
bizarre series of recent shootings 
that have rattled college campus- 



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es nationwide. 

On Sept. 1 7, a Penn State stu- 
dent was killed and another 
wounded when 19-year-old 
Jillian Robbins known as "Crazy 

Jill" to acquaintances allegedly 

opened fire outside the student 
union 

Melanie Spalla, a 19-year-old 
Penn State junior, was killed 
instantly and another student, 22 
year-old Nicholas Mensa, was 
wounded. 

Penn State senior Brendon 
Malovrh, 22, suffered a stab 
wound after he tackled Robbins. 

Robbins, who also stabbed her- 
self in the leg during the struggle, 
has been charged with murder 
and attempted murder. 

In San Pablo, Calif., the usual 
quiet at Contra Costa College 
was shattered Sept. 25 when a 
gunman jumped from a car and 
opened fire, killing 20-year-old 
Christopher Robinson and slight- 
ly wounding two other students. 
"My campus was invaded by 
terrorists," said college President 
Dr. Candy Rose. 

Also on Sept. 25, University of 
Pennsylvania junior Patrick F. 
Leroy suffered a gunshot wound 
during a botched robbery. 

Leroy, 21, was the latest victim 
in a string of about 20 muggings 
and armed robberies around the 
campus since August, the univer- 
sity said. 

Penn President Judith Rodin 
told students that she planned to 
"fight back" by hiring 10 more 
security guards and 10 armed 
police officers to the university 
force. 

"Can we do more? We're going 
to have to," she said. "Can the 
City of Philadelphia do more? It 

must." 



The Clarion 
Call News 
Staff wishes 
the student 
body, facul- 
ty, and staff 
a happy and 

safe 
Halloween! 



October 31. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Paee9 



LIFESTYLES 



Food for Friends helps the needy 



Courtesy of the Community 
Service-Learning Office 

Every Wednesday night, stu- 
dents are attracted to a food spe- 
cial in Clarion. They are not 
headed to McDonalds for the 
$.39 hamburgers, nor to the 
Loomis for retro-night $.59 fries. 
They volunteer for "Food for 
Friends". 

The program began in the early 
1990s. A single mother who was 
attending the University found 
that at the end of each month, 
when food stamps ran out, there 
was a need to provide a meal to 
those who could not afford to 
feed their families. The woman 
then approached her church, the 
Methodist Church, to prepare a 
meal for those in need. From this 
idea grew the "Food for Friends" 
program. 

The program takes place every 



Wednesday night throughout the 
year at 5:00 p.m., and has an 
attendance of approximately SO- 
TO people each week. 

The program is coordinated by 
the Clarion Ministerium, which 
is an organization of many area 
churches. Each church is respon- 
sible for supplying food and and 
overseeing the preparation of the 
meals for a two week period. 
Seven churches participate in the 
program, but meals are always 
served at the Methodist Church. 
The program follows guidelines 
set forth by the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

Sara Siegel is the current coor- 
dinator of the "Food for Friends" 
program. "The Clarion 

Ministerium thanks the college 
community for its assistance with 
'Food for Friends,'" she said. 
"We are pleased to work together 
for the benefit of all our neigh- 




Community Service- Learning Office 
Volunteers help with Food for Friends 

bors." 

University groups such as Into 
the Streets, Alpha Phi Omega, 



social fraternities and sororities 
and Koininia have volunteered to 
help with the program. They pur- 
chase food, prepare and serve 



meals, and clean up the facilities. 
Also, the Life Skills class from 
Intermediate Unit 6, which meets 
at the Clarion Area High School, 
helps from week to week. These 
students are mentally challenged 
and do not attend regular classes. 



The "Food for Friends" program 
gives them the opportunity to set 
up for a meal and purchase sup- 
plies at the grocery store. 

One of the student volunteers 
from Into the Streets is sopho- 
more Tonya Softcheck. "It is a 
very fulfilling experience," she 
said. "It's always fun and the 
best part is seeing the kids faces 
light up when you give them their 
food." 

Another community volunteer 
is Sue Leonard. "It's very uplift- 
ing," she said. "It makes you feel 
good, and you want to do it 
again. It's just hard to believe 
that there is such a need in a 
small town area." 

If you are interested in volun- 
teering with the program you 
may contact the Office of 
Community Service-Learning at 
xl865 or stop by the office in 
room 247 Gemmell. 



Halloween, it ain't what it used to be 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

I love Halloween. It reminds 
me of my happy childhood days 
as a student at Wampus 
Elementary school in Armonk, 
N.Y., when we youngsters used 
to celebrate Halloween by mak- 
ing decorations out of construc- 
tion paper and that white paste 
that you could eat. 

This is also how we celebrated 
Columbus Day, Washington's 
Birthday, Lincoln's Birthday, 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, 
New Year's, Valentine's Day, 
Mother's Day, Father's Day, 
Armistice Day, Flag Day, Arbor 
Day, Thursday, etc. 

We brought these decorations 
home to our parents, who by fed- 
eral law were required to attach 
them to the refrigerator with 
magnets. 

That was a wonderful, carefree 
time in which to be a youngster 
or construction-paper salesper- 
son. But it all ended suddenly one 
day - I'll never forget it - when 
the Soviet Union launched the 
first satellite, called "Sputnik" 
(which is Russian for "Little 
Sput"). 

Immediately, all the grown-ups 
in America became hysterical 
about losing the Space Race, 



which led to a paranoid insecuri- 
ty about our educational system, 
expressed in anguished newspa- 
per headlines asking, "WHY 
AREN'T OUR KIDS LEARN- 
ING IN SCHOOL?" I wanted to 
answer, "BECAUSE ALL WE 
EVER DO IS MAKE DECORA- 
TIONS OUT OF CON- 
STRUCTION PAPER" but I 
couldn't because my mouth was 
full of paste. 

But getting back to Halloween: 
It's still one of the most fun holi- 
days of the year, as well as one of 
the most traditional, tracing its 
origins back more than 2,000 
years to the Druids, an ancient 
religious cult that constructed 
Stonehenge, as well as most of 
the public toilets in England. 

The Druids believed that one 
night each year, at the end of 
October, the souls of the dead 
returned to the world of the living 
and roamed from house to house 
costumed as Power Rangers. 

And thus it is that to this day, 
youngsters come to our door on 
Halloween night shouting: 
"Trick or treat!" 

According to tradition, if we 
don't give the youngsters a treat, 
their parents will sue us. That's 
why most of us traditionally pre- 
pare for Halloween by going to 
the supermarket and purchasing 




approximately eight metric tons 
of miniature candy bars, which 
we dump into a big bowl by the 
door, ready to hand out to the 
hordes of trick-or-treaters. 

The irony, of course, is that 
there ARE no hordes of trick-or- 
treaters, not any more. We in the 
news media make darned sure of 
that. 

Every year we publish dozens of 
helpful consumer-advice articles, 
cheerfully reminding parents of 
the dangers posed by traffic, per- 
verts, poisoned candy, and many 
other Halloween hazards that 
parents would never think of if 
we didn't remind them ("Have 
fun, but remember that this year 
more than 17,000 Americans will 



die bobbing for apples"). 

The result is that many children 
aren't allowed to go trick-or- 
treating, and the ones who ARE 
allowed out come to your house 
no later than 4:30 p.m., wearing 
reflective tape on their Power 
Rangers costumes and trailed at 
close range by their parents, who 
watch you suspiciously and 
regard whatever candy you hand 
out as though it were unsolicited 
mail from the Unabomber. 

So for most of Halloween, your 
doorbell is quiet. This means that 
you pass the long night alone, 
hour after hour, just you and the 
miniature candy bars. After a 
while they start calling seductive- 
ly to you from their bowl in their 
squeaky little voices. 

"Hey, Big Boy!" they call., 
"We're going to waste over 
here!" As the evening wears on 
they become increasingly brazen. 
Eventually they crawl across the 
floor, climb up your body, 
unwrap themselves and force 
themselves bodily into your 
mouth. 

There's no use hiding in the 
bathroom, because they'll just 
crawl under the door and tie you 
up with dental floss and threaten 
to squeeze toothpaste in your eye 
unless you eat them. 

At least that's what they do to 



me. By the end of the night my 
blood has the same sugar content 
as Yoo-Hoo. 

But eating huge amounts of 
candy allegedly purchased for 
youngsters is only part of the 
Halloween tradition. 

The other part is buying a 
pumpkin and carving it to make a 
"jack-o' -lantern," which sits on 
your front porch, a festive sym- 
bol of the age-old truth - first dis- 
covered by the Druids - that there 
is no practical use for pumpkins. 

Here's how to make a tradition- 
al jack-o' -lantern: 

1 . Cut a lid on top of the pump- 
kin. 

2. Pull off the lid and peer down 
into the slimy, festering pumpkin 
bowels. 

3. Put the lid back on and 
secure it with 200 feet of duct 
tape. (This is also the traditional 
procedure for stuffing a turkey.) 

But however you celebrate 
Halloween, make sure you 
remember this important safety 
tip: (IMPORTANT SAFETY TIP 
GOES HERE). 

Otherwise, you will not survive 
the night. I'd give you more 
details, but right now I need to do 
something about these tiny Milky 
Ways crawling up my legs. 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



October 31,1996 



October 31. 1996 



The Clarion Call 



Page 1 1 




Studying Abroad in 
Australia by Tammy 
Hager 



Hello Mates, 

It's me again, coming to you 
with another exciting adventure 
from the "down under". My lat- 
est journey was down the Great 
Ocean Road last weekend with a 
couple of my mates. I am sure 
many of you never heard of the 
Great Ocean Road, so I will give 
you some insights. 

This is a famous road along the 
coast of southern Australia. It 
runs from Torquay Beach out to 
the Otway Ranges and even fur- 
ther, but I am not exactly sure 
where it ends. By the way, 
Torquay is the famous beach 
where the film "Point Break" was 
filmed. It was the very last scene 
where Patrick Swayze rode the 
big wave. I thought that was 
pretty cool. I don't believe that 
that one big wave exists, but hey 
it's the movies. 

Anyway, my mates and I rented 
a car, a Falcon, which was a pret- 
ty nice car, considering that 
Australians drive around in 
imported box cars from Japan. It 
|was definitely an experience dri- 
ving on the left (wrong) side of 
the road and having the steering 
column on the right side of the 
car. A common mistake was to 
go around a "round-about" and 
1.) turn on the winshield wipers 
instead of the turn signal and 2.) 
end up facing traffic on the right 
side of the road (oops!). We got 
used to it real fast, but then again, 
I guess we had to. The Great 
Ocean Road with its windy, ser- 
pentine curves proved to be a 
challenge to ametuers behind the 



wheel. We made it eventually to 
the 12 Apostles, Loch Ard Gorge, 
and the Blow Hole. All 3 are nat 
urally made from the waters 
carving them out after many 
years. 

The 12 Apostles is 12 limestone 
rocks that are standing alone in 
the water, slowly getting eroded 
away. It's a beautiful sight to see 
the sunset behind them. Loch 
Ard Gorge is named after the 
famous shipwreck of the Loch 
Ard which killed everybody on 
board except two people. When 
they swam to shore they stayed in 
a cave that is now called Loch 
Ard Gorge. Penguins also live in 
this "inlet" and they leave every 
morning out to sea and come 
back every night to stay. We 
actually rescued a lonely penguin 
when we were there. Somehow 
the penguin got into some oil and 
was not looking well off, so we 
called a ranger and he took care 
of it. Im sure everyone is won- 
dering about the Blow Hole 
This is an opening in the land 
about a 1/4 km from the actual 
ocean but it is linked to the ocean 
underneath the ground. The sig 
nificance of it is when there is 
high tide and the waves come 
whistling through like a train, 
they blow up out of the hole. It is 
a very cool thing to see. Not only 
does the Great Ocean Road run 
along the shore, but at some 
points, it goes through the bush. 
We drove through the beautiful 
countryside and stopped at Maits 
rainforest. This was a 45 minute 
drive through the rainforest 
which was pretty interesting. 
There were enormous trees, so 
that of course we had to take our 
pictures by them to show how big 
they really were (typical tourist 
photo). We also climbed some 
trees and swung on the vines, 
which was a lot of fun, until you 
fall out of the tree. After muck- 
ing around for awhile, we went 
back to Torquay Beach to stay 
with a mate from Uni! 

That was my exciting weekend 
on the Great Ocean Road. 




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All of you pet lovers or West 
Virginia natives will love the 
theme of this week's 
re views... animals!! Comin' to 
you this time around are two 
bands with ties to a couple of the 
more undesirable species of 
wildlife. Yep, we have crows and 
weasels to brighten your 
Halloween. So, without further 
yapping, let's get started... 

First up is Counting Crows 
Recovering the Satellites on 
Geffen Records. Counting 
Crows are another one of the new 
breed of slow rock, folkish, radio 
friendly acts trying to avoid the 
sophomore jinx after a break- 
through debut album. With 
Recovering the Satellites, the 
success lies solely in the hands of 
the people, because the music 
hasn't changed one bit It wasn't 
broke, and they didn't fix it on 
this effort. 

Tunes like "Catapult," 
"Children in Bloom," and 
"Daylight Fading," deliver 
slowed-down rock with dynamic 
vocals, showing such influences 
as the Eagles and others of that 
genre. It is very reminiscent of 
the slower tracks on their first 
album, August and Everything 
After. 

The albums highlight is the first 
single, "Angels of the Silences," 
a very driving, contagious rock 
number which reminds one very 
much of the band Sugar, with its' 
inventive harmonies and crashing 
chorus. By far the best track on 
the album. 



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Other up tempo highlights 
include "Children in Bloom," 
and "Millers Angels." Plus