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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 11, 1997 – May 7, 1998"

Vol. 79, nos. 1-12 



September 1 1 , 1997- 
December4. 1997 



Clarion Call 



Sep -Dec 1997 





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Title 


Date 

November 20, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
November 13, 1997 


Page 

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Accident on Route 68 causes student death 

Accommodating learning diabled students: the debate over what's fair 

AIDS Alliance conference take place 


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Anderer, Brendan In Concert with 


October 2, 1997 


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Aquarium meeting to be held Saturday 


October 23, 1997 


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Arrieta entertains crowd 

Art exhibit becomes part of CU's art collection 


September 25, 1997 
November 13, 1997 


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Art on campus at Clarion University 


October 2, 1997 


12 


Auditing seminar held at CU 


November 13, 1997 


6 


Auditor gives report to CSA board of directors 


December 4, 1997 


7 


Autumn Leaf Festival 


October 9, 1997 


8 


Autumn Leaf Festival preview 


October 2, 1997 


9 


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Autumn Leaf Festival, Flavors of ALF 


October 9, 1997 


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Autumn Leaf Festival, Teen pageants kicks off ALF weekend 


October 9, 1997 


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Autumn Leaf Parade 1997 


October 16, 1997 


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Baby it's cold outside 


October 23, 1997 


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Baldwin, Robert H. and Zaeske, Arnold H, In Memory 


September 11, 1997 


5 


Barnett, Tracy Golden Eagles impressive at East Stroudsburg tourn... 


October 9, 1997 


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Barnett, Witte named Academic All-Americans 


December 4, 1997 


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Baseball, Chlebowski wins NCAA Division II batting crown with .480 avg 


September 11, 1997 


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Baseball, expanding or exploding 


November 20, 1997 


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Bell Atlantic supports education 


November 20, 1997 


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Best in Clarion 


December 4, 1997 


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Bigger backpacks are in 


September 18, 1997 


11 


Bilal to speak on diversity 


November 6, 1997 


10 


Binge drinking down in America, except among college students 


September 11, 1997 


3 


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Broadcast, Clarion broadcast team win best play-by-play local sportcast 


October 23, 1997 


24 


Bucky gets in touch with feminity 


September 25, 1997 


3 


Bucs, Steelers, Pitt/Penn State... just like old times 


September 11, 1997 


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California-Davis at a glance 


September 25, 1997 


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Call, a look at the people who make the Call 


December 4, 1997 


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Call, Here comes the Clarion Call 


October 23, 1997 


5 


Can anybody run with the Bulls 


November 6, 1997 


24 


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Carlson undergoes change 


September 25, 1997 


5 


Carnival to be held 


September 11, 1997 


11 


Chelsea (Clinton) arrives at Stanford 


October 2, 1997 


3 


Chlebowski honored for division II batting title 


November 20, 1997 


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Clarion improves advisory 


September 25, 1997 


8 


Clarion loses to Lock Haven 


September 25, 1997 


22 


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Clarion refocuses on second half of season 


October 16, 1997 


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Clarion remains a financial aid affiliate 


October 30, 1997 


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Clarion U hold business conference 


November 20, 1997 


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Clarion University student outreach program visits Pittsburgh 


October 9, 1997 


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Clinton, president, makes a deal with education majors 


September 11, 1997 


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college campus news 


December 4, 1997 


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College Press Day at C.U.P. 


November 20, 1997 


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Commission welcomes two new students 


October 23, 1997 


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Concert review, choir performs Haydn's Creation 


December 4, 1997 


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Cross country team gets first win in Mt. Union Invitational 


October 9, 1997 


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Cross country team increases competition 


October 2, 1997 


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Clarion Call 



Sep -Dec 1997 



Clarion Call 



Sep -Dec 1997 



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Cross country team opens at Cat 

Cross country teams look for veterans to provide strong stars 

Cross country teams peak at regionals 

Cross country teams roll to second place 

Cross country teams run well at PSAC's 

Cross country, cross country teams at Gettysburg Invitational 

Cross country, men win first in CC invitational 

CU bowls for children 

CU recieves legal accreditation 

CU women attend conference 

Delftware dealt to tourists 



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Depression plagues students 

Depression screenings offered 

Despite bad weather, the day pressed on 

Dining- students still dish the campus dining service 

Distance learning creates nursing school at Lock Haven 

Dr. Judy talks with Clarion students 



Drown your stress in the Clarion river 
Drug free awareness week celebrated 
Eagle Ambassadors revamp program 



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Ed Samder, famed poet Ed Sanders to speak 
El Deano, Farewell you'll be missed 
Enrollment continues to increase at CU 
Enrollment surges for third straight year 
Faculty recital slated for Monday night 
Falstaff visits Hart Chapel 
Farnham returns to Clarion for show 
Flyash creates concern at CU 
Flyash project remains at a standstill 
Football, a happy ending 



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Football, California hands Clarion 30-0 loss 
Football, Charles sparks Clarion to first win 
Football, Clarion drops heartbreaker to UC-Davis 
Football, Clarion drops PSAC-West opener 
Football, Clarion falls to Miljersville in season opener 
Football, Division II football news and notes 



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Football, Golden eagle defense stymies Scots in 28-0 win 

Football, golden eagles begin 97 season with no 4 ranking 

Football, No 12 Slippery Rock rolls past Clarion 

Football, struggling golden eagles fall to 0-5 

Football, stunned 

Foreign students stay at CU 

Forensics, Clarion forensics team attends tournament 

Galbreath receives CU award 

Gallew, Kristen named to the council of trustees 

Girls Tennis, Clarion netters another quality season 

Golf team takes sixth at Slippery Rock invitational 

Golfers hold their own Allegheny invitational 

Goulish garb available locally 

Great American Smokeout hits CU 



T02| Griffith's exhibit brings memories of ALF 



B 



September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
November 13, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
November 6, 1997 



October 30, 1997 



October 23, 1997 
October 16, 1997 
October 9, 1997 



September 11, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
October 2, 1997 



November 20, 1997 



October 16, 1997 



October 2, 1997 



December 4J 997 
September 25^ 1997 
October 23, 1997 



November 20, 1997 



September 25, 1997 



October 16, 1997 



October 2, 1997 



September 18, 1997 
October 23, 1997 



November 13, 1997 



October 9, 1997 



September 11 J 997 



November 6, 1997 



November 20, 1997 



October 23, 1997 
November 6, 1997 



October 9, 1997 

September 18, 1997 
December 4, 1997 



October 2, 1997 



November 13,1997 
September 11, 1 997 



October 30, 1997 

October 16, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
October 23, 1997 



October 30, 1997 
October 23, 1997 



September 11, 1997 
October 2, 1997 



October 9, 1997 

October 16, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
October 16, 1997 



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Grugel named to NCATE 

Halloween websites scare up browsers 


November 13, 1997 7 


October 30, 1997 


9 


Harvey Hall may be under renovations September 18, 1997 


8 


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Hockey, Defense key for Penguins November 6, 1997 


24 


Hockey, Pens discover life without Mario December 4, 1997 


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Homecoming, Fletcher and Robinson crowned October 16, 1997 


5 
16 


Inconert October 9, 1997 


Kline gives the ins and outs of 'In & Out' October 30, 1997 


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Kotlikoff Will Visit CU October 1 6, 1 997 8 


Lakers look to bring back showtime November 13, 1997 24 


Laying it on the line. . . one last time November 6, 1 997 


21 


Leadership series begins October 9, 1997 


5 


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Letter to the editor, ... all veterans should be remembered December 4, 1997 


3 


Letter to the editor, ... I will spend a week compiling crap that no one. . . November 13, 1997 


3 


Letter to the editor, ...the university takes such extreme measure... November 20, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, a YES vote for the Regional Renaissance Initiative. . October 23, 1997 3 


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Letter to the editor, Clarion Call in my opinion has implied I am the... 
Letter to the editor, Clarion is still a special place 


October 9, 1997 3 


October 23, 1997 5 


Letter to the editor, Everywhere you look, you see someone wearinq. . . November 20, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, express your desire to have ISF money spent... 


September 25, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, He wrote that coverage was one-sided, and I wish... 


October 9, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, I do not believe that the article in question was in.. 


October 9, 1997 


3 


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Letter to the editor, I don't know what kind of bubble you're living in... 


October 23, 1997 3 


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Letter to the editor, I must admit the event was a rich cultural experience November 6, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, I've never felt the fear, the anger, the pain on an. . . December 4, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, no doubt the increase in business will increase... October 30, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, response to death of Princess Diana, Mother Teresa September 1 1 , 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, the paper is there for you, so use it November 20, 1 997 4 


Letter to the editor, the person who committed this childish act should... September 18, 1997 4 


132 
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135 


Letter to the editor, We commend you for our generosity and. . . 


November 20, 1997 3 


Letter to the editor, would you still be against capital punishment or for... 


November 6, 1 997 3 


Letter to the editor: Nowonto the ignorant people in Gemmell October 16, 1997 


3 


Letter to the editorPlutonium is one of the most dangerous substance. . . October 2, 1 997 


3 


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Life after college grads are deep in debt 


September 25, 1997 6 


Local artist featured at Sandford 


September 18, 1997 


11 


Lose your underwear at Munich's Oktoberfest 


October 23, 1997 


11 


Marlins win series with storybook ending October 30. 1997 


24 


Marlins-Indians make mark on Fall Classic 


October 23, 1997 


24 


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Medallion to be presented at commencement 


December 4, 1997 


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Men's basketball, Clarion falls 78-71 in Classic final 


November 20, 1 997 


21 


Men's basketball, golden eagles set to defend PSAC-West title 


November 13, 1997 22 


Men's basketball, Golden eagles upend Mountaineers 79-73 


December 4, 1997 24 


Mentoring program hits CU 


September 25, 1997 7 


Michigan rules over un-happy valley 


November 13, 1997 21 


Movie review Aniston is picture perfect 


September 11, 1997 11 


Movie review Excess Baggage a hit in theaters September 25, 1997 


15 


Movie review: Liar, Liar now on video October 16, 1997 


13 


Movie review: the horror of Rocky's picture 


November 6, 1997 


9 


Mulder publishes philosophy book 


October 23, 1997 6 


Music review: a garden of sound with no effects 


November 1 3, 1 997 
November 6, 1997 


11 


Music review: Benji is Everclear with The Cure for Hanson 


9 



Clarion Call 



Sep -Dec 1997 



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Music review: Benj's tpp 14 1/2 albums of all time 

NBC & Costas do baseball the right way 

Nellis begins new era of Golden Eagle wrestling 

Outback cafe hops into Clarion 

Parking committee urges student cooperation __ 

Parting thoughts by Benj Auman 

Penguins, Pens life without Mario as NHL season begins 

Penguins-Jagr close to new deal 

Pennant races heat up as magic numbers go down 

Pirates miracle season lies with the stars 

Pittsburgh's sports future lies in hands of voters 

Plans for Clarion University student recreation center moving forward 

President's house still under renovation 

Prevailing wage keeps projects in court and out of construction 

Professional football, Steelers focused on playoffs 



169 



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ProfessionalfFootball, Stoudt, Brister, Malone... destined for Canton 
Provost tries to alleviate student scheduling problems 
PSAC teams eager to start conference play 
Raehsler and Ross honored 



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Real-life courses cover everything from fine dining to car-buing 

Records show high job placement j 

Regional renaissance initiative: a commitment to last a lifetime 
Retention rate goes up at CU 

Retirement hits Clarion U 

Rock and Roll into the sixties 

Rodriguez, Luis: Former gang member visits Clarion 

Rugby team defeats Fairmont State 

Savren to speak at Clarion University concerning racisrn 

SCUPA reaches agreement^ 
Skeletons in our closet 
SSHE keeps taxes at a standstill 
STDs atract growing attention-part 3 
STDs: a growing attraction 



187 



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STDs: a growing problem among students 
Steak with a twist invented 



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Steelers fall to Jaguars... show signs of improvement 

Steelers soar past Ravens 

Studen skip day is an honored tradition 

Student awareness is on the increase 

Student senate mission statement 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 

Student senate, brief 



204 



Student support services receive funding 



November 20, 1997 
October 23, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
October 2, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 2, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
December 4, 1997 



October 2, 1997 

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November^, 1997 
September 1M L 1997 
October 30, 1997 



October 30, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
October 23, 1997 
September 11, 1997^ 
October 2, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 23, 1997 



October 2, 1997 



October 30, 1997 



October 30, 1997 



October 23, 1997 



October 30, 1997 



October 16, 1997 



September 11, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 9, 1997 



November 13, 1997 



October 9, 1997 
October 16, 1997 
September 25, 1997 



October 2, 1997 
October 9, 1997 



October 16, 1997 
October 23, 1997 
October 30, 1997 
November 6, 1997 
! November^ 13, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
October 16, 1997 



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Clarion Call 



Sep -Dec 1997 



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Students experience difficulties at lab 
Summer day in Cook forest 
Swim team gets off the block with win over Allegheny 
Swimmers/Divers look towards inviational 
Swimming and diving team set for another PSAC title 
Swimming, Clarion strokes past Kenyon 
Swimming-Diving teams sparkle at home meet 
Tax relief in sight for students 



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Tennis team has eyes set on PSAC tournament 

Tennis team whips Geneva- falls to IUP 

Tennis, Hershey bound golden eagles knock off Scots 

Tennis, tennis team takes third at PSAC's 

Theater review, Dickens' classic carol comes to Clarion 

Theater review, twelfth night 

Theater review, Where's Godot 

Theaterm Clarion, schedule announced 

Tips for budgeting 

Traffic signal installed in Clario n 

Treatment exists for depression sufferers 

Tuition raises for 97-98 school year 

UAB, Fridays declared as UAB spirit daysT 

Umpires look to take the spotlight 

University residence 

USWF Pro Wrestlinjto invade Clarion ZZZ 

Volleyball team hits winning stride 

Volleyball team in playoff hunt 



Volleyball, Host Clarion stumbles in classic 

Wagner's exhibit focuses on femininity 

Weibel gets medical hardship waiver 

Western Conference loads up as teams chase Lord Stanley 

Where in Clarion the contest 

Where in Clarion the contest 



241 



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248 



249 



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251 



Why PennJState won't win the national championship 
Witte n ame d B urge r King National ScholarAthlete 
Women mar ch on in Philadelphia 

Women to host classic^ 

Women's basketball, Mercyhurst tops Clarion for second time this... 
Women's basketball, women looking for experience to pay off 



Women's basketball, women rebound against Westminster 58-45 

Women's health clinic opens 

Womens tennis, Golden eagles roll past Titans 9-0 



252 



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Womens tennis, Netters move to 6-4 host Pitt today 

Womens tennis, Tennis team loses tow in Shippensburg tournament 

Womens volleyball, Burn's team growing up in tough PSAC-West 

Womens volleyball, volleyball team bounces back against Vulcans 

Womens volleyball, volleyball team rallies for win 

Wrestling, Nellis takes over wrestling program 

Wrestling, Nellis takes over wrestling season at Ashland open 

Yeaney elected to the SBDC for two year term 



B 



September 18, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
November 13, 1997 
November 6, 1 997 
October 30, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 9, 1997 
October 2, 1997 
October 16, 1997 
October 23, 1997 
December 4, 1 997 
October 9, 1997 
November 6, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 2, 1997 



December 4, 1997 
October 30, 1997 
October 16, 1997 
November 6, 1997 
October 23, 1997 



November 13, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
October 9, 1997 
November 6, 1997 
November 13, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
November 6, 1997 
November 13, 1997 
December 4, 1997 



November 13, 1997 
November 20, 1997 
November 13, 1997 
September 25, 1997 
October 9, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 18, 1997 
September 11, 1997 
December 4, 1997 
November 6, 1997 



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September 11, 1997 



" Clarion afoitoergitg of $enn*gttmnia 



Clarion, $S 16214 



tE&e Clarion Call 



What's Smite 




The Rock and 
Roll Hall of Fame 

is a tourist 

attraction for all 

generations. For 

a Clarion Call 

exclusive story 

see page 10. 



£ontent$ 



Opinion 

Reader Responses. 
News 



.2 
.3 

.6 



Lifestyles 10 

Photo Essay 14 

Entertainment. 17 

Call-on-you 22 

Sports. 24 

Classifieds 27 



Volume 79, Mint I 



Weatyer 



Thursday- Cloudy 
with a chance of 

showers. High 78. 
Friday- Definite 

overcast, rainy and 
humid. High 73. 

Saturday- Possible 

rain. High in mid- 
upper 70s. 



WELCOME BACK! 



W 



I 




Photo by Tim Emanuel, Photography Editor 



The flags in GemmeU Park wave as students retake campus. 



Page2>"* 



The XIMrtoto Call 



Se^ertibcJ- 11^1^ 



q 



}r 



\OPINION. 



Che 

Clarion 

Call 

270 6emmell Complex 
Clarion, $fi 16214 

(814)226-2380 

/flX (814)226-2557 

e-mail: CAM 

Cxecuttbe 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

J Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




Hide Part 




"Greetings" 

Welcome back- It's been a glo- 
rious run of September sun and 
Clarion is up and running. The 
new academic year is settling in 
and prospects of football, fall 
foliage and ALF loom. 

Autumn can be an exciting sea- 
son provided your summer was 
active and productive. As mem- 
bers of an academic community 
we have the pleasure of renewal 
and homecoming: New Year's 
Eve every August. It's a wonder- 
ful time for dappled things, "for 
skies of couple-colour as a blind- 
ed cow;/ For a rose-moles all in 
stipple upon a trout that swim." 

With this, the first issue of The 
Clarion Call our season is under- 
way. I anticipate a banner year 
for our news organization; we 



"It has filled its role as an 

open forum for free 
egression; it is available 

to all members of our 

campus community who 

wish to speaks be seen 

and be heard." 



Art fyarloiv 



have settled our accounts, 
upgraded our equipment and 
expanded our staff. 

Most of all, many members of 
our Executive Board have been 
seasoned with "trial by fire," 
especially our editor-in-chief, 
MB Curry; the new members of 
the board seem eager to take on 
their assigned tasks and responsi- 
bilities. 

We have many goals: an aver- 
age of 24 pages per issue and 24 
issues, frequent use of color, 
photo essays and more in-depth 
news, sports and features. But 
our format and regular features 
remain, which brings us to "Hide 
Park." It's ready for another sea- 
son. 

It has filled its role as an open 



Continued on page 4 



Staff 

Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Donna Engle, Shana Stowizky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfiel, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman 

News Writers- Hope Guy, Renae Kluck, Steve Ostrosky, 

Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Rene Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Brian Christy, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, 

Tommi Hearn, Rob Kriley, Jaycie Langlois, Lori Matachak, 

Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Sheri Hertzog, Stella Myers, Jen Mumfordi 

Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Andrea Dillinger, Steve Gabor, Danielle Hermann, 

Mark Kalinoski, Bobby Lee, Christine Metzger, Tara Molina, 

Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Veronica Beck, Dena Bosak, Greg Hensler, 

Wayne Lines, Heather LitL Jnel Ritler 

Circulation Staff- Tina Lasky, Tommi Hearn, Jen Mumford, 

Debbie Odosso 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Matt Wilson 

•Names remainm t m the staff box m the December 4. 1997 CjU recieve co-curriculor credit. 



'Editorial 




We are 

committed to 

futtfitfing our 

responsibilities as 

a newspaper 



>t 



Mary 'Beth Curry, Iditor-itt-Chitf 



Welcome back or to Clarion 
(depending on your academic 
standing) and to another year of 
The Clarion Call 

Most of you have already expe- 
rienced the unparrelled joy of 
fresh copies of The Call every 
Thursday, but for those of you 
who have yet to experience the 
wonders of The_CaJl, let me give 
you a brief rundown. 

The Call is circulated through- 
out the campus and community 
every Thursday afternoon. 

We are publishing between 24 
and 28 pages a week and are 
always looking for story ideas. 
"The Letters to the Editor" col- 
umn and "Hide Park" are open to 
all submissions. 

However, "Letters to the 
Editor" must be signed and 
include a phone number and 
address. "Hide Park" writers 
must be willing to have a picture 
taken to accompany their submis- 
sions. 

The Classifieds are 10 cents a 

word and must be submitted 

before 5:00 p.m. on the Tuesday 

preceding desired publication. 

Editorials are reserved for 



members of the Executive Board 
and do not necessarily reflect the 
views of the entire executive 
board or Clarion University. 

All submissions and ads can be 
delivered to the office in room 
270 Gemmell Student Center. 

If no one is in the office don't 
hesitate to drop them into the 
appropriate envelope (located on 
the bulletin board beside the 
office door). 

However, if you would like to 
use the phone, computer, or pick 
up your yearbook, don't come 
here, that isn't our function. 
Well, now that I've covered the 
basics, I'll tell you what to expect 
from this organization. We are 
looking toward a banner year in 
collegiate journalism. 

I have been a member of the 
Executive Board since Spring 
1995, and I have never seen a 
better assembly of people than 
serves on the Executive Board 
this semester. 

That is not to say that I haven't 
worked with extremely talented 
individuals in the past, but this 

Continued on page 4 



Tlw Clarion Call is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor- 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief). Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi- 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication. 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in foUowing issues of The Clarion Tall Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication: Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the week of publication. The Clarion (>n is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



Sept^bertldf^Z^, 



ii R :Tte>a?i)iQn pall 



Page»3 5 



M 



l 



r 



—READER RESPONSE^ 



"Everyone is weeping for Princess Diana and for Mother Teresa... 



55 



Dear Editor, 

"Did you hear about Mother 
Teresa?" 

*"Yeah, it's really weird. 
Especially since Princess Diana 
died less than a week ago." 

This was a conversation I over- 
heard two dark-haired girls shar- 
ing as they were waiting for their 
cheese pizza combos at the 
Gemmell Snack Bar. 

"You know what they say, 
'Death comes in threes,"' said 
the shorter of the two girls. 

"Makes you wonder who will 
be next... Elvis?," replied the 
other in a joking manner. 



As these two ladies continued 
to converse, I began to think 
about what they had said. 
"Death comes in threes." This 
was a saying I head heard many 
times before from my wise and 
superstitious maternal grand- 
mother. This is the same woman 
(with an American Indian and 
Welsh ancestry) who would 
repeat to me, time and time 
again, not to leave an empty 
rocking chair rock because it 
would rock someone's soul 
away. 
'Death comes in threes.' 
The first of the trio is Princess 




"THIS WE'E^I^C.. 



Iht following took\place during 
the second week^ in September. 



^%^ d! ^.^ : ^A September 15, 1976 
^sIQe!^! z^zi A student drowned while swimming in 

the Clarion river. According to the front 
page story, "The Clarion State College 
junior and Oil City native had been 
swimming with friends around the Toby 
Bridge located at the junction of the Toby and Clarion Rivers when the 
accident occurred. Some of (Tom) Cirincione's friends were in the 
water while others were on the bridge when Cirincione called for help. 
Bob Dunkle and Frank Puleo were in the water at the time and tried to 
rescue Cirincione while Tom Miller, who was on the bridge, jumped in 
the attempted rescue." 

September 11, 1980 

The front page story "Communications on the move" told the story 
of the move of the communication department from Stevens Hall to 
Becker Hall. The story led with the following paragraphs: "Beginning 
its fourth year of operation, the Communications department of C.S.C. 
is one of the fastest growing areas of study at the college. The 
increased enrollment and potential growth of the department has led to 
an expansion move from Davis Hall to the Becker Research Leaning 
Center. About 80 percent of all communication classes are being held 
in the new building with the exception of classes involving the dark- 
rooms and television and audio production which will still be held in 
Davis." 

Also featured in this edition of The Clarion Call, is a story that wel- 
comes new Clarion State College President Thomas Bond. In the story 
Bond was asked what he saw in the future for Clarion, to which he 
replied, "Hopefully, we will have a computerized on-line registration 
system by next year." 

September 5, 1985 

"Comedians to bring offbeat humor to Clarion campus" led with, 
"Rich Hall of 'Saturday Night Live' and Larry 'Bud' Melman of 'The 
David Letterman Show' will present a double-bill comedy concert on 
Friday, Sept. 13 at Clarion University in Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts 
Auditorium at 8:15 pin." 

*All materials are taken directly from back issues of The Clarion 
Call and are compiled by Tlie Call staff. 




Di: The scandalous Princess Di 
who had divorced her husband, 
the Prince of Wales, and in doing 
so, forever shamed the English 
throne- a woman who spent mil- 



lions of dollars on expensive 
clothing and would go to charity 
drives to get others to sponsor 
charities. A hypocrite? I think 
so. Diana died in a speeding car, 
a little bit tipsy, with an interna- 
tional playboy who was engaged 
to another woman. 

The second of the trio is 
Mother Teresa. A woman who 
lived in poverty all her life and 
who gave everything she had to 
those who had nothing. 

The sinner and the saint. The 
rich and the poor. 
'Death comes in threes.' 
"Makes you wonder who will 



be next," was die question one 
dark haired girl had asked the 
other. 

I know who will be next. It 
will be the next door neighbor, 
the common person who is nei- 
ther a complete sinner, nor a 
complete saint; a person of the 
'common' class. Everyone is 
weeping for Princess Diana and 
for Mother Teresa, but who is 
weeping for the common man or 
woman? Aren't they the ones 
who are truly dying?" 

Sincerely, 
Hope Guy 



Binge drinking down in America 
Except Among College Students 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

Heavy drinking is down in 
America, except for one notable 
place: college campuses. 

That's according to a report 

from the National Institute on 

Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 

which calls binge drinking "a 

widespread problem" on college 

campuses desnite a decline in 
alcohol use among the general 

population. 

In 1994, 40 percent of college 

students reported binge drinking 

at least once within the previous 

two weeks of being surveyed 

.according to the triennial report. 

The NIAAA defines "binge 

drinking" as consuming five or 

more drinks at one sitting. 



Gender seems to play a signifi- 
cant role in terms of binge drink- 
ing, with 52 percent of college 
men reporting such drinking as 
compared to 31 percent of 



The report calls the findings 
for college students "quite 
high" in light of a decline in 
drinking among high school 
seniors. 



The authors suggest 



70% of College 

students claim to 

drink alcohol at least 
once a month. 



*w 



women. Across the board, near- 
ly 70 percent of college students 
said they drank alcohol at least 
once a month and about 4 per- 
cent said they drank daily, the 
study found. 



<£ 



»« 



DON'T CLOWN AROUND... 
Write a Letter to the Editor! 

Submissions are welcome from students, faculty, 
staff, administration, and the community. All let- 
ters must be submitted to room 270 Gemmell 
Student Center on the Monday before desired 
publication. Letters must be signed and include an 
address and phone number. 

This Week's topic for consideration... 

Should states permit the legal 
marriage of gay or lesbian couples? 



that college students, who report 
drinking less in high school than 
non-college-bound seniors, may 
be "catching up" and possibly 
surpassing their peers not in col- 
lege. 

The NIAAA, which has com- 
piled previous studies on alcohol 
consumption, blames campuses 
for promoting a "culture of 
drinking" and praises alterna- 
tives such as alcohol-free par- 
ties. 

Among the general population, 
alcohol use hit a 30-year low in 
1993, after peaking during the 
1980s. Increased health con- 
cerns, less tolerant attitudes 
toward drinking, and stricter 
laws against drinking and dri- 
ving are possible reasons for the 
change, the NIAAA said. 

More information on the 
NIAAA's "Ninth Special Report 
to the U.S. Congress on Alcohol 
and Health" is available at the 
agency's website: 

www.niaaa.nih.gov. 



Page 4 



«% 



The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 




ATTENTION WEB 
CRAWLERS!!!!! 

Share your favorite websites with 
the rest of campus! 

Beginning next week The Clarion Call will publish website submissions 
from students, faculty, staff, and the community. If you know of a 

great site that you would like to share with our readers 
submit the complete address, and a brief description to our office in 
room 270 Gemmell Student Center. We will log onto all the sites sub- 
mitted to verify that they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 
So, start yahooing your little hearts 
out and let us know what you find. 



Real-life courses cover everything 
from fine d ining to car-buying 



By Karen Propp 
College Press Service 

At MIT's 4th Annual Charm 
School, students enroll in courses 
like "Nerd Love," where they 
learn how to ask for a date. At 
Texas Christian University, 
seniors sign up for a seven- 
course "fine-dining experience," 
where they pick up tips on how to 
eat difficult foods such as arti- 
chokes and Cornish hens. At the 
University of California- Santa 
Barbara, students scale rock 
walls to prepare for upcoming 
job interviews. 

Is this how one earns a bache- 
lor's degree in the 1990s? 

While four years of discussing 
Plato and memorizing French 
vocabulary makes for a well- 
rounded person, it doesn't neces- 
sarily prepare students for the 
challenges of life after gradua- 
tion: landing a job, negotiating 
an apartment lease, managing 
finances, even grocery shopping. 
So in the past few years, numer- 
ous colleges have created inten- 



sive, innovative workshop pro- 
grams to help students master 
real-life skills. 

"We feel students are entering a 
complex world, a very different 
world from that of their parents," 
says Carolyn Ulrickson, director 
of career services at Texas 
Christian. Indeed, MIT Charm 
School's slogan reads: "When 
being brilliant is not enough..." 

A course called "Real World 
101," taught by retried General 
Motors' executive George 
Spaulding at the College of 
Charleston, guides students 
through how to buy a car, a 
house, insurance, and how to use 
a credit card wisely. Interactive 
lectures in how to be a critical 
consumer, the pros and cons of 
marriage versus living single, 
and how to function effectively 
in a pluralistic society are offered 
to students at Augustana College 
in Illinois. 

Of course, the biggest challenge 
for most diploma-seeking indi- 
viduals is how to secure a job 
after graduation. Today's chang- 



ing and uncertain job market 
makes that tough, say college 
administrators. "More kids than 
ever before are the first genera- 
tion in their family to go to col- 
lege," points out John Gardner, 
director of the National Resource 
Center for the Freshman Year and 
Students in Transition. 'They 
can't get much career planning 
support from their families." 

Making the transition from the 
halls of academia to life after col- 
lege isn't always an easy one, 
students admit. "I didn't know 
that I didn't know how to find a 
job," confesses Yokima Cureton, 
who took John Gardner's Senior 
Seminar at the University of 
North Carolina. An English 
major, Yokima learned, as she 
says, "to field the market" and 
explore many different career 
possibilities. She landed a posi- 
tion that she loves as a banquet 
administrator for a major hotel. 



Continued on page 8 





From page 2 



year there is no weak spot. 

Staff members are ready for 
their new challenges and have 
been working hard since our 
organizational meeting the first 
week of school. Jen, Kristen, 
Benj, and Denise have all served 
on the Executive Board before 
and have shown leadership com- 
ing into the new semester. 

The new faces of Scott, Billy, 
Wayne, Mike, Tim, and Danielle 
have seemed a little confused 
over the last few weeks, but they 
are catching on with amazing 
speed. I look to them to breathe 
new life into The Call and fill its 
pages with fresh ideas. 

We are committed to fulfillins 
our responsibilities as a newspa- 
per and to giving you, our read- 
ers, accurate and timely informa- 
tion. 

We will do this while embrac- 
ing our First Amendment right to 
Freedom of Press (no one out 
there really thought that I could 
make it through an entire editori- 
al without mentioning the First 
Amendment, did you?) 

This means that you may not 
always agree, with the opinions 
presented in these pages, but the 
good news is, it also gives you 
the right to express that disagree- 
ment. Sounds like a win/win sit- 
uation to me. 

We welcome your input at all 
times, and we are not the only 
organization that needs you. The 
radio stations, TV-5, and our 
neighbor the Sequelle (yearbook) 
also welcome you to the world of 
campus media. 



We need you. 

Three years from now you will 
be the editors and station man- 
agers; now is the best time to get 
the edge that will take you to the 
top. 

Clarion has much to offer. Here 
you can go as far as you will let 
yourself be taken. Don't be 
afraid to make the first step and 
savor the college experience. 

A good way to do that is to 
attend some of the events offered 
on campus. 

Speakers, concerts, movies, and 
trips are all provided in the fees 
that you have to pay, why not 
enjoy them? If these events don't 
appeal to you check out a sport- 
ing event (free to students with 
valid IDs). 

Homecoming is a great game to 
attend. Who can beat the whole 
homecoming/ALF experience. 

Let me just tell you that I get 
chills when I think about ALF 
week. If you do one thing as a 
Clarion University student, it 
must be stay here for the entire 
ALF week. 

Even if you love home and miss 
your mom and dad so badly that 
it hurts, just give it a try. Who 
knew that the celebration of the 
dying of leaves would lead to 
such a good time? 

Clarion University can prepare 
you for the real world. It can 
educate you and provide a rich 
and valuable experience. But, 
you must be willing. 

• The author is a senior 

Communication and Political 

Science major. 



^U\>s?ir;'i99f 



IIr-1 nnh«n nrtf he c)arion Ca || 



Pag<*5 



Hide Park continued 



From page 2 



forum for free expression; it is 
available to all members of our 
campus community who wish to 
speak, be seen and be heard. 

It remains clearly posted in the 
Opinion/Editorial page, and 
while the views expressed may 
not always coincide with the 
views of the editor or the readers, 
they are the views of an outspo- 
ken minority. The Executive 
Board of The Clarion Call 
believe in ensuing such freedom 
of speech. This is not a minor 
task. It's an easy call to run a col- 
umn extolling the virtues of a 
universally popular topic or posi- 
tion, but to allow unpopular 
views, to find their way into print 
invites outrage and derision and 
occasionally brilliant invectives. 



But then strong sunlight stunts 
the growth of lower organisms 
which prefer dampness and dark- 
ness for their propagation. 

But now let's not launch a new 
season on a sour note. 

Look on the bright side; smile 
and be happy. Did I miss any, oh, 
have a nice day, grnr. 

• The author is the advisor to 

The Clarion Call and 
groundskeeper of the park. 



'The role of the 
Ipress is to inform 
society about 
problems, not to 
Isolve them." 

Reuven Frank 
news executive 



In Memory 



Robert H. Baldwin, Ph.D. 



Robert Harrison Baldwin of 44 Greenville Ave, Clarion, died September 8 alter protracted treatment for a brain tumor. Bom on 

ISeptembcr 5, 1931, the son of John R. and Elizabeth Baldwin, he came of age in Bridgeville, PA. In 1957 he married Margaret 

(Peggy) Ellen Brasch, who survives as do their three children: Ann Elizabeth Hightchevv, her husband Jeff, and their daughter 

Alyssa; Robert Edward, his wife Judy, and their as-yet unborn child; and Beth Applegate Baldwin. He is also survived by his sis- 

|ter, Gloria Ann Mountain, and her husband Jimmy, and their children and grandchildren. 

Dr. Baldwin attended Wesleyan University on an 

lacademic scholarship and received his B. A. in philosophy and M.A.T. degrees there. He was an NSF Fellow in 1949 and received 

his Ph.D. in the foundations of education from the University of Pittsburgh in 1967. He had previously served in the U.S. Army, 

taught at Latimer & Oliver J/S High Schools, and served on the Pittsburgh Board of Education and as an assistant to the Dean of 

the School of General Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. After completion of the doctorate, he taught at Bowling Green 

|University before returning to Pittsburgh in 1968 as Associate Professor of Education. 

Dr. Baldwin came to Clarion in 1971 to serve as Dean of the College of Professional Studies and Professor of Education. Under 
Ihis direction the nursing program on the Venango Campus came into being, as did the McKeever Environmental Center at Sandy 
I Lake, and the K- 12 experimental program known as the Flexible All- Year School on the Clarion Campus. 

In all of his endeavors, Dr. Baldwin earned the respect and affection of colleagues and charges alike. He served for many years 
las a member of the Faculty Senate, frequently chairing its various committees and subcommittees, and he similarly served on 
numerous University and community committees-Professional Development, Presidential Leadership, Strategic Planning, CUP 
Foundation, Cross Creek, MHMR, McKeesport Consortium, Middle States, NCATE, Act 101, Sigma Chi, Venango Campus, Honors Colloquium, Clarion Borough Planning] 
Commission, Sandy Creek Conservancy, NTE, to name but a few. Upon his retirement in 1993, grateful colleagues and alumni awarded him the Alumni Association! 
I Distinguished Service Award. A retirement celebration in his honor drew hundreds. 

All his life, Dr. Baldwin labored for the betterment of his fellow man. His remarkable intellect, his uproarious humor, his gifted speech, and his devotion to truth, goodness, | 
land personal integrity insured the success of his efforts. His legacy shall remain incalculable; his presence sorely missed. 



Sonnet 10 

'Death, be not proud, though some, have catted thee 

Mighty and dreadful, for thou are not so; 

for those whom thou thinf^st thou dost overthrow 

Die not, poor 'Death, nor yet canst thou kilt me, 

from rest and steep, which but thy pictures be, 

Oduch pteasure; then from tee much more must f tow, 

And soonest our best men with thee do go, 

U(est of their bones, and soul's detivery. 

Thou 'art stave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate ment, 

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwett, 

And poppy 'or charms can make us steep as wett 

And better than thy stroke ' why swett'st thou then? 

One short steep past, we wake eternatty 
And death shatt be no more; Death, thou shatt die. 

-John Donne 



Arnold H. Zaeske, Ed.D. 

Arnold H. Zaeske, Ed.D., 70, of 56 Westwood Drive, Clarion, died Thursday, August 21, 1997, in Northwest Medical Center in| 
Franklin. 

Born on January 26, 1927, in Peru, 111., was the son of the late Henry and Angela DuPont Zaeske. 
In 1957, he married Carol Mae Salo, who survives, as do their two children: Allan Zaeske, Angela Gottshall, her husband Christopher, | 
and their son Jordan Gottshall. 

Dr. Zaeske was a professor emeritus in the elementary education department at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. He earned anl 
undergraduate degree in history and speech from Elmhurst College, as master's degree in speech and education from the University of| 
Illinois, and a doctorate in education from the University of Missouri. 

His professional experience included teacher and principal in Louisiana, Mo.; teacher and superintendent in Wonder Lake, 111,; grad-l 
uate assistant in reading clinical work at the University of Missouri; reading education at St. Cloud State College; reading education at] 
the University of Massachusetts; and reading education and chair of the education department at Clarion University. 

He has been a member of a variety of organizations and has held many positions within those organizations. 

Dr. Zaeske has published a number of of articles pertaining to his field. 
He has dedicated much time to his organizations as well as being a veteran of World War II, serving in the Quartermaster Corps of the U.S. Army from November 1945 to| 
I December 1946. 
He is also survived by his sister, Irma (Mrs. Arthur) Meisenbach, one niece, two nephews and 10 great-nieces and nephews. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 



-NEW® 



President's House Still Under Renovation 




Tim Emanuel/ Clarion Call 
The new president's home is expected to be completed in mid-March, for now still 
remains delayed. 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Writer 



Moore Hall is still the home of 
Clarion University President 
Diane Reinhard, after utility 
problems and difficulty finding a 
subcontractor to work within the 
budget held up construction of 
her new home, orginally sched- 
uled to have been completed by 
this past summer. 

According to Ron Wilshire, 
University Relations, "The rea- 
sons for the delay were because 
there were problems in getting 
the utilities connected, and there 
was difficulty in receiving a bid 
for hanging and finishing plaster- 
board that the budget could 
afford." Wilshire also noted that 
the completion of the project 
should come sometime in mid- 
October. 

The post-Colonial residence, 
located behind Still Hall and 
Parking Lot F, near route 322, 
will be almost 5,500 square feet, 
and will be paid for by a float 
bond issue, with the maximum 
amount of money allocated for 
construction at $650,000. Money 
for furnishing the new residence 
will come from private funding. 
Despite reports to the contrary, 
many students, when asked, were 
still under the impression that 
some or all of the money used in 
obtaining President Reinhard's 
new home came from University 
funds. 
After mentioning the fact that no 



money from CU was used on this 
house, students still had ques- 
tions as to why the funding 
couldn't be used in some other 
fashion to help other schools 
affiliated with the State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE). 

"I feel that the state funding for 
this resident construction project 
should be used to better the 
University instead of buying the 
president a new home," said Amy 
Long, a senior Communication 
major. "She deserves some kind 
of reward for a job well done, but 
a new home?" 

Junior Eileen Schneider com- 
mented, "Why does the state feel 
it necessary to take taxpayer 
money for president homes when 
the money could be better used 
for financial aid for those stu- 
dents who need assistance and 
aren't getting it?" 

Other students are still wonder- 
ing why this and other projects 
on campus have stalled or never 
gotten off the ground. Courtney 
Spangler, a junior 

Communication major, said, 
"There seems to be a hold up on 
everything. They should finish 
doing everything that needs done 
before beginning another pro- 
ject." 

Daria Diaz, a sophomore 
Speech Pathology major, won- 
dered what was holding up the 
project from being finished. 
"They started the project last fall, 
and they should have it complet- 
ed by now," she said. 



The decision to construct a new 
residence for Dr. Reinhard was 
made by the board of Governors 
of the SSHE after determining 
that her current location in Moore 
Hall ws in need of too many ren- 
ovations to make the place suit- 
able for living. The orginal plan 
for the SSHE, of which housing 
is a stipulation for all System 
institutions, would have spent 1.2 
million dollars on the new home. 
However, Clarion University' 
Council of Trustees voted to alter 
the plans to bring the cost to a 
more reasonable level. 

University employees were 
handling most of the construc- 
tion, although some subcontrac- 
tors were hired for site prepara- 
tion, heating, ventilation and air 
conditioning, and installation of 
an elevator (in compliance with 
the Americans with Disabilities 
Act regulations). The subcon- 
tracting of plasterboard, and find- 
ing a company that could finish 
the project with budgetary 
restraints, was party blamed for 
the delay in the completion of the 
project. 

When ready and open to the 
public, the home will be three 
and a half stories in height. It will 
have four bedrooms, a family 
room, a study, a kitchen, a recep- 
tion room, a dining room that will 
be able to hold twenty guests, a 
two car garage, a 
storage/mechanical room, laun- 
dry facilities, and three bath- 
rooms. 



Ccllege Campus News 




What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Hazing at WVU puts 
fraternity at a standstill 

The Omega Psi Phi fraternity at West Virginia University has been 
expelled from campus and ten of its members arrested after a pledge 
told police he was hazed. 

Freshman LaVar J. Grant was allegedly beaten, whipped and 
deprived of sleep for two days and may suffer permanant hearing 
loss after the incident. 

Police arrested ten WVU students in mid-March and charged them 
with hazing, a misdemeanor under a new state law. One of the stu- 
dents is the fraternity president. 

University officials will seperately determine a punishment for the 
students, which could include suspension or expulsion. A WVU com- 
mittee expelled the fraternity for a four-year period after finding it 
violated two counts of the school's conduct code-infliction or threat 
of bodily harm and hazing, said David Taylor, a university 
spokesman. 

Following the four year period, the commitee and the fraternity's 
national office will explore whether Omega Psi Phi should return to 
campus, he said. 



Sex, drugs, and beer 
prompts Christian stu- 
dent to sue university 

Douglas Rader, a devout Christian, didn't think that his religious 
beliefs meshed with what goes on in a college dormitory-things like 
alchohol. drug use, and casual sex. 

So Rader, a freshman at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, 
requested to live off campus with other devout Christians. Last sum- 
mer he asked to be exempt from a university rule that says freshman 
under nineteen must live on campus. 

When the university refused to grant his request, he sued. 
According to his attorney, "Doug Rader wants to be in a place that 
uplifts his soul." 

The university, meanwhile, cites research mat shows requiring 
freshman to live on campus improves grades and leads to higher 
graduation rates. A decision is pending, however Rader has been / 
allowed to live off of campus in a Christian center until the case is 
resolved. 

Courtesy of the College 
Press Service 



September"!!; Ifc? 



9 



\l~ ¥ \ 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



CU women attend conference 



by Andrea Dillinger 
Contributing Writer 



The ninth annual Women's 
Undergraduate Leadership 
Institute was held this past 
August at the McKeever 
Environmental Learning Center 
in Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania. 

The six day institute brings 
together about fifty women stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff from the 
fourteen system universities. The 
major goals of the institute are to 
develop and strengthen women's 



leadership skills, to increase 
committment to social equity, 
and to initiate a network of 
women leaders. This is also an 
opportunity to meet other women 
leaders from other universities. 

Kristi Knott, Linda Wilbur, and 
Andrea Dillinger. all three of 
Clarion University, attended the 
institute this summer. The week 
included climbing ropes at 
Slippery Rock University, to 
playing the drums and congos. 
The keynote speaker was 



Corlisse Thomas, who is present- 
ly working on her doctorate at 
Columbia University. Her open- 
ing address was entitled "Women 
Leaders for the Next Millenium." 
There were two speakers from 
Clarion. Dr. Jocelind Gant did a 
session on social equality issues. 
Carrie Forden did an activity she 
titled "Drumming for Women." 
There will be a conference in the 
Spring, and more information 
will be provided later for interest- 
ed women to sign up. 



Tuition raises for 97-98 school year 



by Hope Guy 
News Writer 



In the 1995-96 academic year, 
the State System Board of 
Governors approved a 1.91 per- 
cent increase in tuition for 
Pennsylvania state-owned uni- 
versities. For the past ten years, 
the Board of Governors has voted 
and approved increases in tuition 
which have included a rise in the 
percentages of these increases. 

In the 1997-98 academic year, 
this board again voted for an 



increase in tuition for state 
owned universities, and it was 
approved. However, it will be the 
smallest percentage increase 
since the '95-96 academic 
year.The fourteen state owned 
universities will raise their tuition 
for undergraduate residents of 
Pennsylvania by three percent, 
which is an average of $100 a 
person.This is the lowest dollar 
amount increase since the 1990- 
91 academic year, when the 
increase was about the same. 



The Clarion Call 

invites you to be 

a part of their 

world- 
there are many 
positions open. 
Call Today! 

226-2380 



Van Dyke's Fifth Avenue 
Restaurant and Bar 226-8512 



Open - Mon - Sat. 10am - Midnight 
"Restaurant: 11am - 10pm Sun. noon - 6pm 

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The pinch is expected to be felt 
in the near future. The 1997-98 
cost for student fees, tuition, 
room and board, is estimated by 
the system to the figure of $216 
per person. Each state-owned 
university sets its own cost for 
student fees, room and board. 
Therefore, this cost at Clarion 
University may vary from the 
state system's average. 

But residents of Pennsylvania 
are not the only ones to feel this 
increase. Tuition rates for non- 
resident undergraduate students 
will raise for 1997-98 by three 
percent or 258$ a person. 




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DaVorDaVoriDaVorOaVortDaVorDaVofOaVoilDaVoriDaVorDaVorDaVo^ 

1997 The Se quelle 

Class of 1998 Senior Portraits 

will be taken for the yearbook 

starting Sept. 15th 



Location: Gemme! Student Complex - Room 262 

Please schedule your appt. 
during the week of Sept. 8th 

at the Gemmel Student Complex - Room 277 

Final 
Opportunity 




jOAeoJOABQJOAeQJOAeaJOAeaJOAeaJOAeajOAeaJOAeoJOAeaJOAeajOAea 



September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 8 



President Clinton makes a deal with education majors 



by Colleen De liaise 
College Press Service 

President Clinlon announced a 
$350 million plan to encourage 
teachers to work in inner-city and 
rural schools and repeated his 
call for racial diversity on college 
campuses. 

The president outlined his pro- 
posal July 17 to the NAACFs 
annual convention in Pittsburgh 
and later to the National 
Association of Black Journalists 
in Chicago. 

The education initiative is the 
first proposal since the presi- 
dent's speech in June calling for a 
yearlong discourse on race. 

"Don't tell me that children 
can't learn because they are chil- 
dren of color, they are children 
from poor neighborhoods," 
Clinton told the NAACP. "We 
cannot stop until we have given 
the best teachers the opportunity 



to teach the children to be the 
best." 

The president laid out details of 
the plan to 3,000 members of the 
NABJ in Chicago. "What I pro- 
pose today," he said, "is a series 
of scholarships that would go to 
people who say T will teach in a 
poor area for three years if you 
help me get an education.'" 

The plan is meant to encourage 
college students studying to be 
teachers to commit to work in 
needy areas. It's similar to the 
storyline of CBS's "Northern 
Exposure" in which a doctor pays 
for his medical training by work- 
ing in a small Alaskan communi- 
ty- 

The president also discussed the 
end of affirmative action pro- 
grams and the danger of resegre- 
gation in higher education, refer- 
ring to a Texas court ruling and 
Proposition 200. 



Clinton mentioned that the 
University of California- 
Berkeley's law school will enroll 
only one black student this fall, 
following the elimination of its 
affirmative action policy. Last 
year, the school admitted 75 
black students and enrolled 20. 

"I'm a little stumped here. 
We're going to have to reexamine 
what we can do," he said. "I don't 
know why the people who pro- 
moted this in California think this 
is a good thing to have a segre- 
gated set of professional 
schools." 

State education officials who 
stand by the decision say they 
expected a drop in minority 
enrollment in the first year of the 
new policy. 

The president, however, said he 
continues to support affirmative 
action policies and hopes to 
restore them or replace them with 
a better plan. 



"There may be some ways to 
get around it, and we are looking 
at it and working on it," Clinton 
said, adding that the Education 
and Justice departments should 
look for solutions. "This is a 
great concern to me and I think it 
is moving the country in exactly 
the wrong direction." 

Clinton's speech to the NABJ 
drew warm applause, although 
many in the crowd reacted with 
cautious enthusiasm to the presi- 
dent's proposed education initia- 
tive. 

Ylasha L. Womack, a recent 
graduate of Clark Atlanta 
University, said the plan doesn't 
address a core problem of inner 
city schools: tight budgets that 
have left older buildings in a state 
of disrepair. 

"I think there are a lot of good 
teachers in the inner cities," said 
Womack, whose mother is a prin- 
cipal at a Chicago public elemen- 



tary school. "I mink there is a 
lack of funding. 1 think schools 
need help." 

Aaron P. Arnold, a Florida 
A&M University junior, said he 
might pursue a graduate teaching 
degree if Clinton's plan is 
approved by Congress. He said 
he was interested in teaching dis- 
advantaged students because "a 
lot of people have helped me get 
to the point where I am." 

But Arnold said Clinton needs 
to move beyond the talking phase 
when it comes to protecting affir- 
mative action. "I would like to 
see more of an effort. I didn't feel 
complete with (his) answer," he 
said. "I was sort of left hanging. 
Actions speak louder than 
words." 

Arnold, who attends a histori- 
cally black university, said he 
supports race and gender prefer- 
ences because racism and sexism 
still exist. 



Clarion University Academic Calendar 97/98 



Fall 1997 
Registration for day and evening classes. ..Aug.25 

Classes begin at 8 a.m Aug 25 

Labor Day Holiday. Sept.1 

Midsemester break begins 10 p.m Oct. 9 

Midsemester break ends 8 a.m Oct. 13 

Thanksgiving holiday begins 10 p.m Nov. 25 

Thanksgiving holiday ends at 8 a.m Dec. 1 

Classes end 10 p.m Dec. 5 

Reading Day Dec. 6 

Final Examination period begins Dec. 8 

Final Examination period ends Dec. 12 

Semester ends 10 p.m Dec. 12 

Winter Commencement Dec. 13 

Semester grades due from faculty Dec 18 



Spring 1998 

Martin Luther King Day. Jan. 19 

Registration for day and evening classes Jan 20 

Classes begin at 8 a.m Jan 20 

Winter holiday begins at 10p.m Feb. 27 

Winter holiday ends at 8 a.m March 9 

Spring Vacation begins 10 p.m April 8 

Spring Vacation ends at 8 a.m April 15 

Classes end at 10 p.m May 8 

Reading Day May 9 

Final Examination period begins May 11 

Final Examination period ends 10 p.m May 15 

Semester ends 10 p.m May 15 

Spring Commencement May 1 6 

Semester grades due from faculty May 21 





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College Press Service Cont'd from pg. 9 

Elon College in North Carolina holds "Transition Tactics," a three-day seminar for seniors just prior to the 
academic year. Elon's workshop features "work shadowing," where students are matched with an organi- 
zation that resembles their interests. Patrick Waddick, a corporate communication major said his two work 
shadow experiences have shaped him in "organizing a path to take." Shadowing in the public relations 
department of a hospital showed Waddick that he didn't want a desk job, while his second experience, in a 
non-profit arts council was more rewarding. As Waddick put it, "You can learn only so much inside a class- 
room." 

Texas Christian University offers seniors "Entry Level Life: Skills for the Real World," a mock profes- 
sional conference held in a downtown hotel where students conduct panel discussions, network, interview 
and listen to speakers. 

According to Ulrickson, "Knowledge in a field of study is down on the list. Companies will train and 
retrain. Because the world is changing so quickly, they want people who demonstrate oral communication, 
teamwork and social skills." 

Hence the instruction in fine dining. MIT, Augustana, and Muhlenberg College are among the schools that ' 
encourage their graduates to know which fork to use at luncheon interviews. 



Page 9 



The Clarion Call 



September 11,1997 



V 



Flyash creates concern at CU 



""w' "i. 




SAVE 
CLARION 

SAV_NO' 

MS.* 

suw£ 

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Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
The "flyash" situation continues to be a major concern for environmental groups and 
residents alike. 



by Donna Engle 
News Assistant 



According to SAVE (Students 
Against Violating the 
Environment) and PEACE 
(Protect Environment and 
Children Everywhere) organiza- 
tions, the Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP) 
has made a plan to cover an area 
of land scanning 200 acres with 
coal flyash residue and other 
industrial wastes near 
Strattanville. This land, once a 
mine site, was reclaimed almost 
ten years ago, and has remained 
its natural stability since. 
Beneficial Ash Management 
(BAM), along with the DEP, 
want to put a "cap" on this land 
to stop rainfall penetration. 
The problem is that flyash, 



according to PEACE, is an 
untested, unmonitored, and a 
complete experiment of technol- 
ogy. Furthermore, this site has 
never been tested for safety, 
hydrology, and geological stan- 
dards. The major concern among 
the people of this local area is 
that this site is just one and a half 
miles from Clarion's drinking 
water supply.. Also this flyash 
material contains chemicals such 
as mercury, cadmium, arsenic, 
and lead — all of which accumu- 
late over time in the human body. 
The ash is very light, and may 
blow around the area easily. 

There have been several recent 
public forums on this subject, 
including an informational meet- 
ing on campus as well as on Main 
Street. A guest speaker was pre- 



sent at the last meeting from the 
Hoosier Environmental Council. 
Matt Waldo spoke on this sub- 
ject, discussing the problem in 
his home state of Indiana as well 
as the six year plan for the Reed- 
Strattanville site. 

Dr. Mark Haggarty, an 
Economics professor at Clarion 
University and an active member 
of the PEACE organization, was 
adament on the subject. "It's 
unproven technology," he 
expressed with concern. "Why 
would you try that here? It just 
doesn't make any sense." Many 
residents are concerned that the 
technology will not work on this 
site, and they don't feel safe with 
it being so close to a water sup- 
ply. Yet the result of this situation 
remains unresolved as of yet. 



CLWRI09iCM;L "FALL TU^LlC^lO0i!D!A c I t LS 



SEPTEMBER 11 
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OCTOBER 2 



OCTOBER 9 
OCTOBER 16 
OCTOBER 23 
OCTOBER 30 



NOVEMBER 6 
NOVEMBER 13 
NOVEMBER 20 
DECEMBER 4 



DO YOU HAVE ANY 
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AT X2380 FOR FUR- 
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The following is a brief synopsis of the criminal inves- 
tigations conducted by Public Safety for the dates 
between July 1 and September 8. The blotter is com- 
piled by The Public Safety office and The Clarion 
Call. 



* On July 1, 1997, a yellow and black Dewalt cordless battery ham- 
mer drill was taken out of 401 Becht Hall. The drill was valued at 
S300. UPDATE: The drill was found on August 25, 1997. 

*Campus police are investigating a hit and run accident that occured 
in lot B on August 28 1997. 

*On August 29. 1997, Robert M. Lawrence, a Clarion University stu- 
dent, was sited for disorderly conduct in Parking Lot Q. 

*On August 31, 1997, officers discovered that unknown actors had 
set fire to a sorority rush banner. The fire did minor damage to the 
brick facing and hand rail of the Gemmell Building. The incident is 
currently under investigation. 

♦Campus police responded to a report of a fight in progress at 
Chandler Dining Hall on August 31, 1997. The incident is currently 
under investigation and further action is pending. 

*On September 1, 1997, two Clarion students, Michael Henderson 
and Joseph Fischer, were cited for burning 7-11 hotdog boxes and 
napkins on top of a picnic table by Stevens Hall. 

*On Wednesday September 3, 1997, a citation for underage con- 
sumption was issued to a student in Campbell Hall. 

*On September 3, 1997 Thomas Gaudino was found guilty for disor- 
derly conduct. 

*On September 5, 1997, unknown persons discharged the fire alarm 
on die first floor of Nair Hall. 

♦Unknown actors entered a residents room in Ralston Hall and 
removed a music box on September 5, 1997. 

*On September 6, 1997, a Clarion University student, Robert Allen 
Petty, was cited for disorderly conduct. 

♦On September 8, 1997, defendant John Fisher was found guilty of 
disorderly conduct and not guilty of public drunkeness. 




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The Clarion Call 




The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 



iU_ Page 10 Page 11 The Clarion Call ^ iCI,lucl "' m 

LIFESTYLES\ Aniston Is "Picture Perfect" 



Rock and Roll Into The Sixties 



by Scott R.Hunsberger 
Lifestyles Editor 

If you're going to go to the 
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, be 
sure to wear some flowers in 
your hair. 

Tie-dye and bell bottom clad 
staffers greet visitors to 
Cleveland's sanctuary of all 
things rock and roll. They are 
dressed in this manner for the 
temporary exhibit "I Want To 
Take You Higher: The 
Psychedelic Era 1965-1969" that 
is on display through February. 

"I Want To Take You Higher" 
chronicles one of the oddest and 
coolest times in rock and roll his- 
tory and shows people that there 
was more to the era than just 
Woodstock. 

The ground level of the muse- 
um houses the exhibit and 
includes a historic (for some, 
nostalgic) view of the culture, 
social habits and political turmoil 

of the late 1960's. 

From Vietnam protests and 

government tests of lysergic acid 
diethylamide to bra burnings and 
hippies galore, the exhibit shows 
it all. 

Included in the exhibit is a wide 
array of paraphernalia from the 
era. There's Jimi Hendrix's pur- 
ple jacket, Pink Floyd album 
covers and stage balloons, Eric 
Clapton's guitar from when he 
played with Cream, Jorma 




Scott Hunsberger/Clarion Call 

"The bus came by and I got on." Ken Kesey and the Merry Prankster's 
Further Bus outside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. 



Kaukonen's (of The Jefferson 

Airplane) high-heeled, saddle 

block shoes, letters that Janis 
Joplin wrote home to her parents 

and posters for the Monterrey 
Pop Festival, Woodstock and 
underground concerts. There's 
also a Christmas card from Jim 
Morrison to his parents that 
reads, "A cool Yule and a frantic 
First. You better get me some- 
thing." 

A walk through beaded curtains 
becomes a journey back in time 
as you wind up on the streets of 




Scott Hunsberger/Clarion Call 
Cleveland's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum 



San Francisco in the late 60's. 

John Lennon's Rolls Royce and 

Janis Joplin's Porsche are parked 
on the street right outside of the 

Fillmore Bar. Inside the bar, ter- 
rific light shows dance and 
groove to non-stop Grateful Dead 
tunes. 

On the stage are Jerry Garcia's 
Gibson Les Paul Jr. guitar that he 
played at the Dead's first East 
Coast show, one of Bobby Weir's 
guitars used in the 60's, two 
amplifiers used by Garcia and 
Weir, Ron "Pigpen" McKernan's 

Hammond B-3 
organ and an apple 
barrel that once sat 
on the steps of the 
real Fillmore Bar 
and reads, "Have 1 
or 2..." 

The room also 
has a couple of 
bcanbag chairs for 
Deadheads and 
other visitors to 
relax in, listen to 
live Dead music 
and enjoy the light 
shows. 

A film titled 
"Feed Your Head" 
describes the 
emergence of psy- 
chedelic drug use 
by the band mem- 
bers and youth of 
the 1960's. The 



film contains 
interviews with 
some of the top 
performers of the 
era, including Pete 
Townshend of The 
Who, several 
members of the 
Grateful Dead, 
Neil Young and 
Bob Dylan. 

Santana tells a 
story about how 
unbelievably wast- 
ed he was when he 
played his historic 
set at Woodstock. 

"Feed Your 
Head" also 

includes informa- 
tion about Ken 
Kesey, author of 
One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest and 
harbinger of the 

acid tests that were performed in 

the late 60's. 

In fact, the Further Bus that was 
used as transportation and a mini 

stage for Kesey and the Merry 
Pranksters sits outside the muse- 
um. 



But the museum isn't just about 
the 60's. It also includes interac- 
tive exhibits in which one can lis- 
ten to the greatest hits of a 
decade, movies that show the 
roots and stars of rock and roll 
and more rock and roll parapher- 
nalia. 

Included in the exhibits are cos- 
tumes and capes that Elvis wore 
in movies and on stage, one of 
Devo's energy suits and hats that 
were used in the video "Whip It," 
Run D.M.C.'s Adidas shoes, 
drumsticks from hundreds of per- 
formers and Michael Jackson's 
"Thriller" outfit. 

The It's Only Rock and Roll 
Cinema plays the film "Rock Is." 
"Rock Is" shows the darker side 
of rock and roll, including punk 
rock's anarchistic views and 
Ozzy Osbourne's disgusting 
stage antics. It carries a dis- 
claimer at the beginning that 
warns parents about the content 
because, "after all, it is rock and 
roll." 

See Sixties on 
page 13 



Where In Clarion? 




An Apple A Day... 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Test your knowledge 

of area landmarks every week in "Where In Clarion?" 






1 



Courtesy of 

College Press Services 

Summer break wasn't much of 
a break for "Friends" star 
Jennifer Aniston. 

While the show was on hiatus, 
Aniston, who plays Rachael on 
the hit NBC sitcom, was busy 
promoting her new film, "Picture 
Perfect." At the same time, she 
was hard at work shooting anoth- 
er film, "The Object of My 
Affection." 

Aniston a movie star? Maybe. 
If "Picture Perfect" takes off, it 
could make the "Friends" actress 
a big screen attraction. 

Sure, Aniston has acted in other 
films; "She's The One" and "Til 
There Was You" come to mind. 
But those were supporting roles. 
"Perfect" stars Aniston. She's in 
almost every scene of the roman- 
tic comedy, which casts her as 
Kate, a Manhattan advertising 
executive who pretends she's 
engaged to a videographer (Jay 
Mohr) in order to win a promo- 
tion she deserves on merit, to 
please her mom (Olympia 
Dukakis) and to attract the atten- 
tion of a studly co-worker (Kevin 
Bacon) who only gets involved 
with involved women. 

One might think Aniston had a 
career game plan: Start small 
and build to that first starring 
role. That's sort of the case. "It 
was almost as if I didn't trust 
myself that I could carry a film," 
the friendly actress says. 
"There's still so much learning to 
do until 1 trust myself. It's also 
this big timing thing. You have 
to strike while the iron is hot. It's 
an uncomfortable pressure of 
'What if I want to wait?' 

"A lot of it was just luck that 
these wonderful parts came 
along. I did them because I loved 
them. I did think it would be 
wise to start doing smaller parts 
in smaller movies, then take on a 
starring role and carry that whole 
burden. I can't toot my horn and 
say I mapped it out from the 
beginning. It unfolded itself, and 
luckily, it worked out for the 
best." 

It also happens that "Perfect" 
surrounds Aniston with a batch of 
veterans and relative newcomers 
like herself. Among the old pros 
are Dukakis and Bacon. Mohr, 
who played the agent-rival of 
Tom Cruise in "Jerry Maguire," 
and Illeana Douglas, who co- 
stars as Aniston's best friend, are 
the fellow neophytes. "Olympia 
was wonderful and so helpful," 



Aniston says. "We had one scene 
where I come home and she's in 
my apartment, and it drives me 
nuts because I want to be my 
own, independent woman. I was 
having a hard time focusing, and 
she saw I wasn't taking care of 
myself the way I should. She 
said, 'Let them wait and pull your 
focus together.' It's something 
I'd usually do because I don't 
want to be a diva or obnoxious, 
but you do have to take care of 
yourself so the work can be good. 
"I also loved watching Olympia 
work. She and Kevin make it 
seem completely effortless. With 
Illeana and Jay, you're seeing a 
learning process. I was learning 
along with them. Jay comes from 
a comedy background, and it was 
exciting to see him push himself 
to limits you know he had never 
gone to before. Illeana is great. 
We really had a great mix." 

While it remains to be seen if 
"Perfect" lives up to its title at the 
box office, Aniston has already 
moved on to her next film, "The 
Object of My Affection." 
Directed by Nicholas ("The 
Madness of King George") 
Hytner, "Object" has been shoot- 
ing around Manhattan all sum- 
mer. Aniston, who grew up in 
Manhattan and attended the High 
School of the Performing Arts 
(the "Fame" school), stars in 
"Object" as a woman who 
becomes best pals with a gay 
man, played by "Clueless" co- 
star Paul Rudd. When a romance 
with another man leaves her 
pregnant, Aniston decides to 
have the baby and wants Rudd to 
raise it with her. In her mind, all 
the baby needs is love, positive 
role models and people who love 
each other. Life, of course, isn't 
that simple. 

"Paul is wonderful in it," 
Aniston says. "Alan Alda plays 
my brother-in-law and Nigel 
Hawthorne plays an older film 
critic. It's a beautiful, touching 
story that I know people will 
relate to. It's almost more painful 
to have an unrequited love than 
to have a love. Nicholas is a 



dream as a director. Talk about 
being pushed to places you never 
thought you could go. I have 
complete faith in him. He focus- 
es on the actor and the truth of the 
scene. I think the film will be 
quite lovely." 

Once principle photography on 
"Object" ends, it'll be back to 
"Friends" for Aniston. As every- 
one knows, Aniston's co-star 
Matthew Perry spent the better 
part of the summer rebounding 
from an addiction to painkillers. 
Perry's downfall was more proof 
than necessary that life at the top 
isn't always a lark. 

Aniston's heady success — the 
magazine covers, that song, the 
hairdo, all of which followed sev- 
eral failed TV series and other 



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frustrations — could easily have 
overwhelmed her. But it didn't. 
"You can't suddenly digest all 
this by saying, 'Oh, it's noth- 
ing,'" she says. "It's something, 
and it's pretty wild. As glam- 
orous as it might seem on the out- 
side because of the pictures and 
beauty, that's just created. 

"That's not what's going on. 
Inside, you're holding on like 
you're on a roller coaster, going 
'Whoa! When is this going to 
slow down for a second?' Then 
you can stop, look around and 
say, 'This is amazing. This is 
amazing. This is everything I 
ever dreamed about.' I know I'm 
lucky, so lucky, and I'm thankful. 
But it can be scary." 

As the conversation concludes, 



Aniston, who's dating actor Tate 
Donovan, contemplates how 
she'd like to continue to evolve 
as an actress and person. 
"Professionally, I'd love to do 
good movies that I'd enjoy see- 
ing," she says. "I have so much 
to learn, so much farther to go, 
and I hope not to let some wild 
ride steer me elsewhere. 

"Personally, I'd love to contin- 
ue to be good to my family, 
friends, fans and myself. I 
always put myself a couple of 
steps behind, but I do want to 
grow and learn from my mis- 
takes. I look forward to that. 

"I'm not one to map out my 
life, but if it keeps going the way 
it's been going, I'll be very 
happy." 



Carnival To Be Held 



by Hope Guy 
Lifestyles Writer 



What would Clarion be like if 
agencies like the Clarion County 
YMCA, PASSAGES and SAFE 
did not exist? Do we really 
want to know? 

These groups and others, 
including the American Red 
Cross, Clarion/Forest VNA, 
Foxview Manor, French Creek 
Council Boy Scouts and 
Keystone Tall Tree Girl Scout 
Council, all benefit from funds 
raised by the United Way of 
Clarion County, and you can do 
your part to ensure the success 
and availability of these agen- 
cies. 

Saturday, September 13 is the 
United Way of Clarion County 
19th Annual 10K Race. 4th 
Annual 5K Race and 8th Annual 
Three-mile Walk-a-Thon spon- 
sored by National City bank. 
These events are a part of 
' United Way's Campaign Kickoff 




Carnival. 

The 10K and 5K Races and 
the Three-mile Walk-a-Thon will 
begin at 10 a.m. Saturday near 
the Clarion County Courthouse 
on Main Street. At 9:45 a.m., 
the carnival will feature, for the 
first time, the "Teddy Bear Trot" 
for children ages 3 and 4. Also, 
from 9:30 a.m. until noon, the 
United Way Carnival will 
include free games and activities 



for children. 

Prizes, mementos and gifts 
will be awarded to the partici- 
pants of these events, and every- 
one is encouraged to join. 

For more information about 
the United Way's Campaign 
Kick-off Carnival and other 
events, call 226-8760 or visit the 
United Way office located at 517 
Main Street, Clarion. 

Hope to see you there! 



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September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 12 



-3T 



Steak With a Twist Invented 



Courtesy of 
College Press Service 



Long ago, some very clever 
people were inspired to inveni 
the food we love: Twinkies. 
Mozzarella cheesesticks. 

Snickers bars. Microwaveable 
burritos. 

In our hurry to scarf the delec- 
tables down, it's easy to forget 
that such tasty treats were once 
mere concepts scribbled on 
notepaper. 

Teams of college students 
recently tested their own design- 
ing abilities by entering their 
ideas for yummy, unique morsels 
in a nationwide food product 
competition held in Orlando, 
Florida. 

A team from the Midwest 
invented a meat product made 
with steak from Nebraska cattle. 
A group of California students 
created an organic drink with an 
herbal extract. 

And the New York team came 
up with a more sophisticated ver- 
sion of the Twinkie — a crepe 
with a shelf life. 

In the end, the University of 

Nebraska-Lincoln food science 

team grabbed top honors in the 

contest, sponsored by the 
Institute of Food Technologists. 

The team's invention, 
"Nebraska Twist Steak," is a pin- 
wheel of marinated beef and pork 



cuts flavored with lemon-pepper 



seasoning. 



The ten-student team, which 
logged more than 900 hours on 
the project, say they hope the 
Twist Steak will take the nation 
by storm. 

They envision it being pro- 
duced in Cajun, Italian and fajita 
flavors. 

The team brainstormed on con- 
test ideas last fall and decided on 
a meat product because of its 
appeal to processors, grocery 
stores and consumers. 

What's nice about the Nebraska 
Twist Steak is that it matches the 
needs of consumers who want 
ready-to-cook, low-fat entrees, 
said Erin Stafford Dormedy, a 
food science graduate student. 

"It's ready to throw on the grill, 
but [consumers] are still able to 
say, 'I made this,'" she said. 

To market Nebraska Twist 
Steak, the team played on the 
"twist" theme. 

They designed a package label 
depicting a tornado hovering 
above a farm field and the phrase, 
"Taste the steak that's sweeping 
the country." 

"While the steak is not avail- 
able commercially, food proces- 
sors often inquire about produc- 
ing products that students present 
at the competition," said Susan 

Cuppett, a University of 

Nebraska-Lincoln food scientist 

who served as the team's advisor. 

Other products submitted in the 



r 



* 



IJic QranH Chapter 
of ZPhi Sigma Oiappa 

Congratulates 




The Nu Pentaton Chapter for Exceeding 

The All Men's GPA for 

Clarion University 



contest include "Raspberry 
Wisdom," a beverage concocted 
by food science students at the 
University of California-Davis. 

The gooey drink, which looks 
something like a lava lamp and 
tastes like raspberry lemonade, 
purports to help boost brain 
power. 

The final ingredient in 
"Raspberry Wisdom" is a dash of 
ginkgo extract, thought by some 
to improve blood flow to the 
brain — thus the "wisdom." 
The drink received an honor- 



it 



It's ready to throw 
on the grill, but [con- 
sumers] are still able 
to say, 'I made this,'" 



able mention in the contest. 

The food science team from 
Cornell University, which swept 
the contest the last two years, 
also received an honorable men- 



tion for "Swiss Crepes," a rolled 
crepe filled with apple slices and 
cinnamon that has a three-month 
shelf life. 

The Iowa State University stu- 
dent team took second place with 
"Pizza Sweets," a microwaveable 
roll that is, oddly enough, half 
pizza-flavored and half cinna- 
mon-flavored. 

Kansas State University stu- 
dents were awarded third place 
for "Waf-Fils," microwaveable 
Belgium waffle sticks with 
strawberry filling. 



Tips For Budgeting 



Courtesy of 
College Press Service 

It's easy to rationalize. 

You think: It's only a CD. Or 
a late-night pizza. Or a T-shirt — 
which by the way is on sale. 

What harm could it do to charge 
it or write that check? 



If you can eat it, 

wear it or listen 
to it, it isn't an 

emergency and 

shouldn't be put 

on credit. 



Unfortunately, spending on 
seemingly small purchases, often 
non-emergency items, can add up 
quickly and throw budgets into 
havoc, say debt counselors. 

That's why students should get 
in the habit now of taking steps to 
cut spending and reduce their 
debt, says Tess Van Duvall, debt 
management consultant at Emory 



University. 

Laying a foundation for good 
financial health while in college 
can make life easier after gradua- 
tion, she says. 

"Whether they are 18-year old 
freshmen getting their first credit 
card or among the older students 
returning to campus, many stu- 
dents find themselves facing an 
array of financial obligations," 
says Van Duvall. 

"Students need to realize that 
they are entering a time of limit- 
ed income and maximum expen- 
ditures, so cutting costs in lots of 
areas can only add to their t man- 
ual well-being," she says. 

Van Duvall gives the following 
tips on how students can better 
manage their finances and avoid 
long-term debt during those early 
career years: 

•Eliminate or reduce credit card 
balances. 

"As a student with limited 
income, the last thing you need is 
to be paying past debts," says 
Van Duvall. 

•If you have a credit card or stu- 
dent loans, learn how to read a 
credit report. 

"If mere are errors on your 
credit card report, they need to be 
corrected, because it can affect 
your credit card rating and even 
keep you from getting lower 



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interest rate loans," says Van 
Duvall. 

Many lending organizations are 
adopting a practice called "credit 
scoring," which judges each indi- 
vidual student borrower, instead 
of lumping students from one 
university into the same financial 
lending category. 

With credit scoring, says Van 
Duvall, "one 30-day late pay- 
ment can make a difference in 
your loan interest rate." 

•Be aware of credit card annual 

interest rates, and remember the 

real cost of using a credit card. 
"When students are tempted to 

make a $1,000 purchase with a 
credit card, they should remem- 
ber that the annual interest on 
even a 12 percent APR card 
pushes the price to $1,120," says 
Van Duvall. 

"Always think of the total cost 
of a purchase and ask, 'Do I still 
want this?" 

•If you can eat it, wear it or lis- 
ten to it, it isn't an emergency and 
shouldn't be put on credit. 

•If possible, pay more than the 
minimum monthly payments to 
creditors. 

Van Duvall also advises stu- 
dents to be budget conscious 
about little things, such as buying 
frozen pizza instead of take-out, 
taking advantage of on-campus 
and free entertainment and send- 
ing e-mail versus making long- 
distance calls. 

But her number one piece of 
advice to students is to get a 
roommate instead of renting 
alone. 

"A savings of $300-5400 a 
month on rent over a three- or 
four-year period adds up to big 
bucks," she says, and can keep 
you from having to borrow more 
heavily to make ends meet. 



September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 




Sign up for senior pictures - Yearbook Office 
Sorority rush registration - 247 Gemmell 
Sorority rush orientation and informational meeting - 7 
p.m., Gemmell Multipurpose Room 
Friday 
UAB Spirit Day 

Sign up for senior pictures - Yearbook Office 
Volleyball at University of Charleston Tournament 
Saturday 

Volleyball at University of Charleston Tournament 
Tennis at Shippensburg Tournament 
Intramural field goal contest begins 
Cross Country at California 
UAB/Residence Halls volleyball tournament - all day, 
campus sand courts 
Football vs. Millersville - 7 p.m. 
Dance featuring music by "C-93 Road Show" - 9 p.m. 
to midnight, Gemmell Multipurpose Room 
I Sunday 
Tennis at Shippenburg Tournament 
Sorority formal rush parties begin: "Meet the Greeks," 
first day of formal rush - 1:30 p.m., Pierce Auditorium 
Raindate for volleyball and softball tournaments 
Monday 

Meet Your Advisor Week begins 
Hispanic Heritage Month begins 
Senior pictures taken - 262 Gemmell 
Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 



Golf at Mercyhurst Invitational 

UAB Homecoming Court Voting - 9 to 11 a.m., 

Gemmell lobby; noon to 2 p.m., outside library; 4 to 6 

p.m., Chandler lobby 

Faculty Senate meeting - 4 p.m., B-8 Chapel 

Minority Student Career Symposium - 4:30 to 11 p.m., 

250 Gemmell 

Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

Tuesday 

Senior pictures taken - 262 Gemmell 

Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 

UAB Homecoming Court voting - 9 to 11 a.m., 

Gemmell lobby; noon to 2 p.m., outside library; 4 to 6 

p.m., Chandler lobby 

Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday Inn 

Volleyball vs. California - 7 p.m. 

Wednesday 

Senior pictures taken - 262 Gemmell 

Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 

UCM Book Review Series - noon, 246 Gemmell 

Activities Day - 1 to 4 p.m., Gemmell complex 

UAB Homecoming Court voting - 1 to 4 p.m., outside 

Gemmell 

Tennis vs. Slippery Rock - 3 p.m. 

UAB Homecoming float meeting - 6 p.m., 246 

Gemmell 

SCT Speaker Series - 7 p.m., Hart Chapel 

UAB Coffee House - 8 p.m., Gemmell Rotunda 

UAB Talent Night - 8 p.m., Gemmell Rotunda 



EiaaaEipjBjajefaaBjaaBJBafaaa^ 



Sixties 

Contiued 
from page 10 



"Mystery Train" is a film mat 
shows the roots of rock and roll 
from railroad workmen singing 
as they pounded ties and blue- 
grass playing on a banjo to 
"oldies but goodies" and electric 
distortion. The film "Kicking the 
Jams" shows some of the recent 
happenings in rock and roll and 
discusses the loss of so many 
rock icons at early ages, such as 
Bob Marley, Jim Morrison, Jimi 
Hendrix and Elvis Presley. 

The hall of fame is located on 
the top floor. A walk up a spiral 
staircase brings you to a dimly lit 
room with several television 
monitors on black walls. Lights 
illuminate the names and signa- 
tures of all of the inductees from 
the Allman Brothers to Frank 
Zappa, while the television mon- 
itors cycle through photos of the 
inductees. 

The Rock and Roll Hall of 
Fame and Museum is an exciting 
place to enjoy the history of rock 
and roll, and the journey through 
the turbulent 60's makes the visit 
well worthwhile. But you'd bet- 
ter hurry because "I Want To 
Take You Higher" ends February 
28. 



flctiuities Day 

Wednesday, September 17 
at Gemmel Student Center 



1 to 2:15 p.m., Blues Guitarist, 

K. J. James 

1 to 4 p.m., Caricaturists 

1 to 4 p.m., Organizational Exhibits 

1 to 4 p.m., UfiB Giue-R-UJay and 

flctiuities 
9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Book Center Sales 




IV^l 



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The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 



Welcome Back To 





September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Pagel? 



' 



Clarion University 



«i 



How fresh o Lord, howsweet 









+ 




■w^^ "" 1 " ■ ■ ■■ ■ - 




Photos by Tim Emanuel, Photography Editor 





and clean are thy returns! 



** 





Quote from The Flower by George Herbert 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 




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I 



Page 17 



The Clarion Call 



ENTERTAINMENT. 



life «vf 
tfeuu 







ONOW THAT'S WHAT I CALL A MEGABUDGET/Q LOOK/ THE HERO IS 
SQUINTING/ HE'S REALLY DETERMINED NOW/ QOH OH/ THE WAy THAT 
VILLAIN ISGLOATINGJ'LLBEThEHAS PLANTED A POWERFUL TIME-BOMB.' 
□AMAZlNG/THAT FRAIL- LOOklNG ACTRESS IS A kUNG-FU MASTER/ 

□ W4/THAT SEWER IS WELL- LI T/Q^OW THERE'S SOMETHI/06!*OU 
DONT SEE EVERJ3 PAb ! THE HUMANS HEAP IS MORPHlNG INTO THE ALIENS 
HEftC?/ n ISrO'T THE, HONAAls) SPIRIT 6REAT? LOOK AT THAT PLUCKS KIP 
PUrv\p^Gm9FlSTiN)THEAIRAMC>SAyiiOe u yESSSS. / // /, nOHrJO/ 
THAT POG IS GOING TO BEBURNEQ ALl\/£ IN THE FlER^ lNF£RMo/ WILL 
IT BE ABLE TO LEAP TO SAFETY INTHE r0iacOFTlME?DyOU CAW TELL 
THE VILLAIN \S 6ETHNG ANNOYED— LOO^HOW HE'S CLENCHING HIS TEETH 
SO HIS JAW MUSCUETW ITCHES «□ SPOT THAT PRODUCT PLACEMENT/ 
nLlSTENTOTHEAOOl6r>JCEHOOT/n L lSTEKJTOTHE AUDIENCE BARK! 
nLlSTDO TO THE AUDIENCE HAVING C0NVERSAT10MS TOTALLY UNftELATEo 
TO THE MOVIE 7 O WOW! SON\E OF THOSE COMPUTE R12EP SPECIAL EFFECTS 
ARE SO IMPRESSWe, IT'S ASHAMETHEy PIQnJ'T HAVETIME TO F/X THE 
ONES THAT PlOrO T WORVC / O AM * CRAZ^, OR WERE HER BREASTS' SMALLER 
Lft?TSOrV\NAER?QTHEy WAVE NOTHlrOG TO VO WITH THE ONSCREEN STosy, 
BUT AftEh)TTHOS€ POP S0W6S OlOTWE SoUlJDTRACfc CATTCH^ ?QCAlO iJOU 
T£LLU)HEn) THE ACTORS HATE THE Ll/sJESTHEy ACE SMl*6? X' LL /"^ 
BET ***> CAW /pHE*, IT MAS* 6E LOOK* WttVTlNfc, BUT IT TESTED / / / 
THROOGHTHeROOF/DTHAiOfeeoPTHATv/EfOTiLATioio over IS / // 
eiGEr4o06H TO C&AWLTHR0U6H/QS0RE THERE'S ?s)OSToR^ Qirr / // 
HOvO ABQUTTWT EXPLODING FIREBALL? D SURE THERE'S nJO 
CHARACTERIZATION), BUT HovO ABOUT THAT COMPuTER'AkJiMATEP 
0EBR\S HORTUkJGTOVjOARP THE C^M6RA?QSUR£ THERE'S rOO 
Emotion, But HOW ABout-that-toRn) Bi-OuSE^n willthere 

BE A HAPpy ENDING? OOR MARKET RESEARCH SAyS iteS ' 

□ WHEN »T % S AtLSAtD ArOP PoNE,THAT WAS A PRETTY DAftrJ 
EkJTERtAiiO\w6 F Li Cfc » □ ANo YOU'RE OM TW HOUQS CU££&t THE 

6RAV6 ' 



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September 11, 1997 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 




As he read the headline in horror, Larry knew that now 
he'd HAVE to take Bertha to the prom. 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 



^NlDERjHAtS 





The Amputation Diet Plan 



September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 18 



ENTERTAINMENT] 





Page 19 



The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 



I didn't say we should see other people. I said 
I should." 



LIFE »M 

HtUL 



6£o«N«*6 



-4- 




CALLING ALL YOUTH/ 

So You Want 
to Get Pierced 




"Well, y'see Dad, it wasn't so much a party as it 
was a urn... a celebration of um... of life". 



Q: ISM'T Piercing Strict ls Foe 
FETISH-GUUS, Sfctf FREAKS, AND 
S6ETHINJ6 CARNIVAL- WORKERS? 

A: mot anymore / thmks to 

MOPERnJ ALIEAJATfOW /Q\/p 

Boredom, aeSTeftpAy's 1 

CREEPS PS<1CH0PATH0LO6y 
HAS 8EENJ MA6/C/Q LLy 

TRAMSFoRA/iEc? /ajto rop/oy£ 
WHOLESOME TRE^Py MIDDLE- 
CLAST ycVTH AFFEcr/qr/OA// 
Q: WILL I EVER Row o^r of 

6op*j parts to Pierce? 

A'. >F IT PANGlES, PROTRUDES, J1G6LES, OR THR06S WE 
CAN IMPARLANCE, PRILL, OB. STAft it/ 





O: DOES IT MURT TO GET PlERCED? 
A: AS MIGHT BE EXPECTED, AN<3 SUOOEN 
PERFORATING, PUNCTURin)G ( OR.SKEu3€Ri<J6 
OF SENSITIVE HUMANi TISSUE MIGHT 
LEAD TO WHAT SOKE CALL "PAlNJ." WE 
LIKE To REFER to I T AS " tmat sharp 
UtOPLCASAiOT TINGLING SENSATION." 
O: ISN'T PIERCING JvST A FANca UORD 
FOR SELF- N^UTiLATlOiO? 

ft". WEH>, SELF-MOTI.lP.TioM IS SowtntulG 
yOUOOTOaOURSELF. w.TwpiGRc^^ 
W e DO |T TO^OO, AND i* OU M6 REl* ' 
PA^US.CowveoH6RowuP! oont <j u 

LlAMT TO fcEAU/J FREAfc OUT MOMAmo DAD 7 



/vcw you cm wear your abused childhood 

AS A PERMANENT FASHION STATEMENT!!! 



So Come om ' Be A SPoer' 



ENTERTAINMENT 



THE Crossword 



AUHUSS 
1 Woven structure 
4 Nora's pet 
8 Tie 

14 Worldwide gp. 

15 Ooze 

16 Special honor 

17 Part of a double 
header 

19 Made amends 

20 Kalahari — 

21 Mail 

23 Alamos or Gatos 

24 Agt. 

25 Spanish river 
29 — the mark 

(obeyed) 
32 Le Gallienne 
and Gabor 

34 Actor Harrison 

35 Composure 

38 Racing sled 

39 Corn or form 
start 

40 Daniel Boone, 
for example 

42 Made into law 

44 Infant food 

45 Readies for the 
drive 

47 Incense 

48 Summer along 
the Somme 

49 Short 
performance 

50 Pub potions 

51 Cincinnati nine 

53 Spain's last 
queen 

54 "Le — " 
(Massenet 
opera) 

56 Lock of hair 
58 Family circie 

members 
62 Confront 
65 Greek 

67 Arthurian 
woman 

68 Great Lake 

69 — la la 

70 Triumphant one 

71 Chair 

72 Tennis division 

DOWN 
1 Coil 




SIGNE 

PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

Philadelphia 

USA 



uMMewW* Gr'ep 




1997 Tnbutie Media Services. Inc. 
All lights reserved. 



2 Author Wiesel 

3 Marshy places 

4 Houston pro 

5 Denominations 

6 Oolong 

7 Garments 

8 Bubbly 

9 Old newspaper 
section, briefly 

10 That's— " 

11 Mover 

12 Ripen 

13 A Kennedy 
18 Grasped 
22 Stage show 

26 Bestial 

27 Fail to follow suit 

28 Compounds of 
elements 

29 Certain dancer 

30 Sedative 

31 Ran off 
33 Penn or 

Connery 

36 Baseball team 

37 Apiarist 



ANSWERS 



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PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

Philadelphia 
USA 



41 Control straps 


59 Insects 


1 


43 Baby's place 


60 Telegraph 


i 


46 Hides the loot 


61 Ella's forte 


8 


52 Tankard's kin 


62 Not many 




54 Eyelashes 


63 — Baba 




55 Cove 


64 Container 




57 Magic charm 


66 Before, to a bard 






'^!&& 



STAMPEDE 





'MEN IN BLACK' 
WILL SMITH 



WSTOIBUTEO BY TRaiME MEOU SERVICES 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 11, 1997 




September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 






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Call On You 



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Photography 
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What are you most looking forward to about the new 

year at C.U.P.? 




Lisa Robinson, Senior, Secondary English Ed. 

"I am looking forward to working with my new 

sorority sisters of Alpha Kappa Alpha and paying 

off one of my many credit cards." 




Carrie Huber, Junior, El Ed/Early Childhood 
"Looking forward to having one less year to 
come to Clarion and get on with my goals." 




Krista Archiable, Sophomore, El Ed/Early 

Childhood 

"ALF week! Autumn Leaf Festival is such a 

good time!" 




Keith Kuhn, Freshman, Information Science 

"I'm looking forward to meeting new people and 

eventually fitting in and having fun." 





Page 23 



The Clarion Call 



September 11 1997 



+- 




Lori Hynes, Sophomore, Communication 
"Getting better grades and having a better swim 



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Mo' I rt/tfl <•! "> orll 



the Clarion Call 



Wl J IffttJqsS 
September 11, 1997 



SPORTS 



Golden E agles begin '97 season with no. 4 ranking 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 



The Clarion University football 
team will kickoff it's most antici- 
pated season in years this 
Saturday when it travels to 
Millersville for a 7:00 matchup. 

The excitement surrounding 
Clarion comes on the heels of last 
year's banner season, which saw 
the 11-3 Golden Eagles claim a 
tie for the PSAC-West crown and 
advance to the national semifi- 
nals before falling to Northern 
Colorado 19-18. 

With a slew of talented players 
returning, the Golden Eagles 
share the #4 ranking with 
Pittsburgh St. (Kansas) in the 
official NCAA Division II poll. 

"Last year was a great year, but 
now it's a new season," said 
fourth-year head coach Malen 
Luke. "Each year is different 
because the team is made up of 
the players' personalities." 

The most notable players to 
graduate from last year's squad 
are defensive back Kim Niedbala 
and running back Steve Witte. 
Niedbala was Clarion's deven- 
sive backbone at the free safety 
position, registering 100 solo 
tackles and 66 assists. Witte was 
equally important to the offense, 
as he rushed for 1,352 yards and 
23 touchdowns. 

However, with Witte's excep- 
tion, the Clarion offense returns 
many of the skill players that 
helped them to a national-best 
43.5 points per game. 

Potential Harlon Hill candidate 
Chris Weibel returns as the 



Golden Eagles signal caller. The 
senior quarterback threw for 
2,880 yards and 32 touchdowns 
last season. Weibel 's primary 
targets also return, including 
senior Mark Witte and junior 
speedster Alvin Slaughter. The 
two wideouts combined to catch 
58 passes for 833 yards and 15 
TD's. Pete Yurisnec is the pro- 
jected starter at tight end. 



Although the Golden Eagles 
return pre season All-America 
Mike Sipos, a two-year starter, 
the rest of last year's starters have 
graduated. 

"Our young players are skilled, 
but at the same time, they haven't 
had experience in game situa- 
tions," said Luke. "I have confi- 
dence in our offensive line. They 
will keep working hard and pro- 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 



The 4th ranked Golden Eagles prepare to face PSAC-East 
contender Millersville this Saturday. 

The running game looks equal- gressing from week to week." 



ly threatening. Senior Ron 
DeJidas will look to add to his 
1,815 career rushing yards, 
which rank him 5th on Clarion's 
all-time list, and versatile junior 
Jamie Sickeri will have increased 
responsibility after starting 11 
games in '96. The Golden Eagles 
have plenty of reserve strength is 
junior Godfrey Bethea, sopho- 
more Kervin Charles, the reign- 
ing PS AC 110 high hurdles 
champion, and transfer Keonte 
Campbell. 

The biggest question mark for 
the Clarion offense heading into 
the season is the offensive line. 



"Quick" and "Athletic" are 
the buzz words that describe 
the defense, where Clarion 
allowed opponents a mere 2.8 
yards per carry a year ago. 

"Our defense is faster than its 
ever been," complemented 
Luke. "The defense is smaller 
than other defenses in our con- 
ference, but we should be able 
to compensate with our speed 
and quickness. We'll be able 
to do certain things, but there 
might be things we can't do," 
Luke adds. "We have to be 
smart as coaches and put our 
players in position so they 



have a chance to be success- 
ful." 

Supplying much of the quick- 
ness will be cornerbacks Chad 
Wissner and sophomore 
Kejuan Culbreth. Wissner, a 
junior from Blackhawk H.S. 
had 51 tackles and 2 intercep- 
tions last season. Culbreth 
matched Wissner in INT's and 
posted 41 stops. Juniors 
Cornelius Edwards and Brad 
Geer return at safety, as well as 
red-shirt freshman Ryan 
Presutti. 

The linebacking corps will 
include senior Keith Kochert. 
and sophomores Brett Wiley, 
Jerry Gilchrist and Jared 
Mahon. Kockert had 49 hits, 2 
sacks, and 2 interceptions in 
'96. On the perimeter will be 
juniors Mike Maguire (53 
stops, 9 sacks), Mike Williams, 
and Phil Rayford. Senior Drew 
Seaman and sophomore Justin 
MillerC 42 tackles, 7 sacks) 
return to anchor the defensive 
front. 

On special teams, two-year 
Tyler Palisin returns as place- 
kicker. Palison has connected 
on 12 of 16 field goals and 80 
of 95 PAT's throughout his 
career. Freshman Jason Flora 
has the inside track on the 
punting position. 

The schedule will certainly 
lest the Eagles this season. 
Aside from playing the always- 
tough PSAC-West. opening 
opponent Millersville is a con- 
tender in the PSAC-East, and 
#7 Cal-Davis will invade 
Memorial Field on Sept. 27th. 



Witte named Burger King National Scholar Athlete 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

Clarion wide receiver Mark 
Witte was recognized Saturday 
during ADC TV's college foot- 
ball telecasts as Burger King 
"Scholar Athlete of the Week." 

Witte, along with seven other 
college footbal players including 
Tennessee's Hiesman Trophy 
candidate Peyton Manning were 
honored by Burger King 
Corporation for their prominent 
academic and athletic achieve- 
ments as well as community ser- 
vice. Burger King will make a 
donation of $10,000 to the gener- 
al scholarship fund of Clarion 
University in Mark Witte's name. 




Clarion WR Mark Witte 

"It is a real honor to receive the 
Burger King award," said Witte. 
"The award recosmizes excel- 



lence in the classroom and com- 
munity service, which are the 
things that last a lifetime." 

Mark's brother Steve Witte , A 
three time Clarion All-American, 
received the award last year, 
making them the first brother 
combination to do so. 

"I think this award really goes 
to my parents, who I love, 
admire and respect. They 
instilled the values that have 
made us so successful. 

MarkWitte is a 6'4" 202 pound 
senior form Warren, PA and 
Eisenhower H.S. He is a Finance 
major with a minor in Computer 
Information Systems with an 
overall grade point average of 



3.71 (4.0). Mark also volunteers 
for the football team's 
Elementary School Youth 
Program as well as the team's 
annual "Spaghetti Dinner", 
which raises money to send 
needy kids to camp. Witte is also 
a three time CUP and PS AC 
"scholar athlete". 

Last season Mark caught 30 
passes for 365 yards and 10 
touchdowns, averaging 12.2 
yards per catch and 26 yards per 
game. His 13 career TD catches 
ranks 6th on the all-time Clarion 
list, while his 10 TD grabs in "96 
are 4th best in school history. 

The award presentation is ten- 
tatively set for October 1 1 . 




This Week at 

Millersville 



Millersville at a glance 

With 21 lettermen and 12 

starters returning from last year's 

64 squad, Millersville should 

present a stiff challenge for the 

Golden Eagles in the season 

opener for both teams. The 

Marauder lineup features a blend 

of seasoned veterans and inexpe 

rienced players. 

Highlighting the roster is 

junior wide receiver Mike 

McFestridge. Nicknamed "Mr. 

Mc-Go-To", McFestridge broke 

the school season pass reception 

record in '96 with 72 catches for 

860 yards. He also led the team 

in all purpose yardage with 
1,117. 

The inexperience of the 
Millersville offense can be seen 
at the quarterback position. The 
Marauders are looking to replace 
three -year starter Greg Moylan, 
who graduated widi 12 school 
passing records. Sophomore 
Ryan Swailes could get the nod. 
At 6'5", 200 lbs., Swailes is big, 
but has only attempted ten pass- 
es in his college career. The 
Marauders will look for their big 
offensive line to provide some 
protection for the young QB. 

Among the defensive leaders 
are DB Jamal Battle and LB 
Steve Reinoehl. Two-year 
starter Battle earned second team 
PSAC-East honors by breaking 
up 14 passes while Reinoehl 
recorded 107 tackles and 4 
sacks. 

Head Coach Dr. Gene A. 
Carpenter is entering his 28th 
season at the school and is Uiird 
on -the Division II active wins list 
with 182 

NOTES: Millersville leads the 
ail-time series 4-3, winning 40- 
27 in '94 and 41-35 in '95. 
Clarion last beat Millers vile 
|25-24 in 1977. 



September 11, 1997 

Girls off to 2-0 start 



The Clarion Call 



Page 25 



Clarion netters exepect another quality season 



by Bethany Boal 
Sports Writer 



Clarion University's Women's 
tennis team has five starters 
returning and look to another 
successful season. Terry Acker, 
the netters head coach for eight 
years now, led Clarion to an 
overall record of 5-4 and a third 
place finish at the 1996 PSAC 
Championships. She is looking 
forward to another quality sea- 
son. "We have real leaders on 
this team," Acker stated. "They 
really stepped up last season and 
gave us the consistency that was 
lacking to return to the top in the 
PSAC." 

Returning starters who will lead 
the way their senior seasons are 
Kristen Golia (Altoona), 
Maureen "Mimi" Williams 
(Bakerstown), and Amy O'Neal 
(Everett). Golia played #3 sin- 
gles last year and posted an 8-4 
record. She is expected to move 
up to #1 this season. She has a 
career singles record of 30-19 at 
Clarion. Williams was a PSAC 
runner-up at #6 singles in 1996 
and posted an overall record of 8- 
3. She is expected to move up to 
#4 singles this season. Her career 
singles record is 33-12. O'Neal 
is expected to start the year play- 
ing #6 singles. She played #2 



singles last year and posted a 3-6 
overall record. Amy has a career 
singles record of 10-27. 

Also returning are sophomores 
Cassie Baker (Beaver) and 
Rachael Link (New Kensington- 
Valley HS). Baker, as a fresh- 



Shaffer (Donegal). Kylee 
Johnson (West Chester) and Lori 
Ostapchenko (Monaca) are all 
expected to see time this season. 
Shaffer has been very impressive 
in the pre-scason, earning the #1 
singles spot on the team. She 



gles. She is now at #8 singles. 
Junior Carly Canicr is sidelined 
with an injury. She saw some 
time in 1996 for the Golden 
Eagles. 

The doubles tandems lit 
expected to be Golia and Shatter 






Clarion seniors Kristen Golia, Maureen "Mimi" Williams and Amy O'Neal look to lead an 
experienced Golden Eagle lineup in hopes of capturing the PSAC crown. 



man, played #1 singles in 1996 
and battled to a 2-8 overall slate. 
She will start the year at #3 sin- 
gles. Also as a freshman, Link 
was a PSAC runner-up at #5 sin- 
gles. She had an overall record 
of 7-4 in singles play. She will 
start at #5 singles this season. 
Freshman newcomers Amy 



was a PIAA State Qualifier in her 
senior year and was a 3 time 
Keystone Conference Singles 
Champion. Currently at #7 sin- 
gles, Ostapchenko played #1 sin- 
gles at Monaca and was 8-4 her 
senior year. Johnson had a 15-3 
singles record her senior year at 
Bishop Shanahan High at #2 sin- 



at #1, Williams and Link at #2, 
and O'Neal and Baker at #3. 
Golia was 8-2 in doubles play 
last season, while Williams and 
Link combined for a 6-5 slate at 
#3. O'Neal and Baker combined 
for a 6-4 slate in 1996 in doubles 
play. 

"I believe our top 6 players 



Burn's team growing up in tough PSAC-West 



by Tom mi Hearn 
Sports Writer 



The 1997 women's volleyball 
season should once again prove 
to be exciting. 

With no seniors on the roster, 
the Golden Eagles return six 
starters from the 1996 season. 
The team will be relying on plen- 
ty of young talent. 



"Last season we had to place 
our freshmen into leadership 
roles," explained Jodi Pezek 
Bums, the third year head coach. 
"Because of the situation, we 
now have the experience needed 
to win the close matches." 

Burns, an All-Region player for 
Clarion from 1987-1990, is used 
to sitting at the top of the PSAC- 
West conference. In four sea- 



Sports Trivia 



When Pitt-Penn State renewed 
their rivalry last weekend, it was 
their 93rd meeting. 

What is the longest rivalry in 
college football? 

f answer next weekJ 



sons, Clarion held a 99-52 record 
led by Bums and won the PSAC 
title in 1988. Bums plans to 
implement that same success 
with her young team. 

Sophomore Jessa Canfield, the 
second team PSAC-West selec- 
tion is expected to lead the way 
for Clarion. 

Junior tri-captains Tracy 
Barnett, Christy Boes, and 
Mandy Kirby are also returning 
for the '97 season. Barnett fin- 
ished last season with 211 kills 
and 235 digs. Bocs finished with 
44 service aces and 256 digs 
while Kirby led the squad with 
382 digs, 179 kills, and 41 ser- 
vice aces. 

Beth Brandstalter. Curtisy 
Hilton, Brooke Pazon, and Jamie 



Soboleski round out the strong 
Golden Eagle starting lineup. 

Hoping to make an impact in 
their first year are Amanda Baer, 
lane Daeschner, Jenny Huter. 
Jamie Mars, Lauren Orner, 
Jennifer Salley, and Mia Sarazen. 

"We are really excited about 
this season," said Burns. "We 
now have the veterans who know 
what needs to be accomplished in 
order to win in this conference." 

Clarion posted a 13-20 overall 
record and a 3-7 mark in the 
mused PSAC West in 1996, 
despite the young talent. 

Clarion faces the California 
Vulcans in it's PSAC home open- 
er on September 16 at Tippin 
Gym. Clarion's hosts Slippery 
Rock on October 7. 



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have the experience and ability 
to match up against anyone on 
our schedule this season," Acker 
remarked. "We have strong com- 
petition up and down the lineup. 
That competition within our team 
will improve our competition 
against other teams, and should 
make us stonger when we head to 
the PSAC Championships." 

The Golden* Eagles played host 
to Mercyhurst in the season 
opener and dropped the Lakers 4- 
3. Clarion dominated doubles 
play, getting wins out of all three 
tandems. Kristen Golia and Amy 
Shaffer beat Lauren Diulus and 
Kim Lilly 8-2 while Mimi 
Williams and Rachael Link won 
9-8 (7-3). Cassie Baker and Amy 
O'Neal finished off Kylelynn 
Sanson and Jessi Stout 8-4 to 
take the victory. Link and O'Neal 
also recorded wins in singles 
play. 

Grove City College made the 
trip to Clarion on Saturday and 
fell to the Golden Eagles 4-3. 

Shaffer, Williams, and O'Neal 
all landed wins in singles play, 
leading Clarion to a quick 2-0 
start on the season. 

Clarion travels East to play in 
the Shippensburg Tournament 
this weekend and returns home to 
entertain Slippery Rock on 
Wednesday, September 17. 



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Page 27 «l 



Nellis takes over wrestling program chiebowski wins ncaa Division n 



by Chris Pfeil 
.Assistant Sports Editor 

After Jack Davis resigned as 
head wrestling coach last April, 
Clarion Athletic Director Bob 
Carlson did not have to look far 
to fill the void. 

Ken Nellis was selected to run 
one of the elite Division I pro- 
grams in the nation. Nellis, 34, 
wrestled at Clarion from 1981- 
1986, and served as Davis' assis- 
tant since the 1990 season. 

Nellis named former Olympian 
Rob Eiter as assistant coach. 
Eiter served on Davis' staff the 
last four seasons. 

Nellis is looking forward to 
continuing to work with Eiter, 
"I'm excited that Rob has accept- 
ed the position as assistant coach. 
He's already been a great asset to 
our program. The respect he has 
from the athletes and his coach- 
ing on the mat gives the program 
a big lift. We're fortunate to have 
him." 

The Nellis/Eiter coaching com- 
bination will have their work cut 
out for them to keep the Golden 
Eagle program at the top. They 
lost two of Clarion's all-time 
best, Sheldon Thomas (1995 
National Champion) and Bryan 
Stout (4-ume All-American) to 
graduation. 

However, Nellis is optomistic 




Ken Nellis begins new era 
of Golden Eagle wrestling 

about the future of the program. 
According to Nellis, "I'd say aca- 
demics and discipline are keys. 
Clarion is known for having tal- 
ented wrestlers, but also for being 
a scrappy, hard nosed team. That 
is the type of team we expect to 
continue." 

Athletic Director Bob Carlson 
is also optomistic about the new 
era for Clarion wrestlinu, 
"Together, we know Ken and 
Rob will help Clarion wrestling 
make a smooth transition into the 
1997-98 season. They were 
already actively involved in 
recruiting and summer camps. 
Clarion wrestling is in good 
hands. 

Nellis will become Clarion's 
fourth coach since 1959. Frank 



Lignelli coached from 1959- 
1966. Coaching legend Bob 
Bubb took over in 1966 and 
established Clarion as a national 
powerhouse during his 26-year 
reign, which ended in 1992. 
Davis look over for Bubb and 
continued the Clarion tradition 
before retiring following the 
1997 campaign. 

Nellis had an outstanding 
career at Clarion. He was a four- 
time NCAA qualifyer and com- 
piled a 113-28-5 record during 
his career as a Golden Eagle. 

Nellis was co-captain of the 
1986 team that finished 17-0-1 in 
dual meets, earning a final rank- 
ing of third in the nation. 

Nellis is thankful for his oppor- 
tunity, "I'd like to thank Dr. 
Reinhard and Mr. Carlson for 
having faith in my abilities and 
giving me this great opportunity. 
I'd also like to thank coach Bubb 
for his leadership and support of 
me throughout my wrestling days 
here, and in bringing me back 
here seven years ago as an assis- 
tant coach. And of course I'd like 
to thank coach Davis for his sup- 
port and help, especially the last 
five years." 

Nellis is a native of Glenshaw 
PA, and a Shaler High School 
graduate. Ken resides in Clarion 
with his wife Cindy and daughter 
Brianna. 



batting crown with .480 average 



by Chris Pfeil 
Assistant Sports Editor 

When the NCAA released the 
final 1997 Division II statistics. 
Clarion University Designated 
Hitler Chad Chlebowski's name 
was at the top of the batting list. 
Chlebowski hit .490 (47-96) as 
a junior, edging out Tim Dubrule 
(West Texas A&M) and Chris 
Madson (Assumption), who hit 
.488 and.480 respectively. 

The Derby, NY, native has ter- 
rorized PS AC- West pitchers 
since his arrival during the 1995 
season. Chlebowski hit .392 as a 
freshman, with 5 doubles, 1 
homerun, and 10 runs batted in. 
Despite battling a knee injury his 
sophomore year, he hit .600 (21- 
35), with 4 doubles, 1 homerun, 
and 23 rbi's. 

Chlebowski was named first 
team Atlantic Region and was a 
first team PSAC-West selection. 
He says the key to his success is 
patience, "Teams started to pitch 
around me, so I had to wait for 
something that I could drive." 

The Lake Shore (NY) High 
School graduate is expected to 
lead the way for the Golden 




NCAA Division II batting 
champ Chad Chlebowski 

Eagles when they open the 1998 
season in March in Cocoa Expo, 
Florida. 

However, Chlebowski feels no 
added pressure as he will be 
expected to carry the offensive 
load for the Golden Eagles. "I've 
proven myself, so now all that I 
have to do is play the game how 
I want to. The awards are nice, 
but I want to end my senior sea- 
son with a trip to the playoffs. 
Winning is the important tiling." 



For up to date Golden Eagle Sports Information, 
call the GOLDEN EAGLE HOTLINE: 226-2079 



I nl mm ii nils and Recreation News 



The new school year has 
arrived and it is time for another 
excting season of intramurals. 
Beach volleyball is already 
underway and will continue 
throughout the month of 
September. You can see these 
talented teams in action Monday 
through Thursday from 4-6 p.m. 
on the Campbell Hall courts. 
Flag football and Tennis will 
begin regular season play on 
Wednesday, September 10. The 
"passing only" concept will be 
used for both mens and womens 
flag football leagues and games 
will be held at the stadium recre- 
ation fields Monday through 
Thursday from 6-8 p.m. Mens 
and womens singles and mens 
and womens doubles tennis 
leagues will be offered with a 
round robin schedule and single 
elimination tournament. 

Matches will take place Monday 
through Thursday from 9- 1 1 p.m. 
at the Campbell Hall tennis 
courts. These activities may have 
started, but it is never too late to 
get involved. Late rosters are 
still being accepted for all 



activites. Call 226-2349. 

Back by popular - demand, last 
year's two new additions, 
"Women's Power Hour" and 
"Aqua Aerobics" will continue 
throughout the 1997-98 school 
year. Women's Power Hour was 
designed for women who are 
interested in strength trainging. 
If you would like a strength train- 
ing program, but are intimidated 
by the equipment, now you have 
the opportunity to work with a 
certified coach on a program 
structured just for you. The 
"Power Hour" is held Tuesdays 
and Thursday from 5-6 p.m. in 
the Tippin Fitness Center. Aqua 
Aerobics will continue on 
Sundays at 6 p.m., and by 
request, the intramural program 
has added a second class to fit 
into your busy schedule. This 
additional class will be held on 
Wednesday evenings at 8 p.m. 

Watch for many more funfilled 
intramural spOrts and recreation 
activities beginning soon! Don't 
forget to enter our Field Goal 
Contest on Saturday, December 
13. For more information and to 



sign up, stop by room 117 Tippin 
or call 226-2349. The intramural 
staff is looking forward to anoth- 
er exciting and fun-filled year! 

HOW TO GET INVOLVKI) 

Early registration dates have 
been established for each sport. 
The schedule of these dates can 
be found on the Fall 1997 
Intramural Schedule as well as on 
the Intramural Bulletin Board 
located outside the intramural 
office in Tippin Gym. 
Registration rosters may be sub- 
mitted personally to room 117 
Tippen, or you may drop them off 
in the intramural deposit box 
located outside the IM office. 
The following steps should be 
taken to enter an intramural sport 
or recreational activity: 

1. Check the intramural bul- 
letin board for scheduled 
sports/recreation activites and 
registration deadlines. 

2. Complete a registration 
sheet and team roster for desired 
sport/recreation activity. 

*Provide names and student 
identification numbers for each 



person listed on your team roster. 

*Check the eligibility of your 
team personnel by consulting 
your IM/Rec information guide 
and the information sheet posted 
on the intramural bulletin board 
for that particular activity. 
Questions concerning eligibility 
can also be answered by the 
Intramural Director or Graduate 
Assistant. 

*Be sure to check the roster 
limits for each sport/recreation 
activity. 

3. Return the completed regis- 
tration sheet to the IM/Rec office 
or drop it in the intramural 
deposit box on or before the des- 
ignated registration deadline. 

4. Check the intramural bulletin 
board for the designated time and 
location of the team captain's 
meeting for that sport, and be 
sure to send a member of your 
team to this meeting. 

INFORMATION &■ SCHEDULES 

Schedules, scores, standings, 
and other important information 
are posted on the IM bulletin 
board outside the IM/Rec office. 



Championship T-shirts will be 
awarded to each idividual win- 
ner or member of a champi- 
onship team. If there is more 
than one division in any sport or 
recreation activity, awards will 
be given to the winners of each 
division. 





IntramuraLSc 


hedule 




Fal 


1997 




flctiuiiy: Registration due: 


Games Begin 


1. 


Beach Uolleyball 


9/2 


9/3 


2. 


Outdoor Soccer 


9/2 


9/3 


3. 


Ultimate Frisbee 


9/3 


9/4 


4. 


Closest to the Pin 9/5 


9/7 


5. 


Flag Football 


9/8 


9/9 


6. 


Tennis 


9/9 


9/18 


7. 


Field Goal Contest 9/ 12 


9/13 


8. 


I8K Relay 


9/19 


9/21 


9. 


1 Pitch Softball 


9/19 


9/21 


18 


Power Lifting 


9/22 


9-Z22 


11 


Indoor Soccer 


9/22 


9/23 


12 


1 on 1 Basketball 


9/23 


9/24 


13 


Challenge Course 


9/26 


9/27 


14 


Horseshoe 


9/38 


18/1 


15 


Golf Scramble 


.18/6 


18/7 


16 


3 on 3 Basketball 


18/7 


18/8 


17 


Tube Basketball 


18/13 


18/14 


«« 


Tug of UVar 


18/17 


IB/ 16 


19. 


BikeTtace - 


18/17 


1IP-18 


44. 


Utilleyball 


18/28 


tiihs 


21. 


Table Tennis 


18/27 


18/28 


22. 


Free Throw 


11/3 


11/4 


23. 


Floor Hockey 


11/3 


11/4 


24. 


Badminton 


11/4 


11/5 


25. 


Whiffle Ball 


11/17 


11/18 


26. 


Big Buck Contest 


12/1 


12/1 


27. 


Swim Meet 


12/1 


12/2 



+ 



CLASSIFIEDS] 



HELP WANTED 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10-$20 

per hour. Call (814) 234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FREE T-SHIRT 

+$1000 

Credit Card fundraisers for fra- 
ternities, sororities &groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext 
65. Qualified callers receive 
FREE T-SHIRT. 



Spring Break '98-Sell Trips, 

EARN CASH AND GO 

FREE! 

Student Travel Services is now 
hiring campus reps/group orga- 
nizers. Lowest rates to Jamaica, 
Mexico & Florida. Call 1-800- 
648-4849. 



PARTY, MEET PEOPLE, 
AND GET PAID 

Promote KODAK Spring Break 

trips— We'll pay you more than 

anyone else...GUARANTEED! 

NO RISK...We handle all the 

bookkeeping. 

CALL WORLD CLASS 

VACATIONS 

1-800-222-4432 

Our 21st year 



FOR SALE 



King size water bed, bookshelf 

headboard with six drawer 

pedastal. $250. Call 

226-5734. 



Sewing machine (hide-a-way) 
cabinet, 41.5"x 20.5" and 32" 
high. Tongue and groove clos- 
ing doors, shelves, thread caddy, 
adjustable free arm machine use. 
$50. 
764- 5282. 



486 Multi-Media computer- 
VGA Color Monitor, 
8 meg ram.CD Rom, Sound 
Card, Speakers, 244 Meg Hard 

Drive, Mouse, Windows, 

Encyclopedia, Games, Business, 

Educational Software. Over 400 

Programs. $425. 

(412)526-5973 



PERSONALS 



To the dance team: We bad a 

blast at the mixer- You ladies are 

great! Stop down any time. 

The Brothers of 65 



Theta Xi, 

What would you do for a buck? 

Thanks for the great time. 

The Dance Team 



To the Brothers of 05: 

I want to wish you all good luck 

this semester. Study hard, be 

good, but have lots of fun. 

Love Always, your sweetheart, 

Rae Ann 



Kim, Happy 21st Birthday! 

Hope your day is as awesome as 

you are. 

Love, Kim and Slis 



To the Brothers of in, 
Welcome back boys. I hope you 

all had a nice summer. I'm 

looking forward to an awesome 

year with you guys. Congrats to 

all the brothers nominated for 

Homecoming. Love you all, 

Your Sweetheart 
ps. Sorry about the cookies. 



To the Sisters of ZTA, 

Let's tap into a championship. 

Love, the Brothers of in 



Fall, 1997 
Rush OIK 



Congratulations to our Brothers 

on their lavalierings; Brother 

Geyer and K. Bemat, Brother 

States and C. Smeal, Brother 

Palmer and C. Sanzari, and 

Brother Wonders and L. Cisek. 

Love, 

your OIK Brothers 



To our lovely Sweetheart Karen! 
Welcome back and congratula- 
tions on your engagement with 
Squirrel. 
Love, OIK Brothers 



Be on top of the world! 
Rush AIT! 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau 
would like to welcome everyone 
back to school and wish every- 
one good luck this semester! 



A mixer with IX...What a great 
way to start the semester. 

Thanks neighbors! 
Love, the Sisters of AIT 



Hope the AITs and KAP's have 

lots of fun with their float! I 

know it will be awesome! 

Love, your sweetheart, 

Daria 



Dear KAP, 

Welcome Back-Hope you all had 

a super summer! I missed you 

all! Congratulations to Beth Ann 

and Mike on their lavalier, I 

wish you both the very best! 

Job well done to the '97 Spring 

pledge class on their overall 

G.P.A.-you guys are awesome! 

Let's all have a great semester- 

KAP's are the Best! Rush KAP! 

Love, your Sweetheart, 

Daria 



Lordy, Lordy, Lordy,...Look 

who's 21! 

Happy Birthday Keira!! 

Love, James 



Dear OA0, 
Welcome Back Guys! I wish 
everyone the best of luck this 
semester and am looking for- 
ward to partying at your new 
house. Love, 
Rochelle 



0OA would like to welcome 
everyone back! 



0OA, Welcome back ladies! I 
hope you had a great summer 
and are ready for another awe- 
some year. You are the best and 
I love you! Your Sweetheart, 
Marcus 



Marcus, We ALL missed you 

this summer, Sweetheart! 

Love, OOA 



Theta Phi Alpha would like to 

congratulate its new Executive 

Board: Pres.-Lis Davis, V. Pres.- 

Dawn Bricker, Rec. Sec- Lauren 

Berenbrock, Treasurer- Jaimie 

Friday, Rush- Veronica Beck, 

Panhel Delegate-Teva T. and 

Marshal- Missy Chronister. 

Good luck ladies. 



Theta Phi Alpha wishes all the 

Rushees good luck during 

formal rush. 



Karen, Congratulations on your 
engagement. We hope you and 
Chris have the best of every- 
thing. Love, your 60 Sisters. 



Christy, Congratulations on your 

lavalier. We're so happy for 

you! 

Love, your BOA Sisters 

Good Luck to all the sororities 

during formal rush. The sisters 

ofeOA 



To whom it may concern: 

We would appreciate the return 

of our banner and mailbox. 

Thanx!! The Sisters of 0OA 



THETA PHI ALPHA- 
WHATARUSH!!! 

The Sisters of AOE would like 

to welcome everyone back. 

Have a Great semester! 



We would like to welcome all 

freshmen to participate in Fall 

Rush '97 

From the Sisters of AOE 



Happy 21st Birthdays Cara and 

Amber! Have fun at the bars! 

Love, Your AOE Sisters 



Annie, 

Happy Birthday! Only one year 

to go, then you can stay after 

work and PARTY! 

Love your AOE Sisters 



To the Brothers ofOIand 

IOE, 

We had a blast last Thursday! 

Thanks for the fun time! 

Love, the Sisters of AOE 



Happy 21st Birthday, Ashley 

Susan Friters!!! You're finally 

legal! 

Love, your Sisters 



Welcome back Phi Sigma 

Kappa. I'm looking forward to 

many great times. I love you 

guys. 

Your Sweetheart, Karen 



Hey Geoff- 
Happy Birthday with lots of love 
from Sara and your Brothers. 



To the Brothers of ETr- 

Welcome Back from summer! It 

is great to see everyone. Let's 

make lots of great memories. 

I love you. 

Love, Sara 



Princess Shana, Get ready to 
pull out the magic wand! 



Ooh Mel-A-Nie, don't make me 
stop this car! 



Tasha, "you-taww-whats" every- 
where! 



Hey Parrothead! 
What's up!?! 

Hey Shell! 
@#*%!,Erin! 



Hey D-Ren! 
Put out that stoggie! 

Hey Ward! 

Goto the river! 

Welcome Back to all my Boyz 

at ITr. I'm looking for 

another great semester. To all 

the freshman, if you have any 

questions on RUSH 

call 226-1138 
House of Pain Wayne 



Hey Jamie and Nikki, another 

semester together, I know it 

will be as fun as the last two. 

Who rocks the house? 

Apartment #7 rocks the 

AOE house! 

Love, Heather! 



To my Bitch: 

Here's to a great semester 

together... last one, (I hope!) 

Here's to Patty's the Purple 

Platypuses! May they guide 

us in the perfect direction! 

Love, Jennay 



To the CALL: 
Let's try to have as much fun 

as possible without killing 
each other come 9:00 deadline 
night! We'll make up for frus- 
trations later... 
Love, Founds 



BB -Don't sue for sexual har- 
rassment! 



To my five favorite room- 
mates: Here's to the best 
times ever! Other than our 
freshman year... We have three 
months left together to make 
many memories... (minus the 
two who left on time.. .they 
will and are greatly missed!) 
Love ya! Foundonez 



Happy birthday Betty, I hope 

it will be one to remember. 

Love, Charlie. 



Welcome back to my wonder- 
ful Call staff! You are the best 
ever and this year is going to 
be even more fun than you 
can imagine. Love, MB 



DJ, This year the family will 
grow, I can't wait! Love, Big 



Hey my bitch- It's great hav- 
ing you so close at hand. I 
can't wait to play with our 

new purples, well, you know, 
love, MB 



Page 28 



The Clarion Call 



Sportsview 

Bucs, Steelers, Pitt/Penn 
State....just like old times 



Cross Country teams look for 
veterans to provide strong start 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



by Bill Bates 
Soprts Editor 



The last lime I can remember 
people talking this much about 
the Pirates, Steelers, Pitt and 
Penn State in the same year was 
in October of 1979. I remember 
watching T.V. with my dad wear- 
ing a pancake Pirates cap and my 
Osh Kosh B'Gosh outfit and 
"The Candy Man" coming off the 
hill as the Bucs came back from 
3-1 to beat the Orioles in the 79 
series. The Steelers were Super 
Bowl champs for the fourth time. 
Penn State was in the top 10 with 
an 8-2 record and Pitt, yes P-I-T- 
T, let's go Pitt, finished #2 in the 
national 11-1. Nearly 20 years 
later, the Bucs are supposedly in 
a pennant race, the Steelers are 
contenders again, and the Nittany 
Lions and Panthers renewed an 
old rivalry. Seems like I'm a kid 
again! 
Sinking Ship 

I'm certainly not the only one 
who is surprised to see the Bucs 
in the race for the NL Central 
title, but is the thought of post- 
season play a reality? I don't 
think so. I hope I'm forced to eat 
my words come October but as of 
now, the Bucs have already 
blown too many chances to take 
the Astros and may be in danger 




of losing second place to die 
Cardinals. If the Pirates are 
going to battle for a pennant, they 
will be in control of their own 
destiny with five games left 
against the Astros and four with 
St. Louis. What is even harder to 
swallow than the losing skid and 
the performances of Estcban 
Loiza and Steve Cooke has been 
the attendence and fan support. 
For a team trying to win what 
WTAE radio personality Mark 
Madden calls the NL Comedy 
Central, the fan support is down 
right embarrassing. When Major 
League Baseball introduced 
inter-league play this season, 
they basically gave the Cleveland 
Indians three more home games. 
During the three game series with 
the Indians, Tribe fans cleary out- 
shined the Bucco faithful, leav- 
ing us to use Art Modell jokes 
just to save face. The bottom line 
is that we are in a pennant race so 
we might as while enjoy it while 
we can, because we may never 
see one again! 
Stained Steel 

I don't know how else to put 
this but the Steelers look nothing 
like Super Bowl contenders. 
Thank the ghost of Art Rooney 
they have a bye week before 
opening up division play at 
Jacksonville next Monday Night. 



With virtually no pass rush, both 
the Cowboys and the Redskins 
threw all over the new Steeler 
secondary. 

After seeing Emmitt Smith 
shake Greg Lloyd's jock strap 
right from his body and Gus 
throw the ball effectively, what 
are we to expect when Jeff Blake, 
Vinny Testaverde, John Elvvay. 
and maybe even Mark Brunell 
come through town? The famed 
Steelers T>' needs to improve if 
they are going to stay in the hunt 
for the Super Bowl or even the 
playoffs. 
Finally 

After a brief absence of one of 
the most heated rivalries in col- 
lege football, Pitt-I mean 
Pittsburgh made the trip to 
Happy Valley to face JoePa and 
the No. 1 Nittany Lions. 

It seems nothing has changed 
since the last time. Pittsburgh is 
still looking for an identity and 
Penn State keeps winning. It 
seemed a little awkward to see 
the Panthers take the field in their 
new duds and try and knock of 
Paterno's boys. Although it's 
great to finally have the rivalry 
back, if Walt Harris can't turn the 
Panthers around in four years, we 
may see this long standing rival- 
ry die faster than the Browns left 
town. 



IF YOU WANT TO RUN WITH THE BIG 
DOGS, YOU HAVE TO GET OUT OF YOUR 

DORMS! 



I 



iTr 



MM 




RUSH 



2Tr> 



\ 



iflmnEH; 




The men's and women's cross 
country teams look to returning 
runners to continue to improve 
their records. The season will 
open this Saturday (Sept. 13) at 
California. The women's race 
starts at 11:15 a.m. with the men 
following at noon. 

The women look to veteran's 
Devon Barr, Daria Diaz, Melissa 
Getz, Danielle Graver, Brigette 
Laflin, Maureen Long, Kristie 
Runk, Bobbi Ryan, Rocky 
Wilson, and Cherie Zurko for the 
experience that the teams have 
lacked in the past. 

First year runners Debbie 
Brostmeyer, Kelly Null, Lea Ann 
Lauer, Megan Pavuk, Missy 
Bauer, and Laurie Young are 
expected to add even more depth. 
The men, losing only one senior 
last year, will be led by Brad 
Alderton, Tora Brady, Craig 



Carlson, Dave Eliwood, Jon Fox, 
Eric Lowry, Mark Trzyna, and 
Bubba Walters. 

Freshmen Jimmy Adams, John 
Aopley, Shane Cummings. Colin 
McGlone, Jim PassarcIIi, Brad 
Undercofler, and Greg Wade will 
fill in the team with some talent. 
The teams look to field four 
solid teams(2 men and 2 women) 
for most of the meets this year. 
The depth and strength of this 
year's team is the best so far 
under four year haed coach Pat 
Mooney. 

Mooney said.'The team looks 
stronger and more together than 
ever before." 





INVISIBLE & EXCLUDED: 
Issues Impacting the Gay, 
" Lesbian and Bisexual 
Community 

Saturday, September 27, 1 997 
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Ceiranei Student Complex 
Gowns 2*8, 25© &282 

Keynote Speaker; 
Karen Williams 

Registration Forms Available In Psychology 

Department Office - Beeht Hall - Clarion 

University of Pennsylvania 

Registration Fee: $20 
Continental Breakfast & Catered Lunch 

"Student Sponsorship Available, Call Jan at 

226-2295" 

Co-spoosored by Clarion 

University ALLIES & 

Northwestern PA Rural AfDS 

Alliance 



MM 



Mtattas 



■ 



I 



[ 



September 18, 1997 



Clarion Kmberaitp of JJemufptoania 



Clarion, $3 16214 



Qfye Clarion Call 



WW* 3n$ibe 




Football team 

loses opener, 

but is looking to 

rebound against 

Glenville State. 

For the story 

see page 25. 



€ontcnt$ 



Opinion 2 

Reader Responses 3 

News 6 

Lifestyles 10 

Photo Essay 14 

Entertainment. 17 

Call-on-you 22 

Sports 24 

Classifieds 27 

Volume 79, 3fe*ue 2 



Wtat\)tr 



Thursday- Partly 

cloudy with a 

chance of rain. High 

in mid 70s. 

Friday- Sunny. 

High in the upper 

70s. 

Saturday- Clear. 

High in the low 80s. 



Improved recruitment efforts and retention contribute 



Enrollment surges for third straight year 



by Renae Kluk 
News Writer 



Enrollment at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania has 
increased. John Shropshire, 
Dean of Enrollment Management 
said, "We have been increasing 
now for the 3rd straight year. 
Our retention rate has increased 
as well. This, along with a larger 
number of students travelling 
from the eastern part of the state 
is the major explanation for the 
increase." 

"Clarion is pleased that its 
enrollment continues to be 
strong, showing increases overall 
and especially in full-time stu- 
dents," says Dr. John Kuhn, 
Provost and Academic Vice- 
President. According to prelimi- 
nary figures, full-time undergrad- 
uate enrollment has increased 
approximately 100 students. 
Final enrollment figures will be 
reported October 1, 1997. 

As a result of rising enrollment, 
Clarion has gained a reputation 
as a quality school that is accred- 
ited in library science, music, and 
nursing. Dr. Kuhn said, "Rising 
enrollment has made Clarion 



attractive to new faculty mem- 
bers. This year, we have fourteen 
new faculty members." The 
enrollment numbers have also 
generated additional tuition, state 
funding, and resources. 

Recruitment improvements 
have contributed significantly to 
the increased enrollment. 

The Admissions Office has 
increased efforts to include 
churches in Pittsburgh and 
Philadelphia, not just high 
schools. Clarion also has the dis- 
tinction of being the top recruiter 
of minority students among the 

"Clarion is pleased 

that its 
enrollment contin- 
ues to be strong..." 

-Dr. John Kuhn 
Provost 

14 State System of Higher 
Education universities. Retention 
is the second part of the enroll- 
ment increase. Retention statis- 
tics are important because usual- 
ly, "...twenty percent to 25 per- 
cent of the freshman class will 
not return for their sophomore 




File Photo 



Clarion Admissions Office on Wood Street is the center of recruitment efforts. 



year," said Kuhn. Student 
Support Services have several 
programs to combat this problem 
and the Admissions Office has 
developed a program focusing on 
students with undeclared majors. 



Rising enrollment figures have 
created housing problems on 
campus. "Yes, housing is tight," 
said Dr. Kuhn. "Currently, we 
have about thirty to forty student 
in temporary housing." Serious 



planning is underway to locate 
another residence hall on Wood 
Street that would house approxi- 
mately two hundred students, but 
that would be at least three years 
in the future. 



Plans for Clarion University student recreation center moving forward 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Writer 



Groundbreaking on Clarion 
University's $6 million Student 
Recreation Center should take 
place this spring, after other cam- 
pus projects delayed construction 
of the new facility almost one full 
year. According to Dave Tomeo, 
chair of the design committee, 
the rec center design is expected 



to be approved by the end of this 
semester. Tomeo noted that the 
committee is currently in the 
phase of the project where a pre- 
liminary design is submitted. 

Delays in beginning the project 
were cause by other projects tak- 
ing place at the university. The 
projects that were delaying the 
construction included the master 
plan and the constniction of a 



new parking lot on Greenville 
Avenue. Hal Wassink, director of 
Student Activities, said, "It was- 
n't wise to proceed (with the rec 
center) when those decisions 
hadn't yet been made." 

Disagreement by the original 
architects and the design commit- 
tee led to another delay in the 
construction. Since an agree- 
ment was not reached, the com- 



mittee was forced to find a new 
architect. Tomeo said that things 
are progressing on schedule, and 
he expects that ground will be 
broken in April 1998. 

Both Wassink and Tomeo were 
members of the design commit- 
tee, and both expressed their 
pleasure in their meetings with 
the architects. 'There were many 
ideas shared back and forth," 



Wassink said. "They (the archi- 
tects) were truly interested in giv- 
ing us a design that met our 
needs." 

Tomeo also mentioned thai 
though students returning to cam- 
pus this fall may not see any tan- 
gible work being done with the 
rec center, the committee (which 

Continued on page 8 



f > "r 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



OPINION 



Che 

Clarion 

Call 

270 Cemmell Complex 
Clarion, $g 16214 

(814)226-2360 
/fix (814)226-2557 

e-mail: Cflll 

Cxetuttbe 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scptt,$. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




| Hide (Pari \ 




"WhUe we hold on to the 
idea of general education, 
we have tost much of the 
certitude about it that 
infused the medieval edu- 
cator's commitment. * 


1 Dr. %gbtrt "Baldwin 1 





"Whither General 
Education" 

Part of our legacy from the 
medieval university is the idea of 
general education, i.e. that there 
are some studies that are unique- 
ly worthy of study by free human 
beings or studies that make a 
human being free. (Actually, they 
used the term for man since in 
good Aristotelian fashion it was 
held that women could not tran- 
scend their genetic imperfec- 
tions.) We don't talk about these 
studies in the terminology of the 
middle ages as the trivium and 
quadrivium, but we still affirm 
the centrality of the liberal arts in 
serving the ends of general edu- 
cation. Nor do we require, as did 



the colonial colleges, a full four 
years of study in a highly pre- 
scribed curriculum as a proper 
grounding for general education. 
Most colleges and universities 
today are content to co-opt only 
three or four semesters of a stu- 
dent's program for this end. Like 
the medieval university, however, 
we still appear to affirm that 
"knowing" is tantamount to 
"doing." 

While we hold on to the idea of 
general education, we have lost 
much of the certitude about it that 
infused the medieval educator's 
commitment. We are no longer 
sure what it is or what it is to do, 
though, of course, we have many 

Continued on page 4 



Staff 

Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Donna Engle, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Hope Guy, Renae Kluck, Steve 

Ostrosky, Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Brian Christy, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, 

Tommi Hearn, Rob Kriley, Lori Matachak, 

Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Sheri Hertzog, Stella Myers, Jen Mumford, 

Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Andrea Dillinger, Steve Gabor, Danielle Hermann, 

Mark Kalinoski, Bobby Lee, Christine Metzger, Tara Molina, 

Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Veronica Beck, Dena Bosak, Greg Hensler, Megan 

Klauss, Wayne Lines, Heather Liti, Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tina Lasky, 

Jen Mumford, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tun Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

•Nanus remaining in the staff box in the December 4, 1997 Call recieve co-curricular credit 



'Editorial 




"I noticed that everyone 

was tuning into Howard 

Stern. When one of the 

employees fell off his 

chair from laughing so 

hard as a result of the 

show, I decided it was 

time to see what he was 

all about. " 



" 1 HQisten 'Davis, 9{ews c \ 



; 9{eius 'Editor 



When I first saw Howard Stem, 
I was about fourteen years old. 

I had been flipping through the 
television station, and this odd 
looking guy with long curly hair 
and sunglasses was hosting what 
seemed to be a new version of 
" Tfre Dating Game ". 

What I later found out after 
viewing the television for a few 
minutes, was that it was not " The 
Dating Game ." It was "Ihfi 
Lesbian Dating Game" 

My sheltered life had never 
exposed me to a celebrity as 
crude as this, and from then on, I 
had a stereotype of Howard 
Stern. He was that sexist, racist 
pig that everybody loathed. 

It wasn't until two summers 
ago, actually, that I started listen- 
ing to his radio show. It was more 
out of curiosity than anything 
else. 

I worked at Mellon Bank in 
Downtown Pittsburgh as a check 
processor, and we were all 
allowed to listen to headphones. 
I noticed that everyone was tun- 
ing into Howard Stern. When one 
of the employees fell off his chair 
from laughing so hard as a result 



of the show, I decided it was time 
to see what he was all about. 

At first,the show was exactly 
what I expected... strippers, lots 
of negative commentary on every 
race there is, and general rude- 
ness. 

But, at the same time, the guy 
was strangely fascinating. I 
found myself starting to become 
addicted to the Howard Stern 
Show. 

He always had good guests, and 
he asked die questions mat every- 
one wanted to ask but was too 
much of a wuss to ask. And 
strangely enough, although I did- 
n't always agree, I began to 
respect his opinion. 

I do not agree with censorship. 
I do not like people telling me 
what I should be watching, listen- 
ing to, and reading. 

And oddly enough, it was Stern 
playing devil's advocate to cen- 
sorship. He wanted to see how far 
he could take things. 

He was constantly challenging 
the Federal Communications 
Commission. And at the same 

Continued on page 4 



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sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief)- Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
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Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
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submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
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Page 3 



RESPONSES 



"The person who committed this childish act should feel very suiltv..." 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to address an inci- 
dent that occurred at the Phi 
Sigma Sigma house some time 
after 1:00 a.m. on Monday 
August 25, 1997. 

An individual, or group of indi- 
viduals, stole a white and blue 
Rush sign from the front of our 
house. 



We feel it was a planned act 
because the person, or persons, 
cut the rope from which the sign 
was hung. 

Since the rules of rush have 
been changed and now permit us 
to hang signs, our membership 
recruitment chair worked very 
hard to make all of our signs. 
She hung signs throughout cam 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



pus as well as in front of our 
house. 

If you notice any of the signs, 
you will see how much time she 
put into our Rush. 

The person who committed 
this childish act should feel very 
guilty for taking the sign. 

I feel we are all adults, but it is 
sad to see that some people don't 



act like they are. 

This is something that is done 
in high school, not in college. 



Sincerely, 

Cloressa Taylor 

Phi Sigma Sigma sorority 



# - -uu.w^vu.aiouiin.jA.upicuuui rni aigma sigma sorority 

Accommodati ng learning disabled students: The debate over what's fair 



By Sunni DeNicola 
College Press Service 



Somnolent Samantha was 
described as a student with an 
auditory processing learning dis- 
ability who demanded extended 
test times, copies of lecture notes 
and a guarantee to sit in the front 
of the class. She even told admin- 
istrators that they may have to 
accommodate her tendency to 
fall asleep in class. 

She was the type of learning 
disabled (LD) student Boston 
University President Jon 
Westling allegedly characterized 
as a "draft dodger"- a slacker tak- 
ing advantage of the American 
Disabilities Act to get out of 
meeting academic requirements. 
In several 1995 speeches, 
Samantha was held up as an 
example by Westling, who had 
denounced the "zealous advoca- 
cy of the learning disabilities 
movement." 

Well, Samantha proved to be a 
fake all right, but not because of 
the LD claim. Westling had 
neglected to mention that 
Samantha did not exist; she was 
just a fictive illustration for his 
platform. 

Now, two years later, the most 
famous student who never was at 
Boston University has served to 
illustrate the tug-of-war that 
exists between educators who 
rail against watering down acad- 
emic standards to accommodate 
sometimes hard-to-measure stu- 
dent disability claims and 
between LD students, who say 
they merely want the academic 
playing field leveled so they can 
compete, too. 

Last month a federal court ruled 
in favor of learning disabled stu- 
dents who charged Boston 
University with violating the 
Americans with Disabilities Act 
(ADA). ADA prohibits educa- 
tional institutions from discrimi- 
nating against student with spe- 
cific learning disabilities. Six of 



the 10 students filing suit were 
together awarded nearly $30,000. 
Yet, instead of being a litmus 
test for higher education's han- 
dling of LD students, both sides 
are claiming some victory, and 
many questions about where to 
draw the line still are unclear. 

BU was found in violation 
largely because of the way in 
which it handled learning disabil- 
ity accommodation policy 
changes. Not able to respond to 
the abrupt reversal of procedures 
quickly enough, some LD stu- 
dents felt like victims of a 
bureaucratic power play. 

UntU 1995, BU had a reputation 
as a leader when it came to pro- 
viding services to LD students. 
In her ruling, U.S. District Judge 
Patti B. Saris described how the 
university actually recruited LD 
students through its Learning 
Disabilities Support Services 
(LDSS). LDSS screened LD stu- 
dents and, if appropriate, offered 
note takers, extended test times, 
support groups, taped textbooks 
and tutors. Students were 
encouraged to attend a summer 
program to help in the transition 
from high school to college. 
Although not required by law, in 
some cases, courses such as the 
Arts of Japan or the 
Anthropology of Money were 
offered as substitutes for tradi- 
tional language or math require- 
ments. 

But all that changed in the 
spring of 1995, when, the judge 
says, Westling (then BU Provost) 
"discovered" these class substitu- 
tions were occurring. Westling 
appointed his assistant, Craig 
Klafter, to research the situation. 
Primarily Klafter wanted scien- 
tific proof that students with LD 
can not successfully study math 
or foreign language. He conclud- 
ed that no such proof existed. 

BU also revised other policies, 
requiring LD students be retested 
every three years by experienced 
evaluators holding a specific 



degree or license. This left many 
students scrambling to arrange 
for retesting and for the money to 
cover the costs for these tests. 
These sudden changes, along 
with what students described as 
the administration's "failing to 
provide reasonable procedures 
for evaluation and review of a 
student's request for accommo- 
dations" led the students to file 
suit. 

Judge Saris agreed students, 
parents and professors received 
"mixed and inconsistent mes- 
sages form university administra- 
tors." Many students found 
themselves in limbo awaiting 
accommodations; several floun- 
dered under the stress. One stu- 
dent testified that she spent four 
days and more than $800 being 
retested, only to have her dyslex- 
ia (which experts say does not 
change after age 18) recon- 
firmed. 

In her decision, Saris wrote that 
the decision to stop course sub- 
stitution was an "uninformed 
stereotype by the President and 
his staff that many student with 
learning disabilities are lazy fak- 
ers, and that many evaluators are 
'snake oil salesmen' who over- 
diagnose the disability." 

But BU also prevailed, in that 
they do not have to waive math 
requirements and have been 
given a semester to present their 
case concerning the waiver of 
foreign language. Foreign lan- 
guage and math often are major 
obstacles for certain types of LD, 
primarily dyslexia, say educa- 
tors. BU previously granted 
course substitution for these 
requirements to about a dozen 
students annually. 

After the suit was filed, BU also 
modified some of its other man- 
dates so that by the time they 
went to trial the judge found 
them in compliance 

Perhaps the most important 
outcome of the case may be to 
draw attention to the debate 



about how colleges should deal 
with LD students. BU's 
Westling has publicly voiced 
how he believes higher educa- 
tion is being compromised in try- 
ing to accommodate LD. He 
expressed concern that evalua- 
tors, often not properly creden- 
tialed, are too ready to label stu- 
dents as LD and grant special 
dispensations instead of pushing 
for them to simply work harder. 
He also asserted that there is a 
dearth of scientific information 
proving that LD students cannot 
conquer some subjects. 

While not denying that LD 
exists, he claimed the LD move- 
ment actually impairs disabled 



students who could overcome 
their academic difficulties "with 
concentrated effort." He also 
believed it was unfair to non-LD 
students, and overall, 
"Wreak(ed) educational havoc." 
Other educators strongly dis- 
agree with Westling 's assess- 
ment. GailAnn Rickert, associ- 
ate dean of academic advising at 
Gettysburg College, paints a dra- 
matically different picture of 
handling LD. It is like those stu- 
dents who need to wear specta- 
cles. We have many student who 
don't need spectacles and we 



Continued on page 5 




The following tookjplaci during 
the third wuk\ in September. 

September 20, 1984 

A new satellite dish turned WCUC radio" from an 
automated juke box to an honest-to-goodness radio 
sattion" said Dr. Henry Fueg in an article titled 
"Becker's new satellite dish proves to be a good investment." The 
new dish allowed the station to recieve mutual news instead of get- 
ting news called in from Franklin. 

September 18, 1987 

"Drug testing for Clarion athletes may begin" was the headline for 
the news story led with, "Due to President Regan's 'War on Drugs,' 
colleges across the nation are adopting new drug testing policies and 
sterner discipline for offenses." 

Also in this edition, a photograph of the "tressel" (a hot spot for 
Clarion students) had a caption under reading, "Clarion's tressel. 
Found just outside of Clarion, the tressel has always be a popular 
spot with college students. It has been a place of solitude to students 
for years. It has also been a place of excitement when a train comes. 
Its dizzying heights are thrilling, its panoramic view is breathtaking. 
In other words, the perfect Sunday afternoon get-a-way." 

September 16, 1993 

'Clarion on schedule with plans to renovate Founders Hall" was 
the cover story in this weeks 1993 issue. 

The story lead with the following paragraphs, "Clarion University is 
on schedule with its plans to renovate Founders Hall, said Clare 
Heidler, Director of Facilities Management, and if all goes well con- 
struction is expected to begin next summer." 

*All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



Hide Park continued 



From page 2 

opinions about it; opinions 
which for the most part can be 
supported only by the flimsiest of 
argument and evidence. 

Nonetheless, we set so much 
store in its importance that we 
include a general education stan- 
dard among those which must be 
met if a university is to be 
accredited by one of the regional 
accreditation associations. Its 
value is not open to debate. 

American colleges and univer- 
sities do differ in their under- 
standing of the ends that general 
education serves and of the 
means that are appropriate to it. 

In one way or another, howev- 
er, a large number subscribe to 
the conception developed by the 
Harvard faculty after World War 
II which is described in General 
Education in a Free Society. 
There are, the Harvard faculty 
assert, certain foundational stud- 
ies like composition, mathemat- 
ics, and foreign languages (the 
skill subjects) that are pre-requi- 
site to subsequent learning. 
Beyond these the work of impor- 
tant human knowledge can be 
divided neatly into three 
domains- the humanities, the 
social sciences, the natural sci- 
ences. 

Each of these, it is said, touch- 
es upon a major dimension of 
human experience, and each has 
its special way of developing 
knowledge about he world. 
A sampling of studies in each of 
these domains (the distribution 
requirements) will acquaint stu- 
dents with each dimension and 
with its unique way of knowing. 
This will ostensibly not only 
open all the doors of knowledge 
to them- but also give them the 
intellectual background for mak- 
ing wise decisions about private 
and public matters. Clarion's 
indebtedness to this model is as 
apparent as the model is com- 
mon. 

As the Harvard model spread 
across the United States, as col- 
leges retooled themselves to meet 
the demands of mass higher edu- 
cational, and as the knowledge 
explosion led to a proliferation of 
courses, departments, and majors 
on university campuses, it 
became increasingly more diffi- 
cult to give anything but arbitrary 
answers to students when they 
asked why they had to take gen- 
eral education studies. 

What more precisely are the 
ends that are served by these skill 
and distribution requirements? 
How can you tell when we have 
reached them? 



Which of our studies really 
helped us to acquire them? These 
are the questions that began to 
appear during the student rebel- 
lions of the late sixties. 

Because universities choose not 
to commit much of their budget 
to researching these kinds of 
questions; because faculty tend 
not to find them particularly 
interesting or worth pursuing for 
professional advancement, and 
because students have been pow- 
erless to hold universities 
accountable, not much progress 
has been made in developing 
answers to them. 

The consequence is that today 
general education is in a state of 
disarray. William Bennett, the 
Secretary of Education, recently 
raised questions about the quality 
and value of higher education 
today. 

A blue-ribbon committee of the 
Association of American 
Colleges, alter completing a two 
year study of higher education, 
ended up asserting that the bac- 
calaureate degree has been deval- 
ued, particularly in the area of 
general education. 

We are, they say, much more 
"confident about the length of a 
college education than its content 
or purposes." And it has become 
fashionable for business leaders, 
politicians, and graduate faculty 
to assert that today's college 
graduates can't write, can't 
speak, can't think and are woe- 
fully ignorant about almost 

everything. 

Several more major studies of 
higher education are due for pub- 
lication within the next year. 

If they echo these judgements, 
we can anticipate increased pres- 
sures from accrediting associa- 
tions, state legislatures, and stu- 
dent groups for some fundamen- 
tal changes in how we conceive 
and execute higher education at 
the general education level. 

Fortunately there are some 
interesting developments going 
on across the nation that hold 
much promise for the future. 
This is not the place to discuss 
the great variety of efforts that 
are underway, but there are are 
two which characterize a new 
approach which focuses on 
"doing" rather than on internal 
states like "knowing" and 
"appreciating" and "understand- 



ing. 



The American College Testing 
program began in 1976 to work 
with a core of eight colleges and 
universities to identify just what 
it was that they wanted their gen- 
eral education program to do. 



The consensual judgement was 
that the general education pro- 
gram should enhance the perfor- 
mance of the student with respect 
to 35 activities clustered around 
three process areas (communicat- 
ing, solving problems, and clari- 
fying values) and three content 
areas (functioning with social 
institutions, using science and 
technology, and using the arts). 
With the identification of these 
outcome ACT was able to devel- 
op an examination to assess the 
proficiency of students with 
respect to them. As progress is 
made in validating the exam, 
institutions whose general educa- 
tion match those of ACT will be 
able to use the results in evaluat- 
ing their curriculum. 

Another departure from the 
standard approaches to general 
education can be found at 
Alverno College in Milwaukee. 
Beginning in 1970 with a chal- 
lenge from its president, faculty 
were pressed to identify what it 
was that they wanted to happen 
to students. After three years of 
intensive discussion by numerous 
faculty and student groups, they 
identified eight processes that 
their students should be able to 
engage in at the completion of 
their program; communication, 
analysis, problem solving, valu- 
ing, social interaction, taking 
responsibility for the environ- 
ment, becoming involved in the 
contemporary world, and aesthet- 
ic response. 

For each of these, four levels of 
proficiency were established. As 
this was being accomplished 
Alverno began working on the 
second phase, that of developing 
ways to assess students to see if 
they were acquiring these compe- 
tencies. 

Through its general education 
revision, the Faculty Senate at 
Clarion has taken its first step: 
translating our goal statement 
into student outcome statements. 
Preliminary work this year has 
put us into a position to move 
with greater effect next year. 

As we proceed it is hoped that 
students, faculty and administra- 
tors will add their voices, 
insights, and concerns to the 
committee's work. 



• This article first appeared 

April 18, 1985. Dr. R. Baldwin 

was a member of the General 

Education subcommittee which 

wrote the current statement of 

General Education. 




ATTENTION 

WEB 
CRAWLERS 

Share your favorite websites 
with the rest of campus! 



This weeks submissions were a little 

slow, so here are some suggestions 

from The Clarion Call exec board to 

get things started. 

http:\\comdept.clarion.edu\360\auman\ benjpagel.htm- 
This page Is all about Copy and Design Editor Benj 
Auman, so if you're into Benj this is the site for you. 
http:\\www.msnbc.com\news\dateline_front.asp- Up to 
date information on newsworthy topics, celebrity birth- 
days, and the dateline timeline. 
http:\\fastball.com\- A fun and very colorful look at base- 
ball. Tells you everything you want to know. 
http:\\info.gdb.org\~laurie\beagles.html- If you love bea- 
gles check out this page. The page is a little cheesey 
looking, but it can link you to information about beagles 

from all over the web. 
The Clarion Call will publish website submis- 
sions from students, faculty, staff, and the 
community. If you know of a great site that 
you would like to share with our readers sub- 
mit the complete address, and a brief descrip- 
tion to our office in room 270 Qemmell 
Student Center. We will log onto all the sites 
submitted to verify that they are legit and in 

somewhat good taste. 
So. keep yahooing your little hearts 

out and let us know what you find. 



i is an open writing 
forum for the readership of Main 



Call. Submissions for this column can be 



mailed to 270 Gemmell Student Center or 
dropped off at the office. As with all mate- 
rials submitted for publication. Hide Park 
is subject to editing for libeUrammar, 
punctuation, and length. 
Thank you, the Editor 



September 11, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 





From page 2 

tim£ he challenged the listener. 
Soon I began asking myself, 
What makes Howard much 
worse than everyone else? 

Was society on a morality cru- 
sade, or were they just hypocrites 
themselves? 

Unfortunately, a lot of the time, 
I discovered it was the latter. 

And his female sidekick, Robin 
Quivers, is also a very admirable 
figure. 

For those of you who don't 
know, Quivers is African 
American. She never gets angry 
at his racist comments. 

She takes him in complete 
stride. 

She realizes what we all should: 
he insults everyone, including 
himself. 

She also never uses her previ- 
ous bad family life as an excuse 
for negative things that may hap- 
pen to her now. She takes respon- 
sibility for herself and her own 
actions, as society so often does 
not do. 



Maybe I like Howard Stern 
because he has something in him 
that I wish I had more of in me. 
Maybe it is because he is just nat- 
urally funny and always makes 
me laugh. 

Or maybe it is both. 
But one fact is for sure. I am 
very glad that I decided to listen 
to Howard Stern myself and form 
my own opinion on him . 

I look forward to getting him 
clearly on my radio again, when I 
go back to Mellon Bank during 
Christmas Break. 

He may be crude. 

He may be rude. 

But he says what he wants to 
say, and not what everybody 
wants him to say. 

And personally, I find it refresh- 
ing to know that their is still a 
role model out there who is one 
hundred percent true to himself. 



• The author is a junior 
communication major. 



Debate of LD students continued 






Rush 

Sigma Chi 

These fiuys 



did... 




XX 



v: : : : ; : : : i : ; ; : : : : : : :-: : : : : : :'' : '-. : : : : :'! ; : : ':'■'. ':'-': :'■.'•:'•'.'.'■: ;■ :v: : : : : : x : :v:'-: : ;vi : : : :^ ■ v: : : :v: : : : :v'-: : :\v 


• John Wayne 


• Dennis Swanson 


•Brad Pitt 


• Woody Hayes 


• Dave Utterrnan 


• Barry Coldwafer 


•MikeDitka 


•James Brady 


• Tom Selleck 


■:'•' Merlin CMsen 


• William Marriott 


•TedMcGinley 


•Woody Harrelson 


• Jim Palmer 


• Mike Holmerin 


♦ Eddie Sutton 


: - --< ■••-■ •'- ■ ■■■■ 

For more information on Rush Events 


jjijigx 


call Chris Cetzn226-28 15. 











continued from page 3 

can't force those who don't need 
them to wear them. But for those 
who do, we say, 'Of course, put 
on your spectacles.' 

"When it comes to a concern 
about 'fairness'... well, if that 
means absolute equality then it is 
a problem... because some need 
spectacles, and some don't, to be 
able to see the blackboard." 

In her ruling, Saris criticized 
Westling's use of Somnolent 
Samantha and says that Westling 
admitted Samantha did not even 
represent the typical LD students 
he had encountered. Further, the 
judge says, there was not "a sin- 
gle documented instance at BU in 
which a student has been found 
to have fabricated a learning dis- 
order to claim eligibility for 
accommodations." 

Even though Westling claims it 
was not his intention, invoking 
Samantha set the tone for a more 
personal attack against LD stu- 
dents instead of a straightforward 
appeal for an educational reeval- 
uation of accommodation stan- 
dards. This was particularly dis- 
heartening for William "Kip" 
Opperman, the former LDSS 
director, he rarely saw students 
try to take advantage of the sys- 
tem. "It's not like we didn't turn 
some students down. We didn't 
just rubber stamp students 



dents trying to take advantage of 
the system. They are all interest 
in doing well." 

Still, Opperman says he doesn't 
deny there may be some out to 
take advantage. "Is that a prob- 
lem that needs to be looked at? 
Absolutely. Is it some wide- 
spread catastrophe? Absolutely 
not! Is every e valuator up to 
snuff? No, but you find that in 
anything. You only hear abut the 
problem student, which is a very, 
very small minority compared to 
the students who successfully 
tackle legitimate problems... they 
don't make the news." 

He also concedes that 
Westling's point that the need for 
scientific evidence is valid. "The 
field itself is relatively new. 
There are a a lot of people doing 
research in this area, and it will 
take a long time to understand 
how it truly works. But it doesn't 
undermine that there are learning 
disabilities." 

During the year following BU's 
accommodation policy changes, 
the judge says, the enrollment of 
LD students had dropped and 
several members of LDSS staff 
had resigned, including 
Opperman. 

"Ethically and morally I could 
not continue on," he says, "with- 
in the next eight months, pretty 
much the entire office hit the 
road." 



"Ethically and morally I could 
not continue on within the 
next eight months, pretty 

much the entire office hit the 

road." 

- William "Kip" Opperman 



through; we had to have a legiti- 
mate reason [to access them as 
LD]." 

And as for the analogy of 
Samantha, Opperman, now an 
ADA consultant, bristles, "... To 
let her sleep in class. ..well, we 
never, ever, ever wrote a letter of 
accommodation to allow a stu- 
dent to sleep in class. That is 
absolutely ridiculous; that is 
beyond comprehension." 

Rickert, who says about 6 per- 
cent of this year's new students at 
Gettysburg report some sort of 
LD, agrees. "I haven't seen stu- 



The judge writes that she hopes 
"the bleak picture has brightened. 
No doubt as a result of this litiga- 
tion, the university has now for- 
mulated harmonious written 
statements of policy that have 
been authorized by the relevant 
academic officials. 

Moreover, the university has 
hired a professional evaluator 
who, at trial, promised that she 
will meet with student s and 
address their concerns as she 
assesses their need for accommo- 
dation." 

College Press sought comment 



from BU officials and were 
referred to their attorney in this 
case, who did not return calls. 

In spite of the rulings, accom- 
modations such as waiving for- 
eign language, are likely to con- 
tinue causing debate. Rickert 
says colleges need to be intro- 
spective. Faculty and adminis- 
trations need to determine what it 
is about the foreign language 
requirement that is critical to 
their institution and if there is 
room for flexibility. 

"The law requires faulty truly 
understand and articulate what 
requirements are... what is the 
nature and essence versus what is 
peripheral," she says. "The fac- 
ulty have a lot more control over 
this than they realize they do." 

Rickert says at Gettysburg 
some departments, such as math, 
have taken the initiative and 
started offering tests during 
evenings so that all students can 
have extra time, if needed, and 
not feel pressured to rush to their 
next class. But, she admits, 
sometimes faculty begrudge 
making accommodations. 

"Some feel it is not fair to give 
extra time on test. They say 
'There are a number of students 
who don't have learning disabili- 
ties who would like more time on 
tests, so it isn't fair to give it to 
some and not others.' But what 
you need to think about is why 
are you concerned about how 
much time it takes- are you test- 
ing speed, or are you testing for a 
knowledge of the material? If 
speed is important, then adhere to 
a certain time, but if you deter- 
mined time is not what you are 
measuring then you might loosen 
standards." 

But will academics ever reach a 
consensus on what it takes to be a 
successful college student? For 
example, should a college gradu- 
ate be about to spell? Spelling 
often is a major stumbling block 
for LD students. 

While spelling is important, 
Rickert says, the question should 
be whether it is "important 
enough to keep students away 
form exploring other incredible 
talent? 

I would be horrified to think 
students who could achieve great 
things would be horrified to think 
students who could achieve great 
things would be kept out because 
they couldn't spell. 

"You know, Einstein couldn't 
spell either. There are many 
intelligent people who can't spell 
their way out of a paper bag. So 
sure, someone won't win spelling 
bees, but he or she might just find 
the cure for cancer." 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



-i 



NEWS 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Becker Lab computer problems still continue to plague students, who are still having diffi- 
culty entering the system. 

Students experience difficulties at lab 



by Leslie Suhr 
News Writer 



For the past few weeks students 
going to the computer lab in 
Becker Hall have been experi- 
encing difficulties with the new 
computers that were installed this 
summer. 

Many students complained that 
it" takes much longer to enter 
Netscape and other features on 
the Internet. Others think the new 
security measures make it diffi- 
cult for them to access informa- 
tion. Additionally, many expect 
more help from lab assistants. 

Dr. Pat Marini, a communica- 
tions professor, regularly sends 
her students to the lab to com- 
plete assignments." Access to the 
Internet is slowed down to the 
extreme," she said. 

Dr. Dana Madison, Chair of the 
Computer Information Science 
Department, also runs the com- 
puter lab with limited resources. 
He stated that the new Windows 
95 system was installed to 
upgrade the system software. 
However, they still need money 
to buy more memory and hard 
drives for sixty five computers. 

Madison believes that the lab 
has "come a long way without 
the support of the university." 
ISF funds from last year only 
allocated the department 



"Clarion does what they 
can with the limited money 
they have, and if they had 
more, they could do more/ 

-Erica Logero 
Junior IS Major 



$10,000. 

The lab assistants are also 
learning the new Windows 95 
system. Many don't have the 
experience because it wasn't here 
when they took their computer 
courses. 

"The positions aren't just limit- 
ed to computer majors. Others 
have to prove themselves and 
compete against computer majors 
too," Madison said. 

Erica Logero, a junior 
Information Systems major, said, 
"This is my third year, and the 
problems have remained the 
same." She has worked in the lab 
for several semesters. "Clarion 
does what they can with the lim- 
ited money they have, and if they 
had more, they could do more." 

The lab is also working against 



the constraints of class schedules, 
and 87 hour a week operating 
schedule, and females not being 
permitted to work after 8 p.m. 

The computer lab has also tight- 
ened security measures to pre- 
vent people from viewing 
pornography and other explicit 
material that is offensive to other 
students and staff. It also pre- 
vents students from deleting 
files, installing files, and chang- 
ing system configurations. 

The Becker computer lab is in 
the process of renovations and 
upgrades, but they hope the stu- 
dents will remain patient. 

Dr. Madison said, "It is the 
most used facility on campus. 
There are always students work- 
ing in there, so what is the prob- 
lem?" 



College Campus News 




What's fioinfi 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Aids is no longer the num- 
ber one cause of death, say 

experts 

Accidents have replaced AIDS as the number one killer of young to 
middle aged adults, the government said. 

The disease is now the second leading cause of death for people ages 
25-44, bumped down by a 26 percent decrease of AIDS deaths 
between 1995 and 1996, according to an annual report by the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. Shalala called the 
drop in AIDS deaths reported by the CDC "truly a remarkable achieve- 
ment." 

"There is a wealth of good news in this report, and I am particular- 
ly encouraged by the progress we are making against AIDS," she said. 

Cancer is the third leading cause of death. 

The report also found that life expectancy reached an all time high 
of 76.1 years in 1996, up from 75.8 in 1995. 

Student fights back after 

being charged with calling 

black women'water buffalo' 

A former University of Pennsylvania student who sparked a national 
debate on political correctness by calling a group of black women 
"water buffalo" has settled his $50,000 lawsuit against the university. 

Eden Jacobowitz, who graduated from Penn and is now a first year 
law student at Fordham University, sued the university last year, claim 
ing the incident had caused him emotional distress. 

Penn admitted no wrongdoing and paid Jacobowitz nothing settling 
the lawsuit, said the universities general counsel, Shelley Green. 

In 1993, Jacobowitz had leaned out his dorm room window and 
yelled "Shut up, you Water Buffalo" to five black women who he 
thought were making too much noise and disturbing his studying. 

The women formally charged Jacobowitz with racial harassment 
under the university's hate speech policy, but later withdrew the 
charge. 

Penn dropped its hate-speech policy later that year after it became 
the center of a national discourse on political correctness. 

In filing the lawsuit, Jacobowitz said he never had a chance to prove 
his innocence before the charges were dropped. He also claimed the 
incident made him suffer academically. 

Courtesy of the 
College Press Service 



Retention rate goes up at CU 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 



During a five year period end- 
ing in 1995, Clarion University 
has led the State System of 
Higher Education in the retention 
rate of African American stu- 
dents. The State-System released 
statistics showing the retention 
rate for Clarion's African 
American students to be 54.9 per- 
cent overall, versus the 55.5 per- 
cent allotted to white students, 
and the sixty percent retention 
rate for Latino students. 

Overall, the State System had a 
total retention rate of 54.6, divid- 
ed between black students at 29.8 
percent, 57.2 percent for white 
students, and 38.8 percent for 
Latinos. Dr. Jocelind Gant, assis- 
tant to the president for social 
equity, explains "The retention 
rate is a positive thing for the uni- 
versity. It is the institutions abili- 
ty to retain students for a speci- 
fied period of time." She also 
went on to say that the high 
retention rate for minorities indi- 
cate that the climate is more wel- 
coming for increasing numbers 
of minority students in a rural 
setting without minority commu- 
nities. 

Clarion's minority student 
enrollment has also increased 



successfully. Figures received 
from the Clarion University 
Office of Academic Affairs 
shows African American student 
enrollment to have increased 
from 142 students in 1987, to 216 
students enrolled for the Fall 
1996 semester. 

These improvements in both the 
retention and enrollment figures, 
are largely due to many factors. 
Dr. Jocelind Gant explains that 
"the success in minority retention 
is the product of several efforts. 
Part of it is the result of the 
efforts of Minority Student 
Services, part of it is the result of 
the mentoring program, and part 
of it is the result of the efforts to 
extend the social equity programs 
into the Clarion community. 

The Minority Student Services 
is directed by Rogers Laughland, 
and it works to provide minority 
students with programs of inter- 
est to them, with a backround 
attempting to improve their qual- 
ity of living. The involvement of 
the minority faculty, administra- 
tion, and staff with the students, 
has also been a helpful factor in 
contributing to the raise in the 
retention rate. This gives minori- 
ty students a strong support sys- 
tem to back their college career. 
Rogers Laughland explains, 
"We want the students to feel 



comfortable to come in and talk 
to us with the confidence that we 
can help solve their problems. I 
help them to make connections to 
other departments from here." 

One such program, the "Eyes 
on the Prize", serves as a mentor- 
ing program offered through 
minority services, which has 
proved quite successful. Other 
programs include The Building 
Bridges Program, Christian Life 
Skills, and the Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Committee. These pro- 
grams allow minorities with an 
opportunity to involve them- 
selves with not only the commu- 
nity but with the public at large. 

Laughland said, "If the students 
have connections, they are more 
willing to stay in college. We try 
to cover all the components 
which I believe the students need 
to become successful." 

Another effort aimed at the 
community for expanding equity 
programs is made by Dr. Ganl's 
Office of Social Equity. "Cultural 
Night" was begun three years 
ago, lasting only one day. It has 
since expanded to "Cultural 
Week," lasting a full five days 
filled with many cultural events. 
Equity Week is yet another event, 
which encourages the campus to 
join in unity during this week cel- 
ebrated annually in November. 




Foreign Students stay at CU 



by Hope Guy 
News Writer 



On August 16, 1997, students 
from all over the world came to 
Clarion University to start the 
academic semester. These stu- 
dents came from Nepal, Saudi 
Arabia, Malta, India, and other 
counties across the entire planet. 
These students not only had to 
adjust to college and dorm life, 
but also to culture and American 
attitudes. 

Most of these international stu- 
dents came to America, and 
learned to admire the nation as a 
whole. Some admire America for 
its technology. Vishi Srinivasan 
of India, said, "The United States 
is great. There is more technolo- 
gy in the U.S. than many other 
countries." 

Shardool D. Vyas, a communi- 
cation major from India, said, 
"The United States is a highly 



advanced country where the stan- 
dard of living is very high. But 
people live very fast. Everything 
goes so quickly here. Everyone is 
very professional, in business, in 
relationships, and in communi- 
cating." 

Others are shocked by the 
things Americans take for grant- 
ed. CIS major Aljawini "TJ" 
Turki of Saudi Arabia said, "The 
biggest pro of living in America 
is the 'freedom of speech', and 
that doesn't exist in other coun- 
tries." 

Fixos Frangos, management 
major from Cyprius, compli- 
mented Clarion's pleasant envi- 
ronment." Nikolas Spanos of 
Greece said, "I like staying on 
campus, everything is in walking 
distance." 

Like Americans at Clarion 
University, the International 
Students have their own dislikes. 
These include American food, 



"Some American 
people don 9 t 
know about other 
cultures... that is 
not right. " 
-Aljawin Turki 
International CU 
Student 



the weather, and the small size of 
Clarion. 

"It's tiny, like some other plan- 
et," commented Aljawin Turki. 
Although he admits that 
Americans are more friendly to 
foreigners than vice-versa, he 
said, "Some American people 
don't know about other cultures. 
They treat these people like they 
are unusual. That is not right." 



The following is a brief synopsis of the 

criminal investigations conducted by 

Public Safety for the dates between 

July 1 and September 8. The blotter is 
compiled by The Public Safety office 



*On September 8, a resident of Givan Hall reported to University 
Police having received a series of harassing telephone calls. The inci- 
dent is currently under investigation. 

*On September 9, a female came to Public Safety to report damage 
to her car. It happened between 2 p.m. Sunday and 4 p.m. Monday. 
Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Public Safety. 

*An ex-student was given notice against trespassing on university 
property on September 10,1997. 

*On September 11, a student from Campbell telephoned Public 
Safety to complain about receiving harassing phone calls, which is 
under investigation. 

*On September 12, Clarion University Police "Officers were called to 
Wilkinson Hall because a large group of students were making noise 
outside. 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



Harvey Hall may be under renovations 




Renovations to Harvey Hall should begin soon. 



by Donna En gel 
Assistant News Editor 

In response to changing student 
needs, $525,000 in capital budget 
funds has been granted to the uni- 
versity by Pennsylvania State 
Governor Tom Ridge. He recent- 
ly released money totalling over 
46 million dollars to colleges and 
universities throughout the state 
for renovations and construction 
projects. 

Harvey Hall, which was built in 
1931, will be seeing much reno- 
vations in the coming years. 
Among these improvements are 
upgrades of the plumbing and 
electrical systems, as well as 
some structured work. 



Though only 66 years old, 
Harvey Hall has been the object 
of many uses over the years 
including a gymnasium, which 
was its primary purpose. Through 
the decades, it has also been used 
as a multi-purpose building stu- 
dent union, and is presently being 
used as an art studio, computer 
lab, faculty offices and the Center 
of Women's Studies. The begin- 
ning of this project will depend 
on a rectification of an uncertain 
wage ratio. Moreover, it will be 
based on a complete review of 
plans for upcoming changes. A 
large factor regarding the confir- 
mation will be the amount of pri- 
vate contributions made through 
the universities Future Capital 



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campaign. The foundation's eight 
million dollar goal over the next 
decade will include three million 
dollars in improvements and an 
additions to Harvey Hall as well 
as Founders Hall on Clarion 
Campus, and Montgomery Hall 
on Venango Campus. 

Mr. Harry Tripp, Vice President 
of Advancement, said, "We are in 
negotiations right now with that 
Capital Campaign and we are 
confident of its progress." He 
pointed out that the campaign for 
Mongomery Hall should hopeful- 
ly be completed sometime this 
fall. Also, they are currently 
receiving pledges for Founders 
and Harvey. 



The Clarion University Alumni 
Relations Office is sponsoring 

a bus trip to the Clarion- 
Glenville, W.V. football game 
on Saturday, September 20. 
The bus is open to faculty, 
staff, and administrators, as 
well as alumni, friends, and 
family. The cost of the trip is 
$35 per person and includes 
bus fare, tailgate party, and 
game ticket. Buses are non 
smoking; small coolers are per- 
mitted on the buses, but cannot 

block the isles. 

To make reservations, contact 

the Alumni Relations Office 

at 226-2637. 



Rec Center Cont'd from page 1 




The propossed Rec Center should soon be underway. 



Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 



does contain some CU students) has been working all summer to find the right design for the students of the 
university. 

The center will be located near Campbell Hall in the current Lot B. The project will involve closing Payne 
Street to accommodate the facility. The center will eventually be connected with Gemmell Student Center. 

The construction of the new parking lot on Greenville Avenue must be completed before construction to 
begin. The lot must be completed to replace parking spaces that will be lost during construction. Tomeo said 
that if the lot is not completed this fall it may affect the original construction plans. 

The center is approximately 288 feel long and approximately 148 feet wide at its widest point. In April 
1999, when the facility will be ready for students, it will house 3 basketball courts, an elevated running track, 
a large weight room (with both free weights and machines), offices and a locker room. 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Health Beat 



Depression plagues students 



by Angie Binick 
Assistant News Editor 



Sadness, despair, sluggish- 
ness.. .all people have felt such 
emotions after some emotional 
trauma, but what about those who 
live their lives suffocated under 
such emotions? For roughly nine 
million American adults, accord- 
ing to the San Antonio Express 
News, such suffocation is the 
reality of depression, an emotion- 
al disorder that for many is a bar- 
rier to normal happiness and 
involvement. Distressing for both 
the sufferer and the family and 
friends around them, depression 
has shown itself as a problem that 
needs to be understood and 
addressed if it is to appear. 

Although it would be easy to 
dismiss depression as a single 
disorder, experts actually classify 
depression into four main cate- 
gories: major depression, dys- 
thymic manic depression, and 
Seasonal Affective Disorder 
(SAD). 

In the case of major depression, 
symptoms include but are not 
limited to: a constantly sad, 
empty mood; feelings of despair, 
pessimism, guilt, or worthless-, 
ness; resdessness; suicidal incli- 
nations; changes in sex drive, 
changes in sleeping patterns; 
changes in appetite; weight fluc- 
tuations; loss of interest in for- 
merly enjoyable activities; 
fatigue; difficulty in concentrat- 
ing or remembering; and physical 
problems (i.e. headaches, drowsi- 
ness) with no apparent physical 
cause that do not respond to treat- 
ment. However, to be classified 
as major depression, these symp- 
toms must be constant and 
impact the sufferer in a way that 
prevents them from functioning 
in daily life. 

Dysthymia (low level long term 
depression) on the other hand, 
differs from major depression in 



that it is far less severe and 
affects the sufferer for longer 
periods of time. Although it has 
symptoms similar to major 
depression, such symptoms are 
usually milder than those of 
major depression and are more of 
a nuisance than a crippling afflic- 
tion, affecting mood and energy 
levels but allowing the sufferer to 
function normally in life. 

Manic depression, also known 
as bipolar disorder, involves fre- 
quent shifts between mania and 
depression and, like major 
depression, comes in long bursts. 
During a sufferer's manic phase, 
feelings of elation, rage or 
excitability dominate the suffer- 
er's mood and are often accom- 
panied by delusions of grandeur, 
increased sex drive, delusional 
thinking, inability to concentrate, 
changes in sleep patterns, gener- 
ally reckless activity, and rapid, 
illogical speech and thought pat- 
terns. However, during a suffer- 
er's depressed phase, the above 
symptoms are accompanied by or 
replaced with the above symp- 
toms for major depression. 

Finally, Seasonal Affective 
Disorder (SAD) is a depression- 
like condition triggered by 
decreasing outside light levels 
during fall and winter. Most often 
found in temperate regions where 
contrasts between seasons are 
greatest, SAD is characterized by 
above symptoms of major 
depression, but only during cold 
months of the year. Once outdoor 
light levels increase with the 
arrival of spring and summer, 
Seasonal. Affective Disorder 
symptoms usually decrease. 

It is important to keep in mind 
that there are varying intensities 
of each type of depression, and 
that it may be difficult to differ- 
entiate one type of depression 
from another. For this reason, 
anyone troubled by these symp- 
toms for long periods of time 



should consider seeing a therapist 
or health care official for diagno- 
sis and treatment. 

Medical research continues to 
search for the root of depression . 
and more and more evidence 
points to the brain as the culprit 
for this often debilitating disor- 
der. The master key to depression 
seems to be the brain's neuro- 
transmitters (chemicals that 
allow for communication 
between the brain's synapses) 
that control everything from 
mood and appetite to memory 
and motor skills. Evidence seems 
to link low levels of the neuro- 
transmitters serotonin and norep- 
inephrine to major depression 
and dysthymia, while new 
research shows that malfunctions 
in the brain's pineal gland, which 
releases the neurotransmitter 
melatonin, may play a role in 
SAD. Furthermore, a direct link 
has been found between low lev- 
els of lithium and manic depres- 
sion. Finally, lower metabolic 
activity has been found in the 
rostral anterior cingulate gyrus of 
the brain's limbic system. This 
shows that depression initially 
stems from chemical imbalances 
in the body. 

Naturally, emotional upsets 
such as stress, grief, loneliness, 
etc. will affect the brain's chem- 
istry, thus traumatic or tiring 
experiences in one's life can trig- 
ger or aggravate depression. 
Genetics may clearly play into an 
individual's brain chemistry, thus 
depression may be genetically 
linked and thus more predictable 
and treatable. However, not all 
roots of depression have been 
fully explained, so further 
research is necessary to define all 
the factors that play into depres- 
sion. 

Part nvo of Health Beat on depres- 
sion will be run in the September 25 
issue of The Clarion Call. 



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Senate 



The Monday, September 8th meeting of Student Senate began with 
a call to order by President Nicole DeFrank. Roll call was taken by 
Vice-President Nicole Henninger. 

Dr. Curtis gave the Advisor's Report in which the Academic 

Calendar for 1999-2000 and the Revision of the Student Activity Free 

'olicy were passed out for the senators to review. On September 22, 

both items will be voted on as to approve them or to request revision. 

Mr. Krull gave the Business Manager's Report, followed by the 
'resident and Vice President, who welcomed this year's senators. 

Jessica Frederick gave a report on the activities of the Internal 1 
Council (IHC). This year's theme for the Autumn Leaf Festival was 
chosen by this group as, "Clarion, one of Pennsylvania's Outstanding 
Communities of the Year." Other possible activities such as weekend 
dances and a scholarship fund for IHC members was discussed by 
Miss Frederick. 
Standing Committee reports were quickly given and the meeting was 

adjourned. 

At the September 15th meeting, Dr. Curtis discussed a draft for the 
academic calendar for the year 2000. He discussed problems regarding 
the Board of Governors allocation of funds to student associations. 
President De Frank asked if any senators were interested in serving on 
the Women's Commission Committee. Senator DiDonato announced 
Michael Chapaloney as a new member of the Facilities Planning 
Committee. Senator Parker spoke of Public Safety providing an escort 
service. Vice President Henninger said that the escort service would be 
revived if need arose. The meeting then adjourned. 



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September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 



LIFESTYLES 



Outback Cafe Hops Into Clarion 



by Rene Farbacher 
Lifestyles Writer 



A relatively new establishment 
has gone virtually unnoticed in 
Clarion since it began business 
two months ago. "The Outback 
Cafe," located just in front of 
Klingensmith's, opened its doors 
to Clarion on July 14th and has 
surprisingly received only a luke- 
warm reaction from the students 
of Clarion University. 



"The student... will 
be guaranteed a 
computer when he 
needs one." 



"We actually did better in the 
summer before the return of the 
students... sales have leveled off 
and even slightly dropped since 
Itneir] return," explains Scott 
Brown, owner of the cafe. 

"We have geared the cafe to the 
students who have to sit, eat, and 
then go on their way." 

Perhaps the reason for the lack 
of a customer base is that few 
people know what The Outback 
Cafe offers, let alone that it even 
exists. 

Allow this reporter to enlighten 
readers: 

The cafe packs just about every- 
thing it can into the store build- 
ing. 

Along with snacks, bagels, cof- 
fee drinks, and other refreshing 
types of beverages, this cafe 
offers computer terminals that 
have access to the Internet and 
VAX, and cool T-shirts that 



reflect just about any university 
sport in existence. 

The idea of cybercafes is a new 
one that is just catching on in the 
larger cities. Brown thought that 
he would try to introduce the idea 
to Clarion as a way to not only 
attract a larger customer base, but 
to provide a service he knows is 
needed to students. 

"I remember what it was like 
waiting in lines to use the lab 
computers, only to have them 
shut down or not work properly. 
At The Outback Cafe, students 
can schedule appointments to use 
our computers. That way, the stu- 
dent knows he will be guaranteed 
a computer when he needs one." 

Along with the access to the 
Internet and VAX, The Outback 
Cafe offers Laser and Color 
printouts for less than what is 
charged in the labs on campus. 
Students can even stop in and 
print out a much needed docu- 
ment without scheduling comput- 
er time. 

Brown is offering a semester 
package deal to students that 
includes scheduled computer 
time and accessories for less than 
75 cents a day. It's worth the 
money to be assured a terminal 
that will work and printouts that 
are readable. 

Plans to expand The Outback 
Cafe are in the future when busi- 
ness picks up. Brown wants to 
keep the cafe unique to smaller 
college towns like Slippery 
Rock. Lock Haven, and Grove 
City. "Larger college towns 
already have their share of the 
cybercafe world, and what's 
good for the larger town is cer- 
tainly good for smaller towns," 
according to Brown. 
Opening at 6 a.m., The Outback 




Photo by Brendan George/Clarion Call 



Inside The Outback Cafe. 




Photo by Brendan George/Clarion Call 

The Outback Cafe in the 800 Center offers refreshing snacks and beverages plus several 
computers to surf the Internet, e-mail friends or complete homework. 



Cafe caters to the morning crowd 
with fantastic breakfast bagels, 
muffins, strudels, and assorted 
coffee and tea drinks. The after- 
noon crowd can enjoy bagel 
sandwiches (hot or cold), pita 
pocket sandwiches, and gourmet 
cookies along with sodas, power 
drinks, juices, and a great tasting 
Sydney Orange Cooler. Coffee 
drinks and teas are, of course, 
still available until the 10 p.m. 
closing time. 

The cafe also offers a "1-2-3 
card," where after every third 
(not tenth) sandwich or coffee 
purchased, you get a free one. 

So, readers, reward yourself for 
making it from Becker to Still 
Hall in under ten minutes by 
stopping in The Outback Cafe for 
a quick refreshment. Or prepare 
yourself for the hike over to the 
other side of campus from Still 
by grabbing a snack and a cooler. 
Or on one of your many trips into 
Klingensmith's, drop inside The 
Outback Cafe and see everything 
that this cafe has to offer. 

Did I mention that they also 
serve a variety of ab-so-lute-ly 
delicious flavors of Penn State 
ice cream? 



Where In Clarion? 




Say Ahhhhh 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the apple on the side of the Clarion 
Beverage Inc. building. 









; 



Page 11 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



Local artist featured at Sandford 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion artist, Chat Hay Ko, is 
the first exhibitor in Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania's 
Sandford Gallery, Marwick- 
Boyd Fine Arts Building for the 
1997-98 school year. His paint- 
ings will be on display from now 
through October 9. 

An opening reception was held 
on September 5 in the gallery. 
Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday, Tuesday and 




Kelly Luczynski/Clarion Call 

"Immaculate Conception" by Chat 
Hay Ko. 



"I didn't like the 
stress of city liv- 
ing and I wanted 
to be in the coun- 
try." 



Friday, and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Ko was born in Canton City, 
China, in 1955, moved to Hong 
Kong in 1962 and from there 

immigrated to the United 
States in 1975. 

In the United States, Ko 
lived in such diverse cities 
as Minneapolis, Miami and 
New York City before 
arriving in Clarion in 1992. 
"I liked having my own 
gallery in Manhattan," says 
Ko about his city life. 

"But, that was the only 
thing that excited me. I 
didn't like the stress of city 
living and I wanted to be in 
the country." 

The Sandford Gallery 
exhibit will be Ko's third 
exhibit in 1997, following 
six years of self-imposed 
isolation. 

"My creative activity 
continued during that time 
period, but I made a con- 
scious choice to not exhibit 
and see where I wound up 
personally," he says. 

"I wanted to purify my 
reason for creating the art. 



This year I 
decided to go 
back out again. 
The art market 
is more bizarre 
than the stock 
market, all I 
can say is that 
it has not 
much to do 
with art." 

Ko has been 
involved with 
art for most of 
his life. He 
received his 
M.F.A. from 
the University 
of Minnesota 
in 1982 and 
embarked on a 
career of 
teaching, cre- 
ating and pro- 
moting art. 

He was a 
professor of 

art history at the University of 
Miami and also taught classes for 
children at the Lowe Art Museum 
and Schools. 

"I was interested in science and 
struggled to figure out what I 
wanted to do," says Ko about his 
past. 

"It was a long search and I also 
considered architecture, dance 
and art. But I always found 
myself going back to painting. I 
need to paint, and it makes me 
happy. 

"Art has to do with the whole 
person and how they handle 
materials. To me, painting is 
very physical and many of my 
paintings are large. 




Photo by Kelly Luczynski/Clarion Call 

Chat Hay Ko's work titled "Oral Fix." Ko's works will be on display through 
October 9 in the Sandford Gallery in Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts Building. 



"I paint fast, so the canvas con- 
stantly changes providing me 
immediate feedback. 

"As long as I am true to myself, 
I make no judgments on the ulte- 
rior motives of my work, just that 
it is important that they should 
exist according to my own per- 
sonal values." 

Ko has extensive involvement 
in furthering the arts. While in 
New York, Ko was director of the 
Chinatown Community Arts 
School. 

In 1987, he received a grant 
from the New York State Council 
on the Arts, which was used to 
create a network of connections 
for the Asian American Arts 



Center to encourage the growth 
of and promote Chinatown cul- 
ture. 

"I try to use my work as a 
teaching tool, rather than being a 
teacher," says Ko. 

"I use my work as a media for 
education. I enjoy young people 
looking at it. 

"I try to challenge established 
society by creating art that is at 
the cutting edge." 



Continued on 
Page 13 



Bigger Backpacks Are In 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 



If you are like most students, 
your backpack is your portable 
home — textbooks, gym clothes, 
granola bars, even laptop com- 
puters get dumped inside it. 

Backpack makers say they've 
had to redesign their tradidonal 
over-the-shoulder packs to 
accommodate all the extras that 
students lug around. 

"Bigger is better with students 
this year," says Rhonda Lewis, a 
JanSport spokesperson. 
In fact, one of JanSport's most 



popular packs this year is the 
"Big Student Pack," which is 25 
percent larger than traditional 
packs and features extra compart- 
ments for computer disks, sports 
equipment and anything else stu- 
dents can squeeze inside. 

Eastpak has invented 'The 
Ultimate," which is even bigger 
than the "Big Student Pack." 

The pack has been selling out 
because it "makes everything 
easily accessible that students 
carry from their dorm to class to 
the gym," says Tun McGuire, 
marketing manager of Eastpak. 

Timberland also thought roomi- 
er was the way to go with its new 



"Apax" pack. 

The supersized pack has side 
water pockets, outside bungee 
straps, inside personal pockets 
and even an outside organizer 
panel. 

Several companies say the pop- 
ularity of laptop computers — 
and the need for students to tote 
them around campus — got them 
thinking big. 

Outdoor Products offers "The 
Bytepak," which is made to fit a 
laptop but looks more like a 
backpack than a regular comput- 
er case. 

"One of the dangers of the com- 
puter case is that computer 



thieves can easily recognize their 
target," said Bryan Stewart, mar- 
keting director for Outdoor 
Products. 
"With a backpack, the comput- 



er is more easily disguised. 

"We're trying to help them 
carry more without them having 
to worry about their packs falling 
apart." 




DESIGNING 
MINDS 



226-5323 




TANNING SPECIALS: 



535 main St. Clarion 
Mon-thurs 9-9 
Fri 9-8 Sat 9-4 



1 MONTH UNLIMITED (30) TANNING $40 
TUES AND WED. 10% OFF 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 12 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



CUP Theater Schedule Announced 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 



Annually and consistently, the 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania Theatre 

Department has provided a wide 
range of varied entertainment 
offerings to the university and the 
surrounding community. 

The 1997-98 season, for which 
tickets are now on sale, continues 
this heritage with the theme "The 
Tradition Continues." 

"Tradition sounds like some- 
thing from 'Fiddler on the Roof,' 
no?" says Robert Levy, assistant 
professor of speech communica- 
tion and theater. "But 'Fiddler on 
the Roof... dozens of other 
musicals and hundreds of plays 
are all part of the glorious tradi- 
tion of theater at Clarion 
University. 

"Clarion's ambitious program 
is designed not only to expose the 
Clarion student to the greatest 
possible variety in the dramatic 
canon, but also to provide the 
Clarion and university communi- 



ties with high quality, entertain- 
ing, thought provoking, some- 
times disturbing, theater." 

Tradition shows up in many 
ways in 1997-98 from a perfor- 
mance of one of the oldest tradi- 
tional playwrights, Shakespeare, 



"Clarion's ambi- 
tious program... 
[provides] some- 
times disturbing 
theater." 



to the now traditional dance con- 
cert and spring musical, with sev- 
eral newer works included along 
the way. 

The season includes: 
"Twelfth Night" by William 
Shakespeare, a classic tale of 
tempest tossed siblings and mis- 
taken identities, runs September 
30-October 4 in the Marwick- 
Boyd Little Theatre. 

"Dance Concert 1997," always 



a sell out, is scheduled November 
20-21 in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. 

"A... My Name is Alice" by 
Joan Micklin Silver and Julianne 
Boyd, a kaleidoscope in revue 
style of contemporary women, 
opens the 1998 offerings from 
February 17-21 in Marwick- 
Boyd Little Theatre. 

"Woman in Mind" by Alan 
Ayckbourn, a quirky comedy 
about a suburban English wife's 
imaginary, idealized family, is 
scheduled April 28-May 2, 1998 
in Marwick-Boyd Little Theatre. 

Ticket Packages include: 

Season tickets: one ticket for 
each theater production, S21. 

Patron tickets: two tickets for 
each theater production and name 
listing in the program, $65. 

Patron plus tickets: two tickets 
to each theater production, two 
tickets for the dance concert, and 
name listing in the program, $77. 
Payment for these categories 
should be made to the Clarion 
Student's Association and sent to 
The Tradition Continues, Clarion 
University, Department of 



Speech Communication and 
Theatre, 840 Wood St., Clarion, 
16214. 

Contributor, Benefactor, 
Director's Circle, Producer's 



Circle and Angel support cate- 
gories are also available. 

Remember, all performances 
are free with a validated Clarion 
Student Identification Card. 



sts 




Delftware Dealt to Tourists 



Courtesy of College Press 
Service 

My first experience with 
ceramics was a one-month 
adjunct course in college. I 
would sit at a spinning wheel 
with a wet lump of clay and try to 
transform it into a beautiful vase 
with my bare hands. Without 
fail, I'd end up with a deformed 
ashtray. 

By the end of the course, I had 
a collection of 16 Dali-esque ash- 
trays, which was fine, except I 
didn't smoke. 

I remember my instructor once 
mentioned a special, blue painted 
ceramic that depicted Dutch 
landscapes. She assured me that 
a large portion of America was 
very fond of this "Delftware." 



I don't recall, however, if she 
ever mentioned where "Delft" 
was. I finally went looking for it 
myself. 

The famous village is about an 
hour's drive southwest of 
Amsterdam. My first stop was at 
Keramiek Boyan, a small tourist 
shop on the main square run by 
Davor Slat. 

Davor, a 30-something self- 
taught artist, invited me to spend 
the day with him in his ceramics 
shop as an apprentice. In 
exchange for helping out, I could 
keep everything I created that 
wasn't high enough quality to 
sell. Yep, free mutated 
Delftware! 

I watched Davor work for a 
while, but mostly learned how to 
sell little Delft trinkets and big 



"95% of our stock is $5.99 or less" 



i DAVE'S , ,^-, 

T music < im 

y^l MINE 7, 

% mm 

Iff CLARION _~'i&H 



New & Used Tapes 
&CD's 

Buy/Sell/Trade 

751 Main Street 
Clarion, PA 16214 
814-227-2244 

Hours: 11-7 Mon- 
Sat. Closed Sun. 



Delft trinkets to French and 
German tourists. Busses seemed 
to be unloading tourists relent- 
lessly, and sometimes they'd 
enter Davor's small shop en 
masse. 

"How much is this?" 

"Why is it blue?" 

"Where's the McDonald's?" 

I never realized just how drain- 
ing it could be to answer stupid 
tourist questions for an entire 
day. 

When I wasn't needed to attend 
to the tourists, I drew a windmill 
onto a white tile with a series of 
brushes. The paint, a cobalt- 
based secret formula which 
Davor mixes himself, looks gray 
and turns blue when it's fired. 
That's the magic of Delft Blue, 
he explained. 

About 400 years ago, Dutch 
trading ships brought back some 
porcelain from China Before 
long, the Dutch became quite 
fond of it. 

However, because it took the 
Dutch trading ships two years to 
make the round trip journey, the 
porcelain (or "China") was very 
expensive. So, the Dutch decid- 
ed to undercut the Chinese and 
make the stuff themselves. 



As it happened back in the 
1600s, there was a war in Europe. 
Much of this region, caught up in 
the war, had less time for drink- 
ing beer. 

Therefore, the major breweries 
around Delft went out of busi- 
ness. And when the ceramic peo- 
ple decided to set up shop, they 
moved right into the deserted 
breweries. 
But this isn't the funny part. 

Several porcelain companies 
sprung up around Delft in the 
mid- 1600s.. They took the basic 
Chinese designs and added typi- 
cal Dutch landscapes to help it 
sell. 

Anyway, the demand for little 
blue windmills eventually waned 
and the companies all went out of 
business, except for the 
Porceleyne Res, which adapted 
by finding more industrial uses 
for ceramics (though nothing as 
useful as the toilet). 

But this still isn't the funny 
part. 

The funny part is that when 
Delftware started to take off 
again with tourism in recent • 
years, many tourists thought it 
was too expensive. 
So, the Chinese started making 



cheap knock-offs. And many of 
the tourists who come to Delft 
end up buying Chinese knock- 
offs of Dutch knock-offs of 
Chinese China. 

Well, I guess it wasn't that 
funny. But we're talking about 
ceramics here, so give me some 
slack. 

I spent the next day getting in 
the way at the Porceleyne Fles. 

Delftware produced at the 
Porceleyne Fles costs about ten 
times more than the same item 
made by my mentor, Davor, 
which may be justifiable for col- 
lectors and people who care 
about that sort of thing but is 
steep for most tourists. 

Therefore, the main message of 
the Porceleyne Fles factory tour 
is that Porceleyne Res products 
(indicated by a special stamp) are 
"real" Delftware, and the rest is 
dirt. 

I spent most of my time at the 
Porceleyne Fles working on a 
special order of teapots with 
Martin, a body builder and expert 
clay, paint and glaze mixer. 

I've always been curious how 
they made teapots hollow. Well, 

Continued on page 13 



..J 



s_y___i 



Calendar 



Events 



Today 

Senior pictures taken - 262 Gemmell 
Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 
Sorority Rush parties 
Friday 
UAB Spirit Day 

Senior pictures taken - 262 Gemmell 
Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 
Sorority Rush theme parties 
Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 248 Gemmell 
Golf Scramble for students at HiLevel - 1 p.m., shot- 
gun start 
Tennis at Westminster - 3 p.m. 

Saturday 

Sorority Rush preference parties 

Golf at West Virginia Wesleyan Invitational 

Cross Country at Penn State 

Sixth Annual Literacy Institute - 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 

p.m., Gemmell Multipurpose Room 

Football at Glenville State - 1 p.m. 

Edwin Arrieta from Costa Rica - 9 to 10:30 p.m., 

Riemer Coffeehouse in Gemmell; sponsored by the 

International Office 

Sunday 

Intramural 10K Relay begins 

Intramural One Pitch Softball begins 

Golf at West Virginia Wesleyan Invitational 

"Lift Every Voice" music and skits - 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., 

Gemmell Performance Area/Gemmell Multipurpose 



Monday 

Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 
Intramural Power Lifting begins 
Freshman Advising Week begins 
UAB sign up for Lock Haven football trip - 10 a.m., 
273 Gemmell 

UAB Homecoming Court pictures - 3 p.m., Gemmell 
Multipurpose Room 

Policy committee meeting - 4 p.m., B-8 Hart Chapel 
Career Development Series "Campus Career 
Resources" - 6 p.m., 250/252 Gemmell 
Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 
Tuesday 

Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 
Intramural Indoor Soccer begins 
Golf at Slippery Rock Invitational 
Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday Inn 
Volleyball at Lock Haven - 7 p.m. 
UAB speaker, Luis Rodriguez: "Gang Violence and 
Intervention" - 7:30 p.m., Hart Chapel 
Wednesday 

Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 
Intramural One-on-One Basketball begins 
College Fair - noon to 9:30 p.m., Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 

Tennis vs. Geneva - 3:30 p.m. 
UAB Wellness Program "Study Skills... Tips" - 4 p.m., 
250 Gemmell 

UAB Homecoming float meeting - 6 p.m., 246 
Gemmell 



9 Room (rain location) 

i — js 

Continued from 
page 11 



"Major Decisions: A Career 
Development Series" 



_j 



is a series of workshops to be held 

from 6 to 7 p.m. Monday nights in 250/252 Gemmell 

and is designed to help students get prepared for the 

professional world and to develop career goals. 

The fall schedule is: 

Sept 22 — Campus Career Resources 

Sept. 29 — Exploring Myself and Careers 

Oct. 6 — The Decision Making Process 

Oct. 13 — Exploring Career Possibilities 

Oct. 20 — Clarion University Majors (to be held in 

GernmeU Multi-Purpose Room) 

Oct. 27 — Learning Outside the Classroom 

Nov. 3 — Developing a Career Portfolio 

For more information call Donna Poljanec at 2264879. 



Furthering education in other 
fashions, Ko writes an art column 
for the Clarion News and creates 
visuals for ARTnews Monthly. 
He will also have visuals pub- 
lished in Carnegie Magazine in 
September. 

Upcoming exhibits of his art are 
planned for Naples, Fla., 
Vancouver, British Columbia, 
Canada and New York City. 



• PAHA'S CAFI 

507 MAIN STREET 
226-9001 



""" "fffE-TPRIFIR" 

(Value $1.29) with 

purchase of any 

sandwich expires 6/1/98 



Continued from 
page 12 



not that curious, but the way it 
works is pretty interesting. 

We poured Martin's secret for- 
mula liquid clay into special 
teapot molds. Then, after a cer- 
tain secret amount of time (about 
five minutes), a thin shell of clay 
would coagulate on the edge of 
the mold and we would pour the 
excess liquid clay out. 

Then we'd remove the still soft 
teapot from its form. This would 
be left to dry, then baked, then 
painted, then baked again before 
it would be sold, probably to a 
Chinese tourist for an incredible 
amount of money. 

After learning to make teapots, 
I went to the painting area. 
Under the supervision of a master 
painter, I tried to copy the picture 
of a bird onto a white tile, the 
entrance test for all prospective 
Porceleyne Fles painters. 

I was concentrating so hard a 
bead of sweat dropped into my 
paint and probably ruined the 
secret formula. 

I was surprised when, after 
careful examination of my bird (a 
species the staff had not seen 
before), they told me I had 
passed. Perhaps the public rela- 
tions person had given my 
instructor strict orders to pass me 
if I had so much as blown my 
nose on the tile, but it still felt 
like an accomplishment. 

Even though a Delft plate costs 
a few hundred dollars, you can't 
eat off it. You would scratch the 
glaze with your silverware. 

And you can't wash it easily 
because the underside can't get 
wet. Well, it can get wet, but the 
glaze-free spots on the bottom 
would let in water and the glaze 
would crack. So basically the 
only thing these extremely 
expensive plates are good for is 
hanging on the wall. 
Perhaps this is the funny part. 





m 




m wm 

(Bfflff 




^_r 



(with coupon) 
eat-in only 
4-10 p.m. 



Page 14 







1 















The Clarion Call 



; 



September 18, 1997 Page 15 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



Activities Day 




ii 



"To spite the threatening weather, it 

turned out to be a very lively and 

successful afternoon..." 





i ■ ■■■— 



i. - i i ■ ■ .■ m i. i ■!'■ I' l'-^ 



Fall 1997 














"I was very pleased, 
Everyone cooperated 
and enjoyed them- 
selves. A lot of the 
student body took 
advantage; 1 



'■'■V: : ::xW: : : : XvX?:;: 



Photos by: Kristen Collelo 

and Tim Emanuel 
Quotes from: Hal Wassink 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 16 



Page 17 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



iW 



wrong 



r 




ENTERTAINMENT 




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September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 18 



ENTERTAINMENT] 




JGOflMliiHfl^riHfcSUW- 



1fl6 



UF6 IM 



©1997 



^ 



CtLianq 

JK1W 



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wrii»»fi»Httttn«jL 




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fBWWL 









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laWlWrfTGWE 

-SfrdflritfWl. 
Ipiwf 




eases* 



HffttMl 









Spell-checkers, 
grammar checkers 
voice entry 
digital scanners 
desktop publishing 
the Internet! Isn't 
technology great? 



Isn't it great? 



Look Karl, you 
may be able to 
do great things 
with computers, 
but you can't 
always depend 
on them! 



Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you want to me admired by DOZENS of fellow 

students? Do you dream of molding and shaping 

the impressionable minds of our campus' youth? 

Then send YOUR fun submissions of poetry, 

comics or Bedazzled clothes to these 
^££W Entertainment Pages, c/o 

Jfjf^S!*?) Ben J- 270 Gemmell 

Center. Or call x2380. 

Impress your 
MOM! 




Look we can even talk and see 
ourselves on the screen How 
could anyone not like this 
technology?! Truly this is the 
information age and we're the 
pinnacle of modern cockroach 






Those #!@ 
programmers! 
I bet they're 
union!!!! 



Karl,' 
you ever 
learn? 




Doim he like l\;irl! ( nine (o (he \\ rile Inn. W ere 



Page 19 



September 18, 1997 



King Crossword 



ACROSS 

1 Kojak lack 
5 Woman of the 

knight? 
9 — Mahal 

12 Wine region 

13 Pianist 
Gilds 

14 — distance 

15 Lahr role 

16 California 
town 

17 Cartoonist 
Chast 

18 Phyllis 
Diller's 
"husband" 

19 "Born in the 

20 Bronx cheer 

21 Send the 
modern way 

23 Here, to Henri 
25 Pooch 
28 George's 

predecessor 

32 As a 
companion 

33 Looked 
lecherously 

34 Aussie soldier 
ofWWI 

36 Claim 

37 Mound stat. 

38 Put to work 

39 Soup du — 

42 Baseball-strike 

concern 
44 Pinnacle 

48 Wapiti 

49 One of a late 

15th-century 



1 


2 


3 


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6 


7 


8 




9 


10 


11 


12 








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15 








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18 








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22 




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23 


24 






25 


26 


27 








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29 


30 


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32 












33 










34 










35 




36 












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40 


41 


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38 


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WILL AND 

A9FS GUIDE to 

RESTAURANTS 



FEATURING 




THEHS'S MAM* OlFFCtf^ 
KIMP5 Of RtlTAOftAM-rs , 

SWAM VOJ, FAUCI, *« 6«W» ft, 
AND FAV-FOOP. 




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have Pima, hambu«gss.t, 

ORCHlckSN. I** CALLEP 
FAST FOOp BECAUSE it 
POESM'T TAKE THAT LOMiTP 
O6PE0.TH63OE AlREAW 
MAPE, Amp TMtV'M LIKE 
A UtUE fliT 




PlZlARESTAvRAMTJAfttvtvAUS 
SMAu. AMO HAVE COUMTEAS. 
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September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 20 



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Page 21 



The Clarion Call 



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The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 





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Call On You 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 



If you could change one thing about Clarion, what 

would it be? 



•W«»"i^"-™— ^^ 




Chris M. Kitchen, Senior, Biology 
"Turn that frown upsidedown. Change it into a 

smile." 




Debra Eshbaugh, Senior, English / Spanish 

"I would make people realize that people can 

change from what they were once percieved to 

be." 





■■■K Tt - a«HSSKB 



Kristie Runk, Sophomore, Special Ed. / El Ed. 

"People need to become more open minded. 

They also need to be a little bit nicer to each 

other." 



Jeff Kapp, Junior, Molecular Biology / Biotech 
"Get rid of all the damn credit card salesmen." 





Leslie Proctor, Junior, Special Ed. / EI Ed. 

"I would want people in classes to be more 

friendly and to realize that there is more to do on 

weekends than party." 



Craig Hoffman, Freshman, Undecided 
"I would change nothing." 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 




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The Clarion Call 



Page 24 




Page 25 



The Clarion Call 



September U , 1997 



SPORTS 



Clarion falls to Millersville in season opener 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

When the 1997 football sched- 
ule was finalized, Clarion 
University Head Coach Malen 
Luke knew his Golden Eagles 
would have their hands full when 
they opened their season at 
Millersville. 

Not only did the Marauders, 
who returned 12 starters from last 
year's 6-4 squad, have the benefit 
of a preseason tune-up at Penn, 
but they also had the incentive to 
knock the Golden Eagles from 
their #4 perch in the NCAA 
Division II poll. 

Those factors came into play 
Saturday evening, as Millersville 
jumped to a 28-7 first half lead en 
route to a 31-25 win over Clarion 
in front of 5,700 fans at 
Biemesderfer Stadium. 

"The things I feared going into 
the first game unfolded in the 
first half," said Luke. "We had 
some first game jitters and 
weren't able to get into the flow 
until it was too late. The bottom 
line, though, is that we didn't 
execute the way we needed to 
execute." 

The loss dropped Clarion (0-1) 
from #4 completely out of the top 
20 as they prepare to travel to 
Glenville State (1-1) this 
Saturday. 

After Millersville (1-0) opened 
the game by taking their opening 
drive for a touchdown, Clarion 



responded on their initial posses- 
sion to knot the score at 7-7. The 
Golden Eagles drove 71 yards on 
11 plays, capped by Keonte 
Campbell's 4-yard touchdown 



At that point, quarterback Chris 
Weibel directed the Eagles on a 
10-play, 65-yard touchdown 
drive to allow Clarion to pull 
within 28-14 at halftime. Senior 




Head coach Malen Luke looks on as Claron prepares for 
Glenville State . Glenville State is coached by former 
Clarion offensive coordinator Warren Rugerio. 



run at the 7:46 mark of the first 
quarter. 

However, Millersville would 
begin their own drive, scoring a 
touchdown one minute later 
when Davonne Mobley crossed 
the goal line on a five yard scam- 
per. Millersville then sand- 
wiched a Drew Fulmer 22-yard 
touchdown pass to Sean Scott 
with another Mobley TD run to 
give the hosts a commanding 21- 
point lead with 1:39 remaining in 
the first half. 



running back Ron DeJidas, who 
finished with 142 rushing yards 
on the evening, registered the 
score on a 1 -yard jaunt as the first 
half expired. 

Luckily for Clarion, the second 
half bore little resemblance to the 
first. After allowing 28 first half 
points, Clarion's defense limited 
Millersville to a mere field goal 
in the final two stanzas. 

"We made some strategic 
changes at halftime," said Luke. 
They were doing some things 



that were hurting us, so we made 
some adjustments." 

Clarion opened the second half 
with a bang as Kervin Charles 
took the kickoff 57 yards to the 
Millersville 33. The Golden 
Eagles then advanced to the 8, 
but were limited to John 
Shikella's 27-yard field goal. 

In the fourth period, the Golden 
Eagles halted a Marauder drive at 
the Clarion 30-yard line, where 
the CUP offense took over and 
launched a six-play, 70-yard 
drive to paydirt. Dejidas keyed 
the scoring drive on a 48-yard 
run, before Weibel punched in 
from 1 yard out. Weibel then hit 
Mark Witte on the ensuing con- 
version the cut the gap to 28-25 
with 8:42 left on the clock. 

Following a Millersville field 
goal at 4:26, Clarion would have 
two more possessions, but were 
unable to reach the endzone. 

"I was proud of the way the 
kids hung in there,"said Luke. 
"We had our chances in the end. 
If we continue to do that the rest 
of the year, whick I think we will, 
we're going to be O.K." 

Despite the loss, the Golden 
Eagles will remain focused on 
their preseason goals. 

"We want to win the conference 
championship, and we would 
love to get another invitation to 
the playoffs," Luke said. "If you 
want to get into the playoffs, it's 
better to lose early in the year 
than late." 



Volleyball team bounces back against Vulcans 



by Tommi Hearn 
Sports Writer 



The Golden Eagle's womens 
volleyball team rallied to beat 
the California Vulcans in an 
impressive 12-15; 15-13; 15- 
13;12-15;15-13 win. Clarion 
stormed back, avenging a loss 
over the weekend to Cal in the 
Charleston Tournamnt. 

Sophomore Brooke Paxton 
led the Golden Eagle attack 
with 83 attempts, 32 assists and 
10 digs. Jamie Soboleski also 
played big netting 40 attempts 
and 15 assists, and 8 digs. 

Jessa Canfield added 17 kills 
and 18 digs along with Amanda 
Baer's and Beth Brandstatter's 
16 digs and 6 kills a piece. 

The win had to be satisfying 
to coach Jodi Burns and the rest 




Clarion's S/OH Brooke Paxton and S/DS Jamie Soboleski 



of the team since the Vulcans 
beat the Golden Eagles in straight 
sets over the weekend. 

Freshman outside hitter 
Jennifer Salley said," the (Cal) 



match was very exciting and kept 
us all on the edge of our seat." 

In Clarions loss to Cal, Brooke 
Paxton led the way with 33 
attempts and 10 assists. Jamie 



Soboleski netted 29 attempts and 
7 assists. 

Despite the loss to California, 
Clarion made an impressive 
showing in the Charleston 
Tournament with wins over 
Shepard, West Virginia State, and 
Barton. 

In the Shepard game, Clarion 
won the first match 15-12. The 
Golden Eagles picked up the sec- 
ond match 15-12 as well and 
rolled to a 15-11 win in the third. 

West Virginia State also fell 
prey to the Golden Eagles. 
Behind Brook Paxton's 29 
attempts, 22 assists, and 11 digs. 
Clarion breezed to a 15-2, 15-3, 
15-10 win. Beth Brandstatter 
added 7 kills and Jen Juter had 6. 

(continued on page 26) 




Clarion 25 
Millersville 31 

This Week at 
Glenville State 



Glenville State 
at a glance 

After a 56-7 torching at the 
hands of Division I-AA Liberty 
two weeks ago, the Pioneers are 
circling their wagons in prepara- 
tion for the Golden Eagles. A 
year ago, Clarion entertained 
Glenville State and romped to a 
49-23 win. This year Clarion 
travels to Pioneer Stadium 
where Glenville State dropped 
Geneva 36-35 in their season 
opener. 

Returning on the Pioneers 
offense, which was ranked 10th 
in Division II a year ago, is wide 
receiver Carlos Ferralls. Ferralls 
led the nation with 10.1 recep- 
tions per game in '96, and was 
5 th in yards per game at 120.6 
After being limited to 44 yards 
on 3 catches against Liberty, the 
senior WR will look to break out 
against Clarion. Glenville 
State's offense also features ath- 
letic quarterback Wilkie Perez, 
who has the ability to move the 
Pioneer offense on the ground or 
in the air. 

Glenville (State College, local 
ed 100 miles south of the 
Pennsylvania border in central 
West Virginia is led by former 
Clarion offensive coordinator 
Warren Ruggiero. Warren 
helped the Golden Eagles to the 
NCAA Division II semi-finals a 
year ago and inherits a very tal 
ented Pioneer team. 
NOTES: Clarion won the only 
meeting between the schools in 
96 by a 49-23 count. Clarion 
had 511 yards of offense in the 
game, rushing for 308. Clarion 
RB had 83 yards on the ground 
in the contest. 



Volleyball team rallies for win 




Kelly Luczynski/Clarion Call 
Jamie Soboleski goes for the kill against Cal. 



From page 24 

Clarion went on to face 
Barton in the third round. 
Paxton led the assault once 
again with 57 attempts and 25 
assists, while Soboleski turned 
in 25 attempts and 10 assists. 

Despite the loss to Cal in the 
next round, the team bounced 
back and is looking forward to 
a winning season. 

"I feel we are doing really 
well this year so far and it looks 
like a promising season," noted 
junior Mandy Kirby. 

Clarion hits the road with 
dates against Lock Haven on 
September 23, the Ashland 
Tournament September 26-27, 
and Edinboro September 30. 



Cross Country team opens at Cal 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



The men's and women's cross 
country teams each improved 
two places over their last years 
finish at California last Saturday. 
The women and men both fielded 
two teams. The women finished 
3rd and 13th out of 15 teams; the 
men finished 7th and 15th of 17 
teams. 

Caoch Mooney said,"Every 
coach has a system for success. 
For the first time I saw it being 
implemented here at Clarion, 
especially with the women. The 
top eight girls finished within 50 
seconds of each other . With our 
runners we saw strength, depths, 
and experience. Hopefully the 



"B" team and both men's teams 
will learn from Saturday." 

The women had six runners in 
the top 25. Daria Diaz(ll), 
Brigette Laflin(13), Kelly 
Null(15), Rocky Wilson(16), 
Maureen Long (22), Debbie 
Brostmeyer(24), and Kristie 
Runk finished (26) out of 130 
runners. 

The men's top seven included 
top 25 finisher Brad Alderton 
(25), Dave Ellwood(33), Tom 
Brady (38), Jon Fox(46), Jimmy 
Adams (63), Mark Trzyna(73), 
and Colin McGlore (79) out of a 
field of 145 runners. 

The Keep On Running award is 
given every week. A male and 
female runner who Mooney feels 
demonstrated an marked 



improvement or "kept going" 
through difficulties (injuries, 
sickness, etc.) receives this 
award. This week Danielle 
Graver and Shane Cummings 
won the honor. 

Mooney gives the Hot Legs 
award weekly to two runners 
he feels gave an excellent per- 
formance or did an exceptional 
job with the race plans that 
were set. For the Califronia 
race, David Ellwood and Kelly 
Null were selected. 

The cross country team com- 
petes this Saturday at the 
Slippery Rock Invitational. 
The women race at 12:40 and 
the men at 1:10 p.m. Clarion 
travels to Penn State on 
September 27. 



Sports Trivia 

Who was the last Big Ten team 
to win the National Championship 

outright? 

What year did the Tampa Bay 
Buccanneers last make the NFL 
playoffs? 

(last weeks answer) 
Lafayette-Lehigh Played in 131 
meetings. 



SportsTalk 



Thursdays 

4-6 p.m. 

91.7 WCUC 



Kraig Koelsch 

"Joe" from PSU 

Charlie Desch 

Bill Bates 

Anything you want 

to talk about in the 

sporting world! 

Clarion's only live 

sports talk show. 



Tennis team loses two in 
Shippensburg Tournament 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



The Golden Eagle netters head- 
ed East last weekend for the 
annual Shippensburg 

Tournament, where they suffered 
two tough losses to Kutztown 
and Bloomsburg, before bounc- 
ing back to manhandle West 
Chesterin the two day event. 

Kutztown (3-0) edged the 
Golden Eagles 5-4 with wins 
from Meredith Keller, Amy 
Sonon, Margo Ayers and Carrie 




Mimi Williams 

Williams. Clarion's Mimi 
Williams dropped Kutztown's 
Meghan Horrigan 6-3, 6-3 .Amy 
O'Neal also notched a singles 
win. 

Perennial PSAC powerhouse 
Bloomsburg was too much for 
Clarion over the weekend, earn- 
ing a 9-0 sweep. Senior Mimi 
Williams did not play in singles 
competition due to back pain. 
Williams did team up with dou- 
bles partner Rachael Link later in 
the day. 

On Sunday, Clarion was out to 
prove something and did so with 
an impressive 8-1 win, improv- 
ing its overall record to 3-2. 

Kristen Golia scored a 6-2, 6-2 
win over Rebecca Roy in #1 sin- 
gles play. Freshman Amy 
Shaffer beat Kristine Kuckler 6- 
2-, 6-4. Mimi Williams bounced 



back with a 6-0, 6-0 win over 
Mandy Wood. Amy O'Neal and 
Carly Carrier also netted wins for 
Clarion. 

The long trip to Shippensburg 
last weekend seemed a little 
longer without the presence of 
sophomore Cassie Baker. Baker, 
who played #1 singles as a fresh- 
man last season, is the Golden 
Eagles #3 player this year. She 
was excused from the trip to 
attend a wedding. 

Baker's absence caused head 
coach Terry Acker to shuffle the 
lineup. 

"Not having Cassie in the line- 
up made a big difference," Acker 
noted. "She is playing some of 
the best tennis I've seen her play. 
Her absence definitely hurt us." 

In the Bloomsburg match, the 
makeshift lineup was not enough 
to overcome the PS AC-East foe. 

"Bloomsburg is the team to 
beat," Acker admitted. "Our 
original lineup one through six 
matches up very well against 
them. We were definitely at a 
disadvantage with Cassie out." 

Perhaps an early season bright 
spot for Clarion has been the play 
of freshman Amy Shaffer (Mt. 
Pleasant H.S.) at #2 singles. 

"I was expecting Amy to take a 
while to adjust to the college 
game, especially playing #2 sin- 
gles." Acker commented. "It is 
much faster than she experienced 
in high school. She has been 
very mature with her play so far." 

Despite the two early losses, 
Acker is pleased with the way his 
team came to play against West 
Chester. 

"We were a little mad at the 
way we played on Saturday, " he 
admits. " We showed a lot of 
heart and took it out on West 
Chester." Clarion's match with 
Slippery Rock scheduled for 
Wednesday, September 17, was 
postponed until Wednesday 
October 8th. 



Adult Survivor's Therapy Group 



J 



A therapy group for Adult Survivor's of Childhood Trauma is being formed at the 
Department of Counseling Services. This group will be facilitated by Melissa H. 
Daugherty. The meeting time will depend on the participant's schedules. 

The Adult Survivor's of Childhood Trauma Group is a ten week therapy 
group that will allow members to begin exploring the impact of childhood 
trauma on their lives. Through education, experiential exercise, and the 
support of other survivors, members can begin to uncover what happened, 
identify the effects, and learn new tools to live more functional, fulfilling 
lives. 

This group is for anyone who has been physically, sexually, or emotionally abused as 

a child; anyone who has grown up in an alcoholic or addicted family, 

anyone who is experiencing difficulty in relationships, school/work, or liking themselves. 

For more information, call 226-225S or stop by the Department of Counseling Services in 
148 Egbert Hall. 






CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



September 18, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 26 



Sportsview 



Why Penn State won't win the national championship 



by Chris PfeU 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Sorry Nittany Lion fans, but 
Penn State will be on the outside 
looking in once again when the 
national championship is decid- 
ed. 

I know all you JoePa lovers out 
there are just thrilled to death that 
the Lions are ranked #1 in the 
nation. All I have to say is that 
the rankings mean absolutely 
nothing until the Bowl Alliance 
gives out bids. 

However, since Patemo sold his 
soul to the Big Ten, they are tied 
down to the non-Alliance Rose 
Bowl. The Lions only hope of 
winning the national champio- 
ship is to go undefeated (which 
they won't) and pray that some- 
one from the Pac-10 does also 
(which they won't). 

Penn State is supposed to be the 
team to beat this year. They 
played a mediocre game against 
Pitt. I don't care that they gave 
up points late, the fact is they 
only won by 17 points. Yeah, 
they spanked Temple last week, 
but they would have gotten more 



of a challenge in a Blue/White 
game. It will be interesting to see 
how they look when they finally 
play a competitive team. 

Michigan and Ohio State will 
both have to come to Happy 
Valley, which will give the Lions 
an advantage. But, Michigan 
looked very impressive against 
Colorado. I'm not sure that Penn 
State will be able to handle their 
defense unless Curtis Enis (forget 
about the Heisman) gets rolling 
and Mike McQuery plays over 
his head. Ohio State isn't as 
good as they were last year, but 
will force the Lions to play near 
perfect. 

Also, don't forget about the late 
season trip to Michigan State. 
The Spartans can score, and I 
question whether Penn State can 
beat them in a shootout. 

My prediction on who will win 
the national championship? The 
winner of this weekend's show- 
down between Florida and 
Tennessee will lose to my 
Nebraska Comhuskers in a #1 vs. 
#2 showdown in the Orange 
Bowl. 

Speaking of Nebraska, I know 



they looked unimpressive last 
week, but the pollsters must 
never heard of a team looking 
ahead. 

Look for the Huskers to knock 
off Washington this week and roll 
to their third UNDISPUTED title 
in four years (sorry JoePa, they 
would have mopped you up in 
1994). 
NFL Notes 

The 1997 NFL season is now 
three weeks old, and up to this 
point it has left the experts 
scratching their heads and arm- 
chair quarterbacks on the edge of 
their seats. 

In the AFC East, New England 
looked like world beaters the first 
two weeks until Bill Parcells 
brought his Jets into town last 
week. If Neil O'Donnell could 
hold on to the football (I still 
have nightmares about him), the 
Jets would have pulled off the 
upset. Look for the Jets and 
Dolphins to be in the playoff 
hunt. The Buffalo dynasty (if 
you can call it that) is over and 
Indy is out of miracles. 

The Jags lead the Central, but 
have to face the Steelers on 



Monday night minus Mark 
Brunell. There is no need to 
panic for the Steelers faithful. 
Bill Cowher is too good of a 
coach not to win the division. 
The Bengals and Tennessee (?) 
Oilers are young, but also talent- 
ed enough to sneak in the play- 
offs. The Baltimore Browns can 
start looking ahead to next year. 
The Broncos, decked out in 
their ridiculous uniforms, are the 
class of not only West, but the 
entire AFC. Kansas City is solid, 
but they never go far. The 
Raiders have tons of talent, but 
always find a way to lose. 

The NFC East will be a heated 
race between the Cowboys, 
Eagles, and Redskins. The 
Cowboys have all the luck in the 
world, but if they don't figure out 
how to score a touchdown, they 
will be a wild card. 

The NFC Central leader at 3-0 
is.. .Tampa Bay! Yes, the Bucs, 
no longer the Yucs, are the only 
unbeaten left in the NFC. Trent 
Dilfer is finally growing up and 
Warrick Dunn is going to run 
away with the Rookie of the Year 
award. They won't be able to 



overtake the Packers, but might 
make them sweat it out. 
The Packers aren't as good as 
they think they are, but are still 
the Super Bowl favorite. 
Minnesota and Detroit will win 
their share of games, while the 
Bears might have a shot at 
Peyton Manning. 

The NFC West is a two team 
race. Carolina is a different team 
with Kerry Collins back. The 
49ers already lost Jerry Rice for 
the year and are one hit away 
from losing Steve Young forever. 
The Rams are exciting and could 
shock a few teams. New Orleans 
and Atlanta will battle with the 
Bears for Manning. 

Thus far, the Bucs are the team 
to beat, the so-called favorites 
are struggling to win, Rice is out 
for the season, and the Jets are for 
real. 

The NFL sesason is off to a 
crazy start. So, my Super Bowl 
pick is the Bucs over the Jets. 



Golden Eagle Hotline 
226-2079 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Intramurals are well underway and competition is intense! Beach vol- 
leyball, tennis and flag football seasons are going strong and will continue 
throughout the month of September. Aqua Aerobics and Women's Power 
Hour have also been a great success. An additional aqua aerobics class is 
being offered on Wednesday evenings at 8: 00 pm in the Tippin Pool. 
Come and experience a new and exciting exercise! 

Don't forget our upcoming intramural and recreation activities begin- 
ning this weekend with a 1 pitch softball tournament at 3 pm 
Sunday, September 21. Teams must be registered by Friday morning, 
September 19th at 10 am. You can pick up a registration sheet on the intra- 
mural bulletin board or stop by room 117 Tippin Gym. Following this tourna- 
ment will be a 10k relay race at 5 pm. 

Looking ahead, power lifting, indoor soccer and 1 on 1 basketball are 
scheduled to begin the week of September 22nd. Check the intramural cal- 
endar for registration deadlines. Don't miss out and opportunity to stay in 
shape, have fun and meet new people! 



RESIDENCE HALL 
VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT 
TEAMS WON LOST 



PLACE 

1 Campbell B 

2. Ralston A 

3. Wilkinson A 

4. Ralston B 

5. Campbell A 



4 
2 
2 
3 

1 




2 
2 

1 
3 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 
5th 



FLAG FOOTBALL 





Page 27 




HELP WANTED 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10-$20 

per hour. Call (814) 234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 



Help Wanted: DAKA Resturants 

is now offering part time and 

full time positions in all areas of 

the snack bar. Delivery 

positions also, must have valid 

drivers license. Own vehicle 

helpful. Apply in person at 

Riemer Snack Bar. EOE. 



FOR RENT 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 

available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. Clean, 

close to campus, quiet, no pets, 

references. Call RUTT APTS. at 

227-1938 

or beeper (814) 227-0722 



Spacious 1 story house for 3 or 
4, close to campus, available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. 

Quiet, no pets, references, newly 

furnished, clean. Call RUTT 

APTS at 227-1938 or beeper 

(814)227-0722 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FREE T-SHIRT 

+$1000 

Credit Card fundraisers for fra- 
ternities, sororities &groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VISA applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext 
65. Qualified callers receive 
FREE T-SHIRT. 



Spring Break '98-Sell Trips, 

EARN CASH AND GO 

FREE! 

Student Travel Services is now 
hiring campus reps/group orga- 
nizers. Lowest rates to Jamaica, 
Mexico & Florida. Call 1-800- 
648-4849. 



FOR SALE 



Sega Genesis, 2 controls, and 23 

games- Asking $295 

Call after 5 p.m. 

797-5052 



PERSONALS 



04>A 

"Our money was well spent' 

Great Mixer! 

<DA0 



Rush AIT... 
It's the place to be! 



To our sweetheart Rochelle, 

We just wanted to wish our 

sweetheart all the best in die 

upcoming year. 

Love, OA0 



Happy Birthday, Melinda &Liz 
Love, the Sisters of AIA 



The sisters of AIA would like to 

wish all the Greeks good luck in 

RUSH 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY SUZY! 

We hope you have a great 22! 

Love your roomies: Courtney, 

Missy, 'Liz, Moe and Kim! 



To the Brothers of ITr, 

Thank you for selecting me as 

your White Rose. I am very 

honored to have this title and 

represent you. It's going to be a 

fabulous year together. 

I love you all very much! 

Melissa 



Congratulations Kristin and 

Amanda on your engagements! 

Love, your <t>II Sisters 



Alissa, Renata and Kelly- Happy 

Belated 21st Birthdays. 

We're all glad you three can 

finally legally come to the bar 

with us! 

Love, Zetas 



Smitty- Welcome Back Cuddle 

Bunny. We hope this football 

season goes well. 

Love, Zetas 



To all sororities and fraternities, 

Good luck with rush 

this semester. 

Love, Zetas 



To the Sisters of AIT, 
Thanks for the magnificant time 

at the mixer. 

We had a "hoppin" experience! 

The Brothers of 05 



05, you guys are always up to 

par! Great mixer.. .let's do it 

again!! Love, AIT 



To the brothers of Theta Xi, 
You all are always on my mind. 

I wish I could see you more 

often. You are simply the best! 

Do not let anyone tell 

you differently. 
Love Always, Diana 



0X, Can't wait to float with 

you! Love, the Sisters of 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Good Luck to all of the rushees 

participating in formal rush. 

Love, the Sisters of III 

Happy Belated Birthday to 

Erica, Sara, Keira and Andrea! 

Love, your Sigma Sisters 

Happy 21st Birthday to Jenn and 

Caroline. 

Love, your Sigma Sisters 

Missy, Congratulations on 
becoming ITfs new White 

Rose. We love you! 
Your girls in the gray house! 

To the Brothers of Theta Xi, 
We are very excited about doing 

our float with you. There will 
be no Rehab or Big Blue Boats, 

but we will take home first for 
the float!! 

Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta 



Happy 22nd Birthday to Amy 
Robeson and Janet Eggleston!! 
With love from your AZ Sisters 



Congratulations to Lori Cisek 

for you OIK lavalier! We are 

all happy for you and we love 

you! Love, your AZ Sisters. 



The Sisters of Delta Zeta would 

like to wish a Happy 21st 

Birthday to Angie Fox. 

Twenty-One in an hour, 

Great job!! 



The Sisters of Delta Zeta would 

like to invite you to come in and 

visit us on Thursday or Friday 

from: 7:00-7:45, 8:00-8:45 or 

9:00-9:45 

Hope to see you there!! 



Rush 0OA... and see what 
Sisterhood is all about! 



To our new sweetheart James. 

We are looking forward to a 

wonderful year with you. Love 

0<DA 



Marcus, It's been a wonderful 

year with you as our sweetheart. 

We will always love you! You'll 

always be our sweetheart! 

Love, 0OA 



Happy Belated 22nd Birthday to 
Brynn. Love, 0<I>A Sisters 



Congratulations to 04>A's 

Pledge Sister Educators-Liz 

Dorner and Chaplain Christina 

Kulinski. Love, 

Theta Phi Alpha 



<M9, Thanks for a Great Mixer. 

Next time, let's not invite the 

slate police. 

Love, 0<J>A 



We would like to thank the base- 
ball team for the awesome 
mixer. Let's have another line- 
up soon... even though you guys 
know we won! 
Love, AOE 



To the Dance Team: 

Thanks for a great night 

"getting screwed" at the mixer. 

We hope to mix with you girls 

again soon! 

Love, the Brothers of KAP 



To the Sisters of AOE, 

Thanks for the great mixer. 

Hope we can hit you again 

sometime soon. 

The Baseball Team 



KAP, 

We "fit" together nicely. 

Thanks for the great time. 

The Dance Team 



Erica, 

How 'bout them Steelers? 

Eat your bologna! 

Love, your Roomie 



Julie, 
Get Over Here Now! 



B.H. Man Strikes again! 



Just wanted to say that I love 

you Betty. 

Charlie. 



Generic Personal Ad. 

Handy Randy 

is Nifty at Fifty!! 

Happy Birthday, Dad! 

Scott 

Last week's bash was cool, 
but the next one is going 
to be a blowout at Apt. B ! 

Let's get 10 barrels for ALF! 



Hey Hair Replacement for Men 

Thanks for the rigitoni on Sat!! 

Love, your ugly ass girlfriend 

and your big schnoz girlfriend 



Em and Shawna... 

Thanks for the fun times in 

Apt 6. Can't wait till I can 

be associated again... 

love, Your Hazardous Roomie 



Hey Kristen.... 
TACOS!!!!Dah?! 



I want the KAP package deal ! ! 



Hey Keith! I love you! You're 

the greatest! 

Love, Heather 



Ron, Jon. Nicole, Jen, Baby 

Brian, Bonny, Stacy, Keena, 
Andrea, Jason, Vinny. Liza, and 

Chris... I miss you guys, what 
can I say... it was one hell of a 

summer. Fun cookouts with 
adult jello, the Pirate game 

(sorry about hitting you Ron), 
the WB shirts in the trailer, truth 

or dare, and dancing twice a 
week to Houserockers- whether 
we liked it or not! Let me just 
say that if I ever hear The Train 

or DaDip one more time, I'm 

going to hurt someone!! More 
fun to come. Love, MB 



What's up to the GIRLS at 136 

Grand Ave lets have a fun filled 

year ! 

Your BOYS downstairs 



To Sara Johnston, 

I just want to say that I Love 

You, and I will miss you 

tremendously! 

Love, Tim 



To the Brothers of Sigma Tau 

Gamma, Have a fun ALF and 

try not to get arrested! 

Love, Wayne and Tim 



To Public Safety, 

Good Luck and Best Wishes! 

Love, Benj and Tim 



To the Girls and bald puppy on 

Liberty Ave, 

Here's to many fun times ahead, 

and a killer ALF!!! 

Love, Founds 



Mom, Dad, Barb, and Kipper, 

I love you and miss you! 

See you in less than 2 weeks for 

the fun wedding shower!!! 

Love, Jennifer 



B.T. How 'bout them dogs! 
Ask T.H. about the plaid under- 
wear! 
Love, G.W. 



Brett, I was noticing you in the 

shower the other night! 

Hmmmmm! Love your roomie, 

J.B. 



Hey Call! 

Here's to Chicago... 

41 Days 'til the fun and crazy 

road trip from hell! 



Page 28 



The Clarion Call 



September 18, 1997 



Pennant races heat up as magic numbers go down 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



As the marathon 162 game 
Major League Baseball season 
winds down, and the post-season 
ghosts of Reggie Jackson and 
Kirk Gibson loom among us, the 
playoff pictures in both leages 
are getting intense. 
NL Central 

With four games left to play 
between the Pirates and the 
Houston Astros, the division is 
still up for grabs. However, the 
Bucs need a big win over the 
Houston tonight if they are 
going to make any noise. 

Pirates first baseman Kevin 
Young made some noise of his 
own in the clubhouse and at the 
plate earlier in the week. Young 
lashed his teammates for "not 
caring" anymore about winning 
the division. Then, in his first at 
bat in over a month, Young hit a 
10th inning homerun to beat the 
Montreal Expos and put the 
Pirates 3 1/2 out. Young, who 
missed playing time with liga- 
ment damage in his thumb, was 
limited to defensive duties until 
pleading with manager Gene 
Lamont to let him bat against the 
Expos. 

The Cardinals have made it 
pretty tough on themselves 
falling to 7 games out but can 
game some ground on the Pirates 
this weekend when they come to 
Three Rivers for a four game sit. 
The addition of Mark McGwife 
has definately turned around a 
rather disappionting year for the 
redbirds, who lost both Alan and 
Andy Benes for the rest of the 
way with injuries. 
NLEast 

The Braves again are off and 
running with the NL East title. 



NL 




Wild Card Race 



Florida (8) 
New York 
San Francisco 



W 

87 
82 
82 



L 
62 
69 
69 



GB 

6 
6 



(magic number) 



AL 




Wild Card Race 



New York (4) 
Anaheim 



W 

87 
78 



L 
63 

72 



GB 

9 



(magic number) 



The health of LHP Denny Neagle 
becomes a concern for manager 
Bobby Cox. Neagle has a par- 
tially torn rotator cuff in his non- 
throwing shoulder. The injury 
does not bother his pitching but 
his ability to field his position 
and swing a bat. 

The Marlins look sure to clinch 
a Wild Card berth in the National 
League. If the fish can hold off 
both the Mets and Giants (or 
Dodgers) , they could challenge 
the Braves for the pennant, play- 
ing the defending NL champs 
tough in their previous meetings 
this season. 
NLWest 

The Los Angeles Dodgers have 
surged again to overtake first 
place from the Giants. Manager 
Bill Russell is counting on catch- 
er Mike Piazza to call the signals 
the rest of the way. 

L.A.'s loaded pitching staff 
should give them an andvantage 
down the stretch, and perhaps in 
the post-season. One concern has 
been the recent slump of closer 
Todd Worrell, who has blown 
five of his last 13 save opportuni- 



ties. The recent addtion of Otis 
Nixon has also been a boost for 
the boys in blue. Nixon is an 
established veteran and knows 
what it is all about to be in a pen- 
nant race. 
AL East 

With Baltimore already clinch- 
ing a playoff bid, and Eric Davis 
proding an added spark to the 
lineup, the O's need to make sure 
everyone is healthy down the 
stretch. Cal Ripken and Roberto 
Alomar both could use some time 
off. Since manager Davey 
Johnson would be tarred and 
feathered for sitting Cal, look for 
the O's skipper to rest him in the 
later innings. Alomar has an 
always flattering groin injury that 
has been nagging him. Jimmy 
Key won his first game at 
Camden Yards since the All-Star 
break against the Indians and will 
be needed. 

The Yankees all but secured a 
Wild Card and a much needed 
break from the Orioles who have 
owned them this year. David 
Wells has been struggling and for 
all we know, big George shipped 



Hidecki Irabu back to Japan. 

Kenny Rogers will be used out of 

the bullpen the rest of the way 

when David Cone makes his 

return to the rotation later in the 

week. 

AL Central 

Clevland has opened up a safe 
lead against the .500 Brewers and 
surprisingly sub .500 White Sox. 
So far, the Tribe has not lost 
stride at the plate with the addi- 
tion of Matt Williams, David 
Justice, and Marquis Grissom. 
Since losing Albert Belle to the 
Sox via free agency, Williams 
and Justice have done nothing 
but fill the hole Belle left. 
Although Grissom isn't Kenny 
Lofton, he has gained post-sea- 
son experience with Atlanta and 
will factor in thelndians scoring 
runs. Manny Ramirez, Sandy 
Alomar, and Jim Thome all pro- 
vide some thunder in the middle 
of the lineup along with Williams 
and Justice. 

Cleveland's problems are on 
the hill where only Charles Nagy 
is a threat. If Indian starters can 
get into the later innings and give 



Paul Assenmacker, Mike 
Jackson, and Jose Mesa a 
chance, Cleveland may make a 
run. 

Phil Garner had the Brewers 
smelling playoffs earlier this 
year, but do not have enough fire- 
power to take the tribe. 
Chicago's 1-2 pucnch of Belle 
and Frank Thomas have the Sox 
looking up as well. 
AL West 

Speaking of potent lineups, 
Seattle sends a pretty good one to 
the plate each night. Ken Griffey 
Jr.'s run at 61 homeruns may not 
pan out, but the Mariners playoff 
chances look pretty good. 
Griffey's career high 139 RBI's 
and 368 total bases make him th 
most productive player in the AL. 
Junior leads the league in home- 
runs, total bases, slugging per- 
centage and RBI's. Enough said. 
With Alex Rodrigez, Jay Buhner, 
and Edgar Martinez mixed in, 
Seattle will be tough to beat. The 
return of Randy Johnson to his 
mid-season form will surely give 
the M's an advantage. The re- 
loaded bullpen should also help. 



Penguins-Jagr close to new deal 



by Robert Fuchs 
Sports Writer 



The Pittsburgh Penguins came 
one step closer to signing Jaromir 
Jagr when they offered him a 
multiyear contract reportedly 
worth a total of &49 million, and 
7 million dollars annually. 

Jagr currently has two years left 
on a contract that would pay him 
and 5 million a year. The 
Penguins have put a number one 
priority on signing Jagr since the 
post Lemieux era is rapidly 
approaching. 

Jagr, the 25 year old Czech 
Republic native, seems to be 
looking forward to the upcoming 
season with the Penguins. 



"We're still talking about a new 
deal," said Jagr, "We're pretty 
close. I'm here to play." 

The signings of Joe Sakic for 
the Colorado Avalanche and 
Chris Gratton for the 
Philadelphia Flyers over the sum- 
mer have raised the stakes a bit. 
Sakic signed a three year 21 mil- 
lion deal, and Gratton a five year 
andl4 million deal. This should 
continue a trend of increasing 
average salaries in the NHL. 

Jagr is a 6-2, 216 pound right 
winger considered by many to be 
the premier right winger of the 
NHL. In the 1995-1996 season 
he set the record for points and 
assists by a right wing when he 



had 149 points and 87 assists, 
which beat out Mike Bossy's 147 
points and 83 assists which had 
been set about 15 years earlier. 

Last season, Jagr was bothered 
by a groin injury that made him 
miss 18 games in the final few 
months of the season. Despite 
missing all those games Jagr still 
finished with 47 goals and 48 
assists. Jagr already holds the 
record for the most points by a 
European born player with 633 
points, and, barring injury, 
should have many good years left 
in the NHL. 

The Pittsburgh Penguins hope 
that if they can get Jagr signed 
they can once again begin the 



long march for Lord Stanley's 
Cup, just as they did in their back 
to back championships of 1991 
and 1992. 



The Pens are currently in train- 
ing camp at their Southpointe 
headquarters and begin regular 
season October 1st. 



Think your're pregnant? 
Worried? 

PREGNANCY CENTER 

21 4. S. 7th Avenue 

Clarion 226-7007 

"Confidential Care". 

Free preganancy tests 




We can help 



fteptemfter 25, 1997 



Oarum gnibentftp of ffeniigpttmnia 



Clarion, M 16214 



Wb* Clarion Call 



Wlmt'k Snsibc 




Relieve school 

stress; go 

canoeing on the 

Clarion River, 

we did. For the 

story see 

page 14. 



Contents 



Opinion 

Reader Responses. 

News. 

Call-on-you. 

Photo Essay 

Lifestyles. 

Entertainment. 

Sports 

Classifieds 



...2 

....3 

...5 

10 

:i2 

.14 

18 

.20 

.23 



Vdhtmt 79, Itftte 3 



Wcatbcr 



Thursday- Mostly 

cloudy with a 

chance of scattered 

showers. High of 65. 

Friday- Partly 

cloudy high in the 

upper 60s. 

Saturday- Sunny. 

High in the 

low 70s. 



Explanation given for projects delay 

Prevailing wage keeps projects in court and out of construction 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Writer 



Clarion University was one of 
many state-affiliated organiza- 
tions that were affected by a dis- 
pute involving Pennsylvania's 
Prevailing Wage Law. 

Because of the dispute, many 
projects that were originally 
scheduled for the summer, or 
scheduled to begin this summer, 
were postponed. These projects 
include the remodeling of 
Founders Hall, the installation of 
fiber-optic cable throughout the 
university, the construction of a 
new parking lot along Greenville 
Avenue, and the repaying of the 
Wilkinson and Nair basketball 
courts. 

Clare Heidler, director of facil- 
ities management, said, "The 
Pennsylvania Department of 
Labor and Industry was instruct- 
ed not to award any prevailing 
wage determinations after April 
17 until court proceedings were 
held. These determinations are 
attached to all state contracts, and 
without a wage determination, 
we had no contract, and we were 
unable to bid on the projects." 

One project that was delayed 
due to the wage dispute was the 
remodeling planned for 

Founders Hall. This contract was 
generated by the Department of 
General Services (DGS), and was 
stopped from bidding until 
recently. "A DGS determination 
was requested for the contract on 
May 13," Heidler said. 

Another project put off by the 
wage dispute were plans for the 
Clarion Network, which involves 
the installation of fiber-optic 
cable throughout the campus. 



Heidler said that plans for inat 
project were delayed at least two 
months. Also, the wage problem 
interrupted Clarion University's 
normal summer maintenance 
program. "These are the con- 
tracts that we would have had 
over the summer, and been work- 
ing on," Heidler said. 

For the moment, the prevailing 
wage problem has been resolved, 
the two projects have received 
wage determinations, and the 
university is currently going 
through the bidding process on 
both jobs. "Now that the situa- 
tion is resolved for the moment, 
we (CU) can get prevailing wage 
determinations on contracts 
we've requested," Heidler said. 

Although some projects were 
not under way this summer, 
many other projects were com- 
pleted because the contracts were 
submitted to the labor department 
prior to April 17, 1997, the date 
when the department was 
instructed not to give wage deter- 
minations. "If a prevailing wage 
was determined, those projects 
were done," Heidler said. 
"Clarion's summer contracts 
were early in getting out, so that 
there were a large number that 
did get wage determinations and 
get completed." Some examples 
he gave were the repair and 
replacement of windows in both 
Peirce Science Center and Egbert 
Hall. 

Asphalt contracts were also 
held up over the summer because 
of the wage question, which 
affected the intended construc- 
tion of the new Greenville 
Avenue parking lot and the 
repaving of the Wilkinson and 



1^3 g*g 




* ■; 



I Imuran itippti 




wwmm; 






Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
The Nair and Wilkinson basketball court repaving is one of the projects on hold because 
of the prevailing wage dispute. 



Nair basketball courts. Heidler 
noted that it is too late for asphalt 
this season, but he will be 
reviewing bids and getting paper- 
work sorted through, and that as 
soon as the weather breaks in the 



Spring, those projects will be 
started. 

A vast array of state projects 
were put on hold by this wage 
problem. Projects in all 14 
schools in the State System of 



Higher Education, along with 
projects scheduled for elemen- 
tary and high schools throughout 
the state were shelved until pre- 
vailing wage determinations 
could be made on each contract. 



Tax relief in sight for students 



by Renae Kluk 
News Writer 



In an attempt to make a college 
education more affordable, tax 
relief is on the way for college 
students and their families from 
the federal government 

Congress recently approved 
legislation aimed at balancing the 
federal budget by 2002. The leg- 
islation provides a variety of tax 



credits and deductions that will 
help families and individuals pay 
for college. 

One part of the legislation is a 
$400 tax credit per child for 1998 
and a $500 credit for 1999 for 
families with an adjusted gross 
income of up to $100,000, and 
$50,000 for single tax filers. 
Beginning in 1998, a tax credit of 
$1,500 a year, which President 



Bill Clinton has named the 
"Hope Scholarship," will be 
available to defray the cost of the 
first two years of college tuition 
and fees for students attending a 
college or vocational school. In 
addition, next July, third and 
fourth year students, graduate 
students, and others returning to 

Continued on page 9 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



•<*,nt* »-•!»*. * r> 



September 25, 1997 



OPINION, 




Clarion 
Call 

270 #emmel! Complex 
CUrfen, $fi 16214 

(614)226-2960 
fS* (614)226-2667 

C-miff: ©fill 

Cxecutfoe 
#oarto 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




'Hide (Pari 




you open the door only 
to discover a distraught 
young woman, unable to 
say anything but your 
name between her hys- 
terical bouts of tears. " 



'Deborah 'Moore 



"In Praise of RAs" 

It's 12:30 the night before one 
of the most important exams of 
the semester. You only have two 
and one half chapters left to 
study, when suddenly you hear 
someone frantically pounding on 
your door and desperately calling 
out your name. 

You open the door only to dis- 
cover a distraught young woman, 
unable to say anything but your 
name between her hysterical 
bouts of tears. 

Being the good listener you are, 
you put aside your studies and 
listen all night to a saga about 
how so-and-so is still going out 
with what's-her-face from home, 
and how she cannot understand 
how he could do this to her. 



There goes your night, and there 
goes your exam. 

Contrary to what you may 
believe, this is not a far-fetched 
scenario off the channel 7 soap 
opera. This is an example of a 
typical problem encountered by 
the Clarion University Resident 
R.A. Stronger than the every day 
student! More tuned in than the 
local cop! Able to juggle extra- 
curriculars and a 2.4 average in a 
single semester! It's a man! It's a 
woman! It's your average R.A.! 

Numerous R.A.s here at 
Clarion University, past and pre- 
sent, have felt discontent with 
their jobs. Resident Assistant 
Michelle Cover said one of the 

Continued on page 4 



Staff 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Donna Engle, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tim Bowerman 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Hope Guy, Renae Kluk, Steve 

Ostrosky, Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Brian Christy, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, 

Tommi Hearn, Rob Kriley, Lori Matachak, 

Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Sheri Hertzog, Stella Myers, Jen Mumford, 

Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger, 

Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Veronica Beck, Dena Bosak, Greg Hensler, Megan 

Klauss, Wayne Lines, Heather Liti, Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tina Lasky, 

Jen Mumford, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tun Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

•Names remaining in the staff box in the December 4, 1997 Cfltf ncieve co-curricular credit. 



"Editorial 




""Even Clarion can 
be noisy and wild 
at times on the 
tueef&nds, but it is 
nothing lik& week: 
ends in Columbus. " 



Scott Phinsberaer, Lifestyles Editor 



I'm glad I came to Clarion and 
Clarion University. No, really, 
I'm serious: well, especially 
compared to Columbus and Ohio 
State University. 

I spent this past summer in 
Columbus and lived one block 
away from the campus of one of 
the largest universities in the 
country. It was louder, dirtier, 
busier and stranger than Clarion. 

Perhaps the worst part about 
living there was trying to sleep at 
night I'd try to go to bed before 
midnight, but that didn't mean I 
would be asleep anytime soon 
thereafter. I would try to sleep 
while the sounds of the city rack- 
et — drunk people yelling, cars 
peeling out and more drunks 
smashing beer bottles in the 
street — echoed outside my win- 
dow. 

Lucky me, I just happened to 
live across the street from people 
who had a fetish for fireworks. 
Most nights around 11:30, they 
would bring out the bottle rockets 
and M-80s to have their version 
of Independence Day. The bottle 
rockets screeched and popped 
right outside my window, and 



when the M-80s boomed and 
shook the windows, I would 
wake from a sound sleep cursing 
whoever invented fireworks. 

But I guess noise should be 
expected in the city, even though 
I am accustomed to the peaceful 
quiet of a summer night in the 
country. Instead of sleeping to 
the songs and chirps of peepers 
and crickets, I had to get used to 
the sounds of sirens and commo- 
tion. 

Even Clarion can be noisy and 
wild at times on the weekends, 
but it is nothing like weekends in 
Columbus. Every Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday night were 
loud and crazy. My apartment 
was about two blocks away from 
High Street, which houses sever- 
al bars, restaurants and night 
clubs. 

In fact, High Street was so busy 
that the police would actually set 
up a steel cable about waist high 
on both sides of the street. The 
cables stretched across an entire 
block and were used to keep 
drunks from falling into the street 

Continued on page 4 



The Clarion Call is published most Thursday* during jg §£551 y* r 'H tCCOfr 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor 
in-Chief). Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi- 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 pan. on the Monday of desired publication. 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on die desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 pan. on the week of* publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 






READER RESPONSES} 



"Express your desire to have ISF money spent on keeping the equipment current..." 



Pear Clarion Call, 

I read with interest your article 
about the Becker Lab in the Sept 
18th issue. 

Your coverage of a story about 
students experiencing difficulty 
in the lab seemed to me to be a 
bit one-sided. I think you should 
have talked with more faculty 
and students who depend on the 
lab. 

In the interest of a more bal- 
anced approach, I would like to 
comment on the value that this 
lab provides my students. 

Your article interviewed a pro- 
fessor who sent her students in to 
do a web search assignment. 

My students do much more 
than that. A year and a half ago I 
taught the first Communication 
course focused on publishing on 
the World Wide Web. 

We were faced with putting 
together a package of programs 
that students could use to make 
web pages. 

The Becker Lab staff eagerly 
jumped in and helped set up an 
effective set of utilities for the 
students. This summer one of the 
students from that class got a 
career path job as a web page 
design team leader for a Fortune 
500 company. It is obvious that 
she couldn't have done this with- 
out the basic support that the 
Becker Lab offered her. 

Web publishing has changed 



dramatically in the last two years, 
and we have had to build and 
rebuild computer resources to fit 
these changes. 

Throughout this process the 
folks running and working in the 
Becker Lab have been there to 
help me with every need I have 
brought them. And they have got- 
ten everything to work smoothly. 
This semester I have 25 stu- 
dents relying on the Becker Lab 
to provide web-publishing utili- 
ties. All of these students have 
come to be amazed at the power 
of Netscape Composer to design 
web sites. Dr. Madison and the 
Lab Assistants, who have also 
installed programs to enable stu- 
dents to make image maps, to 
edit images, and to edit HTML 
source code, set up Netscape 
Composer. 

Sure, there have been problems, 
but none have been serious. Yes, 
some students would like the 
computers to be faster, some 
would like the monitors to be 
bigger, some would like the latest 
software with all the bells and 
whistles. 

But isn't it more important that 
they are able to do this important 
work and do it efficiently? 
Thanks to the Becker Lab folks, 
Coram, majors now can learn 
professional web design and can 
use this skill to gain fruitful 
employment 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



Dr. Madison and his staff have 
done marvelously with very lim- 
ited resources. 

Another way your coverage of 
this story could have been more 
balanced and complete is if you 
had interviewed and observed the 
Becker Lab assistants. These stu- 
dents (mostly computer science 
majors, but not all) are learning 
the ins and outs of running a lab 
and gaining job-type experience. 
They deal with many little 
problems that we never see, such 
as equipment failures and soft- 
ware incompatibilities. They 
learn to make the most effective 
upgrades with limited financial 
resources and how to balance 
security needs with the needs of 
students to have access to com- 
puting features. 

Because of the resourcefulness 
of Dr. Madison and his talented 
Lab Assistants you are able to do 
your own work and not have to 
worry about down-time. The Lab 
is always up and running. 



Bucky gets in touch with feminity 



by Christopher Tennant 
College Press Service 

Bucky Badger, University of 
Wisconsin Madison's big love- 
able mascot is having a bit of an 
identity crisis. Just ask Rebecca 
Bullen. 

Bullen, a UW-Madison 
sophomore is the second female 
ever to don the duds of the big 
black rodent 

Although she has been rous- 
ing crowds across campus since 
her debut last April, she is no 
stranger to furry suits. After per- 
forming similar duties as the 
Osseo Senior Nigh Oriole in her 
home town of Maple Grove, 
Minn. Bullen realized she was 
ready to be a major league mas- 
cot Selected last spring after a 
grueling three-part audition, 
Bullen 's Bucky now appears reg- 
ularly throughout Madison at 



games, alumni functions and 
even the occasional wedding. 

"It's been a lot of fun so 
far," Bullen said. "Little kids 
especially get so excited to see 
Bucky, they'll run right up and 
hug me. I've had a really good 
time doing this." 

However, being Bucky is 
not quite as easy as it looks. 

"The pushups really suck, 
but I do them just like everyone 
else," she said. 

Although being a female has 
hardly hindered Bullen's tenure 
as Bucky, on the eve of tryouts, 
she did encounter some unex- 
pected resistance from an associ- 
ate of the Badger mascot pro- 
gram 

"He told me I shouldn't 
even bother because I was a 
girl," Bullen said. Despite initial 
resistance, the Bucky mascots 
are a team like any other facet of 
the UW athletic program, Bullen 



said. 

"We're all really supportive 
of each other," she said. "We 
have to bond with one another 
because we're sharing each 
other's sweat." 

Although she doesn't 
receive any financial compensa- 
tion for her role as Bucky, for 
Bullen, it's all about the love. 

"Most people have a lot of 
respect for Bucky," Bullen said. 
"He's everybody's best friend. 
People come up and put their 
arms around me, shake my hand, 
whatever. The funniest part is 
when women fondle me because 
they think there's a guy inside the 
costume. Those women need to 
think twice." 

Although Bullen will 
undoubtedly be forced to "pass 
the Buck" after graduation, there 
will always be a big furry spot in 
her heart for that bedeviling 
Badger we all know and love. 



Rather than simply complain 
about the Becker Lab being slow, 
students and faculty can join in 
efforts to upgrade the computers 
and printers. Express your desire 
to have ISF money spent on 
keeping the equipment current 
and speedy if that is what is 
important to you. 

Ask your professors and dean 
to support the allocations of 



funds to the lab. Rather than run- 
ning down the lab, talk to lab 
assistants about what help the lab 
could provide you. They listen, 
and they help. 



Sincerely, 

Scott A. Kuehn, Ph.D 
Associate Professor 
Department of Communication 




Ihe following tookjplace during the 
fourth weekjin September. 



September 26, 1969 

"'Unique summer orientation program proves worthwhile for 
Clarion's new students," was on the front page of this issue of The 
Clarion Call. The story leads: "One of the innovations at Clarion this 
year was unique summer orientation program for new students. The 
program, which was initiated by the Counseling Center in cooperation 
with the faculty and administration, gave new students and their par- 
ents an opportunity to spend two and one half days to poke in the 
cracks and crevices of the campus in an effort to get to the heart of col- 
lege life." 

Also in this issue, an article ran entitled, "Class officers will be cho- 
sen on Tuesday." This article lists qualification of officers as: students 
who collect 50 signatures frua their fellow students and maintain a 
2.25 overall quality point average. 

September 24, 1971 

"College radio on the air" leads the headlines on the front page. 
WCCB radio powered up and began broadcasting this September 20, 
1971. This radio station provides "...this growing state college with 
another facility for communication." 

September 24, 1975 

In the article, "Funding Approved," Student Senate met to discuss 
issues affecting student organizations. The Finance Committee agreed 
to fund organizations such as, the Student Speech and Hearing 
Association, the Classical Guitar Society, and the English Club. 
However, the Senate decided not to fund The Tennis Club. 

September 27, 1984 

In the article, "Comm department adopts new policy," co-curricular 
requirements are changed. Instead of doing four co-curriculars before 
graduation, a change was made so communication majors were 
required to complete only two co-curriculars. These co-curriculars 
had to be completed within the students' first two semesters. The 
change was made because the media organizations were flooded with 
students. 

Also in this issue, reviewer Tim Slaper gave the new Prince rave 
reviews for the album Purple Rain. Also, the article "Male cheer 
leaders ad new twist to spirit squad," announced the new face of the 
CU cheerleaders. 

All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 25,1997 



Hide Park continued 



From page 2 

main problems is lack of respect. 
She feels respect is not only lack- 
ing from the residents in the 
halls, but from the Student 
Affairs administration and 
Resident Directors as well. Other 
R.A.s cite low pay and extremely 
high levels of stress as the main 
concerns. 

R.A. Jennifer Olszewski feels 
the pay is enough, but she, too, 
agrees that there is not enough 
respect because everyone does 
not realize how much work is put 
into the job. 

What exactly is involved in the 
R.A. position? According to the 
application form distributed by 
the Residence Life Office, the 
R.A.s areas of responsibility gen- 
erally fall into five categories: 
assisting groups and individuals: 
assisting with administrative 
responsibilities; maintaining 
rules and regulations; advising 
and encouraging student activi- 
ties; planning and coordinating 
area and hall programs. Assistant 
to the Dean of Student Life 
Services, Mary Walter said, "The 
main job of the R.A. here at 
Clarion is to create a community 
throughout the residence hall, 
especially on the individual 
wings." 

Other requirements that are not 
listed under those responsibilities 
but are demanded of the Resident 
Assistant include the following: 
must be able to schedule person- 
al time to be available for Fall 
Staff Orientation; opening and 
closing the hall each semester 
and during recesses; consultation 
with individual students; office 
duty each week (ranging from 
three to six hours depending on 
the hall and night); planning a 
minimum of four programs orga- 
nized each semester, weekly staff 
meetings; attending R.A. classes, 
and, in some halls, being avail- 
able to escort maintenance per- 
sonnel at a moment's notice. 

The most fascinating aspect of 
this particular job is that both the 
most demanding and the most 
rewarding components are those 



which are neither blatant or obvi- 
ous. 

It is not the R.A. classes or the 
programming that really imposes 
on your time or commands your 
best efforts; it's the hours of pep 
talks, solving endless roommate 
problems, being asked to unlock 
someone's door at 2:30 a.m., and 
those incessant maintenance 
calls. 

These are the types of situations 
that go unrecognized by almost 
everyone but you, that is unless 
you're not around to take care of 
them. If that is the case, you are 
sternly reminded of your duties 
by the residents as well as the 
Resident Director, who certainly 
would have been informed of 
your shortcomings. 

There are payments other than 
mere tangible ones, though. 
These benefits- though few and 
far between- sometimes are far 
more rewarding in the long run 
that the meager $16 paycheck 
every five weeks. 

These benefits include the sup- 
port received from fellow staff 
members, the "way to gos" and 
the "you can do its" from the 
Resident Directors, and best of 
all, the "thank yous" form the 
residents. The often overlooked 
smiles that get you thought each 
day, the bonding that goes on, 
and the community that evolves 
because of your concerns and 
efforts compensate for all of the 
tediously long, unappreciated 
hours put in. 

It may be difficult to appreciate 
or evaluate these lessons while 
they are being learned, but it is 
important to attempt to recognize 
them. 

The most rewarding parts of 
this work aren't tangible at all, 
they are intrinsic benefits that 
make the position worth taking. 



• Deborah Moore was a sopho- 
more Communication major in 
February 22, 1990 when this 
Hide Park originally appeared 
in The Clarion Call. 



Hld6 Pfcrk is an open writing 
forum for the readership of The Clarion 
Call . Submissions for this column can be 
mailed to 270 Gemmell Student Center or 
dropped off at the office. As with all mate- 
rials submitted for publication. Hide Park 
is subject to editing for libel, grammar, 
punctuation, and length. 
Thank you. the Editor 



Okay, another slow week, here are some more 

suggestions from The Call executive board, but 

we'll be looking for your submissions 

for next week! 

Pick of the Week 

http://www.clarion.edu/thecall/col.htni- 

This site, designed by Clarion's own Chris Collins, is The 
Clarion Call On-Llnel Check It out, you can't get too much of a good thing. 
http://www.jackdaniels.com/- This is the Jack Daniels web page. Look here for info 

about everyone's favorite shot. 

http://my.excite.com/lioroscopes/webcrawIer/- Check out your horoscope on line 

with this service. Also see how you and that special someone match up astrologically. 

http://www.senate.gov/activities/index.html- This web site will take you to Capitol 

Hill On-Llne where you can see what Senate is doing, or not doing for you. 




The Clarion Call will publish website submissions from students, faculty, staff, and 
the community. If you know of a great site that you would like to share with our readers 
submit the complete address, and a brief description to our office in room 270 Gemmell 

Student Center or e-mail us at Call@mail.clarion.edu. We will log onto all the sites 
submitted to verify that they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 




continued 



From page 2 

in front of cars. I doubt Clarion 
will ever have to go to these mea- 
sures. Well, maybe during ALF, 
but that's a different story. 

I also had my first experience 
with public transportation this 
summer — Columbus' COTA 
buses. Catching the bus wasn't a 
problem because I could take two 
different route numbers to get to 
and from downtown Columbus. 

The problem was all of the 
weirdos I encountered on the bus 
route. This was mostly due to the 
fact that the mental hospital was 
one of the stops on my route. 
There were droolers, people with 
twitches and some with 
Tourette's syndrome that would 
scream at everyone on the bus or 
to no one at all. 

But the mental hospital wasn't 
the only place where you could 
find weirdos; they were every- 
where. 

There was this one guy who 
looked like Sammy Davis Jr. ; he 
got on the bus just reeking of 
booze. He was clad in a blue suit 
with fringe on the seams and was 
wearing a pair of white gloves. 
He also had on large tinted 
shades to complete the Sammy 
ensemble. He proceeded to 
shake passenger's hands and say 
"What's up baby7' to all of the 
women on the bus. 

Then there was the guy who 
tried to sell me a flower pot that 
he found when he was cleaning 
out a basement. He asked me, 
"Are you into flowers at all?" I 
said "no" and wished him luck 
trying to sell it to someone who 
was into flowers, though. 

There was also this fellow I 
encountered while waiting down- 



town for the bus home. He intro- 
duced himself, gave me a wink 
and said, "Most people think I'm 
weird." "Oh, really? Imagine 
that." I thought. Luckily, my bus 
showed up right away, so I decid- 
ed to take my chances on the bus 
where there might not be any 
weirdos rather than hang out with 
a guy that everyone agreed was 
one. 

But my favorite weirdo was the 
guy who sat in the same spot 
under a tree every Monday night 
when I came home from work. 
He always wore the same shirt 
which read "Mr. Go-For-It" on 
the back. I couldn't help but 
wonder what exactly it was that 
"Mr. Go-For-It" went for. Was it 
groceries for the elderly? Was it 
to the pizza shop to pick up 
someone's order? Was it ciga- 
rettes and booze for underage 
kids? If I had to guess, I'd have 
to say that "Mr. Go-For-It" went 
for something other than gro- 
ceries, pizza or cigarettes — 
probably something much worse. 
Well, enough about the 
weirdos... let's talk about the 
trash and rubble that littered the 
streets around the Ohio State 
campus. 

Granted there is litter floating 
around Clarion, but it is nothing 
like Columbus. In Columbus, it 
seems like people go out of their 
way to avoid throwing rubbish in 
trash cans. Empty plastic bags, 
pizza boxes, McDonald's French 
fries boxes plastic bottles, and 
Taco Bell wrappers rolled down 
the street like tumbleweed. The 
streets and sidewalks glistened 
from the shards of glass scattered 
about from broken beer bottles. 
One morning, I even noticed a 



broken shopping cart hanging 
from a street sign. 

Scenes like this aren't usually 
found in Clarion. Perhaps this is 
due to the larger number of peo- 
ple in Columbus, but I'd like to 
think that people around here 
have a little more respect for the 
environment by putting litter in 
its place. 

Speaking of large amounts of 
people... I don't know how Ohio 
State students ever see the same 
people twice. There are close to 
50,000 students at the university! 
That's just a few more than 
Clarion. I can only guess what 
classes are like with 200-300 stu- 
dents in them. It's nice to have 
classes in which students can ask 
questions and have professors 
who are reachable for help out- 
side of class. It's also nice to see 
familiar faces when you walk 
around our small campus. 

Ohio State's campus is huge. I 
don't know how students ever 
make it to their classes on time. 
The longest walk to classes in 
Clarion is from Still to Becker, 
and that takes about 10 minutes. 
The longest walk at Ohio State is 
about 10 blocks and can take 
more than 20 minutes. 

It's no wonder I'm glad to be in 
Clarion. The streets are mostly 
quiet and peaceful. I can get a 
good night's sleep (well, if my 
roommates manage to be quiet). 
Trash and rubble aren't the cho- 
sen street decorations. Classes 
are small, and getting to class is a 
fairly short walk. But most of all, 
I like Clarion because there's 
hardly any weirdos here — 
unless, of course, you count me! 
• The author is a senior 
Communicaiton major. 



Page 5 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



NEWS 



Carlson undergoes change 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
Carlson Library has lately been the subject of many changes at Clarion University. 



by Shana Stowitzky 

Assistant News Editor 

Many of the positive changes 
implemented in Clarion 
University's Carlson Library may 
be noted upon entering through 
the newly reversed library doors. 
Dr. Rashelle Karp, Interim 
Director of Libraries said, "The 
majority of changes are to con- 
vert Carlson Library from the 
book oriented 1970's to today's 
book and electronic orientation. 
Technology has driven these 
changes with the growth of the 
Internet and more and more 
materials less expensively. This 
will better meet the needs of 
commuters, off campus residents, 
and distance education students, 
who need access to the library 
from home." 

Some areas where these updat- 
ed changes have occured are the 
reference room, which was 
expanded from its former loca- 
tion, to a much larger room locat- 
ed to the right of the circulation 
desk. This increase in room 
allowed for many new computers 
to be placed for student access. 
The previous reference room, 
remains largely occupied by print 
reference materials, and exists 
now as one of many new areas 
reserved for quiet study. At the 
back of it, a classroom was con- 
structed to be used for both 
library instruction and biblio- 
graphic instruction classes. 

Another area which was updat- 
ed and renovated was the 
Instructional Technologies 



Center, formerly known as the 
Instructional Materials Center. 
This area was moved to the oppo- 
site end of the first floor, allow- 
ing library patrons much larger 
and sunnier work stations and 
study areas. This area is now 
equipped with such essential 
tools, books, and audio visual 
equipment along with its own 
collection of computers, which 
are now all available in one 
room. 

These updates occured as a 
result of the library faculty exam- 
ining the collections and finding 
a need for them to be updated, 
especially in today's electronic 
environment 

Dr. Karp also added, "It is a 
challenge to integrate books and 
computers, but the addition of all 
the computer technology does 
not mean that books will disap- 
pear. Neither will print journals. 
Actually, book publishing is very 
strong." 

The use of technology does, 
however, allow for more options 
to acquire these materials. For 
example, interlibrary journal 
requests are received much 
quicker due to the use of a scan- 
ner, which also greatly decreases 
costs. Many full-text journals are 
already available through the 
Carlson Library link at Clarion 
University's home page, and 
many more are added continu- 
ously each month. Carlson 
Library has also recently added 
to its list of developments, the 
installation of an automated 



"The addition of 

all the computer 

technology does 

not mean that 

books will 

disappear." 

-Dr. Rashelle 

Karp 



library system, which is World 
Wide Web based, and shared by 
the State System of Higher 
Education's all fourteen member 
institutions. 

Carlson Library's book collec- 
tion and other materials have not 
been ignored in the updating 
process. Dr. Karp explains, "The 
Carlson Library facility is work- 
ing with the academic depart- 
ments on collection develop- 
ments. We are using an interna- 
tionally developed system, which 
is a way of talking to teachers to 
see exactly what they need to 
coordinate this activity. In this 
way, we get the faculty to help us 
make direct connections between 
our connection, and the courses 
that are taught at the University." 

These changes, and many more 
will be implemented in the future 
to update the resources and tech- 
nology available at Carlson 
Library. A complete renovation 
and expansion of Carlson Library 
is also tentitatively scheduled to 
begin somewhere around 1999. 



Ccllege Campus News 





V -1 


What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 


mMg 








Plane crash kills two Purdue 
University students 

A plane used to train student pilots crashed at Purdue University 
September 12, killing two students and an instructor. 

A witness said the plane veered to the right shortly after take off and 
crashed about 100 feet from the runway .It burst into flames on impact. 

Killed were Julie A. Swengel, 21, a Purdue junior majoring in avia- 
tion technology; Anthony R. Kinkaide, 21, also a junior in aviation 
technology; and Jeremy J. Sanborn, 24, an aviation education special- 
ist who graduated from Purdue two years ago. 

Although it had not been determined who was piloting the plane, the 
students were experienced pilots. Both had private licenses and were 
working to obtain their multi-engine ratings, said Jeanne V. Norberg, 
director of the Purdue News Service. 

Swengel was slated to be the pilot for Purdue's team in the 1998 Air 
Race Classic next summer. 

The plane that crashed was one of 25 in Purdue's fleet of training air- 
craft. In 1930, Purdue became the first university to run an airport and 
offer a flight training program for college credit. 

Mike Nolan, Purdue aviation technology professor, says the univer- 
sity's flight training program averages between 50 and 75 student 
flights each day. These were the first fatalities since the aviation tech- 
nology department was created in 1955. 



National hazing problems continue at 
Lousiana State 

A Louisiana State University has denied mat hazing was involved in 
an August 25 binge that left one pledge dead and three others hospi- 
talized. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon spokesperson Pete Stevenson said the fraterni- 
ty's initial investigation found no evidence of forced drinking during 

Bid Night", the fraternity's annual celebration for new pledges that 
ended with 20 year old Benjamin Wynne's death. 

One of the pledges, Donald Hunt,21, says he was required to drink 
himself sick as part of SAE's initiation. Hunt, who was hospitalized 
after the binge, filed a lawsuit against the fraternity, LSU and a Baton 
Rouge bar seeking unspecified damages for pain, suffering, and med- 
ical bills. 

Hunt claims the fraternity and the bar were negligent in not stopping 
the excessive drinking. 

The fraternity denies any fault for the incident. "We at Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon find it difficult to understand how Donald Hunt, a 21 year old 
mature adult with prior military experience, can find fault with S AE or 
LSU for his actions off site and off campus," Stevenson said in a state- 
ment. 

LSU has suspended all activities for the fraternity and says it will 
conduct its own investigation into what happened on "Bid Night" 

Chancellor William Jenkins also said he is forming a committee of 
students, faculty, staff members and Baton Rouge citizens to assess the 
university's sororities and fraternities. 

Courtesy of College Press Service 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 6 



Life after college: Grads are deep in debt 



by Colleen De Boise 
College Press Service 

Life afier college sounds, well, 
a lot like life in hell. 

Increasingly, college graduates 
are deep in debt, lack basic skills 
and are forced to move back 
home with their parents, accord- 
ing to a new report released by 
The Institute for Higher Policy 
and The Education Resources 
Institute. 

Of course, the news isn't all 
bad. The report also found that 
more college graduates are sav- 
ing money, choosing jobs that 
interest them, and performing 
community service. 

But it's the not-so-promising 
trends that stand out. Pinching 
pennies and dinners with Mom 
make for a less than smooth tran- 
sition into the real world, accord- 
ing to the report's authors. 

"For many of these graduates, 
life afier college has meant suc- 
cess and achievement," the report 
states. "For others it has meant 
challenges and struggles to 'find 
their way' in the world after col- 
lege- 
Paying bills is particularly 



tough for new grads: Most have 
to cough up $850 a month to pay 
off students loans, car loans and 
credit cards. That's likely the rea- 
son why one in four college grads 
move back into their old room at 
their parents' home. 

Some college students admit 
moving back in with Mom could 
be an accurate snapshot of their 
future. 

"I will probably be deep in debt 
and will be going home to live at 
home with my parents," says 
Jake Wilensky, an Indiana 
University senior, who is from 
Atlanta. 

His classmate, Jaime Lox from 
Cleveland, agrees. "I hope not to, 
but most likely I will be living 
back at home," he says. 

The report also found that life 
on the job has its difficulties, too. 
Employers surveyed complained 
that college graduates lacked 
basic skills, such as the ability to 
write, communicate with others, 
and set goals and priorities. 

Employers were particularly 
concerned about the writing and 
presentation skills of technical 
graduates, such as computer sci- 



entists, engineers and accoun- 
tants. 

"The areas of concern are sys- 
tematic ones," says Ted 
Freeman, president. "We must 
find ways to lessen accumulated 
debt burdens for students and to 
enhance general skills." 

But students shouldn't be 
scared out of their wits by the 
results of the report, called "Now 
What? Life After College for 
Recent Graduates," says 
Freeman. 

"Overall, we are seeing a 
more complete picture of college 
graduates emerge than we've had 
in the past, and much of it is very 
heartening," he says. 

For instance, 71 percent of 
college graduates say they are 
saving money for education, 
retirement or a home. That's a 
higher percentage than among 
the general population, which is 
55 percent Nearly 70 percent of 
college graduates perform com- 
munity service, and 90 percent 
are registered to vote. 

And making the big bucks 
isn't a high priority for recent 



grads, either, the report found. 
Forty-five percent say their job 
must stir their intellect, and 42 
percent say it must be interesting. 
Only 35 percent say a good start- 
ing salary is critical. 

Such career priorities sound 
about right to Matt Smith, a 
freshman paleontology major at 
Kent State University. "I've been 
told from the start that there his- 
torically hasn't been much of a 
job market for paleontologists, 
but that hasn't discouraged me 
yet," he says. 

He adds that he plans to bal- 
ance his career with volunteer 
work. "I'll try to be active in the 
community, and if nothing else, I 
plan to take on some type of job 
at my local church," he says. 

But other students are more 
skeptical about the report's find- 
ings. Aaron Morris, a zoology 
major at Kent State, says college 
grads don't overlook salaries 
when choosing a job. 

"In today's society, every- 
one is so concerned with money," 
he says. "This means that every- 
one is trying for the highest pay- 



ing jobs as a first priority, instead 
of doing what they feel in their 
heart is a good career." 

Whatever the case, the 
report found that job prospects 
for 1997 grads are up 17 percent 
from last year, and average start- 
ing salaries are increasing faster 
than the rate of inflation, espe- 
cially for engineering and com- 
puter majors. 

The demand for jobs requiring 
bachelors degrees is expected to 
grow by 27 percent between 
1994 and 2005, according to the 
report. 

"So much of the public discus- 
sion about college has focused on 
whether people get jobs, or how 
much they make," said Jamie 
Merisotis, president of The 
Institute for Higher Education 
Policy." 

The report focused on 7 million 
students who have graduated 
from a four-year college since 
1992. The report drew on data 
provided by the U.S. Department 
of Education, the Census Bureau 
and the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics. 



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September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



Mentoring Program Hits CU 



by Janelle Donoghue 
News Writer 



As the new school year begins, 
many things are changing here at 
Clarion University, for both stu- 
dents and professors. A new pro- 
gram will be implemented this 
year that promises results that 
will benefit everyone. Mentoring 
has been a part of many student 
organizations for years. This type 
of program has given new stu- 
dents and new members of cer- 
tain groups an individual that 
allows them to be their own per- 
son while supplying the guidance 
and support that is needed. 

Now, however, mentoring has 
taken on a new group of individ- 
uals. Under the direction of Dr. 
Steven Johnson, associate dean 
of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, Dr. Michael LaRue, 
associate professor of history, 
and Dr. Hallie Savage, assistant 
professor of communication sci- 
ence and disorders, the effort will 
have a very informed beginning. 
Mentoring will now help new 
Clarion faculty with adjustments 
to new jobs or facets of their 



departments. 

"People do better if they have 
someone to turn to for advice," 
said Dr. Michael LaRue. 

As the number of new faculty 
members increased on campus, 
the need for cross departmental 
communication also increased. It 
was between Provost John Kuhn 
and Dr. Gail Grejda of the 
Clarion University Faculty 
Senate that the discussions of a 
mentoring program first devel- 
oped. At the faculty level, the 
College of Education and Human 
Services already had a mentoring 
program in place. The problem 
was that other departments were 
in need of such efforts. 

"Everyone is trained in then- 
field, but not all professors are 
trained as teachers," says LaRue. 
"They need to be able to achieve 
a balance between teaching, 
research, and service to the com- 
munity. This is best imparted to 
them by one who has been there. 
This is not expected to be a life- 
time connection, but something 
to get them started on the right 
track." 

As things get started, there are 



four formal programs scheduled 
as part of the mentoring effort put 
forth by LaRue. There is a 
keynote address scheduled to be 
given by Dr. Gail Grejda, and 
information of various related 
topics will be presented by the 
following: "Evaluation Process*' 
by Dr. Brian Dunn, professor of 
history, "New Course Proposals" 
by Dr. Steve Harris, assistant pro- 
fessor of biology, "Partners in 
teaching Learning Assessment" 
by Dr. Jeanne Slattery, assistant 
professor of psychology, 
"Women's Studies" by Dr. Donna 
Ashcraft, interim director of 
Women's Studies, and "Making 
Connections" by Dr. Johnson. 

In the second program, there 
will be sessions on "Advice for 
New Advisors" that will be pre- 
sented by Dr. Donna Polijanec of 
academic support services, along 
with Dr. Marite Rodriguez 
Haynes, associate professor of 
psychology. Also, there will be 
two other programs dealing with 
"Beyond the Basics" and 
"Staying on 

Tenure Track" that are being held 
during the spring semester. 



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The following is a brief synopsis of the 

criminal investigations conducted by 

Public Safety for the dates between 

July 1 and September 8. The blotter is 
compiled by The Public Safety office 



♦On September 17, unknown actor(s) picked up a gold ring in the 
women's restroom in Gemmell, and failed to take reasonable mea- 
sures to restore the ring to its rightful owner. 

♦On September 16, a person entered a resident's room in Wilkinson 
Hall and removed a memory card. 

♦On September 20, someone pulled a fire alarm pull station on the sec- 
ond floor of Nair Hall, causing the evacuation of the building. The 
incident is still under investigation. 

♦On September 20, campus police officers observed four students 
attempting to enter Tropin Gym by way of a roof top window. Charges 
are pending. 

♦On September 21, a person reported being harrassed at the Gemmell 
snack bar at 3:05 p.m. 

♦Some individual pulled a fire alarm on the fourth floor of Nair Hall 
on September 22. There are no suspects at this time. 

♦On September 22, a male student was removed from Becker Lab for 
being beligerent to the lab assistant 

♦On September 22, a male student reported that his wallet had been 
stolen out of his backpack in Gemmell. 

♦On September 22, three females reported that they were being sexu- 
ally harrassed. 

♦On September 23, two students were fighting in Ralston Hall. Both 
were charged with disorderly conduct. 

♦ A student reported clothing stolen from a washing machine in Givan 
Hall on September 24. 




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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



Clarion improves advisory 



by Hope Guy 
News Writer 



If students are unsure of what 
classes are needed for their 
major, Donna Poljanec, director 
of the new Clarion University 
Advising Services office, has the 
answer. 

"Students often don't realize 
how much an academic advisor 
can be to them. I have heard 
upperclass students tell freshman 
that they don't need to see their 
advisor," she commented. "This 
is very poor advice. If students 
can see their advisor as freshman, 
they can obtain information 
about the major and the require- 
ments. This knowledge can be 
beneficial throughout their entire 
college career. An advisor can be 
a source of information about 
other campus resources." 

The Advising Services Office 
started with one purpose in mind: 
to improve advising for both stu- 
dents and faculty, alike. To 
accomplish this purpose, the 
office has set up workshops for 
both faculty and students. 



One workshop for faculty will 
teach advisors how to use Clarion 
University's computerized 
Student Information System to 
help advise students. 

For students, there will be a 
series of seven workshops titled 
"Major Decisions: A Career 
Development Series." These 
workshops include "Campus 
Career Resources", "Exploring 
Myself and Career", "The 
Decision Making Process", 
"Exploring Career Possibilities", 
"Clarion University Majors", 
"Learning Outside the 
Classroom", and "Developing a 
Career Portfolio." 

"The October 20 session might 
be of particular interest to all stu- 
dents. Students and faculty repre- 
sentatives from each department 
on campus will be available to 
provide personal insight into 
their programs and distribute 
materials about majors and 
minors in their deprartment," 
said Poljanec. 

Other projects of the Advising 
Services office include the coor- 



"Students 
often don H 
realize how 
much an aca- 
demic advisor 
can be to 
them. " 

-Donna Poljanec 

Director of Advising 

Servisces 



dinating of advising for unde- 
clared students, designing acade- 
mic advising web pages for 
Clarion University's web site, 
and developing publications and 
resources to assist faculty and 
students in the advising process. 
Anyone interested in this pro- 
gram, or interested in joining the 
workshops, should contact Dr. 
Donna Poljanec. 



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September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Health Beat 

Treatment exists for depression sufferers 



by Angle Binick 
Assistant News Editor 

For sufferers of depression, 
medication has proven to be a 
powerful weapon in combating 
the symptoms of depression, 
given that 70% of patients 
improve or recover with proper 
medication, according to the 
University of Texas Health 
Science Center. For those who do 
not respond to medication, elec- 
troshock therapy is still used as 
an alternative treatment, with 
positive results. However, the 
best results usually come from 
medication or shock therapy 
combined with counseling thera- 
py, addressing both the physical 
and interpersonal causes of 
depression, while finding help 
for both. 

When asked what means of 
treatment was best for depression 
sufferers, Dr. Kathy Meley, a 
counselor at C.U.P.'s Department 
of Counseling Services, said, 
"That is difficult to say. For 
example, you can have a lot of 
weight loss, or you can have a lot 
of weight gain, depending on 
what type of depression you 
have. In general, usually a com- 
bination of therapy and medica- 
tion is best for moderate to severe 
depression." 

In recent times, three families 
of medication have been focused 
on for depression treatment, 

opening new doors to depression 
management but not without suf- 
ficient controversy. The first of 
the three families are Tricyclic 



Antidepressants or TCA's, which 
increase serotonin and 
norenephrine levels in the brain 
but also inhibit other neurotrans- 
mitters, resulting in numerous 
side effects. Examples of TCA's 
include Tofranil, Elavil, 
Norpramin and Pamelor. 

On the other hand, Monoamine 
Oxidase Inhibitors, or MAOI's, 
slow down the breakdown of 
serotonin and have fewer side 
effects than TCA's or MAOI's. 
Under brand names such as 
Prozac and Zoloft, SSRI's were 
introduced in the 1980's as more 
effective drugs in treating depres- 
sion, but such drugs have not 
proven effective in all people and 
some, such as Prozac, have even 
produced violent or suicidal reac- 
tions in some sufferers. 

Hope for those who want nei- 
ther the cost nor the side effects 
of conventional antidepresssants 
may lie in a herb called St. John's 
Wart, also known by its proper 
name, Hypericum. Praised as a 
natural mood elevator, 
Hypericum has become popular 
as a holistic treatment for mild to 
moderate depression, and a study 
published in the British Medical 
Journal in August 1996 showed 
that Hypericum had promising 
effects on 1,757 mild depression 
sufferers. 

The recent publicity surround- 
ing Hypericum has been wel- 
comed by holistic merchants 
across the world, including 
Velma Greenawalt, manager of 
the General Nutrition Center in 



the Clarion Mall. "We've sold a 
lot of Hypericum before," says 
Greenawalt, "but since it's been 
on TV., and now that doctors 
have reccommended it, its sales 
have skyrocketed." 

At roughly half the cost of 
Prozac with almost no side 
effects, save increased light sen- 
sitivity in some users, this centu- 
ry's old treatment may have 
potential, but it is important to 
remember that Hypericum is not 
a substitute for prescribed med- 
ication and is not appropriate for 
use against severe depression. 
Before approaching Hypericum 
therapy or any type of self med- 
ication, depression sufferers 
should always consult a doctor 
beforehand to guard against over- 
dose, drug interactions, etc. 

Although sometimes over- 
looked by society, depression is a 
growing problem mat deserves to 
be understood and treated. If you 
or anyone you know is manifest- 
ing signs of depression, it is 
important to seek professional 
help, such as a doctor, threapist 
or counselor, and offer compas- 
sion to sufferers and the friends 
and family of sufferers. 
Furthermore, if you or anyone 
you know is even considering 
suicide (depression based or not) 
it is essential to seek help immea- 

diately in the form of a counselor, 
minister, or responsible adult 

Information and treatment for 

depression is avaiable at C.U.P.'s 

Department of Counseling 

Services. 



Attention All SCJ 
Members... 

****************************** 

The Society of Collegiate Journalists 

will hold a very important meeting on 

October 2nd at 3:30 in Becker Hall's 

Studio B. 

If there are any questions, please 

contact Dr. Susan Hilton @ 226-2540. 

********************************************* 



Student 




Senate 



The September 21st meeting of the Student Senate began with the 
advisor's report. He reported that Dr. Curtis 's main complaint was that 
the Board of Directors planned to take away the Student Senate's abil- 
ity to control activity fee funds. He also announced that on October 12, 
a meeting would be held at IUP to discuss the change in the fee policy. 
The President announced that the executive board attended a meeting 
with the Sequelle to suggest a "create your own page option." Each stu- 
dent sentate member was encouraged to write a paragraph for the stu- 
dent senate page.The Vice President reported that the Senator of the 
Week award went to Shannon Bean. The Student Trustees report 
included a mention of the Venango meeting on Sept 18th, where long 
distance learning possibilities were the focus. The passed university 
budget was $51,886,600, which was distributed to different organiza- 
tions. The Secretary reviewed an allocation of the funds. 

The Appropriations committee discussed new accounts and passed 
out papers regarding the accounts to be voted on. The Student Facilities 
Committee suggested a new system to regulate Gemmell Computer 
Lab. Senator DiDonato complained that the RAC room in Gemmell is 
often locked in the evenings, and is an inconvenience to have to con- 
tact Public Safety to get it open. 

Finally, Senator Snyder wanted to approve two old and two new 
accounts, which were passed by senate. 



Taxes.. .cont'd from Page 1 

school to improve their job skills could receive a yearly tax credit of 
up to $1,000 for 20 percent of their charges. The maximum credit for 
this incentive rises to $2,000 after 2002. Dr. Ken Grugel, director of 
financial aid at Clarion University of Pennsylvania said, This is the 
most drastic piece of legislation to assist educational financing since 
the higher education amendments of 1965 that created most of the fed 
eral aid programs that exist today." 

Also, the federal PELL Grant will increase by $300 in the 1998-99 
school year to a maximum of $3,000. 

According to Grugel, Clarion applies for additional federal funding 
each year. This year, the university has almost doubled the amount of 
work study money available to students. That money has been used 
for a variety of things including: extended hours in the computer labs, 
the Keystone Smiles program and the America Reads program. 

With regards to a possible tuition increase Grugel said, "We would 
hope that they don't gear tuition increases to increases in federal aid, 
but the state legislature has not done that historically." 



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Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 





On You 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 



What is your opinion on cloning? 




William J. Havershaw, Junior, Spanish 

"I don't think it will ever happen in our 
lifetime." 




Frank Merkin, Senior, Information Science 

"Technology is a dangerous tiling. I would hate 
to see something like that get out of control." 





Harry Schmedily, Sophomore, General Studies 



"Sheep maybe, but people, never. 



» 



Frank Whinenshankle, Freshman, Biology 



"I don't really have an opinion. 1 



»» 




_____»«_— ^—-_—_- 



John J. Jinglehiemer-Schmidt, Junior, Library 
Science 

"Hey, anything is possible today." 



Tim Emanuel, Senior, Communication 
"What was the question?" 



Page 11 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 







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The Clarion Call 



Page 12 



A Summer Day 











As summer draws to a close our 
thoughts travel back to long days, 

warm evenings, iced tea, and 
lemonade. This past summer I 

had a chance to spend a lot of 

time in Cook forest, on these 
pages are just some of the many 

moments I had opportunity to 

enjoy. 



vXXvX-XvXviv^-xX'ix:-::-:-::-:-:-^^ :•:■:■:■: 



•: : v : :': : : ; : : :v: : >: ; : ; : : : ; :-^: : : : : : : : ::::: : :-:x-::': : :-: 




September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 






m^mm^mmmmmmm 



In Cook Forest 











_Jw* - *^ 8# ^ 



i 












So as the days get shorter 

and the evenings not so 

warm, try to remember that 

May is only eight short 

months away. 






Words and Photos by: Tim Emanuel, 
Photography Editor. 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



LIFESTYLES 



Drown your stress in the Clarion River 



by Brendan Anderer 
Lifestyles Writer 



As Clarion University students 
finally settle in and begin the rig- 
ors of academia, so does the 
search for certain stress relievers. 
While many of these quests 
begin by inviting twenty-four of 
our "Best" friends from 
Milwaukee over, few end up on 
the doorstep of the Cook Forest 
Canoe Livery. For about the same 
price as a case of beer, you can 
take a stress-drowning canoe trip 
down the mighty Clarion River. 
Pressures and causes of stress 
on students vary, as do the meth- 
ods of relieving them. For the 
freshman who carries the ever- 
demanding load of one hundred 
level intro courses, the recom- 
mended journey would be the 
one and a half hour, four mile 
trip. This is sure to ease the pains 
of what seem like hours in the 
library. 

Those carrying the average fif- 
teen credit burden may find a 
longer therapy session is in order: 
A ten mile, three and a half hour 
voyage. Courageous scholars: 18 
credits, 18 miles. 

Stress need not be the only rea- 



son for a canoe trip. What better 
way to spend quality time with a 
significant other or an old friend. 
A canoe trip is also a great way 
for organizations to bond as 
groups. Modern day distractions, 
such as the telephone, e-mail, and 
pagers, are all left on the bank of 
the river. 

Becoming one with nature is 
effortless. Cook Forest, just min- 
utes outside the hustle and bustle 
of downtown Clarion, is home to 
many species of wildlife. 

White tailed deer, great blue 
heron, and numerous hawks and 
birds of prey are just a few 
friends you will make along your 
outing. 

Sojourn on a quiet island for a 
cookout lunch, or gently drift 
with the current. You decide. 

Here at the University, the 
Health and Physical Education 
department offers weekend class- 
es in canoeing during Pre- 
Session, both summer one and 
two, and the fall and spring 
semesters. 

The department also offers a 

weekend camping and canoeing 
trip, where the class canoes on 

the river for three days and 

camps for two night. 

A new addition to these classes 



is the introduction of a river 
kayak. Students wishing to give 
this experience a shot are now 
able to. "The Health and Physical 
Education department is also try- 
ing to raise funds to buy four to 
five more of these kayaks," says 
Marcy Schlueter of the HPE 
department 

The Cook Forest Canoe Livery 
also offers a 30 mile overnight 
camping and canoeing trip for 
$60. 

You do not need to be an able- 
bodied seaman to negotiate the 
raging waters of the Clarion 
River. Canoeing is an activity 
that does not require a lot of 
experience. A beginner can pick 
up the sport in enough time to 
make the four mile trip quite 
enjoyable. 

Much of the fun, however, 
comes with learning your boat 
and how to maneuver it through 
the often shallow and rocky 
waters. 

It is recommended that any per- 
son embarking on a canoe trip be 
prepared. 

Wearing old tennis shoes i« 
advised, as you might need to get 

out of the canoe, or the canoe 

decides it wants you out. 

Prices are reasonable for day 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
Canoes in dry dock outside of Becker Hall. 



trips, with the four mile trip cost- 
ing $16 a canoe. The ten mile trip 
is $22 a canoe, and the "mega- 
trip" of eighteen miles is $33 a 
canoe. 

The Cook Forest Canoe Livery 
can be reached at 744-8094, and 
is open on weekends April 
through Memorial Day (weather 



permitting), seven days a week 
Memorial Day through Labor 
Day, and on weekends through 
October (again, weather permit- 
ting). 

So next time you feel the halls 
of academia closing in on you, 
escape to the great outdoors of 
Cook Forest for a canoe trip. 



Where In Clarion? 



the picturesque Toby Bridge over the Clarion River. 




Give Peace a Chance 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the mouth of the lion water fountain in 
Clarion Memorial Park. ■ 



Page 15 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



Park it up an d take it home 



'Excess Baggage ' a hit in theaters 



by Melissa Andrews 
and Jotina Giaramita 
Lifestyles Writers 



The "clueless" chick finally 
gets some access to her brain in 
this 1997 romantic comedy. 
Excess Baggage, starring Alicia 
Silverstone and Benicio del 
Torro, was unexpectedly fresh 
and very entertaining. 

Emily (Silverstone) is, once 
again, a multi-millionaire's 
motherless teenage daughter. 
Slightly different from her previ- 
ous role as Cher in Clueless, 



Alicia's character is a "bad girl," 
drinking, smoking and pulling a 
multi-million dollar prank which 
is the plot for the movie. 

When Emily is tired of not 
receiving the love and attention 
she thinks she deserves from dear 
old dad, who is leaving the coun- 
try for a business trip the next 
day, she decides to kidnap herself 
and demands a ransom of a mil- 
lion dollars. 

del Torro, working as a high 
class car thief runs into Emily 
when he finds her in the trunk of 
the BMW he has stolen. Without 





knowing she had planted herself 
in the trunk of her car, he now 
becomes part of her scheme. 

After a series of events, 
Silverstone and del Torro end 
up. . .well, this isn't a summary of 
the movie, it's a review, therefore 
we can't tell you what happens 
between the "two youths" (Afy 
Cousin Vwnie), but we can tell 
you some other stuff. For exam- 
ple, del Torro can't believe 
Emily's plot when he figures out 
what she was plannning. He tries 
to get rid of her as quickly and 
harmlessly as possible, but she 
has other plans. 

His good guy/bad guy qualities 
come out when he refuses to let 



her smoke and questions her age 
about drinking. 

He doesn't want to put her in 
danger, and staying together 
would put them both in danger. 
He's got some very angry gentle- 
men on his tail about the car he 
was supposed to deliver to them, 
not to mention the garage which 
Emily manages to burn down by 
obeying his directions to get rid 
of her cigarette (right into a 
garbage can full of flammable 
trash). 

And her plan doesn't go quite 
according to schedule when her 
uncle (the scary guy) comes into 
the picture. He, unlike her father, 
picks up on the strangeness of 



Emily's unexpected "kidnap- 
ping." He plans to get to the bot- 
tom of this mess before anything 
seriously gets out of hand. 

One of the highlights of the film 
was the incredible soundtrack. 
Not only does it include the bril- 
liance of Jakob Dylan and the 
gang (The Wallflowers) with 
"One Headlight," but also from 
the musical prodigy that brought 
us the movie's theme song 
"Crash Into Me" — Dave 
Matthews. These songs really 
add a lot of passion to the movie. 
All in all, we think that this is 
the perfect date movie. Not just 
because it's a good old love story, 
but because when you least 
expect it, it really makes you 
laugh (look for the "sasquatch 
sightings" during the scene at the 
gas station). 

But we've already seen the 
movie, now it's your turn. For 
those of us Clarion students on a 
budget, check out the UAB spon- 
sored movie night September 30 
at the Garby Theater. 

So mark your calendars. Hope 
we've helped you out. Enjoy the 
show! 



]L <lH9KD /WW*£ CCAK90/1 UJV9VEKS9<Cy 

^fffi amd eoMMum^y euccun/u: nogm 

Autumn Leaf festival 

Monday, October 6, 1997 ; 

6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Clarion Couttty: YeDDsy wanis's 



FEATURING: 

♦ BLUES CLOWN- Blues/Jazz Music 

♦ DR's SMABY- Scandinavian Dancing 

♦ JACKIE BOOTH- Native American Songs 

♦ CLARION - LIMESTONE AREA HIGH 
SCHOOL SENSATIONS- Performance 

♦ LIFT EVERY VOICE CHOIR- Gospel Music 

♦ ANGELO ANDERSON AND TYRONE 
TYLER- Acappella Music 

♦ Clarion University of PA Jazz Combo in 
front of the Courthouse 

Tuesday, October 7, (7-9:30p.m.): 

♦ Greenville High School Steel Drum 
Band in front of the Courthouse 

♦ Doreen McBride (Irish Storytelling) in 
front of the Courthouse 

Wednesday, October 8, (5: 30-7 :00p.m.): 

♦ Andy Carlyle Band (Blues music and 
Rock 'n Roll) in front of the Courthouse 



WHERE: 




In front of the Courthouse. (In 
case of rain, the events will be 
held at the Gazebo.) 



Contributing sponsors are New Begin- 
nings Speciality Care and Beneficial 
Finance. 

Thursday, October 9, (7-8:00p.m.): 
♦ Allegheny River Dancers (Traditional 

Iroquois Social Dances/ Songs) in front of 

the Courthouse 
(8:30-9:30p.m.): 




♦ CLARION INTERNATIONAL 
ASSOCIATION- Dancing/ Fashion Show 

♦ RUNA PACHA- Ecuadorian Indian Music 



Friday, October 10, (10 a.m.-4 p.m.): 

♦ Highland Bag Pipers of Grove City 

♦ Mariachi Quartet 

♦ Runa Pacha 

These groups will be performing all along 
Main Street throughout the day. 



&@& 



Cultural Night is the third annual, mutual event for Clarion University and the Community. Monday is kick- 
off nighifor the week -long, cultural and musical events. Please come and join us for a great night offim and 
cultural entertainment during ALF. It's free and open to the public. For more information call the Office of 
Social Equity at 226-2109. 




September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 16 



Famed Poet Ed Sanders To Speak 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Internationally known poet, 
journalist and musician Ed 
Sanders has been called the 
"Albert Einstein der 'Lost 



"I felt a calling. 
A set of voices, 
unsettled and 
still calling." 



Generation.'" On Oct. 1, the 
famous beatnik will give a poetry 
reading and music recital at 7 
p.m. in Hart Chapel at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Sanders' performance, which is 



free and open to the public, is 
being sponsored by the Clarion 
University College of Arts and 
Sciences and the Clarion County 
Arts Council. 

His readings will concern the 
politics, culture and music of the 
incredible year of 1968, a year of 
incredible change when Martin 
Luther King Jr. and Robert 
Kennedy were assassinated, 
President Lyndon Johnson abdi- 
cated, Black Power was the story 
at the Mexico City Olympic 
Games and Jimi Hendrix and 
Janis Joplin were emerging stars. 

"I felt a calling," says Sanders. 
"A set of voices, unsettled and 
still calling — from 1968. . .1 kept 
hearing the voices of the unfin- 
ished journeys of Martin King 
and Robert Kennedy, of the injus- 
tices in Chicago, the rigged con- 
vention and un-Democracy; the 
voice of Nixon, and of the sol- 
diers and civilians shouting and 
screaming in My Lai, the voices 




of rock and roll. . .and many other 
events — voices and journeys I 
sequenced in a chronology of the 
year that tells both a personal and 
public story." 

The program brings a mix of 
chanted, spoken and sung works 
to public recitals of poetry, some- 



Arrieta entertains crowd 



by Mark Strieker 
Lifestyles Writer 



It was a cozy celebration of 
music and cultural sharing the 
evening of September 20 as 
Edwin Arrieta performed at the 
Gemmell Rotunda. Arrieta, a 
Clarion student who originates 
from Costa Rica, put on a one- 
man music/variety show spon- 
sored by UAB. 

Arrieta sang an eclectic mix of 
Latin American music, including 
selections form Central and 
South America, the Caribbean 
and Spain. He covered a broad 
sonic spectrum, including 
merengue and salsa. 

Most of the selections were 
upbeat, danceable songs which 





m m mm sm 
am @ free 

We NOW have a POOL TABLE 

(with coupon) 

eat-in only 

Mon&Sat 

4-10 




got the audience swaying, clap- 
ping and tapping their toes. 

The atmosphere of the evening 
was fun and relaxed. At one 
point, Arrieta paused to dedicate 
a song to his mother. Later, he 
caught a banana thrown to him 
from a friend in the crowd. 

Performing is "a way of reach- 
ing out and sharing culture," says 
Arrieta, who came to the United 
States three years ago. 

He has been performing since 
age 14 and was in a group before 
he was forced to leave after 
receiving a scholarship to come 
here. 

Arrieta is currently studying 



secondary education and psy- 
chology and is also an interpreter 
for the deaf. 

He will be kicking off Cultural 
Week during the Autumn Leaf 
Festival at 6:30 p.m. October 6 in 
front of the Clarion County 
Courthouse. 

Other groups scheduled to per- 
form that week are the Greenville 
High School Steel Drum Band on 
October 7 and the Clarion 
University Jazz Combo on 
October 9. Both of these perfor- 
mances will be in front of the 
courthouse at 7 p.m. 

The Highland Bagpipers of 
Grove City and the Mariachi 
Quartet will play in front of the 
courthouse at 10 a.m. October 10. 

Arrieta will also be appearing at 
the Clarion International 
Association Cultural Night, an 
evening of performance and 
food, in the Gemmell Mutli- 
Purpose Room at 7 p.m. 
November 14. 



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times utilizing musical instru- 
ments of his own invention, 
including the Talking Tie, the 
Pulse Lyre, the Light Lyre and 
the Mona Lisa Lyre. 

The Clarion performance will 
include readings for his new 
book 1968, A History in Verse, 
which traces the events of 1968 
using "Investigative Poetry." 

1968, A History in Verse uses 
historical research and analysis 
as the catalyst for the poetry. 

The book combines internation- 
al historic events, such as the 
assassination of Martin Luther 
King, the My Lai massacre, the 
beginnings of the Manson group 
and the emerging influence of 
rock and roll, with Sanders' per- 
sonal accounts, including his 
experiences as a political protest- 
er and his friendship with the 
notorious and revered Allen 
Ginsberg. 

Sanders is a writer and per- 
former whose roots are in the 



counterculture of the 1960s. His 
work is diverse, writing for such 
publications as The New York 
Times and The Village Voice and 
producing musical CDs with his 
"folk-rock poetry satire group," 
The Fugs, a group with a 33 year 
history. 

He is also the author of Hymn 
to the Rebel Cafe and Chekhov, a 
Biography in Verse. 

Sanders' most recent CD is 
"American Bard," and his most 
recent work with The Fugs is 
"The Real Woodstock Festival." 

Sanders is also the founder and 
editor of the Woodstock Journal. 
He lives in Woodstock, New 
York with his wife, Miriam 
Sanders, a writer and artist in her 
own right 

He has received awards and fel- 
lowships which include a 1983 
Guggenheim Fellowship in poet- 
ry and a 1987 National 
Endowment for the Arts 
Fellowship in poetry. 



f 1 



* 



£a 



Join WCUC 91.7 FM in its 

20th year of broadcasting at 

Clarion University 

WCUC's Fall 1997 programming schedule for: 

Monday through Friday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. - 

Top 40 hits from the 80's and 90's 

Monday through Friday 6 p.m. to midnight - 

Album oriented rock and alternative rock 

Weekly features include: 

Tuesday through Friday 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. - 

The Morning Show 

Thursdays 4 to 6 p.m. - Sports Talk 

Saturday 

Jnrm. to noon - Country Connection 

Noon to 3 p.m. - Hometown Top 30 Countdown 

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. - Adult Alternative 
6 p.m. to midnight - Saturday Night R & B Party 

Sunday 

9 a.m. to noon - Clarion Country 
Noon to 6 p.m. - The Sunday Time Capsule 

Weekly features at 7:05 a.m. include: 

Monday - The Law Show 

Tuesday -51 Percent 

Wednesday - The Environment Show 

Thursday - The Health Show 

Friday - Powerline 

News updates can be heard Monday through 
Friday at 7 a.m., 8 a.m., noon, 4 p.m. and 5 p.rr 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Calendar 



Event s 



tmj=\ 



Today 

•Group Pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 

•HHM Bookfair - 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gemmell Lobby 

•Library Science 60th Anniversary colloquium speaker 

series, Dr. Connie Thorson - 3:30 p.m., Hart Chapel 

Friday 

•Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 

•Freshman Advising Week 
ends 

•UAB Spirit Day 
•Volleyball at Ashland tour- 
nament 

•Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 
250 Gemmell 

•Tennis at Indiana - 3:30 p.m. 

•Credit/No Record ends - 4 p.m. 

•Guest faculty piano recital, Dr. Patricia Brady - 8:15 

p.m., Hart Chapel 

•Gemmell Center and UAB Spirit Dance 

"Houserockers" - 9 p.m. to midnight, Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 

Saturday 

•Family Day 

•UAB Alumni 

Cheerleader Day; free- 

shaker poms - Stadium 

•Volleyball at Ashland 

tournament 

•Cross Country at 

Youngstown State 

•Intramural Challenge 

Course begins 

•College of Business 

Open House - 9 a.m. 

•Opening Family Day 

program - Gemmell 

•Bookstore hours - 10 

a.m. to 6 p.m. 

•Swimming and Diving vs. University of California at 

Davis - 10 a.m. 






<* 



\ 



»Pig Roast - noon to 1:30 p.m., Stadium 

•Pep Rally -1:15 to 2 
p.m., Stadium 
•Football vs. University of 
California at Davis - 2 
p.m. 

•Planetarium show - 6 
p.m., Peirce 
y -The Pittsburgh Public 

Schools All City Honors Jazz Band - 7:30 p.m., Hart 

Chapel 

Sunday 

•UAB Steeler Party - noon to 4:30 p.m., Gemmell 

Upstairs Rotunda 

Monday 

•Faculty Senate meeting - 4 p.m., B-8 Hart Chapel 

•Career Development Series: "Exploring Myself and 

Careers" - 6 p.m., Carter Auditorium, Still 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

Public Debate; sponsored by Clarion Forensics - 7:30 

p.m., Hart Chapel 

Tuesday 

•UAB Movie Night - local theater 

•Bloodmobile - 11 a.m. to 5 

p.m., Gemmell Multipurpose 

Room 

•Timeout Luncheon - noon, 

Holiday Inn 

•Tennis vs. Pittsburgh - 3:30 p.m. 

•Volleyball at Edinboro - 7 p.m. 

•Drama Production "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

Wednesday 

•Intramural Horseshoe Pitching begins 

•UAB Homecoming Float meeting - 6 p.m., 246 

Gemmell 

•Drama Production "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

•Poet and author Ed Sanders; sponsored by the College 

of Arts and Sciences - 7 p.m., Hart Chapel 



Page 17 



Family Day 

September 27 

•Beverage & pastries - 

9 to 10 a.m., Gemmell 

Multi-Purpose Room 

•Welcome and preview 

of activities - 10a.m. 

•Selected programs & 

facilities available - 

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

•Planetarium Show - 

11:15 a.m. to noon 

and 6 p.m., Peirce 

Science Hall 

•Pig Roast - noon to 

1:30 p.m., Stadium 

•Pep Rally - 

1:15 to 2 p.m, Stadium 

•Pittsburgh Public 
School All-City Honors 

Jazz Band - 
7:30 p.m., Hart Chapel 



Fridays Declared As UAB Spirit Days 



College of 

Business 

Administration 

Open House 

September 27 
9 a.m. to noon 

•Welcoming address by 
Dr. Joseph Grunenwald, 

Dean of College of 
Business Adminstration 

♦Academic department 
sessions 
•Tours of Still Hall 
•Presentation by admis- 
sions office 
♦Tours of residence 

halls 
♦Lunch at Chandler 
^ Dining Hall 



Courtesy of University 
Activities Board 

The University Activities Board 
has declared every Friday as a 
Spirit Day. 

Each Friday, a member of UAB 
will travel around campus hand- 
ing out key chains to people 
wearing Clarion attire to promote 
spirit for the university. 

So make sure you are wearing 
something that says Clarion on 
Fridays, and you might be one of 
the lucky ones to receive a key 
chain. 



There is also going to be a pep 
rally for the first home football 
game of the season. Come to the 
stadium at 1:15 p.m. Saturday to 



cheer the football team on to 
another winning season. Free 
shaker poms will be given out at 
the pep rally and the game. 



"95% of our stock is $5.99 or less" 

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Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



ENTERTAINMENT 





CHAOS by Brian Shuster 








. //-I've Newer 

_ieeN me G«ns 




The water-balloon toss at the 'Father-Maggot Picnic' 
CHAOS by Brian Shuster 




MUFFIN by Nora McVittie 



"So, so far all weVe got is that the suspect was tall thin 
and in a box?" 



[s)Y\et\ CL$>kcd -to do 
Sorwc-Wifw^/ -th£u /hate. 



£hunK><s<vi X 
<\neu> locif 




"Then-fHe^-plao fruMB . 
O^p/ofer...) 




Soften have, -fo be 
BRfB£:l> . 




September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



ENTERTAINMENT] 






Blfv\Alf 

6fcoe/4i*iG 



WILL AND 

ABrs GUIDE TO 
RESTAURANTS 




FEATURING 
THE CHAUtw&fc 
' OF CHOPSTicicy 



S^. 




w atch out Foe. too- hot 
Pizza' one time steam 

WAS COnuuGOUToF A86S 
MOUTH IT WAS 1 So HOT? 





FAST- FOOD fteSTAUfcflMTS 
HAVE PllTA, HAM8URG6RS, 
ORCHlCfcEN. iTf CALteO 
FAST FOOp 6&CAUSE it 
DOESN'T TAKE THAT LON6TO 
ORPEft. THEY'RE AlREAd* 
MAPE, AND THe*'A€ LIKE 




P IZ1A RESTAURANTS ARE UWALO 
SMAu. A»JO HAVE COOrJTfcftS. 
A LOT OF PlllA RESTAuftAwTS 
F0R.S0ME REASON HAVE THAT 
MONfcy TMtHGTO GtV/E THEM 
GOOD LVCK—MONW TAPED ON 
THE WALL THAT FRlEiW 6lv/6.' 




7 SWANKS* ftESTAuRAMTSX 
USUALLY HAVE A J0N6LE OC 
&EACttTHEME,W|TH LITTLE 
LIKE.KIP CHARACTERS, AND 
FAKE ftiRDS HANGING PoWN. 
WE EAT 8U8.6EBS THERE. «fr 
JUST LIKE FAST FOOD, ONL^ 
A LOTOFPETAILS/ 




AT MEXlCAd RESTAURANTS 

you shoulp orpek gvf wpiLiAijoj 

ANP MOBCHATA. HORCHATA 15 
AfclCEpRlMfcWlTW BROWN 

S06Aft that's so sweet/ it*- 
like SUGAR Wi TH milk AnD 

A UTTIE KICK' 




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RESTAURANTS ARE CotJSipfJKC 

FANC5 restaurants, the 

DIFFERENCE fi£TV066») CHlMCSE 
AHO JAPANESE I S THAT CHINESE 

is Sort of u*e steams and 
sort of mews . sort of. 




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GOODTEfcl»AfclCH\CW») M IXEP 
INTHATSAOCE. WE LIKE EATmJG 

With CHoP$rit« Better. 6ec«mse 

ITV MoRE OF A CHAUEN6E To 
GET WHAT yoO EAT! 





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4 OVAwuJilfftaA/L, 

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<rtJL JiuduiuUL 



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UP, IN. Doww, pP in. With 

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pick up like a shovel, 
And chomp/ 




FAUC3 RESTAvRAuTS USUAll* 
HAVE SEAFOOD WITH FISH 
AupSHRiMP, AMP A LOT OF 
OTHER PEHCACI6S LIKECiAHf 
AND OUSTER. ANO I F THEM'S 
A CHICKEN PAi^cy RestAvAAiJT, 
THEy Give sow A whole Big 
THiiJG OF CHICKED, NOTJujT 
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FISH, WATCH OUT FOR A SI6N 
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WfcXlCAiO HAT.THlUG 0»0 IT/ 
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IN THERE / 





KlPS'ME»JUS AREH'T ASGoop 
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POt»'THAJE Af GOOP S6iEcno»J. 
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PA6ES AUO THE KiOf HAVE 

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ARE REAll^ SAP, like Smile 3 
THE FISH.' IF itouORPEftSMiify 
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ANP THEy Ptn-BACoOoN it To 
MAKE IT LOOK UKE ITS SMIU46 
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THE WORST THi»l6 you COULD 
ORPER IN A ftESTAUSXWT ij 
FR06S' LEGS \ ALSO, WATCH 
OUT FoR MISTA*iw6 SARftECut 

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BApi IT SMEU.S FlEBf! A»IP 
IT WILL AuirJ HOOd pmts I 





VICE 
PRESIDENT 

AL GORE 



w&n>i 



Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you want to be admired by DOZENS of fellow 

students? Do you dream of molding and shaping 

the impressionable minds of our campus' youth? 

Then send YOUR fun submissions of poetry, 

comics or Bedazzled clothes to these 

Entertainment Pages, c/o 

Benj, 270 Gemmell 

Center. Or call x2380. 

Impress your 




Bio CU Plant Safe 



• When: Wednesday 

Sepremhe* 24 tJjrm 

Fmday SejnemheR 26 



• Where: The 
Greenhouse 




September 20, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 20 



r 



Page 21 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



SPORTS 



Stunned! 



By Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The Clarion University football 
team dropped to 0-2 on the young 
season following Saturday's star- 
tling 51-0 loss at Glenville State, 
a team the Golden Eagles had 
defeated 49-23 a year ago. 

However, the Eagles lost more 
than the football game. Senior 
quarterback Chris Weibel, who 
was regarded as a potential 
Marlon Hill Trophy candidate, 
was injured in the second quarter 
and will be "out for the season," 
said Head Coach Malen Luke. 

Weibel's injury was later diag- 
nosed as a torn anterior cruciate 
ligament in his left knee. He left 
the game after completing 12 of 
16 passes for 90 yards. 

"It was one of those days that 
you'd like to forget about," said 
Clarion Head Coach Malen 
Luke. "I'm not making excuses, 
but when Chris went down, it 
kind of took the wind out of our 
sails." 

With Clarion (0-2) trailing 10-0 
at the time of Weibel's injury, the 




Clarion 

Glenville St. 51 

This Week vs 
California-Davis 



Pioneers recovered a Golden 
Eagle fumble and turned it into a 
touchdown pass from Wilkie 
Perez to Carlos Ferralls for a 17- 
point halftime lead. 

"Although we were down 17-0, 
I really thought we'd be O.K.," 
said Luke. "We had some bad 
breaks, but I thought we'd be 
able to weather the storm." 



Tennis team moves to 4-2 

Golden Eagles roll 
past Titans 9-0 



by Bethany Boat 
Sports Writer 



The Golden Eagle Netters had 
a successful trip to Westminister 
on Friday, September 19. 
Clarion scored 9 wins, leaving 
Westminister with a shut out 

In singles play, senior Kristen 
Golia crushed Renee Buffaly, 6- 
3,6-2. Amy Shaffer, a freshman, 
defeated Tersa Hage, 6-2, 6-2. 
Cassie Baker won over Sarah 
Coffman, 6-2, 6-1 at #3 singles. 
Maureen Williams, senior, 
dropped Ellen Johnston, 6-1,6- 
1. Sophomore, Rachel Link 
breezed past Lynn Zolkowski, 6- 
0, 6-0. And finally, in singles 
play, Amy O'Neal defeated Lora 
Miller, 6-2, 6-0. 

In doubles play, Golia and 
Shaffer dominated Buffaly and 
Jennifer Croushoure, 8-1. 



Williams and Link defeated 
Coffman and Johnston also at 
8-1. Lastly in doubles play, 
Baker and O'Neal finished off 
Hage and Zolkowski, 8-0. 

"We played outstanding ten- 
nis," praised head coach Terry 
Acker. "We played very con- 
sistent throughout the lineup." 
Acker noted that is team's 
performance was sparked by a 
slow start in the Shippensburg 
Tournament last weekend. 

"We still have a bad taste in 
our mouth." Acker noted. 
"We felt we lost a little respect 
last weekend and are hungry to 
get it back. We should have no 
problem staying motivated the 
rest of the way." 

(continued on page 21) 



Unfortunately for Clarion, 
Glenville (2-1) had different 
plans. 

After tacking on another touch- 
down in the third period, the 
Pioneers opened the flood gates 
in the fourth quater by scoring 
four touchdowns to seal the vic- 
tory. 

The Perez-to-Ferralls connec- 
tion worked for Glenville all 
afternoon, as Perez completed 19 
of 30 passes for 349 yards and 
touchdowns of 36, 20,and 10 
yards to Ferralls. Ferralls caught 
13 passes to finish with 245 
receiving yards. In all, the 
Pioneers piled up 485 yards of 
total offense, compared to 
Clarion's 283. 

Clarion's biggest scoring threat 
occured on their first possession 
when they advanced to the 
Glenville 5-yard line. However, 
the result was a blocked John 
Shikella field goal attempt, 
which would be a harbinger of 
things to come. 

The shutout loss was CUP's 
first since 1993, and the 51 points 
surrender by the Eagles was the 




Senior quarterback Chris 
Weibel is expected to miss 
the rest of the season with 
a torn ACL. 

most since their 51-10 loss at 
Youngstown State last season. 

The Golden Eagles return to 
action this Saturday in their home 
opener against California-Davis 
(1-2). 

The task at hand for the Golden 
Eagles is to find a way to fill the 
void at quarterback left by the 
injured Chris Weibel. 



Weibel's playing career remains 
an uncertainty at this point. Chris 
will be re-evaluated today, but 
will require surgery to repair the 
knee. With the injury happening 
this early in the season, the possi- 
bility of Weibel being granted a 
medical red-shirt still looms. 

The job appears to be up for 
grabs between senior Bernie 
Pynos, and sophomore Jeff 
Cappa. 

"We'll have to see what hap- 
pens in practice this week," 
Malen Luke noted. 

Pynos, from Blairsville (Penn 
Trafford H.S.) has seen action in 
both of Clarion's games this sea- 
son, completing only 1 of 6 pass- 
es for 7-yards. 

Cappa, a Riverview High 
School graduate saw time against 
Glenville State and posted a 
decent statline, completing 8 of 
15 passes, for 91 yards, with the 
longest gain being 32 yards. 

"Another alternative Clarion is 
to quarterback by committe," 
said Luke, which would involve 
both Pynos and Cappa seeing 
action. 



^^^mmtmmmmmrrmmtmfm 






California-Davis at a glance 

When The Sporting News released their college fcwfoaU prev^ 
game was listedas the top Divison II game to '97, UkeOarion, the Aggies were tabbed as a top ten ieart 
me NCAA preseason poUfoUowing their advance to the Mtton^ 0- 

2 start and UC TJavis currentiy at 1*2, ^ J^gardles^fansMM^Hal 

Stadium should teams. 

UC Davis, which i* tocated 10 miles west of Sacramento and has as enrollment of 23,092, is regarded as a 
pereiutial powerhouse in 041. The Aggies* tradition boasts 12 playoff appearances in the last 20 years, and 

10 alumni who have played m the NFL. Amongmemis former New York Jets quaterback Ken O'Brien, who 
now serves as an assistant at UC Davis. 

Although the Golden Eagles will obtain benefits from playing a team of LCD's caliber, the Aggws* pres- 
ence on Clarion schedule was not planned. 

^There's no real reason other than that we both had an opening (on the schedule)," said CUP Head Coach 
Malen Luke. *But it will kind of be like the playoffs, because we're getting to play a team from another pari 
of the country" 

Altetan 0*2 start to this season, UCDavi&goton the winning side of the ledger last week with a triple over- 
time 36-28 win over Sacramento Stakv Quarterback Kevin Daft threw for 374 yards and four touchctowm, 
atidrinmingbackGe^ 

So far this season, the Aggie offense is averaging an impressive 400 yards per game. In addition to Daft 
and Burgitt, \}C Davis features a talented group of wide receivers; Leading the way are John Shoemaker, who 
has 19 catches for 214 yards and a touchdown, and Francis Monies with 12 receptions for 194 yards and 3 
touchdowns. 

If the Aggie offense does have a weakness, it could be on the line. UC Davis qua(ert>acks have been sacked 

11 limes in three games this season. 
The Aggies appear solid on defense as weU as opponents have averaged 21,6 points per game this season 

Like many "west coast" style football teams, 11C Davis relies on exceptional team speed; Tha is something 
Clarion will account for when preparing for the Aggies. 

^They're extremely fast," said Luke. "Because of that, the game will have a very fast pace." 
NOTES: Facing six I-AA opponents in <JX», the UC Davis finished the season at 8-5, Head coach Bob 
Biggs played in the Canadian Football League, and has a 31-14-1 record with the Aggies. 



Tennis team back on winning track 



From page 20 

Sophomore Rachael Link agrees, 
"We wanted to prove something 
last Sunday against West Chester 
and against Westminister. 
Everyone played much better." 

Clarion has two tough matches 
coming up with Indiana (PA) and 
Pittsburgh. A key for the Golden 
Eagles will be the health of 
senior Mimi Williams, who has 
missed some action with a sore 
back. 

"The best thing to do in her sit- 
uation is rest when she can" 
Acker stated. 

At the mid-point of the season, 
Acker's team seems to be hitting 
stride at just the right time. 

"Our goal is to peaking when 
states come around. If we keep 
progressing, win a few weeks, 
we'll be right there." 




Time Emanuel/Clarion Call 

The Golden Eagle tennis team regained its form against 
Westminister and looks forward to the States in Hershey. 



Rugby team defeats 
Fairmont State 



by Jen Founds 
Managing Editor 



On Saturday, September 13, the 
Clarion Mens Rugby team trav- 
elled to Fairmont State College in 
West Virginia, where they kicked 
off their season with 42-0 win 
over the Fairmont State men's 
rugby team. 

The Clarion Mens Rugby Club, 
also known as the Taffurs, named 
after an old Scottish warrior is a 
certified organization, recog- 
nized by the United States Rugby 
Union with approximately 20 
members on the team. They 
played two matches, have two 
more scheduled and currently in 
the process of coordinating a 
tournament for the Autumn Leaf 
Festival in October. 

This past Saturday, the mens 
rugby team played their second 
conference match, losing to the 
Grove City College rugby team 
with a score of 13-5. 

Matt Zock, a junior biology 
member at Clarion, and a fourth 
semester member of the Taffurs 
said, "If we're projected to win 
the next two matches, and Grove 
City wins again, we'll be playing 
them in the Divison HI Eastern 
PA Conference." 

Last season, the mens rugby 
team placed third out of five 
teams enteries in the Slippery 
Rock 15th Annual Rock Rugby 
Tournament. Zock continued, 
"We have a good solid core of 
experienced players, but we need 

to get others involved to cover 
older members who we will be 



losing in the upcoming semes- 
ters." 

A senior communication major 
and second semester member of 
the rugby team, Matt Wilson said 
"We rely on the backs, who are a 
strong and fast part of the team, 
led by players, Chris Meggats, 
Ian Carson, Mike Smith, Mike 
Geoff, Justin Gvoth and others." 
The Taffurs are managed by Sean 
Dandy, who takes care of the 
members dues to the U.S. Rugby 
Union, and schedules their 
matches. They are lead by team 
captains Ralph Kearney and Dan 
Witzokey. 

The next match will be played 
against Juniata College in 
Clarion this Saturday, September 
27, at 1 o'clock in the afternoon. 
The playing field is to be 
announced, but the match is 
planned to be in the lower field 
behind Wilkinson Hall next to 
parking lot W. 



// 



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4*6 p,m. 
91.7 WCUC 

(after mutual news) 

KraigKeolsch 

Joe" from Penn St. 

Charlie Desch 
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sporting world! 

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call-in sports talk 

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Professional Bartending 



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Classes held 
at Holiday- 
Inn, Clarion. 
Classes begin 
Oct. 8th for 
more info call 
(814) 835-8023 




Starting date Oct 8th 



Cross Country teams roll 
to second place 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



The men's and women's cross 
country teams both finished in 
second place at the Slippery 
Rock Cross Country 
Invitational. Slippery Rock 
won both races last Saturday. 

The women, ranked eighth in 
the East region, were led by 
fifth place finisher Debbie 
Brostmeyer. Maureen Long (8) 
and Lea Anne Lauer (10) also 
medaled. The remaining scor- 
ers were Kelly Null (11), 
Kristie Runk (12), Cherie 
Zurko (18), and Laurie Young 
(20). 

The men were paced by Brad 
Alderton (5) who medaled 
along with Bubba Walters (8) 



and Jon Fox (9). Tom Brady 
(12), Dave Ellwood (15) , Jimmy 
Adams (21), and Gregg Wade 
(22) also added to the scoring. 

Debbie Brostmeyer and Brad 
Alderton recieved the Hot Legs 
award for their team leadership. 
Gregg Wade and Bobbi Ryan 
stepped up their performances to 
win the Keep On Running 
Award. 

"Considering some of our top 
runners were out due to injuries, 
the rest of the team did a great job 
picking up the slack," praised 
assistant coach Virginia Mooney. 

The team will split this week- 
end. The men and women will 
both send a squad to Penn State 
and to Hiram, Ohio. This year's 
Alumni run is set for Saturday 
October 11th. 



For the latest in Clarion Sports 

Information, call the Golden Eagle 

Hotline: 226-2079 




PILOTS WANTED 



Did you know that the United States Marine Corps gets most of its pilots from 
universities like Clarion? The program is called the Platoon Leaders Class and 
if you qualify you could secure your seat at flight school as early as your 
freshman year. No prior experience is required. In fact, the Marine Corps will 
pay for private flying lessons during your senior year to ensure you are 
comfortable with your new career choice. Do not hesitate to explore your 
career opportunities in Marine Corps aviation. If you ever thought about 
becoming a pilot this is the only guarantee! 

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED GUAR WEED PILOT SEW 



-Full time student or graduate 
-U. S. Citizen 
-No older than 27 V4 
•Physically qualified 



Qualifications: 

-GPA of 2.0 or better 
•20/30 vision or better 
-Pass aviation exam 



Benefits: 



-25 hrs of free flight lessons 

-NOT ROTC 

-All training during the summer 



-$1350 per school year 
-75% of masters degree tuition 
-G.I. Bill - $15,000 for grad school 
-No school year commitments 
-OCS summer leadership internship with $1800 pay 
-All expenses and salary paid: $1.200/month for summer training 
-Jrs/Snrs/Grads- one, 10 week; Fresh/Soph-two 6 week sessions 
-Active duty commission, $28,000-$34,000 starting, full benefits 
No obligation if you are not satisfied! 

Mr mire iaf •raitiii see Captain Mel In The finmmell Student Center 

Sept 251k If can 1400-142-7960 

Visit eur website at wwwjninneuth.cin/-usjiic 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



September 25, 1997 



Clarion loses 
to Lock Haven 

by Tommi Hearn 
Sports Writer 

The Clarion Golden Eagle vol- 
leyball team lost its first PS AC- 
West contest yesterday to Lock 
Haven. 

Clarion dropped the opening 
match 15 to 6. In the second 
match, the Bald Eagles were too 
much for Clarion, as the Golden 
Eagle spikers fell 15-6. The third 
match likewise went Lock 
Haven's way by a count of 15 to 
11. 

Junior OH Tracy Bamett and 
sophomore OH/MH Jessa 
Canfield both had five kills for 
the Golden Eagles, who fell to 2- 
1 in the tough PSAC-West, and 
10-4 overall. 

Clarion will play in the Ashland 
Tournament this weekend before 
returning to PSAC play against 
Edinboro on September 30. 
Clarion hosts Slippery Rock on 
October 7, at 7 pjn. at Tippen 
Gynasium. 



Sports Trivia 

Who holds the record for most 
games Played in the World Series? 

What team did Pirate manager 

Gene Lamonf spend five years 

with as a backup catcher f 1 970- 

1975J? 

Last Week's Answers 

Ohio State was the last Bis 10 team to win 
the national champioship outright in 1968. 

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers last made the 
playoffs in 1979. 



IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve Moore 







"Move in! Move in! This guy has no stick!" 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Intramurals kicks off two new seasons of Indoor Soccer and 1 on1 
Basketball this week, Soccer begins Tuesday, September 23, and 
Basketball starts Wednesday, September 24. The registration deadlines 
may have passed, but new teams and players are still being accepted. 
Bring your rosters to room 117 Tippin and sign up TODAY! 

CONGRATULATIONS to Ean King, Jason Boshert and Preston Sell 
who took fist place in the 10k relay on Sunday, Sept. 21. The trio finished 
the 6-mile race with and outstanding time of 32:40. 

Flag Football, Beach Volleyball and Tennis are still in regular season 
play and will continue into Oct. Reminder to all teams: Don't forget to pick 
up a new weekly schedule from the Intramurals Bulletin Boardl 

ATTENTION: Any student interested in joining the intramural 
Recreation Advisory Committee, please stop by room 117 Tippin or call 
x2349 for more information. The committee meets weekly at 12 Noon on 
Monday. 

WOMEN'S POWER 
HOUR 



FLAG FOOTBALL 




TUESDAY AND THURDAYS 

5:00 -6:00 PM 
TIPPIN FITNESS CENTER 

WOMAN ONLY! 

LEARN HOW TO USE FREE WEIGHTS AND 
BEGIN A PROGRAM DESIGNED FOR YOU!! 



AQUA AEROBIC 

Sunday - 6:00 pm 

Wednesdays- 8:00 pm 

tippin swimming pool 

experience a new and excit- 
ing 
type of exercise!! 



FOOTBALL 



4«I»]IL« 



. SIG TAU GAMMA-GREY 

2. SIG PI-PURPLE 

3. BEER LEAGUE ALL STARS 

4. SIG TAU GAMMA -BLUE 

5. MAULERS 



3/0 
3/0 
2/0 
2/0 
2/0 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



Part time sales clerk needed at 

The Denbeigh Shoppe. 

Main Street Clarion 

Contact June at 227-2750 



Part time Animal Technician 
needed at Clarion Animal 

Hospital. 
Contact Denise at 227-2603 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10-$20 

per hour. Call (814) 234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 



I OK KEN I 



For Rent 

3 Bedroom Mobile home in 

Clarion. Available Immediately. 

Call 764-5895 

Furnished Apartments available 

for 4 people for the Fall 1998 - 

Spring 1999 semesters. Very 

close to campus. Leave message 

at 226-5917 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 
available for SPRING SEMES- 
TER. Clean, close to campus, 
quiet, no pets, references. Call 
RUTTAPTS. at 227-1938 
or beeper (814) 227-0722 

Spacious 1 story house for 3 or 
4, close to campus, available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. 

Quiet, no pets, references, newly 

furnished, clean. CallRUTT 

APTS at 227-1938 or beeper 

(814)227-0722 



VNNOl N( I\1EN IS 



EARN 

$750-$1500/week 

Raise all the money your group 

needs by sponsoring a VISA 

fundraiser on your campus. No 

investment & very little time 

needed. There's no obligation, 

so why not call for information 

today. 

Call 1-800-323-8454 ext 95 



FREE T-SHIRT 
+$1000 

Credit Card fundraisers for fra- 
ternities, sororities &groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext 
65. Qualified callers receive 
FREE T-SHIRT. 



Female Roommate needed for 

Spring '98 

Will have own room. 

Call for details 226-5778 



Spring Break '98-Sell Trips, 

EARN CASH AND GO 

FREE! 

Student Travel Services is now 

hiring campus reps/group 

organizers. Lowest rates to 

Jamaica, Mexico & Florida. 



FOR SALE 



Sega Genesis, 2 controls, and 23 

games- Asking $295 

Call after 5 p.m. 

797-5052 



PERSONALS 



The Brothers of Theta Xi would 

like to congratulate Kevin, 

Justin, and Eric on becoming 

Associate Members 

Welcome to the bunch Fall 97! 

Star, Nicole, Marissa, Alison, 
Christine, Julie, Christian, 

Michelle, Becky and Heather 
Love, Your future Sigma Sisters 

Jenn, Great job with rush! 
Love, Your Sigma Sisters 

HiMelanie! It's Thursday 

Be happy and feel special! 

"Your favorite Block Partner" 

Mandy 

Happy Birthday to our summer 

birthday girls: 
Amanda, Joy, Carolyn, Brink, 

Hiro, and Kelly 
Love, AIA 

Happy 21st Birthday Marcie! 
Come join us at the bar! 
Love, the Sisters of AIA 

Congratulations' to our new 

members: 

Brooke Byerly, Shelly L. 

Dawson, Elizabeth Hill, Amy M. 

Hudak, Stacy M. Janocha, Jill 

M. Katana, Megan L. Pile, Taryn 

M. Simko, Tracy Aszpara and 

Amy R. Sullivan 

Love, Zetas 

ZTT, We're looking forward to a 

fun and exciting ALF week. 

Love, Zetas 



Little Smitty, Congrats on 
becoming our JR. Cuddle 
Bunny. We love our new lounge 
lizard. You're a good replace- 
ment for the lawn bunnies! 
Love, Zetas 



Congratulations Mumford! 
We are all very proud of you! 
Love, Mandy, Stella, and Jess 



Congratulations Shannon Bean 

and Jen Mumford on 

Homecoming Court! 

Love, The Dance Team 

Hey Keith... Got tickets!? 

Breakin' the law! Breakin' the 

law! 



IX- Thanks for the great beer- 

becue! We'll do it again! 

Love, Womens Rugby Team 

Happy 22nd Birthday Julie 

Wilkins! 

Hope you have a blast! 

Love, your AOE Sisters 

Congratulations Carla on a great 

rush! We're very proud of you! 

Love, your Deepher Sisters 

Ten Years and still going strong! 

Happy Anniversary 

Delta Phi Epsilon 

Epsilon Omicron Chapter 



D- 

Are you a "beakflipper?" 
lam! -K 



€KJ> A would like to congraratu- 

late all the sororities and rushees 

onrush! 

Congratulations to our new asso- 
ciate members: Brandi, Nicole, 
Dara, Jennifer, Jerrianne, and 
Caryl. Good Luck Ladies! 
The Sisters of 60A 

James, it was great chillin' with 

you, let's do it again soon. 

We love you Sweetheart. 

60A 

Hey you guys! To the Brothers 

of OIK, We're looking forward 

to doing the ALF float with you. 

Love, the Sisters of 0OA 

Veronica, 

You did a most favorable job 

with rush. Also a big thanks to 

the housegirls. 

Love, your 80A Sisters 

Thank you BOA alumni! 

It's great to see you around so 

much! 

Love, your 60A Sisters 

Goat, 

I think you're hot! 

Meet me at the library. 

Veronica 



Shady Ave. was the place to be , 

that fun night last Saturday eve. 

Jackie E. was on her knees, 

Jenny J. rocked the Dee Zees. 

Thanks to those who partied 

late, the next one, we can hardly 

wait! 



Megan Hoon, 5 days University 

Inn...l2:00, Be There! 

Happy 21st Birthday! 

We can't wait! 

Love, your Delta Zeta Sisters 



Congratulations to the newest 

associate members of Delta 

Zeta: 

Lynne Lazor, Becky Maxwell, 

Stephanie Miller, Stephanie 

Saddler, Laura Thome and Heidi 

Vernum. 

We love you Guys! 



Thanks Sigma Tau Gamma for 

the great time. 
Look out Vanilla Ice, here come 

the Brothers of ZTT! 

Love, the Dance Team 



Happy 21st Birthday Little Jen! 
Love, your Oil Sisters 



We want to thank Shelly and Jen 

for all of their hard work and 

dedication during rush. 

You girls did a great jub! 

Love, your OH Sisters 

IX, 

We are glad to be doing the float 

with you. Can't wait to get 

started. 

Love, Oil 

Billy, We are so happy to have 

you as our sweetheart. We're 

looking forward to a wonderful 

year with you. 

Love, the Sisters of OH 

Congratulations to the newest 

members of OH: 
Terri, Christina, Tommi, Tonya, 

Melissa and Marybeth. 
Love, your future OH Sisters 

Saturday is a RUGBY DAY! 

Good luck to the Clarion 

Womens Rugby Team 

Your, Clarion Mens Rugby Team 

60A, Thank you for a great 

year girls. I love you all and 

have been honored to serve as 

your Tbeta Phi guy. Thank you 

for everything, and don't forget I 

have a present for you next 

Thursday at the mixer. 

Love, Marcus 



Hey Bitch- Good job this semes- 
ter. We may be old but we still 
have each other! Love, MB 



Beer Maniac and Sandbox... 

Sunday was fun, used to be we 

could hang all night long, now it 

takes days to recover! We'll 

have to get together and "whine" 

again soon. Love, MB 



Kristen- Sycronized wheeling on 

Call office chairs... who knew? 

Don't worry about that toner 

you'll be fine! Love, MB 



CONGRATULATIONS 

LEFTY! ! YOU'LL ALWAYS 

BE A CALL BOY, NOW YOU 

MAY BE A KING! 



Daddy Ed- 1 missed you on 

Sunday, but I'll be out again 

soon, hopefully not under the 

pool table. Love, MB 



Ed- You're so openminded! 
I may have been slightly intoxi- 
cated Friday night, but you need 
to e-mail me that quote. 
Thanks for being YOU! 
Love, Jenny 



To The Sisters of D-Phi-E, 
I love you guys very much, and 
even though I may not act like 

it, I miss you very much! 

I hope to see and talk to you 

much more before the semester's 

over! Love, Founds 



Meg, Happy 21st Birthday! 

Have a great day! 

Love, Lis 

Congratulations to all on Rush! 
Love, AIA 

Tenence Webley and Lisarini, 

you guys are the best roommates 

in the world! Love, Spaghetti 

Congratulations to Bob: 
Now certifiably SCUBA 



Anyone interested 
In placing a classi- 
fied, stop by I&sl 
ClatiQIl Call office. 

270 Oemmell 
(please fill out forms 

completely with 

appropriate date of 

publication) 

$,10 a word 



September 25, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 24 



Astros in control 

Pirates miracle season lies with the stars 



Compiled by BUI Bates, 
Sports Editor and Brett 
Skovera, Guest Columnist 

One hundred and fifty-nine 
games later, and the Pirates have 
found a way to make things inter- 
esting in the National League 
Central. 

If Pittsburgh fans have any fin- 
gernails left after Monday night's 
Steelers game, they may not last 
through the weekend. 

Regardless of what happens 
down the stretch, the '97 Buccos 
gave more than anyone could 
have expected. On Monday, just 
an hour before the Steelers took 
the field, all 19,000 plus in atten- 
dance at Three Rivers Stadium 
let their Pirates know just how 
they felt As the Rich Loiselle 
recorded the final strikeout, the 
Pirates were saluted by the fans 
and treated to a special music 
video "Only Wanna Be With 
You", by Hootie and the 
Blowfish, which has become the 
Bucs' clubhouse song after each 
win. 

The Pirate players responded to 
the crowd by tossing their caps to 
the fans as souvenirs. 

In light of this "miracle" sea- 
son, USA Today, has named the 
Pittsburgh Pirates it's 
"Organization Of The Year". 




tk 



ekmmk 



•"*■•■"■ mmm — rr.ft_ i .i_ 




Astros vs 



Pirates 



Pirates Notes 

Rotation Announced 

Pirates manager Gene Lamont has his pitching staff set for the 
Houston series. Esteban Loiza will start Friday night, followed by 
Jason Schmidt and Francisco Cordova, who owns the Astros this year. 
Since Marc Wilikins will not be available because of a bursitis prob- 
lem in his right shoulder, Jon Lieber will be used out of the bullpen. 

Injury Report 

Al Martin, who is out with a pulled rib cage muscle in his right side, 
said he may be able to play in the Houston series if they are meaning- 
ful. Kevin Polcovich, who severely sprained his left ankle on August 
29, said his is not quite ready to play nine innings, but may be able to 
contribute if needed. 

Womack Wins Stolen Base Crown 

Second baseman Tony Womack stole his 57th base in the sixth 
inning against the Mets on Tuesday night. Tony surpassed Deion 
Sanders of the Cincinatti Reds/Dallas Cowboys who had 56. St. Louis 
Cardinals second baseman Delino DeShields has 49. 



The award has been handed out 
by the newspaper the last five 
years and was won last year by 
the Atlanta Braves, who have 
won six consecutive NL East 
titles. The honor is based on hav- 
ing the best, or most, prospects 
among all major league teams 

The Pirates, through it's talent- 
ed Scouting and Player 
Development staff, managed to 
acquire 18 players from nine dif- 
ferent organizations within the 
past year. This season the Pirates 
had three players join the major 
league club, who either played 
last season, or the beginning of 
the current season with 
Lynchburg (Class A affiliate) and 
had to dip into their minor leage 
system to replace the injured 
players at the major league level. 
A total of nine players made their 
major league debuts in a Pirates 
uniform during the 1997 season. 

Four of the Pirates seven minor 
league affiliattes, including 
Mexico City, advanced to the 
post season this year, with the 
Pirates still threatening. 
Lynchburg captured the Carolina 
League title. Two farmhands 
ended up winning league MVP 
honors, with third baseman 
Aramis Ramerez winning the 
award at Lynchburg and short- 
stop Kevin Haverbusch capturing 



the same honor while playing 
with the Erie Seawolves in the 
NewYork-Penn League. 

Outfielder Jose Guillen, who 
made the jump from Lynchburg 
in 1996 to the majors leagues in 
'97 Was the Carolina League's 
MVP while playing with the 
Carolina Mudcats in 1995. 

This marks the first time the 
Pirates have won this award. 
This past spring Baseball 
America ranked the Bucs' farm 
system the best in baseball. In 
addition, the publication rated the 
Pirates as having seven of the top 
100 prospects in all of baseball, 
the most among all major league 
teams. 

Regardless of what happens 
next season, the Pirates future 
definately looks bright. Barring 
a disasterous expansion draft, 
where the Pirates are likey to lose 
players like Mark Smith, Keith 
Osik, Jon Lieber, and others, the 
Pirates have defmitly gotten then- 
money's worth out of this *97 
squad. 

In a season where Gene 
Lament's team was sure to lose 
100 games and be the laughing 
stock of the league, they have 
certainly turned some heads and 
spit in a few faces along the wild 
ride that the Let's Go To Work 
Pittsburgh Pirates gave us. 



Steelers fall to Jaguars...show signs of improvement 



by Rob Kriley 
Sports Writer 



Steeler fans can all agree that 
Mark Brunell came back a game 
too soon, after suffering ligament 
damage to his right knee on 
August 9th. The win gave the 
Jaguars their first Monday night 
victory in franchise history, 30- 
21 against Pittsburgh. 

Norm Johnson had a chance to 
win the game for the Steelers 
with a field goal but the attempt 
was blocked and returned for a 
touchdown with :06 left on the 
clock. 

Even BUI Cowher's 10-1 
Monday night record couldn't 
keep last year's AFC passing 
yardage leader down. Brunell, 
picking up where he left off 
before the injury, finished 24 of 
42 passes for 301 yards. 

All three games for the Steelers 
this season have shown the weak 
secondary that has taken its own 
loss with the departure of Rod 
Woodson and Willie Williams to 
the 49ers and Seattle. The prob- 




Steelers 21 
Jaguars 30 



lems mounted for Pittsburgh 
when rookie Chad Scott did not 
play because of injury. Scott's 
replacement, Randy Fuller just 
could not keep up with the 



speedy receiver in Jimmy Smith 
of the Jaguars. 

On Jacksonville's fust posses- 
sion Brunell led his team to a 68 
yard scoring drive that included a 
23 yard pass to Smith to the 
Pittsburgh 3 yard line. Two plays 
later, Natrone. Means capped the 
scoring drive with a touchdown 
run. 

Blackwell and the Steelers 
came right back running the kick- 
off the length of the field for what 
appeared to be a potential tying 
touchdown, but it was called 
back for holding. 



Starting at their own 20 yard 
line after the penalty, the Steelers 
drove the length of the field for 
their first touchdown. A key play 
on the drive was a 49-yard catch 
from Kordell Stewart to receiver 
Charles Johnson. Stewart fin- 
ished the drive with six yard run. 



With the loss the Steelers drop 
to 1-2 while the Jacksonville 
Jaguars remain unbeaten in their 
first three games. 

The Tennessee Oilers come to 
town this week as the Steelers 
continue AFC Centra! play. The 
Oilers are currently 1-2. 



— I 



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Worried? 



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October 2, 1997 



Clarion Wnfoemitp of $enn*ptoan<a 



Clarion. $S 16214 



XKfyt Clarion Call 



Wlm's Ifnsibc 




The Autumn 

Leaf Festival 

will swing into 

action Sunday. 

For a preview 

of events for the 

week see page 9. 



Contents 



Opinion 

Reader Responses. 
News 



Lifestyles, 

Photo Essay.... 

Call-on-you 

Entertainment. 

Sports 

Classifieds 



...2 
....3 
...5 
...9 
.12 
.15 
16 
.20 
.23 



^ofottte 70, 3ta«e 4 



Weather 



Thursday- Mostly 

cloudy with a 

chance of showers. 

High in the mid 50s. 

Friday- Fair skies. 

High in the upper 60s. 

Saturday- Clear. 

Chance of rain in the 

afternoon. High in the 

50s. 



Clarion's Autumn Majesty 



•.fpupw— mmmtim — m 









w Stf 






$*-**- 







■*'*? 



*-V 






?«i ■■'Htl't" 



i £W - - 



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"«% 









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'Site 




ffisfot a safe an* ijappp %&$ toeek! 



Page 2 



m. ry, »"* **%.W 



The Clarion Call 



•*<>/■» »- ^ 



October 2, 199? 



OPINION. 



Clarion 
Call 

270 •rnnnell CampUx 
CUrtoa, $fl 16214 

(814)220-2380 
f«* (814)228-2587 

C-nifl: Cfill 

txttntitit 
Itoart 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

Online Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



L 



m 




'Hide Var^ 




They were grutid By the 
children of the Oiolocaust, 
emaciated faring skeletons 

in tattered rags, men, 
women and children con- 
demned to live in hideous 
deprivation and die in the 
gas chambers. ' 



Sriujoii Cfioicdhurif 



"For A Nobel Cause" 

"One day I was able to get up, after 
gathering all my strength, I wanted 
to see myself in the mirror hanging 
on the opposite wall. I had not seen 
myself since the ghetto. From the 
depths of the mirror, a corpse gazed 
back at me. 

The look in his eyes, as they stared 
into mine, has never left me. " 

-Elie Wiesel, 
Winner of the 1986 
Nobel Peace Prize. 

At six o'clock in the evening 
on April 10, 1945, the first 
American tanks stopped outside 
Buchenwald Concentration 
Camp in Nazi Germany. 
Eisenhower's crusaders jumped 
out, ready to "liberate" this facto- 
ry of death. They were greeted 



by the children of the Holocaust, 
emaciated living skeletons in tat- 
tered rags, men, women and chil- 
dren condemned to live in 
hideous deprivation and die in 
the gas chambers. Fifteen-year- 
old Elie Wiesel, one of the few 
survivors of Auschwitz, and then 
Buchenwald, was "liberated" that 
evening. The Allied soldiers 
came too late: over six million 
people, including Wiesel's par- 
ents, and his little sister were 
dead. 

Today, four decades after the 
anguish of Auschwitz, Wiesel, a 
teacher and a journalist, is the 
author of 30 books, including the 
celebrated Night. He is also a 

Continued on page 4 



m*n 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Donna Engle, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman, Sheri Hertzog 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Hope Guy, Steve Ostrosky, 

Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Bethany Boal, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, Tommi 

Hearn, Rob Kriley, Lori Matachak, Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, 

Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Stella Meyer, Jen Mumford, Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger, 

Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Karli Berlin, Greg Hensler, Megan Klauss, Wayne 

Lines, Heather Liu, Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tma Lasky, 

Jen Mumford, Stella Meyer, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tim Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

•Noma remaining m the staff box in the December 4, 1997 CM redeye co-cumadar credit. 



'Editorial 




"I was always the type 

of girl who never 

wanted to turn into 

the typical sorority 

chic^' But I found 

myself turning to my 

sisters more and more. " 



*DamilU PlbcrZ (Business Manager 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



As ALF approaches I can't help 
but realize that this will be the 
last ALF in "My Clarion." 

Yes I'm only a junior, but I will 
be spending my next year study- 
ing in the south of France and 
when I come back "My Clarion" 
will be gone. 

All my friends will have gradu- 
ated, and I'll be left here all by 
myself. This is a scary thought 
because I've always had my best 
friend KD with me everywhere I 
went. 

We came here to Clarion and 
with the exception of our friend 
Lisa who is a year older, we hard- 
ly knew anyone. It wasn't long 
though until I began to make 
other friends. 

First it was Liz across the hall 
then Amy and Stacy next door, 
soon I was making friends on 
other floors and in other dorms, 
such as the 337 boys, Dan, Ron, 
Mikey, and Shelle, and Sarah. 
Freshman year was the best! We 
always had fun and we made a lot 
of memories. 

I pledged D-Phi-E the spring of 
1996 along with Kristen, Shana, 
Mel, Carta, Mandy, Tonya, and 



Shannon. Those 7 women 
became my best friends that 
semester and for the rest of my 
college career. 

Last year, when I came back 
from summer break I just 
assumed that my best friends 
from freshman year would 
always be there and would 
remain my "best friends". This 
was not the case. 

That's when the saying " Never 
assume because it makes an ass 
out of u and me" really hit home. 
Through the attitudes of my 
freshmen "best buds," I began to 
realize who truly was a friend 
and who was just a freshman 
friend. 

I was always the type of girl 
who never wanted to turn into the 
typical "sorority chick," but I 
found myself turning to my sis- 
ters more and more. It was then 
that I used to get depressed and 
think that they were virtually the 
only ones who cared, with the 
exception of Dan, but, soon I 
learned to accept it. It took all 
last year to realize that friend- 

Continued on page 4 



is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve toe right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief)- Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication. 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The piarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 pjn. on the week of publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



READER RESPONSES] 



"Plutonium is one of the most dangerous substances known." 



Dear Editor: 

The Russian Mars 96 space 
probe crashed to earth carrying 
plutonium batteries. Initially, it 
was said to have fallen into the 
Pacific Ocean. Later, it was 
revealed to have scattered debris 
over the Atacama Desert in Chile 
and Bolivia. 

Now, in October, there is the 
scheduled Cassini probe to 
Saturn carrying 72 pounds of 
plutonium. This probe will orbit 



Venus twice and come hurtling 
back at earth to get the gravita- 
tional boost to get to Saturn. 
What if something goes wrong 
and it vaporizes in the Earth's 
atmosphere? What if the Titan 
rocket carrying the Cassini probe 
explodes on the launch pad 
spreading radioactive dust over 
much of Florida? 

Plutonium is one of the most 
dangerous substances known. Dr. 
Helen Caldicott, founder of 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



Physicians for Social 
Responsibility, has stated that 
one pound of plutonium, if even- 



"It is really sad to have to fret every year when the stu- 
dents return to wait and see what will be missing next." 



Dear Editor: 

This letter is an attempt to find 
the individual(s) who borrowed 
my porch furniture on the eve of 
August 28. 

This furniture has been on my 
porch for the last ten years and 
has never been touched. 

I don't mean to point the finger 
towards the university, but it is 
quite a coincidence that the furni- 
ture disappeared shortly after the 
students came back to school. 

It is really sad to have to fret 
every year when the students 



return to wait and see what will 
be missing next. I was a college 
parent, and I know for a fact that 
when my children needed furni- 
ture, plants, etc., they bought 
them. 

How do you he to your parents 
and friends when they visit your 
apartment and they ask you 
where you purchased your new 
items? 

I am offering a $100.00 reward 
to any person who may have wit- 
nessed this crime and will aid in 
the return of my furniture. 



The items stolen are described 
as the following: 

•White rod iron table with glass 
top 

•White rod iron chair with 
brown/white piping cushions 
(top & bottom) 

This furniture has a lot of value 
to me, and I would greatly appre- 
ciate having it returned 
unharmed. 



Sincerely, 
Barb Ragley 



Students g ive advice to the First Dauehter 



Chelsea arrives at Stanford 



by Maggie Welter 
College Press Service 

There's a popular metaphor 
used to describe freshmen at 
Stanford University: Students 
are like ducks. On the surface, 
they're cruising nicely, but under- 
neath, they're paddling furiously. 

This month Chelsea Clinton is 
spreading her wings and testing 
the elite waters at Stanford's cam- 
pus in Pal Alto, Calif., 20 minutes 
south of San Francisco. And 
though she's no ordinary duck- 
ling, (traveling to college on Air 
Force One rather than in a U- 
HauL) Chelsea, the Clintons and 
Stanford officials are determined 
to see to it that she lives as one. 

Since Bill Clinton took office in 
1992, the press has largely 
regarded the first daughter as off- 
limits, for which Hillary Rodham 
Clinton has thanked them numer- 
ous times in public. But now that 
Chelsea, 17, is a poised and cam- 
era-perfect young lady, Mrs. 
Clinton is concerned that the 
hands-off attitude might not fol- 



low her daughter west The First 
Lady used her weekly column to 
say that Chelsea is "entitled to 
space and privacy [and ] should 
be left alone to mature as sanely 
as possible." 

Mrs. Clinton had reason for 
concern. Reporters and photog- 
raphers began roaming 
Stanford's sprawling campus 
about a week before Chelsea's 
arrival, trying to figure out bow 
to cover the family's arrival 
despite stringent restrictions. 

But Ramin Zahed, a media 
watcher with The Daily Variety 
in Los Angeles, predicts interest 
in the first daughter will fade in a 
few weeks. "Unless she starts 
having a love affair with a rock 
star, becomes a nun or something 
extreme, I think the media are 
going to leave her alone after this 
initial coverage." 

Likewise, Stanford students are 
expected to respect Chelsea's 
right to live as a normal college 
freshman. Stanford, also referred 
to as 'the Harvard of the West," 



is a hot bed of exceptional stu- 
dents and is no stranger to 
celebrity students. In fact, 
Chelsea isn't even the only star 
of the Class of 2001. Olympic 
Gold medalist Dominique Dawes 
also will sport the cardinal and 
white colors this fall. And Fred 
Savage, former star of "The 
Wonder Years" has been there for 
three years, though he is current- 
ly on leave making the sitcom 
"Working." Until golfing great 
Tiger Woods recently turned pro, 
he also was a Stanford student 

Stanford also boasts an impres- 
sive alumni list with names such 
as Sigoumey Weaver, ABC's Ted 
Koppel.and Supreme Court 
Justice Sandra Day O'Conner. 

Graduate student Rebecca 
Leigh Palmer said students will 
take Chelsea's arrival to campus 
in stride. "It's possible for 
celebrities to get around with 
their own crowd and not be 
noticed, because the people are 
generally polite enough to 

continued on page 9 



ly distributed among the earth's 
population has inhalable dust 
particles that would be enough to 
give everyone lung cancer. - 

None of this is considered seri- 
ous enough by our free, indepen- 
dent, objective and piercingly 
investigative media to make the 
evening news. They would rather 
talk about Tiger Woods or some 
other celebrity. I fear that this 



may be just the prelude to 
nuclear weapons in space and 
nuclear-powered rockets. Some 
very rich and powerful men are 
playing Russian roulette with life 
on earth, and it is occurring in 
absolute media silence. What an 
Orwellian world it is becoming! 

Sincerely, 

Gary Sudborough 

Bellflower, CA 




TkfoHomy tootphu faing tk 
first wufiof Ocioitr. 



October 5, 1973 

In the front page article "Pot in Park" the story reads: "The 
Clarion State 'Peoples' Park' was the scene last Thursday 
(September 27) for an alleged booze and pot party by a number of 
Clarion students. 

At approximately twelve noon on that date, several students began 
gathering in the grassy area of the park just below the rear of 
Ralston Residence Hall. According to residents of the dormitory 
that witnessed the gathering, an amount of beer, wine, and marijua 
iia were consumed and smoked. One report added Tequila to the list 

of beverages, but this is unconfirmed." 

October 4, 1984 

The article titled "Kelly to be Grand Marshall of ALF parade" led 
with the paragraph: "Jim Kelly, an East Brady native, 'Rookie of 
the year,' and present quarterback for the Houston Gamblers is slat 
ed as Grand Marshall of the ALF parade on October 13, according 
to Festival Chairman, Paul Weaver." 

October 1, 1987 

In the article "Little sisters removal questioned" the story reads: 
"At the Student Senate meeting Tuesday night, senator Kim 
Acquaro questioned Dr. Curtis about the removal of little sisters 
from the fraternities. He said, 'the Federal Law makes it illegal to 
discriminate on the basis of sex, race... under the title IX law that 
deals with education.' The little sisters are not really within the fra- 
ternity so they are discriminating on the basis of sex being that only 
women can belong to little sisters and the legislation says you can't 
discriminate, so they have to be dropped." 

October 4, 1990 

The front page of the Sports sections led with the headline; "15th 
ranked Edinboro downs the Golden Eagles, 23-14; Offense scores 
for first time in two weeks." 



All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



October 1, 19^7 



~.*\ 



The Clarion Call 



* *ȴIP*T 



continued 



From page 2 

conscience-keeper of the world 
and the winner of the 1986 Nobel 
Prize for Peace. 

Wiesel stands between two 
holocausts. He has lived through 
the first a meticulously planned 
slaughter of the Jews and other 
enemies of the Third Riech. 

He can prevent the second: a 
nuclear catastrophe, toward 
which the merchants of death are 
gently guiding the world. 

We are already at the edge of 
despair: nuclear winter stares us 
in the face. 

Any charismatic lunatic with a 
finger on the nuclear trigger can 
reduce 5,000 years of civilization 
into radioactive rubble in seconds 
and leave Planet Earth to the 
cockroaches. 

In a world ruled by the balance 
of terror, Wiesel is a voice of san- 
ity. 

Wiesel was in his cluttered 
office in downtown Boston when 
this correspondent met him. This 
slight and soft-spoken man was 
giving the final touches to his 
master plan to dedicate the 21st 
century to the pursuit of peace. 

The plan, conceived after 
Wiesel won the Nobel Prize in 
the closing months of 1986, is as 
epic as it is eloquent. It also has 
the blessings of his friend, 
Francois Mitterand, the president 
of France. 

"When Francois asked me what 
I wanted to do with the Nobel 
money (about $290,000), I final- 
ly came up with answer," he 
said. Seeing what impact I, a lone 
winner could make after receiv- 
ing the award, I felt that if a 
dozen Nobel winners spoke out 
about something, it would make 
a tremendous impact. I asked the 
President if the government of 
France was willing to share the 
cost. He agreed." 

The recent effort was designed 
to create an impact 

From the 18th to the 25th of 
January 1986, 85 winners of the 
Nobel Prize participated in a 
series of seminars and workshops 
to discuss the "future of the 
world." 

The event, called "Facing the 
21 st century," was chaired by the 
President of the Nobel Prize 
committee. For five days, some 



of the worldly geniuses were 
involved in a freewheeling dis- 
cussion about the problems the 
world was facing. 

They included nuclear deploy- 
ment, hunger amidst plenty, 
racism and AIDS. Wiesel, keep- 
ing an eye on history, planned to 
inaugurate the convention on 
18th January. "It is an important 
day for mankind. For it was on 
that day that Auschwicz was lib- 
erated. And you can't see the 
21st century without looking 
back at the 20th," he said. 

Missing from this gallery of 
greats was Mother Teresa, the 
angel of the slums, and a resident 
of Calcutta. 

Also missing was Andrei 
Sakharov, the Soviet dissident 
and an outspoken critic of totali- 
tarianism. Sakharov has not been 
allowed by the Soviet govern- 
ment to come, although the other 
Soviet winners are coining. "I 
will write to Mr. Gorbachev in 
protest," Wiesel had said a week 
before the convention. 

But Communist states do not 
give up their victims so easily, 
even if they are Nobel winners. 
Gorbachev did speak to Sakharov 
in front of Western pressmen, but 
against the spirit of glasnost, did 
not allow him to go to Paris. 

Towards the 21st Century is not 
an isolated and grandiloquent 
gesture. Wiesel is already think- 
ing of a similar event; this time 

an international conference on 
hatred. 

"I would like to bring together 

a Catholic and a Protestant from 

Ireland, an Israeli and a 

Palestinian, and a Hindu and a 

Sikh from India," he said. 

Wiesel had finished speaking. 
His voice had trailed off. For a 
moment he seemed far away. I 
looked again at this soldier of 
peace surrounded by his pile of 
books and passionately devoted 
to the survival of humanity. 

I realized what greatness was 
all about. 

•Srinjoy Chowdhury was a 

staffer of Sunday, cm Indian 

News magazine and a graduate 

student of Clarion University . 

This Hide Park selection was 

first published in The Calrion 

CM on January 18, 1988. 



Write a Letter to the Editor! 



inmmiis (lie v.ckonic liom siuduiis 



cllcis mum he MihniKki 



on I he \loiul;i\ heir 



he sj«j 



e ,iii .in* 



i- WeJ.\ 



Page 4 







www,oden.se/-pfen3d^ravelhtm 

Hey Theater Majors, this is your web site! Everything a theatre-buff would need to know about inter- 
national theatrical resources, t^xmung eveats, boo^ to other web sites. 
Also, this site gives a full list of rw^hiesa^ John Paul II, 
T.S.FJfliot and Dylan Thomas. 

www.geocities,c<Hii^^ 

Let's say you're on the last leg of your 50-page term paper and you recently found a great research 
pieceon the web. Weu\ k>w do yoij^te an tateniet soutce? There are oodles of books that show you 
how (i.e. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers) but many are outdated and won't have the 
information you need to cite a web source. Check out the address above to find your answer. You 
might even "wow" your professor, 

www.virtuaUotcom/cmp/er/er.htm I 

www.thex-files.com 

www.babylon5.com 

You'd think these shows were made for the Internet. The web authors for these sites really took the 
time to make their sites "net- worthy". Did you miss the live version of E.R. last Thursday night? 
That's okay, you'll find all the updates, video clips and cast biographies. Did you miss the season end- 
ing X-Files and need to know what really happened? However, don't expect to find clues to the 
November 2nd season-premiere. That would be like telling your friend bow The Crying Gaim ends. 
Are you a Trekice? Load the Babylon 5 and find far more man you'll get on any Star Trek page. 

www.michaeIjordan.com 

Everyone's favorite athlete now has his own personal web page, the guy has it all: a kazillion trophies, 
his own cologne, shoes, clothes, and now his own Internet site. What's happening with Mike in the 
future? Will be buy his own country? Will he try hockey? Find out all the goods with his electronic 
fan club and live chats. 

www.clieathoiise.com 
www.cheater.com 

Okay, so you've been looking for the easy way out when it comes to writing -.your 10, 15, and 20 page 
papers. WelL here it is. These are some of the best FREE papers you'll find online. Of course ttosis 
cheating and you shouldn't use these sites to plagiarize. Be warnedrifsjustas easy for any professor 
to access these sites as it is for a student. 

•Submitted by Adam Earnkeardt 

The ClariOB Call will publish website Subiai^ons from s^ faculty, staff, and the community. If 

you know of a great site that you would like to share with our readers submit the complete address, 

and a brief description to our office in room 270 Gemmett Student Center or e-mail us at 

Call@mail.clarion.edu, We will log onto aUUte sites submitted to verify that 

they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 




— ___ 




— —^— — 



S^ww^mj 



fMt*nmtm—m* | | | in, 



*m—+m—m+ 



Should a tax he charged to build new 
stadiums in Pittsburgh? 



From page 2 

ships come and go all the time. 

I will never forget all my fresh- 
men friends or, for that matter, 
any of my friends from last year, 
but time marches on, and it sure 
as hell isn't waiting for me to quit 
being depressed. 

I can't say that I've lost touch 
with all of my friends because I 
still have Bonita, Kristen, Mel, 



Dan, Matty, Ron, etc... , but I've 
lost touch with some of the peo- 
ple who are still here along with 
the people who have dropped out 
I'd like to take this time to say 
"HI" to all of the people that I 
never get to see and to all the 
people with which I've lost touch 
(you know who you are). 

Since this is my last year here, 
as I know it, I'd like to say 



"Good Luck" to everyone who 
will be graduating during my 
year in France. I have faith in you 
ALL!!!! The Verve Pipe says it 
best in their song "Freshmen" 
when they sing "We were only 
freshmen,.-." 



•The author is a junior French 
and Marketing major. 



Page 5 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



NEWS 



Clarion Stu dent Association 



Audit shows discrepancies 




The CSA office has had to deal with a recent controversy. 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Writer 



The Clarion Student 
Association was part of an audit 
of Clarion University and all 14 
State System of Higher 
Education schools. This audit, 
done by the Auditor General of 
Pennsylvania, and made avail- 
able to the public in early August, 
uncovered four accounting dis- 
crepancies for the CSA. These 
included payroll processing, the 
need for an audit review system 
by the CSA Board of Directors, 
dicrepencies concerning ticket 
sales for athletic events, and 
receipts for raffles and conces- 
sion sales. 

In a written statement, Lee 
Krull, CSA Business Manager, 
said, "Since the audit was pre- 
sented to the University, the CSA 
Board of Directors, along with 
the CSA business office has cor- 
rected these findings." 

However, according to CSA 
Board of Directors chairperson 
Michael Chapaloney, "Mr. Krull 
has not reported to us (Board of 
Directors) as to what the solu- 
tions and weaknesses are." 
Chapaloney went on to mention 
that an ad-hoc committee has 
been set up to evaluate the effi- 
ciency and structure of the CSA 
administrative office. 

Clarion University president 



Diane Reinhard has also com- 
mented on the findings of the 
audit in relation to the CSA. She 
said, "I have written to the CSA 
Board of Directors expressing 
my concern about the audit find- 
ings. I encouraged them to 
address these findings in a sys- 
tematic fashion and quickly 
review and adopt policies to sat- 
isfy the auditors." Reinhard also 
said, "Even though the CSA and 
Clarion University are separate, 
it is appropriate to be concerned 
about the findings, because the 
data was reported in a combined 
way." Because the data was 
reported in that manner, the find- 
ings are still reflective towards 
Clarion University, Reinhard 
added. It was also noted that 
there was not a mismanagement 
of funds, but a lack of necessary 
controls in accordance with stan- 
dard operating procedure for 
accounting. 

In response to the president's 
comments, chairperson 

Chapaloney said, "The CSA 
Board of Directors is looking for- 
ward to meeting with the presi- 
dent to evaluate the weaknesses 
and to develop the necessary 
solutions." 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice- 
president for Finance and 
Administration, said that the 
Clarion Student Association had 
more audit findings than any 



other student association in the 
SSHE. She said that she was 
responsible for writing a 
response to the audit findings and 
submitting that response to Don 
Passmore, the director of the 
internal review group for the 
SSHE. Passmore contacted all 
the institutions to provide dead- 
lines for addressing the findings. 
Haberaecker said that according 
to state regulations, the findings 
must be addressed within six 
months of the report being made 
public. She said, "We have been 
asked by the state to review the 
findings again and develop a 
plan to address the policies which 
need to be implemented." 

A copy of the audit was request- 
ed, and the University provided 
both a copy of the audit which 
detailed the CSA findings, and a 
copy of the CU response to the 
findings. 

The first finding is that control 
weaknesses were noted in 
Clarion University's Student 
Association payroll processing. 
The recommendation by the 
auditors was that the CSA Board 
of Directors should review the 
management controls relevant to 
personnel actions, payroll docu- 
mentation, leave accounting and 
verification procedures, and take 
appropriate corrective action. 



tcllege Campus News 




What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



Continued on Page 7 



Female kicker sues Duke 
University 

A Duke University student, who says she was denied a fair shot at 
becoming the first female kicker on a Division I football team, has 
sued the university and head coach. 

Heather Sue Mercer, 21, filed a lawsuit in a federal district court, 
charging that Duke and head coach Frank Goldsmith violated Title 
IX of the Education Amendements of 1972, which prohibits sex dis- 
crimination at any college sports program that receives federal funds, 

Mercer, an all-state kicker on her high school team, tried to join 
Duke's football team as a walk-on starting her freshman year. She 
alleges in her suit that after she kicked a 28-yard game winning field 
goal in an intersquad game in 1995, Goldsmith told her she was on 
the team. 

She said the coach later withdrew his offer, telling her he got car- 
ried away with his comments. 

Duke spokesperson John F. Burness would not comment about 
specifics of the case, but said Mercer's attorney's claim that Duke 
violated the Title IX rule was "frivolous." 

"Fred Goldsmith is a two-time national coach of the year," he said. 
"He bases his assessment of who does or doesn't play on his team on 
a player's performance and ability." 

Notre Dame prof claims to 
discover largest carnivore 

A University of Notre Dame paleontologist has unearthed a fos- 
silized skeleton believed to be the largest Tyrannosaur ever found. 

J. Keith Rigby says the fossil is either a Tyrannosaurus rex or 
something very much like it. The largest of bones, discovered this 
summer in northeastern Montana, measures 52 inches. 

"What we do know is that it is the largest carnivore on the planet," 
he said. 

The fossil, only partially excavated by Rigby and his field crew, 
lies in a vast dinosaur graveyard near Montana's Fort Peck Reservoir. 

Rigby was forced to close the site in August, after the land's for- 
mer owners began digging up bones, including the skull, to a private 
collector. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture now owns the land, once a cat- 
tle ranch, and forced the former landowners from the site. 

Rigby says he announced the discovery in an effort to protect the 
specimen. He plans to donate the fossil to a new museum set to open 
in Fort Peck in 2005. 

Much of Rigby's research was funded by the Earthwatch Institute, 
a non-profit agency that finances field studies through paying volun- 
teers. One of them, Louis Trembley, an earth science high school 
teacher found the specimen by literally stumbling over a protruding 
bone, Rigby said. 

Courtesy of College Press 

Service 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



Enrollment continues to increase at CU 



Senate 




by Janelle Donoghue 
News Writer 



No one can say that interest in 
CUP in decreasing. For the third 
year in a row, enrollment at 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania is on the rise. At 
the recent Council of trustees 
meeting held this past Thursday 
night, this trend was discussed. 
According to President Diane L. 
Reinhard, the increase in the. full 
time student equivalent (FTE) is 
a result of a number of different 
factors. These factors range 
everywhere from the number of 
full time students increasing to an 
increase in the amount of stu- 
dents taking additional credits. 
"Our headcount now exceeds 
5,900 students and we continue 
to see a greater increase in the 
full time equivalent students, said 
President Reinhard. 

Another matter that was dis- 
cussed at the meeting was the 
fact that Venango Campus is also 
holding steady with it's enroll- 
ment President Reinhard was 
quick to thank the Venango 
Advisory Board for the special 
efforts they have made in achiev- 
ing this goal. Another important 
part of the meeting was held 
when Dr. Art Acton, executive 



dean of the Venango Campus, 
welcomed trustees to the new and 
improved Venango Campus. 
With recent renovations com- 
plete, trustees held their meeting 
in Montgomery Hall. Since the 
new renovation, this hall has 
become the technology hub of 
the campus. Some of the new 
facilities include a complete net- 
work connected with Clarion 
University as well as the World 
Wide Web. Along with the build- 
ing and 

technology there are also new 
programs and activities being 
implemented. 

"...We are much more than 
buildings and technology," states 
Dr. Acton. "We have many new 
programs in place and are explor- 
ing additional opportunities to 
meet educational needs of the 
region. The enrollment has been 
relatively steady and will remain 
so as long as we are responsive to 
the needs of the community. 
There is a new spirit and enthusi- 
asm on campus." 

A few of the new programs and 
opportunities that will be offered 
at the Venango campus include a 
certified occupational assistant 
program that is now in its second 
year and is waiting for an accred- 
itation visit. Two new certified 



business courses and nursing pro- 
grams are also offered in distance 
education in connection with 
West Penn Hospital will be 
offered. Clarion University also 
is offering an unique cooperative 
M.S. Nursing program with 
Slippery Rock University. 
Cooperative courses and pro- 
grams in nursing and providing 
nursing care are also being 
explored as a possibility for con- 
nections with other universities. 
However, along with all of this 
advancement comes the need for 
additional funds to continue 
meeting these needs. Harry 
Tripp, vice president for 
advancement, reported a recent 
successful beginning for the 
Venango Challenge, a $1,975 mil- 
lion dollar campaign to fund the 
renovation of Montgomery Hall 
and scholarships endowments. 

"We are pleased with the 
progress of the campaign. 
Because of the success of the 
campaign. We now need only to 
raise 525,000 by March 1,1998, 
on order to successfully meet the 
$300,000 challenge from the 
Kresge Foundation-and the 
250,000 challenge from the 
Prometheus Fund of the State 
System of Higher Education", 
states Mr. Tripp. 




Student 



A visit from President Reinhard topped the agenda of the Student 
Senate meeting. She spoke briefly to the senate, applauding the 
increase of enrollment, spoke on the master plan and discussed her 
new home behind Still Hall. 

WCCB reported a successful open house. The representative also 
addressed legal issues and equipment that would be needed to convert 
the station into FM. 

The Sequelle reported major changes in management, including hir- 
ing a financial manager. 

Under senate standing committees, appropriations chair, Senator 
Snyder reported the amounts available for each account. The main 
account has a total of $97,989, the supplemental account and the sup- 
plemental reserve account, each contain a total of $12,000. 

The student relations committee announced the creation of four new 
e-mail accounts for committees. 

The following people were appointed to subcommittees pending the 
approval of Dr. Reinhard. 



Distance learning creates nursing school at Lock Haven 



by Janelle Donoghue 
News Writer 



Through Clarion University's 
distance education and onsite 
instruction, Clarion will be able 
to offer its undergraduate nursing 
degree at the Clearfield campus 
of Lock Haven university. 

The National League of 
Nursing accredited BSN program 
will be taught by Clarion's nurs- 
ing faculty at Venango Campus 
and West Penn Hospital, In 
Pittsburgh 
The idea to form a collaborative 



program with Lock Haven 
University originated from a sur- 
vey in Clearfield concerning bac- 
calaureate education for nurses. 
Although Lock Haven offers an 
associate of science in nursing 
degree at the Clearfield campus, 
it did not have the resources to 
offer a professional program. 

Dr. T. Andean Duespohl, dean 
of the Clarion University School 
of Nursing, is happy with the 
newest changes. Over 20 people 
have registered for the courses 
this fall. 

"Clarion University is already 



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united with Slippery Rock 
University to offer a joint practi- 
tioner program at the master level 
and now we are branching out to 
work with Lock Haven to meet 
the nursing needs of the 
Clearfield community," she says. 

Clarion University will offer 
the courses in nursing at 
Clearfield while Lock Haven 
offers the general education 
classes. The students will receive 
the degree and diploma from 
Clarion University in the nursing 
program. 

There are many highlights to 
the program that is being offered. 
These include things like part 
time studies, flexible scheduling, 
and transfer of credits. 

Individuals who have graduat- 



ed from a National League for 
Nursing accredited associate 
degree or diploma program will 
have their credits transferred as 
equivalent freshman and sopho- 
more nursing courses. This is to 
avoid repetition of nursing cours- 
es and experiences. 

Flexible clinical experiences 
will be available to the students. 
The BSN program will be built 
upon the experiences of the regis- 
tered nurse student Students will 
also have access to libraries and 
facilities at both Clarion and 
Lock Haven. 

Students will pay instructional 
support fees and activity fees to 
the appropriate school for the 
courses that they are taking. 

This is Clarion's second con- 



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junction with another state sys- 
tem university. At Slippery Rock 
University a master of science in 
nursing — family nurse practi- 
tioner degree is offered. 

Duespohl says, "These agree- 
ments place Clarion in the fore- 
front of implementing State 
System imperatives". 



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October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



CHELSEA...cont'd from page 3 



respect privacy," Palmer said. "People are well-educated and aware of the fact that Chelsea's here to get 
an education, not for show." 

But that doesn't mean she won't be shown a good time. " I could kiss Chelsea Clinton and make her a 
legitimate Stanford freshman," volunteered senior Darron Evans, referring to a popular tradition known as 

Full Moon Quad." As the tradition goes, freshmen come out to the quad on the night of the first full moon, 
and with the kiss of a senior are unofficially ordained. 

One student said Chelsea should prepare for more than lipsmacking. The male student, who wished to 
guard his name for the Secret Service's hit list advised Chelsea to "bring a lot of condoms. There's a lot of 
sex going on here. "That's enough to give poor Bill Clinton a heart attack. 

Others, not wanting to inflict such pain on the leader of the free world, offered a lighter dose of advice for 
the first daughter. "I would say enjoy your college years here; they go by so fast Don't come in dead set 
on a career, explore all kinds of fields, and meet a lot of people," said Dean Hung, a graduate student. 

Sophomore Jan Hong wouldn't mind being one of those people. "Yeah, I'd like to meet her. I think it's 
great that she's coming here." 

Still, the First Freshman might want to steer clear of graduate student Kristin Thesis- Alvarez. "I was jok- 
ing with my family that I would like to TA one (of her classes) and flunk her." 

One person Chelsea will definitely get to know well is Summer, her roommate in co-ed Wilber Hall. 
Summer, who has only been identified by first name, was thoroughly checked by the Secret Service. Their 
dorm room that she and Chelsea will share is outfitted with bulletproof windows and a steel door. 

Just down the hall, a young looking team of Secret Service agents is living in the dorm. To blend in, they 
will don college garb and get around on mountain bikes. But students needn't worry. A former agent said 
the service is there to insure Chelsea's safety, not to break up quarters games and turn down loud music. 

"What the service wants to protect against is kidnapping so that the President doesn't have to make a deci- 
sion between family and country," Larry Sheafe, a former Secret Service agent, told NBC. 

One thing the Secret Service can't prevent is the culture shock Chelsea might feel as she leaves the Beltway 
bubble. She'll likely see a lot more rollerbladers on Stanford's palm-tree studded campus, and she might 
want to leave her Starbucks coffee mug behind- Californians have moved on to the next trend, Jamba Juice 
smoothies. 

But Palmer, herself an East Coast native, warns Chelsea not to be overwhelmed by the shift of attitude 
"I'm from Virginia, and I'm shocked at how materialistic Stanford and the Silicon Valley area are. You don't 
really appreciate the East until you get out here, i would tell her not to give in to materialism," Palmer said 

Palmer can rest assured. Chelsea probably won't have time to let materialism creep into her veins. She 
wants to go to medical school and become a pediatric cardiologist A lofty goal, but not an easy one 
"Chelsea can prepare to spend a lot of time studying and in the lab if she wants to get into med school," said 
Hung, a lab assistant, adding that the pre-med path, "is no walk in the park." 

No walk, maybe, but now that Chelsea's in sunny California, she can rollerblade. 



CSA continued from 
page 5... 

**A» *1* *1* *1# »I* vL» «X» «d* «4# •!• *4* *4r *4* *4? *k *J<? ^ ^t? "X* 
?j% #j^ *j^ *^ #y* ^* «x* *T* *T* *!* *T* *T* *T* *T* 1* *T* *I* *l* 1* 



CSA Board of Directors should implement an audit review procedure, 
with a recommendation that the procedure encompass both the report 
ing of financial statements and management letter comments on an 
ongoing basis. 

A third recommendation came in light of finding that athletic event 
settlement sheets cannot be reconciled with supporting ticket sales 
The finding states that cash receipts could not be reconciled with the 
canceled tickets for a given athletic event The recommendation hand- 
ed down was that the CSA management should evaluate the controls 
of functions related to athletic ticket sales and take the appropriate cor- 
rective action. 

The fourth and final CSA audit finding states that controls over cash 
receipts from raffles and concession sales were deficient An important 
fact noted in the findings was that cash receipts submitted to the CSA 
office for deposit were not always documented with a prenumbered 
duplicate receipt The auditor recommendation was that the CSA 
review the control over receipts and require the completion of 
prenumbered, duplicate receipts for all CSA deposits. 

Dr. Reinhard noted that the goal for the CSA should be no findings 
for the next audit and she hopes that the correct checks and balances 
will be in place following the release of this audit She also mentioned 
that the CSA had been working on correcting the problems before the 
report became final. According to the response submitted by Eh-. 
Haberaecker, some of the proper steps have been taken in order to cor 
rect the findings. Haberaecker commented that the new policies and 
procedures to be implemented in light of this audit have target dates 
of either March or April. 



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Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



SCUPA reaches agreement 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 



The State College and 
University Professional 

Association (SCUPA), one of 
Clarion University's five bargan- 
ing units, has just reached a ten- 
tative agreement with the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE). 

Tne proposal reached was 
based on a barganing committee 
formed of all 14 state schools in 
an attempt to forge an agreement 
to meet everyone's needs. 
SCUPA, which has been without 
an agreement since December 
31, has reached a tentative one. 
The contract will run from July 1, 
1997 until June 30, 2000. This 
contract must be ratified by over 
51% of SCUPA's members. 

If it meets this criteria then it 
will be sent to the State System 
of Higher Education's Board of 
Governors, who then must 
approve it for it to be implement- 
ed. This agreement includes four 
basic areas where changes need 
to be implemented. These four 
joint committees consist of: 




Mary Jo Phillips 

salary and work compensation, 
live-in staff and office support 
environment, work related 
injuries, professional leaves and 
the career ladder, and profession- 
al evaluation. 

Through these committees, 
many terms were changed and 
added to. For example, a new 
three step classification appeal 
process for classification griev- 
ances was created. A professional 
development fund is also to be 



formed by the State System, 
which would be jointly adminis- 
tered by both SCUPA and the 
State System. The campus repre- 
sentative of SCUPA, freshmen 
financial aid advisor, Mary Jo 
Phillips, explains,"I think it's a 
fair deal. I think that the State 
System and Barganing 
Committee worked hard. It's fair, 
and the changes that were made 
were necessary." 

SCUPA's members include 
employees in student intensive 
areas such as residence halls, 
financial aid offices, and student 
activities centers. They claim 
about 45 people at Clarion 
University alone, and about 450 
from all of the 14 state schools 
total. 

Another positive outcome of 
this tentative agreement is that it 
still leaves ample room for con- 
tinuous discussion. A new salary 
scale, and continued classifica- 
tion of employees will exist, as 
well as topics for future consider- 
ations, as this tentative agree- 
ment will be contracted for the 
next three years. 




The following is a brief synopsis of the 

criminal investigations conducted by 

Public Safety for the dates between 

September 10 to September 30. The 

blotter is compiled by The Public 

Safety office and The Clarion Call. 



*On September 10, an act of criminal mischief (grafitti writing) was 
investigated in the west stair well of Ralston Hall. 
♦On September 21, Clarion University police officers cited James 
Steven Gates for disorderly conduct in Ballentine Hall. 
♦On September 28, a number of incidents occured: 
-Campus police investigated a report of theft that occured in 
Campbell Hall. 

-Some unknown individual pulled the fire alarm on the fifth floor of 
Wilkinson Hall. 

-Three non-students Michael D. Wenzel, Bradley J. Fox, and 
Christopher M. Zandier were cited for underage drinking and public 
drunkeness. 

-A Clarion student was cited for disorderly conduct,under age drink- 
ing, and public drunkeness. 

♦On September 29, a person reported that unknown actors damaged a 
car with a football at the university stadium. 
♦A student reported that another student borrowed a coat sometime 
ago, and refused to return it in Campbell Hall on September 29. 
♦A male reported being harassed by another male on September 29. 
♦Public Safety is investigating a theft of cable services occuring in 
Nair Hall on September 30. 



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The Clarion Call 



Page 9 




LIFESTYLES 




ALF Preview 



by Scott Hunsberger 
Lifestyles Editor 



As the warmth of summer 
departs and Mother Nature 
makes her transition to the icy 
cold of winter, Clarion becomes a 
hot spot in Pennsylvania. 
Clarion's ALF Week is the largest 
festival in Western Pennsylvania 
and will bring from 250,000 to 
500,000. No, it's not an entire 
week devoted to that short, furry 
Alien Life Form from Melmac 
who dines on cats. It's the 44th 
Annual Autumn Leaf Festival 
Week, October 4-12. 

During ALF, Clarion's Main 
Street will be transformed into a 
fair grounds with concession 
stands, whirling thrill rides, sou- 
venir booths, fun games and 
activities for all ages. 

ALF kicks off this Saturday 
with a Classic Car Cruise of 250 
antique cars, a three-mile walk-a- 
thon, and the C-93 Junior 
Olympics. Sunday offers an all- 
day autorama, a bake and craft 
sale, a square dance and a free 
rock-and-roll oldies concert fea- 
turing The Dovells. 

Monday's events include the 
opening of the Third Annual 
Clarion University and 
Community Cultural Week at 
6:30 p.m. at the Clarion County 
Courthouse. Scandinavian danc- 
ing, Native American songs, 
blues and jazz music, Irish story- 
telling, a cappella music, interna- 
tional dances and Ecuadorian 
music will be featured Monday 
evening and throughout the 
week. 

Tuesday through Friday include 
a Kiddies Parade, the Clarion 



Community Choir ALF Reunion 
Pops Concert, fire truck rides, 
craft shows, book fairs, dances, 
art shows and much more. 

The "World Famous Budweiser 
Clydesdales" will be in Clarion 
from Wednesday through 
Sunday. They will be featured in 
full dress during the ALF Parade. 

More than 200,000 people are 
expected to line Main Street dur- 
ing the ever popular ALF Parade 
on Saturday, October 11. The 
parade will be a gala event fea- 
turing 126 units, including 
marching bands, about 30 floats, 
drill teams, community organiza- 
tions, candy clowns and animals. 

Make sure you hit the conces- 
sion stands during the week as 
you can eat a wide array of treats 

from 26 food vendors. Back by 
popular demand is the Quaker 

Steak and Lube booth featuring 
"The Best Wings in the USA." 
Other tasty foods to try include 
stromboli, funnel cakes, hand- 
made pretzels, blooming onions, 
gyros, taffy, hot roasted peanuts 
and baked potatoes. 

ALF schedules of events are 
available at the Chamber of 
Commerce, local businesses and 
thruway rest areas. For more 
information stop by the Chamber 
of Commerce, 41 South 5th Ave., 
or call (814) 226-9161. 

If you can't make it out to the 
parade, check it out on TV5's live 
broadcast. 

A message to those Clarion stu- 
dents planning on going home for 
the weekend of October 10-12 to 
have mom do their laundry — 
stay here. Wear dirty domes if 
you must, but stay in Clarion and 
enjoy all that ALF Week offers. 





:: : !:^:>:::>SKi$:- 




Photos by Kristin Colello/Clarion Call 

BEFORE (10/1/97) 

Clarion's Main Street and Memorial Park will be transformed 
into a fairground when the 44th Annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival hits downtown Clarion. Look for plenty of fun 
activities and tasty treats during ALF Week, October 4-12. 





Where In Clarion? 




Rocky Mountain Hi 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the dove on the logo of The Olive Branch 
Christian book store. 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 



Luis RodrigHCZ sneaks on °an?s. youth and education 



Former gang member visits Clarion 



by Bonnie Fair 
Lifestyles Writer 



Luis Rodriguez, poet, critic, 
journalist and former gang mem- 
ber, gave an enlightening speech 
from the Hart Chapel stage on 
September 13 at 7:30 p.m. 
Rodriguez spoke about experi- 
ence with gangs, youth empow- 
erment and the need to improve 
our schools. The event was spon- 
sored by the University Activities 
Board and the Martin Luther 
King Jr. Committee. 



ous East L.A. Riots saved him 
from the same fate. "30,000 peo- 
ple got together to protest the 
Vietnam War. I went just to party 
but ended up saved by the move- 
ment" 

At 16 years old, he was arrest- 
ed during the riots and confined 
in a cell next to Charles Manson. 
That's when the call to write 
came to him. By 17 years old, he 
was a serious writer. He says, 
"Everybody has a special calling 
in this world." 

Rodriguez recited passages 
from Always Running: La Vida 



"We had become a second gen- 
eration gang family, and I 
wanted this to change." 



Rodriguez was a member of a 
gang some 20 years ago. "There 
was nothing else to do, nothing 
else to engage my imagination. I 
didn't see gangs as a bad thing. 
Drugs and guns were there but 
not as big as today," said 
Rodriguez. Even so, by the time 
he was 16 years old, he was using 
drugs, had been stabbed and shot 
at and had spent time in jail. 

He cited the language barrier as 
one of the biggest problems for 
Spanish speaking youth during 
his childhood. "We weren't 
wanted in the schools or the 
churches of the community," he 
said. "Language is power." A 
power he and his friends lacked. 
"So," he said, "we created our 
own street talk, our own world." 
Rodriguez lost many of his 
friends to the violence on Los 
Angeles streets during the late 
1960s and 1970s. He believes 
what happened during the notori- 



Loca, Gang Days in LA, one of 
the earliest books based on his 
fust hand experiences. After try- 
ing in vain to get Poems Across 
the Pavement published, he 
founded Tia Chucha Press and 
published it himself. 

He has been married four times 
but wasn't active in the raising of 
his children. Rodriguez said, 
"One day my son, Ramiro, tried 
to kill his mother. She called and 
said, 'It's your turn to be a par- 
ent* It was the scariest thing." 
His son came to live with him 
and within a short time became a 
gang member. Rodriguez said, 
"We had become a second gener- 
ation gang family, and I wanted 
this to change." 

When he couldn't find a pro- 
gram to help his son, he started 
one in his home. Using what he 
believed had helped him make it 
through, Rodriguez worked to 
help his son and other local juve- 



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(814)835-8023 





Starting date Oct 8th 



niles. Mentoring played a key 
role in the program, along with a 
belief that people can change. 
Rodriguez said, "Most young 
people don't have any mentors, 
just people who disrespect 
them." The program he created 
grew, was used by other groups 
and enabled his son, Ramiro, to 
become actively involved in 
mentoring. 

In 1993, Luis put what worked 
in the program into a book that 
could help other youth groups. 
Now, he lectures throughout the 
country on gangs, the failures of 
schools, and ways to empower 
today's youth. 

Luis pointed out that our gov- 
ernment spends more on prisons 
than schools. He said, "The 
incarceration rate in California is 
85 to 95 percent — the highest in 
the world. California prisons are 
mostly black and brown. There 
has to be another way. If we 
build them... they will come." 




After opening the floor for audi- 
ence questions, one audience 
member asked, "Why don't pris- 
ons work as a deterrent to 
crime?" Rodriguez answered, 
"Prison had become a rite of pas- 
sage we were all gonna have to 
go through. It doesn't work 



where there's nothing else going 
on; some even prefer it." 

Another asked, "Why do you 
think our government is more 
willing to build prisons than 
schools?" He said, "Our country 
is in a state of transition from an 
industry-based to an electronic- 
based economy. Not enough 
jobs. . .so prisons have become an 
economic boom." 

He spoke of this time of transi- 
tion as an opportunity for posi- 
tive change. The change would 
require strengthening the rotes of 
family, school, community and 
the church in young people's 
lives. 

"Gang kids need exposure to 
things they never know about. 
Teach them that they have tradi- 
tions, roots, that heritage is civi- 
lization, is history. Give them 
power, respect, someplace to be 
loved. If you show them another 
way you know, they may take 
another path." 



will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday nights 
in 250/252 Gemmell. 

The series is a collection of interactive sessions 
that explore how to be a leader and examine one's role as a leader. 

The fall schedule is: 

October 8 — Motivation and Leadership 

October 15 — Language of Leadership 

October 22 — Group Dynamics and Teamwork 

October 29 — Diversity and Leadership 

November 5 — Power 

November 12 — Gender Issues and Leadership 

November 19 — Managing Stress 

For more information call Andrea Dillinger at 226-2354. 



Ill Breakfast available all day 

JCjiafceK Dinners from to $3.95 to $1 2.50 



■CUPPER 

MMI 

226-7950 

1 Mile south on 

5th Ave towards 

the Mall 



Gaslight Saloon - Daily Specials 

Discount with valid CUP 

ID 

Wed. Is Wing Night 



dining Room Hours 6:30am to 1 0:00pm Bar Hours 4:00pm to 1 1 :30 



J J IT 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



Pittsburgh Hi gh School All-Star Honors Jazz Band plays on Famliy Day 

In Concert with Brendan Anderer 



Music and families were the 
main program in Hart Chapel last 
Saturday as the Pittsburgh High 
School All-Star Honors Jazz 
Band performed to close out 
Clarion University's annual 
Family Day. 

This group is an ensemble of 
talented students of all ages from 
the Pittsburgh School System. 
While most of the students were 
of high school standing, at least 
one member of the group was in 
eighth grade. 

The group, under the direction 
of Mr. Calvin Stemley, has had 
several public appearances, 



including the Mellon Jazz 
Festival. The group also per- 
formed as an opening act for 
renowned jazz musician David 
Sanborn. 

The jazz ensemble played many 
old standards by such "greats" as 
Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane, 
Duke Ellington and Stanley 
Turrentine. Some of the favorites 
included Victor Young's "Stella 
by Starlight," "The Blues 
Doctor," by the Count Basie 
Orchestra, 'Take the 'A' Train," 
by Billy Strayhom, and Duke 
Ellington's "Satin Doll." 

As with all great jazz pieces, 



solos were a dominant factor to 
the evening's entertainment. 
Solo spotlights shown on trum- 
pets, trombones, piano, guitar, 
drums and the crowd pleasing 
conch shell. 

Immediately following the 
High School All-City Jazz 
Ensemble performance was a six 



song set by the Jazz Aces Band 
Highlighting pieces like "All 
Blues," by Miles Davis, John 
Coltrane's "Blue Train" and the 
standard "Over the Rainbow," the 
group won the crowd over. This 
band is composed of an indepen- 
dent group of high school stu- 
dents interested in playing jazz 



music. 

The evening's performance, in 
the spirit of Family Day, was 
dedicated to the director's mother 
and won a standing ovation. 

The band is currently preparing 
for an upcoming performance at 
New York's Essentially Ellington 
Contest 



Depression screenings offered 



by Hope Guy 
Lifestyles Yhriter 




On Wednesday, October 8, free 
depression screenings will take 
place in 250/252 Gemmell. This 
program is part of National 
Depression Screening Day and is 
open to all students, staff and fac- 
ulty of Clarion University. There 
will be two sessions of the 
screening — one from 10 a.m. to 
noon and the other from 2 p.m. to 
4 p.m. 

These sessions will include a 
brief screening form containing 
20 to 23 questions. This form 
Will be filled out anonymously by 




number. After tilling out the 
screening form, there will be 
about a 15 to 20 minute lecture, 
including a question and answer 
period. A video will then be 
shown. 
At the end of the session, those 



participating in the program will 
review their screenings confiden- 
tially with the professional staff 
of the Department of Counseling 
Services. 

continued on page 14 




<CH9RD ANWAC €£AR90tf UJUVVERStty 

AJQD COMMUJWZy eU&tUK/UC f*9QWZ 

Autumn Ceaf festival 

CUtIod County: $ eDD$yi\?9i)te's 




Monday, October 6, 1997 

6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
WHERE: 

In front of the Courthouse. (In case 
of rain, check local radio station.) 
FEATURING: 

♦ BLUES CLOWN- Blues/Jazz Music 

♦ DR's SMABY- Scandinavian Dancing 

♦ JACKIE BOOTH- Native American Songs 

♦ CLARION - LIMESTONE AREA HIGH- 
SCHOOL SENSATIONS- Performance 

♦ LIFT EVERY VOICE CHOIR- Gospel Music 

♦ ANGELO ANDERSON AND TYRONE TYLER- 
Acappella Music 

♦ DOREEN McBRIDE from Northern Ireland- Irish 
Storytelling 

♦ CLARION INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION- 
Writing / Dancing / Fashion Show 

♦ RUNA PACHA- Ecuadorian Indian Music 



Outstanding Coi»i»UT)!ty 

See What's Happening Throughout the 

Rest of the Week 
Tuesday, October 7, (7-9:30p.m.): 

♦ Greenville High School Steel Drum Band in 

front of the Courthouse 

♦ Doreen McBride (Irish Storytelling) in front of 
the Courthouse 

Wednesday, October 8, (5:30-7:00p.m.): 

♦ Andy Carl vie Band (Blues music and Rock 'n 
Roll) in front of the Courthouse 

Thursday, October 9: 

♦ Allegheny River Dancers, (7:00«8:00p.m.) 
Traditional Iroquois Social Dances/Songs in 
front of the Courthouse 

♦ Clarion University of PA Jazz Combo 
(8:30-9:30p.m.), in front of the Courthouse 




Friday, October 10, (10 a.m.-4 p.m.): 

♦ Highland Bag Pipers of Grove 
City 

♦ Mariachi Quartet 

♦ Runa Pacha 

These groups will be performing 
all along Main Street throughout 
the day. 



Contributing sponsors are New Beginnings 
Specialty Care and Beneficial Finance. 



w £li ':-^S^%\ 




- 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 



Luis Rodriwez. speaks on eanps. youth and education 



Former gang member visits Clarion 



by Bonnie Fair 
Lifestyles Writer 



Luis Rodriguez, poet, critic, 
journalist and former gang mem- 
ber, gave an enlightening speech 
from the Hart Chapel stage on 
September 13 at 7:30 p.m. 
Rodriguez spoke about experi- 
ence with gangs, youth empow- 
erment and the need to improve 
our schools. The event was spon- 
sored by the University Activities 
Board and the Martin Luther 
King Jr. Committee. 



ous East L.A. Riots saved him 
from the same fate. "30,000 peo- 
ple got together to protest the 
Vietnam War. I went just to party 
but ended up saved by the move- 
ment." 

At 16 years old, he was arrest- 
ed during the riots and confined 
in a cell next to Charles Manson. 
That's when the call to write 
came to him. By 17 years old, he 
was a serious writer. He says, 
"Everybody has a special calling 
in this world." 

Rodriguez recited passages 
from Always Running: La Vida 



"We had become a second gen- 
eration gang family, and I 
wanted this to change." 



Rodriguez was a member of a 
gang some 20 years ago. "There 
was nothing else to do, nothing 
else to engage my imagination. I 
didn't see gangs as a bad thing. 
Drugs and guns were there but 
not as big as today," said 
Rodriguez. Even so, by the time 
he was 16 years old, he was using 
drugs, had been stabbed and shot 
at and had spent time in jail. 

He cited the language barrier as 
one of the biggest problems for 
Spanish speaking youth during 
his childhood. "We weren't 
wanted in the schools or the 
churches of the community," he 
said. "Language is power." A 
power he and his friends lacked. 
"So," he said, "we created our 
own street talk, our own world." 
Rodriguez lost many of his 
friends to the violence on Los 
Angeles streets during the late 
1960s and 1970s. He believes 
what happened during the notori- 



Loca, Gang Days in LA, one of 
the earliest books based on his 
first hand experiences. After try- 
ing in vain to get Poems Across 
the Pavement published, he 
founded Tia Chucha Press and 
published it himself. 

He has been married four times 
but wasn't active in the raising of 
his children. Rodriguez said, 
"One day my son, Ramiro, tried 
to kill his mother. She called and 
said, 'It's your turn to be a par- 
ent' It was the scariest thing." 
His son came to live with him 
and within a short time became a 
gang member. Rodriguez said, 
"We had become a second gener- 
ation gang family, and I wanted 
this to change." 

When he couldn't find a pro- 
gram to help his son, he started 
one in his home. Using what be 
believed had helped him make it 
through, Rodriguez worked to 
help his son and other local juve- 



Professional Bartender 



$$$$$Learn to Earn $$$$$ 



Classes held 
at Holiday 

Inn, Clarion. 

Classes begin 
Oct. 8th for 

more info call 

(814)835-8023 





Starting date Oct 8th 



niles. Mentoring played a key 
role in the program, along with a 
belief that people can change. 
Rodriguez said, "Most young 
people don't have any mentors, 
just people who disrespect 
them." The program he created 
grew, was used by other groups 
and enabled bis son, Ramiro, to 
become actively involved in 
mentoring. 

hi 1993, Luis put what worked 
in the program into a book that 
could help other youth groups. 
Now, he lectures throughout the 
country on gangs, the failures of 
schools, and ways to empower 
today's youth. 

Luis pointed out that our gov- 
ernment spends more on prisons 
than schools. He said, "The 
incarceration rate in California is 
85 to 95 percent — the highest in 
the world. California prisons are 
mostly black and brown. There 
has to be another way. If we 
build them. . .they will come." 




After opening the floor for audi- 
ence questions, one audience 
member asked, "Why don't pris- 
ons work as a deterrent to 
crime?" Rodriguez answered, 
"Prison had become a rite of pas- 
sage we were all gonna have to 
go through. It doesn't work 



where there's nothing else going 
on; some even prefer it." 

Another asked, "Why do you 
think our government is more 
willing to build prisons than 
schools?" He said, "Our country 
is in a state of transition from an 
industry-based to an electronic- 
based economy. Not enough 
jobs. . .so prisons have become an 
economic boom." 

He spoke of this time of transi- 
tion as an opportunity for posi- 
tive change. The change would 
require strengthening the roles of 
family, school, community and 
the church in young people's 
lives. 

"Gang kids need exposure to 
things they never know about. 
Teach them that they have tradi- 
tions, roots, that heritage is civi- 
lization, is history. Give them 
power, respect, someplace to be 
loved. If you show them another 
way you know, they may take 
another path." 



*JJm JEmuUmIUp Zbotm/gpmmt JSrtJi 

will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday nights 
in 250/252 Gemmell. 

The series is a collection of interactive sessions 
that explore how to be a leader and examine one's role as a leader. 

The fall schedule is: 

October 8 — Motivation and Leadership 

October 15 — Language of Leadership 

October 22 — Group Dynamics and Teamwork 

October 29 — Diversity and Leadership 

November 5 — Power 

November 12 — Gender Issues and Leadership 

November 19 — Managing Stress 

For more information call Andrea Dillinger at 226-2354. 




226-7950 

1 Mile south on 

5th Ave towards 

the Malt 



Breakfast available all day 
Dinners from to $3.95 to $12.50 
Gaslight Saloon - Daily Specials 

Discount with valid CUP 

ID 

Wed. is Wing Night 



dining Room Hours 6:30am to 1 0:00pm Bar Hours 4:00pm to 1 1 :30 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



Pittsburg h Hi gh School Al l-Star Honors Jazz Band plays on Famliy Day 

In Concert with Brendan Anderer 



Music and families were the 
main program in Hart Chapel last 
Saturday as the Pittsburgh High 
School All-Star Honors Jazz 
Band performed to close out 
Clarion University's annual 
Family Day. 

This group is an ensemble of 
talented students of all ages from 
the Pittsburgh School System. 
While most of the students were 
of high school standing, at least 
one member of the group was in 
eighth grade. 

The group, under the direction 
of Mr. Calvin Stemley, has had 
several public appearances, 



including the Mellon Jazz 
Festival. The group also per- 
formed as an opening act for 
renowned jazz musician David 
Sanborn. 

The jazz ensemble played many 
old standards by such "greats" as 
Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane, 
Duke Ellington and Stanley 
Turrentine. Some of the favorites 
included Victor Young's "Stella 
by Starlight," "The Blues 
Doctor," by the Count Basie 
Orchestra, "Take the *A* Train," 
by Billy Strayhom, and Duke 
Ellington's "Satin Doll." 

As with all great jazz pieces, 



solos were a dominant factor to 
the evening's entertainment. 
Sok) spotlights shown on trum- 
pets, trombones, piano, guitar, 
drums and the crowd pleasing 
conch shell. 

Immediately following the 
High School All-City Jazz 
Ensemble performance was a six 



song set by the Jazz Aces Band. 
Highlighting pieces like "All 
Blues," by Miles Davis, John 
Coltrane's "Blue Train" and the 
standard "Over the Rainbow," the 
group won the crowd over. This 
band is composed of an indepen- 
dent group of high school stu- 
dents interested in playing jazz 



music. 

The evening's performance, in 
the spirit of Family Day, was 
dedicated to the director's mother 
and won a standing ovation. 

The band is currently preparing 
for an upcoming performance at 
New York's Essentially Ellington 
Contest 



Depression screenings offered 



by Hope Guy 
Lifestyles Writer 




On Wednesday, October 8, free 
depression screenings will take 
place in 250/252 Gemmell. This 
program is part of National 
Depression Screening Day and is 
open to all students, staff and fac- 
ulty of Clarion University. There 
will be two sessions of the 
screening — one from 10 a.m. to 
noon and the other from 2 p.m. to 
4 p.m. 

These sessions will include a 
brief screening form containing 
20 to 23 questions. This form 
will be filled out anonymously by 




number. After filling out the 
screening form, there will be 
about a 15 to 20 minute lecture, 
including a question and answer 
period. A video will then be 
shown. 
At the end of the session, those 



participating in the program will 
review their screenings confiden- 
tially with the professional staff 
of the Department of Counseling 
Services. 

continued on page 14 



# # * * • * • i 



¥ 



p 



*CH9KD ANNUA£ CCAK90M UJQ9VEKS9<Cy 

/wd eojwMN&zy GU&O/BMC N9QWZ 

Autumn Leaf festival 




Monday, October 6, 1997 

6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
WHERE: 

In front of the Courthouse. (In case 
of rain, check local radio station.) 
FEATURING: 

♦ BLUES CLOWN- Blues/Jazz Music 

♦ DR's SMABY- Scandinavian Dancing 

♦ JACKIE BOOTH- Native American Songs 

♦ CLARION - LIMESTONE AREA HIGH- 
SCHOOL SENSATIONS- Performance 

♦ LIFT EVERY VOICE CHOIR- Gospel Music 

♦ ANGELO ANDERSON AND TYRONE TYLER- 
Acappella Music 

♦ DOREEN McBRIDE from Northern Ireland- Irish 
Storytelling 

♦ CLARION INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION- 
Writing / Dancing / Fashion Show 

♦ RUNA PACHA- Ecuadorian Indian Music 



Outstanding Community 

See What's Happening Throughout the 

Rest of the Week 
Tuesday, October 7, (7-9:30p.m.): 

♦ Greenville High School Steel Drum Band in 

front of the Courthouse 

♦ Doreen McBride (Irish Storytelling) in front of 
the Courthouse 

Wednesday, October 8, (5:30-7:00p.m.): 

♦ Andy Carlyle Band (Blues music and Rock 'n 
Roll) in front of the Courthouse 

Thursday, October 9: 

♦ Allegheny River Dancers, (7:00-8:00p.m.) 
Traditional Iroquois Social Dances/Songs in 
front of the Courthouse 

♦ Clarion University of PA Jazz Combo 
(8:30-9:30p.m.), in front of the Courthouse 




Friday, October 10, (10 a.m.-4 p.m.): 

♦ Highland Bag Pipers of Grove 
City 

♦ Mariachi Quartet 

♦ Runa Pacha 

These groups will be performing 
all along Main Street throughout 
the day. 



Contributing sponsors are New Beginnings 
Specialty Care and Beneficial Finance 




inmin 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



The Art On Campus 



Page 13 



s | 



* V I 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



At Clarion University 








■■*>- *■ 




Next time you're walking 

across campus and have 

a few minutes on your hands, 

stop by and check out some 

of the many works of art on 

campus. Take a break for a 

few hours and just look 

around, enjoy what the 

campus has to offer. 

Photos and words by: Tim Emanuel 



In Harvey Hall 



'■m->. 



Beside Carlson Library 



l_ 




«8 ^^wi.iJB ft i_™ WMjxWS^Ek 
SB vy - ^Hb 




























































:m 



£&$£&$!&&&!&£ 



In the Carlson library courtyard 



\t the Sr^ndfi 



October 2 , 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



Calendar of Events 



Today 

•Rosh Hashanah 

•Drama production; "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

Friday 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg tournament 

•Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 250 Gemmell 

•Tennis at California - 3 p.m. 

•Drama production; "Twelfth 

Night" - 8 p.m., Little Theatre 

•UAB Movie Night - 8 p.m., 

Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

Saturday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Archery season opens 

•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg 

tournament 

•Cross Country at Mount Union 

•Community Service Learning "Plunge" - 8:30 a.m. to 

4 p.m. - Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

•Junior Olympics - 11 a.m., Memorial Stadium 

•Tennis at Youngstown State - noon 

•UAB Lock Haven bus trip 

•Football at Lock Haven - 2 p.m. 

•Drama production; "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

Sunday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Autorama - noon to 5 
p.m., Main Street 
•ALF concert: The 
Dovells - 6 p.m., 
Memorial Stadium 
•UAB Movie Night - 8 
p.m., Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 
Monday 

•ALF WEEK 
•Policy committee meeting - 4 p.m. 




m mm 



TABLE 



$M/„ (with coupon) 



eat-in only 
Mon&Sat 




•Career Development 

Series: "The Decision 

Making Process" - 6 p.m., 

Carter Auditorium, Still 

Hall 

•Cultural Week kick off 

events, including Runa 

Pacha, Blues Clown, 

Clarion-Limestone 

Sensations - 6:30 p.m., 

Clarion County Courthouse 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

Public Debate; sponsored by Clarion Forensics - 7:30 

p.m., Hart Chapel 

•British Debate Team public debate - 7:30 p.m., Hart 

Chapel 

Tuesday • 

•ALF WEEK 

•Intramural Golf Scramble begins 

•Golf at Allegheny Invitational 

•Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday | 

Inn 

•Volleyball vs. Slippery Rock - 7 

p.m. 

•Cultural Week event: Greenville 

High School Steel Drum Band and 

Irish storytelling by Doreen 

McBride - 7 p.m., Clarion County 

Courthouse 

•Friends of the Clarion University 

Libraries meeting - 7 p.m., Carlson Library Conference 

Room 

Wednesday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Sidewalk sales - Downtown Clarion 

•Intramural 3-on-3 Basketball begins 

•Cultural Week event: Andy Carlyle Band - 5 p.m., 

Clarion County Courthouse 

•Leadership Development Series - 7 to 8:30 p.m., 

250/252 Gemmell 

•UAB Residence Hall lobby judging - 8 p.m. 



Depression 

continued from 
page 11 

This staff includes three 
licensed psychiatrists two 
licensed social workers and one 
certified counseling and guidance 
official. 

The staff will not diagnose 
depression or even rate the levels 
of depression. Rather, the staff 
will only talk about the results 
and will give participants refer- 
rals, both on and off campus," 
stated Dr. Herbert Bolland of 
Counseling Services. 

"Starting October 19, Dr. Cathy 
Meley, a licensed psychiatrist in 
this department, will be starting a 
depression group to help others 
cope with depression," he said. 

It is estimated that over 17 mil- 
lion Americans suffer from 
depression. National Depression 
Screening Day is helpful in the 
identifying of depression and in 
helping those who suffer from it 
to seek treatment. Eighty to nine- 
ty percent of those that suffer 
from depression can be helped. 

It is asked that anyone interest- 
ed in this program should attend. 
The Department of Counseling 
Services is also available for any- 
one needing assistance. The 
office is located at 148 Egbert 
Hall and can be reached at 226- 
2255. 




sleeping patterns 
♦irritability, anxiousness, 

restlessness 
♦inability to concentrate 

•unexplained aches ami 

pains 

♦thoughts of suicide 



MMMMIMI 



MBMMM 




MOUNTAIN BIKE 

BAC K RAO K 
I IS/I 



Mhi 



34 South 5th Ave 
1 0-6 Daily 



Igh gear 



OVER 10 YEARS OF OUTDOOR 
EXPERIENCE YOU CAN TRUST 



fe.J-3E;~ s~-^JS —J- [■IM^.^P, 8i^22a^7:aa 



*$ 



TV 5 broadcast schedule 
for Thursday: 



Weekend Wire 

Behind the Scenes 

Consider This — 



— 7 p.m. 

— 7:02 p.m. 
7:32 p.m. 



*s 



I 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 




Call On You 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 



If you could make up the "Call on You 
question, what would you ask? 





JMMH ■■■■■> .IMMIIMWIia 



m 



Brandy Caetschman, Junior; Art 

"If you could have any band come for 

the UAB concert, what band would it 

be?" 



•*i^^mmm—*m 



Katie Jones, Freshman, Secondary 

English Education 

"What expectations do you have of 

yourself as a student at Clarion?" 






Mark Humenansky, Junior, 

Communications 

"Do you believe in rock and roll?' 










•WP 




Mike Mccormick, Sophomore, 



Accounting 

"What would you do about parking on 

campus?" 



Jason Fox, Freshman, Information 

Science 

"If pigs had wings, would you still eat 

them?" 



Bryan Charter, Freshman, Comm 

Design 
"Does your mother dress you?" 







««HM*M««ilM 



*8 



October 2 , 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



/^ 1 J J* r\ j_ I Depress' " 

Calendar of Events I r, rrom 



■••. •■••••••.», 



' ' IIIIMMII««tlHMMill ••■IIUMMIIIIItMMM •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ttt* •••#•••••••••••••••! 



Today 

•Rosh Hashanah 

•Drama production; "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

Friday 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg tournament 

•Admissions Day^ 9 a.m„ 250 Gemmell 

•Tennis at California - 3 p.m. 

•Drama production; "Twelfth 

Night" - 8 p.m., Little Theatre 

•UAB Movie Night - 8 p.m., 

Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

Saturday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Archery season opens 

•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg 

tournament 

•Cross Country at Mount Union 

•Community Service Learning "Plunge" - 8:30 a.m. to 

4 p.m. - Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

•Junior Olympics - 11 a.m., Memorial Stadium 

•Tennis at Youngstown State - noon 

•UAB Lock Haven bus trip 

•Football at Lock Haven - 2 p.m. 

•Drama production; "Twelfth Night" - 8 p.m., Little 

Theatre 

Sunday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Autorama - noon to 5 
p.m., Main Street 
•ALF concert: The 
Dovells - 6 p.m., 
Memorial Stadium 
•UAB Movie Night - 8 
p.m., Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 
Monday 
•ALF WEEK 

•Policy committee meeting - 4 p.m. 




m i mm m§ 

m @ FREE 

We NOW have a POOL TABLF 



% . |JI, ( vith coupon) 

eat-in only 
<f Mon&Sat 

i. ^{R/; 4-10 




•Career Development 

Series: "The Decision 

Making Process" - 6 p.m., 

Carter Auditorium, Still 

Hall 

•Cultural Week kick off 

events, including Runa 

Pacha, Blues Clown, 

Clarion-Limestone 

Sensations - 6:30 p.m., 

Clarion County Courthouse 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

Public Debate; sponsored by Clarion Forensics - 7:30 

p.m., Hart Chapel 

•British Debate Team public debate - 7:30 p.m., Hart 

Chapel 

Tuesday > 

•ALF WEEK 

•Intramural Golf Scramble begins 

•Golf at Allegheny Invitational 

•Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday | 

Inn 

•Volleyball vs. Slippery Rock - 7 

p.m. 

•Cultural Week event: Greenville 

High School Steel Drum Band and 

Irish storytelling by Doreen 

McBride - 7 p.m., Clarion County 

Courthouse 

•Friends of the Clarion University 

Libraries meeting - 7 p.m., Carlson Library Conference 

Room 

Wednesday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Sidewalk sales - Downtown Clarion 

•Intramural 3-on-3 Basketball begins 

•Cultural Week event: Andy Carlyle Band - 5 p.m., 

Clarion County Courthouse 

•Leadership Development Series - 7 to 8:30 p.m., 

250/252 Gemmell 

•UAB Residence Hall lobby judging - 8 p.m. 



This staff includes three 
licensed psychiatrists two 
licensed social workers and one 
certified counseling and guidance 
official. 

"The staff will not diagnose 
depression or even rate the levels 
of depression. Rather, the staff 
will only talk about the results 
and will give participants refer- 
rals, both on and off campus," 
stated Dr. Herbert Holland of 
Counseling Services. 

"Starting October 19, Dr. Cathy 
Meley, a licensed psychiatrist in 
this department, will be starting a 
depression group to help others 
cope with depression," he said. 

It is estimated that over 17 mil- 
lion Americans suffer from 
depression. National Depression 
Screening Day is helpful in the 
identifying of depression and in 
helping those who suffer from it 
to seek treatment. Eighty to nine- 
ty percent of those that suffer 
from depression can be helped. 

It is asked that anyone interest- 
ed in this program should attend. 
The Department of Counseling 
Services is also available for any- 
one needing assistance. The 
office is located at 148 Egbert 
Hall and can be reached at 226- 
2255. 







♦changes in eating and 
sleeping patterns 



restlessness 

♦inability to concentrate 

•fatigue or loss of energy 

•unexplained aches and 

pains 

♦thoughts of suicide 




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Consider This — 7:32 p.m. 



fe 



October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 




On Yon 



.• 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 



If you could make up the "Call on You" 
question, what would you ask? 




* 






iWMWHUUUUMWUMMiUMWMMMMiM 



M*M*tMM****tt** 



Brandy Getschman, Junior, Art 

"If you could have any band come for 

the UAB concert, what band would it 

be?" 



Katie Jones, Freshman, Secondary 

English Education 

"What expectations do you have of 

yourself as a student at Clarion?" 



Mark Humenansky, Junior, 

Communications 

"Do you believe in rock and roll?' 











Mike McCormick, Sophomore, 

Accounting 

"What would you do about parking on 

campus?" 



Jason Fox, Freshman, Information 

Science 

'If pigs had wings, would you still eat 

them?" 



Bryan Shaffer, Freshman, Comm 

Design 
"Does your mother dress you?" 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



ENTERTAINMENT. 



Look on ihe W \ojW <sick , dH of 
these books Contain B Medlth 
o£ ^txo^led^e. 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 



Yeah , and all of 

that yjealtn is Cotnirvj 
out of nw Wiftet 






Marty was the big loser in their game of Dress 
Poker. 



CHA O S by Brian Shuster 



SW*3i 



\^^ t 25^TN;^^wrmf'uo^tes / 






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Hollywood a^d uou lik-e! 
CarVgrncj ikl bftfl aftJiMd 
-Hvt malt. 




By Nora McVittie 



~Th<r\ you <\l-\ Y\ow\t and 

ivcar-Hu. br<*.,<sje+ S-HU 
dr«S5«r. 




bag, they'll kinoio ho to 
Kip you. r^a_tkj are. 







October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 17 



ENTERTAINMENT] 



THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Senor'shome 
5 Extra tire 
10 Cheese type 

14 Birthstone 

15 Rabbit fur 

16 Volcanic fallout 

17 Blend together 

18 Not talented 

19 Ready for 
publication 

20 Drawn out 
22 Go back 

24 Spool 

25 Move swiftly 

26 False promises 
29 Exiled 

33 Gem weight 

34 English money 

35 Age 

36 Baking chamber 

37 Serving dish 

38 Unruly child 

39 Got the prize 

40 Wear away 
gradually 

41 Shut 

42 Lack 

44 Sharpened 

45 Guns, etc. 

46 Kind of poem 
48 Nonmetallic 

element 
51 Noose 

55 Horse's gait 

56 Body of water 

58 Flying prefix 

59 Monster 

60 Health: Fr. 

61 Haul behind 

62 Look at 

63 Concluded 

64 Long periods of 
time 

DOWN 

1 Arrive 

2 Highest point 

3 Seasoning 

4 City official 

5 Playground 
feature 

6 Wall section 

7 Copied 

8 Tear 

9 Doorway 

10 Votes into office 




1 997 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 
All rights reserved. 



ANSWERS 




hnp .' ww^* . lemmtUwown.awr 



11 Florida county 

12 Enthusiastic 

13 Spouse 

21 Cozy place 
23 Great Lake 

25 Italian author 

26 Freight boats 

27 Great damage 

28 Place for sports 

29 Like a necklace? 

30 Wading bird 

31 Rub out 

32 ad-fashioned 
34 Schemes 

37 Garden flower 

38 Hostile naval 
action 

40 Tan 

41 Poker money 
43 Roof beam 

46 Make happy 

47 Longed 

48 Street sign 



s n o 3la a a n jIu 3 3d 


o v u ola j. n v sis « o o 


O H 3 v|n V 3 O oil U 1 


i o n x d i -i slu n d i n s 


Id i d 3ils n d v| 


3 N O H| lAl 1 D UJV O S 


3 s o i 0H3 a u^In m 


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V b 3 ■T O N 3 dli V « V 


a 3 hTs 1 m v si |s_ n v h s 


IIUV £11^ 3 3 Hi 


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1 1 a Bill d 3 N 1 I! a 1 3 H 


V A V llN 1 d V ill V d 


w v a all ti v d sflv s v o 



DOCTOR FUN 



49 Goad 

50 Legendary 
knowledge 

51 Dispatch 



52 Roman ruler 

53 Algerian port 

54 Attire 

57 Food container 




Where lesser-known bad guys and lowlifes of the Old West were buried 



NEW HABITS FOR A NEW YEAR 

Before the academic year eels too far along, this is a perfect time to make some "new year resolutions." What adjust met its can you 
make to make the year really count? 

I lere are some resolutions to help you Make College Count: 

I will go to all my classes, even the early ones. 

I will study between classes. 

I will learn what resources are in the library and how to find and use them. 

I will stay away from the television set. 

I will make a concerted effort to get involved in several extracurricular activities early in the year. 

I will make my study time count by studying in the Quietest, least distracting setting I can find. 

I will learn as much about the Internet as a business tool as I can. 

I will record all of my assignments and exams in my planner so I can foresee and survive the crunch times 

I will get to know my professors. 

I will have a great time socially, but not so great that my college record suffers. 

I will avoid all nightcrs because they create more problems than they solve. 

I will add at least one meaningful success story" to my resume every semester 

I will learn about the career placement center long before senior year. 

I will be the first person I know to look for a good summer job 

I will read at least one major newspaper or new magazine on a regular basis. 

I will Make College Count. 



£jjf\ *\* **"* #•* 



~Mw 



Making 

COILEGE 

COUNT 




Making College Count is a syndicated column based on the book (SM.9S ♦ S k H I 800 54 7 7950) and seminar 

scries of the same lillc. To share comments ideas or rcojicst information visit www ni.ikingcollcgciounl com. or oil I 888 267 01 J J loll lice 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 2 , 1997 



Uf£ IK 
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"So, what do you think the archaeologists will say 
when they find that bungee cord around Frank's 
ankle?" 



Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you want to be admired by DOZENS of fellow 

students? Do you dream of molding and shaping 

the impressionable minds of our campus' youth? 

Then send YOUR fun submissions of poetry, 

comics or Bedazzled clothes to these 

Entertainment Pages, c/o 

Benj, 270 Gemmell 

Center. Or call x2380. 

Impress your 
MOM! 







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October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Fap IV 










HEy, U)HPXT HAPPEMEC? 
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CHAOS by Brian Shuster 




"Well, he sure didnt buy it on our salary 
think he's moonlighting as a cropper." 



SIGNE 

PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

Philadelphia 

USA 

oemmnEO by tbibuw mcwa services 



fl|(9tTcFHp5y<w 







Page 20 



The Clkrion Call 



October 2, T997 



«» 




SPORTS 



Clarion drops heartbreaker to UC-Davis 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

In a contest billed by The 
Sporting News as tta gamp of thp 
year in Division II, the Clarion 
University Golden Eagles 
dropped a heartbreaking 35-28 
overtime decision to perrenial 
power California-Davis in fron 
tof 5,500 fans at Memorial 
Stadium on Saturday. 

Following a 28-28 dead heat at 
the end of the regulation, both 
team received one posession 
from their opponent's 25-yard 
line, as specified by NCAA rules. 
What transpired proved to be a 
microcosm of the problems that 
plagued the Eagles all afternoon. 
The Aggies (2-2) got the game- 
winner when Gerald Burgin, who 
terrorized the Eagles with 202 
yards and five touchdowns on the 
day, reached the end zone from 
eight yards out Clarion was 
unable to respond, as sophomore 
quarterback Jeff Cappa, starting 
in place of the injured Chris 
Weibel, endured his sixth sack on 
the final play of the game after 
three incomplete passes. 

The loss dropped Clarion to 0- 
3 on the year, as they prepare for 
their PSAC-West opener at Lock 
Haven (1-3) this Saturday. 

"I was happy with the effort, " 
said Clarion Head Coach Malen 
Luke. "I think I can speak for the 
team when I say I was very dis- 
appointed that we didn't win, but 
I was very proud of the way the 
players came out fighting." 

Not overshadowed by the 
excitement of the game was the 
solid performance from Cappa. 
The Riverview High School grad 




UC Davis 35 
Clarion 28 

This Week at 
Lock Haven 



looked stronger as the game went 
on despite facing heavy pressure 
from UC Davis defenders. 
Cappa connected on 16 of 26 
attempts for 208 yards and a 
touchdown. 

"Jeff did a great job," said 
Luke. He did a very good job of 
getting prepared, not just physi- 
cally, but mentally and Emotion- 
ally. He went out there and did 
what he was asked to do, and 
he'll only get better as he gains 
confidence." 

The Aggies got on the score- 
board fust after a short passing 
attack set up an 8-yard touch- 
down sweep by Burgin late in the 
first quarter. 

It looked like Clarion would 
respond on the ensuing kickoff 
when CUP's Alvin Slaughter 
faked a reverse to teammate 
Kervin Charles then raced up the 



right sideline to the UC-Davis 42. 
However, Clarion could not 
advance any further, as two sacks 
and a penalty forced a Frank Van 
Wert punt 

The Golden Eagles scored their 
initial touchdown in the second 
quarter when Cappa kept the ball 
on an option play from the 1 yard 
line. The conversion failed 
though, leaving the Aggies with a 
7-6 edge. 

After Burgin's second TD gave 
UC Davis a 14-6 lead, the Golden 
Eagles took charge in the third 
period by scoring 22 points. 
CUP leading rusher Ron DeJidas, 
who became the fifth Clarion 
running back to run for over 
2,000 career yards, scored on a 7- 
yard draw play to pull Clarion 
within 14-12. Clarion then knot- 
ted the score when Cappa lofted a 
pass over 5-10 Aggie Ryan Porter 
into the outstretched arms of 6-4 
Mark Witte for the two point con- 
version. 

The Cappa-to-Witte connection 
clicked again later in the quarter 
when Cappa found a diving Witte 
from 11 -yards out. John 
Shikella's extra point attempt 
split the uprights to put Clarion 
ahead 21-14. It was the first time 
the Golden Eagles held a lead all 
season. 

After another Burgin TD, 
Slaughter found paydirt on a 44- 
yard reverse for a 28-21 Golden 
Eagle advantage at the 4:05 mark 
of the third quarter. 

Following the skillful third 
period, the Eagles benifitted from 
a couple of lucky breaks in the 
fourth quarter. UC Davis wide 
receiver Francis Montes gained a 
clear path to the end zone on a 



43-yard pass play, but stumbled 
on the Clarion 17-yard line. A 
couple plays later, the Aggie 
drive stalled when a Kevin Daft 
pass bounced off the knee of his 
receiver and into the hands of 
Clarion linebacker, Mike 
Williams. 

The Aggies had a chance to win 
the game at the end of regulation 
after Burgin tied the score at 28- 
28, but Ray Hill's 41-yard field 
goal attempt was wide right. 

Slaughter, who softened the 
tough UC Davis defense with a 
series of reverse plays, led the 
Golden Eagle attack with 236 all- 
purpose yards. DeJidas pushed 
his career rushing total to 2,089 
yards with 109 yards on 15 car- 
ries. 

Defensively, the Golden Eagles 
allowed more than thirty points 
for the third time in as many 
games this season. Clarion will 
look to improve upon that as con- 
ference play begins. 

"We have to start playing better 
defense,"said Luke. "We're 
going to have to move some peo- 
ple around and get a look at some 
different personnel." 

"We're so young and inexperi- 
enced on the defensive side of the 
ball that when we get physically 
tired we get mentally tired, and 
mat's when mistakes happen. We 
have some guys coming back 
from injuries this week, so that 
will help." 

NOTES: Clarion's Brad Geer, 
who suffered a leg contusion in 
the fourth quarter, is probable 
for this Saturday's game at 
Lock Haven...The overtime ses- 
sion was the first in Clarion 
school history. 



PSAC teams eager to start conference play 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Clarion football fans puzzled 
at their team's 0-3 start should 
take note that the Eagles' early 
season woes is not an isloated 
case. 

The PSAC-West, which is 
regarded as one of the best 
Division II conference in the 
nation, has stumbled to a sub- 
par 8-15 record in non-confer- 
ence play. And for the first time 
in recent memory, the confer- 
ence has not had a team ranked 



'What might be happening is there isn't enough talent 

to go around for PSAC schools...teams can't stockpile 

talent like they once could" 

- Malen Luke, head football coach 



in the NCAA poll in three weeks. 
The dilemma starts with IUP, 
who has claimed at least a share 
of six conference crowns this 
decade. The Indians began the 
season with a #11 ranking, but 
fell from the Top 20 following a 
season-opening 30-29 loss to 



Fairmont State. After rebound- 
ing against Bloomsburg, IUP was 
pummeled by New Haven 43-14 
last week, leaving the Indians at 
1-2. 

Edinboro, who has been a play- 
off regular under Head Coach 
Tom Hollman, also stands at 1-2 



after three games. The 
Fighting Scots made a brief 
visit to the Top 20 after a 21-17 
win over Hillsdale. However, 
the Boro suffered a 33-10 loss 
to #1 Carson-Newman, fol- 
lowed by a 35-27 loss to 
Glenville State, a team that 
romped Clarion 51-0. 

The three teams that have 
formed the conference's lower 
echelon in recent years — Lock 
Haven, California and 
Shippensburg- 

continued on page 22 



Lock Haven 

at a glance 

A win over me Haven has been 
a lock for Clarion in recent 
years. The Golden Eagles have 
beaten the Bald Eagles each of 
the last five seasons, including 
last year's 57-3 homecoming 
romp. This year, the game will 
be played at Lock Haven's 
Hubert Jack Stadium on 
Saturday at 2 p.m. 

After losing to Division I*AA 
lliaio (730), Kutztown <li 
22), and PSAC-East favorite 
Bloomsburg (3-17), the Bald 
S&tgles got their first win of the 



season last week with a 34-19 
win. -at Mansfield. Freshman 
running back Sean Fisher ran for 
172 yards and 3 touchdowns, 
while the LHU defense limited 
the Mounties to 41 rushing 
yards 

So far this season, the Bald 
Eagles have relied on their 
defense, which returns 10 
starters from last year; to keep 
them in ball games. Led by a 
group of physical linebackers, 
"D M has allowed 22 points perl 
game. OLB Jon McFarland 
leads the team with 27 tackles, 
while OLB Brad Caldwell and 
TLB Jeremy Grills have 22 stops 
each. 

After Fishery standout perfor- 
mance test week, Ixxk Haven 
will most likely return to a 
ground-oriented attack against 
Clarion. Operating out of a 
Multiple*! offense, the Bald 
Eagles rank fourth in the PSAC 
with 176 rushing yards per con 
test Second-year starter Carlos 
Clecktey retarns at quarterback. 
Ciecktey has completed 51 of 
101 passes, but has been inter- 
cepted six times 
NOTES: Clark* leads tb* all- 
ttme aeries 34-1M. 



-_—___ 



p:.v;-S.:;-,:-::,::v:W^l ' 

PSAC West 

Standings 

PSAC Onrd 

Slippery Rock 0-0 3-1 

California 0-0 14 

liiiboro M 14 

W* to 14 

Shlppensburg 0-0 1-2 

Lock Haven 0-0 1-3 

Clarion 0-0 . .0-3 



Page 21 



The Clarion Call 



October 2 ,1997 



i 






1 



Eastern Conference Preview 

Pens begin life without Mario as NHL season begins 



by Robert Fuchs 
Sports Writer 



Pittsburgh Penguins 

The Penguins are going to have 
to do things without Mario 
Lemieux this year and that means 
Jaromir Jagr is now the premier 
player on the team. 

He will be accompanied by 
many familiar faces such as Ron 
Francis, Kevin Hatcher and 
Darius Kasparaitis as well as 
most of the cast from last year, 
with a few exceptions. 
Defensemen Jason Wooley and 
Francois Leroux have been trad- 
ed the Buffalo Sabres and 
Colorado Avalanche respectively, 
for furture draft picks in 1998. 

New faces on the teams include 
Jiri Slegr on defense and rookie 
Robert Dome. Dome was drafted 
this year and if he can crack the 
Penguins lineup and stay there, it 
would be a big boost to the team, 
especially if he can provide the 
offense they think he can on left 
wing. The Penguins are also 
happy that they were finally able 
to sign their number one draft 
pick in 1995, Alexei Morozov. 
He is regarded by many to be the 
best player outside the NHL. He 
should be able to provide some 
extra offense from his right wing 
position. But at 20 years old and 
living in the United States for the 
first time means that he is ripe to 
go through some growing pains, 
not to mention culture shock. 

The Penguins are definetly 
going through a rebuilding 
process right now, but they have 
enough vetern leadership on the 
team to make a legitimate run at 
the cup. 
New Jersy Devils 

The Devils come into this sea- 
son one of the top contenders for 
the Stanley Cup once again. The 
main reason being that they 
choke the opposition with great 
defense. Their core of defense- 
men is one of the best in the 
league and includes Scott 
Stevens and Scott Niedermayer. 
That is not the only reason their 
defense has been so good, 
because any team with a goalie 
like Martin Brodeur in the net is 
going to be a least all right in the 
defensive end. 

Their offense got an infusion of 
creativity last year when they 
picked up center Doug Gilmour, 
one of the best playmakers in the 
league. Their offense should not 
snuggle this year as it has in the 
past with Gilmour in the lineup. 
Bill Guerin and Brian Rolston are 
poised to have career years in 



points as they have been in the 
league a few years now. 

The Devils are looking toward 
Lord Stanley this year and may 
be the team to beat this year in the 
east. 
Buffalo Sabres 

The Sabres come into this year 
with one advantage over every- 
one else in the league, Dominik 
Hasek in the net. Hasek, often 
called the dominator, is consid- 
ered by many to be the best goalie 
in the league. 

With the goalie position sealed 
tight, their defense is not to bad 
either. Darryl Shannon and 
Alexei Zhitnik will head up the 
defense solidly. The offense is 
made up of a lot of young talent 
like Michael Peca, Donald 
Audette and Derek Plante. 
Hopefully, they will be able to 
provide enough offense for the 
Sabres to make a run at the cup. 
Philadelphia Flyers 

The Flyers once again will be a 
top contender for the Stanley Cup 
with a good supporting cast they 
have for Eric Lindros. 

On defense they don't lack 
speed with the likes of Paul 
Coffey, Janne Niinimaa, and Eric 
Desjardins. The goalie position 
on the other hand has been one of 
controversy in Philadelphia 
because both Ron Hextall and 
Garth Snow have not performed 
as well as can be expected on the 
playoffs. 

On offense they certainly won't 
lack size with Eric Lindros, John 
Leclair, and newly acquired Chris 
Gratton. I don't think scoring 
will be a big problem for the 
Flyers. 
Florida Panthers 

The Panthers will be relying 
mostly on how far goalie John 
Vanbiesbrouk can take them this 
year. They do have a very good 
defensive core that features play- 
ers such as Ed Jovanovski and 
Gord Murphy. However, they 
run into problems when it comes 
to offensive production. With 
relatively no new acquisitions on 
offense and no scorers from last 
season having over thirty goals, 
it should prove to be a problem 
again this year. 

The Panthers will make the 
playoffs, but they will need more 
offense to go anywhere. 
New York Rangers 

Expect the Rangers to take a 
downturn this year after losing 
Mark Messier to the Vancouver 
Canucks. The main reason is a 
core of aging veterans that won't 
be able to keep up the same inten- 



sity all season long. 

They should be solid at goal 
with Mike Richter. On defense 
they will have some problems 
because the core is up in years, 
Ulf Samuelsson and Jeff 
Beaukeboom being two primary 
examples. 

The Rangers offense will not be 
bad but if their looking for 
Gretzky to lead them, they are 
about five years late. 

If they make the playoffs they 
can go one, maybe two rounds 
with the experience they have, 
abut no more than that. 
Ottawa Senators 

The Senators will be looking 
Alexandre Daigle to live up to his 
expectations this year and lead 
them deeper into the playoffs. 

With goalie Damian Rhodes 
coming off a good year and their 
young core of defenseman poised 
to make their mark in the NHL, 
they should be able to provide 
problems for other teams. 

Alexander Daigle and Daniel 
Alfredson should provide the 
offense for their playoff run. 
Montreal Canadiens 

The Canadiens are a team that 
definitely does not lack team 
speed with Saku Koivu and Mark 
Recchi in the lineup. 

They will score a lot of goals 
this year but defense will be lack- 
ing somewhat They allowed 
close to thirty more goals against 
last year than they scored. If they 
play better defense than they did 
last year they make the playoffs. 
Washington Capitals 

The Caps will look mostly 
toward Peter Bondra for their 
scoring and will rely on Olaf 
Koizig in the net to take them 
where they want to go, the play- 
offs. 

After missing last years play- 
offs, they will be looking to 
Adam Oates to lead the young 
team to their goal. 
Carolina Hurricanes 

The newest kid on the block is 
reallyjustanoldonein disguise. 
Formerly, the Hartford Whalers, 
they will once again look to 
Keith Primeau to provide leader- 
ship. 

The speedster Geoff Sanderson 
will lead the team in offensive 
production once again and their 
defense should hold firm for the 
goalie Sean Burke. 

Look for them to make a good 
run at getting into the playoffs. 
Tampa Bay Lightning 

The Lightning are one of the 
hardest working teams in the 
NHL and will remain that way 



this year. 

Dino Ciccarelli and Michael 
Renburg will provide most of the 
offense for the team while 
Roman Hamarlik will keep the 
defense solid. Goalie Daren 
Puppa will do his usual superb 
job of keeping the puck out of the 
net as they contend for a lower 
playoff spot. 
New York Islanders 

The Islanders hope Ziggy 
Palffy will continue his good 
play on offense as their young 
defensemen Bryan McMabe and 
Bryan Berard mature into two of 
the best defensemen in the 
league. 

They definitely will be one of 
the most fun young teams to 
watch blossom this year. 



Boston Bruins 

The Boston Bruins have been 
blessed this year with two of the 
premier offensive prospects form 
the draft. 

Joe Thorton and Sergei 
Samsonov if they prove to be as 
effective as they can be will make 
the Boston Bruins a much better 
team this year. But they will 
need time to adjust fully to the 
league before the team will make 
a run at the cup. 

The Bruins will contend well 
this year, but do not look serious- 
ly at them making a cup run until 
two or three years down the road. 

Look for the NHL 

Western Conference 

preview next week 



IH THE BLEACHERS 



By Steve Moore 









l Ui 1 i'/ 1 1 ' ' ' ' ' 



© 1996 Universal Press Syndicate 



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This is artificial turf." 




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October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 22 



Conference play begins this week 



from page 20 



haven't seemed to make drastic 
improvements over previous 
years. The squads have an aggre- 
gate record of 3-7. 

Perhaps the only PSAC-West 
team happy at this point is 
Slippery Rock. Throw out their 
loss to Division 1-AA 
Youngstown State, and the 
Rockets are a sparkling 3-0. The 
Rock seems to have compensated 
for the graduation of record-set- 
ting quarterback Chad Vogt with 
a balanced attack on offense 
andefense. Among SRU's wins 
is an impressive 42- 14 count over 
Fairmont State. 

While this may simply be a 
down year for the conference, 
Clarion Head Coach Malen Luke 
suggests that the humble records 
could be the result of raised out- 
of-state tuition. Scholarship 
money doesn't cover as much of 
the tuition for out-of-state players 
as it once did, thus limiting 
recruiting grounds for PSAC 
teams to the borders of 
Pennsylvania. 

"What might be happening is 
there isn't enough talent to go 
around for PSAC schools," said 
Luke. 'Teams can't stockpile tal- 



ent like they once could." 

Although non-conference 
records have no bearing on the 
PSAC standings, they will have 
an impact when playoff invita- 
tions go out at the end of the reg- 
ular season. The PS AC- West has 
frequently sent as many as two 
teams to the playoffs in the same 
year, but with losing records 
against non-conference opposi- 
tion, that probably won't happen 
this season. 



For the latest 

in Clarion 

Sports 

Intormation, 
call the 

Golden Eagle 

Hotline: 

226-2079 



Cross Country Teams Increase Competition 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



The mens and womens cross 
country teams split this past 
weekend and faced some tough 
competition. Half the team 
raced at Penn State against 
Division I schools. Hiram, OH 
hosted a meet that had teams 
comparable to the second 
squads. 

At Penn State the women fin- 
ished 6th out of nine teams. 
The women showed again that 
the team has strength in its 
numbers. Debbie Brostmeyer 
(39), Brigette Laflin (41), 
Maureen Long (42), Kelly Null 
(44), Daria Diaz (50), and 
Rocky Wilson (53) all covered 
the 3.1 mile course within 20 
seconds of each other. Kristie 



Runk (69) and Lea Anne Lauer 
(72) worked together to help the 
team effort in the race with 90 
competitiors. 

The men continued to improve 
against some top quality compe- 
tition. Clarion was ted to a 13th 
place finish at the 13 team invita- 
tional by Dave Ell wood (81) and 
Brad Alderton (90). Jon Fox 
(118), Tom Brady (123), Jimmy 
Adams (138), and Mark Trzyna 
(139) pushed through some per- 
sonal struggles to finish strong. 

At Hiram the women placed 4th 
of six teams. Cherie Zurko (6), 
Laurie Young (18), Missy Bauer 
(22), Devon Barr (34), and 
Melissa Getz (37) scored for 
Clarion. Fifty seven girls ran and 
Megan Pavuk (38), Danielle 
Graver (39), and Bobbi Ryan 
(54) also pulled in improved 



results. 

The men were 2nd in the five 
team- 36 member race. Craig 
Carlson (9) and John "Gus" 
Copley (10) paced the pack of 
male runners. Gregg Wade (13), 
Eric Lowry (14), and Jim 
Passarelli (19) worked together 
to add strong performances. 
Shane Cummings (29) and Brad 
Undercufler (30) also figured in 
with the scoring. 

The Hot Legs award went to 
Brigette Laflin and Dave 
Ellwood (at PSU) and to Cherie 
Zurko and Gus Copley (Hiram). 
The Keep on Running Award was 
given to Daria Diaz, Rocky 
Wilson, and Tom Brady (PSU) 
and Devon Barr and Eric Lowry 
(Hiram). Clarion will host an 
Alumni run on October 11th and 
will travel to Geneva on the 18th. 



Golf team takes sixth at Slippery Rock Invitational 



by Vickie Geer 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion golf team 
placed sixth with a combined 
score of 315 at the Slippery 
Rock Invitational golf tourna- 
ment last Tuesday at the par 70 
Armco Golf Club. 

Individual scores for the 



Golden Eagles included a 75 
from both S.Will and B.Will. M. 
Honack shot an 81 for the tourna- 
ment, with C. Taylor turning in 
an 84. M. Robb finished the day 
with a 90. 

Allegheny College placed first 
in the event with a combined 
score of 295. Tournament host 
Slippery Rock took second with a 



299 . IUP finished third with a 
301. 

Both S. Will's and B. Will's 
score of 75 was good enough for 
a tie for 5th place individually. 
Allegheny's N. Smith won the 
overall event with 65 on the day. 
Clarion will play in the 
Allegheny Invitational on 
October 7th. 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



It's about mid-way through the Flag Football season and the com 
petion is fierce as Sig Tau Gamma- Blue and Beer League All-Stars 
remain undefeated after game four of the regular season. With 21 
teams still fighting for position, the intensity is high and it's going to 
be a battle to remain in the top ten. You can catch Flag Football 
action Monday - Thursday beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the stadium 
recreation fields. 

Beach Volleyball is about to begin the final round of regular season 
with Crushers 2 holding on to the #1 spot in the Woman's division. 
The Twinkie Team remains undefeated in the Co-Rec division, and 
the Smith team is on top in the Men's division. Look for the playoffs 
to begin sometime the week of October 13 - 16. 

Intramural tennis is also progressing with a very competitive Men's 
division. Cliff Clorety is undefeated, but Nani Lombard, Naqeeb 
Hussain and Farhard Hussain are looking strong with only 1 loss 
each. In Men's doubles, Scott Courtney and Cliff Clorety are hoping 
to enter the tournament as the #1 seed. 

The Indoor Soccer league is off to a great start with SCRUBS on 
top with a record of 4-0. GAmes began last week, but we're still 
looking for new teams. The Women's and Co-Rec divisions only 
have one team each, so grab a few friends and submit your roster 
todayl Indoor soccer is a five-on-five competion with a 9 person ros- 
ter limit. 



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October 2, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



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PERSONALS 



Sigma Pi, 

Thanks for the great time. 

We had a blast! 

Love, the Dance Team 



Congratulations to the new 

Kappa Delta Rho associate 

members: Frank, Charlie, 

Travis, Justin B., and Dave. 

Best of luck to all of you, and 

have lots of fun! 
Love, your sweetheart Daria 



Happy 21st Birthday to Eric 

Kemp. Hope you have lots of 

fun! Love, your Sweetheart 

Daria 



Congratulations to Mike and 
Kelly on getting lavaliered. (I'm 
sorry this is late) I wish you 
both all the love in the world! 
Love, your sweetheart Daria 

Jov well done to Kidd on his 
awesome job with KAP rush! 

Keep up the great work! 

Love, your sweetheart of 
"Flowers and Bows" 

Congratulations to Jason, Corey, 

Kurt, Codey, Rob, Jesse, Darren, 

B J. and Korn for excepting their 

bids to rush. 

<DIK Brothers 

Keep out the cold! 

TRY New He-Hose for men! 

Call 555-7855 



Happy 21st Birthday Becca. 

Can't wait to party with you! 

Love, Zetas 

Cross your fingers for this week- 
end, girls! We're on our way! 
ZLAMM 

6<X>A Sisters would like to wish 
everyone a safe and fun ALF. 



6X, Thanks for a great mixer. 

Who knew Hooters could be so 

much fun!? 

Love, the Sister of 64>A 

Happy Birthday to Mary Beth 

and Liz. As if ALF wasn't 

enough reason to PARTY. 

We love you! 

Your, OOA Sisters 

Congrats to Veronica Beck for 
being Sister of the Month. 
Love, your 60A Sisiters 



Get ready DJ, We're going to get 

you at midnight. We all will be 

responsible for you! 

Your 0<I>A Sisters 



Happy 21st Birthday to Heather 

Kelly! Hope you're ready 

because we sure are! 

Love, your DZ Sisters! 



The Sisiters of Delta Zeta would 

like to Congratulate Jen Jones 

on a great rush week!! You are 

doing wonderful!! 

You're the Best! 



To the Brothers of KAP, 

Your make us laugh, you make 

us cry, we'll always be your 

"American Pie." Thanks for the 

great time last Thursday night. 

Let's do it again, do you think 

we might? 
Love, the Sisters of Delta Zeta! 



COURT, Happy 23rd Birthday! 

We love you very much and 

hope you have a great day! 

Love, your "GRAY" house 

roomies, Missy, Sue, Kim, Moe 

and Slis (Zeus and Lindy too!) 

ITT, Great mixer!! "You can 

dance!" When can we do it 

again? Love, AIT 

Mindy, Moss, and Whitie- Great 

job with rush! 

Love, your AIT Sisters 



Tara, Congratulations on your 

lavaliere! 

Love, your Zeta Sisiters 



Sarah, congratulations on getting 

lavaliered! 

Love, your AIT Sisters 

KAP, We'll rock ALF with our 

float it'll be the best!! Can't 

wait until the mixer! 

Love, ATT 

Congratulations to our Fall '97 

Pearl Class: Lorraine, Cheri, 

Michelle, Kim, and Windy. 

Love, your AIA Sisters 



To AXP, Homecoming 1997 is 

going to be a blast! We love 

you guys! 

Love, the AIA Sisters 



Let's go 8X, we need to build 
this float! 
Love, III 



Thanks for the great mixer IX! 
Love, the Sisters of III 



Congrats to Jenn and Ace. Way 
to win the case race. Love, III 



OH, thanks for giving us a 

clue! 

Love, OA0 

To our Sweetheart Daria, 

What's going on Daria? Hope 

you have a great week. 

Love, the Brothers of KAP 



Happy 21st Birthday Becca! 

It's about time! 
Love, Christine and Maureen 



Congrats to Tutor, Nut, Dana, 

and Kevin on Homecoming 

Court. You boys are the bomb. 

Congrats to the 8 new associate 

memebersofin. Good luck. 

Your Sweetheart Mindy 



OH- The float is coming along 

great! Happy to be doing it with 

you girls. It will be the best! 

IX 

III- We had a great night! 

Let's do it again! 

IX 



IX + ZTA 

Mack Dad Big Cheese and Larry 

Congrats on the lavalier! 

I STILL LOVE YOV GUYS! 

Sofia (the leo) 

Come celebrate ALF at Grand 
Ave. Where the leaves are 

falling and so are we! 
Jen, Jess, Mandy & Stella 






Congratulations Jen Ashbaugh, 

the new sweetheart of IX! 
You're the best, we love you! 



Congratulations to the new 

pledges of IX: 

Justin, Adam, Luke and Zach. 



To the Sisters of AZ, 

Thanks for a great time at the 

mixer. You guys rock! Hope to 

do it again soon. 

Love, the Brothers of KAP 



Congratulations to our associate 
members: Ariane Beck, Kristy 

Best, Lisa Lamorella, Tina 
Miller, Megan Parks, Jen Reid, 
Kristy McKay, Emily Mackey 

and Mindy Maraskanish. 
Love, your future AOE Sisters 



Congratulations Jen Ashbaugh! 

You'll make a wonderful IX 

Sweetheart! 

Love, your AOE Sisters 



To the brothers of IX: 

I am very honored to be your 

1997-'98 Sigma Chi Sweetheart. 

I love you guys! Let's make this 

year the best one yet! 

Love, Jennifer 



ITT, Our float's gonna be great! 
Can't wait for ALF! Love, AOE 



Happy Birthday Amy Vansickle, 

Now you're twenty-two! 

So have a blast, 'cause we love 

you! Love, your AOE Sisters 



Cara D.- You are the best big I 

could ever ask for-Thank you for 

everything! Love, your Little 



Happy 21st Birthday Heidi 

Branchen! Have a great one! 

Love, Kristen and Danielle 



Amy V- You are a wonderful 

roomie, and a great friend. 

Hope your year is filled with all 

the happiness you deserve! 

Happy 22nd! Love, Kristen 

Julie Wilkins- Happy 22nd 

Birthday! Hope your day isn't 

as intoxicating as last years! 

Love, Your Big, Founds 



To the Brothers of Sigma Tau: 
You guys are the best! Even 
though I'm just a little sister, I 
love being part of the family! 
IT Rules! ! Love, Jen Founds 

Lisa Lamorella 

Can't wait for you to know who 

I am!! Love, Your Big 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 2, 1997 



Sportsview 



Umpires look to take the spotlight 



by Chris PfeU 
Assistant Sports Editor 

For baseball fans, it's the most 
wonderful time of the year. 
Fall has arrived, and the play- 
offs are in full swing. 

However, stars like Ken 
Griffey, Jr., Greg Maddux, and 
Barry Bonds may not be the 
difference in deciding who 
wins the 1997 World Series. 

Instead, the umpires may be 
the ones to watch this October. 
Umpires, who claim their pro- 
fession is being demeaned, 
have vowed to adapt a "no tol- 
erence" stand for the playoffs. 

I'm not one who thinks that 
spitting on umpires, physical 
abuse, or throwing things are 
part of baseball. But, the 
umpires' threat of "no toler- 
ence" is absolutely ridiculous. 



Richie Phillips, union chief for 
the umps, has stated that such 
things as spitting or spraying 
tobacco and arguing will be 
grounds for ejection. 

Eight teams have survived a 
two month spring training and a 
rigorous 162-game schedule. 
They are playing to fulfill the 
dream of evey little boy in 
America. Tempers are going to 
flare and disputres are going to 
arise. That is part of the game. 

The umpires need to realize that 
the post season is not the time to 
start throwing people out for 
every little dispute. They also 
need to realize that arguements 
come with the territory. 

Instead, they are trying to steal 
the show. I've said it to many 
umpires before, and I'll say it 
again: NO ONE COMES TO 
WATCH YOU! 



I can't ever remember sitting 
down to watch a game to watch 
the umpires. Now, I guess I 
don't have a choice. I guess 
I'll have to watch my favorite 
players get tossed and pray 
their backups can lead the way 
to a world championship. 

Baseball is finally back on its 
feet after the 1994 strike. Just 
when I thought the national 
past time is about to start thriv- 
ing again, umpires are threat- 
ening to ruin it all. 

I wait all year for October. 
What can be better than ALF 
and the World Series in the 
same month? The cops can't 
ruin ALF, and I just hope the 
umps don't ruin the World 
Series. 

If the umps don't change the 
outcome, I'll take the Yanks 
over the Braves in seven. 



Tennis team whips Geneva- 
falls to IUP 5-4 



by BUI Bates 
Sports Editor 



After blowing away Geneva 8- 
1 last Wednesday, the Golden 
Eagle tennis team was on a roll. 
However, Clarion, winners three 
straight since their sluggish open- 
ing day performance in the 
Shippensburg Tournament, did 
not have enough Friday to beat 
the IUP Indains on the road. 

Despite the 5-4 loss, Clarion 
senior tri-captain Maureen 
"Mimi" Williams jumped 7-0 this 
season in singles competition. 
Mimi dropped IUP's Leigh Ann 
Datts 6-3, 6-2. 



Senior tri-captain Amy O'Neal 
was equally impressive, beating 
Rachel Russotto 6-2, 3-6, 6-4. 

Williams is aslo making an 
impact on the doubles ciruit as 
well. Mimi and partner Rachael 
Link improved to 7-1 after their 
8-5 defeat over the Indian's 
Angie Carbaugh and Russotto. 
O'Neal and her doubles partner 
Cassie Baker also scored an 8-5 
win over Becky Speigal and Amy 
Peritin. 

"We made some mistakes as a 
team that cost us," noted O'Neal. 
"We seemed to be playing a little 
tentative against IUP. It looked 
like we were playing not to lose 



instead of playing to win." 

Clarion (4-3) has a big weekend 

coming up, travelling to 

California on Friday, and 

Youngstown State on Saturday. 

The team returns home 

Wednesday to host Slippery 
Rock. 

"We are looking foreward to 
turning things back around this 
weekend," O'Neal said. "We 
feel pretty confident that we will 
be playing at our best when 
States come around." 
NOTES: The Slippery Rock 
match was originally scheduled 
for October 17th, but was post- 
poned. 



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Pittsburgh's sports future 
lies in hands of voters 



by Chris PfeU 
Assistant Sports Editor 

On November 4, voters in the 
11 counties that surround 
Pittsburgh will have a big say 
about the future of the Pirates and 
Steelers. 

The Regional Renaissance 
Initiative will be on the ballots. It 
will be up to the voters to decide 
if they are willing to increase the 
sales tax by half a percentage 
point over the next seven years to 
finance new stadiums for the 
Pirates and Steelers. 

If voters pass the initiative, the 
Pirates and Steelers will commit 
to staying in town for at least 25 
years. 

Kevin McClatchy has pledged 
$35 million (19%) of the estimat- 
ed $185 million price tag for a 



new baseball stadium to be locat- 
ed near the Sixth Street Bridge. 

Last week, Steeler president 
Dan Rooney pledged $50 million 
(27%) towards a new stadium for 
football only, estimated at $185 
million. The proposed name is 
Arthur J. Rooney stadium. 

Included with the stadiums in 
the initiative are a variety of 
development projects, road 
improvements, expansion of 
industrial parks, and an addition 
to the David L. Lawrence 
Convention Center. 

The Pirate and Steeler owner- 
ship groups have made the com- 
mittment to keep their franchises 
in Pittsburgh. Now, it is up to the 
voters to decide if they are will- 
ing to make the committment to 
keep their beloved Buccos and 
Steelers. 



Sports Trivia 

Who is the NHL all-time goals per same 

leader? 

Last Week's Answers: 

Yogi Berra Played in 75 World Series games. 

Gene Lamonf was a backup catcher for the Detriot 
Tigers in 1970-1975. 



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Football is off to a 
slow 0-4 start, but 
this week the 
Golden Eagles 
hope to recover 
with a homecom- 
ing victory. For the 
story see page 20. 



dontents 



Opinion 

Reader Responses. 
News 



Lifestyles 

Photo Essay.... 

Call-on-you 

Entertainment. 

Sports 

Classifieds 



...2 
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16 
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Volume 79, 3fa*ue 5 



Weatljer 



Thursday- Chance 

of scattered showers. 

High in the mid 60s. 

Friday- Cloudy 

skies. Increased 

chance of rain. High 

in the 60s. 

Saturday- Rain. 

High between 60-65. 



The Autumn Leaf Festival 




jiiij 



Welcome alumni antr frtente! 



Page 2 



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OPINION, 



Clarion 
Call 

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Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

On-line Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




1 9tide 'Part | 


If -^r**^IB 

II J* . 1 


*&«/ in the life of 

the returning 

adult student at 

Clarion. * 




■ ;/(///c/ Tazsint 1 



"The Snooze Blues" 

It's 6:15 a.m., the alarm goes 
off, no sooner do I hit the snooze 
button then I hear the voice of my 
17-year-old daughter moaning, 
"My stomach hurts really bad. I 
can't go to school." After doing 
the 'mom assessment of illness' I 
realize she will require a day out 
of school and a trip to the family 
M.D. 

Great. I have to be in class in 
Clarion by 9:30 a.m., a forty 
minute trip from my home. I 
won't be done there until 3: 15. I 
' call the school to tell ihent she is 
sick: a busy signal. Call the 
Mi)., and get, what else: a busy 
signal. In between I gulp down a 
cup of coffee and whatever is lay- 
ing in the kitchen that can be con- 



sumed while I am on the way to 
the shower. Halfway down the 
hall I again hear the plaintive cry 
of my daughter, "Can you bring 
me something to drink?" After 
putting everything down, I head 
for the kitchen to get the drink. 
As long as I am there, I call the 
school again, this time - success. 
I leave the message and call the 
Mix's office, again the busy sig- 
nal. 

Turning to go down the hall I 
take the drink to my daughter. As 
I decide it is safe to head for the 
shower again the phone rings. 
Oh joy, it's the credit card com- 
pany Wanting to know when I am 
going to send last month's pay- 

Continued on page 4 



9s[pt your ordinary image 

at 





Images of the West 



STERLING SILVER JEWELRY 

GENUNINE STONES 

THUMB RINGS 

INCENSE, BEADS, HEMP 



«»5 



625 Main Street 

Clarion Pa. 16214 

814-226-5513 



JAM PACKED WITH W1W §1 



1£ 









n%ji 




'Editorial 




"Without any new eco- 
nomic development, the 

loss of young people 
along with the the possi- 
ble increase in unem- 
ployment and crime will 
lead to the downfall of 
a once proud region. " 





(Bates, Sports *Editor 



Whether we can admit to it or 
not, Western Pennsylvania resi- 
dents are stubborn. It is obvious 
to me that we have become com- 
placent with our surroundings, 
our economy, and even our 
regional job market. However, 
over the last couple of years, 
Western/ South we stern 
Pennsylvania has not been keep- 
ing up with the national and 
world economies at all. The truth 
of the matter is that the region 
ranks dead last among competi- 
tors in attracting new and 
expanded business. 

Let me tell you how encourag- 
ing this is to myself, and the 
thousands of other students who 
live in the Pittsburgh area and 
will be entering the job market 
shortly. For an area which once 
prided itself on its 'blue col- 
lar"' attitude and ways of life, we 
should be ashamed at our current 
efforts to keep our region grow- 
ing and prosperous for genera- 
tions to come. 

Since the decline of the steel 
industry, the improvement of the 
economy in Southwestern 
Pennsylvania has relied on the 



high tech companies and other 
new businesses that have migrat- 
ed here. What is now being over- 
looked is that our competitors are 
now taking the proper steps in 
attracting new businesses while 
our region simply can not keep 
up. Unless we take immediate 
steps to revitalize our region, we 
will continue to slide and may 
never bounce back. Without any 
new economic development, the 
loss of young people along with 
the possible increase in unem- 
ployment and crime will lead to 
the downfall of a once proud 
region. 

The first step in kick-starting 
the economy in the 
Western/Southwestern 
Pennsylvania region begins with 
the Regional Renaissance 
Initiative that will approve the 
proposed revitalization. 

This revitalization plan is struc- 
tured to boost the quality of liv- 
ing in Allegheny, Armstrong, 
Beaver, Butler, Clarion, Fayette, 
Greene, Indiana, Lawrence, 
Washington, and Westmoreland 

Continued on page 4 



Think youy're pregnant? 
Worried? 





PREGNANCY CENTER 

214 S. 7th Avenue 

Clarion 226-7007 

"Confidential Care" 

Free preganancy tests 



Odftft M997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSES\ 



"He wrote that coverage was one-sided, and I wish to respond to that." 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to 
Scott Kuehn's response to the 
article about Becker lab that was 
published in the September 18 
issue. He wrote that coverage 
was one-sided, and I wish to 
respond to that 

I am the reporter who wrote 
that article. I took plenty of time 
exploring my resources. I spent 
a lengthy time with Dr. Madison, 
Chair of the CIS department and 
operator of Becker lab. 

Secondly, I also spoke with lab 
assistants who work there. After 
several declined to comment, 
Erica Logero gave me a com- 
ment on her perspective about 
the regulation of the lab. 

Finally, I went through the lab 
talking with students and faculty 



and received a comment from 
Ms. Marini. It is not my fault that 
the comments they made gave a 
negative view of Becker lab. 

The purpose of writing the arti- 
cle was to explore the negative 
opinions we have been hearing 
from the students and staff. At 
first, I, myself, thought that there 
were serious problems with the 
lab. 

But after discussing the issue 
with Dr. Madison for an hour and 
a half on Friday afternoon, I dis- 
covered where the problems real- 
ly lie, and that the problems in 
the lab were a matter of minimal 
adjustments. 

The purpose of the article was 
not to bash the lab, staff, or assis- 
tants. If anything, it down- 
played the concerns that the stu- 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



dents have been expressing. The 
article showed the positive 
aspects of protecting female 
workers, operating 87 hours a 
week, and tightening security 
measures. So, Dr. Kuehn, if you 
go back and reread the article, I 
believe that you will see that 
The negativity came from the 
remarks that were made by the 
people who should know. 
I understand that many people 



"... The Clarion CalL in my opinion, has implied 
I am the reason for these discrepancies." 



Dear Editor, 

After reading the article per- 
taining to the Clarion Students' 
Association in the October 2, 
1997 issue of The Clarion CalL I 
felt compelled to clarify an issue 
that has caused me great concern. 
Because I was not interviewed 
for, nor made aware of, the issues 
raised in the audit I find it to be 
totally inappropriate for my pic- 
ture to accompany this article. 



By doing so The Clarion Call, in 
my opinion, has implied I am the 
reason for these discrepancies. 
Since I have always tried to 
maintain a high level of integrity 
'in my position, the thought of 
anyone else interpreting this arti- 
cte in the same light has caused 
rie great embarrassment I only 
hope those who know me and 
my work ethic will absorb this 
photo for what it is - totally out 



of context 

Perhaps, The Clarion, Call 

might consider obtaining permis- 
sion from those involved in an 
article to photograph them to cor- 
roborate facts, rather than using 
the uninvolved without permis- 
sion to misconstrue them. 

Sincerely, 

Shelly Wilson 

Clarion Students Association 



"I do not believe that the article in 
question was in need of a photograph." 



Dear Editor, 

Once again The Clarion Call 
has amazed me for their lack of 
professionalism, journalistic 
competency and basic good judg- 
ment The Clarion Call recent- 
ly ran a picture of Shelly Wilson 



as being representative of the 
"Audit shows discrepancies" 
article published recently. 

The Editor, who chose to run 
this article with the accompany- 
ing picture, displayed an obvious 
lack of judgment when using Ms. 



is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor- 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief). Opinions expressed in editorials are those of die identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, fet- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the week of publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



go to the lab and expect to have 
an easy time, but that is because 
not everyone is a computer 
major nor is everyone capable of 
understanding computers. 

So, when the computers don't 
boot right or they shut down in 
the middle, I can see why stu- 
dents are easily frustrated. 

Lastly, I want to say that 
Becker has come a long way 



since I was a freshman; however, 
there is always room for 
improvement. I think if we look 
at it positively and strive to help 
the students, then everyone will 
have a more comfortable experi- 
ence there. 

Sincerely, 
Leslie Suhr 
News Writer 




Wilson's image, because anyone 
who knows Shelly Wilson knows 
that her standards, integrity, and 
work ethic are beyond reproach. V 

Furthermore, when it comes to 
assisting students, whether it be 
with Student Association matters 
or otherwise, Ms. Wilson takes it 
upon herself to make sure that 
their needs and the needs of their 
organizations are met to the 
fullest capacity. 

I would simply ask the Editor of 
The Clarion Call to use better 
judgment in reviewing the paper 
for content before it goes to 
press. I do not believe that the 
article in question was in need of 
a photograph. 

Sincerely, 

KaraRaehsler 
Class of 1994 



+ **S **»-***'*** 



tvj p »VAVAftr^v^*vy'/^^»v/^vvwvi,^ 



Ik following tooiplau 
ktmgWtiui 

October 11, 1984 



An article titled, "DeNardo to ride in ALF parade" topped 
page 3 and pictured a younger Joe DeNardo who was a 10 
year veteran of KDKA and had just moved to WTAE, where 
he's been ever since. The person responsible for DeNardo's 
appearance in the 33rd Annual ALF parade was the Clarion 
University President Tom Bond. 

Another article entitled "Police' set-up search for assailant" 
discussed and pictured a sketch of a man believed to be 
involved in a series of indecent exposures and one indecent 
assault These incidents occurred in the laundry room and 
women's shower room of Forest Manor, and a women's show- 
er room of Campbell Hall. 

October 9, 1986 

The article titled "NBC fall TV season line-up full of sur- 
prises" gave students the quality shows from "way back 
when" that are now some of our favorite reruns such as...The 
Cosby Show, Family Ties, Cheers, Night Court and Hill Street 
Blues. The new line-up for fall 1986 included, "LA Law", 
"Our House", "Crime Story", and of all shows to debut at this 
time of year, "ALF"! (Alien Life Form, not Autumn Leaf . ; , : 

October 10, 1991 

Topping the Features section was the article, "C & C Music 
Factory is 'gonna make you sweat'", who travelled to Clarion 
University on Sunday, October 13, with the opening band, 
Rhythm Syndicate. 

A ncwa article entitled "Successful recycling program on 
campus may change hands in future" story reads, "A lack of 
manpower in collecting materials from the recycling bins on 
Clarion University's campus is creating a problem for an other- 
wise successful program." The story continues, "The program 
was originally geared towards student participation but has 
resulted in paid workers collecting the material. One solution 
that would increase the manpower for collecting materials is 
the transfer of the program into the hands of the student sen- 
ate." 

All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



V»V»V»Y»V!>r»'.TiV»V}TiV.'iV 




Page 2 



>*>nH 



The Clapton ChHrf T 



•J, < •* 









OPINION. 






f " .r • •' ■" 



C 










Clarion 
Call 

270 Gemnull Complex 
Clarion, $21 10214 

(814)226-2380 

ifflX (814)226-2557 

e-mail: calI@matl.clarfon.eDu 

tototo. cl ar f on. ebu/t becall/col. htm 

executive $oarfe 



Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

On-line Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



I 



m 




tfide "Part 




<<c Ihis is just one 
day in the lift of 

the returning 
adult student at 



Clarion. " 



Janet Tazsint 



"The Snooze Blues" 

It's 6:15 a.m., the alarm goes 
off, no sooner do I hit the snooze 
button then I hear the voice of my 
17-year-old daughter moaning, 
"My stomach hurts really bad. I 
can't go to school." After doing 
the 'mom assessment of illness' I 
realize she will require a day out 
of school and a trip to the family 
M.D. 

Great. I have to be in class in 
Clarion by 9:30 a.m., a forty 
minute trip from my home. I 
won't be done there until 3:15. I 
call the school to tell them she is 
sick: a busy signal. Call the 
M.D., and get, what else: a busy 
signal. In between I gulp down a 
cup of coffee and whatever is lay- 
ing in the kitchen that can be con- 



sumed while I am on the way to 
the shower. Halfway down the 
hall I again hear the plaintive cry 
of my daughter, "Can you bring 
me something to drink?" After 
putting everything down, I head 
for the kitchen to get the drink. 
As long as I am there, I call the 
school again, this time - success. 
I leave the message and call the 
M.D.'s office, again the busy sig- 
nal. 

Turning to go down the hall I 
take the drink to my daughter. As 
I decide it is safe to head for the 
shower again the phone rings. 
Oh joy, it's the credit card com- 
pany wanting to know when I am 
going to send last month's pay- 

Continued on page 4 




Images 'of the West 



STERLING SILVER JEWELRY 

GENUNINE STONES 

THUMB RINGS 

INCENSE, BEADS, HEMP 



625 Main Street 

Clarion Pa. 16214 

814-226-5513 

JAM PACKED WITH MiW STO« 

nHiihniiniii*H»miiHiMwiMnni n mi 



'Editorial 




"Without any new eco- 
nomic development, the 

loss of young people 
along with the thi possi- 
ble increase in unem- 
ployment and crime wilt 
lead to the downfall of 
a once proud region. " 



Will (Bates, Sports "Editor 




Whether we can admit to it or 
not, Western Pennsylvania resi- 
dents are stubborn. It is obvious 
to me that we have become com- 
placent with our surroundings, 
our economy, and even our 
regional job market. However, 
over the last couple of years, 
Western/Southwestern 
Pennsylvania has not been keep- 
ing up with the national and 
world economies at all. The truth 
of the matter is that the region 
ranks dead last among competi- 
tors in attracting new and 
expanded business. 

Let me tell you how encourag- 
ing this is to myself, and the 
thousands of other students who 
live in the Pittsburgh area and 
will be entering the job market 
shortly. For an area which once 
prided itself on its 'blue col- 
lar'" attitude and ways of life, we 
should be ashamed at our current 
efforts to keep our region grow- 
ing and prosperous for genera- 
tions to come. 

Since the decline of the steel 
industry, the improvement of the 
economy in Southwestern 
Pennsylvania has relied on the 



high tech companies and other 
new businesses that have migrat- 
ed here. What is now being over- 
looked is that our competitors are 
now taking the proper steps in 
attracting new businesses while 
our region simply can not keep 
up. Unless we take immediate 
steps to revitalize our region, we 
will continue to slide and may 
never bounce back. Without any 
new economic development, the 
loss of young people along with 
the possible increase in unem- 
ployment and crime will lead to 
the downfall of a once proud 
region. 

The fust step in kick-starting 
the economy in the 
Western/Southwestern 
Pennsylvania region begins with 
the Regional Renaissance 
Initiative that will approve the 
proposed revitalization. 

This revitalization plan is struc- 
tured to boost the quality of liv- 
ing in Allegheny, Armstrong, 
Beaver, Butler, Clarion, Fayette, 
Greene, Indiana, Lawrence, 
Washington, and Westmoreland 

Continued on page 4 



Think your're pregnant/ 

Worried? 

am 

PREGNANCY CENTER 

214 S. 7th Avenue 

Clarion 226-7007 

"Confidential Care" 

Free preganancy tests 




October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



i 



READER RESPONSES\ 



"He wrote that coverage was one-sided, and I wish to respond to that." 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to 
Scott Kuehn's response to the 
article about Becker lab that was 
published in the September 18 
issue. He wrote that coverage 
was one-sided, and I wish to 
respond to that 

I am the reporter who wrote 
that article. I took plenty of time 
exploring my resources. I spent 
a lengthy time with Dr. Madison, 
Chair of the CIS department and 
operator of Becker lab. 

Secondly, I also spoke with lab 
assistants who work there. After 
several declined to comment, 
Erica Logero gave me a com- 
ment on her perspective about 
the regulation of the lab. 

Finally, I went through the lab 
talking with students and faculty 



and received a comment from 
Ms.Marini. It is not my fault that 
the comments they made gave a 
negative view of Becker lab. 

The purpose of writing the arti- 
cle was to explore the negative 
opinions we have been hearing 
from the students and staff. At 
first, I, myself, thought that there 
were serious problems with the 
lab. 

But after discussing the issue 
with Dr. Madison for an hour and 
a half on Friday afternoon, I dis- 
covered where the problems real- 
ly lie, and that the problems in 
the lab were a matter of minimal 
adjustments. 

The purpose of the article was 
not to bash the lab, staff, or assis- 
tants. If anything, it down- 
played the concerns that the stu- 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



dents have been expressing. The 
article showed the positive 
aspects of protecting female 
workers, operating 87 hours a 
week, and tightening security 
measures. So, Dr. Kuehn, if you 
go back and reread the article, I 
believe that you will see that. 
The negativity came from the 
remarks that were made by the 
people who should know. 
I understand that many people 



"«.« The Clarion Call , in my opinion, has implied 
I am the reason for these discrepancies." 



Dear Editor, 

After reading the article per- 
taining to the Clarion Students' 
Association in the October 2, 
1997 issue of The Clarion Call. I 
felt compelled to clarify an issue 
that has caused me great concern. 
Because I was not interviewed 
for, nor made aware of, the issues 
raised in the audit, I find it to be 
totally inappropriate for my pic- 
ture to accompany this article. 



By doing so The Clarion Call, in 
my opinion, has implied I am the 
reason for these discrepancies. 
Since I have always tried to 
maintain a high level of integrity 
in my position, the thought of 
anyone else interpreting this arti- 
cle in the same light has caused 
me great embarrassment. I only 
hope those who know me and 
my work ethic will absorb this 
photo for what it is - totally out 



of context 

Perhaps, The Clarion Call 
might consider obtaining permis- 
sion from those involved in an 
article to photograph them to cor- 
roborate facts, rawer than using 
the uninvolved without permis- 
sion to misconstrue them. 

Sincerely, 

Shelly Wilson 

Clarion Students Association 



"I do not believe that the article in 
question was in need of a photograph." 



Dear Editor, 

Once again The Clarion Call 
has amazed me for their lack of 
professionalism, journalistic 
competency and basic good judg- 
ment. The Clarion Call recent- 
ly ran a picture of Shelly Wilson 



as being representative of the 
"Audit shows discrepancies" 
article published recently. 

The Editor, who chose to run 
this article with the accompany- 
ing picture, displayed an obvious 
lack of judgment when using Ms. 



The Clarion CalJ is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor- 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief). Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi- 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication. 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters mat do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the week of publication. The Garion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



Wilson's image, because anyone 
who knows Shelly Wilson knows 
that her standards, integrity and 
work ethic are beyond reproach. 

Furthermore, when ft comes to 
assisting students, whether it be 
with Student Association matters 
or otherwise, Ms. Wilson takes it 
upon herself to make sure that 
their needs and the needs of their 
organizations are met to the 
fullest capacity. 

I would simply ask the Editor of 
The Clarion Call to use better 
judgment in reviewing the paper 
for content before it goes to 
press. I do not believe that the 
article in question was in need of 
a photograph. 

Sincerely, 

Kara Raehsler 
Class of 1994 



go to the lab and expect to have 
an easy time, but that is because 
not everyone is a computer 
major nor is everyone capable of 
understanding computers. 

So, when the computers don't 
boot right or they shut down in 
the middle, I can see why stu- 
dents are easily frustrated. 

Lastly, I want to say that 
Becker has come a long way 



since I was a freshman; however, 
there is always room for 
improvement. I think if we look 
at it positively and strive to help 
the students, then everyone will 
have a more comfortable experi- 
ence there. 

Sincerely, 
Leslie Suhr 
News Writer 







IMS WE t E%I9{ i .. 

Ikfottowwjj tooipku 
during ALJ Weei 

October 11, 1984 



An article titled, "DeNardo to ride in ALF parade" topped 
page 3 and pictured a younger Joe DeNardo who was a 10 
year veteran of KDKA and had just moved to WTAE, where 
he's been ever since. The person responsible for DeNardo's 
appearance in the 33rd Annual ALF parade was the Clarion 
University President Tom Bond. 

Another article entitled "Police set-up search for assailant" 
discussed and pictured a sketch of a man believed to be 
involved in a series of indecent exposures and one indecent 
assault. These incidents occurred in the laundry room and 
women's shower room of Forest Manor, and a women's show- 
er room of Campbell Hall. 

October 9, 1986 

The article tided "NBC fall TV season line-up full of sur- 
prises" gave students the quality shows from "way back 
when" that are now some of our favorite reruns such 2&..Jhe 
Cosby Show, Family Ties, Cheers, Night Court and Hill Street 
Blues. The new line-up for fall 1986 included, "LA Law", 
"Our House", "Crime Story", and of all shows to debut at this 
time of year, "ALF'! (Alien Life Form, not Autumn Leaf 
Festival.) . 

October 10, 1991 

Topping the Features section was the article, "C & C Music 
Factory is 'gonna make you sweat'", who travelled to Clarion 
University on Sunday, October 13, with the opening band, 
Rhythm Syndicate. 

A news article entitled "Successful recycling program on 
campus may change hands in future" story reads, "A lack of 
manpower in collecting materials from the recycling bins oa 
Clarion University's campus is creating a problem for an other- 
wise successful program." The story continues, "The program 
was originally geared towards student participation but has 
resulted in paid workers collecting the material. One solution 
that would increase the manpower for collecting materials is 
the transfer of the program into the hands of the student sen 
ate." 

All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



— — 






& nsdoJaO 
October 9, 1997 



U * fioilfiU 9iiT 

The Clarion Call 



PageV^ 



Editorial continued fro page 




counties and position this region 
as a world-class competitor for 
business in the 21st century 
through a half cent sales tax 
increase. The initiative is on the 
ballot for the upcoming 
November 1997 election. 

The Regional Renaissance 
Initiative will collect 50% of its 
funds from the half-federal 
matching funds. I know, who is 
going to vote yes to raise taxes, 
right That is just the problem. 
We are so stubborn and fixated 
on not paying any extra taxes that 
voting on this issue becomes a no 
brainer. Well before you voters 
out there, including Clarion 
County citizens, pull the no lever, 
make sure you know what you're 
voting on. 

The initiative supports local 
economic development projects 
such as industrial parks, high- 
ways and other public transporta- 
tion facilities, sewer and water 
facilities, and other local eco- 
nomic growth projects. It will 
help fund new regional culture 
and to partially fund new stadi- 
ums for the Pirates and Steelers. 
Most of all, the Regional 
Renaissance Initiative guarantees 
at least 3/4 of the funds raised in 
each county will be used in that 
county." That ' niearis' ' Imjirov'e- 
ments right here in Clarion coun- 
ty along with the rest ot the 
region. 

The tax itself will not apply to 
food, clothing, housing, medi- 



cine, and other basic necessities 
and will last only for seven years. 
The tax cannot be reinstated 
without another vote by the peo- 
ple and cannot be used to fund 
more than 50% of any develop- 
ment project 

Well so far that doesn't seem all 
that bad now does it? Perhaps 
the biggest hurdle to climb with 
this initiative is the stadiums 
issue. Let me guess what you are 
thinking now: Why should I pay 
more taxes for the Pirates and 
Steelers to have new stadiums 
when they already have one that 
isn't even paid off? The answer is 
easy if the voters truly realized 
the importance of both teams to 
this region. Hotels, bars, restau- 
rants, merchandising, and per- 
haps big-businesses in general 
would all lose a tremendous 
amount of business without these 
to professional sports franchises. 
Back in the early seventies, 
some genius thought it would be 
great idea to introduce "multi- 
purpose" stadiums to major mar- 
ket cities. Philadelphia, 
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, and St. 
Louis were suckers and introduce 
dwhat are now known as "cookie 
Cutter" stadiums to the sporting 
wor'd. Now, twenty some years 
,J later, 1 ariybne'whd has' been -to 
Camden Yards or Jacobs Field 
and has actually seen a profes- 
sional baseball game on real 
grass can tell you the difference. 



mm 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Donna Engle, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman, Sheri Hertzog 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Hope Guy, Steve Ostrosky, 

Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, , 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Bethany Boal, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, Tommi 

Hearn, Rob Kriley, Lori Matachak, Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, 

CherieZurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Stella Meyer, Jen Mumford, Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger, 

Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Karli Berlin, Greg Hensler, Megan Klauss, Wayne 

Lines, Heather Liti, Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tina Lasky, 

Jen Mumford, Stella Meyer, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tun Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

•Names remaining in the staff box in the December 4, 1997 Qijl recieve co-curricular credit 



L 



Pittsburgh Pirates owner Kevin 
McClatchy has pledged $35 mil- 
lion towards a proposed $185 to 
$200 million dollar stadium that 
would guarantee the Pirates will 
call Pittsburgh home for at least 
another 25 years. 

Steelers president Dan Rooney 
pledged $50 million towards a 
proposed $185 million dollar 
football stadium to be named 
after Rooney's father and 
Steelers founder Arthur J. 
Rooney. Rooney added that as 
part of the steelers' commitment 
the team would sign a 25-year 
lease for the new stadium. Both 
stadiums would receive a portion 
of the funds from the initiative as 
well as the possibility of state 



funding and both owners would 
assume responsibility for cost 
overruns in the construction of 
the parks. 

The current status of both teams 
is very similar to the status of the 
region in that they can not create 
enough revenue with their cur- 
rent facilities to remain in busi- 
ness. The bottom line is that if 
you think for one minute that 
Pittsburgh will never lose the 
Pirates or for that matter the 
Steelers, think again. Know any- 
body from Cleveland? 

When it comes down to it this 
initiative is bigger than any pro- 
fessional sports franchise. It's 
bigger than digging deep in your 
pocket for that extra half cent 



sales tax increase. It is the eco- 
nomic future of this region here 
in Clarion, Pittsburgh, and all of 
We stern /South we stern 
Pennsylvania. It is the economic 
future of myself and other soon 
to be college graduates. It is the 
economic future of your children. 
When it comes time to cast your 
vote for the Regional 
Renaissance Initiative, don't 
think of it being jut another tax 
increase, but an investment for 
the future. 

For more information on the 
Regional Renaissance Initiative, 
call 1-800-568-0151. 

• The author is a senior 
Communication major. 




Park continued from page 2 



ment and, did I know that if it 
isn't soon they will be turning the 
account over to a collection 
agency. I assure them that I am 
aware of the overdue payment 
and that I will send it as soon as I 
have the money. Now, my body 
and my brain have gone into 
overdrive, and my blood pressure 
is rising. 

I fpaljy. get. the HP- whose 
receptionist tells me that the only 
appointment she has is at 4:00 
p.m. Okay. I rush to get a show- 
er, grab my bookbag, tuck in my 
daughter and tell her I will be 
back as close to 4:00 p.m. as I 
can, dash out the door, and with 
my heart pounding, drive to 
Clarion. 

This is just one day in the life 
of the returning adult student at 
Clarion. Deciding to attend col- 
lege as a 41-year-old single 
mother of two teens was not a 
difficult decision to* make. It 
wasn't difficult because I really 
had no clue about the changes it 
make in my life. It seemed it 
wouldn't be that overwhelming 
considering all I had been 
through the year before (divorce 
after 22 years of marriage). I was 
in for a real surprise. 

They say 'ignorance is bliss,' 
but in this case it was just igno- 
rance. I am in this for survival. 



No parent is paying my way, and 
I am too far along in my life to 
change my mind after I get my 
degree. 

In class there are times when I 
know I annoy the traditional stu- 
dents with my questions, my 
quick response to the teacher's 
questions, the fact that I have my 
reading done, and I always have 
the homework done. They think 
I am a brownnoser. They could 
be right; I only know that this 
could be my last chance to have a 
comfortable future: one where I 
don't have to lay in bed all night 
and worry about how I am going 
to pay the bills. 

On the other hand, those tradi- 
tional students have been so sup- 
portive; they have given me a 
renewed sense of the security of 
the future of our world with their 
enthusiasm and intelligence. I 
see them struggling to make the 
grades, dealing with homesick- 
ness, imagining their own finan- 
cial problems, and trying to have 
a social life. I used to think there 
was this huge gap between them 
and persons of my age. Now I 
realize that it is really a matter of 
different times of life, different 
problems. I think to myself that I 
wouldn't really want to be start- 
ing all over again. I know that I 
am a better student because of 



my age not despite it 

My age also gives me the life 
experience that enables me to be 
a better problem solver and criti- 
cal thinker. I think being older 
helps me to be able to push on 
when I feel too tired to think, 
walk, talk, or eat. I also think 
that my positive attitude helps 
other students. I have actually 
had a few come and talk to me 
when they need a little boost I 
am happy I can help. We are, 
after all, in this together. 

...It's 3:15 p.m., I jump into my 
car, head down 322, pick up my 
daughter, and we are off to the 
doctor's. She'll be fine, but we 
have to get a prescription. We go 
to the drugstore and then home. 
Once there, it's get dinner on the 
table, throw another load in the . 
washer, one in the dryer, do the 
dishes, see how my other child is 
doing on his homework, and get 
my own homework out- a test 
and more algebra problems than 
any one person should ever have 
to do after a day like mine, and 
then to bed at midnight- or later. 
And it all starts again tomorrow 
at 6:15 p.m. when I reach over 
and hit the snooze button.... 

•The author is a junior 
Communication major. 



Attention Web Crawlers! 

.'" http://www.wqd.coin/fcAifVafc/central/steelers 

http://www.oz.net/~goedde/pittsburgh_steelers.html 
These web sites give info about the Steeleers, so if you bleed black 
and gold, this is the place to look! 
http://www.geocities.com/~eharty/gin_blossoms.html 
http://www.ticketmaster.com/chat/ginbloss/chat.htrnl 
Okay, so maybe the Gin Blossoms broke up, but they are still out 
there on the web, if your a fan these sites are must see! 
http://www.munichtourist.de/english/o.htm 
http://www.munichtourist.de/english/o2.htm 
Want to know about Oktoberfest.. look here! 



The Clarion Call will publish website 

submissions from students, faculty, staff, 

and the community. If you know of a 

great site that you would like to share 

with our readers submit the complete 

address, and a brief description to our 

office in room 270 Genimell Student 

Center or e-mail us at Call@mail.dari- 

on.edu. We will log onto all the sites 

submitted to verify that they are legit 

and in somewhat good taste. 



Pag<v5L„c, 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 






Leadership Series begins 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
Andrea Dillinger is the student coordinator for Clarion's Leadership Series. 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 

The Leadership Development 
Series, sponsored by the Offices 
of Student Life Services and 
Residence Life is returning for its 
fifth year. The series has proven 
to have been quite successful, 
and is a wonderful opportunity 
for all students to improve and 
enhance their leadership and 
organizational skills. The series 
will be coordinated by student 
Andrea Dillinger. It is open to all 
interested students. They may 
attend all seven, or even just one 
of the sessions. 

The sessions include mini-lec- 
tures, interective exercises, group 
discussions, and self assessment 
activities. If five or more sessions 
are completed out of the possible 
seven, a certificate will be award- 
ed to the student verifying their 
completion and participation in 
the series. They will also be invit- 
ed to attend a special reception 
and awards ceremony on 
December 10 in Moore Hall. 

The Leadership Development 
Series will be held every 
Wednesday, beginning October 
8, from 7:00-8:30 in room 
250/252 of the Gemmell Student 
Complex. The first of the series, 
which focuses on Motivation and 
Leadership, will be presented by 
Dr. Ron Righter. The following 
sessions will consist of: 



The series is a great 
opportunity for both the 
student who coordinated 

the sessions, and the 

students participating in 

the series, " 

-Ms. Mary Walter 



Language of Leadership, Group 
Dynamics and Teamwork, 
Diversity and Leadership, Power, 
Gender Issues and Leadership, 
and Managing Stress. They are 
being presented by: Ms. Mary 
Walter, Dr. Myrna Kuehn, Dr. Jan 
Grigsby, Ms. Heather Hoffman, 
Dr. Sylvia Stalker, and Mr. Adam 
Earnhardt and Betty McKisson. 

These sessions will leave the 
attendees with leadership and 
organizational skills, stress man- 
agement techniques, and ways to 
utilize individual abilities and 
goals. 

Mary Walter, Assistant to the 
Dean of Student Life Services 
and Director of Orientation, 



explains/The series is a great 
opportunity for both the student 
who coordinated the sessions, 
and the students participating in 
the series. The series is also very 
interactive because it allows the 
participants an opportunity to 
practice the skills as they are 
being learned. In the past four 
years, 385 students have com- 
pleted the series, and over 1000 
have attended at least one ses- 
sion." 

The series exists as an excellent 
opportunity for people to 
enhance and further develop their 
leadership skills, to practice these 
skills, and to prepare for present 
and future leadership rules. 



NEWS\ 



Ccllege Campus News 




What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



IUP's band goes down- 
literally 

Usually it's the football team, not the marching band, that has to 
worry about injuries on game day. But 18 members of the Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania marching band sustained bumps and bruis- 
es on September 27, when a section of bleachers collapsed just before 
kick off. 

The musicians had just finished a pre-game practice on the football 
field at the University of New Haven when they started up the bleach 
ers with all of their insturments. 

Although the grandstand is supposed to hold people, the supports 
underneath gave way under all of the weight-and members of the band 
came tumbling down after it 

'They were loading up the west side and it came down like a pan- 
cake," said Richard Masssaro, chief of of the Allingtown Fire District, 
which responded to the accident 

Fortunately for the band, ho one was seriously hurt. Five members 
were treated at the hospital for minor cuts and bruises and released. 

"The worst hurt was the tuba player because the tuba fell on him," 

Massaro explained. 
The football game went on as planned, although it ended on a sour 

note, too, for Indiana U. They lost to New Haven, 43-14. 

And yes, even though a few members were missing, "the band did 
play on," Massaro said. "Other than that it turned out to be a good 
day." 

Auburn U. sues to remain 
an all-male fraternity 

An all-male veterinary fraternity is suing Auburn University to con- 
test the university's demand that the group accept female members or 
lose its lease. 

In its suit Alpha Psi fraternity challenges the university's classifica- 
tion of the fraternity as a professional organization rather than a social 
one. Federal law prohibits colleges receiving federal money from 
allowing campus groups to discriminate because of sex. The law 
exempts social organizations, such as fraternities, however, and for the 
past 25 years, Alpha Psi was recognized as a social organization, the 
lawsuit said. 

After female students in the veterinary school complained about the 
group's exclusion, Auburn began investigating the chapter. Auburn 
later said the chapter would lose its lease unless it admitted women to 
the group. 

The lawsuit asks for a jury trial to determine whether the fraternity 
should be allowed keep its lease. 

Courtesy of College 
Press Service 



. 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 6 



CU's Student Outreach Program visits Pittsburgh 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Assistant News Editor 

Eleven students from Clarion 
University are giving of their 
time and becoming involved in 
an outreach program for some of 
Pittsburgh's inner-city youth. 
This program, which began in the 
spring of 1994, is now entering 
its fourth year. The students work 
with teenagers referred to them 
by the Community Intervention 
Supervisors Project, and they 
spend one day a month visiting 
these teens and act as mentors 
and role models for them. The 
first trip of this year was held on 
September 20. 

Rogers Laugand, director of 
Minority Student Services at CU, 
said, "Our students focus on 
mentoring from a Christian per- 
spective and developing life 
skills." Life skills developed 
include money management, use- 
ful job skills for today's job mar- 
ket, and developing talents to 
help attain life goals. One student 
who will be involved with the 



X^^v£<aK««#v-<, 



<&&&&&&'>> ' * * "*<•*•■ 



program, David Smith, said, 
"The program gives us (CU stu- 
dents) a chance to lead these kids 
in the right direction and away 
from traps." Smith added that he 
is very excited to be a part of the 
program and looking forward to 
being matched with someone, 
because he was unable to attend 
the last trip. 

The inner-city work is being 
conducted through Christian Life 
Skills Inc. of Pittsburgh, which is 
led by director Barbara Rogers. 
The program is operated through 
the Church of God on Lincoln 
Ave. in East Liberty. Laugand 
said, "This is a program that I 
believe in. Many students here at 
Clarion University also find it 
worthwhile enough to want to do 
it on a regular basis." Laugand 
also said that the focus of this 
program is on the African- 
American community because 
many of the volunteers are from 
the same backround, but have 
grown distant from their commu- 
nity since coming to college. 



"The only way to survive as a 
community is to grow together." 
said Laugand. "If we come 
together collectively, we can suc- 
ceed together and branch out to 
the larger community." 

This program is linked to a 
"think tank" which is also operat- 
ed by Laugand. "Our 'think tank' 
talks about how to deal with 
issues so people don't become 
part of the criminal justice sys- 
tem," he said. "We discuss how 
to deal with concerns that affect 
us or hinder our success and how 
to make these experiences more 
successful." 

Laugand sees this program as a 
benefit, not only to the teens, but 
to the students who act as men- 
tors as well. "This program gives 
the Clarion University students 
an opportunity to reach back into 
a community that they are a part 
of. They have a chance to give 
something back as a role model, a 
person who rose above their 
environment. As role models, 
they show a different way to suc- 



cess as examples of hard work." 
Laugand also mentioned the fact 
that the mentors are closer in age 
to these teens, and they can show 
them that someone is concerned 
for them, and can keep them on 
the right track." 

Students who have participated 
in this program in past years have 
benefitted from their choosing to 
participate. "They have made 
connections, gained references, 
and networked with people who 
can help them in many ways," 
said Laugand. 

Full day visits to Pittsburgh are 
planned for October 18 and 
November 15, and in 1998 for 
January 31, February 21, March 
21, and April 4. The Pittsburgh 
participants will be invited to 
Clarion in April for the annual 
Minority Student Services picnic. 
Members of Christian Life Skills 
Inc. are also invited to CU's 
annual Black Recognition 
Dinner, where the director will 
present awards for outstanding 
service. 



* PLEASE* 
NOTE: 
Last week, an arti- 
cle was featured, 

titled 
"Distance Learning 
creates nursing 
school at Lock 
Haven." The cor- 
rect author of that 
article is 
Leslie Suhr. 



Page 7 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



SCJ execu- 

tive board 

meeting 

today at 3:15 

in Dr. Hilton's 

off ice... please 

be there! 



M I 




.^WOMEN'S 
HEALTHCARE 
OF CLARION 



Private practice ~ obstetrics/gynecology 
"Devoted to individualized health care for women" 




John Myers, D.O. 





BartMatson, D.O. 



Helen Lambe, M.D. 



+Birth control 

^Menstrual irregularities 

^Sexually transmitted diseases 

+ Abnormal pap smears 

^Infertility 

♦ Hormone replacement therapy 



Personal, caring service always provided by a fully-accredited physician in obstetrics/gynecology. 



Womens Healthcare of Clarion 

Clarion Hospital Office Park 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(located right behind the hospital two miles from town) 



Call 226-8800 for an 
appointment. 



d> 



Affiliated with Clarion Hospital 






Student 




Senate 



byAngie Binick, Student Senate Reporter 

Monday, October 6, 1997 marked the fifth meeting of the 1997-98 
Clarion University Student Senate. 

There was encouragement from the Student Senate president to 
participate in the Leadership Development Series being held in 
Clarion, as well as the Bowl for Kid's Sake fundraiser being spon- 
sored by Arete. 

An announcement from the Senate's Panhellenic Council represen- 
tative regarding anti-hazing measures to be started next Monday and 
Tuesday. Also, the Interfratemity Council will be selling rape defense 
whistles in the lobby of Chandler Dining Hall in the coming days. 

An announcement from the University Activities Board representa- 
tive was made regarding the Homecoming Pep Rally. It will be held 
on October 9, at 6:30 pjn. 

An allocation of $3,813 from the Senate's capital account to the 
University Athletics Department (pending approval of Dr. Rhinehart) 
to cover the cost of two new diving boards and new football head- 
sets. 

There was a successful promotion of Dean Wonders to the Senate 
Conduct Board, handled by the Senate. 
♦Please Note* Currently, the Capital Account has $94,196, The 
Supplemental account has $11,690, and the Reserve Supplemental 
Account has $35,500. 



Tonight marks 
the third 

annual Clarion 
Community 

Cultural Night 

in front of the 
Courthouse 

from 7-8 p.m„ 

featuring the 
Allegheny 

River 
Dancers. 

From 8-9 p.m. 

the University 
of 

Pennsylvania 
Jazz Combo 
will be per- 
forming. 



CU receives legal accreditation 




by Hope Guy 
News Writer 



Prior to 1993, Clarion area 
attorneys would have to travel in 
order to fulfill the Pennsylvania 
Supreme Court's requirement of 
continuing legal education for 
attorneys. 

Dr. Jeffrey Eicher, professor of 
finance and director of the 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania Center of Legal 
Education said, "Although we 
(the center) have been offering 
courses since November 1993, 
and have provided approved con- 
tinuing legal education for over 
300 Pennsylvania lawyers 
through nine courses since that 
time, we have always been 
required to submit each program 
to the state board for approval 
prior to offering the course." 

However, this center was certi- 
fied as an Accredited Provider for 
Pennsylvania Continuing Legal 
Education as of August 18, 1997. 

"A center must do five confer- 
ences in two years to receive 
accreditation," says Eicher. "We 



"A center must do five confer- 
ences in two years to 
recieve an accreditation... we 
have tried additional 'non-tradi- 
tionar offerings in the past year. 
This puts us past the five confer- 
ences ' limit. " 
—Dr. Jeffrey Eicher 



have tried a few additional 'non 
traditional' offerings in the past 
year. This gets us past the five 
conferences limit One experi- 
ment we would like to try is to 
provide continuing legal educa- 
tion on demand. The compliance 
period of Pennsylvania lawyers 
are staggered and they need 
courses at different times of the 
year. With the videotape, they 



could contact the Center for 
Legal Education during a compli- 
ance period and request private 
viewing. We are also investigat- 
ing the option of doing more pro- 
grams with the Pennsylvania Bar 
Institute (PBI). We applied for 
the accreditation last summer and 
had to provide information on 
past and future conferences." 



Call 
I -800-878-3872 

www.att.com/college/np.html 




AT&T 

It's all within your reach 



ii ioq; aijj.1 



■— 



October 9, 1997 



-rv. 



The Clarion Call 



Page 6 



CU's Student Outreach Program visits Pittsburgh 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Assistant News Editor 

Eleven students from Clarion 
University are giving of their 
time and becoming involved in 
an outreach program for some of 
Pittsburgh's inner-city youth. 
This program, which began in the 
spring of 1994, is now entering 
its fourth year. The students work 
with teenagers referred to them 
by the Community Intervention 
Supervisors Project, and they 
spend one day a month visiting 
these teens and act as mentors 
and role models for them. The 
first trip of this year was held on 
September 20. 

Rogers Laugand, director of 
Minority Student Services at CU, 
said, "Our students focus on 
mentoring from a Christian per- 
spective and developing life 
skills." Life skills developed 
include money management, use- 
ful job skills for today's job mar- 
ket, and developing talents to 
help attain life goals. One student 
who will be involved with the 



program, David Smith, said, 
"The program gives us (CU stu- 
dents) a chance to lead these kids 
in the right direction and away 
from traps." Smith added that he 
is very excited to be a part of the 
program and looking forward to 
being matched with someone, 
because he was unable to attend 
the last trip. 

The inner-city work is being 
conducted through Christian Life 
Skills Inc. of Pittsburgh, which is 
led by director Barbara Rogers. 
The program is operated through 
the Church of God on Lincoln 
Ave. in East Liberty. Laugand 
said, 'This is a program that I 
believe in. Many students here at 
Clarion University also find it 
worthwhile enough to want to do 
it on a regular basis." Laugand 
also said that the focus of this 
program is on the African- 
American community because 
many of the volunteers are from 
the same backround, but have 
grown distant from their commu- 
nity since coming to college. 



"The only way to survive as a 
community is to grow together." 
said Laugand. "If we come 
together collectively, we can suc- 
ceed together and branch out to 
the larger community." 

This program is linked to a 
"think tank" which is also operat- 
ed by Laugand. "Our 'think tank' 
talks about how to deal with 
issues so people don't become 
part of the criminal justice sys- 
tem," he said. "We discuss how 
to deal with concerns that affect 
us or hinder our success and how 
to make these experiences more 
successful." 

Laugand sees this program as a 
benefit, not only to the teens, but 
to the students who act as men- 
tors as well. "This program gives 
the Clarion University students 
an opportunity to reach back into 
a community that they are a part 
of. They have a chance to give 
something back as a role model, a 
person who rose above their 
environment. As role models, 
they show a different way to suc- 



cess as examples of hard work." 
Laugand also mentioned the fact 
that the mentors are closer in age 
to these teens, and they can show 
them that someone is concerned 
for them, and can keep them on 
the right track." 

Students who have participated 
in this program in past years have 
benefitted from their choosing to 
participate. "They have made 
connections, gained references, 
and networked with people who 
can help them in many ways," 
said Laugand. 

Full day visits to Pittsburgh are 
planned for October 18 and 
November 15, and in 1998 for 
January 31, February 21, March 
21, and April 4. The Pittsburgh 
participants will be invited to 
Clarion in April for the annual 
Minority Student Services picnic. 
Members of Christian Life Skills 
Inc. are also invited to CU's 
annual Black Recognition 
Dinner, where the director will 
present awards for outstanding 
service. 



* PLEASE* 
NOTE: 
Last week, an arti- 
cle was featured, 

titled 
"Distance Learning 
creates nursing 
school at Lock 
Haven." The cor- 
rect author of that 
article is 
Leslie Suhr. 



Page 7 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



SCJ execu- 

tive board 

meeting 

today at 3:15 

in Dr. Hilton's 

off ice... please 

be there! 



&& 



•.<•.«£•••..«•. 



■*» * i* ^., - 



ssM»$i>>>: 



■ * *•. 




.^WOMEN'S 
HEALTHCARE 
OF CLARION 



Private practice ~ obstetrics/gynecology 
"Devoted to individualized health care for women" 







John Myers, D.O. 








Bart Matson, D.O. 



Helen Lambe, M.D. 



•Birth control 

•Menstrual irregularities 

•Sexually transmitted diseases 

•Abnormal pap smears 

•Infertility 

•Hormone replacement therapy 



** 



Personal, caring service always provided by a fully-accredited physician in obstetrics/gynecology. 



Womens Healthcare of Clarion 

Clarion Hospital Office Park 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(located right behind the hospital two miles from town) 



Call 226-8800 for an 
appointment. 



cs> 



Affiliated'with Clarion Hospital 



-* Ita 



Student 




Senate 



by Angle Binick, Student Senate Reporter 

Monday, October 6, 1997 marked the fifth meeting of the 1997-98 

Clarion University Student Senate. 

There was encouragement from the Student Senate president to 
participate in the Leadership Development Series being held in 
Clarion, as well as the Bowl for Kid's Sake fundraiser being spon- 
sored by Arete. 

An announcement from the Senate's Panhellenic Council represen- 
tative regarding anti-hazing measures to be started next Monday and 
Tuesday. Also, the Interfraternity Council will be selling rape defense 
whistles in the lobby of Chandler Dining Hall in the coming days. 

An announcement from the University Activities Board representa- 
tive was made regarding the Homecoming Pep Rally. It will be held 
on October 9, at 6:30 pjn. 

An allocation of $3,813 from the Senate's capital account to the 
University Athletics Department (pending approval of Dr. Rhinehart) 
to cover the cost of two new diving boards and new football head- 
sets. 

There was a successful promotion of Dean Wonders to the Senate 
Conduct Board, handled by the Senate. 
♦Please Note* Currently, the Capital Account has $94,196, The 
Supplemental account has $11,690, and the Reserve Supplemental 
Account has $35,500. 



Tonight marks 

the third 

annual Clarion 

Community 

Cultural Night 

in front of the 

Courthouse 

from 7-8 p.m., 

featuring the 

Allegheny 

River 

Dancers. 

From 8-9 p.m. 

the University 

of 
Pennsylvania 
Jazz Combo 
will be per- 
forming. 



CU receives legal accreditation 



by Hope Guy 
News Writer 



Prior to 1993, Clarion area 
attorneys would have to travel in 
order to fulfill the Pennsylvania 
Supreme Court's requirement of 
continuing legal education for 
attorneys. 

Dr. Jeffrey Eicher, professor of 
finance and director of the 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania Center of Legal 
Education said, "Although we 
(the center) have been offering 
courses since November 1993, 
and have provided approved con- 
tinuing legal education for over 
300 Pennsylvania lawyers 
through nine courses since that 
time, we have always been 
required to submit each program 
to the state board for approval 
prior to offering the course." 

However, this center was certi- 
fied as an Accredited Provider for 
Pennsylvania Continuing Legal 
Education as of August 18, 1997. 

"A center must do five confer- 
ences in two years to receive 
accreditation," says Eicher. "We 



"A center must do five confer- 
ences in two years to 
recieve an accreditation... we 
have tried additional 'non-tradi- 
tional ' offerings in the past year. 
This puts us past the five confer- 
ences 9 limit. " 
— Dr. Jeffrey Eicher 



have tried a few additional 'non 
traditional' offerings in the past 
year. This gets us past the five 
conferences limit One experi- 
ment we would like to try is to 
provide continuing legal educa- 
tion on demand. The compliance 
period of Pennsylvania lawyers 
are staggered and they need 
courses at different times of the 
year. With the videotape, they 



could contact the Center for 
Legal Education during a compli- 
ance period and request private 
viewing. We are also investigat- 
ing the option of doing more pro- 
grams with the Pennsylvania Bar 
Institute (PBI). We applied for 
the accreditation last summer and 
had to provide information on 
past and future conferences." 




October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 8 



Student Awareness is on the increase 



oy janeiie uonognue 

News Writer 

There are many programs on 
campus that are designed to 
increase involvement and com- 
munication. One such group has 
been increasing student aware- 
ness and communication about 
racial and ethnic issues for three 
years. This year there will be thir- 
teen associate students in the pro- 
gram. It is called Building 
Bridges. 

The idea for this campus wide 
group was designed by a group of 
students who attended a confer- 
ence on Students of Color. After 
attending the conference students 
brought the idea back to 
President Diane L. Reinhard 
which led to the establishment of 
the program directed by Rogers 
Laugand, Director of Minority 
Student Services, and Deborah 
King, involved in the Women's 
Studies Program. 

As the program started under 
way, it was very apparent that 
there was going to be ample sup- 
port on campus. 

"President Reinhard, the 
administration, and the faculty 



are very supportive of this 
effort," states Laugand. "We 
already have 15 sessions booked 
and expect to go through 30. We 
always conduct a session for all 
resident assistants, which results 
in a lot of interaction." 

The way that Building Bridges 
is designed to work is that the 
professors invite the students in 
to the classroom to have group 
discussions. The effort is 
designed to bring the goal and 
reality of this program into focus. 

"Students need to have mean- 
ingful dialogue in a safe environ- 
ment," says Laugand. "The class- 
room provides a setting where 
they don't have to fear a back- 
lash. The whole program serves 
to build relationships and break 
down stereotypes." The main 
focus of the group is race and 
ethnicity, however, the group 
also raises discussions on other 
topics such as gender, class, 
racial bias, and interracial dating. 
The professors that are involved 
in entertaining the associates pre- 
pare for the class by collecting 
questions and topics through 



anonymous sources. Gaining 
these ideas in mis manner allows 
for a more diverse topic list. 

The selection process for this 
program involves an interview 
for all that are interested. Once 
selected, the applicant completes 
a three day training session to 
develop the skills that are needed 
to be an affected member of the 
group. Some of these skills 
include creating a supportive and 
open atmosphere, nondefensive 
communication of feelings, 
effective listening, and handling 
difficult group members. And in 
addition to this training session, 
the members also continue train- 
ing throughout the year. 

"We have a lot of students inter- 
ested in participating in this pro- 
gram," says Laugand. "The suc- 
cess of this program indicates 
that this institution is on track 
and it is welcoming and con- 
ducive to teaming." 

Because of the success of this 
program, there is already talk of 
expanding to the Venango 
Campus in Oil City and the West 
Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh. 



die supplies last. One per customer 






UNIVERSITY 
BOOK CENTER 

GEMMELL COMPLEX, PAYNE STREET 



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Public Safety Blotter 




The following is a brief synopsis of the 
criminal investigations conducted by 
Public Safety for the dates between 
September 29 to October 7. The blot- 
ter is compiled by The Public Safety 
office and The Clarion Call. 



*On September 29, a male reported being harassed by another stu- 
dent since the second week of school. 

*On October 3, Derick Charles Squicquero was cited for underage 
drinking and public drunkeness out side of Givan Hall. 

* An unknown person activated the pull station on the ground floor of 
Wilkinson Hall on October 3. 

♦On October 5, Joseph M. Seiler was cited for criminal mischief, 
underage drinking, and public drunkeness. 

♦On October 5, an unknown person activated a fire alarm on the sec- 
ond floor of Nair Hall. 

♦Kristy L. Youkins was cited for underage drinking on the grounds of 
CUP on October 5. 

*0n October S, Jared Reichard was cited for minor consumption and 
public drunkeness on Service Road near Parking Lot B. 

♦On October 7, the Public Safety Office was notified that unknown 
persons have been dumping liquids in the mail box outside Campbell 
Hall. The manager of the post office stated that the box may be 
removed. 



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&CD's 

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Clarion, PA 16214 
814-227-2244 

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Sat. Closed Sun. 



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We care hair is headed in a new direction with a new look 
Big names like Paul Mitchell, Back to the Basics 

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843 Main St. 



T 



Page 9 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 







• »»»»»»» » * 9 HO.tmi.fwmH. 



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.... * 



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Student Advantage. It's all FREE just for being with AT&T. 

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October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 8 



Student Awareness is on the increase 



by Janeiie uonognue 
News Writer 

There are many programs on 
campus that are designed to 
increase involvement and com- 
munication. One such group has 
been increasing student aware- 
ness and communication about 
racial and ethnic issues for three 
years. This year there will be thir- 
teen associate students in the pro- 
gram. It is called Building 
Bridges. 

The idea for this campus wide 
group was designed by a group of 
students who attended a confer- 
ence on Students of Color. After 
attending the conference students 
brought the idea back to 
President Diane L. Reinhard 
which led to the establishment of 
the program directed by Rogers 
Laugand, Director of Minority 
Student Services, and Deborah 
King, involved in the Women's 
Studies Program. 

As the program started under 
way, it was very apparent that 
there was going to be ample sup- 
port on campus. 

"President Reinhard, the 
administration, and the faculty 



are very supportive of this 
effort," states Laugand. "We 
already have 15 sessions booked 
and expect to go through 30. We 
always conduct a session for all 
resident assistants, which results 
in a lot of interaction." 

The way that Building Bridges 
is designed to work is that the 
professors invite the students in 
to the classroom to have group 
discussions. The effort is 
designed to bring the goal and 
reality of this program into focus. 

"Students need to have mean- 
ingful dialogue in a safe environ- 
ment," says Laugand. "The class- 
room provides a setting where 
they don't have to fear a back- 
lash. The whole program serves 
to build relationships and break 
down stereotypes." The main 
focus of the group is race and 
ethnicity, however, the group 
also raises discussions on other 
topics such as gender, class, 
racial bias, and interracial dating. 
The professors that are involved 
in entertaining the associates pre- 
pare for the class by collecting 
questions and topics through 



anonymous sources. Gaining 
these ideas in this manner allows 
for a more diverse topic list. 

The selection process for this 
program involves an interview 
for all that are interested. Once 
selected, the applicant completes 
a three day training session to 
develop the skills that are needed 
to be an affected member of the 
group. Some of these skills 
include creating a supportive and 
open atmosphere, nondefensive 
communication of feelings, 
effective listening, and handling 
difficult group members. And in 
addition to this training session, 
the members also continue train- 
ing throughout the year. 

"We have a lot of students inter- 
ested in participating in this pro- 
gram," says Laugand. "The suc- 
cess of this program indicates 
that this institution is on track 
and it is welcoming and con- 
ducive to learning." 

Because of the success of this 
program, there is already talk of 
expanding to the Venango 
Campus in Oil City and the West 
Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh. 



Public Safety Blotter 




The following is a brief synopsis of the 
criminal investigations conducted by 
Public Safety for the dates between 
September 29 to October 7. The blot- 
ter is compiled by The Public Safety 
office and The Clarion Call. 



*On September 29, a male reported being harassed by another stu- 
dent since the second week of school. 

*On October 3, Derick Charles Squicquero was cited for underage 
drinking and public drunkeness out side of Gi van Hall. 

* An unknown person activated the pull station on the ground floor of 
Wilkinson Hall on October 3. 

*On October 5, Joseph M. Seiler was cited for criminal mischief, 
underage drinking, and public drunkeness. 

*On October 5, an unknown person activated a fire alarm on the sec- 
ond floor of Nair Hall. 

*Kristy L. Youkins was cited for underage drinking on the grounds of 
CUP on October 5. 

*On October 5, Jared Reichard was cited for minor consumption and 
public drunkeness on Service Road near Parking Lot B. 

♦On October 7, the Public Safety Office was notified that unknown 
persons have been dumping liquids in the mail box outside Campbell 
Hall. The manager of the post office stated that the box may be 
removed. 



HAPWBEtATED 23,-J B/RTWAWlAWBEm/ 

wi/E MTSt W00, Bm, scorn, mi/ce, 

DAMUE, DEME, MWE, SE/VJ, AND Ttfit 



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&CD's 

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Sat. Closed Sun. 



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Big names like Paul Mitchell, Back to the Basics 

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Page 9 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 




\ 



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Student Advantage: It's all FREE just for being with AT&T. 

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• FREE AT&T CALL ORGANIZER: no more hassles — use your personalized code before you 
dial, and we'll tally your phone bill by roommate (up to 12 people per bill). 

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October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 








On You 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 




MMMMMMUMHtMMMMMWiMW 



What are you enjoying most about ALF 

week so far? 




ww~~~- — wmmMgmi 

>:•:::•:•:•:-.-:•:•:• ■■■ -••,y 1 - -frp-yfiYf \rf ■ "f : 'ii In i ViYil i iti n'i^haia^^a^i 




^^^^???'T'*^***'!'**!'!*! , !***'!*!***T*!'!i 



- , .....^ ,.-..: ,...;>..■.. .■.-...-■ ■-■-■■-..-.-.-■ ... 



Ron Davis, Sophomore, Sec. Ed. Biology 

'I don't know, I haven't watched that show 

in five years." 
















Joe Be vans, Sophomore, SCT 

'Flagrant lack of self preservation and love 

of others." 




■ 

..;.v.v.v.;.;. ;.;.;; .v. v.v.v _.;.;. v. v.v.;.v.v.v.-t ;■.-:•:■ 








Brian Hanson, Sophomore, Sec. Ed. Social 

Studies 
"Parties, meeting new people.' 





Aimee Fissel, Sophomore, Elem. Ed. / 

Special Ed. 
"The nice weather, parties every night.' 



Mark Talton, Senior, Molecular Biology / 

Biotechnology 

"All the Clarion people coming out of the 

woodwork and being social." 



.• 



:•> 



Jody Newton, Senior, Sociology 

"What with the sudden influx of people, 

Clarion seems more like home." 



•.•.v.-.-. •.-.•.'.•.•.•.vjKp.ySK 



Mazmt 






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m 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



Autumn Leaf 




■ :>¥ : 



:::•:■:•:•:*.■:■ 
•. •..•.•.•.••••■.■ 

..... ,.,,.. 






Page 13 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 






>*:* 



.•.v.v.v.'.v.v.*.v.v 



Festival 1 



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^7 



. 






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. 









' •" V,^^ "|£ 



It's that time of year again, 

time for candy apples and 

carnival rides. Take a walk 

downtown, sample some of 

the food and enjoy the 
weather while we have it. 



Photos by: Kristen Colello and A.J. Mineo 
Vds by: Tim Emanuel 










mmi SUAE I0AIIE 



%toS£K>S^ 




W.V.W.W.V 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



LIFESTYLES 



The flavors of ALF 



by Mark Strieker 
Lifestyles Writer 



Once again the week of fun 
known as the Autumn Leaf 
Festival is upon us. It brings with 
it rides, games, and most impor- 
tantly food. Tons of food. 

It was my job to venture out, 
leave Chandler behind and sam- 
ple some carnival cuisine. 
Instead of trying to rate booths by 
giving them a certain number of 
stars it would be 
more efficient to 
rate booths on 
how many 

pounds I've 
gained doing 
"research" for 
this story. 

As always, there are a lot of 
booths to choose from offering a 
wide selection of food. There are 
many places to find Italian cui- 
sine. Caputo's Pizza and S&R 

Mi 



WING 




** *Hol 
•Golden 



*M ,;. v ;? 



m i«% 



ling 



$3*0C 

qis fir 




a veritable meal in themselves. 
Molnar's also sells cinnamon 
rolls. 

In the mood for some classic 

fttwii iiwiii ifiii iojym i n^om^j&B 

i„J > untA 



as onion rings, pepper rings, 
broccoli, cauliflower, and mush- 
rooms. Veg King's servings are 
colossal and they also have blos- 



SODS 












>:->:■;.--: ■:-■ ■ ' ■■■■ .: ' ' ■ ' 




fcTAMA.tt 



FftSlfCfel 
TRIES 



soming onions. 

Quaker Steak and Lube has 
returned once again bringing 
their wonderful wings. I can per- 
sonally vouch for the greatness of 
the barbecue and golden garlic 




^ W :*.v-v 



\&$y 



Italian Foods are two of your 
choices. Vinny's Pizza is selling 
their namesake for one dollar a 
slice. 

My personal favorite of the fes- 
tival would have 
to be Grandma 
L a m a n a ' s 
Strombolis with 
their selection of 
original, pepper- 
oni, supreme, 
and (my favorite) vegetable 
strombolis. 

In the mood for a sandwich? 
DeAngelo's Roast Beef and 
Chopped Sirloin booth and Bretz 
Concessions, offering BBQ rib 
and Chicken sandwiches, are two 
of your options. Or you can try 
Provenzale's Steak and Sausage 
sandwiches. Saint Joseph's PTU 
is selling hot dogs as well. 

China Lite Eggrolls and Simons 
Gyros offer a selection of ethnic 
foods. The Veg King serves up 
piping hot fried vegetables such 



flavors. If you like wings, you 
will absolutely love Quaker 
Steak and Lube. 

With all these great choices, it's 
important to remember to save 
room for dessert 



f FAR EAST 



" ..■ ' .. ""■ - >>■,- 

ORIENTAL ^ 
FOOD <^ 



g*2 



One of the festival favorites are 
the Elephant Ears sold by 
Molnar's Concessions. These 
huge pieces of dough are covered 
with cinnamon and sugar and are 



concessions. 
Other booths 
offer frozen 
cheesecake on a 
stick and apple 
dumplings. 

Of course my favorite part of 
ALF would have to be Jaam 
Concession's Poorman's 

Caramel Apple Delight. This 
truly amazing treat consists of 
apple wedges covered in hot 
caramel,, ice cream, chocolate 
and your choice of another top- 
ping. The size of this Delight 
may make you think you want to 
share it, but once you taste it, 
you'll want to keep it all for 
yourself. 

If you're just in the mood for a 
snack, you can go to Fowler's 
Taffy and try a candy apple, or 
head over to Phillips Peanuts to 
try some fresh-roasted peanuts or 
pistachios. You can also pick up 
good old fashioned cotton candy 
at a few booths. 

A Main Street 
lined with food 
booths is certain- 
ly my dream 
come true. The 
unusually warm 
weather gives 
students the perfect opportunity 
to go for a walk and appease their 
appetites. 

Maybe ALF should stand for 
Always Lots of Food. 



av .11 mi -■ 




Photos by Kristin Collelo/Clarion Call 




Photos by Kristin Coiello/Clarion Call 

DURING (10/8/97) 

The booths and rides have arrived. Clarion's Main Street 
and Memorial Park have been changed into a fairground for 
the 44th Annual ALF Week. With plenty of food choices and 
rides, the week offers loads of family fun. 




Where In Clarion? 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Going Nuts Over The Leaves 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?'' was the "Hi" on the logo of the High Gear store 
on Fifth Avenue. 






M*^*^*M*l »*. B <• 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



Barry's Back 



FORE! by Dave Barry 



You've surely noticed that a big 
golf craze is sweeping the nation, 
as aging Baby Boomers discover 
the benefits of participating in a 
sport where the most physically 
demanding activity is ordering 
putters by mail. 

It has reached the point where, 
if you don't play golf, your career 
can suffer. I know mine has. In 
my newspaper office, the two 
senior editors — let's call them 
Tom Shroder" and "Bill Rose" 
— regularly go off together dur- 
ing business hours to play golf. 
I'm sure that while they're out on 
the "links" whacking their 
"bogeys," they discuss important 
business matters and formulate 
newspaper policies in conversa- 
tions like this: 

TOM: Bill, before I attempt to 
"shank" this "birdie," I'd like to 
know your "gut feeling" on the 
use of quotation marks in the 
newspaper. 

BILL: Tom, I feel they are 
overused. 

TOM: I agree. Let's formulate 
a policy on that. 



BILL: And then let's try on 
evening gowns. 

TOM: Yes! We'll accessorize 
with brooches! 

I'm not saying "Tom" and 
"Bill" discuss exactly these top- 
ics. I'm merely saying that, 
because I don't play golf, I don't 
know WHAT they discuss, and so 
I'm "out of the loop." Perhaps 
you're "in the same boat" 
Perhaps you'd like to learn about 
golf, so that when your col- 
leagues talk about it, you can join 
in and be "one of the persons." 

That's why today's topic is 
Basic Questions About Golf, 
starting with the question that 
beginners ask most often: 

Q. Has anybody ever used a 9- 
iron to kill emus? 

A. Alert reader Marjorie 
Dishron sent me a fascinating 
column written last February by 
Ron Henry Strait, outdoor writer 
for The San Antonio Express- 
News', the column concerns a 
man named Wes Linthicum, who 
heads an informal group called 
the Texas Christian Hunters 



Association, which each year 
feeds the homeless using donated 
meat. 

An area emu farmer offered to 
give the group a bunch of emus, 
which are very large, ostrich-like 
birds. The problem was that the 
birds were alive, and, as the old 
folk saying goes, "You can't feed 
large ostrich-like birds to the 
homeless if they, the birds, are 
walking around." The members 
of the Texas Christian Hunters 
Association didn't have guns 
with them, and nobody wanted to 
strangle the emus manually. 
According to the column, the 
problem was solved when: 

". . .someone recalled that emus 
have a tendency to closely exam- 
ine an object that is dropped on 
the ground. That's when 
Linthicum got out his 9-iron. . ." 

I called Linthicum, and he told 
me, after some hemming and 
hawing, that although the story 
he'd related to columnist Strait 
was essentially correct, the golf- 
club part was not 100 percent 
accurate in the sense of being 



true. Linthicum also made these 
points: (1) If you are ever offered 
a gift of live emus, you would be 
wise to turn it down, because 
"those things have feet like 
something out of Jurassic Park"; 
(2) If it gets printed in the news- 
paper that you dispatched emus 
with a 9-iron, even for a good 
cause, you're going to hear from 
some extremely angry animal- 
rights people; and (3) If a person, 
for whatever reason, did have to 
dispatch an emu with a golfing 
implement, it would make more 
sense to use a wood than an iron. 
Speaking of Jurassic Park, 
another question often asked by 
beginning golfers is: 

Q. What happens if a snake 
eats my balls? 

A. Don't worry! The snake 
will be fine, provided that it gets 
proper medical care. I base this 
statement on an article from the 
July 5, 1996, Harrisburg (Pa.) 
PatriotNews, written by Danielle 
I lollistcr and alertly sent in by 
Dave Barrows, headlined 
SURGERY GETS SNAKE UP 



TO PAR. 

The story states that Sandy and 
Jeff Paul, who raise chickens, 
sometimes "put golf balls in their 
hens' nests to encourage the hens 
to stay put and lay eggs." One 
day they noticed a five-foot rat 
snake near their home with three 
distinct lumps in its middle, and 
they realized that the snake had 
swallowed their golf balls. So 
they grabbed their 9-iron and. . . 

No, seriously, according to the 
Patriot-News article, the Pauls 
contacted a veterinarian, who 
successfully removed the golf 
balls. The snake, which the Pauls 
named "Spalding," came through 
the operation OK and has been 
accepted to law school. 

No, I'm kidding about that last 
part. But I'm not kidding about 
our final common golf question, 
which is: 

Q. If I do not wish to stand 
around on a golf course listening 
to a bunch of business clients 

Continued on page 17 



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October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



lifestyles] 



The flavors of ALF 



by Mark Strieker 
Lifestyles Writer 



QUAKER -STl A i I 



Once again the week of fun 
known as the Autumn Leaf 
Festival is upon us. It brings with 
it rides, games, and most impor- 
tantly food. Tons of food. 

It was my job to venture out, 
leave Chandler behind and sam- 
ple some carnival cuisine. 
Instead of trying to rate booths by 
giving them a certain number of 
stars it would be 
more efficient to 
rate booths on 
how many 

pounds I've 
gained doing 
"research" for 
this story. 







•Golden 



i / 4 i 



.1 i 



*% 






as onion rings, pepper rings, 
broccoli, cauliflower, and mush- 
rooms. Veg King's servings are 
colossal and they also have blos- 



-ymm 



*%, *r 






W~^\ 



.... sa ■■-■ 

V E A ■ 



H C H 
111 



As always, there are a lot of 
booths to choose from offering a 
wide selection of food. There are 
many places to find Italian cui- 
sine. Caputo's Pizza and S&R 



soming onions. 

Quaker Steak and Lube has 
returned once again bringing 
their wonderful wings. I can per- 
sonally vouch for the greatness of 
the barbecue and golden garlic 



. 



'■ < ! ' ' ; !'" ■:■ I 



. 



■t.jilirtili 




Italian Foods are two of your 
choices. Vinny's Pizza is selhng 
their namesake for one dollar a 
slice. 

My personal favorite of the fes- 
tival would have 
to be Grandma 
L a m a n a ' s 
Strombolis with 
their selection of 
original, pepper- 



flavors. If you like wings, you 
will absolutely love Quaker 
Steak and Lube. 

With all these great choices, it's 
important to remember to save 
room for dessert 






a veritable meal in themselves. 
Molnar's also sells cinnamon 
rolls. 

In the mood for some classic 
funnel cake? 
Head over to J&B 
concessions. 
Other booths 
offer frozen 
cheesecake on a 
stick and apple 
dumplings. 

Of course my favorite part of 
ALF would have to be Jaam 
Concession's Poorman's 

Caramel Apple Delight. This 
truly amazing treat consists of 
apple wedges covered in hot 
caramel,, ice cream, chocolate 
and your choice of another top- 
ping. The size of this Delight 
may make you think you want to 
share it, but once you taste it, 
you'll want to keep it all for 
yourself. 

If you're just in the mood for a 
snack, you can go to Fowler's 
Taffy and try a candy apple, or 
head over to Phillips Peanuts to 
try some fresh-roasted peanuts or 
pistachios. You can also pick up 
good old fashioned cotton candy 
at a few booths. 

A Main Street 
lined with food 



\ 



1 <$ ' 



^ 



t 



$ 



t(M w«»»>w»^«l»ww«WW < ^- M « wwt » m 4^«m«~^»w«^^»^»«-»»: v - I 



oni, supreme, 

and (my favorite) vegetable 

strombolis. 

In the mood for a sandwich? 
DeAngelo's Roast Beef and 
Chopped Sirloin booth and Bretz 
Concessions, offering BBQ rib 
and Chicken sandwiches, are two 
of your options. Or you can try 
Provenzale's Steak and Sausage 
sandwiches. Saint Joseph's PTU 
is selling hot dogs as well. 

China Lite Eggrolls and Simons 
Gyros offer a selection of ethnic 
foods. The Veg King serves up 
piping hot fried vegetables such 



One of the festival favorites are 
the Elephant Ears sold by 
Molnar's Concessions. These 
huge pieces of dough are covered 
with cinnamon and sugar and are 



booths is certain- 
ly my dream 
come true. The 
unusually warm 
weather gives 

students the perfect opportunity 

to go for a walk and appease their 

appetites. 

Maybe ALF should stand for 

Always Lots of Food. 




Photos by Kristin Collelo/Clarion Call 




°wmt&* 



Photos by Kristin Colello/Clarion Call 

DURING (10/8/97) 

The booths and rides have arrived. Clarion's Main Street 
and Memorial Park have been changed into a fairground for 
the 44th Annual ALF Week. With plenty of food choices and 
rides, the week offers loads of family fun. 




Where In Clarion? 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 



Going Nuts Over The Leaves 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the "Hi" on the logo of the High Gear store 
on Fifth Avenue. 



— j 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



Barry's Bach 



FORE! by Dave Barry 



You've surely noticed that a big 
golf craze is sweeping the nation, 
as aging Baby Boomers discover 
the benefits of participating in a 
sport where the most physically 
demanding activity is ordering 
putters by mail. 

It has reached the point where, 
if you don't play golf, your career 
can suffer. I know mine has. In 
my newspaper office, the two 
senior editors — let's call them 
'Tom Shroder" and "Bill Rose" 
— regularly go off together dur- 
ing business hours to play golf. 
I'm sure that while they're out on 
the "links" whacking their 
"bogeys," they discuss important 
business matters and formulate 
newspaper policies in conversa- 
tions like this: 

TOM: Bill, before I attempt to 
"shank" this "birdie," I'd like to 
know your "gut feeling" on the 
use of quotation marks in the 
newspaper. 

BILL: Tom, I feel they are 
overused. 

TOM: I agree. Let's formulate 
a policy on that. 



BILL: And then let's try on 
evening gowns. 

TOM: Yes! We'll accessorize 
with brooches! 

I'm not saying "Tom" and 
"Bill" discuss exactly these top- 
ics. I'm merely saying that, 
because I don't play golf, I don't 
know WHAT they discuss, and so 
I'm "out of the loop." Perhaps 
you're "in the same boat." 
Perhaps you'd like to learn about 
golf, so that when your col- 
leagues talk about it, you can join 
in and be "one of the persons." 

That's why today's topic is 
Basic Questions About Golf, 
starting with the question that 
beginners ask most often: 

Q. Has anybody ever used a 9- 
iron to kill emus? 

A. Alert reader Marjorie 
Dishron sent me a fascinating 
column written last February by 
Ron Henry Strait, outdoor writer 
for The San Antonio Express- 
News; the column concerns a 
man named Wes Linthicum, who 
heads an informal group called 
the Texas Christian Hunters 



Association, which each year 
feeds the homeless using donated 
meat. 

An area emu farmer offered to 
give the group a bunch of emus, 
which are very large, ostrich-like 
birds. The problem was that the 
birds were alive, and, as the old 
folk saying goes, "You can't feed 
large ostrich-like birds to the 
homeless if they, the birds, are 
walking around." The members 
of the Texas Christian Hunters 
Association didn't have guns 
with them, and nobody wanted to 
strangle the emus manually. 
According to the column, the 
problem was solved when: 

". . .someone recalled that emus 
have a tendency to closely exam- 
ine an object that is dropped on 
the ground. That's when 
Linthicum got out his 9-iron..." 

I called Linthicum, and he told 
me, after some hemming and 
hawing, that although the story 
he'd related to columnist Strait 
was essentially correct, the golf- 
club part was not 100 percent 
accurate in the sense of being 



true. Linthicum also made these 
points: ( 1) If you are ever offered 
a gift of live emus, you would be 
wise to turn it down, because 
"those things have feet like 
something out of Jurassic Park"; 
(2) If it gets printed in the news- 
paper that you dispatched emus 
with a 9-iron, even for a good 
cause, you're going to hear from 
some extremely angry animal- 
rights people; and (3) If a person, 
for whatever reason, did have to 
dispatch an emu with a golfing 
implement, it would make more 
sense to use a wood than an iron. 
Speaking of Jurassic Park, 
another question often asked by 
beginning golfers is: 

Q. What happens if a snake 
eats my balls? 

A. Don't worry! The snake 
will be fine, provided that it gets 
proper medical care. I base this 
statement on an article from the 
July 5, 1996, Harrisburg (Pa.) 
PatriotNews, written by Danielle 
Hollister and alertly sent in by 
Dave Barrows, headlined 
SURGERY GETS SNAKE UP 



TO PAR. 

The story states that Sandy and 
Jeff Paul, who raise chickens, 
sometimes "put golf balls in their 
hens' nests to encourage the hens 
to stay put and lay eggs." One 
day they noticed a five-foot rat 
snake near their home with three 
distinct lumps in its middle, and 
they realized that the snake had 
swallowed their golf balls. So 
they grabbed their 9-iron and. . . 

No, seriously, according to the 
Patriot-News article, the Pauls 
contacted a veterinarian, who 
successfully removed the golf 
balls. The snake, which the Pauls 
named "Spalding," came through 
the operation OK and has been 
accepted to law school. 

No, I'm kidding about that last 
part. But I'm not kidding about 
our final common golf question, 
which is: 

Q. If I do not wish to stand 
around on a golf course listening 
to a bunch of business clients 

Continued on page 17 



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Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 17 



CUP Theatre's "Twelfth Night" 

Theater Review 




Courtesy of University Relations 
Jarrod Fry and Mamie Welliver starred in "Twelfth Night" 



by Hope Guy 
Lifestyles Writer 



Despite the difficult language 
present in all of William 
Shakespeare's plays, Clarion 
University Theatre's presentation 
of 'Twelfth Night" has won the 
minds and hearts of many. With 
its comedy and its very creative 
cast, one cannot help but enjoy 
this well-acted out play. 

The scenery was exceptional in 
helping the plot of the play. By 
placing lighting in certain areas 
ofWM§P andh&vin'g* ffl&l Q 
dWBe could lose 'temselveF 
in the setting of each act. 

The costumes were also excep- 
tional in their design and func- 
tion. Of course, the audience's 
favorite costume belonged to 
Ralph Leary, playing the part of 
Malvolio in his bright yellow 
stockings and cross garters. 

The only flaw in the set of the 
play was the blue lights that 
could be seen behind the upper 
main set. I must admit that in 
seeing this lighting I was rather 
upset. The audience was drawn 



into the play, and by seeing the 
lights, they were reminded that it 
was only a play, much like the 
epic plays written by Brecht. 

The cast of "Twelfth Night" 
was very good. All parts in this 
play were acted well, and the 
singing by Kristie Leigh Belles 
as Feste took the audience away. 
But the best acting was a tie 
between Ralph Leary as 
Malvolio and Jarrod Fry as Sir 
Andrew Aguecheek. 

Leary played the part of the 
very serious Malvolio well, and 
in keeping his very solemn face 
ile the audience could not help 
laugh, I admire his acting 
greatly. 

Fry played quite the idiot, and 
as the old saying goes, "A genius 
plays the idiot best," so goes true 
for Fry's performance. Fry pro- 
vided the audience with laughter 
with bis short skits of stupidity 
and cowardliness. 

Overall, mis performance was 
enjoyable and enlightening. Of 
four stars, I rate this production 
three and one-half stars, with 
very few areas in need of 
improvement 




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In Concert 

by Brendan Anderer 
Lifestyles Writer 

Clarion University celebrated 
its third annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival Cultural Night Monday, 
October 6th. The evening's 
events, a joint effort of the 
Clarion University Office of 
Social Equity and the Clarion 
Chamber of Commerce, took 
place on Main Street in front of 
the courthouse. 

"Cultural Night celebrates 
diversity in the community," said 
Clarion University President Dr. 
Diane Reinhard to kick off the 
festivities, which are the first in 
the Cultural Week celebration, 
sponsored by New Beginnings 
Specialty Care. 

Clarion's first Cultural Night 
was so successful three years 
ago, it was expanded to a week- 
long event in its second year. 
"We are in our third year and 
every year we keep getting big- 
ger and better," said Social 
Equity Office Manager Jeanie 
McLaine. 

Emcees Karen Hazlett and 
Brian Roberts kept the evening 
moving between the various per- 
fdfmancesi 4 which itfclBded 
dances and song. m* 

Leading off the night were 
Doctors Beverly and Richard 
Smaby who, dressed in custom- 
ary clothing, performed tradition- 
al Scandinavian dances. Two of 
the dances they performed were 



the Telemark Springar and the 
Telemark Gangar. The dances, 
costumes and music originate 
from the Telemark region of 
Norway. "The music and dances 
have been preserved because of 
the isolated mountainous loca- 
tion," said Dr. Richard Smaby, 
professor of Computer 
Information Science. 

Next to perform was Jackie 
Booth, a Native American stu- 
dent of Clarion University. Ms. 
Booth, a member of the Seneca 
Nation, is a direct descendent of 
Chief Complanter. 

Booth performed songs of both 
Seneca and Cherokee origins 
accompanied only by a drum. 
She closed her set with a Native 
American national anthem in 
honor of Leonard Pelter, a Native 
American activist imprisoned 
since the 1970's. 

The CL Sensations represented 
Clarion-Limestone Area High 
School. The Sensations, a show 
choir formed in 1984, performed 
their own versions of "Jump" and 
"Let it Shine." Jolene Painter 
and Max Pfaff due ted on John 
Lennon's "Let it Be." Under the 
direction of Tina Bennett, the 
Sensations took first place in a 
recent competition in New York 
City. 

Doreen MeBride, a story teller 
from - Banwidge, Northern 
Ireland, entertained the crowd 
with traditional folk songs and 
stories. 

"There is a lot of history and 
folk lore incorporated in story," 
she said. MeBride also thinks we 



should spend more time with sto- 
ries saying, "We all watch too 
much TV. The world watched the 
Gulf War, where people were 
being killed, like it was a movie. 
Through storytelling we can 
become more empathetic towards 
others and be tuned into them, be 
able to feel what they feel." 

Jeremy Nesmith led the Lift 
Every Voice Choir in gospel 
music. Composed of about 50 
Clarion University students, the 
group performs on campus and at 
local churches. The group was 
featured at Luanda's Festival of 
Trees, and has sang in Pittsburgh 
and Philadelphia. 

Nesmith said, "Cultural Night 
helps continue to have diversity 
within the community, causing 
naive stereotypes to be torn down 
between the races and ethnic 
backgrounds. They also call for 
brotherhood and sistership estab- 
lishing unity within the commu- 
nity." 

A cappella R&B was the score 
for Tyrone Tally and Angelo 
Anderson. This duo sang their 
own original songs and even cov- 
ered one from Stevie Wonder. 

Cultural Week continues, ; 
through Friday. Tonight's per- 
formers will be the Allegheny 
River Dancers from 7:00 to 8:00 
p.m. and the Qarion University 
of PA Jazz Combo from 8:30 to 
9:30 p.m. in front of the court- 
house. Friday wraps up the week 
with the Highland Bagpipers of 
Grove City, Mariachi Quartet and 
Runa Pacha strolling Main Street 
during Fanners and Crafts Day. 



Teen ALF Pageants Kick Off ALF Week 



by Jen Founds 
Managing Editor 



Tins past Saturday at 7:30 pm, 
in the Clarion Area High School 
Auditorium, people gathered to 
watch a variety of young local 
women participate in the Miss 
Junior Teen and Miss Teen ALF 
Pageants. 

Nine young women were 



entered in the junior teen catego- 
ry and performed on stage with a 
variety of talent ranging from 
tumbling, tap, and lyrical jazz to 
vocal and violin. The winner of 
the Miss Junior Teen ALF 
Pageant was 13-year-old Jolene 
Bartley from Union, whose talent 
portion included dancing charac- 
ter ballet. 

Eight women were entered in 
the teen category, and the talent 




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portion included monologues, 
various dance styles, vocal and 
instrumental performances, 
including piano and flute. The 
winner of Miss Teen ALF was 
16-year-old senior Felicia Yang 
from Clarion Area High School. 
She performed a piece on her 
violin, an instrument she has 
been playing since she was 3 
years old. 

The ALF Pageant was a schol- 
arship program, and winning par- 
ticipants were awarded prizes 
ranging from $500 scholarship 
bonds and a variety of gift certifi- 
cates to $100 scholarship bonds 
and flowers. The evening turned 
out to be a success, with all par- 
ticipants awarded a $50 scholar- 
ship bond and an ALF leaf 
charm. 

The Miss Teen ALF Pageant 
was sponsored by the Comfort 
Inn of Clarion, and the Miss 
Junior Teen ALF Pageant was 
sponsored by Caroline Rearick, 
Prudential Representative, 
Prudential Insurance & Financial 
Services. 



*~%* -■ ^ a ■ ^ la Barry continued 

Calendar of Events ■ frompage15 



Today 

•ALF WEEK 

•Mid-semester Break begins at 10 p.m. 

•Library Science 60th anniversary colloquim speaker 

series, Dr. Elizabeth Rupert - 3:30 p.m., Hart Chapel 

•Cultural Week Event: Allegheny River Dancers and 

Clarion University Jazz Combo - 7 p.m., Clarion 

County Courthouse 

•UAB Homecoming Pep Rally - 7 

p.m., Gemmell Performance Area 

•Visiting Writer Series: David 

McKain, writer - 8 p.m., Hart Chapel 

Friday 

•ALF WEEK 

•NO CLASSES 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Cultural Week Event: The Highland Bag Pipers of 

Grove City, The Mariachi Quartet, and Runa Pacha - 

10 a.m., Qarion County Courthouse 

•UAB Homecoming Court practice - 5 p.m., Memorial 

Stadium 

Saturday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Yom Kippur 

•Homecoming Day 

•Cross Country Alumni meet 

•UAB Court brunch - 10 

a.m., 250/252 Gemmell 

•University Book Center open - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

•ALF Parade - noon, Main Street 

•Football vs. Shippensburg - 2 p.m. 

•Volleyball vs. Alumni match - 7:30 p.m. 




in 



Sunday 

•ALF WEEK 

•Columbus Day 

•Artists' reception, Carol 

Griffith, Women's Studies 

Center - 2 to 4 p.m., Harvey 

•Vocations Liturgy: Father Ed Lohse, Diocesan 

Vocations Director - 5:30 p.m., IC Church 

Monday 

•Mid-semester Break ends at 8 a.m. 

•Columbus Day (observed) 

•Thanksgiving Day (Canada) 

•Spring/Summer 4 98 grad. school applications due - B- 

16 Carrier 

•Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 250/252 Gemmell 

•Tennis vs. Edinboro - 3:30 p.m. 

•Faculty Senate meeting - 4 p.m., B-8 Hart Chapel 

•Career Development Series: "Exploring Career 

Possibilities" - 6 p.m., Carter Auditorium, Still Hall 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

•Public Debate - 7:30 pjn., Hart Chapel 

Tuesday 

•Intramural Tube H20 Basketball begins 

•Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday Inn 

•Volleyball vs. Indiana - 7 p.m. 

•UAB Tie-dye - 8 p.m., Gemmell Rotunda 

Wednesday 

•Hispanic Heritage Month ends 

•UCM Book Review Series - noon, 246 Gemmell 

•UAB Wellness Program - 4 p.m., 248 Gemmell 

•Leadership Development Series: "Language of 

Leadership" - 7 to 8:30 p.m., 250/252 Gemmell 



Farnham returns to Clarion for show 



drone on about their "mulligans," 
can I hire somebody to play golf 
with them for me? 

A. Yes! Alert dentist Steve 
Carstensen sent me a flier for a 
new Seattle outfit called Golf In 
Action ("We'll Play For You 
When You Can't"). The idea is, 
you pay a golfer to take your 
clients out and play with them, 
thereby (to quote the flier) "giv- 
ing you the freedom to continue 
your important daily business 
needs." 

I called Golf In Action and 
spoke with the founder, Sheila 
Locke, who told me that her idea 
has gotten a good public 
response, although a lot of the 
calls are from people who want 
to join her staff and get paid to 
play golf. 

Me, I love the idea of paying 
somebody to play golf with your 
clients, and I'm thinking: Why 
not take it further? Why not pay 
somebody to have meetings with 
your clients, and take your clients 
to dinner, and smoke cigars and 
drink brandy with your clients, 
and then throw up on your 
clients' shoes because you hate 
brandy and cigars? This compa- 
ny could be called: 
Businesspersons In Action. 

So those are your golf basics. 
Good luck out on the "links," and 
be sure to say "hi" to my editors, 
"Tom" and "Bill," who will be 
easy to spot because they get 
stuck in the sand traps with those 
high heels. 



Courtesy of 
Katherine Farnham 



Katherine Farnham, singer, 
songwriter and pianist will return 
to Clarion during ALF Week for a 
repeat performance at the 
Captain Loomis Hotel, Mr. T's 
nightclub at 9 p.m. tonight 

The daughter of Betty and Dr. 
Dean Farnham, Katherine is the 
1989 Miss Teen ALF, a 1991 
graduate of Clarion Area High 
School and a June 1996 summa 
cum laude graduate of Boston's 
Bcrklee College of Music. 

The performance will feature 
Farnham singing and playing 
keyboard and will include songs 
from her latest CD, "For The 
Love of it All," as well as select- 
ed pop, jazz and blues favorites. 
Her CD and other merchandise 
will be on saleat the show. 

"For The Love of it All" was 
released to the public in June at 
the Hard Rock Cafe in Boston 






' "i V 



and is currently on sale in Clarion 
at The Book Nook and at 
National Record Mart, as well as 
Tower Records and Strawberries 
in Boston. 

The September issue of 
Northeast Performer Magazine 
states, "Tor The Love of it All' is 
soaring self-inspiration. 

[It]... displays many strengths for 
Farnham as writer, singer, musi- 
cian, producer and all-around 
musical talent" 

Farnham performs regularly in 
the Boston area and will soon be 



appearing in Miami area clubs 
and adding modeling and acting 
to her activities. She has been 
signed to Miami Beach's Image 
Models and Talent, a full service 
modeling, talent and casting 
agency. 

Image has cast for such major 
motion pictures as "The Bird 
Cage," starring Robin Williams, 
"Striptease," starring Demi 
Moore, and "Just Cause," star- 
ring Sean Connery. 

Farnham is a recent inductee of 
the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and 
Publishers (ASCAP). She also 
composes songs for other artists 
and has collaborated with Boston 
producer Chris Phoenix on a 
song for Grammy winner and 
Celine Dion backup vocalist, 
Terry Bradford. 

Farnham will present a seminar 
for the Music Marketing students 
today at 11 a.m. in Room 213 of 
Marwick-Boyd. 




CLIPPER 

FAMILY 
M.TAWANT 



Clarion Clipper 
Restaurant 



226-7950 



Brcafast all day, Sandwiches, 
Soup n' Salad bar, Steaks, and Seafood. 
Cocktails available. 

Buffet every Saturday. 
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

.••ttlscouritwitnVali'aTOPiK-. 



rr 



1 mile south on 5th Ave. towards the Mall 
Hours 6:30 a.m. - 10 00 pm _^ 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



ENTERTAINMENT, 




October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



DOCTOR FUN 




VtCLL 






Helpful waiters 




NO PARKING IN 

LOTS 

G, H, I, J & M! 

For the ALF 

parade. 

From October 10, 1997 

@ midnight until 

Saturday October 11, 

1997® 3:00 p.m. 

Cars will be towed at 

the owners expense. 

Students, please use 

lots near Still Hall. 



MOUNTAIN BIKE 

BACKPACK 




34 South 5th Ave 
10-6 Dairy 

10-4Sat&Sun 



fegfi gear 



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EXPERIENCE YOU CAN TRUST 

81 4-226-4763 



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Classes held 

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Classes begin 

Oct. 8th for 

more info call 

(814) 835-8023 





Starting date Oct 8th 




Dr. Jeky II and Mr. Coffee 



VanDyke's 5th Ave. 

Across from "old jail" in Clarion 
814-226-8512 

j. Come Dance with: 

NO COVER CHARGE Drink Specials! Dinier specials until 9pm. 






*mt 







ENTERTAINMENT] 



tl aEAs^^'TUNT.UAFTef? 
±t\ cl$S TO ^Pr/tttE Ttc^sH... 

MiNloflT/ STUPEMT^ T 




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Excitement had run high at the first annual mime 
convention. Yet, within seconds, an embarrassing 
silence filled the auditorium. 



THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
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5 Atmospheric 

condition 

9 Sliver 

13 — Sharif of films 

14 Prayer ending 

15 Glow 

16 Bucharest 
citizens 

18 Big 

19 Refrain syllable 

20 Too 

21 Man 

22 "— Street" 

24 Desire 

25 — Zeppelin 

26 Unions 

29 "— Marner" 

32 Liquid measures 

33 One — time 

35 The — of March 

36 Sweets 

37 Elliptical 

38 Decade number 

39 Fop 

40 Metric measure 

41 Hopes 

43 Perform 

44 Currier and — 

45 Lodger 
49 Ogled 
52 Courage 

54 St. 

55 Church table 

56 Stresses 

58 Runs amok 

59 Short note 

60 Color 

61 "Citizen — " 

62 — and even's " 

63 Consumes 

DOWN 

1 Citadels 

2 Love in Italia 

3 The — and the 
Papas 

4 Historic time 

5 Greeted 

6 Amo,— ... 

7 Greek 
philosopher 

8 Nav. off. 

9 Pure 

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1997 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 
All rights reserved. 



11 Playwright 
William 

12 Equal 
15 Hurls 
17 Titles 
21 Borgnine film 

23 Woe! 

24 "Peter Pan" girl 
26 Heeds 

■27 'Great review *-' 

28 Luminary 

29 Pose 

30 Thought 

31 Camera part 

32 Glass sections 
34 Tankard 

contents 

36 Had concern for 

37 Director 
Preminger 

39 Various 47 Happening 

40 Dundee citizens 48 Takes a 

42 Sea robber 

43 Comes up 
46 Callas of opera 



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51 English school 

52 Football field 

53 Tear 

56 Arafaf s gp. 

57 Indian 



Attention Clarion StttHents! 

Do you want to be admired by DOZENS of fellow 

students? Do you dream of molding and shaping 

the impressionable minds of our campus' youth? 

Then send YOUR fun submissions of poetry, 

comics or Bedazzled clothes to these 

Entertainment Pages, c/o 

Benj, 270 Gemmell 

Center. Or call x2380. 

Impress your 







Page 20 



lo/lotoi) 



• 



.. 



on Call 



October 9J19OT" 



SPORTS\ 



Clarion drops PSAC-West opener 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

After losing to three non-con- 
ference opponents, the arrival of 
PS AC -West conference play 
presented the Clarion University 
Golden Eagles with somewhat of 
a clean slate. 

However, the same difficulties 
that contributed to the 0-3 start 
persisted, as the Golden Eagles 
fell to 0-4 with a 33-32 loss to the 
Lock Haven Bald Eagles on 
Saturday. 

Clarion, who gave up 4,287 
yards to the Lock Haven offense, 
allowed more than thirty points 
for the fourth time this season. 
Also, after losing senior quarter- 
back Chris Weibel two weeks 
earlier, sophomore replacement 
Jeff Cappa was forced to leave 
the game in the second quarter 
with a bruised shoulder. 

Leading the way for Lock 
Haven on th e afternoon was 
quarterback Carlos Cleckley. 
Cleckley passed for 154 yards 
and two touchdowns, and ran for 
45 yards and two touchdowns for 
the Bald Eagles (2-3 overall, 1-0 
PSAC-West). 

Cleckley's second touchdown 
run proved to be the game win- 
ner. The senior QB rumbled into 
the end zone from 32 yards out to 
put the Bald Eagles up 33-32 
with 9:57 remaining in the game. 

Clarion had an opportunity to 
respond shortly afterward, but 



John Shigella's 42-yard field goal 
attempt was wide left. 

The Golden Eagles will look for 
their first win when they host 
Shippensburg this Saturday in a 
2:00 homecoming contest. 



Cleckley to Jeremy Burkett to put 
LHU ahead 14-7. 

The Golden Eagles followed 
with a flurry of three touchdowns 
within a span of just over three 
minutes. Clarion sandwiched 



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photo courtesy of Adam Earnheardt 

Senior quarterback Bernie Pynos rolls out against the Bald 
Eagle defense. Pynos replaced the injured Jeff Cappa last 



Senior running back Ron 
DeJidas registered the only first 
quarter tally on a 4-yard run to 
put Clarion ahead 7-0. The Bald 
Eagles countered in die second 
quarter with a 28-yard touch- 
down run by Cleckley, and a sub- 
sequent 84-yard strike from 



two more Dejidas touchdown 
runs (20 yards and 3 yards) with 
Alvin Slaughter's 87-yard punt 
return for a touchdown. The con- 
versions failed on the final two 
scores, leaving Clarion with a 26- 
14 lead. 
It looked as if Clarion would 



bold the 12-point edge at the 
halftime intermission, but 
Cleckley found Burkett on anoth- 
er long touchdown pass-this time 
43 yards on the last play of the 
half-to pull the Bald Eagles with- 
in 26-21. 

LHU's leading rusher, fresh- 
man Sean Fisher, made his pres- 
ence felt in the second half. 
Fisher, who finished with 197 
yards on 21 carries, sprung free 
for a 94-yard scoring sprint. 
Clarion countered with its own 
freshman running back Keor.te 
Campbell, who found paydirt 
from the five yard line. The con- 
version pass failed, though, as 
Clarion led 32-27. 

Cleckley's game winning TD 
run would then follow. 
Campbell led Clarion with 92 
rushing yards on 11 attempts. 
DeJidas ran for 57 and caught 
two passes for 36 yards. Rich 
Kindel led the receiving corps 
with 53 yards on 2 receptions. 

Bernie Pynos, who replaced 
Cappa, completed 5 of 13 passes 
for 62 yards and an interception. 
Cappa left the game with 62 
yards on 3 of 4 passing. 
NOTES: Clarion had defeated 
Lock Haven the previous five 
seasons, including 57-3 last 
year...It was Clarion's third 
loss of seven or fewer points 
this season. Alvin Slaughter is 
among the NCAA Division II 
statistical leaders in three cate- 
gories 



Williams - O'Neal continue winning wavs 



Netters move to 6-4 host Pitt today 



by Bethany Bool 
Sports Writer 



In what has been somewhat 
of an up and down year for the 
Clarion tennis team, the 
Golden Eagle netters were 
looking to bounce back from a 
tough trip to IUP last week- 
end, with two road matches at 
California and Youngstown 
State. 

The Golden Eagles traveled 
to California (PA) on Friday 
and returned home with a 7-2 
PSAC-West win. 

In singles play, freshman 
Amy Shaffer defeated Lori 
Casper 4-6, 7-6 (7-0), 6-1. 





Seniors Mimi Williams and Amy O'Neal 



Rachael Link won over Cal's 
Carmen Welker 6-2, 6-0, while 
Amy O'Neal remained undefeat- 
ed, beating Rachel Clark 3-6, 6-1, 



6-1. Senior Mimi Williams also 
continued her hot streak breezing 
past Megan Musolino 6-1, 6-0. 
"We really did a good job as a 



whole," Williams said. "We 
really needed this conference 
win." 

In doubles, Williams and 
Link defeated Welker and 
Bronson 8-3, improving the 
tandems record to 7-2 on the 
year. 

O'Neal and doubles partner 
Cassie Baker dropped 
Musolino and Clark 8-3 as 
well. 

"Everyone was on today," 
noted senior tri-captain Amy 
In the California match, the 
Golden Eagles dom - 

continued on page 21 




Clarion 32 
Lock Haven 33 

This Week vs 
Shippensburg 



Shippensburg 
at a glance 

This Saturday at Memorial 
Field, Clarion will face a 
Slippensburg (2-2 overall, 1-0 
PSAC-West) squad that is capa- 
ble of winning games in many 
ways, In their conference open 
er against Edinboro, the Red 

aider defense proved to be the 
difference, as DB Phil Galiano 
returned ^Interception 35 yards 
^theclmchmgtouclKfewnma 
!7«3 * handling the Fighting 
Scots* 

£q four games this season^ ! Jbe 
S4|(»pensburg defense has 
allowed an average of X8*5 
points per game. The Red 
Raiders opened their season with 
a loss at Shepherd (1 6-20), 
rebounded against Kutztown 
(21-14), and fell to Millersvilte 
(27*37), before their win over 
Edinboro. Although lackluster 
against the Scots, the Ship 
offense has recorded some 
impressive numbers this year. 
The Red Raiders rolled up 500 
yards of offense against 
Millersvilie, a team mat Clarion 
3 1-25 in the season opener. 

History is on the side of 
Clarion, who won last year's 
contest by a score of 59-20. The 
Golden Eagles have a 32*8-1 
advantage in the all-time series 
and have not lost a conference 
home game since losing to 
Edinboro 28-6 in 1995, 
NOTE: Shippensburg head 
coach Rocky Rees has a record 
of 73-60-2 in 11 years as a col- 
lege coach. 



P£g££lo -»^A^n 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



Cross Country team gets first win in Mt. Union Invitational 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



The women's cross country 
team won its first competitive 
tide at the ML Union Invitational 
last weekend. 

The men finished fifth. 

The nine team women's race 
showcased the strength of the 
team. Once again the first five 
finishers were packed very close 
- within 25 seconds. 

Head coach Mooney summed 
up the team's feelings by simply 



stating,"It's nice to finally win." 
(This was the first invitational 
win, mens or womens, under the 
four year coach.) 

Scoring for the winning team 
were Brigette Laflin(3), Rocky 
Wilson(5), Daria Diaz(6), Debbie 
Brostmeyer(8), Maureen 

Long(9), Kelly Null(18), and 
Cherie Zurko(22) in the 102 run- 
ner race. 

The men. competing without 
some runners, finished fifth in the 
10 team, 94 competitor race. 



Brad Alderton(12), Bubba 
Walters(16), Dave Ellwood(24), 
Jon Fox(29), Craig Carlson(39), 
Gregg Wade(49), and Jimmy 
Adams(52) did a nice job in pick- 
ing up some of the slack for the 
injured runners. 

Jim Passarelli and Bridgette 



Laflin are the Hot Legs winners, 
while the Keep On Running 
Award went to Cherie Zurko and 
Bubba Walters. 

Mooney praised his 
runners/The men and women, 
from top to bottom, as a team - 
it's the best we've ever done. I'm 



pleased where we're at" 

The teams will train through the 
next two weeks, to peak at the 
'big' meets at the end of the sea- 
son. 

This Saturday the teams will 
take on the alumni at Mayfield 
Golf Course at 9:00 a.m. 



Tennis team has eyes set on PSAC tournament 



Sports Trivia 

When was the last time Pitt beat Notre 
Dame in college football? 

Last Week's Answer: r 

Mario Lemuiex is the NHL's all-time 
goals per game leader. 



from page 20 

inated the doubles circuit with 
Kristen Golia and Shaffer team- 
ing up for an 8-3 win as well. 

"Doubles were our strong point 
against Cal," Williams noted. 

The Golden Eagles fortunes 
turned sour the very next day. 
Clarion headed West on 1-80 to 
visit the Youngstown State 
Penguins in a non-conference 
affair. 

The Pens took care of the 
Golden Eagles, pulling out a 5-4 
win. 

Amy O'Neal continued her win 
streak with a win over Jane Price 
6-4, 6-2. Rachael Link also 
dropped YSU's Amy Garcher 6- 
4,6-2. 

In doubles action, Golia and 
Shaffer defeated Abby Vens and 
Mary Russ 8-6. O'Neal and 



Baker also clipped Garcher and 
Price 8-3. 

"We played super," said 
Williams. 

"This was one of the time we 
played our hardest and we fought 
to come back in doubles, but just 
couldn't hold on. In a way, I 
think this is a victory for the team 
because we worked so hard and 
had high spirits as a team." 
Williams went on to say, 
"Our minds are set and we know 
we have to work hard for States." 
Sophomore teammate Rachael 
Link agrees, "We know what we 
need to do, we just have to go out 
and do it. Sometime instead of 
just going out and doing the 
things we need to in order to win, 
we make mistakes that beat our- 
selves. We can't do that in 
States." 





Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
Clarion Golden Eagle 
tennis player Kristen Golia. 

Clarion host Pittsburgh in a 
make-up match today and hosts 
Edinboro on Monday in the con- 
ference regular season finale. 

The PSAC Tournament is set 
for Friday October 17th and 
Saturday the 18th in Hershey 
Pennsylvania 



. 



ino otono 




- . L 

» n"i W ! » I t ' , «fl » » I 



I : ; *3i ) 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



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MIDDLEWEIGHT: 22 PULL-UPS 

TENNIS. INDOOR SOCCER & 
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CHECK THE BULLETIN BOARD FOR 

BRACKETS AND MATCH TIMES. 

a ON 3 BASKETBALL 
CAPTAINS MEETING; Tuesday, October J4 

9;15pm-Tipp»nGym 
GAMES BEGIN: Wednesday, October 15 

• MEN'S & WOMENS LEAGUES 

• ROSTER LIMIT: 5 PLAYERS 

• CHAMPIONSHIP T-SHIRTS will be awarded 

to the winners of each division. 



FLAG FOOTBALL STANDINGS 



MEN'S DIVISION: 


WON 


LOST 


D/F 


1 . THE GOOFATHERS OF FOOTBALL 


3 


4 


DFF 


3. BEER LEAGUE ALL STARS 


6 


2 


D 


4. BRAWLERS 


1 


4 


DFF 


5 THEDOGSBOLAX 


3 


4 


D 


6. SIGTAU GAMMA -GREY 


7 


1 




7. SIG TAU GAMMA - BLUE 


5 


2 


DD 


8 LAZYORUNKS 


3 


4 


F 


9 SIGMA PI - PURPLE 


7 


1 




10. WEIL STILL WIN AGAIN 


5 


2 




11. THE BOYS 


4 


2 




13. SIGMA PI GOLD 


4 


3 




14. GAMECOCKS 


1 


4 


FF 


15. MCDONALD 


3 


4 


F 


16 T D CLUB 


3 


4 


DF 


17. TEAMGRAFFIX 


4 


4 


F 


18. PURPLE HEADED WARRIORS 


5 


3 


D 


19 B M. PANTHERS 


4 


1 




20. MAULERS 


7 


1 


F 


21 RIMMERS 


3 


2 





(DEFAULTS & FORFEITS COUNT AS A LOSS) 




October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



root a *,,^if*- >n 



Page 22 



Barnett named All Tournament Selection 

Golden Eagles impressive at 
East Stroudsburg Tournament 

by Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



The Golden Eagle volleyball 
squad bounced back from a tough 
PSAC-West loss to Edinboro last 
week to win three games at the 
East Stroudsburg Tournament 
last weekend. 

Clarion met Edinboro in the 
first round match-up, where 
Clarion would avenge their pre- 
vious loss. Clarion dropped the 
Fighting Scots 15-12, 15-7, 8-15, 





Kristin Coiello/Clarion Call 



The Golden Eagle volleyball team played well over the 
weekend in the ESU Tournament Clarion's Alumni game 
is set for October 11th. 



OH Tracy Barnett 

15-10. 

The victory left the Golden 

Eagles to face a New Paltz team 

in which they did not know that 

much about Clarion proved to 
be too much for their opponents 

by a 15-9, 13-15, 15-10, 9-15, 

15-9 count. 

The second round win set up a 

third round match with PSAC- 

East foe West Chester. Clarion 

dropped the first two games by 

13-15, 5-15 marks. However, the 

Golden Eagles would rally to win 

three in a row by scores of 15-2, 

15-12, 15-12. The victory over 

the Huskies advanced the Golden 

Eagles fourth round matchup 

with tournament host East 



Stroudsburg. 

Clarion could not overcome a 
strong ESU attack, falling 5-15, 
15-12, 9-15, 7-15. 

Another bright spot for the 
Golden Eagles was the play of 
junior OH Tracy Barnett who 



ing back pain and has been play- 
ing through it. 

"She is still not playing up to 
par, to play with pain and make 
the All-Tournament team really 
says something about her," Burns 
commented. 



We played pretty well...but we haven't 
peaked yet. 

-Jodi Pezek Burns, head coach 



earned All-Tournament honors 
for her play. 

Tracy is a great kid," praised 
bead caoch Jodi Burns. "Even 
though she played good, contri- 
butions came from everything in 
the tournament" 

Bamett's play deserves recog- 
nition in that she has been battle- 



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As for the team's overall play, 
Bums has bittersweet feelings. 

"We played pretty well, but we 
haven't reached our potential 
yet." Burns noted. "We haven't 
peaked yet/* 

One thing that has been haunt- 
ing Burns' squad lately has been 
the injury bug. With Bamett's 
back problem, Jessa Canfield has 
missed two weeks with an ankle 
sprain. 

"We are really struggling with 
injuries," Burns added. "Staying 
healthy is important" 



Golfers hold their own at 
Allegheny Invitational 



by BUI Bates 
Sports Editor 



Clarion's golf team finished the 
season strong with a fourth place 
finish at the 24th Annual Guy W. 
Kuhn Memorial Golf Invitational 
at The Country Club in 
Meadville, PA. 

The Clarion linksters shot a 
combined 320 on the par 72 
6,551 yard course. 

Shawn Will's 77 led the Golden 
Eagles while Matt Honacki kept 
pace shooting a 78. 

Brent Will shot an 81 and Jeff 
Weller's 84 was fourth best on 
the team. J.P. Kenney turned in 
his scorecard with a 90 on the 
afternoon. 

Robert Morris barely edged the 
Golden Eagles with a combined 
319 total to take third. 

Host Allegheny successfully 



defended the title of its Kuhn 
Memorial, edging Division I St. 
Bonaventure by five strokes, 
shooting a +9 297. 

St. Bonaventure's Chris 
Blocher shot a course high 72 
leaving him at even par for the 
tournament. Nick Mahramas and 
Mike Gasper of Allegheny tied 
for second with a +1 73 while 
Chad Rittle of Westminister took 
fourth with a 74. Mahramas was 
runner up for a second consecu- 
tive year. The fifth spot was 
crowded with two Gators and 
two Bonnies vying for postion. 
Allegheny's Tom Lavelle and 
Nathan Smith both shot a 75 and 
St Bonaventure's Rich Bolander 
and Dan Hennessey did the same. 
Tournament Host Allegheny is 
currently ranked No. 2 in the 
Golf Coaches Association of 
America NCAA Division III poll. 



Steelers soar past Ravens 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



After what started out as 
Kordell Stewart's worst game as 
a starting quarterback, if not his 
career, the artist formerly known 
as Slash turned in one of the most 
incredible quarterbacking perfor- 
mances in Steeler history. 

Stewart, who was picked off on 
his first three posessions, man- 
aged to throw for three touch- 
downs and run for two, including 
a 74- yard jaunt to seal the 
Steeler win. 

The Steelers bolted out of the 
locker room down 21 points to 
start the second half, but Will 
Blackwell changed all that as he 
brought the opening kickoff back 
for a touchdown. The Steelers 
men dominated the second half, 
beating the Ravens in a 42-34 
shootout 

Another bright spot for the 
revived Steelers offense was 
another 100 plus yard rushing 
performance out of Jerome 
Bettis. So far mis season, Bettis 
has three 100-yard rushing games 




Steelers 42 
Ravens 34 



Clarion Uniu ersity Men's Basketball team 




SEEKING MALES AND FEMALES 

TO BECOME MANAGERS AND 

STATISTICIANS. IF INTERESTED 

PLEASE 

INQUIRE AT 102 TIPPIN, OR 

CALL 
226-2458 




and 522 yards overall, which puts 
him on pace for yet another 1,000 
yard season. 

A major concern for Pittsburgh, 
as they prepare for the 0-5 
Indianappolis Colts, is in the sec- 
ondary. Both Chad Scott and 
Randy Fuller are on the injury list 
this weekend, leaving the possib- 
lity of Carnell Lake moving to 
comerback, again. It was Lake 
who moved from his safety posi- 
tion to fill in for the then injured 
Rod Woodson. . 

This move may be necessary 
due to the injuries to both Scott 
and Fuller, and the lack of confi- 
dence in veteran J.B. Brown, who 
was an off-season acquisition 
from the Miami Dolphins. 

If Lake does make the move to 
comerback, Myron Bell would 
move in to start at strong safety. 
Ironically, that was the same 
move the Steelers made when 
they began their Super Bowl run 
back in 1995 when Rod Woodson 
went down. 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



CLASSIFIEDS 



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seeking students for promotional 
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regarding open-calls. 



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Furnished Apartments available 
for 4 people for the Fall 1998 - 

Spring 1999 semesters. 

Very close to campus. Leave 

message at 226-5917 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 
available for SPRING 
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campus, quiet, no pets, refer- 
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or beeper (814) 227-0722 



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4, close to campus, available for 

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or beeper (814)227-0722 



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Any campus organization can 
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65. Qualified callers receive 
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http://www.icpt.com 



Off-Street Parking Available 

CUP commuters, tired of look- 
ing for a place to park or feeding 
meters? Rent a reserved parking 

space by the semester or year. 

Only one block from campus. 
Call 764-3690 



Seeking Pen Pals: 

Fascinating life story. 

Incarcerated male seeking male 

and female pen pals. Will 

respond to all correspondences. 

Write to: 

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2500 S. Avon Belden Rd. 

Grafton, Ohio 44044 



RELIABLE SPRING BREAK 
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Organize a group-travel free. 

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brochure. Call 1 (888) SPRING 

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games- Asking $295 

Call after 5 pm. 

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and two games plus memory 
card. $190O.B.O. 

Call 226-8344 

Ask for Scan. 



84 Renult Alliance 
Call 764-3443 



PERSONALS 



To the Sisters of e$A, 
Couldn't fall asleep at a mixer 
like that! Thanks for the good 
time! From the Brothers of 65 

Hey Lisa Lamorella, only three 
more days till you find out who 
lam! Be good tonight I'll be 

watching you! 

Love, your BIG 

Happy ALF to my orientation 

BUDS! 

Love, MB 

Little- Happy 21st! I'm so glad 

that you're finally a BIG girl! 

We'll have fun tonight. 

Love, MB 

ACE-Happy Birthday 

Sweetheart! Getting closer to 

the Big 3-0 everyday! 

Love, MB 



To the brothers of Theta Xi, 

You boys are doing a great job. 

The float is of top nob 

The pomping is almost done. 
This year we'll be Number One! 



Jenny J, Last weekend was a 
blast, I thought the drive would 

forever last, We know the tape 
by heart, We lost at the table-not 
smart!, This weekend we'll take 

reign, and next weekend we'll 
be insane!! Love, Nicole 



The Sisters of AIA would like 

to congratulate Kimmy 
Bradshaw on her engagement. 
* We love you!! 



TheSisters of AEA wish every- 
one good luck with the parade! 



05, We had a blast at he mixer! 

Y'all look most favorable in 

your PJ's. Love, OOA 

Dody and Rachel, We love you 

and are always here for you! 

Love, the Sisters of 04>A 

Happy Birthday D.J. and Carrie! 

We love you! 

The Sisters of 04>A 



To the wrestlers: Thanks for the 
great mixer, we'll slam with you 
anytime. Love, the Dance Team 

Good luck with homecoming 

Jill K. Love your future 

ZTA sisters 

SP, can't wait to float away with 
you. Love, the Sisters of ZTA 

Let's Toga it up at the mixer £11. 
Love, ZTA 

Have a safe and happy ALF 
week everyone! Love, ZTA 

The Brothers of Sigma Pi would 

like to congratulate Chad, 

Kevin, Ken and Dana on 

Homecoming Court 



Nikki, Welcome to the #1 
Family Love, your G-BIG 



To AIT, We can't wait until the 
mixer. This float could be the 
best ever, thanks to the wonder- 
ful girls of A£T 
The Brothers of KAP 

Briann, Your G-Big loves you 
welcome to AIT 

Happy Birthday Natalie and 
Julie. Love, ZTA 



Damon, Thank you so much for 

the beautiful lavalier. You know 

how much it means to me. I 

will always wear you letters 

proudly. Love always, 

Heather 



We can't wait to pass the pitch- 
er again, we had a blast. 
Love, III 



Happy Birthday Leanne, your 

finally 20! Love, your Sigma 

Sisters 



The Sisters of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma would like to wish every- 
one a safe and enjoyable ALF. 



ZIZ Welcomes Dawn Dicky to 
Fall 97' 

Theta Xi, Have a blast during 

ALF. Good luck on your float! 

My thoughts are always with 

you. Love always, Diana 



OX, You guys sure know how to 

party! Thanks for the great 

mixer. Love, AIT 



The Sisters of X%T woula* 

like to congratulate our new 

associate members: Lani, Sandy, 

Jody, Hollie, Rachel, Melisasa, 

Nikki, Sarah, Brianne, Rayanne, 

Kristan, Marci, and Jamie. 

We love you girls! 

Delta Zeta would like to wish a 

Happy Birthday to Andrea, 

Allison, Lori and Stacy! 

Happy 22nd Birthday!! 

The BOYS at 136 Grand Ave 

hope that we can have a great 

ALF with our girls upstairs Jen, 

Kelly, Carrie and Regina 



Hey Mandy, 

Don't forget to drop off the kids! 

Beware of the traffic! 



Hie Sisters of Delta Zeta would 

like to wish everyone a happy 

and safe Autumn Leaf!! 

Congratulations to the pledges 

of Kappa Delta Rho. The 

Brothers of KAP 

Happy 21st Birthday Kemp. 

Wexford is in the house. 

Hie Brothers of KAP 

Megan Parks, keep smiling... 
Only 4 more days then the party 
begins! Have a great ALF! Love 

your Big (Your 2 big says HI) 



The Clarion Call would like to 
wish the coolest Editor-in-Chief 

a very Happy Belated B-day! 

Love, your ass-kissing staff! 



Happy last ALF roomies! Mony, 
great to see you! Love, Founds 



To my Bitch MB, 

Happy Birthday! Glad we're 

here to survive and "stick it out" 

together! I'm looking forward 

to the weekend! Love, Jennay 



To my dearest bitch Jennay- You 

rule! Starting at noon seems a 

little late, but you know that the 

older you get the less hang time 

you have! Love, your aging 

bitch, MB 



Dear Dr. Barlow, We wish you, 

your family, and neighbor Bob 

all the best this Autumn Leaf 

Festival weekend. Love, The 

Clarion Call Executive Board 



Sheri, Tne JD coolers are still 

chill in' in my fridge! If we can't 

have a happy ALF we'll have a 

happy other day! Love, MB 



J 



Tun, Keep your filthy paws off 
of Little Susie Hunsberger, espe- 
cially on her birtday! 
Yours violently, Scott 



Sober Sandee and Beer Maniac, 

Too bad that you can't play, I'll 

miss you both! Bring home the 

big bucks! Love, MB 



DearBecca, Sorry I missed you 

last time, see you Friday! Love, 

Your BAP sister, MB 

Happy 22nd Birthday, Sheryl 

Graczyk! Love, your A<I>E 

Sisters 



Way to go Moureen! We can't 

wait to see you in the parade! 

Love, your A<HE Sisters 

The Sisters of A4>E would like 

to wish everyone a fun and safe 

ALF! 

Thanks to Erica for your great 

work on the grab-a-date! Love, 

your AOE Sisters 

Kristy McKay, I can't wait until 

Sunday! You're doing a great 

job! Love, your Big 



Jen Reid, We hope your ALF is 
fun and safe. Can't wait to wel- 
come you to the family Sunday! 
Love, your Big, 2 Big and 3 Big 



« » » »,i »,« 






Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 9, 1997 



Western Conference loads up 
as teams chase Lord Stanley 



by Robert Fuchs 
Sports Writer 



As the 97-98 NHL season gets 
into full swing, teams in the 
Western Conference, home of the 
last two Stanley Cup champions, 
are gearing up for a third consec- 
utive Cup run. Here is a team- 
by- team preview of the Western 
Conference. 
Colorado Avalanche 

The Avalanche are still the most 
talented team in the league and 
that alone makes them a con- 
tender. Since they resigned team 
leader Joe Sakic they will defi- 
natley contend again this year. If 
Patrick Roy is his usual stellar 
self in net, you can bet on the 
Avalanche making another seri- 
ous cup run. 
Dallas Stars 

The Stars did themselves a big 
favor by resigning Mike 
Modano, who was one of the 
most consistent players. They 
still have a relatively young 
nucleus of players that are ready 
to make their first trip to the 
Stanley Cup Finals. All they have 
to do is get past the Red Wings 
and Avalanche. 

Detroit Red Wings 

The defending Stanley Cup 
champs will have a tough road 
ahead if they plan to go back to 
the finals. They have essentially 
the same core of players from last 
year, both the problem comes in 
motivation to get back to the 
Finals. If they can duplicate the 
drive that they had last year with 
players like Larry Murphy and 
Sergei Fedorov leading the way, 
men it is possible. 
Anaheim Mighty Ducks 

One of the youngest teams in 
the NHL, the Ducks are hoping 
their youngsters are ready to 
mature after a good season last 
year. 

Paul Kariya and Teemu Selanne 
will lead the team on a treck that 
may end up in the Finals. That is 
if they can develop a more even 
attack that gets production from 
places other than the first line. 
Then they may be able to contend 
more easily in their conference. 
Phoenix Coyotes 

The Coyotes are defmitley a 
contender because they have 
such a high talent level on the 
team. They were definitely the 
underachievers of last season. 

If they can form team cohesiv- 
ness they will be a team to watch. 
Look for Keith Tkachuk and 



Jeremy Roenick to the lead them 
into the playoffs. How far they 
go in the playoffs is up to them. 
St Louis Blues 

The Blues success will rely on 
keeping Bret Hull happy and in 
St. Louis. If they can do that then 
their team will continue to get 
stronger. 

With Chris Pronger on defense 
and Grant Fuhr in net the defense 
will play well enough to support 
a good offense. If it all falls into 
place, then the Blues will be back 
in the playoffs once again. 
Edmonton Oilers 

The Oilers will continue to 
improve this year as their young 
players keep maturing. 

Doug Weight will lead the 
offense, while a good young 
defensive core will provide lots 
of hitting, especially with Bryan 
Marchment in the lineup. 

Look for the Oilers to take great 
strides this year towards a Cup 
run. 
Chicago Blackhawks 

The Blackhawks are a very 
capable defensive team with 
Chris Chelios holding the fort. 

The problem has been incon- 
stancy on offense. But with Tony 
Amonte stepping up as well as he 
did last year when Roenick left, 
the offense was not that bad. 

If the Blackhawks get consis- 
tent production from their for- 
wards, they can make it into the 
second round of the playoffs at 
least 
Vancouver Canucks 

Adding Mark Messier and 
Brian Bellows to their roster 
means that the Canucks want to 
make a run at the Cup this year. 

After missing the playoffs last 
year, they are now a top con- 



tender in the Western 
Conference. With players like 
Alexander Mogilny, Pavel Bure, 
and Mark Messier, they mean 
business. It remains to be seen if 
they can put it all together. 
Calgary Flames 

The Flames are hoping one of 
their young goaltenders steps up 
this year. Right now it is Rick 
Tabaracci in the starting role, 
whether he can hold on or not 
remains to be seen. 

They have a good offense that 
they will have to rely on if their 
goaltending does not come 
through. Forewards like Theoren 
Fleury and Jarome Iginla will 
have to lead the team. 
Toronto Maple Leafs 

Toronto is in the process of 
rebuilding around one of the best 
players in the league, Mat 
Sundin. 

They will be looking for Sundin 
to lead the attack with Wendal 
Clark close behind. The defense 
is very capable with Felix Potvin 
in net. 

The Leafs will be looking to 
make the playoffs this year. 
Los Angeles Kings 

The Kings are going to have 
trouble making the playoffs this 
year. 

They have a good defense but 
their offense is seriously lacking. 
Forwards Luc Robitaille and 
Josef Stumpel are not going to 
solve thier offensive problems. 
San Jose Sharks 

The Sharks will be looking to 
improve this year with acquisi- 
tions of Shawn Burr and Murray 
Craven at the forward positions. 

Their defense will be adequa- 
te this year as they try to back 
into playoffs. 








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Wlm'e i J iiBibi 




Saturday's 

parade was a 

huge success. 

For a look back 

at the Autumn 

Leaf Festival see 

page 11. 



<L on tents 



Opinion 

Reader Responses. 
News 



Lifestyles 

Photo Essay.... 
Entertainment.. 

Call-on-you 

Sports 

Classifieds 



...2 
....3 
...5 
..10 
.14 
16 
.19 
.20 
.23 



Volume 79, 9**tte 6 



Weather 



Thursday- Partly 
sunny but cool. 
High in the 50s. 

Friday- Chance of 

rain. High in the 
low 50s. 

Saturday- High in 
the 50s. Partly 

cloudy. Showers. 



Looking down on Clarion 




An aerial view of Downtown during ALF. 



Photo by Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call and Special Thanks to Dr. Herb Bolland 



«<•... »> 



Page 2 



fi. 



,„»•"*, 



-jnr 



The Clarion Call 



poor ar t«^w"» 
October 16, 1997 



OPINION 



Clarion 
Call 

270 frntnu.I Cmnplex 
CUrton. $1 16214 

(814)226-2380 
/flX (614)226-2697 

e-mail: aIl@Mia.cUrttii.tfci 
litBli.dir<m.cfei/4caiII/nl.|t« 

Cxettttfbe Poarb 



Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

On-line Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 





Hide Tart 




i live in one of the 

fastest grouting 

and changing 

environments that 

can be imagined. " 



Tract) Orr 



"Just Another Monstrosity 
of Modernism" 

WHACK! CLANK, CLANK! 
ONE, TWO, THREE...! CHA- 
CHING! All of these sounds are 
making me go crazy. As I sit here 
in the lower rotunda of the 
Gemmell Student Center, drink- 
ing my Cafe Mocha from the 
French Quarter, this is what I 
hear. To my left at the very end 
of the hall are the three racquet- 
ball courts, all of which are being 
used at the moment. A bit closer 
is the weight room with resis- 
tance machines, bikes, stair 
climbers, and numerous other hi- 
tech equipment to make the body 
'rock hard.' Closest to my com- 
fortable seat is the aerobics stu- 



dio where an advanced step class 
is in session. In the very opposite 
direction from all this action I 
hear the sound of cash registers 
'raking in the dough* made by 
hard-working students and their 
parents. These facilities are won- 
derful and are a mere four years 
old. I have made frequent use of 
almost all of them, and I rather 
enjoy doing so. My fellow stu- 
dents and my tuition are paying 
for me to use all of these rooms, 
and I'm quite happy to have 
them. There is only one problem; 
even after four years, my hard 
earned dollar is still paying for 
this extravagant building. 
As Bob Dylan said, "The times, 

Continued on page 4 



Staff 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Steve Ostrosky, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman, Sheri Hertzog 

Asst. Copy & Design Editor: Jnel Ritzier 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Donna Engle, Hope Guy, Leslie 

Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Bethany Boal, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, Tommi 

Hearn, Rob Kriley, Lori Matachak, Aaron Mitchell, Dan Wascovich, 

Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Stella Meyer, Jen Mumford, Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger, 

Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, 

Jen Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Karli Berlin, Greg Hensler, Megan Klauss, Wayne 

Lines, Heather Liti 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tina Lasky, Jen 

Mumford, Stella Meyer, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tun Bentz, Cara Daugherty, JeffKomoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

•Names remaining in the staff box in the December 4, 1997 Qall receive co-curricular credit. 



"Editorial 




a Oki how 'bout 
this: Lower the 

price of the 
ticf&ts, Tarfgng 

Committee. ' 



<Benj Slitman, Copy & Design "Editor 



Clarion...It's Not Bad. 
Now, I realize that's not going 
to be the university's next ad slo- 
gan (I would personally suggest 
"Clarion: You're Damn Right!"). 
But let's face it, our little school 
stacks-up pretty well against a lot 
of places as far as the education 
for the price. And, overall, I have 
no major problems with my past 
four years here. OK, so my 9- 
year-old cousin could grow a 
beard in the time it would take 
him to get through a cafeteria 
line, and the time capsule outside 
Gemmell will be opened before 
Founders Hall will be. But I, 
along with most people, can live 
with that. 

There are, though, a few very 
little outrages that have been 
needing fixing for far too long. 
They are petty, money-producing 
scams, approved by our adminis- 
tration, that you would only 
expect from such trusted organi- 
zations as our state and federal 
governments or the Mafia. And 
if you've ever parked your car on 
campus, or ever eaten at the 
Gemmell snack bar, you've been 
screwed hard by these little 



scams one way or the other. 

The first outrage is parking 
tickets. You know, those ugly 
bright yellow pieces of snot rag 
that clutter approximately 75% of 
university parked cars every day. 
While there is a need to punish 
the most defiant parkers among 
us (the ones who park on side- 
walks, on basketball courts, on 
people, etc.), maybe it's about 
time to take it easy on everyone, 
Public Safety. OOPS, sorry, I 
actually thought that could hap- 
pen for a second! Guess my 
dreams of a public safety which 
spent more time "securing" and 
less time "meter-maiding," got 
the best of me for a second. 

Ok, how 'bout this- Parking 
Committee, lower the price of the 
tickets. The reason for my revo- 
lutionary ideal is actually pretty 
simple. Take the cost of a park- 
ing ticket in downtown Clarion, 
where the amount of available 
spaces is less. Price for a park- 
ing ticket downtown: $1. Price 
for a ticket on Clarion's campus: 
$5. 

Continued on page 4 



The Clarion Call is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief)- Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi- 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication. 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request. Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 pjn. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 pjn. on the week of publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSES] 



"Now onto the ignorant people in Gemmell." 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to write about the 
shitty service that is given to the 
students via Gemmell and the 
Cafe. First of all I had gone to 
the Cafe right after class. 

Once I got there I discovered 
that I had lost my ID card. When 
I tried to explain to the lady at the 
door, she sighed as if her chest 
was gonna burst, then proceeded 
to ask me if I lived on campus or 
close to it 

As if I was gonna leave and go 
all the way home to get it. Do the 
people in the Cafe not realize that 
most of the students who eat 
there are between classes and 
don't have time to go home and 
get their ID's? 



Some of the students, like 
myself, live pretty far off cam- 
pus. I purchase the meal plan so I 
don't have to go all the way home 
to eat then get back onto campus 
within an hour. 

Now onto the ignorant people 
in Gemmell. I work on The Call. 
and so I had gone into the snack 
bar and purchased a drink during 
deadline; it was in a clear bottle. 
I went back into the snack bar not 
more than a half hour later; the 
lady who had checked me out 
was standing at the registers talk- 
ing to another worker. 

The snack bar was dead, and 
they both watched me walk past 
them with my coat and bookbag 
on, and the drink that I had pur- 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



chased 3/4 of the way gone. 

I walked over to the pretzels 
got one out and walked over to 
the register. 

It was there that they informed 
me that I would have to pay for 
my drink again!!! 

Can you believe that? 

That woman was the same one 
who had checked me out a half 



Despite trendy foods. Mom's recipes and late night deliveries 

Students still dish the campus dining service 

by Colleen DeBaise 
College Press Service 



•Amanda Horowitz is sick of 
dining hall food. 

Horowitz, a Northwestern 
University sophomore, is a 
vegan. That's kind of like a veg- 
etarian except stricter- she won't 
touch meat, or any food that 
comes from an animal, such as 
milk or cheese. Needless to say, 
she finds her dining hall options 
a bit limited. 

"It seems like three out of four 
days I have beans, beans, beans," 
she complains. That is all they 
think I want to eat I used to love 
all kinds of beans, but it gets old 
fast. Beans, beans, beans." 

Other students are less critical 
of dining hall grub. Chris Bokel, 
a Syracuse University freshman, 
says the cafeteria meals are tasty, 
if not exactly gourmet. 
"Everyone always complains 
(but) they can't possibly accom- 
modate everyone," he says. "I 
mean, you can't expect the din- 
ing hall to be a five star restau- 
rant" 

Maybe not but campus dining 
halls, once considered the 
scourge of college students' 
experience, have been forced to 
spice up their image to compete 
with fast-food restaurants, pizza 
delivery and local eateries. As a 
result, some dining halls now 
lure students by asking parents to 
send in favorite recipes. Others 
offer trendy foods such as wraps, 
smoothies and cappuccino. 
Dining halls even are offering 



late-night meals and delivering 
food to better accommodate stu- 
dents' busy lifestyles. 

Still more cafeterias work to 
meet the epicurean needs of 
picky eaters like Horowitz. An 
estimated 15 percent of students 
who eat at campus dining halls 
forgo the standard Beef 
Stroganov and Chicken Divan for 
vegetarian meals. 

And, "salads aren't the only 
vegetarian option at most col- 
leges," says S. E. Nunmaker, 
food services manager at 
American University. The col- 
lege's food service saw an 8 per- 
cent rise in the number of vegir- 
tarian students and now offers 
garden burgers, pastas, and other 
vegetable dishes. 

Some dining services are hop- 
ing to attract students through 
Mom's "Home cooking." At 
Saint Mary's College in Indiana, 
the menu showcases parents' 
recipes. Students dine in 
"Gretchen's Mom's Herb 
Chicken," "Maura's Mom's 
Tuna Noodle Casserole," 
"Kristen's Mom's Mac-n- 
Cheese" and "Janet's Mom's 
Meatloaf." 

Roanoke College in Virginia 
also urges parents to send in 
favorite recipes so that students 
who eat at the campus dining hall 
feel more at home. 

"College food does not mean 
inferior food," said Michael C. 
Maxey, dean of admissions at 
Roanaoke. "We've had students 
who told us that they chose 



Roanoke because of the food 
after they made a decision about 
the quality of the college." 

Still, campus dining services 
find students are a difficult 
crowd to please. Brian 
Landauer, 18, a Syracuse fresh- 
man, admits his favorite dish is 
take-out. 

"I have a full meal plan, and at 
the end of the week, I have 13 
meals left! I only eat in the din- 
ing hall when it is absolutely 
necessary," he says. "The food 
literally makes me sick." 

Horowitz is convinced her 
campus cafeteria can't get lettuce 
right "And the salad is pretty 
awful everyday- the lettuce is 
always limp and icky," she says. 
"For once I'd like some decent 
salad. I don't think that is too 
much to ask, do you?" 

For most students, it's an issue 
of quality, not variety. Even 
tough critics admit campus din- 
ing halls are serving up more 
than mystery meat and noodle 
casseroles. Most cafeterias have 
made an effort to diversify their 
daily menus. 

The dining hall at Western 
Washington University now 
offers Cyberwraps, or tortillas, 
rice, beans, meats, fresh vegeta- 
bles and spices rolled into a 
lunch time wrap. Students can 
wash it down with a "Final 
Exam," which is a frosty carrot 
apple and celery juice blend. 

Made-to-order quesadillas 
filled with peppers, meats, 

Continued on page 6 



hour before then watched me 
walk in, get a pretzel, and go to 
the register. 

Yeah, I guess those thrifty 
Gemmell people finally caught 
onto the students secret hiding 
place where we chug down as 
much of our drink as we can so 
we don't have to pay for it! 

I think it is about time that 



these workers take a minute and 
realize that if it wasn't for people 
like me who have no other choice 
than to purchase a meal ticket for 
food that makes you run to the 
bathroom before you even leave 
the place, they would be out of a 
job! 

Sincerely, 
Danielle Hock 




{ BOS WBE^I^.. 

Tk following tootylou 
km§ the third wuliin October. 



October 16, 1970 

"Six Thousand March on Harrisburg" headlined page one of 
The Clarion Call this week in 1970. Tne lead read; "Six thou- 
sand members of the state college community, including nearly 
one hundred students of Clarion State College, converged on the 
steps of the Capitol building, yesterday, to show state legislators 
their concern over the financial plight of higher education within 
the Commonwealth." 

October 15, 1975 

In the "Letters to the Editor" section of The Clarion Call. 
Melvin David Hubbared wrote the following excerpt which he 
signed, "Yours in disgust": "Did Clarion forget about the 
Homecoming Queen and Autumn Leaf Festival? Let me first ask 
two more questions! Did anyone from The Call attend the 
Autumn Leaf Festival? Was Bob Yeatts the only Call writer in 
attendance at the Homecoming game? According to last week's 
Call (Which didn't include anything about Homecoming except 
for the game) the answer to both of these questions is yes." The 
front page of this story features a photo of President Gemmell 
crowing the homecoming queen, and the back page had photos of 
three floats and announced the results of the parade. Some things 
never change. 

October 16, 1980 

In the column "Only At Clarion" the following observations 
were made: 

•... Can you wake up in the morning and fmd a pitcher of grain 
punch in your fridge. 

•... Do accounting majors know what kind of soap to use to wash 
off hickies. 

«... Does a girl in College Park have a "closed party" and not even 
invite her roommates. 

• ...Does Happy Hour last half the day. 

October 15, 1987 

In this issue, the Roving Reporter asked "Do you feel intimi- 
dated by AIDS in Clarion?" The following where the answers 
students gave. 

• **No, because I don't know any homosexuals in the Clarion 
area." 

• "No. AIDS is not a problem that affects me." 

• "No, it doesn't bother me unless I'm involved in the situation." 
• " Personally no, because I'm very selective." 

• "Yes, I've taken precautionary measures to ensure prosperity 
and integrity within my historical and traditional lifestyle." 

All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



October 9, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 4 



Hide Park continued from page 2„: 



they are a changin"' and a rural 
area like Clarion is not immune 
to this fact. I have seen many 
changes such as faculty, staff, and 
food service shifts. 

As a Resident Assistant at 
Clarion University in the north 
western region of Pennsylvania I 
have seen these changes and 
more. 

My Residence Hall is Bertha V. 
Nair, and in my three years of 
service to the State System of 
Higher Education I have learned 
a lot about how a university is 
run. Why is it then that when I 
hear about a new recreation cen- 
ter being built on campus that I 
am so alarmed? 

In the Spring of 1996 a propos- 
al was made to build this rec cen- 
ter on university property. I 
should clarify that the committee 
in charge has decided to build in 
a high traffic area of campus. As 
time wore on and the semester 
dwindled I began to hear more 
and more about this idea for yet 
another monstrosity of mod- 
ernism in this rural area of the 
state. 

I have spoken with the people 
on campus who are pulling for 
the new recreation center. I have 
heard them trying to make a won- 
derful case for their proposed fit- 
ness spectacular. Clarion 
University is one of fourteen 
state schools from which young 
high school seniors may choose 
as their vessel for higher educa- 
tion. 

The trustees at the university 
feel that in order to raise enroll- 
ment they must develop the cam- 
pus into an area in which the 
youth of Pennsylvania or for that 
matter the youth of the United 
States will want to enroll. In 
order to accomplish these feats, 
the students and parents of 
Clarion need to raise $5.5 mil- 
lion. 

Seeing the traffic that runs in 
and out of the Gemmell Student 
Center each day tells me that 
something is found to be interest- 
ing to at least 500 students a day. 
For that matter, Gemmell is par- 
allel to the Tippin Gym which 
houses both swimming and div- 
ing pools, three basketball courts, 
three racquetball courts, a dance 
studio, a wrestling room, locker 
rooms, classrooms, and finally a 
snack bar. 

Granted Tippin is an old build- 
ing, but as one of my friends 
pointed out to me, he and his 
friends use the facilities to play 
basketball because they are good 
courts. It sounds to me like the 
students are putting both Tippin 
and Gemmell to good use. 



However, I am still troubled 
about that $5.5 million rec center 
the school thinks it so desperate- 
ly needs. 

This summer I worked for a 
family by taking care of their two 
boys. I was told I would make 
four dollars an hour, forty hours a 
week, for five days a week. That, 
however, was a lie because I was 
given about twenty hours a week, 
maybe three days a week. 

This all means that I didn't 
make or save much money over 
the three month summer break. I 
came back to school with only 
$186.76 in my National City 
checking account. 

Out of this money I had to pur- 
chase books for the semester 
which put me into debt. If I was 
lucky I would only have a bill for 
books, but this new rec center 
adds yet more money to my bill. 

As a senior, I am charged an 
extra ten dollars a semester for 
the next two years in which I 
continue my education. To a 
high school graduate who has 
had a decent job for the summer, 
I'm sure that doesn't sound like 
an extreme amount of money. 
The real problem is that I will 
never have a chance to use the 
facilities. However, I haven't 
mentioned the fact that sopho- 
mores are charged an extra $35 
and incoming freshmen are 
expected to pay $80 a semester 
until the project is completed. 

Estimate building time: three 
years. Clarion is a four year col- 
lege, so if the Clarion High 
School graduate decides that he 
wants to enroll at Clarion 
University, he may see and use 
that rec center for approximately 
one year of his college career. In 
all fairness to the incoming fresh- 
men, I would like to say that the 
cost of using the rec center for 
one year will amount to $640. 

It is now 11:30 at night, and as 
I sit here in the office of Nair 
Hall, I wonder what will become 
of our Tippin Gym and Gemmell 
Student Center when the new rec 
cent is finally complete. 

I have to contemplate the fact 
that the rec center may become 
so popular with its elevated 
indoor track, three partitioned 
basketball courts, two racquetball 
courts, hi-tech Nautilus and free 
weight rooms, mirrored dance 
studio, and snack/juice bar that 
students will no longer feel the 
need to use the formerly men- 
tioned buildings. 

Would there be a point in hav- 
ing these other buildings if stu- 
dents could fmd what interested 
them under one roof? I hate to 
answer my own question, .but I 



would be inclined to say "no." I 
ask "What then?" to the adminis- 
trators who once had great plans 
of a new and exciting project, but 
now find tons of useless brick 
lying in their laps. 

Clarion has a wonderful reputa- 
tion for its many opportunities. 
The university offers one of the 
most highly acclaimed Speech 
Pathology and Audiology pro- 
grams in the country. 

Now, I know that fitness has 
become a very important 
American pastime, but does a 
university with excellent acade- 
mic programs really need three 
building on campus almost 
entirely devoted to fitness. 

Though I must confess that I 
see some point in the investment 
of the new building on campus. 
Students from the tri-state area 
and beyond will be interested in 
an exciting place to hang out with 
new found friends, but didn't I 
come to a university for an edu- 
cation:? 

The Calrson Library could use 
some materials that weren't 
copyrighted five years prior to 
the start of the Vietnam War. I 
seem to think that the only way 
the trustees see higher enrollment 
on campus is by envisioning stu- 
dents milling around in an over- 
glamorized gymnasium. 

It doesn't seem possible to me 
or other residents whom I have 
spent time with that the people in 
charge have completely thought 
their plans through. With higher 
enrollment on campus, where am 
I supposed to house after this 
astonishing influx of students? I 
had two women living in the 
study lounge on the seventh floor 
of my residence hall. My friend 
and fellow RA, Greg, had four 
men living in the study lounge of 
the first floor. 

I live in one of the fastest grow- 
ing and changing environments 
that can be imagined. This is 
Clarion University, in the north 
western region of Pennsylvania. 
I came for an education, and I 
know I will leave with a Bachelor 
of Science in both elementary 
education and secondary educa- 
tion. I didn't need a rec center to 
help me decide that this rural 
campus is an excellent place to 
receive an education, and neither 
did the other 5,843 students who 
will came back for another 
semester or are beginning their 
education at Clarion. 

•The author is a Senior 

Elementary 

Education/Secondary 

Education Major. 




Attention Web Crawlers! 



http://clipart.com/- Here's the site for any- 
one who is a fanatic when it comes to cre- 
ative designs on the web. An unbelievable 
amount of icons, graphics, animated charac- 
ters/cartoons and much MUCH more! 

http://www.wteam.com/wcard/Halloween.html- Get into the holi- 
day, and make a friend a Halloween card! This site lets you create 
(with the help of the authors ideas and graphics) and send a 
Halloween holiday card to anyone who has an address on the inter- 
net! Some are even animated! 

http://www.ubl.com-The Ultimate Band List! For any and all bands 
you want to know more about...this is your site! 



Page 5 



.#T 



»* 



f| rN 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call will publish website submissions from students, facul- 



ty, staff, and the community. If you know of a great site that you 
would like to share with our readers submit the complete address, and a 
brief description to our office in room 270 Gemmell Student Center or 
e-mail us at Call@mail.clarion.edu. We will log onto all the sites sub- 
mitted to verify that they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 




continued 



Wwm. 



Does your butt feel sore yet? 
Get out the aloe vera, because 
there's more. 

Did you ever eat in the 
Gemmell snack bar? Ah yes, the 
prices of a Red Lobster with the 
quality of a gas station vending 
machine. A little price compari- 
son is all that's needed to show 
my point here. Price of a turkey 
sandwich on wheat bread at the 
Gemmell Snack Bar: $2.50. 
Price of one loaf of bread, and a 
1/2 pound of turkey at your local 
grocery store: $2.50. That's just 
one example from the Snack Bar. 
They do it because we're all stu- 
pid enough to pay it. . 

Does something seem wrong 
here? Is there some kind of intri- 
cate labor involved in the produc- 
tion of these sandwiches? Some 
kind of backhanded skill tech- 
nique? I'd venture to guess that 
there isn't; we're just getting 
screwed: plain and simple. I 
can't think of one reason that 
would justify charging $1.50 for 
a bottle of yoo-hoo where the 
same bottle costs less at 7-11, 
which doesn't exactly charge 
thrift store prices. 

Now I don't want The Call t o 
get 9,000 letters from every 
Parking Committee, Snack Bar 
employee and Administration 
member justifying their scams. 
The cost is too much: period. I, 
as well as every student here, 
wish that I had a nest egg of cash 
laying around. If I did, I'd pay all 
my fines and would be knee deep 
in fine Canadian Lager and 
Marshmallow Ruff. But, we 
don't live in Disney world, and 
most of us are too poor to even 
buy Blatz. And Tm not even 



going to start wondering where 
that vast goldmine of fines and 
excess cash goes. That's another 
story all together. You would 
expect to get ripped off like this 
in places like New York or other 
tourist trap cities. 

I'm not the kind of person who 
makes a million gripes and does- 
n't give some suggestions on 
how to change matters, so here it 
is: hey parking committee, 
administration, and those in 
charge of Riemer Snack Bar, 
STOP RIPPING US OFF! 
Charge us $1 for parking tickets, 
and make the price of your food 
comparable to the prices at a reg- 
ular fast food place. Fairly sim- 
ple, huh? 

Is this going to happen? I doubt 
it Why? Because all of us as 
students pay it, and we silently 
gripe about it later. But I'd like 
some of the people in charge out 
there to know that most of us 
don't find sheer enjoyment in 
getting ripped off, and that we 
resent you for your abuse of 
authority. I expect to be ripped 
off my whole life by taxes and 
the government, but it's just sad 
that I have to learn these lessons 
on being ripped off from a place 
that is supposed to teach me how 
to lead the world and to be a bet- 
ter person. I guess that if some of 
Clarion's graduates turn out to be 
crooked used car salesmen or 
fraudulent business people, we'll 
know where they learned how to 

rip people off. 

r 

• The author is a senior 
Communication major. 






NEWS 



CU Homecoming Wrap-Up 

Fletcher and Robinson crowned 



University Relations 
1997 Homecoming Court-Front from left: Alyssa Curry, Jenni Mumford, Nick Chervenak, 
Wayne Fletcher (King), Ken Pruitt, Shannon Bean, Lisa Robinson (Queen),and Kevin 
Mizenko. Back from left: Dani Close, Chad Tuttoilmondo, Valerie Drozd, Dana McComb, 
Dawn Snyder, Kurt Staab, Jill Katana, Jeff Levkulich, Maureen McLane, and Josh Selleck. 



by Leslie Suhr 
News Writer 



The 1997 Clarion University 
Homecoming Court was selected 
by the CSA student body. The 
court consisted of 11 men and 11 
women. 

This year's Homecoming king 
and queen wee crowned at the 
annual pep rally on October 9, 
1997 and were represented in the 
parade. They were also recog- 
nized during halftime ceremonies 
during the Clarion-Shippensburg 
football game on Saturday. This 
year's king and queen were 
Wayne Fletcher and Lisa 
Robinson. Both said the opportu- 
nity has given them something to 
cherish for the rest of their lives. 

Robinson said, "You couldn't 
really guess who would win. It is 
the best experience and one that 
wont happen again. Everyone 
was real supportive and Jamie 
did a good job organizing the 
affair and making us feel like 
royalty." 

"I can't describe my feelings," 
said Wayne Fletcher, after he was 
crowned. "It took me a couple of 
hours to really understand what 
happened." 

Lisa is a senior english major, 
and was sponsored by Alpha 



Kappa Alpha sorority. Wayne is a 
senior management major, and 
was sponsored by Kappa Alpha 
Psi Fraternity. Valerie Drozd is a 
senior elementary major and was 
sponsored by Alpha Sigma Tau 
sorority. Dawn Snyder is a senior 
secondary education/communi- 
cation arts major and was spon- 
sored by Alpha Psi Omega hon- 
orary theatre fraternity. Jeff 
Levkulich is a senior communi- 
cation major sponsored by Kappa 
Delta Rho fraternity and by The 
Clarion Call.Chad Tuttoilmondo 
is a senior communication major 
and was sponsored by Sigma Pi 
fraternity. Shannon Bean is a 
junior elementary and special 
education major and was spon- 
sored by Student Senate. Jennifer 
Mumford is a junior communica- 
tion major and was sponsored by 
the Dance Team. Nicholas 
Chervenak is a junior communi- 
cation major and was sponsored 
by CSA. Kevin Mizenko is a 
junior accounting major and was 
sponsored by Sigma Pi 
Fraternity. Dani Close is a sopho- 
more psychology major ans was 
sponsored by Alpha Sigma Tau 
Sorority. Jill Katana is a sopho- 
more arts and sciences major and 
was sponsored by the CSA. 
Stacey May,erscik is a sophomore 



nursing major and is sponsored 
by the Venango campus students. 
Ken Pruitt is a sophomore com- 
munication major and was spon- 
sored by Sigma Pi Fraternity. 
Chad Riley is a sophomore mar- 
keting major and is sponsored by 
students at the Venango Campus. 
Joshua Selleck is a sophomore 
psychology major and was spon- 
sored by the Clarion University 
Cheerleaders. Alyssa Curry is a 
freshman arts and sciences major 
and was sponsored by the CSA. 
Maureen McLane is a freshman 
arts and sciences major and was 
sponsored by Delta Phi Epsilon 
Sorority. Crystal Shreffler is a 
freshman environmental sciences 
major and was sponsored by the 
students at Venango Campus. 

Dana McCombs is a freshman 
communication major and was 
sponsored by Sigma Pi 
Fraternity. 

Kurt Staab is a freshman arts 
and sciences major and is spon- 
sored by the Student Alumni 
Ambassadors. 

Timothy Turner is a freshman 
rehabilitative sciences major and 
was sponsored by the students at 
Venango campus. 

The court was determined by 
CSA votes. 



College Campus Nens 





What* s going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 






Barbie is a college girl now 

America's favorite plastic sweetheart is a college girl now. 

Under a special licensing agreement, Barbie is on sale at college 
bookstores on 19 major campuses, including Clemson, Duke, 
Wisconsin, Arkansas.Georgia, and Virginia. 

While the huge breasts and the small waist are the same, the Mattel 
doll's teeny outfit is now a cheerleader uniform customized with the 
school's colors. 

And how are sales going? 

'They were going great while we had them," said Pete Gorski, front- 
end supervisor of the Clemson University bookstore, which is await- 
ing another shipment after going through the last three batches of dolls 

We get several phone calls a day for them. We havesold through over 
a thousand already." 

Students, faculty, and staff are clamoring for the dolls, which are 
packaged in their traditional cotton-candy pink box. The older crowd 
is buying the doll in bulk quantities, he said, to give to their children 
or grandchildren. 

When she's in stock at Clemson, Barbie sells for $14.99, which is $5 
off the suggested retail price. All the colleges who sell the doll get to 
keep a certain percentage of the wholesale price. 

Of course, the doll, dubbed University Barbie, has drawn some crit- 
icism because she doesn't exactly look like a typical college co-ed on 
her way to psychology class or biophysics lab. 

"She's got pom-poms,"Gorski said. "Her knees bend forward and 
backward so she can do more gymnastics based stuff." 

Instead of a backpack, she carries an oversized hairbrush. Not that 
anyone was expecting University Barbie to carry a slide rule, but the 
doll has been criticized by many for looking, well, not quite as intel- 
lectual as her real life female counterparts. 

"I suppose I could see people getting peeved at that," Gorski said. 
"But it's a toy. This is not necessarily a symbol of what college stu- 
dents should be." 

Low-Tech Veggies for sale at 
Student Union 

Students strolling through the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Student Union on Fridays are bagging more than their usual coffee and 
croissant before heading to classes. They're also buying com, cucum 
bers, and tomatoes — all organically grown on campus. 

Members of EcoLogic, the student environmental club, planted and 
tended an organic garden this summer, and now sell produce every 
Friday in the Student Union. 

The garden, which was supported by a grant from the university, 
gives students a place to demonstrate the cultivation of vegetables and 
herbs without pesticides and chemical fertilizers, said Melinda Kane, 
a member of EcoLogic. 

Produce on sale includes Italian parsley, purple basil and zucchini. 
Profits will help pay for next year's seeds, said Kane. 

Courtesy of College Press 

Service 



■ !■<■ 



October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 6 



Student Support Services receive funding 



Student 



by Angie Binick 
Assistant News Editor 

Thanks to a favorable assess- 
ment by the federal government, 
Clarion University's Student 
Support Services have been 
refunded for the fifth time since 
1980 by the U.S. Department of 
Education. After receiving a 
score of 99.3 by a government 
panel of three reviewers, and the 
highest possible points with 
regards to performance quality, 
the Student Support Services has 
joined the roughly 60% of the 
1300 applications to the 
Department of Education to 
receive funding. Such funding, 
totalling over one million dollars, 
will sustain the department 



through 2001 so that it may serve 
its student base of more than 200 
individuals. 

When asked why such a cam- 
pus organization was important 
and thus in need of funding, 
Student Support Services director 
Greg Clary responded, 
"Basically, it's the nature of our 
program, in that we meemt with 
students for academic advising. 
Furthermore, we provide a place 
on campus to go for information, 
and are the primary provider for 
disabled students." 

The 2.5 million Student 
Support Services has received 
from the Department of 
Education, including the recent 
one million dollars, goes to sup- 
port various campus programs 



such as assistance to disabled stu- 
dents (i.e. adaptive test accomo- 
dations, prerecorded texts, early 
registration, peer tutor services, 
special equiptment) and general 
academic support programs (i.e. 
career planning assistance, acad- 
emic advising, financial aid 
counseling, tutors, miscellaneous 
seminars based on student 
needs). Furthermore, as a part of 
Clarion University's Department 
of Academic Support Services 
along with Educational Talent 
Search and Upward Bound 
Program, Student Support 
Services provides Grant money 
to the university that, combined 
with that of Educational Talent 
Search andthe Upward Bound 
Program, totals roughly 
$640,000. 




Senate 



Continued from Page Three... 



cheese and onions pressed between sundried tomato and pesto is a main dish at Northeastern Louisiana 
University. Indian curry chicken, Spanish tapsa and other ethnic entrees are on the menu at Northwestern 
Yet, often even a more varied menu than years before doesn't improve the dining halls' reputation in the 

eyes of the students. 

"The dining hall has done a lot in the last year to increase the variety and options, but it has not really 
increased the quality of the food at all," said Jeff Jewett, 19, a Northwestern University sophomore. "It's 
still the same old dorm food." 

Other students say their main gripe with the dining hall is its schedule. "The real problem I have is with 
the hours of the dining hall," says Shanon Henry, 18, a Syracuse freshman. "I'm a college student. I don't 
go to bed at 10 o'clock at night. I eat dinner at 5 or 6 p.m., and then come 10 o'clock, I'm hungry again, 
and I have nowhere to go for food." 

Henry's night cravings aren't unusual, according to Mariott Management Services, which manages the din 
ing services at 500 colleges nationwide. In a four-year study of more than 75,000 college students, faculty 
and staff members, the late-night meal or "fourth meal" turned up as a popular trend, about 60 percent of 
students say they eat a meal after 10 p.m., with many choosing pizza and sandwiches for a snack. 

Some colleges have started a late-night pizza delivery service to meet the needs of hungry students bum 
ing the midnight oil. Others have added cafeterias and convenience stores with night hours to provide stu 
dents with the "fourth meal." 



The sixth meeting of the 1997-98 Clarion University student senate 
took place on Monday, October 13, 1997. Points of interest during the 
meeting go as follows: 

President Nicole DeFrank reminded senators of the upcoming 50th 
anniversary of the C.S.A. (Clarion University Association) suggesting 
that past senate presidents and officers be invited to Clarion University 
to mark the occasion 

Senator Corwin was Senator of the Week in recognition of service 
and good office hours 

The Student Athletics Council noted a new contract with W.W.F. for 
its November 21 appearance 

The Interfraternity Council announced that it will be sponsoring an 
anu-hazing seminar on October 15 at 9 p.m. in 250 Gemmell 

The Appropriations Committee announced that the senate's supple- 
mental account totaled $11,690 while its capital account totaled 
$95,121.87. 

The Committee on Subcommittees appointed Senator Antoinette 
Parker, Senator Bonnie Spence, Senator Shannon Bean, and Senator 
Mike DiDonato to the Conduct Board, pending the approval of Dr. 
Reinhard 

The Committee on Rules, Regulations, and Policies announced that 
racquetball will be considered an intramural sport at present, and has 
decided to recognize Pro-Life as a university organization. 

Senator Parker reminded the senate that the Gospel Choir was hold- 
ing a candy selling fundraiser to allow the Choir to travel in the com- 
ing year, and invited the Senate to purchase fundraising candy for the 
purpose 



life is M of tlajor Decisions 
fall 1997 tlajffi ft 

Wlut! Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

Wlfl! Monday, October 20 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. 

WHl! Student and faculty representatives from each academic 
department will be available to provide personal insight 
into their programs and distribute materials about majors, 
minors, and graduate programs. 

Wlf ! Because you shouldn't wait to make your major decisions. 
Plus there will be Music and Door Prizes. 



YOUR fill « 



Student Senate Mission Statement 




tmmmmmaim 



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iraoi 



Student Senate is an organization that consist of twenty elected Clarion University Student Senators. Their 
responsiblity is to represent the entire student body. Student Senate is vested with all powers of the Clarion 
Students' Association (C.S.A.) and they allocate the Student Activity Fee revenues with the approval of the 
President of Clarion University. The Student Senate office is located in the Gemmell Student Complex, back 
by the Gemmell Computer Lab. 

Their are eight committees that listen to the concerns of all the students on Clarion campus. Each com- 
mittee has its own chairperson, they oversee the activities of the committee and setup goals for the commit- 
tees to fulfill. 

Nicole DeFrank is the Chair of Executive Committee. The primary function of this committee is to devel 
op overall goals, focuses, and objectives of the Student Senate. The e-mail address is 
stusenexec@mail.clarioii.edu . Tammi Snyder is the Chair of the Appropriations Committee. The primary 
function of this Committee is to recommend to Student Senate a budget, allocation and distribution of the 
Student Activity Fee with the approval of the President of Clarion University. The e-mail address for this 
committee is: stusenappr@mail.clarion.edu . Sam Swenson is the Chair of Campus Safety, Health, and 
Environmental Concerns Committee. This committee assists the Public Safety Department in ensuring the 
safety of students on this campus. The email address is: stusensafe@mall.clarlon.edu . Leslie Sum* is the 
Chair of Student Facilities Committee. It is responsible for the operation of the Gemmell Student Complex. 
The e-mail address is: stusenfac@mail.clarion.edu . Mike DiDonato is the Chair of Committees on 
Subcomittees. The function of this committee is to recommend to Student Senate qualified CSA members 
to serve as student representatives on university committees. It's e-mail address is:stusensub@mail.clari 
on.edu . Shannon Bean is the Chair of Committee on Rules, Regulations, and Policies. It has the responsi 
bility of advising Student Senate on recommending approval or recognition of any student organization by 
Clarion University. The e-mail address is stusenrule@mail.clarion.edu . James Fisher and Bryan Coates 
are Co-Chairs of the Dining Hall and Housing Concerns Committee. This consists of two sub-committees 
on Dining Concerns and Housing Concerns. Their e-mail address is: stusedine@mail.clarion.edu 



Page 7 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 






Health Beat 

STDs: a growing problem among students 




— !» ..«■ » — «i 



Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 



The Keeling Health Center treats, among many other ailments, STDs. 



i .. 



by Angie Binick 
Assistant News Editor 

Once a taboo subject, sexually 
transmitted diseases (STDs) have 
come to the forefront of 
American Health as a rapidly 
growing problem among the sex- 
ually active. STD's, defined as 
bacterial, viral, and parasitic 
infections passed primarily 
through sexual contact, will 
plague at least one in every four 
Americans between the ages of 
15 and 55 at some point in their 
lives, according to Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention. 
Given that roughly two-thirds of 
all U.S. STD victims are under 
the age of 25, according to the 
National Institute of Health, the 
issue has gained even more atten- 
tion among sexually active col- 
lege students, making education 
all the more important. 

Although not the only STD's in 
existence, Gonorrhea, 

Chlamydia, Syphilis, Herpes, and 
HIV are by far, some of the most 
common diseases facing the 
country, and must be understood 
to be prevented. 

GONORRHEA (a.k.a. "the 
clap", "the drip"): With an esti- 
mated 800,000 new cases surfac- 
ing each year, according to the 
National Institute of Health, 
Gonorrhea is a rapidly growing 
STD that deserves greater atten- 
tion. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the 
bacteria that causes Gonorrhea, 
lives on mucus membrane such 
as the urethra, the vagina, rectum, 
mouth, and throat and is spread 
when.an infected jjerson's mucus 



'There are problems partic- 
ularly with Chlamydia, 
because that is the number 
one STD on campuses." 
•Debbie Hartel, head nurse 
of Keeling Health Center 



membranes come into contact 
with another person's mucus 
membranes (i.e. through oral or 
anal sex). Symptoms usually 
appear two to ten days after 
infection, although, 5-20 percent 
of men and the majority of 
women show no symptoms, 
according to Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention. Males 
who do manifest symptoms usu- 
ally complain of an inflamed ure- 
thra, burning or painful urination, 
and a thick yellow or white dis- 
charge from the penis. If left 
untreated, Gonorrhea bacteria 
can spread into the uterus and fal- 
lopian tubes, often resulting in 
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease 
(PID), characterized by fever and 
severe abdominal pain. If action 
is not taken at this point, sterility 
is often an unfortunate result. 

CHLAMYDIA: The most com- 
mon STD in the US, with an esti- 
mated 4 million new cases each 
year, according to the National 
Institute of Health, Chlamydia 
has warranted growing concern 
in the medical world. According 



to Darlene Hartel, head nurse at 
Keeling Health Center, "There 
are problems particularly with 
Chlamydia, because that is the 
number one STD on campuses, 
and 85 percent of women have no 
symptoms and up to 40 percent 
of men have no symptoms." 

Chlamydia develops when 
Chlamydia Trachomtis bacteria 
are spread from the infected 
mucus membranes of one indi- 
vidual to the mucus membranes 
of another. Although overt symp- 
toms are not common, some 
symptoms for both men and 
women include irritation to the 
urethra, burning during urination 
and clear discharge from the 
penis or vagina. If ignored, 
Chlamydia can cause prostate 
and epididymis infections in 
men. It can also cause pelvic 
inflammatory disease in women, 
both of which can lead to sterili- 
ty. 
Stay tuned next week for 

Part Two of "STDs: a grow- 
ing problem among stu- 
. dents" in. The Clarioo.CaH. 




Call 
I -800-878-3872 

www.att.com/college/np.html 



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October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 8 



Kotlikoff will visit CU 



by Donna Engle 
News Writer 



Presented by the Economic 
Policy Lecture Series, Professor 
Laurence J. Kotlikoff will be 
speaking on why and how to 
privitize Social Security. His lec- 
ture will take place Thursday, 
October 23 at 3:30 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 

Kotlikoff, Professor and Chair 
of Economics at Boston 
University received his 
Bachelors Degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Following his 1977 PhD in 
Economics from Harvard, he 
served on UCLA's and Yale's fac- 
ulties. 

In addition, he has been a con- 
sultant for major U.S. and inter- 
national organizations. Such as 
the International Monetary Fund, 
the World Bank, The U.S. 
Department of Education, Merrill 
Lynch, and Fidelity Investments, 
among many others. 

Kotlikoff, with over 100 jour- 
nals to his name, has also co- 




University Relations 
Dr. Laurence Kotlikoff will visit CU on October 23. 



authored several other publica- 
tions. These include "The Wage 
Carrot and the Pension Stick" 
with David Wise, and "What 
Determines Savings". Prior to his 
current associate editor position 
for "The Japanese Economic 
Review" he held the same honor 
for "The American Economic 



Review". His lecture is spon- 
sored by the Department of 
Economics and Finance, The 
Association of Graduate 
Business Students, the Clarion 
Faculty Professional 

Development Grant, the Small 
Business Development Center, 
and CSA. 



CU bowls for children 



by Janelle Donoghue 
News Writer 

One of the many worthwhile 
causes that are being undertaken 
right now on Clarion Campus is 
"Bowl for Kids Sake". This 
event, which encourages groups 
of five or six students across 
campus to come together are 
bowling in order to make the 
world a little brighter for children 



around the Clarion area. 

Ragley's, radio station C-93, and 

Clarion University's Arete pro- 
gram are sponsoring the event to 

raise money for the Clarion 
County Buddies Team — Big 
Brother/Big Sister. 

Each participant is given a 
sponsor sheet that allows them to 
get various students and mem- 
bers from around the community 
to make a donation for this event. 
It will occur on October 25 and 




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26 and November 1 at Ragley's 

Bowl Arena. Sponsors may give 

as much or as little as they wish, 
but each bowler's goal is to get 

$50 in donations. 

Clarion University's Arete joins 
together members of the Honors 
Program and other students in 
good standing to support the aca- 
demic, interests and provide 
exposure to many professional 
activities. This includes travel- 
ling to educational areas, work- 
ing with the community and 
other events. 




Page 9 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



The following is a brief synopsis of the 
criminal investigations conducted by 
Public Safety for the dates between 
September 20 to October 11. The blot- 
ter is compiled by The Public Safety 
office and The Clarion Call. 



♦Stemming from an incident that occured at Tippin Gym on 
September 20, 1996, the following individuals have been cited for 
criminal tresspassing and criminal conspiracy: Shane McChesney, 
Jason Moaney, Lee Pritts and Mark Angle (the three latter for crimi- 
nal conspiracy only. 

♦Jason Reichard was cited for minors consumption and public drunk- 
enness on Service Road near Parking Lot B. 

♦On October 6, 1997, it was reported to Public Safety that someone 
had removed a computer from Carlson Library. This incident is cur- 
rently under investigation. 

♦An unknown actor knocked over a light pole at the comer of Ninth 
Avenue and Wood Street on October 10, 1997. 

♦On October 10, 1997, Joseph Anderson was cited for criminal mis- 
chief outside of Campbell Hall. 

♦Rachel Brady, a female student, was cited for underage drinking in 
Wilkinson Hall on October 11, 1997. 



If anyone has any story 
ideas or would (ike to be a 

staff member of The 

Clarion Call, Please call us 

at x2380 or email 

us at: CALL 



Attention Students... 

FLU SHOTS ARE AVAILABLE 
THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 27 IN 
KEELING HEALTH CENTER. 

Any questions? 

Call Darlene Hartell at 226-2 1 2 1 



* W<tttUIMM » » «» ** «« A»M « W» ' " » ■l u ii nnum i n> 



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The Clarion Call 



Page 10 




October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



LIFESTYLESl 






Goulish garb available locally 



by Bonnie Fair 
Lifestyles Writer 



ALF week is over, but 
October's fun isn't Halloween is 
approaching faster than a pirate 
can wink with his remaining eye. 
That means it's time to start 
working on a prize-winning 
Halloween costume. 

Surprisingly, it's possible to rent, 
buy or find nearly everything 
needed for making a costume 
without traveling far from 
Clarion. 

Town & Country Cleaners is 
probably the only local place to 
rent a costume. Located at 541 
Liberty Street in Clarion, Town 
& Country Cleaners' business 
hours are Monday through Friday 
7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and 
Saturday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

"We have over 300 costumes 
available for rent," says Manager 
Rita Whitesides. Rental rates for 
costumes range from about $15 
to $60, depending on the costume 
and accessories. 

"Some costumes are pretty pop- 
ular without the wigs, so we price 
the accessories separately. With 
some costumes like the Elvis one, 
you just about have to have the 
wig," said Whitesides. 




Besides Elvis, costume seekers 
can choose from storybook char- 
acters like Robin Hood and Maid 
Marion, cartoon friends such as 
Fred Flinstone and Barney 
Rubble, or become a bull fighting 
matador for a night. 

But don't plan on renting Fred, 
Barney, or their wives for 
October 24, they're already 
booked. "People have been 
reserving costumes for a month 
now," says Whitesides. 

The selection is wide, but the 
time frame for costume hunting 
is shrinking. "Those who wait 
will have less to choose from," 
cautioned Whitesides, "but we 
never rent out all 300 [cos- 
tumes]." Renting is a fast, easy 
and convenient way to fill 
Halloween costume needs. 
Some costume seekers prefer 




Scott Hunsberger/Clarion Call 

Various costumes, such as vampire or witch capes and 
I960s-type hippie outfits, can be found at local Goodwill 
Stores in Knox, Brookvillo and Franklin. 



the challenges of designing and 
putting together a costume. 
Good sources for costume mak- 
ers are the Goodwill stores in the 
Knox, Brookville and Franklin 
areas. 

Goodwill Stores are fun places 
to look for items of clothing from 
the 1950s through the 1980s. In 
the Knox store, it took only a few 
minutes to pull together a 1960s 
"hippie" outfit with striped jeans 
and a rainbow headband. 

A black floor-length gown and 
a red-lined black cape found at 
the store could easily become a 
vampire or a witch costume. 
Western shirts, hats and boots 
will turn any "city slicker" into a 
"cowboy" in minutes. 

Wishing to try out the role of 
Frankenstein's Bride this 
Halloween? The Knox Goodwill 
store has vintage wedding gowns 
that can make that wish come 
true. The stores also have hats, 
gloves, shoes and jewelry of var- 
ious kinds to lend the finishing 
touches to any costume. 

"Our stores receive fresh ship- 
ments of merchandise twice a 
week. Halloween items will be 
sent until Halloween is over," 
said District Sales Manager 
Linda Gleghorn. So if a wanted 
item isn't there, check back 
another day. 

"Goodwill also offers a 15 per- 
cent student discount card after 
seeing a valid university ID," 
said Gleghorn. 

Jo-Ann Fabrics at the Clarion 
Mall carries a large selection of 
materials and patterns to make a 
Halloween costume. Jo-Ann 
Fabrics also offers some ready- 
made costumes including pirates, 
nurse's uniforms, bandits and 
even a nun's habit. Halloween 
decorations and costume acces- 
sories are also available. 

All Halloween merchandise is 
now 50 percent off. "The 
Halloween merchandise might 
even go down to 60 percent off 
before the holiday arrives," said 
Department Manager Denise 
Messenger. But waiting for a 
bigger discount will mean fewer 
merchandise choices. 

So, it is possible to rent, buy or 
find nearly everything to make a 
costume locally. Clarion offers 
plenty of shopping choices, but 
remember, only two weeks 
remain to acquire that prize-win- 
ning costume. 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

AFTER (10/13/97) 

Life has returned to "normal'' in Clarion. Some leaves have 
fallen and the rides and food booths are gone. All that's left 
are fond memories and the knowledge that next year's ALF 
is scheduled for September 25 through October 4. 




Where In Clarion? 





A-E-O-l-U and Sometimes Y 
Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was one of the Autumn Leaf Festival flags 
hung on downtown light poles. 



»"W^ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^r^^^r^P 



*■ i ** w^ 




Scott Hunsberger/Clarion Call 

"Marty," on of the World-Famous Budweiser Clydesdales, enjoys the Autumn Leaf 
Festival with Michael Goughler (left), Assistant Director of the Clarion County Historical 
Society, and Lindsley Dunn, Director-Curator of the Historical Society. "Marty" and the 
other Clydesdales marched in full dress during last Saturday's ALF Parade. 



WW 

■4 W 




Scott Hunsberger/Clarion Call 

Balarama Warner and the Subway Sub pose for a photo 
during Clarion's 44th Annual ALF Week. 



Carol Griffith's "Parade" on display in Harvey Hall 



Griffith's exhibit brings memories of ALF 



by Reni Farbacher 
Lifestyles Writer 



Over the ALF weekend, Clarion 
University welcomed the artwork 
of Carol Griffith, a Clarion 
native, to the Women's Studies 
Center in Harvey Hall. 

Throughout the past week, 
Griffith's series, titled "Parade," 
was open to the public for free 
viewing at Harvey Hall. A recep- 
tion was held for Griffith on 
Sunday at the Women's Studies 
Center. 

The ideas for Griffith's paint- 
ings come from memories and 
experiences that trigger the artist 
to use the formal medium of 
painting to let viewers reexamine 
their own memories. 

Included in her paintings, 
Griffith said, are insights into the 
image's "larger social signifi- 
cance... beyond the emotional or 
psychic effect that originally gen- 
erated them." 

Griffith has won numerous 
awards for her works, including 
"Best of Show Award" at the 
Ohio State Fair Professional 
Juried Exhibition for her recently 
completed series, "Parade." 
"Parade" reflects memories of 
Clarion's most popular tradition 
— the Autumn Leaf Festival 
Parade. 

"It [ALF] was always a big fea- 
ture of my life here. It appealed 
to me as a painting subject at first- 




Brendan George/Clarion Call 

"Autumn Wonderland," part of the exhibit "Parade" by 
Clarion Native Carol Griffith, is currently on display in the 
Women's Studies Center in Harvey Hall. 



because it seemed to maintain a 
homemade innocence and 
integrity that I nostalgically asso- 
ciate with small towns," 
explained Griffith. 

The "Parade" series is full of 
the warm autumn colors that 
reflect Clarion during the first 



weeks of fall. All who saw the 
paintings could relate to the 
themes that were presented. 
Anyone who experienced the 
ALF Parade saw their own mem- 
ories captured in Griffith's paint- 
ings. 

With numerous solo, duo, 



group, and juried (or judged) 
exhibitions in Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, and West Virginia complet- 
ed, Griffith returned to her child- 
hood homeland to share with the 
Clarion community the memories 
it gave her. 

The images in Griffith's paint- 
ings show not only the innocence 
of a small town's celebration but 
also the conflicts and contradic- 
tions that are the reality of a 
small town. 

Griffith used the "Parade" 
series to capture the small town 
sentimentalism, but was careful 
not to overdo this perspective. 
She wanted "to create both a 
believable place and the sense of 
something more significant 
behind it." 

Griffith is currently an associ- 



ate professor in the Division of 
Fine Arts at the Columbus 
College of Art and Design. She 
earned her Master's of Fine Arts 
degree in painting at Ohio 
University in Athens, Ohio after 
graduating from Carnegie- 
Mellon University in Pittsburgh 
with a bachelor's degree in Fine 
Arts and an associate's degree in 
visual communications from the 
Art Institute of Pittsburgh. 

She currently resides in 
Columbus, Ohio with her hus- 
band and daughter. 

Griffith's art exhibit is open to 
the public from 2 to 3 p.m., 
Mondays and Wednesdays, from 
8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m., 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 
from noon to 4 p.m. Fridays, in 
Harvey Hall. 



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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



Passing The Test by Dave Barry 



OK, high school students: I 
want you to stop piercing your 
noses for a moment and listen to 
me because I'm going to talk to 
you about a topic that is more 
important to your future than 
anything else except flossing — 
your SATs. 

It is very unfortunate that these 
tests cause some of you to expe- 
rience great stress — or, as you 
say in your own teen-age lingo, 
"make a cow." You believe that 
if you get a low SAT score, 
you're a dope, and you'll have to 
attend some third-rate college 
where the classrooms have 
wheels and the athletic teams 
have a nickname like "The 
Fighting Tarpaulins," and you'll 
wind up in some boring dead-end 
loser job such as rag picker or 
leech monger or Whitewater 
investigator. 

This is incorrect, young people! 
A low SAT score does NOT auto- 
matically mean failure! 
Remember that Charles 
Lindbergh got only 240 on his 
verbal, and he went on to invent 
the phonograph. 

And if that's not inspirational 
enough, let me tell you a little 



story about a young man who 
took his first SAT and did very 
poorly. His parents were disap- 
pointed; his friends laughed at 
him; his dog went to the bath- 
room on his feet. But that young 
man did not give up. He signed 
up to take the SAT again, and he 
prepared by getting up every day 
at 3:30 a.m. to study, and when 
the time came to take the second 
SAT, he walked into that testing 
room and set an American record 
— which, will probably never be 
broken — for falling asleep. 
Today he makes his living wear- 
ing ill-fitting pants and serving 
contaminated hamburger to the 
public. 

The point, young people, is that 
there is a right way and a wrong 
way to prepare for your SATs, 
and unless you are even stupider 
than you look, you want to do it 
the right way. 

To help you, I would like to pre- 
sent the following list of 
"Common Questions and 
Answers About the SAT," which 
was prepared by the American 
Association of High School 
Educational Professionals Hiding 
Out in the Lounge. 



Q. What is the SAT? 

A. The term "SAT' is a set of 
initials, or "antonym," standing 
for "Scholastic Attitude Treaty 
Organization." This is a series of 
tests that predict your ability to 
perform in the college environ- 
ment by measuring the degree to 
which you possess knowledge 
that nobody would ever in a mil- 
lion years actually need. 

Q. What is the origin of the 
SAT? 

A. The SAT was developed by 
the prestigious Educational 
Testing Service, which is located 
in Princeton, N.J., home of 
Harvard University. The original 
idea behind the SATs, as stated in 
the E.T.S.'s Official Historical 
Statement of Goals and Purposes, 
was "to sell a huge quantity of 
No. 2 pencils that we ordered by 
mistake." So the E.T.S. invented 
a standardized test wherein high 
school students were required to 
fill in circles on an answer sheet. 
The first SATs had no ques- 
tions: your score was based 
entirely on how many circles you 
filled in, and you could get extra 
credit by writing on your desk. 
When colleges complained that 



too many students were getting 
high scores, the E.T.S. introduced 
questions, mostly on topics of 
interest to E.T.S. personnel, such 
as "Where can you get decent 
Chinese food in the Princeton, 
N J., area?" Today, the questions 
are developed by a prestigious 
team of world-renowned acade- 
mic experts, who get them from 
"Jeopardy." 

Q. Does the SAT ever contain 
errors? 

A. Yes. Just last year, for 
example, an alert Michigan 
youngster named Jeremy 
Winklehopper received national 
attention when he noticed that, 
contrary to what he had learned 
in physics class, the SAT defmed 
"gravity" as "a type of snake." 

Q. What happened when this 
was brought to the attention of 
the Educational Testing Service? 

A. Everybody enjoyed a hearty 
laugh, and then Jeremy's score 
was changed to minus 46,000 
points, thus assuring that no col- 
lege would ever accept him. He 
is currently employed in the field 
of urinal maintenance. 

Q. Was the SAT definition of 
"gravity" changed? 



A. Yes. It is now defined as "a 
heavy type of snake." 

Q. What should I do if I don't 
know the answer to a multiple 
choice SAT question? 

A. Experts suggest that you 
start by "weeding out" the 
answers that are obviously false. 
Some of the telltale signs to look 
for are: 

The answer contains swear 
words. 

The answer is followed by a lit- 
tle sarcastic note in parenthesis, 
such as, "Oh, sure, THAT makes 
sense." 

The answer contains the phrase 
"according to a White House 
spokesperson." 

Q. I have heard that I can 
increase my SAT score by attach- 
ing a $20 bill to the answer sheet. 
Is this true? 

A. "Absolutely not," stated an 
Educational Testing Service 
spokesperson who identified 
himself as Bob. "You're going to 
have to do way better than that, 

continued on 
page 13 




^WOMEN'S 
HEALTHCARE 
OF CLARION 



Private practice ~ obstetrics/gynecology 
"Devoted to individualized health care for women" 




John Myers, D. O. 








9 






* A 









BartMatson, D.O. 



Helen Lambe, M.D. 



♦ Birth control 

^Menstrual irregularities 

^Sexually transmitted diseases 

^Abnormal pap smears 

^Infertility 

♦ Hormone replacement therapy 



Personal, caring service always provided by a fully-accredited physician in obstetrics/gynecology. 



Womens Healthcare of Clarion 

Clarion Hospital Office Park 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(located right behind the hospital two miles from town) 



Call 226-8800 for an 
appointment. 



I 

i 



Affiliated with Clarion Hospital 



Page 13 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



Calendar of Events 



Wrfi4W$ 



Today 

•National Boss Day 

Friday 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball Clarion 

Classic - Tippin 

•Tennis at PSAC 

Chamionships, 

Hershey, Pa. 

•Education Department Learning Center Fair - 8 a.m. 

to 3 p.m., Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

•Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 250/252 Gemmell 

•Jaycee Haunted House visit at Wolf's Den; sponsored 

by the Admissions Office - 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday 

•National Teacher's Exam Core Battery Exam 

•Intramural Tug of War begins 

•Intramural Bike Race begins 

•Volleyball Clarion Classic 

•Tennis at PSAC 

Championships, Hershey, 

Pa. 

•Cross Country at Geneva 

•Football at California - 2 

p.m. ' 

Sunday 

•Phi Mu Alpha Recital - 
»3:15 p.m., Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium 



77TTT\ 



.- Av! 



Monday 

•Early Registration for 1998 Spring Term begins 
•Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 
•Policy Committee meeting - 
4 p.m., B-8 Hart Chapel 
•Career Development Series: 
"Clarion University Majors" _. 
6 p.m., Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 
•Student Senate meeting - 7 
p.m., 246 Gemmell 
Tuesday 
•Sign up for group pictures 
•Intramural Volleyball begins 
•UAB Movie Night - Garby Theater 
•Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday Inn 
•Volleyball at California - 7 p.m. 
•Opening Reception: Lonnie Graham, Pittsburgh pho- 
tagrapher/artist - 6 p.m., Sandford Gallery, Marwick- 
Boyd 

Wednesday 
•Sign up for group pic- 
tures - Yearbook Office 
•UAB Wellness Series: 
"Sign Language" - 4 
p.m„ 250/252 Gemmell 



,>jI 



•Leadership Development Series: "Group Dynamics 
and Teamwork," presented by Dr. Myrna Kuehn - 7 to 
8:30 p.m., 250/252 Gemmell 



THE UFT EVERY 
VOICE CHOR 

will hold a dinner 
fund-raiser from 
11 a.m, to 3 p.m,, 
Saturday, 
November 11 in the 
Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room. 

A chicken dinner is 

available for $4 and 

a Rib dinner is $6. 

Dinners include a 
choice of two side 

dishes and roils. 

Reservations 

should be made 

by October 18. 

To make reserva- 
tions see any choir 
member; 
or call 
Dave Smith at 
226-2898 or 

Jeremy Nesmith at 
226-2869. 






Jim Carrey's latest hit.. .and that's no lie 



' Liar, Liar' now on video 



by Melissa Andrews 
and Jolina Giaramita 
Lifestyles Writers 

The producers of Nutty 
Professor strike back again with 
Liar, Liar, an enjoyable comedy 
starring Jim Carrey. 

To Fletcher Reed (Carrey) lying 
is a part of his daily life until the 
night of his son's fifth birthday. 
Max (Justin Cooper) makes a 
wish that will stop Fletcher from 
lying for 24 hours. Max makes 
the wish knowing his dad was 
going to miss his birthday. The 
wish causes many problems for 
Fletcher in that his lies help his 
career as a lawyer. 

Striving to become a partner in 
the law firm, Fletcher is given an 
important case that will prove his 
capability is worth his promo- 
tion. 

Fletcher is expected to lie in 
order to win the case — some-. 



thing he never had a problem 
with before. Fletcher is outraged 
with the notion that he can't lie 
and it begins to make him literal- 
ly crazy! 

Once he realizes he cannot lie, 
he tests himself by something so 
simple as the color of a pen. 
Carrey shows off his crazy antics 
in this scene by trying to lie about 
the color of a pen. He goes ballis- 
tic trying to figure out why he 
cannot lie about something so 
insignificant as this. 

During a conversation with his 
ex-wife, Audrey (Maura 
Tierney), she tells Fletcher about 
their son's wish. This causes 
Fletcher to confront Max and talk 
him into taking back the wish. He 
explains to his son that he has to 
lie in order to excel in his career. 

Max does not understand his 
father's reasoning. He just wants 
to have a father that will be there 
for him and not lie about why he 
can't spend time with him. In 



this particular scene, Fletcher 
realizes that his son meant the 
wish and that his lies really hurt 
Max. 

Although Fletcher hates the fact 
that he can't lie, he realizes that 
he might lose his son. In the end, 
Fletcher's honesty is worthy of 
the case and his son's trust in 
him. 

Siskel and Ebert gave Liar, 
Liar two thumbs up, and Dave 
Nehr of New York Daily News 
quoted Carrey as being "scream- 
ingly funny." 

Compared to Ace Ventura and 
Dumb and Dumber, Liar, Liar 
has a plot that can teach a lesson 
about trust and honesty, not about 
stupidity! 

We enjoyed this flick and sug- 
gest it to people who appreciate 
moral issues brought out in a 
film. It's also a good movie for a 
relaxing evening in front of the 
tube. Liar, Liar is now on video 
for your convenience. • 



Barry continued from 
page 12 



with the price of decent 
Chinese food being what it is in 
Princeton." Bob noted that the 
record for highest SAT score 
ever is still held by Donald 
Trump, who, while only in 
sixth grade, got 117 billion 
points. 



Q. Can you give me the 
answers to last year's SAT test? 
A. Well, I suppose if you sent 
me a large sum of cash money, 
I could. But that would be 
wrong, and I would never do 
such a thing, according to a 
White House spokesperson. 



CLARION B9WI AREA 



TUESDAY & THURSDAY SPECIAL $5.CC PEE PERSON 
f€P TWO HCUPS! 4T0miANE. 

FREE SHOES 



ROCKIN BOWL STARTING 

OCT 4 EVERY SATURDAY 

11PM-2AM.$25.00PERA 

LANE FREE SHOES' 







October 16 , 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



Autumn Leaf 



•:•:•:•:■:•*•:•>:•:•:•:•: 




CURiQtf Pw* 






October 16, 1997 


i. ™ 


P 











The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



arade 1997 




tmmvsxx 




I 



Autumn Leaf week has come 

and gone and everyone, for 

the most part, has survived it 

all. So here's one final look 

back at the parade that 

ended it all. 



Photos by: Kristen Colello 
Words by: Tim Emanuel 



/ 




m 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



TT 



October 16, 1997 



ENTERTAINMENT 




THE Crossword 




ACROSS 

1 Ordinances 

5 Movie star 

10 Young horse 

14 Colorful fish 

15 Prop 

16 Small case 

17 Seagirt region 

18 Terra — 

19 Distance 
measure 

20 New inhabitants 
of a region 

22 Kind of monkey 

24 Occupation 

25 Stratford- 
upon — 
Learned one 
Extremely pure 
Relative of a 
hoosegow 
Celestial body 
Cat's cry 
Split 

Goat antelope 
Own 

Indefinite 
amount 
Senior 
Beer 

Tunesmlth's 
specialty 
Grows gradually 
smaller 
Sows 
— and 
circumstance 
Acme 
Distrusts 
"— for All 
Seasons- 
Reveals 
Writer Ephron 
Baseball team 
Beethoven's 
"Fur — " 
Perfect place 
Geologic time 
divisions 
Coins 
Flag and Arbor 




October 16, iyy/ 



i ne uarion t^au 



m acv m. i 



^E 



© 1997 Tribune Media Services, Inc. distributed by tribune media services 

All rights reserved 



60 

61 

62 
63 



y.^tr. 



JEL NINO RNP5 m> WV«#<flU 4WEPICAN VERNdQA/fc.. 



DOWN 

1 Lane of 
"Superman* 

2 Church part 

3 Disney or 
Whitman 



4 Kind of pony 

5 Rise 

6 Job 

7 Children 

8 Scrap of food 

9 Kind of mirror 

10 Rubber or 
Portland 

11 Mr. Skinner 

12 Unmatched 
thing 

13 Bonds 
21 Connect 
23 Party giver 

25 Knight's 
protection 

26 Get lost! 

27 Coeur d' — 

28 LP material 

29 Skin openings 

30 Picture 

31 At no time 

32 Pitchers 
34 Yields by treaty 

37 Snubbed 

38 Took place 
40 Blue-pencil 



ANSWERS 



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41 Lantern 

43 Expresses a 
belief 

44 Throws 

46 Throb 

47 Writer Grey 
46 Arab chieftain 



49 Grandma . 

50 Slender 

51 Musical passage 

52 Card with three 
pips 

53 Without 
56 Actor Wallach 




Barney's secret defense mechanism 



entertainment] 



UffcM-J 

HBUU 



©I9S7 




Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you have a talent? Do you dream of using 
that talent to attract a guy, girl or animal that 
you desire? Send it to The Call todayl We accept 
mostly just stuff that can be printed, but we can 
work with you. Poems and comics are recom- 
mended! Send it the 
The Clarion Call, 270 
GemmelL c/o Benj. 

Impress 

Your 

Mom! 




C H A O S by Brian Shuster 




Big Foot, the Loch Ness monster, the Abominable 
Snow-man and Ed, right before his unfortunate 
discovery that the three of them hate being 
photographed. 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 




"Waiter, two glasses of water, please. And none 
of that tap stuff . . . make sure this? comes 
straight from the toilet." 



Page 18 



y U 



o 








ftWCHWOUSE 





flfllWlUHWflPiriP 




mfm—M—i 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



• >, m«T 1 vircr^o 



wise. 

futo. 







|NL0ft^RtyUV 

ibtrttiflflMims, 








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Vloold y>u like a title, 
or \ club o\er your kea^ ? 



^w?T}*rw»v>T« 





C H A O S by Brian Shuster 




October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 







Call On You 



By 
Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 






j^^^^j________^_»________^________M«a___— — M^^ 1 1 1 I I l __________a_____M_yy«**»' M »'* M *— —**— — I I I I II 1 1 1 1 I II 

If you could sum up your college 
experience in one word, what would it be? 




— — - — — -— m»™— «■*- w— — — — 



~ ™ ™^~ s™ - ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ " 





____________j_____ M ________ M _ M I I ' I — — —__ 



Jeff Say, Sophomore, Communications 



"wccb; 



_________ 



Ryan O'Neil, Freshman, Education 
"Longevating." 



————————— 













Abbie Sleppy, Freshman, Anthropology 



'Sociable." 



wrm*mmmmmmm*mmm*m 



>MM_«_tti_M-a_a_---_M_-< 



Matt Evans, Freshman, Education 



"Eventful." 



______________________ 




"— w — — — — — - 



Jason Bell, Sophomore, Information 

Science 

"Seasonal.." 




Dan Mangel, Junior, Finance 
"Eye-opening." 






itfrvffltm 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



SPORTS 



PSAC Tennis Championships under way this weekend 



Hershey bound Golden Eagles knock off Scots 



by Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



With the tough PSAC 
Tournament and a trip to choco- 
late town less than a week away, 
the Golden Eagle tennis team 
used Monday's match with the 
Ediboro Fighting Scots as a tune- 
up for the big weekend. 

The Golden Eagles depth 
proved to be the difference in the 
6-3 win. 

Led by singles wins from 
Cassie Baker, Mimi Williams, 
Rachael Link, and Amy O'Neal, 
Clarion looked to be primed for 
the PSAC's. 

Baker dropped Edinboro's 
Mary Jo Messina 6-1, 6-2. 
Williams handled Lora Proctor 
6-1, 6-0, while Link defeated 
Missy Musico 6-1, 6-0. O'Neal 
stayed sharp, beating Lori Kurutz 
in straight sets 6-2, 6-1. 

Williams and O'Neal continued 
their solid play on the singles cir- 
cuit. Williams 6-1, 6-0 victory 
moved the senior to 10-2 on the 
year with O'Neal jumped to 11-2 
with her 6-2, 6-1 win. 

In doubles action, Williams and 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Amy O'Neal looks to make a run at the #6 singles PSAC 
Championship. O'Neal finished her senior season with an 
outstanding 11-2 record. 



indoors to the hardwood of 
Tippin Gym to prepare for the 
fast surface. 

"We have been doing a lot of 
serving and returns in the gym," 
coach Terry Acker said. 'The are 
probably the hardest things to get 
used to on fast surface." 

Defending PSAC champion 



will likely get a tough draw with 
defending PSAC champion 
Danielle Faretta of Bloomsburg 
and runner-up Kristin Maneval of 
Millersville providing some stiff 
competition. 

At #2 singles will be freshman 
Amy Shaffer, who has made 
strides in her first year with 




Tim Emanuael/Clarion Call 
Mimi Williams and Rachael Link reached the finals of the PSAC Championships last year 
at #3 doubles. The duo look to do the same this year at #2. 



Link improved to 9-4 with an 8-1 
win over Messina and Proctor. 
Baker and O'Neal moved to 9-1 
as a team when they breezed past 
Misico and Kurutz 8-0. 

As the team prepares for the 
PSAC's this weekend at Hershey 
Racquet Club, head coach Terry 
Acker has moved practice 



Bloomsburg and runner-up 
Millersville are again likely 
favorites. However, the Golden 
Eagles surged to take third last 
year, and have upset on thieir 
minds this weekend. 

Senior Kristin Golia will head 
into the weekend playing #1 sin- 
gles for the Golden Eagles. Golia 



Clarion. Shaffer posted a 5-8 
overall record at the #2 spot 

Sophomore Cassie Baker 
anchors the #3 singles position 
for Clarion, with another 
Bloomsburg player, Jen Espisito 
playing the role of the favorite. 

"The fast surface will help out 
both Amy and Cassie, who hit 



'mmmwmm 



I 



...... 




Time Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Senior Kristen Golia will face some tough competition in 
Bloomsburg's Daniell Faretta and Millersville's Kristin 
Maneval at #1 singles. 



the ball hard, especially their 
serves," Acker noted. 

Mimi Williams will take her 10- 
2 record to Hershey in hopes of 
winning a title. Williams only 
losses this season came at the 
hands of Youngstown State's 
Shana Young (6-2, 6-1) and 
Pittsburgh's Fran Davis (6-3, 6- 
3). 

Making the finals of the 
PSAC's last season as a freshman 
was Rachael Link. Link, who 
pulled her record to above .500 
(7-6) in the Golden Eagles win 
over Edinboro, has her eyes set 
on winning it all this year. If 
Link is going to repeat her jour- 
ney to the finals, Bloom's 
Shannon Law (17-1) stands in 
her way. 

"Bloomsburg and Millersville 
are definately the teams to beat," 
admits Link. "States are what we 
worked all season for." 

Playing at #6 singles this year is 
senior Amy O'Neal, with an 
impressive 11-2 record. O'Neal 
lost to Slippery Rock's Linda 
Christenson and Pitt's Ali Bucher 
earlier this season. 

In what has been somewhat of 
an up and down season for 
Clarion, the Golden Eagles have 
turned some heads in doubles 
play. 

"I think we will be seated well 
in doubles," said Acker. "That' 
has been our strong point- all 
year." 

Golia and Shaffer will hook up 



at #1 doubles, where they went 9- 
4 this year. 

Williams and Link took second 
at PSAC's last year, are currently 
9-4 and are looking to give a 
repeat performance. The Clarion 
tandem lost a dissappointing 
match to Bloomsburg's Jen 
Esposito and Amy Koontz 8-1 
earlier this year and hope to 
rebound. 

Baker and O'Neal are also 
focused on having a successful 
tournament together. 

"We get along well together 
and that helps us play better," 
noted Baker. 

Baker who did not compete 
against Bloomsburg in the 
Shippensburg Tournament earlier 
this year admits she does not 
know what to expect from the 
PSAC powerhouse. 

"I not quite sure what to expect 
since I didn't play in the match 
earlier this year, but I know that 
(Amy) and I will do well if our 
game is on." 

Despite having to face 
Bloomsburg and Millersville, 
Acker feels the Golden Eagles' 
fate depends on the draw. 

"The bottom line depends on 
the draw, if we draw well, we can 
do really well." 

Even if the Golden Eagles do 
not get good seeds, Acker is hop- 
ing his- 'team is peaking at the 
right time. 

"We are playing really well, but 
haven't quite peaked yet." 



Page 21 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



.--. - 



•••*#.. 



Struggling Golden Eagles fall to 0-5 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The frustrating lossess continue 
to mount for the Clarion 
University football team, who 
fell to 0-2 in the PSAC-West (0- 
5) overall, following Saturday's 
37-14 Homecoming loss to 
Shippensburg at Memorial 
Stadium. 

The Red Raiders, who were 
coming off a big 17-3 win over 
Edinboro, broke a 14-14 halftime 
deadlock with 23 unanswered 

Clarion 14 
Shipp 37 

This week at California 

points in the second half to raise 
their record to 2-0 in the confer- 
ence and 3-2 overall. 

Shippensburg's momentum- 
gaining play took place in the 
third quarter when Brad 
Simendinger intercepted a Bemie 
Pynos pass and returned it 52 
yards to the end-zone for a 20-14 
lead. The Red Raiders added a 
31-yard field goal by Robert 
Bognet later in the third period to 
increase the margin to 23-14. 

In the fourth quarter, Shipp 




Brendan George/Clarion Call 

Clarion RB Ron DeJidas (22) breaks free with a block from 
Alvin Slaughter (2). DeJidas racked up 140 all-purpose 
yards against the Red Raiders. 



converted another Pynos inter- 
ception into a touchdown when 
Jeremy Brubaker's 1-yard run 
capped an 8-play, 70-yard drive. 
The Raiders would score again 
on the final play of the game 
when Mike Eriandson caught a 5- 
yard pass from Keith Kullman 
for the 37-14 final. 



Shippensburg used a balance 
attack to beat the Eagles, as eight 
players combined for 179 rushing 
yards, and 4 receivers totaled 293 
receiving yards. 

The Golden Eagles, who will 
travel to California on Saturday, 
opened the game with a dominat- 
ng first quarter. A 19-yard pass 



Clarion refocuses on second half of season 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Even before the kickoff of 
1997, there were strong indica- 
tions that the Clarion University 
Golden Eagles were in for a 
strange season. 

The Eagles were ranked by the 
NCAA as the No. 4 team in 
Division n football in the coun- 
try, before even playing a single 
game, yet the coaches in the 
PSAC-West picked Clarion to 
finish third in the seven-team 
conference. While the Golden 
Eagles faced a variety of expec- 
taions, no one predicted them to 
have a losing record at the mid- 
point of the season, much less an 
0-5 slate. 

Clarion's combination of costly 
injuries, bad breaks, and chal- 
lenging schedule have led to the 
0-5 record. Among other 
injuries, the Golden Eagles lost 
record setting quarterback Chris 
Weibel for the season in a week 
#2 matchup with Glenville State 
(a 51-0 loss), followed by a 
shoulder injury to promising 
sophomore quarterback Jeff 
Cappa that kept him out of 



Saturday's 37-14 loss to 
Shippensburg. 

With the exception of the 
losses to Glenville and Shipp, 
the Eagles have lost by a 
touchdown or less in their 
other three contests. Clarion 
bowed to Millersville 31-25, 
lost a 3528 overtime game to 
Cal-Davis, and were edged at 
Lock Haven 33-32. 

While the Golden Eagles 
haven't received many breaks 
this season. Clarion has not 
executed as well as it needs to 
win against quality opponents. 
Clarion has yet to hold an 
opponent to under 30 points, 
yielding an average of 37.4 
points per game. CUP has suf- 



fered on special teams as well, 
converting only 1 of 6 field goal 
attempts. These difficulties can 
partly be attributed to the fact 
that the Eagles are young, start- 
ing only five seniors. 

"We just have to get mentally 
tough and realize things are 
going to happen," said coach 
Malen Luke. "And when some- 
thing bad happens, we have to 
move on." 

Prior to the season, Clarion had 
hoped to win its second straight 
PSAC-West conference title and 
receive an invitation to the play- 
offs. While these goals appear to 
be out of reach, the 0-5 Eagles 
will continue to put forth a strong 
effort the rest of the way. 



MOUNTAIN BIKE 

BACKRACK 




34 South 5th Ave 
10-6 Daily 
10-4Sat&Sun 



bgk gear 

OVER 1 YEARS OF OUTDOOR 
EXPERIENCE YOU CAN TRUST 

81 4-226-4763 



from Pynos to Rod DeJidas set 
up DeJidas' l-yard touchdown 
run on the next play from scrim- 
mage. Shippensburg's offense 
was unable to advance past their 
own 42-yard line, as the Golden 
Eagles held a 7-0 lead after the 
first quarter. 

The Red Raiders got on track in 
the second period with 3-yard TD 
runs by Brubaker and Mike 
Madison, to gain a 14-7 advan- 
tage. Clarion then knotted the 
score with 36 seconds left in the 
half when DeJidas punched into 
the end-zone from one yard out 
for the 14-14 halftime score. 

"We didn't stay emotionally 
sharp," said Clarion head coach 
Malen Luke. "We started out 
really well, then we had a couple 
of bad things happen to us lide 
penalties and missed opportuni- 
ties. Instead of playing to win, 
we played not to lose. We're let- 
ting things happen to us instead 
of making them happen." 

DeJidas enjoyed a fine all- 
around performance, totaling 53 
yards on the ground and 97 
through the air. 

NOTES: Clarion was 0-11 on 
third down conversions. 
Injured QB Jeff Cappa is ques- 
tionable for Saturday's game 
against California. 



California 

at a glance 

The Vulcans, who are in a tran 
sition year under first-year bead 
coach Mike Kolakowski. Under 
Kolakowski, the Vulcans (0-2 
PSAC, 14 overall) have aban 
doned the run and shoot offense, 
which they had used in recent 
years, m favor of the conserva- 
tive l-formation offense. With 
the change, Cal has gone to more 
of a ground oriented attack, scor- 
ing 17.6 points per game this 
season. 

Last week, the Vulcans lost on 
the road to Edinboro 38-22. The 
Fighting Scots scored 24 points 
in the second quarter and held 
Cal scoreless m the first half to 
pick up the win. The Vulcans 
fought back in the second half 
with a third quarter touchdown 
and 15 fourth quarter points. 

The Vulcans lone victory came 
in their second game of the sea 
son against West Virginia 
Weselyan 21-16. Last week, 
WVW beat Glenville Si, who 
topped Clarion 51-0 in week #2 
as well. 

Clarion leads the all-time series 






Singers, 

Singer/Dancers, 

Mu sicians & D J.'s 

Morgantown, West Virginia 

Friday, November 14, 1997 
West Virginia University 
Creative Arts Center - Falbo Theatre 
Auditions: 6:15 -8:15 p.m. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, November 15, 1997 
Point Park College 
Lawrence Hall Lobby 
Auditions: 3:00 - 5:30 p.m. 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Sunday, November 16, 1997 
Youngstown State University 
Dana School of Music - Room 3136 
Auditions: 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. 

r POSITIONS ALSO AVAILABLE^ 

• Technicians • 

• Assistant Choreographer • 

• Costumed Characters • 

(Berenstain Bears™) 

• Costume Shop Personnel • 



CALL (419) 627-2390 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 



For additional sites or 
information contact: 

Cedar Point® 

Live Entertainment 

Post Office Box 5006 

Sandusky, OH 44871-5006 

(419)627-2390 
www.cedarpoint.com 




M 

ENIdtlAWMfM 



October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 22 



Volleyball team hits winning stride 



by Lori Matachak 
Sports Writer 



The Golden Eagles Women's 
Volleyball Team have been keep- 
ing themselves busy with a win- 
ning streak. 

Last Tuesday, October 7, the 
Lady Eagles defeated Slippery 
Rock with the win of 3-2 (15-12, 
12-15, 15-6, 7-15, 15-11). 
Before the match, Clarion was 
ranked 4th and SRU 7th in the 
region. Junior Jamie Mars had a 
total of 24 kills and 1 5 digs in the 
match versus SRU. Also, Mars 
was named co-athlete of the 
PS AC West for the week. 

An alumni match was held 
Saturday, October 11 over the 
Autumn Leaf weekend. A total 
of 5 girls came back to play, 
including coach Jodi Bums, who 
is also alumni. A total of 3 games 
were played with the varsity team 
defeating the alumni. Assistant 
coach, Tina Gustely, said "It was 
great to see the alumni and that 
everyone had a good time." 

On Tuesday, October 14, the 
Lady Eagles were at it again 
defeating IUP in 3 straight 
matches. Final scores (15-3, 15- 




For the latest in 

Clarion sports 

information, call 

the Golden 

Eagle Hotline at 

226-2079 



Sophomore Jamie Soboleski sets teammate Brooke Paxton. 



10, 15-11). Coach Burns said, 
"Both teams played sloppy, but 
we did our job and won the 
game." 

Tracy Bamett led with 15 kills, 
Jamie Mars with 11 and Beth 
Brandstatter and Curtisy Hilton 
with 10. 

Brooke Paxton led with 20 ser- 
vice aces and 14 assists. Paxton 
set the first 2 games with a 
sprained thumb and was eventu- 
ally pulled in the third. Also, 



Jamie Soboleski had 39 service 
aces and 30 assists. 

Freshmen, Amanda Baer said 
the team is pushing to be top in 
the PSAC's but haven't reached 
their peak yet Baer added that 
"The team struggled Tuesday 
against IUP when the girls are 
usually on fire and ready to go!" 

This weekend, the Lady Eagles 
are hosting the Clarion Classic 
Tournament. Competing at 
Clarion this weekend is Juniata, 



Kristin Colello/Clarion Call 



who is ranked #1 in the nation, 
East Strousburg, Lycoming, 
University of Charleston WVA, 
who is ranked third in the region, 
and Oakland Michigan. Playoffs 
will be held all day Saturday. 

In standing, Curtisy Hilton is 
the #1 percentage hitter in state, 
PSAC, and is the top percentage 
hitter in the west. Beth 
Brandstatter is #1 in the state for 
blocking and Christy Boes is 5th 
in the state with service aces. 




This week 

Clarion Classic 

October 17-18 
Tippin Gym 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



SINGLE ELIMINATION TOURNAMENTS THIS WEEK!!! 



TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT 









■CK 






mtttc 


















mi m 








CLOCTY 
















MM 








counter 
















N HLOEMN 







avmm 




BEACH VOLLEYBALL 
WOMEN'S TOURNAMENT 






Ml 












**W0WhPi 




i 




| 


— — 








**■ 








M 


CHUMRt 








w* 










cnumwmt 







DOUBLES TOURNAMENT 



•EACH VOLLEYBALL 
CO-REC TOURNAMENT 









n—wm—i 


ooumov/ 

OUMTT 








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counter/ 




aamn 







WW 



CONGRATULATIONS! 

TYLER PALISON . 
INTRAMURAL WORKER 
OF THE WEEK 



BEACH VOLLEYBALL 
MEN'S TOURNAMENT 




GOOD LUCK!! 



FLAG FOOTBALL RANKINGS 

SIGMA-PI PURPLE 7-1 

MAULERS 7-1 

SIGTAU GAMMA-BLUE 6-1 

B.M. PANTHERS * 6-1 

BEER LEAGUE ALL STARS 8-2 

WEIL STILL WIN AGAIN 5-2 

SIG TAU GAMMA-GREY 7-3 

THE BOYS 5-3 

PURPLE HEADED WARRIORS5-3 

* Defaults and Forfeits are counted 

as a loss and are now included in 

the team record. 

Play-offs begin Monday, October 10 

RACQUETBALL TOURNAMENT 

Three Divisions- Double Elimination 

Beginner. Intermediate, Advanced 

Tuesday - Wednesday, OCT. 28-29 

Gemmell Racquetball Courts 

Register at 4:30 pm, Tues. Oct. 28 

Tournament Ray begins at 5:00 pm 

Student -$1.00 entry fee 

Non-Student - $2/00 entry fee 

PRIZES AWARDED !! 



October 16, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



CLASSIFIEDS] 



mi:lp\\\\ti;i) 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10- $20 

per hour. Call (814)234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 



I OK RENT 



For Rent 

3 Bedroom mobile home in 

Clarion. Available Immediately. 

Call 764-5895 

Furnished Apartments Available 

for 4 people for the Fall 1998- 

Spring 1999 semesters. 

Very close to campus. 

Leave message at 226-5917 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 

available for SPRING 
SEMESTER. Clean, close to 
campus, quiet, no pets, refer- 
ences. CallRUTTAPTS.at 
227-1938 
or beeper (814)226-0722 

Spacious 1 story house for 3 or 
4, close to campus, available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. 
Quiet, no pets, references, newly 

furnished, clean. 

Call RUTT APTS at 227-1938 

or beeper (814)227-0722 



Mobile Home for rent starting 
SPRING SEMESTER 

Ideal for 3 or 4 students. 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 bathrooms with show- 
ers, washer and dryer room, liv- 
ing room and kitchen combined. 
Located across from Comet 
Food Warehouse 
Call during the day at 226-1913 



\\\oi m i;\n;\Ts 



EARN 

$750-$1500/week 
Raise all the money your group 
needs by sponsoring a VISA 
fundraiser on your campus. No 
investment & very little time 
needed. There's no obligation, 
so why not call for information 

today. 
Call 1-800-323-8454 ext 95 

Earn MONEY and 
FREE TRIPS! 
Absolute Best SPRING BREAK 
Packages available! 
INDIVIDUALS, Student 
ORGANIZATIONS, or small 
GROUPS wanted!! Call INTER- 
CAMPUS PROGRAMS at 1- 
800-327-6013 or 
http://www.icpt.com 



Off-Street Parking Available 
CUP Commuters, tired of look- 
ing for a place to park or feeding 
meters? Rent a reserved parking 
space by the semester or year. 
Only one block from campus. 
Call 764-3690 

RELIABLE SPRING BREAK 
TOURS 

Bahamas, Cancun & Ski Trips! 

FREE FOOD & FREE 

DRINKS! 

Sign up before Nov. 30. 

Organize a group-travel free. 

Call for details and free 

brochure. Call 1 (888) SPRING 

BREAK Today! 

FREET-SHffiT 
+$1000 
Credit card fundraisers for 
fraternities, sororities & groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 
65. Qualified callers receive 
FREE T-SfflRT. 



PERSONALS 



Hey AOft , 1 had fun rearrang- 
ing fumature! Who's next?! I'll 
set the table! Thanks for the 
shirt! Allison 



New Guy, Thanks for the great 

ALF! I had a real blast- Good 

luck with your new job! I'll 

miss you buddy! 

Love, Newer Guy 

(your 2 Brother) 



Thanks to the Dance Team, AIT 

and AOE for the Great mixers! 

From the Brothers of ITr 



Great Job on the float Rudy, 

Dawn, and Laura! AOEand 

nr #1 Float in Clarion County! 

IX, Thanks for the good lay! 
We had a great time! Love, OH 

We would like to thank Trisha 

for her hard work and dedication 

on the float You did a great 

job! Love, your OH Sisters 

To AXP, The mixer rocked! 

Thanks for making ALF a lot of 

fun! Our float was awesome! 

Love,A£A 



To our Sweetheart Daria, 

You are the greatest sweetheart a 

fraternity could have. We hope 

you had a great ALF! 

Love, the Brothers of KAP 






To the Sisters of AIT, We all 
had a great time at the float and 

at the mixer. You girls are the 

best. Let's do it again next year. 

Love, the Brothers of KAP 

To the Sisters of AZ, Thanks for 

all the great work on the float, it 

looked superb. The mixer was 

even better! 

Love, the Brothers of OX 

Sigma Pi, 

We had a great time at the 

mixer. We're glad you guys 

were s o brief w ith us. Lets Toga 

again some time. 

Love, the Zetas 



Dance Team, Thanks for a great 

mixer, thanks especially for the 

routine. Love, the Brothers of 

in 



III, Thanks for the great mixer, 
can't wait to do it again some- 
time. Love, the Brothers of in 

To the Sisters of ZTA, Thanks 
for the great toga mixer, and a 

great time doing the float. 

Love, the Brothers of in 



Thanks for the great mixer ©X 
Love, III 



Megan, Congrats on becoming 

an Aunt. 

Love, your III Sisters 



Congratulations to Maggie, 
Faith, Marissa, and Suzanne. 

Welcome to our bunch. 
Love, your future III Sisters 



To the Brothers of 65, 1 hope 

you had a great ALF week, your 

float looked wonderful! Good 

luck the rest of the semester. I 

love you all. Love, your 

Sweetheart, Rae Ann 



To the Pledges of 6E, You guys 

are doing great. Hope you had a 

great ALF. If you ever need 

anything, I'm here for you. 

Love, your Sweetheart, Rae Ann 

Delta Zeta would like to wel- 
come and congratulate our 
newest associate members: 
Stephanie Miller, Lynne Lazor, 
Laura Thome, Becky Maxwell, 
Cindy Aquaro, Shannon 
Finamore, Shelly Dyson and 
Stephanie Sadler. 
We love you guys! 

I really wanted to write it 
but..Oh- just "ruck it up"!! 



To the Sisters of Delta Zeta and 

the Brothers of Theta Xi- 

Congratulauons on winning 

3rd place!! 

The float looked great! 



Thanks to Mandy and Cara for 

doning a wonderful job on the 

chartering banquet. 

Love, your AOE Sisters 



To our sweetheart Rudy, you're 

the best Deepher Darling we 

ever could' ve asked for. 

Thanks for everything, 

especially the pizza. 

Love, The Sisters of AOE 

To the Brothers of ITT, thanks 

forageatALF! We had a great 

time building the float, a blast at 

the mixer, and the mysterious 

keg race was tons of fun! 

Love, AOE 

To Dawn and Laura, congratula- 
tions on Sisters of the week, and 
thanks for doing a great job with 
the float! 
Love, your AOE Sisters 



Congrats AOE and ITT - 
Homecoming Float Champions! 



OIK, Great Job on the float! 
We had a blast. OOA 



James, We love you Sweetheart! 
Hope you had an awesome ALF. 
You must come play soon, 0OA 



Lissy, You're the Best Ballerina, 

keep it up and remember you 

Rock... 

Love your BOA Sisters 



G-I-L-P-I-N Gilpin Gilpin Win 

Win Win-for my Gilpin 

girls! It was fun sharing my 

munchos with you! 



Hey Dany-elle, do ya know how 
to spell your name yet? 



Daddy Ed - Making footers was 

the best ALF is always more 

fun at the Loomis. 

Love, MB 

DJ, Good job little! You made 

me proud as always. I'll just 

never give you blue tattoo 

before the car ride home again. 

Love, MB 

I know you'll miss me this 

weekend but try and 

struggle through. 

I love you Betty. 



Chili, what are you wearing 

tonight, the sneakers or the 

heels. Love, MB 



Hey Call Staff, it is time to 
break out the ANAL love beads! 

Stacy, thanks for the great week- 
end. See you again in two 
weeks. 
Love, Michael 



To Scotty and Founds, your par- 
ties helped make this ALF the 
best one yet! 
Mike 

Happy Birthday to the oldest 

friend of mine still at Clarion! 

Justkiddin'Stac! Happy 23rd! 

Love ya! Founds 



Welcome to the family Jen Reid! 

So happy to be here to see such 

a great person added to the 

Betas! Great job 2 little! 

Love, Founds 

Hi Grandma! Hope you enjoy 
reading the news in our presti- 
gious little paper! I love you, 
and will see you next weekend! 
Love, Jennifer 



Ed, Thanks for allowing my 
bitch and I to consume the left- 
overs after our long, laborous 
efforts last Thursday! 
I had a blast! 



To all seniors done in 
December... I'm ready to get the 
hell outta here, how 'bout you?! 



Melanie, you are "the Baum"! 
Ha! Ha! 



Megan Parks. ..you are doing a 

great job! Hang in there! Love, 

Kristen 

Happy Belated Birthday. Mom! 
Love, Benj. 

Hello "Woolies" everywhere. I 

hope to see you guys soon. 

Love, Juto Boy. 

My beautiful, sexy wife Lynn, 

thanks for waiting up, I'll call ya 

around 7am 

Love, Beowulf 

My darling Robesiere, you bring 
the peanut butter and the two- 
by-fours, and I'll meet you in 
Trenton! 

Kiss my brick! 
Love, Brian Corl 






Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



Sportsview 



Farewell El Deano, you'll be missed 



by Chris Pfeil 
Assistant Sports Editor 

When the college hoops sea- 
son kicks off next month, the 
sports world will be minus one 
of the classiest acts ever to pace 
the sidelines. 

Dean Smith called it quits last 
Thursday after 36 magical sea- 
sons at the helm for the North 
Carolina Tarheels. 

At the press conference, 
Smith thanked everyone from 
his assistants to his secretaries. 
However, he lost control of his 
emotions when he began to 
speak about his players. With 
his voice cracking, he said, 
"they're very special". Then, 
he had to stop. 

That is what made Dean so 
special. He had a father-son 
relationship with his players, 
past and present The Tarheels 
were much more than a basket- 
ball team, they were a family. 

What this man has accom- 
plished is phenomenal. He 
holds the NCAA record with 
879 wins, won two national 
titles, and made 11 trips to the 
Final Four. 

But in today's world of scan- 
dals and investigations, per- 
haps his greatest accomplish- 
ment is that he won and still ran 



a clean ship. A statistic that 
Smith says is one of his biggest 
accomplishments is that 97% of 
his players went en to earn their 
degrees. 

Even though 1 am a Dukie, I 
will miss Dean Smith as much 
as anyone. I have the same 
feeling now as when the 
Browns fled Cleveland and 
ended their rivalry with the 
Steelers. The Duke-North 
Carolina battles on Tobacco 
Road will never be the same 
without El Deano. Neither will 
college basketball. 
Penn State takes over #1 

Before I start bashing Penn 
State, I will pause and give 
them credit They came back 
from a 10 point deficit to beat a 
good team and Curtis Enis 
looked like the Heisman candi- 
date everyone said he was 
before the season. 

If the Lions hope to stay on 
top of the polls, which they 
won't they will need to play 
better than they did last 
Saturday to beat Michigan, 
Michigan State, and the reener- 
gized Wisconsin Badgers. 

Despite the win, Penn State 
showed some glaring weak- 
nesses in their passing game 
and inability to stop the pass. 
JoePa better go to work, or 



Happy Valley may turn into 
Weeping Valley. 

I give the Lions credit for 
winning, but I still don't think 
they should be #1. I'm sure 
you're wondering who should 
be, so I'll tell you-Nebraska. 

Before you throw the paper 
down and call me every name 
in the book, let me speak my 
peace. 

Nebraska went on the ROAD 
and convincinly beat the then 
#2 Washigton Huskies. On the 
other hand, it took a total col- 
lapse by Ohio State for Penn 
State to beat the then #6 
Buckeyes at HOME. 

However, like I said before in 
this column, it doesn't matter 
who is #1 until after the bowls. 
But by then Penn State's title 
dreams will be just that and 
Nebraska will claim their third 
title in four years. 

Finally, a message to every- 
one who has come up to me 
and yelled about my article on 
why Penn State won't win the 
national championship: 

Sportsview is an opinion col- 
umn, and I have earned the 
right to speak my mind. If you 
want to be heard, put the time 
into the paper, use the reader's 
forum, or stop complaining. 

That's the bottom line. 



Sports Trivia 

What years did Dean Smith lead 

the North Carolina Tar Heels to a 

national title? 

Last Week's Answer: 

Pittsburgh last beat Notre Dame 
in 1 987 at Pitt Stadium 30-22. 

Know any good trivia questions? Send 

sports trivia questions to The Clarion Call. 

270 Gemmel Student Center. 



tv nrrj 



<^7T 



October 23, 1997 



Clarion tEhtibertitp of $emt*ptoania 



Clarion, $3 16214 



SportsTalk 

Today 4-6 p.m. 
91.7WCUC-FM 

after Mutual News 



Kraig Koelsch 

Joe" from PSU 

Charlie Desch 

Bill Bates 



Think your're pregnant? 
Worried? 





We can help 



PREGNANCY CENTER 

. |$I;IS, 7th Avenlje 
^Clarion 226-7007 
't^deWal Care" 
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Buy one Big Mac Sandwic h 
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with 
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voice of the 

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XEfye Clarion Call 



Whit's Susifo 



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■< .' Bfifl f 



Red Ribbon 

Week helps 

keep Clarion 

students drug 

free. For the 

story see 

page 9. 



€ontents 



Opinion: ...-. Pg- 2 

Reader Responses: Pg- 3 

News: Pg- 5 

Lifestyles: Pg- 9 

Call-on-you Pg-13 

Photo Essay: Pg- 14 

Entertainment: Pg- ' 7 

Sports: Pg-20 

Classifieds: Pg-23 



T0tAumt 79, %*%nt 7 



Weather 



Today: High around 
45. Rain and possible 

snow flurries. 

Friday: Cloudy. High 

in low 50s. 

Possible rain. 

Saturday: Definite 

showers. High in the 

high 40s. 



President's Residence nears completion 




Kelly Luczynski/Clarion Call 



The new President's house is located behind Still Hall. 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 16, 1997 



Sportsview 



Farewell El Deano, you'll be missed 



by Chris Pfeil 
Assistant Sports Editor 

When the college hoops sea- 
son kicks off next month, the 
sports world will be minus one 
of the classiest acts ever to pace 
the sidelines. 

Dean Smith called it quits last 
Thursday after 36 magical sea- 
sons at the helm for the North 
Carolina Tarheels. 

At the press conference, 
Smith thanked everyone from 
his assistants to his secretaries. 
However, he lost control of his 
emotions when he began to 
speak about his players. With 
his voice cracking, he said, 
"they're very special". Then, 
he had to stop. 

That is what made Dean so 
special. He had a father-son 
relationship with his players, 
past and present. The Tarheels 
were much more than a basket- 
ball team, they were a family. 

What this man has accom- 
plished is phenomenal. He 
holds the NCAA record with 
879 wins, won two national 
titles, and made 11 trips to the 
Final Four. 

But, in today's world of scan- 
dals and investigations, per- 
haps his greatest accomplish- 
ment is that he won and still ran 




Today 4-6 pan. 
91.7 WCUC-FM 

after Mutual News 



Kraig Koelsch 

Joe" from PSU 

Charlie Desch 

Bill Bates 



// 



with 
special guest 

Bill Hillgrove 

voice of the 

Pittsburgh 

Steelers 



a clean ship. A statistic that 
Smith says is one of his biggest 
accomplishments is that 97% of 
his players went en to earn their 
degrees. 

Even though 1 am a Dukie, I 
will miss Dean Smith as much 
as anyone. I have the same 
feeling now as when the 
Browns fled Cleveland and 
ended their rivalry with the 
Steelers. The Duke-North 
Carolina battles on Tobacco 
Road will never be the same 
without El Deano. Neither will 
college basketball. 
Penn State takes over #1 

Before I start bashing Penn 
State, I will pause and give 
them credit. They came back 
from a 10 point deficit to beat a 
good team and Curtis Enis 
looked like the Heisman candi- 
date everyone said he was 
before the season. 

If the Lions hope to stay on 
top of the polls, which they 
won't, they will need to play 
better than they did last 
Saturday to beat Michigan, 
Michigan State, and the reener- 
gized Wisconsin Badgers. 

Despite the win, Penn State 
showed some glaring weak- 
nesses in their passing game 
and inability to stop the pass. 
JoePa better go to work, or 



Happy Valley may turn into 
Weeping Valley. 

I give the Lions credit for 
winning, but 1 still don't think 
they should be #1. I'm sure 
you're wondering who should 
be, so I'll tell you-Nebraska. 

Before you throw the paper 
down and call me every name 
in the book, let me speak my 
peace. 

Nebraska went on the ROAD 
and convincing beat the then 
#2 Washigton Huskies. On the 
other hand, it took a total col- 
lapse by Ohio State for Penn 
State to beat the then #6 
Buckeyes at HOME. 

However, like I said before in 
this column, it doesn't matter 
who is #1 until after the bowls. 
But, by then Penn State's title 
dreams will be just that, and 
Nebraska will claim their third 
title in four years. 

Finally, a message to every- 
one who has come up to me 
and yelled about my article on 
why Penn State won't win the 
national championship: 

Sportsview is an opinion col- 
umn, and I have earned the 
right to speak my mind. If you 
want to be heard, put the time 
into the paper, use the reader's 
forum, or stop complaining. 

That's the bottom line. 



Sports Trivia 

What years did Dean Smith lead 

the North Carolina Tar Heels to a 

national title? 

Last Week's Answer: 

Pittsburgh last beat Notre Dame 
in 1 987 at Pitt Stadium 30-22. 

Know any good trivia questions? Send 

sports trivia questions to The Clarion Call, 

270 Gemmel Student Center. 



Think your're pregnant? 
Worried? 




©ctober 23, 1997 



Clarion ® mberattp of $enn*ptoania 



Clarion, $S 16214 




e Clarion Call 



Wljat'g 3hrtibe 



i an 






1 «* m 




l ^} 


BG9 


■ j K..I, 


■ , I 






I n 




1 Jfl it- 





Red Ribbon 

Week helps 

keep Clarion 

students drug 

free. For the 

story see 

page 9. 



£ontent£> 



Opinion: 

Reader Responses: 

News: 

Lifestyles: 

Cali-on-you 

Photo Essay: 

Entertainment: 

Sports: 

Classifieds: 



..Pg. 2 
..Pg. 3 
...Pg. 5 
..Pg. 9 
.Pg.13 
Pg. 14 
.Pg. 17 
.Pg.20 
..Pb.23 



Volume 79, 3teaue 7 



Wwttytt 



Today: High around 
45. Rain and possible 

snow flurries. 

Friday: Cloudy. Hi^h 

in low 50s. 

Possible rain. 

Saturday: Definite 

showers. Hii>h in the 

high 40s. 



President's Residence nears completion 



we can help 



PREGNANCY CENTER 

?.t4 : S. 7th Avenlje 
Clarion 226-7007 
"Cofifideritial Care" 
Free preganancy tests 



Buy one Big MacS andwi ch 

GETONE 
FREE 



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The new President's house is located behind Still Hall. 



ra^er 



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"" tWCIiAfflrf Call 



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OPINION. 



Che 

Clarion 
Call 

270 •rmmell Complex 
CUrtOH, $8 16214 

(0U)22t-236O 

/fiX (814)226-2557 

t-mifl: caU$mifl.dir<ti.tfci 

teteto. dnr(n.cta/ttt nll/nl. |m 

Cxecittitie Poarb 



Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 

Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 

Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

On-line Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



4 



m 




mk Park 




"for tht next three 
hours, as the summer day 

began to taf& shape, I 
would pay as much atten- 
tion to my articulation 
and voice as I would to 
my batting stance. " 



'lason 'Ihvnbacli 



"Field of Dreams" 

The routine was the same each 
week. Saturday morning had 
arrived, and I was about to play 
out my dreams. I would wake up 
at 7 o'clock in the morning with 
an excitement that fell just short 
of the excitement of Christmas 
morning. 

My first instinct was always to 
peer out my bedroom window 
and look down on the dew-cov- 
ered grass of my backyard that in 
just a few minutes would trans- 
form itself, in my mind, into a 
40,000 seat stadium. I even 
noticed the large pine trees that 
overlooked the yard like giant 
skyscrapers overlook a down- 
town ballpark. It was Saturday- 
theonedayon I was able to cre- 
ate my dreams. 



Trying to remember just where 
I had last put the ball and bat was 
always the frustrating part. I had 
a habit, not unlike many other 8- 
year-old kids, of leaving my 
equipment where I had last put it, 
instead of picking it up and 
returning it to the large cardboard 
television box in the garage 
where I stored all of my sporting 
goods. 

Finally, I would remember 
leaving them in the middle of the 
yard the day before. I did not 
care that the overnight thunder- 
storm had soggied my already 
waterlogged baseball- I just 
wanted something that was hard, 
round, and could fly. My over- 
sized 33-inch, 30 once bat would 

Continued on page 4 



Staff 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Steve Ostrosky, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tim Bowerman, Sberi Hertzog 

Asst. Copy & Design Editor: Jnel Ritzier 
Asst. AdSales Managers:Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Hope Guy, Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Rend Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Bethany Boal, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, Lori 

Matachak, Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Stella Meyer, Jen Mumford, Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott 

Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, Jen 

Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Karli Berlin, Greg Hensler, Megan Klauss, Wayne 

Lines, Heather Liti 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Tina Lasky, Jen 

Mumford, Stella Meyer, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tun Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins, Jill Siegel 

'Names remaining in the staff box in the December 4, 1997 QdL receive co-curricular credit. 



'Editorial 




"you can 'tgo to tht 

bathroom until 

someone comes by to 

Ut you out (or you 

could go indoors and 

suffer the 

consequences y 




Jennifer founds, Managing editor 



During a time when we're 
learning how to be on our own, 
take care of ourselves and learn 
to juggle classes, homework, liv- 
ing situations, and partying, how 
can we possibly take on the 
responsibility of caring for anoth- 
er living being? 

I'm talking about having a pet 
in college. Throughout my four 
and a half years at Clarion, I've 
seen many students take on the 
responsibility of having a pet: be 
it a dog, cat, hedgehog, or snake, 
these animals need to be treated 
fairly and given love, care, and 
freedom to enjoy their lives. As 
students, we have these rights, 
along with the right to hang out 
with friends, go to classes, and 
enjoy our college life. 

I love animals, (well, most of 
them) and it's fun to play with 
my roommate's dog when I get 
home from class, or play with a 
friend's new puppy. But, there 
are some people who do not 
deserve to have pets while in col- 
lege. 

I'm sure some of you have seen 
the mistreatment of a pet during 
your time at Clarion. I can't 



believe some people actually get 
a kick out of allowing their dog 
or cat to drink alcohol, and it's 
even more revolting when some- 
one has the audacity to get their 
pet high or give them some other 
type of drug. 

These types of behaviors are 
extreme, but I have seen it hap- 
pen. 

I have two points to make: one, 
alcohol is for adult human 
beings, not dogs, besides, half of 
the time people can't handle their 
own alcohol intake. If they can't 
handle it, what makes them think 
that their pet can? Two, illegal 
drugs are just mat -illegal. Even 
though we all know that drugs 
are out there, it's not legal for 
people to take them, so don't give 
them to your pets! 

On the lighter side, think about 
how busy we are as college stu- 
dents. Unless you skip classes or 
major in being a homebody, you 
probably won't have the time or 
energy to-take proper care of your 
pet 

Try putting yourself in a college 

Continued on page 4 



UlTMFWfflWH 



is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief)- Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the. student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Monday of desired publication 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let 
ters that do not appear in the publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call. Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the week Of publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



October 23, 1997 ~ 



IX 



The Clarion Call 



Page-3 



READER RESPONSES\ 



"I don't know what kind of bubble you're living in..." 



Dear Editor, 

This letter is a response to 
Danielle Hock's letter in last 
week's Call. 

Danielle, I hate to shatter your 
erroneous conceptions, but that 
little card we all get when we 
come to school isn't just a paper- 
weight to be left sitting on your 
desk at home. 

It actually has a purpose: to 
confirm who is a student of this 
school for functions and services 
that only students should be 
allowed to utilize (and non-stu- 
dents must pay for). 

Sure, it's a little inconvenient 
not to be able to do whatever we 
want whenever we want, but I 



personally don't like the idea of 
some schmuck off the street, or a 
high school student who looks 
older than he is, getting a free 
ride for things I'm paying for. 

Yes, it would be nice if you got 
less hassle when you honestly did 
forget your card -and you prob- 
ably would if more people were 
careful about keeping track of 
their ID cards, so that places like 
the cafe weren't constantly hear- 
ing, "Oh, I left it at home, now 
just let me in." 

As for the snack bar situation... 
well, I wasn't there to see exactly 
how obvious it was that you 
came in with the bottle. 

However, I can guarantee you 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



wouldn't have had any problems 
if you would' ve just set your 
things down at a table before 
entering the food area to pick up 
that pretzel. (But that would 
have taken up two whole seconds 
of your time - and then you 
would have to pick everything up 
again - horror!) 
I don't know what kind of bub- 



"...a 'YES' vote for the Regional Renaissance 
Initiative is a vote for economic growth..." 



Dear Editor, 

Funny story. I spent the better 
part of two weeks trying to find 
information on the upcoming sta- 
dium tax vote: someone told me 
it applies to Clarion county. I 
didn't find the information I was 
looking for. 

I even looked on the Internet, 
searched Yahoo. I found a story 
about the Cincinnati, Ohio stadi- 
um tax. It seems that Cincy is 
floating on a sea of bumper stick- 
ers that say, "Shoot me, I voted 
for the stadium tax." "Suckers," 
I thought to myself. 

A week later I received my first 
bit of real, eye-opening informa- 
tion on the stadium tax. "Ha!" I 
laughed to myself, it's not even 
called the "stadium tax," it's 
called the Regional Renaissance 
Initiative. 

Those clever political bandits 
hid the stadium tax by giving it 
some strange name that would 
confuse voters. Well, that's what 
I thought I was wrong, and so 
were many of my friends and 
family. Everyone I spoke with 
said they would vote against the 
tax. Now, they're voting "YES." 

The voters in Cincy chose to 
vote solely on new stadiums for 
the Reds and the Bengals. Now, 
with the increased taxes and poor 
performances by both teams, the 
residents of Cincy are distraught 

Should this affect the way you 
vote on November 4? No. Why? 
Because it is not a stadium tax. 

Turns out a group called The 
Allegheny Institute is trying to 



mislead people by calling the ini- 
tiative a stadium tax. The 
Institute claims half of the taxes 
collected will go towards the 
construction of the (two) new 
stadiums, when in reality the 
amount allocated for the con- 
struction is less than 14 percent. 

The truth is only 25 percent of 
the tax collected over seven years 
(the amount of time the tax will 
survive unless an extension is 
approved by another vote) will 
go to Lawrence Convention 
Center additions, renovations to 
the cultural district in Pittsburgh, 
the stadiums, and numerous cul- 
tural improvements to the sur- 
rounding counties. 

So what happens to the other 75 
percent? According to a joint 
study conducted by Carnegie 
Mellon, Duquesne University, 
and the University of Pittsburgh, 
the Initiative will create over 
30,000 jobs and bring 20,000 
additional residents to the area. 
By 1999, voters will see an 
increase of 5,000 to 8,000 new 
jobs and an overall increase of 
$140 million in personal income 
in Allegheny County alone. 

What else? One billion dollars 
in increased income, $100 mil- 
lion in private, state and federal 
matching funds. 

The estimated tax paid over a 
seven year period by a resident 
according to the study, is $630. 
That works out to be $90 a year 
or $12.60 a year for the stadiums. 
The tax will not affect food or 
clothing. 



Sure, I love the Pirates. I'm a 
Steelers fan. I want them to stay 
in Pittsburgh. I'm willing to pay 
$12.60 a year to keep them here. 
But this goes way beyond loyalty 
to a sports team. 

This is about the employment 
outlook for western 

Pennsylvania. I love this area 
and plan on being here for a long 
time. Most of my friends and 
family feel the same way. Only 
problem is: will they find jobs? 
Will my brother find work in 
western Pennsylvania or will we 
have to drive to Charlotte for 
every Christmas and 

Thanksgiving? 

We've seen the growth in 
Clarion County. Imagine that 
type of growth spread throughout 
the other 10 counties helped by 
this Initiative's effects. 

Don't take my word for it Find 
out for yourself. If you have the 
opportunity to vote in the upcom- 
ing election and want more infor- 
mation about the Regional 
Renaissance Initiative, check out 
http//w ww.swpajobs.com. You'll 
find voter information, press 
releases and contact information. 
Think about the information 
you find. When you've studied 
all the facts I'm sure that you'll 
agree that a "YES" vote for the 
Regional Renaissance Initiative 
is a vote for economic growth in 
Clarion county and western 
Pennsylvania. 

Sincerely, 
Adam Earnheardt 



ble you're living in, but people 
really do try to get away with 
stuff for free - yes, even at col- 
lege. 

If I have the option, I never 
walk into places carrying things I 
could have taken from there and 
if I must, I make sure I clearly 
point it out to someone when I 



enter and leave it in their sight 
while I'm there. 

Anyway, you know what? I've 
never had the problems that you 
wrote about 

Hmmm... 

Sincerely, 
Rick Cotter 




THIS t WVE t K.I9&.. 

%t following tockjki 
during ik last wuiin October. 



October 25, 1968 

In a very political paper, the front page headlines included, 
"Democratic Regime Termed 'Sick' by Nixon Supporter" and 
"Students Voice Opinions on Wallace as Candidate." 

October 23, 1974 

The editorial on page 3 headlined, "Stadium Seating is "Soggy" 
Subject." The editorial written by Liz Pfister lead with the follow- 
ing: "For those of you who attended Saturday's football game, the 
"chilly" weather was not the only factor that would have prevented 
you ardent fans from staying for the whole game. 

Students who were forced to stand throughout the game due to a 
lack of seats have a legitimate gripe. Most of us would assume that 
a $35 activity fee would assure a mere student of a seat at the 
biggest football game of the season." 

October 23, 1980 

In the "Only at Clarion" column the following items were print- 
ed: 

• ... Can a radio deejay do his last show of the semester for 7 
straight weeks. 

• ... Does a girl paint herself denim blue to win the tight jeans con- 
test at Mr. J's. 
• ... Are electric blankets irreparable if they lose their cords. 

October 22, 1987 

The front page of the Features section ted with the story, "Dizzy 
celebrates 70th birthday at CUP." Features Editor, Maria Kapsak 
sat down with jazz great Dizzy Gillespie and interviewed him for a 
Clarion Call exclusive. During the interview she asked him where 
he got the name Dizzy. He responded by saying that when people 
ask him if he was named Dizzy, he says, "Would your mother name 
you Dizzy." 

October 24, 1991 

"Clarion's sororities and fraternities 1990-91 GPA exceeds full- 
time undergraduate average," led page 8 of this issue. The lead 
paragraph read, "Eight of Clarion University's fraternities and 
sororities had grade point averages above that of the rest of the full- 
time student body during the 1990-91 academic year. Seven of the 
ten sororities and one of the 13 fraternities topped the 2.797 on a 
4.0 scale, grade point average of all full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents. The grade point average for all full-time undergraduate 
women is 2.956." 



All materials are taken directly from back issues of 
The Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 



^■no r r r 



^r\ 



October 23, 1997 



H„A 



The Clarion Call 



Page 4' 




Park continued from page 2, . . 



be difficult to swing at my size, 
but it helped to add to the drama. 

I was so determined and precise 
that I would run back into the 
house in order to copy down a 
lineup for two teams, complete 
with averages and other statistics, 
in order to be as realistic as pos- 
sible. 

After that it was time to head 
into the backyard or, in other 
words, my field of dreams. 

With baseball in hand, bat 
lodged under my armpit, and a 
notebook with the starting line 
ups and statistics that I had 
already meticulously prepared in 
my other hand, I quietly opened 
the back door and walked into the 
yard to practice my skills. 

Certainly, I was not the only 
eight-year-old boy who was in 
his backyard pretending to be the 
next Mickey Mantel or Willie 
Mays, but I was the only boy who 
was also pretending to be the 
next Vin Scully, Bob Costas, or 
Mel Allen. 

For fifteen minutes, before I hit 
the ball one time, I would 
announce the starting line ups 
and conduct my own pregame 
show. 

Then, in a voice only audible to 
myself, I would say, "Welcome 
back to Wrigley Field in Chicago 
(or whatever city was hosting 



NBC's Saturday Game or the 
Week) I'm Vin Scully." For the 
next three hours, as the summer 
day began to take shape, I would 
pay as much attention to my 
articulation and voice as I would 
to my batting stance. 

Rarely would I get bored throw- 
ing the ball up in the air and hit- 
ting it and then having to chase it 
down. If it were Mike Schmidt's 
turn at bat, for example, I would 
try my hardest to hit the ball over 
the fence (designated by a row of 
hedges) for a home run. If I did, 
I would run around the bases, 
represented by three samples of 
carpeting and a welcome mat for 
home plate, and say "And 
Schmidt hits a long drive to deep 
left-center field- Moreland goes 
back to thewarning track... to the 
wall... it is GONE!" 

After touching home plate I 
would immediately walk over to 
my notebook and scribble an 
"HR" next to his name and then 
say, "That was Schmidt's 25th 
home run of the season and now 
on the day he is three-for-three." 

Finally, hours later, on a ground 
ball hit weakly down the third 
base side, I would proclaim, 
"Grounder to third... Schmidt's 
throw to first., and the game is 
over... Phillies win seven to 
three." 



Because of my love of sports 
and my dreams of becoming a 
sportscaster, I used my Saturday 
mornings in the backyard as a 
way to mix fun with practice for 
the future. Neighbors who saw 
me wondered what I was doing 
throwing the baseball up, hitting 
it 200 feet and then chasing it 
down; however, I did not care, 
for I was playing out my dreams 
and enjoying the solitude of it 
Of course, in the fall I was in the 
yard announcing my solo football 
games. Meanwhile, in the win- 
ter, our garage made the perfect 
basketball or hockey arena. 
Whichever sport it was, I would 
be certain to announce every sec- 
ond of the action. 

To this day, my fondest memo- 
ries still are the Saturday morn- 
ings that I spent in the backyard 
playing out the game as if it were 
a reality and announcing every 
second of the action. My future 
aspirations are in the field of 
broadcasting, but if your future is 
in teaching, accounting, or any 
other field, I encourage you to 
reflect on the event or process 
that got you interested in your 
career goal. 

•The author is a senior 
Communication major. 



; is an open writing 
forum for the readership* of The Clarion 



Call . Submissions for this column can t>e 
mailed to 270 Oemmell Student Center or 
dropped off at the office. *=*s with all mate- 
rials submitted for publication. Hide Park 
is subject to editing for libel, grammar, 
punctuation, and length. 
Thank you. the Elditor 




Euthanasia: Right or Wrong 



Euthanasia, or "Right to Die" as it is more commonly know, is going to 
become a very hot topic for Oregon residents in the near future. On elec- 
tion day this November 4, voters in Oregon will decide if they want to make 
euthanasia legal in their state. In 1994, the population voted to make it 
legal, but the decision was contested in court The U.S. Supreme court has 
already decided that the right to die is NOT a constitutional right, but 
whether or not it is a legal right is still under question. 

People have very strong feeling on both sides of the issue. There are the 
stories about how someone's grandparent spent the last few days or weeks 
■of his or her life in excruciating pain that could have been stopped had the 
grandparent possessed the "Right to Die." Opponents of euthanasia feel that no one has the right to end 
a life except God. Parade magazines' article on this topic this week suggests the euthanasia issue might 
become as divisive as the abortion debate. 

In my opinion, euthanasia is dead wrong. This is just the next step of the dangerous precedent that 
was set by the decision of Roe v. Wade when abortion was made legal. The first group to die are the 
unborn, now the elderly and suffering. Who will determine where this will end? 

Does anybody have any brothers or sisters with learning disability? At this rate, they may be the next 
to go. Think about it. 

If you get fired up about issues like this and want to make a difference, get involved with politics. You 
don't have to become the next congressman, just write to him or her. 






I 



wwwxoraedycentral,com' 

ttiis site isWevei^one w^ 

lots of stupid games and links to comedy shows. Guarw«e|d 

to keep you laughing. 

w^wjuIImjoitj- if you've been spending your nights snug- 
gled up to the tv watching the world series, Oils site is for you. 
Devoted baseball fans can check out the action anytime when 
they type in this address. 

www.swpajobs.conv Check out this site to learn more about 
the Regional Renaissance Iiiitiatsve befoi« the Nov. 2 vote. 



«■*" «MaMM«M mt^ttmMmtttttmf^mmfmm^^f^'^'f*m'f'*'mmm 






*?ll publish websjt* suljjBissiQBs from students, {acui- 
ty mftt mi foe community If you know of ..* gw*tf site u»t yes* 
would like to share -with oar readers submit the complete address, a»d a 
brief deseriptibQ to ottr office irt room 2?Q Gemmeti Student Center or 
e-mail as at CaIl@mait.clarion.edu. We will Jog onto all the sites sub- 
mitted to verify that they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 



"Clarion is still a special place." 



Dear Editor, 

We enjoyed a beautiful 
Saturday at The Autumn Leaf 
Festival 1997. 

The parade and reception for 
alumni were wonderful. I regret 
that it took me 25 years to return 
for the ALF and Alumni 
Weekend. We had a great time. 

Clarion is still a special place. 
As a teacher I have encouraged 
many students to attend Clarion 
and I enjoyed seeing some of 
tbem on campus. 

Thanks again to the coed at the 
snack bar (check-out line) in the 
Gemmell Complex for the "ran- 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



dom act of kindness." 

You helped to make it a super 
day. 

Sincerely, 
Pete Palumbo 
Bradford, PA 
Class of 72 



Editorial continued 



pet's pawprints. You can't go to 
the bathroom until someone 
comes by to let you out (or you 
could go indoors and suffer the 
consequences). 

You're stuck in your house all 
day while your buddy is at class, 
and when they finally come 
home, they're usually too busy to 
play. 

You eat when it's convienent 
for your pal to feed you, and you 
rarely get to go outside for exer- 
cise, especially when the weather 
gets bad (and we all know the 
weather in Clarion isn't always 
sunny and 70 degrees). Come on 
people, you know how boring it, 
gets when you're sick and stuck 
inside all day for a week: think 
how bad it would be if you had 
to live like that all the time! 



I know some students that have 
pets do a good job of taking care 
of them, but, if you don't already 
have a pet, and are considering 
taking on the responsibility- 
THINK FIRST. 

Why not wait until you gradu- 
ate, make some money, get your 
own apartment, and start a fami- 
ly. 

By then, you can let others 

enjoy, love, and and share in the 
responsibility of having a pet If 
you already have a family pet at 
home, enjoy it, and wait to get 
your own. Look before you leap 
and remember, be fair to yourself 
and your animal. 

• The author is graduating in 

December with a 

Communication degree. 



Page 5 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



NEWS \ 



Watch Out World! 

Here comes The Clarion Call! 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
The Clarion Call's Web Page allows students to read the news via the Internet. 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 

The Clarion Call can now be 
added to the expanding list of 
campus oriented World Wide 
Web sites available for access at 
Clarion University. 

Planning for this innovative 
accomplishment began last year. 
The plans were not finalized until 
this semester with the first issue, 
September 11. The full text and 
pictures of The Clarion Call are 
available each week, along with 
the previous issues. Work is 
presently being conducted to 
place the classifieds and ads on 
line as well. 

The person most responsible for 
this is senior communications 
major, Chris Collins. His interest 
in World Wide Web publications 
led him to inquire about placing 



"It may take a while, 
but this is the direction 
that all periodicals will 
eventually go. " 

— Chris Collins 
Clarion Call On-Line Editor 



"It's great 
to see The 
Call on the 



Web! 



yy 



"Mary Beth Curry 
Editor-in-Chief 



The Clarion Call on-line for 
access, keeping up with the 
growth of computer technology 
in college settings. Chris replied, 
"It may take a while, but this is 
the direction that all periodicals 
will eventually go." Placing The 
Clarion Call on-line is accom- 
plished through a series of copy- 
ing and pasting done each week, 
resulting in the finished text, that 
is available on the Web. 

Clarion University and the 
other state schools are expanding 
their computer knowledge and 
access, to meet the growing 
demands of modern times. One 
issue that has been raised is con- 
cerning the privacy of the World 
Wide Web, and what is appropri- 
ate to be placed on-line. 

These legality issues have 
not yet been examined in detail, 



and remain as unexplored territo- 
ry to be further examined as com- 
puter technology advanced. 

The Clarion Call site can be 
accessed from most computer 
labs on campus. It is easily avail- 
able on IBM and Macintosh, 
through Internet Explorer or 
Netscape Navigator, and is also 
possible to be accessed from the 
VAX computers. Editor Mary 
Beth Curry said, "It is great to see 
The Call on the Web. With the 
fast-changing technology, it is 
hard to keep up with the times, 
but Chris came in and brought us 
up to speed. We now publish on- 
line every week and are in the 
process of creating the executive 
position of on-line editor." 

The address is: 
www.clarion.edu/thecall/col.ht 
m. 



College Campus News 




What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



MIT bans alchohol on 
campus 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials have banned alchohol 
from the Zeta Psi fraternity after under-age students tried to have a keg 
delivered to the fraternity house Oct. 10. 

The incident happened only two weeks after an MIT freshman drank 
himself into a coma and died during a drinking binge at the universi 
ty's Phi Gamma Delta fraternity house. 

State investigators told campus police they followed a liquor truck to 
the house, where they stopped it in the process of delivering a keg to 
an under 21 student and picking up seven empty kegs. 

All MIT fraternites, sororities, and dormatories voluntarily banned 
alchohol from all social events after the September 29 death of 18 year 
old Scott Krueger. But students over 21 were still allowed to drink pri 
vately. 

MIT officials said all students living at Zeta Psi are now forbidden 
to drink on the premises, although the universities 36 other greek hous- 
es are not affected by the ban. 

"I regret this ever happened," MIT dean of students Rosalind 
Williams told reporters at a press conference, adding that the Zeta Psi 
may be disciplined further. 

The dean's office will be focusing on whether the fraternity has lived 
up to its organizational responsiblities. 

Georgia Southern pre- 
serves the wildlife 

At most colleges, visitors who want to investigate what constitutes 
the wild life on campus are pointed to student residence halls. 

But at Georgia Southern University, you'll find the real thing. Bald 
eagles, falcons, vultures, and other birds of prey are on view at GSU's 
new wildlife center, the first of its kind on a university campus. 

The wildlife center features an outdoor ampitheater an an elevated 
boardwalk that cuts through a stimulated coastal marsh, mountain 
ledge, tobacco barn and other habitats where the birds roost 

"We will use birds of prey as a drawing card to talk about what it 
takes for wildlife to co-exist with man,"explained center director Steve 
Hein, who is also a master falconer. " I know of no other university 
with this kind of facility." 

The wild birds, some of which have been hit by cars or shot by 
humans, can't fly so there are no cages or nets on the facility. A big 
attraction is a 15 foot eleveated eagle's nest. 

The center was funded largely through private donations and a grant 
from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The fact that visitors 
can easily connect to the birds of prey will encourage wildness educa- 



tion. 



Courtesy of College 
Press Service 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



.• 



Page 6 



Mulder publishes philosophy book 



by Janelle Donoghue 
News Writer 



Dr. Dwayne Mulder, assistant 
professor of philosophy at 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, has had a book, 
"The Theory of Knowledge: A 
Thematic Introduction" pub- 
lished. This book, that was co- 
authored by D. Paul Moser and 
Dr. JX). Trout, both from Loyola 
University, Chicago, Illinois, has 
a focus on epistemology, or the 
theory of knowledge. 

"This is a textbook in episte- 
mology or the theory of knowl- 
edge, which is one of the three 
main areas of philosophy," states 
Mulder. Because philosophy is 
such a diverse school of thinking 
that varies from the very general 
to the most involved, this text 
only focuses on material for the 



beginner. 

"It is intended to be an intro- 
ductory text. There are a few 
textbooks on the market in epis- 
temology but most are more 
advanced. This one is more 
accessible for the undergradu- 
ate," says Dr. Mulder. 

Most of the work done by 
Mulder, Moser and Trout was 
done during the summer of 1996, 
splitting the work three ways. 
Though this was not Mulder's 
first experience in publishing, it 
was definitely the most involved. 
Mulder, in cooperation with Dr. 
Moser, had previously edited an 
anthology, titled "Contemporary 
Approaches to Philosophy", 
which was published by Mac 
Millan Press in 1994. 

Dr. Mulder attended Calvin 
College in Michigan where he 




'(*)(*)• 





University Relations 

Dr. Dwayne Mulder 

obtained his undergraduate 
degree and completed his Ph.D. 
work in January 1997. He previ- 
ously taught at Loyola, Oakton 
Community College in Illinois, 
and the University of Wisconsin 
at Parkside. 



Please Note: 

Flu shots will be available in Keeling and 

all over campus during the week of 

October27 



Public Safety Blotter 



Page 7 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



4/** 



The following is a brief syn- 
opsis of the criminal investi- 
gations conducted by Public 
Safety for the dates between 
September 20 to October 11. 
The blotter is compiled by 
The Public Safety office and 
The Clarion Call. 



On October 15, 1997, Public Safety 
police officers recovered a stolen parking 
permit in Parking Lot A. 

*On October 16, 1997, The Clarion 
University Book Store Staff reported the 
theft of a book from the bookstore that 
took place at 10:15 a.m. on October 15. 




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Affiliated with Clarion Hospital 



by Donna Engle 
News Writer 



Kristen Gallew named to 
the Council of Trustees 




Clarion student, Kristen Gallew, 
originally from Wyalusing, recent- 
ly earned the title of Student 
Trustee to the Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania Council of 
Trustees. 

A secondary education/english 
major, she said she learned of the 
position when a friend offered her 
an application. She pursued it, due 
to encouragement from employees 
at her campus job. After complet- 
ing the application, she had an on- 
campus interview. Following that, 
she had a second interview in 
Harrisburg, where Governor Tom 
Ridge recommended her approval. She then obtained her position 

Gallew's appointment was official in July, but she attended her first 
meeting in September. That was also around the time she was sworn in 
at Clarion County Courthouse. She said, "It is important for the 
trustees to be able to look at all areas of the campus objectively." 

The Council of Trustees was established in 1982 by Act 188. The 
duties for this table includes the review and approval of budgets and 
fees, academic programs, contracts, and purchases. It also requires 
Gallew and other members to represent Clarion at official functions. 

Gallew said of her new position, "I'm pretty excited about getting 
into it. I have a meeting with Dr. Reinhard next week to go over the 
rest of my job." She will be attending a master planning meeting in 
November, where she is on the facilities committee. 

"Everyone has been really supportive of me," said Gallew.'The fac- 
ulty and administration along with my friends and family have given 
me a great deal of help and have stood by me." 

In addition to Council of Trustees, Gallew is also involved in Sigma 
Tau Delta,, Phi Eta Sigma, UAB, Hall and Interhall Council, Phi Sigma 
Sigma, and Panhellenic Council. 



Healthbeat 

STDs Attract Growing Attention-Part 2 



News Ideas? Ca((x2380 



by Angie Hinuk 
Assistant News Editor 

The following is a continuation 
of "STDs attract growing atten- 
tion" run last week. 

SYPHILIS (aka "the pox"): An 
estimated 101,000 new cases of 
Syphilis erupt each year in the 
U.S., according to the National 
Institute of Health. This is a dis- 
turbing figure given that untreat- 
ed Syphilis is even more harmful 
than untreated Gonorrhea or 
Chlamydia. Caused when 
Treponema Plallidum bacteria 
come into contact with mucus 
membranes or the bloodstream 
(i.e. through a cut in the skin.) 
Syphilis attacks the body through 
a series of four stages. The first, 
or Primary Stage, occurs two or 
four weeks after infection and is 
characterized by a painless chan- 
cre sore at the site of infection, be 
it the penis,vulva,lips, tongue, 
etc. The second, or Secondary 
Stage, arrives several weeks 
thereafter and is characterized by 
healing of the chancre, fever, 
nausea, body aches, throat pain, 
an itchless painless rash on the 
skin, and large fluid filled sores 
on the genitals. The third, or 
latent stage, arrives several 
months thereafter when the infec- 
tuous sores disappear. Although 
Syphilis cannot be spread to oth- 
ers at this time and most symp- 
toms vanish, Syphilis bacteria 
continue to damage internal 
organs and blood vessels unless 
medical action is taken. If left 
untreated, Syphilis will 



inevitably go to its final, or 
Tertiary Stage, marked by ulcers 
on the skin and bones, moderate 
to severe organ and blood vessel 
damage (often resulting in death) 
and damage to the nervous sys- 
tem, resulting in madness or 
paralysis. 
HERPES: Often thought of as a 
single disease, Herpes is actually 
caused by two related viruses, 
Herpes Simplex I (oral herpes) 
and Herpes Simplex II (genital 
Herpes). Spread by infected skin 
to non-infected skin contact, 
Herpes is the reminiscent of 
Syphilis in that it attacks the 
body through a series of three 
stages. The first, the Prodorome 
Stage, erupts roughly two to 
twenty days after the initial infec- 
tion and is characterized by burn- 
ing, itching, or numbness on skin 
where the Herpes virus was intro- 
duced. Two to four weeks after 
infection heralds the second, or 
vesicle stage, characterized by 
rashes, painful fluid-filled blis- 
ters, headaches, fever, and 
painful urination. This vesicle 
stage alternates in future years 
with the third crusting over stage, 
when blisters crust over.and heal, 
making it difficult to transfer the 
virus. 

HIV: Perhaps one of the most 
feared viruses of the Twentieth 
Century, the HIV (Human 
Immunodeficiency Virus) contin- 
ues to ravage the world and dras- 
tically alter American views on 
sexual activity. To this date, two 
sister viruses, HIV and HIV n, 
have been found to cause AIDS 



(Acquired Immune Deficiency 
Syndrome) although HIV I is far 
more prevalent in North 
America, than HIV II. Found in 
the blood and sexual secretions 
of infected persons, HIV can eas- 
ily be spread by sexual contact, 
most easily from man to woman 
and from man to man. 

Like many other STDs, HIV 
infection progresses through a 
series of stages until it triggers 
the condition of AIDS. The first 
stage, that of Asymtpomatic HIV 
infection, can last for several 
years after the initial infection, 
when the victim manifests no 
symptoms. The second stage, that 
of Symptomatic HIV infection, is 
characterized by a loss of apeti- 
ite, fever, diarrhea, weight loss, 
swollen lymph nodes, an 
onslaught of minor infections 
(thanks to the body's weakened 
immune system) and decreased 
T-cell count (1000-1200 cells per 
cubic millimeter is considered 
normal, but HIV sufferers often 
drop to 500 or below). In the 
advanced stage of HIV infection 
that opens the gate for AIDS, T- 
cell levels drop below 200, mak- 
ing the sufferer vulnerable to a 
host of opportunistic diseases 
such as pulmonary tuberculosis, 
bacterial pneumonia, and 
Karposi's sarcoma. 
Next week, diagnosis and treat- 
ment for these STD's will be 
discussed. Last Week, Darlene 
Hartie, Health Educator, was 
incorrectly named as "Debbie 
HartelT. 



Savren to speak at Clarion Unversity concerning racism 



by Leslie Suhr 
News Writer 



Mr. Clifford Savren, the region- 
al director for the Northern Ohio 
and Western Pennsylvania Anti- 
Defamation League (ADL), will 
speak on October 27, 1997 at 
7:30 pjn. in Hart Chapel. The 
topic for discussion is "The 
Dilemma in Confronting Hate 
and Extremism in a Democratic 
Society." 

This lecture is sponsored by the 
Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Committee at Clarion and is open 
to the public. It is part of the 
series called "People's 
Movement: king's Vision for 
Social Justice." 

Mr. Savren worked as an attor- 
ney for Forest City Enterprises in 
Cleveland before being appoint- 
ed as director of the ADL. 



He also served as chairman of 
the Soviet Jewry Task Force in 
Cleveland and was a member of 
the national executive committee 
of the National Conference of 
Soviet Jewry. 

He received his B.A. from the 
University of Rochester and did 
graduate work at Ohio State 
University in Hebrew 
Linguistics. He is a graduate of 
Case Western Reserve Law 
School and studied Israeli law of 
the Middle East conflict at 
Hebrew Law School in 
Jerusalem. He was recently nom- 
inated to the Ohio Advisory 
Committee of the U.S. Civil 
Rights Commission. 

Mr. Rogers Laugand, Director 
of the Minority Student Services 
at Clarion, says they are trying to 
bring speakers to Clarion which 
will coincide with what is hap- 



pening in society, such as racism 
and hate. 

Mr. Savren will speak about the 
hate that exists in culture and will 
describe his personal experiences 
that he has sustained as well. 

The committee brought him to 
Clarion to focus on the theme for 
the MLK series. These topics 
demonstrate the public concerns 
of Dr. King. They entail the areas 
that he had active involvement in, 
including human violence, intol- 
erance, gender issues, social jus- 
tice, and the structure of job 
opportunities in society. 

Mr. Laugand wants students to 
recognize that there is a problem 
and that racism does exist in soci- 
ety. He said, "If you ask a white 
student if there is racism on this 
campus, they will probably say 
no. But if you ask someone who 
has experienced it, they will say 



yes. So the purpose will be to 
open the students' eyes to this 
prejudice. 

According to Laugand, people 
need to place themselves in the 
shoes of other people to really 
feel the prejudices of others. By 
bringing these speakers to 
Clarion, they will open the eyes 
of the students to these happen- 
ings and help to develop a sense 
of awareness. 



"I want the students to recog- 
nize that it exists and to look at 
the culture as a whole. If it flash- 
es in front of us, you can play a 
role in helping to stop it, either 
actively or silendy," Laugand 
said. "Everyone has a role to 
play, no matter how small. The 
participation you give will make 
a statement to the rest of your 
community and will give a posi- 
tive image to the rest of society." 



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The Clarion Call 



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Commission welcomes two new students 



by Angie Binick 
Assistant News Editor 

This fall, Clarion University's 
Presidential Commission on the 
Status of Women welcomed two 
new students, Sandra Cisek- 
Wood and Andrea Dillinger, as 
well as three new professors and 
staff members, Donna Ashcraft 
(Psychology Department), 
Sharon Challener (Physics 
Department) and Carolyn 
Masters (Nursing Department), 
to its list of campus-wide mem- 
bers. These additions, combined 
with the Clarion commission's 
twenty-two former members, 
hint at the growing interest in 
women's studies on Clarion 
University's campus. 

When asked to comment on the 
growth of the program, co-chair 
Dr. Beverly Smaby responded, 
"It has certainly progressed in the 
last number of years. It's been a 



gradual growth since I've been 
here. I've just seen more and 
more involvement as we've 
grown and become better known 
off campus." 

Smaby continued to describe 
the activity that has accompanied 
the commission's gradual 
growth. "We are an extremely 
active commission. We have 
eleven standing committees that 
are active in all endeavors." 

With goals to promote under- 
standing and progress for 
women, Clarion University's 
Presidential Commission on the 
Status of Women has instituted or 
supported countless gender- 
focused programs and workshops 
in the past few years. Among its 
many achievements are hosting 
the 14th annual Women's 
Conference, "Understanding Our 
Legacy, Shaping Our Destiny," in 
early 1997, organizing the visit- 



ing scholar series, "Forging a 
New Tradition: Women Who 
Paved the Way," offering two 
Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) 
workshops on both the Clarion 
and Venango campus (in con- 
junction with Public Safety), 
organizing a past "Take Our 
Daughters To Work" Day with 
more than 30 area daughters tak- 
ing part, and offering financial 
support to those partaking in the 
upcoming Million Woman March 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
this Saturday, October 25. 

For anyone interested in joining 
or finding out more information 
regarding Clarion University's 
Presidential Commission on the 
Status of Women, please contact 
co-chair Jeanne Slattery 
(Psychology Dept.) at 226-2254, 
or co-chair Dr. Beverly Smaby 
(History Department) at 226- 
2502. 



Retirement hits Clarion U 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Assistant News Editor 

At a recent meeting of the 
Council of Trustees, held at the 
Venango Campus in Oil City, 
Faculty Promotions, sabbatical 
leaves, and retirements were 
announced. 

Three instructors have been 
promoted to assistant professors, 
eight assistant professors have 
been promoted to associate pro- 
fessors, and six associate profes- 
sors have been promoted to full 
professors. There are many appli- 
cants for promotion, and a com- 
mittee of CU faculty is formed 



every year to review the applica- 
tions and make recommendations 
to the president. Dr. Thomas 
Vilberg, who chaired last year's 
University-Wide Promotion 
Committee, said, "Professors 
submit applications to the com- 
mittee for review, and they are 
scared based on 13 subcate- 
gories, according to the promo- 
tion policy negotiated in a local 
agreement by the faculty union 
and the administration." After 
this lengthy process, Vilberg said 
the seven CU faculty members 
who are elected to this committee 
make their recommendations to 
Clarion University President 



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Diane Reinhard, who then makes 
her recommendation to the 
Trustees. 

Fourteen CU professors have 
been awarded sabbatical leaves, 
two of which will be working on 
programs concerning Clarion 
University. Dr. Donna Ashcraft 
of the psychology department 
will be spending the 1998-99 
academic year summarizing data 
from questionnaires distributed 
to students in the human sexuali- 
ty class over the past 20 years. "I 
will be analyzing the data to sub- 
mit for presentation at confer- 
ences, and hopefully I will also 
submit the data for publication," 
Ashcraft said. 

Frank Vento, chair of the 
Anthropology, Geography, and 
Earth Science Department, will 
be spending the summers of 1999 
and 2000 doing a geomorpholog- 
ical investigation of the Sive 
River Valley in Italy, and Phil 
Terman from the English 
Department of Venango Campus 
will spend the 1998-99 academic 
year doing course work and trav- 
el related to Jewish traditions, 
cultures and literature leading to 
a series of poems. 

James Flahaven from the Art 
department will be spending the 
1998-99 academic year, creating 
virtual classrooms in the visual 
arts, and communication profes- 
sor Dilnawaz Siddidqui will be 
spending that same academic 
year developing a book on cross- 
cultural communication. 



Student 




October^ 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Senate 



by Leslie Suhr, Student Senate Reporter 

The seventh meeting of the 1997-98 Clarion University Student 
Senate was called to order by President Nicole DeFrank at 7:35 p.m 
on Monday October 20, 1997 in room 246 Gemmell. 

President DeFrank announced the resignation of Senator Fisher with 
a letter addressed to the rest of the senators. John Goughner replaced 
him. 

Senator Snyder announced that there is $11,690 in the supplemental 
account an there is $95,121.87 in the capital account 

Student Trustee Kristen Gallew said that Dr. Reinhard is working on 
plans for orientation for new trustees in November. 

Due to the resignation of former Senator Fisher, Senator Spence was 
appointed as chair of the Dining Hall Concerns Committee. 

Vice-President Henninger announced that Senator Coates was 
Senator of the Week. 

The Committee on Sub-Committees appointed Senator Lisa 
Robinson to the University Conduct Board, pending the approval of 
President Reinhard. 
Faculty Senate is looking into revising its academic standards policy. 
They are still looking for representatives to serve on the CCPS and 
Student Affairs Committees. Also, Dr. Reinhard announced that 
Harvey Hall and Pierce Science Center have been added to the state's 
list to be approved for funding. 

Inter-Fraternity Council is currently working on an association pro- 
gram for each recognized chapter at Clarion. 

In order to be recognized they must comply with events such as com- 
munity service and events with other chapters. Panhellenic council 
announced that November 3 is Greek Pin Day. 

The Committee On Rules and Regulations announced that the Pro- 
Life and Campus Scouts organizations will be coming to Senate for 
approval to be recognized. 

The Student Relations Committee reported that the plans for Social 
Equity Night are complete. It will be held on November 20, 1997 
They are looking for nominations for awards. Also, all committees 
have received their e-mail accounts. Students should direct concerns to 
the appropriate committees. 

The Campus Safety Committee is looking into what is done with the 
money they receive from parking tickets. 

President DeFrank reminded everyone that there is a 24-hour sleep- 
out and food drive going on for Stop Homeless and Hunger Week. 

The Sequelle announced that pictures are cancelled this week. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:21 p.m. 



Also announced at the Trustee 
meeting were six faculty retire- 
ments, three of which have 
already taken place. Grace 
Urrico, associate professor of 
music, retired effective June 27, 
1997; Donald Leas, associate 
professor of health and physical 
education, retired effective July 
12, 1997; William Schell, assis- 
tant professor in the Center for 
Computing Services, retired 
effective August 4, 1997. 



Patty Laswick, professor of 
chemistry, and William Ross, 
economics professor, will retire 
effective January 2, 1998. Also, 
music professor Vane Berberian 
will retire from the university 
effective May 22, 1998. 



LIFESTYLES 



Public Wears Red Ribbons in Support of a Drug Free Community 

Drug Free Awareness Week Celebrated 



Courtesy of Clarion County 
Drug & Alcohol Administration 

Clarion County Drug & 
Alcohol Administration is con- 
ducting the Drug Free Awareness 
Red Ribbon Campaign from 
October 20-24. 

Clarion County Drug and 
Alcohol Administration coordi- 
nates the campaign to promote 



uted at the following businesses: 
Country Corner, Jordan 
Hardware, Custom Frame 
Gallery, Sealy Mattress Factory, 
Wein's, Anne Martin-Ko, M.D., 
The Korner Restaurant, Bi-LO, 
Comet Food Warehouse, Clarion 
Mall and the County Courthouse. 
Delta Phi Epsilon is also handing 
out ribbons on campus from 11 
a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday in 
Gemmell. 



"If one more person is reached 
with this campaign, the effort 
was well spent." — Nicole Salvo 



awareness of alcohol and other 
drug problems in the community 
and to take a stand by showing 
intolerance of illegal alcohol and 
other drug use. 

The campaign is observed 
nationwide and was initiated in 
1985 by IDEA and the Virginia 
Federation of Parents. This year, 
4,500 ribbons were ordered for 
the week. 

Business who contributed to the 
campaign include: Comet Food 
Warehouse, Seven Seas Pools, 
Holabough's Distributor, Sligo 
Citgo, Clarion Psychiatric Center 
and Sligo Pizza. 

Red Ribbons are being distrib- 



Several business are offering 
discounts during the week for 
students wearing red ribbons. 
Businesses offering a 10 percent 
discount include: BJ's Crafts, 
The Olive Branch, King's 
Jewelry, Captain Loomis 
Restaurant (excludes alcohol), 
Clarion Clipper, Pizza Pub 
(excluding alcohol), The 
Children's Shop, Countryside 
Crafts & Quilts and Evermoore's 
Restaurant 

Business offering free items 
include: Subway (free cookie), 
County Seat (cup of coffee), 
Burger King (soft drink) and 
Ragley's Bowl Arena (buy one 



game, get one free; also free shoe 
rental from noon to 6 p.m. or 
after 9 p.m.). 

Flowers-n-Bows and Wear 
Else? are offering 20 percent dis- 
counts, and Crooks Clothing is 
offering a 15 percent discount 
during the week. Wally Boe's 
Pizza is also offering $1.50 off of 
a town square pizza. 

Monday was "Red Ribbon 
Decoration Day" on which 
groups were encouraged to deco- 
rate their communities with red 
ribbons. Tuesday was "Reach 
Out to Others Day" when indi- 
viduals could take time to con- 
nect with others to promote drug- 
free lifestyles. Wednesday was 
"Rally in Red Day" on which 
everyone was encouraged to 
wear red clothing and accessories 
that are red. 

Today is "Pledging to Be Drug 
Free is No Sweat Day." Students 
are encouraged to make a pledge 
to be drug free by wearing sweats 
today. Friday is, "Red Ribbon 
Together Proud and Drug Free 
Day." On this day, individuals 
are asked to join together to make 
Clarion County drug free. 

Schools in the area that will be 
participating during the week 
include Clarion Limestone, 
North Clarion, St Joseph's, St. 
Michael's, Keystone, Redbank 
and Immaculate Conception. 
Clarion Area will celebrate Red 
Ribbon Week October 27-31. 



Clarion forensics team attends tournament 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

The Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania Forensics team 
traveled to California University 
of Pennsylvania's "Phoenix 
Speech Tournament" on October 
18. 

The tournament was attended 
by 12 schools including 
Otterbein (Ohio), Geneva, 
California, Shepherd College, 
Morgan State, University of 
Akron, Westmoreland 

Community College, Marietta, 
and Alderson-Broaddus. Clarion 
was very successful at the tourna- 
ment, with four students receiv- 
ing awards for their perfor- 
mances. 



Amy Moeslein and Allison 
Rilling, both sophomore commu- 
nication majors, qualified for 
finals in Dramatic Duo, perform- 
ing a scene from "Rosencrantz 
and Guildenstem are Dead," and 
were ranked first at the tourna- 
ment. Rilling was in her second 
tournament and Moeslein, her 
first. 

Steve Bennett, also competing 
in his first tournament, qualified 
for finals in "After Dinner 
Speaking" with a speech about 
flirting, and was the third speaker 
at the tournament Bennett is a 
sophomore secondary English 
education major. 

Renae Kluk qualified for finals 
in prose and was ranked 6th 
speaker in prose at the tourna- 
ment. Kluk is a junior communi- 



cation major. 

All four students qualified for 
the National Forensics 
Association National 

Tournament, and they each 
received a trophy of Westerwald 
Pottery that was designed exclu- 
sively for this tournament Their 
trophies may be seen in the 
Forensics trophy case outside of 
the speech communication and 
theater office in 149 Marwick- 
Boyd. 

Also participating from Clarion 
were Jessica Yeager, a freshman 
information systems major, and 
John Dellich, a sophomore com- 
munication major. 

Director of Forensics Dr. Anand 
Rao and forensics graduate assis- 
tant Jay Wagner accompanied the 
team to California. 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Delta Phi Epsilon has a table set up for Red Ribbon Week 
upstairs in Gemmell. Get your red ribbons, bumper stickers 
and information packets from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday. 



"Red Ribbon Week is a chance 
for the entire community to 
become involved. An opportuni- 
ty to take a stand and support 
drug-free lifestyles. When stu- 
dents learn there are alternatives 
to substance abuse that are fun, 
they are better able to resist peer 
pressure. 



"If one more person is reached 
with this campaign, the effort 
was well spent," said Nicole 
Salvo, Prevention Specialst at the 
Drug & Alcohol Administration. 

For more information call Beth 
Grant or Nicole Salvo at the 
Clarion County Drug & Alcohol 
Administration at 226-5888. 



Where In Clarion? 



^^.-. 




Phone Home 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the "O-l" logo of the Owens-Brockway 
glass plant. 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 



Country shocked and saddened by... Whatever 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

ANCHOR PERSON: If you're 
just joining our broadcast, you 
can tell from my somber expres- 
sion and the sad music that there 
has been another shocking 
celebrity tragedy. 

We'll be covering it in our stan- 
dard Celebrity Tragedy Format, 
during which we look sad and 
constantly remind you how tragic 
this situation is and repeat the 
only three actual pieces of news 
we have over and over far into 
the night. 

Also, you will be seeing a great 
deal of the special logo that our 
graphics people have created for 
this tragedy, which will appear on 
the screen as a tasteful buffer 
between our somber coverage 
and, for example, the Depends 
commercials. But right now, let's 
go to our field reporter to see 
how shocked and saddened the 
public is. 

FIELD REPORTER: As you 

can see, members of the public 

•have spontaneously gathered on 

the street directly in front of our 

camera to express their grief. 

(The people wave at the cam- 
era. Several make "rabbit ears" 
behind each other's heads.) 

FIELD REPORTER: Here's a 
husband and wife who came a 
long way to be here. How do you 
feel? Shocked and saddened? 

HUSBAND: Definitely. 

WIFE: We came as soon as we 
saw the tragic logo on TV. We 
dropped everything and drove all 
night with nothing to eat except 
loose candy com that we found 
under the seat. 



HUSBAND: We drove 700 
miles. We only live 450 miles 
away, but when we got here we 
circled the parking structure for 
several hours because we could- 
n't figure out how to get inside 
because we were so upset about 
this tragedy. 

FIELD REPORTER: Did you 
bring your children with you? 

HUSBAND: We don't know. 

WIFE: We just knew we had to 
be here. When this celebrity 
died, it was like we lost our best 
friend. 

HUSBAND: Actually, our best 
friend did die yesterday, but we 
skipped his funeral so we could 
drive here and show our feelings 
about this celebrity. 

WIFE: She was just like us. A 
person. We felt so close to her. 

FIELD REPORTER: This par- 
ticular celebrity was a male. 

WIFE: Whatever. 

FIELD REPORTER (turning to 
the camera): So there you have 
it. A shocked and saddened pub- 
lic, grieving openly about this 
tragic loss in their lives. 

We are now going to move our 
camera to the bottom of an aban- 
doned, water-filled mine shaft, to 
see if we can get a spontaneously 
grieving crowd to gather there. 

I am betting the cameraperson 
$50 that we can. Back to you in 
the studio. 

ANCHOR PERSON: We'll 
resume our coverage of this 
tragedy in a moment, but first 
we'll pause for these headlines. 

NEWSREADER: In the non- 
celebrity news, the Stock Market 
has crashed; war has broken out 
in the Middle East; a volcano has 
erupted in Seattle; militants in the 
rebellious Russian province of 




^TRi 




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Brzkszckrzkzistan, angry over 
the chronic shortage of vowels, 
have launched nuclear missiles at 
the United States; and Vice 
President Al Gore has admitted 
that he robbed four convenience 
stores, but he contends that this 
was "well within the current 
campaign-finance laws." 

On a brighter note, this network 
has already been awarded two 
prestigious Emmy awards for its 
coverage of this ongoing celebri- 
ty tragedy — one Emmy for best 
tragedy logo, and one for most 
uses of the phrase "shocked and 
saddened." 

ANCHOR PERSON: That is 
certainly a ray of sunshine in an 



otherwise gloomy time. And 
now we resume our ongoing cov- 
erage of this tragedy, with the 
help of Barbara Walters, who 
never talks to anybody below the 
celebrity rank of Julio Iglesias. 

She's going to try to help us 
gain a better understanding of 
what, exactly, it feels like to be 
famous at a time like this. 

BARBARA WALTERS: With 
me to discuss this is an extreme- 
ly well-known celebrity. 

(She turns toward the celebrity 
and displays a thoughtful frown 
of concern.) 

BARBARA WALTERS: Is it 
hard to be a celebrity? I am sen- 
sitive to this issue because of 
course I personally am very 
famous. 

I am more famous than many of 
the people I interview, including, 
no offense, you. My producer 
has to hold up a sign to remind 
me which specific celebrity you 
are. 

And I personally have found 
that existing at this level of fame 
is very difficult, which is why I 
often display this little frown of 
concern. 

Have you found this to be a 
problem? 



CELEBRITY: Being famous? 

BARBARA WALTERS: No, 
my little frown of concern. I'm 
thinking of having it fixed. 

CELEBRITY: What's a 
"fwown?" 

BARBARA WALTERS: 
Thank you. We'll be back in a 
little while to talk more about my 
feelings about this terrible 
tragedy with the U.S. Supreme 
Court and Whoopi Goldberg. 

ANCHOR PERSON: We go 
now to the bottom of an aban- 
doned, water-filled mine shaft, 
where we understand that grief- 
stricken members of the public 
have spontaneously gathered in 
response to this tragedy. 

(In the murky water, we see the 
field reporter, wearing full scuba 
gear and holding a $50 bill. 
Behind him is a crowd of people 
holding their breath and waving. 
Some are making "rabbit ears.") 
FIELD REPORTER: Glub, 
glub, glub. 

ANCHOR PERSON: I believe 
he's saying "shocked and sad- 
dened." 

FIELD REORTER: GLUB! 
GLUB, GLUB, GLUB! . 

ANCHOR PERSON: My mis- 
take. He's saying "out of air." 



Nothing fishy about Aquarium Consortium's Conference 

Aquarium meeting to be held Saturday 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 



Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania will host the Third Annual 
Environmental Conference of the 
Pennsylvania Aquarium 

Consortium from 9:30 a.m. to 2 
p.m. October 25 in Gemmell 
Rooms 246 and 248. The pro- 
grams are free and open to the 
public. 

The conference brings together 
faculty and students from the 20 
member institutions and organi- 
zations of the consortium. The 
annual environmental conference 
provides an opportunity for stu- 
dents and faculty in aquatic and 
applied ecology to meet and 
interact. 

The conference will feature 
nearly 20 presentations and 
posters in the areas of aquatic 
ecology, hydrology and toxicolo- 
gy- 
Clarion University faculty and 

students will give eleven of these 
presentauoins. 

The consortium membership 
includes: Clarion University, 




Edinboro University, Gannon 
University, Glindo Center, 
Indiana University, La Roche 
College; 

Mercyhurst College, the 
Behrend Campus of Penn State 
University in Erie, Slippery Rock 
University, the American 
Fisheries Society (Pennsylvania 
Chapter); 

Catholic Schools of the Diocese 
of Erie, Erie Aquarium Society, 
Erie City School District, Hamot 
Medical Center, Harborcreek 
School District, Millcreek School 
District; 

Penn Crest School District, Tri- 
County Intermediate Unit of 
Northwest Pennsylvania, Union 
City School District, Warren 



County School District and the 
Wattsburg Area School District. 

The unifying theme for this 
diverse group is a common inter- 
est in promoting and encouraging 
teaching and research in the 
aquatic and environmental sci- 
ences and in providing opportu- 
nities to discuss such issues 
through meetings and seminars. 

For additional information 
about the conference contact Dr. 
Stanton Green, dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences at 
Clarion University, or Dr. Steve 
Harris, assistant professor of 
biology at Clarion University, 
who are Clarion's representatives 
to the consortium and the confer- 
ence organizers. 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



Bavarians battle for bras, boxers and beer 



Lose your underwear at Munich's Oktoberfest 



by Doug Lansky 
College Press Service 

If you've ever had the urge to 
go out in the back yard with a 
case of beer, stand on the deck 
furniture and trumpet drinking 
songs at the top of your lungs 
until you fall off and pass out in 
the shrubs, I highly recommend a 




trip to the famous Munich 
Oktoberfest, where you can join 
thousands of people from all cor- 
ners of the globe with this same 
passion. 

A few people may wander in by 
mistake, many are on vacation, 
but some come to Oktoberfest 
purely on instinct, the same mys- 
terious force that draws mosqui- 



toes to a light and 
keeps them ram- 
ming their heads 
against the bulb. 
This last group j 
mostly refers to 
young visitors from Down 
Under. 

I thought I'd "done" the 
Oktoberfest a few years ago; I 
tried all the beers, watched the 
horses pulling beer-wagons, 
swayed to the oompah bands and 
rode the vomit-inducing rides. 
But this time I discovered I'd left 
one rather odd stone unturned: 
AussieKiwiFest. 

On pervious visits, I had 
skipped the Hofbrau tent because 
it served the same beer as 
Munich's famous Hofbrauhaus, 
where I once sat for two hours 
while a 75-year-old beer-loving 
Bavarian wrapped his arm 
around my neck and told me sto- 
ries in German (not a language I 
understand) at very close range 
until I accumulated so much sali- 
va on my face that it began to 
drip on the table. 

When I arrived in Munich this 
time, someone — I think it was 
an Aussie — told me I had to see 
the Hofbrau tent for myself. 



OCTOBER 



When I popped my head in, all 
10,000 people were standing on 
the tables and yelling — in a 
"Tastes Great" - vs. - "Less 
Filting"-type competition to be 
the loudest — "AUSSIE!" 
"KIWI!" "AUSSIE!" "KIWI!" 

As the chant ended, each side 
declared itself the winner, and a 
barrage of celebratory underwear 
and bras exploded into the air. 

I made my way through the 
crowd until an Aussie (or maybe 
it was a Kiwi) standing on a 
table, dressed in a rugby shirt 
(almost everyone was wearing 




rugby shirts), 
pointed toward 
me and yelled, 
"Underwear! 
You have under- 
wear!" He 
looked possessed. 

I started to back away when a 
beautiful young women, seem- 
ingly trying to straighten things 
out, asked politely, "Are you 
wearing underwear?" 

"Of course," I answered with- 
out thinking. 

"He's wearing underwear!" she 
cried. 

Five people descended on me, 
two the size of NFL nosetackles. 
To my surprise, and relief, my 
underwear ripped right out. I 
watched as it was victoriously 
hurled into the air. It landed in a 
crowd where several people bat- 
tled for it like baseball fans fight- 
ing for a foul ball in the cheap 
seats. 

I saw a woman emerge from the 
scrap with my boxers, or what 
was left of them. She held the 
shreds of Calvin Klein above her 
head in a powerful clenched fist, 
as though she'd just found a new 
symbol that would rally the 
troops to party harder. She then 



carefully arranged my mangled 
shorts on her head and crowned 
herself leader of this new move- 
ment. 

Just as quickly as the underwear 
patrol had descended on me, they 
let go and headed off to more 
pressing business. The beautiful 
young woman gave me a nice pat 
on the back. 




"No worries, mate," she said. 
With that, she flashed her bare 
breasts and told me the same 
thing had happened to her bra. 

Still dazed, I noticed for the 
first time that about 30 percent of 
the people were wearing ripped 

Continued on page 12 



Jack Hall and Donald Black to perform in Marwick-Bovd Auditorium 



Faculty Recital Slated For Monday Night 



Courtesy of 
Jack Hall 



Jack Hall, trumpet instructor at 
Clarion University will present a 
trumpet recital at 8:15 p.m., 
October 27 in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. Hall will be accom- 
panied by Donald F. Black on 
piano and organ. 

Black holds degrees from 
Wayne State University and the 
University of Michigan. He is 
former chairman of the music 
department at Clarion University 
and currently teaches courses in 
music education, applied piano, 
and organ. In addition, Black is 
in considerable demand as an 
organ and piano soloist. 

Hall has received degrees from 
the University of Kentucky, 
Eastern Kentucky University, 
and Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. Among his teach- 
ers, Hall has studied extensively 
with Adolph Herseth of the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
Louis Davidson of the Cleveland 
Orchestra, and Samuel Krauss, 
former solo trumpeter of the 



Philadelphia Orchestra. 

The recital will begin with an 
original composition entitled 
"Tyburn Chronicles" that was 
written in 1995 by Hall. This 
work is based on happenings at 
the famous gallows, located at 
Tyburn Hill in England, where 
convicted criminals were hanged 
in the 1400s. 

The second composition fea- 
tured in the recital is "Legend" 
which was composed in 1907 by 
Georges Enesco. This work is 
highly technical and romantic in 
both mood and structure. Many 
musicians believe that "Legend" 
is founded on ancient Rumanian 
Gypsy scales and thematic 
motifs. Enesco began to play the 
piano when he was 4 and studied 
with the Gypsy violinist, Nicolas 
Chioru. 

To complete the first half of the 
recital, Hall will perform 
"Sonatina" by Richard Lane. 
This piece was written in 1968 
and dedicated to Hall. Lane stud- 
ied with Howard Hanson at the 
Eastman School of Music and is 
a Ford Foundation recipient in 



composition. He currently 
resides and works in New York 
City. 

After intermission, Hall will 
perform "Sonata for Trumpet and 
Organ" by Alan Hovhaness. 
Hovhaness is noted for a modem 
and unique style of composition 
that is reminiscent of Gregorian 
Chant, which was popular in 590 
AD. 

Next, Black will be featured on 
"Choral in a minor" by Cesar 
Franck for solo organ. This piece 
is representative of the "high" 
Romantic period (circa 1850) and 
displays extreme technique and 
brilliance. Black will offer the 
"Choral" in commemoration of 
the 175th birthday of the com- 
poser. 

The program will conclude with 
the "Suite" by Jean-Philippe 
Rameau and performed on the 
piccolo trumpet. Rameau was a 
noted music theorist and compos- 
er. The "Suite" amply displays 
the craft and skill of this talented 
composer. 

The public is cordially invited 
to attend the free concert 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Donald Black (piano) and Jack Hall (trumpet) rehearse for 
their upcoming recital at 8:15 p.m., Monday, October 27. 



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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



Calendar of Events 



Today 

•Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 
•Economic Policy Lecture Series: 
"Why and How to Privatize Social 
Security," Professor Lawrence J. 
Kotlikoff - 4 p.m., Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 

•Chemistry on the Road: Cyril H. 
Wecht, MD, JD, 'Trials and Tribulations in Forensics 
Science" - 7 p.m., 250/252 Gemmell 
•SCT Speaker Series: Craig Smith, "The Making of a 
Presidential Speechwriter"- 7 p.m., Hart Chapel 
Friday 

•United Nations Day 
•UAB Spirit Day 

•Sign up for group pictures - Yearbook Office 
•Admissions Day - 9 a.m„ 250/252 Gemmell 
•Class Withdrawals end at 4 p.m. 
•Madrigal Singers Concert - 8 p.m., Hart Chapel 
Saturday 

•Major Admissions Visit - All Campus 
•UAB Spirit Day: free shaker poms - Memorial 
Stadium 

•Volleyball at Bentley, Mass., Tournament 
•Cross Country at Gettysburg 
•Football vs. Slippery Rock - 1 p.m. 
Sunday 
•Daylight Savings Time ends ("Fall Back" one hour) - 



2 a.m. 

•Volleyball at Bentley, Mass., 

Tournament 

•UAB Steeler Party - 3 to 7 p.m., 

Gemmel Upstairs Rotunda 

Monday 

•Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 

•Faculty Senate meeting - 4 p.m., B- 

8 Chapel 

•Career Development Series: "Learning Outside the 

Classroom" - 6 p.m., Carter Auditorium, Still Hall 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 

•Faculty Recital: Jack Hall, trumpet, and Donald 

Black, piano/organ - 8:15 p.m., Boyd Auditorium 

Tuesday 

•Group pictures taken - 248 Gemmell 

•Intramural Table Tennis begins 

•Timeout Luncheon - noon, Holiday Inn 

•Volleyball vs. Lock Haven - 7 p.m. 

•UAB Psychic Fair - 5 to 8 p.m., Gemmell Rotunda 

Wednesday 

•Group pictures taken - 248 

Gemmell 

•Swimming and Diving at 

Allegheny 

•Leadership Development Series: 

"Diversity and Leadership," - 7 

to 8:30 p.m., 250/252 Gemmell 



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Oktoberfest contin- 
ued from page 11 

underwear on their heads. (I sup- 
pose I'd previously dismissed 
them as rugby headbands.) 

I retreated to an area off to the 
side and tried to buy a beer ($7 
for a one-liter stein), but I wasn't 
allowed to because I didn't have 
a place at a table. 

A friendly Kiwi with a seat 
agreed to order for me and we 
began talking. Our conversation 
ended as the "AUSSIE!" 
"KIWI!" "AUSSIE!" "KIWI!" 
chant resumed and underclothes 
started flying again. 

Several men and women, on the 
shoulders of their friends, decid- 
ed to flash everyone, which 
received great approval from the 
entire tent 

I finally found a place to sit at 
a table full of Germans — per- 
haps the only ones in the tent. 
Every time the "AUSSIE!" 
"KIWI!" chant started, they sided 
with the Kiwis. "Because New 
Zealand is smaller and they need 
more help," one German offered. 
"And the Aussies got our under- 
wear." 

They seemed happy. After 
years of oompah bands and guys 
in lederhosen, they must have 
thought this was the greatest 
thing since German television 
picked up "Bay watch." 

The most surprising thing was 
that during the months I spent 
traveling in Australia and New 
Zealand, I never saw anything 
like this. 

The Aussies and Kiwis were 
much more restrained in their 
own countries. Here, they 
seemed to be drinking to set 
world records. 

In the process, they may have, 
in their own unique way, re- 
invented the Oktoberfest. Right 
here in the middle of Munich. 






will hold an 
Evening of 

Elegance 




Page 13 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 




Call On You 



By 

Tim Emanuel 



Photography 
Editor 






Steve Estock, Senior, Anthropology 
"Because the voices in my head are 
drowning out the rest of the world." 



Matthew Darrifter, Sophomore, Art / 

Philosophy 

'Because I'm an only child, left handed 

student of logic." 




11m Cammisa, Freshman, Elementary / 

Secondary Education 

'Why do I have only fifteen minutes before 

my next class?!?!" 




Geoff Griffin, Junior, History 
"Who knows?" 



Leslie Gray, Junior, Elementary / 
Special Ed. 
"Why not?" 



Jamie English, Senior, Elementary Ed. 
"Why ask why?" 



' ' " ' Ni i iii' i 'M ii ■ i ■ 



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• 



October 23 , 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 



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Baby it's 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



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Cold Outside 




*y 






It would seem that autumn has 
finally dug in its heels and is 

hear to stay as the days get 
shorter and jackets get heavier. 

Enjoy the last few weeks of 
snow-free living while you can. 

Photos and Words by: Tim Emanuel 



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The Clarion Call 



Octoner 15, lyrr 



ENTERTAINMENT 





CHAOS by Brian Shuster 



IHWWI 



&\mm 




"Well sure he wobbles around a lot, but my money 
says that that boy just wonl fall down." 



DOCTOR FUN 



hAR-cV 




THE Crossword 



Coupon-clipping ants return to their nest 



Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you have a talent? Do you dream of using 
that talent to attract a guy, girl or animal that 
you desire? Send it to The Call today! We accept 
mostly just stuff that can be printed, but we can 
work with you. Poems and comics are recom- 
mended! Send it the 
The Clarion Call, 270 
Gemmell, c/o Benj. 

Impress 
Your 
Mom! 




1 Scope 

6 Quick jaunt 
10 Slugger Ty, of 

old * 
l4PoetT.S. 

15 Blood: pref. 

16 — Mountains, 
Russia 

17 — Maria 

18 Parched 

19 Vulgar 

20 Rolling scone? 

22 Obis 

23 Jaunty 

24 Gathers 

26 Eur. country 

29 King: Sp. 

30 Pastry product 

31 Wonderland 
visitor 

33 Ordained 

36 Jacob's wife 

37 Certain sect 
39 Word of woe 
41 Prophets 

43 Glide on ice 

44 Anthropologist 
Margaret 

45 Vital fluid 

47 — Guinea 

48 Mount Vesuvius 
buried it 

51 Haberdashery 
items 

53 Opera solos 

54 Egg dish: var. 

58 Called 

59 Flip through 

60 Clock faces 

62 Scholar's collar 

63 A Guthrie 

64 Ms. — Ewing 

65 Withered 

66 Turns to the 
right 

67 Singer Delia 

DOWN 

1 Legal matter 

2 "When I was — " 

3 Spanish boy 

4 Rose 

5 Piece with open 
shelves 

6 Lean-to 

7 Bolivia's neigh- 
bor 




1997 Tribune Media Services. Inc. 
AH rights reserved 



8 Copies 

9 Show agree- 
ment 

10 Beef slice 

11 Ph.D. exams 

12 Moisten, as a 
turkey 

13 Sanctify 

21 Otto's realm: 
abbr. 

22 Roseanne, once 

25 Word relating to 
speed 

26 Comrade 

27 Butterine 

28 False witness 

32 Bubbly 

33 God of the 
underworld 

34 Oomph 

35 Engagement 

37 Jai — 

38 So-so 
40 Suture 

42 Fair grades 

43 Fast driver 

45 Pool members 

46 Bother 



ANSWERS 



1 


S 


3 


3 


« 


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48 Cuts back 

49 Make a speech 

50 Unimportant 
52 Set of steps 

over a fence 



55 Guy 

56 Yam 

57 Yale graduates 
59 Droop 

61 Get it 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 18 



ENTERTAINMENT] 



will 



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October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Pag' 19 



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»/"»/» •■*■»- I I <■ I 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



SPORT S\ 



Page 21 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



Tennis team takes third at PS AC 's 



by Bethany Bool 
Sports 'Writer 



The Clarion netters finished the 
'97 season with a third-place fin- 
ish at the PSAC Championships 
at the Hershey Racquet Club, in 
Hershey, PA. 

The Golden Eagles tallied 13 
overall points, good enough to 
manage a tie with Kutztown, who 
also landed 13 points. 

For the Golden Eagles, sopho- 
more Rachael Link made a run at 
a PSAC Championship at #5 sin- 



Jen Guyton and Lindsey Pullan 
from Slippery Rock 8-4, and ral- 
lied to upset Lisa Curran and 
Shannon Law from Bloomsburg 
8-4 as well. 

"Cassie and Amy played their 
best match of the year in the 
semi's against Bloom," said 
Acker. 

Clarion's Kristen Golia was 
defeated in #1 singles play by 
Kristine Kuchler from West 
Cheser, 6-4, 6-1. 

In #2 singles, freshman Amy 
Shaffer defeated Cheyney's 







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Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 
Amy O'Neal Rachael Link 





gles. Link advanced to the 
semifinals before dropping a 
hard-fought match to Brianne 
Peiffer of Millersville 6-1, 6-2. 
"Rachael rose to the occa- 
sion," praised head coach 
Terry Acker. "She was unseed- 
ed, and knocked off IUP, and 
lost to the eventual champion. 
The score of the final match 
really does not indicate how 
well she played. Every game 
went to duece/advantage 
before she lost. She did a great 
job!" 

The doubles tandem of 
sophomore Cassie Baker and 
senior Amy O'Neal advanced 
to the finals at #3 doubles, 
where they fell short to Pam 
Kaylor and Thresa Fame from 
Millersville 8-4. 

On route to the finals, Baker 
and O'Neal vanquished Becky 
Spiegel and Amy Peretin from 
IUP 8-2. In the second round, 
the Clarion duo knocked off 



Melissa Boyd 6-3,6-1. Shaffer 
was then taken in the second 
rourd by Amy Sonan from 
Kutztown , 6-1, 6-2. 

Cassie Baker defeated Mindy 
Wood m third singles, 6-2, 6-2, 
advancing the sophomore to the 
second round. However, 
Millersville's Abby Neff was too 
much for Baker, earning a 6-2, 6- 
1 win. 

Senior Mimi Williams earned a 
#4 seed and a first round bye at 
#4 singles. Williams met IUP's 
Leigh Ann Datt where she pulled 
out a 6-2, 7-5 victory. In the third 
round of play, Williams was 
defeated by Lauren Winner from 
Millersville, 6-1,6-0. 

At #6 singles, Amy O'Neal 
dropped Rachael Clark from 
California 6-0, 6-1, but went 
down to Lisa Curran from 
Bloomsburg, 6-4, 6-2. 

In doubles action, Golia and 
Shaffer crushed Kia Lewis and 
Celinda Garret from Cheyney, 8- 




Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

Sophomore Carry Carrier will help to fill the void left by 
Golia, O'Neal, and Williams next season. 

0. Golia and Shaffer then lost to moving to an 8-4 win. 



IUP's #1 team of Kristi Rega and 
Cara McKenna of 8-5. 

At #2 doubles, Mimi Williams 
and Rachael Link took a first 
round bye and met Edinboro's 
Mary Jo Messina and Laura 
Proctor. Williams and Link 
dropped the Fighting Scots 8-2 to 
earn a third round bout with 
Millersville. Abbey Neff and 
Lauren Winner proved to be too 
much for the Golden Eagles, 



"I was impressed with the way 
we played as a team," Acker 
added. "We played well." 

For the fust time in the 21 years 
of the PSAC Championships, 
Millersvile captured the title, 
racking up 33 team points. 

Bloomsburg finished second 
with 29 points, while Clairon and 
Kutztown took third. The 
Rockets of Slippery Rock (11 
points) round out the top five. 



"I figured with Millersville and 
Bloom being so strong, it would 
be between us and Kutztown for 
third, and we ended up tying," 
noted coach Acker. 

"We were down early, but man- 
aged to come back and win some 
tough matches. It was a great 
all-around effort." 

The third place finish marks the 
second in a row for the Golden 
Eagles, who finished behind 
Bloom and Millersville in last 
years tournament in Erie. 

Clarion will lose tri-captians 

"I was impressed with 
the way we played as 

a team...we were 
down early and man- 
aged to win some 
tough matches" 

- head coach 
Terry Acker 

Kristin Golia, Mimi Williams, 
and Amy O'Neal to graduation, 
but sophomore Carly Carrier 
should have no problem stepping 
in next season, along with fresh- 



Host Clarion stumbles in Classic 



by Jen Founds 
Managing Editor 



After ripping off five wins in 
its last six matches, the worn- 
ens volleyball team was on a 
roll heading into the Clarion 
Classic this past weekend. 

Clarion drew the Division III 
#1 team in the Nation in Juniata 
in the first round. The Golden 
Eagles fell short in its effort to 
knock off the DUI powerhouse, 
losing to Juniata 8-15, 15-10, 
15-11. 

Clarion rebounded against 
second round East Stroudsburg 
with a 10-15, 15-8, 15-10, 15-6 
win, and a third round date 
with Lycoming. 

In the third round the Golden 
Eagles were too much for 
Lycoming, dropping the guests 
15-6, 15-12, 15-4. 

Clarion then faced Oakland, 
Michigan in round four. 
Oakland proved to be too much 




OH/MH Beth Brandstatter 
leads the Golden eaagales 
in solo blocks with 38. 

for the Clarion spikers, handing 
them a 9-15, 5-15, 9-15 defeat 
: In its fifth match of the tourna- 
ment, Clarion hosted Charleston, 
and again stumbled losing 6-15, 



8-15, 13-15. 

Despite the loss sophomore 
Jessa Canfield, came back and 
played after being out for three 
weeks with an ankle injury. 

■ We played a lot of compet- 
itive teams this weekend, but 
we were really though and 
hung in with the best of them," 
Canfield said. "At the end of 
the day Saturday, we were real- 
ly tired, but we pulled through, 
and played our best." 

Jaime Mars made the All- 
Tournament team, and was a 
couple of points shy of receiv- 
ing MVP. 

The Clarion Golden Eagles 
Women's Volleyball team will 
compete in the Bentley 
Tournament this Saturday and 
Sunday, October 25 and 26. 
Their next PSAC West bout is 
against Lock Haven, Tuesday, 
October 28 at 7:00p.m. in 
Tropin Gym. 



I I M t l ilH l llH W l l » %%%%■»*,*,%•% » * * »A*aaL%JH . \AA,A. ' 



California hands Clarion 30-0 loss 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The California Vulcans scored 
17 second quarter points and 13 
fourth quarter points, while 
staving off four first half scoring 
threats from the visiting Clarion 
Golden Eagles to claim a 30-0 
PSAC-West victory on Saturday. 

In the second quarter, Clarion 
(0-6 overall, 0-3 PSAC West) 
turned the ball over on a fumble 
at the Cal 34, where the Vulcans 
(2-4, 1-2) took over launched an 
11 -play 66-yard touchdown drive 
capped by Jim Kubina's 6-yard 
reception from Jason Bennett. 
Clarion drove into Vulcan territo- 
ry again later in the period, but a 
fumble on fourth down stalled 
the drive. On the next play, 
Bennett hooked up with Brian 
Harte on a 54-yard TD strike to 
put the Vulcans ahead 14-0. The 
Vulcans would then add a 46- 
yard field goal from Josh Gray to 
push the margin to 17. 

Clarion's deepest advance into 
Cal territory occurred in the sec- 
ond quarter, as the Eagles had a 
third-and-goal situation from the 
2 yard line, but were unable to 
capitalize. 

After a scoreless third quarter, 
the Vulcans tacked on two more 
touchdowns in the fourth quarter 
to clinch the win. 

Dennis Biggs scored the first of 
those touchdowns on a 26-yard 
run, and Mason Murray, who ran 
for 149 yards, completed the 
scoring with a 2-yard jaunt. The 




Brendan George/Clarion Call 

Clarion's running back Jamie Sickeri # 32 fight's off 
California's defence for a loose ball. 



extra point attempt failed, mak- 
ing the final score 30-0. 

On the afternoon, Cal outgained 
Clarion in total yards 384-141, 
while the Vulcan defense limited 
Clarion to 19 net rushing yards to 
score Cal's first shutout win since 
1989. 

Sophomore Jeff Cappa and 
senior Bemie Pynos split time at 
the quarterback postion, combin- 
ing for 122 yards on 13 of 29 
passing. Alvin Slaughter led the 
Eagles in receiving yards with 

59. 

As was the case against the 
Vulcans, the second and fourth 
quarters have been problematic 
for Clarion all season. 



While the Eagles have played 
evenly with opponents in the first 
and third quarters, the second and 
fourth periods have produced 
unwanted results for Clarion. 
CUP opponents have outscored 
the Eagles 87-39 in the second 
quarter and 70-8 in the fourth 
quarter this season. 

The Eagles will look to rebound 
at home this Saturday when they 
face the most difficult portion of 
its schedule in the next three 
weeks. After SRU, the Eagles 
have dates with PSAC rivals IUP 
and Edinboro, who bom field tal- 
ented teams. Clarion will close 
out the season November 15th 
against PS AC-East foe Mansfield 



Men win first in CC Invitational 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



The men's and women's 
cross country teams raced the 
alumni October 1 1 at May field 
golf course. 

Three female and nine male 
graduates competed in the race 
in which the alumni received a 
ten second head start for every 
year since they graduated. 

The men defeated the alumni 
15 to 50. Dave Ellwood, Brad 
Alderton, Tom Brady, Jimmy 
Adams, Jon Fox, Bubba 
Walters, Gregg Wade, Craig 
Carlson, and Mark Trzyna fin- 
ished in the top nine spots. 

The women's race was won 
by 1981 graduate Nancy 
Wyatt Lea Anne Lauer (2), 
Cherie Zurko (3), Kristie Runk 



(4), Laurie Young (5), Devon 
Barr (8), Megan Pavuk (9), and 
Bobbi Ryan (10), placed among 
the other alumni. 

Last Saturday the teams split. 
The men and women's team 
competed at Geneva, another 
women's team record at 
Duquesne. 

The men, led by PSAC athlete 
of the week and individual cham- 
pion Brad Alderton, trounced the 
competition. Jimmy Adams, Jon 
Fox, Mark Trzyna, Tom Brady, 
Craig Carlson, and Gregg Wade 
finished in third through eighth 
place to bring home Clarion's 
first invitational win under coach 
Pat Mooney. 

Also at Geneva, the women's 
team finished fifth of six teams. 
Laurie Young (10), Melissa Getz 



(19), Megan Pavuk (25), 
Missy Bauer (31), and Bobbi 
Ryan (47) all scored for the 
team. 

At Duquesne, the women fin- 
ished seventh out of a field of 
13. Scoring were Daria Diaz 
(21), Rocky Wilson (29), 
Brigette Laflin (32), Maureen 
Long (40), Debbie Brostmeyer 
(41), Lea Anne Lauer (32), and 
Kelly Null (50) in the 112 par- 
ticipant race. 

Tlie Hot Legs award went to 
Brad Alderton, Daria Diaz, and 
Laurie Young. The Keep on 
Running Award was earned by 
Jimmy Adams, Melissa Getz, 
and Lea Anne Lauer. 

This weekend the team will 
travel to Gettysburg, ending 
the season for some. 



Slippery Rock 

at a glance 

At 0-6, Clarion may not be able to defend the PSAC West crown it 
won last season, but the Eagles can still have input in this year's con 
ference race when they face PSAC-West leading Slippery Rock (2-0 
PS AC West, 6-1 overall) this Saturday at 1 p.m. at Memorial Stadium. 

Itoe Rockets, who are ranked 12th hi the nation in Division H, have 
consistently fielded quality teams in recent years, but have always 
been a step behind the conference leaders* This year the Rockets 
established themselves as the team to beat, in the PSAC West by hand 
ing IUP a 16-9 defeat two weeks ago. It was the Rockets' first win 
over the Indians in 11 seasons and IUP's first conference home loss in 
38 games. 

Slippery Rock followed the win at IUP with last week's impressive 
30-10 handling of Edinboro. Running back Stan Kennedy ran for 114 
yards and touchdown runs of 4, 6, and 36 yards as the Rockets cruised 
to the win. Redshirt freshman quarterback Randy McKavish connect- 
ed on 13 of 23 passes for 176 yards, and Scott Whipple caught six aeri 
als for 62 yards. Defensively, SRU held Edinboro's talented running 
back, Gerald Thompson, to just six rushing yards. 

Slippery Rock's lone defeat came in the season opener at nationally- 
ranked Division I-AAYoungstown State. The Rockets took a 3-0 lead 
earty in the first quarter, but fell 33-9. 

NOTES: Clarion won last year's meeting 54-28. . . The Rockets 
have not won the PSAC crown since 1974. Former Steelers defen 
si ve lineman Keith Willis serves as an assistnat coach for the 
Rockets. 



CLARION FOOTBALL 
INSIDE THE NUMBERS 

Clarion Scoring by Quarters 



vs. California 
1st 
Clarion 

California 



2nd 3rd 4th 

17 13 



OT 



Total 
00 
30 



Season 
















1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


OT 


Total 


Clarion 


21 


39 


31 


8 





99 


OPP. 


24 


87 


29 


70 


7 


217 





CAPTAIN IX33MIS INN 



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SINK OR SWIM WITH THE CAPTAIN 



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HOURS: 
7:00 am-9:30 pm WEEKDAYS 
7:00 am-1 0:00 pm WEEKENDS 



CORNER OF 6TH AND MAIN ST. 
Clarion, PA 16214 (814)226-8400 



October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 22 



Sportsview 

NBC & Costas do baseball the right way 



Ay Bill Bates 
Sports Editor 



In the midst of another Fall 
Classic, NBC and it's broadcast 
crew of host Bob Costas, and 
color commentators "Mr. 
Baseball" Bob Ueker and Joe 
Morgan have done their share 
to entertain to spectators of a 
once dead sport 

Costas is perhaps the only 
network broadcaster that is 
capable of giving our national 
pastime justice. Costas is a 
die-hard baseball traditionalist, 
bringing out the true nostalgia 
and essence that baseball 
deserves. 

Since joining NBC in 1980, 
Bob Costas has handled a wide 
array of assignments, working 
countless hours as host of the 
1992 and 1996 Olympic games 
and Super Bowls XX, XXm 
and XXVII. Costas' passion 
for baseball keeps him coming 
back year after year, to put his 



spin on baseball's finale. With 
sidekicks Ueker and Morgan, 
Costas' broadcasts provide both 
humor and quality baseball 
insight. 

Costas won Emmy Awards as 
Outstading Sports Personality/ 
Host in 1987, 1988, 1992, 1993, 
1994, and 1995. Costas also 
earned an Emmy for his moving 
tribute to Mickey Mantle at the 
Hall of Famer's funeral in 1995. 
He has been honored as 
Sportscaster of the Year by the 
National Sportswriters 

Association a record six times. 
He is simply the best in the game. 

I can't help but think of Harry 
Doyle every time I hear Ueker 
say Indians on the air. (Ueker 
played Doyle in the movie 
Major League). I'm waiting for 
him to give the audience his 
patented "just a bit outside" or 
"K-Y ball" on any Indians pitch. 
Seriously though, "Mr. 
Baseball's" insight and wise 
cracks give, what can be a dull 



sport at times, some life. 

As for Joe Morgan, the Hall 
of Famer uses his knowledge 
of the game to put into lay- 
mens terms what is happening 
in the game. Morgan, who 
usually teams with John Miller 
on ESPN, together make up 
baseball's #2 broadcast team, 
but still fall short of NBC's 
efforts. 

The additon of ESPN outcast 
Ketih Olberman, who hosts 
The World Series along with 
Hannah Storm, also adds to 
NBC's telecasts. 

Although it is rather tough to 
see Olberman sitting next to 
Storm as opposed to former 
tag-team partner Dan Patrick, 
it is refreshing to see a more 
serious Keith back on the air. 

Forget Fox's Catcher Cam, 
Tun McCarver, Joe Buck or 
whoever they round up to 
cover post-season baseball. 
Nobody does it like Costas and 
NBC. Nobody. 



SPORTS TRIVl A 

When was the last time the 
Cleveland Indians won the World 

Series? 

last week's answer 

Dean Smith led the North Carolina 

Tar Heels to National Titles in 

1982 and 1993. 



Look in SPORTS TRIVIA 

beginning next week for a 

chance to win U.S. W.F. 

Wrestling tickets. 



Kraig Koelsch, "Joe" from Penn State, Charlie Desch, & Bill Bates 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



CONGRATULATIONS 
MIKE WILLIAMS 

INTRAMURAL WORKER 
OF THE WEEK!! 

REMINDER: 

The 6 ON 6 VOLLEYBALL and 
3 ON 3 BASKETBALL tournaments 
have begun, but new teams are still 
being accepted in all divisions 
Volleyball - men's /women's /co-rec 
Basketball - men's /women's 
Games and matches are held 
Monday through Thursday beginning 
at 9:00 pm in Tippin Gym. 
Get involved ... 
SIGN UP TODAY !! 

MOUNTAIN BIKE 
RACE 

Monday, October 27th 
4:00 pm 

For more information and to 

register, call x2349 or stop 

by 117 Tippin. 



INTRAMURAL 
CHAMPS 

GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Tyler Best. Tim Odds, 

Matt Black, Derek Sommer 

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 

Beach Babes 

Gilligan & Ginger 

Brak & Zorak 

INDOOR SOCCER 

The Scrubs 

CONGRATULATIONS!! 



GRADUATE ASSISTANT 

Jntramurals has an opening for a 

20 hour Graduate Assistant 

beginning in the Spring 1998. 

* Full tuition waiver 

4 Stipend 

For more information, call x2349 

or stop by 117 Tippin. 



FLAG FOOTBALL 
TOURNAMENT 



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October 23, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



CLASSIFIEDS 



MKLPWANTi;!) 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10- $20 

per hour. Call (814)234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 



Reimer Snack Bar is currently 
looking for part time delivery 
drivers with their own vehicle. 

Starting wage is $5.15/hour, plus 
compensation for use of own 

vehicle. Apply at Riemer Snack 
Bar. 



I OR RIM 



For Rent 

3 Bedroom mobile home in 

Clarion. Available Immediately. 

Call 764-5895 



Furnished Apartments Available 

for 4 people for the Fall 1998- 

Spring 1999 semesters. 

Very close to campus. 

Leave message at 226-5917 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 

available for SPRING 
SEMESTER. Clean, close to 
campus, quiet, no pets, refer- 
ences. CallRUTTAPTS.at 
227-1938 
or beeper (814)226-0722 



Spacious 1 story house for 3 or 
4, close to campus, available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. 
Quiet, no pets, references, newly 

furnished, clean. 

Call RUTT APTS at 227-1938 

or beeper (814)227-0722 

Mobile Home for rent starting 
SPRING SEMESTER 

Ideal for 3 or 4 students. 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 bathrooms with show- 
ers, washerand dryer room, liv- 
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Located across from Comet 
Food Warehouse, 
Call during the day at 226-1913 
Call evenings after 5p.m. at 
226-6327 

Nice, quiet, furnished two bed- 
room apartment. In quiet resi- 
dential neighborhood. For spring 
semester. Call 226-8225 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FREE T-SHIRT 

+$1000 
Credit card fundraisers for 
fraternities, sororities & groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
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65. Qualified callers receive 
FREE T-SHIRT 



EARN 

$750-$1500/week 

Raise all the money your group 

needs by sponsoring a VISA 

fundraiser on your campus. No 

investment & very little time 

needed. There's no obligation, 

so why not call for information 

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Call 1-800-323-8454 ext. 95 



RELIABLE SPRING BREAK 
TOURS 

Bahamas, Cancun & Ski Trips! 

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PERSON XLS 



Hey Jenny J. 

Elephants can have fleas but 

fleas can't have elephants! 

Love, Niklri 

Hey Lefty-It's snowing!! 

We bent over kegs and under 

limbo sticks.. We told jokes that 

gave us kicks. We sang and 

danced all night long. The 

Brothers of ZTT have got it 

going on! Thanks for the great 

mixer! Love, the Sisters of AZ 

Phi Sigs and Sig Eps, 

Thanks for the good time. 

Love, the Dance Team 



To the Sisters of ZTA 

Thanks for the good time at the 

mixer. Love, the Brothers of 

ThetaXi 



"Spin"s Cuz", and "Cuddles", 

"Lazy Bastard" and Kev, Tim 
and Brendan, Naqeeb, 

"Choopie" and Sarah, "Gimpy" 
and "Married One", Mike, 

"Darryl" and "Darryl" and Tom 

and Steve, It was a beautiful 

thing, let's do it again in the 

spring! Lt. Dan or Moses 



Hey there is a dancer down in 

aisle 6, and don't forget to put 

your car in park! 



Happy 21st Birthday to Frankie 

R.! Hope you have a great trip! 

Love, your famous friend 



Hey Girls! Strap on some boots, 

get yourself an O'Douls on tap, 

and rope that cow! 



Teddy Ruxpin-Thanks for every- 
thing! I love ya! Love, the 
Greatest American Hero 



Happy 23rd Birthday Cara 

Maudhuit! Love, your A<ME 

Sisters 



Happy 22nd Birthday Nanette 
Zewe! Love, your A<ME Sisters 

Coach Davis, 

The weather was great, and so 

was the class. Camping and 

canoeing sure kicked... um? Butt! 

Thanks, Jen, Mike, Jen, Tod, 
Brendan, NaQeeb, Kevin, Brian, 

Matt, Jeremy, 11m, Brenda, 
Sarah, Steve, Tammi, and Tom 

HeyFatman, Is bad better? I 

fired the first shot. The war 

begins. Fat, Bad, and Ugly; 

nice combo! Your Fat Partner in 

crime #436 

DONELLELOY 

WASHINGTON!!!!!!! 

We need to play at the bar soon 

little! I miss you and can't wait 

for the new addition! Love, MB 

Look out Chicago- Here we 

come! Oprah, Bulls, and the L! 

Big Fun in the windy city! 



Scotty, Sorry about seizing your 
computer. The keyboard just 
feels so good beneath my fin- 
gers! Love, Jen 



KRIST-ANN, Will you ever just 
get over John Black and move 

on with your life? We know that 

you love ANAL love beads, but 
not as much as you love your 

tacos! Thank God for C drives. 
Love, The Call 



Hey Sandee, The snow is on the 

ground, and the heat is on! 
Thank God! I know we're sup- 
posed to love penguins, but this 
is ridiculous! Love, MB 



Billy "The Master" Bates, 

Sometimes your such a chicky 

mama! Love, MB and KD 



Tim, I'll buy the green hair dye, 

if you'll go back to the way you 

once were. Love, MB 



Danielle, Next time just let me 

know and I'll flex you! 

Love, MB 



Beer Maniac, Miss you and your 
bong! 



Bitch, Only 2 months left and 

then the big G-Day. I'll miss 

you! Love, MB 

House of Pain Wayne- Who 

knew that an e-moon would get 

you so excited! Just think what 

the real thing would do! 



Daddy Ed - Do you make shoot- 
ers for senior walk? Love, MB 
and Jenny 

To my Call Girls (MB, Jen, and 

Kristen): Happy Halloween! If 

you pull the tricks I'll 

give you the treats. 

Love, Chris (aka Adam) 

Chris, We'll be sure to pull 

slowly so that you derive the 

most enjoyment possible! Bring 

the magazine and we'll get 

some peter butter! 

Love, Your Call Girls 



ZTT would like to wish 
Missy a Happy Belated Birthday 

ZTT would like to thank 

the Delta Zetas for the 

Great Mixer 

Drew good luck against 

Slippery Cock 

from H.P.W. 



Happy Birthday to Jen Newell, 
the best first off-campus room- 
mate EVER! Sorry I'll be miss- 
ing two in a row! Have fun, and 
I'll "get ya" after the weekend! 
Love, Founds 



To thtMSI big sister IN THE 
WORLD! I'll miss you after 

your "Big" day! I love you very 
much, and I wish you and Joe 
many years of love and happi- 
ness together! Enjoy your 
cruise, and I'll visit you at the 
new place over the holidays! 

Love, Your FAVORITE and only 
little sister, Jen 



Happy B-Day Nan! It took long 

enough for you to turn 21, now 

look how fast the past year flew! 

Enjoy your day! Founds 



Kipper, Can't wait for you to 

come up and visit! Mom and 

Dad may need a break from you 

after the wedding! 



Bob, WAKE UP and read the 
CALL! 



Bill Yarussi, bald eagles are fly- 
ing over Clarion, and they're 
watching you! 



Melanie, I'll see you next 

semester! Love your roommate 

Shana 

You live a minute away yet I 

haven't seen you in two weeks, 

I'm sorry about my difficulties 

in reading a calendar, it will all 

be back to normal soon, 

promise. I love you Betty. 

Charlie. 

MB, You are the light of my life, 

and I must say, that these past 

few years of knowing you have 

been unfathomable! I love my 

bitch! Love, Jennay 

To our faithful advisor, Dr.B. 

You make us all warm and fuzzy 

inside! Never mind what you do 

to our outsides! Love, 

Ifce_Call Exec Board 



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Page 24 



Marlins 

by Chris Pfeil 
Assistant Sports Editor 



The Clarion Call 



October 23, 1997 



The 1997 World Series kicked 
off last weekend in Florida. 
That's right, the Marlins hosted 
the Cleveland Indians to start the 
series that wasn't supposed to be. 
The Indians came to life in the 
American League playoffs after 
hanging-on late in the season to 
win the Central Division. 
Despite having the worst record 
among the four AL playoff teams, 
the Indians ousted the defending 
champion New York Yankees, 
then stunned the Baltimore 
Orioles in six games to reach the 
World Series for the second time 
in three years. 

In the National League, the 
Marlins became the first wild 
card team ever to make the World 
Series by knocking off the San 
Francisco Giants and the favorite 
to win it all, the Atlanta Braves. 
At press time, the Marlins were 
up in the series 2-1. The Marlins 
jumped out of the gate in Game 1 
to win 7-4. Florida jumped out to 
a big lead in the fourth inning 
when Moises Alou hit a three run 
homer off the left field foul pole. 
Charles Johnson followed with 
an upper-deck homer to left to 
give the Marlins a 1-0 lead in the 



The World Series 





Florida 
Marlins 



Cleveland 
Indians 



series. 

In Game 2, Cleveland was 
sparked by a two-run roundtrip- 
per by Sandy Alomar, Jr. and a 
great pitching performance by 
Chad Ogea. The Tribe evened 
the series at 1-1 with a 6-1 win. 

The focus for Game 3 in 
Cleveland was the temperature. 
Despite the cold weather, (game 
time temperature was in the low 
thirtys) the bats were hot. The 
Marlins outlasted the Tribe 14-11 
to take a 2-1 lead in the series. 
Gary Sheffield had three hits, 
five RBI's, and robbed Jim 
Thome of a home run to lead the 
Marlins. 



Game 4 was scheduled for 
Wednesday night, with game 
time temperatures once again in 
the low 30's. Tonight's Game 5 
will be a rematch of Cleveland's 
Orel Hershiser and Florida's 
Livan Hernadez. 

If Games 6 and 7 are necces- 
sary, the series will move back to 
the warm Florida sun. Probable 
starter for Game 6 are Ogea and 
Florida ace Kevin Brown. If the 
series goes to Game 7 on Sunday, 
the Marlins will throw Al Leiter 
against Cleveland's Charles 
Nagy. 
World Series Notes 



SPORTS EXTRA 



Marquis Grissom extended his 
World Series hitting streak to 15 
in Game 3. He is two games shy 
of the record of 17. 
World Series Schedule 

Game 5: Thursday at 
Cleveland, 8:20 p.m. Orel 
Hershiser, Indians, vs. Levan 
Hernandez, Marlins. 

Game 6: Saturday at Florida, 8 
p.m. Chad Ogea, Indians vs. 
Kevin Brown, Marlins. 

Game 7: Sunday at Florida, 
7:35 p.m. Charles Nagy, 



Clarion broadcast team win best 
play-by- play local sportscast 



by BUI Bates 
Sports Editor 




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j Jeremiah who has been diagnosed with hone mar- 
row cancer. He wishes to receive a record num- 
ber of cards. Please drop off or mail cards to 
the Tri Sterna house at 1 1 Wilson Ave. Your 

help is appreciated! 



Those who know Kraig 
Koelsch are well aware that he is 
never at a loss for words. Some 
would go as far to say that he 
knows how to use his "gift of 
gab" rather well. 

Nonetheless, Kraig was reward- 
ed for his talents along with C-93 
broadcast partner Dave Katis for 
their coverage of Clarion Golden 
Eagle football by the 
Pennsylvania Association of 
Broadcasters. 

Kraig and Dave were awarded 
Best Play-By-Play Local 
Sportscast by the PB A at a dinner 
held at the DoubleTree Hotel in 
downtown Pittsburgh. The din- 
ner was held in recognition for 
outstanding performances in 
broadcasting throughout the state 
of Pennsylvania. The PB A hand- 
ed out awards in several cate- 
gories for both radio and televi- 
sion including best commercial, 
promotion announcement, public 
service announcement, editorial, 
sport news, and newscast to name 



a few. 

Major market stations such as 
Pittsburgh's KDKA and WTAE, 
as well as Philadelphia's WYSP 
and WHYY were among the win- 
ners, proving that both Koelsch, 
Katis, and the WCCR, C-93 
award deserves recognition. 

"Dave and I work very hard and 
we are thrilled to accept this 
acheivement," Koelsch said. "A 
lot of credit goes to our producer 
Ron Smith, who does an incredi- 
ble job. The award was defini- 
ately unexpected, but well appre- 
ciated." 

Katis agrees in not taking all of 
the glory. 'Without the help of 
people like Rich Herman, 
Clarion's Sports Information 
Director, Athletic Director Bob 
Carlson, our producer (Ron 
Smith), and Bill Hearst, our 
broadcasts would not run so 
smooth. We definitely want to 
thank Malen Luke, for giving us 
card blanche to get into prac- 
tices^ to meetings, and travel 
with the team." 

This award proves to be anoth- 
er spinoff of the spectacular sea- 



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son the Golden Eagle football 
team put together last year. Both 
Koelsch and Katis agree. 

"This is just another straw in 
the cap for last year's final four 
season," Koelsch added. 

Katis, who does the play-by- 
play, is full-time employee of 
Clarion University in the 
Advancement Office. He has 
been associated with the football 
program since 1980, as a student 
assistant, graduate assistant, and 
now as the voice of the Golden 
Eagles. 

Color commentator Kraig 
Koelsch, a senior graduate stu- 
dent in communication, also has 
had his nose in Clarion football 
for some time, serving as sports 
editor of The Clarion Tai] and 
his years of broadcast experi- 
ence. Koelsch is also host of the 
famed SportsTalk, on Clarion's 
student FM radio station 91.7 
WCUC. 

The two admit that their rela- 
tonship outside of the broadcast 
booth help when on the air. 

"We get along pretty well with 
each other," Katis admits. "We 
are both from around the same 
area, Kraig being from Norwin, 
and myself from the Penn- 
Trafford area, which gives us 
plenty to talk about." 

Both Kraig and Dave use their 
knowledge of each other, and the 
football program, as well as other 
experiences as part of their 
broadcasts. 

"We often use insight from 
things like the bus ride to road 
games to what we had for lunch 
during the game, which makes it 
fun." 






v^Pctooer 30, 1997 



Clarion fflntoertfitp ot ftemtfpltiania 



Clarion, $3 16214 



XEfyt Clarion Call 



Whs?* J n si be 




Football is still 

losing. What is 

the problem? 

For the story of 

this week's 

game, see 

page 20. 



€ontent5 



Opinion: Pg. 2 

Reader Responses: Pg- 3 

News: Pg. 5 

Lifestyles: Pg. 9 

Call-on-you Pg.13 

Photo Essay: Pg. 14 

Entertainment: Pg. 1 7 

Sports: Pg20 

Classifieds: Pg.23 

Volume 79, 3fe*ue 8 



Wtat\)tv 



Today: High around 

55, with partly cloudy 

skies and a 53 

percent chance of 

showers. 

Friday: Showers 

likely. High of 53. 

Saturday: Chance of 

showers. High of 55. 



Trick or Treat! 




$aue a sfafe anb happp 2|alloujeen! 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



OPINION. 



tEhe 

Clarion 

Call 

CUrta, 91 U214 

(614)220-2810 
/ftX (0t4)22«-2W7 

t-matt: callg«aa.cUr<t«.t*i 
Mm.dir(tR.iH/tMaII/ca!.|tai 

Cxetutibe Uoarto 



Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Beth Curry 

Managing Editor 

Jennifer Founds 

News Editor 

Kristen Davis 

Lifestyles Editor 

Scott R. Hunsberger 

Sports Editor 

William Bates 

Ad Design 

Wayne Ailing 
Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Chapaloney 
Photography 

Editor 

Tim Emanuel 

Business Manager 

Danielle Hock 

Copy & Design 

Editor 

Benjamin Auman 

Circulation 

Manager 

Denise Barney 

On-line Editor 

Christopher Collins 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



A, 



m 




| tttit Tart | 


H 


"As an educator, 
I believe in edu- 
cation!" 




1 'Maritc 'JxodrujiiczM 
1 'Haiftics 1 





"MulticulturaUsm in My 

Classroom: Political 

Correctness?" 

Psychologists have long com- 
plained that research in the 
United States has focused on 
samples of middle class, Anglo 
participants and that American 
psychology has largely ignored 
research originating in other 
countries. Both complaints are 
well founded. For example, even 
though textbooks may introduce 
the concept of cross-cultural 
research and describe one or two 
ecological theories, the bulk of 
the research presented is based 
on the study of the middle-class 
Anglo individual and his or her 
middle-class Anglo family. 
Traditionally, the results of these 
studies have been generalized, 



explicitly or implicitly, to the 
American population, without 
regard to social class or ethnic 
and racial differences. 

Even the Rat Was White: 
Robert Guthrie wrote that book 
in 1976 to decry the absence of 
notable black psychologists in 
psychology textbooks and the 
almost negligible presence of 
black Americans in psychologi- 
cal research samples. Today, the 
situation is not as dire, but it is 
still there. As an example, in 
1994, at the Conference on 
Human Development in 
Pittsburgh, a researcher from the 
University of Miami presented a 
paper on an infancy study of 
white, middle-class infants and 

Continued on page 4 



Staff 



Asst. News Editors: Angie Binick, Steve Ostrosky, Shana Stowitzky 

Asst. Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Nathan Koble 

Asst. Photography Editor: Kelly Luczynski 

Asst. Ad Design Manager: Tun Bowerman, Sheri Hertzog 

Asst. Copy & Design Editor: Jnel Ritzier 

Asst. Ad Sales Managers:Mark Kalinoski, Christine Metzger 

News Writers- Janelle Donoghue, Leslie Suhr 

Lifestyles Writers- Brendan Anderer, Melissa Andrews, 

Bonnie Fair, Ren6 Farbacher, Jolina Giaramita, Hope Guy, 

Mark Strieker 

Sports Writers- Bethany Boal, Bob Fuchs, Vickie Geer, Lori 

Matachak, Cherie Zurko 

Ad Design Staff- John Brown, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 

Andrea Dillinger, Stella Meyer, Jen Mumford, Matt Wilson 

Ad Sales Staff- Steve Gabor, Tara Molina, Heather Pellegrini, Scott 

Weir 

Photographers- Kristin Colello, Charles Desch, Brendan George, Jen 

Harlan, Tommie Hearn 

Proofreaders- Karli Berlin, Greg Hensler, Megan Klauss, Wayne 

lines, Heather Liti 

Circulation Staff- Terry Franciscus, Tommi Hearn, Una Lasky, Jen 

Mumford, Stella Meyer, Debbie Odosso, Wayne Scott 

Typists- Mark Beckner, Cyndi Jonov, Jaycie Langlois, Matt Wilson 

Business Staff- Tim Bentz, Cara Daugherty, Jeff Komoroski, Julie 

Wilkins,JillSiegel 

'Names remaining m the staff box in the December 4, 1997 Call receive co-curricular credit. 



'Editorial 



k 




"We have all heard 

about the girl at the 

prom who had her 

baby in a restroom 

stall, strangled it 

and threw it in the 

garbage." 



(Denise barney, Circulation Manager 



I believe Jen had a great point 
last week about the abuse of ani- 
mals. I would like to elaborate 
on the topic of abuse but on a dif- 
ferent subject - the abuse of chil- 
dren. There are numerous sub- 
jects under the topic of child 
abuse, but two issues really make 
my blood boil. Child molestation 
and rape and neonaticide (baby 
killing). 

I am confident that everyone 
agrees that these are acts of 
which only monsters are capable 
of. I want to know why these 
monsters are let go so frequently. 
I personally believe that moles- 
ters never recover. I have come 
to this conclusion from hearing 
millions of stories about multiple 
offenders. 

Even after the myriad of treat- 
ments, rehabs and psychiatrists, 
these criminals perpetually come 
away the same people, the same 
unchanged, deranged monsters 
who, repeatedly molest and rape. 

Every day when I watch the 
news, I see a story or two, or 
three about some crazy lunatic 
who has done something inex- 
cusable to an innocent little child. 



I see family members sticking up 
for the abuser and pleading for 
them to be set free. This makes 
me sick. How can anyone have 
any remorse for the culprit when 
he/she has done such a disgust- 
ing, repulsive thing. How would 
they feel if their four year old boy 
was raped by a 50 year old pig? 
In case you need a descriptive 
example, here is one I will never 
forget. 

A man has been caught molest- 
ing young boys in McDonald's 
restrooms. In one instance, a 
videotape from the McDonald's 
surveillance camera showed a lit- 
tle boy coming out of the 
restroom almost running for his 
mother obviously looking dis- 
concerted, shattered and dis- 
traught Seconds later, toe man 
swiftly walked out of the 
restroom and out the rear 
entrance. 

How vulgar and nauseating is 
this? Who would ever think a 
McDonald's restroom would be 
so unsafe? The most troubling 
fact is this man had been caught 

Continued on page 4 



M*I«rvTT«ni 



is published most Thursdays during the school year in accor 
dance with the academic calendar. Editors accept contributions from all 
sources, but reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctuation, length, 
and obscenity (the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor- 
in-Chief). Opinions expressed in editorials are those of the identified writer 
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the student body, university, or 
Clarion community. The Executive Board reserves the right to refuse publi 
cation of any information both factual and editorial in content. Letters to the 
Editor must be received by 5:00 p jn. on the Monday of desired publication 
Letters must be signed and include a phone number and an address. If the 
author wishes to have his/her identity withheld, a second signed letter must be 
submitted explaining the reasons for the request Due to space restrictions, let- 
ters that do not appear in die publication on the desired week will be held and 
published in following issues of The Clarion Call- Display Advertising copy is 
due Monday by 4:00 p.m. on the week of publication. Classifieds are due 
Tuesday by 2:00 pjn. on the week of publication. The Clarion Call is funded 
by the Clarion Student Association and advertising revenue. 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSES] 



"No doubt the increase in business will increase inflation..." 



Dear Editor, 

Oh, to be young, naive and 
light-headed enough to be vault- 
ed over facts in a single bound by 
tall tales of propagandists on the 
www, to land in La La Land; 
Like SuperAdam who earned his 
purple heart for pursuing his Fat 
Cats' nonsense to its reductio 
absurdities in last week's Clarion 
Call of the wild claims! 

He bought and brought to you 
the claims of the four million 
dollar PR campaign by the Fat 
Cats and Plump Pussies in 
Pittsburgh who touted their grab 
for business and corporate wel- 
fare behind a smoke-screen of 
rationalizations that economic 
growth really could create a 
"Regional Renaissance" of new 
jobs for us. Adam doesn't realize 
that if these taxes were to be 
spent on self-sustainable, prof- 
itable enterprises, honest fat cats 
and their moles would be invest- 
ing enough of their money on the 
businesses anyway. 

Since long before Hamilton 
subsidized his fat cat supporters 
with his fust National Bank Bill 
back in the 1790s, Fat Cats have 
had their paws in the public till. 
Plump pussies like to play with 
the public purse. They've sel- 
dom been so foolish or so bold as 
to think they can invest only five 
million in PR to fool enough of 
the people enough of the time to 
get away with a two billion dol- 
lar haul. The robber barons of 
the latter nineteenth, and trusts of 
the early twentieth, centuries had 
to sneak favors surreptitiously 
from the politicians they had 
bought for a much greater invest- 
ment of campaign cash than this 
current crop of robbers is willing 
to pay for PR. After Teddy 
Roosevelt, the Fat Cats could 
only bleed the people by paying 
many quid for legislator's elec- 
tions on the Q.T., and only for the 
pro quo that legislators wouldn't 
stop the Fat Cats' economic rape 
and pillage that led to the 
Depression. 

Ever since insurance and med- 
ical corporations found that the 
PR dollars they paid for Harry's 
and Louise's lies on TV defeated 
the Clinton's Health Care plan so 
well, they have gotten cocky, 
even campaigning directly 
against a global warming treaty 
before it was proposed. They 
seem to think they can always 
lead us to their profits and our 



destruction with a few big lies in 
a little PR campaign. Not this 
time, bozos. It would take a lot 
more than a five million dollar 
PR campaign to sufficiently mist 
the eyes of most of us other than 
youngsters without memories 
like Adam Earnest Heart. He 
was even blinded to the facts he 
claimed to get from them. 

First, without belaboring 
Adam's razor by which he cut 
out his fuzzy facts; although less 
than a fourth of our taxes will go 
to build stadiums, etc., that's not 
true of Pittsburgh. 

Second, it really makes no dif- 
ference nor does anyone really 
care whether the Fat Cats with 
their paws out own losing sports 
or other businesses to which our 
taxes are to be given away. (As 
long as they aren't polluters, like 
the owners of a local fiber-board 
plant to which state and county 
aid was given - which constituted 
most of our local area giveaways 
to Fat Cats to support "growth" 
lately (especially growth of lung 
cancer units.) 

Third, it is a study by three 
Pittsburgh institutions that 
claims that the Fat Cats* initiative 
of sticking out their paws to raid 
our coffers will create 10,000 
new jobs for people already liv- 
ing in the whole western PA 
region, possible including some 
few jobs in Clarion. Are these 
the same folk who predicted how 
many new jobs WalMart would 
bring in without telling us how 
many of these jobs would just be 
transferred from other businesses 
gone broke from WalMart's com- 
petition? How much experience 
do we need with university stud- 
ies for corporate groups or the 
military which are self-serving 
institutional and corporate 
claims? 

Fourth, other than the 20,000 
better-paying new jobs that will 
be created for the 20,000 better 
educated new people who will be 
brought into our area (whose 
affluent kids those universities 
may well desire to recruit) - for 
whose needs we may have to 
increase local taxes for schools 
and infrastructures - should the 
rest of the current residents of 
western Pennsylvania rejoice 
that we will pay so much added 
taxes for the 10,000 new jobs for 
people already living in the 
region (including a few in 
Clarion). 



Letter 
to the 
Editor 



Fifth, of course there will be 
five to eight thousand temporary 
new jobs in Pittsburgh! It takes a 
tot of people to build a stadium 
and other structures. A billion 
tax dollars certainly should 
increase personal income of 
those 20,000 workers by $140 
million, leaving $860 million to 
feed the Fat Cats and Plump 
Pussies. No doubt the increase in 
business will increase inflation 
and drain further taxes form state 
and federal sources as well as 
increase local taxes further. 
That's a plus, Adam? 

Sixth, Adam is right that this 
"initiative" is not about a stadi- 
um. It's about spending public 
money for the profits of private 
Fat Cats. Profitable sports teams 
won't leave because we don't 
give them a little catnip. If peo- 
ple in Pittsburgh truly wanted 
their taxes invested to buy them 
their own sports teams, let them 
do that, or give their taxes to the 
Fat Cat owners. If the teams are 
really going broke paying their 
own way, Pittsburgh could buy 
their franchises real cheap to cre- 
ate real hometown teams 
Pittsburgh owns. We never 
promised them a rose garden or a 
sports team. 

Seventh, this initiative has little 
to do with good new jobs for 
good old residents of western 
Pennsylvania. The 20,000 new 
residents who will be brought in 
will be brought in for 20,000 bet- 
ter jobs for which there are no 
local people qualified. Why else 
import people? We have well 
over 30,000 unemployed current 
residents prepared for the less 
skilled jobs, if that were what 
was needed. So on Adam's Fat 
Cat plan, we'd be giving the Fat 
Cats about $200,000 for each 
new low wage job the Fat Cats 
would create to profit from. So 
forget creating the 20,000 higher 
paying jobs that would bring in 
new people. We'd be paying 
additional taxes and higher 
prices to accommodate the 
20,000 immigrants who got the 
good jobs for local residents. 



Adam and his friends and family 
would not thrive on the few nig- 
gardly jobs for local people that 
our taxes would create if given to 
the Fat Cats. So, why don't we 
just divide the two billion in new 
taxes among the 10,000 old resi- 
dents who Adam's Fat Cats' plan 
implies would be offered new 
low wage jobs on the Fat Cats' 
initiative. Give each of the 
10,000 his $200,000 share direct- 
ly rather than give it to the Fat 
Cats to create a low wage job for 
each of the 10,000 current resi- 
dents. There's no need to match 
the Fat Cats' "initiative" of stick- 
ing out their paws, at no one's 
urging, to get us to fill them with 
tax dollars, with our foolishness. 
Much of the growth in Clarion 
County paid for by tax dollars 
which Adam touts has not been a 
boon to old residents of Clarion 



County, except for a few Fat 
Cats. If we want to tax ourselves 
all this money, keep it all in 
Clarion county and divide it up 
among our poor, not Pittsburgh's 
Fat Cats and Plump pussies. 
Come to think of it, I could use 
$200,000. I've lived here five 
years. Does that count? 

We really must keep our kids 
like Adam away from evils on 
the internet. They lack the expe- 
rience or maturity to judge all the 
pros and cons and scams they 
meet with on swpajobs (web 
site), not even nwpajobs. It 
should be labeled "adult only fic- 
tion." It's obscene. Still, Master 
Adam should be commended for 
wanting jobs created for friends 
and family. 

Sincerely, 
Ed Marshall 




Ikfofaity tookplou during tfu end of October beginning offyombtr. 



October 31, 1964 

"A Halloween Costume Dance featuring the "Joe Alese Quintet" 
will be sponsored by the Student Christian Association Saturday 
night, October 31, in the Harvey Gymnasium at 8:30 pjn." 

Also, in this issue of The Clarion Call , titled "24 Hour Staff On 
Duty At New Infirmary." This medical service center, located in 
Egbert Hall, is open on a 24-hour, 7-day basis, with registered nurs- 
es on duty at all times. 

October 30, 1970 

In the article, "Founders Hall Name Revived" Founder's Hall, a 
title assigned to the college's second most venerable structure in 
1930 by vote of the Board of Trustees, has been reaffirmed as the 
proper name for the familiar campus landmark which most persons 
now call "Old Science Hall." 

October 30, 1974 

Making the front page is the article, "Special Food Meeting Held" 
The major topic of discussion was last Tuesday's announcement 
that Servomation will be terminating their contract in 90 days 
because of excessive losses. 

It was estimated that the food contract for the next semester may 
run as high as $226 per student 

November 1, 1984 

"A Clarion tradition resumed Friday night, as Venango 
Management re-opened the Orpheum Theater that was damaged 
by fire in May 1983," was the lead of the front page story in this 
issue. Theater owner Chester DeMarsh said this of the re-open- 
ing, "We just took our time to get it done because we wanted to 
do it right. All that is left of the original theater is the shell." 

• All materials are taken directly from back issues of The 
Clarion Call and are compiled by The Call staff. 






October 30, 1997 



rirl'- 



-* ant»' 



The Clarion Call 



Page 4 



Hide Park continued from page 2,. 



their mothers. When asked why 
the sample did not include ethnic 
minorities, the researcher 
responded, "Well, I guess I'll 
have to study minorities soon 
because of the new federal guide- 
lines." This seemed an especial- 
ly thoughtless answer to me 
because I conducted research in 
and near Jackson Hospital, the 
teaching hospital for the 
University of Miami, where this 
researcher had obtained the sam- 
ple. That hospital serves many 
different ethnic and racial 
groups: Haitians, Cuban- 
Americans, Nicaraguans, 
African-Americans, both 
American bom and immigrant 
groups. One would have to work 
hard to obtain a sample of only 
white, middle-class infants and 
their mothers from that popula- 
tion. 

More recently over the last few 
years, cross-cultural research has 
increased and some textbooks 
give more than lip service to the 
importance of studying more rep- 
resentative samples of people. 
Those who applaud this move 
believe it is necessary to study all 
segments of the population in 
order to uncover both similarities 
and differences. Not only is it 
interesting to find that African- 
American and Latino teenagers 
are less likely to have peers who 
encourage academic excellence 
than are Anglo teenagers, it is as 
interesting to find out that 
African-American, Latino, and 
Anglo-American parents encour- 
age academic excellence in their 
teenagers to the same degree. 
Studying only Anglo-American 
teenagers and their parents would 
preclude our even having that 
knowledge. And if we ignored 
parenting style and child out- 
comes in other cultures, we 
would remain convinced (and, of 
course, many of us remain so) 
that the fact that children sleep in 
the same bed with their parents is 
either a sure sign of poverty or 

one of incest It is neither, by 

the way. 

Liberals, the "Left," radicals, 
those who advocate more inclu- 
siveness in the classroom, do so 
because they want to increase 
sensitivity toward other ethnic 
groups among majority students 
or to increase pride in one's own 
ethnic group among minority stu- 
dents. These reasons, however, 
lie outside the central functions 
of my job as an educator, and 
they leave no doubt that political 
correctness will definitely play a 
role in my classroom. My job is 
to inform and to help develop 
critical thinking skills, and 



although I should be careful not 
to insult my students and 
LOWER their self-esteem by 
humiliating them in the class- 
room because they belong to an 
ethnic minority group or because 
they ask a "stupid question", my 
job is not to make them feel good 
just because they are in my class- 
room. That could be easily 
achieved by giving them only 
flattery and no criticism, and by 
granting As to all my students 
(but we won't go there...). 

I have also heard it argued by 
advocates of multiculturalism 
that only members of an ethnic 
group can truly teach about that 
ethnic group or conduct research 
with that ethnic group. In fact, 
two years ago, I wrote an essay 
for the National Education 
Association on whether only 
members of a particular ethnic 
group could study that ethnic 
group. The researcher who wrote 
the opposing viewpoint said that 
as a Native American, she was 
received more warmly by her 
Native American research partic- 
ipants and that they probably told 
her things they would not have 
told an "outsider." Does this dis- 
qualify her from conducting 
research with Anglo-Americans? 
She did not address this point. In 
fact, others argue that as a mem- 
ber of that group she would be 
too personally involved and too 
likely to be a biased, rather than 
an objective, observer. This is an 
ongoing debate in sociology and 
anthropology as well. 

As an educator, I believe in edu- 
cation! Researchers who conduct 
research with ethnic minority 
groups (something that multicul- 
tural groups would heartily 
encourage!) must surely learn 
about that group's language and 
culture to establish rapport with 
participants and to know what to 
study and how to study it. But 
this can be learned! I certainly 
haven't heard multicultural advo- 
cates argue that African- 
American psychologists are 
unqualified to study Anglo- 
American children, college stu- 
dents or older adults! But I have 
heard of opposition to the teach- 
ing of "ethnic courses" by Anglo 
faculty. "She could not possibly 
teach Black Studies - she is 
white! and I don't care that she 
has a PhD. and has published 50 
articles in that area!" Whatever 
happened to the function of edu- 
cation? If I were an Anglo- 
American faculty member, I 
would take that as a decree to 
NOT infuse my own classes with 
multicultural data and issues. 
Education is the key! We can 



learn! Of course, it's not the 
same as living as a member of an 
ethnic minority group, but I also 
don't believe I can't talk about 
divorce and its effects on chil- 
dren because I am not divorced. 
Experience is important, and it 
does enrich our lives, but books 
and science also enrich our lives 
and our understanding of human 
behavior and human culture. 

One danger of political correct- 
ness is that instead of changing 
the world to rid it of racism and 
ethnocentrism by changing 
minds and hearts, it might intro- 
duce our students to a world of 
make believe, a world we would 
like to imagine but one that does 
not exist. Racism still lives out 
there in the real world. Are we 
giving our students, minority and 
majority students, a false sense of 
security? 

Conservatives, those of the 
Right, traditionalists, argue that 
multiculturalism is merely an 
attempt by do-gooders to create a 
classroom which is a feel-good 
place for all students who are 
also ethnic minority members. 
They also argue that multicultur- 
alsim is a barely disguised 
attempt to make students feel 
guilty about past injustices and 
thus want to make amends for 
those injustices. Critics of politi- 
cal correctness argue that, to be 
inclusive, one must ignore the 
great works and contributions of 
the masters in literature, history 
or psychology which are the real 
roots of our progress in these 
areas. When as a professor I 
introduce multiculturalism into 
my classroom, I may be doing so 
by making a political statement, 
whether it is clearly presented as 
such to the students or not, or 
whether I am even aware of it or 
not Not everyone includes mul- 
ticultural data, much less infuses 
their curriculum. Those who do 
are a minority who are likely to 
also introduce more liberal ideas 
about their subject matter, human 
behavior, or any other. Thus, 
critics of PC argue that the agen- 
da becomes political, rather than 
educational, but without any 
warning label for students! 
Students, of course, are fore- 
warned when they enroll in 
courses like "Cross-Cultural 
Psychology." But those on the 
Right would argue that these 
courses work to divide racial and 
ethnic groups by pointing to our 
differences instead of our simi- 
larities. 

• Part two of "Multiculturalism in 

My Classroom: Political 

Correctnees?" will run in the 

November 6. 1997 Call. 




mmm 



Attention Web 




^v^m:m$m 



www.compiifink-c0.uW^^ 

Do you drink too much? 

iMs h an interactive self-test of your akohol cbMump- 
iidth There are also a variety of links to other cool beer 
sites* 

www.iibc.coin/tvcent^ 

If you're a big "Days*' fan or your just in love with 
Marlena cheek but the updating and infofmative site 
about the hit soap; Days of Our Lives! 

www,the0errick,com/t<^ 

For all the local news online, including Clarion's top sto- 
ries, look up The Derrick online. This site is updated 
daily with all of the latebfeaking events. 



i 



■-■■The Clarion Call will publish website submissions from stu- 
dents, faculty, staff, and the community If you know of a great 
site that you would like to share with our readers submit the 
complete address* and a brief description to our office m ami 
270 Gemmed Student Center ore-mail us at Call <^aU.clari* 
on.edu. Vfe will log onto all the sites submitted to verify that 
they are legit arid In somewhat good taste. 



MHMMMMHtHlMMWNHMHMM 



.v.v. 

Hiliiil 



Page 5 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



•*~~mmrm 



lliorial continue!! 



before and let go each time. 

The other topic that I cannot tol- 
erate is neonaticide. How can 
you kill your own baby? How 
can you throw a newborn baby 
into the garbage? How can you 
stuff toilet paper down your 
baby's throat or hold your hand 
over his mouth until he dies from 
suffocation? If a person does not 
want his/her baby, for god's sake, 
give it to a hospital, the police, a 
friend - anyone! If a teenage girl 
doesn't want her parents to find 
out she is pregnant and is able to 
hide the pregnancy for nine 
months, why would she rather 
kill the baby at birth than drop it 
off at the police station or the 
hospital? These girls have got to ' 
realize that killing their babies is 
not the only way out - it is the 
stupid way out 

We have all heard about the girl 
at the prom who had her baby in 



a restroom stall, strangled it and 
threw it in the garbage. After this 
she went out on the dance floor 
and partied the night away. 
These psychopathic acts occur all 
the time. 

The punishments for neonati- 
cide and child molestation and 
rape are nowhere near tough 
enough. Although the leniency 
in neonaticide cases is slowly 
coming to an end, the leniency in 
child molestation cases is ongo- 
ing. I do not believe child moles- 
ters are en tided to anything. 
Why should taxpayers pay for 
these vile people to supposedly 
get help when they just do it all 
over again. It is a never ending 
cycle. Something must be done. 
Child molesters do not deserve to 
live when they make other peo- 
ple's lives hell forever. 
• The author is a senior 
Marketing major. 



NEWS 



Life After Colleg e 



Records show high job placement 



Ccllege Campus News 




The Career Service Department tallies stats on graduates. 

Services, 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 

A survey conducted by Clarion 
University's Career Services 
determined that 95 percent of the 
students who graduated during 
the years of 1995-96 are either 
employed, or involved in further 
education. 

This percentage, concluded 
from the graduates themselves, is 
identical to the one tallied in 
1994-95. 

Of the 1,136 graduates in 1995- 
96, 683 prior Clarion students 
responded to the written survey, 
and telephone follow up. 

Of these graduates, 65 percent 
of the respondents are full time 
employees, and another 10 per- 
cent are involved in further edu- 
cation. 

The categories of post-gradua- 
tion activities established for the 
survey included continued educa- 
tion, and employment either full 
or part time in career fields of 
their choosing, or in other fields. 
Of the graduates from the 
1995-96 years, 417 wre men, and 
719 were women. According to 
those who responded to the sur- 
vey 66.9 percent were employed 
in career fields of their choice, 
either full or part time; 14.1 per- 
cent were employed full time in 
another field; and 9.5 percent 
were involved in continuing their 
education; .6 percent were not 
involved or seeking employment, 
and .1 percent had entered the 
military service. 

The director of Career 



Connie Laughlin 
explained that she was pleased 
with the figures collected and 
compiled by her office, which 
reflects the statistics of activiities 
of Clarion graduates. 

During 1995-96, the Venango 
Campus graduates responded 
with a 77.5% employment rate in 
the field of their choice, either 
full or part time; 12.3 percent 
were employed in another field, 
full or part time; 6. 1 percent were 
involved in continuing their edu- 
cation, and 4.1 were in the 
process of seeking employment 
Of the Master's Degree recipi- 
ents, 77.6 percent of those who 
responded to the survey were 
employed in the field of their 
choice full time, and 8.4 percent 
were employed part time; 5.6 
percent were employed in anoth- 
er field full time, and 2.8 percent 
were employed part time. Of 
those not employed, .9 percent 
were continuing their education, 
3.7percent were seeking employ- 
ment, and .9 percent were not. 

The report containing the statis- 
tics of the post-graduate activities 
of Clarion University graduates, 
is the eleventh one to be generat- 
ed. 

The report has many areas for 
usage. 

Connie Laughlin said, "We 
hope our annual report is used 
with students. 

All departments receive a copy 
and we urge them to share it with 
their students. 

It shows the entry level and 
advanced positions achieved by 
our graduates, the employers hir- 

ct (did led 'jtb.'] .?d* acnq sdj i£ 



Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

ing them and the salaries they are 
receiving. 

In addition, the information 
may be used by a perspective col- 
lege student and their parents in 
making educational and career 
decisions." 

This report enables faculty and 
administrators to receive infor- 
mation from Career Services, 
showing the post-graduate activi- 
ties of previous students. 

Along with this annual survey 
report, Clarion's Career Services 
provides many other means to 
help students in their post-gradu- 
ation futures. 

A few of the many other aids 
available include: a career 
library, job fairs, mock inter- 
views, on-campus interviews, job 
listings, information on graduate 
schools, and a resume lab. 

Laughlin replies, "It is impor- 
tant for students to take advan- 
tage of our services to insure 
progress toward their career 
goals. It is equally important for 
them to use their college experi- 
ence to develop the qualifications 
employers want. Doing well aca- 
demically, participating in cvam- 
pus and community activities, 
and taking on leadership roles is 
important So is some kind of 
experience through a co-op, field 
training or internship. 
Communication skills, both writ- 
ten and oral are vital." 

Career Services offers a variety 
of ways to aid the perspective 
graduate in both future employ- 
ment and further schooling. For 
info call Career Services. 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



The Daily Cal-ripped off AGAIN! 

At the University of California-Berkeley, thousands of copies of the 
student newspaper was stolen from the newsracks — again. 

The Oct 16 theft of nearly 7,000 copies of the Daily Californian 
marked the seventh such incident in lesss than a year. The paper's 
editors say they believe the most recent theft and others were 
prompted by the publication of opinion pieces against affirmative 
action. 

"It is hugely ironic that the campus that gave birth to the Free 
Speech Movement 30 years ago is now in danger of coming full cir- 
cle and squelching true political discourse on campus," said Ryan 
Tate, the paper's editor-in-chief, in a Daily Cal article. "I am hopeful 
we can prevent that from happening." 

The most recent opinion piece criticized a small but militant group 
on campus, the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action By Any 
Means Necessary. 

The group has publicly denied having anything to do with the 
thefts, although coalition leader Tania Kappner told the San 
Francisco Chronicle that she would like the Daily Cal to "print pro- 
affirmative action pieces as well." 

The thefts started last November, when 4,000 copies were stolen on 
the Daily Cal endorsed Proposition 209, the measure banning affir- 
mative action in public university admissions. 

In a statement published in the Daily Cal, Berkeley chancellor 
Robert Berdahl said he was "deeply troubled" by the theft. 

The University of California at Berkeley is committed to free 
speech and supports the expression of diverse viewpoints," he said. 
"The university will not tolerate suppression of views expressed in 
The Daily Californian or any other campus publication." 

Campus police are investigating the incident Daily Cal editors 
estimate the papers were worth $4,200 in lost advertising revenue 
and printing costs. 

For love or money??? 

If you want to live comfortably in your old age, a good strategy 
may be to marry-for love and for money. 

Married people tend to have more financial assets than divorced or 
never married persons when they reach retirement age, according to a 
new Purdue University study. 

"Marriage has a lot to do with wealth accumulation," says Janet 
Wilmoth, assistant professor of sociology at Purdue. "Getting and 
staying married appears to provide institutional benefits that greatly 
impact long-term economic well being." 

The study was based on a national survey of more than 7,000 
households that included at least one preretirement person age 51 to 
61. 

"In later life, people who had never married had only 14 percent of 
financial assets that married people had accumulated. 

Divorced people who did not marry had 15 percent, Wilmoth said. 

Wilmoth says some of the financial benefits of marriage include 
home ownership, insurance coverage for spouses, survivor pension 
benefits, and an increased rate of savings. 

Courtesy of College Press 






October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 4 



Hide Park continued from page 2L. 



their mothers. When asked why 
the sample did not include ethnic 
minorities, the researcher 
responded, "Well, I guess I'll 
have to study minorities soon 
because of the new federal guide- 
lines." This seemed an especial- 
ly thoughtless answer to me 
because I conducted research in 
and near Jackson Hospital, the 
teaching hospital for the 
University of Miami, where this 
researcher had obtained the sam- 
ple. That hospital serves many 
different ethnic and racial 
groups: Haitians, Cuban- 
Americans, Nicaraguans, 
African-Americans, both 
American born and immigrant 
groups. One would have to work 
hard to obtain a sample of only 
white, middle-class infants and 
their mothers from that popula- 
tion. 

More recently over the last few 
years, cross-cultural research has 
increased and some textbooks 
give more than lip service to the 
importance of studying more rep- 
resentative samples of people. 
Those who applaud this move 
believe it is necessary to study all 
segments of the population in 
order to uncover both similarities 
and differences. Not only is it 
interesting to find that African- 
American and Latino teenagers 
are less likely to have peers who 
encourage academic excellence 
than are Anglo teenagers, it is as 
interesting to find out that 
African-American, Latino, and 
Anglo-American parents encour- 
age academic excellence in their 
teenagers to the same degree. 
Studying only Anglo-American 
teenagers and their parents would 
preclude our even having that 
knowledge. And if we ignored 
parenting style and child out- 
comes in other cultures, we 
would remain convinced (and, of 
course, many of us remain so) 
that the fact that children sleep in 
the same bed with their parents is 
either a sure sign of poverty or 

one of incest It is neither, by 

the way. 

Liberals, the "Left," radicals, 
those who advocate more inclu- 
siveness in the classroom, do so 
because they want to increase 
sensitivity toward other ethnic 
groups among majority students 
or to increase pride in one's own 
ethnic group among minority stu- 
dents. These reasons, however, 
lie outside the central functions 
of my job as an educator, and 
they leave no doubt that political 
correctness will definitely play a 
role in my classroom. My job is 
to inform and to help develop 
critical thinking skills, and 



although I should be careful not 
to insult my students and 
LOWER their self-esteem by 
humiliating them in the class- 
room because they belong to an 
ethnic minority group or because 
they ask a "stupid question", my 
job is not to make them feel good 
just because they are in my class- 
room. That could be easily 
achieved by giving them only 
flattery and no criticism, and by 
granting As to all my students 
(but we won't go there...). 

I have also heard it argued by 
advocates of multiculturalism 
that only members of an ethnic 
group can truly teach about that 
ethnic group or conduct research 
with that ethnic group. In fact, 
two years ago, I wrote an essay 
for the National Education 
Association on whether only 
members of a particular ethnic 
group could study that ethnic 
group. The researcher who wrote 
the opposing viewpoint said that 
as a Native American, she was 
received more warmly by her 
Native American research partic- 
ipants and that they probably told 
her things they would not have 
told an "outsider." Does this dis- 
qualify her from conducting 
research with Anglo-Americans? 
She did not address this point. In 
fact, others argue that as a mem- 
ber of that group she would be 
too personally involved and too 
likely to be a biased, rather than 
an objective, observer. This is an 
ongoing debate in sociology and 
anthropology as well. 

As an educator, I believe in edu- 
cation ! Researchers who conduct 
research with ethnic minority 
groups (something that multicul- 
tural groups would heartily 
encourage!) must surely learn 
about that group's language and 
culture to establish rapport with 
participants and to know what to 
study and how to study it. But 
this can be learned! I certainly 
haven't heard multicultural advo- 
cates argue that African- 
American psychologists are 
unqualified to study Anglo- 
American children, college stu- 
dents or older adults! But I have 
heard of opposition to the teach- 
ing of "ethnic courses" by Anglo 
faculty. "She could not possibly 
teach Black Studies - she is 
white! and I don't care that she 
has a PhD. and has published 50 
articles in that area!" Whatever 
happened to the function of edu- 
cation? If I were an Anglo- 
American faculty member, I 
would take that as a decree to 
NOT infuse my own classes with 
multicultural data and issues. 
Education is the key! We can 



learn! Of course, it's not the 
same as living as a member of an 
ethnic minority group, but I also 
don't believe I can't talk about 
divorce and its effects on chil- 
dren because I am not divorced. 
Experience is important, and it 
does enrich our lives, but books 
and science also enrich our lives 
and our understanding of human 
behavior and human culture. 

One danger of political correct- 
ness is that instead of changing 
the world to rid it of racism and 
ethnocentrism by changing 
minds and hearts, it might intro- 
duce our students to a world of 
make believe, a world we would 
like to imagine but one that does 
not exist. Racism still lives out 
there in the real world. Are we 
giving our students, minority and 
majority students, a false sense of 
security? 

Conservatives, those of the 
Right, traditionalists, argue that 
multiculturalism is merely an 
attempt by do-gooders to create a 
classroom which is a feel-good 
place for all students who are 
also ethnic minority members. 
They also argue that multicultur- 
alsim is a barely disguised 
attempt to make students feel 
guilty about past injustices and 
thus want to make amends for 
those injustices. Critics of politi- 
cal correctness argue that, to be 
inclusive, one must ignore the 
great works and contributions of 
the masters in literature, history 
or psychology which are the real 
roots of our progress in these 
areas. When as a professor I 
introduce multiculturalism into 
my classroom, I may be doing so 
by making a political statement, 
whether it is clearly presented as 
such to the students or not, or 
whether I am even aware of it or 
not Not everyone includes mul- 
ticultural data, much less infuses 
their curriculum. Those who do 
are a minority who are likely to 
also introduce more liberal ideas 
about their subject matter, human 
behavior, or any other. Thus, 
critics of PC argue that the agen- 
da becomes political, rather than 
educational, but without any 
warning label for students! 
Students, of course, are fore- 
warned when they enroll in 
courses like "Cross-Cultural 
Psychology." But those on the 
Right would argue that these 
courses work to divide racial and 
ethnic groups by pointing to our 
differences instead of our simi- 
larities. 

• Part two of "Multiculturalism in 

My Classroom: Political 

Correctnees?" will run in the 

November 6. 1997 Call. 




Attention 




\vww«compu!ink.co.uk/~arc/beerpage.htmI 

Da you drink too much? 
This is an interactive self-test of your alcohol consump- 
tion. There are also a variety of links to other cool beer 
sites. 

www.nbccom/tvcentral/shows/daysofourlives/ 

If you're a big "Days" fan or your just in love with 
Marlena check out the updating and informative site 
about the hit soap, Days of Our Lives! 

www.theDerrickxom/topstories»asp 

For all the local news online, including Clarion's top sto- 
ries, look up Hie Derrick online; This site is updated 
daily with all of the latebreaking events. 



The Clarion Call will publish website submissions from stu- 
dents, faculty, staff, and the community. If you know of a great 
site that you would like to share with our readers submit the 
complete address, and a brief description to our office in room 
270 Geanmell Student Center or e-mail us at Call @maU. Claris 
on.edu. We will log onto all the sites submitted to verify thai 
they are legit and in somewhat good taste. 



Page 5 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



Editorial continued 



before and let go each time. 

The other topic that I cannot tol- 
erate is neonaticide. How can 
you kill your own baby? How 
can you throw a newborn baby 
into the garbage? How can you 
stuff toilet paper down your 
baby's throat or hold your hand 
over his mouth until he dies from 
suffocation? If a person does not 
want his/her baby, for god's sake, 
give it to a hospital, the police, a 
friend - anyone! If a teenage girl 
doesn't want her parents to find 
out she is pregnant and is able to 
hide the pregnancy for nine 
months, why would she rather 
kill the baby at birth than drop it 
off at the police station or the 
hospital? These girls have got to ' 
realize that killing their babies is 
not the only way out - it is the 
stupid way out. 

We have all heard about the girl 
at the prom who had her baby in 



a restroom stall, strangled it and 
threw it in the garbage. After this 
she went out on the dance floor 
and parried the night away. 
These psychopathic acts occur all 
the time. 

The punishments for neonati- 
cide and child molestation and 
rape are nowhere near tough 
enough. Although the leniency 
in neonaticide cases is slowly 
coming to an end, the leniency in 
child molestation cases is ongo- 
ing. I do not believe child moles- 
ters are entitled to anything. 
Why should taxpayers pay for 
these vile people to supposedly 
get help when they just do it all 
over again. It is a never ending 
cycle. Something must be done. 
Child molesters do not deserve to 
live when they make other peo- 
ple's lives hell forever. 
• The author is a senior 
Marketing major. 



NEWS 



Life After Colleg e 



Records show high job placement 



College Campus News 




The Career Service Department tallies stats on graduates. 

Services, 



by Shana Stowitzky 
Assistant News Editor 

A survey conducted by Clarion 
University's Career Services 
determined that 95 percent of the 
students who graduated during 
the years of 1995-96 are either 
employed, or involved in further 
education. 

This percentage, concluded 
from the graduates themselves, is 
identical to the one tallied in 
1994-95. 

Of the 1,136 graduates in 1995- 
96, 683 prior Clarion students 
responded to the written survey, 
and telephone follow up. 

Of these graduates, 65 percent 
of the respondents are full time 
employees, and another 10 per- 
cent are involved in further edu- 
cation. 

The categories of post-gradua- 
tion activities established for the 
survey included continued educa- 
tion, and employment either full 
or part time in career fields of 
their choosing, or in other fields. 
Of the graduates from the 
1995-96 years, 417 wre men, and 
719 were women. According to 
those who responded to the sur- 
vey 66.9 percent were employed 
in career fields of their choice, 
either full or part time; 14. 1 per- 
cent were employed full time in 
another field; and 9.5 percent 
were involved in continuing their 
education; .6 percent were not 
involved or seeking employment, 
and .1 percent had entered the 
military service. 

The director of Career 






Connie Laughlin 
explained that she was pleased 
with the figures collected and 
compiled by her office, which 
reflects the statistics of activities 
of Clarion graduates. 

During 1995-96, the Venango 
Campus graduates responded 
with a 77.5% employment rate in 
the field of their choice, either 
full or part time; 12.3 percent 
were employed in another field, 
full or part time; 6. 1 percent were 
involved in continuing their edu- 
cation, and 4.1 were in the 
process of seeking employment. 
Of the Master's Degree recipi- 
ents, 77.6 percent of those who 
responded to the survey were 
employed in the field of their 
choice full time, and 8.4 percent 
were employed part time; 5.6 
percent were employed in anoth- 
er field full time, and 2.8 percent 
were employed part time. Of 
those not employed, .9 percent 
were continuing their education, 
3.7percent were seeking employ- 
ment, and .9 percent were not. 

The report containing the statis- 
tics of the post-graduate activities 
of Clarion University graduates, 
is the eleventh one to be generat- 
ed. 

The report has many areas for 
usage. 

Connie Laughlin said, "We 
hope our annual report is used 
with students. 

All departments receive a copy 
and we urge them to share it with 
their students. 

It shows the entry level and 
advanced positions achieved by 
our graduates, the employers hir- 

iii tela* \ti. 'j-j>. i?d* /!.'.. a 



Tim Emanuel/Clarion Call 

ing them and the salaries they are 
receiving. 

In addition, the information 
may be used by a perspective col- 
lege student and their parents in 
making educational and career 
decisions." 

This report enables faculty and 
administrators to receive infor- 
mation from Career Services, 
showing the post-graduate activi- 
ties of previous students. 

Along with this annual survey 
report, Clarion's Career Services 
provides many other means to 
help students in their post-gradu- 
ation futures. 

A few of the many other aids 
available include: a career 
library, job fairs, mock inter- 
views, on-campus interviews, job 
listings, information on graduate 
schools, and a resume lab. 

Laughlin replies, "It is impor- 
tant for students to take advan- 
tage of our services to insure 
progress toward their career 
goals. It is equally important for 
them to use their college experi- 
ence to develop the qualifications 
employers want. Doing well aca- 
demically, participating in cvam- 
pus and community activities, 
and taking on leadership roles is 
important. So is some kind of 
experience through a co-op, field 
training or internship. 
Communication skills, both writ- 
ten and oral are vital." 

Career Services offers a variety 
of ways to aid the perspective 
graduate in both future employ- 
ment and further schooling. For 
info call Career Services. 



What's going 
on in the rest 
of the nation? 



The Daily Cal-ripped off AGAIN! 

At the University of California-Berkeley, thousands of copies of the 
student newspaper was stolen from the newsracks — again. 

The Oct. 16 theft of nearly 7,000 copies of the Daily Califomian 
marked the seventh such incident in lesss than a year. The paper's 
editors say they believe the most recent theft and others were 
prompted by the publication of opinion pieces against affirmative 
action. 

"It is hugely ironic that the campus that gave birth to the Free 
Speech Movement 30 years ago is now in danger of coming full cir- 
cle and squelching true political discourse on campus," said Ryan 
Tate, the paper's editor-in-chief, in a Daily Cal article. "I am hopeful 
we can prevent that from happening." 

The most recent opinion piece criticized a small but militant group 
on campus, the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action By Any 
Means Necessary. 

The group has publicly denied having anything to do with the 
thefts, although coalition leader Tania Kappner told the San 
Francisco Chronicle that she would like the Daily Cal to "print pro- 
affirmative action pieces as well." 

The thefts started last November, when 4,000 copies were stolen on 
the Daily Cal endorsed Proposition 209, the measure banning affir- 
mative action in public university admissions. 

In a statement published in the Daily Cal, Berkeley chancellor 
Robert Berdahl said he was "deeply troubled" by the theft. 

"The University of California at Berkeley is committed to free 
speech and supports the expression of diverse viewpoints," he said. 
The university will not tolerate suppression of views expressed in 
The Daily Califomian or any other campus publication." 

Campus police are investigating the incident Daily Cal editors 
estimate the papers were worth $4,200 in lost advertising revenue 
and printing costs. 

For love or money??? 

If you want to live comfortably in your old age, a good strategy 
may be to marry~for love and for money. 

Married people tend to have more financial assets than divorced or 
never married persons when they reach retirement age, according to a 
new Purdue University study. 

"Marriage has a lot to do with wealth accumulation," says Janet 
Wilmoth, assistant professor of sociology at Purdue. "Getting and 
staying married appears to provide institutional benefits that greatly 
impact long-term economic well being." 

The study was based on a national survey of more than 7,000 
households that included at least one preretirement person age 51 to 
61. 

"In later life, people who had never married had only 14 percent of 
financial assets that married people had accumulated. 

Divorced people who did not marry had 15 percent, Wilmoth said. 

Wilmoth says some of the financial benefits of marriage include 
home ownership, insurance coverage for spouses, survivor pension 
benefits, and an increased rate of savings. 

Courtesy of College Press 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 6 



SSHE keeps taxes at a standstill 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Assistant News Editor 

Students enrolled in all 14 State 
System of Higher Education 
schools will not see a tuition 
increase in the 1998-99 academic 
year, after an appropriation 
request that included a zero per- 
cent tuition increase was 
approved recently by The Board 
of Governors for the SSHE. "For 
many years, too much of the bur- 
den of support for our institutions 
has been placed on the backs of 
students." Board Chairman F. 
Eugene Dixon, Jr, said, "This 
trend is jeopardizing our mission 
of providing access to higher 
education and our ability to offer 
workforce development for the 
state. 

According to State System 
Chancellor James H. 
McCormick, "The Board of 
Governors is taking a bold step in 
proposing a zero percent tuition 
increase." He added, "With the 
help of the governor and state 
legislature, the system will be 
able to hold the line on the spiral- 
ing cost of higher education and 
put a college degree within reach 
of many more students." 

Clarion University students 
have voiced their opinions on the 
subject. "It (the zero percent 
tuition increase) is excellent for 
me because I pay for my tuition 
from my own pocket," said Paul 
Dyer, a freshman at CU. "It is 
about time that the system 
stepped in to keep tuition at a 
consistent rate." 

Also holdingfirm here at 
Clarion as a result of the approval 
of the appropriation request wil 



be the Instructional Support Fee, 
which is a percentage of tuition. 
Another fee that will not see an 
increase will be the Gemmell 
Student Center Fee, which is also 
calculated by a percentage of the 
tuition rate. 

The State System projects a fis- 
cal year 1998-99 educational and 
generally budgetary need of 
$882.9 million, or a 3.9 percent 
over last year's budget. Out of 
this total, the SSHE is requesting 
a state appropriation of $435 mil- 
lion, a $30.3 million increase, or 
7.5 percent more over the 1997- 
98 fiscal year. 

The Board of Governors also 
approved several special purpose 
appropriations requests, the first 
of which is $1.5 million to sup- 
port continued implementation of 
"Excellence and Equity", the 
SSHE's multi-year social equity 
plan. Another $4 million was 
appropriated for a special pro- 
jects appropriation grant pro- 
gram, which will award grants 
for projects that support the 
strategic goals and initiatives of 
the State System through improv- 
ing access, enrollment, student 
learning, and institutional pro- 
ductivity. 

$1.25 million was appropriated 
for the Pennsylvania Academy 
for the Profession of Teaching. 
This academy will convene 
regional K-16 discussions of 
standards and assessments, and 
work with the System, other uni- 
versities, and schools throughout 
the Commonwealth to initiate 
needed changes in professional 
programs and to insure high qual- 
ity, rigorous teacher preparation 
programs. 



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"The Board of 
Governors is tak- 
ing a bold step in 
proposing a zero 
percent tuition 
increase. " 

-James McCormick 
Chancellor of SSHE 



The final special purpose 
appropriation was $7 million for 
the William Penn Scholars 
Program. This is a $21 million 
merit-based scholarship endow- 
ment program that will encour- 
age the state's brightest academic 
achievers to pursue higher educa- 
tion at one of Pennsylvania's 14 
public universities through 
$1,000 scholarships. These 
scholars will be asked to work in 
the Commonwealth for at least 2 
years after graduation. This pro- 
gram will be a 2 to 1 match, 
where the state funds $7 million, 
with the other $14 million com- 
ing from private funds. 

There are more than $94,000 
students enrolled at SSHE insti- 
tutions, more than 90 percent of 
whom are Pennsylvania resi- 
dents. The State System was cre- 
ated on July 1, 1983, and there 
are 14 state-owned schools 
including California, Clarion, 
Edinboro, Indiana, and Slippery 
Rock Universities of 

Pennsylvania. 



ATTENTION COMMU- 
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DON'T FORGET TO 

FULFILL YOUR CO- 

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AVAILABLE SUCH AS: 

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AND MANY 
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The following is a brief synopsis 
of the criminal investigations 

conducted by Public Safety for 
the dates between October 22 

until October 27. The Blotter is 

compiled by The Public Safety 
Office and The Clarion Call. 



* On October 22, 1997, unkown actors activated the fire alarm sys- 
tem at Campbell Hall by damaging the system. The incident is under 
investigation. 

* An unknown person pulled the fire alarm on the second floor of 
Wilkinson Hall on October 22, 1997. 

*On October 24, Brian Smith, a university student was found uncon- 
scious in the grassy area next to the service road into Parking Lot E 
of the university. A citation was issued for public drunkeness. 

♦Kyle Holbrook, a student, will be charged with theft of services and 
disorderly conduct after refusing to pay for his meal at the Gemmell 
Snack Bar. He was also loud and used obscene language, on October 
27. 

♦On October 27, James Gates was found guilty on a disorderly con- 
duct charge and will pay a fme of $222.27. 

♦On October 27, a male student reported damage to his car in 
Parking Lot W. 



by Angie Binick 
Assistant News Editor 



Health Beat 



STDs: A growing attraction 



This is the third and final part of Healthbeat's STDs: A growing 
attraction. 

Diagnosis for these common STDs is rather simple: a Gonorrhea test 
involves a bacterial culture of either the urethra, vagina or unusual dis- 
charge itself; a Chlamydia test involves either a bacteria culture or a 
urine test (males only); a Syphilis test involves either a blood test or a 
bacterial culture of sores; a Herpes test involves a viral culture of 
sores; and an HIV test involves a blood test. Although Gonorrhea, 
Chlamydia, and Syphilis can usually be cured with antibiotics, no cure 
exists for Herpes or HIV, although drugs such as acyclovir (for Herpes) 
and AZT (for HIV) can ease symptoms and inhibit viral progress. 

After being diagnosed with an STD of any kind, many individuals 
react negatively and face great emotional distress, making it important 
to treat sufferers with compassion. Dr. Janet Grigsby, who has dealt 
with considerable victims of STDs at Student Counseling Services, 
commented that the knowledge of infection often brings about "guilt, 
feeling ashamed, withdrawal from friends. I saw a quote this weekend: 
It's not as important what disease a person has as what kind of person 
has the disease. People start to label themselves as a disease, rather 
than individuals." 

If you or anyone you know suspects an STD infection, it is crucial 
to see a health care professional to be tested so that the disease (if it is 
indeed an STD) can be properly identified and treated. Of course, pre 
vention is the key to fighting the 1 onslaught of STDs, so safe sex mea 
sures such as the use of a condom can help prevent the spread of these 
diseases. For more information about STDs and prevention, contact 
the Keeling Student Health Center at 226-2121. 






Page 7 



Student 




Senate 



by Michael Chapaloney, Student Senate Reporter 

The Clarion University Debate Team can now make plans to attend 
the World University Debate Championships after the Monday, 
October 27 Student Senate Meeting. Senate allocated $4,136.00 from 
the Supplemental Reserve Account for the Championships, which are 
held in Athens, Greece. Clarion University's Debate Team is ranked 
7th in the nation and this is the second straight year that they have been 
invited to the competition. 

Last year, Senate denied the team funding because their allocation 
request included expenses for their advisor, Dr. Anand Rao. The 
1996797 Student Senate ruled that money from 
the Student Activity Fee shouldn't supply funds to a faculty member. 
This year, Dr. Rao received a grant from the College of Arts and 
Sciences for $700, which will pay for most of his expenses. 

Chuck Morris, president of the Debate Team, noted that 250 to 300 
teams from more than 30 countries would be participating in the 
Championships. He went on to express, "Let the world know that 
Clarion is world class." Four student debaters and Rao will compete in 
Athens from December 20 until January 5. 

One other allocation ws made to the Leadership Institute from the 
Supplemental Account. Forty-six Clarion Students attended the 
Million Woman March in Philadelphia and $1,000 was removed from 
the Black Student Union Account to pay for the trip. The Leadership 
Institute requested the allocation to replenesh the BSU account. 

Several concerns at the Sequelle were expressed by the editor in 
chief, Courtney Spangler. She explained that the reason for the delay 
in publishing last year's book was the resignation of the previous edi 
tor in chief three weeks before the close of the Spring semester. A 
sports section will not be included in the book due to a lack of pictures 
and poor quality in those that were taken. Spangler also reported that 
only six students made an appointment for senior pictures and that 
another date and time had to be established. 

CS A Board of Directors chairman Michael Chapaloney reported that 
the CS A decided not to submit a bid for the library copier program to 
become an operation of the CS A, but the Board felt that he proposed 
program would be to costly and demanding for the CSA to operate 
Especially since the University is demanding that the price for copies 
must not exceed ten cents and a percentage of the profits must be 
awarded back to the University. 

The CSA audit findings were also discussed. Chapaloney announced 
that an ad hoc committee is in place to review the CSA office. The 
Board of Directors is also currently working on reviewing proposals 
which were developed to correct the negative findings. 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



ewe. a 



SVO O KY 



Hall 



oweeiv 



Love, Tl\c Call Staf 



Galbreath recieves CU award 



by Donna Engle 
News Writer 



Dave Galbreath, a computer 
operator for The Center of 
Computing Services on campus 
was recently honored with an 
innovative award called "Making 
Life Better at Clarion 
University". 

Galbreath is the main trou- 
bleshooter for computer support 
on campus. A Lucinda resident 
and Clarion employee of four 
years, he was nominated for his 
relentless assistance to students 
and faculty throughout campus. 
Prior to working on campus, he 
was a UNISYS field engineer for 
23 years. 

Galbreath said, "I was really 
surprised," Galbreath said of his 
honor. "I appreciate it and I was 
really grateful to get it" 

The Making Life Better at 
Clarion University is a monthly 
award recognizing employees 
who "go the extra mile" to make 
students lives easier. 
Anyone wishing to nominate an 




University Relations 
President Reinhard presents award to Mr. Galbreath. 



employer for a Making Life 
Better at Clarion University 
Award shuld e-mail the office of 
University Relations at the 
Alumni House 

(u.relations @mail .clarion.edu) . 
All nominations need to include 
the nominee's name, department 
of area employment, and what 



the nominator feels that the nom- 
inee has done to improve the 
lives of Clarion Students. 
Suggestions are welcome from 
all, and nominees are chosen by a 
table comprised of faculty and 
staff, students, and Clarion alum- 
ni. 



Clarion remains a financial aid affiliate 



by JaneUe Donoghue 
News Writer 

Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania is now in the clear 
for financial aid until the year 
2001. Though many students 
may have not given this a 
thought, exactly what would hap- 
pen if Clarion University was no 
longer involved in the federal 
financial aid program? 
According to Ken Grugel: 

"Clarion would not be permit- 
ted to certify Stafford loans. This 



would leave 3,100 out of 5,800 
that would not be able to finance 
their schooling." 

However, now that Clarion has 
reobtained certification stan- 
dards, the average student has the 
benefit of participating in all cur- 
rent programs. "This includes 
low default rates on federal 



loans," said Grugel. The college 
now has no worries about distrib- 
uting the 1.3 million in academic 
and the 375,000 in athletic schol- 
arships each year. The university 
financial aid office administra- 
tors over twenty-five million dol- 
lars each year to an excess of 
75% of Clarion students. 



If you 
would like 

to be a 
staff mem- 
ber of The 

Call, 
please let 
us know at 

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October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 8 



If you have any 

news story ideas* 

Please contact The 

Clarion Call office at 

226-2380 or email 

us at: Call. 

************** 



Attention all SCJ members... 
There will be a manditory SCJ meeting on 

Tuesday. November 1 1 at 3:30 in G-72 
concerning the banquet and Student Press 
Day. All members as well as potential 
members. Please R.S.V.P. about the 
Banquet A.S.A.P. [f you have any ques- 
tions. Please contact Kristen at 227-2510. 




TAKE TECHNOLOGYiTOiTHEINIH/ROWERJ 




When something is too extreme for words, it's to the Nth degree. 
And that's the level of technology you'll experience at Raytheon. 

Raytheon has formed a new technological superpower -together, 
Raytheon Electronic Systems, Raytheon E-Systems and Raytheon 
Tl Systems are driving technology to the limit. And we're looking 
for engineers who want to push the envelope. Break new 
ground. Make their mark. 

At Raytheon you'll take technology - and your career - to 
the highest possible level. You'll take it to the Nth. We'll be 
visiting your campus soon. Contact your career placement office 
now to schedule an interview, or check out our website at 
www.rayjobs.com. 



WE'LL BE ON YOUR CAMPUS ON NOVEMBER 18, 1997. 

CONTACT YOUR CAREER PLACEMENT OFFICE TODAY TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW. 

Internet: www.rayjobs.com • E-mail: resume@rayjobs.com 

U.S. citizenship may be required. We are an equal opportunity employer. 



Raytheon 

Expect great things 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



LIFESTYLE^ 



Halloween Websites Scare Up Browsers 



by Colleen De liaise 
College Press Service 

Talk about scary. 

Halloween is almost here, and 
what frightens you most is 
whether you'll find a costume 
that won't cost big bucks or isn't 
so complicated it'll prevent you 
from going to the bathroom the 
entire night 

Or maybe what's keeping you 
awake these nights is the thought 
of throwing a Halloween party so 
dull that your guests act like 



zombies — out of sheer bore- 
dom. 

Never fear. There are plenty of 
websites out there this season 
that can offer last minute inspira- 
tion for those spooked by the 
social pressures of Halloween. 
By spending a few minutes 
online, you can research the best 
fright flicks, get costume ideas, 
even find recipes for ghoulish 
party appetizers. 

No parties to go to? Then con- 
sider taking part in an online 
seance (www.microserve.net/ 
-magicusa/halloween.html). 



Organizers say it's an attempt to 
call back the spirit of magician 
Harry Houdini, who died on 
Halloween in 1926. 

"The Houdini Halloween 
Seance has been a tradition for 
the past 71 years since the great 
magician's untimely death and 
has now moved to cyberspace," 
the site noted. 

But organizers admit they 
aren't expecting too much. Even 
Houdini's wife, who first started 
the seance tradition, called them 
off 10 years after his death when 
they didn't produce any astound- 



f- 



13 Hatiowun Safety lips 
from $gd Cross 

•Walk, slither and sneak on sidewalks; 

not in the street. 

•Look both ways before crossing the street to check 

for cars, trucks and low-flying brooms. 

•Cross the street only at corners. 

•Don't hide or cross the street between parked cars. 

•Wear light-colored or reflective-type clothing, so 

you are more visible (Remember to put reflective 

tape on bikes, skateboards and brooms, too!) 

•Plan your route and share it with your family. If 

possible, have an adult go with you. 

•Carry a flashlight to light your way. 

•Keep away from open fires and candles. 

(Costumes can be extremely flammable.) 

•Visit homes that have the porch light on. 

•Accept your treats at the door and 

never go into a stranger's house. 

•Use face paint rather than masks or 

things that will cover your eyes. 

•Be cautious of animals and strangers. 

•Have a grown-up inspect your treats before eating. 

And don't eat candy if the package 

is already opened. 



)Uk\\ 




ing results. 

Still, "e-mail us with any results 
and lack of results," they said. 
"No kooks please, this is a seri- 
ous test and tribute." 

If contact with lost souls in the 
netherworld isn't your thing, then 
check out a listing of nearly 
every horror movie ever made 
(la.yahoo.com./Showbiz/Film/ 
Movie_Websitesnitles/Horror/). 

The site provides links to movie 
homepages, such as "Halloween 
"97 Celebration: The Homepage 
of Michael Myers" 

(www.ipass.net/~halloween/), 
which bills itself as "a website 
dedicated to the most terrifying 
film series ever — Halloween." 



The site is named after Michael 
Myers, the series' evil villain 
who escapes from a sanitarium 
and stalks young girls, including 
the character played by Jamie 
Lee Curtis. If you've never seen 
the Halloween movies, there's 
quite possible enough pictures on 
the site to save you a trip to the 
video store. 

In the spirit of the holiday, the 
Ghost Web (www.aone.com/ 
~starwest/) offers tips for ghost 
hunting and answers a host of 
frequently asked questions, such 
as "What do ghosts look like?" 

Continued on page 11 



Where In Clarion? 




& *€** 



4 










If Only I Had a Brain 

Where is this Clarion landmark? Last week's "Where In 
Clarion?" was the telephone booth without a telephone 
in front of the 800 Center. 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 10 



_ 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



The Flying Checkbook by Dave Barry 



I have some news that is going 
to cause you taxpayers to want to 
throw down this newspaper and 
dance the Funky Chicken of Joy. 

Here it is: The B-2 "Stealth" 
Bomber can get wet! Hurrah! 

In case you're wondering why 
this is so exciting, let me give 
you some background. The B-2 
is... 

SECURITY ALERT: THE 
FOLLOWING IS TOP SECRET 
INFORMATION THAT MUST 
NOT FALL INTO THE HANDS 
OF FOREIGN AGENTS 
UNLESS THEY HAVE MADE 
LARGE ILLEGAL CASH CON- 
TRIBUTIONS TO A LEADING 
POLITICAL PARTY. THANK 
YOU. 

...a bomber that is invisible to 
enemy radar because it is made 
of high-tech "stealthy" materials, 
such as (to judge from the price) 
caviar. The original mission of 
the B-2 was to fly from overseas 
bases deep into the Soviet Union 
and drop nuclear bombs. Of 
course there IS no Soviet Union 
anymore, which means that now 
the mission of the B-2 Bomber 
is... The mission is... Hang on, 
it'll come to me... 



OK, never mind the pesky 
detail of what the military mis- 
sion is. The important thing is, 
the B-2 has demonstrated a 
breathtaking capability, 

unmatched in aviation history, to 
deliver, with pinpoint accuracy, 
extremely large payloads of tax- 
payer dollars into the districts of 
strategic members of Congress. 

So far the B-2 project has cost 
us taxpayers $45 billion, which 
has purchased us 21 bombers, 
which works out to around $2 
billion per bomber. That makes it 
the most expensive airplane ever 
built (bear in mind, however, that 
it does come with nice floor 
mats). 

Now here's the problem: The 
General Accounting Office did a 
big study of the B-2 bomber, con- 
cluding that — I will try to put 
this in layperson's terms — fly- 
ing is bad for it 

Yes. It turns out that the secret 
stealthy materials are sensitive to 
moisture, which as luck would 
have it (Who could have predict- 
ed this?) is plentiful in the atmos- 
phere, so according to the GAO, 
after the B-2 flies, it tends to need 
lots of costly repairs. 



I can relate to this. I used to 
own a boat, and whenever I made 
the stupid mistake of putting it in 
the actual water, expensive 
pieces of it would immediately 
fall off. 

I wound up deploying my boat 
permanently on a trailer. 

Using similar reasoning, the Air 
Force has decided that, instead of 
putting the B-2s at bases around 
the world, it will deploy ALL of 
them in — get ready for a strate- 
gic location — Missouri. Really. 
That's where the Air Force has 
special climate-controlled main- 
tenance facilities. 

So let's just recap the B-2 his- 
tory: 

ORIGINAL IDEA: Station 
overseas; fly deep into Soviet 
Union; drop nuclear bombs. 

CURRENT ACTUAL USE: 
Station in Missouri; fly deep into 
Kansas; get repaired. 

So, OK, things have not worked 
out exactly as planned. But how 
many of us can honestly say that 
we have never, in a moment of 
absentmindedness, purchased an 
unnecessary weapons system for 
$45 billion? I didn't think so! 
Nevertheless, when the GAO 



report came out, there were a lot 
of snide remarks from the media 
about the B-2 Bomber not being 
able to fly in the rain. So in 
September, the Air Force struck 
back with a bold strategic move: 
It flew several dozen reporters 
and photographers from 
Washington to Missouri, where 
they witnessed as a team of air- 
men — I swear I am not making 
this bold strategic move up — 
WASH A B-2 BOMBER. 

"This airplane does not melt in 
water," stated an Air Force offi- 
cial in a quote that I am also not 
making up. "We do this all the 
time. We just get out here with 
the brushes and scrub away." 

I don't know about the rest of 
you taxpayers, but when I read 
those words, I get a proud feeling 
deep in my stomach, knowing 
that there is no way that any 
enemy of this nation could dis- 
able our B-2 Bomber fleet by 
having agents sneak into 
Missouri and wash the planes. 

Despite the fact that the B-2 has 
been shown to be capable, with 
proper maintenance, of with- 
standing moisture, the Pentagon 
has decided that it does not want 



to buy any more of these planes. 
In other words, even our top mil- 
itary experts believe that 21 is a 
sufficient number of extremely 
expensive bombers with no 
apparent function. 

So guess what a bunch of con- 
gresspersons recently tried to do? 
Right! They tried to have the tax- 
payers buy nine more! For 
another $27 billion! 
Guess why they did this? Right! 
To enhance the National 
Security! By which I mean, get 
themselves re-elected! 

It doesn't even matter if the B- 
2 can fly! We could make the B- 
2 entirely out of a fragile type of 
cheese that spoils upon contact 
with the air and has to be com- 
pletely replaced every 45 min- 
utes! As long as the money gets 
spent in these congresspersons' 
districts! 

Unfortunately for our National 
Security, Congress decided to 
cancel the new B-2s and spend 
the money on other things. 
(What, you thought they'd give 



Continued on page 12 




^WOMEN'S 
HEALTHCARE 
OF CLARION 



Private practice ~ obstetrics/gynecology 
"Devoted to individualized health care for women" 




John Myers, D.O. 





BartMatson, D.O. 



Helen Lambe, M.D. 



•Birth contivl 

•Menstrual irregularities 

•Sexually transmitted diseases 

•Abnormal pap smears 

•Infertility 

•Hormone replacement therapy 



Personal, caring seivice always provided by a fully-accredited physician in obstetrics/gynecology. 



Womens Healthcare of Clarion 

Clarion Hospital Office Park 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(located right behind the hospital two miles from town) 



Call 226-8800 for an 
appointment. 



o 



Affiliated with Clarion Hospital 



Halloween Websites continued from page 9 



Ghost Web, the official website 
for the International Ghost 
Hunters Society, also features a 
gallery of 615 "ghosfly" pho- 
tographs sent in by users. 
Prepare to be utterly spooked or 
underimpressed, depending on 
your level of skepticism. 

Most of the photographs — 
including lots of graveyard shots 
— feature "mysterious" mists 




identified as the "swirling energy 
vortex" of ghosts. Funny thing is 
they often look a lot like regular 
precipitation, too. 

For lighter entertainment, 
Sympatico Halloween 

(www.nb.sympatico.ca/Features/ 
Halloween/boo.html) boasts a 
continuing Halloween story, 
which starts off with the line "It 
was a dark and stormy night..." 
and allows users to add their own 
spin. 

The site also provides a link to 
an online Ouija Board, which, if 
done right, should have your 
mouse flying across the 
mousepad as if possessed. 

There's also costume tips on 
Sympatico Halloween — "Learn 
how to make great fake 
blood... on a budget!!!" — and 
some truly disgusting recipes for 
Halloween parties, such as the 
edible Meathead centerpiece. 

To make the centerpiece, start 
off with a plastic skull, layer it 



with Jell-O, then cover with 
strips of ham or corned beef, 
depending on the look you hope 
to achieve, according to the site. 

"A ham Meathead looks some- 
thing like a severe bum victim, 
while a corned beef Meathead 
has the appearance of someone 
with his outer layer of skin 
peeled off," the site said. 
"Vegetarians can experiment 
with the Cheesehead concept." 

If your Halloween plans 
include a stop to a costume party, 
several sites offer clever ideas for 
a get-up. 

A commercial site, Halloween 
Mart (www.accessnv.com/hal- 
loween/) offers an order form and 
a catalog of costumes — every- 
thing from Batgirl to Chinese 
Take-Out Guy. 

Halloween Costume Closet 
(www.FabricLink.com/Closet.ht 
ml) has put together "10 Terrific 
Timesaving Costumes," which is 
a list of easy and inexpensive 



ideas for thrifty partiers. 

For instance, the site details 
how to "quickly and inexpensive- 
ly create a medieval costume 
using things you might already 
have in your closet." (Here's the 
skinny: Find a shirt four times 
too big. Cut off the collar, throw 
on a vest and presto! You're a 
Renaissance man.) 

There's even tips from the folks 
at Goodwill Stores of New 
Jersey, people who really know 
how to offer expert advice on 
how to dress like a Tacky 
Man/Woman. "Just butt ugly, 
mismatched clothes (polyester 
and patterns are a plus)," they 
said. 

If you're in the mood to share 
Halloween well wishes with oth- 
ers, consider sending an online 
greeting card. One of the more 
extensive collections can be 
found on the Awesome 
Halloween Greeting Card Site 
(www.marlo.com/hallowee.htm). 

The cards are free and can be 



sent whizzing through cyber- 
space with a musical greeting, 
too. 

To end your night, stop by the 
official homepage of the Ghost 
Research Society (www.ghostre- 
search.org), another site that fea- 
tures lots of "ghostly" pho- 
tographs. 

There's also tips on how to cap- 
ture a "swirling energy vortex" 
on film, such as what kind of 
camera you need to use. 
Although not to fear, "any cam- 
era at any given time can capture 
a ghost on film," the site assured. 

For a little light reading, turn 
your eyes to the Ghost Trackers 
Newsletter, the official online 
publication of the Ghost 
Research Society, which 
"devotes each and every issue 
strictly to the reporting of ghosts, 
hauntings, poltergeists and life- 
and-death articles and will never 
deviate from that." 

At least some things in life — 
and in death — you can count on. 




Kline gives the ins and outs of ' In & Out' 



by Ian Spelling 
College Press Service 



Kevin Kline's been doing inter- 
views all day long, one after the 
other, answering every possible 
query about his latest films, 
thrown at him by TV and print 
journalists. One particular TV 
reporter's question, however, 
stands out above all the others 
posed to the Oscar-winning and 
Tony-winning actor. 

"This guy asked me, 'Now that 
you have "In & Out" and "Ice 
Storm" and "L.A. Confidential" 
coming out, can you talk about 
those three movies?" Kline 
recalls with a raised eyebrow. 

"I said, 'They are different. 
"L.A. Confidential" in particular 
was a really interesting experi- 
ence because I got to be someone 
else playing a role. I got to be 
Kevin Spacey. It was nice being 
Kevin Spacey, and the role was 
challenging. It was a wonderful 
group of actors and a great expe- 
rience.'" 

The reporter's leg was being 
pulled like a turkey's on 
Thanksgiving Day, but the poor 
guy never caught on. 



"I don't even know if he's 
caught on yet," Kline says, 
laughing. "That was definitely 
the most memorable question 
I've been asked in the last couple 
of days." 

While Kline can easily think of 
a million other activities he'd 
rather indulge himself in, he's not 
averse to facing the media on 
behalf of the two films in which 
he does star, "In & Out" and "Ice 
Storm," because of the positive 
buzz on both films. 

So it is then, that a tired but 
relaxed Kline kicks back on a 
couch at the Regency Hotel in 
Manhattan to talk. 

He's by turns serious and sar- 
castic, focused and distracted, 
and nothing like his "In & Out" 
character. 

In the wonderfully risky film, 
directed by Frank ("Dirty Rotten 
Scoundrels") Oz and written by 
Paul ("Jeffrey") Rudnick, Kline 
stars as Howard, an English 
teacher at a high school in ultra- 
conservative Greenleaf, Indiana. 
Just as the slightly effete 
Howard prepares to marry his 
ever-patient fianc6e (Joan 
Cusack), a former student (Matt 
Dillon) outs him before an audi- 
ence of millions while accepting 



a Best Actor statuette at the 
Oscars. That bombshell rocks 
everyone, including Howard's 
parents (Debbie Reynolds and 
Wilford Brimley) and Howard 
himself. 

Howard's struggle with the 
notion that he may indeed be gay 
is complicated by the arrival of 
the media, who converge on 
Greenleaf intent on yanking 
Howard out of the closet, kicking 
and screaming. Chief among the 
journalists is Peter Malloy (Tom 
Selleck), a ratings-challenged 
tabloid TV sort with a secret of 
his own. 

Kline notes that the movie, via 
laughs and without preaching, 
connects with audiences. And it 
doesn't seem to matter if it's men 
or women, heterosexuals or gays, 
who make up the audience. 

"Movies ultimately take root in 
our subconscious," he says. 
"There are things you learn with- 
out knowing you're learning 
them, that change you without 
knowing they change you. 
They're imperceptible. 

"I don't know if the bigoted, the 
narrow-minded, will be affected 
by the movie because I doubt 
they'll go see it. The unschooled, 
the uneducated, those who are 



just not exposed to a gay ethos, 
might learn something they did- 
n't know," he added. 

"For them it may dispel certain 
preconceptions about what being 
gay means. It may dispel the 
notion that if a teacher who's gay 
is teaching their child, some 
voodoo vibe might make their 
child gay. 

"Fear borne of ignorance is a 
real fear. So, maybe this film 
will allay some people's fears 
and misconceptions." 



Shortly after "In & Out" reach- 
es multiplexes, "The Ice Storm" 
will hit the arthouse circuit. The 
drama, directed by Ang Lee, the 
man behind "Sense & 
Sensibility," unfolds in 
Connecticut in 1973. Kline and 
Joan Allen play Ben and Elena 
Hood, parents to Wendy 
(Christina Ricci) and Paul (Tobey 
Maguire). 

continued on page 12 




M 

■McDonald's 
CuTr|<&I 



1 C Cheeseburgers 
in a bag tor 



$4.99 



+Tax 



expires 
12/1/97 



WITH THE PURCHASE CE 
A URGE SCET DRINK 



***GOOD ONLY WITH THIS COUPON 
'GOOD EACH NIGHT FROM 4-8 PM ONLY 



* * *. » *j 



< % * % ^ » ». * « - • • • 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



Calendar of Events 



cy 






Today 

•Group pictures taken - 248 

Gemmell 
•Second Series Production - 8 p.m., 

Hart Chapel 
•UAB Rocky Horror Picture Show - 

9 p.m., Gemmell Multi-Purpose 

Room 
Friday 

•HALLOWEEN 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Group pictures taken - 248 

Gemmell 

•Admissions Day - 9 a.m., 250/252 

Gemmell 

•Swimming and Diving at Pre- 
season Invitational - Edinboro 

•Volleyball at Fairmont State - 7 

p.m. 

•Second Series Production - 8 p.m., 

Hart Chapel 

•UAB 'The Amityville Horror" 

followed by a seance - 9 p.m., 

Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

Saturday 

•General small game season begins 

•Cross Country at 
PSAC 

Championships - 
Bloomsburg 
•Interhall bus trip 
to Indiana football 
game 

•Football at Indiana 
- 1:30 p.m. 
•String Seminar 
Concert - 3 p.m., 
Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium 



Wlttn in ClaUan (IctftcmUi... 

The fiipQ?! rn;i 

CAPT|iopjvus«; ,eS 



"Has 

It 

All 



nrtfvTH 




OPEN SEVEN DAYS 

Lunch and Dinner 

ote^ Fiom Holiday l'«» 
("oilier o' fttli and Main • Clarl<n 



^ TONY AND JOE'S CAFE 

•^ CAl'T. LOOMIS RESTAURANT 



E2 



B 226-8400 g 



Italian - Steaks - Seafood 

Our famous 

KiVisJ Prime Rib of Beef An Jus 

Setvti Wednesday and Salutday Nifcs 

DAILY LUNG I AND DINNER SPECIALS 






w 



Sunday 

•No events scheduled 
Monday 

•Policy Committee meeting j 
- 4 p.m., B-8 Chapel 
•Career Development 
Series: "Developing a 
Career Portfolio" - 6 p.m., 
Carter Auditorium, Still 
Hall 

•Student Senate meeting - 7 p.m., 246 Gemmell 
Tuesday 

•ELECTION DAY 

•Intramural Free Throw 
begins 

•Intramural Floor 
Hockey begins 
•Timeout Luncheon - 
noon, Holiday Inn 
•"FalstaffortheTrue 
and Valiant Deeds of 
SirJohnFalstaff,"by 
David Weston, sponsored by the Department of Arts 
and Sciences - 7 p.m., Hart Chapel 
•Volleyball vs. Edinboro - 7 p.m. 
•Seminar on "Catholic Liturgy" - 7 p.m., Immaculate 
Conception School Library 
•UAB Movie Night - Garby Theatre 
Wednesday 
•Intramural Badminton 
begins 

•UAB Wellness Program 
"Body Sculpting" - 4 
p.m., 248 Gemmell 
•Leadership Development 
Series: "Power," present 
ed by Heather Hoffman - 
7 to 8:30 p.m., 250/252 
Gemmell 



■ '• T"t ■ *■ * W 9 



Barry continued from page 10 



the money back to YOU?) 
Nevertheless, we can all take 
comfort in the fact that for 
many years, we will be pay- 
ing millions and millions of 
dollars to maintain the origi- 
nal fleet of Stealth bombers 
stationed strategically in 
Missouri, scrubbed and ready 
to fly out and bomb enemy 
targets. Or maybe it will turn 
out to be more cost-effective 
to fly the enemy targets to 



Missouri, so our B-2s can 
bomb them without getting 
too far from the climate-con- 
trolled maintenance facili- 
ties. 

So as a taxpayer, I applaud 
all the congresspersons who 
helped make this amazing 
weapon possible. I hope they 
get rewarded for their efforts 
by being taken for lengthy 
VIP flights on the B-2. In the 
rain. Strapped to a wing. 







'In & Out' contin- 
ued from page 11 

Ben has the hots for his neigh- 
bor, Janey (Kline's "Dave" co- 
star Sigoumey Weaver), while 
Wendy spends way too much 
time with Janey's boys (Elijah 
Wood and Adam Hann-Byrd). 

As the worst ice storm in years 
wallops the area, everything 
comes to a head. 

"It's a very different film from 
4 In & Out,"' notes Kline, who 
lives in Manhattan with his wife, 
actress Phoebe Cates, and their 
young son and daughter. 

'"In & Out' is a rollicking, ram- 
bunctious movie. It wasn't 
chaos, but it was a lot of fun. 'Ice 
Storm' was a much more disci- 
plined movie, with a much small- 
er budget. Ang, by his nature, is 
a very quiet, almost meditative 
presence on the set The set was 
very quiet. 

"How much of that was a func- 
tion of Ang's personality and 
how much of it was a function of 
budget is hard to distinguish. 
There wasn't a lot of goof-around 
time because we didn't have that 
luxury. There ain't going to be 
any reshoots. It wasn't in the 
budget," says Kline. 

"I have the feeling that even if 
Ang were given $100 million to 
make the movie, it probably 
would've been the same. 
Working with him you got the 
sense of tremendous thoughtful- 
ness and vision." 

As is his habit, Kline has gone 
from screen comedy to screen 
drama, meaning it's time to 
return to the Broadway stage, 
where he's starred in everything 
from "The Pirates of Penzance" 
to "Hamlet." And he'll do just 
that in a production of Chekhov's 
brooding "Ivanov," slated to run 
from November to January at the 
Beaumont Theater at Lincoln 
Center. 

Nothing, it seems, scares Kline, 
who says he'd even try his hand 
at a thriller or action-adventure 
film if one with a decent script 
were ever to come along. 

"I'm one of those actors who 
deludes himself into thinking he 
can play anything and every- 
thing," Kline says, as the curtain 
closes on the conversation. 

"Remember 'Tootsie,' when 
Hoffman says, i can be tall!' 
That's me. I hate to limit myself. 
The reverse of that — I think it's 
the reverse* — is I try to avoid 
roles that are too easy to play. 
What I do is try to find roles I 
think I can play with a certain 
ease, but that challenge me in 
some way, that demand I draw on 
something original or fresh." 



Page 13 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



; . ' . ' . ' . ' . ' .u.M. ' . ' 




Tierrah Bier, Senior, Arts / Sciences 

"Treat. They're more fun and you 

get more out of it." 



Jeremy Peffer, Senior, Political Science 

'Trick. Everyone needs to get a 

good laugh at Halloween." 



— — — • 



Melanie Spellen, Freshman, Secondary Ed. 

'Trick. We all need to laugh and a good 

scare at least once a year." 





\ 



{ 






Jamah Hawes, Senior, Elementary Ed. 

'Treat. Because chocolate melts in your 

mouth not in your hands." 



John R. Tweardy, Grad Student, 

Communications 

'Treat. Because tricks are for kids.. .and the 

Eagles Nest!" 



Lisa A. Robinson, Senior, Secondary Ed. 

'Treat. Because I love to eat sweets. 

Something sweet for a supreme lady of 

Alpha Kappa Alpha." 



'*B -«h *' «~« 



I * 



' " J"i ' < ■ 1 i \")' < i>' > 'i't'i'i i ' i i'i' i t' * ' i ' * < 



October 30 , 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 14 






Skeletons In 





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October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



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Skeletons, everyone has a few 

in their closet. The Call may 

have more than most. So in a 

special Halloween tribute we're 

going to let a few of them out. 

Images that you thought or 

hoped, would never see the 

light of day again have come 

back to haunt us all in these 

photos taken from our archives 

that span nearly a decade. Be 

afraid. 







I • I • 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 





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|teALLYC0UNT0NT0HELPUSACC0MPUSHALLTHAT ^ 

pNEEDTO DO. RELIABLE, DEPENDABLE THINGS LIKE 

|hE TOYOTA COROLLA. OVER THE PAST 30 YEARS,^ 

iROLLA HAS BECOME ONE OF THE MOST TRUSTED 

k RS IN THE WORLD. AND NOW IT'S ALL-NEW...WITH 

bRE PASSENGER AND TRUNK ROOM, AN ALL-NEW 

.UMINUM ENGINE THAT'S ONLY MORE POWERFUL, 

IT'S MORE EC0N0MICAL..UP TO 38 MILES PER 

GALLON HIGHWAY. COROLLA IS SAFER AND 

QUIETER.ANDBESTOFALUTSTARTS 

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Page 17 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



ENTERTAINMENT 



DOCTOR FUN 



Burn off -rue Powno> 
III with FAT TORCH! 











"... •- ■■ ■■ ».. jv>-.--- 









Another popular product that soon attracted the attention of the FDA 




Attention Clarion Students! 

Do you have a talent? Do you dream of using 
that talent to attract a guy, girl or animal that 
you desire? Send it to The Call today! We accept 
mostly just stuff that can be printed, but we can 
work with you. Poems and comics are recom- 
mended! Send it the 
The Clarion Call, 270 
Gem m ell, c/o Benj. 

Impress 

Your 

Mom! 




DAVE 

by David Miller 



Quiz 

7lNP 

AcnvflY 



DM? tardier. 
M»M«!tw3e.lnt. 






D*ly fc*«ttW 




CHAOS by Brian Shimer 




* * 

Mm 



It was on the morning of their third anniversary when 
Harvey first realized he had married a buffalo. 



S®®*®® 1 ®^^ 



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■VAV.VAVAV 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Page 18 



October 30, 1997 



The Clarion Call 



Pa^e 19 



ENTERTAINMENJ\ 



THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 High cards 
5 Sum 
10 Square block 

14 Section 

1 5 Likeness 

16 Sailing 

1 7 Arabian ruler 

18 Grows weary 

19 Seines 

20 Adorn 
22 Scanty 

24 Camera eye 

25 Genuine 

26 Lily plant 
29 Handrail 

33 Covered with 
vines 

34 Pry bar 

35 Mr. Onassis, 
familiarly 

36 Rip 

37 Lost color 

38 Applaud 

39 Sea bird 

40 Ruffled edge 

41 Unrestrained 

42 Office fasteners 

44 One who has 
title to 

45 Baseball 
umpire's calls 

46 Large: pref. 
48 Attic 

51 Reno specialties 

55 Landed 

56 Silly 

58 Dumb creature 

59 Fountain favorite 

60 Consumed 

61 57 

62 Foot part 

63 Raises 

64 Calendar span 

DOWN 

1 Copied 

2 Arrived 

3 Clapton 

4 Kind of carriage 

5 Mogul 

6 Leaves out 

7 Container 
weight 

8 Epoch 

9 Abated 



1 


2 


3 


4 


1 




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1997 Tnbune Media Services Inc 
All rights reserved 



10 Inland 
waterways 

11 Consumer 

12 Wagers 

13 Comfort 
21 Peruse 
23 Duo 

25 Come undone 

26 Refers to 

27 Prevent 

28 Climbing plant 

29 Chimes 

30 Eagle's weapon 

31 Rub out 

32 More mature 
34 Dens 

37 Better looking 

38 Craven 

40 Chimney feature 

41 Trademark 
43 Door 

46 Underground 
worker 

47 Equalizes 

48 Large cut 



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"Well, yes, I loved him once, but that was before 
realized that I need more than just a silhouette in 
my life." 



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PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

Philadelphia 
USA 



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GRADUATE SCHOOL IS A JOB 

If youre planning togo tograd school, you may get a dTucklcataflyourrricnclsworkirg^ 
lortunatcJy. yw dont riave to be bothered wifi 

Well, guess what? Graduate school is a job. 

While there are obvious differences (especollyfinan(^)rjetwe^ 

similar in many ways. It turns out that the same characteristics tJiat would rrdce you a desir^ 

programs as wel. r~ j& 

If you are pbnrure to apoly to a graduate progra 

actually apply . Although you might expect a mast^spiomm in history to fjeniostinUsested in your 
academic background, especially in history courses, your see the programs application ako asks about 
your extracumcular and work experiences. And if an interview is rcQuired. the discussion will 
definitely go well beyond your grades. 

Keep in mind that graduate programs are often very selective, so tJx^ can look rwt just for strong 
students, but strong students who are wellroundedandwlTowiladdtothecharaderoftr^ 
in other ways. Many graduate programs involve teaching assistant responsibilities, favoring 
candidates who can demonstrate Leaders* and ConMriiaiiNskik. And applied programs such as 
business schools accept very few students who have not worked for two or more years. 

The bottom line is that whether youre headed for the job market oron to more 
education, you wi be evaluated against other lalenledcarididates. and while an 
•rop 1 ? 35 ^ GPA is a ^rcat edification, it wifl rarely condensate for a lack erf other 
activities and skills. Think of wad school as a job. build your background 
accordingly, and yailgrealty enhance your chances of beirg accepted. 

Making College Court isasyndkated column based on the book ($M.»S*S*H. I 8OaS47 7»S0) and semiwr series ofthe same liUc To share tommento 
ideas, or request information, visit www.makingtollcgctourt.com. or call 1488-267 01J] loll free. 




qRADUK 
SCHOOL 



Makin 





Page 2b 



The Clarion Call 



October 3d, 1997 



SPORTS\ 



No. 12 Slippery Rock rolls past Clarion 



by Nathan Koble 
Assistant Sports Editor 

A year ago, the nationally- 
ranked Clarion University 
Golden Eagles used a punishing 
ground game to hand the 
Slippery Rock Rockets a 54-28 
defeat 

At Memorial Stadium on 
Saturday, the Rockets returned 
the favor by using the same strat- 
egy 

Running back Rick Magulick 

bulled his way to 144 yards and a 
touchdown and backfield mate 
Stan Kennedy added 113 yards 
and three touchdowns to lead the 
twelfth-ranked Rockets to a 28-7 
victory over the undermanned 
Golden Eagles. 

Slippery Rock, now 7-1 overall 
(3-0 conference), will face Lock 
Haven this Saturday, while 
Clarion (0-7,0-4) travels to IUP. 
On their opening drive, the 
Rockets took advantage of a 
Clarion penalty to to notch the 
game's first score. After forcing 
the Rockets into a punting situa- 
tion, the Eagles were flagged for 
a facemasking penalty, allowing 
the Rockets to retain possession. 

Slippery Rock quickly capital- 
ized, as redshirt freshman quar- 
terback Randy McKavish hooked 
up with Larry Wilson for a 45- 
yard pass to the Clarion 6. On 
the next play, Kennedy followed 
a host of blockers into the end 
zone for a 7-0 SRU lead. 

The Rockets threatened again 
on their next possesion. Starting 
from their own 4-yard line, 
Slippery Rock marched into 
Clarion territory on 16 plays, but 
McKavish, throwing toward the 
end zone, was intercepted by 
Clarion defensive back Kejuan 
Culbreth to end the drive. 

However, the Rockets would 
return to their running game— 
and the end zone — before the end 
of the opening period. 

A seven-yard punt return by 
Brian Polk placed the Rockets on 
the Clarion 44. Three plays later, 
Kennedy got his second touch- 
down of the day on a 30-yard 
draw play. The PAT failed, 
though, leaving SRU with a 13-0 
lead. 

Clarion, who started only four 
seniors, put together its best drive 
of the day in the second quarter. 
Fourth-string quarterback Chris 




Clarion 7 

Slippery Rock 28 

This Week at 
IUP 



"When you're the underdog you want 

to get the game to the fourth quarter 

and try to find a way to win." 

-head football coach Malen Luke 



Janson, a true freshman starting 
due to a string of injuries to 
Clarion signal callers, keyed the 
nine-play, 63-yard drive with an 
11-yard pass to Alvin Slaughter 
and a 15-yard strike to Ron 



score again before halftime. 
From the Clarion 38, Janson 
threw a short pass to Slaughter, 
who reversed to the other side of 
the field and sprinted to the 
Slippery Rock 32. Three plays 
later on third-and-ten, Janson 
spotted Jamie Sicken running a 
post pattern toward the end zone, 
but his pass was slightly over- 
thrown. 

At halftime, the Eagles found 
themselves down by six points to 
the highly-touted Rockets. 
"When you're the underdog 




photo courtesy of Adam Earnheardt 



Clarion WR Alvin Slaughter has been a triple threat this 
season for the Golden Eagles averaging 11.4 yards per 
game receiving, 27.6 yards per kick return, and 11.8 per 
punt return. 

DeJidas. 

On first-and-ten from the SRU 
16, Janson rolled left and found 
Rich Kindel just beyond the goal 
line for the Eagles' first touch- 
down in two weeks. Tyler Palisin 
nailed the extra point to pull the 
Eagles within 13-7. 

It looked as if Clarion would 



you want to get the game to the 
fourth quarter and try to find a 
way to win," said Clarion head 
coach Malen Luke. "We didn't 
get to that opportunity. We shot 
ourselves in the foot with penal- 
ties and mental errors." 

By the end of the third quarter, 
the Slippery Rock running game 



had re-established itself and the 
Rockets were again in scoring 
position on the Clarion 11 when 
the period expired. 

Fifty-two seconds into the final 
quarter, Magulick plowed his 
way into the end zone to put SRU 
ahead 19-7. The Rockets then 
converted the two-point attempt 
when tight end John Sabo caught 
a short pass from McKavish. 

Slippery Rock got the clincher 
six minutes later, as Kennedy 
scored a touchdown from one 
yard out for the 28-7 final. 

In all, the Slippery Rock run- 
ning game allowed the Rockets 
to post decisive advantages in 
several statistical catagories. The 
Rockets led Clarion in total 
offense (501-162), first downs 
(29-8), and total offensive plays 
(77-44). SRU also benefitted 
from 12 Clarion penalties, which 
resulted in 103 yards. 

For Clarion, Janson, a 6-1, 175 
lb North Penn High School grad- 
uate, completed 11 of 26 passes 
for 131 yards and a touchdown. 
Slaughter led the receiving corps, 
which is without Mark Witte for 
the remainder of the season due 
to a hand injury suffered two 
weeks ago, with four catches for 
61 yards. DeJidas caught four 
balls for 47 yards. 

Keith Kochert had a big game 
defensively, coming up with 19 
tackles. 

NOTES: Slippery Rock moved 
up to No. 8 in this week's 
NCAA Division II poll. . . 
Kochert leads the team with 59 
solo and 90 total tackles. . . Ron 
DeJidas laeds the squad with 
with 457 rushing yards, aver- 
aging 5.6 a carry. . . 
Quarterback Jeff Cappa is still 
nursing a shoulder injury. . . 
Nose Guard Bill Burns is out 
for Saturday's game at IUP, 
and linebacker Brian ,- 
Komoroski is questionable. 
IUP leads the overall series 44- 
20-3. 



IUP Indians 

at a glance 



Clarion travels to IUP this 
Saturday for a 1 :30 matchup 
between last year's PS AC West 
co-champions. 

Clarion wouldn't mind a 
repeat of last season's contest 
The Golden Eagles romped to a 
4M5 victory powered by stand* 
out perfonnances by wide 
itecetver Alvin Slaughter and 
running back Ron DeJidas, 
Sl|||hter caught 4 passes for 
til^ards and 2 touchdowns, 
aoifDeJidasran for 121 yards. 

IIP got off to a slow start this 
season and currently holds a 3-4 
overall record and a 2-1 confer- 
ence mark. In irnlependent 
action, me Indians defeated 
Bloomsburg (18-13), but lost to 
New Haven .(43-14), East 
Stroudsburg (33-31), and 
Fairmont State (30-29). 

In conference play, IUP lost 
its First conference home game 
iu:3S: : startS: t6 : Slrppery l&ck 
(16-9). 

IUP rebounded last week 
against rival Edinboro with a 
narrow 25-20 win. Edmboro 
held a 20-19 lead at the end of 
the third period; but IUP 
launched an 11 -play 71-yard 
drive* ej||||^^ 
yard run, to go ahead 25-20. 

On the last play of the gam 
it appeared as though Edinboro 
hadc^plet.dalongifH^- 

down pass, but the pass was 
ruled incomplete. 

Qqafierbaci leixy Item 
completed 17 of 33 passes for 
255 yards and two touchdowns, 
Wide receiver Jason Tirado 
caught both touchdown passes. 

On the season, Throm has 
connected on 128 of 228 passes 
for 1,492 yards and 7 IDs while 
throwing 7 interceptions. link 
Stennett is the leading rusher. 
The tailback has 514 yards and 
3 TDs on 104 carries. 
NOTES: Head coach Frank 
Cignetti has a 62*4-1 record 
against PSAC West opponents 
dating back to 1984. . . IUP 
holds a 44-20-3 lead in the 
overall series against Clarion. 
..IUP won in *9S 14-9. 



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^ri^i^r* 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



Swimming and diving teams set for another PSAC title 



by Lori Matachak 
Sports Writer 



Once again, the Golden Eagles 
swimming and diving teams are 
geting ready for another run at a 
PSAC championship. 

Swimming head coach Bill 
Miller will begin his 20th year as 
the head man for the men's pro- 
gram and 11th season guiding the 
women, will again have his assis- 
tant of 10 years Mark VanDyke 
by his side. 

Under Miller, the Golden 
Eagles are looking for their 23rd 
straight women's PSAC champi- 
onship and have won 23 of the 
last 27 men's championships. 

Diving coach David Hrovat is 
in his eigth year at Clarion and 




Ken Bedford 

was named NCAA Division II 
Women's Diving Coach of the 
Year" in 1996. 
This year may be somewhat of 



Andy Ferguson 

a transition year for the Golden 
Eaglesas they lost IS seniors 
from last year. The future 
remains bright for the the Golden 



Eagle program, adding a total of 
24 newcomers, 23 of which are 
freshman, and the other a junior 
college transfer. 

"It is too early in the year to 
make any predictions, but I see a 
lot of talent on both the mens and 
womens teams," Miller said. 
Seniors Ken Bedford and Andy 
Ferguson will anchor the Clarion 
divers. Junior Brian Ginochetti 
and freshman Jason Weidman 
and Tom Dickson will keep the 
men strong. 

Senior Eric Fringer, Cristiano 
Fernandes and Lucas Matteson 
return to lead the Golden Eagle 
swimmers 

For the women, Juniors Julie 
Murray and Wendy Casler and 
sophomore Kelly Moore return 



on the diving roster. Hrovat is 
looking for freshman Kristine 
Young, Shelly Munzak and 
Stepahanie Sutton to help make 
the team stronger as the season 
progresses. 

The Golden Eagles warmed up 
for their opening meet against 
Allegheny with a pre-season 
invitational against Indiana, 
Slippery Rock, Edinboro, 
Westminister, and Lock Haven. 

The invitational is a great 
opportunity for each swimmer 
and diver to get a feel for what 
actual meet competion is like, 
which will be valuable for the 
young Golden Eagles. 

The Golden Eagles will open 
the 1997-98 PSAC schedule trav- 
eling to Edinboro tomorrow. 



Sports Trivia 



Cross Country teams at 
Gettysburg Invitational 



Name the three Bis 12 

schools that call 
Memorial Stadium home. 

last week's answer: 

The Cleveland (ndains last won 
the World Series in 1948. 



by Cherie Zurko 
Sports Writer 



^MaaMi 



YES! 



on the Regional Renaissance 

Initiative. 

November 4, 1997 



The Gettysburg Invitational 
allowed virtually all men's and 
women's cross country runners 
the opportunity to run a season's 
best, if not a personal best time. 

Last Satruday the women's var- 
sity finished fifth out of 33 teams. 
The top five women all finished 
within 25 seconds of each other 
in the 219 person race. LeaAnne 
Laured (24), Rocky Wilson (35), 
Debbie Brostmeyer (42), 
Maureen Long (46), Daria Diaz 
(47), Kelly Null (53), and 
Brigette Laflin all competed for 
Clarion. 

The men's varsity race had 35 
teams and consisted of 240 run- 
ners. Scoring a 21 team finish 
were Brad Alderton (50), Mark 
Trzyna (121), Tom Brady (127), 
Craig Carlson (141), Jimmy 



Adams (151), Gregg Wade (156), 
and Jim Pasarelli (175). 

Junior Varsity results are 
incomplete and unofficial. For 
the women, Cherie Zurko (7), 
Kristie Runk (25), Laurie Young 
(47), Melissa Getz (58), Megan 
Pavuk (66), Devon Barr (75), 
Missy Baur (88), and Bobbi Ryan 
(99) all competed for Clarion. 

Eric Lowry, Colin McGlone, 
Shane Cummings, and Brad 
Undercofler all competed in the 
Men's JV race. 

Hot Legs Award winners: 
LeAnne Lauer, Cherie Zurko, 
Jim Pasarelli, and Brad 
Undercofler. Keep on Running 
Award winners: Maureen Long, 



Megan Pavuk, Tom Brady, and 
Colin McGlone. 

This weekend the varsity will 
travel to Bloomsburg for the 
PSAC meet, looking to continue 
their improvement over last year. 





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Octobef 30, 1S97 



VI r"v • 



The Clarion Call 



Page 22 



USWF Pro Wrestling to invade Clarion 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



The stars of the United States 
Wrestling Federation will be in 
town on Friday, November 21st, 
at 8 p.m. in Tippin Gym. 

The card features a Main Event 
of Tito Santana vs. Salvatore 
Sincere. Two title matches 
including USWF Heavyweight 
Champion Sgt. Cy Youngblood 
versus The Swat Man; and Junior 
Weight Tide holder H.C. Loc vs. 
Steve Corina. 

Other matches include former 
tag team champions The 
Pittsburgh Steel (John Diamnod 
& Rodney Allen) vs. current 
USWF Tag Team Champions 
Tony DeVitto and The Italian 
Sensation. BONZ, formerly Man 
on a Mission) will face Mad Dog, 
7-Foot Giant Primo Camerra in 
will square off against Damage 
Inc. and the Milwaukee Mauler 
will take on The American Eagle, 
T.C. Reynolds. 

The event is sponsored by the 
Clarion University Athletic 
Department, the Student Athletic 
Advisory Council (SAAC), and 
the Student Association. 
Proceeds will benefit Clarion 
University Athletics. 




Sgt. Cy Youngblood will put his USWF title up for grabs 
against The Swat Man. 



"The best wreslters of the 
USWF are coming to Clarion and 
we're expecting an exciting event 
at Tippin Gym" stated Clarion 
Athletic Director Bob Carlson. 
"The excitement of professional 
wrestling is something everyone 
can enjoy and we're hoping for a 
big turnout" 



Ringside seats are $13, with 
Reserve Seat prices set at $9 and 
General Admission set at $6. 
Tickets are available at National 
City Bank and New Bethlehem 
Bank in Clarion, the Clarion 
University Ticket Office in 
Gemmell Center and Rod's 
Grocery in Lucinda. 



Win U.S.W.F. 

Pro Wrestling 
Tickets 



Guess the answer to our wrestling trivia to enter a 
drawing for USWF Wrestiling Tickets. 

What was the main event at 
Wrestlemania I? 

Answer: 

Name: 

Campus Address: 

Phone # 

Send or bring answeres to The Clarion Call office, 
270 Gemmell c/o Bill Bates, Sports Editor 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



JHMIE S0B0LESKI 

INTRRMURflL WORKER 

OF THE WEEK !! 

UPCOMING EVENTS 

♦VOLLEYBALL & *3 ON 3 
BASKETBALL (IN PROGRESS) 
*You may still register a team! 
FREE THROW CONTEST 
November 4th 9:00 pm 
FLOOR HOCKEY 
o Captain's Meeting 11/3 9: 1 5 prn 
< Games Begin 1 1/4 

BADMINTON 
Games Begin 11/4 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 

Intramurals has an opening for a 

20 hour Graduate Assistant 

beginning in the Spring 1998. 

* Full tuition waiver 

* Stipend 

For more information, call x2349 

or stop by 117 Tippin. 



CONGRATULATIONS!! 

-FLAG FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP- 

WE'LL STILL WIN AGAIN 

DEFEATS THE 
BEER LEAGUE ALL-STAR'S 

The Flag football season has 
concluded with what some are calling 
the end of a dynasty! The We'll Still 
Win Again team has captured this 
coveted crown for the fifth (and 
hopefully) final time. Captained by 
Kraig "The Animal" Koelsch the squad 
systematically dissected the Beer 
League All-Star's defense en route to 
a 41-27 victory in the title match. 
Semi-final action saw Beer League 
edge out The Purple Headed Warriors 
by a score of 39 - 34. While We'll Still 
Win beat up on Sig Pi Purple by a 
final score of 55 - 42. 

Intramural Director, Doug Knepp 
would like to thank all the teams that 
participated in this year's tournament. 
"This year we had close to 200 
participants representing 23 teams in 
the Flag Football Tournament We 
hosted 112 regular season games, and 
I think we had an outstanding season!" 





/.W-7A jS ,V.V V, I 



October 30, 1997 



n~'-\ 



Tile Crarion Call 



Page 23 ' 



CLASSIFIEDS 



IIIU'WWIi;!) 



EXCEL Model Management is 
seeking students for promotional 
modeling. Wages from $10- $20 

per hour. Call (814)234-3346 
regarding open-calls. 

Reimer Snack Bar is currently 
looking for part time delivery 
drivers with their own vehicle. 

Starting wage is $S.15/hour > plus 
compensation for use of own 

vehicle. Apply at Riemer Snack 
Bar. 



Creative Kids Learning Center 

in Clarion is hiring substitute 

teachers. Minimum requirement 

32 credit in Human Services 

field. Ed. classes preferred. 

For information call 764-3111. 

EOE. 



I OK KENT 



For Rent 

3 Bedroom mobile home in 

Clarion. Available Immediately. 

Call 764-5895 



Furnished Apartments Available 

for 4 people for the Fall 1998- 

Spring 1999 semesters. 

Very close to campus. 

Leave message at 226-5917 



Apt. furnished for 3 or 4 people 

available for SPRING 
SEMESTER. Clean, close to 
campus, quiet, no pets, refer- 
ences. CallRinTAPTS.at 
227-1938 
or beeper (814)226-0722 



Spacious 1 story house for 3 or 
4, close to campus, available for 

SPRING SEMESTER. 
Quiet, no pets, references, newly 

furnished, clean. 

Call RUTT APTS at 227-1938 

or beeper 

(814)227-0722 

Mobile Home for rent starting 
SPRING SEMESTER 

Ideal for 3 or 4 students. 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 bathrooms with show- 
ers, washer and dryer room, liv- 
ing room and kitchen combined. 
Located across from Comet 
Food Warehouse, 
Call during the day at 226-1913 
Call evenings after 5p.m. at 
226-6327 

Nice, quiet, furnished two bed- 
room apartment. 
In quiet residential neighbor- 
hood. For spring semester. Call 
226-8225 



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FREE T-SHIRT 

+$1000 
Credit card fundraisers for 
fraternities, sororities & groups. 
Any campus organization can 
raise up to $1000 by earning a 
whopping $5.00/VIS A applica- 
tion. Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 
65. Qualified callers receive 
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$750-$1500/week 
Raise all the money your group 
needs by sponsoring a VISA 
fundraiser on your campus. No 
investment & very little time 
needed. There's no obligation, 
so why not call for information 

today. 
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RELIABLE SPRING BREAK 
TOURS 

Bahamas, Cancun & Ski Trips! 

FREE FOOD & FREE 

DRINKS! 

Sign up before Nov. 30. 

Organize a group-travel free. 

Call for details and free 

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Earn MONEY and 
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Absolute Best SPRING BREAK 
Packages available! 
INDIVIDUALS, Student 
ORGANIZATIONS, or small 
GROUPS wanted!! Call INTER- 
CAMPUS PROGRAMS at 1- 
800-327-6013 or 
http://www.icpt.com 



ACT NOW! Call Leisure tours 
for SPRING BREAK packages 
to South Padre, Cancun, Jamaica 
and Florida. REPS NEEDED... 
Travel free and earn commis- 
sions. GROUP DISCOUNTS 
for 6 or more people. 1-800- 
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machine. 2264193 



I Ok SMI 



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miles, 5-Speed,$7,500 O.B.O. 

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286 IBM compatible computer 

with monochrome monitor. 

Includes MS-DOS 5.0, Word 

Perfect 5.1, PrintShop, Eight-in- 

One and Direct Access. $115. 

Call Scott at 226-4878 



PERSONALS 



Dear AIT, We'll be your MIB's 
Anytime. Love, OA6 

Dear ZTA, Thanks for the 

GREAT mixer. Let's do it again 

next semester. Love, OA© 



AZ, We had a great time at the 
mixer. Can't wait to do it again 
sometime. Love, the Brothers of 

in 

To the Sisters of III, 
The mixer was the highlight of 
our week. Thanks for the good 
time. Love, the Brothers of 05 

Theta Chi, Thanks for the fun 
mixer! Love the Sisters of A<E>E 



Happy 23rd Birthday Michelle 

Graham! Love, your A$E 

Sisters 

05, Thanks for the power hour. 

We had a groovy time! Love, 

Zeta 



Kristen and Heather, Happy 

Belated Birthday girls! Love, 

your Zeta Sisters 



ZTA and Sigma Pi, 

Congratulations on Best of 

Parade. 



Stacey, Congrats! You're on 

your way to law school. We 

love you. Best of luck. 

Love, your ZETA Sisters 



Have a happy, safe Halloween! 
Love, ZTA 



To the Sisters of AIT, 

Thanks for the wonderful mixer. 

It was so much fun, it was like 

you weren't even mere. Oh 

yeah, you weren't there! 
Love, the Brothers of OIK 

Dear Pearl Sisters, You're doing 

a great job! We love you! The 

Sisters of AIA 

To our Pearl Sisters, You're 
doing a great job, keep up the 
hard work! Congrats on your 
bigs! Love, your AIA Sisters 



Our date party kicked ass! 

Thanks for all your hard work 

Wee-Wee! Love, the Sisters of 

AIA 



ATT Fall 4 97, 

Keep your chins up and smile! 

We love you! Your future ATT 

Sisters 



... 



Happy birthday Emily! Love, 
the Sisters of AOE 



Melanie, Thanks for everything! 

Next time I have a computer 

freeze, I'll call ya! Love, Kristen 



Ed+Ed-get it together! 



To the Psis- you are doing a 

great job! Keep your heads up! 

I can't wait to call you "sisters"! 

Love, Kristen 



To the Brothers of Sigma Chi. 

Thanks for the great time at the 

mixer. A special thanks to Jim 

for busting a move with us. 

Love, the Dance Team 



OA6, Thanks for the great 

mixer, and the flowers! Love, 

ZTA 



To the Oct 17th, 18th and 19th 

camping and canoeing class, 

thanks for helping us out on the 

water. It's a lot of fun when you 

have a hole in your canoe. 

Thanks fo t the memories. 

Love, Brenda and Sarah 



KAP, Sorry this is late! You 

guys are the greatest! We had 

an awesome time at the mixer 

and doing the float with you! 

We'll make you chug again! 

Love, AIT 



Bums: To our wonderful Tau 

Tiger: Where are our cookies? 

Love, your AIT Sisters 

Brothers of 0E, Thank you for 

the flowers! You guys are the 

best. Sorry I have not been 

around much. See you on 

Saturday! Love, your 

Sweetheart, Rae Ann 



George-It's all good! Forget 
Southern Hospitality, you're get- 
ting some Southern Comfort 
It's time to roll with the big dogs 
instead of CHANCE. Happy 
21st Birthday! Pfeil,D,and 
Guy 



If you build it, they will come. 

Vote yes on the Regional 

Renaisance Initiative. 

The Sisters of 6<DA would like 
to congratulate AKA on becom- 
ing recognized by our local 
Panhellenic Council. 

Good Luck to all the sororities 

participating in Derby Daze. 

Love, 0OA 



Adrianne, you did a wonderful 

job with the alumni. 

Love, your Sigma Sisters 



KAP- Sorry about the mess but 

we still had a great time. 

Thanks for an awesome mixer. 

Love, EH 



The Sisters of III would like to 

thank you Mary and Willie for 

the use of the garage. It was 

greatly appreciated. 



To the new pledges, Keep up the 

good work! You guys are doing 

great 

Love, The Brothers of A$Q 

Congratulations you our newest 

sisters Mary Beth, Jen, 

Christina, Tommi, Melissa, and 

Terri. 

Love, your Phi Sigma Sigma 

Sisters 



Congratulations to our new 

members Maura, Amber, 

Kristen, and Lynne. 

Love, The Sisters of Phi Sigma 

Sigma 



Happy Birthday to Jaime Stahl! 

You're a cool roomie, and I'm 

glad I'm getting to know you 

better this year! (even though 

you're hardly around!) Hard to 

believe it's been 4 years now! 

Have fun, enjoy your day! 

Love, Founds 



Tun, We're sorry we're going to 

miss you in Chicago. You'll be 

in our thoughts. Love, The Call 

Exec Board 



Hey House of Pain Wayne- 
Sorry to hear that your an old 
man, you used to drink those 
kids under the table, now it's 
just poker night at the old age 

home for you! Just joking, 

you're still a big dog. Love, 

IfeL£aJl Exec Board 

HEY ADAM -Here's a 

Classified with your name on it! 

Are you happy now? Hope your 

having a good week, I'll see you 

Saturday! Love, MB (oops! I 

mean Mary Beth) 

Hey bitch- Don't fret the web- 
page - 1 know you worked hard, 

and soon you will be done. 

Let's concentrate on the windy 

city. Love, MB 

Patti - I'm so glad to have you in 
the family G-little! Love, MB 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 30, 1997 



Marlins win series with storybook ending 



by Chris Pfeil 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Game 7 of the World Series 
Bottom of the Uth inning 
Score is tied 2-2 
Bases boded with two outs... 

No, this is not a script from a 
baseball movie. Instead, it is 
what Florida Marlins shortstop 
Edgar Renteria faced Sunday 
night in Miami. 

Renteria lived out every child's 
dream by lacing a single up the 
middle to score Craig Counsell 
making the Marlins the first wild- 
card team to win the World 
Series. 

The 1997 World Series show- 
cased two teams that were not 
supposed to be there. The 
Marlins and the Cleveland 
Indians scrapped their way 
through the playoffs to meet in 



the Fall Classic. Nevermind that 
television ratings were poor and 
that the first six games were lack- 
luster, the two teams put on a 
classic in Game 7 

The final game was all about 
drama. It was everything that a 
decisive game should be. 

Cleveland led 2-1 going into the 
bottom of the ninth with one of 
the dominant closers in baseball 
on the mound. 

Moises Alou came to the plate 
and poked a single into left-cen- 
ter off of Jose Mesa. Charles 
Johnson moved Alou to third 
with a one-out single to right- 
field 

The tension began to mount at 
Pro Player Stadium as Counsell 
stepped to the plate. He respond- 
ed by driving a fly ball to deep 
right to score Alou and tie the 
game. 

Mesa and Florida closer Rob 



Nen put zeroes on the board in 
the tenth and the tension began to 
mount once again. The Marlins 
held off the Tribe in the top of the 
eleventh to set the stage for a sto- 
rybook ending. 

Bobby Bonilla singled up the 
middle to lead the bottom of the 
eleventh off. He was moved to 
third when Tony Fernadez booted 
a double play ball, ala Bill 
Buckner, off Cousell's bat Jim 
Eisenrich was intentionally 
walked to load the bases. 

Devon White tapped a grounder 
to Fernadez, who threw Bonilla 
out at the plate for the second out, 
setting up Renteria's winning hit 

As Renteria's single tipped off 
Charles Nagy's glove and fell 
softly into centerfield, 67,204 
fans erupted into celebration. 

Then, the postgame celebration 
began for the Marlins. As the 
players mobbed each other on the 



field, manager Jim Leyland took 
a moment to salute the Martin 
faithful. Bonilla came over and 
picked up his longtime manager 
and embraced him in one of the 
most moving moments of World 
Series history. 

For a moment, baseball was 
pure again. The drama and 
excitement took over and salary 
caps and strikes were forgotten. 
No one thought of the players as 
overpaid and arrogant. Instead, 
the Marlins looked like little kids 
celebrating winning a little 
league championship. 

On the other side, Cleveland 
was so close again. The Indians, 
who have not won the World 
Series since 1948, will have to 
wait another year. 

The anguish in Cleveland must 
be unbearable. They were two 
outs away from winning it all, 
then it slipped through their fin- 



gertips. 

A Cleveland fan was inter- 
viewed and said the loss was 
worse than John Elway's drive 
and Ernest Byner's fumble that 
denied the Browns trips to the 
Super Bowl. 

The pain continues for 
Cleveland fans, who havent't 
seen a champion since the '64 
Browns, who now reside in 
Baltimore and are known as the 
Ravens. 

Livan Hemadez was named 
World Series MVP. Hemadez, a 
rookie who defected from Cuba, 
followed up his NLCS MVP per- 
formance by picking up wins in 
Games 1 and 5 to lead Florida. 

The national pastime once 
again rose up and provided a 
classic. Any doubts that baseball 
is not what it used to be were put 
to rest last Sunday night in 
Miami. 



L^ 



oH 



Sportsview 



The Regional Renaissance Initiative: A commitment to last a lifetime 



By Kraig Koelsch 
Former Sports Editor 

It's quickly approaching crunch 
time as the November 4th elec- 
tion looms, and the Regional 
Renaissance Initiative appears 
almost certain to fail. 

Why you ask? It's quite simple. 
"We're not paying for a tax to 
give those mi