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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 17, 1998 – May 6, 1999"

Vol. 81, nos. 1-11 



September 17, 1998- 
DecembeMO, 1998 



! 

CIA DIVERSITY OF PA 

CLARION, PA 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 



8 



Title 



$350,000 in renovations completed this summer 



Activists gat her to protest clearcutting 



Alcohol & membership problems close AEA Clarion 



ALF Preview 



AmeriCorps still at crossroads 



Amsler, Burns family honored for SSHE contributions 



Autumn Leaf Festival wins International award 



Average college costs up four percent survey finds 



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Baseball: Baseball returns to glory 



Basketball: Excitement grows as hoops season nears 



Basketball: NCAA wants to settle disput with coaches 



Book Center evaluation team answers to CSA Board 



Brown, James: Fox's Brown to speak at Social Equity Banquet 



Call Executive Board visits Kansas City 



Carlson Library catches VIP 



Chevemak and Bean CU's king and queen 



Cheyney still winless 



Civil Rights author opens 'Eyes' in Clarion 



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Civility With Diversity is BSGP issue 



Clarion Call sponsors second annual College Press Day at Gemmell 



Clarion Clipper Closes its doors 



Clarion grad Vuckovish has done it all in baseball 



Clarion students elect their royalty 



Clarion Students Sound off on Professional Wrestling 



Clarion University's enrollment best in the west 



Clarion's $53 million budget approved by Council of Trusties 



Clarion's CNET project nears completion 



Clarion's SPSEA chapter wins Quest Award 



30 



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Classic raises $36,000 for athletic fund 



Clinton extends Higher Education Act 



College enrollment continues to soar nationally 



College of Ed. Receives $6,000 Heinz PDS Grant 



B 



Date 



September 17, 1998 



November 5, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



College students raise concerns over contsant construction on campuses 



Computer problems continue to frustrate Clarion students 



Concert review: 'Better than Ezra' better than average 



Concert review: Blues Traveler rocks Clarion 



October 29, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



39 



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45 



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Concert Review: Pittsburg concert delivers raw energy & visceral power 



Concert review: 'Sunny Day Real Estate' stakes a claim in Cleveland 



Concert review: The Clarks rock Altoona 



Creighton, Scott: Creighton names assista nt hoops coach 



Cross Country- Runners picking up the pace 



Cross Country- Wilson, King pace Clarion 



Cross Countr y: Clarion set a host PSAC cross country championship 



Cross Country: Eagle runners fare well in regional even at Slippery Rock 



November 12, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



Cross Country: Eagle runners fourth at invitational 



Cross Country: Eagle runners split for weekend mees at Duquesne 



Cross Country: Eagles battle at Gettysburg 



November 12, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



Page 



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Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 



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Cross Country: Eagles test D-1 co mpetition 



Cross Country: Edinboro sweeps PSAC cro ss country c hampio nships 



CU and C-L team up for Mill Creek ecology project 



CU enrollment continues to rise 



CU observes AIDS Awareness Week 



CU observes Alcohol Awareness Week 



CU possibly facing $1 .7 million shortfall next year 



CU students elect homecoming 



CUP athletes making the grade in the classroom 



CUP competes in flag tourney 



Cureton challenges CU to become a more diverse community 



Darkly complex X -Files x'scapes the normal 



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Dating Doctor curs Clarion 



Different view of ALF 



Disabled students sue for access to voter registration 



Dixon re-eleced SSHE chairman for Term #16 



Eagles look to ground Rockets at the launching pad 



Eagles swim past Gators 



Enrollment rises at most SSHE schools 



Faculty members recently awarded SSHE grants 



Faculty promotions, sab baticals announced 



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Faculty Senate: Changes proposed to academic calendar 



B 



October 8, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 1,1998 



October 15, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



Faculty Senate: Faculty Senate raises questions about committee appt. 



Faculty Senate: Faculty Senate votes to appoint Nair committee 



Faculty Senate: Haberaecker, Heather breaks down the budget 



Faculty Senate: Haberaeker, answers more budget questions 



Faculty Senate: Learning Partnership Model hoped to develop leadership 



Farnham, Katherine: Katherine Farnham brings it home 



Farnham, Katherine: Katherine Farnham to perform during A.L.F. 



Felicity follows her heart 



Final plans being made for Winter Commencement Dec. 19 in Tippin 



Foobtall: Slippery Rock tops IUP in miraculous finish 



September 17, 1998 



October 1,1998 



October 29, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



Football: (cont) Slaugher has plenty in store for Clarion fans this fall 



Football: Beaned 



83 



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87 



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89 



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Football: Complete Recovery 



Football: CUP looks to return to winning ways 



Football: Eagles bitten by injury bug in win over Bears 



Football: Eagles bow to California in season finale 



Football: Eagles fall at IUP, 52-14 



Football: Eagles look to wreck Ship 



Football: Eagles roll past Millersville 



Football: First-half explosion pushes Lock Haven past Clarion 



Football: Hurrinca Alvin 



Football: Late score lifts Eagles past Kutztown 



September 24, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



September^, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



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Football: Momentum from win carries into practices 



Football: Notebook: Younger players begin work for next season 



Football: Raiders rout Eagles, 38-3 



Football: Rockets slip away with win 



October 1, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



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Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 



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Football: Unsung Hero 



Football: Weibel, Eagles show character in loss to YSU 



Football: West Chester outscores Clarion, 44-40 



Football: WHAT A WIN! 



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109 



Former Call pho to editor remembered 



Fox's Brown "enthused" about coming to Clarion 
Freshman welcomed with new program 



Future CU's Genr eal Education requirements called into question 



Golf: CUP Golfers continue strong fall on the links 



Golf: CUP Golfers third 



Golf: Eagles complete golf season 



Golf: Golfers compete in event 



110 



Gospel choir headed to Atlanta after Senate approves request 



111 



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113 



114 



115 



116 



Golf: Golfers fifth at Edinboro Fall Shootout 



Grejda named Dean of Education & Human Services 



Hammond, Darrell: Darrell Hammond to crown Queen 



Hammond, Darrell: performs at CUP 



Havard makes changes to avoid more student suicide 



Homecoming brings back CUP football memories 



Horror movies don't scare up the thrills they used to 



117 



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Jazz Band soothes Clarion with cool rhythms 



Karp, Rashelle: Karp named Associate VP for Academic Affairs 



Keeling consolidation work underway 



Kendig, Diane: Renowned poet reads at Clarion University 



Knickerbocker, Deon: Knickerbocker named new Associate Dean of Lib. 



Levin, Jack: Dr. Jack Levin exposes the truth on serial killers 



Local landmakr unmarked after theft 



124 



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127 



128 



129 



130 



Look at ALF 



Mars, Canfield named PSAC All-stars 



McCary, Judith Dr.: Modern Language department chair mourned 



Men's Basketball: Blockbuster! 



Men's Basketb all: Clarion picked second in PSAC-West poll 



Men's Basketball: Eagles nip Mansfield, again 



131 



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133 



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135 



136 



137 



Men's Basketball: Roberts Weslyan no match for CUP 



Men's Basketball: Schedule upgrade will benefit Eagles, fans 



Men's Basketball: Sharp shooting gives Clarion third 



More teens drinking to get drunk, report says 



Movie Review: "Va mpires" sucks the life out of the horror genre 



Movie Review: 'Antz' crawl into movie theatres 
Movie Review: Rush Hour brings in the crowds 



138 



139 



140 



141 



142 



143 



Music Festival review: 1998 CM J Music Festival rock n' rolls into NYC 



Music revew: Sheryl Crow's new album garners four stars 



Music Review: 'CIV is full of holes & 'Mineral' hasn't taken it's vitamins 



B 



October 15, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



November 5, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 1,1998 



October 15, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 5, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



November5, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



Music Review: 'Fear Factory' & 'System of a Down' prove metal still lives 



Music Review: Former Screaming Trees singer with new album 



Music Review: Frank Black unremarkable & Meat Beat Manifesto flops 



October 22, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



144 



Music Review: Horn & Hole offer up new album 



Music Review: Seal proves to be more than human 



September 17, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



21 



23 



17 



22 

12 



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10 



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11 



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13 



13 



10 



10 



14 



13 



September 24, 1998 12 

November5, 1998 10 



14 



14 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 



145 



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A 



Music R e view: Sunny Day Real E s tate returns af ter 3 yr. Hiatus w/a new 



Music Review: Top 30 albums of 1998 



Nationally kn own voice in sports is heard at Social Equity dinner 



Network opens SSHE libraries 



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New "Adventure" joins Clarion nightlife 



New class makes students multimedia designers 



New committee fo rmed to improve relations b/ween CU & surrounding 



New lab in Marwick-Boyd geared towar d multimedia applications 



New Parking lot finally open 



New radiological science degree being offered at Venango campus 



B 



October 1,1998 



December 10, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



October 1,1998 



December 10, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



New residence hall slated for Master Plan 



Nighthawk, Jesse: Jesse Nighthawk enlightens crowd 



October 1, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



Ohio State favored to win the MEDIOCRE Big Ten 



O-l contributes $50,000 to CU campaign 



Open forum kicks off CSA 50th weekend 



Out-of-state tution rate reduced at CU 



PA college senior makes absentee voting easier 



PA state poet reads at Clarion University 



Parade marches ALF out the door 



Parking Lot B set close Monday 



Peer Tutoring begins this month 



Penn State, WVU to tangle with Eagles this weekend 



Percusion ensemble pounds it out 



Pittsburgh shows signs of life 



Reinhard, Diane: Reinhar Outlook 'gloom' says funding options limited 



171 



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Report takes state schools curricula to task 



Residence halls undergo some changes 



Residence Life changes include renovation of Basketball Courts 



Roberson, Paul: Paul Roberson Memorial concert 



Rocky Sequel? 



Rourke, Thomas: Rourke published his first book 



November 19, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



October 8, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



November 5, 1998 



October 1,1998. 



Rugby: Rugby opens 



Safe Schools discussed at summit downlink held at CU 



Sanchez, Sonia: Sanchez: " In Pursuit of Community" 



Shontz, Charles: Shontz gives Clarion remaning crest 



Siler Center chosen for satellite workshop series 



Simple Gifts perfroms 



Smoking on the rise among college students 



Soccer: Soccer players want UNC coach kicked off campus 



Sorority sister guilty of stealing from sisters 



Sportsview: Call to all Steeler fans 



Sportsview: It's been a great ride 



Sportsview: Time is now for a playoff system in college football 



SSHE adds almost $18 million to budget requests 



SSHE attempting to meet high-tech needs of students 



SSHE gives universities the power to reduce distance education credits 



SSHE opens new University Center in Pittsburgh 



SSHE students could benefit from tax change 



December 10, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



October 1, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 5, 1998 



Septembers, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



October 15, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



November 19, 1998 



December 10, 1998 



Novembers, 1998 



September 24, 1998 



Octoberl, 1998 



October 29, 1998 



November 12, 1998 



12 



11 



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8 



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24 



12 



12 



24 



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14 



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8 



8 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 





A 


B 


C 


193 


SSHE unveils new ApllyWeb software 


Septembers, 1998 


9 


194 


State System student leaders address parking 


October 8, 1998 


1 


195 
196 


Student Abroad returns from Malta with fond memories 


November 12, 1998 


12 


Student Senate: Brown elected to fill vacant V-P position 


November 19, 1998 


5 


197 


Student Senate: Chandler renovations questioned by Senators 


December 10, 1998 


6 


198 
199 
200 


Student Senate: Changes made to CSA 50th plans 


October 8, 1998 


6 


Student Senate: Cheerleaders prepare for competition after 


November 12, 1998 


5 


Student Senate: Interhall, Sequelle benefit from over $5,000 in allocation 


October 22, 1998 


6 


201 


Student Senate: Money on hold for CSA 50th 


October 1, 1998 


6 


202 
203 
204 


Student Senate: Sequelle status questioned by Krull 


October 29, 1998 


5 


Student Senate: Student Senate looks at parking situation 


September 24, 1998 


7 


Student Senate: Student Senate names committee chairs for 98-99 


Septembers, 1998 


8 


205 


Student Senate: Student Senate takes a 20-year journey 


October 15, 1998 


6 


206 


Students concerned about upcoming renovations to Chandler Dining Hall 


October 1, 1998 


5 


207 


Students gets look inside CU as president for a day 


November 19, 1998 


6 


208 
209 


Students question freshman scheduling process 


November 19, 1998 


9 


Study Abroad student sends greetings from Mexico 


Novembers, 1998 


11 


210 
211 


Swimming & Diving: Lady Eagles place first in Clarion Invitational 


December 10, 1998 


22 


Swimming & Diving: Swimming & diving teams open season 


Novembers, 1998 


20 


212 


Swimming & Diving: Swimming & diving teams to open 1998-99 season 


October 29, 1998 


23 


213 


Tennis: Clarion netters hope keep tradition alive 


September 17, 1998 


20 


214 
215 


Tennis: Eagle netters show promise 


October 1, 1998 


21 


Tennis: Gannon edges Clarion 


October 8, 1998 


24 


216 


Tennis: Melnick leads Clarion netters to strong PSAC finish 


October 22, 1998 


17 


217 


Tennis: Netters prepare for PSAC tourney 


October 15, 1998 


22 


218 


Tessel, Bobby: Bobby Tessel cracks up Clarion 


Novembers, 1998 


12 


219 


That 70's Show debuts on Fox 


October 29, 1998 


11 


220 


Theatre Review: "Picasso at the Lapin Agile" delights & entertains 


November 19, 1998 


10 


221 


Theatre Review: Les Miserables proves it's one of the classics 


November 19, 1998 


11 


?22 


Theatre review: 'Servant of Two Masters' opens CUP's Theatre season 


October 22, 1998 


9 


223 


Theatre Review: 'The Portrait' & 'Savage Love', 2 different view of love 


Novembers, 1998 


9 


224 


Tuition increase 'likely' for 1 999-2000 


October 15, 1998 


5 


225 


University's Master Plan finally approved 


September 24, 1998 


1 


_26 


Volleyball: California outlasts Clarion spikers 


October 22, 1998 


19 


227 


Volleyball: Clarion University volleyball glides into midseason 


October 1, 1998 


19 


2^8 
2^J 


Volleyball: Eagles aiming for playoffs 


Septembers, 1998 


20 


Volleyball: Eagles even record with win at IUP 


October 15, 1998 


21 


230 


Volleyball: Eagles lose tough match to Lock Haven 


October 29, 1998 


21 


231 


Volleyball: Lock Haven spikes Clarion 


September 24, 1998 


20 


2?2 


Volleyball: Spikers 3-1 week 


October 8, 1998 


24 


2 


A/olleyball: Spikers close season with win 


November 12, 1998 


21 


234 V-P Rearick & Huska resignations shake up Senate 


November 12, 1998 


1 


235[what's Good, What's Bad, What's Legal 


October 8, 1998 


7 


231 'Wilson, Susan: Wilson honored for making life better at Clarion 


November 19, 1998 


8 


237 
238 


Wilson, Timothy Marketing professor on his way to Europe next semester 


October 29, 1998 


8 


Women's Basketball: CUP women net ESU crown 


December 10, 1998 


21 


22' 


'Women's Basketball: Eagles running & gunning for playoffs 


November 12, 1998 


21 


240 l Women't Basketball: Clarion women impressive in second-place finish 


November 19, 1998 


19 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 1998 



241 



242 



243 



Wrestling: Angle, Moaney first in Las Vegas 



Wrestling: Purler named assistant wrestling coach 



Wrestling: Wrestling has college viewers in a head lock 



B 



December 10, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



September 17, 1998 



20 



18 



13 



V 



>■ 



\\ « 







EPTI MB! K 17, 1998 



CI \K1C)\ UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME 8t ISSUE I 



Clarion henna the Fall 1 998 semester 



INSIDE 



BACK INTO THE SWING OF THINGS 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses...Page 3 

News Page 6 

Lifestyles Page 12 

Call On YOU Pagel6 

Entertainment........ Page \i 

Classifieds...., Pageis 

Sports Page 19 



News 



Parking concerns still 
plague Clarion's cam- 
pus, even after a new 

parking lot on 

Greenville Ave. opened 

recently. See the full 

story on Page 6. 



Lifestyles 



Clarion welcomes 
freshman to campus 
with a new program 
to help ease the tran- 
sition to college life. 
See full story on 
Page 12. 



Sports 



Clarion rallied from a 

10-3 halftime deficit to 

defeat Millersville 38- 

31 Saturday at 

Memorial Stadium. 

See Page 19. 







(Students start the fall semester With a bang as they go to classes (top photo) and catch a bite to eat with 
friends at the cafeteria. «"*> b V G *<"*> Groff/Clarion Call 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



September 17 1QQ8 



September 17. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 GEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, PA 16214 

(814) 226-2380 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-mail: call@maiI.clarion.edu 

www.clanon.edu/thecall 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



The Canon foil is published most 



Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
from alt sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which is die responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in-Chief)- Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse publica- 
tion of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5:00 
p.m. on the Monday of desired publi- 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
letters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 
issues of The Clarion Call. Display 
Advertising copy and greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2. -00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. The Clarion 



Cal| is funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue. 



OPINION 




,.,>-,.. 



..<#"* 



3W 



Hide Park 



"Americans have 

been on the verge of 

losing their national 

pastime..." 



Dr. Stanton Green 



"Why McGwire's Home Run 
is Good for America" 
Mark McGwire may have 
saved the national pastime and 
with it a good part of American 
culture. A bold statement? 
Perhaps, but here is why I think 
not. 

With the twentieth century 
coming to a close, Americans 
have been on the verge of losing 
their national pastime and with it 
all that baseball has been defin- 
ing in what it is to be an 
American. From its beginnings 
as four stakes in a square in an 
open pasture in a game called 
Townball, to its modern configu- 
ration of well-groomed diamonds 
in retro ballparks, baseball has 
both reflected and helped define 
American values. Throughout the 
. twentieth century, it has played a 
role in creating successive gener- 
ations of Americans (most often, 
but not exclusively boys and 
men) through the assimilation of 
immigrants and the socialization 
of children. With one swing of a 
bat and a series of hugs, Mark 
McGwire reminded us of this. 

Baseball has long been a calling 
card to immigrants and aconnec- 
tion between generations. My 
emotional response to 
McGwire's home run brought me 
back pictures of my father and 
his friends playing stickball on 
the Lower East Side of New 
York. All of these ball players 
were first generation Americans 
being raised in the tenements of 
the Lower East Side by parents 
who were probably living more 
like Europeans than New 
Yorkers. But their children were 
playing baseball. And this was 
carried on to their grandchildren 
such as my brother and myself. 

Who can forget the sight of 
Mark McGwire, after he crossed 
home plate, holding his son Matt 
high? And almost as if he wanted 
to make sure we got point, he 
climbed into the stands to hug the 
children of Roger Maris to show 



his respect and to pass on the 
moment to the Maris family. 
Baseball is our national pastime 
because it provides family con- 
nections. I watched McGwire's 
home run with my 12-year-old 
son just as I watched Maris' 
homerun with my father when I 
was 12. McGwire's record tying 
61st home run was hit on his 
father's 61st birthday. Some 
might say that these are just his- 
torical coincidences. But that is 
just the point: these historical 
moments are what baseball has 
always cherished and kept for us 
as a society. 

Upon his arrival last year, the 
community bond between 
McGwire and St. Louis seemed 
almost immediate. The support 
he received from the fans and the 
respect he returned was clear 
(and loud) after he hit number 62. 
But the effect of this moment of 
baseball (and all that led to it) 
goes well beyond this traditional 
baseball town on the Mississippi. 
Indeed, the relationship between 
McGwire and Sammy Sosa 
speaks to the diverse community 
we call America and to the fact 
that we may be the only country 
in the world that can prosper as a 
nation of immigrants. The friend- 
ship they have developed in their 
quest for Maris' record speaks 
volumes on what can happen if 
we all live together as Americans. 
The hug between the native-born 
American and the Dominican 
bom immigrants was an indica- 
tion of what America can be. 

Recently, I brought my children 
to Cooperstown for our first visit. 
During our tour of the Hall of 
Fame, our conversation revolved 
around my memories of the hall 
of famers. I recounted events I 
had witnessed during my child- 
hood including Roger Maris' 61st 
home run. I also shared with my 
children the story of when Babe 
Ruth hit a home run over their 

Continued on Page 3 



Editorial 




Kristen Davis, Editor-in-Chief 



Welcome back kids, for anoth- 
er year at Clarion University! I 
have to admit that I am having an 
absolutely great year so far, and I 
couldn't be more enthusiastic 
about The Clarion Call as well 
as everything else. 

I think that the newspaper has 
potential to be high quality this 
year. Our seasoned vets Mike, 
Steve, Nate, Danielle, and Jnel 
are ready to take their experience 
from last year and run with it. 
(Especially Mike, our right hand 
man!) And I am very excited to 
have Jeff, Tun, George, Tom, 
Matt and Codey on Executive 
Board. Their enthusiasm began 
last spring, before we even start- 
ed! I also wanted to thank the 
assistants. I hope you guys never 
feel like you are in a thankless 
job. I have already seen Leslie 
and Shawn in the office getting 
started, and Matt has made it a 
point to help out since last year- 
not to mention Chris and Jason 
who have been around forever. 
You guys are wonderful. 

Judging by our organizational 
meeting, I am very pleased to see 
that students of all majors are 
getting involved with the school 
newspaper. I am so glad to see 
that you are taking advantage of 
the one thing that is totally creat- 
ed by you, the student. 
This summer, I%egan thinking 



about how this is the last summer 
I will ever have to worry about 
coming back to Clarion 
University; I am graduating in 
May. At first this thought thrilled 
me to death, but now I am not so 
sure. 

I can't complain because I had 
a great summer. I had many 
unique experiences. 

I swam with stingrays in Grand 
Cayman and climbed a waterfall 
in Jamaica. I realized that there is 
a whole big world out there that 
is waiting for me to visit. But as 
back to school time got nearer, I 
actually began to look forward to 
it. And when I finally got here, it 
was good old Clarion, but some- 
thing had changed. It wasn't the 
town or the people. It was my 
attitude. 

Call me a nerd, but instead of 
complaining about classses I 
want to go overboard doing the 
best I can in them. Instead of say- 
ing to myself, "there is always 
next week to spend time with 
friends," I find myself wanting 
to spend as much time with them 
as possible. And instead of avoid- 
ing people with whom I grew 
apart, I really want them to be in 
my life again. At the very least I 
want to make an effort to extend 
the olive branch. I know that at 
least in one case, it was definite- 
Continued on Page 3 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Asst. Sports Editor: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Asst. Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Ass*. Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
News Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Rachael Foflygen, Mike Markewenski, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, 
Kelly Palma, Jason Rhoades, Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker 
Lifestyles Writers: Jeff Chaff ee, James Gates, Kelly Palma, Cory Pittman 
Sports Writers: Jerry Collier, Angela Everly, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob 
Meyers, Marvin Welles 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, TimPuhala, Tamr Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamiltoa Julie Lope, Nicole 
Mildren, Kelly Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, Alvin Slaughter 

Names remaining in the staff box in the December 10 issue will receive co-curricular credit. 



READER RESPONSE 



"Too many 
nearby 

Dear Editor, 

It may seem facetious to com- 
plain about where college stu- 
dents put their feet. This is espe- 
cially so in an age when the 
awareness of the issues of racism, 
gun proliferation, drug use, fre- 
quent school massacres, date 
rape, teenage pregnancies and 
addiction to tobacco in our soci- 
ety is impossible to avoid. 

Who can explain what causes 
so many students to unconscious- 
ly, insensitively and impolitely 
attack, damage and dirty the best 
furniture the university can 
afford with meandering feet and 
footwear than plods the best and 
worst of our environment? 

H 



students put their feet ort 
seats and furniture." 



Some can very reasonably 
claim that parental teaching in an 
earlier time prevented these 
crude, irresponsible and less than 
civilized assaults on the persons 
and things that surround us most 
closely. 

Too many students plant their 
feet on nearby seats and furni- 
ture. A visit to Gemmell displays 
that sad and immature scene to 
the public. It's kid stuff, but the 
messages that behavior sends are 
many; all negative! 

First, it suggests that parents 
evidently failed to teach respect 
for their home, its costs and sac- 
rifices, even for the parents them- 
selves. Surely it's a put-down of 



the home from which the guilty 
came. 

It says that a shoe, clean or oth- 
erwise, misplaced on an adjoin- 
ing seat, shows no respect for the 
unseated others, for the universi- 
ty, its property, its limited budget 
or for the students of tomorrow. 

Aside from the insensitivity and 
disrespect it displays towards 
others, it proclaims that one has 
little self respect or concern for 
the perception of oneself it leaves 
with others. 

However, I am reminded to be 
thankful that my parents taught 
us to keep our feet on the floor. 
Be Better, 
Anonymous 



'Almost every week the cafeteria 
serves an unpopular dish that near- 
no one eats..." 



ly 



Dear Editor, 

In the April 23, 1998 issue of 
The Clarion Call, there was a car- 
toon in the entertainment section 
that read, "Instructions. Flush 
(toilet) twice, it's a long way to 
the cafeteria." Upon reading this, 
I had to laugh, but then I realized 
that the food at Chandler Dining 
Hall really is not very good. So I 
am offering three suggestions 
that I feel should improve the 
quality of the meals. 

The first revision should be 
made to the menu. Almost every 
week this cafeteria serves an 
unpopular dish that nearly no one 
eats. My solution is to have a 
group of students aid in the mak- 
ing of the menus. Therefore, the 
students would have more choic- 
es tha most of them were satis- 
fied with. 

The second issue that needs to 
be addressed is the temperature 
of the food. Almost all of the 
food is cold by the time the stu- 



dents get to eat their meals. This 
is probably the most urgent issue 
that could be corrected to 
increase students' tolerance for 
the meals provided. 

The third improvement should 
be to revise the recipes. Every 
once in a while, the food really 
does taste good, but the meals are 
not very consistent in taste. Many 
times, the food is very bland, 
which automatically turns the 
students off. 

So keep in mind a business's 
number one goal is to please the 
customer. Now there are many 
customers who are dissatisfied 
because since fall semester start- 
ed, there has been a drastic 
decline in food quality. So wehn 
the structural renovations are 
completed in the cafeteria, hope- 
fully the improvements in the 
food will be too. 
Sincerely, 
Erik Omlor 




Letters 

to 

the 
Editor 



Editorial Continued from Page 2 



"This is the first incident 

of rape I have ever heard 

of in Clarion..." 



Dear Editor, 

I found the article "Clarion man 
faces attempted rape charges" in 
the volume 80 issue from May 7, 
1998 an eye opener. This article 
made me see that Clarion is not a 
perfect crime free environment 
like everyone would like to 
believe. How many times a day 
do we see girls, especially, walk- 
ing outside of Clarion by them- 
selves? Is this really safe, and is 
there enough safety features on 
this campus? 

Even though this incident did- 
n't take place on campus, you 
still have to wonder what a per- 
son is to do if they are attacked 
on campus. Honestly, if anyone 
was raped, what could those "call 
buttons" do for you? And if I was 
being raped, I would not stay in 



\y worth making this effort 
because I would have really been 
missing out on someone who is 
probably one of the greatest peo- 
ple I have ever known. And I am" 
really glad we made peace early 
in the year too. Now we will have 
the whole year, instead of pulling 
an "I'm sorry, gotta run" at the 
May senior walk! 
I want to leave Clarion, know- 



ing that I did the best job I could 
and was the best person I could 
be. Advice to underclassmen: 
take advantage of every second. 
You have your whole life to 
climb waterfalls and swim with 
stingrays in foreign lands. 
Clarion is a land in itself that 
needs exploring first. Do the best 
you can and spend every second 
with the people you care about. 



one place. I would not and could 
not stay there and wait for Public 
Safety. Public Safety would prob- 
ably take too long and not show 
up in time. Would Public Safety 
even take one of those buttons 
being pushed seriously? This is 
Clarion. 

This is the first incident of rape 
I have ever heard of in Clarion.I 
feel really bad about this incident 
and hope nothing like this ever 
happens again. Are we safe in 
Clarion? Instead of busting up 
parties, we should be worrying 
about safety precautions on cam- 
pus. I am not saying that the 
school is unprepared, but a little 
old fashioned. 
Sincerely, 
Andrew Bitner 



The Clarion Call last semester and you 
or your advisor did not receive it, please 
put your name, phone number, and posi- 
tion you were on and place it in the 
Editor-in-Chief's mailbox in Room 270 
Gemmell. Please check in the folder out- 
side the newspaper for completed co-cur- 
ricular forms. Yours will be in the folder 
of the staff that you worked on. Thanks! 



Hide Park Continued From Page 2 



Surround yourself with the peo- 
ple who make you happy. Don't 
leave with any regrets. 

Right now, I feel like the only 
regret I will have left with is to 
not have taken my own advice 
sooner. 

Kristen Davis is a Senior 
Communication major. 



great-grandfather's head at Shibe 
Park in Philadelphia. I heard 
many fathers and mothers talking 
to their children about their base- 
ball experiences. Baseball was 
fulfilling its role as the national 
pastime by providing the stories 
needed to pass on our values and 
our culture. 

The passing on of tradition 
competes with the quick paced 
change of the later twentieth cen- 
tury. Traditions are presented less 
often and appear less relevant to 
younger generations. Loyalty to 
place is erased by mobility and 
Superstations: America's team- 
the Atlanta-formerly-Milwaukee- 
formerly-Boston Braves had 
replaced the Brooklyn (now Los 
Angeles) Dodgers. The kinds of 



moments I shared with my chil- 
dren at the Hall of Fame are 
becoming less frequent. My chil- 
dren and I now live 300 miles 
from Ebbett's Field where I saw 
my first baseball game. But 
McGwire's home run brought us 
back to Brooklyn, as it brought 
millions of fans back to their 
hometowns. And that is why 
McGwire's home run is good for 
America. 

Stanton Green is an anthropolo- 
gist who currently serves as Dean 
of the College of Arts and 
Sciences at Clarion University 
and is a lifelong baseball fan. He 
has recently written Baseball 
and the Next Generation of 
Americans. 



. « v <* * -w - 



Page 4. 



The Clarion Pall 



Septemhpr17,iQQ« 



September 17, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



READER RESPONSE 



" I don't expect the food to be extraordinary, but I 
believe right now it is not fit to serve a college student." 



Dear Editor, 

My letter is concerning 
Chandler Dining Hall. I think it is 
time for some changes in the din- 
ing hall to make the eating expe- 
rience more pleasurable there. 
We need to have a different vari- 
ety of foods and change these 
foods week to week. All I hear 
from my friends and peers are 
complaints of how the food 
stinks. 

Don't get me wrong. I don't 
expect the food to be extraordi- 



nary, but I believe right now it is 
not fit to serve a college student. 
Sometimes, my friends and I 
would rather skip a meal then to 
go eat at Chandler. On the week- 
ends it is even worse because 
there is only one line open. The 
key to this whole ordeal is vari- 
ety. It could change the students' 
outlook. 

Creativity in the minds of cooks 
will attract others and also stop 
the complaints. Perhaps they 
could change the lines and have 



u 



The Call is a valuable piece of work 
and should be looked at by all." 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to say that I feel 
The Clarion Call is a very bene- 
ficial piece of literature for those 
who read it. I think that the arti- 
cles are interesting, mainly 
because they deal directly with 
what is going on in our college 
commuinity. From sports to pub- 
lic safety summaries, the materi- 
al is not only entertaining but can 
also be helpful , like the previous 

mentioned public safety section. 
This makes students aware of any 
criminal-like problems on cam- 
pus, and by giving the names, it 
also allows us to take our own 
precautions. The sports section 
allows us to keep up to date on 
our athletic teams and their per- 
formances. All in all, I think that 
The Call is great. 
I am not sure of how many peo- 



Take A 
Walk (ii 

The W/dD 



Side... 
With 



pie read it, but I know I do most 
of the time. I am wondering if it 
would be at all possible to pro- 
vide each mailbox with one Call 
paper every week? I feel that 
only one is necessary because 
roommates could share. By pro- 
viding one for each mailbox, the 
range of your readership would 
be broadened considerably. I feel 
The Call is a valuable piece of 
work and should be looked at by 
all. I do realize that there are dif- 
ferent stations provided through- 
out campus, but sometimes it is 
just overlooked. If it was in the 
mailboxes, then people would 
find it more convenient to read. 

I think you are doing a good 
job, and I really like The Call. 
Keep up the good work! 

Sincerely, 
Kelly Lutz 




foreign foods like Italian, French, 
Chinese, and Spanish. Perhaps on 
the weekend they could make 
more than one line. 

Hopefully, the student repre- 
sentitives for Chandler Dining 
Hall can change the minds of 
those who work there. Then 
maybe we can leave with a smile 
of satisfaction rather than a frown 
of disapproval. 

Sincerely, 
Matt Hartle 



"I have heard many war 

stories involving 
the eating of the food..." 







Dear Editor, 

There are two issues that great- 
ly concern me. Our housing costs 
are being increased to over one- 
thousand dollars next semester. 
From what I have heard, this 
money is to be used to put new 
furniture in Campbell Hall as 
well as to remodel their bath- 
rooms. It is also to be used to put 
new windows in Nair and 
Wilkinson Halls. Well, perhaps 
Nair and Wilkinson need new 
windows, and I'm sure that the 
residents of Campbell will enjoy 
their new furniture and bath- 
rooms. However, I live in Ralston 
Hall, which has some of the old- 
est furniture on campus, and the 
bathrooms certainly leave some- 
thing to be desired. I'm not sug- 
gesting that I shouldn't have to 
pay for the renovations that are 
currently in order, but I am sug- 
gesting that the money for these 
projects could be better spent 
elsewhere. 

On the subject of better spent 
money, I would like to direct 
your attention to Chandler 
Dining Hall. This is probably the 
most feared and hated place on 



campus. One can never be sure 
that they will not become sick as 
a result of eating the food at 
Chandler. I have heard many war 
stories involving the eating of 
food prepared for the students of 
Clarion University by Daka. I 
myself, became ill once from the 
food at Chandler. Their selection 
is also terrible. Burgers, fries, and 
pizza get old after a while. The 
situation with milk is also appar- 
ently quite bad. Almost every 
time I try to get a glass of milk 
there isn't any, and when there is 
I am almost afraid to drink it. 
This wouldn't be such a problem 
for me if I had not personally 
seen someone spooning chunks 
out of the milk that they had just 
gotten. It also seems to be diffi- 
cult for Daka to make enough of 
the food that I do like. When I go 
back for seconds, there is none 
left. And this is usually early on 
in my meal. I would like to see 
these issues addressed, because 
they are very serious. 



Sincerely, 
Paul Flint 



441 



'I think that Patricia Meeley, the author, did an excel- 
lent job researching and conveying the message. 

Dear Editor, 

I was reading the article titled 
"Clarion deals with the year 2000 
computer crisis" last semester. I 
think that Patricia Meeley, the 
author, did an excellent job 
researching and conveying the 
message. It helped me to get a 



better idea of what has been 
going on with the computer sys- 
tem. 

I've been interested in getting 
the internet in the dorm rooms, 
but I guess before that happens 
there are more important prob- 
lems that need to be addressed. 



» 



I'm glad to find out that the uni- 
versity is looking into getting an 
updated e-mail system. Maybe 
this one will let us download files 
and surf the net. 



Sincerely, 
Eric Glenn 



"I saw a girl park her car in the 

same place without her flashers on, 

and she did not get a ticket." 



WMSI3=r3 



Tie-Dye Party-TUESDAY SEPT.22 at 9:00 p.m. 
Call Jessica with questions at 227-1929 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing this to address 
parking issues on Clarion's cam- 
pus. I feel that students should be 
allowed to park anywhere they 
want. We, the students of Clarion 
University, pay enough money to 
this school! 

I saw Public Safety give out 
rickets to cars in front of 
Campbell with their flashers on. 
The problem with that is, I saw a 
girl park her car in the same place 



without her flashers on, and she 
did not get a ticket. 

Now why is it that the other 
cars with people in them and 
who have their flashers on got 
tickets? I mean, come on! Five 
damn minutes is not going to kill 
anyone. I feel this is so wrong of 
Public Safety. Something should 
be done about it. 

Sincerely, 
Frank Frederick 






Positions are 
still available at 
The Clarion Call 
and all students 
are welcome. 
Please stop by 
The Call Office 
in 270 Gemmell 
or call at x2380. 



IF YOU'RE INTO DOPE, m 
YOU MIGHT AS WELL SMOKE THIS 




There's one sure way to see 
your future go up in smoke. 
Do drugs. 
Last year alone, America'^ 



businesses lost more than $60 
billion to drugs. So this year, 
most of the Fortune 500 will be 
administering drug tests. If you 



fail the test, you're out of a job. 

The message is simple. 
Doing drugs could blow your 
whole education. 



WE'RE PUTTINC DRUGS OUT OF BUSINESS. 

Partnership for a Drug-Free America Foundation for a Drug Free Pennsylvania— Media Partnership 



Pagd6 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 19 98 September 17, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



NEWSWIRE 



Computer problems 

Clarion students are 
concerned about prob- 
lems with the computer 
systems they use daily. 

For the full story, 
turn to page 7. 



Summer maintenance 

While students were 
away this summer, sever 
al projects took place to 
improve the campus. 
For more information, 

see page 8. 



Grejda named new 
dean 

Dr. Gail Grejda was 
recently named Dean of 
the College of Education 
and Human Services, 
after spending almost a 
year as interim dean. To 

learn more about her, 
turn to page 10. 



NewApplyWeb process 

The State System of 
Higher Education has 
recently unveiled a new 
on-line application sys- 
tem, where students can 
use the Internet to apply 
to any of the 14 SSHE 
schools, including 

Clarion University. 
Read more on 
page 9. 



Also inside: 

Student Senate page 8 

Faculty Senate page 11 

Public Safety page 9 



NEWS 



CNet pushes back opening of Bec ker Lab 



Computer problems continue 



REINHARD: Outlook 'gloomy' to frustrate Clarion students 




Says funding options limited 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Editor 



In her annual address to faculty 
Sept.l, Clarion University presi- 
dent Diane Reinhard said "the 
outlook is cloudy at best" for tap- 
ping into new revenue sources in 
the next several years. 
" What is very clear is that the 
costs associated with pressing 
needs and with mounting new ini- 
tiatives that might yield addition- 
al revenue will have to come from 
the reallocation of existing 
resources," she said. 

Earlier this year, the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) Board of Governors 
voted to freeze the tuition rate at 
all 14 SSHE universities with the 
requirement that each school trim 
their proposed budgets for fiscal 
year 1998-99 by a combined $8 

million in order to balance them. 

After long wait 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Clarion University president Diane Reinhard (above) made 
her annual Fall Faculty Address on September 1 in Hart 
Chapel. She touched upon numerous issues during that 
speech. 



According to information from 
the SSHE, the total reduction for 
each school would amount to less 
than one percent. 

Here at Clarion University, a 
total of $780,000 needed to be 
reallocated as part of the tuition 
freeze package. 



Reinhard told faculty that she 
will push for a multi-year plan 
when looking at budgets and real- 
locations as opposed to the cur- 
rent system where those financial 
items were handled on a yearly 
basis. 

During the speech, Reinhard 



also touched upon some of the 
major accomplishments that have 
occurred over the last year. She 
noted the efforts of Computing 
Services to both install the new 
CNet system as well as prepare 
the University for the "Year 2000 
or Y2k crisis." 

Another CU accomplishment 
she touched upon was the accred- 
itation of the College of Business 
by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB) last Spring. 

Something else Reinhard noted 
was that the University received a 
commendation from the review- 
ers of CU's Middle States 
Accreditation Periodic Review 
Report. 

She said that the report noted the 
progress made by the University 

continued on page 7 



New parking lot finally opens 



by Mark Strieker 
News Writer 



Student drivers were greeted 
with a new parking lot when they 
returned for the fall semester. The 
approximately three-hundred 
space lot on Greenville Avenue is 
operational, if not entirely com- 
plete. 

A wall still needs to be con- 
structed around the perimeters of 
the lot. Doug Hepler, a worker at 
the site, said the wall could be 
completed in about four weeks, 
but it may take more time. 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice 
president for finance and adminis- 
tration, said the final cost is not 
yet known, since the wall has not 
been built yet. Haberaecker esti- 
mates that the cost of construction 
will be over $500,000. the land 
on which the lot was constructed 
cost over $300,000 according to a 
deed at the Assessment Office in 
the Clarion County Courthouse. 



Haberaecker said $385,000 was Three dollars a week are taken 
allocated from a Residence Life from each student's room and 
Auxiliary Fund to pay for the lot. board fee and placed in the fund. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

The new parking lot on Greenville Avenue (above) opened 
on August 31. The parking situation on campus may 
become tricky once Parking Lot B is closed, which is set 
to begin September 25. 

Money in that fund comes from The Auxiliary fund is used to pay 
students who live on campus, for large-scale projects in resi- 



dence halls such as plumbing and 
painting. Habereacker said the 
money taken from the Auxiliary 
Fund will be replaced this year. 

Haberaecker said all the money 
used to construct the parking lot 
will eventually come from the 
Student Recreation Center fee. 
The Greenville lot was built to 
make up for spaces that will be 
eliminated by the construction of 
the Recreation Center. Half of 
parking lot B will be lost. 
Haberaecker said the earliest 
those spaces will be made 
unavailable is Friday, September 
25. 

Haberaecker said parking 
around campus is "much tighter 
than we expected." Sergeant Eric 
Grafton, of Public Safety, said a 
survey is being conducted this 
week to see how full parking lots 
are getting. Empty spaces are 
counted in. each lot every two 

continued on page 7 



by Courtney Spangler 
News Writer 

Clarion University students 
are up in arms over computer 
breakdowns, malfunctions, gen- 
eral problems and closed com- 
puter labs during the opening 
few weeks of the Fall 1998 
semester. 

Students agree that there are 
three major problems with the 
computer systems at Clarion's 
main campus. The first problem 
voiced by students is that there 
are never enough computers for 
them to use. Next, students are 
upset that the computer lab in 
Becker Hall, which has approxi- 
mately 70 terminals, was closed 
until after Labor Day. A third 
complaint is that the systems 
seem to be slower now than at 
the end of last semester. 



"They(the computers) are 
slow," said Casey Keck, sopho- 
more. "A lot of the problems 
occur when people don't know 
how to use the computers." 

There are seven major comput- 
er labs on campus, and each 
computer is used for a variety of 
tasks. From research to the 
Internet to word processing to 
writing computer programs, 
most students have projects that 
require computer access. 

Some students are upset with 
what seems to be constant wait- 
ing in order to use computers, 
especially with using labs in the 
residence halls. "Wilkinson Hall 
only has two computers with 
VAXA access, but they are also 
used for word processing," said 
Keck. "The dorms need more 
computers for both E-mail and 
for word processing." 

Another aspect that irritates 



students is the unavailability of 
many of the computer labs. 
Becker Lab was closed until 
Tuesday, Sept. 8, more than a 
week after classes started for the 
semester. 

Many students were annoyed 
by this fact. "It sucked," said 
Debbie Odosso, junior. 

"Becker Lab normally does not 
open until the first Thursday in 
any Fall semester," said Dr. 
Dana Madison, Chair of the 
Computer Information Science 
Department. "The lab is staffed 
by work-study students who 
meet on Tuesday to produce a 
schedule by Wednesday and be 
open by Thursday... that is as fast 
as you can turn around with stu- 
dent workers." 

Also, the CNet project, which 
is the new fiber-optic computer 
network being installed through- 
out the campus, slowed down the 



opening of Becker Lab because 
of work that still needed to be 
completed. 

Director of Computing 
Services Karen DeMauro was 
unavailable for comment regard- 
ing the progress of the CNet pro- 
ject or other computer concerns 
of students. 

The third complaint many stu- 
dents have with the computers is 
that they are too slow. "VAXA is 
very slow," said Douglas 
Haskins. "It takes forever to 
write a single E-mail message." 

"Why is it so slow? It's impos- 
sible," said Suzanne DeGrazia. 

According to information pro- 
vided by Computing Services, 
once the new fiber-optic lines are 
completely installed and the 
CNet project is up and running, 
the computers should run faster 
than before. 




» *zl4r * 



George Groff/Clarion Call 

Parking Lot B (above) is currently full, but will soon be 
empty once construction of the Student Recreation 
Center begins. 

Parking changes affect students (from page 6) 

counted in each lot every two hours. Grafton said an accurate count 
of how many cars are being parked in the lots won't be available until 
after the survey is concluded at the end of this week. 

Cheryl Beckman, a Senior Elementary Education major, is con- 
cerned that the Greenville lot isn't enough to compensate. Beckman 
said "I think we're going to be back to square one after we lose that 
parking lot." 

Beckman said she uses the Greenville lot every day. Melissa 
Obenrader, a Senior Rehabilitation Science major, said she will park 
in employee spaces and risk getting a fine. Obenrader, a commuter, 
says parking at the University is "ridiculous." 

Residents who live directly behind the Greenville lot are generally 
disappointed that the wall has not been built yet. Laurie Snyder of 19 
East Eighth Street says residents were promised that a wall would be 
built before the parking lot would be used. "Noise has definitely 
increased," said Snyder. 

Residents did say, however, that the lights in the lot are sufficiently 
directional and do not shine in their windows. 



College News... in brief 



Professor becomes first disabled person to 
scale Mount Everest 

by Katie Bodendorfer, College Press Exchange 

Tom Whittaker, a professor of adventure education at Prescott 
College, is returning to campus with a towering achievement behind 
him. 

He is the first disabled person to scale Mount Everest. After a cou 
pie of failed attempts, Whittaker, who lost his right foot and kneecap 
in a car accident nearly 20 years ago, successfully made the trek in 
May with help from a prosthetic foot. 

The injury has slowed, but never stopped, his mountaineering. To 
encourage others to follow suit, Whittaker founded the Cooperative 
Wilderness Handicapped Outdoor Group, an organization devoted to 
showing people that they can overcome their disabilities. 

"People should be valued for their contributions to society-not their 
gender, race or physical completeness," Whittaker said. " I'm dedi 
cated to lighting a fire in people by building their self-esteem, their 
feelings of empowerment and by engaging their powers of imagina 
tion. From there, they can make their contributions." 

Six of Whittaker 's students took his words to heart and agreed to fol 
low him up a portion of the mountain. The students picked up trash 
along the way and helped their professor and other disabled climbers 
set up base-camp tents at an altitude of 17,500 feet. When Whittaker 
and other experienced climbers continued up the mountain, the stu- 
dents dispersed- some to work on local reforestation projects, others 
to teach environmental education in local schools. 

Whittaker, a popular professor on campus, wants his students to find 
the same inner strength he did and to " envision themselves doing 
something unique after they graduate." 

"By seeking wisdom and apprenticing yourself to those people, you 
empower your vision and your life," he said. "We need to count our 
value by the positive effect we have on people's hearts after we die. If 
we count our value by the money we have when we die, then we've 
missed the point." 



Reinhard 
makes Fall 
Faculty 
Address 

(continued from 
page 6) 



in increasing the number of fac 
ulty. 

Accountability was another 
aspect that Reinhard spoke about 
during her speech. "While we're 
building a future that affirms our 
commitment to quality, we will 
need to spend more time on jus 
tifying our present," she said. 

She said the SSHE Board of 
Governors approved an account- 
ability framework for the State 
System that includes the use of 
24 "Performance Indicators" that 
are related to costs, student suc- 
cess, and diversity. 

Not only will we be expected 
to report on our performance vis 
vis these indicators, but the 
evaluation of State System presi- 
dents will be tied directly to pro- 
ductivity and accomplishments 
in the specified areas," she com- 
mented. 

An important issue Reinhard 
dealt with was the University's 
responsibility to fund renova- 
tions to facilities throughout 
campus, including those that are 
listed in the recently approved 
Facilities Master Plan. 

"Our commitments to quality 
in programs and services, the 
faculty and students we recruit, 
our facilities, and the technology 
and support that we provide for it 
all come at a cost," she said 
The increased burden we have 
been expected to shoulder for 
academic facility renovation is 
one example." 

She said that CU's estimated 
share of the multi-million dollar 
renovation and addition to 
Carlson Library is $4.89 million, 
and money is also needed to 
replace administrative software 
systems, which Reinhard said 
are " aging." 

After discussing these projects, 
she then said that the amount of 
money that Clarion University 
receives from the state continues 
to decrease. "Between FY 
(Fiscal Year) 1983-84 and FY 
1996-97, for example, state sup- 
port for all of higher education 
went from 11.5 percent to 9.9 
percent of the Pennsylvania 
General Fund Budget," she 
noted. " The state appropriation 
for Clarion declined as a percent- 
age of total Education and 
General revenue from nearly 60 
percent in FY 1989-90 to 55.2% 
in FY 1997-98." 



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$350,000 in renovations completed this summer 



by Elisabeth Navarra 
News Writer 



While students enjoyed the sum- 
mer, it was business as usual for 
the people who assist in the 
upkeep of facilities at Clarion 
University. 

Several small projects were 
undertaken to maintain the upkeep 
of the buildings and grounds on 
and off campus. Among the pro- 
jects completed were the installa- 
tion of a water line at Memorial 
Stadium, the painting of the water 
tower and the renovation of the 
bathrooms in Becht Hall. 

According to Clare Heidler, 
director or facilities management, 
there were two reasons for 
installing a water line at the stadi- 
um, a project which cost $36,290. 
The first reason Heidler men- 
tioned was that there wasn't a fire 
hydrant near the pole barn, which 
is located near the practice fields. 
The second reason for installing a 
waterline was to provide a source 
of water for the practice fields. 

Heidler said that rain has been 
the only source of water to the 



fields and for the past few sum- 
mers, there has hardly been any 
rain at all. The dry conditions 
caused the soil on the fields to 
become hard and this sometimes 
led to injuries of student athletes, 
Heidler noted. 

More renovations were done to 
the grounds at the practice fields 
after the water line was installed. 
"We did other work on three of the 
practice fields," Heidler said. 
"Those fields were developed 
from the material that was taken 
out when Wilkinson, Campbell, 
and Nair Halls were built." 

The material was dumped where 
the fields are now and used to help 
build them, he said. The past 
summer all the grass was removed 
from the fields, as well as the 
rocks and topsoil. Heidler said 
the fields were then regraded by 
dropping new topsoil and planting 
grass. Heidler could not provide 
cost figures for that practice field 
project. 

Another project that was com- 
pleted this summer was the paint- 
ing of the water tower, located 
near Chandler Dining Hall. "The 
water tower was painted because 



there was a lead-base paint on the 
tower," Heidler said. "The tower 
was beginning to chip and peel. If 
we had one more severe winter, 
that would have compounded the 
problem and all the paint would 
had to have been peeled." 

Heidler said that peeling all of 
the paint from the tower would 
have cost between $300,000 and 
$350,000. The total cost for the 
tower project was $83,350 
because Heidler said there were a 
minimal amount of chips on the 
paint, the tower was simply paint- 
ed over without removing the 
original paint. 

The bathrooms in Becht Hall 
also received a face-lift this sum- 
mer at a cost of $145,000. The 
interiors were completely gutted 
and new showers, drains, and fix- 
tures were installed. Heidler said 
he believes that all that may 
remain of the original bathrooms 
are the mirrors. 

A project that began in 
December was completed this 
summer, also. 15 to 17 new park- 
ing spaces were added behind 
Becker Hall in the former location 
of the basketball court. Heidler 



said the job cost about $8,500 
because the asphalt behind the 
building had to be extended to 
accommodate the new parking 
spaces. 

The fire alarm system in 
Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts 
Building was upgraded over the 
summer, as well. To abide by the 
Americans with Disabilities Act, 
the alarm pulls had to be lowered 
and strobe lights had to be added. 
This alarm upgrade project, which 
Heidler said costs 50 to 70 cents a 
square foot, will continue in 1999 
with renovations to Campbell 
Hall. 

A few other renovations that 
were done over the summer 
include: painting of the multi- 
purpose room and the hallways in 
Gemmell Student Complex; 
painting of most of the interior of 
Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts 
Building; replacing the boiler 
plant transformer, which Heidler 
said was done to prepare for the 
installation of an air conditioning 
system in Founders Hall. These 
three projects were done at a cost 
of $78,917, Heidler said. 



Renovations done this 
summer on campus: 

■ Water line installed at 
Memorial Stadium 

■ Practice fields regraded 
.....i _ • 



I CL water tower painted 

Bathrooms in Becht 
Hall gutted and new 
showers, drains and 
fixtures installed 

Parking spaces added 
behind Becker Hall 

■ Fire alarm system 
upgraded at Marwick- 
Boyd 

I Hallways painted in 
Gemmell Complex 



Student Senate names committee chairs for 1998-99 year 

by Steve Ostroskv Senators were nampH *« c. nu i ** 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Editor 

Committee chairs were 
announced at Monday's first 
meeting of the Clarion University 
Student Senate. 

Senators are required to serve on 
at least one sub-committee and 
two standing committees. 
Committee chairs only have to 
serve on one additional commit- 
tee, according to Senate appropri- 
ations chair Leslie Suhr. 

There currently are eight differ- 
ent standing committees on which 



Senators were named to serve. 
Suhr said that she, Vice President 
Nathan Rearick and President 
Tammi Snyder decided which 
Senators would sit on or chair 
each committee. 

Student Senate committee chairs 
for the 1998-99 academic year 
are: Appropriations Committee, 
Leslie Suhr; Student Facilities 
Committee, Jason Huska; 
Executive Committee, Tammi 
Snyder; Student Relations 
Committee, Naqeeb Hussain; 
Committee on Sub-Committees, 
Brian McQuillan; Committee on 
Rules, Regulations and Policies, 




r 



Rush 
0X 

Theta Chi 
38 Years of Tradition 



George Groff/Clarion Call 
Clarion University Student Senate held their first meeting 
of the 1998-1999 academic year Monday night in Gemmell 
Student Complex. 

Nick Chervenak; Dining In other business, Senate is still 

Committee, Bonny Spence; in the process of naming a new 

Housing Committee, Eric Kemp; secretary. Suhr said that 15 peo- 

Campus Safety, Health and pie have applied for the position 

Environmental Concerns and it is anticipated that the new 

Committee, Daniel Mellon. secretary will be named by the 



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next Senate meeting, set for 
September 21. 

After the meeting, Suhr said that 
she is looking forward to a good 
year for Senate. 

"It's going to be a busy, pro- 
gressive year if everyone works 
hard," she said. "We are doing a 
lot of restructuring work with 
Senate itself along with making 
connections in regards to the 
University." 

She said that she is hoping for a 
smooth transition in the budgeting 
process, now that she is taking 
over the Appropriations 
Committee. Another major goal 
for Senate, Suhr said, is a plan to 
revise their constitution and by- 
laws. 

Finally, she said that Senate is 
hoping for more student input 
throughout the year. ""We can't 
do it all...other students have to 
get involved." 

Clarion University Student 
Senate meets every Monday dur- 
ing the academic year at 7:30 p.m. 
in 246 Gemmell Complex. 



FAX your news 

story ideas to 

The Clarion Call 

at 226-2557 



September 17, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



; 






j 




Harassment by phone 

-On September 10 at 1:13 a.m., 
two residents of Wilkinson Hall 
contacted Public Safety about 
harassing phone calls. 

Criminal mischief 

Campus police reported some- 
one shot a window at Gemmell 
Student Complex on September 
10. 

Minors consumption 

-Public Safety reported that 
Brian A. Sten was cited for 
under age drinking and posses- 
sion of alcohol on September 9. 

Theft 

-According to Public Safety, 
someone removed a foam sign 
from Chandler Dining Hall on 
September 8. 

Minors consumption 

-John M. Jordan was cited for 
minors consumption on 
September8. Public Safety 
reported he had a bottle of 
alcohol in his possession. 

Man arrested 

-According to Public Saftey, 
Rocco Million, who is not a 
Clarion University student, was 
arrested on September 6 and 
charged with resisting arrest, 
disorderly conduct, under age 
possession of alcohol, public 
drunkeness and criminal mis- 
chief. 

Harassment 

-On September 3, Frederick 
Walker was found guilty of 
harassment on a complaint filed 
by a resident of Campbell Hall 
in April, according to Public 
Safety. 

Damaged car 

-On August 31, Public Safety 
reported damage to a '91 Toyota 
that was located in Parking Lot J 
between lp.m and 4p.m. 

Criminal mischief 

-Public Safety reported criminal 
mischief involving a pine tree 
outside of Gemmell Student 
Complex on September 31. 



SSHE unveils new Apply Web software 



by Gretchen Druschel 
News Writer 

Students who want to apply to 
any of the fourteen State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE) can 
now do so over the Internet. 

ApplyWeb is an easier and faster 
way for college-bound students to 
apply to any of the 14 SSHE uni- 
versities in Pennsylvania. 

"Clarion was the first college to 
have a link with college net 
ApplyWeb server. Clarion has 
tried for the past two years to have 
an application process over the 
Net, however real success did not 
occur until we linked up with 
College Net," said Adam 
Earnheardt, Assistant Admissions 



Director. He said Clarion recom- 
mended College Net to the SSHE 
in regards to a joint venture with 
the other thirteen state universi- 
ties. Clarion also has links at six 
other web sites for potential appli- 
cants. 

After the applicant determines 
which school or schools they 
would like to apply to they simply 
fill out the designated application. 
If they want to apply to more than 
one school the ApplyWeb retains 
the bsic information and then 
copies it onto all the other appli- 
cations such as their name and 
Social Security number. This fea- 
ture of the system makes it quick- 
er for the applicant to fill out sev- 
eral applications. 
Then the ApplyWeb sends an e- 



mail to one or more college's 
admissions office notifying them 
of an Internet application. The 
college cannot take the applica- 
tion fee until they receive the 
application. The applicant will 
receive notification from college 
net, the ApplyWeb server opera- 
tor, when the admissions office 
receives their application. 

Even though the ApplyWeb 
server creates an easier way for 
applicants to apply, they still have 
to send transcripts through the 
mail. Overall, most applicants for 
the next five years will still con- 
tinue to use "hard copy" applica- 
tions. Clarion's Admissions 
Office has already seen an 
increased usage of the ApplyWeb 
system for them. However, most 



students still do not know about 
the ApplyWeb site. Desyre 
Nitowski, a junior Special 
Education/Elementary Education 
major, said that, "No, I didn't 
know of such a system on the Net. 
If it would have been accessible to 
me back then I would have possi- 
bly pondered the idea." 

Also, Jennifer Westerman, a 
freshman Special Education 
/Elementary Education major, 
said, "No, I am not familiar with 
that system. The Internet is used a 
lot today and therefore is more 
convenient for me." 

Future applicants can check out 
the ApplyWeb system at 
w ww.sshechan .edu . 



College of Ed. receives $6,000 Heinz PDS Grant 



by Jennifer Mathis 
News Writer 



At the end of last semester when 
students were shutting their 
books and breathing a sigh of 
relief, welcoming the year's end, 
the faculty and adminstration of 
Clarion University and Clarion 
Area School District were just 
cracking their books, preparing to 
research and create a Professional 
Development School (PDS) plan 
that would win them a $6,000 
grant from the Heinz Endowment. 
The Clarion Area School 
District was one of only six dis- 
tricts across the state awarded the 
grant, which will be used as seed 



money to implement the PDS 
plan. 

According to the application for 
the Planning Grant, the purpose of 
the PDS is to "improve student 
learning, prepare teachers plan- 
ning to enter the field of educa- 
tion, continue professional devel- 
opment of those who are currently 
teaching, and research different 
teaching practices." 

Clarion Area Elementary School 
Principal Sue Ellen Gourley said, 
"Our main goal is to come up with 
a common vision of good teach- 
ing." Dr. Anne Creany, one writer 
of the grant proposal, said, "This 
program will serve as a teaching 
hospital." This "teaching hospi- 



tal" will take place for the first 
time in October when the mem- 
bers will attend a retreat in Cook 
Forest. At the retreat, members 
can share ideas on what makes 
teaching effective. 

When Education majors begin 
student teaching, they will no 
longer be paired with a single 
teacher, but with a whole team of 
educators. University faculty will 
spend more time teaching in 
grades K-12. 



The members forming this PDS 
plan are currently working on 
other grant proposals for Clarion 
University and Clarion Area 
Schools. 

Other members of the grant 
team included Dr. Gail Grejda, 
Dean of the College of Education 
and Human Services; Dr. Vickie 
Harry, Interim Associate Dean of 
the College of Education; and 
four other members of the Clarion 
University Education department. 



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The Clarion CalJ 



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.inn 



aSeptwTihpr4.7^Q^ 



After a yearlong search 



Grejda named Dean of 
Education and Human Services 



by Mike Markewinski 
News Writer 



As the new term begins, students 
in the College of Education and 
Human Services welcomes a new 
dean. 

Dr. Gail Grejda, a professor of 
education at Clarion University 
since 1988 was. the interim dean 
since August 1997. 

"I have always been a lifelong 
learner," Grejda said. Being a 
learner has allowed her to be full 
of energy, which she said helps 
her bring fresh ideas and the tech- 
nology concept to classrooms. 

"By integrating technology with 
teaching, it gives the teacher the 
opportunity to deal with individ- 
ual students on a one-on-one 
basis," she said. "Technology 
gives (the teacher) the opportuni- 
ty to clone themselves." 

Dr. Grejda said she understands 
how the technology can help 
teachers. For 17 years, Grejda 
worked as an elementary teacher. 
"You really need to work with stu- 
dents one-on-one," she said. 

Students at the education depart- 
ment will be taught how to inte- 
grate the technology into their 
lessons, she said. As part of the 
new education plans, Grejda is 
working on ITV (Instruction 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Dr. Gail Grejda (pictured above) was named Dean of the 
College of Education and Human Services over the sum- 
mer. She had been the interim dean for almost a year 
before a decision was made. 



Television) graduate classes to be 
transmitted as far away as the 
Bahamas. 

In addition to adding more tech- 
nology lessons into the curricu- 
lum, Grejda said she plans to 
involve education majors in more 
hands on field service opportuni- 
ties. She said she feels that pro- 
grams such as these will help 
strengthen the cooperative bridges 
between basic and higher educa- 
tion. 

To strengthen the programs, a 
Heinz grant totaling $6,000 was 
given as seed money to help 
establish a working relationship 
between Clarion Area Schools 
and the University Education 



department. 

Grejda said she is also commit- 
ted to maintaining the high level 
of national accreditation which 
the College had built. The 
National Council for 

Accreditation of Teacher 
Education recently completed a 
five-year review of Clarion's pro- 
grams. Although official word 
will not be available until next 
month, Dr. Grejda termed the visit 
"very positive." 

As for her personal motives, she 
said, "Four generations of my 
family have graduated from 
Clarion and understandably, my 
loyalties to Clarion are deep." 



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College Campus News 



Absentee voting made easier for PA 
college students, thanks to Ursinus 
senior 

by Christine Tatum t College Press Exchange 



The whole notion of having someone drive four hours to help her 
voie--l process that would take less than 10 minutes-offended Amy 
Brown's sensibilities. 

If she'd had a car on campus, the rising senior at Ursinus College 
in Collegeville, Pa., would have made the one-hour drive home by 
herself. But she didn't. And because the school is in the same coun- 
ty as her voting precinct, state law prevented her from getting an 
absentee ballot. 

" I couldn't believe 1 wouldn't be able to vote because I was in 
school," she said. "And all I could think about were those people 
who would see my name and say, 'Well, there's one more apathetic 
Gen X-er who doesn't care about voting.' That wasn't true of me, 
and it's not true of a lot of people my age." 

Brown, 21, figured other people were in the same predicament. At 
her father's suggestion, she presented her case during her freshman 
year to state Sen. Stewart Greenleaf and inspired a.new state law that 
expands absentee voting rights. The new statute, in effect since 
March 30, doesn't apply to students only. It also pertains to people 
who works outside their hometowns--but within the same county- 
and are unable to make it to the polls before or after work. 

At Ursinus alone, the new law will make it possible for more than 
160 students to get absentee ballots. Its impact statewide will be bet- 
ter determined when elections roll around again in November. 

"The problem dealt with a quandary that many college students 
faced," Greenleaf said. "Often they don't have adequate transporta- 
tion, and if they're not close to their voting district, it may as well be 
another county." 

Three years and two elections passed before the new law was 
approved, but Brown, an economics and business major, said the wait 
was worth it. 

"I couldn't even vote for my own bill when it was on the ballot," 
she said. " But it was pretty cool to see that the system really can 
work. One person really can make a difference. 

' It just goes to show what kind of huge change can be produced 
from a five-minute phone call," she added. "And I would have never 
known if I'd never tried." 



Guess what Johnny's bringing 
for Show and Tell today. 



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1 

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Every da* thousand! of kicU bring gvas to idwol 

Find out how to help get gun* but of the Hindi of children. 



Not one mare lust life. Not one more grieving family. Not Doe more, 



» m a 




Spptomhgr17.1998 

Disabled students 
sue for access to* 

voter registration 

Courtesy: College Press 
Service 



Thp Clarion Call 



Page 11 



>»*»»*♦«#*»*-». »«<*.«, 



Faculty Senate raises questions about 
committee appointment 



The U.S. Court of Appeals 
ruled recently that public col- 
leges and universities throughout 
the Fourth Circuit must provide 
voting information and voter reg- 
istration to disabled students. 

The ruling stems from a 
suit filed against several Virginia 
officials by the National 
Coalition for Students with 
Disabilities. The coalition 
alleged that at least one Virginia 
University dodged its responsi- 
bility to provide voter informa- 
tion to disabled students as out- 
lined in the 1993 National Vother 
Registration Act. 

Some school and state 
officials argued that colleges and 
universities should be exempt 
from the law and free of the cum- 
bersome and costly duties of dol- 
ing put information and signing 
up new voters. 

A three-judge panel of 
the appellate court sided with the 
coalition, ruling that the law 
requires colleges to ask disabled 
students whether they are regis- 
tered to vote. The panel also said 
the law requires colleges to keep 
registration materials on hand 
and, if needed, must assist stu- 
dents with completing necessary 
paperwork. 

The ruling affects public 
campuses throughout the Fourth 
Circuit-Maryland, North 

Carolina, South Carolina, 

Virginia, and West Virginia. 



Interested in a 
business major? 

i The College of 
Business 
Administration has 
scheduled a group 

visit day for 

Saturday, Sept. 19 at 

Still Business 

Administration 

Center. 

The event begins at 

10 a.m. and will 

include free lunch at 

Chandler Dining 

Hall. 



by Angela Everly 
News Writer 



Discussion Monday at the first 
Faculty Senate meeting of the 
1998-99 academic year revolved 
around committee appointments 
and new information about a think 
tank report conducted by the 
Commonwealth Foundation in 
Harrisburg. 

The report implies that State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) universities along with 
Penn State, Temple, Lincoln, 
and the University of Pittsburgh 
are "failing to provide 
Pennsylvania students with the 
fundamentals of a college educa- 
tion," according to Professor 
Colleen Sheehan, a member of the 
Governor's Commission on 
Academic Standards. 

Senate decided to obtain more 
information about the study 
before discussing the issue fur- 
ther. 

Dr. Ralph Leary, Chair of the 
Committee on Academic 
Standards, said that there were 50 
to 60 more suspensions during the 
1997-98 academic year than in the 



year 1996-97. Leary said that if 
anyone on Senate had further 
questions, he wouldrelay them to 
the former chair of the 
Committee. 

Also at the meeting, Faculty 
Senate Chair Dr. Mary Jo Reef 
announced that Senate now has a 
World Wide Web site, and that all 
information about meetings will 
be made available to the public on 
this new Web page. 

Dr. Scott Kuehn, also a Senate 
member, designed the site. The 
web site can be accessed from the 
Clarion University homepage 
(www.clarion.edu) and then click- 
ing on Faculty Senate. A meeting 
schedule, an on-line discussion, a 
membership list, records of min- 
utes of past meetings, Faculty 
Senate's constitution and by-laws 
are some of the options to choose 
from on the Web site. There are 
also links to other SSHE universi- 
ties as well as some web sites for 
parliamentary help. 

Senate minuies fr jm as far back 
as three years ago available for 
public view on the Web site. 

In other business, Senate 
approved the appointment of vari- 



ous faculty and staff members to 
serve on different committees or 
sub-committees. Questions were 
raised about the appointment of 
Dr. Donald Nair of Counseling 
Services to the Committee on 
Academic Standards by Dr. 
Jeanne Slattery. She said that stu- 
dents might be uncomfortable 
having their counselor decide 
their academic future. She added 
that his presence on the commit- 
tee might violate ethical 
Psychology standards. 

While all other committee 
appointments were approved, the 
motion to approve the appoint- 
ment of Nair and Janis Jarecki- 
Liu to the Committee on 
Academic Standards was tabled 
until Senate's next meeting. 
The committee chairs of Faculty 
Senate for the 1998-99 academic 
year are: Academic Standards, 
Dr. Ralph Leary; Budget 
Committee, Dr. Karen Bolinger; 
Committee on Courses and 
Programs of Study, Dr. Elizabeth 
MacDaniel; Committee on the 
Committees and Rules, Dr. Fred 
Keen; Committee on Faculty 
Affairs, Dr. Hallie Savage; 



Committee on Institutional 
Resources, Dr. Peter Dalby; 
Committee on Student Affairs, Dr. 
Doug Smith; Committee on 
Venango Campus, Dr. Anita Hall. 
Faculty Senate will have a 
police meeting Monday, Sept. 21 
at 3:30 p.m. at B-8 Hart Chapel. 
Their next regular meeting has 
been set for Monday, Sept. 28 also 
at 3:30 p.m. in B-8 Hart Chapel. 



It's not too 

late to join 

The Clarion Call! 

We are looking for 

writers, ad sales reps, 

ad design staffers, 

proofreaders, 

circulation personnel, 

and on-line editors. 

Find out more by 
stopping in The CaLl 
cilice, 270 Gemmell 
Student Complex or 
by calling us at 
226-2380. 



More College News 

Sorority sister guilty of stealing from sisters 



Courtesy: College Press 
Service 



Sisters of Pittsburgh State 
University(Kansas)'s chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma watched in 
stony silence in a Kansas court- 
room as their former sister, Kelly 
Jennings, pleaded guilty to steal- 
ing $74, 150 from the sorority. 

With hejp from her parents, 
Jennings, who had served as the 



sisterhood treasurer, repaid the 
sorority $76, 325-enough to 
cover the money she had taken 
and the expense of an accountant 
hired to look into the sorority's 
finances. 

Jennings, who has dropped out 
of school and is working to repay 
her parents for the restitution, 
sobbed in the courtroom: " I'm 
sorry. It just got out of hand. I'm 
very sorry." 



Jennings was sentenced to two 
years of probation and 100 hours 
of community service. She is 
liable for any remaining court fees 
and must draft a handwritten letter 
of apology to the sorority. 

Jennings' punishment isn't harsh 
enough, many sorority members 
said. 

"I think she deserved jail time," 
Tri-Sigma member Lucia Harding 
told the university's student news- 



paper, The Collegio. 
'There was no lesson learned." 
Added member MandLSchnaer. 
"She'll go (clean) up a park and 
get on with her life. This has 
damaged rush and affected our 
reputation on campus. The sen- 
tence is not fair to us. The penal- 
ty isn't strong enough." 



SCJ Exec Board 

in Dr. Hilton's 

office on 

Tuesday at 

3:30 p.m. Be 

there or be 

square 



ALLIES MEETING 



■ V 



Wednesday September 23, 1 998 in Psychology 
Department Lounge, 23 Becht Hall @ 3:30 



Committees will be formed at this meeting. 

Allies is a group for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual 

and Straight Supporters, who do educational 

and social programming. 

Call Jan Grigsby at 226-2295 or contact via 
e-mail at JGRIGSBY for further information 




Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 17. 1998 



LIFEWIRE 



Simple Gifts 

Unique Folk group 
perfoms on cam- 
pus. 
See Page 14 



Music Review 

Reviewer James 

Gates explains 

why rock isn't 

dead with Korn 

and Hole's new 

albums. 

See page 14 



Dave Barry 

wonders if old 

things are cool ,does 

that make him cool 

again? 

See page 15 



Calendar of 
Events 

For what's hap- 
pening on and 
around campus, 
see page 13 



The Appeal of TV 

Wrestling 

Why is it big on col- 
lege campus's? 
see page 13 



Welcome Back 
Students! 




LIFESTYLES 



Clarion University holds Convocation 



Freshmen welcomed with new program 



by Jeff Say 
Lifestyles Editor 



As the new year begins, the famil- 
iar sights and sounds of campus 
return. The buzz of students get- 
ting reacquainted with old friends, 
students rushing to class and the 
wide-eyed look of fear, astonish- 
ment and bewilderment on the 
faces of freshmen as they wander 
around campus. Those freshmen 
feelings were eased this year with a 
Freshmen convocation.. The pro- 
gram featured a bagpipe concert, 
the faculty in full academic regalia, 
welcoming speeches by both facul- 
ty and student leaders, and the 
freshmen's first chance to sing the 
Clarion University Alma Mater. 



The evening was kicked off by 
Evan Elliot, a student here at 
Clarion, who treated the new stu- 
dents to a bagpipe conceit as they 
entered Marwick-Boyd. Various 
welcoming speeches were given 
including President Reinhard who 
welcomed the freshmen to the 
University. The students were then 
greeted by sophomore theatre 
major Eric Grugel who gave them 
an idea of life at the university. 
Faculty members Dr. Ngo Tu, Dr. 
Iseli Krauss, and Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald spoke on "what it 
means to be part of an academic 
community" and "the historical 
tradtions of the university." A 
mulitmedia presentation designed 
by students taking Dr. Sue Hilton's 



presentation graphics. The convo- 
cation ended with the freshmen 
singing the Alma Mater and a 
musical recessional as the faculty 
exited the auditorium. 

This years convocation was pro- 
posed by the faculty led Retention 
Advisory Council. The council's 
plans for the program were to 
encourage students to get involved 
in campus life and in the process 
get a positive start as they begin a 
new chapter in their academic life. 
The convocation was used as a 
forum for students to see the differ- 
ence from their previous education 
and that they are entering a level of 
higher learning by utilizing ceremo- 
nial effects. According to Dr. 
Barbara Grugel, chair of the convo- 



cation committee, "Convocation 
provides a visual link to the univer- 
sity's history. This ceremonial 
introduction to college life also is 
designed to be a bonding experi- 
ence for the students who will 
become the graduating class of 
2002." 

Student interest in the convoca- 
tion was high. Adam Earnhardt 
Chairperson of the Freshmen 
Convocation Subcommittee said, 
"The committee was impressed 
with the freshmen's turnout. I was 
glad to see the support for the fac- 
ulty and staff." 

Faculty believes that the convo- 
cation will help ease the students 
transition to life here at Clarion in 
the upcoming weeks. 



A new "Adventure" joins Clarion nightlife 




Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
nights, with food being served 
until 1 am every night. 

This first week of fabulous 
food and beverage specials leads 
directly to the September 24-27 
GRAND OPENING! D.J.'s will 
be spinning your favorites from 
10-2 on both Thursday and 
Saturday nights and Friday 
night's highlight is a cruise give- 
away. Yes, I said cruise give- 
away. On Friday night some 
lucky person dancing and 
singing karaoke will be the win- 
ner of a cruise to be given away 
at midnight by the featured D.J. 
"We don't want this to be just a 



'one night a week' place. 
People are welcome here every 
night." says Missy Bobbert, part 
owner of Adventures. 
The festivities continue into 
October with live bands being 

continued on page 13 

"We welcome college and 
people of the community. 
The college crowd was 
anticipated from the 
beginning and are very 
welcome here." 
— Missy Bobbert, part 
owner , Adventures 



George Groff/Clarion Call 
Adventures opens it s doors to the public. 



by Nicole DeFrank 
Contributing writer 

It was known as "the place to 
be" on a Thursday. Now it has 
been recycled into an 
"Adventure" everyday. With a 
litde creative decoration and a 
lot of colorful paint, most of the 
old, familiar Roost tables and 
wall structures have been refur- 
bished and made a part of the 
new Bar and Grill. 
Posters and props displaying 
adventures around the world will 
surround you throughout the 
restaurant. Live entertainment 



will take you through the week- 
ends. And popular food and 
beverage specials will fill you 
up throughout the night. 
Beginning Monday, September 
21, daily food and beverage 
specials will be in full swing. 
Sunday and Monday nights will 
feature three television screens 
of football mania, as well as 
super prize giveaways. 
Tuesday nights will offer free 
game night including pool and 
foos ball. Wednesdays will 
include the ever popular wing 
specials. Adventures will fea- 
ture live entertainment every 




George Groff/Clarion Call 



September 17,1998 

continued from page 12 

featured on the first Friday and 
the following three Saturdays of 
the month. The band Final 
Approach will be performing on 
the Saturday of the Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

Adventures offers great food, a 
unique atmosphere, and friendly 
service. "We welcome college 
students and people of the com- 
munity," says Bobbert. "The 
college crowd was anticipated 
from the beginning and are very 
welcome here." 

This bar and grill has many 
unique and exciting adventures 
in store for the town of Clarion. 
With new beverage and food 
specials, Adventures is a new 
addition to the Clarion night life. 

Wrestling 
has college 
viewers in a 
head lock 

by Caryn Rousseau 
College Press Service 

Walk into just about any frater- 
nity house or college dorm around 
9 p.m on a Monday night and 
you'll likely find rambunctious 
guys pretending to throw chairs at 
one another and yelling, "Here 
comes the Stone Cold Stunner!" 

Its really big with us because it's 
the one sport where there are no 
real teams involved," said Tom 
Mclnereney, a sophomore at 
Syracuse University who watches 
wrestling with his friends. "We 
can watch the same channel with- 
out flipping to see the Yanks' 
score or who's winning the Ranger 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



game. 



Fans rattle off the names of their 
favorite wrestlers — Big Poppa 
Pump, Disco inferno, Dude Love 
and Psychosis. 

It's the aggression of professional 
wrestling that keeps men glued to 
the tube, said Dr. Robert Burton, 
vice president of the Sports 
Psychiatry Group at Northwestern 
Memorial Hospital in Chicago. 



BOOK NOOK 

'Area's largest selection of mag- 
azine's. 

'Special order books recieved in 
less than a week. 
'Cliff Note's 

'Lot's of good stuff to read!!! 
532 Main Street 226-5120 



Calendar of Events 



Adventures interior has been refurbished. 




^ 



Today 

•Tennis vs. Indiana 3:30 pm 
•Golf at U of Pitt-Greensburg 

Fall Challenge KS&k^^^ 

•Sorority Rush Information 

Meeting (Gem MP) 7pm 

•Clarion University of PA 

Speech and Debate Team's 

1998 British Debate 

Friday 

•Admissions Day (Chap) 9 

am 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at Charleston W. VA Tournament 

•Golf at Bucknell Fall Invitaitonal 

•Sorority Rush begins 

Saturday 

•Football at Shepherd 1 pm 

•Residence Hall Softball Tournament and Picnic 10 am 

- 5 pm (Stad) 

•Cross Country at Slippery 

Rock 

•UAB Trip to Sea World 

(outside Gem) 8:15 am 

•Tennis at Shippensburg 

•Golf at B ucknell Fall y W '*% 

Invitational K m 

•Volleyball at Charleston W. VA Tournament 

Sunday 

•Raindate: Residence Hall Softball Tournament and 



Picnic 

•Tennis at Shippensburg 

•MSS Spiritual 3:30 (Chap) 

Monday 

•ROSH HASHANAH 

•Freshmen Advising Week begins 

•Sanford Gallery exhibit, "The Pittsburgh Biennial" 

(Marwick-Boyd) continues through Oct. 8 

•Womens Studies Brown Bag Luncheon, Dr Jean 

Rumsey, "One Feminist's View of Death and Dying" 

(250/252 Gem) noon 

•Faculty Senate Policy Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 3:30 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30pm 

Tuesday 

•Golf at Edinboro University 

Challenge 

•Freshmen Education Majors Group 

Advising Session (Gem MP) 7pm 

•Volleyball vs Lock Haven 7pm 

•Intramural Tennis Roster due 

•Intamural Field Goal Contest Roster 

due 

•Intramural 10k Relay Roster due 

Wednesday 

•Undecided Freshmen Advising Mtg." (Gem MP) 

4-6pm 

•Dr. Samuel Hazo, state poet of PA (Chap) 7:30 

•Intramural One Pitch Softball Roster Due Sept 29 

•Intramural Power Lifting Roster Due Sept 29 

•Intramural Indoor Soccer Roster Due Sept 29 



UNIVERSITY INN 
226-7200 

Nightly Specials 



|Monday: $.15 wings 6:00-? 
Monday Night Football 
3T.V. Screens 
[Wednesday: $.50 pizza by 
jthe slice. $4 whole large 8-? 

FREE Pool ALL DAY!!! 
[Thursday: BUCK Night!!! 

I Friday: Live music by 

"SIMON SEr 
| Saturday: FREE pizza at 
Midnight. 

|DJ EVERY TUES. & THURS. 



Dan Smith's 
Candies and Gifts 

Chocolate for every occasion. 

-FREE gift wrapping 

-Greek chocolate letters 

-Gifts for everybody 

-Novelty candy 

-Gift Baskets Delivered to the Dorms. 

Purchase. 
Expires December 31,1998 



612 Main Street 

Clarion PA 

16214 

(814)227-2255 

HOURS: 

10:00-5:00 Mon-Sat 
10:00-8:00 Friday 









Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 



September 17,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



LIFEWIRE 



Simple Gifts 

Unique Folk group 
perfoms on cam- 
pus. 
See Page 14 



Music Review 

Reviewer James 

Gates explains 

why rock isn't 

dead with Korn 

and Hole's new 

albums. 

See page 14 



Dave Barry 

wonders if old 

things are cool ,does 

that make him cool 

again? 

See page 15 



Calendar of 
Events 

For what's hap- 
pening on and 
around campus, 
see page 13 



The Appeal of TV 

Wrestling 

Why is it big on col- 
lege campus's? 
see page 13 



Welcome Back 
Students! 




LIFESTYLES 



Clarion University holds Convocation 

w 

Freshmen welcomed with new program 



by Jeff Say 
Lifestyles Editor 



As the new year begins, the famil- 
iar sights and sounds of campus 
return. The buzz of students get- 
ting reacquainted with old friends, 
students rushing to class and the 
wide-eyed look of fear, astonish- 
ment and bewilderment on the 
faces of freshmen as they wander 
around campus. Those freshmen 
feelings were eased this year with a 
Freshmen convocation.. The pro- 
gram featured a bagpipe concert, 
the faculty in full academic regalia, 
welcoming speeches by both facul- 
ty and student leaders, and the 
freshmen's first chance to sing the 
Clarion University Alma Mater. 



The evening was kicked off by 
Evan Elliot, a student here at 
Clarion, who treated the new stu- 
dents to a bagpipe concert as they 
entered Marwick-Boyd. Various 
welcoming speeches were given 
including President Reinhard who 
welcomed the freshmen to the 
University. The students were then 
greeted by sophomore theatre 
major Eric Grugel who gave them • 
an idea of life at the university. 
Faculty members Dr. Ngo Tu, Dr. 
Iseli Krauss, and Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald spoke on "what it 
means to be part of an academic 
community" and "the historical 
traduons of the university." A 
mulitmedia presentation designed 
by students taking Dr. Sue Hilton's 



presentation graphics. The convo- 
cation ended with the freshmen 
singing the Alma Mater and a 
musical recessional as the faculty 
exited the auditorium. 

This years convocation was pro- 
posed by the faculty led Retention 
Advisory Council. The council's 
plans for the program were to 
encourage students to get involved 
in campus life and in the process 
get a positive start as they begin a 
new chapter in their academic life. 
The convocation was used as a 
forum for students to see the differ- 
ence from their previous education 
and that they are entering a level of 
higher learning by utilizing ceremo- 
nial effects. According to Dr. 
Barbara Grugel, chair of the convo- 



cation committee, "Convocation 
provides a visual link to the univer- 
sity's history. This ceremonial 
introduction to college life also is 
designed to be a bonding experi- 
ence for the students who will 
become the graduating class of 
2002." 

Student interest in the convoca- 
tion was high. Adam Earnhardt 
Chairperson of the Freshmen 
Convocation Subcommittee said, 
"The committee was impressed 
with the freshmen's turnout. I was 
glad to see the support for the fac- 
ulty and staff." 

Faculty believes that the convo- 
cation will help ease the students 
transition to life here at Clarion in 
the upcoming weeks. 



A new "Adventure" joins Clarion nightlife 




Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
nights, with food being served 
until 1 am every night. 

This first week of fabulous 
food and beverage specials leads 
directly to the September 24-27 
GRAND OPENING! D.J.'s will 
be spinning your favorites from 
10-2 on both Thursday and 
Saturday nights and Friday 
night's highlight is a cruise give- 
away. Yes, I said cruise give- 
away. On Friday night some 
lucky person dancing and 
singing karaoke will be the win- 
ner of a cruise to be given away 
at midnight by the featured D.J. 
"We don't want this to be just a 



'one night a week' place. 
People are welcome here every 
night." says Missy Bobbert, part 
owner of Adventures. 
The festivities continue into 
October with live bands being 

continued on page 13 

"We welcome college and 
people of the community. 
The college crowd was 
anticipated from the 
beginning and are very 
welcome here." 
— Missy Bobbert, part 
owner , Adventures 



George Groff/Clarion Call 
Adventures opens it s doors to the public. 



by Nicole DeFrank 
Contributing writer 

It was known as "the place to 
be" on a Thursday. Now it has 
been recycled into an 
"Adventure" everyday. With a 
little creative decoration and a 
lot of colorful paint, most of the 
old, familiar Roost tables and 
wall structures have been refur- 
bished and made a part of the 
new Bar and Grill. 
Posters and props displaying 
adventures around the world will 
surround you throughout the 
restaurant Live entertainment 



will take you through the week- 
ends. And popular food and 
beverage specials will fill you 
up throughout the night. 
Beginning Monday, September 
21, daily food and beverage 
specials will be in full swing. 
Sunday and Monday nights will 
feature three television screens 
of football mania, as well as 
super prize giveaways. 
Tuesday nights will offer free 
game night including pool and 
foosball. Wednesdays will 
include the ever popular wing 
specials. Adventures will fea- 
ture live entertainment every 




George Groff/Clarion Call 



continued from page 12 

featured on the first Friday and 
the following three Saturdays of 
the month. The band Final 
Approach will be performing on 
the Saturday of the Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

Adventures offers great food, a 
unique atmosphere, and friendly 
service. "We welcome college 
students and people of the com- 
munity," says Bobbert. "The 
college crowd was anticipated 
from the beginning and are very 
welcome here." 

This bar and grill has many 
unique and exciting adventures 
in store for the town of Clarion. 
With new beverage and food 
specials, Adventures is a new 
addition to the Clarion night life. 

Wrestling 
has college 
viewers in a 
head lock 

by Caryn Rousseau 
College Press Service 

Walk into just about any frater- 
nity house or college dorm around 
9 p.m. on a Monday night and 
you'll likely find rambunctious 
guys pretending to throw chairs at 
one another and yelling, "Here 
comes the Stone Cold Stunner!" 

Its really big with us because it's 
the one sport where there are no 
real teams involved," said Tom 
Mclnereney, a sophomore at 
Syracuse University who watches 
wrestling with his friends. "We 
can watch the same channel with- 
out Hipping to see the Yanks' 
score or who's winning the Ranger 
game. 

Fans rattle off the names of their 
favorite wrestlers — Big Poppa 
Pump, Disco inferno, Dude Love 
and Psychosis. 

It's the aggression of professional 
wrestling that keeps men glued to 
the tube, said Dr. Robert Burton, 
vice president of the Sports 
Psychiatry Group at Northwestern 
Memorial Hospital in Chicago. 



aaaaaiaaaaaaBEfi 



Adventures interior has been refurbished. 



BOOK NOOK 

*Area's largest selection of mag- 
azine's. 

'Special order books recieved in 
less than a week. 
•Cliff Note's 

'Lot's of good stuff to read!!! 
532 Main Street 226-5120 




Calendar of Evei 










^ 




Q 



i 



Today 

•Tennis vs. Indiana 3:30 pm 

•Golf at U of Pitt-Greensburg 

Fall Challenge 

•Sorority Rush Information 

Meeting (Gem MP) 7pm 

•Clarion University of PA 

Speech and Debate Team's 

1998 British Debate 

Friday 

•Admissions Day (Chap) 9 

am 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at Charleston W. VA Tournament 

•Golf at Bucknell Fall Invitaitonal 

•Sorority Rush begins 

Saturday 

•Football at Shepherd 1 pm 

•Residence Hall Softball Tournament and Picnic 10 am 

- 5 pm (Stad) 

•Cross Country at Slippery 

Rock 

•UAB Trip to Sea World 

(outside Gem) 8:15 am 

•Tennis at Shippensburg 

•Golf at Bucknell Fall 

Invitational 1? M 

•Volleyball at Charleston W. VA Tournament 

Sunday 

•Raindate: Residence Hall Softball Tournament and 





Picnic 

•Tennis at Shippensburg 

•MSS Spiritual 3:30 (Chap) 

Monday 

•ROSH HASHANAH 

•Freshmen Advising Week begins 

•Sanford Gallery exhibit, "The Pittsburgh Biennial" 

(Marwick-Boyd) continues through Oct. 8 

•Womens Studies Brown Bag Luncheon, Dr Jean 

Rumsey, "One Feminist's View of Death and Dying" 

(250/252 Gem) noon 

•Faculty Senate Policy Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 3:30 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30pm 

Tuesday 

•Golf at Edinboro University 

Challenge 

•Freshmen Education Majors Group 

Advising Session (Gem MP) 7pm 

•Volleyball vs Lock Haven 7pm 

•Intramural Tennis Roster due 

•Intamural Field Goal Contest Roster 

due 

•Intramural 10k Relay Roster due 

Wednesday 

•Undecided Freshmen Advising Mtg." (Gem MP) 

4-6pm 

•Dr. Samuel Hazo, state poet of PA (Chap) 7:30 

•Intramural One Pitch Softball Roster Due Sept 29 

•Intramural Power Lifting Roster Due Sept 29 

•Intramural Indoor Soccer Roster Due Sept 29 




aaagjaaagaBEEJgjgiaB^igjBB^ 




Dan Smith's 
Candies and Gifts 

Chocolate for ever y occasion. 

-FREE gift wrapping 

-Greek chocolate letters 

-Gifts for everybody 

-Novelty candy 

-Gift Baskets Delivered to the Dorms. 

rFresehTthTs'cbu^^ 

Purchase. 

Expires December 31,1998 



612 Main Street 

Clarion PA 

16214 

(814)227-2255 

HOURS: 

10:00-5:00 Mon-Sat 

innn.ft'dn PriHnv 



■ 

■ 



mmm 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 



%feyte^bt»f*tt?rt99ft 



The Clafrrort Cftfr ' > orrr 



Pa ge 15 m- ^-.o 



Korn and Hole offer up new albums The Fountain of Youth 



Simple Gifts 




by James "Korn" Gates 
Lifestyles Writer 

Hello music lovers and haters. 
My name is James "Korn" Gates 
and I am talcing over the music 
reviews for the year. 

The first two albums up for 
review are the highly anticipated 
Follow the Leadef "by Korn (the 
band, not me) and Celeberity 
Skin"by Hole. 

Follow the Leader is the third 
release from Korn on Immortal 
Records. For those of you not 
familiar with Korn simply mix 
metal and hardcore riffs with hip- 
hop and rap beats. Throw some 



funk and jazz into the mix and 
add seven-string sludgy guitsrs 
and you get the Kom groove, 
which is brutal and intense. 

Some of my particular favorites 
include; "It's on" and "B.B.K.", 
which rock as hard and brutal as 
ever. In "Pretty" Jonathon Davis 
sings *about his previous experi- 
ences working in a morgue, see- 
ing babies after being abused. 
"Dead Bodies Everywhere" is 
just as thought provoking as 
"Pretty" lyrically, but the music is 
more entrhalling, making it one 
of my favorites on the disk. 
Where else could a gruesome line 
like "Dead Bodies Everywhere" 
be so darn catchy? The final 
track, "My Gift to You" opens 
with Davis playing the bagpipes, 
which Korn should employ more 
often. Another gem on the disk is 
the hidden track, "Earache my 
Eye" made famous by Cheech 
and Chong, featuring Cheech 
Marin on vocals. 

The highly talked about track, 
"All in the Family" is not as good 
as everyone says. Honestly, it is a 
decent song with Davis and Fred 
Durst of Limp Bizkit involved in 
a verbal war, but Durst severly 




he drags the song down. Other 
songs that I could have done 
without include "Children of the 
Korn" with Ice Cube and 
"Cameltosis". Both tracks are 
layered too much and have stale 
riffs. 

I will admit that I was unim- 
pressed with this disk upon first 
listening. I thought it sounded 
like all of their other albums, but 
it grew on me after the third lis- 
ten. Right away though, I noticed 
that the disk is darker than the 
others. It isn't as good as Korn's 
self-titled debut, but it blows 
sophmore album Life is Peachy 
away. 

Hole is Kurt Cobain's widow, 
Courtney Love's band, for those 
of you who did not know. 
Celeberity Skin follows the criti- 



lacks in the talent department so cally acclaimed Live Through 



Simple Gifts performs 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Lifestyles Writer 



Folk group "Simple Gifts", who 
describe themselves as "three 
ladies playing twelve instru- 
ments", came to Clarion to enter- 
tain and inform last weekend. 
Hosting a jam session and work- 
shop on Friday night, they also 
put on a full length show last 
Saturday in Hart Chapel. 

Founded by Karen Hirshon in 



1989, "Simple Gifts" has had an 
ever-changing face over the 
course of four albums. The cur- 
rent line-up consists of; Hirshon 
(playing, among other things, vio- 
lin, banjo, and mandolin), Linda 
Riddleton (viola, recorder), and 
Rachel Hall (piano, concertina). 
The band takes their name from a 
tune featured in the Aaron 
Copeland ballet "Appalachian 
Spring". 

Beginning with the workshop 
Friday night, the ladies presented 



Issues to be discussed will include: 

self-esteem 

relationships 

women's changing roles 

This group will begin meeting on Friday, September 18,1998, from 
2:00-3:30 p.m., and will continue to me>t weekly throughout the fall 
semester. Both traditional and non-traditional female students are 
welcome. Anyone interested should call the Department of 
Counseling Services or stop by 148 Egbert Hall. Ms. Kay King will 
facilitate this group. 

All names and information will be kept confidential. 

Women of all races, sexual orientation, religion, and women with 

different abilities are welcome. 



their unique blend of Irish jigs, 
American reels, and the haunting 
melodies of Gypsy music to an 
eager crowd. It was easy to see 
that everyone was excited; many 
people brought along their own 
instruments to play along with the 
band. 

I was able to speak with Rachel 
Hall Friday evening and we dis- 
cussed the nature of her music. 
She told me that there is a com- 
mon misconception that all folk 
music has singing, and is in the 
style of 60's legend Bob Dylan. 
"Simple Gifts" are the exception 
to this stereotype since their 

continued on page 15 



This, which vaulted Hole and 
Love to mega-starstatus. 
Unfortunately, this album does 
not live up to it's predecessor. 

One of the few tracks that 
caught my attention was the first 
single and title track "Celeberity 
Skin", but the album goes down- 
hill from there. Billy Corgan, of 
Smahing Pumpkins fame, wrote 
and helped produce four tracks on 
the album including the rocking 
opening title track, but the 
Pumpkin-boy failed to deliver. 
I can see this album becoming a 
smash hit because Hole modified 
their sound more to the main- 
stream. Songs like "Awful" and 
"Malibu" are nothing but your 
run of the mill, light college rock, 
which should become over- 
played radio staples. Hole seem- 
ingly abandoned their distorted 
guitars and screechy vocals for a 
more refined mellow sound. 
Think Gin Blosoms with a 
female vocalist. 

Fortunatley, Courtnely Love 
sings melodically throughout the 
disk, although her voice isn't very 
feminine. Still, she sounds a lot 
better without the cigarettes and 
beer voice that became her trade- 
mark in the past. 









m >-"^f 


WPm M 1 


4$ 


^1 


^k '■«■:•. .si 


Bj@^-- : ' '* 


W \ 






HI 


"<&*2 








y&y : ' f ' , ffi-jj:JH 






mW'.J :•: 









Since this is Love's first album 
since becoming a movies star, 
most of her lyrics deal with the 
Hollywood lifestyle and how she 
dealt with it. I actually had a hard 
time listening to the full album in 
one sitting. 

Both of these albums will not 
live up to the greatness of earlier 
albums, but Korn has a greater 
chance of doing so than does 
Hole. Follow the Leader grew 
on me after a couple of listens, 
but I still cannot get into 
Celeberity Skin. 

Rating these albums on a scale 
of 1 to 10, Follow the Leader 
would get a seven and better luck 
next time to Courtney Love and 
Hole because they end up with a 
four. Now I'll have to forego 
buying books to pick up the new 
Korn album. 



Where In Clarion? 







A Real Cut-up 

Test your knowledge of area landmarks every week 
in "Where In Clarion?" Where is this Clarion land- 
mark? 



MEMBERSHIP HAS ITS 
PRIVLEDGES 







Rush Theta XI 



>**".*,*.' 



by Dave Barry 
Sydicated Columnist 



Recently I was at a party host- 
ed by a younger couple, defined 
as "a couple that had not yet been 
born when 1 started worrying 
about cholesterol." You will 
never guess whose music these 
young people were people: 
Bobby Darin's. Yes. Bobby 
Darin, hepcat swinger from my 
youth, is cool again! 

No doubt you've read about 
how the Hot New Trend among 
"with-it" 20-something people is 
to eschew the rock scene and pre- 
tend tht thye're swank sophisti- 
cates living three or four decades 
ago — drinking martinis, going 
to nightclubs, dressing like the 
late Frank Sinatra (not the 
women, of course; they're dress- 
ing like the late Dean Martin), 
voting for Dwight Eisenhower, 
using words like "eschew", etc. 
This makes me wonder: If old 
things are cool, could I become 
cool again? 

I have not felt remotely cool 
for a long time, thanks largely to 
the relentless efforts of my 
teenage son, whose goal in life is 
to make me feel 3,500 years old. 
We'll be in the car, and he'll say, 
"You wanna hear my new CD?" 
And I, flattered that he thinks his 
old man might like the same 
music he does, will say "Sure!" 
So he increases the sound-system 
volume setting from "4" to 
"Meteor Impact," and he puts in 
a CD by a band with a name like 
"Putsule," and the next thing I 
know gigantic nuclear bass notes 
have blown ou the car windows 
and activated both the driver and 
passenger side air bags, and I'm 
writhing on the floor, screaming 
for mercy with jets of blood 
spurting three feet from my ears. 
My son then-ejects the CD, smil- 
ing contentdly, knowing he has 
purchsed a winner. On those 
extremely rare ocassions when I 
LIKE one of his CD's, I imagine 
he destroys it with a blowtorch. 



If you are inter- 
ested in writing 

for lifestyles 
please call Jeff 

at extension 
X2380! 




My point is that, for some time 
I have viewed myself as being 
roughly equal, on the Coolness 
Scale, to Bob Dole. And then,* 
suddenly, at this party, these 20- 
somethings were playing Bobby 
Darin, a singer from my youth, 
an era known as "teh Era When 
There Were A Lot of Singers 
Named Bobby And One Named 
Freddy" (Bobby Sherman, Bobby 
Vee, Bobby Vinton, Bobby 
Rydell, Elvis "Bobby" Presley 
and Freddy "Boom Boom" 

Cannon). 

I KNOW Bobby Darin's music. 
Whenever I hear his swinging 
verson of "(Oh My Darlin') 
Clementine" I snap my fingers in 
a happening "jive" manner and 
sing right along with these 
immortal lyrics: 
"You know she would rouse up 
"Wake all of them cows up" 
(They don't write them like 
that anymore. They can't: They 
have been medicated.) 

I vividly remember when 
Bobby Darin had a hit record 
with "Mack the Knife," which is 
sometimes referred to as "The 
Sg. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club 
Band of 1959," because it was 



nearly three minutes long and 
had weird, incomprehensible . 
lyrics involving somebody named 
"Sukey Tawdry." I remember 
going to a record hop — that's 
right, an actual record hop — in 
the gymnasium of Harold C. 
Crittenden Junior High in 
Armonk, N.Y., where they played 
"Mack the Knife" maybe 14 
times and we all danced the jit- 
terbug. 

The Jitterbugwas dance where- 
in you remained in actual, physi- 
cal contact with your partner — 
what kids now call "touch-danc- 
ing" I grew up at the tail end of 
the touch-dancing era; after that, 
we started doing on-touch dances 
— the Jerk, the Boogaloo, the 
Cosine, the Funky Downtown 
Rutabaga, etc., wherein you 
strayed several feet from your 
partner. Later in to 60' s, songs 
got longer and dance standards 
got looser, and you often lost 
visual contact altogether with 
your partner, sometimes winding 
up, days later, in completely dif- 
ferent states. This was followed 
by the disco era, during which 
you and your partner might touch 
briefly, but only for the purpose 



of ex-changing narcotics: which 
in turn was followed by the 
"mosh pit" concept Of dancing, 
wherein you dance simultaneous- 
ly with many people, the object 
being to inflict head injuries on 
them. 

So for decades, the only time 
you saw touch-dancing was at 
wedding receptions, when the 
band — as required by federal 
wedding-reception law — played 
"Bad, Bad Leroy Brown," and 
guest age 73 and older would 
hobble on to the floor and do the 
Fox Trot while younger people 
gyrated randomly around them. 
But now touch-dancing is back 
and I'm excited about it, because 
— ask anybody who has seen me 
at a wedding reception after the 
bar opens — I can still do the 
Jitterbug. I can get out there on 
the floor and really whirl my 
partner around. Granted, some- 
times my partner winds up face- 
down in the wedding cake, but 
that is not the point. The point is 
that, despite what my son thinks, 
maybe I am cool again. I'm 
thinking about putting a tube and 
a half of Brylcreem in my hair 
and going to a swank nightclub. 
I'd saunter up to the bar, order a 
dry martini and settle back to 
soak up the scene; then, when a 
real "swinging" song came on, 
I'd get to my feet and "wow" the 
younger generation when I, in a 
suave and sophisticated manner, 
threw up on my shoes, because 
martinis make me sick. 



continued from page 14 

seemed optimistic about her 
group's first time in the Clarion 
area and was happy to sec that 
many people brought their instru- 
ments. She gave me one impor- 
tant piece of at! vice for all of 
Clarion's buckling musicians: 
"Just start playing with a bunch 
of other people.... [because] that's 
what it's all about." 

On Saturday night, those who 
had attended the workshop the 
previous evening were invited 
on-stage with the band to help 
perform a number of tunes during 
the second set. The ladies were 
also joined by hammer dulcimer 
player Tulle and Clarion's own 
Dr. Brunt Register. After the 
band had finished their sets, they 
hosted three jam sessions with 
the audience: an instrumental, a 
singing, and a jam featuring all 
the dulcimers by themselves. 

As a whole, I enjoyed my visit 
with the band. The music was 
beautiful and had an almost oth- 
erworldly quality to it. I would 
recommend these talented ladies 
to anyone seeking a unique music 
experience. 

WCCB will be on 
the air Monday, 
Sept. 21 at 
noon. Tune into 
1610 AM 



Don't be rushed; Be selected! 
Phi Sigma Kappa 




Patrick a* 223-9675 or Tom at x3866 




1 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 



Korn and Hole offer up new albums 




by James "Korn" Gates 
Lifestyles Writer 

Hello music lovers and haters. 
My name is James "Korn" Gates 
and I am taking over the music 
reviews for the year. 

The first two albums up for 
review are the highly anticipated 
Follow the Leader"by Korn (the 
band, not me) and Celeberity 
Skin"by Hole. 

Follow the Leader is the third 
release from Korn on Immortal 
Records. For those of you not 
; familiar with Korn simply mix 
| metal and hardcore riffs with hip- 
hop and rap beats. Throw some 



funk and jazz into the mix and 
add seven-string sludgy guitsrs 
and you get the Kom groove, 
which is brutal and intense. 

Some of my particular favorites 
include; "It's on" and "B.B.K.", 
which rock as hard and brutal as 
ever. In "Pretty" Jonathon Davis 
sings mahout his previous experi- 
ences working in a morgue, see- 
ing babies after being abused. 
"Dead Bodies Everywhere" is 
just as thought provoking as 
"Pretty" lyrically, but the music is 
more entrhalling, making it one 
of my favorites on the disk. 
Where else could a gruesome line 
like "Dead Bodies Everywhere" 
be so darn catchy? The final 
track, "My Gift to You" opens 
with Davis playing the bagpipes, 
which Korn should employ more 
often. Another gem on the disk is 
the hidden track, "Earache my 
Eye" made famous by Cheech 
and Chong, featuring Cheech 
Marin on vocals. 

The highly talked about track, 
"All in the Family" is not as good 
as everyone says. Honestly, it is a 
decent song with Davis and Fred 
Durst of Limp Bizkit involved in 
a verbal war, but Durst severly 
lacks in the talent department so 







•St* /*ys : 








he drags the song down. Other 
songs that I could have done 
without include "Children of the 
Kom" with Ice Cube and 
"Cameltosis". Both tracks are 
layered too much and have stale 
riffs. 

I will admit that I was unim- 
pressed with this disk upon first 
listening. I thought it sounded 
like all of their other albums, but 
it grew on me after the third lis- 
ten. Right away though, I noticed 
that the disk is darker than the 
others. It isn't as good as Kom's 
self-titled debut, but it blows 
sophmore album Life is Peachy 
away. 

Hole is Kurt Cobain's widow, 
Courtney Love's band, for those 
of you who did not know. 
Celeberity Skin follows the criti- 
cally acclaimed Live Through 



Simple Gifts performs 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Lifestyles Writer 



Folk group "Simple Gifts", who 
describe themselves as "three 
ladies playing twelve instru- 
ments", came to Clarion to enter- 
tain and inform last weekend. 
Hosting a jam session and work- 
shop on Friday night, they also 
put on a full length show last 
Saturday in Hart Chapel. 

Founded by Karen Hirshon in 



1989, "Simple Gifts" has had an 
ever-changing face over the 
course of four albums. The cur- 
rent line-up consists of; Hirshon 
(playing, among other things, vio- 
lin, banjo, and mandolin), Linda 
Riddlcton (viola, recorder), and 
Rachel Hall (piano, concertina). 
The band takes their name from a 
tune featured in the Aaron 
Copeland ballet "Appalachian 
Spring". 

Beginning with the workshop 
Friday night, the ladies presented 



WOME9CS SUPPORT Q%pWP 

Issues to be discussed will include: 

self-esteem 

relationships 

women's changing roles 

This group will begin meeting on Friday, September 18,1998, from 
2:00-3:30 p.m., and will continue to me>t weekly throughout the fal 
semester. Both traditional and non-traditional female students are 
welcome. Anyone interested should call the Department of 
Counseling Services or stop by 148 Egbert Hall. Ms. Kay King will 
facilitate this group. 

All names and information will be kept confidential. 

Women of all races, sexual orientation, religion, and women with 

different abilities are welcome. 



their unique blend of Irish jigs, 
American reels, and the haunting 
melodies of Gypsy music to an 
eager crowd. It was easy to see 
that everyone was excited; many 
people brought along their own 
instruments to play along with the 
band. 

I was able to speak with Rachel 
Hall Friday evening and we dis- 
cussed the nature of her music. 
She told me that there is a com- 
mon misconception that all folk 
music has singing, and is in the 
style of 60's legend Bob Dylan. 
"Simple Gifts" are the exception 
to this stereotype since their 

continued on page 15 



This, which vaulted Hole and 
Love to mega-starstatus. 
Unfortunately, this album does 
not live up to it's predecessor. 

One of the few tracks that 
caught my attention was the first 
single and title track "Celeberity 
Skin", but the album goes down- 
hill from there. Billy Corgan, of 
Smahing Pumpkins fame, wrote 
and helped produce four tracks on 
the album including the rocking 
opening title track, but the 
Pumpkin-boy failed to deliver. 

I can see this album becoming a 
smash hit because Hole modified 
their sound more to the main- 
stream. Songs like "Awful" and 
"Malibu" are nothing but your 
run of the mill, light college rock, 
which should become over- 
played radio staples. Hole seem- 
ingly abandoned their distorted 
guitars and screechy vocals for a 
more refined mellow sound. 
Think Gin Blosoms with a 
female vocalist. 

Fortunatley, Courtnely Love 
sings melodically throughout the 
disk, although her voice isn't very 
feminine. Still, she sounds a lot 
better without the cigarettes and 
beer voice that became her trade- 
mark in the past. 



HO 


-E CELEBRITY SKIN 




rH' 








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S*2*\^. 




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I v^*! 




ii 


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I ^v-' Jfl 


I#«>- 


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mM , , 1 


'*■ ' : ^m 







Since this is Love's first album 
since becoming a movies star, 
most of her lyrics deal with the 
Hollywood lifestyle and how she 
dealt with it. I actually had a hard 
time listening to the full album in 
one sitting. 

Both of these albums will not 
live up to the greatness of earlier 
albums, but Korn has a greater 
chance of doing so than does 
Hole. Follow the Leader grew 
on me after a couple of listens, 
but I still cannot get into 
Celeberity Skin. 

Rating these albums on a scale 
of 1 to 10, Follow the Leader 
would get a seven and better luck 
next time to Courtney Love and 
Hole because they end up with a 
four. Now I'll have to forego 
buying books to pick up the new 
Korn album. 



Where In Clarion? 




A Real Cut-up 

Test your knowledge of area landmarks every week 
In "Where In Clarion?" Where is this Clarion land- 
mark? 



MEMBERSHIP HAS ITS 
PRIVLEDGES 



0S 



Rush Theta XI 



* ftffi tarfb»ffiw>9tt 



The Clafrrort OH- 






P, 






»\ i 



<i 



The Fountain of Youth 



Simple Gill 



by Dave Barry 
Sydicated Columnist 



Recently I was at a party host- 
ed by a younger couple, defined 
as "a couple that had not yet been 
born when 1 started worrying 
about cholesterol." You will 
never guess whose music these- 
young people were people: 
Bobby Darin's. Yes. Bobby 
Darin, hepcat swinger from my 
youth, is cool again! 

No doubt you've read about 
how uie Hot New Trend among 
"with-it" 20-something people is 
to eschew the rock scene and pre- 
tend thi thye're swank sophisti- 
cates living three or four decades 
ago — drinking martinis, going 
to nightclubs, dressing like the 
late Frank Sinatra (not the 
women, of course; they're dress- 
ing like the late Dean Martin), 
voting for Dwight Eisenhower, 
using words like "eschew", etc. 
This makes me wonder: If old 
things are cool, could I become 
cool again? 

I have not felt remotely cool 
for a long time, thanks largely to 
the relentless efforts of my 
teenage son, whose goal in life is 
to make me feel 3,500 years old. 
We'll be in the car, and he'll say, 
"You wanna hear my new CD?" 
And I, flattered that he thinks his 
old man might like the same 
music he does, will say "Sure!" 
So he increases the sound-system 
volume setting from "4" to 
"Meteor Impact," and he puts in 
a CD by a band with a name like 
"Putsule," and the next thing I 
know gigantic nuclear bass notes 
have blown ou the car windows 
and activated both the driver and 
passenger side air bags, and I'm 
writhing on the floor, screaming 
for mercy with jets of blood 
spurting three feet from my ears. 
My son then ejects the CD, smil- 
ing contentdly, knowing he has 
purchsed a winner. On those 
extremely rare ocassions when I 
LIKE one of his CD's, I imagine 
he destroys it with a blowtorch. 



If you are inter- 
ested in writing 

for lifestyles 
please call Jeff 

at extension 

X2380! 




My point is that, for some time 
I have viewed myself as being 
roughly equal, on the Coolness 
Scale, to Bob Dole. And then; 
suddenly, at this party, these 20- 
somethings were playing Bobby 
Darin, a singer from my youth, 
an era known as "teh Era When 
There Were A Lot of Singers 
Named Bobby And One Named 
Freddy" (Bobby Sherman, Bobby 
Vee, Bobby Vinton, Bobby 
Rydell, Elvis "Bobby" Presley 
and Freddy "Boom Boom" 

Cannon). 

I KNOW Bobby Darin's music. 
Whenever 1 hear his swinging 
verson of "(Oh My Darlin') 
Clementine" 1 snap my fingers in 
a happening "jive" manner and 
sing right along with these 
immortal lyrics: 

"You know she would rouse up 
"Wake all of them cows up" 

(They don't write them like 
that anymore. They can't: They 
have been medicated.) 

I vividly remember when 
Bobby Darin had a hit record 
with "Mack die Knife," which is 
sometimes referred to as "The 
Sg. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club 
Band of 1959," because it was 



nearly three minutes long and 
had weird, incomprehensible 
lyrics involving somebody named 
"Sukey Tawdry." I remember 
going to a record hop — that's 
right, an actual record hop — in 
the gymnasium of Harold C. 
Crittenden Junior High in 
Armonk, N.Y., where they played 
"Mack the Knife" maybe 14 
times and we all danced the jit- 
terbug. 

The Jitterbug was dance where- 
in you remained in actual, physi- 
cal contact with your partner — 
what kids now call "touch-danc- 
ing" I grew up at the tail end of 
the touch-dancing era; after that, 
we started doing on-touch dances 
— the Jerk, the Boogaloo, the 
Cosine, the Funky Downtown 
Rutabaga, etc., wherein you 
strayed several feet from your 
partner. Later in to 60's, songs 
got longer and dance standards 
got looser, and you often lost 
visual contact altogether with 
your partner, sometimes winding 
up, days later, in completely dif- 
ferent stales. This was followed 
by the disco era, during which 
you and your partner might touch 
briefly, but only for the purpose 



ofexchai narcotics; which 
in turn was followed by the 

sh pit" concept of dancing, 
wherein you dance simultaneous- 
ly with many people, the object 
being to inflict head injuries on 
them. 

So tor decades, the only time 
you saw touch-dancing was at 
wedding receptions, when the 
band — as required by federal 
wedding-reception law — played 
"Bad. BadLeroy Brown." and 
guest age 73 and older would 
hobble on to die floor and do the 
box Trot while younger people 
gyrated randomly around them. 
But now touch-dancing is back 
and I'm excited about it, because 
— ask anybody who has seen me 
at a wedding reception after the 
bar opens — I can still do the 
Jitterbug. I can get out there on 
the floor and really whirl my 
partner around. Granted, some- 
times my partner winds up face- 
down in the wedding cake, but 
that is not the point. The point is 
that, despite what my son thinks, 
maybe I am cool again. I'm 
thinking about putting a tube and 
a half of Brylcreem in my hair 
and going to a swank nightclub. 
I'd saunter up to the bar, order a 
dry martini and setUe back to 
soak up the scene; then, when a 
real "swinging" song came on, 
I'd get to my feet and "wow" the 
younger generation when I, in a 
suave and sophisticated manner, 
threw up on my shoes, because 
martinis make me sick. 



continued from pag 

seemed 

first lime in ll 
area and was happy to 
1 i lb i 
ive me o 
tant pic. idvice I ■•! 

n's bud musi 

"Just start playing will 

iher people ...[I 
what si's all about." 

On Saturday night, thosi 
had attended the works), 
previous evening were 
on-stage with die band I 
perform a number of tunes during 
the second set Fhe ladies were 
also joined by hammei dulcimer 
player Tulle and Clarion' own 
Dr. Brunt Register. Alter the 
band had finished their sets, they 
hosted three jam sessions with 
die audience: an instrumental, a 
singing, and a jam featuring all 
the dulcimers by themselves. 

As a whole, I enjoyed my visit 
with the band. The music was 
beautiful and had an almost oth- 
erworldly quality to it. 1 would 
recommend these talented ladies 
to anyone seeking a unique music 
experience. 

WCCB will be on 
the air Monday/ 
Sept. 21 at 
noon. Tune into 
1610 AM 



fclipip^p^^nMitf^R'iipi^^ 



Rush 

rrr 



Don't be rushed; Be selected! 
Phi Sigma Kappa 




Palrick at 223-9675 or Xom at x3866 




^SEaMS 



ANYONE CAN 
WEAR LETTERS, 
BUT DO YOU HAVE 
WHAT IT TAKES 
TO WEAR: 



rrr 



am/tea. 



\TZg&3E^E33S888S38®Em 



I « 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 



CALL ON YOU 







by 
George Groff 



Photography 
Editor 



What is your opinion of the 

Kenneth Starr report in the 

Clinton Investigation? 






Corey Trott, Sophomore, Communication 
'1 fee! that the issue is overrated and is nobody's 

business except Clinton's family. Bill Clinton is 
human and prone to make mistakes. We were the 

ones who voted him in knowing that he smoked 
marijuana and dodged the draft, so I don't want 
to hear it anymore." 



Mike Morgan, Sophomore, Business Admin. 
*'I think it is a little ridiculous to dedicate this 
much time, effort and money towards this sub- 
ject. Clinton is doing a great job as President and 
his sexual life shouldn't matter." 



John Mozzocio, Sophomore, SpecEd/Ei. Ed 

"I believe it is taking up too much time and 

money. Clinton should deal with his private life 

within his family and not the country." 






Bill Graper, Junior, Business 
I think it is pretty bad that it cost over 46 mil- 
lion dollars to investigate one case." 



Tony Babusci, Junior, General Studies 
* I think we are wasting a lot of money." 



Ron Finck, Senior, Political Science 

" We can't make exceptions or put a price 

on justice." 



September 17. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 17 



ENTERTAINMENT 



ACROSS 

l Gang 
5 Mark from a 
wound 

9 AAA member 

13 Uner 

14 TV's Alan 

13 -Slop. hor*«!" 
16 Assemblage 
1 6 Wrecked ship s 
May 

10 Sharp — tack 

20 Catcn 

21 Pulverizes 
23 QuadaJaiara 

native 

25 Stubble 

26 Basntui 

27 Innocuous 
30 Scl. branch 
33 Iridescent gem 
3STear 

36 Talk wildly 

37 Stem joints 

39 Poet Walter — 
More 

40 Questionnaire 
item 

41 Remainder 

42 Fragrance 

43 Tumultuous 
flows 

47 Industrious 
Insect 

49 Doughnut shape 

50 Made a derisive 
look 

54 In the same 
place: Lat. 

56 Stare 

57 Have being 

58 Challenge 
50 Deadly 

nightshade 

62 Edible spread 

63 Give Off 

64 Man from Rio 
<3S Covers 

66 Dee ot Keeiyr 

67 Gaelic 

DOwn 

1 Selected 

2 Take it easy 

3 Snaky fish 

4 Miserable one 



■ 


2 


i 


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**-S!-i-* JH«*Wll 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



*S¥: : 




Men/Women earn $480 weekly assem- 
bling CIRCUIT BOARDS/ELEC- 
TRONIC COMPONENTS at home. 
Experience unnecessary, will train. 
Immediate openings in your local area. 
Call 1-541-386-5290 Ext. 6075. 



******** 



Spring Break '99-Sell Trips, Earn Cash 
& Go Free! !! Student Travel Services is 
now hiring campus reps/group organiz- 
ers. Lowest rates to Jamaica, Mexico & 
Florida. Call 1-800-648-4849. 



******** 



MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS. Sell 
Kodak Spring Break '99 Trips. HIGH- 
EST COMMISSION - LOWEST 
PRICES. NO COST TO YOU. Travel 
FREE including food, drink & non- 
stop parties!!! World class vacations. 
1998 student travel planners "Top 

Producer". 1-800-222-4432. 

******** 

-AMATEUR MODELS NEEDED- for 
very lucrative internet website N.Y. 
based company will be in Erie on 
September 25 and 26 conducting inter- 
views by appointment only. To qualify, 
applicants must like fun/money, and be 
comfortable with themselves, some- 
what provocative, and definitely not 
camera shy. For questions, scheduling, 

or an interview, call 1-800-881-7954. 

******** 

Keystone Short way Restaurant, Exit 1 1 , 
1-80 & 322, Strattanville, PA (814)379- 
3279. Now hiring evening shift; all 
positions, flexible scheduling. Apply in 
person. Gain experience in the food 

service industry. 

******** 

MAKE EASY MONEY! GO ON 
SPRING BREAK FOR FREE! USA 

Spring Break offers Cancun, Bahamas, 
Jamaica, and Florida packages, and is 
currently accepting applications for 
campus sales representatives. 

Call 1-888-SPRING-BREAK. 

******** 

DIRECT CARE WORKERS, 
Passavant Memorial Homes is seeking 
patient, caring people to fill full time, 
part time and on call positions in our 
current homes in the Clarion area. 
Responsible for assisting individuals 
with disabilities with daily living skills 
and community outings. Passavant 
maintains a drug free workplace with 
mandatory pre-employment drug test- 
ing. Competitive wages and friendly 
work environment. Experienced work- 
ers helpful but not required, compre- 
hensive Training Program provided. 
Requirements: 

- Must be at least 18 years of age 

- High school diploma/equivalent 

- Valid PA drivers license 
Interviews will be held at the Comfort 
Inn, Clarion PA, on Monday October 5, 
1998 from 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and 
Tuesday October 6, 1998 from 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. For more information call toll 
free, 1-888-764-6467 or 724-775-0448, 
ext. 143 or 136. EOE 



FOR SALE 



Computer for Sale: IBM 486 Multi- 
media Computer. VGA Color Monitor, 
8 Meg Ram, CD Rom, Sound Card, 
Speakers, Hard Drive, Mouse, 
Windows, Encyclopedia, Games, 
Business, Educational Software. Over 
140 programs! $375. 724-526-5973. 



******** 



Computer for sale. Must sell 486-DX 
IBM computer. Works great! Color 
VGA monitor, CD Rom, sound, speak- 
ers, Windows, encyclopedia, business, 
games, & educational software. Over 
140 programs! Only $300. 724-526- 
5973. Please leave message. 




HAPPY 21ST ERICA! Love, Autumn, 

Keira, Adrianne. 

******** 

LOOK OUT! Jack Alston is 21 ! Don't 

be clueless... 

******** 

HAPPY 22ND KEIRA! Love, Autumn 

******** 

HEY MR. DJ! Happy 21st Scott! 

Love, Keira and Autumn. 

******** 

Ryan, You're the greatest proofreader 

ever!! 

******** 

Kristen and Danielle, I love you guys! 

Nelm 

******** 

I love my Tri Sigma sisters! 

Love, Jnel 

******** 

Happy 21st birthday to Jared and 
Wayne! Love, your wonderful neigh- 
bors, Tine, Abby, Niki, and Nicki! 

******** 

Keep up the great work dance team! 

Love, Brooke 

******** 

Hey Jeff, Merch, and Kevin, Here's to 
a year of late night, Busch parties. 
Thanks for being such great friends! 

Love, Danielle 

******** 

Tonya, Carla, Mandy, and Kristen, 
Let's make this last year one to 
remember! Upsies forever! Love ya, 

Danielle! 

******** 

Heidi- here's to a semester of "drive 
bys". Love, Kristen and Danielle 



i n n ii II m il i nn l uH iiii m i n i I i > m 



KAP, I hope everyone had a wonderful 
summer. I'm looking forward to a great 
semester with all of you! Good luck 
with rush. You guys are the best! Love, 
your sweetheart, Nicole. 



******** 



To Mandy and Cindy, Congratulations 
to you girls on being lavaliered. We are 
glad you are a part of our fraternity. 
Good luck in the future. Love, the 
brothers of KAP. 



******** 



Way to go Tracy Campbell for winning 
1st in the 10k last Saturday! Love, your 
Zeta sisters. 



******** 



Congratulations Joy on your lavalier! 
Love, your Zeta sisters. 



******** 



Sororities: Good luck with rush! 
Zeta Tau Alpha 



******** 



Hey ITT! Welcome back guys! I'm 
looking forward to having another 
great semester with you. Good luck 
and stay out of trouble I love you 
guys! Always, Hayley 



Way to go Tracy Campbell for winning 
the 10K last Saturday! Love, Your Zeta 

Sisters 

******** 

Congratulations Joy on your lavalier! 
Love, Your Zeta Sisters 

******** 

The sisters of ZTA would like to thank 
the brothers of KAP, in, and IX for 

including us in your rush! Good luck! 

******** 

To Our Sweetheart Nicole, Just a little 
note to know we are thinking of you 
and have a good week. Thanks for the 

cookies. The brothers of KAP. 

******** 

Nikki- We're looking forward to a good 
year with you. Good Luck. The broth- 
ers of ez 

******** 

To the brothers of HI, Welcome back 
guys! I hope that you all had a great 
summer. Good luck with everything 

this semester. Love, Beth 

******** 

Happy Birthday Amber. Love, Your 

A«E Sisters. 

******** 

Thanks for the great mixer baseball 

team! Love, AOE 

******** 

Happy Birthday Annie! Now that you 
are 21 being at the bar will be twice the 

fun! Love your AOE sisters! 

******** 

A$E can't wait to meet you at Meet the 

Greeks on Thursday! 

******** 

Congratulations Mandi and Dave on 
your lavalier to KAP. Love, the sisters 

of ZTA. 

******** 

GX- We are excited to build our float 
with you! It's going to be great! Love, 

GOA 

******** 

To our sweetheart James: We are all 
very happy to see you again! We 
missed you this summer! Love, your 

04>A ladies! 

******** 

0OA would like to wish all of the 
Greeks great success in their classes 

and rush this semester! 

******** 

Happy Birthday Erica, Keira, Sara, and 

Andrea!! 

******** 

Congratulations to Jnel and Rachael on 

getting engaged! 

******** 

Welcome back Sigmas! Have a great 

semester! 

******** 

Good luck to all Greeks on rush! We 

wish you the best! Love, III 

******** 

Happy 21st to Sarah and Karrah! 

******** 

III looks forward to meeting future 

sisters during rush! 

******** 

Start you own fraternity! Zeta Beta Tau 
is looking for men to start a new chap- 
ter. If you are interested in academic 
success, a chance to network and an 
opportunity to make friends in a non- 
pledging brotherhood, e-mail zbt@zbt- 
national.org or call Mike Simon at 
(317)334-1898. 



ENTERTAINMENT 




"I'm so proud. My son visits a fancy 

psychiatrist five days a weak and all he 

wants to talk about is me." 




The Siamese Twins visit England. 




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'- fftknfraklCaoLcom. 



Mr. <Spock Souncjs so £rm<*LJ 
eJust coll me Bunny. J 




******** 



September 17, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



SPORTSWIRE 



Fall sports season is well 

underway. The Clarion volley- 
ball team has high aspirations 
after narrowly missing the play- 
offs last season, while the tennis 
team looks to make another 
strong showing at the PSAC 
tournament this fall. Also, the 
cross country team has a sched 
ule full of high-profile oppo 
nents, and coach Mike Power 
and the golf team are looking for 

a strong fall on the links 
See Page 20 

Football season is here once 
again at Clarion University. This 
year's Golden Eagles have a 
blend of veterans and talented 
young players, but the schedule 
is as tough as ever. How will the 
Golden Eagles do in 1998? 
See Page 21 

Clarion opened the season at 
defending Division I-AA cham- 
pion Youngstown State and fell 
by a 50-6 count. However, the 
Eagles were able to take several 
positives away from the setback. 
See Page 21 



Quarterback Chris Weibel 

returns for the 1998 season after 

sitting out most of 1997 with a 

torn anterior cruciate ligament. 

See Page 24 

Clarion begins a crucial three- 
game road trip this Saturday 
when it travels to Shepherd. The 
Golden Eagle defense will have 
its hands full with Ram running 
back Damian Beane. 
See Page 21 



QUOTABLES 



"I am just excited to play again. 
I missed the game so much last 
year and it felt great to be back 
out on the field. It was a beauti- 
ful day and we had a great 
turnout for our home opener. It 
was great knowing that there are 
so many people who came out to 
watch us." 

- Clarion quarterback Chris 
Weibel, on his return from 
injury and the Golden Eagles' 
home opener. 



SPORTS 




*■•#■+**■ 



George Groff/Clarion Call 

Millersville quarterback Drew Folmar is the victim of a jailbreak blitz by the Clarion defense 
Saturday. The Golden Eagles won their home opener by a 38-31 count over the Marauders despite 
trailing 10-3 at halftime. The Eagles now look ahead to Saturday when they travel to Shepherd. 

Eagles roll past Millersville 



By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 

And you thought you were out 
of opportunities to ride a roller 
coaster until next summer. 

Senior quarterback Chris Weibel 
and All-American wide receiver 
Alvin Slaughter hooked up on a 
71-yard touchdown pass with just 
over one minute remaining in the 
game to give the Golden Eagles a 
pulsating 38-31 victory over 
Millersville at Memorial Stadium 
Saturday. 

That touchdown helped salvage 
what nearly was a disastrous 
fourth-quarter collapse that saw 
Millersville rally from a 31-10 
deficit in the final 10 minutes of 
the game. 

The Marauders tied the game at 
31-31 with 1:23 left when sopho- 
more quarterback Drew Folmar 
connected with Mike McFetridge 
on a 9-yard scoring play, the final 
of Folmar's three fourth-quarter 
scoring strikes. 

However, on this day, one 
minute would seem like an eterni- 
ty. 

On a second-and-15 play from 
their own 29, Weibel hit Slaughter 



with a perfectly thrown bomb on 
an out-and-up route for the game- 
winning score. 

The decision to throw the ball, 
as opposed to running out the 
clock and playing for overtime, 
was risky, but it paid off in a big 
way for the Golden Eagles in a 
game that featured 962 yards of 
total offense between the two 
squads. 

"I just called the play," said 
Clarion head coach Malen Luke. 
"(Weibel) and (Slaughter) made it 
work ... they deserve the credit." 

Yet, for as good as the offense 
was in the second half, it was 
equally as ineffective in the first 
half. Clarion (1-1) went three 
plays and out on its first four pos- 
sessions and did not manage a 
first down until the final play of 
the first quarter when running 
back Jamie Sickeri raced 53 
yards to the Millersville 23 -yard 
line. 

Despite their offensive troubles 
in the first quarter, the Golden 
Eagles did get on the scoreboard 
first when, three plays after a 
Millersville fumble, Frank 
VanWert booted a 38-yard field 
goal to give Clarion a 3-0 lead. 
Midway through the second 



quarter Millersville broke a 3-3 
deadlock when, on first down, 
Folmar and McFetridge hooked 
up on a dazzling 39-yard pass 
play to the Clarion 1-yard line. 
One play later running back 
Warren Thomas scored from one 
yard out to give the Marauders a 
10-3 lead that they took into the 
locker room at halftime. 

"We were awful in the first 
half," said Luke. "I don't want to 
take anything away from 
(Millersville), but we just weren't 
in sync." 

What the Golden Eagles needed 
was a kick-start, and they got it 
early in the second half thanks to 
their defense and special teams. 

On the second play of the third 
quarter, sophomore linebacker 
Ryan Presutti dropped back into 
coverage and intercepted a pass, 
returning it 25 yards for the tying 
score just 47 seconds into the sec- 
ond half. 

Then, after the defense held the 
Marauders to a three-and-out on 
their ensuing possession, 
Slaughter fielded a punt from his 
own 43 and returned it 57 yards to 
pay dirt, giving the Golden Eagles 

continued on page 21 



Momentum 
from win 
carries into 
practices 

By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 

Clarion's 38-31 win over 
Millersville Saturday did much 
more than even the Golden 
Eagles' slate at 1-1. 

An early-season win over a team 
with legitimate playoff aspira- 
tions goes a long way in the con- 
fidence department for a team that 
dropped the first seven games of 
last season, including a 31-25 set- 
back to Millersville in the opener. 



SIDELINES 



"It was definitely huge to win a 
big game like that," said line- 
backer Keith Kochert, one of the 
team's captains. 

'To win and to win the way we 
did will help our confidence and 
definitely help us improve." 
The Marauders have the 
Division II playoffs circled on 
their calendars after being select- 
ed first in the PS AC-East pre-sea- 
son poll. Millersville has drawn a 
great deal of acclaim, as 
explained by Gregory M. 
Drahschak, a columnist for CBS 
Sportsline (www.cbssport- 

sline.com): 

Through the 25-year history of 
the Division II playoffs, a rela- 
tively small list of teams have 
dominated the seedings. 
Occasionally, however, a new 
name manages to break into the 
D-II elite ...A young quarterback 
(Drew Folmar) could help 
Millersville make the D-II play- 
offs after a two-year absence ... 
The Marauders' playoff hopes 
could be determined Sept. 19 
when they host New Haven. 

Not only does Drahschak 's col- 
umn illustrate the strength of 
Millersville, but it also reflects 
the "what have you done for me 
lately?" attitude that often exists 
in D-II football. One has to won- 
der why the Marauders' playoff 
hopes weren't "determined" 
against the Eagles, who were 
national semifinalists just two 
seasons ago. 

The enthusiasm of Saturday's 
win has also carried over into this 
continued on page 23 






Page 20 



... 



>'• 



The Clarion Call 









September 17, 1998 



Eagles aiming for playoffs 

Lock Haven visits Tippin Gym Tuesday night 



By Lori Matachak 
Sports Writer 



The 1998 season is in progress 
for the Golden Eagle women's 
volleyball team. 

After posting a 20-19 record in 
1997 and missing the playoffs by 
a loss to eventual conference 
champion Lock Haven, the 
Golden Eagles hope to take the 
next step this season and qualify 
for the playoffs. 

The Golden Eagles stand at 1-1 
in the PSAC-West and 3-6 over- 
all after Tuesday night's 15-3, 13- 
15, 15-11, 15-5 loss at California. 

This year's team is led by four 
senior captains: Tracy Bamett, 
Christy Boes, Jaime Mars, and 
Jamie Soboleski. 

Coach Jodi Pezek Burns said, 
"It means a great deal to have 
these captains. They are the rea- 
son why the program has contin- 
ued to be successful because of 
these individuals leading in every 
way in a positive manner." 

Barnett entered the season with 
767 career kills and 475 digs. 
Mars has piled up 308 kills and 
297 digs while adding 24 service 
aces and 68 blocks. Boes, 
Clarion's top server and defen- 
sive specialist, has 919 career 
digs and 142 service aces. 
Soboleski, who suited up for the 
Clarion women's basketball team 
last season, has 668 assists set- 
ting up the offense, plus 177 digs, 
34 service aces, and 30 kills. 

Also returning with experience 
are junior Jessa Canfield and 




Photo courtesy of Sports Information 
Leading what Clarion hopes is a playoff season are captains 
(pictured from left to right) Jamie Soboleski, Jaime Mars, Tracy 
Barnett, and Christy Boes. 



sophomore Amanda Baer. 
Canfield was injured for part of 
last season, but has a career total 
of 526 kills, 458 digs, and 215 



first-year players to step in and 
contribute. Looking to make 
their mark for the Golden Eagles 
this season are Danielle Foote, 



blocks. Baer, from Spring Grove, Ali Graham, Kiley Hazelton, A.J. 

had a strong freshman campaign, Ravvlings, and Kate Waksmunski. 
159 kills and 231 The Golden Eagles have a big 

contest with Lock Haven 
Tuesday at Tippin Gym at 7 p.m. 



registering 



digs. 



The team is also looking to its 



Creighton named assistant hoops coach 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



' Scott Creighton began duties as 
assistant women's basketball 
coach at Clarion University this 
summer. 

Creighton replaces Terry Acker, 
who stepped down as assistant 
coach and head tennis coach to 
accept a position as assistant 
women's basketball coach at 
Robert Morris College. 

Creighton comes to Clarion with 
very strong coaching credentials. 
He has spent the last three seasons 
as girls' coach at Titusville High 
School. Prior to his stint with the 
Rockets, Creighton spent seven 
years at Cranberry High School, 
serving- as head coach in 1994 and 
1995. During those two years, the 



Berries went 61-2, with the '94 
team going 31-1 and winning the 
PI A A state title. He was honored 
with PIAA "Coach of the Year" 
honors that season. 

A 1984 graduate of Cranberry, 
Creighton continued his education 
at Edinboro University, where he 
graduated with a degree in Health 
and Physical Education in 1988. 
Familiar with the PSAC and 
Clarion, he has worked as a camp 
clinician at the Clarion University 
Girls' Summer Basketball Camps 
since 1994. 

"I'm really looking forward to 
coaching at Clarion University 
and with (head coach) Gie 
Parsons," said Creighton. 

"This is a great opportunity for 
me. I've always wanted to coach 



at the college level." 

"Scott is a very hard-working, 
knowledgeable, and enthusiastic 
coach," said Parsons, who led 
Clarion to five consecutive PSAC- 
West titles between 1991-95. "He 
is a strong teacher of fundamen- 
tals, has quality experience in 
women's basketball, and will def- 
initely be a big contributor in 
recruiting student athletes. I look 
forward to working with him and 
know he's going to do a great job 
for our program." 

The women's basketball team 
will tipoff the 1998-99 season at 
the Clarion Classic Friday, Nov. 3, 
and Saturday, Nov. 4. 

The Eagles play in the 
Mercyhurst Tournament the fol- 
lowing weekend. 



Clarion netters hope to 
keep tradition alive 

Although women's tennis at Clarion University has been extremely 
successful for more than a decade, new head coach Lori Sabatose will 
likely face a rebuilding year in 1998. 

Over the last 12 seasons the Golden Eagles have posted a remarkable 
record of 110-37, won five straight PSAC tides from 1986-90, and, 
more recently, placed third at the conference tournament the past two 
seasons. 

However, the Eagles return only two starters from last season. 

Back to anchor the team will be captains Amy Shaffer and Rachael 
Link. Shaffer, a sophomore, played No. 2 singles in 1997 and posted a 
record of 6-9, including a 1-1 slate at PSACs. A talented doubles play- 
er, Shaffer went 9-6 in doubles competition. 

Link, a junior, was 9-7 in singles in 1997 and was a PSAC runner-up 
in 1996 at No. 5 singles with a strong 9-3 mark. Also a capable dou- 
bles performer, Link has a two-year mark of 17-9. 

"Amy and Rachael will need to provide us with strong leadership on 
and off the court this season," said Sabatose. 

The lone other returner with experience is Kylee Johnson, who will 

be counted upon in 1998 at No. 4 singles and doubles play. 

Clarion will be looking for strong seasons from freshman recruit 

Bethany Melnick, who could battle for the No. 1 singles spot as the 

season progresses. 

"Bethany Melnick is an extrer .oly talented freshman," said Sabatose. 
"It will be very interesting to see how she does against some of the top 
collegiate players." 

The Eagles will count heavily upon these top four players this season 
while filling the No. 5 and 6 singles spots with Ladonna Dunlevy and 
Jacquelyn Neilen to begin the season. 

"Our top four players will be very competitive while our No. 5 and 
6 singles lack experience, but that's something they will gain this sea- 
son," said Sabatose. 

Rounding out the Clarion roster for the '98 campaign will be senior 
Hande Heay, sophomore Sarah Granberg, and freshmen Darci 
Harkleroad and Taryn Dalton. 

"It will be a bit of a rebuilding year, but we're going to focus on how 
much we can improve between now and PSACs. PSACs will be our 
main goal," said Sabatose. 

The Golden Eagles were in action over the weekend at the St. 
Bonaventure Tournament, finishing 1-1 against a pair of squads from 
New York. 

The Eagles fell to Canisius, 5-2, but defeated Niagara by a 4-3 count. 

The doubles tandem of Shaffer and Melnick was victorious, as were 

Link and Johnson in singles competition. Melnick and Shaffer were 

also victorious against Canisius in doubles action. 

•Courtesy of Sports Information 

Wilson, King pace Clarion 

Boosted by the 1 lth-place finish 
of Roxanne Wilson, the Clarion 
University women's cross coun- 
try team finished fourth out of 17 
teams at the California (Pa.) 
Invitational Saturday. 

Wilson, who finished in 20:38, 
was followed six seconds later by 
teammate Kelly Null. 

Carnegie Mellon won the team 
competition. 

The men's squad was also in 
action in California, finishing 
seventh out of 16 teams. 

Ian King led the way for 
Clarion, crossing the finish line 
with a time of 28:58 for an 
eighth-place finish. 

Frosfburg (Md.) State finished 
first in men's competition. 
The Golden Eagles will be back 
in action Saturday at Slippery 
Rock — the site of the NCAA 
Division II championships Nov. 7 



— for a 12:45 start. Also on 
Clarion's schedule are trips to 
Youngstown State (Sept. 26), 
Lehigh (Oct. 3), Duquense (Oct. 
17), and Gettysburg (Oct. 24). 

CUP Golfers third 

Shawn Will led the Clarion 
University golf team to a lofty 
third-place finish in the 18-team 
Glenville (W.Va.) State 
Invitational , which took place 
Sunday and Monday. 

Will finished fifth in the indi- 
vidual standings by firing a 145. 
J .P. Kinney (149), Anthony 
Tacconelli (152), Matt Hanacki 
(153), and Mike Robb (164) also 
helped the Golden Eagles to the 
third-place finish. 

Clarion finished at 597 team 
score behind Shawnee State (590) 
and Bluefield State (591). 



September 17, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



■ f i 



Page 21 



CUP looks to return to winning ways 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Clarion University head football 
coach Malen Luke and the Golden 
Eagles have learned that a football 
can take a lot of different bounces 
through the course of a season. 
It was only two years ago that 
the Golden Eagles 
enjoyed one of the 
finest seasons in 
school history, 
posting an 11-3 
record on the way 
to the PSAC-West 
title, the Northeast 
regional champi- 
onship, and a 
berth in the 
NCAA Division II 
Final Four. 

However, CUP's 
good fortunes hit 
an abrupt halt with 
the arrival of the 
1997 season. 

Entering the season as the 
fourth-ranked team in the nation, 
the Golden Eagles suffered 
through a string of injuries and an 



Ron DeJidas, and veteran receiver 
Mark Witte. 

There is a sense of optimism 
around the Golden Eagles this 
season, though. Much of which 
stems from the return of Weibel, 
who has over 400 career comple- 
tions. 
One of Weibel's favorite targets 



1998 Clarion Football Schedule 


ill 


Sept. 


3 Youngstown St. 


6-50 


JgEw 


Sept. 


12 Millersville 


38-31 


N I 


Sept. 


19 Shepherd 


Away 


y§yi 1 


Sept. 


26 Kutztown 


Away 


wflMflrvStf 


Oct. 


3 Slippery Rock 


Away 


JHpfl^^vjHR 


Oct. 


10 Edinboro 


Home 


#iL% 


Oct. 


17 Shippensburg 


Home 


Oct. 


24IUP 


Away 


m $&r • 


Oct. 


31 West Chester 


Home 


.# 


Nov. 


7 Lock Haven 


Away 


CB Kftrvin Charles 


Nov. 


14 California 


Home 



also returns in Alvin Slaughter, a 
third-team Ail-American a year 
ago. Slaughter, from Carol City, 
Fla., is a gamebreaker with blaz- 
ing speed and knack for making 

0-7 start before returning to form big plays. 

and winning the final three games However, while the Weibel-to- 

of the season. Among the casual- Slaughter connection has the 

ties were ^-America quarter- potential to be among the best in 

back Chris Weibel, leading rusher the nation, the success^f the 

Second-half surge pushes Eagles past Millersville 



Clarion offense may lie in the 

development of the running game. 

In order to prevent opponents 

from double-teaming Slaughter, 

Clarion must develop a consistent 

threat in the backfield to keep 

defenses honest. 
Third-year starter Jamie Sickeri 

has been through the battles of the 
past two sea- 
sons and 
brings a great 
deal of experi- 
ence to the 
Clarion back- 
field. Keonte 
Campbell also 
returns after 
rushing for 
398 yards and 
three touch- 
downs on 75 
carries last 
season. 

The Eagles 

have high 

expectations for freshmen running 

backs Demetric Garnder and 

Glenn Allen. 

"They both are going to be spe- 
cial players," said Luke. "They 
have bright futures." 

The offensive line returns four 
starters from last season. Erie 
natives Ken Nickson and Dan 

continued on page 24 



continued from page 19 

momentum and a 17-10 lead. 
The Clarion offense finally 
knocked on the end zone door 
halfway through the third quarter 
when Weibel connected with 
sophomore receiver Dan Stout on 
a 31 -yard pass play to the 
Millersville 2-yard line. 
However, the Marauder defense 
stopped the Golden Eagles on 
four consecutive plays to regain 
the momentum in this roller- 
coaster contest. 

But, after failing to move the 
ball themselves, Millersville wit- 
nessed a flash of the 1996 Clarion 
Final Four team that seemingly 
scored at will on its opponents. 
Weibel found Sickeri across the 
middle of the Marauder defense 
on their first play of the posses- 
sion for a 69-yard touchdown and 
a 24-10 Clarion led at the 4:13 



mark of the third quarter. 

It was the second gain of over 50 
yards on the day for the senior 
from Brockway, who had missed 
some practice -time early in die 
week. 

"Jamie's our heart and soul," 
said Luke, who won his 25th 
game at Clarion since being hired 
in 1994. 

But while Sickeri may be the 
heart and soul of the team, senior 
wideout Slaughter continues to be 
the bread and butter. 

Slaughter hauled in six passes 
for 193 yards and a pair of touch- 
downs, as well as tallying 114 
yards on special teams, 57 of 
which coming on his third-quarter 
punt return for a touchdown. 
Slaughter's performance followed 
his eight-catch, 103-yard (one 
TD) game at Youngstown State 

Sept. 3. 

Early in the fourth quarter 

Weibel hit Slaughter on a patented 



inside screen pass and the six-foot 
senior from Carol City, Fla., did 
the rest by following his blockers 
down the left sideline for a 50- 
yard touchdown that gave the 
Golden Eagles a seemingly insur- 
mountable 31-10 lead. 

Millersville fought back to tie 
the game on two scoring passes 
by Folmar to McFetridge and 
another to Sean Foxworth. 

However, the story of the game 
was the amazing turnaround the 
Golden Eagles showed after a 
delirious first half. 

"We made some minor adjust- 
ments, but mainly they just had to 
be woken up," said Luke. 
Another key to the game was the 
play of Presutti, who, in addition 
to his interception return for a 
touchdown early in the second 
half, picked off another pass later 



Week Two Scouting Report 




vs. 




Clarion (1-1) 



RAMS 

Shepherd (1-1) 



Where: Ram Stadium (3,000), Shepherdstown,W.Va. 
When: Saturday, 1 p.m. Radio: C 93 92.7 FM 
Weather: Partly cloudy, high in the 80s. 

On the road again ... and again ... and again. That's the tune the 
Golden Eagles are singing this week as they open a three-game road 
swing at Shepherd College ih Shepherdstown, W.Va., Saturday at 1 
p.m. 

The Rams are coming off a 9-1 season in which they claimed a share 
of the West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship. 
Thus far this season Shepherd is 1-1 with a 36-14 loss to Shippensburg 
and a 36-6 win over East Stroudsburg. 

There's no question what the focal point of the Eagle defense will be 
this Saturday. Shepherd running back Damian Beane is the leading 
returning rusher in the nation in Division II. Although just a 5-8 junior, 
Beane, a product of Baltimore City College High School, rushed for 
1,590 yards last season. The first-team All-WVIAC selection demon- 
strated a great deal of consistency, running for eight straight 100-yard 
games. While the improving WVIAC is not at the level of the PSAC, 
Beane demonstrated his abilities against PSAC entries Shippensburg 
and East Stroudsburg, running for a total of 294 yards and two touch- 
downs on 49 carries. Stopping Beane will be a key for the Golden Eagle 
defense. 

"He's a very good running back," said Clarion head coach Malen Luke. 
"He's low to the ground, has great speed and runs hard. There's no 
question who they're going to go to. When you have a big gun you shoot 
it." 

While the Shepherd running game presents a challenge for CUP, 
Clarion's All-American pitch-and-catch tandem of quarterback Chris 
Weibel and wide receiver Alvin Slaughter is certain to create several 
matchup problems in the Ram secondary. Shepherd fields an inexperi- 
enced secondary that gave up 298 passing yards and three passing 
touchdowns to Shippensburg. 

Under 12th-year head coach Monte Cater, Shepherd has built itself 
into a perennial contender in the WVIAC. Cater's teams have made five 
first-place finishes (1997, 94, 92, 91, 88). The recent titles are the most 
relevant, as the WVIAC teams made the jump from NAIA competition to 
NCAA Division II three years ago. 

* Preview compiled by Sports Editor Nathan Koble 



in the third quarter. 

"(Presutti) turned the game 
around for us in the third quarter 
... that was the wake-up call we 
needed," said Luke. 

Meanwhile, it was an efficient 
day for Weibel, who made the 
most of his 12 completions. He 
finished the day 12 of 30 for 322 
yards and three touchdowns, as he 
continues to show his pre-injury 
form. 

Millersville (0-1) showed why 



they should be one of the most 
potent offenses in the PSAC in 
1998. 

Folmar hit on 29 of 45 passes for 
436 yards and three touchdowns, 
while wide receiver Sean Scott 
pulled in 12 aerials for a school- 
record 227 yards. 

The Golden Eagles will be look- 
ing for their second win of the 
season when they face Shepherd 
Saturday in Shepherdstown, 
W.Va. 



Images of the West 

Sterling Silver Jewlery, 

Incense, Tapestries, 

Unique Gifts 

652 Main Street Clarion, PA 16214 (814)226-5513 




IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ADVERTISE 



IN THE CLARION CALL 



PLEASE CONTACT DANIELLE AT x2380 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 17 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



INTRAMURAL SCHEDULE 
FALL 1998 



ACTIVITY: 



REGISTRATION DUE: 



BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9/8 

OUTDOOR SOCCER 9/8 

ULTIMATE FRISBEE 9/8 

GOLF SCRAMBLE • 9/15 

FLAG FOOTBALL 9/15 

VOLLEYBALL 9/15 

TENNIS 9/22 

FIELD GOAL CONTEST 9/22 

10 K RELAY 9/22 

10. 1 PITCH SOFTBALL 9/29 

11. POWER LIFTING 9/29 
INDOOR SOCCER 9/29 
1 ON 1 BASKETBALL 10/13 
CHALLENGE COURSE 10/13 
HORSESHOE PITCHING 10/13 
CLOSEST TO THE PIN 10/20 
3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 10/20 

18. TUG OF WAR 10/20 

19. BIKE RACE 10/27 
TABLE TENNIS 10/27 
FLOOR HOCKEY 10/27 
TUBE H20 BASKETBALL 1 1 /3 
FREE THROW 11/3 
BADMINTON 11/3 
WHIFFLE BALL 11/10 
SWIM MEET 11/10 
BIG BUCK CONTEST 11/17 

(clip & save!) 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



20. 

21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



INTRAMURALS 

UP AND RUNNING !!!! 

The Intramural Recreation & Fitness 
Program's are off to a fast start this 
semester! We already have several 
intramural sports started (beach 
volleyball, flag football etc.) but 
IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO ENTER! 
We will still accept rosters and begin 
to schedule your games starting next 
week. We will also be offering other 
programs throughout the school year 
that will help promote the quality of 
student life at Clarion University. We 
hope you will allow these activities to 
become an important part of your life! 




How To Get Involved! 

Registration deadlines have been 
established for each sport. The schedule of 
these dates can be found on the Fall 1998 
Intramural Schedule as well as on the Intramural 
Bulletin Board located outside the Intramural 
office in Tippin Gym. Registration rosters may 
be submitted personally to room 1 17 Tippin, or 
you may drop them in the intramural deposit 
box located outside the IM office. The 
following steps should be taken to enter an 
intramural sport or recreation activity: 

1 . Check the intramural bulletin board (located 
in the hallway outside room 117 Tippin) for 
scheduled sports/recreation activities and 
registration deadlines. 

2. Complete a registration sheet & team roster 
for desired sport/recreation activity. 

•Provide names and phone numbers 
for each person listed on your team roster. 

•Check the eligibility of your team 
personnel by consulting your IM/REC 
information guide and the information sheet 
posted on the intramural bulletin board for that 
particular activity. Questions concerning 
eligibility can also be answered by the 
Intramural Director or Graduate Assistant. 

*Be sure to check the roster limits for 
each sport/recreation activity. 

3. Return the completed registration sheet to 
the IM/REC office or drop it in the intramural 
deposit box on or before the designated 
registration deadline. 

4. Check the intramural bulletin board for the 
designated time and location of the team 
captains meeting for that sport and be sure to 
send a member of your team to this meeting! 



*Body Fat Testing Available* 

Tuesday's at 12:00 noon 

The Intramural, Recreation & Fitness 
office is again offering free body fat 
percentage testing. The procedure, 
which takes only a couple of minutes, 
is done with the Futrex 5000. This is a 
near infrared measuring device, 
applied to the biceps area of the 
subject, "Testing is conducted in the 
IM/REC office room 117 Tippin Gym. 



**i 



.** 



'Aqua Aerobics' 
Sunday's 6:00 pm 

It's back by popular demand! The 
most refreshing form of exercise ever 
invented. Class is held in the Tippin 
Gym swimming pool and are FREE to 
all students. 

***Women's Power Hour*** 

Tue. & Thur. from 7:00 - 8:00 pm 

This is a weight training session 
specifically designed for the ladies. 
The use of free weights is explained 
and programs are available for you to 
follow. Beginner's and experienced 
lifter's are welcome. If you are 
interested in using free weights, but 
are not sure about how to get started, 
this is for you! 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

(Qjjided trips Equipment Adventure R entals 

The brand new "Clarion Outdoors Program" provides 

a number of activities that are designed to bring students 
together to enjoy outdoor adventure!! Dedicated to improving the quality of 
life for students through outdoor recreation and awareness, our programs goals include: 
providing opportunities for direct contact with the natural environment, promoting outdoor 
pursuits that can be safely enjoyed for your entire life, and offering supportive and cooperative 
environments that foster personal and social growth. 

EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

Equipment rentals are available for a small fee to students on a daily, week-end and 
semester break basis. A partial list of equipment available includes: mountain bikes, roller 
blades, cross country skis, snow sleds, inner tubes( summer & winter), kayaks, canoes, 
paddles and PFD's, tents, camping accessories, backpacks and caving equipment. For a 
complete list of available equipment call or stop by our office during regular office hours. 



DATE: 


Sept. 24 


Sept. 26,27 


Oct. 22 


Nov. 7 


Nov. 21 


Dec. 5,6 



FALL 1998 CALENDAR 

PROGRAM: 
Rock Climbing 
Camping & Canoeing 
Rock Climbing 
Mountain Biking 
Caving 



LOCATION: 
Panther's Gave 
Clarion River 
Panther's Cave 
Cook Forest 
Panther's Cave 
Cook Forest 



Camping & Hiking 

* Dates and locations are subject to change due to unforeseen conditions. 
"Watch for advertisements in the Clarion Call for more details- including 
sign-up times and the number of spaces available for each trip. 

REGISTRATION AND FEES 

Registration for one day and week-end trips can be made at the Intramural office (Tippin room 
117) 10 days prior to the departure date. Cost for overnight trips will be $ 5.00 per day to 
cover the cost of your meals and must be paid when you register to reserve your spot. 
Equipment rental and transportation is included. 



September 17,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Weibel, Eagles show character in loss to YSU 

Clarion takes 6-0 lead in second quarter but falls, 50-6, to I-AA champs 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



iw.w^w.a^w.;.tt^^ 



YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO -- 1 must 
confess that I had the best seat in 
the house when the Golden Eagles 
took a 6-0 lead in the second quar- 
ter of their 50-6 loss to 
Youngstown State Sept. 3. 



SIDELINES 



I was positioned behind the end 
zone when quarterback Chris 
Weibel dumped an inside pass to 
wide receiver Alvin Slaughter, 
who danced his way around a 
swarm of YSU defenders and 
across the goal line, stunning the 
16,000-plus Penguin fans who had 
flocked to Stambaugh Stadium to 
see the four-time Division I-AA 
champs open their season against 
"some school from 

Pennsylvania." 

Slaughter sliced through the end 
zone and knelt down to catch his 
breath at a perimeter fence while 
his teammates flocked around him 
in celebration. Among them was 
Weibel, who returned to the 
Clarion lineup after missing most 
of last season with a torn anterior 
cruciate ligament. 

As the rest of the Eagles ran 
back to the Clarion sideline, 
Weibel stayed with his winded 
teammate to offer a few words. As 
the two Ail-Americans started 
back to the Clarion bench, Weibel 
turned his head in my direction 
and gave me a quick nod. Perhaps 
that was his way of thanking me 
for being part of a small throng of 
Clarion rooters among the sea of 
red and black, or perhaps that is 
customary for a charismatic field 
general who had just orchestrated 
, a scoring drive. 

Whatever the reason was, one 
thing was clear to me: This guy is 
a winner. He could have danced 
around and lost his poise like 
many Division II quarterbacks 
might have done after taking a 
lead against a team that is revered 
throughout the college football 
world. Weibel showed why the 
Eagles were national semifinalists 
in 1996, and he certainly proved 
to be far better than the two young 
quarterbacks YSU fielded. 

It would be all YSU after 
Clarion's initial strike, as the 
superior size and athleticism of 
the Penguins overcame the upstart 
Eagles. The final score was some- 
what misleading. Ahead 29-6, the 
Penguins gained a first down on 
the last play of the third quarter on 
a fake punt. They later punched in 
a touchdown on fourth-and-inches 
instead of kicking a field goal to 
cap the scoring. Youngstown State 
wasn't trying to create bad blood. 
They are ranked No. 1 in a series 




of I-AA polls, and a narrow win 
over the D-II Eagles would have 
hurt their chances in the eyes of 
the pollsters. 

Clarion didn't have to look far 
for bright spots. Kervin Charles, 
just breaking into the cornerback 
position, kept his man in check all 
night, freshman running back 
Demetric Gardner gave flashes of 
a strong potential, and center Nick 
Swiger showed a lot of guts by 
playing with a broken hand. 

However, perhaps above all else, 
the Eagles will enter PSAC-West 
play knowing their toughest oppo- 
nent is behind them. Slippery 
Rock's powerful running game 
won't seem quite so strong and 
neither will the passing of IUP's 
Paul Failla, a transfer from Notre 
Dame. If that holds true, the 
Eagles will have gained from a 
loss. 

(Editor's note: YSU defeated 
Division 1-A Kent State, 24-10, 
Saturday. The Penguins also face 
Heisman Trophy candidate 
Daunte Culpepper and Central 
Florida this season.) 

Scoring by Quarters 



Clarion 6 


0-6 




YSU 23 


6 21-50 






CUP 


YSU 


First downs 


11 


12 


Rushes-Yards 


32-61 


49-266 


Passing Yards 


156 


147 


Comp-Att-Int 


14-29-1 


10-19-1 


Return Yards 


74 


161 


Punts-Avg. 


11-33 


4-40 


Fumbles-Lost 


1-0 


2-0 


Penalties-Yards 


8-69 


5-45 



Time of Possession 29:42 30:18 



CUP practice 

from page 19 

week's practice, as the Eagles pre- 
pare for Shepherd (W.Va.), another 
team that figures to be in the thick 
of the playoff chase (see scouting 
report page 21). 

"The atmosphere is always better 
in practice after a win, especially 
when you beat a team that maybe 
you weren't supposed to beat," 
said Clarion head coach Malen 
Luke. 

'The players always seem to pay 
attention and concentrate more. 
It's nice to get a win, but in athlet- 
ics — football especially, maybe 
— celebrations have to be short- 
lived because you have another 
game coming up." 



I-AA Poll 



Sports Network Poll 
Sept. 14 

1 . Youngstown State 

2. McNeese State 

3. Georgia Southern 

4. Villanova 

5. Hampton 

6. Northern Iowa 

7. Hofstra 

8. William & Mary 

9. Delaware 

10. Northwestern State 

11. Montana 

12. Murray State 

13. Northern Arizona 

14. Appalachian State 

15. Western Kentucky 

16. Eastern Kentucky 

17. Western Illinois 

18. Southern 

19. Florida A&M 

20. Middle Tennessee State 



Now that you've had a lover, 




maijbe tjou need a friend. 



Someone who will be straight with you. Like the medical team at Family Health Council. 

So if you want to protect yourself from becoming pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted 

disease, call us. We offer complete gynecological exams, birth control and free pregnancy testing 

on a walk-in basis. And everything is confidential. Located walking distance from campus. 



226-7500 



Convenient appointments with evenings available. 
Reduced fees for students. Most health insurance plans accepted . 



r 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064A East Main Street, Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 






\ige 22 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 17 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



INTRAMURAL SCHEDULE 
FALL 1998 

ACTIVITY: REGISTRATION DUE: 

1. BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9/8 

2. OUTDOOR SOCCER 9/8 

3. ULTIMATE FRISBEE 9/8 

4. GOLF SCRAMBLE • 9/15 

5. FLAG FOOTBALL 9/15 

6. VOLLEYBALL 9/15 

7. TENNIS 9/22 

8. FIELD GOAL CONTEST 9/22 

9. 10 K RELAY 9/22 

10. 1 PITCH SOFTBALL 9/29 

11. POWER LIFTING 9/29 

12. INDOOR SOCCER 9/29 

13. 1 ON 1 BASKETBALL 10/13 

14. CHALLENGE COURSE 10/13 

15. HORSESHOE PITCHING 10/13 

16. CLOSEST TO THE PIN 10/20 

17. 3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 10/20 

18. TUG OF WAR 10/20 

19. BIKE RACE 10/27 

20. TABLE TENNIS 10/27 

21. FLOOR HOCKEY 10/27 

22. TUBE H20 BASKETBALL 11/3 

23. FREE THROW 11/3 

24. BADMINTON 11/3 

25. WHIFFLE BALL 11/10 

26. SWIM MEET 11/10 

27. BIG BUCK CONTEST 11/17 



INTRAMURALS 

UP AND RUNNING !!!! 

The Intramural Recreation & Fitness 
Program's are off to a fast start this 
semester! We already have several 
intramural sports started (beach 
volleyball, flag football etc.) but 
IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO ENTER! 
We will still accept rosters and begin 
to schedule your games starting next 
week. We will also be offering other 
programs throughout the school year 
that will help promote the quality of 
student life at Clarion University. We 
hope you will allow these activities to 
become an important part of your life! 




How To Get Involved! 

Registration deadlines have been 
established for each sport. The schedule of 
these dates can be found on the Fall 1998 
Intramural Schedule as well as on the IntramuraJ 
Bulletin Board located outside the Intramural 
office in Tippin Gym. Registration rosters may 
be submitted personally to room 1 17 Tippin, or 
you may drop them in the intramural deposit 
box located outside the IM office. The 
following steps should be taken to enter an 
intramural sport or recreation activity: 

1 . Check the intramural bulletin board (located 
in the hallway outside room 117 Tippin) for 
scheduled sports/recreation activities and 
registration deadlines. 

2. Complete a registration sheet & team roster 
for desired sport/recreation activity. 

•Provide names and phone numbers 
for each person listed on your team roster. 

•Check the eligibility of your team 
personnel by consuming your IM/REC 
information guide and the information sheet 
posted on the intramural bulletin board for that 
particular activity. Questions concerning 
eligibility can also be answered by the 
Intramural Director or Graduate Assistant. 

•Be sure to check the roster limits for 
each sport/recreation activity. 

3. Return the completed registration sheet to 
the IM/REC office or drop it in the intramural 
deposit box on or before the designated 
registration deadline. 

4. Check the intramural bulletin board for the 
designated time and location of the team 
captains meeting for that sport and be sure to 
send a member of your team to this meeting! 



*Body Fat Testing Available* 
Tuesday's at 12:00 noon 

The Intramural, Recreation & Fitness 
office is again offering free body fat 
percentage testing. The procedure, 
which takes only a couple of minutes, 
is done with the Futrex 5000. This is a 
near infrared measuring device, 
applied to the biceps area of the 
subject Testing is conducted in the 
IM/REC office room 117 Tippin Gym. 



**< 



»** 



*Aqua Aerobics" 

Sunday's 6:00 pm 

It's back by popular demand! The 
most refreshing form of exercise ever 
invented. Class is held in the Tippin 
Gym swimming pool and are FREE to 
all students. 

***Women's Power Hour*** 

Tue. & Thur. from 7:00 - 8:00 pm 

This is a weight training session 
specifically designed for the ladies. 
The use of free weights is explained 
and programs are available for you to 
follow. Beginner's and experienced 
lifter's are welcome. If you are 
interested in using free weights, but 
are not sure about how to get started, 
this is for you! 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

Guided trips Equipment Adventure R entals 

The brand new "Clarion Outdoors Program" provides 

a number of activities that are designed to bring students 
together to enjoy outdoor adventure!! Dedicated to improving the quality of 
life for students through outdoor recreation and awareness, our program's goals include: 
providing opportunities for direct contact with the natural environment, promoting outdoor 
pursuits that can be safely enjoyed for your entire life, and offering supportive and cooperative 
environments that foster personal and social growth. 

EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

Equipment rentals are available for a small fee to students on a daily, week-end and 
semester break basis. A partial list of equipment available includes: mountain bikes, roller 
blades, cross country skis, snow sleds, inner tubes(summer & winter), kayaks, canoes, 
paddles and PFD's, tents, camping accessories, backpacks and caving equipment. For a 
complete list of available equipment call or stop by our office during regular office hours. 



DATE: 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 26,27 
Oct. 22 
Nov. 7 
Nov. 21 
Dec. 5,6 



FALL 1998 CALENDAR 

PROGRAM: 
Rock Climbing 
Camping & Canoeing 
Rock Climbing 
Mountain Biking 
Caving 



LOCATION: 
Panther's Cave 
Clarion River 
Panthers Cave 
Cook Forest 
Panther's Cave 
Cook Forest 



Camping & Hiking 

* Dates and locations are subject to change due to unforeseen conditions. 
"Watch for advertisements in the Clarion Call for more details- including 
sign-up times and the number of spaces available for each trip. 

REGISTRATION AND FEES 

Registration for one day and week-end trips can be made at the Intramural office (Tippin room 
117) 10 days prior to the departure date Cost for overnight trips will be $ 5.00 per day to 
cover the cost of your meals and must be paid when you register to reserve your spot 
Equipment rental and transportation is included 






September 17,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Weibel, Eagles show character in loss to YSU 

Clarion takes 6-0 lead in second quarter but falls, 50-6, to I-AA champs 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



YOUNGSTQWN, OHIO ~ 1 must 
confess that I had the best seat in 
the house when the Golden Eagles 
took a 6-0 lead in the second quar- 
ter of their 50-6 loss to 



Youngstown 



State Sept. 3. 



SIDELINES 



I was positioned behind the end 
zone when quarterback Chris 
Weibel dumped an inside pass to 
wide receiver Alvin Slaughter, 
who danced his way around a 
swarm of YSU defenders and 
across the goal line, stunning the 
16,000-plus Penguin fans who had 
flocked to Stambaugh Stadium to 
see the four-time Division I-AA 
champs open their season against 
"some school from 

Pennsylvania." 

Slaughter sliced through the end 
zone and knelt down to catch his 
breath at a perimeter fence while 
his teammates flocked around him 
in celebration. Among them was 
Weibel, who returned to the 
Clarion lineup after missing most 
of last season with a torn anterior 
cruciate ligament. 

As the rest of the Eagles ran 
back to the Clarion sideline, 
Weibel stayed with his winded 
teammate to offer a few words. As 
the two Ail-Americans started 
back to the Clarion bench, Weibel 
turned his head in my direction 
and gave me a quick nod. Perhaps 
that was his way of thanking me 
for being part of a small throng of 
Clarion rooters among the sea of 
red and black, or perhaps that is 
customary for a charismatic field 
general who had just orchestrated 
a scoring drive. 

Whatever the reason was, one 
thing was clear to me: This guy is 
a winner. He could have danced 
around and lost his poise like 
many Division II quarterbacks 
might have done after taking a 
lead against a team that is revered 
throughout the college football 
world. Weibel showed why the 
Eagles were national semifinalists 
in 1996, and he certainly proved 
to be far better than the two young 
quarterbacks YSU fielded. 

It would be all YSU after 
Clarion's initial strike, as the 
superior size and athleticism of 
the Penguins overcame the upstart 
Eagles. The final score was some- 
what misleading. Ahead 29-6, the 
Penguins gained a first down on 
the last play of the third quarter on 
a fake punt. They later punched in 
a touchdown on fourth-and-inches 
instead of kicking a field goal to 
cap the scoring. Youngstown State 
wasn't trying to create bad blood. 
They are ranked No. 1 in a series 



■i i n i 'p t 1 1 1 mym >; i; i;t 'rr r» ; * . i .i, i , i .i.i. i .i. i .i. i , i . i . » . » . ' ,". ' *7 . T } 77 ? * , .".'. , . l . l T , ! l . l . * . l . ' . 1 ? . l . l . ' . ' .l l . l . l . | . l . , . | . 








of I-AA polls, and a narrow win 
over the D-II Eagles would have 
hurt their chances in the eyes of 
the pollsters. 

Clarion didn't have to look far 
for bright spots. Kervin Charles, 
just breaking into the cornerback 
position, kept his man in check all 
night, freshman running back 
Demetric Gardner gave flashes of 
a strong potential, and center Nick 
Swiger showed a lot of guts by 
playing with a broken hand. 

However, perhaps above all else, 
the Eagles will enter PS AC- West 
play knowing their toughest oppo- 
nent is behind them. Slippery 
Rock's powerful running game 
won't seem quite so strong and 
neither will the passing of IUP's 
Paul Failla, a transfer from Notre 
Dame. If that holds true, the 
Eagles will have gained from a 
loss. 

(Editor's note: YSU defeated 
Division l-A Kent State, 24-10, 
Saturday. The Penguins also face 
Heisman Trophy candidate 
Daunte Culpepper and Central 
Florida this season.) 

Scoring by Quarters 



Clarion 6 


0-6 




YSU 23 


6 21-50 






CUP 


YSU 


First downs 


11 


12 


Rushes-Yards 


32-61 


49-266 


Passing Yards 


156 


147 


Comp-Att-Int 


14-29-1 


10-19-1 


Return Yards 


74 


161 


Punts-Avg. 


11-33 


4-40 


Fumbles-Lost 


1-0 


2-0 


Penalties-Yards 


3-69 


5-45 



Time of Possession 29:42 30:18 



CUP practice 

from page 19 

week's practice, as the Eagles pre- 
pare for Shepherd (W.Va.), another 
team that figures to be in the thick 
of the playoff chase (see scouting 
report page 21). 

"The atmosphere is always better 
in practice after a win, especially 
when you beat a team that maybe 
you weren't supposed to beat," 
said Clarion head coach Malen 
Luke. 

"The players always seem to pay 
attention and concentrate more. 
It's nice to get a win, but in athlet- 
ics — football especially, maybe 
— celebrations have to be short- 
lived because you have another 
game coming up." 



I-AA Poll 



Sports Network Poll 
Sept. 14 

1 . Youngstown State 

2. McNeese Slate 

3. Georgia Southern 

4. Villanova 

5. Hampton 

6. Northern Iowa 

7. Holstra 

8. William & Mary 

9. Delaware 

10. Northwestern State 

11. Montana 

12. Murray State 

13. Northern Arizona 

14. Appalachian State 

15. Western Kentucky 

16. Eastern Kentucky 

17. Western Illinois 

18. Southern 

19. Florida A&M 

20. Middle Tennessee State 



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Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



September 17, 1998 





„ ■:;■ 



Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

■ 
Two years ago, Chris Weibel 

was on top of the world. The 
junior quarterback had just guided 
Clarion to an 1 1-3 record, a trip to 
the NCAA Division II semifinals, 
and was named an Ail-American. 
When the 1997 season 
approached, expectations at 
Clarion were high to make anoth- 
er run at the national champi- 
onship. Weibel was beginning his 
senior season with hopes of taking 
the Golden Eagles back to the 
playoffs and possibly landing a 
professional tryout. 

However, all of that came to an 
abrupt halt when Weibel dropped 
back to pass in the second game 
against Glenville State. As 
Weibel planted his foot, some- 
thing went wrong. That some- 
thing was an anterior cruciate lig- 
ament tear. 

Weibel missed the rest of the 
season and it seemed as though 
his brilliant career at Clarion was 
over. 

Weibel petitioned the NCAA to 
grant him a medical hardship 
waiver to allow him a sixth year 
of eligibility. The NCAA granted 
the request and Weibel began the George Groff/Clarion Call 

long road of rehabilitation to try Record-setting quarterback Chris Weibel is back in action for the 

Golden Eagles this fall. After directing Clarion to the national 
semifinals in 1996, Weibel was forced to sit out most of last season 
with a torn anterior cruciate ligament. 

players, he has a great relationship great relationship with Cappa. 
with all of the players. Weibel "Jeff and I are good friends. He 
noted, 'They respect me for what did a great job last year. Jeff real- 
I have done, and I respect them as ly knows the offense and he sup- 
well. I realize that they are young ports me 100 percent. When he is 
and just learning the system." out on the field I support him the 
While Weibel was out last sea- same. Jeff's support has been real 
son, junior Jeff Cappa stepped up important to me." 
and guided the Clarion offense. Weibel said that he came back 
excited to play again. I missed the However, despite the fact the two because he wanted to prove to 
game so much last year and it felt ^ competing for the same job, himself and everyone else that he 
great to be back out on the field., ^y have worked together close- could overcome the injury. "My 




and return for the 1998 season. 

Return, he did. Last Saturday, 

Weibel threw for 322 yards and 

three touchdowns as Clarion 

pulled off a 38-31 upset over 

PSAC-East favorite Millersville 

in Clarion's home opener. 

After a year of excruciating 

rehab, Weibel returned and did 

what he does best, dazzle the 

crowd at Memorial Stadium. 

According to Weibel, "I am just 



It was a beautiful day and we had \y 
a great turnout for our home open- 
er. It was great knowing that there 
are so many people who came out 
to watch us." 

Weibel was quick to point out 
that he had a lot of help during the 
recovery process, "Everyone was 
so supportive. My parents (Jay 
and Diana) and my girlfriend 
Robin (Shaffer) were there for me 
the whole time. Coach (Malen) 
Luke encouraged me every time 
he saw me. And, Thunder 
(Clarion University Head Trainer 
Jim Thorton) and his wife 
Bridgette pushed me every second 
throughout my rehab." 

Weibel said that despite being 
much older than some of the other 



Weibel noted that he has a 



goal was to be back this year and 
play well. I really hope to get a 



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look to move on past college." 
The chance of getting a pro try- 
out is realistic for Weibel. Weibel 
holds Clarion's single-season 
record for touchdown passes (32) 
and passing yards (2,880). Weibel 
also holds Clarion's career record 
for touchdown passes (53), pass- 
ing yards (5,841), completions 
(437), attempts (774), and com- 
pletion percentage (56.5). 
Weibel noted, "Everyone tells 
me I have a chance to get a look 
(from the pros). I hope that I do. 
I just want to play well and keep 
working towards that goal." 
When asked what his fondest 
memory of his career at Clarion 
was, Weibel quickly said, "The 
whole 1996 season." 

That was the year that Clarion 
came within a blocked field goal 
of going to the national title game. 
With Clarion trailing Northern 
Colorado 19-18 with under 30 
seconds to go, Weibel connected 
with Steve Witte on a 40-yard 
pass to set up a last-second field 
goal. However, the field goal was 
blocked, and Northern Colorado 
went on to eventually win the 
national title. 

According to Weibel, "It was 
such a rush. Even though we fell 
short, we proved that we were one 
of the best teams in the nation. 
That 1996 team was a tight-knit 
group. We had a lot of seniors and 
made a great run. We were picked 
to finish fourth in the PSAC-West 
and went on to the national semi- 
finals." 

Weibel said that the one game 
that stood out that year was 
against Indiana, "They came to 
Clarion and everything clicked for 
us. To beat them as bad as we did 
(49-15) is definitely one of the 
games that will stand out in my 
mind." 

No^that Weibel is back, he said 
that while he is proud of what he 
has already accomplished, he is 
ready to focus on (he 1998 season. 
"The win against Millersville was 
big for us. I hope that we can get 
on a roll and make another run 

this year." 
With Weibel back under center 

for the Golden Eagles, anything is 

possible. 



CUP football 

continued from page 21 

Greulich will man the tackle 
positions, with Nick Swiger at 
center. Senior Marcus 

Kubanscek returns to the guard 
position, with Ryan Winkleblech, 
Joe Crowe, Steve Schafer and 
Ben Boldin looking for time this 
season. Pete Yurisinec, a strong 
blocker and receiver, returns at 
tight end. 

The defense features a group of 
swarming linebackers. Keith 
Kochert and Brett Wiley man the 
inside linebacker positions, 
while Ryan Presutti, Mike 
Williams, Mike Maguire, and 
Phil Rayford guard the perime 
ters. 

Nose guard Bill Burns, Justin 
Miller, and Don Painter are the 
lineman, with Fred Walker, Cory 
Trudgen and Drew Painter ready 
for action. The secondary boasts 
talent and potential. Senior cap 
tain Brad Geer anchors the 
defensive backfield, which 
includes cornerbacks Kervin 
Charles and Donte Williams. 
Chris Janson, the emergency 
quarterback a year ago, lines up 
at safety. 

Frank Van Wert returns to han- 
dle the placekicking and punting 
duties. 

With a number of players 
returning, Clarion has the ability 
to make 1998 a memorable sea- 
son. However, the schedule may 
be the most difficult in school 
history. Youngstown State 
(Gateway), Millersville (PS AC 
East), and Shepherd (WVIAC) 
are all picked to win their respec 
tive conferences. Also, the 
PSAC-West is comprised of 
seven teams who are capable of 
winning the title. Defending 
champion Slippery Rock returns 
the core of its title team, IUP has 
landed another D-I transfer in 
Paul Failla (Notre Dame), and 
Penn State's starting fullback, 
Anthony Cleary, has transferred 
to Shippensburg for the season. 
With everything factored in, 
Luke agrees that Clarion could 
finish anywhere in the PSAC- 
West standings. 

"The conference is very com- 
petitive," said Luke. "Right now, 
we control our own destiny. We 
just have to work hard and hope 
for a little luck." 




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INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Response.. ..Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Page 9 

Call On YOU Page 14 

Classifieds Page 15 

Entertainment Page 15 

Sports Page 19 



News 



Enrollment has 

increased against 

Clarion University's 

main campus for the 

fourth consecutive 

year. Why is it still 

rising? see page 5. 



Lifestyles 



Pennsylvania poet 

Sam Hazo reads at 

Clarion, for full 

story, see page 9. 



Sports 



Alvin Slaughter 
appears to be on his 
way to another great 
season, read what he 

has in store for 
Clarion this season, 

see page 19. 



CI ARION UNIVERSl IV OF PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME 81, ISSUE 2 



University's Master Plan finally approved 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Editor 



Clarion University's compre- 
hensive Facilities Master Plan 
was approved over the summer 
by the Board of Trustees. 

The 20-year plan, which calls 
for renovations to current CU 
buildings, demolition of others 
and construction of several new 
facilities, came about after over 
three years of meetings and site 
work. 

According to Vice President for 
Finance and Administration Dr. 
Heather Haberaecker, "This is a 
major accomplishment for the 
University, and will benefit the 
University in the long run." 

"This will make us competitive 
in a very cjjmjgetjtive environ- 
ment for enrollment," she added. 

Haberaecker said the plan out- 
lines projects for the first five 
year period, a term of five to 10 
years, and a long-term plan for 10 
to 20 years. Projects scheduled 
for the first five years include 
construction of the student recre- 
ation center, a massive renova- 
tion and possible addition to 
Carlson Library, and the con- 
struction of a new student hous- 
ing facility. 




The Call File Photos 
Harvey Hall is next in line to be renovated as part of Clarion's Master Plan, which was 
approved recently by the University Trustees. 

Haberaecker could not provide tion of both Harvey Hall and 



specifics on the library project 
because meetings still need to be 
held with architect Ross Bianco 
of Pittsburgh, who has yet to 
design a sequence for the renova- 
tion/addition, which will cost 
around $14 million, according to 
president Diane Reinhard during 
her Fall Faculty Address earlier 
this month. 

Other projects on-line for the 
first five years of the Facilities 
Master Plan include the renova- 



Xeeling Health Center,and the 
move of Academic Support 
Services to Campbell Hall. This 
will allow both the English and 
Modern Languages departments 
to move into Davis Hall during 
the Carlson Library renovation 
process. 

Haberaecker said the bid results 
on Harvey are expected to be in 
by December, and that work is 
expected to begin on that build- 
ing sometime in 1999. 



She also said a contract was 
awarded to a company to perform 
the renovation work on Keeling. 
Plans for that building include 
the consolidation of the 
Communication Sciences and 
Disorders (CSD) department 
with the Health Center. She 
noted that the Health Center will 
be reduced in size in order to 
accommodate the CSD depart- 
ment. 

continued on fggVb 



Faculty members recently awarded SSHE grants 



by Patricia Boberg 
News Writer 



Five Clarion University faculty 
members were recently named 
recipients of 1997-98 State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) Faculty Professional 
Development Grants. 

Dr. Steven Harris, associate 
professor of biology, received 
$6,162 for "Drift of Aquatic 
Invertebrates in the Mill Creek 
system as an Indication of 
Recovery from Acid Mine 
Drainage." 

This was granted in the joint 
faculty-student applied research 
category intended to promote 
faculty and student interest and 
involvement in applied research. 



"I feel that the primary con- 
tributing factor in the approval of 
my proposal deals with the stu- 
dent involvement," Harris said. 
A grant designed for the student 
participation category must 
imply that the students are not 
being hired merely as workers, 
but as participants. 

Dr. Scott Kuehn, associate pro- 
fessor of communication, and Dr. 
Mark Mitchell from the depart- 
ment of psychology received 
$3,546 for "Training Faculty to 
Use Active Learning Strategies 
Using World Wide Web 
Technology: The World Wide 
Web Active Learning 
Environment Training 

(WWALET) Program." This 
was granted in the group projects 



in curriculum, instruction and 
assessment or in the design of 
learning communities category. 

Drs. Kuehn and Mitchell are 
currently working, together to 
"promote teaching that promotes 
active learning" through the 
World Wide Web. Both Kuehn 
and Mitchell said, "There is a 
need for teachers to know the 
Web and without training, most 
will not use it in their class- 
rooms." 

The grant process undergone by 
faculty members begins with the 
decision of what will be success- 
ful. A proposal must be good, but 
doable, and is required to qualify 
under one of the specified cate- 
gories. Professors must apply for 
a proposal and present it to the 



SSHE, who provide a fixed 
amount of money to the accepted 
faculty member proposals. All 
grants are then internally 
reviewed at the University level 
by a panel of scientists. 

"The process of very competi- 
tive," Harris and Kuehn agreed. 
Grants to both Harris and 
Kuehn have provided work study 
and graduate student salaries. 
The grant has also contributed 
travel expenses, supplies and 
equipment to the biology depart- 
ment. "This grant has allowed 
the biology department to pro- 
vide first-hand experience to our 
students," Harris said. 

"Education is limited if it only 

continued on Page 6 



"■ 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



September 24. 1998 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 GEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, PA 16214 

(814) 226-2380 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-ma i I : ca I l@ma i I .c la r ion .ed u 

www.clanonodu/thocall . 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Th<? Ctorian Call « published mo$i 



Thursdays durmg the school year in 
accordance with the academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
front alt sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which is the responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in-Chief). Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nee 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community, the Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse pubhea 
don of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5:00 
p. m on the Monday of desired publ i 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
letters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 
issues of T h e Clarjop QM Display 
Advertising copy and greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Tfa? ClBKffl 



CaJN s funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue. 



— — — — 



OPINION 



September 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Tage 3 




Hide Park 



" 1 was slightly 

paranoid to say the 

least./' 



Donnelle Washington 



This short FICTIONAL story 
was first developed in a creative 
writing class at Clarion. 
"Bob Means Insanity" 
"You stupid retard, get outta 
here," exclaimed the manager. 
Bob leaves, kicking imaginary 
dirt between his feet. He scuffles 
out of the store with his head 
down, then he turns to me and 
says, "I'll be back." I knew that 
he would. Bob comes and goes 
when and where he pleases. 

A short, stocky dwarf-like man 
with a head the shape of a water- 
melon, you couldn't miss him if 
you tried. Trust me, I've tried. He 
drives a tiny gray Chevrolet that 
is seen all over town. Bob lives 
with his mom because he has no 
job. Oh, did I tell you Bob is 43? 
I see him everywhere I go. I try 
and hide from him, but he always 
seems to notice. He's annoying. 
Very annoying. 

"DONNELLE!! ! I haven't seen 
you in months!" Bob will scream 
in a grocery store, a parking lot, 
or wherever. I'll duck behind 
cars, so no one will know that I 
know this man. His hands wave 
frantically in the air like he is 
directing air traffic. From the 
other side of the parking lot, all I 
see is a watermelon and his hands 
look like two loaves of bread fly- 
ing in the air. This makes me 
hungry. 

I drove to work and stepped out 
of my car on Saturday morning 
and saw him. Not again. 

As if I couldn't be luckier, his 
eyes could' ve lit up the parking 
lot that morning. "Donnelle, 
Donnelle, guess what I got?" 

"What did you get, Bob?" 

"I got a kitten! My own kitten! 
Do you want to see it?" 

"Sure, but I have to be at work, 
so make it fast." 

Bob reached into his backpack 
and pulled out a small polka-dot- 
ted cat. The cat must have had no 
air, and it ran like lightning when 
Bob let it out "Hey Bob, I am 
glad you let that cat out of the 



bag," I said. I knew that this 
would be a long day. 

I went into work and told all of 
my co-workers the cat story. 
They all know Bob. He bothers 
all of us. We receive the infa- 
mous phone call every morning 
from him to talk about the weath- 
er, the football game, any kind of 
BS. But it all stopped the day 
Bob went bonkers. 

I left work on Saturday 
evening. As I left, I felt a strange 
chill. I looked behind me and did 
a complete 360-degree turn. I 
was slightly paranoid to say the 
least. I walked past a garbage 
dumpsite and passed a fence. As I 
walked to my door, I saw a little 
bald head bobbing up and down 
to a drum rhythm. I peeped over 
the fence with much dismay. It 
was Bob. 

"Bob, what the hell are you 
doing here? It is 10:30. The mall 
closed at 9:30!" Bob laughed at 
me, and with that laugh, I knew 
he was up to something. I ran to 
my car, which was another twen- 
ty feet away and got into it. I 
picked up my cellular phone and 
called security. 

"Hello, there is a very strange 
man walking behind the dump- 
site and you might want to check 
this out." 

Wow, I can't believe that peo- 
ple like Bob are allowed in pub- 
lic. I laughed to myself, as I 
pushed down my parking brake 
and threw my car into first gear. 
As I zoomed out of the parking 
lot, the sound of my car made an 
airport runway sound like a 
church mouse. EEHHHHHCC- 
CC VVVRRRROOOOM. 

SCREECH! 

I think it is time for a new muf- 
fler. 

As I peeled out of the parking 
lot, I saw two little legs and a 
hockey mask running towards 
me. Okay, I had four options at 
this point: a) run this person over 

Continued on Page 3 

ii i 



M 


Editorial 


" i take the stereo- 
type 'alcoholic, 
snobbish, just-in-it 
for-the-opposite-sex' 
personally/' 


Jnel Ritzier, Copy and Design Editor 



This is my fourth year at 
Clarion. In my years here, I can't 
help but notice how Greeks (fra- 
ternities and sororities) are 
looked at. Being a member of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, I 
take the stereotype "alcoholic, 
snobbish, just-in-it-for-the-oppo- 
site-sex" personally. 

Yes, fraternities and sororities 
do like a good party, but that is 
not all they do. Greeks partake in 
many community service activi- 
ties and raise money for philan- 
thropies. Last semester alone, 
Tri-Sigma sold daffodils for the 
American Cancer Society, read 
stories to children, raised money 
for organizations through dance- 
a-thons and car washes, and 
sponsored "Take Back The 
Night" for Clarion County's 
Rape Crisis Center. Tri-Sigma 
also raised money for the Robbie 
Page Memorial, an organization 
for children in hospitals. 

We are not "buying our friends" 
as some might say. We are here 
for an education~not a party. 

At first, my parents weren't too 
sure when I pledged a sorority. 
However, in April, my parents 



had the opportunity to join my 
sisters and myself in celebrating 
our Founders Day. Instead of 
thinking how awful my sorority 
was, my mother said, "What a 
nice organization to be a part of." 
My parents had the chance to see 
the community service, the fund- 
raisers, and-most importantly-the 
friendship and sisterhood. 

My sorority didn't keep me 
from my friends and family; they 
are my friends and family. They 
are the people who cheer me up 
when I cry, pick me up when I 
fall, and celebrate my good for- 
tune. There is always someone 
around willing to offer a shoulder 
to cry on, an ear to listen, and 
arms to hug me. 

Instead of stereotyping the peo- 
ple in class next to you, take the 
time to get to know them. 
They're the people who represent 
you on Student Senate, are 
involved in choir and track, hold 
an office in a club, and could 
become your best friends. The 
feeling of sisterhood is incompre- 
hensible unless experienced. 
Jnel Ritzier is a Senior 
Communication Major. 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith Cwillim 

Asst. Sports Editor: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Asst. Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Asst. Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
News Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Mike Markewinski, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, Kelly Palma, 
Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker 

Lifestyles Writers: Jeff Chaffee,- Mike Cody, James Gates, Keith Gwillim, James 
Paige, Kelly Palma, Janet Pazsink, Cory Pittman, Jason Rhoades 
Sports Writers: Jerry Collier, Angela Everly, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob 
Meyers, Marvin Wells 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tim Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Drayton, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Julie 
Lope, Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, 
Alvin Slaughter 

Circulation Staff: Shane Bednez, John Dellich, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
Ibinson, Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 

Names remaining in the staff box in the December 10 issue will receive co-curricular credit. 






I 



I 



READER RESPONSE 



" I would like to mention the robber-barrons 
that call themselves Reimer Snack Bar." 



♦Please note this letter was writ- 
ten last semester* 
Dear Editor, 

I am not an avid reader of The 
Call, so I am not sure if this issue 
has been addressed to death or 
not, but I would like to voice my 
frustration on the subject. It 
seems to me that in Clarion, stu- 
dents are somewhat taken advan- 
tage of. It also seems to me that 
the reason this happens is 
because the student body lets it 
happen. I would like to state just 
a few examples. 

I will start with the easy one 
that everyone has talked about: 
parking. Upon entering CUP 
campus on any weekday it is not 
difficult to see that there is a 
parking problem on campus. Big 
Deal! Yes....yes....the adminis- 
tration is working on it. I under- 
stand that. What I don't under- 
stand is that people are still buy- 
ing parking permits for spaces 
that don't exist. Don't buy park- 
ing permits. And how about 
meters? It costs a quarter per 
hour. OK.... no problem. But 
what about hour and 15 minute 
classes? Leave class early to 
avoid a ticket? 

Next problem: laundromats. 
Why are they so good at getting 
clothes wet and so poor at getting 
them dry? Just this week I put 
two pairs of pants and a shirt in a 
dryer for an hour and a half. 
When they were done, I was dis- 
gusted to realize that I might as 
well have left them sitting in my 
laundry bag. I have visited all of 
the laundromats in town and have 
had similar experiences. But 
even though they don't work we 
all still use them every week or 
so. 

Now let's discuss the slum-like 
conditions most of the college 
housing is in. Why can landlords 
get away with renting subpar 



apartments and houses at such 
high prices: because we keep 
renting them and they know that 
SOMEONE will rent them no 
matter what the price. Many liv- 
ing places, though moderately 
priced, are barely livable. Those 
that seem to be nice enough and 
decently priced, almost without 
fail, have no utilities at all includ- 
ed, which generally adds about 
$80-100 per month to the cost of 
living. 

Finally, I would like to mention 
the robber-barons that call them- 
selves Reimer Snack Bar. I don't 
know how the person who sets 
the prices sleeps at night. How 
can you reconcile charging 
almost double the price of com- 
petitors? The competitors, such 
as 7-11, Sheetz, and Uni-Mart do 
not have exceptionally low 
prices, but they seem very low in 
comparison to Daka prices. Who 
ever heard of a 20 ounce bottle of 
soda costing $1.25? 

Hamburgers, cheeseburgers and 
fries are also much more expen- 
sive than competitors such as 
McDonald's and Wendy's. The 
question that comes to mind is, 
"Why do you eat here then?" The 
answer is simple.. ..they accept 
flex as payment. Now... that 
brings up flex. What a racket! 
We are charged $125 for $100 in 
flex. Is that new math? Also, 
how difficult would it be to 
refund unused flex or even carry 
it over to the following year? 
The system as it stands now leads 
us to my next complaint, the bla- 
tant (an in my opinion) fleecing 
of college students by "last 
chance for flex" scams. I was in 
Gemmell today and they were 
trying to sell a 24-pack of Pepsi 
for $14. That is more than 60 
cents per can. Is that fair? The 
same cube is on sale at County 
Market for $4.99. Microsoft is 



on trial for antitrust violations — 
Gemmell should be there with 
them. Reimer Snack Bar is an 
unfair monopoly if there ever 
was one. 

In conclusion, I would just like 
to say that these situations are not 
totally the fault of those in power. 
We, as the consumers must bear 
part of the blame. We are the 
ones who allow these trends to 
continue. I do not know of any 
hard-and-fast solution. But I do 
know that everyone complains 
about it, so we should all start 
complaining to the right peo- 
ple—the ones in the administra- 
tion buildings. 

Sincerely, 
AdamWarman 




Beginning this semester, advertisers will be charged for ordering an ad, 
regardless of whether or not they meet The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 



CUP WELCOMES BLUES TRAVELER 

The band will Play in TiPPin Gym on October 1 3 at 

7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for CUP students and $15 

for non-students. They can be purchased at the 

information desk in Gemmeii. A valid (D will be 

needed at the door. All tickets will be $15 the day of 

the show. Questions? Call UAB at 226-2312! 



Hide Park Continued From Page 2 



b) pull over before I get shot c) 
pretend I am trying out for 
"Friday The Thirteenth" or 
option d)scream like hell. I chose 
options a and d. 

"AAAAHHHHHH!!!" Brake! 
(silence). 
CRASH! POP! 

I sat up with a mouthful of hair 
and an exploded airbag in my 
face. Rolling out of my car was a 
challenge because I couldn't see 
anything. I fell to the ground and 
landed on a large pillow. I picked 
it up and a stack of Ben Franklins 
fell out. Oh no, oh no, oh no, 
what do I do? I'll get into my car 
and ride into the sunset; with a 
new car of course. But I decided 
to put the pillowcase of money 
into my car, and, as I reached for 
it, I felt something cold and wet. 
It was a hand attached to a per- 
son. I RAN SOMEONE OVER! I 
jumped into my car and began to 
call the police or 911, but I forgot 
the phone number. By the time I 
remembered, I heard a small faint 
voice. "Benjamin Franklin, 
Mommy where am I?" I 
screamed and dropped my phone. 
The phone dropped right on the 
redial button and dialed mall 
security. What luck! "Please 
come quickly and call an ambu- 
lance. I am in section 2D! I hung 
up, rolled out of my car, and 
began to put my sweater on this 
man. 

"Sir can you hear me? I called 
the ambulance. Everything will 
be okay!" I put my hand above 
his mouth and I felt him breath- 
ing. I knew he was in shock. I 
began to peel the ski mask from 
his face. It was Bob. Could I have 
killed Bob? 

Shortly I heard ambulance 
sirens and saw police cars. They 
lifted Bob onto a stretcher and 
loaded him into the ambulance. 
They began to search my vehicle 
and the pillow case was in the 
back seat. 



"Officer, it is not what you 
think. I am not Bob's accomplice. 
You see, I just finished working 
and then, ahhh, can I contact a 
lawyer?" 

I was so confused, I looked so 
guilty, and I was held on bond for 
$10,000. My father came to the 
jail shortly, and I asked him to 
contact the hospital about Bob. 
Fortunately, he was in stable con- 
dition with a minor concussion 
and a broken hip bone. Many 
people were called to the station 
on Saturday night. I didn't have 
to go to trial because many peo- 
ple came to testify that Bob was 
insane. 

I now have a reputation at work 
as "the girl who killed Bob." 
Funny, I don't remember killing 
him. I just wanted to go home 
after a hard day of work. 

I still see him from time to 
time. His head is now the size of 
two watermelons and he doesn't 
talk as much as he used to. * 
Recently he told my co-workers , 
that he doesn't go out past 8:00 
p.m. because it is scary and dark 
outside. How ironic, I've been 
getting picked up from work 
these days, preferably before 
8:00 p.m. and have also bought a 
new car. You're probably won- 
dering what happened to Bob 
after he fully recovered from the 
accident. He went on trial and 
was sentenced to 25 years. He 
pleaded neither guilty or not 
guilty. Bob pleaded insanity. 

I know that after he goes to jail, 
I will never see Bob and his 
watermelon head again. This is 
cause for celebration (for many 
of us anyway). Bob still contin- 
ues to show up in my life though. 
You may ask how. At nighttime I 
will see a small polka dotted cat 
sitting on my window glancing at 
me. Then I draw my curtain 
closed. 

Donnelle "D.J. " Washington is a 
Senior Communication Major. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

Michael "Pony" Chapaloney! 

We are so excited! We can't wait to 

see you in the parade! You will always 

be our "Kins." 

Love. 
The Clarion Call 






Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



Sept ember 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



READER RESPONSE 



"Peterson believes in an economy based on cutting "There will not be an increase in 
our national and state forests..." housing costs next semester." 



Dear Editor, 

Clarion University lies in the 
Fifth Congressional District, 
which has a unique election this 
year. For the first time anywhere 
in the country, the two candidates 
on the ballot for Congress in our 
district are a Republican and a 
Green Party candidate. 

With 17 Congressional candi- 
dates nationwide this year and 
almost 100 more in local races, 
the Green Party is rising as a 
clear voice of progressive 
Americans. In New Mexico and 
California, Green candidates are 
beating Democrats and 
Republicans in college neighbor- 
hoods and winning seats on city 
councils. 

Voters often complain that 
there isn't much difference 
between the Republicans and the 
Democrats. No one will say that 
about my race. From Social 
Security to protecting out forests, 
from abortion rights to restoring 
public education, the differences 
between Congressman Peterson 
and me could hardly be larger. 

Peterson has stated that he 
believes the so-called budget sur- 
plus should be invested in "feder- 
al debt reduction, Social Security, 
Medicare, and tax cuts." I 



believe that only by returning all 
these funds to where they belong- 
the Social Security trust fund- 
will the current generation of col- 
lege students ever receive Social 
Security. 

Peterson believes in an econo- 
my based on cutting our national 
and state forests, rather than pre- 
serving them for tourism. Even 
though parts of the Allegheny 
National Forest itself are already 
being clearcut, Peterson stated in 
a recent radio interview that there 
should probably be even more 
logging. Meanwhile, the federal 
government loses almost a billion 
dollars a year in its management 
of national forests, and lumber 
company make huge profits. I 
believe that national and state 
forests are our forests and that the 
logging of public lands must 
stop. 

Peterson has said that he sup- 
ports clean air and water. Yet he 
has failed to oppose threats to our 
health and all around the district, 
there are problems from tire 
burning and toxic soil incinera- 
tion in Clinton County, more 
nitrous oxide emissions in Elk 
County, hog factories in Union 
and Tioga Counties, and a new 
nuclear waste dump proposed for 



somewhere in Pennsylvania. 

Peterson is pro-life. I am pro- 
choice. 

Republicans have blocked the 
Partnership to Rebuild America's 
Schools Act, which would invest 
$22 billion of federal tax credits 
to rebuild the crumbling infra- 
structure of our public schools. I 
would fight for this funding in 
Congress. 

It has been 44 years since there 
has been a third party in 
Congress. Often elections are 
three-way, requiring a tough 
choice between the minor-party 
candidate you believe in and the 
major-party candidate who "can 
win." But this is a two way race. 
By definition, I "can win," with 
your support. 

As college students, you 
breathe the same air and drink the 
same water as the community 
around you. It's important to be 
involved in the decisions of your 
community. If you are not regis- 
tered to vote, contact your county 
courthouse. Please spread the 
word about the Green Party and 
my campaign. I ask for your vote 
on November 3. 

Bill Belitskus 
Green Party Candidate 
for U.S. Congress 



Dear Editor, 

In the September 17th issue of 
The Clarion Call, a letter to the 
editor from Paul Flint stated that 




£dU*i.to. 
tUSddo* 



housing costs were being 
increased next semester. This is 
an inaccurate statement. 

Residence hall room rates are 
set by the Council of Trustees at 
its spring meeting. The current 
rates, which were approved in 
March of 1998, will be in effect 
through the summer of 1999. 
There will not be an increase in 
housing costs next semester. 
Sincerely, 

George W. Curtis, Jr. 
Vice-President of Student Affairs 
Editor's Note: Last semester, 
we received an abundance of 
Letters to the Editor. Because of 
space limitations, we carried 
some letters over to this semester. 
Paul Flint's letter was written last 
semester. 
We regret the error. 



"The students are all so polite, 
friendly and cheerful." 



Dear Editor, 

I'm glad that you're back. I 
was an avid reader of The Call 
all last semester. 

The students comments are all 
very interesting and I enjoy read- 
ing them (probably because I 
usually agree with them). 



The students are all so polite, 
friendly, and cheerful. I love hav- 
ing them come into the store. 

I just wanted to thank you for 
the pleasure you've given me. 
Sincerely, 
Alice 
Wal-Mart Employee 



" Like Brian Obst, I have witnessed cheating countless times..." 



♦Please note that the following 
was written last semester* 
Dear Editor, 
Injustice reigns supreme here at 
Clarion University, and probably 
will continue long after I am 
gone. It exists and we all know it, 
but how we deal with it is even 
more important. 

Like Brian Obst, I have wit- 
nessed cheating countless times. 
As a matter of fact, I know for 
certain that I know of one person 
who will be graduating this May 
who almost entirely, if not entire- 
ly, cheated their way through 
their courses. 

Yet for the non-offender, an 
excused absence is almost an 
impossibility here. The Health 
Center has a two to three day 
wait, and is being run like an 
HMO, because the administra- 
tion wants it that way, so it will 
only get worse (anything they say 
to the contrary is Up service.) My 
advice: have a friend cart your 
sick person to the hospital or the 
800 Center that day, otherwise 



you do not have a snowball's 
chance in hell with most faculty 
members. Also, many do not do 
well in a "boot camp" testing 
environment, and that set up does 
not stop the people who cheat. 
They are damn good profession- 
als. Sometimes it seems like the 
honest get screwed. 

What about professors who are 
biased or have an agenda? The 
first are so biased in their grading 
it makes you wonder. My exam- 
ples are many, but the one that 
makes the point best is academic 
dishonesty. I must stress it was an 
experiment, and what the stu- 
dents learned will never be for- 
gotten. Same paper, same instruc- 
tor, four different grades. Now 
how does that happen? The 
instructor, with a known track 
record for playing favorites, and 
grading according to their biased 
assessments of the students, and 
not the students' work, taught the 
course in each instance. The stu- 
dents, four residents on my wing, 
took the class one after another, 



four consecutive semesters. An 
A, a C, a D and a B, in that order. 
Not percentage points (how the 
papers were graded), but letter 
grade differences. You judge. 

The second is, instructors with 
an agenda. My example is very 
clear. The student knows comput- 
ers inside and out and is taking 
CIS 217, a relatively straight-for- 
ward course. Not too hard, right? 
Not so fast. The instructor has the 
course set up so an "A" is virtual- 
ly impossible. The student is 
going to medical school in the 
fall, and cannot earn an "A" in 
this class. Not because the stu- 
dent cannot, but because the stu- 
dent has been prevented from 
being able to do so. You judge. 

Then there is Residence Life. 
They have been "changing" the 
way they do things since I started 
here. Still the violent or drug- 
using jerks remain and graduate. 
I was an R.A. and sat on a con- 
duct board or two, so I know how 
it all works. I may have disagreed 
with my R.D. many times, but at 



least he did something. When it 
would go to Egbert, forget it. It 
was eventually swept under the 
carpet. I am still looking for the 
bulge on the floor every time I 
am in that building. 

Sure we all know alcohol is a 
serious offense, but the way they 
treat violence or drug use certain- 
ly leads us to believe neither are. 
The worst incident I ever dealt 
with involved an individual who, 
the very next year, appointed 
people to serve on conduct 
boards because of their . student 
senator position. The individual 
graduated with an education 
degree and is now teaching. 
Unreal. 

Not far behind is a person who 
had a discipline file as thick as a 
book, and their last offense was 
possession of marijuana. He was 
the darling of the Education 
Department. He came high every ' 
day to class, received an 
esteemed placement, and is now 
teaching. Amazing! 

We all know life is not fair, and 



have known it for a long time, 
right? I could have probably been 
the "Hitler youth R.A.," and 
turned my academically dishon- 
est residents in, and that is exact- 
ly what the people who let Joe 
Violence and Joe Drug-User 
slide, would have wanted. No 
way, the lesson they learned was 
way too valuable to not let hap- 
pen. Do not let the fact that 
others are unjust and unfair sway 
you. Be the candle in the dark- 
ness. When it is your turn, be fair 
and fight injustice! You may not 
win any popularity contest, you 
may not win the particular battle, 
but you will have stood in the 
face of inequity and stared it 
down. 

Just the other day, one of them 
told me that he had been tempted 
to cheat on a test, and could have 
easily, but remembered what I 
had said. He wanted it to be his 
grade, not somebody elses. He 
stared it down, and he gained! 
Never forget this! 
Name Withheld By Request 



NEWSWIRE 



Parking Lot closing 

Beginning Monday, Sept. 

28, Parking Lot B will be 

closed in order to allow 

construction to begin on 

the new Student 

Recreation Center. 

For more information, 

see page 7. 



VP speaks to Senate 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker 

spoke to members of 

Student Senate Monday 

night to update them on 

the new changes in 

parking and discuss 

possible solutions to an 

ongoing problem. 

Turn to page 7. 



Lower tuition for 
out-of-state students 

Clarion University has 

approved a new tuition 

plan for out-of-state 

students that will lower the 

rate by $1,000 this year 

and more than $2,500 for 

1999-2000. 

For the full story, 

see page 6. 



High tech needs 

The State System of 

Higher Education is 

making strides in meeting 

the technology needs of its 

students. 

For more information, 

turn to page 8. 



McDaniel remembered 

A memorial program 

honoring the late James E. 

McDaniel, a retired 

assistant professor and 

librarian from Clarion 

University who died Aug. 

15, will be held Friday, 

Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. in Hart 

Chapel. 



Also inside: 

Public Safety page 7 



NEWS 



For the fourth consecutive year 



CU enrollment continues to rise 



by Courtney Spangler 
News Writer 

The number of students at 
Clarion University's main campus 
has increased for the fourth con- 
sective year, according to prelimi- 
nary figures released by the 
University. 

In a press release from 
University Relations, it states a 
total of 21 additional students 
were enrolled at Clarion, bringing 
the campus totals to 5,286 stu- 
dents. 

The number of full-time equiva- 
lent students at Clarion also show 
an increase of 23.4 students. 

Although final enrollment fig- 
ures for the State System of 
Higher Education will not be 
released until October 1, early fig- 
ures show small decreases at other 
sites. Those other sites include 



Venango Campus in Oil City, 
West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh 
and Clearfield. 

According to University 
Relations, the enrollment 
decreased account for less than 
half a percent drop in total full- 
time equivalent University enroll- 
ment. 

CU students have reacted to the 
news that the University's num- 
bers are up. 

" I think that they (the 
University) need to make sure that 
they don't overbook housing," 
said Lauren Allie, graduate stu- 
dent. 

"I honestly didn't know we had 
one (an enrollment increase)," 
said Jennie Siegler, senior. "I 
hope that the increase in students 
means an increase in faculty." 

Clarion University has seen its 
enrollment rise five percent over 
the past five years, according to 



Dean of Enrollment Management 
John Shropshire. 

He said mat the main reason that 
CU has seen an enrollment rise is 
related to an aggressive admis- 
sions and recruiting program. 

"The secret of our success is 
being aggressive," he said. "Most 
students who attend schools in the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) usually live within 50 
miles from a SSHE school.. .they 
are loyal to certain schools." 

"We work hard because CU is 
not within 50 miles of a Class A 
city," Shropshire said. "We 
depend on students traveling a 
distance to get here." 

He said mat members of the 
Clarion University Admissions 
Office are constantly visiting high 
schools and appear at college fairs 
in order to attract prospective stu- 
dents. 

"Also, our Marketing 



Committee helped by putting up 
billboards to get our name into 
areas where people aren't familiar 
with who we are and what we are 
about," he added. 

Clarion University is one of the 
few SSHE schools that has actual- 
ly seen an enrollment increase 
over the past several years, he 
noted. 

Clarion University President 
Diane L. Reinhard has voiced her 
pleasure over the rise in enroll- 
ment. 

"We are pleased that we contin- 
ue to attract students in the highly 
competitive market of western 
Pennsylvania," she said in a 
release. 

"Our theme of Advancing 
Academic Excellence and 
Shaping Professional Careers 
continues to promote a quality 
education at Clarion University 
for our students," she added. 



After three days of voting last week 



Clarion students elect their royalty 



by Steve Ostrosky 
News Editor 



Clarion University students 
elected their homecoming court 
members last week. 

According to Jamie Bero- 
Johnson, assistant director of 
Gemmell Student Complex, 527 
students voted during elections, 
down slightly from 1997. A big- 
ger drop was noticed in the num- 
ber of students who filled out 
court applications. Sixty applica- 
tions were submitted this year, 
down from 68 in 1997. 

Nine women and nine men were 
selected for this year's court. The 
queen and king, one of the three 
seniors on the court, will be joined 
by four juniors, four sophomores 
and four freshmen. 

"Saturday Night Live" personal- 
ity Darrell Hammond will be on 
hand at a pep rally Thursday, 
October 8 at 7 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room to 
crown the homecoming queen, 
according to Ashleigh Kozup of 
the University Activities Board 
(UAB). The king and queen will 
ride in the homecoming parade 




George Groff/Clarion Cal 
The Clarion University 1998-99 Homecoming Court. The 
king and queen will be crowned at a pep rally Oct. 8 at 7 
p.m. at Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 



and be recognized during halftime 
ceremonies of the Clarion- 
Edinboro football game on 
October 10 at 2 p.m. 

Here are the members of the 
1998-99 Clarion University 
homecoming court: 



Bean of West Middlesex and the 
late Donald Bean, and is a gradu- 
ate of West Middlesex High 
School. She is sponsored by the 
Clarion University Dance Team. 

Rochelle Ross, a senior elemen- 
tary education major, is the 



Shannon Bean, a senior elemen- daughter of Charles and Sharren 
tary education/special education Ross of Lower Burrell and is a 
major, is the daughter of Anne graduate of Burrell High School. 



She is sponsored by Zeta Tau 
Alpha fraternity. 

Cynthia Thompson, a senior 
communication major, is the 
daughter of Andrew and 
Constance Thompson of 
Philadelphia and is a graduate of 
Philadelphia High School for 
Girls. She is sponsored by the 
Black Student Union. 

Michael Chapaloney, a senior 
communication major, is the son 
of Richard Chapaloney of 
Coalport and the late Carol 
Chapaloney. He is a graduate of 
Glendale High School and is 
sponsored by The Clarion Call. 

Nicholas Chervenak, a senior 
communication major, is the sone 
of Therese Allen of Madison, 
Ohio and Dennis Chervenak of 
Cranberry Township. He is a 
graduate of Madison High School 
and is sponsored by the students 
of Clarion University. 

Jeremy Young, a senior busi- 
ness/marketing major, is the son 
of George and Shirley Young of 
Erie. Young is a graduate of 
Cathedral Prep High School and 

continued on page 8 



Page v 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



Out-of-state tuition rate reduced at CU 



by Jennifer Mathis 
News Writer 



Clarion University has enacted a 
new tuition plan that has lowered 
tuition for out-of-state students by 
150 percent. 

This is just the first part of a 
two-year plan proposed by the 
University to the State System of 
Higher Education (SSHE) and 
was later approved by the Board 
of Governors. 

During the 1997-98 academic 
year, tuition for out-of-state stu- 
dents was $8,824. 

As a result of this new plan, the 
tuition rate dropped $1,000 to 
$7,804 for the 1998-99 academic 
year. Next year, out-of-state 
tuition for CU will be reduced by 
$2,500 to $5,202. 

According to Vice President for 
Finance and Administration Dr. 



Heather Haberaecker, in order for 
this plan to remain in effect, the 
University must recruit 76 more 
out-of-state students for the 1999- 
2000 academic year. If that does 
not occur, it will result in a loss of 
$390,000 to the University. 

Out-of-state tuition wasn't 
always this high. Back in 1990, it 
was $4,488 to attend Clarion 
University. However, 

Haberaecker said because of a 
gradual decrease in students from 
outside Pennsylvania, the 
University had no choice but to 
raise tuition in order to make up 
for the loss. 

Currently, CU has the fewest 
number of out-of-state and inter- 
national students. Only five per- 
cent of the student body is from 
outside Pennsylvania, 

Haberaecker noted. 

She said the University has 



"You can only achieve 
diversity when given an 
opportunity to interact 
with people from other 
cultures." 

--Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, 
commenting on the 
University's reason for 
lowering the out-of-state 
tuition rate. 

pushed for this tuition plan in 
order to have a more diverse stu- 
dent body. "You can only 
achieve diversity when given an 
opportunity to interact with peo- 
ple from other cultures," she said. 
Provost/Vice President for 



Academic Affairs Dr. John Kuhn 
added, "For true diversity, all 
dimensions and areas must be rep- 
resented in the classrooms." 

In an attempt to get out-of-state 
students to attend Clarion, Dr. 
Haberaecker said the Admissions 
office will be on the phone and 
also use direct mail to send infor- 
mation to those interested in the 
University. 

"As a result of this new tuition 
plan, we will be going into Ohio, 
New Jersey and New York to 
recruit new students," said John 
Shropshire, dean of enrollment 
management and academic 
records. 

Haberacker added that a recruiter 
has been hired to travel and to 
inform people about Clarion 
University in the surrounding 
states in an effort to increase the 
number of out-of state students 



Tuition lowered 

Clarion University's 

out-of-state tuition rate 

has been reduced in an 

attempt to recruit more 

students from outside 

Pennsylvania, 




X990-9I rate: $4,488 



1911 

111* 






\~* 



Source Office of the Vice 

President for Finance and 

Administration 



Trustees approve Master Plan 



(continued from page 1) 

As for Academic Support, Haberaecker 
said that beginning in January, Campbell 
Hall will be reconfigured in order to best 
meet the needs of that department. "This is 
only a temporary home," she stressed. 

Meanwhile, both the English and Modern 
Languages departments are expected to be 
moved into Davis Hall by Fall 1999. She 
said that meetings will be held with the fac- 
ulty of both of those departments over the 
course of this academic year to discuss the 
proposed move. 

When asked if students will be affected or 
inconvenienced by the implementation of 
this Facilities Master Plan, Haberaecker 
responded, "There will be short-term incon- 
venience for the long-term good of the 
University... This plan will move us forward 
in all respects." 

Some of the funding for the plan will 
come from capital requests to the State 
System of Higher Education (SSHE), she 
said. "Also, the President's Executive 
Council (PEC) recently approved to allo- 
cate $3.5 million over the next 5 years to 
the Master Plan process," she said. 

The allocation from the PEC is coming 
from the University's normal Education and 
General Budget. 

"The funding from the PEC is how we are 
able to do Davis, Keeling and Campbell as 
well as be able to commit money to pay for 
cost increased in renovations to Founders 
Hall and Harvey Hall," she added. 

According to Dr. Joseph Grunenwald, 
chair of the Facilities Planning Committee, 
funds to cover the plan will also come from 
capital fundraising campaigns. He noted 
the success of the current capital campaign 
which has met its goal of raising $8 million 
over a five-year period. 

He estimates that the total cost for the 



Master Plan will run somewhere between 
$75 million and $100 million. 

Another major goal for the first five years 
of this plan include the construction of a 
new residence hall. 

Plans for the facility include the demoli- 
tion of both the Haskell House and Alumni 
House, located along Wood Street. 
Haberaecker said there are needs to be 
addressed, namely whether or not the new 
residence hall will be arranged in an apart- 
ment style setting to better compete with 
other SSHE schools, such as Slippery Rock, 
that have newer residence facilities that are 
set up in that manner. 

A second need for the new residence hall 
is funding. "We are working on a finance 
plan that enables us to build a residence hall 
without increasing students' room fees," 
she said. She added that the University is 
working on public and private arrange- 
ments to provide a new residence for stu- 
dents. 

Haberaecker said that she plans on meet- 
ing with Student Senate to keep them 
informed as to the progress of the plan's 
implementation. 

She said she is planning five or six more 
sessions on campus to keep the CU com- 
munity informed. 

Also, copies of the plan will be given to 
all academic departments and smaller 
brochures summarizing the plan's high- 
lights will be distributed in an effort to offer 
more information to the community without 
going giving the students "information 
overload." 

Look for more stories about 
the Master Plan in upcoming 
editions of The Clarion Gall! 



CU faculty receive 
SSHE grants 



(continued from page 1) 

takes place in the classroom," Harris 
added. "I feel that a successful 
teacher must be able to go beyond the 
classroom to educate." 

Professors are not the only target 
audience of the Web program 
designed by Kuehn and Mitchell. 
Student participation is also encour- 
aged. 

Students will be able to contribute 
items such as book reviews and 
essays to the Internet. 

The Web program, the men said, 
will now enable students and profes- 
sors to communicate back and forth 
from home, allowing students to have 
a voice. 

"We expect people to see people 
develop cool stuff," Kuehn said. 

Kuehn and Mitchell's new program 
is expected to allow faculty to have 
fun and enjoy social contact. 

"We want to share the joy of teach- 
ing with others and build on the social 
contact that there is currently not 
enough of," Mitchell said. 

Professors are learning to learn new 
material that will help them in becom- 
ing better teachers. According to 
Mitchell, all of the volunteer profes- 
sors are said to be "excited about 
being on the other side." 

"I feel that professors have to be 
interested in improving themselves 
and learning new things," Mitchell 
added. 

The Web program is designed for 
the professors themselves, outside of 
class. 

"We are showing them the tech- 
niques to use. ..creativity from faculty 
members is needed to get students 
involved," Kuehn said. 

Twenty-four Clarion faculty mem- 
bers are volunteering their time to 



learn Web publishing as they create a 
Web site for one of their Fall 1998 
semester courses. "Our purpose is to 
help participants create a modern 
course Web site during the fall semes- 
ter to be implemented the next 
spring," said both Kuehn and 
Mitchell. 

The Web program intends to uphold 
the perception of Clarion University, 
said both professors. 

"We want the outside world to see 
that Clarion has good professors and 
is a great place to go to school," both 
said. "We want to see students 
become excited to talk about the field 
outside of class whether it be with 
each other or their professors." 

"We are looking forward to a good 
year and hope to receive the necesary 
funding to keep the program running 
once the year ends," Kuehn said. 

Programs such as these cannot con- 
tiue to provide experience to students 
without funding. "Without funds, 
students do not have opportunities." 

Three other CU faculty who 
received SSHE grants. 

Dr. Shimen Chen, professor of 
accounting, received $5,000 for "The 
Value-Relevance of Accounting 
Information in the Chinese Stock 
Market." 

Dr. Paul Hart, assistant professor of 
history,, received $5,024 for 
"Changing Material Culture and the 
Creation of Class Consciousness in 
19th Century Morelos, Mexico." 

Finally, Dr. Deborah Burghardt, 
director of Women's Studies, received 
$2,000/ for "Women's Studies 
Directors: Knowing Our Place." 

The five proposals accepted have a 
total funding of $21,812, according to 
a release from University Relations. 



SCO r t\ C -,.,•-.* »« m ! » 



September 24, 1998 



Public Safety 



Computer stolen 

On Sept. 16, Public Safety 
reported that someone took a 
laptop computer from a class- 
room in Davis Hall. 

Criminal mischief 

Public Safety is investigating a 
report of criminal mischief that 
occurred in Campbell Hall to 
one of that hall's residents on 
Sept. 17. 

Student cited 

John Elliot Zitman of Nair Hall 
was cited on Sept. 18 for crimi- 
nal mischief. 

DUI arrest 

Graig Farrel of 346 Wilkinson 
Hall was arrested on Sept. 18 
for DUI on campus. He was 
charged under Pennsylvania's 
zero-tolerance law for operating 
a vehicle with any alcohol in his 
system. Other charges include 
reckless driving and underage 
drinking. 



Letter opened 

On Sept. 17, a student from 
Wilkinson Hall discovered that a 
letter from home had been 
opened. A phone card was 
reportedly stolen, according to 
Public Safety. 

Underage consumption 

Gary Lee Leatherman of 
Campbell Hall was cited on 
Sept. 19 for underage 
consumption, Public Safety said 

The Public Safety 

Blotter is a brief 

synopsis of the 

criminal investigations 

conducted by Public 

v>>Xv.yX-.v. '.-'.:•'. '. XvXvX .-.-.If'.-. .yX-X\;X\vXvXvI 

Safety for the dates 

between September 16 

and September 19,1993. 

The blotter is compiled 

by the Public Safety 
Office and 

The Clarion Call. 



The Clarion Call 



Pa S e7 



Parking Lot B set to close Monday 



by Mark Strieker 
News Writer 



Barring any delays, on Monday 
Sept. 28, half of Parking Lot B 
and a portion of Payne Street will 
be closed forever to make room 
for the new Student Recreation 
Center. 

The project will proceed as 
planned, unless parking concerns 
postpone construction. 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, Vice 
President for Finance and 
Administration, told Student 
Senators that almost 260 more 
parking passes were sold this year 
than last year. 

Haberaecker said that delaying 
construction of the building may 
be an option to help with parking 
overcrowding, but is not likely. 

While the lot and street are 
scheduled to be closed on 
Monday, Dave Tomeo, director of 
Gemmell Student Complex, said 
actual construction probably 
won't begin until after 
Homecoming. 

However, he said some under- 
ground pipelines will be re-routed 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Parking Lot B will be closed beginning Monday, Sept. 28 in 
order to allow construction of the new Student Recreation 
Center to commence. 



and some trees will be removed 
between now and when actual 
construction begins. 

Tomeo said Vandusen, the gen- 
eral contractor for the project, will 



Tomeo said, "It surprised all of 



us. 



Haberaecker explained that with 
such low financing, students will 
in essence get a higher-priced 



most likely have a schedule pre- building for less money, 

pared in the next two to four Tomeo said job conferences will 

weeks. He noted construction will be held every two weeks. These 

probably take one year if there are meetings bring together the archi- 

no delays. tects, University personnel, and 

Haberaecker said the Recreation the four project contractors to dis- 

Center bid was slightly higher cuss the progression of the pro- 

than the University had hoped, but ject. 

that current financing is much Tomeo noted no major changes 

lower than anyone had expected. have been added to the design of 



the Recreation Center. 

On the first floor of the Center 
will be three basketball courts 
which will also accommodate 
other activities like volleyball and 
soccer. The first level will also 
house the weight room and a juice 
bar area and office space. 

The second floor will house a 
four-lane banked track. 

A climbing wall will begin on 
the first floor, continue to the sec- 
ond, and partially protrude 
through the ceiling allowing 
climbers to look out through a 
skylight in the roof. 

Students have voiced their con- 
cerns about the loss of parking 
spaces once construction starts. 

" Personally, I think that Clarion 
University needs to postpone the 
construction of the Rec Center 
until the parking dilemma is 
solved," said Leslie Suhr, Student 
Senate Appropriations Committee 
chair. 

"Why didn't they close it (Lot 
B) before school started? We 
wouldn't have gotten used to 
parking there," said former 
Student Senate president Nicole 
DeFrank. 



Student Senate looks at parking situation 



by Danielle Boccio and 

Jennifer Mathis 

News Writers 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice 
president for finance and adminis- 
tration, and Randy Rice, chair of 
the Parking Committee, discussed 
parking concerns at Monday 
night's Student Senate meeting. 

Both mentioned that the num- 
ber of parking spaces on the 
Clarion campus will become lim- 
ited because of the forthcoming 
construction of the Student 
Recreation Center. 

Immediate solutions were dis- 
cussed at length and both parties 
examined the options. 

Currently, students who live 
within a two-block radius of cam- 
pus are denied parking permits. 
One immediate solution discussed 
was an extension of this parking 
permit boundary. This solution, it 



was suggested, would cut down 
on students driving to and from 
class, which would then open up 
more spaces. 

A second option was the idea of 
having students park at the stadi- 
um and having a shutUe bus bring 
students back and forth from cam- 
pus. 

With this option, several ques- 
tions arose from Senators as to 
what would happen to the shuttle 
service during sports seasons and 
where spectators, athletes, and 
band members will park. 

Other questions arose about 
where the funding will come from 
and who will drive the bus and 
keep up with its maintenance. 

During this discussion, Senator 
John Brown commented that we 
should deal with the problem at 
hand (parking) before the recre- 
ation center is built. 

In other business, Senate voted 
to allocate $2,000 to WCCB, 



Clarion University's AM radio 
station. 

The money will be used to pur- 
chase a new sound system which 
will be used for remote broadcasts 
as well as concerts that the station 
may sponsor over the next few 
months. General Manager of 
WCCB, Jeff Say, was on hand to 
answer Senate questions concern- 
ing how the funds will be used. 

" I feel that this allocation will 
push us in the right direction and 
become more visible on campus," 
he said. 

Say also told Senate that an 
open house will be held on 
Tuesday, Sept. 29 from 7-9 p.m. at 
the station, located at 263 
Gemmell Student Complex. 



In other business, it was 
announced that the fifth annual 
Social Equity Dinner will be held 
on November 18. The theme for 
this year is " In Pursuit of 
Community" and James Brown, 
sports announcer for Fox Sports, 
will be the guest speaker. 

Naqeeb Hussain, chair of the 
Student Relations Committee, 
also announced that Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir has been con- 
tacted to see if they would be able 
to perform at the dinner. 

Finally, Kara Stimpert has been 
named as the new Student Senate 
secretary for the 1998-99 academ- 
ic year. She began her duties at 
Monday night's meeting. 



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l i '•' I tin »•«.- i i / . ■ 

The Clarion Call 



Septembers 1Q9fl 



September 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



SSHE attempting to meet 
high-tech needs of students 



by Gretchen Druschel 
News Writer 

The 14 Slate System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) universities 
offer four-year degree programs 
in computer or information sci- 
ence. 

In the graduation year of 1996- 
97, 240 students graduated from 
the State System with baccalaure- 
ate degrees in computer or infor- 
mation science. 

Another twenty-nine students 
graduated in the 1996-97 school 
year with master's degrees. 

Clarion University's CIS depart- 
ment strives to aid undergraduates 
in terms of recruiters from busi- 
nesses and posting flyers about 
possible job opportunities follow- 
ing graduation. 

"Actually, our average graduate 
probably has between three to 
five job offers," commented Dr. 
Dana Madison, department chair 
of computer information science. 
Madison said that Clarion 
University's computer informa- 
tion science department has 
approximately a 100 percent 
placement rate. Clarion's CIS 



department prides itself on facili- 
tating its graduates into the tech- 
nological world. 

Dixon University Center in 
Harrisburg offers a master's 
degree program through 
Shippensburg University. 

This three session, twelve week 
program enables graduates to find 
jobs with companies such as Rite 
Aid, Capital Blue Cross and 
Pennsylvania Blue Shield. Dixon 
aids in expanding the knowledge 
of students within the computer 
science field. 

It also offers a computer science 
program for working adults in 
connection with Elizabethtown 
College. 

IBM has joined with the Dixon 
Center in order to confront the on- 
going learning needs of workers 
in the information age. 

The Dixon Center also hosted a 
"Summit Workshop" on July 8 
which featured several panels of 
government, education, business, 
and industry leaders commenting 
on issues dealing with science and 
advanced technology education 
and workforce development. 



Continued from pape 6 

CU students elect homecoming court 



is sponsored by Sigma Pi fraterni- 
ty. 

Sparrow Affrica is a junior ele- 
mentary education major, and is 
the daughter of Danny and Karen 
Affrica of Leechburg. She is a 
graduate Kiski Area High School 
and is sponsored by Delta Phi 
Epsilon sorority. 

Christine Agosta, a junior mar- 
keting major, is the daughter of 
Jay and Valerie Agosta of Cory, 
111., and is a graduate of Butler 
High School, Butler, PA. She is 
sponsored by the Clarion 
University Dance Team. 

David Bauer, a junior elemen- 
tary education major, is the son of 
Jerry and Carol Bauer of 
Pittsburgh and is a graduate of 
Plum High School. He is spon- 
sored by Kappa Delta Rho frater- 
nity. 

Ryan Lewis, a junior communi- 
cation major, is the son of David 
and Cheryl Lewis of Erie and is a 
graduate of Cathedral Prep High 
School. Lewis is sponsored by 
the Order of Omega. 

Kristy Best, a sophomore mar- 
keting/French major, is the daugh- 
ter of John and Susan Best of 



Pittsburgh and is a graduate of 
North Hills High School. She is 
sponsored by Delta Phi Epsilon 
sorority. 

Brooke Rinier, a sophomore 
communication major, is the 
daughter of Tony and Diane 
Rinier of Jeannette and is a gradu- 
ate of Jeannette High School. She 
is sponsored by the Clarion 
University Dance Team. 

Chris Kercheval, a sophomore 
elementary education major, is the 
son of Debra Smyers of Saltsburg 
and is a graduate of Kiski Prep 
High School. He is sponsored by 
Clarion University students. 

Shawn Whiting, a sophomore 
business major, is the son of 
Robert and Marcia Whiting of 
McKean and is a graduate of 
General McLane High School. 
Whiting is sponsored by Kappa 
Delta Rho fraternity. 

Carolyn "Carrie" Robinson, a 
freshman elementary 

education/early childhood educa- 
tion major, is the daughter of Bob 
and Becky Robinson of State 
College and is a graduate of State 
College High School. She is 
sponsored by Delta Zeta sorority. 



Maria Sollecchio, a freshman 
elementary education/special edu- 
cation major, is the daughter of 
Gary Sollecchio, 523 Scott Ave., 
Jeannette, and Kathleen 
Sollecchio, 916 N. Third St., 
Jeannette. She is a graduate of 
Jeannette High School and is 
sponsored by Zeta Tau Alpha 
sorority. 

Benjamin Chervenak, a fresh- 
man political science major, is the 
son of Therese Allen of Madison, 
Ohio and Dennis Chervenak of 
Cranberry Township and is a 
graduate of Madison High 
School, Madison, Ohio. He is 
sponsored by the Clarion 
University Cheerleaders. 

Tony Fisher, a freshman sec- 
ondary education/history major, is 
the son of Tony and Rena Fisher 
of Bethel Park and is a graduate of 
Bethel Park High School. He is 
sponsored by Sigma Pi fraternity. 



jeonurig 






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LIFEWIRE 



Clarion Clipper 
Closes doors 

The community 

landmark ends it 

operation here in 

Clarion 

See Page 12 



Music Review 

Former Screaming 
Trees lead singer 
Mark Lanegan's 

new album 

reviewed, for full 

review, 

see page 12 



Movie Review 

Mike Cody reviews 

the new Jackie Chan 

release Rush Hour 

See page 13 



Dave Barry 

becomes Batman for 

a day, to find out 

why he becomes a 

superhero 

See page 13 



Calendar of 
Events 

For what's hap- 
pening on and 
around campus, 
See page 11 



Residence Life 
Changes 

Wilkinson and Nair 

Hallsrecievenew 

Basketball courts 
See page 11 



LIFESTYLES 



Dr. Sam Hazo 



PA state poet reads at 
Clarion University 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Lifestyles Writer 



Tuesday, September 22, 
brought Clarion a unique visi- 
tor. Samuel Hazo, who calls 
himself a "writer" rather than a 
"poet," came to CUP to share 
with the students and faculty 
his take on the role of writing 
in modern life. 

Hazo, Pennsylvania's first 




Samuel Hazo 



"Since eyes are deaf 
and ears are blind to 
words in all their 
ways, I speak the 
sounds I write, hop- 
ing you see what 
somehow stays 
unheard and hear 
what never is quite 
clear at sight." 
"Preface to a Poetry 
reading" 
— Samuel Hazo 
"PA Sate Poet 

Moore Hall. The goal of the 
workshop was the improve- 
ment of the guests' writing. 
When I asked how a young 
writer (like me) might improve 
his or her poetic style, Hazo 
replied (rather cryptically) that 
true poetry can come from any- 
thing and that the best poems 
are the truest expressions of a 



by the Clarion College of Arts 
and Sciences, English 
Department, honor fraternity 
Sigma Tau Delta, and the 
Clarion Office of Academic 
Affairs. 

Perhaps Hazo's most stun- 
ning line was offered at the 
afternoon session. He told 
those in attendence that "a 
poetic line. . . is impossible to 
forget." The crowd seemed to 
agree. Hazo's clever use of 
words and imagery give his 
work a beauty not usually 
found in poetry. 



The Golden 
Eagle Marching 
Band will be 
performing 
"Ballet Sacra" at 
our football 
game againstthe 
"Golden Bears/ 
this Saturday at 
Kutztown. 



Where In Clarion? 



Samuel Hazo, the first state poet of Pennsylvania, read 
Tuesday night at Clarion's Hart Chapel. 

State Poet, has numerous sense so that anthor can sense 
accomplishments to his name, the same thing. Hazo also 
including honorary degrees stressed that the opinions of 
from Seton Hall College, Theil others are rather unimportant 
College, and Marquette to the writer's cause. 
University. He also earned an Later Tuesday evening, Hazo 
MA at Duquesne and his Ph.D. switched gears and held a read- 
at Pittsburgh. ing of his poetry in Hart 
A prolific writer, Hazo has 34 Chapel. The presentation was 
published books to his credit, one of "poem cycles"; two or 
including the most recent, "The more poems in some way relat- 
Holy Surprise of Right Now," ed to a topic. The topics cov- 
and "Latching the Fist." His ered in Hazo's hour-long read- 
work has sent him around the ing ranged from the horrors of 
world, as well. In past years, war (in the poem "The Ballad 
he has spoken at Jordan's of the One-Legged Marine"), 
University of Amman, Egypt's women as the stronger sex (in 
University of Cairo, and "Kack" and "The Ballad of the 
Greece's University of Athens. Old Couple") and humanity's 
Beginning at 4:15pm urge towards the future ("The 
Tuesday, Hazo hosted an infor- Horizon at Our Feet"), 
mal writer's workshop in Hazo's visit was sponsored 




Weekend Warriors 

Test your knowledge of area landmarks every 
week in "Where in Calrion?" Where is this 
Clarion landmark. Last weeks landmark was 
the doors of the Captain Loomis Restaurant 



Page 10 



The Clarion Tall 



Septemhpr24 IQQft 




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September 24 1<M« 



The Clarion Tall 



Page n 



Calendar of Events 



Today 

•UAB sign up starts for IUP football trip (273 

Gem) 10 am 

•Blues Traveler tickets will be on sale at the 

Gemmell Info desk until the day of the concert 

•Northwest Pennsylvania Rural AIDS Alliance 

conference, "Reducing the Risk: HIV and 

Substance Abuse," Troggio's Meeting and Banquet 

Complex, New Castle, 8:30 am-4:30 pm 

Friday 

•Secondary education "Block workshop," Gemmell 

Multi-Purpose Room 8 am-noon 

•Admissions Day (Chap) 9 am 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Freshmen advising Week Ends 

•IHC Street Dance (Payne St. at 

Gemmell/Campbell) 9pm-midnight 

Saturday 

•Football at 

Kutztown 1:30 pm 

•Cross Country at 

Youngtown State 

•CSL "Into the 

Streets" Plunge 

(Gem MP) 9 am 

•High School 

Cheerleading 

Competition (Tip) 

Sunday 

•No events sched- 
uled 



Monday 

•Faculty Senate Mtg. (B- 
8 Chap) 3:30 pm 
•Golf at Westminster/ 
Slippery Rock 
Invitational 
•UAB Creative Dating 
with Dave Coleman 
(Gem MP) 8pm 
•Student Senate Mtg. 
(246 Gem) 7:30 pm 
•Tickets go on sale for 



Dave Coleman 



<*% 



its 



trip to Pittsburgh Penguins 
game November 10th vs. the 
NY Islanders (UAB office) 
or call 226-2312 Tickets are 
£-*■ $28 per person 
Tuesday 

■Bloodmobile (Gem MP) 1 1 
am - 5pm 

•Volleyball vs. Edinboro 7pm 
•MLK Taylor Branch (Chap) 
7:30 pm 

•UAB Movie Night The , 
Negotiator (The Garby)7:15 
pm 

•Golf at Westminister/Slippery Rock Invitational 

•Intramural 1 Pitch Softball Roster due 

•Intramural Power Lifting Roster due 

•Intamural Indoor Soccer Roster due 

Wednesday 

•YOM KIPPUR 



Clarion Clipper Closes its doors 



Cory Pittman 
Lifestyles Writer 



As we return to Clarion we find 
many new stores and restaurants. 
We also lose some of the same 
things. This is the case with the 
Clarion Clipper. Numerous stu- 
dents and townspeople frequent- 
ed this Clarion landmark, but as 
of Monday September 21, 1998, 
the Clipper is no more. 

It all started over thirty-five 
years ago with a local business 
man and a marketing professor. 
In January of 1972, they decided 
to open the Clarion Pancake 
House. After several years of 
business, they sold the restaurant 
to Layne Geiring. Thus in April 
of 1972, the Clarion Cupper was 
bom. 

The Clipper continued until 
present serving meals to the stu- 
dents and townspeople of 
Clarion. As with any good thing, 
the Clipper must come to an end. 



In March of 1997 Mr. Giering put 
the Clipper up for sale. It is still 
on the market and the fate of the 
restaurant is currently unknown. 
While talking to Mr. Giering he 
wished to thank everyone who 
had visited his establishment. He 



also gave me a little advice for 
the future for Clarion students. 
He said, "Don't plan on starting 
at the top, learn the basics at the 
bottom then climb to the top." 

The Clarion Clipper has been a 
fixture here in Clarion for many 



years and with it's departure 
Clarion loses one of it's most 
notable landmarks. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
After over 35 years of service the Clarion Clipper ends it's establishment in Clarion. 



Celebrity Profile: 

Leonardo 

DiCaprio 

by Veronica Looseleaf 
Syndicated Writer 

Though he's the heart-throb 
of millions, Leonardo 
DiCaprio, is not all that thrilled 
about being recognized, 
stalked, and paparazzied to 
within an inch of his life. 

And this is exactly what I 
predicted would happen when 
Leo made his very first talk 
show appearance back in 
November of 1992, on my 
cable access televsion show, 
"The Looseleaf Report." Leo 
was 16, going on 12. 

"You're gonna turn into this 
huge sensation," I told Leo, 
who was adorable even back 
then, dressed in a wool plaid 
shirt and baggy pants as he fid- 
geted with his hair and kept 
rubbing his nose with the back 
of his hand. I also declared: 
"Girls are gonna go nuts." 

Leo's just your average boy 
next door — if you happen to 
live in Hollywood and are 
house-hunting English tudor 
mansions. He may be into 
double digit million salaries 
now, but he's still the lovable 
Leo I remember. The one 
who's double jointed and does 
strange things with his shoulder 
blades. The wild kid who got a 
with fire, not firecrackers, 
every Fourth of July. He's 
also the devoted son who sur- 
prised his father on his 50th 
birthday with a new car — by 
driving it into the party. 

I caught up with Leo a few 
months ago in New York, 
where he was about to undergo 
knee surgery for an injury he 
incurred while shooting hoops. 
Now that he's finished pro- 
moting "The Man in the Iron 
Mask" Leo said he plans on 
taking a much needed vaca- 
tion. 

We doubt it'll be a long 
ocean journey, but, hey — 
with Leo, ya just never know. 




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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



Music Review 



Former Screaming Trees singer with new album 



by Keith Harrison 
College Press Service 

Mark Lanegan must take 
pleasure in defying expectations. 
As the last nails were being 
pounded into the grunge coffin 
in '96, his Screaming Trees 
reached new heights of 
Zeppelinesque splendor with 
"Dust." And who, years ago, 
would have expected that this 
hard rock hero would now be 
releasing his third solo disc of 
exquisitely evocative postmod- 
ern countryblues? 

It's the sound of this record, a 
droning and foreboding blues, 
that captivates at first, "Hospital 



Roll Call" simultaneously roams 
and wobbles, a soundtrack to 
some non-existent film noir 
Western. Elsewhere, lonely, 
howling guitar along the fringes 
of "Waiting on a Train" stir the 
ghosts of Robert Johnson and 
Leadhelly, and a mesmerizing 
Middle Eastern buzz builds to a 
cathartic squall in "Because of 
This." 

But it's Lanegan's voice that 
lingers long after this disc ends. 
He's been compared to Jim 
Morrison, but he's far more sub- 
tle; this is an instrument that 
reeks of the proverbial whiskey 
and cigarettes without any of the 
pretension or over emoting that 



often attend such efforts. Simply 
put, Lanegan has one of the 
finest voices in rock today. All 
the proof anyone needs, in fact, 
can be found in his perfectly 
played incantation of the word 
"sixteen" on the disc-opening 
"Hospital Roll Call." It's a 
mantra that conjures up both 
weariness and dread, and it's one 
reason that "Scraps at Midnight" 
stands as one of the finest discs 
of the year. 

The latest Versus disc kicks 
off with the aptly named 
"Atomic Kid," a surging blast of 
adrenaline that's all chiming gui- 
tars on top and churning, chaotic 
rhythm section undeneath loads 



of fun, albeit reminiscent of 
reined-in Sonic Youth, particu- 
larly given Richard Baluyut's 
shades-of-Thurston Moore 
vocals. 

Overall though, they trade in a 
bit of the propulsive kick and 
roar of their previous "Secret 
Swingers" disc the understated 
shimmer of a song like "Dumb 
Fun" or the melancholy air of 
"Crazy-Maker" It's a promising 
exchange on this track, although 
a few others sputter when they 
should take off. 

Yet this band retains its not-so 
secret weapon, second singer 
Fontaine Toups, and she adds 
dreamy, gorgeous vocals to the 



cascading, "Never Be O.K." and 
the rattling "Jack and Jill." And 
while heartache stands as the 
dominant lyrical concern, fol- 
lowed by music-biz cynicism, 
this band's smart and swirling 
music certainly takes the edge 
off the pain. 

While the juvenile East Coast- 
West Coast rap rival generally 
has collapsed under the weight 
of its own idiocy, hip hop's new 
geographic diversity also should 
get some of the credit; certainly, 
the emergence of vibrant scenes 
in Atlanta, Houston, Chicago 
and other communities has aid 
waste to the idea that New York 
and L.A. are the only rap cities 
that matter. 



Residence Life changes include renovation of Basketball Courts 



by Janet Paszint 
Lifestyles Writer 



The Basketball Courts behind 
Nair and Wilkinson Halls have 
been repaved and new equip- 
ment installed. The original 
courts were built approximately 
25 years ago and have been 
repaired on a regular basis. Two 
years ago the Outdoor 
Recreational Committee decided 
to take a look at what kinds of 
things could be done to improve 
them. The committee found that 
they needed more than repair, 
they needed to be replaced. 



The Student Association had 
money available for recreational 
purposes and agreed to purchase 
the new equipment if the 
University would install it. A 
schedule was set up to do the 
work and the new high quality 
equipment that meets new safety 
standardswas ordered. 

In the middle of that summer 
due to a "contractual argument 
concerning prevailing wages" 
according to Mr. Hal Wassink, 
Coordinator of Student 
Activities, the state was not 
approving any paving contracts. 
It was decided not to do any- 



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thing with the basketball court 
project during the summer of 
1997. The project was put on 
hold until the spring of 1998. 
Mr. Heidler and Mr. Larson, 
from Maintenance, scheduled 
the project again for this past 
spring and had it finished the 
first week of July. This enabled 
summer students to use the new 
courts as well as allowing the 
summer basketball program to 
utilize the courts for their sum- 
mer basketball camp. 
"Maintenance did a marvelous, 
marvelous job," commented 
Wassink, "Those two gentlemen 
deserve a lot of credit for getting 
this project scheduled and com- 



pleted." Wassink went on to 
say, "This is a good example of 
the cooperation between Student 
Activities and Maintenance." 

The improvements include six 
new baskets and three newly 
paved full courts. 'These new 
courts are being utilized a great 
deal, which we are very pleased 
about," said Wassink, "It is the 
ultimate compliment." 

This will be the fourth year 
that the Student Activities office 
has completed the Residential 
Hall Recreation Equipment pro- 
gram. The Student Activities 
office provides a minimum level 
of support for the recreational 
items in the residence halls. Part 



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The basketball courts at Wilkinson and Nair were repaved 
and improved this summer. 



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EXPERIENCE YOU CAN COUNT ON. 

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of the agreement for implemen- 
tation of the program is that the 
residence halls make the equip- 
ment available for both resident 
and non-resident students with a 
valid I.D. "This puts the equip- 
ment where a lot of our student 
body lives and also provides the 
opportunity for non-resident stu- 
dents to check out and use the 
equipment." stated Wassink. 

In a joint effort with the 
Intramural Department and 
Student Activities, Mr. Doug 
Knepp, Director of Intramural 
and Recreation investigated the 
purchase of in-line skates and 
has put in. an order for them. 
They are expected to arrive 
within the next month and will 
be available for rental, $2.00 a 
day, from the Outdoor 
Equipment Room at 217 Tippin 
Gym. The in-line skate rental 
includes knee, elbow, and wrist 
pads. 

Also in progress according to 
Knepp, is an in-line hockey area 
to be developed near Wilkinson 
Hall at one of the tennis courts. 
New nets for the tennis courts 
have already been put out. 

Knepp is also in the process of 
ordering additional climbing 
equipment to be used for the 
Clarion Outdoor Program. 
Bicycles, inner tubes for use in 
the water or on snow, snow 
sleds, cross-country skis, canoes, 
paddles, backpacks, PDF's, 
tents, camping accessories, and 
caving equipment are available 
to students for a $2.00 daily fee. 
These pieces of equipment can 
be reserved and rented Monday 
through Friday from 3:00 p.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. or by appointment 
upstairs in Tippin Gym. 



September 24,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



Batman to the Rescue 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

One evening my wife men- 
tioned, casually that she had 
been talking to the son of one of 
her friends, a little boy named 
Alexander, about his upcoming 
fourth birthday. 

"Alexander says he's having a 
Batman party," my wife said 

"Hm," I said. 

"So I told him that maybe 
Batman would come to the 
party," my wife said. 

"Hm," I said. 

My wife said nothing then. 
She just looked at me. 
Suddenly, I knew who was 
going to be Batman. 

I was not totally opposed. In 
my youth I read many Batman 
comics, and it seemed to me that 
he has a pretty neat life, dis- 
guised as wealthy playboy Bruce 
Wayne, waiting for the police 
commissioner of Gotham City to 
shine the Bat Signal onto the 
clouds(it was always a cloudy 
night when the commissioner 
needed Batman). Then Bruce 
would change instantly — it 
took him only one comic-book 
panel — into his Batman cos- 
tume and roar off in the 
Batmobile to do battle with the 
Forces of Evil or attend a birth- 
day party. 

Of course, Bruce owned his 
own Batman costume. I had to 
rent mine. It consisted of 
numerous black rubber pieces, 
similar to automobile floor mats, 
with strings so you could tie 
them to your body. One piece 
was shaped like rippling chest 
muscles, so you could transform 
yourself, like magic, from a 
flabby weakling into a flabby 
weakling wearing an automobile 
floor mat. 

It took me a lot longer than 
one comic panel to get into this 
costume, but finally I was ready 
to speak the words that strike 
fear into the hearts of criminals 
everywhere: "Michelle, could 
you tie my G-string?" It turns 
out that a key part of the Batman 
costume is this triangular floor 
mat piece that protects the Bat 
Region. It's very difficult to 
attach this piece to yourself 
without help, which could 
explain why Batman hooked up 
with Robin. 

At last I was ready. In full Bat 
regalia, I stepped out of the 
house, and — as crazy as this 
may sound — for the first time I 
truly understood, as only a cru- 



sader for justice can understand, 
why people do not wear heavy 
black rubber outfits in South 
Florida in August. Staggering 
through the armor-piercing sun- 
shine and 384 percent humility, I 
made it to the Batmobile, which 
was disguised as a wealthy play- 
boy Toyota Celica. 

When we got to Alexander's 
house, in accordance with our 
Bat Plan, I remained outside in 
the Batmobile while Michelle 
went to the back yard, where the 
party was going on. We had 
bought Alexander a Batman 
walkie-talkie set; Michelle gave 
Alexander one unit and told him 
to use it to call Batman. These 
Batman walkie-talkies contain 
actual transistors, so when 
Alexander called me, I was able 
to hear, on the other unit, clear 
as a bell, a random bunch of sta- 
tic. Interpreting this as the Bat 
Signal, I pulled the rubber Bat 
Cowl over my head, thus render- 
ing myself legally blind, and 
drove the Toyota Batmobile into 
the back yard. 

The effect on the party guests, 
as you would expect, was elec- 
trifying. The adults were so 
electrified that some of them 
almost wet themselves. The 
younger guests were stunned 
into silence, except for Matthew, 
age 1, who ran, crying, to his 
mom, and probably did wet him- 
self. 

With all eyes upon me, I 
stopped the Batmobile, flung the 
door open, and, in one fluid, 
manly motion, sprang out of the 
seat, then got retracted violently 
back into the seat, because I had 
forgotten to unfasten my seat 
belt. Eventually I was able to 
disentangle my cape and stride 
in a manly, rubberized way over 
to the birthday boy. 

"Happy birthday, Alexander!" 
I said, using a deep Bat Voice. 
After that the conversation 
lagged, because, let's be honest, 
what are you going to talk to 
Batman about? The pennant 
races? So we just stood there 
for a while, with Alexander star- 




ing at me, and me trying to look 
manly and calm despite the fact 
after 30 seconds in the sun I 
could have fried an egg on top 
of my cowl. 

Finally the cake arrived, and 
everybody sang "Happy 
Birthday," and I announced that 
I had to go fight crime. Striding 
back to the Batmobile, I opened 
the car door, turned dramatically 
toward the youngsters and said, 
quote, "BWEEPBWEEPB- 
WEEPBWEEP" Actually, it was 
the Batmobile that said this, 
because I had forgotten to deac- 
tivate the Bat Alarm. I climbed 
into the front seat, slammed the 
door with several inches of cape 
sticking out the bottom, and 
backed manfully and blindly 
into the street. Fortunately there 
was nothing in my way, because 
I would definitely have hit it, 
and the law would not have been 
on my side. ("Mr. Barry, please 
tell the jury exactly what you 
were wearing as you backed 
over the plaintiff.") 

The next day, Alexander's 
mom reported that the first thing 
he did when he woke up was 
turn on his walkie-talkie and call 
Batman. He said he could hear 
Batman, but Batman couldn't 
hear him because he was busy 
fighting evil super criminals 
named Poison Ivy and Mr. 
Freeze. This was almost true: 
Batman was actually battling 
Heat Rash. So he will be out of 
action for a while. The next 
superhero from this household to 
visit Alexander — and I have 
made this very clear to Michelle 
— will definitely be Cat 
Woman. 



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Movie Review 

Rush Hour brings in 
the crowds 



by Mike Cody 
Lifestyles Writer 



While watching Rush Hour, 
the new film from Jackie Chan 
and Chris Tucker, I had the nag- 
ging suspicion that I'd seen this 
movie countless times before. A 
straight-laced cop teams with a 
wild cop to solve a case that 
their department doesn't want 
them to crack, blowing up half a 
city in the process. Hmmm... 
maybe I wandered into the 
Lethal Weapon 4 theater by acci- 
dent 

Although annoyingly familiar, 
buddy cop films simply refuse to 
go away, Rush Hour manages to 
still inject some fun into this 
tired, old formula. Both Tucker 
and Chan appear to be having a 
great time while trading one-lin- 
ers and and kung-fu kicks. Rush 
Hour is Tucker's first real 
chance to shine as a leading man 
and Chan's best opportunity yet 
to become a major American 
action star. 

In Rush Hour, Tucker plays an 
LAPD officer assigned to escort 
Chan, a Chinese policeman 
searching for his friend's kid- 
napped daughter. The plot is 



further complicated by the 
involvment of Chinese gangsters 
and the fact that (surprise, sur- 
prise) Chan and Tucker can't 
stand one another. After several 
huge explosions and a little male 
bonding, the two cops put aside 
their differences and solve the 
case. 

Rush Hour could hardly be 
considered an innovative film, 
but Chan's incredibly dangerous 
stunts, which include flipping 
himself into a double-decker bus 
while hanging from a road sign, 
are always a blast to watch. 
Chris Tucker's nasal comedic 
style is much more tolerable 
than in his previous effort, the 
abysmal Money Talks, and cre- 
ates quite a few laughs. 

Has America had its fill of 
buddy cop flicks yet? Rush 
Hour's incredible $31 million 
opening weekend certainly sug- 
gests that we haven't. It's a tried 
and true formula that we all 
know by heart. Even though 
you saw this film back when it 
was called Lethal Weapon and 
you'll probably spot every plot 
twist from a mile away, that 
doesn't mean Rush Hour is any 
less enjoyable. 




RUSH HOUR 



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Clarion 
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Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



CALL ON YOU 




What do you think of the new 
Clarion logo? 





CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 






















f/i 




j|i||k: 





























Lauren Lazzaro, Freshman, Business Man. 

*1 am happy with the old mascot, although the 

new "O f logo is pretty radical!" 



Jill Horvath, Freshman, Communication 

"1 don't care for either mascots, but the new '*C" 

logo is $tylin'." 



Jen Grayzer, Freshman, El. Ed/ Spec. Ed 
'They are all cool but! prefer the old mascot.* 






Erin O'Hara, Senior, El. Ed/ Spec. Ed. 

." I like the new mascot. I think it makes us look 

tougher. Not like chickens!" 



Wink, Senior, Sec. Ed/ Math 
" I think it gives Clarion University a new , inter- 
esting look heading into the new millennium." 



Brian Fields, Senior, Marketing 
"If Wink likes it, then I like it." 






I 



September 24.1998 



The Clarion Call 



Pa ge lg 



CLASSIFIEDS 




MEDICAL BILLING. Nationwide 
needs full/part time medical toilers. 
Home PC required. Salary to 30k/year. 
No experience necessary/ will train. 
1-800-600-1844. 



TRAVEL 



Spring Break '99-Sell trips, earn cash 
& go free!!! Student Travel Services is 
now hiring campus reps/group organiz- 
ers. Lowest rates to Jamaica, Mexico & 

Florida. Call 1-800-648-4849. 

******** 

MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS. Sell 
Kodak Spring Break '99 Trips. HIGH- 
EST COMMISSION-LOWEST 
PRICES. NO COST TO YOU. Travel 
FREE including food, drink & non- 
stop parties!!! WORLD CLASS 
VACATIONS. 1998 STUDENT 
TRAVEL PLANNERS "TOP PRO- 
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MAKE EASY MONEY! GO ON 
SPRING BREAK FOR FREE! USA 
Spring Break offers Cancun, Bahamas, 
Jamaica, and Florida packages, and is 
currently accepting applications for 
campus sales representatives. Call 
1-888-SPRING-BREAK. 



GREEK PERSONAIS 



The sisters of ATT would like to wel- 
come back all CUP students and wish 
them good luck in the 98-99 school 
year! 



******** 



Welcome back Tau Tiger! We're look- 
ing forward to another great semester. 

Love, the sisters of AIT. 

******** 

Congratulations to the brothers of 
AXP, the new fraternity on campus. 
Good luck! Love, the sisters of ACT. 



******** 



Welcome back OIK! Hope you all had 
a great summer and have a terrific 

semester. Luv, Marcie. 

******** 

Hail to the chief: Corey C. Congrats on 
the 4>ZK presidency! You never cease 

to amaze me... Love, Marcie. 

******** 

No one ever said life was fair, if it were 
every girl would be a Delta Zeta. Rush 

the rest, pledge the best. Join AZ 

******** 

Happy belated 20th b-day Lynne! We 

love you! Love your Delta Zeta sisters. 

******** 

Robinson, you better start practicing 
your parade wave! We're so proud of 
you getting on homecoming court! You 
make us Delta Zeta sisters proud. We 

love you! 

******** 

Candyland will never again be the 
same! Thanks for the great mixer Theta 

Xi! Love, the Delta Zeta sisters. 

******** 

To the sisters of ZTA, we would like to 
thank you for all the help in our rush. 
We had a great night with you girls. 
Thanks for the sign and sorry this is so 

late. Love, the brothers of KAP. 

******** 

To Kid, Bauer, and Shawn, 
Congratulations on being voted on the 



Homecoming court. You guys repre- 
sent the fraternity well and good luck. 

Your brothers of KAP. 

******** 

4>A6: Sorry about the misunderstand- 
ing. We love you guys and we hope to 
see a lot of you this semester! Love, 

04>A. 

******** 

Casey and Jamie, congratulations on 
your engagements! We wish both of 
you all the happiness in the world! 

Love, your 64>A sisters. 

******** 

Happy 21st birthday Casey!! The 
Loomis is going to be even more fun 
from now on! One more year for you, 
Patti. We can't wait!! Love your 04>A 

sisters. 

******** 

CTT, Bowling was a blast! Thanks for 
including us. Can't wait to see you 

guys again! Love, the Dance Team. 

******** 

in, You guys once again satisfied our 
every need! We had a blast! Love, 

Dance Team. 

******** 

On behalf of $A6, the brothers would 
like to congratulate Tara Bonaroti, of 
AOE, on becoming our newly elected 

sweetheart. 

******** 

To the brothers of Phi Delta Theta- 1 am 
very honored to be your sweetheart. 
You guys kick a**! It's time to party! 

Love, Tara 

******** 

2JI, Good luck with Rush! 
Congratulations to Jeremy Young and 
Tony Fisher on making Homecoming 

Court! Love you, Beth 

******** 

To the brothers of OIK, I'm really 
looking forward to a great year! ! I hope 
that everyone has a wonderful and 
exciting semester. Good luck this 

year!! Love, Kristi 

******** 

Thanks ZTA for helping with a great 

rush. The brothers of in. 

******** 

To Beth, we're ready for a great year 

with you! Love, the brothers of UT. 

******** 

Thanks to the dance team for a great 

mixer. The brothers of in. 

******** 

Congratulations to the new associate 

members of in. Good luck. 

******** 

Thanks to the Crows for the mixer. We 
loved Stayin' Alive with you. Love, 

D-Phi-E 

********* 

Congrats Sparrow and Kristy. We can't 
wait to see you in the homecoming 

parade. Love your A<X>E sisters. 

******** 

Congrats Tonya and Barry on your 

engagement. Love the sisters of AOE. 

******** 

Congrats sororities on a great rush. 

Love A<DE. 

******** 

Tara, congrats on becoming the Phi 
Delta Theta sweetheart! Love your 

A4>E sisters. 

******** 

Kari, 

You are in our hearts and in our 

prayers. We all love you. 

Love the Sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma 

******** 



******** 



Congratulations to the new associate 
members of CTT. Good luck! 



******** 



To Melissa, Shelley, Tammy, Haley, 
and Emily. Thank you for all your help 
with Parent's Weekend. Love the broth- 
ers of CTT. 

******** 

AZ, thanks for the fun mixer. Sorry the 
game didn't work out. The brothers of 

Theta Xi. 

******** 

Happy 21st birthday Laura! Welcome 
to the Clarion bar scene. AT love, AIT 

sisters. 

******** 

To the brothers of III, looking forward 
to doing the float with you. Get ready 
to celebrate first place. Love the sisters 

of ACT. 

******** 

To the brothers of 6E, Welcome back; 
I hope you all had a wonderful summer. 
I'm looking forward to a great year 
with you guys! Good luck this semes- 
ter! Love, your sweetheart Nikki. 
******** 

To the brothers of ITT, Get your 
money ready for tonight! AT love, the 
sisters of ACT. 



PERSONALS 



Leanne Marie Havely- the countdown 
begins: 21 days left! "How exciting for 
you", piped Marcie from the couch 

with a mischievous look in her eyes. 

******** 

Erica, Do you wish you were a little bit 
taller? The meter is set to explode in 
mid-October- then maybe you'll be 
asking, "How 'bout them Steelers" 
again! Love, your old roomie. 



******** 



Smooter, thanks for the socks. You're a 
lifesaver! Marcie. 



******** 



Krissie D, 

To my news girl: You're doing such a 
great job! Thanks for being my Robin 
Q! Love Ya, Steve 



******** 



Stevey V, 

I will be Robin to your Howard Stern 
anyday! I am glad you are all cheered 
up! Love, Kristen D. 



********* 



If someone has taken the Call's Love 
Beads, it was not nice. Please return! 



******** 



Chris, 

To our favorite delivery boy... thanks 

for the pizza. We owe ya! Love K&D 



******** 



Tonya, 

Congratulations on your engagement! 

Lots of love and luck! The Upsies 

******** 

Hey Loomi Guys!! Smoke gets in our 
eyes when we look at you! We Love 
you!! 

Cathy, Welcome to Clarion! Hope you 
have a great semester. Behave! Your 
mother knows! Love, Janet. 

******** 

Becky, 

You are our favorite b****!!Love, 

DandLL! 

******** 

Tyler and Oddis, 

Thanks for the trip to Wal-Mart and the 

big beef stick!! You know who!! 



ENTERTAINMENT 




« HSSI/OI9M Wiley Miller/ dial, by The Washington Post Writets Group 
\/RSsX E-mail: wlleyeiwileytoons.com Web Site: www.wileytooni.com I-/ 



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By Adam Green 



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wsraieirrED by twbune media services 



Page 16 




The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



ENTERTAINMENT 



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The Clarion Call 



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Page 18 



The Clarion Tall 



September 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



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1 Apogee 
6 Passing fancy 
9 Blazing 

14 Eagle's nest 

15 Corrida chant 

16 Not national 
■17 Get the hang of 

18 Charged particle 

19 Studies, for 
short 

20 Name badges 

21 Japanese fish 
treat 

24 Religious 
woman: abbr. 

25 Credo 
27 Races 
30 Sewing item 

34 Rhine feeder 

35 NY city 

39 Appear 

40 One of the 
Mavericks 

41 Change the 
price of 

42 Sports group 

43 Affluent 

44 "Home — " 

45 Composer of 
"Rule Britannia" 

46 Nautical word 
48 Try out again 
50 Underhand 
54 Throng 

57 One no longer 
working 

58 Easy throw 
61 Winged 

63 "Make — while 
the sun shines" 

64 Gullible 

66 Eyelashes 

67 Nav. off. 

68 Cornered 

69 — up 
(hibernated) 

70 Spoilage 

71 Bedazzles 

DOWN 

1 Colombian city 

2 Clarinet 

3 Ages 

4 Knight's 
address 

5 On edge 



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O 1997 Tribune Madia Services, Inc 
All rights reserved. 

6 Pass off as 

genuine 

7 Island greeting 

8 Jeans material 

9 Of high 
mountains 

10 In favor of 

11 Freezes 

12 Entranced 

13 Otherwise 

22 Certainty 

23 Zoo 

25 Made a molar 

26 Having made a 
will 

27 Native-born 
Israeli 

28 Plaster of — 

29 Upright 

31 Plow pioneer 

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SERVICES 



33 Ant, old style 
36— Aviv 

37 Japanese 
statesman 

38 Container 
47 Go over 



51 Anesthetic 

52 Spinet 

53 Rendezvous 

54 Number equal to 
the speed of 
sound 



55 Potpourri 
.56 Fancy dance 

58 Stead 

59 Kiln 

60 Cots 
62 Cravat 

65 Painting, e.g. 



SPORTSWIRE 



Clarion wide receiver/kick 
returner Alvin Slaughter is on 
track for another great season. 
Read how Alvin nearly took his 
football talents to Florida St. 
before he found himself at 
Clarion. 

See Pages 23-24 



The Clarion volleyball team had 
a strong weekend at the 
Charleston Tournament, but 
returned home and lost to Lock 
Haven Tuesday evening. 

See Page 20 



The Clarion football team is on 
the road again this Saturday at 
Kutztown. The Eagles will be 
looking to hand Kutztown (2-0) 
its first loss on the young season. 

See Page 20 



Alvin Slaughter ranks among 
the best in the nation in several 
statistical categories. See the 
scoreboard for the stats. 

See Page 22 



The Clarion golf team had a 
strong showing once again last 
week. Read how the team is 
rounding into shape. 

See Page 20 



Associate Sports Editor Chris 
Pfeil looks ahead to the rest of 
the season for the Pittsburgh 
Steelers. 

See Page 21 



QUOTABLES 



"He sat down and explained 
every little thing ... He told me 
where I would be on the depth 
chart and that I could play 
special teams if I didn't want 
to red-shirt He made me feel 
like he really wanted me." 

» Clarion wide receiver/kick 
returner Alvin Slaughter, on 
being recruited by Florida State 
head coach Bobby Bowden. 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



SPORTS 



The Golden Eagles knew what 
was coming Saturday — they just 
couldn't stop it. 

Damian Beane, the leading 
returning rusher in the nation in 
Division II, ran for 254 yards on 
34 totes to lead host Shepherd to 
a 27-20 win over Clarion in front 
of 2,500 fans at Ram Stadium. 
"He's a good back. There's no 
question about that," said Clarion 
head coach Malen Luke. 

Beane set the tone in the game's 
early stages . After a 6-yard jaunt 
on the contest's opening play, the 
Baltimore native rumbled for 65 
yards two plays later to put the 
Rams on the Clarion 23. 
Shepherd (2-1) put the first points 
on the board five plays later when 
Matt Davis and Dan Woodward 
hooked up for a 7-yard touch- 
down pass. 

Beane struck again with just 
under 10 minutes remaining in 
the second quarter, finding pay 
dirt on a 42-yard run to boost the 
Shepherd lead to 14-0. 
Teammate James Rooths got 
into the act just over a minute 
later, capitalizing on some key 
blocks for a 68-yard punt return 
for a touchdown. 

Clarion (1-2) finally got on the 
scoreboard in the second period 
when Chris Weibel found Alvin 
Slaughter for a 67-yard touch- 
down pass 7:29 before half time. 
The extra point would fail, 
though, leaving Clarion behind 
21-6 at the half. 

After falling victim to big plays 
in the first half, the Eagles came 
up with some key plays them- 
selves to claw back into the con- 
test. Forced into punt formation 
at their own 32, Clarion up-man 
Ryan Presutti took a short snap 
and bolted 68 yards for a Golden 
Eagle touchdown. 

Clarion was unable to convert 
the two-point conversion, making 
the score 21-12. 

Beane restored the Shepherd 
cushion to 15 points on a 10-yard 
run. 

However, the Eagles made one 
more stab at it. 



Beaned 




George Groff/Clarion Call 



Top: Running back Keonte 
Campbell lowers his shoul- 
der to absorb a hit from a 
Millersville defender Sept. 
12. 

Right: Drew Painter (95) 
wrestles down Millersville 
quarterback Drew Folmar. 




The Eagles blocked an Alan 
Mullendore punt, which was 
picked up by Brett Wiley and 
returned 37 yards for a touch- 
down with 1:03 showing on the 
clock. 

That would be the end of the 
Clarion threat however, as the 
Rams curled up on an onside 
kick. 

Alvin Slaughter continues to put 
up big numbers for the Eagles, 
nabbing eight passes for 144 
yards and Clarion's lone offen- 



sive touchdown. 

While Clarion's opponent 
changes each week, the Eagles' 
biggest foe remains inconsisten- 
cy. 

Clarion outplayed Youngstown 
State for a quarter and a half 
before being dominated for the 
remainder of the contest Sept. 3. 
Clarion struck for 21 points in 
the third quarter of a 38-31 win 
over Millersville Sept. 12 before 
nearly seeing the Marauders 
steal the game in the fourth peri- 



od. 

Clarion will look for more con- 
sistency as the season wears on. 
Luke feels the Eagles aren't yet at 
the point that they can play with- 
out a great deal of emotion and 
defeat a quality team. 

"The big thing is that we didn't 
go down there and play with the 
kind of emotion that we needed to 
play with," said Luke. 

"As it was, we still had a chance 
to win the game. The game was- 
n't over until the last minute." 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



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Lock Haven 
spikes Clarion 



September 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 




By Matt Jolles 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion volleyball team 
posted a strong 3-1 record at the 
Charleston Tournament. The 
Golden Eagles knocked off 
Wheeling Jesuit in the full five 
games and then went on to 
orchestrate a sweep of both 
Mount Olive and Queens 
College. Their only setback 
came in three games to Edinboro. 

The Eagles returned home and 
were defeated by Lock Haven. 
Lock Haven built a quick 2-0 
lead. The Golden Eagles stormed 
back in the third game to prevent 
the sweep, but still fell 3-1. 
Clarion now stands at 6-8 overall 
and 1-2 in the PSAC-West. 

Jamie Mars was Clarion's top 
offensive performer with 25 kills 
over the weekend. Ali Graham 
recorded double-digit digs. 



CUP golfers continue strong fall on the links 



By J.P. Kenney 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion golf team continues 
to rise. 

Following its third-place finish 
at Glenville State last week, the 
Golden Eagles were back in 
action at the Fall Golf Challenge 
at Pitt-Greensburg Sept. 17, post- 
ing a team score of 324 to claim 
first place via a tiebreaker over 



Carnegie Mellon. 

The Golden Eagles were led by 
Shawn Will's 79, which was good 
enough for a third-place finish in 
the 55 -player field. Anthony 
Tacconelli, a freshman, posted an 
impressive fifth-place finish with 
a round of 80. 

The rest of the team's scores 
were J.P. Kenney with an 82, 
Andy Ganoe with an 83, and Mike 
Robb with an 85. 



Following their win, the Golden 
Eagles traveled to Bucknell 
University for a two-day event 
that featured a field full of 
Division I talent 

The team posted a respectable 
llth-place finish out of 18 teams. 
The individual team low was fired 
by Tacconelli at 156. Other scores 
included Kenney (159), Will 
(161), Matt Honacki (164), and 
Ganoe (168). 



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Week Four Scouting Report 




VS. 




Clarion (1-2) Kutztown (2-0) 

Where: University Field (5,600), Kutztown, Pa. 
When: Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Radio: C 93 (92.7 FM) 
Weather: Partly cloudy, high 80, low 59 
Series: Clarion leads 8-1 
Last meeting: 1991; Clarion won 33-27. 

The Golden Eagles hit the highway again this week for yet another 
difficult road contest as they travel to Kutztown in a PSAC inter-divi- 
sional matchup. Saturday's game will be the second of three road 
contests for Clarion, which lost at Shepherd (W.Va.), 27-20, and next 
week opens the PSAC-West schedule at nationally ranked Slippery 
Rock. 

After a 6-4 season in 1997, the Bears have started strong this year 
thanks to the return of 1 9 starters. Kutztown won its first two con»°sts 
against PSAC-West opponents Lock Haven and Shippensburg and 
will not leave the state of Pennsylvania this season, playing all ten of 
their games against PSAC schools. 

There are several keys to a Clarion win on Saturday. First, their 
defense must corral the PSAC's top rushing attack, led by junior run- 
ning back Emneko Sweeney. Sweeney has averaged 122 yards in his 
first two games while also grabbing 11 catches for 94 yards. 
Meanwhile, freshman Yorel Prosser has also emerged as a threat out 
of the Bears' backfield, running for 144 yards on just 15 carries. The 
Golden Eagles' defensive line will have its hands full with KU's offen- 
sive line, which was given the PSAC Eastern Division offensive play- 
er of the week award for its efforts in the Bears' 35-7 win over Lock 
Haven in the opener. Last week's offensive player of the week, fresh- 
man quarterback Michael de Marteleire has been extremely accurate 
in his first two collegiate endeavors, completing 64 percent of his pass- 
es with fourTDs and no interceptions. 

Secondly, the Golden Eagles must continue their strong play on spe- 
cial teams. Kutztown's Jason Gray and freshman Terry Robertson 
lead the PSAC in punt and kickoff returns respectively. However, 
Clarion's special teams have been just as impressive, led by All- 
American Alvin Slaughter. In addition to his PSAC-leading 22 recep- 
tions for 440 yards, Slaughter has picked up 223 return yards. Last 
week at Shepherd, the special teams recorded two touchdowns. Brett 
Wiley returned a blocked punt by Ryan Presutti for a touchdown late 
in the fourth quarter after Presutti had earlier run a fake punt 68 yards 
for a touchdown. 

Finally, the Golden Eagles must establish a rushing attack early in 
the game to open up more opportunities for senior quarterback Chris 
Weibel and Slaughter. Through three games, Clarion ranks 12th out 
of 14 teams in the conference in rushing (112.7 yards per game). 
Senior Jamie Sickeri leads the rushing attack despite being hampered 
by a leg injury. He has compiled 108 yards on 17 carries. 
EXTRA POINTS: Clarion sophomore Ryan Presutti was named 
PSAC-West defensive player of the week for his 13-tackle, one-sack 
performance against Shepherd. ... Kutztown can boast of having the 
most former PSAC players on active NFL rosters (2) — Denver line- 
backer John Mobley and Buffalo wide receiver Andre Reed both 
attended KU. 

•Preview compiled by Asst. Sports Editor Jason Dambach 



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ortsview: Call to all Steeler fans 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

After three weeks of mediocre 
play, the Pittsburgh Steelers are 
scratching their heads trying to 
figure out what is going wrong. 
The offense has been flat-out 
disgusting. Kordell Stewart has 
the lowest quarterback rating in 
the league (38.0), completing 
only 45.7 percent of his passes 
and throwing six interceptions, 
most of them into double and 
triple coverage. 

As poorly as Kordell has played, 
the run defense has been equally 
unimpressive. The Steelers are 
giving up 117.3 yards per game 
on the ground. The last two 
weeks, Curtis Enis and Karim 
Abdul-Jabbar have run up and 
down the once-feared Steeler 
defense. 

Bill Cowher has promised 
Steeler fans that he will find a 
way to win. The only way 
Cowher is going to find a way to 
get the Steelers on the right track 
is by doing something he seems to 
have gotten away from — coach- 
ing. 

Over the past two seasons, 
Cowher has tried to be a cheer- 
leader instead of a coach. The 
Steelers have not been prepared 
for any of their first three games. 
The blame has to be on his shoul- 
ders. It is time Cowher gets down 
to coaching instead of worrying 
about his media image. 

With that off my chest, I will 
now turn my attention to the 
Steeler fans. The Steelers have 
the toughest schedule in the 
league. If the Steelers are going 
to entertain any thought of going 
to the Super Bowl, Three Rivers 
Stadium better be rocking every 
Sunday. 

It is evident that the Steelers 
aren't as talented as everyone 
thought they were. However, the 
secret to the Steelers' success has 
always been their dominance at 
home. The Steelers need their 
fans this year more than ever to 
continue to create the most hos- 
tile environment in the NFL. 

With seven home games remain- 
ing, Steeler fans should be 
reminded that this is the year that 
many former Steelers who left for 
free agency return to Three 
Rivers. Now, it is payback time 
for the Steeler faithful. It is your 
chance to break out in a chorus of 
boos to welcome back the players 
that turned their back on you. 



September 27 
The Seattle Seahawks come into 
town this Sunday with a 3-0 
record. The Seahawks feel that 
this is their year to make a run at 
the playoffs and are hoping to 
come into Pittsburgh and make a 
statement to the rest of the league. 
Sunday's game marks the return 
of Chad Brown and "Wee" Willie 
Williams to Blitzburgh. Brown 
became one of the league's best 
linebackers in Pittsburgh and 
promptly bolted when his contract 
was up. Williams showed 
glimpses of potential while in 
Pittsburgh but chose to join 
Brown in the great football town 
of Seattle. 

October 18 

When the Baltimore "Browns" 
come into Pittsburgh, the game 
will mark the return of future Hall 
of Famer Rod Woodson. 
Woodson spent 10 brilliant sea- 
sons with the Steelers, before 
moving on to San Francisco last 
year and Baltimore this year. 

Throughout Woodson's career, 
Steeler fans embraced him. Fans 
flocked to stores to purchase his 
#26 jersey and Woodson's All- 
Star Grille was the hot spot at 
Station Square. 

Upon his departure to the 49ers, 
Woodson thanked the city that 
embraced him by calling 
Pittsburgh a racist town. 
Well, Rod, when you come back 
on the field at Three Rivers in 
your cute purple uniform, don't 
expect the Steeler fans to forget 
your gratitude towards them. 
November 1 

The Steelers open the month of 
November by hosting the 
Tennessee Oilers. You know what 
that means. That's right, the 
return of Yancey Thigpen. 

Yancey, I warned you this day 
would come. I hope you are 
enjoying yourself down in 
Tennessee, and I want you to 
know that we have had this date 
circled on our calendar since the 
schedule came out. 

I went to every sporting goods 



store in Western Pennsylvania and 
purchased your old Steelers jersey 
on clearance for $9.99 a piece. 
I'm going to use them to fuel a 
bonfire outside of Gate C. You're 
more than welcome to stop by. 
I'll be the guy explaining to the 
little children why you left your 
fans to play for a losing team and 
how the only thing you care about 
is money. 

November 9 

Even though the Packers don't 
have any former Steelers on their 
roster, it's Monday Night 
Football, and that is enough rea- 
son to get crazy. 

The Packers look like they are 
on track to make their third 
straight appearance in the Super 
Bowl. This will be a huge test for 
the Steelers to see if they are legit- 
imate tide contenders. 
November 22 

The Jacksonville Jaguars will 
come to town for what should be 
a pivotal game in the AFC Central 
race. Since the departure of the 
Browns, the Jags have stepped up 
to become the Steelers' new divi- 
sional rival. 

Last year, the Steelers pulled out 
an overtime victory in Three 
Rivers and this year's game 
promises to be another close bat- 
tle between the two division 
favorites. 

December 6 
New England rolls into town 
with vengeance on their mind. 
The Patsies fell to the Steelers 7-6 
in the playoffs last year, and no 
doubt feel they were the better 
team. 

This will be another game that 
will have a huge impact on the 
AFC playoff picture. The Steelers 
pulled one out late in the regular 
season last year in New England, 
and the Patsies will be looking to 
do the same this year. 
December 20 

The schedule makers have saved 
the best for last. The Steelers will 
close out their home schedule 
against the Cincinnati Bengals, 



led by none other than Neil 
O'Donnell. 

It might get ugly in Three 
Rivers. O'Donnell, the guy who 
threw away Super Bowl XXX and 
then jetted for dollar signs in New 
York, may hear the loudest boos 
in the history of the NFL. 

I, along with every Steeler fan in 
the world, still can see him hitting 
Larry Brown right between the 
numbers twice to cost the Steelers 
their fifth Super Bowl ring. 

Good Luck, Neil, and remember 
not to take your helmet off. 

Well Steeler fans, there should 
be plenty of motivation to keep 
Three Rivers Stadium rocking the 
whole 1998 season. I have faith 
that you will not let me down. 
But, make sure you don't strain 
your vocal cords too much, 
because next year marks the 
return of the Cleveland Browns. 

(Clarion Call columnist Chris 
Pfeil welcomes your comments. 
You can e-mail him at 
s_crpfeil@ clarion, edu. ) 



Rugby opens 

By Matt Wilson 
Sports Writer 

The Clarion Taffurs men's club 
rugby team is coming off a suc- 
cessful spring season in which 
they placed in several tourna- 
ments and have high hopes for 
the fall season. 

The Taffurs' most significant 
tournament placing was at the 
Washington St. Patrick's Day 
Tournament in which they placed 
second out of 16 teams in 
Division II. 

Now a new season is underway 
and the Taffurs are looking to 
build on the success of the spring 
season. The Taffurs picked up 
where they left off this past 
Saturday when they traveled to 
Fairmont State and won convinc 
ingly, 75-10. 

The Taffurs scored early and 
often when Alan Sarazen scored 
the first of his three tries on the 
day. Also scoring three tries was 
Mike Smith, followed by Chad 
Lowe, Josh Lefcowitz, John 
DeMarinis, Neil Sorek, and Matt 
Wilson each having one. 

The match was the first of four 
scheduled this season. The 
Taffurs, who play in Division III, 
will travel to Juniata College this 
Saturday. 



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Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



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The Clarion tennis team stands at 1-7 following a 9-0 

loss to Bioorosburg over the weekend. 





Lock Haven 
spikes Clarion 

By Matt Jolles 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion volleyball team 
posted a strong 3-1 record at the 
Charleston Tournament. The 
Golden Eagles knocked off 
Wheeling Jesuit in the full five 
games and then went on to 
orchestrate a sweep of both 
Mount Olive and Queens 
College. Their only setback 
came in three games to Edinboro. 

The Eagles returned home and 
were defeated by Lock Haven. 
Lock Haven built a quick 2-0 
lead. The Golden Eagles stormed 
back in the third game to prevent 
the sweep, but still fell 3-1. 
Clarion now stands at 6-8 overall 
and 1-2 in the PSAC-West. 

Jamie Mars was Clarion's top 
offensive performer with 25 kills 
over the weekend. Ali Graham 
recorded double-digit digs. 



September 24, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 



CUP golfers continue strong fall on the links 



By J.P. Kenney 
Sports Writer 



The Clarion golf team continues 
to rise. 

Following its third-place finish 
at Glenville State last week, the 
Golden Eagles were back in 
action at the Fall Golf Challenge 
at Pitt-Greensburg Sept. 17, post- 
ing a team score of 324 to claim 
first place via a tiebreaker over 



Carnegie Mellon. 

The Golden Eagles were led by 
Shawn Will's 79, which was good 
enough for a third-place finish in 
the 55-player field. Anthony 
Tacconelli, a freshman, posted an 
impressive fifth-place finish with 
a round of 80. 

The rest of the team's scores 
were J.P. Kenney with an 82, 
Andy Ganoe with an 83, and Mike 
Robb with an 85. 



Following their win, the Golden 
Eagles traveled to Bucknell 
University for a two-day event 
that featured a field full of 
Division I talent. 

The team posted a respectable 
llth-place finish out of 18 teams. 
The individual team low was fired 
by Tacconelli at 156. Other scores 
included Kenney (159), Will 
(161), Matt Honacki (164), and 
Ganoe (168). 



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Week Four Scouting Report 




VS. 




Clarion (1-2) Kutztown (2-0) 

Where: University Field (5,600), Kutztown, Pa. 
When: Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Radio: C 93 (92.7 FM) 
Weather: Partly cloudy, high 80, low 59 
Series: Clarion leads 8-1 
Last meeting: 1991; Clarion won 33-27. 

The Golden Eagles hit the highway again this week for yet another 
difficult road contest as they travel to Kutztown in a PSAC inter-divi- 
sional matchup. Saturday's game will be the second of three road 
contests for Clarion, which lost at Shepherd (W.Va.), 27-20, and next 
week opens the PSAC-West schedule at nationally ranked Slippery 
Rock. 

After a 6-4 season in 1997, the Bears have started strong this year 
thanks to the return of 19 starters. Kutztown won its first two con»°sts 
against PSAC-West opponents Lock Haven and Shippensburg and 
will not leave the state of Pennsylvania this season, playing all ten of 
their games against PSAC schools. 

There are several keys to a Clarion win on Saturday. First, their 
defense must corral the PSAC's top rushing attack, led by junior run- 
ning back Emneko Sweeney. Sweeney has averaged 122 yards in his 
first two games while also grabbing 11 catches for 94 yards. 
Meanwhile, freshman Yorel Prosser has also emerged as a threat out 
of the Bears' backfield, running for 144 yards on just 15 carries. The 
Golden Eagles' defensive line will have its hands full with KU's offen- 
sive line, which was given the PSAC Eastern Division offensive play- 
er of the week award for its efforts in the Bears' 35-7 win over Lock 
Haven in the opener. Last week's offensive player of the week, fresh- 
man quarterback Michael de Marteleire has been extremely accurate 
in his first two collegiate endeavors, completing 64 percent of his pass- 
es with fourTDs and no interceptions. 

Secondly, the Golden Eagles must continue their strong play on spe- 
cial teams. Kutztown's Jason Gray and freshman Terry Robertson 
lead the PSAC in punt and kickoff returns respectively. However, 
Clarion's special teams have been just as impressive, led by All- 
American Alvin Slaughter. In addition to his PSAC-leading 22 recep- 
tions for 440 yards, Slaughter has picked up 223 return yards. Last 
week at Shepherd, the special teams recorded two touchdowns. Brett 
Wiley returned a blocked punt by Ryan Presutti for a touchdown late 
in the fourth quarter after Presutti had earlier run a fake punt 68 yards 
for a touchdown. 

Finally, the Golden Eagles must establish a rushing attack early in 
the game to open up more opportunities for senior quarterback Chris 
Weibel and Slaughter. Through three games, Clarion ranks 12th out 
of 14 teams in the conference in rushing (112.7 yards per game). 
Senior Jamie Sickeri leads the rushing attack despite being hampered 
by a leg injury. He has compiled 108 yards on 17 carries. 
EXTRA POINTS: Clarion sophomore Ryan Presutti was named 
PSAC-West defensive player of the week for his 13-tackle, one-sack 
performance against Shepherd ... Kutztown can boast of having the 
most former PSAC players on active NFL rosters (2) — Denver line- 
backer John Mobley and Buffalo wide receiver Andre Reed both 
attended KU. 

•Preview compiled by Asst. Sports Editor Jason Dambach 



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Sportsview: Call to all Steeler fans 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

After three weeks of mediocre 
play, the Pittsburgh Steelers are 
scratching their heads trying to 
figure out what is going wrong. 
The offense has been flat-out 
disgusting. Kordell Stewart has 
the lowest quarterback rating in 
the league (38.0), completing 
only 45.7 percent of his passes 
and throwing six interceptions, 
most of them into double and 
triple coverage. 

As poorly as Kordell has played, 
the run defense has been equally 
unimpressive. The Steelers are 
giving up 117.3 yards per game 
on the ground. The last two 
weeks, Curtis Enis and Karim 
Abdul-Jabbar have run up and 
down the once-feared Steeler 
defense. 

Bill Cowher has promised 
Steeler fans that he will find a 
way to win. The only way 
Cowher is going to find a way to 
get the Steelers on the right track 
is by doing something he seems to 
have gotten away from — coach- 
ing. 

Over the past two seasons, 
Cowher has tried to be a cheer- 
leader instead of a coach. The 
Steelers have not been prepared 
for any of their first three games. 
The blame has to be on his shoul- 
ders. It is time Cowher gets down 
to coaching instead of worrying 
about his media image. 

With that off my chest, I will 
now turn my attention to the 
Steeler fans. The Steelers have 
the toughest schedule in the 
league. If the Steelers are going 
to entertain any thought of going 
to the Super Bowl, Three Rivers 
Stadium better be rocking every 
Sunday. 

It is evident that the Steelers 
aren't as talented as everyone 
thought they were. However, the 
secret to the Steelers' success has 
always been their dominance at 
home. The Steelers need their 
fans this year more than ever to 
continue to create the most hos- 
tile environment in the NFL. 
With seven home games remain- 
ing, Steeler fans should be 
reminded that this is the year that 
many former Steelers who left for 
free agency return to Three 
Rivers. Now, it is payback time 
for the Steeler faithful. It is your 
chance to break out in a chorus of 
boos to welcome back the players 
that turned their back on you. 



September 27 
The Seattle Seahawks come into 
town this Sunday with a 3-0 
record. The Seahawks feel that 
this is their year to make a run at 
the playoffs and are hoping to 
come into Pittsburgh and make a 
statement to the rest of the league. 
Sunday's game marks the return 
of Chad Brown and "Wee" Willie 
Williams to Blitzburgh. Brown 
became one of the league's best 
linebackers in Pittsburgh and 
promptly bolted when his contract 
was up. Williams showed 
glimpses of potential while in 
Pittsburgh but chose to join 
Brown in the great football town 
of Seattle. 

October 18 
When the Baltimore "Browns" 
come into Pittsburgh, the game 
will mark the return of future Hall 
of Famer Rod Woodson. 
Woodson spent 10 brilliant sea- 
sons with the Steelers, before 
moving on to San Francisco last 
year and Baltimore this year. 
Throughout Woodson's career, 
Steeler fans embraced him. Fans 
flocked to stores to purchase his 
#26 jersey and Woodson's All- 
Star Grille was the hot spot at 
Station Square. 

Upon his departure to the 49ers, 

Woodson thanked the city that 

embraced him by calling 

Pittsburgh a racist town. 

Well, Rod, when you come back 

on the field at Three Rivers in 

your cute purple uniform, don't 

expect the Steeler fans to forget 

your gratitude towards them. 

November 1 

The Steelers open the month of 

November by hosting the 

Tennessee Oilers. You know what 

that means. That's right, the 

return of Yancey Thigpen. 

Yancey, I warned you this day 
would come. I hope you are 
enjoying yourself down in 
Tennessee, and I want you to 
know that we have had this date 
circled on our calendar since the 
schedule came out. 

I went to every sporting goods 



store in Western Pennsylvania and 
purchased your old Steelers jersey 
on clearance for $9.99 a piece. 
I'm going to use them to fuel a 
bonfire outside of Gate C. You're 
more than welcome to stop by. 
I'll be the guy explaining to the 
little children why you left your 
fans to play for a losing team and 
how the only thing you care about 
is money. 

November 9 
Even though the Packers don't 
have any former Steelers on their 
roster, it's Monday Night 
Football, and that is enough rea- 
son to get crazy. 

The Packers look like they are 
on track to make their third 
straight appearance in the Super 
Bowl. This will be a huge test for 
the Steelers to see if they are legit- 
imate title contenders. 
November 22 
The Jacksonville Jaguars will 
come to town for what should be 
a pivotal game in the AFC Central 
race. Since the departure of the 
Browns, the Jags have stepped up 
to become the Steelers' new divi- 
sional rival. 

Last year, the Steelers pulled out 
an overtime victory in Three 
Rivers and this year's game 
promises to be another close bat- 
tle between the two division 
favorites. 

December 6 
New England rolls into town 
with vengeance on their mind. 
The Patsies fell to the Steelers 7-6 
in the playoffs last year, and no 
doubt feel they were the better 
team. 

This will be another game that 
will have a huge impact on the 
AFC playoff picture. The Steelers 
pulled one out late in the regular 
season last year in New England, 
and the Patsies will be looking to 
do the same this year. 
December 20 
The schedule makers have saved 
the best for last. The Steelers will 
close out their home schedule 
against the Cincinnati Bengals, 



led by none other than Neil 
O' Donne II. 

It might get ugly in Three 
Rivers. O'Donnell, the guy who 
threw away Super Bowl XXX and 
then jetted tor dollar signs in New 
York, may hear the loudest boos 
in the history of the NFL. 

I, along with every Steeler fan in 
the world, still can see him hitting 
Larry Brown right between the 
numbers twice to cost the Steelers 
their fifth Super Bowl ring. 

Good Luck, Neil, and remember 
not to take your helmet off. 

Well Steeler fans, there should 
be plenty of motivation to keep 
Three Rivers Stadium rocking the 
whole 1998 season. I have faith 
that you will not let me down. 
But, make sure you don't strain 
your vocal cords too much, 
because next year marks the 
return of the Cleveland Browns. 

(Clarion Call columnist Chris 
Pfeil welcomes your comments. 
You can e-mail him at 
s_crpfeil@clarion.edu. ) 



Rugby opens 

By Matt Wilson 

Sport s Writer 

The Clarion Taffurs men's club 
rugby team is coming off a suc- 
cessful spring season in which 
they placed in several tourna- 
ments and have high hopes for 
the fall season. 

The Taffurs' most significant 
tournament placing was at the 
Washington St. Patrick's Day 
Tournament in which they placed 
second out of 16 teams in 
Division II. 

Now a new season is underway 
and the Taffurs are looking to 
build on the success of the spring 
season. The Taffurs picked up 
where they left off this past 
Saturday when they traveled to 
Fairmont State and won convinc- 
ingly, 75-10. 

The Taffurs scored early and 
often when Alan Sarazen scored 
the first of his three tries on the 
day. Also scoring three tries was 
Mike Smith, followed by Chad 
Lowe, Josh Lefcowitz, John 
DeMarinis, Neil Sorek, and Matt 
Wilson each having one. 

The match was the first of four 
scheduled this season. The 
Taffurs, who play in Division III, 
will travel to Juniata College this 
Saturday. 



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Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



CLARION SCOREBOARD 



co«v> *< ;.„..», — '„ 

September 24,1998 






The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Division II Individual Leaders 

Sept. 19 

Rushing offense leaders 

1. Murphy, Cent. Wash. 269.0 

2. Shay, Emporia St. 201.3 

3. Meyer, Bemidji St. 188.0 

4. Beane, Shepherd 182.7 

5. Bryant, Merrimack 165.7 

6. Thompson, Edinboro 150.3 

7. Duerr, Moorehead St. 149.0 

8. Gray, Western N.M. 148.7 

9. Meyer, Southwest St. 142.3 

10. Variance, N.M High. 140.3 

Total offense leaders 

1 . Folmar, Millersville 331.0 

2. Fox, Grand Valley St. 325.7 

3. McGuffey, Northern Colo. 316.7 

4. Tollie, Northwood 294.7 

5. Brown, Midwestern St. 291.3 

6. Greisen, NW. Mo. St. 281.7 

7. Perez, Glenville St. 271.7 

8. Murphy, Central Wash. 269.0 

9. Hawkins, Virginia St. 265.0 

10. Mitros, West Chester 257.5 

Scoring offense leaders 

1. Murphy, Central Wash. 18.0 

2. Miles, Northwest Mo. St. 16.0 

3. Griffoul, Pace 15.0 
3. Phillips, West Ala. 15.0 
3. Duerr, Moorehead St. 15.0 

6. Shay, Emporia St 14.0 

7. Granata, Grand Valley St. 12.0 
7. Thompson, Edinboro 12.0 
7. Hawkins, Carson-Newman 12.0 



FOOTBALL 



7. Leden, Bemidji St. 12.0 

7. Variance, N.M. High. 12.0 

7. Moore, North Dakota 12.0 

15. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 10.0 

Pass Receptions per game 

1 . Ingram , West Chester 1 1 .0 

2. Scott, Millersville, 10.5 

3. Thorton, Virginia State 9.3 

4. Mitchell, Minn. St. Mank. 8.7 

5. McFetridge, Millersville 8.0 

6. Mauer, Assumption 7.5 

7. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 7.3 
7. Thompson, Virginia St. 7.3 
7. Giovingo, Ark.-Mont 7.3 
10. Trent, Fairmont St. 7.0 

Receiving yards per game 

I.Scott, Millersville 175.0 

2. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 146.7 

3. Hunter, Northwood 141.3 

4. Thompson, Virginia St. 130.7 

5. Juaire, Winona St. 126.0 

6. Dolph , Saginaw Valley 1 1 9.0 

7. Mitchell, Minn. St.-Mank. 118.0 
6. Giovingo, Ark.-Mont 115.7 

9. McFetridge, Millersville 113.5 

10. Ingram, West Chester 110.5 

Kickoff return leaders 

1. Williams, Savannah St. 43.8 

2. Bussey, Concord 43.6 

3. Jones, Northwood 39.8 

4. Pierce, Newberry 38.4 

5. Stinyard, Fort Valley St. 38.4 

6. Smith, Eastern N.M. 38.0 

7. Smith, Mo. West. St. 37.0 



POLLS 



8. Austin, Central Ark. 35.2 

9. Larrimore, West Tex. A&M 34.8 

10. Feehan, Pace 34.7 

Interceptions per game leaders 

1. Richardson, Southern Conn. 1.5 

2. Brinkley, Mercyhurst 1.3 

3. Younger, Miles 1 .3 

4. Grogan, Merrimack 1.0 
4. Jones, Savannah St 1.0 
4. Puckett, Saginaw valley St. 1.0 
4. Bumey, New Haven 1 .0 
4. Rhett, Albany (N.Y.) 1.0 
4. Caviglia, Cal-Davis 1.0 

4. Mathis, E.M. 1.0 

Field goals per game 

I.Todd, Washburn 2.33 

2. Pederson, North Dakota St. 2.00 

2. Christian, Wingate 2.00 

2. Barcus, Pittsburg St 2.00 

5. Klee, Truman St. 1.67 
5. Krull, Southwest St. 1.67 
5. Barnes, Glenville St 1.67 
5. Werner, Mich. Tech 1.67 
5. Wynn, Hillsdale 1.67 
10. Ryzewski, Millersville 1.50 
10. Stern, East Stroudsburg 1.50 
12. Stevens, Mansfield 1.33 
12. Meyer, Central Mo. St 1.33 
12. Boone, Elon 1.33 
12. Berry, Saginaw Valley St. 1 .33 
12. Price, Augustana 1.33 
12. Williams, Southern Ark. 

1.33 



Division II Football 
Sept 22 

1. Northern Colorado 

2. California-Davis 

3. Southern Arkansas 

4. Indiana, Pa. 

5. (tie) Central Oklahoma 
Northwest Missouri State 

7. North Alabama 

8. (tie) Grand Valley State 
North Dakota 

10. (tie) Carson-Newman 
West Texas A&M 

12. Emporia State 

13. Slippery Rock 



14. Eastern New Mexico 

15. Fort Valley State 

16 (tie) Central Missouri State 
Saginaw Valley State 
18. (tie) Albany State 
Nebraska-Omaha 
20. Chadron State 

Division II Volleyball Sept. 16 
Atlantic Region 
1. Edinboro 

2. (tie) Charles., Fair. St, Lock Haven 
5. (tie) CLARION, Lees-McRae, 
Millersville, Shepherd, Slippery Rock 
West Virginia Wesley an. 



GOLDEN EAGLE CALENDAR 


Crass 

Country 


Miay 


•at 

at 

YSU 


*"" 


M— day 


Tew. 


■fed. 


QoN 








at 

Westminster/SRU 

Inv. 




Football 




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1:30 p.m. 










Tennis 














Vollsybal 
















INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Re creation & Fitness Director -JX)UG KNEPP (Office 1 1 7 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



Flag Football Box Scores 

9/16 
ST Grey 15 Redmen 
P & E Inc n/a Atoms n/a 
Other Ones n/a Warriors n/a 
Bandits n/a Team KDR n/a 
Iron City n/a DeezNuts n/a 

9/17 
S T Blue n/a S T Grey n/a 
Redmen 8 P & E Inc 68 
Atoms 18 Other Ones 59 
Warriors 60 Bandits 6 
Team KDR 40 Iron City 26 

9/22 
ST Blue 30 P&EInc 16 
Oeez Nuts 46 69 Boyz 6 



RESIDENCE HALL 
SOFTBALL 
WILKINSON HALL won 

annual 
Softball 



I8AR 41 
Swore 22 
P&EInc 32 
STGrey 35 



3B Brawlers 23 
The Nation 46 
Bandits 12 
Iron City 36 



'SPECIAL NOTICE* GOLF SCRAMBLE 
IN-LINE HOCKEY RESULTS 

TOURNAMENT The annual Intramural 

Fall Classic was held at the second 

Registration is now being Mayfield Country Club residence hall 

accepted for a new In-line this past Monday and tournament held on 

Hockey tournament Tuesday. This was an 18 Saturday September 20. 

scheduled to begin hole 4 person "best ball" Congratulations to the 

October 13. This will be a scramble. Turning in the players for the Wilkinson ln fj ui [J; ^ )0 ^J he 5^ ^ e 

4 on 4 tournament and best score was the squad: Mike Schoepky, ^n^ and returning on 

roster limit is 8 players. RUBINOS II squad Matt Croyle, Jenny Lee, Sunday afternoon. The cost 

We will feature a men's consisting of: Shane Eck, Dan Donken, Chrystell 2t?Si r lP f ? rst V_ den ? sis J < on L y 

and women's division if Jamey Bigler, Josh Brody Dean, Cory Rex, Kelly 

there is interest in both, and Tom Musgrove. Pennwell, Jim Oddis, 

Games will be played on Thanks to all the teams Jessica Frederick, Ed 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

G.E.A.R. 

CAMPING & CANOEING 

There are still a few spots 
open for this week-ends 
camping and canoeing trip. 
Interested persons should 
phone 2349 A.S.A.P. to 



Volleyball Box Scores 
9/17 
BonzaiOG 21 Hats 2 G 
Kamakazies G Diggettes 2 G 
Scherminat. G Set to Kill 2 G 

9/22 
Smile 0G Mixed Up 2 G 

Crazy Girls 2 G 21 Hats G 
Crows 2 G Stairdrvers 1 G 
Bonzia 2 G Warriors G 

WOMEN'S 
POWER HOUR 
TUES & THUR 6-7 PM 



the court next to that participated!! 
Wilkinson and Nair, using 
the new nets that were 
recently set-up. For more 
info call 2349. 



Paprocki, 
Aharrah! 



and Gary 



AQUA AEROBICS 

Sunday's 6:00 pm 
FREE TO STUDENTS 



BODY FAT TESTING 
TUESDAY 12 NOON 
(OR BY APPOINT.) 
RM 117 TIPPIN 



I.R.A.C. 

Interested and enthusiastic 

students!! The Intramural- 

Recreational-Advisory- 

Committee will now be TENNIS 

meeting every Tuesday at power lifting 

3:30 pm in room 103 Tippin 



INTRAMURAL 
UPCOMING EVENTS clay 
10 K RELAY 9/27 

OUTDOOR SOCCER 9/28 

9/29 

9/29 

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9/30 



$10.00 to pay for your food. 
AH transportation and 
equipment is provided. 
RENTAL EQUIPMENT 
There are still some nice 
days left in summer. 
Students are reminded they 
may rent our new in-line 
skates for only $2.00 per 
This includes knee, 
elbow and wrist pads. 
There are also other items 
available. Stop by the 
Outdoor Equipment rental 
office on the second floor of 
Tippin of call X2349 for info. 



If you would like to become indoor <sorrFR m/14 
a member of the group that j, on 1 BASKETBALL 10/12 CLIMBING GEAR 



PITCH SOFTBALL 



10/11 



plans and evaluates 
activities for this campus, 
then this is the spot for you! ( st0 P b Y room 1 1 7 T, PP ,n 

to register for activites) 



Our first guided rock climbing 
trip is Thursday September 
24. We will be taking 
additional trips as long as the 
weather cooperates. Our 
next trip is scheduled for 
October 22. 




AM 



?M 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Stylish, outgoing, and blessed 
with an abundance of talent, 
Alvin Slaughter is everything a 
college football star should be. 

The six-foot, 190-pound wide 
receiver/kick returner from Carol 
City, Fla., has dazzled the crowd 
at Memorial Stadium for three 
seasons with skills that have 
earned him a place on the PS AC- 
West first team and the Division 
II All-America squad. 

Slaughter, now a senior, has 
shown no sign of slowing down 
this fall. Alvin started the season 
with an eight-catch, 103-yard 
performance at Youngstown 
State, followed by a stellar 307 
all-purpose yard showing against 
Millersville Sept. 12. 

For the 6,000 fans on hand at 
Memorial Stadium for Clarion's 
38-31 win over Millersville, the 
most memorable part of the game 
was Slaughter's 71 -yard touch- 
down reception from quarterback 
Chris Weibel with just over a 
minute to play. But, according to 
Alvin , that game-winning score 
was four months in the making. 

Also a member of the CUP 
track team, Slaughter was at 
Millersville in May for the PS AC 
track and field championships. 
On hand was most of the 
Marauder football team, which 
heckled Slaughter throughout the 
preliminaries and the finals. 

"They were ragging on Kervin 
(teammate Charles) and I, saying 
how Kervin is short, that I could- 
n't catch, and that they had the 
best secondary in the country," 
says Slaughter. 

"I just couldn't wait for that 
game. I felt that I could get the 
corners deep. The corners kept 
running up on us hard to stop 
Weibel from running the option. 
So we called the play and it was 
picture perfect" 

That it was, as Alvin, Kervin, 
and the rest of the Golden Eagles 
celebrated their first win of the 
season while the Marauders 
endured the long trip back to 



Millersville. 

While Clarion fans have come 
to expect big things of Slaughter, 
Clarion is a place Alvin never 
expected to end up in college. 

As an all-Florida performer at 
Pace High School (outside of 
Miami), Slaughter was 
recruited by the likes of^ 
Miami (Fla.), Florida 
State, Florida, and 
Central Florida. 

Ask Alvin of his 
recruiting process, and 
he talks of experiences 
only a select group of players 
can attest to. 

Slaughter speaks of being 
unimpressed with Florida 
head coach Steve 
Spurrier, while being 
drawn to Florida 
State boss Bobby 
Bowden. 

"The biggest turnoff was that 
(Spurrier) just spoke with me real 
quickly and didn't even really 
acknowledge me," says Alvin. "I 
don't even think he knew what I 
was wearing. He was just like, 
'We really want you ... I want 
you to think about it real hard ... 
You have an opportunity to play 
here.' — just the things 
(recruiters) normally tell you. 
That was it. We didn't sit down 
and talk about the visit or what I 
expected of him. He didn't real- 
ly sit down and talk to me like the 
other coaches." 

However, Alvin, who speaks 
about the game of football with 
the same enthusiasm that he 
plays it with, changes his tone 
when talking about Seminole 
head coach Bowden. 

"He sat down and explained 
every little thing," recalls Alvin. 
"He told me how many receivers 
they were recruiting. He told me 
everything. They were recruiting 
four receivers that year and he 
said I was one of their best guys. 
The other receivers were more 
like possession receivers. 

"(Bowden) told me where I 
would be on the depth chart and 
that I could play special teams if 
I didn't want to red-shirt. He 




made me feel like he really want- 
ed me." 

But as Slaughter's senior year 
pushed on, his future in college 
football was undecided. Alvin 
was afraid the recruiting process 
was passing him by and his 
mother, Lois, was adamant that 
he go to college. As the summer 
arrived, Alvin's high school 
coach placed calls to Division II 



schools in the north and Clarion 
was the first to show interest. 

"It was one of those last-second 
things," says Alvin. "All of a 
sudden I was pushed. My mom 
and my high school coach want- 
ed me to go to college because 
once you start sitting out you're 
never going to go to school." 
When Slaughter arrived in 

continued on page 24 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



CLARION SCOREBOARD 



September 24, 1998 



Division II Individual Leaders 


Sept. 19 




Rushing offense leaders 


1 . Murphy, Cent. Wash. 


269.0 


2. Shay, Emporia St. 


201.3 


3 Meyer, Bemidji St. 


188.0 


4. Beane, Shepherd 


182.7 


5. Bryant, Merrimack 


165.7 


6. Thompson, Edinboro 


150.3 


7 Duerr, Moorehead St. 


149.0 


8. Gray, Western N.M. 


148.7 


9. Meyer, Southwest St. 


142.3 


10. Variance, N.M High. 


140.3 


Total offense leaders 




1. Folmar, Millersville 


331.0 


2. Fox, Grand Valley St. 


325.7 


3. McGuffey, Northern Colo. 


316.7 


4. Tollie, Northwood 


294.7 


5. Brown, Midwestern St. 


291.3 


6. Greisen, NW. Mo. St. 


281.7 


7. Perez, Glenville St. 


271.7 


8. Murphy, Central Wash. 


269.0 


9. Hawkins, Virginia St. 


265.0 


10. Mitros, WestChester 


257.5 


Scoring offense leaders 


1. Murphy, Central Wash. 


18.0 


2. Miles, Northwest Mo. St. 


16.0 


3. Griffoul, Pace 


15.0 


3. Phillips, West Ala. 


15.0 


3. Duerr, Moorehead St. 


15.0 


6. Shay, Emporia St. 


14.0 


7. Granata, Grand Valley St. 


12.0 


7. Thompson, Edinboro 


12.0 


7. Hawkins, Carson-Newman 


12.0 



FOOTBALL 



7. Leden, Bemidji St. 12.0 

7. Variance, N.M. High. 12.0 

7. Moore, North Dakota 12.0 

15. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 10.0 

Pass Receptions per game 

1. Ingram, West Chester 11.0 

2. Scott, Millersville, 10.5 

3. Thorton, Virginia State 9.3 

4. Mitchell, Minn. St. Mank. 8.7 

5. McFetridge, Millersville 8.0 

6. Mauer, Assumption 7.5 

7. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 7.3 
7. Thompson, Virginia St. 7.3 
7. Giovingo, Ark. -Mont. 7.3 
10. Trent, Fairmont St. 7.0 

Receiving yards per game 

1. Scott, Millersville 175.0 

2. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 146.7 

3. Hunter, Northwood 141.3 

4. Thompson, Virginia St. 130.7 

5. Juaire, Winona St. 126.0 

6. Dolph, Saginaw Valley 119.0 

7. Mitchell, Minn. St.-Mank. 118.0 
6. Giovingo, Ark. -Mont. 115.7 

9. McFetridge, Millersville 113.5 

10. Ingram, West Chester 110.5 

Kickoff return leaders 

1. Williams, Savannah St. 43.9 

2. Bussey, Concord 43.6 

3. Jones, Northwood 39.8 

4. Pierce, Newberry 38.4 

5. Stinyard, Fort Valley St. 38.4 

6. Smith, Eastern N.M. 38.0 

7. Smith, Mo. West. St. 37.0 



POLLS 



8. Austin, Central Ark. 35.2 

9. Larrimore, West. Tex. A&M 34.8 

10. Feehan, Pace 34.7 

Interceptions per game leaders 

1. Richardson, Southern Conn. 1.5 

2. Brinkley, Mercyhurst 1.3 

3. Younger, Miles 1 .3 

4. Grogan, Merrimack 1.0 
4. Jones, Savannah St. 1 .0 
4. Puckett, Saginaw Valley St. 1 .0 
4. Bumey, New Haven 1 .0 
4. Rhett, Albany (N.Y.) 1.0 
4. Caviglia, Cal-Davis 1 .0 

4. Mathis, E.M. 1.0 

Field goals per game 

I.Todd, Washburn 2.33 

2. Pederson, North Dakota St. 2.00 

2. Christian, Wingate 2.00 

2. Barcus, Pittsburg St. 2.00 

5. Klee, Truman St. 1.67 
5. Krull, Southwest St. 1.67 
5. Barnes, Glenville St. 1.67 
5. Werner, Mich. Tech 1.67 
5. Wynn, Hillsdale 1.67 
10. Ryzewski, Millersville 1.50 
10. Stem, East Stroudsburg 1.50 
12. Stevens, Mansfield 1.33 
12. Meyer, Central Mo. St. 1.33 
12. Boone, Eton 1.33 
12. Berry, Saginaw Valley St. 1.33 
12. Price, Augustana 1.33 
12. Williams, Southern Ark. 

1.33 






Division II Football 
Sept 22 

1 . Northern Colorado 

2. California-Davis 

3. Southern Arkansas 

4. Indiana, Pa. 

5. (tie) Central Oklahoma 
Northwest Missouri State 
7. North Alabama 

6. (tie) Grand Valley State 
North Dakota 

10. (tie) Carson-Newman 
West Texas A&M 

12. Emporia State 

13. Slippery Rock 



14. Eastern New Mexico 

15. Fort Valley State 

16 (tie) Central Missouri State 
Saginaw Valley State 
18. (tie) Albany State 
Nebraska-Omaha 
20. Chadron State 

Division II Volleyball Sept. 16 
Atlantic Region 
1. Edinboro 

2.(tie) Charles., Fair. St., Lock Haven 
5. (tie) CLARION. Lees-McRae, 
Millersville, Shepherd, Slippery Rock 
West Virginia Wesleyan. 



GOLDEN EAGLE CALENDAR 



Cross 
Country 



Golf 



Football 



Tennis 



Voiloyball 



FiMay 



at 

YSU 



at 
Kulztown 
1:30 p. m 



Monday I Jvm. 



at 

Westminster/SRU 

Inv. 







INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Re creation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 117 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 
'SPECIAL NOTICE* GOLF SCRAMBLE RESIDENCE HALL "CLARION OUTDOORS' 



Flag Football Box Scores 
9/16 

ST Grey 15 Redmen 
P & E Inc n/a Atoms n/a 
Other Ones n/a Warriors n/a 
Bandits n/a Team KDR n/a 
Iron City n/a DeezNuts n/a 

9/17 
S T Blue n/a S T Grey n/a 
Redmen 8 P&EInc 68 
Atoms 18 Other Ones 59 
Waniors 60 Bandits 6 
Team KDR 40 Iron City 26 

9/22 
ST Blue 30 P&EInc 16 
Deez Nuts 46 69 Boyz 6 



IN-LINE HOCKEY 
TOURNAMENT 



I8AR 41 
Swore 22 
P&EInc 32 
S T Grey 35 



3B Brawlers 23 
The Nation 46 
Bandits 12 
Iron City 36 



RESULTS SOFTBALL 

The annual Intramural WILKINSON HALL won 

Fall Classic was held at the second annual 
Registration is now being Mayfield Country Club residence hall softball 
accepted for a new In-line this past Monday and tournament held on 
Hockey tournament Tuesday. This was an 18 Saturday September 20. 

scheduled to begin hole 4 person "best ball" Congratulations to the 
October 13. This will be a scramble. Turning in the players for the Wilkinson 
4 on 4 tournament and best score was the squad: Mike Schoepky, 

roster limit is 8 players. RUBINOS II squad Matt Croyle, Jenny Lee, Sunday afternoon. The cost 
We will feature a men's consisting of: Shane Eck, Dan Donken, Chrystell of the trip for students is only 
and women's division if Jamey Bigler, Josh Brody Dean, Cory Rex, Kelly aii° ^transKtion° Ur 'and 

Oddis, equipment is provided. 



G.E.A.R. 

CAMPING & CANOEING 

There are still a few spots 
open for this week-ends 
camping and canoeing trip. 
Interested persons should 
phone 2349 A.S.A.P. to 
inquire about the trip. We 
will be departing Saturday 
morning and returning on 



there is interest in both, and Tom Musgrove. Pennwell, Jim 



Games will be played on Thanks to all the teams 
the court next to that participated!! 
Wilkinson and Nair, using 



Jessica Frederick, Ed 
Paprocki, and Gary 
Aharrah! 



Volleyball Box Scores 
9/17 
Bonzai G 21 Hats 2 G 
Kamakazies G Diggettes 2 G 
Scherminat. G Set to Kill 2 G 

9/22 
Smile G Mixed Up 2 G 

Crazy Girls 2 G 21 HatsOG 
Crows 2 G Stairdivers 1 G 
Bonzia 2 G Warriors G 



WOMEN'S 
POWER HOUR 
TUES & THUR 6-7 



PM 



the new nets that were 
recently set-up. For more 
info call 2349. 

AQUA AEROBICS 

Sunday's 6:00 pm 
FREE TO STUDENTS 



BODY FAT TESTING 
TUESDAY 12 NOON 
(OR BY APPOINT.) 
RM 117 TIPPIN 



I.R.A.C. 

Interested and enthusiastic 

students!! The Intramural- 

Recreational-Advisory- 

Committee will now be tennis 

meeting every Tuesday at P0WER LIFT|NG 

3:30 pm in room 103 Tippin 



INTRAMURAL 

UPCOMING EVENTS 

10 K RELAY 9/27 

OUTDOOR SOCCER 9/28 

9/29 

9/29 

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9/30 



RENTAL EQUIPMENT 

There are still some nice 
days left in summer. 
Students are reminded they 
may rent our new in-line 
skates for only $2.00 per 
day. This includes knee, 
elbow and wrist pads. 
There are also other items 
available. Stop by the 
Outdoor Equipment rental 
office on the second floor of 
Tippin or call X2349 for info. 



If you would like to become | ND0 OR SOCCER 1 0/1 4 
a member of the group that -j 0N 1 BASKETBALL 10/12 CLIMBING GEAR 



I PITCH SOFTBALL 



10/11 



plans and evaluates 
activities for this campus, 
then this is the spot for you! ( st0 P b y room 1 1 7 Tl PP ,n 

to register for activites) 



Our first guided rock climbing 
trip is Thursday September 
24. We will be taking 
additional trips as long as the 
weather cooperates. Our 
next trip is scheduled for 
October 22. 



*.d 




September 24,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 





Ya,<fe-1,931 
Yards per catch: <4v$ 
Yard* per game: 538 
Touchdowns: 14 
Punt Returns: 32 



Yard* per return: t0.9 
•ftrtfefK TO** $ 



mm 



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mm 



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im 

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>**;; 

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By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Stylish, outgoing, and blessed 
with an abundance of talent, 
Alvin Slaughter is everything a 
college football star should be. 

The six-foot, 190-pound wide 
receiver/kick returner from Carol 
City, Fla., has dazzled the crowd 
at Memorial Stadium for three 
seasons with skills that have 
earned him a place on the PS AC- 
West first team and the Division 
II All-America squad. 

Slaughter, now a senior, has 
shown no sign of slowing down 
this fall. Alvin started the season 
with an eight-catch, 103 -yard 
performance at Youngstown 
State, followed by a stellar 307 
all-purpose yard showing against 
Millersville Sept. 12. 

For the 6,000 fans on hand at 
Memorial Stadium for Clarion's 
38-31 win over Millersville, the 
most memorable part of the game 
was Slaughter's 71 -yard touch- 
down reception from quarterback 
Chris Weibel with just over a 
minute to play. But, according to 
Alvin , that game-winning score 
was four months in the making. 

Also a member of the CUP 
track team, Slaughter was at 
Millersville in May for the PS AC 
hack and field championships. 
On hand was most of the 
Marauder football team, which 
heckled Slaughter throughout the 
preliminaries and the finals. 

"They were ragging on Kervin 
(teammate Charles) and I, saying 
how Kervin is short, that I could- 
n't catch, and that they had the 
best secondary in the country," 
says Slaughter. 

"I just couldn't wait for that 
game. I felt that I could get the 
corners deep. The corners kept 
running up on us hard to stop 
Weibel from running the option. 
So we called the play and it was 
picture perfect." 

That it was, as Alvin, Kervin, 
and the rest of the Golden Eagles 
celebrated their first win of the 
season while the Marauders 
endured the long trip back to 



Millersville. 

While Clarion fans have come 
to expect big things of Slaughter, 
Clarion is a place Alvin never 
expected to end up in college. 

As an all-Florida performer at 
Pace High School (outside of 
Miami), Slaughter was^ 
recruited by the likes of| 
Miami (Fla.), Florida 
State, Florida, and 
Central Florida. 

Ask Alvin of his 
recruiting process, and 
he talks of experiences that 
only a select group of players 
can attest to. 

Slaughter speaks of being 
unimpressed with Florida 
head coach Steve 
Spurrier, while being 
drawn to Florida 
State boss Bobby 
Bowden. 

'The biggest turnoff was that 
(Spurrier) just spoke with me real 
quickly and didn't even really 
acknowledge me," says Alvin. "I 
don't even think he knew what I 
was wearing. He was just like, 
'We really want you ... I want 
you to think about it real hard ... 
You have an opportunity to play 
here.' — just the things 
(recruiters) normally tell you. 
That was it. We didn't sit down 
and talk about the visit or what I 
expected of him. He didn't real- 
ly sit down and talk to me like the 
other coaches." 

However, Alvin, who speaks 
about the game of football with 
the same enthusiasm that he 
plays it with, changes his tone 
when talking about Seminole 
head coach Bowden. 

"He sat down and explained 
every little thing," recalls Alvin. 
"He told me how many receivers 
they were recruiting. He told me 
everything. They were recruiting 
four receivers that year and he 
said I was one of their best guys. 
The other receivers were more 
like possession receivers. 

"(Bowden) told me where I 
would be on the depth chart and 
that I could play special teams if 
I didn't want to red-shirt. He 





made me feel like he really want- 
ed me." 

But as Slaughter's senior year 
pushed on, his future in college 
football was undecided. Alvin 
was afraid the recruiting process 
was passing him by and his 
mother, Lois, was adamant that 
he go to college. As the summer 
arrived, Alvin's high school 
coach placed calls to Division II 



schools in the north and Clarion 
was the first to show interest. 

"It was one of those last-second 
things," says Alvin. "All of a 
sudden I was pushed. My mom 
and my high school coach want- 
ed me to go to college because 
once you start sitting out you're 
never going to go to school." 
When Slaughter arrived in 

continued on page 24 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



September 24, 1998 



Slaughter has plenty in store for Clarion fans this fall 



continued from page 23 



Clarion that fall, it was very 
apparent to Clarion head coach 
Malen Luke that he had a star on 
his hands. 

"We knew we had something 
special from watching him on 
film," said Luke. "Coming out of 
high school, it was clear that he 
had the ability and talent." 
Slaughter quickly proved to be 
an asset to the Golden Eagles. 
Perhaps the game Clarion fans 
most remember Alvin for was his 
155-yard showing in Clarion's 49- 
15 romp of IUP in 1996. That win 
spurred the Golden Eagles on to a 
showing in the national semifinals 
and a spot on the national college 
football scene. 

"That was one of my best 
games," says Alvin. "We had two 
great running backs in Steve Witte 
and Ron DeJidas, and Chris 
Weibel was having one of those 
years. Back then, I was on the 
team and when I needed to per- 
form, I did. When I needed to 
make a big catch, I would. 

"Coach came up to me before 
the game and said that he was 
going to me. And the second play 
of the game he called my number 
and it just happened. Once you 
make one big play it's just going 
to start happening." 

Although things started "hap- 
pening" on the field for Alvin, off 
the field was another story. 
Slaughter says it took him nearly 
two years to make the adjustment 
from the palm trees and sand of 
southern Florida to the pine trees 
and snow of western 
Pennsylvania. 

"Carol City is like a night club," 
explains Alvin. "It's like a party 
scene. Every night, Monday 
through Sunday, something is 
going on. Coming to Clarion was 
so much different. I didn't have 
any friends and I didn't know any- 




the NFL, the Arena Football because of getting to play four ZLZaJTTI . A 

t ^ pumped up. I mst want to sive 

League, or the Canadian Football years instead of only two. What 



that has forced the NFL and the 



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-Greek chocolate letters 

-Gifts for everybody 

•Novelty candy 

-Grit baskets delivered to the dorms 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

Some of Alvin Slaughter's best games have occured on the turf of Clarion's Memorial 
Stadium. In 1996, Slaughter led the Golden Eagles to a 49-15 win over IUP with a 155-yard 
performance. Against California-Davis a year ago, Slaughter racked up 236 yards of total 
offense in a 35-28 overtime setback to the Aggies. Two weeks ago, Slaughter led Clarion 
to a 38-31 triumph over Millersville by recording 307 all-purpose yards. 

one. Carol City is an all-black Reed of the Buffalo Bills and John Ohio State or someplace like that 
community. Up here, there are Mobley of the Denver Broncos, would have taken 10 years ago 
more whites than blacks. I was the PSAC has developed a reputa- can't take him. That player will 
homesick and needed someone to tion as a conference that supplies go to Clarion or Northern 
talk to. I didn't know who I could "diamonds in the rough" for the Colorado, or wherever, and devel- 
talk to up here. I didn't know who professional leagues, whether it's op perhaps at a faster pace 
I could trust going from a city to 
an area that is more like the coun- 
try. It was a real culture shock for League. While the odds are 
me " against a player from a small 
Although not as swift as his school from playing at the profes- 
adjustment to college football, sional level, Luke explains that 
Alvin has made the transition to any player who makes some noise 
life in a small community in at the D-II level is going to get a 
Pennsylvania. Not only is Luke look from professional scouts, 
impressed with Alvin's perfor- "Every NFL team is going to 
mance on the field, but he also come through here every year," 
admires Slaughter off the field. explains Luke, who has worked 
"He goes down to the elemen- with Edmonton of the CFL. 
tary school and those kids love "They're not going to leave any 
him. / mean they love him," says stone unturned. 
Luke. "He's worked summer "Part of what has happened is 
camps for us and the kids all like that the Division I schools no 
him. It's because of being 'cool' longer have unlimited scholar- 
and 'witty' and things like that, ships. Now, because of the limita- 
He has a great rapport with kids." tions on scholarships, what's hap- 
With past players such as Andre pened is the borderline kid that 



out all the schools. 

"The question surrounding Alvin 
is, 'What can he do other than play 
receiver?' That's why we have 
him on special teams. He's run- 
ning down on kickoffs and return- 
ing kicks. A lot of it is being in the 
right place at the right time." 

Slaughter says it's a dream of his 
to play in the professional ranks, 
whatever league that may be. 

"Coming out of Division II, you 
can have all of the stats and num- 
bers, but people wonder if you can 
play at that (pro) level," says 
Slaughter, who was tested by the 
Pittsburgh Steelers last spring. 
"Things are much faster and the 
guys are much bigger and 
stronger. I've been playing the 
game my whole life. I'll just have 
to adjust and adapt to it." 
Until that time comes, Alvin still 
has some business to take care of 
at Clarion. Far from the sight of 
Bobby Bowden and far from the 
memory of Steve Spurrier, 
Slaughter wants to end his career 
at Clarion with a bang. 

Clarion fans may want to get to 
Memorial Stadium for Slaughter's 
four remaining home games, as 
Alvin promises to have plenty in 
store for the CUP faithful. 

"I try to give the fans something 
to look forward to," says Alvin. 
"When we score they're scream- 
ing and yelling and I'm all 



something in return. 

"I love my fans. They're crazy, 
professional leagues to do is check The » re wiw J 



Captain 
Loomis Inn 



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540 Main Street 
226-8400 



612 Main St. 
Clarion PA 
' 16214 
(814)227-2255 



Hours: 

10:00-5:00 Mon-Sal 

10:00-8:00 Friday 



Michelle's Cafe 




*Buy one Tall Mocha and get a second Tall Mocha FREE!* 
Coupon Valid 9/24 through 9/28 



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Specials every night of the week!!! 




INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses.. .Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Pageio 

Call On You.-.i Page 15 

Entertainment Page 16 

Classifieds Page 17 

Sports Page 19 



New, 



School violence was 

the focus of the Safe 

School Summit 

Downlink, held 

recently at Clarion 

University. 

For story, see Page 7. 



Lifestyles 



Dave Coleman, "The 

Dating Doctor" 
presented his views 
of dating on Monday. 
To see how you can 
become a pro at dat- 
ing, see Page 10. 



Sports 



The Golden Eagles 

used a last minute 

touchdown to escape 

Kutztown with a 23- 

16 win on Saturday. 

See Page 19 for info. 



Clarion's $53 million budget 
approved by Council of Trustees 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

Clarion University's Council of 
Trustees approved a $53,325,100 
budget for the 1998-1999 fiscal 
year Sept. 17 in Oil City. 

The budget has increased a total 
of $1.4 million from $51,886,600 
last fiscal year. 

Now that the budget has been 
approved by the Trustees, it will 
be submitted to the State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE) to 
the Office of the Vice Chancellor 
for Finance and Administration, 
Wayne G. Failor. 

A budget workshop was held 
prior to the Trustees meeting in 
order to explain the 
process. 

In the budget packet provided 
by the Office of Finance and 



FY9M9 



State Appropriation 

$29,849.3 56.0% 




Instr. Support Fee 
$1,968.8 3.7% 

Other Revenue 
$927.2 1.7% 



Tuition $20,579.8 38.6% 



Graph courtesy of the University's Office of Finance and Administration 
budget Administration which was given SSHE, a total of $29,849,300. 



The next largest amount of rev- 
enue is earned by tuition. 

The tuition total is $20,579,800 
and makes up 38.6 percent of the 
University's total revenue. 

Instructional Support Fee (ISF) 
dollars provide $1,968,800, or 3.7 
percent, of the total revenue. 
Finally, other sources of revenue 
make up the last 1.7 percent, or 
$927,200 of the budget. 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice 
president for finance and adminis- 
tration, said that there were a 
number of factors in preparing the 
budget. 

This year's budget was bal- 
anced, she said, by a reduction of 
$453,948 in personnel costs. The 
reductions were needed because 



to Trustees, it states that the major 
revenue source for the University 
is its appropriation from the 



Autumn Leaf Festival 1998 

ALF PREVIEW 



by Jeff Say 
Clarion Call Lifestyles Editor 

Next week Clarion will be 
hosting the forty-fifth annual 
Autumn Leaf Festival. The 
Autumn Leaf Festival is the pre- 
mier event at Clarion University 
and community. 

Every year numerous activities 
are scheduled along with week 
long attraction such as vendors, 
carnival rides, art shows and 
parades. 

The festival kicks off on 
Saturday, October 3rd, with the 
Miss Junior Teen A.L.F. 
Pageant, C-93 Junior Olympics, 
the Classic Car Cruise and the 
"For Love of Clarion 
Walk-A-Thon. The festivities 
continue on Sunday with the 
S&T Bank Autorama. A bake 
and craft sale will be held at 
Immaculate Conception School 
featuring baked goods and a 
quilt raffle. A free oldies kick-off 



£..j0'i&[^v>m> 




Clarion Call File Photo 
Eating is always a main activity at the Autumn Leaf 



concert featuring nationally 
known oldies band "Pure Gold" 
will be held at the Memorial 
Stadium. 

The 4th Annual Clarion 
University and Community 
Cultural Night on Monday will 
begin a week long cultural music 
fest. Featured performers on 
Monday will be The Clarion 
Singers and Runa Kuna. 
International songs, dances and 



The appropriation comprises 56 of a lower state appropriation and 
percent of the total revenue for a tuition freeze for the 1998-1999 
the University. Continued on Pace 6 

Fun ALF facts 
DID YOU 
KNOW... 

Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival 
was bestowed with a prestigious 
award this past week. 

The International Festival and 
Events Association awarded the 
Autumn Leaf Festival the 
bronze medal in the Grand 
Pinnacle category for festivals 
under $500,000. 

The Autumn Leaf Festival also 
received second place in festi- 
vals with a budget under 
$500,000. According to a 
spokesperson at the Clariom 
Chamber of Commerce, Clarionl 
also placed second in best mer- 
chandise for festivals under 
$500,000 but because of the 
limited number of festivals reg- 
istered the Autumn Leaf Festival 
was competing against events 
such as the Disney theme parks 
and the Kentucky Derby. There 
were approximately 1 ,200 com- 
petitors in this category. 
For more info, see Page 11! 



fashions will be featured along 
with African American, Asian, 
Native American, and 
Norwegian performers. On 
Tuesday October 6th, a 4-H 
benefit auction will be held at 
the Clarion Mall. The Clarion 
Jaycees, Clarion County 
Humane Society and Kentucky 

Continued on Page 10 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



October 1.1 9Q8 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 GEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, PA 16214 

(S14)22b-23NO 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-mail: call@maH.cIariori.eciu 

wnu.danon.iAlu thecall 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



all is published moil 
Thursday* during the school year in 
accordance with the academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
from all sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua 
don, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which is the responsibil 
rty of the Editor-in-Chief). Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse publica- 
tion of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5.-00 
p. m. on the Monday of desired publi- 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
tetters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 

«*"" •<* The Clarion Ctll, DbpUy 

Advertising copy and greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday "by 2#G p.m. on the 
week of publication. The Clarion 



Call i* funded- by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue 



L 



OPINION 




Hide Park 



"In more modern 

times, the media was 

almost entirely 

responsible for the 
collapse of support..." 



John Gerow 



"News Media-Gatekeeper of 

the Debate or Agent of 

Propaganda?" 

Modern Americans rely almost 
solely on the mass media for 
news and information from out- 
side their local communities. If 
one considers the sheer magni- 
tude of the country, there can be 
no other way. Besides merely 
delivering the news, the media, to 
a large degree, determines what 
issues should be important to the 
American people. Scholars note 
this as being the "Gatekeeper of 
the Public Debate." 

But there are media and culture 
critics who suggest that the 
media does more than just deter- 
mine the debate. These scholars 
argue that the media sets Hie pub- 
lic agenda, and then persuades 
the public of the correct stand to 
take on these issues. One might 
suggest that the news media is an 
"Agent of Propaganda," rather 
than a "Gatekeeper of the Public 
Debate." 

There is a tendency to naively 
believe that this is a news phe- 
nomenon. An objective look at 
history and the role of the media 
would tend to suggest that it is 
now not new. Even before we 
were a nation, the print media 
focused attention on the per- 
ceived repression by the British 
crown, fermenting revolutionary 
zeal,where little had existed 
before. 

In the decade before our Civil 
War, many of the northern news- 
papers dedicated themselves to 
the abolition of slavery. People 
living in the North had no contact 
with the "peculiar institution" of 
slavery except through the 
media, including extremely emo- 
tional books like Uncle Tom's 
Cabin. Southerners, assaulted by 
the inflammatory rhetoric in the 
northern press, became irra- 
tionally defensive. The real issue 
was the 10th Amendment and the 
rights of states to self-govern- 
ment. The abolitionist press 



primed the nation for an almost 
holy crusade, either for or against 
slavery. 

In more modem times, the 
media was almost entirely 
responsible for the collapse of 
support for the American war 
effort in Vietnam. In this case, it 
was television more than news- 
papers that contributed to the 
change in public mood. The 
evening news brought the horror 
of war right into the American 
living room. Media attention to 
segregation and the reality of 
blacks in America was instru- 
mental in the momentum and 
achievements of the civil rights 
movement. 

Today's issues and concerns are 
also developed by the media. 
Issues such as global warming, 
economic globalization, and gay 
rights have litde direct impact on 
the average American. Yet there 
is constant media attention for 
these, and other, "politically cor- 
rect" issues. The news media are 
actively, for whatever reason, 
turning the public's attention 
away from one group of issues 
and toward another. 

As responsible citizens, we 
must be constantly aware of the 
media's ability to manipulate the 
debate. We must be well enough 
informed to understand when 
issues are truly important and 
when they are issues on someone 
else's agenda. Real and relevant 
issues, issues that directly affect 
the well-being of Americans, fair 
and honestly presented, would 
prove the social value of the 
"Gatekeeper" role for the media. 
Emphasis on non-issues, or on 
issues that do not direcUy effect 
the average citizen, suggest that 
the media is functioning as an 
agent of propaganda. A well 
informed and well-educated pop- 
ulace must be able to distinguish 
between the two and act accord- 
ingly. 

John Gerow is a Freshman 
Communication Major. 




Editorial 



"// is the little 

things in life that 

make you who you 



are. 



» 



Danielle Hock, Advertising Sales 



As I sat in class today, my pro- 
fessor made a quote that will 
stick with me forever. He said, 
"one can always get more money, 
but one can never get another 
day." 

That really hit borne, and I 
began thinking about how much 
the litde things in life really 
mean. It is those little things that 
I will remember forever. About 
three weeks ago, my cousin 
called me from Tennessee to say 
"hello." She went on to say that 
her two-year old son missed me 
and kept asking for me. 
This was shocking since I hadn't 
seen him in six months. This 
made my entire day. 

A year ago I was working at 
The Junior Olympics with Karen 
and Tracy from the Chamber of 
Commerce, and they brought me 
to tears. They introduced me to 
the Pirate Parrot. The child in me 
took over as I began clapping and 
jumping up and down. For the 
whole day, nothing brought me 
down off of my high. 

So what do these two examples 
have to do with anything? Well, 
as I grow older, I become more 



aware of events I had never seen 
when I was younger. Although, I 
have no children, I can see where 
a parent feels unconditional love. 
I understand why my mother 
used to love receiving homemade 
gifts. I understand why my father 
would do just about anything for 
me. 

It is the little things in life that 
make you who you are. 

Sure, money is nice, but money 
can't create the happiness felt 
when I found out that I was going 
to be introduced to the Pirate 
Parrot. It can't compare to the 
perma-smile I had while talking 
to my baby cousin. Money can't 
replace lost time, and it can't 
replace quality-time spent with 
friends and family. 

As you complete this semester, 
whether or not you are graduat- 
ing, keep in mind that you only 
have one life, and it is up to you 
how you decide to live it. If you 
zero in on all of the negatives, 
you will miss out on what really 
counts-the little things. 

Danielle Hock is a Senior 
Marketing and French Major. 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith GwiUim 

Asst. Sports Editor: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Asst. Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Asst. Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Copy and Design Assistants: Ryan Camuso and Wendy Stivers 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
Staff Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Mike Markewinskl, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, Kelly Palma, 
Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker, Jeff Chaffee, Mike Cody, 
James Gates, Keith Gwillim, Lori Imbrugno, James Paige, Janet Pazsink, Cory 
Pittman, Jason Rhoades, Jerry Collier, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob Meyers, 
Marvin Wells 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tun Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Drayton, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Julie 
Lope, Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, 
Alvin Slaughter 

Circulation Staff: Shane Bednez, John Dellkh, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
lbinson. Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 
Proofreaders: Dawn Koch, Niki Stediha, Brooke Rinier, Stephanie Apter 



October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



Beginning this semester, advertisers will be charged for ordering an ad, 
regardless of whether or not they meet The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 



44 



READER RESPONSE 



I would publicly like to admonish this organization for promoting 

intolerance toward a way of life..." 



Dear Editor, 

On Monday, September 21, 
Koinonia Intervarsity Christian 
Fellowship presented Eric Harrah 
to speak about how he had sup- 
posedly been saved from his 
lifestyle as an abortionist and 
homosexual, an event that has 
proven to be the last straw for 
me. 

Unable to accept any more 
homophobia issuing from 
Koinonia and it's speakers, I 
would like to publicly admonish 
this organization for promoting 
intolerance toward a way of life 
and a sector of the population 
that has taken far too much 
oppression. Essentially, I feel 
that this fundamentalist Christian 
club needs to be reminded of the 
need to love one's neighbor and 
accept ways of life that are differ- 
ent from one's own, and that the 
student body needs to know that 
religiously-justified bigotry is 
still ugly, damaging bigotry. 

As many people may remem- 
ber, earlier this spring, several of 
the Christian groups organized a 
Christian conference that fea- 
tured several religious work- 
shops, including a speech by a 



man who claimed to have been 
cured from AIDS and of his "sin- 
ful" gay lifestyle by the influence 
of God. Not only did he associate 
the gay lifestyle with rape in his 
speech (claiming that he first 
developed homosexual desires 
while being molested by another 
male,) but with gay prostitution, 
promiscuity, drug use, contrac- 
tion of the AIDS virus, and gen- 
eral spiritual decadence, qualities 
that are no more universal to the 
homosexual lifestyle than they 
are to the heterosexual lifestyle. 
But, of course, the influence of 
Christianity and the love of the 
right woman supposedly "cured" 
him of his homosexuality, which 
only served to reinforce the 
stereotype that people are gay or 
lesbian because they are spiritu- 
ally corrupt. 

Although a few friends and I 
who attended the speech doubted 
the man's honesty, given that his 
conversation story had too many 
contradictions to be believeable, 
I was still angered by the way he 
described the homosexual 
lifestyle in such overly negative 
and unrealistic terms. Most 
homosexual people do not live 




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1 Block off Main Street 

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Letters 

to 

the 
Editor 



lifestyles of rampant promiscuity, 
drug use, or prostitution-no more 
than the majority of heterosexu- 
als-and they often find solid love 
and companionship in monoga- 
mous relationships. Apparently, 
last spring's speaker was 
unaware of this knowledge or 
deliberately chose to ignore it. 

This was my first real taste of 
the Koinonia-rooted homophobia 
on campus, and just when I 
thought it would be my last, I dis- 
covered that Koinonia had invit- 
ed Eric Harrah, a supposedly 
reformed homosexual and abor- 
tionist, to speak. I was angered 
by Harrah's biased opinions of 
the abortion industry. But what 
angered me even more was how 
he instructed the audience to deal 
with homosexuals who they 
know. He agreed with boycotting 
Disney movies because they 
sponsored employee "Gay Days" 
at their theme parks. Finally, he 
had reinforced the audience's 
stereotypes by claiming that he 
had been a drag queen. 

My main criticism of Koinonia 
is that they have shown such a 
negative one-sided view of the 
gay and lesbian community. I 



have talked to many homosexual 
people and found that they have 
the same capacity for love, com- 
panionship, and spiritual under- 
standing as we heterosexuals do. 
They have the same loves, fears, 
ambitions, and quirks as we do, 
making them just as human and 
worthy of respect and tolerance 
as any member of the human 
race. I am sick and tired of seeing 
religious fundamentalists on 
campus wearing t-shirts with slo- 
gans like "Don't come out of the 
closet. Stay in and clean it up!" 
(And you know who you are. 

Koinonia, leave these people 
alone! If you wish to believe that 
homosexuality is a sin, fine! You 
are fully entitled to your opinion, 
but you do not have the right to 
publicly condemn their way of 
life and, in the process, promote 
what is plain and simple bigotry. 
Please, in the name of unity and 
tolerance, stop glorifying Christ 
and start emulating him, and try 
to accept the homosexual people 
for who they are and who they 
love. 

Sincerely, 
Angeline J. Binick 

Student 



CUP WELCOMES 
BLUES TRAVELER 

The band will Play in TiPPin Gym 

on October 13 at 7 p.m. Tickets are 
$10 for CUP students and $15 for 
non-students. They can be pur- 
chased at the information desk in 
Gemmed. A valid ID will be needed 
at the door. All tickets will be $15 
the day of the show. Questions? Call 

UAB at 226-2312! 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 1. 1998 



READER RESPONSE 



This situation is really disturbing, not only to 
me,but to others as well." 



♦Please note that this Letter to 
the Editor was written last semes- 
ter and due to space was not pub- 
lished until now 4 ' 
Dear Editor, 

Hello, my name is Laura 
McNally, and I am a freshman 
communication major. I guess 
that you could say that I have a 
gripe to voice. Recently, I was at 
the cafeteria (good old 
Chandler), and I noticed that 
there was a cockroach crawling 
around in the beverage area. The 
next day, there was the same type 
of bug in a food container at the 
salad bar. 

Obviously, there are many 
problems that go along with a sit- 
uation like this. Not only is it 
absolutely disgusting.but it is 
unhealthy. You would be sur- 
prised as to how much someone 
could be at a health risk by just 
being in contact with cockroach- 
es. Perhaps if someone took the 
initiative to solve this, less peo- 
ple on campus would be sick. We 



all know that cockroaches carry 
several diseases. 

We have all heard the phrase, 
"where there is one, there are 
many," when it comes to these 
crawling critters. We are also all 
aware of the fact that where there 
is food.there are bugs. However, 
there is an easy solution to this! If 
the people at Chandler and 
Gemmell Snack Bar invested in 
food covers, perhaps this would 
eliminate actual contact with the 
food from the bugs. Granted, it 
may be an expensive hassle, but I 
would rather the money be spent 
than eat food in which cock- 
roaches have played. 

This situation is really disturb- 
ing, not only to me, but to other 
students as well. Other people, 
including myself, have filled out 
comment forms in the cafeteria 
regarding this situation. The peo- 
ple at Chandler do not seem very 
eager to assess this problem. 
Perhaps if the Health Department 
was notified, they would be more 



willing to cooperate. 
Sincerely, 
Laura McNally 




tUGdifai, 



Helpful Hints for the College Student 



TO: Clarion University Students 
FROM: Student Activities Office 

SUBJECT: Change of 
Loading/Unloading Site for Friday 
charter fo Pittsburgh 

The County Trails Charter Bus that 
Picks up students on Fridays and trav- 
els fo Pittsburgh has changed its load- 
ing/unloading site due to the new con- 
struction. Beginning this Friday 
("October 2J, the bus will load in front 
of TiPPin Cym and unload there on its 
return Sunday evenings. 



Nothing else has changed as far as 
the schedule, so please tell your 
friends. 



Students deal with balancing homework and a job 



by Christine Tatum 

Courtesy of College Press 

Service. 

Claire Weingarden, a sopho- 
more at Syracuse University, 
doesn't want the responsibilities 
of a part-time job while in col- 
lege. Her parents also discourage 
the idea, hoping that a scholar- 
ship, federal loan, and the money 
she saves from summer jobs will 
cover most of her expenses. 
While many of her friends work 
odd jobs to make ends meet, 
Weingarden, a journalism major, 
writes for the newspaper and a 
national collegiate news service. 
"I think at the very beginning it 
would have been especially 
stressful to have had a job," she 
said. 

On the other hand, Marcus 
Bischel, a sophomore at the 
University of Missouri, needed to 
find work soon after arriving on 
campus. He landed a clerical 
position, working ten to twelve 
hours a week in the university's 
alumni center, to help his parents 
cover the costs of tuition and 
spending money. The job never 
got in "the way of studies, he said. 



"I also learned how to type bet- 
ter," Bishel added. " I have orga- 
nizational skills, and I know how 
to interact in a business setting- 
something I was clueless about 
before." 

Despite choosing different 
paths, Weingarden and Bischel 
have struck a healthy balance 
between work and study that 
eludes many students, said 
Jacqueline E. King, director of 
federal policy analysis at the 
American Council on Education. 

According to ACE, eight out of 
ten students work while pursuing 
an undergraduate degree. Full- 
time employees who also attend 
college-primarily an older crowd 
enrolled in school part-time make 
up about a third of working 
undergraduates. The other two- 
thirds of the working undergrad- 
uate population are under the age 
of 24, enrolled in school full time 
and toiling an average of 25 
hours a week. 

It's the younger crowd King 
especially worries about. Their 
primary reason for working so 
hard outside of the classroom is 
admirable: they want to avoid 
borrowing student loans or at 



least reduce the need for them. Of 
students attending public, four- 
year institutions in 1995-96, the 
ACE reported that 40 percent did 
not borrow any money for school 
but worked 15 hours or more a 
week. 

At the same time, many of those 
students harmed their chances for 
academic success and, ironically, 
also increased their student loan 
debt, King said. 

"A lot of research has shown 
that students who work 15 hours 
a week or less actually do better 
in school than those who don't," 
she said. "They leam a variety of 
skills including time manage- 
ment, make friends, and feel con- 
nected to campus quickly. 

"But working while in school 
turns into a big negative for most 
students when they get above 15 
to 20 hours a week," she added. 
"Their grades suffer or they wind 
up dropping (academic) hours, 
thinking that working more will 
help them pay for school. What 
they don't seem to realize is that 
the longer they stay in school, the 
more money they may have to 
borrow. There's also an opportu- 
nity cost in terms of the higher 



income students could have had 
sooner if they had only dropped 
some of their work hours, come 
up with a borrowing strategy, 
persisted and finished school as 
soon as possible." 

The bottom line, King said, is 
that it's better to borrow reason- 
able amounts than to work long 
hours. 

"Borrowing doesn't seem to 
have a negative impact on stu- 
dents' ability to finish college or 
their academic success," she said. 
"In fact, they're just as likely to 
graduate as those students who 
don't (borrow money from 
school). And students who 
default on their loans are almost 
exclusively those who failed to 
graduate. 

"I am not suggesting that every- 
one run out and apply for student 
loans, " she continued. "But I am 
saying that students and their par- 
ents need to come up with a strat- 
egy that makes sense right from 
the very beginning." 

Decisions about whether stu- 
dents should work while enrolled 
are highly personal and individ- • 
ual, university officials say. But 
most agree that for those who 



choose to work, jobs on campus 
and school work-study programs 
are more student-friendly than 
off-campus opportunities. It's 
also wise, school officials say, for 
parents to closely monitor their 
child's credit-card spending, or 
discourage them from even hav- 
ing one. 

"Many students wouldn't even 
be working if it weren't for their 
credit card debt," said Anna 
Griswold, assistant vice provost 
for student aid at Pennsylvania 
State University. "But that is 
another story all together." 



COMM 

STUDENTS- 

(f you worked on 
The Call staff last 
semester and have 
yet fo get a co-cur- 

ricular, contact 
Krisfen at the Call 
Office, at x2380. 



October 1. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 






NEWSWIRE 



Allocation questioned 

A motion to allocate over 

$5,000 to the CSA for 

their 50th anniversary 

celebration led to a 

spirited debate at 

Monday's Student Senate 

meeting. 

For the whole story , 

see page 6. 



Journalist visits CU 

Juan Williams, well- 
known journalist, came to 
Clarion on Tuesday to 
speak to students, as the 
Martin Luther King 
Speaker Series began. 
Turn to page 9. 



State System allows 
distance education 
credits to be reduced 

Clarion University, along 

with the 13 other SSHE 

schools, have been given 

the power by the State 

System to reduce the cost 

of distance education 

credits for non-resident 

students. 

For the full story, 

see page 6. 



New courses added 

Two new courses have 

been added recently for 

students. To learn more 

about the new radiological 

sciences program, 

turn to page 8. 

To leam more about Dr. 
Susan Hilton's interactive 
multimedia class, 
see page 9. 



Also inside: 

Public Safety page 7 



NEWS TIPS?? 

Phone: 226-23X0 
FAX: 226-2557 
E-mail: CALLCaclarion.edu 



NEWS 



Students concerned about upcoming 
renovations to Chandler Dining Hall 



by Mark Strieker 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Preliminary work has begun on 
the renovation of Chandler Dining 
Hall. 

Two bathrooms are currently 
being renovated and the large 
windows on the Ralston side of 
the hall have been bricked over in 
preparation for next semester's 
dining hall renovation. 

Students frequenting the dining 
hall received a memo detailing 
changes for next semester. Only 
two of the existing food lines will 
be open and the only entrance to 
the building will be from the 
Ballentine side. 

Dr. George Curtis, Vice 
President for Student Affairs, said 
the break between fall and spring 
semester is really the only break 
long enough for necessary demo- 
lition to occur. The wall currently 
separating the food lines will be 
removed to allow for wraparound 
food court stations. 

Curtis said the project should be 
complete in time for 1999 sum- 
mer programs. He also said that 
even though there will only be 
two existing lines, Chartwells will 
provide more buffet lines and 
other options in the dining rooms 




Jolina Giaramita/Clarion Call 
Lines at the Chandler Dining Hall are only expected to 
lengthen as renovations get underway both inside and out- 
side the building. The work is expected to be completed 
sometime in the summer of 1999. 

themselves. Both dining rooms being able to enter the hall 

will remain open and no work will through the Ballentine entrance, 

be done next semester on the two There will only be one line into 

rooms. Dining room windows the hall, but more than one ID 

and wall coverings will be scanner will be in operation, 

replaced at a later time. The renovation plan involves 

Curtis said that crowding in the opening up the food service area 

cafeteria is "never as bad in the to create a food court atmosphere, 

spring." However, he also said All food will be served at stations 

tour groups and visitors will con- located on the Ralston side of the 

tinue to use the hall. Curtis said building. New restrooms will 

there really is no other option for replace the restrooms displaced 

the scheduling of the renovation, by the wall's removal. Money for 

"If we had an alternative facility, the project comes from $800,000 

we would have shut down originally provided by DAKA 

(Chandler)." and money from reserves. 

The biggest complaint Curtis When the University re-bid for 

feels students will have is only the food service contract two 



years ago, prospective companies 
were told to submit a plan for the 
renovation of the dining hall. 
DAKA Restaurants was selected 
and the design is based on their 
proposal which stemmed from a 
partnership with an architectural 
construction and design firm out 
of Baltimore. DAKA's parent 
company was acquired by 
Compass Group USA. Chartwells 
is Compass's food service divi- 
sion for elementary schools and 
colleges. 

Bonny Spence, chair of the 
Student Senate dining committee, 
said, "some students are wary" of 
the renovation. 

Jeffrey Ahlberg, a freshman 
music education major, said, "It's 
going to take half an hour to get in 
(to the dining hall)." 

Susan Opat, a sophomore early 
and elementary education major, 
said, "It will be very inconvenient 
because it will be time-consuming 
waiting for our meals, especially 
around noon time." 
Crystal Kelley, a sophomore ele- 
mentary and special education 
major, said, "It's going to be diffi- 
cult for people with classes an 
hour apart to be able to get lunch." 



After tabling the motion two weeks ago 



Faculty Senate votes to appoint Nair to committee 



by Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Dr. Donald Nair of Counseling 
Services was named to the 
Faculty Senate Committee on 
Academic Standards at Monday's 
meeting, despite concerns from 
several members. 

Senate voted 11-7-4 to appoint 
Nair to that committee, which 
advises Faculty Senate on matters 
relating to academic achievement, 
grading systems, standards of 
scholarship, graduation, and terms 
and conditions of academic pro- 
bation and reinstatment. 

According to the bylaws, the 
Committee on Academic 
Standards also has the authority to 
act on individual problems of 



admissions, readmission, and 
reinstatement referred to it by the 
Office of the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs, faculty mem- 
bers or students. 

During their Sept. 14 meeting, 
Senate voted to table Nair's 
appointment to the committee 
pending further discussion. 
Discussion Monday focused pri- 
marily on ethical and profession- 
alism of any counselor or faculty 
member serving on a committee 
that could potentially make any 
student feel uncomfortable. 

Certain members of Faculty 
Senate were not convinced that 
having a counselor serve on the 
committee was appropriate, which 
brought Dr. Mary Jo Reef, chair, 
to call for the vote. 



Although the controversial think 
tank report conducted by the 
Commonwealth Foundation in 
Harrisburg has been pushed to the 
back burner for now, it has not 
gone unnoticed by Clarion 
University's faculty. President 
Diane Reinhard told Senate she 
will be meeting with the General 
Education Committee to discuss 
the report further. 

In the report, it implies that the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) universities along with 
Penn State, Temple, Lincoln, and 
the University of Pittsburgh are 
"failing to provide Pennsylvania 
students with the fundamentals of 
a college education." 

In other business, Dr. Elizabeth 
McDaniel, chair of the Committee 



on Courses and Programs of 
Study (CCPS), recommended and 
was granted approval of two new 
classes. The classes are BIOL 
175: Conservation and Box Turtle 
Biology and BIOL 224: Human 
Biology. McDaniel said that these 
classes will be added to the 
General Education roster. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, Chair of 
Faculty Affairs, reported on 
Clarion University's new Faculty 
Mentoring Program. She said this 
program gives new faculty mem- 
bers a chance to pair up with a 
senior faculty member and get 
acquainted with available 
resources and professional devel- 
opment. 

continued on page 6 



• 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 



At Monday nights Student Senate meeting 



Money on hold for CSA 50th 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

A motion to allocate $5,500 to 
the Clarion Students Association 
(CSA) 50th Anniversary Planning 
Committee came under fire at 
Monday night's Student Senate 
meeting. 

Senate vice president Nathan 
Rearick, the chair of the planning 
committee, approached his col- 
leagues for the funding in order to 
finish making plans for the CS A's 
50th anniversary celebration, 
scheduled for Oct. 9-11. 

In particular, the funds request- 
ed from the supplemental reserve 
account were to be used to pur- 
chase food for a barbecue at the 
Moore Hall lawn on Sunday, Oct. 

11. 

Questions were raised when 

Senate treasurer Leslie Suhr, 
moved to allocate the funds with 
the stipulation that they be used 
only if the barbecue is open to all 
students. 




Jolina Giaramita/Ciarion Call 
Student Senate met Monday night to discuss several 
issues, most importantly the changes in the parking 
situation. Senate also allocated funds during the meeting, 
as well. 



Rearick responded that if the 
event was open to the student 
body, it would be "almost impos- 
sible" to provide food for every- 
one. To that note, Suhr fired back 
that of the many letters that were 



16-1-0 to table that motion until 
Oct. 5. 

In other business, Clarion 
University president Diane 
Reinbard spoke to Senate and 
welcomed the new members. She 



sent to former Senators, only four also addressed the parking prob- 

responses were received. lem that was only exacerbated by 

Senator Mellon moved that the the closing of Parking Lot B on 

motion be tabled until the next Monday morning, 

meeting and Senate agreed, voting Several Senators inquired about 



the Student Recreation Center 
construction plans and offered 
possible ideas as to how to allevi- 
ate the parking situation. 
Reinhard said that the construc- 
tion of the new Rec Center will 
enable the University to better 
compete with other schools in the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE). 

Provost/Vice President for 
Academic Affairs Dr. John Kuhn 
also spoke to Senate, asking them 
to look over a proposed academic 
calendar for 2000-2001. He 
encouraged Senate to look at 
making possible changes to the 
calendar, such as shortening the 
time period between fall and 
spring semesters as well as possi- 
bly combining the two breaks that 
occur during the spring semester. 
Another topic of concern for 
Kuhn was the summer class 
schedule. He noted that other 
schools run courses on different 
schedules. Clarion University's 
current summer classes run on a 



3-week pre-session and two five 
week sessions. 

Kuhn added that suggestions will 
be taken regarding changing the 
summer schedule to two sessions, 
one three- week and one six week, 
or three sessions, a three-week, a 
five-week, and another three- 
week session to round out the 
summer. 

Senators Augustine, Hussain, 
and Chervenak decided to meet 
sometime this week to look over 
the calendar draft and offer more 
feedback to Dr. Kuhn at next 
week's meeting. 

Finally, the Clarion University 
Cheerleaders were allocated 
$2,850 from the capital account in 
order for them to purchase a new 
inflatable Golden Eagle mascot. 

Both Nick Chervenak and cheer- 
leading sponsor Jamie Bero- 
Johnson were on hand to answer 
Senate questions about the alloca- 
tion. 

They said the new mascot "will 
benefit all Clarion students." 



Trustees approve $53 million budget 



(continued from page 1) 

academic year. 

"We accomplished the budget 
reductions through the elimina- 
tion of vacant regular positions 
and temporary positions whenev- 
er possible," she said. 

"We have also started the real- 
location of funds from personnel 
compensation to the operating 
budget so that by the end of a 
five-year period the personnel 
compensation amount will equal 
80 percent of the budget or less." 
Out of the $53.3 million operat- 
ing budget, 53.81 percent will be 
used for instructional activities, 
0.27 percent will go to public ser- 
vice, 10.27 percent will go to aca- 



demic support, 9.02 percent has 
been allocated for student ser- 
vices, 14.2 percent is earmarked 
for institutional administration, 
11.05 percent will be used for 
physical plant operations, and 
1.39 percent for scholarships and 
fellowships. 

Also, president Diane Reinhard 
said that CU is moving ahead with 
new budget planning, showing a 
more multi-year process. 

She added that a special budget 
issues paper is in the works to be 
distributed to the University com- 
munity concerning budget back- 
ground as well as long-term bud- 
geting needs. 



Some of the goals in preparing 
the 1998-99 fiscal year University 
operating budget were: develop- 
ing a balanced budget; increasing 
funding for University operating 
budgets by the rate of inflation 
(3.0 percent) since funding has 
not kept pace with costs. 

Other goals in preparing the 
budget were reducing personnel 
versus operating budgets to meet 
the required budget reductions 
given the need to increase operat- 
ing budgets long term and provid- 
ing funds required to meet new 
technology demands. 



Faculty Senate approves 
Nair's appointment 



(continued from page 5) 

Five sessions have been devel- 
oped to execute this program. 
The first two sessions have 
already been held. The third ses- 
sion, Staying on the Tenure Track: 
Promotion and Tenure at Clarion, 
is set for Oct. 14. Two other ses- 
sions will be held for the program 
in February and March. 

Savage also announced three 
individuals who have been nomi- 
nated to serve on the Honors 
Council. The Council is a group 
of University faculty and admin- 
istrators who represent various 
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guide and support the growth of 
the Honors program. CurrrenUy, 
the Council has 11 members and 
is looking to add Dr. Ralph Leary 
of the English department, 
appointed to CU's faculty in 
1989. 

The other two faculty members 
nominated for the Honors Council 
are Dr. Carole Anderson of the 
Administrative Sciences depart- 
ment, a faculty member since 
1990, and Dr. Julia Bartkowiak of 
the Philosophy department, 
appointed to Clarion's faculty 
since 1992. 

Faculty Senate will conduct a 
policy meeting Monday, Oct. 5 at 
3:30 p.m. in B-8 Hart Chapel. 
Their next regularly scheduled 
meeting has been scheduled for 
Monday, Oct, 12 at 3:30 p.m. and 
they will meet in B-8 Hart 
Chapel. 



October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 




Underage drinking 

Carl Benedict, 20, of 1205-C 
Leatherwood Drive was cited 
for underage drinking on Sept. 
27, according to Public Safety. 



Alarm activated 

Public Safety reported that 
someone activated the fire alarm 
in Ralston Hall sometime on 
Sept. 26. 



Disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety, a 
student reported being harassed 
by other students while in the 
Carlson Library Classroom 
sometime on Sept. 24. 



Criminal mischief 

Public Safety is investigating a 
report of criminal mischief that 
occurred in Campbell Hall to 
one of that hall's residents on 
Sept. 17. 



DUI arrest 

Graig Farrel of 346 Wilkinson 
Hall was arrested on Sept. 18 
for DUI on campus. He was 
charged under Pennsylvania's 
zero-tolerance law for operating 
a vehicle with any alcohol in his 
system. 

Other charges against Farrel 
include reckless driving and 
underage drinking, Public Safety 
reported. 



'Safe schools' discussed at 
summit downlink held at CU 



by Mike Markewinski 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Helping local school adminis- 
trators and educators combat the 
issue of school violence was the 
focus of the Safe Schools Summit 
Downlink, held last week on 
Clarion University's campus. 

Pennsylvania governor Tom 
Ridge was one of the participants 
in the summit, which consisted of 
the satellite downlink and a fol- 
low-up discussion to the program. 
Ridge delivered a powerful 
statement on the problem of 
school violence when describing 
the problem of school violence. 

"Violence is not simply a prob- 
lem found in our large and urban 
schools; it exists in all schools 
throughout our state," he said. 
"Last year, the Pennsylvania 
Commission on Crime and 
Delinquency surveyed sixth, sev- 
enth, ninth and twelfth-grade stu- 
dents about topics such as alcohol 
and drug consumption and vio- 
lence. The PCCS found that 
almost half of the students sur- 
veyed were involved in a physical 
fight during the past year." 

Ridge added, "Sadly, one out of 
12 students carried a weapon to 
school at least once in the year 
before the survey." 

One goal of Uie Safe Schools 
Summit was to heighten aware- 
ness among local leaders regard- 
ing the important intervention 
strategies aimed at reducing youth 
violence. 

Dr. William Kaufman, superin- 
tendent for the Clarion Area 
School District, said, "In the past 
we ignored the idle threats caused 
by frustration, but now we take 
them seriously." 

The summit provided ways to 
educators ways to combat the 
problem by demonstrating how 
programs developed in certain 
troubled areas of Pennsylvania 
have combatted or have managed 
to help control violence in 



schools. 

The Wilkinsburg School District 
in Allegheny County has devel- 
oped a program entitled 
"Communities that Care" which 
evolved through the leadership of 
the CTC thtough the Hosanna 
House, an established outreach 
center located near the center of 
Wilkinsburg. 

As a result of the program's 
implementation, the school 
increased its attendance by 25 
percent and helped to establish a 
supportive relationship with at 
least 50 middle school children 
with achievements and behavioral 
indicators of risk. 

The program also incorporates 
members of the community and 
75 volunteers from the University 
of Pittsburgh education depart- 
ment to work with troubled 
youths to prevent incidents like 
the shooting of a teacher in 
Edinboro last spring. 

During the local portion of the 
summit, educators from the sur- 
rounding schools collaborated and 
held a panel discussion on the 
issue. 

Questions were raised about 
what causes violence. While a 
majority of the panelists blamed 
the lack of time parents are home 
with their children or the time 
children spend home alone, Dr. 
Kaufman blamed the decline of 
society by not intilling common 
courtesy in children either in the 
home or in the learning environ- 
ment. 

James Howell, director of the 
International Society of Crime 
Prevention Practicioners, has also 
discussed this issue. "Television 




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Educators from both Clarion University and Clarion area 
schools met to discuss preventing school violence at the 
Safe School Summit Downlink, held last week at Gemmell 
Student Complex. 

plays a role in violence among While many school districts, 
children," he said. 'TV shows both local and statewide, develop 
often do not depict reality of tailor-made program for each, the 
shootings and their aftermath. A Pennsylvania legislature has corn- 
child may see this but the conse- pleted and passed the Safe 
quences are not shown, nor is the Schools Act. This act applies to 
grieving process following the the public school system and is 
event." made up of Act 26, passed in 
"Being a rural school district, 1995, and Act 30, passed in 1997. 
we have less of a problem than These acts prohibit possesion of 
you would find in an urban or city weapons in schools and establish 
school," Kaufman said. "Before the Office of Safe Schools within 
we would have taken things for the Department of Education, 
granted, but now we are taking The acts also set forth reporting 
steps to prevent the violence." requirements of incidents of vio- 

He added that a peer mediation lence and weapons possession and 

program is being formed with the provides for transfer, maintanance 

help of the Clarion University and availability of school records, 

education department. Currently, Governor Ridge said, "Ensuring 

he said the program is in a devel- that our schools are safe havens 

opment stage. are a priority for my administra- 

"A few years ago, before all the tion. Our students deserve to 

violence came to light, a guidance learn and grow in a place that is 

counselor in the high school was safe. And our parents deserve to 

developing a peer mediation know that for a moment their kids 

plan," Kaufman noted. "When he step on the school bus, they are 

died, the plan did, too." protected from danger." 



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Page 8 



The ClaHnn Call 



October 1,1998 



SSHE gives universities the power 
to reduce distance education credits 



by Elisabeth Navarra 
Clarion Call News Writer 



The State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) has given 
Clarion University the power to 
reduce the tuition rate for all dis- 
tance education classes. 

As of now, the University has 
yet to put that power into use. 

In early July, the SSHE Board of 
Governors said that all 14 state- 
owned universities can reduce the 
tuition on distance education 
classes. According to Dr. Arthur 
Acton, dean of Clarion 
University's Venango campus in 
Oil City, "As of the moment, all 
classes are at the same rate (as last 
academic year)." 

Distance education classes are 
conducted through interactive 
video. They are classes in which 
the students and instructor are not 
in the same location while the 
class is being conducted. "It's a 
real time interaction," Acton said. 

The classes involved the use of 
videotape, cable television or cor- 
respondence courses. 

The motive behind offering dis- 
tance education classes, Acton 
said, is to "offer classes at remote 
locations where we couldn't 
afford to send an instructor." 
Right now, there are 10 courses 
being offered with five more 
added in the spring. Last year, 
approximately 400 Clarion stu- 
dents were enrolled in distance 



education classes. 

Currently, the students enrolled 
in these classes pay the same per- 
credit rate as students that attend 
classes on campus. Pennsylvania 
residents pay $144 per credit for 
all undergraduate courses. They 
pay $193 per credit for graduate 
courses. All non-Pennsylvania 
residents pay $368 a credit for 
undergraduate courses and $346 
for graduate courses. 

Rates for nonresidents could 
change if the new policy is adopt- 
ed. They could pay as little as 
$147 a credit for some classes. 
The policy also allows university 
presidents to make a proposal to 
SSHE Chancellor James H. 
McCormick in which rates for 
Pennsylvania residents could be 
lowered for some classes. 

The reason for adopting the new 
policy is simple. "As the oppor- 
tunities for distance education 
continue to expand, we want our 
institutions to be able to success- 
fully compete for students," 
McCormick said. 

Dr. Acton said that the policy 
"enables us to compete more 
effectively with other universi- 
ties." 

In order to reduce the tuition rate 
for some of the distance education 
classes, a request would have to 
come from the distance education 
department itself. 

According to Vice President for 
Finance and Administration Dr. 
Heather Haberaecker, "We would 



have to have a specific request 
made through Art Acton (director 
of the distance education pro- 
gram." 

No proposal has come out of the 
department thus far. 



owerrai 



The State System of 

Higher Education 

has given its 14 

universities the 

power to reduce the 

cost of credits for 

distance education 

courses. 

Non-PA residents 

Undergrad: $368/cr. 
Grad: $346/credit 

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New radiological sciences 
degree being offered at 
Venango campus 



by Elisabeth Navarra 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Starting this fall, students at 
Clarion University have another 
career opportunity from which to 
choose. 

The newest degree added to the 
curriculum at Venango campus is 
one in radiological sciences. 

An agreement was made 
between the Venango campus and 
Northwest Medical Center and 
agreed upon in March by the 
Clarion University Council of 
Trustees. The State System of 
Higher Education (SSHE) Board 
of Governors gave their approval 
to the new program back in April. 

According to information from 
University Relations, radiological 
sciences is a four-year program 
that requires 68 credits in general 
education courses, along with 60 
credits of clinical radiological 
work. That work must be com- 
pleted at the Northwest Medical 
Center School of Radiological 
Technology, which is accredited 
by the Joint Review Committee 
on Educational Programs in 
Radiological Technology 

(JRCERT). 

The program will be imple- 
mented in the University's depart- 
ments of nursing and biology, 
with most of the courses being 
offered at the Venango campus 
because it is near Northwest 
Medical Center. 

Dr. Terry Morrow of the biolo- 



gy department said, "The biology 
department was glad to be a part 
of the program and we are hope- 
ful it will be a good, productive 
program for the University." 

He said most of the students 
currently enrolled in the program 
are at the Venango campus, but 
that the departments at main cam- 
pus are prepared to teach students 
if needed. 

The release from the relations 
office also states that most of the 
cost for implementing this pro- 
gram will fall on the Medical 
Center or other participating 
health facilities which will pro- 
vide the medical and radiological 
services, as well as any faculty. 

Additional sections of general 
education courses may be needed 
to accommodate this program, 
depending upon the number of 
students who are enrolled. 

Studies have shown that the 
radiological sciences field has a 
great opportunity for growth 
throughout this decade. A 1993 
study conducted by the Hospital 
Council of Western Pennsylvania 
showed that radiological technol- 
ogy ranked fourth in the number 
of full-time positions. 

Results of the State Plan for 
Vocational and . Applied 
Technology Education later 
backed up those findings. That 
report identified radiological 
technology as having a projected 
growth rate of 44.4% during the 
1990's. 



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October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



MLK Speaker Series begins 



Civil Rights author 
opens 'Eyes' in Clarion 



by Leslie Suhr 

Clarion Call 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Juan Williams, one of the best 
known journalists in America, 
was the opening speaker for the 
1998-99 Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Committee Speaker Series which 
started Tuesday, September 29, 
1998. 

Williams is the author "Eyes on 
the Prize: America's Civil Rights 
Years 1954-1965." In his book, 
Williams dares to examine the 
black and white world of politics 
and race relations in America. 

Williams has been with The 
Washington Post for 16 years as 
an editorial writer, columnist, and 
White House correspondent. He 
is a guest commentator for CNN's 
"Crossfire" and ABC's 
"Nightline." 

Currently he is under commis- 
sion to write the authorized biog- 
raphy of the recently retired 
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood 
Marshall. 

Tuesday's event was opened by 
Mr. Rogers Laugand, Director of 
Minority Student Services at 
Clarion University. He stressed 
the importance of recognizing the 
diversity among student leaders 
and encouraged students to partic- 
ipate actively. 

Alvin Slaughter, a senior 
Communications major, was rec- 
ognized with the Minority Student 
of the Month award. 

At Tuesday's series, Williams 
spoke about the historical aspects 
of the Civil Rights Movement and 
related it to the present in which 
students need to demonstrate 
leadership qualities to promote 
racial relations. 

"Class plays into the racial divi- 
sion and puts strains on you and 
the leadership of the country," 
Williams said. 




Jolina Giaramita/Clarion Call 

Juan Williams spoke to Clarion students on Tuesday, Sept. 
29 as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Committee Speaker Series 
began another year of events. 

He compared it to the racial ten- there is the strong need to take off 

sions of the 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s the blinders and open our eyes to 

and stressed the need for people to the world around us. 

further social justice. 'Today we need to act not as a 

He stressed that in the 1950s, melting pot, but as a salad bowl of 

school segregation was ended but many people blended together," 

segregation in other areas was still Williams said, 

a major focus area that would Several students asked questions 

carry itself into the 1960s. as to what they could do to partic- 

The 1960s brought about a ipate more actively in the commu- 

change among young Americans nity and be more aggressive stu- 

as participation in marches, ral- dent leaders. 



lies, and anti-war movements 
increased. 

"The assassination of Kennedy 
increased minority power and 
people had a lesser sense of equal- 
ity among race relations," 
Williams said. 



Williams urged students to 
determine their place in society 
and focus on what historical 
events have brought to the current 
focuses in the 1990s. 

The next event in the MLK 
Series will be held on Monday, 



During the 1970s the depression Oct. 12 when Carl Upchurch will 



paved the way for nationwide 
economic crisis. 

"The 1980s brought about a 
strict change as politics became 
more conservative and more 
aggressive toward the minority 
race," he added. 

Williams also said, "The 1990s 
are spent trying to figure out your 
role as Americans and the values 
that are needed to try to move for- 
ward." 

He went on to add that it is also 
immigration and class that affect 
the way people see themselves 
and the people around them and 



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what can be done to change the 
cycle of poverty, violence, and 
social decay. 



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New class makes students 
multimedia designers 



by Wendy Stivers 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Students in Dr. Susan Hilton's 
interactive multimedia class have 
an enormous task at hand. 

They have been selected by the 
Oil City Heritage Region to design 
and build a touch-screen informa- 
tional kiosk system as an economic 
development tool. 

According to Marilyn Black of the 
Heritage Region, "The system will 
enable tourists and residents to find 
out information, past and present, 
about surrounding areas and the oil 
heritage system," 

The Oil Heritage Region will use 
these indoor kiosk systems to help 
tourists and local individuals get 
news and knowledge of the area, 
Black said. 

The kiosks will be a multimedia 
format as opposed to one that just 
provides print information like 
brochures. The reason for using the 
multimedia design, Black said, 
would be used to enable the com- 
munity to find all of the information 
possible involving a particular sub- 
ject. The subjects include every- 
thing from lodging and recreation 
to historical sites, calendar events 
and museums. 

Dr. Hilton's class hopes to be able 

Now that you've had a 



to show the beauty of the region 
and satisfy the communities by dis- 
playing an actual representation of 
what the region is and looks like. 
They will use as many visual and 
sound effects as possible to show 
everything that the Oil Heritage 
Region has to offer. 

"The class also hopes to reach out 
to as many people as possible but 
specifically people who are more 
interested in outdoor recreation and 
ones that are more historically 
involved," Hilton said. 

"This is something I am very 
interested in," said Kelly Palma, 
one of the students in the class. 
"We are the guinea pigs for this and 
if the project goes well, then this 
could be the prototype for all of the 
historical regions of 

Pennsylvania... the start of some- 
thing very big." 

Another student, Charlie Desch, 
added, "I feel that this class will 
offer me the knowledge needed to 
impress potential employers while 
enjoying state-of-the-art facilities." 
Because of this project, the stu- 
dents were granted the use of a new 
design studio that is located in 
Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts Building. 
Those in the class also will receive 
a copy of the actual program on 
CD-ROM. 

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Page in 



The Clarion Call 



October 1,1 QQfi 



LIFEWIRE 



Autumn Leaf 

Festival wins 

award 

story continued 

from front page 

See page 11 



Katherine Farham 

to perform during 
A.L.R week 
See page 11 



Music Review 

Sunny Day Real 

Estate return with 

their first new 

album in three 

years 

see page 12 



Dave Barry 

examines why we 

shouldn't worry 

about the American 

economy 

See page 12 



Darrell 
Hammond 

star of Saturday 
Night Live to 
speak on the 

Clarion Campus, 

for details 

See page 13 



Calendar of 

Events 

For what's 

happening on and 

around 

campus and the 

community 

See page 13 



LIFESTYLES 



Dave Coleman treats Clarion to a romatic night out 

'Dating Doctor' cures Clarion 



by Lori Imbroglio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Have you ever wondered why 
men never call when they say 
they will or why women always 
go to the restroom in groups? 
Perhaps you are repeatedly dis- 
satisfied with your relationships 
and do not understand why you 
continue to move from one disas- 
trous relationship to the next? 
Whatever the case may be, 
"Dating Doctor" David Coleman 
may be the man to turn to for 
explanations and suggestions 
concerning this modern-day phe- 
nomenon called dating. 

In an effort to improve people's 
social skills and enhance their 
understanding of relationships, 
Coleman presented a "Creative 
Dating" program free to all 
Clarion students. In mis UAB 
event, he provided a wide variety 
of dating suggestions, explana- 
tions of puzzling behaviors of the 
opposite sex, and ways people 
can better understand them- 
selves. 

By using candy as a reward, 
Coleman was able to entice the 
audience to discuss with one 
another and address their ques- 




Dave Coleman 



tions and comments. 

As nearly one hundred students 
filed into the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room, they were hand- 
ed cards in which they wrote 
their ideal fantasy date along 
with the worst pick-up line ever 
used on them. Throughout the 
program, many of these cards 
were read as the audience roared 
in laughter. Fantasies included 
people ranging from firemen to 
famous television stars such as 
Xena the Warrior Princess. 

Coleman had students test their 
acceptance of criticism by hav- 
ing audience members air their 

complaints. In the two-minute 
time frame the criticized individ- 
uals were restricted from any 
form of communication. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

Dave Coleman interacts with students at his Creative 
Dating seminar. 



Once understanding between 
people is achieved, Coleman sug- 
gests that they become more 
advanced in their dating skills. 
To answer the question as to why 
people repeat poor relationships, 
he agrees with Richard Doyle in 
that "We seek out what is familiar 
to us, and we practice what we 
become good at." He informed 
the audience that people are crea- 
tures of their own habit and are 
comfortable around that which 
they are accustomed to. 

Other topics of Coleman's pro- 
gram included unique dating sug- 
gestions such as going to a 
stranger's wedding (he's actually 
done this), and ways to impress 
men or women. Be yourself. 

Along with performing at over 
1,500 campuses, Coleman has 
written top-selling books includ- 
ing his most recent release 101 
Great Dates. He also writes a 
weekly syndicated newspaper 
and magazine column and has 
made several radio and television 
appearances. 

Coleman has been featured in 
many publications such as 
Glamour and USA Today and has 
been honored the 1997 
Outstanding Lecture Entertainer 
of the Year by the National 
Association for Campus 
Activities (NACA). Campus 
Activities Today magazine has 
twice named Coleman the coun- 
try's best lecturer, and he is a 
finalist for the 1998 NACA and 
Campus Activities Today lecturer 
and entertainer of the year. 

Coleman uses his own methods 
and has been happily married for 
the past thirteen years. He 
encourages others to become dar- 
ing and remember the saying 
from Parker Lewis Can 't Lose, 
"If you ask them out, they might 
go out with you. If you don't ask 
them out, they'll never go out ' 
with you." 



A.LF. preview 

continued from front 

page 

Fried Chicken will sponsor a 
Kiddies Parade at 6 p.m. The 
Ambridge High School Steel 
Drum Ensemble will perform in 
front of the Courthouse from 7 
till 9 p.m. Runa Kuna will be 
performing in front of the court- 
house with traditional music 
from Latin America. Katherine 
Famham, 1989 Miss Teen A.L.F., 
will be performing at the Captain 
Loomis Restaurant from 8 till 9 
p.m. Karaoke, sponsored by 
Holiday Inn, will be featured 
Wednesday night from 8:30 to 
10:30 p.m. in front of the court- 
house. 

On Thursday October 8th, 
Susan Lowell, a 1998 Children's 
Choice Book award winning 
author will speak at Hart Chapel 
on the Clarion University 
Campus at 7 p.m. The 4th annu- 
al Clarion University and 
Community Cultural Night con- 
tinues in front of the courthouse 
featuring Native American 
dances, songs, and traditions. 

On Friday October 9th Bruce 
Weaver and Friends, a ventrilo- 
quist act, will be performing 
form 11 a.m. to 12 noon at the 
Clarion Free Library. Susan 
Lowell will be signing books 
from 11 a.m. till 12 noon at the 
Clarion Free Library. Farmers 
and Crafters day will be held in 
downtown Clarion from 8 a.m. 
till 5 p.m. The event which is 
sponsored by Wolf's Den 
Restaurant, Camping Resort, and 
Bed and Breakfast features over 
250 crafters selling their wares. 
The Cultural Music Fest contin- 
ues with Highland Bag Pipers of 
Grove City and Runa Kuna, from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. along Main 
Street. The Jock-Ular Juggler 
will be performing twice in front 
of the Courthouse at 1 and 3 p.m. 
The night will be concluded with 
the TCI teen dance from 8:30 
p.m. to 10:30 p.m. outside of the 
Courthouse. 

On Saturday the festivities are 
kicked off with the ever popular 
A..L.F. parade featuring floats 
from various organizations here 
on campus and from the commu- 
nity. The parade will also feature 
the Clarion University 
Homecoming court. The Clarion 
University Golden Eagles will 
host Edinboro at 2:00 p.m. at 
Memorial Stadium. 



Ortnhor 1.1998 



Thf Clarion Call 



Page 11 



Autumn Leaf 
Festival wins 
International 
award 

by Jeff Say 
Clarion Call Lifestyles Editor 

The International Festival and 
Events Association recently awarded 
Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival with 
two Pinnacle awards. The Autumn 
Leaf Festival won third place in the 
Grand Pinnacle category and second 
place for Best Overall Merchandising 
Program. 

After being awarded the grand prize 
the Autumn Leaf Festival was also 
honored by receiving a front page 
story in this past Friday's Wall Street 
Journal. 

Clarion Area Chamber of Business 
& Industry, the organizer of the event, 
Executive Director Karen M. Pope 
was among the representatives in 
Denver for the Autumn Leaf Festival 
Pope stated, 'Tm so overwhelmed, 
it's such an honor to be competing 
against the big companies." "The 
award goes to the whole community, 
the university and all the sponsors. 

The contest drew 1,200 entries from 
121 different event orginizatioas 
from around the world. Clarionwas 
one of the smallest in relation to the 
size of the community and to the size 
of the budget, but in spite of of it's 
size the Autumn Leaf Festival drew 
more people than some of the bigger 
festivals. According to Pope, the fes- 
tival had an attendance of half a mil- 
Hon people last year. 

Pope also said that the Pinnacle 
awards were a chance to gain world 
wide recognition for the community 
and the festival, and also a great 
chance to gain new ideas and sugges- 
tions from other communities. 

As for the success of ALP. Pope 
said, "It makes you feel good after all 
the hours the chamber and volunteers 
put into the festival. It makes it feel 
worthwhile." 



Former Miss Teen A.LF. 



Katherine Farnham to perform during A.L.F. 



by Jeff Say 

Clarion Call 

Lifestyles Editor 



Katherine Famham, a former Miss Teen 
A.L.F. will be performing on Wednesday 
October 7 at Mr. T's Nightclub, in the Captain 
Loomis Inn. Miss Farnham's act will feature 
songs from her CD For The Love Of It All as 
well as pop, jazz and blues favorites. 
Audiences in Clarion will hear her new mater- 
ial to be featured on an upcoming solo release 



Miss Famham, who 
won Miss Teen A.L.F. 
in 1989, is also a 1991 
Clarion Area High 
School graduate and a 
1996 summa cum laude 
graduate of Boston's 
Berklee College of 
Music. She currently 
resides in Miami 
Beach, Fla., where she 
performs locally and is Katherine Farnham 




a faculty member of the Sdoia-Satz Music 
Institute. 

She just returned from a mini-tour in Boston 
where she appeared at Ryles Jazz Club in 
Cambridge and made several appearances for 
local television and radio. 

Famham will also be appearing at the 
Clarion Rotary Club's luncheon on October 5 
and will present two in-store shows at 
Scarlett's Garden in Cranberry Mall on 
October 10, from 1:00 till 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 
till 8:30 p.m. 



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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 



Don't Forget The Ketchup 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 



Where is the American economy 
headed? Should we be nervous? 
Will the Stock Market crash? Will 
we lose our jobs and our life sav- 
ings and our homes? Will we ulti- 
mately have to ward off starvation 
by eating our household pets? 

Hold it! Let's calm down! There 
is NO reason for that kind of 
thinking! Sure, the economy has 
been on a "roller coaster" of late, 
but let's consider the reassuring 
words of Federal Reserve Board 
Chairman Alan Greenspan in his 
recent speech before the 
Association of People Before 
Whom Alan Greenspan Gives 
Speeches. 

"This is merely a temporary 
economic slump/ Greenspan stat- 
ed, adding, "everybody should get 
some dogs." 

So there is absolutely nothing to 
worry about, except for the eerie 
parallels between our current eco- 
nomic circumstances and those 
surrounding the big Stock Market 
crash that led to the Great 
Depression: 

EERIE PARALLEL NO. 1: The 
big Stock Market crash occurred 
in 1929. The year that we are cur- 
rently in, according to a majority 
of leading economists, is 1998. 
Both of these years start with 
exactly the same two digits, in 
exactly the same order. 
Coincidence? 
EERIE PARALLEL NO. 2: 




Alan Greenspan gave exactly the 
same speech in 1929. 

EERIE PARALLEL NO. 3: 
President Lincoln had a secretary 
named "Kennedy." President 
Kennedy had a secretary named 
"Lincoln." Incredibly, neither of 
these presidents had an intern 
named "Lewinsky." 

So perhaps there is, indeed, 
cause for alarm. To help us better 
understand the situation, let's ana- 
lyze the current economic picture 
by making up questions and then 
answering them: 
Q.Why has the U.S. econoy been 
so strong in recent years? 
A. The key is the software 
industry, which employs many 
highly educated, well-paid work- 
ers to (a) design software and then 
(b) try to figure out how come it 
doesn't work. 
Q. And that makes the 
economy strong? 
A. No. Software actually 
HURTS the economy, because at 
any given time two-thirds of the 
American work force is on hold 



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waiting for Technical Support. 
What makes the economy strong 
is that, while waiting, these work- 
ers drink billions of gallons of spe- 
cialty coffees costing upwards of 
$3.49 per cup. Our LATTE indus- 
try alone dwarfs General Motors. 
Q. So what's the problem? 
A. The problem is Asia, a large 
land mass located near Hawaii. 
Asia is having a severe currency 
crisis caused by the fact that the 
Asians suddenly realized that a lot 
of their currency has funny names 
such as the "bant," the "kip," the 
'Yinggit" and the "Vietnamese 
currency whose name we can't 
print in the newspaper but you 
should look it up in the encyclope- 
dia and then imagine the endless 
stream of hilarious jokes you'd be 
making if you were a tourist in 
Vietnam." 
Q. Why does the Asian eco- 
nomic crisis pose such a seri- 
ous threat to America? 
A. Because Asia is where 
TV sets come from. 
Q. Can't we just make our 
own TV sets? 

A. Ha ha! The only person still 
alive who remembers anything 
about the era when Americans 
could actually build a working 
television is a 92-year-old retired 
Motorola employee named 
Horace M. Sneet, who, when 
asked recently how to make a TV 
set, said, quote, "You need 12 foot 
of stout walnut" 

Q. Are you going to get many 

letters from irate humor-impaired 

animal-lovers chastising you for 

making a joke about eating dogs? 

A. Yes. 

Q. What will these letters 
say? 

A. They will say: "Mr. Barry, I, 
personally, am unusually intelli- 
gent and therefore capable of real- 
izing that you were attempting to 
be satirical, but many of your 
readers, particularly impression- 
able young people, will, as a direct 
result of your column, eat their 
dogs." 
Q. What about this "Year 2000" 



Music Review 



Sunny Day Real Estate 
returns after 3 year hiatus 
with a new album 



by Keith Gwillim 

Clarion Call Assistant 

Lifestyles Editor 

History has shown that bands 
that break up and reunite or 
undergo major personnel shifts 
have not fared well in the post- 
break period. Squeeze was the 
quintessential new wave act, but 
after a brief hiatus, were nothing 
more than a slickly polished pop 
band. The Specials invented 
two-tone ska, but are considered 
a joke nowadays; and not a good 
one. 

It seems that Sunny Day Real 
Estate is the exception to that 
rule. After releasing two ground- 
breaking and rabidly popular (at 
least within the college music 
community) albums, singer 
Jeremy Enigk found Christianity, 
and the other half found Dave 
Grohl, and the perfectly average 
Foo Fighters were born. 

Now Sunny Day has found new 
life, and their third disc, How It 
Feels To Be Something On, does 
not disappoint. The three-year 
break seems to have had no effect 
on them whatsoever, adverse or 
otherwise. True, it is their best 
album yet, but that can be attrib- 
uted more to the fact that this is 
the strongest set of songs they've 
had yet. It is rather short, with 10 
songs clocking in at 45 minutes, 
but that does not stop it from 
being a tour de force of emo-core 
rock. 

As always, Jeremy Enigk is the 
centerpiece, with his croaky 
voice belting out dejected cou- 
plets as the guitars and drums 
cascade around him. He doesn't 
just demand your attention, he 
nearly dares you not to devote 
every ounce of your being to 
hanging on his every word. His 
voice is almost otherworldly; and 
it wouldn't be an overstatement 



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to say that Enigk is one of the 
best vocalists the rock world has 
seen within the past decade. 
Enigk has bis own brand of 
depravity, and he hands out the 
gloom in generous dollops on 
How It Feels... Enigk loves to 
churn out lyrics concerning 
human relationships, told mostly 
with heart-wrenching melan- 
choly. He touches ground on 
everything from personal depres- 
sion to dissipated love and social 
rejection. The disc has already 
garnered comparisons to 
Radiohead, which is not just 
hype. How It Feels... sounds 
remarkably like The Bends-eta 
Radiohead. 

Their sound has remained 
unchanged from Diary and the 
self titled sophomore album, for 
the most part. The unrefined gui- 
tars, tight rhythms, and minimal- 
ist production are still there, but 
the noticeable change is that the 
arrangements are significantly 
more sophisticated. Sunny Day 
comes across as much more 
resigned here, as the anger is kept 
in check. How It Feels... comes 
at the song's sketches in the past 
tense, with Enigk realizing that 
events cannot be changed. It 
does make the album a downer, 
but also incredibly cathartic. 

If anything, Enigk has slid even 
deeper into the depths of his tor- 
tured self, with his increasingly 
morose and somber lyrics. On 
"Two Promises", he sings "Long 
days caught in his room, trapped 
in the gloom of a dying light." 
It's an incredibly gothic line, and 
representative of the whole 
album's tone. Thankfully 
though, the monolithic How It 
Feels... is not terminally dreary, 
as the occasional ray of light 
breaks through the overcast sky 
of the album. 

That's actually a good analogy 
for the state of emo-core today, 
with many a sub-par band, and 
the occasional diamond in the 
rough popping up, i.e. Hum, 
Sunny Day. ( When you have 
pearls like that, though, that's all 
you need. On my five star rating 
system, How It Feels To Be 
Something On gets four. 



October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



Calendar of Events 



Today 

•AIDS Awareness month 

•Small Business Development Center seminar, "Interviewing, 

Hiring, Training, and Developing Employees," Days Inn, Clarion, 

8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

•Blues Traveler tickets will be on sale at the Gemmell Info desk 

until the day of the concert 

Friday 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Secondary education "Block Workshop," Gemmell Multi-purpose 

Room, 8 a.m.- noon 
•Admissions Day, Hart Chapel, 9 a.m. 
•Tennis vs. California, Campbell Hall Courts, 3:30 p.m. 
•Credit/no record ends at 4 p.m. 
•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg Tournament 
•"Herps Alive" reptile show and presentation, Rhoades Center, 
Venago Campus, Oil City, 8 p.m. 

•Faculty recital, Paula Amrod, piano, Marwick-Boyd Auditorium, 
8:15 p.m. 
Saturday 
•ALFWEEK 

•Football at Slippery Rock, 2 p.m. 
•Cross country at Lehigh 
•Volleyball at East Stroudsburg 
Tournament 
•Archery season opens 
Sunday 
•ALFWEEK 

•Autorama.Main Street noon-5 p.m 
•Pure Gold 6 till 8p.m. at Memorial Stadium, fireworks sponsored 
by Eatn' Park afterwards 
Monday 
•ALFWEEK 
•Faculty Senate Policy Meeting (B-8) 3:30 p.m. 



f s^ 



•4th Annual Clarion University and Community 
\ A Cultural Night, Clarion County Courthouse, 

|T 6:30-9:30 p.m. 

^ -Student Senate Meeting (246 Gem) 7:30 p.m. 

rj ^ T\iesday 

•1 f ©-ALFWEEK 

' *^^ m •Athletic department "Timeout Luncheon," 
Holiday Inn, noon 
•Tennis vs. Gannon 3:30 p.m. 
•Golf at Allegheny Invitational 
•Volleyball at Slippery Rock, 7 p.m. 
•4th Annual Clarion University and Community Cultural 
Night, Clarion County Courthouse, featuring Ambridge High 
School Steel Drum Ensemble, 7-9 p.m. 
•Career symposium for minority students, 250 Gemmell 
Complex, 7:30 p.m. 

•Intramural 1 on 1 Basketball Roster due Oct 13 
•Intramural Challenge course Roster due Oct 13 
•Intramural Horseshoe Pitching Roster due Oct 13 
Wednesday 
• ALF WEEK 

•Northwest PA AIDS Alliance conference, "Providing Home 
Health Care for People with HIV/ AIDS," Days Inn, 
Meadville, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30p.m. 

•4th Annual Clarion University and Community Cultural 
Night, Clarion County Courthouse, featuring Runa Kuna, tra- 
ditional Latin America music, 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. 
•Leadership Development Series, 250-252 Gemmell 
Complex, 7 p.m. 

•Speech Communication and Theatre political movie series 
and discussion, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," Hart 

Chapel, 7:30 p.m. 

•Katherine Farnham, Captain Loomis restaurant 8-9 p.m. 

•UAB Residence Hall Lobby Judging 9 p.m. 



Darrell Hammond to crown Queen 



Courtesy of Baker Winokur 

Ryder 

Public Relations 

Saturday Night Lives' Darrell 
Hammond will be appearing in 
Clarion on October 8. He will 
crown the Queen at the corona- 
tion during the pep rally. 




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Afterwards he will be appearing 
at the Marwick-Boyd auditorium 
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President before several thousand 
people. 

His television credits include 
NBC's "Late Night with Conan 
O'Brien," MTV, Showtime, 
Comedy Central, VH1, and "Late 
Show with David Letterman." 

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Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 



Chandler Dining Hall Menu for 10/4/98 - 10/10/98 





HOMESTYLE 
LUNCH 

& 
DINNER 



&tt 












WEDNESDAY 



SUNDAY 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

CHEESE OMELETS 

FRENCH TOAST 

CAJUN CHICKEN 

LINGUINE 

PIEROGIES 

THURSDAY 



BUFFET 



MONDAY 

MEATBALL SUB 

BROCCOLI/RICE CASSEROLE 

BAKED POTATO 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 



VEGETABLE STUFFED 

PEPPERS 

CHICKEN GRILLAS 

MACARONI & CHEESE 

SUNDAY 



CHICKEN PATTIES 

FRESH BROCCOLI 

LOCRO 



FRIDAY 

FISH SANDWICH 
CHEESE QUICHE 
MIXED VEGETABLES 
BAKED POTATO 
SHEPHERD'S PIE 



TUESDAY 

VEGETABLE LO MEIN 

FRESH CARROTS 

GRILLED CHEESE 

TOMATO SOUP 



SATURDAY 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

PANCAKES 

HOME FRIES 

BACON 

BAKED RIGATONI 

BBQ PORK HOAGIES 









^ 



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MEATLOAF 

MASHED POTTOES 

BROCCOLI 

GRAVY 

RICE 

BAKED FISH 

PENNI PASTA 



MONDAY 

DICED PORK 
SAUERKRAUT 

MASHED POTATOES 
APPLE SAUCE 

VEGETABLE SIRLOIN 



TUESDAY 

CHICKEN TACOS 

BEEF TACOS 

REFRIED BEANS 

VEGETABLE FAJITAS 



WEDNESDAY 

TURKEY 

STUFFING 

MASHED POTATOES 



'%• 



NACHO 
CHIP 

BUFFET 

MON. THRU FRI. 

TORTILLA CHIPS 

SALSA 

CHEESE SAUCE 

JALAPENO 

PEPPERS 

ONIONS 



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B UFF eT 

HOTOOQS 



THURSDAY 



HAM 
SCALLOPED POTATOES 

CARROTS 

SPINACH 
VEGETARIAN GOULASH 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



SAUSBURRY STEAK 

BAKED FISH 

MASHED POTATOES 

SAUSAGE PIZZA 

HOT TURKEY SANDWICH 



PENNI FOR YOUR THOUGHT 

ASPARAGUS 

COUNTRY FRIED STEAK 

MASHED POTATOES 

WAX BEANS 

FRIED RICE W/VEGGIES 

ASSORTED PIES, CAKES BROWMES, COOKIES, CRISP SERVED DAILY ON A 

ROTATING BASIS 



VARIETY B OFBBfiS 

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October 1. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Pa ge 15 



CALL ON YOU 




b y 

George Groff 



Photography 
Editor 



What do you think of Mark 

McGwire hitting 70 home runs 

this season? 






Tom Zenewicz, Senior, Management 

'I'm just glad to see that McGwire got the 

record. It's great! ! I hate Sosa!" 



Jeff Patinski, Junior, IS 

'I think its an amazing accomplishment that will 

not be broken for many years." 



John Spinda, Junior, Communication 

"What he did is unbelievable. Not only how many 

he hit, but how far he hit them." 






Justin M. Ezyk, Senior, Communication 

"It definitely brought back the 'sport' of 

baseball." 



Chris Megats, Junior, Elementary Education 

'I think it was good for the game of baseball, but 

I wanted Sosa to win." 



Pete Ramirez, Senior, Elementary Education 

'He's great and all, but the 70 1 h homer was 

fixed." 



% I - « •' I 



fit 1 it^Ufn «-.,i r r 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 1. 1998 



ENTERTAINMENT 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Prober 1.1998 



ThP Clarion Call 



Pflgg 17 



ENTERTAINMENT 



ACROSS 
1 — Dillon 
5 Singing group 
10 Call 

14 Farm measure 

15 Spear 

16 Hero 

17 Strengthened 

19 Pierre's state: 
abbr. 

20 Intuition letters 

21 Uncivil 

22 Up to the time 
when 

24 Woman 

25 Move quickly 

26 Foliage 
29 Sign up for 

another tour of 
duty 

32 Devastation 

33 — Castle 
(historic Cuban 
fort) 

34 Go sit — tack! 

35 Arabian sul- 
tanate 

36 Hairstyles of old 

37 Easy job 

38 — ammoniac 

39 Openings for 
coins 

40 Room 

41 Semi drivers 

43 Follows 
relentlessly 

44 AKA 

45 Like — of bricks 

46 Tiny particles 

47 Lima's locale 

48 Afternoon social 

51 Ireland 

52 Repetitions 

55 — gin 

56 Unavailable 

57 On 

58 Ages 

59 Cupidity 

60 Loch — monster 

DOWN 

1 Horse 

2 Tops 

3 Journey 
4X 

5 Sky sights 

6 Robust 




FOR RENT 



7 Fairy tale start 
6 Chill 
9 Dieters 

10 Gun 

11 More 

12 Aim 

13 Antlered animal 
18 French coin 

23 Tabu 

24 — Enrol, actor of 
old 

25 Peons 

26 Specter 
27"— of the 

Jungle" 

28 Appraisal 

29 Puts to flight 

30 Nosh 

31 Records 
33 Secures a 

vessel 

36 Agreeable 

37 Bridge 

39 Kind of milk 

40 Obese 

42 Doubles 

43 Thread 



s 


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45 Eagle's nest 

46 A Guthrie 

47 A Rose 

48 Carry 

49 Adam's 
grandson 



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Congratulations AZ on winning the 
plaque for the largest group in atten- 
dance at the walk-a-thon for 
Altzheimer's Disease! You girls have 
the biggest hearts in the world! 
Thanks for helping raise money for a 

worthy cause! Love, Dezort 

**************** 

Thanks for wasting away in margari- 
taville with us 0X! We had an awe- 
some time! You can mix us a few any- 
time! Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta 

**************** 

To the sisters of AZ thanks for the great 

mixer. 0X 

**************** 

To our Dream Girl Maggie, we appre- 
ciate all you have done for us. We wish 

you the best this semester. Love, 0X 

**************** 



To A<J>E, Paybacks were definitely 
worth it. Thanks for a great mixer. The 

brothers of Sigma Pi 

**************** 

Congratulations to Mark, Phil, and 
Adam. Welcome to the best. Your in 

brothers 

**************** 

Congratulations to our new associate 
members: Marilyn, Katie, Melissa, 
Kerri, Dawn, Holly, Jessa, Stephanie, 
Angie, Leah, Christina, Jenna, Jen, 
Callie, Shelley, and Stacey. Love your 

future sisters of AOE 

**************** 

To the brothers of in, Revenge was 
never so sweet. Thanks for the great 

mixer. Love, AOE 

**************** 

To Brandon, Tom, Mike, and Larry, 
congratulations on becoming brothers 
of KAP. We are happy we can call you 

our brothers. Your brothers of KAP 

**************** 

To Shawn, Kemen, Matt, Chris, and 
Rob, Congratulations on becoming 
associate members of KAP. The broth- 
ers of KAP 

**************** 

Congratulations to Jill and Heather on 
your engagements! Love your OLE 

sisters 

**************** 

Theta Xi, thanks for a great mixer. 
We'll twist with you anytime! Love, 

**************** 

Congratulations to Kylene Falvo, our 
new member. Love, your future $££ 

sisters 

**************** 

63 would like to thank the sisters of 
Oil for a great mixer. Twister with 

you is always a new experience. 

**************** 

Sigma Tau Gamma, thanks for another 
great mixer. Our money was well 
spent! Love, the sisters of Alpha 

Sigma Tau 

**************** 

Congratulations to the new associate 
members of Alpha Sigma Tau: 
Taushia, Heidi, Tammy B., Jen, Tracey, 
Jenna, Tammy H., Jennie, Kristen, 
Sarah, Danielle, and Brooke. Love the 
sisters of ALT 



**************** 

Happy 20th birthday Aimee and 

Rachel! Love AZT 

**************** 

KAP, I hope the semester is going well 
for everyone! Congratulations Ryan, 
Dave, and Shawn on being chosen for 
the Homecoming court. Also, congrat- 
ulations to the new associate members 
on choosing the best fraternity! Love, 

your sweetheart, Nicole 

**************** 

0X, Bowling was awesome! Our float 

is going to be great! Love, 04>A 

**************** 

Leanne Marie Havely, The countdown 
continues: 14 days to go. Wow! 
You're almost as old as me! Love, 

your older and wiser little 

**************** 

Good Luck this Saturday against 
Slippery Rock, Justin, Pete, Drew, 
Donnie, Ryan, Flora, and Coach Watts. 
Love, your brothers of XTIT 



PERSONALS 



Dougie and Morrow (Meatheads), 
Thank God for "friends in low 
places"! You're "two of a kind"! 
Thanks for taking us to see Garth! 

You rock! Love, Lisa and Brooke 

**************** 

To the Call staff, You guys are doing 
wonderful - here's to a great semester! 

Love, The Chief 

**************** 

Matty, Is Captain Hook gonna get 
smart and fluffy this weekend? Good 

luck! 

**************** 

Nikki-Noodle, Despite the wierdos that 
I "wined" about, it was a great week- 
end and it will "always be on my 
mind." You are the greatest! Love, 

Kristen 

**************** 

To the girls of the 5th floor Wilk, even 
though you "replaced" me, I still love 

you. Call me we'll "hang." Love, Jeff 

**************** 

Pip and Chesty, I want a rematch, we'll 
have wrestlemania again next week. 

Skip 

**************** 

It is impossible to tame the pony, but 
try if you dare. 



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Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 1.1998 



ENTERTAINMENT 








DAVE 

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October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



SPORTSWIRE 



PSAC-West play kicks off this 
week with the Golden Eagles 
paying a visit to defending cham- 
pion Slippery Rock. Read what's 
in store for Clarion this week. 

See Page 20 



The PSAC-West may be the 
strongest it has ever been. 
Everyone seems to be a con- 
tender. 

See Page 24 



The Clarion tennis team has a 
pair of home matches coming up. 
Friday, the netters will host 
PSAC rival California at 3:30 
p.m. 

The team will then be in action 
Tuesday for a non-conference 
affair with Gannon. 

See Page 20 



The golf team is heading into 
October with a great deal of 
momentum. The linksters were 
in Edinboro last week for the 
Edinboro Fall Shootout, placing 
fifth. 

See Page 23 



Clarion cross country team will 
host the PSAC championships 
Oct. 31 at Mayfield Golf Course. 
Until that time, the Golden 
Eagles are busy winning meets. 

See Page 23 



QUOTABLES 



'The girls have the talent and 
ability to win, they just need to 
know when to turn it on. 
Unfortunately, we're doing it 
too late in matches." 

-Clarion head volleyball coach 
Jodi Burns. 

"We're off to a good start." 
-Clarion head cross country 
coach Pat Mooney. 



SPORTS 



Late score lifts Eagles past Kutztown 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Dan Stout caught a 14-yard 
touchdown pass from Chris 
Weibel with 22 seconds showing 
on the clock to lift the Golden 
Eagles to a 23-16 win at 
Kutztown Saturday. 

The win improved Clarion's 
record to 2-2 on the season, while 
the Golden Bears suffered their 
fust loss of the year and stand at 
2-1. 

The clinching score capped a 
seven-play, 63-yard drive that got 
underway after Kutztown tied the 
score at 16-16 with 2:17 left to 
play. 

During the drive, Weibel hooked 
up with wide receiver Alvin 
Slaughter on three occasions to 
account for 40 yards. 

Although the offense came 
through in the waning moments of 
the contest, much of the credit for 
the win can go to the Golden 
Eagle defense. After allowing an 
average of 36 points per game in 
their first three outings, the Eagle 
defense clamped down in the sec- 
ond half against Kutztown, allow- 
ing only three points. 

"We broke it down and they had 
13 plays in which they gained 291 
yards of their total offense," said 
Luke. "They ran 65 plays. So 
what that tells us is that defensive- 
ly we need to get better at taking 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
A pack of Millersville players gets tied up trying to stop Alvin Slaughter Sept. 12. 



away the big play. In the first half 
we gave them the big play, but in 
the second half we didn't give 
them the big play. That's some- 
thing we need to continue to get 
better at. The big play is what's 
hurting us." 

The Bears opened the scoring in 
the first period with a 1-yard 



touchdown run by Vincent 
Jamison. Clarion knotted the 
game early in the second quarter 
when a Weibel pass found its way 
into the hands of Slaughter for a 
3-yard strike. 

However, that's when Kutztown 
came up with a big play to retake 
the lead. Running back Emneko 



Sweeney darted for a 91 -yard 
touchdown to put the hosts ahead 
13-7. The conversion would fail, 
keeping the margin at six points. 
Clarion managed to cut the lead 
to 13-10 on a Frank Van Wert field 
goal, but not before the Eagles 
made a pair of costly mistakes. 

continued on page 23 



Clarion University volleyball glides into midseason 



Li i niumi i impup 



I j h i mu pwi w 



* i f l ** w f y ; y s "g p^ y-H«|nipr ^ ri t if ^^ w -mup W i H i' ll 



>■■ 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
The Eagles venture to East Stroudsburg Friday. 



By Matt Jolles 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The 1998 volleyball season has 
been one of Tips and downs. 

However, after two hard losses 
to Lock Haven and Edinboro, the 
Golden Eagles are only looking 
up. 

Clarion posted a 20-19 overall 
record last season, but it was good 
for a 7-3 standing in the PSAC- 
West. 

"The Western Division is one of 
the toughest divisions to play in, 
and Clarion is much tougher than 
they sometimes look," said 
Edinboro head coach Lynn 
Theehs. 

Led by four senior captains 
(Christy Boes, Jaime Mars, Jamie 



Soboleski, and 1997 All- 
American Tracy Bamett) along 
with six returning starters, the 
Golden Eagles are looking to con- 
tend for the title. 

The season took a turn at the 
beginning as CUP tried to come 
together but dropped two tough 
games to Allegheny and Saginaw 
Valley, but a 3-1 victory over 
Allegheny gave them hope. The 
Golden Eagles, only a few hours 
after their first victory, would then 
lose to Alma, placing them at 1-3. 
Clarion opened its home season 
Sept. 8 and quickly decided to 
make a run at the PSAC title by 
knocking off IUP in three straight. 
Sporting a hopeful 2-4 record, 

continued on page 21 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 



Eagles look to ground Rockets at the launching pad 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



October may be less than a week 
old, but the 1998 football season 
hits full throttle this Saturday 
when the Golden Eagles travel to 
face Slippery Rock in a battle of 
the last two PSAC-West champi- 
ons. 

The Eagles (2-2) have upset on 
their minds against the defending 
champion Rockets, who stand at 
3-1 and hold the No. 12 spot in 
this week's NCAA Division II 
poll. 

However, Clarion will play the 
role of underdog, as Slippery 
Rock returns the core of last 
year's national quarterfinalist 
squad. 

"This is the first game in the 
PSAC-West," said Clarion head 
coach Malen Luke. "If you want 
to win your conference you have 
to win your conference games. 
From that standpoint it's very 
important. (A win) could give us 
a lot of momentum and an emo- 
tional lift." 

The Rockets have posted three 
convincing wins following a sea- 
son-opening 39-10 loss at 
Division I-AA South Florida Sept. 
J. After falling to South Florida, 
which will make the jump to 
Division I-A status as a member 
of Conference USA in 2001, 
Slippery Rock edged West 
Virginia Wesleyan, 28-14, before 
routing Fairmont State, 52-7, and 
East Stroudsburg, 44-9. 

At East Stroudsburg Saturday, 
the Rockets took advantage of 
three Warrior turnovers in the 
fourth period to put 24 points on 
the board and break open what 
was a close game. 

The Eagles will be certain to 
break out last year's game film in 
preparation for SRU. The 
Rockets defeated Clarion 28-7 
behind the backfield combination 
of Rick Magulick and Stan 
Kennedy, who combined to rush 
for 257 yards. Both are power 
runners who would go on to sur- 
pass the 1,000-yard mark for the 
season. 




Malen Luke 

Not much has changed in the 
Rocket backfield this year, as 
Magulick has 346 yards on 62 
carries and Kennedy has 283 
stripes on 51 totes. Slowing the 
Rocket running attack is a must if 
the Golden Eagles are to be suc- 
cessful. 

"It's really no secret what they 
want to do," said Luke. "They'll 
run the ball and run the ball to get 
you geared up to stop the run, then 
they'll play-action pass (fake 
handoff then pass). Their offen- 
sive line is so huge that you have 
to commit eight guys to stopping 
the run and that leaves you in sin- 
gle coverage on their receivers. 
For us to have an opportunity, we 
have to play well versus the run. I 
don't think we can stop them 
completely, but we have to con- 
tain them." 

However, stopping the Rocket 
ground game may only be half the 
battle for the Golden Eagles, as 
sophomore quarterback Randy 
McKavish presents a multi- 
dimensional threat for defenses. 
McKavish, who also plays basket- 
ball for the Rockets, was named 
the PSAC "Offensive Player of 
the Year" as a freshman last sea- 
son. This year, McKavish has 
completed 28 of 65. passes for 471 
yards and six touchdowns. Also a 
smart runner, McKavish has 95 
rushing yards on 15 tries. 

"When the receivers are cov- 
ered, he'll pull the ball down and 



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run around back there," said 
Luke. "There are times, too, that 
when they call a play-action pass, 
he has a run/pass option. Scheme- 
wise you have to contain him and 
keep him in the pocket. 

"We want to be able to force 
them to throw more than they 
want to, but at the same time we 
have to keep (McKavish) inside 
the pocket so he can't get outside 
and run around. There will be 
times when he gets outside of the 
pocket and runs. He's a good 
player. We just can't let him do 
that a lot." 

The receiving corps will be led 
by flanker Larry Wilson (11 
grabs, 167 yards, 3 IDs), H-back 
Scott Whipple (7 catches, 99 
yards), and wideout DJ. Flick (6 
receptions, 161 yards, 3 TDs). 

Slippery Rock is also solid on 
the defensive side of the ball, 
ranking No. 1 in the conference in 
scoring defense (17.3 points per 
game) while permitting only 
268.5 yards per game. 

Pre-season All-American Matt 
Kinsinger has 15 tackles and three 
sacks this season lining up at the 
noseguard position. 

Working in Clarion's favor this 
week will be the strength of past 
opponents. Although the Rockets 
have lined up with a I-AA team in 
South Florida and a quality team 
in West Virginia Wesleyan, their 
first four opponents don't stack up 
to Clarion's early-season opposi- 
tion. Clarion has faced defending 
I-AA national champion 
Youngstown State, PSAC-East 
favorite Millersville, WVIAC 
champ Shepherd, and Kutztown. 
"I hope it's to our advantage that 
we've played some better compe- 
tition," said Luke. "When they 
get some big plays, our kids aren't 
going to get down on themselves. 
The advantage is that when they 
make big plays our kids will be 
able to put it to rest and focus on 
the next play." 

Looking to future opponents, the 
Rockets will face No. 2 IUP the 
week after they face the Eagles. 
Slippery Rock will need to avoid 
looking past Clarion. 

Those on hand at Slippery 
Rock's N. Kerr Thompson 
Stadium Saturday are certain to be 
treated to a hard-fought game. 
Rocket head coach George 
Mihalik expects no different. 

"We have tremendous respect 
for Clarion," said Mihalik. "Our 
games have always been hard 
fought no matter who's up or 
down, and I certainly expect that 
same type of game this week. 




October 1, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 




VS. 




Clarion (2-2) Slippery Rock (3-1 ) 

Where: N. K. Thompsn Stadium (10,000) , Slippery Rock 

When: Saturday, 2 p.m. Radio: C 93 (92.7 FM) 

Weather: Partly Cloudy, High 55-65. 

Series: Slippery Rock leads 31-22-3 

Last meeting: 1997; Slippery Rock won 28-7 



1998 Numbers 



33.5 



31.0 




Points per game 

235 



Points allowed per game 




Rushing yards per game Passing yards per game 




Clarion Time of Possession 



"Clarion's offense can strike at 
any time with (Chris) Weibel at 
quarterback and with (Alvin) 
Slaughter as a receiver or on spe- 
cial teams. Weibel has tremen- 
dous poise at quarterback. 
Defensively, Clarion plays an 
aggressive, attacking defense and 
tries to create a lot of confusion 
and mistakes. We're also really 
concerned about Clarion's special 



teams. Slaughter can change the 
momentum at any time on a punt 
or kickoff return. But then you 
look at the punt blocks (against 
Shepherd) and other ways 
Clarion can hurt you and you 
know you better be prepared for 
anything. For fans who come to 
the game, they will certainly see 
all three phases of the game this 
week." 



,2####&i 



• ♦ « ♦ 



Runners picking up the pace 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Clarion University cross country 
coach Pat Mooney, who has 
improved the men's and women's 
teams on a yearly basis, is very 
happy with the start of the 1998 
season. 

"We're of to a good start," said 
Mooney. 'The team did a great 
job of getting their summer 
mileage in and it has also shown 
in the first two meets. The 
women's team has a chance to 
place in the top five in the PS ACs, 
while the men are hoping to move 
up from their lOth-place ending in 
1997." 

The men's team placed a 10th at 

PSACs and 19th at the regionals. 

Leading the women's team in 

1998 are co-captains Roxanne 

Wilson and Maureen Long. 

Wilson, a senior, is Clarion's top 
runner. She placed 24th at the 
PSAC meet last year. She placed 
24th at the PSACs with a time of 
20:18, then placed 22nd at 
Reginals, finishing in 20:08. 
Long, meanwhile, placed 38th at 



PSACs (20:48) and 57th at 
Regionals (21:04). 

But the Eagles have six addi- 
tional runners who can "run with 
the pack" and turn in solid finish- 
es every time out. They include 
Daria Diaz, Kelly Null, Brigette 
Laflin, Kristie Runk, Laurie 
Young, and Wendy Kengor. 
Diaz was 44th at PSACs (20:52) 
in 1997 and 37th at Regionals 
(20:38). Null placed 54th at 
PSACs (21:15) and Laflin was 
43rd at PSACs (20:51) and 70th at 
Regionals (21:19). 

Already in 1998, the Eagles 
were fourth at the Cal Invitational 
and won the Slippery Rock 
Invitational. Wilson and Null 
were 11th and 12th respectively at 
Cal, while Null was second, 
Laflin third, Long fourth, and 
Runk fifth at Slippery Rock. 

"We're excited about the 1998 
season," said Mooney. "Our team 
runs well together and should 
have a great season." 

The men's team is captained by 
Jon Fox. Fox was 79th at PSACs 
last year and finished 133rd at 
Regionals. 



Also ready to run are newcomer 
Ean King and veterans John 
Copley and Mark Trzyna. King is 
a talented freshman, while Copley 
ran last year and is looking to step 
up. Trzyna placed 63rd at PSACs 
and was 157th at Regionals. 
Also ready to make strong con- 
tributions are John Sherry, Gregg 
Wade, Colin McGlone, and Jason 
Bochert. 

In 1998, Clarion has finished 
seventh at the Cal Invitational and 
second at Slippery Rock. King 
was eighth at Cal (28:58) and Fox 
21st with a 29:43 clocking. King 
was sixth and Fox seventh at 
SRU. 

"Our top runners are doing a 
quality job thus far," stated 
Mooney. "At PSACs and 
Regionals, we'll be looking for a 
few guys to step up and run then- 
best races. If we do that, we can 
improve on our lOth-place PSAC 
finish from 1997." 

NOTES: The women's team is 
currently ranked seventh in the 
region ... Clarion will host the 
PSACs Oct. 31 at Mayfield Golf 
Course. 



Clarion travels to East Stroudsburg this weekend 



continued from page 19 

Clarion traveled to Mercyhurst for 
matches with conference rival 
Lock Haven, Juniata, and host 
Mercyhurst. The Golden Eagles 
again played with heart, but fell 
upon tough times. They ventured 
to conference rival California 
with a 3-5 record only to be hand- 
ed loss number six. 

'The girls have the talent and 
the ability to win, they just need to 
know when to turn it on," says 
Clarion head coach Jodi Bums. 
"Unfortunately we're doing it too 
late in matches." 

One week later the Golden 
Eagles got it. 
The traveled to the University of 



CAMPUS REP 



Charleston for a two-day event 
that featured Wheeling Jesuit, 
PSAC rival Edinboro, Queens 
College, and Mount Olive. 
Clarion jumped to 6-7 by posting 
an impressive 3-1 record. The 
Golden Eagles outlasted 
Wheeling Jesuit (3-2), bowed to 
Edinboro (3-0), and then turned 
around to hand shutouts to 
Queens and Mt. Olive. 

"We just did what we had to do, 
and that was win," says outside 
hitter Ali Graham. "Now we have 
to focus on the rest of the season." 
However, the Golden Eagles 
have had some tough times in the 
past two weeks as they have been 
defeated by Lock Haven and 
Edinboro, falling to 6-9 overall 



and 1-3 in the PSAC-West. 

"It's too early to decide who is 
going to win the division,"' says 
senior outside hitter Jaime Mars. 
"But we are in a tough spot now 
and we have to deal with it." 

The Golden Eagles return to 
action Friday and Saturday when 
they venture to the East 
Stroudsburg Tournament, before 
visiting Slippery Rock Tuesday. 
The Golden Eagles will not play 
in Tippin Gym again until Oct. 20 
against California. 

Clarion's top offensive per- 
former last week was Barnett, 
who slammed seven spikes 
Tuesday against Edinboro. Jamie 
Soboleski placed four aces and 
assisted 15 points against the 
Fighting Scots. 



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George Groff/Clarion Call 
California and Gannon will visit Clarion for matches. 

Eagle netters show promise 



By Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Slippery Rock overthrew the 
Clarion women's tennis team 6-3 
Thursday, Oct. 24. 

Lori Berk-Sabatose is a former 
Clarion netter who has returned 
this year to undertake the position 
of head women's tennis coach. 
With only two returning starters, 
a 1-11 record, and two matches 
left in the season, Sabatose is 
proud of her fall roster. Sabatose 
is looking forward to the PSAC 
tournament in Erie Oct. 17-18 so 
the young team members can 
show how much they have 
improved and learned this sea- 
son. 

Against Slippery Rock, senior 
co-captain Amy Shaffer and 
freshman Bethany Melnick were 



each victorious in singles compe- 
tition. 

In doubles action, junior co- 
captain Rachel Link and sopho- 
more Kylee Johnson fought to a 
victory over the Rockets. 
Although the match lasted an 
hour and a half, which is slightly 
long for a doubles match, aggres- 
sive, strong, and consistent play 
helped the women achieve victo- 
ry. Freshmen LaDonna Dunlevy 
and Tracy Heim experienced a 
tough loss following a tiebreaker. 
Coach Sabatose said the doubles 
pair of Dunlevy and Heim 
"played great together." 

The women's tennis team will 
be backhanding again on the 
courts of Clarion University 
Friday against California and 
Tuesday against Gannon. 



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Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 



CLARION SCOREBOARD 



FOOTBALL 



CROSS COUNTRY 





Division II Individual Leaders 


10. DeBrito, BentJey 


7.3 


Division II Poll 




Sept 26 




12. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 7.0 


Sept 28 




Rushing offense leader* 


12. Fairbanks, Western Wash 


I. 7.0 


Men's Cross Country 


1. 


Shay, Emporia St 


206.8 


12. Trent, Fairmont St. 


7.0 


1. Sourth Dakota 


2. 


Murphey, Central Wash. 


189.5 


Receiving yards per game 


2. Adams State 


3. 


Beane, Shepard 


182.7 






3. Abilene Christian 


4. 


variance, N.M. Highlands 


173.0 


1 . Grant, American Inf I 


151.3 


4. North Dakota State 


5. 


Meyer, Bemidji St 


172.5 


2. Scott, Millersville 


146.3 


5. Western State 


6. 


Thompson, Edinboro 


150.3 


3. Thompson, Virginia St 


141.0 


6. Edinboro 


7. 


Gray, Western N.M. 


148.7 


4. Gilmore, Midwestern St. 


126.0 


7. Central Missouri State 


8. 


Bryant, Memmack 


145.0 


5. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 


125.0 


8. Mankato State 


9. 


Ranek, South Dakota St. 


140.0 


6. Mitchell, Minn. St-Mank 


122.5 


9. Lewis 


1C 


1 Sweeney, Kutztown 


137.7 


7. Ingram, West Chester 


116.8 


10. UC-Davis 








8. Niskanen, Stony Brook 


116.5 


11. Shippensburg 




Total offense leaders 


9. South, Adams St. 


115.0 


12. Chico State 


1. 


Folmar, Millersville 


319.3 


10. Nicewarmer, WV Wes. 


113.0 


13. New Mexico Highlands 


2. 


Fox, Grand Valley St. 


311.3 






14. NW Missouri State 


3. 


McGuffey, Northern Colo. 


310.8 


Division II Poll 




15. East Stroudsburg 


4. 

5 


Larkin, Ben Hey 
Tollie, Northwood 


296.0 
284.5 


Sept 28 




16. Fort Hays State 

17. Kennesaw State 


6. 


Brown, Midwestern St 


278.5 


1 . Northern Colorado 




18. West Georgia 

19. Ashland 

20. South Dakota State 

21. Harding 

99 Truman State 


7. 
8. 


Mitros, West Chester 
Perez, Glenvilie St 


277.3 
264.5 


2. Indiana, Pa. 

3. Central Oklahoma 




9. 


Goettl, Winona St. 


260.3 


4. NW Missouri State 




1C 


i. Greisen, NW Mo. St. 


256.5 


5. North Alabama 

6. Grand Valley State 




23. Hawaii-Hilo 

24. Northern Florida 




Scoring Offense Leaders 


7. UC Davis 




25. Humboldt State 


1. 


Shay, Emporia St. 


18.0 


8. Carson -Newman 






2. 


Murphy, Central Wash. 


15.0 


9. North Dakota 




Women's Cross Country 


3. 


Paddyfote, Concord 


13.5 


10. West Texas A&M 




I.Adams State 


3. 


Miles, NW Mo. St 


13.5 


11. Emporia State Kansas 




2. Edinboro 


5. 


variance, N.M. Highlands 


12.5 


12. Slippery Rock 




3. North Dakota State 


6. 


Thompson, Edinboro 


12.0 


13. Fort Valley State 




4. Shippensburg 


6. 


Dumas, Southern Conn. 


12.0 


14. Eastern New Mexico 




5. UC-Davis 


6. 


Phillips, West. Alabama 


12.0 


15. Southern Arkansas 




6. Hillsdale 


6. 


Mader, Neb-Kearney 


12.0 


16. Saginaw Valley State 




7. Wisconson-Parkside 


6. 


Hawkins, Carson-Newman 12.0 


17. Central Missouri State 




8. Seattle-Pacific 


6. 


Duerr, Moorhead St. 


12.0 


1 8. (tie) Nebraska-Omaha 




9. North Dakota 


23 


. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 9.0 


Albany State 




10. Indiana, Pa. 








20. Chadron State 




11. Fort Lewis 




Pass receptions per game 






12. Lewis 








Northeast Regional Ranking 


13. Western State 


1. 


Ingram, West Chester 


10.3 


I.Indiana, Pa. 




14. Kennesaw State 


2. 


Thorton, Virginia St 


10.0 


2. Grand Valley State 




15. South Dakota 


3. 


Scott, Millersville 


9.0 


3. Slippery Rock 




16. Bloomsburg 


4. 


Mitchell, Minn. St-Mank. 


8.8 


4. Saginaw Valley State 




17. Mankato State 


5. 


Niskanen, Stoney Brook 


8.5 


5. Glenvilie State 




20. Colorado Springs 


6. 


Hinton, Glenvilie St 


8.3 


6. Ashland 




21 . Northern Florida 


7. 


Thompson, Virginia St. 


7.8 


7. West Chester 




22. Northern Colorado 


8. 


Lelko, Bloomsburg 


7.5 


8. Millersville 




23. NW Missouri State 


8. 


Giovingo, Ark.-Montice 


7.5 


9. New Haven 




24. Chico State 


10 


. Nicewamer, WV Weselyn 


7.3 


10. Shepherd 




25. West Virginia Wesleyan 



Oct 10. 1998 



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Call now 

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Open House. 



Widener University mn 541-3903 [3021477-2162 



SCHOOL OF LAW HARBISBURG CAMPUS DELAWARE CAMPl S 



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Sponsored by: 
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Away Team 



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Pann State. Ohio State 

West Virginia. Navy 

Tennessee. ~ Auburn 

Stanford.. « Notre Dame 

Akron * i « Pittsburgh 

Arizona State USC 

Colorado Oklahoma 

Eastern Michigan ..Kent 

Kentucky. Arkansas 

Arizona. - Washington 

Vikings Packers 

Cowboys Redskins 

Dolphins Jets 

Chargers Colts 

Seahawks Chiefs 

TIEBREAKER: CLARION at SLIPPERY ROCK Total Points 



Nathan Koble 

Ohio Stale 

West Virginia 

Tennessee 

Notre Dame 

Pittsburgh 

USC 

Oklahoma 

Eastern Michigan 

Kentucky 

Washington 

Packers 

Cowboys 

Jets 

Chargers 

Chiefs 



Call Staff Picks 

Chris Pfeil 

Ohio State 
West Virginia 

Auburn 

Notre Dame 

Pittsburgh 

Arizona State 

Colorado 

Eastern Michigan 

Kentucky 

Washington 

Packers 

Cowboys 

Jets 

Chargers 

Chiefs 



.» Jason Dambach 

Ohio State 

West Virginia 

Tennessee 

Notre Dame 

Pittsburgh 

USC 
Colorado 

Kent 

Kentucky 

Washington 

Packers 

Redskins 

Jets 

Colts 

Chiefs 



Print Clarion University T-shirt 

Pigskin Pick 'Em is open to all readers of the Clarion Call. Entries must be e-mailed by Saturday at 
noon to: S_CRPfeieClarion.edu. The entrant with the moat correct selections is the winner. In the event 
of a tie, the entrant closest without going over to the total points scored in this week's Clarion/Sippery 
Rock game wM be declared the winner. If a tie still exists, a coin toss will determine the winner. 



GOLDEN EAGLE CALENDAR 



Country 



Gort 



Football 



Tonal* '&&$&$ 



VoffoybaJI 



at 

Lehigh 



at 
Slippery 

Rock 
2:00 p.m. 



at 
East Stroudsburg 
Tournament . 



Tteee. 



at 

Allegheny 

Inv. 





Come attend the Philosophy Club 

MOVIE SERIES 

Admission fat frtt, tad tvtryom Is wticomt! 

The Handmaid's Tale: October 3rd 

Europe Europa: October 17th 
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest: 

October 31st 
Sybil: November 14th 

All films will be shown on their respective dates at 

7 pjn. in 248 Geminell Student Complex. Good food 

and in-depth philosophical discussions of the films' 

themes will follow after each showing. Contact Angie 

at (814) 226-3494 or S_AJBINICK9Mail.Clarioa.Bdu 

far more in format ion. 



October 1,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Eagles bitten by injury bug in win over Bears 



continued from page 19 
With a fourth-and-goal at the 
Kutztown 1, the Eagles were 
flagged for a false start. 

With less than a minute in the 
first half and Kutztown driving, 
Clarion safety Brad Geer picked 
off a Kutztown pass and raced for 
the end zone. However, Geer 
coughed the ball up at the Bear 16, 
turning the ball over to Kutztown. 

In the second half, the Golden 
Eagles took advantage of a 
Kutztown fumble that was recov- 
ered by Clarion's Mike Maguire 
on the Bear 14. Seven plays later, 
running back Jamie Sickeri 
pounded in on a fourth-and-one 
situation to give Clarion its first 
lead. 

The game then turned into a 
defensive struggle until late in the 
fourth period, when the Eagles 
seized the win. 

The win didn't come without a 
hefty price, however. Comerback 
Kervin Charles and center Nick 
Swiger were both injured and will 
miss time. 

Charles, who was hampered 
with an ankle injury earlier in the 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

Chris Weibel (above) and the Clarion passing game will be put to the test this Saturday at 
No. 12 Slippery Rock. The last time Weibel faced the Rockets in 1996, Clarion rolled to a 
54-28 win. Weibel has thrown for 727 yards this season on 99 attempts. The senior has 
also tossed seven touchdown passes. 

season, intercepted a Kutztown Swiger, who has played with a swing this Saturday when they 
pass on the Bears' final offensive broken hand this season, suffered travel down Interstate 80 to face 
play but broke his collarbone in a knee injury and will miss one No. 12 Slippery Rock. Kickoff is 
the process. Charles is expected week of action. scheduled for 2:00 p.m. at N. Ken- 
to be out three to five weeks. The Eagles close their road Thompson Stadium. 



Golfers fifth 
at Edinboro 
Fall Shootout 

By J. P. Kenney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Clarion golf team kept up 
its solid play this fall with a fifth- 
place finish at the Edinboro Fall 
Shootout at Culbertson Hills in 
Edinboro. 

The field was highlighted by a 
nationally ranked Allegheny 
team that took home first place 
with a total of 300. 

The Golden Eagles were led by 
Shawn Will's 77. Other scores 
were J.P. Kenney with a 79, Matt 
Honacki (81), Anthony 
Tacconelli (82), and freshman 
Mark Miller with an 84. 

With two tournaments to go, 
the fall average of the team is 
solid with room for improve- 
ment. Shawn Will leads the way 
with a 77.3 stroke average, fol- 
lowed closely by Tacconelli and 
Kenney at 78.3. 

Matt Honacki has had a solid 
fall and checks in just below 80 
at 79.4. 

Look for the team to get even 
stronger in the last two weeks of 
the season. 




Flao Footba ll Box Scores 
9/23 

Crows 41 Spr. Atom 32 

Spat II 22 T. Chi 5 

PHWarr 58 69Boyz 17 

9/24 
S T Blue 39 The Ones 6 
ST Grey 28 Crows 12 
PH Warr 43 Nation 17 
Team KDR "W 3B "P 

9/28 
Deez Nutz 35 Nation 6 
Swore 30 1 8A Pie 23 

Spat II 48 P&E 18 

ST Blue 30 ST Grey 12 
Atoms 45 Brawlers 41 
The Ones 24 Crows 22 

9/29 
Deez Nutz 38 Atoms 3 
69Boyz 55 Bandits 40 
Team KDR 35 Swore 24 
S T Blue "W Iron City "F 
PHWarr 59 1 8A Pie 23 
Redmen "F Nation "W 

Volleyball Box Score* 
9/24 

Mixed Up 2G Warriors OG 

9/28 
Diggettes 2G Crazy Girls OG 
Chall. 2G Scherm OG 

Slackers 2G Set to Kill 1G 
21 -Hats "W Kamakazis "p 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 17 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 
FLAG FOOTBALL 



STANDINGS won /loss 

1 . ST. Gamma Blue 5/0 

2. ST. Gamma Grey 2/2 

3. Redmen 0/4 

4. P&E Inc. 1/2 

5. Atoms 1/4 

6. The Other Ones 2/2 

7. PH Warriors 6/0 

8. Bookstore Bandits 0/2 

9. Team KDR 4/0 

10. Iron City 1/2 

11. Deez Nutz 3/0 

12. Spafll 3/0 
13 1 8A Pie 1/2 

14. Crows 2/3 

15. Swore 1/2 

16. 69Boyz 1/3 

17. The Nation 2/2 

18. 3B Brawlers 0/5 



Volleyball Scores (con't) 
9/29 

Six Pack 2G Doggs 0G 
Stairdivers 2G Crows OG 
Mixed Up 2G Bonzai OG 

Vert. Chall 2G Crazy Girls OG 



VOLLEYBALL 

STANDINGS 

CO-REC won / toss 

1. Bonzai 1/2 

2. The Challengers 2/0 

3. Smile 0/1 

4. Wood St. Warr. 0/3 

5. The Slackers 1/0 

6. Scherminators 0/1 

7. Set to Kill 0/2 

8. Mixed Up 5/0 

9. Cats & Doggs 0/1 

10. Six Pack Attack 1/0 

WOMEN'S 

A. Kamakazis 0/2 

B. The Diggettes 2/0 

C. Crazy Girls 1/2 

D. 21 -Hats 1/1 

E. Vert. Challenged 1/0 

MEN'S DIVISION 
1. Crows 0/2 

2.Stairdivers 2/0 

FIELD GOAL 
CONTEST 

RESULTS 

JASON DAMBACH has 
won the 1998 kicking 
championship. 

Congratulations Jason! 



1 PITCH SOFTBALL 

Don't forget about the 
Softball tournament 

scheduled for Sunday 
October 11 at 2:00 pm. 
This is a one day co-rec 
tournament. A great way 
to end ALF week with a 
fun and healthy activity! 

IN-LINE HOCKEY 

Registration is now being 
accepted for a new In-line 
Hockey tournament 

scheduled to begin 
October 13. This will be a 
4 on 4 tournament and 
roster limit is 8 players. 
Games will be played on 
the court next to 
Wilkinson and Nair, using 
the new nets that were 
recently set-up. For more 
info call 2349. 

AQUA AEROBICS 

Sunday's 6:00 pm 
FREE TO STUDENTS 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

G.E.A.R. 

ATTENTION STUDENTS 
In-line skates are now 

being rented to interested 
students. If you wanted to 
try this exciting sport, but 
donl have the equipment 
then stop by the outdoor 
rental office Monday thru 
Friday from 3 - 5 pm. Skates 
and pad sets can be rented 
for only $2.00 per day. 



n 



"ROCK CLIMBING 

The next scheduled trip 
for Clarion Outdoors is 
slated for Thursday 
October 22. Mark your 
calenders and call x 2349 
to reserve your space. 
The trip will be to nearby 
Panther's cave and 
includes transportation 
climbing gear and 
instruction. No 

experience is necessary, 
just a desire to try 
something fun! 






Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 1, 1998 




By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Talk about jumping directly into 
the fire. After splitting four non- 
division contests, the Golden 
Eagles travel to Slippery Rock 
this Saturday to open up their 
1998 PSAC-West schedule. The 
Rockets are one of several strong 
contenders for the PSAC-West 
title this year after winning it last 
season en route to the NCAA 
Division II quarterfinals. 

Of course, Clarion is just two 
years removed from an NCAA 
playoff appearance itself. 

However, PSAC coaches don't 
seem to feel the Golden Eagles are 
a legitimate threat to the PSAC 
title. In their preseason poll, the 
coaches around the conference 
predicted fifth-place finish for 
Clarion out of seven teams in the 
Western Division. 
Certainly, after playing the most 
lemanding non-division schedule 
of any PSAC-West school, the 
Eagles are well-prepared to prove 
the coaches wrong. 

Let's take a team-by-team look 
at the PSAC-West, using the 
coaches' poll as the order: 

Slippery Rock 

Clarion fans still talk about the 
lethal running duo of Steve Witte 
and Ron DeJidas. Well, the 
Rockets, who hold down the No. 
12 spot in this week's D-II poll, 
are fortunate to have a similar 
dynamic duo in senior Rick 
Magulick and sophomore Stan 
Kennedy. In 1997, both running 
backs amassed over 1,100 yards 
each. Only Bloomsburg ran for 



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more yards as a team. and hold a lofty No. 2 ranking in 

Sophomore quarterback Randy the NCAA poll. Jason Tirado and 

McKavish became the first player standout Lewis Hicks provide 

in PSAC history to win both the Failla with a pair of outstanding 



wideouts, while the offensive line, 
anchored by tackle Leander 
Jordan, should make Failla's tran- 
sition back to football much easi- 



er. 



"Rookie of the Year" and 
"Offensive Player of the Year" 
awards in the same year in the 
PSAC-West after running up over 
2,500 yards of total offense as a 
freshman. The defense is led by All-PS AC 

Nose tackle Matt Kinsinger is a cornerback Barry Threats and 
preseason All- American after linebacker Phillip Woods, who led 
recording 23 sacks over the past the team last year with a 103 tack- 
two seasons. les. 



quarterback Chris Weibel and big- 
play wide receiver/return special- 
ist Alvin Slaughter. The defense 
may be as good as any in the 
PSAC, led by the linebacking trio 
of Ryan Presutti, Brett Wiley, and 
Keith Kochert. 

Lock Haven 

The Bald Eagles will try to ride 
the running of Sean Fisher. Fisher 
ran for 823 yards as a true fresh- 
man last year, including a 21- 
carry, 197-yard effort against 
Clarion. 

California 

Quarterback Mike Yurcich 
returns after missing all of 1997 
due to an injury. He'll be aided by 
the return of four starters on the 
offensive line. Defensive tackle 
Jon Bolden returns after leading 
the team in sacks (6.5) and tackles 
(81). 

PSAC-East 

It was just three weeks ago that 
the Golden Eagles defeated 
Millersville 38-31 at Memorial 
Stadium. Clarion's win was con- 
sidered an upset because the 
Marauders are the coaches' pick 
to win the Eastern Divsion of the 
PSAC. 

What a difference a week made. 

Millersville stormed back to nip 
New Haven, the runner-up in D-II 



son. 

All-PS AC linebackers Dan Caro 
and Ed Mattie return to anchor a 
defense that was second-best in 
the conference a year ago. 

Shippensburg 

The Red Raiders made headlines 
throughout Pennsylvania late in 
the summer by announcing that 

Penn State running back Anthony a vear a S°. °y a 19 ' 18 count. Last 

Cleary was transferring to the week, the Marauders continued to 

school. Although he has seen show why they were the presea- 

time on defense this season, son pick in the East by demolish- 

Cleary is a tremendous addition to ing Edinboro by a 42-7 bulge. 

■UP Edinboro a team mat already features an Right behind Millersville is 

Just when everyone thought Returning 19 starters from 1997, explosive offense. Diminutive West Chester, which currently 

IUP's dynasty was ready to fold, the Fighting Scots are arguably wide receiver Jamie Ware (5-10, holds the No. 7 spot in the D-II 

the Indians pulled an ace from the most experienced team in the 155) averaged 23 yards per catch Northeast Regional rankings. The 

their sleeve. PSAC. All 11 starters return on last season, while also blocking Rams will make a trip to face 

After taking five years off to offense, led by senior running five kicks on special teams. Clarion at Memorial Stadium Oct. 

give professional baseball a try, back Gerald Thompson, who has fM«M«fi ^1. 

former Notre Dame quarterback rushed for over 2,700 yards in his IrtWTOH Q n ^ e ^^ en( j ^ ^ s ^ c 
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fans forget about last year's 5-5 receiver Quentin Ware-Bey aver- Ea 8 ,es are geared up to open rentIy hold me nation ' s j ongest 
season. So far, the Indians are 4-0 aged 21.0 yards per catch last sea- PSAC-West play. Their efforts j osmo S [ IGa k at 48 games. 

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INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses.. .Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Page 12 

PhotoEssay: ALF....Page 10 

Entertainment Page 18 

Classifieds Page 19 

Call On YOU Page 21 

Sports Page 19 



News 



The Clarion Students 

Association celebrates 

its golden anniversary 

this week. For more 

information, 

see page 5. 



lifestyles 



Oldies Group 

"Pure Gold" began 

ALF with a bang. 

See page 12. 



Sports 



Turnovers plagued 

the Golden Eagles 

in a 28-14 loss to 

Slippery Rock on 

Saturday. 

See page 22. 



A look at Autumn Leaf Festival 



m-' 




George Groff/ Clarion Call 

Take a ride on the Sea Ray...Both children and adults enjoy one of the amusement rides offered during Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

Board of Student Government Presidents 

State System student leaders address parking 



by Steve Ostrosky 

Clarion Call News 

Editor 



HARRISBURG- Parking was a 
concern mentioned by several 
members of the Board of Student 
Government Presidents (BSGP) 
at their first meeting of the acad- 
emic year on Saturday, Sept. 26. 
The meeting, held at Dixon 
University Center, was held pri- 
marily as an orientation for the 
student government presidents at 
all 14 State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) schools, but 
several topics were discussed 
during the more than three-hour 
meeting. 

The fourteen student body pres- 
idents represent a total of more 
than 94,000 students who cur- 
rently attend one of the 14 SSHE 
institutions. 

Clarion isn't the only SSHE 
school that is dealing with a 



parking problem. Edinboro 
University student body presi- 
dent David Day mentioned dur- 
ing his report that Edinboro has 
"many parking and safety 
issues." 

Slippery Rock student presi- 
dent Rashad Kirby also noted 
that his university is suffering 
from a parking problem. He 
mentioned that SRU offers a 
student shuttle service to help 
alleviate their situation. 

At Lock Haven University, 
Luke Lorenz said that LHU has 
purchased what he called an 
"eyesore" near the campus in 
order to add 250 more parking 
spaces. Meanwhile, E.J. 
Gallagher, student body vice 
president of Mansfield 
University, said that they have 
insituted a shuttle service to try 
to combat their parking prob- 
lem. 



At last week's Student Senate 
meeting, CU Senate president 
Tammi Snyder told the mem- 
bers that she plans to contact 
several of the presidents and 
learn more about shuttle ser- 
vices and other plans imple- 
mented on other campuses to 
tackle parking problems. 

In other news, Zack Cattell of 
West Chester University, the 
new chair of BSGP, told the 
group that he has formed an ad 
hoc Student-Faculty Relations 
Committee on his campus. The 
committee is made up of four 
students and four faculty mem- 
bers. Cattell is a member of the 
committee along with two other 
students, and he said that one 
more student is needed. 

The four faculty members 
include one representative from 
The Association of 

Pennsylvania State College and 



University Faculties (APSCUF), 
the union that represents all of 
the SSHE's faculty, one member 
from West Chester's Faculty 
Senate and two at-large mem- 
bers. 

The reason behind developing 
the committee was to provide a 
student "review" process of the 
faculty members at West 
Chester. "Students get informa- 
tion back and they have a say in 
faculty relations," he said. 

Closer to Clarion, Clarion 
Students Association (CSA) 
Board of Directors chairman 
Michael Chapaloney also spoke 
at the meeting, addressing his 
desire to meet with the board 
chairs of the other 13 SSHE 
schools. He provided each of 
the presidents with an informa- 
tion letter and asked them to 

continued on Page 6 



Page 2 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 CEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, TA 16214 

(814) 226-2380 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-mail: call@mail.clarion.edu 

www clarion odu/thocjll 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



is published most 
Thursday* durmg the school year in 
accordance with (he academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
from alt sources; but reserve die right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which is the responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in-Chief). Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse publica 
don of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5:00 
p. m. on the Monday of desired publi- 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
tetters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 
issues of The Clarion (>!{, Thsphy 
Advertising copy and greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. The Clar^ n 



£aJl is funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue 






The Clarion Call 



October ft. 1998 



OPINION 




Hide Park 



"We also know that 
alcohol abuse occurs 
at Clarion 
University... 



» 



Dr. Diane Reinhard 



As a university president, I 
receive a good many letters each 
week on a host of issues. One let- 
ter I received this summer stood 
out. It was from Dr. Charles 
Stoddard, Superintendent of the 
Orchard Park Central School 
District in Orchard Park, New 
York, who poignantly described 
the tragic and untimely death of a 
young man from his district. 

Scott Krueger had been an 18 
year old scholar, accomplished 
athlete, respected leader, and 
community servant. He was 
loved by his family, community, 
church and school. He graduated 
from high school on June 28, 
1997, and entered the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology on August 20, 1997. 
In an alcohol-induced coma, in a 
fraternity house where he lived as 
a freshman, Scott died on 
September 29, 1997. 

Superintendent Stoddard asked 
my help in preventing this kind 
of senseless loss on our nation's 
campuses. He asked me to do 
whatever I could to help to 
ensure that Clarion University 
welcomes students to a kind, sen- 



sitive, and caring environment 
where neither underage drinking 
nor pressures to drink excessive- 
ly are tolerated. 

Unfortunately, we do not have 
to look far to find other examples 
of alcohol related deaths of stu- 
dents on college and university 
campuses. We know that alcohol 
abuse is related to academic diffi- 
culties, behavioral problems, 
property damage and vandalism, 
and strained campus-community 
relations. We also know that 
alcohol abuse occurs at Clarion 
University. 

Your years here at Clarion are 
precious ones. They require too 
much time, effort, and resources 
to be wasted in careless and dan- 
gerous alcohol abuse. As we 
begin our week-long celebration 
of Autumn Leaf Festival here in 
Clarion and throughout the acad- 
emic year, let's work together to 
ensure that life and learning at 
this university are not marred by 
alcohol or drug abuse of any 
kind. 

Dr. Diane L. Reinhard is the 
President of Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania. 



7Je Ciarion Caii 




ow a eafie and kappa 
/{utuMK Leak regtiu<a£/ 




Editorial 



"Even the minute 
advancements with- 
in a year's time can 
be extraordinary. 



Tom Casey, Business Manager 



» 



As I look through the eyes of 
my nieces and nephews, I realize 
that they will live in a computer 
dominated society. Growing up a 
child in the 1980s, I have seen 
many advancements in computer 
technology. 

Some of these advancements 
include Speak-n-Spell, the 
mouse, hard discs, and the 
Internet. With rapid advance- 
ments, there is always something 
new to learn, making each gener- 
ation more knowledgeable then 
the last 

In my communication studies at 
Clarion University, I've seen cur- 
riculum changes due to computer 
advancements. For instance, a 
course requirement of the com- 
munication department is Intro to 
Images. This is a course designed 
to teach elements of photography 
and Internet application. When I 
took this course a semester prior 
to these requirements, Images 
was primarily a photography 
class. In the matter of one semes- 
ter, I missed out on the Internet 
skills, which I would later need to 
know. As a freshman, I remember 
having to type papers on a blue 



screen IBM, and print on a dot 
matrix. Even the minute 
advancements of computer sys- 
tems within a year's time can be 
extraordinary. 

In future employment, people 
will need to adapt to future ideas 
and waves of technology to 
maintain employment. Will the 
days of power lunches and pre- 
sentations turn into impersonal 
video conferences? Will the mes- 
sages we relay in future commu- 
nication lose the contextual 
meaning we receive from feed- 
back and body language through 
personal communication? These 
are questions we will discover in 
future generations? 

In the movie Drug Store 
Cowboy , the main character 
(Matt Dillon) refers to his 1950 
predecessors as the "television 
babies." This is because the new 
generation defined themselves 
from what they saw on t.v. I'd 
like to think our 1990 predeces- 
sors should be coined the "com- 
puter babies." With all of the 
technological advancements, it 

Continued on Page 3 



Clarion Call Staff ~" 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith Gwillim 

Assistant Sports Editor: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Assistant Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Assistant Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Copy and Design Assistants. Ryan Camuso and Wendy Stivers 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
Staff Writing Supervisor: Mary Beth Curry 
Staff Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Susan Ferchalk, Mike Markewinski, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, 
Kelly Palma, Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker, Jeff Chaffee, 
Mike Cody, James Gates, Keith Gwillim, Lori Imbrugno, Janet Pazsink, Cory 
Pittman, Jason Rhoades, Jerry Collier, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob Meyers, 
Marvin Wells 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tim Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Drayton, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Julie 
Lope, Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, 
Alvin Slaughter 

Circulation Staff: Shane Bednez, John Dellich, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
Ibinson, Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 
Proofreaders: Dawn Koch, Niki Stedina, Brooke Rinier, Stephanie Apter 
Names remaining in the staff box in the December 10 issue will receive co-curricular credit. 



Beginning this semester, advertisers will be charged for ordering an ad, 
regardless of whether or not they meet The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 



October 8, 1998 



The Clan on Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSE 



"The images are still as vivid as the formaldehyde smell that 

accompanied them." 



Dear Editor, 

When I recall the days of my 
biology education — from high 
school in the late seventies 
through ten years of college 
undergraduate and graduate 
training during the eighties — I 
am reminded of animal labs. I 
chose to study animals because I 
love them. But I hated the labs. 
They stretch out in my mind like 
a long anthem of grim death and 
moldering flesh. The images are 
still as vivid as the formaldehyde 
smell that accompanied them. 
Pathetic little fetal pigs who 
never saw life, removed from 
clear plastic bags, pinned out, 
splay-legged on a rubber tray. 
Cats with distorted faces, tongues 
protruding, some with kittens in 
their wombs. Dogfish sharks who 
expelled part of their insides in 

Editorial contin- 
ued from Page 2... 

will take the children of the 90s 
- with their early computer devel- 
opment, to solve problems and 
advance computer communica- 
tion systems. People ages 20 to 
30 must compete with baby 
boomers and pay attention to new 
technologies on the horizon. 
Thomas Casey is a Senior 
Communication Major. 



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the throes of death with severed 
tails where latex dyes were 
injected. Pigeons, no longer 
graceful, their feathers drowned 
in preservative. Frogs with eyes 
that shown like jewels in life now 
milky and dull. 

When the dissections were 
over, one could listen to the thuds 
of discarded bodies hitting the 
bottom of the plastic buckets at 
the front of the room. Students, 
their morals muddied, often 
joked around and made crude 
displays of their carcasses. The 
sinks would clog with greasy bits 
of skin and muscle. Animals as 
throw-aways. Disposable items. 
Catch, kill, preserve, dismember, 
and toss. 

What do we learn when animals 
are killed for school exercises? 
We learn that animals don't count 




Letters to 
the Editor 



for much, and that they are 
throw-away objects. We're 
taught that killing to learn is 
okay. We take away their most 
prized possession — their lives — 
so the teacher can test our knowl- 
edge on a mid-term exam. 

Is there another way? 
Absolutely. There are many ways 
to learn anatomy and physiology 
that don't involve killing. Don't 
be led to believe that you need to 
cut open animals to become a 
good scientist or a good surgeon. 
Neither is true. More than half of 
U.S. medical schools, including 
Yale, Harvard and Columbia 
have no animal labs. 

As your educational experience 
unfolds, invest in it with your 
conscience, as well as your mind. 
Education is about much more 
than merely learning facts and 



concepts. It is also about becom- 
ing a caring, responsible citizen. 
And keep in mind the words of 
Margaret Mead: "Never doubt 
that a small group of thoughtful 
committed citizens can change 
the world; indeed, it is the only 
thing that ever has." 

Sincerely, 

Jonathan Balcombe 

Associate Director for Education 

Animal Research Issues 

The Humane Society of the 

United States 



Have a comment 

or complaint? 

Write a letter to 

the editor! 



V •»:-• 



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Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 8. 1998 



READER RESPONSE 



"What is so difficult about finding three 
men and three women for this section?" 



Dear Editor, 

I am very disappointed in The 
Clarion Call and its staff's lack 
of equality. For the second time, 
this semester alone, the "Call On 
You" section of the student news- 
paper has had all male opinions 
with photos. 

What is so difficult about find- 
ing three women and three men 
for this section? 

During the third issue of The 



Clarion Call, I was most offend- 
ed. The question was in reference 
to McGwire's 70 home runs this 
past season. Only interviewing 
men for this response was an 
extremely sexist practice assum- 
ing that women show no interest 
in sports. 

There are plenty of female ath- 
letes who have been very suc- 
cessful on this campus alone, and 
you should be embarrassed by 



your presumption to suggest oth- 
erwise. I expect this to never hap- 
pen again. 

Democratically yours, 
Jennie E. Seigler 
Senior 

Pol. Science/Women's Studies 
Editor's Note: Although our 
photography editor asked an 
equal number of males and 
females to participate, the 
females declined. 



XTT BROTHER 
AUCTION 



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October 8, 1998 



NEWSWIRE 



New report on binge 
drinking and students 

A new report states that 
more college students are 
drinking to get drunk, and 
binge drinking is down- 
though only slightly. For 
more information and a 
look at how CU is dealing 
with this situation, 
see page 6. 



Enrollment rise 

Nationwide, college 
enrollment is at a record 

high and expected to 

increase even more over 

the next ten years. 

Also, find out why 

Clarion's enrollment 

continues to improve. 

Turn to page 8. 



Hartle wins award 

Darlene Hartle, health 

education coordinator at 

Keeling Health Center, 

was recently given the 

Making Life Better at 

Clarion Award. 

For the full story, 

see page 9. 



Press Day scheduled 

Clarion University will 

host the second-annual 

College Press Day next 

Friday, Oct. 16. This 

year's focus is law. To 

learn more about it and see 

a complete schedule of 

events, 

see page 7. 



Also inside: 

Public Safety page 7 

Student Senate page 6 



NEWS TIPS? 

Phone: 226-2380 
FAX: 226-2557 
E-mail:CALL@clarion.edu 
Mail: 270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



NEWS 



New COB A and fine arts floors added 



Residence halls undergo some changes 



by Susan Ferchalk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Residence Life made several 
changes to the residence halls at 
the start of this semester. 

These changes include new 
theme floors, new non-smoking 
floors, and regular maintenance 
work on the buildings. 

In Wilkinson Hall, several floors 
have been changed to theme 
floors. The north wing of the third 
and fourth floors have been 
changed to College of Business 
Administration (COBA) floors. 
This floor is designed to help stu- 
dents get in contact with faculty 
and gain important experience in 
their job fields. 

Although not everyone on the 
floor is a business major, the focus 
of the floor is geared toward busi- 
ness. 

Heather Pirraglia, a resident 



assistant on one of the COBA 
floors, said that professors from 
the College of Business 
Administration are more willing 
to come to the floor programs and 
speak because they know of the 
student interest. 

Nair Hall now has a fine arts 
floor to cater to students with an 
artistic interest. This co-ed floor 
creates a learning atmosphere for 
students with an artistic pursuit. 

Ken Rossman, resident assistant 
on that floor, said that they have 
conducted several programs with 
the floor's theme in mind. Some 
of the programs include a service 
experiment with the local elemen- 
tary school where they conduct 
short plays and a student-mentor- 
ing program with the high school. 
Rossman said that soon floor 
members will be taking a trip to 
Toronto to see "Les Miserables." 
On weekends, students who live 



on the floor will take trips to more 
local sites, such as Heinz Hall in 
Pittsburgh. 

Rossman said that in the future 
he hopes that the floor can work 
with the art, music, and theater 
departments. "Right now, we're 
feeling the water and seeing what 
we can do," he added. 

Dr. Barry Morris, director of 
Residence Life, said the changes 
have occurred because of student 
surveys. He said that two inter- 
ests that topped the students' lists 
were arts and academics, which is 
why the floors have been 
changed. 

According to Morris, the sur- 
veys have also resulted in many 
floors on campus being changed 
to non-smoking floors. He said 
the students showed a lot of 
interest in the non-smoking floors 
and he hasn't heard any com- 
plaints yet 



Some changes done affect all 
campus residence halls. All resi- 
dence hall offices and labs will be 
hooked up to the CNET fiberoptic 
cable system sometime this fall. 
Also, Clarion University has a 
new long distance carrier, ACC, a 
subsidiary of AT&T. 

Also, regular maintenance work 
has also been done on the build- 
ings. According to Morris, 200 or 
more mattresses have been pur- 
chased for the halls. Some halls 
have been repainted and new car- 
peting will be added to certain 
halls over Christmas break. 

In the long run, Morris said he 
hopes to introduce voice mail, 
separate computer lines in the res- 
idence halls and possibly, in the 
distant future, to build a residence 
hall. 

Morris said he "wants to make 
all living areas attractive to stu- 
dents." 



Open forum kicks off CS A 50th weekend 



by Patricia Boberg 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

On October 6, 1998 the Clarion 
Students Association (CSA) held 
their fiftieth anniversary open 
forum 



According to the 1997 version of president of a University was not 
the Petersons Four Year College questioned. Students need to realize 



Review, "The Student Senate at 

Clarion University is a vital and 

active campus organization. Its 

members allocate all athletic and 

activity funds, initiate academic and 

The focus of discussion was pre- campus policies and serve on search 

sent and upcoming issues currently committees for faculty and adminis- 

affecting Clarion University stu- trative positions." 



dents. Among the panelists were 
Frank Lignelli, Ron Wilshire, Barry 
McCauliff, Tammi Snyder and 
Michael Chapaloney. 

All of the panelists contributed 
their insight on issues oncerning 
both CSA and Student Senate. 
Nathan Rearick, vice president of 
Student Senate, stated, "The cele- 
bration of the CSA's 50 years of ser- 
vicing the students of Clarion 
University is important because it is 
a thankless job." 

The name "Clarion Students' 



The CSA is a business. Nathan 
Rearick said, "Today, after fifty 
years of serving the students of this 
University, Clarion's Student 
Senate remains the driving voice for 
the students." 



that their opinions are now being 
taken more seriously by administra- 
tion. Universities are more respon- 
sive when students raise objec- 
tions." 

Barry McCauliff was a Student 
Senator form 1970 to 1972. He was 
on the budget committee for two 
years, serving as chair for one, and 
also served on the social committee. 
McCauliff has served as a member 
of Clarion faculty since 1974. 

McCauliff focused on what is best 
for students as a whole for the 



Among the panelists were former University. In 1972 a 20% increas- 

Student Senators. Frank Lignelli es from $25 to $30 a semester, 

was a member of Student Senate McCauliff said, 'Today's issues are 

from 1948 to 1950, and served as remarkably the same. Students are 

vice president in 1949. Lignelli sensitive about money issues, but 

then spent almost thirty four years they are not aware of where it is 



as a member of faculty. He served 
as moderator, and said he believes, 
"Students need to realize the impor- 

the 



Association," as an operational cor- 
poration, was approved and regis- tance of the activity fee for 
tered by the Secretary of the entire student body." 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on 
the April 27, 1947. 

At this time, the amount of assets 
with which the corporation started 
to function with was the sum of 
$1,000. 

Today, the CSA receives just under 
$1 million from the activity fee, and 
this funds over fifty student clubs 
and organizations. 



Ron Wilshire was a former 
Student Senator in 1972. He was a 
member of the budget committee, 
UAB and active on The Clarion 
Call and WCCB radio. He dis- 
cussed some of the differences from 



going. 

Tammi Snyder, current president 
of Student Senate, is a former 
approriations chair and currently 
president of Sigma Sigma Sigma 
sorority. She discussed many of the 
problems that currently exist on 
campus, and the involvement of 
Student Senate in these issues. 

Michael Chapaloney is chairman 
of CSA, and a member of the board 



today, and the importance of student of directors from fall 1997 to pre- 

involvement in meetings such as sent. He is also a member of the 

this. Facilities Planning Committee and 

Wilshire said, "In past years the is the Managing Editor of The 



Clarion Call. Chapaloney said, "As 
a CSA member, we are always look- 
ing for input. We just want to have a 
prospering operation." 

All members of the panel shared 
the experience of being a Student 
Senator and the emphasis on the 
great deal of work involved. 

Wilshire said, "Being a member of 
Student Senate has provided me 
with real life experiences in dealing 
with the public and co-workers." 
McCauliff added, "I accumulated 
experience that otherwise I would 
have been able to gain." 

Chapaloney said, "Students com- 
plain this and that is wrong and they 
can't change it. I have seen 
changes, whether they occur now or 
in five years, a students voice can 
make a difference." 

All of the present panelists agreed 
that the purpose of being a part of 
CSA is "for students to let someone 
know how they feel on what is rele- 
vant for their eduction, and to let 
administration and members know 
what is important." 

"I still call on the experiences 
today," McCauliff said. "I learned 
appreciation of government and 
myself as an individual and differ- 
ent kinds of people," 
"Hopefully, Senate's decisions will 
be as rewarding to future Senators 
as it has been for me," McCauliff 
added. 




Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 



Student Senate 



Changes made to CSA 50th plans 



by Danielle Boccio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

If you are a student who was 
planning on attending the Clarion 
Student Association (CSA)'s 50th 
anniversary cookout this Sunday, 
try again. 

At Monday's Student Senate 
meeting, Vice President Nathan 
Rearick announced that the event 
has been moved to the new 
University residence. 

Rearick apporoached his col- 
leagues at the Sept. 28 meeting to 
ask for $5,500 to help fund the 
event. After much discussion, 
that motion was tabled. 

Clarion University President 
Diane Reinhard decided to pro- 
vide the remainder of the funding 
for the event herself, according to 
Rearick. 

The event will be open only to 
current and former Senators. 
Originally, the event was to 
include the entire campus com- 
munity. 

When asked why the motion 
was not brought up at this week's 
meeting, Treasurer Leslie Suhr 




Jolina Giaramita/Clarion Call 
Student Senate is preparing for a visit by Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, vice president for finance and administration, 
to discuss the Master Plan. She will address Senate, as 
well as the entire campus, at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 12. 
The location of the meeting has not yet been announced. 
said that she was unable to bring it Committee must serve on that 
up because she made the motion board. She added that she already 
last week. Other Senators could attended the board's first meeting, 
have brought the motion up, " but but she was unable to vote on any 
they didn't have to based on the matters until officially appointed 
wording of the motion." by Senate. 

In other business, Treasurer Chair of the Committee on Sub- 
Leslie Suhr was appointed to the committees, Brian McQuillan, 
Clarion Students Association said that he will begin assigning 
(CSA) Board of Directors. Senators to serve on the various 

Suhr told the group that a mem- subcommittees, 
ber of the Appropriations He asked all Senators to give 



him a copy of their class sched- 
ules to help make the assign- 
ments. 

Senator Mangieri announced 
that he, along with other Senators, 
are working on designing a new t- 
shirt for Student Senate. Senator 
Kemp said that the t-shirt is being 
made to "make students aware" 
about Senate. 

When Vice President Rearick 
asked who will get the shirts, 
Mangieri said that they may be 
made just for Senators or some 
may be sold to students. 

Finally, President Snyder told 
Senate that Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, vice president for 
finance and administration, will 
be at next week's Senate meeting 
to make a presentation on the 
Facilities Master Plan. 

Snyder noted that the meeting 
may be moved from 246 Gemmell 
to either Gemmell Multi-purpose 
room or Rooms 250/252 Gemmell 
because the presentation will be 
open to the entire campus. 

That meeting has been sched- 
uled for 7:30 p.m. on Monday, 
October 12. 



CSA chairman speaks to BSGP in Harrisburg 

(continued from page 1) 



pass it on to their respective board 
chair in the hopes that they could 
all meet sometime this academic 
year. 

He told BSGP that the CSA is an 
"ever-changing organization" and 
that he is interested in learning 
more about how the boards at 
other schools are comprised to 
look possibly try and establish 
some continuity among boards 
throughout the State System. 

"I hope that a meeting between 
the board chairs will result so that 
we as students can have a better 
understanding of how to make 
policies and operate businesses to 
best benefit the students," 
Chapaloney said after the meet- 
ing. 



He also touched upon some 
issues that the CSA could benefit 
from by holding just such a meet- 
ing that is being proposed. 

"Some concerns with the CSA 
that would benefit from a meeting 
of this sort would be the board 
makeup and the operation of the 
CSA Business Office," he said. 

"I would like to see what other 
services or businesses in the other 
institutions which are working for 
their students," Chapaloney 
added. 

Chancellor James H. 
McCormiCk addressed the student 
leaders and told them of the 
importance of the job they hold. 

"This is a critical time for high- 
er education," he said. 




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18 Grant Street, Clarion, PA 

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George Groff/Clarion Call 

Student Senate president Tammi Snyder and CSA Board of 

Directors chairman Michael Chapaloney both spoke on 

behalf of Clarion students at the Board of Student 

Government Presidents (BSGP) meeting in Harrisburg on 

Sept. 26. 

"Competition is increasing and tackling. 

we face out most serious chal- BSGP meets four times during 

lengesnow." the academic year. The next 



"Our most important resource is 
people and their investment 
through higher education is most 
important," he added. 

Also during the meeting, the 



meeting will be held from 
November 6-8 on the campus of 
Edinboro University of 
Pennsylvania. 

The board will meet in 



board was introduced to the many Harrisburg again sometime in 

vice chancellors who make up the February at the Dixon University 

administration of the SSHE. Center, and the final meeting of 

They learned about what the the 1998-99 academic year will be 

duties are of each office as well as held in April at Mansfield 

current issues that each office is University of Pennsylvania. 



Snyder 
elected to 
BSGP office 

by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

HARRISBURG-Clarion 
University's own Student Senate 
president Tammi Snyder was 
elected parliamentarian for the 
Board of Student Government 
Presidents (BSGP) at their Sept. 
26 meeting. 

"Basically, I am responsible for 
keeping the order of meetings 
and keep track of bylaws," she 
said. "I'll make sure the meeting 
is in order and the rules are being 
followed." 

One of her major tasks this year 
will be working to make revi- 
sions to the BSGP bylaws. "No 
revisions have been made to the 
bylaws in a while," she noted. 

Snyder feels that her work on 
the BSGP bylaws will help in the 
efforts of the CU Student Senate 
and the CSA Board of Directors 
to revise their constitution and 
bylaws. 

There is currently an ad hoc 
Bylaw Amendment Committee at 
Clarion to begin the revision 
process. 

Snyder is looking forward to 
her year in office, both as Student 
Senate president as well as BSGP 
parliamentarian. 

"I am very honored to be able 
to represent Clarion University at 
meetings and sit as an officer on 
the Board," she said. "I think it's 
an amazing thing... 14 members 
represent 94,000 students." 

Snyder will hold office with 
Zachary Cattell of West Chester 
University, who was elected to be 
Chair. Other officers include 
David Day of Edinboro, Vice- 
chair, and Luke Lorenz of Lock 
Haven, who will serve as 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

At their next meeting in 
Edinboro Nov. 6-8, Snyder said 
workshops will be held and legal 
personnel will be in attendance to 
help the Board begin discussing 
their Issue of the Year. 

At future meetings, BSGP will 
draft a resolution based on the 
issue that they decide to tackle. 

Snyder said that the majority of 
the work on the resolution will 
come sometime in February or 
April. 

"BSGP shows that students do 
have a voice or say in what goes 
on...we are important," Snyder 
said. 

"You don't really realize how 
important it is until you go and 
are a part of it," she added. 



October 8, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 




Man arrested 

According to Public Safety, 
Stanford Hayden was arrested 
on Sept. 30 and charged with 
two counts of simple assault, 
two counts of harassment and 
one count of disorderly conduct 
concerning an incident at Peirce 
Science Center. 

Man cited 

Public Safety said John M. 
Jordan, 18, was cited for minors 
consumption on Sept. 8. They 
said Jordan also had a bottle of 
rum in his possession. 

Theft from Snack Bar 

Public Safety is investigating the 
theft of food/drink from Reimer 
Snack Bar on Oct.2 at approxi- 
mately 6:15 p.m. 

Vehicle damaged 

Someone damaged a vehicle in 
Parking Lot Y on Oct. 3, accord- 
ing to Public Safety. 

Harassment reported 

A student from Campbell Hall 
told Public Safety that he has 
been receiving harassing phone 
calls. Public Safety said the 
incident is under investigation. 



College Press Day 1998 

"What's Good, What's Bad, What's Legal" 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

Legal questions will be the focus 
of the 1998 College Press Day, set 
for Friday, Oct. 16 in Gemmell 
Student Complex. 

For the second annual event, 
presented by The Clarion Call, a 
number of professors, advisors, and 
media professionals have been 
invited to the University to present 
ideas and answer questions for stu- 
dent journalists. 

Student journalists from Clarion 
University and other schools will 
be in attendance for this meeting of 
student media. 

The theme for this year's gather- 
ing is "What's Good, What's Bad, 
and What's Legal." 

"In just one year, the College 
Press Day program has expanded 
considerably," said Dr. Arthur 
Barlow, associate professor of 
communication at CU, national 
executive director of the Society 
for Collegiate Journalists (SCJ) and 
coordinator of College Press Day. 
"We are presenting a very solid 
academic opportunity for anyone 
who chooses to participate," he 
added. 

This year's keynote speaker, 
Michael C. Hiestand, a staff attor- 
ney at the Student Press Law 
Center, Washington, D.C will be 
speaking on "The Student Press 
Law Center's Silver Anniversary: 
Hold die Champagne." 

Many sessions have been sched- 
uled throughout the morning and 
afternoon, followed by a panel dis- 
cussion featuring Clarion graduates 
who will discuss ethical issues and 
answer questions. A media fair will 
follow, giving students a chance to 
network with the graduates. 




Michael Hiestand: The 
keynote speaker for 
College Press Day 1998. 

"Last year's College Press Day 
gave us a firm foundation on which 
to build," said Mary Beth Curry, 
assistant coordinator, Student Press 
Day 1998. "We've expanded the 
day by adding two more sessions 
and expanding the media fair. 
College Press Day marks year two 
of a three-year commitment." 

"We hope to involve other uni- 
versities in next year's planning," 
r he added. 

The packed day begins with 
opening remarks at 10 a.m., fol- 
lowed by Hiestand's keynote 
address in Gemmell Multi-purpose 
Room. Sessions are scheduled for 
the remainder of the morning and 
into the afternoon in different 
rooms of Gemmell Student 
Complex. 

The Clarion Call editor in chief 
Kristen Davis said there are many 
benefits to attending College Press 
Day. 

"College Press Day is a perfect 
time to learn about how your stu- 
dent newspaper and runs," she 
noted. "This year, you can also 
learn how to write the right way 
and avoid legality issues in the 
process." 



Schedule of Events-CPD 1998 

9;<MM>:30 a.m.* Registration and Morning Refreshments in 

Cemmell Multi- Purpose Room 

10:00 ajrMOpening Remarks in Cemroell Multipurpose Room. 

Speakers include the Provost of Clarion University, i>r. John Kuhn 

and the advisor of The Clarion Call, Dr. Arthur Barlow 

11:00 a.m.-Sessiou la-Gemmell Room 246. "Using the Tools of 

the Trade: A Guide to Freedom of Information Law." Presented 

by Mr. Michael C. Heistand, Staff Attorney, Student Press l^aw 

Center 

1 1:00 sum.-Session lb-Gemmell Room 250* "Libel and the 

Student Press/* Presented by Dr. Allan Larson, Professor, 

CMaraunication Department, Clarion University 

1.1*00 a,m.»Session lc-GemmeH Room 252. freedom of the 

^lisi^Bder the Constitution," Presented by Dr. Ngo Dtnh 1 u. 

Professor, PSSP, Clarion University 

12:00 p.m.-Session 2a-Gemmell Room 246, "Alcohol Advertising 

in Campus Puhlicat^ons/ , Presented by Dr Douglas Campbell 

Chair, Journalism l)e^artrnent,1^>ck Haven University 

l&OO p,m^Session 2o-Oeramell Room 250. "The New Campus 

Crime Legislation." Presented by Dr William Lawbaugh, National 

President, Society for Collegiate Journalists, and Professor, Mount 

St Mary's College. Maryland. 

12:00 p.m.-Session 2c»Gemmell Room 252. "Classroom vs. 

Illwsroom: Student Reporters and Their Sources. Presented by 

Ik Dale Harrison, Protessor, Younptowu State University, Ohio. 

1:00 p.m. Lunch-Chandler Dining Halt 

2:00 p.m. ♦Session 3*-Gemtne)l Room 246, *'MarketuigYottrs«lt 

How do you Get Your First Job?" Presented by Mrs. Mary 

Wilson, Instructor, (^m^uhicattoa Department, Clarion University,; 

and Mrs. Lori Neisen, PR Department, Clarion Hospital 

2:00 rwn,* Session 3b-Gemroeil Room 252. "Digital Medial 

|!*eseiited by Dr. Sue Hilton, Dr.Scoti Kucrm,and Mr, Bill Adams, 

&«jfe$sor$> Cornmunication Derwu^nt^ Oari<H) tJniversity 

3?00 p,m,-Gemmett Multi-Purpose Room, "Panel Discussion," 

jlpifif includes: Jeanne Hamrnefstrom, Marketing Director, Tucker 

Atsasberg, . P.C; Dawn Hicken, District Training Majnager, Ceridjaa- 

Employer Services; Joe Kapp, Producer, TCDKA Radio Sports; Deb 

ff$|pe$Sv General Manager, Communications and Consumer 

Affairs, Heinz North America; Mark Power, Kendra Power Design 

and Communication; Kathryn Spryn, Associate Director, WTAE-TV 

^biinnel 4; Alan Vaughn, City Editor, The Citizen 

4:00 p.m,»Media Fair Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. This Is 

your chance to network* Bring your resumes? 

5:30 p.m.«Ctostng Reception at tbe Captain I^khtus Inn. 



More teens drinking to get drunk, report says 



by Mark Strieker 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

According to a study released 
last week by the Harvard School 
of Public Health, more college 
students are drinking to get drunk. 
The study was based on a survey 
of 14,521 randomly chosen stu- 
dents attending 130 colleges 
across the country. The report, 
published in the Journal of 
American College Health, said 
that 52 percent of students drank 
to get drunk in 1997, compared 
with 39 percent in 1993. 

The number of students who 
binge drink (five drinks in a row 
for men and four in a row for 
women) dropped from 44.1 per- 
cent in 1993 to 42.7 percent last 



year. The number of students who 
reported they hadn't had a drink in 
a year rose from 15.6 percent to 
19 percent. 

President Diane Reinhard said, 
"The issue of binge drinking 
keeps me up at night." 
Reinhard said a survey was done 
on the Clarion campus in 1995 to 
address the issue, and that another 
survey will be conducted in the 
Spring. 

Henry Wechsler, lead author of 
the 1993 and 1997 studies, said 
"We have to know all the con- 
tributing factors to this behavior - 
the fraternities, the tradtion sur- 
rounding athletics and the sale of 
alcohol for dirt cheap in bars and 
stores throughout the communi- 

ty" 



Reinhard said there is only so 
much college adminstrators can 
do. 

She stressed the importance of 
student responsibilty and chang- 
ing student norms. "Encouraging 
people to drink with the kind of 
respect for alcohol they need to 
have is very important," she said. 
Reinhard recently e-mailed a let- 
ter to students, encouraging them 
to be responsible, especially dur- 
ing the Autumn Leaf Festival 
week. 

Reinhard said drinking at off 
campus locations is the biggest 
problem and that real alternatives 
to alcohol-related parties must be 
found. She said the Pennsylvania 
Association of Colleges and 
Universities will release a report 



in January listing anti-binge 
drinking practices in place at other 
institutions. 

Wechsler's studies say four out 
of five students binge drink at fra- 
ternities and sororities. Student 
Senator Mitchell Augustine, who 
gives the InterFratemity Council 
report at Senate meetings, says 



fraternities are "trying to regulate 
parties so they don't get out of 
hand." 

§§ad Dr, Reinhaid's 
letter to CU students 
about binge drinking 
in Hide Park. 



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The Clarion Call 



Ofrohfr8,1998 



College enrollment 
continues to soar 
nationally 

by Christine latum 
College Press Exchange 



CHICAGO — More students 
than ever are heading to college, 
according to a study released 
recently by the U.S. Department 
of Education. 

A record 14.6 million freshmen 
enrolled in school this fall — about 
240,000 more first-year students 
than a year ago. 

The booming freshman classes 
are directly linked to an increas- 
ing number of high school gradu- 
ates. Last year, a record-breaking 
67 percent of high school seniors 
went direcUy to college. 

That number is projected to rise 
another 17 percent over the next 
decade, said Tom Snyder, director 
of the department's National 
Center for Education Statistics. 

"It's very difficult to say exact- 
ly what it is that makes up peo- 
ple's minds to do things," he said. 
"But in this case, many young 
people feel that getting a college 
education is a really big help 
when it comes to finding a good- 
paying job. And they're right" 

While enrollment of nontradi- 
tional students, particularly those 
older than 35, is up seven percent, 
it's the younger crowd that's dri- 
ving the frenzied pace at which 
colleges and universities are 
expanding their living quarters 
and support services. 

Schools nationwide, including 



Stanford University and the 
University of Delaware, are 
reporting packed dorms. 

Some schools will have to work 
hard — perhaps even raise acade- 
mic requirements — to control the 
wave of students expected to 
crash through their doors within 
the next 15 years. 

The report predicts that 52.7 
million children will enroll in 
grade school this fall, surpassing 
last year's record by about 
500,000. 

The record-breaking pace is 
expected to continue at the ele- 
mentary and secondary school 
levels for at least the next eight 
years, with about 54.3 million 
children attending U.S. schools 
by 2008. 

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According to figures from the SSHE 

Clarion University's 
enrollment best in the west 



by Courtney Spangler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



As reported in earlier editions of 
The Clarion Call, Clarion 
University's enrollment has 
increased five percent over the 
last four years. 

When comparing CU's enroll- 
ment to other schools in the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE), Clarion is a rarity. 

Since the fall of 1995, the 
enrollment and retention rates at 
Clarion have steadily increased. 

In 1994, the number of students 
enrolled at all of Clarion's cam- 
puses (Clarion main campus, 
Venango campus in Oil City, West 
Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, and 
Clearfield) during the fall term 
was 5,637. 

In fall 1997, the number of stu- 
dents enrolled was 5,948. The 
question on the minds of many 
students is why Clarion 
University's enrollment is 
increasing. 

"A large part (of the increased 
enrollment) is the variety of pro- 
grams that can accommodate a 
large number of people," said 
John Shropshire, Dean of 
Enrollment Management. 

"(Also), One of the strongest rea- 
sons why we are able to attract 
more students is having families 
visit the campus. 

Shropshire said that CU is 
known around Pennsylvania in 
both the eastern and western parts 
as having great ambiance, 
scenery, friendly students and fac- 
ulty, qualities he said are some- 



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on 

The history of enrollment at all of 
campuses of Clarion Universi ty : 



Fall 1994 


5,637 


Fall 1995 


5,860 


Fall 1996 


5,886 


Fall 1997 


5,948 


Fall 1998 


5,971* 


Estimate 

*Source: Office of the Vice 1 


President for -A 



times a rare commodity in the 
ever-growing world of secondary 
education. "I am happy with our 
situation," he said. 

According to Shropshire, 
Clarion University has the fifth 
highest retention rate of students 
behind Millersville, Bloomsburg, 
Shippensburg and Kutztown, all 
located in the eastern half of 
Pennsylvania. 

Figures from the SSHE say that 
California, Edinboro, Mansfield 
and Slippery Rock universities 
have all seen enrollment 
decreased between 1994-1997, 
while Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania's enrollment has 
remained stagnant. 

So, why is Clarion's enrollment 
on a steady increase? 

"We have an intensive high 
school recruitment program and 
outreach program to the eastern 



Parking Restrictions for 
ALF/Homecoming 

*There will be NO PARKING in parking 

lots G, H, I, J, and M from Midnight, 

Friday, Oct. 9 through 3 p.m. Saturday, 

Oct. 10 for ALF Parade formation. 

*Cars left in these lots WILL BE TOWED at 

the owner's expense. 

*It is recommended that students use the 

parking lots near Still Hall. 

*Your cooperation will be appreciated. 



part of thie state," Shropshire said. 

He noted that the western part of 
Pennsylvania has had a decreas- 
ing population and economy over 
many years. The applicant pool is 
not the same as it is the eastern 
part of the state, where there are 
many prospective students from 
the growing area of York, 
Lancaster, Berks, and 

Montgomery counties. 

There are a large number of col- 
leges in western Pennsylvania 
competing for a smaller amount 
of people. "The secret of our suc- 
cess is being aggressive," 
Shropshire noted. 

"Most students who attend 
schools in the State System usual- 
ly live within 50 miles of certain 
schools. ..we depend on students 
traveling a distance to get here." 



- t?rr.*»'j». 



October 8, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Hartle wins Making Life Better Award 



by Kelly Palma 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Darlene Hartle, a nurse at 
Keeling Health Center, is the lat- 
est recipient of the Making Life 
Better at Clarion Award. 

"I had no idea that I won," she 
said. "President Reinhard just 
showed up with the award...I was 
wearing jeans! I was so embar- 
rassed." 

Many people nominated her, 
among them Shirley Kuzmovich, 
the Clarion coordinator for the 
American Red Cross. 

Hartle felt that nominating her 
was Kuzmovich's way of recog- 
nizing her for organizing the 
blood drives on campus for the 
past ten years. 

As a result of Hartle's efforts, 
over 3,000 pints of blood have 
been raised in the past ten years. 




New grad course stresses 
"real world experiences" 



by Gretchen Druschel 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



students. However, students in 
DAP deal directly with kinder- 
SS garten through third grade chil- 
dren. The students keep journals 
throughout the semester, record- 
ing their experiences in the class- 



Hartle, a nurse for 25 years, has her popularity 



been working at the Health 
Center for almost half of those 25 
years. 

She started out working the 
night shift as a staff nurse and is 
currently the health education 
coordinator. 

"I have no interest in leaving 
Clarion anytime soon... the Potty 



George Groff/Clarion Call 
Darlene Hartle (above), who has worked at Keeling Health 
Center for over 10 years, has recently been awarded the 
Making Life Better at Clarion Award. 

Press will go on as long as I'm She will graduate from the 
here and the students want it," she University in May along with her 
said oldest son, Aric. Her other son, 

Speaking of The Potty Press, it Brian, will graduate from high 
was the inspiration for an article school this spring, 
written recently in the Pittsburgh "I am looking forward to taking 
Post-Gazette. a picture with both of my 

Hartle is constantly amazed at sons...with all of us in our robes," 

she noted. 

When she's on campus, some 
events that Hartle works on are 
the flu shot clinics, the Wellness 



When she discovered that more 
than 2,000 students read The 
Potty Press weekly, she was quite 

shocked. "I don't really realize Fair, eating disorder screenings, 

how many people know me," she the peer education program, the 

sa id. Educational Talent Search pro- 

In addtion to working 40 hours gram, the Women's Health Clinic 

a week, Darlene is currently earn- along with designing programs 

ing her Bachelor's degree. for the residence hall students. 



Clarion University's education 
department has scheduled a new 
graduate course this semester. 

The course, Developmental room with some of the ideas pre- 

Appropriate Practices and sented in class. 
Indirect Teaching Strategies, or Bruner and Dean attempt to 

DAP, is being taught by Dr. coordinate their teaching experi- 

Richard Couch, associate profes- ences and suggest ways to the 

sor of education, and two Clarion graduate class to meet the needs 

University graduates, Judy of their own students. 
Bruner and Patty Dean, both It is hoped that DAP, and the 

kindergarten teachers at Clarion alliance between future teachers 

Area Elementary Schoool. and the public school system, will 

The class addresses the concept prepare the teachers to fulfill the 

of diversity in the classroom. needs of the school system and its 

"Instead of all school children students. 



learning the same thing on 
Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday and some children 
getting left behind or bored to 
tears, DAP class takes a child 



The objectives of the class con- 
centrate on the actual practical 
tools instead of theory. 

Couch hopes that with enough 
support, this graduate class will 



from where they are and tries to remain in the University's stan- 

develop them in the course of a dard curriculum. The DAP prin- 

year," said Couch. "They (the ciples are being taught not only at 

teachers) try to develop them by the graduate level, but also at the 

giving them real world expert- undergraduate level, 

ences." "We really want to make this a 

The class concentrates on practical course for all students," 

preschool through eighth grade Dean said. 



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WAX BEANS 

BROCCOLI 

W/CHEESE. SAUCE 

SATURDAY 






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THURSDAY 

SLOPPY JOES 

VEGETABLE COUS 

COUS 

RICE 




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SUNDAY 

SPICY PORK 

CHOPS 

CARIBBEAN RICE 

CHICKEN FIESTA 

VEGETABLE 

LASAGNA 

THURSDAY 

AMISH STYLE HAM 

SINGAPORE RICE 

AUGRATIN 

POTATOES 



MONDAY 



HONEY DIJON 
CHICKEN WINGS 

RUEBENS 

BAKED POTATOES 

GREEN BEAN 

CASSEROLE 

TUESDAY 



1/4 HAMBURGERS 
HONEY MUSTARD 

CHICKEN 
LINGUINE ITALIANO 

FRENCH FRIES 
CHEESE OMELETS 



NACHO 
CHIPS 



BUFFET 



»Aifcn cicm CHICKEN 

HAMPER GRAVY ^FWATOES 
BISCUITS CORN 

BAKED POTATO 

FRIDAY 

COUNTRY FRIED 

STEAK 

TURKEY DIVAN 

MASHED POTATOES 

LINGUINE 



WEDNESDAY 

YANKEE POT ROAST 
STUFFED PEPPERS 



MON. THRU FRI. 

TORTILLA CHIPS 

SALSA 

CHEESE SAUCE 

JALAPENO PEPPERS 

ONIONS 



SATURDAY 

MEATLOAF 

MASHED POTATOES 

GARDEN STYLE 

PRIMAVERA 



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ASSORTED PIES, CAKES, BROWN.ES, COOK.ES, CR.SP SERVED DA.LY ON A ROTATING 









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Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



October 8. IQQfi 



A Glimpse of Autumn Leaf ... 





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Photo Essay by : 

George 

Groff and 

photography 

staff 




r 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 



LIFEWIRE 



Food Review 

James Gates samples 
someofALFs deli- 
cacies for his review, 
see page 13. 



Pure Gold kick's off 
ALF 

Pittsburgh's oldie 

band adds a fifties 

feel to the first night 

of ALF 

See page 13. 



Royalty Crowned 

To see who this 

years Miss Teen ALF 

is, 

see page 13. 



Video Review 

To find about Robert 

Duvall's spiritual 

rebirth in The 

Apostle, 
see page 14. 



Movie Review 

Robert Deniro's new 

film Ronin shoots 

into theatres for 

review, 

see page 14. 



Calendar of Events 

For what's hap- 
pening on and 
around campus and 
the community, 
see page 15. 



Music Review 

New Earth Crisis 

and Soul Coughing 

albums reviewed 
See page 16. 



LIFESTYLES 



Clarion holds Mulit-Cult ural Night | Nationally known hand to perform 

Blues Traveler to hold 
concert in Clarion 



4th Annual Event 
"unites cultures" 



by Lori Imbrogno 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



■*-^^ ^w>J 



Excitement filled the air as 
hundreds of people of all ages 
and cultures were united during 
the 4th Annual Clarion 
University and Community 
Cultural Night, a kick-off of 
ALF. Sponsored by Beverly 
Healthcare Clarion, the event 
celebrated diversity through a 
variety of music, dance, and 
fashion. 

Dr. Reinhard, president of 
Clarion University, introduced 
the program, rejoicing racial and 
ethnic differences of the commu- 
nity and world. People crowded 
Main Street as Major Robert 
Yoho continued, explaining that 
the town would be "filled with 
international joy." 

Taking over were cohosLs Karen 
Hazlett and Brian Roberts, intro- 
ducing the performers one by 
one. 

The entertainment opened with 
Christopher Waite, a student here 
at Clarion, performing a solo to 
"Stars" from Les Miserables. As 
the music electrified the commu- 
nity, people viewed surrounding 
sales as some received writing 
samples from various cultures. 

Appearing in Scandinavian 
attire were professors Drs. 
Beverly and Richard Smaby, per- 
forming dances to a variety of 
Swedish and Norwegian selec- 
tions. Jackie Booth, a Native 
American Clarion student, fol- 
lowed, welcoming the audience 
to the "land of the Seneca 
Nation" by singing the Seneca 
National Anthem. 

Clarion's Lift Every Voice 
gospel choir and McKeesport's 
New Image Mime Group provid- 
ed a program with a religious 
twist. The chorus preached their 
beliefs through songs including 
"How Excellent" and "Speak to 
My Heart, Lord" while the 
Mimes illustrated their faith 
through a combination of dance 
and sign language. "We came 
here to minister you," said the 
director of New Image Mime 



Group. "We're going to dance 
before you the way we dance 
before the Lord." She explained 
that God will answer people's 
prayers, despite their culture, and 
that everyone is equal in the eyes 
of the Lord. 

The buzz continued as the 
Clarion International Association 
presented a fashion show, por- 
traying styles from around the 
world. Set to international 
music, Japanese, Chinese, 
Egyptian, and Indian students 
were among many representa- 
tives to model the costume of 
their homeland. 

Many musical programs dis- 
played their talents, including 
CUP students Angelo Anderson 
and Brad Wright's rap "Groove 
Me with Your Flows" and multi- 
ple performances by Clarions 
High School's Clarion Singers. 
Reappearing from years past was 
the Ecuadorian band Runa Kuna, 
closing the night with traditional 
songs from South America. 
Moved by the beat of the music, 
spectators left the event with an 
advanced knowledge of cultural 
diversity. 

Community interest in 
Clarion's Cultural Night was 
extraordinary. Bettina Johnson, a 
freshman here in Clarion, was 
especially impressed with New 
Image Mime Group's perfor- 
mance, saying, "They did an 
excellent job, and it would be 
nice if they come back next 
year." Overall, she believes that 
Cultural Night was a "great 
experience" and "very creative." 
Brookville resident Sandy Geer 
also enjoyed the program. "I 
think it's fantastic," she replied. 
"It has outlived my expectations, 
and I love the variety." 
Attendance was exceptionally 
high as well. Although it has 
been the coldest of any Cultural 
Night in Clarion, Karen Hazlett 
announced, "This is the best 
crowd we've had yet." 

President Reinhard hopes that 
by having seen students, faculty 
members, and community mem- 
bers share their cultures, people 
will join them in their celebration 
of diversity. 



by Jeff Say 
Clarion Call Lifestyles Editor 



After years of begging for a big 
name band, Clarion students 
requests have been answered 
with the arrival of Blues 
Traveler. 

Blues Traveler will be per- 
forming at Tippin Gymnasium 
on October 13 at 8:00. Tickets 
are on sale at the Gemmell info 
desk and Dave's Music Mine. 
The price is $15 for non students 
and $10 for students. 

Blues Traveler is also the 
founding fathers of the 
H.O.R.D.E. (Horizons of Rock 
Developing Everywhere) festi- 



val. They first gained notoriety 
in 1993 with their fourth album 
four. Blues Traveler are also 
known for there unique mix of 
blues and rock and lead singer 
John Popper's harmonica play- 
ing. 




P 



Where In Clarion? 




Hot Spot 

Test your knowledge of area landmarks every 
week in "Where In Clarion?" Where is this 
Clarion landmark. The landmark two weeks ago 
was the bleachers at Memorial Stadium. 



October 8, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Food Review 



Page 13 

JWfc— ii-. — 



A Taste of ALF 



by James Gates 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

What's the greates aspect about the 
Autumn Leaf Festival? It isnt' the 
games, or the rides, ore even the 
parade; it's defintely the food. ALF is 
known for having some of the best 
festival food around, and this year is 
no exception. 

This year's AL oners a wide array 
of food, ranging from Poorman's 
Caramel Apples to Kettle Kom to 
Chicken Wings. Walking along Fifth 
Avenue you will find all of the food 
vendors, some travelling from other 
states to bring us the delicious delica- 
cies. 

One of the first places to stop at is the 
Piovenzale Concession Stands by the 
Captain Loomis Inn. They serve 
excellent steak sandwiches and fiench 
fiies. From there, venture over to the 
Quaker Steak and Lube wing stand 
and chow down on some tasty 
LouisianaLkkers. For dessert, mere's 
a plethora of stands to choose from. 
There's fudge, soft pretzels, fried 
dough, kettle popcorn, cotton candy, 
and of course, Poorman's caramel 
apples. 

There are new stands this year along 
with the festival mainstays. One new- 
corner this year is the Kettle Kom tent 
inthepark. Coming all the way from 
Wyoming, they pop com kernels in a 



huge kettle and it is the best tasting 
popcorn ever, crossing regular pop- 
corn with caramel com. It is very 
sweet, but is virtually fat free. 

ALF regulars include Evans fudge, 
a great homemade fudge stand The 
fudge is made fresh daily and is 
extremely tasty. Another regular is 
J&B Concessions from Youngstown, 
Ohio. They serve excellent funnel 
cakes, a festival staple. Both stands 
have served delicious desserts at ALF 
for over twenty years. 

For fans of Italian sausage sand- 
wiches, there's J&J's Carnival 
Concession Stand near the court- 
house. Pizza lovers should try 
Caputo's Pizza Stand or S&R 
Pepperoni Roll Stand. It is definitely 
worth it 

Finally, the must try ALF dessert is 
the famous Poorman's Caramel 
Apples by JAAM Concessions. 
They are unbelievable. With eight 
toppings to choose from, caramel, 
chocolate, ice cream, and a waffle 
cone, the caramel apple is a meal into 
itself. 

Business this year, as usual, has 
been booming. Some vendors had to 
dose early on Tuesday because they 
sold out too soon. 

Come down to AXF. and eat 

everything under the sun, just there 

early so you won't be left out 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

The Food stands are one of the main attractions during 
the Autumn Leaf Festival. 



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The Malen Luke Show at 1:15 



Popular Clarion 
Pageant held 

Miss Teen ALF 
and Junior ALF 
crowned 



by Cory Pittman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Many Clarion students may 
not be aware about the Miss 
Teen ALF pageant. However it 
is the event that opens ALF 
week, and it is evidently a very 
popular event. 

On Saturday October 3, in the 
Clarion Area High School audi- 
torium, the Miss Teen ALF and 
the Miss Junior Teen ALF 
pageant took place. There were 
eight young ladies competing 
for Miss Junior Teen ALF and 
10 young ladies competing for 
Miss Teen ALF. All of these 
ladies had to perform their tal- 
ents to the packed high school 
auditorium. 

The winners were judged on a 
weighted scale such that 15% of 
their score was Runway model- 
ing, 15% was Evening wear, 
35% was their talent, and final- 
ly 35% for their Essay (which 
they wrote to get into the com- 
petition.) 

After sitting through many 
different Talents and clothing 



changes, the audience finally 
got what they were waiting 
on.. .the winners. 

In the Miss Junior Teen ALF 
Bethany Moore and Meighan 
McMillen tied for the best 
Essay Award, Stephanie Spear 
received the Miss Congeniality 
Award, and the most 
Photogenic Award went to 
Rebecca Magrini. Then 3rd 
runner-up went to Meighan 
McMillen, 2nd runner-up to 
Bethany Moore, 1st runner-up 
to Emily Righter, and the win- 
ner of Miss Junior Teen ALF 
was Jennifer Kifer of Clarion 
Area High School. 

In the Miss Teen ALF pageant 
the Essay Award went to 
Colleen Hazlett, the Miss 
Congeniality award went to 
Anne Wolbert; Laura King won 
the Best Interview award, and 
the Most Photogenic award 
went to Lindsey Sherman. The 
3rd runner-up was Jessica Best; 
the 2nd runner-up was Laura 
King; the 1st runner-up was 
Ashley Heidler; and Miss Teen 
ALF went to Colleen Hazlett 



Concert Review 

"Pure Gold" 
kicks off 
ALF 

by Keith Gwillim 

Clarion Call Assistant 

Lifestyles Editor 

Oldies cover band Pure Gold 
performed this Sunday at the 
Clarion Memorial Stadium, 
leaving no bubble gum oldie- 
stone unturned. From six to 
eight, they took the sizable 
crowd that braved the cold 
weather back to a friendlier 
time, music-wise; as they cov- 
ered songs from everything 
from teen idols to British inva- 
sion. 

It could' ve been the sound- 
track to The Wonder Years tele- 
vision show, as Pure Gold 
churned out hit after hit from 
yesteryear. 

The people in the attendance 
certainly seemed to have a good 
time, as they sang along to these 
songs which have been perenni- 
al favorites at social functions 
for decades. Short of putting 
Buddy Holly's skeleton on stage 
with a guitar in his hands, this is 
probably the closest you'll get to 
that sound. 

After the show, a display of 
fireworks was put on by Eat n' 
Park. It was a perfect way to cap 
off the evening, as everyone just 
sat back arid enjoyed the half- 
hour display. 



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Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 



Movie Review 



Ronin: Gives James Bond 
a run for his money 



by Keith Gwllim 

Clarion Call assistant 

Lifestyles editor 

Ronin sounds like a sure-fire 
winner on paper, both artistically 
and commercially. A John 
Frakenheimer spy thriller, with 
plenty of intrigue, backstabbing, 
car chases, and filled with A-Hst 
actors like Robert DeNiro, 
Jonathan Pryce, and Jean Reno. 
So how does it come across on 
film? 

Well, it's not the second coming 
of Frakenheimer's classic The 
French Connection, but it is a 
large cut above most amateurish 
efforts you find in the theaters 
today. Ronin_ starts off on the 
wrong track; with an opening 
sequence that gives you a crash 
course in Samurai culture. Ronin 
refers to a dishonored samurai 
without a master that roams the 
land. It gives you the impression 
that this is going to be a bad 
Kurosawa knock-off. 



Instead of shamed samurai, 
the 'ronin' in this movie are 
all disavowed spies, on the 
track of a mysterious brief- 
case, a la Pulp Fiction, the 
exposition could have been 
done better, with the intro- 
duction of the ensemble cast 
coming of as rather tedious. 
Six of these spies have been 
assembled by Irish terrorist 
Seamus (Jonathan Pryce), for 
the seemingly simple task of 
retrieving a heavily guarded 
briefcase, contents unknown 
to them. 

Ronin is heavy on plot, as it 
weaves a darkly complex web. 
This incredibly rewarding story- 
line comes at the expense of 
character development, which 
surprisingly doesn't hurt as much 
as it should. In fact, it actually 
adds to the movie, making the 
spies seem even more enigmatic. 
The movie is also gritty and real- 
istic, as nobody in this movie is 
truly safe. As these 'ronin' cut a 
swath of destruction through 
Paris, innocent bystander upon 



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innocent bystander upon inno- 
cent bystander is killed senseless- 
ly. These spies care only for the 
paycheck they will receive at the 
end of the mission, and the unin- 
volved are constantly used as 
everything from bullet shields to 
leverage in shady deals. It really 
shows you just how detached 
these people are from the real 
world. Ronin_shov/s the dark 
underbelly of what 

Mission: Impossible should have 
been. 

Frankenheimer proves that he is 
still king of the car chase scenes, 
with some of the best he's ever 
done. From the crowded, narrow 
cobblestone back alleys of Paris 
to incredibly high speed high- 
ways, Frankenheimer keeps the 
action moving at a breakneck 
speed, and shows that the MTV 
generation of directors just how 
it's done. One chase in particular 
works well, as it goes under- 
ground into a claustrophobic 
Paris tunnel. 

All the actors earn their pay- 
check, with several standout per- 
formances. Sean Bean 
(Goldeneye, Patriot Games) does 
much with his brief role as a jit- 
tery weapons expert. DeNiro and 
Reno play off each other remark- 
ably well, with the pair often pro- 
viding a much needed shot of 
humor to the film. S tell an 
Skarsgard (Good Will Hunting) 
is wonderfully devious, as he 



whatever he can to outdo his 
companions. One scene where 
he shows off his unwavering 
conviction, as he trains his gun 
on a little girl is bone-chilling. 
The only part of the movie in 
which the actors don't interact 
well is a pointless scene of sen- 
suality between DeNiro and 
Natasha McElhone's character, 
Diedre. It serves no purpose in 
moving the plot, and is inconsis- 
tent with the characters' previous 
behavior. 

This is not the romantic lovers' 
Paris we are so often treated to in 
films. These are the slums, the 
back alleys darkened at night, 
and the people that inhabit them. 
You're never sure just what each 
characters' motivations are, even 
when the movie has wrapped up, 
much like previous 

Frankenheimer outings, such as 
The Manchurian Candidate or 
The French Connection. 
Everything has to be just right, as 
demonstrated by his casting of 
Olympic skater Katarina Witt for 
a minuscule, 2-line part as a 
Russian ice skater. 

Ronin could conceivably be 
better, but it would be a hard 
task. It's a thinking man's 
movie, which are unfortunately a 
dying breed. Ronin deserves a 
place in the long line of taught 
suspense movies, right alongside 
From Russia With Love and the 
above-mentioned Frankenheimer 
films. On my five-star rating 
system, Ronin gets a four. 



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Video Review 

The Apostle follows 
Robert Duvall's 
spiritual quest 

by Mike Cody 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



After learning that actor Robert 
Duvall wrote directed, produced, 
and starred in the The Apostle, I 
expected a project dripping with 
self-glorification. Giving one 
person such tremendous creative 
control would probably tempt 
most people to create a monu- 
mental tribute to his or her own 
skill. Perhaps that's why I was so 
surprised at what a well-rounded 
film The Apostle is. 

Duvall plays Sonny, a popular 
but troubled Southern preacher 
who accidentally kills his wife's 
lover. While on the run from the 
law, Sonny experiences a spiritu- 
al reawakening and decides to 
begin his life anew and become 
an apostle of Jesus. Sonny bap- 
tizes himself as the Apostle E.F. 
and sets out on a mission to save 
the souls of an entire community. 

Sonny's mission is furhter com- 
plicated by a confusing romantic 
relationship he begins with a 
local woman (Miranda 
Richardson) and his guilt over 
not being able to provide comfort 
for his ailing mother, while he 
hides from the police. 

At it's heart, The Apostle is 
about the lengths people will go 
to find spiritual salvation. 
Fortunatley, the film never tries 
to pass judgement on any of it's 
characters. There are no "good 
guys" or "bad guys" in The 
Apostle , only people who have 
either found redemption or are 
still searching for it. 

The film benefits greatly from 
the fine performances of Duvall 
and the rest of the great ensemble 

continued on page 15 



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The Oadaa C<>H 



Page 15 



Calendar of Events 





Today 

•ALFWEEK 

•MID SEMESTER BREAK BEGINS AT 

10 p.m. 

•UAB Pep Rally (Gem MP & Gem 
Performance Area) at 5-8 p.m. 
•1998 Winning Children's Author - Susan 
Lowell (Chap) 7 p.m. 
•4th Annual Clarion University and 
Community Cultural Night (in front of 
Courthouse) 7-9 p.m. 
Friday 
•ALFWEEK 
•UAB Spirit Day . 
•C.S.A. 50th Anniversary 
•Volleyball Alumni Match 

•4th Annual Clarion University and Community Cultural Night (in 
front of Courthouse) 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 
•Alumni Awards Presentation (Gem MP) 5 p.m. 
Saturday 
•ALFWEEK 
•HOMECOMING DAY 
•C.S.A. 50th Anniversary 
•Book Center open 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
•ALF Parade (Main Street) 12 Noon 
•Cross Country Invitational 1 p.m. May field 
•Football vs. Edinboro 2 p.m. 
•Football Spirit Day 2 p.m. 
Sunday 
•ALF WEEK 
•C.S.A. 50th Anniversary 
Monday 

•COLUMBUS DAY 
i •THANKSGIVING DAY (CANADA) 




• MID-SEMESTER BREAK ENDS 8 a.m 
•Spring/Summer 99 Grads need to file grad apps during early 
registration (B-16 Carrier). 
•Faculty Senate Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 3:30 p.m. 
•Tennis at Edinboro 3:30 p.m. 
•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30 p.m. 
•MLK Carl Upchurch (Chap) 7:30 p,m. 

Tuesday 

•UAB Movie Night (local theater) 
TBA 

►Volleyball at Indiana 7 p.m. 
•Cleveland Ballet Dancing Wheels 
!(Gem MP) 7:30 p.m. 
I-WCCB Tailgate Party 6-9 p.m. 
•UAB Concert featuring "Blues 
fTraveler" (Tippui) 8 p.m. 
•Drama Production "Servant of Two 
jMasters" (LT) 8 p.m. 
•Intramural 1 On 1 Basketball Roster 

J due 

Holti Hamilton and Jarrod .i ntramura i Challenge Course Roster 
Fry, "Servant of Two due 

Masters" •Intramural Horseshoe Roster due 

Wednesday 

•UAB Wellness Program "Body Sculpting" (248 Gem) 4 p.m. 
•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gem) 7-8:30 p.m. 
•Career Symposium for Minority Students (248 Gem) 7:30 
p.m. sponsored by African American Caucus 
•Drama Prod "Servant of Two Masters" (LT) 8 p.m. 
•UAB Karaoke (Gem Upstairs Rotunda) 8-11 p.m. 
•Intramural Closest To The Pin Roster Due Oct. 20 
•Intramural 3 On 3 Basketball Roster Due Oct. 20 
•Intramural Tug Of War Roster Due Oct. 20 



continued from page 14 



the fine performances of Duvall 
and the rest of the great ensemble 
cast, including Billy Bob 
Thornton and June Carter Cash. 
Farrah Fawcett, who portrays 
Sonny's estranged wife, proves 
once again what a fine dramatic 
actress she is when presented with 
the right role. 

Duvall's performances as 



hour 



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Sonny/Apostle E.F. truly anchors 
the film. Duvall keeps Sonny a 
realistic character, resisting the 
longstanding Hollywood tradition 
of presenting religous characters 
as either fanatics or zealots. 
Sonny's humanity is part of what 
makes the film so touching. 

Perfectly acted and uniquely 
crafted, The Apostle is the type of 
quality drama rarely seen in the- 
multiplex these days. Those 
expecting slam-bang action and 
instant gratification may be dis- 
appointed, but movie fans look- 
' ing for a film with deeper mean- 
ing will no doubt be very pleased. 



WCCBTaBgate j 
party to be held 
before Blues 
Traveler in the 
Gemmell 
Outdoor 
Performance \ 
Area from 6-9 
p.m. 



(814)226-7977 
843 Main St. 
800 center 
Clarion, PA 
16214 



M-R9-9 
Sat.:9-5 
Sun.10-5 




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Candies and Gifts 

Chocolate for every occasion. 

-FREE gift wrapping 

-Greek chocolate letters 

-Gifts for everybody 

-Novelity candy 

-Gift Baskets Delivered to the Dorms. 

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Clarion PA 

16214 

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HOURS: 

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10:00-8:00 Friday 




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Pa ge 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 



Music Review 



Earth Crisis and Soul Coughing release new albums 



by James Gates 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Earth Crisis and Soul 
Coughing both have new albums 
out, Breed the Killers and El Oso 
respectively. Earth Crisis is a 
hard-core band out of Syracuse, 
New York and Soul Coughing are 
trip-pop out of Atlanta Georgia. 

Most normal heavy rock bands 
have the talent to utilize their 
instruments in creating songs. 



Such is the with Earth Crisis. 
Their third release, Breed the 
Killers, is a hardcore-metal mas- 
terpiece. 

Soul Coughing, on the other 
hand, lack any song writing talent 
and their latest release, El Oso , 
falls flat on it's face. 

Earth Crisis mixes hardcore 
with metal on Breed the Killers, 
which has proven to be an effec- 
tive formula with them in the 
past. The grooves are slower and 



more muscular, but are far from 
being simple hardcore bets. 
Breed the Killers is easily Earth 
Crisis's most consistent album to 
date. 

Drummer Dennis Merrick and 
bassist Bulldog hook up to lay 
down some of the most complex 
mid-tempo patterns around in the 
heavy rock scene. Guitarists 
Scott Grouse and Erick Edwards 
interplay their metal riffs back and 
forth, and vocalist Karl Buechner 



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screams over the wall of noise. 

Earth Crisis is the premier mil- 
itant, vegan hardcore band out on 
the scene today and their message 
against all that is animal-based is 
evident in the lyrics. 

Buechner punctuates his vegan 
message in every song with group 
shouts and sing-a-longs, a proven 
hardcore styles. Other times, he 
oscillates his voice between the 
speakers, panning them out for 
increased effectiveness. 
Soul Coughing 's new album El 
)so is, in my opinion, a complete 
ulure. After forcing myself to lis- 
ai to the album the full way 
through twice, I was in pure 
agony. 

First off, Soul Coughing uses 
only bass and drums in their 
songs. The guitars are merely 



fillers. This would work if their 
bassist and drummer had talent, 
but they apparently lack in that 
department. 

The mix on the disc is extreme- 
ly weak and inconsistent. 
Apparently, the producer didn't 
want to be associated with them 
either. There might be hope for 
Soul Coughing yet. If they prac- 
tice their instruments hard and 
develop an alternative rock 
sound, they might be considered 
decent. Until then, they don't 
even rate on my scale of ten, 
especially with El Oso. 

Earth Crisis, on the other hand, 
are accomplished musicians and 
it shows. Their Breed the Killers 
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ten from me. 



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The Clarion Call 



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GREEK PERSONALS 



Welcome III alumni and families to 
ALF '98. Thanks for all your support. 

The brothers of Sigma Pi. 

**************** 

Hey AZ, it was money definitely well 
spent ! Thanks for a great mixer. Love 

in. 

**************** 

To the sisters of AIT, we're ready for 
a great ALF weekend with you. Thanks 
for all the help and get ready for the 

good times. Love, in. 

**************** 

Beth, thanks for all the cookies, candy 
and help. We're planning on a great 

week with you. Love, Sigma Pi. 

**************** 

AIT, sorry this is late but we were still 
counting our dollars from the mixer. 

We had a great time. lit. 

**************** 

ZTA, we had a great time at the mixer. 
We should run around in our under- 
wear more often. ITT. 

**************** 

Congratulations to our new associate 
members: Sabrina, Kasey, Jen, 
Christine S., Amanda, Candace, 
Christian, Tracy, Mandy, Christine A., 

and Jami. Love, the sisters of ZTA. 

**************** 

Happy Belated Birthday Jenn Roetter. 

We love you! Love, your ZTA sisters. 

**************** 

Happy 20th Birthday to Liz, Natalie 

and Julie. Love, your Zeta sisters. 

**************** 

Congratulations Rochelle, Mana. and 
Christine for making Homecoming 
Court! Love your Zeta sisters. 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



CLASSIFIEDS 



ITT, Thanks for the great mixer! It was 

P.J.ammin'! Love, the sisters of ZTA. 

**************** 

Happy 100th Anniversary Zeta Tau 

Alpha! 

**************** 

The Zeta sisters would like to wish 
everyone a safe and happy ALF week- 
end! 

**************** 

OA0, Thanks for a great mixer, we'll 
mix with you guys anytime! Love 

♦II 

**************** 

Jessa Steffy- we can't wait for Sunday! 
Soon you'll know who we are! We love 

you! Love, your Big & 2-Big. 

**************** 

in, Thank you for the roses. I loved 
them! You guys are the best and I'm 
sure you'll do great in the parade on 
Saturday. Good luck to Jeremy and 
Tony F. I hope you all have a wonder- 
ful ALF weekend. Love, Beth. 
**************** 

Happy Birthday Jill! Love your AOE 

sisters. 

**************** 

nT, can't wait to mix with you on 

Friday. Love, AOE. 

**************** 

Thanks for the mixer 62. We'll write 

on you anytime Love, AOE. 

**************** 

To our new associate members: can't 
wait for you to find out who we are. 

Love, your AOE Bigs. 

**************** 

Good luck fraternities and sororities on 

your floats. Love AOE. 

**************** 

Jessica, thanks for all of your hard 

work with rush. Love your AOE sisters. 

**************** 

AOE, thanks for the great mixer. We'll 
get written on by you girls anytime. 

The brothers of 0H. 

**************** 

Nikki, have a great ALF. You're always 

a blast! Love the brothers of 02. 

**************** 

IX. Actually we won the dance con- 
test, but you guys rock our world! 

Dance Team. 

**************** 

Happy Belated 22nd Birthday Megan! 

We love you! Love your AZ sisters. 

**************** 

Kid and Frank, thanks for those home- 
baked (yah right) cookies! Just kid- 
ding! We loved them! That was such a 

sweet thought! Love the AZ sisters. 

**************** 

To the brothers of KAP: Thanks for 
working on the float with us! We can't 
wait to march with you in the parade. 

Love AZ sisters. 

**************** 

The sisters of AZ would like to wish 
everyone a safe and happy ALF! Have 



fun! 



**************** 



Congratulations to the new members of 
Delta Zeta: Katie, Beth Ayn, Beth, 
Gina, Meredith, Tristen, Melanie, Jami, 
Katy, Jodi and Amy. Love your future 

sisters of AZ 

**************** 

To the brothers of 111: Show us the 
money again baby! It was definitely 
worth every penny! Thanks for the 
great mixer! We'll have to do it again 
real soon but with the stakes higher this 
time! Love AZ 



Happy Birthday Nikki and JoAnne! 

Love your sisters of AIT. 

**************** 

Sisters of OH, thank you for helping 
us out with our fundraiser. We'll help 

you out anytime. Love, OIK. 

**************** 

Have a great semester. Kristi Knott. 
You're the greatest sweetheart ever. 

Love, the OIK boys. 

**************** 

Mary Beth and Donelle: Now we have 
yet another reason to celebrate during 
ALF!! Happy Birthday girls! How old 

are you again? Love your ©OA sisters. 

**************** 

0OA would like to congratulate and 
welcome our newest associate mem- 
bers, Franny and Lisa. We love you 

girls! Love, your future sisters. 

**************** 

0OA wishes everybody a fun and safe 

ALF. 

**************** 

To our sweetheart Nicole, Hello 
Sweetheart! Hope you have an excel- 
lent and safe ALF. You are the best 
sweetheart a fraternity could ask for. 

Love, the brothers of KAP. 

**************** 

Welcome back Alumni! Have a great 

ALF week! AIA sisters. 

**************** 

Congratulations to the new associate 
members of Alpha Sigma Tau. Good 

luck Love your Tau Tiger. 

**************** 

Congratulations to our new Pearl sis- 
ters! Love, your AIA sisters. 

**************** 

KAP, Have a great ALF and good luck 
on the float!! Love, your Sweetheart, 

Nicole. 

**************** 

The brothers of IX would like to con- 
gratulate new brother Brad Hallam. 

**************** 

AOE, Thanks for doing it up at the 



cookout during Rush. Love the broth- 
ers of IX. 

**************** 

Hey ZTAs, let's get crazy during ALF. 

Love, IX. 

**************** 

Dance Team, the brothers of IX are 
still trying to remember what happened 

at our mixer the other week. Love IX. 

**************** 

Carrie Robinson, Have fun Saturday! 
I'm so proud of you! We'll be watch- 
ing. ..Luv, your Big. 

**************** 

To the brothers of ITr, have a great 

ALF and stay out of trouble. Love, Tim 

**************** 

To the sisters of AOE: have a great 
ALF. Thanks for your help with the 

float, it looks great. Love, ITr. 

**************** 

Hey AOE: Let's have one hell of an 

ALF mixer. Love, ITr. 

**************** 

To the brothers of OIK, Have an awe- 
some ALF week! Good luck with the 
float; it looks great. You all did a won- 
derful job. Love, your sweetheart 
Kristi 
PS. Congratulations on Homecoming 

court to the brothers Chervenak!! 

**************** 

To AIT, we went around the world and 
back and yep a few of us even yacked. 
Thanks for a great time, the brothers of 

AXP. 

**************** 

To AOE, sorry this is late but you gals 
were great! Travolta would have been 
proud of all of us. We can't wait to do 

it again. Thanks, the brothers of AXP. 

**************** 

AXP, thanks for a great mixer, we 
loved going around the world with 

you! Love AIT. 

**************** 

Dear Alpha Alpha pledge class, keep 
up the good work! Love, Danielle 



PERSONALS 



Hey Christine, How many shots are 
You gonna do? Happy almost 

Birthday! Love, Marcie. 

**************** 

Leanne Marie Havely, Turning 21 
Tuesday night at the U.I.-are you 
ready? Just remember, it's all out of 
love. Less than one week and counting' 
Looking forward to seeing you at the 

bar, Marcie. 

**************** 

Rugby, Hey "Little Ruggers" we'll 
play musical chairs with you anytime! 

Dance Team. 

**************** 

Hey Loomi Guys! Long time no see! I 
miss you! Get ready for this weekend' 

We are gonna have some fun! 

**************** 

Boyfriend, Thanks for your help! I 

love you! Your girlfriend 

**************** 

Ber, Way to "give him the Boot!" 

Can't wait for ALF! Love, Daniellie 

**************** 

To Mike, Hi! Love, Wendy 

**************** 

The Call staff ROCKS! Love, Stivers 

**************** 

Sunny Day crew, "I killed a cat, I killed 

another cat." 

**************** 

Cheska, Would you like some soy 

sauce from Bonanza? Jeff 

**************** 

Manda, Glad you had fun Saturday 
night, hopefully there will be more 

nights like it. Jeff 

**************** 

Vickie "Ginger," Thanks for putting 
up with my clumsy feet. You were the 
best dance partner that I could ask for. 

Love, Mike 

**************** 

Stacy, I hope that you are looking for- 
ward to a "Royal" love affair. L, M 



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Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 




DAVE 

by David Miller 





October 8, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



•■ r* 



Page 21 



CALL ON YOU 



WARY Xm CHARGE/ 



THE LATE 

HARRY CARAY 



••yvi 




SO^^fe*^' 



Allies wants to remind you that 







is Sunday, October 11th, 1998 



ALLIES 



Support acceptance and understanding of 
the gay, lesbian, and bisexual community by 
remembering National Coming-Out Day this 
Sunday! Wear blue-jeans to commemorate the 
day, and learn more about the struggles and 
achievements of homosexual individuals 
in our culture. 



For more information about National Coming-Out Day or Allies, contact 
Dr. Jan Grigsby at JGRIGSBY@Mail.Clarion.Edu or (814) 226-2430. 




A^«AC«£A**««*SA«S£SS?SSS9*T7W7TT X.T.T.T.T .T.T.- „» 






*±£~±±Al.££SSSZ£ZStZ4 ¥ 9 7 ; ? * TCTTT 




Photography 
Editor 





Justin Relihan, Senior, Communication 
"Hanging out with the carries uptown." 




Sparrow Affrica, Junior, Elementary EdY 
"M y first keg stand at 79 Wilson." 




What is your fondest memory of 

ALF? 




Jim Troup, Senior, Sociology 
Standing on the porch and chilling on the roof 
of Dan Estad t's, drinking?' 




Amber Peters, Senior, SecEducation/English 

"The 'Skip and Go Naked 1 party in the front 

apartments of the A4>E house." 




Garrett Fabian, Junior, Communication 

"It's hard to remember. That show was on a long 

time ago. I remember he was always trying to eat 

people's cats. The Pukes of Hazzard was a much 

better show." 




Gretchen Gilbert, Sophomore, Special Ed. 

Shawna Stoyer, Sophomore, Psychology 

"In the midst of drinking, we didn't know that 

ALF was taking place." 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 



SPORTSWIRE 



The Clarion volleyball team 
was at Slippery Rock Tuesday 
night after a 2-1 showing at the 
East Stroudsburg Tournament 
over the weekend. 

See Page 24 



The tennis team took to the 
courts against Gannon Tuesday. 
The netters will be gearing up for 
the upcoming PSAC champi- 
onships in Erie. 

See Page 24 



The Clarion/Edinboro football 
series has always been one of 
surprises. Two years ago, the 
Golden Eagles took a No. 7 rank- 
ing into snowy Sox Harrison 
Stadium and were upset by the 
Scots. Last year, Clarion 
returned the favor. Although 
entering the game 1-7, the 
Golden Eagle defense swarmed 
the Scots in a 28-0 Clarion win 
The two teams will lock horns 
this Saturday in CUP's home 
coming contest. 

See Page 28 



Success on the gridiron is noth- 
ing new to Clarion University 
Read how the Eagles have estab- 
lished a tradition over the years. 
See Page 28 



The Clarion cross country team 
met up with some D-I competi 
tion at the Lehigh Invitational 
over the weekend. 

See Page 24 



QUOTABLES 



'That commitment is the 
right way to run a first-class 
program and we expect to 
continue that tradition." 

—Clarion head coach Malen 
Luke, on the years of commit- 
ment to hard work in the 
classroom and the on the foot- 
ball field that have helped 
build the Clarion fooiball pro- 
gram. 



SPORTS 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
The Golden Eagles return home to face Edinboro Saturday after a three-game road trip. 
The Eagles fell to Slippery Rock, 28-14, Saturday to complete the road trip. 

Rockets slip away with win 

Eagles show strong defense in loss 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Twelfth-ranked Slippery Rock, 
taking advantage of seven Clarion 
turnovers, defeated the Golden 
Eagles 28-14 Saturday at rain- 
soaked N. Kerr Thompson 
Stadium. 

The win moved the Rockets to 
4-1 overall and 1-0 in the PSAC- 
West as they prepare for a show- 
down with No. 2 IUP Saturday. 

Clarion, which played its fourth 
road game in five starts, fell to 2- 
3 overall and 0-1 in Western 
Division play. The Eagles will 
look to rebound this week with a 
homecoming matchup against 
Edinboro. 

Against Slippery Rock, the 
Eagles were able to do what no 
other team has accomplished over 
the past two seasons — shut down 
the Rocket offense, which looked 
like a three-fisted fighter on paper. 
The Rockets featured the back- 
field duo of power runners Rick 
Magulick and Stan Kennedy and 
Rick Magulick, along with the 
versatility of quarterback Randy 
McKavish. 

However, the Golden Eagle 
defense stuffed the Rocket attack, 
allowing only one sustained drive. 
Magulick finished with 94 yards 
on 20 carries, most of which on 



that drive, a touchdown march in 
the fourth quarter. Kennedy could 
only manage 18 stripes on 12 car- 
ries, while McKavish's runs 
yielded minimal damage. 

Leading the Clarion defense was 
freshman Doug Diegelman, who 
was named the PS AC- West player 
of the week for his nine-tackle, 
one-sack performance. 

Diegelman also blocked an SRU 
extra point attempt. 

Yet, the story of the game was 
the turnovers that plagued the 
Golden Eagles. Slippery Rock 
also featured a strong defense, and 
the cold, unceasing rain also 
played havoc with the Eagle 
offense. 

In the first quarter, Alvin 
Slaughter caught an inside pass 
but lost the handle to a Slippery 
Rock defender. Shortly after, the 
Rockets capitalized when 
McKavish, facing heavy pressure 
from Clarion defenders, heaved a 
19-yard pass to Scott Whipple for 
the first score of the game. 

The score remained 7-0 until the 
2:14 mark of the second quarter 
when the Rockets took advantage 
of another Eagle miscue. Punter 
Frank Van Wert, who has enjoyed 
a fine season as a punter and a 
placekicker this season, couldn't 
get a grip on a long snap. The ball 
was bobbled between VanWert 



and Slippery Rock defenders until 
the ball fell into Jason Hawks' 
hands for a touchdown and a 14-0 
Rocket lead. 

In the second half, the. Rockets 
cushioned their lead to 20-0 when 
comerback Brian Polk nabbed a 
Chris Weibel offering and ran 
untouched for 51 yards and a 
touchdown. The Rockets were 
flagged for taunting, however, and 
the extra point attempt was 
blocked. 

The Clarion offense got on track 
at the end of the quarter when 
Weibel punched in from 3 yards 
out to put the Eagles on the board. 
VanWert connected on the extra 
point, cutting the Slippery Rock 
lead to 20-7. 

Slippery Rock responded with a 
touchdown drive and a two-point 
conversion to restore the lead at 
28-7 four minutes into the quarter. 
Three minutes later, Weibel 
found Demetric Gardner for a 13- 
yard strike to pull within striking 
distance. 

The Eagles would threaten again 
with just over two minutes 
remaining, but the coup de grace 
took place when Weibel was inter- 
cepted. 

Weibel passed for 213 yards on 
16-of-38 passing. Gardner caught 
four passes for 91 yards. 



Cheyney 

still 

winless 

By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 

The good and the bad: The 

PSAC is widely regarded as one 
of the nation's premier confer- 
ences in Division II football with 
good reason. The conference has 
sent at least one team to the play- 
offs in each of the last 11 sea- 
sons, and on four occasions the 
PSAC has placed three teams in 
the playoffs. 



D-II Notebook 



Based on that, you can forgive 
the conference for being the 
home to the laughing stock of 
college football. With a 41-0 loss 
at California Saturday, Cheyney 
is now winless in 49 straight 
games dating back to 1993. 

But, if there's a man who can 
handle a long losing streak it has 
to be first-year head coach John 
Parker, who was the head coach 
at the University of Minnesota- 
Morris when that school ended a 
27-game losing streak in 1996. 
The Wolves' best chance to end 
the streak may be on Oct. 31 
when they host Mansfield. 
Where are they now?: Many 
people feel this area became 
huge D-II football fans after 
Clarion's improbable run to the 
final four in 1996. And while 
injuries and graduation have 
moved the Golden Eagles back 
towards the pack, the three other 
national semifinalists from that 
year remain among the nation's 
elite. 

In fact, all three are among the 
top ten in this week's top 20 poll. 
Northern Colorado, which 
knocked Clarion out of the semis 
and have gone on to win back-to- 
back national titles, is the top- 
ranked team in the country. 
California-Davis is sixth while 
Carson-Newman is ranked 
eighth. 

Congratulations: Millersville 
head coach Gene Carpenter 
recorded his 200th career victory 
with a 37-13 win at Mansfield. 
He is just the third active 
Division II coach to reach the 
200-win plateau and his career 
winning percentage of .694 is 
among the top ten in the nation. 
Surprise, Surprise: The most 
pleasant surprise of the early sea- 

continued on page 28 



October 8,1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



IF YOU'RE INTO DOPE, 
YOU MIGHT AS WELL SMOKE THIS 




There's one sure way to see 
your future go up in smoke. 
Do drugs. 
Last year alone, America^ 



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fail the test, you're out of a job. 

The message is simple. 
Doing drugs could blow your 
whole education. 



WE'RE PUTTING DRUGS OUT OF BUSINESS. 

Partnership for a Drug-Free America Foundation for a Drug Free Pennsylvania— Media Partnership 



j 



* i 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 8, 1998 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

The Clarion volleyball team followed a 2-1 showing at the 
East Stroudsburg Tournament with a win over Slippery 
Rock Tuesday. 



Spikers post 3-1 week 



The Clarion University volley- 
ball team improved its record to 
9-10 with a 2-1 showing at the 
East Stroudsburg tournament over 
the weekend and a win at Slippery 
Rock Tuesday night 

Clarion opened play Friday with 
a sweep of Pace, 15-11, 15-11, 
15-11. Leading the way was 
Jaime Mars, who knotched 20 
kills, 15 digs, and two aces. 
Jamie Soboleski came up big for 
the Eagles with 35 assists and 11 
digs. 

Clarion came out Saturday and 
fell to a tough Shepherd squad 15- 
2, 15-8, 15-8. Soboleski enjoyed 
another fine showing, collecting 



18 assists. 

Clarion then ended the weekend 
on a high note by claiming a hard- 
fought win over the host Warriors, 
5-15, 15-13, 15-4, 15-9. Mars 
came up with 22 kills, four digs 
and four aces, while Baer record- 
ed 11 kills and six digs. 

At Slippery Rock, the senior trio 
of Tracy Bamett, Soboleski, and 
Mars led the way to a CUP victo- 
ry. Bamett came up with 17 kills 
and 11 digs, while Soboleski had 
48 assists. Mars chipped in with 
13 kills and 14 digs. 

The Eagles return to action 
Tuesday at IUP for an important 
PSAC-West match. 



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Walking Distance from Campus 



George Groff/Clarion Call 
The PSAC championships await Clarion next week. 

Gannon edges Clarion 

Clarion dropped a tight 5-4 match to Gannon Tuesday afternoon at 
the Clarion University tennis courts. 

Clarion (1-12) received wins from Bethany Melnick, Amy Shaffer 
and Ky lee Johnson in singles action, while the doubles team of Johnson 
and Rachael Link rounded out the scoring for the Golden Eagles. 

The netters will next take to the courts Monday for a match at 
Edinboro, followed by the PSAC championships in Erie Oct 17-18. 

Eagles test D-I competition 



By Megan Pavuk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles split squads this past 
weekend. 

The top seven runners of each 
team ran Saturday at the 25th 
Lehigh University Paul Short 
Run, while the others ran Friday 
at Walsh (Ohio) University. 
Despite being at two different 
locations, both races proved to be 
challenging. All of the teams 
gave a commendable effort. 

At Walsh, the women finished 
third behind the College of 
Wooster and Walsh. Leading the 
way for the team was Andrea 
Borek (21:23). She was followed 
by teammates Linda Bryce, 
Megan Pavuk, Cheryl Sorice, and 
Seana Simon. 

The men's team also placed 
third at Walsh. Finishing ninth 
overall was Gregg Wade (30:38). 
He was followed by Matt 
Lapatka and Shane Cummings. 

Lehigh University hosted 42 
men's teams and 39 women's 
teams. Most of the teams in 
attendance were Division I 
schools, including Cornell, Yale, 
Georgetown, Pittsburgh, and 
Michigan State. For both the 
men and the women, competition 
was extremely fierce. Each indi- 
vidual had to step up to the big- 
name competition. 

Among 264 runners in the 



women's race, co-captain 
Roxanne Wilson led the Eagles, 
placing 147th with a time of 
19:11. She was followed closely 
by her teammates Kelly Null, 
Bridgette Laflin, Maureen Long, 
Daria Diaz, Wendy Kengor, and 
Kristie Runk. This gave the 
women's team 34th-place finish, 
beating rival Duquense among 
others. 

The "Hot Legs" award rightful- 
ly went to Wilson, and the "Keep 
on Running" award went to 
Kengor. 

The men's team also faced a 
challenge running against D-I 
schools. By running their fastest 
times, each of them jumped up to 
the competition and placed 41st. 
Setting Clarion's pace was top 
runner Ean King (26:32), finish- 
ing 213th out of 293. Next was 
Mark Trzyna followed by captain 
Jon Fox, Colin McGlone, Jason 
Bochert, Brad Walker, and John 
Sherry. 

Since all seven men had the 
fastest times in team history, the 
entire men's team received the 
"Hot Legs" award. 

The teams will run this 
Saturday at Clarion's own 
Clarion Invitational held at 
Mayfield Golf Course. Some of 
the team will run the Alumni 
Meet at 10 a.m., and the top 
seven will be seen in the college 
race at 1 p.m. 



Golfers 
compete in 
event 

By J.P. Kenney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The golf team traveled this past 
week to the Westminster/ 
Slippery Rock Golf Invitational. 

The field was made up of some 
good teams, such as Allegheny, 
Malone, and Slippery Rock. On 
the first day, Clarion posted a 
score of (322). The Eagles were 
led by junior Matt Honacki, who 
shot an impressive round of four- 
over-par 76. Other scores 
included Anthoney Tacconelli 
(81), Shawn Will (82), and J.P. 
Kenney with an 83. As the sec- 
ond day began the site of the 
tournament changed from the 
New Castle Country Club to 
Armco Golf Club in Slippery 
Rock. Clarion improved 13 
shots to post a 309. The fresh- 
man, Tacconelli, once again 
came up big with a round of 74. 
Right behind him was the great 
play of Andy Ganoe "Tin Cup," 
who shot a 77. Other scores 
included Will with a 78, and Matt 
Honacki at 80. Clarion's total of 
631 was good enough for sev- 
enth place. 

Classic raises 
$36,000 for 
athletic fund 

Courtesy of 
Sports Infor mation 

The 11th annual National City 
Bank/Pepsi Golf Classic, to ben- 
efit Clarion University's Waldo 
S. Tippin Scholarship Fund, 
raised over $36,000 for athletic 
scholarships and was termed a 
"big success" by Athletics 
Director Bob Carlson. 

Held on Friday, Sept. 11 at 
Mayfield Golf Club, 144 persons 
registered and participated in the 
event. The turnout, 144, was a 
full field ( reduced from 152 
golfers in 1992-97). The 
"Classic" tournament started 
with a total of 96 in 1988, 110 in 
1989, 128 in 1990, 148 in 1991 
and 152 from 1992-97. The field 
has been full for the last eight 
years. 

In addition to those who paid 
to play, the corporate sponsors 
and donations from National 
City Bank and Pepsi, additional 
.hole sponsors, and donations 
from area businesses enabled the 
tournament to raise in excess of 
$36,000, which ties the tourna- 
ment record set last year. 



October 8, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 25 



CLARION SCOREBOARD 



FOOTBALL 



PSAC Leaders 
Total offense YPG 

1. Folmar, Millersville 320.6 

2. Mitros, WCU 316.4 

3. Smith, Mansfield 214.2 

4. Caldwell, Edinboro 191.4 

5. WEIBEL, CLARION 186.2 

All-Purpose YPG 

1. SLAUGHTER, CLARION 193.0 

2. Thompson, Edinboro 152.0 

3. Sweeney, Kutztown 140.0 

4. Scott, Millersville 140.0 

5. McFetridge, Millersville 126.8 

Tackles 

LNagle, ESU51 

2. WILEY, CLARION 49 

3. GEER, CLARION 45 

4. Kralik, California 44 

5. Hendricks, LHU 44 

Punting 

1. Gross, Cal 44.5 

2. Cook, Edinboro 44.2 

3. Minck, WCU 42.6 

4. Manley, Mansfield 38.8 

5. Kosttotter, ESU 38.2 



Division II Poll 

1 . Northern Colorado 

2. IUP 

3. Central Oklahoma 

4. NW Missouri State 

5. North Alabama 

6. (tie) Grand valley State 
Cal-Davis 

8. Carson-Newman 

9. West Texas A&M 

10. Slippery Rock 

11. Fort Valley State 

12. Central Missouri State 

13. Eastern New Mexico 

14. Neb.-Omaha 

1 5. S. Arkansas 

16. Saginaw Valley State 

17. Chadron State 

18. Emporia State 

19. Albany 

20. North Dakota 

Northeast Region 

1. IUP 

2. Grand Valley State 

3. Slippery Rock 

4. Saginaw Valley State 

5. Glenville State 

6. Ashland 

7. West Chester 

8. Millersville 

9. New Haven 

10. Shepherd 



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CROSS COUNTRY 



Men's Cross Country 

1. Western State 

2. Adams State 

3. South Dakota 

4. Abilene Christian 

5. North Dakota State 

6. Edinboro 

7. Cent. Missouri State 

8. Mankato State 

9. Lewis 

10. Cal-Davis 

11. Shippensburg 

12. NW Missouri State 

13. Fort Hays State 

14. Hawaii-Hilo 

15. East Stroudsburg 

16. West Georgia 

17. Kennesaw State 

18. Chico State 

19. Ashland 

20. South Dakota State 

21. New Mexico Highlands 

22. Truman State 

23. Northern Florida 

24. Humboldt State 

25. Minnesota-Duluth 

Women's Cross Country 

1 . Adams State 

2. Edinboro 

3. South Dakota 

4. Shippensburg 

5. Cal-Davis 

6. Hillsdale 

7. Wis.-Parkside 

8. North Dakota State 

9. Seattle Pacific 

10. Western State 

11. IUP 

12. Lewis 

13. Kennesaw State 

14. Mankato State 

15. North Dakota 

16. Fort Lewis 

17. WestChester 

1 8. Cal State Dominguez 

19. Southern Indiana 

20. NW Missouris State 

21. Chico State 

22. Minnesota-Duluth 

23. Colorado Springs 

24. Bloom sburg 

25. Cal-State LA 



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TIEBREAKER: Edinboro at Clarion Total Points 



Call Staff Picks 



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North Carolina 


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West Virginia 


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Complex Clarion, Pa. 16214. Entries must be postmarked by Saturday at noon. The entrant with the 
most correct selections is the winner. In the event of a tie, the entrant closest without going over to the 
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Sportsview 



The Clarion Call 



October fi„199fl 



Ohio State favored to win the MEDIOCRE Big Ten 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

With the college football season 
approaching the halfway point of 
the season, a number of teams 
have risen above the pack and 
established themselves as national 
tide contenders. 

Ohio State has marched out to a 
4-0 record and seems to be a lock 
to play in the national champi- 
onship game, which will be 
played in the Fiesta Bowl in 
January. The Buckeyes have 
looked impressive in beating 
Missouri and thrashed an overrat- 
ed Penn State team last week. 

The Buckeyes have only one test 
left on their schedule, and that 
game is at home against a 
Michigan squad that is struggling 
after its undefeated season last 
year. 

I know that the Big Ten is 
thought of as one of the toughest 
conferences in America, but, like I 
have been saying for three years, 
it is extremely overrated. The 
not-so-Big Ten has only three 
teams ranked in the Top 30 in the 



Sagarin computer rankings. Ohio 
State (No. 2) has already beaten 
Penn State (11) and does not play 
Wisconsin (10) this year. 

Speaking of Penn State, they are 
going nowhere again this year 
because JoePa insists on playing 
his seniors, instead of his more 
talented underclassmen. 

Remember, no Big Ten has won 
an outright national championship 
since the 1968 Ohio State 
Buckeyes. And many still consid- 
er it the best conference in 
America? 

The Nebraska Cornhuskers have 
emerged as the early favorite to 
play Ohio State in the Fiesta 
Bowl. However, Nebraska has a 
long haul in front of them if they 
hope to land a spot in the national 
title game. 

After rolling over Washington, 
the Huskers struggled last week 
against Oklahoma State. 
Nebraska has a grueling Big 12 
schedule ahead of them. That's 
right, I said grueling. 

The Big 12 has taken much crit- 
icism over the last few years about 
being a cupcake conference. Yet, 



this year, nine teams in the Big 12 
are ranked in the Top 30 in the 
computer rankings. 

Nebraska (1) has a huge test late 
in the year at Kansas State (3). 
The Huskers also face Colorado 
(6), Texas (25), Missouri (29), 
and Texas A&M (30). Other Big 
12 teams that are ranked are Texas 
Tech (14), Oklahoma (23), and 
Baylor (26). 

Whoever does survive the tough 
Big 12 schedule, also has to play 
in the Big 12 Championship 
Game before entertaining any 
thoughts of a national title. 

UCLA has emerged as the fron- 
trunner in the Pac-10. The Bruins 
(4) will batUe the likes of Arizona 
(9), Oregon (12), USC (17), 
California (24), and Washington 
(32) for the conference title. 

The SEC is once again full of 
hopefuls for the national tide. 
Tennessee (5) leads the way after 
impressive victories over Florida 
(18) and Auburn. The other SEC 
teams that are in the hunt to win 
the conference are LSU (13), the 
surprising Arkansas Razorbacks 
(15), Florida (18), and my upset 



choice to win the SEC, the 
Georgia Bulldogs (19). 

Florida State (7) is still clinging 
on to national title hopes after 
being upset early by North 
Carolina State (16). The key here 
is that the Seminoles lost early, 
and in college football, if you lose 
early you still have a chance. The 
only other team in the conference 
that has hopes of winning the 
ACC is Virginia (22). 

The Big East may be the most 
unpredictable conference in the 
nation. Virginia Tech (8) looks to 
be the front runner, followed by 
the high scoring Syracuse 
Orangemen (21) and West 
Virginia (28). The spoiler in this 
conference may be the Pittsburgh 
Panthers. Pitt gave Penn State a 
huge scare and barring a few 
turnovers may have knocked off 
Virginia Tech. 

Finally, talk about college foot- 
ball would not be complete with- 
out mentioning Notre Dame. 
There I mentioned them, and, no, 
they are not a national tide con- 
tender. 

As I have been known to do in 



this column, I will go out on a 
limb and tell you now who will 
play in the Fiesta Bowl for the 
national tide. The Nebraska 
Cornhuskers will take on the not- 
so Big Ten champion Ohio State 
Buckeyes. 

Now that the Big Ten and Pac- 
10 have joined the Bowl Alliance, 
college football should finally 
have a decisive No. 1 versus No. 2 
game. Granted, it is not as good 
as a playoff system, but it is better 
than having the top two teams 
playing in different games. 

No, I won't let you hanging on 
my prediction for the Nebraska- 
Ohio State title game. But, I'm 
sure you already figured out who I 
would pick. That's right, 
Nebraska in a romp over Ohio 
State to claim their fourth national 
championship in the last five 
years. 



(Clarion Call columnist Chris 
Pfeil welcomes your comments. 
You can e-mail him at: 
s_crpfeil@clarion.edu. ) 




Flag Footfru ll Box Sc 9 r ? ? 



INTRAMURAI NFWQ 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 1 7 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



9/30 

69Boyz 54 
Other Ones 42 
OeezNutz 46 
P & E Inc. 33 
Spaffll 34 

10/1 
S T Blue 39 
TeamKDR 43 
Spaffll 56 

10/5 
ST Grey 51 
Nation 33 
1 8A Pie 63 
Deez Nutz 62 
10/6 
S T Blue 58 
P&Elnc. 43 
PHWarr. 17 
Crows 39 



Redmen 
Brawlers 6 
l8APie 12 
Nation 18 
Bandits 25 

Bandits 8 
Deez Nutz 34 
69Boyz 12 

Swore 36 
Bandits 12 
Redmen 9 
Other Ones 1 1 



FLAG FOOTBA^ 

STANDINGS won /loss 



Spaffll 12 
I 8A Pie 20 
TeamKDR 15 
Brawlers 14 



VollevbaM Boy S r „ raa 
9/30 

Vert. Chall. 2G 21 -Hats 0G 
6Pack2G Slackers 0G 
Set to Kill 2G Doggs 0G 

10/1 
Smile 2G Doggs 0G 

Diggettes "W 21-Hats "F 
Vert. Chall. 2G Kamakazis 
6 Pack 2G Chall. 0G 



1. ST. Gamma Blue 7/0 

2. ST. Gamma Grey 4/3 

3. Redmen 0/5 

4. P&Elnc. 4/2 

5. Atoms 1/7 

6. The Other Ones 4/2 
7 PH Warriors 8/0 

8. Bookstore Bandits 0/4 

9. TeamKDR . 5/1 

10. Iron City 1/5 

11. Deez Nutz 6/1 

12. Spafll 5/1 
13 l8APie 2/4 

14. Crows 4/3 

15. Swore 2/4 

16. 69Boyz 2/4 

17. The Nation 3/3 

18. 3B Brawlers 1/7 



Volleyball Scores fc 9 n't) 
10/5 

6 Pack 2G Scherm. OG 
Vert. Chall. 2G Kamakazis 0G 

10/6 
6 Pack 2G Bonzai 0G 
Stairdivers 'W Crows "F 
Crazy Girls "W Kamakazis "P 



VOLLEYBALL 

STANDINGS 

CO-REC won /loss 

1. Bonzai 1/3 

2. The Challengers 3/1 

3. Smile 1/1 

4. Wood St. Warr. 0/4 

5. The Slackers 1/1 

6. Scherminators 0/2 
7 Set to Kill 1/2 

8. Mixed Up 5/0 

9. Cats & Doggs 1/3 

10. Six Pack Attack 5/0 

WOMEN'S 

A. Kamakazis 0/5 

B. The Diggettes 3/0 

C. Crazy Girls 2/2 

D. 21-Hats 1/3 

E. Vert. Challenged 4/0 

MEN'S DIVISION 

1. Crows 0/3 

2. Stairdivers 3/0 

BEACH 
VOLLEYBALL 

RESULTS 

Team "K AND G" 
comprised of Kevin 
Deardorff and Garrett 
Hershberger capture the 
title. 



NEWS IN ■ BRIPF 

1 PITCH SOFTBAI I 

Sunday, Oct. 1 1 @ 2:00pm 

IN-LINE HOCKF-V 

Captains Mtg.Tue 10/13 9 PM 
DONT BE LATE! Get your 
roster turned in by the deadline 
Monday, Oct 12. 

AQUA AEROBIf^ 
No class Sun. 10/11 

FITNESS CENTFR 

IN TIPPIN GYM WILL BE 
CLOSED 10/9- 10/11 

INDOOR SQ^FR 

Indoor soccer sign-ups 
will continue until the 
NEW indoor goals arrive. 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

G.E.A.R. 

QUEHANNA TRAIL 

Reservations are now 
being accepted for the 
next adventure trip. We 
will be going to the 
Parker Dam area near 
Clearfield PA to hike the 
16 mile loop of the 
Quehanna Trail. 

Departure date is Friday 
October 23 and we will 
be returning to Clarion on 
Sunday October 25. Cost 
for students is $15.00. 
This covers all of your 
meals for the week-end. 
Tents, backpacks and 
most other equipment will 
be furnished. 



3 ON 3 baskptram "ROCK CLIMBING" 

Coming up at the end of The next scheduled trip 
the month I Sign-up now. ' s slated for Thursday 

October. 22. Mark your 
calenders and call x 2349 
to reserve your space. 



October 8. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Tage 27 



SPORTS TALK'S LIVE REMOTE 





limit, 



■ nmn««".v.'.v. 






-From in front of the Captain Loom is 

Inn 

-4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, October 8th 

-Prize giveaways and chances to win 

tickets to next week's Blues Traveler 

concert 

-Join special guest alumni host Kraig 

Koelsch along with Jason Dambach, 

Chuck Desch, Wiz, and Joe from 

Penn State. 

Friday: Don't forget about WCUC's live broad- 
casts throughout the day as the Autumn Leaf 

Festival continues 

WCUC: There's nothing else 

quite like it!! 






Page 28 



The Clarion Call 



Homecoming brings back 
CUP football memories 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Most college football teams 
long for just one championship 
season, or hope for a sustained 
stretch of quality football for a 
few years. Clarion's football tra- 
dition takes in over 40 years of 
excellence and features the indi- 
vidual greatness of coaches and 
student-athletes, which is the 
Clarion University trademark. 

The football tradition itself was 
started by Waldo S. Tippin, prob- 
ably better known as the "Great 
White Father," because of his 
white hair and fatherly approach 
to his players. Tippin, also 
Clarion's athletics director, 
coached from 1935-47 and 1952- 
56, and had a quality record. But 
his comeback in 1952 set the 
stage for future decades of 
Clarion football. The Golden 
Eagles posted a 9-0 overall record 
in 1952, including a 13-6 win 
over East Carolina in the Lions 
Bowl, Clarion's only bowl 
appearance. That seasons was led 
by the play of Dave Bevevino, 
John Lovre, Bob Shaw, George 
Czap, and Alex Sandusky. 

A number of good seasons fol- 
lowed, but in 1961, under Ernie 
"Turk" Johnson, the Eagles post- 
ed a 5-2-1 record and an NCAA 
Division II streak was born. 
Amazingly, for the next 27 sea- 
sons, Clarion didn't have a losing 
seasons and seemingly either won 
the PSAC- Western Division or 
was favored to win the division 
every season. 

What coaches Tippin, Bob 
Moore, Ben Kribbs, and Ernie 
Johnson labored to build from 
1935-62, reached legendary 
heights from 1963-81 under 
nationally recognized head coach 



Al Jacks. 

When Al Jacks came to Clarion 
in 1963, the overall program 
: (1926-1962) had managed a 
record of 106-127-12. When 
Jacks stepped down as head coach 
in 1981, he had completed an 
unbelievable 19-year record of 
128-46-5, a winning percentage 
of 72.9 percent. Remarkably, 
Jacks guided the Golden Eagles to 
19 straight non-losing and 18 
straight winning seasons. Under 
his masterful tutelage, the Golden 
Eagles won the PSAC-Western 
Division titles in 1966, 67, 69, 
77,78, and 80, while winning the 
PSAC championship in 1966, 77, 
and 80. 

Clarion's best teams over that 
period? No doubt the first was 
the undefeated 1966 squad (10-0), 
which featured Jim Alcorn, 
Mickey Catello, Jim Becker, Jim 
Miller, John DeRiggi, and Tom 
Kurts. 

The 1977 PSAC championship 
team was 9-0-1 behind the likes 
of Ed Arndt, Jay Dellostretto, and 
BUI May. The PSAC title team of 
1980 was 9-2 with top players 
including Bob Beatty, Steve 
Scillitani, Gary McCauley, and 
Bob Bettis. 

The 1982 seasons saw longtime 
assistant Charles Ruslavage 
become the Eagle boss and lead 
the team to a 7-3 record. That 
year ended with an exciting three- 
game winning streak to set the 
stage for 1983. 

Gene Sobolewski, also a long- 
time assistant, became Clarion's 



ninth head coach in 1983 and 
directed the Golden Eagles to the 
PSAC-West title and won the 
PSAC championship 
with a 27-14 victory over East 
Stroudsburg at Hershey Stadium. 
The Eagles finished with a 9-2 
mark that year led by Pat Carbol, 
Elton Brown, Kevin Ewing, Terry 
McFetridge, and Jon Haslett. The 
1984 season ranked third in the 
nation by Sports Illustrated in the 
Division II preseason poll. 

Sobolewski led Clarion to a 7-3 
mark in 1984 and an 8-2 record in 
1985, including a final season No. 
16 ranking. 

Both Clarion (27 straight) and 
Penn State (49 straight) lost their 
nation-leading non-losing season 
streaks in 1988, but both have 
returned to their winning ways. 
In 1992 Clarion won its eighth 
PSAC-West title on the field. 

In 1994, Malen Luke became 
Clarion's 10th head coach and has 
continued the tradition. 

In 1996 he led Clarion to an 11- 
3 record, won the 
Lambert/Meadowlands Cup, the 
NCAA East Region and PSAC- 
West titles, gained the NCAA 
playoffs, and a "Final Four" fin- 
ish. 

"Clarion's football tradition is 
outstanding because of its dedi- 
cated and hard-working head 
coaches and their commitment to 
excellence in the classroom and 
on the football field. 

"That commitment is the right 
way to run a first-class program 
and we expect to continue that 



Division II football notebook 



continued from page 23 



ftDVttS '£2M S 




son in the PSAC has to be California. The Vulcans, who were picked 
to finish at the bottom of the standings, are off to a 3-2 start. Two of 
their wins may be against Cheyney and Mansfield, the two worst teams 
in the conference, but they have already surpassed last year's total of 
two wins. A win at Lock Haven this weekend would give Cal its first 
four-win campaign since 1993. However, for the Vulcans to record 
their first winning season since 1987, they must win at least two of their 
final five contests against Slippery Rock, Edinboro, IUP, Shippensburg 
and at Clarion in the final game of the regular season. 



October 8, 1998 



Week Six Scouting Report 



VS. 





r~T0% Off "wifF ] f 
I college l.D. J 

625 Wood St. 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814)226-7171 

Melissa Driscoll-Owner 




Where: Clarion's Memorial Stadium 
When: Saturday, 2 p.m. 
Radio: C 93 92.7 

The Golden Eagles return home after a grueling three-game road trip in 
which they went 1-2 to face Edinboro in an important contest. A loss 
would drop Clarion to 2-4 overall and 0-2 in the PSAC-West, a hole from 
which it would be difficult to recover from. 

Despite returning a conference-leading 19 starters from last year, 
Edinboro has struggled to a 1-4 record, including a heartbreaking 27-23 
loss at home last week to Shippensburg. Meanwhile, the Golden Eagles 
are coming off a frustrating 28-14 loss at No. 12 Slippery Rock, in which 
the Golden Eagles turned the ball over seven times. Aside from the 
turnovers, Clarion had to be happy with its defense, which held Slippery 
Rock's vaunted running attack to just 2.7 yards per carry. 

This week, the Golden Eagle defense will once again have its hands full 
with a strong running attack. Edinboro senior running back Gerald 
Thompson is by far the PSAC's leading rusher with 730 yards and seven 
touchdowns in five games. Last week against Shippensburg, Thompson 
ran for 202 yards on 39 carries. 

However, the Scots' offense is not one-dimensional. They possess the 
conference's fourth-best passing offense led by sophomore Brian 
Caldwell, who has thrown for 1 ,059 yards in five games. Dangerous wide 
receiver Quentin Ware-Bey leads Edinboro with 25 catches for 352 yards 
and five TDs. Kicker Tyson Cook possesses range from beyond 50 yards. 
Defense has been Edinboro's Achilles heel in its 1-4 start. The Scots 
rank 12th out of 14 teams in the PSAC in total defense and are dead last 
against the pass. That means that Clarion's standout wide receiver, Atvin 
Slaughter, whose 36 catches for 587 yards are among the PSAC's best 
could have a field day. 

However, the Clarion running game, which is ranked 10th in the PSAC 
could be the key to victory. The Golden Eagles will need to run the ball 
effectively in order to chew up yardage and clock and keep the defense 
rested. Senior quarterback Chris Weibel, who has made a tremendous 
recovery from a season-ending knee injury last season, will focus on find- 
ing Slaughter, who is on pace to break the school's single season recep- 
tions (74) and receiving yards (1,018) records. 

Defensively, Clarion will attempt to shut down the Edinboro offense as 
it dkl a year ago in a 28-0 victory — also at Memorial Stadium. In that 
game, the Golden Eagles held the Soots to (-3) yards rushing, a task that 
may be tough to duplicate once again, especially with Edinboro hoping to 
feed Thompson the ball over 30 times. However, after keeping Slippery 
Rock's running game in check last week, anything is possible. 

The defensive star inlast week's game for Clarion was freshman defen- 
sive lineman Doug Diegelman, who was awarded with the PSAC-West 
"Defensive Player of the Week" award. As always, the linebackers will be 
the key to the Clarion defense. Sophomore Ryan Presutti has been dom- 
inant over the first five weeks, recording 3.5 sacks, two interceptions, and 
an average of eight tackles per week. Junior Brett Wiley is second in the 
PSAC in tackles and is tied with Presutti with five tackles for a loss If 
those two, along with senior linebacker Keith Kochert, can find them- 
selves in the Edinboro backfield much of the day, Clarion will be in good 
shape. The secondary will look to tame the fourth-best passing offense in 
the conference. 

EXTRA POINTS: Clarion has not beaten Edinboro in consecutive sea- 
sons since 1984-85 ... Five of Clarion's 10 Division II opponents are 
ranked in the Northeast Region - IUP (No. 1, No. 2 nationally), Slippery 
Rock (No. 3, No. 10 nationally), Westchester (No. 7), Millersville (No 8) 
and Shepherd (10th) ... The Golden Eagles are 1-2 against those teams' 
with games left to play against IUP (Oct. 24), West Chester (Oct. 31) 
Edinboro head coach Tom Hollman, now in his 11th season at the school 
has posted a 43-16-2 record against PSAC-West competition. 
Compiled by Asst. Sports Editor Jason Dambach 



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OCTOBER 15. 1998 



INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses... Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Page 10 

Entertainment Page 15 

Classifieds Page 16 

Call On YOU... Page 18 

Sports Page 20 



News 



The State System of 

Higher Education is 

planning a 35% tuition 

hike for the 1999-2000 

school year. 

See Page 5. 



Lifestyles 



Blues Traveler 

rocks Clarion's 

campus. For the 

story, see Page 10. 



Sports 



The Golden Eagles 

will look to 

continue their 

winning ways against 

Shippensburg at 

Memorial Stadium 

Saturday. See Page 20. 



CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME 81, ISSUE 5 



Clarion defeats Edinboro 33-20 

WHAT A WIN ! 



by Nathan Koble 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

The Clarion University foot- 
ball team enjoyed Homecoming 
more than anyone else Saturday 
afternoon. 

The Eagles, who opened the 
season with four away games in 
five starts, hammered PSAC- 
West rival Edinboro, 33-20, in 
front of 7,000 fans at Memorial 
Stadium. 

The win allowed Clarion to 
even its record at 3-3 on the year 
(1-1 PSAC), while the disap- 
pointing Fighting Scots tumbled 
to 1-5 (0-2 PSAC). 

Though sloppy at times, the 
Golden Eagle offense spread the 
ball around, keeping the 
Edinboro defense guessing. The 
Eagles rolled up 206 rushing 
yards on 42 attempts. The 
Eagles went to more of a ground 
attack after tossing 38 passes in 
a 28-14 loss at Slippery Rock a 
week earlier. 

"I think we're starting to get a 
better balance," said Clarion 
head coach Malen Luke. 
"We're doing alright moving the 
ball, but then we get a second- 
and-2 and we get a motion 
penalty or poor execution on a 



play. Those are the things that 
are hurting us right now." 

When passing, the Eagles used 
their short-passing attack led by 
quarterback Chris Weibel, who 
threw for 167 yards on 26 
attempts. Running back Jamie 
Sickeri came out of the backfield 
to account for 100 of those yards. 

However, it was the play of 
freshman running back Demitric 
Gardner that seemed to put life 
into the Golden Eagle offense 
Saturday. Gardner sparked the 
Clarion running game, which has 
been among the conference's 
least effective at times this sea- 
son, with 106 yards on 1 1 tries — 
good for an impressive 9.3 aver- 
age. 

"He's a great player," said 
Luke. "He's going to have a 
great future here for us I think. 
He's just going to get better as he 
gets more experience. We're real 
happy about it." 

Gardner was pleased with his 
performance, which came just 
one week after totaling 91 receiv- 
ing yards at Slippery Rock. 

"It's all about learning the 
offense," said Gardner. "It takes 
some time to adjust to the (col- 
lege) game. This is a lot faster 
than high school. It's a lot more 




As high as the sky.. .Call Photography Editor George Groff 
braved a plane ride to get a sky view shot of ALF. The plane 
was flown by Clarion's own Dr. Herbert Bolland. 







The Clarion Eagles defeated the 
coming on Saturday. 

physical." 

While the Eagles would control 
most of the contest, the Scots 
gave the Golden Eagles an early 
wake-up call. 

Edinboro quarterback Brian 
Caldwell hooked up with star 
wide receiver Quentin Ware-Bey 
for strikes of 39 and 44 yards on 
the first two plays of the game to 
put the Scots ahead 7-0. 

"We just didn't come ready to 
play — pure and simple," said 
Luke. 

That score would stand at the 
end of the first quarter before the 
Eagles exploded for a 16-poinf 
second period. 

On a fourth-and-goal situation 
from the 1, Sickeri punched into 
the end zone to put the Eagles on 
the board with 10:36 to play in 
the first half. Frank Van Wert 
drilled the extra point to knot the 
score at 7-7. 

Edinboro's next possession 
would stall when Brad Geer 
intercepted a Caldwell pass at the 
Edinboro 32. Five plays later, 



George Groff/ Clarion Call 
Edinboro Scots at their home- 
Gardner coughed the ball up into 
the end zone just before crossing 
the goal line. Fortunately for 
Clarion, the ball wound up in the 
hands of wide receiver Dan Stout 
to give the Eagles a 13-7 edge. 
The two-point conversion would 
fail, leaving the Eagles with a six- 
point bulge. 

VanWert would tack on a 25- 
yard field goal with just over a 
minute to play to cap the first-half 
scoring at 16-7 in favor of the 
Golden Eagles. 

Clarion took a page from the 
Edinboro playbook to open the 
second half. Just like the Scots 
wasted little time in denting the 
scoreboard in the first quarter, the 
Eagles used a three-play, 66-yard 
drive to extend their lead to 24- 
13. The touchdown occurred 
when Gardner scored on a six- 
yard jaunt and Weibel found 
Alvin Slaughter in the middle of 
the end zone for the two-point 
conversion. 

continued on Page 23 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



octohpr masa 



THE CLARION CALL 

270GEMMELLCOMrLEX 

CLARION, TA 16214 

(814) 226-2380 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-mail: call@mail.clarion.edu 

vvvvw.clarion.edu/thecall 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



The ClariOft Cj)| is puhHahari ituvtt 



Thursdays during the school year in 
accordance with the academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
from all sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter 
mination of which is the responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in^hief). Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse publica- 
tion of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5:00 
p.m. cm the Monday of desired publi- 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
letters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the de^red week will be 
held and published iu following 
issues of The QuJQU Call, Display 
Advertising Copland greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2t00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. The Clarjptt 



£aJl is funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue. 



OPINION 



October 15. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 




Hide Park 



'Wow could ypu 

transfer a ball 

club when you did 

not have a highway?" 



Casey Stengel Testimony 



This non-fiction artifact from 
the public record is reproduced 
periodically so each generation 
of CUP students may vicariously 
participate in our national pas- 
time-giving testimony. 

'The Grounds Keeper" 
On July 9, 1958, hearings were 
held in Washington by the 
Subcommittee on. Antitrust and 
Monopoly of the Committee of 
the Judiciary of the United States 
Senate. The Subcommittee was 
considering H.R. 10378 and S. 
4070 to limit anti-trust laws so as 
to exempt professional baseball, 
football, basketball, and hockey. 
Before them as an expert witness 
came Casey Stengel, whose ver- 
bal cuneiform has added the 
word "Stengelese" to our lan- 
guage. They say there was noth- 
ing like it, in all the history of 
Congressional hearings. 
Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, 
you are the manager of the New 
York Yankees. Will you give us 
very briefly your background and 
your views about mis legislation? 
Mr. Stengel: Well, I started in 
professional ball in 1910. I have 
been in professional ball, I would 
say, for forty-eight years. I have 
been employed by numerous ball 
clubs in the majors and in the 
minor leagues. 

I started in the minor leagues 
with Kansas City. I played as 
low as Class D ball, which was at 
Shelbyville, Kentucky, and also 
Class C ball and Class A ball, and 
I have advanced in baseball as a 
ball player. 

I had many years I was not so 
successful as a ball player, as it is 
a game of skill. And then I was 
no doubt discharged by baseball 
in which I had to go back to the 
minor leagues as a manager, and 
after being in the minor leagues 
as a manager, I became a major 
league manager in several cities 
and was discharged, we call it 
discharged because there was no 
question I had to leave. 

And I returned to the minor 



leagues at Milwaukee, Kansas 
City and Oakland, California, 
and then returned to the major 
leagues. 

In the last ten years, naturally, 
in major-league baseball with the 
New York Yankees; the New 
York Yankees have had tremen- 
dous success, and while I am not 
a ballplayer who does the work, I 
have no doubt worked for a ball 
club that is very capable in the 
office. 

I have been up and down the 
ladder. I know there are some 
things in baseball thirty-five to 
fifty years ago that are better now 
than they were in those days. In 
those days, my goodness, you 
could not transfer a ball club in 
the minor leagues, Class D, Class 
C ball, Class A ball. 

How could you transfer a ball 
club when you did not have a 
highway? How could you trans- 
fer a ball club when the railroad 
then would take you to a town, 
you got off and then you had to 
wait and sit up five hours to go to 
another ball club? 

How could you run baseball 
then without night ball? 

You had to have night ball to 
improve the proceeds, to pay 
larger salaries, and I went to 
work, the first year I received 
$135 a month. 

I thought that was amazing. I 
had to put away enough money to 
go to dental college. I found out it 
was not better in dentistry. I 
stayed in baseball. Any other 
question you would like to ask 
me? 

Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, 
are you prepared to answer par- 
ticularly why baseball wants this 
bill passed? 

Mr. Stengel: Well, I would have 
to say at the present time, I think 
that baseball has advanced in this 
respect for the player help. That 
is an amazing statement for me to 
make, because you can retire 
with an annuity at fifty and what 

Continued on Page 4 




Editorial 



" ...another ALF 

weekend has come 

and gone, and we 

have survived 

another year. 



jy 



Codey Beck, On-Line Editor 



The Clarion University home- 
coming is an event that is antici- 
pated and feared by many stu- 
dents and alumni. The excitement 
builds as October rolls around 
with the always enjoyed and very 
badly needed mid-semester long 
weekend. We all were able to see 
students that have graduated and 
are now in the "real world." 
We were able to drink and be 
merry after we returned some 
books for money. And we got to 
eat lots of ALF food (free for 
some of us, right Kom?) 

At my fraternity house, Phi 
Sigma Kappa, we had our annual 
pig roast. The pig was actually 
cooked this year and not basted 
in Aftershock by alumni. Many 
alumni slept in our chapter room 
all weekend; an event not to be 
tried unless you want to be col- 
ored with permanent marker and 
covered with shaving cream. But 
there were no major incidents, 
and the dried-up shaving cream 
will eventually come off of the 
walls. 
The fear comes into play with 



most of the local fraternities and 
sororities as the parade runs near. 
The ever-hated but always 
enjoyed float needs to be fin- 
ished. It is a great time for bond- 
ing and building great friend- 
ships. It is like a mixer that goes 
on for two weeks. We had a great 
time with Phi Sigma Sigma and 
we cannot wait to "work" with 
them again. 

Well, another ALF weekend has 
come and gone, and we have sur- 
vived one more year. The float is 
now a two-foot ball of chicken 
wire. The house is starting to 
become clean again, although the 
front yard may never recover. 
And most of us are back in class 
or at work, if we have gotten rid 
of our hangovers. Now we wait 
in anticipation (and again fear for 
some) for the next big weekend: 
Halloween. I hope everyone had 
a great ALF and made some 
memories that will never be for- 
gotten. That is, if you can remem- 
ber them in the first place. 

Codey Beck is a Junior IS Major. 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith Gwillim 

Assistant Sports Editor: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Assistant Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Assistant Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Copy and Design Assistants: Ryan Camuso and Wendy Stivers 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
Staff Writing Supervisor: Mary Beth Curry 
Staff Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Susan Ferchalk, Mike Markewinski, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, 
Kelly Palma, Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker, Jeff Chaffee, 
Mike Cody, James Gates, Keith Gwillim, Lori Imbrugno, Janet Pazsink, Cory 
Pittman, Jason Rhoades, Jerry Collier, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob Meyers, 
Marvin Wells 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tim Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Drayton, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Julie 
Lope, Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, 
Alvin Slaughter 

Circulation Staff Shane Bednez, John Dellich, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
Ibinson, Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 
Proofreaders: Dawn Koch, Niki Stedina, Brooke Rinier, Stephanie Apter 
Names remaining in the staff box in the December 10 issue will receive co-curricular credit. 



Beginning this semester, advertisers will be charged for 

ordering an ad, regardless of whether or not they meet 

The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 






READER RESPONSE 



"Miss Binick's words angered and 

frustrated me." 



After reviewing numerous 
responses to Angeline Binick's 
letter from October 1 which rep- 
rimanded Koinonia's views, I 
finally feel that I have been led to 
the proper response with this let- 
ter. 

Miss Binick's words angered 
and frusterated me. I am a 
Christian and live what I believe 
to be the Christian way of life 
every day. However, we are all 
human, and we all make mis- 
takes. Yes, some of us still have 
fears about homosexuals. I, too, 
would like for everybody to care 
about the rest of society, regard- 
less of our various fears, profes- 
sions, race, lifestyles, faith-based 
choices, etc. 

I do not mean that we need to 
accept homosexuality or other 
sinful lifestyles as right. I know 
that the Lord has the power to 
change sinners' lives. Does that 
mean that he will change all of 
them? No, but He cant Why? I 
don't know why, and I never will 
until the Lord decides to let me 
know. 

I apologize for others who may 
be overzealous or self-righteous. 
I do not know what was said by 
the speakers at the Koinonia pre- 
sentation about which Miss 
Binick wrote. However, fellow 
Christians, if you see or hear oth- 
ers anywhere who are leading 
anyone astray, please pull them 
aside privately and inform them 
politely of the correct message- 
the one our maker wants us to 



give. 

I support the Disney boycott. I 
am not anti-gay, but Christians 




Letters to 
the Editor 



need to love all their neighbors 
enough to share the Lord and His 
love with them. We should not 
support or encourage sinful 
lifestyles, whatever they may be. 
There are no faith-based rea- 
sons for bigotry, which Miss 
Binick seems to think is a docter- 
ine of local Christian groups. I 
came across two quotations 
recently which I would like to 
share. "Tolerance is a virtue of 
people with no convictions," and 
"The opposite of intolerance isn't 
tolerance. It's love." We need to 
love the sinners, not tolerate the 



sins. 

I invite all those out mere who 
feel that something is missing in 
their lives, or who are tired of 
thin rationalizations for their pain 
and emptiness, to find a church 
that accepts them for who they 
are and who they want to be. I 
have a church, and I am there 
every day when I'm with a broth- 
er or sister in Christ. Although 
I've always got one, more are 
always appreciated and welcome. 
It is a hard line to draw and even 
a thinner line to walk. But when 
your best friend is the Maker's 
Son, it is difficult. 

I would like to end this letter 
with a wake up call to everyone. 
Christians, too, are widely dis- 
criminated against in this coun- 
try, especially by the media and 
the public. So, as you see, we're 
really not that different. 
Everybody has the right to 
choose what they will believe 
and how much love they will 
give, whether it is regarding what 
social movement is worth talking 
about, or who to like and who not 
to like. 

I would like to say that humans 
are humans, saved or unsaved. 
We are not perfect and never will 
be. However, our best is always 
better than our worst. Spread 
love, not hate, regardless of your 
beliefs. 



Sincerely, 
Craig M. Dorn 



"The administration takes advantage 
of us on a constant daily basis." 



Dear Editor, 

I was just reading Adam 
Warman's letter to the editor, and 
I agree with him about every- 
thing he said about the university. 
This administration takes advan- 
tage of us on a constant, daily 
basis. I'm sure that if Mr. 
Warman had received that little 
yellow paper that was put on our 
windshields today (about the new 
parking regulations), he would 
have included that in his letter. 

How on earth can Public Safety 
expect us to be patient and under- 
standing with them when they do 



not treat students in that manner? 
Half the time they prowl the 
parking lots, waiting for time to 
be up on the parking meter. The 
other half of the time is spent on 
getting bent out of shape when 
students make reasonable 
requests (i.e. "please unlock the 
building I work in", "I'd like to 
pay for my "*ahem* parking 
ticket in cash," etc.) And what's 
the deal with ticketing us for 
using a parking meter when there 
is still time left on it, just because 
we have a student parking permit 
showing?!! Obviously, if we paid 

,~. .— ~ i 



money to park, then there must 
not have been other viable spaces 
open (no, we will NOT walk all 
the way to the other side of the 
campus from a remote parking 
spot. ..remember, WE pay to 
attend mis university...). 

Also, I have worked in the 
Reimer Snack Bar in the past, so 
I am quite familiar with the 
ridiculous over-pricing that goes 
on there. At one point, they were 
selling 24-packs of soda for 
seven dollars and I thought that 
was bad. The monopoly Daka has 
on our campus meal plans needs 



"I am especially grateful to the 
Muslim Student Association..." 



*Please Note* This letter was 
written last semester. 
Dear Editor, 

Featuring a one man dramatiza- 
tion by minister Al Skaggs of 
Deitrich Bonhoeffer's resistance 
to the Nazis, a talk by visiting 
scholar Dr. David Rabeeya, an 
Iraqi Jew, a talk by Dr. Robert 
Erickson on Christianity and the 
Nazis, a book review by Dr. 
Brian Dunn on Euthanasia in 
Germany, and our traditional 
"Unto Every Person There is a 
Name" reading of the names of 
the Holocaust victims, I am very 
pleased to report that all events 
were well received and well 
attended. 



As one of the coordinators of 
the series, I want to thank so 
many individuals and organiza- 
tions without which the program 
would not have been possible for 
their support. I am especially 
grateful to the Muslim Student 
Association for their part in this 
year's program. When we read 
about KKK or the Neo-Nazis tar- 
geting our area, it is very refresh- 
ing to see the support generated 
by a program like this at Clarion 
and in the surrounding communi- 
ty 

Stephen I. Gendler 
Holocaust Remberance Service 



"We do not come up with excuses 
and hang up on our customers." 



Dear Editor, 

I have noticed that many peo- 
ple are criticizing Chandler 
Dining Hall. I feel that more 
attention should be put towards 
the snack bar. 

I don't know how many times I 
have ordered something from 
Gemmell, just to have it arrive 
cold, not what I ordered, and at 
least one hour late. I give them 
about $100 a semester and I 
know that other students do, too. 
If we want to use our flex, we 
have no choice. The management 
at the Snack Bar knows this. 
Today, I ordered some food from 
Gemmell at 4:00 p.m. I had a 
class at 5:00, but they assured me 
that my food would arrive in a 
half an hour. I have no clue when 
it did arrive because I went run- 
ning from my room at five min- 
utes until six to class. 

There have been numerous 
other times where I did wait to 
get my food. It always arrives 
cold, and is not that good. 
Moreover, just try to call and 
complain. Last time I did this, the 
person who claimed to be the 



manager hung up on me. Usually 
their response is, "Well, we are 
understaffed and there is nothing 
we can do." 

I have been working as a pizza 
delivery man for about two years. 
We have a thing called customer 
satisfaction. If you do not like 
what we produce, we will replace 
your food or refund your money. 
We do not come up with excuses 
and hang up on our customers. 
But if our customers are dis- 
pleased, then they will just call 
somewhere else the next time 
they order. As students, we do not 
have that luxury. 

Someone needs to sit down 
with the employees of the snack 
bar and remind them that they are 
a business and we, the students, 
pay their salary. I personally do 
not like ordering from Gemmell 
because of the long wait, the cold 
food, and the cold management. I 
hope that someday, they get com- 
petition. Then maybe they will 
have to try and make a decent 
product and provide good cus- 
tomer service to stay in business. 
Sincerely, 
Mike Waite 



to be shattered, and I urge all of 
our student representatives there 
in the Senate to reject Daka's 
next renewal. 

So let's summarize here. 
Student Senate Members, I urge 



you not to approve Daka's next 
renewal. And Public Safety, let's 
have some realistic and respect- 
ful attitudes towards the students. 

Jon Hall 



«-l-»'»'«- 



Page 4 




The Clarion C*U 



October 15. 1QQ8 



READER RESPONSE 



organization in America allows 
you lo retire at fifty and receive 
money? 

I want to further state that I am 
not a ballplayer, that is, put into 
that pension fund committee. At 
my age, and I have been in base- 
ball, well, I will say I am possibly 
the oldest man who is working in 
baseball. I would say that when 
they start an annuity for the 
ballplayers to better their condi- 
tions, it should have been done, 
and I think it has been done. 

I think it should be the way they 
have done it, which is a very 
good thing. 

The reason they possibly did 
not take the managers in at that 
time was because radio and tele- 
vision or the income to ball clubs 
was not large enough that you 
could have put in a pension plan. 
Now, I am not a member of the 
penison plan. You have young 
men here who are, who represent 
the ball clubs. 

They represent the players and 
since I am not a member and 
don't receive pension from a 
fund which you think, my good- 
ness, he ought to be declared that, 
too, but I would say that is a great 
thing for the ballplayers. 

That is one thing I will say for 
ballplayers, they have an 
advanced pension fund. I should 



Hide Park Continued From Page Two 

impfira allrtu/c think it u/as onin^H hw r.,i;,» ™a vt __ .. . . *— " 



think it was gained by radio and 
television or you could not have 
enough money to pay anything of 
that type. 

Now the second thing about 
baseball that I think is very inter- 
esting to the public or to all of us 
that it is the owner's own fault if 
he does not improve his club, 
along with the officials in the ball 
club and the players. 
Now what causes that? 
If I am going to go on the road 
and we are a traveling ball club 
and you know the cost of trans- 
portation now-we travel some- 
times with three Pullman coach- 
es, the New York Yankees and 
remember I am just a salaried 
man, and do not own stock in the 
New York Yankees. I found out 
that in traveling with the New 
York Yankees on the road and all, 
that is the best, and we have bro- 
ken records in Washington this 
year, we have broken them in 
every city but New York and we 
have lost two clubs that have 
gone out of the city of New York. 
Of course, we have had some 
bad weather, I would say that 
they are mad at us in Chicago, we 
fill the parks. 
They have come out to see good 
material. I will say they are mad 
at us in Kansas City, but we 
broke their attendance record. 



Now on the road we only get 
possibly 27 cents. I am not posi- 
tive of these figures, as I am not 
an official. 

If you go back fifteen years or 
so if I owned stock in the club I 
would give them to you. 
Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, 
I am not sure that I made my 
question clear. 

Mr. Stengel: Yes, sir. Well, that 
is all right. I am not sure if I am 
going to answer yours perfectly, 
either. 

Senator O'Mahoney: How 
many minor leagues were there 
in baseball when you began? 
Mr. Stengel: Well, there were 
not so many at mat time because 
of this fact: Anybody to go into 
baseball at that time with the edu- 
cational schools that we had were 
small, while you we.e probably 
thoroughly educated at school, 
you had to be-we only had small 
cities that you culd put a team in 
and they would go defunct. 

Why, I remember the first year 
I was at Kankakee, Illinois and a 
bank offered me $550 if I would 
let them have a little notice. I left 
there and took a uniform because 
they owed me two weeks' pay. 
But I either had to quit but I did 
not have enough money to go to 
dental college so I had to go with 
the manager down to Kentucky. 



This past summer, my girl- 
friend Stacy and I were waiting 
in line at a minature golf course. 
The kid in front of us, roughly 17 
years of age, turned and said, 
"What does that mean?" He was 
referring to the Greek letters on 
my chest. I responded, "It's my 
fraternity, Sigma Pi." 

"I guess you drink a lot of 
beer," was his response. 

I honestly believe that when 
students, university faculty, and 
the Clarion public see an individ- 
ual wearing Greek letters, their 
thoughts are very similar. For 
those of you that presume this, 
unfortunately for you that is not 
the situation. 

The Greek fraternity system at 
Clarion has remained the top 
community service working body 
on campus, and is still progres- 
sively increasing. This semester, 
the Interfratemity Council (IFC) 
has adopted the Salvation Army 
as its philanthropy, with Kappa 
Delta Rho's Mitch Augustine 
managing the operation. The 
hours, dedicated to this organiza- 



tion this year will help make 
profits for Clarion. Also, many 
other organizations benefit from 
the Greek fraternities on this 
campus. For instance, Sigma Chi 
raises money for Children's 
Miracle Network, Kappa Delta 
Rho supports the American 
Cancer Society, Sigma Tau 



This Week 

in Greek: 

Don't Believe the Media 

about Greeks 

by Tony Fisher 
Greek Contributor 



Gamma represents BACCHUS, 
and Sigma Pi dedicates its efforts 
to the American Red Cross. 

This semester, the IFC has also 
put into effect an Accreditation 
Program that was approved by 
President Diane Reinhard. This 
program was developed by IFC 
president, Chris Monaco and the 
IFC executive board. It will 
assure the university that the fra- 
ternities will continue to be 
involved in community service 
efforts, will maintain a 2.5 GPA, 



will join together in Greek rela- 
tions, and most importantly, regu- 
late alcohol consumption on cam- 
pus. 

The IFC works diligently to min- 
imize risks involved with alchohol 
by raising alchohol awareness 
through sponsored programs and 
various speakers. The IFC also 
curves binge drinking on the 
Clarion campus with a six member 
alcohol awareness committee, 
which is chaired, by Sigma Chi's 
Bud Bender. 

It is just a shame that all the hard 
work done by the Greek system in 
Clarion is overshadowed by some 
fraternity in Louisiana, 

Massachusetts, or IUP that messed 
up. Don't pass the buck to us, 
because we are in no way, shape, 
or form the same Greeks that 
appear on 20/20. 

So, next time you see me or any 
other individual wearing Greek let- 
ters, remember that we are not a 
bunch of alcoholics. Rather, we are 
one of the strongest parts of the 
backbone of this institution. 



What happened there was if you 
got by July, that was the big date, 
you did not play night ball and 
you did not play Sundays in half 
of the cities on account of a 
Sunday observance, so in those 
days when things were tough, 
and all of it was, I mean to say, 
why they just closed up July 4 
and there you were sitting in the 
depot. 

You could go to work some- 
place else, but that was it. 

So I got out of Kankakee, 
Illinois, and I just go there for a 
visit now. 

Senator Carroll: The question 
Senator Kefauver asked you was 
what, in your honest opinion, 
with your forty-eight years of 
experience, is the need for this 
legislation in view of the fact that 
baseball has not been subject to 
antitrust laws? 
Mr. Stengel: No. 
Senator Langer: Mr. Chairman, 
my final question. This is the 
Antimonopoly Committee that is 
sitting here. 
Mr. Stengel: Yes, sir. 
Senator Langer: I want to know 
whether you intend to keep on 
monopolizing the world's cham- 
pionship in New York City. 
Mr. Stengel: Well, I will tell you. 
I got a little concern yesterday in 
the first three innings when I saw 
the three players I had gotten rid 



of. I said when I lost nine what 
am I going to do and when I had 
a couple of my players I thought 
so great of that did not do so good 
up to the sixth inning I was more 
confused but I finally had to go 
and call on a young man in 
Baltimore that we don't own and 
the Yankees don't own him, and 
he is doing pretty good, and I 
would actually have to tell you 
that I think we are more the Greta 
Garbo type now from success. 

We are being hated, I mean, 
from the ownership and all, we 
are being hated. Every sport that 
gets too great or one individual- 
but if we made 27 cents and it 
pays to have a winner at home, 
why would not you have a good 
winner in your own park if you 
were an owner? 
That is the result of baseball. An 
owner gets most of the money at 
home and it is up to him and his 
staff to do better or they ought to 
be discharged. 

Senator Kefauver: Thank you 
very much, Mr. Stengel. We 
appreciate your presence here. 
Mr. Mickey Mantle, will you 
come around? ...Mr. Mantle, do 
you have any observations with 
reference to the applicability of 
the antitrust laws to baseball? 
Mr. Mantle: My views are about 
the same as Casey's. 



Early Registration for the 1999 Spring 
Semester will begin on Monday, October 

1 9. Copies of the schedule of classes 
which include TELREG instructions will be 
available at The University Book Center 
and the Office of the Registrar. Please 
check the Telephone Registration 
Appointment Schedule which will be Posted 
at the Wood Street, entrance of Carlson 
Library for your specific date of eligibility. 
Students are advised to call ahead of time 
to make certain they are able to schedule 
classes Prior to attempting to do so by 
calling TelReg at 226-2680 and entering 
action code 728HLD. Also, students who 
will be candidates for graduation in May or 
Summer 1 999 should Pick up graduation 
applications in B- 1 6 Carrier. 



October 15. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



NEWSWIRE 



Calendar changes? 

Clarion University Faculty 

Senate is looking into 

making changes to the 

2000-2001 academic 

calendar. 

See page 6. 



Aid on the rise 

Students who receive 

financial aid have more to 

be happy about after the 

government increased the 

amount of aid to be 

allocated to students. 

Turn to page 9. 



Eight receive awards 

Clarion University 

Distinguished Awards 

were presented recently by 

the Alumni Association to 

eight deserving 

individuals. 

For the full story, 

see page 8. 



SPSEA wins award 

Clarion University's 

chapter of PSEA won the 

Quest Award for the fourth 

consecutive award. 

To find out more, 

see page 7. 



O-I makes donation 

Owens-Illinois Company 

made a $50,000 

contribution to complete 

the Venango Call to Action 

phase of the Investing in 

Futures Capital Campaign. 

To learn more about the 

contribution as well as the 

campaign, 

look on page 6. 



Also inside: 

Public Safety page 7 

Student Senate page 6 



NEWS TIPS? 

Phone: 226-2380 
FAX: 226-2557 
E-mail:CALL<Sclarion.edu 



NEWS 



State System approves a $448 million appropriation request 

TUition increase 'likely' for 1999-2000 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

Students who attend one of the 
14 State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) institutions 
will most likely see a tuition 
increase next year, according to 
SSHE press secretary Kenn 
Marshall. 

"We're looking at an increase of 
somewhere between two and four 
percent right now," he said. 
Earlier reports from the 
Associated Press that stated a 3.5 
percent increase was planned 
were false, Marshall said. 

"We cannot crunch the numbers 
until negotiations (with APSCUF) 
begin and look at further cost 
reductions," he added. 

The Board of Governors of the 
SSHE will seek a state appropria- 
tion of almost $448.3 million, 
which will be used to help fund 
the operation of the 14 state- 
owned schools. 

The SSHE's overall proposed 
educational and general budget 
for the 1999-2000 school year 
totals $926.5 million. More than 
half of that budget would come 



from student tuition and other 
required fees. This total repre- 
sents a 4.2 percent increase over 
the current operating budget. 

However, Marshall admitted, 
"That percentage could come 
down." 

The 4.2 percent works out to 
over $37 million more than this 
year's budget. One of the major 
reasons for the increase is to han- 
dle negotiations with the 
Association of Pennsylvania State 
College and University Faculties 
(APSCUF), which represents the 
SSHE's almost 5,500 university 
professors. 

"We also have negotiations in 
Harrisburg with four other 
unions," Marshall said. "Salaries 
and other personnel costs make up 
80 percent of the operating bud- 
get." 

The increase is also needed to 
help support new facilities that are 
opening on other SSHE campus- 
es. Marshall mentioned a new 
library will be opening at 
Bloomsburg, a new Science and 
Technology Building is open at 
California University, and con- 
struction will be complete on a 



building 



at 



new science 
Millersville. 

"Operating costs are also up and 
we also are working to make tech- 
nology upgrades, which are two 
more reasons for the increase," 
Marshall said. 

The Board of Governors is seek- 
ing an increase of about $23.5 
million from the state in funding 
next year, or 5.5 percent. 

For the current academic year, 
the State increased funding five 
percent. 

"We were already committed to 
freezing tuition and it left us with 
a $10 million gap," he said. "We 
asked the universities to cut their 
budgets and as a result some pro- 
jects and hirings did not get 
done." 

Marshall said that half of the 
funding for the SSHE comes from 
the State, and the remainder 
comes from tuition. 

"Right now, we're looking at 
between a two to four percent gap 
and we need a tuition increase to 
close that gap," he said. 

"It's too early to tell right now 
just what die increase will be," he 
added. 



The next step for the SSHE 
Board of Governors is to hear 
what Governor Ridge has pro- 
posed in his budget. That 
announcement will be made 
sometime in February. 

Appropriations hearings will 
take place at the state capital in 
late February or early March. 

"We'll know then how the 
Legislature stands," Marshall 
said. "Any changes to our budget 
won't be known until the state 
budget is passed." 

Normally, the tuition rate is set 
at the July meeting of the Board of 
Governors. "The Legislature has 
until June 30 to pass their state 
budget, and we can't set a rate 
until that budget has been 
approved." 

Marshall doesn't hold out hope 
that the SSHE will see that 5.5 
percent increase from the state. 
"Maybe Governor Ridge will be 
generous this year, but it isn't very 
likely," he said. 

The current tuition rate is $3,468 
per academic year for 

Pennsylvania students. A four 
percent hike would raise the rale 
by around $140, Marshall said. 



Crowned during last week's pep rally 



Chervenak and Bean CU's king and queen 



by Mark Strieker 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Nick Chervenak and Shannon 
Bean were crowned 1998 Clarion 
University homecoming king and 
queen last Thursday during the 
annual pep rally. 

The pep rally was held in the 
Gemmell Multi-purpose Room. 
During the rally, the cheerleaders 
and football team were also intro- 
duced to the crowd. 

Chervenak, a senior communi- 
cation major, is a son of Theresea 
Allen of Madison, Ohio and 
Dennis Chervenak of Cranberry 
Township. Chervenak is a gradu- 
ate of Madison High School. 

Bean, a senior elementary edu- 
cation/special education major, is 
a daughter of Anne Bean of West 
Middlesex and the late Donald 
Bean. She is a graduate of West 
Middlesex High School. 

Senior representatives on the 
homecoming court include 



Michael Chapaloney, Jeremy 
Young, Cynthia Thompson and 
Rochelle Ross. 

Junior homecoming court 
members were Sparrow Affrica, 
Christine Agosta, David Bauer 
and Ryan Lewis, 

Sophomores Kristy Best, 
Brooke Rinier, Chris Kercheval, 
and Shawn Whiting were also 
homecoming court members. 

Carrie Robinson, Maria 
Sollecchio, Benjamin Chervenak 
and Tony Fisher were the 
freshman representatives on the 
court. 

Members of the homecoming 
court rode in the Autumn Leaf 
Festival Parade. 

Other students of CU also were 
able to participate in ALF festivi- 
ties. Fraternities and sororities 
joined forces to design floats for 
the parade. 

The floats were judged and the 
winners were: First place: (tie) 
Delta Phi Epsilon/ Sigma Tau 




Photo: courtesy of Ben Chervenak 
Nick Chervenak and Shannon Bean are the 1998 Clarion 
University Homecoming King and Queen. 

Gamma and Alpha Sigma designed by Kappa Delta Rho and 
Tau/Sigma Pi. Delta Zeta. 

Theta Xi took second place hon- In fourth place came the float 
ors in the University Floats com- from Sigma Chi and Zeta Tau 
petition, followed by a float Alpha. 



Page 6 



The Clarion tall 



October 15, 1998 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 



takes 20-year journey 



Clarion University's compre- 
hensive Facilities Master Plan 
was presented to members of 
Student Senate at their meeting 
Monday. 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice 
president for finance and adminis- 
tration, Dr. Jospeh Grunenwald, 
chair of the Facilities Planning 
Committee, and Clare Heidler, 
director of facilities management, 
were all on hand to present the 
numerous aspects of the Master 
Plan and to answer any questions 
the Senators or other students had 
about what the plan entailed. 

The team provided slides that 
discussed the overview of the 
planning process and the themes 
that would be incorporated into 




Lisa Hamrick/Clarion Call 
Dr. Heather Haberaecker spoke at Monday night's Student 
Senate meeting, updating the Senators about some of the 
highlights of Clarion University's Master Plan. Some early 
projects outlined in the plan are already underway. 



A second residence hall is possi- 
bly being planned for Main St. in 
the area between Wilkinson and 
Nair Halls and Carrier Hall. 

Senator Naqeeb Hussain noted 
that currently the area in question 
is a parking lot, and he inquired as 
to where students will park if that 
area is used to build a new resi- 
dence hall. 

Haberaecker said that the two 
parking decks are proposed. The 
second deck planned will be 
located where Lot W currently is. 
She said this would aid in replac- 
ing the spots, and the plan for this 
second hall' is not proposed until 
the 



Disorders department to Keeling central core of the campus and out ZL^m^n ° f £ ***** 
Health Center, are already under- to the perimeter *T 10 tC \ 20 years from now 

" . ,. Senator Michael Mangieri 

other guidelines inquired about how the University 

goes about awarding contracts for 



way 



Two 
Two of the major issues the Haberaecker mentioned were 
panel talked about were parking eliminating mixed-use lots, where 



"■ "v»mm» ww iiivvn|/wiuiwU UllU . * «* ~ ~" O ■■■■■■■« n»~ iv/uj, niiuv, 

the plan specifically for Clarion and residence ^lls. Two parking students, faculty, and staff all 

decks are planned in the 20-year share a parking lot and developing 



University. 

Those themes are: unification of 
the campus, reduce 

pedestrian/ vehicular conflicts, 
create a "campus heart," improve 
housing quality and diversity, 
improve recreational opportuni- 
ties, maximize adaptability, set 
phasing priorities, and improve 
the community "interface." 
Slides were also used to list pro- 
jects to be completed during the 
three phases of the plan. 

Haberaecker said that some of 
the projects slated for the first five 
years, such as construction of the 
new Student Recreation Center 
and consolidation of the 
Communication Sciences and 



document. 

One such parking facility is 
planned for the area of Parking 
Lot R, located behind Public 
Safety and the grounds building. 
Haberaecker said the estimated of 
this parking deck is $6 million. 

Haberaecker said the plan iden- 
tified five major parking guide- 
lines. The first guideline is estab- 
lishing parking as a fiscally inde- 
pendent function. "Basically, it 



specific lot designations based on 
"zonal use analysis." She said, 
"It (zonal use analysis) deter- 
mines where faculty park in rela- 
tion to where they need to be." 

Student housing is an important 
part of the Master Plan. 

The plan gives details for the 
demolition of both the Haskell 
and Alumni Houses in order to 
build a residence hall along Wood 
St. The demolition of those two 



means that parking will pay for buildings is scheduled for some- 

ltself, she said. time this summer. 

The next parking guideline is , The current design of the resi- 
addressing issues of fairness or dence hall calls for apartment- 
equity to access and distribution type housing. This was noted as a 
of parking spaces. Another point way to improve the diversity of 
is eliminating parking from the student housing. 



construction projects 

Heidler said that on larger pro- 
jects that affect academic build- 
ings, the Commonwealth 
Department of General Services 
(DGS) has their own set of criteria 
when looking at bid specifica- 
tions. 

For auxiliary or smaller projects, 
he said that there are several pro- 
visions that CU looks at when 
awarding the contract. 

Those provisions include expe- 
rience, safeguards, and a look at 
the internal financial standards of 
the company making a bid. 

"After all the specifications are 
met, it (the contract) goes to the 
low bidder," Heidler said. 

Other Master Plan presentations 
are scheduled in upcoming weeks. 



Gospel choir headed to Atlanta after 
Senate approves request 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 



Ten members of the Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir have more to 
sing about after Student Senate 
approved an allocation during 
Monday's meeting to help them 
attend a choir workshop in 
Atlanta. 

The allocation of $2,456.28 
came from the supplemental 
reserve account so that the mem- 
bers could sing at the National 
College Gospel Choir Workshop. 
David Smith, choir president, 
spoke at the meeting and said that- 
ten members from schools at 
choirs in all of the State System of 
Higher Education will be meeting 
to form a "State System Choir" to 



represent all of the schools at the 
workshop, set for Nov. 26-29. 

Smith said that the Clarion con- 
tingent will travel to another 
SS HE school to practice with the 
other students before traveling 
south for the workshop. 

"It's a good recruiting tool," he 
said. "We are going to get our 
name out there and represent the 
best way we can." 

In other news, Senate president 
Tammi Snyder announced that 
Kristi Knott has been named to 
Senate, after it was learned that 
Senator Meagan Solomon has 
withdrawn from the University. 

Knott was present at Monday's 
meeting and will serve on the 
committees that Solomon was 
originally set to serve. 



Meanwhile, plans continue to be 
made for the Social Equity 
Dinner, set for Nov. 18. 

Social Equity chair Senator John 
Brown said that Fox Sports 
announcer James Brown will be 
speaking at the event. Brown said 
the speaker will be in Pittsburgh 
the day prior to the event, and they 
will be paying for his trip to 
Clarion and to the airport, as well 
as his plane ticket. 

Senator Brown added that he 
recently spoke with president 
Reinhard, and she agreed to give 
$500 as a donation for the guest 
speaker. 

Also, Brown has a tentative 
agreement with Provost/Vice 
President for Academic Affairs 
Dr. John Kuhn for $500, but he 



said that he will not know for cer- 
tain about Ktihn's contribution 
until next week. 

Chartwells will be catering the 
event, at a cost of $1,095 for 
between 300-400 people, $1, 295 
for 200-300 people, and $1,495 
for 100-200 people. 

Senator Shannon Bean asked 
how Brown will know the number 
of people who will be attending 
the dinner, he responded that a 
tentative RSVP will be given to 
Chartwells on Nov. 4. 

Finally, Snyder announced that 
she and Senators Leslie Suhr and 
Mitchell Augustine will be attend- 
ing the next Board of Student 
Government Presidents (BSGP) 
meeting, set for November 6-8 at 
Edinboro University. 



New residence 
hall slated for 
first phase of 
Master Plan 

by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 



During the Master Plan pre- 
sentation to Student Senate 
Monday, the three phases of the 
Master Plan and the projects 
proposed for each phase were 
announced. 

Phase One of the plan details 
projects to be done within the 
next five years. 
Projects for Phase One: 
♦Renovations to Founders Hall 
and Harvey Hall 
♦Renovation and expansion of 
Carlson Library 

♦Construction of the Student 
Recreation Center 
♦Conversion of Davis Hall to 
accommodate English and 
modern languages departments 
♦Consolidation of CSD into 
central location at Keeling 
Health Center 

♦Phase 1 of renovation to Peirce 
Science Center 

♦Move of the University 
Advancement office to the 
second floor of Moore Hall 
♦Construction of a new student 
residence hall 

♦Re-use of the ground floor of 
Becht Hall 

Dr. Heather Haberaecker, vice 
president for finance and 
administration, said that bids 
should come back to the 
University in December on 
Harvey Hall, and work should 
begin on that building sometime 
in the spring. 

Work on the $14 million 
Carlson Library renovation and 
expansion project is scheduled 
to start in fall 1999. 

Another project of priority is 
preliminary work on Peirce 
Science Center. A $2 million 
improvement is needed to the 
heating, ventilation, air condi- 
tioning, and electrical systems 
to keep the building operating. 

"We desperately need to do 
something with our science 
building," Haberaecker said. 

Other plans are in the works 
for Peirce, but they don't appear 
hi the Master Plan until the 5 to 
10 year phase. 

According to Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald, chair of the 
Facilities Planning Committee, 
the early "cost estimates for 
implementing the Master Plan 
run between $75 million and 
$100 million. 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



^ 



Public Safety 



Two cited 

Citations were filed against 
Marcus Steven Pivec, 328 
Wilkinson Hall, and a 
non-student, Preston Reese, of 
Hanover, Pa. after an incident 
in Parking Lot Y on Oct. 10 at 
3:30 p.m. 

According to Public Safety, 
both were cited for underage 
drinking, public drunkenness, 
and disorderly conduct. 

Man cited at Homecoming 

Public Safety said Joseph 
Brown of Tunkhannock, Pa. 
was cited on Oct. 10 for public 
drunkenness at Clarion's 
homecoming game at 
Memorial Stadium. 

Public drunkenness 

Travis Jordon of 534 Main St. 
was cited for public drunken- 
ness on Oct. 9, according to 
Public Safety. 

Underage consumption 

Public Safety said that James 
Hoffer was cited for scattering 
rubbish and underage posses- 
sion of alcohol on a University 
sidewalk near Parking Lot J on 
Oct. 10. 

Trespassing in Lot B 

Public Safety said that Justin 
Graham and Justin McElhenny, 
both of Verona, Pa. and not CU 
students, were cited on Oct. 11 
for defiant trespass at the 
Parking Lot B construction 
site. 

CU flag stolen 

On Oct. 11, Public Safety 
reported that someone stole the 
Clarion University flag that 
flies beside the Pennsylvania 
and the United States flag at 
the corner of Wood St. and 9th 
Ave. 

Barrel thrown at vehicle 

Public Safety said that some- 
time between 11:35 p.m. and 
12:05 a.m. on Oct. 10, some- 
one threw a construction barrel 
into a parked vehicle; causing 
damage to that vehicle. 



Faculty Senate 

Changes proposed to academic calendar 



by Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Dr. Jocelind Gant and Dr. Joe 
Thomas addressed equity for fac- 
ulty members, staff, and students 
of Clarion University at Monday's 
Faculty Senate meeting. 

Gant, assistant to the president 
for social equity, described An 
Equity Plan: In Pursuit of 
Community. One of the funda- 
mentals of the plan is to recognize 
equity and diversity as hallmarks 
of academic excellence. 

Thomas, chair of the 
Presidential Commission on 
Affirmative Action, spoke about 
diversity of ideas and better repre- 
sentation of equity. They both 
stressed a sense of community on 
campus and a welcoming of 



diversity. 

Academic Standards committee 
chair, Dr. Ralph Leary, reported 
that the admissions and athletics 
subcommittees will be organizing 
a meeting this week. 

Dr. Elizabeth MacDaniel, chair 
of the Committee on Courses and 
Programs of Study (CCPS), 
announced that open hearings are 
now going to be held. These hear- 
ings will be used for faculty to 
make any curriculum changes or 
curricula proposals. 

In other business, Senate tabled 
discussions concerning the acade- 
mic calendar for the 2000-2001 
school year. Discussion focused 
on combining the two breaks of 
the spring semester. 

A proposal was made to cut the 
length of Easter break to only one 



day off instead of four and adding 
the three days to the Winter 
Holiday. Student Affairs 

Committee chair Dr. Doug Smith 
said he is also looking into short- 
ening breaks so the school year 
could end earlier. 

Institutional Resources 
Committee chair Dr. Peter Dalby 
presented Faculty Senate with 
information concerning the status 
of the first phase of Master Plan 
projects. The paper lists the reno- 
vations to buildings and reloca- 
tions of various academic depart- 
ments from now until January 
2002. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, chair of 

Faculty Affairs Committee, said 

there will be a faculty retirement 

reception in May. 

Also during the meeting, Senate 



approved a motion by Ms. Anita 
Hall, chair of the Venango 
Campus Committee, to take their 
meeting on the road. Sometime 
during the spring semester, 
Faculty Senate will travel to 
Venango Campus in Oil City to 
conduct one of their regularly 
scheduled meetings. 

A policy meeting will be held 
Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 p.m. in 
B-8 Hart Chapel. Faculty 
Senate's next regular meeting will 
be on Monday, Oct. 26 at 3:30 
p.m., also in B-8 Hart Chapel. At 
that meeting, Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, vice president for 
finance and administration, will 
discuss the 1998-1999 University 
budget. 



O-I contributes $50,000 to CU campaign 



by Leslie Suhr 

Clarion Call 

Assistant Managing Editor 



The Investing in Futures Capital 
Campaign at Clarion University 
has received a $50,000 contribu- 
tion from Owens-Illinois 
Company. 

This contribution completes the 
Venango Call to Action phase as 
part of the overall Investing in 
Futures Campaign. 

The Owens-Illinois contribution 
helped complete the Venango 
Campaign for the support of the 
renovations of Montgomery Hall 
at the Venango campus. 

It also helped establish a new 
scholarship endowment fund. 

"We are extremely pleased with 
the campaign support we have 
received from area businesses and 
Owens exemplifies the support 
necessary to meet and exceed our 
Investing in Futures Campaign 



goal of $8 million," said Harry 
Tripp, vice president for universi- 
ty advancement. 

The recenUy completed 
Montgomery Hall renovation 
reaffirms Clarion University's 
commitment to remain responsive 
to the educational needs of the 
region. 

It is hoped that classes will 
expand between the Clarion 
Venango campuses through the 
distance education program. The 
building now serves as a techno- 
logical resource center for the 
region. 

"We are happy to make this con- 
tribution on behalf of all employ- 
ees in Clarion, Jefferson, and Erie 
counties who have benefited from 
the educational programs and 
opportunities at Clarion 
University," stated Joseph H. 
Lemieux, Owens-Illinois 

Chairman and CEO. 

The renovations are hoped to 



connect area high schools, higher 
educational councils, and others 
sites in the northwestern region. 

The $8 million Investing in 
Futures Campaign supports sever- 
al areas which include renova- 
tions of Founders Hall and 
Harvey Hall on Clarion's main 
campus and Montgomery Hall at 
Venango campus in Oil City. 

These renovations are part of 
Pennsylvania's Shared-Funded 
Capital Projects program 
announced in 1992. 

The state program provides 75 
percent state funding for capital 
projects previously approved by 
the Commonwealth. Clarion 
University must raise 25 percent 
of the original projected costs. 

A majority of scholarship 
awards made by the Foundation 
are funded through annual contri- 
butions and must be endowed to 
ensure future viability. 

This year $2.1 million was 



awarded for scholarship endow- 
ments. Additional endowed 
scholarships allow greater support 
of university programs through 
annual contributions. 

Additionally, $2.5 million was 
granted for annual fund-supported 
scholarships and a variety of cam- 
pus projects and programs. As the 
fund continues to grow there will 
be a greater flexibility to respond 
to campus needs. 

Also, $400,000 was endowed to 
cultural series which will provide 
permanent funding necessary to 
recruit prominent and cultural 
speakers which will relate with 
the students needs on campus. 

As the University continues with 
the 20 year Master Plan for 
Clarion University and its branch 
campuses, the funding from such 
programs will be used for further 
advancement at the University 
level, Tripp said. 



4 



College Press Day 1998 

"What's Good, What's Bad, 
and What's Legal" 

*Friday, October 16 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 
at Gemmell Student Complex 
^Registration begins at 9 a.m.~GMP 
* All CU students are welcome 



OFFICIAL VOICE OF THE 
GOLDEN EAGLES 

Hear the Golden Eagles Live on C-93 




92.7 FM 



W@©(F3 



CLARION VS. Shippensburg 1:00 p.m. 
The Malen Luke Show at 12:15 p.m. 



Pflgpft 



Thp Clarion Call 



Eight receive Qarion 
Distinguished Awards 



by Patricia Boberg 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Eight distinguished awards were 
presented by the Clarion 
University Alumni Association of 
Friday, Oct. 9, as part of the annu- 
al Homecoming activities. 

The awards were established by 
Clarion University Alumni 
Association in 1966 to recognize 
alumni and University friends 
who have excelled in at least one 
of the following areas: significant 
accomplishments in his or her 
profession; outstanding service to 
the University and/or the Alumni 
Association; or contributions to 
humanity. 

Rear Admiral Joan Engel and 
Dr. Audrey (Sader) Hall received 
the Distinguished Alumni Award 
in recognition of their outstanding 
achie vments and services in a pro- 
fessional career. 

Engel, who graduated in 1969, 
is the assistant chief for 
Operational Medicine and Fleet 
Support at the Navy's Bureau of 
Medicine and Surgery in 
Washington, D.C. 

She previously served as the 
18th director of the Navy Nurse 
Corps. Engel was the first school 
nurse at Elk County Christian 
High School before returning to 
nursing school at Clarion. 

She entered the Navy Nurse 
Corps and was commissioned a 
lieutenant in 1969. 

Hall, who graduated in 1973, 
pursued her M.D. degree ten years 
after leaving Clarion University. 

She graduated with honors in 
1989, completing her residency as 
chief resident in internal medicine 
at Allegheny General Hospital 



(AGH). 

She joined the AGH staff and 
became a faculty member of the 
Medicine College of 

Pennsylvania/ Hahnemen 
University. She is now in private 
practice with the Greater 
Pittsburgh Medical Associates. 

Joyce (Ulizio) Fosdick accepted 
the Special Achievement Award 
for her personal humanitarian 
nature and noteworthy citizen- 
ship. 

She received her B.S. in ele- 
mentary education and her M.S. 
in science education in 1978. 
Fosdick taught second grade at 
the Keystone School District in 
Knox for twenty years. 

She organized a service-learning 
project with her fellow second 
grae teacher and began a school- 
wide learning project, Students 
Making an Impact through 
Learning Experiences with 
Seniors (SMILES). She is cur- 
rently president of the board of 
directors. 

Dr. Dennis Lavery, who gradu- 
ated in 1968, received the 
Distinguished Alumni Venango 
Campus Award. 

He is the deputy records admin- 
istrator for the Department of the 
Army, Fort Belvoir, Va. Lavery 
earned an M.A. and a Ph.D. in 
history, and later joined the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs. 

Romaine McClune and Mary 
Seifert both received the 
Distinguished Service Award. 

McClune has been involved 
with education at Clarion 
University for over 42 years as a 
secretary for the College of 
Education and Human Services. 

McClune was the first full time 



Awards presented 

The eight winners of the 
Qarion 'University 
Distinguished Awards 
are: 

*fear Admiral Joan Engel 
and Audrey (Sader) Hall, 
Distinguished Alumni 
Award 

"Joyce Fosdick, Special 
Achievement Award 
^Dennis Lavery, 

Distinguished Alumni 
%*ango Campus Award 
*Rornaine McClune and 
Mary Seifert, Dbt|^^d 
Service Award 



5Rt Eugene Rhoads; 
Distjungitished Faculty 



student teaching/placement secre- 
tary in the department 

Seifert, who graduateed in 1946, 
taught for 35 years. Seifert 
recently established the Mary L. 
Seifert Music Department 
Scholarship. 

Dr. Eugene Rhoads received the 
Distinguished Faculty Award. 
Rhoads received his B.S. from 
Clarion State College in 1951. He 
taught for twenty-two years at 
Clarion University. 

Dr. James Schwab received the 
Special Volunteer Award. 
Schwab, who graduated in 1949, 
served in the Army Air Force and 
enrolled at Clarion upon his 
return. 



Try McDonald's New 
$.88 Value Menu 



Double Hamburger 
Small Fries 
4 Piece McNuggets 
Cheeseburger w7 
Lettuce & Tomato 



McDonald's is a value any time of day-breakfast, 

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* Regular Milk shake 

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QdohaCB l^9ft 



Clarion Borough Council 

Residents upset over 
Animal Nuisance La 



by Mike Markewinski 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion Borough Council 
members expressed their con- 
cerns over the county commis- 
sioners' plans to add parking 
spaces onto Liberty Street behind 
the old jail. 

The discussion continued for 
twenty minutes over the expan- 
sion of the parking lot. Chief 
assessor Robert Lieberum 
approached the council to get 
their reaction to the plans, and in 
turn faced an overwhelming 
majority willing to vote the plan 
down. 

The plan calls for fourteen 
spaces to be built on the bor- 
ough's right of way and includes 
designs for a proposed human 
resources office building to be 
constructed by the old jail. 

While the dispute over parking 
raged on, residents voiced their 
concerns over the new Animal 
Nuisance Law. 

The law, approved by Council 
Tuesday, came after concerns 
from the Clarion Canine 
Obedience Club. 

Representatives from the club 
approached council with their 
questions on the law, which they 
say is very vague. 

Jeannie Moore, a club member, 
noted that the law would prohibit 



a child from carrying a hamster to 
school. 

Council assured the residents 
that the law would not affect the 
children. 

The law states that pet owners 
need to control their animals and 
prevent accumulation of feces. 

Those who walk animals will 
also be required to have some 
way of cleaning up after the ani- 
mal. 

Exotic animals, excluding any- 
thing other than a dog or cat, are 
prohibited from the central busi- 
ness district. 

In addition, dogs and cats are 
banned from special events, such 
as the Autumn Leaf Festival and 
sporting events. 

Violation of the law will result 
in a $100 fine or five days in jail. 
In other borough council news, 
Council president Ron Wilshire 
criticized county maintenance 
following the proposal of con- 
structing new buildings when old 
buildings begin to deteriorate and 
in need of repair. 

The Clarion Borough Council 
meets the first Tuesday of every 
month in the basement of the 
Clarion Free Library, located on 
Main St. This month's meeting 
was pushed back a week because 
of the Autumn Leaf Festival, 
which was going on all of last 
week. 



CLARION VFW 

2145 



EypBl(E)$3& ShdDW 



StiaiiOTi^ IBa^s&dtalh 



OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

Must be 21 years of age 

Tickets: $8:00 

No tickets will be sold at the door 

Comedian before - DJ after the show 

Doors open at 7:30 p.m. 

Show starts at 9:30 p.m. 



Call 226-8327 for tickets 



to-Xvv. 



. J 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



More financial aid given to 
Clarion students this year 

More green for students 



by Mike Markewinski 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion University students 
who receive financial aid saw an 
increase this semester. 

The raise in aid was a result of 
the federal and state governments 
raising the maximum amount of 
aid available to students. 

According to Ken Grugel, 
Director of Financial Aid, "77.7 
percent of students are receiving 
some type of aid which boils 
down to 4,705 students out of 
nearly 5,900 atttending." 

Since 1994, students who 
receive aid have seen their aid 
increase nearly 2 percent. 

Financial Aid can be broken 
down into Stafford Loans, a 
Federal Pell Grant, a PHEAA 
State Grant, Scholarships, Federal 
Work Study, Supplemental 
Opportunity Grant and State Work 
Study. 

"Another reason that students 
noticed an increase was a result of 
the tuition not increasing," 
Grugel said. 

While room and board may have 
increased, so did the interest in 
new programs. 



TYPE OF CURRENT LAST 
AID AMOUNT YEAR CHANGE 



Talent Search program 
$1 million richer after 
receiving national grant 



Federal 
PellGrant 



$3,000 



State Grant $2>9Q0 



Work Study $221,449 



$2,700 +$300.00 



$2,800 +$100.00 



$403,042 



Source: Office of Financial Aid 



-.'.>, 



One such program entitled 
"Keystone Smiles" is a reading- 
tutoring program which the stu- 
dents in the college of Education 
and Human Services participate in 
by visiting local area schools and 
help a child with reading. 

Grugel said, "This program has 
helped to increase student 
employment, which in turn, helps 
the financial aid." 

A new program slated to be 
implemented in spring 1999 is the 



H.O.P.E. Grant which comprises 
of a tax credit and pays the first 
$1500 for the beginning two years 
of college. 

Any student is eligible for finan- 
cial aid. To become eligible, stu- 
dents must fill out a Free 
Application for Financial Student 
Aid(FAFSA). 

The financial aid office is locat- 
ed in 104 Egbert Hall. The office 
is open Monday through Friday 
from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. and 



by Danielle Boccio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion University has been 
awarded $1.1 million by the 
United States Department of 
Education to continue its 
Educational Talent Search pro- 
gram for the next four years. 

Only 362 Educational Talent 
Search programs were funded 
nationwide through this compet- 
itive process. Clarion 
University's program will begin 
with $284,738 for 1998-1999. 

Participants for the program 
are based on income guidelines 
and from students whose parents 
don't have baccalaureate 
degrees. 

The Educational Talent Search 
services include: providing acad- 
emic advice and assistance in 
secondary school as well as col- 
lege selection, assisting in 
preparing for entrance exams 
and completing college admis- 
sion and financial aid applica- 
tions. 
The program gives direction on 



the re-entry of secondary school 
or entry to other programs. 

Instruction in learning and 
study skills, personal and career 
consulting along with trips to 
two and four year campuses, 
career sites and cultural events 
are included in the program ser- 
vices. 

The means used to provide 
these services are in-school and 
after-school programs, educa- 
tional/cultural enrichment, finan- 
cial aid programs, parent support 
component and young adult ser- 
vices. 

There are twelve targeted 
school districts for Clarion's pro- 
gram. The districts are 
Allegheny-Clarion Valley, 
Clarion Area, Clarion- 
Limestone, Keystone, North 
Clarion, Redbank Valley, Union 
in Clarion; and Cranberry, 
Franklin, Oil City, Valley Grove, 
and Titusville in Venango. 

Clarion's Educational Talent 
Search has served 950 students 
annually since the start of the 
program in 1992. 








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issw^^rrtl Well Equipped 9?cotw 
(Mow Yoa Can Get a vvui M .,,_„_ 



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Toyotas At^fetiP 
Toyot^Dealer 

,*$avmgs v ba$tf oil comparison of V9 
Corolla equipped with options Pjickaj^.jfsi 
comparably, equipped '98 Corolla? Corolla 
is the best selling car in history, based on 
worldwide safes figures. 




JgSSSfc 




(No-Matter 



_ g0HET!5 "SMART 

What Your Major) 



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Page W 



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Trip Clarion T^J 



October IS, 1998 



LIFEWIRE 



Darrell Hammond 

The Saturday Night 

Live Star performed 

on the Clarion 

Campus, and 

conducted an 

interview with the 

Clarion Call 

See page 11 



Katherine Farnham 

returned to Clarion 

last week for a 

hometown 

appearance, 

see page 11 



Everyone Loves a 
Parade 

The parade is one 

of the highlights of 

ALF each year, for 

a review of this 

years festivities, 

see page 11 



Dave Barry 

explains why guys 

don't get credit for 

being "domestic" to 

see why, 

see page 12 



Calendar of Events 

For what's 

happening on and 

around 

campus and the 

community, 

see page 13 



A view of ALF 

Lifestyles writer 

Jason Rhoades takes 

a different view of 

ALF 

see page 14 



J 



LIFESTYLES 



Concert review 



Blues Traveler rocks Clarion 



by Mike Cody 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



On Tuesday night, a quick 
look inside the Tippin Gym 
would reveal long-haired 
teenagers dancing with mid- 
dle-aged women, a burly man 
in overalls pumping his fist in 
the air, and hundreds of people 
cheering wildly. Blues 

Traveler just has that effect on 
people. 

Roughly 1000 concertgoers 
packed Tippin to see a rare 
intimate-setting performance 
from Blues Traveler, whose 
H.O.R.D.E. Festival was one 
of the most successful concert 
packages of this past summer. 
Even though the band could 
have viewed their Clarion gig 
as an easy paycheck and deliv- 
ered a half-hearted show, 
Blues Traveler put on a jam- 
heavy show that people will no 
doubt be talking about for a 
long time to come. 

The opening act, Michael 
Parrish Band, had enough 
rhythm to get the audience 
moving but their set was ulti- 
mately forgettable. The high 
point of their act came when 
one of the band members 
broke into a high-spirited 



dance at the front of the stage, 
much to the delight of the 
crowd. His dancing provided 
a momentary jolt of excite- 
ment that the band's set was 
otherwise lacking. 

Blues Traveler recieved a 
huge ovation when they took 
the stage, the first of many 
they would hear that night. 
The cheers continued when 
they launched into their hit 
single "But Anyway." 
Unfortunately, auJio prob- 
lems buried lead singer John 
Popper's voice for almost the 
entire first hour and was diffi- 
cult to hear for mjch of the 
show. 

Throughout the entire 
evening, Blues Traveler 
appeared to be having a great 
time on stage, especially gui- 
tarist Chan Kinchla. 
Highlights of the show includ- 
ed a special cover of Steve 
Miller's classic "The Joker." 

It should be noted that some 
concergoers who were unfa- 
miliar with Blues Traveler's 
music aside from their top-40 
hits seemed confused by the 
performance. Those who 
were expecting a three-hour 
show of radio-friendly hits no 
doubt were left dissapointed 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

Blues Traveler entertained the crowd last night at Tippin 
Gym. 



by the band's constant jam- 
ming The biggest disappoint- 
ment for many fans was that 
they did not play their Top 40 
hit "Hook". Despite repeated 
chanting from audience mem- 
bers, "Hook was not included 
in their set. 

Despite Blues Traveler's 
occasionally overdone jam 
sessions, their performance 
was fantastic. The biggest 
cheers of the show came dur- 
ing an acoustic set, when 
Popper and the boys played 
"Runaround." The audience 
sang the entire song with 
Popper and gave a thunderous 
ovation after "Runaround" 
ended. 

Popper's harmonica skills 
were simply incredible when 



experienced live. Blues 
Traveler's lead singer has 
played every imaginable 
instrument from 12-string gui- 
tars to 12-gauge shotguns, but 
is the most impressive of all 
when he goes ballistic on his 
harp. 

The concert ended with a 
longstanding Blues Traveler 
tradition, as the band threw 
harmonicas into the crowd. 
Drummer Brendan Hill also 
got into the act, tossing his 
drum sticks to the eager fans. 

Hundreds of people clam- 
ored to catch Hill's drum 
sticks, cheering and clapping 
as the band left the stage. 
Although this may be a worn- 
out cliche\ it truly felt like 
one of the moments rock V 



Where In Clarion? 




A view of Clarion 
Test your knowledge of area landmarks every 
week in "Where in Calrion?" Where is this 
Clarion landmark. Last weeks landmark was the 
interior of Diverse Adventures. 



(VrnriPr 111998 



Tno riarinn Call 



Page 11 



SNL star entertains Clarion 

Darrell Hammond performs 
at CUP 



by Jeff Say - 
Clarion Call Lifestyles Editor 

Saturday Night Live star 
Darrell Hammond tickled 
Clarion's funny bone last 
Thursday. I had a chance to 
interview the comic before his 
performance and find out a little 
more about his perspective on 
the Clinton scandal and life at 
Saturday Night Live. 

Clarion Call: One of your best 
known characters is The 
President. Since you've met 




Darrell Hammond 

President Clinton and portray 
him often, do you have a differ- 
ent view on the scandal? 

Darrell Hammond: "I think 
what Clinton did was stupid, but 
he couldn't resist. The 
Republicans remind me of 
pirates jumping ship with knives 
in their mouths. It's like a gang 
war at the expense of the coun- 
try. Portraying the President is so 
much larger than life, and he's so 
larger than life, it's hard to 
expiain." 

CC: How do you prepare for 
your skits of the president? 



DH: "It's hard to parody 
something that's so unreal to 
begin with." 

CC: What SNL alumni have 
influenced you the most? 

DH: "Eddie Murphy and Dan 
Akroyd are two that had an 
influence on me becaue they 
were sketch players like me and 
both did stand-up before SNL." 

CC: You are best known for 
your impersonations on SNL. 
How long have you been doing 
impressions? 

DH: "Actually , when SNL 
signed me I wasn't even doing 
impersonations in my stand-up 
act anymore." 

CC: How was the transition 
from stand-up to SNL? 

DH: "I don't think that any 
shock could be greater than the 
switch from stand-up to SNL." 

CC: How stressful is SNLt 

DH: "I think the theory is, why 
we do only two weeks in a row 
is because the emotional stress is 
enough and we do enough mate- 
rial for four shows in one week" 

CC: Is there a lot of improvi- 
sation during the show? 

DH: "There's a lot of improv 
leading up to 11:30 on Saturday 
night but not during the show, 
that would be unfair to the other 
actors. 

CC: You play a wide range of 
characters, which ones are your 
favorites? 

DH: "The one's they give me, 
Clinton and Ted Koppel are two 
of my favorites." 




Homecoming court runs in the family 

Benjamin and Nick Chervenak were the first brothers ever 
elected to homecoming court together. Benjamin is a 
freshmen political science major and Nick is a senior 
communications major. They are the sons of Theresa 
Allen of Madison, OH and Dennis Chervenak of Cranberry, 
PA. 



Hometown concert 

Katherine Farnham 

« 

brings it home 



by Kelly Palma 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The mood of the Captain 
Loomis Inn was unlike anything 
I had ever seen before. The room 
was brightly lit and soft ballads 
could be heard playing in the 
background. What was going 
on? Was I in the right place? 

Then all of a sudden the lights 
dim and Katherine Farnham 
takes the stage. The crowd is 
silenced for a few short 
moments, while Farnham is 
introduced. She returned to 
Clarion especially for this one 
night engagement to showcase 
her musical abilities as a singer, 
songwriter, and pianist. 

During the hour set, Farnham 
performed songs from her 
upcoming CD, For The Love Of 
It AH, as well as pop, jazz and 
blues songs. Among those per- 
formed were: You can Have My 
Husband, but Please Don't 
Mess With My Man, traditional 
blues, I'll Be There, by the 
Jackson 5; My Heart WUI Go 
On, by Celine Dion; and I 
Believe, by Katherine Farnham. 
I Believe was inspired by Patti 
LaBelle. Farnham tried unsuc- 
cessfully many times to get 
LaBelle to record it. A friend 
finaly told Farnham that maybe 
she was supposed to record the 
song. As things ended up, I 
Believe is one of the main tracks 
on Fambam's new CD. 

Some patrons of the Loomis 
were delightfully surprised by 
the music. Two such students, 
Ken Pruitt and Don Ursich had 
this to say, "It's pony bottle 
night... we didn't know there was 
gonna be a concert...it was a 
pleasant surprise." Others came 
for the live music, "I like to hear 
people livc.the sound makes all 
the difference," said Pat 
McGroarty. Special Ed Major 
Robin Shanafelt had nothing but 
praise for Farnham, "I thought 
she was really good... the Titanic 
song was beautiful." 

For Famham's fans who are 
under twenty-one, don't despair, 
she is planning on adding a show 
on campus or at a local hot spot 
next year. 

FawiifSB started singing at the 
age of five, and has been singing 
professionally for 11 years. 
Some of recent appearances 
include the Hard Rock Cafe' in 
Boston, Massachusetts and being 



chosen to sing the National 
Anthem at a Florida Marlins 
game. 

Over lunch I had the chance to 
chat with Farnham about a vari- 









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Katherine Farnham 

ety of subjects. Some of the 
things we spoke of included 
music, dreams, influences, and 
love. Her musical influences 
include: Teena Marie, Celine 
Dion, Barbara Striesand, Mariah 
Carey, Whitney Houston, Stevie 
Wonder, Sting, Paula Cole, Tori 
Amos, and George Michael. 
Farnham stated "Mainly all the 
diva's." Among her dreams, two 
Grammy Awards, a house in 
France, and the artistic freedom 
to do what she wishes with her 
music. In the subject of love, 
Farnham kept her lips tightly 
sealed, saying only that she 
would love a wedding in Boston, 
but cautioned that it was a long 
way off. 

When asked why she came 
back to Clarion, Farnham stated, 
'To see my family and friends 
and do a performance for my 
hometown crowd." One Senior 
Communications Major certainly 
agrees with her. "It was nice to 
see someone from Clarion finally 
get out and make something of 
themselves and bring something 
back to the community," said 
Charlie Desch. 

Auditions for the 
1998 Dance Concert 

at Clarion 
University will be 

held Monday 

October 19th at 

7:00 pjiu and 

Tuesday, October 

20th at 3:30 p.m. in 

the Tippin Gym 

dance Studio 



Parade 
marches ALF 
out the door 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



So, where on Earth can you 
find all of the following at once: 
five local chapters of Zem Zem 
Shriners on motorcycles and go- 
carts, dignitaries in Humvees, 
fifteen marching bands, adorable 
little kids in Lego costumes, and 
a bizarre tribute to the vision of 
the Virgin Mary at Fatima? Why 
Clarion of course! Yes, Saturday 
10 October saw the annual 
Autumn Leaf Festival roar 
through the downtown streets of 
Clarion. 

As a break from tradition, this 
year's special guests (including 
KDKA-2's anchor Jennifer 
Antkowiak and meteorologist 
Larry Richert) were carried 
down the route in Humvee jeeps 
(rather than convertable 
Cadillacs) and the nine 
Homecoming Court couples 
rode in brand new Ford pick-ups. 
At noon, the fun began, with 
the Pennsylvania Highway 
Patrol's mounted color guard 
and a regiment of American 
Veterans carrying a gigantic 
American flag. But the patriotic 
fun wasn't over yet; the Clarion 
Women's rugby team was next, 
carrying a flag nearly as big as 
the Veterans'. Next down the 
street was the Clarion Marching 
Blue and Gold, who stopped and 
played a few selections for the 
Alumni gathered across from 
Hart Chapel. Keeping up with 
the band was also the Clarion 
Cheerleaders and Dance Team. 

And then came the Humvees. 
Leading the way were ALF 
Chairmen Carol Lapinto, Gale 
Owen, and Barney Knorr. Also 
honored with a Humvee ride 
were Grand Marshall Jeff 
Verszyla (also of KDKA-2), 
President Diane Reinhard, 
KDKA's visitors, and the march- 
ing members of the Veterans of 
Foriegn Wars. Other dignitaries 
included: Float Judges Carm 
Dunkerly, Bob Carbaugh and 
Fran Shope, City Chamber 
President Matthew Lerch, 
Honorary Grand Marshall and 
children's author Susan Lowell, 
winner of the 1998 
Distinguished Service Award 
Mary Seifert, Congressman John 
Peterson, State Senator Mary Jo 

continued on page 13 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



Calendar of Events 

» 




What's Good, What's Bad, 
and What's Legal. College 
Press Day 1998 Sponsored 
by The Clarion Call 



Today 

•Hispanic Heritage Month ends 

•Drama Production "Servant of Two Masters" 

(Marwick-Boyd Little Theatre) 

Friday 

•National Boss Day 

•Admissions Day 

(Hart Chapel) 9 am 

•College Press Day 

(Gemmell Multi- 

Purpose,246,250,252) 

9 am-5 pm 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Drama Production 

"Servant of Two 

Masters" 

(Marwick-Boyd Little 

Theatre) 

•Volleyball at Rollins (FL) Tournament 

•Madrigal Singer's concert (Hart Chapel) 8 pm 

•UAB Midnight Madness with Clarion's men's 

basketball (Tippin Gymnasium) 12 midnight 

Saturday 

•Football vs. Shippensburg 
1 pm 

•Major Admissions Visit 
(all campus) 
•NTE Core Battery 
Exam/PLT/Specialty 
Area/Special Assessments 
•Drama Production 
"Servant of Two Masters" 
(Little Theatre) 8 pm 




Volleyball at Rollins (FL) Tournament 
•Cross Country at Duquesne 
•Tennis at PSAC Championship (Erie) 
Sunday 

•MSS Spiritual (Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 
•Tennis at PSAC Championship (Erie) 
•Open Auditions for CU Theatre "Picasso at the Lapin 
Agile" A comedy by Steve Martin (Little Theatre) 7 
p.m. 

Monday 

•Early Registration begins for 1999 spring term 
•Faculty Senate Policy Meeting. (B-8 Hart Chapel) 
3:30 pm 

•Open Auditions for CU Theatre "Picasso at the Lapin 
Agile" A comedy by Steve Martin (Little Theatre) 7 
p.m. 

•UAB presents The Newstead Trio (Hart Chapel) 7:30 
pm 

•Student Senate Meeting. (246 Gemmell) 7:30 pm 

Tuesday 

•Volleyball vs. California 7 pm 

•UAB Movie Night (local theatre) TBA 

•Intramural Closest to the Pin Roster Due 

•Intramural 3 on 3 Basketball Roster Due 

•Intramural Tug of War Roster Due 

Wednesday 

•Opening Reception: A group show, Khyal 

Braun/Amanda Kaiser/Kay Thomas (Sanford Gallery) 

4:30-6 pm 

•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gemmell) 
7-8:30 pm 

•Intramural bike Race Roster Due Oct. 27 
•Intramural Table Tennis Roster Due Oct. 27 




oo^^,^ 



Peer T\itoring begins this month 



by Keith Gwillim 

Clarion Call 

Asisstant Lifestyles Editor 



Certification training for this 
year's Peet Tutoring Program 
begins October 30 for interested 
volunteers. The Peer Tutoring 
Program, which was launched 
last spring by Miss Amy Cutner- 
Klinger, is now run by Mr. 
RalphCritten Residence Director 



of Campell Hall and Darlene 
Hartle. Presentations include 
discussions on safe sex, stress, 
and anxiety. 

Affiliated with the Baccus and 
Gamma Peer Education 
Network based in Denver, 
Colorado, the program is open to 
anybody. Interested people will 
complete a weekend training 
course, which includes videos 
and role playing. Three people 



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Worried? 

We can help. 



will be accepted into the pro- 
gram, which already has 8 vol- 
unteers. 

Upon completion of the train- 
ing course, the Peer Educators 
will hold presentations in the 
residence halls, encompassing a 
wide variety of topics. If you 
are interested, they can be 
reached Monday nights at 8:30 
p.m. in Keeling Health Center. 

Mr. Critten hopes to expand 
the program much in the future. 
Higher membership and more 
certifications are among 



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Critten's expectations for the 
program. He hopes to add a 
crop of new programs, including 
improvisational material and 
plans to extend the Peer 
Education Program's reach into 
the classroom. 

"The hope is it grows; the 
vision in the future would be to 
have a full Peer Education 
Department, similar to the one 
found at universities such as 
IUP," says Mr. Critten. Student 
input geared towards the pro- 



October 15, 1998 

Road R.A.L.L.Y. 
returns to Residence 
Halls 

by Lori Imbrogno 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



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Combo 

Potato Wedgies & 

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Participation in campus activi- 
ties is being rewarded this 
semester with the return of the 
Road R.A.L.L.Y. program. 
After striking student interest in 
years past, the Office of 
Residence Life is again homing 
drawings for various prizes 
awarded to those who have 
entered the raffle. 

R.A.L.L.Y. (Resedence 
Activities - Living, Learning, 
and You) is a relatively new pro- 
gram, encouraging growth and 
development of residence stu- 
dents. Students are encouraged 
to explore social, intellectual, 
spiritual, physical, emotional, 
occupational, and culturally 
diverse activities. All students 
living in residence halls recieve 
one Road R.A.L.L.Y. ticket for 
each approved campus event or 
activity they attend. Between 
7:00 and 12:00 p.m., they may 
turn in their tickets to a staff 
member at the front desk of their 
hall to become eligible for 
prizes. 

There is a total of five 
R.A.L.L.Y. drawings throughout 
the semester. Prizes include 
mountain bikes, $200 gift cer- 
tificates for the university book 
store, portable CD. players, and 
gift certificates for various local 
stores including Chinatown and 
Vinnies. During the first draw- 
ing on September 29, Blues 
Traveler tickets were also given 
away. 

Future drawings will be held 
on October 24, October 28, 
November 23, and December 3 
at programs including UAB- 
sponsored "Serial Killers" and 
Comedian Bob Tussel. Mary 
Walters, Assistant to the Dean of 
Student Life Services, helped 
launch the Road R.A.L.L.Y., but 
has now turned it over to Mr. 
Ralph Critten RD of Campell 
Hall. He hopes to "improve the 
program with more drawings 
and prizes" as well as ".give res- 
idence students a positive expe- 
rience each fall." 

Although R.A.L.L.Y. has been 
successful in attracting resi- 
dence students to events, Critten 
hopes that new students learn 
from them and become more 
aware of the community they 
live in. He expects people "to 
take full advantage of the 
events" and "take what they 
have learned and apply it with 
interaction with their peers, job, 
and family life." 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



It's a guy thing 



Domestic Tips from guys 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

Todays topic is: Domestic tips 

from Guys. 

Guys do not get enough credit 
for being domestic. This is 
because the people who give 
OUT the credits for being 
domestic are — not to generalize 
or anything — women. 

Women tend to believe that 
domestic things should be done 
in a certain way, defined as "not 
the way guys do them." I have a 
perfect example of this type of 
thinking in the form of a letter 
received from a woman named 
Karen in Portland, Ore., who 
does not approve of the way her 
fiancee handles his dirty dishes. 
Here's how he handles them: He 
puts them in the refrigerator. 

Now I can hear you women 
asking: "Why?" But I bet most 
guys immediately grasped the 
reason, which is: If you put dirty 
dishes in the sink, after a couple 
of days they get moldy; whereas 
in the cold, airtight environment 
of the refrigerator, mold takes 
much longer to develop. Karen 
says her fiancee does not actual- 
ly wash the dishes "until (a) he 
runs out of dishes; or (b) his 
refrigerator gets full." 
Fortunately, he has a lot of room 
in the refrigerator, because, 
Karen states, "he hates to go 
grocery shopping." She also 
notes, for the record, that "he 
has a dishwasher that works per- 
fectly fine." 
"I'm wondering," Karen wrote, 
"if we should just ask for an 
extra refrigerator for a wedding 

gift." 

My feeling is, no. It makes far 
more sense to get a freezer. Not 
only will a freezer hold a lot 
more dirty dishes than a refriger- 
ator, but, thanks to the lower 




temperature, these dishes can 
remain relatively mold-free in 
there forever. This will leave 
Karen's guy with more time for 
other domestic chores, such as 
laundering his underwear in the 
dishwasher, unless that is where 
he keeps his canned goods. 

Speaking of which, what this 
nation needs is an Institute of 
Guy Domestic Research, where 
guy scientists wearing white lab- 
oratory coats stained with Cheez 
Whiz would conduct experi- 
ments to answer household 
(questions that concern guys, 
such as: If you leave your used 
underwear in the freezer for a 
week, is that as good as launder- 
ing it? Or should you also splash 
a little Old Spice on it, just to be 
safe?) 

But getting back to my main 
point: Guys, are sometimes 
accused of not having a domes- 
tic "flair" just because they tend 
to accessorize a room with used 
pizza boxes. But there are exam- 
ples of guys coining up with 
decorative "touches" that 
Martha Stewart would never 
conceive of even with the aid of 
world-class narcotics. 
For example, I have here a fasci- 
nating newspaper article sent in 
by alert pastor Pete Beckstrand 
of the Zion and Franklin 
Lutheran Churches of Viroqua, 
Wis. This article, which I swear 
I am not making up, is from the 



VANDYKE'S 5th AVENUE 



Sept. 26, 1996, edition of — get 
ready for an excellent newspaper 
name — the Vernon County 
Broadcaster. It concerns a local 
resident named Mervin Langve 
who, according to the article, 
"discovered a slice of toast in an 
old-time toaster... in an old cook- 
stove." He realized that the toast 
was made from bread baked by 
his mother; thus, as the article 
states, "Mervin determined that 
the toast is 36 years old." 

I am telling you right now what 
a woman would have done if she 
had found a piece of toast older 
than all three Hanson brothers 
combined, and even older than 
some Christmas fruitcakes: She 
would, using tongs, throw the 
toast away, then throw the tongs 
away, then get out her industrial 
disinfectant and violently scrub 
the entire house as well as sever- 
al neighboring houses. But that 
is not what Mervin Langve did. 
According to the Vernon 
Country Broadcaster, he 
"mounted this piece of toast on a 
breadboard he now has hanging 
in his kitchen." The Vernon 
County Broadcaster states that it 
makes for "a very attractive 
keepsake." 

I called Mr. Langve, and he 
told me that the toast is still on 



his wall and looking as good as 
ever, despite the fact that he has 
never put any kind of preserva- 
tive on it. 

I asked him if visitors think 
his wall decoration is unusual. 
"They sure do," he said. "They 
can't hardly believe it." 

I bet they can't. And I happen 
to think that — despite the fact 
that this entire story has been 
ignored by so-called major 
newspapers such as the so- 
called New York Times — 
Mervin Langve has broken 
important new interior-decor 
ground with the concept of 
wall-mounted heirloom foods. 
Think of the possibilities! ("... 
and on this wall is the actual 
meal that Uncle Walter was eat- 
ing when he passed away; you 
can see his forehead impression 
in the mashed potatoes.") 

So let's not say that guys are 
not domestic, OK? When we 
see a guy who makes drapes by 
nailing trash bags over his win- 
dows, let's remember that he 
might have a legitimate domes- 
tic reason, such as that he ran 
out of duct tape. Let's be* fair; 
let's be open-minded. And 
above all, let's remember to let 
our underwear thaw before we 
put it on. 



continued from page 11 

White, State Representative 
Fred Mcllhatten, and Clarion 
Citizen of the Year Bill 
McKissick. 

Clarion's Greek community 
was also well represented, with 
floats from AOE-ITT, IX- 
ZTA, KAP-AZ, mi, AIT- 
En, OOA, AXP, OIK, and 
05, with AIT-En and AOE- 
ITr tying for top honors as 
best float. 

The crowd got to see beauty 
queens as well, as Miss Teen 
ALF Colleen Hazlett and Miss 
Jr. Teen ALF Jennifer Kifer 
rode through the parade. 

It couldn't have been a nicer 
day for the parade, as the sun 
played hide-and-seek all after- 
noon and the crisp air of 
autumn surrounded the parade- 
goers. But even bad weather 
couldn't have beaten the spirit 
of the crowd, as they were too 
happy to see everyone in their 
fall parade finery. 



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Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



Octoberl5/1998 - 



A different view of Autumn Leaf Festival 



by Jason Rhoades 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



I experience Autumn Leaf 
Festival differently than most of 
you reading this article, because 
I happen to be visually 
impaired. I use other senses to 
experience the world, such as: 
hearing, sense of smell, and 
sense of touch. When ALF is in 
town things change overnight. 
Because of that it's very hard 

for me to get around. 

It's sometimes difficult for me 
to maneuver through the crowds 
of students on campus on a day 
to day basis. Dealing with all of 
the people ALF brings with it is 
a nightmare. It is not something 
that I look forward to each year. 
For me to walk uptown through 
ALF is almost impossible and 
leaves me frustrated. It seems 
that the bigger the crowd, the 
more boisterous everyone gets. 
People are constantly moving, 
so that makes it difficult for me 
to find a clear path of travel. If 
I run into someone, and get 
turned around I don't know 
where I am. Try blindfolding 
yourself, have someone spin 
you around, and then see if you 
can figure out which direction 
you're facing. That is kind of 
what it is like for me. 

Another problem ALF causes 
for me is it affects my sense of 
hearing. When I can't hear it's 
hard for me to tell where I am. 
More people and more cars 
make more noise. This inter- 
feres with my ability to deci- 
pher what I am hearing. For 
example: if I am walking down 
the sidewalk and I hear some- 
one talking, I am pretty good at 
guessing where they are. At the 
park during ALF there are peo- 
ple sporadically scattered 



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around having conversations, 
cars making noises. All of the 
noise pollution makes it more 
likely for me to run into some- 
one, get turned around and not 
have a clue where I am. This 
isn't a very desirable experi- 
ence, trust me. 

Lastly, I have to talk about all 
of the different smells in the air. 
Did you ever notice the smell of 
hot electrical wires, engine 



grease, or mildew at ALF? 
These smells are a little harder 
to detect because the dominant 
aroma in the air is food. 
Because I am not able to see 
what is going on around me, I 
have to visualize it. The more 
information I can get about 
something, the more accurate I 
can be. I think everyone notices 
smells but it isn't the first thing 
you notice. 



All of the noise and people 
that come along with ALF make 
it hard for me to enjoy what 
most people do. I hope with 
the information in this article, 
you have a better understanding 
of how people with sight 
impairments use other senses to 
do things. I truly wish to be as 
independent as possible, but 
when ALF takes place, it makes 
it slightly difficult. 





Mid-October 




Madness 




October 


16th 




*v 






y p.m 


i. 



Tippin Gymnasium 

Golden Eagles 

Basketball 

sponsored by UAB 

and the Golden Eagte 

Basketball team, live 

remote by WCDC 



T 



P R I \ G I P L 1 



t S () l N I) R K T 1 R K ,\1 E N 



x v i; s i i n g 



RECENTLY, 
MORNINGSTAR CALLED 

USCHEAP. 

IT'S NOT EVERY DAY 
YOU GET A COMPLIMENT 

LIKE THAT. 



All financial companies charge operating fees 
■^ A- and expenses — some more than others. Of 
course, the lower the expenses you pay, the better. 
That way, more of your money goes where it 
should — towards building a comfortable future. 

We make low expenses a top priority. 

As the largest retirement system in the 
world 1 — a nonprofit company focused exclu- 
sively on the financial needs of the educational 
and research communities — our expenses are 
among the lowest in the insurance and mutual 
hind industries. 2 

In fact, TIAA-CREF s 0.31% average fund 
expenses are less than half of the expense charges 
of comparable funds. 3 It's why Morningstar ~~ 
one of the nation's leading sources of annuity and 
mutual fund information — says, 'At that level 
[TIAA-CREF] is cheaper than any other 



[variable annuity] policy, and is even compet- 
itive with the cheapest mutual fund complexes, 
though it offers far more benefits."" 

"TIAA-CREF sets the standard in the 
financial services industry." 

Of course, expenses are only one factor to 
consider when you make an investment decision. 
Morningstar also noted our commitment to 
"consumer education, service" and "solid 
investment performance." Because that can 
make a difference in the long run, too. 

At TIAA-CREF, we believe people would 
like to spend more in retirement, not on their 
retirement company. Today, over two million 
people count on that approach to help them 
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can you. To find out more, call us at 
1 800 842-2776. We'd consider it a compliment. 



"Visit us on the Internet at www.tiaa-cref.org 




Ensuring the future 
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1 . Based on $236 billion in assets under management. 2. Standixrd ej Poor'* Insurance Rating AnalyaL), 1998; Lipjper Analytical Services, Inc., 

Lippcr-Director.i' Analytical Data 1998 (Quarterly). 3. Of the 4,829 variable annuities tracked by Morningstar, the average fund had total fees 

combining annual expenses of 0.82% plus an insurance expense of 1.27%. Source: Morningstar, Inc., for periods ending 7/31/98. 

4. Source: Morningstar Principia Variable Annuities) 'Life 4/30/98. 

TIAA-CREF expenses are subject to change and are not guaranteed for the future. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 

TIAA-CREF Individual and Institutional Services distributes CREF certificates and interests in the TIAA Real Estate Account. 

For more complete information, including charges and expenses, call 1 800 842-2776, extension 5509, for the prospectuses. 

Read them carefully before you invest or send money. 



nctnWAVvirt^* 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



ENTERTAINMENT 



CHAOS by Brian Sinister 



CHAOS ^ Brian Sbuster 



CHAOS by B 



by Brian Siuster 




"For goodness sakes, guys, it's just a little cough! 



"Whoa, head-rush." 




'^JNWte^£^ m *fiPujwnD^rvmw^ 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 



J 





As she gazed into the mirror, Sally realized that the kids 
at school werenl teasing . . . she was, indeed, a cow. 






L 



Pa ge 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 15, 1998 



Orrnh P r1S.1998 



ThP Clarion Call 



Page 17 



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ITr would like to thank AOE for a 
great mixer and an awesome ALE 

Love. The Brothers of £11 

**************** 

Dance team, The mixer two weeks ago 
was a bomb, hopefully we can let 
another one off soon. Love the broth- 
ers of Sigma Chi 

**************** 

ZTA'S Thanks for making homecom- 
ing week a time no EX could ever for- 
get. You girls are the best! Love the 

brothers of Sigma Chi 

**************** 

ZTA'S Friday's mixer was the best, 
even though we did not win the float 
ITr would like to thank AOE for a 
great mixer and an awesome ALF. 

Love, The Brothers of ITT 

**************** 

HI, Congratulations on 1st place in the 
float competition. You worked hard 

and it showed. Way to go! Love, Beth 

**************** 

To all the new Associate Members of 
AOE Welcome to your new families. 

Love Your Bigs, 2-Bigs, & 3-Bigs 

**************** 

ITr thanks for the mixer, as always it 

was a Wast. Love AOE 

**************** 

Thanks EmJy, Kristy, Rob, and Rudy 
for all of your hard work and time spent 
on the float. You guys are "#1" 



The availability of the Daily Bulletin online 
means that we have discontinued the List 
Serve that allowed faculty and staff to choose 
to receive this information in the past. In 
addition, by going online we have now made 
this information available to all staff and stu- 
dents who have computer access. Please con- 
tinue to send your Daily Bulletin information 
to Patti Ruefle (e-mail to RUEFLE) and it wil 
be put it on the University Web Page. 




**************** 

Congratulations ITr, AIT, and in 
for our first place floats and to all of 
the sororities and fraternities on a great 

homecoming. Love AOE 

**************** 

Happy Birthday Kristen and Tracey! 

Love the sisters of AIT 

**************** 

We would like to thank the alumae for 
making this ALE a successful one! We 
had a blast partying with you guys! 

Love the sisters of AIT. 

**************** 

Congratulations to ITr & A<I>E on 
sharing first place with us! Love the 

sisters of AIT. 

**************** 

in thanks for all your help with the 
float. We knew all our hard work 
would pay off! We wouldn't want to 
celebrate #1 with anyone else! Love 

the sisters of AIT 

**************** 

Congrats to Marcus and Lauren on 
their engagement. Good Luck you 

two. Best Wishes, Your 0H brothers 

**************** 

The brothers of 0H would like to con- 
gratulate their newest Associate 

Members. Good Luck 

**************** 

Leanne-Your 21 ! Be Careful! Love 

the brothers of 05 

**************** 

Congratulations AZ and KAP for win- 
ning 3rd place for the float! You all did 
a terrific job and worked so hard! It 

looked wonderful! 

**************** 

To the Brothers of KAP, Thank you so 
much for the awesome mixer. We 
never knew graffiti could be so much 

fun! Love the sisters of AZ 

**************** 

Robinson and Kid, The two of you 
looked wonderful riding in the parade! 



You made us so proud! We love you 

both! Love the AZ sisters 

**************** 

To my ITr newsboy, Dan! Thanks for 
being my co-host last thurs! You defi- 
nitely made the show tons of fun! 
Keep up the good work sweetie! Love, 

Dezort 

**************** 

Congratulations, Paul and Carrie, on 
your engagement. To ZTA congratula- 
tions as well, for your sister. Good 

luck in all you do. Your in Brothers. 

**************** 

To all the families and alumni of in, 
you made Autumn Leaf, what it was! 
A Fantastic Weekend Thanks, The 

Brothers of Sigma Pi 

**************** 

AIT - Thanks for a great A.L.F We 
had a great mixer, the best float, and an 
amazing weekend. Thanks for all the 

help, and good times. Love in 

**************** 

Thank you to all the in sponsors. You 
helped us make a winning float, and an 
awesome weekend followed. Sigma Pi 

Fraternity 

**************** 

To our advisor Dr. Beloit, Thanks for 
the great food, a real fun time at your 
cabin. We'll have to do it again next 

year. The Brothers of KAP 

**************** 

To AZ To the other side of third place 
winners. We couldn't have done it 
without you. Also, thanks for the awe- 
some mixer. Can't wait to do it next 

semester. The Brothers of KAP 

**************** 

Congratulations to all the sororities 
and fraternities on your floats. 
Everybody did a great job! Love, The 

sisters of ZTA 

**************** 

Congratulations on your engagement 
Carrie and Paul. Love, The sisters of 



ZTA 






Thanks Sigma Chi for being our float 
partners. We had a great time working 
with you. Love, The Zetas PS. Our 

mixer was a great way to talk it off! 

**************** 

Jessa, Welcome to the Nu Family! We 
are going to have a blast this year! 

Love Your 2-Big, Kristen 

**************** 

Stacey, Callie. Jen, Holly, Jessa, Kerri. 
Katie, Melissa, Shelley, Leah, Angie, 
Stefanie, Jenna, Christine, Dawn, and 
Marilyn - You guys are doing an excel- 
lent job! AOE is glad to have you and 
so am I... can't wait to call you sisters! 
Love, Kristen 



PERSONALS 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Dezort, Bang-Bang Shaboobie THIS! 

**************** 

Janelle M. Donoghue, I love you. 

Love, Peter King 

**************** 

Missy, the duck is finally 21 ! Lookout 
Loomis, here she comes. Love, K 

PS: Quack, Quack 

**************** 

JG, I thought you were supposed to 
break a leg - not the props! Have fun, 

K 

**************** 

S & M, My two favorite hot men at 
Clarion are you ready to become danc- 
ing queens again this weekend? K 

***************** 

S, Rememer, you are such a nice per- 
son. Love, K 

**************** 

M, Good boy! you get a watermelon. K 

**************** 

Erica, You are the best walking buddy, 

thanks for the flex baby! 

**************** 

Hey Zach Winters, that garter belt 
looks better on my leg than your head. 
Love, Fly Wilson 



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The Clarion Call 



October 15. 1998 



CALL ON YOU 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 





How was your ALF experience? 



Photography 
Editor 




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** I spent most of my time licking beer and eating 
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Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 15, 1998 



SPORTSWIRE 



The Clarion golf team has 
completed a strong fall season 
that included several individ- 
ual and team accomplish- 
ments. The team wrapped up 
the season at Wanango 
Country Club, taking a fourth- 
place finish. Head coach 
Mike Power and the Golden 
Eagles hope to carry the 
momentum from the fall sea- 
son into the spring in order to 
compete with conference pow- 
ers IUP and Slippery Rock. 

See Page 22 

The football team gets set for 
an important three-game 
stretch against regionally 
ranked opponents. The Eagles 
face No. 10 Shippensburg 
Saturday, followed by a trip to 
No. 4 IUP next weekend, and a 
home date with No. 7 West 
Chester Oct. 31. For complete 
Division II, I-AA, and III 
rankings, see the scoreboard. 

See Page 24 

Clarion athletes have made the 
grade in the classroom and in 
the athletic arena. Clarion stu- 
dent athletes were honored for 
having the highest QPAs of 
any school in the 14-member 
PSAC. 

See Page 22 



The cross country team was 
home Saturday to host the 
Clarion Invitational. The 
Eagles will also be home Oct. 
31 to host the PSAC champi- 
onships. 

See Page 22 



QUOTABLES 



"I think we're starting to get 
a better balance. We're 
doing alright moving the 
ball, but then we get a sec- 
ond-and-2 and we get a 
motion penalty or poor exe- 
cution on a play. Those are 
the things that are hurting 
us right now." 

—Clarion head football 
coach Malen Luke. 



J 



SPORTS 




Week Seven 




Eagles look to wreck Ship 



By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Edito r 

Fresh off of last Saturday's 
impressive 33-20 victory over 
Edinboro, the Golden Eagles will 
now look for revenge against the 
visiting Shippensburg Red 
Raiders Saturday. 

Last season, Shippensburg 
ruined the homecoming festivities 
in Clarion with a 37-14 win at 
Memorial Stadium. 

Shippensburg will look to keep 
pace with Slippery Rock atop the 
PSAC Western Division stand- 
ings. Prior to last week's 
crossover tilt with East 
Stroudsburg, won by the Red 
Raiders 35-13, they defeated 
Edinboro 27-23 in their only 
PS AC- West contest to date. 
Meanwhile, Clarion enters 
Saturday's game with a 1-1 divi- 
sion record and will need to win 
to remain confident heading into 
the following week's matchup at 
No. 18 IUP. 

CLARION OFFENSE 
The Golden Eagle offense will 
look to get strong production from 
its running backs for the second 
straight week. Freshman 
Demertic Gardner produced 
Clarion's first 100-yard rushing 
performance of the season, while 
senior Jamie Sickeri ran for two 
touchdowns, caught six passes for 
100 yards, and blocked a punt on 
special teams. Gardner and 
Sickeri could have big afternoons 
on Saturday against a 
Shippensburg defense that is 
allowing 210 yards per game 
against the run. Quarterback 
Chris Weibel should try to get the 
ball to wide receiver Alvin 
Slaughter early and often after the 
pair connected just two times last 
week — once on a two-point con- 
version. 

SHIPPENSBURG OFFENSE 
The Red Raider offense enjoyed 
a field day last week in a win over 
East Stroudsburg, compiling 605 
yards. However, things won't be 
so easy this week against 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Clarion linebacker Brett Wiley makes things difficult on Edinboro quarterback Brian 
Caldwell Saturday. The Golden Eagles are riding a four-game winning streak at home dat- 
ing back to last season. Clarion will look to keep that going Saturday versus 
Shippensburg. 

Clarion's stifling defense. 8.5 yards per carry, and Penn bent but has yet to be broken 
Nonetheless, Shippensburg's State transfer Anthony Cleary, through six games. Despite 
offense is very potent, highlighted who also is starting oh defense. allowing the fourth most yards in 
by big-play wide receiver Jamie CLARION DEFENSE the PSAC, the Shippensburg 
Ware, who averages 16 yards per Defensively, the Golden Eagles defense has allowed a respectable 
reception and has scored seven continue to shine. Last Saturday 22 points per game, fifth best in 
touchdowns. It should be fun to against Edinboro, linebacker Brett the conference. Seniors Chris 
watch Ware and Slaughter when Wiley became the third Golden 
their respective offenses are on Eagle defender to be named 
me field - PSAC-West "Defensive Player of 
At quarterback the Red Raiders the Week" this season. Wiley, 
have been platooning freshman sophomore Ryan Presutti and 
Chris Gicking and sophomore senior Keith Kochert have devel- 
Keith Kullman without missing a oped into perhaps the best line- 
beat. Both appear among the top backing trio in the PSAC. They, of Cleary has been a keylddit'ion 
five in the PSAC in passing effi- in addition to the defensive line, to the Red Raider defense adding 
ciency. Unlike last week when will be asked to slow down the four sacks and an interception. 
Clarion had to concentrate on Shippensburg running attack, as 
shutting down Edinboro's Gerald they did in the past two games 
Thompson, they will now have to against Slippery Rock and 
focus on a group of strong run- Edinboro. The Golden Eagle cor- 
ning backs. Five Red Raiders nerbacks will have a tough assign- 
have gotten significant carries, led ment in covering Ware, while the 
by junior Jeremy Brubaker, who safeties of Chris Janson and Brad 
leads the team with 335 yards. Geer, both among the PSAC's bing t- 
However, the two most dangerous leaders in tackles, must continue Shippensburg. 



Heilman and Kareem Brown 
anchor the defensive line. 
Heilman leads the PSAC in tack- 
les for a loss with 12, while 
Brown is among the conference 
leaders in sacks with five. 
Meanwhile, the two-way threat 



The leading tackier is sophomore 
defensive back Deion Harrison 

(36). 



backs may be sophomore Dave to provide run support. 

Brown, the PSAC champion in SHIPPENSBURG DEFENSE 

the 100-meter dash, who averages The Red Raider defense has 



BOTTOM LINE 

The Golden Eagles have not 
forgotten last year's 37-14 drub- 

hands of 
In addition, 



Clarion needs a win to avoid 
stumbling into next weeks game 
at IUP. 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 



mm. 



J 



mm 



too* We 



Unsung Hero 



D-ll Notebook 

Slippery Rock tops IUP 

By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Ed itor 

Last Saturday's key PSAC-West 
showdown between IUP and 
Slippery Rock was billed as the 
game of the weekend in Division 
II, and the two teams didn't dis- 
appoint. In fact, based on the 
game's incredible ending it may 
qualify as the game of the year. 

With the game tied at 21-21 and 
IUP driving for the potential win- 
ning score, Slippery Rock line- 
backer Paul Allegretto intercepted 
a Paul Failla pass and fell to the 
ground with just one second left 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

Every successful college foot- 
ball program has big-name play- 
ers who grab the spotlight and 
carry their team to winning sea- 
sons. These same programs have 
role players that add depth and the 
drive that it takes to make a good 
football team great. 

The Clarion Golden Eagles are 
fortunate enough to have one of 
these role players. Fifth-year 
senior Ryan Winkleblech has 
spent his career at Clarion as a 
role player, yet head coach Malen 
Luke realizes how valuable 
Winkleblech has been to Clarion's 
success. "Ryan is a guy that is out 
there every day. He doesn't miss 
practice, he doesn't miss meet- 
ings, and the coaches and players 
can always count on him to be 
there. He sends a good message 
to the younger players," Luke 
said. 

Winkleblech came to Clarion in 
1994 from Charleroi High School. 
Winkleblech, known around cam- 
pus as "Wink," passed on offers to 
go to schools such as Washington 
& Jefferson, Waynesburg, and St. 
Francis to try and walk-on for the 
Golden Eagles. 

According to Wink, "I knew 
what Clarion was all about 
because my brother (Jerry) went 
here. Maybe I could have gotten 
more playing time somewhere 
else, but I'm glad I came here. I 
had a great experience and met 
some great people." 

Not only has Winkleblech 
played football for five years at 
Clarion, he has also been an active 
member of the campus communi- 
ty and excelled in the classroom. 

in miraculous finish 

— just enough a time for a Hail 
Mary pass from their own 48 yard 
line. On the play, quarterback 
Randy McKavish heaved the ball 
into the end zone, where it was 
tipped into the hands of wide 
receiver D.J. Flick for a touch- 
down and an incredible 27-21 
Slippery Rock win. The Rockets 
seized the inside track on the 
PSAC-West title, while the 
Indians plummeted from No. 2 to 
No. 18 in the NCAA poll. That 
drop comes just weeks after the 
Indians jumped from No. 17 to 
No. 4 in just one week. 




File Photo 

Ryan Winkleblech (61) has been helping pave the path to 
success for the Golden Eagles for five seasons. 

Winkleblech has served as the to hang it up. I'm glad I stuck 

Chair of the Election Committee with it because it has been a great 

for the Student Senate, is a coun- experience for me." 

selor in the Upward Bound pro- Winkleblech feels that his career 

gram, and volunteers his time for at Clarion has been a success. 



the children at a local elementary 
school. Winkleblech has main- 
tained a 3.1 gpa as a secondary 



"When I came here I hoped to 
get a couple of things out of foot- 
ball. The two main things were 



education/mathematics major and responsibility and friendships, 

also has completed Clarion's think I got both of these things 

coaching certification program. here at Clarion. The game teach- 

Coach Luke noted, "Wink has es you a lot about life. It is a big 



added credibility to the program. 
His involvement in his different 
activities and his hard work in the 
classroom shows that he is more 
than just a football player. He 
deserves a lot of credit for being 
involved in so many different 



commitment, and it is a big 
responsibility to make every prac- 
tice and every meeting. Also, I 
can't say enough about the friends 
that I have made on the football 
team," Winkleblech said. 

When Winkleblech leaves 



things. He is someone you can Clarion, he hopes to stay in foot- 
count on and that will make him a ball by coaching. Winkleblech 
success after he leaves Clarion." noted, "I would like to get into 
Despite his lack of playing time, coaching at the high school level. 
Winkleblech stayed with the pro- I gained a great deal of experience 
gram for five years. He says that playing at Clarion and I think that 
pride was a major factor in stick- will help me when I become a 



ing it out. Winkleblech added, "It 
is something that I wanted to fin- 
ish. It would have been too easy 



coach." 

Winkleblech added, "Coach 
Luke is an excellent coach. He 



has taught me a lot during my 
career. He is always looking out 
for everyone on the team. He 
always pushes me to do well both 
on the field and in the classroom. 
Also, coach (Dave) Durish has 
been great this year. He has been 
understanding and helped me get 
through this year." 

When he graduates in May, 
Winkleblech said he will have 
mixed emotions. According to 
Winkleblech, "I'll be glad to 
move on to the next chapter of my 
life, but I will also miss it here. I 
have a lot of good memories. My 
time at Clarion has been the best 
time of my life." 

Winkleblech's two fondest 
memories of Clarion include, 
"Living on the third floor north of 
Nair Hall and the 1996 national 
title run." 

Winkleblech was quick to point 
out that there were a number of 
people who made it possible for 
him to finish his football career 
and graduate. 

"My parents have always sup- 
ported me. I know every time I 
walk on to the field my dad will 
be up in the stands Also, my two 
grandfathers kept ine going and 
that is where I got n y determina- 
tion from. They were great role 
models for me," Winkleblech 
said. 

There are still things 
Winkleblech wants to accomplish 
this football season. Winkleblech 
said, "If we take care of our busi- 
ness, we have a shot to win the 
PSAC-West. We can't worry 
about anybody else and have to let 
the chips fall where they may. 
Winning the West would be a 
great way to finish my college 
career." 



Eagles even record 
with win at IUP 



The Clarion University volley- 
ball team evened its overall and 
conference records with a sweep 
of IUP Tuesday night. 

The Eagles (10-10 overall, 3-3 
PSAC-West) drilled the Indians, 
15-5, 15-6, 15-2 in the PSAC- 
West match. 

Jessa Canfield had six kills for 
Clarion, while Christy Boes 
chipped in 12 digs. Jamie 
Soboleski notched 27 assists. 

The Golden Eagles are in 
Florida for the weekend to partic- 
ipate in the Rollins College 
Tournament in Winter Park, Fla. 



Mid-October Madness 

Friday, Oct. 16 at 9 p.m. 
Tippin Gym 

Get your first look at this year's men's basket' 
ball team. Watch the Golden Eagles in a Blue- 
Gold Game, a 3-point shootout, and a slam 

dunk session! 

Free food and prizes await those who attend! 
Live coverage on WCUC 91 .7 FM 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 15, 1998 



SPORTSWIRE 



The Clarion golf team has 
completed a strong fall season 
that included several individ- 
ual and team accomplish- 
ments. The team wrapped up 
the season at Wanango 
Country Club, taking a fourth- 
place finish. Head coach 
Mike Power and the Golden 
Eagles hope to carry the 
momentum from the fall sea- 
son into the spring in order to 
compete with conference pow- 
ers IUP and Slippery Rock. 

See Page 22 

The football team gets set for 
an important three-game 
stretch against regionally 
ranked opponents. Ihe Eagles 
lace No. 10 Shippensburg 
Saturday, followed by a trip to 
No. 4 11 IP next weekend, and a 
home date with No. 7 West 
Chester Oct. 3 1 . For complete 
Division II, I-AA, and III 
rankings, see the scoreboard. 

See Page 24 

Clarion athletes have made the 
grade in the classroom and in 
(lie athletic arena. Clarion stu- 
dent athletes were honored for 
having the highest QPAs of 
any school in the 14-member 
PSAC. 

See Page 22 



The cross country team was 
home Saturday to host the 
Clarion Invitational. The 
Eagles will also be home Oct. 
3 1 to host the PSAC champi- 
onships. 

Set Page 22 



QUOTABLES 



k 'I think we're starting to get 
a better balance. We're 
doing alright moving the 
ball, but then we get a sec- 
ond-and-2 and we get a 
motion penalty or poor exe- 
cution on a play. Those are 
the things that are hurting 
us right now." 

—Clarion head football 
coach Malen Luke. 



SPORTS 




Week Seven 




Eagles look to wreck Ship 



By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Fresh off of last Saturday's 
impressive 33-20 victory over 
Edinboro, the Golden Eagles will 
now look for revenge against the 
visiting Shippensburg Red 
Raiders Saturday. 

Last season, Shippensburg 
ruined the homecoming festivities 
in Clarion with a 37-14 win at 
Memorial Stadium. 

Shippensburg will look to keep 
pace with Slippery Rock atop the 
PSAC Western Division stand- 
ings. Prior to last week's 
crossover tilt with East 
Stroudsburg, won by the Red 
Raiders 35-13, they defeated 
Edinboro 27-23 in their only 
PSAC-West contest to date. 
Meanwhile, Clarion enters 
Saturday's game with a 1-1 divi- 
sion record and will need to win 
to remain confident heading into 
the following week's matchup at 
No. 18 IUP. 

CLARION OFFENSE 
The Golden Eagle offense will 
look to get strong production from 
its running backs for the second 
straight week. Freshman 

Demertic Gardner produced 
Clarion's first 100-yard rushing 
performance of the season, while 
senior Jamie Sickeri ran for two 
touchdowns, caught six passes for 
100 yards, and blocked a punt on 
special teams. Gardner and 
Sickeri could have big afternoons 
on Saturday against a 
Shippensburg defense that is 
allowing 210 yards per game 
against the run. Quarterback 
Chris Weibel should try to get the 
ball to wide receiver Alvin 
Slaughter early and often after the 
pair connected just two times last 
week — once on a two-point con- 
version. 

SHIPPENSBURG OFFENSE 
The Red Raider offense enjoyed 
a field day last week in a win over 
East Stroudsburg, compiling 605 
yards. However, things won't be 
so easy this week against 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Clarion linebacker Brett Wiley makes things difficult on Edinboro quarterback Brian 
Caldwell Saturday. The Golden Eagles are riding a four-game winning streak at home dat- 
ing back to last season. Clarion will look to keep that going Saturday versus 
Shippensburg. 

Clarion's stilling defense. 8.5 yards per carry, and Penn bent but has yet to be broken 
Nonetheless, Shippensburg's State transfer Anthony Cleary, through six games. Despite 
offense is very potent, highlighted who also is starting oh defense. allowing the fourth most yards in 
by big-play wide receiver Jamie CLARION DEFENSE the PSAC, the Shippensburg 

Ware, who averages 16 yards per Defensively, the Golden Eagles defense has allowed a respectable 
reception and has scored seven continue to shine. Last Saturday 22 points per game, fifth best in 
touchdowns. It should be fun to against Edinboro, linebacker Brett the conference. Seniors Chris 
watch Ware and Slaughter when Wiley became the third Golden Heilman and Kareem Brown 
their respective offenses are on Eagle defender to be named 
me fi eld. PSAC-West "Defensive Player of 

At quarterback the Red Raiders the Week" this season. Wiley, 
have been platooning freshman sophomore Ryan Presutti and 
Chris Gicking and sophomore senior Keith Kochert have devel- 
Keith Kullman without missing a oped into perhaps the best line- 
beat. Both appear among the top backing trio in the PSAC They, 
live in die PSAC in passing effi- in addition to the defensive line, 
ciency. Unlike last week when will be asked to slow down the 

Clarion had to concentrate on Shippensburg running attack, as The leading tackier is sophomore 
shutting down Edinboro's Gerald they did in the past two games defensive back Deion Harrison 
Thompson, they will now have to against Slippery Rock and 

Edinboro. The Golden Eagle cor- 
nerbacks will have a tough assign- 
ment in covering Ware, while the 
safeties of Chris Janson and Brad 
Geer, both among the PSAC's 
leaders in tackles, must continue 



focus on a group of strong run 
ning backs. Five Red Raiders 
have gotten significant carries, led 
by junior Jeremy Brubaker, who 
leads the team with 335 yards. 
However, the two most dangerous 



anchor the defensive line. 
Heilman leads the PSAC in tack- 
les for a loss with 12, while 
Brown is among the conference 
leaders in sacks with five. 

Meanwhile, the two-way threat 
of Cleary has been a key addition 
to the Red Raider defense, adding 
lour sacks and an interception. 



(36). 



backs may be sophomore Dave to provide run support. 

Brown, the PSAC champion in SHIPPENSBURG DEFENSE 

the 100-meter dash, who averages The Red Raider defense has 



BOTTOM LINE 

Ibe Golden Eagles have not 
forgotten last year's 37-14 drub- 
.bing at- the hands of 
Shippensburg. In addition, 
Clarion needs a win to avoid 
stumbling into next weeks game 
at IUP. 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 



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Unsung Hero 




D-II Notebook 

Slippery Rock tops IUP 

By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 



Last Saturday's key PSAC-West 
showdown between IUP and 
Slippery Roek was billed as the 
game of the weekend in Division 
II, and the two teams didn't dis- 
appoint. In fact, based on the 
game's incredible ending it may 
qualify as the game of the year. 

With die game tied at 21-21 and 
IUP driving for the potential win- 
ning score, Slippery Rock line- 
backer Paul Allegretto intercepted 
a Paul Failla pass and fell to the 
ground with just one second left 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 

Every successful college foot- 
ball program has big-name play- 
ers who grab the spotlight and 
carry their team to winning sea- 
sons. These same programs have 
role players that add depth and the 
drive that it Lakes to make a good 
football team great. 

The Clarion Golden Eagles are 
fortunate enough to have one of 
these role players. Fifth-year 
senior Ryan Winkleblech has 
spent his career at Clarion as a 
role player, yet head coach Malen 
Luke realizes how valuable 
Winkleblech has been to Clarion's 
success. "Ryan is a guy that is out 
there every day. He doesn't miss 
practice, he doesn't miss meet- 
ings, and the coaches and players 
can always count on him to be 
there. He sends a good message 
to the younger players," Luke 
said. 

Winkleblech came to Clarion in 
1994 from Charleroi High School. 
Winkleblech, known around cam- 
pus as "Wink," passed on offers to 
go to schools such as Washington 
& Jefferson, Waynesburg, and St. 
Francis to try and walk-on for the 
Golden Eagles. 

According to Wink, "I knew 
what Clarion was all about 
because my brodier (Jerry) went 
here. Maybe I could have gotten 
more playing time somewhere 
else, but I'm glad I came here. I 
had a great experience and met 
some great people." 

Not only has Winkleblech 
played football for five years at 
Clarion, he has also been an active 
member of the campus communi- 
ty and excelled in the classroom. 

in miraculous finish 

— just enough a time for a Hail 
Mary pass from their own 48 yard 
line. On the play, quarterback 
Randy McKavish heaved the ball 
into the end zone, where it was 
tipped into the hands of wide 
receiver D.J. Flick for a touch- 
down and an incredible 27-21 
Slippery Rock win. The Rockets 
seized the inside track on the 
PSAC-West title, while the 
Indians plummeted from No. 2 to 
No. 18 in the NCAA poll. That 
drop comes just weeks after the 
Indians jumped from No. 17 to 
No. 4 in just one week. 




File Photo 

Ryan Winkleblech (61) has been helping pave the path to 
success for the Golden Eagles for five seasons. 



Winkleblech has served as the 
Chair of the Election Committee 
for the Student Senate, is a coun- 
selor in the Upward Bound pro- 
gram, and volunteers his time for 
the children at a local elementary 
school. Winkleblech has main- 
tained a 3.1 gpa as a secondary 



to hang it up. I'm glad I stuek 
witli it because it has been a great 
experience for me." 

Winkleblech feels that his career 
at Clarion has been a success. 

"When I came here I hoped to 
get a couple of things out of foot- 
ball. The two main things were 



education/mathematics major and responsibility and friendships, 
also has completed Clarion's think I got both of these things 



coaching certification program. 

Coach Luke noted, "Wink has 
added credibility to the program. 
His involvement in his different 
activities and his hard work in the 
classroom shows that he is more 
than just a football player. He 
deserves a lot of credit for being 
involved in so many different 
things. He is someone you can 
count on and that will make him a 
success after he leaves Clarion." 
Despite his lack of playing time, 
Winkleblech stayed with the pro- 



here at Clarion. The game teach- 
es you a lot about life. It is a big 
commitment and it is a big 
responsibility to make every prac- 
tice and every meeting. Also, I 
can't say enough about the friends 
that I have made on the football 
team," Winkleblech said. 

When Winkleblech leaves 
Clarion, he hopes to stay in foot- 
ball by coaching. Winkleblech 
noted, "I would like to get into 
coaching at the high school level. 
I gained a great deal of experience 



gram for five years. He says that playing at Clarion and I think that 

pride was a major factor in stick- will help me when I become a 

ing it out. Winkleblech added, "It coach." 

is something that I wanted to fin- Winkleblech added, "Coach 

ish. It would have been too easy Luke is an excellent coach. He 



has taught me a lot during my 
career, He is always looking out 
for everyone on the team. He 
always pushes me to do well both 
on the field and in the classroom. 
Also, coach (Dave) Durish has 
been great this year. I Ie has been 
understanding and helped me get 
through this year." 

When he graduates in May, 
Winkleblech said he will have 
mixed emotions. According to 
Winkleblech, "I'll be glad to 
move on to the next chapter of my 
life, but I will also miss it here. I 
have a lot of good memories. Mv 
time at Clarion has been the best 
time of my life." 

Winkleblech's two fondest 
memories of Clarion include, 
"Living on the third floor north of 
Nair Hall and the 1996 national 
title run." 

Winkleblech was quick to point 
out that there were a number of 
people who made it possible for 
him to finish his football career 
and graduate. 

"My parents have always sup- 
ported me. I know every time I 
walk on to the field my dad will 
be up in the stands Also, my two 
grandfathers kept me going and 
that is where I got n y determina- 
tion from. They were great role 
models for me," Winkleblech 
said. 

There are still things 
Winkleblech wants to accomplish 
this football season. Winkleblech 
said, "If we take care of our busi- 
ness, we have a shot to win the 
PSAC-West. We can't worry 
about anybody else and have to let 
the chips fall where they may. 
Winning the West would be a 
great way to finish my college 
career." 



Eagles even record 
with win at IUP 



The Clarion University volley- 
ball team evened its overall and 
conference records with a sweep 
of IUP Tuesday night. 

The Eagles (10-10 overall. 3-3 
PSAC-West) drilled the Indians, 
15-5, 15-6, 15-2 in the PSAC- 
West match. 

Jessa Canfield had six kills for 
Clarion, while Christy Boes 
chipped in 12 digs. Jamie 
Soboleski notched 27 assists. 

The Golden Eagles are in 
Florida for the weekend to partic- 
ipate in the Rollins College 
Tournament in Winter Park, Fla. 



Mid-October Madness 

Friday, Oct. 16 at 9 p.m. 
Tlppln Gym 

Get your first look at this year's men's basket- 
ball team. Watch the Golden Eagles In a Blue- 
Gold Game, a 3-point shootout, and a slam 

dunk session! 

Free food and prizes await those who attend! 
Live coverage on WCUC 91 .7 FM 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



October 15, 1998 



CUP athletes making the grade in the classroom 



Courtesy of 
University Relations 

Academics and athletics go well 
together at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Clarion University had the high- 
est percentage of scholar athletes 
with 3.25 quality point average or 
above among the 14 State System 
of High Education member insti- 
tutions according to a report 
issued for 1997-98 by the 
Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference office. Clarion has 71 
athletes who met this criteria, 
almost evenly divided with 33 



men and 38 women, nearly 26 
percent of all student athletes. 

Clarion has 274 student athletes 
(173 men, 101 women) during the 
1997-98 school year out of a total 
enrollment of 4,593 students. The 
percentage was determined by 
dividing the total number of stu- 
dent athletes into the total that 
maintained a 3.25 quality point 
average or above for the entire 
year. 

Athletics director Bob Carlson 
traced this success to several fac- 
tors, including interest in the stu- 
dents, support programs, and 
recruiting practices. 



"The caliber of student athletes 
recruited by Clarion is a factor in 
academic success," said Carlson. 
"We are looking for athletes who 
also can succeed in the classroom. 
The NCAA Clearing House helps 
our coaches to be more selective 
in the recruiting process. Once 
they are here our coaches stress 
academics seriously and work 
hard to make sure the athletes are 
given an opportunity to succeed. 

"Clarion's faculty work with 
students and that makes a differ- 
ence for them. Dr. Louis 
Tripodi's Academic Support 
Services program is also a big fac- 



tor. Mandatory study halls help to 
make sure studies are completed. 
I think the students are pleased 
with the opportunities they find 
on campus. They are satisfied 
with the degree they receive and 
that their education will help them 
to succeed in the future." 

Carlson noted that a great deal 
of effort is made to keep on top of 
academic issues to prevent other 
problems. For instance, practices, 
which are limited to 20 hours per 
week, are held at times that do not 
conflict with class schedules. 

Clarion's scholar-athlete success 
has grown during the past decade. 



In 1991, a yearly luncheon was 
added to recognize scholar-ath- 
letes. That year 47 students met 
the qualifications for recognition. 
By 1997, that number had reached 
92. 

"There is more to this than wins 
and losses," said Carlson. 
"Clarion is concerned with the 
total athlete. Mandatory pro- 
grams are held to instruct the ath- 
letes in healthy living including 
programs about AIDS, drugs and 
alcohol, safe sex, and harassment. 
All of these things tie together to 
make well-rounded student ath- 
letes." 



Eagles complete strong golf season 



By J.P. Kenney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion golf had its final tourna- 
ment of the fall season last week 
at Wanango Country Club. 

The tournament was hosted by 
Allegheny College. The Golden 
Eagles posted a tie for fourth 
place with the Allegheny Gold 
team. Both teams shot 319, 
which was 15 strokes behind first- 
place Slippery Rock. 

Clarion was led by junior Matt 
Honacki with a score of 76. Not 
far behind was Clarion's No. 1 



man Shawn Will at 78. Other 
scores included Adam Botteicher 
with an 81, J.P. Kenney (84), and 
Anthony Tacconelli with an 85. 

As for the season as a whole, it 
was very productive. There were 
some excellent individual perfor- 
mances, such as Will's fifth-place 
finish in West Virginia, which 
included a round of 68. 
Tacconelli, a freshman, took a 
fifth place at the Pitt-Greensburg 
Tournament. Also, Honacki's 
top-ten finish at Allegheny and 
Kenney's 72 in the first round at 



West Virginia rank among the 
highlights. 

As a team, winning the Pitt- 
Greensburg Tournament was a big 
accomplishment, as was shooting 
a combined 292 in the second 
round of the Glenville State 
Tournament. 

In the spring, all of the players 
will be returning, including all of 
the freshmen who will have a 
semester of experience under 
their belts. Clarion promises to 
contend for the PS AC title against 
IUP and Slippery Rock. 



Netters prepare for PSAC tourney 



By Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The women's tennis team, under 
head coach Lori Sabatose, tri- 
umphed over Edinboro Monday 
by a 7-2 score. 

The win gave the Eagles a 2-12 
regular-season record. This 
record, however, does not give an 
accurate portrayal of the netters, 
who are one of the top four teams 
based on individual record in the 
conference. 

During singles competition, 
freshman Bethany Melnick fought 
to secure victory by finishing off a 



tiebreaking game. Kylee 

Johnson, a sophomore, was able 
to stay in the match with powerful 
forehand ground strokes and 
extreme patience to cinch a 
tiebreaker. Junior co-captain 
Rachel Link, with a variety of 
powerful shots, secured a victory 
for the team, as did sophomore 
co-captain Amy Shaffer, who used 
a powerful assortment of serves. 
Senior Carly Carrier won by using 
excellent defensive strategy, 
attacking the net and throwing her 
opponent off guard. 

In doubles action, Melnick and 
Shaffer displayed a great attack- 



ing game and executed a victory 
for the netters. Link and Johnson 
also exhibited determination and 
patience to pick up a win for the 
team. Tracy Heim and LaDonna 
Dunlevy, both freshmen, experi- 
enced a tough loss because of 
falling behind at the start of the 
match. 

Although the netters have closed 
their regular season, they will be 
serving a few more balls in Erie at 
the Pennbriar Athletic Club for 
the PSAC tournament this 
Saturday and Sunday. All confer- 
ence teams will be attending the 
tournament. 



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Soccer players want UNC 
coach kicked off campus 

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Two former soccer players at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill filed a $12 million lawsuit, alleging 
sexual harassment and other misconduct against Anson Dorrance, the 
school's head women's soccer coach. 

Dorrance, who has led the team to 15 national titles in 17 years, 
vowed in a prepared statement to "vigorously defend" himself against 
the accusations, he has coached at the university since 1979. 

"I am shocked and saddened by these allegations," Dorrance said. "I 
have never and would never abuse my position in any way." 

The lawsuit, filed in federal district court in Chicago by Debbie 
Keller, who played for the Tar Heels from 1993 to 1996, and Melissa 
Jennings, who is still a student at UNC, also faults several school 
administrators for failing to do anything about the allegations against 
Dorrance after having learned of them. Jennings claims Dorrance cut 
her from the team in May after she complained to administrators about 
his behavior. 

The suit claims Dorrance ensured alcohol was made available to high 
school recruits visiting campus and that he probed players about their 
sex lives and those of their teammates. 

Keller also alleges that Dorrance often made "offensive physical con- 
tact" with her by putting "his arms and hands on her body on multiple 
occasions." Keller also claims that in October, 1996, Dorrance lured 
her to a secluded spot where he "made an uninvited sexual advance" 
toward her. 

The university said it acted quickly on the women's complaints and 
that an internal investigation found "absolutely no evidence" that 
Dorrance had "used his position to make uninvited, sexually explicit 
comments" to the women. The university also said it found no evi- 
dence of inappropriate physical contact. 

Current team members said a letter released Tuesday that they, too, 
believe the accusations are false. 

But as for the allegations that Dorrance provided alcohol to recruits 
and inquired about players' personal lives, the university said it found 
that the coach's conduct fell short of the standards of good judgment 
that we expect from university officials." 

Louis A. Varchetto, an attorney representing Jennings and Keller, said 
talks aimed at settling the dispute broke down when his clients insist- 
ed that the university ask Dorrance to step down from his post as part 
of any deal. 

"The university is unwilling to do that," he said. 

The lawsuit and the prominence of the people on both sides of it are 
sure to rqck the world of women's soccer. Dorrance is credited with 
building the sport of women's soccer in the United States and with 
leading the U.S. women's team to-victory during the first World Cup 
for women in 1991. 

Keller, now a starting forward on the women's national team, 
received UNC's top honor for student athletes during her senior season 
in 1997. The school retired her jersey earlier this year. 
Courtesy of College Press -Service 



October 15, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Golden Eagles leave Scots seeing plaid 



continued from page 1 



Seven minutes later, Jamie 
Sickeri showed his versatility on 
special teams. With Edinboro 
pinned deep in its own territory, 
Sickeri broke loose to block a 
Tyson Cook punt into the end 
zone. Sickeri got his fingertips on 
the ball, but it would flip out of 
the end zone for a Clarion safety. 
Nonetheless, the Golden Eagles 
increased the bulge to 26-7 mid- 
way through the third quarter. 

The Scots, who suffered their 
fifth straight loss after opening the 
season with a win over Hillsdale, 
stayed in contention when Dorian 
Wilkerson caught a 26-yard 
touchdown pass from Caldwell to 
pull the Scots within 26-14 with 
2:03 showing on the clock in the 
third. 

That was as close as the Scots 
would get, as the two teams trad- 
ed touchdowns in the fourth quar- 
ter. 

Sickeri scored his second touch- 
down of the day on a 1-yard run at 
the 9:32 mark. 

Dawn Price pulled Edinboro 
within 33-20 on a 23-yard run 



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Eagle runners 
fourth at 
Invitational 

By Megan Pavuk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



George Groff/Clarion Call 

Running back Demltric Gardner heads upfield for yards against Edinboro. Gardner record- 
ed over 100 yards for the Eagles Saturday. 

with 2:25. With the win, the Golden Eagles it five in a row this Saturday when 

However, Geer would handle ran their home winning streak to another PSAC-West rival, 

the ensuing onside kick to seal the four games, dating back to last Shippensburg, visits Memorial 

Clarion win. season. Clarion will look to make Stadium for a 1 p.m. start. 



The Autumn Leaf Festival was- 
n't the only occasion that attract- 
ed people from various parts of 
the state over the weekend. 

Cross country teams from Lock 
Haven, Bloomsburg, Millersville, 
California, and Mercyhurst all 
attended the Clarion Invitational 
held Saturday morning at 
Mayfield Golf Course. The invi- 
tational followed two high school 
races, as well as the Alumni Meet. 

The college women's race was a 
6K, as opposed to last year's 5K. 
Finishing in the top 10 for the 
women was fifth-place finisher 
Roxanne Wilson (25:36), fol- 
lowed by Kelly Null in 10th 
place. Next came Maureen Long, 
Bridgette Laflin, Laurie Young, 
Kristie Runk, Wendy Kengor, and 
Andrea Borek. 

On the men's side, the top 10 
included Ean King (29:46), who 
placed sixth, and ninth-place Jon 
Fox. These two were followed by 
Colin McGlone, John "Gus" 
Copley, Mark Tryzna, Jason 
Bochert, John Sherry, Brad 
Walker, Gregg Wade, and Matt 

Continued on page 24 




INTRAMURAL A/ f %g 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 1 7 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



P. H. WARRIORS 



FLAG FOOTBALL 
TOURNAMENT 



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TUE- 206:15PM 




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NEWS IN ■ BRIEF 
1 PITCH SOFTBALL 

The "One and Only" 

Softball team won the 1 pitch 
tournament on Sunday 
10/11. Team members 
included: Brian Cerilli, Cory 
Schaeffer, Mike Sanders, 
Keith Reed, Josh Douds, Bill 
Johnston, Eric Knorr, Cory 
Conners, Jeremy Venenzi, 
and Dave Ellwood. 
Congratulations!! 

3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 

Thanksgiving Basketball 
Classic!! Two days of 
basketball- 
"Hoop it up style". 
$15.00 per team member 
which includes a T-shirt 
and drinks during the 
tournament. The winning 
team will also receive a 
cash prize based on the 
number of entries. 
Tournament date Nov. 21 
& 22. Deadline to enter 
and guarantee a shirt is 
Nov. 6! 
(Also, 3 pt. shot contest!) 



"CLARION OUTDOORS" 

G.E.A.R. 

QUEHANNA TRAIL 

Reservations are now 
being accepted for the 
next adventure trip. We 
will be going to the 
Parker Dam area near 
Clearfield PA to hike the 
16 mile loop of the 
Quehanna Trail. 

Departure date is Friday 
October 23 and we will 
be returning to Clarion on 
Sunday October 25. Cost 
for students is $15.00. 
This covers all of your 
meals for the week-end. 
Tents, backpacks and 
most other equipment will 
be furnished. 



»» 



"ROCK CLIMBING 

The next scheduled trip 
is slated for Thursday 
October 22. Mark your 
calenders and call x 2349 
to reserve your space. 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call 



October 15, 1998 



SCOREBOARD 



NCAA Division II Poll 
Oct. 12 



Northern Colorado 

2. Central Oklahoma 

3. Northwest Missouri State 
Grand Valley State 
California-Davis 

6. Carson-Newman 
Slippery Rock 
West Texas A&M 

9. Fort Valley State 

10. Central Missouri State 

11. (tie) Eastern New Mexico 
Nebraska-Omaha 

13. Saginaw Valley State 

14. West Georgia 

15. Southern Arkansas 

16. Chadron State 

17. North Dakota 

18. Indiana, Pa. 

19. (tie) Albany State 
Emporia State 

Regional Rankings 

Midwest 

1. Northern Colorado 

2. Northwest Miissouri State 

3. Central Missouri State 

4. Nebraska-Omaha 

5. North Dakota 

6. Emporia State 

7. Pittsburg State 

8. Winona State 

9. Truman State 

10. North Dakota State 

Northeast 

I.Grand Valley State 

Slippery Rock 
3. Saginaw Valley State 

Indiana, Pa. 



Cross Country 

Continued from page 2T 

Lapatka. 

Both the men and the women 
finished fourth overall. The "Hot 
Legs" awards went to Fox, Long, 
and Lafiin. The "Keep on 
Running" awards went to Copely 
and Young. 

There were 15 total participants 
in the annual 5K Alumni Meet. 
The graduating years of the run- 
ners ranged from 1967 to 1997. It 
was won by Dave Ellwood 
(18:52). Tied for second and third 
was Tom Brady and Clarion's 
assistant cross country coach 
Brad Alderton. The top finishers 
for the 1998 Eagles who ran in the 
race were Shane Cummings 
(sixth) and Linda Bryce (ninth). 

The running Eagles continue to 
soar through their season this 
weekend when the squads once 
again split. They travel to Pitt- 
Bradford, with the exception of 
the top seven, who will face more. 
Division I challenges at 
Duquesne. 



FOOTBALL 



5. Glenville State 

6. Ashland 

7. West Chester 

8. Millersville 

9. Shepherd 

10. Shippensburg 

South 

1 . Carson-Newman 

2. Fort valley State 

3. West Georgia 

4. Southern Arkansas 

5. Albany State 

6. North Alabama 

7. Delta State 

8. Valdosta State 

9. Livingstone 

10. Presbyterian 

West 

1. Central Oklahoma 

2. Cal-Davis 

3. West Texas A&M 

4. Eastern New Mexico 

5. Chadron State 

6. Texas A&M-Kingsville 

7. Northeastern Oklahama 

8. Fort Hays 

9. Angelo State 

10. Western State 

Sports Network l-AA Poll 

1. McNeese State 

2. Georgia Southern 

3. Appalachian State 

4. Hampton 

5. Western Illinois 

6. Youngstown State 

7. William & Mary 

8. Northwestern State 

9. Florida A&M 

10. Delaware 

11. Troy State 

12. South Florida 

13. Weber State 



14. Eastern Illinois 

15. Connecticut 

16. CS-Northridge 

17. Eastern Kentucky 

18. Massachusetts 

19. Western Illinois 

20. Montana State 

21. Murray State 

22. Villanova 

23. Southern 

24. Furman 

25. Hofstra 

Division III Regional Rankings 

East 

1. Springfield 

2. Rensselaer 

3. Ithaca 

4. College of New Jersey 

5. Merchant Marine 

South 

1. Lycoming 

2. Trinity 

3. Western Maryland 

4. Howard Payne 

5. Catholic • 

6. Emory and Henry 

North 

1. Mt. Union 

2. Illinois Wesleyan 

3. Wittenburg 

4. Hanover 

5. Wooster 

6. Millikin 

West 

1 . Central 

2. St. John's 

3. Linfield 

4. Wisconson-River Falls 

5. (tie) Wartburg 
Gustavus Adolphus 



GOLDEN EAGLE CALENDAR 



Country 



PiMay 



Got! 



Football 



tat. 

at 

Duquesne 






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Tennis 



Volleyball 



at 

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at 

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TIEBREAKER: Shippensburg at Clarion Total Points 



Call Staff Picks 



Nathan Koble 


Chris Pfeil 


Jason Dam bach 


Kriston Davis 


Penn State 


Penn State 


Purdue 


Penn State 


PM 


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Indiana 


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Kansas State 


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Georgia Tech 


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use 


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Cardinals 


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Jaguars 


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Season lt-11 



19-10 



19-10 



0-0 



Prize: Clarion Hat 
Laet week's winners George Qrofff 

Pigskin Pick 'Em is open to all readers ot the Clarion Call. Entries must be e-mailed by Saturday at 
noon to: s_crpteiiaclarion.edu. Entries can be made via mail to: Clarion Call Sports 270 Gemmell 
Complex Clarion, Pa. 16214. Entries must be postmarked by Saturday at noon. The entrant with the 
most correct selections is the winner. In the event of a tie, the entrant closest without going over to the 
total points scored in this week's Clarion/Shippensburg game will be declared the winner. It a tie still 
exists, a coin toss will determine the winner. 






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INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses... Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Page 9 

Call On YOU Page 13 

Entertainment Page u 

Classifieds Page 15 

Sports Page 17 



News 



A recently-released report 

questions the strength of 

core curricula at schools 

throughout Pennsylvania, 

including Clarion 

University. 

For more information, see 

Page 5. 



Lifestyles 



Clarion University's 

Theater Department 

kicks off its season 

with "Servant of 

Two Masters." For 

the review, 

see Page 9. 



Sports 



Shippensburg 
handed the Golden 
Eagles a 38-3 set- 
back on Saturday. 
For the story, see 
page 17. 



Clarion Call sponsors second annual 
College Press Day held at Gemmell 



by Michael Chapaloney 
Clarion Call Managing Editor 

"Did you check your rights 
when you pulled off of Interstate 
80," asked Dr. William 
Lawbaugh, who spoke about the 
new campus crime legislation at 
College Press Day. 

Lawbaugh, the national presi- 
dent of the Society for 
Collegiate Journalists, was 
influential in the adoption of a 
new legislation that opens cam- 
pus crime records to student 
journalist and gives them the 
opportunity to make them pub- 
lic. 

He voiced his concern about 
the closed trials that are used on 
college campuses. "Only Cuba, 
China and college campuses 
have closed trials." 

This was the second College 
Press Day, an event that origi- 
nated here at Clarion. Press 
Day is a one day convention that 
attracts college journalists from 
Pennsylvania and neighboring 
states through presentations 
concerning current issues in 
journalism. This year several of 




Clarion Call/George Groff 

Michael C. Hiestand of the Student Press Law Center and the 
co-author of SPLC's book, taw of the Student Press' delivered 
the keynote address at College Press Day 1998. 



the sessions focused on the legal 
concerns of collegiate journal- 
ism, such as the one presented 
by Lawbaugh and others which 
dealt with libel, freedom of 
information, and alcohol adver- 



tising. 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow, profes- 
sor of communication at Clarion 
who is the coordinator of Press 
Day was thrilled *with its suc- 
cess, "It was gratifying to see 



the sessions so well attended for 
all of those who worked so 
hard." "We may not have the 
numbers of national conventions, 
but all of the sessions were qual- 
ity," said Barlow who is also the 
national executive director of the 
Society for Collegiate 
Journalists. 

Dr. Ngo Dinh Tu, professor of 
political science at Clarion, pre- 
sented "Freedom of the press 
under the Constitution." Tu 
posed the question of whether or 
not the press should serve as a 
fourth branch of government that 
checks on the other three. He 
used examples from Supreme 
Court decisions in which the 
freedom of press was upheld. 

Tu discussed the boundaries of 
the press in expressing their 
opinions through editorials. 
Threatening national security or 
exciting violence are the two 
main aspect that must be consid- 
ered when writing editorials, said 
Tu. He emphasized the power of 
collegiate journalism, "Calling 
for impeachment of the president 
can be either the Washington 
Post or The Clarion Call. 



Carlson Library catches VID 



by Elisabeth Navarra 
Clarion Call News Writer 

For students that are often up 
past library hours working on 
papers or doing homework, there 
is a different kind of library avail- 
able this year. 

The Virtual Information Desk 
(VID). which began operating 
Sept. 8, is a new library service 
that is being offered on-line from 
Mansfield University o\' 
Pennsylvania. 

The Desk is open from 9 p.m. 
through I a.m. Sundays through 



Thursdays and from 4 to 8 p.m. 
on Fridays. During these times, 
three librarians and numerous 
assistants from Mansfield will be 
available to assist students with 
any reference or computer appli- 
cation questions. 

The VID can be accessed by e- 
mail at www.mnsfield.edu/~vid. 
Students who are unable to use a 
computer can call the toll-free 
number. I -888-76 1 -940 1. and 
receive help. Those that use the 
. service will be asked to provide 
the ID barcode that is located on 
their student identification card. 



'Editor's note* Last week's Clarion News Teaser 
should have read: "The State System of Higher 
Education is planning a 3.5% tuition hike for the 
1999-2000 school year." 



Another quick way to access 
the VID e-mail reference form is 
through the PILOT library data- 
base. "PILOT is the statewide 
library system." said Deon 
Knickerbocker, an employee at 
Carlson Library. "It is basically 
a uniform card catalog system (is 
used the same way at all col- 
leges) and is accessible through 
all the computers on campus." 

VID. which was made possible 
through a grant from the State 
System of Higher Education, is 
intended to help students and 
faculty alike. "We want to help 
you locate references, find 
answers, or do whatever you 
need to finish your work." said 
Larry Schankman. a librarian at 
Mansfield. "The concept of 



electronic reference should 
enable us to help someone who 
needs it even when they're hun- 
dreds of miles away." 

This service expects to provide 
answers to students' questions, 
and also to simplify library use . 

"If we cannot answer your ques- 
tion that night, we'll let the refer- 
ence desk at your home campus 
know so thar you can follow up 
there when your library is open 
again." said Jane Fenn. another 
VID librarian. "Going in with 
any of the citations or informa- 
tion we've been able to provide 
should shorten your search time." 
Knickerbocker noted that the 
VID is being used because sever- 
al requests have been made. 



Pa ge 2 



The Clarion f fl|| 



October 22 IQQfi 



THE CLARION' CALL 
270 GEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, TA 16214 

(S 14) 226-2380 

FAX: (S 14) 226-2557 

e-mail: callvdmail.clarion.edu 

wuw.cljnon edu/thccill 






Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



is published most 
Thursdays during the school year in 
Accordance with the academic calen- 
dar. Editors accept contributions 
from ail sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which ts the responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in-Chief). Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
lessarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse publica- 
tion of any information . Letters to 
ri»e Editor roust be received by 5:00 
p.m. on the Monday of desired publi- 
cation Letters most be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address, if the author wishes to have 
rnsilier identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted] 
explaining the reasons for the] 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
letters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 
**»« of Ik q«i« Call, Dfatfly 
Advertising copy and greek articles 
*re due Monday by 5.00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the 
week of r*blic*uon. TJjejQirJaa 



CaJi ia funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue. 



J 



OPINION 




Hide Park 



"Media organizations 
have almost always 
practiced agenda 
setting. 



» 



Rachael Foflygen 



««1 



Who's Afraid of the big bad 
Media Monster?" 

Who's afraid of the big, bad 
Media Monster? This seems to be 
a mocking question coming from 
the media, like a parent trying to 
console a child. But, this child 
happens to represent the 
American public. 

With recent events concerning 
the downfall in the moral charac- 
ter of the most powerful person 
in the free world, the President of 
the United States of America, the 
American public must think criti- 
cally about how this will, and 
should, affect them personally. 

However, the mass media tends 
to shape public opinion by bom- 
barding the American people 
with biased and often very con- 
fusing messages in the form of 
agenda setting. Not only does 
this type of bombardment actual- 
ly backfire against the media's 
ultimate intention of creating 
interest in their agenda but it also 
fosters apathy and desensitization 
on a massive scale. An apathetic, 
desensitized society, in turn, falls 
prey to corruption. 

The mass media permeates our 
culture. In anthropology class, 
students learn that culture inti- 
mately intertwines with their 
lives. As a matter of fact, anthro- 
pologists go as far as to say that 
humans are innately bicultural 
organisms, meaning that our bio- 
logical makeup relies on culture 
for survival and vice-versa. Any 
person who says the mass media 
does not affect them usually lies 
or remains ignorant of what mass 
media really involves. What are 
you going to wear to work today? 
Well, that depends on the weath- 
er. Do you go right outside and 
check the weather? No. Like 
most people, you probably turn 
the television to the local news 
channel to see what the meteorol- 
ogist predicts. 

How many times did you pass 
a billboard on the way to work? 
There used to be a time when 



the Amish could be characterized 
as impervious to modern conven- 
tions, including mass media. 
However, now some "modern- 
ized" Amish drive cars and stop 
at McDonald's to get a Big Mac. 
Messages, such as weather 
reports, Big Mac advertisements, 
and car advertisements, are 
geared towards specific audi- 
ences according to the media 
organization's specific agenda in 
order to stir up interest, whether 
it be interest in the McDonald's 
Big Mac sandwich or the Post 
Gazette's article on the all- 
important, but highly embell- 
ished "Kenneth Starr Report: 

Media organizations have 
almost always practiced agenda 
setting. However, when biased 
opinions become demands, the 
media oversteps the boundaries 
of agenda setting. Agenda setting 
focuses on a particular subject for 
a certain period of time in order 
to catch the public's interest. 
Journalism's partiality makes no 
reference to public opinion; it 
infers that the public concurs. A 
few examples of recent news arti- 
cles and stories point to this sort 
of partiality. For instance, on a 
quick television news update, an 
anchor announced, " The Post 
Gazette calls for President 
Clinton's impeachment," making 
it sound like that is what the pub- 
lic wants. Similarly, the headline 
for the local Erie newspaper 
reads, America says, 'Yuck!'" 
Keep in mind that polls from 
other media organizations, such 
as MSNBC, report that the presi- 
dent's ratings still remain high 
despite the recent damaging evi- 
dence against his moral character 
and behavior. Even then they 
cannot agree on what constitutes 
how high. It's no wonder people 
seem apathetic towards such an 
important subject. When confu- 
sion and disorder reign, a country 
can easily become misled. 

Lontinued on rage 4 




Editorial 



Clarion University 
students are The 
Clarion Call." 



OrrohPf 22. 1998 



Tr,P Clarion Call 



JEageJL 



Steve Ostrosky, News Editor 



As I sat in a session during last 
week's College Press Day, I 
began thinking of the incredible 
responsiblity student journalists 
have. But then I realized that 
you, the audience, have an even 
larger responsibility: the respon- 
sibility to react to the information 
provided by the student media. 

Clarion University students are 
The Clarion Call. We write the 
stories; we lay out the pages; we 
sell the advertising, and we take 
the criticism from the public. We 
are a newspaper, and we have an 
obligation to report the news, be 
it positive or negative. Some 
people in the administration may 
say that we are the University's 
mouthpiece; in fact, at times, we 
could be their worst enemy. 

In my more than three years as 
a student and in my year as news 
editor, one fact I have learned is 
that higher education is a big 
business, and Clarion University 
is no exception. Someone said 
to me, "Well, it's, not like the 
president (Dr. Reinhard) is the 
CEO of a business." 



In fact, she is. We recently 
reported that the University's 
Council of Trustees approved a 
$534pillion budget for the 1998- 
1999 academic year. Who over- 
sees the operations of this entire 
University? Dr. Diane L. 
Reinhard. Do you know who is 
paying for over one-third of that 
$53 million? You guessed it...the 
students. 

We, as students, have a right to 
know how our dollars are being 
spent. We as student journalists 
have an obligation to tell you 
exactly how the administration 
plans on allocating that tuition 
money. It is especially important 
if our money becomes used for 
purposes other than its original 
intent. If that circumstance 
should arise, do we not bring it to 
the students attention or do we 
bow to the wishes of the 
University? 

Students play an important role 
in student media, even though 
they may not be directly involved 

continued on Faee 4 ~ 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith Gwillim 

Assistant Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Assistant Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Assistant Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Copy and Design Assistants: Ryan Camuso, Wendy Stivers 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
Staff Writing Supervisor: Mary Beth Curry 
Staff Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly Susan Ferchalk, Mike Markewinski, JenMathis, Elizabeth Navarra, 
Kelly Palma, Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker, Jeff Chaffee 
Mike Cody, James Gates, Keith Gwillim, Lori Imbrugno, Janet Pazsink, Cory 
Pittman, Jason Rhoades, Jerry Collier, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob Meyers 
Marvin Wells y ' 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tim Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Drayton,Vkki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Brad 
Holtman, Julie Lope, Sonja Meerabox, Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly 
Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, Alvin Slaughter, Pete Yurisnec 
Circulation Staff: Shane Bednez, John Dellich, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
Ibinson, Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 
Proofreaders: Dawn Koch, Niki Stedina, Brooke Rinier, Stephanie Apter 
Names remaining in the stuff box in the December 10 issue will receive co-curricular credit. 



Beginning this semester, advertisers will be charged for 

ordering an ad, regardless of whether or not they meet 

The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 



READER RESPONSE 



"It also violates the first and second commandments of a reli- 
gious docterine endorsed by our own congress." 



♦Please Note* This letter to the 
editor was written last semester 
Dear Editor, 

Sometime this summer or early 
fall, the United States Senate will 
vote on a resolution (S.J. res 40) 
which would deliver to the states 
for ratification an amendment 
that would protect the physical 
integrity of the flag, at the 
expense of the ideas for which it 
stands. In 1995, a similar resolu- 
tion was narrowly defeated in the 
Senate, despite support from both 
Pennsylvania Senators Santorum 
(R) and Specter (R). 

Supporters for this amendment 
are well organized and funded, 
and they have sponsored several 
polls, which show tremendous 
popular support for the amende- 
ment Please take this opportuni- 
ty to let our legislators know how 
you feel. Let them know that this 
amendment would be an egre- 
gious infringement on one of the 
most important liberties our flag 
represents. 

Please do not misunderstand 
my position as a lack of respect 
for our flag. It is an important 
symbol, not only of our nation, 
but also of the ideological frame- 



work around which our nation 
has grown. I consider it uncon- 
scionable however, to place the 
physical integrity of that symbol 
over the ideological integrity of 
its referent. This amendment 
would be the first limitation of 
the freedoms guaranteed by our 
Bill of Rights and that it would 
qualify all three facets of the first 
amendment to the constitution. 

The most contested issue is this 
amendment's restriction on free 
speech. The Supreme Court has 
ruled on numerous occasions, 
most notably Street v. New York 
(394 U.S. 576) and Texas v. 
Johnson (491 U.S. 397), that this 
sort of symbolic speech is pro- 
tected by that clause in the first 
amendment which guarantees 
that congress may not legislative- 
ly restrict "The Freedom of 
Speech...or the right of the people 
peaceably to assemble..." 

In addition to free speech, this 
amendment would allow con- 
gress to violate the establishment 
clause of the first amendment 
which reads, "Congress shall 
make no law respecting an estab- 
lishment of religion..." Setting 
the flag up as a 'sacred' object 



has been discussed several times 
by the Supreme Court, mostly in 
cases involving compulsory reac- 




Letters to 
the Editor 



tion of the pledge of allegiance. 
In West Virginia v. Barnette (319 
U.S. 624) Justice Jackson clearly 
expressedthe opinion that "...no 



official, high or petty, can pre- 
scribe what shall be orthodox in 
politics, nationalism, religion, or 
other matters of opinion, or force 
citizens to confess by word or act 
of faith therein." By establishing 
the flag as our nation's sacred 
symbol and protecting it from 
desecration, the government is 
requiring citizens to act with a 
respect toward the flag they may 
not feel. 

The third element of the First 
Amendment compromised by 
this proposed amendment, the 
"free exercise" of religion, has 
also been debated numerous 
times in Supreme Court cases 
dealing with the pledge of alle- 
giance. Some religions, most 
notably Jehovah's Witnesses, 
have won decisions freeing them 
from punishment for practicing 
their beliefs which prevent them 
from praying to a false god, rep- 
resented by the flag .It is not only 
these religions which are violated 
by establishing the flag as a 
sacred symbol of our national 
orthodoxy. In another blatant vio- 
lation of the separation of church 
and state in 1996, The United 
States House of Representatives 



voted to endorse the Ten 
Commandments, the first and 
second of which read as follows 
(Exodus 20:3-5): 

1. Thou shalt have no other gods 
before me. 

2. Thou shalt not make unto thee 
any graven image, or any like- 
ness of anything that is in heaven 
above, or that is in the earth 
beneath, or that is in the water 
under the earth: Thou shalt not 
bow down thyself to them, nor 
serve them... 

This amendment then not only 
violates all three facets of the 
First Amendment; it also violates 
the first and second command- 
ments of a religious doctrine 
endorsed by our own congress. 

So consider this a call to action. 
Don't let Senator Santorum and 
Specter cast their votes without 
hearing your opinion first. And if 
this amendment is submitted to 
the states for approval, don't let 
your state legislators make their 
decision without your input. 

Sincerely, 
Christopher Collins 

Clarion Graduate 1998 



Applications will be available for The Clarion Call Executive Board 

Spring 1999 Semester on October 29, 1998. 

Opening positions include: 
*Editor-In-Chief 
*Managing Editor 
*Sports Editor 
*Copy and Design Editor 
* Clarion Call Secretary (must have clerical skills) 

i 

Applications are due on November 4. Interviews will then be set up by the 
current Editor-in-Chief. If there are any questions, please contact Kristen 
at x2380 or 226-5833. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 22. 1998 



READER RESPONSE 



Editorial continued from Page 2 Hide Park continued from Page 2 



in the reporting or disseminating 
of the news. I hope that if stu- 
dents have concerns about stories 
they have read, they attempt to 
set the wheels in motion to bring 
about change. 

When almost $21 million of the 
budget comes from our pockets, 
we should play an active role in 
what our University is doing. 
The student media is the "checks 
and balances" system for the 
University, if you will. We're 
making sure that what goes on 
around here is all on the up-and- 
up; that responsibility doesn't fall 
on my already-cluttered desk. 
All students have to make their 
voices heard if they want events 
to change. 



I look at myself as a "gatekeep- 
er" in a way. Information comes 
my way, and it then gets passed 
to all students through this publi- 
cation, but the chain shouldn't 
stop there. If you are upset over 
an issue you read in The Call, 
send us a letter and make your 
voice heard. Who knows, the let- 
ter we print or the comment you 
make may be the spark for 
progress. 

Just because the story is sitting 
in front of you in black and white 
doesn't mean that the story is 
over. In fact, the story really 
begins after the paper is printed. 
What do you think about the 
story? What will you do in 
response? 



The UAB would like 
to take this oppor- 
tunity to thank all 
of the students, 
faculty, and staff 
that helped make 
The Blues Traveler 
concert a success. 
We would also like 

to thank The 

Clarion Call, WCUC. 

Dave's Music Mine, 

and C-93. 



We in the student media have a 
great responsibility: to inform. 
Sometimes that news isn't 
always the happiest or the easiest 
to write, but we tell you because 
we are students, too. We also 
have a vested interest in the pre- 
sent and future of Clarion 
University, and we pay our 
tuition just like the rest of the stu- 
dent body. 

The media has a huge responsi- 
bility, but the greater task falls 
upon the shoulders of all who 
read this. You have an obliga- 
tion to come to the "gates" and 
use what you are given to make 
progressive change at Clarion 
University. 

Steve Ostrosky is a Senior 
Communication Major. 



The American public does not 
want to hear anymore concerning 
the affair between President 
Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. 
The American public does not 
want to hear any more about the 
presidency in crisis. The 
American public does not want to 
hear about what they should hear 
because what they should hear 
became a moneymaking tool 
which the media obscenely 
abused. The blatant order from 
the Post Gazette reveals how the 
mass media has more control 
over the American public then it 
ever had and ever should have 
had. Reporting and commenting 
on the news are the sole jobs of a 
newspaper. 

What gives the newspaper the 
right to demand action from the 
people, even if it is the President 
of the United States? A media- 



controlled society can easily 
evolve into a Communist politi- 
cal system. This demand from the 
Post Gazette screams of 
Communism just for the fact that 
it "demanded" action from the 
government. The Communist 
political system unifies the media 
and the government. Unbiased 
media sources are becoming 
harder and harder to find as parti- 
san organizations increase with 
their agenda-setting practices. 
This, in and of itself, does not 
seem too bad; however, it is 
when corruption takes place on a 
regular basis. The American pub- 
lic doesn't know what to believe, 
especially when they allow the 
media to determine their lives. 
Who's afraid of the big, bad 
Media Monster? 

Rachael Foflygen is a Freshman 
Communication major. 



Be sure to check out The Clarion Call 
on-line tor the most recent (ate break- 
ing news as well as reference to past 

events. 
http ://www.clarion.edu/thecaIl 



THANK YOU! 

TO EVERYONE WHO PARTICIPATED 
IN THE SIGMA TAU GAMMA BROTHER 

AUCTION. $614 WAS COLLECTED 
FOR THE ELI GUNTRUM TRANSPLANT 

FUND. 



$19.00 
$ 8.00 
$ 44.00 
$ 40.00 
$ 30.00 
$100.00 
$ 20.00 
$30.00 



Delta Phi Epsilon 
Zeta Tau Alpha 
Women's Rugby 
Zeta Tau Alpha 
Dance Team 
Clarion Call 
Theta Phi Alpha 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 



$15.00 Delta Phi Epsilon 

$15.00 Delta Phi Epsilon 

$50.00 Nicole Wilson 

$50.00 Zeta Tau Alpha 

$34.00 Delta Phi Epsilon 

$31.00 WCUC 

$ 5.00 Kristen Bucuren 
$50.00 



Delta Zeta 
AND ALL OTHER PARTICIPANTS-THANKS! 



FOR ADDITIONAL DONATIONS CONTACT MARK WATTS AT 226-4335 



October 22, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



NEWSWIRE 



New allocations 

Clarion University Student 

Senate allocated over 

$5,000 to two campus 

organizations-one to help 

pay for a speaker, and the 

second for new computer 

equipment. 

See page 6. 



New job for Karp 

Dr. Rashelle Karp, 

currently serving as 

interim Dean of Libraries, 

was recently named 

Associate Vice President 

for Academic Affairs. 

For more information, 

turn to page 9. 



CU observes NCAAW 

Clarion University is 
doing its part to observe 

National Collegiate 

Alcohol Awareness Week. 

For the full story, 

see page 7. 



SPSEA wins award 

Clarion University's 

chapter of PSEA won the 

Quest Award for the fourth 

consecutive award. 

To find out more, 

see page 8. 



Clinton extends Higher 
Education Act 

Earlier this month, 

President Clinton 

approved an extension of 

the Higher Education Act 

that would lower the 

interest rate on student 

loans to their lowest level 

in 17 years. 

See page 8. 



Also inside: 

Public Safety page 7 



NEWS TIPS? 

Phone: 226-2380 
FAX: 226-2557 
E-mail:C ALL@clarion.edu 



NEWS 



One of the first projects in the Master Plan 



Keeling consolidation work underway 



by Mark Strieker 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Renovations are in progress to 
Keeling Health Center. 

The project, which began on 
September 28, is scheduled to be 
finished by December 27. 

The building, which houses the 
health center and the speech and 
hearing clinic will also house the 
entire Communication Sciences 
and Disorders (CSD) department. 

The health center will be closing 
an hour early at 4 p.m. until the 
end of spring semester, at the lat- 
est. 

Randy Rice, director of the 
health center, said the change real- 
ly won't affect the number of stu- 
dents that can be seen because no 
appointments are scheduled after 
3 p.m. 

He said the crews come in to do 
work at 3 p.m. and that there may 
be too much dust in the air after 4 
p.m. "If you had someone with 
asthma, you'll be doing them 
more harm than good," said Rice. 




George Groft/Clarion Call 

Keeling Health Center is undergoing $400,000 in renova- 
tions in order to accommodate the move of the 
Communication Sciences and Disorders department from 
Davis Hall into that facility. 



Rice said the entire renovation 
project should cost around 
$400,000. He also said, "Students 
will see a real difference in the 



new carpet and tile, new cabinetry 
and new window dressings. 
Another change is the integration 
of CNET, which will improve 



quality of service. It won't just data, voice and video communica- 

look different, it will be differ- tion capabilities, 
ent." Operational enhancements 

Some structural differences include the hiring of a certified 

include a redesigned floor plan, registered nurse practitioner, 



which will increase the total 
provider staff from two to three. 
The planned enhancement of 
encounter/billing software should 
also improve timeliness of 
billings. 

Dr. Colleen McAleer, from the 
CSD department, said that the 
move from Davis Hall to Keeling 
will be good. 

Currently the department is split 
between Davis and Keeling. "I 
think there have been some logis- 
tical problems with the separa- 
tion," said McAleer. 

The two halves of the depart- 
ment haven't been located in the 
same building for at least ten 
years, according to McAleer. 
Originally, the clinic was sup- 
posed to be in Davis Hall, but was 
placed in Keeling since the reno- 
vation of Davis took five years. 

McAleer said seven members of 
the CSD faculty will join the three 
members already at Keeling 
sometime in December. 

CSD classes are scheduled in 
Keeling for the Spring semester. 



Clarion University's requirements questioned 



Report takes state schools curricula to task 



by Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

A recently released report from 
a conservative think tank has 
raised questions about the 
strength of courses at 
Pennsylvania colleges. 

The Pennsylvania Association of 
Scholars and The Commonwealth 
Foundation, both based in 
Harrisburg, issued the report enti- 
tled "Are Pennsylvania Students 
Receiving the Fundamentals of a 
.College Education?" 

The report reviewed course cat- 
alogs and searched the State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) and state -related univer- 
sities to see if they were requiring 
subjects that they felt were essen- 
tial to a solid core curriculum. 

Although the study admits to not 
examining course rationales, 
course requirements, which would 
add an important qualitative fac- 



tor to the assessment, the authors 
believe that the report is still a 
"comprehensive assessment" of 
State System and state -related 
schools. 

The report was written by 
Colleen A. Sheehan, Ph.D., a 
member of the Governor's 
Commission on Academic 
Standards. It was co-edited by 
Richard Orodenker, Ph.D., from 
Penn State University; 
Christopher F. Armstrong, Ph.D., 
from Bloomsburg University; and 
Henry A. Olson from the 
Commonwealth Foundation. 

Subjects The Commonwealth 
Foundation considered "essential" 
to the core curricula are: English 
composition, literature, history, 
philosophy, fine arts, foreign lan- 
guage, mathematics, and natural 
science. 

"While there may well be other 
subjects that could be considered 
essential areas of study for college 



students, the eight disciplines list- 
ed here are clearly among the 
prinicipal subjects of a genuine 
liberal arts and science core cur- 
riculum," the report said. 

In addition, the report stated mat 
only three-quarters of SSHE 
schools actually require students 
to take only one-half or even less 
of the "essential" subjects. 

According to the SSHE, they 
consider the report's "essential" 
list of core curricula to be 
"invalid." Also, the System 
believes that disciplines such as 
psychology, economics, anthro- 
pology, political science, sociolo- 
gy, geography, and speech to be 
"essential to a student's educa- 
tion." . 

"Such glaring omissions serve to 
present an unrealistic picture and 
to devalue the true educational 
experience that State System stu- 
dents receive," said the SSHE. 

Kenn Marshall, SSHE press sec- 



retary, said, "The report's findings 
are based entirely on hypothetical 
students. There is no supporting 
data and it is not based on any 
actual student experience." 

He added, "In listing courses a 
student could take in order to 
graduate, it ignores any degree 
requirements that students would 
also have to meet." 

Clarion University's core 
requirements were examined in 
the report. 

It states, "Among the educa- 
tional goals established by 
Clarion University is that 'the stu- 
dent will acquire a broad aware- 
ness of various accounts of human 
heritage by developing an under- 
standing of... literature.. .history, 
and philosophy.' However, 
Clarion does not include litera- 
ture, history or philosophy in its 
subjects students must study." 

continued on page 6 



.. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 22, 1998 



October 22, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



Student Senate 



Interhall, Sequelle benefit from over $5,000 in allocations 



by Courtney Spangler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

At the sixth meeting of the 1998- 
99 Clarion University Student 
Senate Oct. 19, substantial 
amounts of money were given to 
Interhall Council and The 
Sequelle for programs and com- 
puter equipment 

Interhall Council will be spon- 
soring a speaker, Doug Curetin, to 
talk about gay, lesbian and bisex- 
ual issues on Tuesday, November 
10 from 7 to 9 p.m. and 9 to 11 
p.m. 

Interhall was awarded $2,000 
from the supplemental account to 
pay Curetin's speaking fee. 

Wilkinson Hall Resident 
Director Patty O'Toole said that in 
light of the recent killing of a 
homosexual male at the 
University of Wyoming, it is 
important to talk about these 
diversity issues. 

"What message do you choose 
to send to the campus community 
in the approval or disapproval (of 
this speaker)," said O'Toole. 

The Sequelle, Clarion 




Lisa Hamrick/Clarion Call 
Members of Clarion University Student Senate discussed 
many issues at their meeting Monday, including making 
allocations to two campus organizations. 

University's yearbook, was also ed, the oldest being from 1989. 
given money at the Senate meet- To run the new computer pro- 
ing. grams for Herff-Jones (The 

The Sequelle was allocated Sequelle's new publishing com- 
$3,709.94 from the capital pany), the computers needed to be 
account to purchase two new upgraded. Haskins said, "There 
computers, a printer and acces- will be a much longer lifetime 
sories, pending the approval of expectancy on these computers." 
University president Dr. Diane In other news, Senator 

Reinhard. Chervenak reported that 1,150 

Douglas Haskins and Suzanne people attended the Blues 
DeGrazia were present to answer Traveler concert on Oct. 13. Of 
questions. Haskins explained to those people, 950 purchased tick- 
Senate that the present Sequelle ets and 200 worked at the concert, 
computers were extremely outdat- It is possible to have a much 



smaller concert next semester, 
according to Chervenak. 

Senator Mellon, chair of the 
Campus Safety, Health and 
Environmental Concerns 

Committee, reported that this 
week is Alcohol Awareness Week, 
and Boosting Alcohol 
Consciousness Concerning the 
Health of University Students 
(BACCHUS) will be sponsoring a 
tombstone contest throughout the 
week along with a play on Friday, 
Oct. 23 at 7 p.m in the Gemmell 
Multi-purpose room. 

Interhall Council is sponsoring a 
food drive starting next Monday, 
Oct. 28. The proceeds will bene- 
fit the Clarion County Action 
Agency. 

Senator Naqeeb Hussain, who 
also serves as the Clarion 
University student trustee, attend- 
ed the Pennsylvania Association 
of Councils of Trustees (PACT) 
conference held last week at 
California University of 
Pennsylvania. 

He noted that several workshops 
were held and many issues were 
discussed over two days. 



Hussain also reported that a 
Student Trustees Association, 
which would be an arm of PACT. 
According to Hussain, it would 
operate in a fashion similar to the 
Board of Student Government 
Presidents. 

Prior to the allocations being 
approved, Senate treasurer Leslie 
Suhr announced the current 
account balances. 

There was $43,111 in the sup- 
plemental account, $112,610 in 
the large item capital account, 
$88,635 in the capital account, 
and $42,084 in the supplemental 
reserve account. 

It was also announced that 
Governmental Relations Day has 
been tentatively set for Nov. 13. 
Further information on the event 
is expected to be given at future 
Senate meetings. Tentative plans 
call for a breakfast at Moore Hall, 
a discussion about the University 
budget, and a campus tour. 

The next meeting of the Student 
Senate will be Monday, Oct. 26 at 
7:30 p.m. in room 246 of the 
Gemmell Student Complex. 



Continued fhm pag e 5 



Report calls general education requirements at 
Pennsylvania schools into question 



The report lists how many cred- 
its students at CU are required to 
take in the eight "essential" sub- 
jects. 

It states that Clarion requires six 
credits of composition, no credits 
in literature, history, philosophy, 
or fine arts, three credits in math- 
ematics, and nine science credits. 

CU faculty and administration 
have reacted to the findings of this 
report. Provost/Vice President for 
Academic Affairs Dr. John Kuhn, 
said he is "disappointed in the 
report because it doesn't do a gen- 
eral study of the transcripts that a 
student graduates with." 

He added, "I applaud them for 
trying to get people to examine 
the University curriculum when 
it's done with integrity and I hope 
that it will encourage further dis- 
cussion on campus." 

Kuhn said, "The series of 
accreditations we have received 
that review with substance and 
character carry enough to validate 



what we do here at Clarion. 

President Diane Reinhard has 
also made her feelings known 
about the report's findings. 
"Contrary to what the 
Pennsylvania Association of 
Scholars and the Commonwealth 
Foundation suggest in their report. 
Clarion University has a general 
education program mat is continu- 
ally subjected to assessment and 
refinement to ensure its quality 
and relevance," she said. 

She noted that additional assur- 
ances that the University's general 
education curriculum meets quali- 
ty standards are: 

— Courses approved for the 
University's General Education 
curriculum undergo extensive and 
thorough review involving the 
academic department, General 
Education Council, Committee on 
Courses and Programs of Study, 
Faculty Senate, and the adminis- 
tration. 

— The University's regional 



Middle States accreditation 
process involves a comprehensive 
self-study of programs and ser- 
vices, including general educa- 
tion. 

— All Clarion University profes- 
sional programs for which spe- 
cialied accreditations exist have 
earned that distinction. In helping 
to ensure cohesiveness between 
standards established by accredit- 
ing agencies and the University's 
professional curricula, the special- 
ized accreditation process assess- 
es the degree to which the general 
education component of that cur- 
ricula is academically strong. 

— The findings of a recent State 
System alumni satisfaction survey 
further affirm the quality of edu- 
cation at Clarion University, with 
83 percent of Clarion respondents 
indicating that their preparation 
for a career bad been excellent or 
good while 94 percent felt that 
their college education had 
improved the quality of their lives. 



The report's findings are as fol- 
lows: 

-- All universities require at least 
one course in English composition 
or writing, but many do not pro- 
vide sufficient numbers of sec- 
tions to enable these courses to be 
taken freshman year. 
-Essential subjects of Humanities 
are the most neglected by univer- 
sities' core requirements. 

- Only three state universities and 
two state-related universities 
require students to take founda- 
tional courses in at least three of 
the essential subjects of the 
Humanities. Clarion University 
was not one of the three state 
schools mentioned. 

~ 78 percent of state-funded uni- 
versities do not requLe students to 
achieve at least an intermediate 
proficiency in a foreign language. 

- Only four of the state-funded 
institutions require the study of 
American and/or Western civiliza- 
tion. Clarion University is not one 



of those four schools. 
- In a majority of cases, students 
at state-funded universities are not 
guaranteed a broad-based intro- 
duction to core suN ;cts, but are 
permitted to fulfill core require- 
ments. 

-- Courses are narrowly focused 
and trendy, doubting such core 
requirements provide a genuine 
core of learning at all. 

The State System of Higher 
Education has made clear their 
reaction to the findings of the 
Commonwealth Foundation 
report. 

"The approximately 350,000 
working Pennsylvania residents 
who are alumni of one of the 14 
universities of the State System of 
Higher Education are testimony to 
the quality of the education 
received at. the state owned uni- 
versities," said Marshall. 




CU observes Alcohol Awareness Week 



Theft at Library 

Public Safety is investigating a 
theft that occurred at Carlson 
Library on Oct. 14 at about 1 
p.m. 

Dance disrupted 

Officers are investigating a 
report of a disorderly person 
on Oct. 11 at the dance in 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

Items stolen from delivery 
vehicle 

Someone took a pizza storage 
box with two pizzas inside 
from a Domino's Pizza vehicle 
parked outside of Wilkinson 
Hall on Oct. 13 at about 12:30 
a.m. The value of the items 
taken is $124. 

Criminal mischief 

Someone cut a hole in the 
chain-link fence that surrounds 
Memorial Stadium on Oct. 10. 

Theft at Tippin Gym 

Public Safety is investigating 
the theft of outdoor gear from 
the outdoor equipment rental 
room in Tippin Gym. The 
theft occurred sometime during 
the first week of October. 

Scarecrow stolen 

Someone stole a display scare- 
crow from the Campbell Hall 
lobby on Oct. 7 at approxi- 
mately 8:15 p.m. The investi- 
gation is continuing into this 
incident. 



The Public Safety 
Blotter is a brief 
synopsis of the 

criminal 

investigations 

conducted by Public 

Safety for the dates 

between October 7 

and October 14, 1998. 

The blotter is 

compiled by 

Public Safety and 

The Clarion Call. 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 



Clarion University will do its 
part for National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week 
(NCAAVV) from Oct. 19-25. 

One of the primary objectives of 
the week is to increase conscious- 
ness of alcohol abuse on college 
campuses and stress the need for 
effective prevention programs. 

Some of the other objectives are: 
focusing attention on different 
facets of the issue by scheduling 
special lectures or seminars, dis- 
tributing literature, and other 
activities; highlighting existing 
campus and community programs 
geared toward prevention and 
intervention; and promoting 
responsible decision making and 
healthy lifestyles. 

According to Dr. John 
Postelwait, director of Clarion 
University's Alcohol and Drug 
Awareness Education/Training, 
"This year, NCAAW is stressing 
the positive things that students 
do. Not all students are binge 
drinkers and not all of them abuse 
alcohol." 

Ryan Lewis, president of the CU 
chapter of Boosting Alcohol 
Consciousness Concerning the 
Health of University Students 
(BACCHUS), the main sponsor of 
the week's activities, has voiced 
his opinion on the week. 

"BACCHUS feels very fortu- 
nate to put together programs that 
are beneficial to the whole univer- 
sity. We hope the information 
provides education and safety for 
the students. NCAAW is very 
beneficial to our organization, but 
we are active the entire year to 
provide important information 
about alcohol and its effects," he 
said. 

"Alcohol abuse is greater among 
the younger students, freshmen 
and sophomores," said Brian 
Hayes, BACCHUS treasurer and 



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president of Sigma Chi fraternity. 

"Maturity and an increasing 
course load limit consumption. 
Education about alcohol before 
the student reaches college is the 
best thing that a college student 
could have. They need to know 
the long term effects of alcohol on 
an individual's life," Hayes 
added. 

Earlier this week, "Search for 
Awareness" tombstones were set 
up across from the main entrance 
to Chandler Dining Hall. The 
crosses represent the 50 
Pennsylvania^ killed each year 
as a result of alcohol abuse. 

On Oct. 20, DWEyes demon- 
strations were held in Gemmell 
Multi-purpose Room. DWEyes 
enables a person to wear a special 
set of goggles that disorient a per- 
son in a fashion similar to having 
too much to drink. 

DWEyes concentrates on drink- 
ing and driving by use of the gog- 
gles and video tape programs to 
demonstrate that it is not safe to 
walk, let alone drive, when too 
much alcohol has been consumed. 
The DWEyes demonstration 
was sponsored by BACCHUS and 
the Interfratemity Council. 

Another event of the week 
occurs on Friday, Oct. 23, where a 
one-act play "Instant Love" will 
be performed at 7 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-purpose room. 
Sponsored by BACCHUS, the 
play concerns alcohol abuse and 
date rape. The performance will 
be followed by a "mocktail" (non- 
alcoholic beverage) party. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

These crosses were placed in front of Chandler Dining 
Hall this week to represent the 50 Pennsylvanians killed 
every year as a result of alcohol abuse. The crosses are 
part of CU's observance of National Collegiate Alcohol 
Awareness Week (NCAAW). 



Also involved in NCAAW are 
the residence halls. A variety of 
educational programs were sched- 
uled throughout the week. 

Campbell Hall held a mock dri- 
ving under the influence funeral, 
where individuals posted informa- 
tion about the aftermath of alco- 
hol abuse. 

Wilkinson and Nair Halls sched- 
uled "mocktail" nights. Nair also 
has bulletin boards and an alcohol 
wall. 

Postelwait said that the informa- 
tion flow actually started several 
weeks ago with all residence hall 
students receiving a list of alcohol 
laws prior to the Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

Clarion University employees 
got a letter about NCAAW asking 
diem to keep alcohol information 
going to the students throughout 
the year. Alcohol awareness e- 



mail messages were sent to 
employees every day. 

A survey released earlier this 
month by the Harvard School of 
Public Health reported that 19 
percent of the student surveyed 
hadn't touched a drink in a year, 
up from 15.6 percent in a study 
conducted in 1993. 

However, alcohol abuse contin- 
ues to be a problem on campuses. 
The same survey, which ques- 
tioned over 14,000 students from 
130 colleges across the country 
showed more than half of the 
nation's college students drank to 
get drunk last year and the number 
of binge drinkers was virtually 
unchanged from four years ago. 

Clarion University is one of 
almost 3,000 colleges in the U.S., 
Canada, and Mexico scheduling 
activities for NCAAW. 



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Page ft 



The Clarion Call 



October 22, 1998 



Clinton extends 
Higher Education Act 



by Christine Tatum 
College Press Exchange 

President Clinton approved an 
extension of the Higher Education 
Act Oct. 7 that would lower the 
interest rate on student loans to 
their lowest levels in 17 years and 
would raise the maximum Pell 
Grant. 

Clinton's approval of the com- 
promise legislation, cobbled 
together by a joint committee 
from both chambers, gave him a 
chance to talk about the positive 
results of cooperation in 
Congress, tacitly comparing the 
act to the partisan bickering over 
impeachment 

"We put the progress of the 
country and the people of the 
country ahead of our partisan dif- 
ferences and reached a principled 
resolution of the matters of dis- 
pute," Clinton said. 

"That's the way America is sup- 
posed to work, and that's the way 
the American people want us to 
work." 

The bill: 

— Raises the maximum Pell 



Grant to $4,500 for the 1999-2000 two years of undergraduate study 
school year, followed by a $300 if he or she teaches at a school 
increase for each of the next three with a high percentage of low- 
years and a $400 increase in income pupils. 
2003-2004. The maximum grant — Denies financial aid to students 
for the 1998-1999 school year is with state or federal drug convic- 
$3,000. tions and require those students to 

— Increases the amount of money undergo repeated drug tests 
can earn and still qualify for a Pell before the aid is reinstated. 
Grant to $5,000, and increase to — Denies Pell Grants and federal 
$2,200 the amount dependent, loans to colleges and universities 
working students can exclude where student loan default rates 
from assessments of their family's are 25 percent or higher for three 
need. consecutive years. 

— Lowers the student loan inter- — Establishes a program that 
est rate to 7.46 percent until would double the maximum Pell 
January 1999 for a limited group Grant award for low-income stu- 
of borrowers looking to consoli- dents who graduate in the top 10 
date, those who graduated before percent of their high school class- 
October 1st. Current students, on es. 

the other hand, may borrow, but — Requires colleges and univer- 

not consolidate previous loans at sities to disclose more detailed 



the low rate. For example, a 
senior could borrow at the low 
interest rate to fund his or her 
final year in school but could not 
use the rate to consolidate loans 
used to pay for the first three 
years. 

— Forgives student loan debt 
accrued during a student's last 



crime statistics. 

"I'm sure that some are sur- 
prised that this Congress, in this 
environment, would be able to 
come together to produce such an 
important piece of legislation," 
said Representative Howard 
McKeon, a California Republican 
who helped draft the legislation. 



Clarion's SPSEA chapter wins Quest Award 



by Susan Ferchalk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



nized for helping the schools and Fair, held annually at the Clarion 

the community, are parts of the Mall. 

achievement recognition require- "Our goals this year are to 

ment. increase membership and get 

For the leadership development involved in more community ser- 

portion, the chapter must include vice activities," said co-vice pres- 

an American Education Week idem Erin O'Hara. 

project and a membership drive. Officers for the 1998-1999 aca- 

Finally, the chapter must fulfill a demic year are Gina Hohl, presi- 



For the fourth consecutive year, 
the Quest Award was presented to 
the Clarion University chapter of 
the Student Pennsylvania State 
Education Association (SPSEA). 

The award honors the most out- 
standing SPSEA chapter in the professional growth and develop- dent; Grace Bare and Jeff Joseph, 
Commonwealth. Winning the ment requirement by including an co-vice presidents; Jodi Toy, sec- 
award this past spring allowed the EDGE program utilization, learn- retary; Christy Catania, treasurer; 
chapter to compete at the National ing center competition entries, and Tony Fisher, regional liaison. 
Education Association (NEA) and a locally developed project, 
assembly. Some of the activities that the 

The award is based on four goal SPSEA's 292 members conducted 

areas. To fulfill the community last year included bringing prof es- 

service requirement, the chapter sional speakers on campus to 

must create a campus project and address members, conducting 

a class project. A local achieve- campus tours and participating in 

ment award and a PEPPer cam- community service projects with 

paign, where someone is recog- Junior Olympics and the Health 



Karp named 
Associate VP for 
Academic Affairs 



by Susan Ferchalk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Dr. Rashelle Karp, a 15-year 
member of the Clarion University 
faculty, has been named Associate 
Vice President for Academic 
Affairs. 

Karp, who once served as a 
library science professor at 
Clarion, is also currently the 
interim Dean of Libraries on cam- 
pus. 

Karp was appointed to her new 
position after an internal search 
was conducted to replace Dr. 
Helen Lepke, who retired last 

December. curriculum, helping the academic 

Karp earned her B.A. in English departmenls with ^ program 

and M.S. in Library Science from reyiews ^ ^.^ students 

the University of Illinois. with ^ problems 

She attended the University of j^ said she is aWe t0 lmSk 

Rhode Island Graduate Library ^ ^^ with ^ hdp of 

School, the University of Associate Dean of Libraries Deon 

Connecticut and Southern Knickerbocker. 




University Relations 

Dr. Rashelle Karp was 
recently appointed Vice 
President for Academic 
Affairs here at CU. 



Connecticut State College. She 

received her Ph.D. from Florida 

State University. 

Karp has worked in several dif- 
ferent environments including a 

children's library in Connecticut, 

the State Library for the Blind in 

Rhode Island and the Northwest 

Florida Water Management 

District. 

She joined Clarion University in 

1983 as a professor and taught for 



While Karp is handling person- 
nel issues and the upcoming 

library renovations, 

Knickerbocker handles the day to 

day workings of the library. 

Karp will hold both positions 
for the next two years until a new 
Interim Dean of Libraries is 
found. A search will be per- 
formed to fill this role next school 
year. 
Karp said she finds her new job 



13 years before becoming interim enjoyab , e ^ interesting ^cause 
Dean of Libraries, a position that 
she has held for the past two 
years. 



As associate Vice President for 
Academic Affairs, Karp performs 
such tasks as working with the 



she never knows what will be 
coming up next. 

"This position should be a chal- 
lenge," Karp said. "I think I can 
make a contribution." 



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October 22, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



LIFEWIRE 



Dave Barry 

goes to the 
heartland to see 
how ordinary peo- 
ple are reacting to 
the Clinton scandal, 
see page 10.- 



Music Review 

Sheryl Crow 
delivers something 

to "crow" about 
with her new album 
entitled "The Globe 

Sessions", to see 

how it measures up, 

see page 10. 



Concert Review 

Sunny Day Real 

Estate and Better 

Than Ezra rock 

Cleveland and 

Pittsburgh 

respectively, for the 

reviews 

see page 11. 



Calendar of Events 

For what's 

happening on and 

around 

campus and the 

community, 

see page 12. 




LIFESTYLES 



Theatre review 

'Servant of Two Masters' 
opens CUP's Theatre season 



by Kelly Palma 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



"Servant of Two Masters" 
opened the Clarion 
University's Theatre pro- 
gram with a bang, in more 
way than one. "The sole 
purpose of this play was to 
provide entertainment and it 
reaches this goal through 




photo courtesy of University 
Relations 

Holli Hamilton and Jarrod 
Fry starrred as Smeraldino 
and Truffaldino in the com- 
edy "Servant of Two 
Masters". 

demanding, physical come- 
dy," said director Marilouse 
Michel. "Servant" was 
filled with slapstick come- 
dy. Even the stagehands 
hammed it up every chance 
they got. They even encour- 
aged the audience to clap for 
them every time they moved 
the set. There were tug- of- 
war fights over the bread 
and the trunks, sword fight- 
ing, and numerous others. 
In almost every instance, 
someone ended up on the 
ground. 

Sexual references and 
innuendoes abound in this 
play. Everytime Silvio 
(played by Trevor 

Soulworth) pulls out his 
sword the audience could 
not help but burst into 
laughter. There are glances, 
butt slapings, and almost 



groping on the stage. 
Michel went on to say, 
"This is different from any- 
thing we have done in quite 
a while." Gauging from the 
reactions I saw and the 
comments I heard, the audi- 
ence certainly enjoyed the 
performance. 

The only bad comment I 
overheard was that the first 
act was a little long. 
However, scene five cer- 
tainly made up for it. 
During the scene, 

Truffaldino (played by 
Jarrod Fry) ate the entire 
time. He is supposed to be 
serving dinner to both of his 
masters, and ends up eating 
half of it himself. At one 
point, pudding is even 
flung toward the audience. 
I am told President 
Reinhard sat in the front 
row on opening night, and 
remained pudding-free. 

The entire cast was simply 
superb. The most laughs 
however, went to Jarrod 
Fry, the meddling servant 
Truffaldino. "He certainly 
has come a long way in four 
years, and has matured a lot 
in his acting," stated 
theatergoer Chuck Morris. 

Others in the cast 
included: Kristie Belles as 
the foot-stomping, temper- 
tantrum-throwing Clarice. 
Trevor Southworth was the 
seductive Silvio, with Laura 
Reichert as the love lost 
Beatrice Rasponi mas- 
querading as her brother. 
Robert Zinsmeister por- 
trayed Florindo, Beatrice's 
long lost love. Chris Taylor 
performed as Pantalone, the 
elderly sexually frustrated 
guardian. Eric Grugel was 
Dr. Lombardi, the Latin 
spouting official. Holli 
Hamilton was a crowd 
favorite as Smeraldino, the 
sassy female servant who 
becomes Truffaldino's 

counterpart. Jonathon Toth 



gave his take on Brighella, 
the innkeeper. Mamie 
Welliver and Miranda 
Scopel gave life to the fight- 
ing waiters, along with 
Micheal Fox and Jeff 
Chaffee as the porters. 

When entering the 
Marwick-BoydLittle 
Theatre you are immediately 
taken back in time. 
The set, done by Ed Powers 
had an extended proscenium 
with a sun/moon symbol at 
the arch and footlights at the 
bottom. Everything in the 
play could have been 
described as cartoonish. 
But then again that is 
Commedia dell' arte in a nut- 
shell. Everything from the 
wonderfully colored cos- 
tumes, to the make up, and 
even the props were larger 
than life. 

All of these things, plus an 
immensely talented cast 



make up "The Servant of 
Two Masters". 

The play was written by 
Carlos Goldoni in 1743, and 
is one of the few Commedia 
dell'arte plays that was 
written down. 

On the technical side of 
things were the following 
individuals. The production 
was directed by Marilouse 
Michel. Set and lighting 
design was done by Ed 
Powers, with Myra 
Bullington doing the cos- 
tume design. Scott Weston 
was the stage manager, 
assisted by Natalie Smith, 
with props designed and 
built by Joe Gourley, along 
with many other people 
backstage as well as the 
production staff. 

It is certainly one play 
that won't be erased from 

my memory too soon. 




photo courtsey of Advising and Career Services 

Dr. Andrea Miller and Patrick Kovalsky from the 
Department of Library Science, one of the twenty-six 
Academic Departments which participated in the 
Majors Fair Monday, October 19. The Majors Fair is 
one of the six sessions of the Major Decisions 
career development series sponsored by the 
Academic Advising Services and Career Services. 



Page 1Q 



The aarion Call 



Orfnhpr2219Q8 



Swept Away in the Heartland 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

On the weekend that 
Kenneth Starr released his 
Official Big Book 0' Smut, I 
went to America's Heartland 
to see how ordinary citizens 
were handling the ongoing 
traumatic national crisis 
involving President Clinton. 
(Motto: "I Am Really Sorry, 
Although Legally I Did 
Nothing Wrong.") 

As you know if you read this 
column regularly, America's 
Heartland is located in Areola, 
111., which — to orient you — 
is immediately south of its 
arch-rival city, Tuscola. To get 
to Areola, you take jet air- 
planes as far as they will go, 
then you switch to a "com- 
muter" airline, which gets its 
name, from the fact that "com- 
mute?' sounds better than 
"terrified passenger." You can 
tell when you're dealing with 
a commuter airline because 
your flight number is longer, 
in linear feet, than the 
wingspan of your airplane. 
Also there's only one counter 
person, who is also a baggage 
handler, mechanic, and pilot, 
and who is making announce- 
ments like: 

"If you're waiting for Flight 
36548257 from Moss Haven, 

Music Review 




be advised that this flight has 
been delayed by sheep. For 
passengers on Flight 
5380235324576 to 

Sludgemont, that flight will be 
boarding just as soon as we 
can find the, whaddycallit, the 
thing that goes on the motor. 
If you are a passenger on 
Flight 35309086453456795 
for Weeberville, we have a 
weight limitation due to a 
wing hole and we are asking 
that you remove any excess 
jewelry, car keys, breath 
mints..." 

The cockpit crew on my 
flight consisted of two teen- 
age boys. OK, that's an exag- 
geration: One of them was 11. 
I'm pretty sure that, once they 
closed the little curtain 
between the cabin and the 
cockpit, they played "rock, 



paper, scissors" to see who 
would get to be the pilot. After 
a 40-minute flight that lasted, 
in Commuter Airline 
Passenger Time, 163 hours, 
we landed at Willard Airport, 
which services Champaign, 
111. (Motto: "Gateway To A 
Whole Lot Of Flatness.") 
From there I rented a car and 
drove past a number of scenic 
tractor distributorships to 
Areola, where the annual 
Broom Corn Festival was in 
full swing. 

The Broom Corn Festival 
celebrates the era when Areola 
was a leading supplier of a 
type of corn used to make 
brooms, and thus was a major 
player in the high-stakes, fast- 
paced world of international 
broom manufacturing. Those 
hectic days are over, and 
today Areola has diversified 
into other economic areas, 
such as being the home of the 
World's Largest Rocking 
Chair. But the Broom Corn 
Festival is still the highlight 
of the year in Areola, drawing 
people from as far as Paris. (I 
refer to Paris, 111., which is 32 
miles away.) 

During the festival, the 
streets of downtown Areola 
are lined with booths, many 
offering wares that reflect the 
essence of American 
Heartland consumer needs: 



things on a stick. You can buy 
brooms on a stick, every 
imaginable kind of lawn orna- 
ment on a stick, and several 
major food groups on a stick, 
including lollipops, ice cream, 
corn dogs and —I am not mak- 
ing this up — pork chops on a 
stick. 

Don't laugh: There is big 
money in food on sticks. A 
friend of mine, Jeff Arch, 
claims that he lives near the 
guy who invented the corn 
dog, and Jeff reports: "He has 
MILLIONS. I think the Eagles 
played over there at a birthday 
party.") 

So anyway, as a profession- 
al journalist, I spent several 
minutes gauging the reaction 
of the Broom Corn Festival 
crowd to the ongoing traumat- 
ic national crisis. Although I 
did not hear anybody actually 
mention the Starr report, it 
was clear to me that many 
Heartland residents — I esti- 
mate 63 percent — were feel- 
ing concerned, based on the 
reflective manner in which 
they chewed their pork chops. 

The only direct reference to 
the national crisis that I saw 
occurred at the annual busi- 
ness meeting of the World 
Famous Lawn Rangers preci- 
sion lawn mower drill team, of 
which I am a proud member. 
The Lawn Rangers are an elite 



corps of men who, after a rig- 
orous training regimen that 
sometimes lasts for several 
kegs, march in the Broom 
Corn Festival parade, carrying 
brooms and pushing highly 
modified lawn mowers. A!ong 
the parade route we astonish 
the crowd by performing intri- 
cate maneuvers such as: (1) 
holding our brooms in the air; 
(2) tossing our brooms to each 
other; and (3) picking our 
brooms up off the ground. 
Naturally, we do this for a 
good cause, namely: To 
improve the morals of our 
nation's youth Parents along 
the parade route can say to 
their children, "You better be 
moral, or you'll wind up like 
these men." 

Anyway, at the Lawn Ranger 
business meeting, which is 
held in Ranger Ted Shields' 
driveway, several Rangers 
gave a thought-provoking pre- 
sentation on the current trau- 
matic national crisis, in which 
one of the Rangers put on a 
blue dress and, using a stan- 
dard bratwurst 

Well, I'm not going to tell 
you what he did. As far as I'm 
concerned, there is no room 
for that kind of disgusting, 
immature, low-rent, pathetic, 
repulsive, sleazy behavior in 
this great nation. Outside of 
the White House, I mean. 



Sheryl Crow's new album garners four stars 



by Keith Gwillim 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor 

Clarion Call 

Sheryl Crow's newest CD, The 
Globe Sessions has just been 
released. Since she obviously did- 
n't put any effort into the album's 
title (Globe refers to the name of 
the studio it was recorded in), you 
hope that her creative savvy went 
into the record's content. You 



wouldn't be hoping in vain. The 
Globe Sessions is Crow's strongest 
album yet by far. Deep, soulful, 
and heartfelt, Crow has hit her 
stride with this, her third disc. 

While it isn't loaded down with 
obvious singles like her two previ- 
ous efforts, it is strong throughout 
with hardly any filler, unlike her 
two preceding albums, which were 
plagued^ with unengaging songs. 
The lead-off single, "My Favorite 
Mistake" isn't quite the perfect, 



radio-ready sing-along chorus 
material Crow novices are used to, 
but still manages to become infec- 
tious. By far the most "fun" song 
on the disc is 'There Goes The 
Neighborhood", an insanly catchy 
cut that sounds like a lost Don 
Henley single (coincidendy, Crow 
used to be a backup singer for 
Henley). "Neighborhood's repeat- 
ed horn refrain is irresistable, and 
gives the album a nice anchor the 
first listen around. 



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"Riverwide" is arguably her best 
ballad yet, cutting out the emotion- 
al excesses that made earlier tracks 
in that vein ("Strong Enough") a 
litde bit too contrived. It is beauti- 
ful, simplistic and flowing, one of 
her best songs to date, period. 
Those first three tracks aren't the 
end of the good material, either. 
The album is a wealth of good 
music; most of which is remark- 
ably subdued and worlds more 
mature than Tuesday Night Music 
Club or the sophomore self tided 
album. 

It does slighUy slump towards the 
end, but never for more than one 
song. Considering the disc is only 
11 songs long, it can't afford to 
make many mistakes and still 
come off as sounding good. The 
Globe Sessions is a welcome return 
to form after her over-produced 
title song to the recent James Bond 
film, Tomorrow Never Dies. That 



song wasn't all that bad, but the 
smaller scale of the traditional 
band works as a much better frame 
for Crow's voice than the full 
orchestra. Even her habit of not 
quite hitting certain notes, which 
got very ingrating after a while on 
past efforts, is endlessly endearing 
on Globe. 

Perhaps the only sub-par song on 
the album is "The Diffucult Kind". 
It is overly long, and is milked for 
everything it's worth, which isn't 
much. Her cover of Bob Dylan's 
"Mississippi" isn't exactly 
Grammy material either, but it can 
be forgiven. When all is said and 
done, Globe resonates quite well, 
and leaves a nice aftertaste. While 
people expecting an album filled 
with "All I. Wanna Do'"s will be 
dissapointed, everyone else will be 
pleased. On my five-star rating 
system, The Globe Sessions gets a 
four. 



October 22. 1998 



mm 




The Clarion Call 



Tage 11. 



RT REVIEWS 



jaws 



' Sunny Day Real Estate* 
stakes a claim in Cleveland 



by Keith Gwillim 

Clarion Call Assistant 

Lifestyles Editor 

^ «■■■*■** 

Cleveland, OH 

The Odeon 
October 1. 1998 

It's a rare occurrence when 
a concert can take you to a 
whole new level, but on 
October 1st at the Odeon in 
Cleveland, the emo-core rock 
group Sunny Day Real Estate 
did just that. The show wasn't 
about fancy light displays, 
intricately crafted stage back- 
drops, or a giant lemon (U2 
anyone?). Rather it was about 
the raw emotional, instrumen- 
tal and lyrical power of this 
modern-day progressive rock 
band. 

Without the aid of a massive 
sound system, Sunny Day 
Real Estate captivated the 
packed, smoke-filled room. 
Singer Jeremy Enigk held all 
in sway that night, using his 
thin, impossibly high-pitched 
voice to grab hold of your 
heart with firm, cold fingers. 

Surprising the entire crowd 
by not entertaining the rumors 
that only material from their 
new album, How It Feels To 
Be Something On would be 
played that night, Sunny Day 
opened with the fan favorite 
"In Circles". They performed 
it with such a fierce intensity 
that was almost frightening, 
but also totally enthralling. 
That wasn't the height of the 
evening, either. In fact, it 
would be near impossible to 
pinpoint the exact defining 




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moment of the concert, there 
were so many. It was truly 
remarkable how the band and 
the audience seemed to be on 
the exact same wavelength. 

Of course, Sunny Day could 
have come out and played 
their worst songs to the least 
of their ability and the crowd 
would have still loved it, so 
horrendous were the two 
opening bands, MK Ultra and 
Ida. It's definitely a puzzler 
how these two bands ended up 
on the same bill as Sunny Day 
Real Estate. 

But not to dwell on the bad 
points, Sunny Day more than 
made up for the previous 
bands' lack of musical know- 
how. They really seemed to 
be enjoying themselves; 
drummer William Goldsmith 
even laughed as one fan cried 
out "Foo Fighters suck!" 

For those of you who feel 
left out of that joke, 
Goldsmith had previously left 
SDRE for the Foo Fighters. 
Not a single note was missed 
by the quartet, and the songs 
contained even more power 
live than on disc. It was unbe- 
lievable how well they played 
the new songs in their set. 
You'd think they had been 
playing them for years, they 
sounded so good. Several 
songs were turned on their 
heads, giving them a different 



spin, and the audience a pleas- 
ant surprise. 

Enigk's voice never once 
faltered during the set; he 
actually appeared to feed off 
the crowd's energy, gathering 
in intensity and volume as the 
concert went on. His muse 
was definitely smiling over 
his shoulder that night. 
Perhaps the apex of the con- 
cert, vocally, was the slow- 
climbing beginning of "The 
Prophet". Enigk began by 
uttering only a slight whisper- 
ing sigh, which over the 
course of the next few minutes 
rose into an Olympian shout. 
It's truly amazing how long 
Enigk can hold a note. 

It was also the finest ending 
for a concert I have ever per- 
sonally witnessed. Closing 
out with a moving rendition of 
the haunting "Days Were 
Golden", the band members 
left the stage one by one, until 
only drummer Goldsmith was 
left, gently tapping out the 
soothing rhythm, until he, too 
left the stage. 

Sunny Day Real Estate 
proved that they appreciate 
their fans, also. All the band 
members stayed and signed 
autographs and received 
praise for the concert (and just 
about everything else, too) 
afterwards. Enigk defies the 
rock-star stereotype, as he 
was remarkably soft-spoken 
and easy to talk to. Guitarist 
Daniel Hoerner could only 
look on in awe as one fan 
showed him his tattoos of 
Sunny Day symbols. 
"Wow..." was all he could 
muster up. That quote pretty 
much sums up my reaction to 
the night as a whole, simplis- 
tic as it seems. I can't imag- 
ine a better way to have 
closed out the evening. 



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'Better than Ezra' 
better than average 



by Jeff Say 

Clarion Call 

Lifestyles Editor 



Pittsburgh, Pa 

The Graffiti 

October 4, 1998 



It's not often a band can transform 
itself from an alternative rock radio 
staple with seemingly no personali- 
ty to a plain old fun rock n' roll 
band. Better than Ezra has been a 
favorite of radio stations for a few 
years and though when many 
(including myself) have called 
them one hit wonders, they still 
continue putting out consistently 
successful albums. On tour in sup- 
port of their new album, "How 
does you garden Grow," Better 
than Ezra rolled into Pittsburgh 
ready to knock the socks off the 
crowd. 

Before Better than Ezra hit the 
stage, the two opening bands 
already had the crowd jumping. 
Anthenaeum, a band mat's quickly 
becoming noticed, opened the night 
with their brand of radio friendly 
alternative rock. After drawing the 
crowd in with their two biggest 
hits, Flat Tire and What I know, 
they pulled them in even further 
with the rest of their self-titled 
debut Maybe not the most talent- 
ed band out in the scene today, 
Anthenauem made up for it with 
their enthusiasm and their connec- 
tion with the crowd. 

Next up,Possum Dixon, a mix of 
60's rock with an alteranuve feel 
was nothing to get excited over. I 
was too busy watching the lead 
singer try to pull off feeble magic 
tricks, to even bother to listen to the 
music. 

When Better Than Ezra hit the 



stage, the near empty dance floor 
quickly became engulfed with a sea 
of bodies. This is a band that can 
appeal to anyone, from the 
bra-tossing groupies, to the star 
crossed teenagers to the lone drunk 
man jumping from one spot to the 
next. After coming out and treating 
the crowd to some of their well 
known hits like "Good" and "King 
of New Orleans," they broke into 
some of their new album. One of 
the best songs "One More Murder" 
is just as amazing live, although it 
is only a normal rock song laid over 
a bare-boned synthesizer riff, 
"Murder" comes off sounding 
remarkably accomplished. 

One of the few low spots in the 
show came courtesy of their new 
song, "I Like It Like That", which 
was tailor made for the toilet This 
song is by far the worst of the 
album and shows none of Better 
Than Ezra's writing talents. 

The best part of the show, was by 
far the enthusiasm and level of 
intensity they brought with them. 
Instead of playing their hits and not 
even interacting with the crowd, 
they instead thrived on the energy 
that was given to them and gave it ' 
back two-fold. They broke up their 
songs with non-traditional covers 
of LI Cool J's "Doin' It" and 
Princes' "Sexy M***** F*****". 
The crowd got into the act too, 
when lead singer Kevin Griffith 
taped audience members' voices 
and inserted them into the songs. 

Better Than Ezra also proved 
that they haven't let stardom go to 
their heads, as they mingled with 
the audience for almost an hour 
after the concert. Not just signing 
autographs but interacting with 
their fans and taking interest in 
them. 



OFFICIAL VOICE OF THE 
GOLDEN EAGLES 

Hear the Golden Eagles Live on C-93 




CLARION VS. INDIANA 1:30 p.m. 
The Malen Luke Show at 12:45 p.m. 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 22, 1998 



Calendar of Events 



Today 

•Jazz Bands fall tour 
Friday 

•Admissions Day (Hart Chapel) 9 am 

• UAB Spirit Day 

•Koinonia Fall Retreat begins (leaves Campbell Hall) 5 pm 

•Volleyball at Juniata Tournament 

Saturday 

•UNITED NATIONS DAY 

•Football at Indiana 1:30 pm 

•Volleyball at Juniata 

Tournament 

•Cross Country at 

Gettysburg 

•UAB Bus to IUP 

football game (outside 

Gemmell) 11:30 am 

•Faculty Recital: 

Milutin Lazich, voice 

(Aud) 8 pm 

•MSS Fashion Show 

(Hart Chapel) 7:30 pm 

Sunday 

•Daylight Savings Time ends (turn clocks back one hour) 2 am 

•Koinonia Fall Retreat ends 

Monday 



ri# 



f/ 



^Sk 



•Faculty Senate Meeting (B-8 Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 

•AIDS Awareness Day Candlelight March (Hart Chapel) 

6:30 pm 

•Safer Sex conference (Gemmell MP) 7 pm 

•Student Senate Meeting (246 Gemmell) 7:30 pm 

Tuesday 

•Athletic department "Timeout Luncheon," Holiday Inn, 

noon 

•Guest poet, Diane Kendig, work- |jp|| 

shop for teachers, (Hart Chapel) 4 1 

pm, reading in 250-252 Gemmell 

8 pm 

• Volleyball at Lock Haven 7 pm 

•UAB presents Dr. Jack Levin 

"Overkill: Serial Murder 

Exposed" (Gemmell MP) 8 pm 

•Intramural Bike Race Roster due 

•Intramural Table Tennis Roster 

•Intramural Floor Hockey due 

Wednesday 

•Small Business Development center seminar, "Design Your 

Own Publications With Ease," Computer Lab, Still Hall 

•Leadership Development Series, 250-252 Gemmell 7pm 

•UAB presents comedian Bobby Tassel, (Gemmell MP) 

8 pm 

•Intramural Tube H20 Basketball Roster Due Nov. 3 

•Intramural Free Throw Roster due Nov. 3 



Dr. Jack Levin, 
Overkill: Serial Murder 
Exposed 



CHANDLER HALL MENU 10/18-10/24/98 





HOMESTYLE 
LUNCH* 

DINNER 




BUFFET 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 

TACO SALAD 
CHICKEN NUGGETS 






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PITA POCKETS 

MASHED POTATOES 






PIEROGIES 

HOT SAUSAGE 

MASHED 

POTATOES 

TURKEY 

THURSDAY 

GRILLED CHICKEN 

BROCCOLI & RICE 

CASSEROLE 



WEDNESDAY 

MACARONI & 

CHEESE 
FRIED RICE 



^ 






FRIDAY 

MEATBALL 
HOAGIE 



SATURDAY 

BLUEBERRY 

PANCAKES 

ORANGE GLAZED 

PORK 

SPAGHETTI 

FRENCH FRIES 



NACHO 
CHIPS 



BUFFET 







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TACO SALAD 

BAKED FISH 

BAKED POTATO 

VEGETARIAN STEW 

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THURSDAY 

BEEF TIPS 

W/PEPPERS 

BUTTERED 

NOODLES 



MONDAY 



SWISS STEAK 



TUESDAY 

BAKED LIVER 

BRAISED CABBAGE 

STUFFED MEATLOAF 



WEDNESDAY 

SWEET-N-SOUR PORK 

VEAL PARMESAN 

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ASSORTED PIES, CAKES, BROWNIES, COOKIES, CRISP SERVED DAILY ON A ROTATING 

BASIS 



2^ ^J* 







October 22, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



CALL ON YOU 



J 




by 
George Groff 



Photography 
Editor 



What do you think of the 

construction of the new 
recreation 






Fj 


: ■■■"....' 


v *^ 1 




Mb 

m 


■ WBKs 


fie i 





Michelle Dunham, Senior, El. Ed/ Early Child. 
"Is it being constructed for the students or the 
gained revenue that the university will profit?" 



Kenneth Rossman, Junior, English 
"When the residence halls crumble due to disre- 
pair, will we be able to live in it?" 



Will Skinner, Sophomore,, English 

"How much money is this costing me? It will be 

nice to see When I come back from ALF Weekend 

in the year 2025." 






Kimberly Culp, Junior, Early Childhood/El. Ed. 
*1 think we need more parking, not a recreation 

center." 



Suzanne Shaffer, Sophomore, Graphic Design 

"I think it is a really bad place for construction 

because it takes Up the center of campus, and the 

noise is very distracting." 



Ryan Winkleblech, Senior, Secondary Ed J Math 
'It's great, but I still don't have a place to park." 



/ . *• #,.<•.' 



.< ifi j* 









Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



October 22, 1998 



ENTERTAINMENT 



i need help 



by VIC LEE 




Why executioners don't make 
good photographers. 




Garth Vader 



Reebok goes into the underwear business. 




The funeral of Lars Thatchel, inventor 
of the Hokey Pokey. 



George Washington visits 
the Washington Monument. 




Qrtpfrer 22, 1999 



The Cfcfion CflU 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Page 15 



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Happy 21st Stacey! Love, the 

sisters of AOE 

**************** 

Happy 21st Emily! Love your 

A$E sisters 

**************** 

Happy Birthday Cara, Holly, 

and Jen. Love, A4>E 

**************** 

Thanks to Carla and Kelly for 
all of your hard work on the lip 
sync. We just wanted to have 
fun, and we did! Love, your 

AOE sisters 

**************** 

Phi Delts, Thanks for the great 

mixer. Love, A4>E 

**************** 

Congrats to all of the sororities 
and DC for a great job with 

Derby Daze. Love, AOE 

**************** 

Annette and Lora, Thanks for 
the great chartering banquet. 

Love your A«DE 

**************** 

Congrats AOE for kicking a** 

in the football game. 

**************** 

We love our EX Derby Daze 
coaches, you guys are #1. 

Love, AOE 

**************** 

Happy belated birthday to 
Christine and Leanne who are 
finally the big 2 to the 1. 
Welcome to the big girls club! 

Love your Sigma sisters 

**************** 

Congrats to Theta Xi on 2nd 



place on the float! Love Tri 

Sigma 

**************** 

Happy belated birthday, Maria. 

Love the Sigmas 

**************** 

Mary Wilson we all miss see- 
ing you. Love Tri Sigma 

**************** 

Erica, you're only one month 
away! We love you and wish 

you luck. Love Tri Sigmas 

**************** 

Deran, We love you and the 
dog, no ham intended with the 
Grinck jokes! Angie is cute 

and hyper. Love £££ 

**************** 

Good luck to all the sororities 
participating in Derby Days. 

Love, £11 

**************** 

III Fall'98, Four more weeks; 
your 're 1/2 way there. Keep 
smiling you'll soon be sisters. 

Sigma Love, your future sisters 

**************** 

Tarn mi, Congrats on 
Parliamentarian for the Board 
of Student Government 

Presidents. Love Tri Sigma 

**************** 

Dan, How could anyone think 
you were something other than 
a ZII boy? You're the best! 

Love ya, Dezort 

**************** 

in Dan and Jeremy and KAP 
Corey, I had tons of fun danc- 
ing the night away with you at 
the Blues Traveler concert! 
You all were great dates! Love, 

Dezort 

**************** 



Jen, You are a remarkable per- 
son and I hope I can be as good 

of a sweetheart as you. Dani Jo 

**************** 

Thank you 4>ZI for the mixer 
we two weeks ago. <DA8 

always enjoyed the pong. 

**************** 

To the ladies of A<t>E, we had a 
great time at the mixer last 
Thursday. <DA6 can't wait to 

mix again next semester. 

**************** 

<DA@ would like to thank the 
brothers of KAP for our foot- 
ball game. We will call you for 

a rematch. 

**************** 

Congratulations Jen on your 

lavaleir 0X 

**************** 

0OA, thanks for a great float 

and a great mixer. 6X 

**************** 

4>II, thanks for the mixer 

we'll do it again 82 

**************** 

To the brothers of Sigma Chi, 
Thanks you for selecting me as 
your sweetheart. You guys are 

th best! Dani Jo 

**************** 

To the brothers of 05, 
Congratulations on 2nd place 
for your float! It looked 
great. ..the lollipop was a great 
idea, who came up with it? 

Love Always, Leanne 

**************** 

Carrie, Happy 21st birthday! 

Love the sisters of AIT 

**************** 

Congratulations on getting IX 
sweetheart, Dani Jo, we're 



proud of you! Love the sister bers. Keep up the good work. 



of ATT 

**************** 

Congratulations Melissa on 
being lavaliered to 8H. We 
love you! Love the sisters fo 

ATT. 

**************** 

To the sisters of ZTA, Thanks 
for the great mixer, we'll race 
with you anytime. The Men's 

Rugby Team 

**************** 

Good luck to Dave Marsh on 
your upcoming race. We are all 
here to suport you. Take a first 
place bro. Much luck, your 

Sigma Pi brothers 

**************** 

Thanks Beth, for the great 
cookies. We loved them. 
Hope your semester is going 
well, if ya need anything let us 

know. Love, Sigma Pi 

**************** 

Congratulations, to Joe and 
Becky, Good luck and hopeful- 
ly many happy married years 
together. Good luck again, 

your Sigma Pi brothers 

**************** 

To the sisters of <J>II, The 
three week "float mixer" was 
great and the real mixer was 
even better! The stakes will be 

higher next time, Love, OIK 

**************** 

The brothers of HT would like 
to thank Jen and Christine for 
their help during the brother 

auction. 

**************** 

Congratulations to the new Phi 
Sigma Kappa associate mem- 



<&IK 

**************** 

Congratulations brother Nick. 
Chervenak on being the 1998 
Homecoming King and little 
brother Ben Chervenak on 
being on the Homecoming 

court. OIK 

**************** 

Theta Chi, Thanks for a great 
mixer, we'll "bond" with you 

anytime! Love, 4>LI 

**************** 

To the rough and tough Taus 
and assocate members who 
played football on Sunday. 
You made me proud. Love 

your Tau Tiger 

**************** 

Thanks for the great mixer 

Rugby Team! Love, the Zetas 

**************** 

Adrienne, It's a countdown til 
Saturday! Happy Birthday! 
We love you! Love, your AZ 

sisters 

**************** 

Happy belated 21st birthday 
Jami! It's bar hopping time! 
We love you ! Love, your soon 
to be AZ sisters 



PERSONALS 



Tim loves large women from 

Bucknell named Jodi! 

**************** 

Good luck to the Clarion 7 on 

7 football team going to the 

Ohio State Tournament this 

weekend. Coach Deiner 
**************** 

Becky, Tyler, anil Tony, I real- 
ly need a good night out! -L 




I 



I 
1 



Sunday to Thursday, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

Annual Alumni Phonathon 

Now until December 

Applications available at the CU Alumni 
Relations Office, 2nd floor, Haskell House 

Must be outgoing, with a pleasant 
telephone voice and enrolled as a student. 

Deadline is 
October 27, 1 998 



1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 



i n i : .y. : ■■:■:■: .y:^., : :v: : .v. : :-: : ivy;|/'^ 



UanDyke 

Mahoning 




Ballet 



If 



DjLacula 




tn:< 



Friday, October 30 & Halloween 7:00pm 

Punxsutawney Area Middle School 

GeneralAdiiiis9on-$d00 Reserved -$&00 

Forticketecall: 814-938-SG4 










* »**.-*-»**.»* - 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



October 22. 1998 



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226-0201 



O, rnher 22. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Pa ge 17 



SPORTSWIRE 



The football team will look 
to bounce back from its 38-3 
loss to Shippensburg this 
Saturday at IUP. However, the 
Eagles will face a stiff chal- 
lenge from the Indians, who 
are in the thick of the Division 
II playoff chase and still have 
a chance at the PSAC-West 
title. The Indians, led by Paul 
Failla, a former Notre Dame 
quarterback, also have 
revenge on their minds, as the 
Eagles have won the last two 
games between the teams. 

See Page 18 

The cross country team 
countinues to run hard through 
the fall. The team was split at 
Duquesne and Pitt-Bradford 
over the weekend. 

See Page 18 

As the 1998 baseball season 
draws to a close, fans every- 
where are being reborn into 
the sport. With records being 
set and history being written, 
the 1998 baseball season will 
go down in history as one of 
the greatest of all time. 

See Page 20 

Three winners have been 
named this year in Pigskin 
Pick 'Em contest. For a 
chance at this week's prize, 
enter the contest. 

See Page 20 



QUOTABLES 



"It was a bitter- 
sweet moment, as 
neither team could 
really celebrate vic- 
tory." 



—PS AC tennis tournament 
representative Andy Findlay, 
on the first-place tie between 

Millersville and Bloomsburg 



SPORTS 



Raiders rout Eagles, 38-3 



By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Editor 

Call it disappointing. Call it dis- 
heartening. Call it devastating. 

Wide receiver Jamie Ware 
shredded Clarion's defense for 
236 yards on eight catches, as 
Shippensburg scored 21 first- 
quarter points en route to a 38-3 
victory over the Golden Eagles 
Saturday at Memorial Stadium. 

The loss virtually eliminates 
Clarion (3-4 overall, 1-2 PSAC- 
West) from playoff contention in 
the Northeast Region. 
Meanwhile, Shippensburg (5-2, 2- 
0) improved its playoff hopes and 
will face nationally ranked 
Slippery Rock this Saturday in a 
battle for first place in the PS AC 
Western Division. 

The Red Raiders had a 14-0 
lead before much of the crowd at 
Memorial Stadium was settled in. 
On the game's second play, quar- 
terback Chris Gicking hit Ware 
for a 73-yard touchdown pass to 
give Shippensburg a 7-0 lead in 
the first minute of action. 

Then, less than three minutes 
later, Gicking and Ware combined 
for a 61 -yard pass and catch that 
gave, the Red Raiders a 14-0 
advantage. 

"Their strong start left its mark 




The Golden Eagles will look to 

on us," said Clarion head coach 
Malen Luke. "It was downhill 
after the second play of the 
game." 

Still in the first quarter, 
Shippensburg added its third 
touchdown when linebacker Joe 
Wasyluk recovered a blocked 
punt in the end zone, giving the 
visitors a commanding 21-0 lead. 
The early deficit left the Clarion 



George Groff/Clarion Call 

get back on track this Saturday at IUP. 

offense one-dimensional. Golden continued 



Eagle running backs Jamie 
Sickeri, Keonte Campbell, and 
Demetric Gardner only managed 
to carry the ball a combined 11 
times for 18 yards. 

Wide receiver Alvin Slaughter 
caught six passes for 85 yards. 



to be effective. 
Freshman Gicking rnd sopho- 
more Keith Kullman both entered 
Saturday's game among the top 
five in the PS AC in passing effi- 
ciency, and they showed why 
against Clarion. 
The duo combined to go 14 of 



Shippensburg 's offense once 24 for 320 yards and two touch 
again did not miss a beat as their downs, both by Gicking in the 
alternating quarterback system continued on page 18 



Melnick leads Clarion netters to strong PSAC finish 

PSAC 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



Bethany Melnick claimed sec- 
ond place in singles competition 
to lead the Clarion University ten- 
nis team to a fifth-place finish at 
the PSAC Championships held at 
the Pennbriar Athletic Club in 
Erie Saturday and Sunday. 
, After receiving a bye in the first 
round, Melnick breezed past 
Martha Hall of California 6-0, 6-0 
to earn a place in the semifinals. 
The freshman then came up big 
with a 4-6, 6-2, 6-3 win over 
Millersville's Kristin Maneval, 
the defending champion and 1997 
PSAC Athlete of the Year. 

Melnick then fell to top-seeded 
Daniel Faretta of Bloomsburg 6-3, 
6-0 in the finals. 



Nonetheless, Melnick was the 
only player not wearing a 
Bloomsburg or Millersville uni- 
form to reach the finals. 

Bloomsburg and Millersville 
finished in a deadlock for first 
place in team competition with 31 
points apiece. Shippensburg fin- 





ished a distant third at 14, while 
Slippery Rock was fourth at 11. 
Close behind was Clarion with 10 
points. 

Rounding out the 11 -team field 
was IUP (9), Edinboro (6), 
Kutztown (5), West Chester (4), 
California (1), and East 



Stroudsburg (0). 

Melnick wasn't the only Eagle 
to make noise. Rachael Link won 
her opening-round match 6-0, 6-0 
over Lori Senkewitz of Edinboro 
before falling to Headier Miller of 
Millersville in tough, 6-1, 7-5 
loss. 

Amy Shaffer reached the semi- 
finals with a bye and a win over 
Kitt Camplese of West Chester 
before being ousted by Katie 
Kochera of Bloomsburg. 

Kylee Johnson reached the sec- 
ond round with a narrow 6-3, 3-6, 
6-4 triumph over an East 
Stroudsburg opponent. 

Melnick and Shaffer teamed up 
in doubles action to reach the 
semifinals. The duo advanced via 

continued on page 19 



»**»*** 



Page IS 



The Clarion Tall 



Eagle runners split for weekend 
meets at Duquesne, Pitt-Bradford 



By Megan Pavuk 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Running Eagles were spotted at 
the Duquesne and Pitt-Bradford 
cross-country invitationals this 
past Saturday. 

At Duquesne's invitational, held 
at Schenely Park, Clarion raced 
against such teams as Penn State, 
Pitt, Mount Union, and Carnegie 
Mellon. The men placed eighth, 
while the women were fifth. 

Captain Jon Fox (28:00) was the 
top finisher for the Eagles, plac- 
ing 34th overall. Ean King 
crossed the line next, placing 
35th. King was followed by 



Mark Trzyna, Colin McGlone, 
Brad Walker, Jason Bochert, and 
John Sherry. 

Eighth place overall for the 
women was taken by co-captain 
Roxanne Wilson (19:19). 
"Rocky" has consistently been 
the team's No. 1 runner. Next 
was co-captain Maureen Long, 
finishing 16th. Kelly Null, Daria 
Diaz, Kristie Runk, Wendy 
Kengor, and Laurie Young all fol- 
lowed closely. 

Pitt-Bradford's invitational was 
hosted at Allegheny National 
Park. There, the women placed 
fourth, while the men were fifth. 



Andrea Borek led the way for 
the women, finishing 12th over- 
all. Linda Bryce, Megan Pavuk, 
Cheryl Sorice, and Seana Simon 
comprised the remainder of the 
team. 

The men were led by 16th-place 
finisher Matt Lapatka. Shane 
Cummings finished close behind. 

The Eagles conclude their regu- 
lar season this Saturday at 
Gettysburg. The PSACs will be 
held in two weeks at Clarion's 
Mayfield Golf Course. Regionals 
are scheduled the following week 
at Slippery Rock University. 



Purler named assistant wrestling coach 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Tony Purler, an outstanding col- 
lege wrestler and currently ranked 
No. 1 in the USA as a member of 
the USA Freestyle team at 127.5 
pounds, was recently named 
assistant wrestling coach at 
Clarion University. 

Purler replaces Rob Eiter, a 
1996 USA Olympian, who 
resigned over the summer to 
return to his native Chicago. 
Clarion competes at the NCAA 
Division I level in wrestling. 

"We're very happy to have Tony 
here at Clarion," said Clarion 
head wrestling coach Ken Nellis. 
"He is extremely well-liked, a 
great person, and wrestler. Tony 
brings outstanding collegiate and 



freestyle experience to the pro- 
gram that will help everyone in 
our program. We know he is 
going to do an outstanding job 
here at Clarion." 

"I really like Clarion," said 
Purler. "I love the small-town 
atmosphere, the people are friend- 
ly, and I love to hunt This also 
fits my ambitions. I wanted to 
start up my coaching career, plus 
have a place that would allow me 
to train. I'm looking forward to 
coaching here at Clarion." 

Currently a member of the USA 
National Freestyle team, Purler 
competes at 127.5 pounds. The 
1998 US Open National 
Champion, he placed third at the 
Goodwill Games, third at the 
World Cup, and was 1-2 at the 



1998 World Championships in 
Iran the first week of September. 
The Olympic Games are his main 
goal, which will be held in 
Sydney, Australia, in 2000. 

He was second at the US Open 
in 1997 at 127.5, fifth at 125.5 in 
1995 and seventh in 1994 at 
136.5. In 1993 he was US Open 
runner-up at 125.5 in Greco- 
Roman. 

A native of Wentzville, Mo., 
Purler attended Wentzville High 
School and graduated in 1988. 
He was a two-time Missouri state 
champion, capturing states at 105 
his junior year with a 33-0 record, 
then at 1 19 pounds his senior year 
with a 35-0 mark. 

He attended Oklahoma State 



continued on page 20 



Eagles fall to 3-4 with loss to Shippensburg 



continued from page 17 



first quarter. It was Kullman that 
led the Raiders to their fourth 
touchdown of the first half, a two- 
yard run by junior Jeremy 
Brubaker. 

Clarion's lone score of the after- 
noon came off of the right foot of 
kicker Frank VanWert, who 
nailed a 37-yard field goal late in 
the first half to make it 28-3. 

Shippensburg 's Nathan 
Robinson capped the scoring late 
in the fourth quarter with a 17- 
yard touchdown run that made the 
final score 38-3. 

The win was the Red Raiders' 
second in as many years at 
Memorial Stadium. Last year on 
Autumn Leaf Festival weekend in 
Clarion, Shippensburg pounded 
the Golden Eagles 37-14. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Clarion fell to Ship for the second straight year. 

For Clarion, senior quarterback Cappa was 5 of 9 for 36 yards. 

Chris Weibel completed 1 8 of 38 The Golden Eagles travel to IUP 

passes for 224 yards and one on Saturday, where they won 21- 

interception, while backup Jeff 6 last season. 



October 22. 19Q8 



Week Eight Scouting Report 




vs. 



Hpi? 



Where: George P. Miller Stadium, Indiana 
When: Saturday, 1:30 p.m. 
Radio: C 93 (92.7) 



After a tough 38-3 loss against Shippensburg Saturday, the Golden 
Eagles look to rebound this Saturday at nationally ranked IUP. Kickoff at 
George P. Miller Stadium is set for 1 :30 p.m. 

"The series between the schools has been very spirited over the years. 
Although IUP holds an overall edge of 44-21-3 dating back to 1927, 
Clarion has won the last two meetings and is 3-3 in the last six. In 1 997 
Clarion defeated the Indians 21-6 at IUP, while in 1996, a year Clarion 
advanced to the NCAA semis, the Eagles gained a 49-15 victory. IUP 
dropped the Eagles 14-9 in 1995, 44-17 in 1994, and 44-7 in 1993 
Clarion won the 1992 game on the field 35-26. 

Clarion enters Saturday's tilt with a 3-4 overall record (1-2 PSAC- 
West), while the Indians, who started the season with a 5-0 record and 
reached No. 2 in the NCAA poll before failing to Slippery Rock on a last- 
second Hail Mary pass, enters the contest at 6-1 (1-1 PSAC-West). 

"IUP has a very solid, well-rounded team," said Clarion head coach 
Malen Luke. They are physical on offense and like to run the football. 
(Quarterback Paul) Failla is a very athletic quarterback who can deliver 
the deep pass and run out of the packet, which gives them big-play 
potential with the run and the pass. 

"I think the big improvement is on defense. Their defense is playing 
extremely well and is tough to move the football on. We're expecting a 
very hard-hitting game on both sides of the ball." 

lUP's offense is averaging 28 points and 360.4 yards per game. The 
Indians are getting 200.6 rushing yards and 159.9 passing yards per 
game. 

Failla, a former quarterback at Notre Dame who spent 3-1/2 years in 
minor league baseball with the Anaheim Angels), has completed 82 of 
161 for 1,095 yards and eight touchdowns with six interceptions. 

The running game is paced by tailbacks Tink Stennett and Terrance 
Wilson. Stennett started the year on defense, but was switched to the 
offense and has been the leading rusher. In only four games at running 
back, Stennett has 520 yards and four touchdowns on 87 carries. 
Wilson, meanwhile, has 474 and three touchdowns on 103 tries. 

The wide receivers are talented with Lewis Hicks (27 catches, 4112 
yards, three touchdowns) and Jason Tirado (13 catches, 136 yard's two 
touchdowns) leading the way. 

Also, the IUP offensive line weighs in from tackle to tackle at an aver- 
age Of 6-4, 300 pounds. 

The IUP defense is No. 1 in the PSAC in total defense, yielding only 
264.9 yards per game and No. 1 in rushing defense at 60.7 rushing.yards 
per game. Opponents are getting 204.1 passing yards per game and 
15.9 points per contest. 

Freshman nose guard Tim Buffone anchors the down linemen, getting 
24 hits, 1.5 sacks, and four tackles for losses. 

Outside linebackers Quincy Tisdale and Roger Wilson guard the 
perimeters, while inside linebackers Mike Borisenko and Phillip Woods 
clog the middle. 

The secondary has corners Barry Threats and Gradvell Taylor, with 
strong safety James Tindell and free safety Adam Boylan. 



Golden Eagle Hotline 



226-2079 






October 22, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



California outlasts Clarion spikers 

Eagles prepare for Juniata tournament 



The Clarion University volley- 
ball team dropped a tough, five- 
game contest to California in 
PSAC-West volleyball action 
Tuesday night at Tippin Gym. 

The Vulcans claimed the win by 
an 18-16, 15-17, 15-8,6-15, 15-13 
count. 

With the setback, the Golden 
Eagles fell to 10-14 overall on the 
season and 3-4 in PSAC-West 
play. 

Against California, Jessa 
Canfield and Jaime Mars each 
recorded 18 kills. 

Tracy Barnett also chipped in for 
the Golden Eagles, picking up 10 
kills. 

Christy Boes paced the Golden 
Eagles in the dig department with 
20, while Amanda Baer and Ali 
Graham had 14 each. 

Soboleski led the Golden Eagles 
with 65 assists. 

Clarion now gets set to compete 
in the Juniata Tournament Friday 
and Saturday. 

Juniata is an annual power in the 
NCAA Division in ranks. 




CUP 
fifth at 
PSACs 

continued from page 17 



George Groff/Clarion Call 



The Golden Eagles will travel to Juniata this weekend. 



a bye and an 8-6 win over 
Shippensburg in a pro set. 
Millersville put an end to the 
Eagle advance in the semis, win- 
ning 8-3. 

Link and Johnson went 1-1 in 
the tournament, topping 
California 8-1 and losing to 
Millersville 8-0. 

The team competition provided 
the closest finish in 20 years, as 
Millersville's No. 3 doubles 
team recorded an 84 win over 
Bloomsburg to tie the team scor- 
ing. 

"When the championship came 
down to third doubles the atmos- 
phere was electric," said Andy 
Findlay, Edinboro University 
head coach and tournament rep- 
resentative. "Both teams were 
courtside as Millersville took the 
8-4 victory to earn the tie. It was 
a bittersweet moment as neither 
team could really celebrate vic- 
tory." 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Intramural, Recreation & Fitness Director - DOUG KNEPP (Office 1 17 Tippin Gym 226-2349) 



NEWS IN - BRIEF 

IN-LINE HOCKEY 

Season has begun! New 
teams may still be added. 

INDOOR SOCCER 

Indoor soccer will begin 
Tuesday 1 0/27. New 
teams may still enter! 

3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 

Intramural tournament 
starts Monday 10/26. 

"LEADERSHIP" 
3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 

NOVEMBER 21 & 22! 

AQUA AEROBICS 
Sunday's 6:00 pm 

WOM.POWER HOUR 

Tuesday & Thursday 7pm 



CLOSEST TO THE PIN 
CONTESTI 

Thursday 10/22 5:30 pm. 
Held at the stadium. 

1 ON 1 CHAMPIONSHIP 

Congratulations goes to 
Shawn Haddox winner 
of the recent 1 on 1 
basketball tournament! 



VOLLEYBALL 
TOURNAMENT 



MIXED UP 



CO-REC DIVISION 



CATS & DOGGS 



10/28 9:00 



10/26 1000 
BONZAI 



11/2 900 



SET TO KILL 



WOMEN'S DIVISION 



10/28 9D0 

SMILE 



VERTICALLY 
CHALLENGED 



11/4 900 



10/26 9 00 
21 - HATS 



CHALLENGERS 



KAMAKAZIS 



11/2 10 00 



10/26 900 
OK3GETTES 



10/28 10:00 
SCHERMINATORS 



n « too 



MEN'S DIVISION 



SLACKERS 



STAIROtVERS 



10/28 1000 

CROWS 



to/a iooo 
6 PACK ATTACK 



"CLARION- 
OUTDOORS" 

QUEHANNA TRAIL 

You may still be able to 
register for the 

backpacking trip this 
week-end. We will be 
departing on Friday 10/23 
and returning on Sunday 
10/25. For more info on 
this exciting adventure 
trip call X-2349. Cost is 
only $15.00 per student 
for your food, all other 
costs for the trip including 
transportation are 

included! 



TEAMS PLEASE NOTE *•"•"•• 

THE TIMES ANO DAYS OF THE TOURNAMENT CANNOT BE CHANGED DUE TO OTHER 
ACTIVTTES THAT ARE ALREADY IN PROGRESS!" THE WOOO ST WARRIORS ANO THE 
CRAZY GIRLS HAVE DROPPED FROM THE RUNNINGS UNLESS SCHOOL RELATED 
EVENTS (VOLLEYBALL OR BASKETBALL) TAKES UP THE GYM, THE TIMES WILL STAY 

AS IS. 

THANK YOU 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



Svortsview 

Baseball returns 



By Chris Pfeil 
Associate Sports Editor 



When the players' union went 
on strike four years ago, it seemed 
as though baseball had forever 
lost the stature of being the 
national pastime. 

The cancellation of the 1994 
World Series seemed to signify 
the death of one of America's 
long-standing institutions. 

After months of negotiation, the 
dispute was settled in time for the 
1995 season. However, games 
were played in front of sparse 
crowds, as Americans made their 
point that they were bitter over 
the tarnished image of their 
beloved game. 

The players and owners vowed 
that baseball would return to 
glory once again. Gradually, 
over the last few seasons, baseball 
has made good on that promise. 

After last year's World Series, 
baseball began creeping back into 
the hearts of Americans. The 
Florida Marlins' dramatic Game 
Seven victory over the Cleveland 
Indians laid the foundation for 
baseball's attempt to restore itself 
as the nation's pastime. 

Then, it happened. The 1998 
season placed baseball back on 
the pedestal of being America's 
grand old game. This season was 

Purler named 
assistant coach 



continued from p age 18 

University and competed for the 
Cowboys in 1990 and 91. As a 
freshman in 1990 he was an 
NCAA Division I qualifier at 118 
pounds, then placed third at 
NCAAs in 1991 at 126 pounds. 

Sitting out his junior year, he 
competed at the University of 
Nebraska in 1993 and won the 
NCAA title at 126 pounds. Also 
a Big 8 champion that year, he 
had a senior record of 37-2. 

Purler returned to Oklahoma 
State and graduated from OSU in 
1994 with a degree in marketing. 
He was an assistant coach at OSU 
in 1994 and 95. The 1994 
Cowboys won the NCAA team 
title under head coach John 
Smith. 

A volunteer coach at Missouri 
in 1995-96, he moved on to coach 
the Olympic Freestyle team at 
Oklahoma from 1996-98, before 
coming to Clarion. 



full of magic, in which Americans 
were reminded of why the game 
has been held so dear for genera- 
tions in this country. 

The 1998 season is what base- 
ball is supposed to be like. 
Families gathered in their living 
rooms all over the country to 
watch Mark McGwire and 
Sammy Sosa chase, then break, 
the home run record. I will never 
forget getting goose bumps every 
time they walked into the batter's 
box. 

The two sluggers handled 
themselves with class and made 
every American feel like they 
were a part of history. 

Nor will I forget watching Cal 
Ripken's press conference after 
he took himself out of the lineup 
to end his consecutive games 
played record. Ripken's streak is 
perhaps the most amazing feat in 
the history of sports. 

Many other players etched their 
names into the record books in 
1998 as well. Barry Bonds 
became the first player ever to hit 
400 home runs and have 400 
stolen bases. Kerry Wood set the 
major league record for strikeouts 
by a rookie. The Cubs 
flamethrower sat down 20 batters 
and gave up only one hit against a 
powerful Houston Astros team. 
Then, there was David Wells' 



to glory 

perfect game on May 17. It was 
just another incredible moment in 
the New York Yankees' legendary 
season. The Yankees won 114 
games as they methodically 
marched to a world champi- 
onship. Baseball fans had the 
chance to witness one of the 
greatest teams in baseball history. 
The 1998 season provided 
Americans with countless memo- 
ries that will be talked about for 
generations. What a story it will 
be. 

I grew up listening to my father 
tell me stories about the baseball 
memories of his youth. I was 
raised on the game. This season 
provided me the opportunity to 
share many fond memories with 
my father and younger brother. 
This season introduced the same 
magic that my family has known 
to a whole new generation of 
Americans. 

That is what the 1998 season 
was all about Baseball fans, 
young and old, were able to share 
the magical season together. 

In an era of sports that has been 
scarred by talk of salary caps, 
franchise relocation, and player 
holdouts, baseball showed 
America what is right about 
sports. This is the way that it is 
supposed to be. 
Who said baseball was dead? 



GOLDEN EAGLE CALENDAR 


Cross 
Country 


Friday 


at 

Gettysburg 


— f 


"***" 


TW 


SM. 


Ootf 




Season Complete 




Football 




at 
IUP 
1:30 










Tennis 




Season Complete 




VoHsyball 


at 

Juniata 

Tournament 






at 

LHU 
1:30 







Think you're pregnant? 

Worried? 

We can help. 




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226-7007 

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October 22, 1998 




Sponsored by: 

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Book Center 

Away Team 



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Oklahoma State 



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Oklahoma 

Missouri 



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^H 1 *""- • Kentucky 

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Alabama Georgia Tech 

iii-Tl~r«i-Ki Tennessee 

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'**'*'* • „,„ 

Patriots 



Bengals.. 

Bills 

Jaguars.. 



.Central Michigan 

Chiefs 

Dolphins 



TIEBREAKER: Clarion at IUP Total Points 

Call Staff Picks 



....Raiders 
.Panthers 
..Broncos 



Nathan Koble 


Chris Pfeil 


Jason Dambach 


Jeff Say 


West Virginia 


West Virginia 


West Virginia 


West Virginia 


Wisconsin 


Wisconsin 


Wisconsin 


Wisconsin 


Notre Dame 


Notre Dame 


Notre Dame 


Notre Dame 


Virginia 


Virginia 


Virginia 


Virginia 


Oklahoma State 


Oklahoma State 


Oklahoma State 


Oklahoma 


Nebraska 


Nebraska 


Nebraska 


Nebraska 


Georgia 


Georgia 


Georgia 


Georgia 
Florida State 


Florida State 


Florida State 


Florida State 


Tennessee 


Tennessee 


Tennessee 


Tennessee 


C.Michigan 
Chiefs 


C. Michigan 
Stealers 


C.Michigan 

Steelers 


C. Michigan 
Steelers 


Patriots 


Dolphins 


Dolphins 


Dolphins 


Bengals 


Bengals 


Bengals 


Raiders 


Bills 


Panthers 


Panthers 


Bits 


Broncos 


Broncos 


Broncos 


Jaguars 



Season 30-15 



29-16 



27-11 



Prize. Clarion Mug 



Pigskin Pick 'Em is open to all readers of the Clarion Call. Entries must be e-mailed by Saturday at 
noon to: s_crpfeilOdarion.edu. Entries can be made via mall to: Clarion Cal Sports 270 Gemmell 
Complex Clarion, Pa. 16214. Entries must be postmarked by Saturday at noon. The entrant with the 
most correct selections is the winner. In the event of a tie, the entrant closest without going over to the 
total points scored in this week's Oarion/IUP game will be declared the winner. If a tie still exists, a coin 
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OCTOBER 29, 1998 



INSIDE 



Opinion Page 2 

Reader Responses... Page 3 

News Page 5 

Lifestyles Page 10 

Call On You Pagel6 

Entertainment Page \7 

Classifieds Page 18 

Sports Page 20 



News 



Clarion does its 

part for AIDS 

Awareness Week. 

See page 7. 




Dr. Jack Levin, serial 

killer specialist, 

spoke at Clarion on 

Tuesday. See page 

10 for details. 




■■ •■■■■----'± - ■ 



The Golden Eagles 
were on the receiv- 
ing end of a 52-14 

loss at IUP on 

Saturday. See page 

20. 



CLARION UNIVERSITY 



riTaS a sE?i Iwi eW-itft k 



VOL 



Clarion's CNET project nears completion 



by Steve Ostrosky 
Clarion Call News Editor 

After over three years and $3 
million, Clarion University's 
CNet project is almost complet- 
ed. 

Work began last semester when 
fiber-optic cable was run through 
steamlines to all campus build- 
ings. Electronics packages were 
also purchased so that the net- 
work can operate in each build- 
ing. 

"We are in the process of 
installing faceplates in all acade- 
mic buildings, " said Karen 
DeMauro, director of Computing 
Services. "We are finished with 
Still and then we are on to 
Keeling as our last academic 
building." 

After all of the academic build- 
ings, computer labs in the resi- 
dence halls and administration 
buildings are next to be connect- 
ed to the network. 

"Our aim was to get students 
the services first," DeMauro said. 
Once the faceplates were 
installed, audits were done on 
computer systems in every office 
and classroom to determine if the 
computers were able to connect 
to CNet. 




George Groff/Clarion Call 
Becker computer lab will serve as one of the main hubs of CNet. 



One of the major aims of the 
project was wiring all seven res- 
idence halls, DeMauro said. 
That project has not yet hap- 
pened, but she said that her office 
is currently working on forming 
a public-private partnership to 
try and get the residence halls 
wired without costing the stu- 
dents additional money in tech- 
nology fees. 

"We want to to work with ven- 
dors to supply telecommunica- 



tion services and we want to see 
it generate revenue to pay for the 
wiring of the residence halls," 
she noted. "We want them (the 
vendors) to put the money up 
front so that we can get the 
wiring installed and they can 
accept the revenues late." 

"President Reinhard is very 
interested in getting the rooms 
wired," she added. "She wants 
the residence halls wired this 
summer." 



Even though there has been a 
delay in that aspect of the pro- 
ject, DeMauro said, "If the stu- 
dents don't have to pay extra 
fees, then it is worth the delay." 

Clarion University's Master 
Plan calls for construction of 
new facilities, and CNet has 
already been included in those 
plans. "CNet will be included in 
plans for everything, just like 
telephone service," DeMauro 
said. 

For smaller classrooms, one 
faceplate was installed in the 
front of the room. On each face- 
plate, there are two plugs to 
accommodate two modems for 
computers and one plug for the 
telephone line. Larger class- 
rooms have one faceplate in the 
front and one in the back of the 
room. 

"There is a CNet connection in 
each conference room and con- 
nections are in every office on 
campus. ..the capabilities are 
there," she said. 

DeMauro also touched upon 
some of the benefits of the new 
network system. "There will be 
a quicker response when you 
click on an icon, all terminals 
that are connected can use the 
Continued on page 6 



Shontz gives Clarion remaining crest 



by Mike Chapaloney 
Clarion Call Managing Edior 

The remaining Clarion 
University crest has arrived at the 
University archives. Dr. Charles 
J. Shontz, a retired University 
administrater presented the 
heraldic crest to President 
Reinhard. 

Accepted by the Board of 
Trustees on March 7, 1968, the 
crest was designed by David 
Christie-Murray. A professor of 
English, Christie-Murray was 
visisting from the United 
Kingdom. Two impression of the 
three dimensional crest were 
made by Art Through the Ages, a 
firm in Los Angles. 
The impressions were presented 




courtesy of University Relations 
Dr. Charles Shoutz presented the crest to President Diane 
Reinhard. 



"Shed the 
light of 

learning, 
Clarion, and 
be famous." 

-The Clarion Crest 



to Shontz by John Yount the vice 
president of Art Through the Ages 
and a former student of Shontz. 
One was presented to then 
President James Gemmell and the 
other was retained by Shontz. 



A heraldic crest is an insignia or 
symbol that records history. The 
University crest has a helmet sig- 
nifying a public corporation and 
consists of a shield of azure with 
a clarion, which is a medieval 



trumpet between three eagles 
with inverted wings, a wreath 
with an eagle holding a clarion 
in its dexter claw. At the bottom 
of the crest is the motto, "Clare 
Clarion Clara" meaning "Shed 
for the light of learning, Clarion, 
and be famous." 



Page 2 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 CEMMELL COMPLEX 

CLARION, PA 16214 

(814) 226-2380 

FAX: (814) 226-2557 

e-mail: call@maiI.clarion.edu 

to uHcliirion cd vi / thecal 1 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kristen E. Davis 

Managing Editor 

Michael Chapaloney 

News Editor 

Steve Ostrosky 

Lifestyles Editor 

Jeff Say 

Sports Editor 

Nathan Koble 

Ad Design 

Tim Bowerman 

Ad Sales Manager 

Danielle Hock 
Photography Editor 

George Groff 
Business Manager 

Tom Casey 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jnel Ritzier 

Circulation Manager 

Matt Nickolas 

On-line Editor 

Codey Beck 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Tta QWIOO Cflll '» published inosi 



Thursdays durjag the school year in 
accordance with ibt academic calen- 
dar. Editors Accept contributions 
from all sources, but reserve the right 
to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length, and obscenity (the deter- 
mination of which is the responsibil- 
ity of the Editor-in-Chief)- Opinions 
expressed in editorials are those of 
the identified writer and do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of the 
student body, university, or Clarion 
community. The Executive Board 
reserves the right to refuse pubbca 
don of any information . Letters to 
the Editor must be received by 5:00 
p.m. on the Monday of desired publi- 
cation. Letters must be signed and 
include a phone number and an 
address. If the author wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld, a second 
signed letter must be submitted 
explaining the reasons for the 
request. Due to space restrictions, 
tetters that do not appear in the pub- 
lication on the desired week will be 
held and published in following 
issues of The Cla/jog Call, Display 
Advertising copy and greek articles 
are due Monday by 5:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. Classifieds are 
due Tuesday by 2:00 p.m. on the 
week of publication. The Clarion 



Call i s funded by the Clarion Student 
Association and advertising revenue. 



The Clarion Call 



October 29, 1998 



OPINION 




Hide Park 



"We pushed her (out- 
house) toilet over." 



Emma Neuland 



"A Halloween Tale" 

The dogs would take us down 
and bring us back from the coun- 
try store in the winter. One day, 
Mrs. Moore, our neighbor, got up 
in the morning, and she hollered 
over, "Tell Tom to get over and 
get his old dog. It's lying dead in 
the backyard." 

So Tom went over, and it's true: 
our dog's dead. She hit him with 
a flat iron, and it was that good a 
crack she killed him right out 
She admitted she had a big ham 
bone, and she'd coaxed him. She 
was kind of a coarse old thing. 
She never allowed her children to 
go visiting with any neighbor. 

We got a "talking-to" that when 
Halloween comes, we are not 
going outside the door. "The 
Baker kids are not going to be 
Halloweening from door to door, 
understand?" 

We knew what we were going 
to do. 

Tom said, "We're going to bed 
at 8 o'clock like Mum said. 
Mum's going to turn the lights 
out, and nobody will be coming 
to our door. But when you can 
hear Dad snoring, we'll come 
over, and we'll just tap you on 
the arm to get up." 

Now, our grape arbor was high 
and iron, so it just went right up 
to the window. The boys could 
slide down poles of iron, but they 
were afraid that I'd get hurt. Ted 
said, "You go down the banister. 
Mum and Dad won't hear that. 

We went over to Lana Moore's 
yard. 

We didn't talk. But before we 
went over, Tom said, "We'll say, 
'One for the money, two for the 



show, three to get ready, four to 
go.' When I say, 'four to go,' 
push." 

So we did. 

We pushed her (outhouse) toilet 
over. 

It went boom. 

Well, we went to bed. 

Now Tom was full of the devil. 
He sat by the window and 
watched because Mrs. Moore 
always went to the toilet at 6 
o'clock in the morning. She goes 
down there, and she sees her toi- 
let down. So she pulls up her 
dress in the back yard. 

Tom had come over to my bed 
and he said, "Oh you could have 
got your picture taken!" He says, 
"Now, my god, don't tell any- 
one. 

It wasn't very long until old 
Lana Moore came over. She 
knew who did it. She says, "Your 
kids were over there and knocked 
my toilet down last night." 

Dad hadn't gone to work yet. 
He said, "Now Mrs. Moore, my 
children were in bed before 8 
o'clock. I can swear to it, every 
one." 

You know, Mum and Dad got 
old and maybe twenty years 
afterwards we kept that secret. 
Then we told 'em. I thought it 
was the best one we ever pulled. 
But it wasn't as dirty as she did. 



This Hide Park appeared in the 
October 31, 1991 issue of the 
Clarion Call. Emma Neuland 
was an 88-year-old resident of 
Lucinda when she shared her 
story with Communication grad- 
uate, Peter Lowe. 



Just a reminder that 
registration for Spring 
1999 classes will end on 

November 12, 1998. 




Editorial 



"When UAB brings 

in bands, where are 

those students?" 



Jeff Say, Lifestyles Editor 



"Pathetic!" 

That was a term used by a stu- 
dent who attended the Blues 
Traveler concert two weeks ago 
in Clarion. 

The term was directed towards 
the small number of students who 
attended the Univeristy Activities 
Board sponsored event. Only 
1,150 people attended the show. 
(200 of these students were 
working at the event.) So that's 
950 people who paid, let's say 
800 of them were Clarion 
University students. What's 
wrong with this picture? There 
are 6,000 students enrolled at 
Clarion and only one sixth of the 
campus came out to see a nation- 
ally known band. In my opinion, 
that's worse than pathetic: that's 
downright absurd. 

Who does UAB have to bring in 
to excite the students of Clarion? 
Granted, Blues Traveler may not 
appeal to every one but students 
could have shown up just to sup- 
port the UAB and to show that 
they actually care about activities 
on campus. The tickets were 



merely ten dollars with a student 
ID. Ten dollars for a band that 
usually charges thirty for a nor- 
mal show. That's one hell of a 
steal if you ask me, but appar- 
ently very few others felt that 
way. 

I hear students complaining all 
the time about nothing to do. 
Well when UAB brings in bands, 
where are those students? I've 
been enrolled at Clarion for two 
and a half years now, and every 
year UAB tries to provide the 
campus with at least one big 
concert In the past the turnout 
has been even worse than the 
Blues Traveler concert, was that 
was due to the lack of appeal of 
the bands to the students. Blues 
Traveler is by far one of the 
biggest bands that has performed 
at Clarion in the past decade. 
Still, I've heard students com- 
plain that the reason they didn't 
see the concert was that Blues 
Traveler isn't as big as they were 
a few years ago. One of the other 

continued on Pace 4 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Leslie Suhr 

Assistant Lifestyles Editor: Keith Gwillim 

Assistant Sports Editors: Chris Pfeil, Jason Dambach 

Assistant Ad Sales Manager: Matt Wilson 
Assistant Advertising Design Manager: Shawn Morrow 
Copy and Design Assistants: Ryan Camuso, Wendy Stivers 
Classified Assistant: Amy Zahniser 
Staff Writing Supervisor: Mary Beth Curry 
Staff Writers: Patricia Boberg, Danielle Boccio, Gretchen Druschel, Angela 
Everly, Susan Ferchalk, Mike Markewinski, Jen Mathis, Elizabeth Navarra, 
Kelly Palma, Courtney Spangler, Wendy Stivers, Mark Strieker, Jeff Chaffee, 
Mike Cody, James Gates, Keith Gwillim, Lori Imbrugno, Janet Pazsink, Cory 
Pittmaa Jason Rhoades, Jerry Collier, Matt Jolles, Lori Matachak, Bob Meyers, 
Marvin Wells 

Ad Sales Staff: Mercedes Boggs, Alison Campbell, Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, 
Tara Haverly, Aaron Kapner, Nicole Mildren, Hillary Simmons 
Business Staff: Ed Bombaci, Peter Chido, Tim Puhala, Tammi Snyder 
Advertising Design Staff: Kristen Balicky, Jason Burtman, Jackie Caddell, 
Amie Croyle, Cara Croyle, Jason Dray ton, Vicki Geer, Matt Hamilton, Brad 
Holtman, Julie Lope, Sonja Meerabox) Bob Meyers, Nicole Mildren, Kelly 
Probala, Justin Relihan, Mike Ruane, Alvin Slaughter, Pete Yurisnec 
Circulation Staff: Shane Bednez, John Dellich, Mark Humenansky, Dave 
Ibinson, Matt Lord, Kelly Mc Intyre, Ken Pruit, Don Ursich, Jay Young 
Proofreaders: Dawn Koch, Niki Stedina, Brooke Rinier, Stephanie Apter 
Names remaining in the staff box in the December W issue will receive co-curricular credit. 



Beginning this semester," advertisers will be charged for 

ordering an ad, regardless of whether or not they meet 

The Call's Wednesday night deadline. 



h 









October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



READER RESPONSE 



"People may give it other names, but it is 
still bigotry none the less." 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to address this 
response to Craig M. Dorn, 
whose letter in the October 15 
issue of the Clarion Call, struck 
me as a mixed message. 
Although I can appreciate Mr. 
Dorn's advice "for everyone to 
care about the rest of society, 
regardless of our various fears, 
professions, race, lifestyles, and 
faith-based choices," I strongly 
believe that the "caring" for those 
people often involves an accep- 
tance of who they are. This is 
something that the Christian 
groups on campus have forgot- 
ten. When there is no acceptance 
for a particular group's tenden- 
cies, such as the tendency of 
homosexual people to have feel- 
ings for members of the same 
sex, there will inevitably be 
attempts to try to change that 
group and flady ignore or con- 
demn there tendencies. 

When Christians ask lesbians or 
gays to change into supposedly 
virtuous heterosexuals, .they are 
essentially asking them to change 
who they are (certainly not a 
show of compassion!) 

Repeatedly, homosexuality is 
deemed "sinful,' and thus unde- 
sirable, An assumption I think is 



If you 
worked on 
the Clarion 
Call staff 
last semes- 
ter and have 

yet to 
receive your 

co- 
curricular, 
please con- 
tact Kristen 
at x2380. 



not only erroneous but cruel. 
However, although he and his 
fellow Christians are free to hold 




Letters to 
the Editor 



that opinion, it is not fair to the 
gay, lesbian and bisexual com- 
munity if they act out those opin- 
ions, given that it would cause 
more harm than good. 

I don't think many people in 



favor of homosexual acceptance 
would be impressed with Mr. 
Dorn's slogans such as 
"Tolerance is a virtue of people 
with no convictions," given that 
bigotry is NOT a moral convic- 
tion. People may give it other 
names, but it is still bigotry none 
the less. 

However, I want to make it 
clear to Mr. Dorn and to other 
people who may have misinter- 
preted my last letter, that my aim 
is not to denounce Christianity 
per se. The intent of my letter is 
not to condemn anyone's belief 
in Christ, God, modes of wor- 
ship, or afterlife. My letter was 
only to show my incompatibility 
with Christian morality. If one 
appreciates Christ's message to 
be loving, accepting and non- 
judgmental of one's neighbors, 
homosexual tolerance could actu- 
ally be seen as an extension of 
Christian morality. 

Mr. Dorn, I think your words 
about love and caring are well- 
spoken, but to give the words 
"love" and "caring" meaning, the 
word "tolerance" must be incor- 
porated into their definition. 

Sincerely, 
Angcline Binick 
Student 






XX would like 

to thank all the 

sororities for a 

successful 

Derby Days 



AKA 



AOE 



eoA 



AZ 



ZTA 



ACT 



<&ZZ 



Applications will be avail- 
able for The Clarion Call 
Executive Board Spring 
1999 Semester on October 

29, 1998. 

Opening positions 

include: 



*Editor-In-Chief 



*Managing Editor 
*Sports Editor 

*Copy and Design 
Editor 



*Clarion Call 
Secretary (must 
have clerical skills) 

Applications are due on 
November 4. Interviews will 
then be set up by the current 
Editor-in-Chief. If there are 
any questions, please con- 
tact Kristen at x2380 or 
226-5833. 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



October 2Q,1QQfi 



READER RESPONSE 



Letter to the Editor 

"This is not a case of sour grapes..." 



Dear Editor, 

I would like to add a few com- 
ments and observations of my 
own to Mr. Wakes' and Mr. 
Hall's letters to the editor in the 
October 15 edition of The 
Clarion Call. 

As a former employee, I 
observed, on a daily basis, the 
treatment employees received 
from the present management. 
They need to take an employee 
management and sensitivity 
course and a few leadership 
courses. The next time you see an 
employee of Reimer with tears in 
their eyes or a sad or angry 
expression on their face, please 
consider the reason. 



Chartwells Catering has 
replaced Daka, but the problem 
seems to remain. Perhaps it is the 
management who needs to be 
replaced. 

As a former manager in anoth- 
er profession, I found it astonish- 
ing and sad to observe these 
managers. It's not surprising that 
Chartwells has been advertising 
for help since August.and the 
turnover rate is exceedingly high. 
This is not a case of 'sour 
grapes' on my part, as I volun- 
tarily left my position at the 
French Quarter. I enjoyed the stu- 
dents and my co-workers. The 
bagel sandwiches, espresso cof- 
fees, and smoothies are very pop- 



ular. 

The next time you're in French 
Quarter, observe the number of 
employees. If there are less than 
four, and this is most of the time, 
then you know why the lines are 
so long. 

Students have told me that they 
expect an hour wait during lunch 
time. To me, that would be unac- 
ceptable if I were a member of 
management. 

As an alumni of C.U.P., surely, 
we can do better by our students 
and our Reimer employees. 
Sincerely, 
Doris Moore 
Strattanville, PA 



Editorial continued from Page 2... 

complaints is that Blues Traveler doesn't appeal to them. 

Everyone's heard the saying "You can't please every one all the 
time, just please some of the people some of the time." Well that's 
my solution to the problem. Instead of having one big concert that 
people are going to complain about, have smaller more niche orient- 
ed concerts. Instead of paying $48,000 for one band, spread it out 
among four or five bands. 

The main issue in all of this is for student involvement. Voice your 
opinion. Let the UAB know who you want to play at Clarion and this 
time, show up. 



Be sure to check out The Clarion Call 

on-line for late breaking news 

as well as 

reference to past events. 
http://www.clarion.edu/thecall 



ur 



CLOTHING DRIVE 





LOOK AROUND CAMPUS FOR OUR MANY CLOTHING 
BINS, AND PLEASE FEEL FREE TO DONATE ANY OLD 
OR USED ARTICLES OF CLOTHING THAT YOU DON'T 

WANT!!! 




October 29, 1998 



NEWSWIRE 



Budget breakdown 

Clarion University Faculty 

Senate learned about the 

University budget from Dr. 

Heather Haberaecker, vice 

president for finance and 

administration, at their 

meeting Monday. 

See page 6. 



Wilson wins Fulbright 

Dr. Timothy Wilson will 

be spending next semester 

in Europe after he was 

recently awarded a J. 

William Fulbright Foreign 

Scholarship. 

For more information, 

turn to page 8. 



College costs on the rise 

A recent survey released 

by the College Board 

shows that the average 

cost of college tuition is 

up around four percent. 

For the full story, 

see page 8. ' 



Lizza mourned 
Former Clarion Call 

photography editor Chuck 

Lizza was killed Oct. 8 

when he was accidentally 

attacked by a white 

Siberian tiger he had 

raised from a cub. 

See page 9. 



Dixon re-elected 

F. Eugene Dixon, Jr. was 

unanimously re-elected to 

be the chairman of the 

State System of Higher 

Education, and the State 

System has also opened a 

new University Center in 

Pittsburgh. 

See page 9. 



NEWS TIPS? 

Phone: 226-2380 
FAX: 226-2557 
E-mail:CALL@clarion.edu 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



NEWS 



Student Senate 



Sequelle status questioned by Krull 




by Courtney Spangler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion Students Association 
(CSA) business manager Lee 
Krull voiced his concerns about 
last week's allocation of 
$3,709.62 for new computers for 
The Sequelle at Monday night's 
Student Senate meeting. 

Krull said that The Sequelle has 
been having some serious prob- 
lems over the last few years. Lisa Hamrick/Clarion Call 
"There should be some alarm Student Senate discussed a recent allocation at their 
here," he said. seventh meeting of the year Monday night. 

Krull advised that Senate should ■** lots « Rearick said the CSA Environment Concerns 

question the yearbook staff about would char 8 e W^ t0 P 3 * in Committee, reported the 
his concerns of last year's ^em. University is looking for the orig- 

Sequelle and the fact that he still ^ so ' l* ear ick note d that the inal bell that hung in the tower of 

has not* been informed as to CSA is looking to replace all of its Seminary Hall. 



Finally, Senator Brian 
McQuillan, chair of the 
Committee on Sub-Committees, 
made 12 nominations for sub- 
committees during the meeting. 

Serving on the Conduct Board 
are president Snyder, Senators 
Bean, Knott and Spence. Serving 
on the Faculty Senate Committee 
on Student Activities are Senators 
Bothell and Chervenak. 

Serving on the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Student Affairs are 
Senators Huska and Kemp. 
Senators Mangieri, Moeslein and 
Shirey will serve on the 
Foundation Advisory Board. 

Senators Isbir and Mellon will 
serve on the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Courses and 



whether or not The Sequelle has a 
new advisor. 

In other news, vice president 
Nathan Rearick informed 



old copiers on campus. 

In other business, Treasurer 
Leslie Suhr moved to allocate 
$2,257 from the capital account to 



In the master plan, part of Programs of Study (CCPS). 



Senators that the CSA is looking Student Senate in order t0 P ur " 
into investing some of its monies. chase a new computer with a larg- 



He also reported that the game 
room in Gemmell Student 
Complex lost $9,601 last year. 

"Something needs to be done," 
Rearick said. 

In further CSA business, 
Rearick said mat the association is 
looking into purchasing land near 
campus in order to build more 
parking lots. After constructing 



er hard drive. 



Carlson Library is scheduled to be 
demolished and rebuilt with a 
clock tower modeled after the one 
that was part of Seminary Hall. 

The original bell is wanted for 
the the new tower for die library. 



Suhr also reported the latest bal- Mellon said mat anyone who has 



ances of the four accounts. Senate 
has $41,001 in the supplemental 
account, $42,084 in the supple- 
mental reserve account, $84,925 
in the capital account, and 



any leads is urged to contact 
Student Senate. 
Senator Nick Chervenak, chair 



Senator Augustine will serve on 
the Presidential Commission on 
Sexual Harassment, Senator 
Brown will serve on the 
Presidential Commission on 
Affirmative Action, and Senator 
Williams will serve on the 
Presidential Commission on 
Disabilities. 

Student Senate's eighth meeting 
of the 1998-1999 academic year 



of Committee on Rules, 

Regulations and Policies, reported will be held Monday, Nov. 2 at 
$112,610 in the large-item capital that Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority 7:30 p.m. in 246 Gemmell 
account. and the Clarion Scouts are "very Complex. 

Senator Dan Mellon, chair of the close" to becoming recognized 
Campus Safety, Health and organizations. 

Faculty promotions, sabbaticals announced 



by Leslie Suhr 

Clarion Call Assistant 

Managing Editor 

Clarion University president Dr. 
Diane Reinhard recently 
announced the promotions and 
sabbatical leaves granted for the 
1999-2000 academic year. 

The promotions were effective 
on August 15. 

According to Dr. John Kuhn, 
Provost/Vice President for 
Academic Affairs, for both pro- 
motions and sabbaticals, profes- 
sors follow criteria in the 
Collective Bargaining Agreement 
handbook . 

The University is allowed to 
grant sabbaticals to up to seven 
percent of the faculty at a time. 
Kuhn said that because of the cost, 
however, usually five percent are 



awarded sabbaticals. 

A faculty member submits a pro- 
posal as to why he/she may want a 
sabbatical leave and gives a 
detailed proposal of such a 
request. Kuhn said requests have 
to do with fulfilling graduate 
requirements or exploring a high- 
er field of learning such as writing 
a book or research. 

After the recommendations are 
given to Dr. Reinhard, Kuhn said 
they all are usually approved. 

For promotions, the same guide- 
lines apply. Professors apply after 
they fulfill requirements based on 
local procedures. They are evalu- 
ated on the basis of teaching, 
research, service to the communi- 
ty, and professional manner. 

To change from instructor to 
assistant professor, the applicant 
will meet a minimum of a 
Master's degree plus 10 semester 



hours of graduate credits. There 
must also be a minimum of three 
years of college teaching experi- 
ence. 

A promotion from assistant pro- 
fessor to associate professor 
requires the applicant to have 
earned a doctorate or equivalent. 
The applicant must also have at 
least five years of college teaching 
experience. 

A promotion from associate pro- 
fessor to full professor includes 
earning a doctorate and having 
taught for at least seven years at 
the college level. 

After returning from a sabbati- 
cal, the faculty member must pre- 
sent samples of work and make a 
formal presentation of what they 
accomplished while on leave. 

The following promotions were 
made, effective August 15: 

Assistant professor to associate 



professor: Karen Bolinger, math- 
ematics; William Buchanan, 
library science; Greg Clary, acad- 
emic support; Vicky Harry, educa- 
tion; Herbert Luthin, English; 
Melanie Parker, mathematics; and 
Jeanne Slattery, psychology. 
' Associate professor to full pro- 
fessor: Maryann Fricko, counsel- 
ing services; Saundra McKee, 
education; Donna Poljanec, acad- 
emic support services; and George 
Xu, English. 

Faculty who were awarded sab- 
baticals for 1999-2000 include: 

Julia Bartkowiak, 1999-2000 
academic year, completion of a 
textbook and other publications in 
areas of ethics and creative think- 
ing. 

J. Bauman-Waengler, spring 
2000, completion of a workbook 

continued on page 6 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



October 29, 1998 



Faculty Senate 



Haberaecker breaks down budget 



by Angela Everly 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Vice President for Finance and 
Administration, Dr. Heather 
Haberaecker, presented Faculty 
Senate with their first budget 
report in more than two years dur- 
ing their meeting Monday after- 
noon. 

Haberaecker reported to Senate 
the distribution breakdown of 
1997- 199o total revenues. 

She said that 83.4 percent of 
total revenue was distributed to 
unrestricted funds. Out of the 
unrestricted funds, 70.9 percent 
were designated as Educational 
and General (E & G) Fund. 

The E & G Fund is a combina- 
tion of undesignated and designat- 
ed funds differentiated by weight 
of internal restrictions. 

Restricted funds are available 
for financing operations that are 
limited by donors, which account 
for 16.4 percent of the total rev- 
enues. 

The Auxiliary Fund, a self-sup- 



porting entity, accounts for 12.5 
percent of total revenue. This 
fund exists to furnish goods or 
services to students, faculty or 
staff, such as student unions, resi- 
dence halls, dining facilities, and 
recreation centers. 

In old business, Faculty Senate 
again discussed the academic cal- 
endar for the 2000-2001 academic 
year. Although Dr. Doug Smith, 
Chair of the Committee on 
Student Affairs, proposed three 
different calendars to Senators, a 
vote was taken to approve the 
original calendar. The approved 
calendar will now give students 
four days off for Winter Holiday 
and six days off during Spring 
break. 

Brian McQuillan, Student 
Senate representative, reported on 
the 50th anniversary of the 
Clarion Students Association 
(CSA). 

The anniversary was celebrated 
during Autumn Leaf Festival 
weekend with a tent displayed by 
Student Senate along with the 
CSA Board of Directors. The tent 




Lisa Hamrick/Clarion Call 
Dr. Heather Haberaecker 
presented a budget workshop 
to Faculty Senate at their 
Monday meeting, 
drew previous Student Senators 
who spent the day in Clarion for 
the celebration. 

McQuillan also mentioned a 
need for student representatives 
for various committees. 

In new business, Chair of the 
Committee on Courses and 
Programs of Study -(CCPS) Dr. 



Elizabeth MacDaniel reminded 
Senators that open hearings are 
scheduled for Oct. 30 and Nov. 6 
in 246 Gemmell Complex. She 
also requested approval of several 
special topics courses, minor cur- 
ricula changes (changes in course 
titles and changes in course num- 
bers), proposals of general educa- 
tion courses and an experimental 
course. 

Special Topics courses request- 
ed were Honors 130: Honors 
Humanities, Honors 240: Honors 
Social Sciences and Honors 350: 
Junior Seminar 

Minor curricular changes in 
course titles were: MATH 270: 
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 
I to MATH 270: Calculus I, 
MATH 271: Calculus with 
Analytic Geometry II to MATH 
271: Calculus II, and MATH 272: 
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 
III to MATH 272: Calculus III. 

Changes in course numbers 
were: MUS 153 to MUSA 
130/330, MUS 154 to MUSA 
131/331, MUS 154 to MUSA 
132/332/crosslisted as SCT 154: 



Show Choir, MUS 155 to MUSA 
135/335, MUS 157 to MUSA 
136/336, MUS 156 to MUSA 
137/337, MUS 156 to MUSA 
138/338, MUS 139 to MUSA 
139/339, MUS 195 to MUSA 
142/342, MUS 190 to MUSA 
143/343, MUS 193 to MUSA 
144/344, and MUS 192 to MUSA 
145/345. 

General Education proposals 
were: 

— PSSP department for a value 
flag for PS 211: American 
Government 

— Department of Economics for 
an application flag for ECON 342: 
Economics of Government and 
Business 

— Department of Finance for a 
writing intensive flag for FIN 471: 
Financial Problems 

A policy meeting will be held 
Monday, Nov. 2 at 3:30 p.m. in B- 
8 Hart Chapel. Faculty Senate's 
next regular meeting will be on 
Monday, Nov. 9 at 3:30 p.m., also 
in Hart Chapel. Dr. Haberaecker 
will again be discussing the bud- 
get at the Nov. 9 meeting. 



CNet project (from page 1) 



browser we have installed, there 
will be more server sharing, and 
eventually we will be able to pro- 
vide central storage onto the net- 
work where the file will be auto- 
matically backed up," she said. 

All of the wiring necessary for 
the project was completed by 
September and DeMauro said the 
remainder of the work revolves 
around the electronics compo- 
nent. 

FORE Systems was awarded the 
contract to build the electronics 
package for CNet. 

Originally, ATM technology 
was to be used for the project, but 
OC-3 and OC-12 speed technolo- 
gy is being implemented. 

DeMauro described the new 
technology as between three and 
12 times faster than the ATM that 
was originally set to be used. 

Even though most of the work 
for the project has been complet- 
ed, there is still some work that 
needs to be finished behind the 
scenes in order to get the entire 
operation running smoothly. 

"The company (FORE Systems) 
is still installing equipment and 
fine tuning the network," 
DeMauro noted. "FORE is also 
training our people on the new 
system. 

. As a part of CNet, all computer 
terminals connected to the net- 



work were audited to see if they 
could be readily connected to the 
network. 

"We also dropped off a form to 
let the user know that we were 
there and what was done," 
DeMauro said. 

For computers that were unable 
to connect to CNet, Computing 
Services will send a list of what is 
needed for the computer in order 
to make the connection, and also 
provides an list of approximately 
how much the necessary items 
will cost. 

DeMauro said that her office is 
excited about the prospect of a 
public-private partnership in 
order to wire the seven residence 
halls. 

"We are the first to try some- 
thing like this, and we are work- 
ing with the State System in order 
to help them by letting them know 
about roadblocks we encounter 
and what can be done to fix 
them," she said. 

'This partnership project paves 
the way for the other 13 
schools... we hope to expand the 
project to the other universities of 
the State Sytem," DeMauro 
noted. 

This project is being funded by 
a bond issue through the State 
System of Higher Education 
Board of Governors. 



Faculty promotions announced (from page 5) 



and computer software for cours- 
es related to phonetic transcrip- 
tion. 

William Belzer, summers of 

1999 and 2000, research involv- 
ing genome mapping of canine 
ocular defects. 

Jeffrey Eicher, fall 1999 or 
spring 2000, developing a new 
track or major in personal finan- 
cial planning; completion of 
coursework for CFP certifica- 
tions. 

John Ernissee, 1999-2000 acad- 
emic year, study of dinosaur 
anatomy. 

Linda Felicetti, 1999-2000 aca- 
demic year, development of 
instructional material, related to 
ethical issues in the workplace. 

Stephen Gendler, spring 2000, 
revision and update of MATH 171 
course within context of four-year 
study involving computer appli- 
cations. 

Al Kennedy, fall 1999, study of 
graduate study recruitment strate- 
gies. 

George LaRue, 1999-2000 aca- 
demic year, research and writing 
related to Egypt's 19th Century 
slave trade. 

Elizabeth MacDaniel, 1999- 

2000 academic year, compilation 
of children's book on American 
fairy tales and folk tales with 
strong female characters. 



Patrick McGreevy, 1999-2000 
academic year, completion of 
manuscript on Erie Canal. 

Charles Pineno, fall 1999, co- 
author a textbook on cost account- 
ing. 

Jeanne Slattery, 1999-2000 aca- 
demic year, completion of 
advanced training in therapy, 
preparation for a professional 
exam. 

Doug Smith, fall 1999, co- 
author a textbook in the area of 
biology and ethics. 

Kevin Stemmler, fall 1999, 
completion of a research project 
on Pennsylvania writers. 

According to information pro- 
vided by Dr. Kuhn, the 1998-1999 
Sabbatical Leave Committee 
members were: Paula Amrod 
(music), Kate Eggleton (Biology), 
Karen Bolinger (Mathematics), 
Larry Bering (Chemistry), Bill 
English (HPE), Beverly Smaby 
(History), and Sylvia Stalker 
(Education). 

To support an application for 
promotion, the candidate must 
submit evidence of achievement 
related to promotion criteria to 
their Department Chairperson not 
later than Nov. 1 or in accord with 
the provisions of the Collective 
Bargaining Agreement. 

The evidence must be sufficient 
to determine past performance 



and to suggest the probability of 
future excellence. Evidence must 
be presented in a manner which 
will enable the committee to 
clearly determine what has 
occurred since the last presenta- 
tion. 

While each candidate shall be 
evaluated on all criteria, emphasis 
shall be placed on an increasing 
number of criteria for particular 
ranks in an ascending order from 
assistant professor to professor so 
that a rising level of performance 
shall be expected for promotion to 
higher tasks. 

In applying for a sabbatical, five 
points were evaluated by the 
Sabbatical Leave Committee. 
The points are: Appropriateness 
to applicant's position, 
Significance of the proposed pro- 
ject, Quality of the proposal, 
Feasibility of the proposed project 
with a maximum rating of five, 
and Appropriateness to a leave of 
absence, also with a maximum 
rating of five. 

According to a memo from 
Chair of the Sabbatical Leave 
Committee Kate Eggleton, the 
committee felt that this was need- 
ed to rate the proposals, not only 
on whether they were feasible, but 
whether" they truly justified a sab- 
batical in order to be completed. 



October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 




Student pleads guilty 

Michael Benesasi pleaded 
guilty to charges of public 
drunkenness and disorderly 
conduct on Oct. 23. These 
charges were related to an inci- 
dent that occurred in front of 
Campbell Hall. A third charge, 
purchase and consumption, 
was withdrawn. 

Student cited 

Public Safety said that on Oct. 
22 at around 4:15 a.m., Marcus 
Pivec of 328 Wilkinson Hall 
was cited for public drunken- 
ness, minors consumption and 
defiant trespass. 

Fight at Tippin 

On Oct. 21, University Police 
were called to Tippin Gym on 
the report that there was a fight 
in progress. All persons 
involved fled the scene before 
officers arrived. 

Complaint of marijuana 

Public Safety responded to a 
marijuana complaint on Oct. 
21 at 1:21 a.m. Charges are 
pending in relation to this inci- 
dent. 

Harassing phone calls 

According to Public Safety, a 
student reportedly received 
harassing phone calls on Oct. 
25 at around 1:30 p.m. The 
incident is currently under 
investigation. 

Fire alarm forces Ralston 
evacuation 

A fire alarm on Ralston Hall 
was pulled Oct. 23 just before 
Midnight, causing the building 
to be cleared, Public Safety 
reported. 

Ballentine theft 

Public Safety is investigating a 
theft that occurred in the TV 
lounge in the basement of 
Ballentine Hall. The theft took 
place sometime on Oct. 20, 
Public Safety reported. 



CU observes AIDS Awareness Week 



by Danielle Boccio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

This year, the Northwest 
Pennsylvania Rural AIDS 
Alliance, in conjunction with 
Keeling Health Center, Residence 
Life, and the student workers at 
these operations put together the 
first ADDS Awareness Week at 
Clarion University. 

The week began Monday with a 
candlelight march from Hart 
Chapel to Gemmell Student 
Complex, followed by a safer sex 
social in the Multi-purpose room. 

Lori Meszaros from Northwest 
Pennsylvania Rural AIDS 
Alliance said she was pleased 
with the turnout Monday night. 

"This is a good representation of 
the student body and good support 



for the cause," she said. 

Senior Liza Suhr expressed her 
reason for marching and taking 
part in the week. 

"I feel it is important for stu- 
dents to show awareness of this 
disease and to realize that it can 
happen to them, their friends and 
family," she said. 

In 1997 alone, 633,000 adoles- 
cents and adults living in the 
United States were reported to the 
Center for Disease Control (CDC) 
to have been exposed to HIV, the 
virus that causes AIDS. 

Out of that 633,000, 40,534 men 
were reported to have been 
exposed to HIV. 

AIDS is the leading killer of 
African-Americans between the 
ages of 25 and 44. AIDS-related 
incidents are the third leading 
killer among women between the 



In 1997, 633,000 

adolescents and adults 

living in the United States 

were reported to the 

Centers for Disease 

Control to have been 

exposed to HIV, the virus 

that causes AIDS. 

ages of 25 and 44. 

During the week, a speaker liv- 
ing with the disease spoke to stu- 
dents in health classes. 

Tables were set up at each resi- 
dence hall with information about 
AIDS. 

Also, free condoms were dis- 
tributed and people were sitting at 
the tables answering questions 
that anyone might have had. 



Another event for AIDS 
Awareness Week was a "Condom 
Olympics" this past Wednesday in 
Nair Hall. 

World AIDS Day will be 
observed on Dec. 1. 

Red ribbons are commonly worn 
to represent AIDS awareness and 
the need to continue research to 
find a cure for this disease. 

The AIDS Alliance has estab- 
lished a rural health care clinic to 
provide people in northwest 
Pennsylvania with specialized 
HIV/AIDS medical specialists, 
who are based in Pittsburgh to 
travel throughout the region to 
provide medical care to patients. 

The medical specialists are 
available to local primary care 
physicians for consultation. 



College students raise concerns over 
constant construction on campuses 



by Elana Ashanti Jefferson 
Campus Correspondent 
College Press Exchange 

Serylle Horwitz discovered 
unusual damage in her dorm room 
last year when she returned to 
campus after spending winter 
vacation at her parents' house in 
Israel. 

"There was this massive crow- 
bar sticking through the wall," 
said the sophomore at Columbia 
University in New York. "My 
roommate and I freaked out." 

A building that eventually will 
house the university's new student 
union was going up right outside 
Horwitz's room. Someone had 
hammered a long, metal bar so 
hard it jutted out of one building 
and into another — right through 
Horwitz's wall. The pipe stuck 
out just inches above one of the 
beds. 

Still scaring Horwitz and her 
roommate is the idea that one of 
them could have been sleeping 
there when the accident happened. 

While this dorm horror story is 
unique, it's not hard to find stu- 
dents across the country who are 
coping with noisy, dusty construc- 
tion projects. 

Colleges and universities have 
dramatically increased spending 
to build and renovate their cam- 
puses. College Planning & 
Management magazine recently 
reported that colleges expect to 
complete $6.3 billion in construc- 



tion projects this year — an 8.6 
percent increase over 1997. 

Public schools appear to be get- 
ting most of the money. In 1998, 
the legislatures of at least 10 
states, including Alabama, 
Connecticut, Illinois, Nebraska, 
New York and Tennessee — have 
approved some of their largest 
financial commitments to campus 
construction in decades. 

In April, Minnesota legislators 
agreed to borrow $143 million for 
rebuilding and repairs — the 
largest loan ever granted for con- 
struction in that state's college 
system. 

"Just like businesses, universi- 
ties need to grow and make 
progress," said Lori Kay, director 
of transportation services at the 
University of Wisconsin at 
Madison. 

While many students say they 
like the idea of improving their 
campus, they despise suffering 
through the inconveniences of 
construction, knowing that future 
students will reap the benefits. 

"The noise is the real issue," 
Horwitz said. "You don't really 
understand what it means to live 
next to a construction site until 
you move in." Then there are 
those other little issues to worry 
about, such as parking, sleeping 
and traveling across campus. 

Students at the University of 
Wisconsin at Madison have 
watched numerous construction 
projects tangle 



traffic, eat up nearly 1,000 park- 
ing spaces and foil campus bikers 
and pedestrians. 

At the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, students 
eat in a temporary, plywood hut 
that serves as a makeshift dining 
hall while the real one, Lenoir 
Hall, is gutted and rebuilt. 

As if that's not enough, nearly 
50 other construction projects, 
including the development of a 
new performing arts center and 
renovation of several dormitories, 
mar the Chapel Hill campus. 

"It's really disturbing to see it all 
going on at once," said Hope 
Jackson, a senior psychology 
major at UNC. "Descriptions of 
Carolina as the 'Southern Side of 
Heaven' are now rendered false 
by the noise, machinery and open 
expanses of mud." 

At the University of Arizona, 
students are scrambling to find a 
new place to hold their annual 
"Spring Fling," booked as the 
country's largest student-run car- 
nival. 

Construction of what the school 
is calling an "Integrated 
Instructional Facility" and expan- 
sion of some offices will make it 
nearly impossible for the ninth 
annual event to be held on campus 
next year. 

Future students at the University 
of Oregon at Eugene can look for- 
ward to a new student union and a 
Nike sports center, but neither 
means much to senior Jennifer 



Gleason. 

"I won't be here to use them," 
she said. 

Library renovation is what both- 
ers dedicated academics most. 
Sara Comer, an American studies 
major at Stetson University in 
northern Florida, said the process 
of revamping her campus library 
"has created a distracting environ- 
ment that is not conducive to 
studying." 

Unlike much of the grumbling 
and griping coming from the rest 
of the country, undergraduates at 
Columbia say they're not too 
bothered by the renovation of 
their main library because con- 
struction typically happens 
between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. when 
they're in class. 

But perhaps an even bigger rea- 
son for their indifference is that 
they don't use their library to 
study anyway. They hang out 
there instead. 

And why is that? Well, their 
campus options are limited — 
especially given that they haven't 
had a student union for the last 
two years. A new one is, well, 
under construction. 

"The study environment here (at 
the library) really couldn't get any 
worse," said Marc Sjolseth, a 
junior who works at the Columbia 
library. "It's kind of a pain when 
the people next to you are eating 
Cheetos and talking about who 
did whom at some party last 
weekend." 



Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



Octnbpr29„1998 



After receiving a Fulbright Scholarship 



Marketing professor on his way 
to Europe next semester 



by Patricia Boberg 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Dr. Timothy Wilson, professor 
of marketing at Clarion 
University, was recently named a 
J. William Fulbright Foreign 
Scholarship recipient. 

Wilson will spend five months, 
beginning in February, teaching 
courses to be determined at the 
Technical University of Civil 
Engineering in Bucharest, 
Romania. 

"It is kind of flattering to be 
selected for the Fulbright scholar- 
ship.. .it's an honor," said Wilson. 
"Of 2,000 selected this year, I was 
among one of those." 

He added, "It is a reflection in 
part of Clarion University. People 
tend to forget that other people 
look on us very favorably." 

Wilson received his B.S., M.S., 
and Ph.D. degrees from Carnegie 
Mellon University and an MBA 
and Ph.D. from Case Western 
Reserve University. 

He has been a member of the 
Clarion University faculty since 
1987. 

Over the past six years, he has 
taught and conducted research 
internationally in Sweden, Czech 
Republic, Austria, and Malta. 

"I have some experience in these 
types of environments, but none 
in Romania," said Wilson. "I 
have been assured that they are 
nice and pleasant people, so I'm 
looking forward to it." 

"I have found international 
teaching to be a very pleasant 
experience," Wilson noted. 
"When I wrote my Fulbright pro- 
posal, I requested assignment to a 



country with an emerging econo- 
my. 

"My courses will be taught in 
English. Having a native English 
speaker as an on-staff teacher 
seems to be an attraction for busi- 
ness programs outside the U.S.," 
he added. 

Wilson credits the marketing 
department and the College of 
Business Administration for sup- 
porting his international teaching 
ventures. 

"They (the College of Business 
Administration) provided the 
opportunity for me to do this," he 
said. "There is never a hesitancy 
to grant leaves, even though mar- 
keting is a small department and it 
creates hardships for the other fac- 
ulty members." 

When describing how he went 
about getting the scholarship, 







'in 


11 I 


f 












W ^3 







George Groff/Clarion Call 
Dr. Timothy Wilson will spend six months in Romania after 
being recently named a Fulbright scholar. 

Wilson plans to use this oppor- gressional legislation introduced 
tunity to do additional research by former Senator J. William 
and learn different cultures. Fulbright of Arkansas, the pro- 

"You gain a better concept of gram is designed "to increase 

your own culture," he said. "The mutual understanding between the 

different economic systems and people of the United States and 

Wilson said, "The process is fair- S loDal marketplace becomes more the people of other countries." 

ly extensive." ****• 

He said he also learns from the 

difference in the educational sys- 
tems. 

"Education in Europe is more 

theoretical, so they teach more 

advanced theory," Wilson said. 
All of these experiences return 

to the classroom with Wilson. 
"Ten to fifteen years from now, 

Romania could be an important 

market for the United States," he 

said. "The Central and Eastern 

European (CEEC) all aspire to 

being part of the common market. 

The Economic Union has changed 

every time I visit Europe. I bring people have drawn on the benefits 
of the businesses "that are being ^is background back to my class- of the "Fulbright experience- 
started, see how privatization is room " Wilson is the flfth P rofessor t0 
going and find out what the social, Now in its 50th y ear ' ** receive a p u lbri g hl at Clarion 
political and economic environ- Fulbright exchange program has University since 1981 



That process includes submit- 
ting an overall proposal stating 
what the applicant wants to do. 

The overall object of programs 
such as this is to benefit students 
at one's home university and the 
host university. 

"This assignment promises to be 
somewhat different from my pre- 
vious experiences," he said. 
"Among the emerging nations, 
Romania has the lowest per capita 
income of $1,500 per year, thus 
they are just starting to build their 
economy." 

He added, "I hope to see some 



In 1948, the program brought 35 
students and one professor to the 
United States and sent 65 
Americans abroad. 

Today, some 4,400 grantees 
from the U.S. and 140 countries 
participate annually to study, 
teach, and conduct research 
around the world. 

Individuals are selected on the 
basis of academic and profession- 
al qualifications, plus their ability 
and willingness to share ideas and 
experiences with people of 
diverse cultures. 

Over the decade, nearly 250,000 



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CU has a long connection with 
Fulbright awards. Several retired 
or former faculty members also 
participated in the program. 

"It is my feeling that if the num- 
ber of people here at this 
University became interested in 
Fulbright, they would probably 
get them," Wilson said. 



Interested in 
writing news? 

Call Steve at 
x2380. 



Average 
college costs up 
four percent, 
survey finds 

by Christine Tatum 
College Press Exchange 

The average cost of college 
tuition rose four percent this year, 
outpacing the rate of inflation, 
according to an annual survey 
released by the College Board. 

This year's increase is only 
slightly smaller than last year's 
rise, researchers said. 

And much like last year's 
increase, this one is more than 
twice the rate of inflation, which 
rose 1.6 percent for the 12 
months ending in August. 

Four-year, private institutions 
raised their rates more than any 
other — despite many complaints 
in recent years about the price 
tags attached to their offerings. 

Room and board costs also rose 
between three and five percent on 
average, the survey said. 

"We must encourage colleges to 
do even more to hold the line on 
rising prices even as we 
encourage families to plan 
ahead," said Donald Stewart, 
president of the College Board. 

Among the survey's highlights: 

■ Students at private, four-year 
schools are paying an average of 
$14,508 to be there— a five 
percent increase over last year. 

■ Four-year, public colleges are 
charging an average of $3,243, 
up four percent. 

■ Tuition and fees at private, 
two-year colleges rose four per- 
cent to $7,333. 

■ Tuition at two-year public col- 
leges is up four percent to 
$1,633. 

The College Board also 
released its analysis of financial 
aid trends and found that the 
money available to students dur- 
ing the 1997-98 academic year 
grew six percent to $60 billion. 

Loans make up 60 percent of 
the money available to students, 
while grants make up less than 40 
percent — a ratio that is almost 
exactly the opposite from those 
reported in the late 1970s. 

The College Board's figures are 
based on reports from more than 
3,000 colleges that gave informa- 
tion for both the 1997-98 and 
1998-99 school years. 

The current tuition rate for 
undergraduate students who 
attend any of the 14 State System 
of Higher Education (SSHE) 
schools is $3,468. 



Orrnher 29. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Former Call photo 
editor remembered 

by Renee Rosensteel 
Contributing Writer 

The AP wire story read 
"Man killed by tiger." 
The man was Charles E. 
Lizza III, a former photo 
editor of The Call from 
1986-87. 

Fate had taken him on 
an intense and beautiful 
journey far from the 
quiet mountains of 
Pennsylvania to circus 
tents and finally to find a 
home with a Florida 
couple who trained big 
cats. 

He died on October 8, 
1998 at age 34, acciden- 
tally struck by a white 
Siberian tiger that he had 
raised from a cub. 

He didn't start out as a 
tiger trainer. He was just 
a kid from a Catholic 
high school in western 
Pennsylvania who liked 
to take pictures and play 
drums. 

He was different 
though. He lived with a 
fire in him... a fire to 
learn, a fire to experi- 
ence. He was driven to young man. He filled a void as the son that they 
figure out how to make something work, whether it never had. It was perfect. No, it was more than 
was a video camera, a sound system or a piece of perfect. 

music. He was relentless in attacking projects that As a friend or the Guays so aptly puts it, "Their 
were well beyond what anyone would have expect- ranch is the peaceable kingdom." It is filled with 
ed. life — people, tigers, leopards and dogs working an 

I remember pulling many an all-night session in playing together. Like Chuck, each creature holds 
the darkroom alternately sleeping under the fea- a special place of love and respect in the Guay 
tures editor's desk to avoid being caught by cam- home. 

pus security. Deadlines were met, and the work it has been more than a week now since his death, 
was well done. J had no idea how to capsulize the enormous ener- 

At a summer job at Idewild amusement park he gy that was in Chuck's being. But there are a few 
found the Royal Hanneford Circus, which had a lessons that I have learned from him: 




Chuck Lizza, former Clarion Call photo editor, was killed Oct. 8. 



summer long gig there. He was taken with the 
mystique of the big top. 

His senior year at Clarion, the circus took him. 
He had a job offer with them and started traveling 
the country doing everything from sound engineer 
to drummer, roadie to ringmaster. He even taught 
the children of the circus performers how to read. 

Past his flair for performance, he was truly a gen- 
tle spirit with enough room in his heart for pretty 
much everything. 

He met up with Ron and Doris Guay (stage 
names Ron and Joy Holiday) who did- an act that 
was truly magical-big cats, dancing and illusion. 
They were taken with the cocky, but endearing 



I Take the messed-up pictures out of the roll 
before you show it to anyone - you know what 
you did wrong; they don't need to. 

I Focus on each project as though that is all that 
matters. 

| Don't worry about the money. It will figure 
itself out. 

I Let your heart guide you. Find the courage to 
follow it faithfully. 

I Live by all means, carpe diem. 

You can read more about the people and the cats 
that Chuck loved at www.catdancers.com 



State System News 



Dixon re-elected SSHE chairman for Term # 16 

The State System of Higher Education's Board of Governors unan- 
imously re-elected F. Eugene Dixon, Jr. as its chairman for an 
unprecedented 16th consecutive term. 

Mr. Dixon of Lafayette Hill is the Board's founding chairman, 
having served in the position since the System's inception in 1983. 

"I have been proud to serve the State System of Higher Education 
as it has grown into one of the leading educational systems in the 
nation," Mr. Dixon said. "All of the Board members with whom I 
have served over the years have worked extremely hard to help push 
the system universities toward excellence. I am grateful to the current 
Board members for their continued confidence in my leadership, and 
look forward to serving another term as chairman." 

State Senator F. Joseph Loeper of Derail Hill chaired the nominat- 
ing committee that recommended Mr. Dixon for another term as 
Board chair. 

"Mr. Dixon's long service to the higher education in Pennsylvania 
is unparalleled," Sen. Loeper said. "As chairman of the Board of 
Governors, he has provided outstanding service and strong leadership 
to the State System, and, I am certain, will continue to do so." 

SSHE opens new University Center in Pittsburgh 

The State System of Higher Education recently opened a new 
facility in the historic Alcoa building in downtown Pittsburgh, 
marking another step in the transformation of the site into the 
Regional Resource Center (RRC). 

The new State System University Center for Southwest 
Pennsylvania will link businesses and industries in the 13 county 
region with the resources of all 14 state-owned universities in order 
to help the companies identify and meet their education and train- 
ing needs. 

The larger resource center grew out of the recommendations of a 
task force of the region's higher education institutions that was 
convened last summer by the Working Together Consortium. 

That group sought "to place the region's higher education assets 
and strengths in the service of economic development in the south- 
western Pennsylvania" through the creation of the center at 425 
Sixth Ave. 

The new University Center within the RRC signifies the System's 
commitment to contribute to that overall effort. 

It will be utilized to develop a variety of programs and services 
in such areas as executive education, policy and planning, technol- 
ogy transfer and workforce development. 

"This is vet another tool in our portfolio of capabilities we can 
offer to businesses who are already here or who are interested in 
coming to the region," said John Thornburgh, president of Penn 
Southwest Association and a member of the State System of Higher 
Education's Board of Governors who chaired the effort to establish 
the new University Center. 

The System universities will work with other higher education 
institutions in the region in the development of needed programs. 

"We are excited to be part of this collaborative effort," said State 
System Chancellor James H. McCormick. "This facility will 
enable all of our universities to become actively involved in the 
region's growth, and we look forward to working with businesses 
throughout southwestern Pennsylvania to help them meet the 
educational and training needs of their workforce." 



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Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



OrfohPr^Q 1QQS 



LIFEWIRE 



Concert review 

Local favorites 

The Clarks 

recently played in 

Altoona, for the 

review 

see page 11. 



Music Review 

new albums by 

Mineral and Civ are 

reviewed, for story, 

see page 14. 



Halloween Special 

Halloween is the 

time for horror 

films and reviewer 

Keith Gwillim 

looks at a few 

classics 
see page 11. 



Dave Barry 

breaks out the 

grammar police, as 

Mr. Language 

returns 
see page 13. 



Movie Review 

Mike Cody reviews 

the new Dreamworks 

breakthrough 

animated movie 

'Ante' 

See page 13. 



Calendar of Events 

For what's 

happening on 

and around 

campus and the 

community, 

see page 12. 



LIFESTYLES 



Nationally known expert visits Clarion 



Dr. Jack Levin exposes 
the truth on serial killers 



by Colleen Leonard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Some may mistake him for 
Albert Einstein, David Crosby, or 
even Captain Kangaroo. With his 
long white hair and bushy mus- 
tache he could very well pass for 
someone other than himself. His 
name? Dr. Jack Levin and he 
knows serial killers like the back 
of his hand. He was never partic- 
ularly interested or "obsessed" 
about investigations on serious 
crimes, but after doing a study in 
1980 with a college partner, 
observing serial killers eventually 
became his profession. 

On Tuesday, October 27, Levin 
gave a disturbing presentation in 
the Gemmel multi-purpose room 
on vicious serial killers, some 
well known and others unfamiliar. 
He reamains a nationally recog- 
nized expert on serial killers and 
has appeared on such shows as 
Oprah, Good Morning America, 
20/20, Geraldo, and Unsolved 
Mysteries. Levin has written over 
nineteen books, including his lat- 




Dr. Jack Levin 

Levin explained in great detail 
about the murders committed by 
such people as John Wayne gacy, 
theodore bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, 
and the Unabomber. By using 
color slides to project images of 
the killers and their victims, it 
became apparent that these 
hideous crimes are far from fan- 
tasy. One of the most interesting 
points that Levin made was that 
most serial killers don't look like 
the strangers we have always 




Jade Scholl/Clarion Call 



Dr. Jack Levin presented "Overkill: Serial Murder 
Exposed" Tuesday night in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose 



j 



room. 

est sequel, "Killer on Campus," 
which takes a look into the 
grotesque murders of five college 
students in Florida. He has had 
numerous interviews with the 
killers themselves, as well with 
their families and friends. 



been warned about. They look 
like every day people, and that is 
why they are usually so difficult 
to catch. 

Many people wonder what 
exactly makes a serial killer's 
mind tick, and sometimes the 



answers ae more disturbing than 
the killers themselves. Most kill 
simply becaue it is exciting for 
them, and Levin refers to this 
enjoyment as a "hobby". Usually, 
there is never an apparent motive, 
whereas in a homocide, it may be 
for anger or revenge. The targets 
are commonly strangers, and this 
in some ways fills their fantasy of 
ultimate power. Pictures may be 
taken, video may be filmed, and 
souvenirs may be obtained to 
relive the memory of the murders 
committed. 
Levin admits to becoming much 



more cautious and aware after 
seeing hideous images and doing 
in depth studies. He also explains 
that there is a limited need for 
such caution. For example, more 
deaths are related to crimes such 
as domestic violence than serial 
killings, and only two hundred 
American lose their lives due to 
serial killers. It is a "rare phe- 
nomenon", and that is the reason 
why our society is so intrigued by 
the lives of these killers. It is 
however, something to think 
about the next time you pass a 
stranger on the street. 



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Where In Ciario 





Right Behind.... . George Groff/Clarion Call 

Test your knowledge of area landmarks every 
week in "Where in Clarion?" Where is this 
Clarion landmark. Last weeks landmark was the 
mural in Gemmell Student Complex 



October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 












Concert review 



The Clarks rock Altoona 



by Kelly Palma 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Even getting there two hours 
early was not good enough, 
every table was full. The 
Clarks certainly do attract a 
wide variety of people. Young 
and old alike, along with those 
who I shall call groupies came 
from miles around. My defini- 
tion of a groupie is one who 
can sing along to most of the 
songs, and be willing to travel 
a number of miles to get there. 
Friday, October 23rd, The 
Gingerbread Man club in 
Altoona was the place to be. 
The G-Man which is smaller 
than the Loomis was filled to 
capacity and then some. "The 
Clarks were a very exciting 
band to watch, and that was 
proven by the large crowd at 
the G-Man," said Michael 
Chapaloney. 

Grapevine, a local band out 
of Pittsburgh opened and 
played about an hour long set. 
For some it couldn't be over 
soon enough. For others, the 
five to ten people who made up 
the Grapevine groupie club, 
sang along to every single 
word. Their music could be 
described in one word - loud. 
Of course, that may be attrib- 
uted to the fact that I was sit- 
ting in front of a speaker. But 
even what seemed to begin as 
ballads ended up being fast, 
loud, rock songs. Then again, I 
am biased. I was there to see 
The Clarks, and it didn't mat- 
ter who was on stage if it was- 
n't them. Grapevine is current- 
ly recieving massive airplay 
from 105.9 the X in Pittsburgh, 
and can be heard on their X- 
Files CD. 

Then finally after two hours 
of waiting, The Clarks took 
the stage. By this point in the 
evening the crowd was suffe- 
ciently inebriated, so everyone 
was on their feet. It was a mix 
of dancing, singing, and drink- 
ing for some. They kept the 
crowd captivated with their 
music for over two hours. 
They played mainly new mate- 
rial from their forthcoming CD, 
Clarks Live!, which hits stores 
in 25 days. In addition to 
almost every song off of 



Someday Maybe, one song that 
sticks firmly in mind is their 
rendition of the Violent 
Femmes' "Blister In The Sun." 
Something that The Clarks do 
not normally perform, but we 
were special as Scott Blasey, 
the lead singer told us. 

It was an evening mostly 
filled with fun. It was only 
marred by one thing - the fight 
that broke out on the dance 
floor. The G-Man security staff 
literally had to drag four people 
out of the club. Blasey actual- 
ly stopped singing to repre- 
mand them himself. That was 
something that truly impressed 
me. He showed a true concern 
for the fans, and I could hardly 
believe it. After the ruckus, 
things went on as planned. 
There was, however, much 
more dancing room, so I made 
my way up to the front. All 
right, I'll admit it, I am a 
Clarks groupie. I have been 
sucked in, they are just that 
good. For anyone who hasn't 
seen them, I would definitely 
recommend it. They rock the 
free world, to quote Neil 
Young. "They were great. It's 
nice to see a band from my area 
doing so well. ..I think they will 
only get more popular," com- 
mented Steve Ostrosky. 

1998 marks 12 years together 
for The Clarks, who are com- 
prised of Scott Blasey, Robert 
James, Greg Joseph, and David 
Minarik. They started out as 
just a group of friends at 



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Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania who decided to 
form a band. So far they have 
amassed a fan base of over 
11,000 people all over 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West 
Virginia. The Clarks own their 
own music label called King 
Mouse Records, and release all 
of their music through it. They 
have been named "Best Local 
Band' for six consecutive years 
by The Pittsburgh City Paper. 
The Clarks have also gotten 
some national media attention. 
They were profiled by Billboard 
Magazine in its "Continental 
Drift" column, which spotlights 
up and coming regional artists. 
The Clarks soon-to-be released 
album, Clarks Live!, will be 
their fifth full-length album. 
This evening the band is playing 
in Columbus at Ludlow's, 
Friday they are at the WDVE 
Brew Bash in Pittsburgh, and 
Saturday they can be found at 
The Fantasy II in Stoystown. 
Unless The Clarks come back 
to Clarion you may have to trav- 
el quite a ways to see them. 
One of their managers said, "We 
would gladly come back, but we 
heard that Clarion spent all of 
their money on Blues 
Traveler... no one has contacted 
us yet." 



'That 70 's Show' 
debuts on Fox 



by Jessica Wallenfels 
College Press Exchange 

On an impossibly hot day in 
the San Fernando Valley, an 
impossibly beautiful girl is 
"freezing." The air conditioning 
is too much for the ballarina- 
thin, 14-year old Mila Kunis, 
who is getting made up for 
"That 70s Show," the new Fox 
sit-com airing on Sundays at 8 
ET. 

"That 70s Show" chronicles 
the lives of suburban teens com- 
ing of age in the Me Decade — 
and Kunis sets a fine example, 
at one point during the pilot 
actually ranting "Me! Me me me 
me me!" at her dim boyfriend. 

The show centers around 
semi-geeky Eric Foreman, 
(Topher Grace) in whose base- 
ment the neighborhood kids 
hang out. Kunis is the high 
maintenance girlfriend of Eric's 
bud, Kelso. It's 1976: the girl 
next door (Laura Prepton) has 
turned ravishing and Fez 
(Wilmer Valderama), the foreign 
exchange student, is learning 
about America as fast as he can. 
Parents float by surrealistically 
as the kids sneak beers and bor- 
row the car for a concert. Think 
of it as "The Wonder Years" 
with bite. 

As Jackie Burkhardt, Kunis is 
a spoiled cheerleader who gets a 
car along with her learner's per- 



mit and has her boyfriend "pret- 
ty much wrapped around her lit- 
tle finger." "...Throughout the 
show you find out she's very 
controlling." 

Executive Produced by Bonnie 
and Terry Turner, (Emmy award 
winners for "3rd Rock From the 
Sun"), "That 70s Show" enjoys 
a "Happy Days'Mike marketing 
niche. The pilot episode also 
has a bit of controversy going 
for it: marijuana, dope smoking 
is clearly implied in the pilot. 

"They're worried the kids are 
going to take it too seriously. 
Well, if the kids take it too seri- 
ously its not our fault, it's the 
parents' fault. They should do 
something about it. They 
should talk to the kids." 

Kunis at first recalls the drug 
material "a scene in an episode 
of just one show," but when 
pressed to comment on contin- 
ued pot themes, responds coyly. 
"I don't know, I guess you have 
to watch the show and see." 

"Work? Tschhh," Kunis 
scoffs. "It's fun, it's absolutely 
fun. (I'm) like a little kid, with 
little swings, and little sand... 
getting my hair done, getting my 
makeup done..." here she com- 
mands the hairdresser, who has 
sculpted Kunis' hair into the 
perfect 70s good girl 'do: parted 
in the middle, pushed behind her 
ears. 



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Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



October 29, 1998 



Renowned 
poet reads 
at Clarion 
University 



by Lori Imbroglio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Students and community mem- 
bers were struck with curiosity 
Monday night as they listened to 
poet Diane Kendig unlock her 
talents. Working for over 25 
years as a writer, teacher, and 
Nicaraguan translator, Kendig 
was excited to come to Clarion 
and share her poetry. "It's a won- 
derful opportunity for me to get 
out and connect to people," she 
said to the audience filling the 
seats in 250/252 Gemmell. 

Kendig has had a love for writ- 
ing from an early age, first 
inspired at age 10 when her 
mother gave her a diary. Her 6th 
grade teacher also influenced her 
and holds a special place in her 
heart as she reflects on her many 
accomplishments as a writer. 
She has taught English at the 
University of Findlay in Findlay, 
Ohio since 1984, and she has 
been a member of the National 
Council of Teachers of English 
where she served as chair of the 
poetryboard for College 
Compositionand 
Communication. 

In 1989 Kendig joined the 



Calenda 




#•#•#>*»»•»«••**•*•**•»»■*•*•«< 



'••••■^•••••••••■••■••••i 



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Today 

•Second Series production "The Portrait" and "The 

Savage Love" (Hart Chapel) 8 pm 

Friday 

•Admissions Day (Hart Chapel) 9 am 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Class withdrawals end 4 pm 

•Second Series Production "The Portrait" and "The 

Savage Love" (Hart Chapel) 8 pm 

•Volleyball vs. Fairmont 7 pm 

•Swim and Dive at Edinboro Pre Season Invitational 

Saturday 

•HALLOWEEN 

•Football vs West 

Chester 1 pm 

•Cross Country 

PSAC 

Championship 

(Clarion) 

•Diving at 

Oakland Inv. 

11 am 

•Volleyball vs. 

Alderson-Broadus noon 

Sunday 

•Minority Student Services Spiritual, guest speaker 

Rev. Ann Jones, (Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 




Ohio Arts Council Writers in the dents. Her poetry has been pub- 
Schools program, and she now lished in the chapbook A Tunnel 
teaches creative writing to both of Flurte Song and in over 50 
elementary and high school stu- journals including English 



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Monday 

•Faculty Recital: 

Jack Hall, trumpet/ 

Donald Black, organ 

Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium) 8:15 

pm , 

•Faculty Senate 

Policy Meeting (B-8 Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 

•Student Senate Meeting (246 Gemmell) 7:30 pm 

luesday 

•ELECTION DAY 

•Volleyball at Edinboro 7 pm 

•MSS NAHM Panel Discussion (250/252 Gemmell) 

7 pm 

•Intramural Tube H20 Baseketball Roster due 

•Intramural Free Throw Roster due 

•Intramural Badminton Roster due 

Wednesday 

•Percussion Ensemble Concert (Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium) 8:15 pm 

•Swim and Dive vs Allegheny 6 pm 

•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gemmell) 

7-8:30 pm 

•Intramural Whiffle Ball Roster due Nov. 10 

•Intramural Swim Meet Roster due Nov. 10 

•Intramural Big Buck Contest due Nov. 10 



October 29. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



1 









Journal, Minnesota Review, and 
Cincinnati Poetry Review. As 
the recipitent of two Ohio Arts 
Council Individual Artists 
Fellowships in Poetry and a 1998 
Yaddo Fellowship, she illustrated 
her merit for her many awards as 
she read her poems. The English 
department and the College of 
Education and Human resources 
was proud to sponsor her visit. 

After being introduced by Dr. 
Welsch, Kendig gave a brief 
background of some of her 
poems and began her readings 
with a fairly new one entilted 
"Unearthing a Paul." She contin- 
ued with many poems about her 
experiences as a teacher in a 
medium-security prison, her fam- 
ily history, and her many travels. 
The program was concluded with 
the reading of an old poem "If I 
Die, Leave the Balcony' Open," 
explaining a man's agony toward 
being blind. 

Kendig has been involved with 
writing for many years and has 
learned through her experiences 
to "work hard and adapt like 
crazy." When speaking of her 
passion for writing, she explains, 
'If writing were illegal, I'd be in 
prison for life." 



Alcohol Education 
Quiz 

Resident Hall Students! 
Complete this quiz and 
recievea Road R.A.L.L.Y. 
ticket (must be returned to 210 
Egbert Hall by 4 pm 
November 19.) 

1. How fast does the average 
person metabolize a drink. 

a. one dirnk per hour 

b. two drinks per hour 

c. one drink every two hours 

2. Which has more alcohol in 
it? 

a. 12oz beer at 4% 

b. 4oz wine at 12% 

c. Iozat50% 

d. AH have the same amount 

3. How does the body adapt to 
alcohol? 

a. becomes violently ill 

b. passes out 

c. Automati cally raises the 
tolerance level. 

4. What plays a role in a person 
devloping alcholism? 

a. Genetics 

b. How much and how 
ofter they drink 

c. Both 

continued on page 14 



Mister language knows all about grammar 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Columnist 

At this juncture in the time 
parameter we once again proudly 
present "Ask Mister Language 
Person," the No. 1 rated language 
column in the United States, 
according to a recent J.D. Power 
and Associates survey of con- 
sumers with imaginary steel 
plates in their heads. The philoso- 
phy of this column is simple: If 
you do not use correct grammar, 
people will lose respect for you, 
and they will bum down your 
house. So let's stop beating 
around a dead horse and cut right 
to the mustard with our first ques- 
tion: 

Q. I often hear people use the 
word "irregardless," as in: 
"Irregardless of what you may or 
may not think, moths are capable , 
of remorse." So finally I decided 
to look "irregardless" up in the 
dictionary, but I can't figure out 
what letter it begins with. 
A. Grammatical experts disagree 

on this. 
Q. What are the correct lyrics to 

the song, "It's Howdy Doody 

Time!"? 

A. According to the Library of 
Congress, they are as follows: 
"It's Howdy Doody Time! It's 




Howdy Doody Tune! It's Howdy 
Doody Time! It's Howdy Doody 
Time!" 

Q.Who wrote those lyrics? 
A.Cole Porter. 

Q. I am in the field of busi- 
ness, and people keep saying they 
want to "touch base" with me. 
They'll say, "I just wanted to 
touch base with you on the 
Fooberman contract," or "We 
need to touch base on the rental 
sheep for the sales conference." 
But my understanding of the 
rules is that if you touch base 
WITH somebody at the same 
time, at least one of you is out. So 
my question is, who the heck is 
"Fooberman"? 

A. We decided to consult with 
William Safire, one of the top 



experts in the language field, but 
his number is not listed. 

Q. I am never sure when I 
should use the word "principle" 
and when I should use "princi- 
pal." Is there an easy way to 
remember the difference? 

A. Here's a simple memory 
device for distinguishing between 
these two similar-sounding words 
(or "sonograms"): Simply 
remember that "principal" ends 
in the letters "p-a-1," which is 
an antonym for "Police Athletic 
League": whereas 'principle" 
ends in "p-l-e," which are the first 
three letters in "Please Mister 
Postman," by the Marvelettes. If 
this memory device does not 
work for you, we have a more 
effective technique involving a 
soldering iron. 

Q. When the Marvelettes sing, 
"Deliver de letter, de sooner de 
better." are they using correct 
grammar? 
A. No. The correct grammar 

would be, "Deliver de letter, 

irregardless." 

Q. Did alert reader Johnny G. 
Stewart send you an amusing 
automotive review from the 
March 12, 1997, Lewiston, 
Idaho, Morning Tribune? 

A. Yes. It states: "A short- 
throw six-speed Borg-Warner 
transmission means classic 



Pontiac excitement and the fun of 

a well-timed shift." 

Q. What's so amusing about that ? 

A. There was a letter missing 
from "shift." 

Q. Can you cite some other 
examples of language usage 
sent in by alert readers? 

A. Certainly: 

— John Triplett sent in a 
Heartland America catalog adver- 
tising baseballs that were "hand 
signed by Mickey Mantle before 
his death." 

— W. Michael Frazier sent in 
an editorial from the Dec. 6, 
1997, Huntington, W.Va., Herald- 
Dispatch containing this state- 
ment: "We believe if you have 
too much to drink at a holiday 
party, insist on driving yourself 
home." 

— Susan Olp sent in an 
Associated Press story concern- 
ing a lawsuit verdict in which a 
lawyer is quoted as saying: "It 
sends a message to gas compa- 
nies in Wyoming that gas compa- 
nies better operate safely because 
people are not going to tolerate 
being blown up." 

— Thomas Caufield sent in an 
Aug. 11, 1996, San Jose 
Mercury-News story about a 
Stanford University instructor, 
containing this statement: "Since 
his suspension, Dolph has contin- 



ued working as a manager in the 
university's lab for cadavers. In 
that position, he deals mainly 
with faculty members, Jacobs 
said. 

— Several readers sent in a 
June 19, 1998, Associated Press 
story concerning a Vermont high- 
school student who disrobed dur- 
ing her graduation speech; the 
story quotes school administra- 
tors as saying the incident "was 
not reflective of our student 
body." 

— Renee Harber sent in a 
police log from the July 24, 1997, 
Corvallis (Ore.) Gazette Times 
containing this entry: "12:38 p.m. 
July 20— report that a man near 
the Crystal Lake boat ramp was 
threatening to kill the next person 
he saw wearing a kilt." 

TIP'S "FOR" WRITERS: In 
writing a screenplay for a movie, 
be sure to include plenty of 
action. 

WRONG: "To be, or not to be." 

RIGHT: "LOOK OUT! GIANT 

RADIOACTIVE 

SQUIRRELS!" 

Got a question for Mister 

Language Person? Send it in, and 

you could receive a baseball hand 

signed by William Shakespeare 

shortly after his death. 



Antz' crawl into movie theatres I ™ y al 



by Mike Cody 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Toy Story it ain't. Unlike 

Buzz Lightyear and Sheriff 

Woody, the computer generated 

images in Antz gripe about 

their lives, swear, and aren't 

afraid to beat the living tar out 

of one another. Oh, and they 

also drink beer from the anuses 

of tiny bugs. 

Antz certainly represents a 
tremendous leap forward in the 
world of CGI, proving that 
computer animation can be 
used to tell stories with a 
decidedly adult slant. 
However, one question 
remains: does the film come 
anywhere close to the quality 
of Toy Story, the film that all 
future CGI films will be com- 
pared to? 

Nope. But then again, Buzz 
and Woody were a pretty tough 
act to follow. Antz follows the 



life of Z (voiced by Woody 
Allen), a hapless worker ant 
who constantly questions the 
lowly role he plays in his 
colony. While feeling down in 
the dumps about life in general, 
Z has a chance meeting with 
Bala, the daughter of his 
colony's queen. 

The meeting recharges Z and 
makes him determined to meet 
Princess Bala once again. Z 
trades places with a soldier ant 
(voiced by Sylvester Stallone) 
with the hopes of seeing his 
true love. He doesn't know that 
he's about to be shipped off to 
war against the ants' deadly 
enemy, a colony of termites. 

The cowardly Z ends up 
being the sole survivor of the 
battle and returns home to his 
colony, where he is mistaken 
for a war hero. Although Z 
finally gets to meet Princess 
Bala again, a series of misad- 
ventures lead to their being 
separated from their colony 
and cast into the outside world. 



Antz features nice vocal work 
from Allen, Stallone, and the 
film's all-star supporting cast, 
including Gene Hackman, 
Christopher Walken, Dan 
Akroyd, Jane Curtin, and 
Jennifer Lopez. A scene where 
Walken 's character, General 
Cutter, intimidates a motley 
crew of bugs by doing a 
Walken-esque psychotic rant is 
well worth the price of admis- 
sion. 

Unfortunately, the animation 
in Antz isn't always convincing 
enough for viewers to lose 
themselves in the fantasy 
world. At times, the creatures 
inhabiting Z's world appear 
stiff-legged and devoid of life. 
The film's animation especially 
lags during the action 
sequences occuring when Z and 
Bala leave their colony and 
explore the outside world. 

Antz may not take any giant 
steps forward in animation or 
storytelling, but it certainly 
bodes well for the future of 



Dreamworks SKG's 

(Spielberg-Katzenberg-Geffin) 
animation department. If you 
want to see truly extraordinary 
animation, save your money 
until Prince Of Egypt. It uses 
old-fashioned cell animation 
and comes out this Christmas. 
In the meantime, though, 
Antz isn't half-bad. Despite a 
certain summer movie's claims 
to the contrary, Antz proves 
that size doesn't matter after 
all. 



\ssociatioii 





WARM UP WITH A 
POT PIE COMBO 





• POT PIE 

• MEDIUM DRINK 




tt»* 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



Renowned 
poet reads 
at Clarion 



October 29, 1998 



University 



by Lori Imbrogno 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Students and community mem- 
bers were struck with curiosity 
Monday night as they listened to 
poet Diane Kendig unlock her 
talents. Working for over 25 
years as a writer, teacher, and 
Nicaraguan translator, Kendig 
was excited to come to Clarion 
and share her poetry. "It's a won- 
derful opportunity for me to get 
out and connect to people," she 
said to the audience filling the 
seats in 250/252 Gemmell. 

Kendig has had a love for writ- 
ing from an early age. first 
inspired at age 10 when her 
mother gave her a diary. Her 6th 
grade teacher also influenced her 
and holds a special place in her 
heart as she reflects on her many 
accomplishments as a writer. 
She has taught English at the 
University of Findlay in Findlay, 
Ohio since 1984, and she has 
been a member of the National 
Council of Teachers of English 
where she served as chair of the 
poetryboard for College 
Compositionand 
Communication. 

In 1989 Kendig joined the 



Today 

•Second Series production 'The Portrait" and "The 

Savage Love" (Hart Chapel) 8 pm 

Friday 

•Admissions Day (Hart Chapel) 9 am 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Class withdrawals end 4 pm 

•Second Series Production "The Portrait" and "The 

Savage Love" (Hart Chapel) 8 pm 

•Volleyball vs. Fairmont 7 pm 

•Swim and Dive at Edinboro Pre Season Invitational 

Saturday 

•HALLOWEEN 

•Football vs West X^^¥l/ r J 

Chester 1 pm A^V^ ^-</£—Z\!L j 

•Cross Country 

PSAC 

Championship 

(Clarion) 

•Diving at 

Oakland In v. 

11 am 

•Volleyball vs. 

Alderson-Broadus noon 

Sunday 

•Minority Student Services Spiritual, guest speaker 

Rev. Ann Jones, (Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 




Ohio Arts Council Writers in the dents. Her poetry has been pub- 
Schools program, and she now lished in the chapbook A Tunnel 
teaches creative writing to both of Flurte Song and in over 50 
elementary and high school stu- journals including English 



Sign up at 
Computer Products Co. 

1 Dietz Place 
(Behind the Post Office) 



PENNCOM 

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Clarion University Student Rates 

Purchase Internet service for the entire 
school year (through May '99) and pay only 

$120 

6 N ^ A For a limitecl time save an additional 
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Redeem this coupon at Computer Products 
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Monday 

•Faculty Recital: 

Jack Hall, trumpet/ 

Donald Black, organ 

Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium) 8:15 

pm 

•Faculty Senate 

Policy Meeting (B-8 Hart Chapel) 3:30 pm 

•Student Senate Meeting (246 Gemmell) 7:30 pm 

Tuesday 

•ELECTION DAY 

•Volleyball at Edinboro 7 pm 

•MSS NAHM Panel Discussion (250/252 Gemmell) 

7 pm 

•Intramural Tube H20 Baseketball Roster due 

•Intramural Free Throw Roster due 

•Intramural Badminton Roster due 

Wednesday 

•Percussion Ensemble Concert (Marwick-Boyd 

Auditorium) 8:15 pm 

•Swim and Dive vs Allegheny 6 pm 

•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gemmell) 

7-8:30 pm 

•Intramural Whiffle Ball Roster due Nov. 10 

•Intramural Swim Meet Roster due Nov. 10 

•Intramural Big Buck Contest due Nov. 10 









^ 



October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Pa ge 13 



Journal, Minnesota Review, and 
Cincinnati Poetry Review. As 
the recipient of two Ohio Arts 
Council Individual Artists 
Fellowships in Poetry and a 1998 
Yaddo Fellowship, she illustrated 
her merit for her many awards as 
she read her poems. The English 
department and the College of 
Education and Human resources 
was proud to sponsor her visit. 

After being introduced by Dr. 
Welsch, Kendig gave a brief 
background of some of her 
poems and began her readings 
with a fairly new one entilted 
"Unearthing a Path." She contin- 
ued with many poems about her 
experiences as a teacher in a 
medium-security prison, her fam- 
ily history, and her many travels. 
The program was concluded with 
the reading of an old poem "If I 
Die, Leave the Balcony Open," 
explaining a man's agony toward 
being blind. 

Kendig has been involved with 
writing for many years and has 
learned through her experiences 
to "work hard and adapt like- 
crazy." When speaking of her 
passion for writing, she explains, 
'If writing were illegal, I'd be in 
prison for life." 



Alcohol Education 
Quiz 

Resident Hall Students! 
Complete this quiz and 
recievea Road R.A.L.L.Y. 
ticket (must be returned to 210 
Egbert Hall by 4 pm 
November 19.) 

1 . How fast does the average 
person metabolize a drink. 

a. one dirnk per hour 

b. two drinks per hour 

c. one drink every two hours 

2. Which has more alcohol in 
it? 

a. 12oz beer at 4% 

b. 4oz wine at 12% 

c. 1 oz at 50% 

d. All have the same amount 

3. How does the body adapt to 
alcohol? 

a. becomes violently ill 

b. passes out 

c. Automati tally raises the 
tolerance level. 

4. What plays a role in a person 
devloping alcholism? 

a. Genetics 

b. How much and how 
ofter they drink 

c. Roth 

continued on page 14 



Mister language knows all about grammar 



by Dave Rarry 
Syndicated Columnist 




At this juncture in the time 
parameter we once again proudly 
present "Ask Mister Language 
Person " the No. 1 rated language 
column in the United States, 
according to a recent J.D. Power 
and Associates survey of con- 
sumers with imaginary steel 
plates in their heads. The philoso- 
phy of this column is simple: If 
you do not use correct grammar, 
people will lose respect for you, 
and they will burn down your 
house. So let's stop beating 
around a dead horse and cut right 
to the mustard with our first ques- 
tion: 

Q. I often hear people use the 
word "irregardless," as in: 
"Irregardless of what you may or 
may not think, moths are capable , 
of remorse." So finally I decided 
to look "irregardless" up in the 
dictionary, but I can't figure out 
what letter it begins with. 
A. Grammatical experts disagree 

on this. 
Q. What are the correct lyrics to 

the song, "It's Howdy Doody 

Time!"? 

A. According to the Library of 
Congress, they are as follows: 
"It's Howdy Doody Time! It's 




Howdy Doody Time! It's Howdy 
Doody Time! It's Howdy Doody 
Time!" 

Q.Who wrote those lyrics? 

A.Cole Porter. 

Q. I am in the field of busi- 
ness, and people keep saying they 
want to "touch base" with me. 
They'll say, "I just wanted to 
touch base with you on the 
Fooberman contract," or "We 
need to touch base on the rental 
sheep for the sales conference." 
But my understanding of the 
rules is that if you touch base 
WITH somebody at the same 
lime, at least one of you is out. So 
my question is, who the heck is 
"Fooberman"? 

A. We decided to consult with 
William Safire, one of the top 



experts in the language field, but 
his number is not listed. 

Q. I am never sure when I 
should use the word "principle" 
and when 1 should use "princi- 
pal." Is there an easy way to 
remember the difference? 

A. Here's a simple memory 
device for distinguishing between 
these two similar-sounding words 
(or "sonograms"): Simply 
remember that "principal" ends 
in the letters "p-a-1," which is 
an antonym for "Police Athletic 
League": whereas 'principle" 
ends in "p-l-e," which are the first 
three letters in "Please Mister 
Postman," by the Marvelettes. If 
this memory device does not 
work for you, we have a more 
effective technique involving a 
soldering iron. 

Q. When the Marvelettes sing, 
"Deliver de letter, de sooner de 
better." are they using correct 
grammar? 
A. No. The correct grammar 

would be, "Deliver de letter, 

irregardless." 

Q. Did alert reader Johnny G. 
Stewart send you an amusing 
automotive review from the 
March 12, 1997, Lewiston, 
Idaho, Morning Tribune? 

A. Yes. It states: "A short- 
throw six-speed Borg-Warner 
transmission means classic 



Pontiac excitement and the fun oi 

a well-timed shift." 

Q. What's so amusing about that? 

A. There was a letter missing 
from "shift. " 

Q. Can you cite some other 
examples of language usage 
sent m by alert readers.' 

A. Certainly: 

— John Triplett sent in a 
Heartland America catalog adver- 
tising baseballs that were "hand 
signed by Mickey Mantle before 
his death." 

— W. Michael Frazier sent in 
an editorial from the Dec. 6, 
1997, Huntington, W.Va., Herald- 
Dispatch containing this state- 
ment: "We believe if you have 
too much to drink at a holiday 
party, insist on driving yourself 
home." 

— Susan Olp sent in an 
Associated Press story concern- 
ing a lawsuit verdict in which a 
lawyer is quoted as saying: "It 
sends a message to gas compa- 
nies in Wyoming that gas compa- 
nies better operate safely because 
people are not going to tolerate 
being blown up." 

— Thomas Caufield sent in an 
Aug. 11, 1996, San Jose 
Mercury -News story about a 
Stanford University instructor, 
containing Uiis statement: "Since 
his suspension, Dolph has contin- 



ued working as a manager in the 
university's lab lor cadavers In 
thai position, he deals mainly 
with faculty members, faci 

said. 

Several readers sent in a 
June 19, 1998, Associated Press 
story concerning a Vermont high- 
school student who disrobed dur- 
ing her graduation speech; the 
story quotes school administra- 
tors as saying the incident "was 
not reflective of our student 
body." 

— Rcnce Harber sent in a 
police log from the July 24, 1997, 
Corvallis (Ore.) Gazette Times 
containing this entry: "12:38 p.m. 
July 20— report that a man near 
the Crystal Lake boat ramp was 
threatening to kill the next person 
he saw wearing a kilt." 

TIP'S "FOR" WRITERS: In 
writing a screenplay for a movie, 
be sure to include plenty of 
action. 

WRONG: "To be, or not to be." 
RIGHT "LOOK OUT! GIANT 
R A D I O A C T I V E 
SQUIRRELS!" 

Got a question for Mister 
Language Person? Send it in, and 
you could receive a baseball hand 
signed by William Shakespeare 
shortly after his death. 



Antz' crawl into movie theatres 



by Mike Cody 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Toy Story it ain't. Unlike 
Buzz Lightyear and Sheriff 
Woody, the computer generated 
images in Antz gripe about 
their lives, swear, and aren't 
afraid to beat the living tar out 
of one another. Oh, and they 
also drink beer from the anuses 

of tiny bugs. 

Antz certainly represents a 
tremendous leap forward in the 
world of CGI, proving that 
computer animation can be 
used to tell stories with a 
decidedly adult slant. 
However, one question 
remains: does the film come 
anywhere close to the quality 
of Toy Story, the film that all 
future CGI films will be com- 
pared to? 

Nope. But then again, Buzz 
and Woody were a pretty tough 
act to follow. Antz follows the 



life of Z (voiced by Woody 
Allen), a hapless worker ant 
who constantly questions the 
lowly role he plays in his 
colony. While feeling down in 
the dumps about life in general, 
Z has a chance meeting with 
Bala, the daughter of his 
colony's queen. 

The meeting recharges Z and 
makes him determined to meet 
Princess Bala once again. Z 
trades places with a soldier ant 
(voiced by Sylvester Stallone) 
with the hopes of seeing his 
true love. He doesn't know that 
he's about to be shipped off to 
war against the ants' deadly 
enemy, a colony of termites. 

The cowardly Z ends up 
being the sole survivor of the 
battle and returns home to his 
colony, where he is mistaken 
for a war hero. Although Z 
finally gets to meet Princess 
Bala again, a series of misad- 
ventures lead to their being 
separated from their colony 
and cast into the outside world. 



Antz features nice vocal work 
from Allen, Stallone, and the 
film's all-star supporting cast, 
including Gene Hackman, 
Christopher Walken, Dan 
Akroyd, Jane Curtin, and 
Jennifer Lopez. A scene where 
Walken's character, General 
Cutter, intimidates a motley 
crew of bugs by doing a 
Walken-esque psychotic rant is 
well worth the price of admis- 
sion. 

Unfortunately, the animation 
in Antz isn't always convincing 
enough for viewers to lose 
themselves in the fantasy 
world. At times, the creatures 
inhabiting Z's world appear 
stiff-legged and devoid of life. 
The film's animation especially 
lags during the action 
sequences occuring when Z and 
Bala leave their colony and 
explore the outside world. 

Antz may not take any giant 
steps forward in animation or 
storytelling, but it certainly 
bodes well for the future of 



Dreamworks SKG's 

(Spielberg-Katzenberg-Geffin) 
animation department. If you 
want to see truly extraordinary 
animation, save your money 
until Prince Of Egypt. It uses 
old-fashioned cell animation 
and comes out this Christmas. 
In the meantime, though, 
Antz isn't half-bad. Despite a 
certain summer movie's claims 
to the contrary, Antz proves 
that size doesn't matter after 
all. 



University 

.-.■:•:•:• :*:•;•:•:•:•: ■:■:•:• *** x-x-Xv 

International 

Association 

Cultural Night, 

Gemmell 

xx-XvX-xxvX-x :-x*X;XvXvX;X XvXvX'yXv.*.; ;-:xvX'XvXvX*:vXyX; 

"Multi-Purpose 
room 

: : x : x : Xv: : x : XvX-:x x-x-x-x-x- :•:•:•: ■:■:•:■:■ .-yXxvX'xvXv 

'• '•'••• ••• \ '•' y .'' •*' '* ' '.x'^'' 

7 Dm 

Nov* 6 



¥!«w«!««wS 



SS««fewx'W'>^ ; w'i<^ww!? 




Paee 14 



The Clarion Call 



Music Review 



October 29, 1998 



'CIV is full of holes and 'Mineral' hasn't taken it's vitamins 



by James Gates 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

It's a trend you hear about all 
too frequently in the music busi- 
ness. Bands burst from the 
underground into the spotlight 
with a hit debut album and fol- 
low it up with a dissappointing 
sophomore disk. Both Mineral 
and CIV have been mulling 
around in the underground 
scene for years and have their 
own cult of fans. Mineral 
gained considerable popularity 
with their first disk The Power 
Of Failing while CIV broke- into 
the mainstream with their debut 
Set Your Goals. 

EndSerenading is the new disk 
from Mineral, giants in the 
underground emo-core rock 



scene. Mineral is comprised of 
four guys from other emo bands 
who have too many emotions in 
them. The music on 

EndSerenading is light, wispy, 
and ever flowing, with the gui- 
tars interlacing over the gentle, 
rolling rhythms. The overall 
sound is extremely melodic, but 
dark and ominous. 

The lyrics on the disk are 
insightful and thought provok- 
ing, but Mineral's lead singer 
lets his emotions get to him and 
he whines about how his heart 
aches. Picture a grown man cry- 
ing uncontrollably over a lost 
puppy. 

EndSerenading opens with an 
acoustic song, "Love Letter 
Typewriter", which is overly 
pretty and then picks up the 



pace to a painfully slow crawl 
with "Palisade." Except for the 
brooding "Walking To Winter" 
and the flowing "Gjs" the album 
is virtually forgettable. It is 
probably one of the prettiest 
albums by one of the most tal- 
ented emo rock bands outside of 
Sunny Day Real Estate on the 
market today, but unfortunately, 
all of the songs blend and drone 
on for the entire disk. They are 
melodic, but trudge along at a 
snail's pace. It is an excellent 
album to drift away to, though. 
There's no problem staying 
awake to CIV's new album, 
Thirteen Day Getaway. The 
albums opens with the insanely 
poppy and catchy single 
"Secondhand Superstar" and 
keeps a feverish pace consis- 



tently throughout the disk. For 
those unaware, CIV plays high 
energy, bouncy music that 
teeters on the fine line between 
pop and punk called power pop. 
Most of the songs clock in under 
three minutes and are fast and 
furious. 

CIV's lead singer doesn't 
have any special message to 
convey, unlike Mineral, beyond 
the usual punk anthems of rebel- 
lion and going your own way. 
He alternates between singing 
on songs like "Big Girl", and 
screaming on "Owner's 
Manual." The hands-down mas- 
terpiece of the album is the clos- 
er "Little Men." It starts 
acoustically and builds to a 
stunning ending of full-blown 
power. 



Halloween Special 

Horror movies don't scare up the thrills like they used to 



by Keith Gwillim 

Clarion Call 

Asisstant Lifestyles Editor 



Well, Halloween has rolled 
around once again, and we all and interesting ways 



Every single year, like clock- What has happened to the classic 
work they arrive; all showcasing horror movies, ones that went for 
beautiful 30-year old actors play- actual scares, rather than compet- 
ing high school students getting ing for most gallons of fake blood 
their intestines ripped out in new used? Halloween delivered gen- 



But that's 



know what that means - children 
collecting enough candy to stock a 
fallout shelter for a decade, carved 
pumpkins on porches, and a new 
crop of incompetent horror 
movies. 



the problem; they aren't new or 
interesting. Most of these so- 
called movies make you feel like 
you were a victim in the movie, 
not just a spectator. 




t 





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uine chills almost every frame, 
and did it with a minimum of 
bloodshed. 

The Exorcist, which is quite pos- 
sibly the most frightening movie 
of all time, managed not only to 
scare the pants off theatre patrons, 
but also make a strong (and 
incredibly offensive, to some) reli- 
gious statement. The Exorcist did 
dip into the gore department for 
chills (if a pea soup regurgitating 
Linda Blair doesn't gross you out, 
then more power to you), but used 
it as a means to an end; and also in 
conjunction with searing psycho- 
logical terror, to have a nice bal- 
ance. 

If you're talking about mental 

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thrillers, though, you can't forget 
the master of the genre, Alfred 
Hitchcock, and the crown jewel in 
his directoral cache", Psycho. 
Now, I know that film critics drop 
his name more often than Homer 
Simpson chomps donuts, but 
there's a good reason, that being 
that Psycho is the defining horror 
movie. Not only was it complete- 
ly new and exciting, but it changed 
the entire genre forever. It tackled 
a multitude of taboos; everything 
from murder to insanity to trans- 
vestism, and was able to wrap all 
of them up in a neat and terribly 
disturbing package. Hitchcock 
chose not to shoot in color, to mute 
the violence, especially that of the 
famous shower scene. 

The only halfway decent horror 
film to come out within this 
decade was Scream, and it almost 
doesn't count; being just a few 
jokes and Leslie Nielsen short of a 
spoof. The only reason Sere am 
worked so well is that it cleverly 
subverted the entire horror genre; 
twisting in on itself, borrowing 
elements from similar movies, 
while poking fun at them all at the 
same time. That's a lot of balls to 
be juggling in the air, but director 
Wes Craven pulls it off with style. 

So this Saturday, avoid the latest 
gore-fest fodder in the theatre 
(Bride OfChucky, Urban Legend), 
and go down to the video store to 
rent a real horror film. Of course*' 
if the copy of Psycho is out, you 

know where it is. 



Unfortunately, Thirteen Day 
Getaway is not consistent 
throughout, with a handful of 
filler songs only worthy of 
being B-sides. It will never live 
up to the success of Set Your 
Goals no matter how much pub- 
licity CIV gets. 

It's always hard to pump out 
albums that satisfy the main- 
stream audience over and over. 
CIV and Mineral found this out 
with their respective new releas- 
es. While they'll reap the bene- 
fits from their past album's suc- 
cess and the goodwill their 
names bring, the bottom line is 
still there... the quality is lack- 
ing. I give Mineral's 
EndSerenading a 5 out of 10 and 
CIV a 6 out of 10. 

Alcohol 
Quiz 

continued from page 12 

5. What's the only 
thing that can be raised 
by drinking heavily? 

a. Tolerance 

b. Trigger Level 

c. Both 

6. T/F 

Vodka or gin makes you 
more intoxicated than 
drinking the same 
amount of whiskey? 

7. T/F 

In the body, Alcohol is 
burned up just as food 
is. 

8. T/F 

A few onces of liquor 
helps keep you warm on 
a cold night. 

9. T/F 

The best cure for a 
hangover is aspirin. 

10. T/F 
Because it 
is a stimu- 
lant, alco- 
hol tends 
to pep 
people 
up? 




Qctofrer 2% \m 



The Clarion Call 



Pa ge 15 



CHANDLER HALL MENU 11/01-11/07/98 





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Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



*i.V . •' 



October 29. 1998 



CALL ON YOU 




b y 

George Groff 



Photography 
Editor 



Who is your favorite character in a 
horror film? 






Lisa Hamrick, Junior, Communication 

'"Monica Lewinsky in the horror film *OIiver 

OosofT with Bill Clinton." 



Chris Megats, .1 u nior. Elementary Education 

'It's a tie between Regan from' The Exorcist' ami 

that dude from "A Clockwork Orange." 



J ustin M . Ezyk, Senior, Communication 

"Scarface. Although he is not really a horror film 

character, he is a vidian that knows how to run 

the show." 






Justin Shields, Junior, Communication 

"Jason, cause he finds the weirdest things to kill 

people with." 



Lisa Marshall, Junior, Psychology/Sociology 
"Michael Myers from 'Halloween.'" 



CJ. McBride, Junior, Communication 
"Candyman." 



October 29. 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Tage 17 



ENTERTAINMENT 








C H A O S by Brian Shuster 



\$XMU}t~. 





"Well, how nice to see you. Can I take your 
coats?" 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 




"What toppings? It doesnt matter to me. Just be 
sure to send the fattest delivery boy you've got." 



COME CELEBRATE A 
BELATED HALLOWEEN 

WITHZZE 




*SCARY MOVIES 

"HALLOWEEN TREATS 

*ALL WOMEN WELCOME 

*OPEN BID: MONDAY, 
NOVEMBER 2ND @ 8PM 




TRI SIGMA HOUSE 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



October 29. 1998 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HELP WANTED 



FOR SALE 



We need enthusiastic individuals to 
earn big $$$ selling advertising in 
your official campus directory and on 
the Internet! We provide training, 
support and offer flexible hours! 
Excellent experience in advertising/ 
sales/public relations. Call College 
Directory Publishing 1-80O-466-2221 

x 233. www.campusdirectory.com 

**************** 

Handicapped faculty member needs 
assistance in swimming. Will pay $7 
per swim session. Phone: 226-6675. 

Ask for Dr. Lynn Smith 

**************** 

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night 

babysitter needed. 223-9473 

**************** 

Starving students short on cash? Eam 
a free trip for Spring Break 99 by sell- 
ing trips to friends and other students. 
For details call Mike ©412-621-3369 
or email mabs+5@ pitt.edu 



A beautiful, black living room set con- 
sisting of one full size couch, love 
seat, and chair. Completes the perfect 
apartment. If interested call 724-79 1- 

2419. Asking $ 300 for the set. 

**************** 

Wooden coffee table with smoked 
glass insets. Asking $50 for table. 
724-791-2419 



TRAVEL 



HORRENT 



Nice, quiet two bedroom apartment 
available for Spring semester. 

226-8225. 

**************** 

Silver Springs Apartments. Two bed- 
room furnished apartments available 
for the Fall 1999/Spring 2000 semes- 
ters. Four person occupancy. Very 
close to campus. Call 226-5917 and 
leave message. 

**************** 

Attn: Grad students. Sleeping rooms 
for rent in large Victorian home close to 
campus. $175 a month including utili- 
ties and TV cable. Private phone lines 

available. 226-5651 

**************** 

Available Spring '99 East Main St. 
Two apartments, 1st floor. Two person, 
2nd floor. Three people - $700 per 
semester and utilities and security. 
782-3177 

**************** 

Beautifully renovated 2-bedroom wall- 

to-wall$479 plus electric. 

Phone 412-441-1400 or 814-849-4132 



Act now! Call for best Spring break 
prices to South Padre (Free Meals), 
Cancun, Jamaica, Keywest, Panama 
City. Reps Needed. Travel free, eam 
cash. Group discounts for 6+. 
www.leisuretours.com 

800-838-8203 

**************** 

Make easy money! Go on Spring break 
for free! USA Spring Break offers 
Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica and Florida 
packages and is currently accepting 
applications for campus sales represen- 
tatives. 

Call 1-888-SPRING-BREAK. 



GREEK 
PERSONALS 



KAP, Hi guys! Hope everything is 
going well! Wanted to wish you all a 
safe and happy Halloween. Have a 
wonderful time at your date party! I 
hope you enjoy your treat from me! 

Love, your sweetheart, Nicole 

**************** 

AXT, Slavery was great! We had a great 

mixer. Thanks. The brothers of 6E 

**************** 

Leanne, Congrats on becoming part of 

the "Little Pink Mafia!" 

**************** 

BB. Don't you ever get tired of AZ 
dancing? Neh-Neh, hee-hee, (cough)! 

We love ya! Love, Bandit 

**************** 

To our Halloween B-day girl, Irwin! 
Happy 22nd B-day! We love, you! Love 
your AZ sisters 





MAKE YOUR 

THOUGHTS 

CONCRETE! 

VOTE ON 

TUESDAY, 

NOVEMBER 3 




**************** 

Irwin! Happy Birthday Big! I hope it's 

the best ever! I love ya! Love, Dezort 

**************** 

Gigler and Shan, Are you ready for the 
AZ costume contest? We are! Love.BB 

and Miller 

**************** 

We love our IX coaches! You guys 
rock! Thanks again EX for another 

great Derby Days! Love, AZ 

**************** 

IX Brad, Kenny, Nick, and Ryan, We 
had a great time with you on Friday! 
You were definitely worth every penny! 

Love, the sisters of AZ 

**************** 

To the brothers of IX, Thanks for the 
awesome mixer! It was a great way to 
celebrate our Derby Bowl win! you're 

all tons of fun! Love, AZ 

**************** 

The brothers of IX would like to con- 
gratulate Dani Jo Close on becoming 
their Sweetheart for the 98-99 school 

year. We love you! 

**************** 

AZ, Thanks for the great time at our 
mixer during Derby Days. Love, the 

Brothers of IX 

**************** 

Happy 21st, Nikki. Love the Brothers 

of IX 

**************** 

Flea, Congratulations on a fine job you 
did organizing Derby Days. Your 

Brothers of IX are proud of you! 

**************** 

Congratulations, AOE for wining Derby 

Days. Love, the Sisters of ZTA 

**************** 

We'll break the Ten Commandments 
with you any time KAP. Thanks for the 

great mixer! Love, the Zetas 

**************** 



Congratulations to all the sororities that 
participated in Derby Days. Everyone 
did a great job! Love, the Sisters of 

ZTA 

**************** 

ZTA Fall '98, We can't wait to have you 

in our families! Love, your future Bigs 

**************** 

Thanks for being our coaches Aaron, 
Chris, Ron, and Jim. You guys were 

great! Love, ZTA 

**************** 

KAP, Looking forward to a great time 

tonight. It should be scary! Dance Team 

**************** 

Baseball, Thanks for a great mixer! 

Let's do it again! Love, Dance Team 

**************** 

Congratulations to our newest Sisters 

Kylene and Jenn! Love, OH 

**************** 

Congratulations to our new member, 

Julie! Love, your future 4>H Sisters 

**************** 

A$Q, Hang in there during the remain- 
der of your pledging process. Good 

luck! Maurice R. 

**************** 

Congratulations, AOE on wining 1st 
place in Derby Days. You did a great 

job! Love, AIT 

**************** 

65, Thanks for a great mixer. We'll be 
your slaves anytime! Love, the Sisters 

of AIT 

**************** 

Congratulations to all the sororities and 

IX for a great Derby Days! Love, AIT 

**************** 

Happy Birthday Holly! Love, your 

AOE Sisters 

**************** 

Congratulations to all fraternities and 
sororities with Derby Days. It was a lot 
of fun. Love, AOE 



**************** 

Dani Jo, I know you will be a wonderful 
sweetheart. Congratulations! I'm very 

excited for you! Love, Jennifer 

**************** 

Kom & Steve, Waiting for the great 

pumpkin? Camron & Dewey 

**************** 

To the associate members of Phi Sigma 
Kappa, you're the best down pledge 

class. Cam & Dewey 

**************** 

Congratulations to the new members of 
ITT, Gabe Caputo, Jeff Mullen, Andy 
Sibble, and Rich Walsh. Your Brothers 

ofirr 

**************** 

Tarn mi, Break a leg with your play. 

Love, your Sisters of III 

**************** 

Congrats to all soroties on a job well 
done with Derby Days. Love, EH 



PERSONALS 



Special thanks to the Security crew of 

Blues Traveler! Kris tie 

**************** 

Lordy, Lordy guess who's 40! If you 
see Fr. Brian Vossler wish him a happy 

belated birthday! 

**************** 

Tim, Good luck in Dr. O's class. It's a 

great idea to study at the bar. 

**************** 

Loomi Guys, Can't wait to see you on 
Halloween I'll be dancin' like a queen 
after 2:00 when you lock the door we'll 

have a party in Apt. 4 

**************** 

Amber, Can't wait for our Cheesey 
Disney night! Swiss family Robinson 

here we come! Love, D & K 

**************** 

Kelly, the Clark caravan was big fun! 



: : ; t;g.i y .;,;ii r i Y , i l i,, y , Y , n , _ , ,, - ; - , , , ; ;■; ■ ; ■ ; ; ; ■ ; : ;, ; ,; ; ;,. ■ ; ■; ■ ; ■ ; „ v i j , „ j „ „ , ;;y , „ ....... , ' , - , , , ^_^ 




Mahoning Valley Ballet 

present 

k a ciila 

cmdoilmwd 




y, October 30 & Halloween 7:00pjn. 
PUnxsutawney Area Middle School 



GeneraIAdmissioii-$60) Reserved 
Fortfcketecall: 81493&S4& 



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October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



ENTERTAINMENT 



MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM 




JUNIOR, 

WHERE'S Your 

MANNERS? 
NOW 60 OVER 
Am SMELL THE 
HENPERSO/VS' 
BUTTS. 






C H A O S by Brian Shuster 



BUBBA'S 



GARAG 





"Well, now, I'm not exactly sure . . . it's real slow 
when I gotta order parts for these foreign 
models." 



MR/BE I SftoUU) DoSoHELKOMYVJHKmTHWK,TOM Ton? 



wrf 



oroi&n&ah&tr 



CHAOS 



by Brian Shuster 




"A delicious shake for breakfast, one for lunch, 
and a sensible dinner ... I lost close to a ton!" 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



October 29, 1998 



SPORTSWIRE 



The Golden Eagles will 
return home with hopes of 
returning to their winning 
ways this Saturday. The tal- 
ented West Chester Rams, 
who have been in the 
Northeast Regional rankings 
for much of the season will be 
the opposition. Read the 
scouting report to see what's 
in store for the Golden Eagles 
this week. 

See Page 21 

There's a lot of excitement 
surrounding the Clarion 
University basketball team 
this season. The team's expec- 
tations are as high as ever this 
season with the return of sev- 
eral key players, as well as an 
influx of Division I transfers 
and a group of talented fresh- 
men. 

See Page 22 

Columnist Chris Pfeil takes 
a look at the Steelers and how 
they stand as the midpoint of 
the NFL season arrives. 

See Page 24 



QUOTABLES 



"The PSAC is the premier 
conference in the NCAA 
Division II today. For local 
fans who want to come out 
and see some great cross 
country runners, this is the 
meet." 

— Clarion cross country 
coach Pat Mooney, on 
Saturday's PSAC cross coun- 
try championships at 
Mayfield Golf Club. 



'Two years ago we won the 
PSAC-West, and that's a 
feeling I'd like to feel all 
over again." 

—Clarion University for- 
ward Marvin Wells, on the 
upcoming basketball season. 



SPORTS 



Eagles fall at IUP, 52-14 



By Nathan Koble 
Sports Editor 



The Golden Eagles found them- 
selves at the wrong place at the 
wrong time Saturday against IUP. 

For IUP, the formula for making 
the Division II playoffs appears 
simple — win and you're in. 

The inspired Indians are keeping 
up on their end of the bargain, 
routing Clarion 52-14 at IUP's 
George P. Miller Stadium. 

IUP racked up 536 yards of 
offense and a 42-7 first-half lead 
en route to their seventh win in 
eight starts. Clarion, meanwhile, 
suffered its second consecutive 
setback, falling to 3-5 overall (1-3 
PSAC-West). 

The Indians opened the scoring 
on the game's initial possession, 
as Terrance Wilson capped a 
seven-play, 78-yard drive with a 
33-yard touchdown run. 

Following a Clarion punt, the 
Indians took over on their own 15 
and marched to pay dirt. Tink 
Stennett did the honors for IUP, 
duplicating Wilson's feat with a 
33-yard rumble. 

After the two teams traded 
turnovers, the Indians took over 
on their own 4-yard line, where 
they again used long runs to find 
the end zone. 

Wilson took IUP into Clarion ter- 
ritory with 57-yard run, followed 
by a 15-yard strike from Paul 
Failla to Lewis Hicks and an 18- 




George Groff/Clarion Call 

Alvin Slaughter needs seven catches to tie the school 
record for career pass receptions. 

yard touchdown run by Wilson to the second period before Clarion 

increase the margin to 21-0 with a could dent the scoreboard, 

minute still remaining in the first Clarion quarterback Chris Weibel 

quarter. kept the ball on a 25-yard keeper 

IUP would tack on another to trim the margin to 28-7 with 

touchdown in the early minutes of 10:21 showing on the clock. 



After IUP scored a pair of touch- 
downs to go ahead 42-7, Clarion 
drove to the IUP 12 with under a 
minute in the half, but was unable 
to capitalize, as a Frank Van Wert 
field goal attempt of 35 yards was 
off the mark. 

The Eagles found themselves 
with another opportunity to score 
in the third quarter. A botched 
punt snap allowed the Eagles to 
take over at the IUP 9. However, 
the IUP defense yielded zero 
yards on four plays to stifle the 
Clarion threat. 

The Eagles were able to find the 
end zone in the fourth quarter. 
With IUP leading 49-7, Weibel 
found wide receiver Alvin 
Slaughter for a 62-yard touch- 
down pass with just under 10 min- 
utes remaining. 

IUP then capped the scoring 
when Jeremy Sauve nailed a 36- 
yard field goal at the 3:37 mark. 

Weibel and Slaughter each put 
up strong numbers in the loss. 

Weibel clicked on 22 of 37 
attempts for 307 yards and a 
touchdown. 

Slaughter nabbed nine aerials for 
158 yards and a touchdown. 

However, the Clarion running 
game was unable to establish 
itself, recording 74 total yards. 

The Eagles return to action 
Saturday at Memorial Stadium to 
host West Chester in a 1 p.m. 
meeting. 



October 29, 1998 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 



Clarion set to host PSAC cross country championships 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



While ghouls, ghosts, and gob- 
lins are preparing their costumes 
for the largest candy-rama on 
earth, Halloween, the PSAC is 
offering its own version of "Trick 
or Treat" on Saturday, with the 
men's and women's cross country 
championships on the line. 

Clarion University and Mayfield 
Golf Club, located just off 
Interstate 80's exit 9, is hosting 
the annual affair. The men's race 
is 8,000 meters and begins at 
10:30 a.m., while the women's 
race is 6,000 meters and is set to 



start at 11:30 a.m. The races are 
open to the public. 

What will the weather and 
course conditions bring to the 
PSAC field? That's a question 
most traditional Halloween 
observers would admit have 
played many a "trick" over the 
past decade of championships. 
But the team and individual prize 
of being recognized as PSAC 
champion is quite a satisfying 
"treat," one that lasts a lifetime. 
PSAC Men's Championship 

There's little doubt (hat the top 
two teams will be Edinboro and 
Shippensburg. The remainder of 
the teams will be battling for posi- 



tions 3-14. Edinboro won the 
1997 title scoring only 35 points, 
while Shippensburg was second 
with 62 and IUP third with 82. 

Edinboro, led by talented 30th- 
year head coach Doug Watts, has 
directed the Fighting Scots to six 
straight PSAC men's champi- 
onships, 13 of the last 14 titles, 
and a total of 20 PSAC men's 
titles in his 29 years. Ranked No 
1 in the Region this year, 
Edinboro has won four NCAA 
Division II titles (1986-88, 1990)' 
and placed second five times.- 

Although Edinboro's two-time 
winner Travis Kuhl has graduat- 
ed, the Scots will look to fresh- 



men Xi Min Wu to run ahead of 
the pack. Scott Kovacevik, who 
was fourth at PSACs in 1997 and 
sixth in 1996, is expected to run 
with the lead pack. But the Scots 
could be without another top five 
runner, junior Jeff Barker, who 
hasn't run since Sept. 14. Barker 
was 10th in 1996. Also ready to 
run are sophomore Daryl Myer, 
who was eighth at PSACs last 
year, and Jon Newlin (16th at 
PSACs in 1997) and Jerad 
Bullers. ' 

Shippensburg, led by first-year 
head coach and former Olympian 



continued on page 22 



m nmm m tmmimmm^ n ca. 



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George Groff/Clarion Call 

Clarion volleyball fans will have a chance to see the Golden Eagles in action twice this 
weekend. The Eagles host Fairmont Friday at 7 p.m., followed by a noon contest against 
Alderson-Broaddus. 

Eagles lose tough match to Lock Haven 



The Clarion University volley- 
ball team opened Tuesday night's 
match at Lock Haven with a 15-3 
win in the initial game before the 
potent Bald Eagles swept the next 
three games, 15-5, 15-10, 15-8, to 
claim the Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference contest at 
Lock Haven. 

The Golden Eagles were led by 
senior captain Jaime Mars, who 



recorded 13 kills, 11 digs, and 
three aces. 

Senior captain Christy Boes 
notched 13 digs, while Jessa 
Canfield and Tracy Barnett even- 
ly split 20 kills. 

Jamie Soboleski continued her 
strong season, with 34 assists. 

The Golden Eagles were also in 
action over the weekend at the 
Juniata Tournament. The Golden 



Eagles broke even with a 2-2 
slate. 

Clarion now stands at 12-17 
overall and 3-5 in the PSAC- 
West. 

The Eagles return to action 
Friday to host Fairmont (W.Va.) 
State. Clarion will then welcome 
Alderson-Broaddus Saturday at 
noon. 



NCAA wants to settle dispute with coaches 



Courtesy of 
College Press Exchange 

The National Collegiate Athletic 
Association is trying to reduce an 
$80 million settlement with its 
coaches, leaving many member 
schools wondering where that 
money will come from. 

The scramble to pay up stems 
from the Supreme Court's deci- 
sion to let stand a lower court's 
ruling that the NCAA acted 
unlawfully when it capped entry- 
level coaches' annual salaries at 
$16,000. The lower court's ruling 
in May set damages — essentially 
back pay and benefits — at $67 
million for about 1,900 entry- 
level coaches. With attorney's 
fees figured in, that sum is esti- 
mated to reach $80 million. 

NCAA officials and lawyers for 



the coaches began settlement talks 
earlier this year. The association 
had offered $44 million for the 
coaches and attorneys countered 
with $58.5 million. In light of the 
high court's decision, attorneys 
for the coaches now say they'll 
likely bump their demand "up into 
the 60s." 

The association had asked the 
Supreme court to overturn the lia- 
bility finding, insisting that the 
lower court's decision "places in 
grave doubt the future of compet- 
itive intercollegiate athletics." 
But the coaches' lawyers success- 
fully argued that the salary cap 
was nothing more than "garden- 
variety price fixing." 

How the payments will be 
spread among the association's 
membership schools is a thorny 
issue. Small schools — who say 



their budgets will be hit hard by 
the expense — want larger 
schools to pay the biggc ^hare. 
Big schools say the cost si uld be 
split equally because the a acted 
earnings rule was agreed m by 
nearly all 300 Division I scnools. 

Because the association i 11 has 
several past-trial motions i argue, 
the case is expected to drag on for 
at least another year. 

"Way back when the case began, 
they (the schools) could have set- 
tled cheaply," Dennis Cross, an 
attorney representing the coaches, 
told the Associated Press. 

"But everything that's happened 
since has caused the settlement to 
go up. The $80 million is accu- 
mulating interest at $12,000 a day. 
We don't think it would be fair to 
ask the coaches to settle for 50 
cents on the dollar." 



Week Nine Scouting Report 




Where: Memorial Stadium, Clarion 
When: Saturday, 1 p.m. 
Radio: C 93 (92.7) 



Returning home to the friendly confines of Memorial Stadium, the 
Golden Eagles will look to snap a two-game losing streak this 
Saturday as Clarion hosts West Chester for a 1 p.m. kickoff . 

Clarion enters the game with an overall record of 3-5 and a PSAC- 
West record of 1-3. The Eagles opened 1998 losing to Youngstown 
State 50-6, before compiling a 3-4 mark over the next seven con- 
tests. Fifth-year head coach Malen Luke has a 27-25 record at 
Clarion and an 11 -year collegiate record of 64-46. 

West Chester is 5-3 overall and 3-1 in the PSAC-East, but is com- 
ing off a very tough loss at Millersville. The Golden Rams had 
Millersville down 31-14 with less than 10 minutes to play before 
Millersville rallied for a 34-31 win. A victory for the Rams would like- 
ly have meant a PSAC-East title. West Chester opened 1998 with a 
19-10 home loss to IUP, defeated New Haven in overtime 33-27, lost 
at l-AA Delaware 42-21 , then reeled off four straight wins at East 
Stroudsburg 57-35, Bloomsburg 21-10, Mansfield 39-0 and 
Shippensburg 36-21 , before losing to Millersville. Ram coach Rick 
Daniels is in his tenth year at WCU and has an overall record of 64- 
41-0 

With a 3-5 record and three games remaining, the Golden Eagles 
will need a win Saturday to keep their hopes of a winning season 
alive. On an individual basis, wide receiver Alvin Slaughter needs 
seven receptions to tie Tim Brown for Clarion's all-time receptions 
record. Slaughter currently has 162. 

West Chester's offense is very potent. The Golden Rams are aver- 
aging 447.3 yards of offense per game, including 153 rushing and 
294.3 passing. 

Calling the signals will be junior Mike Mitros. Mitros has complet- 
ed 190 of 335 passes for 2,350 yards and 20 touchdowns, with only 
nine interceptions. 

His top receivers include the PSACs leading pass catcher, Kevin 
Ingram, who has 80 receptions for 991 yards and 13 touchdowns. 

The running game is led by Conrad Quarles (118 carries, 582 
yards, six tds) and Brian Bradley (81 tries, 407 yards, one td) at tail- 
back and Scott Reed (125 yards, 1 td) at fullback. 

West Chester's defense is giving up 128.8 rushing yards and 254.6 
passing yards per game, for a total of 383.4. 

Playing a 4-3 defense, the Rams' leader up front is Rob 
Colontrelle, who has 52 hits, four tackles for losses, and 4.5 sacks. 
Also contributing are Mark Burns Matt Jesson, and Kevin Verbosh. 

The linebacking corps has Marcellus Simmons, Harry Wescott, 
Mike O'Neill, and Brian Kersey making a lot of tackles. 

The secondary features leading tackier Matt Cozza (53 hits, two 
ints)and Mark Fields at free safety, with Paul Borusiewicz at strong 
safety and Lamont Johnson and Vince Ellzy at the corners. 
EXTRA POINTS: Clarion visits Lock Haven next Saturday, then 
returns home for Senior Day Nov. 14 against California ... West 
Chester holds a 10-1 series lead between the two schools ... West 
Chester won two close games in 1993 (19-17 at Memorial Stadium) 
and 37-30 at West Chester in 1994 ... Clarion's only win came back 
in 1966, the PSAC Championship game, which was a 28-26 triumph 
... Millersville passed for 432 yards and five touchdowns against 
West Chester ... Millersville had 482 yards of offense, WC 416 ... 
Mitros was 20 of 40 for 285 yards and three touchdowns ... Clarion 
defeated Millersville 38-31 Sept. 12. 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



October 29, 1998 



Excitement grows as hoops season nears 

Returning stars, Division I transfers bring hope of strong season 



By Jason Dambach 
Assistant Sports Ed itor 

After back-to-back 20-win sea- 
sons, hope generally gives way to 
expectation. And as the Clarion 
University men's ba