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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 13, 2001 – May 2, 2002"

Vol. 87, nos. 1 - 14 

and 21 - 28 



September 13, 2001 - 
February 14, 2002 

and 
February 21, 2002 

May 2, 2002 



Ca^lscn Library 

Clarion Uni/ersity 

01 Pennsylvania 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 2001 



Title 2 

Accounting Clu b receives achievementaw ardof^xceiien^ 
Anthrax scares 



B 



Date 



8 



10 



11 



12 



13 



Assocjation of Muslim S ocial S cientist condemnlerrorisrattacks 
Athletics in the c omm unity: Softball jearrijakesjii^r^ SAAC food^dri^ 
Attacks on U^S.^isturb college teams 

Autumn j-eaf^Festival : Heightens alcohdawareness ~ 
AuturnnJ.eaf Festival: is here again 

BasketbaJhClanonop^ns^eason^^th]<FC/Subv^ 
Basketball:^Mege^basketball tipsj)ff 2001-02 season 



October 25, 2001 



November 1 , 2001 



September 20, 2001 
jDecember 6, 2001 
September 13, 2001 
September 27, 2001 



September 27, 2001 
September 20, 2001 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



^isi®*^.3!'i_^^^P^'?n?®lJ?i'!L'2^ to^200T-02 season 

Basketball : Golden Eagles s oaringjigh^fivejamelrTtos^ason^ 



Basketbal l^^olden Eagles^k^ toBloomsburg : 3-3 overall 



September 20, 2001 
November 15, 2001 



October 18, 2001 



November 15, 2001 



Ben Chervenak elected secretary/treasurer of Board of Student 
Government Presidents 



BlackStu^nt Union: boasts full schedule 



December 6, 2001 
December 6, 2001 



October 4, 2001 



19 



20 



21 



22 



-- — v~^-— -:^r z_-j:L--.r |October 25, 2001 

Black StudenjUnion:Jiscusses^ideasjforjye^^ 

October 18, 2001 



Br eas t Cancer Awareness Month 



CajTiera niissingJ^iTT^mrnujto Department 



CarnpojjrovesJo^e^jTiaste^ 



23 



24 



25 



26 



27 



Catheririe^oslyn^rticipatesjr^ 
Chancelloj;:^dress es students in opeTrforum 



Cjajlon^NewflexjTiea^ students 

Clarionhold s "Learn to Swim/Dive" Fall prograrn 
Clarbri^Tlniversity^perie^^ 

/^'I'srii-kn- 4 tr^^. .11. . i —i. — n i . '~. 



28 



29 



30 



31 



32 



33 



ClarionM3Jacu1ty arid^sta^ff me^ 
Clanon^ Accredited by NCACE 



Clarjon:^unTn|Associatjon offers scholarships 



34 



35 



^L^L'°J^Annual Dance^oncert thi^ 
C|aj-ion^Aretej;epresents^arbjTD^^e^^^ 



36 



37 



38 



39 



40 



^'^'''°"- Artjsnniag^resourcesjo appearjn Sanford Gallery 
Clario^n^ BACCHUS^roniotesjTioderate a^Tespo^^ 
Clarjon :Biology^students work with PAFBC 
Clarion: Blood^driyejransfers new Jifelntothe^on^ 



41 



42 



43 



44 
45 
46 
47 



Clarion^ Brashea^rkick^^ffeighThar^ 

CJariom Campusjiferemains calm foMnternationalStudents^ 

Clanon: Carlson IJbrary^sjTiakeover is clos^^ 



Clajori:^o|[egeMed]a j)ay V was a big sTiccess 
Clanori^Co^ndlofTrustees discuss Venango Car^ 
Clarion: aooked^reek^ En^iroriment avajlableloC^^ 
Clarion: Cujtural D[versity Week^to coincide with ALF 
Clarion: bario Wayne receiyes^erTzolriS^ 
CJarion: Deb^te^Team advances to the finallour 
Clarion: Debate Team's season looks promising 



November 1 , 2001 



I November 1 , 2001 



i September 27, 2001 
{September 13, 2001 



November 1 , 2001 
!September13, 2001 
|October11,2001 



■September 20, 2001 



September 20, 2001 



CJarion^AieshaunTurnerdTo^n^a^ Minority Student of jhilvi^nth !NovemVe78^20oi 

CJario^n:Alcoho[gu^st speaker relajesjo Clarion students 



jNovember 15,2001 



September 27, 2001 



i December 6, 2001 



December 6, 2001 



September 13,2001 



November 8, 2001 



November 15,2001 
{September 27, 2001 



November 1, 2001 



December 6, 2001 
December 6, 2001 



October 18, 2001 
October 11, 2001 



September 13, 2001 



September 13, 2001 



JNovember 8, 2001 
'September 27, 2001 
October 11, 2001 



Page 



27 



20 



21 



18 



24 



25 



26 



10 



11 



22 



17 



14 



14 



10 



11 



8 



10 



8 



8 



15 



8 



Clarion Call 


Sept-Dec 2001 








A 


B 


C 


48 
49 


Clarion 


Double Treat Bakery promises to sweeten up CUP 


December 6, 2001 


11 


Clarion 


Drug and alcohol program a success 


December 6, 2001 


26 


50 


Clarion 


E.J. Josey to receive honorary degree at commencement 


December 6, 2001 


1 


51 
52 
53 


Clarion 


Enrollment increases 


October 4, 2001 


10 


Clarion 


Flame to Fire Vigil lights up the night 


October 25, 2001 


6 


Clarion 


Honors program expands 


September 20, 2001 


5 


54 


Clarion 


Honors Program make senior presentations at CUP 


December 6, 2001 


10 


55 


Clarion 


Honors seven "Distinguished Award" recipients 


September 20, 2001 


8 


56 
57 


Clarion 


Hosts Modern Language Conference 


November 15, 2001 


9 


Clarion 


Looks forward to Speaker Series 


October 11, 2001 


6 


58 


Clarion 


New courses being added to general education curriculum 


September 27, 2001 


8 


59 


Clarion 


Next year's possible tuition increase 


November 8, 2001 


1 


60 


Clarion 


Offers courses for enjoyment 


September 27, 2001 


8 


61 


Clarion 


Poet and essayist John Haynes kicks of visiting writer series 


September 13, 2001 


13 


62 


Clarion 


Prayer Memorial Service brings CUP and community together 


September 20, 2001 


1 


63 


Clarion 


Prepares for College Media Day V 


October 4, 2001 


9 


64 


Clarion 


President Reinhard announces coming retirement 


September 13, 2001 


6 


65 


Clarion 


Professional Development Series completed 


November 15, 2001 


6 


66 


Clarion 


Professional Development Series presents Interviewing Skills 


October 11, 2001 


7 


67 


Clarion 


Professor and student meeting to share research 


November 8, 2001 


9 


68 


Clarion 


Saturday Service Days a success 


November 1,2001 


8 


69 


Clarion 


Social Equity Awards presented last Friday 


November 15, 2001 


1 


70 


Clarion 


Social Equity Dinner and Awards Ceremony slated 


November 8, 2001 


1 


71 


Clarion 


Street Beats brings urban flavor 


September 13, 2001 


13 


72 


Clarion 


Students participate in community outreach 


October 11, 2001 


7 


73 


Clarion 


Students speak, next step in roundtable experience 


November 15, 2001 


1 


74 


Clarion 
campus 


Summer closes another chapter in library construction and 
5 renovations 


September 13, 2001 


9 


75 


Clarion: Takes precautions 


October 18, 2001 


1 


76 


Clarion: To hold Legal Conference 


October 11, 2001 


8 


77 


Clarion: To host Middle States preliminary site visit 


October 11, 2001 


5 


78 


Clarion: U-ASC offers help to students 


October 4, 2001 


9 


79 


Clarion: Unites fundraiser is successful 


October 11, 2001 


6 


80 


Clarion: University and community react to Tuesday's tragedy 


September 13,2001 


1 


81 


Clarion: University area will benefit from $2.2 million grant 


September 13, 2001 


10 


82 


Clarion: Videonet keeps students informed 


September 13, 2001 


7 


83 


Concert Review: George Clinton brings the funk to Clarion University 


December 6, 2001 


12 


84 


Cross Country: Clarion rookies step up at Duquesne Invite 


October 18, 2001 


19 


85 


Cross Country: Clarion women take seventh, men ninth, at PSAC's 


November 1 , 2001 


17 


86 


Cross Country: coaches select "Athletes of the Year" 


December 6, 2001 


27 


87 


Cross Country: Runners place 33rd in Division 1 Invitation 


October 11, 2001 


14 


88 


Cross Country: Runners soar past Slippery Rock 


September 27, 2001 


18 


89 


Cross Country: Teams place at NCAA Div. II Regional 


November 8, 2001 


21 


90 


Cross Country: Teams place in top three at California Invite 


September 13, 2001 


23 


91 


Cross Country: Teams prepped for PSAC Champs 


October 25, 2001 


18 


92 


Disco sucks! Disco rules!... Ummm, wait... 


September 13, 2001 


15 


93 


Diving" Four qualify for NCAA Div. II competition 


November 1,2001 


19 


94 


Dr. Stanton Green participates in Sociology of Sport Panel 


October 4, 2001 


23 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 2001 



95 



96 



97 



98 



99 



100 



101 



Drew Barrymore takes you for a n emotional ride 

Drug chaj^es rampant 

F aculty S enate: Collier announces new mealplan 



B 



-f 



Faculty^en^Je: discusses safety precautions^ 
Faculty SenaJe:^iscusses^WeekeridP^ 
Football^AshJeyJVIarti^ kicks into Div^ I history as first female 



October 25, 2001 
I September 27, 2001 
October 25, 2001 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



107 



108 



FootbalL^larion^continues strea k with CaiifornTa victory 
Football: Cl arion de feated by SlipperyRockln PSAC^est play~ 
Football^larion^efeatsJ<uzt^wriJ36-7lnTome^ 
Football: Clarion ends seasons with WestChesteFloss 



November 8, 2001 



December 6, 2001 
October 4, 2001 



109 



110 



111 



112 



113 



114 



Football: Clarion hostjIjpperyRockjn PSAC-West play" 
F oot ball : Cl arion to h onor seniors duringTuTP showdown 
Football: Clarion travels t o Edinbo roToTshowdown 
Football: Coaches drill fear of loss into mlnds^ofathletes" 



Octobe£l 1,2001 
October^5, 2001 
Octobe r 4. 2001 
I November 15, 2001 
(October 18, 2001 
October 25, 2001 
October 11, 2001 



FootbalL Eagles^allJo^DivisiorT^ nroungsTown S^^^ 
Foot ball : E agle s tram ple Tiffin 2y-t4^orrhome lurf^^ 
Foot^lhGo[den^EaglesJios^CaliforniaTn"PSAC^V^ 



October 4, 2001 



September 13, 2001 



Football: Golden Eagles impr ove record with Lock Haven defeat 



Football: Golden Eagles^takePASC-West loss to Fighting Scots 



115 



116 



117 



118 



119 



Football: GoldenJaglestake^/Q^C-VVesn^^ 



September 20, 2001 
October 4, 2001 
November 8, 2001 



October 18, 2001 



September 27, 2001 
November 1 , 2001 



Football: Golden Eagle s takejightjossjolIJplrT^^vertirT^ 

FootbalUy[cCuNum & Diege^ 

Football: Nine Clarion playej^ voted to All PSAC-West squad "December^, 200T 



November 8, 2001 



120 



121 



122 



123 



124 



125 



Football: Som e colleges are playing, some or not 
FromJHell^slashes into theaters 
Golden E^g[esJakeJopJiojTors^at^nr^^^^ 



September 13, 2001 
November 8, 2001 



Gol^ Golden jagle go lfers take fifth o veralF at VVVIAC tournament 
Golf: Go lfers work course at Hal Hansen Memorial 



126 



127 



128 



129 



130 



-?^L^Ll??J!LH'}!???hes returning talenF 
Gon zalez to spea k about AmeTJcan Holocaust 
LibraryScience: Tote bag dist ributiorujccursacrossThe country 



Local Bandl^RooteJRisirig^ring^ajd-backatmospher 
Markov|ch^aj1icipates injhe Harr^sbu^nt^ 
Martin Luth^King Jr. Series opens with Street Beats 



October 11, 2001 



October 11, 2001 



September 27, 2001 



September 20, 2001 
October 18, 2001 
November 1, 2001 



131 



132 



133 



134 



135 



Martjn LutherKjngJr^ Series^oasts^a^full^ 

M icahJare^ McEJIhattan : arrested In'wFkinson assaurcase^ 



Octobei^25^2001 
September 13, 2001 



MLK Series. Errim^^ard-winner spealcs of diversity^ 
Monsjers? Aliens? Trans vesTitesTOh my 
Movie^Rev]ew^Domj(stic^isturbancelslichiFingthrilleF^ 



136 



137 



138 



139 



140 



141 



142 



Moy ie^eyiew: Don'^Say A Wordjs 



Movie Review: Monsters Inc . is fun for people^of^rages 
Movie Review: ShaHow Hal lives upTolts^name^TthaTew laughs 
Movie Review: TYa|ning^ay^re^ents^ 
Movie Review^ Zoolander Is a victim of its own fashion sen^ 



September 20, 2001 
September 13, 2001 



September 13, 2001 
October 18, 2001 



September 27, 2001 
November 8, 2001 



^^tober18, 2001 
{November 15, 2001 



Music From a^ajnted Cave^' comes toClarion^ 

Music Review: Goriliaz ape "cart^oon^and'co^epF' at every turn' 

Music Review: "Stroking" the flames of rock and roll 



JDecember 6, 2001 
jNovember 1, 2001 
October 4, 2001 
October 25, 2001 



October 11, 2001 



November 1, 2001 



11 



17 



11 



22 



16 



20 



19 



23 



17 



17 



13 



23 



24 



20 



21 



22 



20 



20 



20 



20 



19 



25 



23 



14 



14 



14 



19 



18 



10 



10 



12 



13 



10 



12 



16 



12 



14 



14 



11 



13 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 2001 



Clarion Call 



Sept-Dec 2001 





A B 1 C 


143 


Music Review: Adams changes his image with the release of Gold 


December 6, 2001 


15 


144 


Music Review: Air delivers a failed, but noble experiment 


October 25, 2001 


13 


145 


Music Review: Bjork's "Hidden Place" is tantalizing 


September 27, 2001 


12 


146 


Music Review: CUQ fashions clinical, yet engaging jazz-rock 


November 8, 2001 


13 


147 


Music Review: Get ready to rediscover New Order 


October 4, 2001 


13 


148 


Music Review: 1 Might Be Wrong captures Radiohead's live electricity 


November 15, 2001 


13 


149 


Music Review: Rondelles don't want to grow up 


September 20, 2001 


11 


150 


Northwest Pennsylvania Rural AIDS Alliance to receive $1 .4 million grant 


November 15,2001 


7 


151 


PDS presents "Dress for Success" 


October18,2001 


6 


152 


PDS presents "How to Dine and Act Fine" 


October 25, 2001 


7 


153 
154 


Professional Development Series: presents "Application Letters" 


November 1, 2001 


9 


Robert Mirabal "paints" with vivid colors 


November 8, 2001 


11 


155 


Rugby: Teams battle against odds for victorious seasons 


September 27, 2001 


17 


156 


Sigur Ros takes you on a trip to another universe 


October 18, 2001 


12 


157 


Soccer: Clarion steps down to # 1 Lock Haven 


October 4, 2001 


20 


158 


Soccer: Fans support first year team on victory conquest 


September 20, 2001 


18 


159 


Soccer: team improves a strategy in Ohio 


September 13, 2001 


21 


160 


Soccer: Team suffers loss to Kutztown 


October 25, 2001 


17 


161 
162 
163 
164 


Soccer: Winning tradition welcomes new coaches 


September 13, 2001 


24 


Student Senate: debates budget allocation for Psychology Club 


November 8, 2001 


8 


Student Senate: Denies International Association's proposal 


November 1,2001 


9 


Student Senate: discusses issues and goals at first meeting 


September 13, 2001 


8 


165 


Student Senate: discusses Weekend Programming Initiative policy 


November 15,2001 


10 


166 


Student Senate: initiative prompts controversy 


December 6, 2001 


1 


167 


Student Senate: Introduces Weekend Programming Initiative 


October 25, 2001 


1 


168 


Student Senate: Open forum held for freshnrien election 


September 20, 2001 


6 


169 


Student Senate: passes five motions 


December 6, 2001 


7 


170 


Student Senate: Passes two motions 


October 4, 2001 


8 


171 


Student Senate: President Chervenak voices student issues at Faculty 
Senate's first meeting 


September 13, 2001 


8 


172 


Student Senate: President Reinhard welcomes new freshmen senators 


September 27, 2001 


6 


173 


Student Senate: Sells red, white, and blue ribbons 


September 20, 2001 


6 


174 


Student Senate: Six Members return from National Conference in Califor 


October 18, 2001 


6 


175 


Student Senate: Weekend Programming Initiative passes with unanimous 


October 25, 2001 


9 


176 


Swimming and Diving: Men's team wins Akron Invite: Bell smashes recor Decembers, 2001 


24 


177 


Swimming: Golden Eagles wake at Pre-season Invitational 


November 1 , 2001 


18 


178 


Swimming: Teams begin season with dual victories 


November 8, 2001 


24 


179 


Swimming: Teams defeat Shippensburg in PSAC meet 


November 15, 2001 


20 


180 


Swimming: Teams host Pre-season Invitational 


October 25, 2001 


19 


181 


Tennis: Golden Eagles battle Edinbooro in Fall Season 


October 11, 2001 


15 


182 


Tennis: Team serves up new season 


September 13, 2001 


21 


183 
184 
185 
186 


The first annual "Discovery awards" lets you know what you've been miss 


December 6, 2001 


16 


Theatre Review: A second look at the immensely popular Rocky Horror 


October 11, 2001 


9 


Theatre Review: Laramie Project is harrowing real-life tale 


November 15, 2001 


11 


Theatre Review: Rocky Horror is a raucous good time 


October 4, 2001 


11 


187 


Theatre Review: Second Series showcases student's talent 


November 1 , 2001 


14 


188 


Venango: Jump Start program established 


October 11, 2001 


7 


189 


\/isiting Writer Series" John Haines reads his poetry in Clarion 


September 27, 2001 


10 



190 



191 



192 



193 



194 



195 



196 



197 



198 



199 



200 



201 



^*y^_3''v^o'denI^^^^^ 
^°''®y'^^l': Golden Eagles^improve record at MillersvTlle 
Volleybal[: GoldejT^agles spiked by Lo7:kJHaven in four"-set match' 
VoJIeyball^Gdd^enJagle^s suffer joss to PSAC-WestrEdinbor^^ 



202 



203 



204 



M^^^^lhjGolden^E^gles^taJ^e^o defeats t^^^^^ 
Volleyball.;^Two GoidenEagles set records 
Wanda Nesbit named Mi nority Sl u^enTof thelvJontfT 
WCUC r esumes programming 



205 



206 



207 



208 



^^^^'1 so sp ecial abou|^beer? Dave^BefryexplairTs 
^"®IL''®^?9nizedatj^ecen]Public^P^^ 
Wonien^s Soccer^Three^PSAC^cjiools^make ^N^^ 
Wrestin£:^olden Eajfes^tryjorstarting position at^Blue/GoFd"" 
Wrestling^larion finishes # 1 T^a^WlKeen LasVegas^lnvite 



^•■^slling: Golden^ Eagle wrestlers^pumped^for2001-02 season 
Zeta Phi Eta helps with PBS documentary 



B 



September 13, 2001 



VoneybaH" Volleyballers set high season goals 

Vollei^ajh Ashfey Riordan^named PSAC-West pT^^ joctoberT200i 

VoMba"; Clarion^feats Sjippery Ro^ during Senior Night 

Voneyball: Clarion to hosjtearris in annuaf 



November 1, 2001 

t- ■ - - - — 

(October 4, 2001 



iOctober18, 2001 
[September 27, 2001 
October 25, 2001 
October 4, 2001 



November 8, 2001 



November 1, 2001 
October 18, 2001 



September 20, 2001 



October 18, 2001 



November 1, 2001 



November 8, 2001 
November 15, 2001 



December 6, 2001 



November 8, 2001 
November 15, 2001 



22 



_?1 
18 



_?1 
18 



17 

18 

22 

21 

17 



Jl 
11 



8 



23 



8 




Yi- w: — ^vv~» — ^t-— h — 8—€ — I — a — p™-!-— — n — C"~a — I — I — « — c — o — in — 

Clarion University and community re act to Tuesday's tragedy 

by Amy A. Thompson In a statement issued on this has been a wrenching psycho- r~W '| j/JL^^^jSSJM^^^^^^^^BBi 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

The devastation of Tuesday's 
events have had a large impact on 
Clarion University and the 
Clarion community. 




PresMent 
P^ Reinhard slated 
y^ to retire....pg. 6, 




Ij "Artists Image 
R^ources: 
Prints fh)iii tM 
Archives*'.pg. 11. 




CUP football 
takes 
lefeat..pg.24. 



Index 



In a statement issued on 
Tuesday, President Diane 
Reinhard said, "Our hearts go out 
to the victims of today's tragedies 
across the United States. The 
Clarion University administration 
team is closely monitor- 
ing the situation at the 
local, state and national 
levels. 

"We need to come 
together as an education- 
al community and offer 
W™ all the support that is 
— ours to give to friends 
and family affected by 
this tragedy." 

Reinhard requested that 
classes continue as 
planned but many teach- 
ers cancelled classes so 
their students could 
watch the days events 
unfold on news pro- 
f|%^ grams. If teachers didn't 
.^M cancel class many took 
the time to discuss the 
events with students. 

"I definitely thought it 
was necessary to deal 
with events of the last 24 
hours, both because my 
students want to be 
media professionals and 









this has been a wrenching psycho- 
logical experience for everyone," 
Dr. Pat Kennedy, J.D. and com- 
munication professor. 

All Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference athletic events sched- 
uled for Tuesday night were can- 
celled, however. 

In the Clarion community, can- 
dle light and prayer vigils have 
been taking place at area church- 
es. 

Clarion University and the 
Clarion Ministerial Association 
will be having a Prayer Memorial 
Service Sept. 16 at 8 p.m. in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. 

In addition to prayer, many 
members of both the university 
and community have been tele- 
phoning area blood banks and 
Keeling Health Center as to when 
they can donate blood. 

"The urgent need is there, but 
there is a prolonged need," said 
Darlene Hartle, R.N.C., director 
of the drug and alcohol program 
and Nurse/Health Educator for 
Keeling Health Center. 

"They prefer that it is spaced out 
a little bit so they can use it over a 
period of time," Hartle said. 

Once a donation is made the 
blood is usable for 30 days. 




Graham Hermanns /The Clarion Call 



Students assembled in ttie Gemmell Rotunda to view news 
reports of ttie tragedy that ocurred on Tuesday, Sept. 10. 



A blood drive is scheduled for 
Sept. 25 in Clarion University 
Tippin North Gymnasium from I i 
a.m. to 5 p.m. The blood drive 
was already scheduled and could- 
n't have come at a better time, 
said Hartle. 

"The need doesn't stop with the 
intial event," said Hartle. 

According to Tricia McCall, 
administrative assistant for 
Clarion County Red Cross, more 
than 80,000 units of blood were 



sent Tueday to New York and 
Washington D.C. Over 700,000 
units are committed to New York 
and Washington D.C, McCall 
added. 

"If you have never donated 
before, now is the time," said 
McCall. 

People with blood types and 
negative are the most sought 
after because they can donate to 
so many other people, Hartle said. 

See 'Tragedy' Page 5 



CUP student arrested in Wilkinson assault cases 




Opiiiion..»*.......pg.3. 

tti^Ies...»..pg. 11. 

Entertainment 

16. 

lSSsiried.„...pg 





by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

Micah Jared McEllhattan, 19, a Clarion 
University student, has been arrested for 
sexual assault in relation to two separate 
cases. 

In one case, McEllhattan is charged with 
Indecent Assault, Indecent Exposure, Open 
Lewdness and False Imprisonment. 

According to the office of District Justice 
Anthony Lapinto, McEllhattan held a 
female against her will in the laundry room 
of Wilkinson Hall Sept. 3 and repeatedly 



fondled her through her shirt and jeans. 

The female reportedly asked him to let 
her go and that she did not want contact. 

McEllhattan proceeded to engage in a 
lewd act in front of her. 

McEllhattan also is being charged in 
another case which took place Sept. 4 and 
involves two female residents of Wilkinson 
Hall. 

Because the incident involves two 
females, McEllhattan is being charged with 
two counts of Stalking and two counts of 
Harassment. 

According to Public Safety, McEllhattan 



entered the rooms of the two girls uninvit- 
ed at 6 p.m. 

He reportedly tried to kiss them and also 
chased them through the seventh floor of 
Wilkinson Hall. 

A resident assistant made Public Safety 
aware of the incidents occurring in 
Wilkinson Hall, said Dave Tedjeske, direc- 
tor of Public Safety. 

According to Tedjeske, McEllhattan is 
being held in the Clarion County Jail. 

After the incident occurred, the residence 
halls went on 24 hour lock-down. 



■PPj^ 



he first draft of Clarion University history" 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 

Amy A. Thompson 

Kylee Ebersole 

Keith GwiUim 

Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 

Jill Brennan 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



We think that it is a 
true shame that such 
tactics were used to get 
the message across. 

How does one begin 
to resort to such an act? 
We truly wish that the 
family and friends of 
the victims didn't have 
to experiance this hard- 
ship. 

Though we can not 
speak for others, this is 
the first time in our 
lives that we have felt a 
sense of nationality; 
that we are Americans. 
Before, this was only 
a place that we lived in, 
now it feels like our 
country. It is a travesty 
that it took an even 
such a this for us to feel 
this way, but only 
through unity will we 
prevail. 

Yesterday came as a 
real sfiock to all of us. 

When we all turned 
on the television yester- 
day morning around 
nine o'clock in the 
morning we were 
expecting to watch the 
same old programs that 
we get up and watch 
every other morning. 

Instead we turned on 
the television and our 
hearts broke as we 
watched the two 
hijacked planes fly into 
the World Trade Center. 



Our nation took a 
direct hit, not only on 
the actual structures 
destroyed, but on the 
pride of the country. 

We are more shocked 
than angered because 
we thought of America 
as the "invincible." 

That just shows our 
nievety, but we are sure 
we are not the only 
ones who still remain in 
a state of disbelief. 

What happened yes- 
terday was a terrible 
tragedy. The events 
will alter America for- 
ever. Our deepest sym- 
pathy goes out to those 
who have lost family 
and/or friends. Our 
prayers are with all of 
you in your time of 
need. 

Even in the time of 
despare, some of us are 
sort of releaved. 

That might sound 
very cold and heartless, 
but we were releaved 
when we received word 
our families and friends 
were ok and they were 
not harmed. 

Yesterday was a devis- 
tation to many people 
and we are sure that 
some of them are here 
at Clarion University. 
You have our sympathy 
and you are in our 
prayers. 



From the Editor !y Desk 



Our world is surrounded by 
change. How we adjust to change 
is one of the tests of life. Never 
was that more apparent than on 
Tuesday. 

When I was growing up my dad 
always used to tell me nothing 
ever stays the same. 

However, not every change is 
bad. For instance, sometimes 
organizations experience change 
including. The Clarion Call. 

One of those changes was prob- 
ably apparent to you when you 
picked up the issue and looked at 
the cover of The Clarion Call. 

The new banner was helped 
along by Wayne Anderson, a grad- 
uate student in the 
Communication Department at 
Clarion University. 

Every so often a change is nec- 
essary to keep ideas updated and 



moving forward. 

Additional changes came about 
on the back page as well. Now the 
back page will have a color sports 
photos. 

The Clarion Call has also made 
a significant policy change. All 
Classified ads are to be paid 
before they are published. We 
apologize for any inconvenience 
this may cause you. 

We also have several new tal- 
ented staff members and have 
retained some of the veterans. 

We all look forward to making 
the paper your voice. 
Sincerly, 



Amy A. Thomposon 
Editor-in-Chief 



Want to do your part to 

help victims of ttie New 

Yori( City and 

Washington DC. 

tragedy? 



Donate blood 

September 25 from 

11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Trppin 

North Gymnasium. 



Editorial Policy 



•.^.^Xf--' V 



The Clarion Cali k lajte $le|i& to uiiil v the imper mlh 
a$if^kvoice^ Wl Mak^ The ^.U/./. t^thatUrs^ 

m^, We> m^e Mii0ti$^ B^ard, will ^Kpr^s mt opiftlon 
about 1mm across ^e cami^m $latej nation, «»ii 
mM. We d»e not $|»eaki]ig for Clarloii Universits^, the 
Ckfim Btu^mis* As$oc\mm or ihe sWeuits of the 
Uiilv«^l|v<, wo aufo ^^Idng as an Editorial BoanI - the 
voke of Imi C&AmoiN Cail. The^e editorials are devel- 
oped III a meetSiis of tibe Editorial Board, all members 
Wm mi itecessamy a|:ree on the oplnioii stated in the 
emtorlal^ The ophnon expressed Is shared bv the 
malorlly of the hoards it is not Sklwrnys a unaoimoiis 
i^lnioD^ Ym^ the piihlie^ i^^serve Ihe right to e^re$$ 
TOUT pleaifnoure or displeasure with these oolittntts via a 
Utter to ttt^Edlton 



I 



From the office of 

the Registrar: 

please be aware 

of the following 

dates: 

September 10 

Credit/No Record begins 
10 a.m. Office of the 
Registrar 



September 28 

Mid-Semester Break 



September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



October 1 



Credit/No Record ends 
4 p.m. 



October 15 



Early Registration for 
2002 Spring Begons 
(Web for Students/Tel reg) 



October 26 



Class Withdrawals end 
4 p.m. 



November 21-23 

Thanksgiving Holiday 



December 7 

Classes End 



December 10 



Final Exams begin 8 a.m, 



December 14 



Final Exams end 10 p.m. 



December 15 



Winter Commencement 




Opinion 




lam saddened 
that it took something 
of this proportion to 

send electricity 
through our genera- 
tion. 9§ 

-Amy a. Thompson 



Editorial, Amy A. Thompson 



For years I've heard my gener- 
ation criticized a.s being apathet- 
ic or unaware of the situations in 
the world. At times I've agreed 
with that statement. 

I've always beheved that part 
of the reason for my generation's 
apathy was because we hadn't 
lived through something astro- 
nomical to make us appreciate 
the rights and luxuries we have 
been handed. 

However, I always believed 
that we shouldn't have had to 
have lived through something as 
tragic as say, Pearl Harbor, to 
appreciate the freedoms and lux- 
uries we do have. 

On Tuesday, I saw a change. 
Students were in clusters watch- 
ing the day's events unfold on 
TV's across the campus and in 
their college residence hall 
rooms and apartments. 

The campus was solemn, but 
yet there was a mix of emotions, 
whether it be sadness or anger, 
causing people who are normally 
quiet to have an opinion. 

I am sadenned that it took 
something of this proportion to 
send electricity through our gen- 
eration. However, we should use 
this incident and never forget it. 

We should never let the passion 
for our country die even though 
the press will eventually stop 
covering the event to the magni- 
tude it did that first day. 

Let me also say that even if you 
are the most quiet person on 
campus, you have a voice. 

I think many times people feel 



the only "voice" they have is the 
spoken one. But there is one 
"voice," which isn't audible, but 
often times is just as powerful if 
not more so. 

I am talking about the written 
word. 

There are many powers to the 
written word. For one, the writ- 
ten word is long lasting. I once 
heard that 80 percent of all spo- 
ken word is forgotten almost as 
soon as its uttered. 

Many students express to me 
(vocally) that they don't feel 
they are capable of writing. 
Whether they are concerned 
about their own grammar or sim- 
ply worried about how they are 
articulating their words, writing 
is still less popular than speak- 
ing. 

I have always found a certain 
safety in writing a for a publica- 
tion such as. The Clarion Call, 
because my eyes aren't the only 
pair of eyes which will see my 
story before 't goes to print. 

If you do have something to 
say about the events that are tak- 
ing place in our nation right now 
or maybe in your personal life, 
take advantage of The Clarion 
Call and utilize your other 
"voice." 

If you are worried about how 
your articulating something or 
your spelling or grammar, 
remember that The Clarion Call 
can help you. Don't allow any- 
thing to stop you from "voicing" 
what is most important to you. 



Have a story you'd like to see as a 
Hyde Park? Call Amy at 393-2380. 




As a member of the National Newspaper 
Association, The Clarion Call is enti- 
tled to access NNAs Libel Hotline; with 
advice from Washington attomey 
Alice Neff Lucan. 



Hyde Park, John Crawford 



Man is defined in adversity. In 
the wake of the multiple terrorist 
attacks against the United States 
on September 11, 2001, it is 
important to remember that 
human beings can only be 
defined in adverse circumstances. 
And, what goes for people goes 
for nations. 

Our generation, those who 
strive in the aftermath of 
Generation X, has early been 
defined as a generation of apa- 
thetics. Maybe we can blame it 
on the death of rock and roll. 
Perhaps it's the large amount of 
herbal inhalants. Blame our par- 
ents. 

Why are we so apathetic? Do 
we not care? 
I blame the TV. 

After all, we are the generation 
of Columbine. We were raised on 
media images of violence and 
strife. We are the generation of 
the Oklahoma City Bombing. We 
have watched Waco bum, L.A. 
riot, and Seattle protest. Our for- 
eign world is covered with 
images of mass graves in Bosnia, 
towering infernos in Kuwait, and 
bodies clogging the rivers of 
Rwanda. As the images grow, the 
explanations thin. 

Maybe we are just so inundated 
we cannot be moved. 

The terrorist operations of 
September 11 are the wake-up 
call to our generation. The world 
is not a foreign land with insane 
gunmen. It is not a kid gone mad 
in "some other town." We cannot 
idly sit by and assume that it is 
"their" problem. The whole 
world is not crazy, and we are not 



safe unless we move. 

We have to wake up to the real- 
ity of our world. We have to dis- 
cover it and grow to understand. 
The world cannot be brought to 
us through television - a simple 
filter of immature ideas that thin- 
ly exploit critical thought to 
thickly exploit advertising rev- 
enues. We cannot allow the 
world to be bought and sold and 
shot and killed while we burn 
MP3s, watch TV, and shrug, say- 
ing, "Holy s**t..." We cannot 
assume somebody else will take 
care of it - even if we do elect 
them and pay them to do it! 

However much those involved 
deserve to be put to the knife, we 
cannot ignore our own complicity 
in this plot. Too many years we 
have lazily allowed the world to 
be our proxy as we fought wars 
for riches that never were ours, in 
places we never saw, and for 
things we never believed. T(3o 
many fields have burned and too 
many cities have fallen since the 
American Century began. We 
must awaken to realize our role in 
it all. 

There is a whole world - a world 
of young people who also are 
OUR GENERATION - who are 
living and dying and praying and 
stealing and ducking and killing 
to have the opportunity we have. 
We cannot turn a blind eye to a 
Palestinian whose life is so bleak 
that he would strap a bomb to 
himself and walk into a cafe in 
Jerusalem. We cannot dismiss an 
Isreali who feels the only way to 
save his people is to evict another 
See 'Crawford' Page 5 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 

Staff Writers: Matt Greene, Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix. Justin £z\'k, Emily 

Gill, /\;iron Steinpeck, Laura .'Minian, Andrea Borek, Manisse Macn, KelK' 

Drevirch, .\dani Berlotn and Klialia Robinson 

Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Rcinhart 

Photography Staff: Man' Beth Crawshaw, Zoe Boni, Rachel Pe.snick, Iron 

Valentine, Alison Fink, Jeff Wetzel and Jon Pizzica 

Proofreading Staff: Kellv Evn-, Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Faiineau, .\iaina Vehec, 

Julianne Keman, Jeff Bailev, Emilv Saners and Omar Rozier 

Circulation Staff: Lun Stroup. Leah Fennell, Nicole Piazza, Casev Bowser. 

Brad Ilennings, Jackie .Miller, Emilv Sears. Aaron ^estover 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion.edu 

www, clarion.edu/thecall 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

Rachael Foflygen 

Advisor 

Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 



'mm Qyyu ^ jpsbl{$he4 x^m. 




.4ur^ ^ ktiool year to 

BiiRjrs 8**q>t «»<rib«tiE»« from aft 
^<i^(ic«t> bat reserve tlie ngttt to6dtt for 

iaCfeief. <!^«iiioo& ^xprtssed io edito- 
rial mt ttK»e t>f if» ideotiftiMi writer 
dfld do TMH &eces$»Uy tftlfect d% opiit- 
joDSy ot tfie sladent body. Universiiy, or 
Clanon comrouitity. Vdifi Ext:c«tjve 
BoaRi reserves li«: riglii to refuse pub- 
hcatioa of any mformatioti Letters to 
the Editor must be recclvc<i by 500 
p.in. oti tbt" Mwjdav of desired pubhca- 
oofi- Letters mu5l be signed aitd 
include a pli(»nc number und ao 
aikircs^. If the authoi wushes lo luive 
his/her identity withheld it must be 
noted on tht Jetttr When Jccters 4rt* 
published js the discreiH^n of the EditOf 
jo Chwf. Display Advertismg copy uikJ 
^leek articfcs are dae M«»day by 5:00 
p.ni. ise week of publication. 
Classifit^ are dtie Tuesday by 5:00 
p.m. fbc week of publication. The 
CtAKiON Call is funded l>y the 
Clarion Studejots" Assnciatiuri and 
advertisiQg revenue 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 




OPINION 




CAa On You 

What are you looking forward to about Garion? 

by: Graham Hennaims 




Tete yencsik^ 
Sofkomore, Qeolo^y 



Casie Lucas 
SofftomorCf CS'D 



9€tirsfiaU Schtrtr 
fnskmttM, Intemaiionaf 



Skaivn Conner 
Jrcshman, undecided 




^randen TQidunce 
Sophomore, T/tt/sics 



"Having so much fun." 



f^ 9{annatf 



Communicaiion 



'Making new friends." 



Clarion County Literacy Council 

A tutor training workshop will be held Sept. 15, 2CX)1 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. It 
will be held at the Clarion County Lliteracy Council offrce in the lower lever 
of theClahon Free Library. Following this workshop you will be able to 
teach reading, math or GED subjects to adult students who do not pos- 
sess a high school diploma. A minimum of two hours of week of volunteer 
time required for you. New tutors are always needed. Please call the 
CCLC office at 226-4626 between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. with 
any additional questions that you may have or to RSVP that you will be 

attending. Hope to see you there. 




Student Senate is 

the group on campus 

that is here to ser\'e 

you, the students of 

Clarion University. 99 

-BEN CHERVENAK 



September 13, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 



President's Forum, 
Ben Chervenak 




Welcome back to everyone for 
another semester at Clarion 
University. Recently, Clarion 
started out the year at full sprint, 
with a visit from the new 
Chancellor of the State System of 
Higher Education, Judy Hample. 

Hample started her visits of the 
State System schools with Clarion 
•last Thursday. 

Throughout the day she met 
with not only faculty and adminis- 
tration members, she also held an 
open forum which everyone could 
attend, and also a meeting for stu- 
dent leaders on campus. 

It was through these meetings 
that we were able to hear what her 
plans were for the state system 
schools, and for us to inform her 
on what we thought to be impor- 
tant issues facing Clarion and the 
13 other state universities. 

At one point, Hample said she 
believes that the state system, 
"has not told its story well." 

Telling its story to not only its 
students, but its faculty, adminis- 
tration as well as prospective stu- 
dents. 

A group I think needs to sell its 
story more is Student Senate. 
(You knew I was going some- 
where with this right?) 

Student Senate is the group on 
campus that is here to serve you, 
the students of Clarion University. 
The 20 senators, including 
myself, are here to be your voice . 
and your advocate to the universi- 
ty and to the entire State System 



of Higher Education. 

Over the summer the university 
went through many changes, 
physically, departmentally and 
also with personnel. The biggest 
change to happen was the restruc- 
turing of the Student Affairs 
Division. Dr. George Curtis 
retired as the Vice President of 
student affairs and Harry Tripp, - 
moved into a new )sition as Vice 
President of Student and 
University affairs midway 
through summer. 

There also has been many 
changes within the student activi- 
ties office with the retirement of 
Hal Wasink. Shawn Hoke, a grad- 
uate of Clarion University moved 
into the reformed position as 
Advisor of Interfraternity Council 
and Panhellinc Councils. Mr. 
Hoke is also going to be working 
with the students at several levels 
throughout the year. 

Hopefully, this article, which I 
will write bi-weekly for the 
Clarion Call will help to keep you 
imformed of what we are doing, 
as well as ways to become more 
involved with the university and 
with Student Senate. 

I will say again, we as your 
Student Senators are here to serve 
you, the students of Clarion 
University- Our office is open 
most of the day from 9-5, or you 
can call us at 393-2318, email at 
senate@clarion.edu, or stop by 
anytime at our office in 269 
Gemmell. 



Do wish to write a weeldy 

opinion column? 

Call Amy at 393-2380. 




OPINION 




Investigators focusing on theory of 20 hijackers 



Courtesy of KRT Campus 

WASHINGTON - Launching 
perhaps the largest criminal 
investigation in U.S. history, fed- 
eral and state authorities raided 
hotel rooms and searched for 
vehicles from Maine to Florida 
on Wednesday as they began 
uncovering the complex plot that 
led to the deadly terrorist attacks 
on the World Trade Center and 
the Pentagon. 

Investigators in the FBI-led 
probe tracked down hundreds of 
potential leads on their first full 
day, scouring clues left behind by 
the suicide terrorists, from rental 
cars and hotel rooms to Arabic- 
language piloting manuals. 

The early evidence indicated 
that 20 or more hijackers com- 
mandeered the four jetliners and 
steered them into the seats of 
U.S. economic and military 
power. The terrorists may have 
been divided into separate, self- 
contained groups, some crossing 
into the United States from 
Canada recently. Others may 
have been here for some time, 
law enforcement authorities said. 

Among them was a 33-year-old 
man who was on the passenger 
list of one of the hijacked planes. 
He had also been taking flying 
lessons in South Florida. 

"A number of the suspected 
hijackers were trained as pilots in 
the United States," Attorney 
General John Ashcroft told a 
news conference. 

"The four planes were hijacked 
by between three and six individ- 
uals per plane, using knives and 
box-cutters, and in some cases 
making bomb threats," Ashcroft 
said. "Our government has credi- 
ble evidence that the White 



House and Air Force One were 
targets." 

FBI Director Robert Mueller 
said law enforcement authorities 
have identified many of the 
hijackers by name, and efforts are 
now under way to find their asso- 
ciates. 

Mueller said the investigation 
involves 4,000 of the bureau's 
agents, 3,000 support staff and 
400 lab technicians. Some people 
have been held on immigration 
violations, but no one had been 
arrested Wednesday in the hijack- 
ings, the FBI chief said. 

In South Florida, investigators 
focused on Mohamed Atta, 33, 
who was on the passenger list of 
one of the two flights that took 
off from Boston's Logan 
International Airport and 
slammed into the World Trade 
Center. Records show he once 
had a driver's license in Egypt. 

The FBI in Miami also is look- 
ing for two cars. Florida Division 
of Motor Vehicle records show 
one of them, a 1989 red Pontiac, 
was registered to Atta. 

From July to November 2000, 
Atta and another man trained at 
Huffman Aviation, a pilot school 
that operates out of the airport in 
Venice, on Florida's west coast. 

Charlie Voss, a former Huffman 
employee, said the men told him 
they had just arrived from 
Germany and wanted to take 
flight training at the school. 

A Venice couple told FBI agents 
Wednesday morning they'd 
leased a bedroom in their home 
to Atta and a second man, 
Marwan Alshehhi, for about a 
week in July 2000. 

Investigators got passport infor- 
mation on the two men from 
Huffman's records 



CrawfordI Hyde Park, from Page 3. 



people from their lands. We 
cannot ignore the disparity of a 
world where a man can see the 
swath of humanity from filth and 
death to splendor and opulence. 
We cannot ignore the cries of 
people who see this life as noth- 
ing but a death waiting to hap- 
pen. 

In the aftermath of this tragedy, 
our prayer should be: "May we 
awaken." 



May we awaken to the reality 
that has always been here. 

May we awaken to problems 
that need to be solved. 

May we awaken to the many 
views that must be seen. 

May we awaken to the world 
before us. 

May we awaken to what we 
must do. 

J.C. Crawford is a History 
and Communication major. 



FBI agents and local police 
officers searched the Coral 
Springs, Fla., apartment that Atta 
had been renting, but apparently 
found little there. 

Investigators also talked with 
the manager of a local bar, 
Shuckums, who told them that 
Atta had identified himself as an 
American Airlines pilot after 
having several drinks there 
Friday night. 

Another focus of the terrorism 
probe was in New England. Law 
enforcement authorities said they 
were investigating whether one 
group of hijackers crossed into 
the United States from Canada 
before traveling to Boston's 
Logan International Airport, 
departure point for the two jetlin- 
ers that struck the World Trade 
Center. 

Osama bin Laden, the prime 
suspect behind the attacks, tried 
once before to pull off a terrorism 
extravaganza during the world- 
wide millennium celebrations, 
when his operatives also tried to 
cross into the United States from 
Canada but were caught by 
police. 

Mueller said several individuals 
were interviewed in the Boston 
area and that some were being 
detained for apparent immigra- 
tion violations. 

Gov. Angus King of Maine said 
two of the suspects flew to 
Boston from the airport in 
Portland, Maine. They left 
behind a rental car that has been 
impounded, he said. 

And in Boston itself, heavily 
armed FBI agents searched the 
Westin Hotel in the city's Back 

Tragedyl Clarion reacts 
with follow-up events, 
from the front page. 

Local sororities and fraternities 
will be helping out at the blood 
drive. Alpha Sigma Tau will be 
greeting people at the door and 
Sigma Pi will help in the registra- 
tion and set-up of the days events. 

Papa John's will be donating all 
of the pizza for the day. Burger 
King will provide the beverage 
and Chandler Dining Hall will 
provide the fruit. 

For more information about the 
blood drive and how you can help 
call Keeling Health Center at 
393-2121. 



Bay section. A room at the hotel 
is believed to have been used by 
one of the hijackers of the two 
flights out of Boston. 

The overall investigation, con- 
ducted by terrorism units of U.S. 
attorneys' offices and the FBI, 
swept up passenger manifests, 
rental car receipts, telephone 
logs, videotapes from parking 
garages and pay phones, Ashcroft 
said. Investigators also were 
working the crime scenes and 
trying to recover the "black 
boxes" from the downed aircraft, 
he said. 

Ashcroft called the probe "per- 
haps the most massive and inten- 
sive investigation ever conducted 
in this country." 

But criticism rose in Congress 
and elsewhere Wednesday over 
the failure of U.S. intelligence 
and law enforcement agencies to 
give advance warning of the 
attacks. U.S. intelligence offi- 
cials have said they had no such 



warnings, but are studying recent 
reports to see if anything was 
missed. 

"The American people are not 
well-served by the intelligence 
community. There were no warn- 
ings, no infiltration of (terrorist) 
organizations," said Sen. Robert 
Torricelli of New Jersey. 

'The problem with intelligence 
is that you need very precise 
information to tell you when 
something is going to go off," 
said Frank Cilluffo, a senior poli- 
cy analyst at the Center for 
Strategic and International 
Studies, a Washington-based 
research group. "Now we're 
obviously shaking all the bushes 
... working every single line and 
flushing them out all at once." 

"In retrospect, when we do the 
assessment, we're going to find a 
number of dots that, on their 
own, may not make a lot of sense, 
but when you connect them, you 
say, 'Aha,'" Cilluffo said. 




« : » 



niiiii||)mion. matters. 



wilt to'iliilliirri you. : 
If yii'haMiiWsopmiOfi- 
concerning an 
article tMlippears 

in The Clarion Gail"lltite us a 
letter and drop it off in the 

Call office or send it to 

270 Gemmell Student 

Center 

i||rio|i^ j^ Clarion 



■•■■■••■■■ ■^"^-"""■^- ■ ■ 



'-•-■-' •^'-•-" ■■■ • 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 




News 




Reinhard announces coming retirement 



by Amy Thompson 
Clarion Call Mitor-ln-ChJIef 

Clarion University President 
Diane Reinhard announced her 
retirement at a Clarion University 
Council of Trustees meeting this 
summer. Her retirement is slated 
for July 1,2003. 

Reinhard said a number of rea- 
sons played into her decision to 
retire in two years. One reason for 
her retirement is her belief that 
every university needs new lead- 
ership from time to time. 

Reinhard is going into her 12th 
year of leadership and will finish 
her 1 3th year at retirement. 

After her retirement, a new cap- 
ital campaign will begin and 
Reinhard said it is best to have 
one president during the entire 
Capital Campaign which lasts 
five years. 

According to Reinhard, the last 
Capital Campaign she was a part 
of raised $11.3 million. 

Another reason for her retire- 
ment is that the Middle states 
accreditation process will be com- 



plete as well as various other pro- 
gram initiatives. 

"It's good for the university and 
it's good for me personally," said 
Reinhard. 

Reinhard also has a desire to be 
with her family in her hometown 
of Watertown, Wisconsin, a 
hometown close to universities, 
she said. 

In addition, Reinhard said, "I 
wanted to retire in a town like 
Clarion." 

Reinhard has purchased a house 
in Watertown. 

"It's a sweet little colonial but it 
needs a lot of tender love and 
care," said Reinhard. 

Reinhard said her immediate 
plans will involve renovating her 
new home. Eventually, however, 
she would like to get back into 
some form of teaching or consult- 
ing. 

Reinhard will also return to 
Clarion for the Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 

Reinhard also wants to empha- 
size that her retirement is still two 
years away and there are certain 



goals she would like to see 
accomplished. Reinhard said she 
wanted to give the university and 
the state system plenty of time to 
find a replacement. 

Reinhard said she would like to 
see the replacement of a new sci- 
ence center. She also said she 
would like to see that the accredi- 
tations are in good standing and 
that the university is understood 
by the new chancellor of the state 
system. 

Also on her agenda is to move 
ahead with the universities basic 
infrastructure and see that there is 
new program development not 
only at the main campus but at the 
Venango campus as well. 

Reinhard said she wants people 
to understand there are two cam- 
puses but classes are offered at 
different campuses in the state. 

Reinhard said one of the high- 
lights of her career has been the 
people she has had the privilege to 
work with, and the faculty that 
hasn't lost the focus of academic 
excellence. 

Reinhard said the sad moments 



of her job have been when there 
are many good ideas and little 
money to work with. 

'The community members have 
been very kind and generous to 
me from the moment I stepped on 
campus," she said. 

Although Reinhard said she had 
a special fondness of downtown 



Clarion and its businesses, she 
said her special place to be in 
Clarion is at her home on her back 
porch watching the trees and 
wildlife. 

Finally, Reinhard said, "I just 
dearly love this university. I just 
hope that history will show that 1 
made a difference." 





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B^'d!^ 


I 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Pictured above is President Diane Reintiard on tier baci< 
porch Witt) l\/laggie, tier cocl<er spaniel. 



Martin Luther King Jr. Series boasts a full schedule 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Martin Luther King Jr. Committee 
arranged an array of events for 2001-2002. 
These events are open to all and have no 
charge. 

This Clarion University committee believes 
Dr. King's heritage, as a United States leader, 
needs more implementation and attention. In 
fact, this year's theme concentrates on 
"Leadership and Achievement Through 
Diversity". Dr. King's persistence and hard 
work helped further social justice in school- 
ing, human violence, intolerance, gender 
issues, and the structure of job opportunities. 

The speakers and events include: 
September 18, 2001, Street Beats, Hart 
Chapel at 7 p.m. Created and produced by 
Romeo Joven, a graduate of NYU's Tisch 
School of Arts, Street Beats combines high 
energy with music and sounds of New York 



City's subway. Street Beats includes Latin, 
tap, break-dancers, singers, tumblers, bucket 
drummers, singers, and comedians. 

September 22, 2001, Lenny Kohm, 'The 
Late Great Wilderness Project," Hart Chapel 
at 7:30 p.m. This event is a multimedia 
slideshow presentation by Lenny Kohm. In 
1987, Kohm, a nature photographer, was 
assigned to photograph the Arctic's National 
Wildlife Refuge's coastal plain in Alaska. 

October 15, 2001, Sandra Guzman, 
"Workplace Diversity Beyond Black and 
White Issues: The Latino Factor," Hart 
Chapel at 7:30 p.m. Guzman, an EMMY 
Award-winning journalist, has over 10 years 
of experience in the fields of broadcast, mag- 
azine, newspaper, and Internet journalism. 
She is also the former editor-in-chief of 
"Latina Magazine", the first national bilingual 
lifestyle magazine for Latino American 
women. 



January 28, 2002, Kevin Powell, "Looking 
for Martin: Are Dr. King and His Dream Still 
Relevant," Hart Chapel at 7:30 p.m. Powell, 
the former member of MTV's first season of 
"Real World," is an accomplished journalist 
with his work appearing in "Vibe," "Rolling 
Stone," 'The Washington Post," "Essence," 
"George," "Code," "Ms.," and elsewhere. 
Powell also wrote four books and is the editor 
of "Step into a World: A Global Anthology of 
the New Black Literature." 

February 4, 2002, Herman Boone, Hart 
Chapel at 4 p.m. 

Boone, motivator and football coach, brought 
his leadership accomplishments to the big 
screen in Disney's "Remember the Titans." In 
1971, he coached the TC. Williams High 
School to a state championship victory. 
However, this was no ordinary football team. 
When three schools integrated to form one 
school and one Titan football team, racial ten- 



sions sparked. The team named Boone foot- 
ball head coach, instead of the local favorite. 
With determination, goals, and respect, the 
coaches dissolved their prejudices and led 
their team to a championship. 

March 8, 2002, Rev Irene Monroe, "Role 
Religion Plays in Discrimination," Hart 
Chapel at 7:30 p.m. Monroe, a writer, colum- 
nist, theologian, motivational speaker, and 
gay and lesbian activist, crusades for the silent 
but growing society. Currently, Monroe 
writes a biweekly column, "The Religion 
Thang," for Newsweekly . a lesbian, gay, 
bisexual, and transgender newspaper that cir- 
culates widely through the New England 
states. Her column received a commendation 
from the mayor. 

For further information contact: Roger J. 
Laugand III, Minority Student Services, 25 
Becht Hall or phone at 393-2645 or 226- 
2043. 



INSIDE 
NEWS 



The SSHE Chancellor, 

Judy Hample visited 

Clarion University 

Sept. 6. For more 

details. 

See Page 7. 



Clarion University 

has recently 

installed 

Videonet? 

To find out more. 
See Page 7. 



When is the 
completion of the 
library expected? 

See Page 9. 



For the latest in 

campus crime, check 

out the Public Safety 

Blotter 

On Page9. 



September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



New chancellor addresses students in open forum 



by Amy Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

Judy Hample, the new chancellor for 
the Pennsylvania State System of Higher 
Education, advised students to follow the 
advice their parents and teachers gave 
them concerning their futures at the open 
forum Sept. 6 in Hart Chapel. 

Hample said she also would like to 
stress the importance of a liberal-based 
education to the students in the state sys- 
tem. 

Hample chose to conduct an open forum 
in order to get an idea of the issues facing 
the state system. Hample in return com- 
municated with students, faculty and the 
Clarion community her plans for the state 
system. 

"She was just very sincere, very intelli- 
gent and you could just tell she wanted to 
take care of everyone," said Student 
Senate Vice President, Missy Gring. 

CUP was her first stop on her way to 
touring all 14 state system schools. When 
Hample and her staff were constructing 
her touring schedule, Hample said she 
told them what she expected of her first 
stop. 

"Take me to the best university in the 
system, and by the way, that university 
must have a debate team," she said. 

Because Hample expressed her fond- 
ness in the state system. Dr. William 
Barnes, professor of Clarion University's 
biology department, brought to her atten- 
tion that many consider the state system 
to be a "generic alternative to Pitt or Penn 
State." 

"I don't think our system has told its 



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'ivjTr^'^^tjfWjT '■i::i^^z.^>^,j^. 










Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Tlie new State System of Higtier Education Chancellor, Judy Hample, 
addressed the media in a press conference held in the Founders Hail library 
Sept. 6. 



story very well," she said. 

Hample said the state system needs to 
"emphasize what we do best." 

However, Hample said, "Clarion is 
doing a pretty good job of telling its 
story." 

In addition, she said the state system is 
the envy of other systems because of the 
ideas which are being implemented and 
the student/faculty ratios. 

Hample also said the state system needs 
to "extend and expand what we already 
have" and take the state system to a high- 
er level. 

Hample, in an interview with Mark 
Despotakis, TV 5 station manager, said a 
higher level is reached "by being vigi- 
lante, by improving the quality of every- 



thing we do." 

Hample discussed one initiative already 
in place by the former Chancellor James 
H. McCormick. McCormick had already 
began the steps for a "Virtual University." 
Hample discussed her technology 
views. Technology has its limitations and 
should be used as an "extension of the 
ways faculty can interact with the stu- 
dents." 

She also said, "Technology is a means 
to an end, not an end in itself." 

Hample also focused on the use of video 
conferencing but "not as a substitution for 
face-to-face interaction," she said. 

Another topic brought to the floor was 
the issue of student activities in a per- 
son's college experience. Hample called 



student activities "a critical component" 
of a student's college experience. 
College, she said, is "more than a 
degree." 

President Diane Reinhard joined in the 
discussion with the topic of students ath- 
letes. Clarion University athletes are stu- 
dents first and athletes second, she said, 
which gained a round of applause from 
those who attended the open forum. 

Reinhard, who also introduced Hample 
at the event, described her as "quite tal- 
ented, quite bright and quite perceptive." 
Student Senate President Ben 
Chervenak said, "1 thought she was very 
concerned with what the students' issues 
were. She seems very open to new ideas 
and suggestions. 1 feel that she is going to 
be an asset to not only Clarion University, 
but the entire State System of Higher 
Education." 

"Chancellor Hample is extremely intel- 
ligent and perceptive. The fact that she 
came in after such a short time and 
answered questions so well just amazed 
me," said Student Senate Treasurer, Tom 
Clopp. 

Hample was one of three finalists for 
the job. Former University of Toledo 
president, Frank E. Horton and former 
acting secretary of the Army, Joseph W. 
Westphal were the other finalists. 

Hample is the former chancellor of the 
Board of Regents of the Florida State 
University System. She is replacing for- 
mer Chancellor McCormick, who went to 
serve as chancellor of the Minnesota 
State Colleges and Universities system. 

Hample will earn a $275,000 annual 
salary in verbal three-year contract. 



Thinkine about Law School? 



<^^ 



' ii^ --v i ictu practice 

exan ictence Dept« will 

be sponsoring a tree practice exam. 

Saturday September 22, 2001 at 

S:30 a.iB, tit 118 Fonndcrs Hall 

^ee Dr< Sweet in ii)6 F*^ouiiders Hall 
bv^ve^tembet 19 to sign up, or email 
bswt ciarioii.eaii^ or call extension 



Videonet keeps students informed 



by Khalia Robinson 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



It's in with the new, out with the old as Clarion's 
new videonet innovation replaces the old L.E.D. 
message boards. 

What exactly is videonet? It's a campus events 
publicity program that brings the events calendar 
right to your television screen. Along with the com- 
pany that provided the old L.E.D. message boards, 
Mr. Hal Wassink, coordinator of student activities, 
thought the addition of the new videonet system 
would be in the campus' best interest. After being 
approved by the Student Senate Appropriations 
Committee, implementation began. 

Videonet can be viewed on special monitors in 
Gemmell snack bar, by the Gemmell information 
desk, and in the student recreation center (this mon- 
itor is not yet functional). 

Yet access to the videonet is not just limited to 
those locations. Students and faculty alike can find 
the videonet anywhere on campus on its assigned 
channel 50. Students living in the residence halls 
may view the videonet at any time from their dorm 
rooms. 
Off-campus students won't have home access, but 



any television on campus can be turned to channel 
50, and the videonet will be there for your viewing 
pleasure. 

"It's a really great way to find out what events are 
happening on campus in a relatively short amount of 
time," says Mr. Dave Tomeo, director of the univer- 
sity center and student activities. In about six or 
seven minutes you can see all of the activities post- 
ed for the next few weeks. 



It's a really great way to find out 
what events are happening on 
campus in a relatively short amount 
of time. §9 

-Dave Tomeo 



Any student organization is encouraged to come to 
the student activities office in 251 Gemmell to fill 
out a form so that their activities can be posted on 
the videonet. Messages can be submitted at any 
time, but messages will not be posted more than two 
weeks in advance. 

In addition to worded messages, video clips will 
soon be added to the videonet. For more informa- 
tion, call 393-2311. 



Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



Student Senate 



Student Senate discusses issues and goals at first meeting 



by Michelle D'Uva 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The new Chancellor of the State 
System of Higher Education, Dr. 
Judy Hample visited Clarion 
University Thursday, September 
6. 2001 to acquaint herself with 
the campus. After Student Senate 
President Ben Chervenak had the 
opportunity to meet with Dr. 
Hample, he said, "I thought she 
was very concerned with what 
the students' issues were. She 
seems very open to new ideas and 
suggestions. I feel that she is 
going to be an asset to not only 
Clarion University, but the entire 
State System of Higher 
Education." 

Also during the first meeting of 
the 2001-2002 academic school 
year, President Chervenak 
addressed some of the goals he 
has for the executive board. 
These issues include such topics 
as diversity and apathy on cam- 
pus, parking concerns, and the 
restructuring of the Clarion 
Students Association (CSA) 
Board of Governors. 

Treasurer Tom Clopp, chair of 
the Appropriations Committee 
said one of his main objectives 
for the school year would be to 
review the policy for national 
conferences. 

Faculty Senate 



Senator Mike McCabe, chair of 
the Committee on Rules, 
Regulations, & Policies reminded 
Senate all organizations must 
include at least 15 active mem- 
bers. Senator McCabe's commit- 
tee plans on addressing this issue 
by drafting a letter to all organi- 
zations, which would explain this 
policy. 

After Senate passed Vice 
President Missy Gring's motion 
to approve the 2001-2002 
Student Senate Committee List 
by an 18-0-0 vote, standing com- 
mittee chairs are as follows: 
Appropriations-Treasurer Clopp, 
Student Facilities-Senator Erika 
Pidro, Executive Committee- 
President Chervenak, Student 
Relations- Senator Rob Pica, 
Committee on Sub-Committees- 
Senator Tameka Washington, 
Committee on Rules, 

Regulations, & Policies-Senator 
McCabe, Dining Hall Concerns 
Committee-Senator Jacqueline 
Collier, Housing Concerns 
Committee-Senator Dustin 

Tudor, and Campus Safety, 
Health, & Environmental 
Concerns Committee-Senator Jen 
Reis. 

In other news, Business 
Manager Mr. Krull, announced 
Family Day on Saturday, 
September 15. In addition, he 




Graham Hermanns/ The Clarion Call 



Members of this year's Student Senate discussed ttie visit of 
Ctiancellor Judy Hample and covered goals for the upcom- 
ing year, at their meeting Monday, Sept 10 In 246 Gemmell 
Student Complex. 



mentioned some of the summer 
projects that have carried over to 
the Fall 2001 semester, which 
include implementing a new 
accounting system as well as a 
new student ID validation sys- 
tem. 

President Chervenak reminded 
Senate freshmen elections are 
being held throughout the next 
two weeks. Applications are cur- 
rently available, and they are due 
by 6:00 p.m. on Monday, 
September 17; there will be an. 
orientation that same day for all 
candidates. An open forum is 



scheduled for the following 
evening on Tuesday, September 
18; students may vote on 
Wednesday, September 19 and 
Thursday, September 20. Results 
should be available by Friday, 
September 21. 

In addition. President 
Chervenak announced the resig- 
nation of former Senator Andrew 
Barnes; Senator Justin Kauffman 
has been elected to fill the open 
spot. 

Vice President Gring reminded 
all senators they are required to 
complete at least two office hours 



each week. In addition, she 
would like Senate to participate 
in more community service hours 
throughout the year. 

A representative from the 
Student Athletic Advisory 
Council said there are three new 
coaches at Clarion University for 
the following sports: tennis, vol- 
leyball, and soccer. She also men- 
tioned Clarion remains in first 
place in the PSACs for the per- 
centage of scholar athletes, which 
requires a GPA of 3.25 or higher. 
Treasurer Clopp reported the 
following account balances: 
Supplemental, $23,000 and 
Supplemental Reserve, 

$64,333.33. 

Finally, Vice President Gring 
announced Senator Derrick 
Tudor as Senator of the Weekend. 
(Members of Senate participated 
in weekend-long activities at 
Findley Lake in New York for a 
chance to get to know each other 
better). 

Senator Tudor said, "I think the 
weekend was really fun, and it 
was a good experience for new 
senators. Tm looking forward to 
the new school year as a first- 
year member of Senate." 

The next Student Senate meet- 
ing is scheduled for Monday, 
September 17 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Room 246 Gemmell. 



Chervenak voices student issues at Faculty Senate's first meeting 



Student Senate President Ben Chervenak 
spoke on issues involving the Student 
Senate at the first meeting of the Faculty 
Senate on Sept. 10, 2001 in Hart Chapel. 

Chervenak reported on attempting to 
elect more freshmen members this semes- 



by Adam Berteotti some issues on the Student Senate agenda 

Clarion Call Staff Writer such as the parking problem on campus 

and the congestion in the cafeteria. 
Problems of alcohol on campus and hav- 
ing more non-alcoholic events were also 
issues the Student Senate would be 
addressing. 

Chervenak also spoke of "combatting 
apathy" on campus and letting students 
ter to the Student Senate. He explained j^^q^ ^^ey have a voice in the affairs at 
that this would help in reaching out to Clarion University. There are currently 22 
incoming freshment and giving them more ^^nsi^o^s in the Student Senate, 
of a voice in affairs affecting them on ^ grent Register, professor of the 

campus. He also informed the Senate of ^^^j^ department, speaking on behalf of 

Student Affairs, 
spoke of ideas 
on making 
information 
more available 
on work that 
has been done, 
and that will be 
done on resi- 
dence halls on 
campus. He 
said it is impor- 



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tant to make a favorable impression on 
potential students and their families when 
they are selecting a college to. attend. 
Renovated residence halls may help to 
attract those potential students. After the 
meeting he said some of the residence 
halls were around thirty years old. 

Dr. Susan Prezzano, professor of the 
anthropology, geography, and earth sci- 
ence department, gave some statistics on 
student suspensions at the meeting. She 
reported that there are currently 223 stu- 
dents under suspension. Of those 223, 55 
of the students appealed the ruling. 
Sixteen of the students were upheld. Seven 
of the appeals were rescinded under the 
Equal Opportunity Rules, and one student 
had a grade changed to lift the suspension. 
In other reports. President Diane 
Reinhard and £>r. Susan McBride, profes- 
sor of speech communication and theater, 
commented on the 40th anniversary of 
Venango campus. They spoke of good turn 
out at a celebration over the weekend. 

The induction of new committee mem- 
bers was also discussed. 



The next Faculty Senate meeting will be 
held Sept. 24, 2001 at Hart Chapel. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Pictured above is Provost Joseph 
Grunenwald, and President Diane 
Reinhard. Senators Jlstened as 
Student Senate President Ben 
Chervenak addressed the group at 
Monday's meeting. 



September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Summer closes another chapter m library 
construction and campus renovations 



by Martisse Maori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

It's the question everybody 
has been asking, "When are 
we going to have a library 
again?" According to Howard 
McGinn, Dean of Libraries, 
the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Department of 
General Services (DGS), 
Carlson Library was 70 per- 
cent complete at the begin- 
ning of August. The reopening 
for the entire building is 
anticipated for May. 

The $14.67 million Carlson 
Library is coming close to its 
completion allowing anticipa- 
tion for occupancy to occur in 
November. Wireless and wire 
data networks will be 
installed along with compact 
shelving. In December the 
Library Administration and 
technical services are sched- 
uled to move in. New furni- 
ture, shelving, and new com- 
puters will be installed in 
January, and in February, the 
reference and circulation 
areas will return. Operations 
to move books back will also 
begin. The periodical section 
will return in March, and the 
Library Science Department 
will move from Becker in 
May after commencement. 
Scheduled for April is the 
opening of the first floor 
which will include the refer- 
ence room, periodicals room, 
and a computer lab. The open- 
ing of other floors will 
depend on the arrival of 



returning books. 

The redesign and renovation 
of Carlson Library will 
include three classrooms, a 
conference room, study 
rooms, an archival center, and 
a new art gallery. It will also 
house the Library faculty and 
faculty from the Department 
of Library Service. Wireless 
Internet access will be avail- 
able on all floors, and patrons 
will now have laptop comput- 
ers to check out for library 
use. Those using their own 
laptops will have access to 
wireless modem cards. 

The office of Clare Heidler, 
Director of Facilities 
Planning, is where projects 
are planned, worked on, and 
completed. Carlson Library is 
not the only project that has 
gone through this office. 



Landscaping projects, electri- 
cal renovations, and the con- 
struction of a 45-foot bell 
tower have also been decided. 
A landscaping project that 
correlates with the Carlson 
project will change the 
scenery for students 

approaching the library. The 
other landscaping project was 
started during the summer 
when trees were removed, 
plantings were added, and 
sidewalks were replaced in 
front of Hart Chapel and 
Founders Hall. Sidewalks 
were also replaced along 
Wood Street and Ninth 
Avenue. A new walkway lined 
with bricks will lead toward 
the bell tower when it is fin- 
ished. The bell tower is based 
on the once existing bell 
tower of Seminary Hall, one 




Graham Hermanns/ The Clarion Call 



The current library is in the process of rebuilding. The txiOding 
construction is slated to be complete for May 2002. At the 
beginning of August the library was about 70 percent com- 
plete. 



of Clarion's former buildings. 
The $3.5 million electrical 
work is part of a three-year 
project funded by State 
System of Higher Education 
Academic Facilities 

Renovation Project funds. 
Most of the work being done 
involves replacing under- 
ground cable, installing con- 
duit for more cable, and 
replacing transformers and 
switches that control the dis- 
tribution of power on campus. 
The old saucer style outdoor 
lights on campus will be 
replaced with Victorian style 
light poles. 

Other projects that were 
completed this summer 
included bathroom renova- 
tions, installation of a fire 
prevention sprinkler system, 
and increased electrical ser- 
vice in Wilkinson Hall. 
Bathrooms were upgraded in 
the basement of Given Hall, 
windows were replaced in 
Chandler Dining Hall, light 
fixtures and new pole founda- 
tions were installed at the 
Campbell Hall tennis courts, 
an underground safety device 
was installed in the McEntire 
Maintenance Building fuel 
box, to prevent accidental 
spills from reaching the storm 
drains, and the parking lot 
between Carrier Hall and Nair 
Hall was repaved. Speed 
bumps were also installed 
after being recommended by 
the Facilities Planning 
Committee and Parking 
Committee. 



Crooked Creek Environmental Center available to Clarion University 



by Susan Campbell 
Clarion Call News Editor 



Students at Clarion University now 
have the opportunity to learn about the 
environment at Crooked Creek 
Environmental Learning Center in 
Armstrong County due to an agreement 
signed by Clarion in order to join other 
educational and organizations in oversee- 
ing the facility. 

Clarion's representative to the Center's 
steering committee is Dr. Bruce Smith, 
director of science education at Clarion 
University. 

"Crooked Creek Environmental 
Learning Center is a wonderful outdoor 
classroom," Smith said. "The possibili- 



ties for environmental studies are unlim- 
ited. It includes 30 acres with a dam and 
an environmental center that has a con- 
ference room, classroom, kitchen, and 
sleeping area for approximately 15." 

The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers built 
the center and used it for educational pur- 
poses. 

In 2000, Dr. Stanton Green, dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Steve 
Harris, chair of the biology department; 
and Smith discussed the facility's future. 
The Armstrong Educational Trust, a 
non-profit organization, was called upon 
by Dr. William Kerr, superintendent of 
the Armstrong County School District. 
The trust agreed to handle the legal 
issues of leasing the property and mainte- 



nance. 

The governing board includes Clarion, 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the 
New Kensington Campus of Penn State 
University, Butler County Community 
College, the Armstrong County School 
EHstrict and several other districts, the 
Pennsylvania Fish Commission, and the 
Pennsylvania Game Commission. The 
Center was signed over to the Armstrong 
Educational trust in August. 

''This is close to the original intention 
of the use of the facilities. All of this is at 
no cost to Clarion University," Smith 
said. "We envision the facilities being 
used year round for classes and as a loca- 
tion for faculty and staff retreats and 
development sessions." 



Public Safety 
Blotter 

Public Drunkeness 

According to Public Safety. 
Jason Vetere, 21, of 
Murrysvilte, Pa, was arrested 
after being found intoxicated in 
parking lot 5 at 1:40 a.m. on 
Sept. 7, 2001, 

institutional Vandalism 

According to Public Safety, 
vandalism at Man«lck-Boyd 
was reported on Sept. 3, 2001 
at 12:05 p,m. Officers found a 
broken window, jars of paint 
broken, and damage to a musi- 
cal instrument inside. 

CQ3304Ag Criminal 

Mischief Tampers with 
tangible Property 

According to Public Safety, on 
Sept, 3, 2001 at 6:05 p.m. 
Clarion University Police 
observed damage to the railing 
and cement curb located on 
Main and Ninth Streets. 
Apparently an unknown vehicle 
had struck the curb and railing 
causing moderate damage. 
Anyone with information 
should contact Clarion 
University Public Safety. 

Ibsfi 

According to Public Safety, an 
unkown person took a pizza 
thermo box and food content 
out of a Domino's Pizza vehicle 
which was parked in the 
Gemmell parking lot on Sept. 
2, 2001 at 11:00 p.m. 

According to Public Safety, a 
male resident from the sixth 
floor of Nair HatI discovered the 
keys he had left in his door, 
with his wallet attactied, were 
stolen on Sept. 2, 2001 at 1:30 
a.m. 

Minors Consumption 

According to Public Safety, 
Courtney laukitis, 20, of 311 
Wilkinson Hall did consume 
beer within an undisclosed 
location in Clarion County on 
August 31, 2001 at 1:33 a.ni. 



Sctta a h€t 
ne^vs tip? 

Call Susan at 
393-23§C. 



"• 



Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



Clarion Undversity area will benefit 
from $2.2 million grant 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

K-16 students and their 
teachers in the Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
area will benefit from a $739, 
859 grant to the State System 
of Higher Education. 

The U.S. Department of 
Education is issuing the grant 
to the State System for train- 
ing teachers to use the latest 
technology in their class- 
rooms. 

The State System anticipates 
receiving additional funding 
over the next three years for a 
total grant award of $2.3 mil- 
lion. 

Some of the money goes to 
Clarion University's K-16 
Council, established through a 
December 2000 grant to 
Clarion University Department 
of Education faculty members 
Dr. JoAnn Dugan, Dr. Barrie 
Brancato, and Dr. Jocelyn 
Smrekar. 

That grant was funded by the 
Pennsylvania Academy for the 
Profession of Teaching and 
Learning. Clarion and sister 
State System institutions 
Mansfield, Slippery Rock, and 
West Chester are the lead 
institutions in the grant. 

The new grant money is part 
of the U.S. Department of 
Education's "Preparing 

Tomorrow's Teachers to Use 
Technology" (PT3) grant pro- 
gram. Funds will be distrib- 
uted to the State System's 
Pennsylvania Academy for the 
Profession of Teaching and 
Learning (Academy) under the 
Educational Resources Group. 
Besides the educational 
organizations involved with 
the PT3 grant, Microsoft 
Corporation has committed 
$250,000 in software. 

For the first year, the State 
System will secure matching 
funds of nearly $1.6 million or 
68 percent of the total budget. 
The remaining 32 percent will • 
be financed with the grant 
money. Over three years, the 
State System will provide 
nearly $4.8 million in match- 
ing funds. 

"This grant and the makeup 
of the K-16 Council reflect the 
idea that the education of 
young people is the responsi- 



bility of everyone," says Dr. 
Gail Grejda, dean of Clarion 
University's College of 
Education and Human 
Services. "The old divisions 
between basic and higher edu- 
cation no longer exists. We all 
have to work together. It is a 
thrill for Clarion to be a part of 
this effort and be a leader in 
reforming educational meth- 
ods. We will share what we 
learn with other members of 
the State System." 

The Clarion K-16 Council 
focuses on mathematics. "The 
additional funds will allow us 
to continue our support of 
mathematics education and 
expand it to bring in literacy 
as another component," says 
Dugan. "we see literacy and 
mathematics as related. Our 
last workshop involved writ- 
ing about mathematics. 
Writing is reflective and deep- 
ens the understanding of a sub- 
ject. It encourages students to 
talk with classmates and 
express mathematical concepts 
in their own words. A student 
has to read about mathematics 
and being competent in read- 
ing and writing helps to devel- 
op content knowledge." 

In Fall 2001, the Clarion K- 
16 program will move from 
workshops and meetings into 
the participating school dis- 
tricts. University personnel 
will provide support to the 
teachers in the schools, where 
internal teaching circles are 
already developing to plan 
instruction methods and 
lessons. 

"We have worked extensive- 
ly with teachers for the past 
six months," says Dugan about 
the workshops and meetings 
held to encourage a dialogue 
among educators, demonstrate 
teaching strategies, and coor- 
dinate efforts between the 
University and community. 
"Clarion's mathematics facul- 
ty gave several presentations 
about its activities and 
research to improve instruc- 
tion and achievement in math- 
ematics at Clarion." 

A major aspect of the pro- 
gram funded with the new 
grant is a web-based learning 
community that will bring pre- 
service teachers, K-12 cooper- 
ating teachers, and higher edu-" 



cation faculty from the depart- 
ments of teacher education and 
arts and sciences together in 
an interactive environment. 

The web technology will 
allow all participants to share 
information, ideas, lesson 
plans, and methods for using 
technology to enhance K-i2 
learning. 

Pre-service teachers will 
have the opportunity to contin- 
ue to participate in the web 
community after they enter 
their first classrooms, continu- 
ing the learning process, men- 
toring and sharing of best 
practices. 

"The goal is basically system 
reforms, identifying goals and 
focus, and sharing the infor- 
mation with other State 
System members,: says 
Grejda. "As a result of these 
meetings, Clarion University 
is looking at the mathematics 
courses taken by its education 
majors. An early result of this 
review is offering academical- 
ly underprepared students the 
opportunity to take an on-line, 
World Wide Web based course 
from Educational Testing 
Services. The tutorial better 
prepares them for mathematics 
courses and to pass the 
required PRAXIS I test for 
teaching." 

The Clarion K-16 Council 
Advisory Board is chaired by 
Clarion University President 
Diane L. Reinhard. It includes 
Clarion University faculty 
members; the superintendents 
and faculty representatives 
from the Clarion-Limestone, 
Farrell, and Redbank Valley 
School districts; faculty mem- 
bers from Butler Community 
College and Westminster 
University; representatives 
from Intermediate Unit 6; 
Clarion Chamber of 

Commerce; business and com- 
munity representatives; and 
professional development 
school partners-Brookville 
Area School District, Clarion 
Area School District, Clarion- 
Limestone School District; 
and Keystone Area School 
District. 

"This grant is a clear affir- 
mation of the U.S. Department 
of Education's confidence in 
the State System to administer 
a cutting-edge program that 



Markovich participates in the 
Harrisburg Internship 
Semester program 




by Susan Campbell 
Clarion Call News Editor 



Photo courtesy of the State 
System of Higher Education 



Pictured above is Kelly 
Markovich, participant In Ttie 
Harrisburg Intership program. 



Kelly Markovich, a junior psy- 
chology major at Clarion 
University, is participating in a 
15-week internship at the 
Pennsylvania Department of 
State's Bureau of Professional & 
Occupational Affairs. The 
internship is being sponsored by 
the State System of Higher 
Education. 

Daughter of Michael Jay and 
Sharon Markovich of Northern 
Cambria, Markovich is one of 
12 students in The Harrisburg 



Internship Semester (THIS) pro- 
gram. THIS provides a chance 
for students to earn a full semes- 
ter's worth of credits while 
working in every area of the 
state government. 

Students from each of the 14 
State System universities are 
invited to participate in this 
internship program. 

Markovich and the other par- 
ticipants will be attending many 
academic seminars during the 
semester-long internship. A part 
of the program's requirements 
includes a research paper that 
must be completed individually. 

THIS began in 1989 and has 
hosted more than 150 students 
from State System universities. 
The program offers opportuni- 
ties to work with several state 
agencies. It also offers the 
chance of working in the gover- 
nor's offices, with the speaker of 
the House of Representatives, as 
well as the attorney general. 

Students attending State 
System universities can obtain 
information about THIS by ask- 
ing their individual campus 
coordinator, their university's 
cooperative or internship office, 
or by calling the Dixon 
University Center at (717) 720- 
4089. 



addresses the need to integrate 
our approach to education 
reform in Pennsylvania," said 
Interim Chancellor Mary W. 
Burger. "Over the past few 
years, under the leadership of 
former Chancellor James H. 
McCormick, the State System 
has positioned itself positively 
in the federal arena. 

Now, with the leadership of 
the recently appointed 
Chancellor Judy G. Hample, 
we look forward to continuing 
and extending these outstand- 
ing efforts." ' 

The funding will support the 
first year of the program that 
initially will run for three 
years. During the process, the 
program will be evaluated and 
best practices will be gathered 
with the hope of expanding it 
to the eight remaining State 
System universities. The 
System has committed a mini- 
mum of two years beyond the 
three-year program. 



Additional information may 
be found at Clarion's K-16 
website at 

www.clarion.edu/kl6council. 

Funding for the Academy has 
been provided through both 
the State System and the state 
Department of Education. 

The Academy's primary 
office is in Richards Hall at 
the Dixon University Center, 
2986 North Second Street, 
Harrisburg. It also has an 
office in Room 410, Regional 
Enterprise Tower in 

Pittsburgh. 

For more information about 
the Academy or the K-16 
Councils, contact Dr. Stephen 
Pavlak at 717-720-7240 in 
Harrisburg or 412-565-2616, 
or by e-mail at 

spavlak2@sshechan.edu. The 
assistant director of the 
Academy is ^andi Sheppeard. 
She may be contacted at 717- 
720-7238, or by e-mail at 
ssheppeard@sshechan.edu. 



September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 





Lifestyles 



Artist Image Resources to appear in Sanford Gallery 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



The 2001-2002 Sanford 
Gallery Exhibits at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
begins September 5 with 
"Artist Image Resources: 
Prints from the Archives." 
The exhibit continues through 
October 5 in the Sanford 
Gallery, Marwick-Boyd Fine 
Arts Building. 

Gallery hours are Monday 
and Wednesday, 11 a.m. - 1 
p.m. The exhibit is free and 
open to the public. 

The Artists Image Resource 
(AIR) is a printmaking 
resource that integrates the 
creation of fine art printwork 
with educational programs 
that explore the creative 
process. Since 1994, AIR has 
initiated new work with over 
20 artists and collaborated on 
educational projects with 
many organizations. AIR is 
located in Pittsburgh. 

The artists for this exhibi- 
tion are Edward S. Eberle, 
John Lysak, Maritza 

Mosquera, Patricia Villalobos- 
Eschverria, Lorraine Vullo, 
Stewart Wilson, Patricia 
Bellan-Gillen, Michael 

Loderstedt, Ian Short, and 
Robert Beckman. 

Eberle, a ceramic artist, 
lives and works in Pittsburgh. 
His work is photographs of 
cylindrical ceramic pieces that 
incorporated text into the 
work. He received his MFA 
from Alfred University and 
taught at the Philadelphia 
College of Art and at 



Carnegie-Mellon University. 

Lysak, a printmaker and 
educator, teaches printmaking 
at Edinboro University of 
Pennsylvania. He has created 
a series of prints that started 
as images scanned into a com- 
puter and later photographi- 
cally enlarged and put onto 
screens. Before joining 

Edinboro, Lysak was a master 
printmaker for "Stone Press 
Editions" in Seattle, WA. 

Mosquera, originally from 
Ecuador, is an assistant cura- 
tor of education at the Andy 
Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. 
Her recent work focuses on 
process, sensual works, sensu- 
al image, personal word, and 
the desire for evidence, pre- 
sented on large-scale screen- 
printed material, text, and 
objects. She received her 
masters degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 
Philadelphia and studied at the 
Skowhegan School of Painting 
and Sculpture in Maine. 

Villalobos-Eschverria, an 
artist and educator, is teaching 
at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. Her work is a 
photo-print series "Grietas- 
Fissures" incorporating pho- 
tographs of the body with 
schematics, diagrams, and 
poems to explore issues of 
cultural and individual identi- 
ty. She received her MFA 
from West Virginia University. 

Vullo, an artist, lives and 
works in Pittsburgh. Her pro- 
ject, "Simon Sleeping," is 
photographs of her son, 
scanned into a computer, and 



printed out as positive trans- 
parencies used to make photo 
etching plates. 
Wilson is a printmaker. 

Bellan-Gillen is a 
painter/printmaker from 

Burgettstown who teaches at 
Carnegie Mellon University in 
Pittsburgh. Bellan-Gillen is 
an established printmaker/lith- 
ographer who has printed for a 
number of prominent artists 
through her own studio in 
Burgettstown. 

Loderstedt is a multiple 
media artist living in 
Cleveland, Ohio, and teaching 
at Kent State University in 
Kent, Ohio. Lodersedt's work 



often incorporates print-relat- 
ed elements in larger project 
work. 

Short is a multiple media 
artist and printmaker from 
Pittsburgh. Short taught at 
Kent State University and 
Edinboro University of 
Pennsylvania where he was 
chairman of the art department 
from 1993-1996. Short is co- 
founder of the Artists Image 
Resource in Pittsburgh and 
currently serves as AIR's resi- 
dent printmaker. 

Beckman is a printmaker and 
installation artist from 
Pittsburgh. Beckman taught at 
Edinboro University of 



Pennsylvania and is currently 
an adjunct professor at 
Carnegie Mellon University in 
Pittsburgh. Beckman is a co- 
founder of the Artists Image 
Resource in Pittsburgh and 
currently serves as AIR's 
artistic director. 

Upcoming exhibits this 
semester are: Carol Werder, 
"Constructed Figurative 

Paintings," October 17 - 
November 14, with an opening 
party, Tuesday, October 16, 
4:30 - 6 p.m. in the Gallery, 
and an artist talk at 5 p.m. in 
the Gallery; and Bachelor of 
Fine Arts Exhibitions, 
November 26 - December 14. 



Wher 




■j^wmnmnmr 




Just a reminder that the 

Bioodmo&ile will be here ofl 

September 25. Take time to 

donate in this time of need. 




Photo by Graham Hennanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 



www.theclarioncall.com * 




Street Beats will bring a 

taste of the dty to 

Qarion University with 

"Subway Stories." To 

find out more. 

See Page 13. 



The annual Cultural 
Oversity Week will be 

coming to Clarion 

during this year's ALE 

For more information. 

See Page 15. 



French band Daft Punk 

actually makes disco 

sound good on their 

newest offering, 

Discovery. 

See Page 15. 



Calendar of Events. 
To find out whaf s 
going on at Clarion 
University and the sur- 
rounding community. 
See Page 14. 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



Dave Barry's "hornet puke" weight loss plan 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated writer 



Are you overweight? Take this 
simple medical test to find out: 

Stand with your arms hanging 
by your sides and your feet slight- 
ly apart. Now look out the win- 
dow. If you see the United States 
of America, then you are over- 
weight, because everybody here 
is. That's why your arms are hang- 
ing by your sides at a 45-degree 
angle. 

We are in the midst of a nation- 
al weight-gain epidemic, as indi- 
cated by the Surgeon General's 
just-released "Report on Obesity 
in America," which is virtually 
unreadable because of Haagen- 
Dazs stains. And the situation is 
getting worse. This summer, for 
the first time, Walt Disney World 
was forced to close for two con- 
secutive days because of vacation- 
ers getting wedged in the turn- 
stiles. 



The national weight problem is 
especially troubling for our young 
people, because as they have 
become fatter, their role models 
have become skinnier. Your mod- 
ern pop stars — your Britney 
Spears, your Christina Aguilera, 




your Britney Aguilera, your 
Christina Spears and your Back 
*N' Street Sync Boys — have the 



body fat of a Bic pen. These stars 
have to be in superb shape 
because their musical acts consist 
of sprinting frantically back and 
forth across the stage, as if pur- 
sued by invisible jackals, so as to 
distract attention from the fact that 
their music — and I don't mean 
this as a criticism, just an observa- 
tion — bites. 

When 1 was a youth, it was eas- 
ier to relate, physically, to the pop 
stars, who tended to be less- 
mobile, larger-dimensioned artists 
such as Elvis Presley, Fats "Fats" 
Domino, and Luciano "Really 
Fats" Pavarotti. These artists did 
not sprint. Sometimes they took 
actual naps on stage. 

Even when the pop stars of the 
past moved around, they stuck to 
movements that did not require 
superb physical conditioning, or 
even a central nervous system. A 
good example is a dance called 
"The Freddie," which was popu- 
larized briefly in 1965 by Freddie 



and the Dreamers, a British Twit 
Invasion band that, when it per- 
formed this dance, strongly 
resembled a group of men failing 
a roadside sobriety test. (If we 
really want to gauge the character 
and judgment of today's politi- 
cians, we should stop asking them 
if they ever took drugs, and 
instead ask them if they ever did 
"The Freddie.") 

But my point is that today, we 
are a fat nation, and we have low 
self-esteem because our role mod- 
els are thin. Something needs to 
be done about this. The simplest 
solution, of course, would be to 
put Britney Spears in a room filled 
with Moon Pies and refuse to let 
her out until she ate them all. That 
way, when she gave a concert, the 
stage would collapse, and our kids 
would feel better about them- 
selves. I know I would. 

But that would be wrong. So 
instead we must embark on a 
national program to lose weight. 



There is only one safe, sane way 
to do this: Eat less, and exercise 
more. So we can rule THAT out. 
Which leads us to the only other 
option: hornet juice. 

I am not making hornet juice up. 
There's a Japanese company 
called Meiji that is selling a prod- 
uct (check it out for yourself at 
hornet-super-juice.com) derived 
from the larvae of "giant killer 
hornets." The company says that 
these hornets, which "grow up to 
five times the size of a typical 
wasp" and "kill about 40 people 
every year," feed their young by 
killing other insects and then 
"chewing the meat into a ball.'" 
The hornets feed these meatballs 
to their larvae, which then regur- 
gitate a clear liquid, which the 
adult hornets drink. This gives 
them enough energy to fly 50 
miles per day, which is more than 
you can say for some major air- 
lines. 

See 'Barry,' Page 13 



Side Items 

Garlic Sauce 
Nacho Cheese Sauce 

Pizza Sauce 

PepperonI, Anchovies 

Seasoning Shaker 



Extras 

Bread Sticks, Cheese Sticks 



Drinks 

2 Liters - Coke, 
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$1.99 
20oz.- Coke, Diet, 
Sprite, Root Beer 

$1.25 




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To ppings 

Pepperoni 

Sausage 

Italian Sausage 

Baby Portabella Mushrooms 

Onions 

Green Peppers 

Black Olives 

Anchovies 

- Ham 

Bacon, Beef 

Jalapenos 

Banana Peppers 

Pineapple 

Extra Cheese 



slices only 
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Expires 30 days Not valid with any other offer Valid 
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One large with the works & One 
large with two toppings 
1 -2 liter of Coke 



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10:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m. - Fri. - Sat. 

We now accept Visa Master Card and 
American Express 




730 Main St. 
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Free Breadsticks 

with purchase of Large or 
X-Large pizza 
at regular price 



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only at participating locations. Customer pays all applica- 
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4 i^rge One Topping Pizzas 

^^^ $23-99 



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Additional toppings extra. 



X-Large 2 Topping 
2 Liter Coke 

$10.99 

Empires 30 days Not valid with ar y other otter. Valid 

only at participating locations Customer pays all applic- 

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Large 1 Topping Pizza 
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cheesesticks 
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September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



Street Beats brings urban flavor to Clarion 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



The unique music of Street Beats 
comes to Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, September 18, 7:30 
p.m. in Hart Chapel. The music 
performance is the first program in 
the 2001-02 Martin Luther King 



Jr. Speaker Series. The program is 
free and open to the public. 

Street Beats is a high energy per- 
formance with music and sounds 
from the New York City subways. 
Street Beats was created and pro- 
duced by NYU's Tisch School of 
the Arts graduate Romeo Joven. 
Joven got the idea of creating 



Street Beats watching many tal- 
ented and unique acts while wait- 
ing for the subway. 

Street Beats features bucket 
drummers, Latin, tap and break 
dancers, tumblers, comedians and 
singers. It also features a special 
audience participation segment 
where audience members are 






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invited on stage to show off their 
talents. 

The band includes: singer 
Yolanda Tolentino, a performer in 
many Broadway shows includmg 
"The Phantom of the Opera," 
"Miss Saigon" and 'The King and 
I"; Mai«D«(nm and Fred Lewis, 
who got their start in the subways 
of New York, were featured in 
■"Bring in "da Noise, Bring m "da 
Funk"; Andrew Nemr, also a for- 
mer subwi y performer, who stud- 
ied tap with Savion Glover and 
toured with Glover and Gregory 
Hines; Bonny Rodriguez and his 
extraordinary dancing doll also 
got their start in New York City 
subways and acted in several 
movies including "For Love of the 
Game" and "You've Got Mail." 

Upcoming durmg the Fall 2001 
semester in the Martin Luther 
Kings Jr. Speaker Series are: 
September 22, The Last Great 
Wilderness Project, a multimedia 



slideshow presentation. Hart 
Chapel, 7:30 p.m.; and October 
15, Sandra Guzman, EMMY 
Award-winnmg journalist, 

"Workplace Diversity Beyond 
Black and White: The Latino 
Factor," Hart Chapel. 7:30 p.m. 

Clarion University's Martin 
Luther Jr. Committee maintains 
that the breath o\ Dr. King's hery 
itage as a US.A leader is a mainly 
untapped resource. Consequently, 
this year the committee seeks to 
focus on the theme "Leadership 
and Achievement Through! 
Diversity." Some areas of his 
active involvement to further 
social injustice include all levels 
of schooling, human violence, 
intolerance, gender issues, and the 
structure of job opportunities. 
Programs in these and other 
domains developed through vari- 
ous academic disciplines seem 
appropriate for the committee to 
cooperatively develop each year. 



Haines kicks off 
Visiting Writer Series 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



Poet and essayist John Haines 
will open Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania's 2001-02 Visiting 
Writers Series with a reading on 
September 20 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Moore Hall. The reading is free 
and open to the public. 

Haines is the author of an 
Alaskan memoir, "The Stars, The 
Snow, The Fire"; a collection of 
poems, "The Own in the Mask of 
the Dreamer"; and a collection of 
essays and reviews, "Fables and 
Distances." He has received a lit- 
erary award from the Academy of 



Arts and Letters and was awarded 
the 63rd Annual Fellowship by the 
Academy of American Poets. 

Most recently, Haines was Poet- 
in-Residence at the Stadler 
Center, Bucknell University. 
Previously, he was a resident at 
the Rockefeller Center in 
Bellagio, Italy, and a guest at the 
annual Summer Wordsworth 
Conference in Grasmere, 
England. His newest collection of 
poems, "For the Century's End" 
will be published in October 
2001. 

Upcoming in this smes is poet 
Raphael Campo, November 2 at 
7:30 p.m. in Moore Hall. 



BARRYI Dave Bany outlines his plan for losing weight fast, 
from Page 12. 



The company states that 
Japanese hornet scientists first 
tested the hornet juice on — I 
am still not making this up — 
"swimming mice." The scien- 
tists found that the juice 
enabled the mice to turn fat 
into energy, and thus swim 
longer. The hornet juice was 
then tested on students riding 
exercise bicycles; sure enough, 
in a short time, these students 
were stinging people to death. 



No, really, the students also 
converted fat to energy. And so 
now Meiji has put this juice 
into a drink for yon, the con- 
sumer. It's being sold under the 
name "VAAM," which is smart 
marketing, because it has more 
consumer appeal than ''Hornet 
Larvae Puke." But whatever 
you call it, this is a product 
that America NEEDS. I could 
use some right now, to wash 
down these meatballs. 



•«an 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



September 13, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 



Dave Barry's "hornet puke" weight loss plan street Beats brings urban flavor to Clarion 



hy DaM' Barr\ 
Svnditated writer 



•••■■■•••••*•••••••••••« 



!••••• 



■\ic \ou overueighi ' Take iliis 
.simple medical test to find out 

St.ind uith \our arms hangini: 

h> \oLj! sides and >ou! teet sliiiht- 

i\ an. Ml Now look out the uin- 

\iHi see the I'n'ted States 

.!\ he;. 



The national vveitiht problem is b(^d\ tat ot a Bie |">en These stars 
especiall) troublinii torour \oung 
people, bee.iuse as the\ b.a\e 
be-^onie tatter, their role niode'> 
ha\e becinne skinnier. \ou\ mod 
ern pop s!,; uir Britnev 

.Spe ! suna Aiiuileia. 



■ me m , • 

• gam Cp':- ,is iii^:; 

........ ;'\ the SuiL. - • leneral'-- 

iust relea^ed ■'Rer, m . •:. Obesit) 
;•; Xiiici u.. irtuaiU 

unreadable because ot llaagen 
IXi/s siaiiiN .-Xnd the situation i- 
gettini: worse This summei 
the first time. Walt Disiie) World 
was forced to close tor \\\o con- 
secutne da\s because ot vacation- 
ers getting wedged m the turn- 
stiles 




ha\e to be 


in 


^U[ 


K-rb shape 


because their 


musiL 


al 


acts consist 


ot sprinting 


ran tic 


all 


\ back and 


torth across 


he stc 


ge 


. as it pur- 


sued b) m\ isible ta 


ck 


iis, sv) as to 


distract attention tn 


m the tact that 


then music - 


- and 


I 


don't meaii 


till V ^j.. , . |t , ■ 


; ^ ' n n 


|v,I 


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\\h- 


.1 _\Ol 

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if 

11. 


•e less 


:ei 


-diiv.e 


'IM 


>Mied an is! 


' s 


lYev 







and the Dreamers, a British Tuit 
Inxasion band that, when it per- 
li'imed this dance, strnnglv 
resembled a gn»up o\' men failing 
.1 ii'adside sobiiet) test (It we 
ic.ii!\ want to gauge the character 
and judgfTient ot today's politi- 
cians, we should stop asking them 

' ^ii-.'^ e\er 

. isk th 

■ I he 1 leddie. 



' diUgs. and 

!e\ e\er did 



your BntTH' 
Christina "^^ 
"N" Street ^^ 



\guilera. \ou! 
,md vour Back 



iJv'imn... and 

Fats" Pa\aicitti. i ,.esc .t; lists jiu 
" ■' ■ :'■•■" >onxMinie'- ''■■•■' look 
... :...,^ .,.., • on stage. 

f-\en wlicn the |iop oj-.. .i ;iic 
[tas; .1 aiound. t; k to 

movements that did .juiie 

supeib physical conditioning, 
e\en a central ner\ous s_\stem. .A 
g.>!>d example is a darkc ..died 
"The I'reddie."" which a.i^ i^. 'p-u- 



I ') o s s 



have the larized brie!]\ m I'-'O."" b\ b'reddie 



:i roie mod 
::g neec-- ■ 
. a[\'u; mi-, i he simjiiesi 
,, of ct . >ould be to 

I .,; i.Mi!ie_\ Spe.il- 1,1 .1 room filled 
^•■\[h .\U)on Pics and retuse to let 
nc! out until she ate them all. That 
wa\. when she g.r. c .i cimcert. the 
>!.ige -iMaiid collaj'se. and inii kids 
■Aould teel better about ihem- 
~-ei\cs 1 kin'W 1 would. 

But that would be wrong. So 
uisie.td we must embark vn a 
national program to lose weight. 



lere is onl\ one sate, sane wa\ 
to do this lal less, and exeicise 
more So we can rule THAI' out. 
Which leads us ti> the onlv other 
option' hi>rnet luice. 

I am not making hornet iukc up 
There's a .lapanese ..unp.<n\ 
called Mei|i that is seP-' > • ■ : 

UCI ^chCvk !l out to! ..... 

liornelsuivr mice. c. -ml . 
t' :';fi the l.ir\:ie 

■e hornets, wh:. 
!!\e times 

. .'.i; Iced then ) > 
Kiiiing other insects ar 
■'chew ing the meat w 
1 he hornets teed thc-.c ,,..,;; .,,,-. 
to then !..;■ ae whieh then icliui 
^ ■ liquid, which tfu' 

a'dult hornets drmk. 'I his gi\es 
them enough energ_\ i i flv .si) 
miles jier d.i\. which is ninic '.H.in 
\ou cm sa\ tor some mainr air- 

St'L' 'Harry,' Pa^c 13 



Side Items 

Garlic Sauce 
Nacho Cheese Sauce 

Pizza Sauce 
Pepperoni, Anchovies 

Seasoning Sbaker 



Extras 

Bread Sticks, Cheese Sticks 



Drinks 

2 Liters - Coke, 
Diet, Sprite 

S1.99 
20oz.- Coke, Diet. 
Sprite, Root Beer 

SI. 25 








loppings 

Pepperoni 

Sausage 

Italian Sausage 

Baby Portabella Mushrooms 

Onions 

Green Peppers 

Black Olives 

Anchovies 

- Ham 

Bacon, Beef 

dalapenos 

Banana Peppers 

Pineapple 

Extra Cheese 



slices only 
$.99 



Two Large 
® $14.99 



es 30 Oay^ 
aarjiciDa! ■ 

aLl'C- 5dl8b '.dA A. 



■•DTie'- DSi 



Late Night Special 

Larqe '-Toppma 
_^ci3^ 2-2O0Z Coke " 

^fmm^ Sg.gg 






3D"as ex" 



Family Special 

One larg^ ■ " le works & One 
la-'ge vm;; twc toppings 
1-2 i'ter of Coke 

S17.99 

■ *vith any uher oficf Vauii 
,i\.>.-i . Customer I'-i-,^ ^'- y*\^-<>'i'- "* 



INMIOTir&l 

J. 



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Hours: 

10:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. - Sun. - Thurs. 
10:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m. - Fri. - Sat. 

VJe now accept isa Master Card and 
American Express 



V/SA 






730 Main St. 
Clarion, PA 16214 



m 



Free Breadsticks 

with purchase of Large or 
^gpufc. X-Large pizza 



e at regular price 



Exi \o: -a-a A';n a"> o'her Qt'er va'ia 

only i g locations Customer pays all appiica- 

D.c =aieb !ax Addi!ioi-ai 'opD:'-gs exi^a 



4 Large One Topping Pizzas 

(Sfiljiii $23-99 



® 



Nut \/alid with any other otter \/a"u j- > a! participat- 
ing locations Customer pays all applicable sales tax 



Additiona: toppings extra 



X-Large 2 Topping 
2 Liter Coke 

$10.99 

W days Not va^d \^ :n any othe' " "'•' '-'- 
.tiCipating locations Customer p, 
-..1 e sales tar- Additioni'-opi'^g' '-■• .: 




IPAI 



Large 1 Topping Pizza 
W/ drier 
cheeses ;'cks 
$10,C)0 



® 



■lO days Not valid w:th any oti - 
iiing locations Customer po,.. 
•'S tax Add'tionai 'oppmgs 6' ' 1 



^1 

"Papa's Choice 

1 Large with 5 toppings 

$10.99 

Not vairo w.tn any othe' otier Vand only at padicipal- 
■ng locatijr-s Customer pays all applicable sales tax 
Addi'iC'iai toup'pgs ext'a 



Story courtesy ot 
I iiivtTsitv Relations 



Jr. Speaker Senes. The program is Street Beats v\aiehinL' many tal 



I he uiiique mu.sie el Slieel Beats 
comes to Clarion I'niversity ot 
lViiiis\ Kama. September 18. 7:30 
|t m. Ill llari (tuipel The nuisie 
("lei !.>::i'aiKe i> tlielirsi program m 
the -i'l H 1)2 Martin l.uiher Kuiii 



tree and open {o the public. 

Street Fieats is a high energy per- 
lormance with music and sounds 
from the New York City subwa\s 
Street Ik'ats was created and pro- 
duced hy NYl"s Tisch School of 
the .Arts graduate Komeo .lo\cn. 
.io\en iiot the idea ol creatine 



ented and unique acts while wait- 
ing t\)r the suhwa\. 

Street Beats tealures bucket 
drummer,-,. Latin, tap ' 'leak 
dancers, tumblers, coiindians aiiu 
singers. It also leatures a m^ ■ •■' 
audience participaiioii 
where audience menii . 



invited on stage to shiiw otf their slideshow presentation. Ila;: 

talents. Chapel. 7..^() p ni . and (kiutie; 

The band include--. >ip.gei ^^ ^aiidia (ui/nian. fiMNH 

V)!anda Tolentmo. a [x-rtormei m .Ac, ard- w innmg louinali-; 

n'.dV);. Broadwa> shows including "Workplace DuersU. iicmi.j 

"Tiie I*hantt)m of the Opera." Black and White hi. 

"^'i-- Saigon" and "The King and Factor," Han Cnapel. 7 .^i. , 
, Mare Dartiam and Fred Lewis, rianon I mversuv s Ni 



bo (Jut their start 

- - -: >.Mk 



u^ A a\ 



miniinci- 




fiiiie.- 1) •i\.',\ i\ , 




e\traordinar\' dan 


1 i , - ■ ' 1 ■ 


got Uu'H- >tarl III N 


. al :^^:..I-.; .. .,,, .. 


sub,- .iiid ac'c; 


- ■ . ■■ \uA. . 


movies includ' . : •• , 


. ... 


Ciame" and. "^ou'- '. 


sli UCtUU . pvlllUIl- . 


rpcoiming during i,',c 1 all 20(i: 


jse and > i' 


sLinesfer in the Martin Luthc 


■iiaiiis ue\eloped through , . 


Kings i' Speaker Seiics are 


.IN academic dl^cM'iM;v. 


SepieniIxT 22. T' ' i (jieai 


appix)priatv ■ 



Wllderne^^ l^uieci. a nailtitiiedia Luoperatoeu uc\eio;; cawh seai. 

Haines kicks oflf 
Visiting Writer Series 



story courtes\ of 
I niversit\ Relations 



Poet and essa>ist John Maines 
will open Clarum rni\ersi!\ ;! 
Pennsv Kama's 2001-02 Visiting 
Writers Series with a reading on 
September 20 at j.m. in 

Mt)ore Hall. The reading is tree 
and open to the public. 

Haines is the author of an 
Alaskan memoir '"The Stars. The 
Snow. The Fire"; a collection of 
poems, "The Own m the Mask of 
the Dreamer": and a collection of 
essays and reviews, "Fables and 
Distances " He has received a lit- 
erar\ award from the Academ\ i){ 



BARRY> Dave Barr> outlines 
from Page 12. 



,\rls arid Letters and was aw a ; 
tile ()3rd Annua! lellowslr. 
.Acadenn ^it .Xnicru.!' ;' 

Most recent!}. Ilanics wun <. ■ 
in Residence at tiie StaUi^'. 
(enter, Buc knell laii\ersit\ 
F're\iousl\. he was a resident a! 
the kocketeller C'enlei m 
Beliagh>. Ital). and a guest at the 
annual Summer Wordsworth 
Conference m Graimere. 
Imgland His newest collection ot 
poems, '"F-or the Century's Fnd" 
will be published in Octot)e! 
2001. 

Upcoming in this series i<; p. iC 
Raphael Campo, Niivemii 
7..^0 p.m. in Mot)re Hail. 

his plan for losing weight fast. 



The compan\ -.iaies tliat 
.lapanese horn:, 
tested the hornet 
am still n(tt mako 
■■swimming mue. i;:c -lich 
tists found thai the juice 
enabled the mice !•> turn tat 
into energy, and thus swim 
Umger. The hornet piicc .. .l^ 
then tested on students riding 
exercise bicycles; sure enough, 
in a short time, these students 
were stinging people ti> death. 



\, 



Mei|i has put this iui.c 

a drink f 

''eing suM Unvici ; jk 
1 1 .11 i i L- \ .■ \ .-■'v M . ■ ■ which 1 
marketing, because it ha- iii -i- 
cimsumer appeal than ~ Hornet 
larvae ^*uke." But whatexei 
><)u call It. this is a produc: 
that .America NFFDS. 1 could 
use some right nov^. Id wasii 
down these meatballs 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



Calendar of Events 



BlIBJBJBMBIBJBiBMBMBMaiBJBlBJBIBIBJBJBfBMajgjBlBiBJ^^ 



Wednesday, September 12 

•IM Entries due in Rec Center (Flag Football) 

•Volleyball v. Mercyhurst 7 pm 

•UAB Homecoming Court Voting (outside Gem) 12-3 pm 

•UAB Under the Big 

Top Carnival Activities 

Day (outside Gem) 12-4 

pm Rain Site: Rec 

Center 

•UAB Picture Contest 

Begins 

•UAB Student Leader 

Series "Appreciating 

Diversity" (250/252 

Gem) 4 pm 

•Public Debate (Chap) 

7:30 pm 

Thursday, 

September 13 

•UAB Student 

Organization's Advisor Reception (252 Gem) 5 pm 

•W. Soccer at Gannon 4 pm 

•IM entries due in Rec Center (1 Pitch Softball) 

Friday, September 14 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Admissions Visit Day (248 Gem) 9 am 

•IM entries due in Rec Center (Tennis) 

•UAB Canoe Lock-Through 2 pm 

•Koinonia Fall Retreat begins (meet at Wilkinson/Nair bb 

courts) 6:30 pm 

Saturday, September 15 

•Football vs. Tiffin 2 pm 

•Volleyball vs. lUP 7 pm 




•Family Day 

•Hispanic Heritage Month begins 

•Book Center open 10 am - 6 pm 

•Cross Country at YSU or Penn State 

•Tennis at Indiana 

Sunday, September 16 

•UAB White Water Rafting 

•Koinonia Fall Retreat ends 

Monday, September 17 

•Faculty Senate Policy Mtg. (B- 

8 Chap) 3:30 pm 

•IM entries due in Rec Center 

(Field Goal Contest) 

•UAB Homecoming Court 

Pictures (248 Gem) 2 pm 

•UAB Student Leader Series 

"Incorporating Fitness 

Activities" (250/252 Gem) 4 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 

7:30 pm 

Tuesday, September 18 

•ROSH HASHANAH 

•Volleyball at Lock Haven 7 pm 

•IM entries due in Rec Center 

(In-Line Hockey) 

•MLK Series (Chap) 7:30 pm 

•UAB Float Mtg. (248 Gem) 6 pm 

Wednesday, September 19 

•UAB Student Leader Series "Incorporating Nutrition" 

(Campbell Lobby) 4 pm 

•W. Soccer vs. Slippery Rock 4 pm 

•UAB Ritazza Open Mic Night (Gem) 8 pm 




BifgigigiBiBiaaaBMagiaaaaaBjaBiBiBMaBjaaBJBiB^^ 



i 
I 
I 
i 

I 

i 

I 

i 

I 

I 
i 

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a 



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Photo courtesy of UAB 






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Two students go at It during UAB's "Inflatable Gannes"6v0nt that was held on 
Monday, August 27 at the Pierce Field. 











September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 



Disco sucks! Disco rules! Ummm, wait.... 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call Lifestjies Editor 

ARTIST/ALBUM: Daft Punk, 
Discovery. 

FOR FANS OF: Modem-day 
disco; poppy techno. 

FOR FURTHER LISTENING: 
Daft Punk's Homework, Saturday 
Nif^ht Fever soundtrack playing 
simultaneously with some Fatboy 
Slim. 

Let me make something abundant- 
ly clear: 1 hate disco. It was nothing 
more than an excuse for coked-up 
rich white hipsters to dress flamboy- 
antly and shake their collective 
groove thangs in mindless, 
Watership Down rabbit-style. 

As much as I loathe boy/giri bands 
and mcxlem r&b, those genres are 
nothing more than pimples on 
disco's pale, flaccid a**. 

But like all greai human tragedies, 
a silver lining can be found within 
discoteque purgatory. The move- 
ment did inadvertently spawn a 
handful of classic albums and sin- 
gles. It was the main catalyst for the 
punk genre m response to its excess 
and polished gloss. It fueled the new 
wave movement with a higher level 
of acceptance regarding the synthe- 
sizer as a legitimate instrument, and 
transitively, the electronica of today, 
including French act Daft Punk. 

Content to dabble in bouncy house 
music and engaging yet cut-and- 
paste rhythms on their debut, 



Homework, Daft Punk breaks out 
that giant mirrorball and platform 
shoes for their long-awaited sopho- 
more release. Discovery. Make no 
mistake about it - Discovery is not an 
electronica album, or even a house 
album - it's disco. From the ultra- 
processed vocals to the prefabricated 



roots and questionable artistic merit, 
resulting in alternating moments of 
genuine tribute and knowing winks 
of absurdity. Compulsively dance- 
able ("One More Time"), irresistibly 
sappy ("Digital Love") and unfortu- 
nately sometimes as irritating as a 
termite in your ear ("Short Circuit"), 




guitar "solos," Daft Punk has created 
what is quite possibly the world's 
greatest disco album, ever. (My 
apologies to the Pet Shop Boys). 

Discovery is a huge slab of ripe 
cheese, self-aware of its dubious 



Daft Punk has crafted an album that 
at once collectively pulls the best and 
worst elements of the genre into a 
(mostly) endlessly listenable platter. 
The album's first four songs form 
a suite of resplendent glitter with 



enough energy to carry you through 
the album's lesser moments, such as 
a sampled Barry Manilow 
("Superheros") and the overly long 
closer, appropriately titled, "Too 
Long." 

"One More Time" makes you 
aware of Daft Punk's intentions from 
the get-go, as guest singer 
Romanthony's voice gets the 'talking 
Macintosh' treatment, sounding like 
the ecstasy-retarded brother of 
Radiohead's paranoid android. 
"Music's got me feelin" so 
fineAVe're gonna 

celebrate/Celebrate and dance so 
free.." is repeated ad infinitum as a 
stupidly happy synth loop drums you 
into drooling oblivion for the next 
five minutes. "One More Time" 
teeters on the line between being 
repetitive to the point of annoyance 
and simply hypnotizing. Fortunately 
it never loses its footing for a second. 

The energy level is only upped for 
"Aerodynamic," the next track. A 
collage of drum loops and a searing 
Van Halen-styled riff" that struts its 
stuff all over your speakers so well 
you expect David Lee to pop up at 
any moment, "Aerodynamic" will 
have even the staunchest disco-hater 
pumping their fist in the air. 

"Digital Love" is a track of such 
wondrous robotic funk that I'm sure 
Prince is weeping tears of envy 
somewhere in Minnesota. It's. the 
sound of computers "networking," if 



you catch my drift. Even the ridicu- 
lous Supertramp-emulaling key- 
board chill section works unbeliev- 
ably well, despite its recent inclusion 
in a Gap commercial. I've never 
wanted to buy parachute pants so 
badly. The oozing sentiments of 
"Digital Love" melt perfectly into 
the mathematical precision of 
"Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger," 
which is every bit as dynamic and 
anthemic as its title suggests. 

The second half of Discovery is 
much weaker, filled with holes and 
mine traps for your ears, but for those 
willing to tiead with caution, there 
can be rewards. Skip past the emo- 
tionless ambient sludge of 
"Nightvision," as well as the afore- 
mentioned "Superheros" if you value 
your health and well-being at all. 
But in your dealings with the 'skip' 
button on your player, make sure to 
make a pit stop at "Something About 
Us," which is nearly as brilliantly 
cheesy as "Digital Love." Gotta love 
those talk-boxes, man. 

"Voyager" and "Veridis Quo," a 
pair of instrumentals that seem like 
lost Duran Duran singles without 
Simon LeBon's prattling are also 
worth a look. If you are unable to 
find even modest pleasures with Daft 
Punk's Discovery, then you aren't a 
fan of dance music in any of its per- 
mutations. Now if you'll excuse me, 
that damn mirrorball is giving me a 
headache. 4 out of 5 stars. 



Clarion's Cultural Diversity Week to coincide with ALF 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania and the 
Clarion community are sponscMing the seventh 
annual "Cultural Diversity Week," September 
24-28, coinciding with the 48th Annual 
National City Autumn Leaf Festival. The theme 
this year is "Clarion County - The Pinnacle of 
Success." 

This is a joint cultural event planned by 
Clarion University and the community and is 
free and c^^en to the public. 

The week's events include: 

September 24, beginning at 6:30 p.m., Clarion 
University President Diane L. Reinhard and 
Clarion Borough Mayor Robert Yoho will pro- 
vide the welcome. Clarion University stuctents 
Ian Wingfield and Tynelle Williams are the mas- 
ters of cerenionies for the evening. 

Wingfield, a junior rehabilitation science 
major, is a son of Oenise Cobb of Harrisbui^, 
and is a graduate of Harrisburg High School. 

Williams, a junior library science major, is a 
granddaughter of Luciee Branch of 
Philadelphia, and is a graduate of Martin Luther 
King High School. 



The program includes: 

•Clarion University faculty and staff singing 
Clarion University's Alma Mater under the 
direction of Dr. Steve Johnson, associate dean of 
Arts and Sciences at Clarion University. 

•The Pods with Paul Bylaska, Clarion 
University Vice President of Finance and 
Administration, and Brain Hoovct, resident 
director of Campbell Hall at Clarion University. 

•Clarion UnivCTsity's Lift Every M)ice Choir 
singing gospel music under die direction of 
Barbara Hammond and Kahli Payton. The 
choir includes approximately 50 Clarion 
University students. 

Hammond, a senior communication and 
speech discMxiers maJOT, is a niece of Barbara 
JaggCTS of Farrell, and is a ^aduate of Farrell 
High School. 

Paytcxi, a sqjhomore biology majcw, is a 
granddaughter of Evone Cross-Thomas of 
Willow Grove, and is a graduate of Uppo- 
Morcland High School. 

•Evan Elliot, 'The Madpiper," a Clarion 
University student, playing bagpipe music. 
Elliot, a senior bioIogy/philcKophy major, is a 
son of Robert and Linda Elliot of Prospect, and 
is a graduate of Valley Forge Military Acactemy. 



•Clarion UnivCTsity's "Unity Steppers" under 
the direction of Erica Johnson. Johnson, a 
sophomore accounting major, is a daughter of 
Patricia Johnson of Pittsburgh, and is a graduate 
of Penn Hills High School. 

•"BATUCADA," a Brazilian performance by 
Slippery Rock University International and 
United States students. 

•Cyprus Intonational Students dancing tradi- 
tional Greek dance. 

•Mahoning Valley Ballet Dftnce Group frc«n 
Punxsutawney will dance Irish step dancing 
urKlCT the directicMi of Joan Van Dyke. 

•Runa Kuna firom Ecuadw paforming Latin 
American traditional music. This group of 
native Inca Indian musicians is ftx)m the village 
of Otavalo in Ecuador. The main purpose of the 
five-member group is lo preserve their cultural 
hoitage through the music of the Aixles. They 
perform in traditional native dress and play 
many native instruments. 

•The Clarion-Limestone High School 
"Sensations," under the direction of Tina 
Bennett 

•Clarion University's "Lift Every Voice Mime 
Group" will perfonn mime under the direction 
ofDeidraLavine. 



•Clarion University Intematicmal Association 
fashion show of native costumes. Lateef Alabi- 
Oki will be the masto- of ceremonies for the 
fashion show. Alabi-Oki, a sophomore account- 
ing major, he is a son of Buruji Alabi-Oki of 
Nigeriia, and is a graduate of Kings College 
Lagos. 

September 25, in front of the Courthouse ftom 
7 to 8:30 p.m.. The Freedom Band fix)m 
Pittsburgh will be playii^ reggiae and adult con- 
temporary with LesKe flowe. The band has 
won awards including '^est Reggae Musician" 
and "Best Reggae Performer " 

Sq)tember-26, in; front of the Courthouse from 
5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Runa jl^ will play agjun. 

On Sqjtember 27, in front of the-Cburthouse, 
the Ambridge High School Steel Drum 
Ensemble will play a mix of calypso, rock, clas- 
sical, and jazz renditicxis under the directi(xi of 
Toddy Hartman. The Ensemble has perfcMined 
with the Pittsburg Pops Orchestra, and at 
Disney World. They will be playing from 7 to 
8:30 p.m. 

Finally, on September 28, members of the 
Clarion University Pep Band, Evan Elliot on 
bagpipes and Runa Kuna will perform all along 
Main Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



September 13, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



1^ 

Page jy 




Entertainment 




IN THE BLEACHERS 



By Steve Moore 



IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve ^' ore 



1 



CHAOS by Brian Shuster 



f UK£ J KhloW IT'S HeALW 
\ To Work OUT, OK? BUT I 
OW'T HtLP THiMKlMG TVIAT 

iM y\ Hours Weil tust 

KEEL OVtR AMD DIE ON 
j 5oMEWlMDoW5lLLAHVWA\: 




flW^i 



(-WAiL.'icUHCC-NMuL', Jci<KttoBe.*>»poL.Co»A 



f 



© 1996 Univefsal Press Syndicate 








"Doni try to talk ywir way out of this one ... it says 
right here that the top speed a cheetah can ain is 
70 moh, and I docked you going at least 80!" 



"And please bless my mom, my dad, my tennis 

coach, all my fellow competitors on the professional 

tour, my agent, my shoe sponsor, my accountant, 

my therapist, my lawyer and my bodyguard. Amen." 




Twisted View 



Cooney 



VI=Ki 





"Well, you asked for a tummy tuck. 
Where did you think I was gonna tuck it?" 




X+ ujould b^ +h« jong- 
es+ t-en days €V€C 

WHAT DiD T DO To 
DESERVE T\<iS^/ 





Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 13. 2001 




Entertainment 




UOW llO»Mk|4TlC hXL Sou? 



Sou Ooi^'-T VCpiOW 
viWAT -CfloC PA?5\o»JA.-r€ 
UOVC \S' vt'S A wove 
■to D\C fo^i. V A wovg 

UCofJAR-Do T5»CA9?.%o 
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fUrJDCSl.S-rAr4o'^.r---L: 



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PO.ovioco.ofcoup.sC, x-r 




Ir^^iiP^il? 



"I (ippr»wUt*' the fBPt thnt you krpp the toilet 

WAt down for me... hnt could you J<i<«t not 

p<»» on It too!" 





Muffin 



By Nora McVittie 



OOESNT bujinj boalsi 
■for school 



\ 



Rrst of all, -<H« books 




^^[jgp-HK r»nr eig)o»i*e 
■the booKi ttr«,-fhc i^ss 



of covrse. •♦'$oi3«<«ft+hat 





Twisted View 



Cooney 



rwf ORIGINAL 





^c»Me=T«Ate$, 
A Pi^lr K 

Tf^oU<i4NP 



•Bobby, come m her© and chanoe the channeir 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 




Classifieds 



Happy 19th Birthday Rippin. 
Love the peach house 

:(I * N< % * * * * t< >t< * * * * 

Rippin and Andy, It was nice 
hanging out with you. Debby, 
Judy. Ashley, and Ashlee 

Aaron and Allison, We love you. 
Love the peach house 

To by beloved Camel Lights, 1 
love you and I don't know where I 
would be without you. I love you! 
Tim 






3(C)|e5|t!(C*3(e** + ***** 



Good luck Clarion swim team. 
Hope that everyone has a success- 
ful season. Graham 



^i^^ii^^^:tf^HiitHt:^i^^ 



To Martisse Macri, Hope that you 
feel better soon. Susan 



«ili4<:t<>t>>t>*4>>l<4>>l<4>4<>l< 



Welcome back to the girls of sec- 
ond west. To the freshman, hope 
that you have a great year. Don't 
be afraid to ask about anything 
that is on your mind. 



titi**>lf*!ts*****itf* 



Good luck Mel with your first 
show of the semester. Love your 
Givan girls on 2nd west. 

Danielle, Good luck with your 
musical. Hope that you have fun 
and hope that you do great. Have 
a JAM of a time. You are a great 
roommate, I couldn't ask for a 
better person to live with. Your 
roommie, Kylee 

Kim, Ashley, and Lynne: Have a 
great semester! Your other room- 
mate 

Jeff, Have a great semester. I love 
you! Emily 



The Clarion Cai 
extends our d^st 
sympathy to all the fac- 
ulty and students that 
have lost family mem- 
bers and/or friends in 
the devastating events 
that took place on 
luesday. You are m 
our thoughts. 




NIGHT 

Every 3rd Wednesday of every montli, 

beginning September 19, 2001. 

Gemmell 8:00 p.m. at the Ritazza 

Coffee Shop. 



" You mever know just what might 

happen" 



i» 



ggtJUJtttDtJjttStM 



#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Earn Cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 
tours.com. 

#1 spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Now hiring Campus 
Reps. 1-800-234-7007 or endless- 
summer.com. 



d 



or rant 



D 



4i;^:»:ti^*«««****4> 



Steve, You got tickets? Jeff 

CU Softball, Good luck this fall 
season. Work hard and it will 
show 



#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Book Early and Get Free 
meal plan. EArn cash and go free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 
tours.com. 

#1 Spring Break Vacations! Best 
Prices Guaranteed! Cancun, 
Jamaica, Bahamas, and Florida. 
Sell Trips, Earn cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 
tours.com. 



Apartments avaiable for the Fall 
2002/Spring 2003 semesters at 51 
Penn Avenue. Four person occu- 
pancy. Furnished. Call 226-5917. 

House available for the Spring 
2002 semester and also for the 
Fall 2002/2003 semesters. Five 
person occupance. Furnished. 
Call 226-5917. 

House available for the Fall 
2002/2003 semesters. 7-8 person 
occupancy. Furnished. Call 226- 
5917. 




Waiters, Waitresses, Bartenders, 
and Kitchen Help/ Flexiable 
hours. Apply in person at the 
Wayside Inn or call 226-2344. 



ifli^tt********** 



ALF PUBLIC NOTICE 

BY ORDER OF THE MAYOR AND THE CHIEF OF 

POLICE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CLARION 

BOROUGH CODE OF ORDINANCES: 

During the period of Saturday, September 22,2001 through Sunday, 
September 30,2001, bicycles, skateboards, rollerblads and roller-skating are 
prohibited for use by the general public in the Central Business District 
area of the Borough of Clarion, in all displayand carnival areas used for the 
Autumn Leaf Festival. The Central Business District is situated in that 
area of the Borough of Clarion bounded by 8th Avenue, Madison Road, 3rd 
Ave and Merle Rd, and includes Main Street. Persons riding bicycles, or 
using skateboards, rollerblades or roller-skates, are required to dismount, or 
immediately depart, from areas used for Autumn Leaf Festival activities. 
This measure is required to protect pedestrians from injury, and to prevent 
property damage, in accordance with Section 151-3F. The fine for a viola- 
tion of the Ordinance is from $15.00 to $50.00, plus court costs. 

Duming the same period, in acordance with the Code of Ordinances, 
Section 62-10, persons are prohibited from having any animal, including 
dogs, not specifically approved as a participant in the Autumn Leaf Festival 
activities, upon any public property within the special event areas used for 
the Autumn Leaf Festival. The fine for a violation of the Ordinance is 
from $25.00 to $100.00, plus court costs. 



September 13. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 




Classifieds 




graslc ads 



Thank you A<I>E for the great 
time! The Brothers of Sigma Pi 



and prayers to all those touched 
by Tuesday's horrifing events. 
Only together will we pull 
through. 



Congrats to sister Tiffany R. on 
being elected Panhel treasurer. 
Love, AST 



i|c*>|c««s|i«itc*:ti>»:|>** 



itc * « :» s|c :|i i|i ifiK iK it< >l< >t< * 



♦ .■'^**J(!*1|I******* 



Thank you ZTA for the good 
time. The Brothers of Sigma Pi 



*««««Dc****«««iti 



AZT would like to welcome the 
sororities and fraternities back to 
school. Have a great year. Love, 
AIT 



Happy 21st birthday to: Kate H, 
Stacey, Liana, Katie S, Jennie D, 
and Lacey! Have fun at the bar 
girls! Love AZT 



Jt<*;tc4c%)t<:4<i|>i|citi4i««i|i 



Thank you Stacey for being such a 
great sweetheart! The Brothers of 
Sigma Pi 



Ai*tf*********** 



***♦***+****♦* 



OSK would like to welcome 
everyone back for a great semes- 



ter! 



I|<4i4c4i4<*«>|l*>|e*l|c>|c>|c 



IX, are looking forward to doing 
the float with you. You guys are 
the best. Love, AIT 

«*«:|c Decile i|c4c««*i(C]K 

Congratulations to Tiffany R. and 
Laura P. on their new exec, board 
positions. We love you! AIT 



Congratulations to Katlin Ryan on 
your engagement. Love your sis- 
ters of Zeta Tau Alpha 



:|r]|cj|i:^i|ii|c;tc«!|i;t<**iti:tc 



Thank you to Sigma Pi for having 
us up for your rush event. Love, 
Zeta Tau Alpha 



}|(})c3tc;tc%}tc)fc;4c:t:^3t:>|(>l'}(( 



Many thanks to Dena for her 
treats and great gifts! You are the 
best sweetheart we could ever 
hope to have! OIK 

Good luck to all fraternities and 
sororities on their ALF floats and 
preperations. The brothers of 
OIK 

The brothers of OIK would like 
to extend their deepest sympathies 



i|(i|c>l<<l'*!l<>l<!):'t<*!|<>|o|i>l< 



Congratulations to this years 
homecoming court, especially sis 
ters. Amy T, Laura P, Dana, and 
Leanne. Good luck, AIT 



*******>i«****** 



Happy birthday to all our summer 
girls: Megan, Laura P, Kristy, 
Lindsie, Jenn H, Heather, Dana, 
Kira, Jill Haley, and Kasey. Love 

AIT 

************** 



Good luck to the sororities and 
fraternities with rush. Love, Zeta 
Tau Alpha 

Happy 22nd birthday Dana 
Secola! Love your sisters of Zeta 
Tau Alpha 



)|(^]fc3f(;^%)t'i)tif4c})e3t(:4c]|c 



Congratulations to Kara Guinther 
on becoming the new Vice 
President of Recruitment for 
Panhel. Love, your sisters of Zeta 
Tau Alpha 



CUP STUDENTS! 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS 

TODAY! 

TELL THAT SPECIAL PERSON 

THAT YOU CARE OR TELL WHAT 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 P.M. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



4c4<>lc>K>K<K **>!<*«*** 



AOE hopes everyone had a fun 
and safe summer and we are look- 
ing forward to a great semester! 



^ *F T* T* 1* *!* ^ ^ 3f ^ 3|C ^ ^ ^ 



Want to advertise 

your 
business in 

The Clarion Call? 

Call 393-2380 
for more information 



Happy 22nd birthday Marilyn 

Frye! Love your AOE sisters! 

*♦**********>)'* 

Congratulations to our new mem- 
bers: Kristy, Valerie, Andrea, 
Jackie, Lauren, Ashley, Jessica, 
and Jenn! Love your future AOE 
sisters! 

Happy belated 21st birthdays to 
Dawn Breski and Deanna Scott! 
Love your AOE sisters 

««* !|i He >|c*# till >!<««>(< 

Welcome back all students to 
CUP from all the sisters of Delta 
Zeta. 

Good luck Mel and Jenna, we just 
have to say we'll listen to your 
radio shows everyday! 

Delta Zeta gives out a hollar to our 
sister Lindsay Collar, she got 
engaged! 

Good luck to all the pledges! 
Truck 

He************* 

From the brothers of Theta Xi, 
good luck to all the students at 
Clarion. 



Rachel and Laura, Happy 
Birthday! Love, 2nd West 

Kimmie, Toni, and Gina, don't hit 
anyone too hard! Love, Stacey 
and Robin 

Ky, don't forget to pull Robin's v- 
card when she picks on you! 

April, great minds think alike! 
Jimmie has my number! 

Mel, B, Bria, Andi, Gabby, Lana, 
we are so proud of our AZ! Love, 
Stacey 

Bruce, Bubba, Billy Bob, and 
Bud, you guys are the greatest! 

Jill, Good luck this year, hope 
everything turns out good. Brad 

To my Givan Girls, you guys are 
the best and I'm looking forward 
to this year and the new memories 
that we will make. Love you 

guys, Kylee 

************** 

Ben, Thank you for standing by 
me thru everything - "you didn't 
have a choice," right? Your dirt- 
ball 

************** 

To "The Call" staff, well we have 
the first issue down. It is going to 
get better, right? You guys are a 

pleasure to work with. Kylee 

************** 



Stacey, I hope that you feel better 
soon. And I hope that you don't 
get me sick. Love always, your 



twm. 



************** 



Brian, Have a great semester. I 
love you! Jill 



************** 



Kel, Good luck this semester. 
Can't wait to hit the Loomis with 
ya! Love ya, Jill 



************** 



Tim, Don't burn down KFC, and 
remember to throw flour on a 
grease fire. Good luck this semes- 
ter. Jill 



3^:(c:1c:(c}|(3(c:t')|(3|(^)|'3tE3tc;t< 



Amy, you are doing a great job as 
Editor-in-Chief. We all know that 
you will lead us through a great 
year. You are awesome. Your 
staff at the Clarion Call. 






To the new staff of the Clarion 
Call. Thank you so much for 
putting up with me. You are all 
such talented people. Keep up the 
good work. Amy 



************** 



To all my roommates. Sorry I'm 
never home. I love you anyway. 

Love, Amy 

************** 

Judy, Stay up and talk to me. 
Okay I'll just make you anyway. 

Love, Amy 

************** 

Marshall, stay away from those 
explosives. 



Robin, don't worry we will get 

Mar ley in the end! 

************** 



Still rxmdt that 

co-curricular? 

Come join tiie staff of 

The Clarion Call 



interested in being a part 
of the "Call On You"? 
Give Graham a call at 

393-2380 to participate. 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 13, 2001 



Attacks on U.S. disturb college teams 



by Andrew Bagnato 
Courtesy of Krt Campus 

As Americans came to grips 
with Tuesday's apparent terrorist 
attacks, six major-college foot- 
ball games were postponed and 
school officials debated whether 
to play the rest of the weekend's 
slate. 

Meanwhile, hundreds of non- 
revenue athletic contests, includ- 
ing volleyball matches involving 
Northwestern and Notre Dame, 
were scrubbed Tuesday as cam- 
puses across the nation closed. 

Three of the Division I-A foot- 
ball games postponed were 
scheduled for Thursday night: 
Penn State's nationally televised 
game at Virginia, Ohio 
University's visit to North 
Carolina State and Texas Tech's 
game at UTEP. The Texas Tech 
game was tentatively moved to 
Saturday. 

San Diego State at No. 21 Ohio 



State was rescheduled for Oct. 
20, an open date for both schools. 
No. 13 Washington's visit to top- 
ranked Miami also was post- 
poned. And No. 14 UCLA said it 
hoped to move Saturday's game 
against Arizona State to Dec. 1. 

"We sit here thinking that it 
puts a lot less importance on 
Saturday," Ohio State coach Jim 
Tressel told reporters in 
Columbus, Ohio. "You say to 
yourself, 'Who's going to be get- 
ting on airplanes to go play each 
other right now?'" 

Because few teams play Dec. 1, 
that Saturday could become a 
convenient rescheduling option, 
although the Southeastern and 
Big 12 conferences stage their 
playoffs that day. 

Big Ten commissioner Jim 
Delany, who had been in 
Philadelphia with an aide for an 
NCAA meeting, had planned to 
fly back to Chicago on Tuesday 
morning, but his flight was can- 



celed. The Big Ten sent most staff 
members home, spokeswoman 
Sue Lister said. 

Commissioners were expected 
to discuss how cancellations 
might affect the complicated BCS 
standings, which weigh game 
results to determine the pairing in 
the BCS title game. 

In Division I-A and I-AA, 116 
games were scheduled for 
Thursday through Saturday, 
including two others with nation- 
al title implications-No. 8 
Tennessee at No. 2 Florida and 
No. 10 Georgia Tech at No. 6 
Florida State. 

College officials said they 
would wait to see whether the 
government freezes non-essential 
air travel. Some tried to interpret 
signals from the Bush administra- 
tion that the nation would quickly 
return to normalcy. 

"It may be out of our hands," 
Big East commissioner Mike 
Tranghese told reporters. "There 



are a lot of issues, emotional 
ones. Kids flying, playing in large 
venues with a lot of people and if 
the government says do some- 
thing, we do it." 

"This is one of those things 
where you can't do the right 
thing," Ohio State athletic direc- 
tor Andy Geiger said. "You can 
do what you think is the best 
thing to do. Whether it's right or 
wrong is for others to debate, I 
guess." 

There is precedent for wide- 
spread cancellations and post- 
ponements. As officials mulled 
whether to play games this week- 
end, the some schools suspended 
the business of football Tuesday. 

"After listening to comments 
from several members of the 
team, I decided that regardless of 
whether or not we play the game 
Saturday, today should be a day 
for us to reflect on things other 
than football," Bruins coach Bob 
Toledo said. 



iHHOS^Cii&lil^than just a degree | 




to[*lil:1ilt'nAmericans 


deadline for 

the 2002-2003 

Fellows 

Program is 

Feb. 1 , 2002 


The Goro Center for Civic Leadership 

Pittsburgh 



Wayside Inn 



[Fine food and spirits since 1873 

• Wednesday night 

seafood night 

•Prime Rib Fridays and 

Saturday 
luncheon features daily\ 

from 11:00 am 

•Casual atmosphere / 

romantic dining 

Reservations Recommended 
Call: 226-7344 



1.5 miles west of I 
Lucinda / just 
off of route 66 



CoachesI Two new coaches accept positions on Clarion 
University's leading staff, from Page 24. 

four-year starter (1991-94) for the 
women's volleyball team. She 
earned All-WVIAC honors from 
1992-94, was team captain for two 
seasons (93 & 94) and co-captain 
in 1992 as a sophomore. She led 
the team in kills and service aces 
for her final three seasons. 

Fluharty went on to earn her 
Masters Degree from West 
Virginia in 1997 in Physical 
Education and was hired as an 
instructor and women's volleyball 
coach at Glenville in 1997. As an 
instructor at Glenville she taught a 



variety of courses including first 
aid and safety, fitness and well- 
ness, swim and aquatic safety, 
coaching philosophy and develop- 
ment and much more. 

A native of Clarksburg, West 
Virginia, she attended Liberty 
High School and was a three-sport 
athlete. An All-State selection in 
basketball, volleyball and tennis, 
she was All Big- 10 and All- 
Harrison County in all three 
sports. 

She is the daughter of Gary and 
Norma Fluharty. 



Sports Briefs 



Cross Country 

Sept. 8 @ California 
Sept. 15 @ Penn State 

Sept. 22 @ Lehigh 

Oct. 20 @ Gettysburg 

Oct. 27 @ Lock Haven 

(PSACs) 

Soccer 

Sept. 13 @ Gannon 

Sept. 19 @ Home 

(Slippery Rock) 

Sept. 22 @ Home 

(Bridgeport) 

Sept. 23 @ Home 

(Salem International) 

Football 

Sept. 15 @ Home 

Sept. 22 @ 

Shippensburg 

Sept. 29 @ Home 

(Kutztown) 

Oct. 6 @ Home 

(California) 





$100 

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DONT MISS OUT 

iarnin^ Potential ot 

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PLUS 

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^ -iieck our oitr flwr in roJ.i\'s jMpur 
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^14-'677'00is 



RunnersI Teams make top 
three, from Page 23. 

Kengor, who is the team cap- 
tain this year, finished 63 at 
PSACs and 84 at Regionals. 
while Szafran was 73 at PSACs 
and 110 at Regionals. 

Two other runners who could 
push for time for the Golden 
Eagles are freshman Melissa 
Harkins and sophomore Gayle 
Specht. 

One runner Clarion won't have 
this season is senior Brandy 
Colley, who finished 62 at 
PSACs and 68 at Regionals last 
season. Colley suffers from an 
injury and will not be able to 
compete in 2001. 

The Golden Eagles mens team 
finished tenth at PSACs and 12 
at Regionals last season, while 
the women's team was ninth at 
PSACs and eleventh at 
Regionals. Edinboro won both 
the men's and women's titles in 
2001. 

The PSAC is expected to be 
strong this year with Edinboro, 
Shippensburg and Millersville 
leading the -way on the men's 
side and Edinboro, lUP, 
Kutztown, and Millersville the 
top teams on the women's side. 



September 13,2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 21 



Womens Soccer 



Clarion Soccer team improves strategy in Ohio 



by Laura Altman 
Clarion Call StafT Writer 

The Clarion womens soccer 
team spent a long weekend on the 
road, travelling to Finley, OH. to 
play two tough games against 
Siena Heights and St. Joseph. 
The women played two very 
intense defensive games but, 
despite of their efforts, the team 
came out t)f the weekend 0-7 and 
03. 

During the game against Siena 
Heights, several good plays were 
executed by Tara Harrington and 
goalie, C.J. Gattens, but most of 
the team was suffering from 
injuries during the warm-up. 

"Although the team considers 
the game poor, all teams have one 
bad game at some time or another. 
The only thing we can do is put it 
behind us and move on," said 
coach Christina Alonzo. 

The defense was scattered 
throughout the field and commu- 
nication was low. That allowed 
our opponent to come at us with- 
out a fight back," Alonzo com- 
mented. 

On Sunday, the Golden Eagles 
were ready to prove that they 
came to play hard. Anna Goldman 
scored a goal on a direct kick, but 
it was called back. Tara 
Harrington and Marianna Reino 
both played outstanding games in 



the mid-field. As a whole, the 
team was much more organized 
and had more of an opportunity to 
be dangerous in the opponent's 
defensive field. 

Leading the Golden Eagles is 
new head coach Christina "Nina " 
Alonzo, a former assistant coach 
at Allegheny College. Alonzo 
believes that the team has set real- 
istic goals, as it works on estab- 
lishing the program and winning 
with an all-freshmen squad. 

"I think it's going to be long, 
hard season, but a good learning 
experience for those involved," 
said Alonzo. 

The main goal of the team is to 
go .500 on the season. The 
Golden Eagles also plan to work 
on team-building experiences and 
improvement through the year. By 
doing this, everybody will keep 
getting better throughout the sea- 
son and be more prepared for the 
future to compete against strong 
competition. 

With this being the first year of 
the program, Alonzo has only 
been able to observe the players in 
practice and the Ferris State 
Tournament. She has been 
impressed by the team's perfor- 
mance. The main attribute with 
the team is hard work and deter- 
mination. The women are moti- 
vated, dedicated and give 110 per- 
cent. Their attitude is great and 



their work ethic and effort shows 
out on the field. 

Another sign of optimism is the 
relationship among the players on 
the team during the rough pre-sea- 
son. A lot of the players had never 
been through a preseason together 
and because they all experienced 
a preseason together, as one, it 
was a bonding experience m 
itself. They had tt) go through the 
good times and the bad times of 
the preseason together, and those 
experiences have made them a 
close-knit team. 

During the games over the 
weekend, being the first womens 
soccer games in Clarion history, 
there was definitely some ner- 
vousness and excitement. The 
players didn't know what to 
expect because they have not been 
in this specific situation before. 

This is the first ever soccer team 
tobe put on field, so we have to 
take it one step at a time," added 
Alonzo. 

The team's strategy was a defen- 
sive approach, with the defense 
setting up the offense with 
counter-attacks. The women put a 
lot of focus during the preseason 
on defense. Everyone on the field 
is involved in the defensive plays 
because of the need for high-pres- 
sure, aggressive defense, and the 
use of speed to attack offensively. 

Due to some injuries, the starting 




Courtesy of the Womens Soccer wrf>sitc 



A Golden Eagle displays her defensive skills while defending 
her goal from an opponent. The Clarion women pride in 
playing all of their games defensively. 



line-up was not completely cer- 
tain, but the women played to the 
best of their abilities despite of 
this. Clarion's first home game 
will be played on September 19 
when the Golden Eagles host 
Slippery Rock at Memorial 
Stadium. Game time is 4p.m. 



Footballl Clarion falls to 
Youngstown, from Page 24. 



Tennis team serves up new season 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 



Leading the womens team for the 2001 
Fall season are juniors Erin Glatz and Cara 
Bobish who expect to battle between the #1 
and #2 singles positions. Both were PSAC 
semifinalists in 1999 in singles and doubles 
competition. 

Glatz, a captain in the 1999 season, also 
holds an MVP title. She went 8-4 including 
6-2 at No. 1 singles. She won five straight 
dual meets going into PSACs and went 1-1 
at the tournament. In the Fall 2000 cam- 
paign she was 2-3 in singles. 

Bobish was also 8-4 in 1999 including 6- 
2 at No. 2 singles. Cara was 2-4 in singles 
play in the Fall 2000 season. Bobish and 
Glatz will team up for the second straight 
season at No. 1 doubles for the Golden 
Eagles. The duo went 9-3 in 1999 and 
advanced to the PSAC semi's before losing. 
They were 2-4 in doubles play in the Fall 
2000 season. 




The remainder of the lineup should have 
Jennifer Spaid at #3, Brooke Vukich and 
sister Brandy Vukich at the #4 and #5 
spots, with a battle for #6 singles between 
Janet Irvin, Tonya Leed, Kenyata Dawson 
and Rebecca Emert. 



Photo courtesy of the 2001 Media Guide 



Junior Brandy Vukich serves to an 
opponent during a close match. 



rushes for 111 yards and two 
touch-downs. Ryn completed two 
of four passes for 61 yards and 
one touch-down. The Penguins 
gained 541 yards of total offense, 
including 451 on the ground. 

Top defensive efforts were 
turned in by Clarion's George 
O'Brien and Chris Janson. 
O'Brien posted II tackles and 3 
tackles for losses, while Janson 
had 11 stops. Safety Korey 
Eppinette had nine stO{», while 
Dennis Yu, Kevin Platz, Doug 
Diegelman and Tom Gaydosz all 
had tackles for losses. 

Clarion returns home to the 
friendly confines of Memorial 
Stadium next Saturday to host 
Tiffin University. Kickoff for the 
"Family Day" game is set for 
2pm. 

The Penguins, who have a 98- 
30-1 record at Stambaugh 
Stadium since opening the facili 
ty in 1982, travel to Div. I Toledo 
next Saturday. YSU, under first 
year coach Jon Heacock, is 2-0. 
The Penguins, under former 
coach Jim Tressell, won I-AA 
National Titles in 1991, 93, 94 
and 1997. Tressell is now the 
head coach at Ohio State. 



■ ' - - s*.»^^^*A^i»^i<.*-.».>v»>.*^J*«t«"ri*i*i*ft*.*.*.'*i«.%>»(lL%.*.». »A.*.^»A.»a.».v«.«.*JW»^J'.- .' .■ -• . 



Sept. 


Fall Schedule 


5 Wed @ Juniata 4:00 p.m. 


Sept. 


15 Sat @ Indiana with 




ShippensburgTBA 


Sept. 


23 Sun CALIFORNIA 




1:00 p.m. 


Sept. 


29 Sat @ Rolex Tournament 




(Bloomsburg) TBA 


Oct. 8 Mon EDINBORO 3:30 




p.m. 


Oct. 


13 Sat @ California with 




KutztownTBA 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call 



Sj^EPTEMBER 13, 2001 



Athletics in the Community 



Clarion holds "Learn to Swim/Dive" Fall program 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

The annual "Learn to Swim" 
and "Learn to Dive" programs 
kicked off their Fall session on 
Monday, September 10 and 
Tuesday, September 11 in 
Tippin Natatorium. 

The overall program holds 
lessons for children in the 
Clarion community and sur- 
rounding areas. The sessions are 
divided so that the children 
attend two lessons per week, 
either on Mondays and 
Wednesdays or Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. The program will 
run for a duration of four weeks 
in providing eight lessons per 



child. The eight lessons will be 
taught for a total fee of $50 per 
child with a $5 reduction for 
each additional person from the 
same family. 

The program is being taught 
by students from the university 
who are qualified in both swim- 
ming and diving knowledge and 
instruction. Members of the 
Clarion University swimming 
and diving teams are the leading 
instructors. 

The clinic will provide 
instruction for all levels of 
swimming ranging from non- 
swimmers and divers to 
advanced. Competitive swim- 
mers can also benefit frolri for- 
mal instruction from swim team 



members. 

This program has been very 
succesful in the past years and 
continues to uphold this tradi- 
tion. Children generally show a 
remarkable amount of progress 
from this instruction. The clinic 
is also a great way for small 
children to become acclimated 
to and comfortable within the 
water. 

For additional information 
about the Fall program or mate- 
rial on the Spring Clinic, con- 
tact head swimming coach, 
Mark VanDyke, assistant swim- 
ming coach, Christina Tillotson, 
or diving coach, Dave Hrovat at 
814-393-2457. No applications 
will be taken over the phone. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Clarion students and athletes teacti community chilren swim- 
ming skills at the Waldo S. Tippin Natatorium. 



Golden Eagle volleyballers set high season goals 



by Danielle Foote 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Clarion University womens volley- 
ball team has set high goals going into the 
2001 season under first-year head coach, 
Tracey Fluharty. Four returning starters 
will lead the team to a victorious season. 
The Golden Eagles return a total of 
eight players from a team that went 18-20 
overall and 1-9 in the tough PSAC-West 
last season. The women have set three 
goals for the 2001 campaign. 



Leading the way for Clarion in 2001 
will be the four returning starters, who 
will once again be in the starting line-up. 
They are senior AH Graham at outside 
hitter, junior Beth Stalder at middle hitter, 
sophomore Jackie Hill at setter and 
sophomore Melanie Bull at outside hit- 
ter. 

Joining the four returning starters in the 
starting line-up will be senior defensive 
specialist Kate Waksmunski and sopho- 
more outside hitter Ashley Riordan. 
Graham, one of Clarion's co-captains, has 




Graham Hermanns/ The Clarion Call 



: The Clarion womens volleyball team practices on perfecting their technique 
\prior to a game. Timing is one of the most important elements the players 
must master in order to be efficient players. 



had an outstanding Clarion career. After 
making a seamless transition from setter 
to outside hitter last season she led the 
Golden Eagles with 357 digs, was second 
on the team in kills with 317 and assists 
at 214 while adding 32 aces and 82 
blocks. 

Graham is fourth in school history with 
1,523 assists and seventh in school histo- 
ry with 888 digs, while adding 482 kills 
and 179 blocks. She needs 112 digs to 
become only the fourth player in school 
history to reach 1,000 in a career and 398 
to move into a tie for first in school histo- 
ry with Christy Boes. 

Stalder also played strong for Clarion 
last year leading the team with 136 blocks 
while coming in third on the team with 
291 kills. In her career, she has 516 kills, 
217 blocks and 122 digs. She is 96 blocks 
short of moving into seventh place all- 
time in school history, 101 blocks short of 
moving into sixth place all-time, and 135 
blocks shy of tying Jenny Better for fifth 
in school history with 352 blocks. 

Hill, Clarion's other co-captain, upheld 
her position as setter during her freshman 
year, last season. She had 1,408 set assists 
to go along with 95 kills, 33 aces, 87 
blocks and 3 14 digs. The 1,408 assists are 
the second most in a single season in 
Clarion history and the fifth most in a 
career at Clarion. She is 115 assists 
behind teammate Graham for fourth in 
school history and only 1,582 assists 
behind Wendy Ellenberger for first h 
school history. In addition, her 314 digs 
tied her for second on the team last year, 
and the 87 blocks were good for third on 
the team. 

Bull led the Golden Eagles last season 
with 333 kills while finishing fourth on 



the team with 298 digs. She also added 37 
aces and 23 blocks. 

Waksmunski enters the starting line-up 
after seeing action in 136 of Clarion's 140 
total games last year. She has been a key 
member of Clarion's bench the past three 
seasons coming up with 381 digs includ- 
ing 251 last season. She also added 38 
aces in 2000 for the Golden Eagles. 

Riordan showed glimpses of being a 
steady player for Clarion last year despite 
limited playing time. In 61 games she had 
73 kills, 16 aces, HI digs and six blocks. 
Currently the Golden Eagles have four 
players coming off the bench who should 
all see playing time including sophomore 
defensive specialist Laurie Hepler, fresh- 
man outside hitter Sara Heyl, sophomore 
middle blocker Alissa McKinley and 
freshman middle hitter Tonya Zatko. A 
fifth player, freshman middle hitter 
Colleen Sherk is currently unavailable 
because of an illness, but should provide 
solid play in the middle once she returns. 
One of the things that will make this 
season interesting is a rule change in 
NCAA Division 11 volleyball that 
changes the scoring from the traditional 
side-out scoring to rally scoring. In rally 
scoring a team scores a pomt every time 
the ball touches the ground regardless of 
who served it. To win a game, a team will 
need to score. 21 points. 

If last season is any indication, the 
Golden Eagles might enjoy the new scor- 
ing system. Rally scoring was u.sed last 
year any time a team reached a fifth set in 
a five-set match. Eight ol Clarion's 
matches went five sets last season with 
the Golden Eagles winning seven of those 
matches. 



September 13, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 23 



Mens and Womens Cross Country 



Clarion teams place in top three at California Invite 



by Andrea Borek 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The Golden Eagle mens and 
womens Cross Country teams 
started off the 2001 season on 
Saturday, Sept. 8 at California 
University of Pennsylvania. The 
womens team finished second 
place overall and the men 
placed third. Both teams had 
exceptional runs for the first 
meet of the season. 

The Golden Eagle women 
took everyone by surprise with 
their second place standing at 
the invitational. Jen Boerner 
turned up the heat with an over- 
all victory, taking the first place 
title. Not far behind her was 
first year rookie, Melissa 
Terwillinger with an eighth and 
captain, Wendy Kengor, in 
ninth. "Also placing within the 
top 20 finishers at the competi- 
tion were Katie Szafran in 13 



and Allison Borek in 16. 

The Clarion mens cross coun- 
try team also took a high stand- 
ing during the invitational with 
a third place overall finish. 
Placing in the top 20 for the 
men were A.J. Mayernik in 17, 
Matt Mastarone in 18, and Ean 
King in 20. 

Head coach, Pat Mooney, 
always goes into the first meet 
of the season with his eyes open 
to see what his runners can do. 
Overall, he is very pleased with 
the results of both teams. 
Overall the men placed higher 
in the invitational than last year, 
but Mooney believes that they 
have room to move up. 

The Golden Eagles mens team 
is efficient in depth and experi- 
ence. Three seniors Ean King, 
Matt Mastarone, and Gerald 
Smith are expected to be the top 
three runners on the mens team. 

King, missed the first half of 



last season with a knee injury, 
but, should be able to return to 
his sophomore form when he 
earned both All-PSAC and All- 
Region honors. That year he fin- 
ished twelfth at PSAC's and 
fourteenth at Regionals. Last 
season he finished 24 at PSAC's 
and 31 at Regionals. 

Mastarone, who finished 54 at 
PSAC's and 67 at Regionals last 
season, hit a high point during 
the spring track season when he 
qualified for the PSAC's in the 
5,000-meter run. 

Smith finished 63 at PSAC's 
and 70 at Regionals in 2000, but 
was third at the PSAC track 
meet in the 800 in the spring. 

Along with the three top 
seniors, two sophomores, Dave 
Duriancik and A.J. Mayernik, 
performed very well as fresh- 
men. Duriancik finished 40 at 
PSAC's and 37 at Regionals a 
year ago, while Mayernik was 



39th at PSAC's and 55 at 
Regionals. 

Pushing the top five runners 
for the Golden Eagles will be 
John Snyder, a junior who trans- 
ferred from Thiel in the spring. 
He earned All-Conference hon- 
ors in both track and cross coun- 
try while at Thiel and set the 
school's 1,000-meter indoor 
record. 

Three seniors, Jason Bochert, 
Matt LaPatka, and Brad Walker 
could also challenge for a spot 
in the top five during the sea- 
son. Sophomore Chris Noal and 
freshman Zach Ogden will also 
challenge the top runners this 
season. 

While the mens team is deep 
with experience, the Golden 
Eagles womens team is very 
young with two sophomores and 
a freshman expected to be the 
top three runners. 

Leading the way for Clarion in 



2001 is sophomore Jen Boerner. 
Boerner had an outstanding 
freshman season for the Golden 
Eagles finishing 16 at the 
PSAC'S and 30 at Regionals. 
She was one place shy of all- 
conference at the PSAC meet. 

Sophomore, Ali Borek will 
most likely be Clarion's second 
place runner throughout the sea- 
son. Last year, Borek was 43 at 
PSAC's and 114 at Regionals. 
Freshman Melissa Terwillinger 
will also be battling for the sec- 
ond place spot on the team and 
placing in the top five for the 
Golden Eagles. 

The next three spots in 
Clarion's line-up are filled by 
returning runners from last sea- 
son. Wendy Kengor, Linda 
Bryce and Kathryn Szafran are 
expected to battle for these posi- 
tions. 

See 'Runners' Page 20 



Some colleges are playing, some are not 



Courtesy of KRT Campus 

From the Deep South to the 
Pacific Northwest, dozens of 
college football teams will take 
the field Saturday as scheduled. 

But in the Bay Area, Stanford, 
San Jose State and Cal are shut- 
ting down for the weekend. 

Citing sentiment and security 
concerns, Stanford and San Jose 
State have postponed 

Saturday's game at Spartan 
Stadium until Dec. 1 - the earli- 
est available date for both 
teams. 

"The games are insignifi- 
cant," Stanford Athletic 
Director Ted Leiand said in the 
aftermath of Tuesday's terrorist 
attacks in New York and 
Washington. 

Not everyone agrees. The Big 
East and Atlantic Coast confer- 
ences have canceled or post- 
poned all games. 

But the Pacific- 10 Conference 



is split. Five teams won't play 
(Washington, UCLA, Arizona 
State, Stanford and Cal, which 
called off its game at Rutgers). 
But Washington State and 
Oregon State will play if their 
opponents can travel by Friday. 

The Southeastern, Big Ten, 
Big 12, Mountain West and 
Western Athletic conferences 
have left Saturday to the discre- 
tion of their schools. Most are 
planning to play. 

"What we've been hearing 
from Washington and President 
Bush is that everybody should 
try to return to normalcy," WAC 
spokesman Dave Chaffin told 
the Associated Press. "To do 
that would be to return to the 
games." 

Ranked teams expected to 
play include Oklahoma, 
Mississippi State, Brigham 
Young, Fresno State and Kansas 
State. 

Two of the three big games in 
the state of Florida have been 



postponed: Washington -Miami 
and Georgia Tech-Florida State. 
But the Tennessee-Florida 
showdown will be played as 
scheduled. 

Each SEC school will donate 
$1 million (from gate receipts 
and TV fees) to funds aiding the 
attack victims. 

In a statement, the SEC said 
its members "mourn the tragic 
loss of lives" but that the games 
"represent a meaningful oppor- 
tunity to bring our people 
together in a common expres- 
sion of sympathy and mourn- 
ing." 

That might be true in the 
South, where they say football 
is a religion. But the Bay Area 
schools seem to feel differently. 
All three have canceled or post- 
poned all sporting events 
through the weekend. 

"Everybody knows somebody 
who was affected," San Jose 
State wide receiver Casey Le 
Blanc said. "It would have been 



tough to play football on 
Saturday." 

San Jose State Coach Fitz 
Hill, a Gulf War veteran, urged 
people to donate blood. 

"We've prayed for the victims 
and their families," he said. 

Tickets for the postponed 
game will be honored Dec. I. 
Kickoff is 2 p.m. 

The matchup might have more 
significance at the end of the 
season than it would Saturday. 
Six victories are required for 
bowl berths. If either the 
Cardinal or Spartans have at 
least five, then the game could 
have postseason implications. 
What's more, it will be Senior 
Day for the Spartans. 

"I'm really happy and excited 
they gave us a new date instead 
of canceling it," Le Blanc said. 

Both teams will have played 
big games the previous week- 
end, when Stanford hosts Notre 
Dame and San Jose State hosts 
Fresno State University. 



Want to write sports? Call Bethany at 393-2380. 



*-> 



Is there a 

special 

sporting 

team you 

wish to 

cover on a 

regular 

basis? 

Call the 

Sports 

Editor, 

Bethany 

Bankovich 

at 393- 

2380. 



Page 24 



CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



3 9363 00586 4589 



The Clarion Call 



September 12, 2001 




Sports 

Golden Eagles fall to Division I Youngstown State 




Courtesy of Sports Information 

Fifth rated NCAA Division I- 
AA power Youngstown State (2- 
0) used an explosive running 
game and six Clarion (0-2) 
turnovers to roll to a 44-0 win 
over the Golden Eagles on 
Saturday night. 

Held at Stambaugh Stadium, 
better known as the "Ice Castle," 
the partisan Penguin crowd of 
16,019 had hardly settled in their 
seats when talented tailback P. J. 
Mays rambled for 77 yards and a 
touchdown on the opening play 
from scrimmage. Jake Stewart's 
RAT made it 7-0 at the 14:37 
mark. 

After the Eagles made two first 
downs on a 14-yard pass from 
Adam Almashy to Justin Sickeri 
and a Demetric Gardner 16 yard 
run to the YSU 49, Almashy was 
intercepted by Levar Greene at 
the YSU 41. 

Moving the ball to the Clarion 
48 on a Jeff Ryan run, Ryan 
tossed a perfect out route to 
Jerald Burley who broke a tackle 
and raced down the far sideline 
for a touch-down and a 14-0 lead 
at 12:44. 

Clarion tried to rebound again. 
The Eagles took possession at 
their own 17, and on 2nd and 8 



at the 19, halfTjack Robert 

Walker darted 22 yards to the 
Clarion 41, but the drive stalled. 
After a 69-yard punt by Clarion's 
Ken Crawford had pinned the 
Penguins at their own 12, things 
were looking promising. But on 
second and five at the 17, Mays 
look another deep handoff and 
exploded up the middle, veered 
to the left sideline and scam- 
pered 83 yards to paydirt. The 
Penguins had a 20-0 first quarter 
lead. 

Clarion all-conference guard 
Ryan Duchon left the game early 
in the second quarter with a foot 
injury, which brought changes to 
the Eagle line. On the next pos- 
session Clarion quarter back, 
Almashy, never received the 
snap, and as the ball rolled loose 
on the turf, Youngstown defen- 
sive lineman Bruce Hightower 
scooped up the pigskin at the 
Clarion 6 and rumbled into the 
endzone for another YSU score. 
The Penguins also scored on 
Darius Peterson's 27 yard run, 
and Jake Stewart's 24-yard field 
goal before intermission to make 
it 37-0 at halftime. 
YSU rounded out the scoring 
with a Peterson 41 yard run at 
9:08 of the third quarter. 

Clarion entered YSU territory 
twice in the second half but was 



unable to score. 

"Youngstown is an extremely 
talented team and they will win a 
lot of games this year," echoed 
Clarion head coach Malen Luke 
at the post-game press confer- 
ence. "Their skill speed was just 
too much for us," he continued. 
"We had a lot of guys out 
(injured) tonight and that hurt us 
defensively. I think our defense 
would have made an even better 
showing with those guys in the 
lineup. We were very thin in 
spots." 

"Our offense moved the ball, 
especially in the first half. But 
losing Ryan Duchon (Clarion's 
all conference guard) early in the 
second quarter changed what we 
could really do against their 
defense." 

"With YSU scoring on the first 
play, and on the second drive 
too, that also took a little out of 
us early. I did feel we played 
hard to the final play and I was 
proud of our team's overall 
effort. We'll use this as a learn- 
ing experience to sharpen us up 
for the weeks to come. No mat- 
ter how far we might advance 
this season, there's no chance, 
even in the NCAA Playoffs, that 
we could play a team that's bet- 
ter than the one we played 
tonight." 




Courtesy of the Football website 



Several Golden Eagle football players clear the way for quar- 
ferback,, Adam Almashy, to gain yardage. Ttie young team 
must learn to work togettier In order to score points. 



Clarion had 234 yards of total 
offense, including 167 rushing 
and 67 passing. Robert Walker 
gained 57 yards on four carries, 
while Glen Lovelace had 42 
yards on five carries and QB 
Almashy had 24 carries for 47 
yards. Almashy also clicked on 



five of 15 passes for 65 yards 
Wideout Mike McCullum 
grabbed three passes for 37 
yards. 

YSU had Mays carrying nine 
times for 180 yards and two td's, 
while Darius Peterson had 12 

See 'Football' Page 21 



Clarion winning tradition welcomes new coaches 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor and 
^P.®*!^ Information 

Two new coaches, Christina 
Alonzo and Tracey Fluharty 
join the Golden Eagle coaching 
staff. Alonzo replaces Tony 
Howard in women's soccer, 
while Fluharty replaces Scott 
Pennewill in women's volley- 
ball. 

Alonzo comes to Clarion 
from Allegheny College, where 



she was assistant women's soc- 
cer coach the past two seasons 
and helped lead Allegheny to a 
28-9-3 overall record as well as 
a 2000 NCAC regular season 
conference title. 

Alonzo from Wichita Falls, 
Texas and attended Notre Dame 
High School. She was valedic- 
torian of her class and graduated 
in 1995. She earned four basket- 
ball, three track and two volley- 
ball letters. She was a member 




of the Texas Longhorns Soccer 
Club (1992-94) and the 
Olympic Development Program 
while being selected to for ODP 
Regionals. Alonzo went on to 
attend Southwestern University 
in Georgetown, Texas. A four- 
year letterwinner on the wom- 
ens soccer team, she was a for- 
ward her junior and senior years 
and team captain as a senior 
(1998). She was a mid-fielder 
her freshman and sophomore 

'inrw.tlieclartoficaHxofii • 



years. She was named as a sec- 
ond team All-SCAC in 1996 and 
97 and an HM SCAC selection 
in 1995. Christina earned her 
B.A. in Kinesiology in 1999. 

Alonzo is the daughter of 
Mary and Tommy Alonzo of 
Wichita Falls, Texas and has' a 
sister and two brothers. 

Fluharty comes to Clarion 
from Glenville State College in 
West Virginia and had a very 
successful four year career. She 



led her teams to a career record 
of 99-56, a 63.9% winning rate. 
Last year her team posted a 28- 
12 overall record and set the 
school record for single season 
wins. Other yearly records show 
Glenville at 26-16 overall in 
1999, 26-13 in 1998 and 19-15 
in 1997. 

A 1995 graduate of Glenville 

State College with a degree in 

Physical Education, Tracy was a 

See 'Coaches' Page 20 



Cross country teams 

off to strong start. 

See page 23. 



Volleyballers have 

high hopes for fall 

season. 

See page 22. 



Soccer team builds 

second year status. 

See page 21. 



Tennis team serves 
up new rookie 

team. 
See page 21. 







c—o ~m 



Prayer Memorial Service brings CUP and community together 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Cliief 

Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania in conjunction 
with the Clarion Ministerial 
Association hosted a Prayer 
Memorial Service in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium at 8 p.m. 



Jjrjkl^ 




Lir^jtylej 



1 




Sunday Sept. 16, for the tragedy 
that took place on Tuesday. 

"Clarion University has exer- 
cised courage by bringing the 
prayer service to us tonight," 
said Father Jim Saluczak, of the 
Campus Catholic Ministries. 

Saluczak said a prayer for 
those who are trying to rescue 
the injured and the 
deceased. He also spoke 
momentarily about the 
topic of courage and said 
he was graetful for the 
rescue workers' courage. 
Saluczak wasn't the 
only minister to speak 
and offer prayers. The 
evening featured many 
ministers and represen- 
tatives from different 
beliefs and churches. 

Rev. Keith Richardson, 
pastor of the First 
Baptist Church of 
Clarion and President of 
the Clarion Ministerial 
Association, offered a 
brief message from the 
Bible. 

"Last Tuesday our 
nation heard a deafening 
roar," Richardson said. 

In addition, 
Richardson said, "Last 
Tuesday you heard a call 
to repentance." 

Richardson also said 
he was disturbed by the 
news that a Mosque was 
attacked and that many 
Arabic people have been 
personally attacked. 

He said he publically 
denounces those acts of 
terrorism as he 
denounces the acts of 
Tuesday. 

Dr. Dilnawaz Siddiqui, 
an practicing Muslim 
and professor of the 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Marwick-Boyd Auditorium was filled wltti members of Clarion community and Clarion 
University for the Prayer Memorial Service held Sept. 16. The event was sponsored by Clarion 
University and the Clarion tylinisterlal Association. The evening hosted various representative 
from a wide variety of faiths. 



communication department, 
quoted words from the Qu'ran. 

According to Siddiqui, the 
Qu'ran says that taking one 
innocent life is equivalent to tak- 
ing the entire generation. 

In an earlier interview, 
Siddiqui said, "This kind of 
thing should not be blamed on 
any faith." 

Siddiqui said he agreed with 
Bishop McCarrick in New York 
City who said, "Lasting peace 
only prevails with justice." 

"This life is brief," Richardson 
said, and "Only God can bring 
good out of evil. 

"Ultimately, the only answer 
that showed itself Tuesday is the 
Prince of Peace." 

Dr. Jerry Belloit, professor of 
the finance department and 
member of the Clarion 
Ministerial Association, intro- 
duced the other ministers, speak- 
ers and vocalists. 

University President Diane 
Reinhard was one such speaker 
who thanked all who had helped 
to bring this event together. 



"Tonight we gather to remem- 
ber those victims and families," 
said Reinhard. 

Between prayers and com- 
ments, those in attendance sang 
hymns such as "God of the 
Sparrow," "El Shaddai" and 
ended with "God Bless 
America." Those in attendance 
joined hands during another 
hymn, "Bind us together." 

Clarion University Christian 
groups, Koinoinia and 
Intervarsity, joined together for 
songs of praise and worship. 

Three members of the Lift 
Every Voice Choir sang a selec- 
tion entitled, "I Feel Like Going 
On." The entire Lift Every Voice 
Choir joined the other members 
and also sang a selection. 

Other guests included Rev. 
Mark Cummins, pastor of Zion 
Baptist Church in Reidsburg, 
who offered a prayer for the res- 
cue workers. 

"They paid the ultimate price 
so others might taste freedom," 
Cummins said. 

At the close of the service. 



Belloit encouraged the audience 
to stay to view the video that 
was made by Clarion University 
faculty members and students. 

The film depicted Clarion 
University and community 
members taking part in a peace 
walk that took place Friday Sept. 
14. 




Dr Diane Reinhard was one 
speaker Sunday night. 
Reinhard said the reason for 
the event was to remember- 
vicitlms and families. 




Pacf 24 



CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



3 9363 00586 4589 



r 




The Clarion Call 



Sports 



September 12, 2001 




Golden Eagles fall to Division I Youngstown State 



Courtesy of Sports Informutiori 

{•ifth rated NC\\.\ Dimmoii I- 
\ A power Youngstt)\\n State (2- 
Oi used ail e\plo.M\e running 
L'.inie and m\ ClaruMi (i)-2i 
turno\ers to roll to ;i 44-0 win 
o\er the ('i.'Idcn l-agles on 
"^aiijr.i.iN nighi. 

Held at Stambaugh Stadium, 

hetter know- ' '-^c ' Le Castle." 

liie jiariisa;, . ^ ._uiii eru\ul >'t 

1^.(^'^^ had hardi) settled in their 

', -. ■ ■.ieniedtailbaek P J 

■^ " JTlbled I." "'" V .;UN .ind ,; 

. "dou V, ._ l^\a\ 

iiinnage, Jake Stewart s 
V\i made • • the U 

■ ■ 'ei liic Lagiei made two 'w -i 
!"!-- i-n a 14-\ard pass (r-'iv. 
.\.;,.m A!mash> lo Justin Sieker; 
and a Demetne Gardner 16 >ard 
run to the YSl' 49, Almashy wa- 
intereepted b\ Le\ar Greene at 
the VSl^ 41. 

Mining the ball to the Claru)n 
48 on a Jeff Ryan run. R>an 
tossed a perfect out route to 
Jerald Burley who broke a tackle 
and raced down the far sideline 
for a touch-down and a 14-0 lead 
at 12:44. 

Clarion tr;eH 'n rebound again. 
The Eagles uuik possession at 
their owr. rid >in 2nd and 8 



at the 1'). halfback Riibert 

\\'alker darted 22 yards to the 
Clarum 41. but the dn\e stalled. 
After a 69-) aid punt b\ Clarion s 
Ken Crawford had pinned the 
Penguins at their own 12. things 
were looking prt)mising But on 
^e..ond and (\\c at the i^. Mays 
took another deep handuff and 
expKided up the middle, \eered 
to the left sideline and scam- 
pered 83 _\ards lo pavdirt. The 
Penguins had a 2i)-() fust quarter 
iead- 

Clanon all-CL>nterenee guard 

i\san Duchon left the game earl> 

,n ;ne se>.\Hid quartei with a foot 

in|ur\, which brougiit changes toi 

le L:agle line. On ilie next po.- 

>e-. ion C^larion .. 

.\lmash\. never rcvCived oie 

Nnap, and as the ball rolled loose 

on the turf, "I'oungstown defen- 

" ■ lirK-man Bruce High:ov\er 

.. ped up the pigskin at the 

Claiion 6 and rumbled into the 

endzone for another ^'SU score. 

I'he Penguins also scored on 

Darius Peterson's 27 yard run. 

and Jake Stewart's 24-yard field 

goal before intermission to make 

It 37-0 at halftime. 

YSU rounded out the scoring 

with a Peterson 41 yard run at 

9:08 o\' the third quarter. 

Clarion entered YSU territory 
twice in the second half but was 



unable to scDre. 

"'Voungstt)wn is an extremely 
talented team and they will win a 
lot of games this year," echoed 
Clarion head coach Malen Luke 
at the post-game press confer- 
ence. "Their skill speed was just 
too much tor us." he continued. 

We htid a lot ol gii\ s out 
(injured) tonight and that hurt us 
detensively. 1 think our defense 
would ha\e made an e\en better 
showing with tbiose guys in the 
lineup We were \cr> thin in 
spi)ts." 

'Our olfense moved the ball, 
especially in the tirst half. But 
losing Rvan Duchon (Clarion's 
ail .oinlcrence guard i eail) in the 

-•ciMid quarter changed what we 
^>)Uid realiv do against their 
defense. 

"With >Sl,' scoring on the first 
pla\. and on the second drive 
too. that also took a little out of 
us early. 1 did feel we played 
hard to the final play and I was 
proud of our team's overall 
effort, 'We'll use this as a learn- 
ing experience to sharpen us up 
for the weeks to come. No mat- 
ter how far we might advance 
this season, there's no chance, 
even in the NCAA Playoffs, that 
we could play a team that's bet- 
ter than the one we played 
tonight." 




Courtesy of the Football website 



Several Golden Eagle football play ers'clear fh^waYfo^^ 
ter back,, Adam Almashy , to gain yardage. Ttie young team 
must learn to work togettier in order to score points. 



Clarion had 234 yards of total 
offense, including 167 rushing 
and 67 passing. Robert Walker 
gained 57 yards on four carries, 
while Glen Lovelace had 42 
yards on five carries and QB 
Almashy had 24 carries for 47 
yards. Almashy also clicked on 



five of 15 passes t\)r 65 yards. 
Wideout Mike McCuIlum 
grabbed three passes for 37 
yards. 

YSU had Mays carrying nine 
times for 180 yards and two td's, 
while Darius Peterson had 12 

See 'Football' Page 21 



Clarion winning tradition welcomes new coaches 



by Bethany Bankovich 

Clarion Call Sports Editor and 

Sports Information 

Two new coaches, Christina 
Alonzo and Tracey Fluharty 
join the Golden Eagle coaching 
staff. Alonzo replaces Tony 
How ard in w omt-n s 
while Fluh " '■ ^ . - 

Pun new :: ,.<> ■ . ■ .- ^ 

^omes to Clarivsn 
.; ...c-;her . < ' iieL'e. where 



she was assistant women's soc- 
cer coach the past two seasons 
and helped lead Allegheny to a 
28-9-3 overall record as well as 
a 2000 NCAC regular season 
conference title. 

Alonzo from Wichita Falls. 
1^' < and attended Notre Dame 
■':-.'. School She was valedic- 
:'. ot' her class and graduated 
'''^. She earned four basket- 
.'■ai;, three track and two volley- 
ball letters. She was a member 



• •• « ••••••••••••••••• 



•••••••••••«• 



Inside 
Sports 



Cross country teams 

off to strong start, 

See page 23. 



of the Texas Longhorns Soccer 
Club (1992-94) and the 
Olympic Development Program 
while being selected to for ODP 
Regionals. Alonzo went on to 
attend Southwestern University 
in Georgetown. Texas. A four- 
year letterwinner on the wtim- 
ens soccer team, she was a for- 
ward her junior and senior years 
and team captain as a senior 
(1998). She was a mid-fielder 
her freshman and sophomore 

• WWW !h*r<ii'4riontall.com» 



Volleyballers have 

high hopes for fall 

season. 

See page 22. 



years. She was named as a sec- 
ond team All-SCAC in 1996 and 
97 and an HM SCAC selection 
in 1995. Christina earned her 
B.A. in Kinesiology in 1999. 

Alonzo is the daughter of 
Mary and Tommy Alonzo of 
Wichita Falls, Texas and has' a 
sister and two brothers. 

Fluharty comes to Clarion 
from Glenville State College in 
West Virginia and had a very 
successful four year career. She 



led her teams to a career record 
of 99-56, a 63.9'/r winning rate. 
Last year her team posted a 28- 
12 overall record and set the 
school record for single season 
wins. Other yearly records show 
Glenville at 26-16 overall in 
1999, 26-13 in 1998 and 19-15 
in 1997. 

A 1995 graduate of (ilenville 
State College with a degree in 
Physical Education, Tracy was a 
See 'Coaches' Page 20 



« • • • 



•••••••••«•••••••«• 



••••••••••• 



Soccer team builds 

second year status, 

See page 21. 



Tennis team serves 
up new rookie 

team. 
See page 21. 



Tie C^'on Cciio 



September ED, 2DD1 



CN 

QJ 

D 

m 

K 
oo 

QJ 

E 

I 



WWW 



t h e c I a r i o 



n c a I I 



com 



Prayer Memorial Service brings CUP and community together 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 



•••••••■< 



!•••••• 



Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania in conjunction 
with the Clarion Ministerial 
Association hosted a Prayer 
Memorial Service in Marwick- 
Bovd Auditorium at 8 p.m. 



Inside 



/ 



JpNews 



..^ 



Photos from 
Sept. 14 Silent 
Walk.........pg. 5. 



Lifestyles 



Autumn Leaf 
Festival this 
year. pg.9. 

Sports 

Football team 
defeat Tiffin 
on home 
turf. pg.20 

^ IndoxaJ^ 



A 



Opinion pg.Sr 

Lifestyles...pg.9. 
Sports......pg.20. 

Entertainment... 

...pg.l3. 

Classified.pg.15. 



Sunday Sept. 16, for the tragedy 
that took place on Tuesday. 

"Clarion University has exer- 
cised courage by bringing the 
prayer service to us tonight," 
said Father Jim Saluczak, of the 
Campus Catholic Ministries. 

Saluczak said a prayer for 
those who are trying to rescue 
the injured and the 
deceased. He also spoke 
momentarily about the 
lopic of courage and said 
he was graetful for the 
rescue workers' courage. 
Saluczak wasn't the 
only minister to speak 
and offer prayers. The 
evening featured many 
ministers and represen- 
tatives from different 
beliefs and churches. 

Rev. Keith Richardson, 
pastor of the First 
Baptist Church of 
Clarion and President of 
the Clarion Ministerial 
Association, offered a 
brief message from the 
Bible. 

"Last Tuesday our 
nation heard a deafening 
rt)ar," Richardson said. 

In addition, 
Richardson said. "Last 
Tuesday you heard a call 
to repentance." 

Richardson also said 
he was disturbed by the 
news that a Mosque was 
attacked and that many 
Arabic people have been 
personally attacked. 

He said he publicaliy 
denounces those acts of 
terrorism as he 

denounces the acts of 
Tuesday. 

Dr. Dilnawaz Siddiqui, 
an practicing Muslim 
and professor of the 





Marwick'Boyd Auditorium was filled witti members of Clarion community and Clarion 
University for ttie Prayer Memorial Service field Sept. 16. Tfie event was sponsored by Clarion 
University and ttie Clarion Ministerial Association. The evening hosted various representative 
from a wide variety of faittis. 



communication department, 
quoted words from the Qu'ran. 

According to Siddiqui, the 
Qu'ran says that taking one 
innocent life is equivalent to tak- 
ing the entire generation. 

In an earlier interview, 
Siddiqui said, "This kind of 
thing should not be blamed on 
any faith." 

Siddiqui said he agreed with 
Bishop McCarrick in New York 
City who said, "Lasting peace 
only prevails with justice." 

"This life is briet." Richardson 
said, and "Only God can bring 
good out of evil. 

"Ultimately, the onl\ answer 
that showed itself Tuesday is the 
Prince of Peace." 

Dr. Jerry Belloit. professor of 
the finance department and 
member of the Clarion 
Ministerial Association, intro- 
duced the other ministers, speak- 
ers and vocalists. 

University President Diane 



"Tonight we gather to remem- Belloit encouraged the audience 

ber those victims and families," to stay to view the video that 

said Reinhard. was made by Clarion University 

Between prayers and com- faculty members and students. 



ments, those in attendance sang 
hymns such as "God of the 
Sparrow," "El Shaddai" and 
ended with "God Bless 
America." Those in attendance 
joined hands during another 
hymn, "Bind us together." 

''iirn ;-. ■ n'versity Christian 
group- i.oinia and 

Inter\ai■^ ;_. , joined together for 
songs of praise and worship. 

Three members of the Lift 
Every Voice Choir sang a selec- 
tion entitled, "I Feel Like Going 
On." The entire Lift Every \r.ice 
Choir joined the other members 
and also sang a selection. 

Other guests included Rev. 
Mark Cummins, pastor of Zion 
Baptist Church in Reidsburg, 
who offered a prayer for the res- 
cue workers. 

"They paid the ultimate price 



The film depicted Clarion 
University and community 
members taking part in a peace 
walk that took place Friday Sept. 
14. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Reinhard was one such speaker so others might taste freedom," 

who thanked all who had helped Cummins said. 

to bring this event together. At the close of the service. 



Dr Diane Reinhard was one 
speaker Sunday night. 
Reinhard said the reason for 
the event was to remember- 
vicifims and families. 



"The first draft of Clarion University history 



If 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 
Amy A. Thompson 

Keith Gwillim 

Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 

Graham Hermanns 



Ungodly garbage 



September 20, 2001 



We are at the start of another 
semester, and now that we are 
back, so is all the garbage around 
campus. 

We are finding some things on 
our adventure to class that would 
turn your stomach, and some 
things that would just make you 
roll your eyes. 

What we have noticed behind 
Ralston is especially disgusting. 

There is a wide variety of items 
that can be found. Anything from 
cigarette butts to Gemmell waste 
to used condoms to Band-aids. 

It is pretty bad when children 
are being dropped off at the Day 
Care Center, and have to walk 
past condoms and some even try 
to pick them up. 

That is a scary thought if you 
are a parent and it is something 
which can be prevented from 
happening. 

Another place we have noticed 
covered with garbage is the steps 
coming up from Gemmell. 

As people walk to the different 
residence halls or class, they are 
eating their food and just throw- 
ing the garbage on the steps or in 
the bushes. 

There is no need for this to be 
going on. We are in college now 
and we should be adult enough 



to make sure that the garbage 
gets from our hands to the 
garbage cans. 

Garbage cans are found on the 
way to everything around cam- 
pus. Just take the extra step and 
put it in the right place so every- 
one else does not have to walk 
through it. 

We have also noticed the trash 
around campus is getting out of 
hand. 

On the way to some people's 
apartments, there is a trail of 
Band-aids which have no busi- 
ness of being there. 

Although we can't speak for 
everyone on campus, we are 
pretty sure other people don't 
want to walk by used Band-aids. 

Another bad find on the way 
off of campus is used maxi pads. 
There is nothing sanitary about 
those napkins. 

No one needs to see those 
items, let alone walk through it. 

"Stay-free should stay unseen." 

Clarion University is a beauti- 
ful, small school. Let's try not to 
trash it up with unnecessary 
garbage. 

It will only stay nice and clean 
as long as we want it to. 

So give a hoot and don't pol- 
lute! 



Editorial Policy 



y:ii.>^ '«.>§: ^ ■■':■■■'.' ifi 



*th» Clari0ii Call 1^ i$Mxkg steps U> unify th& paper with 
(at «tegle voice, WffMAmIm,Ml^ fe m^i first 

step. We, the Em'&dm B^idm^ vM express our t^pinloH 
about Issues across the campti^, state, nation, and 
Wdfid. We are not spealulii| tor Clarloii Untveii^ty) the 
CiaHon Stodeiiis^ AssK^daHoii or the students m the 
llBiversitv, we are spring ^ aii EditoiM Board * the 
Toice of fiiE Clamor Cajlu H^se editorials are devet* 
oped in a meeting of the Editorial Board, M m^aait^n 
did not necessarBy agree on the opinion stated In ^e 
e^y^rlaL The opMoit e?({»ressed is ^jeetmd by tlie 
m^onty of the boards ft Is not always a ttnanlmoiis 
opinion, Voii» the puhlic^ reserve the light to expresn 
Your pieasiire or displeasing with ttiei^ optiik^s vla^ a 
Letter to the Edtor, 



^ 



Your Views 

Association of Muslim Social Scientists 
condemn terroist attacks 



The Association of Muslim 
Social Scientists (AMSS) joins 
the nation in condemning the 
heinous terrorists attacks on 
America Sept. 11, and calls on 
law enforcement agencies to bring 
the perpetrators to justice. 

The AMSS shares the unyield- 
ing anger shock, and deep sorrow 
felt by all Americans, and offers 
its condolences to the families and 
friends of those who lost their 
lives in the horrific attacks on the 
World Trade Center (WTC) and 
the Pentagon. 

Muslims share with their fellow 
Americans the psychological 



anguish for the loss of loved ones, 
as Muslims were among the vic- 
tims in Tuesday's unsparing and 
vicious attacks. 

Dr. Louay Safi, AMSS vice 
president, said that "committing 
aggression and taking innocent 
lives is deplorable in all religious 
traditions, Islam included. And 
those who direct their rage and 
anger at people of peace defy both 
religion and humanity." 

As an organization dedicated to 
outlining Islamic positions on 
issues in the modern world, it is 
the moral responsiblity of AMSS 
to urge the media, government 



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and all fellow Americans not lo 
sterotype Islam. 

Since Islam forbids violence 
against innocent men, women and 
children, these reprehensible acts 
of violence cannot be reconciled 
with Islamic teachings. 

With the sanctity of life as an 
integral part of Islamic teachings, 
these attacks are a crime in Islam. 

The Qur'an states that "if any- 
one kills a person - unless it be for 
murder or for spreading mischief 
in the land - it would be as if he 
kills all of mankind. And, if any- 
one saves a life, it would be as if 
he saves all of humanity. 

In fact, these barbaric and brutal 
attacks on the WTC and the 
Pentagon are attacks on humanity, 
not only Americans. 

Since a person cannot be held 
accountable for another person's 
actions, we urge fellow citizens 
not to prejudge their Muslim 
neighbors and make them targets 
of hate crimes. 

"Americans, regardless of their 
rehgious affiliation, should unite 
in the war against terror," said Dr. 
Safi. 

The Association of Muslim 
Social Scientists 



Want to do your part to 

help victims of th 

York City and 

Washington D.C. 

tragedy? 



Donate blood 

September 25 from 

11 a.m. to 5 p.m. In Tippin 

North Gymnasium. 



PnSSRGES 

PRSSRGES, Inc. uiiil 

be holding senuai 

ulolence training 

beginning Tuesdag, 

Oct. 2. 

The free 4e-hour 

training uiill be held 

at the Clarion office 

location on 

IBS S. 5th fluenue. 

Uolunteers ujill be 

trained to respond to 

people ujhose Hues 

haue been affected 

bg seKual uiolence. 

More information 

and applications are 

auailable bg calling 

1-80B-793-362B or 

226-7273. betiueen 

8:38 a.m.-4:3B p.m., 

Mondag through 

Fridag. 



September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 




Opinion 





I'm back up on my 
horse and ready to 
ride it a few more 
miles, 9§ 

-Tim Connors 



Editorial, Tim Connors 



I'm not going to lie when I say 
things have been fairly crappy in 
my book for the past few months 
and then some. I honestly felt like 
luck had dropped out on me and 
left me holding the bag. 

Now I'm not going to get into 
the whole story on why I was 
miserable, but I can assure you 
I'm back up on my horse and 
ready to ride it a few more miles. 

What I would like to do though 
is send out my thanks and grati- 
tude to those of you who helped 
me get back on the proverbial 
horse. This is my tribute to all of 
you. 

To the one who smokes like 
woman, though I might be your 
Yoda, for the past few weeks you 
have been mine. I can't say 
thanks enough for lending an ear 
to my problems. Furthermore, I 
would like to say even though 
you spit all the advice I have 
given you in the past back at me, 
it helped me realize it can work 
for me. 

To the one who I have known 
longer than anyone else, you 
might feel you had little impact 
in my return to sanity but you did. 
Thank you for staying by my side 
and offering what assistance you 
could. 

You gave me the one piece of 
advice you could and it was prob- 
ably the best piece of advice I 
could hear. 

To you who I have rebuilt the 
bridge of friendship, I must say if 
you don't hate me for the simple 
fact of chewing your ear off about 
the same things over and over I'm 
a lucky p)erson. Your words have 
finally sunk in through my thick 
skull, and they are all true. 

Thank you for putting up with 
my tangents, drunken and sober. I 



would also like to say you were a 
key part in holding me up when I 
didn't have the strength to do it. 

To the the fine people who share 
my fate at Destinta, I don't know 
where to begin. You put up with 
my ever so enjoyable bitter 
moods and suffered the brunt of 
those moods. 

You also lent an ear when it was 
needed and offered what you 
could to better my situation. I'm 
sorry if I was a pain at times ad 
thank you for not beating me 
senseless. 

To the one who shared almost 
the same situaitons, I know we 
had our personal conflicts in the 
past, but I'm glad we were able to 
put those behind us. Thanks for 
offering what you could to assist 
me. Also thanks for all the ciga- 
rettes. 

To my family here in Clarion, in 
my times of need I was always 
able to turn to you. As always I 
can rely on you to help with the 
trials and tribulations that are 
placed in front of me, and in 
return, I can offer the same to you 
when you need it. 

Though we might have had our 
differences just remember, what 
family doesn't? 

To the one who had the joy of 
playing both sides of the ball, I 
must say thank you for taking the 
time to hear my words. Most peo- 
ple would have said "forget it" 
and left it at that but you didn't. 
Why, I may never know, but once 
again thank you. 

Finally, to my other skinny half, 
we've seen it a lot in the past 
three years. Up, down, left and 
right you have helped me through 
so many things. I'm glad to have 
a friend like you in my life. 

See *Conners' Page 4 




As a member of the National Newspaper 
Association, The Clarion Call is entitied 
to access NNA's Libel Hotline; with 
advice from Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 




/ hope that they too 
will sense the potential 
for peace and quiet 
that sailing offers. 99 

-John Gerow 



Hyde Park, John Gerow 



September is more than half 
spent and I know that the first 
frosty mornings are not long 
away. 

My robins have fled south, and 
I notice that other birds are flock- 
ing, getting set for their migra- 
tion. Winter, with all that it is 
with all that it means, lies waiting 
somewhere just beond tomorrow. 

Time is of the essence now, as it 
is, once again, later that I think. I 
gaze out across the lake and con- 
template my summer love affair 
with this place. 

April — the surface of the lake 
rough and wind-tossed, steel gray 
beneath a steel gray sky. The 
forests around the shore are still 
their winter gray. 

Kahle Lake, hidden here in 
these folds in the earth waits for 
spring to quicken her. I study the 
water and the wind, not really 
sure what it is that I need to know. 

June — and late spring brings 
life to the lake and to the shores. 
The woods are full of trees in 
countless shades of green, reach- 
ing gratefully toward the sun. 

I am struggling to learn my 
boat, I do not take the time to 
revel in spring's glory on the 
lake. My learning comes in fits 
and starts, somewhat like the 
winds that dance across the water. 



I am finding some of the com- 
fort in tranquility that I thought I 
might find sailing, but I am learn- 
ing some hard lessons about the 
wind, the water, and the ship. 

July — full summer stretches 
majestically across the plateau, 
with a bright hot sun in a brassy 
sky and winds that whisper of 
thunder storms just over the hori- 
zon. 

The water on the lake is blue 
enough to mirror the sky, and 
clouds dance and sail across the 
sky, teasing me while I continue- 
to learn my new, chosen, art. 

August — and the taste of fall is 
in the air. The land around the 
lake is almost corrupt in the full 
summer richness. The forests are 
almost overburdened with their 
cargo of leaves. 

Spring's promise has been ful- 
filled. My children find time in 
their busy teen age lives to spend 
two weeks with Dad at the tail 
end of summer. 

We manage to steal three after- 
noons to go sailing. I want to 
share my new passion with my 
children, who have always been 
my first love. 

I hope that they too will sense 
the potential for peace and quiet 
that sailing offers. 

See * Gerow' Page 5 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Ten Cattau 

Staff Writers: Matt Greene, Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezyk, Emily 

Gill, Aaron Stempeck, Laura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Macri, Kelly 

Drevitch, Adam Beriotti and Khalia Robinson 

Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Reinhan 

Photography Staff: Mary Beth Crawshaw, Zoe Boni, Rachel Resnick, Iron 

Valentine, Alison Fink, Jeff Wetzel and Jon Pizzica 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Evry, Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, 

Julianne Keman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sarvers and Omar Rozier 

OrculatioD Staff. Kristina Strojny, Alyson PauWen, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer 

WoD)ert, Jill Baumcratz and Josh Sachs 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion.edu 

WWW.CLARION.EDU/THECALL 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




Letters and Editing 
Policy 






■"^^^"$, bttt £«S<»ve the rigte \i^M$^.. 

lef Opisjoo$«x|»es^ke^lft>' 
^^ ^sim of tlie »d€»titie<l ^n^ 
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10^1^ wDhs^ a most 
<H> I*' Idler. ^^"^ 




W-f.< 



■■^p 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call 



Se ptember 20^ 2001 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 
Amy A. Thompson 

Keith Gwillim 
Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 
Graham Hermanns 



Ungodly garbage 



\Vc are al ihc >tai1 o\ duolhcr 
semester, and tun\ that we are 
back, so IS all the garbage around 
eampus. 

We are finding some things on 
our adventure to class that would 
turn your stomach, and some 
things that would just make you 
roll your eyes. 

What we ha\e noticed behind 
Ralston is especially disgusting. 
There is a wide variety of items 
that can be found. Anything from 
cigarette butts to Gemmell uastw 
to used condoms to Band-aids. 

It IS pretty bad when children 
are being dropped off al the l)a\ 
Care Cenlei. and have to vsalk 
past condoms and some even tr\ 
to pick them up 

That 1^ a scary thought if you 
are a parent and it is something 
which can be prevented from 
happening. 

Another place we have noticed 
covered with garbage is the steps 
coming up from Gemmell. 

As people walk to the different 
residence halls or class. the\ arc 
eatinu their food and just throw ■ 
ing the garbage on the steps or m 
the bushes. 

There is no need for thi> 
going on. We are in college m-N 
and we should be adult enoui^ti 



to make sure that the garbage 
gets from our hands to the 
garbage cans. 

Garbage cans are found on the 
way to everything around cam- 
pus. Just take the extra step and 
put it in the right place so every- 
one else does not have to walk 
through it. 

We have also noticed the trash 
around campus is getting out of 
hand. 

On the way to .^ome people's 
apartments, there is a trail of 
Hand-aids which have no busi- 
ness of being there. 

Although we can't speak for 
everyone on campus, we are 
pretty sure other people doni 
want to walk by used Band-aids. 

Another bad find on the wa\ 
off of campus is used maxi pads. 
There is nothing sanitary about 
those napkins. 

No one needs to see those 
Items, let alone ualk through it. 
"Stay-free should stay unseen." 

Clarion lJni\ersity is a bcaun- 
ful. small school. Let's try not to 
trash It up with unnecessar\ 
iiarbaize. 

l! Will only stay nice and clean 
■ long as \Kc v'.ant it to. 

St) give a hoot and don't poL 
lute' 



Editorial Policy 



The Clarion Call is taking steps to unify the paper with 
a sinjfk^ voice. MMaMlliljCka. »s that first 

step. We, the Editorial Board* will express our opinion 
ahout issues across the tainpus, state, nation) and 
world. We are not speaking for Clarion University, the 
Clarion Students' Association or the students of the 
University, we are speaking as an Editorial Board - the 
voke of The Clakion Calu These editorials are devel- 
oped in a meeting of the Editorial Board, all members 
did not necessarily agree on Che opinion stated in the 
editorial. The opimon expressed is shared by the 
majoi Uy of the boards it is not always a unanimous 
opinion! Vou, the public, reserve the right to express 
M>iir pieasure or displeasure with these opinions via a 
Ldter to the Editor. 



Your Views 



Association of Muslim Social Scientists 
condemn terroist attacks 



September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 3 



The Association ol Muslim 
Soeial Scientists (AMSS) joins 
the nation in condemning the 
heinous terrorists attacks on 
America Sept. 11. and calls on 
law enforcement agencies ti* bring 
the perpetrators to justice. 

The .AMSS shares the unyield- 
ing anger shock, and deep sonow 
felt b> all Americans, and offers 
Its condolences to the families and 
friends of those who lost their 
lives in the horrific attacks on the 
World Trade Center (WTC) and 
the Pentagon. 

Muslims share with their fellow 
Americans the psychological 



anguish tor the loss ot loved ones. 
as Muslims were among the vic- 
tims in Tuesday's unsparing and 
vicious attacks. 

Dr. Louay Safi. .AMSS vice 
president, said that "ctimmitting 
aggression and taking innocent 
li\es is deplorable in all religious 
traditions, Islam included. And 
those who direct their rage and 
anger at people of peace defy both 
religion and humanity." 

As an organization dedicated to 
outlining Islamic positions i)n 
issues in the modern world, it is 
the moral responsibliiy of AMSS 
to urge the media, government 




Want to do your part to 

help victims of ttie New 

Yori( City and 

Washington D. C. 

tragedy? 



Donate blood 

September 25 from 

11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Tippin 

North Gymnasium. 



and all fellow .Americans noi to 
sterotype Islam. 

Since Islam torbids violence 
against innocent men, women and 
children, these reprehensible acts 
of violence cannot be reconciled 
with Islamic teachings. 

With the sanctity of life as an 
integral part oi Islamic teachings, 
these attacks are a crime in Islam. 

The Qur'an states that "if any- 
one kills a person - unless it he for 
murder or for spre.iding mischiel 
in the land n nmmIJ lie js il lie 
ki!K all ot niuiikiiul. And. il any 
one v:!\(.'s a iite. it wMld be as if 
he svi\c> all of human ', 

In fact, these barbar c and brutal 
attacks on the WTv" and the 
Pentagon are attacks on hLiinanit\, 
not only Americans. 

Since a person cannot be held 
accountable for another person's 
actions, we urge fellow citizens 
not to prejudge their Muslim 
neighbors and make them target ^ 
of hate (.rimes. 

"Americans, regardless "f thci 
religious affiliation, should unite 
in the war against terror.' .said Dr. 
Safi. 

The Association of Muslim 
Social ScieiUisls 



PflSSflGES 

PHSSRGES, Inc. will 

be holding senual 

ulolence training 

beginning Tuesdag, 

Oct. 2. 

The free 40-hour 

training luIII be held 

at the Clarion office 

location on 

1 05 S. 5th fluenue. 

Uolunteers LUill be 

trained to respond to 

people iDhose Hues 

haue been affected 

by seKual ulolence. 

More information 

and applications are 

auailable by calling 

1-800-793-3620 or 

226-727 3. betuieen 

8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m., 

Monday through 

F rid ay. 




Opinion 





I'm hack up on my 
horse and reody to 
tide it a few more 
miles. §§ 

-Tim Connors 



Editorial, Tim Connors 



I'm not going to lie when I say 
things have been fairly crappy in 
my book for the past few months 
and then some. I honestly felt like 
luck had dropped out on me and 
left me holding the bag. 

Now I'm not going to get into 
the whole story on why I was 
miserable, but I can assure you 
I'm back up on my hor.se and 
ready to ride it a few more miles. 

What 1 would like to do though 
is send out my thanks and grati- 
tude to those of you who helped 
me get back on the proverbial 
horse. This is my tribute to all of 
you. 

To the one who smokes like 
woman, though I might be your 
Yoda, for the past few weeks you 
have been mine. I can't say 
thanks enough for lending an ear 
to my problems. Furthermore, 1 
would like to say even though 
you spit all the advice I have 
given you in the past back at me, 
it helped me realize it can work 
for me. 

To the one who I have known 
longer than anyone else, you 
might feel you had little impact 
in my return to sanity but you did. 
Thank you for staying by my side 
and offering what assistance you 
could. 

Yt)u gave me the one piece of 
advice vou could and it was prob- 
ably the best piece oS. advice I 
could hear. 

To you who I ha\e rebuilt the 
bridge of friendship, 1 must say if 
you don't hate me for the simple 
fact of chewing your ear off about 
the same things over and over I'm 
a lucky person. Your words have 
finally sunk in through my thick 
skull, and they are all true. 

Thank you for putting up with 
my tangents, drunken and .sober. I 



would also like to say you were a 
key part in holding me up when I 
didn't have the strength to do it. 

To the the fine people who share 
my fate at Destinta, I don't know 
where to begin. You put up with 
my ever so enjoyable bitter 
moods and suffered the brunt of 
those moods. 

You also lent an ear when it was 
needed and offered what you 
could to better my situation. I'm 
sorry if I was a pain at times ad 
thank you for not beating me 
senseless. 

To the one who shared almost 
the same situaitons, I know we 
had our personal conflicts in the 
past, but I'm glad we were able to 
put those behind us. Thanks for 
offering what you could to assist 
me. Also thanks for all the ciga- 
rettes. 

To my family here in Clarion, in 
my times of need I was always 
able to turn to you. As always I 
can rely on you to help with the 
trials and tribulations that are 
placed in front of me. and in 
return, I can offer the same to you 
when you need it. 

Though we might have had our 
differences just remember, what 
family doesn't'.' 

To the t>ne who had the joy of 
playing both sides o\ the ball. I 
must say thank you for taking the 
time to hear my words. Most peo- 
ple would have said "ftirget it" 
and left it at that but you didn't. 
Why, I may never know, but once 
again thank you. 

Finally, to my other skinny half, 
we've seen it a lot in the past 
three years. Up. down, left and 
right you have helped me through 
so many things. I'm glad to have 
a friend like you in my life. 

See 'Conners' Page 4 




As a member of the National Newspaper 
Association, The Clarion Call is entitled 
to access NNA's Libel Hotline; with 
advice from Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 





"^ — —■ 








'1 


, ! .">* .'^it 'SJv;< 




























































j 


















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WM'-'''-'---'-' 



/ hope that they too 
will sense the potential 
for peaee and quiet 
that sailini^ cff^'f'"^- 99 

-John Ghrow 



Hyde Park, John Gerow 



September is more than half 
spent and I know that the first 
frosty mornings are not long 
away. 

My robins have fled .south, and 
I notice that other birds are flock- 
ing, getting set for their migra- 
tion. Winter, with all that it is 
with all that it means, lies waiting 
somewhere just beond tomorrow. 

Time is of the essence now, as it 
is, once again, later that I think. I 
gaze out across the lake and con- 
template my summer love affair 
with this place. 

April — the surface of the lake 
rough and wind-tossed, steel gray 
beneath a steel gray sky. The 
forests around the shore are still 
their winter gray. 

Kahle Lake, hidden here in 
these folds in the earth waits for 
spring to quicken her. I study the 
water and the wind, not really 
sure what it is that I need to know. 

June — and late spring brings 
life to the lake and to the shores. 
The woods are full of trees in 
countless shades of green, reach- 
ing gratefully toward the sun. 

I am struggling to learn my 
boat. I do not take the time to 
revel in spring's glory on the 
lake. My learning comes in fits 
and starts, somewhat like the 
winds that dance across the water. 



I am finding some of the com 
fort in tranquility that I thought I 
might find sailing, but I am learn- 
ing some hard lessons about the 
wind, the water, and the ship. 

July — full summer stretches 
majestically across the plateau, 
with a bright hot sun in a brassy 
sky and winds that whisper of 
thunder storms just over the hori- 
zon. 

The water on the lake is blue 
enough to mirror the sky, and 
clouds dance and sail across the 
sky, teasing me while I continue- 
to learn my new, chosen, art. 

August — and the taste of fall is 
in the air. The land around the 
lake is almost corrupt in the full 
summer richness. The forests are 
almost overburdened with their 
cargo of leaves. 

Spring's promise has been ful- 
filled. My children find time in 
their busy teen age lives to spend 
two weeks with Dad at the tail 
end of summer. 

We manage to steal three after- 
noons to go sailing. I want to 
share my new passion with my 
children, who have always been 
my first love. 

I hope that they too will sense 
the potential for peace and quiet 
that sailing offers. 

See 'Gerow' Page 5 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 

Staff Writers: .Matt Greene, Jctf Chaffee, Chuck DelcroLX, Justin Ez\'k. Emily 

(iill. .\:iron Stempeck. Liura .\ltman. Andrea Borek, .Martisse .Macn, Kelly 

Drevitch, .^dam Berlotti and Khalia Robinson 

Advertising Sales StaflF: Joseph Sacco and juiia Reinhart 

Photography StaflF: .Man- Beth Crawshaw, Zee Boni, Rachel Resnick, Iron 

Valentine Alison Fink, Jeff Wetzel and Jon Pizzica 

Proofreading Staff: Kellv Evr}', Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau. Alaina Vehec, 

Julianne Keman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sarvers and Omar Rozier 

Circulation Staff: Knstina Strojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer 

Wolbert, Jill Baumcratz and Josh Sachs 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 
Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: CALL@CLARiON.EDlj 

www.clarion.edu/thecall 



Edilor- in- Chihf 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee tibersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Beth^'ny Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 

The Clariu^ Cau< \s publisljcd trK«t 
Thursdays during the schoc^l year tn 
accordance v^«th the atadenuc catendar. 
B«.litor5 avxept tootritniHons froro all 
sources, h\x\ i-e&« ve Uie nglii to e<Jii for 
libel, giammar, punctufttkm, Icogth, 
aiid obswnily; the deierounutton of 
which \'> Uie respotuibility of die Eduor 
In Chief Opinjoos txpfessed io edito- 
riuis arc 'has*; of the ideotifiwl writer 
and do Hi- 1 necessarily reHeci the opin- 
iou.v ut i!'r -.ndtot bodv, IJuiversJty, or 
Cianon .-Hjmunity. Thv Executive 
Bo^ res'- '•- ' - the right fo refuse pub- 
licatjoo of ~ ., mtV«-nwtiofl. Letters to 
the Bdiior roust be received by 5:00 
p. in. oa the Monday of desired puWjca- 
tioa, Uitters o^ust be >igried a«d 
mcludc a phoac nttmber und ao 
address. If the auth<»^ wishes to have 
his/her identity withheld it tiujst be 
ooted OQ the ktter. When JcUtTs '41^ 
pubhsfaed is ibe dis<:a-ti<» of the la&Bi 
!0 Chief. Displa)' Advertising copy ieoA 
^t)ek artjdes are dtwM<3n4By 
jp^. the w«ek of pi 





Page 4 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 




OPINION 




Gerowl Hyde Park, from Page 3. 



While the boys rig the boat, 
Sarah wades along the water's 
edge. The boys approach the rig- 
ging relying on their sheer 
strength; they do not have the 
finesse that middle-aged men 
learn to use when strength begins 
to fade. 

I marvel at my children; they 
are so tall and straight and fair! I 
see them at the lake, but I also see 
them as toddlers playing in the 
tree shaded brook below the barn 
in a long ago, far away world. 

We are rewarded one lovely 



August afternoon by being 
allowed to see a bald eagle soar 
above the lake and dive into the 
water to catch a fish. 

It is a rare sight; and momentar- 
ily at least, the three children are 
silent in awe. They have wit- 
nessed one of nature's greatest 
sights. 

We have a history of special 
moments that must stand in for 
my long, unwanted absences. Our 
eagle afternoon is one more 
moment that binds us together as 
a family. 



September and my lake is begin- 
ning to take on its winter hue. 

The water is black and promises 
to be cold as summer fades away. 
The forests that surround the lake 
are beginning to show the first 
sign of color and gold, red and 
orange begin to push out the rich 
summer green. 

My special lake seems empty 
without the children, but I know 
this feeling well. For all these 
long years now, my personal sum- 
mer ends when the children leave. 
I may never get over this old 



Call On You 

Do you think President Bush will handle Tuesday's tragedy properly ? 

by: Graham Hemiaiiiis 







Maron 9(i(ine 

'EUmentary 'Ed., 

y^reshman 



1)ciMar iManucf 

'BioCogy/'Pu-^cd, 

Sophomore 



"That's my Bush." 




"I believe Pres. Bush 
will handle this prob- 
lem real well. I also 
think the situation will 
have a positive and 
sufficient outcome" 



Steer %ast[in ' (WrestCin'l 
junior 



"Oh yeah!" 



Jinanu, Sophomore 



■'Pres. Bush seems to think 
that someone needs to be 
held responsible for their 

actions and most 
Americans will back him 
, 100%." 



Do you want to 
appear in the 
Gallon You? 

Call Graham at 
393-2380. 




Jessica (DUonto 
Jinancc, Sopfiomore 



"I believe he'll be 
'Victorian'." 



litany. But still I sail. Time is of 
the essence, and it is always later 
than I think. 

Sailing this afternoon reminds 
me of a poem by Leonard Cohen 
called "The Kite". 

"The kite is a victim you can be 
sure of; It pulls gently enough to 
call you Master, strong enough to 
call you Fool." 

My sloop "Notorious" is a lot 
like Leonard Cohen's Kite. She 
lulls me into a near drowsy state 
as the wind barely moves across 
the water, and then she snaps me 
back to reality by catching the 
wind and racing across the lake, 
like the devil himself is after her. 

There are moments when I feel 
a mastery of wind and sail; and 
then there are moments when I am 
bound in awe to the mastery of the 
wind and sail. 

Just when I begin to feel a touch 
of pride and arrogance, the wind 
and the ship conspire to remind 
me that I am the interloper; and I 
am battered into humility before 
forces that I can barely compre- 



hend. 

Sometimes, Notorious and I 
drift, almost at random, waiting 
for the wind. And sometimes, I 
am able to set a heading and sail 
her exactly where I want her to 

go- 

And sometimes, sometimes, just 
like life itself, I find that I am 
going somewhere where the wind 
wants me to go. 

Sometimes, I am a very willing 
victim. Septmeber is more that 
half spent, and I know that the 
first frosty mornings are not long 
away. Winter, with all that it is 
and with all that it means, lies 
waiting somewhere just beyond 
tomorrow. 

Time is of the essence now, as it 
is, once again, later that I think. 1 
stole one more afternoon in the 
sun and the wind with the boat. 
Maybe, maybe, just maybe there 
will be one more voyage before 
winter closes in. 

John Gerow is a communication 
major. 



Every penny counts 



The Clarion Borough Fire from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 



Department, along with the 
Clarion University men and 
women Cross Country Teams are 
collecting donations -for the 
United Way to help restore our 
nation. 

Every penny counts so stop by 
at the Fire Department's stand 



28 (ALF Craft Day) at F ifth and 
Main street. 

The team also will be face paint- 
ing. 

Thank you for you help. 

Linda Bryce 



ConnersI Editorial, from Page 3. 



You are family to me and you 
know the lengths I would travel 
for you. 

Beginning to end you have seen 
things unfold, and you have 
helped me sort through the pieces. 
All I can truly say is you have my 
gratitude. 

I know this might seem a bit 
sappy and stupid, but in my eyes 



these people have done what they 
could, and more, to make sure I 
was all right. 

In the future, I hope somehow, 
someway, I can make this up to 
you or do the same for you. 
Tim Conner s is a Senior 
Communication Major and the 
Advertising Design Manager. 



N^^^^^nnww«*««^*V«*««*v««< 



Do wish to write a weelcly 

opinion column? 

Call Amy at 393-2380. 



iriiViiiYiiiiiViiriiTiViiVi 



I 



September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 5 




News 





Silent Walk 




Courtesy of Mary Beth Earnheardt 



The Clarion University community came together for a silent walk to remem- 
ber the victims and families of the Sept. 1 1 tragedy. This walk took place 
throughout the Clarion borough Friday, Sept. 14. 




Symbols of 
mourning 





Courtesy of Mary Beth Earnheardt 



Flying at half mast, the flags are a representa- 
tion of what our nation has endured since 
Sept. 11. 



Clarion University Honors Program expands 



by Martisse Macrl 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

President of Clarion 
University, Diane Reinhard 
said the Honors program will 
be doubled. She announced 
this during an open house 
held for the Clarion 
University community. 

Reinhard read an official 
proclamation to expand the 
program during the open 
house. The proclamation said: 
"Clarion University is 
proud of its tradition of acad- 
emic excellence, affirmed by 
the quality of the faculty and 
their teaching, scholarship, 
and creative contribution, and 
the quality of its students and 
their achievement. 

Clarion University has 



made significant investments 
in its Honors Program and 
wishes to strengthen its com- 
mitment to providing oppor- 
tunities for academically tal- 
ented students to enrich their 
education through honors 
courses and co-curricualr 
experiences." 

Established in 1986, the 
Honors Program's mission is 
"to provide an environment 
which challenges students to 
develop their talents, to 
extend their intellectual 
capacities, to expand their 
creative abilities, and to 
develop a lifelong respect and 
enthusiasm for learning." 

The program consists of 21- 
credit courses spread over 
four years. In the first two 



years, one Honors course is 
taken per semester, consisting 
of language skills, humani- 
ties, social sciences, natural 
sciences, and mathematics 
taking up 15 of the 21 credits. 

During their junior year, a 
mathematics course is taken 
giving the student an oppor- 
tunity to use the skills and 
knowledge attained in the 
first two years. The Senior 
Honors students, with help 
from the faculty in their 
department majors, design a 
project to be carried out in 
the following semester. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, director 
of the Honors Program, said, 
"The rational for program 
expansion is based on pro- 
grammatic achievements. 



This includes the quality of 
the faculty, quality of incom- 
ing students, resources avail- 
able, learning environment, 
curricula, and the satisfaction 
of the program's alumni with 
their educational experi- 
ence." 

Savage said several other 
events will be held by the 
Honors Program during this 
semester. 

They will sponsor two co- 
curricualr activities, one each 
semester. The topic for Fall 
2001 is "Clarion University 
in the 21st Century." Also 
there will be a three-part dis- 
cussion including the topics, 
"A Time to Change," "The 
Role and Function of 
Teaching," and "Technology, 



Governance, and 

Leadership." 

In Spring 2002, there will 
be a discussion on stem cell 
research headed by the biolo- 
gy department. 

There are currently 90 stu- 
dents enrolled in Clarion 
University's Honors Program. 
One hundred and twenty 
students have graduated from 
the program. For a freshman 
to enter the program, the 
qualifications are an SAT 
score of 1150 and a record of 
achievements and leadership 
in high school. 

Sophomore, junior, and 
senior honors students obtain 
a scholarship and maintain 
the scholarship as long as 
they remain in the program. 



INSIDE 

NEWS 



Student Senate 
sells symbols 

of 

rememberence 

for a week 

See Page 6. 



Thirteen faculty 

and 

staff members 

depart 

See Page 7. 



Parking 
and street 
guidelines 

outlined 
See Page 7. 



Clarion University 
to honor seven 

with 

Distinguished 

Awards 

See Page 8. 



1 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call 



September 20. 2001 



Student Senate 



Student Senate sells red, white, and blue ribbons 



by Michelle D'Uva 
Clarion Call Assistant News Editor 



Victims of the Attack on America were 
remembered during a moment of silence at 
the beginning of Monday evening's 
Student Senate meeting. Shortly after, 
Vice President Missy Gring explained that 

the red, white, and blue ribbons worn by passed by a 19-0-0 vote as well, 
each member of Senate would be available 



Treasurer Clopp moved to allocate $1,300 
from the Supplemental Account to the 
Bios Club. All motions carried by a 19-0- 
vote. 

In addition. Treasurer Clopp moved to 
allocate $5,868 from the Supplemental 
Reserve Account to Student Senate for the 
2001 National Conference; this motion 



$86,939.09; Large Item Capital the chairperson's spot. Students who are 
$43,738.13; Supplemental, $23,000; and interested may speak to either Senator 



Supplemental Reserve, $64,333.33. 

President Ben Chervenak announced the 
resignation of former-Senator Mike 
Brown and introduced Senator Nathan 
Trice, who has been elected to fill the 
void. 

According to Senator Tameka 



to all students throughout the week. 
Senate would like to collect $1 for each 
ribbon, which would be donated to a dis- 
aster relief fund for those who died in last 
week's tragedy. 

In addition, Mr. Tripp announced a 
Blood Drive on Tuesday, September 25; 
all students are encouraged to donate. 

In other business. Treasurer Tom Clopp 
presented five motions that passed 
through the Appropriations Committee 
last week. Four of the five motions dealt 
with budget requests from last year. The 
first motion was to allocate $5,550 from 
the Supplemental Account to the Black 
Student Union. Next, Treasurer Clopp 
moved to allocate $1,394 from the 
Supplemental Account to the Visual Arts 
Club. Another motion was to allocate 
$600 from the Supplemental Account to 
the Psychobiology Club. Finally, 



Treasurer Clopp reported the following Washington, there are three positions open 
amounts in each of the accounts: Capital, on the CSA Board of Directors, including 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Pictured above are members of Student Senate during ttieir meeting on 
Sept. 17, 2001. 



Washington or to Senator Tim Smith. 

On behalf of the Student Athletic 
Advisory Council, Vice President Gring 
reported the CU Football team defeated 
Tiffin University last Saturday. According 
to Vice President Gring, Family Day was a 
success, and there were many people pre- 
sent at the game. In addition, the first 
home soccer game is scheduled for 
Wednesday, September 19 at 4 p.m. 
Finally, the volleyball game from last 
week has been rescheduled for Thursday, 
September 20 against California 
University. 

Senator Jen Reis, chair of the Campus 
Safety, Health, & Environmental 
Concerns Committee, reported that she 
has met with Mr. Dave Tedjeske, Director 
of Public Safety. They are coordinating a 
Safety Walk through campus to detect any 
potentially harmful areas. 

Finally, Vice President Gring announced 
Senator Erika Pidro as Senator of the 
Week. Senator Pidro said, "I'm looking to 
improve any issues people have and to 
deal with them as quickly as possible to 
make this year a successful one." 

The next Student Senate meeting is 
Monday, September 24 at 7:30 p.m. in 246 




Open Forum held for Student Senate 
freshmen election 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect 
Douglas Rowell Jr 



Graham Hermanns /The Clarion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect Greg 
Clopp. 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect 
f\/laranda Hanpson. 




by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

Ed i to r 

An Open Forum for the 2001 
Student Senate Freshmen 
Elections was held Tuesday 
evening in Gemmell. The six can- 
didates were given two minutes 
each to present their platform 
speeches. Current members of 
Senate then offered questions to 
which any candidate could choose 
to take one minute and reply. 

Vice President Missy Gring 
began the question-answer ses- 
sion by asking candidates to 
expand on their views of leader- 
ship qualities. Maranda Hampson 
replied by stressing the impor- 
tance of being a strong leadeh She 



said, "People are only as good as 
the person they're following." 

Another question posed by 
Senator' Tameka Washington, 
dealt with any ideas these candi- 
dates have thought of in regard to 
necessary changes on campus. 
Greg Clopp said, "I think it's a 
better idea that the student body 
gets more involved with activities 
on and off campus." 

Many of the candidates recog- 
nized that members of Senate 
must be willing to lead the student 
body to a more comfortable envi- 
ronment. In addition to acting as 
individual leaders. Senator Mike 
McCabe pointed out that team- 
work is another important aspect 

See 'Open Forum' Page 8 



Graham Hermanns /The Garion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect 
Candi French. 



Graham Hermanns /The Clarion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect 
Keegan Baldauf. 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Frestiman senator elect Sara 
Snyder. 



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September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 7 



13 faculty and staff members depart from Clarion University 



by Khalia Robinson 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

After a combined 360-plus years 
of service, Clarion University 
bids farewell to 13 of its most 
familiar faces. Yet in putting the 
past behind us. we open doors to 
fresh faces and new ideas. 

In 1966 and 1968 respectfully, 
Janice Horn and Dr. George 
Curtis joined the payroll at 
Clarion University. Keeping up 
with the pace of ever-advancing 
technology can be a humbling 
task. And after 33 years of ser- 
vice, Horn proved that someone 
has to take the initiative, or be left 
behind in a sea of technical may- 
hem. Horn retired this year from 
her position as technical services 
area coordinator. 

Leaving behind his legacy as 
vice president for student affairs, 
Curtis had never been to 
Pennsylvania, let alone Clarion, 
when he took the position of 
director of housing. Scaling his 
way up to the top, Curtis became 
an associate dean, and eventually 
vice president. 

"My best memories are of the 
students I had the privilege to 
work with," says Curtis. 'This 
has been a marvelous experi- 
ence." 

Student Senate ultimately hon- 
ored Curtis by creating the Dr. 
George Curtis Hal Wassink 
Outstanding Service Award. Co- 
named for Mr. Hal Wassink, coor- 
dinator of student activities-emer- 



itus, the award is given annually 
to a staff or faculty member who 
has displayed outstanding service 
to students. 

The 70's brought in a slew of 
leaders to Clarion's campus. In 
1970, Dr. Ahmad Gamaluddin 
joined the department of library 
science. Since then, "Dr. G" as 
many affectionately call him, has 
served in many capacities; assis- 
tant professor, department chair 
and professor, and briefly as inter- 
im dean. Being a man known 
worldwide in the field of library 
science, Gamaluddin also proved 
to be an integral part of Clarion's 
campus by creating courses that 
formed the basis of what is now 
the graduate program in library 
science. 

Dr. John Reed, Dr. David 
Wright, and Dr. John Postlewait 
all came to Clarion in 1971. 

After .serving as an assistant pro- 
fessor of naval science at the 
University of Missouri, and as an 
instructor at the U.S. Naval 
Academy and American 
University, Reed, former profes- 
sor of administrative science, 
accepted a position with Clarion's 
College of Business 

Administration. Among other 
achievements. Vantage published 
Reed's book, "Elementary 
Investing: Stocks, Bonds, and 
Options" in 1984. 

Upon arriving, Wright thrust 
himself right into the throne as 
chair of the Speech 
Communication and Theater 



Gotta hot news tip? 

Coll Susan at 

393-2380. 



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Clarion 
The White House 

(Next to the firehall) 
Unique & Imaginative Items 

• Antiques and Collectables 

• Badge Holders 

• Amber and Sterling Jewerly 
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• Friendship Ball 

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Autumn Leaf Hours 

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Department. Wright taught vari- 
ous courses and included himself 
in many pertinent campus affairs- 
particularly in assisting with the 
implementation of APSCUF at 
Clarion University. Besides shar- 
ing himself with the people on 
Clarion's campus, Wright also 
branched out into the community, 
serving 20 years as state represen- 
tative for the 63rd District in 
Pennsylvania. 

Bringing continuous innova- 
tions to Clarion's campus, 
Postlewait, previous director of 
the university's Drug and Alcohol 
program, also became one of 
many faces to join Clarion's fam- 
ily in 1971. Over the years, 
Postlewait has served as the 
director of both Public Safety and 
the Drug and Alcohol program, 
and as advisor to the 
Interfraternity Council (IFC). 
Speaking of his many accom- 
plishments Postlewait said, "One 
of my student workers, David 
Connan has become the youngest 
to gain the rank of lieutenant in 
the Pennsylvania State police." 
Postlewait moves on to be an 
associate publisher at "TRAVEL- 
HOST" magazine in the 
Harrisburg area. 

In 1972 brought forth the arrival 
of Dr. Herbert BoUand, Chair of 
Counseling Services-Emeritus 
and Dr. Anne Day, former profes- 
sor of history. Not only did 
Holland serve his community by 
working with the Clarion County 
Mental Health Council, he also 



prompted the expansion of the 
counseling services department 
and helped strengthen the bond of 
many "human service" depart- 
ments on Clarion's campus (resi- 
dence life and career services). 

Day proved to be an asset U) the 
campus in a variety of different 
manners. Amongst numert)us 
accomplishments. Day was one of 
the originators of the "Making 
Connections" program for fresh- 
men, she was once Acting 
Affirmative Action Officer, and 
Day's intellectual documentation 
has been published appro.ximately 
ten times (including two text- 
books). One of Day's most presti- 
gious honors was receiving the 
Suzanne Brown Teaching Award. 

In 1974, Dr. William Campbell 
and in 1978, Mr. James Holden 
joined the Clarion University 
team. Campbell, a 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
certified Ci'A, served many years 
on the College of Business 
Administration's MBA study 
committee. Campbell was a long- 
standing treasurer of APSCUF 
and has been twice nominated for 
"Who's Who Among America's 
Teachers." 

Holden, known well at the 
Clarion and Venango campuses, 
has a long list of accomplish- 
ments attached to his name. 
Among these accomplishments 
are former department chair of 
the CIS department, co-founder 
of the wellness Advisory Board, 
president, vice president and trea- 



surer lor the PA Association of 
Computer and Information 
Science Educators, and Franklin 
Area Chamber of Commerce's 
1994 "Man of the Year" 

Dr. Timothy Wilson was the last 
of the retirees to join the Clarion 
team in 1987. Wilson, former pro- 
fessor of marketing, has taught 
many students internationally. 
During his time at Clarion, 
Wilson won a Senior Fullbright 
Award to lecture at the Technical 
University of Civil Engineering 
in Bucharest, Romania. In 1996- 
97, Wilson served as editor of the 
"Pennsylvania Journal of 
Business and Economics," and 
has published over 130 vocation- 
al articles during his career. 

Recently, the department of stu- 
dent affairs and the department of 
university advancement com- 
bined. Since Curtis retired. 
President Diane Reinhard 
appointed Mr. Harry Tripp to the 
new position of vice president of 
the new division of Student and 
University Affairs. Tripp has bla- 
tantly demonstrated his ability to 
lead others through his various 
leadership positions at Clarion 
and other universities. Tripp 
helped Clarion raise over $11.4 
million for its first extensive cam- 
paign, "Investing in Futures." 
Tripp has appointed Carol Roth as 
assistant vice president of 
advancement and planning and 
Mr. Ron Wilshire as assistant vice 
president of advancement and 
university relations. 



Autumn Leaf Festival parking and street guidelines 



by Nancy Boyer 
Contributing Writer 



Witli the kickotf of the Clarion 
Community's Autumn Leaf Festival 
just a few days away, the Clarion 
Borough Police Department has pro- 
vided some parking and street guide- 
lines for the festivities. 

During the ALE carnival. Main 
Street between Fourth and Eifth 
Avenues will be closed to traffic dur- 
ing the hours of 5:30 p.m. to 11:30 
p.m. each evening. The following 
streets will be closed from Sept. 22- 
30: 

Jefferson Place between Wood 
Street and Madison Road 

Madison Road between Fourth and 
Fifth Avenues 

Grant Street between Jefferson Place 
and Eiftli Avenue 

The ALE Autorama will take place 
Sunday, Sept. 23. Handicap parking 
for Autorama will be available on S. 
Eifth Avenue between WlxxI Street 



and Merle Road, and on Seventh 
Avenue between Wood Street and 
Merle Road. Parking along Eighth 
Avenue will be prohibited. 

Oi Friday, Sept. 28, the streets of 
Clarion will be filled with handiwork 
and art as the Farmers and Crafter's 
Day takes place. Between 5 a.m. and 
7 p.m. parking will be prohibited on 
these streets: 

Main Street bet^^'een Second Avenue 
and Eighth Avenue 
The entire length of Eighth Avenue 
Handicap parking is designated tc^ 
Fifth Avenue between Wtxxl Street 
and Main Street and Main Street 
between Second and Third Avenue. 

The culminating event of the 
Autumn Leaf Festival is the parade 
which will take place Saturday, Sept. 
28. The parade route consists of the 
following streets, which will be 
bkx-ked off from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: 

Main Street between First and 
Eighth Avenue 



S. Second Avenue between Main 
Street and the borough line. 
W(xxl Street at Second Avenue 
South Street at Second Avenue 
Handicap parking is available on 
Fourth Avenue between Merle Road 
and Madison Road, as well as Fifth 
Avenue between Wax! Street and 
Main Street. 

Liberty Street, normally a one way 
street, will be converted to a two-way 
street on parade day, running be^veen 
First and Eighth Avenue. This conver- 
sion will take place at approximately 
1 1 a.m. No parking will be permitted 
on Liberty Street diat day. 

Additionally, police are requesting 
that ALF patn)ns be considerate about 
where they park their vehicles. The 
department receives calls each year 
about vehicles parked on private prop- 
erty without the owners consent. 
Remember, home owners have the 
right to have people fined and towed 
off' their property at theu" expense. 



Page 8 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 



September 20. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 9 



Open ForumI Freshmen senators elect voice ideas, from Page 6. 



of Student Senate. Candace French said, 
"Working together is a system of checks 
and balances so if one person doesn't have 
the time to get something done, then anoth- 
er person can pick up after him or her." 

President Ben Chervenak asked candi- 
dates to describe a situation in which they 
were faced with some type of conflict and 
to explain how they dealt with their issue. 
Douglas Rowell, Jr. explained that when he 
is faced with a conflict, he is driven to 
work harder. He said, "If I see something 
and 1 know I can have an effect on it, I'll 
affect it the best way I can." 

President Chervenak and Senator Tim 
Smith both asked questions regarding time 
management and involvement in other stu- 



dent organizations. Most candidates were 
confident that they could handle Student 
Senate by prioritizing their activities and 
eliminating unnecessary parts of their rou- 
tmes. Keegan Baldauf said he does not 
foresee any problems in this respect; he 
currently has a lot of free time in which he 
has been looking for things to do. 

Another question President Chervenak 
raised dealt with how the potential senators 
would promote their voices to the rest of 
the university. Many candidates mentioned 
trying to get involved as much as possible 
with others on campus. Sarah Snyder also 
said she feels it is important to set a good 
example and to earn the respect of others. 
President Chervenak concluded the Open 



Forum by explaining how Senate can be 
very demanding at times, but the hard work 
is worth the effort. He encouraged all can- 
didates to promote themselves throughout 
the rest of the week. Elections are sched- 
uled for Wednesday, September 19 at 
Chandler Dining Hall beginning at II a.m. 
and Thursday, September 20 in the main 
lobby of Gemmell from 1 1 a.m. until 4 p.m. 
Although there are only two open seats 
for the 2001-2002 academic year. Senator 
Washington and Senator Smith invited all 
six candidates to stay involved by joining 
some of the sub-committees of Student 
Senate. 

In addition. Parliamentarian Wendy 
Kengor said, "I wish we had six open spots 



because all of the candidates would repre- 
sent Senate extremely well. I hope this 
does not deter them from running in the 
future." 

The Open Forum concluded with each 
candidate standing up to thank Senate for 
the opportunity to speak out and present 
their platforms. Overall, Treasurer Tom 
Clopp was pleased with the evening's 
events. He said, "I am impressed with the 
turnout-six freshmen for two positions. At 
regular elections, there were only 40 stu- 
dents for 20 positions." 

Every member of the Clarion University 
student body is encouraged to cast a vote 
this week for the two open spots on Student 
Senate. 



Clarion University honors seven "Distinguished Award" recipients 



by Kelly Drevitch 
C jarion Call Staff Writer 

The Clarion Alumni Association 
will present "distinguished awards 
to seven people at the Fourth 
Annual Alumni Association 
Distinguished Awards Banquet. 
The award-winners include: Lois 
Albrecht (1952), Distinguished 
Achievement; Lawrence Cirka 
(1973), Distinguished Alumni; Dr. 
Anne Day, professor of history. 
Distinguished Faculty; Dr. Marlin 
Hartman (1959), Distinguished 
Service; Pete Mervosh (1953), 
Distinguished Volunteer; Joanne 
Vavrek, Distinguished Volunteer; 
and Melachy McMahon (1972) 
who received the Venango 
Campus Distinguished Alumni 
Award duriag Commencements in 
May. 

The banquet, Sept. 28, in 
Chandler Dining Hall, adds to the 
list of 2(X)1 homecoming activi- 
ties. The festivities start at 5:30 
p.m. with a reception and dinner 
at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. For 
questions or reservations, call 
Linda Homer at 393-2637. 

All seven of these award 
receivers excelled and succeeded 
and their hard work will receive 
recognition for that. 

Albrecht chaired the committee 
at the State Library of 
Pennsylvania, which designed the 
Access Pennsylvania program. 
The Access Program permits 
Pennsylvania residents to borrow 
from any library in the common- 
wealth. 

When Albrecht first came to the 
State Library of Pennsylvania, 
now called Commonwealth 
Libraries, she held the oosition of 
a consultant. In thai position she 
helped institut'onali/e public 
libranes in 'planning, continuing 



education, administration, pro- 
gramming of library services, 
development ^nd evaluation of 
LSCA grant proposal, resource 
sharing, inter-library cooperation, 
trustee responsibilities, and work- 
ing with the Friends Group. Later, 
she was promoted as coordinator 
of advisory services for the 
Pennsylvania State Libraries. 

Albrecht took charge of initia- 
tion, planning leadership and 
direction of all programs of 
library development. She also 
made an impact to start the annual 
library day and worked on the first 
Governor's Conference Day and 
Information Services. 

Now, Albrecht is the President 
and Chief Consultant for 
Greensburg's Foresight Inc. 

Albrecht graduated from Clarion 
with a degree in library science 
and mathematics. She furthered 
her education at the University of 
Pittsburgh, receiving her Master's 
Degree and did additional work at 
the University of Maryland. 

Albrecht attributes her success in 
her career to her family and hus- 
band. 

Cirka, who worked in a nursing 
home while attending Clarion, 
graduated with a degree in busi- 
ness administration. At this time, 
he also qualified for the State 
Board test to be a licensed health 
care administrator. He passed and 
landed his first job in operations 
of a health care facility in Warren. 
Ironically, Cirka only came to 
Clarion to play football. 

Cirka changed jobs to American 
Medical Affiliates in Clearfield. In 
the next 12 ears, he worked there, 
in Pittsburgh. Florida, and 
Spokane, Washington. In 1987, he 
joined the newly started 
Integrated Health of Baltimore. In 
1998, he retired as the CEO and 



President. 

Soon Cirka left retirement and 
started his own company, 
ULTRABRIDGE, an information 
technology and date solution for 
long term care and assisted living 
industries. He is the CEO and 
President. 

Day has taught history at Clarion 
since 1972. She plans to retire this 
semester. Day always loved histo- 
ry and enjoys helping future 
teachers with proper teaching in 
her classroom. 

Her first attempt to help students 
was the Project Flourish; a 
Clarion program designed to teach 
faculty to assist with the freshmen 
year experience. Day's two major 
teaching points include helping 
students understand history and 
relating it to today's world. In her 
popular, "History in Headlines," 
she teaches how today's current 
affairs happen because of yester- 
day's history. 

She also helped found and con- 
tinues to help with the Making 
Connections Program, which was 
designed for freshmen level stu- 
dents. 

Day earned her B.A. in history 
from Emmanuel College, a M.Ed, 
from Salem State College, and a 
Ph.D. in history from St. Louis 
University. 

Day began her teaching career at 
Memorial Junior High, in 
Beverly, MA and her first college 
level course at University of 
Hartford. She also taught at the 
University of Connecticut, St. 
Joseph College, Sacred Heart 
University, and Niagara 
University. 

Last spring. Day also received 
the state-wide Suzanne Brown 
Excellence in Teaching. 

Hartman feels Clarion 
University helped him to succeed, 



he tries to reciprocate back to the 
school. 

Hartman graduated in 1959 with 
a mathematics degree and contin- 
ued with his Master's and Ph.D. at 
the University of Pittsburgh. He 
landed his first teaching job at 
Apollo School District. He then 
taught at Gateway in Monroeville, 
as a secondary mathematics 
supervisor, teacher, and coached 
baseball. He led his team in his 
final year to the WPIAL title 
match, where they lost 4-2. 

In 1967, he joined Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania's 
mathematics department. He 
stayed there for 25 years, includ- 
ing six as the assistant department 
chair. He retired in 1 99 1. 

In 1994, he joined the Alumni 
Association Board of Directors. 
He served six years, two years as 
president (1997-99). He also acted 
as the Alumni Board 
Representative to the Clarion 
University Foundation for two 
years. 

Even after leaving the board in 
2000, he still continued to help 
Clarion. He and his wife, Cleva 
(1959), established the Marlin and 
Cleva Harman Scholarship at 
CUP. The scholarship is for a 
child of an U.S. veteran. 

After graduating, Mervosh sp^nt 
two years in the U.S. Army. In 
1955, he began his teaching career 
in the Penn Hills School District. 
Fourteen years later, Clarion hired 
him as an assistant director of 
admissions. 

In 197 Lhejoined the Highlands 
School District and finally retired 
in 1992. 

Mervosh also helped organize 
one of Clarion's semi-annual 
alumni gatherings. 

Vavrek, a graduate of Carnegie 
Mellon University has accom- 



plished so much in her time at 
Clarion. In 1971, she moved here 
with her husband. Dr. Bernard 
Vavrek, a chair of Clarion's 
library science department. 
Vavrek will co-chair the 2002 
Spring for Scholars Auction. For 
the last two years, she has served 
on this committee. 

Recently, Vavrek was selected to 
the board of Sawmill Center for 
Fine Arts. She was also elected on 
the Clarion Free Library Board, 
vice-president of Clarion Borough 
Council, member of the 
Governor's Advisory Council, 
and served as a committee mem- 
ber to help Clarion's Judge Jim 
Arner. 

In the past 20-plus years, Vavrek 
held the President's position of the 
Clarion Free Library, Clarion 
Library System Board, Clarion 
District Library, Clarion County 
Historical Society, and the Clarion 
University Sanford Gallery 
Board. The Clarion Chamber of 
Commerce also honored Vavrek 
as "1986 Chamber Citizen of the 
Year." 

After graduating in 1972 with a 
B.A. in Social Studies, McMahon 
started working at Nationwide 
Insurance in Oil City. He gained 
his Pennsylvania real estate 
license and Insurance Broker's 
license. He is also the owner and 
operator of Nationwide's Oil City 
office. 

In 1988, he was elected and 
served two terms on the Oil City 
Council. In 1996, he was elected 
as Oil City mayor and received re- 
election in 2000. 

During 1992-1998, he .served on 
the Clarion University Alumni 
Board of Directors. He also voIuq- 
teered for many years in tundrais- 
ing for the Clarion Alumni 
Venango Campus Fund. 



I 




Lifestyles 




Autumn Leaf Festival is here again 



by Keith GwtUim 
Clarion Call Liffstyjfs. Editor 

So what makes going to col- 
lege in Clarion worthwhile? 
The quality of education? The 
wonderful and personable fac- 
ulty? The quaint atmosphere 
of the town? Wal-Mart? Try 
again - it's the annual Autumn 
Leaf Festival! 

This year's theme is 
"Clarion: The Pinnacle of 
Success." The week-long fes- 
tival is the highlight of activi- 
ty in our little collegiate ham- 
let, and it's here again this 
year, bigger and better than 



long, and many of them are 
among ALF's most treasured 
events. Airplane rides will be 
at the Clarion County airport. 
To schedule a ride, or to find 
more information about times, 
call 226-9993. 

The Clarion County Arts 
Council 43rd Annual Art Show 
and Sale will be at the Main 
Street Senior Center. The 
show runs from September 22 
to the 30th. 

The ALE Carnival will run 
from Sunday the 23rd to the 
following Sunday. 

The Clarion Model Railroad 
Club will have a miniature 



The many different varieties 
of food will set up in 
Memorial Park all week. Go 
stuff your face all week long; 
but don't blame anyone else 
for your heartburn. 

Now, here is a list of events 
separated by day. 

On Friday, September 21, 
the Holiday Inn will host the 
ALF "Kick-Off dance. For 
info, call 226-8850. 

On Saturday, September 22, 
the Miss Junior Teen ALF 
Pageant and Miss Teen Alf 
Pageant, long mainstays of the 
ALF experience, will be held 



at the Clarion Area High 
School Auditorium. The 
Pageants will start at 7:30 
p.m. You can purchase tickets 
at the Clarion Area Chamber 
of Business and Industry for 
$10. 

Saturday also brings us the 
Junior Olympics at the CUP 
Stadium, which start at 1 p.m., 
and the Craft Show, to be held 
in the Wal-Mart parking lot 
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

On Sunday, the 23rd, the 
S&T Bank Autorama will 
occur on Main Street from 4th 
to 8th Avenue. Streets will be 



closed to traffic from 7 a.m. to 
4:45 p.m. The Autorama is 
sure to please any car enthusi- 
ast you know. The 
Immaculate Conception 
School will host the Bountiful 
Bake Sale on Sunday, as well 
as line dancing in front of the 
Courthouse, starting at 6 p.m. 
Monday, September 24 
brings Clarion businesses out 
to you! The Mall Out on the 
Bricks Sidewalk Sales will be 
held from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
There will also be sidewalk 
sales on Tuesday. Clarion 




Whe 




See 'ALF,' Page 10 



rion? 



ever. With events of all kinds railroad display in the back of 

happening throughout next the Clarion Masonic Lodge 

week, ALF promises to be a Building on Main Street, 

fun-filled time for all. Times for the display vary 

"So what exactly goes on at throughout the week. Call 

ALF," you might be asking. 226-0699 or 223-9719 for 




Well, here is a schedule of 
everything you need to know 
about to maximize your 
week's pleasure. 

Several events last all week 



details. 

Concessions, which is the 
highlight of ALF for many 
people, will once again open 
up shop in Clarion as well. 



Photo by Graham Hermanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 



www.theclarioncall.com * 



Inside 

LIFE 



Street Beats got the 

crowd involved with 

their performance last 

week. To see details 

about the show. 

See Page 12. 



The Rondelles make 

straight-up punk-pop 

sound fresh again. To 

read all about their 

brand of punk, 

See Page 11. 



WCUCisbackupfor 

all of your 

listening needs. 

To find out about their 

schedule. 

See Page 11. 



Calendar of Events. 
Tofindoutwhafs 
going on at Qarion 
University and the sur- 
rounding community. 
See Page 10. 




Page 10 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 



C a 1 en 




ents 



g i tgiaaagiaEEiBMBiaBeaajB^^ 



13 



Thursday, September 20 

•No events scheduled 
Friday, September 21 

UAB Spirit Day 

Volleyball at Millersville Invitational 
•W.Soccer Clarion Tournament 
•Admissions Visit Day (248 Gem) 9 am 
Saturday, September 22 
•Football at Shippensburg 1 pm 
•Volleyball at 
Millersville 
Invitational 
•W. Soccer Clarion 
Tournament 
•Cross Country at 
Slippery Rock 

PPST/PLT/Specialty 
Area Exam/Subject 
Assessments 7:30 am 

5:30 pm 
•Soccer vs. 
Bridgeport 2 pm 
•Saturday Service 
Plunge (250 Gem) 8 
am - 3 pm 
Sunday, 
September 23 
•W. Soccer Clarion 
Tournament 

ALF WEEK 
•Autorama (Main Street) 12-5 pm 

Vocal Chamber Concert (Chap) 3 pm 




Monday, September 24 

•ALF WEEK 

•Hal Hansen Memorial Golf Inv. 

•Faculty Senate Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 3:30 pm 

•Freshman Advising Week begins 

•IM entries due in Rec Center (Power Lifting) 

•UAB Student Leader Series "Massage/Stress Management" 

(250/252 Gem) 4 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 

Gem) 7:30 pm 

•Professional Development 

Series "Getting A Job - An 

Employer's Perspective" 

(250/252 Gem) 5:30 pm 

Tuesday, September 25 

•UAB Block Party (outside 

Gem) 3-6 pm 

•Volleyball at Slippery 

Rock 7 pm 

•W. Soccer at California 4 

pm 

•ALF WEEK 

•Hal Hansen Memorial 

Golf Inv. 

•IM entries due in Rec 

Center (Indoor Soccer) 

•UAB Scavenger Hunt (outside Gem) 5 pm 

•Bloodmobile (Tip) 11 am - 5 pm 

Wednesday, September 26 

•ALF WEEK 

•Sidewalk Sales (Main Street) 

•UAB HC Lobby Judging 8 pm 




raiaii3B3ri3B3iaii3r aiBiaBiB|giBiaaiBi§^^ 



ALFI A schedule of events for this year's Autumn Leaf Festival, from Page 9. 



University's Cultural Night ers will bring a plethora of 

begins on Monday, in front of cultural activities, programs 

the Courthouse, from 6:30 to and shows to Clarion. 

9:30 p.m. A host of perform- Cultural Night lasts through 



$100 

Sign-on 

Bonus 

DONT MISS OUT 

Earning Potential o 

$9 ' $ 1 1 Per hour 

PLUS 

-Unlimited daily bonus 

Day and Evening shifts available 

-Excellent Benefits 

-Paid Professional Training 

Check c)uf ouY tlyer in today's paper 

and call us ior an interview at 

814'077'0018 

1800^365']500ext.684 



the remainder of ALF. For 
more information, call 393- 
2109. 

On Tuesday, September 25, 
the Kiddies Parade will be 
held. Line-up begins at 5:30 
p.m. in the parking lot behind 
National City Bank. The 
parade begins at 6 p.m. 

On Wednesday, September 
26, the Clarion Mall will host 
the Fall Craft Show. There 
will be fire truck rides from 5 
p.m. to dusk at the Clarion 
Fire and Hose Company, No. 
1. Holiday Inn will have a 
karaoke night from 9 to i 1 
p.m., in front of the 
Courthouse. 

Thursday. September 27 will 
bring us the 3rd annual 
Foodstock food drive, from 5 
p.m. to 11 p.m. on 5th and 
Main. You can bring non-per- 
ishable food items here to help 
try and break the Guinness 
World Record that was set two 
years ago! 



Friday, September 28, 
Foodstock will continue, as 
well as the Christian Fun Fest, 
in the Gazebo from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. 

Saturday, September 29, is 
when the climax of ALF will 
happen - the ALF Parade! The 
Parade will run all along Main 
Street, starting at 12 noon. 
After the Parade, Clarion 
Homecoming football game 
will be held at the CUP 
Memorial Stadium, versus 
Kutztown at 2 p.m. 

If you have any questions 
about any of the week's 
events, you can contact the 
Clarion Area Chamber of 
Business and Industry at 
(814)226-9161. The Chamber 
is located on 41 South 5th 
Avenue in Clarion PA. 

So, as you can see, there is 
something for everyone to do 
at this year's Autumn Leaf- 
Festival. Go experience a 
taste of Clarion culture! 




iljl^ 

Irainiil^'ii 




j October 2nd. 
Training will be 
Svery Tuesday, 
jihurdsay and 
Saturday. The 
cost Is free to 
all. 

Call 226-7273 

• for additional 

information. 



September 20. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 11 



I 



Music Review 



The Rondelles don't want to grow up 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call L>/f.^W?.E*!iVi^ 

ARTIST/ALBUM: The 
Rondelles - Shined Nickels And 
Loose Change 

FOR FANS OF: New wave 
influenced punk-pop. 

FOR FURTHER LISTENING: 
Elvis Costello's This Years Model, 
the Buzzcocks' Singles Going 
Steady. 

Early this summer, I went to a 
record-release show for Pittsburgh 
punk icons Anti-Flag. My friends 
and I were mainly interested in 
seeing Snapcase, who was open- 
ing, but we figured "The Flag" 
would be a good primer for the 
upcoming Warped Tour. 

That show was the first time I 
felt I was getting older. The medi- 
an age of the gathered crowd had 
to have been about 16. My one 
friend, who was sporting a Sick 
Of It All shirt, was approached by 
a pimply-faced young'un. "Dude, 
who is that?" he asked. Our entire 
group groaned inwardly. I prayed 
to Joey Ramone's ghost that he 
wouldn't ask me what that 
"London Calling" slogan on my 
shirt meant. After schooling the 
the kid with a brief history lesson, 
he replied, "Well, they're no 
Blink." 

At that, my group retreated to 
the bar, where we sat with the 
bewildered-looking parents that 
had driven their teenagers to the 
club. It was that show that made 
me give up punk for the next few 
months. "I'm too old for this," I 
thought. "I should be listening to 
more mature music... now where 



did I leave that Godspeed You 
Black Emperor! album?" 

Now comes the Rondelles. I 
won't go as far as to say that 
they've sparked a punk renais- 
sance with me, but I will say that 
my Living End albums have 
received more rotation than they 
usually do as of late. 

Shined Nickels and Loose 



The Rondelles seem to practice 
Calvin Johnson's creed of 
"unlearn your instruments" to a 
certain point; pounding out spiky 
two-chord keyboard lines and 
standard punk-pop guitar riffs 
over bare-bones percussion. 
What they lack in instrumental 
prowess is more than made up for 
with a genuine enthusiasm, sharp 




Change, the Rondelles' debut 
platter, is about as indie as you 
wanna get. They're on K 
Records, for one; the album 
sounds like it was recorded in a 
back alley on a Fisher Price tape 
recorder, and the album is filled to 
the brim with tuneful, catchier- 
than-the-flu ditties about teenage 
love, sex and pop culture. 



wit, and even sharper songwrit- 
ing. 

Each song is attacked with reck- 
less abandon; the band sometimes 
barely finding its groove, and 
threatening to rattle themselves 
out of it when they do. Songs 
such as "Strike-Out" build from 
simplistic shout-out rockers to 
glorious new wave tributes with 



three-part harmonizing, all in 
under three minutes, to boot. 

Indeed, brevity is a tool that the 
Rondelles understand the power 
of. The album's 14 tracks rush by 
with lightning speed, many of the 
tracks never even reaching two- 
minute maturity. This is a lesson 
learned from albums such as 
Wire's Pink Flag and Elastica's 
debut (two albums that are touch- 
stones for Shined Nickels... 's 
sound). The Rondelles launch 
themselves full-force into each 
song, stumble not-so-blindly into 
a climax, and pull out just as fast 
as they came. 

Even with Shined Nickels.. .'s 
truncated running time, this would 
get old if not for the group's two 
aces in the hole: lead singer Juliet 
Swango and mini-organist Oakley 
Munson. It's no accident that 
Swango has perfected a sexy girl- 
next-door styled shout/croon 
(only the sort of girl that secretly 
pours over her Pixies records), 
infusing even the weaker tracks 
with enough personality to keep 
them interesting. Their cover of 
"Angels We've Heard On High" 
begins with a voice informing you 
that "up next is the Rondelles," as 
if you'd forgotten. Fat chance of 
that. 

Oakley Munson's organ makes 
like Ray Manzarek weened on the 
Buzzcocks, sometimes irritable 
and stinging, and other times 
playful and bouncy, providing the 
tracks with a much-needed 
dynamic. 

Lyrically, the album is filled 
with words that could have come 
straight out of a teenager's diary; 



the sort of sentiments that kids 
like Blink-Boy would memorize 
and snicker at with their friends, 
yet mature enough to make old 
curmudgeons like me nostalgic 
for their not-too-far-removed high 
school years. 

"Cafeteria Rock" comes on like 
an anthem, with its repeated cho- 
rus of "Food fight! Food fight!" 
and others such as "TV Zombie" 
are doe-eyed declarations of dead- 
end puppy love. As Swango sings 
in "Backstabber," "You bought 

me bottled soda pop picked me 

up right after your classes." For 
those not content in just reliving 
their prom night, there are deeper 
emotions to be found, such as the 
jealous frustration of "Six 
O'clock." 

Highlights of Shined Nickels... 
include an irony-free cover of 
Madonna's "Like A Prayer," the 
bitter "Backstabber," and the 
sinewy "Safety In Numbers." The 
only track where the Rondelles 
completely loose their footing is 
the album's closer, "Fort 
Siirrounded," which seems to be 
an attempt to flex their shoegazing 
muscle. It's messy, misguided 
and sticks out like a sore thumb. 
Calvin Johnson's lesson does 
NOT apply in that complex, intri- 
cate genre. 

Shined Nickels and Loose 
Change isn't going to spark a 
musical revolution (or even a 
punk/new wave revival), and 
probably won't even end up on 
many year-end best-of lists. ..but 
damn - is it fun. Disconnect your 
brain and just go with it. 3 1/2 out 
of 5 stars. 



WCUC resumes programming 



story courtesy of 
WCUC 



WCUC, 91.7 FM is available 
for its listeners once again. 



There has been a slight change 
in the weekday daytime format, 
which was originally Top 40. 
WCUC has switched to "Hot 
Adult Contemporary,' which 




will suit a more mature audi- 
ence. 

Weeknights, the station is pri- 
marily unchanged. Classic 
rock, alternative, and new rock 
will still be available; urban 
and hip-hop will be available 
too. The weekends will still 
have country, along with some 
rock, and open requests at 393- 
2514. 

WCUC also now features spe- 
cialty programs, which include 
a reggae program, techno- 
dance, and a rock show that 
spans from the 1960s to 2001. 




Page 12 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 



Dave Barry's 'Big Blue Bear' adventures 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Writer 



You will die of jealousy when I tell 
you who I recently saw live in concert: 
The Bear in the Big Blue House. 

For those of you who do not have 
small children, let me explain that The 
Bear in the Big Blue House is a major 
morning- TV star. I'd go so far as to say 
that, with his talent, some day he could 
be as big as Elmo. We watch his show 
every morning while we're feeding our 
17-month-old daughter, Sophie, her 
breakfast, by which I mean picking her 
food off the floor and checking to see if 
it's still clean enough to eat. 

I like the Bear's show because it 
meets the single most important artistic 
criterion for children's TV: It is not 
Barney. I hate Barney, because he is a 
large annoying purple wad of cuteness, 
and his songs are lame, and some of the 
"children" on the show appear to be in 
their mid-20s. They are definitely too 
old to skip, and yet they skip every- 
where. They must have a mandatory 
skipping clause in their contracts, 
because it is their only mode of trans- 
port. If they were in a burning build- 
ing, they would skip to the exits. 1 sus- 
pect that when they finish taping the 
Barney show, they skip behind the stu- 
dio and drink gin. 

On The Bear in the Big Blue House, 
there are no children, only animals, the 
main one being the bear, which I 



assume is a guy wearing a bear suit, 
although it moves in a realistic manner, 
so it could be an actual bear wearing a 
bear suit. The bear has various animal 
friends, which are played by people's 
hands inside puppets. (DISCUSSION 




QUESTION: Do the hands wear the 
puppets when they rehearse? Or is the 
rehearsal just a bunch of naked hands 
talking to each other.') 

Anyway, one morning we were read- 
ing the newspaper and picking 
Sophie's food off the floor, and sud- 
denly my wife said: "The Bear is going 
to give a live concert in Miami!" 



"The Bear in the BIG BLUE 
HOUSE??" I said. 

"Yes!" she said, and we both became 
more excited than when the Berlin Wall 
fell. This gives you an idea how pathet- 
ic it is to be the parent of a small child. 

Of course we got tickets to the show, 
which was also attended by, at a con- 
servative estimate, every small child in 
the western hemisphere. There has 
probably never been an event where 
more audience members were wearing 
diapers, other than a Tom Jones con- 
cert. 

The bear's show was excellent by any 
artistic standard, except the standard of 
being able to actually hear it. That was 
because at any given moment, at least a 
third of the audience was crying. 
Fortunately, Sophie was in a good 
mood: She stood on our laps for the 
whole show, clapping and shouting 
"Yayyyy!" in response to everything 
that happened, including the announce- 
ment that flash photographs were pro- 
hibited. 

Despite the audience noise level, it 
was possible, if you listened hard, to 
follow the program. It opened with one 
of the bear's hit songs: "What's That 
Smell?" 

"Hey!" I shouted to my wife. He's 
singing 'What's That Smell?!'" We 
sang along, as did many other parents. 
Meanwhile, all. over the theater, young- 
sters responded to the song by shout- 



ing, shrieking, falling down, running 
away, crying, babbling, rolling on the 
floor, sleeping, gurgling, burping and 
going to the bathroom. At the end of 
the song, Sophie clapped her hands and 
went "Yayyyy!" This was the basic 
procedure for all the rest of the songs. 
During the intermission, vendors 
came into the theater to sell — I swear 
— helium balloons. Many children got 
them, which meant that the audience, 
in addition to not being able to hear, 
could not see. Nevertheless, we parents 
continued to sing along to such hit 
songs as "Magic in the Kitchen," "The 
Bear Cha Cha Cha" and my personal 
favorite, "Otter Love Rap," a hip-hop 
style of song that explores the too- 
often-ignored topic of otters who love, 
and the otters who love them. I don't 
mind saying that I was "getting down" 
to that particular song, and so was 
Sophie, to judge, from her comment 
when it ended ("Yayyyy!"). 

It was a fine father-daughter moment, 
made only slightly bittersweet by the 
knowledge that, soon enough, Sophie 
will want to go to concerts by some 
synthetic prefabricated soul-free "boy 
band." She'll want me to drop her off 
out front of the concert and then disap- 
pear, lest I embarrass her in front of her 
friends by the mere fact o\' my exis- 
tence. But for now, for a little while. 
I'm as cool as anybody she knows. 
Yayyyy. 



Martin Luther King Jr. Series opens with Street Beats 



by Becky Borgony 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Martin Luther King Jr. speaker series kicked 
off this year with its opening presentation of "Street 
Beats" at Hart Chapel last Tuesday night. This per- 
formance tied in with the series theme of "Leadership 
and Achievement Through Diversity" that the organi- 
zation has chosen. The performance featured a band 
of five talented young men from New York City, 
including Dennis J. Dove, Travius J. Sharpe, Darrell 




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Photo by Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



The per-formers of Street Beats jam onstage. 



Dove Jr., David Dove and Jared "Choqiatte" 
Crawford. 

The show featured a wide variety of music through- 
out the performance including latin, jazz and hip- 
hop. In addition to the instrumental performances, 
they also featured comical skits as well as singing 
and dancing. Crowd participation was a must, as the 
band brought the audience to their feet time and time 
again. 

Doug Girvan, one of the Martin Luther King com- 
mittee sponsors, described the atmosphere and the 
way the crowd reacted towards the group as "infec- 
tious." 

"Street Beats" also featured a sequence where they 
performed on buckets to demonstrate to the audience 
what it is like to be in New York City and experience 
the music of the streets. A featured song in the per- 
formance, "Afrofunk," which mixed music tempos 
and beats from African and funk music varieties 
demonstrated to the audience how native African 
music is influencing modern music. 

The opening moments of the show began with a 
comical act which lead into a mix of modern hip-hop 
music including a song from the late Notorious 
B.I.G. The music in the performance changed tem- 
pos from being music that was pre-recorded to 
becoming instrumental music played by the band. 



Darrell Dove said, "I always like to have crowd 
participation." Whether it was dancing in the seats, 
singing or cheering, the crowd both influenced and 
became involved in the show. Each show that the 
group performs is different from that of the previous 
night. 

Show variety depends on the time allotted and how 
the crowd reacts to the performance. "Street Beats" 
did not highlight the amount of crowd participation it 
usually emphasizes in its show, which would allow 
the audience to join the group on stage to perform 
and express their talents. 

Members of the band have numerous performing 
experience and have been featured in a number of 
films, commercials, music tours as well as musicals, 
including the original cast of Broadway's "Bring In 
Da Noise, Bring In Da Funk." 

"Choqiatte" also went on tour with Lauryn Hill and 
is currently working on his off-Broadway production 
of "Keep Banging," which is set to go out and tour 
the country soon. He also hopes to have his new 
album, which is untitled at the moment, to be out 
shortly as well. 

The talent, enthusiasm and love for music was evi- 
dent in this performance of "Street Beats." The large 
crowd that gathered in Hart Chapel that night was 
treated to a little piece of New York culture. 



September 20. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 13 




Entertainment 







■•,«•' mnr^rA ATlt ram MU> 



"OK, this time I'll pretend to be John Stockton. 

Billy will be Shaq, Andy is Magic Johnson and ... 

let's see ... Larry, I guess you can 

be Dennis Rodman again." 







**1 knov this is a tough concept to grasp 

Johnny, but to make Ice cubes, you have to fill 

the trays with vater." 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 



September 20. 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 15 




Entertainment 



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September' 17-23, 2001 

Aries (March 21-Aptii 20i Property agreements or old family documents may cause 
delays. Expect relatives or family tnends to request detailed information or financial 
permissions. Many Aries natives wiH soon expand home security. 
Taurus (April 21 -May 20). Complicated social promises from the past may require an 
extra effort. Watch for close friends or colleagues to openly discuss yesterday's social 
events changed plans or romantic tnangles. Delicate issues may be involved. 
Gemini (May 21-June 21). A recently silent fnend may challenge your ideas or opinions. 
Watch for loved ones to express disappointment in past social decisions. Key areas of 
concern may involve demanding work habits, old vs new friends or complicated group 

events. 

Cancer (June 22-July 22). A close fnend may compete for your attention or emotional 
support. Although loved ones may demand extra time and energy, long-term friends will 
also need your ongoing dedication. Avoid group meetings or quickly planned social 

gatherings. . . ^ , 

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22), Key officials may. soon demano added efforts and dedication. 

Expect small projects to become increasingly complicat-d. Scattered ideas or revised 

time limitations may cause delays or confusion. 
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). A close fnend may request delicate romantic advice. 

Personal relationships or private social triangles are complex. Expect others to reveal 

rare encounters or emotional information. Some Virgos may also experience a subtle 

change in a family relationship. 
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). After a fairly intense penod of social or romantic doubt, love 

relationships are due to greatly expand. Watch for lovers or marital partners to end a 

phase of emotional distance and mistrust. Ongoing questions or social differences will 

be easily resolved. 

Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). New emotional options or proposed home changes may be 
on the agenda. Watch for loved ones to request a public shift of home priorities or new 
social rules in romance. Intimacy, mutual friendships or shared time in the home may be 

a strong concern. 

Sagittanus (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Loved ones may be focused on small amounts of money 
and short-term business agreements. Expect tnends and lovers to publicly question the 
ethics or business practices of authority figures. Public criticism, although draining, is 

healthy. , , , 

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20). Recent flirtations v^^ili deepen. Watch for potential lovers 
to issue bold statements or obvious romantic invitations. Although progress may have 
previously felt sluggish, lovers or close tnends will dramatically change the pace of key 



BEELER'CI 




THE SWWD mi WWWN, FUU JWTKE MUST BE WNE.' -Wm mm$CH 




Classifieds 







Happy 20th Birthday to Tricia 
Bennet! Hope you have a blast. 
Love your AOE sisters 

Thanks to Sigma Chi for a fun 
time! Hope we can do it again 
soon! Love, AOE 

sicitl * :)< * 4i * :ti :tc 4c ;t! ,|ci|e « 

Congratulations to our sisters on 
Homecoming Court: Emily 
Pastor, Christina Yokum, Jessica 
Froehlizh, Katie Nee, Deanna 
Scott, and Angie Boddorf. We are 
soproudof allof you! Love, your 
AOE sisters 

Prayers and thoughts go out to the 
victims and families of the nation- 
al tagedy. Love, ZTA 

Congratulations to our homecom- 
ing court members: Kara 
Guinther, Sarah Etzel, and Kristy 
Fennel. Love your sisters of ZTA 

Congratulations to Fall 2001: 
Nikki, Erin, Kelly, Sarah, Jen, 
Corrie, Molly, and Amber. Love, 



ZTA 



^ilfllf^:t:'^>if**>t''lf*** 



To the hero's, survivors, and the 
lost victims of America's tragedy- 
our thoughts and prayers are with 
you always. AST 






Please donate blood on September 
25. May this tragedy bring us 
together and do good. AIT 



**♦*♦*****♦*** 



Jamie, congratulations on your 
engagement! We couldn't be hap- 
pier for you! Lots of love, your 
OS sisters 

,(> :|c « He i|c :)c Ik 4e !|' * * >ic * >•< 

The sisters of OSS hope everyone 
is having a terrific start to the first 
semester! 

Congratulations to Holly, Kristin, 
and Whitney! You girls are doing 
wonderfully and we love you lots! 
Love, your future Phi Sig sisters 

The sisters of OSS want to remind 
everyone to give blood Sept. 25th 
from 11-5 in Tippin Gym. Our 
thoughts and prayers are with our 
nation and the victims of this 
tragedy. 

OSS congratulates all the sorori- 
ties on a fabulous recruitment. 
We ail got great new girls into the 
CU greek system! 

OSK, we're all looking forward to 
working with you on the float! 
We always have a blast hanging 



out with you guys! Love, OSS 

Mike, thank you for continuously 
being the best sweetheart ever! 
We're looking forward to another 
great year with you. Love, OSS 

Happy Belated Birthday Franny 
and Lisa. Love your 0OA sisters 

Happy 21st Birthday Barbi. Love 
your 0OA sisters 

Happy 21st Birthday Maura! 
Love, your 90A sisters 

Happy Birthday Sarah. One more 
year to go! Love, your GO A sis- 
ters 

Good luck to all the fraternities 
and sororities with ALF. 0OA 

iftHf^ Hi, iHf^fit' ****** 

ZTA, thank you so much for all of 

your support. 90A 

*it************ 

0X, can't wait to start pomping 
with you guys, it's gonna be a 

blast. Love 60A 

tf^f************ 

Amy U, keep up the good work 
with recruitment. Love, your 
90A sisters 

*iif*iti********** 

Dena, thanks for the treats! OSK 

OSK wishes brother Tim Perry a 
happy 21st birdiday! 

( «pr.n« «>r,«K ) 

#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Earn Cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 

tours.com. 

************** 

Spring Break 2002!!! Student 
Express is now hiring sales reps. 
Cancun features FREE meals and 
parties @ Fat Tuesdays-MTV 
Beach Headquarters. Acapulco, 
Mazatlan, Jamaica, Bahamas, 
South Padre, Florida. Prices from 
$469, with major airlines. 24,000 
travelers in 2001. Call 800-787- 
3787 for a FREE brochure or 
email: 
bookit@studentexpress.com. 
www.studentexpress.com 



House available for the Spring 
2002 semester and also for the 
Fall 2002/2003 semesters. Five 
person occupance. Furnished. 
Call 226-5917. 



*************if 



House available for the Fall 
2002/2003 semesters. 7-8 person 
occupancy. Furnished. Call 226- 
5917. 






yirr i y i Tmy"rff''r i T"Vf i r"j i T;A'ft¥V | im^^ 



mMsmm^tmiv^f'i^" 



D 



Waiters, Waitresses, Bartenders, 
and Kitchen Help/ Flexiable 
hours. Apply in person at the 

Wayside Inn or call 226-2344. 

************** 

MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS! 
Sell Spring Break 2002 trips. 
HIGHEST COMMISIONS - 
LOWEST PRICES! NO COST 
TO YOU! Travel FREE including 
food, drink and non-stop parties! ! ! 
World class vacations! 2001 
Student Travel Planners " TOP 
PRODUER" and MTV's choice. 
(Spring Break Cancun Party 
Program) 1-800-222-4432 




oFsiH 




Apartments avaiable for the Fall 
2002/Spring 2003 semesters at 5 1 
Penn Avenue. Four person occu- 
pancy. Furnished. Call 226-5917. 



All steel building, engineer certi- 
fied 50X100X18 was $19,210, 
Now $11,935. Can deliver. 800- 
292-0111 

|i«rsoii«is ) 



April and Dustin, Congrats on a 
year. It is time to hit the restart 

button. Love, the crew 

************** 

Gina, Toni, and Kimmie: 

Congrats on the win and bruises! 

************** 

Ky and Robin, thanks for making 
my best decision yet! Love, Bo 

^Hc^f*********** 

Bruce, Bubba, Billy Bob, and 
Bud: Put your drinking caps on! 

It's ALF time! Love, Bo 

************** 

Thank you to all the proofreaders. 

You are all doing a wonderful job! 

i^itii^iifitf********* 

Kel, Thanks for inviting us to your 

cookout. It was fun. Love, Jill 

************** 

Tim, hope you had a great 21st 

birthday. Jill 

^************* 

Brian, hang in there this week. 
Good luck with all your work. 
Love, Jill 



************** 



************** 



Robin, thanks for kicking my butt 
when we worked out. 1 love not 
being able to walk. Just kidding! 
1 love to work out with you. 
Hopefully we can keep it up. 
Love ya, Kylee 

****i{Hr******** 

Tim, wish you luck with your lit- 
tle situation. Hope it all works out 
for you. I'm sure that you will 
find happiness sometime. If not, 
keep those Camel Lights close to 

your heart. 

^f^if*********** 

Danielle, thanks for the lolly pop. 
That was very nice of you. I'm 
sure that I will enjoy the lovely 
taste of Cotton Candy. Love, your 
roomie 

Hi************* 



Stacey, I'm glad that you finally 
decided to make the "good deci- 
sion." I'm very proud of you for 
getting out of it. Just remember 
that your friends are always here 
for you! Don't ever forget that. 
Love, your friends 



:il^,il,itt^itl*^i*^**** 



Givan girls, can't wait for ALF 
weekend to begin. What can 1 say, 
it should be another interesting 
year. Here is to a great weekend. 



************** 



Stacey and Robin, we need to get 
that house. I will go crazy if we 
don't get it. Please don' make me 
live in the Residence Halls for 
anohter year. Kylee 



iti************* 



Clubs - Student Groups 

Earn $1,000-$2,000 this semester with 
the easy Campusfuiidtaisencom thtee 
hour fundraising event. Does not 
involve credit card applicatioitis. 
Fundraising dates are filling quickly, 

so call today! Contact 
Campusfundraiserxom at (888) 923- 

3238, or visit 



ALF PUBLIC NOTIC E 

iiii mTl iiii M i m iiii j iiiiiiiiii Ti iiiii i iiiiiiii m ii ii i i i 

BY ORDER OF THE MAYOR AM) THE CHIEF OF 
POLICE IN ACCORDANCE WITH TfiDB CLARION 
BOROUGH CODE OF ORi:)IN ANCES: 
During ihe perkxJ of SatHiday, September 22,2001 through 
Suiiday, Sept«iabcr 30,2001, lacycfes, ^Jkat^xsaids^ rdlerfjkd^ 
md jEoiler-dfosiliiig mi pmhMUid for use 1^ d» gctiml public 
m the C^r^^ Bu^mm DIstnci ^fea of the Borough of 
Clarion^ in ail dlsplayand carnival areas used for diet Autumn 
Leaf Festival The Central Business Di&tnct k sitaaied in that 
area of (be Borough of Ctarton twurided by Mk Avmm, 
Madison Roiid^ 3rd Ave and Merle Rd, and includes Main 
Street. Ptersons riding bicycles, or using skateboards, 
follej blades or roller-skates, are required to dismount, or 
immediately dep^, from areas used for Autumn Leaf Festival 
activities. This rtieasure is required to protect pedestrians froni 
injury, and lo prevent property diunage. in accordance witli 
Section 151-3F. The ^ne for a violation of the Ordinance is 
from $l5.m to $50.00. plus court costs. 
Doming the same period, in acordance with the Ct)dc of 
Ordinances, Section 62-10, persons are prohibited from having 
any animal* including dogs, not specifically approved as a par- 
ticipant in the Autumn l^eaf Festival activities, upon any pub- 
lic property within the special event areas used tor the Autumn 
Leaf FeMvi^ Tlje Tim for a violation of the Ordinance is 
from $25 OH mtlOO 00 nins court costs 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 




Classifieds 




September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Cali 



Page 17 



personals 



Marlon, please forgive me for my 
foolish actions. I never meant to 
hurt or upset you. You are such a 
big part of my life and I can't 
imagine you and I being apart. I 
am sorry and I miss you so much. 
I love you, Christine 



Katie, Carrie, and Erin: Good 
luck this year! Your the best 
roommates ever!! Love, Alaina 



To Jared, Happy Anniversary! I 
love you! Terry 






,t:^i,t,^,f****!tl**** 



SW Skinny man, very attractive, 
6'2", brown hair. Looking for 
someone to walk down sandy 
beaches and to do all that senti- 
mental bull crap. For information, 
call Timmy 



Adam, you are a great guy, and 
I'm so happy to have you in my 
life. I would never give you up. 
Love your babydoll 



Marshall, hope that I didn't hurt 
your feelings after class. You 
know that I was just kidding. Plus 
it is just me and my wonderful 
personality. You know how I am. 



we have been back. 



1*'PT''C'1''r'f**r ^3lt!l(5|C)|( 



sli************* 






Everyone at Clairon University: 
Hope that everyone has a great 
semester and has a lot of fun. 



;|I l|c * « ^ ;|< >|( « :)< 4< * * * :<< 



Hfi^Hlif********** 



*♦♦****♦***♦** 




To all the new members of the 
Clairon Call: Everyone is doing a 
great job. I think that we will 
have a great year. It might be a 
long ride, but in the end we will 
make it. Just think, we have New 
Orleans and New York to look 
forward to. 



Well Robin another week has 
gone by. Maybe soon that v-card 
won't be pulled anymore, but then 
again pigs could fly first. You 
know we love you and it is all in 
fun. 









Megan. I miss jamming with you. 
We need to get together sometime 
and just hang out. Haven't had 
much of a chance to do that since 



To my Marlboro Lights: I love 
you with all of my heart. You 
never leave my side and you never 
talk back. You will never know 
how much that means to me. 
Thank you for always being there. 






Timmy P, Happy 21st Birthday. 
Hope that you have a great time at 
the bar. 



Still need that 

co-currJGular? 

Come join the staff of 

The Clarion Call 



Interestedin being a part 
of the "Gall On You"? 
Give Graham a call at 

393-2380 to participate. 



CUP STUDENTS! 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS 

TODAY! 

TELL THAT SPECLVL PERSON 

THAT YOU CARE OR TELL WHAT 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 P.M. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



Athletics in the News 



Clarion University accredited by NCACE 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

The National Council for 
Accreditation of Coaching 
Education (NCACE) has grant- 
ed accreditation to Clarion 
University's athletic coaching 
education program. 

Clarion becomes NCACE's 
first approved Level III insti- 
tution. Level HI accreditation 
indicates that the program's 
graduates are qualified for the 
intermediate athlete, defined 
as high school level and 
younger. 

"We are very pleased to have 
our coaching program receive 
National Council for the 
Accreditation of Coaching 
Education accreditation," says 
Clarion University Provost 
.Joseph Grunenwald. 

"Assurance of high quality 
through external validation by 
professional organizations like 
NCACE is one of the ways that 
Clarion can demonstrate to its 
students and other publics that 
its programs are nationally 
competitive. We are very 
proud of the fine work of our 
faculty that has led to this 
wonderful outcome." 

"The opportunity to be a 
qualified coach will enhance 
the ability of our graduates to 



find teaching positions," says 
Dr. Dick Taylor, professor of 
health and physical education 
at Clarion University. "The 
national accreditation is an 
outstanding boost to our pro- 
gram." 

Taylor has been involved in 
coaching accreditation activi- 
ties for several years, spending 
the last three helping to gain 
this accreditation for Clarion. 

"I was fortunate to have 
worked with Dr. Mathew 
Maetozo when I worked at 
Lock Haven University of 
Pennsylvania from 1972-78," 
says Taylor. "He was a pioneer 
in the need for coaching edu- 
cation. He aroused my interest 
in the issue of improving 
coaching in the United States." 

"It is an honor for Clarion 
University to be the first insti- 
tution in the country to receive 
Level III accredited status for 
its athletic coaching program," 
says Dr. Gail Grejda, dean of 
the College of Education and 
Human Services. 

"This recognition by the 
National Council for 

Accreditation of Coaching 
Education (NCACE) is a trib- 
ute to the vision and detailed 
planning of the Health and 
Physical Education 



/ Family Health Council specializes 
in...Birth Control, Pregnancy Testing, 
Gyne Exams, Emergency Contraception, 
STD Testing & Treatment, Breast & 
Cervical Cancer Screening, Adoption 
and more! 



v^Our office is conveniently located near 
campus and our flexible office hours fit 
any academic sc hedule. _^__^ 

/We've been providing students with 
affordable reproductive health care for 

30 years. ...«.«^«_— 

Call our office for more information! 

r iwu.«iA 814-226-7500 

Famlly.lteal!h .^,,, ,„^,M«i„st ria. 



St., Clarion 

Visit us on the web at: www,/hcincorg 



Coanal,lnC 1064A East Main 



miw-i'*^ 



Department, particularly Dr. 
Richard Taylor. 

"The President of NCACE 
noted that Clarion's program 
reflects the highest level of 
professionalism and will serve 
as a prototype for other organi- 
zations seeking to promote 
excellence in coaching prepa- 
ration. He added that the pro- 
gram is comprehensive and 
clearly demonstrates a com- 
mitment to quality coaching. 

"Clarion University is proud 
to lead the state in the number 
of national accreditations. The 
Coaching Accreditation brings 
the total to 26 and, once again, 
indicates that our programs 
meet the highest national stan- 
dards." 

Founded by the National 
Association for Sport and 
Physical Education (NASPE), 
NCACE is committed to, 
"Quality Sports Through 
Quality Coaching." It uses the 
"National Standards for 
Athletic Coaches" as the foun- 
dation of its mission. The 
"National Standards for 
Athletic Coaches" were devel- 
oped in 1995 and is endorsed 
by over 140 sport organiza- 
tions. 

These standards serve as the 
cornerstone for quality coach- 
ing and provides the basis for 
coaching education guidelines, 
which address aspects of 
coaching skill and knowledge. 
They also outline the adminis- 
trative support, personnel and 
operational policies needed to 
provide coaching education. 

The area of study include: 
injuries and prevention, care 
and management; risk manage- 
ment; growth, development, 
and learning; training, condi- 
tioning, and nutrition; 
social/psychological aspects of 
coaching; skills, tactics, and 
strategies; teaching and 
administrative aspects; and 
professional preparation and 
development. 

"The review involves a great 
deal of careful work by the 
applicant organization," says 
Drew Zwald, president of 
NCACE. 

"NCACE grants accredita- 
tion to educational programs 
that meet or exceed established 
requirements deemed essential 
to preparation of well-quali- 



fied coaches. Clarion 
University has successfully 
documented content identified 
in the National Standards for 
Athletic Coaches and the 
NCACE Guidelines for pro- 
gram supervision, personnel 
and operations. 

Not only has Clarion demon- 
strated program excellence, 
but also in the willingness to 
engage in the process of self- 
study and folio preparation and 
submission in the first year of 
NCACE operation, your orga- 
nization has shown profession- 
al leadership at a high level." 

NCACE is accepting mem- 
berships from all sport and 
coaching organizations that 
have or support coaching edu- 
cation programs or compo- 
nents, and advocate the certifi- 
cation of coaches at all levels 
of sport. 

NCACE is also recruiting 
organizations that train coach- 
es to join the NCACE registry 
as an indicator of support for 
quality coaching education and 
the intent to seek program 
accreditation. 

NCACE's mission is to sup- 
port qualified coaches for 
sport participants through pro- 
grams that provide quality 
coaching education. The 
Council reviews the quality of 
coaching education programs 
and encourages continuous 
improvement of coaching edu- 
cation. 
The Council endorses nation- 



al standards for coaches which 
facilitate certification, evalua- 
tion, and selection of coaches. 
In addition, the Council over- 
sees the development of 
coaching education and guide- 
lines for the review of coach- 
ing education programs. 

NCACE reviews coaching 
education/certification pro- 
grams that seek accreditation. 
These reviews are based on the 
program's compliance with 
Guidelines for Coaching 
Education and the National 
Standards for Athletic 
Coaches. 

One measurement of the 
quality of a university's acade- 
mic program is the recognition 
that programs receive from 
accreditations by professional 
organizations. These groups 
often make national standard 
measurements and that help to 
tell if an academic program 
ranks with the best. 

A great source of pride is that 
every one of Clarion's profes- 
sional schools has achieved the 
specialized accreditation 

acknowledged to be the most 
prestigious available to the 
discipline. 

Clarion University is the 
only State System of Higher 
Education university to have 
specialized accreditations for 
all of its professional programs 
and with the addition of 
NCACE accreditation, leads 
the State System with 26 
accreditations. 




Cross Country 

Due to the recent terrorist tragedy, the meet at 

Penn State was cancelled. The team travelled to 

Lock Haven for a non-scored dual instead. 

Volleyball 

Also due to last week's unfortunate event, the 
game against Mercyhurst and Indiana have been 

postponed. 

Tennis 

The tennis match at Indiana with Shippensburg 
has also been cancelled due to this past week's 

events. 



Page 16 



Tmh Clarion Call 



September 20, 2 001 




Classifieds 




Seplember 20, 2001 



The Clarion Cali 



Page 17 



(' personals 



Marlon, please toriiiM' me tor ni\ 
foolish actions, i nc\ei meant \o 
hurt or upset \ou. ^'ou are sueh a 
big patt ot nn lite and I ean't 
iiiKiLiuie \ou and 1 heini.' apart. 1 
ani sorr\ and 1 miss \ou so much, 
1 lo\e \ou ( "hnstipe 



Katie. Cariie. and l:rin. ( iood 
luek this \ear' ^oul the hest 
unnnniates e\or" I ii\o Alaina 



S\\ .Skinn\ man. \er\ attractne, 
(i'2"". hroun hair, l.ookinu tor 
stHiietMie to walk down sandy 
beaches and to do all that senti- 
mental bull crap, l-or intormation. 
call rimmv 




lo Jaied, Happ> Anniversary' 1 Marshall, hope that 1 didn't hurt 
line \(Hi' Terry your teelings after class. You 

-*"'**'■'- ■ knt)w that 1 was just kiddiny. Plus 

Adam. \(Hi are a great guy, and ,t ,s just me and my wonderful 
I'm so happy to have >ou in my pcrsonalit\. You know how I am. 

lite i would ne\ei gne you up. 

Love ycuir babydoll To all the new members ot the 

.**,..**....„ Clairon Call: liveryone is doing a 

Hveryone at Clairon Umveisiiy: g,eat job. I think that we will 
Hope that c\eryone has a great have a great year It might be a 
semester and has a lot of tun long nde, but in the end we will 

make it. Just think, we have Nev\ 
Orleans and New ^'oik to look 
lorvNcird to 

Megan. I miss jamming with _\oui 
We need to get together sometime 
and just hang out. Haven't had 
much ol' a ciiance to do ihal smce 



we have been back 



jC :i< .-V ;t< + •.^c + 4; rK i. +: ;,c r, 



Well Robin another week has 
gone by Maybe soon that \-card 
wi>n"t be pulled anymore, but then 
again pigs could fly tiist. ^'ou 
know we love you and it is all iii 
fun. 

< < •. -i- "-I* 'K % * H* 'I' % -i' ^ -T^ 

lo m\ .MailbcMO Lights: ! love 
vou u ilh all ol' mv heart, ^'i-ii 
never leave mv side and you neve; 
talk back. You will nevei know 
h(nv much that means to mc 
Thank _\ou tor alwavs bcmg llieic. 

limmv P, lla(")py Jlsl Bnihdav 
Hope that vou have a great nme :ii 
the bar. 



Still need that 

co-curricular? 

Come join the staff of 

The Clarion Call 



Interested in being a part 
of the "Call On You"? 
Give Graham a call at 

393-2380 to participate. 



CUP STUDENTS! 

placp: your classifieds 

today: 

tell that special person 

that you care or 1 kll what 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 RM. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



Athletics in the News 



Clarion University accredited by NCACE 



Courtesy of I'niversity 
Relations 

The National C\)uncil tor 
.Accreditation of Coaching 
hducalion (NCACH) has grant- 
ed accreditation to Clarion 
University's athletic coaching 
education program. 

Clarion becomes NCACE's 
Inst approved Level III insti- 
tution. Level 111 accreditation 
indicates that the program's 
graduates are qualified for the 
intermediate athlete, defined 
as high school level and 
younger. 

"We are very pleased to have 
our coaching program receive 
NatK)nal Council for the 
.Accreditation o\' Coaching 
Fducation accreditation," says 
Clarion University Provost 
.Joseph (irunenwald 

■".Assurance of high quality 
thiough external validation by 
piitlessional organizations like 
NC.ACI-; IS one of the vva\s that 
Clarion can demonstrate to its 
students and other publics that 
Its programs are nationally 
ci'mpelilive. We are ver\ 
pi I'ucl of ihc line u ork o\' our 
lai. ult\ that has led to this 
w onderful outcome."" 

■'The opportunity to be a 
qualitied coach will enhance 
ihe ahilitv i.>\ our iiraduates to 



find teaching positions."" says 
Dr. Dick Taylor, professor of 
health and physical education 
at Clarion University. '"The 
national accreditation is an 
outstanding boost to our pro- 
gram." 

Taylor has been involved in 
coaching accreditation activi- 
ties for several years, spending 
the last three helping to gain 
this accreditation for Clarion. 

■'1 was fortunate to have 
worked with Dr. Mathew 
Maetozo when 1 worked at 
Lock Haven University of 
Pennsylvania from 1972-78," 
says Taylor. "He was a pioneer 
in the need for coaching edu- 
cation. He aroused my interest 
in the issue of improving 
coaching in the United States." 

"It is an honor for Clarion 
University to be the first insti- 
tution in the ct)untry to receive 
Level 111 accredited status for 
Its athletic coaching program,"" 
says Dr. (jail Cirejda. dean of 
the College oi' Education and 
Human Services. 

"This rect)gnition by the 
National Council for 

Accreditatu.n ot Coaching 
Education (NC.ACE) is a trib- 
ute to the Nision and detailed 
planning of the Health and 
Phvsical Education 



/ Family Health Council specializes 
in.. .Birth Control, Pregnancy Testing, 
Gvnc Exanis, Emergency Contraception, 
STD Testing & Treatment, Breast & 
Cervical Cancer Screening, Adoption 
and more! 



v^Our office is conveniently located near 
campus and our flexible office hours fit 
any academic sc hedule. 

/We've been providing students with 
affordable reproductive health care for 

30 years. ^ ^ 

Call our office for more information! 



M 

F 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



814-226-7500 

1064A East Main St., Clarion 



Visit us on the web at; www.flicinc.org 






- .r^a^*li.i.5»*fti*u.-i.-.^ 






Department, particularly Dr. 
Richard Taylor. 

"The President of NCACE 
noted that Clarion's program 
reflects the highest level of 
professionalism and will ser\e 
as a prototype for other organi- 
zations seeking to promote 
excellence in coaching prepa- 
ration. He added that the pro- 
gram is comprehensive and 
clearly demonstrates a com- 
mitment to quality coaching. 

"Clarion University is proud 
to lead the state in the number 
of national accreditations. The 
Coaching Accreditation brings 
the total to 26 and. once again, 
indicates that our programs 
meet the highest national stan- 
dards." 

Founded by the National 
Association for Sport and 
Physical Education (NASPE). 
NCACE is committed to, 
"Quality Sports Through 
Quality Coaching." It uses the 
"National Standards for 
Athletic Coaches" as the foun- 
dation of its mission. The 
"NatK)nal Standards for 
Athletic Coaches" were devel 
oped in 1995 and is endi-rsed 
by over 140 sport organiza- 
tions. 

These .standards serve as the 
cornerstone for quality coach- 
ing and provides the basis for 
coaching education guidelines, 
which address aspects of 
coaching skill and knowledge. 
They also outline the adminis- 
trative support, personnel and 
operational pi)iicies needed to 
provide coaching education. 

The area of slud\ include: 
injuries and prevention, care 
and management; risk manage- 
ment; growth, development, 
and learning; training, condi- 
tioning, and nutrition; 
social/psychoK>gicai aspects of 
coaching, skills, tactics, and 
strategies; teaching and 
administrative aspects; and 
professional preparatum and 
development. 

"The re\ iew invt>l\ es a great 
deal of careful work b\ the 
applicant organizatum," says 
Drew Zwald. president of 
NCACE. 

"NCACE grants accredita- 
tion lo educational programs 
that meet or exceed established 
requirements deemed essential 
to preparation of well-quali- 



fied coaches. Clarion 

University has successfully 
documented content identified 
in the National Standards for 
Athletic Coaches and the 
NCACE Ciuidelines for pro- 
gram supervision, personnel 
and operations. 

Not only has Clarion demon- 
strated program excellence, 
but also in the willingness to 
engage in the process of self- 
study and folio preparation and 
submission in the first year of 
NCACE operation, your orga- 
nization has shown profession- 
al leadership at a high level." 

NCACE is accepting mem- 
berships from all sport and 
coaching organizations that 
have or support coaching edu- 
cation programs or compo- 
nents, and advocate the certifi- 
cation of coaches at all levels 
of sport. 

.NCACE is also recruiting 
organizations that train coach- 
es to join the NCACE registry 
as an indicator of support for 
quality coaching education and 
the intent to seek program 
accreditation 

NC.ACE s mission is to sap 
port qualified coaches for 
sport participants through pro- 
grams that provide quality 
ctuching education. The 
Council reviews the quality of 
coaching education programs 
and encourages continuous 
improvement of coaching edu- 
cation. 
The Council endorses nation- 



al standards for coaches which 
facilitate certification, evalua- 
tion, and selection ot coaches 
In addition, the Council over- 
sees the development of 
coaching education and guide- 
lines for the review of coach- 
ing education programs. 

NCACT: reviews coaching 
education/certification pro- 
grams that seek accreditation. 
These reviews are based on the 
program's compliance with 
Guidelines for Coaching 
Education and the National 
Standards for Athletic 

Coaches. 

One measurement of the 
quality of a university's acade- 
mic program is the recognition 
that programs receive from 
accreditations by professional 
organizations. These grt)ups 
often make national standard 
measurements and that help to 
tell if an academic program 
ranks with the best. 

A great source of pride is that 
every one of Clarion's profes- 
sional schools has achieved the 
specialized accreditation 

acknowledged t(» be the most 
presiigu)us available to the 
discipline 

Clarion Universitx is the 
only State Systetri of Higher 
Education universitv to have 
specialized accreditations tor 
all of Its professional programs 
and with the additi(^n of 
NCACE accreditatit)n, leads 
the State System with 2b 
accreditations 




Cross Couiitn^ 

Due to the recent terrorist tragedy, the meet at 

Penn State was cancelied. The team travelled to 

Lock Haven for a non-scored dual instead. 

VoUeybaU 

Also due to last week's unfortunate event, the 
game against Mercyhurst and Indiana have been ^ 

postponed. 

Tennis 

The tennis match at Indiana with Shippensburg 
has also been cancelled due to this past week's 

events. 



CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Page 18 




3 9363 00587 3119 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 



Womens Soccer 



Fans support first year team on victory conquest 



by Stephanie DeFiorentis 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

Clarion University's womens 
soccer team played a hard game 
on Wednesday, September 19. 
hosting its first collegiate game 
at Memorial Stadium. The 
Golden Eagles competed for 
their first season win against 
Slippery Rock. Match time was 
set for 4 p.m. 

After playing five road games, 
the team was really looking for- 
ward to having their first home 
game in front of their Clarion 
fans. 

"It's an honor to be a part of 
the first Clarion soccer team. We 
appreciate all of the support," 
said sophomore defender, Dawn 
Jackowski. 

In their first season of NCAA 
Division II collegiate soccer. 
Clarion has an 0-6 record to start 
the year, but has played most of 
those contests very close. And 
all but one game has been score- 
less into the second half. 

Clarion has lost to Ferris State 
(2-0), Aquinas (3-0), Siena 
Heights (7-0), St. Joe's (Indiana) 



(3-0), Gannon (2-0), and now 
Slippery Rock (4-0). 

Slippery Rock entered the 
game with a 3-0 mark, including 
a 1-0 PS AC slate. The Rockets 
defeated Shippensburg 2-0 on 
Sunday. Their top players 
inclijjied Sara Arsenault who had 
two goals and one assist, and 
goalie Allyn Blind who has yet 
to give up a goal in three games. 

Clarion's lineup had starters 
C.J. Gattens in goal, with Tara 
Harrington, Josephine Reino, 
Dawn Jackowski, and Rachel 
Aul on defense. The mid-field- 
ers will be Nicole Bell, Joann 
Eddins, Ashley Rickrode and 
Danielle Allemang, with the for- 
wards being Marianna Reino 
and Anna Goldman. 

The Golden Eagles have not 
scored a goal yet this season, but 
Marianne Reino had five shots, 
Goldman four and Rickrode and 
first sub Chrystell Dean also has 
two shots going into the game. 
Gattens has led a strong Clarion 
defense. She has glaced 100 
shots and made 66 saves, and 
only permitted 10 goals for a 
2.59 GAA. She was named to 




Ben Chandlee/The Clarion Call 



A Golden Eagle fakes the ball to ttie net during their first home game at Memorial Stadium. 
The women are 0-6 after the game, but still have high hopes for this season. 



the PSAC honor roll for her play 
against Gannon last week. 
During the game against 
Slippery Rock, Gattens had an 
impresive 16 saves to improve 
her overall record. 

Harrington served as the top 
defender for the Golden Eagles 
during the game with several 
strategic plays. On the offensive 



side, Alisha Turner and Reino 
worked the field, getting the ball 
into Slippery Rock territory. 
Despite of their effort, they 
failed to score the first goal of 
the season that put Clarion on 
the scoreboard. 

"We're in a building phase, 
we're trying to play better as a 
team. I am not worried about 



losing. I care that after each 
game we come off of the field 
knowing we played better and 
gave our best effort," said coach 
Alonzo. 

The Golden Eagles are also 
home on Saturday at 2p.m. 
against Bridgeport and on 
Sunday at 12:30p.m. against 
Salem International. 



Clarion golf team unleashes returning talent 



by Jason Hixner Glenville Invitational in 

Clarion Call SUffWrt^^^^^ Ravenwood, West Virginia. The 

team gave an impressive seventh 
place finish out of 19 competeing 
teams. 

After last year's second place 



The Clarion University golf 
team has hit the links for this 
year's season with a respectable 
opener on Sept. 10-11 at the 




Graham Hermanns/The Garion Call 



A member of the Golden Eagle golf team takes a k>ng shot 
durlnga scheduled practtoe. 



finish at the PSAC championship, 
the team is excited at the many 
possibilities of returning to or sur- 
passing that mark for this season. 
Head coach, Al Lefevre, has 
returned for his third consecutive 
season to lead the Golden Eagles 
to victory. Since the time of his 
arrival, Lefevre has coached his 
players to improve their overall 
skills, thus creating a stronger 
team, and this season is no excep- 
tion. 

With the loss of only one senior 
from last year's young squad, the 
team is ready to return with an 
improved group of experienced 
golfers. The top five scorers have 
returned from last year's squad 
and are ready to make set some 
impressive scores. Key returnees 
are junior Ryan Peffer, sopho- 
mores Mathew Biddington and 
Paul Garris, and seniors David 
Lichina and Anthony Tacconelli. 
Both Tacconelli and Lichina 
were all-conference last year. 
Tacconelli served the role of sta- 
tistical leader with an average 
round of 74.9 strokes per round. 
He also had the best round of the 



season last year with a 66 at the 
Millersville Invitational. His 
score was only one stroke off of 
the course record. 

The Golden Eagles golf team 
also has a lot of freshmen talent 
coming into the program. The 
rookies include Ryan Butler, Matt 
Gibson, Matt Guyton, Alan 
Hosford, Lou Jesiolkiewic, and 
Jonathon Rogers. 

This crop of young golfers 
should prove that Clarion will be 



a serious competitor in the PSAC 
this year, as well as many years to 
come. 

The Golden Eagles will be on 
home territory for the next match 
on September 24-25 at the Clarion 
Oaks Golf Club. The Hal Hanson 
Memorial tournament has proved 
to be an exciting early season 
Invite over the years. The talented 
group of players have high expec- 
tations for this weekend and the 
remainder of the season. 



Golf Roster for 2001-02 season 



k^ 



Mattbew Biddington - Sophomore 

Ryan Butler - Freshman 

Paul Garris - Sophomore 

Matt Giteon - Freshman 

Matt Guyton - Freshman 

Alan Hosford - Freshman 

l.x)u Jcs^toikiewk - Freshman 

Da^ lichma - Senior 

Ryan Peffer - Junior 

Johnathan Hc^rs <• Freshman 

AatiMW ll^Mieffi -Siirfor 



;i <iMii*«iiMM ^ir iiMiifa«iiiiiifaii^ 



September 20, 2001 



The Clarion Call 



Page 19 



Football 



McCuUum & Diegehnan named PSAC-West Players of the Week 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Clarion wide receiver Mike 
McCullum and defensive line- 
man Doug Diegelman were 
named the PSAC-West offen- 
sive and defensive "Players of 
the Week" on Monday. 

Both players were honored for 
their performances in Clarion's 
27-14 win over Tiffin on 
Saturday at Memorial Stadium. 
McCullum, a six foot one, 
180-pound, sophomore, wide 
receiver from Hollywood, 
Florida and South Broward 
High, grabbed five passes for 
113 yards and two touchdowns 
in Saturday's win. 

He scored Clarion's first 
touchdown on a 42-yard pass 
play from quarterback Adam 
Almashy, then found paydirt in 
the fourth quarter with a 25- 
yard catch from Almashy. 

On the sea,son McCullum has 



nine catches for 163 yards and 
two touchdowns. Last year, as a 
freshman, McCullum led the 
Golden Eagles with 27 catches 
for 616 yards and six touch- 
downs. 

Michael is the son of Michael 
and Eugenia McCullum of 
Hollywood, Florida. Mike is a 
management major at Clarion. ' 
Diegelman, a six foot one, 
250-pound, senior, defensive 
lineman from Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and Shaler High, 
also had a strong game on 
Saturday. 

He posted eight tackles (three 
solo), plus had three tackles-for- 
losses for minus eight yards, a 
quarterback sack for negative 
four yards, and recovered a 
fumble that led to a Clarion 
touchdown. 

In three games this year Doug 
has posted 18 tackles, four tack- 
ies-for-losses for minus 11 
yards, one sack and one fumble 



recovery. 

A second team PSAC-West 
choice last year, Diegelman 
posted 26 tackles, 12 tackles- 
for-losses and seven sacks in 
2000. For his career, he now has 
97 hits, 31 tackles-for-losses for 
-135 yards and 15 sacks for -95 
yards. 

Doug is the son of William 
and Diane Diegelman of 
Pittsburgh and is also a manage- 
ment major at Clarion. 

The Golden Eagles have a 1-2 
record this season after going 7- 
4 last year and lying for first in 
the PSAC-West with a 5-1 
mark. Clarion opens PSAC- 
West play at Shippensburg this 
Saturday at 1p.m. 

Watch for impressive plays 
from these two athletes for the 
remainder of the season and for 
more seasons to come. The two, 
being sophomores, have room to 
improve due to their eligibilty 
advantage. 







^v- 



Courtesy of the Football website 



Defensive lineman, Doug Diegelman (#74), drives toward it 22 
for the tackle. Diegelman was named PSAC-West Player of 
the week along with teammate, Mike McCullum. 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Fitness Director 
Recreation Center phone: 393-1667 




9/20/01 



Intramural Schedule 


Fall 2001 




Activity: 


Registration Due 


1. BEACH VOLLEYBALL 


In progress 


2. OUTDOOR SOCCER 


in progress 


3. ULTIMATE FRISBEE 


in progress 


4. GOLF SCRAMBLE 


completed 


5. VOLLEYBALL 


in progress 


6. FLAG FOOTBALL 


in progress 


7. 1 PITCH SOFTBALL 


9/27 


8. TENNIS 


in progress 


9. FIELD GOAL CONTEST 


9/21 


10. IN-LINE HOCKEY 


9/21 


n. 10 K RELAY 


9/24 


12. POWER LIFTING 


9/24 


13. INDOOR SOCCER 


9/25 


14. 1 ONI BASKETBALL 


10/2 


15. CHALLENGE COURSE 


10/8 


16. HORSESHOE PITCHING 


10/9 


17. CLOSEST TO THE PIN 


10/10 


18. TUG OF WAR 


10/16 


19. 3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 


10/29 


20. BIKE RACE 


10/23 


21. TABLE TENNIS 


10/30 


ll TUBE H20 BASKETBALL 


11/5 


23. BADMINTON 


11/6 


24. FREE THROW 


11/12 


25. WHIFFLEBALL 


11/14 


26. SWIM MEET 


11/19 


27. BIG BUCK CONTEST 


12/7 



Ymi may still register a team for most activities 
that have already started. Check the IM office for 
detaib 



Football Results 

Monday 9/17: 

Weed. Blazers 35 I8APIE 31 

Sigma Pi 25 Dirty Dogs 6 

Red Shirt 47 That Team 16 

Volleyball Results 

Tuesday 9/18: 

Phi's w/ Chicks beat Ben Brown's Team 

15-6, 15-9 
Victory beat The Mullets 

15-10, 13-15, 15-12 

In-Line Hockey 

Games start on Tuesday 9/25. 

**A11 players must wear approved 

helmets with face shields! ! 

If you don't have a helmet, you can 
borrow one from the Rec Center. 

Field Goal Contest 

Monday, September 24 at 5:30 pm. 

River Romp Triathlon 

Students who are registered for this event 
may pickup your material at the front desk on 
Friday 9/21. 

Check-in for the race is at 9am on Saturday. 
(Walk-in registration will be accepted). 



Softball Tournament 

Friday, October 5 

This is a ONE PITCH, Co-Rec, double 
elimination tournament. One pitch means each 
batter starts with a count of 3-2 to speed up the 
game! Games start at 2pm and the tourney will 
continue on Saturday if necessary. Games will 
be played at the Clarion County Park. 
Cost is $20 per team to help pay for a cookout 
on Friday evening. Roster limit is 15 players, 
and at-least 5 ^ould be women. Tournament ^ 
is limited to the first 8 teams that pay the 
registration fee. 

Mountain Bike Excursion 

Friday, October 12 - depart 3 pm return 7 pm. 

Outdoor Eaoipment Rental; 

The following equipment is available 

now in the outdoor recreation office: 

Mountain Bikes - helmets 

Roller blades - pads - hockey helmets 

Tents - backpacks - inner tubes 

There is a 2.00 per day charge on bikes, 

blades and tents. Everything requires a 

$5 deposit. 

Equipment is for student use ONLY. 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 




Sports 

Golden Eagles trample TiJBBn 27-14 on home turf 




Courtesy of Sports Information 

The Clarion Golden Eagles 
gave a strong showing during 
this past weekend's game 
against Tiffin, Ohio. Gaining 
ground for Clarion, (1-2) wide 
receiver, Mike McCullum, 
caught two touchdown passes 
and led the Golden Eagles to a 
27-14 win against Tiffin (0-3) 
on Saturday afternoon. 

Held at Memorial Stadium, 
the "Family Day" crowd of 
4,600 remembered all those 
affected by Tuesday's tragedy 
with a minute of silence. 

Tiffin took a 7-0 lead at 4:36 
of the first quarter on a three- 
yard run by quarterback, Joe 
Perchinske, capping a nine- 
play, 80-yard drive. The 
Dragons led 7-0 to start off the 
game. 

Clarion, determined to win on 
their own territory, stormed 
back scoring 14 unanswered 
points to take a 14-7 lead going 
into halftime. 

The Golden Eagles drove 70 
yards in six plays just to tie the 
game after Tiffin's first scoring. 



Mike McCullum caught a 42- 
yard touchdown pass from 
quarterback Adam Almashy at 
2:18 of the first quarter. 

Clarion capitalized on a Tiffin 
turnover for its second score. 
Clarion linebacker, Dennis Yu, 
caused a Dragon fumble at the 
Tiffin 20. That fumble was then 
recovered by teammate, Doug 
Diegelman, at the Tiffin 20 yard 
line. 

On the first play, halfback, 
Glenn Lovelace, scampered 20 
yards for the touchdown with 
12:38 left in the second quarter. 
Clarion took the second half 
kickoff and drove 75 yards in 
six plays to build a 21-7 advan- 
tage. Adam Almashy's 22 yard 
run to the Tiffin 16 set up a 16 
yard touchdown run by Robert 
Walker. 

The Golden Eagles put the 
game away in the fourth quarter 
after getting the ball on downs 
at the Tiffin 21. Almashy hit 
McCullum for his second 
touchdown of the day, a 25-yard 
completion, to give Clarion a 
27-7 lead with only 2:05 
remaining. 
Tiffin's Perchinske connected 



Stats 



Tiffin 



First Downs 16 

Rushes-Yards 37-KM) 

Passing Yards (NET) 222 

Passes Att-Comp-Int 33-18-2 

Tot. Offensive Plays 70-322 

Fumble Returns- Yards 0-0 

Punt Returns- Yards 2-9 

Kickoff Returns- Yards 5-91 
Interception Returns- Yards 1-0 

Punts (Number-Avg) 6-39.2 

Fumbles-Lost 4-2 

Penalties- Yards 9-75 

Possession Time 32:04 

Sacks By: Number- Yards 3-20 



Clarion 



17 

52-262 

121 

12-6-1 

64-383 

0-0 

2-29 

2-43 

2-1 

5-33.8 

4-2 

9-87 

27:56 

2-8 




Courtesy of the Football website 



^f^e Golden Eagle football players raise their helmets to lift spirits prior to game time. Team 
huddles before games help players focus on what to accomplish individually as well as at 
the team level during the game. 



on a 29-yard touchdown pass to 
Terry Dalehite with ten seconds 
left in the game to close the 
scoring. 

Clarion had 383 yards of total 
offense, including 262 rushing 
yards and 121 passing. Almashy 
completed six of 12 passes for 
121 yards and two touchdowns. 

McCullum grabbed five pass- 
es for 113 yards and two touch- 
downs, while Demetric Gardner 
rushed 22 times for 119 yards. 
Walker had ten carries for 69 
yards and one touchdown, while 
Lovelace rushed six times for 
44 yards and one score. 

Tiffin had 322 total yards 
including 100 rushing and 222 
passing. Perchinske completed 
18 of 30 for 222 yards and one 
touchdown with two intercep- 
tions. Nii Hammond gained 86 
yards on 20 carries, while 
Kenny Lockhart grabbed six 
passes for 92 yards. 

Clarion's defense was led by 

•T^^ww. thecIarioncaIl.com 



safety Korey Eppinette who had 
13 tackles and one tackle-for- 
loss. Doug Diegelman had eight 
stops, three tackles-for-losses 
and one sack, while Dennis Yu 
had two fumbles caused, one 
interception and three tackles. 

The Golden Eagles travel to 
Shippensburg next .Saturday to 
begin PSAC-West play. Tiffin 
hosts St. Xavier next Saturday 
at noon. 

The Golden Eagles, under 
eighth year head coach Malen 
Luke, enter the game with a 1-2 
overall record. Clarion started 
the year with a last minute loss 
at East Stroudsburg (33-27), 
and a loss at #3 ranked NCAA 
Div. I-AA Youngstown .State 
(44-0), before toppling Tiffin 
27-14. Luke has a Clarion 
record of 38-41 overall and a 
PSAC-West slate of 20-22. In 
his 14th year as a collegiate 
head coach (6 at Defiance), he 
has a career record of 75-62. 



Shippensburg, under veteran 
head coach Rocky Rees, has led 
the Red Raiders to a very 
deceiving 1-2 start in 2001. 
Ship opened the season with a 
28-25 overtime loss at 
Shepherd, and then lost 29-18 at 
Bloomsburg (2000 NCAA run- 
ner-up) before defeating 
Millersville on Saturday 17-7. 
Rees, in his 12th season at 
Shippensburg, has a record of 
62-62-1, and an overall colle- 
giate record of 98-77-2 in 17 
seasons. 

The Golden Eagles, who were 
7-4 overall a year ago and 5-1 
in the PSAC-West, are hoping 
to follow last year's formula to 
finish on top of the division. 
Last year's team also started 
with two losses and a win on 
their way to a strong finish. The 
2000 Eagles defeated 

Shippensburg in a wild 56-49 
game at Clarion's Memorial 
Stadium. 




Check out your 

sports knowledge 

with the question of 

the week. 

See page 19. 



Fans in support of 

new soccer team. 

See page 18. 



Golf team opens 

season on home 

course. 

See page 18. 



NCACE accredits 

Clarion University, 

See page 17. 




Horror 
Show....pg. 9. 



w w w— T t heclarioncall 



c o m 



Blood drive transfers new life into community 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-jn-Chief 

The Clarion University blood 
drive, held Sept. 25, in the North 
Tippin Gymnasium, generated 
169 productive units of blood. 

The desired amount for the day 
was 125 units. 




In the first 15 minutes, 90 peo- 
ple came through the door, said 
Darlene Hartle, R.N.C., health 
educator and director of the drug 
and alcohol program. 

Throughout the day, 203 people 

came through the door. Because 

of a two to three hour wait all day, 

another 90 people signed rapid 

response cards. 

Donors who signed 
rapid response cards 
gave their contact infor- 
mation where they could 
be reached in case of 
donation emergencies. 

Another 15 donors 
were deferred due to 
colds, low iron or other 
reasons, Hartle said. 

Thirteen units of blood 
were incomplete because 
donors became faint and 
for other reasons, said 
Hartle. 

The incomplete units 
don't go to waste as they 



can be used for testing. 

Of the units donated, 43 donors 
were first time donors. 

"I have not seen so many people 
and so much help ever at a blood 
drive," Hartle said. 

Alpha Sigma Tau sorority, 
Sigma Pi fraternity and Interhall 
Council helped at the blood drive. 

Hartle said these groups helped 
despite having to work on their 
Autumn Leaf Festival floats. 

There wasn't a single "crabby" 
person, worker or donor, all day, 
said Hartle. 

Hartle also said one Sigma Pi 
brother came in at 7:30 a.m. to set 
up chairs by himself 

The blood drive finally finished 
after clean-up at approximately 7 
p.m. The Red Cross even ran out 
of coolers to transport the blood. 

Another blood drive will be tak- 
ing place at Owens-Brockway, 
Oct. 2, in the Clubhouse from 
9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

The event will serve homemade 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



The worl<ers at the CUP Blood Drive were busy all day as 
donors had a one and a half to two hour wait. Some people 
had to leave because they didn't have enough time to 
donate. Owens-Brockway scheduled a blood drive for Oct. 2. 



vegetable soup for donors. For more information about 

Tuesday's food was donated by donating blood call the American 

Papa John's, Burger King and Red Cross Allegheny Region 

Chartwell's Dining Services. chapter at 226-7040. 



Autumn Leaf Festival, "The Pinnacle of Success" 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chi^^^^^ 

The Autumn Leaf Festival 
which began Sept. 22 and will 
continue through Sept. 30 fea- 
tures the theme "The Pinnacle 
of Success." 

The theme was selected after 
ALF received the 2000 Gold 
Pinnacle Award. 

The Clarion Area Chamber of 
Business and Industry usually 
holds a contest every year to 
select the theme, but coordina- 
tors said they wanted this spe- 
cific theme in honor of the 
award. 

National City Bank is the 
sponsor of ALF this year. Food, 




vendors, games, rides and other 
events are slated to take place. 

Some scheduled activities for 
the remainder of the week 
include the Commodore/Colony 
Homes Farmers & Crafters Day, 
Sept. 28. 

Saturday, Sept. 29 will feature 
a parade at Noon followed by 
the CUP Football game at 2 



p.m., held in Memorial 
Stadium. The CUP Golden 
Eagles will host Kutztown. 

After the game an "After- 
Game-Social" will be held at the 
Clarion V.F.W. for CUP Alumni 
and their family and friends. 

The final day of ALF will fea- 
ture an Antique Tractor Show 
between Fourth and Fifth Ave. 
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

A "Rock-N-Roll" Oldies free 
concert will be held at CUP 
Memorial stadium at 6 p.m. The 
local band "Roots Rising" will 
be the opening act. 

ALF will end with fireworks 
presented by Cartwright 
Fireworks. 

Approximately 5,000 volun- 



teers take part in the event 
throughout the course of the 
week. 

Although ALF does not have a 
grand marshall for the parade. 
The Clarion Area Chamber of 
Business and Industry does have 
a new director. 

Gale Owen assumed the posi- 
tion of director following the 
resignation of Karen Pope. 

Owen worked in the health 
industry for 22 years but also 
has a B.S. in communication 
from Clarion University. 

During the summer, Owen 
told The Clarion News that she 
is "excited to be here and excit- 
ed to see how the first year 
goes." 



ft 



The first draft of Clarion University history 



ff 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call 



September 20, 2001 




Sports 

mole Tiffin 




Courtesy of Sports Information 

The Clarion Golden Eagles 
gave a strong showing during 
this past weekend's game 
against Tiffin. Ohio. Gaining 
ground for Clarion, (1-2) wide 
receiver. Mike McCullum. 
caught tvvo touchdown passes 
and led the Golden Eagles to a 
27-14 win against Tiffin (0-3) 
on Saturdax afternoon. 

Held at Memorial Stadium, 
the "Family Day" crowd of 
4,600 remembered all those 
affected h\ Tuesday's tragedy 
uith a minute of silence. 

fiffin took a 7-0 lead at 4:36 
of the first quarter on a three- 
yard run h\ quarterback. Joe 
Pe^chln^ke. capping a nine- 



pla\. SO-\ard dri\ 



The 



Dragon.s led 7-0 to start off the 
game. 

Clarion, determined to win on 
their own territory, stormed 
back scoring 14 unanswered 
points to take a 14-7 lead going 
into halftime. 

The Golden Eagles drove 70 
yards in si.x plays just to tie the 
gam.e after Tiffin's first scoring. 



Mike McCullum caught a 42- 
yard touchdown pass from 
quarterback Adam Almashy at 
2:18 of the first quarter. 

Clarion capitalized on a Tiffin 
turnover for its second score. 
Clarion linebacker. Dennis Yu, 
caused a Dragon fumble at the 
Tiffin 20. That fumble was then 
recovered by teammate. Doug 
Diegelman. at the Tiffin 20 yard 
line. 

On the first play, halfback, 
Glenn Lovelace, scampered 20 
yards for the touchdown with 
12:38 left in the second quarter 
Clarion took the second hall 
kickoff and dro\e 75 vards in 
SI.X plays to build a 21-7 advan 
tage. .Adam Almashy's 22 yard 
run to the Tiffm 16 set up a 16 
yard touchdown run b\ Robert 
Walker. 

The Golden Eagles put the 
game away in the fourth quarter 
after getting the ball on downs 
at the Tiffin 21. Almashy hit 
McCullum for his second 
touchdown of the day, a 25-yard 
completion, to give Clarion a 
27-7 lead with only 2:05 
remaining. 
Tiffin's Perchinske connected 







->.™**w*-.^TOT^»*J*« •5s^;»i^>;■«■.^W^;'^^ .o X£, 1^ '♦.'SSP^e/^ #■** jf^^ft^.'^tt^" »ii^i' 



Courtesy ot the iooibdll vveb.Mle 



The Golden Eagle football players raise their helmets to lift spirits prior to garnefime. learn 
huddles before games help players focus on what to accomplish individually as well as at 
the team level during the game. 



Stats 



Tiffin 



First Downs 16 

Rushes- Yards 37-100 

Passing Yards (NET) 222 

Passes Att-Comp-Int 33-18-2 

Tot. Offensive Plays 70-322 

Fumble Returns- Yards 0-0 

Punt Returns- Yards 2-9 

Kickoff Returns- Yards 5-91 
Interception Returns- Yards 1-0 

Punts (Number- Avg) 6-39.2 

Fumbles-Lost 4-2 

Penalties-Yards 9-75 

Possession Time 32:04 

Sacks By: Number- Yards 3-20 



Clarion 



17 

52-262 

121 

12-6-1 

64-383 

0-0 

2-29 

2-43 

2-1 

5-33.8 

4-2 

9-87 

27:56 

2-8 



on a 29-yard touchdown pass to safety Korey Eppinette w"ho had ^" Shippensburg, under veteran 
Terry Dalehite with ten seconds 13 tackles and one tackle-for- head coach Rocky Rees. has led 
left in the game to close the loss. Doug Diegelman had eight the Red Raiders to a very 
^'^^'■'"g- stops, three tackles-for-losses deceiving 1-2 start in 2001. 

Clarion had 383 yards of total and one sack, while Dennis Yu Ship opened the season with a 
offense, including 262 rushing had two fumbles caused, one 28-25 overtime loss at 
yards and 121 passing. Almashy interception and three tackles. Shepherd, and then lost 29-18 at 
completed si.x of 12 passes for The Golden Eagles travel to Bloomsburg (2000 NCAA run- 
121 yards and two touchdowns. Shippensburg next Saturday to ner-up) l)efore defeating 
McCullum grabbed five pass- begin PSAC-West play. Tiffin Millersville on Saturday H-?*" 
es for 113 yards and two touch- hosts St. Xavier next Saturday Rees. in his 12th season at 
downs, while Demetric Gardner at noon. 

rushed 22 times for 119 yards. The Golden Eagles, under 

Walker had ten carries for 69 eighth year head coach Malen 
yards and one touchdown, while Luke, enter the game with a 1-2 
Lovelace rushed six times for overall record. Clarion started 
44 yards and one score. the year with a last minute loss 

Tiffin had 322 total yard.s at East Stroudsburg (33-27). 
including 100 rushing and 222 and a loss at #3 ranked NCAA 

Div. 1-AA Youngstown .State 
(44-0). hefdre toppling Tiffin 
27-14. Luke has a Clarion 
record of 38-41 overall and a 
PSAC-West slate of 20-22. In 



passing. Perchinske completed 
18 of 30 for 222 yards and one 
touchdown with two intercep- 
tions. Nii Hammond gained 86 
vards on 20 carries, while 
Kenny Lockhart grabbed six 
passes for 92 yards. 



Shippensburg, has a record of 
62-62-1. and an overall colle- 
giate record of 98-77-2 in 17 
seasons. 

The (jolden Eagles, v\lu) ucic 
7-4 overall a year ago and 5-1 
;n the PS.AC-W'csi. arc hoping 
to follow last year's formula ii> 
finish on top i)f the div ision. 
Last years team also started 
with two losses and a win on 
their way to a strong finish The 
2000 l-a^les ^ defeated 



his 14th year as a collegiate Shippensburg in a wdd 56-49 
head coach (6 at Defiance), he game at Clarion's Memorial 



Clarion's defense was led by has a career record of 75-62. Stadium, 



Inside 
Sports 



Check out your 

sports knowledge 

with the question of 

the week. 

See page 19. 



Fans in support of 

new soccer team. 

See page 18. 



Golf team opens 

season on home 

course. 

See page 18. 



NCACE accredits 

Clarion University, 

See page 17. 



3 
7 



Tie C^'oft Ca^ 



September E7, EDDl 



m 

01 

3 

m 
JS 
K 

CO 
QJ 

E 

I 




urMTT 



XlliP Rocky. 



Horror 
Show....pg. 9. 



WWW 



theclarioncall 



com 



Blood drive transfers new life into community 



by .4 my .A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Kditor-in-Chief 

The Clarion University blood 
drive, held Sept. 2.^, in the North 
Tippin Gvmnasium, generated 
169 productive units of blood. 

The desired amount for the day 
was 125 units. 



Inside 



News 

Alcohol 
Awareness for 

• ALF. pg.5. ' 

Lifestyles 

• CUP 

Homecoming 

Court 

photo.....pg.l2. 



In the first 15 minutes, 90 peo- 
ple came through the door, said 
Darlene Hartle, R.N.C.. health 
educator and director ot the drug 
and alcohol program 

Throughout the day. 203 people 

came through the door. Because 

of a tvvo to three hour wait all day, 

another 90 people signed rapid 

response cards. 

Donors who signed 
rapid response cards 
gave their contact infor- 
mation where they could 
be reached in case of 
%. donation emergencies. 

.vnother 15 donm.-, 
were deferred due to 
colds, low iron i)r other 
reasons, Hartle said. 
P Thirteen units of blood 

were incomplete because 
donors became faint and 
for other reasons, said 
H Hartle. 

The incomplete units 
don't go to waste as they 



can be used for testing. 

Of the units donated, 43 dimors 
were first time donors. 

'i have not seen so many people 
and so much help ever at a blo^^d 
drive." Hartle said. 

Alpha Sigma Tau sonritv. 
Sigma Pi fraternity and Interhall 
Council helped at the blood drive. 

Hartle said these groups helped 
despite having to work on their 
■Xutumn Leaf Festival tloats. 

There wasn't a single "crabby" 
person, worker or donor, all day, 
said Hartle. 

Hartle also said one Siuma Pi 
orother came m at 7:"^0 a.m. to :,et 
up chairs by himseit. 

The blood drive finally finished 
after clean-up at appro.ximately 7 
p.m. The Red Cross even ran out 
ot coolers to transport the blood. 

Another blood drive will be tak- 
ing place at Owens-Brockvvay. 
Oct. 2, in the Clubhouse from 
9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

The event will serve hoinemade 




Graham Hermanns i he Clarion Cai 



fhe workers at The CUP Blood Drive were busy all day as 
donors had a one and a half to fw'o hour wait. Some people 
had to leave because they didn't have enough time to 
donate. Owens-Brockwav scheduled a blood drive for Oct. 2. 



vegetable soup for donors For mt)re information about 

Tuesday's food was donated by donating blood call the American 

Papa John's, Burger King and Red Cross Alleghenv Region 

Chartwell's Dining Services. chapter at 226-''040. 



Sports 

Golf team ties 
for 7th at Hal 
Hansen..pg.l9 



• Index • 

Opinion.....pg.3. 

News, pg.5. 

Lifestyles...pg.9. ^ 
Sports......pg.20. ^ 

E*t'meDt..pg.l3. 
Classified.pg.15. 



• Autumn Leaf Festival, "The Pinnacle of Success" 



by Amy .\. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

The Autumn Leaf Festival 
which began Sept. 22 and will 
continue through Sept. 30 fea- 
tures the theme "The Pinnacle 
of Success." 

The theme was selected after 
ALF received the 2000 Gold 
Pinnacle Award. 

The Clarion Area Chamber of 
Business and Industry usually 
holds a contest every year to 
select the theme, but coordina- 
tors said they wanted this spe- 
cific theme in honor of the 
award. 

National City Bank is the 
sponsor of .ALF this year. Food, 




vendors, games, rides and other 
events are slated to take place. 

Some scheduled activities for 
the remainder of the week 
include the Commodore/Colony 
Homes Farmers & Crafters Day, 
Sept. 28. 

Saturday, Sept. 29 will feature 
a parade at Noon followed by 
the CUP Football game at 2 



p.m., held in Memorial 
Stadium. The CUP Golden 
Eagles will host Kutztown. 

After the game an "".'M'ter- 
Game-Social" will be held at the 
Clarion V.F.W. for CUP Alumni 
and their family and friends. 

The final day of ALF will fea- 
ture an Antique Tractor Show 
between Fourth and Fifth .Ave. 
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

A "Rock-N-Roll" Oldies free 
concert will be held at CUP 
Memorial stadium at 6 p.m. The 
local band "Roots Rising" will 
be the opening act. 

ALF will end with fireworks 
presented by Cartwright 
Fireworks. 

Appro.ximately 5,000 volun- 



teers take part in the event 
throughout the course of the 
week. 

Although ALF does not have a 
grand marshall for the parade. 
The Clarion Area Chamber (4 
Business and Industry dc»es have 
a new director 

Gale Owen assumed the posi- 
tion of director following the 
resignation of Karen Pope. 

Owen worked in the health 
industry for 22 years but also 
has a B.S. in communication 
from Clarion University. 

During the summer, Owen 
told The Clarion News that she 
is "excited to be here and e,xcit- 
ed to see how the first year 
goes." 



If 



The first draft of Clarion University history 



If 



(IHl 



I 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 
Amy A. Thompson 

Keith Gwillim 
Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 

Graham Hermanns 

Tim Connets 

Jill Brennan 

Tom McKeough 



Early ALF 



As the year at Clarion University goes on, many of us sit around 
and wait for the hightlights of the year, the biggest one being ALF. 

This year though, it is different. Autumn Leaf has graced Clarion 
County earlier than usual. 

There are many feelings about this, some positive and some nega- 
tive. 

We feel that it is too soon in the semester for ALF to be going on. 

One of the biggest reasons for this reaction is because the leaves 
have not begun to change. 

Part of ALF is seeing all the different colored trees when you look 
off into the distance. This year we do not have that. 

Another part of the festival is that we are used to having it during 
the month of October. 

When looking around and seeing green on the trees instead of the 
warm colors of Fall, it is kind of depressing. The two are just asso- 
ciated together. 

Another problem that has arisen due to the early arrival of ALF is 
fraternities and sororities are finding it hard to get their floats done 
on time. 

They are having problems finding the funds from different com- 
panies in Clarion. 

If ALF wasn't so early this would not be a problem and everything 
would be going according to the schedule. 

One benefit of having ALF this week, is the weather has now 
changed into typical ALF weather. 

Instead of the warm days we were having, the cold weather has 
caught up to ALF. 

The rain has also seemed to help with the change. 

Would it be a typical Autumn Leaf Festival without rain? 

So is making the change easier to deal with because of the weath- 
er? We really don't think so. So maybe this isn't so bad after all. 

We know that no matter when ALF is going to take place, it will 
be the same great celebration that it has been in years past. 

This is what Clarion is known for and it will go on no matter what 
the date is. 

Editorial Policy 



Th« Uarion Call is taking $t&|i&t0 uni^ th« paper wUli 

^,«^«il?,yofpv^.. ^ W$:M«l|MCw feOiai first 
step. We, the MiimM Board, wlU «Kpi^$ <{|}r ofilnbii 
mm Issues across the c^dip^ «lal% iialloii, mM 
world. We m% iiot spe«iJii| Ut Cl^bn tlulwrsli^, ik^ 
Oarloii Stoclc^is^ As^^latlOii or iht stiicleats of mt 
XlnlTers^ity^ we are speakln^^ m m. Ictilanai Board « the 
irmcc of TiiK CtAmoN Call, These edit0rial» ar« 
devebped m a meeting of i\\^ EdtCortai Boards all 
wm^TS did not nece&sariiy agree on the opliil<»i ^^* 
ed In the edltoHaL The opinion expressed is shai^ by 
the w4m\i^ of the hoard, It Is aot always a luiatiteiNiis 
opinloii. You, the puhllc, reser?e the rlg^t i» enpr^nsr 
jour ple-asure or displeasure with these opIitloD^ vib a 
IjettcT \o the Editor. 



TH ECdA^ f O i ^ CA // 



September 27, 2001 



September 27, 2001 



/>/• r./.APm/\i r.Au 



Page 3 



Your Views 

"Understanding Terrorism and the U.S. 
Response" panel discussion scheduled 



The Political Science Association is sponsoring a 
panel discussion concerning the current global polit- 
ical crisis, "Understanding Terrorism and the U.S. 
Response." 

It will be held Thursday, Oct. 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Hart 
Chapel. 

The purpose of the forum is to help students and 
the public to gain a broader perspective on the events 
of Sept. 11, the response of our government and the 
impact on our nation. 

All students, faculty and the public are cordially 



invited. There will be plenty of opportunity for ques- 
tions and audience participation. 

The interdisciplinary panel will consist of the fol- 
lowing members: Patrick McGreevy, of the 
Anthropology/Geography/Earth Science department; 
Thomas Rourke and and Kevan Yenerall, both of the 
Political Science department; and Julia Bartkowiak 
from the Philosophy department will serve as the 
moderator. 

Dr. Tom Rourke 
Political Science Department 



Reader questions source of Sept. 11 attacks 



Dear Editor, 

Since the terrorist attacks on the 
Pentagon and World Trade Center, 
all I have been hearing on televi- 
sion is that it is probably the work 
of Osama bin Laden. Why? 

The number of people around 
the world that are angry over U.S. 
foreign policy is extremely large. 

Iraqis are angry over the contin- 
ual bombings, the sanctions 
which have killed over a million 
people and the depleted uranium 
used in bombing that has caused 
leukimia and other cancers. 

Yugoslavs are angry over the 
bombing and dismemberment of 
their country. 

Palestinians are angry over U.S. 
support for Israel. 

Latin Americans are angry over 
decades of U.S. -supported coups, 
death squads, torture, missing 
people and ruthless dictators. 

Africans are angry over U.S. 
support for apartheid and the 
proxy wars by Renamo and 



The difficult task for 
the American people is 
to change U.S. foreign 
policy.... §§ 

-Gary Sudborough 



UNITA in Mozambique and 
Angola that have caused the 
deaths of millions of people. 

Indonesians are angry over the 
bloody dictatorship of Suharto. 

I could go on and on. 

Now, President George W. Bush 
will undoubtedly massively bomb 
another country, probably 
Afghanistan, causing the loss of 
more innocent lives and possibly 
commit U.S. ground forces in a 
search for Osama bin Laden. 

Incidently, the CIA was respon- 
sible for bringing the Taliban to 
power by financing the fight 
against the Russians. 



This policy will only exacerbate 
the situation and bring more ter- 
rorist attacks. 

I am appalled at the suffering 
and loss of life in New York City 
and Washington D.C. 

It is a terrible tragedy and could 
lead to the loss of civil liberties 
and will result in a headlong rush 
to Star Wars and militarization to 
the detriment of Social Security, 
education, the infrastructure, the 
environment, etc. 

The difficult task for the 
American people is to change 
U.S. foreign policy from one 
based on imperial might designed 
to foster the interests and profits 
of multinational corporations to 
one based on peace, justice and 
the interests of the common peo- 
ple everywhere. 

Then terrorism will cease. 

Sincerly, 
Gary Sudborough, Bellflower 

Ca 



iMMMkbUU^Ua^M 




I 



I 




The American Flag 
was waving in the 
crisp, night air in the 
background. 99 

-Jill Brennan 



Editorial, Jill Brennan 



On Friday, Sept. 21, my 
boyfriend and I attended the B-94 
Summer Stretch Concert at the 
Post-Gazette Pavillion. It is held 
every year around the same time. 
It was your typical concert with 
thousands of screaming fans, but 
something was different about the 
concert this year. 

It took place a week after the 
Attack on America. It was a 
chance for everyone to come 
together, have a good time and 
get a break from the depressing 
newscast everyday. 

Everyone pulled together in one 
place for an evening of entertain- 
ment. 

The bands that were to play 
were Bare Naked Ladies, Jessica 
Simpson. O-Town, Smash 
Mouth, Five for Fighting, Willa 
Ford and LFO. 

The Bare Naked Ladies did not 
attend because they were person- 
ally touched by the tragedy. A 
close friend of the band was 
killed in the World Trade Center 

They made an announcement 
the day of the concert requesting 
that everyone bring a dollar sup- 
porting the firefighters and a 
white candle for a prayer vigil at 
the end of the concert. 

Jessica Simpson sang, 
"Amazing Grace." The American 
Flag was waving in the crisp, 
night air in the background. 

1 always thought the song was 
beautiful, but this time, it touched 
me in a way that it hadn't before. 
I cried. 

The other bands, made refer- 
ence to the recent events by pay- 
ing tibute with some of their own 
songs they believed to be appro- 
priate. 

The mood at the concert was 
hi"h energv, which is usual for 



this kind of concert. 

It was nice to see everyone 
themselves even after all that's 
happened. 

The end of the concert, the staff 
of B-94 asked everyone to stay. It 
was pouring rain, but most people 
stayed for the candlelight vigil. 

You could feel a warmth and 
love overcome the crowd. 
Families and friends were 
embracing each other and crying. 

A moment of silence started the 
tribute, followed by recorded 
music for occasion by various 
artists. 

Some of the songs that I remem- 
ber them playing were Boyz II 
Men, "It's So Hard to Say 
Goodbye" and Sarah 

McLaughlin's "I will Remember 
You." 

It was a very sad moment, but I 
believe it helped people really 
deal with what is happening to 
our country and to mourn for the 
victims. 

They also played a voice-over 
of peoples' reactions to the plane 
crash the moment it happened, 
and you could hear them scream. 
It was a very real moment for 
me, and I felt an overflow of emo- 
tions; anger, sadness for the fami- 
lies and friends who have lost 
their loved ones, but most of all, I 
felt pride for how Americans are 
sticking together. 

That is what our country is built 
on. and nothing, or no one, can 
change that. 

Watching the families and 
friends holding each other made 
me realize we should never take 
our loved ones for granted. 

We should always tell them how 
we feel about them because life is 
precious and short. 




As a member of the National Newspaper 
Association, The Clarion Call is entitled 
to access NTSf A's Libel Hotline; with 
advice from Washington attomey 
Alice Neff Lucan. 



0pf/^(0/\i 






^ I felt fear that ! 

only experienced once 

in a nightmare when I 

was 18. 99 

-Maegon Barlow 



Hyde Park, 9-12 



Dear friends and family: 

I want everyone to know that 
I'm ok. 

Thank you so much for your 
phone calls and e-mails. 

Yesterday was a nightmare, and 
when we were evacuated I had a 
feeling of being lost like I never 
felt before. 

However, knowing that so 
many people were thinking about 
all of us in D.C. and New York 
provided an unbelievable amount 
of strength. 

When I called home collect at 
noon my Mom told me to 'be 
strong'. Those simple words 
helped me through the tragedies 
of yesterday. 

I was at work when the events 
of the day unraveled. I was with 
my colleagues watching CNN in 
horror when we discovered that 
the Pentagon, half a mile away, 
had been hit by a plane. 

We were also aware that an 
additional plane was potentially 
heading towards D.C, target 
unknown. Everything was hap- 
pening so quickly that reality 
seemed suspended. 

Anything seemed possible. Fear 
was palpable in the halls and on 
the Mall. 

Ironically, it was a beautifully 
sunny day, marred only by clouds 



of smoke drifting over from the 
Pentagon. 

I felt fear that I only experi- 
enced once in a nightmare when I 
was 18. Fortunately, I was able to 
stay collected and get out of the 
center of the city. 

I found a colleague, and he took 
me with him to his house in the 
suburbs until the situation was 
under control. 

Many innocent people died yes- 
terday. I was lucky, and yet so 
afraid. 

This is exactly what terrorism is 
''about, and simply for that reason 
I refuse to give into this fear. 

In all of the chaos and disbe- 
lief, I witnessed the heroism of 
people willing to make personal 
sacrifices for the safety of others: 
the security officers, firemen, 
doctors, police, co-workers at the 
Pentagon looking for friends, or 
simply a friendly gesture by a 
stranger to let one know 'we will 
be ok'. 

It is odd to find such humanity 
against the backdrop of such an 
inhumane act. 

Today I am back at work for the 
government, and my fear is trans- 
lating into a deeper conviction 
that the work we do here (non- 
proliferation) is more important 

See 'Barlow' Page 4 



Clarion Call Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 

Staff Writers: .Matt Greene, Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezyk, Emily 

Gill, Aai-on Stempeck, bura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Macri, Kelly 

Drevitch. Adam Berlotti and Khalia Robinson 

Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Reinhart 

Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske. 

Janice Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Evr>', Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, 

Julianne Kernan, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sarvers, Omar Rozier, Vicki Dietz, Brian 

Fashian and Julie Rengers 

Circulation Staff: Kristina Strojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer 

Wolben. lill Baumcratz, Tom Dennis and Liz Harris 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393*2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion.edu 

WWW.CLARION.EDL'/THECALL 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 

Tm Ct^RioN Cau. is pubUsht;4 most 
'fhursduys dunnj; iht' }>chtX'»{ ye;tr la 
accordance wi* }he academic calojdar* 
ii<Jitf>rs accept «wtnb«fJous from «H 
s«mivt<k, but reserve the rigftf to edit feif , 
hbtl. grammar, piuictuatiw. jeagtb; 
aad obsceoiiy; the <kismiinmoxi f^ 
lAbivh is lilt' respon^jibility of tlie EditCHf.; 
in i 'hief OjMmons exprtsst-d in edito* 
nah ;«c {h'vsc ol th<.' idcnlifitd wriicr 
iuid do om aecessariiy itflect Ibe t^a- 
joDs uf the student body, Uoiverstty, or! 
Clajion c<«nmunity. The Bxecyuw 
Boanl TcMTi'CS fhc right to refuse pub- 
ijcatioa of any {fftormaiion letters kj 
!he Editor must be f&.civcd by 5:(i(^. 
p.m. mi the Monday of dtiired ptifoliOfci 
don Litters must be signed md 
include a phone numbtr aod aa 
addfMS. It tht author wistes, to have 
i his/her identity withljeld it must be 
ootEd tm the letter. When tetters are 
pubhsbed is the discretion of the Editoi' 
m Chief. Display Advertising cop>' aadf 
greek urticles are due Monday by 5;0& 
p.m. the week of publication. 
Classifieds are doe Tuesday by 5:00 
p.rn- the we<k of publication. THE 
Cl.<rion C\ll »s funded by the 
Clarion Students" Ai^ociatton dSid 
sdvertisiog revwwe- 



Page 4 



< 



The CcAm/\/ Cau 



September 27, 2001 



September 27, 2001 




DP//\//0/\/ 



Call On You 

What are you looking forward to about this ALF Week? 

by: Graham Hermanns 



^or^e Tizof 

Computer Science, 

Sophomore 



HJ1 



I'm going home." 



n'risfi iMcCfure 

Secondary %({. Sociaf 

Studies, Jresfiman 



"Having fun at the par- 



ties.' 



Sarafi 1{pdgers 
Communication Sciences 
and disorders, Jreshman 



"Poor man's Caramel 

Apples and getting 

together with friends at 

parties." 




Hen 'Barton 
If Id. /'Bio, Junior 



"Looking forward to 

wining and dining with 

the locals." 



Sldett Suggs 

tCementary td. 

Sophomore 



Stephanie Carl 

It. 'Ed/Speciaf 'Ed. 

Sophomore 



"Having fun with 
friends and sorority sis- 
ters." 



"Poor man's Caramel 

Apples and having fun 

at the parties." 



Doyou wish to write a weekly opinion Golumn? 



*************** 



Would you like to appear In the Call On You? 



************** 



Do you need a co-curricular? It's not too late. 

Positions are still available on the 

Circulation Staff. 

*************** 

Call The Clarion Call at 393-2380. 




Letter to the Editor 




Panhel and IPC to raise money 
for Sept. 11 tragedy 



Dear Editor, 

The Panhellenic Council and the 
IntertVaternity Council will be 
holding a fund raiser on Oct. 3 to 
aid in the relief efforts for the vic- 
tims of the Sept. 1 1 tragedy from 
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Tables will be set up in the lob- 
bies of Still Hall and Founders 
Hall, along with the lobby and 
rotunda areas in the Gemmell 
Complex. 

Any and all donations will be 
greatly appreciated. The intention 
of this fund raiser is to pull the 



Clarion University student body 
together for a common goal. 

All of America, including col- 
lege students, have been greatly 
affected by the events of Sept. 1 1 . 

This fund raiser is a small way 
to say that we are proud to be 
Americans and proud to help in 
anyway we can. 

As you walk past these tables 
Oct. 3, please donate however 
much you can. 

Sincerely, 
Lindsey Lowrie, Senior 
Communication Major 



Barlowl A letter home to her friends and family after the 
Sept. 11 tragedy, from Page 3. 



and urgent than ever before. 

This was horrible, but what 
scares me the most, and what we 
are afraid to say, is that it could 
have been worse. 

Yesterday, I contemplated quit- 
ting my job and moving to a 
peaceful oasis far removed from 
any center of political and/or eco- 
nomic activity. I have decided 
against this option. 
I despair to think that these attacks 
will breed a brutal nationalism in 
our people. I believe strongly that 
injustice breeds further injustice. I 
hope that we are able to lead by 



example rather than brute force. 

Anger is destructive and often 
indiscriminate. Too many deaths 
attest to this fact. I hope the US 
response to this attack is well 
thought out, effective and 
humane. I don't want to see more 
innnocent people dying (any- 
where)! 

Today, I am thankful for all that 1 
have. My heart and thoughts are 
with all oi the injured, the dead 
and their families. 

Maegon Elizabeth Barlow lives 
and works in Wasliint^ton D.C. 



If you couldn't give blood 

Sept. 25 in 

Tippin North Gymnasium, 

you can give blood at 

Owens -Brockway, 

Oct. 2 in the Clubhouse 

from 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

If you wish to become a 

Rapid Response Donor 

call the 

Red Cross Allegheny Region 

at 226-7040. 



r//f CcARfO/^ Cau 



Page 5 




Neus 




ALF heightens alcohol awareness 



by Linda Bryce 
Clarion Call Contributing Writer 

The Clarion County District 
Attorney's office, Sept. 17, 2001, pro- 
vided a warning for Clarion University 
students who are anticipating a "party 
time" during the Autumn Leaf Festival. 
Getting arrested and convicted for 
alcohol law violations could jeopardize 
their career plans. 

Clarion County Assistant District 
Attorney Dave Speer offered the infor- 
mation during an informational session 
held for all Clarion University athletes. 
Speer explained how the drug and 
alcohol laws pertain to college students. 
Speer expressed concern saying, 
"Students aren't aware of the law. If 
you aren't 21 you are wide open for 
problems. Students don't realize how 
severe the penalties could be." 

Speer offered the following tips and 
information for CUP students to consid- 
er. 

Outside parties. With the warm 
weather outside parties are popular. 
Police know this and will be looking for 
people leaving the party with open con- 
tainers or people who are stumbling. 
This gives the police a reason to stop 
people for questioning. 

Open container ordinance. If people 
are on Clarion Borough property (side- 
walk, street, etc.) and are caught with 
an open container of alcohol, they can 
be cited. 

Noise ordinance. Police have the 
right to enter a premises if they can hear 
noise or music 50 feet away. Speer 
explains, where there is noise, there is 
usually booze. 

Falie ID'S. If a person is caught with 
fake identification, they may be charged 
with the same penalty as consuming 
alcohol. The ID can be confiscated. The 
bars are strict about this because if they 
are caught with minors the bar is liable. 

DUI. Any adult over the age of 2 1 can 
have a legal blood alcohol content of 
.09 percent or below. Anyone under 21 
can be charged with alcohol law viola- 
tions if their bhmd alcohol content is 
.02 or higher. For a 160-pound person 
the .01 percent limit is attained by 
drinking one beer or one mixed drink or 



one 4-ounce glass of wine in an hour. 
Penalties for a first offense of a DUI is 
a $300 fine, two years probation, DUI 
school, 48 hours to two years in jail, 
and license suspension for one year. For 
a second offense, the fine increases and 
a minimum of 30 days to two years in 
jail. 

Attempt to purchase, consume, 
transport, or possess alcohol for 
minors. The first offense will be a sum- 
mary offense with a $300 fine plus 
court costs and 90-day loss of driver's 
license. The second offense is a $300 
fine plus court costs and loss af driver's 
license for a year. The third offense is a 
$300 fine plus court costs and loss of 
driver's license for two years. This 
summary offense will not leave your 
record. 

Furnishing alcohol to minors. A per- 
son can be charged for driving to pur- 
chase, purchasing, taking money at the 
door, or serving alcohol. In some 
instances, the fraternal organization can 
be charged. This is a misdemeanor and 
the person will have a permanent crimi- 
nal record. For future teachers and peo- 
ple seeking government positions, a 
criminal record could jeopardize job 
opportunities. 

Possession of controlled substances. 
The laws for DUI apply. 

Counterfeit drugs. An example of a 
counterfeit drug is crushing aspirin and 
selling it as cocaine. The penalty is the 
same as selling cocaine. See Possession 
of controlled substances. 

School zone enhancement. If a per- 
son is in 1,000 feet of a school or 
school property (including the 
University, IC School, Clarion Area 
Elementary or High School) and is sell- 
ing drugs, that person can face a prison 
sentence of one to two years in a state 
penitentiary. Speer said there is practi- 
cally nowhere in the borough that is 
safe to sell drugs. 

Alcohol related assaults. If a person 
is accused of an assault, they must plea 
guilty and will receive a misdemeanor 
or the person will go to trial. If people 
go as a group and act out, they can all 
be charged with some pretty heavy 
penalties. 



Speer also offered the following safe- 
ty tips for students: 

If you are at a party and are underage 
and not drinking, you are legal. 

If you are hosting a party and minors 
come to your party and bring their own 
alcohol, you are liable. 

If you live at a house and you are a 
minor and your roommates are having a 
party or there is any alcohol in the 
house you, the minor, are liable. 

"It takes some degree of smarts to get 
here (Clarion University), but people 
don't use their common sense," said 
Bob Carlson, CUP athletic director. 

"If you are under 21 be smart and 
don't drink. It is the law," Speer said. 

Some CUP student athletes expressed 
surprise at what they learned at the ses- 
sion. 

"I was surprised that one beer an hour 
can put me over the legal limit," Missy 
Harkins said. 

"I can't believe people are such idiots 
to try to sell aspirin as cocaine. If they 
get caug+»t, I hope they do go to jail," 
said Rad Martinez. 

Eric "Evo" Evanoski said, "After 
hearing all the new information, it has 
made me think twice about who I hang 
around with. I realize I can have a good 
time without drinking." 

"I didn't realize that police could 
come to a party if they heard music 50 
feet away. It is scary for education 
majors," said Terwilliger. 





President Reinhard 
welcomes 

freshmen senators 
See Page 6. 



Clarion University's 

Debate Team 

advances to 

final four 

See Page 7. 



New courses being 
added to 

general education 
curriculum 
See Page 8. 



lABC Meeting 

Tuesday 

Oct. 2, 2001 

at 5 p.m. in 

1 24 Becker 

Hall. 
All members 

are 

welcome to 

attend. 




The 

Claricn 

Call Staff 

wishes 

everycne 

a 

happy 

and 

safe 

ALr. 



Clarion University 

enrollment 

increases 

See Page 8. 



Page 6 



T^E CiAm/\/ Cau 



September 27, 2001 



Student Senate 



President Reinhard welcomes new freshmen senators 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

Editor 

Clarion University President 
Diane Reinhard welcomed all 
members of Student Senate to 
the 2001-2002 academic year at 
Monday evening's meeting. In 
addition, she congratulated the 
two recently elected senators. 
Freshmen Greg Clopp and Sarah 
Snyder. President Reinhard 
spoke about some of the issues 
she has been addressing this 
semester, which include the 
MiddleStates program and the 
Performance Outcome Plan 
(POP). 

During the Business Manager's 
report, Mr. Krull announced 
2001 is the 55th year Clarion 
University has been in existence. 
Student Senate President Ben 
Chervenak, who attended the 
BSGP conference in Harrisburg 
last weekend, said the issue of 
the year would be Citizenship. In 
addition. President Chervenak 
was elected secretary/treasurer 
of the new BSGP Executive 
Board. 



According to President 
Chervenak, senators still have 
the red, white, and blue ribbons 
available for a one-dollar dona- 
tion to benefit the victims of the 
September 1 1 th tragedy. 

Vice President Missy Gring 
said there would be a meeting 
Monday, October 22 for all fund- 
ed organizations to explain the 
Weekend Program Initiative. 
This plan will most likely go into 
effect next semester. 

Senator Mike McCabe, chair of 
the Committee on Rules, 
Regulations, & Policies, moved 
to amend the policy for funded 
and non-funded CSA organiza- 
tions; his motion carried by a 21- 
0-0 vote. 

Chair of the Committee on 
Sub-Committees, Senator 

Tameka Washington, said Senate 
would be appointing members to 
the Conduct Board. In addition, 
applications are currently being 
accepted for the CSA Board of 
Directors. 

According to Treasurer Tom 
Clopp, the University Activities 
Board (UAB) will be holding a 
Pep Rally for Homecoming 



Thursday, September 27 at 7:00 
p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

Senator Rebecca Emert, of the 
Student Athletic Advisory 
Council (SAAC), said Tameka 
Washington and Jared Moss have 
been selected to serve as the 
PSAC representatives. 

Upcoming fund-raisers spon- 
sored by SAAC members 
include a food drive for 
Thanksgiving and Operation 
Clean-Up, which will be held in 



the spring. The next SAAC meet- 
ing is scheduled for Thursday, 
October 4 at 9:00 p.m. 

A representative of Interhall 
Council informed Senate of 
some of the fund-raising activi- 
ties they would be participating 
in this semester. Members of 
Interhall will provide candy bags 
for Halloween, and they will host 
a karaoke event in addition to the 
Penny Wars. 

Senator Barbara Hammond 




announced a Coat Drive, spon- 
sored by Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sorority to benefit Stop Abuse 
For Everyone (SAFE). Coats that 
are in good condition may be 
donated in Gemmell as well as in 
Campbell and Wilkinson Halls. 

Mr. Harry Tripp, Senate 
Advisor, reminded Senate "The 
Rocky Horror Show" begins 
Tuesday, October 2 and will be 
playing through Saturday, 
October 6. 

Treasurer Clopp reported the 
following account balances: 
Capital, $86,939; Large Item 
Capital, $437,038.13; 

Supplemental. $14,156; and 
Supplemental Reserve. $58,465 

Vice President Gring 
announced Senator Amy Cohen, 
who attended the conference in 
Harrisburg last weekend, as 
Senator of the Week. Senator 
Cohen said, "The BSGP was 
informative, and I enjoyed meet- 
ing other fellow senators from 
different universities." 

The next Student Senate meet- 
ing is scheduled for Mondav, 
October 1 at 7:30 p.m. in 246 
Gemmell. 



College Media Day I Joslyn participates in Fulbfight Scholarship 



"Putting the Pieces Together" 

Friday, Oct. 12, 2001 
8 a.m. -4 p.m. 

All students are welcome: 
to attend the sessions, 
meet new contacts, 
begin networking. 

Sponsored by 
the Society of Collegiate Journalists 



Fall Formals • Homecoming 



America's Top Designers! • LARGEST SELECTION 



OPEN TODAY Monday - Friday 12 to 9 
Saturday 10 to 6 » Sunday 12 to 5 



PITTSBURGH'S FORMAL SUPERSTORE 

Monroeville - Rt. 22 • Pleasant Hills - Rt.51 

North Hills - McKnight Rd. • McMurray - Rt 19 

(412) 372-5311 weddingworld.com 

Wedding World 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

E<JitQC 

Catherine Joslyn, an art profes- 
sor at Clarion University, will be 
participating in the Fulbright 
Scholar program during the spring 
semester of 2002. She will travel 
to the Peruvian Andes to teach tex- 
tile art seminars, work with native 
weavers in a distant mountain vil- 
lage, and create artwork intlu 
enced by her Andean experiences. 

Joslyn will present her work- 
shops to a variety of individuals, 
including professionals and 
advanced art design students, as 
well as school teachers interested 
in learning new techniques for 
integrating the Peruvian and inter- 
national culture into their curricu- 
la. 

Participants in these seminars 
will create panels for two wall 
hangings, which portray Peruvian 
and Pennsylvania motifs. A paral- 
lel workshop in Clarion this fall 
will allow contributors to create 
similar panels for the same two 
murals. Upon completion of the 
murals, one will hang in 
Pennsylvania and the other in 



Peru. An interactive web page 
about this project offers a chance 
for participants in both continents 
to communicate with each other in 
English or Spanish. 

Joslyn has been preparing for the 
Fulbright project during a sabbati- 
cal year and through three subse- 
quent trips to Peru. She said she is 
continuously learning about web 
site design, as well as her own 
artistic direction and the various 
languages of Peru. 

She said, "I look forward to run- 
ning the pilot art exchange work- 
shop here in Clarion this -fall. 
When I return from SoutJi 
America next fall, I will share 
insights and images from the pro- 
ject with local and national audi- 
ences...! feel very lucky as an 
American to have the opportunity 
to carry out this project through a 
program of our State Department. 
One of the most interesting 
aspects of working internationally 
is the cross-cultural connection." 

Joslyn credits a few sources for 
helping her get to this point. She 
said, "One doesn't get a Fulbright 
alone. This kind of project isn't' 
just an individual effort. Many 
colleagues and friends in Clarion 



and elsewhere, and of course my 
family, have supported me in 
achieving my goals, and my work 
celebrates our collaboration.'" 

The J. William Fulbright Foreign 
Scholarship Board is providing the 
grant for Joslyn to pailicipale in 
the Scholar Program to Peru. Now 
in its' ^2nd year, the Fulbright 
exchange program is an interna- 
tional success. Designed by for- 
mer Senator J. William Fulbright 
of Arkansas in 1946. the program 
serves "to increase mutual under- 
standing between the people of the 
United States and the people of 
other countries." 

Members of the I-ulbright pro- 
gram are selected based on acade- 
mic and professional qualifica- 
tions and tlicii ability and willing- 
ness to share ideas and experi- 
ences with people of diverse cul- 
tures. 

Scholarships are awarded 
through open competition, and the 
Foreign Scholarship Board makes 
final selections. Thirty-seven for- 
eign governments share in the 
'funding of these exchanges. 

Joslyn is the .seventh Clarion 
University profes.sor to receive a 
Fulbright .scholarship since 1981. 



September 27, 2001 



r//f /^/A^/M CAU 



Page 7 



Clarion Debate Team advances 
to final four 



Public Safety Blotter 



Contributed by 
Golden Eagle Debate 

Clarion Speech and 
Debate Team traveled 
to King's College in 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa on 
Sept. 21-23, 2001, for 
their first debate 
tournament of the 
season. One of the 
largest tournaments 
on the East Coast, the 
King's College 

Tournament attracted 
nearly 100 teams 
from 22 universities. 
The team of Andrew 
Barnes, and George 
Rutherford had an 
impressive tourna- 
ment, advancing to 
semifinals in their 
division defeating 
teams from John 
Carroll University, 
Catholic University, 
Methodist College, 
the Naval Academy, 
and in an intense 
quarterfinal debate, 
Columbia University. 
Clarion's entry in the 
novice division (for 




Courtesy of Golden Eagle Debate 



Members of the Clarion University Speech and Debate Teann 
traveled to King's College for their first tournament of the season and 
advanced to the final four 



debaters with limited 
previous experience), 
composed of Nicki 
Williams and Lisa 
Bria also advanced to 
elimination rounds 
and competed in the 
round of 32. Williams 
was recognized as 
14th speaker and Bria 
awarded a plaque for 
eighth speaker out of 
a field of 100 



debaters. Bria and 
Williams defeated 
teams from West 
Point, Case Western 
Reserve, and West 
Virginia University. 

Traveling with the 
team were Coach Dr. 
Anand Rao and 
Assistant Coach Prof. 
Jim Lyle, both of 
whom teach in the 
SCT department. Rao 



noted the team's per- 
formance was an 
excellent start to the 
year and will help 
move Clarion 

University up in the 
national rankings. 
Clarion University 
Speech and Debate 
Team will next travel 
to the University of 
Richmond on Oct. 5- 
7, 2001. 



Clarion University Alumni Association 
offers scholarships 



by Teri Cattau 
Clarion Call Secretary 

The Clarion University 
Alumni Association will be 
offering, for the Spring 2002 
semester, scholarships 

through the Clarion 

University Foundation. 

These scholarships, totaling 
$1,500 are named for Ross, 
Gary, and Dan Rankin in 
recognition of their 
volunteer service to this 



university. 

The Ross Rankin and 
Family Graduate 

Scholarships are open to 
full-time graduate students 
who have completed at least 
nine graduate credit hours at 
Clarion University. Part-time 
students are also eligible if 
they are enrolled in a mini- 
mum of six credits during the 
semester that the funds are 
being offered. Graduate stu- 
dents are required to be 



hl^WIgBBHli^i&lislsithan just a degree 


^^KB!8Sn!S!il 


tolMiMiTmAmericans 1 


deadline for 

the 2002-2003 

Fellows 

Program is 

Feb. 1 , 2002 


The Core Center for Civic Leadership 

Pittsburgh 



enrolled in a university grad- 
uate program and must have 
already completed nine grad- 
uate credit hours at the time 
of application. 

All students must be in 
good academic standing with 
a minimum 3.0 QPA in their 
program. Applicants are 
required to state their acade- 
mic goals and volunteer their 
service to the University and 
community. 

Applications are available 
in the Alumni Relations 
Office, Haskell House, and 
the Graduate Studies Office 
in Carrier Hall. They are due 
back by Sept. 30. 

The Clarion University 
Alumni Association is dedi- 
cated to supporting the uni- 
versity community through 
the fostering of relationships 
between current and past stu- 
dents. 



Criminal mischief, 
disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety, 
known suspects dannaged the 
first floor men's restroom in 
Campbell Hall, Sept. 18,2001 
at 11:14 p.m. Actors were 
identified and charges will be 
filed upon determination of 
damages. 

Public drunkeness and 
underage drinking 

According to Public Safety, 
Jason Decker, 20, of 520 Nair 
Hall was cited for public 
drunkeness and underage 
drinking, Sept. 16,2001 at 
1 :32 a.m. Decker was 
intoxicated and fighting in Nair 
Hall. 

Criminal trespass, 
criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety, a 
male resident of Campbell 
Hall reported that approxi- 
mately six unknown males 
entered his room in an 
attempt to provoke a fight, 
Sept. 16,2001 at 2:30 a.m. 
Victim also reports that 
unkown persons wrote on a 
dry erase board with perma- 
nent marker. No suspects at 
this time. 

Public drunkeness. 
minors consumption 

According to Public Safety, 
Nicolas Yeager, 19, of 
Renfrew, Pa, was cited after 
he was observed by officers 
staggering in the middle of the 
road and falling down on 
Wood Street and Service 
Road, Sept. 15,2001 at 2 
a.m. 

Title 18 section 3921 
theft by unlawful taking 
of movable property 

According to Public Safety, 
Campus Police are 
investigating a report of a theft 
that occurred in Peirce 
Science Hall, Sept. 14, 2001 
at 1:32 p.m. 

Theft 

According to Public Safety, a 
student reported an orange, 
18 speed, Mongoose MGX 
bicycle stolen from the base- 
ment of Wilkinson Hall some- 
time in the evening of Sept. 
13 or the morning of Sept. 14, 
2001. 



Possession of 
marijuana and related 
accessories 

Public Safety was called to 
Campbell Hall by dorm staff 
and seized marijuana and 
related items from a known 
suspect, Sept. 12,2001 at 
12:40 p.m. Charges are 
pending lab results, according 
to Public Safety. 

Ag gravated assault, 
simple assault, 
resisting arrest, 
disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety, 
Nicole Williams, 21, of 507B 
Campbell Hall became 
combative and struck a Public 
Safety Officer with her fist 
after they attempted to 
contact her regarding another 
incident, Sept. 9, 2001 at 2:45 
a.m. 

False alarms to 
agencies of Public 

Safety 

According to Public Safety, 
unknown persons pulled a fire 
alarm in Wilkinson Hall on the 
second floor, Sept. 9, 2001 at 
12:30 a.m. Anyone with 
information is asked to con- 
tact Public Safety. 



Larry Ca^^eso will 

be the guest 

speaker at the 

Clarion Community 

and Clarion 

University of 

Pennsylvania 

community 

breakfast* 

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 

at the Clarion 

American Legion 

Banquet Room. The 

hot buffet breakfast 

is open to all and 

begins at 7:30 a.m. 

Cost is $5 payable at 

the door. 

Call 393-1865 

for 
reservations. 



i 



Page 6 



lH^MmildlL 



Shptembfr 27, 2001 



Sfptembfr 27, 2001 



TjfiJkML 



Pa(;i 



L: 



Student Semite 



President Reinhard welcomes new freshmen senators 



bv MiilulleD'l \a 

Clarion ("all Assistant News 

I'd i tor 

ClaruMi InivLTsiiN Proidcnt 
Oiaiio Reinhard uoknmed all 
members o\ Stiideni Senate lo 
the 200! :()(): academic \ear at 
Monda\ e\emng\ meeting. In 
additum. she ciMigratuhited the 
two recentl\ elected senatins. 
l-reshmen (ireg ("h>|ip and Sarah 
Sn\der I'lCMdent Reinhard 
spoke about some ot ilie issues 
she has been addressitig this 
semester, which include the 
MiddleStates program and tlie 
f'erto.rmaiice Outcome Plan 
(POP I 

During the Business Manager's 
repoit. Ml. Kiuil announced 
2001 IS the 55th \ear Clanon 
rm\ersit\ has been m existence. 
Student Senate President Hen 
('l)ci\enak. who alleiidca !he 
!?S(iP conterence m ilarirsburg 
List weekend, said ilie i^vue -i 
the \ear wiuild be (,'iti/ensiiip In 
addition, ['resident C'her\enak 
w,is cK.\ied >ecretai}.' treasurer 
ol the new l^SCil' !>,eaiH\e 
i3oard. 



.Acciirding to President 
Chervenak. .senators still ha\e 
the red, white, and blue ribbons 
available tor a one-dollar dona 
lion to benefit the vietiin.s of the 
September 1 1th tragedy. 

Vice President Missy (iiing 
said there would be a meeting 
Monday. October 22 tor all land- 
ed organizations to explain the 
Weekend Program Initiative. 
This plan will most likely go into 
et'tect next semester. 

Senator Mike McCabe. chair ot 
the Committee on Rules. 
Regulations, & Policies, moved 
to amend the policy tor funded 
and non-lunded (\S.\ organi/a- 
tions; his motion carried b\ a 21- 
0-0 \ote. 

( 'hair i)\ the Committee ^^^n 
Sub-Committees. Senator 

lameka Waslnngton. said Senate 
would be a[)pointing members to 
the Conduct B(nird In addition, 
applications are currenth being 
accepted tor the CS.\ Board ot 
Directors. 

.According to Treasurer Torn 
CK^pp. the Cniversit\ Acti\ities 
B(uird iCABi will be hi)lding a 
Pep RalK tor llomecnmini.'. 



Thursday, September 27 at 7:00 
p.m. Ill Hart Chapel. 

Senator Rebecca Panerl. of the 
Student Athletic Advi.sory 
Council (SAAC). said Tameka 
Washington and Jared Moss have 
been selected to ser\e as the 
PS AC representatives. 

Cpeoming fund-raisers spon- 
sored by SAAC members 
include a tood drive for 
Thanksgiving and Operation 
Clean-Up, which will be held in 



the spring. The next SAAC meet 
ing IS scheduled \\n Thursda\, 
October 4 at 9.00 p.m. 

.A representative i^\' Inlerhall 
Council informed Senate o\' 
some of the fund-raising activi- 
ties they would be [larficipating 
in this semester. Members o\ 
Interhall will provide candy bags 
tor Halloween, and they will host 
a karaoke e\ent in addition to the 
Pennx Wars. 

Senator liarhara Hammond 




C.rahaai f iormann.s.'The Clarion Calil 



\Sruden1 Senofe members at the meeting on Sept. 24. 2001 



announced a Coat Drixe. spon 
sored b_\ .Alpha Kap|ia .Alpha 
si)rorit\ to benetit Stop .Abuse 
F'or P'veryone (S.AI'I-) Coals that 
are in good condition nun tie 
donated in Ciemmell as well as in 
Campbell and Wilkinson Halls. 

Mr. Harry Iripp, Senate 
,Ad\is(M. reminded Senate "The 
Rt»ck\ Horror Sh(n\" begins 
Tuesday. October 2 and will be 
pla\ing thri)ugh Saturda\, 
October (>, 

Treasurer Clopp repiirted the 
following account balance^: 
Capital. S.S6.9.19; large Item 
Capital, S43:'.();s i ;, 

Supplemental. Si-i.l.5ti; .u,,! 
Su|iplemeiital Reset \e. S58.4()."S 

\ ice President (iiing 
announced SeiKitoi .\in_\ Colicn, 
who attended the coiiteicnci; in 
Harrisburg last weekend 

Sc'lhltOI i>j //.'(■ Week 's 

C(»hen said, •"Ihc BS(iP w.i^ 
intoriiiati\c. and 1 cnjoNcd fiicc: 
ing nther lellnw >c!iaioi> h.iiii 
diltercnt u!ii\ cisitic- ."" 

The next Sludeni Senaic incci 
ing is M.heduled toi .Minidjs. 
October 1 ;;i "^ M) pm. m 24(; 
(iemmcll. 



College Media Day Joslyn participates in Fulbrlght scholarship 



''Putting the Pieces Together"! 

Friday, Oct. 12, 2001 
8 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Ail students are welcome: 
to attend the sessions, 
meet new contacts, 
begin networking. 

Sponsored by 
the Society of Collegiate Journalists 



by MuhellcDTva 
Clarion Call .Assistant Neus 
MUqc 



Fall Formals • Homecoming 



America's Top Designers! • LARGEST SELECTION 



OPEN TODAY Monday - Friday 12 to 9 
Saturday 10 to 6* Sunday 12 to 5 



PITTSBURGH'S FORMAL SUPERSTORE 

Monrceviile - Rt. 22 • Pleasant Hills - Rt.51 

Ncnh S^lls - McKnight Rd. • McMurray - Rt. 19 

^^12) 372-5311 weddingworld.com 

Wedding World 



Catherine Jo.sl_\n. an art prole.s- 
sor at Clarion Uni\ersii\. will be 
partieipating in the I-'ulbnuht 
.Seholar pmgrani during the spring 
.seniesiei ot :0()2. She wil! iia\el 
to the rVru\ ian .•\nde> tn teach tex 
tlie an senvn.;!rs. uoik with naii 
\'-ea\(. . ,.; ncuntain v il- 

lage. and eieate a!t\u-.rk intUi 
eneed in iie; .Andean experiences 

,losi\n \\\\\ [)iescni hci uork 
shops to a \aiict) o\ indiv idiitii.^. 
including [irotcssionals and 
advanced art design students, as 
well as scliool teachers interested 
in learning new techniqiies tor 
integrating the Peru\ian and mtei 
national ciilture mio their curricu- 
la, 

Pa^IlClpant^ in these seminars 
will create panels lor two wall 
hangings, which portrav Peruvian 
and Pennsylvania nn)lits. A paral- 
lel workshop in Clarion this tall 
will allow contributors to create 
similar panels for the same two 
murals Upon completion of the 
murals, one will hang in 
Pennsylvania and the other in 



Peru. .\n interactive web page 
about this project otters a chance 
lor participants m both continents 
to communicate with each other in 
I'nglish or .Spanish 

.loslvn has been preparing tor the 
bulhrigiit pn\]ect during a sabbati- 
cal \car and tlnough three >u!i>e 
quent tiip^ to I'eru. .She said she i^ 

ntinuouslv learning .alHUit wch 
^:ie dcsi. 

artistic uiicciJ.Mi .'nJ ihe \aiioiis 
languages of Peiii 

She said. "I loiik loi ■.> .im \- > i nc 
nmg the r)ilot ait exchcUige v^oik 
shop here in Clanoii this -iall. 
\\ hen 1 leiiii n iioin Si uiiji 
America next tall. ! will share 
insiLihts iind nna'acs Iroin. the nio> 
\<:l\ with local and national audi- 
ences. .1 ice! \ei V liicK m 
.•\meiican to have the oc>poiiunitv 
to carrv out this pro|eci through a 
program ot Our State Deparimeni 
One ot the most interesting 
aspects ol working internath>nallv 
IS the cross-cultural connection. ' 

Joslvn credits a few sources lor 
helping her get to this point. She 
said, "One doesn't get a P'uibright 
alone. This kind of project isn't" 
just an individual effort. Many 
eojieaiiues and friends in Clarion 



and elsewhere, and ot course mv 
family, have supported me m 
achieving mv glials, aiit! mv work 
celebrates tun collaboration."' 

Ihe I. William bulbright i oicigii 
Scholaishij') Hoard is prov iding ihc 
grant tor losiv n to parlK ipa.te in 
the Svho!ai Pioo.miii to Peru Now 
li! ,ai !lic I'uihiiiihl 

'L'lani Is an miciiM 

n.l! ^Uv\.^^ hCsi/HCd tu |;-i 

! William I iiihti-;ii 
:i M)4(', the 
s^ i ^i ' M-. lease inuluai .i\\k\^[ 

staiiuing tv;wecn [\v~j people ■' •'' ■ 
Cniicii Slates .m,! ih:' in.-; 
olliei V I 'ai'i \: 

M albriiMii 

gram i ted based i ui a.cade 

mil.' a; / lon.il i_|iialil!ca 

iioiis an.; " -htv atid w iMiii;] 

ness \'- and evpeii 

dices will; ).■! '■; ^ i I diverse ciil 
lures 

Scholai I I, s lie avwioicii 
through open ce):i;neIilioit. and the 
loieign Scholarsh ■) Hoard m.ikes 
tinal seleclion i I i v seven lor 
eign goveiniiieiii; share m the 
'funding of these cxelianges. 

K)slyn IS the se.inih Clarion 
I niversitv proles ■ i eeei^ e a 
|-ulhri!_'ht scholaishij' wkc IMNI. 



Clarion Debate Team advances 
to final four 



Contribuk'd l)> 
(ioldeii Eaj^le Debate 

Clarion Speech and 
Debate Team traveled 
[o King's College in 
Wilkes-Barre. Pa on 
Sept. 21-2 C .:()») 1 tor 
their first debate 
tournament oi the 
season. One of the 
largest tournaments 
on the l:ast Coast, the 
King's College 

Tournament attracted 
nearly iOO teams 



from 



universities. 




The team of Andrew 
Barnes, and George 
Rutherford had an 
impressive tourna- 
ment, advancing ti> 
s e m 1 f i n a I s in t h e i r 
division defeating 
teams from John 
Carroll University, 
Catholic Universitv. 
.Methodist College. 
the Naval .Academy. 
and in an intense 
(luarterfmal debate, 
( 'olumbia L'niversity. 
(Marion's entry in the 
iiiu ice division ( for 



Covirtesv of Golden Eagle Debate] 



Members of the Clanon University Speech and Debate Team^ ' 

traveled to King's College for their first tournament of the season and 
advanced to the final four 



debaters with limited 
previous experience), 
composed of Nicki 
Williams and Lisa 
Bria alsi) advanced to 
elimination rounds 
and competed in the 
round of 32. Williams 
was recognized as 
14th speaker and Bria 
awarded a plaque for 
eighth speaker out of 
a field of 100 



debaters. Bria and 
Williams defeated 
teams from West 
Point, Case Western 
Reserve, and West 
Virginia University . 

Traveling with the 
team were Coach Dr. 
\nand Rao and 
Assistant Coach Prof. 
.Iim Lyle, both of 
whom teach in the 
SCT department, Rao 



noted the team's per- 
formance was an 
excellent start to the 
year and will help 
move Clarion 

U'niversity up in the 
national rankings. 
Clarion Universitv 
Speech and Debate 
Team will next travel 
to the University of 
Richmv:>nd on Oct 5- 
7, 2001. 



Clarion University Alumni Association 
offers scholarships 



by Teri Cattau 
Clarion Call Secretary 

riic Cl.irion Univer.sitv 
Alumni .Association will be 
olfering, for the Spring 2002 
s e m ester. s c li o I d r s h i p s 

through tlie Clarion 

I iiiv ersitv Foundation 

Fhese scholarships, totaling 
Si.50O are named tor Ri'>ss, 
C(,iiv. and Dan Rankin in 
rceognit ion of their 
vidunteer serv ice to this 



university. 

r he R o s s R a n k I n a n d 
Familv Cjraduate 

Scholarships are open to 
full-time graduate students 
who have completed at least 
nine graduate credit hours at 
("laruin University. Part-time 
students are also eligible if 
thev are enrolled in a mini- 
mum o\ six credits during the 
semester that the funds are 
being offered. Graduate stu- 
dents are required to be 



It takes 


f^iJil^than just a degree 


^^i^nTKTMii 


.o^5yj|^A,nencans 


deadline for 




■;:^;i:i<k4i:«^i 


^^ "m-a* 


.:>.s;isi*:;; 


ppJlnyvs^^^^^H 


m 


Program is 


>:x ^ 


:-:-■■■"■ 
v.: ■ 


Feb. 1,2002 


For more information ca'! today! 
41 2-201 -5 //2 • website- www.coro.com 


MH| The Core Center for Civic Leadership 

"^^K" Pittsburgh 



enr(dled in a university grad- 
uate program and must have 
already completed nine grad- 
uate i^redit hours at the time 
cd' application. 

,Ali students iriust be in 
good academic standing with 
a minimum 3.0 QPA in their 
program. .Applicants are 
required to state their acade- 
mic goals and volunteer their 
service to the University and 
community, 

\p[ilications are available 
in the .Alumni Relatu^ns 
Office. Haskell Misuse, and 
the Graduate Studies Oft ice 
in Carrier Hall. Thev are due 
back bv Sept. .'^^O 

The Clarion Universitv 
\lumni .\ssociaiion is dedi- 
cated to supporting the uni- 
versitv coinmunitv through 
the fostering i>f relationships 
between current and past stu 
dents 



Public Safety Blotter 



Criminal mischief 
disorderly conduc t 

According to Public Safety, 
known suspects damaged the 
first floor men's restroonn in 
Campbell Hall. Sept. 18.2001 
at 11 ;1 4 p.m. Actors were 
identified and charges will be 
filed upon determination of 
damages. 

Public drunkeness and 
underage drinking 

According to Public Safety, 
Jason Decker, 20, of 520 Natr 
Hall was cited for public 
drunkeness and underage 
drinking, Sept. 16, 2001 at 
1:32 a.m Decker was 
intoxicated and fighting in Nair 
Hall. 

Criminal trespass, 
criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety, a 
male resident of Campbell 
Hal! reported that approxi- 
miately six unknown males 
entered his room in an 
attempt to provoke a fight, 
Sept. 16, 2001 at 2:30 a.m. 
Victim also reports that 
unkown persons wrote on a 
dry erase board with perma- 
nent marker. No suspects at 
this time. 

Public drunkeness, 
minors consumption 

According to Public Safety 
Nicolas Yeager, 19, of 
Renfrew, Pa, was cited after 
he was observ/ed by officers 
staggering in the middle of the 
road and failing down on 
Wood Street and Service 
Road, Sept. 15, 2001 at 2 
a.m. 

Title 18 section 3921 
theft by unlawful taking 
of movable pro perty 

According to Public Safety, 
Campus Police are 
investigating a report ot a theft 
that occurred in Peirce 
Science Hall, Sept. 14, 2001 
at 1:32 p.m. 

Theft 

According to Public Safety, a 
student reported an orange, 
18 speed. Mongoose MGX 
bicycle stolen from the base- 
ment of Wilkinson Hall some- 
time in the evening of Sept. 
13 or the morning of Sept. '4 
2001. 



Posse.ssion of 
rnarijuana and r elated 
accessorie s 

Public Safety was called to 
Campbell Hall by dorm staff 
and seized marijuana and 
related items from a known 
suspect, Sept. 12, 2001 at 
12:40 p.m. Charges are 
pending lab results, according 
to Public Safety. 

Ag gravated assault, 
simple assault, 
resisting arrest, 
disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety. 
Nicole Williams, 21, of 507B 
Campbell Hall became 
combative and struck a Public 
Safety Officer with her fist 
after they attempted to 
contact her regarding another 
incident, Sept. 9, 2001 at 2:45 
a.m. 

False alarms to 
agencies of Public 

Safety 

According to Public Safety, 
unknown persons pulled a tire 
alarm in Wilkinson Hall on the 
second floor, Sept. 9, 2001 at 
12:30 a.m. Anyone with 
information is asked to con- 
tact Public Safety. 

i Larry Ca^seso will 

be the 2uest 

speaker at the 

Clarion Community 

and Clarion 

University of 

Pennsylvania 

community 

breakfast. 

Wednesday, Oct. 3. 

at the Clarion 

American Lesion 

Banquet Room. The 

hot buffet breakfast 

is open to all and 

begins at 7:30 a.m. 

Cost is S5 payable at 

the door. 

Call 393-1865 

for 
reservations. 



Page 8 



Tne CiAm/\/ Cau 



September 27, 2001 



Facultv Senate 



New courses being added to general education curriculum 



by Adam Berteotti 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

New classes being added to ful- 
fill general education require- 
ments was one of the main topics 
discussed at the Faculty Senate 
meeting on Sept. 24,2001. 

Susan Traynor of the CIS 
department reported changes 
made and changes in the works 
for the Clarion University class 
catalog. Environmental Law, 
BSAD 340, and International 
Environmental Law, BSAD 341, 
can now be used as additional 
course work. Microcomputer 
Applications in the Class Room, 
ED 217, and Multicultural 
Education, ED 225, were still 
being reviewed as classes that 
could possibly be added to a stu- 
dent's general education check 
sheet. Traynor also reported 158 
minor changes to class descrip- 
tions in the catalog in education, 
accounting, nursing, chemistry, 
and English. 



"Special Topic" classes for the 
Spring 2002 semester were 
approved. These classes, which 
will only be available for one 
semester, are based on student 
interest for a subject and a pro- 
fessor's willingness to teach the 
course. The courses will be 
worth the normal three credits. 
Six classes are being introduced 
as "experimental" courses. They 
will be added to the regular cur- 
riculum if they are successful. 

Traynor also talked about the 
introduction of twelve "distance" 
classes. These would be courses 
available on the Web or present- 
ed on interactive video (ITV). 

The topic was then switched 
when President Diane Reinhard 
spoke of how the tragedy of 
Sept. 1 i was affecting campus. 
She said that some students and 
faculty in the Reserves may be 
called to active duty, and that 
they should not be penalized 
financially. 

Reinhard felt that the campus 



dealt with the tragedy well, and 
the silent walk from campus to 
Clarion Park that took place 
Sept. 14 was a great success. She 
also said no incidents of harass- 
ment toward international stu- 
dents in light of the terrorist 
attacks have been reported; how- 
ever, she did say faculty should 
be aware that situations could 
occur. 

Dr. Anand Rao, of the Speech 
Communication and Theater 
department, said that faculty 
should speak to students about 
the treatment of international 
students in the wake of this 
tragedy. 

Jackie Collier, the Student 
Senate representative, reported 
that Sarah Snyder and Greg 
CIopp were elected to Student 
Senate. They will fill the two 
freshman chairs in the Senate. 
Collier also told Faculty Senate 
about the fund-raiser that had 
been done for the Sept. 11 
tragedy relief by selling ribbons 



Clarion University ofifers courses for enjoyment 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The Clarion University Division of 
Continuing Education will be offer- 
ing several non-credit courses start- 
ing in October. These classes 
include: 

IVaditional Hand-Building 
Ceramic Class will be taught by 
Catherine McCall in the ceramics 
lab on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 
16-Nov. 15, from 6-8:30 p.m. The 
classes will underline hand-building 
techniques and decorating processes. 
Students will also learn how to make 
ceramics, construct a fire pot, and 
fire ceramics at home. The class cost 
is $89. 

MS Excel will be taught by Rich 
Puhalla of the CIS department. The 
class will be in 208 Still Hall on 
Mondays from Oct. 15-Nov. 12, 
from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Students will 
leam how Excel 2000 can be used as 
a spreadsheet and database, and how 
to use Excel's formuliis and func- 
tions to design charts, grade sheets, 
calculations, and organize financial 
records. The class cost is $69, and 
there is an additional fee for the 
required text 

Hatha ^'oga, will be taught by Dr. 
Jim Kole of Academic Support in 
the Tippin Dance Studio, will be on 
Thursdays from Oct. 4-Nov. 29, 
from 7-8:30 p.m. This course intro- 



duces Hatha Yoga's advantages such 
as deep breathing, techniques, gentle 
muscular/skeletal stretching, mascle 
relaxation, and guided imagery. The 
class cost is $79. 

The Enei^ Conscious House, 
instmcted by Peter Kiesel, will be on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from Oct. 
2-Nov. 1 from 7-9 p.m. in 202 Still 
Hall. The course will overlay house 
ainstmction and systems, electric 
generation, and sewage waste and 
appliances. The class cost is $45. 

Butterfly/Entomology, also 
instructed by Peter Kiesel, will be on 
Wednesdays from Oct. 3-24 at 7-8 
p.m. Materials covered include 
insect life cycles and interactions 
with the environment. Students will 
gain knowledge on how to grow and 
sustain a butterfly garden and will 
discuss mounting and displaying 
specimens. 

Dinosaurs, also taught by Peter 
Kiesel, will be offered in 202 Still 
Hall on Wednesdays from Oct. 3-24 
from 8-9 p.m. This course will teach 
students about warm-bkxxled, active 
dinosaurs and tlieir kinesiology. The 
course will alst) compare their anato- 
my with ttxlay's animals. The class 
cost is $25. 

Debt-Free Living, taught by 
Rhonda Smith, will be in 202 Still 
Hall on Monday, Oct. 22 trom 6:30- 
9:30 p.m. Students will discuss how 
to pay off credit card bills and car 



payments in one to three years, and 
ho\\' to pay off a 30-year mortgage 
in three to four years. The class cost 
is $39. 

Spend Smart, also instmcted by 
Rhonda Smith, will be offered on 
Tuesday, an. 23 from 6:3a9:30 
p.m. in 205 Still Hall. This course 
will cover how to save in spending, 
save money to invest or for any 
other financial hopes. The class will 
implement a step-by-step process to 
be financially independent. The 
course cost is $39. 

For more infonnation on these 
classes, call the Division of 
Continuing Education at 393-2227. 



Senator of the Week 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Student Senate's Senator of 
the Week is Amy Cotien. 



and helping with a blood drive. 

Rao also announced that he 
was contacted by Student Senate 
requesting that a Faculty Senate 
member be a Faculty Senate rep- 
resentative at Student Senate 
meetings. Faculty Senate thought 
this was a good idea, but nothing 
was finalized on how it would be 
arranged. 



Dr. Susan Prezzano of the 
anthropology department report- 
ed changes in the catalog dealing 
with academic standards. 
Students on academic probation 
will be allowed to carry a maxi- 
mum of 15 credits a semester. 

The next Faculty Senate meet- 
ing will be held on Oct. 8, 2001 
in Hart Chapel. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Faculty Senate members at their meeting Sept. 24, 2001 



Clarion University enrollment 



increases 

Contributed by University 
Relations 

Enrollment has increased at 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania for a fourth consec- 
utive year. Unofficial figures 
through the drop/add period .^how 
6,252 students enrolled, up 116 
students from Fall 200 1's count of 
6,192. The Fall 2001 enrollment 
is a 1.9 percent increase. 

The full time equivalence (FTE) 
total for fall 2001 is 5,779, which 
is 71 (1.2%) higher than last year. 
These numbers include all 
Clarion University credit courses 
taught at all campuses and sites 
and by all instructional delivery 
methods. 

Clarion campus enrollment 
stands at 5,647 students, up 37 
from Fall 2000. Undergraduate 
enrollment was up from 5,186 to 
5,205 (0.4%), with all of the 19 
person increase being full-time 
enrollment. New students were 
down slightly to 1,498, compared 



to 1,507 last year, but graduate 
enrollment was up by 18 students 
from 424 to 442 ( 1 .4 percent head 
count and 3.8 percent FTE). 

Venango Campus in Oil City 
continue on the enrollment 
upswing started in Fall 2000. 
Total enrollment was 481, up 66 
from last year. The number of 
full-time students declined from 
257 to 222, but the number of 
part-time students increased from 
144 to 257 or 78.5 percent. New- 
students in college increased from 
162 to 179. A significant portion 
of the gains in part-time enroll- 
ment at Venango Campus is 
attributed to new program oppor- 
tunities. 

At West Penn Hospital site in 
Pittsburgh, enrollment was up 
from 111 to 124. New .students 
increased from 29-55, with 25 of 
those students enrolling full-time. 
All of these figures are prelimi- 
nary. Official enrollment figures 
must be filed with the State 
System of Higher Education by 



Gotta hot news tipp 

Call Susan at 393-2380 



September 27, 2001 



r//f ecAR/D/\i cau 



Page 9 




C/FESTfUS 




Monsters? Aliens? Transvestites? Oh my! ! 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



Is Clarion ready to do "The Time 
Warp?' 

That question will be answered when 
the Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Theatre season opens with the "Rocky 
Honx>r Show," October 2-6. The play 
will be performed each night at 8 p.m. 
in the Marwick-Boyd Little Theatre, 
with a special midnight performance 
scheduled for October 5. 

Tickets for the play are $9 for adults. 
Clarion University students with a 
valid identification card will be admit- 
ted free. 

'The R(xky Horror Shew" is 
Richard O'Brien's twisted tale of 
aliens, r{x:k and roll and "absolute 



pleasure." The play was made into a 
movie, "The Rocky Honw Picture 
Show," in 1975, which became a cult 
favorite at midnight showings around 
the country. The play was recently 
revived and earned Tony Award nom- 
inations fOT best musical and best actor 
Marilouise Michel, associate profes- 
sor of speech communication and the- 
atre, and director of the production 
says, "University Theatre plans to do 
"The Rocky Horror Show" in all its 
offensive glory. This is absolutely an 
adult production. Ifyou are conserva- 
tive, easUy offended, or not familiar 
with the play, you probably should not 
attend. It is not our intention to insult 
or offend anyone." 

Michel insiders the production 
inappropriate for anyone under 12 and 



suggests that those under 16 have 
parental guidance. It contains sexual 
content and violerKe. 

The story centers on Brad and Janet 
a young couple who stumble upon the 
abodeofaDr.Frankenllirter. Mad sci- 
entists, monster creations and aliens all 
come together with O'Brien's well- 
known rock and roll score to create an 
evening of satirical irreverence. 

The set is designed to resemble an old 
burlesque house. There will also be 
live organ music before each perfor- 
mance. 

"This is a ftin, tongue-in-cheek, 
campy satire of B-horror films from 
the 1950s," says Michel. "It has a crea- 
ture, blood and gore, body parts, and 



aliens. I expect a real give-and-take 
with the audience. Anyone that 
enjoyed the movie will find it absolute- 
ly thrilling in live theatre. It is enor- 
mous fun taken in the frame in which 
it is offered." 

Movie audiences often wear cos- 
tumes and bring props to the showings. 
Michel cautions that for the safety of 
the actors, no outside props will be 
allowed, but 'participation bags' with 
traditionally used props will be avail- 
able to purchase, complete with 
instmctions, so everyone can join in on 
the flin. Bags will be $5 each, with $1 
from each purchase going to the 
September 1 1th fund. 

The cast includes a mix of students 



and faculty members. They are: 

Dr. Brian Dunn, professor of history 
at Clarion University, is the narrator. 
This is his debut for Clarion University 
Theatre. 

Trevor Southworth as Frankenflirter. 
Southworth, a senior accounting 
maJOT, is a son of Nancy Kotch of 
Nanticoke, and is a graduate of Greater 
Nanticoke Area High School. 

Brad Schake as Brad. Schake. a 
junior music education major, is a son 
of Melvin Schake of Homa City, and 
is a graduate of United High School. 

Megan Overholt as Janet. Overholt 
a junior theatre major, is a daughter of 
Michael Overholt of Pittsburgh, and is 

~See 'Rocky Horror,' Page 10 



^v^wj-w 




Photo by Graham Hermanns 



Photo courtesy of University Relations 



At left: Rob Bullington, and'^at right Brad Schake and Megan 
Overholt, in "The Rocky Horror Show." 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 



www.theclarioncall.com * 




John Haines is the first 

speaker in the 

Visiting Writer Series 

this semester. 

To find out more, 

See Page 10. 



Dave Barry battles killer 

butterflies in his home 

this week. 

To leam proper 

strategies. 

See Page 11. 



Bjork returns with the 

lush, engrossing 

Vespertine album. 

To see how it 

measures up. 

See Page 12. 



Calendar of Events. 
To find out what's 
going on at Qarion 
University and the sur- 
rounding community. 
See Page 10. 



Page 10 



nECiAm/\fr.Au 



September 27, 2001 



Calen 




vents 



mI Irw^BlT^ T ~5 — ^ ■-- — . _____ . — _ _ ____ ^ — g 



I 
I 



ThursdayrSeptember^ZT 

•YOM KIPPUR 

•MID SEMESTER BREAK BEGINS 10 PM 
Volleyball vs. Wilmington 7 pm 

•ALP WEEK 

•UAB HC Pep Rally (Chap) 7 pm 

Friday, September 

28 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•ALF WEEK 

•Freshman Advising 

Week ends 

Saturday, 

September 29 
•Football vs. Kutztown 
2 pm 

ALF WEEK 

HOMECOMING 
DAY 

•ALF Parade (Main 
Street) 12 pm 
•Book Center open 
9:30 am-6 pm 
•Cross Country at 
Lock Haven 

•UAB HC Court Intros (Stad) 2 pm 
•Tennis at Rolex Tourn. (Bloomsburg) 




Sunday, SepteinbeF30 

•ALF Week 
Monday, October 1 

•MID SEMESTER BREAK ENDS 

8 AM 

•Golf at WVICA Central Regional 

•Faculty Senate Policy Mtg. (B-8 

Chap) 3:30 pm 

•Credit/No Record ends 4 pm 

Professional Development Series 
"Resume Writing" (250/252 Gem) 
5:30 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 
7:30 pm 
Tuesday, October 2 

Volleyball vs. Edinboro 7 pm 
•Drama Prod "The Rocky Horror 
Show" (LT) 8 pm 
•Golf at WVICA Central Regional 
•IM entries due in Rec Center (1 
on 1 Basketball) 
UAB Starflix Interactive Video (Gem Rotunda) 2 
Wednesday, October 3 
•Boxing Basics sponsored by Rec Center & UAB (Rec 
Center) 7-9 pm 
W. Soccer vs. Lock Haven 3 pm 
Drama Prod "The Rocky Horror Show" (LT) 8 pm 




8 pm 



■ — — — i 

Visiting Writer Series 



ROCKY HORRORI A preview of "The Rocky Horror Show," from Page 9. 



a graduat of North Catholic High School. Playing Ghouls are Sara Clem, 

'School. Danielle Garman as Columbia. Steve Gallagher, Bob Goodrich, 

Rob Bullington, assistant professor Garman, a senior theatre major, is a Mandy Joe, Thomas Manning, Katie 

of speech communication and theatre daughter of Dean and Robin Garman Kerr, Becky Thielet, and Julie Uhlig. 



at Clarion University, as Riff Raff, 

Brett Sloan as Rocky. Sloan, a 
sophomore theatre major, is a son of 
Leslie and Trisha Sloan of (jrove 
City, and is a graduate of Oove City 
High School. 

Miranda Scopel as 



of Coalport, and is a graduate of 
Glendale High School. 

Judd Steiner of Clarion as Eddy. 
Steiner is a former Clarion student 
and a graduate of Clarion High 
School. 



Clem, a junior elective studies in 
business major, is Eastern Lebanon 
County High School. 

Gallagher, a junior theatre major, is 
a son of William and Marianne 
Gallagher of Pittsburgh, and is a 



John Haines reads his 
poetry in Clarion 



Usherette/Magenta. Scopel, a junior senior theatre major, is a son of Ken 

theatre major, is a daughter of Dave Grugel of Shippenville and Barbara 

and Marsha Scopel of Cadogan, and Chesler of Farmville, VA, and is a 

is a graduate of Ford City High graduate ofClarion High School. 



Eric (jrugel as Dr. Scott. Grugel, a graduate of Woodland Hills High 

School. 



Clarion 
Barbell Club 

Presents 

American Red Cross 

Disaster Relief Fund 

Bench-A-Thon and Rope Pu 

October 4, 2001 at 6:00 p -^ 
Student Rec Center 



Goodrich, a sophomore theatre 
major, is a daughter of Thomas and 
Mileta Joe of Turbotville, and is a 
graduate of Warrior Run High 
School. 

Manning, a sophomore theatre 
major, is a son of Patricia Manning of 
Conway, and is a graduate of Quigley 
Catholic High School. 

Kerr, a junior theatre major, is a 
daughter of Margaret Kerr of 
Greensburg, and is a graduate of 
Greensburg Salem High School. 

Thielet, a junior theatre major, is a 
daughter of Donald and Cynthia 
Thielet of Bridgeville, and is a grad- 
uate of Caiiynton High School. 

Uhlig, a sophomore arts and sci- 
ences major, is a daughter of Susan i 
Uhlig of Warren, and is a graduate of 
Warren High School. 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Clarion Cal j Staff Writer 

After opening remarks by Dr. 
Phillip Terman, a comfortably- 



neat older guy next door." 

Beginning with poems from 

Winter News and winding 

through Poems for the End of the 

, J ,, ■, ^ Century, Haines wove a tapestry 

packed Moore Hall settled m for ^,,^ ^j^^ ^^^^^ ^^^j^„ ^^^^ ^.^^^ 

- evenmg of poetry by John ^,^^,^^ ^^^ ^^^ Horsehead Nebula 



an 

Haines. The evening's program 

consisted of works from the 

poet's nearly five decades as a 

poet. 

Haines's work comes frOm a 
variety of sources, but often cen- 
ters on a love of nature and things 
natural, including long walks, 
interesting natives, and hunting. 
Many of the poems read last 
Thursday night also showed the 
simple beauty in subjects such as 
the changing of seasons 
("Foreboding") and the cosmic 
wonder of the universe as a whole 
('The Poem without Meaning"). 
Live, Haines was an amicable 
speaker, giving off the air of "that 



in a mere 50 minutes. After the 
reading, I was able to ask him a 
few questions about his life and 
work, namely if there was a spe- 
cific place within himself he goes 
to for inspiration. His reply was 
simple: yes — a place "decorat- 
ed" with the things he has seen 
and experienced in his very full 
life. 

Haines' reading was the first of 
a series of visiting writers and lit- 
erary events scheduled for the 
.year, sponsoYed by the English 
Club and Sigma Tau Delta. The 
next event will be the October 
4th's "Readmg for the Cure," also 
in Moore Hall. 



September 27, 2001 



r///f ecAR/o/\/ cau 



Page 11 



Mothra, bats and how to deal with them 



A very important issue that we all need to be 
concerned about is global warming, and we 
will get to that shortly, hut first we need to dis- 
cuss the issue of what happened the other night 
in my kitchen. 

it began when I was in the bedr(X)m, flossing 
my teeth (I keep my teeth in the bedrc«m). 
Suddenly my wife, who is not normally a 
burster, burst in and said: 'There's a bat in the 
kitchen!" 

A good snappy comeback line would have 
been: "No thanks! I already ate!" But snappy 
comebacks are not what is called for in this 
type of situation. What is called for, by tradi- 
tion, is for The Man of the House to put down 
his dental floss and go face the bat. 

So I went to the kitchen, passing en route 
through the living room, where my wife and 
her mother, who was visiting us, were huddled 
together, protecting each other. Neither one 
made a move to protect ME, the person going 
to his doom. 

I opened the kitchen door and peeked inside, 
and, sure enough, there was a large black thing 
flitting around, banging itself against the ceil- 
ing. This was a perfect example of why — no 
matter what you hear from the liberal commu- 



nist news media — private citizens have a 
legitimate constitutional need for machine 
guns. No single-shot weapon is going to bring 




down a flitting bat in a kitchen at close range. 
To stop one of those babies, you need to put a 
LOT of lead into the air. Yes, innocent appli- 
ances could get hurt. But that is the price of 



freedom. 

Unfortunately, the only weapon 1 had was a 
brtx)m. And to get it. 1 had to get to the other 
side of the kitchen, which meant going direct- 
ly under the bal. You know how, in John 
Wayne war movies, when it's time to go into 
battle. John Wayne gives out a mighty whcxip 
and charges boldly forward with his head held 
high? Well, that is not how I cros.sed the 
kitchen. 1 sc(X)ted with tiny mincing steps, 
hunched over, emitting a series of high-pitched 
whimpers designed to assure the bat that not 
only was I harmless, but I was also willing, if 
necessary, to bear its young. 

Reaching the other side, I grabbed the broom 
and turned to face the bat, at which point I 
made a shocking discovery: The bat was a but- 
terfly. It was totally black, except that it had, I 
swear, red eyes, which were GLOWING. 

When I say that this butterfly was "large," I 
am not whistling Dixie. This was by FAR the 
largest butterfly I have ever encountered. Are 
you familiar with the 1961 Japanese movie 
Mothra, in which downtown Tokyo is attacked 
by a 230-foot-long, 20,000-ton moth, played 
by the late Ethel Merman? Well, the butterfly 
in my kitchen could have used Mothra as an 



ear plug. (A.ssuming that butterflies have ears.) 

So anyway, when I saw that the bat was, in 
tact, a butterfly. 1 knew exactly what to do. 
Specifically. I yelled: "It's a buttertly!" This 
was for the benefit of my wife. I'm sure the 
buttertly already knew it was a buttertly. 

"Oh! Then don't harm it!" answered my wife, 
in an alternate universe. In the present universe, 
she answered. "Well, KILL IT!" Women have 
a reputation for being gentle and nurturing, but 
in my experience, they pretty much want to 
wipe out every creature on the Great Tree of 
Life below the level of ptxxJIe. 

So there, alone in the kitchen, armed only 
with a broom, I went head-to-head with the 
Giant Demon Butterfly from Hell. It clearly 
was not afraid of me. It flitted right at me in the 
aggressive, confident manner of a creature that, 
in the wild, preys on wolverines. 

In the end, I broke the broom, but I also sent 
the butterfly to that Big Cocoon in the Sky. So 
now our house is quiet again. But I am uneasy. 
I find myself wondering: Where did that thing 
COME from? What if there's ANOTHER one 
out there? 

I frankly don't know how anyone can think 
about global warming at a time like this. 



Side Items 

Garlic Sauce 
Nacho Cheese Sauce 

Pizza Sauce 

Pepperoni, Anchovies 

Seasoning Shaker 



Extras 

Bread Sticks, Cheese Sticks 



Drinks 

2 Liters - Coke, 
Diet, Sprite 

$1.99 
20oz.- Coke, Diet, 
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$1.25 




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To ppings 

Pepperoni 

Sausage 

Italian Sausage 

Baby Portabella Mushrooms 

Onions 

Green Peppers 

Black Olives 

Anchovies 

Ham 

Bacon, Beef 

Jaiapenos 

Banana Peppers 

Pineapple 

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730 Main St. 
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Free Breadsticks 

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Page 12 



ner./JAm^eAu 



September 11, 2001 



Music Review 



Bjork's "Hidden Place" is tantalizing 



by Keith Gwillim bit of emotional detachment. 

Clarion Call Lifestj'les Editor^ ^ Even the swan princess herself, 

Bjork, acts less like the bedroom 

ARTIST/ALBUM: Bjork - intimate she's played on previ- 

Vespertine. qu5 albums, and more like on of 

FOR FANS OF: Fractured yet j^ose mysterious beings from 

organic techno; swan-wearing j^mes Cameron's The Abyss: 

"•^^^- ethereal, angelic, semi-tangible. 




FOR FURTHER LISTENING: 
Bjork's Homogenic, Radiohead's 
Kid A, Autechre if they went 
pop. 

This summer, while working in 
a movie theater, I had the chance 
to sample bits and pieces of 
Disney's latest atrocity on 
humankind, Atlantis. Aside from 
humorous stories about the 
truckloads of popcorn that little 
kids are able to fling at one 
another, 1 never thought I'd take 
anything else worthwhile from 
the experience. 

Until Bjork's Vespertine 
album, that is. See, in Atlantis, 
the once-mighty city has sunk 
into the depths. A daring group 
of souls journeys down to find 
the famed-of city, discovering a 
dazzling underwater kingdom. 
Everything has this hazy, shim- 
mering quality to it, much like a 
dream seems in wakeful hours. 
There's a beautiful symmetry to 
it, yet it can't be touched through 
the submarine windows. 

That is Vespertine in a nutshell. 
Its an album filled with mea- 
sured grace, poise, resplendent 
production and more than a little 



and unattainable to mere mor- 
tals. Sure, there's emotion, but it 
seems like it's on a higher plane 
of existence than the rest of us 
exist on. 

This may come as a shock to 
those who have been introduced 
to Bjork through her theatric 
appearance in Lars Von Trier's 
film. Dancer In The Dark, and 
Bjork's accompanying sound- 
track album, Selmasongs. In 
both movie and record, the 
Icelandic wonder painfully 
scrapes away at herself, until we 
are left looking at a naked and 
tortured human soul. 

Bjork admitted in interviews 
how grueling a process this was, 
and that she'd probably never 
return to acting again. She 
seems to have applied some of 
that doctrine of withdrawal to 
her music, as well. Vespertine is 
filled with images of solitary 
womb-like spaces, isolated 
dreams, and inspirational hope- 
fulness. As Bjork says in the 
album's opener, "Hidden Place," 
"There lies my love /I'll hide it 
under a blanket / Lull it to 
sleep." 



Elsewhere, tracks such as 
"Heirloom" find Bjork retreating 
even further into her own private 
Fantasia. "I swallow little gold- 
en lights / My mother and son 
baked for me / Warm glowing oil 
/ Into my wide open throat." 
Even when she does opt for emo- 
tional directness, such as on 
"Cocoon," Bjork sings in a 
breathless, barely-there hush, as 
if addressing you and only you. 
"Who would have known / That 
a boy like him possessed of mag- 
ical sensitivity / Would appreci- 
ate a girl like me," she sings, yet 
sounding unsure of her happi- 
ness, like a drugged Tinkerbell. 

Bjork has never been quite so 
sexually explicit in her lyrics 
before this album, either. When 
she does decide to go the route of 
full disclosure, she doesn't stop 
halfway. "I shall enter fingers of 
smooth mastery / With chastness 
of seagulls / Will I complete the 
mystery of my flesh," is about as 
elegant a reference to self-love 
as you're going to get. 

Fans of Bjork's earlier materi- 
al might be a little off-put by the 
side-stepping nature of this 
album. Gone are her trademark 



carved-in-granite melodies and 
solid grooves; Vespertine 
decides to focus more on moods, 
singular colors of sound, and 
bursts of rhythmic effects that 
sound like a bag of pins being 
emptied. When Bjork decides to 
unleash a cathartic melody here, 
the results are among her best, 
such as the optimistic "It's Not 
Up To You," and the stately clos- 
er, "Unison." 

Vespertine is indeed a watery 
album; rhythms, tempos and 
vocals always in flux, shifting 
like undertows in your ears. 
Heavenly choirs seem to be per- 
forming in cavernous cathedrals, 
while submarining string sec- 
tions, both real and programmed, 
swoon about. Electronic epilep- 
tic fits sputter to life and appear 
as little blips of light in the back 
corridors of your mind. Bjork's 
voice drapes like a silken tapes- 
try over it all; sometimes a heat- 
ed blanket to snuggle up in, and 
sometimes a thin layer of frost. 
See all of these elements come 
together in the album's haunting 
centerpiece, "Aurora," which is 
every bit as colorful as the celes- 
tial event it's named after. 



Much of Vespertine^ produc- 
tion is due to IDM duo Matmos. 
Bjork brought them in to work 
their laptop wizardry, resulting 
in a rich sonic backdrop that is 
both faint as a well-washed stain 
and an engaging three-dimen- 
sional painting. Naysayers have 
complained that Matmos' pres- 
ence on Vespertine is barely felt. 
They're both right and wrong. 
True, it isn't as distinctive as 
Matmos output usually is, but 
that's the genius of their work 
here - they realize that Bjork is 
the center of attention. They've 
given her a splendid framework 
for her to work with, and Bjork 
is more than up to the task. 

Vespertine does contain its lim- 
itations, however. Not all of the 
tracks are first-rate, and it takes 
many repeated listens for the 
album to gel in your mind. Also, 
the album doesn't work nearly as 
well on regular speakers as it 
does on headphones; where 
Vespertine'^ nocturnal dream- 
world explodes with vividness 
and clarity. But patience 
rewards all, and Vespertine has 
much to give. 4 out of 5 stars. 




Homecoming Court 2001 




Photo courtesy of University Relations 



This year's Homecoming Court, as picked by the students of Clarion University - 
Front from left: Jared Chase, Trevor Southworth, Dave Duriancek, Mark Pruss, Greg 
Clopp, Ben Chervenak, and Jim Gallagtier Back from left: Katie Nee, Emily 
Pastor, Deanna Scott, Jessica Froehlich, Sara Etzel, Kard Guinther Kristy Fennell, 
Angle Boddort and Christina Yocum. Absent when then photo was taken were 
Adam Parks and Mike tVlcCabe. 



September 27, 2001 



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Page 13 




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"No, I do NOT wisH to see his tail wag." 



Page 14 



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"Oh no. It's my husband! Quick, get back on the floor." 






September 27, 2001 



nE ^ I Am/1/ Cau 



Page 15 




ClASS/Fi^DS 




r. n il '"" i i rr- j ii '^-^"— '• jr ' ''iii'"Mp'"'"'" 

f sprliio iir#iilli 



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5' Grand Piano: Young Chang 
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$9000.00 OBO. (814)358-2346 

g rook ads 

Sn, I hope everyone has a great 
ALE! Good luck with the float, 
I'll be there cheering you on! 



515 Wood Street 

Clarion 
The White House 

(Next to the firehall) 
Unique & Imaginative Items 

• Antiques and Collectables 

• Badge Holders 

• Amber and Sterling Jewerly 

• Hand-Painted Boxes, Frames, and 
Nesting Dolls 

• Friendship Ball 

• Hot Sauces and Chai Teas 

• Dinosaurs and Wooden Blocks 

Autumn Leaf Hours 

10 to 6 Daily 

(814)227-1240 



Love your sweetheart, Stacy 

Congratulations Jimmy on home- 
coming! You deserve it! Love, 
Stacy 

^^^^^^^^^^1^1^^^^^1|.1^■^^^^■|^ 

Thank you softball and tennis 
teams for the great time! The 
Brothers of Sigma Pi 

The Brothers of Sigma Pi would 
like to wish all the students a won- 
derful and safe ALF. 

■^(i^1f■l^^(■^^■l|.^^■)^^^■|^■^^^^^^ 

Thank you AZT for the great 
time! The Brothers of Sigma Pi 

Jit!)!************ 

OSK Boys: I hope you all had a 
great week, and are getting excit- 
ed for the weekend! Have a safe 
and happy ALF Love, your 
sweetheart Dena. 

Thanks to OXK for a great time 
this weekend! Love, A<I)E 

Congratulations to Amy Lacinski 
and Kristen Buzzoli on their lava- 
liers to ITF! We are so happy for 
you both! Love, your AOE sister 

Thanks to OA9 for the great job 
your doing on the float! We love 

you guys! Love, AOE 

************** 

AOE hope everyone is having a 
fun and safe ALF! We are looking 

forward to a great homecoming. 

************** 

AOE wishes our sweetheart and 
Kevin O'Brien a great ALF and a 

great semester. We love you! 

************** 

Congratulations to Sara Mills on 
sister of the week. Love, the 

Sisters of AOE 

************** 

Congratulations to Cory Rex, the 
newest Sweetheart of Tri Sigma! 

Love, the Sisters of XSE 

************** 

Fall "01, Welcome to the bunch! 
Sarah, Laura, Tara, Kate, and 
Sarah W., we can't wait to call 

you sisters! Love, Tri Sigma 

************** 

The sisters of Tri Sigma would 
like to wish everyone a happy and 

safe homecoming. 

************** 

To our outgoing Sweetheart Jon: 
Thanks for being the best 
Sweetheart ever! Love, Tri Sigma 



out great thanks to all you've 

done. Love, Tri Sigma 

************** 

Happy 22nd Birthday, 
Westerman! We love you! Love, 

your I sisters. 

************** 

Happy 23rd Birthday Katlin 

Ryan! Love, your sisters of ZTA 

************** 

Have fun and be safe this ALF! 
Good luck with your floats! 

Love, ZTA 

************** 

SO, We had a great time with you 
last Thursday. We can't wait to do 

it again! Love, AST 

************** 

AST would like to thank everyone 
who donated blood. It was a big 
help. Thanks! 



************** 



To the Brothers of KAP, we're 
having a great time with you 
guys! Thanks for all your hard 
work. Love, SSS 



************** 



Lexie and Jason, you guys are 
doing a fantastic job. Don't 
stress, everything is going to turn 



Happy 21st Birthday Michelle! 

We love you! AST 

************** 

We hope everyone has a safe and 

fun ALF AST 

************** 

SX, We had a great time making 
the float. You guys are the best! 

Love, AST 

************** 

Thanks to the brothers of Sig Tau 
for all their help with the float. 

The sister of AZ 

************** 

AZ Spring 2001: It wasn't me! 

Byers 

************** 

Congratulations to our boys on 
Homecoming Court: Greg, Nash, 
Ben, and Jared. Love, the sisters 

of AZ 

************** 



Fraternities - Sororities 
Clubs - Student Groups 

Earn $l,00O-$2,0OO this semester with the 

easy Campusfundraiser.com three hour 

jpundraising event. Does not involve credit 

card applications, Fundraising dates are 

filling quickly, so call today! Contact 

Campusfundraiser.com at (888) 923-3238, or | 

visit www.campusfundraiser.com 

BY ORDER OF THE MAYOR AND THE CHrBF OF 

POLICE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CLARION 

BOROUGH CODE OF ORDINANCES: 

During the period of Saturday, September 22,2(K)] through 
Sunday, September 30,2(X)1, bicycles, skutebcwds, rollcrbiads 
and roller-i^kaiin-g are prohibited for use by tiic general public 
in the Central Business District area of the Borough of 
Clarion, in all dispiayand carnival ai^-as used for the Autumn 
Leaf Festival, The Cenlrol Business District is situated in that 
area of the Borough oiT:iaiion bounded by 8th Avenue, 
Madison Road, 3rd Ave and Merle Rd, and includes Main 
Street. Persons riding bicycles, or using skateboards. 
roHerblades or roller-skates, are requia^d to di&nwunt, or 
immediately depart, from areas used for Autumn Leaf Festival 
activities. This measure is required to protect pedestrians from 
injury, and to prevent property damage, in accordance with 
Section I51-3F The fme for a violation of the Ordinance is 
from $L5.()() to $50.lX), plus court costs. 
Duming the same pericMJ. in acordance with the Code ol 
Ordinances. Section 62-10, persons are prohibited from having 
any animal, including dogs, not specifically approved as a par- 
ticipant in the Autumn Leaf Festival activities, upon any pub- 
He property within the special event areas used for the Autumn 
Leaf Festival. The fme for a violation of the Ordinance is 
from $25.0() to $100.00, plus court costs. 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call 



September 11 , 2001 




ClASS/F/eOS 




and sororities with ALF. AZ sis 
ters 



nities and sororities. James 
Jewlers. Downtown Clarion. 



^^^^^^i^^^1^1^^^^^^(^^^^^^■^( 



Happy 2 1st Birthday to Lisa Asek. The Brothers of <DEK would like t M^fSOIldlS 



Love, your sister of AZ 

Happy belated Birthday to 
Lindsey Collar and Nicole 
Daltorio! Love, your sister of AZ 

Good Luck to all the fraternities 



to wish everyone a happy and safe 
ALF. 



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Kel, Have fun at the wedding. 
Hope to see you guys on Saturday. 
Love ya, Jill 

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at the concert. Love, Jill 



Congratulations Em on making 
Homecoming Court. Love, your 
roomies Em, Joe, and Ang 

Robin, I'm going to try and not 
pull the v-card as much. But you 
are such a good sport about it, that 
I just can't help myself. You 
know that I love you and cherrish 
your friendship. Always, Kylee 

Gimpy (Stacey), Hope that your 
leg feels better soon, but not too 
soon. I'm enjoying the handicap 
spot up at good old Givan. You 
know that no matter what you 
need, I will always be there for 
you. Love, your twin 

April, I tried to buy gravity boots 
at Kmart, but they weren't on blue 
light special. Love, Stac 

Jackie, Toni, Gina and Kimmie: I 
swear you don't look dumb! 
Keep up the good work. Love, the 
gang 

Robin , We are proud of you and 
the hand ofcards you have. Love 

you, Marley and Stac 

************** 

Bria, Looks like we will be gimps 

together this ALF! Love, Stac 

************** 



Ky: Thank you so much for being 
there this week. It means a lot. I 
promise 1 will hurry. Love, 
Stacey 



************** 



Clarion Gang: It is time to put our 
hats on, and for two of us our knee 
immobilzers, and start the drink- 
ing sessions of ALF. Love, Gimp 



************** 



Oger and O'Shea: Thanks for the 
Lord of the Dance, and the mud 
on our pants. Love, Stacey and 
April 



:^;jc)f:>(c)t;:^:4c)lc*5|c:^:)c5r:^ 



Katie, Erin and Carrie. I'm look- 
ing forward to CAKE night and 
my first ALF. You girls are great! 
Luv ya, Alaina 

Patric, D.G.M.S, D.E.G.M.S. I 
love you. Julianne 

To my most favorite thing in the 
uniworld: My Mountain Dew. 1 
can't wait to get home and savor 
every bit of your tender loving. 1 
hope that the fridge treated yt)u 
right today because you are going 

to treat me even better. Tim 

************** 

Brandon, I'm sorry but I wanted 
you to know that I love you and 
you are always in my thoughts. 
Please accept my apology. I love 
you. Love, Bubba 



The Clarion Call would 
like to wish everyone 

here at Clarion 
University a happy and 



GUP STUDENTS! 

PLAGE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS 

TODAY! 

TELL THAT SPECIAL PERSON 

THAT YOU CARE OR TELL WHAT 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 P.M. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



September 27, 2001 



Volleyball 



ne PjAP/nm Cau 



Page 17 



Golden Eagles improve record at Millersville 



by Laura Altman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The Clarion womens volley- 
ball team travelled to 
Millersville for the annual 
Millersville Tournament on 
September 21-22 to play three 
teams. The women competed 
against Dowling, Gettysburg, 
and Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. At the end of the 
weekend, the team held a tour- 
nament record of 1-2. 

The team fell to Dowling after 
competing in five sets, but did a 
great job of lashing back strong. 



Numerical Roster 


N^>. 


NiSDifi 




■:'■;■; 


I 

2 


Jackie 1 


lill 




Bull 




Mclanit 


4 


Laurie Heplcr 




7 


'Fonva Zatko 


:% 


8 


Ashley Riordan 


9 


Kate Waksmunski ^ 


11 


All Graham 


12 Sara Heyl 


14 Alissa McKinley 


16 Colleen Sherk 


17 Beth Stalder 



"The team did a great job of 
coming back during the second 
and third set after their first 
loss," said coach Tracey 
Fluharty. 

After their 20-30 loss in set 
one, the women came back with 
a score of 30-25 in sets two and 
three due to their improvement 
in hitting. During the last two 
sets, the opposing team rallied 
back for the victory. 

Despite their 13 serve receive 
errors, the offense worked 
together to produce 47 kills. The 
team had a total of nine aces, 18 
solo blocks and nine block 
assists. 

After an upsetting loss to 
Dowling, the team increased 
their level of intensity and 
defeated their next opponent, 
Gettysburg in all three matches. 
The women dominated with 
scores of 30-23, 30-24, and 30- 
19. 

Although their passing 
improved, the team still experi- 
enced six serve receive errors. 
Ali Graham lead the way with 
ten kills while Jackie Hill had 30 
assists. 

Even with Melanie Bull's and 



Ali Graham's 12 kills each, 
along with Jackie Hill's 44 
assists, the team still managed to 
fall short to I.U.P. 

During the game, the Golden 
Eagles once again reduced their 
serve receive errors down to 
three and only made one service 
error. 

"The game was one of those 
times when things would not go 
our way, and the team just 
couldn't click," commented 
Fluharty. 

In addition to the Millersville 
Tournament, the Golden Eagles 
also played California 
University of Pennsylvania on 
Sept. 20. The women won all 
three sets during that game. 

"Overall, the team is playing 
really well. Each individual is 
stepping up to play their part," 
stated Fluharty. 

The win against California was 
a big accomplishment for the 
Golden Eagles , since the 
Vulcans were in nationals last 
year. Also, the Vulcans have 
been coached under the same 
individual for several years and 
have many retuning players. 

"Volleyball is an up and down 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Member sof the womens volleyball team work on their com- 
munication skills prior to a match. 



game, and if we stay on the 
same intensity level, no one in 
the conference will be able to 
touch us," added Fluharty. 
The team looks toward tech- 



nique improvements as the sea- 
son progresses. Fluharty also 
believes that the team record 
will improve as the season con- 
tinues. 



Drug charges Kinq)ant Rugby teams battle against 



by Jim Mashik 
Courtesy of Krt Campus 

The Rebels are putting Gunn's 
two arrests on drug charges in 
the last 29 months behind them, 
Gunn regrets that it happened, 
and neither Gunn nor Cutcliffe 
will talk about the matter again. 

The (Memphis) Commercial 
Appeal reported Friday that 
Gunn, a senior tailback from 
Amory, Miss., was arrested for 
possession of marijuana on 
April 22, 1999, then pleaded 
guilty to simple possession and 
paid $695.50 in fines and court 
costs. The newspaper also 



reported that Gunn was arrested 
in Monroe County on May 25, 
2001, for speeding and was 
charged with possession of mar- 
ijuana and driving under the 
influence. 

Gunn pleaded guilty to speed- 
ing and not guilty on the DUI 
and possession charges, the 
Commercial Appeal said. 

Gunn, who ranks fifth on the 
Rebels' all-time rushing list, 
issued a statement through the 
university Monday after 
Cutcliffe reiterated that discipli- 
nary action had been taken 
against the player. 



odds for victorious seasons 



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Phone Number 227-7977 

Hours: M-F 8am-9pm, Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm 
Located in the 800 Center, across from 7-1 1 

We Care Hair offers a wide selection of professional hair products, 

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Walk-Ins and appointments are welcome for all of these, including 

haircuts and coloring. 



by Julie Rengers 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

On Sunday September 23, the 
Clarion womens rugby team 
faced a challenge against their 
biggest rival, Indiana 

University of Pennsylvania 
(I.U.P.). The game began at I 
p.m. at home (in Shippensville). 

Clarion had possession of the 
ball for most of the match, but 
late in the second half, I.U.P. 
pushed into the Golden Eagle's 
try zone and scored the first try 
of the game and the extra kick. 
Immediately after the kick- 
off. Clarion, almost effortlessly, 
scored the second try of the 
game. Amy Lacinski took credit 
for the try scored for the Golden 
Eagle women. Unfortunately 
for Clarion, due to the lack of 
game time, were unable to pull 
ahead. 



The women of Clarion lost 
one of the toughest matches of 
the season with a final score of 
5-7 to I.U.P The team looks 
forward to playing Slippery 
rock next Saturday to pull their 
season's record up to 3-1. 

The mens rugby team started 
off their season with an impres- 
sive, yet close, win against the 
University of Pittsburgh. The 
Golden eagles ended up with a 
final score of 17-16. 

The men played a close and 
challenging game against the 
Panthers. Steve Sikon, Jimmy 
Donnelly, and Jim Galaghr all 
scored tries worth five points 
each. Their efforts allowed for 
the Golden Eagles to keep the 
score as close as possible to 
Pittsburgh. 

Brian Scupink came through 
to aid Clarion in obtaining the 
victory with his kicking of two 



extra points. 

The men will be at home this 
weekend (at Shippenville) 
against California University of 
Pennsylvania. The game is set 
to kick-off at 2 p.m. 



1 1 hUJJ ' ' ^I'wfTT i I ] I I' l l 1 i TifTwrwif f f w i 1 . 1 1 n I w i 1 11 1 1 1 1 n i 1 1 1 min Tt^nyiTT 



see 

those womens' blue 
and gold socks are 

really for at the 

next womens rugby 

match at Slippery 

Rock or watch the 

men in action at 

home this Saturday 

against California* 

Kick-off @ 2 p.ra. 



L 



Page 18 



The tliAP/D/\j r.A//. 



September 27, 2001 



Cross Country 



Clarion runners soar past Slippery Rock 



by Andrea Borek 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

The Golden Eagle cross coun- 
try team took another victory 
under their wing at the 
Shippensburg Invitational with 
the womens team placing first 
overall out of eight competing 
teams. The men also placed 
within the top five teams with a 
fifth place overall finish out of 
11 competing teams. 

The womens victory was 
sealed by the thirteenth and sev- 
enteeth place overall finishes by 
the fourth and fifth athletes of 
the team. The top five runners 
for the womens team all placed 
within the top 20 competitors in 
the invitational. 

Jen Boerner, Clarions leading 
woman runner, took a fourth 
place overall finish for the team. 
Her place set the stage for the 
remainder of the team to pull in 
high places. Following close 
behind Boerner was Melissa 
Terwillinger (Mel) finishing fifth 
overall. These two women pulled 
in the points to keep Clarion on 
top. 

Next in the running for the 
Golden Eagle women was Katie 
Szafran with a tenth place finish. 
Closing in the gap and coming 
out thirteenth overall was Ali 
Borek, followed by team captain. 




Senior Eon King races toward 
the finish! iine during a meet. 



Wendy Kengor, in seventeenth. 

These finishes secured the 
Golden Eagles in first place 
overall for the invitational. 
Excellent runs were also turned 
in by Gayle Spect and Hilary 
Rectenwald. 

Overall, the women did well, 
but they still need to come 
together and tighten up their 



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pack in order to continue with 
their victories for the remainder 
of the sea.son. 

The Golden Eagle mens team 
captured a fifth place finish for 
the invitational with the top five 
runners placing in the top 40 
overall. 

Leading the way for the 
Clarion men was Matt 
Masterone, coming in fifteenth 
overall. Following close behind 
Masterone was A.J. Mayernik 
with a nineteenth place finish. 

Team captain, Ean King, fin- 
ished close behind the top two 
runners for Clarion with twenti- 



eth place. 

Next in line for the Clarion 
men would be John Snyder in 
thirty-third and following him 
would be Dave Durianick in thir- 
ty-seventh. 

The mens team has improved 
from previous meets, but hope to 
further move up as the season 
progresses. If the men hope to 
place higher within the next 
meets, they also need to close the 
gap between the top five team 
runners. 

Both cross country teams will 
travel to Lehigh on October 6 for 
another day of competition. 



Clarion ^s Top Five 

Women 

^ [IT1IIIIII t'l f I I 

Jen Boerner - 4th 

Mel Terwillinger - 5th 

Katie Szafran - 1 0th 

Ali Borek - 13th 
Wendy Kengor - 1 7th 

Men 

Matt Masterone - 1 5th 

A J. Mayernick - i9th 

Ean King - 20th 

John Snyder - 33rd 

Dave Durianick - 37th 



$100 

Sign-on 

Bonus 

DONT MISS OUT 

Earning Potential o 

$9 '$11 Per hour 

PLUS 

-Unlimited daily bonus 

Day and Evening shifts available 

-Excellent Benefits 

-Paid Professional Training 

Check (Hit our tlyer in to Jay '.s paper 

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8 14-67 7-00 18 

]8O0'365'350Oext. 684 



Footballl Fall to 
Shippensburg, from Page 20. 

out the Shippensburg game. 

The receiving corps has wide 
receivers Mike McCullum (11 
catches, 178 yards, two touch- 
downs) and Ed Rivers (four catch- 
es, 79 yards, one touchdown), 
along with tight end Andy Pore 
(three grabs. 44 yards, t)ne touch- 
down). 

Clarion's defense is giving up 
399.8 yards per game (tenth in 
PSAC) including 222.5 rushing 
yards (eighth in PSAC) and 177.3 
passing yards (eleventh in PSAC) 
per game. 

Up front, the Eagles are led by 
tackle Doug Diegelman (22 stops, 
six tackles-for-losses, three sacks), 
end George O'Brien (25 hits, six 
tackles-for-losses, one sack) and 
noseguard Tim Connolly (13 
stops, two tackles-for-losses). 

The perimeters will be guarded 
by Chris Janson (39 jolts, three 
tackles-for-losses) and Kevin 
Platz (20 tackles, five tackles-for 
losses, two fumble recoveries) 
while the inside is anchored by 
Dennis Yu (17 stops, two tackles- 
for-losses, two fumbles caused, 
one interception), Tom Pore (20 
hits), Scott McGrady (11 tackles) 
and Tom Gaydosz (12 stops, three 
tackles-for-losses). 

The secondary has Myron 
Hargon (six hits, one intercep- 
tion), Kevin McKeither (seven 
tackles, one interception) and 
Emil Johnson (25 jolts) at the cor- 
ners, along with Korey Eppinette 
(30 stops, two beak-ups), .labarij 
Weatherspoon (18 tackles, two| 
tackles-for-losses) and Steve! 
Devennie (10 jolts) at the safely! 
spots. I 



Sports Briefs 

Football 

September 29 @ 

home against 

Kutztown 

Soccer 

October 3 @ home 
against Lock Haven 

Volleyball 

September 27 @ 

home against 

Wilmington 



September 27, 2001 

Gal 



nECLAm/ilCAU 



Page 19 



Golfers work course at Hal Hansen Memorial 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

The Golden Eagle golf team 
continues to hit the links for the 
season with their seventh place 
overall finish in the Hal Hansen 
Memorial Golf Invitational at 
Clarion Oaks Golf Club. The 
team tied for seventh place out 
of the 14 visiting teams. 

The Invitational began on 
Monday, September 24 at 9 a.m. 
and extended through Tuesday 
with another tee-off time of 9 
a.m. 

Unfavorable weather left a lot 
of teams dreading the two-day 
invite, but the Golden Eagles 
didn't allow the cold to affect 
them. Rain caused the course to 
be slippery and soggy for the 14 
visiting teams, but the game 
continued despite of this. 

"I just take it one shot at a 
time. I tried not to focus on or 



worry about the weather, but 
just play the game," said fresh- 
man Matt Guyton. 

Guyton lead the way for the 
Golden Eagles with a first place 
overall finish. He shot a 74-70 
during the invite, taking the top 
score. This average would have 
placed him within the top two 
competitors at the PSAC cham- 
pionship last year. 

Despite their lack of experi- 
ence, the freshmen men stepped 
up to make some quality scores 
during the invite. The Golden 
Eagle freshmen took high score 
out of all the rookie teams. 

After last year's second place 
finish at the PSAC champi- 
onship, this young squad has the 
capability of taking the gold this 
year. The freshmen team of 
Ryan Butler, Matt Gibson, Matt 
Guyton, Alan Hosford, Lou 
Jesiolkiewic, and Jonathon 
Rogers look to contribute a 




Graham Hermanns /The Clarion Call 



Members of tlie Clarion golf team carefully travel to ttie next 
hole during the Hal Hansen Memorial Invite. Unfavorable 
weather conditions put a damper on the event. 



tremendous amount of talent to el to the WVIAC Regionals 

the team this year as well as tournament at the Canaan Valley 

years to come. resort on Oct. 1-2. They hope to 

The Golden Eagles will trav- continue their victory streak. 



Sports 
TYivia 

Who was 

the MVP 

of Super 

Bowl 

XXXI? 

Hint: (He went 

to Oakland from 
Green Bay.) 







INTRAIVIirRilL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Fitness Director 
Recreation Center phone: 393-1667 




9/27/01 



Softball Tournament 

Friday, October 5 

This is a ONE PITCH, Co-Rec, double 
elimination tournament co-sponsored by 
UAB and Intramurals. One pitch means 
each batter starts with a count of 3-2 to 
speed up the game! Games start at 2pm. 
Games will be played at the Clarion County 
Park. Cost is $20 per team to help pay for a 
cookout on Friday evening. Roster Umit is 
15 players, and at-least 5 should be women. 
Tournament is limited to the first 6 teams 
that pay the registration fee. 

Bench Press And Rooe Pull Contest 

Co-Sponsored by 

Clarion Barbell Oub and Intramurals 

Contest held on Thursday 10/4 at 6:00 pm 

All proceeds benefit the 

Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund 

Girls rope pull, and guys bench press. 

Get more info in the weight room. 

Racquetball **Singles'' Tournament 

Friday, 10/19 at Gemmell Student Center. 

Free to all students, $5 for non-students. 
Novice, intermediate & advanced divisions. 

Prizes will be awarded to top finishers! ! 



Congratulations 
Heather Maiuro placed 2"* 

in her ap group aad 14tii overall at the 
River Romp Triathlon last Saturday. - Her 
time was 1:19.22 

Football Results 

Thursday 9/20: 

Dirty Dogs 42 ThaTeam 25 

Sigma Pi 69 Red Shuts 23 

ISAPie 42 PAP 15 

Volleyball Results 

Wednesday 9/19: 

Special K beat Victory 17-16, 12-15, 11-6 

Ben Brown beat Silly Slammers 16-14, 15-10 

Phi*s with Chides beat The Mullets 15-5, 1 5-2 

Tuesdav9/25: 

The Mullets beat Ben Brown 16-14, 15-12 

Phi's w Chicks beat Silly Slammers 15-4, 15-4 

Set to Kill beat Victory 17-16, 14-1 1 

Outdoor Equipment Rental; 

Mountain Bikes - helmets 
Roller blades - pads - hockey helmets 

Tents - backpacks - inner tubes. 
There is a 2.00 per day charge on bikes, 
blades and tents. $5 deposit required. 
(Equipment is for student use ONLY). 



Mountain Bike Excursion 

Friday, 10/12 - depart 3 pm return 7 pm. 
We will be traveling to Franklin to ride 
on the Allegheny River Trail and the 
Justus Trail The trail is 15 miles of flat 
smooth, asphalt that offers the scenic 
beauty of the Allegheny River and 
woodland. Bring your own bike and 
helmet or borrow* one from the 
Recreation Center at no cost. 
Transportation will be provided. 
*Please pre-register to reserve a bike. 

*In-Line Hockey Results* 

Starts next week due to inclement weather! 

-Body Fat Testing- 
Thursday at 12 noon or by appointment. 
The Body Fat analyzer is back on-line! ! ! 

Personal training for Students: 

Fitness and nutrition counseling is now 
available for students. 

Doug Knepp 
Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach 

is now accepting groups of 3-4 students who 
want to learn more about any of these topics. 
Stop in the Rec. Center or call 393-1668 to set 
up an appointment to strength train. 



Page 20 



Tne CcAm/\/ Cau 



September 27, 2001 



CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



3 9363 00587 3630 



Sports 



Golden Eagles take PSAC-West loss to Shippensburg 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

Shippensburg's (2-2; 1-0) Tony 
Johnson intercepted an Adam 
Almashy pass at the Clarion (1-3; 
0-1) 48 with 1:04 remaining in the 
game and the Red Raiders held on 
to defeat the Golden Eagles 34-29 
in front of 2,800 fans at Seth 
Grove Stadium. 

Shippensburg led 17-10 at half- 
time, then expanded their lead to 
24-10 at 4:51 of the third quarter 
when John Kuhn scored on a three 
yard run. 

The Golden Eagles came storm- 
ing back in the fourth quarter. 
Corner, Myron Hargon, picked off 
a Tyler Novak pass and returned it 
47-yards to the Raider 28. 
Demetric Gardner capped the si.x 
play scoring drive and hit paydirt 
from eight-yards out. Jason 
Flora's PAT made it 24-17 with 
12:15 left to play. 

Clarion got the ball back, and 
with a little razzle-dazzle, had 
halfback, Ben Culver, throw a 60- 
yard touchdown pass to Ed Rivers 
to actually tie the game. Biut 
Flora's PAT drifted wide right, and 
with 10:33 remaining, 

Shippensburg held a narrow 24-23 
lead. 

The Raiders took the ensuing 
kickoff and drove 68 yards in 
eight plays for a key touchdown. 
Dave Brown rammed the ball in 
the endzone with 6:22 left and 
Shipppensburg had a 31-23 
advantage. 

Shippensburg placekicker, 
Berkley Myers, added to the 
Raider lead with a 40-yard field 
goal with 3:49 remaining, giving 
Shippensburg a 34-23 lead. 

The Eagles were not done! In the 
hurry-up offense. Clarion took the 
ball at its own 28 and drove 72 
yards in only five plays to get 
back in the game. Robert Walker 
grabbed a 23-yard screen pass to 
put the ball at the Shipp. 33. 
Walker, on a draw play, rushed 32 




The Golden Eagles conjugate during a game to rest for ttie next play as well as refocus on 
what needs improvement. Ttie team took a loss to Shippensburg over the weekend. 



yards down the left sideline and 
missed by inches getting into the 
endzone. But he capped the drive 
on the next play, hurdling the pile 
at the goal line to score his second 
touchdown. The Eagles went for 
two, but the pass play failed and 
Shipp. held onto a narrow 34-29 
lead with 2:26 left. 

Clarion had all of its timeouts 
remaining, so Flora kicked deep 
and the Raiders returned the ball 
to the Shipp. 45. Clarion's defense 
held in three plays, and Myron 
Hargon's punt return of seven 
yards had Clarion in business at 
its own 33 with 1:34 remaining. 
On second down, Almashy fired a 
pass toward Mike McCullum at 
the 50, but the ball was deflected 
out of McCullum's hands and 
Tony Johnson posted his game- 
saving interception. 

Robert Walker led the Clarion 
offense with 119 yards and two 



touchdowns on eight carries, 
while also catching one pass for 
23 yards. Demetric Gardner 
notched 73 yards and one touch- 
down on 14 tries. Quarterback, 
Adam Almashy, connected on 
four of 12 passes for 50 yards. The 
Eagles finished with 338 yards of 
offense, including 228 rushing. 

Emil Johnson posted 13 tackles, 
Chris Janson, ten tackles, and 
Doug Diegelman had two sacks. 

Shippensburg's Dave Brown 
rushed for 105 yards and two 
touchdowns on 13 carries. Dave 
Brown caught three passes for 100 
yards and one touchdown, and 
Tyler Novak completed nine of 16 
passes for 196 yards and one 
touchdown. 

Clarion returns home next 
Saturday to host Kutztown at 2 
p.m. in the annual homecoming 
day game. Shippensburg travels to 
Lock Haven. 

•www.theclarioncalI.conp 



Clarion enters the game with a 
1-3 overall record and an 0-1 
PSAC-West mark. Kutztown 
meanwhile was rated #17 in the 
latest D-2 Football.com poll 
(Monday) after charging to a 3-0 
start. Clarion fans can hear the 
game on WCCR-FM, 92.7, or on 
the internet at www.redzoneme- 
dia.com with Mike Kalinowski 
and Dave Katis providing the play 
call. 

The Golden Eagles, led by 
eighth year head coach Malen 
Luke, opened the season with a 
33-27 loss at East Stroudsburg, a 
44-0 loss at Div. I-AA 
Youngstown State, returned home 
for a 27-14 win over Tiffin, and 
opened the PSAC-West with a 
tough 34-29 loss at Shippensburg: 
Luke has a Clarion record of 38- 
42 and a PSAC-West mark of 20- 
23. His 14-year collegiate record 
is 75-63. 



Kutztown, under fourth year 
head coach Dave Keeny, enters 
the game with a 3-0 record, which 
is the best start in Kutztown foot- 
ball history. The Golden Bears 
opened 2001 with a 40-12 win at 
Elizabeth City, then returned 
home for a 28-6 victory over Lock 
Haven and a 20-18 win last 
Saturday against Millersville. 
Keeny has a Kutztown record of 
19-5 and is coming off a strong 7- 
4 season in 2000. 

Clarion's offense is getting 314.3 
yards per game (tenth in PSAC), 
including an impressive 216.5 
rushing yards (fifth in PSAC) and 
97.8 passing yards (thirteenth in 
PSAC) per game. 

Junior quarterback, Adam 
Almashy, has completed 23 of 70 
passes for 329 yards and three 
touchdowns. He has also rushed 
the pigskin 57 times for 61 yards. 
In his career he has completed 240 
of 539 passes for 3,267 yards and 
31 touchdowns. He has also 
rushed for 440 yards and eight 
touchdowns on 315 carries. 

The running game is paced by 
Demetric Gardner at tailback, and 
Robert Walker and Glenn 
Lovelace at halfbacks. Gardner 
ranks ninth in the PSAC with an 
82-.2 yard per game average. He 
has rushed for 331 yards and two 
touchdowns on 59 tries. Gardner 
now has 1,309 career rushing 
yards (twelfth at Clarion) on 258 
carries (5.1 p/c) with nine touch- 
downs. 

Walker is eleventh in the PSAC 
in rushing averaging 77.8 yards 
per game. He has 34 rushes for 
311 yards and nine touchdowns, 
including a 9.1 yards per rush 
average. He now has 109 career 
carries for 945 yards (8.7 p/c) and 
10 touchdowns. Lovelace has 135 
yards and one touchdown on 25 
carries. He has replaced Justin 
Sickeri who was injured in the 
Youngstown State game, played 
sparingly versus Tiffin, and sat 

See ^Football' Page 18 




Cross country soars 

by opponents. 

See page 18. 



Volleyball competes 

at Millersville 

Tournament, 

See page 17. 



Soccer takes first 

season victory. 

See page 17. 



Freshman golfers 

step up. 

See page 19. 



in 



IQ I jyuju-^^ 





Clarion defeats 
Kutztown 36-7, 
Saturday pg. 1 9. 



AN W W 



the 



c \ — ^-^ — i—^ n c a -4 - I 



com 



The photography collage located 
on the front and back pages are 
from Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival. 
The collage was arranged by 
Communication graduate student 
Wayne Anderson. A number of pho- 
tographers captured the week's 
events including, Graham 
Hermanns, Liz Potter Todd Dennis, 
Janice Shanko, Brian Fashion and 
Amy A. Thompson. A wide variety of 
cameras were used from digital to 
disposable. The collage was put 
together in Adobe Photoshop. 



Autumn Leaf Festival, "The Pinnacle of Success" 




College Media v^g. 
Day Vl.......pg^;^|^B 







Rockv Horror 
Review..,.pg.U 






Riordan 

named PSAC 

West Player of 

the 

Week pg.i5^, 

hidtaK 

Opjni(>n..„.pg.3. 

vlfeNl .U. 

ports...... 1^^.19. 

n(.,pg.l6. 

ed.pg,l8» -' 






Page 20 



Tne CiAR/o/^ Cau 



September 27, 2001 



Al^KiN UNIVERSITY Of PENNSYLVANIA 



3 9363 00587 3630 



Sports 



Golden Eagles take PSAC-West loss to Shippensburg 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

Shippensburg's (2-2; 1-0) Ton\ 
Jiihnson intercepted an Adam 
Almash> pass at the Clarion 1 1-3; 
0- 1 ) 48 with 1 :04 remaining in the 
game and the Red Raiders held on 
to defeat the Ciolden Eagles 34-29 
in front ol 2.800 fans at Seih 
CiroNe Stadium. 

Shippensburg led 17-10 at half- 
time, then expanded then lead to 
241(1 at 4 51 K^i the third quarter 
uhen John Kuhn sccMed (^n a three 
\ard run 

The Ciolden Eagles came storm- 
mg back in the fourth quarter. 
Corner, M\ ron Hargon, picked (^ff 
.! Tx icr No\ak pas^ and returned 't 
4" V ,i'\i-. t.) tlic Raider 2> 
fcmetnc Cuirdner capped the ^:\ 
;ig dn\e and hit paxdirt 
irvuvi cight-vard.s out .lason 
I-ii'ra's P.Vr made ii 24- P with 

i ,.ii.v Ii ^.it the ball back, and 
Willi a 'iiile razzle-dazzle, hud 
halfback. Ben CuKer, throw a 60- 
\. ard touchdown pass to Ed Rivers 
,.■'.;,.; ^. tie the game Biiit 
'i.-r.i s !' \r drifted uide right, and 
\' ith 10:3;^ remammg, 

Shippensburg held a naiTow 24-23 
lead 

riic Raiders took the ensuing 
kickotf and dro\e 08 )ards in 
eight plavs tor a key touchdown. 
Dave Brown rammed the ball in 
the cndzone with 0:22 left and 
Shipppensburg had a .M 23 
advantage. 

Shippen.sburg pi ace kicker. 
Berkley M\ers. added to the 
Raider lead with a 40-yard field 
goal With 3:49 remaining, giving 
Shippensburg a 34-23 lead. 

The Eagles were not done' In the 
hiurs-up offense. Clarion took the 
ball at Its own 28 and drove 72 
_\ards in only five pla>s to get 
back m the game. Robert Walker 
grabbed a 23->ard screen pass to 
put the ball at the Shipp. 33. 
Walker, on a draw play, rushed 32 



Spom 




Courtesv of the Football vvebsitei 



\lhe Golden Eagies ccujugate ouniiy a game to rest for the next play as well as refocus on 
'wt^rot needs imcrovement. The team took a less to St~iippensburg over the weekend. 



yards down the left sideline and 
missed by inches getting \w\o the 
endzone. But he capped the drive 
on the ne.xt play, hurdling the pile 
at the goal line to score his second 
touchdown. The Eagles v\ent for 
two, but the pass play failed and 
Shipp. held onto a nairow 34-29 
lead with 2:26 left. 

Clarion had all of its timeouts 
lemaining, so Flora kicked deep 
and the Raiders returned the ball 
to the Shipp. 45, Clarion's defense 
held in three plays, and Myron 
Hargon's punt return of seven 
yards had Clarion in business at 
Its own 33 with 1:34 remaining. 
On second down, .Almashy fired a 
pass toward Mike VIcCullum at 
the 50. but the ball was deflected 
out oi McCuIlum's hands and 
Tony Johnson posted his game- 
saving interception. 

Robert Walker led the Clarion 
offense with 119 \ards and two 



touchdowns on eight carrie.v 
while also catching one pass for 
23 yards. Dem.etric Gardner 
notched "3 yards and one t^.'uch- 
down O'n 14 tries Quarterback. 
Adam Almashy. connected on 
four of 1 2 passes for 50 yards. The 
Eagles finished with 338 yards of 
offense, including 228 rushing. 

Emil Johnson posted !3 tackles, 
Chris Janson, ten tackles, and 
Doug Diegelman had two sacks. 

Shippensburg's Dave Brown 
rushed for 105 \ards and two 
touchdowns on 13 carries. Dave 
Brown caught three passes for 100 
yards and one touchdown, and 
Tyler Novak completed nine of 16 
passes for 196 yards and one 
touchdown. 

Clarion returns home next 
Saturday to host Kutztov\'n at 2 
p.m. in the annual homecoming 
day game. Shippensburg travels to 
Lock Haven. 



Clarion enters the game with a 
1-3 t)verall record and an 0-1 
PS.\C-West mark. Kulzt(^'.vn 
meanwhile was rated #17 in the 
latest D-2 Eootball.com poll 
(Monday) after charging to a 3-0 
start. Clarion fans can hear the 
game on WCCR-FM, 92 7, or on 
the internet at www.redzoneme- 
dia.com with Mike Kalinovvski 
and Dave Katis pr(n'iding the play 
call. 

The Golden Eagles, icd by 
eighth year head coach Malen 
Luke, opened the season with a 
33-27 loss at East Stroud'-burg. a 
44-0 loss at Div. 1 AA 
Youngstown State, returned home 
for a 27-14 win over Tifim., and 
opened the PS.AC-West with a 
tough 34-29 loss at Shippensburg 
Luke has a Clarion record of 38- 
42 and a PSAC-West mark of 20- 
23. His 14-year collegiate record 
IS 75-63. 



Cross country soars 

by opponents, 

See page 18. 



Volleyball competes 

at Millersville 

Tournament, 

See page 17. 



Soccer takes first 

season victory, 

See page 17. 



Kutztown, under fourth year 
head coach Dave Keeny. enters 
the game with a 3-0 rectird, which 
is the best start in Kutztown foot- 
ball history. The Golden Bears 
opened 2001 with a 40-12 win at 
Elizabeth City, then returned 
home f(^r a 28-6 \ ictory (wer Lock 
Haven and a 20-18 win last 
Saturday against Millersville. 
Keeny has a Kutztown record of 
19-5 and is coming oi^ a strong ^ 
4 season in 2000. 

Clarions offense is getting 314.3 
yards per game (tenth in PSA(\i, 
including an impressive 216.5 
rushing \ards (fifth in PS.AC) and 
97.8 jxissing yards (thirteenth iii 
PS.ACi per game. 

Junior quarterback, .Adam 
.Almashv. has completed 23 o\ "o 
passes tor 32^) vards cUid ihi.-c 
touchdowns. He has also iiishcd 
the pigskin 5"^ times for Oi vard- 
In his career he has ciMnpleted 24i ! 
of 539 passes for 3.26^ y;u"ds atni 
31 touchdowns. He has also 
rushed tor 440 vards and eight 
touchdowns on 315 carries 

The running game is paced bv 
Demetric Gardner at tailback. ;ind 
Robert Walker and Cjlenn 
Lovelace at halfbacks. Gardner 
ranks ninth in the PS.\C with an 
S2-.2 yard per game average. He 
has rushed for 331 vards and two 
touchdowns on 59 tries. Gardner 
nt)w has 1.309 career rushing 
yards (twelfth at Claru)n) on 258 
carries (5.1 p/c) with nine touch- 
downs. 

Walker is eleventh in the PSAC 
in rushing averaging 77.8 yards 
per game. He has 34 rushes lor 
311 yards and nine touchdowns, 
including a 9.1 yards per rush 
average. He now has 109 career 
carries for 945 yards (S.7 p/o and 
10 touchdowns, Lovelace has 135 
yards and one touchdown on 25 
carries. He has replaced Justin 
Sicken who was injured in the 
Youngstown Slate game, played 
sparingly versus Tiffin, and sat 
See^^ootbairPage 18 



Freshman golfers 

step up. 

See page 19. 





October 4, 20D1 



QJ 

3 

K 


01 

E 

I 








Clarion defeats 
Kutztown 36-7, 
Saturday pg.l9. 



WWW 



theclarioncall.com 



The photography collage located 
on the front and back pages are 
from Clarion's Autumn Leaf Festival. 
The collage was arranged by 
Communication graduate student 
Wayne Anderson. A number of pho- 
tographers captured the week's 
events including, Graham 
Hermanns, Liz Potter Todd Dennis, 
Janice Shanko, Brian Fashion and 
Amy A. Thompson. ,A wide variety of 
cameras were used from digital to 
disposable. The collage was put 
together in Adobe Photoshop. 



inside 






# 



News 

College Media 
Day V. pg. 7. ® 

Lifestyles 






Rocky Horror 
Review....pg.ll 



.'>^ 

^■^i 



w 




Riordan 

named PSAC- 

Wtst Player of 

the 

Week pg.l9. 

InciiHc 

Opinion«...pg.3. 
News..»,.w..pg.7. 
lJfestyles,.pg.ll. 
Sports...«.pg.l$. 
E*t'inent^pg.l6. 
riassified.p^,18. 



e*>: 



Autumn Leaf Festival, "The Pinnacle of Success" 







"The first draft of Clarion University history 



t» 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 

Amy A. Thompson 

Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 

Tim Conners 

Jill Brennan 



iMjllAmULGALL 



October 4, 2001 



i 



October 4, 2001 



nf^ r./.APm/\/ Cau 



Page 3 



Bold bodily fluids 



We know we have already done 
an article about garbage, but this 
particular article is about bodily 
garbage. This is something which 
has been bothering everyone here, 
but we have finally sat down and 
talked about it. 

The first item brought to our dis- 
cussion were three boys seen on 
campus peeing on three separate 
trees. Do you need to mark your 
territory? 

Now we don't know how any- 
one else feels, but we know we 
sometimes take short cuts through 
the shrubs and landscaping to get 
somewhere quicker, so we really 
don't want to be walking through 
someone else's urine. 

Another area of concern is the 
disgusting spit we generally see 
on the railings as you leave 
Gemmell. It is so entertaining to 
sit there and watch it drop from 
one part of the railing to another. 
Come on that is disgusting and 
some of us use the railing to hang 
onto as we are coming down the 
stairs. We really don't want to be 
putting our hands in your germs. 

Another place we are seeing spit 
is in the water fountains. Loogies 
are so nice to see when getting a 
refreshing drink out of the foun- 
tain! We really don't need to be 
seeing or having that in the water 
fountains. 



When working the late nights 
here at The Call on Wednesday we 
notice some nasty things in the 
bathrooms. Like the little droplets 
on the toilet seats people leave 
because they can't seem to hit the 
toilet. 

If you know it is yours, wipe it 
off so that the rest of us don't have 
to sit in it or wipe it off when we 
go in there. This is amazing in the 
girls bathroom. 

We sit down and yet we still 
can't seem to hit the toilet. This is 
something we were to learn when 
we were young children, so there 
really isn't any nead for it to be 
going on at a college campus. 

One of the less severe items 
we've noticed is the chewing gum 
around campus. Even though this 
is a minor one, it should still be 
addressed. 

When walking out of class, it 
really isn't any fun to step in 
someone's gum and then have to 
carry it with you until you get to 
where you are going or until you 
finally get it off your shoe. 

And we don't know about every- 
one else on campus, but we aren't 
too fond of picking another per- 
son's gum off of our shoe. 

Now we don't ask for much here 
at Clarion University, but we do 
ask for the little things; human 
beings who act like human beings. 



Editorial Policy 

Th« Claiioa Call is taking steps lo unify th« pauer with 
asin|^evoice,__ _^ _ WMm£^.S^ML iSstliatfirst 



step. We, the ^MK^m^WS^^ymj^^tS o«r opinion 
about Issues across the catnpus*, slate, nation^ and 
w&rM. We are not sjpesduiig for Clarioii Universify^ liie 
Oaiioii Students^ AssociaSon m the sladeuls of the 
lJidTersl|Vf vit, are speaking as ixsl Editorial Board « the 
v<^ee of The Clarion Call. These editorials are devel* 
oped in a nrteetltig of the Kdllotia] Board, ai! mei^iliet^ 
did not necessarily agree on the opiiilaii stated In the 
edit<^rjai. The ojpiiiioii expitis^ \s^ shared hv the 
isiajority of the hoard, it Is not always a tittajnumou^ 
opinion* You. the puhlk, reserve the right to expre^^s 

four pleasure or displeasure with the^ opitdons v ia a 
^tter to the Editor. 



Your Views 
National Depression Screening Day 



Dear Editor: 

The World Health 
Organization reports that clini- 
cal depression will be the sec- 
ond-most burdensome illness in 
the world by the year 2020. 

It is SQ concerned that it is 
undertaking a groundbreaking 
international research study to 
better understand what they are 
calling a potential "cancer of the 
21st century." 

Public education for depres- 
sion has been increasing over 
the past several years, and 
National Depression Screening 
Day, a nationwide public health 
event run through the nonprofit 
Screening for Mental Health, 
Inc. started a decade ago. 

This public service program is 
designed to raise awareness of 
depression and to connect those 
in need with treatment. 

The National Institute of 
Mental Health, the National 
Mental Health Organization, the 
American Psychiatric 

Association, and many other 
p»"estigious organizations spon- 
sor the event. 

Clarion University is partici- 
pating as a free public service, 
along with 3,000 other facilities 
across the country and 20,000 
volunteer health clinicians. 



More than 90.000 people are 
expected to take advantage of 
the free screenings. 

As we struggle with the recent 
terrorist events and the tragic 
loss of life, our facility must 
address the toll this will take on 
all of us. Therefore, our com- 
munity, like communities across 
the country and world, needs to 
pay closer attention to depres- 
sion. 

Symptoms of depression 
include a feeling of sadness, a 
loss of pleasure in usual activi- 
ties, changes in sleep and 
appetite, hopelessness, guilt, 
inability to concentrate and 
thoughts of death and suicide. 

Unfortunately, less than half of 
the persons with depression get 
treatment, despite the fact that 
more than 80% of depressed 
people improve within several 
months once they get treatment. 

Depression can affect men and 
women, young and old, of every 
nationality and heritage. About 
two-thirds of people who kill 
themselves have a depressive 
disorder at the time of their 
death, and suicide rates among 
youth have increased more than 
300% since the 1950's. 

At Clarion University, 
National Depression Screening 



Day will be t)bser\cd ^n-^. 
Wednesday, October 10. 

The Department of Counseling 
Services and Keeling Heath 
Center will participate in this 
nationwide effort by offering 
free screenings in 250/252 
Gemmell Complex, from 10 
a.m. to Noon and 1:30 p.m. to 
3:30 p.m. 

Everyone is invited to come 
and take a short self-test for 
depression and manic-depres- 
sion, learn about these disorders, 
watch an informational video, 
and talk individually to a mental 
health professional. 

The screenings are free and 
anonymous. Even if a person 
doesn't have depression, they 
are invited to take advantage of 
the program and learn what 
signs to look for and what ser- 
vices are available on campus. 

For more information, call 
393-2255. To find additional 
sites that are participating in 
National Depression Screening 
Day outside the Clarion area, 
please call 1-800-520-NDSD. 



Sincerely, 

Kay King, M.S.W 
Chairperson/Asst. Professor 



Alf^'-IHC^ PaorS A55D6(A-riON/ U/>ANT^ To Af^M PiLOTS 




&%i^^ 

^A.I^H^ 



Do you have an opinion? Send letters to the editor to 
UiC&rmC<t/fc/o Amy A. Thompson 

270 Gemmell Complex, 
Clarion University of PA, 16214. 



k 



I 




There seems to be 
a sort of blockade sur- 
rounding nearly one- 
third of the entire cam- 
pus due to the library 
construction. 99 

-Bethany Bankovich 



Editorial,Bethany Bankovich 



As a sophomore returning to 
the campus, I have noticed 
quite a change within my own 
character concerning the events 
occurring around me. 

I have become almost cal- 
loused or gained a sort of apa- 
thy about most subjects that, 
prior to this year, would have 
produced an effect over me. 

Now, that is not to say that I 
don't care altogether, but on a 
scale of one to ten, most current 
events are pulling in a solid 
numero uno. I have, however, 
managed to find something that 
does agitate me, along with 
numerous other bustling cam- 
pus students. 

There seems to be a sort of 
blockade surrounding nearly 
one-third of the entire campus 
due to the library construction. 
1 understand the necessity of 
safety in a construction envi- 
ronment, but some of the 
fenced in area isn't even close 
to the actual workspace. 

Why is it that last year, the 
mainstream of student traffic 
was permitted to use the walk- 
ways in front of Becht Hall, but 
this year, that area is closed 
off? 

This particular detour has 
caused an increase of nearly six 
precious minutes in my venture 
to Founders Hall alone. 

Still Hall is another story in 
itself! 

Okay, so there is probably a 
legitimate reason for that par- 



ticular area of fenced in area 
due to its location, but what 
baffles me the most is that large 
enclosed grassland region 
beside Stevens Hall. 

There is enough grassy space 
to nourish a small herd of cattle 
within the fence in that area, 
but why is it enclosed? 

I cannot figure it out for the 
life of me. If that area were 
open to the student body, an 
individual coming from Davis 
or Stevens could make the trip 
to Founders in less than five 
minutes, at a comfortable pace. 
Not only has the fencing 
increased travel time but it has 
also made entrance to Moore 
Hall nearly impossible. 

This inconvenience has put 
somewhat of a damper on orga- 
nizations of the English depart- 
ment because they hold their 
meetings and readings in 
Moore. 

How can the English club 
encourage students to partici- 
pate in the activities when it is 
such an inconvenience to gain 
access to the building? 

Perhaps all of this riff-raff 
sounds ridiculous, but my time, 
along with many others' is 
extremely valuable and limited. 

With less fencmg and more 
available travel space. I, as well 
as many other individuals, 
would be spending less time 
trying to get to their classes and 
more time actually in the class- 
room. 



As a member of the 
National Newspaper Association, 

is entitled to access 
NNA's Libel Hotline; 
with advice from 
Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 




Op//^/o/i/ 





It's a shame that I 

see so many of these 

people follow that 

superficial path instead 

of taking 'the road less 

traveled'. 99 

-Michael James Fox 



Hyde Park, Michael James Fox 



It's always a laughing matter 
when an ex-college student tells 
you that these years in college are 
the best years of your life. 

The folks that completely enjoy 
every single moment while they 
are at college usually do not find 
a meaningful job or a meaningful 
life once their time here is up. 

During their post college expe- 
rience, they reminisce about the 
good old days in college and 
often end up walking and talking 
like an old person before they 
even reach the age of 30. 

It's a shame that I see so many 
of these people follow that super- 
ficial path instead of taking, "The 
road less traveled." 

I've been honored this past year 
to live with three roommates who 
take that path in life because life 
is worth living before, during, 
and after you are at college. 

Every moment that is either 
good or bad should be lived to the 
fullest. The "live fast, die young" 
theory is not only a way you can 
cheat life, but also a way you can 
cheat yourself of many rewards 
that a long life can offer. 

The ones who choose to bite the 
bullet so they can follow their 
dreams will most likely end up 
having the last laugh. 

During these transition years 
into adulthood, my favorite vice 



definitely has to be humor. It's 
unimaginable to see how some- 
one like me could have arrived at 
this juncture without having that 
kind of gift. 

Doctors often say that laughter 
alone can release endorphins and 
can even help you lose weight. 

Plus having the ability to make 
people laugh is not only helpful 
to other people in your presence, 
but it also helps you amuse your- 
self when bombarded by self-per- 
petuating stress. 

In 1992, Ex-Pink Floyd mem- 
ber Roger Waters released a solo 
album that was titled 'Amused to 
Death." 

The name of that album 
reminds me of the feelings that I 
have of this particular institution. 

Life before Clarion holds many 
memories of laughter. Growing 
up, Steve Martin films are what 
kept me laughing. 

His wacky, upbeat and out-of- 
control comic persona in his 
movies inspired me to someday 
become a famous comedian. 

My family recalls me perform- 
ing shows in front of them from 
the time I learned to walk. 
Performance of any kind was 
where I felt most comfortable. 

When I was 18 years old and 
starting off to college at Clarion 

See *Fox' Page 3 



Tm CMRfD/\f Cau Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 

Staff Writers: Matt Greene, Jeff Chaffee. Chuck DelcroLx, Justin Ez>'k, Emily 

Gill, Aaron Stempeck, Laura Altman. Andrea Borek, Martisse Maori, Kelly 

Drevitch, Adam Berlotti and Khalia Robinson 

Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Reinhart 

Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske, 

Janice Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Eury'. Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, .Maina Vehec, 

Julianne Kernan, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sowers, Omar Rozier, Vicki Dietz, Brian 

Frtshiaii and Julie Rengers 

Circulation Staff: Kristina Strojny, .\lyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion.edu 

WWW.CLARrON.EDt'/THECALL 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 









4o tii0t o«!e$j^y refied f he 

iiqjjtilDQt d any tQfor!naittoa< 

Hki Mivx must be received hy i^ 

^m> on m^ M«8d4^ of <tesm!d 

AcR, tetters must be signed 
lutfSiiide a phoBC number aoil 
aflike^. It the author wi«he& lo iun?^ 
fets/hor idteaiiiy withheld it ami be 
txatii <m tNe letter, ^^n leacn> are 
published ii the discretion of 1h€ £<l|^| 
m Chi^f. Display Advertising cqpQ? mSi 
greek stftjcfcs ar*; due Mtmday by 5:0&: 
p.nv. the week of publication. 
ria>sjficcls are doe 'fiiesday b> 5:00; 
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CI.A810N Call t% fanded by tW 
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k 



Page 4 



TH£ CcARfO/ll Cau 



October 4, 2001 



October 4, 2001 



Tne C/:ar/o/\i Cau 



Page 5 




OPf/\/fO/\l 



Call On You 

What are your words to live by? 
by: Jaoice Shanko 




(Diana tmtrick. 
Sophomore 



"It is nice to be impor- 
tant but it is more 
important to be nice." 



Sara ^ackrnan 

Tftd./Sp. ^Ed., 
Sophomore 



"Never frown even when 

you are sad because you 

never know when someone 

will be falling in love with 

your smile." 



petite barker 

%f. Id./Sp. 'Ld., 

freshman 



"Keep smiling, God is 
always on your side." 




(Haria 'Moku'a 

'LarCy ChUdhood/lC %d. 

Senior 



"Listening is just as 
I important as talking.' 



%ristin 'Katie 

9dotecu[ar 'Bio/'Bio Tech 

junior 



"Every beginning 

comes from some other 

beginning's end." 



Cesca T>e9iardis 

Mar fating, 

junior 



"Minds are like para- 
chutes, they don't work 
until they're open." 



Do you wish to write a weekly opinion column? 



*************** 



Would you like to appear In the Call On You? 



************** 



Do you need a co-curricular? It's not too late. 

Positions are still available on the 

Circulation Staff. 



*************** 



Call The Clarion Call at 393-2380. 




Since the tragic 

events of Sept. 11,1 

have seen this campus 

come together as 

one. 99 

-BEN CHERVENAK 



ii t i WiLtiitiiih i w iwwi^^ 



Clarion Universitv of Pennsvlvania 




Recently, some members of the 
Student Senate, including myself, 
traveled to Harrisburg to partici- 
pate in a quarterly meeting for the 
BSGR 

The Board of Student 
Government Presidents is made 
up of the 14 State System Schools 
Senate Presidents. We meet four 
times a year to discuss issues that 
are affecting our campuses, our 
system of schools, and the state as 
a whole. 

One of the things that the group 
decides at the first meeting is the 
''Issue of the Year." 

This year with the, recent events 
at the World Trade Centers, the 
Pentagon, and here in our own 
state, we decided that this year the 
issue should have to deal with 
Citizenship. 

Now, citizenship can mean 
many different things to every- 
one, so we thought of a purpose 
statement that explains how we 
viewed this word and issue as a 
whole. 

Statement of Purpose: "To 
understand our world, value our 
differences and bring together 
people to solve problems, partici- 
pate in society through thoughtful 
actions, and celebrate life every- 
day." 

I would like to touch on that last 
statement, "...celebrate life every- 
day." This seems like something 
we should do no matter what is 
going on in our world, but now, 
more than ever that is true. 

Since the tragic events of Sept. 
11,1 have seen this campu.s and 
community come together as one. 
We are supporting each other. 



helping each other, and working 
together to raise money for people 
that we have never met, never 
seen, and probably never will. 

There is only one common 
thread between these victims, the 
volunteers and us; we are all 
Americans. 

Some things that everyone can 
do to help out, to become a better 
university, a better United States 
"citizen" is to volunteer. 

People can volunteer with a 
campus group, the United Way, 
Red Cross, or any other group 
working toward a common goal. 
Mentoring local students, reach- 
ing out to the community, with 
picnics, fairs and sporting events, 
or become active on campus are 
just a few of the things that can be 
done. 

There are many ways to help 
out, and many more reasons for 
why you should. That is why the 
BSGP picked Citizenship as our 
Issue of the Year. 

It is something which affects 
everyone, and something that 
everyone should have an effect 
on. 

Remember that we are always 
here to help you. Please let us 
know of any way we can. 

I challenge all of you to become 
more involved with your universi- 
ty, state, and nation. Reach out to 
those who need help. 

In this time of terrorists trying to 
break America's spirit, the best 
thing we can do is show them that 
all they "have done was strengthen 
our resolve. 

Ben Clwrvcnak is the Student 
Senate President. 



I 




opf/nfom 




Letters to the Editor concerning diversity 



National Coming Out Day features blue jeans on Oct. 11 



Dear Editor: 

National Coming Out Day is 
Oct. II. 2001- Wear your jeans! 

Every year on Oct. 11, thou- 
sands of gay, lesbian, bisexual, 
and transgendered people, along 
with their straight allies celebrate 
National Coming Out Day in 
many different ways. 

Allies, the campus alliance of 
gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgen- 
der, questioning, and straight stu- 
dents working together to pre- 
serve human rights regardless of 
sexual orientation, will be spon- 
soring several activities to cele- 
brate this day. 

The primary event of the day is 
"Blue Jeans Day." 

We are urging everyone on cam- 
pus to wear blue jeans as an out- 
ward symbol of support for your 
gay and lesbian friends, fellow 
students, and/or family to show 
your intolerance of discrimina- 
tion. 

Blue jeans, being one of the 



most typical articles of clothing 
among students, were chosen to 
promote the understanding that 
being gay or lesbian is just as nor- 
mal as wearing blue jeans. 

This event will give students a 
way to peacefully and easily 
express their views on this contro- 
versial issue. 

Scientific studies have shown 
that around 5-10 percent of the 
population as a whole is gay, les- 
bian, and bisexual. 

With Clarion's enrollment this 
year at roughly 6,252 students, 
that means that there are probably 
upwards of 600 gay or lesbian stu- 
dents right here among us. 

That's right, over 600 gay stu- 
dents, right here at Clarion. Some 
are out of the closet, and most 
probably aren't. 

The point is that we are here; we 
make up some of the faces that are 
classmates, rommates, professors, 
and people we see every single 
day walking across campus. 



Despite the number of gay and 
lesbian students, faculty, and staff 
on campus, this demographic 
group suffers many injustices in 
our culture. 

Gay students are subjected to 
slurs and ridicule even in our 
modern, politically correct cul- 
ture. 

We are reminded this time of 
year of Matthew Shepard, who in 
October 1998 was brutally beaten 
and left tied to a fence, where he 
was found 18 hours later after 
enduring a bitter cold night. 

Witnesses say that Matt was 
covered head to toe with dirt and 
blood except for a patch under 
each eye, wiped clean by tears. 
Matt later died in the hospital of 
his injuries and exposure, which 
included a fractured skull, 18 
severe blows to the head, and 
bruises covering his entire body. 

Of course, nothing this extreme 
has happened here in Clarion, but 
there are smaller examples of dis- 



crimination all around us. 

Everyday people ridicule others 
even thought to be gay. Others 
thoughtlessly talk about strange 
behavior as "so gay". 

Still others will be uncomfort- 
able wearing blue jeans on this 
day because they might be 
thought to be gay. 

Allies exsist to end this discrim- 
ination and promote the rights of 
students of any sexual orientation. 
We are asking that all students get 
involved in stopping discrimma- 
tion by simply putting on jeans 
Thursday. This can symbolize his 
or her own gay/lesbian identity or 
simply, but most importantly, sup- 
port. 

Allies is scheduling other events 
throughout the day. We will have 
an informational table set up in 
the Gemmell Rotunda area from 
9-5 on National Coming Out Day. 
Allies will conduct a meeting at 
5p.m. in room 214 of Harvey 
Hall, where we will host open dia- 



logue and discussion about gay 
and lesbian issues. 

Afterwards, we will be showing 
the MTV Movie: Anatomy of a 
Hate Crime at 7p.m. in Harvey 
124. The movie depicts the 
events sunounding the death of 
Matthew Shepard and was first 
aired to kickoff MTV's anti-hate 
campaign. 

We appreciate your support in 
advance, and remember-being 
gay or lesbian in this diverse 
world is just as normal as wearing 
blue jeans. 

We look forward to the time 
when such events won't be neces- 
sary and sexual orientation will 
not be an issue of controversy. 

Sincerely, 



The officers, student 

members, and faculty advisors 

of the Allies Chapter of Clarion 

University. 



Reader voices concern for music reviews and CUP concerts 



Dear Editor, 

I am a senior Communication major 
here at Clarion University, and I have 
noticed that if there is one thing that this 
university lacks, it is diversity. I am dis- 
appointed to continually see the same 

kind of music reviewed in 7~^e C^of-ion Caii, 
and the same kind of entertainment 
brought to the university, year after year. 
Granted, 1 haven't read every music 
review by the lifestyles editor, but I have 
read quite a few. It seems as if every time 

I pick up the Ca^l there is a review of 
some musician and/or group that nobody 
has heard of. 

Not only that, but the music reviewed 
does not seem very diverse. 

In fact, it seems as if the same genre of 
music gets reviewed every issue. Not to 
downplay any of the music reviewed; 
because 1 believe all music can be cre- 
ative in its own right, but do the majority 
of students on campus know (or care) 
about Travis, Radiohead, and Daft Punk? 

Couldn't the lifestyles editor of the Ca^f 
be a little more diverse in the music he is 



66 



if there is one thing that 
this university lacks, it is 
diversity. 99 

-Anthony V. Hiltz 



reviewmg 



I mean, in all seriousness, what is the 
most popular form of music out now? 

What kind of music do people dance to? 
What kind of music do DJs at parties play 
the majority of the time? 



What kind of music do 'N Sync and the 
rest of those bubble-gum artists emulate 
and make millions of dollars off of? 

Well, the answer is not the obscure 
alternative music that gets reviewed in 

the ^a/^. 

The music I am speaking of (that con- 
tinually gets neglected) is hip-hop and 
R&B music. 

Why are there never any reviews of 1 12, 
Jay-Z, R. Kelly, Dr. Dre, Mary J. Blige, 
Babyface, or DMX? From my perspec- 
tive, this is an example of the lack of 
diversity on campus. 

Another example (which is an even 
stronger example) is the lack of diverse 
entertainment, which is brought to this 
campus. 

For years, the University Activities 
Board (UAB) has brought bands that tar- 
get the same audience and/or group of 
students. I heard a few rumors that the 



UAB was possibly going to get Billy Joel 
for a concert here on campus. 

Don't get me wrong, I am not hating on 
the piano man, but this just proves that 
the UAB isn't doing their job in provid- 
ing entertainment that targets the stu- 
dents. 

Actually, they have been avoiding an 
audience (semester by semester) that is 
hungry for a genre of music that hasn't 
been brought to this campus since 1994 
(give or take a year) when Coolio was 
here. 

Our sister state schools (Indiana 
University, Slippery Rock, etc.) have 
been bringing in big acts like LL Cool J 
and Busta Rhymes for years, and it is a 
shame that in order to see this kind of 
entertainment, we have to look to other 
universities. 

For example, the UAB has brought the 
following entertainment to campus in the 
past four years: Blues Traveler, Lit, Toby 
Keith, Garbage, the Buzz Poets, 
Everclear, and the Clarks. 

Can someone please point out the diver- 
sity in this group of artists? Okay, maybe 
Toby Keith, but a country concert hardly 
brings diversity to the campus. In my 
eyes, the Toby Keith concert wasn't even 
directed toward the students as much as it 
was to the community of Clarion as a 
whole. 



This topic I am writing about could be 
debated on for hours upon hours. But the 
bottom line is, diversity could be promot- 
ed very easily if things were to change 
just a little bit with the problems I am 
stating. 

I'm honestly not trying to be the angry 
student who just likes to complain, but I 
feel it is time for someone to speak up 
about these things I have mentioned. 

There are students on campus who feel 
very segregated from some of the enter- 
tainment brought here to this university. 
There are also some students who are sick 
of seeing classic R&B and hip-hop 

albums go unnoticed in Tlte- C^a/^m Ca^t 

When it all boils down to it, a lot of stu- 
dents who I have communicated with are 
sick of reading reviews about the same 
kind of music. 

We are also upset to see the same kind 
of entertainment brought here semester 
after semester. This university needs 
diversity; please take notice. 

Sincerely, 

Anthony V. Hiltz (Herm) 
Senior Communication Major 

PS. If the Lifestyles Editor of the Caff 
would like help covering hip-hop and 
R&B music, 1 would be more than happy 
to help write reviews. Just contact me. 



Page 6 



T^e CiAm^ C.Au 



October 4, 2001 




OPf/\I/0/\f 




Letter to the Editor concerning Sept. 11 



Reader responds to government foreign relations 



Dear Editor, 

The great wound of Sept. 1 1 
which brought death, injury, and 
sorrow to many thousands will 
lead to new and unimaginable 
consequences, probably for all 
concerned. 

One can only wonder if suffi- 
cient thought will be given to the 
reality that at least four of the 
most involved nations have 
nuclear weapons. 

The first reaction was a blood 
lust in the media and among the 
populus. Yet we must not water 
the roots of terrorism. 

Despite our shock, our surprise, 
the background and causes are 
centuries old. The most direct, the 
most powerful of those go back 
only half a century. 

The definitions are terrorism (a 
racist term), self-defense, retalia- 
tion, along with national self- 
interest and economic necessity. 

There are no guiltless powers, 
but all resist or ignore the facts. 
The truly objective might well 
assert that each participant has 
chickens coming home to roost. 

We clearly remember the down- 
ing of the Pan-Am airliner over 
Lockerbie, Scotland, the invasion 
of Kuwait, the earlier bombing of 
our two embassies in Africa, sui- 
cide explosions in Israel and 
other costly blows. 



We must honestly ask why we 
are under attack. 

Those tragic and deadly events 
did not, of course, occur m a vac- 
uum. Currently, our tag-along 
media speaks only for the lone 
message coming from 

Washington. 

The telly is swamped with the 
constant appearance, the unend- 
ing drumbeat of an unelected and 
appointed leader and his top cab- 
inet officers. 

"Mainstream TV," according to 
The Nation, "sees its role as a 
war-mobilizing and patrioteering 
mechanism, with no interest in 
alternative voices and interpreta- 
tions." 

The same tired icons of the 
establisment have resorted to bel- 
ligerent flag-waving once more to 
do the journeyman work of con- 
structing a national consensus in 
favor of all-out-war, a recipe for 
spreading chaos around the world 
and bringing discredit to our- 
selves." 

There is a self-imposed but 
comforting silence with refuses to 
acknowlege our past. A past that 
is one part of the long running tit- 
for-tat struggle that brought us to 
Sept. 11. 

Our government has supported 
Israel from it founding with large 
financial grants and military 



6§ 



we must not water 
the wots of 
terrorism. 99 

-Kenneth Emerick 



hardware. 

We arepne of only several pow- 
ers which invariably oppose UN 
votes that condemn Israel's over- 
powering political, economic and 
military oppresssion of the 
Palestinian people. 

This support of Israel continues 
after 34 years of Israel's brutal 
occupation of Arab land and after 
its invasion of Lebanon that 
killed 17,500 civilians. 

The U.S. led a deadly one-sided 
war against Iraq in 1991 despite 
the fact that Mikhail Gorbachev 
secured Saddam Hussein's agree- 
ment to withdraw from Kuwait. 

Air patrols over much of Iraq's 
airspace continue and bombing 
raids occur periodically. 
Continuing ecomomic sanctions 
have devastated the Iraqi econo- 
my, limited essential reconstruc- 
tion and lead to at least a million 
deaths according to the UN. 
Sanctions have cost 500,000 







children their lives. When asked 
about the 5,000 who die each 
month. Secretary of State, 
Madeline Albright, said "we 
think the price is worth it." 

Since World War II our govern- 
ment has intervened and been 
involved in the internal affairs of 
Iran. 

In the Eighties we aided both 
nations in the Iran- Iraq War. 

In 1988 a U.S. naval vessel shot 
down an Iranian airliner with the 
loss of 300 lives. The terrorism is 
mutual. 

In 1992 U.S. troops fought their 
way into Somalia in the Horn of 
Africa presumably to aid in food 
distribution during a serious 
famine. 

However, they became militari- 
ly involved in the conflict 
between rival factions. The mis- 
sion failed and the force with- 
drew under fire in 1994. 

In more recent years, the U.S. 
has carred out air raids or rained 
missiles on Libya, Iraq, Sudan, 
and Afghanistan. Some of the 
missiles intended for Afghanistan 
actually struck Pakistan. 

The cleric fascist regimes of the 
Saudis have generally been sup- 
ported by Washington in recent 
decades. 

We now have troops based in 
Saudi Arabia beginnin'^ with the 
Gulf War. U.S. bases in this land 
of Muslim holy sites antagonize 
many of the peoples in the 
Middle East. 

The School of the Americas at 
Pt. Benning is a secret to most of 
us. The School has tramed mili- 
tary delegations from Latin 
America for decades in the most 
violent methods of terrorism. 

The oppressive governments 
which send them here are sup- 
ported by the U.S. The graduates 
wage terrorism against their help- 
less citizens. 

Richard Falk, profesor of 
International Law at Princeton, 
has reminded us that the current 
war fever being nurtured by an 
unholy alliance of government 
and media "will be seen as vio- 
lence directed against those who 
are innocent and against a civilian 
society." 

History and recent events clear- " 
ly prove that war and violence 
will only see the clouds for future 



terrorism. Attorney General 
Ashcroft admitted that whatever 
measures we take will bring retal- 
iation. 

The War Resisters League has 
called attention to "the policies of 
militarism pursued by the U.S. 
have resulted in millions of 
deaths." 

The grisly record is three mil- 
lion in Indochina, one million in 
Indonesia and East Timor, tens of 
thousands in Latin America, 
thousands more in Africa and the 
Middle East. 

The League would have us 
"seek an end of the militarism 
that has characterized this nation 
for decades. Let us seek a world 
in which security is gained 
through disarmament, interna- 
tional cooperation and social jus- 
tice-not through escalation and 
retaliation." 

The Progressive agrees. "The 
easy response is the military one. 
That's what the people clamor 
for. That's what the media clam- 
or for. That's what our U.S 
precedent would require. 

But it is not the moral or the 
sensible line of action. To pile 
innoncent body upon innocent 
body will do no one-and no 
nation-any good." 

They ask, "What kind of moral- 
ity is it for Bush to decry the 
killing of our civilians and then 
go out and kiil some civilian.s 
himself ?" George W. needs to be 
reminded the problem is not the 
solution. 

Truth and civil liberties are the 
first casualties of war. "This 
country has a long tradition," 
according to The Nation , 'of 
responding to fear by stifling dis- 
sent, punishing association, 
launching widespread political 
spying and seeking shortcuts 
around the Constitution." 

Eric Fonei, author of The Story 
of American Freedom , advises 
that "at times of crisis the most 
patriotic act is the unyielding 
defense of civil liberties, the right 
of dis.sent and equality for the law 
for all." 

Blind nationalism is dangerous, 
and bombs are no solution. 

Sincerely, 

Kenneth Emerick, 
Shippenville 



October 4, 2001 



r//e ciARfo/\i cau 



Page 7 




/\/ekfs 




Relationship Group 

beginning the week 

of Oct. 15,2001. 

Facilitated by: 
LaSandra R. Ward,MA 

The department of 

Counseling Services is 

now forming a 

Relationship Group 

for Clarion students. 

This group will address 

issues that arise in 

romantic 

and 

non-romantic 

interpersonal contexts. 

Interested students are 
invited to visit the 

counselor, 

LeSandra Ward, at 

room 148 Egbert Hall or 

call 393-2255. 

Please contact the 

counselor by Oct. 9. 



Community Action, 

Inc. 

provides Tuesday 

evening office hours to 

serve the pubhc. 

Effective Oct. 2, 2001 

Community Action will 

be open on Tuesdays 

until 

7 p.m. for 

Clarion County 

residents. 

Community Action's 

office is located at 

22 S. Second Ave. 

Telephone: 226-4785 

or 

toll free 1-800-997- 

7661. 



mm 



Public Safety Blotter 



CC5505 Public drunkenness. 

CC6501 (a)(1) Scattering 

rubbish 

According to Public Safety, a University 
Police Officer observed two males throw- 
ing two Coors Light beer cans down in 
Lot 5, SepL 29, 2001 at 11 :18 p.m. Barry 
Byers, from Vandergrift, Pa, was issued a 
citation for public drunkenness, and scat- 
tering rubbish, and Dennis Munko, from 
Leechburgh, Pa, was issued a citation for 
scattering rubbish. 

Underage 
consumption, public 

According to Public Safety, Nathan 
Snyder, 19, of Server, Pa, was cited after 
he was found staggering and 
stumbling on Wood Street, Sept. 30, 
2001 at 2:30 a.m. 

CC3$0^A Purglgry 

According to Public Safety, University 
Police had a theft reported from Nair 
Hall, Sept. 30, 2001 at 9 a.m. Apparently 
an unkown individual(s) entered a room 
on the sixth floor and stole a pair of Nike 
Basketball shoes valued at $1 30. 
University Police are still investigating. 

Title 18 section 3921 a Theft by 

unlawful 

taking of movable 

property 

According to Public Safety, Campus 

Police are 

investigating the theft of a stop sign from 

the southwest end of Ralston Hall on 

Ralston Road, Sept. 30, 2001 at 9:20 

p.m. 

Institutional vandalism, 

criming! mischief 

According to Public Safety, unknown per- 
son{s) did throw a brick through a glass 
window at the handicap door entrance to 
the Pierce Science Hall, Sept. 28, 2001 
at 1 a.m. 

CCg$05 Public 



According to Public Safety, University 
Police were 
dispatched to assist an 
ambulance at Campbell Hall and Payne 
Street, Sept. 29, 2001 at 8:49 p.m. 
University Police filed charges on William 
Bardwell from Erie, Pa for public drunk- 
enness. Bardwelt was found laying on 
the grass area outside Campbell Hall, 
and was transported to the Clarion 
Hospital. 

Public Drunkenness 

According to Public Safety, Doug Neese, 
21 , of Fraternity Drive, Clarion, Pa, was 
cited after he was found staggering along 
a sidewalk on campus, Sept. 28, 2001 at 
12:45 a.m. 

Title 18 section 3921 a 
Theft by unlawful 

\^K \ m Qf MPV^i^Jg Pro p erty 

According to Public Safety, Campus 
Police are 

investigating a report of a theft of items 
from Room 220 in Pierce Science Hall. 

Underage 
consumption, public 

drunkenness 

According to Public Safety, Benjamin 
Monroe, 19, of Campbell Hail was 
charged after being found intoxicated in a 
public area in Campbell Hall, Sept 26, 
2001 at 12:30 a.m. 

CC5504A Harassment 
by communication 

According to Public Safety, Clarion 
University Police are investigating 
harassing phone calls that were reported 
from a resident at Campbell Hall. These 
calls were recieved from Sept. 24-25, 
2001 . The phone calls are still under 
investigation. 

CC6308A Underage 
consumption. CC5505 
public drunkenness 

According to Public Safety, Adam Richey, 
20, was cited for underage consumption 
and public drunkenriess, Sept. 20, 2001 
at 10:40 p.m. Clarion University Police 



observed Richey under the influence of 
alcohol while on Service Road Clarion 
University. 

Public drunkenness, 
underage drinking, 
disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety Chad Smith, 
18, of R.D. 2 Box 74 Sugardrove, Pa, 
16350, was observed in an 
intoxicated condition and was under 21 
years of age, Sept. 21 , 2001 at 1 :1 5 a.m. 

Criminal conspiracy to 
criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety Ryan 
Baptiste, 20, of 55 N. Main St., 
Strattanville, Pa, 16258, was charged as 
a result of an incident that occurred at 
Campbell Hall which resulted in property 
damage to the university, Sept. 18, 2001 
at 10:30 p.m. 

Criminal mischief, 
conspiracy to commit 
criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety, Robert Klein, ,. 
Jr.. 19, of 242 Wilkinson Hall, damaged 
the first floor men's restroom in Campbell 
Hail, Sept. 18, 2001 at 11:14 p.m. 

Criminal conspiracy to 
criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety, Jermame 
Horn, 19, of 324 Ralston Hall, was 
charged as a result of an Incident that 
occurred in Campbell Hall which resulted 
in property damage of Clarion University, 
Sept, 18,2001 at 10:30 p.m. 



Gotta hot 

news tip? 

Call Susan at 

393-2380. 



Special carrer event 

for 

minority students 

See Page 8 



Clarion University 

U-ASC offers help 

to students 

See Page 9. 



Clarion University 

prepares for 

College Media Day V 

See Page 9. 



Clarion University 

enrollment 

increases 

See Page 10. 



Page 8 



nE rAAm/\/ r.Au 



October 4, 2001 



Foxl from the Hyde Park, from Page 3. 



University in the fall of 1998, I 
still wanted to be a comedian. So 
on a Labor Day evening in the 
Gemmell Multipurpose Room, 
there was a talent show that was 
showcasing the new freshmen 
class. I had signed up to perform 
some standup comedy, hoping to 
provide this audience with some 
comic relief. For this being my 
first effort at trying comedy, I was 
lucky to get the few laughs that I 
had gotten from this young crowd. 
However, I still ended up getting 
booed off the stage. Apparently 
bashing myself didn't give me the 
license to poke fun at the audience. 
After I walked off, the coordinator 
of the Talent Show sarcastically 
commented to the crowd, "Well, 
he's got four years to get it togeth- 
er." The crowd laughed louder at 
his comment than any joke I had 
given them that evening. 

More attempts at standup come- 
dy had been made following that 
gut-wrenching evening, such as 
when I ventured off to a Wexford, 
PA coffee shop in the summer of 
'99. I tried an Andrew Dice Clay 
approach of being e.xtremely 
raunchy and offensive. This was a 
failure. My high school friends 
who came to support me that 
evening recommended a thorough 
clean-up job on my material. 
Following that nonsuccess, a 
month later I went to Oakland, PA 
to a Friday Night Improv club that 
was started by students from the 
University of Pittsburgh many 
years ago. They had allowed me to 
use my new material before their 
audience, and gladly, it was my 
greatest success as a comic in 
training to this very date. 

My dramatization of daytime 



television was well perceived as 
well as my Charlton Heston rou- 
tine about going to hunt for ani- 
mals in a zoo with Ted Nugent. 
This was an achievement that I 
had yearned to repeat when I 
returned to Clarion the following 
semester. So I brought that same 
material with me to Michelle's 
Cafe, and it didn't go over as well 
because of my negligence of ana- 
lyzing the audience: people who 
like to drink their Java and listen to 
poetry and guitar playing, not 
comedy. 

The following summer I was in 
charge of the drama activities at a 
camp for financially disabled inner 
city youth in Downingtown, PA, 
which is not very far from 
Philadelphia. This was very 
rewarding because the children 
and my co-workers appreciated 
the humor and emulated it in the 
skits that I had them perform. One 
of my favorites was this skit that 
was based on the Judge Judy 
courtroom show where I played 
the judge and I'd have a kid play 
the bailiff, and two other children 
play the parts of the defendant and 
the plaintiff. Looking back on that 
summer, I realize that my comedy 
was a gift for these children. That 
really makes me not only thankful 
for having a passion for humor but 
also the willingness to share that 
passion with people who come 
from very diverse cultural back- 
grounds. 

Reality check time had arrived 
when it was time for me to return 
to this exciting and lively universi- 
ty for the next semester. This was 
going to be an adjustment for me 
because I was aware that since I'm 
back here, my humor and open- 



mindedness isn't going to be as 
acceptable to this hollow-minded 
alternate reality as it is anywhere 
else on this planet. 

Since then I've had no choice but 
to use my radio show that I have at 
91 .7 WCUC as a comedic exercise 
even if a tiny cluster of the listen- 
ing audience has to misunderstand 
me and pass their judgment on. 
They only have to misunderstand 
me for the two minutes that I'm 
permitted to speak on air with my 
CO- host, John Crawford. Frankly, 
if people are going to misinterpret 
my intentions of livening up the 
vibe around this place that ever so 
reminds me of the 1998 movie 
"Pleasantville," so be it. 

Outside of my comic realm, 
when I walk around campus, I rec- 
ognize old faces that I haven't seen 
since freshman year. It's a shame 
because when I exchange words 
with them, I notice right away 
from casual conversation that they 
haven't really allowed themselves 
to grow as human beings. 

For me this actually serves a pur- 
pose because I am reminded of the 
moment that I had chosen a direc- 
tion earlier on in college and had 
decided to stick with it until the 
end. Realizing that I have only one 
more year left at this college, the 
grin on my face widens. I am 
already certain that there is life 
beyond this horizon. If you want to 
know how to feel completely at 
heaven while you are at college, 
then allow all of your dreams to be 
totally wiped and tarnished from 
your imagination. If you choose to 
not relinquish your dreams while 
you are still at college, then you 
will be the one who has the last 
laugh. 



$100 

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Bonus 

DONTiMISSOUT 

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$9 ^ $ 1 1 Per hour 

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Next 
(ABC 

Meeting 
Tuesday, 
Oct. 1 6 
at 5 p.m. 
in 124 
Becker 



Student Senate 



Student Senate passes 
two motions 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

Editor 

Two motions were passed by a 
21-0-0 vote during the fourth 
Student Senate meeting of the 
2001-2002 academic year. The 
first motion, made by Treasurer 
Tom Clopp, was to allocate 
$6,705 from the Supplemental 
Reserve account to the Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir for a College 
Gospel Chior 

Workshop/Conference. Treasurer 
Clopp mentioned the fact that 
choir members participated in 
numerous fund-raising activities 
before they even approached 
Senate for additional funding. 

Next, Senator Tameka 
Washington moved to appoint the 
following students to the Clarion 
University Conduct Board: Kevin 
Byrne, Treasurer Clopp, Vice 
President Missy Gring, Senator 
Amy Cohen, and Senator Tim 
Smith. In addition, she said there 
are currently three open positions 
on the Foundation Advisory 
Committee for any interested sen- 
ators. 

President Ben Chervenak 
reminded senators to continue 
working on the Voter Registration 
Drive, which is one project 



Student Senate has been handling 
in conjunction with the BSGP. In 
addition, he said the Safety Walk 
through campus last Wednesday 
with senators and public safety 
officials was a success. 

Parliamentarian Wendy Kengor 
congratulated President 

Chervenak on being named the 
2001 Homecoming King during 
the Autumn Leaf festivities. 

Treasurer Clopp reported the 
following account balances: 
Capital, $86,939; Large Item 
Capital, $437,038.13; 

Supplemental, $14,156; and 
Supplemental Reserve, $58,465. 

Finally, Vice President Gring 
announced Senator Rob Pica as 
Senator of the Week. Senator Pica 
was left speechless in regard to 
this honor. However, President 
Chervenak said, "Senator Pica's a 
really busy guy, and he's been 
doing a lot of work in preparation 
for the upcoming Social Equity 
Dinner." 

According to President 
Chervenak. there will be no meet- 
ing Monday. October 8 due to a 
Student Senate National 
Conference in San Diego. 
Therefore, the next Student 
Senate meeting will be Monday. 
October 15, 2001 at 7:30 p.m. in 
246 Gemmell. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Pictured above are members of Student Senate at ttieir 
meeting Oct. 2, 2001. 



Reading for the Cure 

Moore Hall at 6 P.m. 

Please bring donations 



October 4, 2001 



f/Zf 6lARfD/iI CAU 



Page 9 



1 




Senator of the Week 
Rob Pica 



"Understanding 

Terrorism 

and tlie 

U.S. Response" 

will be held 

Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. 

in 

Hart Chapel. 



Clarion University prepares for College Media Day V 



by Susan Campbell 
Clarion Call News Editor 

Clarion University will be the 
host for College Media Day V, 
Friday, Oct. 12, 2001 from 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. in order to educate com- 
munication students in a host of 
areas such as libel and marketing 
yourself. This day is open to any 
students or faculty from any 
school. 

College Media Day began with 
funding from the former 
Provost's office after a sticky sit- 
uation occurred at The Clarion 
Call. Clarion University decided 
it needed a public forum for other 
schools to ask questions about 
libel. The Provost granted three 
years of funding, but if College 
Media Day was to continue, 
funding would have to be found 
without assistance from the 
Provost's office. The funding has 
been found and the theme 
changed each year. This year's 
theme is "Putting the Puzzle 
Together." 

Dr. Arthur Barlow, professor of 
communication and advisor to 

TU Cicu'm Ca&, and Joseph 



Upcoming UAB Events 

UAB Comedy Club 

Tuesday Oct. 9th 

Comedian-Brad Lowry 

12 Noon 

At Gemmell Ritazza 

Need a good laugh? Come see famous comedians 

the second Tuesday of every month. 



UAB Gateway Clipper Cruise 

Thursday Oct. 11th 
Departure at 4:30 p.m. for Pittsburgh 
Cost: $15 for students; $20 for non-students 
Sign up at the Gemmell information desk 




The Hot Spot 

Phone Number: 227-1908 

Hours: M-F 8am-9pm, Sat. 8am-5pm, 

and Sun. i2-5pm 

Located at the 800 Center across from 7-11 

Cafe: New^ Wide Selection of Soft Pretzals 

Bagels, Muffins, Breakfast Sandwiches 
Lunch Specials, Coffee, Tea, and Cappacino 
Tanning: Largest Tanning Salon in Clarion 

With 5 New Beds and 2 Stand Up Booths 



Grunenwald, provost will intro- 
duce the day's events. Jen 
DeFazio, SCJ president will 
introduce the keynote speaker 
and discuss the year's theme. 

The keynote speaker is 
Lock wood Phillips, past presi- 
dent of NNA and Board Member. 

The day's sessions will be held 
in Hart Chapel and Moore Hall. 
The sessions include: 

Roundtable of college editors, 
moderated by DeFazio. This will 
entail a discussion among college 
editors about the issues they have 
faced at their respective papers 
and how they have dealt with 
them. 

Libel and the Student Press pre- 
sented by Dr. Pat Kennedy, asso- 
ciate professor of communica- 
tion. This will include libel issues 
that may occur. She will also dis- 
cuss examples of real cases. 

Covering the terror, moderated 
by Dr. Scott Kuehn, professor of 
communication. This will include 
a discussion among media per- 
sonnel at Clarion University and 
media professionals from around 
the country about the latest ter- 
rorism attack. 



Inside MTV. presented by Bob 
Kusbit, executive prt)ducer of the 
hit show TRL. This will give 
people a chance to know what it 
is like behind the scenes in Times 
Square, NYC at the MTV stu- 
dios. 

There will be a media fair, and 
the day will end with the panel of 
returning graduates. This will 
feature graduates such as 
Brendan Anderer from MSNBC; 
Joe Kopp from KDKA;and Bob 
Kusbit from MTV. They will talk 
about their jobs, how they got 
there, and they will also be field- 
ing questions from the audience. 
"I hope that this year's event 
will be even bigger than the last. 
We have many big names and 
many great sessions for every 
attendee to hopefully get some- 
thing out of the day," said 
DeFazio. "College Media Day 
has been a success in the past, 
and we continue to have past 
graduates and other professionals 
return to share their experiences 
with those in attendance." 

College Media Day sponsors 
include The Clarion Call, the 
Society for Collegiate Journalists 



(SCJ), the dean, provost, and the 
Clarion University, and the 
Clarion University 

Communication Department. 

'T hope College Media Day 
serves to educate graduating 
seniors about jobs they may one 
day have." said Vice President of 
SCJ, Amy Thompson. 

Educating graduating seniors is 
one gt)al that College Media Day 
hopes to achieve. Other goals 
include expanding more chapters 
of SCJ, and to receive more sup- 
port to create College Media Day 
at other schools. 

Many are involved in making 
College Media Day happen. 
These individuals include 
DeFazio; Barlow; Mrs. Mary 
Beth Earnheardt, professor of 
communication; The Clarion 
Call; the sponsors; and other 
members of SCJ. 

"College Media Day 'Putting 
the Puzzle Together' is a great 
opportunity for students to gain a 
prospective on the world after 
college, "says DeFazio. "It will 
give everyone a chance to 'meet 
and greet' professionals from 
around the United States." 



Clarion University U-ASC offers help to students 



by Khalia Robinson 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Tucked away in a back cor- 
ner of Becht Hall, the U-ASC 
office offers big - help to 
Clarion University students. 

You may ask yourself the 
question, "How can it help 
me?" The University Advising 
Services Center (U-ASC. ..get 
it? U-ASC, we advise) serves 
the needs of almost everyone 
on campus. Under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Marite Rodriguez- 
Haynes, advising coordinator 
and professor of psychology, 
U-ASC provides general 
information for all undergrad- 
uate students. The center pro- 
vides drop-in advising for stu- 
dents who might need infor- 
mation on majors, including 
occupations associated with 
the different majors. Students 
can view checksheets from 
every major in the U-ASC 
office. Students can even go to 
the U-ASC office to find out 
who their advisor is (regard- 
less of major) and how to con- 
tact them. U-ASC advisors are 
also available to answer any 
general questions about 
advisement. 

Not only does U-ASC pro- 
vide services to all of 



Clarion's students, it serves as 
a central advisement center for 
undecided and liberal arts 
majors. Faculty advisors vol- 
unteer to take on additional 
advisees in order to help the 
students decide what major is 
right for them. These faculty 
advisors receive special train- 
ing from U-ASC on how to 
best advise undecided stu- 
dents. 

"I really appreciate the help 
I received from U-ASC. So 
many students come to college 
confused and undecided about 
what they want to pursue, but 
U-ASC can definitely put you 
on the right track," said an 
anonymous sophomore student 
majoring in Biology. 

According to Pam Burford, 
secretary of U-ASC, advisors 
in the department work very 
hard and remain determined to 
help students in every way. 
"I've also gotten to see famil- 
iar faces. ..seeing our volun- 
teer advisors," said Burford. 
"I also love working with 
Marite. She's a kind, under- 
standing woman and is very 
driven. I don't know when 
I've seen someone with quite 
that drive." 

Included in the list of oppor- 



tunities that U-ASC provides, 
is the Academic and Career 
Essentials for Success (ACES) 
program. ACES is a binder 
full of on-campus resources 
for freshmen and transfer stu- 
dents (and others also). In 
addition to this and many 
other things, U-ASC works 
with residence life to connect 
students' social and academic 
lives. This year, instead of U- 
ASC workers presenting the 
ACES program to freshmen, 
the residence hall directors 
presented the program. The 
audience turnout was better 
than expected. 

Any interested students may 
come to the office Monday 
through Friday between the 
hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. or 
Monday through Thursday 
between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. for 
drop-in advising. Ideally stu- 
dents should make an appoint- 
ment to ensure that their advi- 
sor is available. Don't be 
afraid to drop-in. though; this 
is what most students do. 

For more information, go to 
www.clarion.edu/advising or 
come into the office located 
on the first floor of Becht 
Hall. The phone number is 
814-393-1879. 



Page 10 



Tne CiAm/^ Cau 



October 4, 2001 



October 4, 2001 



Tne CiARfOiV Cau 



Page 11 



Chervenak elected secretary/treasurer of 
Board of Student Government Presidents 



Courtesy of the 

State System of Higher 

Education 

Ben Chervenak, a senior at 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania, has been elected 
secretary/treasurer of the State 
System of Higher Education's 
Board of Student Government 
Presidents (BSGP) for the 2001- 
02 academic year. 

Chervenak is the son of Therese 
Allen and Dennis Chervenak. He 
is from Madison, Ohio. The pres- 
ident of the Clarion University 
Student Senate, he is majoring in 
communications. 

The BSGP comprises the presi- 
dents of the state-owned universi- 
ties' 14 student government orga- 
nizations. The student govern- 
ment presidents, along with the 
other elected student government 
officers from each of the campus- 
es, meet four times a year to dis- 
cuss issues of importance to the 
more than 96,000 students who 
attend State System universities. 
In recent years the student leaders 
have addressed such issues as 
campus safety and security, civili- 
ty, and alcohol abuse and binge 
drinking. 

The student leaders establish 
goals and promote activities to 
help improve the health, welfare, 
and quality of education for stu- 
dents throughout the system. 

"I would like us to become an 




Photo courtesy of the State System of Higher Education 



Sen Chervenak Student Senate president tias been elected 
secretary/treasurer of Board of Student Government 
Presidents. 



A live accounting webcast program, 

"Corporate Leadership 

Perspectives," 

Thursday, Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. 
Room 202 of Still Hall. 

The keynote speaker is Warren Bennis, 

founding chair of The Leadership 

Institute at USC. 

This event is sponsored by the 

Northwest Keystone Chapter of the 

Institute of Management Accountants, 

the Financial Executives Institute, and 

Clarion University. 

For additional information, contact 

Dr. Charles J. Pineno at 393-2614. 



even stronger group and to have a 
positive effect on all of the stu- 
dents of the State System," 
Chervenak said. 

Chervenak said he wants to 
work with the other members of 
the executive committee and the 
other student government presi- 
dents "to make the BSGP really 
stand out as a very active and car- 
ing group." 

The student leaders have been 
instrumental this fall in leading 
efforts on each of the campuses to 
raise funds for disaster relief 
agencies such as the American 



Red Cross, United Way, and 
Salvation Army following the 
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New 
York and Washington, D.C. Many 
of the student groups also have 
helped to coordinate blood drives 
on their campuses. 

The other 2001-02 BSGP offi- 
cers are Ashley Shoenfelt of East 
Stroudsburg University of 
Pennsylvania, chairperson; 

Brandon W. Danz of Millersville 
University of Pennsylvania, vice 
chairperson; and Dawn M. Quail i 
of Kutztown University of 
Pennsylvania, parliamentarian. 



Clarion University enrollment 
increases 



Any student concerned about possible layoffs 

that could effect your family, 

as a result of the Sept. Uth tragedy, 

may contact the 

Office of Financial Aid. 

Stop by 104 Egbert HaU or call 393-2315 

for financial information. 

We understand the impact of the recent 

events, and we are willing to work with 

Clarion University students to help 

as much as possible. 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

Enrollment has increased at 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania for a fourth consec- 
utive year. Unofficial figures 
through the drop/add period show 
,6,252 students enrolled, up 116 
students from Fall 200 1's count of 
6,192. The Fall 2001 enrollment 
is a 1.9 percent increa; e. 

The full time equivalence (FTE) 
total for fall 2001 is 5,779, which 
is 71 (1.2%) higher than last year. 
These numbers include all 
Clarion University credit courses 
taught at all campuses and sites 
and by alf instructional delivery 
methods. 

Clarion campus enrollment 
stands at 5,647 students, .up 37 
from Fall 2000. Undergraduate 
enrollment was up from 5,186 to 
5,205 (0.4%), with all of the 19 
person increase being full-time 
enrollment. New students were 
down slightly to 1,498, compared 
to 1,507 last year, but graduate 



enrollment was up by 18 students 
from 424 to 442 ( 1 .4 percent head 
count and 3.8 percent FTE). 

Venango Campus in Oil City 
continue on the enrollment 
upswing started in Fall 2000. 
Total enrollment was 481, up 66 
from last year. The number of 
full-time students declined from 
257 to 222, but the number of 
part-time students increased from 
144 to 257 or 78.5 percent. New 
students in college increased from 
162 to 179. A significant portion 
of the gains in part-time enroll- 
ment at Venango Campus is 
attributed to new program oppor- 
tunities. 

At West Penn Hospital site in 
Pittsburgh, enrollment was up 
from ill to 124. New students 
increased from 29-55, with 25 of 
those students enrolling full-time. 
All of these figures are prelimi- 
nary. Official enrollment figures 
must be filed with the Slate 
System of Higher Education by 
Sept. 21. 



Would you like to write for 

The Clarion Call? 

If so, call 393-2380. 




IfF^ST^US 




Theatre Review 



Rocky Horror is a raucous good time 



by Jeff Chaffee 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

1 have to admit that I wasn't 
a big Rocky person going into 
Tuesday night's performance. 
Then again, I wasn't a Grease 
person either when my high 
school did it and 1 had to learn 
everyone's (and I mean 
EVERYONE'S) lines, songs 
and choreography as stage 
manager. While I still hate 
even the mention of "the 
chicks'll cream," I can't say 
the same after CU's Rocky 
Horror Show (Tonight at 8 
PM, Friday at 8 and Midnight, 
in the MarwickBoyd Little 
Theatre). In a sentence, I've 
only had more fun simply 
watching a show when I was 
in the audience for the Blue 
Man Group in Las Vegas. 

1 knew a bit about the story, 
and that there were all kinds 



of shenanigans and goings-on 
that were to accompany a 
showing of the film, and that 
Clarion was encouraging said 
shenanigans with $5 "partici- 
pation bags," but I never knew 
how fun this would be. 
Between confetti for Rocky 
(Bret "Mr. Modesty" Sloan) 
and Frank's (Trevor 

Southworth, quite, um, 
"frankly" the best-cast person 
in the show) wedding, news- 
paper for the "rainstorm" and 
"cards of sorrow and cards of 
pain," the air was full of 
thrown objects, material and 
verbal. 

What was good: Well, I usu- 
ally inject my plug to Myra 
Bullington and Ed Powers 
here for costumes and set 
quality--- again far-above the 
call of duty. I'll say this: I 
wouldn't have believed some 



of the ghouls would've made 
it up and down the ladders as 
liquid-spined as they did, a 
credit to them and the set 
itself. Acting was top-notch, 
even when mics cut out during 
songs (hey, not anything more 
than a nit-pick. ..I know it's 
opening night after all) and 
when the crowd was laughing 
just as hard at the Rocky afi- 
cionado in their midst as what 
was on stage. I'm not usually 
a fan of squeaky, Brooklyn- 
brat tones, but somehow, 



Danielle Carman's Columbia 
made it work. Add in Rob 
Bullington's superb Igor-cum- 
Peter-Travers Riff-Raff and 
Dr. Brian Dunn's "no-jitters- 
here" debut and the show 
was fantastic. 

What was less good: I can't 
even find something in the 
script I didn't like. Usually, 
I'd blast holes in plot or con- 
fusing action on stage, but 
here, everything was done 
with such glam-rock excess 
that even the slightly over- 



done 50's B-Movie camp stuff 
was right at home. 

So if you're one of the lucky 
ones who got tickets (or some- 
one's seat since they didn't 
show), I can guarantee you'll 
love what you see. And I must 
recommend thai the poorest 
college kids among us pony up 
the Fiver for a bag of good- 
ies. ..it's much more fun that 
way. 

See you all at the midnight 
show. ..but I may not look like 
me. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



KISS THE BLUES AWAY 

lONALDEPRESSlDN 

.cm 



^%i/ 



.WEDNESD 




H i 0, 200 1 ; 

N I 



TO fivn K m:% nPH vnu. CM I TOI I 

I'KIT raoO-'S'iiriXDSD 




Photo by Graham Hermanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion? " 



www.theclarioncall.coin * 






Luminous Threads to 

bring Pemvian weaving 

skills to Qarion. For 

information about this 

program. 

See Page 12. 



Musical pioneers 

New Order make a 

triumphant retum with 

Get Ready, their first 

album since 1993. 

See Page 13. 



Zoolarider is every bit as 

stupid as its main 

character. 

To see why Ben Stiller 

has failed. 

See Page 14. 



Calendar of Events. 
To find out what's 
going on at Clarion 
University and the sur- 
rounding community. 
See Page 12. 



Page 10 



The C car/ 01^ Cau 



OCTOBFR 4, 2001 



0( loiUK \, 2001 



TirE ClAk/0:\ 



r\<.i II 



Chervenak elected secretary/treasurer of 
Board of Student Government Presidents 



Courtesy of the 

State System of Higher 

Education 

Ben (liLMNcnak. a senuM at 
Clarion I'nivcrsity ot 

Pennsylvania, has been elected 
secretary/treasurer ot the Stale 
System i^f Higher Mdueatu)n"s 
Board ot Student Cunernment 
Presidents (BS(iP) tor the 2001 
02 academie \ear. 

Chervenak is the son ot Therese 
Allen and Dennis Chervenak. \\c 
IS from Madiscm, Ohio. The pres- 
ident of the Clarion University 
Student Senate, he is majoring in 
communications. 

The BSGP comprises the presi- 
dents of the state-ow ned universi- 
ties' 14 student government orga- 
nizations. The student govern- 
ment presidents, along with the 
other elected student government 
officers from each of the campus- 
es, meet four times a year to dis- 
cuss issues t)f importance to the 
more than 96,000 students who 
attend State System universities. 
In recent years the student leaders 
have addressed such issues as 
campus safety and .security, civili- 
ty, and alcohol abuse and binge 
drinking. 

The student leaders establish 
goals and promote activities to 
help improve the health, welfare, 
and quality of education for stu- 
dents throughout the system. 
•'1 would like us to become an 




Photo courtesy of the State System of Higher Education 



Ben Chervenak Student Senate president has been elected 
secretary/treasurer of Board of Student Government 
Presidents. 



even stronger group and to have a 
positive effect on all of the stu- 
dents of the State System," 
Chervenak said. 

Chervenak said he wants to 
work with the other members of 
the executive committee and the 
other student government presi- 
dents "to make the BSGP really 
stand out as a very active and car- 
ing group." 

The student leaders have been 
instrumental this fall in leading 
efforts on each of the campuses to 
raise funds for disaster relief 
agencies such as the American 



Red Cross, United Way. and 
Salvation Army following the 
Sept. 1 1 terrorist attacks on New 
York and Washington, D.C. Many 
of the student groups also have 
helped to coordinate blood drives 
on their campuses. 

The other 2001-02 BSGP offi- 
cers are Ashley Shoenfelt of East 
Stroudsburg University of 
Pennsylvania, chairperson; 

Brandon W. Danz of Millersville 
University oi' Pennsylvania, vice 
chairperson; and Dawn M. Qualli 
of Kutztown University of 
Pennsylvania, parliamentarian. 



Any student concerned about possible layoffs 

that could effect your family, 

as a result of the Sept. 11th tragedy, 

may contact the 
Office of Financial Aid- 
Stop by 104 Egbert Hall or call 393-2315 

for financial information. 

We understand the impact of the recent 

e\ ents, and we are willing to work with 

Clarion University students to help 

as much as possible. 



A live accounting webcast program, 

"Corporate Leadership 

Perspectives," 

Thursday, Oct. i8 at 7:30 p.m. 
Room 202 of Still Hall. 

The keynote speaker is Warren Bennis, 

founding chair of The Leadership 

Institute at USC. 

This event is sponsored by the 

Northwest Keystone Chapter of the 

Institute of Management Accountants, 

the Financial Executives Institute, and 

Clarion University. 

For additional information, contact 

Dr. Charles J. Pineno at 393-2614. 



Clarion University enrollment 



increases 

Courtesy of University 
Relations 



»••••••< 



Enrollment has increased at 
Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania for a fourth consec- 
utive year. Unofficial figures 
through the drop/add period show 
,6,252 students enrolled, up 116 
students from Fall 200 Us count of 
6,192. The Fall 2001 enrollment 
is a 1.9 percent increa e. 

The full time equivalence (FTF) 
total for fall 2001 is 5,779, which 
is 71 ( 1.2'7f ) higher than last year. 
These numhers include all 
Clarion University credit courses 
taught at all campuses and sites 
and by alT instructional delivery 
methods. 

Clarion campus enroll men! 
stands at 5.647 students, ,up .">7 
from Fall 2000. Undergraduate 
enrollment was up from 5,1S6 to 
5.205 (0.4^^f ). with all of the 19 
person increase being full-limc 
enrollment. New students were 
down slightly to 1.498, compared 
to 1.507 last vcar. hut graduate 



enrollment was up by 18 students 
from 424 to 442 ( 1 .4 percent head 
count and 3.8 percent FTE). 

Venango Campus in Oil City 
continue on the enrollment 
upswing started in Fall 2000. 
Total enrollment was 481. up 66 
from last year. The number of 
full-time students declined from 
257 to 222, but the number of 
part-time students increased from 
144 to 257 or 78.5 percent. New 
students in college increased from 
162 to 179. A significant portion 
of the gams in part-time enix^ll- 
ment at Venango Campus is 
attributed to new program oppor- 
tunities. 

At West IViin Hospital Mtc m 
Pittsburgh, enrol linciit was uji 
from 111 to 124. Ncu students 
increased from 29-55. with 25 of 
tfio^e students enrolling lull-iimo. 
All oflhe.se figures aie pielinn- 
n.uw Official enrollment figures 
must be filed with the State 
S\stcm of Higher lulucation by 
Sept. 21. 



Would you like to write for 

The Clarion Call? 

If so, call 393-2380. 




///■^cfrf/^cf 




Thcciire Review 



Rocky Horror is a mucous good time 



by JeHChatTee 
( larion Call Staff Writer 

I have to admit that I wasn't 
a big Rock) person going into 
'fuesday night's pcrtorinance. 
■fhen again, I wasn't a Crease 
person either when my high 
sch(n)l did It and I had to learn 
everyone's (and I mean 
FVFRYONH's) lines, songs 
and choreography as stage 
manager. While I still hate 
even the mention of ""the 
chicks'll cream," I can't say 
the same after CU's Rocky 
Hnrnir Show (Tonight at S 
PM, Friday at 8 and Midnight. 
in the Maru lek Bo\d I ittle 
fheatre). In a sentence. I've 
only had more fun siinpl) 
watching a shov\ when I was 
in the audience for the Blue 
■Man (Iroup in Las \egas. 

1 knew a bit about the stor). 
and that there were all kinds 



of shenanigans and goings on 
that were to aceompanv a 
showing of the tilm. and that 
Clarion was encouraging said 
shenanigans with S5 "partici- 
pation hags." but 1 never knew 
how fun this wv)uld be. 
Between confetti for Rocky 
(Bret "Mr. Modesty" Sloan) 
and Frank's (Trevor 

Southwu)rth, quite, urn, 
"frankly" the best-cast person 
in the show) wedding, news- 
paper for the "rainstorm" and 
"cards of sorrow and cards of 
pain," the air was full of 
thu)v\n objects, material and 
verbal. 

What was good: Well, I usu- 
ally inject my plug to Myra 
Bullington and lid Powers 
here for costumes and set 
quality— again far-above the 
call of duty. I'll say this: 1 
wouldn't have believed st)me 



11 Til iLiis A^^ 






I nwRESSlON 









* V ... )t_'' i ■ 



'i nj\f\ 



\ r 



\J 



:.¥'"V")l\i 



• •«•••••••••••••••«*«• 



• «•••••«•••• 



ol the ghouls W(Hild'\e nuide 
It up and down the kicldeis as 
l!quul-spined as the> did. a 
credit to them and the set 
itsell. Acting wa:> top notch, 
e\en when mics cut out during 
s(mgs (hey, not anything more 
than a nit-pick...l know its 
opening night after all) and 
when the crowd was laughing 
just as hard at the Ri>cky afi- 
cionado in their midst as what 
was on stage. I'm not usually 
a fan of squeaky. Brooklvn- 
brai tones, but somehow, 



Danielle (iainian's Columbia 



nuule I! work. 



>uu 



in Rob 



Bullington's superb Igor cum 
Peter Tra\ers Riff-Ratf and 
Dr. Brian Dunn's "no |ittcrs 
here" debut and the show 
was fantastic. 

What v\ as less good: 1 can't 
even find something in the 
script I didn't like. Osually. 
I'd blast \\o\cs in plot or con- 
fusing action on stage, hut 
here, everything was done 
with such glam-rock excess 
that even the slightly over- 



done ■^O's B Mo\ ic Ctiinp ,iutt 
w as light at home 

,So il vduic oiic ot the iuckv 
ones \\ho got tickets (or some- 
one's seat since they didn't 
show), I can guarantee you'll 
love what you see .And I must 
recommend that the poorest 
college kids among us pony up 
the Fiver for a bag of good- 
ies. ..it's much more fun that 
w a y . 

See y()u all at the midnight 
show. ..but I may not look like 
me. 



Wher 









i 






J^^a&iS^l^^^&M&iii. .■■K#rf,..-.., . 



Photo by Graham ilerrnanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in 'Where In Clarion? 



www .thcclario Ileal I. coin 






1 umincxLs Threads tt^ Musical pioneers 

bring Pem\ ian \vea\ ing ■ I New Order make a 
skills to Clarion. For triumphant return with 
ini'ormation abcuit this Cv\ Rendu, their first 



: '/Dolauiicr is e\'er\' bit a^- 
stiipid as its main 
character. 



*••••«•••*•••* 



prc^^'am, 



aibum sii^''^' ^'^^^'^ 



I t I ! ' ' . V * 



i -i 



Pv, 



; '^ 



Calendar oi Vwni^ 

To find out what' 

going on at Clarion 

! ni\ei^it\ and thesur 

-undingO^-'Tininih 



Page 12 



Ca 



T^£ {ilAP/D/\/ r.AU 



October 4, 2001 



^%^^ 




nts 



i rnn . , :r ^ . . - = , _, ~ ~ gl 



Thursday, October 4 

•Drama Prod "The Rocky Horror Show" (LT) 8 pm 
•Reading tor the Cure (Moore Hall) 6 pm 
Friday, October 5 
•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at Holiday Inn/Clarion Classic 
•Drama Prod 
"The Rocky 
Horror Show) 
(LT) 8 pm 
•Admissions 
Visit Day (248 
Gem) 9 am 
Saturday, 
October 6 
Football vs. 
California 1 pm 
•UAB Tailgate 
Party (Stad) 12 N 
•Volleyball 
Holiday 
Inn/Clarion 
Classic 
•W.Soccer at 
East Stroudsburg 
3 pm 

•Drama Prod 
"The Rocky 
Horror Show" 
(LT) 8 pm 

•Cross Country at Lehigh 
•Tennis v. California 10 am 
Sunday, October 7 
•Golf at Fairmont State Inv. 




UAB Faliingwater 
&. Andy Warhol 
Museum 
Monday, 
October 8 
•COLUMBUS DAYI 
(OBSERVED) 
•THANKSGIVING 
DAY (CANADA) 

Admissions Visit 
Day (250/252 Gem)| 
9 am 

•Golf at Fairmont 
State Inv. 

Faculty Senate 
Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 
3:30 pm 

•Spring/Summer 02 
Grads need to file 
grad apps during 
early registration 
(B-16 Carrier) 
•Professional 
Development Series "Interviewing" (250/252 Gem) 5:30 pm 

Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30 pm 
•IM entries due in Rec Center (Challenge Course) 
Tuesday, October 9 

•UAB Comedy Club: Brad Lowry (Gem Ritazza) 12 N 
Volleyball at California 7 pm 
•W. Soccer at Edinboro 4 pm 
•Golf at Allegheny Inv. 

•IM entries due in Rec Center (Horseshoe Pitching) 
Wednesday, October 10 

•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gem) 7:30 pm 
•IM entries due in Rec Center (Closest to the Pin) 




Brad Lowry 



Luminous Threads to weave cultures and styles 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania will offer a 
"Luminous Threads work- 
shop, Saturday, October 20, 
10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 
p.m. in the textile studio, 
B-13, of Founders Hall. 
Cathie Joslyn, professor of 



art at Clarion University 
and a Fulbright Scholarship 
recipient to work in the 
Peruvian Andes during the 
Spring 2002 semester, will 
teach the workshop. 

The workshop registration 
fee is $10, with an addi- 
tional $5 payable to the 
instructor at the first class 
meeting for materials. To 



Shelly's Family Restaurant 

Paint Bvld. 
Shippenvill, Pa 

Daily Homemade Specials 

Homemacie Pies, Breads, & Soups 
Old Fashioned Meals 
Clean Restrooms! 

223-4004 



Open 7 

days 

Mon-Sat 

6am-9pm 

Sun 
6am-3pm 





register for the workshop, 
call Continuing Education, 
Clarion University at 814- 
393-2227, or e-mail Kris 
Stiglitz at kstiglitz@clari- 
on.edu. For more informa- 
tion on the workshop, e- 
mail Cathie Joslyn at 
cjoslyn@clarion.edu. 



The workshop is intended 
for adults, university and 
high school students, teach- 
ers and anyone interested in 
fabric art and Latin 
America. It will teach fab- 
ric printing with stamps and 
silkscreen, with the possf- 
bility of some tie dye and 
decorative stitching: The 
suggested minimum age'for 
participation is 12. 

Participation will con- 
tribute to an international 
cultural exchange through 
art. In the workshop, stu- 
dents will create an art pro- 
ject relating northwestern 
Pennsylvania with Peru 
through visual symbols. 
Images to be used will be 
inspired by the geography 
and cultures of the two 



regions. For example, the 
ancient Parker's Landing 
petroglyphs will represent 
culture.<i of western 

Pennsylvania, and Peru will 
be symbolized by designs 
from pre-Columbian ceram- 
ics and textiles. 

Each participants" art will 
become part of two fabric 
murals, one for northwest- 
ern Pennsylvania and one to 
hang in Peru. A parallel 
project will be done with 
Peruvians, and some of 
their panels will also 
become part of the 
Pennsylvania mural. The 
murals will be featured on 
an interactive website for 
the project where people 
can write to each other in 
English or Spanish. 



October 4, 2001 



T^e CcARfO/^ Cau 



Page 13 



\ 



Music Review 



Get Ready to rediscover New Order 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call Lifestyles Editor^ 

ARTIST/ALBUM: New 
Order - Get Ready. 

FOR FANS OF: Electronica- 
friendly rock; prog for the mass- 
es. 

FOR FURTHER LISTENING: 
Electronic 's Twisted 

Tenderness, The Doves' Lost 
Souls, Garbage's Version 2.0. 

Way back in my high school 
days. I had a concrete vision of 
where I wanted to be and what I 
wanted to do in college. First 
was to drastically improve my 
social status. Let's see, I've 
accomplished that. Next, to 
become an editor at the college 
paper. Yep, got that covered. 
Bcttei grades.' Ummm...see me 
next semester. And finally, 1 
wanted to write a euphoric 
review of the triumphant come- 
back album I was sure would be 
released by my then-favorite 
group. New Order. Well, the 
comeback album is here, and so 
is the review, though not quite 
as ecstatic as I'd hoped it would 
be. 

Gel Ready has been a long 
time coming. I've been waiting 
for this record since 1993, 
which is when their last album, 
Republic, was unleashed. A lot 
has changed in that time. My 
critic's ears have gradually been 
trained to appreciate more 
sophisticated sounds; more 
intricate arrangements. Bernard 
Sumner's emotionally detached 
vocals, which spoke directly to 
my alienated heart in high 
school, have been traded in for 
more emotive singers, such as 
Thorn Yorke and Jeff Buckley. 
The thinking man's dancefloor 
anthems of New Order have 
been supplanted with the think- 
ing man's art-rock of my now- 
favorite group, Radiohead. 

After nearly a decade of 



silence and lackluster side pro- 
jects, 1 didn't hold much hope. 
Republic itself was a mixed bag, 
the sound of a group utterly los- 
ing passion for making music, 
nearly becoming a Sumner solo 
project along the way, with nary 
a live drum set and precious few 
classic Peter Hook bass lines to 
be found. The album drowned 
in a sea of predictable dance 
grooves and syrupy synths. 

The 1999 release of Sumner's 
side project. Electronic, showed 
that one of the original post- 
punk guitar gods was develop- 
ing a newfound love of the 
instrument; as the album was 
filled with driving Led 



Morris ferociously slaps his set 
around as if his life depended on 
it, especially on the messy, raw 
"Rock The Shack." Sumner's 
once-spiky guitar has smoothed 
out the edges, resulting in a 
more streamlined attack with 
less feedback and random bursts 
of noise that nevertheless packs 
a formidable punch. Most 
importantly, bassist Peter Hook 
is in top form, churning out his 
now-patented bass hooks (no 
pun intended) at every turn. 

Get Ready doesn't offer any- 
thing drastically new for the 
group, save the acoustic closer, 
"Run Wild," but it does show 
them adapting their sound for 




Zeppelin-esque beats and elastic 
rhythms and riffs. 

Get Ready only confirms this. 
New Order haven't rocked this 
urgently since 198C's 

Brotherhood album. A fruitless 
nostalgia romp this ain't, 
though it is reminiscent of their 
earlier work. Drummer Steve 



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today's audience. And unlike 
recent comeback albums by 
other 80s stalwarts Depeche 
Mode and Echo and the 
Bunnymen, New Order is less 
concerned with digging them- 
selves a comfortable AAA-radio 
rut than they are actually rock- 
ing out. They sound alive, vital 
and above all - to be enjoying 
themselves and each other, a 
feat that has always been diffi- 
cult for this most private of 
groups. 

Dense production that over- 
flows with attention to detail, 
sharp songwriting and skillfull 
playing are all aspects that Echo 
and Depeche mined on their 
recent albums, but they seemed 
lifeless, listless and bored by 



the whole procedure. New 
Order launch themselves with 
full force on every track, includ- 
ing the ballads, infusing them 
with strains of pure joy of 
music. It's the sound of a band 
rediscovering themselves and 
their craft; filled with positive 
sentiments and organic sounds; 
the complete antithesis of 
Republic's glittering, yet vacu- 
ous trinkets. 

The opening salvo and leadoff 
single, "Crystal." is the perfect 
encapsulatit)n of Get Ready. 
Live drums nest comfortably 
next to programmed drum 
loops; Hook's bass takes the 
forefront, providing the song 
with both its definmg rhythm 
and unforgettable melody all at 
once; Gillian Gilbert's key- 
boards float in and out of the 
mix unobtrusively; and 
Sumner's awkward vocals are 
just as endearing as they were 
15 years ago. "Crystal' is slick, 
ultra-produced and processed, 
yet it is performed with the cav- 
alier, off-the-cuff manner that 
only accomplished veterans 
with supreme beliefs in their 
abilities could manage. The 
fact that it is already climbing 
the dance charts in even the 
USA is a testament to the stay- 
ing power of this band. 

"60 Miles Per Hour" dupli- 
cates the formula of "Crystal" 
with slightly less impressive 
results, but is never boring. 
When New Order does slow 
down the tempo for more intro- 
spective songs, the music still 
remains invigorating, such as in 
"Vicious Streak," with its com- 
puterized bass loop that feels 
like an anvil tied to your brain. 
The only other track that finds 
New Order in subdued mode is 
the prog-tinted "Run Wild," 
which is already being hotly 
debated among devoted fans as 
either one of the best things 
they've ever done, or a sappy 
and simplistic piece of psyche- 
delic folk-cheese. 

In "Run Wild," Sumner actu- 
ally opts for a straight-forward 
narrative, as he paints a 
poignant love song with a frag- 
ile acoustic guitar and harmoni- 
ca. "Run Wild" slowly crescen- 
dos into waves of strings and 
synthesizers colored by deepest 
dusk. When Sumner, backed by 



the angelic Gillian Gilbert, 
informs his lover that "When 
Jesus comes to take your hand/ I 
won't let go," it's quite possibly 
the most emotionally direct 
mt)ment these musicians have 
shown us since 1980, when they 
were still the dark visionary 
group known as Joy Division. 
They've never sounded so at 
peace than here. Sappy? 
Maybe, but I guess that we all 
have to grt)w up sometime, and 
it's done gracefully here. 

Perhaps the most telling 
moments on Get Ready are the 
collaborations with Billy 
Corgan (yes, that Billy) and 
Primal Scream, on "Turn My 
Way" and "Rock The Shack," 
respectively. The Great 

Pumpkin himself appears on 
"Turn My Way" to provide both 
vocals and guitar. I'm not sure 
if the track bridges the gap 
between Corgan's dearly depart- 
ed group and New Order's dis- 
cofied punk, or is just a desper- 
ate attempt at hipster points. 
Taken on its own merits, it's a 
fine modern rock song, filled 
with wistful lament, and 
Corgan's voice compliments 
Sumner's quite nicely. 

"Rock The Shack," despite its 
ridiculous title, is the album's 
most aggressive track, as a raw 
guitar in the vein of MC5 or The 
Stooges parades around like a 
drunken thug, while Screamer 
Bobby Gillespie provides plenty 
of fractured, dissonant squelch- 
es and nasal sneers. Sumner's 
funk-fried down-and-dirty gui- 
tar repeats and expounds upon 
his guest appearance on the 
Scream's last album, "Shoot 
Speed/Kill Light." The whole 
mess melts down after four min- 
utes of noisy outbreak. Not bad 
for a bunch of reserved 
Englishmen (and women) that 
are pushing 50 years of age. 

New Order's glory days, both 
in my own aesthetic view and 
the musical world at large may 
be long gone, but Get Ready is a 
rock-solid reminder of what 
made them the 80s greatest 
musical creation. 

It's a great reminder of what 
made them so great in the old 
days, and why newer fans 
should check them out. 
Welcome back guys, I missed 
you. 4 out of 5 stars. 



Page 14 



ne PAAR/o/y r.Aii 



October 4, 2001 



Movie Review 



Zoolander is a victim of its own fashion sense 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call Lifest^vles Editor 

For years, Saturday Night 
Live has ignored a very sim- 
ple rule - recurring sketches 
on the show DO NOT WORK 
AS FULL-LENGTH 

MOVIES!!!!!! The casual 
breaking of this fundamental 
rule then spread to other 
sketch comedy shows, includ- 
ing the Canadian mainstay 
Kids In The Hall, with their 
slight little film. Brain 
Candy. From there, it spread 
to MTV as they decided to 
green-light a feature-length 
version of Beavis and 
Butthead. The horror. Now, 
it seems as if VHl feels left 
out of the fun, and has decid- 
ed to get in the game. 
Unfortunately, this game has 
no winners, and the only loser 
is the audience. 

Zoolander, based on a short 
little sketch that Ben Stiller 
formulated on the VHl 
Fashion Awards show (and 
what the hell is a music chan- 
nel broadcasting a fashion 
award show for, anyway?), is 
just the latest casualty in the 
ever-growing throng of failed 
sketch-to-film concepts. 

Let me address all of these 
bigwig Hollywood types right 
now - Wayne 's World was a 
fluke!! This WILL NOT hap- 
pen again, no matter how hard 
you try! Even the sequel was 
only moderately enjoyable! 



Zoolander isn't the worst destroy the quality of life for 

example of this broken rule, other people. ..oh wait - that 

not by a long shot (Night At really is the truth. 

The Roxbury probably takes A new prime minister of 

the cake for that), but it cer- Malaysia has been elected, 

tainly is an offense to movie- and declares to end unjust 

goers with good taste and an child labor practices within 




Ben Stiller as Derek Zoolander, with a not-so-brlght expression 
on his face. 



IQ that is above their bucket 
of popcorn. 

The plot of Zoolander (Ha 
ha ha! Get it? It's an oxy- 
moron!! Like 'military intelli- 
gence.' Warning - that joke I 
just cracked is about as funny 
as anything else in 
Zoolander) centers on a con- 
spiracy within the fashion 
world, which is all a front for 
international terrorism, it 
turns out. As if anyone cared 
that Kate Moss was really a 
brainwashed agent out to 



the country. Of course, this 
would cripple the fashion 
industry, so a shadowy con- 
sortium of designers, led by 
an ex-member of Frankie 
Goes To Hollywood, Mugatu 
(Will Ferrell), must take him 
out. (Trust me - if you didn't 
hate "Relax" before going 
into Zoolander, you will 
afterwards). They need a 
patsy to murder the prime 
minister; someone who is 
dumb enough to be molded to 
their needs. Three-time male 



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model of the year Derek 
Zoolander (Ben Stiller) fits 
the bill nicely. 

His model friends having 
recently died in a freak gaso- 
line fight incident (don't ask). 
Zoolander has retired from 
the fashion world, discover- 
ing that there is more to life 
than "being really, really, 
really fabulously good-look- 
ing," or so he thinks. But 
when Mugatu offers him a 
modeling job, Zoolander 
can't resist. He is brain- 
washed to kill the prime min- 
ister on cue, but an intrepid 
reporter for Time unearths 
this plot, and along with a fel- 
low male model. Hansel 
(played with usual idiocy by 
Owen Wilson), attempts to 
rescue the dim-witted 
Zoolander from himself. 

Along the way, the writ- 
ers/directors mine the usual 
tired fish-out-of-water rou- 
tines, the patented Jim 
Carrey-dumb guy routine, and 
plenty of other cliches to 
boot. Here is another rule for 
you Hollywood types, just to 
fill you in: Celebrity cameos 
do not make for a good 
movie, or even a very funny 
film!!! If I see one more film 
where celebrities poke fun at 
themselves in. an exclusi\e, 
in-joke sort of manner, I'm 
going to flip. 

The exception fo this is 
(Spoiler alert! Stop reading if 
the appearance of one uncrcd-- 
itcd celebrity will ruin \oiir 
enjoyment of thi.s dri\cl) 
David Bowie's role. Wlu) 
better to judge a model walk- 



off than Ziggy Stardust? I 
guess if he can't make decent 
music anymore, he might as 
well resign himself to appear- 
ing in low-grade comedies. 

Stiller is filled with manic 
energy throughout the entire 
film, as per usual, but he just 
doesn't have decent material 
to work with this time out. 
Occasionally, his comic tim- 
ing is enough to carry off 
some jokes, but others are too 
mired in stupidity even for 
him. Mostly, he just comes 
off as awkward as the name 
for the building he plans to 
erect one day: "Center For 
Children Who Can't Read 
Very Well, And Would Like 
To Learn To Do Other Things 
Good, Too." 

As for the rest of the cast, 
Ferrell chews scenery and 
overacts every chance he 
gets. His Flock Of Seagulls 
hairdo is more entertaining 
than his performance. I don't 
even think that Wilson is act- 
ing; I truly believe he is that 
dumb, and Jon Voight contin- 
ues his downward slide that 
he started with Toinb Raider. 
I expected more from Stiller 
after the hilarity of Meet The 
Parents, but Zoolander is a 
serious misstep for him. The 
entire film is directed like one 
huge music video, with 
vibrant colors, hit songs and 
flashy camera work at every 
turn. Unfortunately, those 
nifty little gimmicks can't 
hide the fact that Zoolander is 
every hit as empty-headed as 
its mam charactci. 1 1/2 out 
of 5 stars. 



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UAB Trip to Falling Water! 

On Sunday, October 7, UAB is spon- 
soring a trip to the Andy Warhol 
museum in Pittsburgh and to Frank 
Lloyd Wright's Falling Water. 

Departure is 7:00 dm outside of Tippin. 
Cost is $ 1 and bring your own lunch. 

Sign-up at the Gemmell Info Desk!!!! 



October 4, 2001 



r^/f CCAR/O/^ CAU 



Page 15 



Mr. Grammer returns to help you avoid embarrassment 



by Dave Barry 
Svndicated Writer 



Welcome to another episode of "Ask 
Mister Language Person," the column 
written by the language expert who 
recently won the World Wrestling 
Federation Grammar Smackdown when 
he kneed William Safire right in the 
gerunds. 

Our first language question comes 
from an extremely high federal official, 
who asks: 

Q. What are the mandatorical parts of 
speech that is required to be in a sen- 
tence? 

A. To be grammatorically correct, a 
sentence must have three basic ele- 
ments: (1) A SUBJECT, which is a noun 
that can be either a person, place or 
mineral; (2) A VERB, which is word 
that describes an action, such as "kung 
fu"; and (3) AN OBJECT, which is a 
noun that weighs two or more pounds. 
Let's see how these elements combine 
to form this example sentence, written 
by Marcel Proust: 

"Being late at night. Earl failed to 
check his undershorts for lipstick 
stains, which is why he was awokened 
at 6:30 a.m. by Lurleen whanging him 
upside his head with a object." 

Q. Speaking of Marcel Proust, what 
can the letters in his name be 
rearranged to spell? 

A. "Rump Locaters." 

Q. I am a top business executive writ- 
ing an important memo, and I wish to 
know if the following wording is cor- 
rect: "As far as sales, you're figures do 
not jive with our parameters." 

A. You have made the common gram- 



matical error of using the fricative 
infundibular tense following a third- 
person corpuscular imprecation. The 
correct wording is: "As far as sales, 
your fired." 

Q. I am a foreign person from abroad 
visiting the United States, and I would 
like to know how to speak so I can "fit 
in" with the locals. 

A. This depends on where you are. 




For example, suppose that somebody 
says "hello" to you: 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN THE 
MIDWEST: "You can make a bet on 
that! It is not presenting any prob- 
lems!" 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN URBAN 
AREAS: "Are you talking? To me? 
Forget all about it, bagful of dirt!" 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN THE 
SOUTH: "I am fixing to experience a 
hankering for a pig organ such as 



chitlings, you all!" 

Q. I am a member of the United States 
House of Representatives, and recently, 
following an incident that was totally 
not my fault involving an underage 
Shetland pony, I was charged with 
"moral turpitude." My question is: Is 
that bad? If so, would IMMORAL 
turpitude be good? Also, is there a rock 
band called "Marcel and the 
Turpitudes?" 

A. There certainly should be. 

Q. You know how, when you're wait- 
ing on hold for Customer Service, they 
have a recorded voice tell you that 
"your call may be monitored?" Who, 
exactly, may be monitoring it? 

A. Keanu Reeves. 

Q. In the song "I Shot the Sheriff," 
how come the singer keeps loudly 
announcing that he shot the sheriff, but 
he did NOT shoot the deputy? Is he in 
some weird municipality where it's a 
serious criminal offense to shoot a 
deputy, but if you shoot the actual sher- 
iff, hey, no problem? 

A. Your question is very important to 
us. 

Q. Is it time to pad out this column 
with true examples of strong language 
usage sent in by alert readers? 

A. It most surely is: 
•Paul Briggs sent in an Associated 
Press article concerning a referendum 
to ban alcohol sales in Fairhope 
Township, Pa., in which a resident is 
quoted as making the following allega- 
tion about the town's only bar, Hillbilly 
Havep: "Some nights, I think they have 
those teriyaki songs." 

•Marcia Berner and Charlie Dallas 
sent in a newsletter from the 



Musselman Funeral Home in Lemoyne, 
Pa., that has two front-page articles, 
one headlined "Cremation Around the 
World," and the other headlined, 
"Outdoor Grilling Tips." 

•Ann Stanley sent in an article from 
The Winston-Salem Journal that 
begins: "An attacker shot and killed a 
Spanish newspaper executive seven 
times yesterday. ..." 

•Dan Lothringer sent in an article 
from The Houston Chronicle that 
begins: "Texans used to enjoying a 
frosty brew inside their car may soon 
find themselves slapped with a hefty 
ticket, with a bill banning open con- 
tainers of alcohol in cars speeding to 
the governor's desk." 

•Sharon Canada sent in an English- 
language driver's manual for foreigners 
in the Republic of Korea, which con- 
tains this statement: "Drivers must not 
allow passengers to make noise or dis- 
order such as dancing on vehicles to the 
degree of interrupting safe driving." 

Q. Does that mean that a certain 
amount of dancing on vehicles is OK? 
A. Yes, under the right circumstances, 
such as when the vehicle is speeding 
toward the governor's desk and every- 
one is singing teriyaki songs. 

TODAY'S TIP FOR "PROFESSION- 
AL" WRITERS: When writing poetry, 
be sure to express angst. 

WRONG: Jack fell down, and broke 
his crown. 

RIGHT: Jack fell down, and experi- 
enced a bunch of angst. 

GOT A QUESTION FOR MISTER 
LANGUAGE PERSON? Speak directly 
into the newspaper. Keanu is monitor- 
ing you. 



Wom^H 








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OC TOHhR 4, 2001 



/r' RiXlC^y 



October 4, 2001 



Zoolander is a victim of its own fasliion sense 



l)\ KiMth (.willim 
( Liiion Call I if't'st\ies Kditor 



/ooliiihlrr iM;'i ;iio vsvJsi lIcs1m>\ llic i.|ualil\ i'! i i Ic toi 



• •«>«« •*•••«••• 



cs.mipii' i^t this fiiok'j 



dlhcr |icopk'.. (ill wai; iluii 



I :M V cii ^, S-.iiKrdiiv A/i,'/;/ 
/,/!( has Ignored a \ci\ sini- 
pu' ;'ik' iolumiim; sketches 
on U'c show DO NOT WORK 
AS FIM 1 1 HNCTH 

MOVIES'"!" The casual 
breaking oi this tundarnental 
rule then spread to other 
skeich comedy shows, includ- 
ing: (he Canadian mainstay 
Kids !n The Hall, with their 
slight little film, Bnun 
Caiuix. From there, it spread 
to MTV as they decided to 
green-light a feature-length 
version of Beans and 
Butthcad. The horror. Now, 
It seems as if VHl feels left 
out o\ the fun, and has decid- 
ed to get in the game. 
rntoriunatel\. this game has 
no w Miners, and the onls li^ser 
is the audience. 

/(lolandcr. based on a short 
little sketch that lU^n Stiller 
formulated on the \\\ 1 
l-ashion .Awards show land 
what the hell is a music chan- 
nel broadcasting a fashion 
awanl show for. aiuwas .'). is 
just ihe Kitcsl casualty in the 
c\c; L;r(n\ing throng o\ failed 
sk.Mdi-t(i- film concepts 

I .■! me address all ot ihe.sc 

1 1. h \ w I'.od i\ pes nglit 

'id'. ';. \ U(i/ /(/ w as a 

''- \ML! \()i haiv 

;ria!lc( hc'^\ hai d 

. -n ;[u' scijuel \«> as 

' ■ ■ PI' i\ .ib!e ' 



iiu! b\ a long slu-t i V /!,'/,>/ \, i eail\ is the iiulli , 



///( R(i\!>iir\ pn^bablv takiVs 



A new Diime ministci of 



the cake foi that), but it cer- Malaysia has heen elected, 
tainl\ is an ottense to mo\ie- and declares to end uii|ust 
goers with good taste and dn child labor practices within 




Photo courtesy of Yahool Movies! 



Ben Stiller as Derek Zoolander, with a not-so-bright expressi^on 
on his face. 



\Q that IS above their bucket the country. Of course, this 

ot poptorn. would cripple the fashion 

The plot of Zoolciiuhr lila industry, so a shadow\ con- 

ha ha' (iet it.' It's an oxy- sortium o\' designers, led bv 

moron" I. ikc 'military intelli an e.\-inemher of i-'rankie 

geiice." Warning - that jtikc 1 (iocs lo Ilollv u oi^d. Mugatu 

just cracked is about as fuiin> iW'ill I-crre!h. must lake him 

as an_\thiin' else in nut i Trust me if }ou didn't 

/I'olaii'di I ) centers on a c^.n- h.ile "Relax'" hetorc ijoini: 

spiiai;\ \sithin the iashio'i into Zoolandi i \ou \vili 

•x'loild, \shich IS all a fmnt ! ''civsarilsi Thcv nci : 

international icnoiisii- ■ |iais> to> mmJcr ilu- p.isnic 

tuiiis.ii;' .aicJ ininislci; si'mcuie w !io i.s 

?Iki; K.i' .jiinih enough i 

'^- Mv-i'us I !!: ■-:c-; i liic ill.. 



model lit !iic >e;ii Derek 
/oo!, mdci (Men Slilleij (its 
ll'c bill iiiccls 

Ills model tncnds ha\ing 
recently died in a freak gaso- 
line fight incident (don't aski. 
/oolander has retired from 
the fashion world, discover- 
ing that there is more to life 
than "being really, really, 
really fabulously good-look- 
ing," or so he thinks. But 
when Mugatu offers him a 
modeling job, Zoi)lander 
can't resist. He is brain- 
washed to kill the prime min- 
ister on cue, but an intrepid 
reporter for Tinic unearths 
this plot, and along with a fel- 
low male model. Hansel 
(pla\ed with usual idioc}' by 
Owen Wilson), atteinpts to 
rescue the dim-witted 
Zoolander from himself. 

.Along the way, the writ- 
ers/directors mine the usual 
tired fish-out-of- water rou- 
tines, the patented .Iim 
Carre>-dumb gu\ routine, and 
plenty of other cliches to 
boot. Here is another rule tor 
you Hollywood t\pes. |iist to 
till _\ou in: Celebrit\ cameos 
di^ not make tor a good 
ino\ie. or e\en a \er\ funiu 
tilm" ' If I see one irn^oj film 
w hi ere celetintics pok..- ir;i ai 
thcnisohcs m ai; c < a, 

iiniiio !i. fl ip. 
'I he Cm. cp! 

■ PiM |i.T ,lic! I ' So 

-■ .ippcar.iiicc ■ 



jfOToNrBig'iiiiS^ 



o]\ than /igL'\ S I aid u si,' I 
guess it he can't make decent 
music aiivmoic. he miu'lii as 
well resign hiniseit to appear 
ing 111 low-grade comedies. 

Stiller is filled w ith manic 
eneig) throusihoui the entire 
film, as per usual, but he just 
doesn't have decent material 
to work with this time out. 
Occasionally, his comic tim- 
ing is enough to carry off 
some jokes, but others are too 
mired in stupidity even for 
him. Mostly, he just comes 
off as awkward as the name 
for the building he plans to 
erect (me day: "Center l-'or 
Children Whi* Can't Read 
Very Well, And Would Like 
To Learn To Do Other Things 
(iood. Too." 

As for the rest o\' the cast. 
L'errell chews scenery and 
overacts every chance he 
gets His f^'iiKk Of Seagulls 
hairdo IS more entertaining 
than his perl'ormance. I don' I 
even think that W'llson is act 
ing; I trulv believe he is that 
dumb, and .ion X'oight contin- 
ues his downward slide that 
he started with Toinh Raider. 

I e\|)ected more tiom Stiller 
alter the hiiaritv of ,\/o<7 7'/;c 

Pcir(H!s. but /(inldmh ,■ Is a 

serious luissicp !ri! him. 1 lie 
cntiie lilm is direciiad like one 
ii 11 ge m iis K' \ nioi I. u It h 
Vibrant f lius. hii mmius and 
■ : ik al cvc!\ 

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pef visiJ No( '.^»J 
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Valid at; 
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M other oflcf 



UAB Trip to Falling Water! 

On Sunday, October 7, UAB is spon- 
soring a trip to the Andy Warhol 
museum in Pittsburgh and to Frank 
Lloyd Wright's Falling Water. 



Departure is 7:00 am outside of Tippin. 
Cost is $ 1 and bring your own lunch. 

Sign~up at the Gemmell Info Desk!!!! 



f///f CtA^/Oiy Caci 



Page 15 



Mr. Grammer returns to help you avoid embarrassment 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated VVriter 



Welcome \o another episode ol "'Ask 
Mister Language Person."" the column 
written by the language expert who 
recently won the World Wrestling 
Federation Grammar Smackdown when 
he kneed William Safire right in the 
gerunds. 

Our I'lrsl language question comes 
from an extremely high federal ot't'icial, 
who asks: 

Q. What are the mandatoncal parts of 
speech that is required to be in a sen- 
tence? 

A. To be grammatorically correct, a 
sentence must have three basic ele- 
ments: ( 1 ) A SUBJECT, which is a noun 
that can be either a person, place or 
mineral; (2) .\ VERB, which is word 
that describes an action, such as "kung 
fu"; and (3) AN OBJECT, which is a 
noiin that weighs two or more pounds. 
l,et"s see how these elements combine 
to form this example sentence, written 
by Marcel Proust: 

■'Being late at night, Earl failed to 
check his undershorts for lipstick 
stains, which is why he was awokened 
at 6:30 a.m. by Lurleen whanging him 
upside his head with a object." 

Q. Speaking of Marcel Proust, what 
can the letters in his name be 
rearranged to spell? 

A. "Rump Locaters." 

Q. I am a top business executive writ- 
ing an important meint), and I wish to 
know if the following wording is cor 
rect: ""As far as sales, you're figures do 
not jive with our parameters." 

A. You have made the common gram- 



matical error of using the fricative 
infundibular tense following a third- 
person corpuscular imprecation. The 
correct wording is: "".As far as sales, 
your fired." 

Q. I am a foreign person Irom abroad 
visiting the United States, and 1 would 
like \o know how to speak so 1 can "lit 
in"' with the locals. 

A. This depends on where you are. 




For example, suppose that somebody 
says "hello" to you: 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN THE 
MIDWEST: "You can make a bet on 
that! It is not presenting any prob- 
lems!" 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN URBAN 
AREAS: "Are you talking? To me? 
Forget all about it, bagful of dirt!" 

CORRECT RESPONSE IN THE 
SOUTH: "I am fixing to experience a 
hankering for a pig organ such as 



chitlings. you all !" 

Q. I am a member of the United Slates 
House of Representatives, and recently, 
following an incident that was iotall\ 
not Miy fault imohing an underage 
Shetland pony. I was charged uith 
"moral turpitude."" My question is: Is 
that bad' If so. would IMMOKAI 
turpitude be good'.' Also, is there a rock 
band called "Marcel and the 
Turpitudes .'"" 

A. There certainly should be. 

Q. You know how, when youre wait- 
ing on hold for Customer Service. the\ 
have a recorded voice tell you that 
"your call may be monitored.'"' Who, 
exactly, may be monitoring it ' 

A. Keanu Reeves. 

Q. In the song "I Shot the Sheriff. " 
how come the singer keeps loudly 
announcing that he shot the sheriff, but 
he did NOT shoot the deputy' Is he in 
some weird municipality where it"s a 
serious criminal offense to shoot a 
deputy, but if you shoot the actual sher- 
iff, hey, no problem? 

A. Your question is very important to 
us. 

Q. Is it time to pad out this column 
with true examples of strong language 
usage sent in by alert readers? 

A. It most surely is: 
•Paul Briggs sent in an Associated 
Press article concerning a referendum 
to ban alcohol sales in Fairhope 
Township, Pa., in which a resident is 
quoted as making the following allega- 
tion about the town's only bar, Hillbilly 
Havep: "Some nights, I think they have 
those teriyaki songs." 

•Marcia Berner and Charlie Dallas 
sent in a newsletter from the 



Musselman Funeral Home in I.emoyne, 
Pa., that has tuo front-page articles, 
one headlined "Cremation Around the 
World."' and the other headlined, 
"Outdoor (lulling lips'" 

•Ann Siank'N scni in an aiticle from 
The Winston Salem J()uinal that 
begins: "An attacker shot and killed a 
Spanish nev\spaper cxecutise seven 
limes yesteida). . "' 

•Dan Lothringei sent in an article 
from The Houston Chronicle that 
begins: "Texans used to enjv)\ing a 
frosts brew inside their car ma> socm 
find themselves slapped with a hefty 
ticket, with a bill banning open con- 
tainers of alcohol in cars speeding to 
the governor"s desk."" 

•Sharon Canada sent in an linglish 
language driver"s manual for foreigners 
m the Republic ol Korea, which con- 
tains this statement: "Drivers must not 
allow passengers to make noise or dis- 
order such as dancing on vehicles to the 
degree of interrupting safe driving." 

Q. Does that mean that a certain 
ainount of dancing on vehicles is OK? 
A. Yes, under the right circumstances, 
such as when the vehicle is speeding 
toward the governor's desk and every- 
one is singing teriyaki songs. 

TODAY'S TIP FOR 'PROFESSION- 
AL'" WRITERS: When writing poetry, 
be sure to express angst. 

WRONG: Jack fell down, and broke 
his crown. 

RIGHT: Jack fell down, and experi- 
enced a bunch of angst. 

GOT A QUESTION FOR MISTER 
LANGUAGE PERSON? Speak directly 
into the newspaper. Keanu is monitor- 
ing you. 



Woman 



■■■■■■■■■■iHai«aH#^ 




PAGE 16 



r^/f CiAm/\i Cau 



OCTOBER 4, 2001 




E/\iTeRrA//\i/i^E/\/T 



CAPTMN RIBMAN "Boy Troubles 




t DJDNTT REALIZE 
-jfOU Wt»?E TAiXfNKj 

ABOUT 'iOUR AwHAT CA>4 
PAftfMTS. 1 1 DO AftOUT 

AAAV0< TMry HAOV THAT? 
Tvmfl NEA«TS SCT 
ON HAVING A ««l/ 



by Sprengelme yer & D avis 
MOP* you« rotxsS 

*CNOW A COMPfTfNT 





/^/dHA^c ^cf^AN To COi^e o^r of Reri^eM^f^r 















OCTOBER 4, 2001 



7>^ /^/A^/M 6Aa 



PAGE 17 




E/\IT^RTAfl\JMe/\/r 




October 1-7, 2001 

Aries (March 21-April 20) . Messages from friends may be 
unusually fast. Expect changing plans and last-minute 
cancellations. At present, friends and lovers may be 
mentally scattered or unsure of their priorities. 

Taurus (April 21-May 20) . New financial or business 
instructions may be unnerving. Watch for colleagues and key 
officials to be easily influenced by private information, 
gossip or social innuendo. 

Gemini (May 21-June 21). Business interest and career 
ambition will return. For the past seven months, disgruntled 
colleagues or work officials may have restricted your options 
or changed your daily success. Aim higher. 

Cancer (June 22-July 22) . Romantic promises, social messages 
or family plans may change without notice. Expect loved 
ones to dispute daily plans, schedules or social obligations. 
Competing loyalities and past history may be ongoing themes. 

Leo (July 23-Aug.22). Business routines are unpredictable. 
Expect authority figures, teachers or mentors to distrust new 
information or ask for detailed written explanations. Past 
projects, deadlines or legal records iriay be unclear. 

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Social or romantic demands may be 
unreasonable. Expect loved ones to reveal an unusual 
jealousy or request strong public loyality. Business errors 
will be costly. False am.ounts or customer relations may be 
key issues. 

hxbrai (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Long-term romantic partners may 
take a more active role in your life. Loved ones may need 
challange old ideas, establish fresh emotional boundries or 
reaffirm their social and remantic idenity. 

Scoxrpxo (Oct.24-Nov. 21). Delayed romantic progress or 
■ unuaual social messages may be intriguing. After a long 
period of emotional isolation, love realtions will become 
clear, obvious and sincere. Carefully study the reactions of 
loved ones. 

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Romance will enter an 
important phase of decision. Watch for minor home changes or 
confl.icting obligations to create new daily priorities and 
strained social loyalities. 



Capricorn (Dec. 22- Jan 



2o; 



Energy is low. Expect moments 



of tiredness and emotional strain. For some Capricorns, skin 
ailments or digestive irritations may also be disruptive. 
Get extra rest and study diet to exercise programs for 
improvements . 

Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 19). Gentle pressure from loved ones 
may reaffirm your faith in long-term romance. Expect lovers 
or close friends to finally address dificult emotional 
issues, past social history or recent disappointments. 

Fisces (Feb. 20- March 20) . Home relationships will begin a 
phase of understanding and social belonging. Minor tensions 
or emotional power struggles may have disrupted key 
relationships. Now, however, loved ones will welcome group 
events, intimacy and unusual social plans. 

If Your Birthday is This Week Take extra time for 

rest, relaxation and thought. New romantic relationships 
will experience sudden ultimatums or quicky revised social 
agendas. Carefully decide if present lovers have your best 
interest in mind. For a private consultation, please visit 
www.mysticstars.net . 



f 



® 



Oft. So€t4Ct P^CPAi^^CS 
SofAt MCvi fAKTC^\^u 
fo|tCLA.SS ... 





A CLASSIC. 



AH, TW6 LOVE. 


WATCH 'ER 
&ANCE. 


• „_„,__ 





SYMBOLS Of TV«E 
MVSTEWOUS, 




6mt£. lUKE 
KAOi SCHNAPPS. 



WHAT IS IT 
ABOUT Mb BOVS 

TATTOOS ? 




IT'SIMKWTANT 

TO MAKE A 

STATEMB^. 




NOTHIN6 15 
PERMANENT. 




^ »■ ■■ • 



»«'m^ffrM.^*i* r 




"It has to be cafe latte or at least cappucino. 
otherwise, forget it!*' 



Page 18 



Tne CiARfo/\/ Cau 



October 4,2001 




CiAssfF/eos 



#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Earn Cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 



tours.com. 



'F'l*'t^*'r'f*'t*T''f*'t* T*T**f 



Spring Break 2002!!! Student 
Express is now hiring sales reps. 
Cancun features FREE meals and 
parties @ Fat Tuesdays-MTV 
Beach Headquarters. Acapulco, 
Mazatlan. Jamaica, Bahamas, 
South Padre, Florida. Prices from 
$469, with major airlines. 24,000 
travelers in 2001. Call 800-787- 
3787 for a FREE brochure or 
email: 
bookit@studentexpress.com. 
www.studentexpress.com 

Spring Break Insanity! 
www.inter-campus.com or call 1- 
800-327-6013 guaranteed lowest 
prices! We're the best - forget the 
rest! Fifteen years experience! 
All destinations! Wanted: 

Representatives and organiza- 
tions, earn top $$$, build resume. 

ACT NOW! Guarantee the best 
Spring Break Prices! South 
Padre, Cancun, Jamaica, 
Bahamas, Acapulco, Florida, and 
Mardigras. Reps needed... travel 
free, earn $$$. Group discounts 
for 6-h. 800-838- 

8203/www.leisuretours.com 

ACT FAST! Save $$$, get 
coupon., go to springbreakdis- 
counts.com or call 800-584-7502. 




Of f^nt 



Apartments avaiable for the Fall 
2002/Spring 2003 semesters at 51 
Penn Avenue. Four person occu- 
pancy. Furnished. Call 226-5917. 



■if. if. if. if. ifi% if if. -if. i(. if if. if. if. 



House available for the Spring 
2002 semester and also for the 
Fall 2002/2003 semesters. Five 
person occupance. Furnished. 
Call 226-5917. 

House available for the Fall 
2002/2003 semesters. 7-8 person 
occupancy. Furnished. Cali 226- 
5917. 




Waiters, Waitresses, Bartenders. 



and Kitchen Help/ Flexible hours. 
Apply in person at the Wayside 
Inn or call 226-2344. 

MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS! 
Sell Spring Break 2002 trips. 
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS - 
LOWEST PRICES! NO COST 
TO YOU! Travel FREE including 
food, drink and non-stop parties! ! ! 
World class vacations! 2001 
Student Travel Planners " TOP 
PRODUER" and MTV's choice. 
(Spring Break Cancun Party 
Program) 1-800-222-4432 




All steel building, engineer certi- 
fied 50X100X18 was $19,210, 
Now $11,935. Can deliver. 1- 
800-292-0111 



if)i.ifit-)fifif-ititifi(i(i,if 



5' Grand Piano: Young Chang 
Ivory, excellent condition. 
$9000.00 OBO. (814)358-2346 



9r«»k «i» 



Congratulations to ZTA, EFI, 
AOE, and OA© on their floats! 
Love, Tri Sigma 

KAP, You were the best float part- 
ners ever. Thanks for all your 
hard work, it definitely paid off! 
Love, ZZZ 



1fif1fif1fiHfifit-l(1flHclf 



Hello to our sweetheart, Cory 
Rex! Hope you had a happy ALE! 
Ooh, my... Love, the sisters of Tri 



^f^,^^i^i^i^^^^^1^i^■l^^^■)^^( 



Fall '01, you guys are doing great! 
Love, your future E sisters 



*****♦♦♦*♦+*+* 



Brittany, Thanks for a great time 
on Thursday! Love, Your S sisters 



■l^^^^H^^^■l(^^■l(■^(^(i^^^■l^i^ 



Jessica D., Not long now! We 
can't wait for Sunday night! 
Love, Your I sisters 



^^if■^^■l^^(^(■^^■^^^^^H^■^^•l^i^ 



To the sisters of AOE: Thank you 
so much for everything these past 
few weeks! ALF was a blast, and 
we had that BEST time working 
on the float with you! You girls 
ROCK!! Thanks again, OA0 




^i^ificltiril.-lfi(1firiti(1f 



Two words: fish sticks. What the 
!@#*! Judges!? OA0 



iti :*>«***#*.:<*'» :t<*>|i 



Kristen, Holly, and Whitney: You 
girls are doing fabulously! Keep 
up the great work, you're almost 
there! We can't wait to call you 
our sisters! Love, Your future Phi 
Sig sisters 



OSS hopes everyone had a happy 
and safe ALF! 

if.Jfif.if.if.i(.ifif.i,.ifif.ififif 

OSK, We had a great time with 
you during ALF! Love, OSS 

OSK boys, I hope you all have 
recovered from the festivities this 
week. Congratulations to Ben and 
Jared for making Homecoming 
Court. You guys looked great. 
Happy 21st Birthday to Jerod, 
you'll do just fine! Love, Your 
sweetheart Dena 

Stacy, Thank you for being such a 
wonderful sweetheart! You're the 
best! The Brothers of Sigma Pi 

ififif.i(.ifififif.i(.ifif.if.ifi(. 

Thank you AOE for the great 
time! Let's do it again! The 
brothers of Sigma Pi 

Thank you ZTA for all the great 
work with the float! It payed off! 
The brothers of Sigma Pi 

Congratulations to Tricia Bennett 
on your lavalier and becoming the 
OAG sweetheart! Love, Your 
AOE sisters 

Congratulations to Jacque Walsh 
on being sister of the week! Love, 
Your AOE sisters 

ifififififififififififif.'ifif 

AOE would like to congratulate 
all the fraternities and sororities 
on the great job everyone did on 
this years floats! 

Thanks SO for a great time this 
weekend ! Love, AOE 

AOE would like to say thank you 
to OA0 for a great homecoming 
and a fantastic float! We had a 
blast with you guys. 

Happy Birthday to Jill Quigley, 
Amy Lacinski, Valerie Johnson, 
and Sara Mills! Love, Your AOE 
sisters 

Congratulations to Amy Cohen on 
being Senator of the Week! Love, 
Your AOE sisters 

Congratulations Jamie Bartolone 
on your engagement. Love, Your 
sisters of ZTA 

Eric, good luck with your first 
week of wrestling. We hope you 
have a successful season! We 
love you cuddles! Love, ZTA 

Congratulations to Clarion's 
Homecoming queen, Kara 
Guinther. You've always been our 

queen. Love, Your sisters of ZTA 

♦♦•♦♦♦♦•♦♦A*** 



ZTA would like to remind every- 
one that October is National Breat 
Cancer Awareness month. So, 
"think pink" 



are all fantastic. Amy 



3|C3fi3fC9f(3fCflfC3|C3fC3|C3)c3fC?fCJfC]|( 



************** 



To SO: Pomps-$270 
Shalack-$90 
Chicken Wire-$ 100.00 
VICTORY-Priceless 

Love, ZTA 



Lana, Abby, and Laura, The 
ladies of the peach house miss 
you. Stop by sometime. 



************** 



Brian, Thanks for the ride, and 
have a great weekend. Love, Jill 



************** 






Sn, Congratulations on taking 
first on the float! Love, Stacy 



************** 



OSK wishes brother Jerod 
Hulings a Happy 21st Birthday! 
Hope you had fun at the bar! 



Kel, You are a wonderful person 
and if certain people don't realize 
it, that's their problem, not yours! 
Luv ya, Jill 

Amanda, Thanks for dinner. It 
was good. Luv ya, Jill 



i^■>(■^^■^l.■)^^^i^^l.i^i^^^if■)(s^ 



r—y-TT— -T-jitiiri— . TWwi i T i H 



personals 

Erb, things will get easier I 
promise. If they don't, you can 
always eat the dishes. ..babe. 
Have a SUPER DUPER weekend. 
Love, Jen 






Ames, thanks for always being 
there for me. Roll the dice. Jen 



■^^^^^f■l^^^^^^^■^(^^■^^^^■l^^^^^ 



To Wayne Anderson, The Call 
staff thanks you for all of the work 
you have done for the paper. The 
collage looks great! 



■I,lcltiflfifi(it-lc)fifif-ltit 



Call Staff, I can't tell you how 
many good things I've heard 
about the job you are doing. You 



Erin, Here is your Clarion Call 
personal. I hope you like it! P.S. 
Super Combo Man rocks. Keith 

Carrie, You're awesome for going 
to see Brittney with me! Luv ya, 
Alaina 

Katie, Thanks for putting up with 

me. I love you!! Alaina 

************** 

Erin, Hey girlie - you better marry 
you know who ~ May 20th 2003. 

Love, Alaina 

************** 

Robin, thanks for listening to me 
and for going shopping with me. I 
had a blast spending my money on 
stupid little things. Although I 
must say that the skirt is very 
cute! Love you girlie, Kylee 



AU DITIONS^r 2001 Clarion 
University Dance Concert 

Auditions for the Dance Concert will 
be held on Monday at 2:00 p.m. and on 
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. at the dance stu- 
dio in Tippng Gym. Please come 
dressed to dance. If you have any 
questions contact Mel Michel at x2480. 

See you there!! 



:*««*«»**•«««** 



Fraternities ~ Sororities 
Clubs -- Student Groups 

Earn $1,000-$2,000 this semester with the 

easy Campusfundraisencom three hour 

fundraising event. Does not involve credit 

card applications. Fundraising dates are 

filling quickly^ so call tbday! Contact 

Campusfundrai^ei'.coni at (888) 923-3238, or 

visit www,campusfundraiser.com 



October 4, 2001 



7>/f CcarimCau 



Page 19 



Sports 



Clarion defeats Kutztown 36-7 in homecoming game 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Clarion halfback, Robert 
Walker rushed for four touch- 
downs and quarterback, Adam 
Almashy, ran for a game-high 
103 yards and tossed a touch- 
down pass as the Golden Eagles 
defeated number 17 ranked 
Kutztown 36-7 on Saturday 
afternoon. 

Clarion moved its record to 2- 
3 overall, while Kutztown 
dropped to 3-1. 

A Homecoming Day crowd of 
7,000 crammed into Clarion's 
Memorial Stadium and watched 



Golden Bear 21 to set up 
Clarion's next score. 

The Eagles scored in six plays 
when Walker ran off right tackle 
into the endzone for a one-yard 
touchdown. The extra point 
failed, but Clarion had a 13-0 
lead. 

Early in the second quarter 
Clarion's Chris Roberts blocked 
a Kutztown punt and teammate 
Ben Culver recovered at the 
Kutztown 12. Four plays later, 
Jason Flora booted a 21 -yard 
field goal and Clarion led 16-0 
at 10:39 of the second. 

On Kutztown's next posses- 
sion the Golden Eagles blocked 



the Golden Eagles take charge another Jon Corson punt. This 
of the game in the first half and time it was Kevin McKeither 
keep the lead for the remainder blocking the punt and Roberts 




of the afternoon. 

Clarion took a 7-0 lead at the 
8:26 mark of the first quarter 
when Almashy fired a 23-yard 
touchdown pass in the back of 
the endzone to tight end Andy 
Pore, who made a diving, one- 
handed catch. 

Clarion safety, Korey 
Eppinette. intercepted a Josh 
Warren pass at the Kutztown 43 
and returned it 22 yards to the 



recovering for Clarion at the 
Kutztown two. 

Clarion's Walker ran it over 
from there on the first play and 
the Eagles had a 22-0 lead with 
8:56 left in the second. 

Kutztown drove 71 yards on 



Liz Potter/ The Clarion Call 



The Golden Eagles press Kutztown during the Homecoming game at Memorial Stadium. 
Clarion defeated number 17 ranked Kutztown by a score of 36-7 on home turf. The Eagles 
return for more PSAC-West play against when they host California on Saturday. 



onds left before halftime! session. Walker posted his ranked number five in the 

Clarion put the game away in fourth rushing touchdown from NCAA averaging 167 yards per 

the fourth quarter with two more one yard out and the final score game, was held to only five 

touchdowns. The Eagles drove of 36-7. yards on five carries on 

67 yards in nine plays to make it Walker had 15 carries for 80 Saturday and played the entire 

1 1 plays to score before inter- 29-7. Robert Walker ran right yards and four touchdowns, plus game. He also had one catch for 

mission. Quarterback, Josh and swept into the endzone from had one catch for 1 1 yards, minus six yards. 



Warren, scored on a quarterback 
sneak and the Bears narrowed 
the margin to 22-7 with 36-sec- 



third 



two yards out for his 
touchdown of the day. 

Then, on Clarion's next po 




Almashy ran 17 times for 103 Top Kutztown rusher was 

yards, plus completed six of 12 Harry Mims with 23 yards on 

passes for 121 yards and one five carries. Quarterback, Josh 

touchdown. Warren, completed 21 of 35 

Wideout, Mike McCullum, passes for 141 yards. Rob 

had two catches for 60 yards. Flowers grabbed eight passes 

and Andy Pore had two catches for 65 yards and Trevor Smith 



for 39 yards and one touchdown. 
The Eagles totalled 398 yards of 
offense, including 274 rushing 
and 124 passing. 

Kutztown, who came into the 
game ranked i7th in the nation 
by Division II Football and the 
AFCA coaches polls, were limit- 
ed to 194 yards of total offense. 

Kutztown was averaging 436 



five catches for 34 yards. Smith 
sustained a knee injury right 
before halftime and did not 
return. 

Clarion's defense was led by 
Myron Hargon and Emil 
Johnson who had seven tackles 
each. Chris Janson had three 
quarterback sacks as the Eagles 
finished with five sacks on the 



Liz Potter / The Clarion Call 



Golden Eagle quarterback, Adam Almashy picks up yardage during the Homecoming game 
against Kutztown. Almashy ran for a game high of 103 yards and threw a touchdown pass. 



yards of offense per game. The day. Janson, Eppinette and 

Bears were also held to only 52 Dennis Yu all had six tackles 

rushing yards in 27 attempts, each. 

The Bears were averaging 253.4 Clarion returns to PSAC-West 

rushing yards before the game play next Saturday, October 6 

and held the position as number when the Golden Eagles host 

three in the PSAC. California. Kutztown returns 

Kutztown's Yorel Prosser, who home to host East Stroudsburg. 



•www.theclarioncall.com< 




Soccer team falls to 
Lock Haven, 
See page 20. 



Riordan named 

PSAC-West Player of 

the Week, 

See page 21. 



Volleyball suffers loss 
to Edinboro, 
See page 22. 



Golden Eagles to host 
California in PSAC- 
West stand-off. 
See page 21. 



Page 20 



Tne CtAmfii Cau 



October 4, 2001 



Soccer 



Clarion steps down to #1 Lock Haven 



by Stephanie DeFlorentis 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

The Golden Eagle soccer team 
suffered a tough loss to number 
one seed, Lock Haven, last 
night, with a final score of 0-7. 
The Clarion women are now 1-8 
overall and 0-2 in the PSAC 
while Lock Haven are 9-1 over- 
all and 5-0 in the PSAC. 

The women stuck with Lock 
Haven for the duration of the 
first half and even had the first 
attempted goal. By the end of 
the first half, Lock Haven had 
three goals scored on Clarion. 

Lock Haven is currently num- 
ber one in the PSAC and has 
much more experience playing 
as a team under their belts than 
the Golden Eagles. By the end 
of the second half. Lock Haven 
had scored another four goals to 
finish off with a total of seven 
for the game. 



"They were a very tough team, 
but I feel that we left everything 
on the field. Defensively, we 
broke down and made some 
mistakes that they capitalized 
on. Overall, we hung in there 
and gave them a game," said 
coach Alonzo. 

Clarion went into the game 
with the main objective of con- 
taining Lock Haven as best as 
they could to try and prevent 
scoring. The women tried to 
play defensively minded 
throughout the game. The 
Golden Eagles also planned to 
hang in the action and keep the 
Lock Haven offense out of their 
territory. 

"We went into the game know- 
ing that we would have to play 
aggressive. Within the first five 
minutes, Clarion already had a 
first shot on goal. Even though 
we lost, we played at their level 
for most of the game and stuck 





...jj-jftjt^ 



Courtesy of Soccer Website 



A Golden Eagle controls the ball while heading to the goal. 



together as a team," said sopho- 
more defender, Josephine 
Reino. 

Some of the top performers for 
the game were goalie, C.J. 
Gattens and defender, Tara 
Harrington. Gattens had a total 



of 19 saves while Harrington 
worked the defensive end of the 
field. 

The Golden Eagles will be 
away for the next two games, 
but will return on Oct. 13, when 
they host West Chester. 



Sports 
mvia 

The answer to 
last week's ques- 
tion is Desmond 
Howard- This 
week's question 
is: Who set a 
Dolphin team 
rookie record 
with 1,116 rush- 
ing yards in 
1996? 



October 4, 2001 



7>/f Ccar/o/lCail 



Page 21 




INTRAiVlURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Fitness Director 
Recreation Center phone: 393-1667 




10/4/01 



Softball Tournament 

Friday, October 5 

This is a ONE PITCH, Co-Rec, 
double elimination touraament co- 
sponsored by UAB and Intramurals. 
One pitch means each batter starts 
with a count of 3-2 to speed up the 
game! Games start at 2pm. Games 
will be played at the Clarion County 
Park. Cost is $20 per team to help 
pay for a cookout on Friday evening. 
Roster limit is 15 players, and at-least 
5 must be women. Tournament is 
limited to the first 6 teams that pay 
the registration fee. 

In-Line Hockey Results 

Tuesday 10/2: 

C. L. Shooters 3 Outsiders 1 

Nefarious Rollers 2 South Street 1 



Volleyball Results 

Monday 10/1: 

Silly Slammers beat The Mullet(in 3 games) 

Victory beat Kappa Inc 15-11, 15-8 

Phi Delts White beat Kappa DA 15-7,15-7 



Racquetball Tournament 

Friday, 10/19/01 5:00 piri 

This Singles tournament features three 
divisions- Novice, Intermediate, Expert. 
Free to all students, $5 for non-students. 
Games played in Gemmell. Sign up at 
the Recreation Center. Or call X-1668. 



Football Results 




Thursday 9/27: 






Dirty Dogs 42 


Tha Team 


25 


Sigma Pi 69 


The Red Shirts 


23 


I8APi 42 


PAP 


15 


Monday 10/1: 






Flying Squirrels 33 


Ten Balls 


17 


Sigma Pi 47 


Tha Team 


14 


The Red Shirts 23 


Blazers 


17 


5*FloorNair 36 


Penn Ave Pimps 


21 


Sig Tau Gamma 34 


Hard Muffms 


26 


New Woodside 38 


KD.R. 


31 


Tuesday 10/2: 






Sig Tau Gamma 30 


New Woodside 


29 


Ten Balls 47 


5* Floor Nair 


27 


Sigma Pi Gold 41 


Bent Wigglies 


23 


Hard Muffms 66 


Flying Squirrels 


9 


Soccer Results 




Monday 10/1: 






Ruff Riders 4 


Storm 


1 



Mountain Bike Excursion 

Friday, 10/12 - depart 3 pm return 7 pm. 
We will be traveling to Franklin to ride 
on the Allegheny River Trail and the 
Justus Trail. The trail is 15 miles of flat 
smooth, asphalt that offers the scenic 
beauty of the Allegheny River and 
woodland. Bring your own bike and 
helmet or borrow* one from the 
Recreation Center at no cost. 
Transportation will be provided. 
*Please pre-register to reserve a bike. 

Paintball Trip 

Sunday, 10/21 we will be traveling to 
Briar Hill for a day of fast paced fun! 
We will be departing from the 
Recreation Center at 1 1 am and plan 
to return at 6 pm. Cost for the trip is 
$10 for students, and includes: 
equipment rental 400 rounds of paint, 
and lunch. . No prior experience 
needed for this trip. Safety clinic and 
instruction included. 



fi 



I 



■ 



VoUevball 



Clarion to host teams in annual Holiday Inn Classic 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



The Golden Eagle volleyball team plays 
host to the 12-team Holiday Inn Classic this 
weekend in both Tippin Gymnasium and 
the Student Recreation Center. Action 
begins at 4 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 5, and 9 
a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6. The champi- 
onship game is being played at 1:30 p.m. 
on Saturday. 

"The tournament has been a traditional 
event here at Clarion," said first-year head 



coach Tracy Fluharty. "Every year it 
becomes more competitive, and I don't 
think this year is any different. Just by 
looking at this year's teams, there should 
be a lot of competition in the pools. I think 
it can be anyone's game. I think both the 
volleyball fans and the other teams will 
find the tournament very rewarding. Each 
team, in each pool, should be very compet- 
itive with one another, and I think we might 
see a lot of matches going to five sets." 

The 12 teams will be divided into four 
pools of three teams, with the winner of 



each pool moving into the championship 
round and the other two teams playing a 
consolation game. 

The winner of the pool will be determined 
by the team with the best record of the pool. 
If all teams have a 1-1 record, then the win- 
ner of the pool will be determined by the 
number of games a team won by. If they are 
still tied, then a point-differential will be 
used to determine the winner. 

The pools will be split as follows: Pool A: 
Clarion, Millersville, and Southampton. 
Pool B: Lock Haven, West Chester, and 



Concordia. Pool C: East Stroudsburg, 
Fairmont State, and Pfeiffer. Pool D: 
Slippery Rock, Wheeling Jesuit, and 
Anderson (SC). 

Clarion enters the tournament with an 1 1- 
11 record through Oct. 2. The Golden 
Eagles have won seven of their last 13 
matches. 

"Overall as a team, we are playing 
extremely well together. There is no self- 
ishness at all, and everyone is doing their 
part to help each other win." 



Golden Eagles host California in PSAC-West stand-oflF 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

The Golden Eagles have a lot at 
stake this weekend during their 
PSAC-West showdown game 
against California. The game will 
be held on Saturday, Oct. 7 at 
Memorial Stadium. 

Clarion is coming off of their 
best 2001 victory after defeating 
Kutztown, 36-7. The Golden 
Eagles, led by head coach Malen 
Luke, are 2-3 overall and 0-1 in 
the PSAC-West. The Eagles lost 
at East Stroudsburg (33-27) and at 
NCAA Div.I-AA Youngstown 
State 44-0 at the beginning of the 
season, returned to Memorial 
Stadium to defeat Tiffin (27-14), 
lost in the final minute at 



Shippensburg (34-29) and 
knocked off Kutztown (36-7) last 
Saturday. 

California is off to a speedy 4-0 
start in 2001. Sixth year head 
coach, Mike Kolakowski, has led 
the Vulcans to wins over Geneva 
(28-6), Fairmont State (34-14), 
Mansfield (35-20) and Edinboro 
(34-24). Kolakowski has a record 
of 25-33 with the Vulcans. 

California is looking to use the 
game as a springboard to the 
remainder of its PSAC-West 
schedule. Clarion is looking for 
the same effect after last 
Saturday's win. 

Clarion's offense is averaging 
331 yards per game including 228 
rushing yards and 103 passing 
yards per game. 



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Junior quarterback, Adam 
Almashy, will direct the offense. 
He has completed 29 of 82 passes 
for 450 yards and four touch- 
downs this season. He ran for 103 
yards against Kutztown and now 
has 164 yards on 74 carries. In his 
career he has completed 246 of 
551 aerials for 3,388 yards and 32 
touchdowns, and toted the pigskin 
332 times for 543 yards and eight 
touchdowns. 

The running game is potent 
behind halfbacks Robert Walker 
and Glenn Lovelace, along with 
fullback Demetric Gardner. 
Walker rushed for four touch- 
downs against Kutztown on 
Saturday and now has 391 rushing 
yards and nine touchdowns on 49 
caries. In his career he has 1,025 
yards and 14 touchdowns on 124 
carries. 

Lovelace has run for 1 80 yards 
and one touchdown on 32 tries, 
while Gardner has rushed for 333 
yards and two touchdowns on 60 
carries. Gardner now ranks 
eleventh in career rushing yards 
with 1,311 and 10 touchdowns on 




Courtesy of the Football website 



Runningback, Robert Walker (24), deadlines for the end zone. 



259 carries. 

Catching passes will be wide- 
outs Mike McCullum and Ed 
Rivers, plus tight end Andy Pore. 

Clarion's defense is giving up 
358.6 yards per game including 
188.6 rushing yards and 170 pass- 
ing yards. 

Up front the Eagles will be led 
by Doug Diegelman, George 
O'Brien, Tom Pore and Tim 
Connolly. 



The perimeters are guarded by 
Chris Janson and Kevin Platz, 
with inside linebackers Tom 
Gaydosz, Scott McGrady and 
Dennis Yu ready for action. 

The secondary has Myron 
Hargon, Kevin McKeither and 
Emil Johnson at the comers, with 
Steve Devennie, Jabari 
Weatherspoon and Korey 
Eppinette. 



m 



Clarion volleyball's Riordian named 
PSAC-West Player of the Week 



m 
M 



^m 



by Bethany Bankovich with 16 kills, a .306 hitting per- 

Clarion Call Sports Editor centage, two assists, 23 digs and 

two blocks. 
Golden Eagle, Ashley Riordan, a 

sophomore outside hitter for the 
Clarion University womens vol- 
leyball team, has been selected as 
the PSAC-West Player of the Week 
for the week ending Sept. 29. 

Riordan, of Mt. Vernon, Indiana 
(Jennings County High School) 
was a key figure in aiding Clarion 
to a 3-1 conference victory over 
Slippery Rock on Sept. 25. 

Riordan led the Golden Eagles 




Through Oct. 1, Riordan was sec- 
ond on the team in kills with 203 as 
well as second in digs with 250. 
She also led the Golden Eagles in 
service aces with a total of 34 and 
had added seven set assists, and 26 
blocks. Riordan is the daughter of 
Steve and Kathy Riordan. 

Clarion volleyball is back in 
action on Tuesday, Oct. 2, when it 
hosts Edinboro. The Golden 
Eagles will also host the Holiday 
Inn Classic on Friday, Oct. 5, and 
Saturday, Oct. 6. 



Page 22 



Tne CcAi^wi^ Cau 



October 4, 2001 



Volleyball 



Golden Eagles suffer loss to PSAC-West: Edinboro 



by Laura Altman 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

On Tuesday, Oct. 2, the 
Clarion women's volleyball 
team had a home advantage for 
the game against Edinboro's 
"Fighting Scots." 
Both teams went into the game 
with a PSAC-West record of 2- 
1, but unfortunately. Clarion 
ended the night with a record of 
2-2 while the Scots gained 
another PSAC-West victory. 

Even though the team fell to 
Edinboro after competing in 
three sets, coach Tracy Fluharty 
felt that the team worked the 
defense accordingly. 

"The team played extremely 
well on the defense. The defen- 
sive specialists did a great job 
of covering the back court," 
said Fluharty. 

The team suffered a loss to 
Edinboro with resulting scores 
of 29-31, 28-30, and 24-30 for 



sets one, two and three respec- 
tively. At one point in both sets 
one and two, the Golden Eagles 
were leading by six points. 
Unfortunately for Clarion, they 
were unable to hold on for the 
duration of the set. Clarion's 
downfall came with the seven 
service errors at very decisive 
points of the sets. 

"The team's seven service 
errors at critical times con- 
tributed to the team's loss," 
commented Fluharty. 

In addition to this, Clarion 
was unable to get kills on the 
transition balls. The team had a 
total of 101 attempts at those 
transitions, but only made 40 
successful kills. This was anoth- 
er factor that contributed to the 
eventual loss. 

Melanie Bull lead the women 
with a total of 13 kills, Beth 
Stalder contributed with eight, 
and Aligraham pulled in six. 

Also, the team had 50 digs 



during the game. Graham had 
20 of those digs, while Bull, 
Laurie Hepler, and Kate 
Waksmunski each contributed 
with seven digs. In addition to 
these plays, the Golden Eagles 
had a total of eight blocks and 
Jackie Hill made way with 26 
assists. 

"Our only focus is to get 
stronger with every game. It's 
time we peak because we are in 
the middle of the season," said 
Fluharty. 

The Golden Eagles will host 
their annual tournament on Oct. 
5-6 at Tippin Gymnasium. They 
will match up against 
Millersville at 4 p.m. on Friday 
and also play Southampton at 8 
p.m. 

"We need to play one game at 
a time and stay focused, we 
need to make it through the 
championship game that will be 
at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday," 
added Fluharty. 




Couresty of the Volleyball Website 



Senior All Graham C# / 1) positions for a save under an 
approaching ball to prevent the opponent from scoring. 



Martins kicks into Div. I history as first female 



by Jon Wilner down gender barriers. Or fulfill- 

Courtesy of Krt Campus ing a dream. It was about kick- 

ing an extra point. Wasn't that 
what Ashley Martin was sup- 
posed to do? See ball, kick ball. 



It was not done in the name of 
womanhood. It was not about 
making history. Or breaking 



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More like: See bail, kick ball, 
enter record book. 

On Aug. 29, Martin became 
the first woman to play (and 
score) in a Division I game 
when she kicked three extra 
points in Jacksonville (Ala.) 
State's 72-10 victory over 
Cumberland in a Division I-AA 
game. 

Martin's first kick prompted a 
standing ovation, and she thrust 
a fist into the air as she jogged 
to the sideline. After the game, 
teammates chanted "Ashley! 
Ashley!" and she received the 
game ball. 

She slept for two hours, 
appeared on "Good Morning, 
America," then hopped a plane 
to Southwest Missouri State, 
where she joined Jacksonville 
State's women's soccer team. 

Although Martin, a sopho- 
more, is featured on a team T- 
shirt with the logo "Battle of the 
Sexes," she did not consider 
herself a groundbreaker. 

"That's not what it's about at 
all," she told reporters before 
the game. "That would be like 
I'm making a statement, and 
that's not the case. I've got a job 
to do. and that's what I'm 
focused on." 



Martin joined the Gamecocks 
out of necessity: They had just 
one kicker on the roster, Steven 
Lee, and he was a transfer. 

But an assistant coach knew 
Martin had kicked for East 
Coweta High in Sharpsburg, Ga. 
iShe was selected homecoming 
queen and reportedly accepted 
the crown in her football uni- 
form.) So the Gamecocks invit- 
ed her to training camp. She 
made 20 of 22 point-after 
attempts against a live rush. 

The NCAA doesn't keep such 
records, but according to the 
Associated Press, the only other 
woman to score in a college 
game is Liz Heaston, who 
kicked two extra points in 1997 
for then-NAIA Willamette 
University in Salem,, Ore. , 

The first woman to suit up for 
a college game was Louisville's 
Kathy Klop, in 1995, but she 
never played. 

Hail, hail to history. Karen 
England is making history at 
Michigan, although she isn't 
playing for the Wolverines. 
England is the first woman to 
lead the famed Michigan 
marching band in its 103-yeaT 
history. But England, Hke 
Martin, didn't set out to break 



barriers. 

"It's a bigger deal to me to be 
leading the band," she said three 
weeks ago. "Being the first 
woman is an extra perk." 

A 22-year-old senior from 
Greenville, Mich., England 
trained for three years and won 
the position (called drum major) 
by a vote of her peers after a 10- 
step tryout last spring. 

She carries a baton, not an 
instrument, and directs the band 
through its pregame, halftime 
and postgame routines - the 
most famous being "Hail to the 
Victors." She also organizes 
non-football functions. 

England's success is a big deal 
to past and present female mem- 
bers, she said. The band used to 
be called "The Marching Men 
of Michigan," and there were no 
women until 1972. Now, 52 per- 
cent of the 400 members are 
women. 

"What bothers me is that peo- 
ple assume 1 wanted to do this 
to be the first woman," she said. 
"But in the band, they know 
hovv 1 feel. If that was my sole 
reason for doing this, they'd see 
right through it. But I'll proba- 
bly look back on this years later, 
and it'll be neat." 



October 4, 2001 



f/Zf CcAR/0/\l Cau 



Page 23 



Coaches drill fear of loss into minds of athletes 



by Blair Kerkhoff 
Courtesy of Krt Campus 

lis not necessarily a hot media 
topic with college coaches. 
After all. nobody wants to talk 
about the pix^spect of losing. 
But, certainlv, coaches will drill 
it into their players' heads as a 
motivational factor. Recovery 
time. Florida State has it. The 
Tennessee-Florida loser has had 
it. And, on Saturday, the loser of 
Saturday's showdown between 
Kansas State and Oklahoma will 
have it. It's simple: The earlier 
in the season a contender loses, 
the better chance that team has 
to recover. 

"That's right," Oklahoma 
coach Bob Stoops said. "That's 
been proven in the way people 
vote in the polls." 

Certainly, the roads to recov- 
ery are different. This season, it 
would be a trickier path for K- 
State because it would have to 
cover more ground in the polls. 
The Wildcats are ranked 
eleventh and ninth in the major 
polls. Losing on Saturday, some 
suggest, could wipe them out of 
the nationaltitle picture entire- 

iy- 

But big games lie ahead for 
the Wildcats - vs. Colorado and 
Texas A&M at home, at 
Nebraska, possibly even the Big 
12 championship game - that 
could propel them back into the 
big-bowl picture. 

The Sooners, meanwhile, are 
ranked third in both major polls 
and wouldn't fall as far as K- 
State. 

And Oklahoma even provides 
a recent model of a team that, 
early in the season, made the 
most of a low ranking. Just last 
year, the Sooners didn't lose 
early but were ranked 14th in 
the final Associated Press poll 
of September. 

That's when they started their 
sensational run, beating Texas, 
Kansas State and Nebraska in 
successive games. 

By the end of October, 
Oklahoma was ranked first, 
where it remained the rest of the 
season. 

College football scholars can 
debate the merits of a playoff 
system, but there is no arguing 
that the game's regular season 
holds more meaning because 
one bowl settles the title issue. 

Every weekend is a playoff, 
with lo.sers falling to the bottom 
of the contender list. The trick is 



not to fall late like several Big 
12 schools have done in the last 
five years. 

Nebraska kissed its national 
chanipionship hopes good-bye 
in 1996, when it fell to Texas in 
the league championship game. 
Two years later, the same fate 
doomed K-State, which lost to 
Texas A&M. 

The Big 12's habit of schedul- 
ing its mega matchups late 
(Nebraska vs. Kansas State, 
Nebraska vs. Oklahoma) makes 
for high drama and hard falls in 
the major-bowl picture for the 
loser. 

But aside from the made-for- 
TV slot games like Nebraska- 
Colorado and Texas-Oklahoma, 
Big 12 scheduling is m'ostly 
luck of the draw. 

It just so happens that K-State 
is meeting Oklahoma on 
Saturday, that both are highly 
ranked and that the loser has a 
chance to battle back through 
the polls and return to a nation- 
al title hunt. 

"Our philosophy has been to 
put in some parameters - like 
Texas. 4nd Oklahoma playing in 
the second league game - and go 
from there," said Big 12 associ- 
ate commissioner Tim Allen, 
who handles football schedul- 
ing. 

"But there is a human ele- 
ment. We saw where Oklahoma 
and Kansas State played early 
and understood there was a 
chance for the loser to battle 
back," added Allen. 

And Allen kept the game 
there. He won't say there was an 
influence, but he remembers 
other schools battling back into 
contention after early losses. 
Florida schools seem to under- 
stand the process better than 
anybody. 

Twice in the previous three 
seasons. Florida State lost in the 
first half of the season and 
wound up in the national title 
game. 

Here they are again. The 
Seminoles are a demoralized 
bunch after Saturday's stunning 
32-point loss to a North 
Carolina team that started the 
season 0-3. 

Bowden will tell the 
Seminoles, or better yet, get 
some of the seniors, to relate to 
the team what happened in 
1998. The circumstances are 
strangely similar to Florida 
State's current situation. 

Then as now, it was the 



Seminoles' second game oi. the 
season. It vvas played in North 
Carolina. The quarterback was 
starting his second game. 
Saturday, it was Chris Rix. 

Four seasons ago, the quarter- 
back vvas Chris Weinke. He 
threw six interceptions in a loss 
at North Carolina State. But 
when the first Bowl 
Championship Series national 
title game was played in the 
Fiesta Bowl, there was Florida 
State matched against 

Tennessee. 

The Seminoles had 10 games 
remaining on the schedule, won 
them all, then got the right 
teams to lose - UCLA and K- 
State - on the final weekend, to 
ensure its title shot. 

Last season, Florida State fell 
to Miami in its sixth game. But 
by the season's end, the 
Seminoles had jumped over the 
Hurricanes in the BCS poll and 
met Oklahoma for the champi- 
onship. 

The latest loss presents a 
greater recovery challenge for 
one simple reason: The 
Seminoles plummeted in this 
week's polls: to No. 18 by The 
Associated Press and No. 15 by 
the coaches. 

In 1998, Florida State fell to 
number 11 after the N.C. State 
loss. Last year, the Seminoles 
fell to sixth. 

"We haven't been in this fix 
for a long time," Bowden said. 

Others have. In 1998 and 
1999, the loser of the 
Tennessee-Florida game ended 
up in a BCS bowl. How? The 
game, the Southeastern 
Conference opener for both 
schools, has been played on the 
third Saturday of September. 

In 1997, the Volunteers lost 
their fifth straight game to the 




Courtesy of Krt Campus 



Fonda's Jabar leaps over Mississippi State's Richard Ball going 
out on the three-yard line. 



Gators. Tennessee didn't lose 
again, captured the division and 
conference championships and 
reached the Orange Bowl. 

Florida's winning streak ended 
the next season but the Gators 
recovered enough to earn an at- 
large spot in the BCS. 

College football lost some of 
its most attractive early-season 
encounters when the Sept. 15 
date was wiped out in the after- 
math of the terrorist attacks. 

Some of those games, like 
Miami-Washington, Tennessee- 
Florida and Florida State- 
Georgia Tech have been moved 
to the end of the season. The 
final weekends will pack more 
meaning than ever because the 
losers have nowhere to go. 



Green participates in 
Sociology of Sport Panel 



Courtesy of University Relations 



Dr. Stanton Green, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
was a member of a panel, "The Sociology of Sport." 

The panel was part of a full day symposium, Sept. 25, on "The 
Legacy of Griffith Stadium" held at Howard University . 

Green's presentation was "Baseball and Race in American 
Society." The panel included Sharon Robinson, the daughter of 
Jackie Robinson, and director of an Educational Program on 
Character Development sponsored by Major League Baseball. 



Sports Briefs 



Cross Country 

The mens and womens 

teams travel to Lehigh 

University on Oct. 6 

for some fast foot 
action. They then make 

way to Duquesne 
University on Oct. 13. 

Soccer 

The Golden Eagles 

have two away games 

in the near future. The 

team will go to East 

Stroudsburg on Oct.6, 

followed by Edinboro 

on Oct. 9. The team 

returns on Oct. 13 

when they host West 

Chester. 

VoUeybaU 

Clarion will host the 
annual Holiday Inn 
Classic on Oct. 5-6, 

then travel to 
California on Oct. 9. 



Page 24 



/>/" CiAm/^ Cau 



October 4, 2001 







Five CUP students 
participate in out- 
reach pro- 



gram 



•••••«•••••«• 



...pg.7. 



~w~~w w 



t h e c I a 



r—l—a— n c a I I 



c o m 



"University Experience'' implements roundtable discussions 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

The University Retention 
Committee has been implement- 
ing the next step in the 
"University Experience," with 
the roundtable discussions. 

The University Retention com- 
mittee began the "University 
Experience" in Spring 2001 to 




Lifestyles 



Missed Rocky 
Horror? 
Another 
review pg.9. 






ports 

Riordan 
named PSAC- 
West Player of 
the 
Week..„,pg.l9. 




naex 



Opliiioii..».pg3. 
News pgj. 

IJfesiyies«pg.9. 
Spor? g.l6. 

Classiiiea.pg,12. 



aid in increasing retention. 

Our retention isn't bad, but it is 
less than the retention rates 
around the country and in the 
other State System of Higher 
Education Schools, said Dr. 
Rashelle S. Karp, of the 
Provosts/Academic Affairs 

office. 

"Clarion has a retention com- 
mittee in place and 
they are doing some 
great things. There are 
many pockets of activ- 
ity on campus and we 
are looking at the 
whole process from 
residence life to the 
classroom because 
they all impact upon 
student success,' said 
Dr. William Bailey, the 
new dean of enroll- 
ment management. 

The purpose of the 
roundtable discussions 
is to gather students, 
faculty and various 
other staff members to 
develop strategies 
which may work for 
retention, said Karp. 

"We are very com- 
mitted to admitting 
students who are have 
the potential to suc- 
ceed," said Karp. 

Karp especially 
placed an emphasis on 
wanting to have the 
students present at the 
meetings because any 
decision made, direct- 
ly affects them she 
said. 

Information for the 
roundtable discussions 
was taken from the 
students during the 
past two years through 
questionnaires, sur- 
veys and focus groups. 



This year's incoming freshmen 
were also questioned as to what 
concerns they have about coming 
to college Karp said. 

According to study results, 
mcoming freshmen were most 
concerned with making new 
friends, getting along with their 
roommates and adjusting to the 
residence halls. 

Other concerns included being 
homesick and obtaining good 
grades. 

The final two roundtable dis- 
cussions have all been reserved 
by faculty and staff members. 

Select students also were invit- 
ed to take part in the discussions. 



"I felt that the roundtable dis- 
cussions were very productive. 
Each group came up with great 
ideas and strategies for student 
retention," said Carrie Lopuh, 
senior communication major. 

"Many departments were repre- 
sented form the different colleges 
and I was very excited that the 
administration invited students to 
join the discussions. 

"I was honored to take part in 
such an important area of focus 
for Clarion University. I hope 
that students are truly aware of 
the fact that the administration, 
faculty, and staff are concerned 
with student needs and are work- 



ing to make Clarion a better 
place," Lopuh said. 

The final roundtable discussion, 
which is completely reserved, 
will take place Oct. 19. 

The results of the discussions 
will be posted on the "University 
Experience" website a week after 
the final discussion. 

Karp said the committee didn't 
want to post the results until all 
of the groups had participated. 

This precaution was taken to 
ensure original ideas at each 
roundtable discussion. 

To view the results or for more 
information University 

Experience website is www.clari- 
on.edu/admin/academicaffairs/ue 








Old Glory 




Clarion University student teachers, Jason Haefner and BUI McWilliams orga- 
nized grades K-3 at Sligo Elementary to build a mural about recent events. 
Each student traced their hands on construction paper. The paper hands were 
arranged in the shape of the American flag. Some students who helped from 
left: Madison Elder, 8; Brett Fancher,5; Sydney Varner,5; and Chris Dietz,8. 



Pace 24 



Tne CcA^fO/y Cau 



October 4, 2001 




W <iiBf ^inp*" ■'"fi"^ 




7^ C^fOH Ca^ 



DctDber 11. 2DD1 



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Five CUP students 
participate in out- 
reach pro- 

{£1 Cllll««««*«*««****«**|Jcr* / • 



WWW 



theclarioncall 



com 



"University Experience" implements roundtable discussions 



b} Amy A. I honipson 
Clarion (all Kditor-in-("hief 

The rnivei'siiy Retention 
f oniniittee htis heen implement- 
mji the next step m the 
■'I 'ni\'ersity !-.xpenence,"" with 
the roundtable diseussKms. 

!'he Uni\ersit\' Retention com- 
mittee began the 'M'noersit) 
Hxpenence" in Spring 2001 te) 



Inside 




News 

Debate team 
successful over 
IP \^eekend...pg. 5. 

Lifestyles 

Missed Rocky 
Horror? 
Another 
review pg.9. 



** 







m 



Sports 

Riordan 

named PSAC- 

West Player of 

the 

Week pg.l9. 



• Index • 



• 



Opinion.....pg.3. 

Lifestyles..pg.9. 

Sports pg'16. 

Classified.pg.l2. 



aid m increasing retention. 

Our retention isn't had, but it i- 
'ess than the retention latcs 
around the ciaintry and in the 
other State S_\.^tem i.t Higher 
I-ducation Schools, ->aid Dr 
Rashelle S. Karp h. 

Provosts/ Academic .\iiaii > 

office. 

■■Chu"K)n has a retention com- 
mittee in place and 
they are doing some 
great things. There are 
many pockets of activ- 
ity on campus and we 
are h)oking at the 
whtile process from 

• , residence life to the 

classroom because 
they all impact upon 
student success," said 
Dr. William Bailey, the 
new dean of enroll- 
ment management. 

The purpose o\ the 
roundtable discussions 
IS to gather students, 
faculty antl various 
other staff members to 
develop strategies 
which may work for 
retention, said Karp. 

"We are \ery com- 
miited to admitting 
students who are ha\e 
the potential to suc- 
ceed," said Karp. 

Karp especially 
placed an emphasis on 
u anting to have the 
students present at the 
meetings because an) 
decision made, direct- 
ly al'fects them she 
said. 

information for the 
roundtable discussions 
was taken from the 
students during the 
past two years through 
questionnaires, sur- 
veys and focus groups. 



This year's inci)ming treshmen 
Acre also questioned as lo vsiial 
concerns they have aJHiut coming 
io cnilege Karfi said. 

.'XcLording to siud\ result'-. 
liKommg i'lestimen were rno.a 
vuncerned with making new 
1 1 lends, uetiinii along with their 
roommates and adjusting to the 
residence halls. 

Other concerns included being 
homesick and obtaining good 
grades. 

The final tvvo roundtable dis 
cussions have all been reserved 
by faculty and staff members. 

Select students also were invit- 
ed to take part m the discussions. 



■'1 telt that the naindtable d'^ 
cussions were very product: 
fiach group came ui^ with grea.t 
ideas and Ntrategi.' tudeni 

retention." said Carne Lopuh. 
senior communication maji'! 

■'Many departments were repre^ 
sented form the different ccdleges 
and 1 was very excited that the 
administration invited students to 
join the discussions. 

"I was honored to take part m 
such an important area of focus 
for Clarion University. I hope 
that students are truly aware of 
the fact that the administration, 
faculty, and staff are concerned 
with student needs and are work 



ing to make Clarion 
/iacc," l.opuh said. 



iCscr ^ Ci 



The final roundtable .. 
which '.s c^Mnpietely 
will take place Oct. 19. 

The lesults of the discuNSMiiis 
All! be posted on the "L'nivcrsnv 
Experience" website a week attei 
the final discussion. 

Karp said the commiiice didn t 
v\ant to post the results until all 
of the groups had participated. 

This precaution was taken to 
ensure original ideas at each 
roundtable discussion. 

To view the results or for more 
information University 

Experience website is www. clari- 
on. edu/admin/academicaffairs/ue 




Old Glory 







A. Thompson/The Clarion CqU[ 



Clarion University student teachers, Jason Haefner and Bill McWilliams orga- 
nized grades K-3 at Sligo Elementary to build a mural about recent events. 
Each student traced their hands on construction paper. The paper hands were 
arranged in the shape of the American flag. Some students who helped from 
left: Madison Elder, 8; Brett Fancher,5; Sydney Varner,5; and Chris Dietz,8. 



ff 



The first draft of Clarion University history '' 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 

Amy A. Thompson 

Bethany Bankovich 

Susan Campbell 

Tim Conners 

Jill Brennan 

Teri Cattau 

Graham Hermanns 



United we stand 



When waking up on Sunday 
morning and turning on the 
television, we were greeted 
with news that the United 
States was bombing 

Afghanastan. Because of Sept. 
11, 2001 and now because of 
Oct. 7, 2001, the lives of 
American and Afghan citizens 
have been changed. 

A discussion of all C^a^m Caff 
staff members took place 
Sunday at our Executive Board 
meeting. The issues brought 
into the discussion were quite 
disturbing. 

One of the issues that we dis- 
cussed was the Talibian powers 
over the women of Afganastan. 
About five years ago the 
Taliban stepped in and pulled 
the women out of their jobs and 
basically put them into hiding. 
They must walk around com- 
pletely covered from head to 
toe. They also are not aloud to 
talk in public or at their own 
home. The men are completely 
in charge and the women must 
obey them. If they do not, they 
are subject to punishment. 

The second issue that we 
addressed was about the actual 
bombing that is taking place in 
Afghanastan. We discussed the 
fact that we might be bombing 
them, but we are providing 



them with food and medical 
supplies. 

Even though we are bombing 
the Talibian, we are being 
thoughtful and providing the 
Afghan citizens with supplies 
they are going to need. 

Next we discussed the 
changes that have taken place 
in the United States. 

There are certain movies that 
are not permitted to be aired 
right now because they have the 
Twin Towers in the backround. 
We never thought that is 
would have come to this. 

And David Letterman had to 
change his backround do to the 
terroristic attacks that took 
place on September 11, 2001. 
We never thought it would 
come to that. 

The last issue addressed was 
how the Middle East students 
were being escorted around 
campus due to the attacks. 

Different groups around cam- 
pus such as fraternities and 
sororities were called into a 
meeting to discuss how they are 
the leaders on campus and they 
need to set a good example. 

The events which have taken 
place and are still unfolding, 
can serve as learning devices to 
help us grow individually as 
well as a nation. 



Editorial Pot tcy 

Thi? Clarion Call w taking steps to unify the paper witJi 
a single voice, ,Wl^ UhU. TMIv CmI. is tkt first 

step. We, the Editorial Board, will express our opinion 
about issues across the campus, state, nation, and 
world, VVe are not speaking for Clarion University, the 
Clarion Students' Association or the students of the 
Universjtv, we are speaking as an Editorial Board - the 
voice of Thk Clarion Ca i.l. These editorials are devel^ 
oped in a meeting of the Editorial Board, All members 
did not necessarily agree on the opinion stated in the 
editorial The opinion expressed is shared by the 
majonly of the board; it Is not always a unammaus 
opinion. You, the public, reserve the right to express 

Cur pleasure or displeasure with these opinions via a 
tter to the Editor. 



T/^fn/AP/nA/P,A// 



October 11, 2001 



Your Views 

Lifestyles Editor responds to criticism 



Dear Mr. Hiltz, 

I am writing in response to your 
letter to the editor ("Reader voic- 
es concern for music reviews and 
CUP concerts") that was pub- 
lished in last week's edition of f^e- 

Cfar-ioH Caff. I hope to explain my 
policies regarding my music 
reviews, and why they are that 
way. 

The first point that you raise in 
your letter concerns the obscurity 
of the artists/bands that I choose 
to review. Pick up any issue of 
Rolling Stone, Spin, Vibe, Source 
or any other reputable music pub- 
lication, and on the cover, in the 
articles and review you will see 
the same groups showcased over 
and over again. 

For me to write and publish the 
millionth review of the latest 
Missy Elliot album would be 
redundant and pointless. 

If you want to read a review of 
a Top 40 artist, there are plenty of 
other outlets to pursue. I choose 
to run my music section in much 
the same manner as the traditional 
independent college radio station. 
That is, I choose to cover lesser- 
known bands, artists on indepen- 
dent and forward-thinking labels, 
or bands on the cusp of breaking 
into the mainstream. 



I use my reviews to try and 
introduce new, underground 
music to fellow students who 
might not ever hear of such bands, 
as most people aren't exposed to 
such like-minded publications 
such as College Music Journal 
{CM J) or the online 'zine 
Pitchfork 
(www.pitchforkmedia.com). 

As a fellow former staff member 
of the dearly departed WCCB- 
AM station, I'm sure you can 
understand why it's important to 
not just "follow the leader" and 
give coverage to artists who lack 
funds and/or label support to get 
press elsewhere. 

If I were to publish music 
reviews of the same crop of artists 
that pop up in constant, endless 
rotation on WCUC, where is the 
point in that? 

You've already heard of these 
artists, listened to their music, and 
formulated your own opinions on 
them. For me, the whole point of 
music criticism is not to simply 
praise or trash an artist's latest 
effort. Instead, the point is to be a 
helpful guide in what the serious 
music consumer might want to 
spend their money on. 

In short, I try to explain why 
Linkin Park fans (shudder) might 
find much to enjoy in At The ' 



Drive-in's music, and so on. 

The second point you raise con- 
cerns the diversity in my music 
reviews. Let me begin by saying 
that even the Lifestyles Editor 
before me wanted to publish 
reviews from R&B/hip-hop 
groups, but faced the same prob- 
lem that I myself am confronted 
with: Neither one of us were able 
to find someone with both the 
extensive knowledge of the gen- 
res coupled with the writing abili- 
ty to craft truly comprehensive 
reviews. 

Previous submissions for hip- 
hop artists centered around such 
hollow statements such as "these 
beats are good," an observation 
every bit as unacceptable as 
"those guitars really rock." 

I know that you are every bit as 
knowledgeable in the R&B/hip- 
hop arena as I am in the 
indie/alternative world. 

Therefore, I welcome your offer 
to write reviews of the genre with 
open arms, provided that you 
would want to cover lesser-known 
artists/DJs such as Dilated 
Peoples, Black Eyed Peas or 
Jurassic 5; or more artistically- 
minded artists along the lines of 
OutKast, The Roots or Tribe 
Called Quest. 



See 'Gwillim' Page 4 




Do you have an opinion? Send letters to the editor to 
He C^k Caff c/o Amy A. Thompson 
270 Gemmell Complex, 
Clarion University of PA, 16214. 



October 11, 2001 



r//f /^//fp/M /j/f// 



Page 3 



i 





How often do I 
really stop to think 
about the life I have 
been given by my par- 
ents. 99 

-Susan Campbell 



Editorial, Susan Campbell 



Just as many other Americans 
have spent many hours reflect- 
ing since the Sept. 11 tragedy, I 
too have been putting things into 
perspective. 

Watching the coverage on tele- 
vision, I discover that the real 
victims are those children who 
have lost one or both of their 
parents. 

A certain train of thought caus- 
es me to look deeper into my 
own life. Even though I have not 
directly been affected by what 
happened, I realize how easy it 
may be to have a parent ripped 
out of my life. 

I take this train of thought 
deeper and think: How often do 
I really look at my parents and 
appreciate the things they have 
done for me, or how often do I 
really see the love they give me 
on a daily basis? 

Nineteen years ago, my par- 
ents adopted me from Seoul, 
South Korea. Because of them, 
my life has been whole and 
wonderful. 

However, another question 
arises: How often do I really 
stop to think about the life I 
have been given by my parents? 

I remember one time in class, 
we were asked to do a group 
activity where we pretended we 
had to decide on candidates for a 
liver transplant. 

Based on facts given to us, we 
were to decide between a 20- 
year-old alcoholic, a mother 
with young children, and a 



mother with children out of high 
school. 

The majority of the class chose 
the mother with young children, 
thinking about the children's 
needs. 

However, I feel that while 
young children do need their 
parents, older children our age 
do also. The love and sacrifice a 
parent gives to their child will 
never be unnecessary. 

I bring the subject up for this 
reason. Many of us who are for- 
tunate enough to still have one 
or both of our parents should 
stop and think about those who 
do not. 

Thousands of people lost one 
or both of their parents due to 
the tragedy. Even outside of this 
tragedy, many children lose a 
parent each day. 

That saddens me because it has 
made me realize how lucky I am 
to have my parents still by my 
side. It also saddens me that it 
took a devastation of such level 
to truly open my eyes. 

My parents chose me. They 
brought me into America, giving 
me the chance to experience the 
life they felt I deserved. 

I think about how different my 
life could be had they not adopt- 
ed me. 

And that makes me appreciate 
even more what I have been 
given from my parents and from 
this country. 

Susan Campbell is a senior com- 
munication major. 



As a member of the 
National Newspaper Association, 

is entitled to access 
NNA's Libel Hotline; 
with advice from 
Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 




Opf/\ffo/\/ 





We could no longer 

disregard that we had 

enemies and that we 

could not be lax on 

mundane safety 

issues. 99 

-Jeanne M. S lattery 



Hyde Park, Jeanne M, Slattery 



Over the last several weeks my 
students and I have been talking 
about the terrorist attacks. 

Initially their conversations 
were characterized by confusion, 
anger and helplessness. Almost to 
a student, they argued they would 
always feel this way. While those 
themes are still there, now other 
themes are also present. 

Recently my students' first 
papers were due. I generally give 
them significant freedom in what 
they write about. Although I 
shouldn't have been surprised by 
their papers, I was. 

About one-third talked about 
their reactions to the Sept. 11 
Attacks. 

The issues they talked about 
indicated their changing view- 
points. Most of them started out 
like this student's paper: "On 
Sept. 11, 2001, I experienced the 
worst tragedy of my life." 

However, later in their papers 
they began to talk about the ways 
that their views of events had 
begun to change and how they 
had begun to find some meaning 
in the midst of the pain. 

One woman talked about our 
country's lessons, saying we have 
begun "to look at our country in a 
different light. 

We could no longer ignore that 
we had weaknesses, we could no 



longer allow our differences to 
get in the way of helping our- 
selves. 

We could no longer disregard 
that we had enemies and that we 
could not be lax on mundane 
safety issues. 

We could no longer overlook 
our neighbors as American too. 
We could no longer forget the 
words to our anthem, to our 
pledge. 

A student whose father flies for 
one of the affected airlines wrote, 
"I began looking at things in a 
different light. I realized I needed 
to step back and look at what was 
important in my life, and how 
deeply I appreciate it. 

"On the outside, I don't believe 
that I will ever be able to say any- 
thing 'good' came out of this 
experience, because in all reality, 
nothing did. However, I learned 
so much about myself, the 
strength of my family..." 

An international student talked 
about our discussion the day of 
the attacks. 

The student said, "I was given 
the chance to talk about how bad 
it is to live with fear being so 
close to you, having the enemy 
next to you and being afraid for 
your life and the lives of your 
loved ones, knowing how it feels 

See 'Slattery' Page 4 



TH^CMm/\/6Au Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 
Staff Writers: Matt Greene, Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezv'k, Emily 
Gill. Aaron Stempeck, Laura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Maori, Kelly 
Drevitch, Adam Berlotti and Khalia Robinson 
Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Reinhart 
Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske, 
Janice Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Eury, Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, 
Julianne Neman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sowers, Omar Rozier, Vicki Dietz, Brian 
Fashian and Julie Rengers 
Circulation Staff: Kristina Strojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion.edu 

www. CLARION. EDU/THECALL 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tinn Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 





Page 4 



T^e CcARfoi^i Cau 



October 11, 2001 



i 



October 11, 2001 




OPf/\//0/\l 



CPdi On You 

Where do you see yourself five years firom now? 
by: Graham Hermanns 




Computer Science., 
Senior 



"Having a computer 

company bigger than 

Bill Gates'." 



'Byron Smitfi 

'Business, 

Sophomore 



Taking over Adam Lohr's 
computer company. 



9? 



*Bfessin^ Ikp 
junior 



'A third grade school 
teacher." 




3eff 'Kilner 

Secondary 'Ld. Thysics 

Jresfiman 



"Teaching high school 
physics and coaching." 



^my 'Janafi 

%C%d. 
freshman 



"In South Carolina 
teaching school." 



*Erica 'Bojatad 

It'Ld,, 

Jreshman 



"Back in my hometown 

being an elementary teacher 

and having a wonderful 

Hfe." 



Do you wish to write a weekly opinion column? 

•kicie'k'k'k'ic'k'k'kit'kit'k'k 

Would you like to appear in tlie Call On You? 

•kifkickitidtifit'k'kifk 

Do you need a co-curricuiar? It's not too late. 

Positions are still available on the 

Circulation Staff. 

Call The Clarion Call at 393-2380. 




Slatteryl Hyde Park, from Page 3. 



to have people far away from 
you, yet so close to you being 
killed. That day I left class feel- 
ing understood and accepted as 
never before in the two and a 
half years I have been in the 
United States." 

Finally, a woman talked about 
optimism: "When beginning this 
paper (before the attacks), I was 
essentially of the opinion that the 
'reframe' was a universal fit to 
any and every psychological 
problem, simply because it had 
always gotten me through my 
personal pain. Now, after an 
undoubtedly horrible and life 
altering experience, I have a 
much deeper understanding of 
the limits and implications of a 
form of therapy that is wonderful 
when used properly." 

Some things are changeable. I 
can change how I talk to my chil- 
dren or how I handle stress. 
When we can change the things 
causing us problems, we should. 
Victor FrankI, an existential 
therapist who had been impris- 
oned in Auschwitz, wrote about 
our search for meaning when 
faced with the terrible and 



unchangeable. 

He noted that he couldn't 
change the fact that he was in 
Auschwitz, but that people who 
found a sense of meaning amidst 
all of the pain were more likely 
to survive than those who could 
not. 

None of us can erase the 
attacks or the pain associated 
with them. Even tht)ugh 1 am 
trained to handle mental health 
aspects of disasters for the 
American Red Cross, they 
received so many volunteers that 
they didn't need my expertise. 

Most of us cannot do much 
more than donate money or 
blood. Like my students, howev- 
er, we can begin to find a tiny sil- 
ver lining in this dark cloud. 

Like them, we would never 
wish the attacks to happen, but 
given this, we can stop to think 
about what is really important in 
life. 

We can take the time to think 
about how we want to live and 
make today a new beginning. 
Dr. Jeanne M. Slattery is a mem- 
ber of the Psychology 
Department. 



Gwilliml Editor responds to last week's letter to the editor, 
from Page 2. 



-ing yet another Snoop Dogg 
review - it would be the same 
as me writing a Creed review. 

But I digress. ..back to diver- 
sity. 

Though my coverage has 
been admittedly lacking in 
R&B/hip-hop reviews, I have 
touched many, many other 
genres and sub-genres. 

From folk to trip-hop, house 
music (which IS a mainstay of 
parties. ..Daft Punk gets fairly 
regular rotation at the Loomis) 
to indie-pop and art rock, I 
have tried my best to never get 
stagnant. 

To someone with only a 
passing interest in music, the 
lines between the genres can 
appear blurred, but just 
because something does not fit 
neatly into the R&B camp 
does not make it "alternative," 
a term which is outdated at 
this stage, anyway. 

There are about as many 
similarities between . a 
Radiohead album and Living 
End album as there are 
between a Macy Gray and a 



DMX album - hardly any at 
all.. 

But since this is a debate 
concerning a matter which is 
almost purely aesthetic in 
nature, we could debate back 
and forth forever and not make 
any progress. 

As for the UAB concerts, I 
couldn't agree with you more, 
and wish there was something 
I could do about it, but since 
that is not my organization, 
the only thing I can do is pray 
that I won't have to suffer 
through a Billy Joel concert 
this semester. 

I hope that I have explained 
my actions succinctly. 

Again, I extend my invita- 
tion for you to write R&B/hip- 
hop reviews, and look forward 
to adding even greater diversi- 
ty to the music reviews. 



Sincerely, 

Keith Gwillim, Lifestyles 

Editor 



i 

i 



I 



The CiAm/v Cau 



Page 5 




/\lei/i/s 




Clarion Debate Team's season looks promising 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

George Rutherford and Andrew 
Barnes, members of the Clarion 
University Speech and Debate 
Team, progressed to the division 
semifinals at the King's College 
Tournament in Wilkes-Barre. 
Clarion opened up their debate 
sea.son at this tournament, which 
is one of the largest tournaments 
on the East Coast. Nearly 100 
teams from 22 universities com- 
peted on Sept. 21-22 at the 
King's College Tournament. 

Barnes and Rutherford 
advanced after defeating teams 
from John Carroll University, 
Catholic University, Methodist 
College, and the Naval Academy. 
Next, they defeated Columbia 
University in the quarterfinal 
round before progressing to the 
semifinal round. 

Nicki Williams and Lisa Bria 
competed in the novice division 
and also moved to the elimina- 
tion rounds. Bria placed as the 
eighth speaker out of a field of 
100 speakers. Williams placed 



fourteenth. Bria and Williams 
beat teams from West Point, Case 
Western Reserve, and West 
Virginia University. 

Dr. Anand Rao, coach of the 
debate team, and Jim Lyie, assis- 
tant coach, accompanied the 
team. Rao and Lyle both teach in 
the speech communication and 
theatre department. Rao felt the 



team's first performance started 
the season with a bang and will 
help them advance in the nation- 
al rankings. 

Oct. 5-7 the Clarion Debate 
Team traveled to the University 
of Richmond Debate Tournament 
in Richmond, Virginia. Clarion 
was the only school to have 
teams advance to the final round 




Photo courtesy of Dr. Anand Rao 



Members of the Clarion Debate team recently traveled and 
participated in the University ofRictimond Debate 
Tournament in Rictimond, Va. These team members 
advanced to the final rounds in all three divisions. 



in all three divisions (varsity, 
junior varsity, and novice). 

The Richmond Debate 
Tournament was the best show- 
ing in over 15 years. 

Williams and Bria competed in 
novice, and were recognized as 
the fourth and sixth speakers in a 
field of 64. They advanced over 
teams from Towson University, 
Mary Washington College, and 
West Virginia. The pair debated 
West Point in the final round, los- 
ing 2-1 in a close decision. 

Rutherford and Barnes 
advanced to the final round in 
junior varsity after defeating 
teams from Catholic University 
and Methodist College. 

Scott O'Donnell and Terrilyn 
Cheatham qualified for the round 
16 after defeating teams from 
Catholic University, Liberty 
University, and West Point. 
O'Donnell and Cheatham then 
advanced over teams from Mary 
Washington College, West 
Virginia University, and Liberty 
University landing them in the 
finals where they lost to the 



University of Pittsburgh. 
Richmond was O'Donnell and 
Cheatham's first tournament of 
the year. 

Accompanying the team to 
Richmond were Rao, Lyle, and 
student researcher, Kim Kelly. 

Lyle noted that several coaches 
from other schools told him how 
impressed they were with 
Clarion's squad. 

"With such a young team, (only 
one member of this year's team, 
O'Donnell, is a senior) there is 
really no limit over the coming 
years to what they will be able to 
do with more experience and 
support," Lyle said. 

"This weekend's performance 
was nothing less than awesome- 
we have a friendly rivalry with 
WVU, and I particularly enjoyed 
winning a bet with their coach 
after Clarion eliminated West 
Virginia from the tournament 
with semifinals wins," said Rao. 

The debate team will be travel- 
ing to Catholic University's tour- 
nament in Washington, D.C. on 
Oct. 19-21, 200 L 



Clarion University to host Middle States preliminary site visit 



by Shannon Sankey 

Clarion University will 
have its Middle States 
Commission on Higher 
Education preliminary site 
visit on Oct. 14-15. Dr. 
Catherine Gira, president of 
Frostburg State University in 
Maryland and Chair of the 
Clarion University Middle 
States Evaluation Team, will 
visit Clarion to discuss 
details relating to the 
Evaluation Team campus 
visit on March 14-17, 2002 
and to make plans to facili- 
tate the visit of the 
Evaluation Team. 

The Middle States 
Commission on Higher 



Education is a regional orga- 
nization that accredits col- 
leges and universities, and 
then evaluates them for re- 
accreditation every ten 
years. Clarion University 
will be evaluated for reaffir- 
mation of its Middle States 
accreditation in Spring 2002. 
For its ten year Self-Study, 
the Middle States Steering 
Committee, which is a com- 
mittee representing faculty, 
adminstrators, staff, stu- 
dents, and the Council of 
Trusteess, decided to carry 
out a comprehensive Self- 
Study. This analysis covers 
every aspect of Clarion 
University, ranging from its 
mission and goals to the 



quality of student life. 

A draft of the Self-Study 
report will be distributed to 
all of the university con- 
stituencies later this semes- 
ter and will be followed by 
public hearings on this draft 
in December. The final Self- 
Study report will then be 
sent to the Middle States 
Commission on Higher 
Education and the Evaluation 
Team in February 2002. 
Based on the Self-Study 
report and their visit to the 
campus, the Evaluation Team 
will make a recommendation 
to the Middle States 
Commission on Higher 
Education regarding the re- 
accreditation of Clarion 



University. 

Dr. William Sharpe, 
Professor of Chemistry and 
Chair of Middle States 
Steering Committee, highly 
regards this re-accreditation 
process. "This Self-Study 
process is extremely impor- 
tant," says Sharpe, "in that it 
provides the university with 
an opportunity to carry out 
an internal study of all of its 
programs and services to 
insure that the university is 
accomplishing its intended 
mission and goals." 

For more information on 
the Middle States re-accredi- 
tation process, access 
www.clarion.edu and click 
on the Middle States link. 



Next 

(ABC 

Meeting 

Tuesday. Oct. 1 6 

at 5 p.m. 
in 1 24 Becker 

All members are 

welcome to 

attend. 






Clarion University 

Unites 

fundraiser 

is a success 

See Page 6. 



Students participate 



in 



outreach program 
See Page 7. 



Professional 

Development 

Series 

See Page 7. 



Clarion University 

Venango Campus 

shows growth 

See Page 8. 



J 



Page 6 



7>/f CiAm/v tlAu 



October 11, 2001 



October 11, 2001 



TH£ eiARfO/V Cau 



Page 7 



Clarion University Unites fundraiser is successful ^"^''^ ^^f®*^ 

Blotter 



by Lindsey Lowrie 
Contributing Writer 



• ••••'•■•••••< 



Clarion University's Greeks 
pulled together to raise money 
for the victims of the Sept. 11 
tragedies. Unity was the theme as 
members from all chapters of the 
sororities and fraternities on 
campus set up tables and collect- 
ed money that will be donated to 
the Sept. 11 fund. The student 
body, along with members of the 
community, donated almost 
$500, making the fundraiser a 
huge success; however, the 
fundraising is not over yet. All 
sororities and fraternities have 
been asked to donate money from 
within their own chapters. The 



final estimate is expected to be 
nearly $1,500. 

This fundraiser was not only an 
effort by the Greeks of Clarion 
University, but by all whom 
showed their support and pride in 
America by donating. Members 
of the community actually parked 
their vehicles and walked over to 
a table set up along the sidewalk 
outside of Founders Hall. It was a 
success not only monetarily, but 
it showed how great human spir- 
it can actually be. 

The goals of Clarion University 
Unites, as the fundraiser was 
appropriately titled, were to raise 
money for the much needed aid 
for those directly affected by last 
month's terrorist attacks, and to 



pull all of Greek life together 
along with the rest of the student 
body. 

Hank Crawford, a junior com- 
munication major and member of 
the Kappa Delta Rho fraternity 
said, "It was great to see the 
entire campus helping out for 
such a worthwhile cause." 

The fundraiser consisted of 
tables set up at various locations 
across campus. Sororities and 
fraternities were randomly 
selected to sit at each of the 
tables and collect donations from 
the student body. 

"I think it is wonderful that in a 
time of crisis, all the fraternities, 
sororities, and independents on 
campus can come together to 



raise funds," said Renee Irwin, a 
senior communication science 
disorders major and a member of 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Clarion University Unites was 
co-sponsored by the Inter-frater- 
nity council and the Panhellenic 
Council. These two councils 
oversee the running of all frater- 
nities and sororities on campus. 
By working with these two coun- 
cils, the fundraiser truly was a 
unifying event tying together 
Greeks, students of Clarion 
University, and the Clarion com- 
munity. All dontations will be 
sent to help the victims, sur- 
vivors, and families of those 
affected by the events of Sept. 
11. 



College Media Day 

"Putting the Puzzle Togeliier" 

Friday, Oct. 12,2001 

8a.m.-4p.m. 



Clarion University looks 
forward to Speaker Series 



Keynote Addresses by 

Lockwood Philips, past president of 
the National Newspaper Association 
9 a.m. in Hart Chapel 

Bob Kusbit, senior vice president of 
production at MTV 

2 p.m. in Moore Hall 



All students are welcome: 
to attend the sessions, 
meet new contacts, 
begin networking. 

Sponsored by 
the Society for Collegiate Journalists 



Clarion's newest Internet service is 

offering Clarion University Students 

special pricing ! Stop by at: Computer 

Products Co. directly behind the 

Clarion Post Office for details and 

sign up. Best deal in town!! 

Webshoppinglink.net 



by Amy Ujazdowski 
Clarion Call Staff Wri 

The upcoming speakers for the 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Center for Natural Resources and 
Environment are preparing for the 
Fall 2001 seminar series. It will cover 
a broad variety of topics to inform 
people of different national and local 
environmental issues. 

The Center wishes to provide the 
information on environmental issues 
that effect the region, promote higher 
learning on these issues, and focus 
interest on the univea^ity's environ- 
mental programs. 

"A lot of people don't realize the 
environmental issue complaint in that 
area," said Dr. Patrick McGreevy, 
chair of the anthropology, geography, 
and earth sciences departments, as he 
referred to his past trip to Hungary. 
McGreevy spent one year there learn- 
ing about the environmental issues of 
that region. 

Another speaker is Dr. Patricia 
Kennedy, award winner of the 
Science Communication Interest 
Group and professor of the communi- 
cation department. She thinks it is a 
great idea to include the media as an 
environmental issue. 

"Less than one percent of television 
or news is about environment," she 
said. "And that is usually not proenvi- 
ronment." 

The seminars are to make people 
environmentally aware of the world. 
Anybody may attend one or all of the 
following themes: 

"The Significance of Special Studies 
in Long-Temi Biological Monitoring 
Programs" with Dr. Arthur J. Stewart, 



Oct. 11, at 4 p.m. in 125 Harvey Hall. 
Stewart is involved in the environ- 
mental sciences division of Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory, 
Tennessee. 

"Stable and Unstable States in a 
System Controlled by Positive 
Feedback: Impliction for the Tropical 
Rainforest Ecosystem" with Dr. John 
Alcock, Oct. 18, 4 p.m. in 125 1-Iarvey 
Hall. Alcock is a member of the envi- 
ronmental sciences program at Penn 
State University, Abington College. 

"Environment and Society in Post- 
Communist Central Europe" with 
McGreevy, Oct. 25, at iioon in 249 
Peirce Science Center. 

"Monitoring Zebra Mussel Invasion 
in the Edinboro Lake Watershed" 
with Dr. Laurie Parendes, professor of 
geosciences at Edinboro University of 
Pennsylvania, Nov. 5, noon in 249 
Peirce Science Center. 

"When is Maple a Bully? Ecological 
Damage by an Invasive Tree" with 
Dr. Sara Webb, Nov. 12, noon in 249 
Peirce Science Center. Webb is a 
member of the biology department at 
Drew University in Madison, N.J. 

"Recent Archaeological 
Investigations of the Upper Allegheny 
River" with Dr. Susan Prezanno, 
assistant professor of anthropology, 
geography, and earth sciences, Nov. 
29, 4 p.m. in 125 Harvey Hall. 

"Is Television Ever an 
Environmental Friendly Medium?' 
with Kennedy, Dec. 6, at 4 p.m. in 1 25 
Harvey Hall. 

The whole series if free and open to 
the public. For further information, 
contact Dr. Chuck Williams, of the 
biology department, at 393-1936 or 
email cwilliams@clarion.edu. 



According to Public Safety, 
Campus Police are 
investigating an incident of 
vandalism where holes were 
made in the walls of the east 
stairwell in Campbell Hall, 
sometime Oct. 2*3, 2001 

Underage drmi(|nq, 
public drunkeni^^^y 

According to Public Safety, 
Lindsey Dalbon, 18, of Nair 
Hall, was found under the 
influence of alcohol and 
exhibiting signs of extreme 
intoxication, Sept. 28, 2001 at 
1:25 a.m. 

Institutional vandaiism, 

criminal mischief 

According to Public Safety, 
unknown person(s) did write 
grafitti on the walls and door 
on the second floor B wing of 
Campbell Hall with indelible 
marker, Sept. 29, 2001 at 2:46 
a.m. 

Purchase con^^fT»p- 
tion. p ossession, 

transportation of 

liauor/malt/or brewed 

beverage 

According to Public Safety, 
PanielRarer, 18,of 245 
Wilkinson Hall, was found 
under, the extreme influence 
of alcohol in Wilkinson Hall. 



inderaae drlnl<ing , 
public drunkenness, 
disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety, 
Christopher Powell, 19, of 
Ralston Hall, was found under 
the influence of alcohol in the 
hallway on the third floor in 
Ralston Hall, Sept. 29, 2001 
at 1 :53 a.m. Powell caused a 
loud disturbance using foul 
language and spit on the floor 
and wall of the dorm. 



Gotta hot 
news tip? 

Call Susan 
at 

393-2380. 



I 



Clarion University students participate in community outreach 

by Kelly Drevitch Minority Services, supervises Pittsburgh, so this is the chance started in 1994. demonstrate how one can turn 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



)••••••••••■#•••••< 



Clarion University students 
will help keep up a tradition of 
community outreach this year 
and next. These five students 
will assist younger students at 
the Christian Life Skills 
Incorporated in Pittsburgh. 
They plan on making full day 
visits from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on 
Oct. 13. Nov. 3, 2001, Feb. 2, 
March 16, and April 16, 2002. 

These Clarion University stu- 
dents are Latisha Jones, a 
sophomore communication 
major; Renee Porter, a sopho- 
more history major; Marcel 
Holyfield, a sophomore special 
education major; Christina 
Stoudmire, a sophomore man- 
agement major; and Ian 
Wingfield, a junior rehabilita- 
tion science major. 

Paired up with younger stu- 
dents, they act as mentors and 
increase enthusiasm in commu- 
nity projects. 

Rogers Laugand, director of 



Minority Services, supervises 
the project. He predicts an 
increase of student volunteers. 

"Many Clarion Students start 
in this program as freshmen and 
continue throughout college. 
They enjoy working with young 
people, and it is refreshing for 
them to have an opportunity to 
leave campus and do some 
good. Many of them are from 



Pittsburgh, so this is the chance 
for them to return something to 
their community," said 
Laugand. 

Clarion students are known 
for consistently helping with 
the Christian Life Skills 
Incorporated, operated through 
the Church of God in East 
Liberty, Pittsburgh. 

Participation in the program 




^^^•^'"w^^ 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Pictured above are some of the students that participated in 
tine community outreoct) program in Pitfsburgli. 



started in 1994. 

"I anticipate a great year.' 
says Barbara Rogers, executive 
director of Christian Life 
Skills. "There is an outstanding 
core of students from Clarion 
University who have participat- 
ed in Christian Life Skills pro- 
grams since they were fresh- 
men. I am delighted that they 
take the time away from studies 
and social opportunities to 
spend time with us and make a 
contribution to the community." 

The Clarion University stu- 
dents assist with the younger 
students to accomplish "rites of 
passage" requirements. This 
includes spiritual direction, 
developing goals for the future, 
learning to express thoughts 
and feelings, challenges of 
addiction, and determining per- 
sonal values. 

Rogers feels that the Clarion 
University students act as role 
models and have a significant 
impact on the children. These 
students also represent a true 
story and act as mentors. They 



demonstrate how one can turn 
to God when times are rough. 

"Our students focus on men- 
toring from a Christian perspec- 
tive and develop life skills," 
says Laugand. These skills may 
include subjects such as money 
management, job skills, and 
finding talents to help them 
reach their goals. 

"This is a program I believe 
in, and that is why I participate 
in it. Many students here at 
Clarion also find it worthwhile 
enough to want to do it on a 
regular basis. We are focusing 
on black communities and 
many of these volunteers come 
from the same background, but 
we have grown distant from 
this community since coming to 
college. They are the same indi- 
vidually, but with broadened 
horizons. The only way to sur- 
vival as a community is to grow 
together. If we come together 
collectively, we can succeed 
together and branch out to the 
larger community," says 
Laugand. 



Professional Development Series 
presents Interviewing Skills 



by Jennifer Marz 
Contributing Writer 

The Professional 
Development Series, Oct. 8, 
2001 presented the topic 
Interviewing Skills. The 
speaker was Dr. Myrna Kuehn 
ol the speech, communication, 
and theatre department. This 
program provided information 
on the interviewing process. 
Many topics that were dis- 
cussed include: 

How should I prepare for an 
interview? What types o\' 
questions should I ask during 
the interview process? Ideas 
were given on how to answer 
the uncomfortable questions 
professionally. Kuehn provid- 
ed information about the inter- 
viewing process such as iden- 
tifying your priorities, 
researching, asking questions, 
preparing for questions, dress- 
ing the part, controlling your 
manners and mannerisms, and 
lastly following up after the 
interview. 

Bryan Plummer said, "I 
found these sessions to be 
refreshing and informative to 
further the development of my 
professional career." 



There were approximately 70 
people in attendence on this 
topic. 

"Interviewing skills are an 
integral part of the job appli- 
cation process. Dr. Myrna 
Kuehn presented this portion 
of the Professional 

Development Series superbly," 
stated by Rachael Foflygen, 
the coordinator of the pro- 
gram. "The Professional 
Development Series offers stu- 
dents information and 
resources that the majority of 
our university classes do not. 
By attending these sessions, it 
has eased my apprehension 
about graduation and entering 
my career," stated by Rachel 
Thompson. 

For additional information 
you can contact Dr. Kuehn at 
393-2286. 

You can also receive valu- 
able information on interview- 
ing that can be found at Career 
Services. 

The next topic is how to 
Dress for Success, Oct. 15, at 
5:30 p.m. in 250 Gemmell. 
The presenters will include 
Jim Crooks and Darla 
Friedlund of Crooks Clothing. 



Jump Start program established at Venango Campus 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 



Ten high school age students in 
Venango County will have an 
early chance to start their college 
education through the newly 
established program. Jump Start. 
During the 2001-02 academic 
year, the selected college bound 
students in grades 10-12, will 
have an opportunity to take cours- 
es at Venango Campus, Oil City, 
or Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Historically, there have been 
many regulations at the university 
as well as the high schools that 
would deter high achieving acad- 
emic high school students from 
taking college courses while 
enrolled in high school. Jump 
Start is a university program at 
Venango Campus that has been 
developed in collaboration with 
area high schools. It would by- 
pass many of the restrictive poli- 



cies of both institutions and per- 
mit high school students in the 
academic track to take university 
courses while attending high 
school. 

Jump Start enables academical- 
ly qualified students to take up to 
nin credits of college courses dur- 
ing the academic semesters. 
Besides taking courses during the 
academic year, they may take 
summer courses as part of this 
program. Qualified students in 
tenth grade who wish to take col- 
lege courses throughout their high 
school experience could possibly 
earn 66 college credits by the time 
they graduate from high school. 

The 2001-02 Jump Start partici- 
pants include seven students from 
Venango Christian High School, 
Oil City, two from Oil City High 
School, and one home school stu- 
dent. These students meet the aca- 
demic requirements of a 3.0 or 
higher grade point average and 
were recommended by their guid- 



ance counselors. 

The Samuel A. Justus Trust 
funded a grant to assist income 
eligible students with tuition and 
fees. Venango Campus is provid- 
ing each of these students with 
$50 toward books. 

Their college courses were 
selected according to the high 
school class schedule of the qual- 
ified students' remaining academ- 
ic high school courses. During 
periods of study hall/free time, 
these students have permission to 
leave their high school and go to 
Venango Campus for their class. 

The participating students 
include: Jessica Baker and Angela 
Elliston, from Oil City High 
School; Mary Drayer, Corry 
Eisenman, Rachel Nelson, 
Matthew Schreckengost, 

Jacqueline Schwabenbauer, Lisa 
Solle, and Dorothy Wolber, from 
Venango Catholic High School; 
and Lacey Hotchkiss, from home 
school. 



Gotta nose for news? 

Call Susan at 393-2380 



Page 8 



neCiAm/\ieAa 



October 11, 2001 



Council of Trustees discusses Clarion University Venango Campus 



Courtesy of University 
Relations 

A rebirth of Clarion 
University Venango Campus 
(CU-VC) was discussed at 
the regular meeting of the 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania Council of 
Trustees held here Thursday 
night. 

"Our enrollment at 
Venango has shown a steady 
growth," said Provost Joe 
Grunenwald. 

"It went from a low of 371 
to 410 last year and 481 this 
year." 

Grunenwald also detailed a 
reorganization plan that is 
looking at procedural 
changes that will enhance 
the vitality of Venango. 

The search for a new exec- 
utive dean continues, 
according to Grunenwald, 
with the university having a 
strong desire to hire some- 
one who will make things 
happen at Venango and be a 
part of the community. 

Dr. Audean Duespohl, 
interim executive dean of 
CU-VC. also pointed to the 
numerous accomplishments 
over the past year. Venango 
has also launched the cele- 



bration of its 40th anniver- 
sary, marking the birth of 
the first branch campus in 
the State System of Higher 
Education. 

Increased visibility for 
CU-VC was achieved 
through many activities such 
as media relations, increased 
advertising, and other pro- 
motions. 

Venango also launched 
many new programs, such as 
Senior Net, Kids in College, 
Jump Start, PACCA- 
TEACH, Summer Graduate 
Academy, and an expanded 
Masters of Science in 
Nursing Program. 

According to Duespohl, an 
early childhood program is 
now in place that allows stu- 
dents to complete an associ- 
ate's degree or the first two 
years of a baccalaureate 
degree at Clarion. 

The first two years of the 
following baccalaureate pro- 
grams are also available at 
Venango: business, psychol- 
ogy, and rehabilitative sci- 
ences. 

Paul Bylaska, vice presi- 
dent for finance and admin- 
istration, briefly outlined 
the 2001-02 annual budget 
that trustees unanimously 



approved for submission to 
the State System. 

Bylaska noted the $62.44 
million Education & General 
(E&G) Budget includes a 
$1.3 million shortfall. A 
plan to meet the shortfall has 
been developed that includes 
reallocations and continual 
review of personnel vacan- 
cies. 

Any savings in wages will 
come through normal attri- 
tion and review of vacan- 
cies. 

Moratorium Trustees 
approved a moratorium for 
the associate degree in occu- 
pational therapy because of 
declining enrollments due to 
changes in the focus of fund- 
ing provided by government 
agencies for students 
enrolled in this degree. 

Faculty Promotions A 
number of faculty promo- 
tions were announced. 

Instructor to Assistant 
Professor: Mary Pat 

McCarthy, communication 
and science disorders. 
Assistant Professor to 
Associate Professor: Barrie 
Brancato, education; Elaine 
Carbone, mathematics; 

Susan Hilton, communica- 
tion; Micheal McConnell, 



mathematics; Catherine 

Petrissans, political science, 
sociology, and philosophy; 
Edward Powers, speech 
communication and theatre; 
and Thomas Rourke, politi- 
cal science, sociology, and 
philosophy. 

Associate Professor to Full 
Professor: Arthur Barlow, 
communication; Robert 

Frakes, history; Fred Keen, 
chemistry; Legene 

Quesenberry, finance; Brent 
Register, music; and 
Douglas Smith, biology. 

Faculty Sabbaticals 
Approved faculty sabbati- 
cals were also announced, 
with name, time period, and 
purpose listed. 

They include: 
*Carole Anderson, 2002-03 
academic year, attend gradu- 
ate classes in industrial and 
labor relation. 

*Joseph Bodziock, 2002 fall 
semester, research African- 
American detective fiction. 
*Biii Buchanan, 2003 half 
pay, complete post-doctoral 
fellowship and work on book 
on multicultural storytelling. 
*Brian Dunn, 2003 spring 
semester, research concen- 
tration camp population at 
Buchenwald. 



*Soga Ewedemi, 2002-03 
academic year, write a book 
on a theory of accidents. 
*Carl Farinacci, to be deter- 
mined, develop teaching 
materials on finance and 
accounting concepts. 
*Marite Haynes, 2002-03 
academic year, revise con- 
tent of psychology courses. 
*Catherine Joslyn, 2002 
spring semester, conduct 
Fulbright project study of 
Andean visual motifs, oral 
history, and landscape. 
*Alvin Kennedy, to be deter- 
mined, develop enrollment 
market for international stu- 
dents. *Paul Kim, 2002-03 
academic year, develop web- 
enhanced course materials. 
*Kristin Marshal, 2002 fall 
semester, research and writ- 
ing on women speakers. 
*Charles Pineno, to be 
determined, co-author 

accounting textbook and 
study guide. 

*Mary Jo Reef, 2003 spring 
semester, develop online 
course content and assess- 
ment for sociology course 
units. 

*Wil!iam Sanders, 2002-03 
academic year, develop 
course materials fcM- 

Economics 3 10. 




Heal our world 




w»f»w^*wwf»i5!nfww 



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sn |^^3H ^^ 



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Clarion University to hold 
Legal Conference 



Amy A. Thompson/The Clarion Call 



Sligo Elementary students designed the bulletin board in the style of the 
American flag. They also put a bandage on a map of the world with the title 
Help us heal our world. The students were under the direction of their CUP 
student teachers, Jason Haefner and Bill Mc Williams. 



by Martisse Macri 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion University will hold a 
Legal Conference on Oct. 26, 
from 8:55 a.m. to 4:49 p.m. 
Registration begins at 8:15 a.m. 
The Center for Legal Education 
is holding the conference. A fee 
of $119 will be charged to cover 
the seminars, fees with the state 
board, and refreshments during 
breaks. 

The course counts as six hours 
of continuing legal eduac'ation. 

Opening remarks will be given 
by Jcffery D. Eicher, Esq., of the 
Center for Legal Education. 
There will also be various other 
speakers throughout the day. Leo 
Hitt, Esq., will give a "Federal 
and State Tax Update." Lorraine 
Heeter, Esq., will speak on 
"Family Law Update." 

"The Spirit of the Orphan's 
Court" will be given by Judge 
Kenneth G. Valasek. Judge 



James Arner will speak about 
"The Implications of Apprendi v. 
New Jersey." 

"Child Custody Issues," will be 
addressed by Dr. Allen Ryan. 
Judges Arner, Valasek. William 
Henry, and Paul Millin, will be 
holding a judge's panel discus- 
sion. 

The College ol Business 
Administration, the university's 
C^ollege of Continuing 

Education, and the Clarion 
County Bar Association joined 
togther to make the Clarion 
Center for Legal Education pos- 
sible. 

The conference will be shown 
at the Venango Campus on tape, 
April 24, 2002. 

Registration forms are due by 
Oct. 19. Forms should be sent to 
Legal Education Conference, 
Continuihg Education, Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, 210 
Still Hall, Clarion, Pa 16214- 
1232. 



October 11, 2001 



77//f CcAR/o/^ Cau 



Page 9 




l/FeST^C^S 




Theatre Review 



A second look at the immensly popular Rocky Horror 



by Amy Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-In-Chief 

The Clarion University Theatre 
department presented Richard 
O'Brien's The Rocky Horror Show 
very well despite O'Brien's weak 
plotline that unravels in the second 
act. Before I explain my dislike of 
the direction O'Brien takes in Act 
2, let me again stress that the cast 
does a wonderful job of perform- 
ing such a risque' piece of work. I 
was a "virgin" (as the cast so 
pointed out), before viewing the 
production Saturday night, 
October 6. 

The plot is put into motion by a 



As the plot continued, I assumed 
it was going to lead you into some 
sort of theory concerning sexual 
power or identity, but the plot 
turns to aliens. As for the alien 
leaders who emerge, the audience 
came to know them as Riff-Raff, 
played by Professor Robert 
Bullington, and Riff-Raff's sister, 
Magenta, played by Miranda 
Scopel. The plot is reminiscent of 
such works that are highly drug- 
influenced, like LSD in Alice In 
Wonderland. 

Despite the plot, Marilouise 
Michel wisely directed the pro- 
duction. Since the Little Theatre 
is a relatively small venue, the 



wouln't have recognized him, 
decked out in his garter belts and 
trashy negligee. Southworth is not 
only theatrically superior in facial 
expressions and movements, but 
musically superior as well. No 
one could have sung "Sweet 
Transvestite" with quite as much 
feeling, pun very much intended. 

Danielle Garmen utilized some 
of the funniest facial expressions 
in her portrayal of Columbia, 
requiring her to be a bimbo with a 
squeaky voice. Garmen also had 
the opportunity to show off her 
dancing capabilities with a tap 
number. 



The greatest surprise of the cast 
had to be the role of the narrator, 
played by Dr. Brian Dunn. The 
seemingly reserved history profes- 
sor shocked the audience with sev- 
eral sexual comments. 

Speaking of comments, the audi- 
ence very much had a role in this 
production. Audience members 
and the stage crew would belt out 
crude comments, which always fit 
into something the actor or actress 
was saying at the time, to suggest 
sexual innuendoes. 

The costumes and make-up of 
this show is really what served to 
set the tone from the moment you 



walked into the door. Everyone's 
make-up was done similar to 
Mimi on The Drew Carey Show. 
The make-up combined with the 
trashy costuming made one feel as 
though they were in a brothel. My 
favorite costume was worn by Bob 
Goodrich, who played one of the 
ghouls. Dressed as a woman, 
Goodrich sported a red bee-hive 
wig, horn-rimmed glasses and a 
lacey purple dress. 

Props also served an important 
role. My favorite prop of the 
entire show, which I felt worked 
well with the trashy atmosphere. 



See *Rocky Horror,' Page 10 




Photo courtesy of University Relations 



"The Rocky Horror Show, " which sold out performances all last 
week at Clarion University. 



I young couple; Brad Majors, 
played by Bradley Schake; and 
Janet Weiss, played by Megan 
Overholt, whose car has broken 



characters had to be placed in cer- 
tain positions to ensure that every- 
one could move freely. The set 
had ladders and two levels; it 
worked well to have the actors 



down. Seekmg help, they come ^^^ttg^gj ^^^^g.j j^e floor and 

across a creepy castle with every- ^^^ ^^^^^^ i^^^, ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^-^^ 

thing inside but a telephone. Each character was smtable for the 

because "there are no telephones ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ gj^^^ ^^^ ^^ 

inside castles, a**hole." While ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^-^^ ^^^^.^ character, 

they are inside, the two eventually Southworth, as Frank N. Furter, 




get tricked into the world of Frank 
N. Furter, played by Trevor 
Southworth. Frank N. Furter also 
shows them the perfect man that 
he has created. 



truly did steal the show. As some- 
one who has seen Southworth per- 
form in other shows, if I didn't 
know it was him playing Furter, 1 



Photo by Graham Hermanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 



www.thecIarioncall.com 




Calendar of Events. 
To find out whaf s 
going on at Clarion 
University and the 

community. 

See Page 10. 



Cartoon band Gorillaz 

promises more than 

they can deliver on their 

debut album. To find 

out why. 

See Page 11. 



The Sandf ord Gallery 

will display Carol 

Werder's work in an 

upcoming exhibit. For a 

preview. 

See Page 11. 




Page 10 



ale 



r//eC^Am/\/^Au 



October 11, 2001 




vents 



yjaea/BiaBiBiBBMBia ^^ 



i 



I 

i 
i 



i 



T h u r s d a yTT) c t ob eFTl 

•DAB Gateway Clipper Cruise 
Friday, October 12 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball at 

Kutztown 

Invitational 

•Madrigal 

Singers Concert 
Trial By Jury" 

(Aud) 8 pm 

•Admissions Visit 

Day (250/252 

Gem) 9 am 

Saturday, 

October 13 
Football at 

Edinboro 2 pm 
hCross Country at 
JDuquesne 
kVolleyball at 
Kutztown 
Invitational 
•W. Soccer vs. 
West Chester 1 
pm 

•Tennis at 
California 
Sunday, 
October 14 

W. Soccer vs. 
Millersville 2 pm 
Monday, October 15 
•Hispanic Heritage Month ends 




•Faculty 

Senate Policy 

Mtg. (B-8 

Chap) 3:30 pm 

•Early 

Registrations 

begin for 2002 

Spring Term 

•Professional 

Development 

Series 

(250/252 

Gem) 5:30 pm 

•Golf at 

Robert Morris 

Inv. 

•MLK Series 

(Chap) 7:30 

pm 

•UAB 

Midnight 

Madness - 

meet the M&W BB Team (Tippen Gym) 9 pm 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30 pm 

Tuesday, October 16 

•Volleyball at lUP 7 pm 

•NATIONAL BOSS DAY 

•IM entries due in Rec Center (Tug of War) 

•Golf at Robert Morris Inv. 

•UAB: David Burgess, Brazilain Guitar (Chap) 8 pm 

Wednesday, October 17 

•UAB Ritazza Open Mic Night (Gem) 8 pm 

W. Soccer at Indiana 4 pm 
•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gem) 7:30 pm 
•Tennis v. Edinboro 3:30 pm 




''''I'^'^'^'^'^^^^^'^'^'^J^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^^ 




We Care Hair 

Walk-Ins Welcome 
Phone Number 227-7977 

Hours: M-F 8am-9pm, Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm 
Located in the 800 Center, across from 7-11 

We Care Hair offers a wide selection of professional hair products, 

facials, manicures, pedicures, and head massages. 
Walk-ins and appointments are welcome for all of these, including 

haircuts and coloring. 



Rocky Horrorl A review of CUP's latest theatre production, 
from Page 9. 

wasn't a high budget prop, but its lack of a hood and being able to see the 
stage hands pushing it out onto stage was amusing. Anything more 
expensive would have belied the "cheap" atmosphere. 

Laura Crago served as the choreographer for the production. The danc- 
ing didn't seem as though it was technically difficult, but it was appro- 
J priate for each cast member. This cast seemed to be especially diverse in 
body shapes and heights, so having moves that can be executed by every- 
one was important. 

The downside to this show is that the theatre department probably could 
have filled the Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts Auditorium, as the crowds lined 
up early each and every night to try to get "first come, first served" tick- 
ets. However, the Little Theatre created a homier atmosphere, vyhich can 
be lost in a greater venue. I also believe the audience participation may 
have dwindled if the audience members felt they weren't being heard by 
the cast. 

There is no question what the most memorable aspect of this produc- 
tion was. The riskiest scenes in which Frank N. Furter seduce Janet fol- 
lowed by Brad received gasps from even "non-virgins." For those who 
had seen the show before, the anticipation of how it was to be handled 
properly kept them from wondering. For a "virgin," nothing can really 
prepare you for the scenes. I believe the "shadows on the sheet" idea was 
a clever way of disguising Frank N. Furter and keeping the actors clothed. 

I only wish the second act was stronger, because this cast deserved to 
have a consistent piece of work from beginning to end. 



~WS, PreserWsTl 
David Jurgess i 







I 



October 11, 2001 



Music Review 



ne CiAmfi Cau 



Page 11 



Gorillaz ape ^cartoon band concept' at every turn 



by Keith Gwillim 
aarion Call Lifestyled Editor 

ARTIST/ALBUM: Gorillaz, 
Gorillaz- 

FOR FANS OF: Quirky brit- 
pop; left-of-the-middle hip- 
hop. 

FOR FURTHER LISTEN- 
ING: Blur's /i, Cibo Matto's 



wrong. ..not quite so. 

It's hard to tell if Albarn and 
Howlett were trying their best 
to create a Josie and the 
Pussycats for the 21st century, 
or just got a little too baked one 
night and thought they'd have a 
laugh or two at their fans' 
expense. When the two major 
elements of the Gorillaz (visu- 




Stereotype A, Handsome Boy 
Modeling School's debut. 

So here's the eternal question 
- which came first? The car- 
toon or the music? With the 
Gorillaz, you're never really 
sure of that, and more impor- 
tantly, if the joke's on you. 
The brainchild of former flat- 
mates Damon Albarn (Blur) 
and Liam Howlett (creator of 
Tank Girl), Gorillaz is just a 
fake band. No, really - fake in 
that they don't even exist in 
real life, not fake in the prefab- 
ricated MTV sort of way. All 
the group's members have their 
own animated alter-egos, and 
exist in this shadowy nether- 
world. 

To help them on their way, 
Albarn and Howlett enlisted 
the help of many high-profile 
musicians, including under- 
ground hip-hop stalwarts Del 
Tha Funkee Homosapian, and 
Dan "The Automator" 
Nakamura. Also along for the 
ride is Cibo Matto's Miho 
Hatori and the Tom Tom Club's 
Tina Weymouth. With such an 
all-star lineup, it would seem 
that Gorillaz could do no 



als and music) are combined, 
such as their highly interactive 
website (www.gorillaz.com) or 
their slick animated videos, the 
end result is a wonderfully 
tongue-in-cheek good time. 
But part of being in a truly 
multimedia entity is to release 
an album, and this crucial 
aspect is where the Gorillaz 
stumble. 

Consisting of a wildly eclec- 
tic (and unfortunately uneven) 
mix of Blur's cheeky brand of 
british pop, lacadasial rap beats 
and a grab-bag of production 
styles (The Automator is one 
member who doesn't slack off 
at all), Gorillaz can hit with the 
force of a 400 lb. ape. The 
problem is that they more often 
slip up than hit the mark. 

When the Gorillaz are on, it 
makes for excellent art-school 
funk; every bit as cerebral as it 
is groovy. "Re-Hash" is any- 
thing but; a compelling chunk 
of acid-fried blues riffs mixed 
with a sprinkling of sing-along 
choruses and 80s synth-pop 
whimsy. The awkward and 
clunky "5/4" works in spite of 



(or perhaps because of) its 
amateurish execution. The 
"zombie hip-hop" of "Clint 
Eastwood" is the obvious high- 
light, but faces competition 
from worthy adversaries such 
as the moog-flavored "19- 
2000" and the fierce head-bob- 
ber "Ml Al." 

Songwriting is the ultimate 
soft spot in the Gorillaz' armor, 
a surprising flaw for a group 
that names one of the past 
decade's sharpest tunesmiths 
(Albarn) in their ranks. Tracks 
such as "Punk," which is any- 
thing but, and the meandering 
"Double Bass" go absolutely 
nowhere; simply stewing in 
their abject failure. 

Particularly offensive is "Latin 
Simone," which features the 
overly pontificating guest 
vocals of Ibrahim Ferrer. Seek 
out the Ferrer-less version on 
the Tomorrow Comes Today EP, 
which has Albarn singing 
instead, which suits the song 
much better. 

More often, though, the 
Gorillaz' ideas just seem half- 
baked, another big surprise 
given Albarn's highly publi- 
cized over-indulgence in leafy 



green substances. "New 

Genius," "Slow Country" and 
others bristle with not-quite- 
tapped promise, jerking about 
like a half-wound wind-up toy. 
You get the sense that with just 
a little bit of tweaking, this 
could have been an exceptional 
sidebar the careers of all 
involved, instead of just a 
mildly entertaining wank-fest. 
Albarn, the master of the 
laconic drawl, has that vocal 
style down to an art form on 
this album, turning the tracks 
where he takes solo vocal 
duties into one big clam-bake, 
and while that's worked for 
him in the past, I don't mean it 
in a complementary fashion 
this time. The Gorillaz original 
intent becomes hard to perceive 
though the haze. It does occa- 
sionally work, such as in the 
trip-hop daze of "Tomorrow 
Comes Today" or "Clint 
Eastwood," where Albarn sere- 
nades his "sunshine in a bag." 
Del Tha Funkee Homosapian 
is grossly underused here, only 
popping up to show his distinc- 
tive flow on "Clint Eastwood" 
and "Rock The House." His 
smooth yet kinetic rhymes are a 



perfect counterpoint to 
Albarn's slacker croon, provid- 
ing the album with a "let's 
party" vibe. And considering 
that the Gorillaz are a cartoon, 
isn't that what it's all supposed 
to be about? 

Sonically, Gorillaz isn't 
much different from Blur's 
1999 opus, 13. Spaced-out 
vocals, druggy rhythms and 
synths can be found in every 
song, and each track adopts a 
different genre, style or 
approach. Gorillaz presents a 
watered-down, less-experimen- 
tal and more radio-friendly 
spin on that formula. 

There are no 7-minute gospel 
chants followed by abrasive 
noise guitar attacks (Blur's 
Graham Coxon is sorely missed 
here. ..proof positive that Blur's 
sum is greater than that of its 
parts), just short little pop dit- 
ties, one right after another. 
Which is all part of the con- 
cept, I suppose; it IS just a car- 
toon after all. But I seem to 
remember the Saturday morn- 
ings of my youth being more 
fun than this. Make another 
Blur record, Damon. 2 1/2 out 
of 5 stars. 




"Extra-Ordinary" 




Photo courtesy of the Sandford Gallery 



Carol Werder will unveil her gallery, "Extra-Ordinary/ on October 16 in the 
Sandford Gallery, located in Marv\/ick-Boyd. Opening party is the 16th from 4:30 
to 6:00 p.m. Werder's exhibit W\\\ run until November 15. Shown here is a piece 
entitled "Sometimes Cactus Bob Carries a Heavy Burden." Gallery hours are: Mon 
& Wed., 11-4 p.m. Tues & Thurs., 11-7 p.m. and Fri., 11-1 p.m. Closed on University 
Holidays. 



Pac.i 10 



iMlMEJIkLCMl 



0( lOHFK 11, 2001 



Calend 





EA 
vents 






i 
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i 
I 
i 
i 

1 
I 
I 
1 
I 

i 

I 
i 

i 
I 



i 
I 
i 
I 
i 

i 
1 

i 
m 
m 
i 
i 
i 
m 

I 

i 
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i 



I liursdiiy, OctohtT II 

•I \B (iato\\a\ ( I ippot ( I uisc 
I riclii\, Octoher 1 2 

•r \\\ Spn II na\ 

•\ollc\b.ill at 

K lit /lnu n 

1 ii \ 1 1 at lotial 

•MaJi.^iial 

.'' : n^crs C 'on cert 

■" i nal H\ ,Fiir\ "■ 

' \ lid ) S pin 

' \ J nil SSI oils X'isil 

I '.IN ( 2.>()/.:5 2 

s I'. Ill ) *^) am 
S.it iirdav, 
October 13 

•I oothall at 

I Jiiihoit> 2 pni 

•( ross ( \>unti > at 

! 'IKJUCSIIO 

•\ol!c\hall at 

Kilt /tow II 

1 !)\ itat lonal 

•W .Soccer \s. 

West ("h ester 1 

pin 

• leiinis at 

C'al horn la 

Sunday, 

October 14 

•W. Soccer \s 

Mil lei s\ ille 2 pm 

.Monday, October 15 

•Hispanic Heritage Month ends 




'I acnlt\ 

LSenate l'olic\ 

Mtg. (B-S 

Chap) 3:30 pin 

•Jiarly 

Registrat ions 

begin lor 2002 

Spring rerm 

•Pi ot essional 

!)e\ elopinent 

S e r i e s 

(230/252 
iGeiii ) 3:30 |nii 

•Ciol t at 

Rohert Morris 

Inv. 

•MI-K Series 

(Chap) 7:30 

pin 

•I \B 

Midnight 

jMadness - 

^meet the W^W liB leain ( lippen Gym) O |>ni 

•Student Senate Mtg. (246 Gem) 7:30 \>u\ 

lucsday, October 16 

•Volley ha 1 1 at 1 1 IP 7 pm 

•NATIONAI. BOSS DAY 

•IM entries kXwc in Rec Center (Tug ot War) 

•CjoII at Robert Morris Inv. 

•I'-ATi: David Burgess, F^razilain Guitar (Chap) <S pin 

Wednesday, October 17 

•I'AB Ritazza Open Mic Night (Gem) 8 pm 

•W. .Soccer at Indiana 4 pm 

•Leadership De\elopment Series (250/2.32 (iem) 7:30 pm 

•Tennis v. I{dinboro 3:30 |im 




I 

i 
I 

i 



i 

i 

I 
i 

I 

i 
I 
i 

I 
I 

I 

\ 

i 
I 

i 

i 



UMIBIazza^Open Pic NiaFtt 

' j ii ■■■■■^ ri ..-ii irT iiiil n iiiii- ■■■■■jy -- ^ 

Wednesday, October 1 7th. 
Gemmeli Ritazza 8:00 p.m. 



^s^M^MM^MMx^m^M^MSSMQ^mMiKM!xkm^m^m&ixmm^^^^^^ 



Rocky Horror! A review of CLP's latest theatre production, 
from Page 9. 



lu 



:ii' )ii 



Do you hav^^ 
dance, pla 
telt jokes - 




caient? Sing, 
i<^ poetry, 
tour artistic 



sidSffn!! 



We Care Hair 

Walk- Ins Welcome 
Phone Number 227-7977 

Hours; M-F 8am-9pni, Sat Sain-5pm. Sun 12pm-5pm 
Located in the 800 (enter, across from 7-1 1 

\\c ( arc Han oltcis a wide selection of professional hair products. 

facials, manicures, pedicures, and head massages 
Wa'k Ins and appointments are uelcome lor all of these. includinL; 

haircuts .uid colonntz. 



wasn't a high budget pn)|i. hut its lack m! .i hccid and hciivj ahic to 
stage hands pushing it out onto s:age was amusing. An\ihii:_ 
e\pensi\e would ha\e belied the ■"cheap" atmosphere 

Laura Crago ser\ed as the choreographer lor the iiroUuciion. I ' ■ 

ing didn't seem as though it was tCi^hnicalK diHiciili. hut it u.- 
priate lor eacli cast member This cast seemed tti be especiallv d 
bod) shapes and heights, so h.n ing moves that can be executed i^ . . 
(me was important. 

The downside to this show is that the theatre dcpaitnicnt pu)babl\ t. oakl 
ha\e filled the Marv\ ick-Bovd f ine .Arts Auditorium, as the crowds hnct' 
up early each and every night to try to get "tirst come, tiist served" tick- 
ets. However, the Little Theatre created a homier atmosphere, which can 
he lost in a greater venue. I also believe the audience participation may 
have dwindled if the audience memliers felt they weren't being heard bv ' 
the cast. | 

There is no question what the must memorable aspect of this produc- ' 
tion was The riskiest scenes in which Lrank N. L'urter seduce .lanet foL | 
lowed by Brad received gasps from even "non-virgins." L'or those who j 
had seen the show before, the anticipation of how ii was to be handled | 
properly kept them from wondering. F-or a "virgin," nothing can really 
prepare you tor the scenes. I believe the "shadows on the sheet" idea was . 
a clever way of drsguising Lrank N. L'urter and kee[)ing the actors clothed. 

I only wish the second act v\as stronger, because this cast deserved to 
ha\e a consistent piece of work from beginning to end. 



UAB Presents: 
David Burgess 

Brazillian Guitar 



D 



layer 



Tuesdo 

I/. 



y^ 



Oct. 




A^l Others: 
$2:00 



October 11, 2001 



Music Review 



f/zf CiAR/Oiy Cau 



Page 11 



Gorillaz ape 'cartoon band concept' at every turn 



by Keith (iwillim 
Clarion (ail Lifestyled Kditor 

ARTLST/ALBUM: Gorillaz, 
Gorillaz. 

F'OR LANS OF: Quirky brit- 
pop; left-of-the-middle hip- 
hop. 

FOR FURTHER LISTEN- 
ING: Blur's /.?, (Tbo Matto's 



wrong. ..not quite so. 

It's hard to tell if Albarn and 
Llowlett were trying their best 
to create a Josie and the 
Pussycats for the 21st century, 
or just got a little too baked one 
night and thought they'd have a 
laugh or two at their fans' 
expense. When the two major 
elements of the Gorillaz (visu- 




Srereotypc A, Handsome Boy 
Modeling School's debut. 

So here's the eternal question 
- which came first? The ear- 
toon or the music? With the 
Gorillaz. you're never really 
sure o\^ that, and more impor- 
tantly, if the joke's on you. 
Lhe brainchild of former flat- 
mates Damon Albarn (Blur) 
and Liam Howlett (creator o\' 
Tank (lirl), Gorillaz is just a 
fake band. No. really - fake in 
that they don't even exist in 
real life, not fake in the prefab- 
ricated MTV sort o\' way. All 
the group's members have their 
own animated alter-egi^s. and 
exist in this shadowy nether- 
vNorld. 

To help them on their way. 
.Albarn and Howlett enlisted 
the help o\ many high-prt)file 
musicians, including under- 
ground hip-hop stalwarts Del 
Lha L'unkee Homosapian, and 
Dan "Lhe Autmpator" 

Nakamura. Also along for the 
ride IS C'ibo .Matto's Mih(^ 
Hatori and the Tom Tom Club's 
'I'ina Weymouth. With such an 
all-star lineup, it would seem 
thai Gorillaz could do no 



als and music) are combined, 
such as their highly interactive 
website (www.gorillaz.com) or 
their slick animated videos, the 
end result is a wonderfully 
tongue-in-cheek good time. 
But part of being in a truly 
multimedia entity is to release 
an album, and this crucial 
aspect is where the Gorillaz 
stumble. 

Consisting of a wildly eclec- 
tic (and unfortunately uneven) 
mix o\' Blur's cheeky brand of 
british pop. lacadasial rap beats 
and a grab-bag of production 
styles (The Automator is one 
member who doesn't slack off 
at all). Gorilla:, can hit with the 
force of a 400 lb. ape. The 
problem is that they more often 
slip up than hit the mark. 

When the Gorillaz are on. it 
makes for excellent art-school 
funk; every bit as cerebral as it 
IS groovy. "Re-Hash" is any- 
thing but; a compelling chunk 
of acid-fried blues riffs mixed 
with a sprinkling of sing-along 
choruses and 80s synlh-pop 
whimsy. The awkward and 
clunky "'5/4" works in spite of 



(or perhaps because of) its 
amateurish execution. Lhe 
"zombie hip-hop" of "Clint 
Eastwood" is the obvious high 
light, but faces competition 
from worthy adversaries such 
as the moog-flavored "19- 
2000" and the fierce head-bob- 
ber "M 1 Al." 

Songwriting is the ultimate 
soft spot in the Gorillaz' armor, 
a surprising flaw for a group 
that names one of the past 
decade's sharpest tunesmiths 
(Albarn) in their ranks. Tracks 
such as "Punk." which is any- 
thing but. and the meandering 
"Double Bass" go absolutely 
nowhere; simply stewing in 
their abject failure. 

Particularly offensive is "Latin 
Simone," which features the 
overly pontificating guest 
vocals of Ibrahim Ferrer. Seek 
out the Ferrer-less versu)n on 
the Tomorrow Comes Today EP. 
which has Albarn singing 
instead, which suits the si)ng 
much better. 

More often, though, the 
Gorillaz' ideas just seem half- 
baked, another big surprise 
given Albarn's highly publi- 
cized over-indulgence in leafy 



green substances. "New 

Genius." "Slow Country" and 
others bristle with nol-quite 
tapped promise, jerking about 
like a hall-wound wind-up toy. 
You get the sense that with just 
a little bit o\ tweaking, this 
could have been an exceptional 
sidebar the careers of all 
involved, instead of just a 
mildly entertaining wank-fest. 

Albarn. the master of the 
laconic drawl, has that vocal 
style down to an art form on 
this album, turning the tracks 
where he takes solo vocal 
duties into one big clam-bake, 
and while that's worked for 
him in the past, 1 don't mean it 
in a complementary fashion 
this time. The Gorillaz original 
intent becomes hard to perceive 
though the haze. It does occa 
sionally work, such as in the 
trip-h(.)p daze of "Tomorrow 
Comes Today" or "Clint 
Eastwood." where Albarn sere- 
nades his "sunshine in a bag." 

Del Tha Funkee Homosapian 
is grossly underused here, only 
popping up to show his distinc- 
tive flow on "Clint Eastwood" 
and "Rock The House." His 
smooth yet kinetic rhymes are a 



perfect counterpoint to 
Albarn's slacker croon, provid- 
ing the album with a "let's 
party" vibe. And considering 
that the (lorillaz are a cartoon, 
isn't that uhal it's all supposed 
to be about .' 

Sonically. Gorillaz isn't 
much different from Blur's 
1999 opus. /.?. Spaced-out 
vocals, druggy rhythms and 
synths can be found in every 
song, and each track adopts a 
different genre, style or 
approach. Gorillaz presents a 
watered-down, less-experimen- 
tal and more radio-friendly 
spin on that formula. 

There are no 7-minute gospel 
chants fi)llowed by abrasive 
noise guitar attacks (Blur's 
Graham Coxon is sorely missed 
here. ..proof positive that Blur's 
sum is greater than that of its 
parts), just short little pop dit- 
ties, one right after another. 
Which IS all part of the con- 
cept. I suppose; It IS just a car- 
toon after all. But I seem to 
remember the Saturday morn- 
ings of my youth being more 
fun than this. Make another 
Blur record, Damon. 2 1/2 out 
of 5 stars. 




"Extra-Ordinary" 




Pboto courtesy of the Sandford Galleryi 



Carol WeFder~wiirLrn\/eil heFgallery, "Extra-Ordinary," on October 16 in the 
Sandford Gallery, located in Marwick-Boyd. Opening party is the 16th fronn 4:30 
to 6:00 p.m. Werder's exhibit will run until November 16. Shown here is a piece 
entitled "Sometimes Cactus Bob Carries a Heavy Burden." Gallery hours are: Mon 
& Wed., 1 1-4 p.m. lues & Thurs., 11-7 p.m. and Fri., 11-1 p.m. Closed on University 
Holidays, 



Page 12 



Ths e^je/M t'.AU 



October 11,2001 




CiAss/Ffeos 




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Apartments available for the Fall 
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Penn Avenue. Four person occu- 
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House available for the Spring 
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Fall 2002/2003 semesters. Five 
person occupancy. Furnished. 
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House available for the Fall 
2002/2003 semesters. 7-8 person 
occupancy. Furnished. Call 226- 
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personals 



Mr. Humpley, Just wanted to 
remind you that I love you! Love, 
Mrs. Humpley 



^^i^.■^(i^l^^■l,1^1^1^^^^^■l^■t^ 



Liz, Buck up little camper, it'll be 
alright! Love, Teri 



^f.^^■i(^^^^^^^■^^^^^i^i^^^^H^ 



Sarah, Let's get together soon. 
Have a good weekend. Jill 



All steel building, engineer certi- 
fied 50X100X18 was $19,210, 
Now $11,935. Can deliver. 1- 
800-292-0111 



+************+ 



**9(c)(c^*3fc^:4c;t(;tc%3((9)c 



Furnished house available 
November I, 2001 four-person 
occupancy. Also available for the 
Spring 2002 semester and beyond. 
Call 226-6654 



All steel building, 40x32 was 
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and Kitchen Help/ Flexible hours. 



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in...Birth Control, Pregnancy Testing, 
Gyne Exams, Emergency Contraception, 
STD Testing & Treatment, Breast & 
Cervical Cancer Screening, Adoption 
and more! 



>^Our office is conveniently located near 
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^ We've been providing students with 
affordable reproductive health care for 
30 years. 



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Call our office for more information! 
I 

TamiljrHealth 814-226-7500 

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Visit us on the web at: wtvw./hdnaorg 



************** 

5' Grand Piano: Young Chang 
Ivory, excellent condition. 
$9000.00 OBO. (814)358-2346 

grailc ails 

ZTA's prayers go out to all those 
involved in war. 

**********||II|C*I|I 

Happy 21st Birthday, Ashley 
Estelle! Love, Your sisters of 
ZTA. 

AOE would like to congratulate 
Jessica Froehlich and Valerie 
Johnson on being sisters of the 
week! You two did a fantastic job 

and we love you! 

****]f **t****** 

AOE wishes everyone Good Luck 

on their semesters midterms! 

************** 

Congratulations to Ashley 
Salinsky on your lavalier. Love, 

Your future AOE sisters. 

************** 

Congratulations to our new sis- 
ters, Kristen, Holly, and Whitney. 
We're so proud of you girls! All 
our love. Your <1)S sisters 

***********J(()(1J|C 

Happy 21st Birthday Nikki-Way 
to go on the 21 shots, you were a 
champ. We love you, AZT 

Congratulations to sister of the 
week Kate H. Great job with the 
float. Love, AIT 

AOE, We just wanted to let you all 
know how much we love you! 
You girls are the best. Love, AST 



*********:|tt*** 

Kel, Eat'n Park was fun. We'll 
have to do it again soon. Have a 
good weekend. Luv ya, Jill 

******>)c* + *:|c*** 

Brian, 1 can't wait to go to the 
wedding with you on Saturday. 
Love, Jill 

Thank you to all the proofreaders. 
You're doing a wonderful job. 

**********:|i*:|c* 

Rachel, Andrea, Ky, Robin, and 
April: I'm sorry that I was a fish 
out of water Thursday! And by 
the way, I could never forget you. 
Love, Stac 

**********:^t** 

April, Welcome to the crew! 
There is no turning around now! 
You are soon to move in with the 
three craziest girls around! Love, 
Stac 

i|i4<**4i«******t* 

My rugby girls. Great season! 
Good luck Saturday! Love, Stac 

******A**1|I]|I*** 

Ky, I know that I have been out of 
it and we have bumped heads. 
But I love you and hope you know 

that. Love, Twin 

****ii>********« 



are a great person and I'm so glad 
that you are in my life. I love ya 
girlie! Everything will work out! 

Love, Kylee 

************** 

Stacey, I hope that everything 
goes well at the surgeon today. 
I'm sure that everything will go 
ok. Even though we have been 
witchy, you know that 1 love you! 
You are my twin. Love, Kylee 

*********>|<*j(t%jt; 

Danielle, 1 hope you are having a 
good time on your vacation. 
Thanks for taking me along. I 
know where 1 rank. Hurry back, it 
is too quiet in the room. Love, 
Your roommie 

Jimbo, Can't wait to get together 
on Saturday. Hope that you are 
looking forward to it too. See you 

then cutie. Your secret admirer 

************** 

Dustin, Happy Belated 22nd 
Birthday! Hope that you had a 

good one. Love, The Crew 

************** 

Kimmie, Hope that you had a 
wonderful 3 year anniversary. We 
are sure that you did. We love 

you, 2nd West 

************** 

Robin, I got into my car this 
morning, and found a surprise in 
the backseat. Did you step in any- 
thing lately? Just checking. You 
know that we love you. Got 

Poon? Your Givan girls 

************** 

Megan. Sometimes fate does 
work out in the end. Go tor it girl ! 
You know you wanna! Love ya, 
The Crew 

****** !i< *:(;:):* ^; :]! .;; 



Robin, Things will be better! Haime, Happy Anniversay! So 

Four months and we will be in glad to see that you are happy! 

North Carolina. Ky you are com- I'm proud of you and I love you 

ing right? Love, Stac Stac. 



********4it**** 



********* **>f;:)cj|t 



Marley, 1 mi.ss you! I love you! April, Glad to hear that you had 

Love, Stac such a GREAT night! Hope you 

************** have many more to come. We 

Robin, I'm so glad that we have wish you the best. Your Givan 

gotten so close this semester. You girl 



I 



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Glubs - Student Groups 

Earn $1,OOQ-$2,000 this semester with the 

easy Campvsfundraiscr.com three hour 

fundraising event Does not involve credit 

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filling quickly, so call today! Contact 

Campusfundraiser.com at (838) 923-3238, or 

visit wwwxampusfundraiserxom 



October 11, 2001 



TH F C iARf O N Cau 



Page 13 






Football 



Clarion travels to Edinboro for showdown 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Fresh of two impressive home 
victories, the Golden Eagles look 
to keep their PSAC-West hopes 
alive this Saturday as Clarion 
travels to Edinboro for a key 
divisional game. Kickoff at the 
Boro's Sox Harrison Stadium is 
set for 2p.m. and will serve as 
the Homecoming Game for the 
Fighting Scots. 

Clarion, under eighth year head 
coach Malen Luke, is coming off 
its top two performances of the 
season, both in the friendly con- 
fines of Memorial Stadium. Two 
weeks ago Clarion knocked off 
Kutztown (36-7) who was 
ranked seventh in the Region and 
seventeenth in the nation in sev- 
eral polls. Last Saturday, the 
Eagles edged previously unde- 
feated California (29-22), who 
was ranked sixth in the East 
Region. 

Clarion enters the game with a 
3-3 overall record and a 1-1 mark 
in the PSAC-West. All three 
losses have come on the road 
versus East Stroudsburg (33-27), 
Div. I-AA Youngstown State (44- 
0) and Shippensburg (34-29). 
The other home win was a 27-14 
victory over Tiffin. Coach Luke 



Sports Briefs 



Cross Country 

Clarion takes 33rd in 

Division I Invite. The 

team travels to 

Dusquene for their next 

showdown. 

Volleyball 

The Golden Eagles 

made their mark at the 

Holiday Inn Classic 

defeating all of their 

opponents: 4-0. 

Tennis 

Clarion travels to 
California for a match 
with Kutztown in their 
final game of the fall. 



enters the game with a 40-42 
record at Clarion, and a 14-year 
coaching record of 77-63. His 
PSAC-West mark is 21-23. 

Edinboro, under second year 
head coach Lou Tepper, is also 
still in the PSAC-West hunt with 
a 2-1 league mark and a 3-2 
overall record. The Scots opened 
2001 with a 27-9 loss at Ashland, 
then defeated Gannon 37-21 and 
Slippery Rock 14-7, lost at 
California 34-24, but bounced 
back to defeat Lock Haven 23-3 
last Saturday. Tapper's two year 
Edinboro record is 8-8, and his 
PSAC-West mark is 4-5. 
Including his five years as head 
coach at Illinois, Tepper has a 
collegiate record of 33-39-2. 

In the history between the two 
schools. Clarion leads the series 
37-32-2 dating back to 1926. In 
the last ten meetings, Edinboro 
leads 6-4. Clarion won last year's 
"Defensive" game 7-0, while in 
1999 Edinboro scored a touch- 
down with 1:08 left in the game 
to win 30-29. That touchdown 
came on an eight-yard pass from 
Jack Davis to Chris Buehner. 
Clarion's last win at Edinboro 
came in 1994, Luke's first sea- 
son. The Eagles won 24-20 on an 
18-yard touchdown pass from 
Craig Ray to Marlon Worthy on 
third and goal with 18 seconds 
left in the game. 

Clarion enters the game aver- 
aging 336.2 yards of total 
offense (7th in PSAC) per game 
including 241.7 rushing yards 
(#2 in PSAC) and 94.5 passing 
yards (#14 in PSAC) per game. 
Directing the offense is versatile 
quarterback Adam Almashy. The 
Clarion junior has completed 31 
of 91 passes for 502 yards and 
four touchdowns. He has also 
rushed a team leading 95 times 
for 284 yards and two touch- 
downs. In his career he has now 
completed 248 of 560 passes for 
3,440 yards and 32 touchdowns. 
He has rushed 353 times for 663 
yards and 10 touchdowns. 

The running games is also led 
by halfbacks Robert Walker and 
Glenn Lovelace, along with full- 
back Demetric Gardner. Walker 
leads the team with 423 yards 
and nine touchdowns on 58 car- 
ries and now has 133 career car- 
ries for 1,057 yards and 14 
touchdowns. He is averaging 7.9 
yards per carry. 
Lovelace has 41 rushes for 229 



yards and two touchdowns, 
while Gardner has 41 1 yards and 
three touchdowns on 75 tries. He 
is eleventh in career rushing at 
Clarion with 1,389 yards on 274 
runs with 10 touchdowns. 

The receiving corps will be 
paced by wideouts Mike 
McCuUum (13 catches, 238 
yards, two touchdowns) and Ed 
Rivers (four grabs, 79 yards, one 
touchdown), along with tight end 
Andy Pore (six receptions, 134 
yards, two touchdowns). 

Clarion's defense is yielding 
347.5 yards per game (10th in 
PSAC), including 179.5 rushing 
yards (seventh in PSAC) and 168 
passing yards (twelfth in PSAC) 
per game. 

Leading the way up front are 
noseguard Doug Diegelman (29 
hits, four sacks, seven tackles- 
for-losses), George O'Brien (31 
tackles, seven tackles-for-loss- 
es), Tom Pore (51 stops, three 
tackles-for-losses) and Tim 
Connolly (13 hits, two tackles- 
for-losses). 

The inside linebaclcers are 
paced by Dennis Yu (34 tackles, 
four tackles-for-losses, three 
fumbles caused), Tom Gaydosz 
(22 stops, four tackles-for-losses, 
two sacks) and Scott McGrady 
(20 jolts), while the perimeters 
are guarded by Chris Janson (50 
tackles, seven tackles-for-losses, 
three sacks) and Kevin Platz (26 
hits, five tackles-for-losses). 

The secondary will be paced by 
corners Myron Hargon (17 jolts, 
two interceptions), Emil Johnson 
(40 stops) and Kevin McKeither 
(12 tackles, one interception) and 
safeties Korey Eppinette (45 hits, 
one interception), Jabari 
Weatherspoon (19 tackles) and 
Steve Devennie (10 stops). 

Edinboro's offense is totaling 
328.8 yards per game (ninth in 
PSAC) including 186 rushing 
yards (seventh in PSAC) and 
142.8 passing yards (tenth in 
PSAC). 

Calling the signals will be 
senior quarterback, Steve Tryon. 
He has completed 6 1 of 1 12 aeri- 
als for 714 yards and five touch- 
downs with six interceptions. He 
ranks sixth in the PSAC with a 
quarterback efficiency rating of 
112 and seventh in total offense 
averaging 153.6 per game. 

The running game is very 
strong with John Williams, 
Brandon Munson and Alonzo 




Liz Potter /The Clarion Call 



Clarion celebrates on the side- 
Golden Eagles are favored for 



■line after another victory. The 
this weekend's game. 



Roebuck at tailback. Williams is 
the leading ground gainer with 
465 yards and three touchdowns 
on 99 carries. He is the second 
leading receiver with 10 catches 
for 100 yards and one touch- 
down. Munson has 22 carries for 
191 yards (8.7 per carry) and 
three touchdowns. Roebuck, who 
was the starter the first three 
games but has sat out the last two 
with bruised ribs, could also see 
action this week. Roebuck has 41 
tries for 197 yards and two 
touchdowns. 

The receiving corps is also very 
talented with wideouts Michael 
Lowe (11 grabs, 146 yards, one 
touchdown) and Josh Geis (eight 
catches, 91 yards, one touch- 
down), plus tight end Chris 
Buehner (eight catches, 99 yards, 
one touchdown). 

Edinboro's defense is giving up 
335.6 yards per game (eighth in 
PSAC) including 168.8 rushing 
yards (sixth in PSAC) and 166.8 
passing yards (eleventh in 
PSAC). 

Up front the Scots are led by 
noseguard Eugene Grooms (15 
stops, three tackles-for-losses), 
tackle Justin Koi (23 tackles, five 
tackles-for-losses) and end 
Aaron Tucker (18 hits, five tack- 
les-for-losses). 

The perimeters are guarded by 
outside linebackers Dave Smith 
(26 jolts, eight tackles-for-losses, 
two sacks), David Hart (21 stops, 
two tackles-for-losses) and Dave 
Holton (2.5 sacks). 

The inside linebackers anchor 
the Scot defense. Foster Johnson 
(41 tackles, eight tackles-for- 
losses, three sacks, one intercep- 
tion) and Jermaine Hughley (38 
tackles, six tackles-for-losses) 
rank as the #1 and #3 tacklers on 



the squad. 

The secondary has Jeff 
Richardson (39 hits, eight tack- 
les-for-losses, three intercep- 
tions) at strong safety, Jason 
Gordon (15 tackles) at free safe- 
ty and Tommie Virgies (18 jolts, 
two interceptions). Elliott Page 
(18 tackles) and James Cowart 
(three tackles-for-losses) are 
ready at the corners. 

Edinboro has the #2 ranked 
punter in the PSAC, Sean 
McNicholas (41.6 average). He 
also has made four of eight field 
goal tries. 

In last year's game. Clarion had 
235 yards of offense to 
Edinboro's 152. The Eagles got 
168 on the ground and 67 pass- 
ing. Walker led the Eagles with 
45 yards on seven carries, and 
Almashy had 42 yards on 18 car- 
ries. He completed six of 22 
passes for only 67 yards and was 
sacked three times. 

Edinboro had 50 rushing yards 
on 33 carries. Williams ran 20 
times for 34 yards and Roebuck 
got 24 yards on five tries. 
Edinboro's Jack Davis completed 
12 of 23 passes for 102 yards 
while tight end Chris Buehner 
had two catches for 33 yards. 
Clarion returns home to host 
Slippery Rock on October 20, 
then hosts lUP on October 27. 
Both games will start at Ip.m. 

In its last two wins, Clarion's 
defense has yielded 194 yards of 
offense against Kutztown and 
292 against California. Kutztown 
netted 53 rushing yards on 27 
carries, while California ran for 
134 yards on 44 tries. Combined 
in the last two games, the Eagles 
gave up 187 yards on 71 carries, 
an average of 98.5 per game and 
2.4 per carry. 



Page 14 



Tne CiAR/ofii Cau 



October 11, 2001 



Cross Country 



October 11, 2001 



TffE CiARfo/\/ Cau 



Page 15 



Clarion raimers 



by Andrea Borek 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

Last Saturday, The Golden 
Eagle cross country teams com- 
peted with some of the top 
schools around, including Penn 
State. Bucknell. Villanova, 
Haverford, and the University of 
Pennsylvania. Both mens and 
womens teams placed 33rd out 
39 teams. 

The competetion was intense 
with some of the best runners in 
the state going for the racing 
against the Golden Eagles. 

The womens team was lead by 
Jen Boerner with a 95th finish 
out of 269 runners. Boerner was 
followed by Melissa 

Terwillinger in 140th and Katie 
Szafran in 180th. 

The hot legs award goes to 
Sarah Rodgers for having an 



excellent race and moving up to 
the sixth runner on the womens 
team. 

The mens team was lead by 
captain, Ean King with a 155th 
place out of 274 runners. King 
was followed by Dave 
Durianick in 170th and A.J. 
Mayernik in 190th. 
The hot legs award for the mens 
team goes to Gerry Smith for his 
excellent running on Saturday as 
well as for the improvements he 
has made in previous meets. 

The womens team still needs 
to improve as they continue 
their season. This weekend they 
have another tough race as they 
travel to Duquesne. 

Captain, Wendy Kengor was 
not able to come to the meet and 
the team looks forward to hav- 
ing her return this weekend at 



Duquesne. The women will real- 
ly have to step it up this week- 
end if they hope to place well at 
the meet. 

The mens pack (top five run- 
ners) were all withm a minute of 
each other. This is an accom- 
plishment in itself since it elim- 
inates the possibilities of other 
teams beating individuals out of 
a top place. The men hope to add 
a few to the pack and move up 
during the meet at Duquesne. 

This meet was, by far, 
Clarion's most competitive meet 
of the season, which tends to be 
a real eye opener for the fresh- 
men. Now that they have some 
experience with big meets, 
hopefuly they will be able to run 
smarter races at Duquesne. 
Thier goal meets of the season 
will be PSAC's and Regionals. 




Ihe Clarion mens cross country team poses for ttie camera. 
The mens pack tias been working on sticking togettier 



Golden Eagles take top honors 
at annual Holiday Inn Classic 

Courtesy of the PSAC website 

Clarion won the 12-team Holiday Inn Classic held at Clarion with a 
4-0 record. The Golden Eagles beat Fairmont State 3-2 in the semifinals 
and Wheeling Jesuit, who had beaten Lock Haven, 3-1 in the finals. 
Clarion's Ali Graham (45 kills, 49 digs and 18 blocks) and Jackie Hill 
(161 set assists, 40 digs and 11 blocks) were named to the All- 
Tournament team. Clarion has won five of its past six matches and 11 
of its past 16. 



Golden Eagle golfers take fifth 
overall at WVIAC tournament 




by Danielle Foote 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

The Clarion university golf team 
attended the W.V.I.A.C. Regional 
Championship Tournament at the 
Canaan Valley Resort in West 
Virginia last week. The mens 
team finished an impressive fifth 
overall out of 15 competing 
teams. 

Five starters were selected based 
on averages to represent Clarion 
in the competition. Par for this 
course was set at a challenging, 
72. Senior, Anthony Tacconelli, 
attended the tournament and 
finised the event with a combined 
score of 144. Matt Guyton, filling 
the number two spot on the team, 
finished with a score of 147. 
Guyton took an impressive fifth 
place overall finish for the event. 
His average is 72.3. 

The remaining players, David 
Lichina, Ryan Peffer, and Matt 
Biddington contributed to the 
team's final score of 601. Lichina 
earned a first place finish on the 
first day of the event while 
Guyton mirrored this on the sec- 
ond day. 

Clarion and Millersville were 
the only two teams from 
Pennsylvania competing in the 
tournament. Charlestown 



University took the official title, 
but the Golden Eagles weren't far 
behind. 

The golfers, once again, had to 
fight against some unfavorable 
conditions. 

"It was very windy and the pins 
seemed to be placed, in difficult 
positions," said Peffer. "This lead 



to a higher overall scoring aver- 
age than usual." 

As a whole, the team did very 
well overall and look forward to 
the spring sea.son. 

"We did well in the rankings 
which will help out with the 
NCAA championships in the 
spring," said Lichina. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



A member of the Golden Eagle golf team takes a long shot. 
The rookie team has been heating up the courses over the 
past several weeks. 



Tennis 



Golden Eagles battle Edinboro in Fall season 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



The Golden Eagles womens 
tennis team took to the courts on 
Monday, October 8, to battle 
Edinboro University. 

In the singles tournament. 
Juniors Erin Glatz and Brandy 
Vukich led the team as they both 
smashed their competition, 
coming out victorious. Junior 
Cara Bobish came up just shy of 
a victory after a very competi- 
tive and grueling third set. It 
was the only singles match that 
day that required three sets to be 
played. 

In the doubles tournament, 
the women came up just short of 
a sweep as teams of Cara 
Bobish and Erin Glatz as well as 
sisters Brooke Vukich and 
Brandy Vukich won their 
matches, followed by a near loss 
by teammates Rebecca Emert 
and Janet Irvin. 



"The doubles matches were 
very close and competitive. We 
played much better than we did 
against Slippery Rock. Overall 
we are playing better as a team", 
stated Brandy Vukich. 

Although fall is not the main 
season for tennis, the girls have 
been working hard in order to 
prepare for the spring. With a 
new head coach, Scott 
Wonsetller, new uniforms and a 
new ball machine, this team car- 
ries a lot of enthusiasm and 
determination into the spring 
season. 

"There is a lot of talent on the 
team, but after losing two play- 
ers we had to make some adjust- 
ments in the line up. Overall, 1 
feel we are getting stronger and 
stronger as the season progress- 
es. We are working hard and 
looking forward to a successful 
spring season," said Brooke 
Vukich. 



The womens tennis team con- 
cludes their fall season this 



Saturday as they challenge lUP 
and Shippensburg. 







Graham Hermanns/TheClarion Call 



A Golden Eagle gets some warm up shots in before a 
match. The women only have one more fall match. 



Sports 
Trivia 

The answer to 
last week's ques- 
tion is Abdul- 
Jabban This 
week's question 

is: Former 
Steeler, Willie 
Williams trans- 
ferred to what 
team in 1997? 




IMi^lWSliltnEiMLt '^ HlPUfC 

mtmm iillJIWllliiii^ llliiiif ai 

HecmUlofi C^tor i^Kme: 393* 1667 




10/11/01 



Softball Tottraamciit Qamptoia 



Camel Toet hdd (^the UAB tesfii i» tfie 
chimpbnship game to wis the fatl toianey 
by t score of] 44. It was tti excitii^ 2 ntn 
game going into ^ 6^ timifig when ^ 
Camel Toes erupted for 7 runs. Thanks to 
everyone who participated! The Came! 
Toes were comprised of: Ryan Peffer, Julie 
Evano^i, Pat Bungo. Stq>hffiiie Snyder, 
Kevin Keams, Kim Byers, Zac Lenayak, 
Stephanie Barone, Steve Rodgers, Can 
Guyron, Mike Shoaf, Dane Kuhlber, Dave 
Lichina, and Paul Garris. 

Racquetball Tournament 

FHday, 10/19^1 S:00 pm 

This Singles tournament features three 
divisions: Novice, Intermwliate, and Expert 
Free to aJI stinlents, $5 for non-students 
Games played in Gemmeti. Sign up at the 
Recreation Center. Or call X- 1 668. 
VoUcybftD Results 

Mom tHY 1 9)^; 

Special K be« The Mullets 15-11.4.l5»l5-9 

Phi's w/ Chicks b^ Set to Kin 174S.1S-S 

-Body Fat T^ing- 

Thursday at 12 nooa or by appoimmem 
The Body Fat analyzer is back on>Unet ! ! 



Otttdoor Soccer Champions 

The Ruff Rl(krs, y^ donuoated the re^ar 
season, bad their hands &I1 on Monday night 
when tl»y played for the chaffiptOQship. The 
Storm gave k all they had, but when the final 
wht^e sounded the Ruff Riders were on U>p 
6-4. The Ruff Rid^s* roster inck^e: Robert 
Dodoh, Amar Tripalhy. Ni^ Tett^ Lynch, 
Becky Underwood. Brandi Uwhom, Eugene 
E^andoh, Erin Witner, and Macauley. 
Foofbill Results 



5*F1oOTNair 37 Sigma Chi 


15 


Sigma Pi 44 K.DR 


3 


New Woodsidc 28 1 8 A Pi 


6 


Monday 10/8: 




Red Shirts 49 Flying Squirrels 


45 


Hard Muffins 72 Pmn Ave Pimps 


9 


ST G Blue 51 10 Bails 





5* Floor Naff 32 ThaTeam 


25 


It-Line Hockey Results 




Tu^dty 10/^; 




Outsiders 1 South Street 





StiKfio Mullet 3 h^rkws Rollers 


1 


Indoor Soccer Results 




TmiKfl^] 




TheStonn S Misfits 


3 


BuckwildA 3 BuckwildB 


2 



Friday, 10/12 - depart 3 |Hn return 7 pm. 
We will be traveling to Franklin to ride 
on the Alleglieny River Trait and tbe 
Justus Trail. Tbe trail is 15 miles of flat 
snK>oth, BSffimk that offers die scenic 
beauty of the Allegheny River and 
woodland. Bring your own bike and 
helmet or borrow* one firom the 
Recreation Center at no cost. 
Tran^jor^on will be provided. 
*Plcasc prenregistcr to reserve a bike. 

Paintball Trip 

Sunday, 10/21 we will be going to 
Briar Hill for a day of fast paced fun! 
Trip departs from the Recreation 
Center at 1 1 am and we plan to return 
at 6 pm. Cost for the trip is $10 for 
students, and incliKies: equi|Hnent 
rental, 400 rounds of paint, and lunch. 
No prior experi^ce iweded fen- this 
trip. Safety clinic and instruction 
included. 



Page 16 



Tne eii^RW/\/ Cau 



October 11, 2001 



Sports 




Clarion continues streak with California victory 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

Clarion quarterback, Adam 
Almashy, ran for 120 yards and 
two touchdowns, and Demetric 
Gardner scored the game-winning 
touchdown with 9:01 left as the 
Golden Eagles rallied to defeat 
California (Pa.) 29-22 in a key 
PSAC-West game. The game was 
held at Clarion's Memorial 
Stadium with 1,234 looking on. 

Clarion upped its record to 3-3 
overall and 1-1 in the PSAC-West, 
while California, who was ranked 
sixth in the Eastern Region enter- 
ing the game, dropped to 4-1 
overall and 2-1 in the PSAC-West. 
Clarion trailed 22-14 at halftime, 
but took the second half kickoff 
and drove 81 yards in six plays to 
tie the game at 22. Glenn 
Lovelace capped the drive with a 
17-yard touchdown run, then 
Almashy converted the two-point 
run and the game was tied. 

The Golden Eagles took the lead 
for good early in the fourth quar- 
ter when Almashy led Clarion on 
a 70-yard scoring drive in 12 
plays. Almashy rushed four con- 
secutive times to the Clarion 48. 




Liz Potter/The Clarion Call 



Jhe Golden Eagle football team crunched helmets with Kutztown during the homecoming 
game over ALF weekend. The Eagles claimed another victory during the California game. 



Gardner led the remainder of the California opened the game with scoring drive. The second came at 
scoring drive carrying five times a 7-0 lead after Dustin Strayer 9:11 of the second quarter and 
for 39 yards, including the two- completed a 68-yard pass to Clint completed an eight-play, 39-yard 



yard touchdown run that put Alexander at 8:21 of the first 
Clarion ahead for good. Clarion roared back to take a 14- 
California's last drive started at 7 lead on two, six-yard touch- 
its own eight with 1:24 left, but down runs by Adam Almashy. The 
ended on the California 10 with first score came at 5:29 of the first 
one second left in the game. and capped a 56-yard, eight play 



drive. The Eagles were set up for 
the score after Myron Hargon 
intercepted at Brandon LeDonne 
pass at the Clarion 38 and 
returned the ball 23 yards to the 
California 39. 



Stats 



California 



First Downs 16 

Rushes- Yards 44-134 

Passing Yards (NET) 158 

Passes Att-Comp-Int 23-9-1 

Tot. Offensive Plays 67-292 

Fumble Returns- Yards 0-0 

Punt Returns- Yards 2-10 

Kickoff Returns- Yards 6-121 
Interception Returns- Yards 1-23 

Punts (Number- Avg) 7-36.6 

Fumbles-Lost 3-0 

Penalties- Yards 5-42 

Possession Time 28:12 

Sacks By: Number- Yards 0-0 




Clarion 

20 

58-310 

52 

9-2-1 

67-362 

0-0 

1-0 

3-5 

1-23 

5-32.6 

4-1 

2-10 

31:48 

1-6 



Courtesy of the football website 



I The Golden Eagles are on an impressive two home game 
\winning streak. The team must stay in focus in order to carry 
lout another victory while visiting Edinboro this weekend. 



California drove 60 yards late in 
the second quarter to turn the 
momentum. All-America running 
back, Wesley Gates, scored on a 
12-yard run at 4:28, but the PAT 
was blocked by Clarion's Doug 
Diegelman and the Vulcans still 
trailed 14-13. 

On the ensuing kickoff Clarion's 
Mike McCullum tried to return 
the kickoff, but was hit by 
California's Nate Brown, fumbled 
backwards into the endzone and 
was recovered by Clarion for a 
safety. California led 15-14. 

After the free kick was returned 
to mid-field, the Vulcans drove 
50-yards in only eight plays to 
take a 22-14 halftime advantage. 
Gates capped the drive with a 
five-yard run. 

Clarion's Almashy finished the 
game with 21 rushes for 120 yards 
and two touchdowns, while com- 
pleting two of nine passes for 52 
yards. Gardner also ran 15 times 
for 78 yards and one touchdown, 
while Lovelace had nine carries 
for 65 yards and one touchdown. 
The Golden Eagles had 362 yards 
of offense and possessed the 
pigskin almost 20 minutes in the 
second half. Clarion rushed for 
310 yards and passed for 52. 

California's offense had 292 
yards with 134 rushing and 158 
passing. Wesley Gates posted 24 
carries for 102 yards, including 99 
at halftime. LeDonne completed 
seven of 20 aerials for 80 yards, 
and Strayer hit of two of two pass- 
es for 78 yards and one touch- 
down. 

Dennis Yu led Clarion's defense 
with 11 tackles and one tackle-for- 
loss, while Korey Eppinette had 
nine hits and a tackle-for-loss, and 
Emil Johnson had eight stops and 
two tackles-for-losses. 

Jamal Colbert posted 12 tackles 
and Jim Lukacs 11 stops for 
California. 

Clarion travels to Edinboro next 
Saturday, while California returns 
home to host Slippery Rock. 



r 



•«w«.tkcclari<mcail.coai ' 



Inside 
Sports 



Tennis team matches 

up against Edinboro, 

See page 15. 



Check out the Sports 

Trivia question of the 

week. 

See page 15. 



Clarion golf team 
heats up season. 
See page 14. • 



Clarion gridders 
psych up for 

Edinboro game. 
See page 13. 



-■■ ^uiJi i , . i ji ii m.j.jnjimi,t.j , 





Duquesne 
Invitatlonai.. 



...pg. 19. 



Clarion University takes precautions 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

Clarion University has been react- 
ing to recent local and national inci- 
dents by circulating guidelines for 
the CUP community to follow in 
case of anthrax and bomb scares. 

"We have been extremely fortunate 
that the university has not been expe- 
riencing any of these problems, but 



the university has taken steps to be 
better prepared in the event that our 
community would fall victim to 
these kinds of crime," said David 
Tedjeske, director of Public Safety. 
Anthrax precautions 

Tedjeske sent out a memo outlin- 
ing suspicious indicators or charac- 
teristics a package or letter may 
have. According to Tedjeske, some 
of the indicators are: 

♦excessive postage. 



♦hand written or poorly typed 

addresses. 

♦misspelling of common words. 

♦restrictive markings such as 

"Confidential" or 'Personal" 

♦excessive weight and/or a feel of a 

powdery substance. 

♦excessive tape or string. 

♦oily stains, discoloration, or crystal- 

ization on the wrapper. 

♦strange odor. 

♦letter is rigid or bulky. 



♦addressed to a title only, or an 
incorrect title, 
♦uneven packaging. 

"If you receive a letter or note 
threatening Anthrax contamination, 
relax and remain calm," said 
Tedjeske. 

Every situation must be treated as 
though it is real, but a hoax is a pos- 
sibility, he said. 

Tedjeske said if a letter or package 
has been opened which may be con- 




Breast Cancer Awareness Month 



speakers„.pg, 5. ^H 

Lifestyles! 

Emmy ftv-ani 
Winning jotir- 
um MLK , 





port! 



i 



L 



by Jennifer DeFazio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



When I was 11 years old, I experienced some- 
thing that changed my life forever. In Nov. 
1991, my mother died of breast cancer. 

I thought my heart was broken forever, and I 
would never heal. I didn't understand how 
someone so young and beautiful could suffer the 
way she did. 

I watched her for three years go in and out of 
the hospital for radiation and chemotherapy 
treatments. I watched as her thick, gorgeous hair 
slowly fell out until she was forced to wear a 
wig. 

Worst of all, I watched as the medication made 
her so delirious that at times she didn't recognize 
me. 

When my mom was first diagnosed, she had to 
have one of her breasts removed in order to start 
the initial treatments. 

She suffered through treatments and medica- 
tion for two years and then went into remission. 
At that point, I thought that we had saved her 
and the worst was over I was wrong. 

One year later, the doctors detected a lump in 
the other breast, and it was too late. They told us 
it was just a matter of time. 

My mom decided to stay at home. I watched, 
day after day, as she continually got worse. Her 
mouth and lips were coated in blue from the 
medication, and she couldn't even function by 
herself. 

I left one night to get away from it all, and 
when I got back home she had been taken to the 
hospital. She died the next morning, and I never 
got to say goodbye. 




My dad had told me that her last wish was to 
see snow. When the ambulance came to take her 
to the hospital, it started to snow. Her last wish 
was granted, and she was able leave this world 
peacefully. 

My mom was one of the most wonderful peo- 
ple I have ever known. I died inside the day of 
her funeral. I never thought my first ride in a 
limosine would be on the way to bury my mom 
It rained that day, and someone told me it meant 
the angels were crying with me. 

1 wish others could have known how wonder- 
ful she was, but most of all I wish every day that 
I would have had a chance to know her better as 
well. I wish my brother, who is two years 
younger, would have been able to understand 
what was happening to our lives and to our fam- 
ily. 

Even ten years later, the pain doesn't get any 
easier, nor does it ever go away. It's hard to 
know that someday I might be afflicted with 
breast cancer, and all I can do is pray and have 
faith in the medical field and all of their 
advancements. 

I have seen first-hand what this disease does. 



See *Breast Cancer' Page 7 



taminated, you are to place ii in the 
area you first read it. One is then sup 
px)sed to minimize their exposure to 
others and allow Public Safety to 
come to you. 

Also you are not to let others into 
the area of the package or letter and 
do not pass the suspicious material to 
someone else. 

"Exposure does not mean that you 
will become sick. Public Health 
responders will provide specific 
information and instructions about 
the symptoms and effective treat- 
ment to prevent illness," said 
Tedjeske. 
Bomb precautions 

Bloomsburg University experi- 
enced its second bomb threat 
Tuesday, Oct. 9. As a result, all of the 
students and faculty were told to 
leave the campus and come back 
Monday, Oct. 15. 

Clarion University released tele- 
phone procedures if someone should 
call in a threat. 

According to the bomb threat 
checklist, the recipient of the call is 
supposed to ask the caller a series of 
questions, including: 
♦When is the bomb going to 
explode? 

♦Where is it right now? 
♦What does it look like? 
♦What kind of bomb is it? 
♦What will cause it to explode? 
♦Did you place the bomb? If so, 
why? 

♦What is your address? 
♦What is your name? 
♦Where are you now? 

The recipient of the call also is 
supposed to look for certain qualities 
in the caller's voice, such as accents 
and lisps. One also is to listen for 
background sounds such as animal 
sounds and office machines. 

If a bomb threat is received in 
another way, you are to report the 
incident to Public Safety at 393- 
2111. 

"Given the status of world affairs, 
I felt it was prudent to give an advi- 
sory," said Tedjeske. 




Pace 16 



TneCiARfo/v Cau 



October 11, 2001 



Sports 



Clarion continues streak with California victory 



Courtesy of Sports Information 

riamtn ijuarterhatk. ,\dam 
Aii!iash\, laii htr l^O yards and 
t\"vo i>Hi^hdo\\ns. and Dcnietnc 
( laid'ici M.ored the uanic-u inninj: 

»iHiChd'>"> r s nh ')()1 it'M ,1-, the 

(hmj, ., ^ ..:,, .: Jeteat 

("alitiMnia I 'a \ l'^^ 11 in a key 
Mnie. ! he i:ame was 
lariun s Meniui ,. 
'34 \vk ■kmu : 
jpped lis reciird : 






mihePSAC 



>.N line (. Jliii'rnia, >s no \\as ranked 
'x!h in 'he [-astern ReguMi enie- 
.. dnippei.; 
■ neiaiiand 2-1 in the PSAC^-WeM. 
rianon trailed 22- 14 at halliime. 
.'k the seeond hail kiekotf 
and >\\\^\c Si yards in six [liays to 
lie ihe game at 22. Cdenn 
Lo\ekiee capped the dri\e uith a 
!"-\ard toLiehdown run. then 
Aiinashx aMnerted the t\\o-j)c)nii 
rii:^ and ihe game was tied. 

' joiden i-agles tiu^k the lead 
Iff g.-'d eai!_\ m the fourth quar- 
ter when .\hiiash> led Clarion on 
a "O-vard \eonng drne in 12 
;\ki^ s .\lniasii_\ rushed four con- 
seeuto.c !lme.^ to the Clarion 4.S 




iz i'otter/ ihe Clarion Calli 



■ r/ie Golden Eagle footoail team crunched nelnners with Kutztown during the homecorring" 
ga^e over aij weekend. The Eagles claimed another victory during the California game. 



Cardner led the remainder of the 
seonnu drive carrying five times 
tor 30 yards, including the two- 
yard tt)uehdo\\n run that put 
Clarion ahead tor good. 

(\jiif'orma's last drive started at 
Its own eight with 1:24 left, hut 
ended on the California 10 with 
vine >eeond left m the izame. 



California opened the game v\ ith scoring drive. The second came at 
a 7-0 lead after Dustin .Strayer 9:11 of the second quarter and 



completed a 68-yard pass lo Clint 
Alexander at 8:21 of the first. 

Clarion roared back to take a 14- 
7 lead on two. six-yard touch- 
down runs bv .Adam Almashy. The 



completed an eight-play. 39-yard 
drive. The Eagles were set up for 
the score after Mvron Harmon 
intercepted at Brandon LeDonne 
pass at the Clarion 38 and 



first score came at 5:29 of the first returned the ball 23 yards to the 
and capped a 56-\ard. eight play California 39. 



Stats California 


Clarion 


First Downs 


16 


20 


Rushes- Yards 


44-134 


58-310 


Passing Yards (NET) 


158 


52 


Passes Att-Comp-Int 


23-9-1 


9-2-1 


Tot. Offensive Plays 


67-292 


67-362 


Fumble Returns- Yards 


0-0 


0-0 


Punt Returns- Yards 


2-10 


1-0 


Kickoff Returns- Yards 


6-121 


3-5 


Interception Returns- Yards 


1-23 


1-23 


Punts (Number-Avg) 


7-36.6 


5-32.6 


Funibles-Lost 


3-0 


4-1 


Penalties-Yards 


5-42 


2-10 


Possession Time 


28; 12 


31:48 


Sacks By: Number- Yards 


0-0 


1-6 




xii:^i^:*i' 



..?-*'i!«^ 




• • • 



3np Golden Eagles are on an impressive two home~galu- 
■A'inning streak. The team musf stay in focus in order to carry 
out another victory while visiting Edinborc this weekend- 



California drove 60 yards late in 
the second quarter to turn the 
momentum. .All-.America running 
back. Wesley Cates, scored on a 
12-yard run at 4:28. but the PAI' 
was bkK'ked by Clarion's Doug 
Diegelman and the Viilcans still 
trailed 14-13. 

On the ensuing kickoll Clarion's 
Mike McCullum tried to return 
the kickoff, but uas hit h\ 
California's Nate Brown, fumbled 
backvxards into the endzone ami 
\as recovered b\ Clarion lox ... 
safety. California led 15-14. 

.•\fter tlie fiee kick uas returned 
to mi(i-field. the \ ulcans d\\'\c 
50-}ai"ds in only eight \Mj- 
lake a 22-14 haiftime ad\antage. 
Cates capped the drive with a 
live- yard run. 

Clarion's Alir.ashy finished the 
game with 2 1 rushes tor 120 yards 
and two touchdowns, while com- 
pleting two o\ nine passes for .52 
yards. Gardner also ran 15 times 
lor 78 yards and one touchdown, 
while Lovelace had nine carries 
for 65 yards and one touchdinvn. 
The Golden Eagles had 362 yards 
of offense and possessed the 
pigskin almost 20 minutes in the 
.secimd half. Clarion rushed for 
310 yards and passed for 52. 

(^iliforma's offense had 292 
yards with 134 rushing and 158 
passing. Wesley Cates posted 24 
carries for 102 yards, including 99 
at lialftime. I.eDonne completed 
^even of 20 aerials for 80 yards. 
':k\ -Strayer hit of tv\'o of two pas,^- 
'^ lor "8 V ards and one touch- 
.loivvn. 

Dennis Yu led Clarion's defense 
with 1 1 tackles and one tackle-foi- 
■-- AHile Korey Hppinctte had 
nine hits and a tackle-for-Ioss. and 
Lrnil .Johnson had eight stops and 
two tackles-foriosses- 

Jamal Colbert posteti 12 tackle^ 
and Jim Lukacs 11 stops Im 
California. 

Clarion travels to l-Ahnbori) next 
Saturday, while California returns 
home to host .Slippery Rock. 



• t«3«»*««««««, «,,,,,, «,,,,, •«"!»"« .lOcCiAfl 



• ••••••# 



• •••••••«tl*«*«*C««««*«»»»Cf 



Inside 
Sports 



Tennis team matches 

up against Edinboro, 

See page 15. 



Check out the Sports 

Trivia question of the 

week. 

See page 15. 



Clarion golf team 

heats up season, 

See page 14. 



Clarion gridders 
psych up for 

Edinboro game, 
See page 13. 










w 



H£^ 









/ 




OdxibBrlB, aOOl 



Duquesne 
Invitational pg. 19. 



Clarion University takes precautions 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Edjtof :«n:Chief 

Clarion University has been react- 
ing to recent local and national inci- 
dents by circulating guidelines for 
the CUP community to follow in 
case of anthrax and bomb scares. 

"We have been extremely fortunate 
that the university has not been expe- 
nencing any of these problems, but 



the university has taken steps to be 
better prepared in the event that our 
community would fall victim to 
these kinds of crime," said David 
Tedjeske, director of Public Safety. 
Anthrax precautions 

Tedjeske sent out a memo outlin- 
ing suspicious indicators or charac- 
teristics a package or letter may 
have. According to Tedjeske, some 
of the indicators are: 

*excessive postage. 



*hand written or poorly typed 

addresses. 

*misspelling of common words. 

*restrictive markings such as 

"Confidential" or ^Personal" 

♦excessive weight and/or a feel of a 

powdery substance. 

♦excessive tape or string. 

*oily stains, discoloration, or crystal- 

ization on the wrapper. 

♦strange odor. 

♦letter is rigid or bulky. 



♦addressed to a title only, or an 
incorran title, 
♦uneven packaging. 

"If you receive a letter or note 
threatening Anthrax contamination, 
relax and remain calm," said 
Tedjeske. 

Every situation must be treated as 
though it is real, but a hoax is a pc»s- 
sibility, he said. 

Tedjeske said if a letter or package 
has been opened which may be con- 



Inside 



News 

CMDV features 
two keynote 
speakers...pg. 5. 

Lifestyles 

Emmy Award 
Winning jour- 
nalist contin- 
ues MLK 



Breast Cancer Awareness Month 




by Jennifer DeFazio 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



series 



•••••••• 



Pg.9 



Sports 

CUP 

Volleyball 
takes 

Kutztown, 5-0 
Pg.l8. 

Index 

Opinion.....pg.3. 

Lifestyles...pg.9. 
Sports..»..pg.l7. 
E't'nment.pg.l3 
Classified.pg.l2. 




When I was 1 1 years old, I experienced some- 
thing that changed my life forever. In Nov. 
1991, my mother died of breast cancer. 

I thought my heart was broken forever, and I 
would never heal. I didn't understand how 
someone so young and beautiful could suffer the 
way she did. 

I watched her for three years go in and out of 
the hospital for radiation and chemotherapy 
treatments. I watched as her thick, gorgeous hair 
slowly fell out until she was forced to wear a 
wig. 

Worst of all, I watched as the medication made 
her so delirious that at times she didn't recognize 
me. 

When my mom was first diagnosed, she had to 
have one of her breasts removed in order to start 
the initial treatments. 

She suffered through treatments and medica- 
tion for two years and then went into remission. 
At that point, I thought that we had saved her 
and the worst was over. I was wrong. 

One year later, the doctors detected a lump in 
the other breast, and it was too late. They told us 
it was just a matter of time. 

My mom decided to stay at home. I watched, 
day after day, as she continually got worse. Her 
mouth and lips were coated in blue from the 
medication, and she couldn't even function by 
herself. 

I left one night to get away from it all, and 
when I got back home she had been taken to the 
hospital. She died the next morning, and I never 
got to say goodbye. 




My dad had told me that her last wish was to 
see snow. When the ambulance came to take her 
to the hospital, it started to snow. Her last wish 
was granted, and she was able leave this world 
peacefully. 

My mom was one of the most wonderful peo- 
ple I have ever known. I died inside the day of 
her funeral. I never thought my first ride in a 
limosine would be on the way to bury my mom. 
It ramed that day. and someone told me it meant 
the angels were crying with me. 

I wish others could have known how wonder- 
ful she was, but most of all I wish every day that 
1 would have had a chance to know her better as 
well. I wish my brother, who is two years 
younger, would have been able to understand 
what was happening to our lives and to our fam- 
ily. 

Even ten years later, the pain doesn't get any 
easier, nor does it ever go away. It's hard to 
know that someday I might be afflicted with 
breast cancer, and all I can do is pray and have 
faith in the medical field and all of their 
advancements. 

I have seen first-hand what this disease does 



See 'Breast Cancer' Page 7 



taminated, you are to place i: r; rhe 
area you first read it. One is then sup 
posed to minimize their exposure to 
others and allow Public Safety to 
come to you. 

Also you are not to let others into 
the iirea of the package or letter and 
do not pass the suspicious material to 
somet)ne else. 

"Exposure does not mean that you 
will become sick. Public Health 
responders will provide specific 
information and instructions about 
the symptoms and effective treat- 
ment to prevent illness." said 
Tedjeske. 
Bomb precautions 

Bloomsburg University experi- 
enced its second bomb threat 
Tuesday. Oct. 9. As a result, all of the 
students and faculty were told to 
leave the campus and come back 
Monday, Oct. 15. 

Clanon University relea.sed tele- 
phone pn^edures if someone should 
call in a threat. 

According to the bomb threat 
checklist, the recipient of the call is 
supposed to ask the caller a series of 
questions, including: 
♦When is the bomb going to 
explode? 

♦Where is it right now? 
♦What does it look like? 
♦What kind of bomb is it? 
♦What will cause it to expkxle ? 
♦Did you place the bomb? If so, 
why? 

♦What is your address? 
♦What is your name? 
♦Where are you now? 

The recipient of the call also is 
supposed to l(K)k for certiiin qualities 
in the caller's voice, such as accents 
and lisps. One also is to listen for 
background si)unds such as animal 
sounds and office machines. 

If a bomb threat is received in 
another way, you are to rei:Kirt the 
incident to Public Safety at 393- 
2111. 

"Given the status of world affaii-s, 
I felt it was pmdent to give an advi- 
sory," said Tedjeske. 



***F]i« flti^ dMft of 






.# 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 

Amy A. Thompson 

Susan Campbell 

Tim Conners 

Jill Brennan 

Teri Cattau 



Breast Cancer Awareness 



October is the month for "Breast 
Cancer Awareness", and we here 

at 7^ (^/a^/(fK Ca& think it is an 
important issue to take the time to 
discuss. 

When examining the is^ue at 
hand, many interesting facts were 
brought to our attention. 

Different organizations around 
campus raise money for the fight 
against breast cancer. We didn't 
reahze how much organizations 
here at Clarion University did 
fight for this cause. 

We also noted how many people 
are wearing pink ribbons to show 
support for 'Br'edst Cancer. We 
think it is great that students are 
showing their support during the 
month. 

Another issue we raised was 
how much Rosie O'Donnell does 
to help raise money because her 
mother died of breast cancer when 
Rosie was young. 

We think it is wonderful; even 
though she is a famous person she 
takes the time to help others who 
are fighting the illness. She also 
helps to prevent the illness. 

Next we talked about how we 
believe some people are too stub- 
born to get checked. We believe 
they don't want to take the chance 
for fear they might have to deal 
with this illness. 
It is far better to get checked and 



deal with it than to wait and have 
it be too late. 

We also brought up the issue that 
men need to get checked for 
breast cancer. We know it sounds 
unlikely, but it is proven that men 
can get it, and they need to be 
screened. 

There are 1 ,400 cases of breast 
cancer found in men each and 
every year. 

Last we discussed breast cancer 
in other countries. 

In China, women do not get 
checked because having cancer is 
sign of weakness. 

We couldn't believe a society 
would actually believe their 
women were weak for beina 
afflicted with something com- 
pletely out of their hands. 

Each year more than 180,000 
new cases of breast cancer are 
diagnosed in the United States. It 
is the second leading cause of can- 
cer in the west. 

Out of the 1 80,000 cases that are 
found. 46,000 of those men or 
women will die from this devistat- 
ing disease. 

We at TU Ciof-ioK Cafi wanted to 
make everyone at Clarion 
University know it was Breast 
Cancer Awareness Month. 

This is a serious illness, so 
everyone at CU go out and get 
checked. 



Editorial Policy 



w 



The Oiirioii Call is tfikttig jtj ps t^gRJfr the fw^^ **^^ 




igSsmk Issues aoross the 
til Stoiteis* 



ca0i|im m^ iiatloii^ and 
1^ Ciadoit lJ]dyefs%» tli^ 
&II or file sttidNftIs 0f Use 
WTemgTt ^e ^t% ^^pe^kliig m £»i Edltori^ Bo^ » the 
fdeec^THECiARlOKCAiX. The$eei}ll^rM^«ped«vel- 
m^ in a meeting of ^le E4IC<»rkf Boant All iiiemheii» 
mi not necessarily agree m. tlie optnioii stated In the 
edlt<»rial 1 he oplnbii ea^t^eng^ea h shared hv the 
majorltj^ of the board; It ii not always a unaxmnous 
opliiion* VoiL the jpuhlic, reserve the right to express 

iour pleasure or displeasure with these opinioas via a 
^Itecto^theMlf^r, 



Tn e Cf jm/ ^ Ca // 



October 18, 2001 



Your Views 

Reader expresses media disapproval 



Dear Editor, 

The tag-along media, espe- 
cially the television, bombards 
us constantly with a single 



message. 



They falsely assume their 
function is to champion and 
sell us a one-sided view <)i 
George Bush's war. 

We are given no background, 
history, or alternatives. 

Their presentations are vacu- 
ums which allow no questions, 
differing views, or dissent. 
Worse yet. they would have 
you believe there are none. 

Furthermore, our screens are 
swamped each and every day 
with the voices and pro-war 
messages of George W. and his 
cabinet officials. 

Historian Chalmers Johnson 
wrote for The Nation that "the 
assassins of September 1 1 did 
not 'attack America' as our 
political leaders and the media 
maintain. They attacked 
American foreign policy." 

He added "Bush and others 
told us we were attacked 
because we are a 'beacon for 
freedom' and the attackers 
were 'evil." 

That jargon is not only disin- 
genuous but also a way of 
evadmg responsibility for the 
blow back that America's 
imperial projects have generat- 
ed." 

The Progressive briefly doc- 
uments Johnson's conclusions. 



1 



Do you have an 

opinion? 

Send letters to 

the editor to 

Amy A. 

Thompson 

2 70 Gemmell 

Complex, 

Clarion 

University of PA, 

16214. 



It refers to the fact that "The 
United States does not have 
clean hands in the world. The 
history of the last fifty years in 
the history of US. war and 
repression in one Third World 
country after another." 

They note that "It is not an 
exaggeration to say that the 
United States has acted as a 
terrorist from Guatemala to 
Iran, from El Salvador to 
Vietnam, from Chile to 
Indonesia. And today it still 
acts as a terrorist in Iraq and 
supports acts of terror by its 
allies, Israel and Columbia." 

The media and the 
Administration has carefully 
avoided telling us of other 
threats. They lurk in the 
silence, however. 

At least five of the involved 
or neighboring nations have 
nuclear weapons, and there are 
no guarantees where any mili- 
tary action might lead. 

There is another serious dan- 
ger. Our obsession with Iraq is 
a dangerous hazard which may 
very well ultimately lead to a 
more traditional and costly 
war. 

There are subtle hints that the 
"war on terrorism" will serve 
as an excuse to transpose, 
manipulate, and justify a 
resumption of the land and air 
assault on Iraq. Many weeks of 
a massive air onslaught pre- 
ceded a US. led one-sided land 



war against Iraq in 1991. 

A hundred thousand Iraqi sol- 
diers died in a desperate retreat 
that was referred to as "a 
turkey shoot." 

Occasional bombings and 10 
years of economic sanctit)ns 
continue to devastate the econ- 
omy, prevent reconstruction 
and result in the loss of thou- 
sands of lives, including five 
thousand children, each month. 

Public uncritical support tor 
Bush's war may easily buy into 
a call for an assault to finally 
eradicate Saddam Hussein. 
Colin Powell. Daddy Bush, and 
Bush II have endured serious 
complaints that Baghdad was 
not taken in '91. 

Those critical wounds may 
suffice to motivate their sup- 
port for a major military under- 
taking to crush Hussein at last. 
The cost in lives could be hor- 
rendous. 

The Progressive reminds us 
"that to heighten the level of 
terror by waging-all-out war 
against Afghanistan or any 
other country . Bush is aiming 
his bombers will serve no use- 
ful purpose. In fact, it may 
boomerang against us." 

Sincerely. 

. Kenneth Emerick, retired 

CUP a.ssistant 

professor/librarian, 

Shippenville 



Tired of sm\\ mail? 

E-mail your story ideas, 

letters to the editor 

and opinions at 

theclarioncall@excite.com 



ARE YOU A DEMOCRAT? 

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ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING AT 5 P.M. 

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October 18, 2001 



Tup rj.Am/\i P.AU 



Page 3 




This is life and life 
has some funny twists 
to it at times. 9§ 

-Graham Hermanns 



Editorial, Graham Hermanns 



I never felt like I was very 
good at expressing myself on 
paper. I believe I am able to do 
that with my pictures, so I guess 
that's why I am not the "News 
Editor," but the esteemed 
Photographer. 

So I sat back and tried to think 
about the curiosities of life I 
might have come by doing my 
day to day business. 

You know the simple tasks 
like waking up, eating break- 
fast, walking to class and 
attending class. It struck me 
then, class. 

Those wonderful events which 
you wake up for every day, but 
what about those so called 
"wonderful classes?" 

Well I had a very interesting 
conversation with my girlfriend 
earlier this summer about "tem- 
porary friends." 

Now I know you are asking 
me what the heck is a "tempo- 
rary friend?" Well let me 
explain and please don't judge 
me as I explain myself because 
we, and I mean everyone, has 
"temporary friends". 

We began talking about those 
people who kind of get you 
through class, work, and basi- 
cally Mfe in general. 

I know this is such a horrible 
thing to say about someone but 
it is so true. Everyone has them 
and you people that are saying 
"no I don't" really do have 
them. 

These people are the ones who 



you ask in class, "Hey, what's 
the professor saying? I just 
woke up." 

Yes, we all have those 
moments. What about those 
people who don't necessarily 
help you, but you see them 
every once in a while at a party 
or some other gathering. 

You don't really know any- 
thing about them, but enough in 
which to hold a small conversa- 
tion. You know you really have 
no intentions of hanging out 
with them later but they were 
someone to talk to at the party. 

We never really hang out with 
these people outside of class, 
but yet we might say "hi" if we 
walk past them going through 
campus. 

Yup, now you are thinking, "I 
know what this dude means." 
Because we all know I am right. 

It is kind of sad that things are 
like that, but we all can't be 
friends. 

I know that because I don't 
think I could remember every- 
one's name at 
Clarion University. Sometimes I 
wish I could, but then I remem- 
ber that one person I sometimes 
really wish 1 didn't know. 

That's okay. This is life and 
life has some funny twists to it 
at times. 

Be a nice person and give that 
"temporary friend" a little more 
attention and let them know 
they are doing a good job. 



As a member of the 
National Newspaper Association, 

is entitled to access 
NNA's Libel Hotline; 
with advice from 
Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 




Op//^/o/\i 





Are we too 
obsessed with our 

appearance? §^ 

I 

-Jennifer Kosek 



Hyde Park, Jennifer Kosek 



While 1 was on the treadmill the 
other day and began my day- 
dreaming session, I looked out 
the window around me and start- 
ed to notice something. 

There were no obese people; 
there are not many overweight 
people on Clarion campus. Then 
I started to think of how long I 
had to wait to get on the treadmill 
and how many people go to the 
gym and I asked myself, "Are we 
too obsessed with our appear- 
ance?" 

I guess Clarion thinks so, con- 
sidering it took them about six 
months to get the rec center up, 
but it's going to take them two 
years for the library. 

We may not have books, but we 
do have pre-cors. I know every- 
one wants to look his or her best 
and there is nothing wrong with 
that. 

But how far are some people 
willing to go to look what they 
think is their best? So many of 
my friends are obsessed about 
their weight, they count every 
calorie and they eat and go to the 
gym for hours and push them- 
selves beyond a healthy point. 

They recall to me everything 
they ate that day and then justify 
why they ate what they did. They 
let diet and exercise consume 
their lives when all they really 



need to do is change their atti- 
tude. 

It drives me crazy, I just want to 
scream at them that they are fine 
the way they are. 

A person will never by happy 
with the way they look until they 
are happy with who they are. I 
wish my friends could see them- 
selves the way that I see them, as 
beautiful women inside and out. 

I can only imagine how many 
girls on this campus obsess about 
their weight and have eating dis- 
orders. It really disturbs me to 
see many wonderful people with 
such low self-esteem and such 
insecurity. 

They try to reach an unrealistic 
body type many people will never 
be. It makes one think about 
what is really important to them. 

I know girls who skip class just 
so they can have more time at the 
gym or work-out twice a day. 
They feel guilty if they don't 
work-out one day, and they just 
refuse to accept that life will go 
on if they skip one or two work- 
outs. 

I am not totally free from this 
group; I work-out a lot and watch 
what I eat. I care about how I 
look, but I don't let my jean size 
control the way that I feel or my 
self-concept. 

See *Kosek' Page 8 



THECMRmCAu Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase; Secretary: Teri Cattau 
Staff Writers: Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezyk, Emily Gill, Aaron Stempeck, 
Laura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Macri, Kelly Drevitcfi, Adam Berteotti, Khalia 
Robinson, Amy Ujazdowski, Shannon Sankey and Angela Batista 
Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco and Julia Reinhart 
Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske, Janice 
Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Eury, Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, Julianne 
Keman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sowers, Omar Rczier, Vicki Dietz, Brian Fashian, Julie Rengers 
and Faith Thompson 

Circulation Staff: Kristina Strojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer Wolbert, 
Jill Baumcratz, Tom Dennis and Liz Harris 



The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: call@clarion,edu 

www.clarion.edu/thecall 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 








■m& m those U iiHf^«fe»lifi*d'^! 



^ <jf the stodeiit body, Onivcrsily, ei^ 

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\xK^ ?iK- week of pi*Hc«ion. Th«; 
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Clarioa Students A>socbtir.n ami 
ad^ertisinjg revtfluf. 



:-^;i;:.-:;gSM.:.5::ffi::-M 




Page 4 



TmCmr^o/\i Cau 



October 18, 2001 




OPf/\/fO/\/ 



Call On You 

What is your fevorite movie of all time and why? 

by: Todd Dennis 




r^ 






'Becca Spin^oCa 
Senior 



''Now and Then, 

because it depicts my 

friends and I." 



Woffyan^ 

Music /business, 

junior 



'Forest Gump, because 
mama always said..." 



Majd. 9fafj 

geofo^y., 

jiunior 



"The Matrix, because I 

love the special effects 

and fighting scenes." 




9{icoU Lai^o 
fMusic^ 
Senior 



^d(y Woods 

'Education, 

Senior 



''Erin Brockovich, because I 

crack up when she tells 

people off." 



''Dumb & Dumber, because 

II ike when they get off the 

motorcycle and are sticking 

to each other" 



'(Petcy" 

Jlnimaf Science, 

Senior 



'Jungle Book because it was 
filmed in my hometown." 



^^^^^■H 


^^^^^^^Hfekf 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^B 


What is there to do 
this weekend? 99 


^^9^^ 


-BEN ChERVENAK 


^■HH 





Student Senate President's 

Forum, 

Ben Chervenak 



"What is there to do this week- 
end?" This is an all too familiar 
question, which can be heard 
buzzing throughout campus as the 
week draws to a close. 

Next semester this should not 
be the case. Student Senate has 
seemed to develop the answer to 
the campus life doldrums--the 
Weekend Programming Initiative. 
You may be aware of this pro- 
gram; this is because last year's 
Senators were the original cre- 
ators of it. 

Due to minor imperfections. 
Senate opted to make necessary 
changes and in order to better the 
program we decided to put its' 
start on hold until the Spring 2002 
semester. 

The Weekend Programming 
Initiative has been designed so 
every organization which is fund- 
ed by Senate will be required to 
hold an event on campus one 
Friday, Saturday or Sunday 
throughout the year. 

We are hoping these organiza- 
tions will use fun, creative and 
original themes, which will pro- 
vide "things to do this weekend," 
With well over 80 funded orga- 
nizations, and only approximately 
thirty weekends in each academic 



year, there should be at least one 
event every day of every week- 
end. Starting next semester when 
someone asks you what there is to 
do this weekend, an answer like 
"nothing" should not be heard. 

Keep in mind that each year, 
you, the student, pay a student 
activity fee. This fee funds events 
such as these. You already pay 
the money, which pays for these 
activities. You might as well take 
advantage of the events, too. 

The purpose of this initiative is 
to promote CSA organizations to 
offer more alcohol-free activities 
on weekends. 

By promoting more weekend 
events for Clarion University stu- 
dents, Student Senate is hoping to 
encourage students to stay on 
campus, make more of their 
money, as well as their college 
experience. 

We hope that every organization 
and student here takes full advan- 
tage of these events and gets 
involved in every way possible. 
As always I will end with saying, 
we as Student Senators are here to 
work for you. 

Any questions or concerns you 
have please let us know so we can 
serve you better. 



FITWWnj^^WW^WM 



Panhcllenic Council and Intcrf paternity Council are sponsoring the 
Central Blood Bank Blood Drive. Oct. 22, 2001 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in 

Tippin North Gymnasium. 
To schedule an appointment, please contact the Panhcl/IFC Office 

@ 393-2121. Walk-ins also are welcome. 




October 18, 2001 




7>^ CiA^/OiV Cau 



Page 5 




College Media Day V was a big success 



by Susan Campbell 
Clarion Call News Editor 

"College Media Day V 'Putting 
the Puzzle Together' was a huge 
success." said Jen DeFazio, 
Society for Collegiate Journalists 
Clarion chapter president and 
CMDV c(Kirdinator. 

The day long event began with 

opening remarks by advisor to TU 

Cia/^m CJ^, Dr. Arthur Barlow and 
the Clarion University Provost, Dr. 
Joseph Grunenwald. 

DeFazio introduced the first 
kevnote speaker, Lockwood 
Phillips, former president of the 
National News Association and 
member of the NNA Board of 
Directors. During his speech, 
Phillips described the duties of a 
newspaper journalist. He said that 
life and death are bookends, and it 
is a journlist's duty to mark the path 
of human beings. 

■"Our Job is to write about what 
happens within the bookends," 
Phillips said. 

"1 think CMDV was very helpful 
to the student body, because you 
can promote yourself and you can 
learn about areas of communica- 
tion you've never known before," 




Photo courtesy of Wayne 
Anderson 



Qob Kusbit senior vice presi- 
dent of production at MJV. 



mm 



said Dave Colamarino, senior com- 
munication major. 

Following Phillips" speech, seven 
sessions focusing on issues that 
affect future communication pro- 
fessionals, took place. 

Dr. Ngo Dinh Tu, professor emer- 
itus of Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, led the session, 
"Constitutional Press Freedoms." 
Tu focused on the constitution and 
provided answers to questions 
which plague journalists. 

"Preparing a Professional 
Publication" was presented by Dr. 
Mike Downing, senior editor for 
Integrated Communication Design. 
Downing discussed trade journal- 
ism, putting together an editorial 
staff, a sales staff and a production 
staff. 

"I found Dr. Mike Downing's 
presentation very informational 
and enlightening. I learned a lot 
from it and really liked his lecture," 
said Kelly Drevitch, senior com- 
munication major. 

Beth Siusser. student publica- 
tions, at Fairmont State College, 
West Virginia, presented "Putting 
and Keeping the Staff Together: 
Square Pegs in Round Holes and 
Other Staff Dilemmas." The topics 
discussed included, recruiting and 
training a new staff and how to 
maintain cohesion with a new staff. 
"Putting and Keeping the Staff 
Together opened my eyes to see 
what goes on behind the college 
newspaper. It's a lot more strenu- 
ous than I thought, and it takes a 
very dedicated student to help run a 
college newspaper" said Angela 
Bautista. senior communication 
major. 

"Roundtable of College Editors" 
was moderated by DeFazio. This 
session gave students a chance to 
meet people "behind the scenes" 
from Clarion University, 
Susquehanna University, Carlow 
College, Ltxrk Haven University. 
Fairmont State, SUNY at New 
Paltz, and the University of 




Photo courtesy of Wayne Anderson 



Students attentively listened to one of the sessions offered at 
CtvlDV. 



Pittsburgh Bradford Campus. The 
discussion was focused on prob- 
lems that college editors deal with 
daily. 

Dr. Patricia Kennedy, J.D., asso- 
ciate professor of the communica- 
tion department, presented "Who 
will represent me I am sued? And 
other legal questions college jour- 
nalists should be asking." The top- 
ics included: questions to ask, what 
kinds of lawsuits might student 
communicators be defendants or 
plaintiffs, how a civil lawsuit 
works, the discovery phase, and the 
trial. 

"This was my first experience at 
College Media Day. I was delight- 
ed when Dr. Barlow asked me to 
fill in for Dr. Larson. I picked a 
topic I thought all college students 
would want to know about," 
Kennedy said. 

Dr. Sue Hilton, Clarion SCJ pre- 
siding chapter advisor, was part of 
the Region I annual meeting that 
was held us a closed session. 

"Covering the Ten'or" was mod- 
erated by Dr. Scott Kuehn, profes- 
sor of the communication depart- 
ment. Sitting on the panel was 
Mark Despotakis, director of TV5; 
Carrie LoPuh. anchor person on 
TV5; Bill Adams, advisor to TV5; 
Amy Thompson, editor-in-chief of 

/Je Ciai'm Caff; Matt Paxton, from 



the News Gazette in Wexington, 
Va; and Phillips. The panel discus- 
sion focused on what it was like to 
experience the World Trade Center 
and Pentagon tragedies from the 
newsroom vantage point. Panelists 
gave an overview of the challenges 
they faced while covering the 
event. 

"We had fun, we got into impor- 
tant issues, and we learned impor- 
tant things from distinguished indi- 
viduals," Kuehn said. 

"CMDV was a nice opportunity 
for students and faculty to get 
together with media professionals 
and some of our alumni to talk 
about media issues,"Hilton said. 

The second keynote speaker. Bob 
Kusbit, senior vice president of 
production, MTV's Total Request 
Live, brought in a full house to his 
speech. 

Kusbit is a 1983 graduate from 
Clarion University. After a fun and 
unpredictable career path, he came 
to Clarion telling his story about 
being "one louder" in creativity. 

When he was an intern at KDKA, 
he .said he did everything that was 
asked of him and more. 

"While there, I did everything I 
possibly could." Kusbit said. 

Kusbit said he wasn't afraid to 

change his job to further his career. 

"I would get the one good job, 

have some fun with it, then move 



Student Senate 

members return from 

National Conference 

See Page 6. 



Professional 

Development 

Series 

See Page 6. 



Gonzalez 

to speak about 

American 

Holocaust 

See Page 7. 



on," Kusbit said. 

Kusbit also left the audience with 
two pieces of advice. 

"Never be afraid to take the 
chances when you can," he said. 

In keeping with his "one louder" 
theory, he said, "Don't be afraid to 
crank it up." 

"I was particularly impressed 
with Bob Kusbit's willingness to 
come back and offer students a 
path to a certain kind of success," 
Kennedy said. 

"I thought Bob Kusbit was very 
imformative and motivational. 
Hopefully he comes back next year 
to inform upcoming graduates," 
said Jon Pizzica, senior communi- 
cation major. 

Offering students answers and 
information, representatives from 
various media organizations were 
on hand at the Media Fair in Moore 
Hall. 

The day ended with the "Panel of 
Graduates." Moderated by Barlow, 
the panel of recent graduates in the 
communicatioti field answered 
questions about the professional 
world and job-related issues. They 
talked about what they learned in 
school and what they use on the 
job. The panelists included: Kusbit; 
Downing; and Wayne Anderson, 
alumni and Clarion University 
graduate student. 




Photo courtesy of Wayne 
Anderson 



Lockwood Phillips, member 
of the NNA Board of 
Directors. 



Nesbit named 

Minority Student 

of the 

Month 

See Page 8. 



Page 6 



Tne CcAR/oi^/ Cau 



October 18, 2001 



Student Senate 



Six members return from National Conference in California 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

Editor 

Six members of Student Senate 
returned to Monday night's meet- 
ing with new information 
obtained at the National 
Conference in San Diego, 
California. Those senators in 
attendance included: President 
Ben Chervenak, Vice President 
Missy Gring, Treasurer Tom 
Clopp, Parliamentarian Wendy 
Kengor, Senator Mike McCabe, 
and Senator Amy Cohen. Various 
issues were covered at the confer- 
ence; some examples are "Time 
Management," "Dealing with 
Alcohol on Campus," and 
"Cultural Diversity." 

President Chervenak said, "It 
was a very entertaining and edu- 
cational conference. It was good 
to talk to other schools from 
around the country on issues fac- 
ing their campuses as well as 
things that they are doing in the 
wake of the September 11th 
attacks." 

During the Appropriations 
Committee report. Treasurer 
Clopp moved to allocate $3,091 



from the Supplemental Reserve 
account to ARATE for the 
National Collegiate Honors 
Conference. According to a repre- 
sentative from ARATE, those 
members attending the conference 
would represent Clarion 
University and learn from other 
schools how to better develop the 
honors program. In addition, she 
said funds raised last semester 
would be used to help cover the 
trip; however, the organization 
has not taken part in any fund- 



raising activities this year. 

After a question-answer session 
between senators and the ARATE 
representative. Vice President 
Gring moved to call to question; 
the motion carried 19-0-0. Senate 
then voted on Treasurer Clopp's 
original motion to allocate funds 
to ARATE; the motion failed by a 
10-7-2 vote. 

Later, Vice President Gring 
moved to approve the request 
from Eeyrie to use Room 264 
Gemmell and all equipment inside 



""tfnmasr- 




Janice Shanko/The Clarion Call 



Student senate meeting discussed information received at 
National Conference, Oct 15. 



Mandatory SCJ Meetings 

Every Monday at 5:30 P.m. 

in Becker Hall Studio B 



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Valid at: 
McDon^'s of 

Clarion 

Oct. 18 through 

Oct. 25. 2001 



for the 2001-2002 academic year. 
The motion passed 19-0-0. 

On behalf of the Student 
Relations Committee, Senator 
Rob Pica said the Social Equity 
Dinner would be Friday, 
November 9 at 7:00 p.m. in 
Chandler Dining Hall. Mr. Carl 
Brashear, an African American 
Navy master diver, will be speak- 
ing at Hart Chapel on Monday, 
November 5 at 7:00 p.m. to kick- 
off Social Equity Week. 

Senator Jacque Collier, chair of 
the Dining Concerns Committee, 
said the food representative for all 
state schools would be present at 
the committee meeting on 
Wednesday, October 17 at 7:00 
p.m. in the Ritazza. In addition, 
Gemmell will now provide indi- 
vidual packets of condiments 
from the salad bar for sanitary 
purposes. 

Senate advisor, Mr. Harry Tripp, 
said Gemmell would be starting a 
new flex-only program, which 
will take effect next semester. 

A representative from 
Panhellenic Council said there 
would be a blood drive Monday, 
Oct. 22 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 



Two members from the Student 
Athletic Advisory Council, Jared 
Moss and Eric Mausser, said 
Clarion University athletes would 
be sponsoring a blood drive as 
well. In addition, they are begin- 
ning a food drive for 
Thanksgiving. 

A member of Interhall Council 
announced some of their upcom- 
ing events for the remainder of the 
semester. Activities include a 
Karaoke Night on Friday, 
November 16 and a Murder 
Mystery fall formal on Saturday, 
Dec. 1. 

Treasurer Clopp announced the 
following account balances: 
Capital, $86,415.43; Large Item 
Capital, $434,892.64; 

Supplemental, $14,156; and 
Supplemental Reserve, $51,760. 

Finally, Vice President Gring 
announced a meeting for all com- 
mittee chairs to discuss the 
Weekend Program Initiative with 
all CSA-funded organizations. 
The meeting is scheduled for 
Monday, Oct. 22 in 250-252 
Gemmell at 5:00 p.m. 

The next Student Senate meeting 
is Monday, Oct. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in 
246 Gemmell. 



PDS presents ''Dress for Success" 




by Jennifer Marz 
Contributing Writer 

"Dress for Success" was the 
topic presented ' by The 
Professional Development 
Series, Oct. 15. Jim and Lydia 
Crooks from Crook's Clothing 
were the speakers. 

The session provided infor- 
mation about dressing for 
interviews. Other topics 
included: finding a suit style, 
deciding appropriate suit 
length, and how to make a 
positive impression. Many 
examples of appropriate dress 
were provided. 

"The professional develop- 
ment series is one of the most 
beneficial workshops Clarion 
offers. Students new to the 
job search process will learn 
many tips and skills essential 
to obtaining a job in their 
potential career. Even more 
knowledgeable students can 
learn something new to secure 
their position in today's com- 
petitive workplace," said 
David Snyder, senior elemen- 
tary education and library sci- 



ence major. 

"The seminar was very 
informative and interesting," 
said Kelly Maxwell, senior 
elementary education with 
concentration in early child- 
hood. 

There were approximately 
75 people in attendance at the 
session. 

"Jim and Lydia from Crooks 
Clothing make "Dress for 
Success" a phenomenal suc- 
cess. They made the audience 
think of the overall package 
of selling themselves in an 
interview through profession- 
al attire," said Rachael 
Foflygen. coordinator of the 
program. 

For additional information 
on "Dress for Success," you 
can go to 

www.looksmart.com. 

The next Professional 
Development Series topic 
addresses how to dine and act 
fine, Oct. 22. at 5:30 p.m. at 
Chandler' Dining Hall. The 
presenters will be from 
Chartwell's Catering 

Services. 



October 18, 2001 



r//f 6tAR/D/^ CAU 



Page 7 



Breast Cancer! from Front Page. 



and it's horrifying. I encourage 
everyone to be aware of ways to 
detect a lump, and the organiza- 
tions out there which specialize in 
helping to find a cure. 

Early detection is the main factor 
in helping to fight this disease. 
Every woman over the age of 20 
should be conducting monthly 
breast self-exams. 

To do this, check for changes in 
the shape, size, and skin texture of 
the breast. To check the right 
breast, lie down and put a pillow 
under the right shoulder. 

Using the fingerpads of the mid- 
dle fmgers, press firmly on the 
breast and move over the entire 
breast to look for a lump. Switch 
the pillow to the other shoulder and 
do the same to the left breast. 

Conducting this procedure in the 
shower may be easier since the fin- 
gers can slide on the skin more eas- 
ily. This may enable you to detect 
changes easier. 

Mamograms also are a common 
way for women to detect changes. 
These x-ray pictures which use 
only a small amount of radiation 
can detect lumps too small to be 
felt during a self examination. 

During a mamogram, pressure is 
applied to flatten the breast to get a 
clear picture. The entire procedure 
should take about 15 minutes. 

If a change or a lump is found, 



you should consult a doctor imme- 
diately. There are different treat- 
ments which are available. 

The main treatment is usually 
surgery, but your doctor can rec- 
ommend which type of surgery is 
best for you depending on your sit- 
uation and how severe the case is. 

A lumpectomy is a surgical pro- 
cedure which includes removing 
the lump and a border of surround- 
ing tissues. 

A partial or segmental mastecto- 
my removes the tumor and up to 
one quarter or more of the breast. 



A simple or total mastectomy 
entails removing the entire breast. 
Many times, for early cancers this 
is the only treatment needed. 
However, radiation therapy may be 
needed. Radiation destroys the 
cancer cells, while causing the 
least amount of damage to other 
cells. 

Chemotherapy is another option 
that reduces the reoccurance rate 
sgnificantly. With this treatment, 
an anticancer drug is given by 
either injection or by mouth. 
This treatment comes in cycles, 




Photo courtesy Jen DeFazio 



iiene DeFazio (May 28, 1948-Nov. 8 1991) with tier daugtiter, 
Jennifer DeFazio. 



and the total course of chemother- 
apy usually lasts about six months. 

There are many side effects that 
are associated with chemotherapy. 
Some of which include nausea, 
loss of hair, mouth sores, and 
changes in the menstral cycle. 

After treatment, many women 
can return t6 work and t^ieir daily 
lives just a few short months after 
treatment. Some rehabilitation 
may be needed to strengthen the 
arm and shoulder on the side of the 
operation. 

The five-year survival rate prog- 
nosis for a breast cancer patient has 
increased from 78 percent in the 
1940's to 97 percent today. There 
are some risk of which women 
should be aware. 

The older a woman is, the greater 
her chances are to contract breast 
cancer. Nearly 77 percent of 
women diagnosed are over the age 
of 50. 

Breast cancer also has been 
linked to genes. Mutations in 
genes known as BRCAl and 
BRCA2 can be inherited from 
either parent. This mutation has 
been found to be prevalent in 
women of Jewish or European 
decent. 

Women who have already had the 
disease in one breast or have a 
mother, sister or daughter with the 
disease are more likely to contract 



breast cancer. 

The risk also increases in women 
who started their menstral periods 
early in life, {before the age of 12) 
and women who start menopause 
after the age of 50. Having a child 
after the age of 30, or never having 
a child put a women at higher risk. 

Being overweight and having a 
diet which consists of fatty foods 
also increases the woman's chance 
of getting breast cancer. 

Clarion University has done its 
part in fighting the disease. 
Recently, the English Club and 
Sigma Tau Delta sponsored 
Reading for the Cure and managed 
to raise $1,025.00 for the cause. 
They also will be official sponsors 
for the Race for the Cure which 
takes place in Pittsburgh on 
Mother's Day. 

The Reading for the Cure fea- 
tured a variety of poems, anecdotes 
and stories. Some participants had 
personal stories of how they were 
affected by the disease. 

For more information on breast 
cancer, or to make a donation call 
toll free 1 -800-ACS-2345 or visit 
their website at www.cancer.org. 
The more people know about this 
disease, and the organizations that 
strive to combat it, the more lives 
which can be saved. Please, do 
your part and be aware of what you 
can do to help. 



Social Equity Dinner and Awards Ceremony 
"Achievement through Diversity" 

Location: Chandler Dining Hall 
Date: Friday, Nov. 9 

Time: 6-7 p.m. Hors doeuvre Reception 
7-9 p.m. Banquet and Awards 

Faculty, staff and students are invited to submit nominations for 
the designated Equity Awards. Please specify the qualifications 
the nominee has with regard to promoting equity, social justice, 
and equality within the university and the external community. 

Deadlines for nomination: Oct. 10 

Submit to: Office of Social Equit> 207 Carrier 

For additional information contact: Jeannine Botta Guth or 

JeanieMclaine at 393-2109 

or email at jmclaine^^/^clarion.edu 



Gonzalez to speak about American Holocaust 



The Hot Spot 

Phone Number: 227-1908 

Hours: M-F 8am-9pm, Sat. 8am-5pm, 

and Sun. i2-5pm 

Located at the 800 Center across from 7-11 

Cafe: New Wide Selection of Soft Pretzals 

Bagels, Muffins, Breakfast Sandwiches 
Lunch Specials, Coffee, Tea, and Cappacino 
Tanning: Largest Tanning Salon in Clarion 

With 5 New Beds and 2 Stand Up Booths 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff ^^ 

The Minority Student Service is 
sponsoring "A song of the 
American Holocaust: Breaking 
the Cycle of Violence." Bobby 
Gonzalez will present the pro- 
gram, Oct. 22 in Hart Chapel at 
7:30 p.m. The show is free and 
open to anyone. 

Gonzalez, a Taino and Puerto 
Rican historian, speaks about 
Taino and Native American tribes 
from North, South and Central 
America. He explains the physi- 
cal, spiritual and cultural hard- 
ships these tribes underwent. He 
defines this as the "Amencan 
Holocaust." 

First, he begins with the time of 



Christopher Columbus and con- 
cluding with the contemporary 
issues in Chiapas, Mexico, and in 
Columbia, where the Uwa's 
Indians experience a mass suicide 
threat. In addition, the Uwa's 
could lose their land due to oil 
exploration. 

Gonzalez, a monthly columnist 
for the Latino Village Press, lec- 
tures throughout the United 
States. He has presented this in 
many prestigious venues such as 
Carnegie Hall, the National 
Museum of the American Indian, 
and the University of North 
Hampshire. He also has written 
poetry books and is both an event 
coordinator and master of cere- 
monies for the Native Harvest 
Festival. The festival takes place 



every fall in Van Cortland Park in 
the Bronx. 

Rogers Laugand, the director of 
Minority Student Services, 
believes this program to be very 
worthwhile for Clarion students. 
Besides the educational value, he 
feels students will see Native 
Americans in a different perspec- 
tive. 

Ultimately, he feels this could 
start the creation of an acceptable 
environment. Students will 
receive valuable knowledge of 
Native American culture and a 
better understanding of what 
occurred in the United States. 

"This presentation connects the 
past to the future. With that con- 
nection, people can live better," 
said Laugand. 



Do you have a hot news tip? 
Call Susan at 393-2380 



Page 8 



TH^ CCARfO/V Cau 



October 18, 2001 



What is yoga? Yoga roughly translated means to be 
one with one's environment. That's easy. 

Come join a class at no charge at Gemmell Student 
Center and the Student Recreation Center at the 
schedule below. 



Nesbit named Minority Student of the Month 



Friday, Oct. 26 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 


Saturday, Oct. 27 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 


Tuesday, Nov. 6 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 


Wednesday, Nov. 7 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 


Tuesday Nov. 1 3 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 


Wednesday Nov. 14 


7:30-8:30 p.m. 



Kosekl from Page 3. 



I know that I will never be a size 
2, and that is okay with me. I 
believe everything happens for a 
reason, and so there is reason to 
look this way. 

Looks are important there is no 
doubt about that. But a person's 
attitude affects the way people 
view you. 

I have many times heard, "I 
thought he was cute until I got to 
know him, and now his personali- 
ty changes the way he looks to 
me." 

This sounds cliquish, but it's 
what inside a person that counts 
the most. 

People do things to themselves 
that doesn't make any sense. 
Girls are willing to put harmful 
pills into their bodies just so the 
scale will tell them that they lost a 
few inches. 

What they don't understand is 
how badly they are hurting them- 
selves in the long run. 

They deprive their body of nutri- 
ents that they need and end up 



doing more harm than good. 

Please, if you have a 
friend who has some sort of eating 
disorder please get them help. 

Go to a counselor or talk to their 
family. Let them know you care 
and they are loved. 

Only they can make a change in 
their lives, but you can help them 
make that first step. It's not so 
much our friends' help that helps 
us as the confidence of their help. 

If you notice a friend is always 
depressed, complaining about 
their weight, constantly going to 
the gym, never eating, you friend 
has a problem. 

I don't think many people notice 
because so many people are con- 
cerned with weight loss in our 
society. 

This is a serious problem which 
needs attention. 

We need to start accepting our- 
selves for who we are, not what 
we weigh, and we shouldn't let 
our dress size determine our self- 
worth. 



by Shannon Sankey 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Wanda Nesbit has been 
selected Minority Student of 
the Month, nominated by Dr. 
Andrea Miller. This accom- 
plishment adds to the lengthy 
list of achievements Nesbit 
has already earned. She is a 
junior, duel major in library 
science and secondary educa- 
tion mathematics. She is 
involved in numerous extra- 
curricular activities, including 
the student chapter of the 
American Librarian 

Association, Lift Every Voice 
choir, Interhall Council, and 
Hall Council for Givan Hall. 

Nesbit's academic achieve- 
ments also speak for them- 
selves for her dedication for 
excellence. She is included in 
the Who's Who of Junior 
College Students and is the 
recipient of many awards, 
including the All-American 
Scholar Award, National 
Collegiate Minority 

Leadership Award, and the 
NASA Space Grant. 

Wanda's first love is for 
computers. This falls hand in 
hand with her experience at 
Delaware Technical 

Community College. She grad- 
uated in Spring 2001 with two 



associate degrees, one in com- 
puter network engineering and 
one in computer engineering 
technology. She also has a pas- 
sion for music. She loves to 
sing, play the drums and 
enjoys many types of music; 
including jazz, classical, and 
gospel. 

This is Wanda's first semes- 
ter at Clarion University. 
Originally from New York and 
residing in Delaware. She was 
working in the school library 
at Delaware Technical 
Community College, and the 
librarian mentioned she should 
go to school for library sci- 
ence. She did an Internet 
search on schools offering 
library science programs, and 
Clarion was one of two 
schools that were listed. After 
a more intense search, Nesbit 
found that Clarion's library 
science program is accredited 
by the American Library 
Association, making up her 
mind to come to Clarion. 

As previously mentioned, 
Wanda hails from New York 
and lives in Delaware. The 
main aspect of Clarion she had 
to get used was "the hills," she 
said without a moment's hesi- 
tation. "Definitely, the hills! I 
was sore from walking for a 
week!" As for the atmosphere. 



Do you have a desire to 
write front page news? 

Call Amy at 393-2380 



Geneva College 



J: 



Graduate Programs 

Master of Business Administration 
Master of Arts in Counseling 
Master of Ed ucatfon in Special Education 
Master of Arts in Higher Education 

(724)847-6697 

masters@geneva.edu 

www.geneva.edu 




\ '. 



•mm: 



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Geneva Colleoe 

rno CM«IS10 i? PA :n|« 

3200 College Avenue 
Beaver Falls PA 15010 




Nesbit says that she finds 
Clarion beautiful. Describing 
Clarion, she said it is like "a 
little hometown, like the ones 
you see in a movie." 

Her favorite Clarion experi- 
ence has been The Autumn 
Leaf Festival. She had a mem- 
orable first ALF, as it was the 
first time she had witnessed a 
parade go through a town. 

The criteria for Minority 
Student of the Month are 
based on any area in which a 
student excels, extra-curricu- 
lar activities, and special 
achievements. 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion 

Call 



Wanda Nesbit Minority 
Student of the Month. 



SCJ would like 

to 

thank 

volunteers. 

SCJ 

members. 

faculty. 

and staff 

for helping to 

make 

Colleae Media 

Day 

a 

success. 






October 18, 2001 



r//f Cmrjo/^ Cau 



Page 9 




L/Fesm^s 




MLK Series 



Emmy Awar d-wirnier speaks of diversity 



by Colleen Leonard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

There are more Hispanics 
living in the United States 
than there are Canadians liv- 
ing in Canada. 

As part of the Martin Luther 
King Jr. Series, Sanda 
Guzman, Emmy Award-win- 
ning journalist, spoke to stu- 
dents and faculty on Monday 
about diversity, discrimination 
and what it really means to be 
Latino. 

"American history is really 




Photo courtesy of University Relations 



[Sandra Guzman, Emnny 
lAward-winning journalist. 



Latino history, and Latino his- 
tory is really American histo- 
ry," explained Guzman. "We 
can't forget that." To say that 
someone is Hispanic is to say 
that they are from Spanish 
decent. There are 35.3 million 
Hispanics living in the United 
States today. 

Guzman strongly feels that 
no matter what the ethnicity or 
religion, discrimination and 
racism come from fear and 
ignorance, not necessarily 
hatred. If people think that 
racism is a thing of the past. 



they are mistaken. "I'm here 
to tell you that racism and dis- 
crimination are alive today," 
Guzman explained. 

When faced with racism, 
Guzman suggests staring it 
straight in the face. "Always 
have a comeback," she advis- 
es. "Speak up! Never stay 
quiet." 

More importantly, Guzman 
wanted the audience to know 
that there isn't much that sep- 
arates Hispanics from every- 
one else. 

"There are several things 
that Latinos share in com- 
mon," according to Guzman. 
From the love of food, music 
and language to the strengths 
of family and a sense of home 
life, there is something very 
distinct about the Latino 
upbringing, explained 

Guzman. "The universal 
Spanish language connects all 
Latinos." 

So how does a person learn 
more? Dance the salsa or 
tango, learn another language, 
travel and eat different foods. 
New experiences can develop 
a better understanding of 
something unfamiliar. 

Guzman's advice has credi- 
bility behind it. She won an 
Emmy Award in 1995 for a 
special on the Cuban 
Embargo. In this half-hour 
special, Guzman united 
Cuban-Americans for a seri- 
ous debate on what to do 
about the embargo. It 

explored new ideas and 
inspired new solutions. 

Guzman is the former 
Editor-in-Chief of Latina 
Magazine. Latina Magazine 
targets Hispanic-American 
women and reaches 1.7 mil- 
lion readers. The magazine, 
unlike many other women's 



magazines, doesn't airbrush or 
perfect the flaws of those fea- 
tured. At Latina Magazine, 
what you see is what you get, 
and Guzman prides herself on 
helping to promote this new 
concept. 

"A beautiful woman is not 
just a woman who is blonde 
with blue eyes," she says. The 
magazine offers coverage of a 
wide variety of women, in all 
colors, shapes and sizes. 

Guzman is also the founding 
editor of the largest website 
ever to be targeted towards 



Hispanic women, 

www.SOLOELLA.com. 
Before Latina Magazine, she 
also worked for Fox 
Television's Good Day New 
York, producing stories target- 
ed towards diverse audiences. 
Guzman also discussed her 
upcoming book. The Latina's 
Bible. It is scheduled for 
release in February 2002. The 
book, written in English, will 
include one chapter entitled "8 
Things You Should Know 
Before You Marry a White 
Guy." Another chapter deals 



with spirituality and religion. 
"I always knew that I want- 
ed to become a writer," 
explained Guzman, who was 
born in Puerto Rico. "I was 
hit by the journalism bug." 
However, she attended 
Rutgers University majoring 
in history and philosophy 
rather than journalism. She 
interned at various places and 
began writing for a small 
newspaper as a reporter. In 
time, she worked her way to 



See 'Guzman,' Page 10 




Photo by Graham Hermanns 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 



' www.theclafioncall.com * 




Michael Douglas 
delivers yet again with 

Wsnew 

action-packed thriller. 

Don't Say A Word. 

See Page 10. 



Icelandic band 
Sigur Ros expands your 

mind with their 

mind-bending album. 

For a review. 

See Page 12. 



Dave Barry explains the 

staying power of beer, 

and why guys love it. 

To see what makes it so 

special. 

See Page 11. 



Calendar of Events. 
To find out what's 
going on at Clarion 
University and the 

community. 

See Page 10. 



>MWi^B«yi W t .^^iM» i»» - J»-i 



Page 10 



Cal 



ne r.iAm/\/ r.Au 



October 18, 2001 




:<>%<■ 



ents 



i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^an 



jThursday, October 17 ~~ 

•UAB: Craig Karges, Mentalist (Chap) 7 pm 

Friday, October 19 

•UAB Spirit 

Day 

•Admissions 

Visit Day 

(248 Gem) 9 

am 

Saturday, 

October 20 

•Football vs. 

Slippery 

Rock 1 pm 

•Volleyball 

vs. Lees 

McRaa 2 pm 

•College of 
Business 
Saturday 
(Still) 9 am 

Cross 
Country at 
Gettysburg 

Sunday, October 21 
•W. Soccer vs. Bloomsburg 1 pm 
•Contemporary Concert (Aud) 3:15 pm 
Monday, October 22 




^ 



Jo. 



•Faculty 
Senate Mtg. 
(B-8 Chap) 
3:30 pm 
•Professional 
Development 
Series 
(250/252 
Gem) 5:30 pm 

Student 
Senate Mtg. 
(246 Gem) 
7:30 pm 
Tuesday, 
October 23 
•Public 
Performance 
Tourn. 

(Founders) 6 
pm 

•Volleyball vs. 
Lock Haven 7 
pm 

•W. Soccer at Kutztown 3 pm 
•IM entries due in Rec Center (Bike Race) 
Wednesday, October 24 
•UNITED NATIONS DAY 
•Leadership Development Series (250/252 Gem) 7:30 pm 




Movie Review 

Don't Say A Word is a suspensful thriller 



by Martisse Macri 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 











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Don't Say A Word opens in 
1981, with four men robbing 
a bank to acquire a $10 mil- 
lion ruby. As the men 
escape, the ruby is given to 
one of the robbers who tries 
to keep it for himself, not 
knowing it would result in 
his death. 

Based on the Andrew 
Klavan novel of the same 



name, Michael Douglas 
plays psychiatrist Dr. Nathan 
Conrad. Dr. Conrad's 

daughter, Jessica, is kid- 
napped and given a strange 
ultimatum. His psychiatrist 
friend, Dr. Sachs, talks him 
into helping with a patient, 
Elizabeth Burrows, played 
by Britney Murphy. 

Dr. Sachs is in the same 
position Conrad is in; his 
girlfriend is kidnapped by 
the bank robbers, but doesn't 
tell Conrad. Instead of ran- 
som money, the kidnappers 
ask Conrad to get a number 
from Elizabeth. Because 
Conrad doesn't know what 
the numbers mean, he does- 
n't know how to go about 
getting Elizabeth to tell him. 
Elizabeth has been through 
twenty psychiatric wards, 
each of them giving a differ- 
ent diagnosis. Elizabeth suf- 
fers from post-traumatic 
stress syndrome, due to wit- 



nessing her father get killed Conrad not to call the police 

by a subway. As Conrad and bug the house to make 

tries to save his daughter, he sure his wife (bed-stricken 

learns of Elizabeth's past due to a broken leg) doesn't 

and why she has been in so try to. 

many psychiatric wards. Michael Douglas delivers a 

The kidnappers warn bold performance as he goes 




Photo courtesy of Yahoo! Movies 



Brittany Murphy and Michael Douglas stick together in a 
scene from the film Don't Say A Word. 



to extreme and daring 
lengths to save his daughter 
and help a patient. Britney 
Murphy plays the perfect 
schizophrenic as she tries to 
convince her doctors she's 
insane, but gives in to 
Conrad as he compares her 
to his daughter. 

Tying the plot together is 
Detective Cassidy who 
believes Conrad and Dr. 
Sachs are involved in the 
homicides committed by the 
notorious bank robbers. As 
they all pull together to 
bring back Jessica, the 
movie takes some very unex- 
pected twists and turns as 
Conrad discovers the true 
story on Elizabeth's father's 
death and where the ruby is 
hidden. 

This suspenseful movie will 
keep you on the edge of your 
seat, as the plot unravels and 
the kidnappers get what they 
have coming to them. 



I 
I 



October 18, 2001 



f//f eiARfO/\/ cau 



Page 11 



What's so special about beer? Dave Barry explains 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Writer 



It's time for "Guys In Science," 
the feature in which we report on 
the heroic efforts of guys, using sci- 
entific knowledge, to explore, and 
exceed, the limits of common sense. 

We begin with this IMPORTANT 
SAFETY ADVISORY: The activi- 
ties described here are very danger- 
ous. These activities were engaged 
in by expert guys with specialized 
experience in such fields as physics 
and accordion repair. Do NOT 
attempt any of these activities 
unless you have a signed statement 
from a medical doctor certifying 
that, in his professional opinion, 
you are a moron who deserves to 
die. Do not even READ this column 
without safety goggles. 

Our first guy is Simon Hansen of 
Auckland, New Zealand, where 
guys are called "blokes." According 
to Simon's website 

(http://www.asciimation.co.nz/beer/ 
), brought to my attention by many 



alert guy readers, Simon was in his 
garage, when he realized that he had 
a very serious guy problem: His 
beer was warm. 

Now many people, faced with this 
problem, would solve it via some 
low-tech, unscientific methtxl such 
as putting the beer on ice, or in a 
refrigerator. But Simon Hansen is 
not "many people." He decided to 
cool his beer by — I am not making 
this up — building a jet engine. He 
welded it together, largely from 
automobile parts, right there in his 
garage. 

To understand how a jet engine 
could make beer cold, you need to 
know something about physics. 
Fortunately, I studied physics under 
the legendary Mr. Heideman at 
Pleasantville High School. 
Unfortunately, we frittered away 
our time studying such topics as the 
fulcrum, and never got to the part 
about cooling beer with a jet engine. 

But if I follow Simon's explana- 
tion, the whole purpose of his 



engine is to suck the fuel — liquid 
petroleum gas — very rapidly out 
of a fuel tank. For some reason, pos- 
sibly involving molecules, this 
rapid sucking action — in addition 
to being a good name for a rock 
band — causes the fuel tank to get 
very cold. So when Simon wants to 
chill a can of beer, he simply puts it 
into a tub of water, puts the fuel tank 
into the tub, fires up his jet engine, 
and, voila, he is deaf Thai's 
because his engine has a noise level 
of 125 decibels. To give you an idea 
what that means: If you were 
exposed to that many decibels, at 
close range and without ear protec- 
tion, you would be sitting in my 
son's car. 

So, yes, it's noisy. But there's an 
old saying among scientific guys: 
"You can't make an omelet without 
breaking eggs, ideally by dropping 
a cement truck on them from a 
crane." The bottom line is this: 
When Simon ran his jet engine, his 
beer-can temperature decreased 



from 1 1 degrees C to 2 degrees C in 
just five minutes. This is very 
impressive, and would be even 
more so if we knew what a "C" 
was. 

The important thing is that this 
guy, using science, has found a new, 
innovative and — above all — loud 
way to cool beer. Perhaps this will 
inspire other guys to come up with 
an even MORE scientific methcxl, 
such as shooting beer cans into 
outer space, or sending them back- 
ward in time to the Ice Age. That's 
how your major scientific discover- 
ies are made, and that's why, in the 
interest of progress, it is so very 
important, when a guy is in his 
garage, never to interrupt him with 
petty requests that he mow the 
lawn, take out the garbage, go to his 
wedding, etc. 

For our other example of Guys in 
Science, we go to San Francisco, 
where a guy named Kimric S my the 
— who makes his living in the field 
of accordion sales and repair — 



recently attached several ordinary 
household vacuum cleaners to a 
propane fuel line, then turned them 
on. As you have no doubt realized, 
he had a scientific reason for doing 
this: to see what happens. 

It turns out that what happens is 
very bad for the vacuum cleaners. I 
have some photographs of the 
experiment sent to me by Kimric's 
proud father. Bill Smythe. Some of 
the vacuum cleaners briefly trans- 
form into rcx'kets, but pretty soon, 
as Kimric informed me in a tele- 
phone interview, they tend to suffer 
a major appliance malfunction, 
sometimes involving shrapnel. 

This is an important exf)eriment, 
because it proves, scientifically, that 
it would be a big mistake, no matter 
how tempting it may be, for us to 
try to build rockets using vacuum 
cleaners powered by propane. 
Somebody should tell NASA 
immediately. Maybe you could do 
that, OK? I'm going to have a cold 
one. 



Side Items 

Gariic Sauce 
Nacho Cheese Sauce 

Pizza Sauce 

Pepperoni, Anchovies 

Seasoning Shaker 



Extras 

Bread Sticks, Cheese Sticks 



Drinks 

2 Liters - Coke, 

Diet, Sprite 

SI. 99 ■ 

20oz.- Coke, Diet, 

Sprite, Root Beer 

S1.25 




Pepperoni 

Sausage 

itaiian Sausage 

Baby Portabeila Mushmnm-^ 

Onions 

Green Peppers 

Black Olives 

Anchovies 

Ham 

Bacon, Beef 

Jalapenos 

Banana Peppers 

Pineapptft 

E;<tra Cheese 



© 



Slices only 
S99 



Two Large 

gfife One Topping 

Expires 30 days. Not valid with any other offer Valid 
only at participating locations Customer pays ali applic- 
able sales tax Additional toppings extra 



Late Night Special 

Large 1 -Topping 
zifc,..,^ 2-20 oz. Coke 

»e $9.99 




Expires 30 days Not valid with any other offer Valid 
only at participating locations. Customer pays all applic- 
able sales tax Additional toppings extra 



Family Special 

One large with the works & One 
large with two toppings 
^^,^ 1 -2 liter of Coke 

^m^ $17.99 

Exfjires .10 days Noi valid »»lth any oltiar offer VaUd 

only at participatinQ iocT*iion5 Cusiofnei pays all appUca- 

bte sales ta« AclJitional loppings extra 



223-4010 

Hours: 

10:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. - Sun. - Thurs. 
10:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m. - Fri. - Sat. 

We now accept Visa Master Card and 
American Express 




730 Main St. 
Clarion, PA 16214 



Free Breadsticks 

with purchase of Large or 
X-Large pizza 
at regular price 



® 



Expires 30 days. Not valid wrtti any other c^er Valid 

only at participajiig locations Customer pays ali applica- 

Die sales tax Additional toppings extra 



4 Large One Topping Pizzas 

(SOtei $^3-99 

® 

Not valid with any other offer Valid only at participat- 
ing locations Customer pays jyi applicable sales tax 
Additional toppings extra 



X-Large 2 Topping 
2 Liter Coke 

$10.99 

Expires 30 days. Not valid with any other otter Valid 
only at participating locations. Customer pays al' applic- 
able sales tax Additional toppings extra. 




Large 1 Topping Pizza 
W / Order 
cheesesticks 
$10.99 



mmm 



® 



Expires 30 days Not valid v«th any other ofler Valid 
only at participating locations. Customer pays all applic 

able sales tax Additional toppings extra 



J? 



"Papa's Choice 

1 Large with 5 toppings 

igfiai?, $10.99 



txot valid witri any otner offer Valid only at participat 

n; locations. Customer pays all applicable sales tax 

Additional toppings extra 



s4 



Page 12 



T^e CiAmAf Cau 



October 18, 2001 



Sigur Ros takes you on a trip to another universe 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call Lifestvles Editor 

ARTIST/ALBUM: Sigur Ros. 
kgaetis Byrjun. 

FOR FANS OF: Cinematic, 
neo-classical music with pop sen- 
sibilities, epic shoegazing. 

FOR FURTHER LISTENING: 
My Bloody Valentine's Loveless; 
Godspeed You Black Emperor's 
Lift Your Skinny Fists Like 
Antennas To Heaven. 

Let me quote you an excerpt 
from J.R.R. Tolkien's Fellowship 
Of The Ring book: "It seemed to 
him that he had stepped through a 
high window that looked on a van- 
ished world. A light was upon it 
for which his language had no 
name. All that he saw was shape- 
ly, but the shapes seemed at once 
clear cut, as if they had been first 
conceived and drawn at the uncov- 
ering of his eyes, and ancient as if 
they had endured forever. He saw 
no colour but those he knew, gold 
and white and blue and areen, but 
they were fresh and poignant, as if 
he had at that moment first per- 
ceived them and made for them 
names new and wonderful. In 
winter here no heart could mourn 
for summer or for spring. No 
blemish of sickness or deformity 
could be seen in anything that 
grew upon the earth. On the land 
of Lorien there was no stain." 

Such a passage is as clear an 
explanation as to what listening to 



Sigur Ros' Agaetis Byrjun is like. 
This Icelandic band, and this 
record in specific have accumulat- 
ed a mountain of hype and hyper- 
bole that dwarves Mt. Everest in 



first time in eons. You do not just 
listen to this album - you experi- 
ence it. 

I don't often buy into the hype 
machine, but all the lavish praise 



comparison. But for one glorious garnered by Sigur Ros is but a 




and shining time, we have an 
album that is deserving of it. 

Enveloping yourself in Agaetis 
Byrjun is akin to lying in a snowy 
field on a blustery winter night, 
while an unquenchable fire smoul- 
ders within you. It is the sound of 
morning mist creeping through 
lush ivy; of glaciers coming to life 
and stretching their limbs for the 




meek whisper when held up 
against the music itself Agaetis 
Byrjun is an album that is equally 
classical and contemporary; sor- 
rowful and exuberant; slumbering 
and rousing. It has all the resplen- 
dent majesty of a Beethoven sym- 
phony, condensed (sort of) into 
easily digestible morsels of sonic 
passion. 

Agaetis Byrjun is an album 
seemingly birthed in a vacuum. I 
can sit here and name-drop every 
band that's walked the earth, but 
Agaetis Byrjun disregards them as 
so many straw houses. There is no 
singular album that has come 
before it that sounds quite like it, 
and I highly doubt there will be in 
the future, even by Sigur Ros 
themselves. 

From the underwater volcanic 
eruption of "Svefn-G-Englar" to 



the numbing headspace of 
"Avalon," Sigur Ros present a 
microcosm of Beauty itself within 
every song, or should I say, 
"suite." They push the sonic and 
temporal boundaries of their 
music with each cut, often result- 
ing in 10 minute-plus constructs, 
but never over-indulging in pre- 
tentious self-glorification. This 
group of souls is crafting music to 
mold universes to, but never let on 
that they know this to be so. 

The basic elements of the Sigur 
Ros sound are remarkably simple. 
Lead singer Jon Thor Birgisson 
intones in a falsetto that could 
make a pre-pubescent choirboy 
weep, employing a mixture of 
Icelandic and English speech, 
dubbed "Hopelandic." Keyboards 
of all manner, bass, spartan drums 
and guitars (both electric and 
acoustic) are all there. For the 
most part, Birgisson, who also 
plays guitar, utilizes the acoustic 
end of the spectrum, filling in the 
ethereal, wispy songs with a rus- 
tic, organic touch. When the elec- 
tric is used, it's played with a vio- 
lin bow, which results in a sound 
I'm sure we could use to commu- 
nicate with whales. 

The songs themselves are rather 
simple on paper, highly melodic 
and flowing, but not bloated prog 
beasts. Simple formula, but the 
magic lies in the way Sigur Ros 
approaches their music, playing 
each note as if that one second of 
noise could enchant someone to 
fall in love; feel the memory of 
lost friends and family; reach out 
and scrape fingers with God. 

"Viorar Vel Til Loftarasa," with 
its lilting strings that weave 
through the song like strands of 
silken hair, and elegant piano mea- 
sures that underpin all else, is the 
sound of a thousand funeral pro- 
cessions, only through the view- 
point of the deceased, safely nes- 



Aierica's ftre$U are ai<i{ iir it$t precisis resoirces, M iiftrtiiately, 

kiiai-caisei firtit fins mail a striois problem fir eur latiii. 

Til (iiserfatiii if iir forest is ii oir ittii ni is iir respiisibility, 

If pliciis tkese FSAs, yii cai kelp Siikey Bear alert aid eJitate tke public aboit 

tbeir iipertait role ii prereitii{ forest fires tkriifk pratticlii{ {oitf forest fire safety kibits. 

fkaik riu ii lifaice for joi coitiiiid sippirt if tkis caipai{i. 



e 



ONLY YOl CAN PIEVENT FOIEST FIIES. 
www.imolityktai.eoii 



GuzmanI An account of the MLK Series. 

to the top. 

Joe Sciullo, a senior at Clarion University, attended Guzman's dis- 
cussion. "I thought it was really enlightening," he said. "I realized 
that there is more of a Latino population than I previously thought." 
Freshman Lisa Covington was also appreciative of Guzman's 
words. "I liked how she felt about women and minorities." 

Martin Luther King Jr. once spoke of having a dream. Nothing 
else mattered but the person themself, not what they looked like or 
where they came from. If we should learn anything from Guzman, 
it's how essential it is to understand those who may be different 
from us, and to accept them for who they are. 

As for Guzman's Emmy? It waits for her at home, only a few 
blocks away from the World Trade Center in the heart of New York 
City. 



tied up in their pillowy cloud in 
Heaven. While the piano sends 
veins of ice up your spinal cord, 
the string sections and slide guitar 
emanate waves of heat directly 
afterwards, sending you reeling 
into the deepest blue. 

If Tolkien's hobbits and elves 
truly did exist (and in Sigur Ros' 
world, I'm sure they do), then 
"Olsen Olsen" would be their 
natit)nal anthem, as it builds from 
a cyclic acoustic guitar riff and the 
violin bowed guitar ct)upled with 
Birgisson's voice, which glides 
along like a firefly in the cool 
night air. As "Olsen Olsen" grows 
in tempo and length, lyrical flute 
flourishes are added, along with a 
steady backbeat, culminating in 
nothing less than the sound of the 
very heavens themselves opening 
up, releasing a host of angels upon 
the earthly plane. 

Agaetis Byrjun is filled with 
moments such as those. When 
Sigur Ros isn't showing us the 
outer reaches of our universe, 
they're turning us inward, with 
delicate and fragile grace. Tracks 
such as "Agaetis Byrjun" and 
"Staralfur" feel like the gentle 
caress of a pixie wing on vinir 
head, perhaps providing the 
soundtrack for the embryonic 
alien that adorns the album's 
cover. 

If you translate Agaetis Byrjun 
into English, it means "a good 
start." A more humble sentiment 
of understatement I've never 
heard. Agaetis Byrjun is not just a 
beginning, but presents us with a 
bold middle and end - an entire 
career within the confines of one 
album. If this group of musicians 
never pick up an instrument again, 
a hundred years from now we'll 
still be singing the praises of this 
album, and wishing that every- 
thing in life could taste this sweet. 
5 out of 5 stars. 

Come to the Music 

Marketing 

Association Conceil! 

"Ghouls' Night Out" 

will feature many 

bands from the area 

and Pittsburgh. 

Concert starts at 
6:00 pm on Monday, 

October 29. Call 

849-5132 for info. 



r//f ciAR/o/\i cau 




PAGE 13 



^/\IT^RTAf/\IM£/\IT 





RUNNY NOSE. 




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BA6S UNDER 
THE EYES. 




BURNING \JP 
WITH FEVER. 




SOME MILD 
HALLUCINATION. 




CHICKEN SOKJP. 




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OF UQUIDS. 




A TURN FOR 
THE WORSE. 



A TURN FOR 
THE WORST. 




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IF You Cf^T MAice PWhJ^P 




fflTT^T^'fWTTfTTTTfflWfTTTHOrnT 

V, l-AiAkcf Pii^ig^p APPfA^ 




Twisted View* 



Cooney 




CooL 

UTME 
^EE. IT, 



Ju5T Swat 

rr... 'S»*iFF-' 
rr reekx wiTW 

MAN. 



Hey.THii >^ 

AN tP oF 

LApy F1?oM 
MiSSoultl NAMED 
CINDY. 

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Do You HX^e 
AKiy ipeA 
WH4T TWir 
ii,L&iue 

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"Bap take 








"We have a new arrangement where I don't 
go to work and they don't pay me." 



PAGE 14 



7>/f CiA^fO.y Cau 



OCTOBER 18, 2001 




E/\ITERTAf/\l/l^e/\/T 



Crossword 



ACROSS 

1 Outmoded sound 

system 
5 King of comedy 
9 SwifBy 

14 Fall garden? 

1 5 Right school final 

16 Kind oflnstiuclor 

17 Property 
dassiticatiofi 

19 Insidious t)etrayer 

20 Ripens 

21 Sharpshooter 

23 ElyorLeibman 

24 Put up a stocliade 

25 Okeechobee and 
Ontario 

28 Infuriating 

32 Deified Egyptian 

bird 
33 de mer 

34 Call lor 

35 Actor Kilmer 

36 Position under 
scrutiny 

38 One Stooge 

39 Weather-map line 

41 Miss a step 

42 Flows back 

43 Worth having 

45 Military 
installations 

46 Come tram 
behind 

47 Prickly husk 

48 Adroit 
maneuvering 

51 Bolivian bread' 
5.-5 Particles 

56 South African 
segregation 

58 Dike 

59 A GiBnt 

60 Perry s creator 

61 Accumulate 

52 Fling 

63 Negatives 

DOWN 

1 Tiller 

2 Something to 
think about 

3 Expksit 

4 Underwrites 

5 Pale 

6 "Gentlemen 
Prefer Blondes" 



1 


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21 


22 














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7 Every last one 

8 Assented silently 

9 Next to 

10 Provident 

11 -de-camp 

12 All, once 

13 Otherv\flse 
18 Love god 

22 Make beloved 

24 Treacherously 

25 Incensed 

26 Degrade 

27 Metric weights, 
briefly 

28 Gymnasfs 
cushion 

29 Metrical feet 

30 Tearful woman 

31 Cagneyof 
"Cagneya 
Lacey" 

33 Principles of 
conduct 

36 Tonnents 
persistently 

37 Afore 



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40 Ancient galleys 
42 Made of clay 

44 Remove cotor 

45 Sacrifice play 

47 Emeralds mineral 

48 Roosevelt's dog 

49 Gossip bit 



50 Stellar blast 

51 Singer Vikki 

52 Space starter? 

53 Wicked 

54 Keats woiks 
57 City near 

Lourdes 



Twisted View 



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"Next time you give CPR try not to use your tongue." 




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October 18. 2001 



Th £ C dAm M C all 



Page 15 




CiASSfFfEOS 




s|iriii9 br^aH \ 



#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Earn Cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
234-7007 or endlesssummer- 
tours.com. 

Spring Break 2002!!! Student 
Express is now hiring sales reps. 
Cancun features FREE meals and 
parties @ Fat Tuesdays-MTV 
Beach Headquarters. Acapulco, 
Mazatlan, Jamaica, Bahamas, 
South Padre, Florida. Prices from 
$469, with major airlines. 24,000 
travelers in 2001. Call 800-787- 
3787 for a FREE brochure or 
email: 
bookit@studentexpress.com. 
www.studentexpress.com 

Spring Break Insanity! 
www.inter-campus.com or call 1- 
800-327-6013 guaranteed lowest 
prices! We're the best - forget the 
rest! Fifteen years experience! 
All destinations! Wanted: 

Representatives and organiza- 
tions, earn top $$$, build resume. 



New house available for Spring 
2002 and also for Fall 2002/2003. 
Six person occupancy. Furnished. 
Leave message at 226-5917. 



itiflflfifififififififir-lfif 



Dimples, Thanks for caring and 
sharing Wiggles with us! We 
loved you! You are approved! 
Only if we can keep Elvis! Love, 
Gimpy and Robin. 



Furnished house available 
November 1, 2001 four-person 
occupancy. Also available for the 
Spring 2002 semester and beyond. 
Call 226-6654 



^^•l(i^1^^^^^^^■^H^^^^^^^■l^■t^ 



Robin, Soon we will be in an 
apartment and you will be cook- 
ing! You can't leave me in a year! 
Love, Gimpy. 



Always, The happy wonderer. 

To The Clarion Call Staff: Good 
luck on your midterms. Hope that 
everyone does great on them. 
Kylee 



this year. You are a pleasure to 
work with. Luv, Kylee. 



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Spring 02-03. Close to campus. 
Leave a message, 227-1238. 



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ACT NOW! Guarantee the best 
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Spring Break with STS. 
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Spring Break-Nassau/ Paradise 
Island, Cancun and Jamaica from 
$459. Air, Hotel, Transfers, 
Parties and More! Organize small 
groups- earn FREE trips plus 
commissions! Call 1-800-GET- 
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Roommate needed for house for 
Spring 2002 semester. Call 226- 
5917/223-9098. 

f help wanted 



Waiters, Waitresses, Bartenders, 
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Apply in person at the Wayside 
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All steel building, engineer certi- 
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All steel building, 40x32 was 
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0111 

5' Grand Piano: Young Chang 
Ivory, excellent condition. 
$9000.00 OBO. (814)358-2346 



porsonals 



Kylee, Road trips, fractured 
growth plates, Stacey almost get- 
ting arrested, epileptics locked in 
cars. What more can you ask for? 
If I break up with you, will you 
send me roses? Love, Gimpy. 



Marshall, Hope that everything 
works out with your love life. 
You deserve happiness. You 
know that I love you always! 
Love, Your Kitten. 



Mel, We enjoy listening to your 
show every Wednesday night. 
You keep up going while we crank 
out the paper. We love ya! 






Good luck to both Rugby teams! 
Way to go guys. We are proud of 
you and your accomplishments. 



if%il.i(.ifif1fif)fififififif 



•If.ifiif1(ii(iif.ifififiiti-iti4tiifi4f. 



Jackie, Happy Belated Birthday! 
Love, The Givan Girls. 

Kimmie and Mike, 
Congratulations on the engage- 
ment! Sorry it is late. Love, 
Stacey. 

Robin, There should be same rules 
no matter what age! April, Yo! 
Stop looking at me swan! Love, 
Stacey. 

Go Clarion Swim Team! Love, 
Graham. 

tUfinnnnnnnnnnnt 

Kel, Good Luck with all your 
midterms. Love ya, Jill. 

Brian, Have a good weekend. 
Love, Jill. 

Paul, Thanks for a good time on 
Saturday. I had a lot of fun, but I 
wish that I could have stayed 
longer. Can't wait to do it again. 



Bob, Sorry about the left hook. 
Love, Dani. 

Marty, I'm brushing up on my 
WWF skills. Your going down! 
Love, Dani. 



Ben - Jammin', Affirmative two! 
Love, Universal Soldier. 



groolc ads 




9^i|(]fc)|c)|ei)t:4e)|e9|c:4()t'9te}|c3(c 



Graham, You aren't 21 yet! So 
keep dreaming about the bar. You 
will get there someday. The Staff. 



OZK would like to wish Brother 
Jared Chase a Happy 21st 
Birthday. We'll see you at the bar. 



************** 



************** 



Terri, Thank you for the wonder- 
ful job that you are doing for me 



Dena, Thank you for the treats. 
They were very tasty. We love 
you! The Brothers of OSK. 



)|e9tc^>k9|'%^3)c](eatc%i(c]|ti|e 



Assi&tent Copy and 
Design Editor h>eec>ed 

Sophomores and Juniors 
can apply by calling Jill at 
The Clarion Call. If you 
are interested call 393- 

2380. 



iNMUMMMiM 



MMMiiMiiMMMU 




I miiviiiiiiiiiiiw iiiii wi<iiiii^*wii*MteBafcai 

Jared, Happy 21st Birthday! 
Have a good time at the bar! I 
love you, Teri. 



The Centml Blood Bank is accepting blood dona- 
tions on Monday, October, 22, 2001 . 

From 10:00-3:00 p.m. 
Sponsored by PANHEL and IFC 



************** 



?or 



Silver Springs Apartments avail- 
able for Fall 2002/Spring 2003. 
Close to campus. Four person 
occupancy. Leave message at 
226-5917. 



Andi, Hope you had a great birth- 
day ! Your secret is safe with me, 
for now! Love, Teri. 



************** 



Wiggles, What can I say? It is 
your turn. Beat locked doors! No 
cappuccino unless you are with 
Jimmie!! Love, Gimpy 



************** 



;^>fti!Tmmmmffif!tmimmmtmfmmmrmmmssiiTf^fammrif!iim>fi 



Fraternities -- Sororities 
Clubs - Student Groups 

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3238, or visit www.campusfundraisei;com 



Page 16 



Tne CtARfo/\j Cau 



October 18, 2001 




CiA^sfF/eos 




Congrats to the Debate Team. 
From the Sisters of Delta Zeta. 

Happy Birthday to our girls of 
Delta Zeta: Michelle, Crystal, and 
Andrea. Love, Your Sisters of AZ. 



Happy 21st Birthday to Lisa 
Vough. Love, Your Sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 

Excellent job. Ride Pride's of 
Delta Zeta. 

Chris Clark, you rock! Thanks for 
all your help. Love, the Sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 



Brenna, Stacey, Kate, Leslie, 
Natalie, Amber, and Allison. You 
are doing a great Job. Keep up the 
good work. Love, your future AZ 



Sisters. 



***++***+****♦ 






Congratulations to the girls on 
their bigs and littles. Love, ZTA. 

To Josie, LP, and the Sigmas. I 
love you guys. Don't be scared 
this weekend. Love always, Your 




fNMlcallMS(^Z77(,aLS5M.flrpl•9KtMn.iMlimc*raM»Mv(yHiMnt iBiciiistiaifwcewiO mi y to wi m wffW.tlwUMiWfMd 
11M-CREFUfctMnmC&.lk«tlMLIiriMKln«Mna«4MiHitiH. ai>»qgl«t P i«|ii |. Fa»wiHte>uit»wiMi H iiil a iil i iiiH l iwwlWIClMWi 
■iy>MWlM«<WMtiMfcp»MlMi.OZMlTtac>w>B»rMaii<>MiiU(>iiiifiiliii-rilitiffiMii 




sweetheart, Cory. 

Thank you AIT iox the great 
float! The Brothers of Sigma Chi. 

Thank you A^I^E and the Rugby 
girls for the great time! The 
Brothers of Sigma Chi. 

Happy 21st Birthday Shurina! 
Way to do seven shots! EX 

Happy 23rd Birthday to Jen 
Kosek! Love, your A<I)E Sisters. 

A<I)E would like to thank our 
sweetheart, Kevin O'Brien, for 
the cookies and flowers! We love 
you lots. 

Congratulations to Angie Boddorf 
and Kathleen Burchfield on being 
sisters of the week! Love, your 
A^E Sisters. 



0OA Si.sters. 



*5*£:+:^<5|c*:)<:j< + **:f;:i!;|: 



Happy 21st Birthday Jen! The 
bars are never gomg to be the 
same! Love, Your 00A Sisters. 






Congratulations on your pinning 
Ashley! You're doing an awe 
some job. Keep up the great 
work! Love, Your future 0OA 



sisters. 



^^^::^<^^^^:>(f:l{;^c %%%:+:% 



Congratulations to Sister 
Gretchen Barrow, who has been 
lavaliered by Artie Clinger of IX. 
We love you both. Love. AIT 






Congratulations to Sister of the 
Week: Erica C. You are doing a 
great job! Love, AIT. 



*>|i**5|e3(tj|!s|ci|(;t!*;ic:tc>|( 



>|c;)C^^^^>)C;fC^^^3|C^;^ 



Thank you to our sweetheart 
Brianne for your help with .A.LF 
and the pig roast. Love, the 
Brothers of KAP. 



Congratulations Amber, Jen, and 
Stacey! Good Luck over the next 
few weeks. Remember, we're 
always here for you! Love, Your 
future Phi Sig Sisters. 



******^i + ****** 



*5|c:te***3f:)j<:(e)|c)|(:)()(<i(c 



Oil thanks everyone who sup- 
ported our bake sale! 






Thanks to Lex and the rest of the 
Tri-Sigs for the help with the 
float. The Brothers of KAP 






Happy Belated Birthday Shanna! 
One more year to go! Love, Your 



Do you want to send a treat to that 
special some(.)ne? Stop by the 
Oil candy gram table in 
Gemmell, Monday thru 

Wednesday. 



Sigma Alpha iota 

Halloween Night 

October ai, 2001 

7:00 p.m. * 9:00 p.m. 

Trick or Treat for canned goods. 

For both on and off campus students. 

Proceeds go to the Donation Center. 



CUP STUDENTS! 

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS 

TODAY! 

TELL THAT SPECIAL PERSON 

THAT YOU CARE OR TELL WHAT 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 P.M. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



I 



October 18, 2001 



fUf ^//IP/M /lAa 



Page 17 



Football 



Clarion hosts Slippery Rock in PSAC-West play 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Clarion's 2001 football team 
returns home Saturday, October 
20, to host PSAC-West rival, 
Slippery Rock, at Memorial 
Stadium. Kickoff is set for 1p.m. 

The Golden Eagles enter the 
game with a 3-4 overall record 
and a 1-2 mark in the PSAC-West. 
All three Clarion wins have been 
at home against Tiffin (27-14), 
Kutztown (36-7) and California 
(29-22). All four losses have 
come on the road at Est 
Stroudsburg (33-27), at 
Youngstown State (44-0), at 
Shippensburg (34-29) and last 
week at Edinboro (24-12). 

Clarion head coach Malen Luke 
is in his eighth season at Clarion 
with a record of 40-43 overall and 
a PSAC-West slate of 21-24. His 
14-year collegiate record is 77-64. 
Slippery Rock is led by 14-year 
head coach. Dr. George Mihalik. 

The veteran Rock mentor has 
the Rockets at 3-3 overall this sea- 
son and 1-3 in the PSAC-West. 
Slippery Rock opened with two 
wins over Florida Atlantic (40-7) 
and Tiffin (45-13), then lost three 
straight to Edinboro (14-7), I.U.R 
(23-7) and Shippensburg (32-20). 
Last Saturday, the Rockets won 
a big road game at California by a 
37-27 margin. Mihalik led S.R.U. 
to PSAC-West titles in 1997, 98 
and 99. They share of the title 
with Clarion and I.U.P. last year. 
Mihalik's record at Slippery Rock 
is 97-49-4. 

Clarion's offense enters the 
game averaging 337 yards of total 
offense (eighth in PSAC) includ- 
ing 235 rushing yards (third in 
PSAC) and 102 passing yards 
(13th in PSAC). 

Directing the offense is junior 
signal-caller Adam Almashy. In 
2001 he has hit on 40 of 118 pass- 
es for 649 yards and five touch- 
downs with six interceptions. He 
has also rushed for 322 yards and 
two touchdowns on 112 attempts. 



In his career he has now complet- 
ed 257 of 587 aerials (43.8%) for 
3,587 yards and 33 touchdowns. 
He has also rushed for 701 yards 
and 10 touchdowns on 370 career 
attempts. 

The running game will have 
Demetric Gardner at fullback, 
with Robert Walker, Glenn 
Lovelace, Ben Culver and Chris 
Roberts all available. Gardner 
leads the team with 471 yards and 
four touchdowns on 88 tries. }\t 
ranks ninth on the all-time rushing 
list with 1,449 yards and needs 
only 27 on Saturday to move past 
Geoff Alexander's 1,475 yards 
(1981-84) into seventh place. He 
has rushed 287 times and has 11 
rushing touchdowns. 

Walker missed the Edinboro 
game, but will be back this week. 
He has 423 yards and nine touch- 
downs on only 58 carries (7.3 
p/c). Lovelace is next with 267 
yards and two touchdowns on 46 
attempts, while Culver has 58 
rushing yards, plus four catches 
for 93 yards and one touchdown. 
Roberts has 43 rushing yards. 

The receiving corps is led by 
wideout Mike McCullum (15 
catches, 263 yards, two touch- 
downs) and tight end Andy Pore 
(six grabs, 134 yards, two touch- 
downs). 

Clarion's defense is limiting 
opponents to 347 yards of total 
offense (ninth in PSAC), mclud- 
ing 180.9 rushing yards (eighth in 
PSAC) and 166.1 passing yards 
(ninth in PSAC) per game. 

Clarion's defensive front has 
played well this season with Doug 
Diegelman (33 hits, eight tackles- 
for-losses, five sacks) at nose- 
guard and George O'Brien (33 
stops, seven tackles-for-losses) 
and Tom Pore (35 hits, three tack- 
les-for-losses) at the tackle spots. 
Guarding the perimeters will be 
Chris Janson, Kevin Platz and 
Derek Puchalsky. Janson leads the 
team with 63 tackles, II tackles- 
for-losses and six sacks, while 
Platz has 26 jolts, five tackles-for- 




Liz Potter/The Clarion Call 



Members of the Golden Eagle "D" line (defensive line) tackle ttieir opponents to the ground. 



Clarion's newest Internet service is 

offering Clarion University Students 

special pricing ! Stop by at: Computer 

Products Co. directly behind the 

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losses. Puchalsky has eight stops, 
three tackles-for-losses. 

The inside linebackers are also 
having solid seasons. Dennis Yu 
(46 hits, four tackles-for-losses, 
three fumbles caused) anchors the 
middle with Tom Gaydosz (27 
stops, five tackles-for-losses, 
three sacks) and Scott McGrady 
(24 jolts). 

The secondary has Myron 
Hargon (four interceptions, four 
break-ups), Kevin McKeither (14 
stops, one interception) and 
Jhermel Goss (15 tackles) at the 
corners, with Korey Eppinette (54 
stops, one interception), Emil 
Johnson (45 tackles) and Steve 
Devennie (13 hits) at the safeties. 

Slippery Rock's offense explod- 
ed for 518 yards at Cal last 
Saturday including 399 rushing 
yards. On the season, the Rockets 
are getting 345.3 yards of total 
offense (seventh in PSAC) includ- 
ing 224.3 rushing yards (fourth in 
PSAC) and 121 passing yards 
(12th in PSAC) per game. 

The Rock seems to have settled 
on Kevin Dvorchak at quarter- 
back. He has completed 44 of 87 
for 489 yards and one touchdown 
with eight interceptions. He com- 
pleted eight of 16 for 119 yards 
and one touchdown at Cal. Also 
available is Tim Arthurs who has 
connected on 28 of 45 aerials for 
237 yards and one touchdown 
with one interception. 

The running game is led by tal- 
ented tailback Dorrian Glenn. 
Glenn rushed for a Slippery Rock 
record of 355 yards at Cal. on 
Saturday. He had 38 attempts and 
rushed for four touchdowns. His 
335 yards were the second most in 
PSAC history behind 

Millersville's Ricke Stonewall 
who had 350 versus New Haven 



in 1982. Glenn is number two in 
the PSAC this season, averaging 
151.2 yards per game. He has 907 
yards and 12 touchdowns on 133 
carries (6.8 per carry). 

Also toting the pigskin will be 
Brandon Markus (63 rushes, 375 
yards, three touchdowns) and 
halfback Ryan McKavish. He 
leads the team with 17 catches for 
156 yards and one touchdown. 



ranked as the number six rusher in 
D-II this week when the statistics 
come out. Slippery Rock, as a 
team, will rank about 20th in 
rushing offense, while Clarion 
will be 15th. This will be the third 
top five rusher in the nation the 
Golden Eagles have hosted. 

Kutztown's, Yorel Prosser, and 
California's, Wesley Gates, also 
made visits to Clarion this year. 



The receiving corps has Neil Prosser gained five rushing yards 

Henry (16 grabs, 125 yards), D.J. and Gates had 102 against the 

Flick (14 catches, 215 yards, one Eagle defense, 

touchdown) and Chris Eckenrode Slippery Rock leads the series 

(eight receptions, 84 yards). between the two schools 34-22-3 

Slippery Rock's defense is giv- dating back to 1928. Last year 

ing up only 314.7 yards per game Slippery Rock defeated Clarion 

(sixth in PSAC) including 211.5 27-14 in a game that was a lot 

rushing yards (tenth in PSAC) and closer than the score indicates. 

103.2 passing yards (first in the Slippery Rock's, Glenn, led both 

PSAC) per game. teams with 140 yards and two 

Up front, the Rock has nose- touchdowns on 14 carries. The 

guard Ian Anderson (23 stops), Rockets rushed for 253 as a team, 

tackle Louis Jamison (26 hits) and Clarion's Almashy hit on eight 

ends Nathan Hogg (II jolts) and of 25 passes for 179 yards and 

John Benka (16 tackles). two touchdowns. The Clarion 

Linebackers, Frank Valvano (45 defense posted seven quarterback 



tackles, two fumbles caused), Joe 
Marecic (37 hits, two intercep- 
tions), Chris Petrarca (31 jolts, six 
tackles-for-losses) and Jesse 
Kelley (14 stops) are ready for 
action. 

The secondary is led by strong 
safety Shawn Hanzely (48 tack- 
les, .two interceptions) and free 



sacks against Randy McKavish. 
In 1999 S.R.U. defeated Clarion 
45-7 at Memorial Stadium. Glenn 
was also the leading rusher in that 
game with 92 yards and one 
touchdown. 

Almashy was 15 for 25 in that 
game for 159 yards with Andy 
Pore catching four passes for 41 



safety Brad Poor (41 stops, four yards. Clarion's last win over 



tackles-for-losses) who are the 
number one and number three 
tacklers. Corners Jim Urbano (33 
stops, four interceptions) and 
Kent Crytzer (15 tackles, five 
break-ups) are top cover men. 
Slippery Rock's, Glenn, has 



Slippery Rock came at Slippery 
Rock University in 1996 when the 
Eagles notched a 54-28 victory. 
The last win over Slippery Rock 
at Memorial Stadium came back 
in 1993 by a 29-24 margin. 
Clarion will host PSAC-West 



rushed for 2,972 career yards and leading I.U.P. on Saturday, 

ranks sixth on their all-time list. October 27th at 1p.m. That game 

He also has 37 career touch- will also serve as the annual 

downs. Glenn will likely be Senior Say. 



\1 






ihiaflMiftaMntfMi 






Pack 16 



TjiL^M£IOjL£AIJ 



OCTOHFK 18, 2001 





( greek ads ^, 



'clla /eta 



(\ineiats !i> the Dehate leain 
l-'iom the Sisiei> A IXMta /eta. 



I'Aeeilenl loh. Rule Pruie's ol 

!)elta/e!,. 

Happ} Binhda) lo vuir giris o! ■- ■ 

i)ella/cta. Miehelle. Crystal, and ^"hri.s (/lark. >.hi rock! Thanks t(M 
Andrea 1 .-\iv Your SiMers ot A/ ^>il >'^^" ii^^'P- i"^^"- 'h^' "^rsiers df 

■ Delta /eta 



u;ee\ , Kale. ! e'-lie, 

..i .1 _ \mivr. aiuJ Allison, ^'ou 

aiL iloiiiL! a iireat joh, Kee[T up the 

yiuHJ work. Lovl. \our tuture a/ i'^'^n' 1 he Bnuhers n| Sigma Th 
.Sistei's. 



1 hank \.)ii \li' !iii the ;_'real N.ipp\ Ji-i l^inlulav ieii' !. 

bars are ne\ei yom>^ U) he iiii. 
same' !.u\e. ^nur (-)(t) A .Sisters 



('oniiratuiations !u tiie liiils vin 



Thank you \'\>\-. and the Rugby 
;:irls lor the ereai time' The 
heir bigs and littles I ove. /FA l^iothers ot' Sigma C'hi. 

■•; + .»£ -A; V 'i; X ;. i '. . ,- ^ . ■- •■ ■ -■ -fC * ?|c S: :^ r|c rk i* 

llappv 21st Birthdav Shurina' 



In losie. LP. and the Sigmas 1 
!o'\e \ou gu>s. \\^\\\ be seared 
this weekend. Linealwavs, ^'olll 




Come to a Qne-on-One 
Counseiing Senior) 

Qne-9n-0n8 Counseling. 

Getpersona! financial 
guidancp. \.z help you 
fcachAou' finanniai goals. 

Dates: 

Thursday, 10,25.01 

Friday, 10.26.01 

Ttme; r ,, 

9:00 am - 4:00 pm 

Place. 

QemineirBuilding, 
Room 246 



RSVP: Cali Jacqueline 
Pugh at 
UaOO.842.2010 







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■ay hM «^H aM art Ml laiU ponitNd. e 2001 leackm luvraixx aad Anmirty Assaaatvi — (2i«e(e RaU^^ 



Wav to do seven shitts! \.\ 

Happy 2?>\x\ (^irthdav to len 
Kosek' I.oxe. your .\01- Sisters. 

■^ .-, < < '■ ■•: -i, .^ :t! ■?; r- ■< '< •- 

Acl-T: uduld like to thank our 
^v\eethe.irt, Ke\in t)Brien. tor 

the eookies and tlnuers' We lo\e 
' il lots- 



('ongiatulaiinr,s U'.\ngie Boddorf 
and Kathleen Buivhfield on being 
sisters i)\' the ueek' i.o\e. \oui 
Act)F-. Slaters 

Ihank \ou to our sueethetirt 
Brianne tor \(Hir help v\ith \i.b' 
and the pig roast. ! o\e. the 
Brothers of KAP. 



Congratulations on \uur pmninv 
AshlcN I You're doing an aue 
some job Keep u\) the grea! 
work' P(ue. \Vair lutuie i-)(\>\ 
sisters. 

Congratiiiations to Sistei 
(iretehen BarrivA. who has been 
lavalieied h\ .\riie (linger oi 1\ 
We lo\e )ou both. Love. .\1 T 

< -i: >■ ^ •;- 4- i; rl. :;: --^ :f ^ ••: : 

fongraiulatioiis to Sister ct tiie 
Week: i:nea ('. Vou are doing a 
great job' Love. Al'T. 

Congratuiatioiis .\inber. Jen. And 
Staee\ ' Ciood Luek o\cr the next 
lev. weeks. Remember. v\l ic 
alv\ays here tor m)u! Lo\e. V.hii 
future Phi Sie Sister^ 



< -K ■• ^ ,■«■ ■. 



Thanks t(^ Lex and th,e rest of the 
TrkSigs tor ihe help with the 
float Ihe Bn-thers of KAP 

".ilip) Heiaied iiirthdax Shannal 
'-'lie nioie .tvu' \n l:o; Lo\e. Youi' 



<F»XX thanks e\er\one ".wi, 
ported our bake sale' 

Do you want to send a neat lo tf: 
speeial "-i.meone-' Stop b\ n 
•Va : iHuv -ram table 
(lemrneil. Moiida\ ;hi 

'\edne'-da\ 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

Halloween Night 
October 31, 2001 
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
Trick or Treat for canned goods. 
For both on and off campus students. 
Proceeds go co the Donation Center. 



CUP STUDENTS! 

PLACE VOLR CLASSIFIEDS 

TODAY! 

TELL THA I SPECIAL PERSON 

THAT YOU CARE OR TELL WHAT 

EXCITING IS GOING ON IN THE 

GREEK WORLD. 

ADS ARE DUE EVERY WEDNESDAY 

AT 5:00 P.M. 
PLEASE HAVE YOUR MONEY 
WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD! 



OciOBtR 18, 2001 



r//f r^AP/nx f.A/./ 



Pa CI 17 



Foothcill 



Clarion hosts Slippery Rock in PSAC-West play 



(Ourtesy of Sports 
Inlormation 



Clarion's 2001 lootball team 
returns home Saturda\. Oelober 
20. to host PSAC-West rival. 
Slipperx Roek. at Memorial 
Stadium. Kiekoft is set for Ip.m. 
Ihe (lolden Hagies enter the 
game with a }-4 overall reeord 
and a 1-2 mark m the PSAC-West. 
All three Clarion wins have been 
at home against Tiffin (27-14). 
Kutztoun (36-7) and C\ilifornia 
(29-22). .All four losses have 
come on the road at Hst 
Siroudsbui-g (.33-27). at 
Y()ungstt)vvn State (44-0). at 
Shippcnsburg (34-29) and last 
week at Fdinboro (24-12). 

Clarion head coach Maien Luke 
IS in his eighth season at Clarion 
with a record of 40-43 overall and 
a PSAC-West slate of 21-24. His 
14-year collegiate record is 77-64. 
Slippery Rock is led by 14-year 
head coach. Dr. George Mihalik. 

The veteran Rock mentor has 
the RiK'kets at 3-3 overall this sea- 
son and 1-3 in the PSAC-West. 
Slip[-)er\ Rock opened with twt> 
wins over F^lorida Atlantic (40-7) 
and Tiffin (4.^-13). then lost three 
straight to Ldinboro ( 14-7). I.U.P. 
(23 '^) and Shippensburg (32-20). 

Last Saturday, the R(>ckcts won 
a big road game at California by a 
37-27 margin. Mihalik led S.R.U. 
to PS AC- West titles in 1997. 98 
and 99. They share of the title 
with Clarion and I.U.P. last year. 
Mihalik's rect)rd at Slippery Rock 
IS 97-49-4. 

Clarion's offense enters the 
game averaging 337 yards of total 
offense (eighth in PSAC) includ- 
ing 23.'i rushing yards (third in 
PSAC) and 102 passing yards 
(13th in PSAC). 

Directing the offen,se is junior 
signal-caller Adam Almashy. In 
2001 he has hit on 40 of 118 pass- 
es for 649 yards and five touch- 
downs with six interceptions. He 
has also rushed for 322 yards and 
two touchdowns on 112 attempts. 



In his career he has now complet 
ed 2.^7 oi .^87 aerials (43. 8';^ ) for 
3.5*87 yards and 33 touchdowns. 
He has also rushed for 701 yards 
and 10 touchdowns on 370 career 
attempts. 

The running game will ha\e 
Demetric (iardner at fullback, 
with Robert Walker, Glenn 
Lovelace. Ben Culver and Chris 
Roberts all available. Gardner 
leads the team with 471 yards and 
four touchdowns on 88 tries. L,e 
ranks ninth on the all-time rushing 
list with 1,449 yards and needs 
only 27 on Saturday to move past 
Geoff Alexander's 1,475 yards 
(1981-84) into seventh place. He 
has rushed 287 times and has 11 
rushing touchdowns. 

Walker missed the Edinboro 
game, but will be back this week. 
He has 423 yards and nine touch- 
downs on only 58 carries (7.3 
p/c). Lovelace is next with 267 
yards and two touchdowns on 46 
attempts, while Culver has 58 
rushing yards, plus four catches 
for 93 yards and one touchdown. 
Roberts has 43 rushing yards. 

The receiving corps is led by 
wideout Mike McCullum (15 
catches, 263 yards, two touch- 
downs) and tight end Andy Pore 
(SIX grabs, 134 yards, two touch- 
downs). 

Clarion's defense is limiting 
opponents to 347 yards of total 
offense (ninth in PSAC). includ- 
ing 180.9 rushing yards (eighth in 
PSAC) and 166.1 passing yards 
(ninth in PSAC) per game. 

Clarion's defensive front has 
played well this season with Doug 
Diegelman (33 hits, eight tackles- 
for-losses, five sacks) at nose- 
guard and George O'Brien (33 
stops, seven tackles-for-losses) 
and Tom Pore (35 hits, three tack- 
les-for-losses) at the tackle spots. 
Guarding the perimeters will be 
Chris Janson, Kevin Platz and 
Derek Puchalsky. Janson leads the 
team with 63 tackles, 11 tackles- 
for-losses and six sacks, while 
Platz has 26 jolts, five tackles-for- 



Clarion s newest Internet service is 

ottering Clarion University Students 

special priciniz ! Stop by at: Computer 

Products Co. directly behind the 

Clarion Post Office for details and 

sign up. Best deal in town!! 

Webshoppinglink.net 




Members of the Golden EagTe~"D'line (defensive line)fackleTheir opponents to the ground. ; 



losses. Puchalsky has eight stops, 
three tackles-for-losses. 

The inside linebackers are also 
having solid seasons. Dennis Yu 
(46 hits, four tackles-for-losses, 
three fumbles caused) anchors the 
middle with Tom Gaydosz (27 
stops, five tackles-for-losses. 
three sacks) and Scott McGrady 
(24 jolts). 

The secondary has Myron 
Hargon (four interceptions, four 
break-ups), Kevin McKeither (14 
stops, one interception) and 
Jhermel Goss (15 tackles) at ihe 
corners, with Korey Eppinette (54 
stops, one interception). Emi! 
Johnson (45 tackles) and Steve 
Devennie ( 13 hits) at the safeties. 

Slippery Rock's offense explod- 
ed for 518 yards at Cal last 
Saturday including 399 rushing 
yards. On the season, the Rockets 
are getting 345.3 yards of total 
offense (seventh in PSAC) includ- 
ing 224.3 rushing yards (fourth in 
PSAC) and 121 passing yards 
(12th in PSAC) per game. 

The Rock seems to have settled 
on Kevin Dvorchak at quarter- 
back. He has completed 44 of 87 
for 489 yards and one touchdown 
with eight interceptions. He com- 
pleted eight of 16 for 119 yards 
and one touchdown at Cal. Also 
available is Tim Arthurs who has 
connected on 28 of 45 aerials for 
237 yards and one touchdown 
v\ ith one interception. 

The running game is led by tal- 
ented tailback Dorrian Glenn. 
Glenn rushed for a Slippery Rock 
record of 355 yards at Cal. on 
Saturday. He had 38 attempts and 
rushed f\)r four touchdowns. His 
335 yards were the second mo.st in 
PSAC history behind 

Millersville's Ricke Stonewall 
who had 350 versus New Haven 



Trn982. Glenn Tsliumber two in ranked as the number six rusher in 
the PSAC this season, averaging D-11 this week when the statistics 
151.2 yards per game. He has 907 come out. Slippery Rock, as a 



yards and 12 touchdowns on 133 
carries (6.8 per carry). 

Also toting the pigskin will be 
Brandon Markus (63 rushes, 375 
yards, three touchdowns) and 
halfTiack Ryan McKavish He 
leads the team with 17 catches for 
156 yards and one touchdown. 

The receiving corps has Neil 
Henry (16 grabs, 125 yards). D.J. 
Elick ( 14 catches, 215 yards, one 
touchdown) and Chris Eckenrode 
(eight receptK)ns, 84 yards). 

Slippery Rock's defense is giv- 
ing up only 314.7 yards per game 
(sixth in PSAC) including 211.5 
rushing yards (tenth in PSAC) and 
103.2 passing yards (first in the Slippery Rock's, Glenn, led both 



team, will rank about 20th in 
rushing offense, while Clarion 
will be 1 5th. This will be the third 
top five rusher in the nation the 
Cn)lden Eagles have hosted. 

Kutztown's, Yorel Prosser, and 
California's, Wesley Gates, also 
made visits to Clarion this year 
Prosser gained five rushing yards 
and Gates had 102 againsi the 
Eagle defense. 

Slippery Rock leads the series 
between the tv\o schools 34-22-3 
dating back to 1928. Last year 
Slippery Rock defeated Clarion 
27-14 in a game that was a kn 
closer than the score indicates. 



PSAC) per game. 

Up front, the Rock has nose- 
guard Ian .Anderson (23 stops), 
tackle Louis Jamison (26 hits) and 
ends Nathan Hogg (11 jolts) and 
John Benka (16 tackles). 

Linebackers, Frank Valvano (45 
tackles, two fumbles caused), Joe 
Marecic (37 hits, two intercep- 
tions), Chris Petrarca (31 jolts, six 
tackles-for-losses) and Jesse 
Kelley (14 stops) are ready for 
action. 

The secondary is led by strong 
safety Shawn Hanzely (48 tack- 
les, two interceptions) and free 
safety Brad Foor (41 stops, four 
tackles-for-losses) who are the 
number one and number three 
tacklers. Corners Jim Urbano (33 
stops, four interceptions) and 
Kent Crytzer (15 tackles, five 
break-ups) are top cover men 

Slippery Rock's, Glenn, has 
rushed for 2,972 career yards and 
ranks sixth on their all-time list. 
He also has 37 career touch- 
downs. Glenn will likelv be 



teams with 140 yards and two 
touchdowns on 14 carries. The 
Rockets rushed for 253 as a team. 

Clarion's Almashy hit on eight 
of 25 passes for 179 yards and 
two touchdowns. The Clarion 
defense posted seven quarterback 
sacks against Randy McKavish. 
In 1999 S.R.U. defeated Clarion 
45-7 at Memorial Stadium. Glenn 
was also the leading rusher in that 
game with 92 yards and one 
touchdown. 

Almashy was 15 for 25 in that 
game for 159 yards with Andy 
Pore catching four passes for 41 
yards. Clarion's last win over 
Slippery Rock came at Slippery 
Rock University in 1996 when the 
Eagles notched a 54-28 victory. 
The last win over Slippers Rock 
at Memorial Stadium came back 
in 1993 by a 29-24 margin. 
Clarion will host PSAC-West 
leading I.U.P. on Saturday. 
October 27th at 1pm. That game 
will also serve as the annual 
Senior Bay. 



t^^ '«■'»**.■•••_"«•; "r 



'« » « «r»i % «» «» » « « VMTJlK «AWumn«iwv 



V 



Page 18 



THEn/^AP/D/^r.A// 



October 18, 2001 



Volleyball 



October 18, 2001 



r//f CtA^/D^ cau 



Page 19 



Cross Country 



Golden Eagles come out 5-0 at Kutztown Invitational Clarion rookies step up at Duquesne Invite 



by Laura Altman 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

On Friday, October 12 and Saturday, 
October 13, the Clarion womens volley- 
ball team traveled to Kutztown for the 
Kutztown Invitational to play New York 
Tech, Southampton, Millersville and 
Aldephi. At the end of the weekend, the 
team held a tournament record of 5-0 
because the team played New York Tech. 

Durmg their first game, the team was 
able to gain a win after playing four sets 
against Southampton. Ashley Riordan 
lead the women with 15 kills, but Ali 
Graham contributed an additional 13. 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA -- The top 
teams by region in the 2001 National 

Collegiate Athletic Association 

Division II Wonrien's Volleyball poll, 

conducted by the NCAA Division II 

Women's Volleyball Committee with 

records through October 9, 2001 . 



Atlantic Region 



Team 



Overall 



1. Lock Haven 16-7 

2.Edinboro 11-9 

3.Clarion 14-9 

4. Indiana (Pa.) 14-9 

S.Califomia (Pa.) 10-11 

6. Kutztown 13-6 

'^ ^Millersville 8-6 

S.East Stroudsburg 8-9 

8.Lees-McRae 15-13 

8.St. Augustine's 10-4 



Regional 



8-1 
7-1 
6-3 
3-5 
5-6 
5-2 
5-2 
4-3 
10-4 
9-1 



The team had a total of 10 aces through- 
out their sets. By the conclusion of 
Friday's games, the Golden Eagles had a 
tournament record of 2-0. 

After playing their second game, the 
Golden Eagles were able to pull even 
further ahead, since they beat New York 
Tech after competing in four sets. The 
scores were 32-30, 30-23, 18-30, and 30- 
24 consecutively. Out of the team's 65 
total kills, Melanie Bull contributed 17 
while Alissa McKinley added 14. In 
addition, the team had a total of 173 total 
attacks while only experiencing three 
serve errors. 

With the completion of three sets 
against Millersville, the team added on 
another victory. Their scores were 30-20, 
30-14 and 30-22. the womens volleyball 
team had a total of five aces, 65 digs and 
10 block assists. 

After experiencing four serve errors 
and two serve receive errors, the team 
managed another win when they played 
three sets against Aldephi. Bull pulled 
out a striking 20 of the team's 54 total 
kills for the matches. Beth Stalder had 
two block solos and two block assists 
while Bull, Graham and McKinley also 
added two block assists for the team. 

The Golden Eagles ended their Friday 
matches on a high note and they would 
carry their mark throughout the week- 
end. 

On Saturday, the team played New 
York Tech. After experiencing slight dif- 
ficulties during the first two sets, the 










> '■ 



Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call] 

I Two Golden Eagles jump up for the block during a pre-game practice. The 
\women have learned how to work together during the season. 



team pulled together and came back full 
throttle for the overall victory. The team 
finished with scores of 24-30 for both of 
the first two sets, but buckled down for 
the remaining three with final marks of 
30-21, 30-25, and 15-13. During the sets, 
Jackie Hill provided the team with 62 set 
assists while Graham added three more. 
The defense had a total of 86 digs for the 
sets. Bull lead with 27 out of those 86, 
aiding the team to victory. By the com- 
pletion of the tournament, the womens 



volleyball team had a record of 20-11. 

On Tuesday, October 16, the team trav- 
eled to Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. The Golden Eagles suf- 
fered an upsetting loss to them after 
three set, but the team didn't let the loss 
ruin their hopes for the remainder of the 
season. 

"We have a lot of fire, and we are going 
to put it towards our future games. As 
long as we do this, we should be able to 
come out on top," said McKinley. 



College basketball tips off 2001-02 season 



Courtesy of Krt Campus 



College basketball starts three weeks from 
today. The games will be sloppy, and yes, it 
should be illegal to tip off before John Madden 
scarfs the first Turkey Day drumstick. But 
some early season matchups merit watching, 
and we're not talking about Clemson-Morris 
Brown. 

Start with the season-opening Coaches vs. 
Cancer Tournament at Madison Square 
Garden. Florida faces Temple in one semifinal, 
followed by Maryland and Arizona. 

Florida-Temple should be a hoot, if only for 
the coaching contrast the Gators' ultraslick 
Billy Donovan and the Owls' delightfully 
disheveled John Chaney. Both are craftsmen. 

Maryland- Arizona matches two of last sea- 
son's Final Four. The Terps return four starters, 
including guard Juan Dixon and center Lonny 
Baxter. The Wildcats return only one, guard 
Jason Gardner, but Lute Olson recruited more 
than enough talent to reload. 

Steve Merfeld did not, try as he might. His 
Hampton Pirates finished 25-7 last season and 
shocked second-seeded Iowa State in the first 



round of the NCAA West Regional. But 
Merfeld's three best players center Tarvis 
Williams, point guard Marseilles Brown and 
wing LaSean Howard were seniors. 

Translation: Don't expect another upset when 
Hampton opens its season Nov. 16 at North 
Carolina. 

"There's going to be a natural regression 
because you can't replace everyone," Merfeld 
said. "You can't replace 60 percent of your 
scoring overnight. Georgetown, Maryland, the 
other teams that were out there (in the West 
Regional), they can reload. As much as we'd 
like to think we can, we can't." 

Merfeld tried. He tried to recruit higher-cal- 
iber players, those drawing interest from 
Atlantic 10 and Big East programs. 

"They still made a conscious decision to play 
at the, quote-unquote, highest level," Merfeld 
said. "We probably set our sights a little too 
high, but I don't think we had any choice." 

No program sets its sights higher than 
defending national champion Duke. The Blue 
Devils talk title virtually every season, and 
coach Mike Krzyzewski's schedule should 
prime them for another March run. 



Duke opens Nov. 19-21 at the Maui 
Invitational (nice gig if you can get it), where 
the field includes UCLA, Kansas, South 
Carolina and Seton Hall. The Blue Devils also 
face, prior to Christmas, Iowa, Temple, 
Michigan and Kentucky with only the Temple 
contest at Cameron Indoor Stadium. 

Krzyzewski's mentor, the combustible 
Bobby Knight, returns to coaching this season 
at Texas Tech of all places. Knight is 106 vic- 
tories shy of breaking Dean Smith's career 
record of 879, and his first chance to close, the 
gap comes Nov. 17 against William an^ Mary. 
W&M began varsity basketball in 1905, but 
virtually none of its 1,998 games attracted 
widespread attention. That changes Nov. 17. 
Knight's resurfacing is national news, if only 
to see when he next implodes, and ESPN's 
cameras will be in the house. 

ESPN will not telecast the Dec. 1 Virginia- 
Virginia Tech game in Charlottesville. 
Question is, will anyone notice? Tech hosts 
Miami that afternoon in what could be a foot- 
ball epic, while Virginia concludes its football 
season at home in a rescheduled game against 
Penn State. 



Sports Briefs 



Swimming 

The mens and \Nom- 

ens teams will host 

the pre-season 

Invitational on 

October 27. 

Soccer 

The Golden Eagles 

host Shippensburg on 

Saturday, 

October 27. 

VoUeybaU 

Clarion hosts 

Shippensburg on 

Fhday, October 26 

and Slippery Rock on 

Tuesday October, 30. 



at CjfJl ^;i?:^. 



by Andrea Borek 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

Last Friday, the Golden Eagle 
cross country teams competed at 
the Duquesne Invitational. The 
womens team placed third out of 
1 1 teams while the mens team 
placed eighth out of 12 teams. 
Some of the teams that the 
Golden eagles competed against 
included Malone College, the 
University of Pittsburgh, 
Carnegie Mellon, and Robert 
Morris. Even though this meet 
was not as big as the last race that 
Clarion competed in, it was still a 
very competitive event with many 
Division 1 teams. 

The womens team finished with 
the best overall finish it has had in 
all of the previous years that 
Clarion has competed in the invi- 
tational. The womens team was 
lead by Melissa Terwillinger with 
a seventh place finish. 
Terwillinger was followed by Jen 



Boerner in 12th and Katie Szafran 
in 16th. The womens lop four run- 
ners were all in the top 20 finish- 
ers and within a minute of each 
other. This was a task not even 
accomplished by the first or sec- 
ond place teams. The hot legs 
award goes to Terwillinger for her 
excellent race and moving up to 
the Golden Eagle's top runner. 

The mens team was lead by cap- 
tain, Ean King with a 25th place 
finish. King was followed by 
Mayernik in 39th and Matt 
Masterone in 48th. The hot legs 
awards for the mens team go to 
Zac Odgen and Matt Lapatka for 
excellent runs. Odgen is getting 
closer to the mens pack and 
Lapatka had his bets race in four 
years. 

The womens team is very happy 
with their accomplishments dur- 
ing the meet. They hope that this 
is just the beginning and are look- 
ing to turn many heads this year at 




Photo courtesy ot Andrea Borek 



Captain Ean King pulls out a sprint to the finish line. 



PSAC's and Nationals as a team, man on across country team does 

Their next goal is to get a larger not place for the team score, but 

pack and have all of the runners they do help to make other teams 

within a minute of each other. score higher since the lowest 

The mens team still has their score wins, 
pack and are working on moving The freshmen on both teams 

it up. The men are hoping that proved that all they needed was a 

freshman, Odgen, will step it up little experience with the "big 



again this weekend at Gettysburg 
and join their pack. If this occurs, 
the top six men will all be within 
a minute of each other. The sixth 



dogs." They will need to maintain 
that confidence going into this 
week's challenging meet at 
Gettysburg. 



Sports 
Trivia 

The answer to 
last week's ques- 
tion is the 
Seahawks. This 
week's question 
is: What AFC 
Eastern Division 
team was in top 
standing in 
1996? 




INTllllMPiUIL NEWS 

Doug Kjicpp - ImramuraJ, Rccreatbn, A Fitness Director 
Recrealiofi Center phone: 393-1 667 




10/18/01 



RacQuetbaM ToMmamePt 

Friday, 10/19/0! StOOpm 
Singles Tourntment featwes three 
divisions: 
Novice. Intermediate, and Expert. 
Free to all students, 
$5 for non-students. 
Games played at the Gcmmell courts. 
Sign up at the Recreation Center. 
OrcalIX.1668. 

Volleyball Results 

MCTkifty W\y 

Kippa Inc belt Special K 13-1S, 15>9. 1 1-8 
PD White beat PD Blue n-lS, 16-14. U-9 

Tucaday Wl^ 

Phi'i w/ Chicks bett Victofy IW, 15-2 
Special K beat BB.'s Team IS-S, 16-14 
PD Bkie beat Kappa Dat Azz 15-5, 17-lS 

Indoor Soccer Results 

Cake Eaters 3 BuckwildA 1 

Mislhs 6 Free Agents 1 

-Body Fat Testing- 
Thursday at 1 2 noon or by appointment 
-Check it out before the Holidays! t- 



Flag Football Standin2s 

SIGMA PI (6-0) 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA BLUE (5-0) 

I g A PI (5-2) 

HARD MUFFINS (4-1) 

SIGMA PI GOLD (3-1) 

5^FUX)RNAIR (3-2) 

WEEDVILLE BLAZERS (3-2) 

NEW WOODSIDE WARRIORS (3-2) 

DIRTY DOGS (1-3) 

KDR (M) 

THEREDSWRTS (3-2) 

THE nyim squirrels (3-3) 

BENTWIOOUES (2-2) 

10 BALLS (2*3) 

THATEAM (1-5) 

PENN AVE. PIMPS (0-4) 

SIGMA CHI (1-4) 

THETA XI (0-2) 
*TMraaaiettt itarts Toeiday, 10/23 

Football Resvlts 

SlgmaK 61 5*Fk)orNair 

HantMuffins 74 ThaTeatti 

S.TG Blue 52 The Red Shirts 

10 Balls 38 Weedvilie Blazers 

iB-Line Hockey Results 

Thursday 10/U: 

Nefarious Rollers 1 CL Shooters 
Studio Mullet 5 South Street 



14 



40 

18 




2 



PAINTBALL TRIP 

Sunday, October 21 
at 

Briar Hil PalatbaO Oab 

NO PRIOR EXraUENCE NEEMD 
Leave Clip at 1 1 00 am return at 6.00 pro 

COST: $10 00 for CUP. students 

(1/2 the normal price) 

COST INCLUDES: 

Semi-automatic gun rottal, C02 
SafieCy Goggtea, 300 rounds of paint 
Lunch and transportation if needed 
Safety dinic and tnstructi(»i 

REGISTRATION DUE: 

To reierye your spot, paymeitt is due by 
Friday, October 19 

Please raster at the infonnaticm desk 
in the Recreation Colter. Make checks 
payable to C.S. A. 

Personal trainipg for Students: 

(Fitness and nutrition counseling available) 
DovgKaepp 
Certified Streagtk and Coidittonlng Ceach 

is now accepting groups of 3-4 students who 
warn to learn niore i^>out any of these topics 
Stc^ in the Rec Center or caU 393-1668 to set 
up an appointment for your grcHjp 



i 



Page 20 



The CcARm Cau 



October 18, 2001 



Sports 



Golden Eagles take PSAC-West loss to Fighting Scots 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••I 

Edinboro's Alonzo Roebuck 
ran for 119 yards and a touch- 
down, and Chris Buehner caught 
a touchdown pass to lead the 
Fighting Scots to a 24-12 win 
over Clarion on Saturday after- 
noon at Sox Harrison Stadium. 
The game also served as 
Edinboro's Homecoming. 

The loss left the Golden Eagles 
with a 3-4 overall record and a 1- 
2 mark in the PSAC-West. 
Edinboro upped their record to 4- 
2 overall and 3-1 in the PSAC- 
West. 

The Edinboro crowd of 6,011 
saw Clarion come out smokin in 
the first quarter and threaten to 
take charge of the game early. 

Clarion corner, Myron Hargon 
stopped Edinboro's first drive 
with an over-the-shoulder inter- 
ception at the Clarion 16. After a 
change of possession, Hargon 
worked his magic again. 

The sophomore corner stepped 
in front of a Steve Tryon pass at 



the Edinboro 33 and posted his 
second interception of the game 
with 12:08 left in the first. 

With great field position 
Clarion drove 33 yards in only 
four plays to open the afternoon's 
scoring. Fullback, Demetric 
Gardner dashed up the middle 19 
yards to hit paydirt which gave 
Clarion a 6-0 lead. A bad snap 
caused Clarion to miss the extra 
point, but the Eagles had a 6-0 
advantage with 9:23 to go in the 
first. 

Clarion's defense stepped up 
again on Edinboro's next posses- 
sion. Tryon fumbled and Eagle 
inside linebacker Tom Gaydosz 
recovered for the Eagles at the 
Edinboro 40. But Clarion could 
not capitalize on the turnover and 
the Scots dodged a big bullet. 

Clarion had the ball at midfield 
later in the first quarter, but a 
missed exchange between 
Clarion quarterback, Adam 
Almashy and Gardner left the 
pigskin on the ground for 
Edinboro's Dave Smith to recov- 
er at the Clarion 34. 




Photo courtesy of 2001-2002 Media Guide 



#9 rrows Dock, it74 Doug Diegelman and #50 Eric Williams 
get ready for action on ttie defensive line. 



Scot placekicker, Sean 
McNicholas, booted a 40 yard 
field goal with 14-seconds left in 
the first to make it 6-3 Clarion. 

Early in the second quarter 
Tryon hit tight end Chris Buehner 
on a post-pattern for 46-yards 
and a touchdown. The point after 
touchdown was good and 
Edinboro led 10-6. 

Edinboro took over on its own 
48 on its next possession and 
used two big plays to score. A 35- 
yard pass play to Sean Hess, the 
quarterback, Tryon, broke out of 
the pocket on a drop back pass 
play and sprinted 17-yards into 
the endzone untouched to give 
the Scots a 17-6 lead with 9:50 
left before intermission. 

The Eagles let a "Golden" 
opportunity slip through their 
fingers late in the second quarter 
that could have put them right 
back in the game. Driving into 
the wind. Clarion came from its 
own 32 to the Edinboro four. The 
big play was a 20 yard run by 
Glenn Lovelace to the Boro four. 
On second and goal at the three, 
Edinboro's Kris Kane blitzed 
through the line, hit Almashy 
from the back side, and stripped 
the ball from the Eagle quarter- 
back. He fell on the ball at the 
five, turning the momentum back 
to the Scots. 

Edinboro drove 63-yards in 
four plays to take a 24-6 lead. 
Alonzo Roebuck went 38 yards 
on a shovel pass from Tryon, then 
ran 23 yards to the Clarion two. 
Roebuck dove over from the two 
to expand the Scots lead with 
5:35 remaining in the third. 

Early in the fourth quarter, the 
Eagles tried to come back. 
Clarion drove 72-yards in nine 
plays to hit paydirt again. The 
touchdown play came on a 29- 
yard pass from Almashy to fresh- 
man halfback Ben Culver. 

Culver caught the pass on a 
crossing route, stopped in his 
tracks and reversed his field to 

www.theclarioncall.com* 




Photo courtesy of 2001-2002 Media Guide 



#/2 Adam Almastiy gains yardage for the Golden Eagles. 



the right. He then picked up a 
block and streaked to the end- 
zone for the score. Clarion's two- 
point conversion pass failed leav- 
ing the Eagles trailing 24-12 with 
6:20 remaining. 

Although Edinboro recovered 
the onsides kick. Clarion's 
defense stopped the Boro and got 
the ball back at the Eagle five 
with 4:12 left in the game. 
Almashy's 23-yard pass to 
Lovelace got them out to the 28- 
yard line. A 20-yard pass to 
McCullum put the Eagles in busi- 
ness at the 48. On 4th and 1 1 at 
the Clarion 47, Almashy hooked 
up with Culver again for 38 yards 
to the Edinboro 15. 

Clarion just missed a touch- 
down connection on a second 
down. Almashy completed a pass 
to Lovelace in the back of the 
endzone, but the catch was made 
just out of play and ruled incom- 
plete. The Eagles turned the ball 
over on downs with 2:01 to play 
and Edinboro held on for the win. 

Clarion posted 342 yards of 
offense, including 195 rushing 
and 147 passing. Gardner had 60 




Cross country team- 
leaves mark at 
Duquesne, 
See page 19. 



Check out the Trivia 

Question of the 

week. 

See page 19. 



Volleyball team stays 

strong through long 

season. 

See page 18. 



Clarion gridders to 

host Slippery Rock, 

See page 17. 



yards and one touchdown on 13 
tries. Culver rushed for 23 yards 
on four carries, plus caught four 
passes for 93 yards and one 
touchdown. Almashy completed 
nine of 27 passes for 147 yards, 
made one touchdown, and ran 17 
times for 38 yards. 

Edinboro managed 342 yards of 
offense, getting 189 on the 
ground and 155 passing. 
Roebuck gained 129 yards and 
one touchdown on 19 carries, 
plus caught two passes for 43 
yards. Tryon completed seven of 
18 aerials for 155 yards plus ran 
for a touchdown. 

Clarion's defense was led by 
Chris Janson with 13 tackles and 
four tackles-for-losses, including 
two sacks. Dennis Yu had 12 hits, 
while Myron Hargon posted two 
interceptions. 

Aaron Tucker had eight stops 
and three tackles-for-losses for 
the Scots, while Dave Smith had 
six tackles and two quarterback 
sacks. 

Clarion hosts Slippery Rock 
next Saturday at 1p.m. while 
Edinboro will travel to lUP. 




■9 



o o o o o o o 




CUPVolleyball 
takes defeat...pg. 18. 



Senate introduces Weekend Programming Initiative 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assitant News 

Editor 

Clarion University Student 
Senate has been working to begin 
implementation of the Weekend 
Programming Initiative, which 
was adopted January 29, 2001. 

The purpose of this initiative is 
to promote organizations to spon- 
sor more alcoht)l-free activities 





defeat....pg.20. 

Index 

Opiiilon.„..pg.3= 
News.«.......i^.6, 

Lifestyles.pg.lO. 
s,m:s. ..pg,20. 




on weekends. Thus, Senate 
would be encouraging students to 
stay on campus over the week- 
ends. 

Senator Mike McCabe, chair of 
the Rules, Regulations, & 
Policies Committee, said, "I hope 
to stop the 'suitcase campus' rep- 
utation by giving students more 
to do on the weekends and get- 
ting them to actually stay on cam- 
pus." 

There are several major 
points included in the 
Weekend Programming 
Initiative. It says all 
Clarion Student's 

Association funded orga- 
nizations are required to 
sponsor one weekend 
event each academic 
year. 

At least two separate 
dates and events will be 
submitted to the Rules, 
Regulations, & Policies 
Committee, who will 
review and coordinate 
the event scheduling with 
the Student Activities 
Office. 

All events will be pub- 
lished in the Student 
Activity Calendar; how- 
ever organizations will be 
required to promote their 
activities accordingly. 
Members of Student 

I mm Senate, as well as Faculty 
l^B Senate representatives, 
■V will monitor the events 
-^ each weekend by going 
to them and recording 
student attendance. 

Organizations must 
provide the Rules, 
Regulations, & Policies 
Committee with a two- 
week notice if they are 
unable to hold their 
event, and there must be 
a valid reason for a post- 
ponement to be granted. 




If an organization fails to hold 
a scheduled event without per- 
mission for postponement, then 
the organization's account would 
be frozen, and they would be 
required to reschedule their 
event. 

Upon completion of the activi- 
ty, a hearing would be conducted 
by the Rules. Regulations, & 
Policies Committee to determine 
whether the organization's 
account should be unfrozen. 

Student Senate will review the 
Weekend Programming Initiative 
in the fall semester of 2003 to 
determine if any amendments are 
necessary. 

In the meantime, the initiative 
will take effect in the spring of 



2002 on a trial basis. 

In order to better familiarize 
students with the Weekend 
Programming Initiative, mem- 
bers of Student Senate conducted 
a mandatory meeting for repre- 
sentatives from every CSA-fund- 
ed organization Monday, October 
22,2001. 

During the meeting. Vice 
President Gring explained that 
Senate developed the initiative 
through a Task Force Conference. 
Senators learned of a similar pro- 
gram implemented at the 
University of Maryland. 

In addition, President Ben 
Chervenak said (.)ther schools in 
the State System of Higher 
Education are trying to develop 



similar initiatives to provide stu- 
dents with alternatives lo alcohol- 
related weekend activities. 

Treasurer Tom Clopp added that 
the Weekend Programming 
Initiative could also serve as a 
constructive way of recruiting 
new members to various organi- 
zations. 

Senator McCabe reviewed 
some guidelines for approved 
weekend activities. 

Each event must be completely 
alcohol -free, and they must occur 
on a weekend. Vice President 
Gring said for purposes of this 
initiative, a weekend is defined as 
Friday at 6 p.m. through Sunday 
at 4 p.m. 

See 'Initiative' Page 6 




University rubble 




Amy A. Thompson/The Clarion Call 



Clarion University owns property located along Greenville Avenue. The house 
which used to rest on the property was torn down by Neiswonger Construction 
Oct. 24. At this time, it is unclear what the university plans to do with the 
property. 



*'The first draft of Clarion University history*' 



Pagf 20 



Tne CMm^ Cau 



October 18, 2001 



Sports 



Golden Eagles take PSAC-West loss to Fighting Scots 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Hdinboro's Alon/ii Roebuck 
ran tor 119 yards and a touch- 
down, and Chris Buehner caught 
a touchdown pass to lead the 
Fighting Scots to a 24-12 win 
over Clarion on Saturday after- 
noon at Sox Harrison Stadium. 
The game also served as 
Edinboro's Homecoming. 

The loss left the Golden Eagles 
with a 3-4 overall record and a 1- 
2 mark in the PSAC-West. 
Edinboro upped their record to 4- 
2 overall and 3-1 in the PSAC- 
West. 

The Edinboro crowd of 6,011 
saw Clarion come out smokin in 
the first quarter and threaten to 
take charge ^^S, the game early. 

Clarion corner. Myron Hargon 
stopped EdinborcVs first drive 
with an over-the-shoulder inter- 
ception at the Clarion 16. After a 
change oi possession, Hargon 
worked his magic again. 

The sophomore corner stepped 
in front of a Steve Tryon pass at 



the Edinboro 33 and posted his 
second interception of the game 
with 12:08 left in the first. 

With great field position 
Clarion drove 33 yards in only 
four plays to open the afternoon's 
scoring. Fullback, Demetric 
Gardner dashed up the middle 19 
yards to hit paydirt which gave 
Clarion a 6-0 lead. A bad snap 
caused Clarion to miss the extra 
point, but the Eagles had a 6-0 
advantage with 9:23 to go in the 
first. 

Clarion's defense stepped up 
again on Edinboro's next posses- 
sion. Tryon fumbled and Eagle 
inside linebacker Tom Gaydosz 
recovered for the Eagles at the 
Edinboro 40. But Clarion could 
not capitalize on the turnover and 
the Scots dt>dged a big bullet. 

Clarion had the ball at midfield 
later in the first quarter, but a 
missed exchange between 
Clarion quarterback, Adam 
Almashy and Gardner left the 
pigskin on the ground for 
Edinboro's Dave Smith to recov- 
er at the Clarion 34. 




Photo courtesv of 2001-2002 Media Guide: 



#9 Iroyls Dock, Ml A Doug Diegelman and #50 Eric Williams 
get ready for action on the defensive line. 



fjmi 
Spom 



Cross country team- 

leaves mark at 

Duquesne, 

See page 19. 



Scot placekicker, Sean 
McNicholas, booted a 40 yard 
field goal with 14-seconds left in 
the first to make it 6-3 Clarion. 

Early in the second quarter 
Tryon hit tight end Chris Buehner 
t)n a post-pattern for 46- yards 
and a ti)uchdown. The point after 
touchdown was good and 
Edinboro led 10-6. 

Edinboro took over on its own 
48 on its next possession and 
used two big plays to .score. A 35- 
yard pass play to Sean Hess, the 
quarterback, Tryon, broke out of 
the pocket on a drop back pass 
play and sprinted 17-yards into 
the endzone untouched to give 
the Scots a 17-6 lead with 9:50 
left before intermission. 

The Eagles let a "Golden" 
opportunity slip through their 
fingers late in the second quarter 
that could have put them right 
back in the game. Driving into 
the wind. Clarion came from its 
own 32 to the Edinboro four. The 
big play was a 20 yard run by 
Glenn Lovelace to the Boro four. 
On second and goal at the three, 
Edinboro's Kris Kane blitzed 
through the line, hit Almashy 
from the back side, and stripped 
the ball from the Eagle quarter- 
back. He fell on the ball at the 
five, turning the momentum back 
to the Scots. 

Edinboro drove 63-yards in 
four plays to take a 24-6 lead. 
Alonzo Roebuck went 38 yards 
on a shovel pass from Tryon, then 
ran 23 yards to the Clarion two. 
Roebuck dove over from the two 
to expand the Scots lead with 
5:35 remaining in the third. 

Early in the fourth quarter, the 
Eagles tried to come back. 
Clarion drove 72-yards in nine 
plays to hit paydirt again. The 
touchdown play came t)n a 29- 
yard pass from Almashy to fresh- 
man halfback Ben Culver. 

Culver caught the pass on a 
crossing route, stopped in his 
tracks and reversed his field to 




Photo courte.sy of 2001-2002 Media Guide 



I #72 Adam Almastiy gains yardage for the Golden Eagles. 



the right. He then picked up a yards and one touchdown on 13 

block and streaked to the end- tries. Culver rushed for 23 yards 

zone for the score. Clarion's two- on four carries, plus caught four 

point conversion pass failed leav- passes for 93 yards and one 

ing the Eagles trailing 24-12 with touchdown. Almashy completed 

6:20 remaining. nine of 27 pusses for 147 yards. 

Although Edinboro recovered made one touchdown, and ran 17 



the onsides kick. Clarion's 
defense stopped the Boro and got 
the ball back at the Eagle five 
with 4:12 left in the game. 
Almashy's 23-yard pass to 
Lovelace got them out to the 28- 
yard line. A 20-yard pass to 



times for 38 yards. 

Edinboro managed 342 yards of 
offense, getting 189 on the 
ground and 155 passing. 
Roebuck gained 129 yards and 
one touchdown on 19 carries, 
plus caught two passes for 43 



McCullum put the Plagles in busi- yards. Tryon completed seven of 



ness at the 48. On 4th and 1 1 at 
the Clarion 47, Almashy hooked 
up with Culver again for 38 yards 
to the Edinboro 15. 

Clarion just missed a touch- 
down connection on a second 



18 aerials for 155 yards plus ran 
for a touchdown. 

Clarion's defense was led by 
Chris Janson with 13 tackles and 
four tackles-for-losses, including 
two sacks. Dennis Yu had 12 hits. 



down. Almashy completed a pass while Myron Hargon posted two 

to Lovelace in the back of the interceptions, 
endzone, but the catch was made Aaron Tucker had eight stops 

just out of play and ruled incom- and three tackles-for-los.ses for 

plete. The Eagles turned the ball the Scots, while Dave Smith had 

over on downs with 2:01 to play six tackles and two quarterback 

and Edinboro held on for the win. sacks. 

Clarion posted 342 yards of Clarion hosts Slippery Rock 

offense, including 195 rushing next Saturday at 1p.m. while 

and 147 passing. Gardner had 60 I-dinboro will travel to lUP. 



Check out the Trivia 

Question of the 

week, 

See page 19. 



Volleyball team stays 

strong through long 

season. 

See page 18. 



Clarion gridders to 

host Shppery Rock, 

See page 1 7. 



Tie- e&UHh CaM 






> 

J 




ll 



CUP Volleyball 
takes defeat...pg. 18. 



Senate introduces Weekend Programming Initiative 



by Michelle DHva 

( larion C all \ssltant News 

Editor 

Ciaiion l^nivciMt) Student 
Senate has been workiriL to begin 
imiilemcntation -X iiic Weekend 
P'ngraniiiiini: lnitiati\e. \^iiicli 
was adopted .laniicU'} 2''. 2i)(j;. 
The purpose vn !hi> iniu.itiw is 
proni-'ic oiiiani/atains i' ■ spon 
snr ni(M\ .icii^ It A 



Inside 




Flame to Fire 
Vigil pg. 6. 



Lifestyles 

Roots Rising i 
reviewed.pg.9. 



Sports 

CUP Football 

takes 

defeat....pg.20. 



Index 

Opinion pg.3. 

News pg.6. 

Lifestyles.pg.lO. 

Sports pg.20. 

Classified.pg.15. 



on weekends. Thus, Senate 
would be eneouraiim;j studenh ii* 
sta\ on campus luer the week 
ends. 

Senator Mike Me( abe. chair of 
the Rules. ReuulatU'ns. ^^ 
Policies Committee, said. "I hope 
h' stop the 'suitcase ^ampus" rep- 
utation b\ [M'iUii: students niore 
lu d'' I'P ihe weekends and i:el- 
' -!i them w actualP- sta\ on cam- 



'ic se\eral map 
iciuded 01 til:.' 
Weekend l"":'' -yammiii:^ 
ini'iiative. \\ --axs ail 
("ianon Studeni's 

Associaiiiin tunded orga- 
nization^ , , ..jUired III 
sp^onsor one weekend 
(;\ent each academic 
)ear. 

:\\ least two -eparate 
dates and exents wUl be 
■.iihmnted to the Rules. 
Regulations. ^; Policies 
' >imminee. vsho will 
re\iew and cooixiinaie 
the e\ent schcdulmL! with 
the Siudeni Acti\ities 
(VI I.e. 

Mi e\ciH.s will be pub- 
lished in the Student 
Aciivit} Calendar; how - 
ever organizations will be 
required tv) prt)m(Ue their 
activ ities accordingK, 

.Members o!' Student 
Senate, as well as Pacult} 
Senate representatives, 
will monitor the events 
each weekend b\ going 
to them and recording 
student attendance. 

Organizations must 
pKHide the Rules. 
Regulations. tV Policies 
(ommittee with a two- 
week noiice il' the\ are 
unable to hold their 
event, and there must be 
a valid reason tor a post 
pi^nement to be iiranted. 



It an organization tails to liold J'!l)J i>n a trial liasis. suTnlar mitialives r > po' id 

a scheduled event without ['Ci- In order to better tamiliaiize vleiits vmiIi altcrnair-.es in, ',_ 

mission tor postponement, then students with the Weekend rclalcil ueekcnd ,utiv iti.._ - 

the oriianization's account would Progiamnung Iniliative. mem i;c, '.surer loni i ^> -pp .id'.lc 

be lr(>zen. and thev would Ix' hers ol Student Senate cnnducled the Weekeiul 



rec|uired to reschedule l.hco .i mandator} meeting !'<i rc}ire 



event. 

\ pon com[)letion ol the actr. i- 
tv. a. hearing v\ould t'e conducted 
h_v thie Rules. Regulations, tV 
Policies ('o.niniiHee r> Lietermine 
w hethei the >■ rganizaUcn's 
.-.. ^ouni should be unlrnzcn. 

Suideni Senate will review the 



■-entatives trom everv (S \-tun 

cd (>igcUi!zalion Moniiav. ( )clobei new men" 

2:. :0(M. 

During tne meeiing. 
I'lesiden! (iring explained : 
.Senate developed tlie iniiuu 
ihriuigh .; Task Po:'ce ( ". ntereik. 
Senati us learned 



lnitiali\e could a's^ 

'isllUCtO. C VO' 



I I'lj- j>i-, . 



zations. 

■-.•nat '^ '"' ' ' 

. cfi! mil si W 

alcohi 'i -Irci'. and ('""cv 



Weekend P'rogrammmg Irnluilise gram iniplemenie 



r 



'n the tail semester of 2i)0.^ ; 
determine i! anv amendmeii's ar.' 
necessarv. 

in the meaniime. the mn' 
will take eftecl in the sprinii '. i 



oersiiv ot Mai V land. 
In addiMi'ii. I-'residciil ik-n 
( liciveiuik said other scho^'ls in 
-late S'.su-m p! High" 
Pdui^alion .v:c irvim: to develop 



>r purposes 



csiclera 
.a this 



■nnative, a weekend 
I idav ai (i p m. tin uidav 

i p m. 

.Ste * iniliative" i^ajic 6 




University rubble 




i 




Mlf^' 



-*--'^, 




fr^ 



.18 




rtT"-f' 



Amy A. Thompson/The Clarion Call 



Clarion University owns property located along Greenville Avenue. The house \ 
which used to rest on the property was torn down by Neiswonger Construction 
Oct. 24. At this time, it is unclear what the university plans to do with the 
property. 



''The first draft of Clarion University history'' 



Page 2 



Th £ (^/ jm/V f!i^ a 



October 25, 2001 



We Make the Call 

Kylee Ebersole 

Amy A. Thompson 

Susan Campbell 

Tim Conners 

Jill Brennan 

Teri Cattau 



Bomb threat in Davis 



On Oct. 12, 2001, a student at 
Clarion University was using 
the restroom and found a bomb 
threat written on the stall wall 
in Davis Hall. The problem is 
no one was made aware of this 
threat until later in the day. 

Green fliers were put up all 
over campus to tell the student 
body about the bomb threat and 
an all campus e-mail was also 
put out. 

Now the people who really 
don't pay attention to fliers and 
don't check their e-mail on a 
regular basis they had no clue 
this took place. Even though 
the fliers were put up, they 
were very vague with the 
details. 

We don't understand because 
bomb threats have occurred to 
other universities in 

Pennsylvania and they were 
evacuated immediately. 

Classes which were taking 
place in Davis were not even 
cancelled for the day, and stu- 
dents were not evacuated. 

However, if classes weren't 
cancelled Sept. 11, why would 
they cancel classes for this? 

Bloomsburg, our sister State 
System of Higher Education 
school, had a bomb threat take 
place, and they were evacuated 
immediately. 



Why can't Clarion follow the 
same procedures other schools 
follow? 

Some of us believe we are 
being treated like children 
because we were not clued into 
the situation which was taking 
place. 

We are supposed to be young 
adults worthy of the entire 
story, no matter how frighten- 
ing. 

In addition, since we did have 
a bomb treat in Davis, should- 
n't all of the other buildings on 
campus be checked? 

Did a safety check take place 
just to make sure students were 
safe and there weren't any 
bombs on campus? 

What had happened in the 
investigation? Was the threat 
found to be nonexistant? 

We can only assume the threat 
wasn't validated. Assuming we 
are safe isn't good enough. 

We want to be certain of our 
safety on campus, but when 
issues like this are not dealt 
with the best way they could 
be, how safe are we? 

What if we do let our guards 
down, and we actually have a 
real bomb threat? 

We fear a tragedy taking 
place will be the only way we 
will be informed. 







Editorial Policy 



I U t^to^ $1^1^ 10 iiiiify tUm paiier with 



.^Mi 










» Will mm^m <Mir (^luldn 
9Sbmi Issues aej»is$ Hie caiB|Hi& i&le» natloiij^ and 
worlds We 9m ^MmfeaSsmg tm Ciarion XJnivei^sl^ tiie 

^iHice of tm dUlcia^ C^ux. fliese e<lll(irl»l$ ure Apf^ 

not tk^mmmf im^ <m the opinion stated In tlie 

„„X The oplitk>ii e3q[>re»>ea is sliared bv the 

^jHty of the H^rd; It is not always a unaidbKius 

iilon. Vou, the jpahuc, reserve the right to expreitg» 

'i»if pleasure or displeasure with the^ opinions via a 

Iter lo the Editor, 



Your Views 

Student pleads for department funding 



The Modern Language 
Department has been quietly 
growing over the past several 
years. More and more students 
are enrolling in language courses. 
Some students are opting to 
minor in or major in a foreign lan- 
guage. 

In addition to the typical 
French, Spanish and German 
courses, Clarion has added 
Russian to its repertoire. 

In a cooperative effort with 
Slippery Rock and Edinboro 
Universities, Clarion offers 
courses through the Interactive 
Television classroom. This means 
students can communicate with 
the other universities in a kind of 
teleconference during class. 

However, we find ourselves fac- 
ing a problem: the Modern 
Lanuage Department is not 
receiving enough funding to con- 
tinue its growth, especially in the 
area of the language lab. 

The language lab is a particu- 
larly valuable resource to anyone 
learning another language. It 
allows them to practice and 
improve their competency by 
using the cassette tapes provided, 
as well as watching movies deal- 
ing with the languages they are 
learning. 

The lab is supervised by Dr. 
Elisabeth Donato and operated by 
students taking part in a work- 
study program, which is funded 
by the department. 

Because funding continues to be 



Do you have an 

opinion? 

Send letters to 

the editor to 

Tic e^ik Caff q/o 

Amy A. 

Thompson 

270 Gemmell 

Complex, 

Clarion 

University of PA, 

16214. 



cut, the workers and number of 
hours the lab is open per week has 
to be cut. 

It is said that a student should 
study approximately three hours 
outside of class for every hour 
spent in class. Naturally, some of 
this time will be spent in the lan- 
guage lab. 

With all the classes we take as 
students, it is already difficult to 
find time to do that. 

Now that the funding is being 
cut, there will be fewer hours the 
lab can be open. Consequently, 
that leaves fewer times available 
for us to use the lab, especially 
when our class times conflict with 
the lab's hours. 

On top of this, students partici- 
pating in work-study are told they 
cannot work the standard ten 
hours per week due to lack of 
funds. 



Another thing to keep in mind is 
with the events of Sept. 11, 2001, 
we realize that America may be a 
great country, but we are not the 
only country that exists. 

It is becoming increasingly 
important that we be able to com- 
municate with others in their 
respective languages rather than 
relying on them to speak English. 
I question how a growing 
department is supposed to contin- 
ue growing without the proper 
funding and support. 

I would ask that those responsi- 
ble please reconsider cutting 
funds for the language lab. 
Otherwise, this is hurting the fac- 
ulty, students and the university 
itself. 

Sincerly, 

Justin Mann 
English Major 



Tired of snail mail? 

E-mail your story ideas, 

letters to the editor, 

and opinions to 

theclarioncall@excite.com 



Thanksgiving Break Transportation 

Home! 

Where: Harrisbure. Kins of Prussia, and 
PtiiladelPt)ia fSOth Street Station) 

Departure: Tuesday. Nov. 20 at 3:30 p.m. 

Return: Sunday. Nov. 25 at 2 p.ni. 

Price: Round Trip. $45 TNo refunds} 

What to bring: Maximum. 1 suitcase and I carry-on 
bag 

Sign-uP where: CSA Office. 1 23 Gemmell 

Sian-up deadline: Monday. Nov. 19.at 4 P.m. 

Any questions: Call the 
Clarion Students* Association at 393-2423. 



October 25, 2001 



T/ ff CdARiO / ^ Ca u 



Page 3 







Some of us choose 
not to get involved, 
whiles others can 't say 
no to anything. §§ 

-Amy a. Thompson 



Editorial, Amy A. Thompson 



'^s**^/ •■ ■■X ■■ 



My sink at home is clogged 
again. Clogged with items 
which should never find their 
way to the sink drain but always 
do. 

However, most of the items 
are now unrecognizable, and it 
is time for them to be intro- 
duced to Drano or a powerful 
plunger. 

Then I started to think, my life 
and other people's lives become 
the sink drain; extremely con- 
gested. The only difference is 
the sink didn't choose for the 
full load. 

As students, we have the 
option to become involved in 
not only university activities, 
but with the world or should I 
say "drain at large." 

Some of us choose not to get 
involved, while others can't say 
no to anything. What about 
those students who can't say 
no? 

What are they getting them- 
selves into? Are their priorities 
really in line? 

I am one of those people who 
can't say no to extra tasks. 

Sometimes I wonder if 1 am 
devoting enough time to the 
truly important aspects of life. 

My best friend is wonderful 
about calling and sending altru- 
istic cards. 

The word altruism escapes us. 
According to Webster's 
Dictionary, to exhibit altruistic 
behavior is to have concern for 
others without considering 



one's self. 

With the situation in this coun- 
try right now, don't you think 
we could use more selfless acts? 
I often think about what is 
must have been like for the pas- 
sengers aboard United Airlines 
Flight 93 which crashed in 
Somerset County. If ever there 
was a selfless act, it was then. 

Of course, one's selfless act 
does not have to be as extreme, 
and I pray others won't have to 
make such a decision. However, 
every day we can exhibit acts of 
kindness such as, sending a 
'thank you' card, holding an 
open door, or smiling at some- 
one. 

There is always time for sim- 
ple chores such as these. 

Many of us have a great deal 
of tasks to accomplish in a short 
amount of time, but it isn't and 
excuse to halt altruism. Maybe 
it's time for us to purge our lives 
of all the items or tasks which 
are not as important as we think. 



,•=*,, 


p 


r 













































As a member of the 
National Newspaper Association, 

is entitled to access 
NNA's Libel Hotline; 
^j^ with advice from 

li j| Washington attorney 
^li^ Alice Neff Lucan. 



Op//\ffO/\/ 





Goats are men- 
tioned in the Bible 136 
times... §9 

-Dr. Dean Straffin 



Hyde Park, Dr. Dean Straffin 



It is common this time of year 
to see articles both scholarly and 
not so scholarly on the meaning 
of Halloween and its associated 
symbols. 

Last year at this time, the 6a/f 
ran an article on the history of 
Halloween, pointing out its ori- 
gin in the Celtic festival of 
Samhaim. The Christian calen- 
dar has superseded the ancient 
Celtic New Year Day with All 
Saints Day (All Hallows) and All 
Hallows Eve (Hallow Eve) alias 
Halloween. 

Halloween is associated with a 
lot of "pagan", pre-Christian 
imagery that over the years has 
come to represent things scary if 
not downright evil. 

Among the most ancient of 
these pre-Christian survivals are 
representations of the Horned 
Goat. 

The "Horned Goat God" prob- 
ably represents one of the oldest 
religious images ever recorded, 
showing up in cave walls of 
upper Paleolithic people in 
Europe during the last Ice Age. 

The Horned Goat figure subse- 
quently became common in 
many different cultural belief 



systems and various "horned fig- 
ures" show up all over Europe 
well before the advent of 
Christianity. The 9th century 
church condemned this imagery 
and accused people associate 
with it as reverting to wickedness 
and evil. 

Goats have appeared in the reli- 
gious symbolism of many cul- 
tures in a more favorable per- 
spective than the one portrayed 
by medieval Christianity. 

Goats are mentioned in the 
Bible 136 times, and there are 11 
direct references to them in the 
Old Testament which point out 
their worth (Jacob received spot- 
ted goats as wages). 

One should also note that the 
Hebrew ritual on the Day of 
Attonement involved a "scape- 
goat" where the priest confessed 
over a live goat the sins of the 
children of Israel and then was 
driven off into the wilderness. 

Goats frequently appear in the 
religious symbolism of widely 
diverse cultures; in ancient Greek 
and Roman mythology the god of 
shepherd, Pan, son of Mercury, 
was half goat. 

See 'Goats' Page 4 



THECiARmCAu Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared ^hase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 
Staff Writers: Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezyk, Emily Gill, Aaron Stempeck, 
Laura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Macn, Kelly Drevitch, Adam Berteotti, Khalia 
Robinson, Amy Ujazdowski, Shannon Sankey, Lindsey Lowrie and Angela Batista 
Advertising Sales Staff: Joseph Sacco, Jim Lugaila, Ean Bohdan, Bradley S. Walker, Kellie 
Kapetanovich, Autumn McShane, Allison Kemirir, Jen Glass and Bryan Hovarick 
Advertising Design: Julia Reinhart and Kristi Spinneweber 
Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske, Janice 
Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Eury, Jocdyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, Julianne 
Keman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sowers, Omar Rozier, Vicki Dietz, Brian Fashian, Julie Rengers 
and Faith Thompson 

Circulation Staff: Kristina Sirojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer Wolben, 
Jill Baumcratz, Tom Dennis and Liz Hams 



270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: 

theclarioncall@excite.com 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Tom McKeough 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 



Letters and Editing 
Policy 



TNMSs^l^^^g the ^^\,^mM. 




Page 4 



Tne Ccar/mCau 



October 25, 2001 




OPf/\/fO/\/ 




GoatsI Notes on Goats, from Page 3. 



The chariots of Thor in 
Scandinavian mythology were 
drawn by a pair of goats. Mendes 
is portrayed as the goat god of 
ancient Egypt. 

As a matter of fact, the Pharoah 
Cephorenes had 2,234 of these 
critters entombed with him at the 
pyramid of El Gezeh. I should 
also like to point out the 
Capricornus has for centuries 
been the 10th sign of the zodiac, 
and Capricorn is a major goat con- 
stellation in the southern skies. 

Aware of these things, and other 



goatly correlations with diverse 
supernatural belief systems, I've 
been surprised to find little schol- 
arly reference or explanation as to 
why goats have played such a 
major world-wide role in religious 
imagery since the earliest known 
times. 

Few other animals have also 
been singled out for such atten- 
tion. 

A little practical experience with 
goats has done much to answer 
my own questions regarding the 
focus of goats in religious 



imagery. 

Since I have been "getting her 
goat" for a long while, I decide to 
give my wife a real one as an 
anniversary present. That was ten 
years ago. I've had a small herd 
around my barn ever since. 

Few people in our society today 
have had any first-hand experi- 
ence with these animals. About 
all they conjure up for us is the 
expression in poor taste".. .horny 
as a billy goat." 

Very few people have any idea 
why goats have been singled out 



Call On You 

What was the most creative Halloween costume you ever wore? 

by: Jaime Johnson 






9{eif Jreedtint 

'Business, 

Sophomore 



"Teenwolf." 



^nd}^ TeHrman 

Computer Science, 

Sophomore 



"I rocked out as 

Teenage Mutant Ninja 

Turtle, Michaelangelo." 



^oUy hunter 

9(eaf Istate, 

junior 



"Oompa-Loompa. 



1 r 




f J- ■■■*.jvw^A*.j-*:.'''''^'** 'v***-^ <> 




J 




juHe ^engers 

Communication, 

Senior 



"My mom made me into a 

bag of garbage when I was 

eight." 



'DanieCCe "'Boonies* 

LoughCin 

Business Management, 

junior 



"I was Mr. D. 
Sanchez." 



^race Saracco 

?4ar({eting, 

Senior 




to represent this expression for 
sexual readiness. 

Be honest now, have you ever 
actually seen a billy goat, much 
less one "sexually aroused"? 
Probably not. If you had, you 
would probably understand why 
goats are frequently associated 
with things supernaturally menac- 
ing, semi-human with horns. 

Modern biologists know that 
these animals are seasonal breed- 
ers whose sexual behavior is con- 
trolled by hormones produced by 
their endocrine system which is 
activated by the length of the days 
which vary according to the sea- 
son. 

Another way of saying this, is 
that they are only sexually 
aroused and receptive in the 
autumn of the year. This is 
Mother Nature's way of seeing to 
it that the newborn kids don't 
arrive in a winter snow storm, but 
the springtime 155 days after con- 
ception when their chances of sur- 
vival are much greater. 

This means that goats start to 
mate around the beginning of 
November-the date on the Ancient 
Celtic Calendar marking the start 
of a new year and the mating of 
animals-Halloween. 

So, what has the phototropically 
triggered endoctrine system of 
goat reproductive behavior got to 
do with all those ancient religious 
symbols and ceremonies? 

You need to actually observe the 
reproductive behavior of goats to 
fully comprehend. 

No amount of carefully com- 
posed description will suffice. 
The expression "horny as a billy 
goat" will forever take on new 
meaning if you do. 

First of all,. goats (and particu- 
larly male goats in the breeding 
season) are capable of standing 
upright balancing on their back- 
legs. 

Their profile is disconcertingly 
human when they do. Very few 
animals on this earth can be con- 
fused with the human profile. 
You will never confuse the silhou- 
ette of a person standing in the 
doorway at dusk with any other 
creature unless you happen to 
have a goat "standing there." 

More than once I've gone out 
after dark to do chores in my barn 
and missed my billy goat only to. 
see him out of the corner of my 
eye standing upright in the shad- 
ows. 



He is pure white and "stands" up 
seven feet tall. More than once 
my heart has skipped a beat as a 
result. That's not all. 

At this time of year, a male goat 
whose sensitive nose detects a fer- 
tile female will make a most 
unearthly noise. I'm not talking 
about the bleating and bah-ing of 
nursery rhymes. I'm talking 
about a terribly human SCREAM. 
In the sense of the best 
Hollywood chiller. Words simply 
can't do justice here. I can only 
say that you are missing some- 
thing till you experience it. 

To my mind, it's no wonder that 
goats show up in ancient imagery 
where the anthropomorphic quali- 
ties of a beast are feared and 
sometimes venerated. 

I can't quit here though; that 
would be very unjust to the goats 
of the world who are not per- 
ceived by everyone as "bad"- 
despite the fact that billy goats do 
have a very musky odor and some 
possibly disgusting habits, such as 
urinating and ejaculating in their 
chin beards. 

Enlightened biologists and 
capriculturalists wouldn't dream 
of making value judgements 
about the olfactory triggers in the 
sexual behavior of barnyard ani- 
mals. Looking beyond these traits 
which may offend some "refined" 
senses, you will discover that 
goats are highly regarded by 
many people. 

The Arab word "Tays" is an 
expression for both goat and 
"nobility of bearing. "The Hebrew 
term atude also refers to both 
goats and prince. 

Many people besides myself 
have felt that goats are unusually 
compatible with human behavior. 
They should be. It turns out that 
goats are near the top of the list, 
vying for the title of oldest 
domestice animal on earth. 

They have been living with peo- 
ple for more than 9,000 years. 
During this vast expanse of time 
they have been selectively bred to 
meet the requirements of their 
keepers. 

Their value for meat, milk and 
fiber has been economically very 
important for much of human his- 
tory. 

It may be stretching it a bit to 
say they h^tve been bred for g(xxl 
company, but goats also display 
many of the characteristics of 

See 'Goats' Page 14 



October 25, 2001 



T^E rAAR/D/\/ CAU 



Page 5 




OP//\ffO/\/ 




administration saw the Iran 
Contra scandal bloom into a 
nationally televised judicial blast- 
ing of high ranking officials, 
President Bush had a difficult 
time overcoming the economic 



Had President Bush not taken the 
time to allow these arrests to be 
made before taking military 
action, retaliation from the al- 



military and intelligence forces 
controlled by the Taliban in 
Afghanistan who have been pro- 
tecting the life of Bin Laden. This 



The Political Prnhe: Political food for thought, by Jaso n Erb 

,=:rr:r:':: -:z^=:^ rHHfHS sHHH= E:":=Ef E= 

September 11 tragedy. The ques- ries out terrorist activities. Osama administration with his inability 

tions are certainly not restricted to Bin Laden is currently under the to live up to his promise of puri- 

the Clarion University student protection of the Taliban, the cur- tying the office. ReaganOs 

body, but are being asked nation- rent government of Afghanistan. 

wide and, more broadly, world- Bin Laden and his network of 

wide in one form or another, terrorists have been carrying out 

These questions include: "Who terrorist activities for many years, 

are these people?", "Why did they including the previous bombings 

do this?", "Why did we wait so of the World Trade Center, US 

long to send in the military?", 

"Will military action work in this 

situation?"and "How long will 

this war last?" to name just a few. 



Qaeda not only would have been war is not going to end soon due 
more probable but also, potential- to its immensity. This is not sim- 
ly more devastating. This time ply a direct strike on a govern- 
also allowed our nation to show a ment but rather a strike on an 
correlation between the attacks underground, worldwide terrorist 



Embassies and an ,n,en,,o„al ship s,.ua,ionof .he country dunng his and ,he al-Qaeda network to "''^'^''"lJ,''lZT:!l.lt 



to ship collision with a US vessel. 
Bin Laden claims that these Anti- 
American acts are on behalf of the 
The answers to many of these sentiment felt throughout the 

Middles East toward the United 
States. 

So, why is Bin Laden the al- 
Queda as angry as they are? There 
are many different reasons. They 
believe that we, as Americans, are 



questions remain to be seen. 
However, the "who's and why's" 
are beginning to be resolved. The 
name Osama Bin Laden strikes a 
sense of anger and, in some cases, 
fear in the minds and hearts of 
many US citizens, but who is 
Osama Bin Laden? 

In short. Bin Laden is the son of 
a wealthy. Saudi-born business- 
man. His father made millions of 
dollars as the owner of one of the 
largest construction companies in 
Saudi .Arabia. Much of Osama 
Bin Laden"s wealth is derived 
from his father's prosperity. 
Contrary to what many believe, 
Bin Laden is not a native to 
Afghanistan but rather Saudi 
Arabia. He has actually resided in 
many different countries, both in 
the Middle East and in Africa. 
Some of these countries asked 
him to leave because of his politi- 
cal affiliations and his radical 



including key strategic nations in 
the Middle East, which we are 



four years in office and, of course, 
former President Clinton, who 
couldn't seem to shake his school- 
boy tendencies aside from his 
duties as president. 

These stereotypes seem to lose now partially operating our mili- 
their validity, even to those creat- tary attacks from within, 
ing them, in times of crisis. This is The military actions currently 

the time when Americans truly being undertaken is not necessari- 
begin to appreciate the job these ly aimed at destroying Bin Laden. 
plmpe^reliThis" coming from a people undertake as elected and They are also not an attempt to 

man who received the majority of non-elected government employ- 

his wealth from his father.) His ees. 

The focus shifts from the "We 
have nothing better to do than 
complain about these people" atti- 
tude toward the "What are they 
going to do" attitude which has 



countries worldwide. This has Taliban will more than likely be 
given us an opportunity to gather the easiest part of the battle to be 
support from other nations, fought against terrorism 



In next weeks edition of the 
"Political Probe," find out why I 
believe that the Taliban will be 
overthrown and Bin Laden will be 
killed or brought to justice, but 
not necessarily by US forces. 
Also, are we truly winning the 
war of propaganda? 



wealth is estimated to be $200 
million. They believe that we 
have no right to have military 
troops safeguarding the Middle 
East region and, not least impor- 



Student Flu Shots 



tantly, they do not share the same been apparent since the recent cat- 
overall religious beliefs as the astrophes. Our officials did a great 

job of not jumping the gun. They 
collected evidence pointing 
toward the association of al- 
Qaeda and Bin Laden with these 
events before making a decisive 
decision. This worked in our favor 
in more ways than one. 

In the time preceding our retali- 
ation to the September Uth 



majority of Americans. 

It has become commonplace for 
US citizens to negatively criticize 
our government. Government 
officials, be it elected or unelecl- 
ed, are often scrutinized for their 
actions. Elected officials are often 
seen as "crooked politicians" and 



^_____^ ^ government employees are often 

Interpretadon of "the Koran. Bin viewed as "lazy." This discontent attacks , you may recall that many 

Laden is the financial mastermind for officials has increased since 

behind the al-Queda network, the 70s during the Watergate scan- 



Tuesday, Oct. 30- 

248 Semmell, 4-5.30 p.m. 

Ballentine, 7-7:30 p.m. 

Bccht Hall, 7:30-8 p.m. 

Campbell Hall, 8-9 p.m. 
Wednesday. Oct. 31- 

Wilkinson, 6-7 p.m. 

Nair, 7-8 p.m. 

Ralston, 8-8:30 p.m. 

6ivan, 8:30-9 p.m. 



Cost ' $9 and will be billed to your student 
account. 




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Phone: (814) 782-6394 Fax: (814) 782-6385 

We Sell and Service All Makes of Cars and Light Trucks! 
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We Care Hair offers a wide selection of professional hair products, 
^" facials, manicures, pedicures, ^"^^ead massages. 
Walk-Ins and appointments are welcome for all of these, including 

haircuts and coloring. 



/Kf^ay^ Sep+embeF* 11: AfgKarvSy ^Amanaans and 
7^ sei^ies oj- Public Dialogues 



Due to the complexity of issues and probfems brought on by the terroist attacks against the United 
^States on Sept. 11 and the subsequent bombing of Afghanistan, there is a wide-ranging need for education 

and public discussion. 

To address these needs, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Political Science Association will spon- 
sor, a series of sessions designed to inform and stimulate discussion of these problems, entitled, "After 
September 11: Arabs, Afghans, Americans and Anthrax- A Series of Public Dialogs," Nov. 1. 

The sessions will be divided into four periods. During each period, three sessions will run concurrently. 
One to three faculty members will be on hand to give a brief presentation and lead each session. 

A complete schedule will be posted across campus and circulated through university e-mail later this 

week. 

The time blocks will be: 3:30-4:45 p.m.; 5-6:15 p.m.; 6:30-7:45 p.m.; and 8-9:15 p.m. 

The event will take place on the first floor of Founders Hall. 

Some of the topics to be discussed include: bioterrorism, patriotism, economic impacts, historical analo- 
gies, social psychology, U.S. Foreign Policy, Islam, faith-based approaches to war and nonviolence, for- 
eign reactions to the crisis, feminist approaches, as well as a discussion of how to communicate with chil- 
dren concerning these events in school seUings. All students, faculty and the public are welcome to attend 



Page 6 



Tne CcAR/o/\/ Cau 



October 25, 2001 



I 




/\/eiji/s 




Flame to Fire VigU lights up the night 



by Lindsey Lowrie 
Clarion Call Staff Wn;ter 

Thursday evening, Oct. 18, men 
and women congregated on the 
lawn outside of Harvey Hall to pay 
homage to the survivors of rape, 
domestic abuse, racism and hate 
crimes. The Flame to Fire Vigil, 
sponsored by Dr Deborah 
Burghardt and the Women's Studies 
Center, lasted about 45 minutes; but 
the content of what was said during 
this brief gathmng will resonate in 
the ears of all whom attended for a 
long time. 

Tma Wagner, of Triota, gave the 
welcoming, and then turned the 



microphone over to Amber 
Klobchar, whom spoke on behalf of 
PASSAGES. Amber gave some 
startling statistics on domestic 
abuse. 

The next speaker was Jamie 
Shropshire of SAFE. Deidre 
Lesesne, of Women United, spoke 
eloquently on behalf of race rela- 
tions by reading an original poem 
that portrayed how it feels to be 
someone of a minority race. 

Moniqua Williams, of Zeta Tau 
Alpha, represented the Susan G. 
Komen breast cancer foundation. 
Every year, the 2^ta Tau Alpha 
sorority raises funds to donate to the 
Susan G. Komen foundation on 



behalf of survivors everywhere. 

Alicia Shropshire invited everyone 
to attend the Laramie Project, which 
is a play based on the infamous town 
of Laramie, Wyoming. Laramie is 
where Matthew Shepard, a gay col- 
lege student, was brutally killed 
because of his sexual orientation. 
The play runs Nov. 13-17 and focus- 
es on how hate and ignorance can 
grow in a small town. 

Christina Yokum spoke, for the 
first time in a public forum, of her 
own experience involving an abu- 
sive relationship. She spoke in 
solemn detail about being abused for 
years and never having the courage 
to speak up against it. Christina gave 



a heartfelt plea to all young women, 
and even men, who are in or have 
ever been in an abusive relationship, 
to speak out and get out. 

The next woman to share her story 
was Jacque Walsh, a representative 
of STAR (Students Together Against 
Rape). Jacque, for the first time, 
explained how she was raped at the 
age of 16 by her longtime boyfriend. 
Emotions filled her speech as she 
explained how she was afraid to tell 
anyone for years. Jacque said that 
after the incident she had told two of 
her longtime childhood friends, and 
they did not believe her. This took 
away her courage to tell anyone else 
or seek help for years. She echoed 



Christina's plea to never be afraid to 
tell someone and to know it is not 
your fault. 

Jolene Painter, also of Triota, led 
the closing to the Vigil. All in atten- 
dance lit candles to remember those 
who are not victims, but survivors, 
of rape, domestic abuse, racism, and 
hate crimes. A networking reception 
followed immediately after the vigil 
with artwork by Carrie Knapton. 

If you or someone you know has 
been a victim of any of these crimes 
and needs someone to talk to, visit 
the Counseling Center in Egbert 
Hall. In addition, PASSAGES and 
SAFE can each be contacted 24 
hours a day. 



Initiative! from Front Page 



Every activity must be open to 
all Clarion University students, 
and events must be held on cam- 
pus. However, certain ideas for 
off campus activities may be 
given special consideration by 
Senate. 

Senator McCabe encouraged 
organizations to "pair-up" when 
hosting events, however organiza- 
tions who choose to do this must 
inform the Rules, Regulations, & 
Policies Committee when submit- 
ting applications. 

Treasurer Clopp advised organi- 
zation members to be creative and 
to program wisely. Vice President 
Gring said Senate recently pur- 
chased a publication entitled 
"5,000 Weekend Programming 
Ideas" at the national conference; 
this book is available in the 
Student Senate office in Room 
269 Gemmell. 

Organization representatives 
present at the meeting received an 
event proposal form and a Budget 
Request form for the spring 
semester. These documents must 
be completed and turned in to the 
Student Activities office by 
Friday, Nov. 9, 2001. 

According to Vice President 
Gring, if two organizations were 



to propose the same event, activi- 
ties would be approved on a first- 
come, first-serve basis. 

Senator McCabe said those 
organizations who did not attend 
the meeting would have their 
accounts frozen, upon approval 
by Senate, until they meet with 
Student Senate to obtain proper 
information. Those organizations 
that fail to turn in their forms by 
the specified date will have their 
accounts frozen as well. 
President Chervenak recognized 



the fact that the Weekend 
Programming Initiative may not 
work perfectly from the begin- 
ning. However, that is why the 
initiative will be reviewed at the 
end of the 2002-2003 school year. 
He said, "We understand that 
100% of the students will not 
come to these events the first year 
this program is running, but this is 
to be expected. The program is a 
success though, even if only a 
small percentage of the students 
take advantage of the events. We 







Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Organizations met with Student Senate, Monday, Oct. 22, to 
discuss ttie Weel<end Programming initiative, ttiat is designed 
to l<eep students on campus and away from aicotioi related 
activities over ttie weel<ends. 



are not only giving students some- 
thing more to do on the weekends, 
also giving them an alternative to 
only alcohol-related events on the 
weekend." 

Vice President Gring believes 
the plan will prove beneficial by 
providing students with opportu- 
nities to engage in non-alcohol 
related activities and by prompt- 
ing more students to spend their 
weekends on campus. 

She said, "Student Senate gives 
about 75 organizations money to 
use however they choose, so for 
organizations to give back two 
hours to the students is not asking 
a lot." 

Clarion University students 
seem to have mixed feelings on 
the new initiative. Senior Brian 
Monico, Vice President of the 
National Student Speech 
Language Hearing Association 
(NSSLHA) said, "I think it's a 
good idea to increase student 
involvement in non-alcohol activ- 
ities; however smaller organiza- 
tions, such as NSSLHA, which' 
include major-specific members 
most likely won't have a large 
turnout since they're not as well- 
known on campus. Unless the ini- 
tiative is publicized throughout 



the university, then their sched- 
uled events could turn out to be 
just another organizational meet- 
ing." 

Senior Julie Obleski, president 
of the International Association of 
Business Communicators (lABC) 
believes the outcome depends on 
student cooperation. 

She said, "It's hard to predict 
how this program will turn out. I 
can see the positive effects for the 
students, but it will need 100% 
student support for it to work." 

Senior Melanie Kondor, 
President of the Society of Human 
Resource Management (SHRM) 
shared a similar opinion. 

She said, "I think it's definitely 
a good thing that they're trying to 
get students more involved and 
trying to get ihem to stay in 
Clarion on weekends. I just hope 
people actually take advantage of 
it." 

Upon conclusion of the meeting, 
members of Senate welcomed any 
questions regarding the program. 
They expressed appreciation to ail 
representatives for attending the 
meeting and to all organizations 
for, working with Senate to imple- 
ment the new Weekend 
Programming Initiative. 






Senator Collier 
announces new^ 
flex meal plan to 

Faculty Senate 
See Page 7. 



BSU boasts 

full schedule 

See Page 7. 



Student Senate 

passes 

Weekend 

Programming 

Initiative 

See Page 9. 



Accounting Club 

receives 

achievement 

av^ard 
See Page 9. 



October 25, 2001 



T^e CMm/^ Cau 



Page 7 



Black Student Union 



BSU boasts fall schedule 



by Susan Campbell 
Clarion Call News Editor 



The Black Student Union 
(BSU) has a busy schedule 
planned for the end of October 
and November. The upcoming 
events were the basis of discus- 
sion at the meeting Thursday, 
Oct. 18. 

The first event discussed was 
"Bowl-a-ween." It is scheduled 
for Saturday. Oct. 27, from II 
a.m. -2 p.m., and will take place at 
the Clarion Bowling Allev. 
"Bow I -a- ween" is tree, open to 
all students and transportation 
will be provided. A van will be in 
front of Campbell Hall to pick up 
students at 10:30 a.m. and in front 
of Nair and Wilkinson Halls at 
10:45 a.m. 

BSU announced that their 
General Body Meeting will be 
held Nov. 1, at 6 p.m. in the 
RACS lounge. 

Another event scheduled for 
next month is an open forum 
"Round Table" discussion, Nov. 



14, at 7 p.m., in 252 Gemmell. 
Although the topics of discussion 
are subject to change due to stu- 
dent participation, they may 
include: political, racial and work 
issues. 

"I hope we all walk away from 
the discussion with something 
we've learned," said Ian 
Wingfield, president of BSU. 

Scheduled for Nov. 17, BSU 
will be holding their own "Gong 
Show" at 7 p m. in Hart Chapel. 
There is a $1 admission and all 
students are invited. There will be 
prizes awarded for the first, sec- 
ond and third place winners. 

A discussion about a guest 
speaker for the Spring 2002 
semester concluded the meeting. 

"The Executive Board is work- 
ing very hard," Wingfield said. 
"Everybody is doing a good job 
making the organization produc- 
tive and positive for students at 
Clarion University." 

The next BSU meeting will be 
held Oct. 25, at 6 p.m. in 265 
Gemmell. 



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Faculty Senate 



Collier announces new meal plan 



by Adam Berteotti 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Student Senator Jackie 
Collier announced at the 
Facuky Senate meeting on Oct. 
22, a new meal plan that would 
be available to off-campus stu- 
dents. 

The meal plan will consist of 
$100 in flex. The students also 
may add to their accounts by 
$25 increments. As with flex 
dollars for on-campus students, 
the flex dollars are not refund- 
able. 

Collier also talked about the 
Weekend Programming 

Initiative Student Senate had in 
mind to keep students on cam- 
pus over the weekends. It had 
been sighted that a large num- 
ber of students leave the cam- 
pus on weekends. Student 
Senate would like to put togeth- 
er positive based activities to 
interest the student body to stay 
on campus. 

Dr. Susan Prezzano, professor 
of the anthropology depart- 
ment, reported on a meeting of 
the Admissions Subcommittee 
that took place last week. The 
meeting discussed issues of the 
number of people that inquire 
about Clarion University com- 
pared to the number of students 
who actually enroll. There is an 
average of 45,000 people that 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Faculty Senate learns about new meal plan and discusses 
ways to increase enrollment at ttieir meeting Oct 22. 



inquire about Clarion, where as 
a small fraction of that number 
enroll. 

Possible solutions discussed 
were to target out of state areas, 
like Cleveland, and large home 
state areas, like Pittsburgh, with 
more awareness of the campus 
in Clarion. Another idea was to 
lower out-of-state enrollment 
fees. 

Prezzano added that another 
strong selling point for the 
University is that all courses 
are taught by Ph.D.s or the 
equivalent. She also mentioned 
of targeting high school stu- 
dents in organizations such as 
the Summer Academics and 



programs run by the honors 
program. 

Mrs. Susan Traynor, professor 
of the CIS department 
announced at the meeting that 
three programs were delayed in 
the curriculum. An A.S. in 
Occupational Therapy and a 
M.A. in English will be effec- 
tive for Fall 2001. A B.A. in 
Earth Science will be effective 
in the Spring 2002 semester. 

The Senate voted to take 
courses ED 217 

(Microcomputer Applications 
in the Classroom) and ED 225 
(Multicultural Education) of 
the table as part of general edu- 
cation. 



PDS presents "How to Dine and Act Fine" 



by Jennifer Marz 
Contributing Writer 

"How to Dine and Act Fine" 
was the topic presented by the 
Professional Development 

Series, Oct. 22. Milford 
Dennison from Chartwell's 
Catering Services was the speak- 
er. 

The session provided informa- 
tion about eating out in a restau- 
rant on an interview or job situa- 
tion. Some points addressed dur- 
ing the session included: place 
settings, recognizing which sil- 
verware to use. table etiquette, 
and proper meal ordermg. 

There were 48 participants at 



the session. 

"I feel that the Professional 
Development Series greatly 
improved my professional atti- 
tude," said Terri Chrismore, 
senior elementary ed/special 
education. 

"The Professional 
Development Series has 
increased my knowledge and 
furthered my understanding of 
the professional world," said 
Kelly McFarland, senior special 
education. 

"The Professional 
Development Series addressed 
many topics that will help all 
students become successful in 



the professional world," said 
Lynne Pinkerton, assistant coor- 
dinator of the program. 

"The Professional 
Development Series events 
expose students to many valu- 
able experiences," said Michelle 
King, senior elementary educa- 
tion. 

The next PDS topic will 
address Application Letters, Oct. 
29, at 5:30 p.m. in 250 Gemmell. 
The presenter will be Dr. 
Darlynn Fink, professor of the 
English department. She will 
provide tips for developing 
effective letters and will facili- 
tate a small-group activity. 



Correction 

In last week's issue, Oct. 18, photos of Bob Kusbit and 

Lockwood Philips were inadvertantly switched. 

We want to clarify the mix-up. 



Page 8 



Tne ecAm/\/ Cau 



October 25, 2O0 



Public Safety Blotter 



person, causing or 
risking a catastrophe, 
ttijuring or tampering 

|iy W flr^ op p 0r$>tMg i 

According to Public Safety, 
Campus police are 



investigating an incident in 
Wilkinson Hall where 
person(s) disabled and 
damaged the fire alarni 
system for Wilkinson Hall. 
Police urge that anyone with 
information should contact 
police at 393-2111. 

Harassment 

According to Public Safety, a 



professor reported being 
harassed by a known student, 
in Davis Hall, Oct. 15.2001, 
at 10:40 a.m. The incident is 
under investigation. 

Underage drinking 

According to Public Safety, 
Anna Hodakovsky, 18, of 624 
Wilkinson Hall was charged 
with underage drinking on the 





tILV Vftl CAN PICYIMT rOICIT rilES 

«««.t»§lit|b«ar.c«M 





% 




Sixth floor Of Wilkinson HatI, 
Oct. 14,2001, at 2:48 am 

tnjMf fug Qf tf miMMg 
with f irg hy#i)ifitet ^. 

According to Pt^lic Safety, 
unknown p0rson(s) did tamper 
with the strobe/sound alarms 
by cutting the wires rendering 
them inoperative In the event 
of a fire on the second ftoor 
North Naif Halt, Oct. 12, 2001 , 
at 11:02 p.m. 

Underage consumption 
of liquor, malt or 

brewg^ Nv?rffgg 

According to Public Safety, 
Michael Clark, 20, of 324 Nair 
Hall was found sitting on a 
bench outside of Nair Hall 
unconscious (sleeping), Oct. 
13, 2001, at 6:40 a.m. 

Theft 

According to Public Safety, 
actor{s) removed a wallet from 
a victim's door, in Nair Hall 
sixth floor, and used the 
victim's credit card, Oct. 1 4, 
2001. at 5:30 p.m. 

According to Public Safety, 
Campus police are 
investigating a theft of a 
wallet from Tippin Gym, Oct. 
12, 2001 at 12:10 p.m. 

Driving under the 
influence of alcohol 

According to Public Safety, 
Jamie Volkman, 21 , of 
Pittsburgh, Pa was charged 
with DUf after lab tests 
showed a BACof .21% 
following a traffic stop on 
Sept. 29. 2001 at 3 a.m. 

Criminal Mischief 

According to Public Safety, 
Josh Cotelesse, 18, of 300A 
Campbell Hall did tamper with 
tangible property of another, 
so as to endanger said 
property, and attempted to 
take a shopping c^rt into his 
dorm room, Oct. 11, 2001, at 
12:36 a.m. 

According to Public Safety, 
Robert Russel, 18, of 300A 
Campbell Hall attempted to 
take a shopping cart into his 
domn room, Oct. 11, 2001, at 
12:36 a.m. 

According to Public Safety, an 
unknown person damaged a 
red Cavalier whrch was 



parked in Parking Lot 
B/behind Campbell Hall, Sep 
30, 2001, at 11:30 p.m. 

According to Public Safety, 
some unknown person (s) 
kicked the passenger side 
door twice on a vehicle 
parked in Lot B, and also 
ripped off the gasoline cover, 
Oct, 6, 2001 , at 2:00 a.m. 

Harassing telephone 

calls 

According to Public Safety ar 
unknown male made 
harassing and obscene 
telephone calls to female 
residents in Campbell Hall. 
Oct. 1, 2001. at 2:20 a.m. 

False alarms to 
agencies of Public 
Safety/Injuring or 
tampering with fire 
hydrants, etc. 

According to Public Safety, 
unknown person(s) did 
activate the fire alarm system 
in Nair Hall without just cause 
Oct. 9, 2001 , at 1 :59 a.m. 

Burglary and theft 

According to Public Safety, a 
Student reported someone 
entered his room and took his 
wallet sometime during the 
early morning hours of Oct. 9, 
2001. 

Tampering with fire 
a pparatus 

According to Public Safety, 
unknown person(s) opened a 
fire hose valve and caused 
water to leak from the sixth 
floor stairwell to the basemeni 
in the east stainwell of Nair j 
Hall, Oct. 7, 2001 , at 7 a.m. I 

Title 18 section 5504a 

tJailSSQOISDlJ^ I 

communication 

According to Public Safety, 
Campus police are 
Investigating a report of 
harassment by communicatloii 
made by a resident of 
Campbell Hall. Oct. 6, 2001, 
at 1:43 p.m. 

Disorderly conduct 

According to Public Safety, 
two unknov/n students were 
involved in a verbal 
confrontation in Parking Lot 5. 
Oct. 5, 2001 . The problem 
was resolved without arrests. 



October 25, 2001 



Student Senate 



ne CcAP/o^ Cau 



Page 9 



Weekend Programming Initiative passes with unanimous vote 



by Michelle D'Uva 

Clarion Call Assistant News 

Editor 

Members of Student Senate 
voted unanimously Monday 
evening to pass the motion to 
freeze accounts of all organiza- 
tions not present at the Weekend 
Programming Initiative meeting. 
Funds will be unfrozen with per- 
mission from Student Senate via 
contact with Mr. Lee Krull's 
[Business Manager] office. 

According to Vice President 
Missy Gring, Senate will not re- 
notify these organizations 
because each CSA-funded orga- 
nization had previously received 
information regarding this mat- 
ter. President Ben Chervenak 
said a representative from these 
organizations should take a few 
minutes to meet with Senate in 
order to obtain the information 
needed to comprehend this pro- 
gram. 

In other business, Treasurer 
Tom Clopp moved to allocate 
$1,250 from the Supplemental 
Reserve account to ARATE for 
registration to their national con- 
ference. Treasurer Clopp pointed 
out to Senate that although repre- 
sentatives of ARATE did not 




Jar\ice Shanko/The Clarion Call 



Student Senate unanimously passed the Weekend 
Programming Initiative at ttieir meeting, Oct. 22. 



complete a lot of fund-raising 
activities, they have performed 
over 350 hours of community 
service. In addition, members 
attending the national confer- 
ence would be presenting infor- 
mation, thus representing the 
university. 

According to ARATE President 
Joe Fiedor and Vice President 
Adam Osterrieder, there is cur- 
rently only one member of their 
organization who is not in the 
Clarion University Honors 
Program. However, they are 



establishing a public relations 
committee to recruit new mem- 
bers; ARATE is open to any stu- 
dent who would like to promote 
academic excellence. 

After Senate unanimously 
passed Senator Mike McCabe's 
motion to call to question, they 
passed Treasurer Clopp's origi- 
nal motion by a 13-2-6 vote. 

Treasurer Clopp had also 
moved to allocate $850 from the 
Supplemental account to the 
Leadership Institute for their 
2001-2002 budget. The motion 



carried 20-0-1. 

Senator Tameka Washington, 
chair of the Committee on Sub- 
Committees, presented three 
motions to Senate. First, she 
moved to appoint Mrs. Diana 
Anderson-Brush and Dr. 
Elizabeth Donato to the CSA 
Board of Directors as faculty 
representatives; the motion 
passed by a 21-0-0 vote. 

Next, Senator Washington 
moved to appoint Clarion 
University students Keegan 
Bauldoff and Christina 
Baumgartel to the CSA Board of 
Directors; this motion carried 
21-0-0 as well. 

Finally, Senator Washington 
moved to appoint Senator 
Rebecca Emert, Senator Jen 
Reis, and Parliamentarian 
Wendy Kengor to the Foundation 
Advisory Board; the motion 
passed 20-0-1. 

Treasurer Clopp reported, on 
behalf of the UAB, upcoming 
sand volleyball activities Friday, 
October 26 behind Campbell 
Hall. In addition, UAB is spon- 
soring Patricia Gagliardo, who 
will be presenting "Voices from 
Beyond" Sunday, Oct. 28 at 8:00 
p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

Mr. Krull announced trans- 



portation to southeastern parts of 
Pennsylvania for Thanksgiving 
break. A bus is scheduled to 
depart from Campbell Hall 
Tuesday, Nov. 20, at 3:30 p.m., 
and will return on Sunday, Nov. 
25. 

Senator Dustin Tudor, chair of 
the Housing Concerns 
Committee, tried to abolish the 
rumor that there would be no 
freshmen parking available next 
year. He said students should not 
be alarmed; this is only a myth. 

Treasurer Clopp reported the 
following amounts in each of the 
accounts: Capital, $86,415.43; 
Large Item Capital, $434,892.64; 
Supplemental, $13,306; and 
Supplemental Reserve, $50,510. 

Finally, Vice President Gring 
announced Senator Jackie 
Collier as Senator of the Week. 
Senator Collier said, "1 am very 
appreciative of the student body 
for electing me to be a Student 
Senator this year. Things with 
my committee are going excel- 
lent, and I'm looking to imple- 
ment some more positive 
changes on campus this year." 

The next Student Senate meet- 
ing is scheduled for Monday, 
Oct. 29, at 7:30 p.m. in 246 
Gemmell. 



Accounting Club receives achievement award of excellence 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Ca'j Staff Writer 

The .Accounting Club 
recently received the Clark 
Johnson Gold Achievement 
Award of Excellence. The 
Institute of Management 
Accountants (l.M.A.) pre- 
sents this award every year 
to a college level account- 
ing club that demonstrates 
involvement in various pro- 
grams and projects. These 
programs and projects must 
show knowledge in the 
accounting field. 

The Accounting Club par- 
ticipates in programs like 
Voluntarily Income Tax 
Assistance (VITA) and the 
Special Olympics. The 
VITA program occurs each 
spring when the Accounting 
Club performs tax returns 
for the elderly and low 
income tax groups. With 
this, these groups avoid 
paying high costs to profes- 
sional accountants 



Colleen Faller, Vice 
President of the Accounting 
Club said, "I contribute us 
winning to our dedication 
and ambition. We work hard 
and hold a couple monthly 
meetings. Also, the contin- 
uous speakers we host real- 
ly pointed us in the right 
direction on the accounting 
road." 

During the meetings, the 
.Accounting Club often 
hosts different speakers. 
Usually, these speakers 
cover different contempo- 
rary accounting issues. 
From public accounting and 
the CPA exam to corporate 
accounting and non-profit 
organizations, these speak- 
ers provide the members 
with in-depth information 
and trends. In addition, the 
Accounting Club attends 
l.M.A. Seminars. 

Also, the Accounting 
Club holds an annual spring 
field trip to a Pittsburgh 
accounting firm. With this, 




Photo courtesy of Sue Patton 



Some Accounting Club members tool< a field trip to 
Pittsburgh to visit Alpern-Rosenthal. 



members experience a 
"hands-on" view of the 
daily routine of a larger 
firm. Immediately after the 
field trip, the members 
attend a Job Fair. 
Conveniently, the Job Fair 
is designed for Clarion 
members only, and this 
allows them to network 



their names into the busi- 
ness world. 

With all their programs 
and activities, the 

Accounting Club prepared a 
report to show their 
progress and future goals in 
the accounting world for 
the l.M.A. Besides winning 
this year; the Accounting 



Club has won six out of the 
last seven years. Clarion 
competes against at least 30 
other schools for this 
award. 

The l.M.A. also congratu- 
lated the club for their 
increase in membership. In 
fact, the Accounting Club 
increased their membership 
to 70 students. Martha 
Whalen, Accounting Club 
Secretary said, "The 
increase in membership is 
exciting. I am just excited 
about the whole award." 

Mrs. Patton is the 
Accounting Club advisor. 
The officers include: 
Lynette Snyder, President; 
Colleen Faller, Vice 
President of Meetings; Matt 
Mastarone, Vice President 
of Membership; Lisa Kahle, 
Vice President of Publicity; 
Mike Mangieri, Treasurer; 
Martha Whalen, Secretary; 
Mark Mackewich, l.M.A. 
Liaison; and Joseph Deza, 
Career Liaison. 



j^ 



Page 10 




Th C^m/m Cau 



October 25, 2001 



5ing brings 




by Jeff Chaffee 
.... .'?!?.'■.'?.". .*9?.'! .^^^ Writer 

I was talking to one of my 
friends before I sat down to write 
this and mentioned that I'd gone 
to Michelle's Cafe Tuesday 
evening to hear Clarion's own 
Roots Rising. "Oh yeah, I like 
them, but 1 can't ever stay 
awake. ..they're so relaxing! 
Especially if I'm in one of tho.se 
big chairs. It's all over then." 
they said. 

The show Tuesday was really 
everythmg you would expect if 
someone told you "acoustic set 
at a college-town coffeehouse ;'" 
candles flickering before the 



band, the ungodly roar of the 
steaming machine in the back- 
ground, and three dudes sittin', 
chillin', and jammin'. Hey, I 
was game. The night was so 
crappy outside, an exhibit of 
17th century anything would 
have gotten me in out of the 
rain. Nothing personal, Roots 
boys. 

I grabbed my bagel and tea and 
settled in to be the rock critic 
guy. Tron Valentine (bass/gui- 
tar) came over and greeted me, 
as he was not in the first few 
songs for the evening. I asked 
him a little about the band, 
including some song titles from 
the setlist (as I'm horrible at 



remembering such things, even 
with a notepad in front of me). 

Roots Rising is usually com- 
prised of five people strumming 
to their heart's content, but their 
set on Tuesday was a pared- 
down trio. ..Valentine, Kris 
Piemonte on Guitar, and Todd 
Henzler on vocals. The impres- 
sive 2-hour set was in fact very 
relaxing; had I been in one of the 
armchairs and not preoccupied 
with some rather delicious pecan 
pie, I would've been out too. 
The evening's set featured a 
number of original songs, 
including "Hero," "Greatest 
Day," "The Root." and "Wait," 
while also offerinti a few crowd- 



pleasing covers (DMB's "Jimi 
Thing," Staind's "Outside," and 
Bob Dylan's "Knocking on 
Heaven's Door"). For those less 
familiar with the boys' sound, I 
suggest the following musical 
cocktail: add equal parts (listen- 
able) Bob Dylan and Dave 
Matthews with a twist of angst 
rock just for flavor. A pleasing 
aural array to say the least. 

Overall, the atmosphere was 
part study hall, part VHl 
"Storytellers." with the crowd 
equally into the music and their 
own homework or newspapers. 
While we all had things to do 
during the show, however, it was 
never that Roots look on a back- 



ground-noise connotation. ..a 
glance at my fellow cafe patrons 
showed plenty of thoughtful toe- 
tapping. 

Among the accolades Roots 
Rising have accumulated 
includes playing WDVE's Battle 
of the Bands concert at 
Washington-Jefferson 
University. 

You can catch Roots Rising 
every Tuesday night at Michell's 
Cafe at 7 p.m. every week. 
Roots Rising does show a lot of 
promise. After hearing them in 
the "quintessence" triad. I'd love 
to hear them as their full-tledged 
"rock band." Keep up the good 
work boys. 




Wher 




rion? 



Photo by Brian Fashian/The Clario n Call' 

IThe lineup of Roots Rising in their element - the live shov\/ at \ 
JMichell's Cafe. Pictured are (left to right): Tron Valentine, \ 
iTodd Henzler and Kris Piemonte, ! 



Tncff orTrea+TTfT 
T^e Qarron Cb{\ sfaff would 

(Ike to wl^h every ooe a 
^afe ancf hat>t>^ HaUoweet)! 





Photo by Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



Can you guess where this week's landmark is? Look for 
sights from Clarion every week in "Where In Clarion?" 




www.theclarioncall.com * 



Drew Barr)inore tugs at 

your heartstrings 

wdth her new film, 

Riding In Cars With Boys. 

For a review. 

See Page 11. 



French band Air trv to 

reinvent their sound 

wdth their new album, 

10 pm Hz Legend. 

For a review. 

See Page 12. 



Dave Barry tells us all 

about men's problems 

wdth gas, and how to 

deal with them this 

week. 

See Page 14. 



Calendar of Events. 
To find out what's 
going on at Clarion 
University and the 

community. 

See Page 12. 



October 25, 2001 



T^e CcAm/\i Cau 



Page 11 



Drew Barrymore takes you for an emotional Ride 



by Martisse Macri 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

It's every teenage girl's 
worst nightmare - getting 
pregnant. Riding In Cars With 
Boys, based on the true story 
of Beverly Donofrio (set in 
the 60s), stars Drew 



Barrymore as Beverly, a 
young girl who gets pregnant 
at the age of 15. The father of 
her baby, Ray, played by Steve 
Zahn says he loves Bev like 
no one else will, and wants to 
marry her. 

Before I go any further, I 
should give this warning - 



GUYS: definitely not a movie 
for you, a total "chick flick." 
LADIES: don't take your 
boyfriend to see this; go with 
your friends. 

Bev decides to keep the baby 
but doesn't want to marry Ray 
because she doesn't love him. 
When she finally works up the 



nerve to tell her parents that 
she's pregnant, her parents 
want her to marry Ray, but she 
tells them that she has her own 
plans. She wants to work and 
raise enough money to move 
to New York City to attend 
school, bringing her son, 
Jason, with her. 



also shows the trouble she 
puts Jason through, due to her 
belief that he is the reason she 
has never accomplished her 
dreams. This movie portrays 
how she was finally able to 
raise her son after his father 
turns to drugs and leaves the 
family. 



i 



.d: 




Come to a Qne-on-One 
CaunseJing Session ' 

One-pn-One Counseling. 

Get personal f.nancia'. 
guidanoe tc f'eip you 
ffcach youf financial goalb. 

Dates: 

Thursday, 10.25.01 

Friday* 10.26.01 

Time: .. ,, , 
9:00 am - -f^ pw^^ 








IN INVESTING, 



TIMING IS EVERYTHING 



WHICH IS WHY WE 



PROVIDED THE SCHEDULE 




jDrew Barrymore as Beverly and 
inew drama. Riding In Cars With 



Cody Arens as Jason in the 
Boys. 



Her father, whom she is very 
close to, tells her that she will 
not disgrace the family; she 
decides to marry Ray so she 
doesn't disappoint her father. 
Riding In Cars With Boys 
tells all about the ups and 
downs Bev encounters while 
trying to make her dreams of 
going to college come true. It 



This movie makes you real- 
ize how one day, just one 
moment can change the rest of 
your life; and how you can't 
plan out your life, but need to 
follow your heart. In this 
film, you will understand that 
every girl goes through the 
same troubles at one point in 
her life. 



ON THE LEFT. 






, Vy ^ v^V^■• 



Co Horseback Riding 
in C^k*s Forcsfll 








^•''»♦■^1ra 



TIAA-CREF Mi^dual and InsJitulioBBl S«f»ices. Ibc. 8R(t Twhers Personal Inwslofs Sannces, lac. distribute securities preducU. For mofecanipWe informalioii on our securities 
proifacts, c^l 1 800 842-2776, ext. 5509, for prospectuses. Read them carefully belore you invest. Teadiers tasuraace and Aaaaily Association (TIAA), New York, NY and 
TIAA-CREF life Insurance Co., New York. HY issue insurance and annuities. TIM-CREF Trust Company. F^ provides trust services. InvtstmenI prodacts ara aal FBIC InjarwI. 
nay ItM vaM aid ara net bank [uanntaad. O 20O1 Teachers Insurance and tenuity Assoaatits — Colleie Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF), New York, NY 08/20 




Sigo OP If W Clffiill If^ 



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■.■.■.•.. ■.■.■r.-.%-.-..'.-.\\-.\\-.'.-.-.-.-.-.-.yf.Y'------^^^^^^ 



Page 12 



Tne CiA/?/OiV Cau 



October 25, 2001 



v^ d 1 c n 




vents 



October 25, 2001 



Tne CiAmi^ Cau 



Page 13 



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IBfBfBfgfBIBISIBlBMBJBIBiBIBJBfaBJaglBEIBlBIBMBJBlBi^^ 



Thursday, October 25 

•Brass Ensemble Concert (Aud) 8 pm 
Friday, October 26 

•UAB Spirit Day 

•Volleyball vs. Shippensburg 7 pm 

•Second Series Prod (Chap) 8 pm 

•Admissions Visit Day (248 Gem) 9 am 

•Class Withdrawls end 4 pm 

•UAB: A 

Ghoulish 

Sand 

Volleyball 

Tournament 

«& Pumpkin 

Races 

(Campbell 

Courts) 2 pm. 

Rain Site: 

Rec Center 

Saturday, 

October 27 

•Football vs. Indiana 1 pm 

•W. Soccer vs. Shippensburg 1 pm 

•Second Series Prod (Chap) 8 pm 

•Cross Country at PSAC's (Lock Haven) 

•Swimming & Diving Pre-Season Inv. (Clarion) 

Sunday, October 28 

•MSS Spiritual (Chap) 3:30 pm 

•W. Soccer at Westminster 1 pm 

•Daylight Savings Time ends (turn clocks back one hour) 2 

am 

•Clarion Diving Invitational 10 am 




•UAB: Patricia Gagliardo "Voices from Beyond" (Chap) 


8 pm 


•UAB: Horseback Riding (Cook's Forest) 12:30 pm 


Monday, October 29 


•Faculty Senate Mtg. (B-8 Chap) 3:30 pm 


•Professional Development Series (250/252 Gem) 5:30 


pm 


•SAI Music Recital (Aud) 8:15 pm 


•IM entries due in Rec Center (3 on 3 basketball) 


•Student Senate 


1 


Mtg. (246 Gem) 


/^ 


7:30 pm 


^y/^n 


Tuesday, 


October 30 


yf^'^^^ V 


•IM entries due 


f ^^'^s. 


in Rec Center 


v^ ^X-^ ^*V 


(Table Tennis) 


ivflK _) 


Wednesday, 


>^^r MlW/^^\j 


October 31 


pv ^ ]m ' jnl 


•HALLOWEEN 


\ mVMi^Bri 


•Volleyball vs. 


) «BMtf/ 4 


Slippery Rock 7 


y^ Vf VU^ 


pm 


^ ^■^SUKA 


•Leadership 


^^""^^^ ^^HrSlvM 


Development 


^S^,^ VBi ^ft 


Series (250/252 


^'"'"^"''^^r tBi 


Gem) 7:00 pm 


Va ^f^ 


•Swimming and 
Diving vs. 


Mi .--/ 


Allegheny 6 pm 


1 


•UAB: Robert Mi 


rabel "Music From a Painted Cave" i 


(Aud) 8 pm 



JBigigjaagiBIBiaaaBiaBIBlifBIBlBjaaiBJBIBiaBiaglBiaM^^ 



1 



i 



DESTINTW THE/^RiWili 
CLARION MALb^^*^^^^^ 
Movie Schedule 



K-Pax PG-i; 

12:50 3:15 6:05 8:40 



Thirteen Ghosts 
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 



Rideing In Cars With Boys Rl 
12:45 3:25 6:05 8:45 



From Hell 
1:15 3:45 6:30 9:00 



Corky Romano PG-i3i 
1:20 3:20 5:20 7:20 9:10 



The Last Castle 
1:00 3:50 6:40 9:20 



Training Day 

4:55 9:10 



Serendipity 
1:00 3:00 7:20 



PG-13 



Remember you can catch the 

Golden Eagle Express to the 

theatre. Check out the schedule 

of bus times. 



Playing Fri. 26th Until i 
Thur. 1st i 

Movie line 
227-2115 

Check us out on the web at 
WWW.Destlnta.com 

. ■.^■.^ , .■.;.■.^^■.^v.^^:.>:.v.y.<:.>>>^^M.^«»X^»06«»« 

S7.00A(jylt 

S4 50 Child S Senior 

Student Discounts 

Get a SI off when |0u show a 
Clanon University ID 

VaiiclaNigKstw! Tuesday 

Tuesday - 
Bargain Night | 
$4.50 Tickets | 

Ask about I 



Frequent 
Movie Goer 
and our 
Frequent 
Popcorn 
Cards 




Bobby Gonzalez Lecture 




Photo by Jancee Shanko/The Clarion Call 



jPoet, lecturer and author Bobby Gonzalez spoke at Clarion University on Tuesday 
inight in Hart Chapel. Gonzalez spoke to the audience regarding "The American 
JHolocaust." Gonzalez was the latest speaker in the Martin Luther King, Jr. series. 



Music Review 



Air delivers a failed, but noble experiment 



by Keith Gwillim 
Clarion Call Lifestj'les Editor 

ARTIST/ALBUM: Air, 
10,000 Hz Legend. 

FOR FANS OF: 
Schizophrenic electronica, 
lounge music on acid. 

FOR FURTHER LISTEN- 
ING: Beck's Mutations; 
Stereolab's Emperor Tomato 
Ketchup; Syd Barrett-era Pink 
Floyd. 

With their 1998 release. 
Moon Safari, French band Air 
became the hipster's favorite 
band to name-drop. They 
were relatively unheard-of up 
'till that time, played cool-as- 
ice, spaced-out lounge techno, 
had stylish and iconoclastic 
animated videos. ..for God's 
sake - they came from France! 
Moon Safari landed on many 
year-end best-of lists, and Air 
were crowned as a visionary 
force to be reckoned with. 

While Air decided how to 
deal with all this adoration, 
they released a collection of 
early songs and b-sides to bide 
time, and scored the Sophia 
Coppolla film. The Virgin 
Suicides. Both soundtrack 
and album went on to become 
critic's darlings, especially 
the darkly seductive 

"Playground Love'" single. 
That move was cause for many 
people to label them the new 
Pink Floyd, as they moved 
further from their bedroom- 
encounter electronica to a 
more drugged, band-based 
sound; decidedly less user- 
friendly, and more avante- 
garde. Moon Safari was their 
Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, 
The Virgin Suicides was their 
Obscured By Clouds, and the 
long-awaited new album was 
sure to be the second coming 
of Dark Side Of The Moon. 

Not quite. Perhaps taking a 
cue from Radiohead, Air com- 



pletely turned everyone's 
expectations on their head 
with 10,000 Hz Legend. The 
album is a grab-bag of styles, 
influences and sounds, at once 
coherent and unfocused. 
Hipsters everywhere mourned 
the loss of their flagship band. 
The main difference between 
Moon Safari and 10.000 Hz 
Legend is this: ...Safari is an 
album to have sex to, and 
...Legend is an album to take 



on your brain." Sexy, huh? 

It seems as if Air delights in 
tormenting their fair-weather 
fans. "How Does It Make You 
Feel?" is a complete mockery 
of Moon Safari and those who 
are enraptured by it. Seamless 
choirs and synthesizers are 
whispering sweet nothings in 
your ear, but then a computer 
voice materializes to deliver 
tongue-in-cheek lines such as 
"You are the most beautiful 




drugs to. There are precious 
few moments on ...Legend 
that's designed for romantic 
encounters; the breezy corne- 
ous of "All I Need" and 
"Kelly Watch The Stars" have 
been supplanted by the acid- 
fried psychedelic folk of "The 
Vagabond" and the glam-rock 
leanings of "Radio #1." 
Where sultry females crooned 
lines such as "You make it 
easy to watch the world with 
love," there are now comput- 
erized vocals warning you that 
they "want to patch my soul 



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entity that I've ever dreamed 
oL" The chorus is one big 
taunt; it's not a lover asking if 
their partner is fulfilled, it's 
the band jeering at the listen- 
er, daring them to accept Air's 
new identity. 

The only concession to the 
Moon crowd is the seven- 
minute mood-piece that is 
"Radian." Building from a 
droning synth loop and word- 
less "ohhhh-ohhhh" vocaliz- 
ing, "Radian" explodes in a 
burst of vibrant harps and 
playful flutes. Capped off 
with a lyrical yet understated 
acoustic guitar, "Radian" is 
the only song off of 10,000 Hz 
Legend that you would put on 
a mix CD for "that special 
night." Yet it also functions 
as a joke, too. It's sort of like 
saying "look what we can do, 
but this is all you're going to 
get." It's one big tease. 

Most of 10,000 Hz Legend 
occupies this half-awake. 



half-dreaming state; the 
majority of the songs are 
down-tempo, but certainly 
aren't meant to be seductive. 
"Lucky and Unhappy," 
"Caramel Prisoner," 

"Electronic Performers" - 
these tracks and more are the 
heart of ...Legend, which is 
the record's biggest drawback. 
Impressively constructed as 
they are, at times it seems like 
Air is too willfully trying to 
change their sound - they're 
too forced, not natural 
enough. Besides providing a 
frame for noises that seem 
really trippy, there really isn't 
much substance behind them. 

Lack of quality songs is 
really the only thing that holds 
this back from being a truly 
great record. That fact is even 
more frustrating when you 
look at how Air has previously 
excelled in that area - the 
songs from Moon Safari and 
Virgin Suicides hold up under 
intense scrutiny and many 
repeated listens, whereas 
...Legend just gets flaky 
around the edges after a few 
spins. ...Le^e/!c/ has great per- 
sonality, wonderful produc- 
tion and execution, but the 
skeleton is just too brittle in 
too many places. But Air- 
heads willing to stick with it, 
...Legend will reveal a few 
gems. 

"Radio #1" is the album's 
first true highlight, and 
sounds nothing like Air's done 
before. Less Tangerine Dream 
and more Low-era David 
Bowie, "Radio #1" rides a 
rotund groove and percussive 
organ arrangements. Air 
makes great use of guest 
vocalists Ken Andrews and 
Jason Falkner, resulting in 
what sounds more like the 
work of a full band, and less 
like studio tinkers. "Radio 
#1" proves that with a strong 
foundation. Air can pretty 
much accomplish anything 
they wish. "People In The 
City"' replicates the sound of 
that song, albeit with a 
stronger focus on the synthe- 
sizer; less melodic and more 
rhythmic. 

"The Vagabond," which fol- 
lows, is a continuation of 
Air's exploration of a more 
organic sound. Featuring 



guest singer Beck (yes, that 
Beck), "The Vagabond" is a 
wonderful slice of easy-going 
folk-rock, yet refracted 
through a prism of odd-ball 
synthesizers and program- 
ming. It also marks the first 
time Air has traveled outside 
of the realm of sex, as far as 
lyrics go. The tale of a drifter 
who's searching for deeper 
meaning, "The Vagabond" is 
brought to life by Beck's 
keening multi-tracked vocal. 

Elsewhere on ...Legend. Air 
just gets plain freaky, as in 
"Sex Born Prison." A minor- 
key dirge is interrupted by a 
prog-rock explosion of key- 
boards and fuzz-guitar, fol- 
lowed by a chorus of Japanese 
girls singing God-knows- 
what, perhaps a love song to 
Mothra. 

Perhaps if Air had tightened 
their focus and concentrated 
on writing a stronger batch of 
songs, ...Legend would be a 
truly wonderful trip around 
the dark side of the Moon 
Safari. But as it stands, it's an 
album of modest pleasures and 
half-baked experiments. With 
luck, they'll come into their 
own with this new sound on 
the next record, and we can 
look back on ...Legend as a 
tentative transitional album. 3 
out of 5 stars. 



Yoga Schedule 
Correction 

Gemmelt 

•Friday, 1 0/26/01 : 

7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

•Tuesday, 11/06/01: 
7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

•Tuesday, 11/13/01: 
7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

Recreation Center 

•Saturday, 10/27/01: 

7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

•Wednesday, 

11/07/01:7:30-8:30 

p.m. 

•Wednesday, 

11/13/01:7:30-8:30 

p.m. 



Page 14 



Tne CtAm/\i Cau 



October 25, 2001 



"Music From a Painted Cave" comes to Clarion 



story courtesy of 
University Relations 



Native American musician Robert 
Mirabal will present "Music From a 
Painted Cave" at Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania on October 3 1 at 8 
p.m. in the Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. Tickets for the concert 
are $8 and $4 for students with a valid 
Clarion University identification 
card. 

Mirabal is a leader of the Native 
American musical renaissance. He 
builds his melodies on the rituals that 
have surrounded him his entire life at 
Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. 

He grew up with his mother and 
grandparents and went to an Indian 



school where he learned to play many 
musical instruments. His want to per- 
sue a musical career took off when he 
learned to play the flute at age 18. 

"They say the flute chooses you, 
and it certainly has changed my life 
since then," says Mirabal. "I've spent 
most of my time traveling and playing 
music." 

Mirabal recorded an album with 
money borrowed from his grandmoth- 
er. He went on to record five albums 
for several music labels. He has trav- 
eled all over Europe. North America. 
Russia and Japan. The music of other 
cultures has als(^ influenced his style. 
He learned Japanese Taiko drumming, 
rhythms from West Africa and Haiti, 



picked up Celtic music, and immersed 
himself in rock, blues and hip-hop. 

"Music From a Painted Cave" draws 
on all those influences. This is 
Mirabal's first large-scale, multime- 
dia production. It features his band, 
Rare Tribal Mob. on cello, electric 
guitar, didgeridoo, vocals and percus- 
sion. Special lighting effects create 
the illusion of a petroglyph-filled 
cavern in which the performance 
takes place. 

"Music From a Painted Cave" grew 
from work on an album in 1997. 
Mirabal made his music scmnd differ- 
ent on the album This album and 
others helped him twice earn the 
Songwriter of the Year award at the 



Native American Music Awards, and 
Best New Age Artist by Amazon.com. 
His album, Taos Tales, broke into the 
Top 10 of the New Age charts. 

"I wanted to make an album that 
explored all of the things people 
experience, love, hate, fear, confusion 
and especially the loneliness that 
seems so pervasive in modern soci- 
ety." says Mirabal. "I wanted it to 
have a rock and roll edge." 

Mirabal filmed the work as a special 
for PBS during three performances at 
the Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut. 
He used visuals and segments of the 
history of the Taos Pueblo, and black 
and white stills of everyday life on 
the reservation for the special. 



Dave Barry tells us how to have fun with gas 



by Dave Barry 
Syndicated Writer 



A man — we'll call him 
"Harvey" — went to see a doctor, 
complaining of tiredness, bruises 
all over his body, shooting pains, 
and quotation marks around his 
name. The doctor immediately 
recognized these symptoms: 
"Harvey" had a snoring problem. 
At night, he was being jabbed 
repeatedly by his wife, trying to 
make him shut up. Also, some- 
body had apparently been shooting 
him. 

Yes, snoring is a serious health 
problem, one that affects more 
Americans than shark attacks and 
Rep. Gary Condit combined. Yet 
many people — and here I am in 
no way referring to my wife — 



refuse to admit that they snore. 
Even if they routinely emit noctur- 
nal noises that cause shingles to 
fly off the roof, they will be out- 
raged that you would leap to the 
conclusion that they are the source 
of the snoring, without consider- 
ing other explanations, such as that 
a third party, unknown to either of 
you, is sleeping in your bed. 

Women — and once again I am 
NOT referring to my wife — tend 
to be the worst snoring-deniers, 
because women are taught from an 
early age that it is not feminine to 
emit any noise or aroma that 
would indicate that they are bio- 
logical organisms. Men, on the 
other hand, consider bodily func- 
tions to be a highly masculine 
form of manliness. That's why 
men are not afraid to haul off and 



let go of a hearty burp, often as a 
way to emphasize a rhetorical 
point (Four score and seven 
BWOOOOOOOOOOORP years 
ago...). 

Men also take pride in another, 
even more basic, bodily emission, 
which, because this is a family 
newspaper, I will refer to by its 
technical name, "making a tooter." 
This is a popular thing to do when- 
ever males gather together. As a 
youth, I was a Boy Scout, and 
while I know that scouting is a fine 
activity that has taught countless 
young men important leadership 
and character-building skills, the 
major activity in my particular 
troop was slicing the Muensten 
We'd go on a camping trip, and for 
dinner we'd consume huge quanti- 
ties of Campbell's brand Pork 'n' 



Mainly Beans, and by nightfall the 
hills were alive with the sound of 
tooting. Eventually the entire area 
would be blanketed by a giant 
mushroom cloud of Boy Scout gas 
that caused flocks of migrating 
geese to reverse course ("Turn 
back! We're spending the winter in 
Canada!"). 

Medical science tells us that, one 
way or another, the average man 
releases 6,000 metric quarts of gas 
per day, and significantly more if 
he is in an elevator Meanwhile, 
the average woman, striving to be 
feminine, is keeping all that gas 
bottled up inside her body. This 
results in an enormous pressure 
buildup that can, later in life, cause 
an explosive and embarrassing 
medical condition known as "The 
Mount Vesuvius Syndrome." This 



is precisely why one well-known 
woman — who, out of respect for 
her privacy, I will refer to here 
only as "The Queen of England" 
— is accompanied at all times by 
men with bagpipes. 

At this point, it might be a good 
idea for all of us to go back to the 
beginning of this column to see 
what our topic is. OK, there it is, 
snoring. As I was saying, most of 
us snore, even though — and I am 
STILL not in any way referring to 
my wife — we refuse to admit it. 

But what is snoring? Medically, 
it is when air has trouble getting 
past the uvula,' which is a part of 
your body that sounds like a dirty 
word but is actually not. You are 
free to say it in polite company, in 
sentences such as: "I hear Todd 
has a huge uvula." 



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Many people besides myself have felt that 
goats are unusually compatible with human 
behavior. They should be. It turns out that 
goats are near the top of the list, vying for the 
title of oldest domestice animal on earth. They 
have been living with people for more than 
9,000 years. During this vast expanse of time 
they have been selectively bred to meet the 
requirements of their keepers. Their value for 
meat, milk and fiber has been economically 
very important for much of human history. It 
may be stretching it a bit to say they have been 
bred for good company, but goats also display 
many of the characteristics of companionable 
dogs and appear for more responsive than most 
barnyard animals in their interactions with 
humans. 

Time and progress has eroded the place 
of goats from both the barnyard and the minds 
of modern people. There arc ik^ longer signs 
for us of diverse sentiments ranging from fear 
to friendliness. The symbolism of goats in 



religious expression along with goats them- 
selves has faded away in our rapidly changing 
world. Goats are not longer cost efficient. 

Occasionally a glimpse of earlier 
understanding will flicker in our contemporary 
society through the perspective of rare reflec- 
tive individuals who perpetuate them in more 
secular art.. Picasso captured some of these 
ancient sentiments when he made a lifesize 
bronze figure of a goat which he kept in his 
own yard. Locally, one of Clarion's finest 
artists has f(>cused on the imagery of the goat, 
and is currently featured in the Sanford 
Gallery. 

As Halloween apprnaches, remember 
that some things that go hump m the night 
might be gi)ats. or they ma\ he >ur\ iving shad- 
ows reflecting the lost sentiment ^of your early 
ancestors. 

Dr. Dean St raff in /v a professor of 
anthropology and the article originally ran in 
1 985. 



October 25, 2001 



fZ/f CcAR/D/\f CAU 



Page 15 




CiAssfFfeus 




groups- earn FREE trips plus 
commissions! Call 1-800-GET- 
SUN-i. 



PRODUCER" and MTV's choice. 
(Spring Break Cancun Party 
Program) 1-800-222-4432 



#1 Spring Break Vacations! 
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, and 
Florida. Earn Cash and Go Free! 
Now hiring Campus Reps. 1-800- 
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tours.com. 

Spring Break 2002!!! Student 
Express is now hiring sales reps. 
Cancun features FREE meals and 
parties @ Fat Tuesdays-MTV 
Beach Headquarters. Acapulco, 
Mazatlan, Jamaica, Bahamas, 
South Padre, Florida. Prices from 
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travelers in 2001. Call 800-787- 
3787 for a FREE brochure or 
email: 
bookit@studentexpress.com. 
www.studentexpress.com 

Spring Break Insanity! 

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prices! We're the best - forget the 
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All destinations! Wanted: 

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ACT FAST! Save $$$, get 
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Info/Reservations 1-800-648- 
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♦ is************ 

Spring Break-Nassau/ Paradise 
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Parties and More! Organize small 



f for 

^ iii mm iiiiii Um iiii i iii ii liii|ii| iiii 



ii *iiMiiimt ii 



Silver Springs Apartments avail- 
able for Fall 2002/Spring 2003. 
Close to campus. Four person 
occupancy. Leave message at 
226-5917. 

VERY nice 2-bedroom apart- 
ments available for Fall 2002- 
Spring 2003 semesters. Call 814- 
354-2238 for details. 

innnfinnnnnnnnnt 

Mobile home for rent. 2-bed- 
room. Security deposit and lease 
required. No pets. Call 764- 





3668. 



tHelHHHHHHHHt^lUli 



All steel building, engineer certi- 
fied 50X100X18 was $19,210, 
Now $11,935. Can deliver. 1- 
800-292-0111. 

All steel building, 40x32 was 
$7,922, now $3,980. 1-800-292- 
0111. 

5' Grand Piano: Young Chang 
Ivory, excellent condition. 
$9000.00 OBO. (814)358-2346. 



iriiirils 



New house available for Spring 
2002 and also for Fall 2002/2003. 
Six person occupancy. Furnished. 
Leave message at 226-5917. 

innnnnnt^innnnnf 

Furnished house available 
November 1, 2001 four-person 
occupancy. Also available for the 
Spring 2002 semester and beyond. 
Call 226-6654 

Apartments for summer, Fall, and 
Spring 02-03. Close to campus. 
Leave a message, 227-1238. 

innnnnnnnnfinnnf 

Roommate needed for house for 
Spring 2002 semester. Call 226- 
5917/223-9098. 




MnMAAMrtAMAMMAfMMMMMAMMMMMMnfMnMWMMMMMfl^tV 



fielfi wiiiit«ii 



) 



»L.»wjiAiitw:aLiiyii>juicw.uj]wiJiai i iiiAiuu >i M.i«.iutt i *.i.ii« 

Waiters, Waitresses, Bartenders, 
and Kitchen Help/ Flexible hours. 
Apply in person at the Wayside 
Inn or call 226-2344. 

MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS! 
Sell Spring Break 2002 trips. 
HIGHEST COMMISSIONS - 
LOWEST PRICES! NO COST 
TO YOU! Travel FREE including 
food, drink and non-stop parties! ! ! 
World class vacations! 2001 
Student Travel Planners " TOP 



Clarion's newest Internet service is 

offering Clarion University Students 

special pricing ! Stop by at: Coinputer 

Products Co. directly behind the 

Clarion Post Office for details and 

sign up. Best deal in town! ! 

Webshoppinglink.net 

Phone 226-9612 



Congratulations Gretchen on 
becoming a part of Sigma Pi. The 
Brothers of Sigma Pi. 

Congratulations to Sister of the 
week, Michelle M. You're the 
bomb! Love, AXT. 

Who's the Tau Tiger? Love, AET. 

Happy Birthday to Christine, 
Holly R., Kate, and Jill. Love, 
Your A0E Sisters. 

Happy 21st Birthday Lauren. 
Love, Your future AOE Sisters. 

Congratulations to the newest 
member of Tri Sigma! Love, Your 
future S Sisters. 

Hi to our sweetheart, Cory Rex! 
We love you! Love, The Sisters 
of Tri Sigma. 

Tri Sigma would like to wish 
everyone a safe and Happy 
Halloween! 

Kim and Brenda: Don't be 
scared, we had so much fun this 
weekend! Thanks for such a great 
time. Love, Your S Sisters. 

Fall '01, You guys are doing 
great! Keep smiling, it won't be 
long now. Love, Your future 
Sigma Sisters. 

Brittany, You're doing a great job 
with your committees. Thank you 
for making this semester so much 
fun for us! Love, Your ISZ 
Sisters. 

0A9, Thanks for the great time 
last week. It was fun! Love, 
ZTA. 



KAP, We enjoyed the dinner 
together. Thanks! Love, ZTA. 



)(l italic 94c 3tt*^lt'lt'3lC^}|Cl|(]|C 



ZTA would like to thank all the 
young women who showed 
courage, shared their stories, and 
inspired us to be stronger at Flame 
to Fire. 



D, Happy Anniversary! Who 
would have guessed I could fall in 
love with a Golden Eagle .' I love 
you. Stinky. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Thank you so much for the shirt. 
Rose! You are the best! Love, 
Judy. 



■IHHtifififl(1Hfi,1HfiHf 



Andrea Hoover: Congratulations 
on your lavaliere to Phi Sigma 
Kappa. We are so happy for you. 
Love, Your Sisters of Delta Zeta. 



^^^^1^■^^i^■l^■^^i^1f^^^^^^^^^^ 



Everyone have a safe and Happy 
Halloween, From the Sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 

1)1 « * « ilciti :)■ 1(1 lt< *# t :(< « 

Congratulations to Jenna on her 
internship at the Magical World of 
Disney. Love, Your Sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 



*4i**i|<i(i*i|i4r>|ii|i«:tE« 



Lisa Vough - are you ready? We 
are! See ya Sunday. Love, Your 
Sisters of Delta Zeta. 

Congratulations to Jamie Bero for 
her recent Marathon finish. We 
are proud of you. Love, Your 
Ladies of Delta Zeta. 



ffmw * wrji>fOTWfnT i MfJW ' rfrftiTOTT i WfiT; j Tr»iiw » 




mAwk 



Lavaliers in stock for most frater- 
nities and sororities. James 
Jewlers. Downtown Clarion. 



Kimmie, Happy Birthday!! Love, 
2nd West. 



^l.i^^^^^^^■^^^^^ti^^^^HH^1^ 

Happy 21st Birthday Gina, and 
Happy 22nd Birthday Kimmie. 
Have a great one! Luv ya, Mels, 

Andi, Speranzo, and Gaby. 

+*********♦♦** 

Gina, Happy 21st Birthday!! 
Love, 2nd West. 

Haime, Happy Birthday!! Love, 
Your older wiser sister. 

Kylee, Try staying off your knee 
when you can or I'm calling in 
Dad! Love, Your twin. 

Andrea, It'll work out! You're 
gorgeous how can't it? Love, 2nd 
West. 

Robin, looks like North Carolina 
is getting closer! By the way you 
have a little over a month until my 
21st! I want a "teddy bear with a 
red ribbon and a tan." It better 
have a made in North Carolina 
tag! Love, Anastacia. 

Jared, Hope you had a great birth- 
day! Goodjobon23shots! Hove 
you, Teri. 

Dani, Glad that you are "dating" 
someone now. You go girl. I'm 
proud of you. You know what is 
going on now. Love, Your 
roomie! 



mmmmmmHm 



Fraternities - Sororities 
Clubs - Student Groups 

Earn $1^00-$2,000 this semester with 
the easy Carnpusfundraiser.com three 

hour fundraising event* 
Does not involve credit card applica- 
tions. Fundraising dates are filling 

quickly, so call today! Contact 
Campusfundraiser.com at (888) 923- 

3238, or visit 
www.campusfundraiser.com 



Page 16 



The CcARfo/\i Cau 



October 25, 2001 




CtAs^ff/eDS 




t i i i ir I li | tWlUW>iJltWlttVlAM.ftllMm'i W WW>*tlH*. > l'i <ll 



Erin, Here's your personal ad! 
Didn't forget this week.. .I'll see 
yaatMatch.com! Have some sto- 
ries for me. Keith. 

Brian, Congratulations on the 
Accounting test. I'm proud of 
you. I'll beat you next time. 
Love, Jill. 

Kel, Hang in there. Remember 
I'm always here for you. Luv, Jill 

Katie, Good Luck on your 
Humanities test! I know you can 
do it!! Luv ya. Alaina. 

Erin, Happy 5-year Anniversary 
at McDonalds. Your jacket is 
lovely. Luv ya, Alama. 

Carrie, I look forward to seeing 
our pretend boyfriends at the rec 
center I! Luv ya! Alaina. 

Marshall, Thanks for the offer on 
Tuesday. I might have to take you 



up on that sometime. Thanks for 
always listening to me complain. 
It is greatly appreciated. You 
know that you are a great guy. I 
love you! Your Kitten. 



Jeanine, Thanks for the straws! 
Love, Mrs. Humpley. 



itit***:)!******** 



*♦♦ + * + **** + *=(<* 



Brian, We really like it when you 
talk! Don't be a mute around us! 
We are friendly people! The Call. 



Keith, Boy it was really quiet in 
the office on Wednesday night. 
You didn't want to join the con- 
test? The belching queen! 



iflc)f1l.ic)f-l(ififi(ifif)fi^ 



■ifiifif.if.'itiilLifif.-if.ifi^ififif. 



April, Megan, and Krista: Thank 
you so much for next year. I'm 
forever thankful to you! I can' t 
wait to see what goes on. It 
should be interesting. Ky. 



Sharon, I hope that you and Peter 
are very happy together. You 
deserve it! Remember always 
play it safe! Love, Mike 






* If >|c * H< >t< >)< * >l< >l< iK * * * 



Skinny Man, Thanks for the com- 
pliment. It really helped boost my 
self esteem. I hope you were just 
kidding! Fugly. 






Joe, Have you seen Mom. I can't 
seem to find her anywhere. Give 

me a call. Amanda. 

************** 

Seamore. Did you get my ciga- 
rettes? All I have is buts. Please 
come through. Adolf. 



Mel, Thanks for keeping the 
tunes going on Wednesday. It is 
greatly appreciated. We love you 
for it! The Call 

Megan, Hope that you got all the 
classes that you wanted and need- 
ed. You know how scheduling 
goes. Good Luck!! Your former 
roomie. 



T*'p'f^T'1^'f"'T"*'t**-T^'t*'1^T* 



+ ^:ic*>|e^**1t** + *'l« 



Paul, Thanks for always calling 
me back when you say you are 
going to. It is ok. I'm gettmg use 
to it. Just try a little harder next 
time. Maybe you should learn 
how to use a phone. Ky. 



Want to advertise 

your 
business in 

The Clarion Call? 

Call 393-2380 
for more info rnria- 

tion. 




Sigma Alpha iota 

Halloween Night 

October 31 , 2001 

7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Trick or Treat for canned goods. 

For both on and off campus 

students. 
Proceeds goto the Donation 

Center. 



J 




DANCE 

October 30, 2001 
8:00p.m.-11:00p.m 

Ralston Lobby 
DJ: Houserockers 



October 25, 2001 



Football 



TH ({ C /A mi^ CAa 



Page 17 



Clarion to honor seniors during I.U.P showdown 



Courtesy of Sports 
Information 



Clarion will honor nine seniors 
in pre-game ceremonies this 
Saturday, October 27th, as the 
Golden Eagles prepare for num- 
ber five ranked I.U.P. in the 
rugged PSAC-West. Kickoff at 
Memorial Stadium is set for 
1pm. 

Recognized in pre-game cere- 
monies will be Ben Boldin, 
Doug Diegelman, Jason Flora, 
Demetric Gardner, Tom 
Gaydosz, Chris Janson, Mike 
Mangieri, Andy Pore and 
Dennis Yu. 

I.U.P. leads the series between 
the two schools 46-22-3 dating 
back to 1927. In the last ten 
meetings, I.U.P. holds a slim 6-4 
lead. Over the past five seasons. 
Clarion has won three times to 
I.U.P.'s two. 

Last year the Golden Eagles 
defeated the Indians 21-13 with 
a big second half. In 1999 at 
Memorial Stadium, I.U.P. posted 
a 26-0 shutout, while in 1998 
I.U.P. notched a 52-14 win. 
Clarion also recorded big wins in 
1997 (21-6) and 1996(49-15). 

Clarion enters the game with a 
3-5 overall record and a 1-3 
mark in the PSAC-West. Clarion 
opened the season with road 
losses to East Stroudsburg (33- 



27) and Youngstown State (44- 
0), defeated Tiffin (27-14), lost 
at Shippensburg (34-29), 
notched home wins against 
Kutztown (36-7) and California 
(29-22), lost at Edinboro (24-12) 
and lost last week's game 33-24 
to Slippery Rock. 

Head coach Malen Luke, in his 
8th season at Clarion, has an 
overall record of 40-44 and a 
PSAC-West mark of 21-25. His 
14-year collegiate record is 77- 
65. 

I.U.P., ranked 5th last week in 
the AFCA coaches poll and 6th 
in the D-2 Football ranking, 
enters the game with a 6-0 over- 
all record and a 4-0 mark under 
16th year head coach Frank 
Cignetti. The Indians opened 
2001 with two home wins 
against Findlay (31-10) and 
Lock Haven (42-0), a road victo- 
ry at Slippery Rock (23-7), a 
return home to defeat PSAC- 
East power Bloomsburg (23-12), 
a 37-7 win at Shippensburg and 
last Saturday's 21-6 win at Miller 
Stadium over Edinboro. 

Cignetti has an I.U.P. record of 
147-37-1 and a 20-year overall 
collegiate record of 164-64-1. 

Clarion's offense will receive a 
stern test this week from I.U.P.'s 
nationally ranked defense. The 
Golden Eagles are averaging 
351.8 yards of offense per game 



(6th in PS AC) including 245.4 
rushing yards (3rd in PSAC) and 
106.4 passing yards (13th in 
PSAC) per game. 

Junior quarterback Adam 
Almashy has completed 48 of 
137 passes for 786 yards and 6 
touchdowns with 8 interceptions. 
He has also rushed for 324 yards 
and 2 touchdowns on 116 
attempts. In his career he has 
completed 265 of 606 passes for 
3,724 yards and 34 touchdowns. 
He has also rushed for 703 yards 
and 10 touchdowns on 374 car- 
ries. 

The running game will feature 
Demetric Gardner at fullback, 
with halfbacks Robert Walker 
and Glenn Lovelace. 

Gardner broke the single game 
rushing record at Clarion last 
week. Gardner rushed for 257 
yards against Slippery Rock, 
breaking the old record held by 
Mickey Catello, who rushed for 
256 yards in 1966 against I.U.P. 
Gardner now leads the team with 
728 yards and 5 touchdowns on 
118 carries this season. He ranks 
7th all-time with 1,706 yards and 
12 touchdowns on 317 carries 
(5.38 p/c). 

Walker is next with 451 yards 
and 10 touchdowns on only 68 
carries. In two seasons he has 
1,051 yards and 15 touchdowns 
on only 143 attempts, an average 



of 7.34 per carry. Lovelace has 
also contributed 274 yards and 2 
touchdowns on 50 tries. 

Clarion's top receivers include 
wideout Mike McCullum and 
tight end Andy Pore. McCullum 
leads the team with 19 catches 
for 334 yards and 3 touchdowns, 
while Pore has latched onto 8 
passes for 187 yards and 2 
touchdowns. 

The Golden Eagle defense is 
giving up 337 yards per game 
(8th in PSAC) including 180 
rushing yards (8thin PSAC) and 
157 passing yards (7th in 
PSAC). 

Up front the Eagles are led by 
noseguard Doug Diegelman, 
George O'Brien, and Tom Pore. 
Outside linebackers Chris 
Janson and Kevin Platz protect 
the perimeters. 

Janson is the leading tackier in 
the PSAC with 77 hits, and is 
also #1 in tackles-for-losses with 
14. Platz has posted 28 stops and 
6 tackles-for-losses. 

Inside linebackers Dennis Yu, 
Tom Gaydosz and Scott 
McGrady anchor the middle. 

The secondary will see corner 
Myron Hargon return this week 
after missing last week with a 
leg injury. Hargon leads the team 
with 4 interceptions, while 
Kevin McKeither and Jhermel 
Goss also handle corner duties. 



Soccer team suflfers loss to Kutztown 



by Steph DeFlorentis 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

The Golden Eagle soccer team 
suffered a disappointing loss to 
Kutztown on Tuesday, Oct. 23 
during an away game. The team 
battled it out, but ended with a 
final score of 0-4. 

The Clarion women had to deal 
with multiple injuries during the 
game. Many players had to 
switch into unfamiliar positions. 
Also, many players who do not 
normally play full games filled 
in for the injured. 

Two starters, Tara Harrington 
and Caitlin Relly, were out of 
the game due to injuries. 

During the first half, the 
Golden Eagles played hard, but 
were not in tune with one anoth- 
er. They failed to play the game 
the way that they practiced and 
played in past competitions. 



* 



During the second half, the 
team had a chance to make a 
come back. Despite of this 
opportunity, the offense could 
not connect with the net and 
failed at scoring a goal. The 
team began to work better dur- 
ing the second half, but it was 
too late. 

Alisha Turner lead the offense 
with a strong game. She made 
several attempts on goal, but 
none of them connected with the 
net. 

The team hopes to improve 
their season record and has set a 
season of goal of two more vic- 
tories during the two upcoming 
games this weekend. They will 
play the final two games of the 
season on Oct. 27 and 28. 

"We didn't play our game. We 
have two games left to prove 
ourselves," said sophomore 
Dawn Jackowski. 




A—Tii AirfiA ^i^Mili A« rtriiifai^iiirtftVi*i-iii AafM.**-'" ' ^ .-^■•flafljjifl^.,,^^ . .. .■i^ii^ , ,^. ^ ,j 



Graham Hermarms/The Clarion Call 



Vne Golden Eagle soccer team has struggled througt) their 
first season as a varsity sport. They will need to establish a firm 
base and look forward to seasons yet to come. The women 
have two games left this season. 






The safeties will be Korey 
Eppinette, Emil Johnson and 
Steve Devennie. 

I.U.P.'s offense is getting 393.8 
yards per game (2nd in PSAC) 
including 167.3 rushing yards 
(9th in PSAC) and 226.5 passing 
yards (1st in PSAC) per game. 

I.U.P.'s offense is led by quar- 
terback Brian Eyerman. He leads 
the PSAC and is ranked 10th in 
the nation in quarterback effi- 
ciency at 157.41. He has com- 
pleted 76 of 135 for 1,312 yards 
and 11 touchdowns with only 5 
interceptions. 

The running game is led by tal- 
ented tailback Aamir Dew. Dew 
ranked 13th in the nation in 
yards per game last week and 
will likely move up to ninth now 
averaging 143.2 yards per game. 
He had 171 yards on 25 attempts 
last week versus Edinboro. He 
has rushed for 716 yards and 4 
touchdowns on 121 carries in 
only 5 games. Also contributing 
will be Henry Lane and Marko 
Jackson. 

Receivers J.R. Thomas and 
Carmelo Ocasio are top pass 
catchers. Thomas has grabbed 23 
aerials for 429 yards and 3 
touchdowns, with Ocasio getting 
17 catches for 356 yards and 3 
touchdowns. Thomas was 
"PSAC-West Co-Player of the 
Week" last Saturday with 202 
receiving yards and 2 touch- 
downs on only 5 catches. Tom 
Rebholz also has 3 touchdown 
catches. 

I.U.P.'s defense is one of the 
toughest in the nation. The 
Indians rank #2 in the NCAA in 
scoring defense allowing only 7 
points a game, #7 in total 
defense (226 yards per game) 
and #12 in rushing defense (85.2 
yards per game). The Indians are 
giving up 85.2 rushing yards and 
140.8 passing yards for a total of 
226 yards per game. 

Up front nose tackle, Tim 
Buffone, tackle, Brian Harris 
and ends, Andrew Batle, Craig 
Prince and Adam Kucenic lead 
the way. 

The linebackers are very strong 
with All-American Mike 
Borisenko, Sondiata McKeithan 
and Jeff Jackson anchoring the 
middle. 

Corners Joey Flora and Kairi 
Cooper protect the passing lanes, 
while free safety Dave Deneen 
and strong safety James Tindall 
complete a strong secondary. 






Page 18 



nE f!lAmM flAU 



October 25, 2001 



Volleyball 



Eagles spiked by Lock Haven in four-set match 



by Laura Altman 
aarion Call Sports Writer 

The Golden Eagle womens volleyball 
team had a home court advantage during 
their match against the Lock Haven Bald 
Eagles on Tuesday, October 23. Despite 
this advantage and their efforts, the 
Clarion women were unable to defeat 
Lock Haven after battling out four sets. 

During the first match, the women took 
a loss with a score of 26-30. The team 
gained 11 kills with Alissa McKinley and 
Melanie Bull contributing three each. 
Jackie Hill also added to the overall per- 
formance with nine assists. Ali Graham, 
Bull, and Hill lead the defense with five 
digs each while Beth Stalder had two 
block assists. 

The Golden Eagles made a surprising 
comeback during the second set and fin- 
ished with a score of 30-26. During this 
set. Bull was able to claim eight of the 16 
total kills for Clarion. Overall, the team 
experienced 15 assists and one serve 



receive error. Graham and Bull helped 
the team out by adding five digs a piece, 
which gave the team 18 digs total. 

Despite their total of nine kills, four 
service aces and 16 digs, the team still 
fell short to Lock Haven during the third 
set by a score of 25-30. 

During the last set. Lock Haven defeat- 
ed the Golden Eagles with a score of 22- 
30. Hill contributed eight of the ten 
assists throughout the set. The Golden 
Eagles had a total of 23 digs throughout 
the set with Hill claiming five of them. 
McKinley and Bull each contributed two 
block solos for the team. During the final 
set, the team experienced two serve 
receive errors and one server error. 

"Our main weakness right now is that 
we need to work on being mentally 
tougher. After a win, we need to stay on 
the same level of intensity. We need to 
stay focused at every point," said coach 
Fluharty. 

The Golden Eagles have three more 
dual matches to work on improving their 




Graham Hermanns/The Clarion Call 



The Golden Eagle volleyball team has three dual matches left before the 
PSAC Championships. The players are focusing on mental toughness. 



bcus and staying mentally tough. They gaining a spot in the regional rankings to 

will need to be ready for the PSAC go to the play-offs," stated Fluharty. 

Championships on Nov. 9-10. The NCAA Regional competition will 

"Our main goal now is to focus on be held on Nov. 16-17. 



Cross country teams prepped for PSAC Champs 



by Bethany Bankovich and 27, at Lock Haven. Both teams freshman rookie, Melissa 



Andrea Borek 
Clarion Call Sports Editor and 

yyri!?r 

The Golden Eagle mens and 
womens cross country teams will 
compete in the PSAC 
Championships on Saturday, Oct. 



will enter the competition in solid 
standing and are coming off of 
solid performances from the 
Gettysburg Invitational on Oct. 
19. 

The womens team, which fin- 
ished tenth last year, will be lead 
by sophomore, Jen Boerner, and 



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Terwillinger. Boerner finished 

16th at PS AC'S last year and has 

made solid perfonnances during 

the 2001 season. Her top finish 

overall was at the the California 

Invitational where she took a first 

place victory for Clarion. She will 

enter PSAC's with a personal best 

time of 18:51.73 for the 5K race 

and a 23:04.87 for the 6K. 

Terwillinger will enter the com- 
petition with a best overall place 

of fifth that she claimed at the 

Slippery Rock Invitational. Her 

best time in the 6K was 23:31.6. 

Boerner and Terwillinger will \Jen Boerner sticks to a fast pace while she competes. 

need to be followed closely by the in 2001 . She has also been fourth ner in the past three meets despite 

third, fourth, and fifth place run- and fifth once each. Borek has his slow start in the beginning of 

ners on the team if the Golden been the number four runner the season. He took 24th at 

Eagles want to place tops in the twice and the fifth place runner PSAC's last year after recovering 

from knee-surgery. Two seasons 
ago. King t(X)k twelfth overall in 



Photo Courtesy of Andrea Borek 



PSAC. These spots have been three times this year, 

consistently held by Ali Borek, The mens team finished ninth'at 

Wendy Kengor, and Kathryn last year's PSAC competition and 

Szafran. jg lead by senior Ean King. 

Captain, Kengor, has finished as King has been the teams top run- 
Clarion's third place runner twice 



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the PSAC. 

Following King will be sopho- 
mores A.J. Mayernik and David 
Durianick. Mayernick had his best 
race at California with a 17th 
place finish while Durianick's 
best place is 21st at California. 

Four additional runners that will 
contribute to the teams overall 
performance are Matt Mastarone, 
Jerry Smith, John Snyder, and Zac 
Ogden. 

Both teams will travel to 
Slippery Rock on the following 
Saturday for the NCCA East 
Regionals. 



I 



October 25, 2001 



r// f C/:Am^' Cau 



Page 19 



Mens and Womens Swimming 



Swimming teams host Pre-season Lnvitational 



by Bethany Bankovich 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

The Golden Eagle mens and 
womens swimming team dive 
into their season opener on 
Saturday, Oct. 27, when they host 
the annual Pre-season 

Invitational. The Eagles will be 
competing against three other 
PSAC teams, I.U.P., Edinboro, 
and Slippery Rock. 

Last year, both mens and wom- 
ens teams took runner-up in the 
PSAC to West Chester. The teams 
are looking forward to another 
strong season and are working to 
recapture the PSAC titles from 
West Chester. 

" So far we are very pleased with 
the way the practices have been 
going. I think that we are going to 
surprise some people this sea- 
son,"said head coach, Mark 
VanDyke. 

Both mens and womens team 
have many returning letterwin- 



ners, PSAC finalists, and PSAC 
champions. 

The mens team will be lead by 
captains Brian Monico and Gary 
Aughinbaugh. Monico will be 
leading the team in the distance 
freestyle events while 

Aughinbaugh will capture victo- 
ries in the sprint freestyle and but- 
terfly events. Monico and 
Aughinbaugh have been PSAC 
finalists for the past four years. 
Aughinbaugh also carries several 
Div. II NCAA All-American 
titles. 

The mens team has a lot of 
depth this year with returning 
individual PSAC champions, 
Ben Chandlee and Beau 
Caldwell. Other PSAC finalists 
include seniors Adam Lohr and 
Matt Buckley, juniors Chandlee, 
Aaron Bell, Bill Wright, and EJ. 
Dams, and sophomores Caldwell, 
Chris Strauber, and Ryan 
Weihagen. Both Chandlee and 



Wright also have several Div. II 
NCAA All-American titles. 

The mens team has also 
acquired several prospective 
freshmen who are expected to 
step up this season. 

"The team is very excited about 
the upcoming season. We have 
the potential to go very far and, in 
honor of Ben Chandlee, our med- 
ley relay has 'fivers' on first," 
said Caldwell. 

Leading for the womens team is 
senior captain, Mary Cardell. 
Cardell is a PSAC placewinner in 
the breaststroke events. 

The womens team also has a lot 
of depth in the underclassmen. 
The returning letterwinners and 
PSAC placewinners include 
juniors Melissa Baer, Abby Koch, 
April Johnson, Alyssa Helm, and 
Katie Zimmer, sophomores 
Megan Trimbur, Bethany 
Bankovich, Brandi Smithson, 
Jessica DiLoreto, and Caroline 



Miller. Baer, Koch, Trimbur, 
Bankovich, Smithson, and Miller 
each hold several Div. II NCAA 
All-American titles. 

The womens team has also 
acquired several freshmen and 
one transfer swimmer who will be 
expected to step up and place well 
this season. 

The first meet of the regular sea- 
son will be at home against Div. 
Ill Allegheny. The meet will be 
held on Wednesday, Oct. 31. 




Sports 
Trivia 

The answer to 
last week's ques- 
tion is New 
England. This 
week's question 

is: Who did 

Carolina defeat 

in the playoffs 

during the 1996 

season? 



IWTRilBiUllllL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - latramural. Recreation, & Fitness Director 
Recreation Center phone: 393-1 667 



10/25/01 



SIGMA PI 



10/22/01,4 00 
FIELD! 



PXP — 

NEW WOODSIDE 



SIGMA PI 



10/25/01,6 00 
FIELD I 



10/22/01,4 00 
FIELD II 



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T M E RgB5MIRT5 ' 



SPECIAL PLAYOFF EDITION 
FLAG FOOTBALL 



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HARDMUFFINS 



10/22/01 5 30 
FIELD II 



PHI'S w/ CHICKS (1) 



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VOLLEYBALL PLAYOFFS 



Bye 
BEN BROWN'S TEAM (4) 



PHI'S w/ CHICKS (1^ 



10/23/01,9:00 
COURT I 



10/22/01,9:00 
COURT I 



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Bye 
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VICTORY (6) 



10/23/01,9 40 
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10/22/01.9:00 
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Page 20 



Tne CcAm/^ Cau 



October 25, 2001 



Sports 



Clarion 



Courtesy of 
Sports Information 



The Golden Eagles suffered a disap- 
pointing loss to Slippery Rock this week- 
end at Clarion's Memorial Stadium. 
Slippery Rock tailback, Dorrian Glenn, 
scored on a 25-yard run with 1:11 to play 
and gave the Rockets a 33-24 win over 
Clarion in a rugged PSAC-West contest. 

Slippery Rock raised its overall record 
to 4-3 and 2-3 in the PSAC-West, while 
Clarion dropped to 3-5 overall and 1-3 in 
the PSAC-West. 

Slippery Rock's Glenn finished the day 
with 200 yards and three touchdowns on 
28 carries, including a 44-yard touch- 
down run in the first quarter. Glenn 
rushed for a Slippery Rock record of 355 
yards at California. 

He had 38 attempts and rushed for four 
touchdowns. His 335 yards were the sec- 
ond most in PSAC history behind 
Millersville's Ricke Stonewall who had 
350 yards against New Haven in 1982. 
Glenn is number two in the PSAC this 
season, averaging 15 1.2 yards per game. 
He has 907 yards and 12 touchdowns on 
133 carries (6.8 per carry). 



Clarion fullback, Demetric Gardner, 
had a record day for the Golden Eagles. 
Gardner rushed for a single game record 
of 257 yards on 30 carries. Gardner 
broke Mickey Catello's former record of 
256 yards set in 1966 against I.U.P. 

Going into the game, Gardner lead the 
team with 471 yards and four touch- 
downs on 88 tries. He ranked ninth on 
the all-time rushing list with 1,449 yards 
and needed only 27 to move past Geoff 
Alexander's 1.475 yards (1981-84) to 
move into seventh place. Gardner now 
holds seventh on the all-time rushing list. 

Clarion trailed the Rock 26-18 late in 
the fourth quarter when the Golden 
Eagles scored on a fourth down, 28-yard 
pass from Adam Almashy to Mike 
McCullum with only 3:57 left in the 
game. Clarion's Robert Walker was 
stopped inches short on the two-point 
conversion run to keep the Rockets 
ahead 26-24. 

Slippery Rock converted a key third 
and fourth down on its final drive. Glenn 
dashed 44 yards on third and 10 at its 
own 28, then scored his final touchdown 
on a 25-yard run on fourth and seven at 
the Clarion 25 to secure the victory. 



Scoring Summary: 
First Quarter: 

06:37 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 44 yd run (Wyatt Campbell kick), 1-44 0:10, ROCK 7 - 
CLAR 

06:04 CLAR - D. Gardner 72 yd run (Jason Flora kick blockd), 1-72 0:45, ROCK 7 - 
CLAR 6 

04:56 CLAR - Robert Walker 2 yd run (Adam Almashy rush failed), 3-14 0:56, ROCK 

7 -CLAR 12 

00:46 ROCK - Wyatt Campbell 35 yd field goal, 9-52 4:10, ROCK 10 - CLAR 12 

Second Quarter: 

05:07 ROCK - Wyatt Campbell 36 yd field goal, 10-61 4:18, ROCK 13 - CLAR 12 

Third Quarter: 

12:19 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 17 yd run (Wyatt Campbell kick blockd), 2-17 0:51, 
ROCK 19 - CLAR 12 

05:05 CLAR - Jason Flora 28 yd field goal, 7-64 3:47, ROCK 19 - CLAR 15 
00:32 CLAR - Jason Flora 23 yd field goal, 5-45 2:20, ROCK 19 - CLAR 18 
00:14 ROCK - D.J. Flick 97 yd kickoff return (Wyatt Campbell kick), , R(X:K 26 - 
CLAR 18 

Fourth Quarter: 

03:57 CLAR - Mike McCullum 20 yd pass from Adam Almashy (Robert Walker rush 
failed). 8-28 3:24, ROCK 26 - CLAR 24 

01:11 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 25 yd run (Wyatt Campbell kick), 7-72 2:46, ROCK 33 - 
CLAR 24 




Liz Potter/The Clarion Cnl 



#92 Ken Crawford punts the ball during a PSAC-West showdown. The Golden 
Eagles will host nationally ranked I. U.P. on Saturday and honor their seniors. \ 



The game opened with Glenn running 
44 yards to paydirt with 6:37 left in the 
first and a 7-0 Rocket lead. 

The Golden Eagles roared back when 
Gardner ran 72 yards on Clarion's first 
play following the kickoff, but the PAT 
was blocked and S.R.U. held onto a 7-6 
lead. 

Clarion's Chris Janson recovered an 
S.R.U fumble on the kickoff at the 
Rocket 14 yard line setting the Eagles up 
for their second score. Robert Walker 
capped the drive with a two yard run 
with 4:56 left in the first. The two point 
conversion failed, but Clarion led 12-7. 

Slippery Rock placekicker, Wyatt 
Campbell, gave the Rockets a 13-12 half- 
time lead with two field goals. The first 
was a 35-yarder at 0:46 of the first, and 
the second was a 36-yarder with 5:07 left 
in the second. 

Glenn put Slippery Rock ahead 19-12 
on a 17-yard scoring run with 12:19 left . 
in the third quarter. 

Clarion placekicker, Jason Flora, had 
two field goals that brought Clarion, to 
tighten the score, 19-18. Flora booted a - 
28-yard field goal at 5:05 of the third, 
then followed with a 23-yarder with 0:32 
left in the third. 



Slippery Rock's, D.J. Flick, switched 
the momentum back to the Rockets on 
the ensuing kickoff when he returned the 
pigskin 97-yards for a big touchdown. 
With 14-seconds left in the third quarter, 
the Rockets moved out to a 26-18 lead, 
setting up the game's final minutes. 

Clarion won the statistical battle notch- 
ing 455 yards of total offense to Slippery 
Rock's 267, first downs to 20-10, and 
time of posses'sion 33:06 to 26:54. 

Clarion rushed for 318 yards and 
passed for 137. Gardner had 30 rushes 
for 257 yards and one touchdown. 
Walker had 28 yards and one touchdown 
on 10 tries. Mike McCullum grabbed 
four passes for 71 yards and one touch- 
down. 

Slippery Rock rushed for 174 yards and 
passed for 93. Glenn gained 200 yards 
and three touchdowns on 28 carries. 
Ryan McKavish grabbed four passes for 
25 yards. 

.Clarion's Chris Janson led the defense 
with 14 tackles, three tackles- for- losses, 
one sack and one fumble recovery, while 
Korey Eppinette had 10 stops. 

Clarion plays the PSAC-West leader, 
I.U.P., next Saturday, while Slippery 
Rock hosts Lock Haven. 



• • • • • • • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •www.theclarioncaIl.cofn* • • • 



••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



//VWf 

Spom 



Swim teams host 

Pre-season Invite, 

See page 19. 



Volleyball team falls 

to Lock Haven, 

See page 18. 



Cross country teams | ^ Gridders host l.U.R 
ready for PSAC's, -j i in home finale. 

See page 18. • ' | | See page 17. 




!!MiiJPJ j t'*iaisai«-Mi6aia B 'fe 




Four qualify for 
NCAA's ............pg. 19. 



Camera missing from Communication Department 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Edi^^^ 

The Communication depart- 
ment's Epson PhotoPC 700 dig- 
ital camera is missing. 

The camera, which was kept 
in the new multi-media lab 
downstairs in Becker Hall, was 
discovered missing last 
Wednesday morning. 



Dr. Sue Hilton, a professor of talked to Hilton last Thursday 
the Communication depart- before her class to make sure 
ment, said the possible times she received her project. 




Side 



i 



% 





ei 

New 

for off-campus 

$tudents....pg. 6. 

Lifestyles 

Visiting poet 
and author, 
Rafael 
Campo, 
revfewed.pg.9. 

Sports 

Football takes 
defeat in over- 
tfnie.......pg.20. 



Index 

Opifiioii.....pg.3. 

Lifestyles*{^ll. 
Sports«..».pgJ^O. 
E't*nieDt„pg.l5. 



the camera could have been 
taken is between Tuesday night 
and Wednesday morning. 

Hilton said at one point she 
left the room last Tuesday and 
shut the door behind her, but it 
wasn't locked. She said the 
camera could have been taken 
then or after she left. 

Hilton also said she 
had her hands full when 
she left for the evening, 
and the door probably 
wasn't closed all the 
way. 

Jill Brennan, a com- 
munication major, 
stopped by Hilton's 
office that evening to 
give her a project. The 
time was approximately 
7:30 p.m., Brennan 
said. 

Brennan said she 



"She (Hilton) asked me if I 
had noticed the camera when I 
dropped off my project, and I 
hadn't," said Brennan. 

"She said I would have had to 
have reached over the camera 
in order to have placed my pro- 
ject where I did." 

The camera wasn't insured, 
therefore, it cannot be replaced. 

The camera was available to 
students on a sign-out basis. It 
is now lost to students who 
could use it, Hilton said. 

"It's disturbing when equip- 
ment we try to make available 
to students is taken by one self- 
centered person," Hilton said. 

The incident has been report- 
ed to Public Safety. 

Anyone with information 
regarding the camera should 
contact Public Safety at 393- 
2111. 




Anthrax scares 








by Amy A. Thompson 

Clarion Call 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mercyhurst College in Erie 
and Dickinson College in 
Carlise have received anthrax 
threats, according to their uni- 
versity websites. 

Mercyhurst College 
received a suspicious letter 
Tuesday, Oct. 30 in the Old 
Main building at 11:15 a.m. 
More than 400 students and 
faculty were decontaminated 
and were put on Cipro as a 
precautionary method. 

Dickinson College, in 
Carlise Pennsylvania, 

received two envelopes con- 
taining a white powder sub- 
stance and threatening mes- 
sages, Oct. 30. 



The letters were sent 
through interoffice mail to the 
student mailroom through the 
possible times of 6:30 p.m., 
Oct. 29, and 8:30 a.m. Oct. 
30. 

Both schools have notified 
the proper authorities and are 
taking additional precautions. 

Mercyhurst is even absorb- 
ing the cost of prescriptions 
for students. 

Both schools are trying to 
function as normally as possi- 
ble, by only closing the build- 
ings which were directly 
affected by the threats. 

Other buildings are being 
utilized to compensate for the 
loss of the regular buildings. 

Both schools sent samples to 
be tested and are awaiting 
results. 





University promotion 




Courtesy of Dr. Bill Buchanan 

Sarah Fiala, a library science graduate student 
from Cleveland and secretary of the Special 
Libraries Association student chapter at 
Clarion University, presents one of the 
group's promotional bags to CUP Provost Joe 
Grunenwald. See story on page 6. 




PAGh 20 



Tne C^m/v Cau 



October 25, 2001 



Sports 



Clarion defeated by Slippery Rock in PSAC-West play 



Coiirti'sy of 
Sports Intbrniation 



The (ii^klcn I-a>jlcs suttVrcii a disap 
pomtins: lo,ss to Slippery Rock this week- 
ciui at (Marion's Memorial Stadiinn. 
"clippers Rock tailback. Dorrian (ilcnn. 
^co'cd Oil a 2.^-\ arc! run u ith IM !'MMa\ 
and ea\e the Rockets a v'^-24 \\\\\ o\er 
(Manon in a ruijiicd I'SAC-West ^'Uitest. 

-':ppcr\ Rn^'ls raised itsineial! 'cciM-d 

t ^ and 2-3 in the TSAC-Wc- !. '.nilc 

1 ■',- lot! dr^^pped to 3^"^ o\erall and i -3 in 

. \ S \C-\\esr. 

^■i[M^er\ Rock's Cdenn finished the da\ 
\% idi 200 _\ards and three ttuichd 
.irnes. Miciud'ni: .^ -+4- 

-■' ^ ■' !ne first ^mki: ^ 

niMic^. :• ■, '. ^i.ppe-^ •-■ -/' ■■ , 
; .iids at California. 

Me had .'^S attetrpts and rMs'^-d f, : t,,ur 

sCC 

•Mild 



\o!:ers\ nie ^ \-. 



Claiiini fullback, Demctnc Gardner, 
had a record dav for the (nilden F-aules. 
(iartliier rushed for a single game record 
i)f 2>7 yards iin 30 carries. Gardner 
broke Mickev Gatello's former record ot 
2.'^(i \ards set in I'HiO against I.l'.R. 

Going into the game, (iardner lead the 
team uith 4"' I _\aids and four touch- 
dow n.s on NS tries. He ranked ninth on 
the all-time rustling list with 1.449 \artl.s 
and needed onl\ 2^ to mo\e past Geoff 
Alexanders l.d'.S sards (i')SI-S4) to 
move into -e\enth place. Gardner nnw 
I'^idds sc\cniii on itic aii-iinK rushing list. 

GKirion liaileu the i'cock 2(i-l> laic oi 
'lie fourth quartei \Uien tne Giddv ;; 
baglcs ,s>.. red "n a i'^'uith di;\\n. 2N-\a:d 

■ ■^s tr,,-i \dam .\lmash\ to Mike 
M^Cuiluin uith or' 
game. Glanon's k^-hcr; v\aiKc, 
stopjvd lu^iiCs NJiiat ' 'H the tx^o ponU 
Lon\ersio!i iuti •.- keep the Rickct-- 
ahead 2(- 24 

Siippcr\ Rock Cv'incoco ,i kc\ thiid 
and tourin dcwn on its i'lnai drive, (ilenn 




1-1/ rotter i fie ( i ll'iti-: ' 

Eagles will host nationailv ranked I.U.P. on Saturday and hono^ ttieir seniors 



Puint-'ei iwo 111 the l'S,-\( ' ;'>is 
-^w-vwi. a\eragi;: ' " uds jier game. 

He has 'in"" \arc> .i.ij i_ i.hi^ iuK'w ns on 
i .-.'" cai I'cs ' '^ ^ :\-' . ,.■ ■ • , 



dastied 44 \aids ov, third and 10 at its 
own 2S. then sctued his final touchdovvn 
''<n a 25-\arLi run on fourth and seven at 
the (lanon 25 to secure the victorv. 



I Scoring Summary: 

First Quarter: 

106:37 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 44 yd run iWvalt C\impbeli kick), i-44 0:10. ROCK 7 - 

icLAR 

06:04 CLAR - D. Gardner 72 vd run (Jason Fl(ira kick blockdi. 1-72 0:4.5. ROCK 7 - 

CI.AR 6 

04:56 CLAR - Robert Walker 2 vd run (Adam Almashv rush tailed). 3-14 0:56. ROCK 

-CLAR 12 
00:46 ROCK - Wyatt Campbell 35 yd field goal. 9-52 4:10. RCK^K 10 - CLAR 12 

Second Quarter: 

05:0^ ROCK - Wyatt Campbell 36 vd field goal. 10-61 4:18. ROCK 13 - CLAR 12 

Third Quarter: 

12:19 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 17 yd run (\V\att Campbell kick blockd). 2-17 0:51, 

ROCK 19 -CLAR 12 

05:05 CLAR - .fa.son Flora 28 yd field goal, 7-64 3:47, RO(^K 19 - CLAR 15 

00:32 CLAR - Jason Flora 23 yd field goal. 5-45 2:20, ROCK 19 - CXAR 18 
|00:14 ROCK - D.J. Flick 97 yd kickoff return (Wvatt Campbell kick). . ROCK 26 - 
'CLAR 18 

Fourth Quarter: 

:03.57 CL.AR - Mike .McC\illum 20 yd pass from Adam Almashv (Robert Walker rush 
I tailed). 8-28 3:24, ROCK 26 - CLAR 24 

jOLl 1 ROCK - Dorrian Glenn 25 yd run (Wvatt Campbell kick), 7-72 2:46. ROCK 33 - 
iCLAR 24 



The gatne opened with (ilenn running 
44 yards to pavdiri with (v3'^ left m the 
first and a 7-0 Rocket lead. 

The Golden b.agles roared back when 
iiardncr ran '2 vards on ( larmn's tirst 
[da> follow ing the kicki^t't'. but the P.Vf 
was blocked and .S.R.L, held onto ;i "-(■. 

I ,ai ion's Chris .l.m.snn rec'.'vercd an 
S.Rl fiiinhle on the kickoff at the 
h'.'ckci 14 \,ird line setting the iuigles up 
: •: ilicif second score. Robert Walker 
^apped the drive with a two \ ard run 
Willi 4:56 Icit ni the first. The two pinnt 
conversion tailed, but Clarion led 12-^. 

.Slipper) Rock placckicker. Wvatt 
Campbell, gave the Rockets a 1-12 half- 
time lead with two field goals. The first 
w;is a .v5-_\arder at 0:46 o\' the first, and 
the secimd w.is a 36-variler with 5:0'' left 
m the sccotid. 

Crienn put .Slipperv Rock ahead 19-12 
on a H-yard scoring run with !2.I9 left 
in the third quarter. 

Clarion placekickci. .lason Mor;i. had 
two t'leld goals that brought (lanon. to 
tighten the scitre. 19- IS. fdora booted a 
2S-_vard field goal at 5:05 of the third, 
then tollowed with a 23-vardei with (J:32 
left in the thud. 



Siipperv Rock's. l)..l. Idick. switched, 
the niomenttiiri back to the R.ocket- on 
the ensuing kickoff when he returneti the 
pigskm *)7-_\ards lor a bii' touchdown 
With 14-^econds left m the third quartc, 
the Ri'ckets moved om to a 26 IS lead, 
setting up the game's final minutes. 

Clarion won the statistical b:ittle notch 
ing 455 sards of total offense to .S!ip|->ei v 
Ro.ck s 26"", first downs to :()-. 10. and 
tune oi' possession 33:06 to 26:54. 

Clarion rushed for .^H S vards and 
passe. 1 t, .1 1.37 (iardner had 30 rushes 
b)r ards and one touchdown. 

Walkc! fi ad 2S vards and one touchdown 
on 10 tries. Mike McCullurn grabbed 
four passes for 71 vards and one touch- 
do w n. 

.Slipperv Rock rushed tor ^^4 vards ;ind 
passed for 9_C Glenn gamed 200 v;irds 
and three touchdowns on 2S carries, 
Rvan N1cK:iv!sh '_ir:ibbed foun passes tor 
25 )ards 

.Clarion's ('hris .lansoti led the defense 
with 14 tackles, three tackles tor h.sscs. 
■ 'lie sack and Mie fumble iwovcrv, while 
Koiev !:[^pinette h:id 10 stopis. 

Clarion pdays the PS.AC West leadci. 
l.r.L. next Saturdav. w^olc ^hppcrv 
Rock hosi> I >.,4 I laven. 



//VWf 




Sv\ im teams host 

Prc-sccLson In\ ite, 

Sec page !9. 



\ollc\ball team falls 

to Lock Ha\ en, 

See page 18. 



Cross country teams 
read\' for PS.AC's, 
See page 18. ' 



Gridders host I.U.P. 

in home finale, 

See page 1 7. 



*, . . » » 










*■■ „»-, 



f - . >,: 



Iff' •M «■*• »->' 












i^ ..>. 


-"Tf — -- 




aJ^" 




1^ ""--^^-^ 


- 




-nrnL^'^- 




^^W^ 


*m^^ 




--C' ^^^^ 



Four qualify for 
NCAA's pg. 19. 



Camera missing from Communication Department 



by Amy A. Thompson 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

The Communication depart- 
ment's Epson PhotoPC 700 dig- 
ital camera is missing. 

The camera, which was kept 
in the new multi-media lab 
downstairs in Becker Hall, was 
discovered missing last 
Wednesday morning. 



Inside 



News 

New Flex Plan 
for off-campus 
students....pg. 6. ^ 

Lifestyles 

Visiting poet 
and author, 
Rafael 
Campo, 
reviewed.pg.9. i 

Sports 

Football takes 
defeat in over- ( 
time pg.20. 



• Index • 

Opinion.....pg.3. 

News pg.6. 

Lifestyles.pg.il. 
ifjk Sports......pg.20. ^ 

E't'ment..pg.l5. 
ClassifiefLpg.l 6. 



Dr. Sue Hilton, a professor of 
the Communication depart- 
ment, said the possible times 
the camera could have been 
taken is between Tuesday night 
and Wednesday morning. 

Hilton said at one point she 
left the room last Tuesday and 
shut the door behind her, but it 
wasn't locked. She said the 
camera could have been taken 
then or after she left. 

Hilton also said she 
had her hands full when 
she left for the evening, 
and the door probably 
wasn't closed all the 
^ way. 

" Jill Brennan. a com- 

munication major, 

stopped by Hilton's 
office that evening to 
1^ give her a project. The 

time was approximately 
7:30 p.m., Brennan 
said. 
«^ Brennan said she 



talked to Hilton last Thursday 
before her class to make sure 
she received her project. 

"She (Hilton) asked me if I 
had noticed the camera when 1 
dropped off my project, and I 
hadn't." said Brennan 

"She said 1 would have had to 
have reached over the camera 
in order to have placed mv pro- 
ject where I did." 

The camera wasn't insured, 
therefore, it cannot be replaced. 

The camera was available to 
students on a sign-out basis. It 
is now lost to students who 
could use It. Hilton said. 

"It's disturbing when equip- 
ment we try to make available 
to students is taken by one self- 
centered person." Hilton said. 

The incident has been report- 
ed to Public Safety. 

Anyone with information 
regarding the camera should 
contact Public Safetv at }9}- 




Anthrax scares 




by Amy \. Thompson 

Clarion Call 

Editor-in-Chief 

Mercyhursi College in Erie 
and Dickinson College in 
Carlise have received anthrax 
threats, according to their uni- 
versity websites. 

Mercyhurst College 
received a suspicious letter 
Tuesday, Oct. 30 in the Old 
Main building at 11:15 a.m. 
More than 400 students and 
faculty were decontaminated 
and were put on Cipro as a 
precautionary method. 

Dickinson College, in 
Carlise Pennsylvania, 

received two envelopes con- 
taining a white powder sub- 
stance and threatening mes- 
saees, Oct. 30. 



The letters were sent 
throush interoffice mail to the 
student mailroom through the 
possible times of 6:30 p.m., 
Oct. 29, and 8:30 a.m. Oct. 
30, 

Both schools have notified 
the proper authorities and are 
taking additional precautions. 

Mercyhurst is even absorb- 
ing the cost of prescriptions 
for students. 

Both schools are trying to 
function as normally as possi- 
ble, by only closing the build- 
ings which were directly 
affected by the threats. 

Other buildings are being 
utilized to compensate for the 
loss of the regular buildings. 

Both schools sent samples lo 
be tested and are awaiting 
results 




University promotion 




Courtesy of Dr. Bill Buchanan 

Sarah Fiala, a library science graduate student 
from Cleveland and secretary of the Special 
Libraries Association student chapter at 
Clarion University, presents one of the 
group's promotional bags to CUP Provost Joe 
Grunenwald. See story on page 6. 



.r-i^-rK' 



n 










If 



^Sii^iiiim • 



Page 2 



We Make the Call 



Kylee Ebersole 

Amy A. Thompson 

Susan Campbell 

Jill Brennan 

Teri Cattau 



Discrimination on campus 



Clarion University's campus is 
exhibiting more and more nar- 
row mindness. 

Ever since the Sept. 11 tragedy 
people have been trying to place 
the blame on someone. Our 
nation is targeting Osama Bin 
Laden as the responsible party 
for all the terrorism. 

Students on this campus are 
associating all international stu- 
dents and faculty as being tied to 
Bin Laden. 

The University has told stu- 
dents of African or Middle 
Eastern descent to lay low. 

One of our professors is afraid 
to go out in public without 
friends because despite the fact 
that he is from India, people 
identify him as a potential ter- 
rorist. 

Another group which is being 
discriminated against are gays 
and lesbians. A student was 
attacked last week in Nair Hall 
because of his sexual prefer- 
ence. 

Clarion students need to get 
past their discriminatory percep- 
tions. People with dark skin are 
not necessarily planning bomb- 
ings and people with different 
sexual preferences are not nec- 
essarily deserving of beatings. 

Even before the tragedies took 
place on Sept. indiscrimination 



has been taking place here. 
Whether it was dirty looks, 
name calling, or racism in gen- 
eral. Some of us have been deal- 
ing with this basically all of our 
lives. 

Although discrimination still 
exists we are becoming more 
tolerant and being more open 
minded with alternative 
lifestyles. A good example is the 
upcoming production of The 
Laramie Project. 

This production deals with the 
Matthew Shepard story. He was 
a gay college student who was 
tied to a fence and left for dead. 
His story made people aware of 
the discrimination and how bad 
it actually is. 

The times are changing and 
peoples' thoughts and actions 
also need to change with the 
times. Whether we like their 
lifestyle or not, they are entitled 
to happiness and to decide what 
they want to do with their life. 

Just because their lifestyle 
might not be what some people 
call "normal" they are entitled to 
do as they please and not to be 
criticized for the choices they 
make. 

We, as a University, need to 
think outside of the box and 
treat people of all races and ori- 
entations with respect. 



Editorial Policy 




exjpress our apiiiio» 
issut*s across the campus, stafe, iiation^ and 




[ 



Uiiivem|v» we art speaking as an Editorial Board - the 
tw>k€ of Thk Clarion Call. Tliese editorials are devel- 
oped lit a meeting of Oie MitmM Board, Ail mmh^n 
m ii<rt necaJsarOy agree ott the opMon stated In tite 
^itoriai. The opiiiioi) expressed Is shared by tite 
inajority of the board; it is not always a unanmiour 
opinion. You, the public* reserve the right to express 
your pieasure or dispieasure with these opinjoas via a 
letter Xo the Editor. 



iMXlAimLCAlL 



November 1, 2001 



Your Views 



November 1, 2001 



r//£ /?/AF/M f,AU 



Page 3 




"Actu;3lly, 
avo(4e4 the q 



3 species we seem to bgve 
rthei4 cjuestion aIto9ethei-..." 



Do you have 

an 

opinion? 

Send letters 

to the editor 

to 

c/o Amy A. 
Thompson 

270 

Gemmell 

Complex, 

Clarion 

University 

of PA, 

16214. 



Tired of snail mail? 

E-mail your story ideas, 

etters to the editor, 

QX\(i opinions to 

theclarioncall@excite.com 



UAM^UiU^ 



Thanksgiving Break Transportation 

Home! 

Where: Harrisburg. Kins of Prussia, and 
Philadelphia r30th Street StationJ 

Departure: Tuesday. Nov. 20 at 3:30 P.m. 

Return: Sunday. Nov. 25 at 2 P.m. 

Price: Round Trip. $45 f No refunds J 

What to brine: Maximum. 1 suitcase and 1 carry-on 
baa 

Sian-up where: CSA Office. 1 23 Gemmell 

Sien-up deadline: Monday. Nov. 1 9 at 4 P.m. 

Any questions: Call the 
Clarion Students' Association at 393-2423. 




•• V^hen ] first laid 

eyes on the campus, I 

fell in love with every 

aspect. §9 

-Kylee Ebersole 



Editorial, Kylee Ebersole 



When I was thinking about what 
I could do my editorial on, my 
mother suggested comparing 
Clarion and how it was thirty 
years ago to how Clarion is today. 
My sophomore year of high 
school my mother and father 
brought me to Clarion because 
my mother wanted me to see 
where she went to school. When I 
first laid eyes on the campus, I 
fell in love with every aspect. 

When coming to Clarion last 
year, my mom couldn't believe 
that she was taking her daughter 
to college, but she also couldn't 
believe she was taking her daugh- 
ter to the school she graduated 
from twenty-six years ago. 

This year when my mom came 
up to visit over ALF she started 
talking about how much Clarion 
University and Clarion the town 
have changed since she has been 
here. 

The first change she brought to 
my attention was when she grad- 
uated almost thirty years ago, she 
didn't graduate from Clarion 
University, she graduated from 
Clarion State College. I could not 
get over that the name has 
changed in just thirty years. 

The next big change she 
brought to my attention was that 
there were two giant pieces of 
sculptures, which use to stand 
outside of Gemmell. That area is 
now called "the outside perfor- 
mance area." She told me that the 
sculptures were quite large and 
brightly colored. One of the 



pieces of art was bright orange 
and the other was bright yellow. 

I also found out that she did not 
have Gemmell when she was 
here. The Student Union was 
located in the bottom of Harvey 
Hall. Now Harvey Hall is used 
for classes and offices. 

Then my mother looked at me 
and told me that unfortunately 
some of the things at Clarion are 
the same. When she was here 
they had demonstrations because 
of the Vietnam War, and that peo- 
ple would streak to get peoples' 
attention. The was twenty-six 
years ago but now today we are 
basically having the same prob- 
lems. 

With all of the terroristic acts 
that have taken place, she feels 
that we are going through the 
same circumstances that they 
went through in the 70s. 

Towards the end of our conver- 
sation I asked her if Givan Hall 
has changed at all since she had 
lived there. She started to laugh 
and told me it hasn't changed at 
all on the inside, but the rules 
have changed. 

When she lived in Givan, they 
had to sign in and out anytime 
they left the Residence Halls dur- 
ing the evening hours. She also 
said that the doors were shut and 
locked at ILOO p.m. every night. 
The last thing she pointed out was 
when she lived in Givan Hall, 
was that they had a house mother 
on duty at all times. 

See 'Ebersole' Page 9 



As a member of the 
National Newspaper Association, 

is entitled to access 
NNA's Libel Hotline; 
with advice from 
Washington attorney 
Alice Neff Lucan. 




Opf/\ifo/\f 





Stengel hacked 
apart the language 
with vigor 99 

-John Crawford 



Hyde Park, Casey at the Mic 



With the World Series upon us, 
it seems appropriate to republish 
the words of Casey Stengel. 
Stengel was manager of the New 
York Yankees during the 1950s, at 
the height of both the club 's great- 
ness and baseball 's magnetism in 
America. 

In 1958, the Senate 
Subcommittee on Anti-trust and 
Monopoly called Stengel to testi- 
fy, along with other greats of the 
sport. 

At issue was whether baseball is 
merely a sport, or it is is a busi- 
ness. The Yankees were the most 
accused of all the clubs. Stengel's 
testimony would become a his- 
toric speech for reasons too 
absurd to believe. 

On more than one level, Mr. 
Stengel's words comprise a mon- 
ument of the language. Often crit- 
ic and contradictory-and fre- 
quently just perplexing-Stengel's 
statements are a meandering 
exploration for truth by a too- 
plain man threatened on both 
sides by power 

A man who was, in his sport, 
equal to Phil Jackson, managed a 
speech deserving of Mike Tyson. 
Stengel hacked apart the lan- 



guage with vigor Indeed, it is 
telling that he mentored Yogi 
Bera, known to have turned an 
odd phrase or two. His statements 
are very humorous, if uninten- 
tionally so. His testimony was an 
episode that was both silly and 
sad. 

We now refer to the 
Congressional Record, July 9, 
1958... 

SENATOR KEFAUVER : Mr. 
Stengel, are you prepared to 
answer particularly why baseball 
wants this bill passed? 

MR. STENGEL : Well, I would 
have to say at the present time, I 
think that baseball has advanced 
in this respect for the player help. 
That is an amazing statement for 
me to make, because you can 
retire with an annuity at fifty and 
what organization in America 
allows you to retire at fifty and 
receive money? 

I want to further state that I am 
not a ballplayer, that is, put into 
that pension fund committee. At 
my age, and I have been in base- 
ball, well I will say I am possibly 
the oldest man who is working in 
baseball. 

See "Baseball' Page 4 



THECcARmCAu Staff 

Assistant Managing Editor: Stacey Hicks 

Assistant News Editor: Michelle D'Uva 

Assistant Ad Design: Jared Chase 

Secretary: Teri Cattau 
Staff Writers: Jason Erb, Jeff Chaffee, Chuck Delcroix, Justin Ezyk, Emily Gill, Aaron 
Stempeck, Laura Altman, Andrea Borek, Martisse Macri, Kelly Drevitch, Adam Berteotti, 
Khalia Robinson, Amy Ujazdowski, Shannon Sankey, Lindsey Lowrie and Angela Batista 
Advertising Sales Staff: Tom McKeough, Joseph Sacco.Jim Lugaila, Ean Bohdan, 
Bradley S. Walker, Kellie Kapetanovich, Autumn McShane, Allison Kemirir, Jen Glass and 
Bryan Hovarick 

Advertising Design: Julia Reinhan and Kristi Spinneweber 
Photography Staff: Missy Pahel, Todd Dennis, Brian Fashian, Jen Taroske, Janice 
Shanko 

Proofreading Staff: Kelly Eury, Jocelyn Hughes, Emily Farineau, Alaina Vehec, Julianne 
Keman, Jeff Bailey, Emily Sowers, Omar Rozier, Vicki Dietz, Brian Fashian, Julie Rengers 
and Faith Thompson 

Circulation Staff: Kristina Strojny, Alyson Paulden, Chad Dougherty, Jennifer Wolbert, 
Jill Baumcratz, Tom Dennis and Liz Harris 



270 Gemmell Complex 
Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 393-2380 

Fax: (814) 393-2557 

e-mail: 

theclarioncall@excite.com 



Editor- in- Chief 

Amy A. Thompson 

Managing Editor 

Kylee Ebersole 

News Editor 

Susan Campbell 

Lifestyles Editor 

Keith Gwillim 

Sports Editor 

Bethany Bankovich 

Advertising Design 

Tim Conners 
Ad Sales Manager 

Mike Metz 

Photography Editor 

Graham Hermanns 

Business Manager 

Kisho Ethirveerasingam 

Copy and Design 

Editor 

Jill Brennan 

Circulation Manager 

Liz Potter 

On-line Editor 

William McCormack 

Advisor 
Dr. Arthur H. Barlow 




Letters and Editing 
Policy 

The Curton Cau. \% publiciied m^ 
TNaisd^ ^tefteg the ifStmX ym U 

ill}«l; paismar, pti 

mi c^Msc€«uy; the de*Bnj«Ball«R, ©f 
wfci0lils Oietes^pesufifeillty of a^^Mlw 
ttt dblet . C^*(»tt(js expressed m. 
rka$ «6.fbo«e of th« ideati^^ -v^lp 

has <jf ^ atodfiflft body. Vfmetn^f&t. 

eo*tftJ Reserves «4$ rigM to ififcfii** j^ 
asy ia)fon8«K»,' JLenia^il^ 

lio», Letters must be aipked 




iKHed on fhc ktter W]j«?n fcuer 
'0^1^ k t^4i$<ir$tk^ af the 
m Chief. I%t|8:;r'A^H«niHng 

ll^ificds «Fe dio<: 'i 

JON < 





Page 4 




THlCMifOi^l Cau 



OP//\/fO/\/ 



November 1, 2001 



November \, 2001 



Baseballl Hyde Park, from Page 3. 




The CLARfO/\/ Cau 



Page 5 



I would say that when they 
start an annuity for the 
ballplayer to better their condi- 
tions, it should have been done, 
and I think it has been done. 

I think it should be the way 
they have done it, whch is a 
very good thing. 

The reason they possibly did 
not take the managers in at that 
time was because radio and 
television or the income to ball 
clubs was not large enough that 
you could have put in a pension 
plan. 



Now I am not a member of the 
pension plan. You have young 
men here who are, who repre- 
sent the ball clubs. 

They represent the players 
and since I am not a member 
and don't receive a pension 
from a fund which you think, 
my goodness, he ought to be 
declared in that, too, but I 
would say that it is a great thing 
for the ball players. 

That is one thing I will say for 
the ball players, they have an 
advanced pension fund. I 



should think it was gained by 
radio and television or you 
could not have enough money 
to pay anything of that type. 

Now the second thing about 
baseball that I think is very 
interesting to the public of to 
all of us that is the owner's own 
fault if he does not improve his 
club, along with the officials in 
the ball club and the players. 
Now what causes that? 

If I am going to go on the 
road and we are a traveling ball 
club and you know the cost of 



Cmi On You 

If you could be any superhero who would you be? 

by: Graham Hermanns 




ToUticaC Science, 
Senior 



^ason Stshe 

^arl(^tin^, 

junior 




Chris Strauber 

'Ekmentary %i„ 

Sophomore 



Speedo Boy." 





I- > 



Tim Ikjis 

Tn^Cisk, 

junior 




Scott WiCson 

^ana^ement, 

freshman 



I 



'The Hamburgler.' 



£ J. "Dams 

Recounting, 

junior 



"Crazy Canuck." 



"Incredible Hulk. He's 
green!" 



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transportation now-we travel 
sometimes with three Pullman 
coaches, the New York Yankees 
on the road and all, that it is the 
best, and we have broken them 
in every city but New York and 
we have gone out of the city of 
New York. 

Of course, we have had some 
bad weather, I would say that 
they are mad at us in Chicago, 
we fill the parks. 

They have come out to see 
good material. I will say they 
are mad at us in Kansas City, 
but we broke their attendance 
record. 

Now on the road we only get 
possibly 27 cents. I am not pos- 
itive of these figures, as I am 
not an official. 

If you go back fifteen years of 
so if I owned stock in the club, 
I would give them to you. 

SENATOR KEFAUVER : Mr. 
Stengel, I am not sure that I 
made my question clear. 

MR. STENGEL : Yes, sir. 
Well, that is all right. I am not 
sure I am going to answer yours 
perfectly, either. 

SENATOR O'MAHONHY : 
How many minor leagues were 
there in baseball when you 
began? 

MR. STENGEL : Well, there 
were not so many at that time 
because of this fact: Anybody 
to go into baseball at this time 
with the educational schools 
that we had were small, while 
you were probably thoroughly 
educated at school, you had to 
be-we only had small cities that 
you could put a team in and 
they would go defunct. 
Why, I remember the first year 
I was at Kankakee, Illinois, and 
a bank offered me $550 if 1 
would let them have a little 
notice. 

I left there and took a uniform 
because they owed me two 
week's pay. But I either had to 
quit but I did not have enough 
money to go to dental college 
so I had to go with the manager 
down to Kentucky. 

What happened there was if 
you got by July, that was the 
big date. You did not play night 
ball and you did not play 
Sundays in half of the cities on 
account of a Sunday obser- 
vance, so in those days when 
things were tough, and all of it 
was, I mean to say, why they 



just closed up July 4 and there 
you were sitting there in the 
depot. 

You could go to work some- 
place else, but that was it. 

So I got out of Kankakee, 
Illinois, and I just go there for 
the visit now. 

SENATOR CARROLL : The 
question Senator Kefauver 
asked you was what, in your 
honest opinon, with your forty- 
eight years of experience, is the 
need for this legislation in view 
of the fact that baseball has not 
been subject to anti-trust laws? 
MR. STENGEL : No. 
SENATOR LANGER : Mr. 
Chairman, my final question. 
This is the Anti-monopoly 
Committee that is sitting here. 
MR. STENGEL : Yes, sir. 
SENATOR LANGER: I want 
to know whether you intend to 
keep on monopolizing the 
world's championship in New 
York City. 

MR. STENGEL : Well, I will 
tell you. I got a little concern 
yesterday in the first three 
innings when I saw the three 
players I had gotten rid of, and 
I said when I lost nine what am 
I going to do and when I had a 
couple of my players I thought 
so great of that did not do so 
good up to the sixth inning I 
was more confused but I finally 
had to go and call on a young 
man in Baltimore that we don't 
own and the Yankees don't own 
him and I could actually have to 
tell you that I think we are more 
the Greta Garbo type now from 
success. 

We are being hated, I mean, 
from the ownership and all, we 
are being hated. 

Every sport that gets too great 
or one individual-but if we 
made 27 cents and it pays to 
have a winner a home, why 
would not you but tin the true 
tradition of the immortals. Yogi 
carries on. His retirement from 
the sport of baseball saddens 
the fans, but obviously Yogi is 
not about to retire from the 
sport of abusing the English 
language. 

"I don't know how much I'm 
going to miss it?" 

But "I' «ure going to try." 
The introduction of the piece 
was written by John C. 
Crawford, Communication 
major 



I 



I 



i 



4 




OPf/\lfD/\/ 




Political Probe 



Propaganda: The war behind the war 



i 



by Jason Erb 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

This article was originally 
intended to cover the bases of 
both propaganda and the usage 
of special operations personnel 
in the war on terrorism. 

So much can be said on both 
topics that I've decided to 
focus this week's Political 
Probe on one of these topics, 
propaganda. 

Since the official beginning 
of the military onslaught of US 
led forces in Afghanistan, there 
has been another ongoing war 
both in the Middle-East and at 
home. This is a war not fought 
with guns and ammunition, but 
rather, it's a war that is psycho- 
logical in nature. 

This war is being waged by 
more than military forces. It is 
a war fought by the militaries, 
the press and by the govern- 
ments on both sides of the war 
on terrorism. 

I'm referring to the art of 
propaganda. War time propa- 
ganda is not a new form of 
warfare. It has been used 
throughout history during 
wartime activities to promote 
political, military and social 
ideologies. 

Probably the most notable, 
but certainly not the only 
example of war time propagan- 
da occurred during World War 
II by Adolph Hitler and the 
Nazi Party. 

Germany, under the authority 
of Hitler and the Nazi Party, 
created pamphlets, advertising 
and even movies to promote 
their movement. Much of their 
propaganda showed huge 
crowds of people lining streets 
in support of Adolph Hitler and 
the Nazi Party. 

Other propaganda used by 
the Germans involved taped 
inspirational speeches by 
Hitler in front of large groups 
of military troops. They even 
attempted to persuade young 
children to become extremely 
nationalistic. This would 
ensure that there would be 
troops at the Nazi Party's dis- 
posal in the future. 

The art of propaganda con- 




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tinues today. In Afghanistan, 
the United States and its allied 
countries are not only dropping 
bombs but also relief aid to 
Afghan refugees. 

Along with the food and sup- 
plies are pamphlets which 
include, in some instances, a 
picture of an American soldier 
shaking hands with a man from 
Afghanistan. 

Also on these boxes of food 
are American flags. Messages 
of peace between the United 
States and the Afghan people 
are also being dropped in mass 
quantities over locations of 
refugee campsites. 

This is, of course, to show 
the people of Afghanistan that 
we are not fighting a war 
against them but rather against 
the Taliban and their political 
and military associates. 

On the other side of the coin, 
the Taliban also is using propa- 
ganda within Afghanistan to 
convince the citizens the US 
and the allied forces are wag- 
ing war against the people and 
their religion. 

This propaganda also is 
reaching bordering countries. 
This not only sparks Anti- 
American sentiment but also 
attempts to persuade key geo- 
graphical countries to side with 
Afghanistan. 

Are these techniques working 
in our favor? The majority of 
people receiving the relief aid 
from the air lifts are uneducat- 
ed, homeless refugees. 
Although the pictures may be 
somewhat effective, the pam- 
phlets may not be working as 
well as we had hoped. 

The majority of these people 
are illiterate and therefore, 
unable to read the writings on 
the pamphlets. The food itself 
acts as propaganda as well. 



This may be the most effective 
way to gain support from the 
Afghan people. 

In a country that is stricken 
by drought and famine, food is 
a universal language. It has 
been reported that fights have 
broken out among those 
receiving these packages. One 
man was even seen tearing 
open a bag of wheat and eating 
its contents raw. 

In these packages, you will 
not find any meat or other 
foods that contradict the reli- 
gion in the area. Typically, 
these packages contain grains 
and fruits. This intrinsically is 
a sign of cultural understand- 
ing, acceptance and peace. 

Other forms of propaganda 
involve a demoralizing aspect 
of psychological warfare. For 
example, the Taliban has 
reported the US has bombed 
hospitals and places of busi- 
ness. 

They are releasing this infor- 
mation on a national and inter- 
national scale. This is intended 
to make the US and its allies 
look as though they are target- 
ing not only military strong- 
holds but also the civilian pop- 
ulation. 

The US has disputed many of 
these claims, saying that the 
number of civilian casualties is 
overly exaggerated by the 
Taliban reports. As is the case 
in most arguments, the truth 
probably lies somewhere in the 
middle of both claims. 

As unfortunate as it is to 
report, civilians close to the 
warfront do die during wartime 
activities. This is an ugly truth 
concerning war. One of the 
goals of war is to minimize 
civilian casualties as much as 
possible, with the understand- 
ing that eliminating such casu- 
alties is all but impossible. 

The number of casualties is 
often exaggerated or underesti- 
mated by opposing nations to 
promote their respective ide- 
ologies. 

President George W. Bush is 
not above propaganda either. 
He continues to attempt boost 
the morale of American citi- 
zens by delivering patriotic 



televised speeches. 

He also has done his best to 
show the American public that 
it is safe to live their lives as 
they had prior to the events on 
September 11. He visited 
"ground zero" shortly after the 
events took place and gave a 
moving, nationally televised 
speech alongside volunteer 
workers at the site. 

This was not only to boost 
the morale of the volunteers 
and the country but also to 
show a sense of safety in a 
time of uncertainty. Having the 
president visit, what many saw 
as the most vulnerable area in 
the country, was a sign of 
strength and security. 

It was also intended to send a 
message to those responsible 
for the dastardly events that 
America would not back down 
from or be scared by terrorism. 

The most recent usage of pro- 
paganda by President Bush was 
seen on Tuesday night in New 
York City. Game three of the 
2001 World Series, pitting the 
New York Yankees against the 
Arizona Diamondbacks, was 
held at Yankee Stadium. 

Fear is often associated with 
large crowds during these 
times of terrorist activities. 
This was the first World Series 
game to be held in New York 
this series. 

This put Yankee Stadium 
under the spotlight and on the 
worldwide stage. Rumors and 
assumptions engrossed many 
in New York and worldwide 
concerning the safety of the 
people in the stadium, which 
was being seen as a prime tar- 
get for terrorist activity. 

The flag that had previously 



flown on the World Trade 
Center was flying high above 
Yankee Stadium on Tuesday 
night. It was supposed to be a 
representation of America's 
will, torn and battered yet 
intact and lifted. It also acts as 
another form of propaganda as 
did the ceremonial first pitch. 

The first pitch is historically 
thrown out by famous people 
from the city in which the 
game is being played. 

Examples include Drew 
Carry's first pitch in Cleveland 
and Jerry Seinfeld's first pitch 
in Shea Stadium, New York. 

The first pitch in game three 
of this year's World Series was 
thrown out by former Yale 
relief pitcher and current pres- 
ident, George W. Bush, who 
gave up his pursuit of a profes- 
sional pitching career in col- 
lege when he was warming up 
in the bullpen during a game 
involving a ten-run lead and 
his coach decided to bring in 
the second baseman as a pitch- 
er instead. 

This marks the first time a 
president has thrown out the 
first pitch in a World Series 
game since 1956 when Dwight 
D. Eisenhower threw out a first 
pitch. This was as much about 
propaganda as it was about 
baseball. 

Not only was the president in 
the most vulnerable place in 
America, but he was center 
stage. It was a sign of confi- 
dence and an added sense of 
normalcy for Americans. It 
also was a sign that not even 
the most powerful person in 
America will be scared by ter- 
rorist activities. 

Bush threw a strike. 




Page 6 



Th^ CtARm Cacl 



NOVEMBER 1, 2001 



November \, 2001 



nE r.iAm/\/ Gau 



Page 7 





New flex meal plan option for off-campus students 



by Kelly Drevitch 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Off-campus students will have 
another meal plan choice next 
semester. Clarion University will 
introduce the tlex only meal plan. 

With this, students will deposit 
$100 for a tlex only meal plan. 

This meal plan will allow stu- 
dents to eat at the Gemmell 
Snack Bar, Ritazza Coffeehouse, 
Chandler Dining Hall, and the 
soon to open. Doubletree Bake 
Shop. 

This new feature will be located 
in the basement of Chandler 
Dining Hall and tentatively will 
open the third week of November. 
Students will access their 
accounts with their ID cards and 
flex dollars will be set up as 
de