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Full text of "Cantorion sheet music collection (part 2)"

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WBITTBN BY 



W. S. GILBERT. 

COMPOSED BT 

ARTHUR S ULLIVAN. 

Full Score, Vocal and Piano (Words I Vocal Gems (Selection, Words and 

and Mutic) .... Soixiyan. $1. 50 Musk) Sullivan. $ .25 

Full Score, Inst (Plaio) . Toubs. . .50 

Violin and Plane. No. I, .50) aAA 

>WmrxR. 1.00 

Quadrilles Powkb 40 

Marche ririllaits . .", . Baglby . .40 Libretto (Words only) . 25 



NBW YORK 

HITCHCOCK PUBLISHING COMPANY 
38 John Street, East of Nassau 



ts 



/sUTHORIZED COPYRIGHT EDITION. 1 



THE 



piEATES 

OF 

PENZANCE 

OR, 

The Slave of Duty. 
AJtr Bismi^EriL.ir OK/ia-insr^JL. comic opbbi 

IN TWO ACTS. 



WRITTEN BY 



W. S. G'LBERT. 

COMPOSED BY 

A RTHUR SULLIVAN. 

ONLY AUTHORIZED AlfD COMPLETE EDITIONS. 

LONDON. 

MmBs. J. M. Stoddabt A Co., by special and satisfactory arrangements with our English 
publishers and ourselves, have secured the exclusive authority to publish our Opera *• The 
Pirates of Penzance; or, The Slave of Duty," in the United States of America. 
We hereby express the earnest wish that they may suffer no invasion of the rights derived from 
as, as the sole publishers of our work, through any attempt to put upon ihe market un- 
authorized editions. 

\V« make this request for the following reasons: First, because we are satisfied there exist* 
» genei U desire on the part of the people of both continents to come to an agreement upon 
the qneKion of an international copyright, affording compensation to authors in their literary 
and artistic productions; Secondly, because we are by this arrangement enabled to secure loe 
publication of our work under our own personal supervision, greatly to the benefit of the piiblie 
sad ourselves; and Thirdly, because by the present contract our publications will be wholly 
naan&ctured in the United States, and will be sold at as low a price, with the certainty of a* 
»nd» i circulation, w if thev w»r» i«sii<><l hr a number if rival and unauthorized persons. 



Ororrtotst, *sao, by J. 



» OTODDAAT «• OO. 



THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE. 



DRAMATIS PERSONyE. 

Ijchard a Pirate Chief 

Samxtil, his Lieutenant 

Frederic, a Pirate Apprentice 

Major-General Stanley, of the British Army 

Edward, a Sergeant of Police 

Mabel, General Stanley's Youngest Daughter 

Kate, ^ ( 

Edith, > General Stanley's Daughters 

Isabel, J 

Ruth, t Piratical " Maid-of-all-work " 

General Stanley's Daughters, Pirates, Po.icemen, etc 



i 



CONTENTS. 

Overtcm 

Mt JE. 

Opening Chorus of Pirates and Solo 

Song (Ruth) 

Song (Pirate King and Chorus) 

Recitative and Duet (Ruth and Frederic) .. 

Chorus of Girls 

Recitative (Edith, Kate, Frederic, and Chorus) 

Aria (Frederic and Chorus of Girls) 
Air (Mabel and Chorus) 

(Edith, Kate, and Chorus of Girls) 

Durr (Mabel and Frederic, and Chorus of Girls) .. 

(Frederic and Chorus of Girls and Pirates) 

Recitative (Mabel, Major-General, Samutl, and Chorus) .. 

Song (Major-General and Chorus) 

Finalf — A>w I. {Mabel, Kate, Edith, Frederic, Samuel, King, Major- General Ruth and Chcrus) 

Introduction Solo (Mabel and Chorus) 80 

Recitative (Frederic and Major- General) 

Chorus with Solos (for Mabel, Edith, and Sergeant) 

Recitative and Trio .. 

Trio (Ruth, Frederic, and King) 

Trio (Ruth, Frederic, and King) 

Recitative and Duet (Mabel and Frederic).. 

Duet (Mabel and Frederic) 

Recitative (Mabel, 6-v. Chorus of Police) .. 

Song (Sergeant and Chorus) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . 

Solo (Sergeant and Clwrus of Pirates and Police) . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Solo (Samuel and Chorus of Pirates) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 

(Frederic, King, Major-General, Police, and Pirates) . . . . .. .. .. . . 

Song ( Major-Gemral and Chorus tf Pirates and Poliet) .. 






THE PIRATES OE PENZANCE 

THE SLAVE OF DUTY 

Written by W. 8. GILBEBT. 



OVERTURE. 



OompoMd by ABTHUB 8ULLIYAN. 



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80EKK. — A rocky sea ghore on the const of Cornwall. Rocks L., As the curtain rifes groups of Pirates are discovered, icmi druiJt 
taping down to L. C. of stage. Under these rocks is a cavern, ing, .some playing cards. Samuel, the Pirate Lieutenant, it 
the fr'ttrance to which is seen at first entrance L. A natural arch going from one group to another, filling the cups from a flask, 
of rock occupies the R. C. of the stage. In the distance is a culm FkHderic is scaled in a despondent aUitude at the back of Oir 
tea, on which a icltconer is lying at anchor. scene, C. Ruth kneels at his feet. 



No. i. OPENING CHORUS OF PIRATES, & SOLO— Samuel. 







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(Frederic rises ani comes forward with Pirate King, wno enters 
from R. U. E.) 

King. Yes, Frederic, from to-day you rank as a full-blown 
member of our band. 

Ajll. Hurrah ! 

Frederic. My friends, I thank you all, from my heart, for 
jour kindly wishes. Would that I could repay them as they 
J «erve! 

King. What do you mean ? 

Feed. To-day I am out of my indentures, and to-day I leaye 
/ou for ever. 

Au, Leave us? 

Fred. For ever ! 

Kimg. But this is quite unaccountable. A keener hand at 



scuttling a Cunarder or cutting out a White Stw neve* shipped 
a handspike. 

Fred. Yes, I have done my best fcr you. And why? It wa* 
my duty under my indentures, and I am the slave of duty. A« 
a child I was regularly apprenticed to your band. It was through 
an error. No matter, the mistake was ours, not your*, and I Was 
in honor bound by it. 

Samuel. An error? "What error ? 

Fred. I may not tell you. It would renew upon my well- 
lored Ruth 

(Ruth eomet down 0.) 

Ruth. Nay, dear master, my mind has long been gnawed by 
the cankering tooth of myster . Better have it ont at once. 



No. 



SONG— Ruth. 




lit - tie lad He proved so brave and da - ring, His fa - ther thought he 

our - s'ry maid. On break - ers a] - ways steer - ing ; And I did not catch the word a - right. Through 

yond all doub:, The scope of this dis - as - ter ; But I hadn't the face to re - turn to my place, And 





Ruth. (Kneeling at his feet.) Oh pardon, Frederic ! pardon ! Fi:ed. Then 

Fred. Rise, sweet one ; I have long pardoned vou. orphan. 

(Ruth nV>.) Sam. Of cou 

Ruth. The two words were so much alike! it is. 

Fkf.d. They still are, though years have rolled over their F 
heads.' (Ruth goes up with Samuel.) But this afternoon mv Eve 
obligation ceases. Individually, I love you all with atlection «c 
unspeakable; but collectively,! look upon you with a di.-gnst had 
that amounts to absolute detestation. Oh pity me, my beloved cam 
friends, for such is ray sense of duty that once out of my inden- 
tures I 5 lmll feel myself bound to devote myself, btart and soul, 



make a point of never molestin 
3 orphans ourselves, and know 



■hat 



kd. Ye.- 



; has got about, and what is the consequence r> 
re says he's an orphan. The last three ships 
be manned entirely by orphans, and so we 
i 10 let em go. One would think that Great Britain's nier- 
itile navy was recruited solely from her orphan asylums, which 
kn..w is'not the case. (Crosses A'.) 

«m. But, hang it all ! you wouldn't have us absolutely 



All. Poor lad ! poor lad ! (All weep.) 
King. Well, Frederic, if you conscientiously feel thutji 
our duty to destroy us, we cannot blame you for acting on 't 

onsciciicc, mv boy, and chance the consequences. 

Sami-ii.. Oi sides, we can olf-r you but little temptatioi 
[•main with us. We don't seem to make piracy pay. I'm s 
don't know whv, but we don't. 

Fred. I know why, but, alas ! I mustn't tell you : it woulc 



1 ii 



Thei 



■ difficulty. Until twelve o'clock I would ; 
aner twelve o'clock "l wouldn't. Was evera man placed in so 
delicate a situation? 



Ki> 



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u liv 



Il.ar! heat 



) become ot her" 
Oh, he will take 
Well, Ruth, 1 fee 



wn Ruth, whom you love so well 
aged way into your boyish heart— 



ttl> lillieulty about v 



j bound to protect o 



Well, then, it is my duty as a pirate to tell v 
you arc too tender-hearted. For instance, you make a point of 
never attacking a weaker party than yourselves, nnd when you 
fvtuwk a fctrongur party you iuvariubly'ijet thriulw>d. 
Ki.N'U. There is tome truth in that. 



It 



/•ha 



1 think it 



Fred. I say 1 think it i.« -that is my impression. But as 1 
lavo never had an opportunity of comparing 70U with othu 
vomen, it is just possible 1 may be mistaken. 

Kixo. True. 

P»K). Wb«l a lerribln ihintc it would ho if worn to murr? 



13 



Uits innocent person, and then find out that she is, on the whole, — keep thy Love! {Bands her back to Frederic.) 
plain ! • Fred. You're very good, I'm sure. 

Kinc. Oh, Ruth is very well — very well indeed. King. Well, it's the top of the tide, and we must be oh.' 

SjOI. Yes, there are the remains of a fine woman about Ruth. Farewell, Frederic. When your process of extermination begins 

Fkid. Do you really think so? Then I will uot be so selfish let our deaths lie us swift and painless as you can conveniently 

as to take her from you. In justice to her and in consideration make them. 

for you I will leave her behind. (Hands Rutii to King.) Fricd. I will. By the love I have for you, I swear it. Would 

King. No, Frederic, this must not be. We are rough men, that you could lender this extermination unnecessary by accom 

vho lead a rough life, but we are not so utterly heartless as to panyin^ im- bark to civilization! 

deprive thee of thy love. I think I am right in saying that there King. No, Frederic, it canuot lie. I don't think much of 

is uot one here who would deprive thee of this inestimable treas- our profession, but, contrasted with respectability, it is eompar- 

ure for all the world holds dear, atively honest. No, Frederic; I shall live and die a pirate 

All. (Loudly.) Not one ! king. 
King. No, T thought there wasn't. Keep thy love, Frederic 



No. 3. SONG— Pirate King & Chorus 

Allegro moderate _^_ m — ^ ^ 

mmmmmmmm 




■ li - mo • nious part Wilh n pi - rale he 
more ships, it's true, Thau a well - bret) 



Atta Song, the King, Samuel, and all the Pirate*, except Fred- 
eric and Kuril, go off R. and R. U. E. Frederic comet 

dou.ii C, followed by Ruth.) 

Ruth. Oh take me with you! I cannot live if I am left 
txhiiid. 

Fued. Rutli, I will be quite candid with you. You are very 
dear to me, as you know, but I must be circumspect. You see, 
Voii are considerably older than I : a lad of twenty-oue usually 
looks for a wife of seventeen. 

R-Jiii. A wife of seveuteen ! You will find me a wife of a 
lli.tuaud! 

Fred. No, but I shall find you a wife of forty-seven, and 
thai is quite enough now. Ruth,' tell me eaudidly and without 
reserve: compared with other women, how are you f 

Ruth. I will answer you truthfully, master : I have a slight 
'•old. hut otherwise 1 am quite well.' 

Fklu. 1 am -orry for your cold, but I was referring rather 
to your personal appearance. Compared with other women, are 
you beautiful ? 

Ruth. (Bashfully.) I have been told so, dear master. 

Fred. Ah, but lately? 

Ruth. Oh no ; years and years ago. 

Fred. But what do you think yourself? 



Ruth. It is a delicate question to answer, but I think I &» 



Fred. That is your candid opinion 
Ruth. Yes : I should be deceiving 



candid opinion t 

if I told you other- 

Fred. Thank you, Ruth, I believe you, for I am" sure you 
would nnt practise on my inexperience. I wish to do the right 
thing, and if— I say, if — you are really a fine woman, your ag9 
shall be no obstacle to our union. (Shakes hands with her.) 
{Chorus of girh heard in the extreme distance, "Climbing own 
rocky viountaiia," etc. See entrance of girle.) 

Fred. Hark ! surely I hear voices. Who has ventured to 
approach our all but inaccessible lair? Can it be custom-house? 
No, it does not sound like custom-house. 

Ruth. (Aside.) Confusion ! It is the voices of young girls 1 
If he should see them lam lost. 

Fred. (Climbing rocky arch R. C and looking off L.) By 
all that's marvellous, a bevy of beautiful maidens: 

Ruth. (Aside.') Lost! lost! lost! 

Fred. How lovely, how surpassingly lovely, is the plainest 
of them 1 What grace ! what delicacy ! what refinement ! and 
Ruth — Ruth told me she was beautiful 1 



No. 4. 



RECITATIVE & DUET— Ruth & Frederic. 







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(Hide* in cave as Uiey enter from R. and L., climbing over the rocJa 
at L. of the tlage and through arched rock R.) 

No. 5. CHORUS OF GIRLS. ^ 

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Kate. What a picturesque spot ! I wonder where we are T Kate. Who are only human beings down to the waist— • 

Edith. And I wonder where papa is? We have left him Edith. And who can't be said, strictly, to set foot anywhert 
ever so fer behind. Tails they may, but feet they cannot. 

Isabel. Oh, he will be here presently. Remember, poor Kate. But what shall we do until papa and the servant 
papa is not as young as we are, and we came over a rather dif- arrive with the luncheon ? (All listen and come doiun.) 
ficult country. Edith. We are quite alone, and the sea is as smooth as glass 

Kate. But how thoroughly delightful it is to be so entirely Suppose we take off our shoes and stockings and paddle f 
alone I Why, in all probability we are the first human beings All. Yes, yes — the very thing! 
who ever set foot on this enchanting spot. (Tk ry prepare to carry out the suggestion. They have all taken ojj 

Isabel. Except the mermaids: it's the very place for mer- me shoe, when Frkvkkic comes forward from cave.) 

maids — 



No. 6. 



RECITATIVE— Edith, Kate, Frederic, & Chorus. 



Chorus of Girls, 




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No. 7. 



ARIA — Frederic & Chorus of Girls. 





snch there be, I swear by hearen'i arch a - hove you, If you will cast yonr eyes on me, Hi 




FIlkd. € hob in. 




No 



AIR— Mabel & Chorus. 




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Edith, Kate. & Chorus of Gills. 

Edith. 



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Kate. 


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(Ckattbuss Csotob (during wAuA Fkkd**^ Mabkl /«& 

DUET— Mabel & Frederic, & Chorus of Girls 




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pour a - gain (I hear the coun- try wants some rain), Yet peo-ple say, I know not why, That we shall have a warm Ju - ly. 
















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(Frederic and Mabel turn to see that the girls are listening; 
detected, they continue their chatter, forte.) 



ky, The glass is ris - ing re - ry high, Con - ti - one 6ne I hop* it may, And yet it rain'd but 




( /hiring this tlte yirk continue their chatter, pianissimo, as bejor 
but listening intently all the time.) 




know not why.That we shall have a warm Ju- ly. To 






pout again (I hear the country wants some rain). 
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Wo. ii. 



Frederic, & Chorus of Girls & Pirates. 





• ni - ty, And in - dolge in the fe-li-ci-ty Of un- bound - ed do-mes- ti-ci-tyl Yon stall 






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No. is. RECITATIVE— Mabel, Major-General, Samuel, & Chorus. 



( The Major- Oerwrai hat entered unnoticed on rock L. U. £.) Samuej 



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u~\a m„ »o~ i i Ere toot pirate caravanserai I . ,. / Just bear in mind that we are ward*) - , . ,„ , 

HoM ' MoMtenl j proceeds ig»io«o*rwm to | wed " ^ 1 II Chancery, and fathe, is a Major-f Ge * e " ^ ! We0 




dan- gen may be • fiU i Their fa - ther u a Ma-jor-Ge- ne-rall Yea, yea, he ia • Ma 




General. Yes, I am Major-General ! General. And it is a glorious thing to be a Major-General'. 

All. You are! Hurrah for the Major-General! All. It is! Hurrah for the Major-General ! 



No. 13 



SONG— Mfljor-General & Chorus. 



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fer-nal non-ienae. Pirn - a ■ fort. And whii - tie »11 the airs from that in - fer- mil nonsense, Pin - a - fin ■ a • fort. 




Major-General. 







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by com • mil - m ■ ri ■ at; Whe» 



•" " I J T ' J jj jj +g g K ^ j F I 




I ha»e learnt what pro-frtM hu beta made in mo -den pa - ae - ly j When I know more of tac • tie* tkaa 



$hir* i ji ■> i j m b j^ ^ ^ ^ 



3 * r =^ 



s 



* 



. n h , . *•**#*. Vhm* . 



• ry; Id »iurt, when l'« a aauU-ta>fef of e - le-men-tal ttia-te • gj— 




rml has ne - ver tat * gee, You'll iay a bet - ter Ma - jor - Ge - ne • ral ha> oe - vet tat a gee, Voml] 




li - ta - ry know-ledge, tho' I'm plack • y and ad • ven • tm • ry, Hu on - ly been brought down to the b» • 




/ E ft^-p-r-ff-rT^UH r e e c M^-ri.J Jj^jjiI 




dem M* • jor - G* - ne - rat 



• si - mil, and mi - ne • ral, He b the Ye - 17 mo • del of a mo - dem Ma - jor - Ge - ne • ral. 




General. And now that I'Te introduced myself, I ibo«M 
like to have some idea of what's going on. 

Kate. Oh, papa ! we — 

Samuel. Permit rue; I'll explain it in two words: we pr»- 
pose to marry your daughters. 

General. Dear me ! 

GtBLfl. Against our wills, papa — against our wills ! 

General. Oh, but you mustn't do that. May I ask — this 
is a picturesque uniform, hut I'm not familiar with it — what are 
you? 

King. We are all single gentlemen. 

General. Yes, I gathered that. Anything else ? 

King. No, nothing else. 

Edith. Papa, don't believe them. They are Dirates — the 
famous Pirates of Penzance ! 

General. The Pirates of Penzance? I have ofteu heard 



of them. 

Mabel. Y 
eric), who W£ 

General. 



s, all except this gentleman (indicating Fred- 
a pirate once, but who is out of his indentures 

But wait a bit I object to pirates as sons-in- 



King. We object to major-genera 

ire waive that point; we do not press : 

General. (Aside.) Hah ! an ider 



i fathers-in-h 
i look over it 
(Aloud.) And do you 



>uld deliberately rob me of these the 
sole remaining props of my old age, and leave me to go through 
the remai^e- c' life unfriended, unprotected, and alone? 



Kino. W all, yes ; that's the idea. 

General Tell me, have you ever known what it is to taa aa 

rphan? 

All the Pirates. (Disgusted.) Oh, dash it all 1 

Kino. Here we are again 1 

General. I ask you, Have you ever known what it to to h» 
an orphan? 

King. (Sighing.) Often. 

General. Yes, orphan. Have you ever known what it to in 
be one ? 

King. I say, often. 

All. (Disgusted.) Often! often 1 often 1 (Turning away.) 

General. I don't think we quite understand one another. 
I ask you, Have you ever known what it is to be an orphan? 
and you say " Orphan." As I understand you, you are merely 
repeating the word "orphan " to show that you understand me. 

King. I didn't repeat the word "often." 

General. Pardon me; you did indeed. 

King. I only repeated it once. 

General. True, but you repeated it 

King. But not often. 

General. Stop! I think I see where we are getting ooo- 
fused. When you said "orphan" did you mean "orphan," a 
person who has lost his parents, or " often," frequently ? 

King. Oh, I beg your pardon I I see you mean frequently. 

General. Ah, you said " often " frequently. 

King. No, only once. 

General. Exactly, you said "oft»n, frequently," only ono*= 



Finale— Act I. 



Mabel, Kate, Edith, Frederic, Samuel, King, Major-General, Ruth, X Chorus. 

Recit. Major-Gknkral. 




SAMU&L 4 KlKU 



ItAjOft-GKXUAl. 




Sami/b-l, King, & Chorus of Pirates. k - - r~~ 
*._^ - » .- 3- * „ - - 3- »- hJ f * *_t---J-j—l 



§ 



fel - low ! See, at our feet they kneel '. Our hearts we can - not 




lz&£££2e&^^ 





Hail, 
Tenors & Fred, with Tenor. Sam. with ist Bass. 






Sam. 


■f- -*-^» , , Y 






Major-General. 


^r.fi^e-z.^-q >»— *~Y= 




^ r . 1 - 




» 1 J' J*~\-J — +—* — 0— I 


For he is 


---"- 




«, 


And it some-times is * 



Chorus. Sopranos. / 




brides - maids 




brides - maids be. . . . 



brides - maids 



all will 



,m 



g. 4 • 



w 



brides - maids be. 




Recit. Ruth. 




Chorus of Piwtbs. 



Chorus or Pirates. 




^^PPPJp 



Fred., Samuel, King, Major-General, & Pirates 




, ... v *- -I- "5 -3 S — — - -* -1 






Mabfl, Edith, Kayk. & Girls. 



^^^^= | !^=— ^^S^^j ---*:^^ * - *^-=^^^S^^ -*: -^r-*- j ^S g=^=^^ 




p— # — 0^ U — --3-" «— 3=j_.crfcr: ^-f AZ^UfEEzL 31*: —J-J-* 



P^ 



F g== 3^ dL -=J^^j -Jr 5 j P^^^^^^^^^^l^^ 






fet ^ B^ 3: b=* =*• 



Mabel & Edit h with ist Sop., Kate with tad. 




^^^^g s 33^ ^£=£=£5=^ ^ 8=J=J ^£^ 




u^L 



*£*£ 



^viiffiii 






(Girls and General go up rocks L. Group while Pirates in- 
dulge in a wild dance of delight on stage A', and It. C. The 
General produces a British flag, and the Pirate Kino (on 
arched rock It. C.) produces a black flag with skull and' cross- 
hoaet. Picture.)' 



ACT II. 

S<;ene.— A ruined chapel by moonlight. Aitlm C, R., and h., I General Stanley discovered seated R C. pensively, furroutu* mi 
divided by pillars and arches; ruined Got hi* windows at back. \ by his daughters. 



No. i. 



INTRODUCTION. SOLO— Mabel & Chorus 





1 p j> f, h ^- » ■ 1 












b • titer, why leave your bed 


At 


thu n-liw - ly 


how? When 

-jg- ^ 


tap • py day -light u dead. 


And 


n ^ +. + rfr^P +- 


*&zr r 


jl. jt- JL-jl^-jl. "££. 








J^J^J^ *£ *%■ J$ ZrZ* 




&> r r r_ r r r 1 r r 


J- — LU — 




'* : ' 







&u-4/r ■nr^'gii i r- ±jb Jr /4M-=a=^& ^^^ 



dark • hum dan - gen lower 1 . . . See, heay'a hai lit her lamp. The mid ■ night hour is part. 




p 



■'■ II' \ I f j g 



And the chU - ly mghj_ air U damp, The dew ii fall - ing fart. Dear fa • ther, why leave yo«r 



f' \V 



Chorus or Girls. 




cheek I . . Thy lov - ing chil - dren bear. In them thy com - fort 



ij.JvP'JPiTP'JTI^ ' P 



5 g _ y, ' v ' ^ v r 



Ifryf e "p hiJ^P; I J_ g ■». Ji .1 ^ J i j i f p f g i J > ? r e 



gym . pa - the - tic care Their arms a - round thee 



bear To «ee thea 



Tf^n j^aj i ^r. ijj i |p | p 



-^^in 



*j3 . 



feU,;_ J-^^l J, I r. j J. I n-i - i. N 







t-u 



(Fred enters R. U. E. and down V.) have brought disgrace upou what I nave no Qw»c ru aa ua 
Mabel. Oh, Frederic, cannot you reconcile it with your con- sta i; le<1 K,c " tcheon - A „, 
.cience to say something that will relieve my father's sorrow? * f Erx 15e comforted. Had you not acted as you did, Uim 
Fred. I" will try, dear Mabel, but why does he sit night rt " ck,ess n, , en wol,ld assuredly have called in the nearest clergy- 
after night, in this draughty old ruin? n,!l "> and have married your large family on the spot. 

General. Why do I sit here? To escape from the pirates' M. ENERAL : 1 . thank . y° u /" r J""""" proUl-rod solace, but it is un- 

clutches I described myself as an orphan, and I am uo orphan, fi^'"^.^^^, at tl '" e your < ' X I"'' 1 """ 1 Imir( ' 1 ' a B alIU * 
mble myself before the tombs of my ancestors, 



r pardon for the disgra 
You o 



mghtnpc 



Fred. At eleven, and befoi 



and to implor 
them. 

Fred. But you forget, sir. You only bought the property SMf ' '".''- th,,) " Ir " 
a year ago, and the stucco on your baronial castle is scarcely dry. >'™ wl " be mlne ! 

General. Frederic, in this chapel are ancestors ; you can- 
not deny that. I don't know whose ancestors they were, but I 
know whose ancestors they are, and I shudder to think that their 
descendant by purchase (if I may so describe myself) should 



e midnight I hope to have atoned 
with these pestilent scourges by 
the earth.— And then, my Mabet 



Frkd. They are; they only wait my c 

(Enter Police, marching in single file fro 

in line, facing audienc 



L., 2d E., atidfiU 



No. 2. 



RECITATIVE— Frederic & Major-General. 





Ho. ;. CHORUS— With Solos for Mabel. Edith. & Sergeant. 



,-' ,>"<* . .. ! 






. VT 


- *- ■>, ,l| 






* * * 







T :^ T :^-T 



Sncuxr. 



We ■ - e» • fen- 1 - fc^ fad : 



CHoirs or Poua. 




m 





Go, . . ye he - roes, go . . to glo - ry, Though . . ye die in com • bat go - - • ry ! Ye 




■^-j^rjd^=^. 




JJ2J 


§fe 


z*; 


J # 3 # 


a 




\ f r? g— T — f 


* j f -m 


— =t 


long . . and stc 


■■* 


Go . 


to 


in, 


moc-U-H 


«y- 


Go to 

J" 


death, . . . and go ti 

1 ^ - f* ■ 


—r—ti 


..." .. — _t 


&-£• — i 


H — 






•q 


-^ 


53 


=&- 


rj — : 5 — 




— '-U — U-^-l 




^jlp J l ^/ J J l^>-3^ J l i-CJFP 



Go . . . a»d do your best . . en-dea - roar, And, . .be - fore all links we 



6y 



CHORUS Of Gckls. 




Solo. Sergeant. 




Mi P C ' S f ' f r — ^ 




1 J\ ^ — P 5 £ — i * ' f I >. £" „ - "S" V -V. »T 


£5 — 1* 2 — U fag — j — fi 7 ^ 

re • fer - ence, a - lack, To 


=fc*= 


1 * * ' ^ — * — p-P^- * g i C 54 

chance of com - ing back ; Still, per - haps it would be wise Not to 


* & i 4 T" 


=^= 




^^ -J U J — 3- 




J— J ^ J Uz* « ! r 1 1 




fefc 










1 






= 




* b 


-f -u f— g-j 


i&- 


^T 


T 


•" 


vi-deut 


— P r-~ (• 


E - ri- 


tint. 


— # F 


e • ri • dent. 


Ah, 


7«, well 


w ~ 








* 
« N- 


* ^-T"" l^-W ^-f 

These at • ten - tioiu are well meant. 


-* ' 


U* — 


* ? r 

yes, well meant 


» 1^ 


Ah, 


yes, well 


0! 


*V» 




V* 




— t *"± -> -J- 


— * — i 


i 


^ -5- 


-^» '-1 


-#~ 


"rU 


S? 


=3— 




=^~ 


5 m 


' # 1 ■ 1 •L-J - 


. j ■ .-■- 


L*_: 


— -.} . - j 1 '- 


1 1 * 


1 i 


-J "l ^ 3J 






__)■ ^ 






r~. j j - 






^y- 


-^p r^g-.-i 


r> 


• • ry. 




Ye . . ^ 


shall live in 


so^ 




ry, Go . . to 


im - mor-U - U • 


r> 


- ry, 




Ye^T -- " 


•hall live in 


song . . 


--^ 


ry, Go to 


im - mor-U - Ii . 


e io 


■ - ■» 




Ye 


shall, 


7« 


shall 


live 


I - 


/■* PS? 




And we 


find the wis 


- est thing, Taran - 


U - ra, U-ran 


r^~ 


Ii to slap oui chests and sing, Ta-ran - ta - 




I J i r 






^mm* 


*NH 


J -J 




1 J J 


4 J 


1 j ' * 


— * — 


-J L^ £ 


ZX——Z—2 




*o. 4 



(Mabel tears hertelf Jrom Kked, and exxU R., jollowed by k 
tisieri, consoling her. The General and olhert Jollov t 
Police off L. Frederic remain* alone.) 

RECITATIVE & TRIO. 






H h j> l, 1 b 






1 J J J* "I J 






Moderate 


KlrtG. 


*\2 


•of du-ty'itteni die- ta- tion. 


I. 


cir-cum-etan-ce'a 


ric - Irm, have been guilt - 


i 






fr 


- 


s*=^ 


|J 






1 E-p h=— 


— 4tj- 




" -J 

>> 

lib 


-T = * 


^ 


_! E 4- 






1 r r I = 


»— 




Wv-+ 


r^= 


\ 



| - j 1J | J - IJJJ I JK - ^ 



And I, tooi lit - tie Ruth I 



ffi>r "r f^ 



Wnocalla? 

41 * i 



j M^M- T"'^^ 



Oh, mad in - tra-den I How dart yoa 



Fred'ric I Yoor late 



uRAii — i-^^ 


(Kino and Ruth taW a jtn*toi to tank ear.) Kiw 

1 r • : y c 1 r - i » * « 1 s b : f T ' P 1 r >■ ^efe 


w Jgrf ■ J 

bee mel 

#^-T = 


Know ye not, oh, r»sh one*, Th»t I hare doomed jot to ex - ter - mi - u • tioa ? Hire 

— M- ^ | H" -K 1 H" ^ 1 H" ^f^ 


JTtt^ 


'^ g:- '^ % '^ gs '!4 g 


■ J ^ gj | J %■ j | X ^ 1 J rri — r 




aLr ' ~ ' ** *cHr ' - ' \^t J &Jr 



HA r ' * r r : 



I * I • \ r ^ I =H£ 



itrr 



cy on «; 



Hear u ert job tlaagh - ter ! 



n j > r 






^H^ 



'*-^ — -H — — I — #— 




No. 5 . 



TRIO— Ruth, Frederic, & King.. 



*r?~t- x * >f 




quip and quib - ble quaint ; 

ftVit 'L f f T <* 1 


But 


all i 


— ,. ,i . 


e heard, We lay and sobh'd up 




the rocks, Un - 








' V * ' y ^ 




— '-U- 





-0 ff-% 


you 


there tc 


hear. 


We 


said, " 


f we 


could tel 


" 


him 


, How Fred-V 


c would the 


J0Ue 


en 


joy. 


And 


«T s £ 




*$£— 










"3: 


^ 






* * 




"«" 






1 J 


, J 










E. — ^t_j- 




—-1 


* J 






# 










# 












9* 




f -loyal, Some person in -\ ( Koyal, Has decided thai, althougk "} ( pleniy : One year in ever 

i, ) .uthor,ty-l don't know who- ( \ for such a beastly month as l-el.Tu- ( J four his days shall be reck 
) (_ very likely the Astronomer j (_-ary, twenty-eight days as a rule are j ^ -oned as nine and 



gP^fF 



If 



twenty. Through some singular ) f*"?' ^ ou are ,he vlc < im . of < hls 

idence-I shouldn't be surprised if it U clum 2; »™neenient, having been 
: '.wing to the agency of an ill-natured) ^ ln lea P 7 ea J £ n , ,h " 

' I. twenty-ninth of Feb- 



-ruaiy. And so, Ly a j f -cover That'tho' you've livedtwenly- \ 

niple arithmetical process, J.-) one years, yet, if we go by i irthdays, f 

you'll easily dis- j (_ you're only five and a little bit J 






c£SA — — v 


— N 


„ | » — , PL| p S ts M— -£ f* h U m , > J** I ^ — * K K- 


count • ing 


in 


the u • sual way, Years twen - ty - one I've been a - live, Vet, rck-'ning by my na - tal day, Vet, 


(jfM.- g — jE 




"3-\ i j *— t 1 > - r | ^ l-~-^ ' | ; -~g n \~£-*—+ 


J 3~ 




tp 2-r-r^f ^w I T ^ ' f all 


gMl'g J* : 


^= 


."* 1 "" ** — H— 2 — J-i ^ ' 1 - 1 l-u 




(AL throw themselves back on seals, exhausted wilh laughing.) 

Fred. Upon my word, this is mos» curious, 

Most absurdly whimsical. Five and a quarter ! 
Ni oue would think it to look at inc. 

Ruth. You are glad now, I'll he bound, that you spared us. 
if on would never have forgiven yourself when you discovered 
that you had killed two of your comrades. 

Fred. My comrades ? 

Kino. I'm afraid you don't appreciate the delicacy of your 
position. You were apprenticed to us — 

Fred. Until I reached my twenty-first year. 

King. No, until you reached your twenty : first birthday 
(producing document), and, going by birthdays, you are as yet 
only five and a quarter. 

Fred. You don't mean to say you are going to hold me to 
that? 

King. No, we merely remind you of the fact, and leave the 
rest to your sense of duty. 

Fred. ( Wildly.) Don't put it on that footing. As I was 
merciful to you just now, be merciiui to me. I implore you not 
to insist on the letter of your bond just as the cup of happiness 
is at my lips. 

RuTn. We insist on nothing. We content ourselves with 
pointing out to you your duty. 

Fred. Well, you have appealed to my sense of duty, and my 
duty is only too clear. I abhor your infamous calling, I shudder 



at the thought that I have ever heen mixed up with il, tnit dot/ 
is before all. At any cost, I will do my duty. 

Kino. Bravely spoken ! Come, you are one of usouoe more. 

Fred. Lead on, I follow! (Suddenly.) Oh, horror] 

King and Ruth. What is the matter ? 

Fred. Ought I to tell you? Nol no 1 I cannot do it; and 
yet, as one of your band — 

King. Speak out, 1 charge you, by that sense of coosaKm 
appealed i 

Fred. ~ 



King a; 
Fred. 
orphan? 
King. 
Fi.i'i). 



(.. i.ial Stanley, the father of my Mabel— 

id Ruth. Yes ! yes ! 

He escaped from you on the pica that Le wa* 



nks my heart to betray the honored iathei of 

1 I adore, but as your apprentice I have no alternative 

It is my duty to tell you that General Stanley is no orphan. 

King and Ruth. What ? 

Fred. More than that, he never was one ! 

King. Am I to understand that to save his contemptible 
life be dared to practise on our credulous simplicity ? (.Fred 
nods as he weeps.) Our rovenge shall be swift and terrible. We 
will go and collect our band and attack Tremorden Castle this 
very night. 

Fred. But — 

King. Not a word ! he is doomed 1 



No. 6. 



TRIO— Ruth, Frederic, & King. 




Ig5g|g^ipg<^ p f^^- 




pire ! . . I find my du - ty hard to do to - day. . . My heart is fill'd . . with an - guish dire; . . It strikes a 




jjg * l f— T^ ^ 




tide* I . Our na - tore* stem he »oft-ened with his lies I . - And in re • torn to-night the I 



' *- t**» * * * 11~— g«Jz* Jt 





j^tf^f J ^W^zU L^^ ^J^ ^ j^ftix jj^ ^^^ 



girls likewise, they will welt 




{EztuiU &l>o and Kuril. Frkd throws himself on a tiont L.U 
in blank despair. Enter Majiel.) 



No. 7. RECITATIVE & DUET— Mabel & Frederic. 




Wd one I \ bound my - self .0 serve the Pi - rale Cap -tain Un - til I reach 'd my one and Iweo- lirti» 





No 8. 



DUET— Mabel & Frederic 





night I quit these walls I The thought my soul ap - pals; But when stern du • ty calls, 1 




r — *>=*& — ^Sr-j: - — ^- 




Nay, Mabel, nay ; 



But du-ty's name. The thought . . my soul ap • pals ; But when 



^m^^^^mm^mw^£§ 




^^^^^^v 1 ^^^— t 




■*-*■■+-* nr -# 



B Ah, leave me not to pine A- lone and de - so- late ! No fate seemed fair as mine. No hap - -pi-nesa so great; And 

?Jff -X-CI^ ;--3 ^S|==p ^iq--i — --■ | i— I ! i - ±g> 1 - GTQ. 




Fal la la la, Fal la! 



pEg^^ ^^fs^^m^^j m^m ^if 



gone. Fal la la la, Fal la la Ns» He loves thee 



Fal U la la, Fal 







No. 9. RECITATIVE— Mabel, &c. Chorus of Police. 




— m- — *■ — r 




MABEL. " Death and glory. 








"oldauocul 


~r 


"acted nobly. 






1 


p Chorus of Police. 


^~ 




~ 




=4 


r 


That is not a pleasant way of putting it ! 


« 


He has acted shamefully 1 


~ 


Ke has acted nobly 


L_|- 


\ 
\ 


V 

p 


~ 




| 1 1- 







SERGEANT. "This is perplexing." 




Mabel. Sergeant, approach. Young Frederic was to have Ai.i.. Very well. 
I<*1 you to death and glory. Serorant. Tlii» is perplexing. 

All That is not a pleasant way of putting it. Ai.i.. We cannot understand it at all 

.Maui:!.. No matter. He will nut .so lead you, for he has Skroeant. Still, if lie is actuated by a M-iiae of duty — » 
allied himself once more with his old associates. Ai.i.. That makes a diflerence, of course. At the same Um« 

Am.. He has acted shamefully! we repeat we cannot understand it. 

Mabel. You speak fals.ly ; yon know nothing about it. He Sergeant. No matter. Our course is clear ; wemu.-ti. 
Ins acted nobly ! our be--t to capture these pirates alone. It is most distressing t< 

A 1,1,. He has -acted nobly! us to be the agents w hereby our erring fellow-creatures are dc 

Mabel. Dcarlv as I loved him before, his heroic sacrifice to prived of that liberty whicrTis so dear to all, but we should hav 
1.;= sense of duty has endeared him to me tenfold ;" but if it was thought of that before ue joined the force. 
his duty to constitute himself my foe, it is likewise my duty to All. We should, 
regard him in that light. He "has done his duty; t will' (k Sergeant. It is too late now. 
•uine. Go ye and do yours (Exit Mabel R. J. E.) All. It is. 

Sergeant. ^ ^_ 






— » M-- -*— r — p * »- m —*- 


— r r—£ = EY£ = * = Z-'-£zZ J * ~'-\ 


- * *—V 

• joy-ment 

• gurg-ling, 


And lis. ten to the mer - ry vil - lage 


maa *. Our feel- ings we with dif - f\ - cul • ty 
chime. Wnen the cos- ter's fir.-ished jump-ing on hit 


^-H >,— ' 


a ■ joy-ment, 
- Eurg-ling, 


vil- lage chime. 


i 


=^==^=F=t=JF^J^ 


~— ^ ~ 






1 ■■ * j, * *• 




vs r ~ S{ *~ * 


00 *■ 












'f • ^— » » ^— , 




—v-r-\:zrr= 


'—? * t 








* * •*- 


-y K. U ^ U— ^ U J 


- o • ther. 


A po - lice-man's 


o. is no. 




py 


Prs 


When con 


sta • bu_*f la • ry dn • ty's to be • 


with an- o- 


ther. 








Ah, 


when con 


sta - bu - la • ry du • ty's to be 


<J -*■ 


— ** — 4* 


w 






L a— — 




* "*• 




No. ii. SOLO— Sergeant. & Chorus of Pirates & Police. 



CHORUS OF PI RATES (behina the scenes). 




gla - tee. With weapons grim and go - ry. Hush, hush, I hear them on [he 






aD. m 






v 


— f» — F* — - — i M — i— 


r n 






. \- 






-1 — 
-fold 


Far 


Ge • De • rel Stan - ley's ito 

. I» s s i r* . j - 


* J^ 1 •* F 1 

- fyi 

^ Sergeant. 


=4 


— " > 


— r 
■ ty 


fold 


— » — 

For 


— 1 zgzz 

Ge - ne - nd Stan - ley's «to 


ry ! They come in force with steal-thy »tride ; 


















„ J^ 




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CHORUS, rtpeat this, and dim. till next Chorus. 



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Our ob • Tioui course 



{ Polite conceal Oitmselvet in aide L. As they do so Ike Pirates, ,low C. They enter cautiously, and come down stage on tiptoe 
tivrith Ruth and Frederic, are seen appearing at ruined win- The Kino u laden with burglariout '-oil and pistols, ete. eta.) 

No 12. SOLO— Samuel, & Chorus of Pirates. 








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No. 13. Frederic, King, Major-General, Police, & Pirates. 







Major-General. 



yes, the Ma- jor-Gcn-'ral comes! He comes, the Ma - jor- Gen- 'ral comes! Yes, yes, the Ma - jor- Gen - 'ral comes I Tor • 




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No. 14. SONG — Major-General & Chorus (Pirates & Police). 




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g Major-Genkral with i«t Tenors. 




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(Enter the General's daughters, led by Mabkl, all m while 
CHOkus or GlRLS. peignoiri and nightcaps, and carrying candles.) 

f Sopranos. 







Kiwo. (Springing up.) Forward, my 
general there ! 
His life U over. 
{JLHaJ.'gve.) 





(A struggle ensues between Pirates and Police, Ruth tackling 

Sergeant. Eventually the Police are overcome and fall pro* 

Girls. • trate. the Pirates standing over them with drawn swords.) 





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*" {Pirate* kneel;' Police stand over them triumphantly.') 




(Police, holding Pirates by the collar, lake out handkerchief* and 
weep.) 
t Soprano. M Recit. Major-General 




let me tell you who they-are : They are no members of the com- mon throng, They are «11 no- ble- a 




O Major-General. 





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faults, we love our House . . of Peers; I pray you par -don me. ex • Pi -rale King! Peers will be Peers, 





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Take 



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f i , f r i i r i -f r 




Different from all Methods heretofore Published 



The Twentieth Century 

Violin School 

Embracing Explanations of the Elementary Principles of Musk 
and the Technics of Joachim, the greatest of violin players 

THE DEVELOPMENT AND MECHANISM OF THE 

Higher Positions of the Hand on the Fingerboard 

With Practical and Melodious Studies, etc. 
BY 

George Percy Howe 



NEW YORK 

HITCHCOCK PUBLISHING COMPANY 

38 John Street, East of Nassau