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Full text of "Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1896-1899, 1900-1903"

Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1893 



OCLC: 36819614 


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Entered: 19970429 


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19970429 


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19970429 


Type: a ELvl: I 


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Lang: eng 


BLvl: 8 Form: a 


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ISSN: 


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DtSt : d 


Dates: 1894, 


,1899 f 



f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



1 040 AAA *c AAA 1 

2 007 h *b c *d b *e 

3 043 n-us-al 1 

4 090 LD271 .A76 I 

5 090 *b I 

6 049 AAAA 1 

7 110 2 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I 

8 245 10 Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] I 

9 246 10 Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

10 260 Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, *c 1894-1899. I 

11 300 6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. 1 

12 310 Annual 1 

13 362 1893-94-1898-99. I 

14 515 Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. I 

15 500 -State Agricultural and Mechanical College." 1 

16 533 Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 

microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 

d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 
20 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 
Periodicals. I 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute I 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 



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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

CATALOGUE 

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AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 





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STATE 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 



COLLEGE 



1HO3-04 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. : 

THE BROWN PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1894. 



1 



■■I 



TRUSTEES. 



♦ ♦ 



His Excellency, Thomas G. Jones, President Ex-Officio 

J. G. Harris, Superintendent of Education . . Ex-Officio 



I. F. Culver (term expires 1899) . . Union Springs. 

J. C. Rich. (term expires 1899) Mobile. 

H. Clay Armstrong. . (term expires 1899) Auburn. 

R. H. Duggar (term expires 1899) Gallion. 



J. G. Gilchrist (term expires 1897) Hope Hull. 

Wm. Smaw (term expires 1897) . .Boligee. 

C. C. Harris (term expires 1897) Decatur. 



Jonathan Haralson — 'term expires 1895) Selma. 

R. F. Ligon (term expires 1895) • Tuskegee. 

J. A. Bilbro (term expires 1895) : . . Gadsden. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 




— ■— — —————— -~^^^^^^^HH 

BARKSDACE 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



Wm. LbROYBROUN.M. A..LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics . 

P. H. MELL,M. E.,Ph,D., \/ 

Professor of Botany and Geology . 

JAMES H. LANE,C. E.,A. M.,LL. D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

OHAELES . TH ACH, A.M., 
Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M . A . , Ph . D . , 
Professor of History and Latin . 

Lieut. J. H. WILLS, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science . 

A. J. BONDURANT,A. M., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

A. F. McKISSICK,A. M., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

J. M. STEDMAN, B. S., 
Professor of Biology . 

B. B. ROSS,M. So., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS,C. E.,Ph. D., 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and English. 

J. J. WILMORE,M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY, B. Sc.,D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 



207877 



wmm^^^^^^^^^^^—— 



B. H CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

A St. C. DUNSTAN,M. E., C. E , 
Instructor in Physics. 

R. E. NOBLE, M.Sc, 
Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 

— R. J. TRAMMELL, C. E., ^ 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

L. W. PAYNE, M. Sc., 
Assistant Librarian and Secretary. 

R. L. Bivins, B. Sc , Assistant in Botany. 

MR. Burton, B. Sc Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

C. W. Daugette, B. Sc Assistant in Agriculture. 

J. H. Holt, B. Sc Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

T. L. Kennedy, B. Sc Assistant in Mathematics. 

N. B. Marks, B. Sc Assistant in Library. 

H. K. Miller, B. Sc Assistant in Chemistry. 

A. L. Quaintance, B. A. Sc Assistant in Biology. 

W. M. Riggs, B. Sc Assistant in English. 

J. F. Webb, B. Sc Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

J. H. Drake, M. D Surgeon. 

C . C . Th ach . . Librarian and Recording Secretary . 

. D . Smith Corresponding Secretary . 



^^™ 



— 



^mhm 



OFFICERS 



OP THE 



AGRieai2TaRAl2 EXPERIMENT STATI0N. 



^oBOARD OF VISITORS.*^ 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

I. F. Culver Union Springs. 

J. O. Gilchrist : Hope Hull. 

H . Clay Armstrong Auburn . 

ABOARD OF DIRECTION. (s^e 

Wm. LkRoy Broun President. 

A. J. Bondurant ...Agriculturist. 

B. B. Ross Chemist. 

P. H . Mell Botanist. 

J. M. Stedman Biologist. 

C. A. Cary Veterinarian. 

_~».«4. ASSISTANTS. $>-«>.— 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D First Assistant Chemist. 

R. E. Noble, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist. 

C. L. Hare, M. Sc Third Assistant Chemist. 

R. L. Bivins, B. Sc Station Sec'y, and Assistant Botanist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 

W. B. Frazer : , Farm Clerk. 



(JJO or TMK 'Ufy 

STATE ^QW'Ol^oXHCCMl COLLCCt 



4*«iH*. >«i.*. 






I 



• _ 



INDEX 





• Pn»«U7r— t<- 

• H**tuaU-Ml Srwfc 






*%i 1% __. 



■■■ 




OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE, 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of languages and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science — or Polytechnic Institute— a title which by reso- 
lution of the Trustees is permitted to be inscribed on the 
catalogue, — and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is now being accomplished by fitting them by a thor- 
ough science-discipline, in which manual training in the 
lower classes is made a prominent feature, for the success- 
ful and honorable performance of the responsible duties of 
life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 



8 Agricultural ami Mechanical College, 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUG 

TION. 



The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following depart- 
ments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illus- 
trative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in the presence of the objects discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an 
educational character are given the students who enter upon 
this course of study. 

II. —IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school in manual training in the 
arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial 
pursuits. The work performed by the students is instruct- 
ive m character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes 
are taught m sections by a series of graded lessons under 
the supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of 
the College each student enters this school, and is assigned 
three exercises a week, each exercise being two hours 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 

well Z« d : S 7 lme / nd trab the <*" «* the hand, a 
well as the^ mind, and thus by associating manual Ind 
mental training, to educate thoroughly the student for the 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



9 



duties of life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no 
attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are systemat- 
ically arranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse-power 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, hand-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands each with a lathe 
and a full set of tools, and thirty benches for carpenter work 
with the tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a cupola 
furnace, having a capacity of 1000 pounds per hour, a core 
oven, a brass furnace, moulding benches, a 2000-pound 
hoist, and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Stur- 
tevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a ten 
horse-power engine, constructed by the students in me- 
chanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30 x 50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, 
one universal milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a 
small emery grinder, a universal cutter and reamer grinder, 
a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine, and a 

power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 
The rooms are lighted with electricity whenever necessary. 



10 Agricultural <md Mechanical Colleye. 

III.— IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern appar- 
atus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities for 
instruction in practical chemistry and for investigation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, a lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
^ and research in chemistry. 

IV.— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It oc- 

with many fine instruments of precision : Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance Kelvin graded current and potential 
galvanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston nflSJtoSd 
ammeter, Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and am Iter 
Thomson watt-meter, Hartman and Braun voltmete" Koh 1 
rausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, and many o her S ' 

Edison compound 12 kilo-watt generator ™ 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo W^ton l^TZ 
ampere dynamo, Crocker-Wheeler o! T V ° U 25 

Brush six arc-light dynamo wi h la "T * ^ r8 t P0Wer motor > 
and 500 volt 20 1 mp/re vJ^£^^ 
also m connection with this department at^w£^ 



/ 



/ 
4 



'Jitf ny 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 11 

motor (made by students) at the experiment station one 
thousand yards from the College, which is operated by the 
500 volt generator in the dynamo room. 

v. — IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for laboratory 
work in the department of physics. Special rooms in the 
basement are appropriated for this purpose, and are 
equipped with the necessary appliances for instruction in 
practical physics. 

VI. — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station there 
is a botanical garden under the charge of the professor of 
botany, investigations in botany are given special attention, 
and opportunities are offered advanced students for practical 
work in a laboratory especially fitted with microscopes, 
tables, a dark room for photographic work, and appliances 
needed for instruction and research. This department is 
provided with Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers 
for teaching botany. 

VIII. — IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, excel- 
lent microscopes and appliances for investigation. Each 
student of the class works under the supervision of the pro- 
fessor. 




1 ' UL " 



^— — 



12 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

IX.— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X.— IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well 
as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation and 
execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, that will 
accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables, lock 
boxes, etc. 

XL— IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

Recently there has been constructed for the veterinary 
laboratory a new and separate two-story building with nine 
rooms. It is provided with lecture room, office, working 
and operating rooms for clinical practice, and museum 
with skeletons of the domestic animals for instruction. Free 
clinics are given every Saturday for the benefit of the stu- 
dents m veterinary science. 



MILITARY TACTICS. 



a means of enforcinc discfalin.^ 7 ? '" " Md os 

prompts and reJLriTin 7k r^"™ 8 g ° ocI 0rder ' 
duties. re g»lanty ,„ tte performance of academic 

22™ wXTsT 4er '^ *"» «** * H- Wills, 
rifle gnns, carriage^ [ 5^™'™' "* *" ^^ 





CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 13 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 160 by 71 feet, and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to purposes 
of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labor- 
atories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

As shown on the opposite page, is a handsome two-story structure, 
40 by 60 feet, with a rear projection, 35 by 60 feet, of one-story and 
basement, and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, 
with cut stone trimmings and terra-cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 

storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary appli- 
ance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases containingcru.de and manufac- 
tured products, illustrating . the subjects of agricultural and indus- 
trial chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institu- 
tion. 




GRADUATES IN 1893. 



«^»» 



CLASS OF 1893. 



♦ ♦ 



HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Robert Lee Bivins Lee . 

COURSE IN CIYIL ENGINEERING. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Walter Merritt Riggs South Carolina. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Joel Franklin Webb Coosa. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Lee Ashcraft .Lauderdale. 

Wallace Reverdy Bishop Talladega. 

Robert Lee Bivins Lee 

Francis Marshall Boykin Montgomery. 

Massey Robart Burton Lee 

Walter Scott Crump gt ci a j r 

Clarence William Daugette Lee 

Joel Dumas Wilcox 

Daniel B. Edwards Dallas 

Thomas Gardner Foster .Montgomery 

John Henry Holt Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee 

James Monroe Little Lee 

James Berry Loveless [[" Marshall 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky 

EdwardBaker Mell Georgia 

Hamilton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Walter Merntt Riggs South Carolina. 

John Shelton Robinson Jefferso 



■ 



^ — — — -^— -^— ii^^^^^^MMM— — «^^^^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 15 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

Henry Hamilton Smith Montgomery . 

Linton Sparks Smith Georgia . 

Sheldon Lynn Toomer Lee. 

Joel Franklin Webb Coosa. 

Thomas Felton Wimberly Lee. 

• 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Raleigh Frederick Hare Lee . 

Louis Philip Heyman k\ Georgia. 

Leonidas Warren Payne Lee. 

Walter Evan Richards Chambers . 

Edward Broadus Smith Lee . 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Charles Allen Brown Sumter . 

George Samuel Clark Montgomery . 

Robert Jefferson Trammell. /. Lee. 

MINING ENGINEER. 

William Francis Feagin Barbour. 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

Frank McLemore Moseley Montgomery . 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1893. 



' i 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 

Freshman Class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in the 

Junior, and in six in the Senior, are distinguished 

for excellence in scholarship, 

and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1893: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Robert Lee Bivins •. Lee. 

Massey Robart Burton Lee 

Walter Scott Crump St. Clair. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee. 

Joel Dumas v Wilcox. 

Daniel B. Edwards Dallas. 

John Henry Holt Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

James Monroe Little Lee . 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky. 

Edward Baker Mell Georgia. 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Walter Merritt Riggs. South Carolina . 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

Margaret Kate Teague Lee . 

Joel Franklin Webb Coosa. 

Thomas Felton Wimberly Lee. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN JUNIOR CLASS! 
COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 
Champe Seabury Andrews Tennessee. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
James Archibald Duncan Pike. 



— 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Champe Seabury Andrews Tennessee 

Kate Conway Broun Lee . 

Robert Park Clower Lee. 

Charles Gordon Greene — Lee 

Jesse Drewry Lane. Randolph. 

Willie Gertrude Little Lee. 

William Washington Moore Blount. 

Peter Preer Georgia. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Henry Clay Burr Georgia. 

William Wallace Bussey Georgia. 

James Claude Thomason Randolph 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

William James Beeson Etowah. 



17 






DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1893. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 

Freshman Class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in the 

Junior, and in six in the Senior, are distinguished 

for excellence in scholarship, 

and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1893: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Robert Lee Bivins .• .Lee. 

Massey Robart Burton Lee . 

Walter Scott Crump St. Clair. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee . 

Joel Dumas Wilcox. 

Daniel B. Edwards Dallas. 

John Henry Holt Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

James Monroe Little Lee 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky 

Edward Baker Mell Georgia 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Walter Merritt Riggs S out h Carolina. 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

Margaret Kate Teague L ee 

Joel Franklin Webb Coosa. 

Thomas Felton Wimberly L ee 

HONOR STUDENTS IN JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 
Champe Seabury Andrews .Tennessee. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
James Archibald Duncan p i j ce 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 17 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Champe Seabury Andrews Tennessee. 

Kate Conway Broun Lee 

Robert Park Clower Lee. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee . 

Jesse Drewry Lane. . Randolph. 

Willie Gertrude Little. : Lee. 

William Washington Moore Blount. 

Peter Preer Georgia. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Henry Clay Burr. Georgia. 

William Wallace Bussey Georgia. 

James Claude Thomason . . .Randolph. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

William James Beeson Etowah. 












CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

4 # 4> » 

FOR THE SESSION OF 1893-94. 

Graduate Students. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.] 
NAME « residence. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd Lee. 

Frank Marshall Boykin Montgomery. 

Robert Lee Bivins . .Lee. 

Massey Robart Burton Lee. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee. 

_jJaraes Buhrman Espy Henry. 

John Henry Holt ' '^Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

^Nicholas Barnett Marks ..*...„ '.'.'.' .Kentucky. 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Altie L. Quaintance Florida 

^Walter Merritt Riggs [[[[[[[ South Carolina 

Henry Hamilton Smith Montgomery. 

Joel Frankhn Webb Coosa b 7 

Undergraduate Students. 
Senior Class. 

George Smith Anderson j jee 

Champe Seabury Andrews Te 

Kate Conway Broun T 

James Vandiver Brown p . 

John Morgan Burns pm?^' 

Greene Watley Carlisle \\ \\ \\ \\\ " " " " ^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 19 

William DeLamar Clayton Lee. 

Boseberry Covington Conner Macon. 

t Palmer Payne Daugette Lee. 

Bufus Thomas Dorsey Georgia. 

Waverly Goode Duggar Hale. 

James Archibald Duncan Pike. 

Julius Confree Dunham Montgomery. 

Charles Dunlap Madison. 

James Dunlap Madison. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun. 

Thomas Preston Flanagan Lee. 

Bobert Cherry Foy Barbour. 

Frederic Almet Fulghum Jefferson. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee. 

Crosland Clarence Hare Lee. 

Augustus J. Harris Morgan. 

Arthur William Holstun Chambers. 

Jesse Drewry Lane . Bandolph. 

Sydney Leach. Tuscaloosa. 

Willie Gertrude Little/. . .Lee. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

Herman Meislahn Florida. 

Lauriston Greene Moore. Lee. 

Peyton HerndonMoore .Blount. 

William Washington Moore Blount. 

Peter Preer Georgia. 

Samuel Arthur Bedding Georgia. 

John Presley Slaton ., Macon. 

Margaret Kate Teague Arkansas. 

Jack Thorington , Montgomery. 

Graham Golson Yaughan . Dallas. 

Frank Atkinson Vernon Chambers. 

Binaldo Greene Williams Lee. 

Arthur Zachariah Wright Lee. 









20 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Junior Class. 

Robert Higgins Adams Pike. 

Daniel Spigener Anderson Lee. 

Walter Scott Askew Chambers. 

Hugh Bickerstaff., Russell. ' 

George Perkins Bondurant Lee. 

Frank Asbury Boykin .« Lee. 

William Wallace Bussey, . Georgia. 

Gordon Flewellen Chambers Russell. 

LeVert Coleman Madison. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Perry. 

William Wherton Fulghum Jefferson. 

Langdon Bowie Gammon Georgia. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson Dallas. 

George Oliver Janney Montgomery. 

Benjamin Glenn Jennings Russell. 

John Whitfield Kelly. Georgia. 

Henry Hearst Kyser Talladega. 

CharlesLinn Jefferson. 

James Neal McLean Montgomery. 

William Cunningham McMillan. Talladega. 

James Newsom Georgia. 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Tilden Hendricks Phipps Georgia 

Walter Russell Shafer Pei JJ 

Harry Howell Smith. ]]'" Lee J ; 

Percy Hilton Smith Georgia 

James Adger Smythe / gouth CaroKna . 

Herbert Warren Taylor ^ Q t 

James Claude Thomason Randol ^h**' 

Robert Edward Lee Weathers ...... . ...."" Randolph 

Andrew Hearne Whitman ' ' ' L 

Frank Lewis Whitman t 

John Adams Wills T 

Lee. 



™ 



i 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 21 

Sophomore Class. 

Albert Lea Alexander Georgia. 

Charles Nutting Alford Marshall. 

Andrew Beirne Andrews Tennessee. 

John Bigham Barnett Pike. 

William James Beeson , Etowah. 

John Simeon Bennett Lee. 

Sidney Josiah Bross Coosa. 

Joseph Quarterman Burton Lee. 

Henry Bozier Casey Jefferson. 

William Oliver Chears . . . Georgia. 

Cyrus Henry Coleman Lowndes. 

Albert Bedell Clower Lee. 

James Washington Culver Lee. 

Walter Ernest Culver Lee. 

William Kozier Daughtry Lee. 

Oba DeVan Dumas. .Wilcox. 

Jesse B. Edwards Talladega. 

John Cuthbert Farley . Lee. 

Clifton Henry Feagin , Barbour. 

Bobert Louis Gaines Chambers. 

Malcolm Luther Gillis ...... Georgia. 

John Louis Glenn Butler. 

John Fletcher Heard Lee. 

Walter Erwin Henley Jefferson. 

Thomas Ismay Hewlett Montgomery. 

Charles Wads worth Hill Greene. 

George Michael Holley Georgia. 

Bobert Campbell Holley South Carolina. 

Daniel Thornton Hudmon Lee. 

Bichard Sparks Jackson • Jefferson. 

Arthur Daniel Johnson .Madison. 

Claude Bertram Johnson Georgia. 

William Berrian Kelly Georgia. 

Charles Lee King .Georgia. 

Garry Devon King Georgia. 

Samuel William Lane Randolph. 



1 

! 



^■■i 



t 



1 



22 Agricultural and Mechanical Colleye. 

William Henry Lawson Montgomery. 

Earle Foster Lee ^ee. 

Fuller McLaren Longley Georgia. 

Hubert Johnston Magruder Florida. 

Francis Morrissette Hale. 

James Louis Molder • Georgia. 

Julian Berry Oglesby Georgia. 

John Alvin Beeves, : Montgomery. 

Englehardt Gustave Kike Montgomery. 

Walter Marvin Koss Lee. 

Oliver John Semmes Mobile. 

William Henry Shanks Butler. 

Edward Baxter Sloss Jefferson. 

Douglas Taylor Madison. 

Reynolds Walker Tichenor Georgia. 

William Abner Tippin Florida. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee. 

Richard Wilde Walker Tennessee. 

Augustus Robinson Wilkerson Georgia. 

William Martin Williams Georgia. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson Franklin. 

Charles Wilson Franklin. 

Darwin Stearnes Wright Georgia. 

9 ■ 

Freshman Class. 

Paul Otey Anderson Lee. 

William Kirk Armstrong Lee. 

Bayard Mcintosh Atwood Georgia. 

George Doan Borup. . Montgomery. 

Walter Marion Carter Montgomery. 

Edge worth Stephens Casey Jefferson. 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Montgomery. 

Peyton Graves Clark Montgomery. 

Benjamin Calloway Condon. L ee# 

Thomas Ganaway Conner Macon. 

Alfred Morrison Davidson Dallas 

Mortimer Varner DeBardeleben Macon. 



™ 



V 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 23 

James Allen Durham Jefferson. 

Yincent Martin Elmore Montgomery. 

George Dudley Glass .. Lee. 

Charles Edwin Goulding Florida. 

Terry Tilden Greil .Montgomery. 

Robert Justin Griffin . Georgia. 

Jule Alf ord Haigler Montgomery. 

Terry Reese Hardaway Montgomery. 

Francis Williams Hare Lee. 

Fletcher Dumas Harvey Russell. 

Ernest William Heck Illinois. 

Harry Herzfeld Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Herzfeld Tallapoosa. 

Robert Edwin Lee Hudson Lee. 

Leslie Kilshaw Irwin . Mobile. 

Edwin Bryce Joseph Montgomery. 

Leon Joseph Jefferson. 

Ray Knight Calhoun. 

William Jay Leinkauf . . Mobile. 

Warren Horton McBryde Mobile. 

William Jones McLeod. Coosa. 

James Meager . . . : . Jefferson. 

Wade Hampton Negus . . .Mississippi. 

Charles Johnson Nelson Dallas. 

Samuel Noble Calhoun. 

LeRoy Elliot O'Neal . . . ., Madison. 

William Clifford Paden . . . Etowah. 

Foster Mitchell Payne. Lee. ' 

William Henry Patterson Georgia. 

Nathan Snow Perkins Calhoun. 

James Robert Prince Mississippi. 

John Purifoy . . Montgomery. 

Adolph Philip Schweizer Dallas. 

Frank Duncan Scott .Montgomery. 

Rufus George Shanks Butler. 

Frank Hartwell Thomas Georgia. 

Leonard Alvie Thomas Lee. 



m 



24 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Merrick Dowdell Thomas Chambers. 

Sidney Johnson Vann DeKalb. 

James Marvin Wallace Elmore. 

William Wren Mobile. 

George Wrigley . . . Georgia. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

James Bardia Cuba. 

Samuel Aydelotte Billing .Montgomery. 

Lula Marcia Bondurant Lee. 

Morris Jefferson Burts Georgia. 

Thomas Spyker Cowan Lee. 

Adam Charles Exnicios Louisiana. 

Milton Tucker Floyd. Chambers. 

Elmore Wynn Gray Georgia. 

Richard Hackley Goulding Florida. 

James Robert Haigler Montgomery. 

Charles Leitner Howard _ Georgia. 

Claud Holstun Chambers. 

Frank Thomas Jackson Mobile. 

Jeremiah Jackson L ee 

Edward Camot Janney \\ .Montgomery. 

Alphonso Rinaldo Jones Coosa. 

Welborn V. Jones. L ee 

John Furniss Knowlen Dallas 

John Phineas Lee '..../ Randol 1 

Edward Sallust McCurdy \\\\\ ' ' ' \ \ \ ' Lownde^ ' 

Cary Park McElhaney -^ 

William Edwin McEwen Ge * 

Oscar Leonidas McKinstry Pick 

Edwin McKay t> i 

Edward Charles Mandy J ff 

Josiah Thomas Mangum t 

Thomas James Middleton ^ ' . 

George Emmet Pace P*!^ ^ 

Samuel James Shivers -p. «: 

Bedford Forest Sledge ....'. \',\\\\ \\\\" ' ' ' Sumter 



I 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

William Cary Slocumb Lee. 

Alexander Clitherall Taylor Montgomery. 

Benjamin Asbury Taylor Autauga. 

Wiley Wesley Thomas Talladega. 

John Alexander Wadsworth . . . . ^ Autauga. 

William Dunbar Wills Lee. 

Sub-Freshman Class. 

Willam Raiford Affleck Georgia. 

Harry Boland Jefferson. 

Lewis Edward Bvrum N. Carolina. 

William Thomas Cammack Wilcox. 

Francis Robert Charles . . ... Montgomery. 

George Graham Cobb . . .Lee. 

Louie Jones DeArman Calhoun. 

Arnold Frederick Glass Mobile. 

Charles William Glass. .Mobile. 

Ramesus Alfonzo Hammack . ....... . . .Dale. 

Absalom Jackson Mobile. 

Thomas Alexander Means Montgomery. 

Edward Thompson Merrick Louisiana. 

George- McElhaney Moore Lee. 

John St. Clair Paden Etowah. 

George Healy Randolph Calhoun. 

Charles Elisha Thomas Lee. 

James Leonard Thomas Lee. 

Hugh McCoy Vann DeKalb. 

Jesse T. Webb Cherokee. 

Summary. 

Graduates 14 

Senior Class ! 40 

Junior Class 33 

Sophomore Class 59 



■I ( 









26 



. Agricultural ami Mechanical College. 



Freshman Class 54 

Special and Irregular Students 36 



Total in College Classes 236 

Sub-Freshman Class 20 



Total 



256 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



English 

History 

French 

vxerman 

Latin 

Mental Science 

Political Economy 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 

Chemical Laboratory . . . 

Agriculture 

Physics 

Botany 



240 Geology 43 

152 Civil Engineering 7 

28 Electrical Engineering . 38 
34 Mechanical Engineering 31 
76 Biology 17 

29 Drawing 154 

39 Mechanic Arts 168 

199 Military Tactics 250 

111 Photography 14 

51 Mineralogy 2 

135 Physical Laboratory ... 22 

106 Physiology 67 

68 Veterinary Science . v . . 27 






Military Organization, 



1893-94, 







President : 






W. L. Broun. 






Commandant: 




John H. 


Wills, 1st. Lt. 22nd Infantry. 

Surgeon: 

J. H. Drake, M. D. 

Major: 

L. W. Payne. 

Battalion Staff: 




Cadet 1st Lieutenant C. J. Dunlap, Adjutant. 




Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. 0. Dunham, Quartermaster. 




Cadet Sergeant 8 


. L. Coleman, Sergeant Major. 




Cadet Sergeant J 


. A. Wills, Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Cadet Captains: 


1. 


P. P. McKeown, 


3. R. T. Dorrey, 


2. 


C. S. Andrews, 


4. J. Thorington. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenants: 


1. 


G. S. Anderson, 


5. C. G. Greene, 


2. 


W. W. Moore, 


6. R. G. Williams, 


3. 


R. C. Conner, 


7. S. A. Redding, 


4. 


P. Preer, 


8. G. G. Vaughan. 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenants: 


1. 


S. Leach, 


3. J. A. Duncan, 


2. 


P. H. Moore, 


4. J. D. Lane. 

Cadet 1st Sergeants: 


1. 


H. H. Peevey, 


3. W. W. Fulghum, 


2. 


H. H. Smith, 


4. L. B. Gammon. 
Cadet Sergeants: 


1. 


B. B. Haralson, 


8. H.W.Taylor, 


2. 


W. C. McMillan, 


9. C. Linn, 


3. 


R. H. Adams, 


10. J. Newsom, 


4. 


J. A. Smythe, 


11. W. S. Askew, 


5. 


H. H. Kyser, 


12. J. C. Thomason, 


6. 


G. P. BONDURANT, 


13. T. H. Phipps, 


7. 


G. F. Chambers, 


14. H. BlOKERSTAFP, 
15. W. R. SlIAFER. 

Cadet Corporals: 


1. 


W. A.Tippin, 


9. A.D.Johnson, 


2. 


A. R. Wilkerson, 


10. A. L. Alexander, 


3. 


H. R. Casey, 


11. W. M. William*, 


4. 


C. W. Hill, 


12. W. E. Culver, 


5. 


F. M. LONGLEY, 


13, R. L. Gaines, 


6. 


R. C. HOLLEY, 


14. F. Morrissette, 


7. 


G. M. HOLLEY, 


15. J. W. Culver, 


8. 


J. A. Reeves, 


16. W. E. Henley. 



28 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 







REQUIKEMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. 
To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not less 
than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass a 
satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences contain- 
ing incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evidence 
of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, gram- 
mar and division into paragraphs. 

The composition in 1894 will be upon subjects drawn from one or 
more of the following works : Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Merchant 
of Venice, Longfellow's Evangeline, Irving's Sketch Book, Scott's 
Marmion, Hughes's Tom Brown at Rugby, Dickens's David Copper- 
field, Scott's Ivanhoe, Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations ; common and decimal fractions ; denominate 
numbers ; the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount; proportion; extraction of square and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of Latin should 
be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in Latin grammar and 
the first two books of Csesar, in addition to the above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be prepared to 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the studies of the lower classes, 
as shown in the courses of study. Where opportunity has not been 
offered to pursue special studies required at this College, the system 
of equivalents will be adopted, and studies which denote an equiva- 
lent amount of discipline and training will be accepted as satisfac- 
tory 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 



— 



■"■ 



™«i 



■■ 



■ 



■■ 



^™» 



> 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



29 



The applicant must be eighteen years of age and be able 
to pass a "satisfactory examination in two of the following 
subjects, one of which must be Mathematics : 

(a) In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctuation ; 
Grammar (Whitney's Essentials of English); Bhetoric 
(Lockwood, Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung) ; 
Scudder's American Prose Selections ; Scudder's American 
Poems. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Johnston's 
History of the United States ; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics,— Arithmetic ; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series ; Plane and Solid 
Geometry; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

(d) In Latin — Grammar, including the forms and syntax ; 
Jones's Latin Prose Composition ; Translations of selections 
from Caesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Let- 
ters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may 
be substituted. 

If the applicant is a candidate for a degree, she will be 
required to pass a satisfactory examination in each of the 
four subjects named. 

Certificates will be granted to those who are not candidates for a 
degree upon the satisfactory completion of any subject as pursued 
by the senior class. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 
they can enter upon the study of any subjects taught in the College, 
join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found qual- 
fied. The only condition imposed will be that they engage in earnest 
study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board in the 
village with private families, and attend College only at the hours of 
their exercises. 

There will be no charge for tuition. The incidental fees, amount- 
ing to $12.00 per year, will be paid, $6.00 on entrance, and $6.00 on 
February 1st. 



r— 



30 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
ENTBANCE EXAMINATIONS. 



Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
12th of September, the day on which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinatiQns fox full admission to the freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the freshman 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to 
the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation . 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing, and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week and in all give twenty- 
seven exercises per week required. 

Special and Ibregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes is 
not granted to young students nor to their parents. The 
faculty will assign a student on admission to that class of 
a prescribed course for which he is qualified ; but for special 
reasons, approved by the faculty, he may be permitted to 
become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the junior 
class, and those over twenty-one years of age that are not 
candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the faculty, the subjects of study for which they 
may be qualified. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations in 
any one study become special students. They will be classed as re- 
gular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they can 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 31 

pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were found 
deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing in 
all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military department 
with that class in which they have the greatest number of studies, and 
their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture, Biol- 
ogy, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing ; Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering; Physiology, and 
Veterinary Science ; English, French, German, and Latin 
Languages ; History, Political Economy, Mental and Moral 
Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the active pursuits of life. 

There are four degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

IV. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 

V. Two- Year Course in Agriculture. 
VI. Two- Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 



w 






82 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



i 



Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language, to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or man- 
ufacturing business. * 

Courses V and VI have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one 
of the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two-year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each de- 
partment of the school of mechanic arts, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in mechan- 
ical engineering. 

Preparatory Course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 

Students who look to pharmacy or medicine as a pro- 
fession, and are qualified, can enter upon a special course 
in chemistry, botany, physiology and biology, and occupy 
their time with great profit in the laboratories of these de- 
partments under the immediate direction of the professors. 

With the very excellent facilities offered in these labora- 
tories scientific training and preparation of great value can 
be obtained. 



COUESE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in engi- 
neering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of mining engineer- 



w—m 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 33 

ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and Will 
require a residence of one year : 

"Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Min- 
eralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, 
Tunnelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various opera- 
tions connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the pro- 
fessors of chemistry, engineering, botany and geology. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under thep rofessor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college 
duties ; but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied. 

They can attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agri- 
culture. 

LABOEATOBY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the students of 
this College, and as far as possible all students are required 
to enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in 
the following departments : 

I. — Chemistry. 

II. — Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 
III. — Agriculture. 
IV. — Botany. 

V. — Mineralogy. 
YL — Biology. 

3 



34 ' Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

VIL — Technical Drawing. 
VIII.— Mechanic Arts. 
IX.— Physics. 

X.— Electrical Engineering. 
XI. — Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

Note— Special work in English or History may be taken by 
students in the General Course as a substitute for laboratory work. 









_ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



35 



L— COUBSE IN CHEMISTEY AND AGKICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


5. English. 


5. English. 


5. English. 


2. History. 


2. History. 


3. -History . 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


3. Elementary Physics. 


3. Elementary Physics. 


2. Agriculture. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


6. Mechanic Art Labor^ 


.6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry 


. 6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry . 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill . 


3. Military Drill. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 


t 


First ferm. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


2. English. 


3. History. 


3. History. . 


3. Botany (a). 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


3. Drawing. 


2. Drawing. 


2. Drawing. 


6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry 


.6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry 


.6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry. 


2. Practical Agriculture 


.2. Physiology. 


2. Physiology. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 


3. Military Drill. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. English. 


3. English.* 


3. English. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Industrial Chemistry 


.3. Industrial Chemistry 


.3. Industrial Chemistry. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


1. Military Tactics . 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


9. Chemical Laboratory 


.9. Chemical Laboratory 


.9. Chemical Laboratory. 


2. Veterinary Science. 


2; Veterinary Science. 


2. Veterinary Science. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Dill. 


2. Military Drill. 


(a) Begins March 1st. 







msm 



M 



36 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






F'mt Term, 
2. English Literature. 2. 
2. Mental Science. 2. 

2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

5. Biology. 5. 

2. Agriculture Ch'm'try.2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory . 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
Political Economy . 
Mental Science. 
Astronomy . 
Geology. 
Biology. 

Agricultur'l Chem'try 
Military Science. 
Chemical Laboratory 
Veterinary Science. 



Third Term. 
2. Political Economy . 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 
2. Agriculture Chem'try 

1. Military Science. 

9. Chemical Laboratory 

2. Veterinary Science . 



H— COUESE IN MECHANICS AND CIVIL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week* 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
8. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 






First Term. 
3. English. 
8. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

(a) Begins March 1st 

(b) For Agriculture may 



Second Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y . 
3. Military Drill . 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a) . 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b), 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



be substituted Physical Laboratory. 



1:1 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



37 



First Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German . 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German . 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



J. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a). 4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a). 6. Field W'rk,Engin'g(a). 

4. Field Work, Engin'g. 4. Field Work, Engin'g. 3. Military Drill. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Thud Term. 

2. English Literature(b). 2. Political Economy(b). 2. Political Economy(b). 



2. Physics 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 
Field W'rk, Engin'g 



2, Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Civil Engineering 
5. Drawing. 



2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 



1. Military Science . 

Field W'rk, Engin'g. Field W'rk, Engin'g 

III— COUBSE IN ELECTEICAL AND MECHANICAL 

ENGINEEEING. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

In freshman and sophomore classes same as in course in mechanics 

and civil engineering. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German . 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Electrical Engin'g. 
2. Mech. Engineering 



Second Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Electrical Engin'g. 



Third Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Electrical Engin'g. 
2. Mech. Engineering. 



2. Mech. Engineering. 
4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 
6. Electrical Laboratory . 6. Electrical Laboratory . 6. Electrical Laboratory . 
6. Mech . Art Lab'y . 6. Mech . Art Lab'y . 6. Mech . Art Lab'y . 
1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

(a) Or Mechanic Arts. 

(b; For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German. 



38 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 















First Term. 
2. English Literature(b).2. 
2, Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

3. Mathematics. 3. 
5. Electrical Engineer'g. 5. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 5. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. 

6. Electrical Laboratory. 6. 
1. Military Science. 1. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
Political Economy (b). 2. 
Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Mathematics. 3. 

Electrical Engineer'g. 5. 
Mech. Engineering. 5. 
Electrical Designing. 2. 
Electrical Laboratory. 6. 
Military Science. 1. 



Third Term. 
Political Economy(b). 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Mathematics. 
Electrical Engineer'g. 
Mech. Engineering. 
Electrical Designing. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Military Science. 



IV.— GENERAL COUESE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

' FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second, Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Military Drill. 6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Firs*, Term. 
5. Latin, 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) French or German may be substituted. 



- .— - 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



39 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Laboratory Work (b) 
3. Military Drill. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second 'Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Laboratory Work (b) 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French . 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
.6. Laboratory Work (b). 
3. Military Drill . 



SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 
2. English Literature . 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
3. 
3. 
2. 
1. 



Second Term. 
Political Economy 
Mental Science. 
Astronomy . 
Geology . 
French . 
German . 
Latin . 



Military Science. 
6. Laboratory Work (b).6. Laboratory Work 



Third Term. 
2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy . 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
(b)6. Laboratory Work (b). 



(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for which he may be 
qualified. 



207877 




— 



mmsm 






I 



40 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

V.— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 




First Term. 

5. English. 5. 

2. History. 2. 

5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. 
3. Drawing. 3. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y . 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



FIRST' YEAR 

Second Term. 
English . 
History . 
Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 
Drawing. 3. Drawing, 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
Military Drill . 3 . Military Drill . 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
8. Physics. s 
3. Drawing. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill 

VI.-TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 
5. English. 5. 

2. History. 2. 
5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. 

3. Drawing. 3. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 
2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

English. 5 

History. 3 

Mathematics. 5, 

Elementary Physics. 2 

Drawing. 3 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 

Military Drill. 3. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 

SECOND YEAR. 



third Term. 
English . 
History . 
Mathematics. 
Agriculture . 
Drawing . 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
Military Dill. 

Practical Agriculture 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricult're 

3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agriculture. 12 

3. Military Drill. 3 



3 
5 
3 

4. 
2. 



Third Term. 
English. 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry. 
Agriculture. 
Veterinary Science. 
Practical Agricult're 
Military Drill. 




,.-.,. »■*-». 



I 



SCHEDULE OF EXEECISES. 



HOURS 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


Friday. 


SATURDAY. 


L 






3. 


Physiology. 






3. Physiology. 








4. 


Algebra. 


4. 


Geometry. 


4. 


Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. 


Algebra. 






3. 


Latin. 


3. 


Latin. 


3. 


Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. 


Latin 




8^9 






2. 


German. 






2. German. 










1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 


and 2 Drawing. 


I and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


Exerc's. in Elocution 


• 


1. 


Elec. EnginVg. 


2. 


Botany. 


1. 


Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 


1. 


Vetin'y. Sci. 






2. 


Mech. EngnVg. 

* 


1. 
1. 


Mental Science. 
Elec. EngnVg. 


1. 


Elec. EnginVg. 


L. Mental Science. 
1. Elec. EnginVg. 


1. 


Elec. EnginVg. 




■ ■ 


4. 


English. 


4. 


History. 


4. 


English. 


4. History. 


4. 


English. 




EL 


3. 


Chemistry. 


3. 


Agriculture. 


3. 


Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. 


Chemistry. 






2. 


Engineering. 


2. 


Engineering. 


2. 


Engineering. 


2. Engineering. 


2. 


Engineering. 




9-10 


2. 


Latin. 


2. 


Botany. 


2. 


Latin. # 


2. Botany. 


2. 


Latin. 






1. 


Calculus. 


L. 


Physics. 


1. 


Calculus. 


1. Physics 


L 


Biology. 


Military Drill. 








2. 


Elec. EnginVg. 


2. 


Vet. Science. 


2. Elec EnginVg. 


1. 


Calculus. 




. _. 


2. 


Elec. EngnVg. 






2. 


Elec. EnginVg 




2. 
2. 


Elec. EngVn'g. 
Vet. Science. 






3. 


English. 


3. 


History (1.2). 


3. 


English (1.2). 


3. History 1.2). 


3. 


English. 


Mechanic Arts. 


y ■ ■ 


•> 


Physics. 


3. 


Botany (2.3*. 


3. 


Botany (2.3). 


3. Botany (2.3). 


2. 


Physics 


Chemical Lab'rat'ry, 


m. 


1. 


German. 


1. 


Biology. 


2. 


Physics. 


1. Engineering. 


1. 


German. 


Electrical Lab'rat'ry 




1. 


Engineering. 
Biology. 


1. 


Engineering. 


L. 


German. 


4. English. 


1. 


Engineering. 


Physical Laboratory 


10-11 


1. 


4. 


English. 


1. 


Engineering. 
Biology. 


1. Mech. Bngi'n'g. 


1. 


Biology. 


Veterinary Clinics. 




3. 


Botany (2. 3). 


1. 


Mech. EngnVg. 


1. 


2. French. 


4. 


History (3). 


Biologic'l Lab'rat'ry 




1. 


Mech. EngnVg. 


2. 


French. 


1. 


Mech. EngnVg. 




1. 


Mech. EngiVg. 


Field Engineering. 






§ 




rf^ 



* ■■■ 






■■MMWBHM 



■i niiWtH I P. i n! i m ii m u M Uin ii 



VM'lWmimm ■m f wmwmmm*' " — ' ' ■ ' ' ""MM! li » I mmmmmmm 



■ " " ■ ■ 



mpmmm**m****m 



TV. 



11-12 



V. 

12-1 



MONDAY. 



4. Physics (1.2). 



4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1.2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
1. English '1). 
1. Polit.Econ.(2 3) 

4. Mech. Arts. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 

4. Mech. Arts. 
. Elec. Designing 



TUESDAY. 



4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics 
1. Chemistry. 
1. French. 



3. Mathematics 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



P. M. 

7LVIII 

2-4 



4. Mech. Arts. 

3. Field W'rk,Agr. 
II & 2 Laboratory, 
Chem. 
1 & 2 Field Work, 

Eng. 
1 & 2 Mach. Work. 
Elec. Lab'y Work. 
Physical Lab'y. 



WEDNESDAY . 



4. Physics (1.2). 
4. Latin (3;. 

3. History (1.2). 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
1. English (1). 
1 . Political Econ 
omy (2.3) 

4. Mech. Arts. 



3. Mech. Arts. 

2. Mineralogy 
Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*). 

3. Mach. Work. 
Elec. Lab'y Work. 
1 & 2 History. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

1. Latin. 9 

4. Mech. Arts. 

2. Mch.Eng'ng. 
2. German. 

1 . Elec. Designi'g. 



THUR8DAY. 



4. Latin. 



\ 



2 
2 
1 
3 

1 



Agriculture. 
Mathematics. 
Chemistry. 
Physiology (3) 
French . 



4. Mech. Arts. 

3. Field W'rk Agr. 

I & 2. Laboratory. 

Chem. 

1&2. Field Work, 

Eng'ng 
1 & 2. Mach. Work 
Exer's in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Lab'y. 



3 
2 
1 



Mathematics. 
English. 
Geology . 



4. Physics (1.2). 

4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1.2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

1. Military Sci. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



3. Mech. Arts. 

2. Mineralogy 
Laboratory . 

Military Drill (*) 

3. Machine Work. 
Elec. Lab'ry Work 
1 & 2 History. 



FRIDAY. 



SATURDAY. 



& 



1 . French . 
3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Electrical Lab r y . 
Physical Lab'y . 
Veterinary Clinics 
Biological Lab'y. 
Field Engineering. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
1. Latin. 

4. Mech. Arts. 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Milit'ry Tactics 



4. Mech. Arts. 

3. Field W'rk,Agr. 

1&2. Lab, Chem. 
1&2. Field Work, 
Eng'ng. 
1&2. Mach. Work. 
Exer's in Elocut'n. 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Lab'y. 



Chapel services daily at 7:50 a. m. 
^umbers prefixed denote classes,— 1 denotes senior, 2 Junior, etc. Numbers affixed—H), (2), (3\ denote terms, 
♦From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



2. French. 

3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Lab'y . 
Electrical Lab'y. 
Physical Lab'y. 
Veterinary Clinics 
Biological Lab'y . 
Field Engineering 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION, 



-•-♦- 



PHYSICS AND ASTBONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of 
the course is occupied with elementary rational mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, fre- 
quent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include optics and as- 
tronomy. 

Post- Graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

PHYSICAL LABOBATOBY. 

Instructor A. St. C. Dunstan has charge of the classes in 
elementary physics and of the physical laboratory. In ele- 
mentary physics the students are taught mechanics, solving 
problems by the elements of graphical statics, and are re- 
quired to do such work in the physical laboratory as is 
adapted to their attainments. A part of their time is given 
to learning practical telegraphy by the use of instruments 
provided for that purpose. 



44 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The physical laboratory is equipped with a number of instruments 
of foreign and American manufacture. It contains a standard metre 
bar, a horizontal comparator, a Kater reversion pendulum, a cathome- 
ter with micrometer, a spectrometer furnished with prisms, crystal 
holder and flat diffraction grating, made by the Societe Genevoise, a 
spectroscope by Browning, with a large amount of spectrum appara- 
tus, a Riehle Brothers' 35,000 lb. testing machine tensile compression 
and transverse strain, a Carre's ice machine, Becker's balances, a 
small dividing engine and a vertical comparator, both the latter 
made at the College in the laboratory of mechanic arts, the com- 
parator measuring to 1.2000th millimetre. There is also a large 
amount of minor apparatus, thermometers, barometers, calorimeters, 
and apparatus for experimentally determining the parallelogram of 
forces, for determining rolling and sliding friction, torsion and flex- 
ure, specific gravity, etc. 

The student in this laboratory is required to ascertain 
experimentally various physical laws, hence in all exercises 
there is something to measure. From these measures he is 
required to find the law connecting the quantities involved. 
Results of experiments are required to be entered, in tabular 
form, together with diagrams, etc., in a laboratory note-book. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra and geometry, six books ; second year, 
solid geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, survey- 
ing, mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental dis- 
cipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town, and government land sur- 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and use of instru- 
ments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 





Agricultural ami Meclianical College. 



45 



Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements 
of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear 
figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pursued 
in the mechanical and engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of principles and formulae. 

Text-Books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trigo- 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Faunce's 
Descriptive Geometry, Taylor's Calculus. 

BOTANY AND GEOLOGY. 



PROF. MELL. 

Geology, — This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are 
drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural deposits 
of minerals in the State. The origin of ore deposits, min- 
eral springs and geological relations of soils are carefully- 
studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical geol- 
ogy for post-graduate students. This subject is pursued 
by applicants for degrees of master of science and mining 
engineer. 

The junior class in engineering spends two terms in min- 
eralogy and blow-pipe work. 

Botany. — The students of the sophomore class begin the 
study of botany the first of March and continue it through 
the session. Analytical^work is made an important feature. 



11 



^™ 



46 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



This class is provided with plants from the fields, and taugh t 
how to determine their specific names. The work is suffi- 
ciently exhaustive to enable the student, after completing 
the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and grasses 
that he will encounter in this section. 

in the junior class, in the course of chemistry and agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the 
microscope in the preparation of specimens showing plant 
structure ; this work is sufficient to familiarize the students 
with the methods of plant building and cellular organiza- 
tion. Excellent microscopes of the most improved patterns, 
and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for preparing 
and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the students. 
A dark room is attached to this laboratory for photo- 
micrography. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, Gray's Botany, Dana's Mineralogy, Goodale's 
Physiological Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and Plant Descriptions 
Williams's Practical Geology, and the Professor's Notes. 

CIVIL ENGINEEKING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 

I CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the junior 
class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, geometry, 
trigonometry and analytical mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows: J 

J™h claS8 7 Sim P le > expound, reversed and parabolic 
sl^lTet ^ Cr0SSiDg8 ' *** "■*»£ «*** 

JESUIT- wiu be f id in this class to the locatio *> 

reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country roads : 
bemor class-Classification, appearances, .defects, sea- 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 47 

soning, durability and preservation of timber, classification 
and description of natural building stones ; bricks and con- 
cretes ; cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; limes, 
cements, mortars and their manufacture ; paints and other 
preservatives ; classification of strains and a general mathe- 
matical discussion of same ; joints and fastenings ; solid and 
open built beams ; classification, construction and mechanics 
of masonry; foundations on land and in water; bridges and 
roofs of different kinds ; their construction and strains de- 
termined mathematically and graphically; common roads, 
their coverings, location and construction ; location and con- 
struction of railroads; navigable, irrigation, and drainage 
canals ; river and sea-coast improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior class. — Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior class.— Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to take drawing ; but only the students 
in mechanics and civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the principles of 
orthographic and isometric projections, shade and shadows, 
perspective and tinting. In the junior class the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and isom- 
etric drawing, perspective, shades and shadows, and tinting ; 
also sketches of tools and machines, plans, elevations and 
cross-sections of buildings, and blue prints. The senior 
class make topographical drawings, and drawings of ma- 
chines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. 
Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete the 
instruction in this department. 



48 



Agricidtural and Mechanical College. 






Text-Books. 



* 

Freshman class.— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing. 

Sophomore class.- Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior class.- Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior class.— French, English and American Plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PBOF. THACH. 
OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge- the 
interpretation of words is the fundamental process in edu- 
cation of whatsoever kind. A full course of English is 
therefore, considered especially important in the technical 
courses of study that do not include the ancient classics 
Accordingly, the course of English is continued throughout 
the four years of the College curriculum, three hours a 
week and is made obligatory upon all students, with the 
exception of those pursuing the first two years of the course 

U renf ln /l P ^Vf nded driU in the «"mmar and litera- 
ture of the English language, the endeavor is made to afford 

^T^z^r^ to the ordinary - — * 

_ Li view of the ill preparation in languages especiallv in 

ab,, *» the 8 ahe j Jlf Zfc.tT £££ -£ 

Srst year to groandiag , U ch stadenta in tlufSnk. of 
grammar. Farther, with the idea that an SSTE^ 
and wnte correct., Eng lis h oI the Jg£%£ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 49 

the literary excellencies of standard authors, is more desir- 
able than training in the philological curiosities and literary 
crudities of Anglo-Saxon literature, the course of study in 
this institution is confined exclusively to the literature of 
modern English. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, 
themselves, of leading English authors, since direct contact 
with literature is considered more profitable than informa- 
tion merely about literature. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman class.— Five hours a week ; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors: Irving, 
Hawthorne, Holme, Poe, Bryants, Longfellow. 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Seudder's American 
Poems, Scudder's American Prose. 

Sophomore class. — Three hours a week ; study of style, analysis of 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and literary 
themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Hales's Longer 
English Poems, Beers's Century of American Literature. 

Junior class. — Three hours a week ; lectures on the history of Eng- 
lish literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Stopford Brooke's History of English Literature, Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury ; Minto's English Prose, Garnett's English Prose from 
Elizabeth to Victoria; Dryden, Tennyson. 

Senior class. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, etc. 

ESSAYS AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
in any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable 
to the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject matter of 
the text-books, set essays or orations are required of all students : 
for the freshman class, ten essays a year ; ten for the sophomore ; for 
the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 



■f-" ' 



■" 



WM 



■■ 



50 



Agricultural and MecJianical College. 



DECLAMATION. 



The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" is 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 
feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimens 
of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards in 
the study hall before the body of students. 

Ihe senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year ; and political econ- 
omy twice a week, during the last two terms. The instruc- 
tion in this department is by lectures in combination with 
text-books. 

Intellectual Science—Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education, and Natural Sciences. The Eelations of 
the Soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter ar- 
guments. The Faculties of the Soul. The nature of Consciousness. 
Sense Perception. Memory, its nature, development, education. 
Fancy. Imagination. Nature of conceptions. Language. Judgment. 
Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. Porter's, Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy.— Value ; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages ;' trades- 
union ; co-operation ; money; credit; functions of government ; taxa. 
tion; tariff; education, etc. F.A. Walker's Advanced Political Econ- 
omy. Lectures by Professor. 

A Post-graduate Course has been established in Political Economy 
Topics are assigned for research by the student, who is facilitated in 
his labor by a well chosen library, including mot of the standard 
works on political economy and government. 

A Post-graduate Course has also been established in English The 
course is as follows: Shakespeare's Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Mer- 

S^Jdin 611108 LlkeIt, ^^ IV " Part *' Richard Itt " 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

ri^rtn,?w k "T^V , FUrne88 ' 8 Vari ° rUm ; Hud8on ' 8 Shakespeare ; 
p art HaK PhH, ^ y? 8 ,°' 8hake8 W **«* Shake-' 

WWte'sL,feTEl P nu f Shakes P eare ! R^hard Grant 

White s Life of Shakespeare ; Collier's Annals of the Stage ; J. A. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 51 

Symonds's Shakespeare's Predecessors; Hudson's Art, Life, etc., of 
Shakespeare; Giles's Human Life in Shakespeare; Mrs. Jameson's 
Woman in Shakespeare ; Dowden's Shakespeare's Art. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. B. B. ROSS. 

* 

Instruction in this department* embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4 Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry: This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the 
entire session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental 
principles of chemical philosophy in connection with the 
history, preparation, properties and compounds of the me- 
tallic and non-metallic elements, with the main facts and 
principles of organic hemistry. In this course the more 
common applications of chemistry to the arts and manu- 
factures are discussed. The apparatus used for experimental 
illustration is extensive, containing the newest and most 
approved instruments necessary for presenting the subject 
in the most attractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Itemsen, Cooks's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of chemistry in the arts 
and manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illum- 
ination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 









Ulfc 



52 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, 
together with models and diagrams. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, Rich- 
ardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy, Sadt- 
ler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the origin, 
composition and classification of soils, the composition and 
growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how obtained, 
the improvement of soils, the manufacture and use of fertil- 
izers, the chemical principles involved in the rotation of 
crops, the feeding of live stock, and the various operations 
carried on by the intelligent and successful agriculturist. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's How Crops Grow and How Crops Feed, Lupton's Elemen- 
tary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson and Cameron's 
Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in relation 
with Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of the va- 
rious home and foreign agricultural departments and stations. 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 
student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 r. m., during six 
days in the week, are amply su plied with everything necessary for 
instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative and quantita- 
tive analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar products, minerals, 
mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of prose- 
cuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to stu- 
dents who wish to devote their time to the special study of practical 
chemistry. t * 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 



wmm 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



53 



with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re-agents 
and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. At the 
close of the session he will be credited with such articles as may be 
returned in good order; the value of those which have been injured 
or destroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to introduce during the next session a short course in elecro-plating. 

Practical instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver,gold, 
etc., upon other metals will be given, and, in addition, the applica- 
tions of electrolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theo- 
retically and practically. 

BOOKS USED. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In Agricultural chemical analysis— Official methods of the Associa- 
tion of Agricultural Chemists. 

Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 13.J 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practi- 
cal work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and 
gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus 
usually supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported 
a new and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, four short- 
arm Becker Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss 
microscope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 

BIOLOGY. 

Prof. Stedman. 



Practical Biology. — This subject is presented by lectures 
and laboratory work to the senior students in agriculture 
and chemistry. The first part of the year will be devoted 
to the study of zoology and entomology with special re- 
ference to practical agriculture. This will be followed by 
the study of bacteriology and mycology giving prominence 
to the causes of diseases of cultivated plants. Special at- 



— ^^^""i™ 



■I 



54 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






tention will be given to methods employed in combatting 
the attacks of fungi and insects upon plants. The lectures 
will be illustrated as far as possible by actual specimens, 
and by the use of the stereopticon and oxy-hydrogen light 
for micro-projection, and also by the use of several hundred 
lantern slides specially prepared for these lectures. The 
biological museum is primarily for the illustration of the 
lectures and contains several hundred marine invertebrates 
as well as representations of nearly all orders of animals. 

The reference books will be announced to the classes. 
The department contains a carefully selected library of the 
standard works on mycology and many rare and valuable 
works, besides current periodicals adapted to aid in the 
special investigations carried on in the laboratory. 

Especial opportunities are offered to graduate students 
who desire to pursue advanced work and engage in original 
investigations. 

Facilities for Work. 

At present three rooms are occupied by the department-an office 
lecture room, and laboratory. The office contains the cabinet of fun- 
gi, the technical library for the department, slate table with a Zeiss 
microscope, re-agents, gas and water fittings. The work in the office 
consists of the examination, identification and cataloguing of the 
specimens, beside the special work peculiar to such an office. The 
cab.net » provided with tight drawers, for receiving the mounted 
specimens of fungi and insects. mounted 

LABORA-roKY.-Five slate top tables are devoted to the use of stu- 
dents, there being 10 Leitz microscopes set apart for them 

Two small culture rooms contain the plate and test tube cultures 
of fung, and bacteria which are being studied in relation tothe plan 
diseases they cause. Here they can be handled and stud/ed wUh 
little danger of contamination from the dust of the laboratory In 

for maintaining constant temperatures * thermor ^Mor 

it A «2£f 5w5o h Y*£rJ" A the examinati0D of cultures - 

geneous immersion Jens ll a Td^ 4 h T-' WpIe r6V ° Iver ' hom °- 
oculars 1, 3 and 5, tl It^''^**™ ** 3 ^ ^ ? ' 

A Winkel microscope is also kent »™ »i, , . 

like the former, exceot th* i u u the Use of the students, 

er, except the 1-24 homogeneous immersion lens. 



_-_— — 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 55 

The other piece of apparatus are follows : 

Steam sterilizer, dry sterilizer, domestic still, instantaneous water 
heater, Pasteur filter, fine and common balances, apparatus for dem- 
onstrating intramolecular breathing of yeast, the Brendel models of 
parasitic and sapro-phytic fungi, bacteria and yeast plants, automat- 
ic device for rolling culture tubes of nutrient agar agar, microtomes 
and paraffine water bath. 

There are also cases containing a large quantity of the various 
glass vessels, paper, dry and liquid dyes- and re-agents, culture media, 
etc., required in modern investigation. 

The laboratory is well lighted from southern and western exposure. 
All the rooms are well fitted with gas and water supply. 

A phytopathological laboratory has recently been fitted up for con- 
ducting investigations on the diseases of plants. While this con- 
stitutes part of the equipment for the biologist in experiment sta- 
tion work, it will be at the disposal of the department for instruction. 

HISTOEY AND LATIN. 

... i 

Prof. Petrie. 

HISTORY. 

m 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that history is not a succession of isolated facts 
but a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause 
and the effect of other events. The students are taught to 
investigate the growth of ideas and institutions, the rise and 
progress of great historical movements and the reciprocal 
influence of men and circumstances. Frequent use is made 
of diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, with which the 
department is well equipped. Constant practice in map 
drawing is insisted on in order to give precision to the 
geographical knowledge acquired. Instruction is given by 
text-books, lectures and class discussion, but a constant 
effort is made to stimulate to wider reading and research 
in the library. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the United 
States and England. The first term (two hours per week) 
is devoted to the history of the United States, the second 



— 






1 









56 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



term (two hours per week) to its government, and the third 
term (three hours per week) to the history of England. 

Text-Books. 

Chambers's Larger History of the United States,Macy's Our Govern- 
ment, Montgomery's English History. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until March) 
the subject studied is general history. 

Text-Book : Myers's General History. 

* 

In the junior and senior classes (six hours each per week) 
opportunity for special historical work is given to those 
students in the general course who wish to elect it instead 
of laboratory work. Each student investigates under the 
direction of the professor selected topics, reports the results 
of his research to the class, and a general discussion follows. 
Thoroughness is insisted on. The trend of the work is 
toward a comparative study of government, but wide liberty 
of choice is allowed. 

During the last term a cource of lectures is given on the 
government of the leading nations of Europe. 

A prominent feature of the work is frequent talks from 
men who are experts in some field of present or past history, 
on the institutions and customs of some country, or upon 
some geographical topic. These talks are informal and are 
followed by general discussion. 

Some of the topics studied have been— 

In the History of Government: The Origin of Govern- 
ment, The Growth and Influence of Eoman Law, The Devel- 
opment of the English Parliament, The Present Govern- 
ments of England and of France, Methods of Electing Presi- 
dents, The Australian Federation, Peculiarities of South 
American Kepublics. 

In Great Movements: The Fall of the Reman Empire, 
The Rise of Mohammedanism, The Crusades, Feudalism, 
Ihe Renaissance, Formation of the German Empire. 






Agricultural and, Mechanical College, 



57 



In Biography : Pericles, Caesar, Charlemagne, Edward I, 
Elizabeth, Cromwell, Napoleon III, Gladstone, Bismarck. 

In Contemporary Topics : Home Rule for Ireland, Rebel- 
lion in Brazil, Norway and Sweden, The House of Lords. 



Textbook: Woodrow Wilson's State. 



LATIN. 



In this department two objects are kept in view : a knowl- 
edge of the language, and an appreciation of the literature. 

In teaching the language the following methods are used : 
A systematic course is given in etymology and syntax. 
These are taught both deductively from a text-book on 
grammar and inductively from the Latin text read. Latin 
texts are translated, sometimes at sight, sometimes after 
being assigned for preparation. English passages based on 
a familiar author or illustrative of special constructions are 
translated into Latin orally and on the blackboard. Simple 
conversation is carried on in Latin. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the subject of Latin litera- 
ture. In connection with each author studied in class there 
is prescribed a course of reading in English descriptive of 
his life, writings and times. The artistic value of his writ- 
ings is carefully studied and discussed, and frequent com- 
parisons are made with modern writers. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman class— Nepos, Virgil, Sallust, Grammar, Composition. 

Sophomore class.— Cicero's Orations and Letters, Jones's Latin 
Prose Composition. 

Junior class— Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Wilkins's Latin Literature, 
Collar's Practical Latin Composition, Miller's Latin Composition. 

Senior class— Cicero's De Natura Deorum, Plautus, Terence. 

AGKICULTUBE. 



PBOF. BONDURANT. 



The course of instruction in this department embraces : 
I, Soils ; II, Plants ; III, Domestic Animals. 



60 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



nunciation, together with facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the prin- 
ciples of grammar are illustrated and impressed by frequent 
exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year : Three recitations a week. During this 
year, almost the same line of work is pursued as that begun 
in the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and careful instruction is given upon the laws of gram- 
mar, the construction of the language, and the history of the 
literature. 

German — Two Years: Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Post-graduate courses in French and German are offered. 
That in French during the past year consisted of a study of 
Moliere ; that in German of a study of Heine and Lessing. 

Text-Books. 

French— First Year: Whitney's Brief French Grammar and Intro- 
ductory French Reader, Jules Verne's Michel Strogoff, Sand's 
La Mare au Diable, Lamartine's Jeanne d'Arc. 

Second Year: Moliere's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, Corneille's 
Le Cid, Sainte Beuve's Causeries duLundi,Feuillet's Le Roman d'un 
Jeune Homme Pauvre, Bowen's Modern French Lyrics, Hugo's Her- 
nani, Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. 

Post-graduate Course: Les Precieuses Ridicules, Le Medecin Mal- 
gre Lui, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, Le Tartuffe, L'Avare, Les 
Femmes Savantes, Le Misanthrope, L'Ecole des Femmes, La Malade 
Imaginaire, Les Fourberies de Scapin ; Oliphant's Moliere ; Saints- 
bury's Short History of French Literature. 

German— First Year: Otis's Elementary German, Grimm's Kin- 
der-und Haus-Maerchen, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz, Germnnia 

Second Year: Schiller's Ballads, Heine's Prosa, Goethe's Her- 
mann und Dorothea, Lectures on German literature. 

Post-Graduate Course: Heine's Gedichte, Die Romantische Schule, 
and Englische Fragmente; Sharp's Heine, Stigand's Heine; Les- 
sing's Minna von Barnhelm, Nathan der Weise, and Laokoon ; Rol- 
leston's Lessing; Scherer's History of German Literature. 



5=5 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 61 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 



PROF. MCKIS8ICK. 



The students in this course will study English, French, or 
German, physics, mathematics, &c, as now prescribed for 
the course of civil engineering in the junior and senior 
years ; and in addition thereto, will prosecute their studies 
in electricity and mechanics, as herein prescribed. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Five hours a week for the entire session are devoted to the 
study of the principles bi electricity and magnetism. The 
student is made familiar with the theoretical principles by 
experiments, illustrations, recitations, and lectures. 

Laboratory Work.— Six hours per week are given to work 
in the laboratory. This includes management of batteries, 
construction of instruments, electrical measurements, veri- 
fication of the principles upon which the measurements of 
currents, electromotive force and resistance are based, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Avrton's Practical Electricity, Desmond's Electricity for Engineers, 
S. P Thompson's Electricity and Magnetism, Stewart and Gee's Prac- 
tical Physics. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, supple- 
mented by a course of lectures and practical demonstrations 
on the applications of electricity to lighting, electrical trans- 
mission of energy, electrical welding, telegraphy and tele- 
phony. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
orfdnSesTrgations.and opportunity is taken to stimulate a sp.r.t 
^ fcir^uiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such stu- 
dents in connection with their experimental work. 



62 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colhye. 



Laboratory Work.— Six hours per week are devoted to 
practical laboratory work, including construction of instru- 
ments, electrical measurements, electrolysis, and relation of 
electrical currents to heat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo, the adjustment and calibration of voltme- 
ters and ammeters, electric lighting, management and care 
of accumulators, energy consumed in lamps, adjustment and 
care of arc lamps, proper wiring of buildings, the applica- 
tion of electricity to street railways, magnetic measurements, 
tests of transformers and motors. 

Drawing and Construction.— Five hours per week in the 
senior year are devoted to the design and construction of 
electrical machinery. The student is required to make 
original designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, galvano- 
meters, etc. 

Text-Books. 



Slingo and Broker's Electrical Engineering, Thompson's Dy 
ectnc Machinery, Fleming's Alternate Current Transforms 



Electric 



namo 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vols. I and II, by Gordon • 
Electricity and Magnetism, by Clerk Maxwell ; Emtage's Introduc- 
tion to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism • 
Kempe's Electrical Testing; Dredge's Electric Illumination, Vols I 
and II ; Dynamo Electric Machinery, by Carl Hering j The Electro- 
Motor and its Applications, by Wetzler and Martin ; Electric Trans- 
mission by Kapp; Electric Lighting, by Atkinson; Electric Light 
Installations.by Salomons; Alternating Currents of Electricity by 

of mTorP : dCn E,ect j5 ian ; P-ceedings of American Instftute 
of Electrical Engineers ; Thompson's Electro-Magnet. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call- 
bells, annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets and all 
apparatus necessary for first year students l'eleltricTeu g ne^ 
The equipmen comprises many fine instruments of precision : sfr 
Wm. Thomson's standard 100 ampere balance (either for direct or al- 
ternating currents) j Sir Wm. Thomson's graded current galvanome- 

S 1 600 Z* 7T : El r hlS gFaded POtential galvanometer, 
reading to 600 volts, Cardew voltmeter (for direct or alternating cur- 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

rents), reading to 150 volts; Weston's standard ammeter and volt- 
meter, box of resistance coils ; Queen/s magnetic vane voltmeter, and 
ammeter, standard % micro-farad condenser and Sabine key ; Thomp- 
son watt-meter ballistic reflecting galvanometer, mirror galvanome- 
ter, Fein ammeter and voltmeter, Ayston & Perry ammeter, Kohl's 
solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez ammeter, Hartman & 
Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction bal- 
ance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus and 
several minor and other galvanometers for first year students. A 
battery of fifty-five Julien accumulators has been installed in the 
laboratory, and a like battery in the department of botany and 
geology. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 150 
volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat ; one Brush 6 arc-light dynamo, 
with regulator and six lamps; one Edison compound wound 12 kilo- 
watt generator ; a Thompson-Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator ; 
a Crocker-Wheeler one-horse power motor and rheostat, and one 
alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by special students, furnish 
current to laboratory, and light up the different buildings. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet, and are 
operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical engine, and a 25 
horse-power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm Thomson's standard 
electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, free of 
expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the College. 

An glectro-motor made by students, supplied with current from a 
generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, silo 
cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. This motor 
not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these ma- 
chines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmission of 
power 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

AETS. 

Prof. Wilmobe. 

B. H. CBENSHAW, I ASS i S TANT8. 
B. J. TBAMMELL, ) 

The course in manual training covers three years as fol- 
lows • First year, wood-working-carpentry and turning ; 
second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work- 
moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine shop 
—chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 



64 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student may be 
excused from this laboratory work by the faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse-power Harris- Corliss automatic engine, 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal 
tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form 
a part of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial 
brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected. 

The eqipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following: 
30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's tools ; 
24 turning-lathes, 10 inch swing, each with complete set of tools ; 1 
double circular saw; 1 hand saw; 1 board-planing machine; 1 buzz 
planer; 2 scroll saws (power; ; 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch 
swing; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the toolroom is 
supplied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work, 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 18 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools ; a 14- 
inch cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 
pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can be melted 100 
pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a 
full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, 
etc . ' 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern 
each with asetof smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No 15 Sturtevant ex- 
haust blower draws the smoke from fires into the smoke-flues and 
forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30 x 50 feet 
and is equipped with 6 engine lathes (screw-cutting^ 14-inch swing 
6-foot bed; 2 engine-lathes, 16-inch swing (one with taper attach- 
ment) ; 1 engine-lathe, ls-inch swing, with compound rest and taper 
attachment; 1 screw cutting lathe, 12-inch swing ; 1 speed lathe, 10- 
inch swing ; 1 20-inch drill press (power-feed; ; 1 10-inch sensitive 
drill; 1 15-inchshaper; 1 22-inch x 22-inch x 5 foot friction planer; 
1 universal milling machine ; 1 corundum tool-grinder (14-inch wheel) ; 
1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press Clinch); 1 Brown & Sharpe 
universal grinding machine ; 1 power hack saw. A part of this room 
is set apart for vise-work, chipping and filing; and benches for 12 
students are provided, each with vise and sets of files, chisels, ham- 
mers, etc . In the tool-room is to be found a good supply of machinists' 



=as 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 65 

tools for general shop use, such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, 
reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, cutting and measuring tools, and 
special appliances for machine work, with machine for grinding twist 
drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : _ 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
two terms and part of the third, or about five months). 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary 
work with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, tim- 
ber-splices, cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame 
work, dovetail work, comprising different kinds of joints 
used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, examples in 
building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third 
term. The lessons comprise nature and use of lathe and 
tools, plain straight turning caliper work to different diame- 
ters and lengths, simple and compound curves, screw plate 
and chuck work, hollow and spherical turning. 

Second Year. 

I. A course in pattern-making, covering the first term. 
The work includes a variety of examples of whole and split 
patterns, core work, etc., giving the students familiarity with 
the use of patterns for general moulding. 

II A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass 
occupying six weeks. The work consists for the most part 
of small articles, such as light machine parts, but a suffi- 
cient variety of forms are introduced for the student to ac- 
quire a good general and practical knowledge of the usua 
methods and appliances used in light foundry work. Most 
of the work is in green sand in two part flasks ; core work 
is also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand 
work is introduced. 



5 



66 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The same patterns that have been previously made by 
students are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger or more complicated work. Instruction and practice 
is given in working the cupola, each student in turn taking 

charge of a melting. 

III. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying 1 
the remainder of the year. The lessons are arranged so 
that the students, in making the series of objects, become 
familiar with the nature of the metals and the successive 
steps in working them by hand into simple and complex 
forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, 
welding by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hard- 
ening, etc. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lec- 
tures is given on the metallurgy and working of the metals 
used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, 
brass, etc. 

Third Year. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering ten weeks 
of the first term. The lessons comprise work on cast and 
wrought iron ; chipping to line on flat and curved surfaces, 
key-seating, etc. ; filing and finishing to line (straight and 
curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dove- 
tail work, sliding and tight fits, sawing, pin, screw and key 
filing, surface finishing with scraps, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the 'remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and wrought iron, . j ^nd brass ; 
turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, 
facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both in lathe and 
drill press,— reaming, boring, screw-cutting in lathe and 
with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with planer m< 
shaper, milling various forms with milling machine, includ- 
ing exercises in making taps, reainers, etc., fitting, grinding, 
polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals, such as forms, construction and 



L^<T 



A * ■ . j> 






i 

h 



\ 






f 



fL/N Of 



OF 



MECHANIC ARTS 



ALA. POLY IN5T. 

SCALE ||«1' 



INDEX 



A 


WORKBENCHES 


R 


SPEED LATHE 





BAND JAW 


S 


MILLING MAOUJNI 


C 


SCROLL SAW 


T 


ENGINE 





RATTTftfll L ATHfl 


U 


DYNAMO 


e 


C/f?CULAW SAW 


V 


MOULOlNa BENCHES 


F 


CRiNOSTONB 


w 


CUPOLA 





9VZT>PLANER 


X 


BRASS FURNAQ& 


H 


SURFACE ft 


V 


FORGES 


J 


Dfl/IL PflttS 


z 


ANVILS 


K 


HLI/Va BENCHES 


a 


WOCD LATHES 


L 


ENGINE LATHES 


i 


BLOWERS 


M 


BENCH GRINDER 


e 


HEATER 


N 


TOOL 


d 


PUMP 





POST DRILL 


% 


BOILEH 


P 


SHAPES 


S 


CLOSETS 


a 


PLANER 


* 


SINKS 




h SHAFT LIMES 






k BENCHES 








•fl 



■ 



— — —^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^—mmmmm—mmmm—mmmmm 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 67 

use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw 
threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction work 
is given the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by blackboard drawings or 
sketches which the student copies, with dimensions in note-book, 
with which each one provides himself; thus each one works from his 
own notes. This is supplemented, whenever necessary, by the actual 
co atruction of the lesson by the instructor before the class, second 
by inspection and direction at the bench by the instructor. The con- 
struction work is made from blue prints, the work of the class in 
drawing. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROF. WILMORE. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

4 

To receive the degree of B. Sc. in electrical and me- 
ch inical engineering the student must complete the course 
of mechanical engineering as here described. 

Principles of Mechanism. — Two recitations per week during 
the year are are devoted to this subject. Under this head 
machines are analyzed and their elementary combinations 
of mechanism studied. The communication of motion by 
gear-wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different 
ways of obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite 
changes of velocity, parallel motions and quick return mo- 
tions as well as the designing of trains of mechanism for 
various purposes, together with the theoretical forms of 
teeth for gear-wheels to transmit the motion through these 
trains, are investigated under this subject. The text-book 
work is illustrated by the study and examination of the ma- 
chines in the laboratory. 

Mechanical Draining. — During the first term the students 
make drawings, to exact scale, of some of the simpler ma- 
chines. The student takes his own measurements and 
makes his own sketches from which to produce the finished 

drawing. 
This is followed by work intended to be supplemental to 




68 



Agricultural and 3fechamcal College. 



the work in mechanism. Involute and epicycloidal gear 
wheels, bevel wheels and endless screws are designed and 
drawn to scale from data given by the instructor. During 
the last term* each student will make working drawings of 
some machine in the laboratory with instruction in the 
making of tracings and the art of blue-printing. 

Laboratory Work. — The laboratory work will consist of 
hand work in iron and machine work in iron, as given in the 
course in mechanic arts in the third year. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Steam Engine. — One-half the year will be given to the 
study of the theory and efficiency of the steam engine, with 
discussions of the effects of condensation in cylinder^ action 
of, fly-wheels, effects of jacketing, etc. Simple and com- 
pound engines, various valves and cut-off motions, and the 
principal types of modern engines are studied. Special at- 
tention is given to the steam engine indicator, and the stu- 
dent is expected to become familiar with its application 
and uses. 

Machine Design. — In the last half of the year the subject 
of machine design will be taken up and carried on in con- 
nection with the strength of materials, the latter being 
studied mainly from actual experiments made on the testing 
machine. In the former simple machines are given to work 
under specified conditions, the motions being laid out and 
the proportion of parts found by calculation. 

Laboratory Wort— The laboratory work will consist of 
making tests of engines under varying conditions of load 
and speed. These results will be carefully recorded/ 
tabulated and filed away for future reference. Also of 
making tests of the strength of the different materials 
of construction, stone, wood, cast and wrought iron, steel 
etc. These will be tested for transverse, tensional and 
compressional strains, and all results recorded and tabu- 
lated. 






I 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



69 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

Students sufficiently qualified that desire post-graduate 
work, can be accomodated to the extent of thG appliances 
at hand. They will be expected to study up the history and 
development of mechanics and engineering, take more in 
detail the theory and structure of the steam engine, and 
solve problems in general engineering, such as designing 
shops for special lines of work, making drawings and speci- 
fications showing the most economical arrangement of ma- 
chines and transmission machinery. 

TESTING APPARATUS. 

For the experimental work in mechanical engineering the follow- 
ing apparatus has been provided : 

A testing machine, capable of exerting compressional, tensional 
and transverse strains up to 35,000. 

A steam engine indicator, planimeter, micrometer and other imple- 
ments for steam engine testing. 

A Harris-Corliss twenty-five horse-power engine, a Westinghouse 
thirty-five horse-power engine, a steam pump, steam boilers, and the 
use of the laboratory for special work. 

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Stahl and Wood, Elementary Mechanism; Goodeve, Steam En- 
gine; Busbridge, Engineering Drawing Copies; Barr, Treatise on 
High Pressure Steam Boilers ; Brown & Sharpe, Treatise on Gearing ; 
Davidson, Practical Perspective ; Grant, Odontics; Hemenway, Indi- 
cator Practice and Steam Engine Economy ; Klein, Machine Design ; 
MacCord, Treatise on the Slide Valve ; Pray, Twenty Years with the 
Indicator; Rose, Mechanical Drawing Self-taught; Rose, Modern 
Steam Engines ; Thurston, Manual of the Steam Engine ; Appleton's 
Cyclopaedia of AppliedJMechanics. 

MILITAET SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 



LIEUT. J. H. WILLS, U. S. AKMY, COMMANDANT. 

t 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 

taught in this institution. This law is faithfully carried out 

by imparting to^each student, not physically incapacitated 
6 



70 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






to bear arms, practical instruction in the school of the 
soldier, of the company and of the battalion ; also in guard 
mountings, inspections, dress parades, reviews, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Revised Statutes, the College 
is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutrements and 
two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing 
is used under the direction of an experienced officer. The 
exercises in target practice and artillery drill begin the first 
day of the third term, March 27th. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has 
been prescribed for dress, viz. : Coats and pants as worn at 
West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet cap. 
A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here at $17 
to $18. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All 
students are required to wear this uniform during the ses- 
sion. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment, 
and studies. Each company is officered by one captain, two 
1st lieutenants, one 2d lieutenant, and with a proper num- 
ber of non-commissioned officers. The officers and non- 
commissioned officers are distinguished by appropriate in- 
signia of rank. These appointments are confirmed by the 
President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. 

The senior class recites once a week in "Notes on Milita- 
ry Science." 

PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PBOFESSOB CABY. 









PHYSIOLOGY. 



The sophomore class during the second and third terms 
study human physiology. 

It is the aim of the department to familiarize the student 
with the gross anatomy and the functions of the various 



Agrimdtural and Mechanical College. 71 

parts of the human body ; moreover, due attention is given 
to the laws of health or conditions most favorable to a 
healthy action of the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures which are illustrated by 
charts, drawings, models of the organs of the body and by a 
human skeleton. 

The department is now supplied with rooms where the 
students can dissect some of the smaller animals and thus 
see the organs, tissues and regions as exhibited in a few of 
the lower animals. 

VETEKINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

During the entire junior and senior years the students in 
the agricultural and chemical course of stiidy devote to this 
work two hours per week in the class room and three to 
five hours per week in clinical practice. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic an- 
imals; also to those students who contemplate studying 
human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the aim to 
give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we attempt 
to present the general principles of comparative medicine 
with such special applications as are adapted to the condi- 
tions and wants of the students. 

Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, while 
comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with the 
study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or other 
domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of the 
most common medicines, the principles and practice of comparative 
medicine, the methods of meat inspection, and the ways of protecting 
the health of man and domestic animals, are considered in as plain 
and practical manner as the time allotted to such subject will permit. 
Post mortem examinations and the dissection of domestic animals 
are used as object lessons in the study of general pathology and ana- 
tomy. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in bacteriology and pathology. 



72 Agricultural and Mechanical Cofkge. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now located 
in a new building which consists of a two-story portion, containing 
four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture room, mus- 
eum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part which con- 
tains an operating room and a hospital ward with two box stalls and 
four open single stalls . 

The building is supplied with water. The museum contains the 
skeletons of the horse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human 
skeleton . It also contains anatomical models of the various parts and 
organs of the human body and models of many parts of the horse, 
the ox, and the other domestic animals . It also contains a collection 
of pathological and anatomical specimens, and one of animal para- 
sites. 

The cases for clinical work have been numerous. During 1893 there 
were two hundred and eighty-seven cases handled by the depart- 
ment. 

POST-GEADUATE DEGEEES. 

The Post-graduate Degrees are— Master of Science, Mining En- 
gineer, Civil Engineer, and Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineer. 

A post-graduate degree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, 
by one year's residence at the College, spent in the success- 
ful prosecution of a course of study approved by the faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the faculty a satisfactory thesis, 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining to 
their course, and must pass an examination at the close of each term 
on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a grade of 
75 per cent. The examination is written, and also oral in the presence 
of the faculty. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are, by order of the trustees, 
permitted to matriculate without payment of fees 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, but 
are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are per- 
mitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College, without payment of regular fees. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named : 

Mining Engineer.— Geology, Civil Engineering, Chemistry. 

Civil Engineer.— Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 73 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer.— Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering, Analytical Mechanics or Mathematics. 

Master of Science. — Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidate must have previously completed the full course of the 
senior class. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire year is above 90 per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on commencement 
day to those who obtain an average of 90 per cent in all the prescribed 
studies of a regular class ; and also to those who obtain three distinc- 
tions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore class, five in the 
junior class, and six in the senior class, provided they have satisfac- 
torily passed all the regular examinations of that session, and have 
not received forty demerits during the year. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the first term there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by the 
officers of instruction. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written monthly examinations on the studies of the month are held 
by each professor. 

At the end of each term written examinations, or written and oral, 
are held on the studies passed over during that term 

Special examinations are held only by order of the faculty, and in 
no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examination, 
can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class, only on 
satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 



74 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains about 
8,000 volumes, including valuable reference and scientific books, with 
select editions of standard authors, and others suitable for students 
carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight hours daily for 
the use of students as a reading-room, and is thus made an important 
educational feature 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is gradually becoming equipped with 
valuable specimens and models of an instructive character. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations en- 
acted by the trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not issued 
for the performance of military duty, and also from using, or causing 
to be brought into the College limits, intoxicating liquors. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are 
required to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The mili- 
tary drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the de- 
velopment of the phyaique and improvement of the carriage of the 
cadet are manifest. 

Privates of the senior class who are candidates for graduation may 
be excused by the President from all military drills, and also students 
over twenty-one years of age at the time of entering College that 
are permitted to devote their time to one special study, as chemistry, 
agriculture, etc. 



■i 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 75 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. > 



Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its weekly 
meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence among the students 
of the College. ^ 

The first week of the session the trains will be met by a committee 
of the Association, whose business will be to give information to, or 
assist in any way it can, the students entering College for the first 
time. The Association is commended to all the students. 

The following are the officers : 

J. A. Duncan, President. 

H. H. Smith, Vice-President. 

W. H. McBryde, Recording Secretary. 

S. L. Coleman, Corresponding Secretary. 

W. D. Clayton, Treasurer. 

GYMNASIUM. 

The fourth floor of the main building is one large attic room, well 
lighted and ventilated. It has been supplied with a number of such 
appliances as are used in a gymnasium, and is used for athletic exer- 
cises by the students, in the afternoon, under prescribed regulations 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles east 
of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred and 
twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the State, the sale of 
spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

BOAKDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the 
students board with families in the town of Auburn, and 
thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences of the 
family circle. 






76 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it 
is to report those who, without permission, leave their 
rooms after "call to quarters," or are guilty of any vio- 
lation of order. The report of the inspector is made to the 
Commandant on alternate days of the week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 
permitted to. make changes without obtaining permission 
from the President, and this permission is given only at the 
close of a term, except for special reasons. 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session $ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session. ........ 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 15 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the trustees no fees can be re- 
mitted 

There is no charge for tuition. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a half 
session only are required. 

EXPENSES FOR COLLEGE YEAR. 
f 

Fees $ 12 00 to $ 12 00 

Board, lodging, fuel and lights 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing 9 00 to 9 00 

Books, etc., say. . . . 8 00 to 15 00 

Total $137 00 $171 00 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all undergrad- 
uate students are required to wear during the session . The uniforms 
are made by a contractor of excellent cloth manufactured at the 
Charlottesville mills. The suit, including cap, costs about $18 00 It 
is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than ordinary clothing ' 



-» 



» 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 77 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited 
by each student on matriculation, to cover any special or 
general damage to college property for which he may be 
liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent 
fee, or the unexpended balance, is refunded* to the stu- 
dent. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the 
Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of fees, 
one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer of 
the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regular 
charges of College fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is the 
duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, and to 
pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board, uniform, 
books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These checks 
are paid only when approved by the President. This approval is given 
only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, unless spe- 
cially requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a stu- 
dent, unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No student 
should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, as it 
brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to the 
faculty an essay or oration and read or deliver the same at com- 
mencement, if required by the faculty . 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the Col- 
lege—the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall in the 
main building. 



78 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



These societies hold celebrations on tlie evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February, and also during 
commencement week. They elect annually, with the ap- 
proval of the faculty, an orator to represent them at the 
close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are con- 
ducted by the Professor of English, in presence of the faculty and 
students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual alumni oration, is delivered by a member of the soci- 
ety, in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tuesday of commencement 
week . The following are the officers of the society : 

T. D. Samford, President. 

C. H. Ross, Vice-President. 

C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary. 

J. W. Morgan, Orator for 1894. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid on enter- 
ing College. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The academic year for 1894^95 commences on Wednes- 
day, 12th September, 1894, (second Wednesday after first 
Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 12th June, 1895, (the 
second Wednesday after the first Monday), which is com- 
mencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 21st of December ; 



v 



oa 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 79 

the second term begins January 1st, and ends March 23d ; 
the third term continues from March the 25th to the close 
of the session. 



EESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the trustees: 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in agriculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College, especially in the department of mechanic arts, made possible 
by the recent donation from the State, the faculty are authorized, in 
addition to the legal name of this College, to print on the catalogue 
the words ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant 
of the expanded system of practical instruction in industrial science 
in the course of education now provided for. 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

P. H. Mell— Mell's Manual for Parliamentary Practice. t 

Miss Kate Lupton — Fenelon : Education of Girls. 

Miss Kate Lupton— N. T. Lupton: Elementary Principles of Sci- 
entific Agriculture. 

C. H. Ross-C. H. Ross: Absolute Participle in Middle and Mod- 
ern English. 

Westinghouse Electric Co.— F. L. Pope: Evolution of the Electric 

Incandescent Lamp. 

Secretary of Interior— Senate Executive Documents, House Execu- 
tive Documents, Senate Miscellaneous Documents, House Mis- 
cellaneous Documents, Congressional Record, Memorial Ad- 
dresses, etc.,— 47 volumes . 

Hon. W. C. Oates— War of the Rebellion Reports, 4 volumes. 

DONATIONS TO ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL DE- 
PARTMENTS. 

Hornberger Electric Co . , Elkhart, Ind -Transformer 

Garton-Daniels Electric Co . , Keokuk, Iowa-Lightning arrester . 

Acme Oil Filter Co., St. Louis, Mo- Oil Filter. 

Pemberthy Injector Co., Detroit, Mich— Injectors. 

Eugene Munsell & Co., New York, N . Y-Samples of micanite. 

Ingersoll-Sargent Rock Drill Co., New York— Rock drill. 

Hancock Inspirator Co., Boston, Mass-Hancock inspirators. 






80 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



William Jessop & Sons, New York-Samples of steel. 
Westinghouse Air Brake Co., Pittsburg, Pa -Air pump. 
Westinghouse Air Brake Co., Pittsburg, Pa. -Air brake and triple 
valve. 

PERIODICALS. 

The following periodicals are regularly received in the 
library and are accessible to students. 

LITERARY. 






Economic Journal. 
Edinburgh Review. 
Political Science Quarterly. 



Atlantic Monthly. 
Blackwood's Magazine. 
Century Magazine. 
Contemporary Review. 
Cosmopolitan. 
Eclectic Monthly. 
Education. 
Educational Review. 



Academy. 
Athenseum. 
Harper's Weekly 



QUARTERLY. 

Quarterly Journal of Economics 
Quarterly Review. 
Sewanee Review . 



MONTHLY. 



Fortnightly Review. 
Forum. 

Harper's Monthly. 
Nineteenth Century. 
North American Review. 
Popular Science Monthly. 
Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's Magazine. 



WEEKLY. 



Nation. 

Saturday Review. 
Spectator. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



American Journal of Science. 
American Naturalist. 
Annals des Sciences Naturelles. 
Annals of Mathematics. 
Around the World. 
Comptes Rendus. 
Engraver and Printer. 
Journal of Franklin Institute. 
Natural Science. 
Nature . 

Philosophical Magazine. 
Physical Review. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



81 



Proceedings of Academy of Natural Sciences and of Philosophy. 
Science. 

American Geologist. 
Journal of Geology . 
American Microscopical Journal . 
Anatomisches Anzeiger. 
Archives de Biologie. 
Archives de Zoologie Experimentale. 
Archives fuer Mikroskopische Anatomic 
Centralblatt fur Bakteriologie . 
Der Hufschimeal. 
Fleming's Veterinary Journal. 
Journal de L'Anatomie et de la Phisiologie. 
Journal of Comparative Pathology and Therapeutics. 
Journal of Morphology . 
Journal of New York Microscopical Society. 
Journal of Royal Microscopical Society. 
Monthly Microscopical Journal. 
Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Society 
Zeitschrift fuer Fleisch und Milch Hygenie. 
Zeitschrift fuer Thiermedicin . 
Zeitschrift fuer Vergleichende Augenheilkunde. 
'Zoologische Jahrbuecher. 
Zoologisches Anzeiger. 
Annals de Chemie et Physique. 
Berichte des Deutsches Chemisehen Gesellschaft. 

Chemical News. 

Journal of American Chemical Society. 

Journal of Chemical Society of England. 

Journal of Society of Chemical Industry . 

The Analyst. 

Zeitschrift fuer Analytische Chemie. 

American Machinist. 
Builder and Woodworker. 

Cassier's Magazine . 

Electrician. 

Electrical Engineer. 

Electrical Review. 

Electrical World . 

Engineering. 

Engineering and Mining Journal. 

Engineering News. • 
Sibley Journal of Engineering. 
Annals of Botany. 
Botanical Gazette. 









82 



Agricultural and Mecfianical College. 



, Bulletin of Torrey Botanical Club. 
Garden and Forest. 
Journal of Botany. 
Mehan'8 Monthly. 
Memoirs of Torrey Botanical Club. 
Pharmaceutical Journal. 
Scientific American. 






Agricultural and, Mechanical College. 



83 



CALENDAR 1B94-95. 

Session begins Wednesday, Sept. 12, 1894 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. 12, 1894 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept. 12, 1894 

First term ends Friday, Dec. 21, 1894 

Second term begins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 1895 

Second term ends Saturday. March 23, 1895 

Third term begins Monday, March 25, 1895 

Sophomore class exercises Wednesday, May 1, 1895 

Final examinations begin Wednesday, May 29, 1895 

Commencement sermon Sunday, June 9, 1895 

Annual meeting of Trustees ■ Monday,June 10,1895 

Junior class celebration, 10 a. m. Monday, June 10,1895 

Military exercises, 4 p. m : . . Monday, June 10, 1895 

Celebration of Literary .Societies, 8 p. m Monday, June 10, 1895 

Alumni day : Tuesday, June 11, 1895 

Military exercises, 5p.m Tuesday, June 11, 1895 

Address before Literary Societies, 8 p. m Tuesday, June 11, 1895 

Commencement day Wednesday, June 12, 1895 



207877 




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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 












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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, f 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] f 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 
Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, *c 1894-1899. I 
6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 4 

Annual 1 

1893-94-1898-99. 1 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. 1 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College." I 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a i 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 



Periodicals • f 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



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ALABAMA POLYTE8HNI0 INSTITUT 



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AUBURN. 
STATE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 



COLLEGE. 



1895. 




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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 
MAIN BUILDING. 





CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



STATE 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 






COLLEGE 



1894-95. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA, 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. : 
ALABAMA PRINTING COMPANY. 
1895. 



. __ 



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TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency Wm. C. Gates, President Ex officio . 

J. O. Turner, Superintendent of Education Ex-officio. 



Jonathan Haralson... (term expires 1901) Selma. 

Thos Williams (term expires 1901) Wetumpka. 

J. A. Bilbro (term expires 1901) ..Gadsden. 

I. F. Culver (term expires 1899) Union Springs. 

J. C. Rich (term expires 1899) Mobile. 

H. Clay Armstrong., (term expires 1899) ... .. Auburn. 

R.H. Duggar ( r erm expires 1899) Gallion. 



J. G. Gilchrist (term expires 1 897) Hope Hull. 

Wm. Smaw (term expires 1897) .Boligee. 

C. C. Harris (term expires 1897) Decatur. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 



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FA0ULTY AND OFFISERS. 







Wm . LeROY BROUN, M . A , LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E, A. M., LL. D., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M. f 
Professor of English and Political Economy, 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of History and Latin. 

Lieut. J. H. WILLS, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

A. J. BONDURANT, A. M., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

J. M. STEDMAN,B. S., 
Professor of Biology. 

B. B. ROSS, M. Sc, 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS, C. E., Ph.' D„ 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and English. 

J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY, B. Sc. x D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

B. H. CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

R. E. NOBLE, M. Sc, 
Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 



i_om? 



R. J. TRAMMELL, C. E., 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

L.W.PAYNE, Jr., M. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian. 

W. M. RIGGS, E. & M. E, 
Instructor Physical Laboratory. 

J. V. Brown, B. Sc./ Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

R. C. Conner, B. Sc Assistant in English. 

J A Duncan, B. Sc...... Assistant in Mathematics. 

C. G. Greene, B. Sc .Assistant in Botany and Biology. 

W. W. Moore, B. Sc Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

J. P. Slaton, B. Sc. . . . Ass't in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

R . G . Williams, B . Sc Assistant in Chemistry. 

L, S. Boyd, B. Sc .Secretary and Assistant in Physics. 



J. H. Drake, M. D Surgeon 

C. C. Thach ... Librarian and Recording Secretary 

°- D Sm,th Corresponding Secretary. 



-~ 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

I. F. Culver Union Springs. 

J.G.Gilchrist Hope.Hull. 

H. Clay Armstrong Auburn. 

STATION COUNCIL. 

Wm. LeRoy Broun President. 

A.J. Bondurant Agriculturist. 

B. B. Ross Chemist. 

P. H. Mell Botanist. 

J. M. Stedman Biologist. 

C . A . Gary Veterinarian . 

ASSISTANTS. 

J . T . Anderson, Ph . D First Assistant Chemist . 

R E. Noble, M . Sc Second Assistant Chemist . 

C. L . Hare, M . Sc Third Assistant Chemist . 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm . 

W. B. Frazer. Farm Clerk. 




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OBJECT OF THE SOLLEGE. 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of languages and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in 
any course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which by reso- 
lution of the Trustees is permitted to be inscribed on the 
catalogue, — and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is now being accomplished by fitting them by a 
thorough science-discipline, in which manual training in 
the lower classes is made a prominent feature, for the suc- 
cessful and honorable performance of the responsible 
duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline 
of the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of 
accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for 
the duties of life, their moral and Christian training will 
always constitute the prominent care and thought of the 
Faculty. 




I 









10 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 




LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUC- 
TION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving labora- 
tory instruction in applied science in the following depart- 
ments: 

I — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres, and is supplied with illus- 
trative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in the presence of the objects discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an 
educational character are given the students who enter 
upon this course of study. • 

II — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, and as a school in manual training in 
the arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial 
pursuits. The work performed by the students is instruct- 
ive in character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes 
are taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under 
the supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of 
the College each student enters this school, and is assigned 
three exercises a week, each exercise being two hours 
long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus by associating manual and 
mental training, to educate thoroughly the student for the 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 11 

duties of life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no 
attempt to teach students special skill in constructing 
articles of commercial value, but all the exercises are 
systematically arranged and designed for purposes of 
education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse-power 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands each with a lathe 
and a full set of tools, and thirty benches for carpentry 
work with the tools requisite for construction. 



A brick building, 30 x 87 feet with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a cupola 
furnace, having a capacity of 1,000 pounds per hour, a core 
oven, a brass furnace, moulding benches, a 2000-pound 
hoist, and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Stur- 
tevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a ten 
horse-power engine, constructed by the students in me- 
chanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30 x 50 fe<jt, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, 
one univeral milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a 
small emery grinder, a universal cutter and reamer grinder, 
a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine, and 
a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist 



-==. 



12 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



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drills. The rooms are lighted with electricity whenever 
necessary. 

Ill — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern appa- 
ratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities for 
instruction in practical chemistry and for investigation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, iu connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to 
advanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities 
to learn the methods of scientific research. The building 
contains a large general laboratory that will accommodate 
sixty students, a lecture room with capacity for one hun- 
dred seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to in- 
struction and research in chemistry. 

IV. — IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. • 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped 
with many fine instruments of precision: Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance, Kelvin graded current and potential 
galvanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston voltmeters and 
ammeter, Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and ammeter, 
Thomson watt-meter, Hartman and Braun voltmeter, 
Kohlrausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, Weston alternating 
current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, 
Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter, 
and many other current-measuring instruments, resistance 
boxes, Wheatstone bridges, condensers, telephones, bat- 
teries, magnets, etc. ' 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are opera- 
ted by a twenty-five horse-power Atlas engine, and a 
thirty-five horse-power Westinghouse engine. In this 
building are installed the following dynamos: 



, 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 13 

Edison compound 12 kilo-watt generator, Thomson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere dynamo, Crocker-Wheeler one-horBe power motor, 
Brush six arc-light dynamo with lamps, two-phase alternator 
and 500 volt 20 ampere generator, made by students. 
There is also in connection with this department a ten 
horse-power motor, made by students, at the experiment 
station, one thousand yards from the College, which is op- 
erated by the 500 volt generator in the dynamo room. 

V. — IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for elementary 
laboratory work in the department of physics. Special 
rooms in the basement are appropriated for this purpose, 
and are equipped with the necessary appliances for instruc- 
tion in practical physics. 

VI. — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station there 
is a botanical garden under the charge of the professor of 
botany, investigations in botany are given special atten- 
tion, and opportunities are offered advanced students for 
practical work in a laboratory especially fitted with micro- 
scopes, tables, a dark room for photographic work, and 
appliances needed for instruction and research. This de- 
partment is provided with Auzoux's clastic models of seeds 
and flowers for teaching botany. 

VIII. — IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, excel- 



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14 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



lent microscopes and appliances for investigation. Each 
student of the class works under the supervision of the 
professor. 

IX. — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including tran- 
sits, levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided 
for the use of the students, and the customary exercises in 
the field are given. 

X. — IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to t^ke 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and band to accuracy of observation 
and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, that 
will accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables, 
lock boxes, etc. 

XI — IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include a 
fairly thorough course of experimental work in mechanical 
engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as follows: 
a 25-horse power Harris-Corliss engine, a 35-horse power 
Westinghouse engine, a 25-horse power Atlas engine, two 
9-horse power engines constructed by students in the shops, 
the boilers belonging to the regular power plant, a small 
engine and boiler for the special purpose of making efficiency 
tests, a Dean duplex steam pump, an Ericsson hot air en- 
gine, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine indica- 
tors, a separating calorimeter, thermometers, a pyrometer, 
scales, a standard steam gauge with apparatus for testing 
steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester with weights 
for correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound testing 
machine, and a Heuning micrometer extensometer. 

No suitable place has as yet been provided for a testing 
laboratory, and the work is carried on, partly in a room in 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



15 



the basement of the main building, partly in the dynamo 
house, and partly in the shops. The work is thoroughly 
practical, and it is desired to extend it as rapidly as the 
funds available for the purchase of apparatus will allow. 

XII — IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary laboratory 
a new and separate two-story building with nine rooms. 
It is provided with lecture room, office, w.orking and op- 
erating rooms for clinical practice, and museum with skele- 
tons of the domestic animals for instruction. Free clinics 
are given every Saturday for the benefit of the students in 
veterinary science. 



MILITARY TACTICS. 



Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing 
good order, promptness and regularity in the performance 
of academic duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J. H. Wills, 
22nd Infantry, U. S. A. 

It is supplied with new cadet muskets and accoutrements 
for the corps, and for artillery practice, with two three- 
inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



16 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College build- 
ing. It is i6oby 71 feet, and contains forty -five rooms. This 
building is not used for dormitories for students, but is appro- 
priated to purposes of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, 
labc ratories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

> LANGDON HALL. 

# 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second 
story is the audience hall, used for commencement and other pub- 
lic occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

As shown on the opposite page, is a two-story structure, 40 by 
60 feet, with a rear projection, 35 by 60 feet, of one-story and 
basement, and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed 
brick, with cut stone trimmings and terra-cotta ornamentation . 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 

storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room and room for gas 
analysis. Around this lecture room are cases containing crude 
and manufactured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural 
and industrial chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in 
this institution. 



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CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 













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GRADUATES IN 1894 



CLASS OK 1894. 



HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Champe Seabury Andrews .Tennessee. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

James Archibald Duncan Pike. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards .Calhoun. 

GENERAL COURSE. * 

Peyton Herndon Moore ,,,,,'. , .Blount, 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: 

George Smith Anderson Lee. 

Champe Seabury Andrews Tenness.ee. , , 

Kate Conway Broun , „ .Lee,. 

James Vandivqr Brown ,. Georgia. 

John Morgan Burns Dallas. 

Greene Watley Carlisle Lee. 

William DeLamar Clayton , f Lee. 

Roseberry. Covington Conner Macon. 

Palmer Payne Daugette. »*> .Lee. 

Rufus Thomas Dorsey Georgia. 

Waverly Goode Duggar Hale. 

James Archibald Duncan Pike. 

Julius Confree-Dunham *.-.... Montgomery. - 

Charles Dunlap Madison. 

James Dunlap Madison. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun, 

Robert Cherry Toy ,. .Barbour, 



111 



— — ^— 



^™ 



18 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Frederic Almet Fulghum .Jefferson. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee. 

Crosland Clarence Hare Lee, 

Augustus J . Harris Morgan 

Arthur William Holstun Chambers 

Jesse Drewry Lane Randolph. 

Sydney Leach . Tiucaloosa. 

Willie Gertrude Little Lee. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida 

Herman Meislahn Florida 

Lauriston Greene Moore Lee 

Peyton Herndon Moore Blount 

William Washington Moore # Blount 

PeterPreer • '.....Georgia. 

Samuel Arthur Redding ; # Georgia 

John Presley Slaton . . ; Macon ' 

Margaret Kate Teague ; Arkansas. 

Jack Thonngton Montgomery. 

Graham Golson Vaughan ' ; .Dallas 

• Frank Atki »son Vernon . . .'.'.' .'.'.Chambers. 

Rinaldo Greene Williams ■ Lee 

Arthur Zdchariah Wright \[ \ Lee 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Robert Lee Bivins .....Lee. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee 



Henry. 



James Buhrman Espy 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee' 

Nicholas Barnett Marks ' '.'.'.'.'. ]]]]' " Kentucky 

Hampton Knox Miller Tallade a 

Altie L Quaintance. . . . V"- Vl *, ***' 

T , « ,,. Florida. 

Joel tranklin Webb. r> 

Coosa. 

V 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Massey Robart Burton.... T 

u,, TT ., Lee. 

Henry Hamilton Smith... . A/f , 

Montgomery . 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

John Henry Holt... 

Walter MerrittRiggs,;;; ' ^°Tr r 

56 * ' V South Carolina. 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 
Freshman Class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in 
the Junior, aid in six in the Senior, are 
distinguished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1894: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Champe Seabury Andrews Tennessee. 

Kate Conway Broun Lee. 

Roseberry Covington Conner Macon . 

James Archibald Duncan Pike. m 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee. 

Arthur William Holstun Chambers. 

Jesse Drewry Lane .. .Randolph. 

Willie Gertrude Little . . . Lee. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

Peyton Herndon Moore Blount. 

William Washington Moore Blount. 

Rinaldo Greene Williams Lee. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Perry 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

James Claude Thomason Randolph 

GENERAL COURSE. 

LeVert Coleman • Madison 



I 







1 1 i 




20 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

LeVert; Colemanf.,. L j .;. j .;. ; . f .j .:.j. [. j ; . .j.j. > i #l j .j. JM|adi's<J>n j 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Perry. 

Langdon Bowie Gammon Georgia . 

Henry Hearst Kyser , Talladega. 

James Newsom i. .. . Georgia. 

Harry Howell Smith, '. , .Lee. 

Herbert Warren Taylor . . . . 1 Montgomery, 

James Claude Thomason Randolph. 

John Adams Wills. . .. ! ' * L ee 

-•'■'•'■ SOPHOMORE CLASS. **--•'. 

Albert Lea Alexander , Georgia 

Charles Nutting Alford .Marshall. 

Andrew Beirne Andrews. :..'.;. :'. '.:.'. f? Tennessee 

William James ,Beeson , Etowah. 

James Washington Culver Lee. 

George Michael Holley !!!!!!! ^Georgia. , !,' 

Garry Devon King Georgia. 

Francis Morrissette ^ u «Halei».t 

James Louis Molder r* 

; lr . n . iw^iucr % .Georgia. • r. 

William Abner Tinoin tti • j 

....... uppin... „.vr. Florida. 

William .Henry .Harrison Trammell JLee. „ , 

Augustus Robiason Wilkerson ...Georgia,. .... 

William Mania Williams Georgia< , , , 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson ^JjJpJ, _ , 

FRESHMAN CLASS.' - 

Alexander Humphreys Clark .............. '.'. . . Montgomery. 

Peyton Graves 'ClarTc: 1 //'' -' "• ™„. T . ?1 ,.., "*..., /?, 

Ernest WillUm Heck M>nt£6mery. 

p . • t, - - :•••......... . ... . . Illinois. 

r-dwin Bryce JoseDh "" "' «V" 

w „„. „ J H ' Montgomery. 

Warren Horton McBryde .... • • m «k;u • ■■•; • ■ 

JohnPurifoy ...Mobile, 

Frank Har&if'^£; '"'"^ ' ''' ' ' -^ finery. 

George Wrigley.. J* 01 *"- 

6 y v. ... . .'GedrgraV 



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Graduate Students.,,, , , ri , , n . 






\ Residence is Alabama when State is not pianiedA , r 
YlOfnO^J. • - IDtJBflC !f>' "t:y\ I 

NAME. , j _ . fifimg j^E^ip^N^E. 

Leigh Sjft$$g £oyd . ................. ,. ..... Mtffc* 1 1 

James f j^$y$r Brown . . ..... . . „ . y* j rf „ prfWff vP e ^Si?^ 

Rosebfl^y^p^jngton Conner.. -V# .^„ri*r///-r^M*WW n 
James ^f^jl?a]d Duncan ...... v . . ... ,,?*,,►},!*//•£&& I I waibitA 

Julius "Qjpfr^e punham .../... v : . .>«..•.;*. f«f.mfi.iWQntg()ni9raf M ; 

Charles Gonjoif Greene.. ...... .-,...,•... v.-. •.•.•^- Hi Ive^uuib A h 

Crosland Clarence Hare Lee. 

Lauriston Greene Hoax*??*:™. &WA Lee. 

Williarn ^4&kft)gtpn Mppre ,***<•«%«««%*• «*&« KxBkniaU mdl / 
Walter. (MflWtt/lRiggs. . ..... .............. ........ .1. f*>i I/. .S^uth/CaiOliiaiai 

John /P$$%l£Jf"»Sl3tQn .•«%«.,.%% ..,...,.,.,.,. v.v^iiwj.AMiaciofii. wrrbn / 
Rinaldo. Q itfattf Williarn^ ....................... ,. jV.uvw^iLe^of noiiM 

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SENIOR CLASS. 



jraooD. , ...... r~7Vr*\ ™"™ : >! rlfiisol <e>nbi2 

NAME, , , .COUNTY, OR STATE, , 

Robert, Rigginf Adams .... ....,-,. .......... T .„... ?ik^ : j v .. 1 1 

Daniel Sj^g£n£r Anderson . . . . ......... tm*htmfeptei<l A v<»H -j [ 

Walter Scott ,4*kew . . .,.,** f ;Qh[a9i^r^ 

Hugh Bicker^ta fij*.*jj„j«'ij>* : v « '^\\if^ri^^^lU^i^ ^ I 
George Perkjnsj Bondurant ...... . .......... s3YkK$4fern3 i 

Frank. A$WfP> PPJ kin . .............. . n $ f , , m $ f. Iy^ ( 1 1 A 3i i ; 

William ^fal^c^e Bussey . . . . . . ;-*xnQ&°W9'.rt 

Gordqiv^weljen Chambers . . .......... ^ivJ^VW^.-M 

LeVert Colen^an ^ v ij^a4wQft. ) n rf< 

Solon Lycurgp? Coleman . . . ..... . . « rff , t(f ..>j. | w ^Ma^A6P^ 

Langdoii.Rowi^ Gammon. .......... , . . , &][\& .^prgi^ 



rf() 



Ft ! ' H 






• 






















22 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson .Dallas. 

Benjamin Glenn Jennings Russell 

Henry Hearst Kyser Talladega. 

Charles Linn Jefferson. 

James Neil McLean Montgomery. 

William Cunningham McMillan Talladega 

James Newsom Georgia. 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Tilden Hendricks Phipps Georgia 

Walter Russell Shafer Montgomery. 

Harry Howell Smith L ee 

Percy Hilton Smith Georgia 

Herbert Warren Taylor \\[ Montgomery. 

James Claude Thomason Randolph. 

Robe rt Edward Lee Weathers Randolph 

Andrew Hearne Whitman Lowndes. 

Frank Lewis Whitman t ^„,.^ 

lttU • * Lowndes. 

John Adams Wills Lce 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

/'Albert Lea Alexander. Georgia 

Charles Nutting Alford \\ Marshall 

Andrew Beirne Andrews '....Tennessee. 

Manon Joseph Bancroft ■ Mobile 

? Wilham James Beeson Etowah 

>. John Simeon Bennett t 

Sidney Josiah Bross .'..**...'... Coosa 

jr Joseph Quarterman Burton... Lee 

* T H T y R 17 T ^ Sey ''•'•'• • ••••••• • • • Jefferson . 

LeRoy Abda Christian ..... «,,.,. 

Albert Bedell dower ,Jw.'.'~ '.'. '.'.'.'.[ Ut 

t* James Washington Culver T 

/-Walter Ernest Culver .". £ 

^Hubert Alberto Drennen . '. ' T #' 

ObaDeVan Dumas... ^ erS °"- 

h Jesse B. Edwards. .. . "'If ° *' 

/.John Cuthbert Farley *'"" T ? lladega. 

A Walter Lynnewood Fleming'.'.'.'. ^L 

Malcolm Luther Gillis ,][ \Z Z^^. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 23 

John Louis Glenn Butler. 

^ Annie Florence Heard Lee. 

p John Fletcher Heard \ . Lee. 

^ Hampton Sanders Henderson Talladega. 

Walter Erwin Henley Jefferson . 

Charles Wadsworth Hill Greene . 

^ Robert Campbell Holley South Carolina. 

Charles Leitner Howard Georgia. 

Daniel Thornton Hudmon Lee. 

Frank Thomas Jackson Mobile. 

Homer Virgil Jackson Georgia. 

/* Richard Sparks J ackson Jefferson . 

^ George Coates Kelley Jefferson. 

h William Berrian Kelly Montgomery. 

^•Charles Lee King '. . .Georgia. 

h Garry Devon King Georgia. 

Francis Morrissette i Hale. 

^ James Louis Molder .Georgia. 

Julian Berry Oglesby Georgia. 

John Albin Reeves Montgomery. 

Frank Alva Robertson Calhoun . 

^ Oliver John Semmes . Mobile . 

William Henry Shanks , . . Butler. 

Ir Benjamin Asbury Taylor Autauga. 

Wade Douglas Taylor Madison. 

t Walker Reynolds Tichenor Georgia. '* 

fr> William Abner Tippin Florida . 

^ William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee. 

Richard Wilde Walker Tennessee. 

t William Martin Williams Georgia. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson Franklin. 

Cary Oscar Wright Lee. 

^ Darwin StearneS Wright Georgia. 

fr Estelle Love Whitaker. Lee. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Emile Glines Abbott Georgia. 

William Kirk Armstrong , Lee. 

Harry Boland !.!'.! 1 ! J f fferson t 



™ 



^ 
















24 



^^Wr^i ^ xflwkmM i$%f • 



George Dpa^.Borup. ...... . .' . ..,^gp^ery., 

Lewis Edwajd jBjrruin . . ............... .fet^M.JJj^ Qpplipa. 

Walter Marian , Carter ...... . .tmsfHftta: 

Edgeworth Stephens Casey. .... ..^,^5 .... • je^rsfln. 

Alexander Humphreys Clark ... . .... . . .,. ...... .fttoufgopery. „ 

Peyton Graves ,Clark.. ..... ............ [Mi'^Sm^^^Y- j 

Rp^rt Walter Collins . . . . . . . . . . ..... y , ,, M1 . jjHale. A 

Thomas ; Canary Conner. .... >....... bnvAfM-NSW^ashiirl 

Claude Carson Crawford... ............... .\v/oVMit>VH' ftSJfffgS* | , ; : , r .- 

Alfred Mffifflfflp. Davidson . . . . . . . . . ....^^hMklil'r J run •]' 

Mortimer Varner DeBardeleben ............. / f w^#fftB9v 1Sf noll 

James Alle,o fiyrham . . . . ; . . . . . . . ; . . . . .^.^^ MgQF&uAol V 

v » nce W JfoffW . Elraore •. •.•.••••• •. • •. •. \ •. •. •. •. vj! tea Wtf^pfe ; • 

Gascon Gr^l, lf .................. ........ .... .............. .... tf .., x -/ftJfWSlPMTWj-/ 

joie Aiffi^^iier. ............................................. .^MnisnnKriD 

Terry BW H^rdaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ ^tg^em, , 

Fletcher Djrajis Harvey. .... . . . ........ ....^jflfoj, ihn „, 

Beverly PW^Head.... .. . ............. ^b^Mfm*,^ 

Ernest W^^Heck. .... . ....... ...... .-.^^1^^ fI ,; (l/l 

H »rai#M# ::: :::::::::; : .v.v.v : •. -.;•.; iM%% l W?PSdo\ 

Joseph .H^rjsfeld .................. .............. m x ts MHm s h^ 

William WfafcHdl; ......... ......... . .'. . ., . . ; ; fJ[M ^MS^,ynU > 

John Buf^flobdy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... ^^gM^n, >ni7.' 

Wilhs E^djohnson. ...,,,,..,..,,. ,,. , ^.^g^, , 

Clarenc^Nef^ones .„'„..„„., .. .. ^ fi ,, r ^p r n^e^ w 

Edwin ^mJ^^v-vv-v-Mt^V^^Pm^^ 
Adus Edwm ^Hebrew,... ,. H9mw ^ f , vwiwM .D^ Sli meiIliV/ 
Geo^Jm^yser, ,, ... . . . . , . . . . . . . . ^f^rl^rb.M 

*'»»»«» Leonard.. ,,,.,,..,,.. ^mw^fc^w 
H en . r y.»W..Lmdsey..... v ... A 

wnZ f or ^ M ?- Br ? e • • v.- •• • •• : : : •. : : : L^m^i ^a 

William James McLeod Lee. 

James Meager &&$} MWPmQ* Jefferson . 

Swepson^C^ ^orton M *¥ acon r -> i; „ 

Wade Hampton Negus .Mississippi 

; ■ 0o «^a?i->, ; ;. V.bmioa v^ }i 



4$m lt mi fl&MWtafc $$p 



M 



William Jac$ jtfixon v .-. •••.•.•.•.>*<■ mMiwrFFJfr bnA 

William Cli^rf Paden . . ................ ,!,•-, i .,,101 W£J'b* Tl ' r > 

Tames LawrenV Pollard . .' • -ff.-JihVr 1 ? 8 *! *> Iwl >l 

J am nr>n1™Hfto7. , ■ • ■ MississioDV 

Tames Robert Prince . . • V . V ,Y.«. .\\\^bufl™W*ru > 'J 

Adolph P^^chwe'zer ....,....: «ia<Affllta blon 

Berry La^^coU .... . ... . v; .V.\V. :.\\\\\WO-Mffl» a»h«iD 

Frank Norris^Sptt ;.\\\\\\\\\v:.\Vd«4fS «<>fl nriol. 

Samue^i^Siaton. . ...... ... ... •..•.■.•.•.Wh^ffl^I ? H,.r 

James Robjnj^n Stewart • • • - r f Efi trei ' nbnW*Wnij [<rM 

Rufus GeorggrShanVa . . . • ;;;;//.v.y.y.V.V ^OT^™* 1 mi-iliiV/ 

Frank Hartw,el}T nomas. •.•.v.VitHkHEW^^- nci'H 

Merrick J^ff l) Thomas . . . . , , , , , , • mU , M ' » - 

Paul Vines. 5 ., <,.•••••:;:: ///.V.V.'.V.V.' ^YWWSnfiral ! 
James CUfJ^^awa:\ /> ... / // / ///.^\\\\TfiMH*OTi^lKftw 

WiUiam TUmas Warren" ! . . . . . . . . .^- wmlSWr^P^fi^l 1 

Reuben 4%4/^ ebb " V \V\V.\Y;V/ l\V. '. ". : t KrfftTO linnet/ 

William'^ ra8 ^^...^.; / : / ;^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•rtWi^oI«^dA 

' <M J -freshman CM**"** no^bnA mstlli N 

. „,.,. • Yr.LphJVt nit i Hi W 

.niswoj.'l . ■ • i • ' Florida 

John Cock Abernetby ;;;;;;;;;Ab8nslO*raodT rifiiaol 

William Raifofd" Affleck ! I ', ; * t 1 * V iniDVa^SBDifl 

_ .9'Vi ... j • * • - ' Geoniia. 

Tames Roger Atwood • TflifcotlrtfCiaaftfl sjpooO 

William fcrowr^Beeson ;'.;;;;;; ; ! litfihYoW flMfiM •nt-y 

Char^eT^iftord'Bfewe.f .' . ." ." .* .* .V /////. .V - y VjSf nivteO nrfo I 

.9!)a • ♦ - u ^ ' Georgia. . t . 

Ernest Bussey .- jIdjiVjM ^rnoljl niv/b 

Samue 

CpVraof cuy :::::::: v/^v/» .aSt^MpSSB 

1 .021131*14,. ...,- 3 « Calhoun.,, 

George Adair Christian noxM noabM 

♦»VPP( ,C M' tt* • " ■ ■" Macon 

Benajah Bibb Cobb tfoolfa' vbhsun&m '» >; ) 

- tt TT^Hrt-r^v •• ,#%> V"'-.:' \ ..Georgia. 



t Bussey .- jlofiViM ^firnoBI nwb 

.BODieinoJ— . ^ *v ,i « Cherokee. 

si Garrett.Cardon «^-,y ftyffiffffiW wiiij 

;e Walter Chester moiMSSQ Mini L? 



Henry Hatchtg Cook. . ';♦;;;;;;;;;;;;; /nigioHlSiW'nftnr)?!. % 

William' Thomas 'Covin//// '. // • • *fM£gr b%9«Wbir.-wc»ll 

^ .9^4, t JUUiJ MoDile 

Henry CrawfOLd bsW lW ^ ndol 

Walter Marvin^CuIver is3tB^tl?lv/yJ8 nodofl 

William Kege -Dean/.: '.V. ^;::/::::. . . . v .,^rgja a) , 



26 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Duncan Patterson Dixon T alladega* 

Andrew Denny DuBose Lee. 

Clifford Lamar Edwards Lee. 

Robert Clark Fenton Connecticut. 

Frank R n ese Frazer Lee. 

Shelton Charles Frederic Mobile. 

Arnold Frederic Glass Mobile. 

Charles William Glass Mobile. 

John Ross Glenn Lee. 

John Lemial Gonce Tennes c ee. 

Benjamin Fortson Griffin Texas. 

William Emery Guy Coosa. 

Francis Williams Hare .... j Lee. 

Charles Edward Harrison Florida. 

Henry E. Harvey Lee. 

William Thomas Hearn Sumter. 

Harry Streety Houghton Jefferson. 

Marshall Hill Hurt Macon . 

Absalom Jackson Mobile. 

David Kahn Montgomery. 

William Anderson Kline . ' . . . . . Lee. 

William Earle Lay Etowah. 

Josiah Thomas Mangum Lee. 

John Richard McCalla Lee. 

George Bulger McDonald . .Coosa. 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre , Montgomery. 

John Calvin McLeod • Lee. 

Edwin Thomas Merrick Louisiana. 

James Williamson Minis Calhoun . 

Benjamin Otey Minge. . . ! /.'. !".'.'.' Marengo*. 

Chad wick Wiley Minge.; Marengo. 

John Nelson Mixon Conecuh. 

George McElhaney Moore Lee 

Berrien Tyrel Morgan ...*/.'.!'...!'.'.'.'. Georgia. 

Howard Crawford Motley ... Lee 

John St. Clair Paden . JZ.! * ' ' ' ' ! ' ' ' E towar, 

Robert Stewart Parker Sumten 

Harry John Pettus Montgomery, 

James Ware Ray E]mQ ^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 27 

John Robbins Dallas. 

Benjamin David Stabler Wilcox. 

William Livingston Stewart Montgomery. 

William Bee Stokes Marion. 

Cecil Pitts Stowe Lee. 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe Louisiana. 

Alexander Clitherall Taylor Montgomery. 

Felix Stanley Thomas . . Lee. 

James Leonard Thomas Lee. 

William Alexander Thomason Lee 

Robert Caldwell Whiting Montgomery. 

John Wesley Williams Lee. 

Richard Morris Williamson Montgomery. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

John Arrington Montgomery. 

Bayard Mcintosh Atwood Georgia. 

Lovie Irene Fielder Elmore. 

Charles Edwin Goulding .Florida. 

Richard Hackley Goulding Florida. 

James Alston Groves Dallas. 

Ramesus Alfonso Hammack Dale. 

Charles Hays . ...Greene. 

Joshua Copeland Hill Pike. 

Perry Nance Hill.. Georgia. 

George Reese Irwin Georgia. 

Alphonso Rinaldo Jones . Coosa. 

Ray Nathaniel Knight Calhoun. 

Earle Foster Lee • • • • Lee. 

Robert Mosley Lewis South Carolina. 

Edward Sallust McCurdy Lowndes. 

Cary Park McElhaney . . . ..... ..Lee. 

William Edwin McEwen .Georgia. 

Andrew Hammill Milstead Elmore. 

Fred William Nardin South Carolina. 

Samuel Noble Calhoun. 

Harry Allen Orr .. .South Carolina. 

John Paschal Russell. 

William Henry Patterson Georgia. 



28 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Marguerite Persons e - 

Leonard Alvie Thomas Lee. 

Westley Park Weathers Marengo. 

SUB FRESHMAN CLASS 

Isaac Abraham Montgomery. 

Albert Martin Ayres.... ; Marshall. 

John LeRoy Bryan Washington. 

Leo Pogue DuBose Lee - 

Walter Alexander Jones Lee - 

Crawford Motley Jackson Elmore. 

John Warmock Giddens Crenshaw. 

Robert Wesley Lockhart Jefferson. 

Henry Loeb Montgomery. 

James Charner Samuel McGehee . Montgomery. 

Robert Hugh Reid V-, Barbour. 

August Daniel Rheiner Texas. 

terdie John Rheiner Texas., 

Horatio Seymour '. Sumter. 

Joseph Marshall Smith Coosa. 

Clifford West Stewart Montgomery. 

Andrew Barnett Terrell - • • • • Elmore. 

Burns Michel Wert • • • • .Morgan. 

Albert Edward Woodall Sumter. 

Summary. 

Graduates >....... >>" l 3 

Senior Class '••••• 2 9 

Junior Class .....53 

Sophomore Class ; 6l 

Freshman Class. . ...... • 6 9 

Special and Irregular Students.... 2 ? 

Total in College Classes. . . . . 2 5 2 

Sub-Freshman Class l 9 

Total.. .•••• 2? 1 




____—-— __^^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



29 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN 

English ... .f4eH*f KW^'SJtO 

History 144 

French 3-2 • 

German 28 

Latin 103 

Mental Science 15 

Political Ecot omy —29- 

Mathematics 227 

Chemistry ... ..... , . ^ . joq. 

Chemical Laboratory 45 

Agriculture.. ...149 

Physics ...116 

Botany 76 



EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 

'"Qeotpgy #'. h .• n- 1 •! 31 

Civil Engineering 10 

-Electrical Engineering. ... 39 
Mechanical Engineering ... 35 

Biology 9 

Drawing . . . . 205 

Mechanic Arts .157 

Military Tactics 252 

Mineralogy.. ... ,..,.« 6 

Physical Laboratory 34 

Physiology 32 

Veterinary Science 32 



-»*» * » 



r ♦ * * r I 



#▼ •-* 



•-* r? 



* ▼ • 



* * • 



* *» 1 



•"T* 1 " *' » 



n *■ f-9 



* r * • * 



♦ r * » 



I » .»» r" » * * 



* - ? 



Military Organization. 



1894-5 



1. S. L. Coleman, 



President, 

W. L BROUN. 

Commandant, 

JOHN H. WILLS, 1st Lieut. 22nd Infantry. 

Surgeon, 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

Battalion Staff. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant H. H. Kysrr Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant J A. Wills, Q iart*r master 
Cadet Sergeant W. M. Williams, Serjeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant 0. J. Semmes, Qaartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

2. H. H. Smith, 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 



1. W. C. McMillan, 
4. W. S. Askew, 



1. W. A. Tippin, 



1. F. MORRISETTE, 

4. J. A. Reeves, 
8 B A. Taylor, 
11 G. B. Kelley, 
14 J. Q. Burton, 



V W H. McBrydk, 

4. A H. MlLSTEAD, 

7. B L Fcott, 
10. E. B. Joseph, 

*COLOR SERGEANT. 



3. L. B Gammon. 



2. R. H. Adams, 
5. J. C. Thomabon, 

Cadet First Sergeants. 

2. fl. R. Casey, 

Cadet Sergeants. 

2. J. W. Culver * 

5 W R. TlCHENOR 

9 J. S. Bennett, 
12. G. D. King, 
15. H. A. Drennen, 

Corporals. 

2. W T. Warren, 
5. W. H Nf.gus, 
8. C. J. Nelson, 

11. G. P. KY8ER, 



3 James Newsom, 
6 H. Bickerstaff. 



3. A. L. Alexander. 



3. W. J Beeson, 

6 J. L. Glenn 

10. W. E Culver 

13. D T. Hudmon, 

16. W. L. Fleming 



3. John Purifoy, 
6. B. M Atwo d, 
9. W. C. Paden, 
12. L. E. Byrum. 







Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



81 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral char- 
acter. To enter the freshman class the applicant must be 
not less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified 
to pass a satisfactory examination on the following subjects: 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evi- 
dence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, 
grammar and division into paragraphs. 

The composition in 1895 will be upon subjects drawn from one 
or more of the following works: Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and 
Merchant of Venice, Longfellow's Evangeline, Irving's Sketch 
Book, Scott's Marmion, Hughes's Tom Brown at Rugby, Dickins's 
David Copperfield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Hawthorne's House of the 
Seven Gables. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, includingfundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions; denominate 
numbers; the metric system; percentage, including interest 
and discount; proportion; extraction of square and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of Latin 
should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in Latin 
grammar and the first two books of Caesar, in addition to the 
above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be prepared 
to stand a satisfactory examination on all the studies of the lower 
classes, as shown in the courses of study. Where opportunity has 
not been offered to pursue special studies required at this College, 
the system of equivalents will be adopted, and studies which 
denote and equivalent amount of discipline and training will be 
accepted as satisfactory. 




32' 



Agricultural and Mechanical College 



• t 



i t • <t » . > 1 1 f ' 1 i 



ADMISSION OF YOUNG FOMEN- 



i » 



i i 

The privilege of becoming students in .this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women .of .mature mipd 
and character, on the following conditions:, , , 

The applicant must be eighteen years of ags> and if a 
candidate for a degree, be* able- to pass a satisfactory 
examination,^, each, of the, four subjects as named belom 

If the applicant is a cauflidate for admission as a special 
or irregular student she must; !?$ able to pass a satisfactory 
examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctua- 
tion; Grammar (Whitney's Essentials of English); Rhetoric 
(Lockwood,* Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung); 
Scudder's American Prose Selections; Scudder's American 
Poems. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Chambers's 
History of the United States; Myers's General fiistoiy. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid 
Geometry; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

* * V I 

(d) In Latin — Grammar, including the forms and 
syntax; . Jones's Latin Prose Composition; Translation 
of selections from Caesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, 
Cicero's Letters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may 
be substituted. » « , t 

Certificates will be granted to those who are not candidates for 
a degree upon the satisfactory completion of any subject as pursued 
by the senior class. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 33 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above 
stated, they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the 
College, and join any class, for which upon examination, they may 
be found qualified. The only condition imposed will be that they 
engage in earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They 
will board in the town with private families, and attend College 
only at the hours of their exercises. 

The Trustees authorize the faculty to admit a candidate for a 
degree who is able to comply with all the requirements, at the 
age of seventeen, if the application meets with their approval. 

There will be no charge for tuition. The incidental fees, 
amounting to $12.00 per year, will be paid, $6.00 on entrance, 
and $6.00 on February 1st. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 



Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
11th of September, the day 011 which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the freshman 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately 
to the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in 
any class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXKRCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing, and military drill . These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in College exercises . 



34 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes is 
not granted to young students nor to their parents. The 
faculty will assign a student on admission to that class of 
a prescribed course for which he is qualified; but for special 
reasons, approved by the faculty, he may be permitted to 
become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the junior 
class, and those over twenty-one years of age that are not 
candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the faculty, the subjects of study for which they 
may be qualified. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become special students. They will be classed 
as regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they 
can pa* the examinations in those subjects in which they were 
fotind deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing 
in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military depart- 
ment with that class in which they have the greatest number 
of studies, and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agriculture, 
Biology, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing; 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering; Physiology, 
and Veterinary Science; English, French, German, and 
Latin Languages; History, Political Economy, Mental and 
Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the active pursuits of life. 

There are four degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science \B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion: 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



35 



I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

IV. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion: 

V. Two-Year Course in Agriculture. 
VI. Two- Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction 
in those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, 
and is especially adapted to those who propose to devote 
themselves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 

Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no 
definite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose 
ultimately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial 
or manufacturing business. 

Courses V and VI have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one 
of the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two-year 
courses will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive 
certificates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each 



36 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



department of the school of mechanic -arts, and are qual- 
fied, can enter upon a mere extended technical course in 
mechanical engineering. 

Preparatory Course in Pharmacy and Medicine. 

Students who look to pharmacy or medicine as a pro- 
fession, and are qualified, can enter upon a special course 
in chemistry, botany, physiology and biology, and occupy 
their time with great profit in the laboratories of these de- 
partments under the immediate direction of the professors. 

With the very excellent facilities offered in these labora- 
tories scientific training and preparation ot great value can 
be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in en- 
gineering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and 
will require a residence of one year: 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Min- 
eralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, 
Tunnelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various 
operations connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the pro- 
fessors of chemistry, engineering, and geology. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study 
agriculture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any 
class under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from 
reciting in any other class, from military duty, and from all other 
college duties; but will be under the general college regulations, 
and will be required to have their time fully occupied. 





Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



37 



They can attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical, work at the experiment station, in the 
field, stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may 
thus in one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific 
agriculture. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the students of 
this College, and as far as possible all students are required 
to enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in 
the following departments: 



I. 

II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 
XII. 

Note- 
students 



Chemistry. / 

Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 

Agriculture. 

Botany. 

Mineralogy. 

Biology. 

Technical Drawing. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Physics. ' 

Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

-Special work in English or History may be taken by 
in the General Course as i. substitute for laboratory work. 



38 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



I.— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The Numerals opposite tbe subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term, 
5. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Labor'y 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLA.SS. 



First Term. 
5. English. 

2, History. 

5 Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Pbytics. 
3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
2. Agriculture. 
3 Drawing. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3 General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Labor'y 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Industrial Chemistry. 


3. Industrial Chemistry. 


3. Industrial Chemistry. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


4. Botany (Lab'y). 


1.' Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


9. Chemical Laboratory. 


9. Chemical Laboratory. 


9. Chemical Laboratory. 


2. Veterinary Science. 


2 Veterinary Science. 


2. Veterinary Science. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 


2. Military Drill . 




SENIOR CLASS. 




FIB8T TERM. 


SECOND TERM. 


THIRD TERM. 


2. English Literature. 


2. Political Economy. 


2. Political Economy. 


2. Mental Science. 


2. Mental Science. 


2. Mental Science. 


2. Physics. 


2. Astronomy. 


2. Astronomy. 


2. Geology. 


2. Geology. 


2. Geology. 


5. Biology. 


5. Biology. 


5. Biology. 


2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try 


.2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try.2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try 


1. Military Science. 


1. Military Science. 


1. Military Science. 


9. Chemical Laboratory. 


9. Chemical Laboratory. 


9. Chemical Laboratory . 


2. Practical Agriculture 


2. Veterinary Science 


2 Veterinary Science. 






(a) Begirs March 1st. 

(b; Also Practical Agriculture. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College,. 



39 



K 



1 



II.-COURSE IN MECHANICS AND CIVIL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRE8HMAN CLA8S. 



FIRST TERM. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3 E'ementary Physics 

3. Drawing 



SECOND TERM. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics 

3. Elementary Physics 



THIRD TERM. 

5 English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
2. Agriculture. 
3 Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Dall. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



FIRST TERM. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIR8T TERM. 

3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



SECOND TERM. 

3. English. 

3. IJistory. 

5. Mathematics. 

3 General Chemistry. 

2 Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



THIRD TERM. 

3. English. 

8. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3 General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLAJ3S. 

SECOND TERM. 

3 Eoglish, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 



THIRD TERM. 

3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



1. Military Tactics. 
6 Lab'yTMech. Arts(c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts(c) 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 
2 Field Work, Eogin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Eo» 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. THIRD TERM. 

2. Eoglish Literature (d) 2. Political Economy (d). 2. Political Economy (d 
2 Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 



(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory. 

(d) For^nl^Lufliid Pol. Boon, may be substituted French or German. 



£d>7£7^ 



™ 



^^^"^^^ 



40 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



6. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering, 
s! Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. DrawiDg. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., L%b'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4 Mech. Eng , Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 






Ill— COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHAN- 
ICAL ENGINEERING. 






The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In Freshman and Sophomore classes same as in course in mechanics 

and civil engineering. 



FIRST TERM. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

SECOND TERM. 

3. English, French; or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 



THIRD TERM. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3 Mech. Engineering. 



3. Mech, Engineering 

4. Mechanical Drawing. 4 Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 

4. Electrical Laboratory. 4. Electrical Laboratory. 4 Electrical Laboratory. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. Second Term. 

2. English Literature (b). 2. Political Economy (b) 2. 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 3. 
5. glectricsl Eogineer'g. 5. Electrical Engineer'g 5. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 5. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 2. 

6. Electrical Laboratory. 6. Electrical Laboratory.6. 

4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. 
1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy (b). 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Mathematics. 
Electrical Engineer'g. 
Mech. Engineering. 
Electrical Designing. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 
Military Science. 



(b) French or German may be substituted. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



41 



-# 



a 




) 



IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3 English. 

2. History. 
5 Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Ar. Lib'y. 2. Agriculture. 
3 Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5 Latin. 

5. Mathematics 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3 English. 
3. His^ry. 
3 Latin. 
5 Mathematics. 
3 Drawing. 



First Ttrm. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 
5 Mathematics. 
3. General Cnemistry. 
3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 
5. L«*tin. 
3. Hisory. 
5 Mathematics. 
3 General Chemistry. 



Third Term. 
5. Latin.- 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing 
6 Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Dri 1. 3 Military Drill. 



First Ttrm. 
3. English. 
3. Phys ; c8. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 
1. Military Tactics. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3 English. 
H. Physics. 
3. Mathematics 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 
1. Military Tactics. 



1. Military Tactics. 
6 Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laborato y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 
2. EngUsh Literature 

2 Mental Scierce. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3 French. 

3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science 



Second Term. 
2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. As'ronomy. 

2 Geology. 

3 French. 

3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



Third Term. 
2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



6. Laborato ry Work (b) 6. Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laboratory Work (b) 

(a) Begins March 1st. ...v . 

(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for which he may be 
qualified. 



42 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



V.— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3 Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture, 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 






VI— TWO-YEAR COURSE m AGRICULTURE. 



Fi+tt Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

^Second Term. 
5. English. 



Third Term. 

5. English . 

2. History. 3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
* Military Drill . 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term, 

3. English. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 



5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry, 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 



2. Physiology. 
t Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 2 Veterina°ry" Science. 
12^Practical Agr culture 12. Practical Agriculture.12. Practical Agriculture 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



HOU 



RSI 



I. 

8-9 



II. 

910 



III. 
10-11 



MONDAY. 



4. Algebra. 



1 and 2 Drawing. 
1 Elec. Engineer' g. 
2. Mecb. Engineer'g 



4. English. 
3 Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

2. Elec. Engineer'g. 



TUESDAY. 



3. Physiology. 

4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2 German. 
1 and 2 Drawing. 
2. Botany. 
L_ 
LlElec. .ungineer'g. 



WEDNESDAY. 



4. Algebra. 
gpLatin 4 

1 and 2 Drawing. 

1. Erei^Engineer'g. 



3 English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German . 
1. Engineering. 
1. Biology. 

1. Mech. Engineer'g 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Botany. 

. Elec. En 



4 Englisb. 
3 Chemistry. 
• 2. Engineering. 
2. Latin 
1 Calculus 
ngineer'g.'2. Vet. Science. 

J 2. Elec. EDgineer'g 



3. History (1. 2), 

3. Botany (2. 3) 
1. Biolo 
1. fingiTreering. 

4. English. 

1. Mech. Engineer'g 

2. French. 



3. Englisb (1. 2). 

2. Physics. 
1 German. 
1. Engineering. 
I. Biology. 

I. H Ei 



THURSDAY. 



3. Physiology. 

4. Geometry. 
3 Latin. 
2 German. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 

2 Botany. 
1. Mental Science. 
1. ETfiC. Engineer^ 



■ I 

4 Algebra. 
3. Latin. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 

1. ET TnSSr g 



ire. 



4. History. 
3. Aju^m^u 
2 Engineering. 
2. Botany. 

1. P bvBirs 

2. HJiec JUngineer'g 



ogineer'g 



3. History (1. 2) 

3. Botany (2. 3) 
I. EMgTrteering. 

4. English. 

1. Mech. Engineer'g 

2. French. 



FRIDAY. 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Latin. 

1. CarcuTu>. 

2. Mech Engineer'g 
2 Vet. Science. 



SATURDAY. 



Exerc's in Elocution. 



Military Di ill. 



3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
1. Engineering. 
1. Birjloay. 

4. HTstoTy (3). 
1. Mecb. Engineer'g 



Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 



riHMMHHIHI 



— — - 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES.— Continued. 



HOUKS 



IV. 



1M2 



MONDAY. 



4. Physics (1. 2). 



V. 



12-1 



4. Agriculture (3). 
4. Latin (1. 2). 
3 Drawing. 
2 Mathematics. 
2 Chemistry. 
l. EnzUshJL). . 
1. rrjnfTEcon. (2 3) 
4. Mechanic Arts . 



P.M. 

VI. VII. 

2-4 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 
1. Elec. Designing. 



TUESDAY. 



±. Latin „ 
3. Drawing. 

2 Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics, 
i. Chemi sts 
i. Frencl 



3. Mathematics. 
2 English. 
L. Geolog y. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3 Field W'rk, Agr. 
1 & 2 L 




1 <fe 2 Field wor 

... Engineer'g. 
1 & 2 Mach. Work. 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor' tory 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
2 Miueralogy 

Laboratory. 



WEDNESDAY. 



4. Physics (1. 2) 
4. Latin (3) 
3. History (1.2). 
3. Botany (2 3). 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry . 
1 English (1). 
1. Political Econ- 



THTJRSDAY. 



4. Latin. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 



4 Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

1. Latin. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

2. Mecb. Engineer'g 
2 German. 

1. E ec. Designing. 



4 Mechanic Arts. 



3. Field W'rk, Agr. 

L & 2 Laboratory, 
Military Drill (*). *• ^^^52 fen. 

1 & 2 Field \ff>rP 



3 Mech. Libor'tory 
Elec Lab'y Work. 
1 and 2 History. 



Eagineer'g 
l&2Mach. Work 
Ex'cis in Elocution 
Elec. Lab Work. 
Physical Labor' tory 



2. 
1 

1. 

3 
1. 



Agriculture. 
Mathematics. 

FnySTolog] 



French. 



ogy (3) 



FRIDAY. 



4. Physics (1. 2).* 

4. Agriculture (3). 
4. Latin (1 2). 
3 Drawii g. 
2 Mathematics. 
2, Chemistry. 




3. Mathematics. 
2 English. 
L 



fieoijjg^ 



3 M chanicArts. 

2 Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*) 

3 Mech. Labor' tory 
Elec. Lab'y Work 
1. and 2 History. 



4 

3. 

I 

4 
1. 



D awing. 
Maih"matics. 
La ti n 

Mechanic Arts. 
Eleo Designing 



2. Military Tactics. 



SATURDAY. 



I. French. 
3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Labora»ory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics 
Biological Labor' tory. 
Field Engineering. 



2 French. 
3. Mechanic Arts 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Bioloeica' Labor' tory. 
Field Engineering. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field W'rk, Agr. 

Ltfe 2 La]x, Cjjp™ . 
Jfe 2 5leTd Work. 
^ Engineer'g 

1 & 2 Mach. Work. 
Ex'cis in Elocution 
Elec Lab Work. 
Phvgical L**bnr'cory 



Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. m. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes— 1 denotes senior, 2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed— (1), (2), (3), denote terms. 

*From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



„ 



1 




DEPARTMENTS OF INST^USTION. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text- 
books and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first 
part or the course is occupied with elementary rational 
mechanics, treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics; while due prominence is given to principles, 
frequent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include optics and 
astronomy. 

Post- Graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY. . 

Instructor W. M. Rig^s has charge of the classes in ele- 
mentary physics, and of the physical laboratory. In 
elementary physics the students are taught mechanics, 
solving problems by the elements of graphical statics, and 
are required to do such work in the physical laboratory as 
is adapted to their attainments. A part of their time is 
given to learning practical telegraphy by the use of instru- 
ments provided for that purpose. 

The physical laboratory is equipped with a number of instru- 
ments pf foreign qn<} American manufacture. It contains a 



_ 



™«^" 



46 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



standard metre bar, a horizontal comparator, a Kater reversion 
pendulum, a cathetometer with micrometer, a spectrometer fur- 
nished with prisms, crystal holder and flat diffraction grating, 
made by the Societe Genevoise, a spectroscope by Browning, with 
a large amount of spectrum apparatus, Carre's ice machine, 
Backer's balances, a small dividing engine and a vertical 
comparator, both the latter nude at the College in the laboratory 
of mechanic arts. There is also a large amount of minor 
apparatus, thermometers, barometers, calorimeters, and apparatus 
for experimentally determining the parallelogram of forces, for 
determining rolling and sliding friction, torsion and flexure, spe- 
cific gravity, etc. 

The student in this laboratory is required to ascertain 
experimentally various physical laws, hence in all exercises 
there is something to measure. From these measures he 
is required to find the law connecting the- quantities in- 
volved. Results of experiments are required to be entered, 
in tabular form, together with diagrams, etc., in a labora- 
tory note-book. 



i 



MATHEMATICS. 



PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra and geometry, six books ; second year, 
solid geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, survey- 
ing, mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained: first, mental dis- 
cipline; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town, and government land sur- 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc.; also in the theory, adjustment and use of instru- 
ments. 



n 




! 



h 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



47 



The claps, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 

practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pursued 
in the mechanical and engineering courses. Especial at- 
tention is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is 
supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical 
problems are required of the student, to make him familiar 
with the application of principles and formulae. 

.Text-Books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's 
Trigonometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, 
Faunce's Descriptive Geometry, Taylor's Calculus, Johnson's 
Differential Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determi- 
nants. 

BOTANY AND GEOLOGY. 

PROF. MELL. 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations 
are drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural 
deposits of minerals in the State. The origin of ore de- 
posits, mineral springs and geological relations of soils are 

carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology tor post-graduate students. This subject is pur- 
sued by applicants for degrees of master of science and 
mining engineer. 



48 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The junior class in engineering spends two terms in 
mineralogy and blow-pipe work. 

Botany. — The students of the sophomore class begin the 
study of botany the first of March and continue it through 
the session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the fields, and j 

taught how to determine their specific names. The work 
is sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, after com- 
pleting the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and 
grasses that he will encounter in this section. 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work with 
the microscope in the preparation of specimens showing 
plant structure; this work is sufficient to familiarize the 
students with the methods of plant building and cellular 
organization. Excellent microscopes of the most improved 
patterns, and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for 
preparing and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the 
students. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

• 

Geology. — The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teach- 
ing crystallography; charts and maps of the geology of America 
and Europe ; Colt's lantern complete with oil, oxy-hydrogen and 
automatic electric lamps ; a large assortment of fine lantern slides 
representing geological formations in this country and abroad; a 
well equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, and 
supplied with collection of representative minerals. 

Botany. — The facilites for teaching this subject are as follows : 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers ; a la/ge collection 
of pressed plants of Alabama and other sections, mounted and 
catalogued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in 
Botany equipped with slate topped tables for twenty students ; 
dissecting and compound microscopes by Zeiss, Leitz and 



f 




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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 49 

Bausch & Lomb ; projection microscopic apparatus ; microtomes 
by King and Bausch & Lomb ; all the necessary glass ware and 
smaller dissecting instruments lequired in a well equipped labora- 
tory. The Zeiss compound microscope used by the professor for 
experiment work in connection with the Station is supplied wkh 
Abbe's illuminating apparatus, slid*? changers, Abbe's camera 
lucida, polarizers, "apochromatic objectives (16 mm, 8 mm, 4 mm, 
and homogeneous immersion), oculars (2, 3, 6, 8, it, 18 and 
photographic), eye- piece with micrometer. This laboratory is 
well lighted with gas and electricity and with a good exposure for 
ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic 
dark room and an excellent photographic outfit consisting of 
cameras varying in size from 4 x 5 to 6}4 x S*4 inches ; Bausch 
& Lomb's Professional photo-micro camera extending to eight 
feet ; Zeiss' anastigmat photographic lens 6j4 x S'}4 fitted with 
Baush & Lomb's diaphragm shutter, and Zeiss' wide angle lens 
6}& x Sj4 t all mounted in aluminium ; Clark's lens fitted with dia- 
phragm shutter ; Darlot lens 4x5; the accessory apparatus and 
chemicals required for first class work in photography. 

The students have access to the Botanical Garden where ex- 
periments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to 
the farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text Books. 

LeConte's Geology, William's Practical Geology, Tarr's 
Economic Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, Gray's Botany, Nelson's 
Herbarium and Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide. 



CJVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the junior 
class, and require good knowledge of algebra, geometry, 
trigonometry and analytical mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows: 







— 



■■ 



■■ 



50 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Junior class. — Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, etc. 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the loca- 
tion, reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country 
roads; and the various pavements and foundations for the 
same. f 

Senior class. — Classification, appearances, defects, sea- 
soning, durability and preservation of timber, classification 
and description of natural building stones; bricks and con- 
cretes; Cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals; limes, 
cements, mortars and theij manufacture; paints and other 
preservatives; classification of strains and a general mathe- 
matical discussion of same; joints and fastenings; solid and 
open built beams; classification, construction and mechanics 
of masonry; fouadations on land and in water; bridges and 
roofs of different kinds; their construction and strains de- 
termined mathematically and graphically; common roads, 
their coverings, location and construction; location and con- 
struction of railroads; navigable, irrigation, and drainage 
canals; river and sea-coast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Tbxt Books. 

Junior class.— Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior class.— Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's 
Graphic Statics. 

Drawing. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to take drawing; but only the students 
in mechanics and civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the principles 



) 



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Agricultural arid Mechanical College. 51 

of orthographic and isometric projections, shade and 
shadows, perspective and tinting. In the junior class the 
instruction embracesa moreextended coursein orthographic 
and isometric drawing, perspective, shades and shadows, 
and tinting; also sketches of tools and machines, plans, 
elevations and Cross-sections of buildings, and blue prints. 
The senior class make topographical drawings, and draw- 
ings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, 
and blue prints. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad 
surveys complete the instruction in this department. 

Text Books. 

Freshman class. — Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Tunior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model 
Drawing. 

Sophomore class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Prac- 
tical Perspective, Keuffd & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the 
College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior class. — French, English and American Plates belonging 
to the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROF. THACH 

OBJECTS AND METHODS. 
In this department the students pursue a systematic 
i course in the English language and literature. 

**} Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge; 

the interpretation of words is the fundamental process in 
education of whatsoever kind. A full course of English 
is, therefore, considered especially important in the tech- 
nical courses of study that do not include the ancient 
classics. Accordingly, the course of English is continued 
throughout the four years of the College curriculum, three 



52 ' Agricultural and Mechanical College. ] 

hours a week, and is made obligatory upon all students, 
with the exception of those pursuing the first two years of 
the course in Latiu. In this extended drill in the grammar 
and literature of the English language, theendeavor is made 
to aflbrd a training somewhat equivalent to the ordinary 
course in the classical languages. j 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in 
their mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates 
for admission to the freshman class, it is deemed advis- 
able, for the sake of honest work, to devote a portion of 
the first year to grounding such students in the principles 
of grammar. Further, with the idea that an ability to 
speak and write correctly English of the present, and to 
appreciate the literary excellencies of standard authors, is 
more desirable than training in the philological curiosities 
and literary crudities of Anglo-Saxon literature, the course 
of study in this institution is confined exclusively to the 
literature of modern English. V 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, 
themselves, of leading English authors, since direct contact 
with literature is considered more profitable than informa- 
tion merely about literature. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman class. — Five hours a week; study of grammar, the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent brief 
papers illustrating the laws studied: study of American authors; 
Irving, Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Scudder's Master 
pieces of American Literature. I 

Sophomore class. — Three hours a week; study of style, analysis 
of selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and 
literary themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Hales's 
Longer English Poems. 

Junior class. — Three hours a week; lectures on the history of 
English literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 



MM 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. " 53 

Stopford Brooke's History of English Literature, Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury, Minto's English Prose, Garnett's English Prose 
from Elizabeth to Victoria . 

Senior class. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of 
Criticism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Dowden's Shaks- 
pere, etc. 

ESSAYS AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English 
as in any other.department of study. Practical work is indispen- 
sable to the successful teaching of English . 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject matter 
of the text-books, set essays or orations are required of all stu- 
dents; for the freshman class, ten essays a year; ten for the soph- 
omore; for the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speak- 
ing" is cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of think- 
ing on the feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of 
finished Specimens of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in 
sections of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards 
in the study hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in 
public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year; and political econ- 
omy twice a week, during the last two terms. The in- 
struction in this department is by lectures In combination 
with text-books. 

Intellectual Science.— Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education, and Natural Sciences. The relations of 
the Soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist Counter 
arguments. The Faculties of the Soul. The nature of Conscious- 



54 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



ness. Sense Perception. Memory, its nature, development, edu- 
cation. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of conceptions. Lan- 
guage. Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. 
Porter's Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy.— Value; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages; trades- 
union; co-operation; money; credit; functions of government; tax- 
ation; tariff; education, etc. F. A. Walker s Advanced Political 
Economy. Lectures by Professor. 

A Post-graduate Course has been established in Political Econ- 
omy. Topics are assigned for research by the student, who is 
facilitated in his labor by a well chosen library, including most of 
the standard works on political economy and government. 

A Post graduate Course has also been established in English. 
The course is as follows: Shakespeare's Hamlet, Othello, Mac- 
beth, Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Henry IV., Part I, 
Richard III., King John. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Ward's Shakespeare;Furness's Variorum ; Hudson's Shakespeare ; 
Clark and Wright's Select Plays of Shakespeare; Rolfe's Shakes- 
peare; Halliweil-Phillips's Life of Shakespeare; Richard Grant 
White's Life of Shakespeare; Collier's Annals of the Stage; J. A. 
Symond's Shakespeare's Predecessors; Hudson's Art, Life, etc., of 
Shakespeare; Giles's Human Life in Shakespeare; Mrs. Jameson's 
Woman in Shakespeare; Dowden's Shakespeare's Art. 

Post-Graduate Course in Dry den. — Poetical Works (Christie); 
Essay on Dramatic Poesy (Thomas Arnold); Essay on Satire, etc , 
(Yonge); Saintsbury's Life of Dry den. 

Pope. — Poetical Works (Ward); Satires (Pattison); Stephen's 
Life of Pope . 

Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope; 18 Century Literature. The 
entire session. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 3 p. m. 



i> 



f 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Scott and Saintsbury's Dry den, 18 \ols.; Critical Essays on 
Dryden by Macaulay, Lowell, Matthew Arnold; Johnson's Life of 



= 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



55 



Dryden; Mitford's Life of Dryden; El win* and Courthope's Pope, 
10 vols,; Critical Essays on Pope by Addison, DeQuincey (3), 
Lowell, Matthew Arnold; Courthope's Life of Pope; Johnson's 
Life of Pope. 



CHEMISTRY. 



1 



PROF. 6. B. ROSS. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry: This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending throughout 
the entire session, and includes a discussion of the funda- 
mental principles of chemical philosophy in connection 
with the history, preparation, properties and compounds 
of the metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main 
facts and principles of organic chemistry. In this course 
the more common applications of chemistry to the arts 
and manufactures are discussed. The apparatus used for 
experimental illustration is extensive, containipg the 
newest and most approved instruments necessary for pre- 
senting the subject in the most attractive and instructive 
form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemraer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooks's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

% The lectures on industrial chemistry (three per 
wlek) extend throughout the session, and include a dis- 
cussion in detail of the processes and chemical principles 
involved in the most important applications of chemistry 




■^^^^^■^■^M 



! 



56 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

in the arts and manufactures to the reduction of ores, the 
preparation of materials for food and drink, for clothing, 
shelter, illumination, cleaning, purifying, writing, print- 
ing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suita- 
ble specimens of raw materials and manufacturing pro- ) 
ducts, together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as ap- 
plied to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dic- 
tionary, Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's 
Metallurgy, Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the ori- 
gin, composition and classification of soils, the composition 

and growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how i 

obtained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture and 
use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in the 
rotation of crops, the feeding of live stock, and the various 
operations carried on by the intelligent and successful 
agriculturist. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's Ho* Crops Grow and How Crops Feed, Lupton's 
Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson and 
Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer*s Agri- 
culture in relation to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of g i 
the United States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins f| 
and reports of the various home and foreign agricultural depart- 
ments and stations. 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work: TJiis 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, 



■*■ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



57 




1 



being varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 
student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m .during 
six days in the week, are amply supplied with everything neces- 
sary for instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative 
and quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar 
products, minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and 
in the method of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual 
facilities are offered to students who wish to devote their time to 
the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. 
At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles 
as may be returned in good order; the value of those which have 
been injured or destroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is de- 
signed, to introduce during the next session a short course in 

electro-plating. ' 

Practical instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, 
gold, etc., upon other metals will be given, and, in addition, the 
applications of electrolysis to chemical analysis will be studied 
both theoretically and practically . 

BOOKS USED. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 
In quantitative analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, 
Rickett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical 

Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis— Official methods of the Asso- 

• ciation of Agricultural Chemists. 

Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 15.] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory 

consists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for 

practical work and investigation. The building is supplied with 



— ^-^^^™ 



■■ 



m^mtm 



58 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



water and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands 
of modern scientific instruction and research. In addition to the 
apparatus usually supplied to first class laboratories, there have 
been imported a new and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polari- 
scope, four short-arm Becker Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen 
spectroscope, Zeiss microscope, and other instruments for delicate 
and accurate work. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROF. STEDMAN. 

Practical Biology.— This subject is presented by lec- 
tures and laboratory work to the senior students in agri- 
culture and chemistry. The first part of the year will be 
devoted to the study of zoology and entomology with 
special reference to practical agriculture. This will be 
followed by the study of bacteriology and mycology giving 
prominence to the causes of diseases of cultivated giants. 
Special attention will be given to methods employed in 
combatting the attacks of fungi and insects upon plants. 
The lectures will be illustrated as far as possible by actual 
specimens, and by the use of the stereopticou and oxy-hy- 
drogen and electric arc light for micro-projection, and also 
by the use of several hundred lantern slides specially pre- 
pared for these lectures. The biological museum is pri- 
marily for the illustration of the lectures and contains 
several hundred marine invertebrates as well as represen- 
tations of nearly all orders of animals. 

The reference books will be announced to the classes. 
The department contains a carefully selected library of the 
standard works on biology and many rare and valuable 
works, besides current periodicals adapted to aid in the 
special investigations carried on in the laboratory. 

Especial opportunities are offered to graduate students 
who desire to pursue advanced work and engage in origi- 
nal investigations. 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



59 




1 



FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

At present three rooms in addition to the museum and plant 
laboratory are occupied by the department— an office, 
lecture room, and laboratory. The office contains the cabinet of 
fungi and insects, the technical library for the department, slate 
tables with a Zeiss microscope, re-agents, gas and water fittings. 
The work in the office consists of the examination, identification 
and cataloguing of the specimens, beside the special work pecu- 
liar to such an office . The cabinet is provided with tight drawers, 
for receiving the mounted specimens of fungi and insects. 

Laboratory.— Nine slate top tables are devoted to the use of 
students, there being 16 microscopes set apart for them. 

Two small culture rooms contain the plate and test tube cul- 
tures of fungi and bacteria which are being studied in relation to 
the plant diseases they cause. Here they can be handled and 
studied with little danger of contamination from the dust of the 
laboratory. In these rooms are kept Rohrbeck thermostats fitted 
with automatic cut off burners and Lautenschlager's most recent 
thermoregulators for maintaining constant temperatures. 

A Winkel microscope is kept here for the examination of cul- 
tures. It consists of stand No. 2, with condenser, triple revolver, 
homogeneous immersion lens 1-24 and 1-14, dry objectives No. 5 
and No. 7, oculars 1, 3 and 5, and micrometer ocular. 

A Winkel microscope is also kept for the use of the students, 
like the former, except the 1-24 homogeneous immersion lens. 

The other pieces of apparatus are as follows: 

Steam sterilizer, dry sterilizer, domestic still, instantaneous 
water heater, Pasteur filter, fine and common balances, apparatus 
for demonstrating intramolecular breathing of yeast, the Brendel 
models of parasitic and sapro-phytic fungi, bacteria and yeast 
plants, automatic device for rolling culture tubes of nutrient agar 
agar, microtomes and paraffine water bath . 

There are also cases containing a large quantity of the various 
glass vessels, paper, dry and liquid dyes and re-agents, culture 
media, etc., required in modern investigation. 

The laboratory is well lighted from southern and western ex- 
posure. All the rooms are well fitted with gas.. and water supply. 



60 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

A laboratory has been constructed especially for conducting 
investigations on the diseases of plants. While this constitutes 
part of the equipment for the biologist in experiment station 
work, it will be at the disposal of the department for instruction. 



HISTORY AND LATIN. 

PROF. PETRI E. 

HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that history is not a succession of isolated facts 
but a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause 
and the effect of other events. The students are taught to 
investigate the growth of ideas and institutions, the rise 
and progress of great historical movements and the recip- 
rocal influence of men and circumstances. Frequent use 
is made of diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, \vith 
which the department is well equipped. Constant practice 
in map drawing is insisted on in order to give precision to 
the geographical knowledge required. Instruction is given 
by text-books, lectures and class discussion, but a constant 
eftbrt is made to stimulate to widen reading and research 
in the library. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the United 
States and England. The first term (two hours per week) 
is devoted to the history of the United States, the second 
term (two hours per week) to its government, and the third 
term (three hours per week) to the history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until 
March) the subject studied is General History. 

In the junior and senior classes (six hours each per 
week) opportunity for special historical work is given to 
those students of the General Course who may elect it 
instead of laboratory work, A regular course of lectures 



/ 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 61 

(two per week) will be given on American history, social, 
political and financial. Students will also investigate in 
the library under the direction of the professor topics con- 
nected with the lectures, and will report to the class the 
results of their research. These reports will be made the 
basis of general discusssion. A series of special lectures 
will be given from time to time on the government of the 
leading natious of Europe and on current foreign events. 

Text Books. 

Freshman class.-— Chambers's Larger History of the United 
States, Macy'sOur Government, Montgomery's English History. 
Sophomore class.— Myers's General History. * 
Junior and Senior classes — Epochs of American History. 

LATIN. 

In this department two objects are kept in view: a knowl- 
edge of the language, and an appreciation of the literature. 

In teaching the language the following methods are 
used: A systematic course is given in etymology and 
syntax. These are taught both deductively from a gram- 
mar and inductively from the Latin text read. Transla- 
tion is constantly practiced, sometimes at sight, sometimes 
after being assigued for preparation. English passages 
based on a familiar author or illustrative of special con- 
structions are translated into Latin, both orally and in • 
writing. Simple conversation is carried on in Latin. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the subject of Latin litera- 
ture. In connection with every author studied in class 
there is prescribed a course of reading in English descrip- 
tive of his life, work and times. The artistic value of his 
writings is carefully studied and discussed, and frequent 
comparisons are made with modern writers. 

Text Books. 
Freshman class. — Nepos, Virgil, Sallust, Grammar, Composition. 
Sophomore class. — Virgil, Cicero, Jones's Latin Prose Composi- 
tion. 



62 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Junior class. — Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Miller's 
Latin Composition. 
Senior class. — Horace, Plautus, Terence. 



AGRICULTURE. 

PROF. BONDURANT 

The course of instruction in this department embraces: 
I, Soils; II, Plants; III, Domestic Animals. 

The freshman class is taught by lectures and text-books, 
during the third term of the session. 

The subjects taught are the treatment of soils, their 
classification, defects and remedies, causes of diminished 
fertility, and thf* means used to protect them from waste 
and to restore fertility, and the theory and practice of sur- 
face and sub-drainage. 

These subjects are treated with special reference to the 
different classes of soil in Alabama and the Southern 
States. 

In the sophomore class, in addition to the discussion of 
the physical properties and treatment of soils, the methods 
of studying their defects and their remedies are also con- 
sidered. 

The sources of the important elements of plant food and 
their use upon different soils and plants, methods of saving 
and applying farm manures, making composts, proportion- 
ing and applying commercial fertilizers, the relation of 
plant growth to soil and atmosphere, terracing and grading 
land to prevent washing, plows and plowing, and in fact 
everything connected with tilling the soil, pass under re- 
view as foundation works. 

Southern agriculture is then treated; the history, nature 
and cultivation of field crops discussed as regards their 
adaptation to and treatment upon the soils of the Southern 
States. 



f 



\ 



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w. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

Attention is also given the raising of stock, horses, 
sheep, swine and other animals, and to the proper feeding 
of dairy, beef cattle, and all farm stock. 

In the junior class instruction is given in pomology, in- 
cluding the propagation of nursery stock, planting, manur- 
ing, pruning, cultivating, harvesting and marketing every 
species of fruit. 

Lectures are delivered to this class upon subjects rela- 
ting to agriculture, namely: a thorough and judicious 
system ot rotation of crops, diversified farming, the selec- 
tion, purchase, equipment and management of the farm, 
employment and management of labor. 

Landscape gardening is also taught with special refer- 
ence to the improvement of country houses. 

Drawings and models of agricultural implements and 
farm products are used to illustrate the subjects treated in 
the lectures. 

Reference will be made to suitable agricultural books, 
and especial reference to the experiments contained in bul- 
letins of other agricultural stations, whenever applicable 
to the subject under discussion. In this department prac- 
tical agriculture is combined with class instruction. Op- 
portunities are given, and students are required, in the 
junior and sophomore classes to do practical field work of 
an educational character, under the direction of the pro- 
fessor. 

The farm instruction will embrace the details of farm 
work, assisting in field and feeding experiments, which are 
conducted daily on the station farm, aiding in dairy work, 
care and management of farm stock, machinery, propaga- 
ting fruits, grafting, budding, and pruning vines and fruit 
trees. 

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 

(i) Winslow's Principles of \griculture. (2) Gulley's Lessons 
in Agriculture. (3) Wrightson's Principles of Agricultural Prac- 



62 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Junior class. — Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Miller's 
Latin Composition. 
Senior class. — Horace, Plautus, Terence. 



AGRICULTURE. 



f 



\ 



PROP. BONDURANT 

The course of instruction in this department embraces: 
I, Soils; II, Plants; III, Domestic Animals. 

The freshman class is taught by lectures and text-books, 
during the third term of the session. 

The subjects taught are the treatment of soils, their 
classification, defects and remedies, causes of diminished 
fertility, and the. means used to protect them from waste 
and to restore fertility, and the theory and practice of sur- 
face and sub-drainage. 

These subjects are treated with special reference to the 
different classes of soil in Alabama and the Southern 
States. 

In the sophomore class, in addition to the discussion of 
the physical properties and treatment of soils, the methods 
of studying their defects and their remedies are also con- 
sidered. 

The sources of the important elements of plant food and 
their use upon different soils and plants, methods of saving 
and applying farm manures, making composts, proportion- 
ing and applying commercial fertilizers, the relation of 
plant growth to soil and atmosphere, terracing and grading y 

land to prevent washing, plows and plowing, and in fact f 

everything connected with tilling the soil, pass under re- 
view as foundation works. 

Southern agriculture is then treated; the history, nature 
and cultivation of field crops discussed as regards their 
adaptation to and treatment upon the soils of the Southern 
States. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

Attention is also given the raising of stock, horses, 
sheep, swine and other animals, and to the proper feeding 
of dairy, beef cattle, and all farm stock. 

In the junior class instruction is given in pomology, in- 
cluding the propagation of nursery stock, planting, manur- 
ing, pruning, cultivating, harvesting and marketing every 
species of fruit. 

Lectures are delivered to this class upon subjects rela- 
ting to agriculture, namely: a thorough and judicious 
system ot rotation of crops, diversified farming, the selec- 
tion, purchase, equipment and management of the farm, 
employment and management of labor. 

Landscape gardening is also taught with special refer- 
ence to the improvement of country houses. 

Drawings and models of agricultural implements and 
farm products are used to illustrate the subjects treated in 
the lectures. 

Keference will be made to suitable agricultural books, 
and especial reference to the experiments contained in bul- 
letins of other agricultural stations, whenever applicable 
to the subject under discussion. In this department prac- 
tical agriculture is combined with class instruction. Op- 
portunities are given, and students are required, in the 
junior and sophomore classes to do practical field work of 
an educational character, under the direction of the pro- 
fessor. 

The farm instruction will embrace the details of farm 
work, assisting in field and feeding experiments, which are 
conducted daily on the station farm, aiding in dairy work, 
care and management of farm stock, machinery, propaga- 
ting fruits, grafting, budding, and pruning vines and fruit 
trees. 

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 

(i) Winslow's Principles of \griculture. (2) Gulley's Lessons 
in Agriculture. (3) Wrightson's Principles of Agricultural Prac- 



64 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



tice. (4) Fream's Soils and their Properties. (5) Webb's Agri- 
culture. (6) Norton's Elements of Scientific Agriculture. (7) 
Stewart's Irrigation for the Farm, Garden and Orchard. (8) 
Griffith on Manures. (9) Harris on Manures, (to) Mill's Silos 
and Ensilage, (n) Curtis on Stock. )i2) Willard's Practical 
Dairy. (13) American Dairying, by H. B Gurler. (14 )Black's 
Cultivation of Fruits. (15) Thomas's Cultivation of Fruits. 
(16) Strong's Cultivation of Fruits. (17) Fuller's Grape Culturist. 



> 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 



PROF. C. H. ROSS. 

■ ...» 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French— First Year: Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire a thorough 
knowledge of the elements of grammar, and a correct pro- 
nunciation, together with facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the prin- 
ciples of grammar are illustrated and impressed by frequent 
exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week." During this 
year, almost the same line of work is pursued as that begun 
in the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and careful instruction is given upon the laws of gram- 
mar, the construction of the language, and the history of 
the literature. 

German— Two Years: Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Post-graduate courses in French and German are offered. 
That in French during the past year consisted of a study of 
Moliere; that in German of a study of Goethe. An extra 
class was also formed for the study of Italian, 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 65 

Text Books. 

French— First Year: Whitney's Brief French Grammar and 
Introductory French Reader; Jules Verne's Michel Strogoff; 
Pailleron's Le Monde ou Ton s'ennuie. 

Second Year: Moiliere's Les Precieuses Ridicules and L'A vare; 
Hugo's Hernani and Selections; Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune 
\ Homme Pauvre (sight reading), Saintsbtirys Primer of French 

Literature. 

Post-graajtate Course: Les Precieuses Ridicules, Le Medecin 
Malgre Lui, Le Bourgeois Gentilhorame, Le Taruffe, L'Avare, 
Les Femmes Savantes, Le Misanthrope, L'Ecole des Femmes, 
La Malade Imaginaire, Les Fourberies de Scapin; Oliphant's 
Moliere; Saintsbury's Short History of French Literature. 

German— First Year: Otis's Elementary German, Grimm's 
Kinder-und Haus-Maerchen, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz, Germania. 

Second Year: Schiller's Ballads, Heine's Prosa, Lessing's 
Minna von Barnhelm, Lectures on German Literature. 

Post-graduate Course: Goethe's Faust; Lewes's Goethe, Sime's 
Goethe, Grimm's Goethe; Browning's Goethe; Hayward's Goethe; 
i Scherer's History of German Literature. 

Italian— Italian Principia, Pts. I & II. 



'I 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROF. MCKISSICK. 

The students in this course will study English, French, 
or German, physics, mathematics, &c, as now prescribed 
for the course of civil engineering in the junior and senior 
years; and in addition thereto, will prosecute their studies 
in electricity and mechanics, as herein prescribed. 



COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Four hours a week for the entire session are devoted to 
the study of the principles of electricity and magnetism. 



(iti 



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Af/t iruliu/'ol and Hwttftmml OtfUge. 



IMiu at ndunt \h umU famWmr with the theoretical princi- 
ple by uxiimuumto, illu&atium* rwit&tioxifL, and lectures. 
Lahmiatoiiv Wohk, — Four bovrs per week are given to 
work in the laboratory, Tbb ii*e3udes ssaaiiagement of 
battoriea, OOMtrtJCtiofl of ioirt«aii^ats, <deetriea3 measure- 
ment^ verification of the pritieiptes apou which the mea- 
uwmontH of current, electromotive force and resistance 
are butted, etc. 

Text Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity, Desmond's Electricity for En- 
gineers, S. P. Thompson's Electricity and Magnetism, Stewart and 
Gee's Practical Physics, Nichol's Laboratory Manual, VoL L 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hoars per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions on the applications of electricity to lighting, electric il 
transmission of energy, electrical welding, telegraphy and 
telephony. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a 
spirit of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to 
such students in connection with their experimental work. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per weebare devoted to 
practical laboratory work, including construction of instru- 
ment^ electrical measurements, electrolysis, and. relation of 
electrical current* to boat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo, the adjustment and calibration of voltme- 
ters and ammeter*, electric lighting, management and care 
of accumulators, energy consumed in lamps, adjustment and 
enre of KM lamp*, proper wiring of buildings, the applica- 
tion &t electricity to street railway*, magnetic measure- 
ment*, toH»M of transformers and motors. 






) 






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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 67 

Drawing and Construction. — Two hours per week in the 
senior year are devoted to the design and construction of 
electrical machinery. The student is required to make 
original designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, galvano- 
meters, etc. 

i Text Books 

Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, Fleming's Alternate 
Current Transformer, Nichol's Laboratory Manual, Vol. II. 

reference books. 

Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vols. I and II, by 
Gordon; Electricity and Magnetism, by Clerk Maxwell; Emtage's 
Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Mag- 
netism; Kcmpe's Electrical Testing; Dredge's Electric Illumina- 
tion, Vols. I and II; Dynamo Electric Machinery, by Carl Hering; 
The Electro- Motor and its Applications, by Wetzler and Martin; 
Electric Transmission, by Kapp; Electric Lighting by Atkinson; 
Electric Light Installations, by Salomons; Alternating Currents 
j of Electricity, by Blakesley; London Electrician; Proceedings of 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers; Thompson's Electro- 
Magnet. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call- 
bells, annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets, and 
all apparatus necessary for first year students in electrical en- 
gineering. The equipment comprises many fine instruments of 
precision: Sir Wm. Thomson's standard ioo ampere balance 
(either for direct or alternating currents); Sir Wm. Thomson's 
graded current galvanometer, reading to 600 amperes; also, his 
graded potential galvanometer, reading to 600 volts; Weston al- 
ternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt meter, 
Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter, 
Cardew voltmeter (for direct or alternating currents), reading to 
150 volts; Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of re- 
sistance coils; Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, and ammeter, 
standard Vi micro-farad condenser and Sabine key; Thompson 
watt-meter ballistic reflecting galvanometer, mirror galvanometer, 



68 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Fein ammeter and voltmeter, Ayston & Perry ammeter, Kohl's 
solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez ammeter, Hartman & 
Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction 
balance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus 
and several mirror and other galvanometers for first year students. 
A battery of fifty-five Julien accumulators has been installed in 
the laboratory, and a like battery in the department of botany and 
geology. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 
150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one Brush 6 arc-light 
dynamo, with regulator and six lamps; one Edison compound 
wound 12 kilo- watt generator; a Tompson-Houston no volt, 75 
ampere generator; two street car motors used as either direct or 
alternating current generators or motors, two polyphase induction 
motors; a Crocker-Wheeler one-horse power motor and rheostat, 
and one two phase alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by 
special students, furnish current to laboratory, and light up the 
different buildings. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet, 
and are operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical 
engine, and a 25 horse- power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm. Thomson's stand- 
ard electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, 
free of expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the 
College. 

An electric-motor made by students, supplied with current from 
a generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, 
ensilage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. 
This motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of 
these machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric trans- 
mission of power. 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






Fein ammeter and voltmeter, Ayston & Perry ammeter, Kohl's 
solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez ammeter, Hartman & 
Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction 
balance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus 
and several mirror and other galvanometers for first year students. 
A battery of fifty-five Julien accumulators has been installed in 
the laboratory, and a like battery in the department of botany and 
geology. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 
150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one Brush 6 arc-light 
dynamo, with regulator and six lamps; one Edison compound 
wound 12 kilo-watt generator; a Tompson-Houston no volt, 75 
ampere generator; two street car motors used as either direct or 
alternating current generators or motors, two polyphase induction 
motors; a Crocker-Wheeler one-horse power motor and rheostat, 
and one two phase alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by 
special students, furnish current to laboratory, and light up the 
different buildings. / 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet, 
and are operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical 
engine, and a 25 horse- power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm. Thomson's stand- 
ard electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, 
free of expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the 
College. 

An electric-motor made by students, supplied with current from 
a generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, 
ensilage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. 
This motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of 
these machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric trans- 
mission of power. 






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PLAN OF LABORATORY OF ELEOTRIOAL ENGINEERING. 



PLAN OF 

LABORATORY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING, 

ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC IN8TITUTE 
SCALE, 1-8"=1'. 



INDEX 



A— Atlas Engine. 

B— Westinghouse 
Engine. 

C— Clutch Coupling. 

D— Edison Generator. 

E— Weston Generator. 

F —Motor-Generator. 

G— Two-Phase Alterna- 
tor. 

H— Crocker-Wheeler 
Motor. 



I— Thompson-Houston 

Motor. 
J -500 Volt Generator. 
K— Series Dynamo. 
L— Brush Arc Dynamo. 
M— Instrument Case. 
N— Switch Board. 
O- Steam Separator. 
P— Work Table. 
Q— Two- Phase Induction 

Motors. 
R— Oil Filter. 




> 



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X Agricultural and Mechanical College. 69 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

AETS. 

Prof. Wilmore. 






B. H. CRENSHAW, 
R. J. TRAMMELL, 



! 



ASSISTANTS. 



The course in Manual Training covers three years, as 
follows : First year, wood-working— carpentry and turn- 
ing ; second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge 
work— moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, ma- 
chine shop— chipping and filing and machine work in 

metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student may be 
excused from this laboratory work by the Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is de- 
rived from a twenty- five horse power Hanis-Corliss automatic 
engine, which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse- power steel 
horizontal tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the 
feed water form a part of the steam apparatus . For the steam 
plant a substantial brick boiler-house and chimney have been 

erected * 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the fol- 
lowing : 30 wood working benches, each with complete set of 
carpenter's tools ; 24 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with 
complete set of tools ; 1 double circular saw ; r band saw ; r 
board-planing machine ; 1 buzz planer ; r large pattern-maker's 
lathe, r6 inch swing ; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, 
the tool room is supplied with a variety of extra hand-tools for 

special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches 
for 18 students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder s 
tools ; a 14-inch cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 



70 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



melting 1,000 pounds of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which 
can be melted ioo pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible 
tongs, etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small mould- 
ing flasks, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new 
pattern, each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast 
for all the forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure 
blower (which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a 
No. 15 Sturtevant exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires 
into the smoke -flues and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x50 feet, 
and is equipped with 6 engine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14 inch 
swing, 6-foot bed; 2 engine-lathes, 16 inch swing (one with taper 
attachment); r engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest 
and taper attachment ; 1 screw cutting lathe, 12 inch swing; 1 
speed lathe, 10 inch swing; 1 20 inch drill press (power feed); 1 
10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch shaper ; 1 22-inch x 22-inch 
x 5-feet planer ; 1 universal milling machine; 1 corundum tool 
grinder (14 inch wheel>; 1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press, 
14-inch; 1 universal cutter and reamer grinder ; 1 Brown & Sharpe 
universal grinding machine ; 1 power hack saw. A part of this 
room is set apart for vise- work, chipping and filing ; and benches 
for 12 students are provided, each with vise and sets of files, 
chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is to be found a good 
supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, such as lathe 
and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, cutting 
and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine work, 
with machine for grinding twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

First Year. 

1. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the 
first two terms. 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary 
work with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, 
timber-splices, cross joints, mortise and teuon, mitre and 
frame work, dovetail work, comprising different kinds of 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



71 



■i 



joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, ex- 
amples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third 
term. The lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe 
and tools, plain straight turning caliper work to different 
diameters and lengths, simple and compound curves, screw 
plate and chuck-work, hollow and spherical turning. 

Second Year. 

I. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying 
the first term. The lessons are arranged so that the 
students, in making the series of objects, become familiar 
with the nature of the metals and the successive steps in 
working them by hand into simple and complex forms, as 
drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding 
by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, harden- 
ing, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making, covering the second 
term. The work includes a variety of examples of whole 
and split patterns, core work, etc., giving the students 
familiarity with the use of patterns for general moulding. 

III. A course in moulding and casting in iron and 
brass occupying the third term. The work consists for 
the most part of small articles, such as light machine 
parts, but a sufficient variety of forms are introduced for 
the student to acquire a good general and practical knowl- 
edge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two 
part flasks; core work is also given, and some three part 
flask and some dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by 
students are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger or more complicated work. Instruction and prac- 
tice is given in working the cupola, each student in turn 
taking charge of a melting. 



72 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of 
lectures is given on the metallurgy and working of the 
metals used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron 
steel, brass, etc. 

Third Year. 



/ 



I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first 
term. The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought 
iron ; chipping to line on flat and. curved surfaces, key- 
seating, etc.; filing and finishing to line (straight and 
curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dove- 
tail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing 
with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the 
year. The work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and 
brass : turning to various diameters and lengths, taper 
turning, facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both 

in lathe and drill press— reaming, boring, screw-cutting in K 

lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with 
planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling 
machine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., 
fitting, grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals : such as 
forms, construction and use of the various machines, 
cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. Dur- 
ing the last term some piece of construction work is given 
the classes. % 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in 
drawing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue 
print and the materiaHor a certain part. He is then encouraged 
to study the work and plan the best method of doing it. 











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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



In connection with this second year work, a series of 
lectures is given on the metallurgy and working of the 
metals used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, 
steel, brass, etc. 

Thikd Year. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first 
term. The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought 
iron ; chipping to line on flat and. curved surfaces, key- 
seating, etc.; filing and finishing to line (straight and 
curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dove- 
tail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing 
with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the 
year. The work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and 
brass : turning to various diameters and lengths, taper 
turning, facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both 
in lathe and drill press— reaming, boring, screw-cutting in 
lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with 
planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling 
machine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., 
fitting, grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals : such as 
forms, construction and use of the various machines, 
cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. Dur- 
ing the last term some piece of construction work is given 
the classes. % 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in 
drawing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue 
print and the material.for a certain part. He is then encouraged 
to study the work and plan the best method of doing it 




^^™ 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 73 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mathematics.— -Three hours a week for the 
first term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental 
laws underlying all mechanical science and the mechanics 
of liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism.— Three recitations per week 
during the second and third terms are devoted to this 
subject. 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary 
combinations of mechanism studied. The communication of 
motion by gear wheels, belts, cams, screws and link work, the 
different ways of obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite 
changes of velocity, parallel motions and quick return motions as 
well as the designing of trains of mechanism for various purposes, 
together with the theoretical forms of teeth for gear wheels to 
transmit the motion through these trains, are investigated under 
this subject. 

Mechanical Drawing. — During the first term the students 
make drawings to exact scale, of some of the simpler ma- 
chines. The student takes his own measurements and 
makes his own sketches from which to make the finished 
drawing. 

The first eight weeks of the second tefm are devoted to detail 
drawing, tracing and the art of blue printing. The student is 
given a machine or a part of a machine and is required to make 
detail working drawings of the same . 

This is followed by work intended to be supplemental 
to the work in mechanism. Involute and epicycloidal 
gear wheels, bevel wheels and endless screws are designed 
and drawn to scale from data given by the instructor. 

Laboratory Work. — The laboratory work will consist of 
hand work in iron and machine work in iron, as given in 
>the course in mechanic arts in the third year. 




74 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Text Books 

Wood's Elementaiy Mechanics ; Stahl and Wood's Elementary 
Mechanism. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Steam Engine. — The first term five hours per week will 
be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of the / 

steam engine, with discussions of the effects of condensa- 
tion in cylinder, action of fly-wheels, effect of jacketing, 
etc. Simple and compound engines, various valves and 
cut-off* motions, and the pricipal types of modern engines 
are studied. Special attention is given to the steam engine 
indicator. 

Graphical Statics of Mechanism. — Eight weeks of the 
second term, five hours per week, will be given to the 
study of this subject. The advantage of graphical over 
analytical methods is generally recognized, and new ap- 
plications of the former are constantly being made. By 
its use, the forces acting in every part of a machine may 
be determined, both in direction and intensity, without 
the use of a mathematical formula. 

Machine Design. — During the remainder of the year the 
subject of machine design will be studied in connection 
with the strength of materials, the latter being studied 
mainly from actual experiments made on the testing ma- 
chine. 

Laboratory Work. — The students are not only taught 
how to calibrate and use the different instruments, but 
they are brought in contact with engineering appliances €*^t 

under practical working conditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the per- . 
formance of a large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged : 

Calibration of steam gauge ; calibration of indicator spring ; 
calibration of thermometer ; calibration of scales and balances ; 
calorimeter tests with barrel, separating and throttling calo- » 



<*■ 



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M, 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



75 



rimeters ; boiler test with determination of the quality of steam 
and analysis of flue gas ; efficiency test of engine with brake and 
indicator power measurement ; test of hot air pumping engine ; 
efficiency and duty of a steam pump ; tensional, compressional 
and transverse tests of cast iron, wrought iron, steel and wood, in 
which are observed the limit of elasticity, the ultimate breaking 
strength and the modulus of elasticity. 

This class usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill 
sometime in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of a 
25-horse power Harris-Corliss engine, a 35-horse power 
Westiughouse engine, a 25-horse power Atlas engine, two 
9-horse power engines constructed by students in the 
shops, a small engine and boiler especially for making 
efficiency tests, a duplex Deane steam pump, an Ericsson 
hot air engine, a Westinghouse air pump, iour steam 
engine indicators, a separating calorimeter, thermometers, 
pyrometers, scales, a standard steam gauge with apparatus 
for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester for 
correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound testing ma- 
chine, and a Henning micrometer extensometer. 

Text Books. 

Holmes' Steam Engine, Herrman-Smith's Graphical Statics of 
Mechanise; Unwin's Machine Design. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

The library contains a number of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them constantly 
for more extended treatment of many points that come up in 

class. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSE. 

Dynamometers.— -This includes dynamometers and the meas- 
urement of power. Absorption and transmission dynamometers 
are studied,with their application and use in tesfing steam engines. 

Valve Gears —The different forms of valve gears of steam 
engines are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked 
out. 



-— 



76 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. — This subject is studied 
theoretically and practically, and attempts a complete analysis' 
of the action of steam in an engine. 

Laboratory Work. — As much advanced laboratory work will be 
given as can be arranged with the appliances at hand. 

Text Books. 

Flather's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. 



/ 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

LIEUT. J. H. WILLS, U. S ARMY, COMMANDANT. 

* 

Military, science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. This law is faithfully carried 
out by imparting to each student, not physically incapac- 
itated to bear arms, practical instruction in the school of 
the soldier, of the company and of the battalion in close 
and extended order, also in guard mountings, inspections, 
dress parades, reviews, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Revised Statutes, the College 
is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutrements 
and two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for prac- 
tice firing is used under the direction of an experienced 
officer. The exercises in target practice and artillery drill 
beginthe first day of the third term, March 23d. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has 
been prescribed for dress, viz. : . Coats and pants as worn 
at West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet 
cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here 
at $17 to $18. This is less expensive than the usual 
clothing. All students are required to wear this uniform 
during the session. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deport- 



V- 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



77 



ft 



h 



ment, and studies. Each company is officered by one cap- 
tain, two 1st lieutenants, one 2d lieutenant, and with a 
proper number of non-commissioned officers. The offi- 
cers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished by 
appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments are 
confirmed by the President on nomination of the Com- 
mandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. . 

The senior class recites once a week in "Notes on Mili- 
tary Science." 



PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROFESSOR CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class during the second and third terms 
study human physiology. 

It is the aim of the department to familiarize the student 
with the gross anatomy and the functions of the various 
parts of the human body ; moreover, due attention is given 
to the laws of health or conditions most favorable to a 
healthy action of the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures which are illustrated by 
charts, drawings, models of the organs of the body and by 
a human skeleton. 

The department is now supplied with rooms where the 
students can dissect some of the smaller animals and thus 
see the organs, tissues and regions as exhibited in a few of 
the lower animals. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

During the entire junior and senior years the students 
in the agricultural and chemical course of study devote to 
this work two hours per week in the class room and three 
to five hours per week in clinical practice. 



1 




78 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals; also to those students who contemplate studying 
human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the aim 
to give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we at- 
tempt to present the general principles of comparative , 
medicine with such special applications as are adapted to ' 
the conditions and wants of the students. 

Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse 
or other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of 
the most common medicines, the principles and practice of com- 
parative medicine, the methods of meat inspection, and the ways 
of protecting the health of man and domestic animals, are con- 
sidered in as plain and practical manner as the time allotted to 
each subject will permit. Post mortem examinations and the dis- 
section of domestic animals are used as object lessons in the study 
of general. pathology and anatomy. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in histology, bacteriology and pathology. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now 
located in a new building which consists of a two-story portion, 
containing four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lee- * 
ture room, museum and office on the lower floor ; and a one- 
story part which contains an operating room and a hospital ward 
with two box stalls and four open single stalls. 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the labora- 
tory is now equipped for work. The museum contains 
the skeletons of the horse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a 
human skeleton. It also contains anatomical models of the vari- 
ous parts and organs of the human body and models of many 
parts of the horse, the ox, and the other domestic animals. It 
also contains a collection of pathological and anatomical speci- 
mens, and one of animal parasites . 

The cases for clinical work have been numerous. During 1894 
there were three hundred and sixty cases handled by the 
department. 




wmmam^mmmam^a^m 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 79 

POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The Post-graduate Degrees are — Master of Science, Mining 

Engineer, Civil Engineer, and Electrical and 

Mechanical Engineer. 

A post-graduate degree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, 
by one year's residence at the College, spent in the suc- 
cessful prosecution of a course of study approved by the 
faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the faculty a satisfactory thesis, 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining 
to their course, and must pass an examination at the close of each 
term on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a 
grade of 75 per cent. The examination is written, and also oral 
in the presence of the faculty. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are, by order of the trus- 
tees, permitted to matiiculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, 
but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are 
permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any depart- 
ment of the College, without payment of regular fees. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named : 

Mining Engineer. — Geology, Civil Engineering, Chemistry. 

Civil Engineer. — Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical 
Mechanics. 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer. — Electrical Engineering, 
Mechanical Engineering, Analytical Mechanics or Mathematics. 

Master of Science. — Studies in three departments, in two of 
which the candidate must have previously completed the full 
course of the senior class. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject 
of a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 



80 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class 
to those students whose grade for the entire year is above 90 per 
cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on commence- 
ment day to those who obtain an average of 96 per cent, in all j 
the prescribed studies of a regular class ; and also to those who 
obtain three distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sopho- 
more class, five in the junior class, and six in the senior class, 
provided they have satisfactorily passed all the regular examina- 
tions of that session and have not received forty demerits during 
the year. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a 
course of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be 
elective, and the instruction will be open to any student that may 
desire to learn how to make pictures. It will be necessary for 
each student to provide himself with an outfit that will cost from V 

$11.50 to $16.00. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept 
by the officers of instruction . 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 



Written monthly examinations on the studies of the month are 
held by each professor. 

At the end of eich term written examinations, or written and 
oral, are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tion, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class, 
only on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next ses- 
sion. 



f 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 81 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall 
remain through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves 
of absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in flie main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains 
about 8,000 volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 
books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students, carefully and recently selected . It is kept open 
eight hours daily for the use of students as a reading-room, and 
is thus made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is 
provided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable speci- 
mens and models of an instructive character. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the Presi- 
dent and faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regula- 
tions enacted by the trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not 
issued for the performance of military duty, and also from using, 
or causing to be brought into the College limits, intoxicating 

liquors. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all un- 
dergraduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, 
are required to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships . The 
military drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in 
the development of the physique and improvement of the carriage 
of the cadet are manifest t 



82 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Privates of the senior class who are candidates for graduation 
may be excused by the President from all military drills, and also 
students over twenty-one years of age at the time of entering 
College that are permittsd to devote their time to one special 
study, as chemistry, agriculture, etc. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to 
attend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its weekly 
meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence among the stu- 
dents of the College. 

The first week of the session the trains will be met by a com- 
mittee of the Association, whose business will be to give informa- 
tion to, or assist in any way it can, the students entering College 
for the first time. The Association is commended to all the 
students . 

The fallowing are the officers : 

H. H. Smith, '95, President. 

S. L. Coleman, '95, Vice-President; 

J. A. Groves, '96, Recording Secretary. 

W. H. McBryde, '97, Corresponding Secretary. 

J. L. Molder, '96, Treasurer. 

GYMNASIUM. 

The fourth floor of the main building is one large attic- room, 
well lighted and ventilated. It has been supplied with a number 
of such appliances as are used in a gymnasium, and is used for 
athletic exercises by the students, in the afternoon, under pre- 
scribed regulations. 



/ 



i 



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^^^^^^—^^^^——^—^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mm^mmm^m^^mmmmm—mmmm 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 83 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles 
east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good 

health and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight 

i hundred and twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the 

State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any 

kind are forbidden. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the 
students board with families in the town of Auburn, and 
thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences of 

the family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it 
is to report those who, without permission, leave their 
hjj rooms after "call to quarters," or are guilty of any viola- 

^^ tion of order. The report of the inspector is made to the 

Commandant on alternate days of the week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 
permitted to make changes without obtaining permission 
from the President, and this permission is given only at 
the close of a term, except for special reasons. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

Incidental fee, per half session ......$ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session • • 2 50 

6 00 
These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and 
$6.00 on February 1st. By order of the trustees no fees 
can be remitted. 






^ 



84 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 
half session only are required. 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights. . . . $12 to 15 00 

EXPENSES FOR COLLEGE YEAR. 

Fees . $ 12 00 to $ 12 00 i 

Board, lodging, fuel and lights. ... 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing 9 00 to 9 00 

Books, etc., say 8 00 to 15 00 

Total ■.,".'.'. $137 00 $171 00 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The 
uniforms are made by a contractor of excellent cloth manufac- 
tured at the Charlottesville mills. This suit, including cap, costs 
about $16.50. It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive 
than ordinary clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be de- 
posited by each student on matriculation, to cover any 
special or general damage to college property for which he 
may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent 
fee, or the unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OP DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with 
the Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of 
fees, one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 



warn 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 85 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treas- 
urer of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether 
for regular charges of College fees or board, or for any other pur- 
pose. It is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed 
\ in his hands, and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, 

including board, uniform, books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer 
of the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when approved by the President. This ap- 
proval is given only for necessary expenses, as stated in the cata- 
logue, unless specially requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a 
student, unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No 
student should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket 
money, as it brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to * 
the faculty an essay or oration and read or deliver the same at 
commencement, if required by the faculty. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the Col- 
lege — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall in 
the main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 

l Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February, and also dur- 

] ing commencement week. They elect annually, with the 

approval of the faculty, an orator to represent them at the 

close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are 




86 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

conducted by the Professor of English, in presence of the faculty 

and students. 

The/™/ and second terms the students of the junior and sopho- 
more classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member of the 
society, in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tuesday of com- 
mencement week. The following are the officers of the society : 

C. H. Ross, '86, President. 

C. W. Ashcraft, '88, Vice President. 

C. C. Thach, '77, Secretary and Treasurer. 

R. H. Thach, '85, Orator for 1895. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid on enter- 
ing College. 

ACADEMIC YEAE. 

The academic year for 1895-96 commences on Wednes- 
day, 11th September, 1895 (second Wednesday after first 
Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 10th June, 1896, 
(second Wednesday after first Monday), which is commence- 
ment day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 20th of December ; 
the second term begins December 30th, and ends March 
2l8t; the third term continues from March the 21st to the 
close of the session. 




^ 



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' 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 



87 



The following resolution was adopted by the trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in agriculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College, especially in the department o( mechanic arts, made 
possible by the recent donation from the State, the faculty are 
authorized, in addition to the legal name of this College, to print 
on the catalogue the words ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC IN- 
STITUTE, as significant of the expanded system of practical 
instruction in industrial science in the course of education na^ 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 



provided for. 



W. Aldrich — Farming Corporations. 
. H. S. Salt— Animal Rights. 

Arthur Pew — Government Railroads. 

Babcock and Wilcox Co. — Steam. Its generation and use. 

P. H. Mcll, Jr. — Mell's Decisions on Parliamentary Practice. 

R. P. Williams — The Apostolic Fathers. 

Secretary of Interior — Senate and House Executive and Mis- 
cellaneous Documents, Memorial Addresses, Reports, etc — 164 
vols. 

Hon. W. C. Oates and Hon. G. P. Harrison — Congressional Re- 
cord, and 3 vols. War of the Rebellion Reports. 

Russian Government — World's Fair Report. 

Commissioner of Education — 8 Pamphlets on American Edu- 
cational History. 

Commissioner of Finance — 47 Pamphlets on Tariff Reports. 

Univeisity of Wisconsin — 4 Pamphlets Engineering Series. 

DONATIONS TO ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Baxter Electric Motor Co., Baltimore, Md. — Two street car 
motors, 20 horse power each. 

General Electric Co., Atlanta, Ga.-— One lightning arrester. 

Hill Clutch Works, Cleveland, O.— One friction clutch pulley. 

Magnolia Metal Co, New York— Eighteen copies of "The 
Practical Engineer" for distribution to the senior class. 



88 



Agricultural and Mechanical Coltege. 



Niles Tool Works, Hamilton, O. — Two large photographs, 
framed, showing machinery. 

The Lane & Bodley Co. — Large photograph of Columbian 
Corliss engine. 

The Consolidated Safety Valve Co., N. Y. — Sectional model 
of locomotive pop safety valve . 

The Ames Iron Works, Oswego, N. Y. — Two framed engrav- 
ings of engines. 

Allis Engine Works, Milwaukee, Wis. — Engraving of engine. 

Frick Co., Waynesboro, Pa. — Four photographs of engines and 
ice machines.- 

Deane Steam Pump Co., Holyoke, Mass. — Duplex steam pump 
complete. 

Lukeins Iron and Steel Co., Coatsville, Pa. — Flanged boiler 
head; two Huston patent boiler braces. 

Mr. W. H. Parrish, President Gulf Red Cedar Co., Greenville, 
Ala. — Cedar lumber. 



PERIODICALS. 

The following periodicals are regularly received in the 
library and are accessible to students. 

LITERARY. 

QUARTERLY. 

Economic Journal. Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Edinburgh Review. Quarterly Review. 

Political Science Quarterly. Sewanee Review. 

MONTHLY. 



Atlantic Monthly. 
Blackwood's Magazine. 
Book Buyer. 
Book Reviews. 
Century Magazine. 
Contemporary Review. 
Cosmopolitan. 
Eclectic Monthly. 
Education. 
Educational Review. 



Fortnightly Review. 
Forum. 

Harper's Monthly. 
McClure's Magazine. 
► Nineteenth Century. 
North American Review. 
Review of Reviews. 
Scribner's Magazine. 



r 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



89 



M 





WEEKLY. 


Academy . 


Independent (New York). 


Athenaeum. 


Literary World (Boston). 


Critic. 


Nation , 


Dial. 


Saturday Review. 


Harper's Weekly. 


Spectator. 




SCIENTIFIC. 



Agricultural Science. 

Agricultural Society Journal. 

American Agriculturalist. 

American Cultivator. 

American Gardening. 

American Geologist. 

American Journal of Mathematics. 

American Journal of Science. 

American Machinist. 

American Meteorological Journal. 

American Monthly Microscopical Journal. 

American Naturalist. 

Analyst 

Anatomischer Anzeiger. 

Anrifcles de Chemie et de Physique. 

Annales des Sciences Naturelles. 

Annals of Botany. 

Annals of Mathematics. 

Anthony's Photographic Bulletin. 

Archives de Biologic 

Archives de Zoologie . 

Archives fuer Mikroskopische Anatomic 

Berichte der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft. 
British Journal of Photography, 
Botanical Gazette. 
Builder and Woodworker. 
Bulletin Torrey Botanical Club. 

Cassier's Magazine. 

Chemical News. 

Centralblatt fuer Bacteriologie . 



) 






90 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Country Gentleman and Cultivator. 

Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Tiermedicine. 

Electrical Engineer. 
Electrical Review. 
Electrical World. 
Electrician. 

Engineering (London). 
Engineering and Mining Journal. 
Engineering News. 
Engraver and Printer. 

Farmer's Gazette (New South Wales). 
Farmer's Advocate. 
Florida Farmer and Fruit Grower. 
Garden and Forest. 

Hufschmied. 

Journal de l'Anatomie et de Physiologic 

Journal of American Chemical Society. 

Journal of Botany. 

Journal of Comparative Pathology and Therapeutics. 

Journal of Franklin Institute. 

Journal of Geology. 

Journal of Horticulture. 

Journal of Morphology. 

Journal of New York Microscopical Society. 

Mehan's Monthly. 

Natural Science. 
Nature. 

Pharmaceutical Journal. 
Photographer (St. Louis). 
Photographic Times. 
Popular Science Monthly. 
Prairie Farmer. 

Proceedings of the Academy of 'Natural Science of Phila- 
delphia. 

Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science. 



> 

\ 




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1 ■— ^^^^^^^^^^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 91 

Rural New Yorker. 

Science. 

Scientific American. 

Sibley Journal of Engineering. 

Southern Cultivator. 

Southern Farm. 

Southern Planter. 

Veterinary Journal. 
Veterinary Magazine. 

Western Rural. 

Wilson's Photographic Magazine. 

Zeitschrift fuer Fleisch und Milch Hygiene. 
Zeitschrift fuer vergleichende Augenheilkunde. 
Zoologischer Anzeiger. 




PUBLIC LECTURES DELIVERED AT THE COLLEGE 

DURING SESSION 1894-95. 

Dr. Broun — How we Hear. 

Prof. Thach— Sir Walter Scott. 

Dr. Petrie — Washington City. 

Dr. Cary — Cor formation of the Horse. 

Dr. C. H. Ross— Names. 

Dr. Mell— Plant Life. 

Prof. Stedman— Biology of Coral Reefs. 

Prof. B. B. Ross— Technical Chemistry. 

PUBLIC LECTURES FOR SESSION 1 895-96. 

Dr. Broun— Lunar Influences Real and Imaginary. 

Prof. Smith— Reminiscences of a Schoolmaster. 

Dr. Mell— Erosion of Continents. 

Prof. Thach— Thackeray's Life and Works. 

Dr. Petrie — Benjamin Franklin. 

Prof. Bondurant— The Southern Labor Problem . 

Prof. McKissick— Phenomena of Alternating Currents. 

Prof. Stedman— Hydroids and Jelly Fish. 

Prof. B. B. Ross— Technical Application of Chemistry. 

Dr. C. H. Ross— Americanisms. 

Prof. Wilmore— The Steam Engine as a Factor in Civilization . 

Dr, Cary— Psychology of Domestic Animals. 



1^61 



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92 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



CALENDAR, 1895=96. 

Session begins Wednesday, Sept. 1 1, 1805 

Examination for .admission Wednesday, Sept. 1 ., 1895 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept. 11,1895 

First term ends -MJ* » ec 20 « -^ 

Second term begins Monday,- J>ec 30, 189S 

Second term ends Saturday, March a., ,896 

Ttird term begins Monday, March 23, '896 

Sophomore class exercises .Friday, May r, .890 

Final examinations begin Wednesday, May 27, .896 

Commencement sermon Sunday, June 7, ^ 

Annual meeting of Trustees .■■.■■ Monday, June 8, 1896 

Junior class celebration, 10 AM Monday, June 8, 1896 

Military exercises, 4 p. * Monda y- J une 8 ' '^ 

Celebration of Literary Societies, 8 p.m.. .Monday, June 8, 1896 

Alumni day Tuesday, June 9 , 1896 

Military exercises, 5 p. m Tuesday, June 9, 1896 

Address before Literary Societies, 8 p. m. .Tuesday, June 9, 1896 
Commencement day Wednesday, June 10, 1896 










Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1895 



OCLCs 36819614 
Entered: 19970429 



Type: 

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S/L: 

Desc: 

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Rec stat: 

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Regl: 
DtSt: 



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Used: 
Ctrl: 
MRecs 
ISSN: 
Dates : 



19970429 
Lang i eng 
Ctryi 
Alph: 
1894,1899 1 



alu 

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*f u *g b *h a *i u *j p 1 



2 

10 
10 



ELvl: 
Form: 
Orig: 
SrTpt 

AAA *c AAA f 
h *b c *d b *e f 
n-us-al 1 
LD271 .A76 1 
*b I 
AAAA 1 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. 1 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] f 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 
Auburn, Ala. t *b The College, *c 1894-1899. I 
6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 
Annual I 

1893-94-1898-99. I 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. I 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College." 1 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 
Periodicals. I 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute I 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 20 



A1ABAMA D OLYTECMIC INSTITUTE 

CATALOGUE 
1895-96 



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COLLEGE. 



1895-96. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. : 

THE BROWN PRINTING 00., PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1896. 



AUBURN UNIVERi 
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TRUSTEES. 



♦ » 



His Excellency, Wm. C. Oates, President Ex-officio. 

J. 0. Turner, Superintendent of Education .Ex-officio. 



Jonathan Haralson (term expires 1901) Selma. 

Thos - AW AMS • • (term expires 1901) Wetumpka. 

J. A. "imi6 (term expires 1901) . . .Gadsden, 



I. F. Culver.... (term expires 1899)... .... .Union Spri 



J. C. Rich 

H. Clay Armstrong . . 
R. H. Duggar 

J. G. Gilchrist 

Wm. Smaw 



ngs. 

• ( term expires 1899) Mobile. 

.(term expires 1899) .Auburn. 

(term expires 1899) Gallion . 



<m 



• • < term expires 1897) Hope Hull. 

< term expires 1897) Boligee. 

C. C. Harris (term expires 1897).. Decatur. 

E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 



• riHHc 



ff-4 









FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A , LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany and Geology. <j t, 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M., LL. D., .11 11 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. .0 X 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., H .II 

Professor of English and Political Economy. H .11 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D.,/^ ° wT * 8 

Professor of History and Latin. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M., M. M. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B. B. ROSS, M. So., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS, C. E., Ph. D., 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and English. 

J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY, B. So., D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

MAGNUS 0. HOLLIS, 1st Lieut. 4th Inf. U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

E. R. MILLER, Phar. M., M. Sc, 
Adjunct Professor of Pharmacy. 

LUCIEN M. UNDERWOOD, Ph. D., 
Professor of Biology. 

J. F. DUGGAR, M. Sc, 
Assistant Professor of Agriculture. 

207879 



AUBURN UNIVERJ 
LIBRARY 




AU 

LD271 
.A76 
189^/96 
c.2 



F. S. EARLE, 
Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

B. H. CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

0. L. HARE, M. So., 
Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 

R. J. TRAMMELL, C. E., 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

L. 8. BOYD, M. So., 

Assistant Librarian. 

W. M. RIGGS, E. & M. E., 

Instructor in Physical' Laboratory. 

J. P. 8laton, M. So. Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

H H. Smith, B. So Assistant in English. 

J. C. Thomabon, B. So Assistant in Mathematics. 

H. H. Kysrr, B. So Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

H. H. Pmvby, B. So. . .Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing 
8. L. Colkman, B. So Assistant in Chemistry. 









———_-*— _^^_^^^^^^^^ 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



■♦ ♦- 



COMMITTEE OP TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

I. F. Culvbb Union Springs 

J. G. Gilchrist Hope Hull. 

H. Clay Armstrong Auburn. 



♦ ♦ 



.STATION COUNCIL,. 

Wm. LeRoy Broun f President. 

P. H. Mell Botanist. 

B. B. Ross — Chemist. 

L. M. Underwood Biologist. 

0. A. Oary Veterinarian. 

J. F. Duoqar.. Agriculturist. 

F. S. Earle Horticulturist. 



ASSISTANTS.. 



J. T. Anderson, Ph. D .First Assistant Chemist. 

C. L. Hare, M. So Second "Assistant Chemist. 

R. G. Williams, M. So Third Assistant Chemist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 



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OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of language and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course* 

The special and technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which by reso- 
lution of the Trustees is permitted to be inscribed in the 
catalogue, — and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is being accomplished by fitting them by a thorough 
science-discipline, in which manual training in the lower 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students L endeavoring to train them to habits of ac- 
curate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 



_ 



_— 



1 



10 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

LABORATOBIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUC- 
TION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 



I— IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres* and is supplied with illus- 
trative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in the presence of the objects discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an 
educational character are given the students who enter 
upon this course of study. 

H— IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
n ndustrml education, and as a school in manual training 
n the arts that constitute the foundation of various bdto 

2SESLS" work performed b ' *• Snts t : 
S^K'i^^."-^' and the 

under the ^iL&^S^*^ *""« 
of the College each ^Je^tht 1.7^ ^ 
signed three exercises a week LT! 8Ch °° 1 ' v and 18 as " 
hours long. ' each exe ™se being two 

The object of this laboratory is not tn t.o W . ., i. . 
to educate, to discipline andfL T ° h * trade ' bot 

well as tne mind ^d Jhnt T *? " dUie W ' M 
mental training to educated 7 « od » ti »W manual and 

duties of life wLve ht ^ the student f <* the 
me, whatever hie vocation may be. There is no 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



11 



attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are syste- 
matically arranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse-power 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands each with <* lathe 
and a full set of tools, and thirty benches for carpentry 
work with the tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a Colliau 
cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace, moulding 
benches, a foundry crane constructed by students, and 
special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturte- 
vant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a ten 
horse-power engine, constructed by the students in me- 
chanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
SO x 50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, 
one universal milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a 
small emery grinder, a universal cutter and reamer grinder^ 
a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine, and 
a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 
The rooms are lighted with electricity whenever necessary. 




12 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

m— IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 



The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern appa- 
ratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities for 
instruction in practical chemistry and for investigation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, a lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

IV— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

- The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped 
with many fine instruments of precision: Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance, Kelvin gradfed current and potential gal- 
vanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston voltmeters and am- 
meter, Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and ammeter, 
Thomson watt-meter, Hartman and Braun voltmeter, 
Kohlrausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, Weston alternating 
current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, 
Queen's " Acme" testing set, Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter* 
Edison ammeters and many other current-measuring instru- 
ments, resistance boxes, Wheatstone bridges, condensers, 
telephones, batteries, magnets, etc. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are opera- 
ted by a twenty-five horse-power Atlas engine, and a thirty- 
five horse-power Westinghouse engine. In this building 
are installed the following dynamos : 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thomson-Hous- 
ton 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 ampere 
generator, Crocker-Wheeler one-horse power motor, Brush 
6 arc light dynamo with lamps, two Baxter street car motors, 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 13 

20-horse power each (so connected as to be used as direct 
or alternating current motors or generators), one General 
Electric 20-horse power motor, two bi-phase induction 
motors (built by students), two phase alternator and 500 
volt 20 ampere generator, made by students. There is also 
in connection with this department at the experiment sta- 
tion, a ten-horse power motor, made by students, which is 
operated by the 500 volt generator in the dynamo room. 

v— IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for elementary 

laboratory work in the department of physics. Special 
rooms in the basement are appropriated for this purpose, 
and are equipped with the necessary appliances for instruc- 
tion in practical physics. 

VI — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station there 
is a botanical garden under the charge of the professor of 
botany, investigations in botany are given special attention, 
and opportunities are offered advanced students for practi- 
cal work in a laboratory especially fitted with microscopes, 
tables, a dark room for photographic work, and appliances 
needed for instruction and research. This department is 
provided with Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers 
for teaching botany. 



if 



14 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



I 






Yin— IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, excel- 
lent microscopes and appliances for investigation. Each 
student of the class works under the supervision of the 
professor. 

IX— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits, 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X— IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation 
and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing-room, that 
will accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables, 
lock boxes, etc. 

XI— IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The me chanical course has been extended to include ex- 
perimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as follows : 
A 25-horse power Harris -Corliss engine, a 35-horse power 
Westinghouse engine, a 25-horse power Atlas engine, two 
9-horse power engines constructed by students, the boilers 
belonging to the regular power plant, a small engine and 
boiler for the special purpose of making efficiency tests, a 
Dean duplex steam pump, an Ericsson hot air engine, a 
Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine indicators, a 
separating calorimeter, thermometers, a pyrometer, scales, 
a standard steam gauge with apparatus for testing steam 
gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester with weights for cor. 
recting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound testing machine, 
a Henning micrometer extensometer, and a Carpenter 
calorimeter with the necessary auxiliary apparatus for de- 
termining the heating value of different kinds of coal. 




Agricultural, and Mechanical College. 16 

No suitable place has as yet been provided for a testing 
laboratory, and the work is carried on, partly in a room in 
the basement of the main building, partly in the dynamo 
house, and partly in the shops. The work is thoroughly 
practical, and it is desired to extend it as rapidly as the 
funds available for the purchase of apparatus will allow. 

Xn— IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINAEY SCIENCEr 

There has been constructed for the veterinary laboratory 
a new and separate two-story building with nine rooms. It 
is provided with lecture room, office, working and operating 
rooms for clinical practice, and museum with skeletons of 
the domestic animals for instruction. Free clinics are 
given every Saturday for the benefit of the students in vete- 
rinary science. 

Xm— IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department, at present, occupies a 
room in the Chemical building and is provided with a suffi- 
cient supply of drugs and apparatus necessary for instruc- 
tion in pharmaceutical preparations. 

The students work in the laboratory with the Professor, 
from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

It is expected to increase the facilities as means are 
available. 



MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing 
good order, promptness and regularity in the performance 
of academic duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut M. O. 

Hollis, 4th Infantry, U. S. A. 

It is supplied with new cadet muskets and accoutrements 
for the corps, and for artillery practice, with two three- 
inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



16 - Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

* 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 100 by 71 feet, and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to pur- 
poses of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second 
story is the audience hall, used for commencement and other public 
occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

As shown on the opposite page, is a two-story structure, 40 by 60 
feet, with a rear projection, 85 by 60 feet, of one-story and basement, 
add contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut 
stone trimmings and terra-cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room and also a room used at 
present for the pharmaceutical laboratory. Around the lecture 
room are cases containing crude and manufactured products, illus- 
trating agricultural and industrial chemistry, prominent subjects 
taught in the institution. 



i_ 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 







II 



c^ \ 



msammmm 



-^*m 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 




GYMNASIUM. 

The recently constructed gymnasium is situated at the west end of the 
athletic grounds and contains one room 80 x 40 feet, with truss-roof and 
strong beams 22 feet above for fastening the usual fixtures. It is equipped 
with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus and is open to all students at stated 
hours, under the care of an instructor. 






I 






= 



if 















GRADUATES IN 1895. 

CLASS OF 1895, 

* 
* • — 

HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Marengo. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

James Claude Thomason . — Randolph. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

LeVert Coleman Madison. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Robert Higgins Adams f. • Pike * 

Daniel SpigeiWr Anderson Lee- 
Walter Scott Askew Chambers. 

Hugh Bickerstaff Russell. 

George Perkins Bondurant Lee - 

Frank Asbury Boykin • • Lee - 

William Wallace Bussey Georgia. 

Gordon Flewellen Chambers, Russell. 

LeVert Coleman , Madison. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Marengo. 

Langdon Bowie Gammon. ..... .• Georgia. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson • • • ' £ alla8 - 

Benjamin Glenn Jennings *„* 

Henry Hearst Kyser i Talladega. 

Charles Linn ■ Jefferson. 

James Neil McLean Montgomery. 

William Cunningham McMillan Talladega. 

James Newsom ? r e °J. g1 *' 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Tilden Hendricks Phipps Georgia. 



_____ 



.____—_ 



__■ 



f 









18 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Walter Russell Shafer Montgomery. 

Harry Howell Smith. Lee. 

Percy Hilton Smith Georgia. 

Herbert Warren Taylor r. » . - . ■ Montgomery. 

James Claude Thomason Randolph. 

Andrew Hearne Whitman Lowndes. 

John Adams Wills Lee. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd Lee. 

Kate Conway Broun Lee. 

James Vandiver Brown Georgia. 

Rosberry Covington Conner Macon. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee. 

Rinaldo Greene Williams Lee. 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

James Archibald Duncan Pike. 

John Presley Slaton Macon. 









ri 



• 












: 






DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



♦ ♦ 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 
Freshman Class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in 
the Junior, and in six in the Senior, are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1805: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Walter Scott Askew Chambers. 

Hugh Bickerstaff Russell. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Marengo. 

LeVert Coleman Madison. 

Henry Hearst Kyser Talladega. ■ 

James Newsom. , Georgia. 

Harry Howell Smith Lee. 

James Claude Thomason Randolph. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Albert Lea Alexander Georgia. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

George Bates Kelley Jefferson. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Albert Lea Alexander .Georgia. 

Andrew Beirne Andrews Tennessee. 

William James Beeson Etowah. 

Hubert Alberto Drennen Jefferson. 



= 






20 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

James Alston Groves Dallas. 

Annie Florence Heard Lee. 

Hampton Sanders Henderson Talladega. 

Gaorge Bates Kelley Jefferson. 

Garry DeVon King Georgia. 

James Louis Moulder Georgia. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee. 

Estelle Love Whitaker , .Lee. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson Franklin. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner Macon. 

Ernest William Heck .Illinois. 

William Welch Hill Talladega. 

Clarence Neil Jones .Montgomery. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph ; Montgomery. 

Henry Madison Lindsey : Mobile. 

Samuel Toliver Slatoo Macon. 

William Tilman Warren..... Montgomery. 

Reuben David Webb Coosa. 

George Wrigley ..'... ..!... Georgia. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

John Cocke Abernethy # .Florida. 

William Menefee Dean . . Georgia 

Robert Clark Fen ton. .'.'.'...'.'.'.'.'..'.Connecticut. 

Harry Streety Houghton Jefferson 

Marshall Hill Hurt ZZ' ' £^ ' 

Robert Stewart Parker Sumter 

William Bee Stokes M . 

WiUiam Alexander Thomason.^ 






IB 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



■+-•-+- 



FOR THE SESSION OF 1895.96. 



♦♦ 




Graduate Students. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.] 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Solon Lyfcurgus Coleman Marengo. 

Henry Hearst Kyser Talladega. 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Walter Bussell Shafer Montgomery. 

John Presley Slaton .Macon. 

arry Howell Smith Lee. 

James Claude Thomason Eandolph. 

John Adams Wills Lee. 

Herbert Warren Taylor. Montgomery. 

Undergraduate Students. 

senior class. 

Albert Lea Alexander Georgia. 

Charles Nutting Alford Marshall. 

Andrew Beiine Andrews Tennessee. 

Marion Joseph Bancroft Mobile. 

William James Beeson Etowah. 

John Simeon Bennett Lee. 

Sidney Josiah Bross Coosa. 

Joseph Quarterman Burton Lee. 

Henry Rozier Casey Jefferson. 

LeBoy Abda Christian Shelby. 

James Washington Culver Lee. \ 

Walter Ernest Culver Lee. 

Hubert Alberto Drenhen Jefferson. 

Oba DeYan Dumas Wilcox. 



H i 















■ 



22 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Jesse Boland Edwards Talladega. 

John Cuthbert Farley Lee. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

John Lonis Glenn Butler. 

Annie Florence Heard Lee. 

. John Fletcher Heard Lee. 

Hampton Sanders Henderson , Talladega. 

Frank Thomas Jackson Mobile. 

Richard Sparks Jackson Jefferson. 

George Bates Kelley Jefferson. 

William Bernan Kelly . . Montgomery. 

Garry DeVon King .. .Georgia. 

James Lewis Moulder Georgia. 

Julian Berry Oglesby Georgia, 

John Albin Reeves. Cherokee. 

Oliver John Semmes Mobile. 

Benjamin Asbury Taylor Autauga. 

Wade Douglas Taylor Madison. 

Walker Reynolds Tichenor Georgia. 

William Abner Tippin , \\\\ Florida. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee 

Estelle Love Whitaker \\\\ # L ea 

Frank Lewis Whitman L ee 

William Martin Williams ...\\\\\ Georgia. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson .' ! .' .\' ! ! . Franf iTn. 

JUNIOB CLASS. 

Emile Glines Abbott. n 

William Kirk Armstrong'. . * '. '. '.'.[][ i^ 8 ^ 

Bichard Manning Boykin an v 

Lewis Edward Byrum. » % ^l** 

Edgeworth Stephens Casey N. C arohna . 

Alexander Hnmphreys Clark Jefferson. 

Peyton Graves Clark Mon gomery. 

Bobert Walter Collins Montgomery. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner m 

George uonard F aucett..:::::;;;:;.;;;;;;^ ph 



AgriaiUural2and Mechanical College. 23 

William Alexander Fitzgerald Georgia. 

Arthur Williams Greene Chambers. 

Gaston Greil Montgomery. 

Jule Alford Haigler Montgomery. 

Fletcher Dumas Harvey Lee. 

Harry Herzf eld Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Herzfeld Tallapoosa. 

William Welch Hill Talladega. 

John Buford Hobdy Bullock. 

George Michael Holley Georgia. 

William Alexander Hood Jefferson. 

Cassius Rex Hudson Lee. 

Clarence Neil Jones Montgomery. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph Montgomery. 

Adus Edwin Killebrew Dale. 

George Powe Kyser Talladega. 

William Parker Leonard Georgia. 

Warren Horton McBryde Mobile. 

William Wrice McLeran Macon. 

George Nathan Mitcham Georgia. 

Wade Hampton Negus Mississippi. 

Charles Johnson Nelson Dallas. 

William Jacob Nixon .... Tennessee. 

William Clifford Paden Etowah. 

Benjamin Sweat Patrick S. Carolina- 
James Lawrence Pollard Russell. 

Leonard Calloway Pratt Bibb. 

John Purif oy Lee. 

John Wesley Purifoy Wilcox. 

Berry Lathum Scott Texas. 

Samuel Tolivar Slaton Macon. 

Frederick Lloyd Tate Russell 

Merrick Dowdell Thomas Chambers. 

Paul Vines Tallapoosa. 

James Clifton Warren Montgomery. 

William Tilman Warren Montgomery. 

Reuben David Webb Coosa. 

Noble James Wiley Montgomery. 



■ 



24 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Lemuel Sledge Allen Marengo. 

Thomas Meriwether Barnett Chilton. 

William Brown Beeson Jackson. 

Carter Berry Tallapoosa. 

Arthur Bingham . Talladega. 

Hector Patrick Blue Bullock. 

William Hamill Bruce Montgomery. 

Thomas Harrison Clower Lee. 

William Thomas Covin .Georgia. 

William Menefee Dean Georgia. 

George Oliver Dickey Crenshaw. 

Duncan Patterson Dixon Talladega. 

Clifford Lamar Edwards Lee. 

Richard Roe Eppes. Marengo. 

Prank Farley Lee. 

Jewett Whatley Feagin Jefferson. 

Walter Zabe Fletcher Lee. 

Frank Reese Frazer Lee. 

James Stephen Gilliland Coosa. 

John Wommack Giddens . . Crenshaw. 

Elmer Wynn Gray .Georgia. 

Benjamin Fortson Griffin Texas. 

Francis Williams Hare Lee. 

Charles Edward Harrison Florida. 

Henry Everette Harvey: Lee. 

Harry Streety Houghton Jefferson. 

William Earl Hudmon ...Lee. 

Robert Edwin Hudson fj 6e 

Marshall Hill Hurt. ...:....;:.". .'.7.." ['.'. '. .Macon. 

John William Jepson S. Carolina. 

William Earle Lay Etowah 

Claude Omega Looney Talladega. 

Joseph Wood King ..Georgia? 

George" Edwards Mason Shelb 

John Kichard McCalla. L ee 

George Bulger McDonald .......... . . " . .' .' [ Coosa. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre Montgomery. 

Henry Edmund Memminger , Tennessee. 

Edwin Thomas Merrick Louisiana. 

William Augustus Mitchell Georgia. 

Benjamin Otey Minge Marengo. 

Ohadwick Wiley Minge Marengo. 

George McElhaney Moore Lee. 

Frank Green Morriss Talladega. 

Howard Crawford Motley Lee. 

John SSt. Clair Paden . . .Etowah. 

Robert Stewart Parker Sumter. 

Harry John Pettus Montgomery. 

Alexander Simpson Pow Jefferson. 

James Ware Ray Elmore. 

Harvey Owen Sargent Franklin. 

Robert Pinkney Scarbrough Russell. 

Selwyn Sutton Scott Lee. 

John Asbury Selman > Coosa. 

Clifford West Stewart Montgomery. 

William Livingston Stewart Montgomery. 

William Bee Stokes! . . ; Marion. 

Cecil Pitts Stowe .Lee. 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe Louisiana. 

Thomas Harrison Tutwiler Jefferson. 

William Alexander Thomason Randolph. 

James Robert Vann Henry. 

Almuth Cunningham Vandiver Talladega. 

Bishop Billing Warwick , Talladega. 

George Newman Ward Henry. 

Burns Michel Wert Morgan. 

John Wesley Williams Lee. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Roland T. Abbott .Georgia. 

LeRoy Jones Allen .Marengo. 

Paul Otey Anderson .' Lee. 

Albert Martin Ayres Marshall. 



\ 



_ 



26 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

William Tennant Besson Montgomery. 

Joseph Peyton Carson I^ee. 

Horace Cecil Tennessee. 

Henry Perkins Cbappell : . . . Bullock. 

William LeVert Christian Shelby. 

Charles Wallace Collins Hale. 

George Davis Collins Hale. 

Charles Chapman Clark Pickens. 

George Price Cooper Madison. 

Henry Neal Coleman Lowndes. 

Bolivar Davis Jefferson. 

Arthur Hillman DeBardeleben Jefferson. 

James Francis Dobbin Florida. 

Charles Washington Drake Madison. 

Leo Pogue DuBose Mobile. 

Flake Erie Farley Lee. 

Philip Suder Finn S. Carolina. 

William Bullock Fleming Montgomery. 

Thomas Coleman Flowers Sumter. 

Joseph Henry Glover Georgia, 

Charles Thomas Hightower . . Georgia. 

Felix Grundy Horn Sumter. 

Charles Vine Ingram Lee. 

Emmett Franklin Jackson Lee. 

John Tate Jenkins Madison. 

Bufus Lee Jenkins Lee. 

Stansell Clare Keys. . . . .' S. Carolina. 

Alexander Killough Autauga. 

Joseph Landman Madison. 

Bobert Wesley Lockhart Jefferson. 

Fred Lee Martin ....'! Autauga.' 

William Elliott Matthews Madison. 

Isham Fennell McDonnell Madison. 

Charles Henry Merritt Chilton. 

Angelo Marvin Nowlin DeKalb 

Francis Franek Oser \[\\\ .Louisiana. 

Julius Ernest Perez Mobile 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 27 

William Wesley Powers Hale. 

William Jackson Pritchett Marengo. 

Lawrence Bratton Rainey DeKalb. 

Frank Gordon Rabb Lowndes. 

Thomas Hamlin Reese Macon. 

Ferdie John Rheiner Texas. 

John Osgood Rush Lee. 

Archie McDonnell Robinson. . Madison. 

Herman Seharnagel Franklin. 

Horatio Seymour » . . . Sumter. 

Benjamin Lewis Schuessler Chambers. 

Dozier Turner Elmore. 

Thomas William Wert. Morgan. 

George Madison Whepler Madison. 

Richard Clarke Wilson Wilcox. 

Albert Edward Woodall Sumter. 

Julien Chandler Tonge Florida. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

Abbreviations : Ph.— Pharmacy ; E. & M, E,-Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering; C— Chemistry ; A g.— Agriculture. 

John Cocke Abernethy ph. ... . . . Florida. 

John Arrington .e. & m. E Montgomery. 

Erister Asbcraft. Lee- 
George Doan Borup Missouri. 

James Warren Capps , .ph Henry. 

Charles Alexander Carmon E. & M. E. Texas. 

Walter Marion Carter • . .Lee.^ 

Benajah Bibb Cobb Macon. 

James Hardin Crawford ph. Georgia. 

Joseph Crenshaw ....". . .ph.. Perry. 

Annie Lizzie Dyer Lee. 

Oliver Hazard Perry Fant ,...e.am.e S. Carolina. 

John Ross Glenn • • • • Lee. 

Charles Edwin Goulding. . . . . .E. & m. e Florida. 

Henry Blount Hunter .0. N. Carolina. 

Ramesus Alfonso Hammack. . .E. & M. e Dale. 



30 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 







1 1 ! 






English 261 

History .....178 

French 34 

German 28 

Latin 106 

Mental Science 27 

Political Economy ... 37 

Mathematics 225 

Chemistry 130 

Chemical Laboratory. .. . 57 

Agriculture 103 

Physics 144 

Botany. 89 



Geology 46 

Civil Engineering 7 

Electrical Engineering.. 44 
Mechanical Engineering. 40 

Biology 14 

Drawing 162 

Mechanic Arts. 170 

Military Tactics 252 

Mineralogy 2 

Physical Laboratory .... 34 

Physiology 54 

Veterinary Science 41) 

Pharmacy 17 










MILITARY ORGANIZATION. 

1895-96. 

■ ♦ ■ 



President , 
W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant, 
M. 0. HOLLTS, 1st Lieut. 4th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Surgeon, 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

Battalion Staff., 

Cadet Captain H. R. Casey, Adjutant. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant A. B. Andrews, Quartermaster. 

Cadet Sergeant J. B. Hobdy, Sergeant Major. 

Cadet Sergeant J. L. Pollard, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains , 

1. W. A. Tippin, 3. A. L. Alexander, 

2. W. M. Williams, 4. G. B. Kelley. 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 

5. W. L. Fleming, 

6. C. N. Alpord, 

7. W. H. H. Trammell, 

8. J. B. Edwards. 

Cadet First Sergeants. 

3. B. S. Patrick, 

4. P. G. Clark. 

Cadet Sergeants. 

10. W. A. Fitzgerald, 

11. E. S. Casky, 

12. 0. H. P. Fant, 

13. R. W. Collins, 

14. W.IA. Hood, 

15. E. Abbott, 

16. F. L. Tate, 

17. L. K. Irwin. 



1. J. W. Culver, 

2. J. A. Reeves, 
3 B. A. Taylor, 
4. H. A. Drennen, 

1. W. T. Warren, 

2. E. B. Joseph, 



1. W. H. MoBryde, 
2.- Jno. Puripoy, 

3. W. H. Negus, 

4. C. J. Nelson, 

5. G. M. Holley, 

6. B. L. Scott, 

7. R. D. Webb, 

8. W. J. Nixon, 

9. C. N. Jones, 



1. P. M. McIntyre, 

2. H. E. Memminger, 

3. W. A. Mitchell, 

4. A. C. Vandiveb, 

5. F. W. Hare, 

6. C. W. Stewart, 

7. J. C. Abernethy, * 

8. J. W.iWlLLIAMS, 

3 



Cadet Corporals. 

9. J. W. SUTCLIPPB, 

10. G. E.!Mason, 

11. G. O. Dickey, 

12. W. M.IDban, 

13. M. H.IHurt, 

14. T.yH. Glower, 

15. W. B. Stokes, 
J.6. H. S. Houghton. 



■ 



32 



AgricuUnral and Mechanical College. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



: 



Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. 
To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not less 
than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass a 
satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English— (a> An examination upon sentences contain- 
ing incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evidence 
of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, 
and division into paragraphs. 

L Reading. The composition in 1896 will be upon sub- 
jects drawn from one or more of the following works : Shake- 
8 cR e ? r f tMwOaaar and Longfellow's Evangeline, Irvine's 
Sketch Book, Scott's Marmim, Hughes's Tom Brown at 
Rwgby , Dickens s David Copperfidd, Scott's IvanKoe, South- 
ey s Life of Nelson. 

„ J he iT 11 ^ wiU , be , re( l uired to Present evidence of a 
general knowledge of the subject matter, and to answer 
simple questions on the lives of the authors. This part of 
the examination is intended to test only a general knowledge 
of the substance of the books. *nowieage 

H Study and Practice. This part of the fiiaminflfinr, 
presupposes the thorough study of each of the Swing 

Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Burke's Speech on Con 
catahon u>Uh America; Macaulay's Essay on Su 

Preparation and examination on these works will be t,po 
essary before the student is classed as regular 

3. Mathematics-(a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 

T m wV 0, T n "? deCimal fraction8 ' denominate 
L ^- ' f m6inC6 l st * m; P ercent *ge> Eluding interest 
and discount; proportion; extraction of square and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

« J^lT^T^? d68ire to COntinae the Bt »dy of Latin 
should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in 

La in grammar and the first two books of Cesar, in addition 
to the above subjects, 

For admission to the higher.classes,>tudents should be 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 83 

prepared to stand a satisfactory examination in all of the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of study. 
Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue special 
studies required at this College, the system of equivalents 
will be adopted, and studies which denote an equivalent 
amount of discipline and training will be accepted as satis- 
factory. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Applicants will be admitted without examination on pre- 
senting a certificate from any of the certificate schools 
named herein. 

The following educational institutions having made 
application to be correlated to this College, and having 
presented an approved course of study, are hereby declared 
to be certificate schools, and are granted the privilege set 
forth in the following resolution ; 

"Students from certificate schools will be admitted to 
"the freshman class without examination upon the certificate 
of the president or principal showing definitely that such 
students have completed satisfactorily all the studies 
required for admission, as stated in the catalogue, and are 
"otherwise admissible." 

certificate schools. 

University Military School, Mobile J. D. Wright 

♦Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa. . . . W. H. Verner. 
Mt. Willing High School, Mt Willing ... . J. D. Garrett. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville J. Forney. 

Male Academy, Huntsville Puryear & Wiatt 

Noble Institute, Anniston W. H. MacKeller. 

*State Normal College, Florence J. & Powers. 

Fur man Academy, Livingston. . .L. A. CockrelL 

High School, Opelika J. M. Smallwood. 

University Military School, Clanton B. T. McMorrisa 

N. A. Agricultural School, Athens M. K Clementa 

University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

W. Ala. Agricultural School, Hamilton. . . . Jag. K Ale x a nd er. 
Eutaw Male Academ y, Entaw. H. C. Horton, 

•Applicant! are admitted to the fophomore classWapproved cer- 
tificates from theie institutions. 



u 
it 
a 



3d 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 









* 






ADMISSION OP YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age, and if a can- 
didate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a special 
or irregular student, she must be able to pass a satisfactory 
examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English — Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; 
Grammar (Whitney's Essentials of English); Ehetoric (Lock- 
wood, Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung); Scudder's 
American Prose Selections ; Scudder's American Poems. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Chambers's 
History of the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic ; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series ; Plane and Solid 
Geometry ; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

(d) In Latin — Grammar, including the forms and syn- 
tax; Jones's Latin Prose Composition ; Translation of selec- 
tions from Csesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's 
Letters, or the equivalent 

TU equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may 
be substituted. 

Certificates will be granted to those who are not candidates 
for a degree upon the satisfactory completion of any subject 
pursued by the senior class. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above 
stated, they may enter upon the study of any subject taught 
m the College, and join any class, for which upon examina- 
tion, they may be found qualified. The only condition 
imposed will be that they engage in earnest study, and attend 



i 




« 



Agricultural jmd Mechanical^Gollege. 35 

the exercises regularly. They will board in the town with 
private families, and attend College only at the hours of 
their exercises. 

The Trustees authorize the faculty to admit a candidate 
for a degree who is able to comply with all the requirements, 
at the age of seventeen, if the application meet3 with their 
approval. 

There will be no charge for tuition. The incidental fees, 
amounting to $12.00 per year, will be paid, $6.00 on entrance, 
and $6.00 on February 1st 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
16th of September, the day on which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department 

They will be advanced to full admission to the freshman 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to 
the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED/ 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing, and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes* is 
not granted to young students nor to their parents. The 
faculty will assign a student on admission to that class of a 
prescribed course for which he is qualified ; and for special 
reasons, approved by the faculty, he may be permitted to 
become irregular. 



36 



Agricultural and Meclianical College. 



Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the junior 
class, and those over twenty-one years of age that are not 
candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the ad- 
vice of the faculty, the subjects of study for which they may 
be qualified. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become special students. They will be classed as 
regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they can 
pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were found 
deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing in all 
the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military department 
with that class in which they have the greatest number of studies, and 
their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

* ■ 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture ; Biol- 
ogy, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing; Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering; Physiology, and 
Veterinary Science ; Pharmacy; English, French, German, 
and Latin Languages ; History, Political Economy, Mental 
and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer 
a liberal and practical education as a preparation for the active 
pursuits of life. 

There are five degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion: 

L Coubse m Chemistry and Agriculture. 

IL Course in Mechanics and Civil Engineering. 

HL Course in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

IV. General Course. 

Y^ Course in Pharmacy. 



No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any 
course unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory exam- 
ination in English. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 37 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 

VI Two-Tear Course in Agriculture. 
VIL Two-Tear Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 

Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or man- 
ufacturing business. 

Course V includes, besides the general education of course 
IV in the lower classes, a special course in phai macy and 
chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect to become 
pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to enter upon the 
study of medicine. 

Courses VI and VII have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one 
of the regular degree courses. 

Students who contemplate either of these two-year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each de- 
partment of the school of mechanic arts, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in mechan- 
ical engineering. 



38 Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree t>f B. Sc. in engineering, or 
who have prosecuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon 
a special course of mining engineering, which includes the following 
subjects of study, and will require a residence of one year: 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Mineralogy, 
Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, Tunnelling, Timber- 
ing, Ore Dressing, and the various operations connected with the ex- 
ploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the professors of 
chemistry, civil engineering, and geology. 

SPECIAL ONE- YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college du- 
ties ; but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agri- 
culture. 

LABOBATOBY INSTBUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in the 
following departments : 

L Chemistry. 

EL Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 

III. Agriculture. 

IV. Botany. 

V v Mineralogy. 
VL Biology, 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 39 

VII. Technical Drawing. 

VIII. Mechanic Aura 

IX. Physics. 

X. Electrical Engineering. 

XL Mechanical Engineering. 

XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

XIII. Pharmacy. 

Note.— Special work in English or History may be taken by stu- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 



X 



207879 



40 Agricultural and Meclianioal College. 

L-COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
JIr« Term. Second Tern. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 5. Engli sh. 

2 History 2. History. 8. History. 

5^ Mathematics 6. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

8 Elementary Physics. 8. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 
8 Drawing 8. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6* Mechanic Art Labor'y .6. Mechanic Art Labor'y. 6. Mechanic Art Labor'y . 



8. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
8. Physics. 



* Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



Second Term. 
8. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture, 
o. x/rawing. 

6 Mechanic ArtLabor'y. 6. Mechanic Art Labor'y 6. Mechanic Art Labor'y. 
2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

f First Term. Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. rhysics. 
3 Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry . 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. Botany (Lab'y). 

l! Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

9! Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 
2 Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 

2. Mental Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

5. Biology. 
2 Agricultural Ch'm'try. 2. Agricultural Ch'm'try. 2. Agricultural Ch'm try. 
1 Military Science. 1. Military Science. 2. Military Science, 

9 Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 
2. Veter inary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) Abo Practical Agriculture. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



2. Military Drill. 



t 



Third Term. 
2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 41 

IL-COURSE m MECHANICS AND CIVIL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

6. English. 5. English. 5.' English. 

2. History. 2. History. 8. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 
8. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Militarv Drill. a uriiit-.m-v rirm o \m:ui tx,.i 



3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

8. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 

1. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Eng. 
8. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 2. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. English Literature(d).2. Political Economy (d).2. Political Economy (d). 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

/k\ Begins Mar ch 1st. 

(c) Or Ar griC ? lfcUre may be substituted Ph ysical Laboratory. 

(d ) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German. 



First Term. 

3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



42 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 

6. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 



III.-COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERING, 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed 
as in Course II in Mechanics and Civil Engineering. 



First Term. 

8. English, French, or 

German. 
8. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
4. Electrical Engin'g. 
8. Mech. Engineering. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 



Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



3. Mech. Engineering. 
4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 
4. Electrical Laboratory. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 

8. Military Drill. 



1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



6. Mebh. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



Third Term. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Eng. Literature (b). 2. Political Economy (b).2. Political Economy (b). 

2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g. 3. Electrical Engin'g. 5. Electrical Engin'g. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 

6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab'y. 

4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 
1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

(b) French or German may be substituted. 



■ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



43 



IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
8. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). , 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



FRE8HMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Latin. 

5; Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5 Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work <b). 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

8. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for which 
he may be qualified. 




44 



dgricidtural and Mechanical2CvUege. 



Y.— COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

ft 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. . 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

, 3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
8. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

8. Physics. 
^6. Chemical Lab'y. 
I/ *. Botanical Lab'y. 
^8. Pharmacy. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 
3, History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Pharmacy. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Pharmacy. 



0. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 



i/4. Pharmacognosy. 
• a Military Drill. 

First Term. 

5. Biology. 
7. Toxicology. 
4. Pharmacy. 



4. Pharmpcogno-y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 



4. Pharmacognosy. 

3. Military Drill. . 

Third Term. 

5. Biology 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Pharmacy. 



4. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 

3. Materia Medica. 3. Materia Medica. 




■HM 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 45 

VI.— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 

6. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

6. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
8. Drawing. 



8. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 



3. xMilitary Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



5. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
8. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 8. Military Drill. * 



VIL— TWO-TEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture* 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 
2. Veterinary Science. 

12. Practical Agricult're. 12. Practical Agricult're. 12. Practical Agricult're. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Tej*m. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 

2. Veterinary Science. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



& 



HOUR8 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY- 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 






3. Physiology. 




3. Physiology. 






I. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 






3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 




8-9 




2. German. 




2. German. 


- 






1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


Exerc's in Elocution. 




1. Elec.Engine'r'g 


2. Botany. 


1. Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 


1. Veterinary Sci. 






2. Mec. Engine'r'g 


1 . Mental Science 


1. Elec.Engine'r'g 


1. Mental Science 


1. Elec.Engine'r'g 






1. Biology. 


1. Elec.Engine'r'g 




1. Elec.Engine'r'g 








4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 




II. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


• 




2. Civ. Engineer'g 


2. Civ. Engineer'g 


2. Civ. Engineer'g 


2. Civ. Engineer'g 


2. Civ. Engineer'g 




9-10 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


Military Drill. 




1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 


1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 








1. Biology. 


1. Elec.Engine'r'g 


2. Vet. Science. 


2. Elec.Engine'r'g 


1. Calculus. 






2. Elec.Engine'r'g 




2. Elec.Engine'r'g 




2. Mec. Engine'r'g 
2. Vet. Science. 




III. 


3. English. 


3. History (1, 2). 


3. English (1, 2). 


3. History (1, 2). 


• 

3. English. 


Mechanic Arts. 




2. Physics. 


3. Botany (2, 3). 




3. Botany (2,3). 


2. Physics. 


Chemical Laborat'ry. 


10-11 


1. German. 


1. Biology. 


2. Physics. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. German. 


Electric'l Laborat'ry. 




1. Civ. Engineer' g 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. German. 


4. English. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


Physical Laboratory. 




1. Biology. 


4. English. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. Mec. Engine'r'g 




Veterinary Clinics 






1. Meo. Engine'r'g 


1. Biology. 


2. French. 


4. History (3). 


Biologic'l Laborat'ry. 




1. Mec. Engine'r'g 


2. French. 1. Mec. Engine'r'g| 




1. Mec. Engine'r'g 


Field Engineering. 



1*1 
I 

?3 



* 



M 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES.— Conttnufd. 



HOURS 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. . 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY 


IV. 
11-12 


4. Physics (1, 2). 

4 Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1, 2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
1. English (1). 
1. Pol.Econ.(2,3) 

4. Mechanic Arts. 


4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 
1. French. 


4. Physics (1,2). 

4. Latin (3). 

3. History (1, 2) 

3. Botany (2, 3). 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

1 . English ( 1 ) . 
1.* Political Econ- 
omy (2, 3). 

4. Mechanic Arts 


4. Latin. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Mathematics. 
1, Chemistry. 

3, Physiology (3) 
1, French. 


4. Physics (l, 2). 

4. Agriculture (3). 
4 Latin (1, 2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

1 . Military Sci. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laborat'ry. 
Eleotric'l Laborat'ry. 
Physical Laboratory, 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laborat'y. 
Field Engineering. 


V. 
12-1 


4. Drawing. 

3 Mathematics. 

2. English. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

1. Elec. Designing 

1, French. 


3. Mathematics. 
2. English 
1. Geology. 


4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

1. Latin. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

2, Mec.Engine'r'g 
2. German. 

1. Elec. Designi'g 


3, Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 


4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. Latin. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 
L. Elec Designing 
2. Military Tactics 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laborat'ry. 
Eleotric'l Laborat'ry, 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laborat'y. 
Field Engineering. 


P.M. 
VI, VII. 

2-4 


4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field Wrk Agr 
1 & 2 Laborato- 
ry Chem. 
l&2FieldWrk, 
Engineer'g. 
1 & 2 Mach. Wrk 
Elec. Lab 'Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 

2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*). 

3. Mech. Lab'tory 
Elec. Lab'y Work 
1 and 2 History. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field Wrk, Agr 
1 & 2 Laborat'ry, 
Chem. 
1 & 2 Field Wrk, 
Engineer'g 
1 & 2 Mach Wrk 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 

2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*>. 

3. Mech. Labor'y. 
Elec Lab'y Work 
1 and 2 History. 


4. Mechanic Arts 

3. Field Wrk, Agr 
2. French. 
1 & 2 Lab. Chem. 
I & 2 Field Wrk, 
Engineer'g. 
1 & 2 Mach Work 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 


■ , 



Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. m. ' 

Number prefixed denote classes— 1 denotes senior, 2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed— (1), (2), (3),— denote terms. 

•Prom 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



t 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



♦ ♦ 



PHYSICS AND ASTBONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of 
the course is occupied with elementary rational mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular mechan- 
ics ; while due prominence is given to principles, frequent 
reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include optics and 
astronomy. 

Post- Graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

PHYSICAL LABORATOKY. 

Instructor H. H. Kyser has charge of the classes in ele- 
mentary physics, and of the physical laboratory. In ele- 
mentary physics the students are taught mechanics, solving 
problems by the elements of graphical statics, and are 
required to do such work in the physical laboratory as is 
adapted to their attainments. A part of their time is given 
to learning practical telegraphy by the use of instruments 
provided for that purpose. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 49 

The physical laboratory is equipped with a number of instruments 
of foreign and American manufacture. It contains a standard metre 
bar, a horizontal comparator, a Kater reversion pendulum, a catbeto- 
meter with micrometer, a spectrometer furnished with prisms, crystal 
holder and flat diffraction grating, made by the Societe Genevoise, a 
spectroscope by Browning, with a large amount of spectrum appara- 
tus, Carre's ice machine, Becker's balances, a small dividing engine 
and a vertical comparator, both the later made at the College in the 
laboratory of mechanic arts. There is also a large amount of minor 
apparatus, thermometers, barometers, calorimeters, and apparatus for 
experimentally determining the parallelogram of forces, for determin- 
ing rolling and sliding friction, torsion and flexure, specific grav- 
ity, etc. 

The student in this laboratory is required to ascertain experiment- 
ally various physic il laws, hence in all exercises there is something 
to measure. From these measures he is required to find the law con- 
necting the quantities involved. Results of experiments are required 
to be entered, in tabular form, together with diagrams, etc., in a 
laboratory note-book. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra and geometry, six books ; second year, 
solid geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, surveying, 
mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental dis- 
cipline; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town, and government land sur- 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and use of instru- 
ments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 



50 



Agrictdturcd and Mechanical College. 



Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements 
of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear 
figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pursued in . 
the mechanical and engineering courses. Especial attention 
is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of the principles and formulae. 

Text-Books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Went worth's Trigo- 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Faunce's 
Descriptive Geometry, Nicholson's Calculus, Johnson's Differential 
Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 



BOTANY AND GEOLOGY. 



PBOF. MELL. 

Geology. — This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are 
drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural de- 
posits of minerals in the State. The origin of ore deposits, 
mineral springs and geological relations of soils are carefully 
studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology for post-graduate students. This subject is pursued 
by applicants for the degrees of master of science and mining 
engineer. 

The^junior class in civil engineering spends two terms in 
mineralogy and blow-pipe wort 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 51 

Botany.-*^ The students of the? sophomore class begin the 
study of botany the first of March and continue it through 
the session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the fields, and taught 
how to determine their specific names. The work is suffi- 
ciently exhaustive to enable the student, after completing 
the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and grasses 
that he will encounter in this section. • 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work with 
the microscope in the preparation of specimens showing 
plant structure ; this work is sufficient to familiarize the 
students with the methods of plant building and cellular 
organization. Excellent microscopes of the most improved 
patterns, and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for 
preparing and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the 
students. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

Geology.— The department is equipped with models of Mount Shasta, 
the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching crystal- 
lography ; charts and maps of the geology of America and Europe ; 
Colt's lantern complete with oil, oxy-hydrogen -and automatic elec- 
tric lamps; a large assortment of fine lantern slides representing 
geological formations in this country and abroad ; well equipped min- 
eralogical laboratory for thirty students, and supplied with collection 
of representative minerals. 

Botany.— The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers ; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections, mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students dissecting and 
compound microscopes by Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & Lomb ; projec- 
tion microscopic apparatus; microtomes by King and Bausch & 
Lomb ; all the necessary glass ware and smaller dissecting instru- 
ments required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss compound 
microscope used by the professor for experiment work in connection 
with the Station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating apparatus, slide 
changers, Abbe's camera lucids, polarizers, apochromatic objectives 
(16 mm, 8mm, 4 mm, and homogeneous immersion), oculars (2, 3, 8, 



52 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






12, 18 and photographic), eye-pieee with micrometer. This laboratory 
is well lighted with gas and electricity and with a good exposure for 
ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark 
room and an excellent photographic outfit consisting of cameras vary- 
ing in size from 4x5 to §% x 8% inches ; Bausch & Lomb's profes- 
sional photo-micro camera extending to eight feet ; Zeiss's anastigmat 
photographic lens Q [ 4 x 8}£ fitted with Bausch & Lomb's diaphragm 
shutter, and Zeiss'a wide angle lens 6)£ x 8>£, all mounted in alumin- 
ium ; Clark's lehs fitted with diaphragm shutter ; Darlot lens 4x5; 
the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for first class work 
in photography. 

The students have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, William's Practical Geology, Tarr's Economic 
Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, Gray's Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and 
Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 



PROF. LANE. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies in this department begin in the junior 
class, and require good knowledge of algebra, geometry, 
trigonometry and analytical mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows : 

Junior class. — Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, etc. 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the loca- 
tion, reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country 
roads ; and the various pavements and foundations for the 
same. 

Senior class. — Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber, classification and 
description of natural building stones ; bricks and concretes ; 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; limes, cements, 
mortars and their manufacture ; paints and other preserva- 
tives ; classification of strains and a general mathematical 
discussion of same ; joints and fastenings ; solid and open 
built beams ; classification, construction and mechanics of 
masonry ; foundations on land and in water ; bridges and 
roofs of different kinds ; their construction and strains deter- 
mined mathematically and graphically ; common roads, their 
coverings, location and construction ; location and construc- 
tion of railroads ; navigable, irrigation, and drainage canals ; 
river and sea-coast improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

TBXT-J>OOK8. 

Junior class.— Henek's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior class.— Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore classes 
are required to take drawing; but only the students in 
mechanics and civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes* 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the principles of 
orthographic and isometric projections, shade and shadows, 
perspective and tinting. In the junior class the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and iso- 
metric drawing, perspective, shades and tinting; also 
sketches of tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross- 
sections of buildings, and blue prints. The senior class 
make topographical drawings, and drawings of machines, 
roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. 
Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete the 
instruction in this department 



I' 



52 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



12, 18 and photographic), eye-piece with micrometer. This laboratory 
is well lighted with gas and electricity and with a good exposure for 
ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark 
room and an excellent photographic outfit consisting of cameras vary- 
ing in size from 4x5 to 6^ x %% inches ; Bausch & Lomb's profes- 
sional photo-micro camera extending to eight feet ; Zeiss's an astigmat 
photographic lens 6^ x 8% fitted with Bausch & Lomb's diaphragm 
shutter, and Zeiss'b wide angle lens 6)£ x 8}£, all mounted in alumin- 
ium ; Clark's lehs fitted with diaphragm shutter ; Darlot lens 4x5; 
the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for first class work 
in photography. 

The students have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, William's Practical Geology, Tarr's Economic 
Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, Gray's Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and 
Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide. 



CIVIL ENGINEEBING AND DRAWING. 



PBOF. LANE. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies in this department begin in the junior 
class, and require good knowledge of algebra, geometry, 
trigonometry and analytical mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows: 

Junior class.— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, etc. 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the loca- 
tion, reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country 
roads ; and the various pavements and foundations for the 
same. 

Senior class.— Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber, classification and 
description of natural building stones ; bricks and concretes ; 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 53 

cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; limes, cements, 
mortars and their manufacture ; paints and other preserva- 
tives ; classification of strains and a general mathematical 
discussion of same ; joints and fastenings ; solid and open 
built beams ; classification, construction and mechanics of 
masonry ; foundations on land and in water ; bridges and 
roofs of different kinds ; their construction and strains deter- 
mined mathematically and graphically ; common roads, their 
coverings, location and construction ; location and construc- 
tion of railroads ; navigable, irrigation, and drainage canals ; 
river and sea-coast improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior class.— Henck's Field Book for Eailway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior class. — Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore classes 
are required to take drawing; but only the students in 
mechanics and civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the principles of 
orthographic and isometric projections, shade and shadows, 
perspective and tinting. In the junior class the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and iso- 
metric drawing, perspective, shades and tinting; also 
sketches of tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross- 
sections of buildings, and blue prints. The senior class 
make topographical drawings, and drawings of machines, 
roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. 
Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete the 
instruction in this department 



54 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



TBXT-B0OK8. 

Freshman class.— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing. 

Sophomore class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior class.— French, English and American plates belonging to 
the College, Kueffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROF. THACH. 
OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; the 
interpretation of words is the fundamental process in edu- 
cation of whatsoever kind. A full course of English is, 
therefore, considered especially important in the technical 
courses of study that do not include the ancient classics. 
Accordingly, the course of English is continued throughout 
the four years of the College curriculum, three hours a 
week, and is made obligatory upon all students, with the 
exception of those pursuing the first two years of the course 
in Latin. In this extended drill in the grammar and 
literature of the English language, the endeavor is made to 
afford a training somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course 
in the classical languages. 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their 
mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission to 
the freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest 
work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such students 
in the principles of grammar. Further, with the idea that an ability 
to speak and write correctly English of the present, and to appreciate 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 55 

the literary excellencies of standard authors, is more desirable than 
training in the philological curiosities and literary crudities of Anglo- 
Saxon literature, the course of study in this institution is confined 
exclusively to the literature of modern English. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, themselves, 
of leading English authors, since direct contact with literature is 
considered more profitable than information merely about literature. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman class.— Five hours a week; study of grammar, the rin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors: Irving, 
Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Scudder's Master- 
pieces of American Literature, Kellogg & Reed's English Language. 

Sophomore class.— Three hours a week ; study of style, analysis of 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and literary 
themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's From 
Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior class. — Three hours a week ; lectures on the history of Eng- 
lish literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature, Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury, Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey. 

Senior class. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Dowden's Shakespere, etc* 

ESSAYS AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
in any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable to 
the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject matter 
of the text-books, set essays or orations are required of all students ; 
for the freshman class, ten essays a year ; ten for the sophomore ; for 
the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" is 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 
feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimens 
of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards in 
the study hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 



'• 



56 Agricultural and Meclianical College. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year ; and political econ- 
omy twice a week, during the last two terms. The instruc- 
tion in this department is by lectures in combination with 
text-books. 

Intellectual Science.— Psychology defined. Value in relation to moral 
culture, education, and Natural Sciences. The relations of the Soul 
to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter arguments. 
The Faculties of the 8oul. The nature of Consciousness. Sense per- 
ception. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of conceptions. Language* 
Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. Porter's Intel- 
lectual Science. 

Political Economy.— Value; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages ;' trades- 
union ; co-operation; money; credit; functions of government; tax- 
ation ; tariff ; education, etc. F. A. Walker's Advanced Political Econ- 
omy. Lectures by Professor. 

A Post-graduate Course has been established in Political Economy 
Topics are assigned for research by the student, who is facilitated in 
his labor by a well chosen library, including most of the standard 
works on political economy and government. 

A Post-graduate Course has also been established in English The 

mi°n in M C TT, f ,mV u bee " glVen '-^-Shakespeare's Hamlet, 
Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, as You Like It Henrv IV 
Part I, Richard 1 II, King John. ' J V ' 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Ward's Shakespeare ; Furness's Variorum ; Hudson's Shakespeare ; 
Clark and Wr.ght's Select Plays of Shakespeare; Eolfe's Shakes 

White sL,fe of Shakespeare; Collier's Annals of the Stage- J A 
Symonds's Shakespeare's Predecessors; Hudson's Art, Life etc of 
Shakespeare; Giles's Human Life in Shakespeare; M» Jameson's 
Woman in Shakespeare ; Dowden's Shakespeare's Art. 

(ThLL rV ArZ^% iCal W ° rk ! (Chfi8tie) ; *"*» on Oranuuic Poesy 
JfSSL >; y ° n SaHrei 6tC - (Y ° n * e) ; anbury's Life 

a/paper™™ 1 W ° rkS (Ward)! SatireS (Patti8on >; Stephen's Life 

J^TuoZ^wTT P T\ 18 Cent » r » &*«***< ^e entire 
session. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 3 p. m . 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 57 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Scott and Saintsbury's Dryden, 28 vols. ; Critical Essays on Dryden 
by Macaulay, Lowell, Matthew Arnold ; Johnson's Life of Dryden ; 
Mitford's Life of Dryden ; E'win and Oourthope's Pope, 10 vols.; 
Critical Essays on Pope by Addison, DeQuincey (3), Lowell, Matthew 
Arnold ; Courthope's Life of Pope ; Johnson's Life of Pope. 

(3.) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Addison, Pope, 
Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper, Burke. 



CHEMISTRY. 



PROF. B. B. ROSS. 



Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the praotice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry : This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending throughout 
the entire session, and includes a discussion of the funda- 
mental principles of chemical philosophy in connection 
with the history, preparation, properties and compounds 
of the metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main 
facts and principles of organic chemistry. In this course 
the more common applications of chemistry to the arts 
and manufactures are discussed. The apparatus used for 
experimental illustration is extensive, containing the newest 
and most approved instruments necessary for presenting the 
subject in the most attractive and instructive form. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooke's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 






68 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of chemistry in the arts 
and manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illumi- 
nation, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, 
together with models and diagrams. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, lire's Dictionary, Watts's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watts's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy, 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry: -This consists of 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the origin, 
composition and classification of soils, the composition and 
growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how ob- 
tained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture and use 
of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in the rota- 
tion of crops, the feeding of live stock, and the various 
operations carried on by the intelligent and successful 
agriculturist 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's How Crops Grow and How Crops Feed, Lup ton's Ele- 
mentary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson and Cameron's 
Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in relation 
to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of the various 
home and foreign agricultural departments and stations. 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work': This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 
student 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 59 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m„ during six 
days in the week, are amply supplied with everything necessary for 
instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar products, min- 
erals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of 
prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to 
students who wish to devote their time to the special study of practi- 
cal chemistry. 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. 
At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles as 
may be returned in good order ; the value of those which have been 
injured or destroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electro-plating. 
Practical instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, 
gold, etc., upon other metals will be given, and, in addition, the ap- 
plications of electrolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both 
theoretically and practically. 

BOOKS USED. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis—Official methods of the Associa- 
ciation of Agricultural Chemists. 

Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

* * 

[For description of the building see page 16] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and 
gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus 
usually supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported 
a new and improved Schmidt and Henscb's polariscope, four short- 
arm Becker Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss 
microscope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



' 






1 



00 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROP. UNDERWOOD. 

The subject of general biology is presented to the senior 
students in agriculture and chemistry by means of lectures, 
laboratory work and reading. In the limited time assigned 
to the subject only the more general principles are con- 
sidered and the work in the laboratory is limited to those 
groups of organisms most concerned in the diseases of cul- 
tivated plants. A large part of the laboratory work is 
devoted to the study of fungi, notably those wliich are 
parasitic on plants. The lectures are illustrated with speci- 
mens as far as possible, and these are supplemented with 
diagrams and other illustrations in order to give as clear an 
idea of the subject as possible. Keference books are an- 
nounced in the class, and with the library of the department 
supplemented by that of the professor in charge extensive 
facilities are offered for the study of fungous diseases. 

Especial opportunity is offered for students who desire 
to pursue advanced work and engage in original study. 

The facilities for work open for students involve besides a lecture 
room of sufficient size, a large laboratory fitted with nine slate top 
tables well equipped with compound microscopes of Leitz and Bausch 
and Lomb manufacture, dissecting microscopes and necessary tools 
and re-agents for work. Connected with the laboratory are two 
small rooms set apart for cultures of fungi and bacteria. They are 
well equipped with special apparatus for the cultivation of bacteria, 
incubators, thermostats, thermo-regulators for maintaining constant 
temperatures. Special microscopes manufactured by Winkel are 
also kept here for the special study of bacterial ovganisms These 
are furnished with homogenous immersion lenses and a full battery 
of oculars. 

Other pieces of apparatus are as follows : 

Steam sterilizer, dry sterilizer, domestic still, instantaneous water 
heater, Pasteur filter, fine and common balances, apparatus for 
demonstrating intramolecular breathing of yeast, the Brendel 
models of parasitic and saprophytic fungi, bacteria and yeast plants, 
automatic device for rolling culture tubes of nutrient agar agar, 
microtomes and paraffine water bath. 

There are also cases containing a large quantity of the various 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 61 

glass vessels, paper, dry and liquid dyes and re-agents, culture 
media, etc., required in modern investigation. 

The laboratory is well lighted from southern and western exposure. 
All the rooms are well fitted with gas and water supply. 

There is also a private office for the department which is fitted up 
as a special laboratory for the professor in charge, and contains the 
works of reference needed by the department and the collections 
possessed by the department. In addition to the growing collection 
of fungi already in possession of the College, the private herbarium 
of the professor in charge, amounting to over 25,000 specimens illus- 
trating all the groups of cryptogamic plants, is accessible for pur- 
poses of study and illustration. The office is fitted up with cases for 
the safe storing of books and collections, and is provided with two 
slate top tables for microscopic purposes and a Zeiss microscope well 
supplied with oculars and objectives. 

A laboratory has been constructed especially for conducting in- 
vestigations on the diseases of plants. While this constitutes part of 
the equipment for the biologist in experiment station work, it will 
be at the disposal of the department fcr instruction. 



HISTORY AND LATIN. 

PROF, PETRIE. 
HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that history is not a succession of isolated facts but 
a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause and 
the effect of other events. The students are taught to inves- 
tigate the growth of ideas and institutions, the rise and 
progress of great historical movements and the reciprocal 
influence of men and circumstances. Frequent use is made 
of diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, with which the 
department is well equipped. Constant practice in map 
drawing is insisted on in order to give precision to the geo- 
graphical knowledge required. Instruction is given by text- 
books, lectures and class* discussion, but a constant effort is 
made to stimulate to wider reading and research in the 
library. 



~ 



I 






























62 Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the United 
States, Alabama, and England. The first term (two hours 
per week) is devoted to the history and government of the 
United States, the second term (two hours per week) to Ala- 
bama, and the third term (three hours per week) to the his- 
tory of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until March) , 
the subject studied is General History. 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity for special historical 
work is given to those students of the general course who may elect 
it instead of laboratory work. During the past year the course con- 
sisted of advanced studies in American history. The work in 1896-7 
will be on the history of England, social, political and economic. 

The work will be partly by lectures ; but students will also investi- 
gate in the library under the direction of the professor topics con- 
nected with the lectures, and will report to the class the results of 
their research. These reports will be made the basis of general dis- 
cussion. A series of special lectures will be given from time to time 
on the government of the leading nations of Europe and on current 
foreign events. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman class. — Chambers's Larger History of the United States, 
Thorpe & McCorvey's Civil Government in the United States and Ala- . 
bama, Montgomery's English History. 

Sophomore class. — Myers's General History. 

Junior and Senior classes. — Green's Short History of the English 
People. . 

LATIN. 

In this department two objects are kept in view : a knowl- 
edge of the language, and an appreciation of the literature. 

In teaching the language the following methods are used : 
A systematic course is given in etymology and syntax. 
These are taught both deductively from a grammar and 
inductively from the Latin text read. Translation is con- 
stantly practiced, sometimes at sight, sometimes after being 
assigned for preparation. English passages based on a 
familiar author or illustrative of special constructions are 
translated into Latin, both orally and in writing. Simple 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

conversation is carried on in Latin. Especial emphasis is 
laid on Latin derivation of words. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the subject of Latin litera- 
ture. In connection with every author studied in class there 
is prescribed a course of reading in English descriptive of his 
life, work and times. The artistic value of his writings is 
carefully studied and discussed, and frequent comparisons 
are made with modern writers. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman class. — Nepos, Sallust, Grammar, Composition. 

Sophomore class.— Virgil, Cicero, Latin Prose Composition. 

Junior olass.— Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Miller's 
Latin Composition. Original Latin Exercises. 

Senior class.— Horace, Plautus, Terence, Preston & Dodge's Pri- 
vate Life of the Romans. Original Latin Exercises. 



AGRICULTUBE. 

PBOF. DUGGAB. , 

Instruction in agriculture is given by means of lectures, 
text-books, bulletins of the agricultural experiment stations, 
and practical work in field, barn, and dairy. 

The study of agriculture begins with the freshman class 
in the third term, and extends through three terms of the 
sophomore year and two terms of the junior year. The 
time devoted to thin study in the lecture room is two hours 
per week with each class. 

The subjects studied by the freshman class are the breeds 
of horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs,— their characteristics, 
uses, management and adaptability to the South. Practical 
work in judging live-stock is included in the course. 

The first term of the sophomore year is devoted to dairy- 
ing and to a study of the principles of live-stock breeding. 
Dairying will be taught by practical work in the dairy,— 
butter making, determination of fat in milk by the Babcock 
method, etc., as well as by instruction in the lecture room. 

In the second term of the sophomore year the following 






64 Jgricultural and Mechanical CcMege, 

subjects are studied : Soils— chemical and physical proper- 
ties, defects, and means of improvement; the control of 
water, including means of conserving moisture in times of 
drought, terracing, underdrainage, and open and hillside 
ditches; objects and methods of cultivation; agricultural 
implements; rotation of crops ; and improvement of plants 
by crossing, selection, and culture. 

The third term of the sophomore year is devoted to the 
staple crops produced in Alabama, to forage plants adapted 
to the South, and to plants valuable for the renovation of 
soils. The more important crops are treated with reference 
to varieties, soil and fertilizer requirements, methods of 
planting and cultivating, and uses. 

In the junior year the subjects of feeding animals and of 
farm management are studied. Among the topics included 
under the latter heading are different systems of farming 
and stock growing, farm equipment and buildings, silos and 
silage, care of farm manures, composting, choice and 
methods of applying commercial fertilizers for different 
crops and soils, and economical methods of improving ex- 
hausted soils. 

In every class the student is enaouraged to independent thought 
on agricultural problems rather than to depend on " rules of thumb/' 
so that he may be prepared to adapt his practice in after years to 
changed conditions of soil, climate, capital, market, etc. The suc- 
cessful farmer must be a thinker rather than a blind follower of in- 
flexible rules. 

The effort is made to keep before the student the difference be- 
tween the widely applicable principles on which every rational 
system of farming rests and details that vary with changing condi- 
tions. The conditions of soil, climate, etc., prevailing in different 
parts of Alabama are kept constantly in view. 

As far as limited time allows, attention is directed to agricultural 
literature now accumulating so rapidly in this and in foreign coun- 
tries, to the end that in future years the student may know where 
and how to seek the information that he may need. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Swine, by Curtis; American Dairying, 
byGurler; Dairyman's Manual, by Stewart ; Soils and Crops of the 
Farm, by Morrow & Hunt; Muir's Agriculture; Corn Culture, by 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 65 

Plumb; Soils, by King; Treatise on Manures, by Aikman; Drainage 
for Profit and Health, by Waring; Agriculture in Relation to Chem- 
istry, by Storer; Manual of Cattle Feeding, by Armsby; Stock 
Breeding, by Miles ; Hand-book of Experiment Station Work ; and 
selected publications of the various divisions of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, and of the agricultural experiment stations. 

Applicants for post-graduate work in agriculture will be assigned 
special research work and aided in the line of investigation deemed 
best for each individual student. 



HORTICULTURE. 



PROP. EARLE. 



In horticulture instruction will be given on the following 
topics: 

Market gardening and Southern truck farming ; construc- 
tion and care of green-houses, hot beds and cold frames ; 
propagating fruit trees ; planting and care of orchards ; varie- 
ties of fruits and vegetables suited to Alabama ; methods of 
producing new varieties ; refrigeration and cold storage as 
connected with transporting and marketing perishable pro- 
ducts ; observations on forestry and landscape gardening. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROF. 0. H. ROSS. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 

German : , 

French— First Tear : Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire a thorough 
knowledge of the elements of grammar, and a correct pro- 
nunciation, together with facility in translating ordinary 
French. Eeading is begun at an early stage, and the prin- 
ciples of grammar are illustrated and impressed by frequent 
exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year : Three recitations a week During this 
year, almost the same line of work is pursued as that begun 






66 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

in the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and careful instruction is given upon the laws of gram- 
mar, the construction of the language, and the history of 
the literature. 

Oerman — Ttoo Years : Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Post-graduate courses in French and German are offered. 
That in French during the past year consisted of a study of 
Victor Hugo ; that in German of a study of Goethe. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

French — First Year : Chardenal's Complete French Course ; Joynes's 
Contes de Fees, Jules Verne's Michel Strogoff. 

Second Year : Moliere's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, FeuilJet's Le 
Roman <Tun Jeune Homme Pauvre (both play and novel, the latter 
for sight reading), Pailleron's Le Monde on Ton S'ennuie, Saints- 
bury's Primer of French Literature. % 

Post-graduate Course : Hernani, Notre Dame de Paris, Les Misera- 
bles, William 8hakespeare, Marzials's Victor Hugo, Barbou's Life 
and Times of Hugo, NichoPs Victor Hugo, Saintsbury's Short History 
of French Literature. 

German— First Year: Sheldon's Short German Grammar, Lech- 
ner's Easy German Headings, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz. 

Second Year : Heine's Poems, Goethe's Dichtung und Wahrheit, 
Wells's Modern German Literature. 

Post-graduate Course : Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea, Brown- 
ing's Goethe, Wells's Modern German Literature. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



67 



LaboQAT*? 

3u/LD/fY6. 





ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PBOF. MCKISSIOK. 

The students in this course will study English, French, or German, 
physics, mathematics, &c, as now prescribed for the course of civil 
engineering in the junior and senior years; and in addition thereto, 
will prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics, as herein 
prescribed. 



COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Four hours a week for the entire session are devoted to 
the study of the principles of electricity and magnetism. 



68 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



The student is made familiar with the theoretical principles 
by experiments, illustrations, recitations, and lectures. 

Laboratory Work. — Four hours per week are given to 
work in the laboratory. This includes management of 
batteries, construction of instruments, electrical measure- 
ments, verification of the principles upon which the meas- 
urements of current, electromotive force and resistance are 
based, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity, Desmond's Electricity for Engi- 
neers, Stewart and Gee's Practical Physics, NichoFs Laboratory Man- 
ual, Vol. I. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demon- 
strations on the applications of electricity, to lighting, elec- 
trical transmission of energy, electrical welding, telegraphy 
and telephony. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting origi- 
nal investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a spirit of 
scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such students 
in connection with their experimental work. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per week are devoted to 
practical laboratory work, including construction of instru- 
ments, electrical measurements, electrolysis, and relation of 
electrical currents to heat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo, the adjustment and calibration of voltmeters 
and ammeters, electric lighting, management and care of ac- 
cumulators, energy consumed in lamps, adjustment and care 
of arc lamps, proper wiring of buildings, the application of 
electricity to street railways, magnetic measurements, tests 
of transformers and motors. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



69 




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70 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



Drawing and Construction. — Two hours per week in the 
senior year are devoted to the design and construction of 
electrical machirffery. The student is required to make 
original designs of dynamos r motors, transformers, galvano- 
meters, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, Fleming's Alternate Cur- 
rent Transformer, NiehoFs Laboratory Manual, Vol. II. 

Reference Books. 

Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vols. I and II, by Gordon ; 
Electricity and Magnetism, by Clerk Maxwell; Emtage's Introduc- 
tion to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism; 
Kempe's Electrical Testing; Dredge's Electric Illumination, Vols. I 
and II; Dynamo Electric Machinery, by Carl Hering ; The Electro 
Motor and its Applications, by Wetzler and Martin ; Electric Trans- 
mission, by Kapp ; Electric Lighting, by Atkinson ; Electric Light In- 
stallations, by Salomons ; Alternating Currents of Electricity, by 
Blakesley; London Electrician; Proceedings of American Institute 

of Electrical Engineers ; Thompson's Electro-Magnet. 

• 

EQUIPMENT. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call-bells, 
annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets, and all ap- 
paratus for first year students in electrical engineering. The equip- 
ment comprises many fine instruments of precision : Sir Wm. Thom- 
son's standard 100 ampere balance (either for direct or alternating 
currents) ; Sir Wm. Thomson's graded current galvanometer, reading 
600 amperes ; also, his graded potential galvanometer, reading 600 
volts ; Weston alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading 
watt meter, Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electrostatic volt- 
meter, Cardew voltmeter (for direct or alternating currents), reading 
to 160 volts ; Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of resist- 
ance coils ; Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, and ammeter, standard 
K micro-farad condenser and Sabine key ; Thompson watt-meter bal- 
listic reflecting galvanometer, mirror galvanometer, Fein ammeter 
and voltmeter, Ayrton & Perry ammeter, Edison ammeters, Kohl's 
solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez ammeter, Hartman & 
Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction bal- 
ance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus and 
several mirror and other galvanometers %r first year students. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed : One Weston 150 






_ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



71 



volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat ; one Brush 6 arc light dynamo, 
with regulator and six lamps; one Edison compound wound 12 kilo- 
watt generator ; a Thomson-Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; 
two street car motors used as either direct or alternating current 
generators or motors two polyphase induction motors; General 
Electric 20 horse-power motor; Edison 3^ kilo-watt generator; a 
Crocker- Wheeler one horse-power motor and rheostat, and one two 
phase alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by special students, 
furnish current to laboratory, and light up the different buildings. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet, and are 
operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical engine, and a 25 
horse-power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm, Thomson's stand- 
ard electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, 
free of expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the 
College. 

An electric motor made by students, supplied with current from a 
generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, ensilage 
cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. This motor 
not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these ma- 
chines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmission of 
power. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEEKING AND MECHANIC 

AETS. 



Prof. Wilmube. 



B. H. CRENSHAW 
R. J. TRAMMELL 



:• \ 



ASSISTANTS. 



The course in manual training covers three years, as fol- 
lows: first year, wood- working — carpentry and turning; 
second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work — 
moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine 
shop — chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student maybe 
excused from this laboratory work by the faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 



72 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal 
tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form 
a part of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial 
brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood- working shop comprises the follow- 
ing : 30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpen- 
ter's tools; 24 turning-laths, 10-inch swing, each with complete set 
of tools ; 1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw • 1 board-planing ma- 
chine ; 1 buzz planer ; 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch swing ; 
1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool room is supplied 
with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 18 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools ; a 
23-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,000 pounds of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the 
forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which 
also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant 
exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues 
and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x50 feet, and 
is equipped with 6 engine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 6-foot 
bed; 2 engine-lathes, 16-inch swing (one with taper attachment); 
1 engine-lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and taper attach- 
ment; 1 screw cutting lathe, 12-inch swing; 1 speed lathe, 10-inch 
swing; 1 20-inch drill press (power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 
1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch x 22-inch x 5-feet planer; 1 universal 
milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench 
grinder ; 1 post drill press, 14-inch ; 1 universal cutter and reamer 
grinder; 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine; 1 power 
hack saw. A part of this room is set apart for vise- work, chipping 
and filing; and benches for 12 students are provided, each with vise 
and sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is to be 
found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, such 
as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, 
cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine 
work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 73 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two 
terms. 

The lessons include instruction in the nature and Use of tools, in- 
struction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work with plane, 
saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber-splices, cross joints, 
mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail work, comprising 
different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, 
examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe and tools, plain 
straight turning caliper work to different diameters and lengths, 
simple and compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow 
and spherical turning. 

Second Year. 

I. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lesions are arranged so that the students, in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making, covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, core 
work, etc., giving the studsnts familiarity with the use of patterns 
for general moulding. 

III. A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass occupying 
the third term. The work consists for the most part of small arti- 
cles, such as light machine parts, buf a sufficient variety of forms are 
introduced for the student to acquire a good general and practical 
knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light foundry 
work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part flasks ; core 
work is also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand work 
is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more com- 
plicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working the 
cupola, each student in turn taking charge of a melting. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the in- 
dustrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 



74 



Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 



Third Year. 



I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first term. The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron ; chipping to line on 
fiat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc.; filing and finishing to 
line (straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slot- 
ting, dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing 
with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. The 
work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
face plate, drilling— both in lathe and drill press — reaming, boring, 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., 
with planer and simper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 
chine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc. , fitting, grind- 
ing, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals: such as forms, construction 
and use of the various machines, cutt ng tools, gearing, gauges, 
screw threads, etc. During the last term some piece ol construction 
work is given the classes. -. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in draw- 
ing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue print and 
the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to study the 
work and plan the best method of doing it. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics. — Three hours a week for the first 
term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental laws 
underlying all mechanical science and the mechanics of 
liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism. — Three recitations per week dur- 
ing the second and third terms are devoted to this subject. 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The communication of motion by 
gear wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different ways of 
obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes of velocity, 
parallel motions and quick return motions as well as the designing 







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75 



of trains of mechanism for various purposes, together with the theo- 
retical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the motion through 
these trains, are investigated under this subject. 

Mechanical Drawing.— During the first term the students make 
drawings to exact scale, of some of the simpler machines. The 
student takes his own measurements and makes his own sketches 
from which to make the finished drawing. 

The first eight weeks of the second term are devoted to detail 
drawing, tracing and the art of blue printing. The student is given 
a machine or a part of a machine and is required to make detail 
working drawings of the same. 

This is followed by work intended to be supplemental to the 
work in mechanism. Involute and epicycloidal gear wheels, bevel 
wheels and endless screws are designed and drawn to scale from data 
given by the instructor. 

Laboratory Work. — The laboratory work will consist of hand work 
in iron and machine work in iron, as given in the course in mechanic 
arts in the third year. 

Text Books. 

Wood's Elementary Mechanics; Stahl and Wood's Elementary 
Mechanism. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Steam Engine. — The first term five hours per week will be 
given to the study of the theory and efficiency of the steam 
engine, with discussions of the effects of condensation in 
cylinder, action of fly-wheels, effect of jacketing, etc. Sim- 
ple and compound engines, various valves and cut-off 
motions, and the principal types of modern engines are 
studied. Special attention is given to the steam engine 
indicator. 

Graphical Statics of Mechanism.— Five weeks of the second term, 
five hours per week, will be given to the study of this subject. The 
advantage of graphical over analytical methods is generally recog- 
nized, and new applications of the former are constantly being made. 
By its use, the forces acting in every part of a machine maybe deter- 
mined, both in direction and intensity, without the use of a mathe- 
matical formula. 

Steam Boilers— The remainder of the second term is given to this 
subject. The different forms of boilers, the different materials used, 
and the most approved methods of construction ; the various styles 
of boiler fittings; cause and prevention of foaming, incrustation. 






76 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

and corrosion; the best manner of setting and operating; are di»- 
cussed. 

Machine Design— During the last term, the subject of machine de- 
sign will be studied in connection with the strength of materials, the 
latter being studied mainly from actual experiments made on the 
testing machine. 

Laboratory Work.— The students are not only taught how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in 
contact with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged : 

Calibration of steam gauge ; calibration of indicator spring ; cali- 
bration of thermometer ; calibration of scales and balances ; calori- 
meter tests with barrel, separating and throttling calorimeters ; boiler 
test with determination of the quality of steam and analysis of flue 
gas; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power 
measurement ; test of hot air pumping engine ; efficiency and duty of 
a steam pump; tensional, compressional and transverse tests of cast 
iron, wrought iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the limit 
of elasticity, the ultimate breaking strength and the modulus of 

elasticity. 
This class usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill some 

time in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of a 25 horse-power 
Harris-Corliss engine, a 36 horse-power Westinghouse engine, a 25 
horse-power Atlas engine, two 9 horse-power engines constructed by 
students in the shops, a small engine and boiler especially for making 
efficiency tests, a duplex Deane steam pump, an Ericsson hot air en- 
gine, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine indicators, a sepa- 
rating calorimeter, thermometer, pyrometers, scales, a standard steam 
gauge with apparatus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight 
tester for correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound testing ma- 
chine, and Henning micrometer extensometer. A Carpenter calori- 
meter with auxiliary apparatus for determining the heating value of 

different fuels. 

Text- Book 8. 

Holmes's Steam Engine, Herrmann-Smith's Graphical Statics of 
Mechanism ; Uhwin's Machine Design ; Wilson's Steam Boilers. 

Reference Books. 

The library contains a nugfter of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them con- 
stantly for more extended treatment of many points that come up 
in class. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 77 

POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

Dynamometers.— This includes dynamometers and the measurement 
of power. Absorption and transmission* dynamometers are studied, 
with their application and use in testing steam engines. 

Valve Gears.— The different forms of valve gears of steam engines 
are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked out. 

Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. — This subject is studied theo- 
retically and practically, and attempts a complete analysis of the ac- 
tion of steam in an engine. 

Laboratory Work.— As much advanced laboratory work will be given 
as can be arranged with the appliances at hand. 

Text-Books. 

Flather's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

LIEUT. M. 0. HOLLIS, U. 8. A., COMMANDANT. 

* 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. The law is faithfully carried out 
by imparting to each student, not physically incapacitated 
to bear arms, practical instruction in the school of the 
soldier, of the company and of the battalion in close and 
extended order, also in guard mountings, inspections, dress 
parades, reviews, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Revised Statutes, the College 
is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutrements and 
two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing 
is used under the direction of an experienced officer. The 
exercises in target practice and artillery drill begin the first 
day of the third term. * . ■ 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has 
been prescribed for dress: Coat and pants as worn at 
West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet cap. 
A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here at $14 
to $15. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All 
students are required to wear this uniform during the 
session. 



78 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for military efficiency, good con- 
duct, and scholarship. The commissioned officers will be 
selected either from the senior or junior classes, and pro- 
motion will depend on merit, and not wholly on seniority. 

Each company is officered by one captain, two ] st lieu- 
tenants, one 2d lieutenant, and with a proper number of 
non-commissioned officers. The officers and non-commis- 
sioned officers are distinguished by appropriate insignia of 
rank. These appointments are confirmed by the President 
on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. 

The senior class recites once a week in, '* Notes on Mili- 
tary Science/' 



PHYSIOLOGY AND VETEEINAEY SCIENCE. 

PROF. CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class during the second and third terms 
studies human physiology. 

It is the aim of the department to familiarize the student 
with the gross anatomy and the functions of the various 
parts of the human body ; moreover, due attention is given 
to the laws of health or conditions most favorable to a 
healthy action of the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures which are illustrated by 
charts, drawings, models of the organs of the body and by 
a human skeleton. 

The department is now supplied with rooms where the 
students can dissect some of the smaller animals and thus 
see the organs, tissues and regions as exhibited in a few of 
the. lower animals. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



79 



VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

During the entire junior and senior years the students in 
the agricultural and chemical course of study devote to this 
work two hours per week in the class room and three to five 
hours per week in clinical practice. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals ; also to those students who contemplate studying 
human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the aim to 
give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we attempt 
to present the general principles of comparative medicine 
with such special applications as are adapted to the condi- 
tions and wants of the students. 

Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 




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80 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of the 
mo*t common medicines, the principles and practice of comparative 
medicine, the methods of meat inspection, and the ways of protect- 
ing the health of man and domestic animals, are considered in as 
plain and practical manner as the time allotted to each subject will 
permit. Post mortem examinations and the dissection of domestic 
animals are used as object lessons in the study of general pathology 
and anatomy. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in histology, bacteriology and pathology. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now loca- 
ted in a new building which consists of a two-story portion, contain- 
ing four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture room, 
museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part which 
contains an operating room and a hospital ward with two box stalls 
and four open single stalls. 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the laboratory is 
now equipped for work. The museum contains the skeletons of the 
horse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human skeleton. It also 
contains anatomical models of the various parts and organs of the 
human body and models of many parts of the horse, the ox and the 
other domestic animals. It also contains a collection of pathological 
and anatomical specimens, and one of animal parasites. 

The cases for clinical work have been numerous. Dnring 1895 
there were five hundred and eighty-one cases handled by the depart- 
ment. 



PHAEMACY AND PHABMACOGNO 

Prof. Miller, 

junior year. 

Pharmacy. — Class work three hours a week. The different 
systems of weights and measures. Specific gravity. Phar- 
maceutical problems. The fundamental operations in phar- 
macy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical processes. Dis- 
cussion of all classes of pharmaceutical preparations. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official and 
non-official galenicals. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 81 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied with aid 
of simple aud compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work four hours a week. Official and 
non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and organic, 
including the more important newer remedies. The pre- 
scription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official and 
non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and organic. 
Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopoeial methods. Drug 
assaying, special attention given to compounding of pre- 
scriptions. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. Study of important non-official vegetable 
drugs ; of drugs of animal origin ; of adulterants and worth- 
less drugs. Practical exercises in identification of pharma- 
ceutical preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not 
less than two hundred pharmaceutal preparations and the compound- 
ing of not less than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than three 
hundred drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize by 
its physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common 
name, origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The Post-graduate Degrees are— Master of Science, Mining 
Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineer, and Phamaoeutical Chemist. 

A post-graduate degree may be obtained by a graduate of 
this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, by 
one year's residence at the College, spent in the successful 
prosecution of a course of study approved by the faculty. 



82 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Candidates must also present to the faculty a satisfactory thesis, 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining to 
their course, ani must pass an examination at the close of each term 
on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a grade of 
75 per cent. The examination is written, and also oral in the presence 

of the faculty. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are, by order of the Trustees, 
permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, 
but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are per- 
mitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College, without payment of regular fees. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named : 

Mining Engineer.— Geology, Civil Engineering, Chemistry. 

Civil Engineer.— Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer.— Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 
\S Pharmaceutical Chemist.— Pharmacy and ChemistFy. — • 

Master of Science.— Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidate must have previously completed the full course of the 
senior class. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire ye*ar is above 90 per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on commencement 
day to those who obtain an average of 90 per cent, in all the pre- 
scribed studies of a regular class ; and also to those who obtain three 
distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore class, five 
in the junior class, and six in the senior class, provided they have 
satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session, and 
have not received forty demerits during the year. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 83 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by 
the officers of instruction. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Written monthly examinations on the studies of the month are 
held by each professor. 

At the end of each term written examinations, or written and oral, 
are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the faculty, and in 
no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tion, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class, only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

. LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains over 
9,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 
books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students* carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight 
hours daily for the use of students as a reading room, and is thus 
made an important educational feature. 

i MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable specimens 
and models of an instructive character. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations en- 
acted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not 
issued for the performance of military duty, and also from using, or 
causing to be brought into the College limits, intoxicating liquors, 
7 



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84 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



MILITARY DRILL. 



There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are re- 
quired to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The 
military drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the 
development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the 
cadet are manifest. 

Privates of the senior class who are candidates for graduation may 
be excused by the President from all military drills, and also 
students over twenty-one years of age at the time of entering Col- 
lege that are permitted to devote their time to one special study, as 
chemistry, agriculture, etc. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

' This Association is regularly organized, and through its weekly 
meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence among the students 
of the College. 

The first week of the session the trains will be met by a committee 
of the Association, whose business will be to give information to, or 
assist in any way it can, the students entering College for the first 
time. The Association is commended to afl the students. 

The following are the officers : 

J. L. Pollard, President. 

W. J. Bebson, Vice-President. 

G. D. King, Recording Secretary. 

W. H. McBrydb, Corresponding Secretary. 

S. T. Slaton, Treasurer. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles east 
of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred and 
twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the Statc^lhe sale 
of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 86 

BOABDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the 
students board with families in the town of Auburn, and 
thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influence of the 
family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it 
is to report those who, without permission, leave their 
rooms after "call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation 
of order. The report of the inspector is made to the Com- 
mandant on alternate days of the week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 

}>ermitted to make changes without ^obtaining permission 
rom the President, and this permission is given only at the 
close of a term, except for special reasons. 

By special arrangement with the College authorities Mrs. 
M. L. Mitchell will accommodate twenty students with 
board, lodging, fuel, eta, for $9.50 per month. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

Incidental fee, per half session .$ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

$ 6 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Trustees no fees can be 
remitted. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 
half session only are required. 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 15 00 

EXPENSES FOB COLLEGE TEAR. 

Fees * 12 O0.to$ 12 00 

Board, lodging, fuel and lights 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing. 9 00 to 9 00 

Books, etc, say 8 00 to 15 00 

Total $137 00 $17100 



86 Jgricultnral and Mechanical College. 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The 
uniforms are made by a contractor of excellent cloth manufactured 
at the Charlottesville mill. This suit, including cap, costs 114.50. 
It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than ordinary cloth- 
ing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited 
by each studont on matriculation, to cover any special or 
general damage to college property for which he may be 
liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent 
fee, or the unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the 
Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of fees, 
one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regu- 
lar charges of College fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is 
the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, 
and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board, 
uniform, books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when officially approved. The approval is 
given only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, un- 
less specially requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a 
student, unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No 
student should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, 
as it brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

• . THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to the 
faculty an essay or oration and read and deliver the same at com- 
mencement, if required by the faculty. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of May. 




Agricultural and Mechmical College. 87 

LITERABY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the Col- 
lege — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall in the 
main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. They elect an- 
nually, with the approval of the faculty, an orator to repre- 
sent them at the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are 
conducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the faculty 
and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

v SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member of the society, 
in Langdon Hall, on Aj.umni Day, Tuesday of commencement week. 
The following are the officers of the society : 

Chas. C. Thach, 77, President. 

C. W. Ashcraft, '88, Vice-President. 

L S. Boyd, '92, Secretary. 

B. H. Crenshaw, '89, Treasurer. 

0. N. Ousley, '81, Orator for 1896. 

SUEGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid on entering 
college. 

ACADEMIC TEAR 

The academic year for 1896-97 commences on Wednes- 
day, 16th September, 1896 {second Wednesday after the first 



88 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 16th June, 1897 (second 
Wednesday after the first Monday), which is commencement 
day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 18th of December ; 
the second term begins December 28th, and ends March 20th ; 
the third term continues from March 21st to theclose of the 



session. 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in agriculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College, especially in the mechanic arts, made possible by the recent 
donation from the State, the facujty are authorized, in addition to 
the legal name of this College, to print on the catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of the ex- 
panded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the 
course of education now provided for. 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. ^ 

Congressional and Public Documents.— Senate and House and Miscel- 
laneous Documents, etc., 157 vols. 

Congressman G. P. Harrison.— Report U. S. Commission on Fish 
and Fisheries, 1888; Congressional Records ; War of the Rebellion, 
J vols. 

Dr. /. R. Jordan, Montgomery, Ala.— Transactions of Alabama Med- 
ical Association, 5 vols. ; Reports Alabama Board of Health, 4 vols. 

Macmillan & Co., N. F.— Laboratory Manual of Physics and Applied 
Electricity, 2 vols. ; The Planet Earth, by E. A. Gregory. 

P. H. Mell, Jr.— Lite of P. H. Mell. 

Senator John T. Morgan.— U. S. Geological Survey ; U. S. Fish Com- 
mission ; U. S. Civil Service ; Messages and Documents, 1895, 5 vols. 

E. A. Smith, State Geologist.— Geological Survey of Alabama, 1895. 

JV. H. Winchell.— Geological Survey of Minnesota, vol. Ill, part I, 

Gen. J. H. Lane.— The History of Mount Mica, Maine, by Augustus 
C. Hamlin. 

Senor Miguel J. Romero.— Six publications on the history of Vene- 
zuela, its boundary dispute, etc. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



89 



DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGI- 
NEERING. 

Westinghouse Electric and Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., one street rail- 
way motor, 20 horse power. 

General Electric Co., Atlanta, Ga., one 3>£ kilo watt generator. 

John A. Roebling Son's Co., Trenton, N. J., boards of different styles 
of cables and wires. 

Mutual Light and Power Co., Montgomery, Ala., one Wheeler- 
Crocker 1-6 horse power fan motor. 

E. McKay, Asheville, N. C, two Edison ammeters. 

Indianapolis Telephone Co., Indianapolis, Ind„ telephone (com- 
plete). - , , 

Standard Electric Co., Chicago, III, one Standard arc lamp. 

Berlin Iron Bridge Co., East Berlin, Conn., framed photograph of 

power house. 

PERIODICALS. 

The following periodicals are regularly received in the 
library and are accessible to students. 

LITERARY. 

QUARTERLIES. 

American Historical Review, Political Science Quarterly, 



Current History, 
Economic Journal, 
Edinburgh Review, 



Arena, 

Atlantic Monthly, 

Bachelor of Arts, * 

Blackwood's Magazine, 

Book Buyer, 

Bookman, 

Book Reviews, 

Century Magazine, 

Contemporay Review, 

Cosmopolitan, 

Eclectic Magazine, 



Academy, 

Athenaeum, 

Critic, 

Dial, 

Harper's Weekly, 



Agricultural South, 
Agricultural Science, 
Agricultural Society Journal, 
American Agriculturist, 
American Cultivator, 



Quarterly Journal of Economics, 
Quarterly Review, 
Sewanee Review. 



MONTHLIES. 

Education, 
Educational Review, 
Fortnightly Review, 
Forum, 

Harper's Monthly, 
McClure's Magazine, 
Nineteenth Century, 
North American Review, 
Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's Magazine, 
Westminster Review. 

WEEKLIES. 

Independent (New York), 
Literary World (Boston) 
Nation, 

Saturday Review, 
Spectator. 

SCIENTIFIC. 

American Gardening 
American Geologist, 
American Journal of Science, 
American Machinist, 



90 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



American Meteorological Jour- 
nal, 
American Monthly Microscopi- 
cal Journal, 
American Naturalist, 
Analyst, 

An atomise her Anzeiger, 
Annates de Chemie et de Physi- 
que, 
Annates des Sciences Naturelles, 
Annals of Botany, 
Annals of Mathematics, 
Anthony's Photographic Bulle- 
tin, 
Archives de Biologie, 
Archives de Zoologie, 
Archives fuer Mikroskopische 

Anatomie, 
Berichte der Deutschen Chemis- 

chen Gesellschaft, 
British Journal of Photography, 
Botanical Gazette, 
Breeders Gazette, 
Builder and Woodworker, 
bulletin Torrey Botanical Club, 
Cassier's Magazine, 
Chemical News, 
Centralblatt fuer Bacteriologie, 
Commercial & Financial Chroni- 
cle, 
Comptes Rendus, 
Country Gentleman and Culti- 
vator, 
Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Tier- 
medicine, 
Drainage Journal, 
Electrical Engineer, 
Electrical World, 
Electrician, 
Engineering (London), 
Engineering and Mining Jour- 
nal, 
Engineering Magazine, 
Engraver and Printer, 
Farmer's Gazette (New South 
. Wales), 
Farmer's Advocate, 
Florida Farmer and Fruit Grow- 
er, 
Garden and Forest, 
Gardener's Chronicle, 
Hufschmied, 
Industrial American, 
Journal de l'Anatomie et de Phy- 
siologic, 



Journal of American Chemical 
Society, 

Journal of Chemical Industrial 
Society, 

Journal of Botany, 

Journal fuer Prak. Chem., 

Journal of Comparative Pathol- 
ogy and Therapeutics, 

Journal of Franklin Institute, 

Journal of Geology, 

Journal of Chem. Society (Eng- 
lish), 

Journal of Horticulture, 

Journal of Morphology, 

Journal Royal Agricultural So- 
ciety, 

Journal of New York Microscop- 
ical Society, 

Mathematical Monthly, 

Massachusetts Ploughman, 

Mehan's Monthly, 

Memoirs Torrey Botanical Club, 

Natural Science, 

Nature, 

Our Grange Home, 

Pharmaceutical Journal, 

Philosophical Magazine, 

Photographer (St. Louis), 

Photographic Times, 

Popular Science Monthly, 

Prairie Farmer. 

Proceedings of the Academy of 
Nat'al Science of Philadelphia, 

Quarterly Journal of Microscop- 
ical Science, 

Rural New Yorker, 

Science, 

Scientific American, 

Sibley Journal of Engineering, 

Southern Cultivator, 

Southern Farm, 

Southern Planter, 

Transactions American Institute 
of Engineers, 

Veterinary Journal, 

Veterinary Magazine, 

Western Rural, 

Wilson's Photographic Magazine, 

Zeitschrift fuer An. Chem., 

Zeitschrift fuer Fleisch und 
Milch Hygiene, 

Zeitschrift fuer vergleichende 
Augenheilkunde, 

Zoologischer Anzeiger. 



f 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



91 



ALUMNI. 



♦ ♦ 



Published under direction of the Executive Committee of the 

Alumni Society. 

1860. 
n ft „ w f. Glenn. Minister and Editor Atlanta, Ga. 

Ffl Tohnson Merchant ; M J ac . ( !"' £ a> 

* . ». Joniwoii. Orawfordville, Ga. 

R. D. Lumsden •• v Orrville Ala 

W G Thrash ; farmer £> "vu ie, a a. 

a'f Woolley Farmer . .Kingston, Ga. 

186 L. 

„ Sparta, Ga. 

Henry Hams.... Social Circle, Ga. 

K/ffl.:.:::::::::::^.:::::::........^.^^^ 

H. S. McFarlana ' "\ ": fvinmhns (ia. 

*J. J. F. Rogers 

1867. 
^ „ r« W vpr La Fayette, Ala. 

1868. 



* 
Re 



t Birmingham, Ala. 

W. W. Moore La wyer ? Ala 

Lev. W. T. ^Pattillo Minister 

1869. ■ ... 

•r. - a f ...Opehka, Ala. 

A. G. Dowdell. . . ..... .... £ ru *£f .Houston, Texas. 

L.A. Dowdell........ if. ac .^; '.'...Louisville, Ala. 

*Rev. A. S. Douglas ..... Ministei Augtin? Texas 

Leander G. Jackson lawyer . . .Jasper, Ala. 

T.J.Lamar Teacher... ...Mobile, Ala. 

*Caleb H. Lindsey Lawyer Auburn, Ala. 

J. J. Motley • Journalist . Midway, Ga. 

James D. Myrick -** rme *' T y' a NrVv" ".'.. .Brooklyn, N. Y. 

R. 0. Persons /oaV W?S«?aSd iSeV graduated in the East 

[The classes of 1860, 1861, 1867, 1868 »«~ «" |^ Alabama College 

Alabama College. In 1872 the ^^£Si^t^ State AgriCUlr 
became, by donation to the State, t* aj ^gy^wighad.] 
tural and Mechanical College, which was tnen 

1872> ...Salem, Ala. 

rc F Rnrt Teacher. ... • • • •••••:"' Waco, Texas. 

t 0.' RouLvali. Prest. National ^^ft'g,*!,, 

W. E. Home • . .Birmingham, Ala. 

L. V. Rosser. ' ' '\^Z r '.. • .-AuBtin, TexM. 

Rev E W.Solomon Minister. ....••• • p ra ttville, A a. 

G.C.Spigener & r ?JE; ;;;;;... ..Opelika, Ala. 

*Rev. C. R. Williamson .... Minister 

* Deceased. 



92 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

1873. 

J. L. Golson Lawyer New Orleans, La. 

W. T. Rutledge Farmer Crawford, Ala. 

*P. R. Rutledge Farmer Crawford, Ala. 

1874. 

R. K. Fitzhugh U. 8. Geological Survey. .Pine Bluff, Ark. 

*B. H. Johnson Lawyer Dadeville, Ala. 

W. H. Moore Contractor Birmingham, Ala. 

M. H. Mooie Teacher Dallas, Texas. 

1875. 

Frank C. Dillard Lawyer Sherman, Texas. 

*Wm. M. Perry. Teacher Columbus, Ga. 

♦John A. Ratchford Manufacturer La Fayette, Ala. 

Eugene R. Rivers Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

187&. 

Rev. M. K. Clements Teacher Athens, Ala. 

*C. T. Hodge Lawyer Opelika, Ala. 

8. B. Holt Manufacturer Siluria, Ala. 

E. M. Oliver Lawyer La Fayette, Ala. 

F. D Peabody Lawyer Columbus, Ga. 

J. E. Ruffin Teacher Columbiana, Ala. 

*P. H. Stowe Farmer Phoenix City, Ala. 

Reese Wilson Editor Waco, Texas. 

1877. 

Rev. Samuel C. Riddle . . .Minister Sulphur Springs, Texas. 

Charles C. Thach Prof. English, A. & M. C.,. ..Auburn, Ala. 

John M. Trammell Manufacturer.. West Point, Ga 

William 0. Trammell Physician Atlanta, Ga. 

1878. 

Lemuel G. Dawson Farmer *, Ware Ala 

Silas C. Dowdell Farmer .... Merrick La 

Tucker H. Frazer Physician Mobile, Ala 

Robert E. Hardaway Civil Engineer . . .. Austin, Texas 

George H Price Physician Nashville, Tenn. 

♦Isaac A Lanier Teacher Huntsville, Ala. 

Lee S. bcluefflin Manufacturer Nashville, Tenn . 

Reuben L. Thornton Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

1879. 

Mark S. Andrews Banker Greenville, Texas. 

WyattH Blake Physician Lineville, Ala. 

Frank B Dillard. Lawyer Sherman, Texas. 

Joshua S. Dowdell Merchant La Fayette, Ala. 

Rev. Oliver C. McGehee. . . Minister Mobile Ala 

♦Allen B. O'Hara Merchant Woodbury Ga 

Thonns M. Oliver Druggist Columbus, Ga. 

x^ n J^ V. nckard Sup*- ot Education Newton, Ala. 

J. E. D. Shipp Lawyer Americus, Ga. 

1880. 

John T. Ashcraft Lawyer Florence Ala 

♦Benjamin F. Atkinson. . . .Lawyer West Point, Ga.' 

8amuel B Cantey Lawyer Ft. Worth, Texas. 

Samuel Callaway Roadm'ter,L. & N. R. R.,Birmingham, Ala. 

John 8. N. Davis R. R. Business Savannah, Ga. 

* Deceased, 




Agricultural and Mechanical Golkge. 



03 



x>v,„cioinn Uniontown, Ala. 

J. M, Langhorne Physician Lampasas, Texas. 



Alva Fitzpatrick Lawyer Montgomery, Ala. 

S t ««rrison Pension Examiner Danville, 111. 

r«Le R Hall Teacher M idway, Ala 

Rev Harrison L. Martin. . .Minister Ozark, Ala. 

Charles B. McCoy Physician '. Opehka.Ala. 

Robert F. Ousley Farmer -Oui ey.Ua. 

So„rv ft Perrv Physic an Greenville, Ala. 

EdSarA G, pr1ce y ::.:: Lawyer Nashville Tenn. 

Sw Stevens Merchant. Roanoke, At. 

Sf) Street Merchant and Planter. Bluff Springs, Ala. 

iXfrV'Y Street . . Planter Bluff Springs, Ala. 

?j°ames l. l$t« I '• '. • ' • '• • farmer , Oourtland, Ala. 

R^sT E Thomas Real Estate Agent. Gadsden, a 

gsfc*«:::::::S^ 

1881. 
W. U. Acree Sec, Banking, Bldg. 4 Loan A«oe., ^ 

J. Callaway... • ■•jHRty^ Montgomery, Ala. 

?• g- SeT^" '.". '• :. K™r ngl . nee : ! \ '. '. •' .' •' • • • , Opejika, Ala. 

J H Jeter Farmer Barachias, Ala. 

& 1: SS; x:::::::::SBStx » «-■ •&•£ D . . 

Physician .Uniontovi 

t O f„„ op Lampasas, 

* J. T. Letcher T Lawy l Sebastian , Fla . 

A. J. Mitchell V^Zaiist ••'••'■ 'Galveston, Texas. 

C. N. Ousley i f oipm'isrrv' A A M. College, 

B.B.Ross.... Pr° f - Chemistry, a. « Auburn, Ala. 

...... ...Ozark, Ala. 

Rev. W. H. 8immons....Minister .._ n ..- L - g - at Uni 

W. D. Taylor... ....Prof. Civil Bug., La. ^ ^^ u 

m r> u Dallas, Texas. 

J. D. Trammell K-SrLe''':.'.'.'.'.'-S« JIex - 

E. I. Van Hoose Supt. Silver Mine 

Birmingham, Ala. 

J. J. Banks £"7 wl'J rw,rai r' R Cit y of Mex ' 

E. N. Brown f U P*- Mex ' Cent . . Dallas, Texas. 

G. A. Garden Lawyer Washington, D- C. 

a. m. ciegg • • • • •••,:;• " ' ■".'.' B utler - A a - 

•W.H.Cunningham Physician .Birmingham, A a. 

Bartow Eberhart Merchant Montgomery, »■ 

*B. H. Fitzpatrick £ arm , er . Auburn, A a. 

J. M. Hurt Teacher .Birmingham, Ala.. 

W. H. Jones .Druggist • , asp er, A a. 

Howard Lamar Lawyer ..Montgomery, A a. 

R. F. Ligon, Jr Lawyer Montgomery, Ala. 

W. W. Pearson J^Wn'rinew" "• • • Pilot P ° int ' 

J. M. Reid Civil Engineer.... 

} m - ..Marble Falls, Tex. 

W. H. Bruce ^Math ,'Cox College, Manchester Ga 

W. S. Cox Prof.Matn.,v, F« ttv ^i!' ii. 

W. L. Ellis. • • • • • v -I Montgomery, Ala. 

C. L. Gay M ,. erC v?™ • ■ -Alexander City, Ala. 

A. L. Harlan Physician •••• 

♦Deceased, 






* 



94 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



M. L. Harp, Jr Druggist Atlanta, Texas. 

D. B. Mangum With iMex. Cent. K. R — City of Mexico. 

T. F. Mangum Lawyer McKinney, Texas. 

A. M. Mcintosh Teacher Renfroe, Ala. 

E M. Face Agt. Maynard, Merrill & Co. Calvert, Tex. 

*Rev N. P. D Samford Minister Trussville, Ala. 

R. L. Sutton Physician Orrville, Ala. 

1884. 

B. H Boyd — Teacher Ramer, Ala. 

L R. Boyd Dentist Troy, Ala. 

R. S. Corry Real Estate Agent Greenville, Ala. 

F. C. Duke Lawyer La Fayette, Ala. 

•Rev. T. F. Hardin Minister. ..Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

W. L. Hutchinson Prof. Chemistry, A. & M. College, 

Agricultural College, Miss. 

J W. Lockhart Teacher Salisbury, Mo. 

D. 1) McLeod. Lawyer Anniston, Ala. 

•J. B. Robinson, Jr Lawyer .Memphis, Tenn. 

W. C. Whitaker iviinister. Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

W. D. Wood Wood Lumber Co Montgomery, Ala. 

1885. 

J. M. Allen Merchant Birmingham, Ala. 

W. T. Andrews P. O. Dept Washington, D. C. 

R. E. L. Collier Civil Engineer Thistle, Utah. 

*W. T. Penn Merchant Cusseta, Ala. 

R. H. Thach Lawyer .. .Birmingham, Ala. 

1886. 
C. A. Allison Railroad Agont. Gadsden, Ala. 

B. S r Burton Physician Yaldosta, Ga. 

L M. Capps Farmer Blackfoot, Idaho. 

L.F.Howell.... Farmer Valdosta, Ga. 

C. L. Newman Director, Exp. Station,. .. .Camden, Ark. 

A. A. Persons ...Prof. Chemistry, A. &M. College, 

*'« ~ Lake City, Fla. 

S. C. Pitts Civil Engineer Tumaco, U. S. 

_ ¥T Columbia, S. A. 

C. H . Ross Prof. Mod. Langs., A. & M. College, 

_ _ __ - Auburn, Ala. 

R. J. H. Simmons Teacher Thomasville, Ala. 

t R \« „ 8mitn Teacher. Equality, Ala. 

L. W. Spratling Surgeon U. S. Navy.. .San Francisco, Cal. 

? ,5 ,\Y^ a Y er * • • ^ otton Merchant Memphis, Tenn. 

m ^- W 1 , . lkin8011 Chemist ,Exper. Sta.,. . . New Orleans, La. 

T. P. Zellars Drummer.... Atlanta, Ga. 

1887. 

4* t " \ ,exander Civil Engineer. Mobile, Ala. 

V. L Allen Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

H.O.Armstrong Sec'y of Legation Madrid, Spain. 

ww B r ?? k . in Clk. State Trea's. Office. Montgomery, Ala. 

W. E. Davis Merchant Opelika, Ala. 

K. ap.C, Jones Banker Selma, Ala. 

l H. Jones Merchant and Farmer. Bonnet Carre, La. 

w tT't i "i ar Lawyer. Washington, D. C. 

w u7 d A « r » A& M - C, Agricult'l College, Miss. 

W. H. Newman U.S. Army San Antonio. Texas. 






♦Deceased. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



% 



£ H- Perry Teacher Memphis, Tenn 

0. W. Simmons Lawyer Geneva Ala 

B. A. BJakey.... Electrician • Montgomery' Ala' 

G ' 1 ;J 1 ti l V i" 8 "™" 06 A S ent Birmingham,' Ala! 

*J. W. Morgan, Jr Prof Eng., State Normal College, 

18g8 Florence, Ala. 

C. W. Ashcraft 

R. L. Bennett — 



• • • 



. . .Journalist Opelika, Ala. 

. . .Dir. Exper. Sta , Ark. Indus. Univ., 

„ -, « J . . Fayetteville,Ark. 

G. F. Broun Physician Birmingham. Ala 

F. Broun .....Lawyer Oharlestown, W. Va. 

H. L Broun Lawyer. Cliarlestown, W. Va. 

A F. Cory. Farmer Mulberry, Ala. 

J. H. Drake, Jr Physician Opelika, Ala 

E \V\ Foster Civil Engineer Mobile, Ala 

J. T. Gregory Teacher Mobile, Ala. 

*E. W Harris Teacher.. . . . : Kowaliga, Ala. 

G. A. Huguley! Farmer West Point, Ga. 

Wm. Lyman Farmer Montevallo, Ala. 

E. C. Macartney Merchant... Mobile, Ala. 

T. D. Samford Lawyer Opelika, Ala. 

0. 0. Smith Bank Cashier Atlanta, Ga. 

S. 0. Taylor Farmer Snowdoun, Ala. 

1889. 

L. D. Burdett Drummer Birmingham, Ala. 

A.J. Burr Merchant Griffin, Ga. 

J. R. Clower Insurance Agent Atlanta, Ga. 

E. C. Cochran Insurance Agt., 114 Main St.,tlouston, Tex. 

A. J. Crawford Farmer Auburn, Ala 

B. H. Crenshaw Instructor Mech. Arts , A. & M. C, 

Auburn, Ala. 

A. C. Crowder Insurance Agent Birmingham, Ala. 

H. G. Crowder Agt. Stn'd Oil Co New Orleans, La. 

H. 8. Doster Lawyer Prattvil.'e, Ala. 

A. St. C. Dunstan Instructor in Physics, Kansas Univ.^ 

Lawrence, Kans 

P. L. Hutchinson Chem., State Ag. Dept., Atlanta, Ga. 

D. Killebrew Manufacturer Newton. Ala 

A. M. Lloyd Chem., McQandless LabVry., Atlanta Ga. 

W. L. Martin <.. Drummer Birmingham Ala. 

M. D. Pace Prof. Mathematics, State Normal College, 

Troy, Ala. 

T. A. Ross Civil Engineer Cape Town, Africa. 

E. J. Spratling. ... Physician Fishkill Landing, N. Y 

H. M. Taylor Civil Engineer • • r ^ ed rffl' 

P. T. Vaughan Physician Insane Asylum, Little RockArK. 

F. H. Vernon Manufacturer .Social Circle Ga. 

T M. Watlington Lawyer . . . .- San Antonio T txas. 

R. Weaver Electrician • SeIma,Aia. 



N. 



1890. 



B. C. Abernethy Druggist ?riando, Fla. 

J W. Bivins. . Manufacturer • ■ £&*X' 

W. Callaway Farmer ^'^ * {£' 

W.?G. Cook Journalist ^'IfZ Texa 

G.W.Emory Physician Anderson, Uxas. 

•Deceased. 



■n 



96 



Agricultural and Mechanical Cdlege. 



S. J. Emory Physician Navasota, Texas. 

•F.M.Fontaine Lawyer Columbus, Ga. 

D. Gillis Teacher Brewton, Ala. 

W. G. Harrison Physician Talladega, Ala. 

R. E. D. Irvin Teacher Opelika, Ala. 

J. H. Little... . :.. .Farmer Auburn, Ala. 

W. B. Matthews Conductor, G. & A. R. R.,. .Americus, Ga. 

F. D. Milstead. Manufacturer Tallassee, Ala. 

J. Milton Lawyer Marianna, Fla. 

R. E. Noble Medical Student New York City. 

R. H. Poole Physician Douglasville. Ga. 

P. \V. Terry Journalist Birmingham, Ala. 

G. H. Waring Chemist Atlanta, Ga. 

J. F. Wilkinson Chemist, State Ag. Dep., — Atlanta, Ga. 

J. Quarles Teacher. ..Texas. 

1891. 

L. E. Baker Bookkeeper Montgomery. Ala. 

H. Benton Director, Exper. Station., Uniontown, Ala. 

F.J. Bivins Bank Teller Cordele, Ga. 

S. J. Buckalew Farmer Boyd's Tank, Ala. 

J. A. Cox Electrician ..Birmingham, Ala. 

J. N. Dean Farmer. Pine Level, Ala. 

W. E. Fitzgerald Farmer Omaha, Ga 

W. T. Glass Physician Phoenix City, Ala. 

C. B.Glenn .....Student Cambridge, Mass. 

C. L. Hare Asst. Chem., A. & M.C., Auburn, Ala. 

B. F. Harwood Supt. Compress .Uniontown, Ala. 

C. C Johnson Teacher Sherman, Texas. 

J. C. Kimball Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

F. A. Lupton Medical Student Baltimore, Md 

W. A. Marshall Rome, Ga. 

A. D. McLennan Electrician Lynn, Mass. 

W.H.Oates Chemist Mobile,Ala. 

P. Reynolds Farmer Tuskegee, Ala. 

W. E. Reynolds Farmer Tuskegee, Ala. 

R. C. Smith Lawyer Opelika, Ala. 

1892. 

W. S. Allen .Civil Engineer Cartersville, Ga. 

A. S. Averett Merchant Valdosta, Ga. 

E. C. Avery t. Merchant Prescott, Arizona. 

L. S. Boyd Asst. Librarian, A. & M. C.,. .Auburn, Ala. 

0. A. Brown Teacher Birmingham, Ala. 

J. T. Bullen Clerk Montgomery, Ala. 

G, S. Clark Teacher Highland Home, Ala. 

W. B. Clay Manager Opera House Troy, Ala. 

J. G. Crommelin Bookkeeper Montgomery, Ala. 

J. L. Culver Postal C, M. & B. R. R., Birmingham, Ala. 

H. L. Davidson Bookkeeper Montgomery, Ala. 

H. T. DeBardeleben Supt. Furnace Birmingham, Ala. 

H. F. Dobbin Draughtsman t New York City. 

W. F. Fe igin Teacher Albertville, Ala. 

J. E. Gachet Dental Student Auburn, Ala. 

E. H. Graves Drummer Atlanta, Ga. 

R. W. Greene,. Theological Student Nashville, Tenn. 

R. F. Hare Asst. Chem.,A. & M. C, Las Cruces,N. Mex. 

L. P. Heyman Journalist Atlanta, Ga. 

•Deceased. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



99 



A. L. Jones ..M'g'r Ala. Printing Co. Montgomery, Ala. 

R. D. McAllister Lawyer.. Atlanta, Ga. 

F. M. Moseley Electrician Montgomery, Ala. 

L. W. Payne Teacher Evergreen, Ala. 

C. T. Pollard Physician Montgomery, Ala. 

W. E Richards. . ..... Lawyer Weatherford, Texas. 

E. B. Smith Druggist Columbus, (la. 

S. S. Strong . Civil Eng.,A. & W. P. R. R, West Point, Ga. 

G. A.Thomas Merchant Montgomery, Ala. 

R. J. Trammell I»sr. Mech. Arts, A. & M. C, Auburn, Ala. 

d! M. Walker Merchant Faunsdale, Ala. 

D. L. Whetstone Bookkeeper Montgomery, Ala. 

D. E. Wilson Druggist Birmingham, Ala. 

B. M. Duggar. State Biological Survey.. Urbana f Ill. 

1893. 

Lee Ashcraft Teacher Geneva, Ala. 

W R Bishop Physician Talladega, Ala. 

R " L G. Bivins Teacher New Orleans, La. 

F. M. Boykin '.- Farmer Montgomery, Ala. 

M R. Burton... Insurance Agent Opelika,Ala. 

W S Crump Lawyer Seddon.Ala. 

C W Daugette Prof. Eng., Normal Col., Jacksonville, Ala. 

JoelDumas Bookkeeper Arlington, Ala. 

D. B. Edwards Farmer . >oapstone, As. 

T G Foster Medical Student Montgomery, Ala. 

J.' H. Holt Electrician Washington, DC. 

T.L.Kennedy Teacher lampa, * a. 

J. M. Little.. ....Farmer Auburn, Ala. 

J. B. Loveless Farmer. . Guntersyille, Ala. 

N.B. Marks . .Law Student. . University of Va. 

E B Mell Teacher i' tt . ? t ? n ;T n 

H. K. Miller Chemist Agr'l Expt. Sta..,. .Raleigh N C. 

W M fUgffs ... . Asst. Prof. Physics,. Clemson College, S. C. 

J S RoSn Electrician Birniingh^Ala. 

C H. Smith Electrician .Atlanta, da. 

Henry Hamilton Smith. . . . VV. Ry. of Ala fi&S** ifc 

L. S. Smith Cotton Business Birm V^' ?£ 

S.L.Toomer Druggist mSS - Ala 

J.F.Webb LawStudent... m^SKm All' 

T.F.Wimberly Merchant Birmingham, Ala. 

1894. 

G. S. Anderson Merchant rh^at^Tmn' 

C. I. Andrew^ , . .Lawyer Cha ^Xrn T Ala. 

Kate Conway Broun „,"' v.. Brewton , Ala. 

J - \j r B "> w .°\ • • • TP^her Loachapoka, Ala. 

w W. Carlisle, Teacher. „ ,„ ■ Station, Texas. 

WD. Clayton Asst A & M. 1/ , S* B Co , (imbia , A | a . 

R. C. Conner Teacher Tallassee, Ala. 

P. P. Daugette Teacher . . ... • • • Atlanta Ga. 

tt t twJ* . Medical Student gViKaIs. 



R T. Dorsey • Medical 

W. G. Duggar Farmer 



Tallahassee, Fla. 



JAD — ■"•-::::::SS&::/::::::^"^^?" t j-fl! 



J.C.Dunham 

Charles Dunlap • Clerk 

James Dunlap Clerk 



Selma, Ala. 
Selma. Ala. 



207879 



96 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



O. E. Edwards U. S. Patent Office Washington, D. C. 

R. G. Foy Cadet. U. S. M. A., West Point, N. Y. 

F. A. Fulghum Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

C. G. Greene i . Merchant Opelika, Ala. 

C. C Hare . . Electrician West Point, Ga. 

A. J. Harris Bank Clerk Decatur, Ala. 

A. W Holstun Teacher Waverly, Ala. 

J. D.Lane Teacher Waverly, Ala. 

Sydney Leach Medical Student University of Va. 

Willie Gertrude Little Auburn, Ala. 

P. P. McKeown Lumber Business Concord, Fla. 

H. Meislahn Elect rician Winter Park, Fla. 

L. G Moore Electrician Pulaski, Tenn. 

P. H. Moor.* Lawyer Birmingham, Ala. 

W. W. Moore Electrician Columbia, Tenn. 

Peter Preer Money Order Dept., P. 0.,. Columbus, Ga. 

S. A. Redding Electrician . . Schenectady, N. Y. 

J P. Slaton Inst'rMath &Eng, A. & M.C .Auburn, Ala. 

Margaret Kate Teague Hot Springs, Ark. 

Jack Thorington Lawyer Montgomery, Ala. 

G. G. Vaughan Selma, Ala. 

F. A. Vernon Merchant Cusseta, Ala. 

R. G. Williams Asst. Chemist, A. & M.C, — Auburn, Ala. 

A. Z. Wright Merchant .. ..Auburn, Ala, 

J. B. Espy Teacher Abbeville, Ala. 

A. L. Quaintance Asst. Biol., A. & M. C, .. Lake City, Fla. 

1895. 

R. H. Adams Teacher Brundidge, Ala. 



D. S. Anderson. . 
W. S. Askew.... 
Hugh Bickerstaff 
G. P. Bon'lurant. 
F. A. Boykin... 



Farmer , Auburn, Ala 

Merchant ..• Cusseta, Ala. 

Electrician Atlanta, Ga . 

Teacher . Athens, Ala. 

Farmer Aubu#i, Ala. 

*W. W. fiussey Electrician Savannah, Ga. 

G. F. Chambers Farmer Oswichee, Ala. 

LeVert Coleman Cadet, U. S. M. A., . . . West Point, N. Y. 

S. L. Coleman Asst. Chemist, A. <fe M. C.,. . Auburn, Ala. 

L. B. Gammon Commission and Brokerage. . . Rome, Ga. 

B. B. Haralson Electrician Atlanta, Ga. 

B. G. Jennings Farmer Seale, Ala. 

H. H Kyser Dir. Phys Lab , A. & M. C. .Auburn, Ala. 

Charles Linn Farmer Birmingham, A»a. 

J. N. McLean Medical Student .New Orleans, La. 

W. C. McMillan .Clerk .Talladega, Ala. 

James Newsom Electrician, 132 W.22 St.,. New York City. 

H. H. Peevey Asst. Drawing, A.<fe V1. C.,. Auburn, Ala. 

T. H. Phipps Bookkeeper... Columbus, Ga. 

W.R.Shafer . . ..PosuGrad., A & M C, Auburn, Ala. 

Harry Howell Smith Asst. in Eng., A. & M.C, Auburn, Ala. 

P. H. Smith Medical Student. New York City . 

H. W. Taylor Farmer Snowdoun, Ala. 

J. C Thomason Asst. Math., A & M.C Auburn, Ala. 

A. H. Whitman Dentist Auburn, Ala. 

J. A. Wills PostGrad., A. <fc M. C, ...Auburn, Ala. 

♦Deceased. 



I 



I 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 
MICROFORM 
TEST TARGET 




10 mm (e= 81 mm) 

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1.5 mm (e= 1.09 mm) 

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.0 



.0 mp (e= 



1.37 mm) 



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2.5 mm (e= 1.77 mm) 

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I.I 



1.25 



Urn ||_21 


[1 2.5 


1- 


i_ m 


12.2 


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111 = 


£ m 


11 20 


u 


ii ^^= 


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1.8 


1.4 1 


1.6 



10 mm (e= .81 mm) 

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abcdefghiiklmnopqrstuvwxyz$c£/%«'/iV4V4 — =+x&@* 



1.5 mm (e= 1.09 mm) 

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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz$<t£/%#'/2'/4 3 /4— =+x&@* 



2.0 mm (e= 1.37 mm) 

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1234567890$c£/%# 1 /2 1 /4%— =+x&@* 



2.5 mm (e= 1.77 mm) 

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1 234567890$<t£/%# 1 /2 VaVa— =+ x&@* 




VJ % 



END OF 

ROLL 

PLEASE