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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

COKPLISEBNXS 



N, R, YOUNG, 

PRESIDENT. 




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CONSTITUTION 



PLAYING RULES 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 

OF 

PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 

Including li.c Proceedings of the League Congress held in New York .SSo 
and rboo.and Cleveland, 1890, and the Official hielding and Batting- • 
Averages of Players in Championship Games in i sw .i. 



CHICAGO: 

PUBLISHED BY A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

,oS Madison St.; Chicac( 241 Broadway, New Y< 

lojj Market Street, Philadelphia. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL GROUND. 



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2d Baseman 




Catcher'* fern 



A. A. A.— fjrotind reserved for Umpire, Batsman and Catcher. 

B. B.- Ground reserved for Captain and Assistant. 
l\— Players' Bench. I) -Visiting Players' Bat Rack. 

E.— Home Players' Bat Rack. 



— TO THE — 



Name 

Objects 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for iSSO 

Not Moie than One Club Member from any City 

Population of Eligible City 

Mode of Applying for Membership 

Election of Club Members 

Mnile of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership 

I Hies, Assessments, Fines, Ete 

Guarantee Eund 

Termination of League Club Membership 

" Membership, How Enforced. 

Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player . 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of 

Board of Directors, Election of 

Directors, Qualifications of 

Board of Directors, Duties of 

Meetings of 

Reports of 

" " Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed. . . 

Filling Vacancy in 

Secretary, how Elected 

Secretary, lo be Treasurer 

Secretary, General Duties of ... . 

" to Record and Report Violations of Rules and 

Regulations 

Secretary, Salary and Guarantees 



Section. 
I 



j 

4 

5-6 

6 

7 
8 

<r 

10 

ii 

12 

13 



14 
■5 
1 6 

'7 

1 8 

") 
20 
21 



24 



INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION. 



LEAGUE CLUB, 



UMPIRES, 

PLAYERS. 



MANAGERS AND 



Sectih 



Club, Jurisdiction of its Affairs — 27 

" " " Territory 28 

Restriction as to Games 2S 

Contract with Manager or Player 29 

Player not under Contract, what (lames he may Play in. . . 29 

Negotiations for Release of Non-League Players 30 

Release from Contract, Notification of 31 

" " " Effect of 32 

When Manager or Player may Engage with Another Club. 33 

" " " " Becomes Ineligible 34 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 35 

" to Play Clubs Employing Disqualified Persons. 36 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievances 37 

" " " Cause of Expulsion of 38 

" '■ " " Suspension of 39 

Umpire, Cause of Disqualification of 39 

The Umpire, how Appointed 40 

Umpire's Expulsion 41 

" Jurisdiction ' 42 

DISPUTES ANT) COMPLAINTS. 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated . . 43 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 44 

Complaint of Reserved Player against the Club Reserving 

Him 45 

Complaint of Player under Contract against his Club 46 



Appeal of Manager or Player. . . 

When Director is Ineligible to Try a Case 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 

Decision of Joint Arbitration Committee Einal. 

PLAYING RULES. 



When Enacted and Amended. 



CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be Contended for Yearly. . 

Season 

Games, what are 

" Games, Number of, in Series. 
Tie, or Drawn Games, how Played off 



47 
48 
49 
5" 



51 



52 
53 
54 
55 
55 



INDEX TO TTIK CONSTITUTION, 



Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds. . . . 
" to Control Exhibition of Game 

" " to be Furnished Hatting Order of Visiting Club. 

Championship Schedule 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Except. ... 

Admission to Championship (lame. Price of 

Correspondence Concerning Championship Games, by whom 

Conducted 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Payment 

of 

Admission to Championship Games, how Regulated 

League (lames Forbidden Prior to Championship Season. . 
( lames between League and Non League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing 

(lames between League and Non-League Clubs, Division of 

Receipts (i. 3) 

(lames between League and Non-League Clubs, Penalty 

for Non-Payment (3, 4) 

Count of Forfeit (lames , 

Drawn, 'lie or Postponed Games not to Count but be 

Played off 

The Champion Club 

Emblem of Championship 

Mode of Deciding Championship 

ANNUAL MEETING. 



Time and Place 

Delegates and Visitors 

Special Meeting, how Called. 

Quorum. 

Order of Business 



AMENDMENTS. 

Amendments to Constitution or Playing Rules (1) 

Suspension of Constitution (2) 



56 
56 

56 

57 
57 
5S 

59 

60 
60 
61 

62 

62 

62 
''3 

(»4 
»5 
66 
66 



67 
6S 
69 

70 
7' 



72 

72 



CONSTITUTION 

OF T1IK 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

OF 

PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS, 1890. 



SECTION I. This association shall be called 

Lkague of Professional Base Ball Clubs." 



Tin; National 



OBJECTS. 

Suction 2. The objects of this League are: 

1. To encourage, foster and elevate the game of baseball; to 
enact and enforce proper rales for the exhibition and conduct of 
the game and to make base ball playing respectable and hon- 
orable. 

2. To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional 
base ball clubs and professional base ball players, and, 

3. To establish and regulate the base ball championship of 
the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Sue. 3. This League shall consist of such professional base 
ball clubs, as may from time to time be elected to membership, 
but in no event shall there be more than one club from any city. 

SEC. 4. No club shall be admitted from any city whose popu- 
lation is less than seventy-five thousand (75,000) except by unani- 
mous vote of the League. 

Ski'. 5. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first have 
delivered to the Secretary of the League, a written application for 
membership, signed by its President and Secretary, accompanied 

I! 



I.F.AOIJE CONSTITUTION. 



by documents showing that such club bears the name of the city 
in which it is located, and that it is regularly organized and offi- 
cered, and where the State law permits it, chartered. Such appli- 
cation shall at once be transmitted by the Secretary to the Hoard 
of Directors, who shall immediately investigate and report upon 
said application; said report to be communicated to the League 
through the Secretary. 

SEC. 6. The voting upon an application for membership shall 
be by ballot, a two-thirds vote being requisite for election, and no 
club shall be required under any circumstances to state how it 
voted upon such application. 

SEC. 7. In case any League club shall forfeit its membership 
during the championship season, the Board of Directors may elect 
a non-League club to temporary membership in the League which 
election shall entitle such temporary club member, without the 
payment of League club dues, to play all the championship sched- 
ule games remaining unplayed by the retired League club, upon 
the same terms and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, and such tem- 
porary membership shall terminate at the next annual meeting of 
the League. 

DUES, ASSESSMENTS, I'lNI'.S, ETC. 

Sice. 8. (1.) Every League club shall pay to the Secretary of 
the League on or before the 1st day of May of each year, the 
sum of one hundred dollars as annual dues ; and on or before the 
twenty-fifth day of each month of the championship season, such 
other sum as may be lawfully assessed for the payment of salaries 
of officers and umpires, and for such other expenses as may be in- 
curred by order of the League, or of the Hoard of Directors. 

(2.) Upon conviction of any of the offences prescribed in Sec- 
tion 10, as causes for expulsion — the Hoard of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, im- 
pose such a fine as is in their judgment commensurate with the 
injury; which line may include a penalty payable to any other 
League club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages, sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or the legislation or contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

GUARANTEE FUND. 

Six. 9. (1.) Each club elected to membership shall within 
thirty days after official notice of such election — by its 1'resident 
or other chief executive officer — sign and affix its common seal to 
this constitution as a covenant to fulfill all the obligations and 
requirements thereof, and of all legislation and contracts made in 
pursuance thereof. 



LEA G U E CONST!!' U TION. 



9 



It shall at the same time execute and deliver unto the President 
of the League, as Trustee for the other League Clubs, a bond with 
approved sureties in the penal sum of twenty-five thousand dollars 
($25,000), conditioned for the faithful performance of said Consti- 
tutional Covenants, and for the payment into the GUARANTEE 
FUND of the sum of twenty-live thousand dollars ($25,000) in 
annual installments of not less than one thousand dollars ($l,ooo), 
payable during the month of May ; any default to cause the for- 
feiture of said penal sum, and of all installments previously paid 
into said fund. 

(2.) The GUARANTEE Fund shall be invested by the Board of 
Directors in United States Government Bonds, or in such other 
interest-bearing securities as the League in meeting shall direct. 
Said securities shall always be subject to the inspection of the 
League, or of its Auditing Committee appointed for the purpose. 

(3.) The interest and income accruing from such securities 
shall, as soon as collected, be transferred into the treasury in aid 
of the current and contingent expenses of the League. 

(4.) The principal of said fund shall, except as hereinafter 
slated, be kept intact as a guarantee against any violation of the 
provisions of this Constitution, or of the legislation and contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

(5.) The f.ulure of a club to pay into said fund, when due, any 
annual installment of its contribution thereto, shall forfeit the fuil 
penal sum of its bond, and suit may at once be entered for the 
recovery of the same, or in lieu thereof, and in default of a col- 
lection of the same, the Board of Directors, unless otherwise in- 
structed by the League, may expel said club from membership in 
the manner prescribed in Section II, when the installment or in- 
stallments already paid shall be forfeited, converted into cash and 
transferred into the treasury in aid of the current and contingent 
expenses of the League. 

(6.) Upon the acceptance of the resignation of a club from 
membership or upon the involuntary termination of such member- 
ship for "business reasons," as provided for in Section 10, said 
club shall be entitled to a return of its bond and of its entire con- 
tribution to the GUARANTEE FUND (less all dues, assessments and 
lines chargeable thereon), either in cash or, at the option of the 
Board of Directors, in the securities in which the said cash may 
then be invested. 

(7.) Upon thirty days' default by a club -after due notice by 
the Secretary— in its payment of dues, assessments, or fines im- 
posed in pursuance of this Constitution, the Board of Directors 
shall declare forfeited an equivalent amount of said club's contri- 
bution to the Guarantee Fund, which equivalent amount, to- 



10 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



gether with such additional tine for said default — as may be im- 
posed by said Board — shall be repaid within three months there 
after, under penalty of forfeiture of the bond of said club and of 
its entire contribution to said fund, and of its expulsion from mem- 
bership. Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be con- 
strued to prohibit a collection by suit on said bond, either before 
or after expulsion, of any unpaid installments of said club's con- 
tribution to said fund requisite to satisfy and liquidate all arrears 
of said dues assessments and fines. 

(8.) Upon a club's expulsion from membership for persistence 
in an unaccepted resignation, its entire contribution to the GUAR- 
ANTEE Fund shall be forfeited and suit may be instituted on its 
bond for all unpaid installments thereof. 

Sec. io. The membership of any League Club may be ter- 
minated: 

(r.) By resignation duly accepted by a majority vote of all the 
League Clubs in meeting duly convened. 

(2.) By an adverse vote of two-thirds of the remaining League 
Clubs in meeting duly convened, when, for business reasons, 
such membership shall no longer be desirable. 

(3.) By expulsion in the manner prescribed in Section II, for 
failure to sign the Constitution, and deliver the bond and pay its 
contributions to the GUARANTEE Fund as prescribed in Section 
Q i or 

Failure to pay the visiting club the amount due under the pro- 
visions of Section 64 of this Constitution. 

Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed upon to 
play any championship game, unless caused by unavoidable acci- 
dent in traveling ; or 

Selling, or allowing to be sold, upon its grounds, or in any 
building owned or occupied by it any spirituous, vinous or malt 
liquors ; or 

Allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds, or in 
any building owned or occupied by it ; or 

Playing any game of ball with a club that is disqualified or in 
eligible under this Constitution or the National Agreement of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Clubs ; or 

Offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game 
of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who shall be 
proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon ; or 

Taking part in any game of ball on Sunday. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



11 



Disbandment of its organization or nine; or 

Failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obligations with the 
other League Clubs ; or 

Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful requirement of 
the Board of Directors ; or 

Willfully violating any provision of this Constitution, or the 
Legislation or Playing Rules made in pursuance thereof. 

SEC. ii. To carry into effect the provisions of Sections 9 and 
10 of this Constitution the facts in any case covered by such sec- 
tions must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall 
at once telegraph the party charged with the specified default 
or offence, inquiring whether any dispute exists as to the facts 
alleged. In case the facts are disputed, the Hoard shall, after due 
notice, try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe, 
and their findings shall be final and conclusive on all parties 
except in case of expulsion, when such finding shall be for- 
warded to each League Club, which shall transmit to the Secretary 
written ballots " For Expulsion," or " Against Expulsion;" and if 
all League Clubs vote " For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify 
all League Clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged ; and every club shall, on or after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled member by the 
prohibitions and penalties prescribed by this Constitution. 

Sec. 12. (1.) The umpires, managers and players employed 
by the clubs belonging to this League shall be considered and 
treated as members hereof to the extent of being always amenable 
to the provisions of this Constitution, and entitled to all its priv- 
ileges in matters of dispute, grievance or discipline, as provided 
in this Constitution. 

(2.) Any umpire, manager or player, having forfeited member- 
ship, shall not be readmitted, except by unanimous vote of the 
League. 

Sec. 13. A list shall be kept by the Secretary of the names of 
any persons who may be declared, by an affirmative vote of t\\e 
League clubs, at any regular or special meeting, to be unworthy 
of service in the League, as umpire, manager or player, and any 
person so named shall be disqualified for employment by, or serv- 
ice in any League club, until his name be removed from such list 
by unanimous vote of all League clubs at a regular or special 
meeting. The Secretary shall immediately notify all League 
clubs of any name placed upon or removed from, such list of 
disqualified persons. 

OFFICERS. 
SEC. 14. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a l'resi- 



12 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



dent by ballot. The President shall be ex officio chairman of the 
Board of Directors. He shall preside at all the meetings of the 
League, and shall call special meetings of the League when he 
may deem it necessary, or when thereto requested by haif of the 
clubs of the League. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resigna- 
tion or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty days 
elect a President. 

SEC. 15. The Board of Directors shall consist of the President 
and four other members, to be chosen at the annual meeting, in 
the following manner: The name of each club, except that of 
which the President is a member, shall be plainly written upon a 
card, in full view of the delegates present, by the Secretary; the 
cards to be of the same size, shape, color and material. The cards 
shall then be placed in some suitable receptacle, and well shaken 
together; thereupon four of these cards shall be drawn successively, 
and at random, and one delegate from each of the four clubs 
whose names are so drawn, shall, with the President, compose the 
Board, and if any club whose name is thus drawn be represented 
by two delegates, such delegate shall name one of their number 
to be a member of the Board : Provided, That at any time after 
the adjournment of the annual League meeting any League club 
represented on the Board may substitute another representative ; 
such substitution to be attested by written notice to the Secretary, 
signed by the President of the League club, and upon receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution shall take effect, 
and the Secretary shall thereupon notify all League clubs. 

SEC. 16. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents; nor shall any 
club under any circumstances be represented by more than one 
person on the Board. 

SEC. I". The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League, and shall 
be individually answerable to the League for the faithful discharge 
of their trust. 

SEC 18. The Board shall meet annually on the morning of the 
first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November at nine 
o'clock at the place where the annual meeting of the League 
is to be held, but may hold special meetings whenever urgent 
necessity may require. 

Sec. 10. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all their 
doings, and present the same, in writing, to the Leagu at its 
annual meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be filed with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, documents and prop- 
erty which may have come into their possession by virtue of their 
office. 



LKAOUK CONSTITUTION. 



13 



SEC. 2o. Any Director who shall disclose or publish any of the 
proceedings of the Board except officially through the report of 
the Hoard, or when called upon by vote of the League, shall for- 
feit his office. 

Sec. 21. In case of a vacancy in the Hoard by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence or disqualification of any Director, 
the club of which he was a member at the time he was chosen 
shall designate his successor, and at once notify the Secretary. 
But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding or 
disqualificatioaof a club represented on the Board, the Hoard may 
till the vacancy by election in the same manner as provided for the 
election of Directors in Section 15. 

SEC. 22. The Hoard shall elect a gentleman of intelligence, 
honesty and good repute who is versed in base ball matters but 
who is not in any manner connected with the press, and who is 
not a member of any professional base ball club, either in or out 
of the League, to be the Secretary of the Hoard, and of the League. 

Sec. 23. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League, 
receive all dues, fees and assessments make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Hoard, or by the vote of the League, and 
render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give such bond 
with approved sureties, as the Board may require. 

Sec. 24. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of the 
official records and papers of the League; shall keep a true record 
of all meetings of the League and the Hoard, shall issue all official 
notices and attend to the necessary correspondence; he shall pre- 
pare and furnish such reports as may be called for by the Hoard, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and mater- 
ials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

Sec. 25. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infractions of 
the rules and regulations of the League that may come to his 
notice, and shall (except in cases covered by Sections 11 and 13) 
make a report on the same to the President, who shall present it 
to the Hoard at its next meeting. 

Sec. 26 The Secretary shall receive such salary as the Hoard, 
by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all traveling 
expenses actually incurred by him in the service of the League ; 
and the Hoard may exact from him such guarantees for the faith- 
ful performance of his duties as they may deem for the interest 
and safely of the League. At the expiration of his term of office 
he shall account for and deliver up to the Hoard all the property 
and papers which may have come into his hands by virtue of his 
office. 



14 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



LEAGUE CLUBS, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND PLAYERS. 

Sec. 27. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 
right to regulate its own affairs, to establish its own rules, and to 
discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own manager, players or 
other employes, and these powers shall not be limited to cases 
of dishonest play or open insubordination, but shall include all 
questions of carelessness, indifference, or other conduct of the 
player that may be regarded by the club as prejudicial to its 
interests: Provided, That all club regulations must be made sub- 
ordinate to and in conformity with, the general regulations estab- 
lished by this League, and no club shall prescribe any rule or 
regulation in conflict with any provision of this Constitution, or 
the Playing Rules. 

Sec. 28. Every club member of this League shall have exclus- 
ive control of the city in which it is located, and of the territory 
surrounding such city, to the extent of four miles in every direc- 
tion from its corporate limits, and no visiting League club shall, 
under any circumstances — except with the consent of the local 
League club, until all League championship games on that ground 
shall have been finished, be allowed to play any club in such terri- 
tory other than the League club therein located, nor shall a visit- 
ing League club play any game in April with any non-League 
club within said four miles from the corporate limits of the city 
in which the League club is located, without the consent of the 
local League club. 

Sec. 29. Contracts between a club and its players may be 
either by telegram or writing, to be followed within thirty days 
thereafter by a regular League contract, which, after registry and 
approval by the Secretary of the League shall be transmitted to 
said club and notice thereof promulgated to all other League clubs 
and to all Associations parties to the National Agreement of Pro- 
fessional liase Hall Associations 

No player, not under one of the two forms of contract specified 
in this Section, shall be eligible to play in more than five cham- 
pionship games in the nine of such club, without the contract and 
notice thereof required by this Section. 

Sec. 30. Negotiations for the release from contract or reser- 
vation, and for services of players other than those of the National 
League Clubs, shall be carried on exclusively through the Sec- 
retary of the League or his duly appointed agent The Presi- 
dent, Secretary or Manager of a club shall file with the Secretary 
of the League, either by letter or telegram, a written offer for the 
release and salary of said player. 

If two or more League Clubs file an offer for the same player, 
the offer first received shall have priority of claim to such player 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



15 



until such negotiations fail, when the offer next in order filed shall 
he entitled to negotiation, and so on in sequential order with any 
subsequent offers; but no club shall have prior claim to any such 
negotiations for more than one non-League player not under con- 
tract with and required by another League Club. Negotiations 
carried on directly or indirectly with any such player, except 
through the Secretary of the League, shall forfeit all right to 
contract with, and subsequent reservation of such player by the 
club so offering, 

SEC. 31. Any player while under contract with or reservation 
by a League Club, who shall, without the consent of such club, 
enter the service of any other club, in any capacity, shall be liable 
to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club releases a 
manager or player without notice, or gives him ten days' notice 
of release in accordance with the terms of the League contract, 
and whenever it suspends or expels a manager or player, that club 
shall at once notify the Secretary, stating, in case of release, the 
date when the same takes effect, and in case of suspension or 
expulsion, the cause thereof, and the Secretary shall at once notify 
all other clubs of the League. 

Sf.C. 32. Release of players from contract or reservation, and 
future contracts with such players, shall 1 e regulated and gov- 
erned by the National Agreement of Professional Base Hall Clubs 
and the League legislation made in pursuance thereof. No player 
without the consent of the club with which he is under contract 
or reservation shall enter into negotiation with any other club for 
future services, but if such consent be obtained a player may ne- 
gotiate for his release, and offer a money consideration therefor, 
which may be accepted by the said releasing club. 

Sec. 33. The disbandment of a League club or its withdrawal 
from or loss of League membership shall operate as a release of 
its piayers from contract and reservation with said club, but the 
right to contract with and reserve said players shall be subject to 
transfer to such other club as the League may designate. 

SEC. 34. No manager or player who has been suspended or 
expelled from a League club, shall at any time thereafter he 
allowed to play with or serve in any capacity any League club 
(either the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of sus- 
pension by the club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Hoard, 
such suspension or expulsion shall have been set aside. 

SEC. 35. No club shall employ as umpire, manager, scorer or 
player, any person who has wilfully violated any provision of this 
Constitution, or of the l'laying Rules, or who has been expelled 
from any club belonging to this League, or who shall be dis- 
qualified from playing with a club under any provision of this 
Constitution. 



1G 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Sec. 36. No game of ball shall be. played between a League 
club and any other club that has been expelled from member- 
ship in this League No game of ball shall be played between 
a League club and any other club employing or presenting in its 
nine a player expelled or under suspension from the League, or 
otherwise rendered ineligible by the National Agreement, or the 
legislation made in pursuance thereof. A violation of this section 
shall forfeit the game in favor of the non-offending club, and 
subject it to such line as the Board of Directors may impose. 

Sec. 37. Any manager or player who may consider himself 
aggrieved or injured by any act of his club, or of any officer, 
agent or employe thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the 
President of the club when the club 'nine" is at home. Any 
manager or player, under contract with or reservation by a 
League club, who shall, without the written consent of such club, 
leave its service, or who shall be proven guilty of offering, agree- 
ing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game of ball, or of 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon, shall be at once 
expelled by such club. 

Sec. 38. Any person under contract with a League club, 
who shall be guilty of drunkenness, gambling in any form, insu- 
bordination, or of any dishonorable or disreputable conduct I except 
the offences requiring expulsion, specified in Sec. 40), may be 
lined or suspended by such club for the remainder of the playing 
season, or for the remainder of that and all the ensuing playing 
season, at the option of such club. And during the period of such 
suspension, such person shall be disqualified from playing in or 
against, or serving any L'eague club. Provided, That the club 
having made the suspension shall not have power to rescind it or 
to curtail its duration. 

The President of the League shall have power, upon proper 
proof, to inflict a fine for any such offences, not exceeding two 
hundred dollars ($200), which line can only be remitted by the 
Board of Directors. 

SEC. 39. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the Playing Rules, or 
who, while acting as Umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules adopted hereunder, may be 
forever disqualified by the President of the League from acting 
as Umpire of any game of ball participated in by a League Club. 

THE UMPIRE. 

Sec. 40. A staff of six League Umpires shall be selected 
by the Secretary before the 1st day of May. 

(1.) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such ex- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



17 



penses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract between 
them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval of 
the Hoard of Directors of the League. 

(2.) lie shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom he will receive all assignments to duty, and 
all instructions regarding the interpretation of the Playing Rules, 
and the Secretary shall prescribe a proper' uniform for him, all 
parts of which shall be worn when officiating as Umpire. 

(3.) In the event of the failure of such Umpire to umpire a 
game assigned to him, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there shall 
be deducted from the next monthly payment to the League Um- 
pire the sum of twelve, dollars for each game assigned to him, 
which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(4.) It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as 
urjpire for any championship game such League Umpire or sub- 
stitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and only in 
the event of the failure of the League Umpire or substitute so 
assigned to appear at the hour appointed for the beginning of such 
game, shall the duty devolve upon the visiting club to designate 
an Umpire for such game. 

(5.) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, re- 
moval or expulsion'of any League Umpire the Secretary shall have 
power to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus created. 

Skc 41. Any League Umpire who shall in the judgment of 
the President of the League be guilty of ungentlemanly conduct, 
or of selling, or offering to sell, a game of which he is Umpire, 
shall thereupon be removed from his official capacity, and placed 
under the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled players by the 
Constitution of the League 

SBC. 42. 1'he Umpire's Jurisdictions and Powers, in addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are: 

(1.) The gentleman selected to fill the position of Umpire must 
keep constantly in mind the fact that upon his sound discretion 
and promptness in conducting the game, compelling players to 
observe the spirit as well as the letter of the Playing Rules, and 
enforcing each and every one of the said Rules, largely depends 
the merit of the game as an exhibition, and the satisfaction of 
spectators therewith. lie must make his decisions distinct and 
clear, remembering that every spectator is anxious to hear such 
dnision. He must keep the contesting nines playing constantly 
from the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing 
such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury 
or rain. He must, until the completion of the game, require the 



18 



LKAOUF. CONSTITUTION-. 



players of each side to promptly take their positions in the field 
as soon as the third hand is put out, and must require the first 
striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon 
as the fielders are in their places. 

(2.) The player's of the side "at bat " must occupy the portion 
of the field allotted them, subject to the condition that they must 
speedily vacate any portion thereof that may be in the way of the 
ball, or any fielder attempting to catch or field it. The triangular 
space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of 
the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit 
any player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, or is 
passing between them, while standing in their positions. 

(3.) The League Umpire is a member of the League. During 
the progress of a game he is the sole representative of the League, 
to see that the game is played and determined solely on its merits, 
and he is invested with ample powers to accomplish this purpose. 
In the performance of his duties he must remember that his sole 
allegiance is due to the League. 

(4.) The Umpire is master of the field from the commencement 
to the termination of the game, and must compel the players to 
observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit to do any 
act, as he may deem it necessary to give force and effect to such 
Rules', and he shall have no power to revoke or remit any lines 
imposed for violation of such Rules. 

(5.) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the offend- 
ing player's side of the infliction of any such line, and the club 
to which such player belongs shall, upon recipt of a notice of said 
line from the Secretary of the League, within ten days transmit 
the amount thereof to the Secretary of the League. 

(6.) When the Umpire shall impose a l'\ne on a player, or 
declare a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice 
thereof to the Secretary of the League within twenty four hours 
thereafter; and if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit his position 
as League Umpire, and shall forever thereafter be ineligible to 
umpire any League game. 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Sec. 43. The Board of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and 
the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the Board shall 
prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board shall be final, 
and under no circumstances shall be reconsidered, re-opened, or 
inquired into, either by the League or any subsequent Board. 
2 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



19 



SEC. 44. The lioard shnll at once consider any complaint pre- 
ferred by a club against a manager or player of another club (prior 
to the expiration of the championship season) for conduct in vio- 
lation of any provision of this Constitution, or prejudicial to the 
good repute of the game of base ball, and shall have power to 
requre the club to which such manager r player may belong, to 
discipline him, and upon repetition of such offence, to expel him. 
Provided, That such complaint be preferred in writing, giving 
such patticulars as may enable the lioard to ascertain all the facts, 
and be transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once be 
referred to the Hoard. 

Sec. 45 In case a player under reserve for the ensuing season 
by any League club, shall prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League against said club, alleging: 

1. That such club is in arrears to him on account of his con- 
tract for the last preceding season, or 

2. That he has on or after March 1st offered to contract with 
such club for the ensuing season, for the same compensation as 
that of the preceding season, and that the said club has declined 
either to enter into such contract, or to release him from reserva- 
tion, the Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of 
such complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of such 
answer, 01 if one week shall have elapsed without the receipt of an 
answer, the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Chair- 
man of the Hoard. The Hoard shall thereupon try the case under 
such regulations as they may prescribe, and should they find the 
player's complaint sustained by the facts, they shall release the 
player from reservation, and instruct the Secretary of the League 
to issue notice of such release, in like manner as if the player 
had been voluntarily released by the club. The lioard shall also, 
should they find the club in arrears to the player, require the club, 
under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player, 
within ten days, the full amount ascertained to be due him. 

Sec. 40. In case a player under contract with a League club 
shall during a current season prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League, against such club, alleging that such club 
is in arrears to him on account of such contract, the Secretary shall 
act in the matter as provided in the preceding Section, and should 
the Hoard find the player's complaint sustained, they shall require 
the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to 
the player within ten days, the full amount ascertained to be doe 
him. Provided, That should the player refuse to serve the club, 
pending action by the Hoard on his complaint, he will thereby 
lorfeil the benefits of the award, and in such case the Hoard shall 
revoke his award. 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Sec. 47. The Hoard shall also be the sole tribunal for the 
hearing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been 
expelled or suspended by his club. The matter shall be proceeded 
with in the following manner: Such person shall, within thirty 
days after the date of the expulsion or suspension, file with the 
Secretary a written statement of his defence, accompanied by a 
request that an appeal be allowed him. The Secretary shall notify 
the club of the request for an appeal, accompanying such notice 
with a copy of the appeal, and at the next annual meeting, the 
club, by its duly authorized representative, and the appellant in 
person, by attorney, or by written statement shall appear before 
the Hoard with their testimony. The Hoard shall impartially hear 
the matter and render their decision, which shall be final, and 
forever binding on both club and player. 

SEC, 4S. No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 

Skc. 49. Any expenses of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

Skc. 5 •. In all disputes, complaints or questions arising under 
"The National Agreement of Professional Base Hall Associa- 
tions," between this League ami any other association of clubs, 
party to such agreement or between any club of this League 
and any club of any other association, parly to such agreement, 
the adjudication thereof shall be left entirely to the joint Board of 
Arbitration provided for by such agreement, and this League 
will comply with and be bound by the award, findings or verdict 
of such Hoard in any such case, so long as this League con- 
tinues a party to such " National Agreement." 

Ski'. 51. The League, at its annual meeting, shall adopt such 
Playing Rules, as may be enacted by the joint committee on Na- 
tional Playing Rules. 

ill IMPIONSim*. 

Sec. 52. The Championship of th? United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs com- 
posing this League. 

Skc. 53. The championship season shall extend from such dale 
in April or May to such date in September or October as the 
League may determine at its stated or special meeting 

SEC. 54. Every game played between two clubs from the com- 
mencement of the championship season to the completion of the 
championship series between such clubs, shall be a game for the 
championship, and no League club shall lend or exchange players, 
to or with each other, for any game played during the champion- 
ship season. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



21 



Sec. 55. Each club shall play fourteen or more championship 
games with every other club, but a tie or drawn game or games 
prevented by rain shall be played off on the same grounds on the 
first succeeding day (not counting Sundays, days previously agreed 
upon for championship games between said clubs, or days when 
rain renders playing impossible) within the dates of the same 
schedule series between such clubs, if any remain open; and if 
not, such game may be played off afterward on either grounds, 
but two games shall not be played on one day without the prior 
consent of two-thirds of all the League clubs. 

Skc. 56. Each club shall have half of the championship scries 
of games with every other club played on its own grounds, ex- 
cept as otherwise provided in Sec. 55, and in all the details of 
such games that do not involve the rights of the visiting club 
under the Playing Rules, but relate solely to such games as at- 
tractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home. club, the visiting 
club shall defer to the wishes of the home club, and the visiting 
club shall furnish to a person designated by the home club the 
batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morning of the day 
of each game. In case of the failure of any visiting club to furnish 
the batting order of its nine as herein stipulated, it shall forfeit 
the sum of $10, which amount shall be immediately transmitted 
to the Secretary of the League upon the receipt of notice from 
him of the infliction of such line, which notice shall be given by 
the Secretary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the man- 
ager and captain of the v'.siting club with a list of the batting 
order before the commencement of the game under similar pen- 
alties for default as herein prescribed. The visiting club shall 
have the right to practice its nine on the grounds of the home 
club between 11 and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit dur- 
ing the championship season. 

Skc. 57. All championship games shall be arranged for in 
writing, and so as to complete the championship series by the 
expiration of the championship season. Such written arrange- 
ment shall be made by such method as the League shall direct, 
before the beginning of the championship season, and shall con- 
sist of a schedule ami agreement relating thereto, which agree- 
ment shall be signed by every League club, and the schedule 
and agreement filed with the Secretary of the League, and a copy- 
thereof, bearing his certificate as to its correctness, furnished 
by the Secretary to every League club. The schedule shall pro- 
vide for an equal number of return games, and specify the date 
of each game, and the dates of each scries of games. No date in 
said schedule shall subsequently lie changed, except (1) by written 
agreement of two clubs, from a date fixed by the schedule for a 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



game between sneh clubs to another clay between the first and last 
date of the same schedule series between such clubs ; or (2) as 
provided in Section 59 ; or (3) by the written consent of two-thirds 
of all the League clubs. 

Sec. 5S. The price of admission to championship games shall 
be fifty cents for each adult person. 

Sec. 59. In correspondence between clubs, all letters and tele- 
grams concerning umpires, dates, and other matters pertaining to 
championship games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of such club des- 
ignated by its I'resident to act for him in such matters, the Sec 
retary of the League to be notitied of such designation. If such 
communication be made by another club when at home, they 
must be addressed by, and answered to, its I'resident or his repre- 
sentative, as above provided ; and if the corresponding club be 
absent from home, they must be addressed by and answered to its 
manager. 

Sec. 60. At the conclusion of each championship game, the 
home club shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and 
shall transmit by mail to the visiting club a duplicate of the same) 
a statement of the receipts of said game, exclusive of extra charge 
for grand stand and shall pay to the authorized agent of such 
visiting club forty per centum thereof. Provided, however, that 
whenever such forty per centum shall be less than one hundred 
and fifty ($ 150) dollars, the home club shall pay to the visiting 
club at least the sum of one hundred and fifty ($150) dollars. 

The number of persons admitted to the grounds shall be deter- 
mined by the use of the necessary number of self-registering turn- 
stiles, the keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the 
visiting club before the opening of the grounds for each game; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have the right to affix a 
seal to the register or box, of such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close of the seventh 
inning, and in case a carriage gate is used, a ticket for each per- 
son admitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to the 
agent of the visiting club. 

No person shall be admitted to the grounds during or prior to 
such game or the hour appointed therefor, excepting only players 
of contesting clubs, policemen in uniforms, and the necessary 
employes of the home club. 

Sec. 61. No game shall be played between League clubs before 
the commencement of the championship series. 

Sec. 62. No game shall be played between any League club 
and any non-League club, or picked nine, upon the grounds of 
any League club, from the commencement to the completion of 



LEAGUE CONSTITU HON. 



23 



the championship series upon such grounds, except that any extra 
players of the home club may so play while the home club is 
absent from the city. No game shall be arranged or played be- 
tween any League and non-League clubs or picked nines, for or 
upon any "off days" of the championship series, except as above 
provided, and upon the following express conditions : 

1. If a League championship game be prevented by rain or 
unavoidable accident on the day (not counting Sunday) preceding 
the day agreed upon for such non- League or picked nine game, 
then the latter shall be declared off so as to allow the League clubs 
to play the championship game on that day. 

2. All such games shall be played under such rules, with such 
ball and such umpire as may be mutually agreed upon by the 
League club and the non-League club. 

3. In the event of game stopped by rain before completion of 
live innings, the home club may issue rain checks good for ad- 
mission to the next succeeding game. The uncompleted game 
shall be considered a postponed game, and no money paid to the 
visiting club. 

4. The non-League club shall, unless otherwise agreed by let- 
ter, telegram or other writing, pay the League club immediately 
upon the termination of play, without reference to the number of 
innings played, the sum of one hundred dollars or one-half the 
gross receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts shall 
exceed two hundred dollars; and it is to be distinctly understood 
that the "gross receipts" include all revenue derived from the 
exhibition whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for ad- 
mission to grounds, grand stands, or to other special privileges of 
the grounds; also that the visiting club shall have sole control of 
all gates, and of all entrances to grand stands, or other special 
ground privileges for which extra fees are charged. And the 
non-League Club shall pay the League club fifty dollars in every 
case where a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non-League club, prepared to play at the time 
appointed for such game, and the game be prevented by rain, 
or by any cause other than the refusal of such League club 
to play such game. In the event of the refusal or failure of 
any non-League club to pay the sum or sums due, as stipulated, 
the League club shall at once telegraph such fact to the Secretary 
of the League, who shall forthwith notify all other League clubs 
by telegraph; and no League club shall thereafter play such de- 
faulting club until the full amount due be paid the League club, 
which League club shall, in case of such payment, notify the 
Secretary and he the other League clubs, by telegraph. 

5. In any case not covered by the first condition specified in 



H 



24 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



this section, a League club having agreed to play a non-League 
club upon the grounds of the latter, and failing to present its 
nine in the city or town of such non-League club, prepared to 
play at the time appointed for such game the League club shall 
pay the non-League club the sum of lifty dollars, or su^h other 
sum as may have been mutually agreed upon, as the penalty of 
such default. 

SEC. 63. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games— to count 
in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none — in 
cases where the umpire in any championship game shall award the 
game to such club on account of the violation by the contesting 
club of any section of this constitution or of any playing rule; and 
in the event of said forfeiture being caused by the withdrawal of 
the players during the progress of the game, or by a failure to 
report with its team at the time fixed for the game unless written 
notice has been received from the home club that the game cannot 
be played, then such forfeiting club shall incur a penalty of three 
hundred dollars, which shall be payable to the Secretary of the 
League within ten days thereafter, for the use and benefit of the 
non-offending club, but said line may be remitted upon appeal to 
and a hearing by, the Board of Directors. 

Sr.c. 64. Drawn, tie, and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any games of not less than live innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if pos- 
sible, as provided in Section 59. If they cannot be played off as 
therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, if sufficient 
time exists before the close of the season. 

SEC. 65. The club which shall have won the greatest percent- 
age of games in the championship series shall be declared the 
champion club of the United States for the season in which 
such games were played. In the event that two or more clubs 
shall have won the same percentage of games, then the Hoard 
shall at once arrange a special series of three games between any 
two of such clubs, such games to be played in the month of Octo- 
ber, and the games so played shall be included in the champion- 
ship record, and counted in determining the award of the cham- 
pionship. In such case only the provisions of this Constitution 
prohibiting the playing or recording as championship games, 
games played after the expiration of the championship season, 
shall have no effect. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the 
national colors) to cost not less than one hundred ($100) dollars. 
It shall be inscribed with the motto, "Champion liase Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the 
year in which the title was won, and the champion club shall be 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 



I. F. AG UK CONSTITUTION. 



SEC. 66. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for the 
championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to the 
Secretary of the League a statement containing the full score of 
the game, according to the system specified in the " flaying 
Rules," the date, place where played, and names of the clubs and 
umpire : Provided, That no tie or drawn game shall be considered 
"a game" for any purpose except the averages; and provided 
further that in any ease where the Secretary shall not receive the 
score of a championship game within live days after the playing 
of such game, the club whose duty it is to forward such score 
shall pay to the League the sum of ten dollars as the penalty of 
such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabular 
statement of the games won and lost by each club, according to 
the statement so sent him which statements shall be the sole evi- 
dence in the matter), and submit the same, with the statements so 
sent him, to the Hoard, who shall make the award in writing, and 
report the same to the League at its annual meeting. In making 
the award the Hoard shall consider: 

i The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. (lames participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, dis- 
banded, or forfeited their membership without completing their 
championship series with all other League clubs; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent: The Hoard shall ascer- 
tain the least number of championship games played by such club 
with any club remaining in the League, and shall, from the 
first game participated in during the championship season by 
such retired club, count in the scries of each League club a similar 
number of games, and all other games participated in by such 
retired club shall not be counted in the championship series. 
Provided, That if such retired club shall have failed to play at 
least one championship game with every League club, all games 
participated in by it shall be thrown out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

SEC, 67. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November of 
each year, at twelve o'clock noon, and at such places as shall 
have been determined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

SEC. 68. At such meeting each club shall be represented, and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have, in addition 
thereto, any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meeting; 



26 



LEAGUE CONSTl'J UTION. 



but no club shall be permitted to send as a representative any 
person under contract or engagement as a ball player or man- 
ager, and belonging to the nine of said club in such capacity ; 
they shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary of 
their club, showing their authority to act, but no club shall have 
more than one vote. 

Sec. 69. Special meetings may be called by the President of 
the League on his own option, or on the w-rilten call of four clubs. 

SEC. 70. A representation of a majority of clubs shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number 
may adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sue. 71. The following shall be the order of business: 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of ISoard of Directors. 

3. Report of special committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 
(>. Amendment of Playing Rules 

7. Election of officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

SEC. 72. (1.) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a two-thirds vote of the League at any annual 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. 

(2.) Any Section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provisions made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



27 




THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT OF PROFES- 
SIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION T< > THE NATIONAL AGREE- 
MENT. REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF ARBITRATION, 
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD, also rill', associations OF BASE 
BALL CLUBS IDENTIFED WITH THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT.' 

NOTE. 

The papers herein contained are published by order of the 
Board of Arbitration, created by and acting under the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Hall Clubs, consisting of dele- 
gates representing the National League and the American Asso- 
ciation of Base Iiall Clubs. 

They include the National Agreement as adopted, ratified and 
approved by the said National League and the American Associa- 
tion; the Articles of Qualified Admission to the National Agree- 
ment and Regulations of the Board of Arbitration. 

The Board of Arbitration respectfully calls the attention of all 
Leagues and Associations identified with the National Agreement 
of all Club members of said Leagues and Associations, and of all 
Hall Players under contract or reservation with any of said Clubs, 
to Article X, of the Agreement. 

This Board has no power to arbitrate upon differences or dis- 
putes between the clubs of an Association, or between Clubs 
and their players, except where positive violation of the pro- 
visions of the National Agreement or the qualified Articles 
thereto is clearly manifest, and then only when the parties 
in interest have exhausted their remedies within their own Asso- 
ciation by appeal to the Directors thereof. 

A proper understanding of this will relieve the Chairman and 
Secretary of the Board of a rapidly increasing and uncalled for 
amount of labor. 

With a view to avoiding trouble hereafter it is also suggested 
that the Secretaries of all Associations require each of their Club 
members to file with them the name or names of the Club officer 
or officers, who alone shall have power to release players from 
contract or reservation. N. E. YOUNG, 

Zack Phelps, Secretary. Chairman. 

Jan. 29, 1890. 

THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

THIS AGREEMENT, made between the Association known 
and designated as the National League of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs of the one part, and the Association known and designated 



¥/ s 



28 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



as the American Association of Base Ball Clubs, of the other part, 
witnesseth, that: 

I. This document shall be entitled The National Agreement, 
and shall supersede and be a substitute for all other agreements, 
similarly or otherwise designated, heretofore existing between the 
parties hereto. 

II. a. No contract shall be made for the services of any player 
by any club member of either party hereto for a longer period than 
seven mouths, beginning April ist and terminating October 31st, 
and no such contract for services to be rendered after the expiration 
of the current year shall be made prior to the 20th day of October 
of such year. 

/'. No player shall, without the consent of the Club with which 
he is under contract, enter into any negotiation or contract with 
any other Club, Club agent or individual for services to be ren- 
dered in an ensuing year prior to the said 20th day of October. 
Upon written proofs of a viola'tion of this paragraph the Board of 
Arbitration shall disqualify such player for and during said ensu- 
ing year, and shall inflict a tine of five hundred dollars, payable 
forthwith into the treasury of the Hoard, upon the Club in whose 
interest such negotiation or contract was entered into. 

c. Every regular contract shall be registered and approved by 
the Secretary of the Association of which the contracting Club is a 
member, who shall forthwith notify the Secretary of the Other As- 
sociation, party hereto, and the other Club members of his 
Association. 

III. When a player under contract with or reservation by any 
Club member of either Association party hereto is expelled, sus- 
pended or rendered ineligible in accordance with its rules, notice 
of such disqualification shall be served upon the Secretary of 
the Hoard of Arbitration by the Secretary of the Association 
from whose Club such player shall have been thus disquali- 
fied, and the Secretary of the Hoard shall forthwith serve no- 
tice of such disqualification upon the Secretary of the other As. 
sociation party hereto. When a player becomes ineligible under 
the provisions of this Agreement, the Secretary of the Hoard of 
Arbitration shall notify the Secretaries of the Associations parties 
hereto, of such disqualification, and from the receipt of such 
notice all Club members of the parties hereto shall be debarred 
from employing or playing with, or against, such disqualified 
player, until the period of disqualification shall have terminated, 
or the disqualification be revoked by the Association from which 
such player was disqualified, or by the Board of Arbitration, and 
due notice of such revocation served upon the Secretary of the 
other Association, and by him upon his respective Clubs. 

IV. On the tenth day of October in each year the Secretary of 
each Association shall transmit to the Secretary of the other Asso- 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



29 



ciation a reserve list of players, not exceeding fourteen in number, 
then under contract with each of its several Club members, and of 
such players reserved in any prior annual reserve list, who have 
refused to contract with said Club members and of all other in- 
eligible players, and such players, together with all others there- 
after to be regularly contracted with by such Club members, are 
and shall be ineligible to contract with any other Club, except as 
hereinbefore prescribed. 

V. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any Club member of either Association, party hereto, the 
service of such player shall at once be subject to the acceptance of 
the other Clubs of such Association, expressed in writing or by 
telegraph, to the Secretary thereof, for a period of ten days after 
notice of said release, and thereafter if said services be not so 
accepted, said player may negotiate and contract with any other 
Club The Secretary of such Association shall send notice to the 
Secretary of the other Association of said player's release on the 
date thereof, and of said acceptance of his services at or before the 
expiration of the ten days aforesaid. Provided thit the disband- 
ment of a Club or its expulsion from membership in either Associa- 
tion, party hereto shall operate as a release of all its players from 
contract and reservation, but the services of such players shall at 
once be subject to the acceptance of the Other Clubs of such Asso- 
ciation as hereinbefore provided. 

VI. Each Club, member of either Association, party hereto, 
shall have exclusive control of its own territory, and no club shall 
be entitled to membership in either Association party hereto, from 
any city, town or county in which a Club member of either Asso- 
ciation, party hereto, is already located. Provided that nothing 
herein contained shall prohibit a Club member of either Associa- 
tion, party hereto, from resigning its membership in such Associa- 
tion during the month of November in any year, and being ad- 
mitted to membership in the other Association, with all rights and 
privileges conferred by this Agreement. 

VII. No game shall be played between any Club member of 
either Association, party hereto, or any of its players under con- 
tract or reservation with any other Club or " team" while present- 
ing on its nine any ineligible player. A violation oi this section 
shall subject each offender to line or expulsion in the discretion of 
the Board of Arbitration. 

VIII. Each Association, party hereto, shall have the right to 
make and enforce all rules and regulations pertaining to the con- 
trol, discipline and compensation of all players under contract 
with and reservation by its Club members. Provided such rules 
ami regulations shall in no way conflict with the provisions of this 
Agreement. 



30 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



I X. A Board of Arbitration, consisting of three duly accredited 
representatives from each of the Associations, parties hereto, shall 
convene annually, at a place mutually to be arranged, and shall 
organize by the election of a Chairman, Secretary and such other 
officers and committees as to them shall seem meet and proper. 
They may make, and from time to time revoke, alter and repeal 
all necessary rules and regulations not inconsistent with this 
Agreement, for their meetings, procedure and the general transac- 
tion of their business, and may adopt such articles of Qualified 
Admission to protection under this Agreement as may be accepted 
by other Associations of Professional ISase Hall Clubs. Their 
membership on said lioard shall be determinable at the pleasure of 
their respective appointing Associations, upon duly certified notice 
thereof. A quorum for meetings shall consist of at least two 
representatives from each Association, and all questions shall be 
voted upon separately by the respective delegations, and shall be 
affirmed only when concurred in by a majority of the delegates of 
each Association. 

X. In addition to all matters that may be specially referred to 
them by both of the Associations, parties hereto the said lioard 
shall have sole, exclusive and final jurisdiction of all disputes and 
complaints arising under, and all interpretations of this Agree- 
ment, They shall also, in the interests of harmony and peace, 
arbitrate upon and decide all differences and disputes arising be- 
tween the Associations, parties hereto, and between a Club mem- 
ber of one and a Club member of the other Association, party 
hereto. Provided that nothing in this Agreement shall be con- 
strued as giving authority to said lioard to alter, amend or modify 
any section or part of section of the Constitution of either Asso- 
ciation party hereto. 

We hereby certify that the said Associations, parties hereto, have 
by a unanimous vote of the Ctubs of said Associations, adopted, 
ratified and approved this Agreement, and authorized us to sign 
the same for them and in their name, place and stead. 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE OK PROFESSIONAL BASE 
HALL CLUBS, composed of Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, 
Indianapolis, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washing- 
ton, Brooklyn and Cincinnati. By N. E. YOUNG, 
Washington, D. C, February, 1890. President. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF BASE BALL 
CLUBS, composed of the Athletics, Brooklyn, Columbus, 
Rochester, Louisville, St. Louis, Svracuse and Toledo. 

By ZACK PHELPS, President. 
Louisville Kv., February, 180,0. 



TIIK X AVION A I. AGREEMENT. 



31 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION 
NATION A L AG R E E M E NT. 



TO THE 



The parties of the first part being the parties to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs (viz.: The National 
League of Professional Base liall Clubs and the American Asso- 
ciation of Base Ball Clubs), acting by the Board of Arbitration, 
and the parties of the second part, being such eligible professional 
or semi-professional Associations, each with a membership of at 
least four base ball clubs, as shall be admitted to qualified mem- 
bership under these articles by the Board of Arbitration, and shall 
duly authorize their Presidents to sign this Agreement, and whose 
Presidents do sign this Agreement in pursuance to said authority, 
do hereby agree each with the other, in consideration of the 
mutual advantages and protection to be derived therefrom as 
follows: 

I, Each Association constituting one of the parties of the sec- 
ond part shall file with the Secretary of the Board of Arbitration 
its application for qualified admission under these articles, and 
accompany the same with a list of its Club members and the loca- 
tion of their respective business offices and playing grounds, 
which Club membership or the location of said business offices or 
playing grounds cannot thereafter be changed without the consent 
of the Board of Arbitration. Provided, however, any Association 
whose membership shall at any time be reduced to less than four 
Clubs actually engaged in a schedule of championship games 
shall forfeit all rights and privileges under these articles. 

II On or after the twentieth day of October of each year the 
Secretary of each Association, which is party of the second part, 
shall forward to the Secretary of each Association party of the 
first part, the names of any and all players then under contract 
who have signed such contracts on or after the 20th day of Octo 
ber, with any of the Clubs, members of the said Associations, par- 
ties of the second part and from and after the receipt of such 
notice, and of notice of all subsequent contracts from said Secre- 
taries, any and all players so reported as being under contract 
with any of the Clubs, members of the Associations, parties of the 
second part, shall, unless released, be ineligible to contract with 
any other Club member of the parties of the first or second part 
until the twentieth day of October then next ensuing; and not 
then if reserved under the provisions of Article NIL 

III. Any player who has entered into a contract with any Club 
member of anv Association, party of the second part, may be sus- 
pended without pay by such Club or Association for breach of 
contract or breach of any of the rules of such Association, and he 
shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or play during the remainder 



32 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



of the current season with any of the Clubs of the Association 
parties to or under the protection of the National Agreement, 
unless such disability shall have been sooner removed by the Club 
or Association by which he was suspended. 

IV. Any player under contract or reservation to cither of the par 
ties of the first part, or who shall be expel led, suspended or rendered 
ineligible by either of tbe parties of the first part or by the Board 
of Arbitration, shall be ineligible to contract, or play with any 
Club member of either of the Associations, parties of the second 
part, and with any other Club or Clubs whatever Any Club 
member of either of the Associations, parties of the second part, 
which shall play an ineligible player. on its 'ream; or 

I'lay against a Club having an ineligible player on its 
Team; or 

Hay with a Club that has played against another Club with such 
ineligible player on its Team; 

Shall be dismissed from membership of its Association, or said 
Association shall forfeit all rights under this Agreement. 

V. Should any Club member of an Association, party of the 
second part, agree in writing or by telegraph with any Club 
member of an Association, party of the first or second part, for 
the release of any player then under contract or reservation, either 
party may file said agreement with the Secretary of the Hoard of 
Arbitration, and should any such Club member refuse to comply 
with its said Agreement, after opportunity has been afforded for 
a hearing before the Hoard of Arbitration, and such Agreement 
proven, then the Association of which the releasing Club is a 
member shall expel such Club from membership, or said Associa- 
tion shall forfeit all rights under this Agreement. 

VI. Before any Club member of any Association, a party of the 
second part, shall contract with a player for an ensuing season, 
such Association shall enact laws or regulations debarring such 
Club from entering into any contract with such player while 
under arrears of salary to him, and from suspending or o herwise 
attempting to disqualify such player for refusing to contract 
with it. Each Association party of the second part, shall also 
enact laws providing for the expulsion of any Club member for 
refusal to pay arrears of salary to a player when thereto required 
by the Board of Directors of said Association, or upon appeal by 
the Hoard of Arbitration or said Association, upon failure to 
enact and enforce such laws, shall forfeit all rights under this 
Agreement. 

VII. Qualified membership of any of the parties of the second 
part, shall be forfeited for failing to expel any of its Club mem- 
bers that may play a game of ball except under the Joint Playing 
Rules adopted by the parties of the first part. 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 33 

VIII. The exclusive territorial rights of the Club members of 
the parties of the first part to their respective cities, towns and 
counties, and to within four miles of the boundaries thereof, shall 
not be invaded by any club member of an Association party of 
the second part. Qualified membership of such Association shall 
be forfeited for failing to expel any of its Club members that may 
play a game of ball within said territory without the consent of 
the Club or Clubs controlling it. Providing that this prohibition 
shall not apply to the playing of a game of ball by a Club mem- 
ber of an Association, party of the second part, in the city or 
town wherein it is located, by authority of the Hoard of 
Arbitration. 

IX. It is understood and agreed by and between the parties 
hereto that any controversy between the Association or between 
Clubs of different Associations, parties to this Agreement, as to 
any matter or matters mentioned in these Articles, or in the 
National Agreement, shall be determined by the Hoard of Arbi 
tration without regard to any law or regulation of any party hereto 
that may be in conflict therewith. 

X. It is expressly stipulated that in any case coming before 
the Hoard of Arbitration involving the forfeiture of any rights 
or privileges of any Association, party of the second part, or any 
Club member thereof, the Secretary of the said Hoard shall notify 
such Association in writing, and on demand of said party of the 
second part said Hoard shall grant it a hearing on the trial of the 
case, and no adverse verdict shall be rendered by said Hoard 
against such Association, party of the second part, nor against 
any Club member thereof, unless such notice be furnished, and 
such hearing, if thereupon demanded, granted. . 

XI. Each Association, a party of the second part, shall pay to 
the Secretary of the Hoard of Arbitration: 

First. As annual dues the sum of $50, on or before the first 
day of April in each year. 

Second. Also, if the right of reservation is claimed under 
Article XII, the sum of $1,000 if said Association be composed 
of four Clubs, $1,500, if composed of six Clubs, $2,000, if com- 
posed of not more than eight Clubs, payable on or before the 
first of May in each year. 

XII. The right of reservation may be claimed by any Associ- 
ation, party of the second part, by written notice to the Secretary 
of the Hoard of Arbitration, on or before, and not later than the 
first day of April in each year, and said right of reservation will 
be granted under the following conditions: 

First. The payment of the sum prescribed in Section 2 of 
Article XI, on a date not later than therein designated. 



k 



34 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT, 



Second. That the Secretary of each Association, party of the 
second part, shall, on or before the loth day of October of each 
year, transmit to the Secretaries of both the Associations, parties 
of the lirst part, a reserve list of the players, not exceeding 
fourteen in number, under contract at the end of its championship 
season, with each of the several Club members of the Associa- 
tion of which he is Secretary, and such players, together with 
such other players reserved in any prior annual reserve list who 
have refused to contract with said Club members, shall there- 
after, unless duly released, be ineligible to contract with any 
Club member of any Association, party hereto, other than their 
respective reserving Clubs. 

Third. A player so reserved will be released from reservation 
by the Hoard of Arbitration. 

a. When the compensation prescribed in his contract to the 
full term thereof, irrespective of the termination of a champi- 
onship season, is in arrears and unpaid on the first day of 
November next after such termination of a championship season. 

/'. When the reserving Club has failed to tender him, on or 
before the first day of April, a regular contract with a salary of 
at least one hundred dollars per month for the season next 
ensuing. 

c. When the Club reserving him has transferred its member- 
ship after the close of a championship season to an Association, 
party of the second part other than that of which it was previ- 
ously a member, without the consent of ths Board of Arbitration. 

Fourth. That each Association entitled to the right of reserva- 
tion may be represented at and participate in any discussion 
before the Board of Arbitration affecting its privileges under 
these articles. 

X 111. All contracts or agreements heretofore made between the 
parties thereto arc hereby declared null and void. 

REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OK ARBITRATION. 

I. The officers of the Board shall be a Chairman and a Secre- 
tary, who shall also be Treasurer, who shall be elected at the 
annual meeting of the Board. The term of each officer shall be 
one year, or unt:l his successor shall have been elected anil 
qualified, provided that any vacancy occurring by resignation or 
disqualification during the said term shall be tilled by a majority 
vote of the Board, which vote may be taken by correspondence. 

II. It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the Board of Arbi- 
tration to preside at all its meetings, and he shall call a special 
meeting when he may deem it necessary. All inquiries as to the 



t 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



35 



interpretation of any provision of the National Agreement, or of 
any agreement supplementary thereto, should be addressed to, 
and answered by, the Chairman of the Board. 

III. The Secretary shall have the custody of all official records 
and papers of the Board, shall keep a record of all its meetings, 
and shall issue all official notices. All applications for admission 
to the benefits of the National Agreement should be addressed to, 
and answered by, the Secretary of the Board of Arbitration. 

IV. The regular meeting of the lioard of Arbitration shall be 
held during the month of November, on such day and at such 
place as the Chairman shall direct. 

THE BOARD OF ARBITRATION, 1890. 

X. K. Young, (National League), Chairman, 1'. O. Box 536, 
Washington 1). C. 

Zack Phelps (American Association), Secretary and Treasurer, 
Kenyon Building, Louisville, Ky. 

John I. Rogers (National League), 13S South Sixth St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

1. |. O'Neill (American Association), St. Louis, Mo. 

1'ihn B. Dav, (National League), 121 Maiden Lane, New York 
City. 

A. W. Thurman (American Association), Columbus, 0. 



VSSOCIATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH THE NATIONAL 
AGREEMENT, 1890. 

lilt: NATIONAL LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 
N. I-'.. Young, President and Secretary P. O. Box 536, Wash- 
ngton, 1 '. C. 

IIIK AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF BASE BALL CLUBS, 

Zack Phelps, President and Secretary, Louisville, Ky. 
I III: IM ERNATION u. LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

M. B. Mills President Detroit, Mich. < '. I). White, Secre- 
tary. Utica, N. Y. 

IIIK WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF BASE BALL CLUBS, 
J. S. McCormick, President, Omaha, Neb. M. J. Roche, 
Secretary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Illl: ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION "I PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

._ James M. Braden, President anil Secretary. Jersey City, N. J. 



36 



THE NATION' A I. AGREEMENT. 



THE TEXAS LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 
J. Seinshcimer, President. Adrian M. Jones, Secretary, Gal- 
veston, Texas. 

THE INTER-STATE LEAGUE (WEST) OF PROFESSIONAL BASE HALL 
CLUBS. 

Joseph C. Pritchard, President and Secretary, St. Louis, Mo. 

I 111'. INTEK-STATE LEAGUE (EAST) OF PROFESSIONAL 11ASE HALL 
CLUBS. 
\V. II. Voltz, President and Secretary, Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE TRI-STATE LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS, 
\V. II. McDermith, President and Secretary, Columbus, O. 

THE ILLINOIS AND IOWA LEAGUE. 

Sanger Steel, President, Joliet, III. E. C. Morgan. Secretary, 
Monmouth, 111. 

The following Leagues have been granted temporary protection 
under The National Agreement with leave to qualify by April the 
first: 

Indiana State League; Colorado State League of Base Ball 
Clubs; New England League of Professional Base Ball Clubs; 
The New York State League of Professional liase Ball Clubs; 
Michigan State League; California League; The New York and 
Pennsylvania League. 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



RULE. 

The Ground I 

The Inlield 2 

The liases 3 

Number of (1) 3 

The Home liases (2) 3 

First, Second and Third (3) 3 

Position (4) 3 

Foul Lines 4 

Pitcher's Lines 5 

Catcher's Lines 6 

Captain's Lines 7 

Player's Lines 8 

Batman's Lines 9 

Three Feet Lines 10 

Lines must be Marked 11 

The Ball 12 

Weight and Size (1) 12 

Number Balls Furnished (2) 12 

Furnished by Home Club (3) 12 

Replaced if Injured (4) 12 

The liat 13 

Material of , (1) 13 

Shape of (2) 13 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of Players in Game 14 

Players' Positions 15 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 16 

Club Uniforms 17 

The Pitcher's Position 18 

The Batsman's Position 19 

Order of Batting 20 

Where Players Must Remain (1) 20 

Space Reserved for Umpire (2) 20 

Space Allotted Players "at Bat' 1 (3) 20 

The Players' Benches 2i 

THE GAME. 

Time of Championship Game (1) 22 

Number of Innings (2) 22 

Termination of Game (a) 22 

The Winning Run (b) 22 

A Tie Game 23 

A Drawn Game 24 

A Called Game 25 

A Forfeited Game 26 

Failure of the Nine to Appear. (r) 26 



38 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



Refusal of One Side to Play (2) 

Failure to Resume Playing (3) 

"~iHful Violation (4) 

Disobeying Order to Kei.iove Player (5) 

Written Notice to President (6) 

No Game 

Substitutes 

One or More Substitute Players (1) 

Extra Player (2) 

Base Runner (3) 

Choice of I nnings 

A Fair Ball 

An Unfair Ball 

A Balk 

Motion to Deceive (1) 

Delay by Holding. (2) 

Pitcher Outside of Lines ." (3) 

A Dead Ball.... 

A Foul Strike 

Block Balls 

Stopped by Person Not in Game (1) 

Ball Returned (2) 

Base Runner Must Stop (3) 

The Scoring of Runs 

A Fair Hit 

A Foul Hit 

Batted Ball Outside Grounds 

A Fair Batted Ball 

Strikes 

Ball Struck at by Batsman (1) 

A Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher (2) 

Attempt to Make Foul Hit (3) 

A Foul Strike 

The Batsman is Out . . 

Failure to Take Position at Bat in Order (1) 

Failure to Take Position Within One Minute after 

Being Called (2) 

If He Makes a Foul Hit (3) 

If He Makes a Foul Strike (4) 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher (5) 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire (6) 

If Ball Hits II im while Making Third Strike (7) 

Attempted Foul Hit after Two Strikes (8) 

The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner 

After a Fair Hit (1) 

After Four Balls are Called (2) 

After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 



RULE. 

26 

26 
26 

26 
26 

27 

28 
28 
2S 

2b 
29 
30 
31 

32 
32 
32 
32 

33 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
3" 
37 
& 
39 
40 

4" 
41 
4' 
4t 
42 
43 
43 

43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
44 
44 
44 
44 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



39 



RUL£ 

If Hit by Ball While at Bat (4) 44 

After Illegal Delivery of Ball (5) 44 

Bases to be Touched 4^ 

Entitled to Base 46 

If Umpire Call Four Balls (1) 46 

If Umpire Award Succeeding- Batsman Base (2) 46 

If Umpire Calls Balk (3) 4 e 

If l'itcher's Ball Passes Catcher (4) 4': 

Ball Strikes Umpire (5) 4t 

Prevented from Making Base (6) 4c 

Fielder Stops Ball (7) 4f 

Returning to Bases 45 

If Foul Tip (1) 4; 

IfFoulStrke (2) 4; 

If Dead Ball (3) 47 

Ball Thrown to Intercept Base Runner (4) 47 

Base Runner Out 4S 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from F'ielding Ball. . . . (1) 48 

If Fielder Hold P'air Hit Ball (2) 48 

Third Strike Ball I lelrf by Fielder (3) 48 

Touched with Ball after Three Strikes (4) 48 

Touching First Base (5) 4S 

Running from Home Base to First Base (6) 48 

Running from First to Second Base (7) 48 

Failure to Avoid Fielder (8) 48 

Touched by Ball While in I'lay (o) 48 

l'"air or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (10) 4S 

Batsman Becomes a Base Runner (11) 48 

Touched by Hit Ball before Touching Fielder (12) 48 

Running to Base (13) 4S 

Umpire Calls I'lay (14) 4S 

When Batsman or Base Runner is Out 40, 

Coaching Rules 50 

THE UMPIRE. 

Umpire's Power 51, 52 

When Master of the Field (1) 52 

Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules (2) 52 

Special Duties 53 

Is Sole Judge of Play (1) 53 

Shall see Rules Observed Before Commencing Game(2) 53 

Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing (3) 53 

Must Count and Call Balls (4) 53 

Attention of Umipre is 1 Mrccted Against . • 54 

Laziness or Loafing (1) 54 

Seeking to Disconcert Fielder (2) 54 

Violation of Rules by Base Runner (3) 54 



40 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



RULE, 

Umpire Must Call Play 55 

Umpire Allowed to Call Time 56 

Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines 57 

For Indecent Language (1) 57 

Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within Bounds(2) 55 

Disobedience of a Player (3) 57 

Shall Notify Captain (4) 57 

Repetition of Offenses.. (5) 57 

FIELD RULES. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting 58 

Who Shall be Allowed in the Field 59 

Audience Shall Not be Addressed 60 

Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force 61 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Play ... 62 

Time 63 

Game 64 

An Inning 65 

A Time at Bat 66 

Legal 67 

Scoring '. 68 

Batting (1) 68 

Runs Made (2) 6S 

Base Hits (3) 68 

Sacrifice Hits (4) 68 

Fielding (5) 6S 

Assists (6) 68 

Error (7) 68 

Stolen Bases (8) 68 

Runs Earned •••(9) dS 

The Summary 69 

Number of Earned Runs (1) 69 

Number of Two Base Hits (2) 69 

Number of Three Base Hits (3) 69 

Number of Home Runs (4) 69 

Number of Stolen Bases (5) 69 

Number of Double and Triple Plays (6) 69 

Bases on Called Balls (7) 69 

Bases from Being Hit (S) 69 

Men Struck Out (g) 69 

Passed Balls (10) 69 

Wild Pitches (n) 69 

Time of Game (12) 69 

Name of Umpire (13) 69 

Amendments 70 



L 




NATIONAL PLAYING RULES 

— OF— 

Professional Base Ball Clubs 

AS ADOPTED JOINTLY BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION, AND GOVERNING ALL CLUBS 
PARTIES TO THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

1890. 

THE BALL GROUND. 

Rule I. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in 
size to enable each player to play in his position as required by 
these Rules, 

RULE 2. The Infield must be a space of ground thirty yards 
square. 

i HE BASES. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

SEC. i. Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second 
Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

Sec. 2. The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve 
inches square, so fixed in the ground as to be even with the sur- 
face, and so placed in the corner of the infield that two of its sides 
will form part of the boundaries of said infield. 

Sec. 3. The First, Second and Third Bases must be canvas 
bags, fifteen inches square, painted white, and filled with some 
soft material, and so placed that the center of the second base 
shall be upon its corner of the infield, and the center of the first 
and third bases shall be on the lines running to and from second 
base and seven and one-half inches from the foul lines, providing 
that each base shall be entirely within the foul lines. 

Sec. 2. All the bases must be securely fastened in their posi- 
tions, and so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 
I HE FOUL LINES. 

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in straight lines 
from the outer corner of the Home Base, along the outer edge of 
the First and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 
THE POSITION LINES. 

Rule 5. The Pitcher's Lines must be straight lines forming 
NoTS. — See diagram of diamond page 2. 
41 



42 



PLAYING RULES. 



the boundaries of a space of ground, in the infield, five and one- 
half feet long by four feet wide, distant fifty feet from the center 
of the Home Base, and so placed that the five and one-half feet 
lines would each be two feet distant from and parallel with a 
straight line passing through the center of the Home and Second 
Hases. Each cornerof this space must be marked by a flat round 
rubber plate six inches in diameter, fixed in the ground even with 
the surface. 

RULE 6, The Catcher's Lines must be drawn from the outer 
corner of the Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines, 
straight to the limits of the Ground back of Home Base. 

Rule 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Line must be a line 
fifteen feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines com- 
mencing at a line parallel with and seventy-five feet distant from 
the Catcher's Lines, and running thence to the limits of the 
grounds. 

Rule 8. The Player's Lines must be drawn from the Catcher's 
Lines to the limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and 
parallel with, the foul lines. 

Rule 9. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming 
the boundaries of a space on the right, and of a similar space on 
the left of the Home Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extend- 
ing three feet in front of and three feet behind the center of the 
Home Base, and with its nearest line distant six inches from the 
Home Base. 

Rule 10. The Three Feet Lines must be drawn as follows: 
From a point on the Foul Line from Home Base to First Base, 
and equally distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on Foul 
Ground, at a right angle to said Foul Line, and to a point three 
feet distant from it; thence running parallel with said Foul Line, 
to a point three feet distant from the First Base; thence in a 
straight line to the Foul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line to 
point of beginning. 

Rule ii. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, (>, 7, 8, 9, and 
10 must be marked with chalk or other suitable material, SO as to be 
distinctly seen by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their 
entire length, except the Captain's and Player's Lines, which must 
be so marked for a distance of at least thirty-live yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 

THE BALL. 

Rule i.\ The Ball: 

Sec. I. Must not weigh less than five or more than five and 
one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than nine 
nor more than nine and one -quarter inches in circumference. 



PI.AVING RULES 



43 



The Spalding League Hall or the Reach American Association 
Ball must be used in all games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be fur- 
nishei by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the 
ball in play is batted over the fence or stands, on to foul ground 
out of sight of the players, the other ball shall be immediately put 
into play by the Umpire. As often as one of the two in use shall 
be lost, a new one must be substituted, so that the Umpire may 
at all times, after the game begins, have two for use. The 
moment the Umpire delivers a new or alternate ball to the pitcher 
it comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, 
passes out of sight on to foul ground. At no time shall the ball 
be intentionally discolored by rubbing it with the soil or 
otherwise. 

Sec. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall be 
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes 
the property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in cham- 
pionship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by the 
Secretary of the Association, inclosed in a paper box and sealed 
with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be broken ex- 
cept by the Umpire in the presence of the Captains of the two 
contesting nines after play has been called. 

Sec. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped 
so as to expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be — in the 
opinion of the Umpire — unfit for fair use, the Umpire, on being 
appealed to by either Captain, shall at once put the alternate ball 
into play and call for a new one. 

THE BAT. 

Rule 13. The Bat. 

Sec. 1. Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle 
may be wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, not 
to exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

Sec. 2. It must be round, except that a portion of the surface 
may be flat on one side, but it must not exceed two and one-half 
inches in diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty- 
two inches in length. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

RULE 14. The players of each club in a game shall be nine in 
number, one of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case shall 
less than nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

RULE 15. The player's positions shall be such as may be 
assigned them by their Captain, except that the Pitcher must take 
his position within the Pitcher's Lines, as defined in Rules. 
When in position on the held, all players will be designated 
" Fielders in these rr'^s. 



44 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 16. Players in uniform shall not be permitted 'o seat 
themselves among the spectators. 

RULE 17. Every Club shall be required to adopt uniforms for 
its players, and each player shall be required to present himself 
upon the field during said game in a neat and cleanly condition, 
but no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes 
other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

THE PITCHER'S POSITION. 

RULE iS. The pitcher shall take his position facing the bats- 
man with both feet square on the ground, one foot on the rear 
line of the "box." He shall not raise either foot, unless in the 
act of delivering the ball, nor make more than one step in such 
delivery. He shall hold the ball, before the delivery, fairly in 
front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire. When the pitcher 
feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the above posi- 
tion and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat. 

THE BATSMEN'S POSITION — ORDER OF BATTING. 

RULE 19. The batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 9, in the order in which they 
are named on the score, which must contain the batting order of 
both nines, and be submitted by the Captains of the opposing 
teams to the Umpire before the game, and when approved by 
him THIS SCORE must be followed except in the case of a substi- 
tute player, in which case the substitute must take the place of the 
original player in the batting order. After the first inning the 
first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose name fol- 
lows that of the last man who has completed his turn — time at 
bat — in the preceding inning. 

Rule 20. Sec. i. When their side goes to the bat the players 
must immediately return to and seat themselves upon the players' 
bench and remain there until the side is put out, except when 
batsman or base runner. All bats not in use must be kept in the 
bat racks, and the two players next succeeding the batsman, in the 
order in which they are named on the score, must be ready with 
bat in hand to promptly take position as batsman; provided, that 
the Captain and one assistant only may occupy the space between 
the players' lines and the Captain's lines to coach base runners. 

Sec. 2. No player of the side at bat, except when liatsman, 
shall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 6. The triangular space behind the Home 
Base is reserved for the exclusive use of the Umpire, Catcher and 
liatsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any player of the side 'at 
bat" from crossing the same at any time while the ball is in the 
hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and Catcher, while 
standing in their positions. 



PLAYING RULES. 45 

Sec. 3. The players of the side " at bat" must occupy the por- 
tion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any por- 
tion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder 
attempting to catch or field it. 

players' benches. 

Rule 31. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the 
home club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside the 
Players' Lines. They must be twelve feet in length, and must be 
immovably fastened to the ground. At the end of ?ach bench 
must be immovably fixed a bat rack, with fixtures for holding 
twenty bats: one such rack must be designated for the exclusive 
use of the Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use of 
the Home Club. 

THE GAME. 

RULE 23. Sec. i. Every Championship Game must be com- 
menced not later than two hours before sunset. 

Sec. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that, 

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs, in nine innings than 
the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then 
terminate. 

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores the win- 
ning run before the third man is out, the game shall terminate. 

A TIE CAME. 

Rule 23. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to 
each side, play shall only be continued until the side first at bat 
shall have scored one or more runs than the other side, in an 
equal number of innings, or until the other side shall score one 
or more runs than the side first at bat. 

A DR/TVVN CAME. 

Rule 24. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire 
when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, after 
[\vc equal innings have been played, if the score at the time is 
equal on the last even innings played; but if the side that went 
second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored the same number 
of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal innings. 
A CALLED came. 

RULE 25. If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of dark- 
ness or rain at any time after five innings have been completed 
by both sides, the store shall be that of the last equal innings 
played, unless the side second at bat shall have scored one or 
more runs than the side first at bat, in which case the score of the 
game shall be the total number of runs made. 



40 



PLAYING RULES. 



A FORFEITED CAME. 

Rule 26. A forfeited game shall be be declared by the Um- 
pire in favor of the club not in fault, at the request of such club, 
in the following cases: 

SEC, i. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a field, or 
being upon the field fail to begin the game within five minutes 
after the Umpire has called "Play," at the hour appointed for the 
beginning of the game, unless such delay in appearing or in com- 
mencing the game be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails 
to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or ter- 
minated by the Umpire. 

Sec 3. If. after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one 
side fails to resume playing within one minute after the Umpire 
has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these 
rules is wilfully violated . 

SEC 5 If, after ordering the removal of a player, as autho- 
rized by Ruie 57, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within five min- 
utes. 

Sec. 6. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he shall 
transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the Associa- 
tion within twenty four hours thereafter. 
no GAME 

RULE 27. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he 
shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, before live 
innings on each side are completed. 

substitutes. 

Rule 28. Six. 1. In every championship game each team 
shall be required to have present on the field, in uniform, at least 
two or more substitute players. 

SEC, 2. Two players, whose names shall be printed on the 
score card as extra players, may be substituted at any time by 
either club, but no player so retired shall thereafter participate in 
the game. In addition thereto a substitute may be allowed at any 
time in place of a player disabled in the game then being played, 
by reason of illness or injury, of the nature and extent of which 
the Umpire shall be the sole judge. 

Sec. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him, except by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams. 

CHOICE OK INNINGS — CONDITION OK GROUND. 
RULE 29. The choice of innings shall be given to the Captain 
of the Home Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness 
of the ground for beginning a game after rain. 



L\\ 



PLAYING RULES. 



•1 



THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL — FAIR AND UNFAIR HALLS. 

Rule 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher 
while standing wholly within the lines of his position, and facing 
the Batsman, the ball, so delivered, to pass over the Home Base, 
not lower than the Batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home 
Base, or does pass over the Home Base, above the Batsman's 
shoulder, or below the knee. 

BALKING. 

Rule 32. A Balk is 

Sec. 1. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball to 
the bat without delivering it, and shall be held to include any and 
every accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or posi- 
tion of the body assumed by the Pitcher in his delivery of the ball 
and any motion calculated to deceive a base runner, except the ball 
be accidentally dropped. 

Sec. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to 
delay the game unnecessarily; or 

Sec. 3. Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering the 
ball to the bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is 
upon ground outside of the lines of his position, including all 
preliminary motions with the hands, arms, and feet. 

DEAD BALLS. 

RULE 33- A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or 
any part of the Batsman's person or clothing while standing in his 
position without being struck at; or any part of the Umpire's 
person or clothing, while on foul ground, without first passing 
the Catcher. 

Rule 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball nor legally 
caught out, Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck 
by a fair hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until it 
is held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 
BLOCK HALLS. 

Rule 35- Sec i. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is 
stopped or handled by any person not engaged in the game. 

Sec. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare it, 
and Base Runners may run the bases, without being put out, 
until the ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher stand- 
ing in his position. 

Sec 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," 
and require each Base Runner to stop at the last base touched by 



r 



48 



PLAYING KULK1 



him until the ball be returned to the Pitcher standing in his 
position. 

THE SCORING OF RUNS. 

Rule 36. One Run shall be scored every timea Base Runner, 
after having legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the 
Home Base before three men are put out by (exception ) If the 
third man is forced out, or is put out before reaching First Base, a 
run shall not be scored. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

RULE 37. A hair Hit is a ball batted by the batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, 
the Third Base, any part of the person of a player, Umpire or any 
other object that is in front of or on either side of the Foul Lines, 
or batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in his 
position that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home and First, 
or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player. 

RULE 38. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, any part of the 
person of a player, or any other object that is behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or batted directly to the ground by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first touches 
Foul or Fair ground) bounds or rolls outside the Foul Lines, 
between Home and First or Home and Third liases without 
interference by a player. Provided, that a Foul Hit not rising 
above the Batsman's head and caught by the Catcher playing 
within ten feet of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip 
HALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS. 

RULE 39. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the 
Umpire shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul 
should it disappear outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and 
Rules 37 and 38 are to be construed accordingly. 

RULE 40. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less 
distance than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall 
entitle the Batsman to two bases and a distinctive line shall be 
marked on the fence at this point. 

STRIKES. 

Rule 41. A Strike is 

Sec. I. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching 
his bat; or 

Sec. 2. A Fair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not 
struck at by the Batsman. 

Sec. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Feu! Hit. 



PLAYING RULES. 



49 



RULE 42. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the liatsman when 
anv part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the 
Batsman's position. 

TIIK IJATSMAN IS OUT. 

RULE 43. The liatsman is out: 

SEC. I. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of 
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper liatsman 
takes his position before a fair hit has been made; and in such 
case the balls and strikes called must be counted in the time at !>;>' 
of the proper liatsman. Provided, this rule shall not take effei.' 
unless the out is declared before the ball is delivered to the sue 
cceding Batsman 

Sec. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute after 
the Umpire has called for the liatsman. 

SEC. 3. If he makes a Foul Hit, other than a Foul Tip as 
defined in Rule 38, and the ball be nr mentarily held by a 
Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught in 
a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder, 
before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike. 

Sue. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from Fielding 
the ball, evidently without effort to make a fair hit. 

Skc:. 6 If, while the First Base be occupied by a base runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two 
men are already out. 

Skc. 7. If, while making the third strike, the ball hits his 
person or clothing. 

Sec. 8. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Section 3, Rule 41. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

WHEN HIE IJATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER. 

RULE 44. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner: 

Sec. 1. Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit 

Sec. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the 
Umpire. 

Skc. 3. 
Umpire. 

SEC, 4. If, while he be a Batsman, his person or clothing be 
hit by a ball from the Pitcher, unless -in the opinion of the Um- 
pire — he intentionally permits himself to be so hit. 

SEC, 5. Instantly after an illegal deliveiy of a ball by the 
Pitcher. 

BASKS TO HE TOUCHED. 

Rule 45. The Base Runner must touch each base in regular 
order, viz.: First, Second, Third and Home Bases; and when 



Instantly after three strikes have been declared by the 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



obliged to return (except on a foul hit) must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order. He shall only be considered as holding a 
base after touching it, and shall then be entitled to hold such 
base until he has legally touched the next base in order, or has 
been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base Runner. 
ENTITLED TO BASES. 
RULE 46. The ISase Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take the Base in the following cases: 
" Sec. I. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called four 
Balls. 

Sec 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base 
on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an 
illegal delivery — as in Rule 44, Sec. 5 — and the Base Runner is 
thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 
Sec. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball delivered by the I'itcher pass the Catcher 
and touch the Umpire or any fence or building within ninety feet 
of the Home Base. 

Sec. 5. If upon a fair hit the Ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the Umpire on fair ground. 

Sec. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the ob- 
struction of an adversary. 

SEC. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his 
hat, or any part of his dress. 

RETURNING TO RASES. 
Rule 47. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall 
be entitled to so return without being put out. 

Sec. 1. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined in 

Rule 38) or any other Foul Hit not legally caught by a Kidder 

Sec. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

Sec. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also 

the fourth Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next 

ba^e, as provided in Rule 46, Sec. 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes 
with the Catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the Catcher 
to intercept a Base Runner. 

WHEN BASE RUNNERS ARE OUT. 
RULE 48. The Base Runner is out: 

Sec. I. If, after three strikes have been declared against him 
while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, 
he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball. 
Sec. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair 
hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the 
ground or any object other than a Fielder: Provided, it be not 
caught in a Fielder's hat or cap. 




PLAYING RULES. 



51 



SEC. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on 
him, while Batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by 
a Fielder before touching the ground: Provided, it be not caught 
in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a 
Fielder, before being caught. 

SEC. 4. If, after Three Strikes, or a Fair Hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a F'ielder before such Base Runner 
touches F'irst Base. 

SEC. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be se- 
curely held by a F'ielder, while touching F'irst Base with any part 
of his person, before such Base Runner touches First Base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from Home 
Base to First Base, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as 
defined in Rule 10; except that he must do so if necessary to 
avoid a F'ielder attempting to field a batted ball, and in such case 
shall not be declared out. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from F'irst to Second Base, from Sec- 
ond to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base he runs more 
than three feet from a direct line between such bases to avoid 
being touched by the ball in the hands of a F'ielder; but in case a 
Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper path, attempting 
to held a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall run out of the 
path, and behind said Fielder, and shall not be declared out for 
so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fails to avoid a F'ielder attempting to field a 
batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 of this 
Rule; or if he in any way obstructs a F'ielder attempting to held 
a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball. Pro- 
vided, That if two or more F'ielders attempt to field a batted ball, 
and the Base Runner comes in contact with one or more of them, 
the Umpire shall determine which F'ielder is entitled to the ben- 
efit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base Runner out lor 
coming in contact with any other Fielder. 

Sec. <). If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched 
by the ball in the hands of a F'ielder, unless some part of his per- 
son is touching a base he is entitled to occupy: Provided, The 
ball be held by the F'ielder after touching him; but (exception as 
to First Base), in running to First Base, he may overrun said base 
without being put out for being off said base, after first touching 
it, provided he returns at once and retouches the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, in overrunning First 
Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or, after passing the 
base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such 
exemption from being put out. 

SEC. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball (other than a foul 
tip as referred to in Rule 3S) is legally caught by a F'ielder, such 



52 



PLAYING RULES. 



ball is legally held by a Fielder on the ISase occupied by the Base 
Runner when such ball was struck (or the liasc Runner be touched 
with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), before he retouches said 
base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was so caught. Provided, 
That the Base Runner shall not be out in such case, if, after the 
ball was legally caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said base, or touches the 
Base Runner with it; but if the Iiase Runner in attempting to 
reach a base, detaches it before being touched or forced out, be 
shall be declared safe. 

Sec. ii. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the 
F'irst Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the F'irst, Second 
and Third liases, be occupied, any Base Runner so occupying a 
base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until any following Base 
Runner is put out and may be put out at the next base or by being 
touched by the ball in the hands of a F'ielder in the same manner 
as in running to F'irst Base, at any time before any following 
Base Runner is put out. 

Sec. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him before touching the 
fielder, and in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the 
Batsman becoming a Base Runner, and no run shall be scored or 
any other Base Runner put out: 

SEC. 13. If. when running to a base or forced to return to a 
base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases if any, in the 
order prescribed in Rule 45, he may be put out at the base he fails 
to touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, 
in the same manner as in running to First Base. 

Sec. 14. If, when the Umpire calls '• Play," after any suspen- 
sion of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occu- 
pied when "Time" was called before touching the next base. 
WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT. 
Rui.K 49. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base Run- 
ner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all 
cases where such player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 48, Sections 10 and 14. 
COACHING RULES. 
RULE 50. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in coach- 
ing to the Base Runner only, and are not allowed to address any 
remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in words of 
necessary direction; and no player shall use language which will 
in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing 
club, or the audience. To enforce the above, the Captain of the 
opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offense, 
and upon a repetition of the same the club shall be debarred from 
further coaching during the game. 



PLAYING RULES. 




THE UMPIRE. 

RULE 51. The Umpire shall not be changed during the pro- 
gress of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 
HIS I'OWERS AND JURISDICTION. 

RULE 52. Sec. i. The Umpire is master of the Field from 
the commencement to the termination of the game, and is entitled 
to the respect of the spectators, and any person offering any insult 
or indignity to him must be promptly ejected from the grounds. 

Sec. 2. He must be invariably addressed by t he players as Mr. 
Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe the provisions 
of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested with authority 
to order any player to do or omit to do any act as he may deem 
necessary, to give force and effect to any and all of such provisions. 
SPECIAL DUTIES. 

Rule 53. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 

Sec. 1. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. 
In no instance shall any person be allowed to question the cor- 
rectness of any decision made by him except the Captains of the 
contending nines, and no other player shall at such time leave his 
position in the field, his place at the bat, on the bases or players' 
bench, to approach or address the Umpire in word or act upon 
such disputed decision. Neither shall any Manager or other officers 
of either club— except the Captains as before mentioned — be per- 
mitted to go upon the held or address the Umpire in regard to 
such disputed decision, under a penalty of a forfeiture of the game 
to the opposing club. The Umpire shall in no case appeal to any 
spectator for information in regard to any case, and shall not re- 
verse his decision on any point of play on the testimony of any 
player or bystander. 

Sec. 2. liefore the commencement of a (lame, the Umpire 
shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the game are 
Strictly observed, lie shall ask the Captain of the Home Club 
whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, and if 
there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, provided they 
do not conflict with any of these rules. He shall also ascertain 
whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's position is distant 
ninety feet from the Home Base. 

Sec. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing 
constantly from the commencement of the game to its termination, 
allowing such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, 
injury or rain, lie must, until the completion of the game, require 
the players of each side to promptly take their positions in the field 
as soon as the third man is put out, and must require the iirst 
striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon 
as the fielders are in their places. 



54 



PLAYING KULES. 



Sec. 4. The Umpire- shall count and call every " unfair ball " 
delivered by the Pitcher and every "dead ball," if also an unfair 
ball, as a ' ball," and he shall also count and call every "strike." 
Neither a "ball" nor a "strike" shall be counted or called until 
the ball has passed the Home Base. He shall also declare every 
"Dead Ball " " Block," " Foul Hit," "Foul Strike," and "Balk" 
, Rule 54. For the special benefit of the patrons of the game, 
and because the offences specilied are under his immediate juris- 
diction, and not subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible violations of the pur- 
pose and spirit of the Rules, of the following; character: 

Sec I. Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places in 
the field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their side is at 
the bat, and especially any failure to keep the bats in the racks pro- 
vided for them; to be ready (two men) to take position as Batsmen, 
and to remain upon the Players' Bench, except when otherwise 
required by the Rules. 

Sec. 2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling to 
a F'ielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field a 
ball, or by any other equally disreputable means seeking to discon- 
cert a Fielder. 

Sec. 3. The Rules make -a marked distinction between hin- 
drance of an adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This 
has been done to rid the game of the childish excuses and claims 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball to put out a Base 
Runner. But there may be cases of a Base Runner so flagrantly 
violating the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in obstructing a 
Fielder from fielding a thrown ball that it would become the duty 
of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out" (and 
to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but 
also to impose a heavy fine upon him. For example: If the P.ase 
Runner plainly strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its 
being caught by a Fielder; if he holds a Fielder's arms so as to 
disable him from catching the ball, or if he run against or knock 
the Fielder down for the same purpose. 

CALLING "PLAY" AND "TIME." 

RULE 55. The Umpire must call "Play," promptly at the 
hour designated by the Home Club, and on the call of "Play" the 
game must immediately begin, When he calls "Time," play 
shall be suspended until he calls "Play" again, and during the 
interim no plaver shall be put out, base be run. or run be scored. 
The Umpire shall suspend play only for an accident to himself or 
a player (but in case of accident to a Fielder, "Time" shall not be 
called until the ball be returned to and held by the Pitcher, stand- 
ing in his position), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spec- 
tators are compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, 



PLAYING RULES. 



55 



in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and should 
such rain continue to fall thirty minutes thereafter, he shall ter- 
minate the game; or to enforce order in case of annoyance from 
spectators. 

RULE 56, The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call 
"Time" in case of an accident to himself or a player, a "lilock," 
as referred to in Rule 35, Sec. 1, or in case of rain, as defined 
by the Rules. Tbe practice of players suspending the game to 
discuss or contest a decision with the Umpire, is a gross viola- 
tion of the Rules, and the Umpire must promptly line any player 
who interrupts the game in this manner. 

INFLICTING KINKS. 

RULE 57. The Umpire is empowered to inflict fines of not less 
than $5.00 nor more than $.'5x0 for the first offence on players 
during the progress of a game, as follows: 

SEC. 1. Kor indecent or improper language addressed to the 
audience, the Umpire, or any player. 

Sec. 2. For the Captain or Coacher wilfully failing to remain 
within the legal bounds of his position, except upon an appeal by 
the Captain Irom the Umpire's decision upon a misinterpretation 
of the rules. 

Sec. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his 
orders or for any other violation of these Rules. 

SEC. 4. In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, he 
shall at once notify the Captain of the offending player's side, and 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the 
Association or League within twenty-four hours thereafter, under 
the penalty of having said fine taken from his own salary. 

SEC. 5. A repetition of any of the above offences shall, at the 
discretion of the Umpire, subject the offender either to a repeti- 
tion of the fine or to removal from the field, and the immediate 
substitution of another player then in uniform. 
FIELD RULES. 

Rule 58. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling 
upon its grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

RULE 59. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the 
liclil during the progress of the game, in addition to the players in 
uniform, the Manager on each side and the Umpire; except such 
officers of tiie law as may be present in uniform, and such officials 
of the Home Club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

RULE do. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or player shall ad- 
dress the audience during the progress of a game, except in case of 
necessary explanation. 

RULE 61. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force upon 
its own grounds to preserve order, anil in the event of a crowd enter- 



56 



PLAYING RULES. 



ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfering with 
the play in any manner, the Visiting Club iray refuse to play 
further until the held be cleared. If the ground be not cleared 
within fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may claim, and 
shall be entitled to, the game by a score of nine runs to none (no 
matter what number of innings have been played.) 
GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Rule 62. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin the 
game, or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 63. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend 
play. Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the 
game. 

Rule 64. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire that 
the game is terminated. 

Rule 65. "An Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players 
representing a Club in a game, and is completed when three of 
such players have been put out as provided in these rules- 

Rule t6. "A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Batsman 
It begins when he takes his position, and continues until he is put 
out or becomes a base runner; except when, because of being hit 
by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 44 

Rule 67. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by these 
Rules. 

SCORING, 

Rule 68. In order to promote Uniformity in Scoring Champ- 
ionship Games the following instructions, suggestions and defi- 
nitions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required 
to make all scores in accordance therewith. 
HATTING. 

Sec. 1. The first item in the tabulated score, after the play- 
er's name and position, shall be the number of times he has been 
at bat during the game. The time or times when the player has 
been sent to base by being hit by a pitched ball, by the Pitcher's 
i'legal delivery, or by a base on balls, shall not be included in this 
column. 

SEC. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

Sec 3. In the third column should be placed the first base 
hits made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the 
fallowing cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the foul 
lines, and out of reach of the Fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder in 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle 
the ball before the striker reaches First Base. 




PLAYING RULES. 



57 



When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the Batsman In case of doubt over 
this class of hits, score a base hit, and exempt the Fielder from 
the charge of an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the Batsman. 

That in all cases where a Base Runner is retired by being hit by 
a batted ball, the Batsman should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, 
as defined in Rule 37. 

Sec. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice hits, 
which shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when but one man is 
out advances a Runner a base on a fly to the outfield or a ground 
hit, which results in putting out the Batsman, or would so result 
if handled without error. 

FIELDING. 

Sec. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a striker is given 
out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or because he struck out of 
his turn, the put out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

Sec. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set 
down in the sixth column. An assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play 
of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time 
to put a runner out, even if the player who could complete the 
play fails, through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches 
the player who makes the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to 
each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and in such a way 
that a put-out results, or would result if no error were made by 
the receiver. 

ERRORS. 

Sec. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for 
each misplay which allows the striker or base runner to make one 
or more bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out, except that "wild pitches," "bases on balls," "bases on the 
batsman being struck by a pitched ball," or case of illegal pitched 
balls, balks and passed balls, shall not be included in said column. 
In scoring errors of batted balls see Section 3 of this Rule. 
STOLEN UASES. 

Sec. 8. Stolen bases shall be scored as follows: 
Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base 
runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, 
but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder making the 



58 



PLAYING RULES. 



same. If the base runner advances another base he shall not be 
credited with a stolen base, and the fielder allowing- the advance- 
ment is also to be charged with an error. If a base runner makes 
a start and a battery error is made, the runner secures the credit 
of a stolen base, and the battery error is scored against the player 
making it. Should a base runner overrun a base and then be put 
out, he shonld receive the credit for the stolen base. 
EARNED RUNS. 

Sec. g. An earned run shall be scored every time the player 
reaches the home base unaided by errors before chances have 
been offered to retire the side. 

THE SUMMARY. 

Rule 69. The Summary shall contain: 

Sec. I. The number of earned runs made by each side 

Sec. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player. 

Sec. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

Sec. 4. The number of home runs made by each player. 

Sec. 5. The number of bases stolen by each player. 

Sec. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each 
side, with the names of the players assisting in the same. 

Sec. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls by 
each Pitcher. 

Sec. S. The number of men given bases from being hit by 
pitched balls. 

Sec. 9. The number of men struck out. 

Sec. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

Sec. II. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher. 

Sec. 12. The time of game. 

Sec. 13. The name of the Umpire. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Rule 70. No Amendment or change of any of these National 
Playing Rules shall be made, except by a joint committee on 
rules, consisting of three members from the National League and 
three members from the American Association. Such committee 
to be appointed at the annual meetings of each of said bodies to 
serve one year from the twentieth day of December of each year. 
Such committee shall have full power to act, provided that such 
amendments shall be made only by an affirmative vote of the 
majority of each delegation. 






SPECIAL MEETINGS OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 59 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of the 

National League oe Professional Base Hall Clubs 
held at the fifth avenue hotel, new york clty, 
Wednesday, Nov. 13, 1889. 

Meeting called to order at 11.05 A - M - 

I 'resent: 

N. E. Voting, Chairman, and Messrs. Brush, Nimick, Day and 
Hewett, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of championship 
games won and lost during the season of 18S9. On motion, the 
following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the New York Hall Club of New York City hay- 
ing won the greatest percentage of games in the championship 
series, is hereby awarded the League Championship of the United 
States for the year 1S89. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary. 

The Secretary presented the petitions of Messrs. Lynch and 
Curry, asking that the amounts ($48.00) each, stopped from their 
pay for time lost by reason of injuries received, be refunded. 

On motion, the petitions were allowed. 

The Secretary also presented the petition of Mr. McQuaid, ask- 
ing that he be paid for time lost by reason of illness contracted 
while in line of duty. 

On motion, the petition of Mr. McQuaid was disallowed. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

N. 10. Young, Chaitman. 

Signed, 

YVm. A. Nimick, | 
W. K. Hewett, 
|. T. Brush, 
JNO. 1!. Day, J 

Annual Meeting of the National League of Professional 
Uase Ball Clubs, held atthe Fifth Avenue Hotel, New 
York City, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 1889. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 12 o'clock noon. 
1 'resent: 
A. II. Soden and W. [I. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 



■ Directors- 



w 



60 



SPECIAL MELTINGS 



John T. ISrush and \V. II. Schmidt, representing the Indianapolis 

Ball Club. 
W. A. Nimick and A. K. Scandrett, representing the Allegheny 

Base Ball Club, 
[ohn B. Day and C. T. Dillingham, representing the New York 

Ball Club. 
A. J. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia 

Ball Club. 
A. G, and J. W. Spalding, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 
F. Dell. Robinson and Geo. W. Howe, representing the Cleve- 
land Base Ball Company. 
W, F. Hewett, representing the Washington Base Ball Club. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting 
was dispensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
accepted. 

The report of the Committee on Playing Rules was received 
and accepted. The Board of Arbitration submitted its report 
which was, on motion, accepted, and the President of the League 
duly authorized to sign the National Agreement on behalf of the 
League Clubs. 

The regular order of business was suspended, and the League 
proceeded to consider amendments to the League Constitution. 

On motion, a recess was taken until 4:30 P. M. 

Meeting called to order at 4:45 P. M. 

The regular order being resumed, Messrs. Anson, Wright and 
Mutrie were invited to be present during the deliberations of the 
League. The committee appointed to confer with the Brother- 
hood submitted its report as follows: 

To the Members of the National League: 

Gentlemen: — The special committee, consisting of A. G. 
Spalding, Chairman, John I. Rogers and John B. Day, appointed 
by President Young on June 1 5, for the consideration of ail griev- 
ances of League players not specially provided for by the League 
Constitution, make the following report: 

It seems to us that the best manner to present this report to the 
League will be to give the official correspondence that has passed 
between John M. Ward and the Chairman of the League com- 
mittee. The following is a copy of the original letter received by 
President Voting from John M. Ward, under date of May 31, 
iSS<j: 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 61 

"At a meeting between the League and Brotherhood commit- 
tees in November, 1889, the former agreed for the League that 
players should not be reserved at a reduction of salary. In pur- 
suance of this agreement the new contract was made to read that 
the players could not be reserved at a salary less than that men- 
tioned in paragraph 20 of the contract, the understanding being 
that the full salary would be inserted. This last the League 
afterward claimed to be unable to do, because of the refusal of 
the American Association to agree to the repeal of the obsolete 
two thousand dollar limit rule, but this need not have interfered 
in any way with its fulfilment of the agreement itself not to re- 
serve at a reduction of salary. In the application of the classifi- 
cation scheme the League has violated its promises by holding 
men at a reduced salary. At the annual meeting of the represent- 
ative body of the Brotherhood it was resolved to insist upon the 
fulfilment by the League of ics agreement, and to respectfully, but 
firmly, ask that justice be done in the cases of those members who 
have been injured by this default. The committee also protests 
against the 'evils of the sales system.' " 

Upon the receipt of the notification from President Young of 
the appointment of this committee, with the above letter inclosed, 
the Chairman communicated with Ward at Cleveland, suggesting 
that a conference should take place upon the arrival of Ward in 
Chicago June 24. The substance of that conference can, per- 
haps, be best explained by quoting the following letter sent by 
the Chairman to his fellow-committeemen, Messrs. Day and 
Rogers: 

"Messrs. /0/111 B. Day and John I. Rogers — Gentlemen: — 
By a recent appointment of President Young I find myself 
Chairman of a special committee consisting of you two gentlemen 
and myself, for the consideration of all grievances of League 
players not specially provided for in the League Constitution. 
Last week I received a note from John M. Ward, asking when it 
would be convenient for the committee to meet the Brotherhood 
committee. I replied to him at once and suggested that, as he 
would be here this week, the matter be left for a personal discussion. 
Yesterday Mr. Ward called on me and we spent a couple of hours 
discussing the matter that the Brotherhood asked to lay before the 
League committee." 

To sum up the discussion in a few words. I will give you the 
points in the words of John Ward, which are as follows: 

"1st. The Brotherhood claim that the classification in its appli- 
cation violates the understanding had with the Brotherhood in 
1SS7. 

•'2d. They ask for a modification of the present system of buy- 
ing and selling releases of players. 



62 SPECIAL MEETINGS 

"3d. They make one specific charge, to the effect that Sut- 
cliffe, of the Cleveland Club, has been affected by the new classi- 
fication rule, claiming that he received his salary of $2,000 from 
the Detroit Club in 1888, and had signed with the Cleveland Club 
for 18S9 at the classfication figure of $1,750. 

This was the only instance cited by Mr. Ward indicating that 
the classification rule clashed with the terms of the Brotherhood 
contract. With the exception of Sutcliffe, Ward does not claim 
that the League has violated the letter of the Brotherhood con- 
tract, but the spirit thereof, claiming that while it was not specially 
written in the contract, it was understood that the total amount of 
salary pa d a player, whether written in the contract or not, was 
to be the'basis of reservation. 

As I happened to be a member of the League committee ap- 
pointed to confer with the Brotherhood committee relative to a 
change in the contract, I assured him that, so far as I was con- 
cerned (and 1 thought I voiced the sentiments of the other mem- 
bers of that committee), there was no such understanding, for it 
was specially intended that the Brotherhood contract should express 
in exact terms every relation between the club and the player, 
while the matter of the $2,000 salary, in vogue when this Brother- 
hood contract was adopted, was referred to at the time, yet, as I 
remember the circumstances, it was distinctly understood that the 
salary named in clause 20 of the League contract should be the 
basis of reservation for the following year, although it was under- 
stood that additional salary above the stated sum named, could be 
paid and evidenced by a sub-contract. 

After discussing the matter fully with Ward, and being assured 
by him that these were the only points that he desired to bring 
before the League, I suggested to him that, in my personal opin- 
ion, the claims of the Brotherhood were not of sufficient urgency, 
and that no material interest would suffer in postponing the con- 
ference of the two committees until the close of the championship 
season, or until the annual meeting of the League. But I told 
him that I would lay the result of our talk before you two gentle- 
men, and upon receipt of your replies would inform him whether 
the committee would meet them immediately or not, and if so 
when and where. 

I gave him to understand that all the committee was empowered 
to do, would be to listen to the suggestions and alleged grievances 
of his committee, and report the result of that conference to the 
League at its special or annual meeting. I suggested to him that, 
inasmuch as all the contracts had been entered into on the part of 
the different League clubs and their players, and as the discussion 
of these matters in mid-season might have an effect on the cham- 
pionship race andtend to attract the attention ot the public and 



Or THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



63 



players to this issue rather than to the games themselves, that I, 
personally, was in favor of postponing it until the end of the 
season. 

I shall expect to receive your views in the matter at your earliest 
convenience, that 1 may make Ward a definite reply, as promised. 
Yours truly, 

A. G. SPALDING, Chairman. 

Replies were received from both these gentlemen on July 2, to 
the effect that in view of the nature of the claims, and the fact 
that no material interest would suffer by postponing the matter 
until the close of the championship season, or at the annual meet- 
ing, it was unanimously agreed by your committee that it was 
advisable to postpone consideration of the matters referred to by 
the representative of the Brotherhood until a later date. 

The following is a copy of the letter sent to John Ward, at 
Pittsburg, under date of July 2: 

John .!/. Ward, President Players' Brotherhood, Pittsburgh, 
Pa.: — Dear Sir — Since my conversation with you on the 24th ult-, 
I have been in communication with Messrs. Rogers and Day, the 
other members of the committee appointed by the League to con- 
sider all grievances of League players not especially provided for 
by the League constitution. It is the unanimous opinion of this 
committee that it is inadvisable to hold a meeting of the Brotherhood 
committee at present, partially for the reason that no material inter- 
ests will suffer by postponing the meeting, and for the principal 
reason that all this committee could do would be to report the result 
of the conference, with recommendations, to the League at a special 
or at the annual meeting. It is contrary to the past policy of the 
League to call a special meeting in mid-season except for some 
extraordinary emergency, and we fail to discover any necessity for 
immediate action in the points you raise. 

If it shall appear, upon investigation, that any injustice has been 
done any player, whether a member of the Brotherhood or not, it 
can and will be righted at the annual meeting of the League. 
Therefore, as chairman of the League committee, I would suggest 
that the meeting of the two committees be deferred until after the 
close of the championship season, or until the annual meeting of 
the League the exact time and place of such meeting to be 
decided upon as the time approaches. 

Yours respectfully, 

A. G. Spalding, 

Chairman League Committee. 
No reply was received to this letter. 



A 






' 



64 



SPECIAL MKKTINGS 



On Sept. 27 the following letter was delivered to Ward in 
Chicago : 

John M. Waid, President Players' Brotherhood, Tretnont 

House, City: — Dear Sir — Referring to my letter to you of July 2, 
I find the following expression: 

" I would suggest that the meeting of the two committees be 
deferred until after the close of the championship season, or until 
the annual meeting of the League, the exact time and place of 
such meeting to be decided upon as the time approaches." 

In accordance with the suggestion quoted above, I will be 
pleased to have you name a date when it will be convenient for 
your committee to meet the League committee and consider the 
suggestions for which this committee was appointed. 
Yours respectfully, 

A. G. Spalding, 

Chairman League Committee. 

A reply was received from Ward to the effect " that as the com- 
mittee appointed by the Iirotherhood to meet the League com- 
mittee on this matter was not a standing committee, it had 
submitted its report and been discharged, and therefore he would 
submit the communication to the entire Brotherhood." 

No further communication has been received by this committee. 
All of which is respectfully submitted: 

A. G. SPALDING, Chairman. 

New York, Nov. 13, i8Sg. 

On motion the report of the committee was accepted, their 
action indorsed, and the committee discharged. 

Mr. Spalding then stated that although the Iirotherhood com- 
mittee had refused further conference with the League committee, 
and therefore have not substantiated by proofs the charges against 
the Cleveland Club in the Sutcliffe case, yet he moved that the 
League would itself investigate said charges forthwith. Carried. 

The Cleveland delegates then stated that Mr. Sutcliffe 's contract 
for 1888 with the Detroit Club was entered into on the old form 
and of a date prior to the formulation of the Iirotherhood contract, 
and therefore contained no salary perpetuating clause. That Mr. 
Sutcliffe having been classified for 1SS9. at $1,750 salary, he had 
no legal right to insist on repeating the $2,000 salary in his De- 
troit contract of 1888, because the latter was entered into prior to 
the formulation of the Iirotherhood contract. After this state- 
ment of facts, the following resolution was adopted: 



THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



WHEREAS, It has been brought to the notice of this League 
that E. E. Sutcliffe, a player of the Cleveland Club, claims that 
he is entitled to payment by that club to him of the sum of $ 250, 
as being the amount paid him for the season of 1839 less than he 
received with the Detroit Club for the season of 1S88; and 

WHEREAS, Such claim is made pursuant to the understanding 
had with the committee of the Brotherhood of Players whereby a 
player consented to serve a club for the season next ensuing the 
expiration of his contract, provided he should suffer no reduction 
in salary; and 

WHEREAS, Such was the spirit of the understanding with the 
Brotherhood committee, and it was so expressed in the form of 
contract then agreed upon; therefore, 

Resolved, That although, as a matter of fact, Sutcliffe did not 
sign a contract containing a perpetuating salary clause for the 
season of 1S88; he, however, signed a contract with the Detroit 
Club under date of Oct. 24, 1887, prior to the agreement with the 
Brotherhood committee, and although there is some doubt as to 
whether Sutcliffe did or did not voluntarily consent to play for 
the Cleveland Club for a less amount than was named in his con- 
tract with the Detroit Club, the year preceding, yet as it was the 
plain intention on the part of both parties at the time the Brother- 
hood contract was agreed upon that the players when thereafter 
"reserved" for the ensuing season should receive not less than the 
same salary specified in the contract for the current season, and as this 
is the only case that has been brought to the notice of the League 
involving a claim of the character indicated, it is hereby ordered 
that the Secretary of the League pay to the said E. E. Sutcliffe 
the sum of $250, being the difference between the amount paid 
him for his services with the Detroit Club for the season of 1888 
and the amount thus far paid him by the Cleveland Club for the 
season of 1889. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 11 A. M. on the following day. 

Thursday, Nov. 14, 1889. 

Meeting called to order at 1 1 A. M. 

The Secretary presented the applications of the Brooklyn and 
Cincinnati Base Ball Clubs for League membership. Upon a 
ballot being taken they were unanimously elected, and Messrs. C. 
IL Byrne and F. A. Abell representing the former, and A. S. 
Stern and Harry Stern representing the latter, were duly admitted 
as the representatives of their respective clubs. 

The President of the League was authorized to designate and 
fix the colois of uniforms for each club. 




66 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



The communication of Messrs. Harris & Sons was referred 
to the President with full power to act. 

The following officers and committees were elected and ap- 
pointed for the ensuing year, viz.: 

President — N. E. Young. 

Directors — F. De If. Robinson, C. II. Iiyrne, W. A. Nimick, 
W. F. Hewett. 

Schedule Committee — A. II. Soden, A. G. Spalding, W. A 
Nimick. 

Playing Rules Committee— A. G Spalding, J no 13. Day, J no. 
I. Rogers. 

Board of A> titration — N. K. Young, Jno. I>. Day, John I. 
Rogers. 

The following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting be held in New York 
City. 

Resolved, That the Schedule Meeting in the spring, be held in 
the city of Cleveland. 

The contract for printing was awarded to Mr. Jno. B. Sage of 
Buffalo, N Y. On motion a committee of three was appointed 
to prepare an address to the public. The Chair appointed Messrs. 
Spalding, Rogers and Day as such committee. 

Our motion adjourned to meet at n A. M. on the following day. 

Friday, Nov. iS, 1 889. 

Meeting called to order at 11:15 A. M. 

Mr. Rogers reported that as it is a notorious fact that a number 
of players reserved by League Clubs have declared their intention 
to violate said reserve, notwithstanding notices by their respective 
clubs of said reserve, and of the batters option to renew the usual 
form of contract with such players for the season of l8go. Also 
that the opinions of eminent counsel had been received affirming the 
legal and equitable rights of League Clubs under said contracts to 
the services of their reserved players for the season of 1S90. That, 
therefore, he moved the following resolution, which was adopted: 

Resolved, That this League hereby declare that it will aid each 
of its club members in the enforcement of the contractual rights of 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, 



67 



said clubs to the services of its reserved players for the season of 
1S90, and that a committee of three be appointed by the League 
wih full power to act and to formulate and carry out the best 
mehods of enforcement of such contractual rights of said clubs, 
andthat said committee be authorized to draw upon the guarantee 
fund of the League such amount as may be necessary to carry out 
the intent and purpose of this resolution. 

Messrs. Rogers, liyrne and Day were appointed a committee 
under the above resolution. 

The following resolutions were introduced by Mr. Spalding, and 
unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That no League Club shall from this date enter into 
negotiations or contract with players not under League reservation, 
or enter into negotiations with any club for the transfer of any of 
its players until February 1, 1S90. 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed, to be desig- 
nated as the Negotiations Committee, of which the President of 
the League shall be Chairman, to which shall be referred all appli- 
cations from players desiring positions on League teams, as well 
as applications from club members of the National Agreement 
wishing to dispose of the releases of their players. 

Resolved, That the Chairman of this committee shall be the 
exclusive channel through which such application and negotiation 
can be conducted by the National League or any of its clubs, and 
said committee shall ascertain the terms upon which any such 
releases can be procured, or such contracts executed. 

Resolved, That all League Clubs in order to secure the services 
of such players, will indicate to the Chairman the positions to be 
Idled ami the names of the players wanted, and upon the unani- 
mous vote of said committee, a contract may be executed between 
a club and any player so approved, and promulgated in the usual 
manner. 

Resolved, That the committee, by its unanimous vote, be autho- 
rized to draw from the guarantee hind of the League, such funds 
as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of the resolution, to 
be repaid to said fund by the clubs benelited thereby. 

Messrs. Voting, liyrne and Reach were appointed a committee 
under the above resolutions. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That it be the sense of the meeting that the " Nego- 
tiations Committee" shall give each club an opportunity to file an 
application for a player's services before an assignment is made. 



68 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Should two or mote clubs desire the services of the same player, 
the assignment shall be decided by lot. 

Section 33 of the League Constitution was suspended until 
February 1, 1S90. 

It was unanimously agreed that when we adjourn, we adjourn to 
meet in New York City, January 28, 180,0. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

N. E. Young, Secretary, 



Special Meeting ok the Board ok Directors of the Na- 
tional League ok Professional Base Bali. Clubs field at 
the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New Vokk City, Friday, Nov. 

16, 1SS9. 

Meeting called to order at 3 P. M. 
Present: 

N. E. Young, Chairman, and Messrs. Robinson, Byrne and 
Ilewett, Directors. 

The Chairman submitted the account of Mr. John B. Day for 
moneys paid for legal opinions, etc. 

On motion the President of the League was authorized and 
instructed to reimburse Mr. Day the amounts paid out by him 
from the guarantee fund, or any other available funds of the 
1 -eague . 
On motion adjourned. N. E. YOUNG, Chaiiman. 

W. F. Hewett, ) 
[Signed] F. De 1 1. Robinson, \ Directors. 

C. II. Byrne, 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League ok 
Professional Base Ball Clubs held at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, New York City, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 1S90. 

Meeting called to order at 3 o'clock \\ M. 
Present: 

John B. Day and C. T, Dillingham, representing the New York- 
Ball Club. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



G9 



A. G. Spalding and J. W. Spalding, representing the Chicago 
Ball Club. 

A. J. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia 
Hall Club. 

J. T. Brush and J. II. Martin, representing the Indianapolis 
Ball Club. 

A. K. Scandrett and II. R. Brown, representing the Allegheny 
Base Ball Club. 

C. II. Byrne and F, A. Abell, representing the Brooklyn Base 
Rail Club. ' 

\V. F. Ilewett, representing the Washington Iiase Ball Club. 

Harry Sterne, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

F. De II. Robinson and Davis Ilawley, representing the Cleve- 
land Base Ball Company. 

A. II. Soden and \V. II. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 

On motion, the reading of minutes of the previous meeting was 
dispensed with. 

The Negotiations Committee submitted its report, which was 
accepted. 

The special committee on law reported: 

That under their direction suits in equity had been instituted in 
New York- and Philadelphia to restrain certain reserved players 
from playing with any but their respective League Clubs during 
the season of 1890. 

That in Philadelphia the suits were being pushed for final argu- 
ment without asking for a preliminary injunction, but in New 
York a test case had been made, with the New York Club as 
plaintiff and John M. Ward as defendant, and an application for 
a preliminary injunction argued and refused. 

That in the latter case the Judge (Hon. Morgan J. O'Brien), 
while holding that on the face of the record no urgency appeared 
that would warrant the issuance of a preliminary injunction, and 
that a regular trial was necessary to dissipate doubts, and substan- 
tiate by proofs the right to a perpetual restraining order against 
Ward, most unequivocally decided the main contention in favor of 
the League's claim that the iSth paragraph of the players' contract 



70 



SPECIAL MKETINGS 



of 1889 gives to ench club an option on the players' services for 
the season of 1890. 

The committee while congratulating the Leagne on this first 
judicial indorsement of the reserve clause in its contracts, respect- 
fully r commend that they be authorized to direct, not only the 
prosecution of the New York and Philadelphia suits to a final con- 
clusion, but that suits in equity be instituted in every State and 
Federal Court in the United States that may be necessary to obtain 
proper jurisdiction to restrain League players who are bound or 
reserved by contract with League Clubs for 1S90 from giving their 
services to any other club or clubs. 

The report of committee was accepted and adopted. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 A. M. on the following day. 

Thursday, Jan. 30, 1S90. 

Meeting called to order at 11 A. M. 

A communication was received from the agent of the Buffalo 
Club stating that he was authorized to negotiate for the release for 
the following named reserved players of thai club, viz: M. 11. 
Lehane, C. C. Collins, J. J. Rcidy, I''.. J. I'lynn, \V. \V. Andrus, 
C. Hamburgh, A. Shepherd, P. E. Dealy. 

On motion, the communication was referred to the Negotiations 
Committee. 

On motion, the League Clubs were all directed to wear white 
uniforms while playing on the home grounds, and any color other 
than white, that they may select while playing away from home. 

On motion the whole question as to the number of persons to 
be admitted free to witness championship games was referred to 
the Schedule Committee with instructions to report at the Schedule 
meeting. 

It was unanimously agreed that when we adjourn, we adjourn 
subject to the call of the Chairman. 

An informal discussion took place as to the advisability of 
increasing the League membership, which, meeting with no favor, 
the subject was dropped without taking formal action. 

On motion adjourned. 

X. K. Voung, Chairman. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



71 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League of 

Professional Base Ball Clubs Held at the YVeddell 

House, Cleveland, O., Tuesday, March 4, 1S90. 

Present: 

A. II. Soden and YV. II. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Bull Association. 

C. II. Byrne and J. J. Doyle, representing the Brooklyn Base 
Ball Club. 

W. A. Nimick and J. Palmer O'Neil, representing the Alle- 
gheny Base Ball Club. 

\V. F. Hewett, representing the Washington Base Ball Club. 

Harry Sterne, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

A. J. Reach, representing the Philadelphia Ball Club. 

A. G, Spalding and Jas. A. Hart, representing the Chicago 
Ball Club. 

Jno. B. Day and C. T. Dillingham, representing the New 
York Ball Club. 

J. 'I'. Brush, representing the Indianapolis Ball Club. 

F. De H. Kobison and Davis llawley, representing the Cleve- 
land Base Pall Company. 

Meeting called to order at 12:55 ''• M - 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the last meeting was 
dispensed with. 

The committee appointed to consider the question of free ad- 
missions, submitted the following report, which was unanimously 
adopted: 

" Your committee recommend that the home club in making a 
settlement with the visiting club be authorized to deduct from the 
total turnstile count an allowance of three per cent, as an offset to 
the free tickets issued. They further recommend that a private 
entrance shall be allow ed for the sole admission of the players of 
the visiting club, and for the exclusive use of the officials of the 
home club and policemen on duty, and that no persons other than 
there, be permitted to use such private entrance." 

The following motion was unanimously adopted: 

" That the forty per centum of gate receipts mentioned in Sec- 
tion 60 of the League Constitution be construed and understood 
to mean twenty cents per capita, turnstile count, except in the case 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



of the Philadelphia Club, where ten cents per capita, turnstile 
count, shall be paid." 

A communication from Messrs. Tracy, McFarland, Ivins, 
Boardman and Piatt addressed to Jno 15. Day Esq., was presented 
and read by the Secretary. 

Communications of F. II. Brunei! were read by the Secretary, 
and on motion, were laid upon the table. 

The Schedule Committee recommend that the mileage of each 
club be averaged and the cost computed on a basis of fourteen 
men at a fixed rate per mile each. All clubs below the average 
to pay an amount into the League treasury to equal the average. 
The clubs having paid on the same basis, an amount exceeding the 
average to be reimbursed such amount at the close of the season. 
The recommendation of the committee was unanimously adopted. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 A. M. on the following day. 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report, and pending its 
consideration, on motion adjourned to meet on the following day. 

March 5, iSno, 

Meeting called to order at 8:45 p. M. 

On motion the schedule was referred back to the Schedule Com- 
mittee for the purpose, if possible, of submitting a more satisfac- 
tory schedule, and giving each club an opportunity to appear 
before the committee to make such suggestions as they may deem 
for the best interests of their own club. 

On motion adjourned to meet on the following day. 

March 6, 189,0. 

Meeting called to order at 6 p. m. 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report, which was unani- 
mously adopted. 

It was unanimously agreed that when we adjourn, we adjourn 
to meet subject to the call of the President. 
On motion adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 
President and Secretary. 






OF THE NATIONAL I.F.AOUK. 



73 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of. tiif. National League 
ok Professional Bask Ball Clubs, held at tiif. Fifth 
Avenue Hotel, New York City, Friday, March 21, iSgo. 

Meeting- called to order at 11:45 ''■ M, 

Present: 

A. II. Soden and W, II. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 

J. J. Doyle, representing the Brooklyn P.ase Ball Club. 

Harry Sterne, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

A. G Spalding and J. \Y. Spalding, representing the Chicago 
Ball Club. 

John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia Ball Club. 

John B. Day, representing the New York Ball Club. 

W. A. Nimick and J. P. O'Neill, representing the Allegheny 
Base Ball Club. 

F. Dell. Robinson and Ceo. \V. Howe, representing the 
Cleveland Base Ball Company. 

Jno. T. Brush, representing the Indianapolis Base Ball Club. 

W. F. Dewett, representing the Washington Base P.all Club. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting 
was dispensed with. 

The special committee appointed at Cleveland to confer with 
the Indianapolis and Washington Clubs, with a view to their 
retirement from League membership, submitted its report, which 
was unanimously adopted. 

On motion, Mr. Rogers was appointed a committee of one to 
confer with solicitors of the other Associations with a view of 
formulating a new form of contract. 

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to accept the resig- 
nation of the Washington Club when presented. 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report, and it was 
unanimously adopted. 

On motion adjourned. 

X. E. Young. President ami Secretary 



1 



74 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION' OF BOSTON, 
MASS. 

A. II. Soden, Piesident, J. B. Billings, Treasure. 

No. 116 Water St. Box 1756. 
Geo. B. Billings, Sec'y, No. 116 Summer St. 

W, S. Brodie, Louis W. Ilardie, A. Shellhasse, 

John P. Taber, John G. Clarkson, Robt. L. Lowe, 

C. A. Nichols, Geo. K. Hodyman, I'. J. Donovan, 

Jas. McGarr, C. M. Smith, C. \V. Bennett, 

Chas. W. Ganzel, H. C. Long, T. J. Tucker. 

CHICAGO BALL CLUB OF CHICAGO, ILL 



A. G, Spalding, President, 
No. 10S Madison St. 



A. C. Anson, 
Cliff Carroll, 
Thos. E. Burns, 
Thos. Nagle, 
M. J. Sullivan, 



J. J. Cooney, 
Howard Earl, 
W. F, Hutchinson, 
M. |. Kittredge, 
W. R. Wilmot. 
\V. E. Coughliu. 



J no. A. Brown, Secretary, 
No. 165 Loomis St. 



J P. Andrews, 
W. B. Inks, 
J. C. Laner, 
Peter J. O'Brien, 
Ed. H. Eisteljorg, 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL COMPANY, OK CLEVELAND, 
OHIO. 



F. DeIL ROBINSON, President. Davis HaWLEY, Secretary. 

Geo. W. Howe, Treasuter. 



Ed. Beatin, 
Vincent Daily, 
E. J. McKean, 
W. D. Smaller, 

Jno. Wadsworth, 



Geo. Davis, 
R.J. Gilks, 
Chas. L Parsons, 
L. C. Stockwell, 
C. L. Ximmer. 



Thos. J. Dowse, 
Ezra P. Lincoln, 
Joseph Somers, 
W. W, Veach, 



BROOKLYN BASE BALL CI. UP. OK BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Chas. II. Byrne, President, 

Co>. c,tii Ave. and 4th St. 
T. P. liurns. II. Collins. 

L S. Corkhill. R. II. Clark, 

I). L. Koutz, M. K. Hughes, 

G. B. Pinkney, G I. Smith, 

W. D. O'Brien, C. S. Reynolds, 



1*'. A. AiiEi.L, Secretary. 

J. J. Doyle, Treas. 
R. L. Caruthers, 
Thos. P. Daily, 
J. Newman, 
W. II. Terry, 
Geo. T. Stalling. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



75 



CINCINNATI BASE BALL CLUB OF CINCINNATI, O. 

Harry Sterne, Secretary. 



A. S. STERN, President, 
No 126 Vine St. 



C. B. Baldwin, 
Win Karl, 
|as. W. Keenan, 
J. A. McPhee, 
Ceo. Tcbeau, 



Ollie I'. Heard, 
J. W. Ilolliday, 
"j. W. Knight,' 
H. Nicol, 
L. Vian, 
F. J. Foreman. 



W. W. Carpenter, 
ferrv Harrington, 
T. f. Mullane, 
J. G. Keilly, 
Wm. Withrock, 



PHILADELPHIA BALL CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A. J. Reach, President, fNO. I. R'GERS, Treasurer, 

No. 1 1 13 Market St. No. 13S S. bt/i St. 

Harry Wright, Manager, No, 1941 A\ 22</ St. 
David Anderson, R. G. Allen, E. D, Burke, 

John Clements; E. H. Decker, E. J. Delehanty, 

Wm. Day, . Wm. Gleason, AI. Myers, 

Joseph Mulvey, Ed. Mayer, S. L. Thompson, 

Allen McCaulley, Wm. Schriver, Jno. F. Smith. 



ALLEGHENY BASE BALL CLUB OF PITTSBURGH, PA. 



W. A. NlMICK, President, 

No. 22 Ross St. 
J. 1'. Beckley, 
II. Brandenburg, 
Chas. Cray, 
Henry Jones, 
G. F. Miller, 
P. I. Routcliffe, 
W. A. Sunday, 



John P. Berger, 
P. J. Daniels, 
Guy Hecker, 
Jno. J. Kelty, 
Ed Mulhearn, 
Wm. Sowders, 
Wm. Wilson, 



A. K. SCANDRETT, Secretary, 
Register 1 * Office. 
Kirtley Baker, 
P. J. Conway, 
W. II. Hemp, 
S. II. Laroque, 
Fred. Root, 
Fred. Schmitt, 
Henry Youngman. 



NEW YORK BALL CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY. 



Jno. B. Day, President, 
No. 121 Maiden Lane 



P. J. Murphy, Thos. O'Rourke, 

M. Tiernan, Jas. Gallyar, 

M. Welch, '1'. Frank Turner, 
Jno. Henry Murphy, Samuel N. Crane, 

C. E. Bassett, J. A. Sommers, 

Jerry Dennv, H. J. Boyle, 

M. J. Scanl'au, R. i> Buckley, 



|amks MuTRlE, Manager, 
Polo Giouuds, 1 $s"< St. &Ȥth Arc. 



Arthur F. Clarke 
Joseph Hornung, 
Chas. L. Dooley, 
Jno. Farrell, 
Jno. W. Glasscock, 
Jesse Burkett, 
A. W. Rusie. 



7G 



BATTING AN'D FIELDING RECORD. 



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COCO73IOC0C0C0O3 



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o; x x i- t- ■■£ 30 -ji 



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■uoav «ani*9 838£83383 



•paXeu ssuibq 



cooi?5^iOfo^5o* 







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>* c 

c 


Philadelphia.. 

Cleveland 
Indianapolis... 
Washington.. . 



4> C 



■jtu«a 



^h zt rt *r *n x t- x 



LEAGUE HATTING AVERAGES. 



77 



THE LEAGUE AVERAGES FOR 1889/ 

Here is the modified record of the League batting averages for 
18S9 of those who played in 100 games or over. 



Brouthers, 

Glasscock 

Anson 

Tiernan 

Ryan 

Van Haltren .. 

O'Rdurke 

Connor 

Seery 

Duffy 

Gore 

Richardson, H . 

Uincs 

McKean 

W ilmot 

Beckley 

Ward 

Thompson ...... 

Kelly 

Mulvey 

Tebeail 

Hoy 

Denny 

Richardson, D. 

Twitchell 

Nash 

Farrar 

Miller 

McGeachy 

Myers, A 

Farrcll , 

Quinn.. .. 

V ogarty . . . . + 



Cli us, 



Boston 

Indianapolis 

Chicago 

New York 

Chicago 

Chicago j... 

New York 

New York 

Indianapolis 

Chicago 

New York 

Boston 

Indianapolis 

Cleveland 

Washington 

Pittsburgh 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Cleveland 

Washington 

Indianapolis 

New York 

Cleveland 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Indianapolis. ... 

Washington «fc Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Philadelphia 





c 2 




i 




"X 


ca 












s 

E 


4J W 


S 
V 

"o 





O 


d, 


C/3 


t/3 


126 


.373- 


22 


31 


134 


.889 


57 


34 


1 31 


.311 


27 


41 


128 


.334 


43 


28 


185 


324 


45 


14 


184 


.322 


28 


18 


1* 


.320 


S3 


24 


131 


.31(1 


21 


33 


127 


.318 


10 


17 


1311 


.811 


52 


35 


11» 


.305 


30 


17 


132 


.sin 


47 


34 


121 


.304 


34 


33 


123 


.302 


35 


83 


KIT 


.301 


40 


28 


123 


.300 


11 


8H 


114 


.298 


02 


41 


128 


.2% 


24 


32 


125 


.203 


08 


52 


12!) 


.288 


23 


35 


I SB 


.282 


20 


81 


127 


.282 


80 


31 


IRS 


.282 


22 


27 


124 


270 


32 


30 


184 


.275 


17 


33 


127 


.274 


20 


3R 


130 


.208 


28 


30 


102 


.287 


10 


18 


131 


.207 


37 


33 


121 


.866 


17 


89 


100 


.203 


13 


14 


111 


.201 


24 


32 


128 


.258 


00 


32 



105 
128 

Oil 
140 
140 
120 

89 
117 
123 
144 
131 
122 

86 

88 
112 
80 
103 
120 
77 
72 
98 
'.Hi 
88 
73 
84 
70 



70 
60 
57 
107 



LEAGUE HATTING AVERAGES. 



Playbrs. 



Burns. ... 
Mailman ., 
Basset.. .. 
Strieker. . 

Wise 

Pfeffer. . . 
Radford.. 
Hanlon. .. 
McAleer., 
Dunlap. . . 
Irwin, A. 
Smith.... 

Faatz 

Johnston . 
Whitney. 



Clubs. 



Chicago. 

Philadelphia. ... 

Indianapolis 

Cleveland 

Washington 

Chicago 

Cleveland , 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Washington & Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh and Boston 

Cleveland 

Boston 

New York 





■« . 










*2 


V) 












fiS 




a 






<e 


cm 


E 




u 




a 


£.* 


05 


<A 


186 


.257 


18 


22 


no 


253 


3U 


II 


12IS 


253 


ir> 


211 


136 


251 


33 


31 


120 


250 


34 


37 


134 


.241 


44 


41 


136 


238 


30 


33 


118 


.338 


53 


34 


109 


235 


37 


25 


121 


.235 


21 


32 


108 


232 


17 


24 


131 


.281 


2!) 


38 


IIS 


.280 


27 


OQ 


131 


.338 


34 


25 


129 


317 


19 


34 



til 

6? 
64 
83 
79 
85 
94 
81 
66 
59 
58 
47 
50 
80 
71 



The following are the averages of those who played in fifty 
games and over, and less than one hundred. 



Playkrs. 



Carroll.. .. 

Ewing 

Andrews... 
Daily. T 
Delehanty . 
Mack 
Irwin. J 
Sullivan .... 
Clements... 
Maul .... 
Ganzell. . . . 
Schriver .. 
Ziromer. ... 

Rowe 

Buckley. . 

White 

Wood 

Daily, G.., 
Sutcliffe... 
Kuehne . . . 
Sunday. .. . 

Gilks 

Brown, T., 
Bennett. . .. 
Carney. ... 
Clarkson . . . 



Clubs. 



Pittsburgh 

New York 

Philadclp'a & Indianapolis. 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

Washington 

Indianapolis 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

Philadelphia, 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Indianapolis 

Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia 

Indianapolis 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Boston 

Boston 

Washington 

Boston 













o." 




u 




-I 


<.I 


rt 






o 




g 


o w 




a 


« 


SSM 




o 


O 1 




t/l 


r n 


90 


380 


15 


19 


96 


826 


38 


34 


50 


303 


10 


17 


li!) 


31X1 


11 


18 


54 


292 


15 


19 


(17 


292 


34 


26 


58 


289 


11 


10 


(i'J 


285 


7 


15 


'S 


284 


15 


6 


C7 


271! 


15 


18 


71 


2115 


33 


13 


55 


205 


Tli 


« 


80 


25H 


14 


14 


74 


258 


21 


6 


05 


258 


18 


3 


55 


253 


15 


2 


97 


351 


27 


17 


60 


351 


15 


14 


66 


348 


12 


6 


97 


34li 


34 


15 


80 


239 


13 


47 


52 


338 


12 


5 


88 


333 


17 


63 


NO 


330 


15 


4 


(i» 


230 


34 


12 


72 


206 


12 


5 



LEAGUE BATTING AVERAGES. 



79 



The following are the averages of those who played in twenty- 
five games and over. 



Players. 



Beecher. .., 
(Jiimbert. 
Sanders, . , , 

Tener 

\V. Brown . 
Clark 

GleasOll, . . . 

O'Brien ... 
Sinners . . 

tfu»ck 

Sweeney. . . 
Bufflnton .. 

Crane 

Dwyer 

Myers, G... 

Welch.. 



Clubs 



Darling Chicago.. 



Washington 

Chicago". 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

New York 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Cleveland 

Chicago & Indianapolis 

Washington ... 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

New York 

< hicago 

Indianapolis 

New York 



Radboume . 

Oalvin 

Morrell 

Hatfield 

Getzeln . .. . 
Rusie 

G. Keefe 

Staley 

Hutchinson. 

T Keefe 

Basiian ... . 

Bakely 

Beatin 

Person 



Boston . 
Pittsburgh. .. 
Washington . 
New York. .. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Washington . 
Pittsburgh. .. 

Chicago 

New York . . . 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Cleveland.. . . . 
Washington.. 







„; 


(C 










to 

B 


is 


5 


m 

at 

-n 






«9 




a 


^ 


03 


'ji 


41 


.290 


14 


7 


49 


.287 


ti 


1 


41 


.378 


14 


8 


38 


.273 


8 


2 


33 


.25!) 


8 


4 


37 


.255 


8 


6 


28 


.252 


10 





41 


.860 


8 





31 


.240 


« 


2 


30 


.238 


13 


9 


40 


.228 


« 


8 


41 


.208 


21 


1 


28 


.204 


4 


6 


33 


.203 


(> 


1 


39 


.194 


5 


12 


41 


.192 


9 





35 


.191 


li 


3 


.35 


.188 


13 


2 


41) 


.187 


9 


2 


41 


.185 


12 


12 


32 


.184 


i 


9 


10 


179 


12 


2 


•_>(; 


.174 


4 


1 


27 


.163 


3 


2 


4(1 


.Hit 


5 


1 


37 


. 158 


4 


1 


41 


.154 


5 





48 


.135 


7 


1 


33 


.1:35 


3 


1 


37 


.115 


9 


n 


35 


.114 


7 






o c 

Is 



20 
30 
21 
18 
IB 
19 
11 
13 
V 
12 
13 
16 
16 
14 
22 
20 
14 
17 
15 
20 
21 
2.1 
15 

7 
11 
14 
17 
19 

9 
13 

6 



The following are the average of those who played in fifteen games and 
over— t lie limit: 



l'LAYEKS. 



Madden .. 
Sowders.. 
Ebright... 
Shoeueck 

Casey 

Flint 

Healy 

Snydir.... 

Krock 

O'Day 

Grnber.... 
Morris.... 



CLUBS. 



Boston 

Pittsburgh & Boston 

Washington 

Indianapolis 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Washington & Chicago. 

Cleveland 

Chicago, Ind. & Washington 
Washington & New York 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 



oW 
SB 



s 



a s a 

CO M K 



.290 
,281 
.264 

.242 
.234 
.232 
.227 
!l92 
.186! 
.1461 
.1011 
.0971 



80 



PITCHER S RECORD. 



PITCHER'S RECORD IN ALPHABETICAL 
ORDER. 



Names. 



Beatin 

Bakeley.... 

Buffinto*. 

Boyle 

Crane 

Clarkson ... 

Casey 

Dwyer 

Ferson 

Getzein 

Galvin 

Gruber. .. 
Gumbert..,. 

Gleason 

Hutchinson 
Haddock. .. 

Healy 

Keefe 

Keefe 

Krock 

Morris.. . .. 
Madden ... 

O'Day 

O'Brien.... 

Rusie 

Radbourne . 
Staley .... 
Sowders.... 

Sanders 

Tener 

Welch .... 



Cluks. 



Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

Indianapolis 

New York 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Washington 

Indianapolis 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Chicago. 

Philadelphia 

Chicago. 

Washington 

Wash, and Chicago.. 

New York 

Washington . 

Chi. Ind. and Wash 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

Wash and N. York... 

Cleveland 

Indianapolis 

Boston 

Pittsburgh 

Pitts, and Boston . . 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

New York 



37 

33 

II 

44 

28 

72 

17 

29 

35 

40 

40 

23 

29 

25 

37 

33 

lfi 

41 

28 

17 

18 

20 

23 fi 

41 5 

26 .(> 

32 

48 

15 

40 

31 

to 



SO 



W3. 
u m 

s5 



0(12.48 
03 u 2.15 

8rfe.8i 

22 2.78 

25 2 03 
86 ; 1.89 
172.85 
862.96 
,742.84 
578.57 
678.02 
261 82 
13 2.72 
88:120 
65 2.4li 
.452.61 
198 81 

in i.iia 
n 2 ei 

708.82 

94 2 84 
55 3.10 

092 21 

2!i:2 41 

3.07 

40 

81 

40 

57 

8 26 

31 



11 

01 . 

« J? 



.2.713 
.2553 
.2592 

.280 2 

[2408 

.203 4 
.270 2 
.205 2 
.2812 
.281 1 
.252 3 
2021 
295 3 
.2508 
,271 1 3 
2811 3 
,21il3 
.2985 
.322 2 
.2811 
.271 3 
.27!! 4 
.205 4 
.20!) 1 

!5il 2 
210:3 
282 2 
25!) 3 

.23018 



=<2 

OS 



m< 



"IS 

pa 



83 3.48 
273.24 
83 3.40 
25 2.29 
.03.4.80 
.83 4.05 
.(Hi 3.94 
.09 2 48 
.97 2.54 
.55 3.50 
92 L.T2 
.09 2.78 
58 3.38 
90 2.90 
05 4.05 
88 3.30 
69 4.87 
75 5.41 
01 3.40 
88 2.70 
83 2 27 
45 3.05 
.08 2 20 

19 3.19 
92 4.34 
50 2 97 
52 3.54 

20 3 20 
25 8.15 
29 3 04 
75 3.22 






821 
.786 
,875 
.810 
591 
865 
787 
772 
782 
782 
795 
.675 
791 
747 
841 
,758 
,741 
802 
,785 
.800 
891 
,802 
807 
.755 
,732 
919 
.751 
700 
784 
813 
,768 



FIELDING AVERAGES. 



81 



THE FIELDING AVERAGES. 

The following record gives all the important figures of the fielding 
averages of Players who took part in not less than fifteen games in the 
Championship contests of the National League for 1889. 

PITCHERS. 



PLAYERS. 


CLUBS. 


in 
o 

a 

<• 

c 


m 
O 

a 
i . 

OJ 

•g ft 
nS 


M 

V 


PLAYERS. 


CLUBS. 


m 

9 

3 
O 


§ 

I • 

Off 

II 

« 
u 

m 






82 
18 

41 
Tl 
41 
20 
31 
37 
37 
23 
17 

•10 
29 
33 
77 


.919 

.891' 

.8651 
.862! 
.882 
.843, 
.841 
.821; 
.807! 
.800! 

.795 ' 
.791 
.788 
.787 


Keefe.G 


Washington .. 
Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis 
Washington... 


26 

40 
40 
35 
2S> 
15 
41 


.785 




Pittsburgh. ... 
Philadelphia. 


.784 
.78-3 
78fl 






,77fl 




Sowders 

Welch 


Pitts. &Bost. 

New York 

Washiugton .. 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh ... 
Philadelphia. 
Wash. & Chi. 
Indianapolis. 


■ 7fi« 






.763 






Haddock .... 
O'Brien 

Staley 


33 1 .758 


O'Day 


Cleveland 
Wash. & N.Y. 
Chi., Ind. & 

Wash. 
Pittsburgh ... 


41 1 .755 
48| .751 




10 .741 






26 .732 
23 .675 




Cleveland 

Philadelphia. 


28 .591 


Casey 




1 





CATCHERS. 



Bennett..., 

Ewing 

Ganzell ... 

Darling 

Daily 

Clements 
Schriber.. 
Zimmer... 

Hnyder 

Farrell 

Buckley... 



Boston 

New York, 

Boston 

Chicago.... 
Washington.. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

Indianapolis. 



80 


.910 


94 .894 


36 


.890 


35 


.875 


54 


.874 


78 


.857 


4H 


.856 


77 


.843 


21 


.842 


75 


.837 


52 


.833 



Fields 

Sutcliffe .. 

Milton 

Daily , 

Carroll 

Mack 

Brown 

IMyers 

Kelly 

iFlint 

ISommers 



Pittsburgh ... 


Hi 


.825 




5(1 


,89.4 


Pittsburgh.... 


78 


.819 


Indianapolis 


48 


.815 


Pittsburgh.... 


43 


.812 


Washington .. 


4:i 


.799 


New York 


30 


.785 


IndianapoliB 


17 


.781 




16 


.772 




.709 


Chi. & Ind 


30 


.707 



FIRST BASEMEN. 







184 


rtm 


Brouthers... 








Pittsburgh.... 

Washington.. 

New York 

IndianapoliB. 


122 .981 




115 
40 
181 


.980 
.979, 

.977 




Indianapolis. 
Washington., 
Washington .. 


109 .964 

58. 357 






Shoeneck.... 


IIS 


.977 







J 



82 



FIELDING AVERAGES. 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Danlap Pittsburgh ...;121| .049 



Pfeffer 

BasBett 

Myers 

Richardson. 



Chicago 134' .943 

Indianapolis. 126] .937 
Wash.&PhiIal21 .935 
New York 1 124] .933 



Strieker Cleveland 

Quiim Boston 

Richardson. Boston 

Wise Washington. 



136 

47 
86 
71 



932 
925 
923 
.916 



Delehant'y... Philadelphia.! 23J .888 



I 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



nenney, 

Nash 

Tebeau. 
Mulvey. 
Kuehne. 



Indianapolis. .133 913 .Whiting...... New York 1291 .88' 

Boston 127 1 .905 lllurns Chicago 136 .R7 a 

Cleveland.. ...136. .897 ;Wbite Pittsburgh ... 52, .871 

Philadelphia. 129 .892 Irwin, A Washington...: 58 .868 

Pittsburgh ...I 7Sl .885 I Sweeny Washington..! 47l .802 



SHORT STOPS. 



Bastian ... 
Glasscock 
McKean ... 

Rowe 

Hallman .. 
Irwin, A... 
Smith 



Chicago | 45 .919! i Ward (New York.. 



Indianapolis. 131 

Cleveland 123 

Pittsburgh ...| 74 
Philadelphia. 106 
Phila.&Wash 103 
Pitts. & Bost. 117 



.915 
.907 
.896. 
.895 
.892| 
.891 



Quinn ]Boston 

Hatfield I New York 

Williamson , Chicago 

Wise i Washington.. 

Ryan jChicago 



.860 
.855 
.843 
.817 
.794 



LEFT FIELDERS. 



Delehanty... 


Philadelphia. 




33 

88 
130 

128 
68 


.905 
.901 




Washington.. 
Cleveland 




.898 


Twitchell ... 
Wood 


13il .916 lO'Rourke ... New York „ 
91] .915 1 Fields Pittsbureh ... 


.892 

a r .o 

















CENTER FIELDERS. 



Gilks Cleveland | 29 

Fogarty Philadelphia. 128 

McMeer Cleveland Il09 

Miller Pittsburgh ... 25 

Ryan Chicago 106 

Hanlon [Pittsburgh.... 115 



.1000 
.960 
.955 
.934 
.9211 
.919 



Johnston 
Sullivan.. 

Hoy 

Andrews 
Carroll.... 
Gove 



Boston 131 

Indianapolis. 64 
Washinijton.. 12/ 
Phila. & Ind. 49 
Pittsburgh ... 39 
New York 119 



.914 

.910 
.890 

.864 
.867 
.863 



RIGHT FIELDERS. 





Pittsburgh.... 
Pittsburgh.... 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Indianapolis 
Indianapolis. 
Washington.. 




Philadelphia. 


\"H 




80 .945 
21, .943 
136' .942 
131 .918 
22 .909 
29) .905 


Tiernan .. .. 
Duffy 


122 

1 "n 




[Kelly 




25 


McGeachy... 


Washington.. 
Washington .. 


39 
1 9 


Shock 




11 



091 
.896 
.894 
,892 
.860 
818 
,786 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



83 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 
SEASON OF 1889. 



May 



DATS 

1889. 



April 24 
" 21 



WHEIIK 

Played. 



Names or Contestants. 



Wash'n't'n'Washington vb. Philadelphia* 

Jersey C'ty New York vs. Boston 

PittBburg .. Pittsburg vs. Chicago 

Indianap'sjlndianapolis vs. Cleveland 



Jersey C'ty New York vs. Boston.... 
Pittsburg.. Pittsburg vs. Chicago.. 



Indianap's Indianapolis vs. Cleveland* 

" " Chicago 

Pittsburg .J Pittsburg vs. Cleveland... 

New York..'New York vb. Washington... 
Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Boston 



Pittsburg.. Pittsburg vs. Cleveland.. 



Winning 

Club. 



Phil'delp'a 1 

Boston 

Pittsburg..; 
Indianap's' 
Cleveland. 
New York- 
Pittsburg.. < 

Chicago I 

Indianap's; 
Cleveland . 

Chicago 

Cleveland . 
New York.. 

Boston 

Phil'delp'a 
Pittsburg... 



Runs 

Scored 






New York..|New York vs. Washington.. 
Indianap's.Indianapolis vs. Chicago 



New York.. New York vs. Washington.. 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Boston 

PittBburg.. PittBburg vs. Cleveland 



New York.. New York vs. Washington... 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Indianap's IndianapoliB vs. Chicago 

" " Pittsburg... 
Phil'delp'a, Philadelphia vs. New York- 
Cleveland.. Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Wash'u't'n Washington vs. Boston 

Pbil'delp'a' Philadelphia vs. New York- 
Cleveland.. Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Indianap'B IndianapoliB vs. PittBburg... 



Cleveland.. Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Boston 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vb. Now York...,. 

Indianap'B Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg....!. 

Cleveland..'cieveland vb. Chicago 

'* IndianapoliB.... 

Chicago !Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

Boston BoBton vs. New York 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Washington. 



. I New York.. 

. lndianai>V 

.Chicago.. J 

.New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 

'Pittsburg.. 

^Cleveland.. 

!New York.. 

.: Boston 

Indianap'B 

1 Pittsburg .. 
Phil'delp'a 
Chicago... ., 
Boston 

Phil'delp'a. 
Cleveland.. 
Indianap's 
Pittsburg.. 
i Cleveland.. 

Boston 

New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 

Chicago 

Cleveland . 
Pittsburg .. 

Boston 

Wash'u't'n 



8 

8 
10 
10 
11 

S 

7 
14 

4 

8 

2 

4 ' 
8 

*> 

6 

5 
IS 
111 

3 

4 
Hi 

5 
IB 
13 

9 

4 

9 

3 
11 

4 
17 

7 
II 

23 1 
13 

6 
10 

5 I 
8 

a 

7 
9 



84 



RECORD ()K CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



record op championship games— Continued. 



Datk Where 
1889. i Played. 



May 9 

•J 

9 

9 

" 10 

" 10 

" 10 

" 10 

" 11 

" 11 

" 11 

" 11 

" 13 

" 13 

" 13 

" 13 

" 11 

ii u 

:: \i 

" 15 

•' U 

" 15 

" IB I 

" IB I 

" 16 

" 16 

" 17 

" 17 

■i 17 

.. 17 

" 18 

" .'8 

•' 18 

" 18 

ii 21 

" 21 

•i 22 

'■ 22 

■i 22 

•i 23 

" 23 

" 23 

■i 24 

■' 24 

■i 24 

" 24 

" 25 

•i 25 



PhU'delp'a 
Boston... 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Boston 

PhU'delp'a 



Names of Contestants. 



Philadelphia vs. Washington. 

Boaton vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

Cleveland vs. Indianapolis 



Winning •§ 

OR . 



Club. 



Buns 
Scored 



Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 



Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

BoBtou 

New York.. 
Piiil'delp'a 

Wash'n't'n 
New York- 
Boston 

PhU'delp'a, 

New York- 
Boston 

Wash'n't'n 

New York- 
Boston 

PhU'delp'a 

Boston 

New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 

Boston ! 

New York.. 
PhU'delp'a 
New York.. 
Wash'n't'nl 
PhU'delp'a | 
New York- 
Boston 

PhU'delp'a 
New York- 
Wash'n't'n 

New York- 
Phil'delp'a 
Boston 



Cleveland vs. Indianapolis 

Chicago vs. PittBburg 

Boston vs. New York 

" Pittsburg 

New Y'ork vs. Cleveland 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Indianapolis. 

New York vs. Cleveland 

Boston vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 



New York vs. Cleveland 

BoBton vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Indianapolis. 

New York vs. Cleveland 

Boston vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

" Indianapolis. 

Boston vs. Cleveland 

Now York vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Chicago 



PhU'delp'a 
New York- 

Chicago 

Cleveland .. 
Indianap's 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 
PhU'delp'a 
Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Cleveland- 
Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 
Cleveland- 
Boston 

Chicago 

PhU'delp'a 
New York- 
Boston 

Indianai)' s 
Wash'n't'n 
New York- 
Boston 

PhU'delp'a 



Boston 

New York- 
Chicago 



Boston vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland 

New York vb. Chicago 

Boflton vs. IndianapoliB 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Pittsburg 



New York vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland- 
BoBton vs. IndianapoliB 



Boston 

Pittsburg.. 
PhU'delp'a 
New York- 
Wash'n't'n 
Piiil'delp'a 
New York- 
Indianap's 
Cleveland- 
Chicago 

Wash'n't'n 
Pittsburg- 
New York- 
Cleveland.. 
Boston 



Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Pit'sburg Pittsbnrg.. 



7 
1 
1 
3 
4 

12 
5 
4 
7 
4 

13 
8 

Q 

4 
4 
6 
3 
4 
4 
2 
17 
1 
7 
7 
4 
3 
4 
1 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



85 



itECORD op championship games— Continued. 



Date 

1889. 



Where 
Played. 



Names of Contestants. 



Winning 
Club. 



May 23 
25 
28| 
28 
28 
SH 
29 
29 
29 
29 
30 
30 
30 
30 
SO 
30 
30 
31 
31 1 

Juno 1 
1 
:t 

!! 
4 
4 
4 
5 
S 
5 
5 



Now York.. 
Phil'delp'a 

New York- 
Boston 

Wash'n't'n 

New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 

Boston 



New York.. 

Phil'delp'a 

Wash'n't'n 
Phil'delp'a 

I 
WaBh'n't'n 
Boston .. 



New York vs. Chicago 'Chicago.. . 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland Cleveland. 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg Phil'delp'a 

New York vs Indianapolis New York- 
Boston vs. Chicago Boston 

Washington vs. Cleveland Cleveland.. 



IiONS 

Scored 



New York vs. Indianapolis.... New York- 
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg Pbil'delp a 

Boston vs. Chicago Boston 



New York vs. Iudianapclis IndianapV 

" " New York- 
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg PtnTdelp'a 

" " Pittsburg- 

Washington vs. Cleveland Cleveland.., 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis Phil'dtlp'a 



Pittsburg.. 
Chicago 



Boston 

Wash'n't'n 



Washington vs. New York- 
Boston vs. Philadelphia 



Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis.. 
Chicago vs. Cleveland 



Chicago.. 
Boston ... 



Boston vs. Philadelphia 

Washington vs. New York- 
Chicago vs. Cleveland 



G Phil'delp'a 
0. Cleveland.. 
Chicago 



BoBtou .... 
Phil'delp'a 



8 Cleveland. . 

8 
10 
10:Chieago 

iol 

10 New York.. 
10 Wash'n fn 
11 



Boston vs. Philadelphia 

" vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 

Cleveland vs. Pittsburg 

Chicago vs. Indianapolis 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 

Cleveland vs. Pittsburg 



Wash'g't'ui 
, Boston 

. Pittsburg..' 

Chicago [ 

Cleveland..! 

Boston 

Wash'n't n 1 

.'New York- 
Cleveland.. 

Phil'delp'a 

Boston 

Phil'delp'a 
Cleveland- 
Chicago 

Boston 

Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 
Cleveland.. 



Chicago vs. Indianapolis Chicago.. 



New York- 
Chicago 



New York vb. Boston Naw York- 
Washington vs. Philadelphia l'liil'delp'a 
" " Wash'n t'n 
" " Th Ijlp i. 
New York vs Boston New York- 
Chicago vs. Pittsburg Pittsburg- 



7 

10 
5 
6 

e 
is 

3 

i) 

4 
6 
7 
13 

10 
2 

11 

11 
9 
7 

10 
1 
2 



SG 



RECORD <)F CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



hecord of championship games— Continued. 



Date 

1883. 



Where 
Played. 



June 11 
12 
12 
13 
13 
18 
13 

w 

11 

14 

15 
15 

15 
17 
17 
17 
17 
19 
19 
19 
19 
20 

3J 

21 

•21 



Iudianap's 
Chicago. 



Boston .. 
New York.. 
Iudiauap s 

Cleveland.. 

Boston 

New York- 
Boston 

Cleveland.. 
Iudianap's 

Cleveland.. 
Boston 



Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Pittsburg.. 
Iudianap's 

Pittsburg.. 
i idveland.. 
Chicago 



Names op Contestants. 



Winning 

Club. 



Cleveland.. 

21 Iudianap's 

22 Cleveland.. 
2'2 ; Chicago 

23 Pittsburg 
22 
21 
21 
21 



Cleveland.. 
Chicago. 

21 Indianap's 

25 

Chicago. 

Cleveland 

Pittsburg 

Iudianap's 

Washu't'n 

Cleveland. 

Chicago. 



Cleveland.. 
Iudianap's 



Indianapolis vs. Cleveland.... 

Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Washington 

New York vs. Philadelphia..... 

Indianapolis vs. Cleveland 

*' vs. Pittsburg 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. Washington 

New York vs. Philadelphia.... 

Boston vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Washington 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

*t " 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

" vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia.... 

Chicago vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Now York 

Cleveland vb. Philadelphia 

Pittsburg vs. Washington .... 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Washington vs. Pittsburg 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia.... 
Chicago vs. New York 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia.... 
Indianapolis vs. Boston 



Buns 

Scored 



to 

3 



Cleveland.. 
Iudianap's 
1'ittBburg .. 

Chicago 

Boston 

New York- 
Cleveland.. 
Pittsburg.. 
Cleveland- 
Boston 

New York- 
Boston 

Chicago 

Indianap's 
Pittsburg .. 
Clo veland- 
Wash'n't'n 

Boston 

Pbil'delp'a 
Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Iudianap's 



Boston 

New York.. 
Pbil'delp'a 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Indianap's 



Cleveland. 
Chicago.... 
Boston 



Pittsburg .. 
Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Indianap's 

New York- 
Cleveland.. 
Pittsburg .. 
Indianap's 
Wash'n't'n 
Pbil'delp'a 
New York- 
Cleveland.. 
Boston 



2 
3 
5 
8 
1 
2 
1 
9 
4 
3 
1 
2 
4 

11 
7 
4 
2 
6 

13 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 

2 
2 
6 
3 
3 
6 
1 

3 
4 
4 

5 
4 
8 
6 
5 
(1 
1 
3 
1 

10 
1 

r. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 87 

record of championship games— Continued. 



Date 
1889. 



June 28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
July 1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Where 
Played. 



Indianap'i 
Cleveland 
Chicago .... 
Pittsbcj.-. 



Cleveland. 
Chicago ..-. 
Iudianap'e 

Pittsburg. 
Chicago ... 
Cleveland. 

Pittsburg.. 
Chicago .... 
Indianap's 



Names op Contestants. 



Winning 
Club. 



Chicago .... 
Pittsburg . 
Cleveland 



Pittsburg .. 

Chicago 

Indianap'B 

Chicago 

Pittsburg .. 
Cleveland.. 

Boston 

New Y( rk.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 

Phil'delp'a 
New York.. 
Boston 



Indianapolis vs. New York 'New York.. 

Cleveland vs. Washington ICleveland.. 

Chicago vb. Boston Chicago.... 

Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia Pittsburg... 

Cleveland vs. Washington I Wash'n't'n 

Chica o vs. Boston .Chicago ... 

Indianapolis vs. New York New York 

" " Indianap's 

Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia I Pittsburg 

Chica <t vs. Boston Boston.... 

Cleveland vs. Washington Cleveland.. 



Pittsburg... 
Chicago .. 
New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 
Chicago .... 

Pittsburg .. 
New York- 
Boston 

Cleveland .. 



Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. New York 

*' vs. Philadelx>hia 

Chicago vs. Washington 



Pittsburg vs. Now York... 
Cleveland vs. Boston 



N w York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 

Phil'delp'a 
New York- 



Pittsburg vs. New York 
Chicago vs. Washington. 
Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Pittsburg vs. New York 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Boston vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vb. Indianapolis 
Washington vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis 

New York v«. PittBburg 

Boston vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. PittBburg 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis 

Washington vs. Chicago 

" vs. Indianapolis.. 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Cleveland 



Runs 
Scored 



3^ oo 



Phil'delp'a 

Chicago 

Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Clevtlaud.. 

Boston 

New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 

Chicago 

Phil'delp'a 
New York. 

Boston 

Cleveland 

New York 

Phil'delp'a 

Wash'n't'n 

Indianap's 

Phil'delp'a 

New York. 



S 

7 
11 

3 

3 

8 

5 

8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

S 
10 

5 

8 

5 

6 
12 

8 

4 

6 

6 
11 

2 

5 

8 
11 
21 
11 

7 

9 

6 

7 
11 

4 
10 
10 

9 
IS 

8 
14 ! 

6 I 
8 
9 
9 



88 



RECORD OF CHAMPIOKfiHIP GAMES. 



record of championship games— Continued. 



Date 

1889. 



Where 
Plated. 



Names of Contestants. 



July 



Winning 
Club. 



Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Chicago Phil'delp'a 

Boston Boston vs. Pittsburg Boston 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Indianapolis.. Wash'n't'n 



New York.. New York vs. Cleveland 

Boston Boston vs. Pittsburg 

Wash'n't'n Washington " 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Cleveland- 
New York.. New York vs. Chicago 

Boston Boston vs. Indianapolis 

New York.. New York vs. Chicago 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Pittsburg 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Cleveland- 
Boston Boston vs. Indianapolis 



Runs 
Scored 



MS 3 

So no 
a. a 



New York. 

Boston 

Wash'n't'n 
Phil'delp'a 
New York.. 
'Indianap's 
Chicago .... 
'Wash'n't'n 
Phil'delp'a 
Boston 






Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Cleveland... 

New York.. New York vs. Chicago 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Pittsburg... 
' '■ Cleveland... 
Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg- 
Boston Boston vs. Chicago 

New York.. New York vs. Indianapolis- 
Boston Boston vs. Chicago 

New York.. New York vs. Indianapolis- 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Pittsbnrg- 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Cleveland... 

Boston Boston vs. Chicago 

" " Washington 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. New York- 
Cleveland .Cleveland vs. Pittsburg 

Chicago Chicago vs. Indianapolis 



Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. New York- 
Boston Boston vs. Washington 

Cleveland.. Cleveland vs. Pittsburg 



Chicago .Chicago vs. Indianapolis...... 

Boston Boston vs. Washington 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. New York- 
New York- New York vs. Washington... 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Indianap's Indianapolis vs. Chicago 

Pittsburg- Pittsburg vs. Cleveland 



Cleveland- 
New York- 
Wash'n't'n 

Tie 

Phil'delp'a 

Boston 

New York- 
Chicago 

'Indianap's 
New York- 
Phil'delp'a 

Cleveland.. 
Chicago 

.'Wash'n't'n 
Phil'delp'a 

. Pittsburg - 
Indianap's 

Chicago 

Phil'delp'a 
Boston 

, Cleveland - 

. I'ittsburg... 
Chicago. ... 
Indianap's 

Boston 

Phil'delp'a 
New York- 

, BoBton 

. Chicago 

. Pittsburg... 



Phil'delp'a Philadelphia V8. Boston Boston 

New York- New York vs. Washington Wash'n't'n 



2 
1 
2 
7 
6 
•1 
4 
3 
4 
4 
10 
6 
2 



4 
13 

9 

8 

4 
16 

5 

2 

3 
10 

7 

2 
10 

7 5 
10 I i 

3 

5 4 
3 2 

6 3 
12 | 3 
15 

7 
6 
7 
3 



^ 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



89 



record op championship games— Continued. 



Date 
1889. 



Where 
Played. 



Names of Contestants. 



Kuns 
Scored 



Ci-ub. 



s° 



July 27 

" 27 

" 27 

" 27 

" 2D 

" 2a 

" 29 

" 30 

» 30 

" 30 

•• 30 

•• 31 

Aug. 1 

■' 1 
1 

" 2 

» 2 

2 

2 

" 2 

.. 3 

3 

3 

3 

S 

5 

.. 5 

5 

t> 

« ti 

" (i 

u B 

" 7 

• • 7 

7 

8 

.' 8 

8 

9 

9 

9 

.. 10 

.. lu 

.. U 

.. 1U 

.. 10 

.. a 

12 



Phil'delp'a 
Indiauap's 



Philadelphia vs. Boston... 
Indianapolis vs. Chicago.. 



Phil'deli/a 
Chicago 



Pittsburg.. Pittsburg vs. Cleveland 

" " Chicago 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. New York.. 
Boston Boston vs. Philadelphia.... 



Pittsburg.. 
Wash'n't'n 
Cleveland.. 

Wash'n't'n 
Pittsburg... 

Chicago 

Wash'n't'n 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Pittsburg .. 



Pittsburg . 
Chicago.... 
: New York. 
Boston 



Pittsburg vs. Chicago 

Washington vb. New York... 
Cleveland vs. Indianapolis.. 



Washington vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis.. 



Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Washington vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. Philadelphia.. 
Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis... 



.Chicago 

. Wash'n't'n 
. j Indiauap's 

.Wash'n't'n 
.Indiauap's 
[Pittsburg... 

. Chicago 

.'Boston 

.Chicago 

. New York. 
. Indiauap's 



Chicago 

New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Indiauap's 
Pittsburg.. 

Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Indiauap's 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 

Pittsburg., 
ludianap' s 

Chicago 

Pittsburg.. 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Indianap' s 

Chicago 



Chicago vs. Cleveland 

New York vs. Philadelphia- 
Washington vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. New York 

Cleveland vs. Washington... 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia.. 

Cleveland vs. Washington... 

Chicago vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 



Chicago vs. New York 

Cleveland vs. Washington... 

" Philadelphia.. 

Pittsburg vs. Washington... 

Indianapolis vs. New iTork.. 



Chicago vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Washington.. 



Chicago vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia 

Indianapolis vs. New York 

" Washington 
Chicago vs. Philadelphia 



Cleveland. 

New York. 

Wash'n't'n 
.New York, 

Cleveland. 

, Boston 

. Phil'delp'a 

Wash'n't'n 
.New York. 
, Indiauap's 

New York. 
Cleveland.. 
1'nil'delp'a 
Pittsburg... 
Indiauap's 
New York.. j 

Chicago ! 

Pittsburg... 

Wash'n't'n' 
Pittsburg... 

, Boston ] 

Cleveland.. 

. New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 
Phil'delp'a 



90 



RF.CORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



becoed of championship GAMES— Continued.. 



Date 
1889. 



Aug. 12 

'• 12 

" 13 

" 13 

" 13 

" ]3 

" 14' 

'• 14 

" 14' 

" 14 

" 151 

" 15 

" IS 

" 15 

" ie 

" lis 

" 10 

ii 171 

" 17, 

" 17! 

" 17! 

" 19 

" 19 

" 19 

" 19 

" 20: 

" 21) 

" 20| 

" 20 

" 21 

■■ 21 

" 21 

" 21 

■1 22! 

■• 22 

" 22 

:: 1 

" 23 

•■ 2:1 

•' 23 

" 23 

■• 23 

- 21, 

•1 24 

" 24, 

" 24, 

'• 24 

.1 <2C| 



Whebe 
Played. 



Cleveland.. 
PittBburg.. 

Cleveland.. 
Chicago .... 
Indianap'E 

Cleveland . 

Chicago 

Pittsburg.. 

Chicago , 

Cleveland . 
Indianap's 

Chicago 

Cleveland . 
Pittsburg.. 



Chicago 

Cleveland .. 
Indianap's 

Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Phil'delp'a 

Cleveland .. 
Indianap's 
Boston 



Names of Contestants. 



Winning 

Club. 



Huns 
Scobed 






Cleveland vs. New York . 
Pittsburg vs. Boston 



Cleveland.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 



Boston 

Chicago.... 
New York. 



Cleveland vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Indianapolis vs. Washington .. 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

" New York 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. New York.. 

Chicago vs. Washington. 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 

1* vs. Chicago 

Cleveland vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington.. 



Cleveland vs. Pittsburg.... 
Indianapolis vs. Cuicago.. 
Boston vs. New York 



New York. 

Boston 

Pittsburg... 
New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 
Indianap's 
New York.. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Pittsburg... 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Phil'delp'a 

Chicago 

Boston 

PittBburg... 

Chicago 

Boston 

Indianap's 

Chicago 

Pittsburg... 

Tie 

Phil'delp'a 
Wash'n't'n 
Pittsburg... 
Indianap's 
Boston 



Cleveland vs. Pittsburg Pittsburg... 

Philadelphia vs. Washington.. Phil'delp'a 
Indianapolis vs. Chicago Chicago 

" Cleveland Tie 

" " Indianap's 

Boston vs. Washington Boston 

Chicago vs. Pittsburg Pittsburg.. 

New York vs. Philadelphia iNow York.. 



" " I Phil'delp'a 

Boston Boston vs. Washington Wash'n't'n 

Indianap's 'Indianapolis vs. Cleveland 'Indianap's 

Chi ago Chicago vs. Pittsburg Chicago 

" " " I Pittsburg... 

Boston I Boston vs. Washington Boston 

Indianap's lndiauapolis vs. Cleveland Cleveland.. 

New York.JNew York vs. Philadelphia New York.. 

" •' Washington | " 



9 
13 
6 
8 
11 
4 
19 
9 
9 
7 

19 

8 

10 

13 

7 

15 

8 

2 

12 

10 

4 

4 

14 

C 

6 

10 

12 

10 

6 

11 

12 
1 
3 
7 

11 
8 
7 

11 
8 
7 
2 
6 
9 
7 

10 
8 

11 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



91 



record of championship GAMES— Continued. 



Date 
1888. 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Where 
Played. 



Names op Contestants. 



l'hil'delp' a' Philadelphia vs. Boston.... 

Cleveland.. I Cleveland va. Chicago 

Pittsburg. ..Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis.. 



Winning 
Club. 



Cleveland.. 
Phil'delp'a 
New York.. 



Phil'delp'a 
Cleveland.. 
Pittsburg .. 

New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 
Cleveland.. 

Wash'n't'n 
New York. 
Pittsburg. 



Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

New York vs. Washington.. 



J 



Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis 

" Chicago 

New York vs. Boston 

Washington vs. Philadelphia- 
Cleveland vs. Indianapolis 



Washington vs. Philadelphia.. 

New York vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Chicago 



Boston... 
Chicago. 
Iudianap's 

Pittsburg. 
Chicago... 
Boston... . 
Wash'n't'n 
New York. 

Phil'delp'a 
Chicago. .. 
Pittsburg.. 



Boston 

WaBh'n't'n 
Cleveland . 
Iudianap's 

Tie 

New York.. 
Pittsburg.. 
Chicago 



.Tie.. 



New York..' New York vs. Boston 

Cleveland... 'Cleveland vs. Indianapolis Iudianap's 

Wash'n't'n Washington vs. Philadelphia.. Wash'n't'n 

" " Cleveland Cleveland.. 

Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Chicago Chicago 

" " IPhil'delp'a 

New York vs. Pittsburg New York.. 



Kcjns 
Scored 



New York. 



Boston Boston vs. Indianapolis 'Boston.. 

Phil'delp'a 



New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 
Boston 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago........ Chicago .... 

New York vs. Pittsburg iNow York.. 

Washington vs. Cleveland. j Cleveland . 

Boston vs. Indianapolis | Iudianap's 



Phil'delp'a 
New York.. 
Wash'n't'n 

Phil'delp'a 

Boston 

New York.. 



Phil'delp'a Philadelphia vs. Cleveland Phil'delp'a 

Boston Boston vs. Pittsburg Boston 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago Chicago 

New York vs. Pittsburg New York.. 

Washington vs. Cleveland Cleveland .. 

" Chicago Wash'n't'n 

Philadelrihia vs. Cleveland Phil'delp'a 

Boston vs. Pittsburg Pittsburg.. 

New York vs. Indianapolis..... Iudianap's 



4 

7 
2 
1 
3 

11 
6 
3 
3 
6 
3 
7 
7 
2 
4 
4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
5 
1 

11 
9 
2 

10 
2 
1 
2 
6 

3 

2 
4 
1 
7 
3 
8 
2 
6 
1 

4 
3 
4 



JIM 

I 



93 



RECORD Of CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



record op championship GAMES— Continued. 



Date 
1839. 



Where 
Played. 



Names of Contestants. 



Winning 
Clcb. 



Buns 
Scored 



m-2 
n.2 
'So 



Sept. 



7' Boston 

7 Phll'delp'a 
7 New York.. 
7 Wash'n't'n 
7 



Phll'delp'a 
New York.. 
Boston 



9 
9 
9 

10 

10 Wash'n't'n 

12 Boston 

12 

13 

13 

14 

11 

14 

14 

H 

M 

11 

16 

16 

h; 

17 

17 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

19 

19 

19 

19 

20 

20 

20 

20 

2' 

21 

•21 
21 
21 
23 
23 
23 



Boston vs. Pittsburg Boston 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland jPhil'delp'a 

New York vs. Indianapolis New York- 
Washington vs. Chicago jWash'n't'n 



" vs. Indianapolis.. " 

Philadelphia vh. Pittsburg Phil'delp'a 

New York vs. Cleveland New York.. 

Boston vs. Chicago Tie 

" " Boston 

Washington vs. Indiauupolis. 1 Indianap's 
Boston vs. Cleveland Boston 



Phil'delp'a 

New York.. 

Wash'n't'n 

Chicago 

Boston 

Chicago 

Boston 

Pittsburg.. 

Wash'n't'n 



Phil'delp'a 

Chicago 

Indianap's 

Chicago 

Phil'delp'a 

Wash'n't'n 

Phil'delp'a 

Chicago 

[hdianap's 

Cleveland.. 
Chicago 



Philadc lphia vs. Indianapolis 
New York vs. Chicago... 



. 



Washington vs. Pittsburg . 
" vs. New York- 

Chicago vs. Indianapolis... 
Boston vs Philadelphia.. ... 



Chicago vs. Indianapolis., 

" vs. " 

Boston vs. Philadelphia.. 
Pittsburg vs. Cleveland.... 



Cleveland.. 

Tie 

Boston 

Cleveland.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 
New York.. 

jWash'n't'n 
New York.. 
Indianap's 
Phil'delp'a 

Boston 

Chicago 

Indianap's 
Boston 

jPittsburg.. 



Washington vs. New York New York. 



" vs. BoBton Boston 

Philadelphia vs. New York 'New York- 
Chicago vs. Cleveland Chicago 

Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg Indianap's 

" " Pittsburg - 

Chicago vs. Cleveland Cleveland- 
Philadelphia vs. New York New York- 

]Tie 

Washington vs. Boston Boston 

" Tie 

Philadelphia vs. New York New York- 
Chicago vs. Cleveland ; Chicago 

Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg ; Pittsburg .. 

" vs. New York [New York- 
Cleveland vs. Philadelphia Phil'delp'a 

Chicago vs. Boston iBostou 



12 
4 

i 
10 
H 

o 

2 I 
9 I 
3 
5 

3 

4 

it! 

10 

3 
13 
10 
12 

4 

3 

5 
18 
10 I 

9 

6 

4 

7 
10 

'■ 

12 J 
19 ' 
12 
10 

7 ! 

o I 

4 

4 

4 

7 

8 

9 
10 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



93 



RECORD OP CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES- C JlltUlUed. 



Date 
1889. 



Sept. 



Where 
Played. 



Oct. 



23 Pittsburg 
24 

24Chicago 

24| Cleveland.. 

24 Indianap's 
25 

25 Chicago 

25! Pittsburg... 
25 Cleveland .. 



Names of Contestants. 



Pittsburg vs. Washington Pittsburg. 



1 Kuns 
Scored 



Winning 
Club. 






a 



Chicago . 

Pittsburg... 

Indianap's 

Cleveland .. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg... 

Indianap's 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 



Chicago 

Pittsburg... 



Chicago 

Pittsburg.. 

Cleveland 



Cleveland vs. Washington . 

Chicago vs New York 

Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia.. 



Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. New York 

Cleveland vs. Washington.. 



Indianap's 

1 Chicago 

1, Cleveland. 
2, Chicago 

2 Cleveland . 
21 Pittsburg... 
2' Indianap's 
3 

Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg .. 



" vs. Boston. 

Chicago vs. Washington.. 
PittBburg vs. New York.... 



Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Indianap's 



5i Pittsburg.. 
5 Cleveland. 
SiChieago. ... 



Chicago vs. Boston Boston 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia I Cleveland 

Indianapolis vs. New York |New York.. 

" " Indianap's 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vb. Washington.. 
Cleveland vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. New York iChicago 

PittBburg vs. Philadelphia Pittsburg 

Indianapolis vs. Boston Boston . . 



Cleveland .. 
New York- 
Pittsburg... 

Indianap's 

Tie 

Cleveland.. 
Wash'n't'n 

Boston 

Chicago 

Tie 

Pittsburg... 
Phil'delp'a 
WaBh'n't'n 

Boston 

Chicago 

Cleveland .. 
New York.. 
Phil'delp'a 
Indianap's 
New York- 
Tie 

Boston 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Indianap's 

Pittsburg... 
New York- 
Chicago 



Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Cleveland vs. Boaton 

Pittsburg vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 
" vs. Washington. 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 



Chicago vs. Philadelphia... 

Cleveland vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Washington. 



Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Cleveland va. New York... 
Chicago vs. Philadelphia.. 



6 
13 

7 

6 
16 

7 I 

7 

8 

2 

4 

9 
12 
IS 
11 
18 

4 

i 
10 

2 

7 

7 

6 

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3 

7 

7 

7 

8 

9 

7 

6 
12 

9 

9 

7 
4 
3 
6 
6 
15 
6 
5 
3 



I 



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3: ::§::»:: 

3 -s % 



GRAY'S 
Patent Body Protector. 

We now have the 
i sole agency for this 
most useful device 
ever invented forthc 
protection of catch- 
ers or umpires. This 
body piotector ren- 
ders it impossible 
for the catcher to be 
iujured while play- 
ing close to the bat- 
ter. It is made of 
best rubber and in- 
flated with air, and 
is very light and 
pliable, and does not 
interfere in any way 
with the movtmen* 
of the wearer, eithL. 
in running.stooping 
or throwing. So 
catcher should be 
without one of these 
protectors. When 
notinusetheaircan 
be let out, and the 
protector rolled in a 
very small space. 
No. o. Extra heavy 

professional. 

$10 oo 
No. i. Standard 

Amateur..,, $6 oo 

CATCHERS' 

UMPIRES' 
BREAST 

PROTECTOR. 

This supplies a 
long felt want for 
the protection of 
Catchers and Um- 
pires exposed to the 
swift urderhand throwing. They are nicely made, well padded and quilted, 
%nd used by nearly all professional Catchers and Umpires, 

Xo. A. Chamois and Canvas Body Protector $j oo 

" B. Leather Body Protector 5 00 




Chicago, A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK. 



SPHLDING'S 
Patent Celluloid Umpire Indicator, 




As shown in the above cut, is intended for the use of Base Ball Umpires 
and Scorers to keep tally of the number of Strikes and Balls that may be 
called. The illustration which represents the exact size of the Indicator, 
gives a good idea of its construction and mode of handling. It can be easily 
operated by the thumb or finger while held in the palm of the hand. It 
has been highly recommended by all League and Association umpires who 
have seen it. 

Price, each 5 0c * 



Sphldincs Scoring Thblet. 

(CELLULOID.) 




now/*' 

A simple, convenient and accurate device for the record of runs and outs; 
can be easily carried in the vest pocket. 

Price, each • ■ 25 c - 

l'>y mail, postpaid on receipt of price. 

ch.cago. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, newvopk. 

PH I LADELPH1A. 



m 



SPHLDING'S CHTCHER'S Mhsks. 

Patented. 
Beware of counterfeits. None genuine with- 
out our trade mark stamped on each mask. 





No. 3-0 Mask. 



No. 2-0 Mask. 



No. 



No. 



No. 3-0. Spalding's New Patented Neck-Protecting Mask-. This 
mask has a peculiar shaped extension at the bottom which affords 
the same protection to the neck as the mask does to the face. It 
does not interfere in the slightest degree with the free movement 
of the head, and is the only mask mad ■. which affords perfect pro- 
tection to the catcher. The entire mask is constructed of the best 
hardened wire, extra heavy padded with goat hair, and the pad- 
ding faced with the best imported dogskin, which is impervious 

to perspiration, and always soft and pliable, each §4 00 

SO. Spalding's Special League Mask, used by all leading pro- 
fessional catchers, extra heavy wire, well padded with goat hair, 
and the padding faced with the best imported dogskin, which is 
impervious to perspiration, and retains its pliability and softness. . 3 50 
1-0. Spalding's Regulation League Mask, made of heavy wire, 
well padded and faced with horsehide, warranted first-class in 

every respect 3 0O 

1. Spalding's Boys' League Mask made of heavy wire, equally 
as heavy in proportion to size as the No. 2-0 mask. It is made to 
fit a boy's face, and gives the same protection as the League Mask 2 BO 
To meet the demand for good masks at a low price, we have manufactured 

a line of amateur masks, which is superior to any mask in the market at the 

same price. 

No. A. Amateur Mask, made: the same size and general style as the 
League Mask, but with lighter wire, and faced with leather. (We 
guarantee this mask to be superior to so-called League or profess- 
ional masks sold by other manufacturers) $1 75 

No. B. Boys' Amateur Mask, similar to No. A Mask, only made 

smaller to fit a boy's face .... . . . 1 60 

Any of the above masks mailed post-paid on receipt of price. 



No. 



Chicago A. 6, SPALDING & BROS, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK. 



^ 



SPALDING'S CATCHER'S MITTS. 

Patented. 





No. 7-0. Left Hand Mitt. 



No. 7-0. Patent Right Hand 
Throwing Glove. 



No. 7-0. Spalding's Special League Catcher's Mitt, 
finest quality drab buckskin, with patent iingerless throwing 
glove. This Mitt is padded with extra thick felt, and is absolutely 
the finest protection for the hand ever made. Price $7-50. 

No. 6-0. Spalding's Special League Catcher's Mitt, 
finest buckskin, with patent fingerless throwing glove. This Mitt 
is padded with felt, not quite so thick as No. 7-0. Price. .§6.00. 

No. 5-0. Spalding's League Catcher's Mitt, made of hog- 
skin, very soft, pliable and durable, patent Iingerless throwing 
glove. Price $5.00. 

No. A. Spalding's Amateur Catcher's Mitt, buckskin, 
well padded, with short fingered throwing glove. Price .. .$2.50. 



cHicAca A. 6. SPALDING & BROS. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK. 



S palding's Fell Left Han d 

Catcher's and Fielder's Qlovt. 



Patented. 





No. 4-0. No. 4-0. Throwing Glove. 

No. 4-0. Spalding's Special League Catcher's and 
Infielder's Gloves, drab buckskin, felt lined, short fingered 
throwing glove. Trice $4.00. 

No. 3-0. Spalding's Catcher's Gloves. Patented, with 
sole leather tips, made of heavy buckskin, and padded, short fin- 
gered throwing glove. Price $4.50. 

No. 2-0. Spalding's Catcher's Gloves. Patented, heavy 
buckskin, with short fingered right hand, well padded, no seams 

.00. 



pain 



$3- 



No. AA. Spalding's Amateur Full Left Hand Catcher's 
Glove, oil tanned, short fingered throwing glove , . .$1.25. 

No. H. Spalding's Boys' Full Left Hand Glove, with 
throwing glove $ 1. 00. 

No. G. Spalding's Boy's Cheap Full Left Hand Glove, 50c. 

No. XX. Spalding's Best Quality Drab Buckskin 
Infielder's Glove, full left or right hand, each $3.00. 

No. X. Spalding's Amateur Buckskin Infielder's Gl ve, 
each $2.00. 

CH.CACO. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, newvork. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Decker Patent Safety Catcher's Mitt. 




Decker Throwing Glove 
to go with Mitt. 
We take pleasure in calling attention to the new Decker Safety G 
Mitt, which has, wherever shown and introduced, been conceded to 



Decker Mitt, Front. 



equaled for protection to the hands 
fingers when wearing them. 

Each pair is packed in a separate box. 



Back. 

itching 

be uiv- 

A catcher need have no fear of bFOtuni 



Price per pair, $5 00. 



SPHLDING'S 

Short Fingered Catcher's and Fielder's Gloves. 



uam 



f\/\ 



PATENTED. 




2 No. 1-0. Spalding's Catch- 

W er's Gloves, made of extra 

w heavy buck, carefully se- 

W^ lected, open back, both 

hands short fingered, well 

padded $2 50 

No. i-o. 

No. 1. Spalding's Professional Glcves, made of Indian tanned 
buckskin open back, well padded, but not quite as heavy- 
material as t lie No. O $2 00 

" B. Spalding's Amateur Gloves, made of buckskin, open back, 

well padded, and adapted for amateur players 1 50 

" O. Spalding's Practice Gloves, made of buckskin, open back, 

wrll padded , 1 °0 

'* D, Open back, a good glove at the price, made of light material. 75 

li E. Boys' Bize, cheap open, back glove °0 

11 F. Youths'" »• '* " ■• 25 

In ordering, please give size of ordinary dress gloves usually worn. 
MAILED ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 

Testimonial from a Well Known Professional Player. 
I Consider your Decker Safety Catching Gloves unequaled. It is a glove 
that ball players have long needed. I shall use them in all the games I catch, 
and recommend them to all base ball players as the best glove in the market. 
FRANK S, FLINT {Old SUver\ Chicago Base Ball Club. 

CH.CACO. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, nbwyork. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Spalding's Base Balls. 

Each of following styles are put up in separate box, and sealed. 

To Clubs 
Each. Per doz. 

No. i. Spalding's League Hall, as adopted by the Na- 
tional League; the finest ball made $1 50 $15 00 

No. iA. Spalding's Association Ball 1 25 13 00 

No. iB. Spalding's Boy's League Ball, a first-class 

ball for boys, made like our League Ball 1 00 1 1 00 

No. 2. Spalding's Professional Dead Ball, white. 

The best dead ball ever made 1 00 11 00 

No. 3. Spalding's Amateur Dead Ball, white. Es- 
pecially adapted for school nines, and for practice 75 8 50 

No. 3R. Spalding's Amateur Dead Ball, red 76 £\ 50 

No. XX. Spalding's Amateur Lively Ball, white. 

A first-class lively ball 75 (I 50 

All above balls are fully warranted. 

FINE HORSEHIDE COVER 50-CENT BALLS. 

No. 5. Spalding's King of the Diamond, white. 

Horsehide cover, regulation size 60 f> OO 

No. 5B. Spalding's Boy's Professional Ball, white. 

Horsehide cover, junior size ball 50 5 00 

HORSEHIDE COVER 2 5- CENT BALLS. 

No. 7. Spalding's Hoy's Favorite. Regulation size 

and weight. Horsehide cover 25 2 75 

No. 7B. Spalding's League Junior. Horsehide cover, 

junior size .... 25 "75 

REGULATION SIZE 20-CENT BALIS. 

No. S. Spalding's Euk£ka Ball, white. Regulation 

size and weight 20 2 00 

No. 9. Spalding's Rattler Ball, white. Nearly reg- 
ulation size 10 1 OO 

No. oB. Spalding's Boy's Dead. An S-inch ball for 

boys 10 i OO 

THE BOSS JUVENILE 5-CENT BALL. 

i*o. 10, Spalding's Boss Ball, large size, scent ball, 

best in the market BO 60 

If you cannot obtain these balls jf your local dealer send the price for 
sample ball and we will mail free of all charges. 

ch,caoo. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, nbwyopk. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Spalding' s Trade Mark ed Bats. 

Spalding's Trade Marked Bats were first introduced in 1S77, and owing 
to the constant improvements that have been made, from year to year in this 
line, they are now almost exclusively used by all prominent professional and 
amateur players. 

The general change of pitching rules during the past few seasons has 
occasioned a demand for bats of entirely different shape from those used ten 
years ago. Each crate of Spalding's Trade Marked Hats contains four different 
models, and as many different lengths. 

The timber used in these bats is seasoned from one to two years, thus 
enabling us to guarantee a lighter, stronger bat than other manufacturers, who 
are rushing their timber through dry kilns, at the expense of quality, and 
driving power in the timber. 

All our bats are hand turned, and must afterward pass a critical in- 
spection; i, found to answer all the requirements perfect workmanship, good 
timber, etc.. the SPALUING TRADE MARK is put on, which is our 
guarantee of quality to our customers. 

DDirrc To Clubs, 

r-Kiuto. Eachi PerDoz> 

No. 000. Spalding's Special Black End, League Play- 
era, Wagon Tongue Ash Bat $100 $10 00 

No XXX. Spalding's Special Black End. Boys' Le gue, 

same quality Ash as No. 000, 3 . and 32 inches .... 50 5 00 

No. OX. Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Bat, 

finest straight grained white ash 50 5 00 

No. 2BX. Spalding's 3pecial Black End Axletree Boys' 

Bat, 30 and 32 inches 25 2 50 

No. 2X. Spalding s Antique Finish Bat , extra quality 

ash, black end and trademarked 40 4 00 

No. IX. Spalding's Antique Ash Finish Bat, trade- 
marked 25 2 50 

No. 2-0. Spalding's Special Black Band League, finest 
quality white ash, highly polished, patent granulated 
handle 75 7 50 

No. 1-0. Spalding's Black Band League Bat, made from 

selected straight grained white ash, highly polished. 50 5 00 

No. OB. Spalding's Black End Boys' League Bat . . 20 2 00 

No. 1. " Trademarked Ash Bat 25 2 50 

No. IB. " " Boys' Ash Bat 15 150 

No. 3. *' Black Band Basswood Bat. from 

selected timber, elegant fiinish 25 2 50 

No. 3B. Spalding s Black Band, Boys' B-sewood Bnt 20 2 CO 

No. 4. •' " •• Willow Bat, highly fin- 
ished, and is guaranteed to be the best light wood 
bat made; incased in strong paper bag 60 6 50 

SPALDING'S TRADE MARKED FANCY BATS. 

Owing to large demand for fancy bats, four years ago we [dared nn the 

marl.et our line of trade marked Fancy Hals, which arc superior in every way 

to any line of fancy bats ever offered to the trade. To Clubs, 

No. AA. Spalding's Trade Marked Fancy Bat, mahogany Each. Per Doz. 

finish, with white band trade mark. Granulated 

handle, inca ed in strong paper bag $0 75 S-7 60 

No. BB. Spalding's Trade Marked l^ncy B.-issv/ocd 

Bat, same finish as the above .. 75 7 50 

No 60. Spalding's Special K, fewood Bat, highly pol- 
ished, gilt bands, trade maiked 25 2 60 

No. 50B. Spalding's Youth's RoFewo<>d Bat highly pol- 
ished, gilt bands, trade marked, very handsome.. . . 20 2 00 
No 63. Spalding's Youths' Maple Bat, black band and 

gilt, trade marked. Length 28 to 32 inches 10 1 00 

No. 66. 8paldin«'s Yc uths' Stained Maple Bat, black 

band, trade mark in gilt; 28 to 32 inches 10 1 00 

No 64 Spalding's Maple Bat for boys, 26 to 28 inches 

in length, with rings and trade marked 05 O 50 



1 






SPALDING'S SPECIAL HAND MADE KANGAROO BALL SHOE. 



IMPROVED FOR 7889. 




No. 2 0, ... Price, $7.00. 

WE now have on the third floor of our New York store a thoroughly 
equipped Shoe Factory for the manufacture ot fine Bnse Ball and Ath- 
letic Shoes. This department of our business is under the immediate 
charge and supervision of Wm. Dowling, who for several years past has 
enjoyed the reputation of being the leading maker of Athletic Shoes in 
New York. We employ in this department the most skilful workmen, 
and use only the very l>pst material, and are prepared to take special orders 
and make a special last for professional players. 

The special attention of Ball players is called to our new genuine 
Kangaroo Base Ball Shoe. 

The above cut represents this Shoe, which is made from selected gen- 
uine Kangaroo skin, all hand tewed, slipper heel, cut low in front, and 
wide, so they can be laced tight or loose as the player likes. 

Each pair is provided with porpoise laces, and the whole Shoe made 
with reference to comfort :md the hard us ge required of it. 

Our new Hand Forged Shoe Plates— lor toe and heel — will be riveted 
on when required, without additional expense. 

HOW TO MEASURE. 

MEASUREMENT BLANKS will be 
furnished on application, or a player can 
take a piece of manilla paper of sufficient 
Size, and by following the directions herein 
given, can take his own measure. 

Place the foot fiat on the paper, and with 
a pencil draw around the foot close to it. 
Then take other measurements as shown 
in the cut, 

left foot. 

Ankle Inches. 

Hebi *' 

ikstep Instep u 

Ball " 

Ball Players will bear in 

mind that we make a special 

last for each man, which 

3^ will be kept for future use. 

^Satisfaction both as to fit and 

P quality of shoe guaranteed. 

CH.CAOO. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, nh™, 

PHILADELPHIA. 




1 



r