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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

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1891. 



CONSTITUTION 



Playing Rules 



NKTIONKL LEHGU6 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 



Including the Proceedings of the League Congress held in New York, 18 
and iSot, and New York, 1891, and the Official Fielding and Batting 
Averages of Players in Championship Games in 1S00. 



CHICAGO: 

PUBLISHED BY A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

108 Madison Street, Chicago. - . 24 , Broadway, New York. 

■032 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL GROUND. 



Left* 



^.ktitre 



High; 



2d Baseman 




Catcher'* fence 



s a 



A. A. A.— Ground reserved for Umpire, Batsman and Catcher. 

B. B. — Ground reseired for Captain and Assistant. 
C— Players' Bench. D.— Visiting Players' Bat Rack. 

E. — Home Players' Bat Rack. 



INDEX 

— TO THE — 

CONSTITUTION. 



Section 



Name . . . 
Objects . 



MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for 1886 

Not More than One Club Member from any City. . . 

Population of Eligible City 

Mode of Applying for Membership 

Election of Club Members 

Mode of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership 

1 Hies, Assessments, Eines, Etc 

Guarantee Fund 

Termination of League Club Membership 

' Membership, How Enforced 

Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice. 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of 

lioard of Directors, Election of 

Directors, Qualifications of 



Hoard of Directors, Duties of. 

Meetings of 

Reports of 

Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed. . . 

Filling Vacancy in 

Secretary, how Elected • 

Secretary, to be Treasurer 

Secretary, General Duties of 

Secretary to Record and Report Violations of Rules 

Regulations 

Secretary. Salary and Guarantees 



3 
3 
4 

;-6 
6 

7 
B 

9 
10 

1 1 

12 

1 ; 



15 

J 6 

17 
18 

»9 

20 

2! 
22 
23 
=4 



-3 



INDEX TO CONSTITUTION. 



LEAGUE CLUB, UMPIRES, 
PLAYERS. 



MANAGERS AND 

Sect 



ion. 

Club, Jurisdiction of its Affairs 27 

' ' Territory 2S 

Restriction as to Games 28 

Contract with Manager or Player 29 

Player not under Contract, what Games He may Play in.. . 29 

Negotiations for Release of Non-League Players 30 

Release from Contract, Notification of 31 

Effect of 32 

When Manager or Player may Engage with Another Club. 33 

" " " " Becomes Ineligible 34 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 35 

" " to Play Clubs Employing Disqualified Persons. 36 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievances 37 

" " " Cause of Expulsion of 

Suspension of 39 

Umpire, Cause of Disqualification of 39 

The Umpire, how Appointed 4° 

Umpire's Expulsion 4 1 

" Jurisdiction 4 2 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated 43 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 44 

Complaint of Reserved Player against the Club Reserving 

llim 



Complaint of Player under Contract against his Club 

Appeal of Manager or Player 

When Director is Ineligible to Try a Case 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 

Decision of Joint Arbitration Committee Einal 



PLAYING RULES. 

When Enacted and Amended 



CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be contended for Yearly. . . 

Season. , 

< lames, what are 

Games, Number of, in Series. 
Tie, or Drawn Games, how Played off 



45 
A(> 
47 

4S 

4') 
5° 



51 



52 
53 
54 
55 
55 



INDEX TO CONSTITUTION. 



Section. 

Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds 56 

1 to Control Exhibition of Game 56 

" lobe Furnished Patting Order of Visiting Club. 50 

Championship Schedule ^7 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Kxcept 57 

Admission to Championship Game 1'rice of 58 

( Jorrespondeoce Concerning Championship Games, by whom 

'■mducted 59 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Pay- 
ment of Go 

Admission to Championship Games, how Regulated 60 

League Games Forbidden Prior to Championship Season. . 61 
< lames between League and Non-League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing 62 

Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Division 

of Receipts ... .(1,3) 62 

Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Penalty 

for Non-Payment (3, 4) n2 

Count of Forfeit (James . 63 

I Irawn, Tie or Postponed Games not to Count but be 

Played off 64 

The Champion Club. 65 

Emblem of Championship r/i 

Mode of Deciding Championship G6 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Time and Place C^ 

1 )clegates and Visitors 08 

Special Meeting, how Called 69 

Quorum 70 

Ovder of liusiness 7t 



AMENDMENTS. 

Amendments to Constitution or Playing Rules (1) 

Suspension of Constitution (2) 



GGNSTiraneN 

OF THE 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



1 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS, 1891. 



NAME. 

Association 



'The 



Section r. (t ) This Association shall be called 
National League of Professional Bask Ball Clubs." 

(2.) While this League continues a party to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associations, such National 
Agreement, whenever applicable, shall be the paramount and 
supreme law of government with the same effect as if all its pro- 
visions were incorporated and written into this Constitution. 

OBJECTS. 

SECTION 2. The objects of this League arc: 

1. To encourage, foster and elevate the game of base ball; to 
enact and enforce proper rules for the exhibition and conduct of 
the game, and to make base ball playing respectable and hon- 
orable. 

2. To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional 
base ball clubs and professional base ball players, and, 

3. To establish and regulate the base ball championship of 
the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

SEC. 3. This League shall consist of such professional base 
ball clubs, as may from time to time be elected to membership, 
but in no event shall there be more than one club from any city. 

Sec. 4. No club shall be admitted from any city whose popu- 
lation is less than seventy five thousand (75,000) except by unan- 
imous vote of the League. 

SEC. 5. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first have 
delivered to the Secretary of the League, a written application for 
membership, signed by its President and Secretary, accompanied 
by documents showing that such club bears the name of the city 
in which it is located, and that it is regularly organized and offi- 
cered, and where the State law permits it, chartered. Such appli- 

7 



8 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



cation shall at once be transmitted by the Secretary to the Board 
of Directors, who shall immediately investigate and report upon 
said application; said report to be communicated to the League 
through the Secretary. 

Sec. 6. The voting upon an application for membership shall 
be by ballot, a two-thirds vote being requisite for election, and no 
club shall be required under any circumstances to state how it 
voted upon such application. 

Sec. 7. In case any League club shall forfeit its membership 
during the championship season, the Board of Directors may elect 
a non-League club to temporary membership in the League which 
election shall entitle such temporary club member without the 
payment of League club dues, to play all the championship sched- 
ule games remaining unplayed by the retired League club, upon 
the same terms and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, and such tem- 
porary membership shall terminate at the next annual meeting of 
the League. 

DUES, ASSESSMENTS, FINES, ETC. 

Sec. 8. (1.) Every League club shall pay to the Secretary of 
the League on or before the 1st day of May of each year, the 
sum of one hundred dollars as annual dues; and on or before the 
twenty-fifth day of each month of the championship season, such 
other sums as may be lawfully assessed for the payment of salaries 
of officers and umpires, and for such other expenses as may be in- 
curred by order of the League, or of the Hoard of Directors. 

Each club shall also pay to the Secretary of the National Board 
of I'rofessional Base Ball Associations all assessments of said 
Board levied on said club, and all lines and penalties imposed by 
said Board on said club or upon any of its officers, players, man- 
agers, scorers or other employes when so levied and imposed by 
virtue of, and in accordance with, the provisions of the National 
Agreement- 

(2.) Upon conviction of any of the offences prescribed in Sec- 
tion 10 as causes for expulsion — the Board of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, im- 
pose such a fine as is in their judgment commensurate with the 
injury; which fine may include a penalty payable to any other 
club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages, sustained for such 
violation of this Constitution, or of the National Agreement, or of 
the legislation or contracts made in pursuance thereof. 
GUARANTEE FUND. 

Sec 9. (1.) Each club elected to membership shall within 
thirty days after official notice of such election — by its President 
or other chief executive officer — sign and affix its common seal to 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



this constitution as a covenant lo fulfill all the obligations and 
requirements thereof, and of all legislation and contracts made in 
pursuance thereof 

It shall at the same time execute and deliver unto the President 
of the League, as Trustee for the other League Clubs, a bond with 
approved sureties in the penal sum of twen'y-five thousand dollars 
(#25 000), conditioned for the faithful performance of said Consti- 
tutional Covenants, and for the payment into the GUARANTEE 
FUND of the sum of twenty-live thousand dollars ($-5, 000! in 
annual installments of not less than one thousand dollars ($1,000), 
payable during the month of May; any default to cause the for- 
feiture of said penal sum, and of all installments previously paid 
into said fund. 

(2.) The GUARANTEE Fund shall be invested by the Board of 
Directors in United States Government Bonds, or in such other 
interest-bearing securities as the League in meeting shall direct. 
Said securities shall always be subject to the inspection of the 
League, or of its Auditing Committee appointed for the purpose. 

(3.) The interest and income accruing from such securities 
shall, as soon as collected, be transferred into the treasury in aid 
of the current and contingent expenses of the League. 

(4) The principal of said fund shall, except as hereinafter 
stated, be kept intact as a guarantee against any violation of the 
provisions of this Constitution, or of the National Agreement or 
of the legislation and contracts made in pursuance thereof. 

("5.) The failure of a club to pay into said fund, when due, any 
annual installment of its contribution thereto, shall forfeit the full 
penal sum of its bond, and suit may at once be entered for the 
recovery of the same, or in lieu thereof, and in default of a col- 
lection of the same, the Hoard of Directors, unless otherwise in- 
structed by the League, may expel said club from membership in 
the manner prescribed in Section II, when the installment or in- 
stallments already paid shall be forfeited, converted into cash and 
transferred into the treasury in aid of the current and contingent 
expenses of the League. 

(6.) Upon the acceptance of the resignation of a club from 
membership or upon the involuntary termination of such member- 
ship for "business reasons," as provided for in Section to said 
club shall be entitled to a return of its bond and of its entire con- 
tribution to the GUARANTEE FUND (less all dues, assessments and 
fines chargeable thereon), either in cash, or, at the option of the 
Board of Directors, in the securities in which the said cash may 
then be invested. 

(7.) Upon thirty days' default by a club— afterdue notice by 
the Secretary— in its payment of dues, assessments, or fines im- 
posed in pursuance of this Constitution or of the National Agree- 



10 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



ment, the Board of Directors shall declare forfeited an equivalent 
amount of said club's contribution to the GUARANTEE FUND, 
which equivalent amount, together' with such additional fine for 
said default — as may be imposed by said Board — shall be repaid 
within three months thereafter, under penalty of forfeiture of the 
bond of said club and of its entire contribution to said fund, anil 
of its expulsion from membership. Provided, That nothing 
herein contained shall be construed to prohibit a collection by suit 
on said bond, either before or after expulsion, of any unpaid in- 
stallments of said club's contribution tosaid fund requisite to sat- 
isfy and liquidate all arrears of said dues, assessments and fines. 

(8.) Upon a club's expulsion from membership for persistence 
in an unaccepted resignation, its entire contribution to the GUAR- 
ANTEE FUND shall be forfeited and suit may be instituted on its 
bond for all unpaid installments thereof. 

Sec. io. The membership of any League Club may be ter- 
minated: 

(i.) By resignation duly accepted by a majority vote of all the 
League Clubs in meeting duly convened. 

(2.) By an adverse vote of two-thirds of the remaining League 
Clubs in meeting duly convened, after ten days' notice before the 
commencement of or subsequent to the termination of the cham- 
pionship season when, for business leasons, such membership shall 
no longer be desirable. 

(3.) Ily expulsion in the manner prescribed in Section n, for 
failure to sign the Constitution, and deliver the bond and pay its 
contributions to the GUARANTEE FUND as prescribed in Section 
9; or 

Failure to pay the visiting club the amount clue under the pro- 
visions of Section 64 of this Constitution. 

Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed upon to 
play any championship game, unless caused by unavoidable acci- 
dent in traveling; or 

Selling, or allowing to be sold, upon its grounds, or in any 
building owned or occupied by it any spirituous, vinous or malt 
liquors; or 

Allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds or in 
any building owned or occupied by it; or 

Playing any game of ball with a club that is disqualified or in- 
eligible under this Constitution or the National Agreement of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Associations; or 

Offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game 
of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who shall be 
proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon ; or 

Taking part in any game of ball on Sunday. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 11 

Disbandment of its organization or nine; or 

Failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obligations with any 
National Agreement Club; or 

Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful requirement of 
the Board of Directors; or 

Willfully violating any provision of the National Agreement, or 
this Constitution, or the Legislation or Playing Rules made in 
pursuance thereof. 

Sec. ii. To carry into effect the provisions of Sections g ami 
10 of this Constitution the facts in any case covered by such sec- 
tions must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall 
at once telegraph the party charged with the specified default 
or offence, inquiring whether any dispute exists as to the facts 
alleged. In case the facts are disputed, the Board shall, after due 
notice, try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe, 
and their findings shall be final and conclusive on ail parties 
except in case of expulsion when such finding shall be for- 
warded to each League Club, which shall transmit to the Secretary 
written ballots "For Expulsion," or "Against Expulsion;" and if 
all League Clubs vote "For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify 
all League Clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged; and every club shall, on or after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled member by the 
prohibitions and penalties prescribed by this Constitution. 

SEC. 12. (i.) The umpires, managers and players employed 
by the clubs belonging to this League shall be considered and 
treated as members hereof to the extent of being always amenable 
to the provisions of the National Agreement or this Constitution, 
and entitled to all its privileges in matters of dispute, grievance 
or discipline, as provided in the National Agreement and this 
Constitution. 

(2.) Any umpire, manager or player having forfeited member- 
ship, shall not be readmitted except by unanimous vote of the 
League and if suspended or disqualified by the National Hoard 
under the provisions of the National Agreement, he shall not be 
eligible to service in the League until reinstated by said National 
Board. 

SEC. 13. A list shall be kept by the Secretary of the names of 
any persons who may be declared, by an affirmative vote of live 
League clubs, at any regular or special meeting, to be unworthy 
of service in the League, as umpire, manager or player, and any 
person so named shall be disqualified for employment by, or serv- 
ice in any League club, until his name be removed from such list 
by unanimous vote of all Leagu: clubs at a regular or special 
meeting. The Secretary shall immediately notify all League 
clubs of any name placed upon or removed from, such list of 
disqualified persons. 



12 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



OFFICERS. 
Sec. 14. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a Presi- 
dent by bai'.ot. The President shall be ex-officio chairman of the 

Board of Directors, tie shall preside at all the meetings of the 
League, and shall call special meetings of the League when he 
may deem it necessary, or when thereto requested by half of the 
clubs of the League. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resigna- 
tion or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty days 
elect a President 

Sec. 15. The Board of Directors shall consist of the President 
and four other members, to be chosen at the annual meeting, in 
the following manner: The name of each club, except that of 
which the President is a member, shall be plainly written upon a 
card, in full view of the delegates present, by the Secretary; the 
cards to be of the same size, shape, color and material. The cards 
shall then be placed in some suitable receptacle, and well shaken 
together; thereupon four of these cards shall be drawn successively, 
and at random, and one delegate from each of the four clubs 
whose names are so drawn, shall, with the President, compose the 
Hoard, and if any club whose name is thus drawn be represented 
by two delegates, such delegate shall name one of their number 
to be a member of the Board: Provided, That at any time after 
the adjournment of the annual League meeting, any League club 
represented on the Board may subsititute another representative; 
such substitution to be attested by written notice to the Secretary, 
signed by the President of the League club and upon receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution shall take effect, 
and the Secretary shall thereupon notify all League clubs. 

Sec. 16. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents: nor shall any 
club under any circumstances be represented by more than one 
person on the Hoard. 

SEC. 17. The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League, and shall 
be individually answerable to the League for the faithful discharge 
of their trust; 

SEC. iS. The Board shall meet annually on the morning of the 
first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November at nine 
o'clock at the place where the annual meeting of the League 
is to be held, but may hold special meetings whenever urgent 
necessity may require. 

Sic. 19. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all their 
doings, and present the same, in writing, to the League at its 
annual meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be filed with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, documents and prop- 



'WWH 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



13 



erty which may have come into their possession by virtue of their 
office. 

Skc. 20. Any Director who shall disclose or publish any of the 
proceedings of the Hoard except officially through the report of 
the Hoard, or when called upon by vote of the League, shall for- 
feit his office. 

Sec. 21. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence or disqualification of any Director, 
the club of which he was a member at the time he was chosen 
shall designate his successor, and at once notify the Secretary. 
But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding or 
disqualification of a club represented on the Board, the Board may 
fill the vacancy by election in the same manner as provided for the 
election of Directors in Section 15. 

Sec. 22. The Hoard shall elect a gentleman of intelligence, 
honesty and good repute who is versed in base ball matters but 
who is not in any manner connected with the press, and who is 
not a member of any professional base ball club, either in or out 
of the League, to be the Secretary of the Board, and of the League. 

Skc. 23. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League, 
receive all dues, fees and assessments, make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Hoard, or by the vote of the League, and 
render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give such bond 
with approved sureties as the Hoard may require. 

Sec. 24 The Secretary shall have the custody and care of the 
official reeords and papers of the League; shall keep a true record 
of all meetings of the League and the Board, shall issue all official 
notices and attend to the necessary correspondence; he shall pre- 
pare and furnish such reports as may be called for by the Board, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and mater- 
ials as the actual duties of his olfice may require. 

SEC. 25. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infractions of 
the rules and regulations of the National Board and of the League 
that may come to his notice, and shall (except in cases covered by 
Sections Hand 13) make a report on the same to the President, 
who shall present it to the Board at its next meeting. 

Sic. 26. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the Board, 
by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all traveling 
expenses actually incurred by him in the service of the League; 
and the Hoard may exact from him such guarantees for the faith- 
ful performance of his duties as they would deem for the interest 
and safety of the League. At the expiration of his term of office 
he shall account for and deliver up to the Board all the property 
and papers which may have come into his hands by virtue of his 
office. 



14 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



LEAGUE (.[.('lis, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND PLAYERS. 

SEC. 2". Each club belonging to this League shall have the 
right to regulate its own affair-., to establish its own rules, and to 
discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own manager, players or 
other employes, and these powers shall not be limited to cases 
of dishonest play or open insubordination, but shall include all 
questions of carelessness, indifference, or other conduct of the 
player that may be regarded by the club as prejudicial to its 
interests: Provided, That all club regulations must be made su- 
bordinate to and in conformity with, the general regulations estab- 
lished by the National Board and by this League, and no club 
shall prescribe any rule or regulation in conflict with any provision 
of the National Agreement or of this Constitution, or the Playing 
Rules. 

Sec. 28. Every club member of this League shall have exclus- 
ive control of the city in which it is located, ard of the territory 
surrounding such city, to the extent of five miles in every direc- 
tion from its corporate limits, and no visiting League ciub shall, 
under any circumstances — except with the consent of the local 
League club, until all League championship games on that ground 
shall have been finished, be allowed to play any club in such terri- 
tory other than the League club therein located, nor shall a visit- 
ing League club play any game in April with any non-League 
club within said five miles from the corporate limits of the city 
in which the League club is located, without the consent of the 
local League club. 

SEC. 2<). Contracts between a club and its players may be 
either by telegram or writing, to be followed within thirty days 
thereafter by a contract in the form approved by the National 
Hoard, which shall be registered by its Secretary and promulgated 
to all other National Agreement Clubs. 

SEC. 30. Negotiations for the release from contractor reser- 
vation, and for services of players oilier than those of the National 
League Clubs, shall be carried on exclusively through the Sec- 
retary of the League or his duly appointed agent. The Presi- 
dent. Secretary or Manager of a club shall file with the Secretary 
of the League, either by letter or telegram, a written offer for the 
release and salary of said player. 

If two or more League Clubs file an offer for the same player, 
the offer first received shall have priority of claim to such player 
until such negotiations fail, when the offer next in order filed shah 
be entitled to negotiation, and so on in sequential order with any- 
subsequent offers ; but no club shall have prior claim to any such 
negotiations for more than one non-League player not under con- 
tract with and required by another League Club. Negotiations 
carried on directly or indirectly with any such player, except 



LEAGUE CONSTITU I I 1 >N. 



15 



through the Secretary of the League, or with his consent, shall 
forfeit all right to contract with, and subsequent reservation of 
such player by the club so offering. 

Sec. 31. Any player while under contract with or reservation 
by a League Club, who shall, without the consent of such club, 
enter the service of any other club in any capacity, shall be liable 
to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club releases a 
manager or player without notice, or gives him ten days' notice of 
release in accordance with the terms of his contract, and whenever 
it suspends or expels a manager or player, that club shall at once 
notify the Secretary of—the National Hoard, stating, in case of 
release, the date when me same takes effect, and in case of sus- 
pension or expulsion, the cause thereof. 

Sec, 32. Release of players from contract or reservation, and 
future contracts with such players, shall be regulated and gov- 
erned by the National Agreement of Professional T!ase Ball Asso- 
ciations and the legislation made in pursuance thereof. No player 
without the consent of the club with which he is under contract or 
reservation shall enter into negotiation with any other club for 
future services, but if such consent be obtained a player may ne- 
gotiate for his release, and offer a money consideration therefor, 
which may be accepted by the said releasing club. 

SEC. 33, The disbandment of a League club or its withdrawal 
from or loss of League membership shall operate as a release of 
its players from contract and reservation with said club, but the 
right to contract with and reserve said players shall be subject to 
transfer to such other club as the League may designate after ac- 
ceptance of their said services in accordance with the provisions of 
the National Agreement. 

Sec 34. No manager or player who has been suspended or 
expelled from a League club, shall at any time thereafter be 
allowed to play with or serve in any capacity any League club 
(either the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of sus- 
pension by the club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board, 
such suspension or expulsion shall have been set aside. 

SEC, 35. No club shall employ as umpire, manager, scorer or 
player, any person who has wilfully violated any provision of the 
National Agreement of this Constitution, or of the Playing Rules, 
or who has been expelled from any club subject to the National 
Agreement, or wdio shall be disqualified from playing with a 
club under any provision of this Constitution, or of the National 
Agreement. 

Sic. 36. No game of ball shall be played between a League 
club and any other club that has been expelled from membership 
in this League. No game of ball shall lie played between a League 
club and any other club employing or presenting in its nine a 






1G 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



player expelled or under suspension from the League or otherwise 
rendered ineligible by the National Agreement, or the legislation 
made in pursuance thereof. A violation of this section shall for- 
feit the game in favor of the non-offending club, and subject it to 
such fine as the National lioard or the League Board of Directors 
may impose. 

faEC. 37. Any manager or player who may consider himself 
aggrieved or injured by any act of his club, or of any officer, 
agent or employe thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the 
President of the club when the club " nine " is at home. Any 
manager or player, under contract with or reservation by a 
League club, who shall, without the written consent of such club, 
leave its service, or who shall be proven guilty of offering, agree- 
ing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game of ball, or of being 
interested in any pool or wager thereon, shall be at once expelled 
by such club. 

Si <\ 38. Any person under contract with a League club, who 
shall be guilty of drunkenness, gambling in any form, insubordi- 
nation, or of any dishonorable or disreputable conduct (except the 
offences requiring expulsion, specified in Sec. 40), may be fined or 
suspended by such ciub for the remainder of the playing season, or 
for the remainder of that and all the ensuing playing season, at 
the option of such club. And during the period of such suspen- 
sion, such person shall be disqualified from playing in or against, 
or serving any League club. Provided, That the club having 
made the suspension shall not have power to rescind it or to cur- 
tail its duration. 

The l'resident of the League shall have power, upon proper 
proof, to inflict a fine for any such offences, not exceeding two 
hundred dollars (§200), which iiatcan only be remitted by the 
Board of Directors. 

Six. 39. Any person who shall ba proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the Playing Rules, or 
who, while acting as Umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution of the National Agreement, or of the Having Rules 
adopted hereunder, may be forever disqualified by the President 
of the League from acting as Umpire of any game of ball partici- 
pated in by a League Club. 

1111: UMPIRE, 

Sec. 40. A staff of five League Umpires shall be selected by 
the Secretary before the 1st day of May. 

(1 ) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such expenses 
as may be mutually agreed upon by contract between them and 
the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval of the Board 
of I lirectors of the League. 

I 



i 






s 






1.EAGUK CONSTITUTION. 



17 



(i ) lie shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom he will receive all assignments to duty, and 
all instructions regarding the interpretation of the Playing Rules, 
and the Secretary shall prescribe a proper uniform for him, all 
parts of which shall be worn when officiating as Umpire. 

(3) In the event of the failure of such Umpire to umpire a 
game assigned to him, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next monthly payment to the League 
Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to him, 
which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(4.) It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as um- 
pire for any championship game such League Umpire or substitute 
as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and only in the event of 
the failure of the League Umpire or substitute so assigned to 
appear at the hour appointed for the beginning of such game, shall 
the duty devolve upon the visiting club to designate an Umpire 
for such game. 

(5.) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time and in the event of the resignation, removal 
or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall have power 
to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus created. 

Sec. 41. Any League Umpire who sliall in the judgment of 
the National Board or /he President of the League he guilty of un- 
gentlemanly conduct, or of selling, or offering to sell, a game of 
which he is' Umpire, shall thereupon be removed from his official 
capacity, and placed under the same disabilities inflicted upon 
expelled players by the Constitution of the National Agreement or 
the League. 

SEC 42. The 1,'mpire's Jurisdiction and Powers, in addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are : 

(1.) The gentleman selected to fill the position of Umpire must 
keep constantly in mind the fact that upon his sound discretion 
and promptness in conducting the game, compelling players to 
observe the spirit as well as the letter of the Playing Rules, and 
enforcing each and every one of the said Rules, largely depends 
the merit of the game as an exhibition, and the satisfaction of 
spectators therewith. He must make his decisions distinct and 
clear, remembering that every spectator is anxious to hear such 
decision. I le must keep the contesting nines playing constantly 
from the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing 
such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury 
or rain, lie must, until the completion of the game, require the 
players of each side to promptly take their positions in the field 
as soon as the third hand is put out, and must require the first 



18 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon 
as the fielders are in their places. 

(2.) The players of the side " at bat " must occupy the portion 
of the Held allotted them, subject to the condition that they must 
speedily va:ate any portion thereof that may be in the way of the 
ball, or any fielder attempting to catch or Held it. The triangular 
space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of 
the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit 
any player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, or is 
passing between them, while standing in their positions. 

(3.) The League Umpire is a member of the League. Muring 
the progress of a game he is the sole representative of the League, 
to see that the game is played and determined solely on its merits, 
and lie is invested with ample powers to accomplish this purpose. 
In the performance of his duties he must remember that his sole 
allegiance is due to the League. 

(4.) The Umpire is master of the field from the commencement 
to the termination of the game, and must compel the players to 
observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit to do any 
act, as he may deem it necessary to give lone and effect to such 
Rules; and he shall have no power to revoke or remit any lines 
imposed for violation of such Rules. 

(5.) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the offend- 
ing player's side of the infliction of any such line, and the club 
to which such player belongs shall, upon receipt of a notice of said 
line from the Secretary of the League, within ten days transmit 
the amount thereof to the Secretary of the League. 

(6.) When the Umpire shall impose a tine on a player, or 
declare a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice thereof 
to the Secretary of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter ; 
and if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit his position as League 
Umpire, and shall forever thereafter be ineligible to umpire any 
League game. 

I. I-.it 1 is AND COMPLAINTS. 

Sec. 43. The Hoard of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 

determine disputes between clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and 
the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the Hoard shall 
prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board shall be final, 
and under no circumstances shall be reconsidered, re-opened, or 
inquired into, either by the League or any subsequent Board. 

Sec. 44. The Board shall at once consider any complaint pre- 
ferred by a club against a manager or player of another club (prior 
to the expiration of the championship season) for conduct in vio- 
lation of any provision of this Constitution, or prejudicial to the 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



19 



good repute of the game of base ball, and shall have power to 
require the club to which such manager or player may belong, to 
discipline him, and upon repetition of such offence, to expel him. 
Provided, That such complaint be preferred in writing, giving 
such particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the facts, 
and be transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once be 
referred to the Board. 

Sec. 45. In case a player under reserve for the ensuing season 
by any League club, shall prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League against said club, alleging: 

1. That such club is in arrears to him on account of his con- 
tract for the last preceding season, or 

2. That he has on or after March 15 offered to contract with 
such club for the ensuing season, for the same compensation as 
that of the preceding season, and that the said club has declined 
either to enter into such contract, or to release him from reserva- 
tion, the Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of 
such complaint, and lequire an answer thereto. On receipt of such 
answer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the receipt of an 
answer, the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Chair- 
man of the Hoard. The Hoard shall thereupon try the case under 
such regulations as they may prescribe, and should they find the 
player's complaint sustained by the facts, they shall release the 
player from reservation, and instruct the Secretary of the League 
to issue notice of such release, in like manner as if the player 
hail been voluntarily released by the club. The Board shall also, 
should they find the club in arrears to the player, require the club, 
under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player, 
forthwith, the full amount ascertained to be due him. 

Sir. 4(1. In case a player under contract with a League club 
shall during a current season prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League, against such club, alleging that such 
club is in arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen days after 
such salary became due on account of such contract, the Secretary 
shall act in the matter as provided in the preceding Section, and 
should the Board find the player's complaint sustained, they shall 
require the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to 
pay to the player forthwith the full amount ascertained to be due 
him. Provided, That should the player refuse to serve the club, 
pending action by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby 
forfeit the benefits of the award, and in such case the Hoard shall 
revoke his award. 

Sir. 47. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal for the 
hearing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been 
expelled or suspended by his club. The matter shall be proceeded 
with in the following manner: Such person shall, within thirty 






20 



LKAtJUE CONSTITUTION. 



days after the date of the expulsion or suspension, file with the 
Secretary a written statement of his defence, accompanied by a 
request that an appeal be allowed him. 'The Secretary shall notify 
the club of the request for an appeal, accompanying such notice 
with a copy of the appeal, and at the next annual meeting, the 
club, by its duly authorized representative, and the appellant in 
person, by attorney, or by written statement, shall appear before 
the Board with their testimony. The Hoard shall impartially hear 
the matter and render their decision, which shall be final, and 
forever binding on both club and player. 

Sec. 48. No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 

SEC. 49. Any expenses of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equa ly by the parties to the controversy. 

Sec. 50. In all disputes, complaints or questions arising under 
"The National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associa- 
tions," between this League ami any other association of chilis, 
party to such agreement or between any club of this League 
and any club of any other association, party to such agreement, 
the adjudication thereof shall be left entirely to the National 
Board provided for by such agreement, and this League will 
comply with and be bound by the award, findings or verdii l of 
such Board in any such case, so long as this League continues a 
party to such " National Agreement." 

SEC, 51. The League, at its annual meeting, shall adopt - 11 h 
Playing Rules as may be enacted by the National Board. 
CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec. 52. The Championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs com- 
posing this League. 

Ski . 53. The championship season shall ex' end from such date 
in April or May to such date in September or October as the 
League may determine at its stated or special meeling. 

SEC. 54. Every game played between two clubs from the com- 
mencement of the championship season to the completion of the 
championship series between such clubs, shall be a game for tin- 
championship, and no League club shall lend or exchange players, 
to or with each other, for any game played during the champion- 
ship season. 

Six. 55. Each club shall play fourteen or more championship 
games with every oilier club, but a lie or draw game or games 
prevented by rain shall be plajed off on the same grounds on the 
first succeeding day (not counting Sundays, days previously agreed 
upon for championship games between said clubs, or days when 
rain renders playing impossible) within the dates of the same 
schedule series between such clubs, if any remain open; and if 



L I •: AGUE CONST ITUTION. 



21 



not, such game may be played off afterward on either grounds, 
but two games shall not be played on one day without the prior 
consent of two-thirds of all the League clubs. 

SEC. 56. Each club shall have half of the championship series 
of games with every other club played OQ its own grounds, except 
as otherwise provided in Sec. 55, and in all the details of such 
games that do not involve the rights of the visiting club under the 
['laying Rules, but relate solely to such games as attractive exhibi- 
tions to the patrons of the home club the visiting club shall defer 
to the wishes of the home club, and the visiting club shall furnish 
to a person designated by the home club the batting order of its 
nine by 10 o'clock on the morning of the day of each game. In 
case of the failure of any visiti.ig club to furnish the batting order 
of its nine as herein stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of $!o, 
which amount shall be immediately transmitted to the Secretary of 
the League upon the receipt of notice from him of the infliction of 
such fine, which notice shall be given by the Secretary upon receipt 
of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the bailing order 
before the commencement of the game under similar penalties for 
default as herein prescribed. The visiting club shall have the 
right to practice its nine on the grounds of the home club between 
1 i and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit during the cham- 
pionship season. 

Sec 57. All championship games shall be arranged in a written 
schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, and reported to 
and adopted by the League before the beginning of the champion- 
ship season. The schedule shall provide for an equal number of 
return games, and specify the date of each game, and the dates of 
each series of games. No date in said schedule shall subsequently 
be changed, except (!) by written agreement of two clubs from a 
date fixed by the schedule for a game between such clubs to 
another day between the first and last dale of the same schedule 
scries between such clubs; or (2) as provided in Section 59 ; or 
(3) by the written consent of two-thirds of all the League clubs. 

SEC. 58. The price of admission to championship games shall 
be fifty cents for each adult person. 

SEC. 59. In correspondence between clubs, all letters and 
telegrams concerning umpires, dates and other matters pertaining 
to championship games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of such club des- 
ignated by its l'resident to act for him in such matters, the Seciv- 
tary of the League to be notified of such designation. If such 
communication be made by another club when at home, thev must 
be addressed by, and answered lo, its l'resident or his represents- 



99. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



tive, as above provided ; and if the corresponding club be absent 
from home, they must be addressed by and answered to its man- 
ager. 

Sec. 60. At the conclusion of each championship game, the 
home club shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and 
shall transmit by mail to the visiting club a duplicate of the same) 
a statement of the receipts of said game, exclusive of extra charge 
for grand stand and shall pay to the authorized agent of such vis- 
itingclub forty per centum thereof, and shall transmit to the Sec- 
retary of the League ten per centum thereof, to create a fund to be 
appropriated to meet the current expenses of the League, and to 
repay to the Guarantee Fund all loans or disbursements therefrom 
made by order of the League. All surplus or excess in such ten 
per centum fund over and above such payments shall be divided 
equally between the club members of the League at such times as 
the Hoard of Directors may determine. 

The number of persons admitted to the grounds shall be deter- 
mined by the use of the necessary number of self registering turn- 
stiles, the keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the 
visiting club before the opening of the grounds for each game ; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have the right to affix a 
seal to the register or box of such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close of the seventh 
inning, and in case a carriage gate is used, a ticket for each person 
admitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to the agent 
of the visiting club. 

No person shall be admitted to the grounds during or prior to 
such game or the hour appointed therefor, excepting only players 
of contesting clubs, policemen in uniforms, and the necessary 
employes of the home club. 

Sec. 6i. Xo gameshall be played between League clubs before 
the commencement of the championship series. 

Sec. 62. Xo game shall be played between any League club 
and any non-League club, or picked nine, upon the grounds of 
any League club, from the commencement to the completion of 
the championship series upon such grounds, except that any extra 
players of the home club may so play while the home club is 
absent from the city. Xo game shall be arranged or played 
between any League and non League clubs or picked nines, for or 
upon any "off days" of the championship series, except as above 
provided, and upon the following express conditions : 

I. If a League championship game be prevented by rain or 
unavoidable accident on the day (not counting Sunday) preceding 
the day agreed upon for such non-League or picked nine game, 
then the latter shail be declared off so as to allow the League clubs 
to play the championship game on that day. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



23 



2. All such games shall be played under such rules, with such 
ball and such umpire as may be mutually agreed upon by the 
League club and the mm League club. 

3. In the event of game stopped by rain before completion of 
live innings, the home club may issue rain checks good for admis- 
sion to the next succeeding game. The uncompleted game shall 
be considered a postponed game, and no money paid to the visit- 
ing club. 

4. The non- League club shall, unless otherwise agreed by let- 
ter, telegram or other writing, pay the League club immediately 
upon the termination of plav, without reference to the number of 

•innings played, the sum of one hundred dollars or one-half the 
gross receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts shall 
exceed two hundred dollars ; and it is to be distinctly understood 
that the "gross receipts" include all revenue derived from the 
exhibition, whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for ad- 
mission to grounds, grand stands, or to other special privileges of 
the grounds: also that the visiting club shall have sole control of 
all gates, and of all entrances to grand stands, or other special 
ground privileges for which extra fees are charged. And the 
non-League club shall pay the League club fifty dollars in every 
case where a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non-League club, prepared to play at the time 
appointed for such game, and the game be prevented by rain, 
or by any cause other than the refusal of such League club 
to play such game. In the event of the refusal or failure of 
any non- League club to pay the sum or sums due, as stipulated, 
the League club shall at once telegraph such fact to the Secretary 
of the League, who shall forthwith notify all other League clubs 
by telegraph; and no League club shall thereafter play such 
defaulting club until the full amount due be paid the League club, 
which League club shall, in case of such payment notify the 
Secretary and the other League clubs, by telegraph. 

5. In any case not covered by the first condition specified in 
this section, a League club having agreed to play a non-League 
club upon the grounds of the latter, and failing to present its 
nine in the city or town of such non League club, prepared to 
play at the time appointed for such game the League club shall 
pay the non-League club the sum of fifty dollars, or such other 
sum as may have been mutually agreed upon, as the penaltv of 
such default. 

Sec. 03. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to count 

in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none in 

cases where the umpire in any championship game shall award the 
game to such club on account of the violation by the contesting 
club of any section of this constitution or of any playing rule; and 



24 



.EAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



in tlie event of said forfeiture being caused by the withdrawal of 
t lie players during the progress of the game, or by a failure to 
report with its team at the time fixed for the game unless written 
notice has been received from the home club that the game cannot 
be played, then such forfeiting club shall incur a penalty of one 
thousand dollars, which shall be payable to the Secretary of the 
League within ten days thereafter, lor the use and benefit of the 
non-offending club, but said line may be remitted upon appeal to 
and a hearing by, the Hoard of Directors. 

Sec. 64. Drawn, tie, and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any games of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if pos- 
sible, as provided in Section 59. If they cannot be played off, as 
therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, if sufficient 
time exists before the close of the season. 

Skc. 65. The club which shall have won the greatest percent- 
age of games in the championship series shall be declared the 
champion club of the United States for the season in which 
such games were played. In the event that two or more clubs 
shall have won the same percentage of games, then the Hoard 
shall at once arrange a special series of three games between any 
two of such clubs, such games to be played in the month of Oc- 
tober, and the games so played shall be included in the champion- 
ship record, and counted in determining the award of the cham- 
pionship. In such case only the provisions of this Constitution 
prohibiting the playing or recording as championship games, 
games played after the expiration of the championship season, 
shall have no effect. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the 
nationil colors) to cost not less than one hundred ($100) dollars. 
It shall be inscribed with the motto. 'Champion Base Hall Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year in 
which the title was won, and the champion club shall be entitled 
to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 

SEC. 66. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner: 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for the 
championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to the 
Secretary of the League a statement containing the full score of 
the game, according to the system specified in the "Playing 
Rules," the date, place where played, and names of the clubs and 
umpire: Provided, That no tie or drawn game shall be considered 
"a game" for any purpose except the averages; and provided 
further that in any case where the Secretary shall not receive the 
score of a championship game within five days after the playing 
of such game, the club whose duty it is to forward such score 



LI-'.ACUK CONSTITUTION. 



25 



shall pay to the League the sum of ten dollars as the penalty of 
such default. 

At the close nf the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabular 
statement of the games won and lost by each club, according to 
the statement so sent him, which statements shall be the sole evi- 
dence in the matter, and submit the same, with the statements so 
sent him, to the Board, who shall make the award in writing, and 
report the same to the League at its annual meeting. In making 
the award the Hoard shall consider: 

1. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, dis- 
banded, or forfeited their membership without completing their 
championship series with all other League clubs; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent: The Hoard shall -ascer- 
tain the least number of championship games played bv such club 
with any club remaining in the League, and shall, from the 
hrst game participated in during the championship season by 
such retired club, count in the series of each League club a similar 
number of games, and all other games participated in by such 
retired club shall not be counted in the championship series. 
Provided, That if such retired club shall have failed to play at 
least one championship game with every League club, all games 
participated in by it shall be thrown out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sec. 67. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November of 
each year, at twelve o'clock noon, and at such places as shall 
have been determined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

Si-:c. 68. At such meeting each club shall be represented, and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have, in addition 
thereto, any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meeting; 
but no club shall be permitted to send as a representative any 
person under contract or engagement as a ball player or man- 
ager, and belonging to the nine of said club in such capacity; 
they shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary of 
their club, showing their authority to act, but no club shall have 
more than one vote. 

Sec. 69. Special meetings may be called by the President of 
the League on his own option, or on the written call of four clubs. 

Sec. 70. A representation of a majority of clubs shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number 
may adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 71, The following shall be the order'of business: 

I. Heading minutes of last meeting. 



26 



LEA G U E C( i NST1TU TION . 



2. Report of Hoard of Directors. 

3. Report of special committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 
0. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of officers 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment- 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 72. (1.) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a two-thirds vote of the League at any annual 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. 

(2.) Any Section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provisions made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



27 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT OF PROFES- 
SIONAL BASE BALL ASSOCIATIONS. 



Rules and Regulations of the National Board of Profes- 
sional Base Bali. Clubs 1891. 



13S South Sixth street, 
Ivan- 
Wash. 



Members of the Board: 
John I. Rogers, (National League), 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

/.. C. Kranlkoff, (Western Association), Nelson Building 
sas City, Mo. 

N. E. Young, Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer 
ington, II. C. 

All official communications should be addressed to the Chair- 
man at Washington. 

The National Agreement herein officially published was 
adopted, ratified and approved by the National League of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Clubs, the American Association of Base Ball 
Clubs and the Western Association of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs, and executed, signed and delivered by the respective Pres- 
idents of said Associations, at the Filth Avenue Hotel, New York 
City, on the evening of January 16th, 1S91, although by the 21st 
Article it went into effect and force only from and after' February 
1, 1S91. On February 13th, 1891, the National Board of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Associations, consisting of one delegate from 
each of the three Associations parties to the National Agreement, 
met at the Auditorium in Chicago, organized, as required by 
its second and third Articles by electing A. W. Thurman, Chair- 
man for one year, and N. E. Young, Secretary and Treasurer for 
live years, and ordered the establishment of the office of the 
Board at Washington, I). C. 

The Board then adopted its Rules and Regulations as herein 
published, and after trying and adjudicating several controversies 
between different Clubs as to their respective rights to the services 
of certain players for the season of iSql, and after ordering the 
publication of the matter herein contained, adjourned, subject to 
the call of the Chairman. 

N". E. Young, 

Chairman. 



28 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



THI-: FULL TEXT OF THE AGREEMENT 



THE OBJECTS OF THE AGREEMENT. 
' To maintain the integrity of the National Game of Profes- 
sional Baseball, to provide the means for preserving harmony and 
for adjusting all grievances and disputes, to protect the large finan- 
cial interests at stake and the rights of individual clubs and players, 
and to give the most solemn assurance that the game will at all 
times be conducted with strictest honesty and under regulations of 
absolute justice to all concerned." 

THE ORIGINAL PARTIES TO THE AGREEMENT. 
"The following agreementis hereby established and entered into 
by and between the National League of Professional Baseball 
Clubs, the American Association of Baseball Clubs, and the 
Western Association of Professional Baseball Clubs. 
THE TITLE. 
" Article 1st. — This instrument shall be called the National 
Agreement of Professional Baseball Associations, and it shall su- 
persede and be a substitute for all other agreements and articles, 
similarly or otherwise designated, existing between the parties 
hereto or any of them." 

A PROVISO. 
'' Provided, however, that all the rights acquired under any pre- 
vious agreement or at tide, or by authority thereof , or of any act 
done or contract or reservation made thereunder, shall neverthe- 
less remain unaffected by this substitution, and in every respect in 
full force and effect, except only as herein otherwise provided." 
THE NATIONAL BOARD. 
" Article 2nd. — The general enforcement of this agreement, 
the protection of all rights thereunder, the determination of all 
controversies as hereinafter provided, and generally the regulation 
of all things within the scope of this agreement, are each and sev- 
erally conferred upon and committed to a board to be known as 'The 
National Board of Professional Baseball Associations.' " 

lis MEMBERSHIP. 

"This board shall consist of one delegate from the National 
League of Professional Baseball Clubs, one from the American 
Association of Baseball Clubs, and one from the Western Associ- 
ation of Professional liaseball Clubs.' 

THE VOTING POWER. 

" The said board by a majority vote shall elect one of its own 
members or some other person as its chairman; but if a person not 
a member of the board be elected chairman^ he shall have no vote." 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



29 



TERM OF SERVICE. 

" The members of the board shall be elected for live years; but 
any member may be removed at any time by a two-thirds vote of 
the Association which elected him," 

VACANCIES AND QUORUM. 

" Vacancies shall be fdled for the remainder of the term in the 
same manner in which the member vacating was originally elected. 
Two members of said board shall constitute a quorum to do busi- 
ness." 

OFFICIALS OF THE BOARD. 

" Article 3d. — The board shall select a secretary, treasurer and 
such assistants as it may deem necessary to properly conduct the 
business in its charge, and shall fix the compensation and prescribe 
the duties of all officers and assistants, provided that the amounts 
to be paid out for such compensation shall be approved by the 
parties hereto." 

QUARTERLY REPORTS AND OFFICE HOURS. 

" The board shall make financial statementsto each association, 
party hereto, quarterly. It shall also establish an office in a con- 
venient location, which shall be kept open in charge of some per- 
son in authority from 10 A. M. to 6 P. M.. from April I to Novem- 
ber I, and from 10 A. M. to 4 r. M., from November 1 to April 1 
of each year." 

chairman's duties. 

"Article 4th. — The chairman shall preside at all meetings of the 
board. He may determine such matters requiring decision or ad- 
justment as the board may have designated as proper to be so de- 
termined by him. But in all matters involving or affecting mem- 
bership, rights of associations or clubs, or the release or exchange 
of players, and in all disputes affecting the standing of clubs, it 
shall be the duty of the chairman forthwith to submit all papers 
bearing on the case, or copies thereof, to the members of the 
board, each of whom shall vote thereon, in person or by mail, or 
telegraph, before any decision is promulgated." 

POWERS OF THE BOARD. 

ITS REQUIRED DUTIES. 

"Article 5th. — The Board .i//<r/7keep a record of all its proceed- 
ings, decisions and orders. It s/in/t also keep a record of ail con- 
tracts and agreements with umpires, and between clubs, and play- 
ers, or managers, which have been approved by the board. Upon 
receiving notice of the signing of a contract or agreement by a 
player or manager, or of the release of a player or manager from 



30 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



contract, agreement or reservation, tlic board shall forthwith pro- 
mulgate notice thereof to the club members of all National Agree- 
ment Associations. It shall also define and interpret Playing 
Kules when called upon by any club official, manager or umpire. 
It .t/W/also compile the playing record of all professional players 
who are members of clubs acting under this agreement, and shall 
publish the same, but may, on request, give confidential informa- 
tion from such record to any club acting under this agreement. 
It shall also have power to amend and enforce the National 1'lay- 
injj Kules, under which all games of baseball shall be played. 
ITS OPTIONAL DUTIES. 

"It may also appoint official scorers for any association or club. 
It may also select, assign and control the umpires for each of the 
associations, parties hereto, separately, on their request, under 
such regulations as the board may prescribe. It may also pre- 
scribe forms of contracts for players and managers. 
THE TREASURER'S DUTIES. 

"Article 6th. — The treasurer shall collect all moneys due to the 
board, and faithfully account for the same. Such money shall 
only be paid out on the order of the board. The treasurer shall 
give such bond as the board may prescribe and approve." 
SPECIAL JURISDICTION or Till'. HOARD. 

"Article 7th. — It shall be the duty of the board, and it shall have 
full and final jurisdiction: Kirstly (A ) — To hear and deter- 
mine all disputes and complaints between associations and 
clubs, between one club and another, members of different associ- 
ations, between clubs and players or managers, and, in addition 
thereto, all disputes and complaints arising under, and of all mat- 
ters involving the interpretation of the National Agreement, or the 
disposition of rights thereunder. Any club belonging to the same 
association, by mntual consent, 01 the association to which they both 
belong, may refer any controversy between such clubs or in which 
such clubs are interested, to the board for decision or adjustment." 
FINKS AND PENALTIES, 

"Section (B.)— In the performance of its duties the board shall 
have power to impose lines and penalties upon associations, clubs, 
club officers, players, managers, scorers and umpires, to sus- 
pend any such body of persons in any instance in which, in its 
opinion, it or he shall have been guilty of conduct detrimental to 
the general welfare of the game, or in violation of the letter or 
spirit of the National Agreement." 

POWER OK ADMINISTRATION. 

"Section (C.) — Its decisions shall be final over any and 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



31 



all matters within its jurisdiction. Its powers shall be exercised 
as it may deem just and equitable, unrestricted by technical objec- 
tions, and it may make any order or take any action necessary to 
enforce its conclusions, and provide such penalties and means for 
their enforcement as to it may seem just and appropriate." 
POWER TO REINSTATE. 
" Section (E.) — It may reinstate any person or body suspended." 

POWER TO ASSESS FOR EXPENSES. 
" Section (D.) — It shall have power to make" such reasonable 
assessments upon clubs or associations as may be necessary to de- 
fray the expenses incidental to the performance of its duties and the 
enforcement of this agreement." 

TO MAKE REGULATIONS. 
" Section (F.) — The said board shall make all orders, rules and 
regulations which it may deem necessary for the performance of its 
duties and the exercise of its powers and to accomplish its purpose 
in view in its establishment, and to amend or supplement the same 
from time to time; Provided, That notice of any proposed amend- 
ments or supplements be first given to all members thereof not 
present at the time." 

PUBLISHING PROCEEDINGS. 

" Section (G.) — The board may cause its proceedings or rulings 
or any part thereof in any case which may be deemed of sufficient 
importance to serve as a precedent to be published in such manner 
as it may prescribe." 

CLASSIFYING MINOR LEAGUES. 

" Section (II.) — The board shall have power to designate classes 
and grades in addition to the parties hereto, in which classes so to 
be established other Associations containing not less than four 
clubs, may, with the consent of such board and under such regu 
lations as it may prescribe, become entitled to the benefits of this 
agreement for the time being. Such other classification shall fix 
the amount of assessments to be paid annually by clubs of each of 
said classes; the salary limit of such clubs; the limit of compen- 
sation to umpires in associations of each class; and also the 
amount upon paying or securing which any association of any such 
class may have its umpires selected, assigned and controlled by 
the said board under such regulations as it may prescribe, and the 
period for which any club of a particular class may contract with 
a player or manager." 

PURCHASING PLAYERS' RELEASES. 

"Section (I.) — For the purpose of enabling players to advance 
in their profession and of building up and maintaining associations 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



of classes in addition to the parties hereto, the said board shall be 
authorized to prescribe that if any association entering any such 
class as aforesaid, and the clubs composing the same, shall consent 
thereto, that any club of any association party hereto or belonging 
to an association of a higher class, may, at any time, during 
the season of said former clubs, with the consent of the board 
and at other times at its election, negotiate with any player then 
tinder contract with, or reservation, by said former club, upon 
payment to it of a sum to bs specified at the time the classification 
herein provided for is made, and said board may provide forms 
and rules for the exercise of such selection. Provided, That no 
such transfer of a player shall be made unless he shall receive an 
increase of salary, and that neither said board nor any association 
or club shall at any time make or undertake to enforce any pro- 
vision or proceeding for the transfer of a player without his 
conseut." 

•RELEASE FROM CONTRACT. 

"Section (J.) — The board may also release from contract or 
reservation any player or manager, when the club with which he 
has contracted or by which he has been reserved shall be in 
arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen days after such 
salary become due; or when the reserving club has failed to tender 
to any player, on or before the 15th day of March, after such 
reservation, a regular contract with a salary of at least such an 
amount per month as the board may fix as thi minimum salary to 
be paid to such player, or when any such reserving club other 
than one of an association party hereto, has transferred its mem- 
bership after the close of a championship season to a different 
association, if the board shall deem that the player will be pre- 
judiced by such transfer." 

THE RESERVATION CLAUSE. 

" Article 8th. — On or before the loth day of October, 1891, 
and of every year thereafter, the secretaries of associations parties 
hereto, or belonging to any class which may be entitled to the 
privilege of reservation, shall transmit to the said board a reserve 
list of players, not exceeding fourteen in number, then under con- 
tract with each of its several club members, for the current or for 
any succeeding season or seasons, and in addition thereto a list of 
such players reserved in anv prior annual reserve list who have 
refused to contract with said clubs, and of all ineligible players. 
Such players, together with all others thereafter to be regularly 
contracted with by such clubs, are and shall be ineligible to con- 
tract with any other club of any asssociation, except as hereinafter 
prescribed. The said board shall thereupon promulgate such lists, 
provided that no club shall be permitted to reserve any player 
while in arrears of salary to him." 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



33 



PERIOD OF CONTRACTS. 

"Article 9th. — Clubs belonging to associations, parties hereto, 
may contract with players for any /■•■rich/ of time that may be 
mutually agreed upon; Providod, That no club shall at any time 
enter into negotiation or contract with any player under contract, 
sgreement or reservation with or by any other club, without the 
latter's consent. The board shall have power to enforce this 
section by such fines and penalties upon and against all bodies or 
persons violating this section, as it may deem proper." 
EXPULSION AND SUSPENSION. 

"Article loth. — When a player under contract or reservation by 
any club of any association party hereto shall be expelled, sus- 
pended or rendered ineligible in accordance with the rules of such 
association, notice of such disqualification shall be given to the 
said board by the secretary of the association from whose club 
the player may have been thus disqualified, and the board shall 
forthwith give notice of such disqualification to the several clubs 
acting under this agreement. When a player shall become in- 
eligible under the provisions of this agreement or by order of the 
board, the secretary of the board shall notify the several clubs 
acting under this agreement of such disqualification. From the 
receipt of any such notice all club members of associations acting 
under this agreement shall be debarred from employing or playing 
with or against such disqualified players, until the period of dis- 
qualification shall have terminated, or the disqualification be re- 
voked by the association from which such player was disqualified, 
or by the board, and due notice of such revocation shall be given 
by the board to the said several clubs." 

SUSPENSION OF PAY. 
"Article nth. — Any player who has entered into a contract with 
any club of any association party hereto may be suspended, with- 
out pay, by such club or association for breach of contract or 
breach of any of the rules of such club or association, and he shall 
thereafter be ineligible to sign or play during the remainder of the 
current season with any of the clubs of any association acting 
hereunder, unless such disability shall have been sooner removed 
by the club or association by which he was suspended, or by the 
board." 

INELIGIBLE PLAYERS DEBARRED PROM PLAY. 
"Article 12th. — No game shall be played between any club of 
any association acting hereunder, or any of its players under con- 
tract or reservation with any club or 'team' containing an ineligible 
player, nor with a club or 'team' that has played with another club 
or 'team,' containing such ineligible player. A violation of this 
section shall subject each offender to fine; suspension or expulsion, 
in the discretion of the board." 



34 



THE NKW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



WHEN PLAYERS AKF. ELIGIBLE TO SIGN, 

" Article 13th. — Upon the release of a player from contract or 
reservation with any club member of an association, then acting 
under this agreement (unless the release be made under Article 
7, Par. I ), the services of such player shall at once be subject to 
acceptance by any club belonging to the same association expressed 
in writing or by telegraph to the board, for a period of ten days 
after notice of said release; and thereafter if said services be not so 
accepted, said player may negotiate and contract with any club. 
The releasing club shall send notice to the board of said player's 
release on the date thereof, and the latter shall promulgate any 
acceptance of his services. Provided, that the disbandment of a 
club or its expulsion from membership in either association acting 
hereunder shall operate as a release of all its players from contract 
with and reservation by said club. I!ut the services of such play- 
ers shall at once be subject to the acceptance of such association 
for a period of ten days for the purpose of supplying the vacancy 
in its membership. The board shall regulate the manner of 
exercising such acceptance." 

RIGHTS OF ASSOCIATIONS. 

Article 14th. — " Each association shall have the right to make 
and enforce all rules and regulations pertaining to the control, 
discipline and compensation of all players under contract with its 
club members, Provided, That such rules and regulations shall in no 
way conflict with the provisions of this agreement or any rule, 
regulation or order of the board. ' 

CUTO CONTROL OF TERRITORY. 

Article 15th. — " Each club of either association party hereto 
shall have exclusive control of its own territory, and no club shall 
be entitled to membership in either of said associations from any 
city or county in which a club member of either of said associa- 
tions may be already located, or within five miles from such city 
or county, Provided, That nothing herein contained shall prohibit a 
club of either of said associations from resigning its membership 
in such association during the month of November in any year, 
and being admitted to membership in any other association with 
all rights and privileges conferred by this agreement." 

TERRITORIAL RICHTS. 

Article iOth. — " The territorial rights of clubs belonging to 
classes other than those parties hereto shall be regulated by the 
board, and no such club of a class different from said parties 
hereto shall play any game within the territory of any other club 
without the consent of such clubs." 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



35 



AGREEMENTS TO BE IN WRITING. 

"Article 17th.— Should any club member of any association 
agree in writing or by telegraph with any club of any association 
subject to the National Agreement for the release of any player 
then under contractor reservation with or by it, either party may 
file said agreement with the board, and, should any such club re- 
fuse to comply with its said agreement, said board may require 
said agreement to be complied with, and may transfer the said 
player accordingly (but not against his will), and may expel or 
otherwise punish the club so refusing to comply with its agreement." 
EXTULSION OF CLUBS. 

Article 1 3th. — "Eefore any association shall be granted the 
benefits of this agreement it shall enact laws or regulations de- 
barring any of its clubs from entering into contract with any 
player while under arrears of salary to him, and from suspending 
or otherwise attempting to disqualify such player for refusing to 
contract while it is so in arrears; and shall also provide for the 
expulsion of any club for refusal to pay arrears of salary to a 
player when thereto required by the board of directors of said 
association, or by the board." 

FORFEITING MEMBERSHIP. 
Article 19th. — " All rights of any association hereunder shall be 
forfeited for failing to expel any of its club members that may play 
a game of ball except under the National Playing Rules adopted 
by the board." 

MISCELLANEOUS RULES. 

Article 20th. — This agreement, and all rules and decisions 
made within the jurisdiction and scope thereof, shall be of con- 
trolling force. 

2 1st. — This agreement may be amended at any time by a 
majority vote of each of the associations parties hereto. It shall 
take effect and be in force from and after Feb. I, 180,1. 

22d. — Any association acting under this agreement shall be en- 
titled to suggest to said board any changes, amendments, or 
additions it may think should be made in or to the rules or regula- 
tions of said board or to this agreement. Any such association and 
any club officer, player, manager, umpire, or scorer shall be 
entitled as a matter of right to be notified of any matter in which 
the board may deem it or him to be interested, and to be heard 
under such regulations as the board may prescribe. 

23d. — The term "Association," as herein used, shall mean and 
cdmprise an organization of professional or semi-professional base- 
ball clubs of not less than four clubs, whether known as a League, 
an Association, or by any other designation. 



8(i 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



24th. — The members of said board shall receive a salary of 
$1,500 per annum, and be paid their necessary traxeling ex- 
penses. 

We hereby certify that the associations parties hereto have 
adopted, ratified and approved this agreement, and authorized ns 
to sign the same for them respectively. 

The National League of Professional Baseball Clots, by 

N. E. Young, President. 
The American Association of Baseball Ctubs, by Allen 

W. Thurman, President. 
The Western Association of. Professional Baseball 

Clubs, by L. C. Krauthoff, President." 

Rules and Regulations of the National Board of Profes- 
sional Baseball Associations. 

1. The duties of a chairman shall be: 

a. To call and preside over all meetings of the Board. 

b. To decitieall incidental aud routine matters presented for deter- 
mination. 

c. To generally supervise the performance of the duties imposed 
upon other officers. 

d. To see that all associations acting under the National Agreement 
and all persons and bodies subject to the provisions of that instrument 
are protected by its benefits and faithfully comply with its provisions and 
the requirements of the Hoard. 

2. It shall \>! the duty of the Secretary. 

n. To make the financial statements provide! for by Article III of 
the National Agreement. 

b. To keep a record of the proceedings of the Hoard. 

c. To keep a record of all contracts approved by him, agreements, 
releases, transfers, reserve lists, acceptances of services, suspensions, dis- 
qualifications and other matters affecting players, managers and umpires. 

</. To give and promulgate, nil notices referred to in the National 
Agreement. 

e. To define and inter], ret the "National Playing Utiles'' when 
properly called on to do so. 

/. To appoint scores when required to do so by any club or associa- 
tion, and to direct and control all scores whether appointed by him 
or not. 

<j. To select, assign and control all umpires in associations parties to 
tie- Agreement requesting the same. 

h. To compile the playing reoordi of all payers in clubs belonging to 
associations acting under h ild Agreement, 

1. To superintend the printing of and to distribute copies of the 
National Agreement, Boies and Regulations ol the Board, National Playing 
Rules, playing records, and also all forms of contracts, proceedings 

directed to be published, ani generally aU brinks, publications, and other 

matters directed to be printed and distributed by tile Hoard, 

j. To notify all clubs of assessments ma I ?, aud of amounts needed to 
pay umpires' salaries an I expenses, a id if any club falls to pay the s ime 
as requested, to notify the Chairman of such failure, to the end that he or 
the Board may take proper step, to enforce snch payment or to provide 
and enforce penalties on account of such failure. 

A-. To receive applications of asso tlatlons desiring to be admitted to 
the benefits of this Agreement, and to collect all dues and nsses<mente 
from th-in. Having obtained the consent of th3 Board to such admission 
he shall promulgate the s one. 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



37 



l. To «ive notice of all fines and penalties imposed by the Board; to 
collect all such fines; to see that the penalties imposed are carried lnio 
effect; and to give notice of any non-payment or non-enforcement to tna 
Chairman. 

m. To require all clubs to send him the nameaof tn<> nmeers or per- 
sons authorized to d^n and release players and to receive notices i ana 
communications on behalf of such clubs respectively. Until notice of any 
change Is given to the Secretary, the authority of the persons whoso 
names in-" so furnish".! to the Secretary will be recognized as continuing. 

n. To attend to such other matters as may be directed by the Board 
or its Chairman. 

3. The Chairman of the Board shall be elected for a term of ono year 
and the Secretary and Treasurer for the- term of live years, but they shall 
hold office until their successors are qualified. , 

4. The Chairman shall receive a salary as such to be fixed by the 
Board, 

5. The Secretary and Treasurer shall be allowed a gross sum to be 
fixed by the Board for his services and for the payment by him out of said 
sum of all clerks and assistants needed aud employed by him to discharge 
the duties of his office. 

6. A 1 salaries shall be paid monthly. All expenses shall be paid 
when proper accounts therefor are presented to and approved by the 
Secretary. 

7. All scons and umpires selected by the Secretary shall be employed 
for the playing season and shall be subject to release or discharge at any 
time at the discretion of the Secretary. Such scores and umpires shall be 
subject to fines, penalties and discipline to be Imposed and enforced by 
the Secretary for intemperance, failure to perform duties and generally 
all matters which the Secretary may deem a violation -jr non-performance 
of such person's duties and obligations. All tines imposed shall be col- 
lected by the Secretary and no scorer or umpire suspended shall be em- 
ployed, during the period of such suspension, to act as player, manager, 
scorer, umpire or in any other capacity, by any club belonging to an 
association acting under this Agreement. 

8. Whenever anybody or person shall desire to submit any matter for 
the consideration of the Hoard, it shall be presented to the Chairman by a 
Concise statement thereof and accompanied by such evidence as may be 
desired tote in support ol such statement. Notice shall be given to any 
other body or person Interested in the matter, to caake answer audio 
present appropriate evidence in support thereof, ihe issue shall then be 
decided upon the doouments presented and such other evidence as may be 
called for; or if deemed necessary by the Board, or its Chairman, a 
hea ing shall be accorded. 

'.t. The minimum salaries i , > be tendered to reserved players are fixed 
at the following sums respectively: 

By clubs of the National League and American Association for a 
peason of seven months, $1,000; by clubs of Hie Western Association, for a 
season of five and one-half months, $750. By clubs of oilier associations 
having the privilege of reservation, $100 per month for the- playing 
season. If such contract, is refused, the Secretary shall be notified 
thereof, and a proper entry of the fact shall be made by him. 

in. when the services of any player released under Article XIII, of 

the National Agreement are accepted by any club or association authorised 
to do SO, notice thereof shall at once be given to the Secretary, who shall 
record and promulgate the fact. 

11. The following classification is hereby made under Article XII, 
paragraph h. of the National Agreement; clashes a, B, <' and i>. 

c aes a shall constitute associations whose clubs shall have the privilege 
of reservation ami shall not le subject to the selections mentioned in- 
Art ie!e 7. Paragraph 1 of said agreement. When any such association -hall 
consist of four clubs it shall pay -MOO for each of said clubs to the Socre- 



38 



THK NKW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



tary of the Board; when it shall consist of six dubs it shall pay $375 each, 
and when of eight cl ubs $250 each. The salary limit Of such clubs shall bo 
$2,600 per mouth, not more than $200 of which shall be paid to any one 
player, directly or indirectly, in any one month. The limit of salaries to 
be paid to umpires in Class A shall bo $150 per month. Players may bo 
contracted with for three seasons, but if the club making the contract 
shall at any time during said period belong to an association not entitled 
to the privilege of reservation, a player so contracted with will be at once 
released from such contract by the Board. 

Class B shall constitute associations whose clubs shall have the privilege 
of reservation, but be subject to the selection mentioned in said para- 
graph 1 of article 7 at the rate of $1,000 for the release of any player. 
The clubs of this class shall pay one-half of the amount prescribed for 
Class A under the same circumstances. The other provisions as to Class A 
shall likewise apply to Claw is. 

Class C shall constitute associations whoso clubs shall not have the priv- 
ilege of reservation, nor b- subject to the selection above mentioned; 
but the contracts made by such clubs with players will be protected for 
the term mentioned therein, not exceeding the term of one paying season. 
Clubs in Class C shall pay $1."0 each if the association shall cosnist of four 
clubs, $125 if it consists of six clubs, and $100 ouch if it consists of eight 
clubs, to the secretary, aivd shall lie subject to a salary limit of $1,600 per 
month, not over $100 of which sum shall be paid to any one player in any 
one month, and umpires in said class shall not be paid more than $150 per 
month. 

Claes D shall constitute associations whose clubs shall not have the 
privileges of reservation, but the contracts made by such clubs with 
players will be protected for the term mentioned therein, not exceeding 
the term of one playing season, subject to the selection prescribed in said 
article VII. , paragraph 1, at the rate of $300 for the release of any player* 
Clubs in such class shall pay one-half of the amount prescribed for Class 
under the same circumsiunces. The club salary limits of Class I> shall be 
Sl,200 per month, not more than $126 of which shall be paid to any one player. 
12. Any association desiring to avail itself of the benefits of the 
National Agreement shall present its application to the Secretary 02 the 
Board OD or before April 15, of each year, stating the clubs of which it is 
OOmpOeedi the class into wl'ich it desire- to be placed and the locution of 
their respective business offices and playing grounds which cannot be 
thereafter changed without the consent of the Board. One-half the 
amount required to be paid under the foregoing classification shall 
accompany such application and the other one-hall shall be paid on or 
before the ensuing 15th day of May. If such application shall be granted, 
such association shall thereupon bo entitled to the benefits of the National 
Agreement accorded to the Class to which it belongs, and be in all respect 
subject to the jurisdiction of said Agreement and all things done there- 
under. Any Association applying to be admitted into Classes li ( ,r I), shall 
be thereby deemed to have consented to the selection provided by Article 
VII, paragraph i, 

18. Any club entitled to make a selection of a player and desiring to 
do so shall notify the Secretary of the Board, staling the name of the 
player and of the club with which be is under contract or reservation, and 
inclosing the amount specified herein to be paid for such release. Tho 
Secretary shall thereupon notify the club from which such selection is to 
be made. If the application shall bo made during the latter** playing 
season, the Secretary Shall notify such club and state the time within 
which it may present any reasons why such selection should not beoOn- 
summuted. If any such reasons are given the Board shall proceed to 
decide the matter. If no reasons are given or if those stated ore not 
deemed sufficient, or if the selection !,<• not made during the aforesaid 
playing season the Board, on receiving the consent of the player shall 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



39 



order hie transfer to the .electing dab. Notice of such transfer sha~ 
thereupon be promulgated. 

EXPLANATORY. 

6PECI4I- 

Rele 2 Hereafter all the matters specified in paragraphs r ami J» «M1 
he 1 leporTed"r,ire £ Se r c"eiu,y,. f the Board and ^»^*&f a ^ ov ^o. 
retaxies of associations will no longer k»Tedia»g»^ tne app ro 
contracts, etc., and thus stand relieved of the greater pom 
dU E^ E2 . Under the National AgreementfArticle VII, paragraph /,,) 
the Board is authorized to provide for the transfer *. the n a tkr of the 
umpires in classified (previously called minor) league* to its Seer ewr* 
but it has been deemed wise not to exercise this authority at t » time but to 
await the practical operation of the plan In the other "OClMWniU^ 

Ruxat 11. While the amounts fixed by this c asslhcat on are f nominal y 
larger than under the former Qualified Articles yet they are no so i. a 
fact. Under the new arrangement the salaries of the officers of .MSOClat on, 
will be much smaller owing to the transfer of their duties to*he Secretary 
of the Board. The expenses of associations for telegraphing p n-ta c 
printing and stationery will also be reduced. The expenses of the Boaid 

will of course include Hi items of additional labor an. expense. JU ie 

difference between tin ■ amounts her. -to fore paid under the Qualified Altli 111 s 
and those naimd In the present classification represents the share ortne 
expenses of the Board to be borne by what were called minor leagues, it. 
is not contemplated that any further assessments shall be levied on the 
classified leagues during the season on account of such expenses. In addi- 
tion to this, the benefits of the New Agreement are much greater than 
under previous legislation. Of course nil should contribute to the cost 
involved in this charge. The associations which unanimously and heartily 
adopted it were more than willing to do this after careful consideration. 
Like reflection on the part of associations, existing and contemplated, will 
doubtless produce the same acquiescence. The Board will cheerfully 
explain any matter or delail to any party interested In Inquiring. 

The plan of selection outlined by the National Agreement should not 
be misunderstood. No association is obliged to submit Itself to It- pro- 
visions unless it so elects. The plan has mfiny advantages which the 
future will doubtless folly develop. If a fair trial should show it to be 
oppressive, it will doubtless be modified or abolished. 

GENERAL. 

For the sake of brevity a number of phrases aro used to describe associ- 
ations, the precise definition of which will prevent misunderstandings. 

a. In the National Agreement the words " parties hereto'' and In the 
Rules the words h parties to the National Agreement'' mean the National 
League, the American Association and the "Western Association. 

b. The words " acting under this Agreement" mean all associations 
alike, present and future, so far as the particular clause has application. 

c. The words M entitled to the benefits of this Agreement" or 
11 Classified Leagues" cover what has been called "Miuor Li agues" in the 
past. This term is not now used; but such associations are to be referred to 
as " Classified Leagues" to distinguish them from "Parties to this Agree- 
ment," previously called " Major Leagues?" in common parlance. 

d. A careful reading of the instrument and of the rules made under 
it will very greatly facilitate tlie matter of putting the new arrangement 
into operation. This is earnestly requested, and it is hoped that ihe final 
result when all is in good working order will be gratifying and beneficial 
to all. 



40 



THE NEW NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



The National Board held a special meeting Feb. 21, at Chi- 
cago, and took action against the Amerian Association for 
withdrawing from the National Agreement. Chairman 
Thurman handed in his resignation, but was immediately re- 
elected to the position, and accepted. The following declaration 
of war against the American Association was adopted : "The 
National Board has received notice signed by William Barnie, 
vice-president of the American Association, announcing the 
withdrawal of that body from the benefi s and privileges of the 
National Agreement of Feb. iS, lSgi. No reasons are 
assigned for this action, nor does this board understand that 
there is the slightest justification for so unwise a step 
on the part of the organization. If we are to believe the pub- 
lished accounts for the action, they cannot be regarded as 
more than pretexts for repudiating the new National Agree- 
ment so recently and so solemnly entered into, to the main- 
tenance of which that Association stood pledged by the 
strongest considerations of trutli and honor. The resulting 
consequences of this ill-advised action must rest on that body 
By its own action it has annulled the approval of the contracts 
its clubs have made with players, and its clubs have released all 
their players from reservation. These players are 
now free to sign witn any National League, Western 
Association or other National Agreement club. The players 
under reserve by the last named clubs remain subject to their 
contracts and to reservation and to all the provisions of 
the National Agreement. Nor can any National Agreement 
club play a game with any American Association club, nor 
with a club which has plaved with such Association club." 
This was signed by Allen W. Thurman chairman, and N. E. 
Young secretary. 

Note, — sir.ee the above meeting Mr. A. W. Thurman has re- 
signed the Chairmanship of the Board, and Mr. N. K. Young 

! to fill vac 



NATIONAL PLAYING RULBS 

—OF— 

Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

AS ADOPTED BY THE NATIONAL BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL BASE 
BALL ASSOCIAI IONS IN lS'll — 1 Ills CODE GOVERNING ALL CLUBS 
PARTIES 1" I'HE NATIONAL AGREEMENT AS REVISED IN1S9I. 



<ii. iinl thirty yards 



THE BALL GROUND. 

i Rule t. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in 
size to enable each player to play in his position as required by 
these Rules. 

Rule 2, The Infield must be a spao ol 

square. 

THE BASES. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

Sec. i. Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second 
Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

i Sec. 2. The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve 
inches square so fixed in the ground as to be even with the sur- 
face and so placed in the corner ol the infield that two of its sides 
Will form part of the boundaries of said infield. 

SEi . }. The First, Second and 'Third Bases must be canvas 
bags, fifteen inches square, painted white, and filled with some 
soit material, and so placed that tin- center of the second base 
Shall be upon its corner of the infield, and the center of the first 
and third bases shall be ou the lines running to and from ■- 
base and seven and one-half inches from the foul lines, provi 
that each base shall be entirely within the foul lines. 

Sec. 4. All the bases must be securely fastened in their posi- 
tions, and so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 
THE FOI I. LINKS. 

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn. in straight lines 
from the outer corner of the Home Base, along the outer ed;;e of 
the First and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 

THE I' 1 >sl 1 Ion 1 
RULE 5. The Pitcher's Fines must be Straight lines forming 
41 



42 



PLAYING RULES. 




the boundaries of a space of ground, in the infield, five and one- 
half feet long- by four feet wide, distant fifty feet from the center 
of the Home Base, and so placed that the five and one-half feet 
lines would each be two feet distant' from and parallel with a 
straight line passing through the center of the Home and Second 
liases. Each cornerof this space must be marked by a Hat round 
rubber plate six inches in diameter, fixed in the ground even with 
the surface. 

RULE 6. The Catcher's Lines must be drawn from the outer 
corner of the Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines, 
straight to the limits of the Ground back of Home Base. 

Rule 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Line must be a line 
fifteen feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines com- 
mencing at a line parallel with and seventy-live feet distant from 
the Catcher's Lines, and running thence to the limits of the 
grounds. 

RULE S. The Player's Lines must be drawn from the Catchi r's 
Fines to the limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and 
parallel with, the foul lines. 

RULE 9. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming 
the boundaries of a space on the right, and of a similar space on 
the left of the Home Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extend- 
ing three feet in front of and three feet behind the center of the 
Home liase, and with its nearest line distant six inches from the 
Home liase. 

RULE 10. The Three F'cet Lines must be drawn as follows: 
From a point on the F'oul Line from Home liase to First liase, 
and equally distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on foul 
Ground, at a right-angle to said Foul Line, and to a point three 
feet distant from it; thence running parallel with said Foul Line, 
to a point three feet distant from the first liase; thence in a 
straight line to the F'oul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line to 
point of beginning. 

RULE ii. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 
10 must be marked with chalk or other suitable material, soastobe 
distinctly seen by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their 
entire length, except the Captain's anil Flayer's Lines, which must 
be so marked for a distance of at least thirty-live yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 

THE BALL. 

Rule 12. The Ball: 

SEC. i. Must not weigh less than live or more than five and 
one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than nine 
nor more than nine and one -quarter inches in circumference. 



PI. A VINO RULES 



43 



The Spalding League Ball or the React] American Association 
Ball must be used in all games played under these rules. 

SEC. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be fur- 
nishtj by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the 
ball in play is batted over the fence or stands, on to foul ground 
out of sight of the players, the other ball shall be immediately put 
into play by the Umpire. As. often as one of the two in use shall 
be lost, a new one must be substituted, so that the Umpire may 
at all times after the game begins, have two for use. The 
moment the Umpire delivers a new or alternate ball to the pitcher 
it comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, 
passes out of sight on to foul ground. At no time shall the bail 
be intentionally discolored by rubbing it with the soil or 
otherwise. 

Sec. 3. fn all games the ball or balls played with shall be 
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes 
the properly of the winning club. Each ball to be used in cham- 
pionship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by the 
Secretary of the Association, inclosed in a paper box and sealed 
with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be broken ex- 
cept by the Umpire in the presence of the Captains of the two 
contesting nines after play has been called. 

Sec. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped 
so as lo expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be — in the 
opinion of the Umpire — unlit for fair use, the Umpire, on being 
appealed to by either Captain, shall at once put the alternate bafl 
""o play and call for a new one. 

THE BAT. 

Rule 13. The Bat. 

Sec. i. Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle 
"lay be wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, not 
to exceed eighteen inches from the vnd. 

SEC 2. It must be round, except that a portion of the surface 
! : "' ,v be Hal Ml one side, but it must not exceed two and one-half 
inches in diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty- 
two inches in length. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

I; ' 1 1 14, The players of each club in a game shall be nine in 
number, one of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case shall 
!ess than nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

Kl LE 15. The player's positions shall be such as may be 
assigned them by their Captain, except that the Pitcher must take 
ms position within the Pitcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 5. 
When in position on the field, all players will be designated 

fielders" in these rr'> 



44 



PLAYING RULES. 



Rile 16. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to seat 
themselves among the spectators. 

Ri I.E 17. Every Club shall be required to adopt uniforms for 
its players, and each player shall be required to present himself 
upon the held during said game in a neat and cleanly condition, 
but no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes 
other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

THE II I CHER'S posn ION. 

R.JJLE 18. The pitcher shall take his position facing the bats- 
man with both feet square on the ground, one foot on the rear 
line of the "box." He shall not raise either foot, unless in the 
act of delivering the ball, nor make more than one step in such 
delivery. He shall hold the ball, before the delivery, fairly in 
front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire. When the pitcher 
feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the above posi- 
tion and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat. 

THE BATSMEN'S POSITION — ORDER OF BATTING. 

RULE 19. The batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 9, in the order in which they 
are named on the score, which must contain the batting order of 
both nines, and be submitted by the Captains of the opposing 
teams to the Umpire before the game, and when approved by 
him TIMS SCORE must be followed except in the case of a substi- 
tute player, in which case the substitute must take the place of the 
Original plaver in the batting order. After the first inning the 
first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose name fol- 
lows that of the last man who has completed his turn — time at 
bat — in the preceding inning. 

Rule 20. Sec. i. When their side goes to the bat the players 
must immediately return to and seal then. selves upon the players' 
bench and remain there until the side is put out, except when 
batsman or base runner. All bats not in use must be kept in the 
bat racks, and the two players next succeeding the batsman, in the 
r in which they are named on the score, must be ready wjth 

bat in hand to promptly take position as batsman; provided, that 
ili" I laptain and one assistant only may occupy the space between 
the players' lines and the Captain's lines to coach base runners. 

Sec. 2. No plavt-r of the side at bat, except when Batsman, 
shall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 6. The triangular space behind the Home 
Rase is reserved for the exclusive use of the Umpire. Catcher and 
Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any player of the side "at 
bat" from crossing the same at any tint! while the ball is in the 
hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and Catcher, while 
standing in their positions. 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



SEC. 3. The players of the side " at bat" must occupy the por- 
tion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any por- 
tion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder 
attempting to catch or held it. 

players' benches. 
Rule 21. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the 

home dub, and piaced upon a portion of the ground outside the 
Players' Lines. They must be twelve feet in length, and must be 
immovably fastened to the ground. At the end of each bench 
must lie immovably fixed a bat rack, with fixtures for holding 
twenty bats; one such rack must be designated for the exclusive 
use of the Visiting Club, and the other lor the exclusive use of 
the Home Club. 

THE GAME. 

RULE 22. Sec. i. Every Championship Gamemust be com- 
menced not later than two hours before sunset. 

SEC. 2. A Came shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that, 

(a) If the side first at bzt scores less runs in nine innings than 
the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then 
terminate. 

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores the win- 
ning run before the third man is out. the game shall terminate. 

a lit; GAME. 
RULE 23. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to 
each side, play shall only be continued until the side first at bat 
shall have scored one or more runs than the other side, in an 
equal number of innings, or until the other side shall score one 
or more runs than the side Inst at bat. 

A DRAWN GAME. 

RULE 24. A Drawn (lame shall be declared by the Umpire 
when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, alter 
live equal innings have been played, if the score at the lime is 
equal on the last even innings played; but if the side that went 
Second to tat is then at the bat, and has scored the same number 
of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal innings. 
A CALLED GAME. 

RULE 25. If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of dark- 
ness or rain at any lime after five innings have been Completed 
by both sides, the store shall be that of the last equal innings 
played, unless the side second at bat shall have scored one or 
more runs than the side first a! bat, in which case the score of the 
game shall be the total number of runs made. 



40 



PLAYING RULES. 



A FORFEITED GAME. 

RULE 26. A forfeited game shall be be declared by the Um- 
pire in favor of the club not in fault, at the request of such club, 
to the following cases: 

Sec. 1. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a field, or 
being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes 
after the Umpire has called "Play," at the hour appointed for the 
beginning of the game, unless such delay in appearing or in com- 
mencing the game be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails 
to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or ter- 
minated by the Umpire. 

SEC 3.' If. after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one 
side fails to resume playing within one minute after the Umpire 
has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these 
rules is wilfully violated . 

SEC 5 If, after ordering the removal of a player, as autho- 
rized by Rule 57, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within 'iwc min- 
utes. 

SEC. 6. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he shall 
transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the Associa- 
tion within twenty four hours thereafter. 
NO GAME. 

RULE 27. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he 
shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, before live 
innings on each side are completed. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

RULE 28. Sec. i. In every championship game each team 
shall be required to have present on the field, in uniform, one or 
more substitute players. 

SEC, 2. Any such player may be substituted at any time by 
either club, but no player thereby retired shall thereafter partici- 
pate in the game. 

SEC. 3. The ISase Runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him, except by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams. 

CHOICE OF INNINGS — CONDITION OF GROUND. 

RULE 29. The choice of innings shall be given to the Captain 
of the Home Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness 
of the ground for beginning a game after rain. 



PLAYINd RULES. 



47 



THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL — FAIR AND UNFAIR BALLS. 

Rule 30. A Fair Kail is a ball delivered by the Pitcher 
while standing wholly within the lines of his position, and facing 
the Batsman, the ball, so delivered, to pass over the Home Baa , 
not lower than the Batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home 
Base, or does pass over the Home Base, above the Batsman's 
shoulder, or below the knee. 

BALKING. 

Rule 32 A lialk is 

Sec. 1. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball to 
the bat without delivering it, and shall be held to include any and 
every accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or posi- 
tion of the body assumed by the Pitcher in his delivery of the ball 
and any motion calculated to deceive a base runner, except the ball 
be accidentally dropped. 

SEC. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to 
delay the game unnecessarily; or 

Sec. 3. Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering the 
ball to the bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is 
upon ground outside of the lines of his position, including all 
preliminary motions with the hands, arms, and feet. 
DEAD BALLS, 

RULE 33- A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or 
any part of the Batsman's person or clothing while standing in his 
position without being struck at; or any part of the Umpire's 
person or clothing, while on foul ground, without first passing 
the Catcher. 

Rile 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball nor legally 
caughr out, Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck 
by a fair hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until it 
is held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 
BLOCK BALLS. 

RULE 35. SEC i. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is 
stopped or handled by any person not engaged in the game. 

SEC. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare it, 
and Base Runners may run the bases, without being put out, 
until the ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher stand- 
ing in his position. 

Sec. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the Fielders the Umpire should call "Time," 
and require each Base Runner to stop at the last base touched by 



48 



PLAYING RULES. 



him until 
position. 



the ball be returned to the I'itcher standing in his 



THE SCORING OF RUNS. 



RULE 36. One Run shall be scored every timeaBase Runner, 
after having legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the 
Home Base before three men are put out by (exception ) If the 
third man is forced out, or is put out before reaching First Base, a 
run shall not be scored. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

RULE 37. A Fair flit is a ball batted by the batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, 
the Third Base, any part of the person of a player, Umpire or any 
other object that is in front of or on either side of the Foul Lines, 
or batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in his 
position, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home and First, 
or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player, 

RULE 38. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, any part of the 
person of a player, or any other object that is behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or batted directly to the ground by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first touches 
Foul or Fair ground) bounds or rolls outside the Foul Lines, 
between Home and First or Home and Third liases without 
interference by a player. Provided, that a Foul Hit not rising 
above the Batsman's head and taught by the Catcher playing 
within ten feet of the Home Base, shall be termed a I*"oul Tip. 
BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS. 

RULE 39. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the 
Umpire shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul 
should it disappear outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and 
Rules 37 and 38 are to be construed accordingly. 

RULE 40. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less 
distance than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall 
entitle the Batsman to two bases and a distinctive line shall be 
marked on the fence at this point. 

STRIKES. 

RULE 41. A Strike is 

SEC. I A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching 
his bat; or 

SEC. 2. A Fair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not 
struck at by the Batsman. 

- 1 1 . 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Foul Hit. 



PLAYING RULES. 



49 



Rri.E 42. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when 
any part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the 
liatsman's position. 

THE BATSMAN IS OCT. 

RULE 43. The Batsman is out: 

SEC. i. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of 
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper Batsman 
takes his position before a fair hit has been made; and in such 
case the balls and strikes called must be counted in the time at bal 
of the proper Batsman. Provided, this rule shall not take effeci 
unless the out is declared before the ball is delivered to the sue 
ceeding Batsman. 

■SEC. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute after 
the Umpire has called for the Batsman. 

SEC. 3. If he makes a Foul Hit, other than a Foul Tip as 
defined in Rule 38, and the ball be nv mentarily held by a 
Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught in 
a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder, 
before being caught. 

SEC. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike. 

SEC. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from Fielding 
the ball, evidently without effort to make a fair hit. 

Sec. 6 If, while the First Base be occupied by a base runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two 
men are already out. 

SEC. 7. If, while making the third strike, the ball hits his 
person or clothing. 

SEC. S. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Section 3, Rule 41. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 



Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

Instantly after four balls have been called by the 



WHEN HIE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER 

Rule 44. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner 

Sec. 1. 

Sec. 2. 
Umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by the 
Umpire. 

SEC 4. If, while he be a Batsman, his person or cloth'ing be 
hit by a ball from the Pitcher, unless— in the opinion of the Um- 
pire — he intentionally permits himself to be so hit. 

Sec. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the 
Pitcher. 

BASES TO BE TOUCHED. 



Rule 45. 
order, viz. : 



The Base Runner must touch each base in regular 
First, Second, Third and Home Bases; and when 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



obliged to return (except on a foul hit) must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order. He shall only be considered as holding a 
base after touching it, and shall then be entitled to hold such 
base until he has legally touched the next base in order, or has 
been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base Runner. 
ENTITLED TO BASES. 

RULE 46. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take the Base in the following cases: 

SEC. i. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called four 
Balls. 

SEC. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base 
on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an 
illegal' delivery — as in Rule 44, Sec. 5 — and the Base Runner is 
thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 

Si :i'. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk." 

SEC. 4. If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the Catcher 
and touch the Umpire or any fence or building within ninety feet 
of the Home Base. 

Si i . 5. If upon a fair hit the Ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the Umpire on fair ground. 

Sec. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the ob- 
struction of an adversary. 

SEC. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his 
hat, or any part of his dress. 

RETURNING To TASKS. 

RULE 47. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall 
be entitled lo so return without being put out. 

SEC. I. If the Umpire declares a l'oul Tip (as defined in 
Rule 38) or any other Foul Hit not legally caught by a Fielder. 

Ski". 2. If the Umpire declares a l'oul Strike. 

SEC. 3. If the Umpire declares a Head Ball, unless it be also 
the fourth Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next 
base, as provided in Rule 46, Sec. 2. 

SEC. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes 
with the Catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the Catcher 
to intercept a Base Runner. ■ 

WHEN BASE RUNNERS ARE OUT. 

Rule 48. The Base Runner is out: 

Sic. 1. If, after, three strikes have been declared against him 
while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, 
he plainly attempts t" hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball. 

SEC. 2. If, having made a lair Hit while Batsman, such fair 
hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the 
ground or any object other than a Fielder: Provided, it be not 
• aught in a Fielder s hat or cap. 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



SEC, 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on 
him, while liatsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by 
a Fielder before touching the ground: Provided, it be not caught 
in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a 
Fielder, before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after Three Strikes, or a Fair Hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a Fielder before such Base Runner 
touches First Base. 

SEC. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be se- 
curely held by a Fielder, while touching First liase with any part 
of his person, before such Base Runner touches First Base. 

Sec. 6 If, in running the last half of the distance from Home 
liase to First Base, while the ball is being fielded to First Base, 
he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as defined in Rule 10, un- 
less to avoid a Fielder, attempting to Field a Batted Ball. 

SEC. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from Sec- 
ond to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base he runs more 
than three feet from a direct line between such bases to avoid 
being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in case a 
Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper path, attempting 
to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall run out of the 
path, and behind said F'ielder, and shall not be declared out for 
so doing. 

Sic. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a 
batted ball, in the manner described in Sections (1 and 7 of this 
Rule; or if lie in any way obstructs a Fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball. Pro- 
vided, That if two or more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball. 
and the Base Runner comes in contact with one or more of them, 
the Umpire shall determine which Fielder is entitled to the ben- 
efit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base Runner out for 
coming in contact with any other Fielder. 

SEC. <). If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched 
by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, uniess some part of his per- 
son is touching a base he is entitled to occupy: Provided, The 
ball be held by the Fielder after touching him; but (exception as 
to First Base), in running to First Base, he may overrun said base 
without being put out for being off said base, after first touching 
it, provided he returns at once and retouches the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, in overrunning F'irst 
Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or, after passing the 
base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such 
exemption from .being put out. 

'-i.e. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball (other than a foul 
tip as referred to in Rule 38) is legally caught by a Fielder, suck 



PLAYING RULES. 



ball is legally held by a Fielder on the Base occupied by the Base 
Runner when such ball was struck (or the Base Runner be touched 
with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), before he retouches said 
base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was so caught. Provided, 
That the Base Runner shall not be out in such case, if, after the 
ball was legally caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the 
1'itcher before the Fielder holds it on said base, or touches the 
Base Runner with it; but if the Base Runner in attempting to 
reach a base, detaches it before being touched or forced out, he 
shall be declared safe. 

Sec. ii. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the 
F'irst Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the P'irst, Second 
and Third Bases, be occupied, any Base Runner so occupying a 
base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until any following Base 
Runner is put out and may be put out at the next base or by being 
touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder in the same manner 
as in running to First Base, at any time before any following 
Base Runner is put out. 

SEC. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him iefort touching the 
fielder, and in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the 
Batsman becoming a Base Runner, and no run shall be scored, or 
any other Base Runner put out. 

Sec. 13. If. when running to a base or forced to return to a 
base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases if any, in the 
order prescribed in Rule 45, he may be put out at the base he fails 
to touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, 
in the same manner as in running to First Base. 

Sec. 14. If, when the Umpire calls ' Play," after any suspen- 
sion of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occu- 
pied when "Time" was called before touching the next base. 
WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER is OUT. 

Rule 49. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base Run- 
ner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all 
cases where such player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 48, Sections 10 and 14. 
COACHING RULES. 

Rii.f. 50. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in coach- 
ing to the Base Runner only, and are not allowed to address any 
remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in- words of 
necessary direction; and no player shall use language which will 
in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing 
club, or the audience. To enforce the above, the Captain of the 
opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offense, 
and upon a repetition of the same the club shall be debarred from 
further coaching during the game. 



PLAYING RULES. 



53 



THE UMPIRE. 

RutE 51. The Umpire shall not be changed during the pro- 
gress of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 

HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION. 

Ri'LE 52. Sec. i. The Umpire is master of the Field from 
the commencement to the termination of the game, and is entitled 
to the respect of the spectators, and any person offering any insult 
or indignity to him must be promptly ejected from the grounds. 

SEC. 2. lie must be invariably addressed by the players as Mr. 
Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe the provisions 
of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested with authority 
to order any player to do or omit to do any act as he may deem 
necessary, to give force and effect to any and all of such provisions. 
SPECIAL DUTIES. 

RULE 53. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 

Sec. i. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. 
In no instance shall any person be allowed to question the cor- 
rectness of any decision made by him except the Captains of the 
contending nines, and no other player shall at such time leave his 
position in the field, his place at the bat, on the bases or players' 
bench, to approach or address the Umpire in word or act upon 
such disputed decision. Neither shall any Manager or other officers 
of either club — except the Captains as before mentioned — be per- 
mitted to go upon the field or address the Umpire in regard to 
such disputed decision, under a penalty of a forfeiture of the game 
to the opposing club. The Umpire shall in no case appeal to any 
spectator for information in regard to any case, and shall not re- 
verse his decision on any point of play on the testimony of any 
player or bystander. 

SEC 2. liefore the commencement of a Game, the Umpire 
shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the game are 
strictly observed, lie shall ask the Captain of the Home Club 
whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, and if 
there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, provided they 
do not conflict with any of these rules. He shall also ascertain 
whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's position is distant 
ninety feet from the Home llase. 

SEC. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing 
constantly from the commencement of the game to its termination, 
allowing such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, 
injury or rain. He must, until the completion of the game, require 
the players of each side to promptly take their positions in the field 
as soon as the third man is put out, and must require the Inst 
striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon 
as the fielders are in their places. 



i-ii 



54 



PLAYING RULES. 



Sf.C. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every " unfair ball " 
delivered by the Pitcher, and every " dead ball," if also an unfair 
ball, as a " ball," and he shall also count and call every "strike." 
Neither a "ball" nor a "strike" shall be counted or called until 
the ball has passed the Home Base. lie shall also declare every 
" Dead Ball/' " Block," " Foul Hit," " Foul Strike, "and " Balk " 

RULE 54. For the special benefit of the patrons of the game, 
and because the offences specified are under his immediate juris- 
diction, and not subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible violations of the pur- 
pose- and spirit of the Rules, of the following character: 

Sec. 1. Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places in 
the field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their side is at 
the bat, and especially any failure to keep the bats in the racks pro- 
vided for them; to be ready to take position as Batsmen and 
to remain upon the Players' Bench, except when otherwise re- 
quired by the Rules. 

SEC. 2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling to 
a Fielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field a 
ball, or by any other equally disreputable means seeking to discon- 
cert a Fielder. 

Sec. 3. The Rules make a marked distinction between hin- 
drance of an adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This 
has been done to rid the game of the childish excuses and claim 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball to put out a Base 
Runner. But there may be cases of a Base Runner so flagrantly 
violating the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in obstructing a 
Fielder from Melding a thrown ball that it would become the duty 
of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out" (and 
to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but 
also to impose a heavy line upon him. F'or example: If the Base 
Runner plainly strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its 
being caught by a Fielder; if he holds a Fielder's arms so as to 
disable him from catching the ball, or if he run against or knock 
the Fielder down for the same purpose. 

CALL1NC "PLAY" AND "TIMK." 

RULE 55. The Umpire must call "Play," promptly at the 
hour designated by the Home Club, and on the call of "Play" the 
game must immediately begin, When he calls "Time," play 
shall be suspended until he calls "Play" again, and during the 
interim no player shall be put out, base be run or run be scored. 
The Umpire shall suspend play only for an accident to himself or 
a player (but in case of accident to a Fielder, "Time" shall not be 
called until the ball be returned to and held by the Pitcher, stand- 
ing in his position), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spec- 
tators are compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, 



PLAYING RULES. 



55 



in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and should 
such rain continue to fall thirty minutes thereafter, he shall ter- 
minate the game; or to enforce order in case of annoyance from 
spectators. 

RULE 56. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call 
"Time" in case of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block," 
as referred to in Rule 35, Sec. 3, or in case of rain, as defined 
by the Rules. The practice of players suspending the game to 
discuss or contest a decision with the Umpire, is a gross viola- 
tion of the Rules, and the Umpire must promptly line any player 
who interrupts the game in this manner. 

INFLICTING FINES, 

RULE 57. The Umpire is empowered to inflict fines of not less 
than $5. 00 nor more than 1SJ5. go for the first offence on players 
during the progress of a game, as follows: 

SEC. i. For indecent or improper language addressed to the 
audience, the Umpire, or any player. 

Sec. 2. For the Captain or Coacber wilfully failing to remain 
within the legal bounds of his position, except upon an appeal by 
the Captain from the Umpire's decision upon a misinterpretation 
of the rules. 

SEC. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his 
orders or for any otter violation of these Rules. 

SEC. 4. In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, he 
shall at once notify the Captain of the offending player's side, and 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the 
Association or League within twenty-four hours thereafter, under 
the penalty of having said fine taken from his own salary. 

SEC. 5. A repetition of any of the above offences shall, at the 
discretion of the Umpire, subject the offender either to a repeti- 
tion of the fine or to removal from the field, and the immediate 
substitution of another player then in uniform. 
FIELD RULES, 

RULE 58. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling 
upon its grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

RULE 59. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the 
field during the progress of the game, in addition to the players in 
uniform, the Manager on each side and the Umpire; except such 
officers of the law as may be present in uniform, and such officials 
of the Home Club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

RULE 60. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or player shall ad- 
dress the audience during the progress of a game, except in case of 
necessary explanation. 

RULE 6r, Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force upon 
its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd enter- 



56 



PLAYIN'G RULES. 



ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfering with 
the play in any manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play 
further until the field be cleared. If the ground be not cleared 
within fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may claim, and 
shall be entitled to, the game by a score of nine runs to none (no 
matter what number of innings have been played.) 
GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

RULE 62. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin the 
game, or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 63. '-Time" 'is the order of the Umpire to suspend 
play. Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the 
game. 

Rule 64. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire that 
the game is terminated. 

Rule 65. "An Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players 
representing a Club in a game, and is completed when three of 
such players have been put out as provided in these rules. 

RULE 66. "A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Batsman. 
It begins when he takes his position, and continues until he is put 
out or becomes a base runner; except when, because of being hit 
by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 44 

RULE 67. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by these 
Rules. 

SCORING. 

RULE 68. la order to promote Uniformity in Scoring Champ- 
ionship Cames the following instructions, suggestions and defi- 
nitions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required 
to make all scores in accordance therewith. 
BATTING. 

Sec. 1. The first item in the tabulated score, after the play. 
er's name and position, shall be the number of times he has been 
at bat during the game. The time or times when the player has 
been sent to base by being hit by a pitched ball, by the Pitcher's 
illegal delivery, or by a base on balls, shall not be included in this 
column. 

Sec. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player- 

SEC. 3. In the third column should be placed the first base 
hits made by each player. Abase hit should be scored in the 
following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the foul 
lines, and out of reach of the Fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder in 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle 
the ball before the striker reaches First Hase. 



PLAYING RULES. 



57 



When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the Batsman. In case of doubt over 
this class of hits, score a base hit, and exempt the Fielder from 
the charge of an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the Batsman. 

That in all cases where a Base Runner is retired by being hit by 
a batted ball, the Batsman should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, 
as defined in Rule 37. 

Sec. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice hits, 
which shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when but one man is 
out advances a Runner a base on a fly to the outfield or a ground 
hit, which results in putting out the Batsman, or would so result 
if handled without error. 

FIELDING. 

Sec. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a striker is given 
out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or because he struck out of 
his turn, the put out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

Sec. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set 
down in the sixth column. An assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play 
of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time 
to put a runner out, even if the player who could complete the 
play fails, through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches 
the player who makes the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to 
each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and in such a way 
that a put-out results, or would result if no error were made by 
the receiver. 

ERRORS. 

SEC. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh' column for 
each misplay which allows the striker or base runner to make one 
or more bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out, except that "wild pitches," "bases on balls," ''bases on the 
batstnan being struck by a pitched ball," or case of illegal pitched 
balls, balks and passed balls, shall not be included in said column. 
In scoring errors of batted balls see Section 3 of this Rule. 

STOLEN BASES. 

Sec. S. Stolen bases shall be scored as follows: 
Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base 
runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, 
but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder making the 



58 



PLAYING RULES. 



same. If the base runner advances another base he shall not be 
credited with a stolen base, and the fielder allowing the advance- 
ment is also to be charged with an error. If a base runner makes 
a start and a battery error is made, the runner secures the credit 
of a stolen base, and the battery error is scored against the player 
making it. Should a base runner overrun a base and then be put 
out, he should receive the credit for the stolen base. 
EARNED KINS. 
Sy.c 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player 
reaches the home base unaided by errors before chances have 
been offered to retire the side. 

THE SUMMARY. 

69. The Summary shall contain: 
The number of earned runs made by each side. 
The number of two-base hits made by each player. 
The number of three-base hits made by each player. 
The number of home runs made by each player. 
The number of bases stolen by each player. 
The number of runs batted in by base hits by each 



Rule. 

Sec. i. 
Sec, 2. 
Sec. 3. 
Sec. 4. 
Sec. 5. 
Sec. 6. 

batsman. 

Sec. 7. The number of .double and triple plays made by each 
side, with the names of the players assisting in the same. 

Sec. S. The number of men given bases on called balls by 
each Pitcher. 

Sec. 9. The number of men given bases from being hit. by 
pitched balls. 

SEC 10. The number of men struck out. 

Sec. 11. The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

Sec. 12. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher. 

SEC. 13. The time of game. 

Sec. 14. The name of the Umpire. 
AMENDMENTS. 

RULE 70. Xo Amendment or change of any of these National 
Playing Rules shall be made, except by the National Board of 
Professional 1'ase P.all Associations. 



L 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



RULE. 

The Ground ! 

The Infield 2 

The Bases 3 

Number of (1) 3 

The I Iome Bases (2) 3 

First, Second and Third (3) 3 

Position (4) 3 

Foul Lines 4 

Pitcher's Lines 5 

Catcher's Lines 6 

Captain's Lines 7 

Player's Lines 8 

Batsman's Lines g 

Three Feet Lines 10 

Lines must be Marked 11 

The Ball 12 

Weight and Size (1) 12 

Number Balls Furnished (2) 12 

Furnished by Home Club '. (3) 12 

Replaced if Injured (4) 12 

The Bat 13 

Material of (1) 13 

Shape of . . .(2) 13 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of Players in Game 14 

Players' Positions 15 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 16 

Club Uniforms 17 

The Pitcher's Position 18 

The Batsman's Position irj 

Order of Batting 20 

Where Players Must Remain (1) 20 

Space Reserved for Umpire (2) 20 

Space Allotted Players "at Bat" (3) 20 

The Players' Benches 21 

THE GAME. 

Time of Championship Game (1) 2 2 

Number of Innings (2) 22 

Termination of Game ( a ) 22 

The Winning Run (b) 22 

A Tie Game 23 

A Drawn Game 24 

A Called Game 25 

A Forfeited Game 26 

Failure of the Nine to Appear (1) 2 6 

59 



60 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULE.S. 



Refusal of One Side to Play fj) 

Failure to Resume Playing (3) 

Willful Violation (4) 

Disobeying Order to Rer.love Player (5) 

Written Notice to President (6) 

No (lame 

Substitutes 

One or More Substitute Players (1) 

Extra Player (2) 

Base Runner (3) 

Choice of Innings 

A Fair Ball 

An Unfair Ball 

ABalk . 

Motion to Deceive (1) 

Delay by Holding (2) 

Pitcher Outside of Lines (3) 

A Dead Ball 

A Foul Strike 

Block Balls 

Stopped by Person Not in Game (1) 

Ball Returned (2) 

Base Runner Must Stop . .(3) 

The Scoring of Runs 

A Fair Hit 

A Foul I lit 

Batted Ball Outside Grounds 

A Fair Batted Ball 

Strikes 

Ball Struck at by Batsman (1) 

A Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher (2) 

Attempt to Make Foul Hit (3) 

A Foul Strike 

The Batsman is Out. 

Failure to Take Position at Bat in Order (1) 

Failure to Take Position Within One Minute after 

Being Called (2) 

If He Makes a Foul Hit (3) 

If He Makes a Foul Strike (4) 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher (5) 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire (6) 

If Ball Hits Him while Making Third Strike (7) 

Attempted Foul Hit after Two Strikes (8) 

The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner 

After a Fair Hit (1/ 

After Four Balls are Called (2) 

After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 



RULE. 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 

27 

28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
30 
3t 
32 
32 
32 
32 
33 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
36 
37 
33 
39 
40 

4' 
41 
4i 
4t 
42 
43 
43 

43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
44 
44 
44 
44 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



61 



RULE. 

If Hit by Ball While at Bat (4) 44 

After Illegal Delivery of Ball (5) 44 

Bases to be Touched 45 

Entitled to Base 46 

If Umpire Call Four Balls (1) 46 

If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base (2) 46 

If Umpire Calls Balk (3) 46 

If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher (4) 46 

Ball Strikes Umpire (5) 46 

Prevented from Making Base (6) 46 

Fielder Stops Ball (7) 4* 

Returning to Bases 47 

If Foul Tip (1) 4j 

If Foul Strike (b) 4J 

If Dead Ball (3) 47 

Ball Thrown to Intercept Base Runner (4) 47 

Base Runner Out 48 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball. .. .(1) 48 

If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball (2) 48 

Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder (3) 48 

Touched with Ball after Three Strikes (4) 48 

Touching First Base (5) 48 

Running from Home Base to First Base (6) 48 

Running from First to Second Base (7) 4? 

Failure to Avoid Fielder (8) 4? 

Touched by Ball While in Play (9) 48 

Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (10) 48 

Batsman Becomes a Base Runner (11) 48 

Touched by Hit Ball before Touching Fielder .(12; 48 

Running to Base (13) 48 

Umpire Calls Play (14) 48 

When Batsman or Base Runner is Out 49 

Coaching Rules 50 

THE UMPIRE. 

Umpire's Power 51, 52 

When Master of the Field (1) 52 

Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules (2) 52 

Special Duties 53 

Is Sole Judge of Play (1) 53 

Shall see Rules Observed Before Commencing Game(2) 53 

Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing (3) 53 

Must Count and Call Balls (4) 53 

Attention of Umpire is Directed Against 54 

Laziness or Loafing. (1) 54 

Seeking to Disconcert Fielder (2) 54 

Violation of Rules by Base Runner (3) 54 



62- 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



I 



RULE, 

Umpire Must Call Play 55 

Umpire Allowed to Call Time 56 

Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines 57 

For Indecent Language (1) 57 

Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within Bounds(2) 5*, 

Disobedience of a Player (3) 57 

Shall Notify Captain (4) 57 

Repetition of Offenses (5) 57 

FIELD RULES. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting 53 

Who Shall be Allowed in the Field - 59 

Audience Shall Not be Addressed 60 

Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force 61 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Play 62 

Time 63 

Game 64 

An Inning 65 

A Time at Bat 66 

Legal 67 

Scoring 63 

Batting (1) 68 

Runs Made (2) 6S 

Base Hits (3) 63 

Sacrifice Hits (4) 68 

Fielding (5) 6S 

Assists (6) 68 

Error (7) 63 

Stolen Bases (») 63 

Runs Earned (9) 68 

The Summary 69 

Number of Earned Runs (1) 69 

Number of Two Base Hits (2) 69 

Number of Three Base Hits (3) 69 

Number of Home Runs (4) 69 

Number of Stolen Bases (5) 69 

Number of I rcble and Triple Plays (6) 6g 

Bases on Caller 5aJs (7) 69 

Bases from Being Kit (8) 69 

lien Struck Out (9) 69 

Massed Balls (10) 69 

Wild Pitches { t 1 ) 69 

Time of Came (12) 69 

Name of Umpire (13) 69 

Amendments 70 



SPECIAL MEETINGS OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 63 



Annual Meeting op the Board of Directors of the 
National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs 
HELD vi THE I'll rii AVENUE Hotel, New York City, 
Wednesday, Nov. 12, 1890. 

Meeting called to order at 10:30 A. M. 

Present : 

\. E. Young, Chairman, and Messrs. Nimick, Day, Byrne and 
Robinson, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of championship 
games won and lost during the season of 1890. On motion, the 
following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Brooklyn P>.i-.c Ball Club of Brooklyn, X. V., 
having won the greatest percentage of games in the championship 
series, is hereby awarded the League Championship of the United 
Stales for the year 1S90. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

Mr. X. E. Young was re-elected Secretary. 

The Secretary presented the petition of Paul A. Ilines.'claiming 
an amount due him from Pittsburgh. On motion, the whole 
matter was referred to Mr. Byrne for adjustment. 

< >n motion, the appeals for refundment of fines were referred to 
Seen tary Young for investigation and adjustment. 

Xo further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

N. E. Young, Chairman. 

Signed. 

W. A Nimick, 

J N0 - B. Day, ! „,•,..,„.., 

FRANKDl H. ROBISON, i '""'"« 

C. II. Byrne, J 

Annual Meeting of the National Leagi e of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs, held atthe Fifth Aveni e Hotel, New 
York City, Wednesday, Nov. 12, [890. 

Meeting called to order by the President, at 12 o'clock noon. 
Present : 

A. II. Soden and W. rf, Conant, representing the Boston Base 

Ball A 1 ''ion. 
John 'P. Brush, representing the Indianapolis Pall Club. 

W. A. Nimick and |. Palmer O'Neill, representing the Allegheny 



64 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



John B. Day and C. T. Dillingham, representing the New York 

Ball Club. 
A. [. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia 

Ball Club. 
A. G. and J. W. Spalding, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 
I''. De II. Kobison and Geo. W. Howe, representing the Cleve- 
land Base Ball Company. 
C. II. Byrne and Joseph J. Doyle, representing the Brooklyn Base 

Ball Club. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting 
was dispensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
accepted. 

The report of the Committee on Playing Rules was received and 
accepted. 

On motion the League unanimously authorized the Negotiation 
Committee to expend ten thousand dollars in closing the deal in 
Chicago. 

On motion, the regular order cf business was suspended, and 
the League proceeded to elect officers and committee. 

On motion, Mr. Soden was unanimously instructed to cast the 
vote of the League for N. E. Young as President for the ensuing 
year. 

Directors — A. J. Reach, Jno. B. Day, \V. A. Nimick and J. T. 
Brush. 

Schedule Committer — C. II. Byrne, F. De II. Robison and 
A. J. Reach. 

Playing Rules Committee — A. <•■ Spalding, Jno. B. Day, Jno. 
I. Rogers. 

Board of Arbitration — N. E, Young, Jno. 1!. Day, John I 
Rogers. 

The following resolutions were adopted : 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting be held in New York 
City. 

Resolved, That the Schedule Meeting in the spring, be held in 
the city of New York. 

The contract for printing was awarded to Mr. [no. B. Sage of 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



A 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



G5 



On motion, the President was authorized to loan all funds now 
to the credit of the " Guarantee Fund ' to the League Treasury, 
to be used in liquidating the Club notes given in payment to the 
Indianapolis < lub. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 12 M. on the following day. 
Tik'Rsiiay, Nov. 13, 1190. 

Meeting called to order at 12:20 P. M, 

The following communication was presented by the Secretary : 

New York, Nov. 13, 1890. 

N. /■'.. Young, Seeretary National League of Base Ball Clubs — 
At the regular annual meeting of the directors of the Players' 
National League the undersigned was appointed a committee to 
confer with other base ball organizations. 1 desire to suggest 
that if your Board will appoint a similar committee to meet me, a 
conference which will be of mutual advantage might be had at 
once. Please address me. at your earliest convenience, at the St. 
James Hotel. Awaiting a reply, I remain yours respectfully, 

A. 1.. Johnson, 

The Secretary was instructed to reply as follows : 

NEW York, Nov, 13, 1S90. 

A. L Johnson, Esq. — Dear Sir, — In reply to your communi- 
cation of this day asking for a conference with the National 
League, I am instructed to say that this League cannot enter into 
any conference with the Players' League unless the American 
Association is made a party to such conference. On October 9 
the National League appointed a Conference Committee of three, 
which together with a similar committee appointed bjr the Amer- 
ican Association, was instructed under certain conditions, pre- 
viously agreed on, to confer with a committee of Players' League 
capitalists. That committee has been continued, with instructions 
to meet at any time at the call of the Chairman of the said joint 
Conference Committees. Respectfully, 

N. E. Young, 

President National League, 
Charges were preferred against the Cincinnati Hase Ball Club, 
as follows : 

New York City, Nov. 13, 1890. 
" N. E. Young, Esq. — DEAR Sir,— The Cincinnati Base Ball 
Club of Cincinnati, Ohio, member of your organization, did on 
October 6, and on subsequent dates in October, 1S90, violate Sec. 
10. paragraph 3, of the League Constitution by playing games of 
ball with clubs disqualified and ineligible under the League Con- 



66 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



stitution, and the National 
Clubs. 



Agreement of Professional liase Ball 
John T. Brush." 



The Secretary was instructed to officially notify Secretary Harry 
Sterne of the preferment of charges against the Cincinnati Club. 

"//urn 1 Sterne, Cincinnati — Charges have been preferred 
against your Club for violation of Sec. ic of the League Consti- 
tution, in playing clubs disqualified under National Agreement in 
October. If charges are disputed please answer at once. 

N. K. Young." 

An answer was subsequently received from Harry Sterne, in 
which he stated that the Cincinnati Club was sold on the 4th day 
of October, and that he was in no way responsible for its subse- 
quent actions. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted : 
Resolved, That a committee, consisting of Messrs. Robison, 
Brush and Young, be appointed to receive, consider and report 
upon all applications for a League franchise in the city of Cincin- 
nati, in the event of the forfeiture of the franchise of the Cincin- 
nati Base Ball Club, at present a member of this organization. 

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to furnish a copy of the 
telegram sent to Mr. Harry Sterne, to Mr. A. L. Johnson, who 
was reported as being the present President of the Cincinnati Bu^l- 
Ball Club, and a copy of the same was delivered in person by 
Mr. Brush. 

It was unanimously agreed that when this annual meeting ad- 
journs it adjourn to meet subject to the call of the Chairman. 

The League proceeded to consider amendments to the League 
Constitution— pending the consideration of which, on motion a 
recess was taken until 10 o'clock A. M. on the following day. 

Friday, Nov. 14, 1850. 

Meeting called to order, and a further recess until 12 M. was 
taken. 

Mr. Rogers reported that lie had prepared, in obedience to 
instructions from the League, a new form of Players' Contract 
which had been submitted to President Phelps of the American 
Association. Mr Krauthoftof the Western Association, Mr. A. ('•. 
Mills, Ex-President of the League. Mr Ullman, an able lawyer of 



OK THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



67 



Chicago, and several other distinguished lawyers, and also to all 
League Club presidents, and after several suggestions had been 
incorporated as amendments, the contract had been approved and 
been in use during the past few months in signing League play- 
ers. Report accepted. 

On motion, Section 5 of the League Constitution was unani- 
mously suspended for this meeting. 

The following report of the special meeting of the Board of 
Directors was presented and unanimously approved : 

Special Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs held at 
the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York City, Friday, Nov. 

14, 1 St/). 

Present : 

N. E. Voting, Chairman, and -Messrs. Day, Reach and O'Neill, 
Directors. 

The Chairman presented charges preferred and presented on 
the 13th inst. against the Cincinnati Base Ball Club for violating 
Section to of the League Constitution, in playing against Clubs 
ineligible under the League Constitution and the National Agree- 
ment in October, 1890. After an examination of the charges, the 
Board finds by statements and evidence presented (formal notice 
having been Lust served on the President of said Cincinnati Club 
of the preferment of said charges, and said Club having failed to 
dispute the correctness of said charges), that the charges as pre- 
sented are true. 

N. E. Young, Chairman, 
Signed, Jno. B. I Cay. ) 

). Palmer O'Neill, • Directors, 
A. J. Reach, ) 

On motion a ballot was ordered upon the expulsion of the Cin- 
cinnati Club, which resulted in a unanimous vote in favor of 
expulsion. 

The Secretary presented formal application signed by I. T. 
Brush, representing capitalists in Cincinnati for a League franchise 
and membership in Cincinnati, and they were u: animously 
elected. 



68 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



On motion, a recess was taken until 10:30 A. M. on the fol- 
lowing clay. 

Saturday, Nov. 15, 1890. 

Meeting called to order at 11:15 A. M., and pending the consid- 
eration of amendments to the League Constitution, on motion 
adjourned subject to the call of the President. 

K. E. Young, 
President and Secretary. 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League 
OF Professional Base Ball Clubs, held at the Fifth 
Avenue Hotel, New York City, Wednesday, January 
14, 180,1. 

Meeting called to order at 12 M. 

Present: 

A. II. Soden and \V. II. Copant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 

J. J. Doyle, F. A. Abell and C. H. Byrne, representing the 
Brooklyn Base Ball Club. 

Jno. T. Brush, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

A. G. Spalding and J. A, Hart, representing the Chicago Ball 
Club. 

John I. Rogers and A. J, Reach, representing the Philadelphia 
Ball Club. 

John B. Day and E. B. Talcott, representing the New York 
Ball Club. 

J. P. O'Neill, representing the Allegheny Base Ball Club. 

F. Dell. Robison, Davis llawley and Geo. W. Howe, repre- 
senting the Cleveland Base Ball Company. 

Jno. T. Brush, representing the Indianapolis Base Ball Club. 

On motion, the reading of minutes of previous meeting was 
dispensed with. 

The President stated that this meeting had been called at the 
request of Mr. Spalding, chairman, to hear and consider the report 
of the Joint Conference Committee. 

The Joint Conference Committee submitted its report, which' 
was, on motion, received. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



69 



On motion, Sections of the League Constitution was tempo- 
rarily suspended. 

The resignation of the Allegheny I!asc Hall Club was receiw i 
and accepted. 

The application of the Pittsburg Athletic Company for League 
membership was received and they weie unanimously elected. 

On motion, a recess was taken until the following day. 
Thursday, Jan. 15, 1S91. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon. 

On motion, the supplemental report of the Conference Com- 
mittee, relating to the proposed new National Agreement, was 
taken up and Mr. Krauthoff, President of the Western Associa- 
tion, was unanimously invited to be present during its considera- 
tion. 

After careful reading and a general explanation of its features, 
and arguments for and against its adoption, on motion, a recess 
was taken until the'following day. 

Friday, Jan. 16, 1891, 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock M. 

1 in motion, the new National Agreement was adopted, to take 
effect February i, 189,1. 

On motion, Messrs. Brush, liyrne and Rogers were appointed a 
committee of three to procure some suitable testimonial which 
would properly represent the appreciation of the National League 
of the very able and unselfish labors of Mr. A. (i. Spalding. The 
Chairman presented a communication from the new Washing- 
ton Club, requesting that certain players of the old organization 
be assigned to their club. On motion, the communication was 
laid upon the table. 

( in motion, the following preamble and resolution were adopted: 

WHEREAS, The Joint Conference Committee has reported that 
the American Association is desirous of locating a club in the city 
of Boston, and the said committee has expressed the hope that 
this wish of the American Association can be satisfactorily con- 
summated, and 

WHEREAS, The Boston Base Ball Association of the National 
League has consented to the location of such an American Asso- 



70 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



ciation Club in the city of Boston on the conditions hereinafter 
set forth; therefore, 

Resolved, That said Joint Conference Committee's report be, 
and is hereby approved, and the American Association be forth- 
with notified that the National League hereby assents to the loca- 
tion of a club member of said Association in the city of Boston; 
provided, 

1st. That all players now or heretofore under contract with, 
or reservation by, any National League Club shall revert to the 
clubs having claims upon the services of said players under the 
provisions of the National Agreement. 

2d. The name of the Association Club to be located in the 
city of Boston shall be other than that of the present National 
League Club now located there, and so entirely dissimilar as not 
to be confused or confounded therewith. 

3d. The general admission to said American Association 
Club games shall be fifty cents for each adult person. 

4th. The Boston National League Club shall be exclusively 
scheduled fur Decoration days in the city of Boston, and the 
American Association Club in Boston shall be exclusively sched- 
uled for July 4th. 

5th. The violation of any of these conditions shall forfeit 
the American Association franchise of club membership in the 
city of Boston. [Attest] 

[Accepted] N. E. VoUNG, Secretary. 

[Signed] Allen \V. Thurman, 

/'resident of the American Ass'n of B. B. C. 

On motion, the American Association and Western Association 
were cordially invited to meet with the National League for the 
purpose of holding a Joint Conference to adopt and sign the new 
National Agreement. 

On motion, a recess was taken until the following clay. 
Saturday, Jan. 17, 1891. 

Meeting called to order at 11 A. M. 

A communication from Mr. A. L. Johnson was received, and 
on motion, laid upon the table. 

On motion, Mr. A. (i. Spalding was unanimously elected a 
member of the National Board by acclamation. Mr. Spalding 
expressed his appreciation of the honor conferred, but, for various 
reasons, he would be unable to accept. 

Col. Jno. I. Rogers was then unanimously elected to represent 
the League as a member of the National Board. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



71 



On motion, the question of an interchange of games with the 
clubs of the American Association be referred to the Schedule 
( 'ommittee with instructions to report at the spring meeting. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That on or before February 9, 1S91, each Club in 
the National League shall send to the Chairman of the National 
Board a list of players under contract with or reservation by it 
whom it may wish to continue in its service. 

All players not included in this list shall be placed in the hands 
of the National Board, which shall have full power to make such 
disposition of unclaimed players as may seem to it fair and equi- 
table to all in interest. 

The President was authorized to reconvene this annual meeting 
at any time. 

On motion, adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 

President and Secretary. 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League of 
1'ki ifessional Base Hall Clubs held at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, New York City, Tuesday, March 3, 1891. 

Meeting called to order at 11 o'clock A. M. 

1'rcsent: 

lohn B. Day and J. W, Spalding, representing the National 
Exhibition Co , of New York City. 

A. (i. Spalding representing the Chicago Ball Club. 

A. I. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia 
Ball <lub. 

J. T. Brush, representing the Indianapolis Ball Club. 

J. Palmer O'Neill representing the Pittsburgh Athletic 
Company. 

C. H. Byrne, F. A. Abell and J. J. Doyle, representing the 
Brooklyn Base Ball Club. 

J. T. Brush, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

F. De II. Robison and Davis Ilawley, representing the Cleve- 
land Base Ball Company. 

A. H. Soden and YV. II. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 



72 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



On motion, the reading; of minutes of the previous meeting was 
dispensed with. 

Mr. Rogers, as the League member of the National Board, 
submitted a verbal report which was received and accepted. 

Mr. Rogers, who was appointed a special committee to revise 
the Constitution with a view of having it conform to the new 
National Agreement, submitted his report and the changes 
suggested by him were unanimously adopted. 

After a lengthy and informal discussion as to the situation in 

Cincinnati, on motion adjourned to meet at II A. M. the following 

day. 

Wednesday, March 4, 1S91. 

Meeting called to order at .11:30 A. M., and informally resumed 
the discussion of the best policy to pursue in relation to Cincin- 
nati. On motion a committee of three, consisting of Messrs. 
Robison, Reach and O'Neill was appointed to confer with Mr. 
Brush and report to the League some plan of action. 

The committee reported in favor of maintaining a League Club 
in Cincinnati to do business under the company organized in 
Cincinnati under the laws of the State of Kentucky. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the report of the committee appointed to con- 
sult with Mr. J. T. Brush in relation to the situation in Cincin- 
nati be adopted. Furthermore, that for the purpose of carrying 
out the recommendation contained in said report, it is 

Resolved, That this League appoint a Special Advisory Com- 
mittee of three with full power to take such action as said com 
mittee deems best to protect the interests of the National League. 

The Chairman appointed Messrs. Abell, Robison and O'Neill 
as such committee 

On motion it was unanimously agreed that the ten per cent, 
payment of gate receipts to the League Treasury be continued 
for 1891. 

fin motion adjourned to meet at 11 o'clock A. M. on the 
following day. 

Thursday, March 5. 1891. 

Meeting called to order at 12 M. 



OF THE NATIONAL I.F.AGUF. 



73 



Sections 57 and 60 of the League Constitution were adopted as 
follows (See Constitution). 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That Section 60, of the League Constitution shall 
not be changed or amended for five years. 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report which was unan- 
imously adopted. (See Schedule) 

On motion, resolved that the mileage of each club as per 
schedule for 1S91 be pooled, and assessments made by the 
secretary on clubs to equalize the cost thereof, each club being 
allowed a charge of two cents per mile on fourteen players. 

On motion, a vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. C. H Byrne, 
Chairman of the Schedule Committee, and his able assistant Mr, 
Ebbetts, for the very able and satisfactory manner in which they 
had discharged the duty of preparing a schedule with table o' 
mileage, etc. 

On motion adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 

President and Secretary. 



74 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 

The following is an official list of the officers of the National 
League of Professional liase Ball Clubs, and officers and players 
of clubs, members thereof, for the season of 1891 so far as com- 
pleted to March, 1891. 

N. E. YOUNG, President and Secretary, Box 536, 
Washington, 1). C. 



DIRECTORS. 



A. I. Reach, 
John B. Day, 



J. Palmer O'Neill, 
J. T. Brush. 



BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OK BOSTON, 
MASS. 



A. II. Soden, President, 

,\'o. Ill Water St. 
11. 1). Stovey. Joseph Quinn, 

C. W. Bennett, Chas. Getzein, 

C. \V. Ganzell, W. S. Brodie, 

R. L. Lowe, T. [. Tucker, 

W. H. Nash. 



J. IL Hillings, Treasure), 
Box 1 75 1. 
John G. Clarkson, 
C. A. Nichols, 
1 1 . C. Long, 
Martin Sullivan, 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. G. SPALDING, President, 

1V0. 108 Madison St. 
Adrian C. Anson, Elmer E. Foster, 



N. F. Pfeffer, 
Thos. Nagle, 
Jno. P. Luby, 
Thos Burns, 
Walter Wilmot, 



[ames Ryan, 
L. G. Groff, 
E. F. Stein, 
J. J. Cooney, 
Wm. Dahlen. 



Jno. A. Brown, Secretary, 
No. 165 Loomis St. 
A. C. Gumbert, 
M. J. K.ttretlge, 
Wm. Hutchinson, 
R. I. Glenalvin, 
Cliff Carroll, 



CLEVELAND BASE HALL COMPANY OF CLEVELAND, 
OHIO. 



F. DeII. Robison, 

President. 
E. A. Beatin, 
Leon Vian, 
Frank Knauss, 
J. K. Virtue, 



Davis ILwvi.lv, 
Secretary. 
C. L. Childs, 
E. I. McKean, 
J. J. Doyle, 
Wm. Alvord, 
Chas. L. Zimmer. 



Geo. W. Howe, 

Treasurer. 
Ralph Johnson, 
O. Tebeau, 
Geo. S. Davis, 
D. T. Young, 



OF THE .NATION AI- LEAGUE. 



BROOKLYN BASE BALL CLUB OF BROOKLYN, X. V. 



Ciias. II. Byrne, President, 

Cor. -jlh Ave. and 4I/1 St. 
II. Collins, T. P. Daley, 

Thos. F. Kinslow, T. J. I.ovett, 
G B. Pinkney, Geo. J. Smith, 

Robt. Caruthers, I J. L. Foutz, 



1-. A ABELL, Secretary, 
|. |. Doyle, Treasurer, 
Geo. E. Hemming, 
Win. D. O'Brien, 
Jno. M. Ward, 
Thos. Burns. 



CINCINNATI BASE KALI. CLUB OF CINCINNATI, O. 

J. W. Iiolliday, Chas. Marr, J. G. Reilly, 

J. A. McPhee. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL CLUB, PHILADELPHIA, PA, 

A. f. Reach, President, Jno. I. Rogers, Treas 13S S. tth St. 
1113 Market St. W. ']. Shottsline, Sec. 138 S. btli St. 
Harry Wright, Manager, [941 A'. 22./ S/. 
1. W. Clements, E. J Delehanty, W. R. Hamilton, 

Win. Shindle, AI. Myers, Ed. II. Mayer, 

W. A. Sunday, Chas. Ksper. Win, Gleason, 

W. T. Gray, ' Jno. F. Shultz, S. L. Thompson, 

Jno. Thornton. 

PITTSBURGH ATHLETIC COMPANY, PITTS- 

m'KGii, PA. 

Scandrett, Secretary, 
Register's Office. 
< lonnie Mack, 
II. E Staley, 
S. A. LaRocque, 
J J. Fields, 



|. Palmer O'Neill, President, A. K. 
(arc of A. G. Pratt o,-° Co., Wood St. 



Edward Hanlon, 
F. II. Carroll, 
('. Scott S'.ratton, 
Jno. F". Smith, 
Albert Maul, 



L. Bierbauer, 
J. 1'. Beckley, 
Chas. L. Reilly, 
Mark Baldwin, 
Geo F. Miller. 



NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY, NEW 
YORK CITY. 

Jno. B. DAY, President, J. W. SPALDING, Treasurer, 

No. 121 Maiden Lane. No. 241 Broadway. 

Jno. W. Glasscock, Jerry Denny, Wm. Ewing, 

Rodger Connor, Geo.- F. Gore, J. H. O'Rourke, 

D. Richardson, Lewis Whistler, Jno. Ewing. 



76 



BATTING AN'I) FIELDING AVERAGES. 





in 




c 








O 




<— . 


(I) 


O 


D 


•a 


O 




< 


u 




K 




Ml 


J 


c 


< 


•o 


Z 


<u 


o 


Ix. 


h 


■a 


< 




7, 






bo 




e 








*j 




** 




rt 




CO 



o 

■f. 



■i 
z 

- 

3 

N 


•p.u'Udoy 


H a- M ■t M -.3 .3 t- 

Tl ™ r. -, *1 ft H !fl 

r. at ~- 06 a / » / 


'B09OVII0 p: pi J, 


S SI A t P t- H ^ 

3i -r r. ■-£ y. ~- 1- = 
-f X -^ i - -^ I- OS i~< 
»ft "A ift <^ i" ■". '*. '•£ 


pnir s|p!;[ pOSBttj 


x 13 c. x c ;~ = *c 


•sjojj;-! 3trppi9fj£ 


tc -^ « ^ ci so *n t- 
C3 -»< 3-. t- « m 3. c 


•flupstssv souiix 


« j j. ?. :i j m x 


*^no ?nj aaqtauji 




g 

- 

23 


■nojojs saseg 


SSSSSifslS 


•s?TH wgfiavs 


H i- H ?1 t- 31 Tf t- 
"^ I- tO 3) X — V~ CI 
31 31 7t 33 31 33 31 31 


'89989 l»i»X 


~ -*■ x .3 x 3i i- H 

'C i- CO --C .3 t- r- -r 


• *a8BtaaoJa,i 


fi 3i fl ri S 31 31 3*i 


■Kdir «»a p*u 


("- » r- © « 3 £ § 


'OOIttg jod eS»i9Ay 


S x -3 i' 3 — •£. i~ 


■panjw^fumi 


X x 5 » ?t rH ci 33 

CO 33 33 33 « 33 CI 31 


•3t«Bf) JO'I 0J*1U3AV 


1C tO 3i CI I- t- -* ■* 
X .— i-l :c l- Cl ^3 23 

■i tc so m o »o ** -t 


'p9403g BOOH 


'.; 2 £ ?s 3B 9 t: £• 

X t3 i-* 1.1 !S t-« 31 ~. 

SB 30 90 t- i- l- so tf] 


*?»ti *» «->t«ix 


h i- X rt i.-! ■+ M 7t 

3 j. -i - _ i § i 




■ u<>\\ ho tin? f) 


gsgessss 




■[i.i.Ch[,i s.miao 


fiTcftrcrrr-frrr: 



C 85 "3 -1 > £ l( 



s i 



2 P. 



S 8 



LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES. 



CATCHERS AVERAGES. 




Club. 



Boston 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Chicago 

New York 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Cincinnati 

Phlla. & Pittsburgh 
Boston ... . 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

N. y. & Cleveland, 
Brooklyn.. 



■i --. 

gp, 



a 5 
~ - 



448 
23 181 

Bill 332 



is 



r.n:l 
244 
345 



91 
50 
B5 
96 
125 

84 1ST 
62 366 
88 161 



158 113 

480 1HK 

43 

93 



IKK 

157 

82 

87 

276 

123 

175 

76 

Kl) 
164 1 



u 



a 



. 91 I 
.929' 
.912 
.892 
.892 
.887 
. 885 
. 869 
.864 
.8«2 
.861 
.843 
.829 
. 826 
.814 



211 


19 


195 .8011 


35 


26 305 1.800 


20 


10 


113 .7911 


17 


14 


117 ,789 


40 


28 


2721.713 



PITCHER'S RECORD. 



Jleatin 

Baker 

Clarkson . . . 

Carulhers.. . 
I'm y--a 

Foreman . . .. 

Getzeln 

Gleason 

Hutchinson. 

Luby 

Lovett 

Mullaue 

Nichols 

Bhines 

Basle 

Stein 

Sharratt 

Smith 

Terry 

Vinn 

\ lekery 

Wadaworth. . 

Welch 

You uk 



, Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

. Boston 

Brooklyn 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

(Chicago 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

( 'hx-muati 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

New York 

Chicago 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Brooklyn 

Cincin. &c ClevePd 

Philadelphia 

Cleveland 

New York 

Cleveland 



W.', £'. '■ 

•j:t :t ' 
41 2fi 
32 28 
81 16 ■ 

•l\\ 18 ( 
40 234 



(IS \l 
28 20 
42 31 

± 

45 2K 



64 SO 1 
18 11 6 

23 11 5 
23 8 li 

11 27 I 
21 11 5 

12 24 3 
2(1 2 7 
38 17 4 
17 8 5 



3> 
B 

u 



- 

< 


11 

0) S, 
(ft . 

= > 


- ■ 
■i. t- 

« a. 

a a 
o 

i'- 

u O 
u s 

1..C 


a 
• 

■si 

U 
3§ 


22 2.28 


.274 


166 


IK 2.69 


.264 


94 


S3 2.34 


.210 


141 


31 1.75 


.250 


89 


71 2.51 


.249 


61 


09 2.62 


.250 


79 


57 2.66 


.251 


80 


31 1.89 


. 21 1 


1B8 


711 1.89 


.217 


190 


86 1.511 


.224 


120 


57 1 90 


.234 


138 


11 2. IK 


T>*> 


91 


761.70 


.231 


117 


58 1.26 


.214 


101 


B8 1.50,. 219 


276 


27 2.33 ,288 


75 


61 2.30 .234 


K'.l 


78 8.17 .287 


108 


80 2.00.245 127 


K7 2.7k . 259 88 


83 2.21 .252; 175 


50 3.15.293 73 


15, 1.48. 235' 122 


35 


2.17 


.243 


2- 



I ir 



.817 
.613 
.760 

.809 
.707 
.731 
.768 
.804 



29 .830 

14 1.783 
23 .771 
13 .770 
31 .717 
13 .869 

30 .704 



777 
.745 
.757 
.757 
.863 
.me, 
.711 
.852 
.790 



78 



LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES. 



FIELDING RECORD— 1890. 

Of Players who have taken part in fifteen or more Championship Gaines. 
First Basemen. 



Esterbrook . 
Whistler.... 

Virtue 

Mines 

Tucker 

Anson 

Iteilly 

Foutz 

Hornling.... 
McCauily . . . 

Veach 

Heeker 

Decker . 

Wilson 



!'~iLi?f !=i 



S fe 



New York 

New York 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh & Boston. 

Boston 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Cleveland & pittsb'K 

Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia 4: Pitta. 
Pittsburgh 



46 4:10 

15 tun 

62 833 

is 182 

132 [84] 

135 1:11.-. 

132 1392 



w.n 
:u;:i 
1063 

721 
MM 

187 

178 1 



4511 

809 

688 

199 

1409 

1 125 

14G.'i 

1269 

386 

lln'.i 

71)1 

666 

183 



» a 



.'.mi 
.982 

.982 

.97'.) 
.979 
.978 
.977 
.977 
.9711 
. 97:1 
. 968 
982 
956 



198 .911 







Second Basemen. 






















tr. 


tr ;'- g 


— -3 


a 


Naur. 


CZ.TTB, 


^ — 
3 


ft 

■i 


1 ■" 

a J 

r- - 


ShUfl 
5 r- 


it 








Hill 
117 


201 
847 


832 
352 


27 
38 


660 

7:17 


'151 




Philadelphia 


,948 




Collins 

McFhee 




129 
132 


298 
404 


4211 
4.'ll 


42 

51 


7fUl 
886 


'ill 




Cincinnati 


.942 






Chicago 


66 


128 


191 


25 


:!I7 


. 928 




Delaney 




36 


B2 


9:1 


14 


189 


. 926 








7f 1 


•>->7 


244 


:is 


509 


9-5 




Smith 




Kl 

i:tl 


205 
234 


267 

nil 


411 
57 


602 

892 


OKI 






.917 






.New Ynrk & Fittsb'g 


16 


36 


52 


8 


96 


.917 




O'Brien 




•II 


69 


79 


16 


154 


. 896 








17 


36 


. 58 


12 


106 


.888 




Earl 




:'<; 


79 


1211 


26 


225 


.881 








17 


36 


63 


18 


102 


.872 




Clarke 




15 


43 


44 


19 


106 


.820 



Third Basemen. 



McGurr . 
Pinkuey. 

Hum- . . . 
Small. -.v. 
1 >oiiijy . . . 
Clarke . . 
Mayor... 

Marr 

Latham . . 
Miller... 

Uoot 

Mullane , 



Boston 

Brooklyn 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

New York 

New Vurk 

Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati. .. . 

Cincinnati . . . . 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh. .. . 
Cincinnati. . . , 



115 


151 


126 


179 


139 


188 


I3fi 


221 


106 


US 


16 


21 


114 


17:1 


1;:; 


71 


411 


54 


89 


127 


11 


M 


21 


38 



228 
222 
290 
827 

210 

30 

221 
125 

103 
213 
102 

II 



41 m .933 

430 .9:12 
582 . 898 

812 .89:1 
422 .888 

61 .886 

452 .K7S 



229 

184 

400 
:iu 198 
21 103 



856 

851! 
860 
.847 
79« 



LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES. 



79 



Short Stops. 



Lowe 

Coouey — 

Allen 

Glasscock . 

Smith 

lleKean. . 

Long 

Beard 

Sales 

Berger..., 
LaBoque.. 



; Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia . 
i N'ew York . . . 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland .... 

i Boston 

[Cincinnati 
'Pittsburgh ... 

Pittsburgh ... 
j Pittsburgh ... 



13B 


237 


162 


laa 


337 


! 


124 


275 


421 


129 


282 


408 


134 


266 


433 


101 


230 


352 


113 


145 


41!» 


51 


85 


151 


88 


62 


mi 


81 


48 


70 



6 122 

47 786 
69 906 



960 
936 

705 .909 
774 .'.UK 
774 .903 
0(H .897 
629 .895 
271 1.871 
192.864 
160 .775 



Fielders. 



g 


Name. 


Club. 


.1 

i = 

as 
- — 

27 

48 

16 
132 

26 
121 
131 

37 
188 
123 

28 
110 
132 

58 

189 
188 

77 
54 
64 
40 
127 
128 

85 
41 
15 
110 
53 
33 

59 

133 
123 

82 

87 
26 
21 
III 
64 
39 
37 
85 
BO 
25 


1} 

6 
z. 

69 
122 

31 
225 

:il 
241 
258 

62 
282 
237 

44 
137 
170 
110 
820 

205 

no 

108 

08 

62 

224 
284 
170 
72 
27 
255 

80 

33 

100 

210 

232 

138 
56 
88 
31 
60 

103 
45 
5(1 
04 

108 
51 


a 

O T. 

a'* 
H * 

2 





19 

6 

13 

20 

9 
35 
20 

4 
23 
29 

9 
26 
28 
12 

4 
12 

8 
11 
27 
14 
11 

4 
31 

10 
3 


13 

23 
7 
4 
7 
5 
8 

13 
4 
9 
8 

23 
8 


5°!s 

a c 

■a u 

s 

1 

3 

1 

12 

2 

18 

15 
4 
18 
16 
3 

10 
13 
8 
23 
20 
9 
8 
6 

19 

28 

8 
8 
3 
29 
10 
4 
12 

20 

34 

11 

'.1 



6 

11 
IB 

8 
12 
15 
28 
15 


5 

3J 

72 
131 


— T3 
3 B 

la, 
at a 








98fi 




Oorkhlll 




077 










Miller 

Uolllclay 

Davis 

(Jitks 








Pittsburgh 








207 951 






288 948 










Cleveland 


335 .846 

273 941 








51 1)11 






170 941 




tvilmot 


Boston & Brooklyn... 

Chicago 


212 .038 
127 .987 

003 037 






818 .936 








115 .330 
86 .930 




Nicol 

Knight 




81 .020 






251 .025 




Philadelphia & Pitta. 


339 .917 




O'Brien 


108 ,915 




Pittsburgh 


91 .912 








34 .911 




Pittsburgh & Phila. . 
Chicago 


816 .908 






loo .900 

40 .000 




Eelty 


Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh .v Boston.. 


lis .898 






249 .895 






280 .882 

166 . 873 
69 .869 




Pittsburgh 


40 .869 






■15 .800 




Bar] 


70 .800 






135 .850 




West 




57 ,859 

7L.8:u 
«7 827 






157 .824 








77 


.805 



80 



LEAGUE BATTING AVERAGES. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Hatting record of players who have taken part in fifteen or more 
championship games. Season of i8yo. 



Luby 

Glasscock... 
Hamilton . . 
Clements. .. 
O'Brien ... 
Thompson. . 

Knight 

Anson 

Pinkuey.... 
Burkett ... 

Virtue 

Tiernan 

Foutz 

U.-illy 

Marr 

McKean 

Tucker 

Brotlie 

E-terbrook . 
Whistler.... 
Dally 
Sullivan . .. 

Carroll 

Burns 

Smith 

Lowe 

Husie 

Decker 

Terry , 

Collins 

Wllmot 

Burns 

Myers . 

Miiiiune 

O'Brien 

Srhriver 

Miller 

Cooney 

Holliday 

Ganzel 

Beard 

Glenalvin .. 

Burke 

Bergei 

Sunday 

Caruthers. .. 
Davis 



Club. 



Chicago 

New York 

Philadelphia... 

Philadelphia 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati . 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

New York ...... 

Cleveland .... 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Cincinnati! 

Cincinnati .... .. 

Cleveland .... .. 

Boston 

Boston 

New York 

New York 

Cleveland 

Boston 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia..., 

Boston 

New York 

Phila. & PiilslVg 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Philadelphia.... 
Cincinnati .. ,. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia.... 

Pittsburgh 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

Chicago .... 

Phila. & Pittsb'g 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsb'g & Phila. 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 



"3 
H 


u 

la 






114 


26 


512 89 


490 ]:::; 


381 61 


350 78 


549' 118 


4*1 66 


5(11 


921 



li 



30 
124 
123 

97 

85 
132 
[27 
139 

126 485 
101 401 

62 223 

138 663 
129 609 
133 663 
180 527 
136 630 
182 639 
182 51i 

45 197 

45 1711 

61 246 

121 606 

18« 582 

119 472 

21 98 

52 2H7 
7:1 284 
95 374 
07 1 303 
129 510 

139 571 
189 638 
117 

81 

27 

57 
138 
135 
131 

88 

122 

66 

132 

llll 391 
116 479 

71 238 
131 626 



79 162 



131 166 

98 131 

1 7 25 

86 68 

32 73 

66 J04 

62 1"! 
1 18 112 
113 159 

92 119 
96 135 

42 79 
15 80 
37 61 
si 180 

116 156 

93 140 

21 41 

61 139 

43 6,7 
•08 149 

63 104 

K3 127 

48 63 

98 139 



ft 

312 
336 
324 
815 

314 
313 

312 
311 
309 

3,09 
305 
303 
302 
311(1 
293 
296 
295 
295 
289 
288 

288 
2*5 
285 

284 

2*1 

280 

278 
278 
278 
278 

278 



-. — 

■a a 



60 
226 

198 
179 
143 

240 

21 HI 

208 

203 

184 

87 
289 
220 

248 
19H 

220 

192 

187 
71 
74 

81 

192 

223 

201 
29 

Mi 

102 

13* 
112 
197 
242 
186 

180 

102 

41; 

81 
197 
212 
198 

57 
184 

93 
21(i 
129 

265 1 15 

266 78 

261 202 



4 
54 
102 

10 
34 
25 
17 
29 
47 
14 

9 
56 
42 
29 
44 
23 
43 
29 
12 

8 
17 
83 
31 
21 

9 

15 
6 
20 
82 

86 
76 
44 

17 
19 



82 

45 
50 
1 
80 
11 
63 
11 
96 
13 
22 



" 



, LEAGUE BATTING AVER &.GES. 



81 



NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING ANERAGES — Continued. 



Nagle 

Buckley 

McPhee 

Donovan . . . 

Long 

Latham . ^.. . 
Giarkson. . . . 

Nichols 

Earl 

Foster 

Harrington, 

West 

McCaully ... 

Veacn 

Henry. 

Dally 

Gray 

Laitogue . . . 

Mayer 

Bassett 

Horaung ... 

Osborn 

lliues 

McGarr 

Kelty 

Murphy 

Ullshong. . . . 

i tetze n 

Smith 

Sa]c< 

Hunter 

Hecker 

Allen 

Clarke 

Corkhill. ... 
Ardner 

Knot 

(Mark 

Zimmer 

Sraalley.. ... 

Gilks 

Hemp 

Wilson 

Bennett 

Denny 

Gleason 

Nlcol 

Dowse 

Vickery 

Hutchinson. 

sharratt 

Kittredge... 



Chicago . . . 
New York 
Cincinnati. 
Boston & Brook. 
Boston . 
Cincinnati ... 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago 

Chicago .... 
Cincinnati... 

i ileveland 

Philadelphia , 
Cleve. & Pittsb'g 
New York ... . 
Brooklyn . ,.. 
Philadelphia .. 

Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia... 
New York ... . 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsb*g& Boston 

P.. .-ion , 

Pittsburgh 
New York.. 
Brooklyn.. . 



Boston . 
Boston . 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia .. 

New Y'ork 

Brooklyn .... 

( Eier eland 

Pittsburgh 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh .. .. 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

NOW York 

Philadelphia .. 
Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia... 

Chicago 

New York 

Chicago 



$ 

'/. >. 

- - 
= - 

3 


Sa 

a 


a* 

u 

si 

X 


a 

7 •- 

y 


a 
5 
fa 

V 

ft 


i 
■ 

H 


■J — 

a 
'Ji 


sa 


144 


23 


38 


.264 


50 


4 


70 


266 


40 


68 


. 255 


86 


19 


|:i'i 


52H 


126 


135 .256 


21 is 


19 


58 


244 


33 


62 .254 


67 13 


1111 


431 


!l! 


11 IS 250 


150 17 


41 


164 


35 


41 '.250 


62 13 


41 


173 


IS 


43 1. 248 


(12 


8 


47 


171 


18 


43 .217 


49 


7 


92 


884 


55 


96 .247 


137 


19 


27 


106 


20 


2(1 .247 


51 


9 


65 


286 


26 


58 


.24(1 


70 


15 


87 161 


20 


37 


.245 


50 


8 


1121 418 


04 


102 


.244 


145 


28 


7ii 266 


30 


65 


. 2 1 1 


95 


15 


37 144 


18 


36 


.213 


45 


7 


H2 2!P2 


56 


71 


.243 


102 


17 


321 128 


19 


31 


.242 


47 


14 


111 


434 


00 


106 .242 


135 


29 


117 


4K1 


47 


11" .211 


165 


2S 


Kiu 


41(1 


51 


lis .239 


12!) 


35 


12(1 


518 


61 


122 .288 


154 


42 


41 


108 


22 


40 .238 


54 


2 


100 


393 


52 


93 .237 


117 


21 


121 


487 


68 


115 .236 


146 


27 


59 


2li7 


23 


49 .236 


69 


6 


32 


119 


13 


28 .235 


86 


n! 


16 


55 


7 


13 .231 


11 


10 


41 


117 


27 


34 ].231 


60 


7 


131 


403 


82 


106 .229 


144 


88 


61 


18!) 


18 


43 .228 


57 


7 


47 


is:, 


18 


42 .227 


59 


15 


80 


3HI 


■13 


77 . 22(1 


IDS 


19 


133 


466 


73 


103 .225 


141 


2S 


llll 


311.") 


56 


89 .225 


117 


83 


51 


'.'Ml 


23 


46 '.225 


5H 


12 


N4 


823 


28 


72 .223 


86 


17 


57 


215 


18 


•is ,228 


57 


13 


43 


151 


23 


33 .218 


41 


Hi 


126 


444 


53 


99 .214 


125 


21) 


13(1 


5(12 


61 


107 .218 


123 


46 


ISO 


544 


65 


116 .213 


131 


22 


21 


Ml 


II 


19 .218 


24 


7 


89 


804 


3(1 


66 .213 


7!) 


11 


a r . 


2Kl 


56 


mi ,213 


SO 


21 


114 


437 


52 


93 .212 


129 


25 


68 


221 


22 


47 ,209 


5(1 


21 


5(1 


186 


28 


39 ,209 


46 


10 


411 


159 


19 


33 .207 


36 


13 


43 


169 


16 


33 .207 


87 


13 


68 


2(11 


2!) 


53 .203 


(17 


13 


29 


1(1!) 


1(1 


22 .201 


SO 


111 


m; 


333 


11 


67 


201 


K!) 


13 



4 

3 

55 

19 

49 

17 

2 

2 

17 

18 

4 

4 

8 

13 

12 

20 

4 

27 

20 

14 
39 
(I 
14 
39 
10 

3 
2 
4 

89 

A 

4 

13 

13 

II 

(1 

I) 

7 

10 

15 

10 

17 

3 

5 

8 

11 

10 

24 

3 

12 



6 

7 



82 LEAGUE BATTING 


AVERAGES 












NATIONAL 


EAG1 K HATTING AVERAGES — Contl 


nutd. 










Z 


y. 




•i. 

-. 


■--. 


5 








■ >. / — 




~ 






•.-- 




M 


N a M B 


I'l.m. 


it 


3 


3g 


f. 7 


u 


= •= 


g 
3 


±.3 
























- 






3 
44 

129 


H 
164 

481 


22 
78 


33 
92 


.21)1 
.191 


n 

39 
124 


32 


■Ji 






Brooklyn . .. 









28 24 






Cleveland .. .- 


30 


11(1 


10 


22 


.189 


28 


2 


5 






Chicago 


53 


21 12 


33 


38 


.1*?, 


55 


11 


11 






Piteb'_g& N. V.. 


45 


154 


10 
3 


29 
17 


.188 
.179 


34 

20 


5 

3 


2 






25 '.■:. 


6 






New York 


34 123 


14 


22 


.179 


27 


V 











20 


09 





12 


.178 


14 


5 









Pittsburgh 


IV 


04 


1U 


11 


.17.' 


13 





2 








17 
21 


04 

72 


4 

5 


11 
11 


.172 
.153 


12 
12 



7 


:i 






'2 








IK 


5'.) 


4 


9 


.152 


11 


3 


1 








32 


99 


lit 


15 


. 151 


21 


5 


9 






Pittsburgh 


23 


03 


V 


11) 


.147 


11 





1 




Lytle 


Pittsburgh 

N\ Y. & ClevePd 


15 
23 


85 

34 


2 


8 
12 


.115 
.14.1 


9 
15 


3 


1) 




Simimers 


3 1 




Heatin 




53 


101 


25 


27 


.141 


39 


15 2 






Cincinnati 


54 


21)2 


ix 


2t 


.138 


44 


13 


5 






Ciu. & Clevelaud 


24 


Kll 


7 


11 


.137 


i:i 


5 


2 




Foreman ... ,... 


Cincinnati 


22 


V.i 


13 


10 


. 133 


20 


5 


3 






Cleveland .. .. 


17 


0.) 





8 


.12)1 


10 


4 







Jordan 


Pitt^bur^h. . 


::, 


125 


8 


12 


.1)90 


14 


4 5 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



83 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 
SEASON OF 1890. 











Runs 










Booms-, 




WlIKRK 








,d 












3 


1890. 


Plated. 




Club. 


Bo 

.a 

13 


a 6 
3 








9 


kt lit New York. . . 


. New York vs. Philadelphia.. 


Philadelphia. 


4 





" 19 Cincinnati.. 




Chicago 


6 


4 


« 19 Pittsburgh. . 




Pittsburgh.. . 


3 


2 


« -ill 


" ** 




U 


9 






Brooklyn 


7 


« 


** 21 New York . . . 


CfewYork vs. Philadelphia. . 


Now York 


5 


8 


M 21 Cincinnati .. 


.Cincinnati vs. Chicago.... 


Cincinnati .. . 


9 


4 


» M " •■ 




Chicago 


ia 


8 


» -j'i N'ew York... 


New York vs. Philadelphia. .. 


Philadelphia. 


7 


8 






Cleveland . . . 


11 

7 


1 


" 22 rittsburKli. . 




1 


« 23 " 




Pittsburgh,. . 


20 


li 


« 28 Cincinnati... 


Cincinnati vs. Chicago 


Cincinnati 


9 


1; 


•* 'S.i Nmv York.. . 


New York vs. Philadelphia.. 


Philadelphia 


3 


1 


" 28Bo>ton 






5 


2 


"24 " 






9 





" 26 Cleveland .. 




Cleveland 


10 


r. 


" 28 Pittsburgh. . 




Cincinnati. .. 


10 


1 






New York.... 


3 
9 




U *t 


■ » 


" 28CIereland .. 


Cleveland vs. Chicago 


Chicago 


5 


4 


* k 'j« Pittsburgh.. 


Pittsburgh vs. Cmrinijit 1 . . . . 


Pittsburgh ... 


6 


2 


*■ 28 Brooklyn . . . 


Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia... 


Brooklyn 


10 


(1 


- 29 " 


BO -ton 


M 


5 


*> 


" *".i Philadelphia 


Philadelphia vs. New York... 


Philadelphia . 


s 


4 


4 * ■".» Chicago. .. . 






9 


4 


11 •".( Cleveland .. 


Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 


Cleveland 


3 


2 


•■ 30 " 


M ll 


Cincinna'i 


4 


n 


w 80 Philadelphia 


Philadelphia vs. New York... 


New York 


9 


8 


•■ :;.) Brooklyn ... 




Brooklyn 


H 


7 








6 


1 


May 1 " 




** 


4 


:i 


" ^Cleveland.. . 




Cincinnati. .. 


12 

6 
9 


11 
1 

7 


» 2 Chicago .... 


Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 


Pittsburgh."",' 


** 2 [Philadelphia 


Philadelphia vs. New York.. 


Philadelphia. 


7 


li 


" 2 1 Brooklyn ... 


Brooklyn vs. r.ostou... 


Bo-ton 


11 


*» 


"• ;{ Philadelphia 


Philadelphia vs. Boston. , . 


Philadelphia. 


5 





" 3 Brooklyn ... 


Brooklyn vs. New fork 


Brooklyn . . , 


7 


8 


" :i Cloveland .. 


Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh,., 


Tie 


3 


:i 


" 5 Chicago .. .. 


Philadelphia vs. Boston 


Tie 


2 
6 


•> 


" r> Philadelphia 


Philadelphia. 


."> 


11 n Brooklyn ... 




Brooklyn .... 


8 


.1 


" e^hicago.. .. 






6 


5 


"7 




Cincinnati 


5 


•> 


" 7| Philadelphia 


Philadelph a v*. Boston 


Philadelphia. 


5 


4 



•Forfeited. 



84 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 



Date 

18'JO. 



Where 
Played. 



Names or Contestants. 



May 7|Brooklyn 

7 Cleveland 

8j " 

8 Philadelphia. 

8 Chicago 

9 Philadelphia. 
9 New York - . 
9 Cincinna.i. .. 

10| 

10 New York 

10 Philadelphia . 

12 

12 New York 

12 Cincinnati .... 

13 " 

13 'New York.... 
13,Chicago 

13 Philadelphia. 

14 Boston .. .. 
14 Brooklyn . . , 
16i 

1<» Philadelphia. 
10 New Yo k 

16 Boston 

17| " 

17 New York . . . 
17 Philadelphia. 

17 Brooklyn 

19 

19 New York.... 

19 Philadelphia. 
Pi Boston 

20 Philadelphia. 
21 1 " 

21 Boston 

21 Brooklyn .... 

21'NewYork 

22 

22 Philadelphia. 
22| Boston 

22 Brooklyn .... 
23 1 * " 

23 New York 

23 •Philadelphia 

23 Boston 

24. " 

24l Brooklyn 

21 (Tew York.... 

24 Philadelphia. 



Brooklyn vs. New York.. 
Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh. 



Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Cincinnati 

Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn.. 

New York vs. Boston 

Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh . . . 



New York vs. Boston 

Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn. 



New York vs. Boston 

Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh... 

New York vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn. . 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

Brooklyn vs. New York 

u Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati. 
New York vs. Cleveland . 
Boston vs. Chicago 



New Y'ork vs. Cleveland. ... 
Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati. 
Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh.... 



Bfew York vs. Cleveland 

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati. 

Boston vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia u 



Boston vs. Cleveland 

Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati. 
New York vs. Pittsburgh. 



Winning 
Club. 



Runs 
Boobsp. 

3a «2 

aO aO 



New Y'ork . . 
Cleveland .. 



Philadelphia 
Chicago . 
Philadelphia 
New York . 
Cincinnati. 



Boston . . . . 
Brooklyn . 



New Y'ork . 
Pittsburgh 

New Y'ork . 
Cleveland, 
Philadelphia 
Boston .... 
New Y'ork . 
Brooklyn . 
Cincinnati 
Cleveland. 
Chicago.. . 
Boston.... 
New York. 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh. 
Brooklyn . 
New York . 
Cincinnati. 
Chicago... 
Philadelphia 



Boston.... 
Brooklyn . 
New York . 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago Chicago.. .. 

Boston vs. Cleveland '.Cleveland.. 

Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati Brooklyn .. 

" " Cincinnati.. 

New Y'ork vs. Pittsburgh. . . . New Y'ork . . 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 'Chicago.. .. 

Boston vs. Cleveland Boston 

" Cincinnati ICincinnati. 

Brooklyn vs. Cleveland Brooklyn .. 

New York vs. Chicago New York . 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. Philadelphia 



3 

5 

9 

5 

18 

6 

16 

10 

11 

3 

6 

17 

1 

5 

4 

7 

10 

11 

14 

(1 

11 

5 

B 

■"> 

9 

6 

6 



18 

5 

9 



4 

1 

19 

14 

14 

5 

K 

s 

7 
17 
10 
4 
7 
7 
S 



♦Game thrown out by order of Board of Directors. 



R2C0RD of championship games. 



85 



record of CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 



Date 

18'jij. 



Where 
Played. 



Names of Contestants. 



May2l> 
' 26 
26 

■27 

27 j 
27 

2* 
28 
28 

2S 
2K 

29 
29 
29 
2'.l 
SO 
30 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
31 
81 
81 
81 
lane - 



New York.. . 
Brooklyn ... 

Boston 

Now York . . . 
Philadelphia 
Brooklyn 

New York 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 



New Y'ork vs. Chicago. . 
Brooklyn vs. Cleveland . 
Boston vs. Cincinnati... 
New York vs. Chicago. . 
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh. 




New Y'ork .. . 
Brooklyn . . . 
Cincinnati.. . 
New Y'ork . . . 
Philadelphia 



Brooklyn vs. Cleveland Brooklyn . . . 



New Y'ork vs. Chicago Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. Philadelphia 



Brooklyn — 
Philadelphia 
New York — 



Philadelphia 

Boston 

Brooklyn 



Rostou vs. Cincinnati Boston 

" Pittsburgh j " 

Brooklyn vs. Chicago Brooklyn ... 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland.. .Philadelphia 
New York vs. Cine nuati Cincinnati 



Philadelphia vs. Cleveland . . 
Boston vs. Pittsburgh 



Brooklyn vs. Chicago Chicago, 



Cleveland. 
Bos! on. . . . 



Boston 

New York 

Philadelphia. 

: New York 

! Cleveland. ... 
I Pittsburgh... 

Philadelphia. 

New York 

Cleveland.. .. 

Pittsburgh . .. 
New York 

Philadelphia. 

i Now Y'ork . . . . 
i Cincinnati.. .. 



" " 'Brooklyn . . . 

Boston vs. Pittsburgh 'Pittsburgh. . 

New Y'ork vs. Cincinnati .... Cincinnati.. 
Philadelphia vs. Cleveland... Philadelphia 

" Boston Boston 

New Y'ork vs. Brooklyn I New York . . . 

Cleveland vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati . . 

Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Chicago 



Philadelphia V8, Bo-ton Philadelphia 



New York vs. Brooklyn. 
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati. 



Pittsburgh vs. Chicago... . 

New Y'ork vs. Brooklyn.... 

Phila lelphia vs. Boston. ., 

Brooklyn, 

Now York vs. Boston . 



Brooklyn . 

< 'in 'innati . . 
Cleveland. . . 

Chicago 

New York . . . 
Philadelphia 



Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh.. 
t> "... " " 

New Y'ork — New York vs. Boston 

('•Cleveland. .. Cleveland vs. Chicago 



, Boston. 



7 Philadelphia. 
7 

7 V-w York 

7 Cincinnati 



Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn. 



New York vs. Boston 

Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh 



Boston .. 
Chicago . 



Cleveland... 
Brooklyn .. . 
Philadelphia 
New Y'ork... 
Cincinnati . . 



8 
4 
4 
8 
4 

15 
5 

12 
7 
1 
5 
8 
8 
7 
3 
1 
8 
4 
6 
3 
6 

11 
7 
9 

12 
S 

11 
(1 
4 

it 
8 
6 

20 

3 
5 
4 
7 
(i 
18 

I 

10 
12 
5 
9 

4 
4 
9 
6 



2 
1 
1 
5 
4 
10 
2 

2 
4 
7 

1 

4 
1 
2 
II 
4 
7 
4 
S 
8 
3 
li 
4 
3 
1 
7 
4 
7 
o 

1 
1 
1 



5 

2 
1 
5 
3 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 






86 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 











Runs 










Scobed, 










*r^ 


.o 










-i - 




1890. 


Played . 




Club. 


a ' 


a- 

7: 

Q 

J 


Jane 9 Cincinnati. .. 


Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh — 


Cincinnati. .. 


8 


2 


9 Brooklyn 




Brooklyn . ... 


7 


3 


" '^Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia vs. New York.. . 


Philadelphia. 


« 


1 


» in 




u 


6 


1 


L4 ID Brooklyn .. 




Brooklyn 


6 


4 


11 10 Chicago 






5 


4 


11 10 Cincinnati ... 


Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh .... 


Cincinnati. . 


9 


2 


'■ 11 


ii ii 


* ; 


5 


1 


M 11 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia vs. New York... 


Philadelphia. 


8 


7 


k ' 11 Brooklyn 






8 


II 








7 


1 


** 11 




ii ii 


Cleveland.. .. 


S 


1 


" 13 








IB 


s 


" 12 


Cincinnati. .. 


Cincinnati vs. Cleveland 


Cincinnati . .. 


8 


II 


'■ 12 Brooklyn 




Brooklyn 


12 


Ii 


" i:j 




'* 


4 


2 


11 13 Cincinnati. .. 




Cincinnati.... 


7 


5 


•* 14 " 


11 " 


ifc 


9 





" 14 Brooklyn .... 




Brooklyn .... 


16 


• 2 


u 14 Boston . .. 


Boston vs. Philadelphia 




6 


5 


11 14 M 


it .i 


Philadelphia . 


8 


1) 


" 16 " 


it ii 




1U 





■ 16 " 


it i* 




3 


2 


*■ l(i New York 




Brooklyn 


5 


4 


" l'> Cincinnati.. .. 




Cincinnati 




8 


" i<; Chicago 






7 


a 


11 16 " 


14 " 


Pittsburg 




:i 






New York 




2 


" 17 M 


ii i« 






:i 


" 17 Brooklyn .. 


Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia.. . 


Brooklyn 


6 


4 


li 17 Cincinnati. .. 




Cincinnati.. . 


:i 


I) 


11 18 " 


II M 


" 


(i 


2 


" 18'pittsburgh... 




Pittsburgh . . . 


a 


II 


M 1* Boston 




Boston 


9 


1 


" in Brooklyn .... 


Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia — 




5 


8 


k - 19 




" 


X 


ii 


" 19 Cincinnati. .. 




Cincinnati . .. 


4 


2 


w 19 Pittsburgh... 




Pittsburgh... 


9 


2 


11 19 " 




I neveland 


7 


1 


" 30 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia va. Pittsburgh.. 


Philadelphia. 


11 


2 


■' 20 ( im-inuati.... 




4 


2 


11 !K> Cleveland.,.. 




Brooklyn .... 


1(1 


8 


* l 21 " 






7 


r. 


• -i\ Cincinnati.... 




Cincinnati — 


4 


l 




Chicago vs. New York .... 


New York.. .. 


8 


7 


.. w 






7 


3 


» 28 




New York 


6 


4 


11 28 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. 


Philadelphia. 


13 


1) 


" 28 


II *! 


Pittsburgh,.. 


ia 


8 


" 28 Cleveland , . , 




Cleveland 


4 


2 


" 23 Cincinnati.... 






U 


4 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



record of championship GAMES — Continued, 



IUTE 

1890. 



Where 
Plated. 



Jun 24 

" 24 

11 "24 

" 24 

•' 25 

" 25 

" 25 

•• 25 

" 26 

•• 26 

" 20 

.. M 

" 27 

II .j; 

•' 27 

ii -i7 

" 28 

.. ._, H 

ii ■_.« 

" 8(1 

•■ :iu 

" SO 

" 80 
July 1 

" 1 



Cincinnati. .. 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh. .. 
Cleveland 
Chicago . . . . 
Cincinnati. .. 

Chicago 

Cleveland . .. 
Pittsburgh. .. 

ii 

Chicago — 
Cleveland . . 
Cincinnati, 

Pittsburgh. 

Chicago. . . 
Cleveland . . 

Pittsburgh. 
< ihleago . - 
Clnofnnatt, 

Pittsburgh. 
Chicago .. 



I 

-J Cleveland... 



! Cincinnati. 
: Pittsburgh. 

Cincinnati. 
Chicago. . . . 
i ":<'\ eland. . 



Chicago 

Pittsburgh. 
ii 

Cincinnati.. 



Chicago... 
Cleveland . 
Brooklyn . 



Names ok Contestants. 



Winnino 
Club. 



Cincinnati vs. lioston Boston.. . 

Chicago vs. New York New York 

Cleveland vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn — 

. .Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. Philadelphia. 

Pittsburgh vs. Boston Boston 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. .. Philadelphia, 
[Chicago vs. Brooklyn Chlcagi 

Cincinnati vs. New York Cincinnati. .. 

.Chicago vs. Brooklyn .Chicago 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia.., Philadelphia 

I ittsburgh vs. Boston Boston 



.. Chicago vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn 



Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. 

Cincinnati vs. New York 



( Cleveland . . 
New Y'ork . . 
Cincinnati.. 

Boston 

Brooklyn . . 
Philadelphir 



Pittsburgh vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Brooklyn 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia 

M Boston Boston 

Pittsburgh vs. New York New Y'ork . 

Chicago VS. Philadelphia .... Chicago... 
Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn . 

" ** Cincinnati. 

Pittsburgh vs. New York . . .. Pittsburgh. 
Chicago vs. Philadelphia Philadelphl 



Runs 
Scored. 

a — — to 
'a° ° a 



Cleveland vs. Bo. ton Boston 

" " 

Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn Cincinnati. 

Pittsburgh vs. New York Pittsburgh* 



Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn Cincinnati. 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia Chicago... 

Cleveland vs. Boston Boston 

" New York... . Cleveland, 

" .... New York . . 

Chicago vs. Boston B< iston 

'* Chicago.. . 

Pittsburgh VS. Brooklyn Brooklyn .. 



Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia.. Philadelphia, 
..[Cincinnati. .. 

.. Philadelphia, 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago 

Cleveland vs. New York Cleveland 

Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh Brooklyn... 



....I " Cleveland " 

' Philadelphl l Philadelphl I ■ -. Cinclnmt!. . C'neinnatl. 



2 
8 
11 
8 
6 
7 

8 
12 
9 
8 
6 
9 
7 
9 
8 
3 
10 
7 
7 
5 
5 
6 
13 
4 

I 

8 
11 
3 
12 

11 
5 
U 
7 
9 
7 
6 
14 
12 
4 
3 



111 
3 



4 
3 
11 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES— Continued. 



Datk 

IV, Ml. 



Where 
Played. 



Names of Contestants. 



Winning 
Club. 



Buss 
Scohed. 



'So 



July 7 

•■ 8 

" I 

" 8 

•' SI 

" II 

" 9 

" 9 

" 10 

" 10 1 

" 10] 

» 111 

" 11 

•■ 11. 

" n 

" n 

" 12 

" 12 

'• 12 

:a 

■' !■> 

•• II 

•' u 

" IS 

" 18 

" 15 

" 15 

" 16 

" 1C 

" 16' 

'• 16 

" it; 

" 17 

" 17 

'• 17 

" 17 

" IX 

11 1H 

•' 1« 

" 1H 

" IS 

" III 

" l'.l 

•' 19 

" 111 

" 111 

ii ul 

" 21 



Boston 

New York . . . 

Brooklyn 
Philadelphia 

Boston 

Philadelphia 
NewYork ... 
Brooklyn . . . 

PostoU 

Philadelphia 
New York.. . 
Brooklyn .. . 

B i-i oi.. .'.' . 
Philadelphia 
New York.. . 

Philadelphia 
Boston .... 
Brooklyn .. . 

New York .. . 
Philadelphia 
Bo-ton 

Brooklyn .. . 
New York.. , 
Philadelphia 

Boston 

Ni'w York. . . 
Brooklyn.. . 

Philadelphia 
Boston .... 
New York.. . 



Boston vs. Pittsburgh . 
New York vs. Chicago., 



Boston . . 
Chicago 



Brooklyn vs. Cleveland Brooklyn .. 

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati., Philadelphi 
Boston vs. Pittsburgh Boston 



Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati.. Philadelphia 

New York vs. Chicago Chicago. . . 

Brooklyn vs. Cleveland Brooklyn.. 

Boston vs. Chicago Boston 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland... Philadelphi 

New York vs. Pittsburgh New York.. 

Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati Brooklyn .. 



Boston vs. Chicago Boston 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland. .. Philadelphi 
New York vs. Pittsburgh New York . . 



Philadelphia vs. Cleveland... Philadelphia 

Boston vs. Chicago Chicago.... 

Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati Brooklyn .. 

Chicago " 

NewYork vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati.. 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh., philadelphi 

Boston vs. Cleveland Boston 



Brooklyn vs. Chicago Chicago.... 

NewYorkva. Cincinnati NewYork.. 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. Philadelphi 



Brooklyn . . 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 



Boston 

New York 

Brooklyn . . . 
l hUadelphlj 

Cleveland . . 



Boston vs. Cleveland Cleveland.. 

** '• Boston 

NewYork vs. Cincinnati NewYork. 

Brooklyn vs. Chicago Brooklyn... 

" Pittsburgh Pittsburgh. 

Philadelphia vs Chicago Philadelphli 

Boston vs. Cincinnati Boston 

New York vs. Cleveland Tie 

" " New York , . 

11 " Cleveland . . 

Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh Brooklyn .. 

Boston vs. Cincinnati Boston 

Philadelphia vs, Chicago Philadelphli 



Boston vs. Cincinnati Boston. ... 

New York VS. Cleveland NewYork.. 



Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh. . .. Brooklyn 

Philadelphia " Philadelphia 

Cleveland vs. Boston Boston 



8 
4 
3 
7 
9 
IS 

111 
6 
:i 
fi 
5 
14 
11 
5 
9 
6 
in 
n 

is 

IS 

:i 

7 

in 

G 

17 

17 

II 

12 

7 

k 

IS 

(1 

H 

VI 

7 

7 

7 

n 

4 

II 
6 

17 
II 
7 
4 
6 

1H 

7 
8 
■Jil 
12 



RECORD OF ( IIAMl'H (NSHIP GAMES. 



89 



record of CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued, 









| Ri 


NS 










SCORED. 




Where 




Winning 


'-r- 


.a 






Names of Contestants. 








1890. 


Plated. 




t'l.rit. 


1*3 ^ 
.3 


¥5 










Jul.'Jl Chicago, 


Chicago vs. New York 


Chicago 


7 


■2 


it ->i Cincinnati. . 




Cincinnati. . 


2(1 


11 


» .>.>, " 




Brooklyn.. .. 


^|\ 


5 


u 22 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia ve. Pittsburgh.. 


Philadelphia. 


10 


8 


** •>•> Cleveland . . . 


Cleveland vs. Boston. 


Boston.. .. 


8 


2 


u 22 Chicago 


Co cago vs. New \ork 


Chicago 


14 


7 


•« 23 " 




** 


13 


12 


4; 23 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia va. Pittsburgh.. 


Philadelphia. 


17 


Ii 


" 23 Cleveland.. . . 






« 





n 24 ' 'hicago 




Brooklyn 


8 


4 


n ->4 Cincinnati — 


Cincinnati vs. Now Y ork . . 


Cincinnati. .. 


7 


5 


tk 'j"» 




11 


in 


t 


»• •>-, ( ihioago 


Chicago vs. Brooklyn 




■i 


3 


u 2ft < leveland .. . 


Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia 


H 


5 


ii .,-, Pittsburgh. .. 






7 


:< 


« 2« " 


" 


Pittsburgh... 


4 


» 


'» ^(Cincinnati. .. 




Cincinnati 


1 


l 


" •»(; Chicago .... 




Brooklyn 


10 


4 




Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. .. 


Philadelphia 


s 


■> 


» -'s [ndianapolia . 


ik Brooklyn .... 


Cleveland.... 


8 


4 


» -'h Pittsburgh -. . 


Pittsburgh vs. New ^ ork 


New York 


4 


2 


« 28 Cincinnati. .. 


i Endnnatl vs. Boston 


Boston 


■) 


1 


** -js Chicago. 




Chicago. . . . . . 


12 


5 


» -j 1 .) 


l * 


*■ 


8 


i; 


» 29 Cincinnati. . . 


Cincinnati vs. Boston 


< 'inciininti.. .. 


It 


:i 


• • 29 [ndianapolia . 


Cleveland vs. Brooklyn 


Brooklyn 


12 


3 


•• 80 " 




11 


IS 


5 


n 80 Pittsburgh. .. 


Pittsb rgh rs. New \ ork. . . . 


New ^ ork . . 


14 


5 


" 30 Chicago. . . . 


Chicago vs. Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


9 


8 


'• :; i Cincinnati ... 


Cincinnati vs Boston 




3 





H :;l 


Philadelphia... 


Cincinnati 


8 


8 


m 21 Chicago.. 




Ci loago .. 


4 


1 


» :([ [ndianapolia . 


Cleveland \> New York. 


Cleveland 


6 


S 


An-. 1 " 

1 Brooklyn .... 




New ^ork 


8 


•» 




Brooklyn .... 


7 


3 


" l| " 




" 


21) 


1 








8 


3 


n 1 Cincinnati.... 


Cincinnati to. Philadelphia.. 


Philadelphia 


5 


1 


it ■> ** 


u 


Cincinnati.. . 


11 


3 


i« 2 Indianapolis.. 




Cleveland 


I) 


'i 


*| 2 Chicago 

^ 2 Brooklyn 






s 






Brooklyn .... 


'.) 


'J 


"4 *" 




k * 


16 







Cleveland vs. New York. 


Tie 


2 

4 


•> 


■l Chicago. • ■■ 




3 


** 4 Cincinnati — 


Cincinnati to. Philadelphia. , . 


Cincinnati 


7 


5 


" s Cleveland 






10 





M 6 u 


u >• 


i lleveland 


8 


1 


» 6 


tt II 


* ihioago. . 


7 


1 


■• 6 Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia to. New ^ ork . . 


New York 


9 


■> 


" 6 Brooklyn ... 




Brooklyn 


(> 


:> 



90 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



record OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 



Date. 
1890. 



I'l.AVKli. 



Aug. C Cincinnati . .. 

7 

7 Philadelphia 

7 Cleveland 

7 Brooklyn 

B Cincinnati . .. 

s Cleveland.. .. 

9 

u Pittsburgh. 

9 Philadelphia. 

:> New York.. .. 
11 

11 Boston 

1 1 Cleveland..., 

11 Pittsburgh. .. 
12 

12 Cleveland.. .. 

12 New York.. .. 

i ■ Bo "a 

IS " 

13 N'-w York.. .. 
13 Cincinnati.. . . 
IS Cleveland.. .. 
11 
n Cincinnati ... 

1 1 Boston 

11 New York.. .. 
1". 

15 Boston 

15 Cincinnati. .. 
15 Cleveland. . .. 

Lnnatl . .. 

10 Boston 

15 Chicago 

15 Brooklyn 

IK •' 

Ik Cincinnati. ., 

18 Boston 

1- Chicago 

l» 
U 

19 1'- Oiii. . . . 
SO 

SO Brooklyn .[.. 
20 
SI 

•-'1 New York. . 
•-'i Philadelphia. 

21 Boston 

22 New York 



Namks of Coktzstanto 



Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh. 



WnrarjrQ 

' I.I !:-. 



Cincinnati 



Philadelphia vs. New York... Philadelphia 

Cleveland vs. Chicago Cleveland.. 

Brooklyn vs. Boston. Brooklyn .. 

Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh Cincinnati . 

Cleveland vs. Chicago... Chicago.. .. 

" Cincinnati Clevelauil. . 

Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Chicago.. .. 

Philadelphia vs. Boston Boston 

New York vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn .. 

" New York.. 

Boston vs. Philadelphia Bosi 

Cleveland vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati. 

Pittsburgh rs, Chicago Pittsburgh. 

11 " Chics - 

Cleveland vs. Cincinnati. Cincinnati . 

New York v*. Brooklyn New York.. 

Boeton vs. Philadelphia ..... Boston 

" Brooklyn Brooklyn.. 

New York vs. Philadelphia... Philadelphia 

Cincinnati vs. Chicago Chicago.. 

Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh Clt ■ * Lai d 



Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cincinnati . 

Boston vs. Brooklyn Boston 

New York vs. Philadelphia. . New York.. 

Boston vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn .. 

Cincinnati vs. Chicago Chicago. . .. 

Cleveland vs. Pittaburgl Cleveland. . 

Cincinnati vs. Cleveland Cinci n nati . 

Boston vs. New Tork Boston 

Chicago vs. Pittsburgh Chicago 

Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia.... Phlladelphl 
'• " Brooklyn . . 

Cincinnati vs. Cleveland Cincinnati . 

Boston vs. New York Boston 

Chicago va. Pittsburgh Chicago.. . 



Boston Vs. Nee- York. 



. . Bo-ton 

New York.. 

Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia. .. Brooklyn.. 

Chicago .... •' '.'. 

New York vs. Cincinnati . ... Clncln: 
Philadelphia va. Pittsburgh . Philadelphia 
Boston ind . Boston.. . 

Cleveland. . 

New York vf. Cincinnati (Jew York.. 



Buss 

BOOBl D. 



18 

2!) 
» 
16 

14 
9 

7 
5 

fi 
9 

:. 

:i 
n 
■j 
6 
18 
2 
3 
1 
7 
6 
8 

'.'it 
11 

2 

8 
:i 
8 
9 
15 
1" 
H 
1* 
1» 
8 
11 
IS 
!i 

18 

4 

i; 

i -i 

4 

5 

7 
« 
8 

4 



:s 
17 
4 
4 
5 
8 

II 

4 
4 

II 
n 


4 
7 
4 
12 

1 


II 
II 

:j 
4 
9 
8 
1 
1 
.-> 
i 
4 
2 
n 

8 
5 
8 
3 
:i 
5 
;l 
4 
3 
8 
5 



:t 

4 

11 

<; 

8 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



01 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP CAMES — Conlinutd. 



DATS. WmiliE 

1890. Plated. 



Amr22 Philadelphia 
'.."...J Brooklyn ... 

" -a 

• • 23 New York. . . 
.- -j:j Philadelphia 
u 25 

ii 2S New Vork. . . 

.. 2S Boston 

» 'j."> Brooklyn .. . 

■• 28 

.. jc, Philadelphia 

ii 26 New Vork. . . 

• • jr. Boston 

" 27 

•• n 

o 27 Brooklyn .. . 

.. 21 New York.. . 

•> 27 Philadelphia 

i, 28 

■• jm Boston 

i. 28 New York.. 

.- 28 Brooklyn . .. 

•• 29 

•• 29 Philadelphia 

ii 29 Boston. .. 

-. 29 New Y'.ik 

" '■'■" M 

•• 80 

■■ 80 Philadelphia 

II ;;n Boston 

" ;io Brooklyn . . 

Bept.l 

■• 1 

•• 1 

" 1 New York.. 

•' 1 

•' l Philadelphia 

.. , 

■' l Boston 

■' 1 

• j 

•' J New York.. 

•• 2 Philadelphia 
■j Brooklyn .. 



Names ok Contestants. 



Ki s, 

H. OK! I.. 

Winking tt ^ i ~, 



('HII. 



as 

5 



Philadelphia va. Pittsburgh .. Philadelphia 
Brooklyn vs. Chioago Chicago 

" ** .... Brooklyn . . . 

New York vs. Cincinnati New Tort. . 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh.. Philadelphia 

« Cleveland. . ■ " 

New Y'ork va, Chlcag Chicago 

Boston ts. Pittsburgh Boston 

Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati. ..... Cincinnati.. 

" •• Brooklyn . . 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland, . . Philadelphia 

New York vs. Chicago Chicago 

Boston vs. Pittsburgh Boston 



Brooklyn va. Cincinnati Cincinnati 

New.x'orkvs. Chicago Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Cleveland. .. Philadelphia 
'■ Chicago Chicago 

IJ iton vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati . 

New York vs. Pittsburgh New Y'ork... 

i: oklyn vs. Cleveland. .. Brooklyn... 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago Chicago.. . 

Boston vs. Cincinnati Boston. . . . 

NewYork vs. Pittsburgh, .. NewYork.. 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago,. . . Chicago. 

I;. .stun \-. ( 'iit'-innati 

Brooklyn vs. Cleveland . 
•• ' Pittsburgh. 



Now York vs. Cleveland 

u ii 

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati . 
Boston vs. Chicago 



Cincinnati . . 
Brooklyn. . . 



:t Philadelphia 

:; 

4 Pittsburgh.. 

I Brooklyn 

4 Philadelphia 

ilCalcago. . 



New Y..rk vs. Cleveland 

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati. 
Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh... . 

ID ' . . 

Pblladelphl t %-. New York. 



New York... 

Philadelphia 
Cincinnati . . 
Cbioago 



Boston 

New York. . . 
Pblladelphl 

Brooklyn . . 



New York. . . 

Philadelphia 
. . . Pittsburgh. . 

Brooklyn VS. New York Brooklyn . . . 

Philadelphia vs. Boston.. . Boston 

Chicago va. Cincinnati Chicago 



12 
1 
4 

1 

7 
:. 

t; 
l.-) 

4 
■■< 

I 

Ii. 

1G 

11 
X 
5 
4 

Bl 
7 
II 

t; 
1» 

i; 
'.' 
1 

5 

7 

in 

t; 

■2 

i" 
:i 
8 

4 
.-. 

X 
4 

17. 
I 
4 

II 
5 

I ■ 
B 
'J 
« 
7 
7 
7 



9:i 



RKCORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 



Datk 

1890. 



WlIKItK 

Played. 



Se 



ipt 



SJChlcago 

5 'Brooklyn . . . 

6| " 

t Philadelphia. 

''. ( 'lncago 

8| " 

8|Xew York.. .. 
k Philailelphia. 
9| " . 

9 Chicago 

1' New York 
9 ' Incinnatl . .. 
10 Philadelphia. 

10 Chicago 

L0 New Fork., .. 
] l Boston, , 

11 Chicago 
11 

11 Cincinnati 
11 
L2 
13 
12 
12 

12 Boston 

13 « .... 
KJ Chicago. . 
13 j " ... 
l:i i 'iiifinnali 
I:; Hew York. 

15 .Ohicago . 

16 Cleveland. 
lfi 
1« Chicago.. 

16 Boston.. .. 

17 Chicago . . 

17 Cleveland. 

17 

is Canton. . . . 
is Chicago . . 

18 " " . 

19 " 

19 Cincinnati 

19 Pittsburgh 

20 " 

30 Cleveland. 

20 " 

20 Chicago.. . 

20 Cincinnati. 

22 " 

22 Chicago ..'. 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Chicago VB. Cincinnati.. 
Brooklyn vs. New York. 



Pliladelphia vs. Boston.... 

[Chicago vs. Cincinnati 

" Pittsburg 

New York vs. Boston 

Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn, 



Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

New York vs. Boston 

Cincinnati vs. Cleveland.., 
Philadelphia v*. Brooklyn. . 
Chicago vs. Pittsburg 

New fork vs. Boston 

Boston vs. Philadelphia.. .. 
Chicago vs. Cleveland 



Cincinnati va Pittsburg. 



Chicago Chicago vs. Cleveland.. • 

" I ** " ... 

. Boston vs. Philadelphia. 

. Chicago vs. Cleveland. ■ . 



. Cincinnati vs. Pittsburg. 
. New York vs. Brooklyn 

Chicago v-. Cincinnati, . . 

Cleveland vs. Pittsburg.. 

.Chicago vs. Cincinnati 
. Boston vs. Brooklyn.! . 
. Chicago vs. Cincinnati.. 
. Cleveland vs, Pittsburg 



Winning 
Club. 



Chicago . . . 
Now York . 



Boston .. 
Chicago . 



Tie 
Philadelphia. 



Chicago 

New York... 
Cleveland. .. 
Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Boston 



Chicago 

Cincinnati . . 



Chicago. 



Philadelphia. 



Chicago.. .. 
Cleveland. 

Pittsburg. .. 
Brooklyn , 
Chicago.. .. 
Cleveland . . 



ItUNH 

Scored. 



6»S 

SO 



Chicago.; . 
Brooklyn.. 
Tie. 

Cleveland. 



Chicago vs. Cincinnati. 



11 Brooklyn 

Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia, 
Pittsburg v-. N.-w York... . 



Cleveland vs. Boston. 



Chicago vs. Brooklyn.. ... 
Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs. Brooklyn 



I hicago 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Cincinnati . . 

Tie 

New York.. .. 

Hid. .. . 

Brooklyn .. .. 
Cincinnati .. . 
Philailelphia. 
Chicago 



12' 
9 
6 

6 
1 

7 

12 

2 i 
8 
9 
8 

8 

I 

7 
2 
4 
7 
11 
17 
11 
12 
8 
11 
8 
8 
8 
6 
8 
4 
5 
12 

(i 
17 

« 
11 

H 
10 
10 

7 

I 

4 

•J 
'J 



8 
1 
1 
5 

3 
6 
3 
6 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
5 
1 

6 

1 
3 
1 
2 
4 
8 
5 
6 
4 
G 
4 
:l 
:i 
3 
2 
4 

i; 

4 

1.1 
4 
S 
5 

4 

7 
:. 
1 



1 

5 
1 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



93 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continue,!. 



Date. 
1890. 



Where 
Plated. 



1>2-j Cleveland.. 
25 Wheeling .. 
28 Pittsburgh. 
28 

Cincinnati. 
I>l;tr..it. . 



NAMES or CONTESTANTS. 



WlNNINO 

Club. 



23 

28 

24 Cleveland. , 

24 

24 

24 

29 

•J.". 

26 

27 



Cincinnati. 
Chicago. . . . 
Pittsburgh . 

Cleveland.. 
Chlcag 



Oleveland.. 

Cincinnati. 



29 Chicago.... 
29 Cleveland . . 

29 Pittsburgh. 

30 " 
80 Cincinnati . 

.;o Chlcag 

::n Oleveland .. 

Oct. 1 Cincinnati.. 
2 
■i Chicago. 



Cleveland, . 

Ilronklyn .. 



Cleveland vs. Boston Cleveland.. 

Pittsburgh vs. .New York New York. 



Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia . . [Cincinnati . . 
Cleveland vs. Boston... Cleveland. . . 

" vs. New York NcwYork... 

Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn lironklyn ... 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh vs. Boston Pittsburgh. 

" Boston 

Cleveland vs. New Tort BTewYork... 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Boston Ohlotgo 

Cleveland vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn .. 

Cincinnati vs. New York. . New York.. 

l * *■ Cincinnati . 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago... 

Cleveland vs. Brooklyn .Brooklyn. .. 

Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia.. Philadelphia 

'• '• ..Pittsburgh. 

Cincinnati vs. New York Cincinnati. 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago..., 

Cleveland vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn.. 

Cincinnati vs. Boston Cincinnati. 

" " Boston. ... 

Chicago VS. New York Chicago 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. .. Tie 
Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh . . 



:s Chicago.... 
:t Cleveland.. 

:: Cincinnati. 
4 Cleveland . . 
4| 



Chicago vs. New York 

('leve'.aud vs. Philadelphia. 

( inrinnal i vs. Boston .... 

Cleveland vs. Philadelphia. 



Brooklyn , 



Chicago.. 
Philadelphia 

( 'inrinnati. 
Cleveland., 



Kr\s 

Sooxnts, 



8 
4 
5 
6 
5 

;i 
r> 

4 

4 
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6 

7 

1.-. 

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6 
6 
10 

a 

6 

4 
S 

7 
7 
■1 
'.' 
in 
;: 
5 
* 
5 
7 



o 
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4 

3 
5 


1 
1 
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SPHLDING'S CATCHER'S Mhsks. 

Patented. 

^Jr^n^-^feg. He ware of counterfeits. None genuine with* 

ft j\ VVp* 0^ '■'"' trade mark stanif-cd <>>: rath mask* 





No. 3-0 Mask. 



No. 2-0 Mask. 



No. 30. Spaldwc's New Patented Neck-Protecting Mask. This 
mask has a peculiar shaped extension at the bottom which affords 
•the same protection to the neck as the mask does to the face. It 
does not interfere in the slightest degree with the free movement 
of the head, and is the only mask mad- which affords perfect pro- 
tection to the catcher. The entire mask is constructed of the best 
hardened wire, extra heavy padded with goat hair, and the pad- 
ding faced with the best imported dogskin, which is impervious 
to perspiration, and always soft and pliable, each $4 00 

No. 20. Spalding's Si e< i.w. League Mask, used by all leading pro- 
fessorial catchers, extra heavy wire, well padded with goat hair, 
and the padding faced with the best imported dogskin, which is 
impervious to perspiration, and retains its pliability and softness.. 3 60 

No. l-o. Spalding's Regulation League Mask, made of heavy wire, 
well padded and faced with horsehide, warranted first-CUSS in 
every respect 3 OO 

No. 1. Spalding's Boys* League Mask made of heavy wire, equally 

as heavy in proportion to size as the No. 2-0 mask. It is made to 
fit a boy's face, and gives the same protection as the League Mask 2 60 
To meet the demand for good masks at a low price, we have manufactured 

a line of amateur masks, which is superior to any mask :n the market at the 

same price. 

No. A. Amateur Mask, made the same size and general style as the 
League Mask, but with lighter wire, and faced with leather. (We 
guarantee this mask to be superior to so-called League or profess- 
ional masks sold by other manufacturers) ... $1 76 

No. B. Boys' Amatf.vk Mask, similar to No, A Mask, only made 

smaller to fit z, boy's face .... 1 60 

Any of the above masks mailed post-paid on receipt of price. 



cHioAOA A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK. 



. 



^a