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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league and American association of professional base ball clubs"

YOUK 

■ 



1 90 1 
CONSTITUTION 



AND 



Playing Rules 



OF TIIK 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



AND 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



OF 



Proi i ssional Base Ball Club^: 



Oil H.I Al. riT.UCATION 



ill 



! by 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

iRK, ''HI- 



CONSTITUTION 

THE 

National League and American Association 

OF 

Professional Base Ball Clubs 
1901 

NAME. 

Section i. (i) This Association shall be called the 
National League and American Association of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs. 

OBJECTS. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League are: 

i i > To perpetuate base ball as the National game of the 
United States, and to surround it with such safeguards as 
to warrant absolute public confidence in its integrity and 
method 

I To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro- 
fessional base hall clubs and professional base ball players, 
and 

(3) To establish and regulate the professional base ball 

championship of the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

.'•"EC. 3. This League shall consist of twelve clubs (the 
membership of which shall not he increased or diminished 
(or a period of ten years) located in the following named 
. to wit: Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia. 
Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburg, Cincinnati. St. Louis, 
Louisville, Cleveland and Chicago; or such other clubs as 
may, from time to time, be elected to membership, as may 
be hereinafter provided for; but in no event shall there he 
more than one club in any city. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM MEMBERSHIP. 

Ski. 4. Any club member of this League finding itself 
Unable tn meet the obligations it has assumed, shall have 
the righ' to ask the League for permission to dispose of its 



CONSTITUTION. 



rights and franchises, ns a member of the League, to some 
other city or organization. In the event of this League 
giving its consent to the acceptance of such city or organi- 
zation to membership, providing said club shall assume, to- 
gether with the rights and franchises of said retiring club, 
all the liabilities, responsibilities and obligations entered 
into by said retiring club, as a member of this League. 
Provided, also, and it must be so understood by the retir- 
ing and the new member, that the retiring club shall not 
be relieved or released from any contracts, responsibilities 
or obligations, entered into by it to this League, until all 
of said contracts, responsibilities and obligations have been 
fully paid and determined by the club accepting its mem- 
bership, rights, fram i 

ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP. 

Sec. 5. N'o club shall be admitted to membership unless 
it shall first have delivered to the Secretary of the League 
a written application signed by its President and Secretary, 
and accompanied by documents showing that such club 
bears the name of the city in which it is located, and that 
it is regularly organized and officered, and, where the State 
law permits it, chartered. Such application shall at 
be transmitted by the Secretary to the Board of 
who shall immediately investigate and report upon said ap 
plication, said report to be communicated to the League 
through the Secretary. 

Sec. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 
election. 

IN' REGARD TO V.v INCTES. 

Sec. 7. In case a vacancy occurs in the membership of 
this organization during the championship season, the 1 
dent shall nominate to all the clubs all applicants for mem 
bership; and the vote thereon may be taken by telegraph 
or mail, as occasion may require, and a majority of all the 
clubs will be required to admit any applicant to member- 
ship. Such membership shall continue only until 
the next annual meeting, but such club shall be SUbji 
all the rules and require! this organization. 
TERMINATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 
Sec. 8. The membership of any club may be terminated— 
(1) By resignation duly accepted by a three-fourths vote 
of all clubs in meeting duly convened, as provided in Sec- 
tion 4. 



CON 



(2) By failure to present its nine at the time and place 
agreed upon to play any championship game, unless caused 
by unavoidable accident in traveling. 

(3) By allowing open betting or pool selling upon its 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied bj 

1 1 I By playing any game of ball with a club th 

'in- ineligible under tins ( bnstitul in. 

(S ' Bj , : attempting to 

lose any game of ball; or failing to immediately 

player who shall I 

conspiring or attempting to lose any game of half, or of 
pool nr wager thereon. 

(6) By disbandment of its organization or club team 
during the championship 

(7) By failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obliga- 
tions. 

By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quiremenl <.f tin- Board of Directors. 

(9) By wilfully violating any provision of this Constitu- 
tion, or the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of tin- provisions of the National 

Agreement. 

TH! 

Sec. q. To carry into effeel the provisii 1 lion 8 of 

this Constitution, the facts in any 

tion must be reportei ague, who 

shall at once notify, by mail or telegraph, the party charged 

with the specific ll or offense and inquire whether 

any disputi I. In case the 

are disputed, the Board shall, after due notice, try th. 
under such regulations as they i! ribe; and their 

finding shall he final and conclusive on all pa ept in 

inch finding shall he forwarded t" 
each club, which shall transmit t" tli 

icpulsion" 
all clubs rote "For Expulsion ' the Secretary shall notify 
all clubs of the forfeitl p of the 1 

charg 

Sic, 10. (1) Each club shall pay to the Secretary, on or 
day of April <,f each year, th 
as annual dues: and such other sums as from time to 
may I ! for the paymi and 

umpires, and fi incurred 

by order of thi f Directors. Also 



fi i ION. 

all fines and penaltic d by said League or its Board 

of Directors upon a club or upon any club officer, player. 
manager, r employe when so levied and im- 

posed by virtue of, and in accordance with, the provisions 
of this Constitution and the playing rules of this League. 

i_-) Upon conviction i f any of the offenses prescribed in 
Section 8, as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 
may. in the first instance, as a preliminary to. or in lieu o! 
expulsion, impose such a line as is in their judgment com 
niensurate with the injury: which tine may include a pen- 
alty payable to any other club or clubs, as an equivalent 
for damages sustained for such violation of this Constitu- 
tion, or of the legislation or contracts made in pursuance 
then 

ERS. 

SEC ii. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a 
President-Secretary Treasurer and Hoard of Directors. 

The President shall I liairnian of the Board of 

Direct shall report to the Board of Directors any 

violation of tl nstitution that may 

to hi- knowledge, tie shall he the sole interpreter 
of /lie playing rules during die championship season. He 
shall preside at all the meetings of the League, and at the 
annual meeting of the Leaj i schedule com- 

mittee, unless -aid meeting shall otherwise direct. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, 
resignation, or removal, the Board is shall, within 

thirty day- thereafter, elect a President. 

■ TIES. 

Sic. t2. The Secretary shall he the Treasurer of the 
League, and as such shall he the custodian of all funds of 
the League; receive all dues, fees and assessments: make 
such paymi dered by the Board or by the 

vote of the League, and render annually a report of his ac- 
counts; and he shall give such bond, with approved sure- 
• d may require. 

Sec. i.i. The Seen have tin- custody .and cat 

the official of the League; shall keep a 

true record of all meetings of the League and the Board: 

shall issue all official notices, and attend to the necessary 

correspondence; he shall also prepare and furnish such re- 
ports as may lie called for by the Board, and shall be en- 
titled to such hook-, stationery, blank- and materials as the 
actual duties of his office may require. 






7 



Sec. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infrac- 
tions of the rules and regulations of the League that may 
come under his notice, and shall make a report on the same 
to the Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 15. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board, bj vote, shall determine, and shall he reimbursed 
for all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the 
service of the League: and tin 1 Board may exact from him 
such guarantees for the faithful performance of his duties 
as they would deem for the interest and safely of the 
League. At the expiration of his term of office he shall ac- 
count for. and deliver up to the Board, all the property and 
papers which may have come into his hands by virtue of 
his office. 

Sec. l6. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
President and four other members, to l>e chosen at the an- 
nual meeting by ballot, two of whom shall represent the 
Eastern clubs and three the Western clubs. 

SEC 17. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Di- 
rector, the club of which be was a member, at the time la- 
was chosen, shall ' : his successor, and at once 
notify the Secretary. Ton 11 tncy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding. - lification of a club repre- 
sented on the Board, the Board may fill the vacancy by 
election in the same manner as provided for the election of 
Directors in Section [2. 

QUALIFICATIONS of DIRECTORS. 

Sec. 18. Xo person shall be qualified to act as Director 

who is not an actual member of the club he represents ; nor 
shall any club, under any circum-i represented by 

more than one person on the Board of Directors, m r shall 
any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his club is 
interested. 

Sec. 19. The I ill meet annually on the morning of 

the second Tuesday in December, at l> o'clock noon, at the 

place where the annual meeting of the League is to be- held, 
but may hold special meetings whenever urgent necessity 
may require. 

Sec jo. The Board --hall nrepan of all 

their doings, and present the same in writing to the I.< 
at its annual meeting; winch report shall, if accept. 
filed with the Secretary; together with all official pa] 
documents and property, which may have come into their 
sion by virtue of their office. 



I ION. 



Sec. 2r. The B general supervision and 

management of all tlie affairs and business of the League, 
including the award of the championship and such other 
duties expressedly or impliedly conferred upon them by 
this Constitution, or !>. ion made in pursu 

thereof. It shall be the sole and exclusive tribunal for tin- 
trial of managers or players for any violation of this_ Con- 
stitute ie pitying rules or other rules of discipline, 
unlcs 1K . |, v a three-fourths vote of its club mem 

P. shall otherwise direct. It shall be tl M ex- 

clusive tribunal to hear and determine disputes between 
clubs; complaints by a club against the manager or player 

of another club, or by a manager or player against his own 
club, or an appeal by a player against fine, n 01 

expulsion by his own club, and generally for the adjudica- 
tion of a!' ■ law or fact arising out of this Con- 
stitution ; the Haying Ru ither legislation made in 
pursuance thereof. 

22. The Hoard shall adopt such regulations, and 
such : lure for the hearing and determination 

of all di omplaints brought before them, 

re such dispute i-, j- .mic alleged to have 

tion of thi I the Play- 

ing 1: Jaint and accompanying p 

;:i the 

dent of the Board, who shall py of the same 

to the other clubs, with orders to tile its answer within five 

rd shall in the 
and forthwith 
communicate hi ith clubs, either of which may 

within five da\ the full B 

Said her with all other documents and pi 

shall then , mail vote to the differ 

I shall 
\l. and under no eircui 

"i- inquired into 

plaint 
prefi 

club (prior to the • 

titn 

ball ; and shall hai which 

him. and 
■pel him. I'i 



CONS1 1 1 1 1 ION. 



that such complaint be preferred in writing, giving such 

may enable the Board ti 

ii particulars transmitted to the 

Secretary, by whom it shall at once be i o the 

rd. 

. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 

club. nplaint in 

writing to aiv of the League club, 

ing that such club 1 ' him for salarj 

more I uch salary became due 01 

count of such contract, tl ry shall at once trai 

gaid clul ch complaint, and require an 

answer t In : . to, I ':■ "r if five 
shall have without tl ■ the 
tary shall 1 Board 1 f 
Directors, and shouli rd find the player's 
sustained, they shall require thi nder penalty of for- 
feiture of its membership, to pay to tl 
the full a- im. Provided thai 
should the player n ' lub pend 
by ti, ! thereby forfeit the 

award, and in Board shall re- 

iis award. 

itly hear an appeal made 

by any person who shall ha\ 

disciplined by his club. thirty 

after the date of 1 ' dis- 

cipline, file with th ' Ws 

defCi t that an appeal b 

quest for an a;' 

of the ap] 

club, by it- duly au 

hint i ir by win 

timony, The B 
shall impartially hear th< their dei 

which shall be final ' : ""' 

playi 

luthoriry 

a club, a " r :i 

r. if warn 

.md hearings on one 

:nalty 

te of 

and heard at an annual 

ting. 



IO 



CONSTHUTIoN. 



INDIVIDUAL CLUB CONTROL. 
SEC. 27. Each club shall have the right to regulate its 
own affairs; to h its own rules, and to discipline, 

punish, suspend or expel its own manager, players or other 
employes, and these powers shall not be limited to ca 
dishonest play or open insubordination: but shall include 
all questions of carelessness, indifference or other conduct 
of the player that may be regarded by the club as preju- 
dicial to its interests, and not in conflict with any pro- 
vision of this Constitution; or the Playing Rules of this 
League. 

PUNISHMENT OF SCANDALOUS CONDUCT. 

Sec. 28. The President of the League shall have power, 
upon proper proof, to suspend for a definite period and to 

impose a fine not exceeding $200 upon any League man- 
ager or player guilty, in public, of gross misbehavior, in- 
cluding intoxication, fighting, quarreling, indecency, or 
other scandalous conduct, whether on or off the playing 
field, during the season, where the same is. in his opinion, 
calculated to bring disrepute upon the National League or 
National Game. Such fine can only be remitted by the 
Board of Directors after a hearing upon appeal duly prose- 
cuted. 

CLUB TERRITORIAL RIGHTS. 

Sec. 29. Every club of this League shall have exclusive 
control of the city in which it is located, and of the terri- 
tory surrounding such city, to the extent of five mile,s in 
every direction from its corporate limits; and no visiting 
League club shall, under any circumstances, be allow 
play any club in such territory other than the League club 
therein located, without the consent of the local League 
club. 

ON RESERVATION OF PLAYERS, 

Sec. 30. Each club a member of this League shall be en- 
titled to the right of reservation. On or before the 30th 
day of September in each year each club shall transmit to 
the Secretary a reserve list of the players, not exceeding 
eighteen, whose services it desires to retain for the ensuing 
season, and who are then under contract to the said club 
for the current or for any succeeding season or seasons; 
and in addition thereto the names of such players reserved 
in any prior annual list who have refused to contract with 
said club. Such pla 'ether with all others there- 

after to be regularly contracted with, namely; players who 



CONSTITUTION. II 

have been secured by purchase or draft under the National 
Agreement for future services shall be ineligible to contract 
with any other club in this League except as hereinafter 
provided. No club shall have the right to reserve any 
player when in arrears of salary to liim. The Secretary 
shall promulgate such li I 

NEGOTIATING FOR RK.RVIi i . 

Sec. 31. No player, without the consent of the club with 

which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter into 
negotiations with any oilier club for future services. 

CONTRACTS. 

Sec. 32. Contracts made between a club and its players 
may be either by telegram or writing, to be followed within 
thirty days thereafter bj a contract in the form approved 
and promulgated by the Secretary to all the clubs of the 
League. 

Sec. 33. The League shall adopt such form of contract as 
it may deem best for the protection of the rights of the 
parties thereto. All contract! BHIS1 1"' approved by the 
Secretary, and duly promulgated by him. The tin days' 
release, provided for in the seventeenth paragraph of the 
League form of contract, shall begin to run from the time 
of notice thereof received by the Secretary of the League, 
who shall, at once, promulgate the same to nil club mem- 
expiration n ''.ays the player, so re- 

leased, shall be eligible t" contrai 1 with the releasing club, 
or any other club member. 

SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION OF ft. AVERS. 

Sec. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or reser- 
vation by, a 1/ who shall, without the consent of 
club, enter the of any other club in any ca- 

,. shall !»• liable 10 expulsion by said League club. 

■ a club n 

• <■ linn ten days' notice of release in accordance 
with the terms of his contract, or suspends 01 

r player, that club shall at '.nee notify the Secre- 
tary of this 1 the date 
when the same taki pension or 
expui 1 ause thereof 

Sf.o. 35. N'o manager or player, who has been suspended 

I from a 1 lb, shall at any time thereafter 

be allowed to play with, or >ervc in any capacity, any 



12 



rioN. 



League club (cither the one expelling him. or any other) 
unless the term of n by the club has expired, or, 

upon his appeal uch expulsion or suspen- 

se. 

INDMENT. 

Sec. 36. The 1 ent of a League club, or its with- 

drawal from or los 

from contract and re 
with said club, but the ri ontract with and re 

said players shall be subject to transfer to such other club 
as the League may designate a ptance of their said 

services. 

PLAYING WITH OUTSIDE CLUBS. 

Sec. 37. No game of base ball shall be played between a 
League club and any other club that has been expelled I 
membership in ague. No game of ball shall be 

played bel ague club and any other club employing 

or presenting it lied, nr under sus- 

pension from the League, or otherwise rendered ineligible 
by this League or a club member thi 

" AM) lis PENALTIES. 

Sec. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offer- 
ing, agreeing, conspiring any game 
it otherwise than mi its merits under the 
Playing Ri lalified by the Presi- 
dent i/f th, - umpire, manager, playei 
or in any 1 acity in an ball participated in 
by a League club, unless such disqualification shall be re- 
moved by a three- fourths vote of the League. 

UMPIRES. 

Se« Umpires shall be sell 

by ti:> pening of the r 

I. Each appli th, under oath, the age, 
residence, . experieno other qualifica- 

may be prescribed on forms pre 
pared by the Secretary, 1 :ll known gentlemen 

! with the applicant. 
Ind er. the Secre- 

tary shall make inquiries and post himself, as far as practi- 
cal)!, rits and qualifications of each appli 

II. They shall be paid and allowed 
expenses as may be mutually agreed ' 



CONSTITI I ION. 



13 



tween them and the Secretary of the League, subject to 
the approval of the Board of Directors of the League. 

But at least ten per cent of current salaries shall be 
withheld by the Secretary until the termination of bis con- 
tract for that season to secure such deductions For ab- 
sences and the payment of such fines as may be lawfully 
imposed. 

III. In the event of the failure of an Umpire to umpire 
a game assigned to him it shall be the duty of the Secretary 
to provide a substitute to umpire such game; and in such 
case there shall be deducted from the next annual payment 
to the Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game 
assigned to him, which for any reason he shall have failed 
to umpire. 

IV. It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as 
Umpire for any championship game such Umpire or sub- 
stitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game. In the 
event of the non appearance of the League Umpire or 
substitute at the hour appointed for the beginning of the 
game each Club Captain shall then select one of the sub- 
stitute player- of the opposing club, and the two players 
thus selected shall be the duly authorized Umpires for that 
game. 

V. It shall be the duty of Umpires to enforce the rules 
as they are written, regardless of personal opinion as to 
their merits, subject to the Secretary's instructions as to 
their proper interpretation. They shall familiarize them- 
selves with these sections of the Constitution; obey all 
orders of the Secretary, assigning their services and wear 
such uniform on the Playing Field as he may designate. 

SUPERVISOR OF UMPIRES. 

Sec. 40. A Su] of Umpires may be chosen by the 

League at an annual or special meeting to serve I"' 

unless sooner removed by the League or the Hoard 
of Directors for incompetency, malfeasance in office, or 
other just cause. His CO on shall be fixed by the 

League prior to his acceptance of tl 

I. He shall supervise and inspect the work and conduct 
of the Umpires and report frequently to the Secretary as 
to their efficiency and fidelity. 

II. All complaints against Umpires shall be referred to 
him for investigation. Complaints as to errors of judgment 
on questions of play will ordinarily require little consid- 
eration, but if repeatedly made and from various sources 



M 



CONSTITUTION. 



against the same Umpire so as to indicate incompetency, 
then the Superivisor shall proceed to collect all available 
evidence on the subject and verify it, if possible by his own 
personal observation, and report the facts and his views 
thereon, to the Secretary, who may suspend or remove 
such Umpire and substitute the next in order on the Wait- 
ing List. If a complaint be for error of interpretation of 
the Playing Rules the evidence shall be collected, the alleged 
offender furnished with a copy thereof, which with his 
statement in reply, together with the Supervisor's views 
thereon, shall be submitted to the Secretary for such action 
as he may deem fit and appropriate. 

If the complaint be for a wilful violation of this Consti- 
tution or of the Playing Rules, or for neglect or refusal to 
enforce any of said rules, or for any improper or ungentle- 
manly language or conduct while officiating as an Umpire, 
then, after g all the evidence by affidavits, or oth- 

e, he shall make a personal investigation of the truth 
of the complaint in the city where it originated, and else- 
where if necessary, giving both sides a hearing and report- 
ing his finding to the Secretary. 

If such finding sustain the complaint, the Secretary shall 
inflict a penalty of at least Fifty Dollars upon the offender, 
and may also suspend or remove him. as the aggravation of 
the offense justifies, and substitute in his place the next in 
order on the Waiting List. 

III. It shall be the duty of the Supervisor to include in 
his Reports all testimony affecting the language, conduct 
and behavior of players in viol; this Constitution and 

the legislation in pursuance thereof or of the Playing 
Rules, copies of which testimony shall be at once forwarded 
to such players and also referred to the proper tribunals 
for appropriate action thereon under existing Rules. 
PLAYING RULES. 

Sec 4t. This League shall h playing rules as it 

deems best for the conduct of its bu il 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec. 42. The championship of the United States, estab- 
lished by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the 
clubs composing the League. 

Sec. 4.3. The championship 11 extend from such 

date in April or May to such date in September or Oi tob< r 
as the League may determine at its stated or special meet- 
ing. 



CONSTITUTION. 



15 



Sec. 44. Every game played between two clubs from the 
commencement of the championship season to the comple- 
tion of the championship series between such clubs shall be 
a game for the championship, and no League club shall 
lend or exchange players to or with each other for any 
game played during the championship season. Any viola- 
tion of this section shall subject each offender to a fins 
of $100. 

Sec. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more champion- 
ship games with every other club; but a tie or draw game 
or a game prevented by rain or other causes shall be played 
off on the same ground on the next or a succeeding date of 
the same or subsequent series, whether open or scheduled 
for another game between the same clubs, thus compelling 
double games for said scheduled date. If, however, both 
series shall have terminated, such postponed game must be 
played off on the ground of the other club on a date open 
or scheduled during a subsequent series between the same 
clubs. 

SEC. 4'). Each club shall have half of the championship 
series of games with every other club played on its grounds, 
except as otherwise provided in Section 45: and in all the 

details of such games, that do not involve the rights of the 
visiting club under the playing rules, but relate solely to 
Such games as attractive exhibitions to the patrons 01 the 
home club, the visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the 

home club; provided, nevertheless, that the home club shall 

not be permitted to change the usual hour for the com- 

duled games in its particular city more 

than thirty (30) minutes without fust having obtained the 

1 nt of the visiting club thereto, under a penalty to the 

visiting club of $500. The visiting club shall furnish to a 
person designated by the home club the batting order 
nine by 10 o'clock on the morning of the daj of each game. 

or the evening previous, if requested. In case of the failure 

of any visiting club to furnish the batting order of its nine 
as herein stipulated, it shall forfeil the Sum ■'■Inch 

amount shall be immediately transmitted to the Secretary 
of the League, upon the receipl of notice from him 01 the 

inflicti uch fine, which notice shall be given by the 

Secretary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the man- 
ager and captain of the visiting club with a list of the bat- 
ting order before the commencement of the game under 



16 



CONSTITUTION. 



similar penalties for default as herein prescribed. The vis- 
iting club shall have the right to practise its nine on the 
grounds of the home club between i I and 12 o'clock A. M. 
on each day of its visit during the championship season. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP S( HEDULE. 

47. All championship fames shall be arranged in a 

written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, and 

reported to and adopted by thi League by a three-fourths 

vote before the beginning lampionship season. The 

schedule shall equal number of return 

! shall spei ify tl oi each same and the date 

of each series No date in said schedule shall 

subsequently be changed, except ( 1 ) by written agreement 

of two clubs from a date fixed by the schedule for a game 

between such clubs to an open date on the same ground-; 

or (2) as provided in S (3) by the written 

ut of threi [ue clubs. 

Any club or club- violating I »n shall be atnenabli 

to a penalty of $1,000, Said penalty to be paid within 

forty the Treasurer of the National League 

and American m, or if nol so paid to be withheld 

any fund 1 redit in the bands of the Treas 

urer. All gam of this section shall 

not count in the championship seri 

THi n'd RECEIPTS. 

Sec. 48. The general admission fee to all championship 
Rimes shall be rifts [its, but each club shall desig- 

1 part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, the 
admission fee to which shall be twenty-five (25) cents, and 
all di ball be made on th< 

fifty (.SOI cents, es he grounds tl, • 

admission fee to which is fixed at twenty-five (-'.si a 

and as to such part of mds all divisions of per- 

centage shall be on the basis of tv. 

At the conclusion hampionship game the honit 

club shail tin- manager of the visiting club (and 

shall transmit by mail to dint or other d 

d of the visitin K club a duplicate of the sami 
ment of the r< , which must includ 

fifty-cenl and twenty-five cent admissions, and shall 1 
the visiting club fifty per centum of said rec< i 

Sec. 49. Out of the funds of thi-- League now' in the hands 
of the Secretary he shall create a Sinking Fund not ti 
ceed ?i2.ooo, which hall be invested in Government bonds. 



C0NS1 n in ION. 



17 



All other funds shall be placed in the treasury to meet cur- 
rent expenses. 

THE TURNSTILE COUNT. 

Sec. 50. The number of persons admitted to the grounds 

shall he determined by the use of the necessary number of 

ell registering turnstiles, tin- arms of which shall extend 

within four inches of a dividing partition, the keys of which 
shall be delivered to the agent of the visiting club before 
the Opening of the grOUtl ch .name; and said agent 

iting club shall have full access to such turnstile. 
o:d the box of such turnstile shall not be removed until 
after the close of the seventh innings, and in case a car- 
riage gate is used a ticket for each person admitted through 
such gate shall tit once be delivered to the agent of the 
visiting club. No person shall be admitted free to the 
grounds during or prior 1 >r the hour appointed 

therefor, 1 ly players of contesting club,, police. 

men in uniform, the Umpires and isary employes 

of the home club, and representatives oi newspapers pub 
lished in some other city in which a League club is located; 
such representative bi identified by holding a ticket 
signed by the President of the League and countersigned 

by the Pn 'he city where tin- 

paper represented is published. The visiting club shall 
have the right to accept the turnstile count for each and 
all games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be re- 
quire. 1 to use for it- business substantial pasteboard tick- 
ets, which can be readily counted. 

[TRANCES. 
Sec 51. No dub shall be allowed to have more than four 
entrances to its grounds except Upon holiday-, hut tor all 
such days the visiting club shall be given at least ten day- 
notice of the whole number and location of additional cii- 
provided, however, emergency gate- may be 00 
•cut of the visiting club if occasion requires. 
STOPPING PLAY TO CATCH TRAINS. 

Sec 52. On any day when either club is required to leave 
a city to, or in ordei to '" "me, u , lu ',', c ,' t 

. play its next game, the home club shall be 

compelled upon proper notice by the visiting, club to Degin 

the game three hours and a half before the tune ol th 
part.tre of the last train by n* <" her c In be. n 

reach the next scheduled point m tune. And ether club 
may leave the field at any time w.th.n one hour of said 



.... 



train time without forfeiting any rights or privileges, pro- 
vided five innings 01 de have been played, and the 
Umpire shall he the sole judge of the time. 

GIVING OUT ADMISSION CHECKS. 

Sec. 53. In the event of a game being stopped by rain or 
declared forfeited before completion of five innings, the 
home club may issue admission checks good for the next 
succeeding game. If such checks arc so issued the visiting 
club shall not be entitled to it- percentage of receipts; but 
if such checks are not issued, the visiting club shall be en- 
titled to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the game 
had been fully played. 

FORFEITED GAMES. 

Sec. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games— to 
count in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to 
none— in case where the Umpire in any championship game 
shall award the game to such club on account of the 
tion by the contesting club of any section of this Con 
tion or of any Playing Rale. In the event of a forfeit tn 
any reason, the forfeiting club shall incur such penalty not 
exceeding one thousand dollars as may he imposed by the 
Board of Directors after a hearing held within one week from 
the date of such game, and any damages suffered by the non- 
offending club shall lie paid out of such penalty. In addition 
to the penalty above referred to, the captain or manager, or 
the person in charge of the offending team and responsible 
for the team leaving the field, shall incur a penalty 0/ one 
hundred dollars, which shall be paid within five days b 
Secretary of the League, said penalty not to be remitted 
under any circumstances. In case such penalties are not 
paid within ten days afler being imposed, the club and player 
cannot participate in a championship gas 
DRAWN GAMES 

Sec. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not count 
in the series as games Unit any game of not less than five 
innings shall be included in the averages), but must be 
played off. if possibl I in Section 45. If they 

cannot be played off. as therein provided, they may subse- 
quently be played off. if sufficient time exists before the 
close of the season 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such, or rendered compul- 
sory by the playing off oi imes, as provided in 
Section 45. 



i 1 I I I ION. 



I') 



WINNING THE PENNANT. 

Sec. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest per 
centagc of games in the championship series, shall I 1 

<l the champion club of the United Stales for the sea 
son in which such games were played, In the event thai 
two or more clubs shall have won the same percentage of 
games, then the Board shall at once arrange a special 
of three games between any I wo of such clubs, such games 
to be played at the close of 'he championship season, and 

the games so played shall be included in the championship 
record, and counti d m determining the award of the chain 
pionship. In such case only the provisions of this Con- 
stitution prohibiting the playing or recording as champion- 
ship games, games played after the expiration of the cham- 
pionship The emblem of the 
championship shall be a pennant 'of the National colors) 
to cos) not less than one hundred dollars ($ o shall 
be inscribed with the motto, ''Champion Base Ball Club "' 
the United States." with the name of the club and the year 
nch the title was won. and the champion club shall 1" 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing 
year. 

DECIDING Till-. CHAMPIONSHIP. 

SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the follow- 
ing manner : 

\\ ithin twenty-four bonis after every match game played 
for the championship, the home club shall prepare and for- 
ward to the Secretary of the League a statement containing 
the full score of the game, according to the system specified 

m the Playing Rules, together with the date, the p 

where played, the names of the clubs and Umpire, provided 
that DO tie or drawn game sh ed a game for 

any purpose except th\ ivided, further, 

thai in any case where the S. r t ,e 

1 championship game within five days after the 

playing of such gam luty il is to 

such Jl pay to ue the sum of $2 as the 
penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season > : tary shall prepare a 

tabulai nt of the games won and lost by each club, 

rding to the statenn tit him, which statement 

the matter, and submit the 

same, with the statement him, to the Board who 

award in writing and report the same t 

nual meeting. 



< n.Vsl IH l ION. 



In making the award the Board shall consider: 

( i ) The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

(2) Forfeited games. 

(.3) Games participated in by clubs which have with- 
drawn, disbanded, or forfeited their membership without 
completing their championship series with all other League 
clubs; such games shall be counted to the following extent: 
The Hoard shall ascertain the least number of championship 
games played by such club with any club remaining in the 
League, and shall from the first game participated in during 
the championship series by such retired club, count in the 
series of each League club a similar number of games, and 
all other games participated in by such retired club shall 
not be counted in the championship scries. Provided, that 
if such retired club shall have failed to play at least one 
championship game with every League club, all games par 
ticipated in by it shall be thrown out entirely. 

■ I \: S. 

Sec. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be held 
on the second Tuesday in December of each year, at 2 
o'clock p. m.. and at such places as shall have been deter- 
mined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

Sec. 59. Special meetings may be called by the President 
of this League on his own option or on the written call of 
six clubs. 

CLUB REPRESENTATION. 

Sec. 60. At such meeting each club shall be represented 
and shall be entitled to t entatives, and to have in 

addition thereto any of its officers or ex-officers present at 
such meeting: but no club shall be permitted to send as a 
representative any person under contract or engagement as 
a ball player or manager, and belonging to the nine of said 
club in such capacity. They shall, if requested by any other 
club representative, present a certificate of their appoint- 
ment duly attested by at least two officers of their club 
ing their authority to act, but no club shall have more 
than one vote. 

EXECUTIVE SESSION. 

Sec. 61. This League may. upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans- 
action hi" it- business, and during such session no club 
be entitled to more than two representatives. 

Sec. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 



CONSTITUTION. 21 

constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 

less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock 
mg the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of door- 
keepers and such other procedures usual in parliamentary 
bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

ORDER or BUSINESS. 

Sec. 63. The following shall be the order of business, 
i nless suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem 
bers : 

i. Reading Minuti il meeting. 

j. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Klection of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of Officers. 

8. .Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be al- 
tered or amended by a three-fourths vote "f the League at 
any annual meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other 
time. Provided, however, that this section and Sections 
i. X. 48 and 49 shall not be altered or amended except by a 
unanimous vote of this League. 

Any section of this Constitution may be suspended 
or its provision made non-applicable by Unanimous vote at 
a League meeting. 



NATIONAL AGREEMi-.NT. 

NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

Of Professional Base Bali Associations Adopted by the National 
Board of Arbitration February 24, 1 896. 

NAME, 

AxTXCXl I. ThU instrument shall he called " The National Agreement of 

Professional Base Ball Associations." 

OBJ] ■ 
Article 2. The objects of this Agreement are : 

1. To perpetuate base hall as the national game of America* and to «ur- 
round it with such safeguards as to warrant absolute public confidence in its 
integrity and methods. 

2. To promote and afford protection to such minor Professional Banc Ball 
Leagues and Associations as may desire to operate under its provisions. 

THE GOVERNING POWER. 

ARTICLES. The governing power under this Agreement, which shall be 
called "The National Beard of Arbitration," shall lie vested in six repre- 
sentatives selected by the National League and American Aaiociatl 
Professional Base Ball Clubs 'hereinafter designated the Major League), and 
such representatives from minor organizatii Feaaional Base Hall 

Clubs (hereinafter designated Minor Leagues) as may be admitted to mem- 
bership by the National Board of Arbitration from time to time under the 
rules governing membership. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

Article 4. The annual meelii 
the second Tuesday in December 01 each year, at which time the repi 
tatives elected by the major League shall elect a President, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Board. 

DUTIES AW1 HE N \ 1 ION it BOARD. 

Article 5.— 1. The general enforcement of this Agreement, the pr- 
of rights thereunder, the detero ill COntTOVei 

provided rnd generally the regulation of all things within the s< ope of thil 
Agreement ai rally conferred upon and committed to th« 

National Board of Arbitt 

2. The Board may adopt rulr. ttiel "f 

rid all of its members and officers, its Lire and the 

general transaction of it 

3. It shall be the duty "f the Board and it shall have full and final juris- 
dlrt'on : 

To bear and determine all disputes and complaint! bel 
and clubs; between one club and another. member* of thl 
different associations; between dubs and ^r*. and, in 

addition thereto, all disptl 
involving the interpretation 0! I 

the rights thereunder, and may hold special meetingi foi tl 
when required. The Board shall have power also to pass upon any 'i 



- 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

brought before it by a club member or members of any organization, where 
unjust discrimination has been made against any club ur clubs, and, if upon 
ft hearing, the Board finds that such charge or charges arc true, it shall have 
the power to impose such fines u it deems proper, or to forfeit 

and terminate the privileges of such organization under this agreement. 
POWER TO IMPOSE FINES. 

4. In the performance of its duties the Board shall have power to impose 
fines or penalties upon associations, clubs, chib officers, players, managers, 
scorers and umpires, and to suspend any such organization or person from 
the protection and privileges of the National Agreement in any instam c in 
which, in its opinion, it or he shall have been guilty of conduct detrimental 
to the general welfare of the game or in violation of the letter or spirit of the 

.; Agreement, DECISION FINAL 

5. Its decision shall he \ and all matters within its jurisdic- 
tion. KIINM \ 1 I MINIS. 

0. It may reinstate any person or body suspend 
ASSESSMENTS. 

7. It shall have power to make such reasonable assessments upon clubs or 
Eationa as maybe necessary to defray the expenses incidental to the 

performance of its dul ement of this Agreement. 

AND REGULATIONS. 

8. It may make all orders, rules and regulations for the performance of in 
duties and the exercise of iis power, and to accomplish the purpose '■ "- w, 
may amend and supplement the same from time to time; provided, notice 
of all changes, amendments or supplements be given to all organizations 
party to this agreement, 

IONS PROMULGA1 SD, 

9. It may cans-; its proceeding! or rulings, or any part thereof, in any case 
which may he deemed of Sufficient Importance to serve as a precedent, to be 
published in such a manner as may he prescribed. 

PKES1 NTATION "I CI UMS. 

10. Whenever any body or persons shall desire to submit any matter for 
the consideration of the board, i. «h I lied within thirty .1 

■ of the act, or of the maturity of the claim to the chairtn 
tatement thereol 1 by such evidence as may be in 

n of such statement ! ill be given to any other body or per- 

son interested in the matter to make answer and to present app opriateevi. 

dence in support thereof. If such answer is not received by tl 

wiihin fifteen days of said lament by default may be rendered. 

MINOR LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP. 

Articli 0. An application (or membership and protection under this 
Agreement must be made in writing or by telegraph to the Secretary of the 
Board. If made by telegraph it must state the name of the League the cues 



comprising the circuit and have the signature 



of the President of the League, 



comprising mc ciitun «,,.. . 

which must be followed within ten days by a written application to the bee- 



J 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



rfttary of the Board stating the name of the League, the cities comprising 
the circuit, the representatives of the respective cities, the location of their 
business offices and playing grounds, if practical, the monthly salary limit 
for its club teams and maximum monthly salary limit of its players, a pledge 
or agreement for the maintenance of said salary limit and the faithful per- 
formance of its obligations under this Agreement, its own Constitution and 
By-Laws and its other contractual obligations, which club membership, 
location of club offices and playing grounds, salary limit, Constitution, 
Agreements, By-Laws and pledges, shall not, after approval hy the Board, 
be changed, modified, altered or released without the assent of the Board. 

CLASSIFICATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 
Article 7. The Board, upon the receipt of an application for protection and 
membership under this Agreement, shall, after consideration and approval, 
determine the class under which the applicant shall be admitted, the said 
classification to be based upon the average population of the cities compos- 
ing the League according to the last published U. S. Census preceding the 
application, and membership fee shall be an amount fixed by the Board 
for Leagues of that 

MINOR LEAGUE REPRESENTATION. 
Article 8. Each Minoi Lea Entitled to one representative of 

its own selection, who shall have the right to appeal before the Board upon 
any or all matters pertaining to its interest or welfare, but the Board may, 
at its discretion, invite additional representation in the adjustment of ut.y 
matter which may be brought before it. 

FEE FOR PROTECTION AND MEMBERSHIP, 

Article 9. The fee for membership and protection under this Agreement, 
with the right of reservation subject to Articles 10 and 11 shall be: 
For each Club *n Class 

For each Club in Class li the sum of $50. 

For each Clnb in Class < ' the sum , ■.: i 

For each Club in Class D 

Class K the Sum ol SO 
For each Club in Class F the sum of £10. 
Such payments to be made within thirty days from the date of filing the 
written application for member I 

SELECTION OF PI Wl.kS BY THE MAJOR LEAGUE 
Articli IOi E players to advance in then 

Cession, the .Major League may, at any time after the first I each 

year, and prior to the first of January following, with the consent of the 
ite with any player then under contract <■■ ■■• to a 

minor league under this Agreement, and shall have the right r 
player, upon payment to the Secretary of the Hoard the sum specified in 
I rticle 12, nrovi led that . o such selection shall be enforced and no transfer 
of a player shall ': ■ isent. 

Provided further thai «n shall n"t apply to a player in I 

"A" League until his name shall have appeared twice on thi 
L'ue. 



NATIONAL AGRKKMENT. 



SELECTION OF PLAYERS BY MINOR LEAGUES. 
Article 11. For the purpose of enabling players to advance in their pro- 
fession and to assist in building up clubs of minor leagues, a club of a higher 
class sliall have the right, with the consent of the Hoard, after January 1 of each 
year, and prior to the first of February following, to select players from a 
league 111 a lower class upon payment to the Secretary of the Hoard the sum 
specified in Article 12, provided that no »uch selection shall be enforced, and 
no transfer 1 of a player shall I"- made without his consent 

TERMS FOR SELECTION OF FLAYERS, 

ARTICXB 12— Sec. 1. Clubs from a high class selecting players from 
leagues of a lower class shall pay to the Secretary of the Hoard for the 
benefit and account of the club from which the selection is made the follow- 
ing sums, viz.: 

For Players in Class A, $1,000. 
For Players in Class B, $300. 
For Players in Class C, $200. 
For Players in Class D, $100. 
For Players in Class K, $75. 
For Players in Class F, $50. 
Sec. 2. Payments must be made a) the time of selection, and unless such 
payment be withdrawn and the selection cancelled by the selecting club 
within thirty days from the date of selection, the Secretary of the Board 
shall remit to the club the amount received by him on account of such 
selection. 

Sue. 3. Any club entitled to make selection of a player and desiring to do 
so, shall notify the Secretary of the Hoard stating the name of the player 
and of the club with which he is under contract and reservation and enclos- 
ing amount specified in Ssctfon 1, Article 12, W he paid for such release. 
The Secretary shall thereupon notify the club or league from which such 
I i be made and shall order his transfer to the selectin 
v--r the terms and posed in Articles H> and !1 <>f this 

men I are complied with. Notice of lUCh Selection and transfer shall 

thereupon be promul 

ASSIGNMENT OF I ^DEVELOPED PLAYERS, 
Artk i.i 1& Fo-i th< purpose * retail ntrol of undeveloped but 

. . i pur< based, all Lea 

to thii Agn ement, may, pi I ; ' s championship i • 

players with their written ■ ufa raerabei of any 

ithei Lea juc party to this \ rreenn at. upon mutual agreement between the 
clubs in lub member of the 1 twhlch 

the assignment Is to be mad uch player at the drafting price of the 

h be played last prior to becoming a National l 
player. Notice ol such transfers and assignments and the condition 
erning must be filed with the Set rotary <>f the Board, and the salary of the 
i-ss than the salary limit which 

he has been assigned. 

Am. 14. Any club member of the major league may at any time between 
April 1 and October 1 negotiate with a club member of a minor league 



N.\ I IONAL AGREEMEN I . 



party to this Agreement, for the releasi ir with his written 

ninor to major league, to take effw i after ( h tobei I of th< 
or for an immediate release if the Constitution of §uch mil p rmits, 

.uid such release shall at once be filed a Ith and promulgated by the Secre- 
tary of the Board and become binding upon both clubs part) to the Iran »fi : 
Article 15. Any i tub member of a minor league, party to this Agreement 
may ;»t any time during its championship reason negotiate for the immediate 
release of a player with Ins written consent from a club member of another 
institution of the rel< asing club permits, and so- li 

. if secured, -shall, when filed with the Secretary of the Hoard, ; . 

binding upon both clubs party to the transfer, providing the salary ol the 
: bo transferred during the championship season shall not be re 
the balance of the season unless he be given an unconditional release. 
CONTRACTS 

Article 16. Contracts between clubs and players shall he in writing in 
the form approved by the Hoard. An informal contract, whether evidenced 
by telegram or other writing, shall be valid for a period not ex 
thirty days, but a formal contract must be tendered by the contracting club 
to the contracting player within said thirty days. The failure "f the club 
to so tender such formal contract will release the player from all contractual 
obligations thereunder, and the refusal of the player to execute such formal 
contract, when so tendered, shall extend the validity of his informal contract 
until he shall execute said formal contract. 

UNLAWFUL CONTRACTS. 
Article 17. No club shall enter into negotiations or contract with a 
player under contract to another club without the lutter's consent, under 
such fines and penalties as the Hoard may InBict. 

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP. 
Article 18. Applications for in mbershtp by minor leagues desiring , 
tection under this Agreement must be made each year to the Secretary of 
■ »ard, as provided in Arti< le 5. 

TERMINATION Ol- MEMBERSHIP. 
Article 19. All rights under this Agreement shall terminate on the first 
day of October unless renewed between the fifteenth ami twenty-fifth of 
uber of each year, according to Article 18. 
NEW LEAG1 I 
Article 20. Newly organized league* may ask for and be admitted to 
membership at any I ihip shall terminate on the first 

of October following unless renewed according to Article 19. 
RESERVA i 
Article 21. On or before the twenty-fifth day of September in each year, 
and prior to the expiration of their ; ntracts, the secretaries of 

minor leagues, parties hereto, entitled to the privilege of reservation, shall 
transmit to the Secretary of the Hoard a reserve list of players, not exceeding 
. then under contract With each of its several club mcin- 
ii the current season, and in addition thereto a list of such players re- 
served in any prior annual reserve list who b tva refu t with 
such clubs and of all ineligible players. Su -h players, together with all 
Others thereafter to be regularly contracted with by such clubs (namely, 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



whose releases have been secured by purchase or draft under this agreement 
for future services), are and shall be ineligible lo contract with any other 
club of any League during the period of time between the terminal. on of 
their contracts and the beginning of the next season. The Secretary 
Board shall thereupon promulgate such lists, provided that no club si 
permitted to reserve any player while in arrears of salary to him. 
RELEASE FROM RESERVATION. 
Artt ubSS. Thf Board ma} tl ore) from contract oi reservation any 

player or manager when the ilub with wlii< h hi ha mtl lCted,Or by which he 
has been reserved, shall be in arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen 
days after such salary became due, or when the reserving club has failed to ten- 
der to any player, on or before the first day of March, after such reservation, a 
formal contract, with a salary of at least sin h an amount per month as the 
Hoard may fix as the minimum salary to be paid to such player, or when any 
ituch reserving club has transferred its membership after the close of the 
championship season to a different league, if the Board shall deem thai the 
player will be prejudiced by such transfer. 

INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS IN CONFLICT WITH THE 
NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

Ami' LRS3 Ski . 1. Any club member of any Minor league Ol ..■--■• i Llton, 

i party to or identified with the National Agreement, thai shall enter into any 
negotiation t" become .1 member ol or in any way co-operate with any brga 
lion ol : h ill clubs whose existence will in any manner 1 on Hit 1 

with the letter and spirit oJ this \greement or 1 lu- Interests of any of the clubs 
log under it, shall forthwith forfeit all rights and privi rred by 

tltis Agreement, said forfeiture to include its membership in any association a 
party to this Agreement, and all ■ 1 r vat ion to players reserved dur- 

ing the current or any preceding season. The penalty herein impo 
positive and final and shall roi 1 inless by the unanimous consent 

of the Hoard 01 upon appeal by a three-fourths vote of the Major lea..: 

Sp.< . *J. Any officer, manager or player who shall enter into any such 
trirms as referred to in Section 1 "i Article -^y, or who shall agree or 
t to play with any club a mem organization shall lie de- 

clared ineligible and subject to all the disabilities referred to in tl 
it ding section. 

DISQUALIFIED PLAYERS. 
ASTICI i* 84, When a player or manager under contract or reservation by 
any ' In!' "I an association part] ii be expelled, suspended or ren- 

dered inel'gii<'' tnce with the provisions of this agreement or the 

Eation, notice of sac hdi tquali fications shall b« 
the Hoard by the secretary of the ion from whose club the playi 1 

may have been thus disqualified, and the Board shall forthwith give notice 

of such disqualification to the several leagues a* ting under this Agreement. 
When a player shall become ineligible under the provisions of this Agree- 
ment, or by order of the Board, the Secretary of the Board shall notify the 
several clubs acting under this Agreement of such disqualification. Prom 
the receipt of any such notice all club members of associations 1 

I freemenl shall be debarred from employing or playing with or against 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



;uch disqualified player until the period of disqualification shall have tes 
initiated or the disqualification be revoked by the association from which 
such player was disqualified or by the Board, and due notice of such revo- 
cation shall be given by the Board to the said several clubs. 
SUSPENSION OF PLAYERS. 

Article 25. Any player who has entered into a contract with any club 
of an association party hereto may be suspended without payor 6ned by 
such club or association for breach of contract or breach of any of the rules 
of such club or association, and he shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or 
play during the remainder of the current season with any of the clubs of any 
association acting hereunder, unless such disability shall have been sooner 
removed by the club or association by which he was suspended or by th« 
Board. 

ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE. 

Article 26. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any club member of an association then acting under this Agreement 
(unless the release be made by " selection " under Article 10 or 11), the ser- 
vices of such player shall at once be subject to acceptance by any club 
belonging to the same association, expressed in writing or by telegraph to 
the Secretary of the Board, for a period '>t ten days after notice of said 
release ; and, thereafter, if said services be- not 10 B I player may 

negotiate and contract with any club. The releasing clnl 
to the Secretary of the Board of said player's release on the date thereof, 
and the latter shall promulgate any acceptance of his services. Provided 
that the disbandment of a club or its expulsion from membership in either 
association acting hereunder shall operate as a release of all of its players 
from contract with or reservation by said club. But the services of such 
players shall at once be subject to the acceptance of such association for a 
period of ten days for the purpo. ; of 8 applying the vacancy in its membership. 

CONTR( I. AWTJ DISCIPLINE. 

Article 27. Each assoc'iati in shall have the right to make and enforce 
nil rules and regulations pertaining to the control, discipline and compensa- 
tion of alt players under contract with its club members. And it may pre- 
scribe that all contracts with its playei ■ made directly with said 
association, assignable to Its club members, with the right of reservatl 
be exclusively txerd In which event all thepro*. 
of this Agreement applying to contracts or reservation of players witl 

by club mem: pply CO sin b < and reservation of pi 

with and by said association ; provided that such rules and regulations shall 
in no way conflict with the provisions of this Agreement, or any rule, regula- 
tion or order of the Board. 

TERRITORIAL RIGHTS, 
Article 28. Each minor league whose application for membership under 
this Agreement has been accepted by the Boa I all have exclusive contro 
of its own territory until the termination of its membership, and no 
from any other league party to this Agreement shall be allowed to play i. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



game in any city of its circuit without the consent of the club representing 
such city, nor shall any club merobei of a minor league party hereto be 
allowed to play a game within five miles of any city in which islocated a 
club member of the major league without the consent of such club. 

INELIGIBLE PLAYERS. 

Article 29, No game shall be played between any club of any league 
acting hereunder, or any of its players under contract or reservation, with 
any club containing an ineligible player ; nor with a club that has played 
with another club containing luch Ineligible player. A violation of this sec- 
tion shall subject each offender to fine, suspension or expulsion, in the 
discretion of the Board. 

TRANSFER OF PLAYERS, 

Article 30. Should a club of any association ngree In writing or by tele- 
graph with another club of an association, subject to the National Agreement, 
for the release of any player then under contract or a with or by it, 

in accordance with the rules governing, either party may file said agreement 
with the Secretary of the Board, and should any such club refuse to comply 
with its said agreement, the Board may require said agreement to be complied 
with, and may transfer the SQld ptftyer accordingly. 

PAYMENTS OF SALARIES. 

Article 81. Before any league shall 1m- granted the privileges and protec- 
tion ol this Agreement, it shall ena< i laws or regulal i i ing any of in 
clubs from entering into conti act with any player while under arrears of salary 
to him, and from suspending or otliei n is to disqualify such player 
[using to contract while il is so in arrears, and shall also provide for the 
expulsion of any club for refusal to pay arrears of salary to a player when 
required by said league or by the I 

FORFE11 1 Kh OF RIGH rs. 

Articlk 83. All rights of any league hereunder shall be forfeited for fail- 
ing to expel any of its club members that may play a game of ball except 
under the Playing Rules adopted by the National League and Ameiican 

Association of Prof' ' Ball Clubs. 

DM IM I ion OF TERMS, 
Article 38. The term "league or association" as herein used shall 
. ind comprise an organization ol professional base ball dubs ol not less 
than four clu! n as a "league," "association," or by any 

other destgnal 

! . ■ may be altered or amended at any time by 

■ he National 1 ttlon of Professional Base I --til 

It shall take effect and be Enforce from and after February ~4, 1890, 
and all former Agreements are hereby revoked. 

CLASSIFICATION OF LEAG1 I I NED BY THE M 

GATE POPULATION OF THE CITIES REPRESENTED. 

Class A 1,000,008 I Class D 100,000 to £ 

Class B 500,000 to 1,000,000 Class E 

Class C 250,000 to 000,000 | Class F-Up to 50,000 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



The Rules and Regulations of the National 
Board of Arbitration. 

The following rules anil regulations have been adopted by 
tin- National Board of Arbitration, ami are here given in order 
that they may be understood by all those inter Sted, The same 
being adopted and to remain in force until repealed, altered, 
added to or amended. 

THE PRESIDENT. 

1. The duties of the President shall be as follows: 

(it) To issue calls for meetings of the Hoard, and preside at 
such meetings; having all powers with reference thereto which 
are incident to a presiding officer. 

(I>) To rule upon and decide all incidental and routine mat- 
ters presented for determination, with power to delegate this 
duty to the Secretary or any member of the Hoard. 

(/) To supervise the perfi ol the duties imposed upon 

her members of the Board. 

(</) To gee that eai h and all ol I of this board are 

lied with. 

THE SECRETARY AND TREASI KICK. 

2. The offices of the Secretary and Treasurer may be tilled 
by one and the same person, and the duties of such officer shall 
be as follow s: 

(it) To receive, receipt for and disburse all moneys payable 
to this Hoard, and to make all financiaj statements required by 
the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(b) To keep the records of the proceedings of the I; 
together with all the records required to be kept by the provi- 
sions of the National Agreement. 

(<•) To i ired by the National Agreement 

issued. 

(•/) To give interpretation to the playing rules when requested 
so to do, pursuant to the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(e) To receive all applications for membership under the 
National Agreement, and to see that the applicants pay their 
proper dues. 

(J'\ To give notice of all lines and penalties imposed by the 
Hoard, and to see that the same are paid. 

(g) To attend to such other matters as maybe require 
him by the Hoard, and to kei rds of all the business and 

duties connected with the Board. 



RIII.KS AM) REGULATIONS. 



ELECTIONS. 

The Chairman and the Secretary and Treasurer shall lit 
elected annually at some melting after tho first of January, and 
shall hold until their successors are elected and qualify. 

OPINIONS AM) DECISIONS. 

Whenever any controversy or matter to lie submitted to the 
Hoard of adjustment or decision shall be forwarded, together 
with all evidence and documents therewith connected, to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, lie shall, after submitting the salt 
the Hoard, promulgate 01 publish the opinion, which must be 
prepared by the Chairman or such other member of the Board 
as he shall designate. 

SELECTION OK PLAYER'S. 

Whenever any player shall be "selected" by more than one 
club, the Board will award him to the club which shall have 
first filed formal notice with the Secretary that it desires the 
services of said player. Such notice, however, must be accom- 
panied by the deposit required by the provisions of the National 
Agreement, otherwise such notice will be of no effect and void. 
A j.l.i y.-r 50 awarded shall be ineligible to sign with any other 
club, and upon declining to abide by the decisions of the Board, 
may be included in the regular 1 i — l of reserved players of the 
club selecting him, as per the provisions of Article 21 of the 
National Agreement. 

ACCEP1 ED PLA' 

Whenever the services if any player released under the pro- 
visions of the National Agreement are accepted by any club or 
iation, authorized so to do by the provisions of such 
agreement, notice thereof shall be at ante given to the Secre- 
tary, wdio shall accordingly promulgate the fact. 

PAYMENTS. 

All expenses of the Board, including compensation to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, or to any other agent, officer or 
member of the Board for special work performed, telegraphing, 
postage and such other expenses as shall be allowed, must be 
paid by check of the Secrecary and Treasurer and ion 
taken thereof, which vouchers shall be submitted at least once 
a year to the Board for examination and approval. 



THE NATIONAL BOARD 



OF 



ARBITRATION 



1C)0I 



OFFICE: WASHINGTON, I). C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD: 

.\. E. VOUNG, - - President, Secretary and Trtaturet 
1.(17 G Stri et, Washington, I>. ' . 



A. II. SODEN, - 

John T. B 

I'. Dill. Koi. 

Jambs \ . II 

J NO. I. Roc 



410 Atlantic \-.rnur, Boston, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Cleveland, O. 

Fisher Building, Chicago, III. 

- Philadelphia, Pa 



J 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 

Season of J 90 1 




NOTE. -For Specifications See Rules From No. 2 to No. 12 






■ [,ES. 



Cbe Official Playing Rules 

OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 

As Adopted by the National League and American Association 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 
'ii-.il> and additions t-. the rules ire in 'taiits. 



Rule i. — Till'. Ball Ground. 
The Ground must lie an inclosed field, sufficient in size in 
enable each player to play in his position as required by ihese 
rules 

Rule 2. 

To lay off the lines governing the positions ami the play of 
the game known as Rase ball, proceed as follows; 

I- mm a point, A, within the grounds, project a right lim 
into the field, and at a point. 11, 154 feet from point A, lay off 
lines B G and li I) at right angles to the line A li ; then, with II 
itre and 63,63945 feet as radius, describe arcs cutting the 
p. A at F ami I'. I : I ■ . 1 1 1 mid I'. E m I. Draw 

lines I-' (i, li E, E II ami II I', and said lines will be the con- 
taining lines of the DiamOl 

Rl LE 3. — THE CATCHER'S Links. 
With F as centre ami 10 feet radius, an arc cutting line I A 
at 1., and draw lines I. M and I, <) at right angles to V A, and 
continue same out from !•' A nut less than 10 fi 

KriK 4.— The Foul Line. 
From the intersection point, F, continue the straight lines 1 ' ■ 
and F II until they intersect with the line-. I. M and L O, and 

then from the points <« and II in tin- opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the grounds. 

Rule 5.— The Players' l.i 

With 1" as centre and 50 feet radius, describe arcs cutting 
lines F O and F M at P and Q; then, w ith I' as ci 
and 75 bet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F II at Rand 
S; then, from the points I', Q, R and S draw lines at right 
angles to the lines F < », I" M, F li and F II. and continue 
same until they intersect at the points T and W. 



PLAYING Kl'l ES. 






Ri i.k 5, — The Captain \m> Coachkk's I.im.. 
With K and .sand 15 feet radius, describe arcs 

cutting lines R W and S T at \ and Y, and from the points X 

V draw lines parallel with lines F II and F G, and 
tinue same oral to the boundary lines of the ground. 

Rule 7. — The Three Foot Link. 
With !•' as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an arc cutting 
line F ('• at t, and from 1 out to the distance of 3 feel dran a 
lineat right angles to F (>, and marked poinl 2; Hun from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line !■' (\ to a point . 
beyond the poinl 1 i, and marked 3 ; then from the point 3 draw 
a line at 1 i i^ 1 1 1 angles to line 2, 3, back to and intersecting with 
line F (•, and from thence back along line (i F to poinl 1. 

Rule S. — Tiik Pitcher's Plate. 

With point F as centre and do.; feet as radius, describe an 
arc cutting the line F li at a poinl 4. and draw .1 line 5, 0, 
perpendicular thereto, passing through point 4 and extending 12 

i ik In eithei side -of line I' l; ; then with line 5, 6, as a side, 

ribi ■ i .on 2 1 inches by im 

Rule 9.— 'I'm. Bases 

Witliin the angle F describe a live-sided figure, two of the 
sides of which shall coincide with the lines F G and F II i 

1 of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the line F II 8>. 
inches to the points X and Y, a straight line between w hich — 17 
inclu-s — will form the front of the plate, and within the angles 
G an<l II, describe squares the sides of which shall be 15 
, the two outer sides of said square lying upon the lilies 
F (i anil (i I and 1- II and II !. and at the angle E describe a 
square whose sides shall be 15 inches and SO described that its 
sides shall be parallel with G I and I II, and its centre imme- 
diately over the angular point !■'.. 

Rule io. — Tin-: Batsman's I.im.. 

< in either side of the line A F I! describe two parallelograms 
6 feet long and 4 feel wide (marked.8 and 9), their length being 

parallel with the line A I' I:, their distance apart being (1 inches 

added to each end of the length of the diagon quare 

within the angle I', and the centre of their length being 
said diagonal. 

Rule ii. 

The Home Base al F and the Pitcher's Plate at 4 must be of 
whitened rubber, and so lived in the ground as to be even with 
the sir 

Rule 12. 

Xhi •'■ E, »nd Hi.- Third 



36 PLAYING R.UL1 

Base at H must be of white canvas bags, filled with soft mate- 
rial and securely fastened in their positions described in Rule 9. 

Rule 13. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 10 must be 
marked with linur, chalk or other suitable material, so as to be 
distinctly seen by the umpire. 

Note. — For a simple way to lay off a ball field sec page 167. 

ki u 14. The Ball.* 

SECTION i. Must not< weigh less than five nor more than 
live and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and it must measure 
not less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in 
circumference. The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach 
American Association Ball, must be used in all games played 
under these rules. 

Sec. 2. For each championship game two regulation balls 
shall be furnished by the home club to the umpire for use. 
When the ball in play is batted to foul ground and out of sight 
of the umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into 
play. As often as one of the two in use shall be lost a new one 
must l>e substituted, so that the umpire shall at all times after 
the game begins have two balls in his possession and ready for 
use. The moment an umpire delivers an alternate ball to the 
pitcher, it comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, 
in turn, passes out of sight to foul ground. At no time shall 
the ball be intentionally discolored by rubbing it'with the soil 
or otherwise. In the event of a new ball being intentionally 
discolored, or otherwise injured by a player, the umpire shall, 
iij. 011 appeal from the captain of the opposite side, forthwith 
demand the' return of that ball, and shall substitute another 
new ball and impose a line of $5. "JO upon the offending player. 

Sec. 3. In all games the balls played with shall be furnished 
by the home club, and the last ball in play shall become the 
rty of the winning club. Each ball to be used in cham- 
pionship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by 
the Secretary of the League, inclosed in a paper box, and sealed 
with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be broken, 
except by the umpire, in the presence of the captains of the i m 
contesting nines after play has been called. 

The home club shall have, at least, a do/en regulation balls 
on the held ready for use on the call of the umpire during each 
championship game. 



•The Spalding League Hall has been adopted by the N igue for 

the past twentv-four years, and is used in all League contests. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys umler It; years of age) w<: recom- 
mend them to use the 1 Spalding Hoys' League Ball, and that ^ames played by 
junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games tile same as if played 
with the ' Mncial League BalL 



playing rules. 



37 



Sec. 4. Should the ball become cut or lipped soastoexpose 
the interior, or in any way so injured as to be, in the opinion 
of the umpire, unlit for fair use, he shall, upon appeal by either 
captain, at once put the alternate ball into play and call for a 
new ball. 

Rule 15. — The Bat. 

Must be entirely of hard wood, except that the handle may 
be wound witli twine or a granulated substance supplied, not to 
• ■! eighteen inches from the end. 

It must be round, and it must not exceed two ami three- 
quarter inches in diameter in the thickest part, nor exceed 
forty-two inches in length. 

Rule 16. — The Players ami Their Positions, 
The players of each club in a game shall be nine in number, 
one of whom shall act as captain, and in no case shall less than 
nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

Rule 17. 

The players' positions shall be such as may be assigned them 
by their captain, except that the pitcher, while in the act of 
delivering the ball to the bat, must take his position as defined 
in Utiles 8ancl 29; and the catcher must stand within the lines 
of his position as defined in Rule 3, whenever the pitcher de- 
livers the ball to the bat, and within ten feet of the home base. 

RULE 18. 

Players in uniform shall not be permitted to occupy seats on 
the stands, or to stand among the spectators. 

Rule 19. 
ction i. Every club shall adopt uniforms for its players, 

and the suits of each team shall conform in color and style. 
No player who shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his 
shoes other than the ordinary base ball shoe plan , or who shall 
appear in a uniform not conforming to the suits of the other 
members of his team, shall be permitted to take part in the 
game. 

Si C. 2. The catcher and fust baseman are permitted to wear 
a glove or mil of any size, shape or weight. All other pis 
are restricted to the use of a glove or mil weighing not over 
ten ounces, and measuring in circumference, around the palm 
of the hand, not over fourteen in 

Rule 20. — Players' Benches. 

SECTION I. The players' benches must be furnished by the 

home club and placed upon a portion of the ground not less 

than twenty-live (25) feet outside of I he players' lines. ( )n« such 

h -hall be for the exclnsive use of the visiting club, and 



r 



one fur the exclusive li >me club. Tlie ben 

Li li end ; a 
space, however, not more than six (' ) inches wide may I 
just under the roof f,,r ventilation. All | layers of the si 
hat must be seated on th ir b nch, i scch 

assigned to i 
when called to the I 

s .shall the umpire permit an; except n 

and players in unifo ; snchei. 

.2. To enforce this rule tl other side 

may call the attention of tl 
the umpire shall iramediat 

order is n t obeyed «i bin one mincle the 
offending player or players shall bi hy the 

umpire. If the order is not then. inutc, 

the offending pi shall he debarred from further 

participation i 
pla) th, 



E 21. — Til i 

. . ; . 
not later than two 1 

Sec. 2. 

testing lli liiat 

(it. ) if I 
than the other side ha 
terminate. 

(/'.) If the side last at 
winning run before the thirl n 

22. — A 'I 

K 1 lie at the end of thi . pUy 

shall he continued until one side in the 

oilier in nn equal number of innings, provided, that the side 

last at the be : the third man in out, 

'■all termit 

A drawn yame shall be by the an 

males a game on account of darkness or rain, 
i innings have 1. 
■ m the last even innings playi ,■ that 

at is then at the bat, and has 
number of runs as the other side, in which i 
shall declare the fcanic draw n without regard to tl 
the last equal innii. 



II AVIS'. I 



ig 



Kri.K 24. — A I G 1MB. 

If the mi. " Game " on account oi darkness or ruin 

ny time after five inn 
shall be th equal innings played, but if the side 

Sa.ll liavi ored in an unequal numl 
innings, i of its unfinished inning one 

or more runs than i !i bat, the score of the game 

shall be ilic total number of runs m 

Rule 25. — A " < Iame. 

A, forfeits I by the umpire in favor of 

1 lio club not in fault, at the request of such club, in the f 
iiij,' cases : 

Section i. If the nine of a club fail to appeal 
field, or being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five 
after the umpire Ins called "Play" al the hour 
inted for the beginning of ch delay in 

appearing, or in commencing the game, I"-- unavoids 
Sec. a. If, aft rtln has begun, one si.le 1 

fails to it suspendei 

"r terminated by 1 hi 
Sec. 3. If, after < lay 1 

one : ''"' 

ampin ! 

Si. . 4. If a :- to dilatory movements to • 

the l 

. 5. If, in the opinion of the umpire, any dne ol 
lated. 
Sec. 6. If.aft ivalof a player.as autl 

one minute. 

. 7 . ][, bi players from the gaini 

the umpire, th players in either lean . 

Sec. 8. If, v played on 

the same al ! 'JiV" 

rst camo > h« 

umpire of the fii ' r - . , . , 

Sec. 9. [nca etheumj iredei lares the game forfeited, 
transmit a written notice 1 

■■ within twenty-four hours thereafter. However, a tai - 

ure on the part to »o notify the president snail 

not affect his decision declaring the game forfeited. 

Kri e 36— No Game. 

"No game "shall b -hall ter- 

,t„f rain or darkness before Bye innings 

1 



40 



PLAYING RULES. 



end of its fourth innings than the club first at bat has made in 
its live completed innings; in such case the umpire shall award 
the game to the club having made the greatest number of rims, 
and it shall be a legal nd be so counted in the cham- 

pionship rei 

Rule 27. — Substiti i bs. 

Section i. In any championship game each side shall be 
required to have present on the field, in uniform, conforming 
to the suits worn by lheir team mates, a sufficient numbi 
substitute players to carry oul the provision which requires that 
not less than nine players shall occupy the field in any innings 
of a game. 

Si C. 2. Any such player may be- substituted at any tin 
either club, but a player thereby retired shall not then 
participate in the game. 

SEC. 3. The base-runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him except by the consent of the captain- of the conti 

Rule 21. — Choice ok Innings — Condition of Gkoi nd. 

'The choice of innings shall be given to the captain ol the 
home club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness i 
ground for beginning a game after rain, but, after play In 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the fit- 
ness of the ground for resuming play after the game has been 
suspended on account of rain. 

Rule 29. — The Pitcher's Position. 

The pitcher shall take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet srptare on the ground, and in front of the pile 
plate; but in th< livering the ball to the bat, oni 

must lie in contact with the pitcher's plate, defined in Rule 
8. He shall not raise either foot, unless in the act of deliver- 
ing the ball to the bat, nor make more than one step in such 
delivery. 

Rt le 30. — A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball to the bat is a ball pitched or thrown 
to the bat by the pitcher while standing in his position and 
facing the batsman, the ball so delivered lo pass over any por- 
tion of the home base not lower than the batsman's knee nor 
higher than his shouldi 

Ri le 31. — An Unfairly Delivered Ball, 

An Unfairly 1 I Ball is a ball delivered by the pitcher, 

as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over any 

home base, or does pass over the home base, 

the batsman's shoulder or below the line of his knee, in 

which <<isf 1 he umpire shell call ene hall. 



PLAYING H'l l . 



41 



Ki le 32. — Delaying the Game. 

Section i. If the ball i er to any 

other than the cc . ■ , . . . to /■ tire a base-runner) and the 
batsman is standing in his proper position ready to strike at a 
pitched ball, each ball • > -/ Hi) ; , ./ shall be called a ball. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall en !l a ballon thepitcher each time 
//,■ delays the game by failing .' • deliver the ball to the batsman 
when in position for a longer period than twenty seconds. 

Rule 33. — B ilking. 
A Balk shall be : 

SECTION i. Any motion made by the pitcher to deliver the 
ball to the bat or to first base without delivering it. 

SEC. 2. The throwing of the ball by the pitcher to any base 
to catch the base-runner without first stepping directly towards 
said base immediately before throwing the ball. 

Sir. 3. Any delivery of the bail to the bat by the pi; 
while his (pivot) foot is not in contact with the pitcher's plate, 
and he is not lacing the batsman, as defined in Rule 29. 

Sec. 4. Any motion in delivering the ba-Il to the bat by the 
pitcher while not in : h" position denned in Rule 29. 

Sec. 5. Standing in position and making any motion to 

1 without having the ball in his possession. 
Sec. 6. The making of any motion the pitcher habitually 
makes in his method of delivery, without his immediately 
delivering the ball to the bat. 

.7. If the pitcher delivers the ball to the bal when the 
catcher is standing outside the lines of thecal osition 

Sned in Rule 3. 
If the pitcher fails to comply with the reqttjt F any 

m of tins rule 1 lie umpire must call "A balk." 

Rl ik 34. — Dead Bails. 
A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the pitcher thai 
touches any part of the batsman's person or clothing while 
standing in his position without being struck at, or thai 
touch 19 MI) purl of the umpire's person or clothing while he is 
standing on ton I ground without first passing thi catcher, 

Rule 35. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not legally caught out, 
dead ball, or base-runner put out lor being struck by a lair-hit 
ball, the ball shall not lie considered in play until it is held by 
the pitcher standing in his position, and the umpire shall have 
called play. 

ki 1 e 36. — Block: I: 
Section i. a Block a batted or thrown ball that is 

touched, Stopped or handled by any person not in the 

gam*. 



42 



I'I.avim; kri.i.- 



Si.i . 2. Whenever a block Occurs the umpire shall declare 

it, and the base-runners may run the bases without being put 
out until the ball has been returned to and held by the pitcher 

standing in his position. 

SEC. 3. In the case of a block, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick 
11 beyond the reach of tin fielders, the umpire should call 
"Time" and require each base-runner to stop at the last base 
touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher stand- 
ing in his position and the umpire shall have called " Play." 

Rule 37. — The Batsman's Position— Order ok Batting. 

The batsmen must take thdr position within the batsman's 
lines, as defined in Rule IO, in tin: order in which they are 
named in the batting order, which batting order must be sub- 
mitted by tin captains of the opposing teams to the umpire 
1« fore the gam.-, and this batting order must be followed 
except in the case of a substitute player, in which case the 
substitute must take tin- place of the original player in the 
batting order. After the first inning the first striker in each 
inning shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the 
last man who has completed his turn — time at bat — in the 
preceding inning. 

Rule 38. 

SECTION I. When their side goes to the bat the players 
must immediately return to the players' bench, as defined in 
Rule 20, and remain there until the side is put out, except when 
called to the bat or they become coachers or substitute base- 
runners ; provided, that the captain or one player only, except 
that if two or more base-runners are occupying the bases then 
the captain and one player, or two players, may occupy the 
space between the players' lines ami the captain's lines to 
-runners. 

SEC. 2. No player of the side "at bat," except when bats- 
man, 'shall occupy any portion of the space within the catel 
lines, as defined in Rule 3. The triangular space behind the 
base is reserved for the exclusive use of umpire, catcher 
ami batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of tin- 
side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the pitcher and 
catcher, while standing in their positions. 

;-,. Ti.e players of the side '-at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any 
ii thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 
fielder attempting to catch or field it. 

Rule 39. — The Batting Rules. 

SECTION I, A Fair Hit i- a ball baited by the batsman — 



ti 



PLAYING RULES. 



■43 



while he is standing within the lines of his position — that lirst 
touches "fair" ground, or the person of a player, or the um- 
pire, while standing on fair ground, and then settles on fair 
ground before passing the line of first or third base. 

Sec. 2. A Foul Hit is a similarly batted ball that fust 
touches "foul" ground, or the person of a player, or the um- 
pire, while standing on " foul " ground. 

SEC. 3. Should such "fair hit" ball bound or roll lo foul 
ground, before passing the line of lirst or third base, and settle 
on foul ground, it shall be declared by the umpire a foul ball. 

Ski . 4. Should such "foul hit" ball bound or roll to fair 
ground and settle there before passing the line of first or third 
base, it shall be declared by the umpire a fair ball. 

Rule 40. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the batsman while standing 
within the lines of his position that goes foul sharp from the 
bat to the catcher's hands. 

Rule 41. 

A bunt hit is a ball delivered by the pitcher to the batsman 
who, while standing within the lines of his position, make-, a 
deliberate attempt to hit the ball so slowly within the infield 
that it cannot be fielded in time lo retire the batsman. If such 
a " bunt hit " goes to foul ground a strike shall be called by the 
umpire. 

Rule 42. — Balls Batted Outside THE Grounds. 
When a batted ball passes ■ >u i --i il t- the grounds, the umpire 
shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul should it 
disappear outside of the range of the foul lines, and Rule 30. is 
to be construed accordingly. 

Rt 1.1c 43. 
A fair batted ball thai goes over (he fence shall entitle the 
batsman to a home run, exi ept, ilia 1 should it go over the fence 

ai a less distance than two hundred and thirty-live (235) 

from the home base, when he shall be entitled lo two 
only, and a distinctive line shall be marked on the fence at 

this point. 

Ri le 44.— Strikes, 

A strike is : 

riON I. A ball struck at by the batsman without its 
touching his bat ; or, 

Sim . 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher, but not 
struck at by the batsman. 

SEC. 3. A foul hit boll not caught on the Jly, unless two 
strikes have already been talleil. 



44 



ri.AVING RULES. 



Sec. 4. A •'bunt hit" which sends the ball in foul ground 
either directly or by bounding or rolling from fair ground to 
foul ground and which settles on foul ground. 

SEC. 5- A ball struck at, if the ball touches any part of the 
batsman's person. 

Sec 6. A foul tip by the batsman, caught by the catcher 
while standing within the lines of his position. 

Rule 4;. 

A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the batsman when any part 
of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the batsman's 
position. 

Rule 46. — The Batsman is Out. 

The Batsman is out : 

Section i. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his 
order of batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper 
batsman takes his position before a time "at bat" is recorded, 
and, in such case, the balls ar.d strikes called must be counted 
in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman, and only the 
proper batsman shall be declared out, and no runs shall be 
scored or bases run because of any act of the improper bals- 
man, provided, this rule shall not take effect unless the out is 
declared before the ball is delivered to the succeeding batsman. 
Should batsman declared out by this rule be sufficient to retire 
the side, the proper batsman the next innings is the player who 
would have come to bat had the players been out by ordinary play. 

SEC. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

SEC. 3. If he makes a foul hit other than a foul tip, as 
defined in Rule 40, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching th>e ground ; provided, it be not caught 
in a fielder's hat or cap, or touched by some object other than 
a fielder before being caught. 

SEC. 4. If he makes a foul strike. 

Si C. 5. If he attempts to binder the catcher from fielding or 
throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the position, 
or otherwise obstructing or interfering with the player. 

SEC. 6. If, while the first base be occupied by a base-runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the umpire, except when two 
men are already out. 

SEC. 7. If. while attempting a third strike, the ball touches 

any part of the batsman's person, in which case base-runners 

-.iiig bases shall return as prescribed in Rule 50, section 5. 

SEC. 8. If he hits a fly ball thai can be handled by an 
infielder while first and second bases are occupied, or first, 
second and third unless two hands are out. In such cas- 
umpire shall, as soon as the ball is Ivit, declare infield or out- 
field hit. 



V 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



Sec. g. If the third strike is tailed in accordance with 
section 5, Rule 44. 

SEC. 10. The moment a batsman is declared out by the 
umpire, he (the umpire) shall call for the batsman next in order 
to leave his seat on the bench and take his position at the bat, 
and such player of the batting side shall not leave his scat on 
the bench until so called to bat, except as provided by Rule 38, 
section I, and Rule 53. 

BASE-RUNNING RULES. 
Rule 47. — When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The Batsman becomes a Base-Runner : 

SECTION i. Instantly after he makes a fair hit. 

SEC. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the 
umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, while he be a batsman, the catcher interferes 
with him, preventing him from striking the ball. 

Rule 48. — Basks to be Touched. 

The base-runner must touch each base in regular order, viz., 
tirst, second, third and home bases, anil when obliged to return 
(except on a foul hit) must retouch tin- base or bases in reverse 
order. He shall only be considered as holding a base alter 
touching it, and shall then be entitled to hold such base until 
he has legally touched the next base in order or has been 
legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding base-runner. How- 
ever, no base-runner shall score a run to count in the game 
until the base-runner preceding him in the batting list (pro- 
vided there has been such a base-runner who has not been put 
out in that inning) shall have first touched home base without 
being put out. 

Rule 49. — Entitled to Bases. 

The base-runni r shall be entitled, without being put out, to 
take the base in the following eases : 

SECTION I. If, while he was batsman, the umpire called 
four balls. 

Sir. 2. If the umpire awards a succeeding batsman a base 
on four balls, and the base-runner is thereby forced to vacate 
the base held by him. 

Sir. 3. ]f the umpire calls a " Balk." 

Sir. 4. If a ball, delivered by the pitcher, pass the catcher, 
and touch the umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the home base. 

SEC. 5- If. upon a fan hit. the ball strike- n or 

clothing of the umpire on fair grouno. 



1 

I 



46 PLAYING RULES. 

SEC. 6, If he be prevented from making a base l»y the 
obstruction of an adversary, unless the latter be a fielder having 
the ball in his hand ready to meet the base-runner. 

Sec 7. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat 
or any part of his uniform except his gloved hand. 

Rule 50. — Returning to Bases. 

The base-runner shall return to his base, and shall be entitled 
to 50 return without being put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares a foul tip (as defined in 
Rule 40), or any other foul bit not legally caught by a fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declare! a foul strike. 

SEC. 3. If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it be also 
the fourth unfair ball and he be thereby forced to take the next 
base, as provided in Rule 49, section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire interferes 
v, ith the catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the catcher 
to intercept a base-runner. 

- 5. The base-runner shall return to his base if. while 
attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the batsman's 
person. 

Rule 51. — When Uase-Runneks Are Out. 

The Base-Runner is Out: 

Section i. If, after three strikes have been declared against 
him while batsman, and the catcher fail to catch the third 
strike ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the catcher from 
fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such (air 
hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground, or any object other than a fielder ; PROVIDED, it be not 
caught in a fielder's hat or cap. 

. 3. If, when the umpire has declared three strikes on 
him while batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held 
by a fielder before touching the ground ; PROVIDED, it be not 
caught in a fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
than a fielder before being caught. 

S] C. 4- If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
lied first base. 

SEC. 5. If. after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with any 
part of his person before such base-runner touches first base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from ' 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to first 
base, he runs outside the three-! in Rule 7, 

unless to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball. 

SEC. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from second 
to third base, or from third to home base, he runs more than 



! 



Playing ri 



three feet from a direct line between such bases to avoid being 

touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder ; but in case a 
fielder be occupying the base-runner's proper path in attempt- 
ing to field a batted ball, then the base-runner shall run out of 
the path, and behind said fielder, and shall not be declared 
out for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If lie fails to avoid a fielder attempting to field a 
batted ball, in the manner described in sections 6 and 7 of this 
rule, or if he, in any way, obstructs a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball ; 
PROVIDED, that if two or more fielders attempt to field a batted 
ball, and the base-runner comes in contact with one or more of 
them, the umpire shall determine which fielder is entitled to 
the benefit of this rule, and shall not decide the base-runner 
out for coming in contact with any other fielder. 

Sic. 9,. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some part 
of his person is touching a base he is entitled to occupy ; PRO- 
VIDED, the ball be field by tbe fielder after touching him. 

SEC. 10. The base-runner in running to first base may over- 
run said base, without being put out for being off said base, 
after first touching it, provided he returns at once and retouches 
the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base. 
If, in over-running first base, he also attempts to run to second 
base, or after passing the base he turns to his left from the 
foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out. 

SEC. 11. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a foul 
tip as referred to in Rule 40) is legally caught by a fielder, 
such ball is legally held by a fielder on the base occupied by 
the base-runner when such ball was struck (or the base-runner 
be touched with the ball in the hands of a fielder), before he 
retouches said base after such fair or foul hit ball was so 
caught: PROVIDED, that the base-i miner shall not be out, in 
such case, if, afler the ball was legally caught as above, it be 
delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the fielder holds it 
on said base, or touches the base-runner with it ; but if the 

base-runner, in attempting to reach a base, detaches it before 
being touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

SEC. 12. If, when a batsman becomes a base-runner, the 
first base, or the first and second bases, or the first, second and 
third, bases, be occupied, any base-runner so occupying a base 
shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until any following base- 
runner is put out. anil may be put out at the next base, or bj 
being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder in the same 
manner as in running to first base at any time before any fol- 
lowing base-runner is put out. 

SEC. 13. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching thc 
fielder, and, in such case, no base shall be run unless I 



r 



1 



48 PLAYING RULES. 

by 1 he batsman becoming a base-runner, and no run shall be 
scored or any other base-runner put out. 

Sec. 14. If, when running to a base, or forced to return to 
a base, he fail to touch the intervening base, or bases, if any, 
in the order prescribed in Rule 48, he may be put out at the 
base he fails to touch, or being touched by the ball in the 
hands of the fielder in the same manner as in running to first 
base ; PROVIDED, t hat the base-runner shall not be out in such 
case if the ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before 
the fielder holds it on said base or touches the base-runner 
with it. 

Sec. 15. If, when the umpire calls " Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he 
occupied when "Time" was called before touching the next 
base ; Provided, the base-runner shall not be out, in such case, 
if the ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher, before the 
fielder holds it on said base or touches the base-runner with it. 

Rule 52. — When Batsman or Base-Runner is Oi r. 
The umpire shall declare the batsman or base-runner out, 
without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all cases 
where such player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 51, sections 10 and 14. 

Rule 53. — Coaching Rules. 
The Coacher shall be restricted to coaching the base-runner 
only, and shall not be allowed to address any remarks except to 
the base-runner, and then only in words of necessary direction; 
and shall not, by words or signs, incite or try to incite the specta- 
tors to demonstrations ; and shall not use language which will 
in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposite 
club, the umpire or the spectators, and not more than one 
coacher, who may be a player participating in the game, or 
any other player under contract to and in the uniform of either 
club, shall be allowed :ii any one time, except, that if base- 
1 miners are occupying two or more of the bases, then the cap- 
tain and one player, or two players under contract to and in the 
uniform of either club, may occupy the space between 'the 
players' lines and the captains' lines to coach base-runners. 
To enforce the above the captain of the opposite side may call 
the attention of the umpire to the offence, and thereupon the 
umpire must order the illegal coacher or coachers to the bench; 
if his order is not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall 
assess a fine of S5.00 each against the offending player or players, 
and, upon a repetition of the offence, the offending player 
or players shall be debarred from further participation in the 
game, and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 



PLAYING RULES. 



A') 



Rule 54. — The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a base-runner, after hav- 
ing legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the home 
base before three men are put out. (Exception) — If the third 
man is forced out, or is put out before reaching first base, a 
run shall not be scored. 

THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 

Rule 55. 
The umpire shall not be changed during the progress of a 
championship game, except by reason of personal illness or 
injury incapacitating him for the discharge of his duties. 

Rule 56. 
The umpire is the representative of the League, and as such 
shall have power to enforce every section of the code of play- 
ing rules of the game, and he shall have power to order any 
player, or captain, or manager, to do or omit to do, any action 
that he may deem necessary to give force and effect to the laws 
of the game. 

Rule 57. 

There shall be no appeal from any legal decision of [lie 
umpire. 

Rule 58. 

Under no circumstances shall any player be allowed to dis- 
pute a decision by the umpire, in which only an error of 
judgment is involved ; and no decision rendered by him 
shall be reversed, except it be plainly shown by the code of 
rules to have been illegal; and in such case the captain alone 
shall be allowed to make the appeal for reversal. 

Rule 59. 

SECTION I. In all cases of violation of these rales, by either 

a player or manager, the penalty for the first offence shall be a 
fine by the umpire of $5.00, and for a second offence, a prompt 
removal of the offender from the game or grounds, followed by 
such period of suspension from actual service in the club as the 
president of the League may elect. 

Ski'. 2. The umpire shall, within twelve hours after fining 
or removing a player from the game, forward to the president a 
report of the action and the causes therefor. 

SEC. 3. Immediately upon notification by the umpire that a 
fine has been imposed upon any manager, captain or player, 
the president shall notify the person so fined and also the club 
of which he is a member, and, in the event of the failure of the 
person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League the 
antounl of said fine within five days of notice, he shall be de- 



50 



PLAYING HULKS. 



barred from participating in any championship game or from 
silting on a player's bench during the progress of a champion- 
ship game until such fine is paid. 

SEC. 4. When the offence of the player debarred from the 
game is of such a flagrant nature, such as the use of cbscer.2 
language or an assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire 
shall, within four hours thereafter, notify the president of the 
Leagne, giving full particulars. 

Sec. 5. He shall also notu'y both captains before the game, 
and in the presence of each other, that all the playing rules 
will be impartially enforced, and that their failing to co-operate 
in such enforcement, will result in their being fined and, per- 
haps, their removal from the game. 

Rule 60. 

Before the commencement of a game the umpire shall see 
that the rules governing all the materials of the game are 
strictly observed. lie shall asl< the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, and 
if there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, provided 
they do.not conflict with any of these rules] 

Rule 6i. 

The umpire shall not only call "play" at the hour appointed 
for the beginning of the game, but also announce "game 
called " at its legal conclusion. 

Rl IK '.2. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the following causes: 
First, if rain is falling so heavily as to oblige the spectators on 
the open field and open stands to seek shelter, in which ense 
he shall note the time of suspension ; and should rain fall con- 
tinuously for thirty minutes thereafter he shall terminate the 
gain>-. 

Rule 03. 
The umpire shall suspend play in case 01 an accident to him- 
self or to a player which incapacitates him or them from ser- 
vice in the field, or in order to remove from the grounds any 
player or spectator who has violated the rules. 

Rule 04. 

In suspending play from any legal cause, the umpire shall 
call "time;" when he calls "lime" the play shall he sus- 
pended until he calls "play" again, and during the interim no 
player shall be put out, base be run, or run be scored. 'Time" 
shall not be called by the umpire until the ball is held by the 
pitcher standing in his position. 



A 



PLAYING RULES. 51 

• Rule 65. 

The Umpire shall call ami count as a " ball " any unfair ball 
delivered by the pitcher to the batsman, but not before such 
ball has passed the line of ihe home base. Fie shall also call 
and count as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which passes 
over any portion of the home base, and within the batsman's 
legal range, as defined in Rule 44, which is not struck at by 
the batsman, or a foul tip which is caught by the catcher, 
standing within the lines of his position, or which aftjr being 
struck at and not hit, strikes the person of the batsman ; or 
when the ball is purposely hit foul by the batsman, or when 
the ball is bunted foul by the batsman. 

Rule 66. 

No person shall be allowed upon any par-t of the field during 
the progress of a game in addition to the players in uniform, 
the manager of each side and the umpire, except such officers 
of the law as may be present in uniform, and such officials of 
the home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

Rule 67. 

\o manager, captain or player shall address the spectators 
during the progress of a game, except in case of necessary 
explanation. 

Rule 68. 

No manager, captain or player, during the progress of the 
game, shall use indecent or improper language directed to a spec- 
tator, umpire, manager, club official or a player. A violation 
of this Rule must be followed by the removal forthwith of the 
offender from the game anil the grounds by the umpire on his 
Option, or upon the written accusation of the manager or 
other official of cither contesting club. Said removal to be fol- 
lowed by written proof s submitted within twenty-four hours to 
the President of the League, -olio, if the evidence warrants, shall 
suspend the offending manager, captain or player from actual 
service for a definite period of lime, subject to appeal to the 
Board of Directors, 

Km 1 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police force upon ils own 
grounds to preserve order, and ill the event of a crowd entering 
a field during the progress of a game and interfering with the 
play in any manner, the visiting club may refuse to play fur! her 
until the field be cleared. If the ground be not cleared within 
fifteen minutes thereafter, the visiting club may claim, and 
shall be entitled to the game, by a score of nine runs to none 
(no matter what number of innings has been played). 



52 



PLAYING RULES. 



Rule 70. — General Definitions. • 

" I'lay " is the order of the umpire to begin the game, or to 
resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 71. 
'< Time " is the order of the umpire to suspend play. Such 

extension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 72. 

"Game" is the announcement by the umpire that the game 
is terminated. 

Rl LE 73. 

An " Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players repre- 
senting a club in a game, and is completed when three of such 
players have been put out, as provided in these rules. 

Rule 74. 
A " Time at Bat " is the term at bat of a batsman. It begins 
when he takes his position and continues until he is put out or 
becomes a base-runner ; except when, because of being hit by 
a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the pitcher, 
or in case of a sacrifice hit purposely made to the infield which, 
not being a base-hit, advances a base-runner without resulting 
in a put-out, except to the batsman, as in Rule 46. 

Rule 75. 

" Legal " or " Legally " signifies as required by these rules. 

SCORING. 

Ki i.E 76. 
Ill order to promote uniformity in scoring championship 
games the following instructions, suggestions and definitions 
are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required to 
make all scores in accordance therewith. 

Batting. 

SECTION t. The first item in the tabulated score, after the 
player's name and position shall be the number of times be 
has been at bat during the game. No lime at bat shall be 
scored if the balsman be hit by a pitched ball while standing 
ill his position, and after trying to avoid being so hit, or in 
case of the pitcher's illegal delivery of the ball to the bat 
which gives the batsman his base, or when he intentionally hits 
the ball to the field, purposely to be put out, or if he is given 
first base on called balls. 

Sec. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column should be placed the first-base 



PLAYING Ki i i- . 



53 



hits made by eacli player. A base-hit should be scored in the 
following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines and out of reach of the fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder in 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to 
handle the ball before the striker reaches firs) base. 

When (lie ball is hit with such force to an inlielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman. (In case of 
doubt over this class of hits, score a base-hit and exempt the 
fielder from the charge of an error.) 

When a ball is hit so slowly towards a fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the batsman. 

That in all cases where a base-runner is retired hy being hit 
by a batted ball, the batsman should be credited with a base-hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the umpire, 
as defined in Rule 49, section 5. In no case shall a base-hit be 
scored when a base-runner has been forced out by the play. 

SEC. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed the sacrifice 
hits, which shall be credited to the batsman who, when no 
is out or when but one man is out, advances a runner a ba 
a bunt hit, which results in putting out the batsman, or would 
so result if the ball were handled without error. 



Fielding. 

Sec. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a batsman is 
given out by the umpire for a foul strike, or where the batsman 
(ails to bat in proper order, the put-oul shall be scored to the 
catcher. In all cases of "out" lor interference, running out 
of line, or infield fly dropped, the "out" should be credited to 
the player w ho would have made the play, but for the action 
of the base-runner or batsman. 

SEC. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set 
down in tin- sixth column. An assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play 
of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in 

time to put a runner out, even if the player who could complete 

the play fails through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handli istS in any manner in handling the ball from 

the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the player who makes 
the put-OUl or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who 
throws or handles it cleanly and in such a way that a put-out 
results, or would result if no error were made by the receiver. 

Assists should be credited to every player who handles the 



51 



I'l.AVIN . 



ball in the play which results in a base-runner seine called out 
for interference or for running out of line. . 

Errors, 

SeC. 7. An error shall he given in the seventh column (or 
each misplay which allows a striker or base-runner to make 
one or more bases when perfect play would have insured his 
being put out. except that "wild pitches," "bases on balls," 
bases on the batsman being struck by a "pitched Ball," or in 
case of illegal pitched balls, balks and passed balls, all of 
which comprise battery errors, shall not be included in said 
column. In scoring errors of batted balls see section 3 of this 
rule. 

An error shall not be scored against the catcher for a wild 
throw to prevent a stolen base, unless the base-runner advances 
an extra base because of the error. 

No error shall be scored against an infielder who attempts to 
complete a double play, unless the throw is so wild that an 
additional base is gained. 

Stolen Bases. 

A stolen base shall be credited to the base-runner win :ni 
he reaches the base he attempts to steal unaided by a fielding 
or by a battery error or a hit by the batsman. 

Rule 77. 

The Summary shall contain ; 

SECTION I. The score made in each innings of the game. 

Sec. 2. The number of bases stolen by each player. 

Sec. 3. The number of two-base bits made by each player. 

Sec. 4. The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

SEC. 5. The number of home runs made by each player. 

SEC. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by 
each side and the names of the players assisting in the same. 

SEC. 7- The number "f innings each pitcher pitched in. 

SEC. 8. The number of base-hits made off each pitcher. 

SEC. 9. The Dumber of limes the pitcher strikes out the 
opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 10. The number of limes the pitcher give., ba 
balls. 

SEC. It. The number of wild pilches charged to the- pitcher. 

Sec 12. The number of times the pitcher hits batsmen 
with pitched ball. 

13. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

St:< . 14. The time of the game. 

Sec. 15. The name of the umpire. 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



55 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS 



Sec. 

The Ground 

The Field 

Catcher's 1 inf. 

I -til Lines 

Players' Lines 

The Captain and Coacher's Line 

Three-foot Line 

Pitcher's Plate 

The Bates 

The Batsman's Line 

The Home Base 

First, Second and Third Bases 

Lines Musi Be Marked 

The Ball 

Weight and Size Ill 

Number of Balls Furnished (21 

Fining Player I >r Discoloring New I 'all r: 

Furnished by Home Club (8) 

Replaced if injured. (4) 

The Bal 

Material of II" 

Shape ol (2) 

THF.PLAYKRS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of Players in [he Game 

Players' Positions 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 

Club Uniforms ' 

i vlovea (*1 

Players' Benches '1 

Players Debarred from Game for N 

i ii f. G mi. 

TimeofChai Game 

Number of Innings 

nation <<'■ Game 

The Winning Run (hi 

\ Ti< Game 

A Drawn (lame 

A Called Game 

\ i- irfeited ' lame 

Failure of the Nine 1 i \ppeai 

,1 .1 <lne Side 10 Play 

Falluri Playing 

If a Team Resorts to Dilatory Practice. 



[11 

«) 



[41 

Wilful Violation (5) 

Ordet to Remove Player 

I . S than Nine P lasers 

nl i lame to be Commenced Within Ten Minutes (8) 

Written Notice to President (9) 

line 

Substitutes 

Sufficient Number of Substitute Players (1) 

When Player May Be Substituted 

Base- Runner 

Choice of Innings Condition of Ground 



Rltl.K 

1 



8 
9 
hi 
11 
12 
It 

u 

14 
11 
14 
14 
14 
19 
V, 
IS 



1(1 

IT 
18 
19 

in 
SO 



'-'I 
21 
21 

"1 

h 
28 

■.'! 
29 
2B 
28 
29 
29 
29 
29 

So 

29 
29 

20 
27 
27 
27 
27 



56 INDEX TO RULES AM) REGULATIONS. 

Sec. Rulk 

The Pitcher's Position '->« 

Delivery of the Ball— Fair iial) 30 

Unfair iiall :i! 

Delaying the (lame (1) 32 

Umpire Shall Call a Kail (2) 32 

Balking :s:i 

Motion to Deceive M) 33 

Throwing by the pitcher lo any base wlthoul stepping 

toward said base (2) 33 

Foot Not in Contact with Pitcher's Plate (8) 39 

Pitcher Outside of Lines (4) 33 

Standing in Position to Pitch Without Having Ball <■>> 33 

Any Motion Made Without Immediately Delivering Ball., (li) 33 
If the Pitcher Delivers the Hall to the Bat when Catcher is 

O in side the Lines of his Position (7) 88 

A Dead Ball M 

A Foul Stri ke 85 

Block Balls 36 

Stopped by Person Not in Game (1) 36 

Hall Returned (21 86 

Base-Runner Must Stop (8) 33 

The Batsman's Position— Order of Batting 37 

Where Players Must Remain II) 88 

Space Reserved for Umpire (2) So* 

Space Allotted Players "At Bat" (3) 38 

Batting Rules— Fair Hit Ill 89 

Foul Hit (?) 39 

Fair Hit Which Rolls to Foul Ground (3) 39 

Foul Hit Which Hulls to Fair Ground (1) 89 

A Foul Tip in 

A Bunt Hit II 

Balls Batted Outside the Grounds 1".' 

A Fair Batted Ball Over the Fence a! 

Strikes 41 

Ball Struck at by Hat snt an (I) 41 

Fail Ball, Delivered by Pitcher (2) 41 

A Foul Hit Ball Not Caught on the Fly (8) 41 

A " Hunt Hit" Which Semis the Ball to Foul Ground (4) 41 

Ball Struck at after Touching Batsman's Person £5) 41 

Foul Tip by Batsman (6; 41 

A Foul Strike 15 

The Batsman is Out M 

Failing to Take Position at Bat in < Irder (1) 46 

Failure to Take position within tine Minute after being 

led (3) 46 

1! be Mai esa Foul llii (3) 46 

If he Makes a Foul Strike (4) 16 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher to! 46 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire (81 46 

It Ball Hits Him While Making Third Strike (7) Hi 

If He Hits a Fly Ball that can Be Handled by lnlieldcr 

while Bases are Occupied with only On-j Out (Hi 46 

If Third Strike is Called (9) 16 

m Must \'ot Leave Bench Until Called by Umpire. Ill)) 46 

The Batsman Becomes a Base- Runner 17 

Aftera Fair llii il) 47 

After Four Halls arc Called 08) 17 

After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 47 

If Catcher Interferes . (I) 17 

Bases to be Touched Is 

Entitled i I V.I 

If Umpire Calls Four Halls mi 4u 

If Umpire Awards Succeeding Batsman Has.- (S) 4'J 



1NDKX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



57 



Sec. Rule 

If Umpire Calls Balk tgj 40 

If Pitched Ball by Pitcher Passes Catcher (4) 111 

Ball Strikes Umpire (5) 49 

Prevented from Making Base (0) 49 

Fielder Stops Ball with Any Part of His Dress (7j 49 

Returning to Bases 50 

H Foul Tip (!) 50 

If Foul Strike fg) W 

1 1 1 >ca,i Bail m W 

[f Person of Umpire Interferes with Catcher w) -"hi 

If the Ball Touches the Batsman's Person ■ (5J 60 

Base-Runner Out 51 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Pall (1) M 

If Field:, II Id Fair Hit Ball l2J 51 

Third Strike Ball Held bv Fielder (3) 51 

Touched wilh Ball After Three Strikes (4) 51 

Touching First Base (5) 51 

Running from Home Base to First Base (0) 51 

Running from First to Second Base (7) 51 

Failure to Avoid Fielder (8) 51 

Touched by Ball While In Play (it) 51 

Base-Runner May Overrun First Base (10) 51 

Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (11) 51 

Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner (12) 51 

Touched by Hit Ball Before Touching Fielder (13) 51 

Running to Base (11) 51 

Umpire Calls Play (15) 51 

When Batsman or Base- Runner is Out 52 

Coaching Rules 53 

Scoring of Runs 54 

THE UMPIRE, 

Umpires Shall Not Be Changed 56 

Powers 56 

No Appeal From Legal Decisions 57 

Disputed Decisions 58 

Penalties for Violation of Rules (1) 59 

Report of Action ami Causes . . . (£) 50 

Notification of Finos (3) 59 

Notification to League President (4) 59 

Notification to Both Captains of Enforcement of Rules (5) 59 

Shall See that the Rules are Strictly Observed 60 

Shall Call I'lay (II 

Suspend Play OS, R8, 64 

Shall Call Balls and Strikes 65 

FIELD RULES. 

Who Shall Be Allowed on the Field 66 

Spectators Shall Not Be Addressed 67 

v. Manager, Captain or Player During the Progress of the Game 

Shall Use Indecent or Improper Language 68 

Every Club Shall Furnish Folic* Force 69 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Play 70 

Time 71 

Game 72 

An Inning 73 

A Ti me at Bat 74 

Legal 76 



58 INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATION 

SCORING. 

Batting (II 

Runs Made (2) 

Hits (8) 

Sacrifice Mils it 

ridding (6) 

Assists (tfj 

Errors (7) 

Stolen liases 

The Summary 

Score Madein Each Inning ill 

Numberof Bases Stolen 

Nu in her of Two- Base Hits (S) 

Clumber of Three-Base Hits Ill 

Number of Home Runs i"'l 

Number of Double and Triple Play* i'ii 

Number of I unities Each Pitcher Pitched In 

Number of Base-Hits oil Each Pitcher 

Number of Batsmen Struck Out by Each 1'ittlier 

Number of Bases on Balls by Each Pitcher 110) 

Wild 1'itchcs HI. 

Number of Batsmen Hit by Each Pitcher ...(18) 

Passed Balls (18) 

Time of tj.imc (14) 

Name of t lie Umpire (15) 



Rule 
7<S 

n 

70 
711 
76 

78 
re 



77 
77 



77 
77 

i I 
t I 

77 



U 



A SIMPLE WAY FOR LAYING OFF A BALL FIELD 

Lay a tape-line front centre of backstop out into the field 227 feet 8j ■■■■ inches 
to second base. At '.«) feet from back st 1 p place home plate, with the tape- 
line dividing it diagonally. Between i">" fetl inches and 150 feet lOinchcs 

from the back stop place the pitcher'*- plate,, with the tape-line dividing it at 
the centre; 1S8 feet 7H in- iies from bai l-l<-\> drive a stake. At ri^lit angles 

io the tape-line and itf feet 'i-Y\ inches fr tlie stake and DO feet fr..i 

home plate ami second base, place first \»abi < n one side and third base on 
the other. This done, remove the stake. I. ay lines connecting the 
thus laid, forming the diamond.; extending the lines from home base and first 
have, and home Iiasc and third base in each direction t<> the fence, thus 
forming the foul line and the ■ atch*rS*S position. Parallel with tliese line-. 

and 50 feet away lay tin: player*' lines, extending from intersection with lines 
From this point lay lines at right angles to lines just 
bed extending to the base lines. At right an e and parallel 

with the base lines, 15 feet dtstai nchers line] 

feet toward the outfield Parallel with and three feet distant from thi 
line from home base to first ' I ty i Hue beginning 45 feet from home plate 
and extending just past first base. 

On each side of home plate, parallel with line fn backstop to 

second base andftiru hes distant from home plate lay lines fi feet long, running 

3 feet each way from a line through the centre of home plate, also lay other 
lines parallel with and 4 feet distant from the ones just described. 

into rectangles 4 feel liroenalon, thus forming the batsman's 

■!. See amendment to Rule '' on location of home i 
Observe Rules 11,42 and 18, 



59 



ADVICE TO UMPIRES. 

You are the absolute master of the field from the beginning 
to the termination of a game. You are by these rules given 
full authority to order any player, captain or manager to do or 
omit to do any act which you may deem necessary to maintain 
your dignity and compel respect from players and spectators. 
(Rule 59.) 

The rules are created to be enforced to the letter. If they 
are poor rules t lie fault is not yours. If they are disobeyed you 
are to blame. 

Before " play " is called satisfy yourself that the field is cor- 
rectly laid off with lines, bases and plates in proper places, and 
that the materials supplied for the game are as required by the 
rules. (Rule 60.) 

Notify each captain that the rules will be enforced exactly as 
they are written, and thai for each violation the prescribed 
penalty will follow. Do not in any case temporize with a rule 

breaker. 

Make all decisions as you sec them. Never attempt to 
"even up" after having made a mistake. 

lie strict in what may seem to be trivial matters, thereby 
"nipping in the bud" trouble before it fully develops. 

Specially observe Rules 20 and 38, which require players to 
occupy their respective benches ; also section 6 of Rule 25, 
which specifies that a player ordered from the field shall go 
within one minute from the time yon order his removal from 
the game. 

Do not allow a player (not even a captain) to leave his posi- 
tion (which is the bench or coacher's box, for the captain 
whose side is at bat, or the regular fielding position of the cap- 
tain whose side is not at bat) to argue with you. The captain 

only is allowed to appeal to yon (and he only from his proper 
position) on a legal misinterpretation of the rules. If he claims 
that yon have erred.it is proper that the spectators should 

know what the claim is. (Rule 58.) 

Coachers have heretofore been a disturbing element to the 
umpire. Rule 53 provides just what his and what your duties 
are. These rules are mandatory, not discretionary. If you 
allow them to be violated you become the chief culprit and 
do not properly perform the duties of your position. I'.ear in 
mind that you are not responsible for the creation of the rules 
or the penalties prescribed by them. 

The umpire who enforces the rules, maintains his dignity 
and compels respect, gives the fullest satisfaction to both 
teams and to the spectators, 

Compel respect from all and your task will be an easy one. 



6o 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL II 



ANNUAL MEETING NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Annual Meeting of the National League and American Asso- 
ciation ol Professional Basj Ball Clubs, held at the 
Fifth Aenue Hotel, New York City, 
Tuesday, December 11, J9C0 

Meeting called to order by the President at 10.30 P.M. 

Present : A. II. Soden anil \V. II. Con ant, representing t he- 
Boston Base Ball Association ; C. II. Ebbetts and ]■'. A. Abel], 
representing the Brooklyn Base Ball Club ; John T. Brush, N. 
A. Lloyd and II. X. Hempstead, representing the Cincinnati 
Base Ball Club ; Jas. A. Hart, representing the Chicago League 
Club ; John I. Rogers and A. J. Reach, representing the Phila- 
delphia Ball Club, Limited ; Barney Dreyfussand W. W. Kerr, 
representing the Pittsburg Athletic Co. ; Andrew Freeelmanand 
I ■'. M. Knowles, representing the National Exhibition Co, of 
New York City; I'. I nil. Robison and \I. S. Robison, rep- 
resenting the American Base Ball and Athletic Exhibition Co. 
of St. Louis, Mo. 

At the suggestion of President Young. Mr. A. II. Soden was 
unanimously elected as Chairman of this annual meeting. 

The reading of the Minutes of the last meeting was dispensed 
with. The report of the Board of Directors was received, 
accepted and adopted. 

( >n motion, adjourned until 12 o'clock noon on the following 
day 

Wednesday, December 12, 1900. 

Meeting called to order at 2 o'clock P.M. All clubs present. 

Mr. Brush, Chairman of Circuit Committee, requested further 
time before being called upon to make any suggestions or 
recommendations to I he League, which was granted. 

Mr. Brush, representing the Committee appointed to confer 
with the Players' Protective Association, submitted a verbal 
statement and report. 

'in motion, Messrs. Robison, Rogers and Kreedman 
appointed a Committee to draft a resolution embodying the 



ANNUAL MEETING "!•■ NATIONAL LEAGUE, 



6t 



views of this body in regard to the Report of the Committee 
appointed to confer with Mr. Taylor, representing the Players' 
Protective Association. 

On motion, adjourned until Thursday, December i }, :it 
10.30 A.M. 

Tin ksday, December 13, 19.00. 

Col. Rogers, representing the Committee consisting of Missis. 
Brush, Soden and himself, submitted the following (See Page 
94, Stenographer's Report). 

Section i6of the League Constitution was amended, reducing 
the number of Directors frcm six to four. 

The following named gentlemen were elected Directors for 
the ensuing year: A. II. Soden, Andrew Freedman, [ohn T, 
Brush and Barney Dreyfuss. 

Messrs. Soden, Hart, Rogers, Brush, Robison and Young 
were elected members of the National Board of Arbitration. 

The Standing Committees were continued 

On Constitution, Messrs. Rogers, Brush and Mart. 

On Playing Rules. Messrs. Hart, Ilanlon and Reach. 

On National Agreement, Messrs, Brush, Soden and Hart. 

On motion, a recess was taken until 3.30 P.M. 

Meeting called to order at .1.40 P.M. 

Col. Rogers offered the following motion, which was adopted : 
"That all moneys due the Washington National Base Ball 
Club, on account of the Reduction Agreement, adopted March 
7, 1900, be paid to Mr. Geo. W . Wagner, to whom said pay- 
ments have been assigned, upon the transfer of certificates of 
stock of said corporation, or as many as can be obtained, to 

\\ E. Young, trustee." 

1 in motion, it was unanimously agreed that no club should 
carry more than sixteen players on iis pay roll after May 15. 
and Messrs. Freedman, Rogers and Brush were appointed a 
Committee to prepare a resolution or agreement to carry the 
above into effect. 

On motion, adjourned to meel al 11 o'clock a.m. on the fol- 
lowing day. 



62 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE, 



Fun. \v, December 14, 191 0. 

Meeting called to order at 12.15 P.M. 

Mr. Hart moved that the Schedule Committee prepare an 
Umpire Schedule with no names attached, simply using ihe 
letters A, B, (,' and 1) instead of names, that will require each 
umpire to umpire for each club as near equally as possible, 
both at home and abroad. 

1 in motion the Secretary was instructed to prepare a Schedule 
calling for 140 games, commencing April 18 and ending 
October 6. 

It was also unanimously agreed that May 30 and September 2 
games should be played in the East, ami July 4 games in the 
West ; also that the last sectional series of games between the 
East and West should be played in the West. 

The report of the Committee in relation to the number of 
play eis tn be carried Iry each 1 lub after May 15 was unanimously 
adopted. 

It was moved and seconded that when airy club serves notice 
upon a player that bis contract will be terminated in ten days, 
or any time, that the President of the League be at once noti- 
fied by telegram ami that the President of the League immedi- 
ately telegraph the other seven clubs the information. Carried. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That inasmuch as the three requests made orally by 
Attorney Taylor in public meeting have been so merged in, and 
confused with, a large number of other new and radical proposed 
changes in our players' contracts, which also affect the National 
Agreement, that it is impossible to intelligently differentiate 
them, and that the adoption of such proposed amendments 
would not only be prejudicial to individual interests, but would, 
we believe, be destructive to organized base ball. 

It was unanimously agreed that " when w 2 adjourn we adjourn 
to meet subject to the call of the President." 

Mo further business appearing, on motion, adjourned. 

(Signed) A. II. Soden, Chairman, 
N. K. YouWG, Set retary. 



ANN'UAI Ml- K.TIN'. ••! NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



63 



RECONVENED ANNUAL MEETING 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League and 

American Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, 

held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, 

Monday, February 25, J 901 

Meeting called to order by Mr. A. II. Soden, Chairman, at 

(j. 50 I'm. All clubs present. 

On motion, the reading of Minutes of last meeting were read 

and, as amended at the suggestion of Mr. Hart, were approved. 

On motion, the regular order of business was suspended. 

The Secretary read a communication from Mr. C. L. Zimmer, 

President of the Players' Protective Association. 

On motion, Messrs. Brush, Hart and Soden were appointed 
a Committee to confer with Mr. Zimmer. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 3 o'clock P.M. on the fol- 
lowing day. 

Tuesday, February a6, 1901. 

Meeting called to order at 8.50 P.M. 

The Playing Rules Committee submitted their report, and, 
on motion, consideration of the same was deferred until the 
following day. 

The Committee appointed to confer with Chas. Zimmer, 
President of the Players' Protective Association, reported cer- 
tain amendments to the Player's Contract suggested by Mr. 
Zimmer, which amendments were considered by the meeting. 

In connection with said amendments (lie following letter was 
read and spread Upon the Minutes. 

"As President of the Protective Association of Professional 
Pase Hall Players, and as its authorized representative, I hereby 
agree in return for the concessions granted by the National 
League of Professional liase I!all Clubs this day, February 26, 
1901, that all National League or Eastern League players who 
may sign American League contracts will he suspended, pend- 
ing final action by the Protective Association as a body. 

"(Signed) C. L. ZlMMt-.k." 



6 4 



ANNUAL MEET1NC "I NATIONAI LEAOUE. 



On motion, it was 

Resolved, That the said amendments, taken in connection 
wi:h Mr. Zimmer's letter be, anil are hereby, approved and 
adopted ; and that a new contract be printed after being 
amended in accordance therewith. 

Unanimously adopted. 

On motion, adjourned until Wednesday, at I. 30 P.M. 

Wednesday, February 27, 1901. 

Meeting called to order at 2.25 P.M. 

The League proceeded to consider amendments In the Playing 
Rules, which as amended, were adopted, as follows (See Play- 
ing Rules). 

The League Constitution was amended as follows (See Con- 
stitution). 

On motion, the appointment of a Supervisor of Umpires was 
Hied until the next annual meeting. 

On motion, adjourned until 7 30 P.M. 

Meeting called to order at 8. 15 P.M , and after the transaction 
..' routine business, on motion, adjourned to meet at 2 o'clock 
P.M. on the following day. 

Thursday, Ftiruary 2-, 1901. 

Meeting called to order at 8 o'clock P.M. 

Mr. lirush submitted amendments to the National Agree- 
ment (to conform to the new form of contract) which were 
adopted. 

It was unanimously agreed that " when we adjourn, v. 
journ to meet subject to the call of the President." 

No further business appearing, on motion, adjourned. 

ned) A. II. Soden, Chairman, 

N. E. S in NO, Si , tiny. 



OFFICERS 



65 



following is an official lisi of the oflti ers of lh< 
ue and American Association of Professional Base Ball 
< -lubs, and l ibs, members i h 

iiient and Set retary 
N. E. VOUNC, i_|i 7 (,S[., X. W., Washington, D. C. 

tors 
A. II. s. .i.i n. Barney Dreyki is, J. i \sn 

Andrew Freshman. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOl 1ATION ON, MASS. 

A. H. So i 

I. Ii. Billings, Treas., Box i ; 

BROOKLYN BASE BALL CL1 I'.. BROOKLYN, N. V. 
Oi \s. II. Ebbi i i s, Presid I'. \. Ami i . '■ 

CINCINNATI BASE "BALL CLUB, CINCINNATI, ". 
J. T. Brush, President. \. A. Lloyd, i. 

( ''.in 

CHICAG" I II \< ,< E R \I.I. CLUB, CHICAGi '. ILL. 
JAS. A. IIari I Building. 

I'H'I 5BUI n BASE BALL CI UE, PI rTSBURG, PA. 

lent. 

PHILADELPHIA BALI I LUU (Limited), PHILA., PA., 

A. J. I: i \' ii, Pn i lent. JolIN I. I 

lii j;. 

NATIONAL EXHIB1 i NEW VORK CITY. 

Andi'i i o M. Know i 

i |j Broad way. 
AME1 lASE BALL VNDATHLETJC I XHIBITION 

I l .. in ST. I ' ! ". 

I-. hill. Robi Pre *' 

I.. I hi i 



C6 



1 .1 ii . 



Official national nam Statistics 1 

m' Comp.Ui by N E. Youi 



BATTING RECORD 

Of Players Who Have Taken Part in Fiftt en ( r More 
Chimpi n:h : p Gan-.es, Reason cf l r 00. 




1 Wagner ■ . 

8 K. 

rkett.. 

>ach.. 
ckley.. 

: nclull 
'.raw., 
in Hai 

11 il.nf.cll.. 

12 Donlin... 



u rg 

St. I. -I 

Philadelphia. 

i ork... . 

Cincinnati.. . . 



St. Lui 



delphia.. 



102 151 

1- i;i 
113 145 



klyi 

r 



• lill 

* . 'i H i ■ 

Philadelphia. 







29 Freeman . . . 



Boston — 



I3»; 



I IK l.-l! 

188 544 

12S ITS 

85 I 

18 151 

IS< I.Vl 



9!i 192 343 

B4 115 139 

103 i; I .'"i 

10 SU ii" 

Da 1 1 1 220 
to urn i is 

06 1 is :;:l| 
50 I".'. 1.13 



=,* 










19 81 







800 



6 19 



825 n .,, 
884 i. ii 

.319 llll 





i 






ii 






in 


Ii. 


313 


:', 




313 


1 


! I 




li 


1 










1 1 




II 
i 
1 


I'.' 



offii i ns'i ics. 

ISATTlNCi 















81 



\ Duffy, 



I Keister 
38 Mi I 
33 Rii 



n 

i [elphia. 

: 

Pittsbui 

ui s 

Pittsburg. . . . 



'' IO'Bi 






SO Bradley. 

-':; Dinneen 

ter . . 

■'!'■' Tenney B 

1" Kiistm Brooklyn 



Pittsburg 

St. Loui i 

Boston 





New Yoi 1 



1 1 Beaumont . . . . 

131 I.,,; 
13 McGi 



Ii 

JWolt 
Mi I 



CI 








I Bo 



50 181 
I2H WW 

94 8i i 

ISO 145 

20 84 

111 187 

103 398 
1 1(1 125 
109 132 

112 II" 

llMi HI 

34'] 10 





Pittsburg 

Piti 

n 



tti and Nc 



Cincinnati 





■ 



wis... 

II <,>U;n 

■ 

I Doyle -. 

I t Walla t. 1 

in Cincinnati 

rncr \. a Vol 

an Bo i in . 



iuis. 

p 

. . ('ill' illlKlti 



nil ITS 229 
78 149 '.'i"' 



1 y ii 

.. Ill 

Philadi i ' 









124 



56 212 



o; i is 

62 I 1 1 
71 143 
60 110 

79 [ 

gfl | 

14 35 

I -I --.'I 

81 38 

57 [20 162 

66 115 163 

■ 

69 |38 166 

59 90 Ii'.' 
62 119 155 

67 l'H 172 

80 124 185 
24 84 



X eg 

298 Ii 12 

Kl 

290 1 1 23 
.295 18 18 



1 n 
In 10 

1 ■'. 

18 

1 I 

,, ._, , 
8 ."> 

5 II 
8 II 
I 7 
I 9 

Ml 
'.' 15 

: 3 

I III 
g '.i 

270 13 35 



.286 
.281 
.281 
.382 
.281 



.275 

•;; i 



260 

10 



3 10 

I I 

1 S 

S iii 

2 II 
1 9 
1 .'. 
1 8 

8 I 
19 1.1 






F FI C I A I 
BATTING I ittucti. 



■ 



72 



I I hilda 

-rail. . . 


tue 

1 Dillard 

\ Everett 

- Callahan . . . 
' Doheny .... 

Donahue 

J Ta> i 
I Hajvle . 

■TV. 

( rrady 

Chiles 

rmick . 
I l.each 

■ tejn. . . 
' I 

ols 

I Leever 

Hahn 

! 

B man . . . 

■ \ 



n 

Dolan 

Sudhoff 



-mity . . 
Philipp] 



Jones.. 

1 
I Phillips. 

; ■ 
. I 

■ in. . . , 
tl 

I 

'.I- 1 i 




1 ■ 

■ 
■ 

St. Louis ; ,ii,i Pittsburg 
St. Louis 

■ 

1 . 
■ ■ 

Philadelphia 

IgO. . , 

N*CW Y.., i i. 

Pittsburg 

■ 
Philadelphi 

1 

Pittsburg 
(.'in' iunai 
Si . i "Mi 

Pittsburg 
Cincinnat 

■ 

■ 
Philadelphi 

Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 

■■Mis. 
■ ■ 

Pittsburg 

1 

Cincinnati 

l;. ■ 



OFFICIAL LEAGUE ,1 ITISTICS. 



'■ 



FIELDING RECORD 

Of Players Who Have Played Fifte n or More 
Championship Games. 

K1KSI B VSEMEN. 



Kelley ... 
QifcGami. . . . 

i Tenney . . 
Delehanl v . 
Beckley. . . . 
Everett . . . 

i O'Bri. .1 

COOll v 

Donlin 



Brooklyn 



St. L >uis 

Brooklyn . . . . 



Bosti 'ii 

[elphia. 
n.iti .. . . 

:<j 



Pittftburg . . . . 
tiis 



28 841 

15 123 

124 1228 

110 1062 

108 1030 

[30 1293 

[38 1388 



03 881 
81 208 



< ■ 



I -j ■'. 
13 1 
, r i I II 

74 18 
:>,:, 16 
36 19 
69 25 

in 61 
18 I 
16 9 
■M 22 

21 s 

I 12 



1296 .989 

llll US | 
872 .'.is:: 



1184 
I88< 
1511 
252 
164 

1419 

;p.i 
224 



'.is:: 
'.is-; 
.979 
.976 
.975 
.975 

'«,:, 
960 
.940 



•\l' BASEMEN, 



! ■ 

2 Lajoic 

:: DeM 

4 Steinfeldt 

6 Riti hie 



ter 





12 Murph 



m 



Brooklyn ■ ■ ■ 

Cincinnati 

inn i:i. 

Pittsburg . 



st. Louis 

New Vorl 

i\ ii 

I'l.il.i.! 

Mew Yorl 





::. 
102 

i; 

06 

s; 
123 
138 

I! 'J 
III 

."' 

21 

in 





■-■; 






25 




129 181 


12 




208 21 1 


'.'1 


443 


181 198 1- 




308 354 80 


688 


334 123 19 


SI IS 


218 812 85 


580 




m 




.Mill 


64 7211 




H 15 I" 


99 


' 


'.i 





.856 
.056 
.054 
Wt 
.939 
.98. 
.988 
026 
924 



THIUH BAS1 





i !dt 

I '■ ■! ■ ii 

Irwin 



w 

Mc< lormick, 
Williams.... 

Dillard 

WoWi ■ 



I tick man 

■ 

■ 



St. Lo 



Philadelphia 

innati 

:i 







Pittsburg 

1 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburg 





York 



188 


184 






61 


108 


1 75 




30 


i; 


'.II 


ii 1 1; 


61 


Sll 


1 82 


II 286 


I 12 


■ 




i: 




(IN 


ii ic, 


216 


29 


51 


l(M 




52 


. 


■•i 


28 58 


i" 


<:■ 


104 




■in 








Ii 


88 


I'M 


136 238 


15 


llll 


31 


13 70 


19 


184 


lis 


181 283 


'.ii 




IK 


18 '. 


'.i 


ii, 


IS 


17 




is 


K« 



.'.111 

.924 
.989 
.988 
.924 

.'.117 

.898 
.891 

.886 

snl 
.791 



7 o 



if I li IA1, ! .!•: v;i'F n VTIS1 ICi 
-Ih n; I STOPS. 









EC 

118 
134 
184 
12; 
130 
125 

85 
180 

h; 

17 

16 


3 

a. 

8i; 

880 
828 

all 
270 
189 
310 
:« 
27 
ft? 


< 

156 
515 
156 

117 
509 

II" 
::ns 
156 

01 

in 
154 


■ 



_: 

i.-) 
.m 
i.-, 
in 

:.] 
56 
89 

<;:, 
s 

83 


ss:: 
Till 
824 

SH| 

766 
516 
861 

Hi) 

» 
289 






ID 




94fl 


1 


Wallace 




•II- 







Mil 


t 

1 




.940 




986 




m 






,,.,, 


(i 







92 1 
92fl 








.905 



FIELDERS. 



1 Barry 

2 Wagner 



8 



B 



Donovan.. . 

I Freeman . 

„ I Dill 
'' i II 
in Crawford .. 



, : 



II Stahl. 

. , [Duffy 

" i Beaumont . ... 
\l { 
H 
'' I Hamill- 

een 

. irk« 

Smith 

\ < 1'Brien 

- B •' 

Sheckanl 
McBride 

[.. 









n 

Pittsburg 

Si, Lotlijt 

U Iphia 

Si. I.miis 



. or! 

Hostoi 

I :lyn 

Si. Louis 

nnati 

nnati 

ii 



urg 



New Vork 



lyn 

[o .... 

urg 



U19 



lyn 





Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 







I'ittsl.ui L' 



-.' I .;.; 
I IT 
88 220 



III 



ISI 

816 

.'!■;.% 
I '."i 
181 
39 
21 
230 
■n: 
107 

:;■: 

229 

2171 



i 1 

is e 

J I s 

IS 11 

12 (1 

I.'! II 



80 16 


871 




no 


18 '.i 


208 


:; 2 


H 




22 


16 la 




22 18 


262 




lis 




•;'.u 


22 1 I 


266 


:;:', Mi 


884 


18 i'.i 


857 


■i\ II 


287 


l:l 18 


243 



108 


263 


9 




110 


151 


II in 


.'1 


16 




142 


845 






285 


:;:. 22 




170 


II 18 


PHI 


166 


16 


18 


IN 


■-■ 


•i 


2 


III 


818 


is 


28 


■r, 


i5 


1 


:, 


I8H 




I'.I 


■::: 


106 


175 


15 


17 


si; 




1-.' 10 


18 


62 




hi 



176 

60 
884 
332 

1:1; 

194 

■;; 
364 

ill 
279 



.976 
.969 

.966 

.'.ion' 

.!'.-,; 

.955 
.954 
.954 

.'.i i:i 
.947 
.947 
.941 
.947 
.'.no 
.'.in 

.'.II.'! 
.'.I I" 
.940 

.986 

,928 

,922 

.'.us 
,'.ns 
.his 
,s;k 




OFFICIAL LEAGUE STATIST!! . 
CATCHERS' AN I RAG1 



11 



Cum, 



3 



Warner 

Sullivan 

Zimiher 

Robinson 



Schriver 

Petti 



Cincinnati . . . 

I Parrel! 

Phil 

i Brooklyn — 

i ■ »"li" 

. 





Grady 

I lark. '. 

Bowerman 

I '"'T'l 11 



irl 30 

Boi ton 04 

; h 

St. 1 "!;■ :>ii ; 

St. Louis 

j ■-'•'i 

Cincinnati 78 

Cincinnati.. 18 

Ill 





i ■ id 1 'ittslmrg. 

New Jfork - 

B i 

Nrw Yorl 

Philacl 1 1 ■ i ' ' ■■ 



r 































u 










q 


















a 


.c 










U| 


-. 






. 
























p< 


< 


w 


Oi 




m 


so 


fl 


4 


156 


221 


65 


1 


11 313 


■ 


101 


IB 


Hi 


155 


lll'.l 


74 


6 


16 


'.". 15 


■:;:> 


108 


I !i 


10 113 


IK! 


x> 


I 


6 122 


304 


m 


20 


19 171 


206 


m 


15 


12 314 


82 


32 


8 


c, 103 


IBS 


s; 


20 


13 373 


272 


137 


[5 


25 149 


■.'!■_' 


HU IS 


in 321 


ffi 


32 6 


1 hi;, 


'.'"J", 


70 21 


I 330 


ll'jl 


64 i; 


10 251 


187 


50 '.i 


16 222! 


i :■: 


(6 13 


g 190 


'.'IS 


104 28 


19 399 






"': (!•', 


139 


60 13 


1 



s< 



.986 
.933 
.982 
.925 

.'CI 
.918 
.917 
.914 
,918 
.'.ill 
.'.il 1 
.'.« in 
.'.li is 
.894 
.892 
ss; 

.SSI 

.882 

.ST.", 



HERS' RECORDS IN U.PHABETICAL ORDER. 



. 






■s> 




■J 


a 
u 

= 




ck Out. 

of Fielding 
s. accepted. 1 






- 






a 


M 


■~: ) 


3 J 


























B 


g 




cti 


~ 


sfe 


7. 


8? 








u 


>' .- 


■ 




Su 










0, 


< 


- 


;s 


I'- 


— 







.,. 


..-illll 


272 


J. 15 


18 


79 


ll 


. 






!« 




B1H 




5 


78 


I'l 


tH6 







Ifl 


i 


'■ 1 


1 :;i 


ll 


7"> 


58 


76S 










297 


:, 97 


•'» 




81 


! 




■ ■: ! 


\-l 


.490 


.289 


5.26 


12 


93 


59 


,868 





■ ■■ 


HI 


9) 


.271 


■ 


21 


•j, 


12 


.739 




ll ,,ii ; i'liil.i. 



■■;, 




322 
,803 


6.59 
6.08 


li 
9 


ill 
SO 


20 
12 


sii; 


1 1 


942 







15 

2fi 


.588 
640 
893 


.245 

.288 

.-.'ll 


1.40 
1.76 
1.82 


s 

111 

18 


108 II i 


sv, 




in 
ffi 


,i'; 


'.HI 




.ssl 






Ml 


536 


.'.''■, 1 


1.20 


16 


.',1 




.868 




Nc« Y orl 


■ 


1, 1 


.286 


5 .08 


11 


4)0 


80 


.915 





".iii 












'.i, 


122 


s-i. 


1 


■ 


M 


. f.' 1 




13 


,ii 





T 



OFFfCI M i ■ ICS. 

PI If HERS' Rl I OUDS I outinnai. 



■ 



Clui 



Brooklyn 

Kitsen Brooklyn 

I.ecver Pittsl Org, 

Boston 

Mercei New York 

McGinnitj . Brooklyn, II 

Newt- ji Cincinnati 

Nichols Boston 28 

<>nh Philadelphi 3(1 

Piatl Philadelphia Ifl 

Powell St. Louis 33 

Philipi i Pittsbui 

Phi llij s Cincinnati 

sti 

'i 

TannehiU Pill 

Pil 

Willi- 

Young 




HOW TO FIND PERCENTAGES. 

In an how 1(» figure out the a1 

play t 

ncr, in 1000 ( 

i v. in 1000, 

■ 

I I 

n. in I900, 
(not in 

playc! i 



^ 



8 



►a'S 












- a«. 



d£-a 






. a 



pig 



S3 s 



Si*? 



—.X ■ 



.5 ~> >--?i . . -.1 . ~ 

jS <S a = -:» 

• — -./ 

c: or. — = " 3 



ta S<- 



?< . -j«f« 



= •3*0 






SI 



> c ~ - 



D £ - ' - 

= a 









> s 
m a 
— a 



= f 



</. ^— .< ' 



. r 



2 



1 



^ — — " * 



" r. g — 



x 8". ™ - • . ' 



?-•• 



r. - ? 



= ■;<- 



-a"<* 



" °s'i 



>ir 



.-* - T 



' - 8 : 



s"3<0 " 



s^.aa^s 






S.8*-*. 



1™ ' ; 7- : 3^ 



|rf««a 



8 » fi a 




c* 3: ?, / 




< 





■ — ' s - 



Si 5 * 5 : 

! 
'.-"—' »* ■« 

*i ■ ": _'?? ■ *7-r — — 
'CO.'** 1 £ 



■ 



! ? - -J > -- - 7 r -' - 3 ?; "' J 






c'3 
3 ■■' 






ag g« 



■ 
• — . to 






■ 






■ 



■ 






5-822 






~- 



81" 












; 


5. 






* 










- 




^ 


>• 












M 


B3 


/. 



-SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL 




Unttd nxolumivaly by th+ National Loaauo for thm ommt twonty-tour 

yoara ; by thm majority of Minor Lamgumm, and by all 

Intoroollopiata and othor Aamoolatlonn 



The Spalding "Official" League Ball 

No. 1m $1.23 

lOMIU itv eUilitif, 



The Spalding " Official " Boys' League Ball 

ut>i (lompovrJ of boyi unJ*r timca 
No. IB. .75 

umc *\ 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



SPAI DING'S ATHUTIC MBPARV 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL BATS 




■ 
.■, but the 

S'i>wlh 
... 
Act no ci<i:-iiii<-tjni;<.-t do wi I 

jy all lh« dctinbfc I 
I in the dorms of ntod*b sucxnilted bv lh« kjJum - 
;o<n- : 

No. AL H-ch, 75<. 

* y 

SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BATS 

r>„r fad* Mtffe fl^lsfre rrudefrwii lb« btnt! Ml ..1 fb» timber used in lh»lr con- 

■ m iwa m th<*r yean brieve using, Ihus ensuring not only j lighter jnd •Monger b«. out 
ilio rctaiMM H* njtyr.il wood. 

BOYS' BATS 




$l<atdinc*i V • 

1 -"> SOc. 




5»UlmgS Junto* Lejgue B*t. e*ir» qu 




Spurting* h 

OX. 

I 

. 2X 



■ 

Mo 2X9. B*h, 'Oc. 




- . ju A*h I 

4. , 25... No IP- ■=<■-'■ »«• 



Compile Catslofue o( A' ' < F«« 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 






SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BASE BALLS. 




uterul and work- 



SPALDING'S "VARSITY" LEAGUE BALL 

Rcgjl.it nm file and weight, fine selected horseMde d0tl 
rubber ctmtr. all wool yarn 

at imi- 
tations of riui Official LcJaue Bill. 
Warranted to last a full game with* 
■liiULdy or shape 

x. Each. »i.oo 



SPALDING'S 

"INT ERSCHOLASTIC* 

LEAGUE BALL 

Sj'iie quality as the 'Varsity 
League but smaller in 

■ 
<o Ust a full game. 

No. XB. Each, Mc. 





DOUBLE SEAM 
No 0. Ea* Si .25 



Made With the unw care and of the lime material ai 

' II. the double stitch is used in iti eorrstruc- 

(ion. rendering it doubly secure against ripping Every 

■i a separate bux and 

■ -ranted to lall a full gam*. 




PROFESSIONAL 

BALL 

aoc 



Regulation < Jr of carefully selected 

material throughout. nt-elase. bad. 

Each baD put up in * separate bo* and sealed. 




Regulation sue ML Var.tcJ ruxw; 

J for practice games. La<h ball put in 
Mparate bos and M 




SPALDING'S 






udc of good 

it in a separ 



-FT yr>KK. 



Complete Gaufap* ot Alhktst 5r*-n Mailed Fr« 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.. 

CHICAGO. 



DENVER 




SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



SPALDING'S TRADER 



) MARKED BASE BALLS 





A vrrylively bdll, ihe 
r.ibber. mak- 
ing i! ihe liveliest ball 
ever offered il Ihe priiF. 
Pot up in * separate box 
and so!*.]. 
No- 10. Each, 25c. 





% a little un- 
der regulation ufe, (ijm 

Put up in » 
separate box and sealed. 

No, 14. Each, i5c. 



SPALDING'S 

BOYS* LIVELY 

A good Boy*' Lively 

ill ««. iwo^ 

piece cover. Each ball 

trade-marked. On* 

'dofen balls in * bo*. 



•.., | 



■: , ■!, IOC. 



SPALDING'S 

EUREKA BALL 

Nearly rrgulaiiun llM 

Th« best 

ii ihe mm*) 

Kjllirade-marked. On* 
In i box. 
•. B. Bach, lOe. 




Slightly under reguljt 
sile, horv.i 
and i* very lively; tare- 
fully made and ■ perfect 
Boy*' ute ball. Put up in 
■ separate box and seated 
No. 7». I 




Regulation lire and 
weight, honentde cover 
*nd well constructed 
An excellent regulation 
hall for boys, I'ul up in a 
Mparjie box tnA sealed. 

No. 7. 





The beat is-cent ball 
rvtf put on the market. 
Regulation lUe and 
weight. Each ball >i 
yul up tn a separate box 
indValed. 

No 0. Each. »6c. 



SPALDING'S 

ROCKET BALL 
ThM ii a good bound 

■ 

-nee*. Thr 
best >*<«M 

i 
Onedoren baits tn a box 
Bach, Be. 





Complete CataJofW of Athktk StMWti Matkd Pre* 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

■oavMAfi 

AfEVYORat CHICAGO. 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRABX 



SPALDING'S CATCHERS' MITTS 



SPALDING'S 



CATCH HRS' MITT 




The Icj-:' ; I quality 

calfskin, Ihe padding and W 
ship of the very best, and the ><ldi- 
it-jfc of Lice Back makes Il- 
ls we intend it thill be— the 'fu- 
kctjom" of Catchers' Mnu. 

No.. 7-0. fi.l., *».0O 




Spalding's Mitt 

FfclLiMBtii 

An earn i^rge - 

padded mitt, without our patent 

Ucebaek. I 

velvet unned deerskin bee and 

No- OA. !■ MOO 




Spalding's League Mitt 

Pun* Li« Bub 
Mjde mrough&ul of a specially tanned 
and selected buckskin, miking a 
strong and durable mitt, at the same 
Irene being very soft and pliable and 
he.lv ily padded. 

No. 5-0. Each, S4.0O 

Spalding's Mitt 

f XMI Ua Buk , 

made of velvet tanned deerskin, and 

• -if teircted asbestos buck, 

. fining 

j: 

■■. Each, W.2S 



Spalding's Amateur Mitt 

P** ■) U«t B*rt 
Made tf • nos bock, 

■» p*oof andeKtfemely loufh 
i ixed tl 
Ihumb. subtianttatly made and well 
padded, 

A %I.SO 



Spalding'* Practice Mitt 
Prtnti Uu B«t 

■ 

adapted 
i'.' practice work; reinforced and lace 

MOO 



KtflKTJ »'•" ' Bfl 




Milt 



Spalding'* 
"Decker Patent" 

Piwm U« rWk 
Made euctly the uw it Vjgf 
1 I addition 
; lees of sole leather 
■ 
the hand and fingers. 

No OX. Each, tw-oo 







Compile OuJoe « «< A ' ' ' d F '" 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



L 



■,i-a; i.i-.- ■■ . a nil i n. i impakv 



SPALDING'S BOYS' CATCHERS' MITTS 



spAi.niNcrs boys' leaouh mitt 






Made throughout of a specially tanned *nd selected 
buckskin, making a strong inJ durable milt Very 
s«!i jr-.J pliable jnJ extra well -padded. Has our patent 
bet back. 

No s-oa. "E«h S2.00 



SMAUHNtJ ;> BOYS' fllTT 



$ 



MadeofriTi 
padded and substantia . H B^k and 

No BB. Each. SOc. 



SPALDING'S BOYS' HITX 




Made 01 extra quality asbestos buck, extremely tough 
It has our Patent Laced Back, well padded 
and finished and reinforced at thumb. A little larger In 
sire than our regular Boys' Mitts. 

No AB. Ear*, Sl.OO 



SPALDING'S JUNIOR MITT 



® 



Made of good quality solt tanned leather. Well pad- 
ded, Patent t.ice Back and remfo«ed Ihn 

'- CH, ■ h 25c. 



spallhnus M.KYS .Mirr 



SPALDING'S BOYS" MITT 



spalmno'S boys- ,Hirr 




■ 

Made Of loft tanned leather, extra pjdJrd and »>ibst..ntialV mad* The Lr*4h«r fee, CfflVM I 

'led and reinforced at the Urge.t Boys" M>tt e-ef offered a: -he 
Ihuerib Joint * 

No 4. ta^h OOc. No- 8 Each, 3flo. No 7. Eats, roo. 



I rUM m KIOMt 



Complete Catalogue of Athletic Sporti Mallei PtjM 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC UBRARV 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL GOODS 




BASEMEN'S 

SPALDING'S AND FIELDERS' 

MITTS 



FIRST BASEnEN'S niTT 

H sclrcled and specially tanned calfskin, eairemely 
well made Ihrougtioul and padded ro meet Ihe special require- 
menu of .1 Basemen's Mill. , It adapts (well nicety to the con- 
formation of the hand without undue straining, and the addition 
of our patent Lace Back and •'Highest Quality Trade Mirk ii 
a sufficient guarantee of it* quality and merits, 
Ro ■>. Each 5U.BO 




"UBraW 



S.'A. LINO'S ni-LDERS' MITTS 



® 




® 



This mill it m.iJr throughout of 

I. (I Mrirird iStrrr-kin, ind fdgr>! 



M.ulf of Iht very bc« jv ■ •■ fiujt of extrj hejvv Injtjk- 

1 hockskm, tlir thumb ,km anJ extra well padded Jt win, 

p.1,' ,:,d',^.i"hri^ -**rf """;"-'-'•• "- iiMM uu^'p-w^ 

manship throughout, a. indicated h, °" '"*"> """ ''"" " ""' l "« h "' f "» *" r"" 1 «"■*"» •""■< «" «* 
, Trade Marl. I"' 1 """ 1 " A very easy fitting mill. „hed. Patent laced thumb. 
IX »2 BO . CI. ,, »2.CX> No 4X. l.th,.»a.oo 




i) 



Made of good i|;i..liiv Ir-tthcr, «tn well pj<Jdrd, and 

[bmigbout in x moci Mjt-M.irni.il ttmaatf, 

i.itt .ii i popular f 
Ha SX. I h *i.oo 



BOV5* SIZE! 
i ins mill ii'iuJr throughout of ■ good quality lntl»f 
A good Mit-iunti-jl mill (or boyi. 'Well pndo«d Ifld 
'*•— J thumb. 

.No. ftX. Each. SOc. 



| I 1*1.1. is BKIHTS am. Lett 1 * 



Complete CaUlofw of Athletic Sfortt Milled Frre 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



t 



.SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



SPALDING'S INFIELDERS' GLOVES 




ail .srvLLs rUDfl in kMJiirs &m 



Ct-npUlC C»Ulo*uc of Alhlflic Spcrti Mailed Fxc 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



w 



SPAIXXFKYS ATHLETIC IIBBABV 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL MASKS 






SPAM- 
SI \ I'RUIUIIMi 



'■ 4-0, - • »3.00 



speciai leaou has*. 

' 1 itifouituwL 

U.00 



SPAU 

AMATJM 

U mi - 



si'o mm 

MVS- AMATU* MASK. 

Eiicily unm v„: i, m mr N*. A 
tofcrwty ufa matk Cm s,, t 
• iiji 





iMumn 

NECK PROTECTIMI MASK. 



m *■<>. i - **•<» 



i.lNOS 

mil i \nm uuaut 

Mt »tt VtarMUM. 

, ■•mm" ».•- 



1 trmi 







VALMN01 

Wffl F*44r*. No MCaS I 

- o. - Site. 




CMMMMkU ' ..I.**, .„ ,1 AlklrlK l^,u M r 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

aqCA«x Ma 



SPALDING S ATI11.I II. LIliKARV. 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL UNIFORMS 



Our unifnrt 

I*he (l.iiu 
, and t: t >j .i t ea i In select- 

ing only the goodi thai an 
to Ban Uall use. Made in all the popular colors. 

The Spalding Uniform, No. o. 
t I*hc workmanship and material of this outfit 
'8 of the very highest quality t ! I 

ire hat been I inif'.nn 

■uperior m anything offered in this llm 
plete.ll.ViiO; net price to cluhs ordering for en- 
tiretca. uit. 

The University Uniform, N 

hip and quality of material equal 

to clubs onl i 
it, Sl'UKJ p.:r suit. 

ic Uniform, No. 2. 

■tally he 
clubi orderinic for entire team, $H.l)0 per suit. 

The Club Spet ial CJnff inn No. 3 

ity flatiti'-l in a variety <pf 
leain.tv", 

ibe An . . 1 

1 be Spalding Jul 



»t|{ nine or 










Complete Catalogue of Athletic Sports Mailed Free 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DkNVKK 



.SPALPINO-S ATHLETIC IIBPABY 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL GOODS 




/^WX/'VX^ 



SPALDING'S 



BASE BALL 
SHOES^W: , 




M B.pII Shot b hand-made throughout. 
md of specially selected kangaroo leather. E*!itmt an it t-ikcri in IU 
it tirrjl construction. -<nd no pains or expense spared in making this shoe 
not only of the wy highest in qualify but ■ perfect shoe In every detail. . 
The plain, made exclusively for.lhit shoe, arc of the firmi hutd-forged 
M/w steel and firmly riveted lo heel and sole. 

HO 2-0. fcl pur, S7.90 

A special new light weight razor steel fund-forged plate ukJ 

on all our best grade shoes, 






SPRINTING-. 

' . at our No J-0 the*, 
hut Tnailt on ou' famous running 
shoe last- Weigh about eighteen 
ounce* 10 the pair jr. | 
eaira canr throughout. 
Nri 3 8. Per pah tt.OO 



CLUB SPECIAL.. 

J iJlin 

C-ilfskin. machine sewed, very tub- 
stantiallv constructed, and 4 first- 
class shoe in every pa rtl 
rlatrt riveted to heel and tot*. 
No. 33. Per pair. M.OO 



AMATEUR SPECIAL- 

Mjde of good quality calfskin. 
machine sealed. A serviceable 
and du'ablf shoe, and one we can 
specially recommend Plain fiv 
eted to heel and sole. 

Kg 35 ''- ■:■■■' «.SO 



HOW TO ORDER UNIFORMS 

Samples of flannels and special measurement blank* m.tikJ in tluht and 
Others interested on applKation If in a hurry for uniforms, and no sample or 
measurement blanks on hand, follow the instructions gn ■ 
idea of color desired and we will use our judgment in gelting'up same. Oui 
many years of experience will enable us to make a more plrjunjt i 

H| malerials and trrmmmgs for uniforms. In tend* 
ing order remit a deposit of at least is, percent of amount of order. 
TO MEASURE FOR UNIFORMS 
Cut out bottom line on this jrace paste at top of letter, trvd enter and meas- 
• i »im Uf e each man separately, at mdKJled fy the numbers gtven and shown on dia- 
grams. Use this form in absence of special measurement blanks 




NAMES 



PANTS 



Ccfer | ?JJ* ■ A.^i Ot*ta« ' IstsstJi I AeaMd ; C*# Baa I hW Aeaf 



CompUle CaiaJofue of Aihletn Sport. Mailed Pre* 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL GOODS 



Spalding'* Beveled Edfe Shoe Platen 
R«i©r Swft 





Professional $b<K Plates 
, iteeL 
■ 
No. I. Pair. 25c. 
Hcfl F-btfs. 
IH.Pakr.9Sc. 



s-.!> 



Spalding's League Plates 




.'. soe. 
SOc. 



Amateur 

Shoe Plate* 

F.nr Sleet. 

■ Ma a. f 



A, 



5paldlng's Pitcher* Toe Plate 
orn en the i<>c i 

1 
■ 

itooabi 

Bran 25c. 




ipaJdj 



ng's Inflated Body Protector 

We are how the sole manu- 
facturers of the Ofay Patent 
. the only practical 
ihe protection of 
They 
■ 
infilled with air, light and 
n I do not interfere 
with Ihe movement! of the 
n III any conditions. 
When not In uve the atr may 
he let out and the protector 
rolled in a verv imall space. 

No O. I ttfue CtttRtn' Protector. Each, 57.50 
No (. Amateur Catcher*' Proiector. 6.00 

No. 9. Boyi Caitheti 'Protector. 4.0© 



Spalding's Home Plates 





Our new style Rubber Home 
Plate (i HUHM in accordance 
with National L*a| 
tions and o( extra <\\ 
rubber. Complete with pirn. 
No. I. EkK S8.0O 



Spalding's Pitcher*' Boa Males' 



Made r* 

■ 
and of extra qua) 
rubber. Gomplcie ta 

No. a. Eacti woo 




5pa1ding '* Boundary Plates f<-r 

% Batsman's Boa 

IS J? 

of ihe h.Htman't hoi. 
. hite rubber. In* 1 ' 

i <nman within 
islam on balb 
Four coeneri, complete, arid 

| Pbl*S, Per let, SlOOO 



CoAptctc C«iaJoffiM of Athleite Sport i Ntnltd F«u 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



' i 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC. LIBRARY _ 




TTiis.i; ry simple and m;*ybede- 

r words. Ii consists of a dumh- 

do in two bal I Bin Inch 

from one another, the intervening space being 

- <-., fouror fi\ e 
When exercising t he Bpringl arc I 

nd bringing the two halves 
i they are kept 
untQ the ■. -r. The number of 

springs - nsequently, the 

power Bet essary to keep the two halves together 
can be varied to any extent. Force is equiva- 
lent to « equently the jeceasityof 
buying a series of different weights I 
d by the use of stronger springs. 

quickly taken out or put in. 
It is not the weight of the hell that produces development, health and 
**S:? Kt i ■ J f * s the cncr *ry and < - ;> P nded while using it. 

The Sandow Spring Damb-Bel] compels the use of energy and will- 
power, which can be I , strong by arranging the 
spring. These dnral 

young and old. Complete with i : Sandow 

after much expericnccandconsidcratton,nnd with full in-^tr 



vot in-, HLU 
tight *«<j ■ 




CHILDREN 5 HLt3— Wffgh 

;>'* in box. 
viih ehjfi ri . 

SI.2S 




OW» 



mo. v anxs-w, 

.tMftof tXrl 

•1.78 



: 

SI.7B 




;>- S2.SO 








Woo 



Co«»Wtt Gui^, 04 AthUt K tmm M«k4 trm 

A. -G. SPALDING & BROS., 

~ gv yo * r - chkaoo nnwot 



SPAUMNG'S ATHLETIC UBKaRY 



SPALDING'S FOOT BALL GOODS 




Official 
Titter- 

Collcqiatc 
Toot Sail 



W 



|E k«v ( (put* nocxpcMt btoukiftf tau kail pttUci 
id nvr iuiL aiMi cf dr ii u the Until Foot Ball 
"" prodwud. Ejtth k*tl ii ikoMMihly (oft 4, 
f>*tk«*J in ■ *p*/i i* boi . h i ksIm 

M f,t,*Ditti a prrfMt WO laud* «ht#i urn, b ftwOtJ 
• .'N»4lwamkM. AfolkW4ba«F«il B«!l InlUt.r 
«ni L« ln| Nwik ViO U »*du<J V.tk <Vh IbUkoI- 
Wf US* Pom Ball vttkowt *tU. cfcarp. U«t.Jt«! u ..»«!r 
In *B match jj.ir.rt kt»«n (be U»4ir, r wOt t ,t ».*.* 



SfMldlflK'* 

Official Pool Ball Ou.dc 



•n«J LofntU r«Mdt of all i 

ef«Bl>Mkad)ii«ptffytr%. 
Pntf, 10c. 



Wm$ eictiutvdt 

tip nil tlx IcaMmj 
llnlvcTSiiici?. 
CoUegcva^ftiMedc 
Bdsociationa In tbc 
Unite* States .in;> 
ohum 





How to Play Foot Ball 
B* W«IW 

I <Jl'«r, ,.'J -i. 

iOe. 



A'hut,. b " ; Mj.fi Ph 



[?** vonic 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



\y J s 



' IBRAKV. 



SPALDING'S DOUBLE END BAGS 



S 




THE SPALDING "EXPERT" BAO 

kited Napa tan lather, and workman-.hip 
M same quality as in <«ir " Eii/simmons " Special Big.. Double 
stitched, welted warns, reinforced one-pi 

Para (ubber bladder. An extremely durable and lively bag. 
Complete in box and carefully inspected before packing. 

No. 7. Complete in box. Each, S5.00 
No. 6. £xtra fine olive tanned leather cover. Double stitched, 
welted teams, and reinforced one-piece top. Extra well made 
throughout Complete. S4.00 

No. 5. Regulation ««. specially tanned glove leather cover, 
one-piece top. welted sea- • -f and lu'jstanhally 

made. . Complete. S3.SO 

}io. 4. Regulation sue, fine gran leather cover and well made 
throughout, oiMVpuxa top reinforced. Comply . *2.25 

No 3. MrJiuni i iher cover, onr ■ 

I and welted Msnu Complete, •1.78 

No 2. M ! quality soft tanned leather, suo- 

• top, double stitched. SI .OO 

Each bag complete in box, with bladder, rubber cord for floor 
and rope for ceiling attachment 



flttlif 
Ik* 1,1 ( sk«lr «K»t 
1 •!»«, *-J it B»*d 




-»*0 MMOtlMQ-' 

■ 

- (OO. 



STRIKING BAG QLOVI S 




Made it 
protect the hand 

Sinking tugs. 

ft 1.50 

1 

ifjclnff 

51. OO 

ml made. 
1 SOc. 



I X TRA BLADDERS 
No, B. Bladders for No-., a and y . Each, Me. 

No 25. Bladders for No. a.. " SOc 

No. 27. Bta and 6. , " 70c 

Above bladders a»e carefully inspected and tested be- 
jiteed in any way. 

N-. Oft, B 

1 I h 51.25 

D. .lev beat 

■•■1. 1 



BRASS IN PLATERS 



H 



No 2- I 

25c. 



Complete CaUlofuc tA Athletic Sports Mailed Free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



NFV YORK. 






Sf*lDfVCS *THLET!C LliRARV 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC SHOES f S" S 




RUNNING SHOES 




Finest Kingttoo Lother 
tremely light *n& glove Tilling, best 
Engliih iieel tpike* firmly riveted on. 



Nq 2*0. Ptf pall, *«.00 



Finni C.iifikm Runnii 

I light weight, h-ind-mjoV 

No. 10. Per D*iT, S4.O0 



*"»«*?"l 



r* 




VJ.OO 



JUMPING, WALKING AND CROSS COUNTRY SHOES. 




JUMPING AND MLMHIWC ) MU 

lu npmg jrj ■■ : re > Finest Kangaroo leather V 

■ rund-made; two f Shoe, brojd Tow rieet. flexible stunk ; 
S .ml ■ ■■■wed. 

i4H *6.oo > No "4W. rVpalr. ftCOO 



eves 

■ 

■ . IH1 Mif , wuh or 
plkei on hrcl 
No l«C. Per pjir »«.00 



ci-unois 

PUSHERS 




r 



ATHLCTIC GRIPS. 




. ', 
Walking. Jumpiiq jnd othrr Athletic Shoes. < of the hjncT. 

29c. 



10c. 



Complete CeUlOfue 'if AthlclC 5poett Milled Fret. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



NET YORK. 



HI P.TIC LIBP.ARV 



S 



~s 



y SPALDING'S BOXING GLOVES /: _x 




■ 
pjutt : 
No. 9. iVf let S4.00 




^<y 



ii. Pertfl. »4.0O 



__' II Pauern. 10ft olive tartiwd k-jthtr. well padded 
' 13. • 44.00 



N9. It. Corbet! Pattern 



I 

lanned feather, well padded 
wuh hair, Uced w 
'■ ■ is. Ptrsct, *3.50 



■ 
Iher, well padded 

S2.75 





So. IJ Ci'txll I'll 



■ 

ored soft IMMd 

PfrtrttaXK) 



»l.75 




CeefaM NttiHl No. JJ. RrfjriM l*it«rn 

YOl m& OLO> 



■ 

4f) 






M<60 



No, J*. 
t^rbwit fallen 



W *2.0O 

jo. *i.7S 

SI. 23 
31 




L 



NEW YORK. 



Comeku (JlJofw of Ath!«iic Sporti M.,kJ Fr« 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.. 

CHICAGO 






JPALDINO-S ATBLITIC .LIMARV. 



y' y r SPALDING'S BASKET BALL GOODS 



The Spalding 




Basket Ball 

lly adopted and must be used In all 
l >c cover ii mi'- 

i jn"d <>( the lincsl 
and moit carePjBy selected pebbh 

leather. The bl id 

I his b.ill. of extra heavy and p il 

gacti tell pvcajad, complete, in 

valrd box. and guaranteed perfect in every 

detail 

The Spalding "Official" Basket Ball. 
No. M. E-ich. SO.OO 

BAN RUdder* 
Nu. OM. I i SI. 25 




The Spildinj- Regulation Basket Ball 

>n ji**e, fine leather cover, with capped enj 
No. 16. Each, S3. SO 

Pnclkc Hall 

Selected leather cover, rcgulali 
'.. Bach, $2.00 

I MM Itlidder. 
Ho 27. ffjt .ibove bags. Each, 80c. 



Spalding's Official Basket Ball Ooals 





■ "" 'Lv 



No 80. Per pair, *4.00 



Outdoor Qoali 

Ontdoor B*ik" i aigfcll .nil N,t I 

Designed far in ! >"umt 

and playground!, bverytning complete lor telling up. 
No. 160. Per pair, complete. S30.O0 




OUTDOOR OOALS 



ra ■ rone 



Complete dialogue ol Athletic Sport. Mailed Free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAOO. 



i l&KAtV. 




-HI0ME5T QUALITY " SWEATERS 

ire made of the very finest Australian 
bmb's wool, and are exceedingly soft and 
pleasant to wear. They are full fashioned 
to body and arms and without seams of 
any kind. The various grades in our 
' 'Highest Quality" Sweaters are identical 
In quality and finish, the difference In 
price being due entirely 
weight- 
No. A. 

No. a 



We call sprcial attention 10 ihc "Inter- 
.ride, whiih v. 

Iff for the Yale foot 

They are 

sweater ever knitted and cannot be fur- 
nlihed by any other maker, i 
exclusive control of thts ip* 



"Intercollegiate," ipcciaJ weight, $6.00 
Heavy Weight, - - - $j>o 



No. C Standard Weight, 



Colon: White, Navy Bhw, Sl-ck and , loordcr alanaJ . 

All made with io-ir>ch collars; sites, 29 to 44. 



SHAKER SWEATERS 

■ 

fill a do 

1 



STRIPED SWEATERS 

Same quality as our No. B. Sizes, ja to 4a inches. 
Colon: Red and Black, Navy and Red, Orange and 
Black, Navy and While. Stnpes 3 inches Uride. 

ombination of colon 10 order only it an 



RIBBED SWEATERS 




1 ng colon Only: 

to any sweater of equal 
'•jarantced abao- 
lutely all 
to 44. 



No. 9. Si .60 



more of 11 

■ y 
Sires. 3- 

■ l 1. 

M 23 




lows: 



. 43.0O 

4.O0 

, 3.00 






STRIPED SWIM I U< 

I 

M. 53.50 

Stripes 3 inches wide, In above combtn. 1 
*«f colon 



NEW YORK. 



Complete Catalogue <rf AlhJetk Sport! Mailed Free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAGO. 



mm 



■ 



SPALDING'S WALL MACHINES 



FOR HOME EXERCISE 

r,.-u Weight* till 
, ->nd by simply following I < 

. ■ 
■ 



SPALDING CHI 51 WEWHT No. 5 

Thi N<- s HmMiM hji the Coitft Arm Adjustment, which 
permit! of jil the lower M well *\ the diftCI jiiJ upper cheat 
movements. The vjmou> thjnir.es jre rrw.K 
erinjj the centre arm, requiring hut J few iccont]) U 

combines tn one nwihine a complete gymnasium. 

II 3.00 




Jjpjn I 
■ 5A 



18.00 



5PAI WNC UU 51 wi Mill l No A 

■ i 

<■ SiO.OO 





uilli i Mil R| ill \\ I tCHMENTS 

SPAI I>in'i \^ \l l MACHINI No -»00 

IOO. uo.oo 



SPAI DING WALL MACHINE No. 301 

BACK AMI I 

■ 
mjihinr '■■v.f:|u'r,li, ..I. ■*'■•;■< Ifi.y |.r!. .rij( jt ill linn" 






4 # 



N JO I i «2B.OO 




CvmpteU C*t*lofu* ol Athletk Sporti MjiU.1 | 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.. 



ww ran 



M'AI nlWr/S ATHI.FTIC IJnllARV. 



_Y ./ .'' SPALDING'S BOXING GLOVES ' / 'f> 




SPALDING'S 

SPECIAL 

"CLUB" 

GLOVE 





TCLUB" BOXINC CLOVES ire nude after the ,.<>nth:p" 

Q l0 .,, • ,n entirely new Lira (wl , irr.tcd and is < 

.lion of the Ihum ■! an open pocket in the end of Ihe gt'.vc where the 

thumb naturally rests when Ihe hand is closed In Ihe glove, thin Hiving absolute protection U Ihe Ihumb 
when boxing. The wrists arc padded, and the glove is inadc In such a way th.tl I of the heel 

of Ihe hand is provided. Each glove has the celebrated Ouharo grip. The lejlhei id of supe- 

lior qualily. The tilling is of the best lulled hail obtain, bl< MKl iM workmanship of Ihe highest | 
commend Ihis glove as one that can be used without in thumbs, bands or wrisls. 

is thoroughly examined, and they are packed one sel of four gloves in 

The "Club" Boxing Glove. 8 or., vcfv soft. The glove for Instructors and Amateurs. 
120. Per set of lout. S7.0O 

Same a " ' tbanj. 

i2l. ivr set of four, *7.00 

No. 122. Per set of four. S7.O0 



Complete Catalogue of Athletic Sports Mailed Free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



| SPALDING'S I 
I HOME LIBRARY 

1 
Devoted to games and amuse- 
ments for the home circle. 



IllCIIL^ 1UI LI 


j* 


J Chess 


16 Piquet 


2 Whist 


17 Go-Bang 


3 Dominoes and Dice 


18 Games of Patience 


4 Poker 


19 Children's Games 


5 Backgammon 


20 Cribbage 


6 Euchre 


21 Drawing Room Games 


7 Billiards 


22 Group of Card Games 


8 Ecarte 


23 Children's Games 


9 Checkers 


24 Group of Card Games 


'0 Bezique 


25 Drawing Room Games 


Jl Pool 


26 Group of Card Games 


12 Pinochle 


27 Children's Games 


13 Loto 


28 Skat 


14 H:arts 


29 Drawing Room Games 


15 Reversi 


30 Baccarat 


PRICK, 


TEN CENTS 



American Sports Publishing go. 

16-18 Park Place, New York 



¥ 



L 




Spalding's Athletic Library 

Published v 

tioit,S/>orts and Pastimes, Each number 

pttte in- itself and ccmpiltd by a leading authority 

•ibjeet. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

I, I! id Ball; IS, 

li Pulley Weights, 
by Prof. H. S. Anderson; 72, Physical Train- 
ing Simplified — no apparatus; 77, Wrestling; 8-1, 
The Care o! I , Wurman's Indian Club 

Exercises ; 1"1, The Grading of Gymnastic 
Exercises; 121, How to Use the Punching Bag; 
123, Indian < lubs and Dumb Hells; TJ4, Gym- 
i Rope Climbing. 

ATHLETICS 

Guide— How to Run, Sprint, Jump, Walk, and 
Throw Weights; 27, College Athletics, by M. C. Murphy; 37, All Around 
Athletics; 56, Sporting Rules, for Discus Throwing, etc.; 62, Military 
Cycling in the Rocky Mountains, by Lieut. J. A. Moss, I '. s. A ; 82, How 
to Train Proper I. tic Primer— How to Make At; 

and Organize Clubs; 92, Official A. A. U. Rules; 96, Official V. M. C. A. 
Handbook; 109, Official P.icyclc Guide; 115, Official Intercollegiate 
Handbook; 196, Athletic Almanac. 
INDOOR ATHLETIC GAMES 

\i. Official l< Hockey Rules, portraits and records; 88, Official 
Roller Polo Guide; 102, Ground Tumbling; 100, Rules for Basket Ball 
for Women; 1 1 8, Bowling, Latest Rules and Regulations; 120, Ol 

, Indoor Base Ball. 

OUTDOOR GAMES 

lay- Lawn Tennis, by Champion Campbell; 12, Gadic and 

Icating — a very pra 
■ >i. D, Philll bt; 80, 

Howto Play Lacrosse; 32, Practical Ball Playing, by Arthur A. Irwin; 
Lawn Bowls, by Henry Cnadwick; to. Archery; 66, Technical 'I • 

Ball; 111. Spalding's Lawn Tennis Annual; 113, Official Roque 

Hall 117, Official Foot Ball Guide for lSWfl— edited by 

Walter Camp; 110, How to I I 11, by Walter Camp; ISO, Spald- 

i ajidc. 

AOUATIC SPORTS 

lowyer Vaux; 112, Ol ide: 127, 

Swimming, 128, Rowing, by !■.. J. Glanaial, Cham- 

" ' 
Price lO cents per copy, postpaid 

American Sports Publishing Company, 16-18 Park Place, New York. 

Spalding's Home Library 

1, Ch< 
12, Pinochle; 18, L '••; IS, Ren hang; 

■.'!, Drawing 

iames; 
27, Children's Gain 80, Bfl carat. 

Price 10 cents, postpaid 

Amerioan Sports Publishing Company, 16-18 Park Place, New York, 



r