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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league and American association of professional base ball clubs"

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IC)03 

CONSTITUTION 



AND 



Playing Rules 



OF THE 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

AND 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
OF 

Professional Base Ball Clubs 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



Published l>y 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago 
Denver 



I 



CONSTITUTION 



National League and American Association 



Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1903 

J* 

NAME. 

Section i. (i) This Association shall be called the 
National League and American Association of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs. 

objects. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League arc: 

(1) To perpetuate base ball as the National game of the 
United States, and to surround it with such safeguards as 
to warrant absolute public confidence in its integrity and 
methods. 

(2) To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro- 
fessional base ball clubs and professional base ball players, 
and 

(3) To establish and regulate the professional base ball 
championship of the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

':'kc 3. This League shall consist of twelve clubs (the 
membership of which shall not be increased or diminished 
for a period of ten years) located in the following named 
cities, to wit: Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, St. Louis, 
Louisville, Cleveland and Chicago; or such other clubs as 
may, from time to time, be elected to membership, as may 
be hereinafter provided for; hut in no event shall there be 
more than one club in any city. 

withdrawal from membership. 

Sec. 4. Any club member of this League finding itself 
Unable to meet the obligations it has assumed, shall have 
the righ* to ask the League for permission to dispose of its 



CONSTITUTION. 



rights and franchises, as a member of the I e 

other city or organization. In the event offv' to 

( ri\ imr it^ consent lu tlic ace rut i n,-.. . . ." .... . . tnls I 



giving its consent to the acceptanct ol uch cifi '-^stie 
/an,, ii iu membership, providing said club shair '"' 0r 8ani 
gether with the rights and franchises of said ' Issu,i| l\ to" 
,-,11 the liabilities, responsibilities and obli«j a ti« n S c lub 
into by said retiring club, as a member of ti'" s en tere<l 

Provided, also, and it niii-t I..- go underci i , 1: Lr 

ing and the new 
lie relieved or rel 



'j"». , " '"ciDer of thio r '''■' 

1,1 " J""' 1 "' -; undersi | ,, . ' S t . Le agU« 

member, that the retiring cb,i, T rt 'tir. 
eased from any contracts? ,-,'", sl '. 1 " noi 



or obligations, entered into by it to this Leat!!?i >nsibili ties 

isibilities and ol,ii ,..;,;',,,,' '\ u,n 'l all 



of said contracts, i 



'gations i m , 



not 

its 

.'ill 



fully paid and determined by the elnh acCentinL V* Ue en 

bership, rights, franchises B »s men*, 



AUMi MEMBERSHIP, 

SEC 5- No elnh shall he admitted to membe 



rshit 



it shall first have (lelivered to the Secretary f U • Utl,e S3 



a written application signed by its President and s e;i 8ue 
and accompanied by documents showing that « c J et *ry 
bears the name of the city in which it 



• such , *!& 

<U1 < thai 

of Dir ' 



\ng that 
it is regularly organized and officered, and, wne 
law permits it, chartered. Such application shai 
be transmitted by the Secretarj to the Board ofT 
who shall immediately investigate and report u,'„ , e . ct °rs 
plication, said report to he communicated to th ?' d a P- 
through the Secretary. ne U-a glle 

Sec 0. The voting upon an application for m 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being rem?- rshi P 
election. luistte f 0r 

IN REGARD To VACANCIES. 



Sec. 7. In case a vacancy occu 
this organization dui ing thechamj 



1 the me mbershi„ . 

, '"" lup ei on 11 '' of 
dent shall nominate to all the clubs all applicants 1 res '" 

up; and the vote thereon may In- taken by \ 1 '""" 

or mail, as occasion may require, and a maioritv f g , ra Ph 
will be required to admit any applicant t ' *« 
ship. Such membership, however, shall ,•,,„.;„.. m .embe 
the next annual meeting, but such e 
all the rule- and requirements of this organizatioi 

i [NATION OF MEMBERS HIP, 



'i"l. shall 1 ! f ««ui| 

tnizatfon^ b]ea l " 

BERSHIP, 

Sec. 8. The membership of any club may be termi 

i 1 , Bj resignation duly accepted by a three-foup,t? ted ~- 

,,11 dubs in meeting duly convened, as provided; J 01 * 



of 

ti' '11 4- 



provided h, s£! 



CONSTITUTION. 



(2) By failure to present its nine at the time and place 
agreed upon to play any championship game, unless caused 
by unavoidable accident in traveling. 

(3) By allowing open betting or pool selling upon its 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied by it. 

(4) By playing any game of ball with a club that is dis- 
qualified or ineligible under this Constitution. 

(5) By offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to 
lose any game of ball ; or failing to immediately expel any 
player who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 
conspiring or attempting to lose any game of ball, or of 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

(6) By disbandment of its organization or club team 
during the championship season. 

(7) By failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obliga- 
tions. 

(8) By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quirement of the Board of Directors. 

(9) By wilfully violating any provision of this Constitu- 
tion, or the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of the provisions of the National 
Agreement. 

THE EXPULSION OF CLUBS. 

Sec. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 of 
this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such sec- 
tion must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall at once notify, by mail or telegraph, the party charged 
with the specified" default or offense and inquire whether 
any dispute exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts 
are disputed, the Board shall, alter due notice, try the case 
under such regulations as they may prescribe ; and their 
finding shall he final and conclusive on all parties except in 
case of expulsion, when such finding shall be forwarded to 
each club, which shall transmit to the Secretary written 
ballots "For Expulsion" or "Against Expulsion"; and if 
all clubs vote "For Expulsion" the Secretary shall notify 
all clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged. 

DUES AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Sec. 10. (1) Each club shall pay to the Secretary, on or 
before the first day of April of each year, the sum of $100 
as annual dues: and such other sums as from time to time 
may be assessed for the payment of salaries of officers and 
umpires, and for such other expenses as may be incurred 
by order of this Leap-ne or the Board of Directors. Also 



CONSTITUTION. 
() 

all fines and penalties imposed by said League or its Board 

"rectors upon a club or upon any dub officer, ,,1.,,,,,-, 

manager scorer, or other employe when so levied and ,,„- 

; " 1 bv virtue of. and in accordance with the provisions 

Us Constitution and the playing rules oi this League. 

( ,,' Upon conviction oi any of the offenses prescribed in 

Section 8 as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 

,„. v in the first instance, as a preliminary to. pr m li cu of 

expulsion, impose such a fine as is in their judgment 

Surate with the injury; which fine may include a pen - 

! v pavahle to any other club or clubs, as an equivalent 

fof damages sustained for such nolation oi this Constitu- 
tion, or of the legislation or contracts made m pursuance 
thereof. opF|i , 



Sec. 1 1. 



At its annual meeting the League shall el 

-I' .,*..<■ on.l ll.iir.l ..I I. 



ect a 



II. At "s »"»""•> -■- = , ,. ' , , clc ei a 

President and a Secretary-Treasurer and Board oi Electors. 
The President shall be ex-offiao Chairman of the Board of 

Directors He shall report to the Board of Directors any 
• i t ;L of the provisions of tins Constitution that tnav 
c'one to hi knowledge. . tlejhall be the sole interpret 
oTthe playing rules during the championship season. Uv 
shall preside at all the meetings of the League ami at the 
annual meeting of the League shall act as a schedule com- 
mittee unless said meeting shall otherwise direct 

erf i i.i„. office of President become vacant by death 
jS d or?or«mov?l,the Board of Directors shal^ wffi 

[hfrty^days thereafter, elect a President. 
THE SECRETARY S DUTIES. 
Crr is The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of tli 
, ,., u,e and as such shall be the custodian Of all funds „ 
he' League: receive all dues lees and assessments; make 
uch payments, as shall he ordered by the Hoard or Dy the 
vote of the League, and render annually a report of his ac- 
counts: and he shall give such bond, with approved sure 

lic |- aS , t ! ie T|ie a Sec'i'-c'tarv shall have the custody and care of 



the 
,f 



Crr 1 1 1 lie Jeeiei.i,., -• - — - j - 

.i ;ffi,i-d records and papers of the League; shal 
I'l So d of all meetings of the League and the Board, 
shall iTsue all official notices, ^n£attend tojh^necessan 



cli-ill ssue all omi-i." ,,.•■■'- ■ ■- --^ s~,u \ 

,„„,dence- he shall also prepare and lurnish such re- 
«;[ S r "k called for by the Board, and shall be e„- 
' '', ; o such books, stationery, blanks and materials as the 
actual duties of his office mav rsawre. 



CONSTITUTION. 



Sec. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infrac- 
tions of the rules and regulations of the League that may 
come under his notice, and shall make a report on the same 
to the Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 15. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board, by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed 
for all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the 
service of the League; and the Board may exact from him 
such guarantees for the faithful performance of his duties 
as they would deem for the interest and safety of the 
League. At the expiration of his term of office he shall ac- 
count for, and deliver up to the Board, all the property and 
papers which may have come into his hands by virtue of 
his office. 

Sec. 16. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
President and four other members, to be chosen at the an- 
nual meeting by ballot, two of whom shall represent the 
Eastern clubs and three the Western clubs. 

Sec. 17. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Di- 
rector, the club of which he was a member, at the time he 
was chosen, shall designate his successor, and at once 
notify the Secretary. But if such vacancy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding, or disqualification of a club repre- 
sented on the Board, the Board may fill the vacancy by 
election in the same manner as provided for the election of 
Directors in Section 12. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF DIRECTORS. 

Sec 18. No person shall be qualified to act as Director 
who is not an actual member of the club he represents: nor 
shall any club, under any circumstances, be represented by 
more than one person on the Board of Directors, nor shall 
any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his club is 
interested. 

Sec. 19. The Board shall meet annually on the morning of 
the second Tuesday in December, at 12 o'clock noon, at the 
place where the annual meeting of the League is to be held, 
but may hold special meetings whenever urgent necessity 
may require. 

Sec. 20. The Board shall oreparc a detailed report of all 
their doings, and present the same in writing to the League 
at its annual meeting; which report shall, if accepted, be 
filed with the Secretary ; together with all official papers, 
documents and property, which may have come into their 
possession by virtue of their office. 



CONSTITUI [ON. 



The Board shall have a general supervision and 
q1 of all the affairs and business of the Leanup 




D hear and determine disputes between 
cubs: complaints bv a club against the manager or p| av , r 
of another club, or by a manager or player against his 0wn 
club, or an appeal by a player against fine, suspension ,„ 
expulsion bv his own club, and generally for the adjudica 

tion of all issues of law or fact arising out of this Con 

stitution: the Flaying Rules and other legislation made i„ 

pursuance ^ Boar d shall adopt, such regulations and 
such rules of procedure for the heanng and determination 
of all disputes and complaints brought before them 
Where such dispute is in relation to a game alleged to have 
been played in violation ol tins Constitution or of the Pl av 
ne Rule's the complaint and accompanying proofs must be 
Sed within five days after the (late of said game with the 



tiled wiinui ">'- v"v - — — „ - ° r "'in tnc 

President of the Board, who shall send a copy of the same 
. .i..k. yvitfa orders to die its answer wi ' 
The President of the Board sha 



"it five 
■n the 



to the other clubs, with orders 

Havs thereafter. The President oi tnc ooara shall in the 
fir^t instance decide the dispute on its merits and forthwith 
communicate his decision to both clubs, either of which may 
within five days appeal from said decision to the full Board 
Said decision, together with all other documents and proofs' 
shall thereupon be transmitted for a mail vote to the differ' 
ent members of the Board. / he finding of the Hoard shall 
be anal, and under no circumstances shall be reconsidered 
reopened or inquired ml", either by the League or any sub- 
sequent Board. 

Sec 2\ The Board shall at once consider any complaint 

'"T,'. gtT ,, o L play01 ', ? f an «ther 

■season, 

ristitu- 
tion or prejudicial to tne gooa repute oi me game of base 
ball and shall have power to require the dub, to which 
such player or manager may belong, to discipline him, a „d 
upon repetition of such oil case to expel him. Provide. 1 



[•referred bv a club against a manager or player of anc 
club (prior to the expiration of the championship sea 

'or COiiduct in violation of any provision of this Cons 
tion or prejudicial to the good repute ol the game ,,f 



CONSTITUTION. 



that such complaint be preferred in writing, giving sucli 
particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the 
facts, and such particulars shall be transmitted to the 
Secretary, by whom it shall at once be referred to the 
Board. 

Sec. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 
club, shall, during a current season, prefer a complaint in 
writing to the Secretary of the League against such a club, 
alleging that such club is in arrears to him for salary for 
more than fifteen days after such salary became due on ac- 
count of such contract, the Secretary shall at once transmit 
to the said club a copy of such complaint, and require an 
answer thereto. On receipt of such answer, or if five days 
shall have elapsed without the receipt of an answer, the 
Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Hoard of 
Directors, and should the Board find the player's complaint 
sustained, they shall require the club, under penalty of for- 
feiture of its membership, to pay to the player forthwith 
the full amount ascertained to be <\uc him. Provided that 
should the player refuse to serve the club pending action 
by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit the 
benefits of the award, and in such case the Board shall re- 
voke his award. 

Sec. 25. The Board shall promptly hear an appeal made 
by any person who shall have been expelled, suspended, or 
disciplined by his club. Such person shall, within thirty 
days after the date of the expulsion, suspension, or dis- 
cipline, file with the Secretary a written statement of his 
defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal be al- 
lowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club of the re- 
quest for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy 
of the appeal: and at the next meeting of the Board the 
club, by its duly authorized representative; and the appel- 
lant in person, by attorney or by written statement, shall 
appear before the Hoard with their testimony. The Board 
shall impartially hear the matter and render their decision, 
which shall be final and forever binding on both club and 
player. 

Sec. 26. The Board shall have authority to impose any 
just fine or pecuniary penalty on a club, a manager or a 
player, if warranted by their findings and decisions, and 
they may impose the expenses of trials and hearings on one 
or both parties to the controversy. Bui such fine, penalty 
and expenses may be remitted by a three-fourths vote of 
the League upon appeal duly made and heard at an annual 
or special meeting. 



HON. 
tNDIVIDUAL CLUB I ONTROL 




,i;ciifinest [lav it " pen '"-"" '"■■•• , " ■■"-■nt:c 

I Sons of carelessness, mdifference or other conduct 

" • , ', cr that may be regarded by the club as p re j u . 

of the player . m ain[W{ Wllh J 

dicial to > its interests. a„ »« 



League. pumsHMENT F SCANDAU buct. 

,,. r , 8 The President of the League shall have power, 

„^?,HT Droof, i" suspend for a definite period and to 

T^glfJmi exceedfng $200 upon any .League „*„' 

Tor nliver guilty, in public, of gross misbehavior, i„. 

Tr ,M,ox.caiiou. fighting, quarreling, indecency, or 

C lw f candK conduct, whether on or off the playin ^ 

c l M^nri ni he season, where the same IS, in his opinion 

lifted to bring disrepute noon the National League or 
calculated to w 8 fine can (j]lly , 1( , remitted ))y th 

Boardof Director; after a hearing upon appeal duly prose. 

CUted. club TFRR j T0 KIAL BIGHTS. 

Cw 20 Every club of this League shall have exclusive 
f C 1 of the City in which It IS located, and of the terri- 
C0B «,rrounding such city, to the extent of five miles in 
t0ry rv d te lion from its corporate limits; and no visiting 
Sue club shall, under any circumstances be allowed to 
\l, anv club in such territory other than the League club 
fherefn located, without the consent of the local League 

0,llb - ON RESERVATION OF PLAYERS. 

Crr w Each club a member of this League shall be en- 
titled to the right of reservation. On or before the 3 otl, 
h!v of September in each year each dub shall transmit to 
^Secretary a reserve list o the players, not exceeding 

„. ltPP n whos, it desin to retain for the ensuing 

JTiK are then under contract ... the said club 
(Jt the current or for any succeeding seas,,,, ,„• seasons; 
!?d in addition thereto the names of such players reserved 
and in aouii ho , 1 ., w . n . hlM .,| ,,, contracl • , 

W -T 7 c\«\ "Sue plavers. together with all others foe™ 
after fo be regularly contracted With, namely; players who 






CONSTITUTION. ■• 

have been secured by purchase or draft under the National 
Agreement for future services shall be ineligible to contract 
with any other club in this League except as hereinafter 
provided. No club shall have the right to reserve any 
player when in arrears of salary to him. The Secretary 
shall promulgate such lists. 

NEGOTIATING FOR SERVICES. 

Sec. 31. No player, without the consent of the club with 
which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter into 
negotiations with any other club for future services. 

( ONTRACTS. 

Sec. 32. Contracts made between a club and its players 
may be either by telegram or writing, to be followed within 
thirty days thereafter by a contract in the form approved 
and promulgated by the Secretary to all the clubs of the 
League. 

Sec. 33. The League shall adopt such form of contract as 
it may deem best for the protection of the rights of the 
parties thereto. All contracts must be approved by the 
Secretary, and duly promulgated by him- The ten days 
release, provided for in the seventeenth paragraph ol the 
League form of contract, shall begin to run from the time 
of notice thereof received by the Secretary of the League, 
who shall, at once, promulgate the same 10 all club mem- 
bers. At the expiration of said 'en days the player, so re- 
leased, shall be eligible to contract with the releasing club, 
or any other club member. 

SUSPENSION AM) EXPULSION OF PLAYERS. 

Sec. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or reser- 
vation by, a League- club, who shall, without the consent of 
such club, enter the service of any other club m any ca- 
pacity, shall be liable to expulsion by said League club. 
Whenever a club releases a manager or player without no- 
tice, or gives him ten .lavs' notice of release in accordance 
with the" terms of his contract, or suspends or expels a 
manager or player, that club shall at once notify the Secre- 
tary' of this League, stating, in case ol release, the date 
when the same takes effect, and in case of suspension or 
expulsion, the cause thereof. . 

Sec. ?=;. No manager or player, who has been suspended 
or expelled from a League club, shall at any time thereafter 
be allowed to play with, or .serve in any capacity, any 



Mill ION. 



12 






sion shall hav 



EFFE( | ,„■ CLUB DISBANDMENT. 




PLAYIKO WITH OUTSIDE CLUBS. 



be 



Mo name of base ball shall be played beti 
Sec 3 i.,h and any other club that has been expelle< 
Leag r c rs ' ^ Ua s»z No S am « of , ba11 

T" ; , L -c > a L«g* ll " , '; mi1 :J, - V "'"T c,ub "nployirj 
played betwee ^ a p , expelled, or under su s ? 

or presenting or ot herwise rendered ineligibl* 

PffilSSlS i Somber thereof. 

"CROOKEPNESS" AND ITS PENALTIES. 




moved by a 

iMI'lkKS. 

c„ r io a ..all of League Umpires shall be selected 
1 i I nvfirv before the opening of the regular season. 

by , th r -I, -II plication >hall sel forth, under oath, the age 
1 :, l '- :uh ' i riViv. experience, and such other qualified 

resul ° n f ,'ik- applicant as may be prescribed on forms pre . 

t,0 " s ,'i X Secretary, endorsed by well know,, gentlemen 

paI > ,k racouainted with the applicant 

intimateij acq endorsements, however, the Se Cre - 



';;■:•., tlK . merits and qualifications of, ich apphcant. 
"n'Thev 'hall be paid such salanes .and allowed such 
expenses as may 



cat >le. 



1 he pain ««•" • • •»« 

, v be mutually agreed upon by contract be 



CONSTITUTION. 



13 



tween them and the Secretary of the League, subject to 
the approval of the Board of Directors of the League. 

But at least ten per cent, of current salaries shall be 
withheld by the Secretary until the termination of his con- 
tract for that season to secure such deductions for ab- 
sences and the payment of such tines as may be lawfully 
imposed. 

III. In the event of the failure of an Umpire to umpire 
a game assigned to him it shall be the duty of the Secretary 
to provide a substitute to umpire such game; and in such 
case there shall be deducted from the next annual payment 
to the Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game 
assigned to him, which for any reason he shall have failed 
to umpire. 

IV. It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as 
Umpire for any championship game such Umpire or sub- 
stitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game. In the 
event of the non-appearance of the League Umpire or 
substitute at the hour appointed for the beginning of the 
game each Club Captain shall then select one of the sub- 
stitute players of the opposing club, and the two players 
thus selected shall be the duly authorized Umpires for that 
game. 

V. It shall be the duty of Umpires to enforce the rules 
as they are written, regardless of personal opinion as to 
their merits, subject to the Secretary's instructions as to 
their proper interpretation. They shall familiarize them- 
selves with these sections of the Constitution; obey all 
orders of the Secretary, assigning their services and wear 
such uniform on the Playing Field as he may designate. 

SUPERVISOR OF UMPIRES. 

Sec. 40. A Supervisor of Umpires may be chosen by the 
League at an annual or special meeting to serve for one 
year unless sooner removed by the League or the Board 
of Directors for incompetency, malfeasance in office, or 
other just cause. His compensation shall be fixed by the 
League prior to his acceptance of the office. 

I. He shall supervise and inspect the work and conduct 
of the Umpires and report frequently to the Secretary as 
to their efficiency and fidelity. 

II. All complaints against Umpires shall be referred to 
him for investigation. Complaints as to errors of judgment 
on questions of play will ordinarily require little consid- 
eration, but if repeatedly made and from various sources 



CONSTITUTION. 



14 

• „. the same Umpire so as to indicate incompetency, 

a , ga ' n 1P Supc" visor shall proceed to collect all available 

,llc ', 1 f on "subject and verify it if possible by his own 
evidence on the sup; rt |||r fects . , |ns 

personal obse ^^,,., uiy . who may suspend or remove 
thereon, '? tn f d subs titute tin- next in order on the Wait- 
such Umpire ana ^ , K . ,-,,, ,,-,„• of interpretation of 
" ,g h ■ „ Rules the evidence shall he collected, the alleged 
the Playing Rules tnee ther eof, which with hi, 

offender ^nished « i w ^ s ^^ "Jut 

S , ,aU " n n n hail e 'uh'niue-l to the Secretary for such actio, 
thereon. snail appropriate. 

If the cotui Ruleg> or for negiec ,, r ri . fl]sal tQ 

union or 01 j, leg M ,,„. anv improper or ungentle- 

^'t^lio-' condud while oihciaunK a, an Dmpire, 
manly hmguag* . i]k . ( . v „ Kn ,„ by affidavits, or oth- 

then ' at I, S ha] make a personal mvesbgation of the truth 
erwise, he snaii . where it originated, and else- 

of h the .f^^givlng DOth sides a hearing and re££ 

^^'^g^gS^TSS^pWot, the Secretary shall 
If such finding' > ^ p.. {ty Dollars „,,,,„ ,, |( . ,, lft . mK , r 

inflict a penaii> d ,„. r€m0 ve him, as the aggravation of 
^XnstfusTfies?- Z [.substitute in his place the „exU« 

° r m 7, shall^bethf duty' of the Supervisor to include i„ 
i- Penorts all testimony affecting the language, conduct 

bis R^P ^* „i nlavers in violation of this Constitution and 
and behavwr of payers ^^ or ^ ^ p d 

the legislation n 1 u . stinlony sha ll he at once forwarded 
Ru,eS -, C °n P nve? a also referred to the proper tribunal 
r o r S aiopria'e action thereon under existing Rule, 
lor dpl PLAYING RULES. 

q F r Al This League shall adopt such playing rules as it 

fS best for the conduc ts business. 

Tllh: CHAMPIONSHIP. 
c ,- ,? The championship of the ''"'ted States, estab 
lished'by this League, shall he contended for yearly by the 

^T^hL h 4Sip season shall extend fro,,, such 
, \V,rl or May to M.eh date m September or October 

S the" league may determine at its stated or special m, i | 

ing. 



deems 



CONSTITUTION. 



15 



Sec. 44. Every game played between two clubs from the 
commencement of the championship season to the comple- 
tion of the championship series between such clubs shall be 
a game for the championship, and 110 League club shall 
lend or exchange players to or with each other for any 
game played during the championship season. Any viola- 
lion of this section shall subject each offender to a fine 
of $100. 

Sec. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more champion- 
ship games with every other club; but a tie or draw game 
or a game prevented by rain or other causes shall be played 
off on the same ground on the next or a succeeding date of 
the same or subsequent series, whether open or scheduled 
for another game between the same clubs, thus compelling 
double games for said scheduled date. If. however, both 
series shall have terminated, such postponed game must be 
played off on the ground of the other club on a date open 
or scheduled during a subsequent series between the same 
clubs. 

Sec. 46. Each club shall have half of the championship 
series of games with every other club played on its grounds. 
except as otherwise provided in Section 45; and in all the 
details of such games, that do not involve the rights 01 the 
visiting club under the playing rules, hut relate solely to 
such games as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the 
home club, the visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the 
home club; provided, nevertheless, that the home club shall 
not be permitted to change the usual hour for the com- 
mencement of scheduled ganies in its particular city more 
than thirty (30) minutes without first having obtained the 
consent of the visiting club thereto, under a penalty to the 
visiting club of $w. The visiting club shall furnish to a 
person designated by the home club the bailing order ot its 
nine by 10 o'clock on the morning of the day 1 each game, 
or the evening previous, if requested. In case of the failure 
of any visiting club to furnish the baiting order of its nine 
as herein stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of ?io. wlncli 
amount shall be immediately transmitted to the Ssecretarj 
of the League, upon the receipt of notice from him ot tic- 
infliction of such fine, which notice shall be given ny tne 
Secretary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the man- 
ager and captain of 'the visiting club with a list of the bat- 
ting order before the commencement of the game under 




16 



i I i > I ION. 



■ ;i.r nenaltiea for default as herein prescribed. Th« • 
ftiAbsha» have the ngh< to practise its HinTfe^ 
Sds of the home club bet ,nd 12 o'clock . l *' 
fits visit during the cham] n _ m. 

IIII-: 1 HAMPIONSHIP m lll.liii.K. 

e m ,7 Ml championship cam.-, shall be arraneeri ; 
Jttenlchedule prepared by the Schedule ComrdS,'^ 

±l U,e andshL.l P 8 Hfy the date of each game anSfe- 



games 



. No date m said schedul, 

subsequently be changed, except (1) by writt, 

,,,' two clubs 

betw 

or 

consent 



... from a date fixed by the schedule fof^S2? t 

,,, guch clubs to an open date on the same ground. 

provided in Section 45; or (3) by the* wr ?& 

;,. of three fourths ol all the Leagui dubs. Uen 

Any club or club violating!! n shall be amenabl, 

. , nenaltv of Si.ooo. Said penalty to be paid Ja' 1 

°^S tours to the Treasurer of the National lS** 

d American \ssociation, or il not so paid to be witEffiH 

V ^y n fo„dfto their credit n the hands of th rT 

played ui m ol .„ '««>- 



urer. Allgan 



not count in 



impionship 

1 l-IITS. 



shall 



Sec 48. The general admission fee to all championshin 
: shall be fiftj 'ts but ea ;,,„ » 

, part of its grounds and provid, «* 

admission fee to which shall be twenty-five (25 cents ^ 
aUdivision of percenuges shall be made on the bas 8 ^ 
fiL (SO) cents, excep as to that part of the ground 
adtaission fee to winch is fixed at wenty-five (25) c , 
Sd'uto >uch part of said grounds all divisioi 
al .,.:' : shall bo on ti. em*. Pr 

,1,,. C onclu ion of each championship game the hi 
, ,,, the manager ol the visiting club r 
transmit by mail to tl lent or other designs 



centage 

At 
club sh 
shall transn 



and 
S1 gnated 



official" 1 duplicate 011 , a 

! I,- ' TSj *£'f h ""T 1 include^ 



CONSTITUTION. 



17 



All other funds shall be placed in the treasury to meet cur- 
rent expenses. 

THE TURNSTILE COUNT. 

Sec. so. The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary number of 
self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which shall extend 
within four inches of a dividing partition, the keys of which 
shall be delivered to the agent of the visiting club before 
the opening of the grounds for each game; and said agent 
of the visiting club shall have full access to such turnstile, 
and the box of such turnstile shall not be removed until 
after the close of the seventh innings, and in case a car- 
riage gate is used a ticket for each person admitted through 
such gate shall at once be delivered to the agent of the 
visiting club. No person shall be admitted free to the 
grounds during or prior to such game or the hour appointed 
therefor, excepting only players of contesting clubs, police. 
men in uniform, the Umpires and the necessary employes 
of the home club, and representatives of newspapers pub- 
lished in some other city in which a League club is located; 
such representative to" be identified by holding a ticket 
signed by the President of the League and countersigned 
by the President of the club located in the city where the 
paper represented is published. The visiting club shall 
have the right to accept the turnstile count for each and 
all games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be re- 
quired to use for its business substantial pasteboard tick- 
ets, which can be readily counted. 

GROUND ENTRANCES. 

Sec 51. No club shall be allowed to have more than four 
entrances to its grounds except upon holidays, but for all 
such days the visiting club shall be given at least ten days' 
notice of the whole number and location of additional en- 
trances ; provided, however, emergency gates may be opened 
by consent of the visiting club if occasion requires. 
STOPPING PLAY TO CATCH TRAINS. 

Sec. 52. On any day when either club is required to leave 
a city to, or in order to reach another city in time, where it 
is scheduled to play its next game, the home club shall be 
compelled upon proper notice by the visiting club to begin 
the game three hours and a half before the time of the de- 
parture of the last train by means of which either club can 
reach the next scheduled point in time. And either club 
may leave the field at any time within one hour of said 



rS 



CONSTITI riON, 



tra i n time without forfeiting any nghls or privileges « 
vided five innings on each side have been played, : „,',i ,,"' 
Umpire shall be the solo judge of the time. ' <«e 

GIVING OUT ADMISSION CHECKS. 

Sec. S3. In the event of a game being stopped ) jy . 
declared forfeited before completion of 6ve ranlne! V* 

home club may issue admission checks good for the le 
Succeeding game. If Such cheeks are so issued the 



the next 
lub Si U°nOt be entitled to ^t^ percentage of nvi',, . ''*'''"& 



.snail noi i". ="«« "- r— T"7*:~» v ._>, receipts- 1 

ch checks are not i-sued, the visiting clul, sna i] j • Ul " 
[ to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the e ° n " 



gatii e 



if sucl 
titled - 
had been fully played. 

FOKFEITED GAMES. 

Sec. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited game. . 
count in its series as games won by a score of „i m . ,-,.,,7)° 
none— in case where the I mpire m any championship 21, \° 
shall award the game to such club on account of the vin e 
tion by the contesting club O any see.,,,,, of this Cons, j ;!" 
tionorof any Playing Rule, [n die event of a forfeiture £~ 
any reason, the forfeiting club shall incur such penalrv '" 
exceeding one thousand dollars as may be imposed bv u 
is after a hearing lielil within «« ■ - 



Board of 1 Wei toi 



one week fr 

the date of such game, and any di iges suffered by the ,,"'" 

offending club shall be paid out of such penalty. i n „,,,. '"'- 

to the penalty above referred to, the captain or 

the person in ch 

for the team leaving the held, shall incur a penalty of T 

hundred dollars, which shall be paid^ within five days to th* 



sou in charge of the offending team and respon 'l i 
team leaving the held, shall uuur a penalty of 
d dollars, which shall be paid within five days L ,u 
Secretary of the League, said penalty not to be remind 
under any circumstances. In ease such penalties are » 
paid within ten days after being imposed, the club and „1 '"" 
cannot participate in a championship game. ^ *?« 

DRAWN GAMES 

Sec. 55- Drawn, tie and postponed games shall nor cm, . 
i„ the series as games (but any game of not less than m 
innings shall be included in the averages), but must k! 
played off, if possible, as provided in Section 45. If \h£ 
cannot be played off, as therein provided, they „uy subs/ 
quently be played off, if sullicient time exists before "he 
close of the season. . 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered comnul 
sory by the playing off of postponed games, as provided j n 
iii 45. 



CONSTITUTION. 



19 



WINNING THE PENNANT. 

Sec. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest per- 
centage of games in the championship series, shall be de- 
clared the champion club of the United States for the sea- 
son in which such games were played. Ill the event that 
two or more clubs shall have won the same percentage of 
games, then the Board shall at once arrange a special series 
of three games between any two of such clubs, such games 
to be played at llie close of the championship season, and 
the games so played shall be included in the championship 
record, and counted in determining the award of the cham- 
pionship. In such case only the provisions of this Con- 
stitution prohibiting the playing or recording as champion- 
ship games, games played after the expiration of the cham- 
pionship season, shall have no effect. The emblem of the 
championship shall be a pennant (of the National colors) 
to cost not less than one hundred dollars ($100). It shall 
be inscribed with the motto. "Champion Base Ball Club of 
the United States," with the name of the club and the year 
in which the title was won. and the champion club shall be 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing 
year. 

DECIDING THE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec. 57. The championship shall be decided in the follow- 
ing manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played 
for the championship, the home club shall prepare and for- 
ward to the Secretary of the League a statement containing 
the full score of the game, according to the system specified 
'" the Playing Rules, together with the dale, the place 
where played, the names of the clubs and Umpire, provided 
that no tie or drawn game shall be considered a game for 
any purpose except the averages ; and provided, further, 
thai in any case where the Secretary shall not receive the 
score of ;l championship name within live days after the 
Playing of such game, the club whose duty it is to forward 
such score shall pay to the League the sum of $2 as the 
Penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a 
tabular statement of the games won and lost by each club, 
according to the statement so sent him. which statement 
shall be the sole evidence in the matter, and submit the 
same, with the statements so sent him. to the Board, who 
Shall make the award in writing and report the same to the 
League at its annual meeting. 



C0N81 ITUTION. 



20 

, ■ „ .i,p award the Board shall consider: 
^"TheiabSa^ Statement of the Secretary. 

(* Sd« e SartiSp S ated in by clubs which have with 
(*> °r ■„ U or forfeited Hun- membership , vi * ; 
drawn, .^^Vnipionship series with all othi 
completing tl ^ , ,,,. counted „, the following £S2* 

clubs; ^IS asc ertain the lea I numbei of championship 
The Board shaU ascent ubw . th :iny , lin , ,,, ll; , ln||] ^ p 

games played ^, f the firs t pme participated in durir^ 
League, andsna" bj ,,,,,,,,,,,, . lmV ( ., mnt . 



-■lng 

scni 'Y '- ,Vs participated in by such retired club shaH 
a" other s ' i, th< championship senes. Provided th*. 
P^VSed d«bi shall have failed to , play al leaV£ 
'* slld - , i, eame with every League club, all games par 
championship ga » |u . lhrown oul entirely. 1Mr ' 

ticipatcd m i.v • MEETING s. 

c . cS The annual meeting of the League shall be held 
Sec. 5»- ln = T-,,«dav n December of each year •., 
o« the second Tuesday h ^ ( iaU have ^ « 2 

o'clock p. "■■ . i( t]u , previous annual meeting. 
mi, - H '' 'Vsnocia'l meetings may be called by the l', ( -s„i 
f ^his 'League on his own option or on the written call 

six clubs. CLUB REPRESENTATION. 

c«. fio At such meeting earl, club shall be represented 

5 ,' n he entitled to two representatives and to have in 

and shall be em offi or ex officers >> 

ad ^TeeSrb^» ocIubS !; aIlbe rT tted *«* 

such nu ■ ^;. . person under contract or engagement at 
representative any V d belonging to th< . , M* 

a bal player r ... W .„ ^ ; f ^ ^ ^Oi Said 

clubinsuchcapacit: certificate f „ u . jr ^ l cr 

*v,r -'^ , ' '' :, r i'ii "-'-"- 

rnent duly .."i ; t() act> but no clul. shall 

showmg their 
than one vote 



*er- 

ent 
of 



club rep.e- ••■■;• ■ fe .,, ,,,,,, ,„ ,, f tf, - •• 

ment.duly attests r .y oactba) no club shall have m or S 
showing tncj. 



BXKCUTIVE SESSION. 

a. This League may, upon a majority vote of 

^tX elect to go into executive n for the tra 

members, eiet*.» ;m(] ,|„ r „, K such session no club si 

action I'. KS "u 

be entitled to more 



IBOM. 

Sec 62. A representation of a majority of clubs s 



shall 



CONSTITUTION. 



21 



constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock- 
ing the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of door- 
keepers and such other procedures usual in parliamentary 
bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

Sec. 63. The following shall be the order of business, 
unless suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem- 
bers : 

1. Reading Minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3- Report of Committees. 

4- Election of new members. 

5- Amendment of Constitution. 
6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 
7- Election of Officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 
9- Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be al- 
tered or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League at 
any animal meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other 
lime. Provided however, that this section and Sections 
3. 8, 48 and 49 shall not be altered or amended except by a 
unanimous vole of this League. , , 

(2) Any section of this Constitution may be suspended 
or its provision made non-applicable by unanimous vote at 
a League meeting. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 



// 




<>8 





9 



ENLASG^ Section! 

j J, . ;]■ J.AbE. 




NOTE.-For Specifications See Rules From No. 2 to No. J2 



PLAYING RULES. 



23 



* 


THE OFFICIAL PLAYING 
RULES 


# 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 

As adopted at the Meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League, the National Association of Professional Base Ball 

Leagues, and the Aineii.Mn League, held at the Auditorium 

Hotel, Chicago, 111., Monday, February 88, 1«tt. 

J* 
The Ball Ground. 
Section i. The Ground must be an in- 
RULE I. closed field, sufficient in size to enable each 

player to play in his position as required by 

these rules. 
Sec, 2. The pitcher's box shall be no more titan 15 inches 
higher than the base lines, and home plate. The base lines, 
and home plate, shall be on a perfect level, and the slope from 
l| ie pitcher's box towards the base lines, and home plate, shall 
he gradual. 

To lay off the lines governing the positions 
RULE 2. and the play of the game known as Base Ball, 

proceed as follows: 
, From a point, a, within the grounds, project a right line out 

'"to the held, and at a point, li. Is4 feel front point A, la\ off 

"nes B C and l; Dai right angles to the line A li; then, with B 
•is center and 63.63945 feet as radius, describe ares cutting the 

hl " s I! A at F and li C at G, B I) at II and I! E at i. Draw 
lines F ti, li E, E II and 11 F, and said lines will be the con- 
taining lines of the Diamond or [nfield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With 1'' as center and 10 feet ratlins, an arc 
RULE 3. cutting line F A at I,, and draw lines I. M and 

1. at right angles to F A, and continue same 
out from F A not less than 10 feet. 

The Foul Lines. 

front the intersection point. F, continue the 

RULE 4. straighl lines h(i and F II until they intersect 

with' the lines 1. M and l.t 1. and then from 

'he points G and II in the opposite direction until they reach 

l »e boundary lines of the grounds. 



24 



PLAYING ROLES. 
The Players' Line*. 




Sir intersect at the pa 



The Captain and Coacher'i Line. 



RULE 6 

lines para' 
to the bar 



Willi K anil S as centers and i 5 ,,.,., 
describe arcs cutting lines R W and s T at v 
and V, and from the points \ and V ,V 
lle i withlinesF Hand FG, and continue Ba me ,?"' 
„,dary lines of the ground. °«t 



7/;,' Three-Foot Line, 
Willi I as cent«rand4S feet radius desi i 

BULfe '* to the di itance of 3 feet draw a line at ,; 

1 .„ F G ami marked point 2. then from point : 
angles to r . ine j, (; |() g im f 

a T„t P G andm«ked3; then from the point 3 draw ^7 

P m!i 'X to line 2, 3. back to and intersecting with li, le k, 
r, g '' a ' ?7." ,?,e hack along line < i F to pom, , . l ' 



/'//,■ /'/V. //<■' -'.f /'/,;/,•. 



Willi point F as center and 60.5 f e 
t • .. , 1 ,., ,. >-i l in in itv din ;.,.. ,i 



radius" Sescribe an arc cutting iE'ifa^" 
RUL at a point 4. and draw a line 5, 6, perpend,*,.,, 

i«r thereto, passing through point 4 and extending r 2 inches o„ 

77/,- Bases. 

Within the angle F, describe a 6ve sid 

out E 9 fig nre ' '"" " f lhe si ' k ' s " f " '"'' '' sl,a11 coined. 

RULE9- with the lines FG and MI to the extent*? 

T , inches each, thence parallel with lhe line F 1: gl j,,, 1 « 
hVpoinls XandY. a straight hue between which. % ,* 
^fom the front of the pTate. 



PLAYING Kl IKS. 



25 



RULE IO. 

with the line 
to each end o 
the angle F, 
diagonal, 

RULE II. 



RULE 12 

securely faste 

RULE 13 



The Batsman's Line. 

On either side of the line A F B describe two 

parallelograms 6 feet long and 4 feet wide 

(marked 8 and 9), their length being parallel 

A.FB, their distance apart being 6 inches added 

I the length of the diagonal of the square within 

and the' center of their length being upon said 

The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's Plate 
at 4 must be of whitened rubber, and so fixed 
in the ground as to be even with the surface. 

The First Base at G, the Second Base at E, 
and the Third Base at II must be of white 
canvas bags, filled with soft material and 
ned in their positions described in Rule 9. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6. 7 
and 10 must be marked with lime, chalk or 
other suitable material, so as to be distinctly 
seen by the umpire. 

The Hall* 
Section 1. Must not weigh less than five 

RULE 14. n..r more than l\vc and one-quarter ounces 

avoirdupois, and it must measure not less than 
nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in circumfer- 
ence. The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach American 
Association Hall, must be used in all games played under 
these rules. 

Ski'. 2. For each championship game two new regulation 
balls shall be furnished by the home club to the umpire for use 
When the ball in play is batted to foul ground and out of sight 
of the umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into 
l>lay. As often as one of thetwo in use shall be lost a new one 
»ust be substituted, SO thai the umpire shall at all tunes after the 
game begins have two balls in his possession and ready for use. 
'I' In- moment an umpire delivers an alternate hall to the pitcher, 
't comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, 
passes out of sight to foul ground. At no time shall the ball 

L *The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League for 
.'lie past twenty-six years and readopted in 1902 for five years, and is used 
01 all League contests. 

for ; 



26 



PI II IN'. 



be intentionally discolored by rubbing il win, u,,. Mii| 
wise. In the evenl ol a new ball being intentional]? j' r " 
colored, or otherwise injured by a player, the „,,,,,,, ' ,<"«- 
„,„,,, appeal from the i aptain of the opposite id, , ? na 'l, 
urn "I thai ball and si,., , , or 'hwit n 

" : " ., 




■lillll| iu»ll-»iii|- };..". ^. - — .. 

ggc, ,. Should the ball become cul or ripped so as to 
be interior, or in any waj bo injure, I as t,, be, in th 
,f the umpire, mini foi he shall, upon appeal 1 '.' 1 "." ,t " 1 

put the alternate ball into play and c.u'i et 
ew ball. • for a 



tin 
of 

new 



The Bat. 

Must be entirely of hard 
RULE 15. the handle may be wound with t W fa * ""' 
granulated substance supplied, not t " r a 
eighteen inches from the • " e *ceed 

It must be round, and it musl not exceed two and 
quarter inches in diameter in the thickest part, nor ' ;<; - 
forty-two inches in length. exceed 

77/f Players and Their Positions. 
The players of each club j n a 

RULE 16. be nine in number, one of wh shall ' 

captain : and in i. ,]] | esg . ! " I as 

i be allowed to play on each side. Ia " "hie 



men 



RULE 17. 



he player-.' positions shall be such ■ 
ssigned them by th lir captain, exceni ",' ay 
u,o pitcher, while in tne acl of d,-n, ..'J "'-'t 
ball to the bat, muat take his position 

->,';• and the catcher must stand with: 

fined in Ri »«▼«« *« P 

the bat, and within ten fi el ol the hi 



Th , 
he assign 
the pitcher, w hile in tne ai l ol c •■ — »<■ 

'""" :LS defined in Rulel"! the 
ithinthe s of hi, 

-Pitcher delivers t he P & 
line plate. ' to 



PLAYING RULES 27 

Players in uniform shall not be permitted 
RULE 18. to occupy seals on the stands, or to stand 
among the spectators. 

Section i. Every club shall adopt uniforms 
aULE 19. for its players, and the suitsof each team shall 

conform in color ami style. No player who 
shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other than 
the ordinary base ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uni- 
form not conforming to the suits of the other members ol MS 
team, shall lie permitted to take part in the game. _ 

SEC. 2. The catcher and first baseman are permitted to wear 
a glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight.. All other players 
are restricted to the use of a glove or mitt weighing not over 
ten ounces, and measuring in circumference, around the pan 
"f Ih'' hand, not over fourteen inches. 

/'la vis' Benches. 
Section t. The players' benches must be 

RULE 20. furnished by the home club and placed upon a 

portion of the ground not less than twenty-five 
(25) feet outside of the players' lines One such bench shall 
be for the exclusive use of the visiting club, and one lor trie 
exclusive use of the home club. The benches must be covered 
by a roof and closed at the back and each end ; a space, How- 
ever, not more than six (6) inches wide may be left just undei 
the roof for ventilation. Ml players of tin side at bat must M 
seated on their bench, except such as are legally assignea. 10 
coach base-runners, ami also the batsman, except when caiiea 
to Ihr bal by the umpire, and under no circumstances shall tut 
Umpire permit any person, except managers and players in uni- 
form, m> occupy seats on the benches. .. 
SEC. 2 To enforce this rule the captain of the other si.k 
may call the attention of the umpire to a violation, whereupon 
the umpire shall immediately order such player or players to 
seated. II the order is not obeyed within one minute tn 
offending player or players shall be lined J5-00 each by toe 
tmpire. ' li the order is not then obeyed within one mwnte. 
Hie offending player or players shall be debaned from lurth i 
Participation in the game, 'ami shall be obliged to leave tne 
Playing field forthwith. 

The Cam,-. 

Section i. Every championship game must 

RULE 21 . be commenced not later than two hours before 

sunset. 



28 



PLAYIRO RULES. 
, me shall consist Of nine 



A game shall consi* ... innings to each con. 

Ies«»g h'T,' \,,l< firsl al bal score, less rnns „, nine ■ 
( n 'lh e otheVsid« has scored in eight Innings, the gRme x £& 



than •>— 

' henter S't n hesidela«< al bal in the mnth innings s 

(*•> t£t „ before the third man is out, the game ..,"" 
winning run 
terminate. 



" shall 



; Tit Game. 

If the score be a tie at the end of t!,,. , ■ 

' \r collli .1 „...:, """ 



If the seme oc a u« «>■ ins ena ot 
innings, play shall be continued until 
,.... „,-„red more runs than the ath 



RULE 22. ,' as' "cored more runs than the 

■ , f innines, provided, that the side last 

equal nu'ml' e .' n ; i '! n ' l ? rl „ri,efore the third man i, ,,„, 
scores the » 
shall termwaw- ( /; ^ ;i;; Game 



one 



in 






an 



th< 



Kan, fc 



A drawn game shall be declared 



•y 



umpire woe i »« ••>-■ • » k".u cc e 

RULE 23. dar kness or rain, after five equal i,„,i " 
,„ e d if the score at the time is equal on the \Si 
have been plw*M MCept when the side thai went second* 
even innings] '■ nd has scored the same number of r ' l ° 
b»« is *S "' le in which case the umpire ahall declare thf 
BS m e%°r.wn^thout regard to the I the last ^ 

innings. f ,;,//,,/ Game. 

If the umpire calls "dame" ,„, account f 

darkness or rain at any time after live innin 

RULE 24. hgve beej] com pleted, the score shall beth ! 

, ,„ s , eoual innings played hut if the side second at ba 

f the last equa unequal number of mninys, 0r bef°?' 

shall have scorett |illis | K .,i in nwg one or more run, , "" 

the CO i n C at bat! the score of the game shall be the ^ 

number of runs made. 




PLAYING RULES. 



2 9 



Sec. 2. Tf, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended 
or terminated by the umpire. 

SEC. 3. If, a'fter play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side (ails to resume playing within one minute after the 
umpire has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team resorts to dilatory movements to delay 
the game. 

SEC. 5. If, in the opinion of the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game is wilfully violated. 

Skc. 6. If, after ordering the removal of a player, as author- 
ized by Rules 20, 53 and 59, said order is not obeyed within 
°ne minute. 

Skc. 7. If, because of removal of players from the game by 
the umpire, there be less than nine players in either team. 

Sec. 8. If, when two games are scheduled to be played on 
the same afternoon, the second game is not commenced within 
ten minutes of the time of completion of the first game. The 
umpire of the first game shall be the timekeeper. 

Skc. 9. In case the umpire declares the game forfeited, he 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the president of the 
League within twenty-four hours thereafter. However, a fail- 
ure on the part of the umpire to so notify the president shall 
not affect his decision declaring the game forfeited. 



RULE 26. 

are completed. 



No Gam?. 
" No game " shall be declared by the umpire 
if he shall terminate play on account of rain 
or darkness before five innings on each side 
Except in a case when the game is called, 
and the club second at bat shall have more runs at the end of 
its fourth innings than the club first at bat has made in its five 
completed innings; in such case the umpire shall award the 
game to the club having made the greatest number of runs, 
and it shall be a legal game and be so counted 111 the cham- 
pionship record. 

Substitutes. 
Section i. In any championship game each 

RULE 27. side shall be required to have present on the 

field, in uniform, conforming to the suits worn 
by their team mates, a sufficient number of substitute players 
1" 'arry out the provision which requires that not less than nine 
players shall occupy the field in any innings of a game. 

SEC. 2. Any such plaver may be substituled at any time by 



3 o 



PLAYING i 



,,,,,,,. dub. i.ui ••> pjjjw thereb y retired s,,a11 n °« >i,c-,,_,, fu . r 

participate in *l<P™tner s1k.11 not have a .ubstitute r „„ . 
him wlepl by the consen. "I the captains of the cont^t/* 

learns. 

■/■/„■ Choice of Innings— Condition of Ground. 



The choice o£ innings shall 1 



RULE 28. 



> iv ?«> 'o the 
1 also be 



captain of the home < lub, who gbal 
the sole judge of the fitness of thi 
■ • . , same after rain; Inn. after play ha bei n i ,n ,' r 

'r g,n ";"7;^ o'<- sh ill I.e. l,.jn,l u , a, ,,,,,,,,, ,^-ll.y 

^K're^ing PUT after the game has 1 a ^*e 

,,„ account of ram. 



on accon 
RULE 29. 

'h, 11 no. raise either foot, unless in the aci of delivers' c ' 
baHto^e bat, nor make more than i step in such d# *« 



The Pitcher's Position 
The pitcher shall take his position ," • 
a the batsman with both feet square on !? 8 
grouml and in front of the pitcher's nl e 
act of delivering the ball to the bat, one i.„„ , '' ; 



.; Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball to the bal |. , 

diile 30 pitched or thrown to the bat by the mW 11 

RULE 30. H hHe slaml , n! , „, |„ s |)usiti()|1 a||(] fac jP"cher 

batsman; the ball so delivered to pass oyer any , lorlilin | 'he 

,,e base not lower than .he batsman s knee, „„r higher** 

Bo^Wer! in which ease the umpire shall ca „ ££*•» 

An I'n fairly Delivered Ball. 
An unfairly delivered bal] is a balldeliv 
by the pitcher, as in Rule 30, except that** 3 
ball does not pass over any portion of the h 
pass over .he home base, above the bats] ,',""'." 



RULE 31. 



ucp or does p»™ 

shoti'lderor bilow the line of his knee, 

umpire shall call one ball. 



, .* batsman's 
'" whlch case ,1,," 



Delaying the Game. 
Suction 1. If the ball is thrown b v 

DULE 32. pitcher to any player other than the CatrV. 

KU (except to retire a base-runner) after the b » 

„ u standing in his proper position ready to 
man IS stanui !,_ ui] tii ' il ,., i w . r ,.,, sllll]| ,„. , . {l 

pitched bal 



^ ." r ■- — ""V l " strike -it 

each ball so delivered shall be called a ball. 



PLAYING RULES. 



31 



SlSC. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to the 
batsman when in position for a longer period than twenty 
seconds. Excepting that in the case of the first batsman in 
each inning, the pitcher may occupy not more than one minute 
in delivering not to exceed 5 balls to a baseman. 

Balking. 

A Balk shall be : 
RULE 33. Section 1. Any motion made by the pitcher 

to deliver the ball to the bat or to throw to 
first base without delivering it. 

SBC. 2. The throwing of the ball by the pitcher to any base- 
to catch the base-runner without first stepping directly towards 
said base immediately before throwing the ball. 

SBC. 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while either foot is back of the pitcher's plate, and he is 
not facing the batsman, as defined in Rule 29. 

Sec. 4/ A,, v motion in delivering the ball to the bat by the 
pitcher while not in the position defined in Rule 29. 

SEC. 5. The holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, 
in the opinion of the umpire, to delay the game unnecessarily. 

SEC. 6. Standing in position and making any motion to 
pitch without having the ball in his possession. 

SEC. 7. The making of any motion the pitcher habitual y 
makes in his method of delivery, without his immediately 
delivering the ball to the bat. . ,, 

SEC. 8. If the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat when the 
catcher is standing outside the lines of the catchers position 
as define. I in Rule 3. , 

If Hie pitcher fails to comply with the requirements ot any 
section of this rule the umpire must call " A balk." 



Dead Halls. 
A Dead Hall is a ball delivered to the bat by 
RULE 34. the pitcher that touches any part, of the bats- 

in or clothinu while standing in 

art 



man's person or clothing while standing 



his position without being struck at; or that touches any pa 
<>f the umpire's person or clothing while he is standing on toui 
ground, without first passing the catcher. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 

RULE 35. legally caught out, dead ball, or base-runner 

put out forcing struck by a fair hi ball, he 

''all shall not be considered in play until it is held by the 



PLAYING I 






3 3 



pitcher 



RULE 36. 



Handing In hU position, and the umpire shai] h 



■IV t 



gj , 1 ION I. A I 



■ bMt *d orth. 
ball thai 11 tooched, Hopped ,„ ),., ' '""«•„ 

[IIV person nol engaged in the game, '7 




Mion t.i tne Dan, ,, r throw '" 

fielders, the umpire ghonW ki '' k 

ase-rnnner to -.t,,|> ;u t ne 1 C: »1I 
] be returned to the i,i,,.i,. ' ls| b »se 



l.oiilii retain I 

I, "-,^"" t ' , the re»ch o\ the 

it hc > < :!"\ 1 r ,.. 

"''T'l hv him until the ball be returned to th'e pi t * ch( 
f^hisWuionandtheumpi ,„',.,, \ % ' 

Batsman'* Position— Order 0/ Batti 
The batsmen musl lake t l, t j r 

, , 07 within the batsman's lim '• ' jl 

RULE 37. ,o ( ... the order in which tfc " Rule 

„ ri l cr , whirl, batting order musl be s,,!,,,,;.'." 1 '.' 1 >n 




.^tedhist" ^-inthe P recedi ag i„„i^ 



RULE 38. 



When their side K ,,«. s ,, 
usi immediately return 



the players m 

players' bench, as define 



y return ,„ ,, 

"> Rule 20 ""•• 
' ana 



.in there until the side is put out, ex. 
r . e,,, -r. ,.: thev becomi titute W*!Sj ' 

'■!" thai j 



the bat or they w >■ Dase- ru , 

be v ided, thai the captain or on. »ner 8 



pro 

two or 

ca 
bet 
base-runners 



,,,,. base-runners .ying the ba 



■ . 11 



otain and one pl»y«. or two pis " '> tl le 

rween the play"- 1 "'<- al " 1 th< captain's li„, 




'' ol the 



tmWmM 



PLAYING RULES. 



33 



side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the ball 
is in the hands of, or passing between, the pitcher and catcher, 
while standing in their positions. 

SEC. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate 
any portion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 
fielder attempting to catch or field it. 



The Batting Rules. 
SECTION I. A fair bit is a ball batted by 
RULE 39. the batsman— while he is standing within the 

lines of his position— that first touches "fair 
ground, or the person of a player, or the umpire, while stand- 
ing on fair ground, and then settles on fair ground before 
passing t) ie ]j lle j f ust or third base. 

Sec. 2. A foul hit is a similarly batted ball that first 
touches "foul" ground, or the person of a player, or the umpire 
while standing on "foul" ground. 

S*C. 3. Should such "fair hit" ball bound or roll to foul 
ground, before passing the line of first or third base, and settle 
OH foul ground, it shall be declared by the umpire a foul ball. 

Skc. 4. Should such "foul hit" ball bound or roll <° fa,r 
ground and settle there before passing the line of first or third 
b ase, it shall be declared by the umpire a fair ball. 



A "foul tip" is a ball batted by the batsman 
RULE 40. while standing within the lines of his position 

that goes foul sharp from the bat b 
catcher's hands. 



the 



A "bunt" hit is a ball delivered by the 
pitcher to the batsman who, while standing 
within the lines of his position, makes a ileltl 



RULE 41. 

erate attempt to hit' the ball so slowly within the infield that it 
cannot be fielded in time to retire the batsman. If such a "Mint 
' goes to foul ground a strike shall be called by the umpire 



hit 



RULE 42. 



Halls Hattal Outside the Grounds. 

When a batted ball passes outside the 
grounds, the umpire shall decide it Fair 
ri.-..i.i :.. ,1: «„, ,„;tliin or Koul should it 



"»"-=. «»*. grounds, tne umpire »u»u " -, 

should it disappear within, or Koul should it 
disappear outside of the range of the foul lines, and Rule 3<) 

,s to be Construed 9<'rordiii<rlv. 



1 to be construed accordingly. 



.34 



ROUE 



43. 



PLAYING RULES. 

A fair batted ball thai goes over the fen, 

.hall entitle Ae bataman to a hom, ^ 

itcept. that should it go over ti lc f net '"• 



a 
»rn 
only 

thi, 



at wb hundred and thirty-five (235) feet f 
less distance "W^^ sIlilll ,„. entitled to two b. 
the home base, * ^ ^ ])C markc ,i on the fence .„ 
and a distincn 
point. Strikes. 

t \ strike is: 

SECTION i. A hall struck at by the batsm 
RULE 44. wil |„„„ its touching Ins bal ; or, 

A fair ball legally delivered l.y the pitcher, i„ lt ^ 

struck al hTj^nffiTball not caught on the fly, urJett 



ail 



SBC, 3- A , r .. a( lv been called. 
strikes have "lreaay hit" which •■*"'?. 1,,c , bal] "' f '"'l g 

SKC ' 'V ;L„r by bounding or rolling from fair grot 
..;,l,er directly "' f , .-^i., , m foul ground. 



tw 



either directly < ^ se(t)es c) foul ground. 
foul ground an fc ^ - f lhe ba n touches an 



SEC. 5 



A ball si 



Pound 

K r <>und to 

y Part „f the 



batsman's P er *"'\ ti , b y the baternan, caught by the catc 



SEC 



6. A 



he lines of his position. 



tier 



wh ile 'standing ^'Ul.in . 

, v foul Strike is a ball batted by the bftl 

RULE 45- " ia " Wlie " ™ 7 ^<°— W * P ' nW " is u °°» 



nan's 



man >,■•—• -~j . . - > a upon 

j.,.,,,,,,,1 outside lhe lines of the batsnw 

position. 

'/'/„■ Batsman is Out. 
The Batsman is out: 



The Batsman is out: 

SUCTION I. I' he f«l« to take his posi . 
RULE 46. llu . ,, at i n his order of batting, unless 1, 

' ,1 -jnd the proper batsman takes his n,, t ;,- 
error he ^^^ Jm and in such case, t ffg« 
^fA^cdled must be counted* "the time "at bat" of ffc 



ion 
ie 
on 



PLAYING RULES. 



35 



SEC. 3. If he makes a foul hit other than a foul tip, as de- 
lined in Rule 40, and the ball be momentarily held by a fielder 
before touching the ground; provided, it be not caught in a 
fielder's hat or cap, or touched by some object other than a 
fielder before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he makes a foul strike. 

Sf.c. 5. If he attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the posi- 
tion, or otherwise obstructing or interfering with the player. 

Sec. 6. If, while the first base be occupied by a base-runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the umpire, except when two 
men are already out. 

Sec. 7. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touches 
any part of the batsman's person, in which case base-runners 
occupying bases shall return as prescribed in Rule 50, section 5. 

Sec. 8. If he hits a fly ball that can be handled by an 
infielder while first and second bases are occupied, or first, 
second and third, unless two hands are out. In such case the 
umpire shall, as soon as the ball is hit, declare infield or out- 
field hit. 

SEC. 9. If the third strike is called in accordance with 
section 5, Rule 44. 

Sec. 10. The moment a batsman is declared out by the 
umpire, he (the umpire) shall call for the batsman next in order 
to leave his seat on the bench and take his position at the bat, 
and such player of the batting side shall not leave his seat on 
the bench until so called to bat, except as provided by Rule 38, 
section 1, and Rule 53. 



RULE 47. 






BASE-RUNNINC RULES. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Hunner. 

The batsman becomes a base-runner: 
Section I, Instantly after he makes a fair hit. 
Sec. 2. Instantly after four balls have been 
called by the umpire. 

SEC. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, while he be a batsman, without making any 
attempt to strike at the ball, his person or clothing be hit by a 
''all from the pitcher, unless in the opinion of the umpire he 
plainly avoids making any effort to get out of the way of the 
ball from the pitcher and thereby permits himself to be so hit. 
S»C. 5. If, while he be a batsman, the catcher interferes 
w ith him, preventing him from striking the ball. 



36 



RULE 48. 



PLAYING RUMS. 

Bases to be Touched. 
The base-runner must touch each base in 
regular order, viz.: first, second, third an<1 
home bases, and when obliged to return ( ex 
,) must retouch the base or bases in reverse 
mil only be considered as holding a base afte 
„',i shall then be entitled to in. I.I such base Unti 
v touched the next base in order or has bee, 



se after 
then be entmeu io uoio sucn Das 
' ol ' c , hing ,'!;X touched the next base in order or has been' 
, ie has legft"y« ^ u for a succeeding base-runner 

legally force" unn( . r sna l] score a run to count in the 



However. 



"" the base-runner preceding him in the batting lis, 

game until tne ^ mu]| g tase . rll „„ c , „ ,„ h as not u 

(provided ej s|ia ,, ,, aV( . , irst touched home base with 



put out 

5„t being P«t ollt - 



RULE 49 

Section i 



Entitled to Bans. 
The base-runner shall be entitled, witl )ol 
being pal out, to take the base in the followin 

if while he was batsman, the inn 



*5Ei; I "o.-> *• 

four balls. ump ire awards a succeeding batsman 

Sbc- a. .« ftnd the bese-runner is thereby forced to 



iout 

g 

Pire called 



^^^^mpirecallsa-balU 

Tf a ball delivered by the pitcher, pass the 



a base 
vacate 



Sir. 3 
Sec. 4- 



all, ucii.v.™ . • -/ i ■ i ■■■- saicm 

pire, or any fence or building within nj nt 



>e catcher 
and touch the umpire, or any i-~ - 6 -«hin „i nety 

W^fKpO^ fair hit, the ball strikes the p erS „ 

SEC. 5- "i j re on fair ground, 

clothing of tne 1^ evente d from making a base by the 

, ^ruction of an adversary, unless the latter be a fielder having 
obstruction o . (<) mect tlle base-runner. ^ 

the cr b f 3l ' ,n I the held.,- Stop or catch a batted ball with his hat 
t of his uniform except his gloved hand. 
Returning to Bases. 
The base-runner shall return to his base and 
shall be entitled to so return without being 
PUt OUt : 
If the umpire declares a foul lip (as defined in 
SBCTIOI) i. f j |lit no , legaUv cau h| , a 

Rule 4"). ^the umpire declares a foul strike. 

SS" ,' if the umpire declares a dead ball unless it be also 
.i. fnurt'h unfair ball and he be thereby forced to take. he next 
thetoiirtii "".^j . n Ru | e A , h section 2. 

1)ase .'- a V >,0 lVtlie person or clothing of the umpire interferes 



■ any part of 

RULE 50 

Section i 



PLAYING RULES. 



37 



RULE 51. 



with the catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the catcher 
to intercept a base-runner. ,., 

Sec 5. The base-runner shall return to his base if , white 
attempting a strike, the ball touches any pari of the batsman s 

person. 

When Base-Runners are Out. 

The Base-Runner is Out : 

Section t. tf, after three strikes have been 
declared against him while batsman, and the 

catcher fail to catch the third strike hall, he plainly attempts 
t" hinder the catcher from Gelding the hall. 

Sec. 2. ff, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit hall he momentarily held by a fielder heforc touching 
the ground, or any object other than a fielder ; Provided, « oe 
not caught in a fielder's hat or cap. 

Sec. 3. If, when the umpire has declared three strikes on 
him while batsman, the third strike hall be momentarily held 
»y a fielder before touching the ground ; Provided, it be not 

caught in a fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than 
a fielder before being caught. , , , 

Sit. .,. II, aller'lhree strikes or 8 lair hit, he be touched 
With the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall Have 
touched first base. , tn . 

SEC. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with an) 
Part of his person before such base-runner touches first base. 



base 
unl 



pei son oeiore sucn oasc-iuioiv. .~.. 

, SEC. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to first 

'• he runs outside the three-loot lines, as defined in kule 7, 
I to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball. 

■••■• 7. If, ,„ running from first to second base, from ^coik 
to third base, or from third to home base, he runs more than 
"'"'■ lee. fron. a direct line between such bases to avoid Ming 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder ; but in ease 
: l held,-, be occupying the base-runner's proper path in attempt 
'Jg to field a baited ball, then the base-runner shall run out o 
ll >e Path, and behind said fielder, and shall not be declared 
°ut for so doing. . , , . ' 

. Sec. 8. If ne fails to avoid a fielder attempting to hew a 

ba «ed ball, in the manner described in sections 6 and 7 Ottms 
n 'le.or if he, in any way, obstructs a fielder attempting to lie Ki 
I batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a throw,, 1 ball , , 
ROVIDED, that if two or more fielders attempt to held a banc 
' :l| l. and ,|,e base-runner comes in contact with one or more ,t 
"'••"'• the umpire shall determine winch fielder is entitled to 



3S 



PLAYING BOWS. 



,-, of this «"'- ««J «•»" '"." ' 1 , ec i'! 1 ' ll,c l * w -nm B et 

,l,e benel.t Ol tni ^ an) . other |u .,, k . r 

out for coming >" [j||ie wh ile the bsJl is in ,,i ay , he , 

SBC. 9- **' ' .. ■ ■ .1... hands of a fielder, unless s,,„... . 



touched by *e 



t )a iii^i.ei ; -Mv , - a ..!::'';!:::r, m '' < r s;, '-'i.,n 



a a base he is entitled to occupy ; i. kci 
of his person s ^^ (hi . |lL .,,,, r , lllrl . touching him. 
„,„i.-i>. t ie ban bage . runner in running to firsl base may over 
without being put out for being off .aid base 
Dr ovide 1 he returns at ouceand retom 




Jith'the ball in the hands of a fielder), before he 
be touched witBtn gfter guch Ua f , h|( hi|| ^ ie 

retouches . , ., , 



, that the base-runner shall not fe 
caught ; 1 *° y \ ,' 1]e ball was legally caught as above 
bat by the pitcher before the field* 



was to 

m out, bj 

it he 

holds 

if the 
'>efor e 



sU ch case, ». -y , the p.tcher betore the fielder 

delivered to touc hes the base-runner with it ; l, ut 

11 "" 5n attempting to reach a base, del ,, 

base-runneiNin "*„£<! ou t , he shall be declared 

u-ing touchea ^ batsman becomes a base-runner 

■£■ ' 2 ' or the first and second bases, or the first, second 
D<IS .' , i„. occupied, any base-runner so oceunvii,„ 

t ^»»i^twto 7 i M idit.«tii« y ^fisy 

shall cease i ng 



SBC 

first 
and 
base 
base-runner 



is put out. and may be put out at the next base, or 
18 rr\ .,... K«ii n the hands of o f,„i.i„- ■ ' "' 



any 



„«— . . out. aim I"..,' «- i — - ■- »i^al oase n 

bast " run ", C , h d by the ball in the hands of a fielder in',, 
|jy bemgtoucM i ^ to first basej at any , ime () 

same manner a* ^ iu| 

following base-r. »^ ^ ^ strike , lim , )efore ^^ 

SKt ' I3 'l in such case, no base shall be run unless 

fielder, ana, • . . base-runner, and no run i 

by th « ba iTo t heTCe-run B erputout. 

s C „,e.l oi any ^^ runn j ng t O a base, or forced to 

S '"; i!" he 'fail W touch the intervening base, or base's" 

S a b f n the order prescribed in Rule 48. he may be ,„„ ££ 
'-;>;' ''ails.,- touch, or being touched by the ball in th, 
' ' \ i the fielder in the same manner as in running t„ (J ' 

^ W the ball be delivered to the bat by the i pitcher bef or , 
ease if »« ban MJd , i;lst . ,„. toaehet „ le , )ase . pii „'2 re 

the fielder Uoias 



■«ll be 
return 



ire 
■runner 



ilh it. 



PLAYING RULES, 



39 



Site. 15. If, when the umpire calls "Hay," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he 
occupied when "Time" was called before touching the next 
base ; PROVIDED, the base-runner shall not be out, in such case, 
if the ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher, before the 
fielder holds it on said base or touches the base-runner with it. 

When Batsman or Base-Runner is Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 52. base-runner out, without waiting for an appeal 
for such decision, in all cases where such 
player is put out in accordance with these rules, except as pro- 
vided in Rule 51, sections 10 and 14. 

Coat-hing Rules, 
The Coacher shall be restricted to coaching 
RULE 53. the base-runner only, and shall not be allowed 
to address any remarks except to the base-run- 
ner, and then only in words of necessary direction ; and shall 
not, by words or signs, incite or try to incite the spectators to 
demonstrations; and shall not use language which will in any 
manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposite club, 
the umpire or the spectators, and not more than one coacher 
w 'ho may be a player participating in the game, or any other 
Player under contract to and in the uniform of either club shall 
he allowed at any one time, except, that if base-runners are 
occupying two or more of the bases, then the captain and one 
Player, or two players under contract to and in the uniform of 
either club, may occupy the space between the players' lines 
a »d tlie captains' lines to coach base-runners. To enforce the 
above the captain of the opposite side may call the attention 
of <he umpire to the offence, and thereupon the umpire must 
" r 'lcr the illegal coacher or coachers to the bench ; if his order 
is not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall assess a fine 
"f $5.00 each against the offending player or players, and, 
Upon a repetition of the offence, the offending player or players 
shall he debarred from further participation in the game, and 
shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a base- 

"ULE 54. runner, after having legally touched the first 

three bases, shall touch the home base before 

U) rec men are put out. (Exception)— If the third man is forced 

°»t or is put out before reaching first base, a run shall not be 

scored. 



4" 



I 

THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 

The umpire shall not be changed dm 



nroeress of a championship game, excem i 
RULE 55. - m gt personal lllneM or injury inca,, ac ' 

l8llBB . rthedi.ch« g -s • 



The umpire is tne n ,,. , if 

i eaeue and as such shall !, 

"I pla 



-.";:; 



rules 



fc — enforce every «-.»- " '" Playi n «, 

. _..,! lie shall have power to order K 



1 .- ,■■!.. tii ii. or '"•'"••s ■ • , , '""'.'at 

player, or capw necessftry „, give force and effect to the 1 



that he may 
of the gam*- 

RULE 57. 



ilW'S 



There shall be no app< J From any i e . 

decision of tin- umpire. Ml 

i „o circumstances shall any player 1 
,wedtodisp ision bytheumpi re ;„ 

RULE 58. . ch „„,„..,„ error of judgment is ,,,.,,, 

..mlered by him shall be reversed, excem •' 
and no piston renderect V^ oj ^ ^ ^ 

be P^^Tthe Stain alone shall be allow, 



[0N i. In all eases „| violation of the 



RULE 59 



rules, by either a playei 01 



rules, i'; •' — --» jw, th 

penalty for the 6rst offence shall be a fine b 
fs-o, and lor a second offence, a prompt re 

let bega. ' '" '" 

spension from a< ta 

t of the league may ''-i. 



prompt re 
the ump l,e , *ff en der from the game or grounds, follow 

" ,,,val "' „f suspension from actual service in the club as I 

such period 



anager, the 

y 

ed by 




r , ,f „-iid fine wiuN" '■ 1- - ' — ■'"" oe ,| L ._ 

am '""! „n participating in any championship game or f rom 
b;ure n anlayer's bench during the progress of a eha,,,,,,,,,,. 
sitting"" •> P';f ucn fine is paid. 

ihi p game uni» ^ ffenceol the player debarred from 
Sl;t ' 4 ' r Inch a flagrant nature, such as the use of obsc 

»anie is 01 " ,,°, ,,,,,,, ., nlaver or umpire, il, 



yanie 
language or 



S an assault upon a player or umpire, the u 



the 



PLAYING EU1.ES. 



41 



shall, within four hours thereafter, notify the president of the 
League, giving full particulars. 

SKC. 5. Me shall also notify both captains before the 
game, and in the presence of each other, that all the playing 
rules will be impartially enforced, and that their failing to 
co-operate in such enforcement, will result in their being lined 
and, perhaps, their removal from the game. 

Before the commencement of a game the 

RULE 60. umpire shall see that the rules governing all 

the materials of the game are strictly observed. 

He shall ask the captain of the home club whether there are 

any special ground rules to be enforced, and if there are, he 
shall see that they are duly enforced, provided they do not 
conflict with any of these rules. 

The umpire shall not only call "play" at 
RULE 61. the hour appointed for the beginning of the 

game, but also announce "game called 
11 its legal conclusion. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the fol- 
RULE 62. lowing causes: First, if rain is falling so 

heavily as to oblige the spectators on the (.pen 
held and open stands to seek shelter, in which case he shall 
note the time of suspension ; and should rain fall continuously 
for thirty minutes thereafter he shall terminate the game. 

The umpire shall suspend play in case of an 
RULE 63. accident to himself or to a player which in- 

capacitates him or them from service in the 
held, or in order to remove from the grounds any player or 
■spectator who has violated the rules. 

In suspending play from any legal cause, 
RULE 64. the umpire shall call "time ;" when he calls 

"lime" the play shall be suspended until 
he calls " play " again, and during the interim no player shall 
be put out, base be run, or run l.e scored. "Time" shall not 
he called by the umpire until the ball is held by the pitcher 
standing in his position. 

The umpire shall call and count as a " ball " 
RULE 65. any unfair ball delivered by the pitcher to 

the batsman, but not before such ball has 
passed the line of the home base. He shall also call and 
count as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which passes over 
any portion of the home base, and within the batsman's legal 



PLAYING Kl I US 







K bat <»'e unrpiw is assigned, his ,1, , 

RULE 66. a])il | ||c !lssist:int ompire, and he hall I, ' '' 

s-ssstfsc- "" »" ft 

person snail l>c allowed upon any lnr , 
the Beld during the progress of ( ' ' ' " °i 
addition to the players in uniform, thai ln 

"the 
the 



RULE 67. 



nf each side and the umpire, except such officers oi 

f KCr ,,.v be l'''-" 1 ,n '""'"""' i,ml T 1 ' officials of 
lttW lub^ks may be necessary to preserve the p, 



RULE 68. 



RULE 69. 



N<i manager, captain or player sh : ,| 

._. . Iii.it>. . ll... .... 



n • 6— ■ ■••>: ,'■ !■•••/> i snail add» 

tators during the progress of a ss 
■ explanation. e ' 
Every dub .shall furnish sufficient 



fore 
an 



rceupon >'- own grounds to preserve c 

,1 in the event of a crowd entering .%¥' 

r _ — ... A .wl im.^if,.-: ■ . r. *l held 



fifUe ^ ""Tlu He game, l.v a score of nin/r ,' "u "" 

shft11 l ';?', «w*efol innings has been played) S '" »"'•« 

(no matter « u»> 



General Definitions. 

• Play " is the order of the 



RULE 70. 

RULE 71. 
RULE 72. 

RULE 73. 

been pal out ' a 



•■ i i»j • • — ■>■"« unipi,,. , 

begin the K ,al " e . or to resume play after if 
suspension. " s 

■ ■ Time " is the order of the 
suspend play. Sucb suspension must not 
t en d beyond the day of the game. 



Pire to 

ex. 



um. 



■•Game" is the announcement 1> V t | 
pire thai the game is terminated. 

An " inning" is the term at bal of tb.. • 
plavers representing a club in a game ,„"i"" 
completed when three of such players I 
provided In these roles. lav * 



PLAYING RULES. 



•43 



\ .'Time at Bat" is the tern, at hat of a bats- 
RULE 74. man. It begins when Ik- takes his Potion and 

continues until he is put out 01 becomes a base- 
runner ; except when, because of being hit by a pitched hall 
or in case of an illegal delivery by the pitcher, or in case ol a 
sacrilicehit purposely made to the infield which, not being a 
base-hit, advances a base-runner without resulting in a put-out, 
except to the batsman, as in Rule -l<>. 



"Legal" or "Legally ' 
RULE 75. quired by these rules. 



signifies as 



SCORING. 

In order to promote uniformity in scoring 

RULE 76. championship games the follow.nginstruct.ons 

suggestions and definitions are made for the 

benefit of scorers, and they are required to make all scores ... 

accordance therewith. 

Batting 
Section i. The first item in the tabulated score after the 

player's name and position, shall be the number of time . 
has been at bat during the game. No time at bat shaH be 
scored if the batsman be hit by a pitched ball ^e standing 
in his position, and after trying to avoid being so hit, .or in case 
of the pitcher 's illegal delivery of the ball to the bat £ hen 
gives the batsman his base, or when he ...ten „ « all) 1 s the 
hall to the field, purposely to be put out, or if he is given 
base on called balls. ,,, . ,,,„.,, ,i, e runs 

SEC. 2. In the second column should be set down the 

made by each player. , , , ,., fi re t.base 

Sec. 3. In .'he third colun.n shou M be p lac ed thefir<£ base 
hits made by each player. A base-hit should be scored 

^Wnln^bail from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines and out of reach of the fielders. fielder in 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped bj a fielder 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself ... 
handle the ball before the striker reaches first £*?«• , , 

When the ball is hit with such force to an *Sf**™m of 
cannot handle it in time to put out »»»J5~J exempt the 
doubt over this class of hits, score 8 base-Hit ana 

fielder from the charge of an error.) , t 

When a ball is hit so slowly towards a fielder tnat 
handle it in time to put out the batsman. 



PLAYING Kt'l i ■. 



as defined in Kuie 49. « l " , ' »■ , " •• oase-hii i„ 

"cored when a base-runner ha. been forced out by the pUy Ih; 
c EC , in the fourth column shal be placed thesacrifi 

S'eisoul or when bul one man >s qui, advance* a r 

, l, v a bunt hit, which results inputting out the l, aK| „ ; ^ 
esalt if the ball were handled without error. ,ot 

The number of opponents put out b) 



innine r>,„ 

>f i t . o'r infield fly dropped, tl hould be , 

Se player who would ha. he play, but fa, 

of the base-run* "»."• ° n 

Skc 6 Thenumberoi tunes the player assists shall be 
■ vn ;„ ;,„. ,i x th column. An assist should be given ,., ^ 
J, ayer »h,. bandies tie ball in assisting a run ... ] ^ 

° f An e ws°st'shottld be given to a player who make, a ,,] av ,„ 
nmc to put a runner out, even if the player who coulc" 

1,11 . . t ■ i . I. -...,, .h iw. (null (if tin- i. Ni \ ,.- ... 



he put-out orin case of a thrown ball, to each player*** 
t l, r „ws or handles il cleanly and in such a way that a ,,„,-,' 
results or would result if no error w, 

Assistsshi reditedto every player who handles tl, 

ba l] in the play which results in a base-runner being called ,„, 
for interior i or for running out of hue. 

trt. 

a*. - An error shall be given m the seventh colu ms i 
eac b mislay which alio* , ma £ 

o„e or more bases when perfect play would have insured his 
beineputo ,lla! " w,ld P'' ches ' I'baseson balls" 

h! s e! on the batsman being struck by a ••pitched baU," „ r „ 
STof illegal pitched balls, balks and | ,„, ,£» 

which comprise battery errors, shall not , ^ 



column. In scoring errors 
rule. 



45 
LAYING RULES. 

of batted balls see section 3 °« tllis 

An error shall not be scored against the ^""JXjces 
throw to prevent a stolen base, unless the base-runne. advances 
an extra base because of the error. ...»«mtsto 

No error shall be score,! against an inhelder who a le. P * I 
complete a double play, unless the throw is so w.Ul that, 
additional base is gained. 

Stolen Basts. 

A stolen base shall be credited to the base-runner ^eftever 

he reaches the base he attempts to steal una.ded by a held.ng 
or by a battery error or a hit by the batsman. 

The Summary shall contain : innin , TS 

SECTION I. The score made m each innings 

of the game. . . 

The number of stolen bases by each player. 
The number oft two-base hits made by eat 
The number of three-base hits made J^g*"' 
The number of home runs made by each flayer. 
SEC. 0. The number of double and triple plays »* "7 
each side and the names of the players assisting n > ■ »• » 
Sec. 7 . The number of innings each p.tche £*}"»£• 
SEC. 8. The number of base-hits made off ^P«" h 
SEC. 9 . The number of times the pitcher strikes 

opposing batsmen. , _:_«, hases on 

SEC. io. The number of times the pitcher gives bases 

^EC. 1 1. The number of wild pitches charged »*»$*£ 
SEC. 12. The number of times the pitcher hits batsm 
with pitched balls. , , ,, ,..,,, .i ier 

SEC. 13. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

Sec, 



RULE 77. 

Sec, 2. 
Sec. 3. 
Sec. 4. 
Sec. 5. 
Sec. 6. 



14- 

Sec. 15. 



The time of the game. 
The name of the umpire. 






4 6 



[ND«X I" l;rl ' ' VN " ''"•' ' ' 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS 



Si, 



•|-|,, (irmin.l ',','... 

The Field. 



Foul I an** 

" c 

's Ptau ;; 

The Bas* — .•","■■ 



Unes Must Be Mark. 

The Bat. •••.■;"« .' 

Material "t 

Shane °f 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

v„„u,cr of ln.y.- in, I,.'-"- ■■•;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;-•••••••. 

£%£*&*&-» ..;;•■•■•• ^ 

Clu ' rm * "" 



PUye pij£l£b«rrf'ii 

y TDK GAME 

Time l I I hil ' 0ame " 

Terro inadonofGame 

•I |„. Winning Kun 

A Tie Game 

\ Drawn Game 

1 Called Game. 



,1, 

fa 
(a 
a) 

III 

u> 
(a) 



(1) 

B) 
(1) 
(2) 



(II 
(S) 

lb, 



A^itoreWeNinewAi 



FaUureto B 
IfaTeamR' 



to Dilatory Practice 



Within Ten Minutes! 

^nNouo i "••••:•■:::::::::::::::— 



\ . Game 

Substitute* ■•••■• -• b ' er ' '{ Substitute Players 

y«M.yB.Sub.tl, .......... 



gase-Runner. 



Choice 



olTSs-Conditl. 10. 



Hi 

(8) 

I, 
I'D 

«j 

IN, 
l '-I I 



(1) 

I -I 



1 

a 
a 

4 

.-> 



7 
x 

a 

in 
u 

14 

ia 
u 

14 

it 
it 
it 
ii 

IB 
18 
IS 



lfi 
IT 

18 
18 

la 
'.•ii 
80 



21 
ai 
-'1 
98 
83 
24 
88 
88 
8B 



86 
88 

as 

88 

as 

a; 
ar 

27 

is 



INDEX TO ROLES AND REGULATIONS. 

Sec. 

Hie Pi tchcr's Position • 

Delivery of the Hall— F»ir Hal) 

Unfair Hall ..'.'.' (I) 

Delaying the Game (2) 

Umpire Shall Call a Ball 

Balking _'_'," .' .'. (1) 

Motion to Deceive ■■■; 'Ii*''.,',' ' c 'tVnni'iii? 

Throwing hy the pitcher to any base without stepping 

toward said base • • (3) 

Foot Not in Contact with Pitcher's Plate ■■■_ > 4 j 

Pitcher Outside of Lines ; .'«' FWav 

The Holding of the Ball by the Pitcher so long as W JJeiay ^ 

the Game Unnecessarily • ■ ."■,7'm"" (ft) 

Standing in Position to Pitch Without Haying Ball. ■■■■■ 
Any Motion Made Without immediately De .vci.ng »£!■• 1" 
If the Pitcher Delivers the Hall JO the Hat when Catcher ^ 
Outside the Lines of his Position 

A Dead Hall 

A Koul Strike 

Block Haiis ;;;; <u 

Stopped by Person Not in Game . ( .>) 

Ball Returned ' ... .. (3) 

Hase-Runner Must Stop 

The Batsman's Position— Order of Batting _ (j) 

Where Players Must Remain "['] (3) 

Space Reserved for Umpire ,,, (3) 

Space Allotted Players "At Bat " ( j) 

Hatting Rules— Fair Hit (g) 

Foul Hit ; , (3) 

Fair Hit Which Rolls to Foul I iround (4) 

Foul Hit Which Rolls to Fair Ground 

A Foul Tip 

A Hunt Hit ■/..■ 

Halls Hatted Outside the Grounds _'.. 

A Fair Hatted Hall ( )ver the Fence 

Strikes " (1) 

Ball Struck at by Batsman . . (2) 

Fair Ball, Delivered by Pitcher (3) 

A Foul Hit Ball Not Caught on the Fly . " •• •• •• •• ■' ■• V • )4| 

A " Bunt Hit" Which Sends the Ball to I'oul (round.. 

Ball Struck a. after Touching Batsman - Parson.. .■•• (( . ; 

Foul Tip by Batsman 

A Foul Strike 

The Batsman is Out ; ■••■ •' '.'... (1) 

FaiUngtoTake Position at Bat >n Orter. • . . • • • • • ■ bi 
Failure to Take Position within One Minnie alter t, 

Called . (3) 

If he Makes a Foul Hit ... (I) 

If he Makes a Foul Strike ".'. (5) 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher (8) 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire. ..•••••••• ... (7) 

If Hall Hits Him While Making ThirdStrike . . . . .^ 

If He Hits :, Fly Hall that call He HanaleaDJ (S) 

while Bases are Occupied with only < *U» < >»■ • ■ • ' ' ' ,,,) 

If Third Strike is Called • ■• • • ■ \j ','l'l,v ' Umpire.. (10) 

.... Hats,,,:,,, Must Not Leave Bench Until Called oj <v 

'he Batsman Becomes a Hase-Runner (1) 

Altera Fair Hit (Si 

After Four Halls are Called ....(8) 

After Three Strikes are Declared •■; ; (4) 

It fair her Interferes 



47 

R HI.K 

■J! I 
30 
81 
32 
32 
33 
S3 

83 
38 
83 

33 



33 

Ml 

35 

38 

36 
36 

36 
37 
38 
38 
38 
311 
39 
39 
89 
in 
41 
42 
43 
44 
44 
41 
44 
41 
II 
41 
45 
46 



46 
46 

in 

Hi 
46 
4G 

46 
Hi 
46 
47 
47 
47 
47 
47 



,M„.X TO KH.KS AS.. RBGDLATIOMS. 

48 

Ski . 

iws to be Touched ""////".'.'."'"'• •■'•'.'. 

Entitled l" Bases."." V'onr !'.-<!'- ,'. ") 

K "" if Umpire $^rfXcee«dl»« Batsman Base $ 

IfUmprreAwarosj 

Returning to Base. ;.•.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'■' ' < 1 ) 

KFou fro. ft 

If Foul Strike §( 

" ' lc "' "' iinu'.iVV Interferes with Catcher M 

« ^SfTouTa the B.t.m«.'» P««o» ;;;;;;;;;••••••. (5) 

Hase-Kunn'er Out ...•■•■• ;: -.Vi'.^'f ,',,'m Fielding Ball , i , 

«fefc::::::::::::::::::::J 

Toui hing «•*, ,';,„,,' i:.,-.- to First Base ,«, 

«""""« r " , " StO Second Base (T) 

Running from .VS-ider <«) 

Touched bj BJ" , ,,„ Fir „ BaM (lo> 

B ^ R T„Yffif Caught by FieWe. <|„ 

Fair or Foul nil >--■ 8 age .R u nnei (12) 

Batsman B":";" 1 ,,,;,, |, c fore Touching Fielder ,i:j) 

Touched by »" , 14) 

Running to Base..... (]5) 

Umpire Calls ™V ;, 0ut 

When Batsman or Base k. 

Coaching Kules _ 

- ^ rH E UMPIRE. 

U,,,piresShallKo.BeC;han.ed..... : . .•••••■;■■■■■••■..... 

^ppeafFrpmLegaM-eci--;;;;-;;;;; _■••••■••• •••;•••••. 

Disputed Deci-o"--;;; — ^ (1) 

Notification of f mes. . • i<]( . n( ( , 

Notification to Ueag i|ns „ f Knforcement of Rules... . (5) 

sw^SsSfil^^?^^::"::":::::::::: 

Shall Call flay '/_ Gi>, 

a^S::"" :;:::::::::::::::::;:::::::;::: 

One Umpire to Officiate.... 

FIELD RULES. 
Who Shall Be AUywe^^ 

|^' at Club S Shall Furnish P .1 " 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS 

Play .'.'.'.' 

Time 



Kri.K 

48 
(S 

in 
•i:i 
48 
49 
40 
49 
IS 
50 

no 

BO 
.'.ii 
60 
60 
61 
Bl 
Bl 
Bl 
Bl 
Bl 
51 
r.l 
Bl 
r.i 
Bl 
r.i 
r.i 

51 
61 
M 
6g 

Ba 

r.l 



66 
Bl 
58 
59 
59 
68 
69 
» 
60 
61 
68, 64 
OS 
00 



67 
68 

69 



70 

71 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 






s» • 



Game 

An Inning .. 
A Time at Bat. 
Legal 



SCORING. 

Batting W 

Runs Made J?; 

Base- Hits \'\ 

Sacrifice Hits *jj{ 

Helding • ' , 

Assists ;S 

Errors ■ ''' 

Stolen Bases — — ■ 

The Summary ... 

Score Made in Each Inning *.,( 

Number of Stolen Bases 

Number of Two- Base Hits 

Number of Three- Base Hits 

Number of Home Runs 

Number of Double and Triple Plays 

Number of Innings Each Pitcher Pitched In 

Number of Base-Hits Off Each Pitcher 

Number of Batsmen Struck Out by Each Pitcher 

Nnmherof Bases on Balls by Each Pitcher }*"' 

Wild Pitches.... jffi 

Number of Batsmen Hit'by Each Pitcher ■ J ' 

Pawed Balls ." )]?{ 

Time of Cam,- :! 

Name of the Uf"" ; -« ( 



49 

Rl'LK 
rta 

73 
74 
75 



76 

70 
7(i 
76 
78 
78 
76 
78 
77 



(3) 
,n 
(5) 
111) 
(7) 
(H) 
(9) 
(10) 



J in pi re. 



5° 



ADDENDA. 






8- 

'IS.' 



TO UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND PLAYER 

The following rejolntion was adopted at a mccti„ g , f 
the National League and American Association of H, S( 
Ball Oubs, held at the Victoria Hotel, New y ork City, 

March 4*. [ 9°* 

Whertas, During the past season, under the admi„ is , 
,i„„ of affairs by the Execntive ( ommittee of this organic 
„■„,, proper steps were taken to preserve order a,„l dis 
cipline on the ball field, and in this manner to uphold th 
dignity of the game and the standard of thia ,,.„■,.,„ ,,. ( 
Ball Organization; 

Be it Resolved, Thai the President of the Or gaili) , :ili 
i, hereby rested with full and ab solute power to maintain 
or der and discipline on the ball field; thai he shall ha Ve 
full power to discipline any player or manager for violation 

of good order i n the ball field; that tins discipline shall 

be either in a ""<■ or suspension from the grounds of :il , v 
Club- that he shall be authorized to adopi such r, K „ w " 
tions for maintaining order upon the ball field as he shall 
deem fit and proper; that he shall have- full and absolute 
power to acl upon any complaint made by an llnipirc 
against any player or manager for violation of order; that 
i„ all cases where the penalty fixed is either a fine or Sl1s 
pension his decision shall be final; that in cases wherehe 
deems it fi< and proper that the offender or offenders should 
be expelled from this organization thai such expulsion s h-,il 
not go into effect until same is ratified by the Board of 
Directors of this organization and thai it shall require 
th ree (3) votes of the Board of Directors (the Presideni 
„ot voting) to carry a decree of expulsion into effect ; that 



ADDENDA. 



51 






this resolution and the powers grained herein shall apply 
only for the season of 1003 and that any provision either in 
the Constitution or Playing Rules of this organization in 
conflict with the provisions of this resolution shall be 
mill and void for the period of 1903, the life of this reso- 
lution. 

This resolution was amended by Mr. Fleisehman with 
the consent of the originator, Mr. Hart, as follows: 

Be it further resolved, That no eh.b in this organization 
shall be permitted to pay the fine of any player or manager 
fined by the President of this organization in conformity 
With the above resolution, and that furthermore, no club 
shall be permitted to pay the salary of any player or man- 
ager while suspended by the President. 

This amendment was unanimously adopted. 

The President calls the attention of club owners, umpires, 
managers and players, to the above resolution with tie 
hope that they will co-operate with him m good taitn u 
bring about a higher standard of ball and thus increase the 
value of dub franchises and at the same time add tone ana 
dignity to the calling of a professional player Anytning 
that tends to elevate the game is to the mutual advantage 
of everyone connected with the game, be he club owner 
manager, umpire or player. The spirit and letter ot 
above resolution will he earned nut. 
Respectfully, 
HARRY C. PULL1AM, President. 



ANNUA! MEETING 01 NATIONAL I I 



MEETING NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Meeting of the National League and American Association of 

Professional Base Ball Clubs, held at the Victoria Hotel, 

New York City, December 9, 1902. 

Meeting called to order 12 o'clock noon. 

Present — • 

V. H. Soden and W. H. Conant, representing the Boston 
Base Ball Association; 

johnT. Brush. N. A Lloyd; 

p M Knowles, representing the National Exhibition 
Company of New Vork City; 

Col. John I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia Ball 
« lub, Limited; 

lames A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball 

Club; , ,, „ „ „. 

Harney Dreyfuss an.] Many C. 1 ulliam, representing the 

Pittsburg Athletic Company; 

Frank DcHass Robison, representing the American 
Base Ha" and Athletic Exhibition Company of St. Louis; 

q |, Ebbets, H. R. Vonder Horst, and Edward Hanlon! 
representing the Brooklyn Base Ball Club; 

Vugust Hermann and Julius Fleischman, representing 
the Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

On motion, Mr. A. II Sodem was elected Chairman. 

On motion, the reading of minutes of the previou meet- 
ins was dispensed with. The Executive Committee sub 

1 » f . ii... ..„..- ; ,,. -1 • ,,...- ...1.:., 1 



mitted its report for the year just over, 

rci v'l. 

On motion, a recess was taken until 8 P. 



which 



M. 



was re- 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

1 Jecember 9th, 8 P. M. 

Meeting reconvened with all present. 
On motion, the Committee cm Constitution was con- 
On motion, the Committee on Rules was continued 
On motion, each club was requested to express inlor- 
mally their views as to the advisability of electing a resi- 
dent or Executive Committee. 

On motion, recess was taken until 12 o clock, December 
toth. 

December 10th, 1902. 

Meeting called to order by the Chairman at 1 ^oR M . 

Mr. Brush offered a resolution that a Conim. tut ot 
Three be appointed to ascertain upon what «™». 
A-merican League was willing to agree upon a pes c 
settlement of the differences existing between the in- 
League and American League. 

Carried unanimously. . . .i,.,. u .,l 

Messrs. Hermann, Hart and Robison were dulj eiec 
members of said Committee, with Mr. August Herman, 

1 'hairman. „ c ,„>n,icd 

0n motion, the regular order of busmess was su^e 

for the purpose of receiving and considering the schedule 

for (903, as presented In the Schedule ConunUtec. 
On motion, a recess was taken until 8 P. M. 
Meeting reconvened at 8:55 P- M. , 

On motion, the Schedule for tO0 3 as presented by 

Schedule Committee was adopted. 

0rl mo tion a recess was taken until 12 °"°<* 
December 1 lib. 

December nth, 1902. 
Mr. Hermann presented a resolution in reference to the 
arrangement between the National League and the *ew 



ANNUAL MBKTIKO OF KATIONA1 LKAOl i. 

54 

York Club in reference to Manhattan Field, which resolu- 
tion was unanimously adopted. 

Mr Hermann made a motion that the election of ffi. 
.,.,'.. be deferred until noon, December 12th, ami Illil(It 
' Vi nrdc- for that time, winch motion was adopted 
T>n" ..,...!..«. recese was taken until 8 P. M. 

Meeting reconvened and called to order at 9:10 P.m. 
Amotion, Messrs. Y mmg and Hanlon were respectively 
tinted Committees to look after the interests of the 
ffional League in base ball properties ,„ the cities „ f 

Sr^nnston ; " ul Ba,timore ' «W«*>«*r- 

W J n m otion, a recess was taken until a o'clock, Dece*. 

ber iith. 



December [2th, 1902. 
Meeting reconvened and called to order at 1 l\ M. 
Mr Hermann, as Chairman, made a report on behalf 
f the Committee appointed to confer with a Committee 
t the American League; said report was accepted, and 

*; nn the Committee was continued in office. 
0n rmSon, Mr. Harry CPulliam was elected Presides 
Toi Rogers placed the named oi Mr. .V I-,. Young j„ „„ mi 
nation for the office of Secretary and rreasurer. Mr 
Young declined the nomination on account of ill health 
„ K 1 Mr. Harry C Pulliam was elected Secretary ilII( j 
Treasurer Messrs. John T. Brush, A. II. Soden, Barney 
Dreyfuss and James A. Hart were elected directors. 

On motion, it was resolved that when this meeting ad- 
• „rns it adjourns subject to the call of the President. 

Mr.N. E. Young was elected honorary member of this 
organization for life. 
Meeting adjourned. 



ANNUAL M 



EETINO OF NATIONAL I.F.ACUE. 



55 



RECONVENED ANNUAL MEETING OF 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

jt 

Held at the Grand Hotel, Cincinnati, January 19, J903, all Cto 
being represented. 
Meeting called to order by the President •^■^J- aml 
Minutes of the previous meeting react. 

approved. . . . tl phUa- 

The president read a communication from 

delphia Ball Club. . cor nnAed by 

On motion of Mr. F. DeHass Robison • ^ \ 
Mr. Julius Hcischntat, the meeting res-l d iKt _ 

Committee of the Whole. Mr. Harry C 1 "ina _ 

ed Chairman and Mr. Julius Fleiscbman was eleO 
toy, Mr. Hermann, on behalf of the ( .". d» « "^ ™ d 
tee will, the American League, presented a 
report was received. „. ., 1nn u a recess. 

On motion, the Committee of the Whok took a ^ 
On motion, the National League took a 
hour. p j^j 

The National League reconvened at 5=3° • ' , dock 

After the consideration of business, recess untt, 

was taken. p M .,,, dubs be- 

NTational League reconvened at B.tS • 
ing represented. ,, . . . Committee 

On motion, the League resolved .tself mto 

Of the Whole. , . „f t t,e Confer- 

On motion of Mr. Fleischman, &"*££££ 
ence Committee was considered, section y ^ ^ ^ 

On motion, the Committee took a 
P. M.. January 20th, 1003. 



ANM ai Ml KII.SO Of NATIONAL I.K .-,, 

The National League reconvened when the Coma 

.,,,- the Whole arose and, after the considerati „ 

nesSl took a recess hum! 10:30 A. ML, January ..,,,1,. 

January aoth, [903. 

The National Lea) ' "'•*& A. M..' .,„ 

clubs being represented. 

On tion, the meeting resolved itself into a ( ,„,„., 

, lf ^ Whole. The Committee of the Whole, after di 
si on on matters before it, took a recess 



ion on matters d«o«< -■ ■ 

ri, L . 1 eague reconvened ai 1 =30 1 , -\i., and ., 
took a recess until 2:30 P. M. 






"ii 



ok a recess "»"' -•.«" • 

Thfi National League reconvened al 2:3, am] 

in , p|i „ n re solved itself into a Committee ol the Whole. ,\f 
ter the consideration of matters before it, the Committee 
of the Whole took a recess. 

Tne National League took a reo 

The National League ened al 3:15, and, on 

tion resolved itself into a Committee ol the Whole. 

0|1 , Mr. Robison, after a full discussion, ,1 w;is 

moved that the Committee of the Whole report its find- 
ings as shown by the • Commute, to the 
National League, with its recommendation for adoption 
II,;, motion was seconded by Mr. Hart and adopted by a 
VilI , of six to two, the New 5fork and Brooklyn Clubs 
voting "No. 

0nnlot ion of Mr. Ebbets, duly seconded, the Committee 
f the Whole duly adjourned. 

The National League reconvened and on motion took a 
recess until January 21 st. at 10 A. M. 

January 2ISt, [903, 

- nu . National League reconvened al 4:50 P. M.. a |i ,-i„|, s 
being represented. 



ANNUAL MEETING OK NATIONAL LEAGUE. =7 

Mr. Hermann, on behalf of the majority of the Com- 
mittee of the Whole, presented its report 

Mr. Brush read a telegram, in which he instructed his 
attorneys to discontinue a suit Bled against the President 

and members of the National League and stated his reasons, 
for bringing said suit. -Mr. Brush then presented on be- 
half ,,f the minority of the Committee of the Whole its 
report. 

On motion, the League took a recess until 10 o clock. 



National League reconvened at it o'clock, all clubs beinr 
represented. . f , 

On motion to adopt the report of the minority ot Be 
Committee on the Whole, said motion was defeated, but. 
on motion, said vole was reconsidered and a report ot tM 
minority of the Committee of the Whole was received 
and filed. t 

Mr. Robison offered a resolution that the agreement 
heretofore entered into between a Committee of this League 
and a Committee representing the American L *" gn ^JJj[p! 
agremenl is commonly known as the "Peace . &* ' 

be ratified, and said motion, together with the exhibits 
tached to It, was unanimously adopted. 

On motion of Mr. EbbetS, a vote Of thanks was extended 
to Mr. Hermann and the members of the Conference Lom- 

"lxecess was taken until W o'clock A. M.. January 22(1. 



January 22(1. igo.?. 

m • i -.1 . -io P M-. all dubs be- 

National League reconvened at i.ro '■ • 

ihg represented. , ,i rit 

After the transaction of business, i. was moved tnai 

When the meeting adjourned, il adjourns subject to Hie cat 
of the President. 

On motion, meeting adjourned. 



5» 



ANNI Al. MKI-TIN<. ">' NATIONAL IK 



RFCONVENED ANNUAL MEETING OF 
K TH E NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City, March 4. 1903, all 
Clubs being represented. 

Meeting called to order bj thi Pn Men! at «:ao p. M . 

Ob motion, the- reading oi the minutes ol the previous 
meeting was dispensed with. 

„ motion, the acti the League ,„ adopting their 

;c hedule at its meeting on December oth to the tath, ,,, ()J 
*, ,= rescinded. On motion, the schedule, as presented b, 
„;. Chairman of the Schedule Committee, Mr. Dreyfu^ 
was unanimously adopted. 

Mr Hart, on behalf of the ( omrmttee oi the Whole, ,,,, 
sented the report of said Committee on Joint l>i ; ,vi,, R 
Rules and said report was adopted. 

Col Rogers presented his resignation as a member of i| u . 
Committee on Constitution and Mr. James Potter of Phila- 
del hia wa s appointed to the vacancy. 



elphia was appointea to w vacancy 
Col Rogers presented his resignation as a 
tbis organization and introduced Messrs. 
d Edwin i. Hyneman as representing the 



the Philadelphia Ball Club. Mr. A. .. Reach 



his resignation. 

On motion, Col. John I. Rogers and Mr. A. j 
we re elected honorary members oi the National 

for life. , ., 

On motion, a recess was taken until ta oclock, 

5th. 



member of 

James Potter 

new owners 

i"< sented 



Reach 
League 

March 



ANNUAL MEETING Of NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



59 



Meeting reconvened at 3:10 P. M., all clubs being present 
except New York. 

The President made a statement in regard to the main- 
tenance of good order on the ball field and presented ms 
recommendation, which, on motion of Mr. Hart, secon 
by Mr. Fleischman, was unanimously adopted. 

The New York Club being now represented by ™ • 
Knowles. 

After the consideration of routine business a recess was 
taken until i_> o'clock, March 6th. 



March 6th, 1903- 



ented, and adjourned subject to the call 01 tn« 






OFFICERS 

The following U an offici-Hist «f the officer, of the Nati, 

j A.„»rir.in Association of 1 rofessiona] 



The following is an offlc... »- »-- - Nation, 

jeague an.l American Association of Professional B, se ,,„ 
2 and Officers of Clubs. Members thereof, for the ,„,,„„ 



n.i] 

Jal] 

1 for "»-■ »ea, O0 

of 1903 : presidmt, Secretary and Treasurer 
Hahry C. Pi i iiam, 
Rooms 1484-14*6 Si Ja«« Building, New York City 
Board •</ Directors 

., H SODEN, JAMKS A. HART. JOHN T. B* 
BARNEY I IKK', i 



RUSH 



AND 



)ST0 N BASE BALL ASSOCIATION. BOSTON, MASS 
15 Aj ii. SODKN, President. 410 Atlantic Ave. 

, ii. BILUNGS, Treasurer, Bon 1756. 

RttOOKLYN BASE BALL CLUB, BROOKLYN, x. v 
rHrRLKsH.EBBErrs.Pres., H. R. Vondek Horst. Treas] 
F A. Abel, Vice-Pre.., Edward Hanlon, Manager. ' 

CINCINNATI BASE BALL CLUB, CINCINNATI, OHIO 

August Herrmann, President, 

Max C. Fleischman, Sec'y and Treas., Wiggins Block. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB, CHICAGO, 11. L . 
James A. Hart, President, Fisher Building. 

PITTSBURG BASK BALL CLUB. PITTSBURG, P A 
Barney Dreyfuss, President. W. H. Locke, Secretary. 

PHILADELPHIA BASE BALL CLUB, PHILA., P A 

Iames Potter, President. J. R. Evans Roberts. Secretary 

Arthur E. Newbold, Vice-President. 



NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY. > 
John T. Brush, President. 
FredM.Knowi.es Sec.-Treas., Room 



../ YORK. 
roHM T. Brush, Pr< sident. 



7 6Si.Jan.es Building. 

iMERICAN BASK BALI. AND EXHIBITION CO. 
OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Frank DeHass Robison, President, 
M. Stanley Robison, Treas. W. C. Schofield, s 



iec, 






OFFICIAL LEAGUE 



STATISTICS. 



6 1 




^fficiaT national 

LEAGUE STATISTICS 



BATTING RECORD 

Of Players Who Have Taken Part in Rfte*» <* 
Championship Games, Season iWi. 



More 



lame jumI club. 



lViiu hi, Plttaburg 

Seymour, Cincinnati ... 

keeler, Brooklyn 

Sebrtug, Pittsburg 

Crawford, Cincinnati .. 
Phillips, Cincinnati •■• 
Beckley, Cincinnati ■• 
wagner, .1.. Pittsburg 

Kelley, Cincinnati 

Clarke Pittsburg 

O "Nclli, K., si. Louis.. 

Tenney, Boston 

Smoot, si. Lonia 

Slaglc, Cbicag 

Pelts, Cincinnati 

Jones, Cbicag 

1' Vim. 1'.. SI. LoUiS 

Bransfield, Pittsburg .. 

geek, Cincinnati 

garry, Pbiladelpbla ... 

Barclay, si. Louis 

McGann, New STork 

Doyle, New Yi.rk 

Robbs, Clnclnnatl-Cbl. 

Cooley, Boston 

Burke, Pitiahurg 

Hoy Cincinnati 

Pontin, Cincinnati 

[nomas, B., Phils 

Bresnahan, New York.. 
OConnor, Pittsburg ... 

Davis, Pittsburg 

TannchiU, Pittsburg •• 
Browne, PhUa-N. Y.. 

gllng, Chicago 

Brashear, St. Louis 

Chance, Chicago 

" olvert Philadelphia 

JJolan, Brooklyn 

Brodle, New York 

Ahearn, Brooklyn 

1.1'ueli. PUtal.urg 



-5- 
133 

at 

132 

Hi 

140 

32 

129 

137 

S7 

114 

86 

184 

121) 

1U 

104 

63 

128 

lim 

43 

138 

137 

ill 

60 

122 

[84 

55 

72 

83 

138 

no 

45 

r,n 

41 

123 

113 

inn 

67 

84 

14" 

inn 

02 
I SB 



±. 
644 
235 

660 

so 
555 
II I 
632 
638 
156 
461 
129 
491 
515 
47i l 
390 
239 
nn2 
H2 
187 
543 
642 
226 
190 

190 
646 
203 
27'4 
I 13 
600 
I7S 
171 
230 
141) 

198 
434 
387 
236 
134 
587 

117 
.... i 

514 



BS 


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106 


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88 


154 


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54 


122 


41 


71 


68 


1.,.. 


50 




-II 






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81 


163 


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71 


1.12 


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88 


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52 


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.333 

.:;:;:: 
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.1127 
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.281 
.281 
.280 



OFMl I 11 LKAOUI .nil 






lennlngs, Philadelphia 
Hurphy, St. Looll ... 
Steinfeldt, fliii-tiiimil 
Kltcbey, Pittsburg ... 
Magooo, Cincinnati 
White, Philadelphia .. 

Itnker, Chloaj 

Irwin, Brooklyn 

gheckard, Brooklyn • ■ ■ 
llulsuiii. Philadelphia 
Nichols, 8t. Loom 

|l,. MmiiIivvIII... I 

Ztminer, Pittsburg 

Dahlcn, Brooklyn 

Carney, Boston 

Kltson, Brooko 

Kroger, St. Louis 

Lowe, Chicago .... 

Farrell, J., St. I 

Bowennan, Ne« \..ik.. 

Corcoran, Cincinnati • 

Gremlnger, Boston ••■• 

Moran, Boston .... 

Van Haltren, N. 1 

Bitter, Brooklyn ...... 

Smith, <;■. New V.ik.. 

UcCreery, Brooklyn ... 

Hallman, Philadelphia 
Congalton, Chicago 

Conroy, Pittsburg 

Lauder, New Xork 

prxter, Chicago Boston 
Taylor, I., fWcago 
Farrell, C, Brooklyn ... 

-a, I., New fork. ... 

Douglas, Philadelphia 

Bean, New fork. 

Wicker, St. Louis 

Kiiirl.li;... Boston 

Williams, A.. Chicago .. 

Lush, Boaton 

Menefee, Chicago 

r I. in klyn 

Dooin, Philadelphia 

Mnl y, Cincinnati ... 

l g, Boston 

MoOraw, New Jork 

Knit. Philadelphia 

Miller, Chicago 

Brers, Chicago ■■• 

Kartman, Bt. Louis. • ■ ■ 
Phllllppe, Pittsburg • •■ ■ 
Wagner. <'.. New York. 

r tney, Boston 

liiinii. New ^..rk 




BHBJSHBMStaSBSSJSJSBBSHk#HSMBJ| 




OFFICIAL LEAGUE STATISTICS. 
HATTING RECOR1 l-«'^i 



63 



Name mill dub. 



Mjilaiky, 11,, slnii 

Duggleby, Philadelphia 

Hughes, Brooklyn 

Mathewson, New York 
Jacklitsch, Philadelphia 

Pholps, Pittsburg 

'•vans. N. v. -Brooklyn 
Williams, w., fining 
f eager, Q New York 
Jackson, New York... 
t'hilils, Philadelphia . 

Schaefer, Cblcag 

(lr I, Philadelphia ... 

Smith, 11., Pittsburg.. 

Jiuhn, Cluelnnatl 

Bergen, Clnci ill ... 

Chesbro, Pittsburg ... 

Leever, Pittsburg 

Ryan, St. Louis 

Newton, Brooklyn 

E™«er, Philadelphia . 
[Swing, Cincinnati ... 
Donovan, \v., Brooklyn 

Doheny, Pittsburg 

< renin, New York 

" Hagan, Chlcago-N. ^ 
Currle, Cin-St. Louis.. 
Calhoun, St. i.,,nis ... 
O'Neill, St. I.,, uls ... 

V\ litis. Bos 

Sparks, Now York 

Pitting,.!-. Boston 

[berg, Philadelphia .. 
Clark, It.. New York. 

"'■Ikes, St. I is 

Wheeler, Brooklyn ■■ 
McQlnnily, New York 
Poole, Plttsburg-Cln.. 

Ilii.lin.iii, N. Y.-t'lri.. 
Lundgren, Chicago ••■ 

E«ylor, I... New York. 
ft" "on. Chicago-Boston 



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64 



... i l KAI riSTICS. 

OFFICIAL l f -" 

FIELDING RECORD 

i-nisT BASEMEN. 



,,. and Club. 



Pittsburg 
Wagner, J.. i' brg 
BranafleW, '.',,,.,,,, . 

McGann, N » 

sag. gf^jar. 

Braabcar, n, 

'•,,.,,,,■..". Chicago 
g£!&. Chicago 
Williams, « 



V..rk 












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1988 
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.984 
.984 
.984 
.984 
.984 
.983 
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.978 
.97a 
.1171 
.964 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



j.. vl . r „ Chicago 

SSar. Kttsbnrg 
Eowe, Chicago 
Smith, <■•■ ; v " ,„| S 
Braabesr, SI 



V.nk. 



Louis. 



SSSj Pbu^iebi. 

r,.|/. Cincinnati 

!i„,k... Pittsburg 





18 


38 


58 


1 


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27.-. 


339 


22 


636 




1 19 


828 


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1 in 


356 


109 


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21 


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131 


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138 


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172 




18 


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90 




118 


272 


281 


12 


596 




n 


84 


111 


18 


21:: 




is 


127 


128 


22 


277 




28 


55 


86 


17 


158 



THIKD BASEMEN. 



Ste&dt. Cluctagtl 
jffi St. i >±Z^ 





1 III 


222 


2711 


21 


526 




34 


II 


!i2 


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131 


170 


268 


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232 


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294 




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67 



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.861 
.821 




OFFICIAL LEAGUE STATISTICS. 
SHORTSTOPS. 



65 



Name and Club. 



Long, Boston 

Conroy, Pittsburg 

Ilium, X,.j, v,,,.| 

l-oreoran, Cincinnati .. 
I- ;i i-i-.-tt. J si, I 

MeUraw, New Von; 

'•■>•' 'i'. Chicago B 
Hnlswftt, Pblladclphia. 

rinkc-r, Chlcag 

"ahlen, Hi kivn 

V'"-"''- St. Lonls 

Wagner, J., Pittsburg... 
Bean, New JTork 

Wjlgu.-r, c ., x,.„ •, ,,,-u . 



CS 

108 
93 
3« 
136 
20 
;:l 
23 
1 28 
127 
136 
107 
16 
an 

17 



286 

IBS 

70 

288 

37 

63 

66 

823 

261 

271 

is:: 
89 
7H 
29 



< 

369 
329 
109 
122 

71 
118 

71 
396 
n;i 
138 
389 
1 46 
163 

44 





■/. 




















a 




•* 


09 


- 


u 


c 

■r- 


37 


692 


40 


664 


14 


196 


66 


766 





10 


Hi 


107 


12 


142 


68 


787 


7:1 


7>-n 


67 


776 




042 


29 


264 


30 


202 


11 


84 



ft. 

.017 
.929 
.929 
.928 
.926 
.919 
.9fS 
.914 
.007 
.014 
.891 
.son 
885 
,869 



PITCHERS. 



WiiibT, ii„»„„, 

,,i'"ii'-liill. Pittsburg 

Baylor, .i., Chicago 

Sparks, New STorS 

Menefee, Chlcag 

1 fer, Pittsburg 

Lurrte, Cincinnati and si. Louis. 
Newton, Brooklyn 

I'l-li"-. Brooklyn 

'.'"Hi Pittsburg 

ff, ,lf Pny, St. Lonls 

Bo itoi 

Ppole, Pittsburg and Cincinnati. 

Williams, W., Chicago 

McOinnlty, New STork 

ihesbra, Pittsburg 

Mathewson, New Ifork 

K™f* p . Philadelphia 

"illllps, Cincinnati 



r>. 



movnn, \v , Brooklyi 



>ugglebj , Phlladi 1-.ii i ; 

fcyans, New fork and Br ilyn. 

g'tson, Brooklyn 

, u .l'.ii". adelphla 

Neill, M., St. Louis 

"'I-'. Philadelphia 

,', hll "i- Cincinnati 

,V>J lor, I. , \. « fork 

"oheny, Pittsburg 

an, N. v. and Cincinnati 

J*!*™. St. I Is 

Malnrky, Boston 

'•■'""'. Chicago and Boston 

[fOndgren, Chicagi 

SI I ...ills 



87 


104 


3 


10 


102 


4 


i I 


18 


2 


12 


46 


2 


1 


is 


2 


s 


66 


:i 


'i 


60 




17 


7" 


4 


'. 


58 


:: 




64 


3 


17 


-i 


a 


-, 


33 


2 


1" 


80 


6 


1 1 


12 


3 


in 


59 


4 


20 

1". 


82 
52 


6 

4 


Is 


80 



6 


13 


77 


1! 


16 

7 


01 
62 




11 


83 


7 


') 


69 




7 


as 




1 1 


7" 


8 


R 


17 


5 


s 


13 


5 


s 


an 


7 


11 


01 






61 


10 




;.7 


LO 


A 


27 


5 


B 


17 


11 



1 II 


.1170 




.070 


L22 

01 


.007 
.007 


59 


000 


.".4 


,963 


70 


,961 


72 


.968 


01 


.956 


Oil 


.965 




.0.54 


[06 


.958 


10 


,950 




.948 


66 


.948 


73 


.9*5 


108 

71 


.011 

.944 


104 


.1142 


I0S 


.Oil 


96 


.938 


81 


.988 


74 


.932 


inl 


,931 


S4 


929 




.929 


92 


.918 


-.7 


.912 


56 


.oil 


71 


.906 


Sl> 

s.i 


.000 

.876 


70 


.SOS 


38 


,868 


66 


.833 



66 



0KFICIA1 U USTM'S. 

CATCHERS. 



Name and l ' 1 "' 1 - 



chance, Chicago 
KlttiSge, Boston ■ 

Uorau, Boston 

bitter Brooklyn 
'■pi, C., Brooklyn. 

.V n Pittsburg. 
.smith, "-'.. ,, , ...... 

O'Connor, Pittsburg ■ 

K' ln * C «Srn": 
Vhearn, Broomy" 

leager, New Jork.. 
&s«i^ 



end Clnb. 

























-. 






















- 

n 


s 

T. 
J5 


' 


= 


7 


i 


T 


•_ 


§ 








1 


r. 


- 


s 


< 


a 


- 


5 


JM 


mt 


28 


i 





lis 


7-' 


365 


99 


8 


s 


ISO 


7" 


340 




in 


5 


156 


[6 


til 


17 


2 


J 


111' 


is 


246 


78 


. 


it 


837 


10 


202 


it 


i 


:: 


258 


It' 


269 


17 


!l 


., 


830 


39 


1ST 


l!i 


5 


it 


247 


It 1 


177 


[60 


IB 


16 


868 


82 


298 


67 


13 


s 


386 


.;t 


26 1 


83 


11 


it 


368 


117 


I 12 


154 


■s, 


12 


838 


16 


|ss 


71 


11 


7 


2TB 


80 


131 


29 


s 


2 


17n 


89 


102 


188 


28 


II 


r,71 


56 


263 


si 


11 


13 


871 


28 


lis 


its 


7 


ri 


168 


83 


135 


lltl 


31 


18 


598 


27 


123 


:i 


11 


i 


17:: 



.978 
.'.1117 
.967 
.964 
.961 
960 
.958 
.956 
.964 

.mo 

.943 

.hi;; 
.942 

till 
.940 

985 
.920 
.926 

tiiis 



OUTFIELDERS. 



Congalton, Chicago 

r^nfontf'l'msourg":::::...-- 

Jones, Chicago ■ ;•;;; 

Clark, SJeV fork 

Kfrd^Brooklyn 



1 vim. 



P. 



SI. 



Loots. 



york. 
Louis. 



Clarke. Pittsburg 
Lnsh. Boston 
Brodle, Sen 
Brashest 
Cooler, Boston .• 

Ml,,:,: Brooklyn ... 
Davis. Pittsburg 



17 


7.-, 


19 


30 


59 


121 


182 


204 


122 


263 


19 


33 


131 


260 


if. 


I ir, 


20 


27 


114 


L'lt7 


138 


278 


I":: 


283 


i",; 


17s 


11 1 


L'I7 


1 17 


j.-,:t 


109 


ill' 


127 


i:.-,. i 


.mi 


ti7 


137 


182 


1 H> 


288 


59 


77 


:i7 


60 



It 
I 

11 
1 1 

19 

r. 
IS 

.". 

■1 
18 
•J I 
1 1 
22 
12 
20 
20 

1 

7 

8 
t I 
II 

i 

t 




OFFICIAL LEAGUE STATISTICS, 
OUTFIELDERS '•"■■" 



67 











Vhii.' ani] Chili. 


4 


3 



& 




a 


^, 


'53 







3 


% 


J5 1'ltu, 1'iiih iphm 

Burke, Pittsburg 

Smoot, St. Louis 




1.1 
1:. 


21 
11 


1 

2 




121' 


I'm; 


111 


Hoy, Cincinnati 




72 


l.-.l 


-1 

r, 


Krug, Philadelphia 




it 


52 


Menefee, Chirac 




20 


2.". 


2 


Carney, Boston 




137 


1.-,.-, 


HI 


Crawford, Cincinnati 




1 -JO 


■Jul 


2a 


Brosnahan, N.-u Y..rk 




U7 


.'in 


'l 


Browne, Philadelphia and I 
Barclay, St. Louis 




12:: 
137 


2.",7 
217 


25 

is 


s ". v ' r, Cincinnati 




59 


130 


s 


> ■'"! Haltron, New STork. . . 




21 i 


HI 


1; 


'""in. New Vi.H, 




::7 


45 


5 


JoneB, .1., New Y.,rk 




85 


122 


1 1 
1 


Jackson, New York 




;i.-. 


57 


" llliama, A., Chicago 




28 


83 


1 


opnlln, Cincinnati 

Maloney, Cincinnati 




32 

is 


59 

2:1 


5 

.'! 



r, 
1 

21 
11 

1 

o 

13 

is 

21 
28 
13 



27 

17 

323 

1, ;n 
in 

2! I 
1S-I 
217 

39 

.'Mil 

288 
151 

.",7 
.-,:. 
1 is 

IIS 
.'IS 
72 
30 



- 

.sir, 

.nil 

.935 

.934 

.934 

.981 

.1)211 

.'.127 

.1)2.". 

.922 

.920 

.'.H I 

.912 

.mil) 

,899 

.897 

.895 

.889 

.867 




Spalding's Official League Ball. I 

• , Minor Leagm s, and by all Intercollegiate 

lions for over a quartei ol a N - ' r 

"rapped in tinfoil and pul in :i sepat iU °o» 

ii . ,: i n .,, , ,,,.,,,, ,. „],!, the regulations 
National I e i rue and Vmeri in \ ■ " ■■" l "" 



cclnaivelybytheNati 



ball 
nd 
of the 

\\ si 



Id other Assocm- 

$1.25 



ranted to last a full game when <u» 



a under ord 



onditions. 



the exce 



I- 



Spaldinc's Official Boys' League Ball. < '■"•'': m '-"'■ ;' u { h . m ade in 
lent qui , Nati rtal I > v 1 " Ball, ana 



particular. It beep 



75c 



bi 



and 



* 
ealed. 



— uusicomposed "i Boys under si«e=" - .' 

atidall i, !, thisballi > used wUJ be jecog 

|>i«dastegal '""'• ,„■"■ 

. i|. Each ball pul up "> 

SPALDINC & BROS. 

lelpnia iwhimorc 

" .. Montreal, Can 

( in- 




Spalding's "'Varsity" League Ball 




Regulation size and weight, fine selected horsehide double 
covei rubber centre, all wool yam and far superior in u „ lk 
.hip to any of the various imitations < 
I Is* 11 Warranted to last a full game without losing fa 
elasticity or shape. 

No. X. Each, $1.00 

Spalding's "Interscholastic" League Ball 

Same quality as the 'Varsity League but smaller in sU e . 
Each ball in sealed boa and warranted to last a full 
No. XB. Hath, 50c. 



St. Louis 
Denver 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

Chi !| ,hi:l 

Boston 

Minneapolis Kanso ' 



BaUim, 
Montr, 








VAVV^'^V 



DOUBLE SEAM 



£s 






Spalding's 

Double Seam 

Bail 

Made with the same 
,,.l ol the same 
JasourLeague 
Ball! tl"'' 1 ublestlti h 
| s used in '" i construc- 
tion , rendering: U 
doublj secure against 
,. VI . 1 v ball 
pped hi tinfoil, 
packed in a 

aled and 
last a 
game. 

No. 
Each, $1-25 



Spalding's Amateur Ball 

Regulation size ball. Selected horsehide cover, and well adapt 
practii e rami -.. Eai h ball put ii ""' s ' ' 



No. 3. Each, 50c. 



Spalding's Professional Ball 

Regulation sue and weight. Vladeof carefully selected material , 
'"". ""-1 warranted a Erat-class ball. I ■ ' i,,n ' M 

■ and sea led. 

No. 2. Each, 50c. 

Spalding's King of the Diamond 

Tl,i " ball [.regulation size and weight, madeol ;ood ">»»"*' land ors 
I..,. I, ball put upin a seps i '" " 

No. 5. Each, 25c. 
Handso [yillusti 



Sen \ .,,: 



A. C. SPALDINC & BROS. 

Chi, , Philadelphia 

I'.. do 

Minneapolis Kani as ' II ' 
I ondon, En 



Uontp 






SPALDING'S BASE BALLs 




LEACUE JUNIOR 

.li.h.lvu.Hk-r , :; v ,,. 

Mlyn. ''• ''-""""»■ ,,„. 

No. 7B. Each, 25c. 

VICTOR 

The best 1". . cm ball >■•■ ati m .1 

height. Each ball u. put up in «»e| 

No. 6. Each, 15c. 

F URE KA 

v .-!.. r.-lll itioU »Ii ill for »1 

N niue «.i'.!ii' !!r.. ',":""•>• 



No. 8. Each, lOc. 






B.«ntt«r£] 



Th.i 

If t !,/,.!. I. .11 ■ " Cl '< 






No. 13. Each, 5c. 



A. C. SPALDINC & BROS. 






St. Loui« 
Denver 



I 

Minneapolis Kai 



HaJtim 






SPALDING'S BASE BALLS 





HIGH FLYER 




HIGH FLYER 

A «ry lively ball; the inside is ,11 rubber, making ll t!,c liveliest ball 

ever offered ai the prii e. Put up in a separate box and seaiea. 

No. lO. Each, 25C. 

BOYS' FAVORITE 

,d weight, horsenide cover and well constructed. An 

No. 7. Each, 25c. 

BOYS' AMATEUR nd is 

"lis ball is a little under regulation mm, has a sheepskin, cover ana 
very livi ly. Pul npin a separate b a and .ealea. 

No. 14. Each, 15c. 

BOYS' LIVELY , .,, ,„„ 

A koo.1 Boys' I ively Ball, juvenile «be, two-piece cover, tacn 
trade-marked. One dozen balls In a box. 
No. 9B. Each, lOc. 
ili;i omely Illustrated catalogue mailed free to any address 



New York 

St. [ , 

I fenvcr 



A. C. SPALDINC & BROS. 

Phlladelphi- fataSf'" 

,,, v Won real, Can. 

M m ill • Kan ■ < ity 



SPALDING'S SUN PROTECTING MASK 




Finest steel 
wire, e x t r a 
heavy black 
enamelled; our 
'atent sunshade 
protects the 
eyes without 
obstructing the 
view. 

No. 4-0. 
Each, S4.oo 



SPALDING'S SPECIAL 
LEAGUE MASK 

BLACK ENAMELLED 

Made of extra heavy 
and best annealed Steel 
wire. Fittings of besl 
quality throughout. 

Each, $2.50 



No. 2-0, 



New Vorlc 
St. Louis 

Denver 




No. 2-0 
A. C. SPALDINC & BROS 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Boston 2. uffal °-.. 

Minneapolis KansasCity 

London, I'.i: 



S.-ui I - 
Baltimore 
Montreal, Ca 



SPALDING'S 

NECK PROTECTING 

MASK 

Finest steel wire, extra 
pavy and black enam- 
eled to prevent reflection 
If light; our patent neck 
extension affords abso- 
lute protection to the 
neck. 

No. 3-0. Each, $3.00 





No. 3-0 



No. OX 



SPALDING'S 

REGULATION 

LEAGUE 

MASK 

Made of heavy, soft 
annealed steel Wire- 
Well finished and reliable 

in every particular. 

Slack enamei led 
N,». OX. Each, $2.00 

HT WIRE 
O. bach. $<- 5 ° 



No. 



St. Louis 



C. SPALDING & BROS. 

1 l P lua tmore 

Mi apolia K 

n, England 











Spalding's 
Amateur Masks 

-NT \\ H-, 

Same size and g enera ] 

style ofthe League mask 
Substantially made . uu| 

warranted perfectly safe 
No. A. Each, $i. 0o 



Spalding's 

Boys' Amateur 

Masks 

BRIOH I' w ' R ' 

Exactly same quality as 

No. A mask, only smaller in 
size. An absolutely safe 
mask for boys. 

No. B. Each, $1.00 




No a 



Not Yi'i '■ 
-. I . 
Denver 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

Minneapolis K 



Halun 

I 




SPALDING'S 
REGULATION MASK 

BRIGHT WIRE 

Made in same style as 
., our Amateur mask, but 
' without head or chin 
piece. Warranted. 

No. L. Each, 75c. 



No. L 



SPALDING'S YOUTHS' MASK 

BRIGHT WIRE 




No C 



No D 



Weil padded. No head or chin piece 

No. C. Each, 50c. 

No. D. Each, 25c. 

CWete Catalogue of Afhletfc Sport. 

Maik-,1 Free to any Address. 

A. C. SPALDINC & BROS. 



New York 
St. Loaia 
Denver 



Philw 

„ , „ Buffalo 

Boston ' <~ rv 

Minneapolis f"?,'Sd 
London, Enjtlana 



San Francisco 

Ball imore 
Montreal, Can. 



1bo\v Hbout H?our Bat? 



II you have an old 
batthatisjustrighi 

or a broken b;it that 
you wish dupli- 
cated, send it to us 
and we will make you an ex- 
act duplicate at the regular 
price of $1.00 each. We will 
keep the model of your bat at 
our factory, so that you can 
re-order at any time. Our 
highest quality batsaremade 
from the very best selected 
second growth white ash 
grown on high land and 
under no circumstances do 
we use swamp or lowland 
ash in these bats. 



Our bats are made under the supervision ..f Jack Pi. Iceti who 
ntified with i veari 

! with the s ' W I rn hi 

thoroughly familiar with the players' wants, 
Cata 





A. <i SPAI.DINO & BROS. 



New 

■ ■ 

>t. Louis 



I 

Baltin Bu8 

I lenver 
London, El 



m< Uco 

K.msj.s (it v 

M one res 



««■«■"*-- *«•■■■*•■■••**■■""■•■■* ■•■■■■■'•■■■"*■"•■■" 



9 

: 
S 

'•••'mi 



k 



No. 3X 



21 



No. 8XB 




kJ 



No. 1» 



SEND FOR SPALDING'S 
II INDSOMELY 1 I- L U S 
Tk AT ED C \ I'M nGUE. 
M UU'.D FREE TO \^ v 
ADDRESS 



Jifit/or teasrwe 

Spalding's Burnt En' 
(Snior Leaen. B I 
extra auflitv a»h 



lengths 



30 and 3a in. 



No.3X.Each,2Sc 
Black End Bat 

tfsSLWE 

No.2XB. too. 



Boys' Favorite 

30 melius. 

No. fO. Each, 3c 



A. C 



St. Louis 
Denver 



SPALDINC & 

Philadelphia 
Buffalo . 
Minneapolis Kansas C.ty 

London, Engiana 



BROS. 



Boston 



San Francisco 

, ..re 
Montreal, Oan. 



^^^^A^^^^ 






Tape 
Handle 



Com hcil 



T 



HE A. G. 



F»ph Baff *& Auto. 

introduced 1 -, <■ \ at W;k 

,rl» o n. '* S t SP:u.. 



and made a pronounced I h\ e; ' s °'i 
the leading batsmen i n Vv ' i,, i 

of material and every oth^' 1 ' 1 )' 
essary requisite for a f " e , r n ec 
article we believe it to k* Ss 
best bat ever turned out i the 
proven exceedingly popu] "has 
this season we have addeH and 
new styles that will Int., s ° lr ie 
ballplayer. Themode"saSl the 
used by the best p| :lyc . rs LnJ i Se 
autograph stamped on e\Vk • lle 
guarantee that every 0n 7 "* a 
passed the closest inspection as 
, s perfect-judged accoS *d 

our knowledge of base baln? t0 
ers' needs— gained after an ay ' 
perience of twenty-seven e *~ 
in the manufacture of ha«Jt ars 
"«»e ball 



bats. 



H mail ,.,, ,, Mica,^ 



A. C. SPALDINC 

■ 
I I 

Denver 

S.1M I' I 



1 

Bosl on 

Minn' 

London, England * al ' <" 



A BROS 

elphia 

City 
A 



> 




&at- 



HE timber is seasoned for 



"ireeyears, not kiln-dried, 

sheds:, lu Season ed in open 

E», then, after a general in- 

lt is passed under the 



s P.ection 

JSorv CyeS ° f " men traincd in ;1 
Ped fn f : "' Ucul «'irlv well equip- 

goodc ,S ln ? out this cl:lss of 
that r i know of nothing 
specti™ ' done t0 m;lk e an in- 

th *e StsT? ,igid ' and pkCe 
as the f efore our customers 
"nest in every particular 
ir| at we can turn out. 

^ Wound Handle... $1.00 

"itch -r . 

Ha„ dIe TWine W ° U " d 1.00 

SK- Hanu.e;,,:,;;, >75 

P,ain Handle 75 



• atal'"""' / """ A """V.' illustrated 

<■>!;::;' z ■"'■'■ "■>■ *— *- 

"" >■;,,/,, of amplication 



A r» 
x "v " SPA LDINC 



Vork 



oulg Chi( 

B»ltl 



& BROS. 

Ionia 
Buffalo 

K:mis;i 

Montrea 

! 






SPALDING'S 

Trademark 

Bats 

Willow Bat 

Spal< 

Willow Bat, h'f 

finished and polished, 

and ' hl 

„ i b'al ,: 

No. 4. Each, 25c. 



"Antique" Bat 

[ding's Burnt End 
"Antique" Finish Bat, 
extra .i"^' 111 '' MD - 

No.2X. Each, 25c. 



I 



No. ^X 



11 






Iding'i hand bjr illustrated catali 



S,\\ \ "ri. 

Denver 



A. C. SPALDINC & BROS. 
Chi, i i Philad San I 

Buffalo Baltii i 

Minneapolis K as 1 it v Montreal C-,„ 






V ' ; '" No. OX 



SPALDING'S 

Trade = Mark 

Bats 



Wagon Tongue 

Spalding's Burnl End 
Wagon Tongue A»li 
Hat, 1 eague quality. 
Handle roughened by 
,.„. patented process 
for better urip. 

No. 3=0. Each, 50c. 



'Axletree' 

Spalding's Burnl El 



Bat 



Axletree 



Bat, 



finest straight grained 
ash, improved models. 

No. OX. Each, 35c. 



lustrate. catalogue of all sports 



?«w ITork 
St Louis 
"eovei 



A. C. SPALOINC &■ BROS 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Minneapolis Kansas I ity 

on, I ngland 



g an Francisco 
Baltimore 
Montreal, < an. 



THE SPALDING 

PERFECTION 

CATCHERS' MITT 




„. v., r.n Min I 

in «•■■■'•■ in, padding of b. il fell 

finest qualltj • ■' ,.,.,,,, ,;i , i I ire has 

been carefulls ' ., ■ ., ,,,,.. 

la«ed,doi I , ,,. k. 



St. Louis 



A. C. SPALDING 

Chicago 



& BROS. 



i -.i 







San I 

>< I,. 

!. ( 




No. OX 

Spalding's 
No. C Mitt 

Face and fj n g e r 
piece of asbestos 
buck, sides and back 
firm tanned leather, 
reinforced and laced 
at thumb, strap-and- 
buckle fastening at 
back and double row 
of stitching on heel 
pad. Superior quality 
throughout. 
No. C. Each, $I.OO 



" Decker" 
Patent 

Madesameasour 

No. Mitt, with 
the addition of" a 
heavy piece of sole 
leather on back for 
extra protection to 
the hand and 
fingers. 

No. OX. 
Each, $3.00 



St. i.oiiis 




A. C. SPALDING & BROS 

elphia 

r;,v 
Kamascity 

.„, England 




Spalding's 

"League" 

Mitt 

Made of green, 
special ! a n n e d 
leather, very 
soft and pliable, 
heavily padded. 
An old favorite. 

No. 5-0. 
Each, $4.00 

Spalding's No. O Mitt 

Pace sides and finger-piece made of velvet 
, n,i /boulevard and back of selected asbestos 
buck weH padded. Well known for reliability. 
No. O. Each, $2.50 



Spalding's No. OA Hitt 

Fxtra large and heavily padded. Velvet tan- 
ned boulevard and a special tanned leather finger- 
riece and back. Extremely well made, 
Mo. OA. Each, $2.00 



1 .1,,. ihovr mitts with strap-and-buclde fastening 
We have equipped the a&ov, f ™ (| . slUrhilK , „„ ,„.,., „,,,,„„ r * 

our pat* ut lace back ;is as 



si back they have douDie row «. 
&S and lied at thumb- and b 



additional feature, 

C. SPALDINC & 



BROS. 



{Jew York 

St. Louis 

Denver 



Chicago 

Boston 

Minneapolis 






Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Kansas City 
England 



Srm Francis* 
Baltimore 
Montreal, ('.,„. 




Spalding's 

Amateur 

Mitt 

Made of extra 
quality asbestos 
juck, perspiration 
proof, extremely 
tough and durable. 
A very popular mitt. 

No. A. Bach, $1-5° 



No. A 

These mitts ire ■ quipped with strap-and I"" kl " '''^''"'nVv are re- 

Bid have ible ro* o{ stitching on ik ■ • ,, ack as an 

i I ,nd laced n thumb, and have our pateni 
additi 1 feature. 



Spalding's 

Practice 

Mitt 

Made of specially 
firm t a n n e d oak 
leather, easy fitting. 
None better for 
practice. 

No. B. Each, SI.OO 




No. B 



C. SPALDINC & BROS. 



New y, ,i. 
St. Louis 
Denver 



Bost i, 
Minneapol 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Kansas ( ity 



San Francisco 
Baltimore 
Montreal, Can. 



!., ndon, England 



Spalding's Youths' Mitt 

Patent Lace Rack 

Superior quality youths' 
m itt. Ma de with extra 
quality asbestos buck, face 
\\|| I and finger piece extremely 

V*i 'XJB tough and durable ; well 

p a d d e d ; reinforced and 
faced at thumb and doubli 
row of stitching on heel 
pad; strap-and-buckle fastening at back. 
No. AB. Each, $I.OO 




/y 



Spalding's Youths' Hitt 

Patent Lace Back 

A very serviceable youths' 
mitt. Face and finger piece 
made of asbestos buck, sides 
and back of firm tan tied 
leather: reinforced and laced 
at thumb and double row of 
stitching on heel pad; strap- 
and-buckle fastening at 

back. 

No. CC. Each, 50c. 

Complete Catalogue of Athletic Sports 
Mailed Free on Application. 



New V.ii'l; 
St. Louis 
Denver 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS 

<■!,;, PhiUdelphi 

Boston Buffalo _ 

Minneapolis Kansas City 

London. England 




San Francisco 
Baltimore 
Montreal, Can 




Spalding's Youths' Hitt 

Patent Lace Back 

A great favorite ; made of 
extra quality firm tanned 
oak leather ; well p a d d e d 
and substantially made ; 
double row of stitching on 
heel pad; reinforced and 
laced thumb, strap-and- 
buckle fastening at back. 
No. BB. Each, 50c. 

Spalding's Junior Mitt 

Patent Lace Back 

Most popular mitt made ; 
of good quality firm tanned 
leather; well padded; laced 
1 h " m b ; double row of 
stitching on heel pad. 

No - CB. Each, 25c. 

Complete Catalogue of Athletic Sports 
Mailed Free on Application. 




New York 
St. Louis 
Denver 



C SPALDING & BROS 

Chicago Philadelphia 

'" ■ ton Buffalo 

Minneapolis Kansas City 

London, England 



San Fi an 
Baltimore 
Montreal. Can. 




Spalding's No. 4 Mitt 

Men's size. 

Firm tanned 
leather; ex- 
tra heavily 
padded ; re- 
inforced and 
lace d a t 
thumb joint 
and double 
row of stitch- 
ing on heel 
nad- strap-and-buckle fastening at back. 
No. 4. Each, 50c. 

Spalding's No. 5 flitt 

1 m pro v ed 
style; firm, 
pliable leather; 
laced thumb; 
well padded 
and double 
row of stitch- 
ing on heel 
pad. 

No. 5. 
Each, 25c. 

Spalding's No. 7 Mitt 

Leather face, canvas back; good size and well 




padded. 



New York 
St. Louis 
Denve. 



No. 
c 



7. 



Each, IOc. 

&. BROS. 



SPALDING 

Chicago Philadelphia 

Buffalo t Baltimore 

Minneapolis KanaasCity Montreal, Can 

I.omiori. England 



Spalding's 
No. BX First Basemen's Mitt 




Highest quality material and workman- 
ship and adapts itself to the conformation of 
the hand without undue straining. 

Made of fine selected and specially tanned 
calfskin, extremely well made throughout 
and padded to meet the special require- 
ments of a baseman's mitt; laced all around 
and strap-and-buckle fastening at back; 
double row of stitching on heel pad. 

No. BX. first Basemen's Mitt, bach, S3.50 



New Vort 
St. Uui« 



A. G. SPALDINC &, BROS. 



Philadelphia 
Boston Buffalo 

Minneapolis Kansas < "n y 

i »n, i England 



San Francisco 
]!:iltimore 
Montreal, Can. 



No.BXS FIRST BASEMEN'S MITT 



Composed of same 
quality materials and 

workmanship Mm* 

asin ourNoBXhrs 

Basemen's Mi U. 
has no heel pad and is 

made up especially foi 

professional use. 

No. BXS. 

,: , Basemen's Mitt 

Each, 63.50 




No. 



CX FIRST BASEMEN'S MITT 




Fine quality and finish : 
made on same lines as 
No. BX mitt; face of 
specially tanned green 
leather, extra well 
padded at wrist and 
thumb; laced all around 
and strap - and - buckle 
fastening at back; double 
row of stitching on heel 
pad. 

No. CX. 

First Basemen's Mitt 
Each, $2.00 




\,« Vorl 
St. Loo's 
] lenver 



Chicago 

n 



elphia 
Iiuflalo 
K:ins;i^ City 



Baltim 
Montre 




No. DX FIRST BASEMEN'S MITT 

Men's size: a good 
article at a moderate 
price; made of oak 
tan specially selected 
leather, laced all 
around and. strap-and- 
1 tickle fastening at 
back: a very easy 
fitting mitt. 

No. DX. 

First Basemen's Mitt. 
Each, $1.50 



No. EX FIRST BASEMEN'S MITT 



An excellent mitt 
">vs; made of 
good quality craven 
father, laced all 
a """Hl; suitably 
Padded and will give 
very g0(K | serv j ce 

No. EX. 

pirst Basemen's Mitt. 
Each, Sl.oo 




', Y 



Denver 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

CMi Philadelphia San I 

i: 1; ffalo Baltimore 

Minneapolis K Montn 
I .ondon, England 



SPALDING'S 
No. PX INFIELDERS' GLOVE 




Our No. PX Infielders' Glove is made up on 
lines suggested by prominent professional 
players. Quality and workmanship cannot 
be surpassed. The quality of buckskin used 
in making up this glove is the finest we 
have been able to obtain, and all other items 
of manufacture have been carefully looked 
into. It is heavily padded around edges 
with fine quality felt, and padding extends 
well up into the little finger. It has no 
hump, but is made extra long to protect 
the wrist. 

No. PX. Each, $3.00 

Handsomely illustrated catalogue mailed free to any 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
St. Louis 
Denver 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Hoston Buffalo 

Minneapolis Kan-a- City 
London, England 



Sun I' ran lS1 :,, 

HalliiM 

Montn 



SPALDING'S 
No. AX INFIELDERS' QLOVE 




A very popular- style. Made through- 
Out of specially tanned calfskin and 
Padded with best quality felt. Web 
thumb, double row of stitching on 
he el pad. Highest quality workman- 
ship throughout. 



No. AX. Each, $2.50 



Hand 



ly '"Mtwt* ■ ,:i, !d f rcc 



any address 



Denver 



A. C. SPALDINC 



Philadelphia 
g.o«ton Buffalo 

Minneapolis Kansas City 

London, England 



&. BROS. 



San 1' i b 

I'.altin 

Montrei 







Spalding's No. 2X Infielders' Gi 0ve 

This glove has re- 
tained iis popularity 
year after year and to- 
day is acknowledged 
the most practical 
in style and get up f 
any on the m a rke t. 
Made of selected velvei 
tanned buckskin, lined 
and correctly padded 
l| with finest felt. Has 
Y Web thumb. Highest 
quality workmanship 
throughout; double 
heel pad. No better made 

2X. Each, $2.50 




row of stitching on 
at any price. 

No 



Spalding's 

2XS Infielders' 

Glove 

A special glove with 
features that will appeal 
to the professional player. 
Made extra long, of se- 
lected velvet tanned buck- 
skin, kid lined and lightly - ; v\ 
padded. Has no heel pad. [\< 

No. 2XS. Each, $2.50 

A. C. SPALDINC &. BROS. 




§ 



. ■ ■ ■ 

St. Louis 

petiver 



Chicago 
Minne 



Philadelphia 

■ 
Kans 



San l'i |] 
Mall i more