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MATIONAL STRIP CARTOON WEEKLY 



DAN DARE 



PILOT or THE FUTURE 



HREEPCNCE 



THE H-.‘A&QoaBT€RS op THF ImTERPlANET SPACE FLCET 
■ SOME VE4RS IK. TWE FUTURE 



IN TWE LAUNCHING CONTRO. ROOM 



'right 

DAN 



^NGFISHER'S 
I4EAOYTOGO. 
SIR HUBERT 



tUXILIARV 

ROCKET 

BOOST 



SMce SHIP 
I TAKINC OfP 
OO NOT Mid 
THIS POlN^ 





KjAY, iris NO^ur 
THEM VITAMIN 
BU3CKS AG AtKJ ! ^ 



CHEER UP, SIR. IT'S NOT VOua 
PAUL.T VOU didn't GO INTVIE 
S. 'KlNGPlSHEQ* 



MORNING, DK3BY- 
BACONi EGGS ? 



ff WEEKLMT£R~ 
HVOmOffRE^ QUARTERS 



"'Impin' JETS! 
fLL. LOOK LIKE 
A VITAMIN . 

soon' 



MORNING 

SIR! 



VALUABLE?— 

\ FOR WHAT? 

/sitting at a 

DESK AMO 
CARRYING THE 
^^^^CANS ? 



WCLL.1T SUITS M£,SwT\BLn;MV DEAR DUMB Dk3B»H IN CASE 
LIRE AT HU'S A LOT ISOUHAVENfX HEARD A IRADIO 
BETTER THAM GADDING lOR SEEN A PAPER IN THE LAST 
ABOUT IN MASTV HOT / FEW WEEKS ,'KlNGFlSMEC^' 
3PAC£ SHIPS TO WASTV A. TRVINGTO RBACH 
COLD PLANETS LIKE / NOT MARS/ 



^AT MAKES IT WORSE' 
-WE DO KNOW WE 

CAN REACH ^ V. 

MARS ^ 



Rafter ALL-vou '■ 
ARE CHIEF PILOT OF 
THE FLEET - VOlTRE 
. TOO VALUABLE 
\ HERE > 






AND WE KNOW WE MU&T 
REACH VENUS, DIG . IT'S THE 
MOST IMPORTANTTWING 
'ME FLEETS EVER HADTD , 
DO-AND HERE I AM / 
TWIDDLING MY THUMBS / 
INSTEAD OF. 



R MESSAGE COMES 7UROUGH 
ON OEM's PERSONAL RRUtO 



IT MUST BE NEWS 
FROM THfKINGFISHER' 
DIG,- COME ON! 



DRN RNP P/GBP NURRO 
OUT TO DEN'S VEPEET' 

(JET-PROMFUEn 

GVROSCOPIO JEEP) 



COWTWOU ER'S LOMPl. 1Ml NTS 
SIR - WILL YOU COME TO 
H Q. RIGHT AWAY ’ 



-HUSH.f 

















, 




PERHAPS THE KINGFISHER'S 
REACHED VENUS, SIR F 



OR PERHAPS she's VANISHED 
- LIKE THE OTHER TWO 
V SPACESHIPS' y 



WONDER WHAT'S HAPPENED? 



CONTINUED 



g/ P,C,^9 



PROM THE FAMOUS RADIO 
series IryALAN STRANKS 





PUjOTAGAiMSrfWe WOtM 




A gripping new Serial by Chad Varab 



Chapter i 

'The Ghost from the Sea 

J IM suddenly fell himself falling. 

He had been stroUing home from the Club 
with his hands in his podtets, whistling 
a popular zither tune that was driving his 
fan^y cra:^, and gazing up at the sky Hying 
to identify the Pede Star. Ihen he trod on 
nothing. 

His feet shot rideways and downwards. 
Before be could gel his hands out of hb 
pockets, he had slid down a <^ute. pving his 
head a cra^ on (be edge that made him sec 
the Pleiades, and dropped several feet on to a 
rocky mountairt. The avalanche be started 
took him with it and went on rumbKng and 
pelting him even aAer he'd reached the 
bottom with his. 

The taste of the grit in his mouth told him 
what had happened. Some fool had left a 
manhole-cover off, and Jim was now mixed 
up with somebody’s coal raiioo. 

Before he c^M pick himself up, he saw a 
shadow on the gruny whitewashed wall - 
evidently cast from a light in a connecting 
cellar. In qiite of the grotesque distortion 
Jim saw what it was, and he could hardly 
believe his eyes. It was a man with a gun. 

He stated as if paralysed at the sinister 
nihouette. The shadow began to creep to- 
wards him, and be r ecovered his wits in a 
hurry. He hadn't a chance in a million of 
being able to scramMe out in time, so he got 
to his feet and picked up a hi^ lump of coal. 
He hurled it with all his siieogth, not at the 
approaching figure, w^nch was still around 
the comer of (he passage, but ai the pile of 
coal behind him. As a fresh avalanche 
started, he yelled at the top of his lungs; 

“ Coime on, chaps! And shoot to kill! ” 
The approaching shadow faltered. The 
man, it seemed, was not aware that his 
shadow could be seen. Encouraged. Jim 
hurled another lump (it felt like slate), and 
shouted; 

“ Wail for Tiger - then weTl rush Ihemr’ 
A shot rang out, terrifying and deafening 
in that confin^ space. In the same moment 
Jim felt thepainsearinto his knee. Ashefril, 
he gasped; 

"They got me, pals! Don't let 'em get 
away!" 

Tenderly his hand explored the injured 
knee. He was astounded not to find it wet 
with Mood. He wasfed the kneecap. 
Nothing seemed to be broken. Then his 
hand toudied a familiar object - a lump of 
slate with a shape he recognised. It had 
bounded back when he threw it, and clouted 
his knee. 

He gave a whistle of relirf. Then he looked 
hastily at the wall. The shadow had gone! 

Had it ever been there? He could hardly 
believe it: and yet his ears still rang with the 
sound of the shot. Why wasn’t a pMioenian 



peerii^ down the mantiMe I9 now, demand- 
ing to know "What's all Ms 'ere?" 

Jim stood perfectly still, and listened. It 
was thcD that h; hard it - a sort erf* scuffle in 
the next cellar, and a strange animal sound. 
There was something horrible and uncanny 
about it, and his skin crawled. He wasn't a 
coward, but he'd had plenty for ooe night. 
The gunman was bad eoough, but this this 
slithering, snuffling sound node him think of 
some hideous rqxile - an alligator, perhaps. 

"I'm getting out of this!’' muttered Jim. 

• He scramUed up the coal, and managed to 
pull himself up <m to the chute. But it was 
slippery, and he fell off. As be picked himself 
upagain,hecBstaglaaceal the wall that was 
faintly lit. 

Cripes! It mu an alligator! Lower down 
than the shadow he’d seen at first, crawling 
on the floor, was a monstrous shape. 

Jim let out a yeH and jumped for the chute, 
scrambling frenlically against the side walls, 
and senMng his fitters raw. At last be got a 
grip on the edge of the-manhole, and hauled 
himsell up until his head and shoulders were 
out in the Mean night air. 

He was just going to heave himself out of 
the hMe trften be saw a burst of flame at the 
end of the street. The bullet whipped past his 
head with a "zwoo-EEP" just before he beard 
thecmckofthesbot. He ducked instinctiveiy, 
lost fas balance, and fell back into the cellar. 
This time he caujM the point of his chin on 
the edge of the hole. Juri before he lost con- 
sciousness he sobbed "O gosh the Thing T 



W HEN be came to. he couldn't remember 
at firtt where be was. He was lying on 
something soft and warm - and sticky. 

He opened his mouth to ydl, and then 
thought better of h. For there was an un- 
mislakable smeU ri^t against hit nose and a 
familiar texture against hri mouth. 



The smell was boot -polish and the texture 
wiswool. 'The contrast between these homely 
things and the horror his strained imagination 
had pictured was so great that he giggled. 

His face was pressed against someone’s 
shoes and socks, and so far as he knew, 
alliguors didn't wear either. 

Then be stopped giggling He was lying 
on a man. and the man was badly hurt. The 
stickiness against his band was not reptilian 
slime but human Mood. 

Was the man dead? 

Jim carefully rolled off him. fell along his 
body to his face, aisd was reassured by the 
warm moisture of breathing. 

Obviously this must be the victim of the 
man with the gun and tus aoconqflkes. ifany. 
And be needed hdp badly. 

But it was too dark in the coal cellar. Jim 
crept cautious^ round the comer, down a 
very short passage and into another cdlar, 
parallel to the fust. It was lit by a hurricane 
lamp hating ftrmi a hook in the ceiling. 

He could see the marks on the dirty floor 
where the man had painful^ dragged himself 
along. They started from a row of wiite-bins 
along the passage wall. It looked as if the 
man had crawled from one of the Mns. 

In the wall t^posite, an c^tening led to a 
Mxt flight of slops curving upwards. At the 
top be could juM see a door, battered but 
stout, with a rusty lock. CnunUmg under 
his breath at the grit that crunched beneath 
his feet. Jim stole up the steps and gently tried 
the door. It was iodred. 

He stood uncertainly fm- a monneat, eyeing 
(he door. Then he noticed the bolt on the 
inside, near the top. It was coated with rust. 
A long strug^ followed before the bolt gave 
way to Jim's frantic heaving and shot 
suddenly to. He hoped the corroded stafde 
would hold if (be gunman should return. 

Swiftly he returned to die wounded man 
and ag^ heard the snuffling noise tbat had 




scared him before. The man had recovered 
consctousocss and was trying to talk. He 
must be gagged! Jim felt for the man’s mouth 
and his fingers solved the problem. There 
was a sorbo ball in his mouth! He got it 
between his finger and thumb and managed to 
pull it mil. 

For a few moments the man made inarli- 
cuiate iKHses, then he whispered thickly, 
"m'han's, m'feet, tied." Jim fumbled with 
his sore fingm at tbe knots, ^ad shat in his 
days with the Scouts he’d learnt to deal mth 
knots MindfMd. At last his companion was 
free. Jbn helped bkn back into (he limited 
cellar, and made a rot^ bandage for the 
nasty wound in his shoulder. 

He was rehevod that K was no worse. But 
the man needed hMp, for he had lost a lot of 
blood, and bis wrists and ankles had been tied 
cruelly t^t. 

Jim made hhn as comfortable as he could 
against a wall and (he man smiled his thanks. 

“You a naoerT’ he asked. 

"Certainly,” rc^hed Jim. 'Tm only 
sixteen." 

"I said ‘miner’, not ‘minor’. You look as 
Mack as a sweep." 

‘Xlh. that," said Jim, lookiog down nie- 
fuKy at his clothes and hands. “Yes, I don’t 
know what Mum trill say. Ifhccanestotbat. 
you're prMty filthy (cm. Did ym fall through 
themanhole.atwMl? Some foM left the cover 
off." 

“No - I was (he fooL They chased me 
down into the cellar, and I tried to get out of 
the manhole, but ih^ pulled me back. If you 
hadn't happened ak>^ they'd have . . . Wdl, 
never mind about that now. Do you think 
you could get me out?" 

"I've bolted the cellar door, so I think you 
should be safe while I get up through the man- 
hole and fetch the police - unless (hat chap’s 
still shooUr^. Can’t think why they haven't 
turned up as it is.*' 

“Not the police, if you dcm'l mind,” said 
the man, lookiug up at Jim enigmatically. 
"And (b^ ore on the job - 1 heard a polire 
whistle just as you feff, after the second shot, 
before you knocked me out by falling on me. 
I dmi't think therell be anyone watching tbe 
manhole dow." 

For Jim, one thing stcx>d out of all this. 

“Why not the policeT’ be adeed. "Are 
yoQ a critninai?" 

“No,” said tbe man. He looked Jim 
strai^t in the eye, with such a frank gaze that 
(he boy felt inclined to believe him. "iH tell 
you part of the reason later. Can you get 
someone who won't talk to help me out and 
put me up for the night?" 

Jim frowned. Then his face cleared. 

"Yes," he said. 



B EFUtE diiiMtig out of the manhole, Jim 
pushed out a targe rounded lump of 
coal, half otpecting it to be shattered by a 
buUel. Whea nothing happened, be dropped 
it and dimbed out He found tbe manhole- 
cover, repiaced it, and carefully noted which 
of the row of bomb-damaged bouses it 
belonged to before moving Off. 

He made his way ahn^ tbe street as fast as 
be could, liii4Mng a little from bis bruised 
knee and aching from the cracks on his head 
and diin. His imagination conjured up 
shadowy figures lurking in doorways, and 
(»ce from just behind him tbe long-drawn 
howl ofa tom-cat sent drivers down hh spine. 

At (he door of tbe house he was making for 
he paused uncertainly, then turned away and 
went round tbe beck alley. There was no 
li^t in the window, and be wanted to get Ken 
without waking bis tnoUier. It must be very 
late - what on earth would Mum say when he 
gothonw? Especially when dxe saw the suie 

Thirty-nine, thirty-seven, thiity-five. No 
number on this hack gate, but H must be 
thirty-three, the one he wanted. Bother, it 
was locked. He hoped there was no broken 
^ass on the yard wall as he leapt and caught 
the top with hts fingns. 

He hauled himself up. one foot on the latch 
of the door. But (he wall was loo high for a 
jump down into tbe yard. Tnstear^ he walked 
along tbe top, balancing precariMisly, and 
managed to dteh on to the slate roof of the 
outhouse. As quiets as he coul^ he crawled 
up tbe roof over the scuHery. 

He had neaity reached the back bedroom 



window when his injured Icnee gave way. and 
he sti|^)ed. He clutched wildly at the roof, 
breaking the rest of the nails on his sore 
Rngers, and at last managed to get the side of 
his foot into the gutter to arrest his fall. As 
he thought of the icsuh if he'd fallen flat on 
his stomach and nose on to the below, he 
shuddered, and blessed the honest workman 
who had fixed that gutter so securely. 

He lay for a moment. rea>vering bis senses 
and listening. There was no sound exixpt 
that of his own laboured breathing. His slide 
had made surpirisingly little noise. 

Resisting the temptation to call it a day and 
get down and knock at the door, he crawled 
up the roof again. The window he was aiming 
for was still open a little at the top, so it 
couldn't be latched. He managed to gel his 
long-suffering hnger-tips under the bottom 
half of the window, trying to cling to the 
sloping roof vacuum-suction, pressing his 
hedlow stomaich against it. The window 
squeaked slightly, but inch by inch he 
managed to raise it until the opening wa.s big 
enough to get through. 

There was no sound from the room. His 
eyes ha<t got used to the darkness by now, and 
he could faintly make out a hump in the bed- 
clothes which told him that the occupant of 
the room was .still sleeping soundly. 

He put his arms and head through the 
window, and got his chest across the sill. 

Suddenly iIk window slammed down on to 
him with such force that it knocked all the 
breathoutofhisbody. A moment sooner and 
it would have guilloUned him. 

He shouted, “Ken, Kent It’s me, Jim!’’ 

At least, he thought he shouted, but it was 
only a choked whis^r from his crushed chest. 
Then he passed out for the second time that 
night or was it morning, now? 



HEN he came to, he was lying flat on the 
fleor, and someone was trying to pull bis 
trousers <^! Before be could open his eyes, 
he fell warm water on his face. When he was 
sure he wasn’t going to get a soapy flannel in 
his eyes he opened them, and looked up. 
Ken's sister Pm was squattir^ by bis head in 
her pyjamas, bathing his face. 

He mode a hasty grab at his trousm, and 
heard Ken's voice from somewhere near his 
feet. 

"All right, Jim,’’ it said. “Can't put you 
into Pru's bed in these filthy things." 

"Bed?” squeaked Jim. “1 can’t go to bed 
- I've got an urgent job to do.” 

“Sh. not so loud,” whispered Pru. “You 
mux! get to bed you’re all in.” 

"Pru nearly kilM you!” murmured Ken. 
He had the cheek to sound .slightly amused 
about it. 

“What happened?” asked Jim, trying to .sit 
up. and groaning as his bruised ribs decided 
otherwise. 

Ken gave another pull at his trousers, but 
Jim kept a tight bold. He'd nothing else on 
by now except his .shirt. 



Pru answered demurely; 

“I beard someone on the roof, and thought 
we had burglars. There wasn't lime to get 
anyone - ih^ all sleep like the dead . . .’’ 

“(Jood thing, too!” intnjected Ken. 
“Keep your voice down, for Heaven's sake!" 

“And in any case." continued Pm more 
quietly, “I thought the man might be armed 
and it would be better to lake him at a dis- 
advantage.” 

“You certainly did!" complained Jim. 

“So I cr^t out of bed, arranged tbe pillow 
to look like someone asleep, grabbed tbe 
cricket bat Ken had left here when we 
changed rooms, and flattened myself agaiiLst 
the wall near the window." 

“Some girl!” gmnted Jim admiringly. 
“How is it you didn’t kitock my head off with 

the batr 

“She didn't want to kill the chap,” ex- 
plained Ken. “Ifsbe’d knocked him silly he'd 
probably have fallen off the roof and killed 
himself." 

■’Besides,” said Pru, ’Tve always wanted 
to guillotirte someone with a window -- nasty 
of me, I krKKv." 

“Look here,” sakl Ken, “we’re the ones 
that want seme ex^naiiun. Who’s been 
beating you up . . 

"Apart from me," pul in Pm slyly, irarts- 
feiring the soapy flannel from Jim's ears to 
his hands and ariru to his great relief. 

“And what did you want me for, and when 
did you become a Devin boy? You said 
nothing about it at Club to-ni^t.“ 

"ni tell you as we go," said Jim. “I’ve 
wasted too much time already, but 1 couldn't 
stand until now." 

He tried to get up, but even with Pru’s help 
he could only stagger to the bed and sit on it. 

"You can’t now." commented Ken. He 
gave a push at Jim's chest, whipped off his 
trousers, and had him tucked into bed before 
be knew what was happening. 

“Now you'll stay there if I have to slug 
you!” growled Ken threateningly. “Ifthcrc's 
anything to be done. Pru and I will do it.” 

Jim was about to protest, but looking at 
Ken’s face he coukJ see it would be a r aste of 
time. And, boy ’ did it feet good to be in bed. 

Quickly he lokt them what had happened 
to him. He couldn't have wished for a better 
audience. Their goggling eyes and gasps of 
astonishment and sympath^c horror as he 
described the shadow that had looked and 
sounded like an alli^tor made him feel for 
the first time that it was good to be in for 
some excitement even if he had got knocked 
about. As .soon as he mentioned tbe wounded 
man, Ken broke in. 

“Hang on a minute," he said. 

He nipped out of the room. Pm just had 
time to whisper “You were jcrfly brave, Jim!” 
and Jim to reply “What about you, you 
bruiser?” when Ken returned carrying his 
clothes and a first aid box, and a pyjama 
jacket which he threw at Jim. He snapped 
out the light, and said to Jim; “You can talk 
while we're dressing.” 



Jim painfully hauled off his shirt, wriggled 
into the jacket, and continued bis story. By 
the time he had finished his friends were leady. 

“Don’t worry, Jim.” said Ken. ‘■‘Wc’II 
look aAer your pal om/keep mum about it! 
Dick Rawlings at the garage will help us - 
he's on all night, and he'll have a rope and 
lend a car. I’m sure his wife will give the chap 
abed. You can go to sleep and don't worry 




Pm’il go to her old bedroom when wc get 
back, and as there isn’t room for two in this 
bed. Ill sleep downstairs on the couch - if 
there’s any of the night left!” 

Ken sp^e rapidly and decisively, and Jim 
felt confident that he and Pm could handle 
the situation, with Dick's help, Jim closed 
his eyes with a sigh, and was o.sleep almost 
before they shut the door. 

They crept cautiously downslaim arid out of 
the from doix: then they raced for the garage. 

“Why do girls bang their krtees together 
and kick their legs up sideways as they run ?” 
wondered Ken aloud. 

"Keep your mind on your own legs. 
Bandy," retorted Pru. forging ahead. 

They told Dick enough for him to get out 
a small von. Tbe young mechanic was a 
Nonbemer and betrayed no excitement or 
surprise. All be said as they drove olf was: 
“Pru, sit on ycr brother’s lap if ye can’t keep 
yer ktrobbly knees out o' my gear lever.” 
“They're very nice knees, Grumpy," pro- 
tested Pm. 

"Ah'll [>ul ye across my knee, young 
woman, if this 'ere is a leg pull.” 

They had no dilliculty in fiitding the man- 
hole as it W3.S the only orte of its type in the 
street. Dick prized up the cover and led the 
way into the clammy cavity beneath. He had 
brought a torch and it didn't take them long 
to be sure there was no-one there. The 



cellars were as Jim had described them, but 
there wa.s no lamp and the door at the lop of 
the steps was locked but not bolted. 

“So ye were havin’ me on.” growled Dick 
omitKiusly. He made a dive for Pm to carry 
out bis threat, but Mopped as he trod on 
smoething springy. It was a sorbo hall: and 
except for recall grime it looked as if it had 
been washed. 

“We’d better get out o' this," said Dick 
grimly. He gave Pru a leg up and hauled Ken 
after him and drove them back to his garage. 
“This ’«e is a job for the police.'' he pro- 
nouTXxd. 

“But the man asked ’’ said Pm. 

“Ah’m Idlin’ ye.” 

“He may be Secret Service.'' suggested Ken. 

“We'll talk about it in the momin'. Now 
buzze^'ome- and keep out o' mischid' if ye 

“You'll not ring them up tonight?” begged 
Pru. 

“Not till I've spoke to Jim myself. Now 
'op it.” 

“Thanks, Dick - you're a sport." 

They ran off as he turned bwk to his work. 
As they approached their street, Ken saUl, 
“You cut along home. I'll just see if there's a 
light in Jim’s house and if there is I'll tell his 
mother not to worry." 

“All righi.” said Pru. yawning. “Don’t 
forget you’re .sleeping downstain.’' 

She ran off towards her home. Just before 
she reached the front door a car drew up 
beside her. Two men sprang out and seized 
her. Before she could utter a sound, some- 
thing soft was pressed over her mouth and 
nose and she was smothered with a sweet 
sickly smell. She struggled frantically but 
was helpless. Just before she lost conscious- 
ness she felt her ankles bang against the 
mnning-board as she was dragged into the car. 



J IM awoke with a start. Someone was 
climbing in at the window. It was too late 
to do Pm's guillotiiK trick, even if he had 
been in any condition to move swiftly. 

He felt for the pear-shaped switch of tbe 
light over the bed, and pressed it. The 
sudden light dazzled him. as it did the in- 
Imder. He was standing by the foot of the 
bed with his hair wetiy plastered down and 
water dripping from it dosvn his face. 

It was someone he recognised, someone 
he knew well, someone he loved and admired. 
It was his cousin Ray. 

And the reason why his blood froze as he 
opened his mouth for a. shriek which the 
man's wet hand quickly stifled, was that Ray 
wa.s dead. He’d been dead two years. His jet 
aircraft had crashed somewhere in the sea oft 
Iceland, and the wreckage hod been found. 
Tbe report said there could not possibly have 
been any survivors. 

Did ghosts feel as solid as the clammy 
hands that gripped him? 

To be continued next meek 



CAPTAIN PUGWASH 




AND A FIRST 
MATE. WHO PRt- 
fERRCD SlMPtNE 
TO ANYTHINO 
ELS£....^NS^ 



CAPTAW W6MASM HAD 
THREE RARTKOLAR^k 

® ms 



IHE &TOHY OF A 

Bad BuccANseR. 

&OF7W£ MANY 

Sticxy Ends j 

WHICH NEARLT^ 

aefeiL 



VUnSAVAMCE 

TERRIFYIHE 

THAN 

PU6WASH— 



MAWCATMe^ 



W// A YEKt 
Y SPECIAL 
Box (ih-*aiua£l> 



„T DMM 



BUT AT DAWN..., CAPTAIN 
PU6WASH OVEtOLEePS. HAVIN6 
CELEBRATED HtS DEPARTURE 
TOO WELL. HIS SHIP. THE 
'BLACK PIS', LEAVES WITHOUTHlM. 



THAT NIGHT.. 









rc-AKSWIB 



fyee /hia paper fomran/s a mirror 

HTM > htShmuuT" 



A SHORT HISTORY OF WRITING 



t/am 



No. I Prehistoric picture writing 



TF you want be a h^py> 
healthy Ovaltiney you should 
do as all other Ovaltincys do — 
drink ‘ Oval tine ’ regularly every 
day. 

This delidous food bever^e pro- 
vides oourishment to build up 
robust health and to {pve you the 
energy and fitness which will 
help you to be successful in games 
and sebodwork. 

EVEKV BOY AND GIBL SHOULD |OIN 
THE LEAGUE OF OVALTINEVS 
TLc Losuc faw been ftxtatd by tbc iropnetfin 
ct ' Ovydoe * ID pramote the heaUi lod faflp* 
piaem of ebiUrea cTerywbae. Boyi and firia 
aH oMa Ibe enmuy h«« (nfrit and me ha wBS 
snat fuM aritb dae accm tdgh-ainia. aisnab ud 
code. 

You can )0>n >bc Lea pi t and obudn die ofickl 
Rtdc Boot and Badpe byaendifig a lafaol ban a 
tin of ' Oaahino ' with your fuU name, ai^caa 
and m lo~THB CHIEF OVALTINEY, DeiM. 
yj, 4a Uppe Gfoavenor Street, lAnufain, V.i 




THE SPIES WHO SAVED LONDON 




D o YOU rem em ber the flying bombs 
and the rockets? ir you lived in the 
London region in 1944, the answer 
is a big Yes. But did you also know 
this -- that whereas the bombs and rockets 
came over on an average of a hundred a day. 
‘ the Germans had planned to send a ihoaiaml 
a day? And that (heir campaign started sis 
months late? Why? Berause we were 

The story I have to (el) you, now revealed 
for the first time, records one of the most 
important spy episodes of the war. 

In September, 193)1, I was riding round the 
Bailie on a bicycle, and arrived ai the 
German island of Rugen. There I strayed by 
accident into an enclosed area, and was 
arrested. I was released afler a few hours, 
and politely escorted from the dtsiricL 
However, in my brief .spelt at laige I had 
noticed a few things. There were huge frag- 
ments of concrete scattered about. One was 
shaped in a semi-circular hollow, with a 
narrow drain down the centre. 

I talked with local villagers. They des- 
cribed explosions, followed by queer niMses 
between a swish and a rumble like an 
express train, they said. At one time some- 
thing had evidently gorw wrong; whole con- 
voys of ambulatK«s had left the area. 

I could make little of this myself, but 
experts in London dkl. The Germans were 
experimenting with rockets! The concrete 
was pan of a laurtching platform, and it was 
evident that rockets were bursting as soon as 
they left their laurtching gitlleys. 1 came to 
the cortclusion that even in 1938 we knew 
quite a lot about the German cxp^iiKnu! 

Later, from German friends, I learned that 
attempts had even been made to fire man- 
carrying rrxJiets. The first 'volunteer' was a 
convici, promised his freedom if he would 
make the experimental trip. He did not live 
to enjoy his pardon. 

From time to time more information came 
in. Our agents picked up bits ami pieces of 
news, and clever men fitt^ them together tike 
a jigsaw puzzle. 

,Now when France collapsed in 1940 our 
SttTet Service received a nasty blow. Fortun- 
ately, the Nazis played into our hands by 
taking millions of foreigners to work in 
Germany, These French, Czechs and Poles 
were our friends, a wonderful recruiting 
ground for spies. 

The scene changes to the Polish capital, 
Warsaw, in 1941. A small group of Irtish 
■volunteers' was about to leave for Germany. 
As they gathered for a farewell party, a friend 
took some of them on one side. 

“I don’t know where you're going, but 
keep your eyes open,” be .said. “Write to me 
occasionally, and if you're on the track of 
anything important, bring in the phrase, ‘I 
wonder how o)d Auntie Katya likes (his 
weather.' Leave the rest to' me. Under- 

Thcy did. They knew that (heir friend was 
a Polish Resistance leader but they did not 
know (hat he was also a Briilsh agent. 

The foitsd ‘volunteers' went off to Ger- 
many, and were moved from >ob to job. At 
last some of them were iransferred to a plant 



on the Baltic, named Pe cnem unde. Prom 
casual conversations th^ gatbeted that it was 
an unusual platx - an expertmental plant. 

Our men were employed on labourers' jobs 

- stoking furnaces, digging foimdatioas, and 
so on. But they could and did keep their eyes 
and ears open. The time came when one of 
the Poles wrote his letter mentioning Auntie 
Katya. 

Three weeks passed. Then an officer 
arrived in German uniform, fie was from 
the branch of the German Todl organisation 
responsible for the recruiting and welfare of 
foreign workers. He was also a Polish spy, 
working in liaison with the British! 

“Well, what have you got?” he asked of 
the man who had an aunt named Katya. 

"Something queer going on at this place. 
It's a LuRwaffe factory an experimental 
place. I’ve heard rockets memioned more 
than once, and one of our men saw in a shed 
small aiieraR, with one engine - but with no 
phee for a pilot." 

“Ah! We're on to something!” 

"Yes. I think so. Of course, it's 
difficult for us to get really inside - the build- 
ings are very carefully guarded." 

“Take any risks you like. And you could do 
this - make out some son of map of the plant." 

"Yes, we could do that. Two of our men 
are camp scavengers they get all around." 

“Good. Mark the buildings which ate 
most importarit. And mark also the offices 
and homes of the Uchnical experts. A job 
like this depends entirely on brains. If we 
knock out the key men, we can stop the work.” 
Basest Raid 

When Mr. Winston Churchill spoke later 
in Parliament on July 6tb. 1944 - after the 
arrival iff the first flying bombs - be said: 
"During the early months tff 1943 we received 
through our many and varied intelligence 
sources reports that the Cicrmans were 
developing a new long-range weapon with 
which they proposed to bombard London." 
Seldom in history has a prime minister 
acknowledged the work of his spies! 

Mr. Churchill continued: “In August last 
the full strength of Bomber Command was 
sent out to attack these installaiions.'' 

The raid on Peenemunde was one of the 
biggest of the war. Every bomber which 
could fly was allocated to the job. The 
cxpcrimenial factory was utterly blasted. Not 
only were buildings destroyed, but dozens of 
technical experts were killed including 
General Jeschemek. Chief of Staff of the 
Luftwaffe. The plan supplied by the Polish 
workmen had indeed been ccxnplete! 

Yet e^ionage has no end. The Germans 
would not halt bAause of one disaster. From 
foreign workers ail over Ctcrmany came more 
reports - fragments oTthejigsawpuzzie. One 
factory was manufacturing this, another that 

- and experts recognised both as parts of a 

Now the scene changes a^in. Poles living 
near Mielec reported an unusual factory 
nearby. It was especially heavily guarded. 
No trains entered its extensive grounds by 
day, but by night came trains of extra-large 
wagons with an armed guard in evety truck. 



A Polish Intelligence officer from the 
Underground Army arrived. He began to 
interrogate the engine drivers who brought 
the trains. Then, working at the other end, 
he found a Frenchman who had managed to 
get inside the German factory concerned. 
At one lime the factory liad been engaged on 
‘radiosondes' delicate radio sets to be 
attached to balloons which would float over 
England, and which would auloiraticany 
emit details of our weather conditions. Now 
the production bad chan^. The French- 
man rqiorted that he heard a technician say. 
"We must know the time at which they ex- 
plode. Then we shall know whether they 
have reached their destinations.” 

The next fragment of the jigsaw puzzle was 
picked up at Rejowks, near LubKn, also in 
Potaod, about 200 miles from that guarded 
camp at Mktlac. A mysterious bomb 
exploded, doing heavy damage - and a party 
of German technicians arrived to make an 
examination. 

In a quiet house in Kensington, British 
experts were comparing reports. They 
noticed that, very sht^Iy before the explosion 
at Rejowice, agents at Mielec had reported 
the discharge of a strange weapon - 'like an 
aircraft, but with a light in its tail.' 

"More information! Scraps of ibe projec- 
tile - anything!” was Ibe signal sent to the 
Polish agents. Their task was very difficult, 
for the Germans held every advantage. But 
fragments of the bomb were collected by 
dozens of amateur spies. 

Then came a piece of luck : any real ^ will 
agree that luck is often a vital factor in the 
Battle of Brains. It was already obvious that 
(he Germans were trying out their new 
weapons. Then one day a flying bomb fell 
near a village near the River Bug - and it 
failed to explode! 

The Polish Underground had warned all 
its agents to look out for the new missiles. 
Immediately the local men rushed to the 
scene. They found the flying bomb. As it 
was too big for normal methods of conceal- 
ment,_^they pushed it into the river! 

Then, wim the German team of scientists 
scoured the distrki, they could not find (he 
bomb. As soon as safe, the Poles hauled it 
out of the river. Polishtechnidanscaineftom 



Warsaw. They photographed the flying 
bomb, exanuDed its mechantsm, and compiled 
a detailed rqwrt. This was handed to a man 
who appeared to be a Swedish seaman. So he 
was, he had a spare-time job as well. He 
carried the report from Stettin to Sweden 
between the rubber and the canvas of his sea 
boots. 

It reached L<oodofi safely. That same 
night the BBCs Polish programme contained 
the phrase: "Hitler is not satisfied wHh paper 
promkes - he wants (he real thing. Well, so 
do we.” 

The Poles understood. They conveyed the 
essential parts iff the bomb's mechanism, 
weighing nearly a hundredweight, to a forest 
in Southern Poland. Here was a clearing - 
two years earlier it had been used by Gentian 
fighters as an emergency landing ground. 

'Operation Whitehall' was planned. It was 
difficull, for G«man soldiers were on a road 
less than a mile away, and others were 
billeted in nearby villages. 

Ad R.A.F. Dakota was ordered to fly from 
Italy. Just as a suitable day arrived, a 
Gennan filter squadron landed without 
warning on the atendoned clearing! The 
anxiety of the Poles on the spot can be 
imagined. Plans for warning the Dakota 
pitot were hastily improvised. But for- 
tunately the Germans away. 

So the Dakota landed safely, soon after 
midnight with only a dozen peasant 
fanners' oil-lamps as its flare-path. The parts 
of the flying bomb, with a technician in 
charge, were loaded. 

Npw the luck changed. As the Dakota 
made its take-off run, it struck a soft patch 
of ground and its wheels were begged, 
imagine the scene. Within half a mile were 
hundreds of Germans (he sound of their 
lorries could clearly be heard. 

It was a hard decision, but the pilot judged 
that he must destroy his aircraft, apparently 
hopelessly embedded. He had actually begun 
to pour petrol over it. when (he Polish tech- 
nician stopped him. Frcan adjacent farms 
more peasants were coliccted. With spades 
and bare hands they dug out the aircraft. Just 
before dawn the Dakota took off. 

Preckw Semt 

It reached Brindisi in Italy and thence the 
precious secret was rushed to London. There 
experts reconstructed the latest type of V.l. 

Thus, although, the flying Immbs and 
rockets were formidable, at least we were 
ready for them. Furtber, now wc knew the 
secret, we were able with our friends to 
organise a vast scheme of sabotage in the 
factories where the missiles were being made. 

1 can now return to the point from which 
I started out. The Gerinans planraxl to send 
a thousand V. Is and V.2s a day, but sent only 
a hundred: and they started six months late. 
Can you imagine the effects of (he original 
plan, if it had succeeded? London suffered 
enough as it was, but six months extra and a 
tenfold attack would have rnade it necessary 
to evacuate the capital. Millions of people 
would have been dispersed all over the 
country. The confusion might have length- 
ened the war by a year. 

But (he German plan did not succeetl in 
full. Why? The principal answer is the 
otlossal R.A.F. raid on Pe e nemunde. We 
give full credh (o Bomber Command for this 
great explat, which cost 41 aircraft. Yet I 
suggest that we must give even greater credit 
to (be spies who told the RA.P. where and 
when 10 go. 






PROFESSOR BRITTAIN EXPLAINS: RADAR 




Any QuestkMist 

Write to Professor Brittain, c/o eagle, if you have any questions or pcoMems you would like him to deal wiUl He wQI be on this page every fortnigfaL 




SETH AND SHORTY - COWBOYS 




SHOBTV/ 

- THE RCOSMN& 

OUT OF TMtl 



lardship 



you 6ET SADDLED 
SHORTV/ Rloe Our 
WITH SETH AND WARN 
THE REST OF THE 
OUTFIT / 



1 KINDA bueSS 

THfyVE CAOsseo 
THE RIVER 
Ry NOW 

boss/ 



OOSH // 
WONT HE 
BAOe/ 



WC LI. HAVE A 
LOOK AT THE 
CANTON ON Odd 



■ HATS THE INDIANS 
CAMP., .AND THEREb 
ONE OP THE VARMINTS 
BEHIND A ROCK 



’ LOOKS AS IF THE BOSS 
IS GOINO TO LOSE SOME 
. CATruE-coM« on/ UT'S 
V WARN THE boys/ 



IHIS RANGE 
IS GONNA 

') HUM/y 



PLENTY BIG 
STEERS BY 



THE NEW GAS TURBINE-ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 



A lu Brilisil RailMa)s that Mill roa oa (he Western krgioii Section 

■.cagth Ton. Wright 117 Ions. 

KKV TO ( vri,l: OK OPKRATIONS 







I. Air emr>' I'roai grill at side of loconoliir. Z. l arhinr air compressor, .t. C iHnprrssnl 
air pipe to proticatcr. 4. ( on^rsacd air passes ihrough pipes of prr-bratrr »liicli arc 
healed by exhanst gases. Oil fad spray norylc. h. Air and fuel arc mixed and ftrrd 
in ronibiWtioa ebamher. 7. igniter for starting up. 8. Klamc lube. V. fits turbine, 
drisen b> expandii^ bM gases, drives the air compressor and geuerator through main 
shaft. 111. Hot exhanst gases passing upwards between lubes of pre-healer. II. Kixhausl 
gasc.s to atmosphere. A. Kcduclion gears driving generator. B. (leneralor which produces 
dectric power for driviiQ the motors. < '. KJecIric rabies In ma>lor>^|jyjJi^K.k'Ctrir nH>lors 
and redaction gears driving the four main axles. K.Ii. IKrivef^OTOtrur car cach^jaAi 



Vl mf >' i 

m ' V- i 

7 mI * - ' 




















A R O O # 



BY DAN£T. DUBRISAY. GENESTRE 



AM ANDRE SARAU-I 
PRODUCTION 





MR. LARKINS HERE 
DIRECTOR OF THE 
I AM DCUOHTED 
HEAR VUu'RC 
COULD you COME 
AND SEE Mf STRAIul 

MOST IMPORTANT 
PROPOSiriON TO PU 
TO VUU . . . 



HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 




THE CONQUEST Of THE AIR PROVIOES A THMUINO STORY 
OFAOIIEVCMCNT IN IHE FACE Of GREAT Olff ICWLTIES. 
HOW AEROPLANES DEVELOPED FROM FUMSY AFFAIRS 
OF WOOD AND WIRE TO THE SLEEK JET PROPELLED 
MACHINES Of TODAY Wia BE EXPLAINED EACH WEEK 
BY THE NICHOLSONS . . . 








LEFT . MEET CAPT. ftfilAN NICHOLSON. D.S.a 
ONE OF OUR EARLIEST PIONEERS AND AN 
'ACE'OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. HE WILL 
TELL YOU OF THE STRUGGLES AND ACHIEVE- 
-MENTS OF THE FIRST MEN TO FLY. 

RIGHT . SQN.LDR.'DICIC'NICHOLSON.O.F.C, 
.HIS SON. IS A TEST PILOT FORA LEADING* 
\ AEROPLANE COMPANY ANDA'RATTLE OF 
1 BRITAIN' VETERAN, HE WIU KEEP YOU INj 
kS TOUCH WITH ALL THE LATEST OEVEIOP-/ 
► 4-MENTS IN THE WORLD OF AVIATION. M 




LEFT . THE FARMAN-TYPE 

Shane flown bycapt. 

BRIAN NICHOLSON IN 1010 
MAXIMUM SPEED WAS 
S5 M.PH.WITH ASOHP 
GNOME ROTARY ENGINE 
NO PROVISON WAS MADE 
FORTMECOMFORTOFTHE 
PILOTASYOUCAN SEE.' 



RIGHT THE IMAGINARY 
'phantom' JET- PROPE LIED 
FIGHTER FLOWN BV'DICK' 
MCHOISON ENeoMES ALLTM 
UTESr DESIGN FEATURES 
SUCH AS SWEPT BACK WINGS 
AND LONG RANGE TANKS ANO 
IS NEARLY TWELVE TIMES AS 
FAST AS1HE FARMAN.^ 



CAPT NKHOLSON WtU DESCRIBE THE FIRST 
ASCENT BY MAN IN AHOT-AiRBALLOON. 



^-DISCOVERING' 





bj^ John Djfke 



REAL LIFE MYSTERIES' 




THE LOST LINER 

They bunched the Wiwatak on the Qyde in 
theeaify sprinsof 1908. Ihenien who buih 
her t«id she was a fine ship. She made her 
maiden voya^ in Novendcr, 1908. 

On 27th April 1909 the U'irciah saibd for 
Austnlb. CM her homeward tun vb South 
Africa, she steamed into Durban on the,2Sih 
July. She took on 2S0 (onsoToual, inenaaed 
ho- paasmgrrs to 92 and sailed for Capetown 



neat day. 

At tunriae on the morning of 27th July, the 
H'araiah overtook a big freighter, the Cbm 
Uacintyre, also steaming down the ccwst. 
Neither ship had witeless. They spoke with 
signal lamps. 

“What ship ate you?" asked the Ckm 
Maclniyre. 

“ Wmaiah, bound for London." 

“ Cbm UaclHijm! here," answered the 
freighter. " Also bound Londotu Cktodbye." 



The officers on the CIm Atmrlinyrr's 
bridge watched the big Uner d isa pp ea r over 
the horizon ahead. Th^ were the last men 
to sec the H'artaak. Nothing mare was ever 
heard of hm'. 

Three warships searched for her. A ship 
named the Se*em hunted for more than a 
month and covered 2.700 miles. Another 
ship, the Sahiae, diaitbed by the WarttaKs 
owners, cruised for 90 days and covered 
I S,000 miles. The StMme even eaplored the 



empty seas towards the Antarctic. 

The H'afotak had paawd five separate in- 
spectkns for sea-wonhineas. The builders, 
the own^ the Board of Trade, Lloyds, the 
Emigration Authorities, had all carefully 
examined her. 

The Uner’s disappevance is as much a 
myaten' today as it was on that July morning 
forty-one years ago. 

Anather Heal Life Myelety toon: 

The White Queen of the SaUfiE' 



Ome 4^ the matt briUiam fantm4t that ever tame jnm Seotkmd . . . 



«< 




my. 

Here’s MY tvay v_ 
to cross a road” 



" It's « forward's job to break 
through — on the football field. 
He must be able to dodge the 
defence -- and have plenty of dash. 
Rut dodgiog and dashing is just 
asking for trouble when yoo're 
crossing a road. Here's my way: 
I Aiankoh— HALT. 

X RKHT. 

3 Eyes — LS’T. 

4 CAMCcjwtia— RICHT. 

5 iraN char— QUIOK MiUtCH. 



" No need to run. because 1 wail 
until there is a real gap in the 
traffic. 



" (n S oc cer , you go aH out to trin ; 
so of course you lake risks — it 
would be pretty dull otherwise But 
traffic's not a game. By taking a 
chance, you may get killed, or kill 
someone die. So Just use your head, 
l e membc f you're part of the traflic. 
bam to be a good Road Navigator, 
and crass etety road the 
Kerb Drill sray.' 






ImrdSy r*» Ulmiury <4 Truman 



Cadburys Comer 









MAKING YOUK OWN MODEL RACING CAR 





4' SV TH/NCH-REAR-V 2* 
6' WHEEI.S-l6*x4M 



(a) ENGINe. CLUTCH AND 
GEARBOX LAYOUT. 
WITH SUSPENSION 
ATTACHMENT 
DETAILS. 




E.D. Flywl'cel Clufc>H 

(u\ SHOWING ITIE GROUPMe 
^ OP THE COMMERCIAL COMPONENTS 
EMPLOYED IN THE CONSTRUCTION 
OF THIS MODEL. NOTE THE METHCO 
WHICH WILL BE ADOPTED FOR 
INSTALLATION OP THE BEAftBOX. 



A WORKINO SCALE MODEL By 
a.W. ARTHUR - BRAMD 
AMoctate Editor. Th« Model Eoqinw 



You con malca for yourself on 
octuol working modal of this famois 
E.R.A racing car if you follow HiesC 
edrawinge onci insfructions e^h 

The only ports you rtee<^ to buy 
are tt>e motor fly wKeel-clutch unit, 
bock okIs and rood wheels . If you 
wont to know wbere to get them 
and how nuich they Cost, write to 
the Ecktor, EAGLE, 43 Shoe Uone,£C4 
enclosing o stomped , addressed 
envelope. 



the model- Jbe Sketcti on tbe'' 
right shows the items to be maote 
and ttie inotertaLs., with ttiejn'row’ 
dimensions, vue Shall need. 

The Tools you will need ore ; — 
a_fret sow, a simple hand drill with 
*/a" inch bit and a sheet each of 
medium and fine sandpaper. 



MATERIALS PM OIAMW SAM AND I 

B one , X 12 >> 2^ Resin Berde J Plywood 
Lomincites, x GJfeSc |* Resin Bonded Ply wood. 
Side mambsrs.Hsx 15.^‘xl.^ji ffexin Bonded THywood. 




SPORTING PERSONALITIES 





STANLEY 

MORTENSEN 



S.H.MORTE.NSE.N WAS BORM BT 
DURHAM) IN 1921 AND PLRyED IN THE. 
TOWN TBAIH AT TWE.LVE.. 



BLACKPOOL SIONED HIM WHEN H& 
WAS SIXTE.&N. 

INJUAC.D WHILE. IN THE A.A.P. IT 
WAS THOUGHT HE. WOULD NEVE.R PLAY 
AGAIN BUT WAS SOON PLAVING IN HIS FIRST 
GAME. FOR E.NGLANO. 



BLACKPOOL 

and 

ENGLAND 



HIS BEST PERFORMANCE. WAS FOR ABERDEEN 
SELECT ELEVEN V. THE ARMY. HE PLAyED 
CENTRE FORWARD OPPOSITE STAN. CULMS AMD 
ALTHOUGH BEATEN 5 TO 4 MORTENSEN SCORED. 
ALL FOUR GOALS. 



MORTENSEN IS PR08ABLV THE 
FASTEST MAN WITH THE BALL iN 
PRESENT OPy FOOTBALL. 



A DYNAMIC INSIDE FORWARD 
AND A TERRIFIC SHOT WITH EITHER FOOT. 







THE EAGLE CLUB 

AMD EDITOR'S PAGE 




14 April 1950 



The ^Mtor's Office 
EAGLE 

43 SAee Imm. Lomdott, V.C4 

E A G L E, ss you can see, is an entirely 
new kind oTstrip-r^oon p^icr and 
it looks as if Uicfe is Koii« to be a way 
big demand for it. So I suggest you 
ask your newsagent to order a copy for you 
each week. At the bottom comer of this pa^. 
you will find a form which you can cut out 
and hand to your newsagent. If you want to 
make sure of your copy fill it in straight away. 

I'm sure you will agree that EACt-s is really 
good value for 3d. We are using <»ly the 
best authors artd the best artists. 

The EAGLE CLUB is going to be one of 
tlK imst ifi^KMlant features in the pape^ and 
we've got a pile of ideas for making it a really 
good Oub to join. 

It has very definite aims and uandards. To 
begin with, a member has to agree to (he Club 
Ruka. Here are the most important of them 
Members of the eagle club will : 

(a) Enjoy life and he4> others to enjoy life. 
They will not eojoy themselves at the 
eicpenac of others. 

(6) Make the best of themsdves. They will 
develop themselves in body, mind and 
qnrit. They will tacklethingsfortfaem- 
sclvcs Md not wait for Mbers to do 
things for them. 

(r) Work with others for the good of all 
around them. 

({/) Always lend a hand to (hose in need of 
help. Thi^ will not shirk difficult or 
dangerous jobs. 

The other main aims arc: Finl, to link 
together those who read and enjoy eagle. 
Second, to organise meetings, eq)cditkms, 
holidaya, camps, etc., for menriws. nird.io 
make qrecial awards to members who achieve 
anything really worthwhile. 

This is what you do to join the Chib. 
Send to the Editor at the above address. 
(1) your name and address; (2) your age and 
date of birthday; (3) your school and dub (if 
you bdong to one) and (4) a postal order for 
one shilling. EqxdaUy don’t forget to tell 
us your biithday. 

In return wc will send you: (I) The eagle 
badge, made in gilt, like the one drawn 
hwe. (2) A Charter of Membership. (3) The 
Club Book of Rules. 

The badge is really first-rate 
- and all those who j<^ the 
Oob triMn lie next fom 
yteeks. i.e., before 14th May, 
will be able to ^ it as part of 
the 1/- membership fee. After 
four weeks, new members will 
have to send an extra 6d. to 
pay fw the badge. So send in 
your application right away. 
The first 100 members to j<m will get a 
special prize. They are to be divided into 
four groups of 2S aooordins to where they 



CHICKO 





live. Twenty-five livii^ in the South of 
England will be taken free to Fam borough 
Air Dtqiiay on July 8th. Twenty-five Mviog 
in the MidUnds will go to Silvemone Gnuid 
Prix Races on May 1 3th. Twenty-five from 
the North England to a Test Match 
againa the West Indians; and twen^-five 
from Scotland to the Hi^iland Games. The 
younger members will be invited to bring one 
parent or guardian free of charge. 

The trioners will be those 100 m e m bcis 
whose applicalions for memberdiip are 
opened first, on Wednesday. April 19th. 

Then there will be. from ,. 

time to time, special 
pedilioDs for selected mem- 1 
here for example, a 
to the T.T. races in 
Isle Man. to the Edin- ' 
burgh Fotival, to 
Monte Carlo Rally, t< 

I9SI Festival of Britain, and to interesting 
(daces abroad. There will be something to 
suit all tastes and interests. 

But joining the Qub is only (he first step. 
There’s a second specia] kind of mem b er sh ip. 

This second step s to be com e a mug. 
That may sound a ralbw strange thing to 
become. This riiortly is what it’s all about. 

There are really only two kinds of people 
in the world. One kind are (be mugs. The 
opposite cS the mugs are the 5>pivs also 
called wide boys, smart piys. booligans, louts 
or racketeers. 

The MUGS are the people who are some 
use in the worid; the people who do some 
thing worth-while for others instead of jist 
grabbing for themselves all the time. 

Of course the s|mvs snigger at that. Tkcy 
use the word Mug as an insult. “ Aren't Ihi^ 
imigs? " they say about people who believe 
in Uving for somdhing big^ than ibemsrives. 

That is why someone who gets called a 
MUG is likely to be a pretty 
good chap. For one thing, 
be's got to have guts 
because he doesn't mind 
being called a mug. He 
Hies it. He’s the amt who 
will volunteer fora difficult 
or risky job and say cheer- 
fully. “Alright. l*n be the Mug." That 
dom't mean be is stupid. It means be's got 
the right ideas and doesn’t think it is at all 
derer to be a q>iv-type. hire the gentleman 
vre have drawn here. 

So when you jrin the eagle club (he 
next step is to become a mug. We shall then 
send you a qwctal badge to attach to the 
ring at the botom of the eagle badge. 
And there are many qvecial privil^es 
arranged for mugs vriiidi we'll tell you about 
uwther Unse. 

But you cannqt become a mug just by 
writing to us. You have got to do something 
to earn it and someone - not 
got to leU us about ft. If 




knows you - say, a sdiocd (eadter. Club 
leader, and so on writes to us and suggests 
your name, we shall go into it carefully and, 
if you really qualify, award you a badge and 
special certificate. 

One of the privil^s that mugs will have 
is to be invited to take a hand in running the 
eagle club and eagle. At regular 
intervals, we shall be calling an editenial 
confesenoe in London, to which we dtall 
invite selected Mugs. They will be able to 
meet the Editor and his artists and writers 
and discuss the whole policy of the paper. 

Of course, (here are thoi^nds of Mu^ 
already - (be great Mugs of history. People 
like Scott of the Antarctic, who gave his life 
to discover new lands; or Michael Faraday 
peo(ric said be was talking nonsense when be 
said that dcctrkity could ‘be used to serve 
man; or the Curies - people said they were 
wasting their lime when (hey were «^it« 
to isolate radium. 



Here, for example, is a pfeuire rft’ one 
famous Mug:- J. L. Baird. 

Pe^vle laughed at 
him when he started 
to suggest that (here 
could be such 
thing as television. ' 

They wanted him U 
give up Uyii^ - but 
fortunately for us he 
didn't. 

Perhaps jvrtr pic- 
ture may appear 
here one day. Earii 
montii we shall pick 
the MUG or THE 
MONTH and (MiMbh his or her phuiograph. 
And at the end of the year, tfaere’ll be a 
spedal' do ' laid on for the HUGS or THE YEAR. 

Don’t forget to write and Sell us whal you 
think of EAGLE. 

YouiB sincerely 

THE EDITOR. 




COMPETITION CORNER 

Setid in your answers la: The Editor, eagle, 

43 Shoe Ixme, London, ec4. and mark tie enrehpe 
" CompeiitioH." Don't fi>rget to inehtde your name, 
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I. STRIP CARTOON STORY We are always on the locA-oul for bright 
ideas about stories to make into strip cartoons. Hkk will be a (Kue of s 10/6 
National Savings Cenificate to (he sender of the best cuggesrion for a su.table story 
It must be an or^nal story that you have made up yourself and what we want is 
an outline of the plot in not more than 300 words. Last date for entries is April 26th. 



2. PICTURE CROSSWORD 



To solve the (Mizzle use the 



y. Fruit-growing town 

2. LJrutg beings 

3. A Wild Flower 

4. A Bird 

5. Another Bird 

6. Species of ShaHc 

7. English Sergsort 

A prize of lOfO it offered 
for the first correct sotn- 
lion opened on April 26th, 



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To m)r Newsagent: please order eagle 
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Lash Lonergan's Quest 

By MOORE RAYMOND 




Chapter 1 

L ash lonergan win now 

attempt to ride Thunderbolt!" 
The announcer's voice rang across the 
Sydney Sbowgrouitd, and a buzz of excite- 
ment swept through the crowd of 60,000 
peorde who lined the arena tier upon tier 
under the blazing Australian sun. 
“Thunderbolt’s a killer!" 

"Lash I.onn'gan's not much more than a 
boy, is he?" 

"Just twenty, but he's the greatest tkfer 
sintx Snowy Baker away back in the twn>- 
lies.” 

"That stallion has killed three men 
already." 

All eyes were on the slim, wiry young man 
who was perched on the rails of the mounting 
yard away over in the comer. 

Lash Lonergan looked down on the wicked 
black stallion and smiled. It was a flashing 
gay smile that belied the flerce pumping ofhh 
heart. 

Thunderbolt snorted and strained at the 
ropes, flattening his ears and showing the 
whites of his evil eyes. His hind hooves 
lashed out viciously, thudding on the timber 
in fury. 

“Ready T' As tbc announcer called across 
the arena, the great crowd became silent, 
lash lugged his broad-rimmed hat a little 

titter. "Thunderboll.’’ he multcfcd through 

grilled teeth, “here comes your boss." 

Shouting “Okay!" to the announcer, he 
snatched the reins, dropped from the rail into 
the saddle, and fell for the stirrups as the 
handlers let tbc horse go. 

Away swung the gale, and Thunderbolt 
plunged into the arena. 

"One!" called the timekeeper. 

- Jhc horse became a mad beast. Head 
down and back arched like a wildcat, he went 
buck-buck-bucking across the arena, sending 
up clouds of du<l. 

"Two!" 

With body tensed yet flexible as a steel 
.spring. Lash stayed in the saddle. 

‘Three!” 

Already the crowd was murmuring its 
admiration while it wondered how long such 
skill would last. 

"Four!” 

Thunderbolt redoubled his frantic etforts, 
leaping and twisting his body in the air. so 
that Lash was almost wrenched from the 
saddle. 

•■Five!” 

Thousands began to cheer. Thousands 
more stood up to watch such horsemanship. 
"Six!" 

Thunderbolt squealed with anger. Only 
Lash heard the danger signal, as the noise 
was drowned by the roar of the crowd. 
■'Seven!" 

Never before had they seen such a sight as 
this raging devil-horse hurling himself into 
the air, contorting himself in Any. 

•‘Eight !” 

The cheers were redoubled till ihe whole 
arena seemed to tremble with the ncm. 
Jarred and dizzy, with dust choking his 
throat and gritty in bis ccetb. Lash was almost 
thrown time and time again. 

“Nine!" 

l.ash felt a shudder go through the half- 
crazed horse. Then Thunderbolt squealed 
again - a horriUe, evil sound. 

“Ten!” 

Now (he wildly cheering thousands sent a 
tornado of sound across Ihe arena. Then, in 
a second, the noise turned into a great gasp 
of fear and dismay. 

Thunderboll reared up and hurled himself 
backwards, intending to cnxsh his rider. But 
Lash was ready. He kk^ed away (he 
.stirrups, thrust at the pommel, and flung him- 
self free. As Thunderbolt crashed almost on 
lop of him, he rolled away to safety and 
sprang to his feel. 

Though ready to reel with dizzirtesi and 
shock. Lash pulled himself together and 
walked calmly towards the competitor's box 
while the stewards rode in and (c^ charge of 
the sweating, snorting, limping Thunderbolt. 



The tremendous ovadon continued till 
I^sh was inside the barrier. Then came the 
announcer's voice; 

"Ladies and gentlemen, that is the end of 
the buck-jumping contest. It is also the end 
of all horsemanship contests this year for (he 
title of Champion of Champions. 

“For the first time in the history of these 
shows, one man has wMi all four contests. 
First in the stockwhip contest, first in the 
cattle-draAing contest, first in Ihe fai^ 
nding contest, and first in the buck-jumping 
contest . . . task Lonergan!” 

Once more the cheering broke out as Lash 
came cantering into the arena on his own 
splendid horse. Monarch. Pure black except 
for a white "sock" on each foot, the horse 
pranced as if proud of (he young man who 
rode him with such natural grace. 

Lash bowed to the cheering thousands and 
IhLshed his bright, boyish smile as .he cantered 
across to the Govemor-General's box. 

A light touch of the bit on Monarch’s 
mouth reined the horse before the flower- 
decorated box. As was the custom. Ihe 
Governor-General rose from his scat and 
bowed to the Champion of Champions. 

As l.ash bowed in return, his hand went to 
the coiled stockwhip that hung at his belt. 
He jerked it free ami flicked wide the plaited 
Ihong. 

Crack -crack-crack-crack! liwasswiAand 
brilliant whipwork of the kind that had 
earned him the nickname of Lash as well as a 
reputation for such skill throughout Ihe land. 

So, to (be accompaniment of tremendous 
applause, Australia's champion boisonan 
turned and went nding from the arena . . . 
riding into an adventure more exciting than 
anything he had ever dreamed about, 



ELL, me flabbergastin’ boy, you’ve 
been and gone and done it!” cried 
Rawhide O’Reilly, hitching up bis dusty 



corduroy trousers around his lean hips. 
"Give us your dock!" 

Lash grinned agreement as he shook the 
hairy hand of the weather-beaten, sun- 
scorcbed Irishman. 

"Stone the crows and stiflen the lizards!" 
Rawhkie went on. “Jist wait till we git back 
to Coolabah Creek. There'll be such cele- 
bratin’ as will set all (he kangaroos jumpin’ 
into one another’s pockets!" 

“But first,” replied La-sh, "we’re going to 
do some celebrating right here in Sydney. 
Come and see the sideshows." 

They walked down the lane between the 
noisy, gaudy booths. African Pygmies. The 
WallofDealh. ThePitof Adders. Andsoon. 

lash stopped outside a tent that carried 
this crudely-painted sign: "The Living Boy 
in Solid Ice. He Speaks. He Eats. He 
Drinks. The Marvel of the Age. Admis- 
sion 6d.” 

"Just (he thing for a scorching day like 
this,” smibd lash. “I think we can spare a 
zac to see the marvel of (he age." He handed 
the money over to the woman at the entrance. 

Inside the almost empty tent they stopped, 
stared, and laughed at the sight. 

On a platform were a number of blocks of 
gleaming ice built to form a sort of trans- 
parent box with one end open. Inside, a boy 
of 14 or IS lay on a mat. He wore only a 
faded flannel shirt and short, tattered iroasers. 

“Hi. cobbers," greeted the freckte-faced, 
curiy-headed youngster, sticking his head out 
of the opening. He grinned, showing strong, 
white teeth. 

“We’ve been had!” cried Rawhide. "Wc'vc 
been diddled out of our zacsl" 

Lash bent down and looked Ihe smiling 
boy straight in the face. The strong, band- 
some teeth were chattering, and Ihe freckled 
face was tinged with blue. 

The roughrider caught Ihe boy by the 
shoulders, hauled him out, and stood him on 
his sturdy feet. 



"You’re freezing to death in there," said 
Lash in a curt but kindly tone. 

“But it’s me job," wailed the boy. "I’ll git 
belted if- • 

“What’s up?" interrupted a harsh voice. 
They turned to see a big, brutal-looking man 
enter the. back of the tent. He was fc^lowed 
by two more toughs. 

“I couldn’t help iL Mr. Scowl" cried the 
b«^ in terror. ‘Tliis cove ” 

“Git back in there!” snarled Scow, swing- 
ing a heavy boot. 

Lash reached out swift tends and caught 
the fool in mid-air. He gave it a sharp twist. 
Scow yelled, swung round, and fell on his 
face. 

“Get the kid out of here," ordered Lash to 
Rawhide. The Irishnmn grabbed the boy's 
ann and hauled him towards the rear exit. 

A stream of abuse poured from Scow’s lips 
as be scrambled to his feet and lunged at Lash 
with great fists swinging wildly. 

The roughrider stepped lightly aside, and, 
balancing himself like a ballet daewer, turned 
on his toes as he swung his open hand in a 
swift arc. The side of his tend caught Scow 
just below the ear. 

"U^!" he grunted, and fell in a semi- 
conscious heap. 

Just as Rawhide and the boy disappeared 
through the rear exit. Scow’s two beefy 
companions flung themselves at Ia.sh. 

“What’s the idea?” panted Ihe boy to 
Rawhide. 

Standing at the back of (he lent and 
listening to Ihe bangs, grunts, thumps, and 
scuffling noises inside, Rawhide chuckled in 
reply: “It’s only me young friend havin' a 
bit of exercise. It's three to one. I know. 
But OIK lash Lonergan is a multitude of 
furies in a fight. If he wants me, he'll 
whistle." 



S OON there was silence. iLtsh emerged from 
Ihe tent, limping a little, but smiling 
gaily. 

“Zonk?” queried Rawhide. 
"Zonk-zook-zonk!" laughed the rough- 
rider. '■ They're sorting themselves out, and 
they'll soon start looking for this young 
squib. Come on, kid.” 

He took the btq' by (he arm and started otf. 
'The lad dragged hack, declaring (hat he had 
to return to Mr, Scow. 

"Now tiscen. Squib.” .said l.ash briskly. “1 
can see you're being booted and banged 
about in that sideshow. So come on!" 

Before the boy could recover Fis breath he 
was silting between Lash a.nd Rawhide at a 
table in oik of the big s.howyrounJ restatr- 
ants. Though dazed by the suddenness of it 
all. he still had a boy'.s apcKtite. Wolfing 
down the fried steak and onions with sweet 
potatoes, he told his story between mouthfuls. 

An Olsten for as far bock as he could 
remember, the boy had been adopted by an 
uncle who was a circus clown. The uncle had 
died, the circus was disbanded, and Scow, 
the assistant ringma.ster. went into the side- 
show business, taking the boy with him. It 
was then he got the idea of the Living Boy in 
Solid Ice. 

"No more of that," Lash assured him. 
"But, me flabbergastin' lad," began Raw- 
hide. ‘What — ” 

“Pull your head in!" snorted l.ash with a 
laugh. “From now on it's going lo be Lash, 
Rawhide and 5iquib - the Three Dinkum 
Cobbers.” 

ITk Irishman lifted his eyes to heaven and 
sighed: “Stone the crows and stiffen the 
lizards! I’ll jist have a double responsibility 
in future.” 

■‘Have another helping of passion fruit 
jelly," said Lash to Squib, “and I'll tell you 
the story of Lash Loneigan. 

“Just like you. I’m an orphan who was 
adopted by an uncle. My Uncle Peter's got 
a place out West called Cmlabah Creek. He 
breeds cattle and horses. That's where I was 
brought up and I was brought up tough. 

“On the day I was seventeen my uncle 
chucked me out. He said I was a coward." 




*Xiawn’” czied Squib in dicbdi^. 
lash grinned tnd went on: “Unde’s got a 
chestnut nure called Chuckle. Ever since 1 
can remember he’s been terriUy proud that 
he's the only man on Cot^hah Cr^ Station 
who can ride Chudtie. Every now and again 
he’d ofTer ten pounds to anytwe on the 
station who could stay on her bark. They all 
tried - and Ihc^ all came off.” 

Squib gulped down a mouthful of jdly and 
adeed; “Did you git thrown, too?*' 

“Unde said I was too youj^g to tiy ridii^ 
ChudJe. But at ni^t I used to go down to 
(he paddodt and make friends with her. It 
took months and months, but in the end she 
let me get on hardtack. Yes. bareback. But 
of course. I never let Uncle kiHtw. 

“Then, the day 1 was seventeen, he called 
me out in front all the men and said I was 
old enough to try to ride Chuckle. And I 
refused.’’ 

“Whair* cried the amazed boy. 

Rawhide cut in : “Lash could have ridden 
her back to front with his hands in his 
pockets. But don't you see it would bare 
broken Uncie Peta'’s heart? It was his great 
pride that he was the only one who could sit 
this rumbustious mare.’’ 

Lash went on to describe bow his unde 
said be was ashamed of hb own flesh and 
bkiod. Finally he ordered him off the 
statiofi, tellii^ him not to return till he’d 
prored himseir a man. 

“Then up lUpt Rawhide O’Reilly,” pul in 
the Iristan^ “and i takes the lad's part. 
Unde Peter gives me a shriveUin* look and 
lelts me to do a git as wd). So before ajti- 
down we was jisi a couple o’ wanderers on 
Ibe face o’ the earth.” 

Lash laughed and said: “it all turned out 
for (he bea. I was determined to make a 
name for myself a cluuniMon roughrider and 
stockwhip expert with the Inlp of the best 
adviser and friend a man ever had. I mean 
(hat hairy Irishman, Rawhide O'ReiUy.” 
“Whal a heait-reodin’, body>bruisin‘ three 
yearstheiad has been through," said Rawhide. 
“Bui now he's Chairqiioo of Champions!'' 

"And now,” said Lash, with a warm smile 
for the other two, “we’re going back in 
triumph to Unde Peter Loneigan. And this 
time thmTI be three of ua.” 

At that very moment. Uncle Peter lay at 




the bottom of a ravine 15 miles from the 
homestead of Coolabah Creek. Over his life- 
less body stood half-a-dozen abmigines, 
shaking spears uid boomerangs with grief 
at the death of one whom they knew as Big 
White Frfend. 

As they wailed, they wondered why be 
should be clutching in his hand a piece of 
rock that gliltcred deep purple and ocean 
blue and fiery red in the of the slanting 



rj-'HL whisper ran through the bush: “Three 
X fdla makem kmga Cootahab Creek.” 
in their own secret and mysterious way, 
the aborigines passed oo the message as the 
three riders amMed along the dusty road that 
led to the far West. 

It Has three weeks since they had left 
Sydney, and they were all looking forwani 
to the end of th^ long and arduous ride. 

Rawhide let the reins trail on the neck of 
his lean and wiry chestnut. Skinny Liz, as he 
twanged at bis banjo and sang: 

“CNi, we ride through the gidyea 
And the mul^ scrub. 

And across Ibe saltbush plain. 

And* we sing as we go: 



With a yo-heave-bo! 

Well BOOB be home again.” 

On his left rode Lash, mounted on proud- 
slepping Monarch. The third of the trio was 
Squib, who rode Patch, a white prniy that 
Lash had bought for him in Sydney. 

“m bet the tail o* me shirt to a bushel of 
emu feathers that your Unde Peur will make 
you overseer,” declared Rawhide. 

Sqtub grinned: “I leckmshell git a bit of a 
sur^se when he sees me.” 

”He*n get a surpriw to see all of us,” 
rallied Lt^. “1 haven't written to him to 
say we’re coming home. I thought it would 
be best if " 

He st<^>ped short. His keen eye had 
caught the glint of sunlight on the twirling 
boomerang. 

”Duck!” ^led Lash, reaching swifliy for 
the stockwhip at his belt. 

Rawhide and Squib flattened themselves 
on thdr horses' nedts as the curved, sharp- 
edged weapon whizzed towards them. 

Lash flicked the handle of his whip, and 
the (hong writhed into the air. Thchondiair 
lip struck like a snake at Ibe boomerang. 

~Bu]rs-cyer' The boomerang fdl hanrt- 
lessty at Monarch’s feet 

“Into the scrubr cried Lash. All three 
turned their horses towards the mulga trees. 

”Them blisterin' myalls!" scowled Raw- 
hide, peering ahead into the shimmering 
summer air. 

”Mo-poke!” The piaintire notes came 
from a nearby patd> of sandalwood. 

Lash and Rawhide looked at cadi other 
sharply. No mopcAe bird ever called in 
broad dayli^t. It must be Mopoke (be 
man. 

”Mo-poke!” called Lasli in a melandtoly 

A moment later there stepped from behind 
a tree a tall and strong young blackfellow. 
He wore nothing but a loin-garment of idaited 
reeds, and be carried a boomerang and a 
spear. 

The black man beckoned. Then he disap- 
peared behind the tree again. 

“It’s Mopoke all righL" said Lash as he 
uiged his horse forward. 

”What's he playin' hide-and-seek for?” 
grinned Squib. 

“No savee.” said Rawriide. He toki the 



boy that (he aborigifie was a good friend of 
theirs. He was one eff a tribe of blacks who 
lived in a camp on the outskirts of Coolabah 
Crock station. 

“Mo-poke!” came the cry from the bush 
somewhere ahead. 

RidiT« on. Lash was puzzled by this 
strange b^iaviour. Suddenly (bey came to a 
deariim. Beside a little waterhole stood 
Mopoke. 

This time the aborigine came forward to 
meet his friends. His Made face aore a grin 
that displayed flashing white teeth. 

Suddenly Mt^wke's face became grave, and 
his voice took on a sad note. As be toU his 
story in a mixture of Elfish and his own 
native words, Uuh learned for the first time 
of the death of his Uncle Peter. 

Dazed by the news, he listened as in a 
dream to the story of how the owner of 
Cootahah Oeck had been found by some 
blacks at the bmiom of a ravine. Th* man's 
skull was broken, and be had obviously been 
killed instantly by his fall. 

When they brought him to the homestead, 
he was still dutching a piece of beautiful 
opal. 

“Then there is more opal up there!” cried 
Rawhide. "I reckon •” 

“Quiet!" nied Lad) with a flera intensity 
(hat shocked (he Irishman into silence. 

The aborigine said that Messiter the fore- 
man had taken charge and had arranged the 
funeral at the nearly setllen>en( called 
Tarniwarra. 

“Dago Messiter!' snorted Rawhide 

furioudy. "Why, he ” The Iridunan cut 

himself short at Lash's swift glance. 

As MoptAe irent on with his story, he 
became very excited. He used more and more 
of his own native words that only L ash could 
understand. The young roughridcr's face 
douded with anger and dismay. 

Abruptly (he abcHiginc said: “This fdla go 
ItMtga walkabout. Goodbye.” He turned and 
made for the trees. 

Lash turned Monaich's head towards 
home. “There's trouble ahead.” he t<dd bis 
companions as they made for (he road again. 
“And the name of that trouble appears to be 
Dago Messiter.” 

To kt eomtimued mx.t 9>*ek . . 



your chance 
to GET ONI 

if you are over 14 and under 16 
here is a gulden opportunity. For three years you can enjoy all Uk ammtiea 
of a fine boarding SdKK)l, entirdy without cost to you or your parents. You 
will be wdl boarded, fed, clothed and cared for and paid while you learn to 
handle modern tods and equipment with skill and precision. Your tiaimog 
over, you will be ready to take your place in oneof the Anny'tcrack Technical 
Corps with every chance of quick promotion to Warrant Officer hikI oppor- 
tunities of reaching Cdnunissioned Rank. Don’t waste diischance. Said the 
coupon NOW for Free Booklet and date of next Entry Fjtam 








ROB CONWAY 


V-- 


^ 1 im 1 j 





^ m mMB's MAJOR mRLWO.My FLAT ISQUJB 

naRAEge, will voodomeone more soots 
wrnF keep mmyReRS&eRiNPMEffwpE 
you SEE Rwy MORE EUfJfJY Bl/S/WESS, BLOW 

ms mtSTLE/ j— 



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ADVERTISER’S ANNOUNCEMENT 



'AGl I I* AprU 1 950 




WHATA WIZ/iRD 

. DESIGN 



HERE SHE 
■ COMES BA(_K 
I AGAIN 



GOSH, it's passing 
oveU here at ten 

O’CLOCK ! 



COMING to' 
St r m JET, 
TOMMV? 



ftUT 

LOOH 



/mKSSffB^j 

/fESTTO0Al L 



^sn't shm 

AfmnY// 

V P 



NOW LET ME SEE 

VVL GO'l IT' Win-tTWEEXTRA 
ENER&V PRC>M THAT SUPER 
DELICIOUS WALL’S I HAU EOi 
1 UNCH 



nniNG 

■wowe/ 



IVF. GOT 
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THE W/HO-tKS 



EX-10 TO BASE^lAKlMfe 

FORCED LANDING AT MOMESWOOD 



SAVED OUR 
BACON, 

LADDIE 



( NEVER MIND I 
,TUAT,SlR-LlDON 
V. mere 1 



WHAT A B&f- HO 
THE PIAKIE AND 
, CALI6HT A , 
SPV i / 



4fi/t£ST THAT \ 
MAN/ / 



that's 



TF€ MAIN SPAR ) 

I6 SAWN THflOO.>l jy'' 



THANKS TO ' 
THE MAGIC ■W 
-AND wall's 



MOST > 
\SASC0S6fn BE THAT NEW 
\ V yt MECHANIC AT 

AlRfDRTy 



TrUMMY WAttS 




670NE.') PEAIU TO 



mM/jTyENATMBNt 



■tCHANI^ . 

AKTT- 
Hk OURS. 

EThao 0/ve 

IHALP AS , 
MntsoN . ✓ 



kill. 7UE 



KILL, mb . 

5LASPUEMER/j 



’{ micauZ- 

\ jTf ■ i 



[MZAIZBNE’APMrr YOU'RE. A 
\UAROR. wElLCLOSE YOUR 
Ns^OUW fCR E^ERye^^ 



( WELL. LORO NELSO 
fftENCM ARF M V 



mo PAilSS X> STANP ANP 
JLSUS, 7W WRSTCHEP CAIhamy; 



howiuer.e'll be 

REAL TROUBLE — 
TUArS SAUL OP 
. TARSUS / ^ 



'UB IS NOT 



OP SAZARBTH me Stf 
MAN, - -me MEssiAP 

OFOuRRACBP r^‘<^hk 



srmmHy 
SAYS so/ 



THE GREAT 



WTURER 





JERUSALEM ] 




1 CAPITAL CITY OF 1 




ROMAN OCCUPIED 1 




' ISRAEL 1 




1900 YEARS ACO 1 



AVE-iSAV rr-^ anpi'llsay IT ^ 
WITH MV LAST BREATH IE 





n - HE INSULTS USALL WITH THiS KOs- 
SENSE •— fiOR THE SAKE OR OUR PATHERS WE 
-YUST HOLD OUR PACm AS THE, HELD IT— OUR 
UNITY IS OUR STRONGEST 



ARE WE TO SACRIFICE IT FOR A 
MAP TRADESMAN 

Blasphemous 

DOWN WITH THE