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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

EAGLE -THE NEWjJ| NATIONAL STRIP CARTOON/ WEEKLY 



■ DANJPARF* 

vPitof^rim FUTURE 




SO FROM NOWOW I'M GOING TO KEEP 
IN TOUCH WITH HER ALL TME TIME BY 
RADAR, RADIO S ON "ME ASTRAL VIEWER 



HER COMMANDER, CAPTAIN CRANE, 

A SPACE PILOT OF VAST EXPERIENCE, 

IS ON THE CONTROL BRIDGE 




ITS NO USE.MAK-SHES GONETUESAMF 
WAY AS THE OTHERS — ITS ABSOLUTELY 
UNBELIEVABLE. EVERY TINIEST PA«T 
OF THAT SHIP WAS CHECKED AND 
DOUBLE-CHECKED. THERE COULDN'T 
HAVE BEEN^.vANVTHING WRONG, 
WITH HER, 



_iX'S 



■- ~A&dO 1 







WELL.THAT'S THE LAST CREW I'LL 
SACRIFICE - ORDERS FROM THE 
CABINET OR NOT-POOR OLD CRANE 
- I FEEL LIKE AMURDERER/ 




BUT YOU KWOWWEVE NO CWOICE 
REALLY. SIR — SO MESOCW'S&XK 
TO GET THROUGH 
TO VENUS I 




WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT ._ 
VENUS? SEE NEXTWEEK'S ISSUI 



?fte AeteeafHtoe* of P.C.49 



FROM THE FAMOUS RADIO 
series by ALAN STRANKS 




... A BLACK 

MOORLAND 

LIMOUSINE, 

LICENCE 

NUMBER 

BXO 179. 



'AND FOUND 
ABANDONED 

IN THE 
EAST END 

SHORTLY 
AFTER THE 

HOLD-UP. 




ALL RIGHT CONSTABLE . 
LET'S HAVE A FULL , 
REPORT ON THE MATTER L 
BEFORE >OU CO / 
OFF Dory. / 


ft 


/CANT 1 HELP ON 
THIS CASE, SIR ? 
THIS KID WAS A 
CHUM OF MINE. 
I'D GIVE ANYTHING 






FOR THE CHANCE 


♦ Pi P = E :: - :=:: ~^~^sP^ 


155 TO GET EVEN 


"^lf /•"p^^^zfcSl 


|?sl WITH THE SKUNKS 


a£&\ _#£\ J 


WM\ WHO RAN HIM 
H \ DOWN. 


ffi%JII 


w 


glyj 


^™^ out you GO 
SSjk, fortvnine! , 




^SlI 



REPORT 


jgROM FINGER 


PRJNTS.SIR 


THEyVE 


TRACED A SET OF DABS ON THE 


GUN 


FOUND 


IN THE HOLD-OP CAR . 


THEylRE 


^THE 


PRINTS OF A CONVICTED MAN. HERE5 


<J 


Wj Vii~f 


Tp-»— ^ M|S 


RECORD- 


Hi 


1 Pi 




B* Cav "*-<k 


i ff\ 


wO 








Tft/\ J-^~ 


m 




'^ GIVE 








/ ME 














sWot" 


BV that! 


"V THUG'S 

■ name? 








IweUSoon 
i rope him 








1 IN- 




donT ask me ! 
all i know is 
these are lou 
parsons prints, 
unless we break 
mis case ouauy 

THE WHOLE FINGER 
PRINT SySTEM 
WILL BE BUST 
WIDE OPEN 




PIO T ACJUNSr tWE WOULD 



A. gripping Serial 
by Chad Varah 




Ray jerked his head towards the window. 
Only inert did Jim become conscious of the 
rain sluishmg down. 

"You want 10 help me?" asked Ra>. 
sitting on I he bed. 

"Why. of course bul how did you " 

"That can wail. Get dressed, and talk fast. 
Who was in thai house when you left?" 



•' J 



Chapter 2 
"They'll Stop at Nothing! " 



B 



LINK three time* il you'll promise to 
keep quiet 1" whispered Ras's "ghost" 
hoarsely * 

Jim obeyed, and the man released him. 

He tried to speak, gulped, and then tried 



"Are you a - a spirit. R-ray?" he quavered 
"I should hope so!" grunted lite "ghost" - . 
rubbing Pru's towel and mopping his face. 



im rolled painfully out of bed and began to 

get into his gritny dottiev 
"1 don'l know who was in the &«««-," he 
said. "lis supposed to be empty. But when 
the man with the gun ran away from the 
cellar. I untied the prisoner and took the gag 
out of his mouth — " 

"What did be soy?" 

"He asked me 10 help him to get out and 
find him a bed, so 1 came here to get Ken- " 

"Help? Bed'' Washehurl?" snapped Ray. 

Jim nodded. 

'A wound in the shoulder. I don't think 
11 was serious, hut he'd lost a lot of blood — " 

'•Then why art you here'"" demanded Ray 

"Pro thought I was a burglar, and nearly 
kilted 



i pri'" 



i Ray 



"Ye- 






disembodied on*? A 
spook'' 1 should have thought yoii could 
have answered that for yourself." said Ray. 
towelling his hair till it stood on end. and 
puffing like a grampus as he used to do when 
he and Jim had been swimming together. 

"You felt solid enough." admitted Jim. 
rubbing his bruised arm, "but - 

"Seen a comb anywhere''" . interrupted 
Ray, rummaging on the drcssing-iable "Ah, 
here we are " He straddled his legs until he 
could nee into the mirror, and hegan combing 
his hair 

"I! there hit such things as ghosts." hecon- 
tttiucc. squinting sideways ai his parting in 
the way tied always done, '"they obvtousls 
can'! hurt you except by frightening you. and 
il ypu retusi: to be scared, what can (hey do? 
Never 'thought you'd be afraid of me. 



i she and Ken put me to bed and went 
to gel Dick Rawlings U» help - you remember 
Dick — " 

"So that's why the cellar was empty when 
I went back just now." mused Ray. '"Here, 
let me do lhat for you ' Jim was having a 
tob to bend and tie his shoelaces. "Sure 
you're going 10 he all right '*" 

Jim nodded vigorously 



"Know where they were taking himT" 

"Dick's place. I gathered." said Jim." We 
can ask them if you like. They're sure to be 
back by now." 

"No. I don't want anyone else to know I'm 
alive, just at the moment." 

"I won't tell anyone - but I say. how did 
you escape'' And who was the man m the 
cellar who didn'l want the police? You're 
not doing anything wrong or or illegal, are 
you. Ray?" 

"We're not doing anything nfimg," 
answered Ray. "but some things we have to 
do may be illegal in certain countries. In any 

tion reporters - and our work is ■deadly 'ush' 
at the moment. As for the man in the cellar, 
if tic's the chap I think he is. he's 'one oi ui 
and I have to rescue him or die in the anempt. 
I was trying to irace him when I saw you pop 
up out of that manhole. I didn't recognise 
you until you passed me then I miaouwed 
to attract vour attention, but you bared off." 

Jim fiddled with his ire at the mirror, to 
hide his blushes. 

"Why dkln't you call my name?" be 



*-nhs. 



'"Cos I didn i want iht- tough who was 
after you to know I was there." 

Jim gaped, feeling hi> heart miss a beat 

"After me''" 

"My dear cliap," drawled Ray. "you don't 
really suppose a gang like thai lust gives up 
and goes home crying for Mum because 
they're interrupted ai their diny work, do 



"Bui what '. 



lough ■ 






Jim grinned feebly. 

"Well," he excused himself "thinking you 
ere drowned and then suddenly seeing you 
artding there dripping wet , as if you'd risen 



< be in the 



mean to aw you. Bui yo 
already. How did you c 
gang's hide-out. anyway?" 

"The manhole cover was off and I fell 
through h into the cellar. Your frietul told 
me he'd pushed tl off, He was trying to 
escape, but they dragged him hack." 

"Well, it's loo kite to keep you out of it 
now. i don't know whether any of them 
would recognise you hut the trouble is they 

"You mean that bloke followed me 
here?" enquired Jim breathlessly. 

"Of course." Ray felt for a cigarette "I 
shadowed him but as he made no move to 
attack you, I kept on his tail, hoping he'd lead 
me to the resi of 'em. As luck would have it. 
a car was waiting for him round the corner: 
I was .just in time lo .see il drive oil' Looked 
like a Morris 14." 

"Olt r " Jim's face fell. "Phy you didn't ruh 
him out while you had the chance." 

Ray flicked on his lighter and lit his cigar- 
ette, studying his, young cousin's face over the 

"1 don'; like to hear you talk like lhat. 
Jim." he said quietly. "If you'd use plain 
English, and say 'kill him", you'd see how 
wrong il was. What do you think I am?" 

Jim's mouth set stubbornly. 



"He"« 



bad 



t he?" 



"Probably. Aren't wc ail? The point is. 
I'm not a Judge and Jury, let alone an execu- 
tioner. If you're going to >oin us, you'll have 
to have some respect for human life." 

"Have titey?" demanded Jim. 

"Not much." 

"Well, then!" 

Ray tossed his cigarette into the fireplace. 

"We're wasting time.'' he said. "I've got 
to get along to Dick's place and sec if my 
friend's safe." 

He made for ihe window, bul Jim seized 
his sleeve. 

"Don't leave me out, Ray!" he pleaded. 
"1 was wrong. I'm sorry. I don't really Ihink 
your side are murderers, loo." 

Hay turned and gripped his shoulders. 

"Good man." Ray smiled approvingly. 
and Jim felt all his hero-worship of his cousin 
come flooding back, as in the days of the 
Battle of Britain. He'd had to forget il during 
the two bitter years since Rays "death". 

"You mustn't think we're soft," added Ray 
grimly. "Beiteve mc. we can get lough when 
it's necessary. Some of us have even hail to 
kill at times in self-defence. But mostly wc 
"take" more than we 'dish out'. You ready 

"Ready for anything!" exclaimed Jim. 
"But I'd rather go out by the door if you 
don'., mmii " He limped over to close the 
window. "What's this gang after 1 " 

"Atomic secrets," replied Ray curtlv 
"And they'll stop ai nothing." 

As he spoke, something whiz/ed through 
the window, so close lo Jim lhat h flicked his 
it passed, anil stuck quivering in the 



wall. 







.1 DlCl. ■: 



SM what I mean'*" mid Ray. ■ 
the light-switch "Meet me 
better take ken with you. and be carfUil 1 " 

Heedless of his own advice, Ray dived for 
ihe window and climbed out. Assuming that 
tlit would-be assassin wasn't likely to haw 
lingered, lie ran across Ihe slippery roof where 
Jim had nearly come to grief anil along the 
wall, without any aticmpi at caution 

By the lime he reached the alley, his eyes 
had become adjusted lo the darkness He 
hadn't been a night-fighter pilot for nothing 
He could sec Ibc gangster slinking along 
towards a car ai ihe <nd of the alley the 
same car Ray had encountered before The 
man was keeping clow under the wall, to 
avoid observation from ihe houses He didn i 
seem to have noticed his pursuer, so Ray 
stayed on the wall and tan nimbi; along the 
lop. blessing his crepe soles hut cursing the 
ramshackle rools of o 



shooting on". Ray transferred himself 10 (he 
roof. He was nearly Thrown off as the driver 
swerved violently into the lane, but managed 
to hold on by forcing his finger-lips into the 
crack nude by Ihc front of the sunshine roof 
and bracing his knees against the back edge 
of the inch-deep depression into which it slid 
hack when opened. It was a most uncom- 
fortable and undignified position, and Ray 
hoped he wouldn't have to hold it for long. 
He didn't think he had made any sound 
that would be heard above the noise of the 
engine, but as be wasn't sure if he'd been 
spotted on the waJI. he kept a good look-out 
lor possible attack as the car careered through 
the deserted streets. 

It was as well that he was on the alert- He 
heard no sound as the back offside door was 
opened. A man crept out backwards on to 
the running board, clinging to the door- 
frame with his left hand and groping for Ray 
with his right. 

Ray rolled as far as he could to the left and 
kicked ouL He heard the man's nose crack 
and a thin scream as he fell, but one of the 
others must have had hold of him. for he was 
dragged back into the car -though not before 
the door had swung viciously back at him as 
the car rounded another corner. 

"Can't be more than three to deal with 
now." thought Ray. wincing in sympathy 
with his assailant, " Wonder what they'll try 
next? A shot from the other side, most 
likely f 

Sure enough, a hand holding a gun snaked 
up towards him from the front nearside 
window. Hut Ray had under-estimated the 
cunning of the enemy. As he let go with his 
left hand and grabbed at the gun, the driver 
braked with a violence that made the car 
shudder as it skidded to a sudden stop. Ray 
was literally catapulted from the roof. He 
turned a somersault on the bonnet, clutched 
at the shameless young lady decorating the 
radiator-cap. and fell on to the road with a 
thud that jarred every bone in his body. 



Whfs Ray disappeared through the win- 
dow, Jim stood still lor a moment, his 
heart throbbing painfully in his throat. He 
stretched out a hand towards the knife lo 
assure himself that it hadn't all been a ghastly 
nightmare: then, thinking "Fingerprints!" 
he withdrew his hand. 

Mechanically wiping a trickle of blood 
from his ear, he went out on to the landing. 
There was no sound from Pni's old room. 
Should he warn her that the house was under 
attack by desperadoes*' 

"They know this house". Ray had said. 

Jim gritted his teeth in sudden rage at the 
thought that Pru and her family might be in 
danger from a gang who would "stop at 
nothing". He wished now that he hadn't 
agreed lo her going to the cellar with Ken. 

"Anyway, she'll be safely back now," he 
assured himself. "But perhaps I'd belter 



warn her that the house may he besieged 
again, even if Ray has drawn off the gang for 
the time being." 

He lapped gently on the door. There was 
no response. He didn't date to knock louder. 
for fear of disturbing her parents. He felt a 
bit shy about going into the room, and he 
didn't want to frighten Pru (hough his 
aching ribs reminded him that she wasn't 
easily frightened! 

Cautiously he turned the knob and opened 
the door a few inches, listening intently. 
There was no sound of breathing or move- 



Abruptly he entered Ihc room and groped 
his way to the bed. 

"Pru!" he whispered urgently. 

In sudden anxiety he put out his hand and 
felt in the bed. There was no one there, and 
the bedclothes were quite cold. He sniffed 
at the pillow, trying to recognise the elusive 
scent of whatever it was Pru shampooed her 
hair with. There was no trace of it. 

She hadn't come back! 

"But they must have been gone hour.%." he 
muttered as he dashed for the stairs. He 
made his way swiftly but silently to the living 
room and snapped on the light. He was 
behind the settee, but he could see at a glance 
that Ken wasn't there. 

He tried to comfort himself with the 
thought ttiat if neither of them was back, at 
least they were together and Ken could pro- 
tect Pru. 

But coutd he? The gang was armed with 
guns and knives, and wouldn't hesitate lo use 
them. 

Jim suddenly felt sick. He couldn't think 
of il all us a great and glorious adventure any 
more. Pru might be in the hands of un- 
scrupulous ruftians. 

He clenched his lists. Until now. Pru had 
only been "Ken's kid sister" - quite a good 
sport for a girl, but no mote. Now . . . 

He stood cudgelling his brains, which 
seemed to have gone numb. 

The room was silent, except for the ticking 
Of the clock on the mantelpiece. 

On Ihe mantelpiece? 

Jim cocked his head, puzzled. Then he 
leapt forward and stared in horrified fascina- 
tion at the settee. 

There, where Ken should have been sleep- 
ing like the Village Blacksmith, after rescuing 
a chap who was probably an atomic scientist, 
was a small brown suitcase. Hanging out on 
one side, where the lid had been closed care- 
lessly, was a little loop of wire covered with 
red insulation. And something inside the case 

Jim drew in his brealh so sharply that the 
sound was like a snort. He'd never seen a 
time- bomb before, but he didn't need anyone 
to tell him what this was. 

His first impulse was to hurl it out of the 
window. Then he took a grip on himself. 



remembering the neighbours - especially the 
kid next -door-but-one who was subject to 
fits. There was only one place for the infernal 
machine, and that was the bomb-site opposite 
the cellar where he'd found Ray's friend. 

It would take him at least live minutes lo 
get then:, even if his hmp and his sore chest 




would allow him to run at his usual speed. 
There was no time for hesitation. Sweating 
with fear he picked up the case, ran cut of 
the house, and lore down Ihe street, drawing 
sobbing breaths into his bruised chest ami 
grimacing with pain from his swollen knee. 



As he streaked round the corner, he ran 
slap imo the arms of a solid figure who 
gripped him like a bear. He let out a yell; 
ihen he noticed the blue uniform, and stopped 
struggling. 

"What's the hurry, sonny 11 " enquired the 
policeman placidly. 
"Gotta get home mum'll be worried." 



The policeman released him. 

"Bit late for you to be out. isn't it?" he 
said. "Been up lo anything you shouldn't?" 

"N-no," replied Jim, edging oway. "I-I've 
been at a friend's house, and . . ." 

His voice trailed away. He was conscious 
all Ihe time of the dpek that was ticking away 
his life. The policeman didn't seem to have 
heard it, but he noticed Jim's involuntary 
glance at the suitcase. 

"Whai have you got there?" 

His tone was still kindly, hut he wanted an 
answer. Jim licked his lips. He felt a 
sudden impulse lo confide in the fatherly 
copper. After all. it was hh duty to dispose 
or anything that was a public danger. 

"Time-bomb!" said Jim impulsively. Then 



he remembered Ray's words: "Police mean 
explanations - and our work is deadly 'ush' !" 

Before he could fed ashamed of his weak- 
ness, ihe policeman threw back his head and 
laughed. 

"All right, sonny, canyon, "he said. "You 
look like an honest lad. Get home to bed." 

Jim was off before he had finished speaking. 
He clasped the bomb like a rugger ball in 
order to run more easily. 

The policeman stood looking after him. 
stroking his chin uneasily. The boy hod 
looked honest, for all his dirty appearance; 
but he'd also looked scared. As scared as if 
lie really had . . . 

Remembering another strange event in the 
neighbourhood that night, the policeman 
sprinted in pursuit, calling himself all kinds 
of a fool. 

"Come back!" he shouted 

"Keep away!" yelled Jim, as he vanished 
into a narrow passage. He had a good start 
and he knew the district inside out. As he 
ran, he remembered Ray's words: "We're 
not soft - we're tough, and we can 'take it'." 

How much longer would the fuse last? 
He'd been lucky so far but surely the gang 
would only have allowed enough time to 
enable them 10 get well away before Ihe 
explosion. 

He could hear the sharp, urgent blasts of 
the policeman's whistle but he could no 
longer hear his pounding footsteps. He him- 
self was running as softly as possible. His 
throat was parched with exhaustion and fear, 
and his skin prickled uncomfortably as 
though he had pine-needles stuck in his 
underclothes. The thing he was holding 
repelled him as if it had been a venomous 
snake, and again he was sorely tempted to 
hurl il from him and go lo look for Pru. Bui 
he was still amongst inhabited buildings and 
he resisted the impulse. 

He had managed to evade (he policeman, 
thai was one good thing. But he didn't know 
how much longer he could keep going. He'd 
had to make a considerable detour already. 
His legs were beginning lo drag, and his eyes 
were blinded with sweat. 

He had almost reached his destination 
when his weary feet stumbled on the uneven 
cobbles of a back street, and he fell. In 
striving to keep his balance, one leg got in 
the way of the other, and be lopplcd side- 
ways and crashed his head against the wall. 

He Tell the stunning blow, and struggled 
desperately to retain consciousness. By a 
tremendous effort of will he managed to get 
up on all fours. Then his body refused to 
respond any more, and he Hopped in a faun, 
the sinister suitcase ticking away against his 
oblivious ear. His last thought was that Ray- 
land Pru, too. if she were still alive) would be 
proud that be had died in a vain attempt to 



United next week 




CRICKET COACHING by LEARY CONSTANTINE 




fcAl L OUT&IOC Of. 
.-u*' ACROSS LEFT INSTEP 
ILCFi EUIOW, LOOSFW 
fi«P A UTTUE . 




FAST BOWLING 





DELIVERS AT 
TOP SPEED. 
OoWl HESITATE, 
TAKE BO*Jf UP 
AND OELIVSli 
BAI.I '-.[OtW^f 



RUM UP CONTINUED 
AT INCREASING 
SPEED. 



REAL LIFE MYSTERIES 




THE WHITE QUEEN OF THE SAHARA Then, out of the western desert, cm a 

Great White Queen With her marched a VH 
army of soldiers, slaves and attendant*. Thi 
Queen was a while woman, golden-hatred and 
very beautiful Her soldiers were bravt 
fighters whom she led imi.i buttle against her 
enemies She was over six feet in height and 
as strong a.s any of her warriors. We called 
het lin-Hinan. Pot several hundred year;, 
her people lived in the Hoggar Then the 



In the heart of the southern Sahara desert lies 
a flat-topped range of rocky hills. The Roof 
of the Sahara is the native name for them Chi 
maps ol Africa t< is the Hoggar Plateau 

The natives told the first explorers a weird 
mod "Lougago these parched hills were cov- 
ered with grass Our forefathers lived here, 
glowing ihett crops. 



streams slowly dried up The rich country- 
side turned to dust. The whiles died out." 
In 1932 a young professor named Count 
Byron de Prorok began a search for the lomb 
of" Tin-Hinan. At last he came across a huge 
pyramid of Moncs. His servants tunnelled inln 
it and de Prorok shone his torch into the 
black interior 

Before him was the Great White Queen 
"The Queen." said de Prorok. "was tying 



on u canopy of sculptured ivory and wood 
Her gorgeous wrappings had turned Ui dust 
Around her neck was a marvellous necklace 
of KOO precious stones. Beside her lay her 
bronze sword and shield." 

Tin-Hinan. the Great White Queen, now 
rests in the National Museum in Algiers. No 
one ha-, yrl discovered who she really was, 
what land she came from or why she marched 
into Africa. 




and hardship 



in a lawless land 



-South -tyeM-Texas 



sixty years 



__3 



s& 



PETE. THE \ 
REDSKINS ARE 1 
OUT OF THEIR / 
RESERVATION. V 
THE BOSS WANTS I 
THE CATTLE t 

"*- 1 ROUNDED J@| 

,-_ \ UP j 


f VOU DONT SAy ! 

WAl) 1 NIVEH 
) TMOOOHT THEM 
[ VARMINTS WOULD 
V GIVE AMy 
\ MORE 
- \ t-- , TROUGLE 


^^r^T^Jo^^P 


K^fe** J 






* t/ j 


f FY 





/ TAKE IT EASV ^ 
^ OLD GIRL. ) 
\ J 1ST YOU LAy < 

■^_ ( OUIET \ 

WP^ N yOUXL BE J 
Ht* V ALRIGHT / 


(" LOOK SHARP ^ 
f~ SHORT y .' 
(THE VARMINTS ARE, / 
^~T OETTIN'REAi>y^___ „,>■' 


-£r4 


jjf l j ■ 


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. ji. 'lip' 1 


$^$^jj/j) 


m> ^ 




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Y\^ ^S^: 



ytP! THERES A 



WONDER IF ITS 

3ETH ANO SHORTY 

SAVIN THEIR 

SCALPS 



BRINGING 10,000 TONS OF FOOD TO OUR SHORES 



A I V P 1 ( A 1. k I I k I ( , 1 K \ I I I ) ( AR(iO I . I M H 

Kfc\ TO N U M B fc R S 

t. HudK*. 2. General Cargo Space*. 3. (hilled Bed. cooled lu Mi k 4. Iro/en 

Multuu. cooled In 15 F. 5. < oojinp Air Duels. 6. Cooling tans. 7. Fan Control Room 

Cheese, cooled lo 30 F. II. Meat Store. 12. Diesel Fngine Room. 13. Diesel Kngiitt 
Kyhausl Pipes. 14. Ofliccrs' Quarters. 15. Refrigeration Control Room. 16. Rcfrineru 
lion Machinery. 17. Chilled Shell Kfy;s, cooled at .Ml F. IK. Frozen Boxed Butiei 
cooled al 15 F. 19. Starboard Propcllor Shafl Tunnel. 211. Fro/en Tinned Kg(!V 
cooled at 15 F. 21. Chilled Cheese, cooled at 30 V. 22. Starboard Propelloi 
23. Rudder. 24. Crews' Quarters. 




S K 1 P P V 


J^ 


1 M BtUNNINtTO ■] 
1-EtLTHECALLOf y 
THE JUNGLE AbAIN P 
ALREADY - IT MUST 1 
BE THEi>E BOOTS 1 


LJxA'^ 




|^#^f 



w 



T HE KANGAROO 



BY DANET, DUBRISAY. GENESTRE 



ODUCTIOK 




HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 




MANMOUNIS THE SKIES 

FOR THE HAST TIME IS IHE 

DRAMA! It STORY BEHIND THE 

SUCCESSFUL EXPERIMENT OF 

THE TWO FRENCHMEN, JOSEPH 

AND iriENNE M0NI6OI.FIER 

HAPERMAKERS FROM 

ANNONAY.NEAA LYONS! 

FRANCE IN THE REIGN 

OF LOUIS XVI 




178?. AT AVIGNON. THE BROTHERS FOUNDTHJ 
A BAG OF SILK PLACED OVER A Fl RE OF WOOL I 
STRAW WOULD RISE RAPIDLY INTO THE AIR,/ 



[.VERSAILLES. ONLY INJURY SUSTAINED 
...BYTHE WING OF THE COCK WHICH WAS 
BROKEN BY A kick FROM THE. SHEEP/ 




THE FIRST ASCENT WAS MADE 8Y J F. PILATRE d« ROZIF.R 
THE MARQUIS d'ARlANDES. AS PASSENGER. FROM THE 
PREVAILING WINDS CARRIED THE BALLOON ACROSS PARIS. 



HIGH OVER THE ROOFTOPS OF PARIS. THE ENVELOPE CAUGHT FIRE 
AND THE OCCUPANTS WER£ IN GRAVE DANGER OF LOSING THEIR LIVES! 
THE BALLOON CARRIED ITS OWN FIRE IN A BRAZIER. SITING I N IHE N ECK 
OFTHE ENVELOPE. IT WAS FEO BY BALES OF WOOL AND STRAW IN 
THE GALLERY. WIU- THEY STOP THE FLAMES? SEE HEXTWEEK.S NUM6ER. 



DISCOVERING THE COUNTRYSIDE 





THE EAGLE CLUB 



AND EDITOR'S FACE 



The Editor's Office 

EAGLE 

43 Shoe Imm, London, EC4 

IT looks as if we are going lo have Ihe 
country swarming whh EAOlJUtlM Ihis 
rills' An tiagk't. of course, isa member 
of ibe eagli: due - before he doe- 
somclhrng special and becomes a Mli(.. The 
postman could do Willi one of Dan Dare's 
Jcpccts to carry all ihc letters of application 
to join the Club and ibe badge-makers an; 
going cross-eyed with working i 

You can't all be among the 
hrsl hundred members of ihc 
(.Tub. of course, and win a free ._ HijJ i)i 
trip lO Silvers lone Motut 
Races, or I- a rn bo rough Air 
Display, or the lest Match at 

the Highland Games. We 




Sllld 



ibe e 



i the I 



possible. 

Mean white, don't forget that if you apply 
for membership in the first four weeks be- 
fore May 14th - youcangct the r. At: i_t Badge 
without any extra payment, simply by sending 
in your I/- Membership fee. Jusl send a postal 
order with your name, address, age and date 
of birthday, name of school and club lo The 
Editor at the above address. After May 14th, 
i he re will be an extra charge of fid. for the 
iA<iir Badge 

Kemember that after you've joined the 
Oub, the second step is to become a miki. 
You can't do this h> applying foi il yourself. 
Someone else has go) to write and IcJ! us 
about something you've done to deserve the 
award, We have heard already of a good 
many readers whose parents, or teachers. o> 
club leaders - or someone like lhat believe 
they have done something rather special and 
deserve to be elected a MUG, We arc too tin g 
into each case carefully and if elected we shall 
award them Ihc MUG I Badge which will 
cm ille them lo a good many privileges. We 
hope, in the next two or three weeks, lo be 
able lo announce (he first MUU 01 shi 



We hope you have go! the idea of whai a 
Mtte really is Some ot our readers have been 
gelling ibeir parenis to send lis accounts of 
things they have done that were just plain 

The pom i is this: a Mi't, isn't a nitwit who 
gets taken in and ihen squeak: he's a chap 
who deliberately sets oul lo do (he worth- 
while Ihings, whatever the COM. lie's never 
imposed on oi ink en advantage of, except 
when he '* witling to he. There's nothing lo hi 



trying lo break into a shop. Il may be by 
taking a stand againsl Ihe gang hooliganism 
that's going on nowadays. A mug may be 
someone crippled or ill in hospital who shows 
great cheerfulness and endurance: or gome- 
one who gives up the chance of enjoyment 
he's been looking forward to in order to let 

Those are only some of the Ihings thai 
would cam the mugs badge. Il might be 
something quite diflcjcm bui h's got to be 
something that's of service lo others. 



As we said last week, we've got a great many 
ideas for the i agli CLUB. But, after all, 
it's your ( lub and we really want to know your 
ideas about it and what you like. So will 
you slan thinking between now and next 
week, about the sort of things you'd like the 
Club to organise. 

Here, for example, are some of the things 
you might be interested in. Some of you will 
like one thing, and others something else. In 
issue we shall ask you lo lei us know 
in pretci. Don't do anything about it 
ow (MBCtM think! 
The idea is that there should be several 
^^^ groups within ihc Club, foi 

fl|PI| those interested in. lor example: 

J\p I. Stamp collect ine orcolleci- 

maT^iffc. mB otbc ' 'hings. 2. Amatcui 
**■ Theatricals. 3. Handicrafts and 
Model making. 5. Engine Spoi- 
ling 6. Amateur Photography. 
Overseas Pen-pals. 9. Swop 








Icaitir/L". 



these, it you decide you « 
them - and you will probably 
have a great many other 
ideas of your own. Bui 
meanwhile don' i forget lo make suie of gel- 
ling your copy of ncii regularly. There's 
an order ioirn at Ihe bottom oi this page 
which we suggest you use. 

Last week we mentioned some of Ihc-greai 
MUtis of history People like ihe Wnghl 
Brothers - folks said they were wasting then 
lime when ibey wcie experimenting with 
aeroplanes: or Florence Nightingale when 
she devored her lift lo improving military 
hospitals, or Keats. 

writing poetry 



COMPETITION CORNER 

Answers on p. 13 
1. SWINGING THE LOAD Study this iliusiraiion carefully and sec if 
you can solve this worrying problem. A bale of merchandise (marked clearly with 
an "X") has to be transferred to a quay (marked "Y"j. Unfortunately as you no 
doubt have already seen Ihe width of the water is considerably greater than Ihc 
span of the crane thai is to lifl Ihc goods. The arm of ihe crane is rigid. 

The whole crane itself can swing, bill 
the arm cannot be either raised or 
towered. 

Imagine yourself in charge of the job. 
What would you advise? Transfer the 
bale by other means'' Or attempt it with 
Ihc crane? I! you decide on Ihe crane, ' 
what method can you possibly use 
you decide against the crane, ask y 
self whether il is absolutely impossible I 
by this means. 1,00k very, very carefully I 
at Ihe picture before replying! 




I. I I / 1 1 j Which is the brightest sta 
(2f Which is the smallest of these: (.bain, t 
is the lightest of these boxing weights: n 
which side of a penny is i he daic - heads t 
oi in water V (6) Whal Dags are these-, jo 



in the heavens (not counting the sun)? 

"•M. I l.H. THON, MOl t( ULI ?<3)Which 
MHI K. H.Y, LIGHT, MAN1AU? (4) Op 

tails? <5) Does sound travel fasiei in air 



3. OPPOSITES There are several words which need only their first letters 
changing to make a word Willi an entirely opposite meaning. For example, "tarnish" 
(to make dull) and "varnish" tin make bright). 

Can you discover the following foui pairs of opposite words? Ontv the first lellcr 
is different in each pan. 

la) Change a word meaning "Something thai gives cokwi" into a word meaning 
something dial removes colour ". (fei'To withhold help" into "lo help a great deal", 
(<•) "A ship'" into "no ship", tit) "The winner'" into "the loser". 

4. V 1 1. 1. - I N S Here is a drawing competition for which we offer a first priw of 
10/6. In the left-hand picture some of Ihc artist's lines gol rubbed out leaving only 
those ihai you can see here. Can you fill in other lines to make a picture? The right- 
hand drawing gives wie example of whal can he done. The prize will go lo Ihe besl 
and most original drawing. Last dale for entries is Wednesday. May 3rd. Send youi 
entries ic> The fcduoi, thi lAiii.r, 43 Shoe Lane, London, tc.4 and mark envelope 
"Compethion", Don'! forget lo include your name, address and age. 



Our | 



proud of in being diddled (though even that 


MUC, - 


Wilberlorce Wi *JjJ 


is better than drddling some other poor 


People 


launhcd ai JR "iC^S 


blighter I, A Mini gha service, knowing what 




">- he said he •^kkV.-'H 


lie is doing. He doesn i have it taken from him 


would 


** u«i aaaaaatcS«J 


by force or trickery. 




acafllaaWT 


There arc anv number of wavs von am can: 






ihe title ol unci, Il may be bv some especially 






brave action like rescuing someone Irom 




Yours sincerely 


drowning, or like ihe boy we read about the 






other da> who chased ofl a couple ol louls 




THE EDITOR 




if j 


Hijp 


XrT 




(vfe 


03_ 


Sri 





ml 



CHICKO 



bu theluucll 




' Cut this out 



f Newsagent: pletise order i 
■■■ every week until further no 



hash Lonergan's Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 



Th* story mo far 




Chapter z 

LASH LONERGAN explained to 
Rawhide and Squib what Mopoke (he 
black-fellow had mumbled to him: 

"The message got through to the blacks' 
camp that I was coming home. When 
Mopoke saw that Dago Messiter was up to 
some dirty work, he took a hone from Coota- 
bah Creek and rode to meet us. 

"He thinks the mounted police might be 
after him for stealing the horse. Thai's why 
he wouldn't come out on to the road. He 
threw a warning boomerang instead." 

Squib, who had been siicnl Tor some tune, 
put a question to the roughrider: "What's 
going to happen when we get to Coolabah 
Creek?" 

"That," replied Lash grimly, ""is something 
for tomorrow to decide." Thrusting out his 
jaw. he added : "But whatever tl is. I'm look- 
ing forward to dealing with Mr. Dago 
Messiter." 

Just before noon next day the three horse- 
men rode up to the gate of Coolabah Creek. 

As Lash entered the property, his feelings 
were a mixture of sorrow, anger, and gladness 
10 be home again. 

Dago Messiter was waiting for him. Dago's 
men were waiting, too. 

Tall, handsome, and swarthy. Dago leaned 
nonchalantly against a verandah post and 
watched the trio ride up the road to Ihe 
homestead . 

A splendid stockman, he had been Uncle 
Peter's foreman for years. Though both 
Lash and Rawhide had admired his skill, they 
had never liked him. There had always been 
something sinister about I he man. 

Now they saw thai Mcssiter's smile was 
half a sneer as be leaned against the post and 
watched them with sharp, dark eyes. He 
made no sign and said no word. Neither did 
any of the men who stood on either side of 
him in hostile array. 

Lash reined his horse in front of the 
verandah steps. Rawhide and Squib pulled 
up on either side. 

"Well, well. Rawhide!" exclaimed Lash 
gaily. "I expected a better welcome home 
than this!*' 

"Isn't it quiet around here?" replied the 
Irishman with a grin. 

Dago Messiter spoke softly but clearly. 
"You might even say it was quiet enough for 

Lash's eyes narrowed as he glanced over 
the other men. "I see a lot of strangers here, 
but none of my old friends." 

"I got rid of your lot when I took over the 
station." said Dago casually. 

"1 hear you've proclaimed yourself boss 
and owner of Coolabah Creek." replied Lash 
just as casually. 

Dago nodded. "You were disinherited the 
day your Uncle Peter kicked you out," he 
said in precise tones that could not conceal 
his delight. "Your uncle told me I was to 
take over the place when he died." 

"Do you know what I think T* said Lash. 
"I think you're a liar." 

Dago started and flushed. Recovering his 
composure, he went on: "I've got witnesses. 
There's Joe Horgan for one." 

He pointed to the fat man beside him, and 
continued, "Joe was there when — " 

"Greasy Joe!" bellowed Rawhide, who 
could contain himself no longer. "'Greasy 
Joe the dingo! Greasy Joe the snake! If ever 




there was a putrefyin' piece o' pong it's 
Greasy Joe Horgan!" 

The fat man, furious at the abuse, suddenly 
bent down and produced a rifle. 

Lash's quick eye saw the move. He swung 
his whip, and the writhing tip hissed out and 
wrapped itself around the barrel. 

"Look out. Lash!" yelled Squib. 

The boy had seen Dago's lightning move 
as the foreman flung out his arm. As if by 
magic, a knife appeared in his hand. 

As Lash's whip jerked the rifle from Greasy 
Joe's hands. Dago hurled the gleaming knife 
straight at the unsuspecting roughrider. 



Lash glimpsed the flying blade loo late to 
duck. The knife pierced the crown of his 
hat and whipped it off his head. 

Amid cackles and guffaws from Dago's 
henchmen. Lash swiftly hooked a knee 
around the pommel as Monarch wheeled 
away. The roughrider swung head down and. 
with the ease of a circus acrobat, snatched his 
hat from the ground. The cackling laughter 
was checked by the sight of such a feat. 

But Dago still smiled his sneering smtle. 
"I didn't intend to touch you," he said. "I 
only wanted to demonstrate that u knife is a 
better weapon than a whip, because it can 
be thrown further than a whip can reach. 
SaveeT 

Lash replied quietly : "Maybe you've heard 
of something (hey call the law of the land. 
You'll be hearing more about it soon." 

"Possession is nine points of the law." 
quoted Dago smugly. 

"And," replied Lash, "possession can be 
proved by a will." 

Dago Messiter started up surprised. 

"Unclc Peter made his will in my favour." 
the roughrider went on. "He showed it to me 
years ago when he said the place would one 
day be mine." 

Dago advanced down the steps and looked 
intently at Lash. 

"There's no will among his papers," he 
said. "And where there's no will Ihere's no 



way of proving he left you Coolabah Creek." 

Rawhide burst in: "Ah, Lash, me boy! 

Don't listen any more to the blather in' 

Lash, keeping his eyes tided on Dago, con- 
tinued to address him. "Maybe you did lind 
uncle's will here in the homestead - and may- 
be you destroyed it." 

"Are you calling me a liar" 1 " snarled the 
swarthy man. 

"Or maybe you didn't find the will because 
it isn't here. Maybe it's in the bank at 
Tarrawaira." 

A buzz of excited comment broke out 
among the men. Dagu looked discomfited 
for a moment or two. Then he burst out: 
"You get off this place! You get off >ny 

"One more question before I go," replied 
Lash calmly. "Where is the opal that was in 
Uncle iter's hand when they found him up 
there?" 

Dago blinked in feigned surprise. "Opal?" 
he repealed. "What opal?" 

A snigger ran through the group of men on 
the verandah. 

"I think you know what I mean." said Lash 
grimly. 

"Yabbayabba was one of the blacks that 
found your uncle," said Dago. "'And he 
didn't see any opal." 

Messiter turned and beckoned to the black- 
fellow who had been squatting on the veran- 
dah. The big. ugly, and almost-naked Abor- 
igine rose and came forward to the railings. 

"'Now, Yabbayabba," said Dago. "Tcllem 
this fdla if you see opal longa Mister I oner- 
gaii when you lindcm longa gully." 

Clutching his boomerang and nullanulla, 
the black shook his head vigorously "No 
see opal. Likern you say, Missa Messiter, no 
opal longa Missa I onergan No see — ™ 

Rawhide again blurted out his opinion. 
"Who'd believe you?" he roared. "You 
horse thief and cattle duffer!" 

The Aborigine scowled insolently at the 
Irishman and raised his boomerang in a 
threatening manner. 



"Rawhide - Squib - come on," ordered 
Lash, who saw further argument was futile. 
The three companions wheeled their horses 
and rode ofT, followed by hocus and jeers. 

Only Dago Messiter did not laugh. With 
speculative eyes he watched the trio go 
cantering down the road. He knew he had 
not seen the last of Lash Lonergan. 

Meanwhile Squib, who had listened to the 
recent argument in timid silence, boldly 
started firing questions at Lash. 

"1 suppose he wouldn't own up about the 
opal because he wants to keep it for hissdf?" 

"On, it's more than that, me innocent little 
cobber," interposed Rawhide. "You can 
bet your sweet life that Uncle Peter made an 
opal strike somewhere up there in the hills. 
A;>:! IT) bet me best pants to a clutch of 
cockatoo's eggs that Dingo Messiter and his 
mob have been up there fossickin' for the 
opal vein that rightly belongs to Lash." 

"Do you reckon they've found it?" 

"I don't reckon so or the news would 
have got around by this." 

"Strike me 'andsomc!" exclaimed Squib, 
suddenly changing the subject. "I'm terrible 
hungry ! " 

Lash and Rawhide burst into laughter. 
Then they agreed they felt the same way. 

"I thought we'd get some tucker at Ihc 
homestead," said the roughrider. "But all we 
got was the boot. We won't be in Tarrawaira 
till about sundown, so we'd better see what 
we can catch." 

Rawhide pointed at the fat. pink-and-grey 
parrots squabbling among the honey-laden 
flowers of a gum tree. "If I had a gun." he 
said. "I'd potshot a fribble o' them gaJahs 
(Hie for each and all of us." 

"Look!" hissed Lash, pointing towards a 
streak of dry. yellow grass beside a parched 
billabong. 

They glimpsed the alert, grey-fealhcrcd 
head of a plain-turkey above the top of the 
grass. Lash swung Monarch off the road and 
made for the billabong. 

The plain-turkey broke cover and ran 
swiftly across the mud flat towards a dense 
clump of waitawhile bushes. Its tiny, useless 
wings flapped furiously in a vain attempt to 
fly as Monarch went racing in pursuit. 

The roughrider felt for the handle of his 
whip and jerked the coiled rawhide free. 

Swish! went the darting lash. It struck the 
outstretched neck and coiled itself round the 
grey feathers. Lash flicked back his wrist - 
and the plump plain-turkey lay dead, ready 
for plucking and cooking. 

"She loves me! She loves me not!" 
exclaimed Rawhide a few minutes later as he 
sat on a log, pulling out the feathers by the 
handful and tossing them into the air. 




M 



Lash lit a lire of mulga and 
L sandalwood, and then showed Squib how 
3 dig for yams with a sharp stick. By i he time 
they had dug up six of the potato-like tubers. 
Rawhide had the turkey plucked and cleaned. 
He went over to a patch of wet clay on the 
edge of the billabong and, scooping it up by 
the handful, smeared it thickly over the 

"Help me make a bushman's oven, kid," 
Lash invited the boy. 

He and Squib soon made a hole in the 
eanhabout three feet deep. Rawhide came back 
with the bird completely covered with day. 

While the curious boy stood and watched 
the strange sight, the two men shovelled big 
embers from the fire into the bottom of the 
hole. In went the turkey. Then came more 
embers. Finally the earth was pushed back 

"Where are the yams?" asked Squib. 

"Inside the beautiful bird." replied Raw- 
hide, rolling his eyes and licking his lips. 
"And when that tasty turkey is ready for our 
gullets, so will those yams be cooked as well. 
Oh, the thought of it makes me mouth water 
like the Niagara Falls." 

"Well," began Lash, '"we've got about an 
hour to wait, so — " 

"Listen!" interrupted Squib, whose keen 



Rawhide 



Ban naO caugnr ihe strange drumn 

Lash cocked an inquiring ear 
lerked up tils head and listened i 
was Ihe booming, throbbing sound of swifl 
foci on hard earth. 

"It's Dago and his push"' exclaimed The 
hoy. "They're after mV 

"HetV ihey come," remarked Rawhide, 
winking ai Lash. "And (hey all seem to be 
wearm' fancy cmiunits." 

Ai Ihat moment the runners came into view- 
on the other side of ihe billabong, and then 
Squib realised Rawhide had been joking 

"Emus!" he exclaimed as a uore of the 
great birds thudded across the mud flat. Wilh 
necks outs i retched and hrown feathen, 
streaming. Ihey raced as fas! as ponies. 
ignoianl of the men's presence. they boiled 
madly into the hush again. 

'■Dingoes'"* cried Squib at ihe sight of ibe 
two wild dog* thai followed in swift pursuit. 
Like iwo creatures of a nightmare. Ihe wild 
dogs, iheir huge jaws open to show savage 
teeth, raced across ihe flai and disappeared 
among ihe trees. 

"They'll never calch those emus," said Lash 
to Squib. "Unless they run any or I hem into 
a netting fence which is one of Iheir tricks 
when ihey get the birds in a corner. They 
just run full till into the fence and break their 



reel ready 

Al last ihe bird was ready. They scraped 
away the earth, then the almost-dead embers, 
to reveal a turkey-shaped mass of baked clay. 

Holding'tbc turkey by the charred feet. 
lash lapped ai the clay with his big knife. It 
flaked off. to reveal the beautifully cooked 
flesh The delicious smell made their mouths 
water I ii nous I > 

Lash broke otf a leg and handed il 10 the 
boy. Squib grabbed il greedily and sank his 
leeth into the succulent flesh 

Between the three of them they finished ihe 
whole turkey. Squib and Rawhide, gorged 
and somnolent, lay back in the shade with the 
imeniion of drowsing and digesting 



'There's a westerly wind rising." said Lash. 
pomiing towards the horizon '" And do "you 
seethecolout or the sky over there'' I reckon 
we're in for a dust storm C6me on, cobbers, 
we're on the road again." 

As they rode south towards Varrawarra, 
Ihe wind was hot and dry on their faces, 
parching [heir lips 

Then came the dust . soft and powdery 
at frrsl . , drifting into their eyes and noses 
and throats 

Like a dark mist. Kit dost storm came 
slowly down the wind, turning the slanting 
sun to I golden yellow ball 

The horses snuffled and snorted The men 
coughed and spat, trying to gei rid of ihe 
gritty taste. 

"Ugh, me throat's as dry as a sunstruck 
bone," croaked Rawhide 

"I could spit chips." gasped Squib. 

Lash muttered "We'll just have to get used 
to it. Il might keep on for days." 

Just as the sun went down - (caving an 
eerie, murky dusk the riders saw the Mghis 
trf Varrawarra. It was only a liny settlement 

a cluster of buildings on the main road 
south hut never had the riders seen a more 
welcome sight. 

They rode to the house of Colin McPhee. 
the manager of the township's only bonk. 

McPhee greeted Lash with huge delight 
After sympathising ahoul the death of his 
uncle. McPhee said : "We've all been follow- 
nig your career wilh great interest, Lash, and 
we're all' very proud of you in ihesc pans 
Your Uncle Peter was, too." 

"Did tie know what I've been doing.'" 
asked Ihe roughrider eagerly 

"Oh, yes. He watched (he papers for the 
results of ail the roughnding contests He 
*as always talking about your success," 

tin the subject of C'oolabah Oeek Siation, 
McPhee said he had heard thai Dago 
Mcssiier had claimed lite properly as his own. 

"Bui of course tt's yours,"" went on the 
bank manager. "You'll soon have him slung 
out when you produce your uncle's will.". . 

"Have you got h in the bank r asked Lash 
quickly. 

"Of course It's in a strongbox in the safe 
with other papers of your uncle's." 




^•**W?Qi> ' ' 



"(oi, Id I see it now. please? fast to make 
sure it's all in order still." 

"Don'l be impatient, young man," laughed 
McPhee. "Us after banking hours, you know, 
tt would be a lot of bother going out into the 
dusl slorm iust lo satisfy your curiosity 
You'll have it in the morning, my boy." 

McPhee invited all three of ihcm to stay 
the nighi at his place provided they did noi 
mind bunks on the hack verandah, where 
they would he sheltered from the gritty wind. 

Alter ihe evening meal they yarned for a 
while Bui they were so tired that even lash, 
young and tough as he was. could light off 
fatigue no longer, tt was early 10 bed for all. 

The westerly wind, laden with dust, drifted 
steadily across ihe night. The stars were 
blotted out. Soon the yellow lamps of the 
township were extinguished, leaving an inky. 
gntiy darkness. 



a tumbling from their beds 

lash was awake in a second Shouts . 
confused cries . . noises nf alarm 

"What's up?" cried McPhee, hopping oot 
of bed. 

"'its the end of the world'" roared Raw- 
hide, plunging about in the darkness 

■f-ire! " The cry came clearly to their cars 
as Lash. McPhee. and the others humed 
round the verandah . 

"Fifcf shouted more voices 

"'The bank's on fire'" bellowed McPhee 

Across ihe road Ihe little wooden building 
was ablaze The flickering yellow flames lit 
up the faces of the excited townspeople as 
they hurried to the spot. The fire hell was 
ringing furiously down the road, and they 
knew that help was on the way. 

"Look" Look!" cried exerted voices. 

From ihe shadows ai ihe hack of the hank 
dashed ha 1 1'- a -dozen horsemen. 

They were all masked by handkerchief:. 
across their faces - all except their leader. 

This man had a wide. ugly, vicious fact, 
thai gleamed yellow in the lighl of the fire. 
More grotesque still, he had a great hump on 
his hack and he looked like n creature of evil 
as he crouched over his galloping horse. 

'The Hunchback !** shouted men and 
women. "Look - the Hunchback '" 

-Who " began Lash, as he waichcd the 

rulers dash off into (he darkness. 

"Bushrangers'" exclaimed McPhee He 
hurried down the verandah step-, and across 
the road io the bank. 

The fire truck came roaring up, and Ihe 
flames were srton extinguished. 

Lash, wilh a premonition of disaster clutch- 
ing at his heart, followed McPhee into the 
bank 

The safe had been blasted open. Papers 
and documents were scattered everywhere 
many of them soaked and charred, 

"The strongbox?" mapped Lash. "Uncle 
Peter's strongbox?" 

McPhee peered into the damaged safe, 
looked frantically around the room, and 
groaned: "Its gone. All the money and 
strongboxes have gone. The Hunchback has 
taken the lot !" 

(To be font imtr.it) 



-\tiswtrs to Competition C omer on p. 1 1 



Si 



jfeLailfr 




*sak*- «=4S»«-§8P 



ROB CONWAY 




USOLBBU8BLE HO&IE ) MAT 4MPPENEO f DID 
,^-Lflll J arjc BABJON SHE4K 

P 




iJ.m.HH*tuj;i.'nn?Md!u?u 



itedesfy- 



TOMMY WALLS 




CONDITIONS OP SALE AMDS 

■ HtK-IWlU- <|j..| .<'■:.<- J itfl:\ .. 





W£\ 1 


toe next day Saul makes 
his wav to the house of 
^ ca1apha8. toe wish priest. . 






J 




j /A 


l^xTr 


£m| . .£vf\ f 




ILittL 






1 3Sp3Tpt 




i\\ 




/ WAS WOT PLEASED 
WITH WE MY YOU 
+4ANPLED THAT 

£r£PH£N Business 

YESTERDAY, 

MY BOYf 





I CAN STAMP IT OUT IN 
PAMASCUS.SiR.IF YOU WILL 
GIVE ME YOUR COMMISSION 
TO GO THERE X ARREST ANY 
NAZARENE5 I FIND. 




IT'S DONE SAUL-YOU SMALL GO! 

but pirst i suggest that 

YOU QUESTION SOME OF OUR 
\ NAZARENE PRISONERS — 

YOU MAY PICK UP 
SOMETHING 
USEFUL.