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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

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LEAVE THE JE.PEET IN THE 



YESS/R / WAKE UP, YOU 
COLONEL PARE/ LANCASW (RE 
v SIR! j/ SLEEPING . 

BEAUTY / 



PARK AND BRING A HELICAR 
TO M-a ROOF TO PICK UP 
k TWE CONTROLLER AND^ 
MYSELF! 






THREEPENCE 



EVERY FRIDAY 



MGIE 



PIGBY !! 



P/GBYi 



TO AN EMERGENCY CABINET MEETING 
DIG - THE 'KINGFISHER-SLEW UP 
. A FEW MINUTES AGO > 



DIGBY!^ 



EAGLE 



NATIONAL STRIP CARTOONI WEEKLY 



DAN DARE 

PHOT OF THE FUTURE 






AWL* 1 WON'T LOSE 
ANYMORE! THE 
CABINET CAM DO 
WHAT THEY LIKE) 
I'M NOT SENDING 
ANY MORE MEN 
TO CERTAIN , 
DEATH / 



fn DOES SEEM A SHAME TO 
LOSE SO MANY GOOD MEN 
SIR— ARE THEY SURE 
THERE'S POOD “WERE ? 



YOU'RE NOT WALT AS SORRY AS \ AM. 
DIGBV. THAT'S THE THIRD CREW |'VE 
LOST TRYING TO GETTO VENUS ! 




fcNDTHEVRE NOT OFTEN \ r UGH, MARS/ 
(WRONG - TH E Y SAID THERE I | PLACE.SiR- 
IWOULDKJ’T BE MUCH ON I MILES OF N 
! MARS, AND. AS YOU KNOW 

THERE I SKIT j — 



AND WE DO URGENTLY WEED BlG T 
NEW POOD SUPPLIES. DIG OR THERE S; 
GOING TO BE SERIOUS TROUBLE ! 



AIR .SOIL AND WATER 
ON VENUS 




frr ALL SEEMS VERY 
I IRONICAL LIKE TO 
ME, SIR 



EXCEPT THERE'S 
NOTHING TO EAT 

W ,T ! 



WE GET A W ORLD GOVERNMENT 
THAT ENDS WARS. THE VOCTC&S 
HAVE NEARLY EVERY DISEASE 
TAPED, AND NOBODYS REALLY 

POOR AMY MORE IN 

FACT, EVERYTHING IN THE 
GARDEN’S LOVELY 



IT WAS BOUND TO HAPPEN, PIGBY — 
THE NUMBER OP PEOPLE IN THE WORLD 
HAS DOUBLED SlKJCE K?50 — AMDfOOD 
SUPPLIES ARE GROWING LESS BECAUSE 
VAST AREAS OP THE EARTH HAVE BEEN 
EXHAUSTED BY BAD FARMING IN THE A 
PAST I 




TRY AS WE MAY, WE 
Simply CAnT GROW 
ENOUGH FOOD TO GO 
ROUND, ANOTHE SCIENTISTS 
CANTPIND AMY GOOD 
SUBSTITUTES \ 



BUT IP they're RIGHT and 
VyE COULD GROW CROPS 
ON VENUS, COMPRESS 
THEM, AND SWlPTHEM 
BACK HERE, IT'LL 
MEAN LIFE ITSELF 
TD MILLIONS OF 
PEOPLE / 



rrs been our greatest 
HOPE, AMD THEN THIS 
HAS TO HAPPEN =■ 
THREE EXPEDITIONS i 
lost — All in the 
SAME PLACE A 



CONTINUED. 



Jtui of P.C.49 






yOUt> BETTER \ / NO-lU-GO BAO? 
BUZZ OFF HOME.] TO COFFEE DANS 
JOAN. 1 MAY BE I AND WAIT. PHONE 
HERE ALL NIGHT/ ^E THERE IF 

. ^^^^Janvthing happens. 


' wr; fa 

im WL 

| V, 


> 




' s? 
'10 

■ Iff f 




"3 





MORNING-. TORTyNINEl 
WHAT ARE you DOING 









PLOT ACAtNSr 1WE WORLD 



by Chad Varab 

leased the brake, and let her coast silently 
back to the bend. 

“'Oo arc wc chasing, anyway T asked Dick, 
his eyes scanning the road in every direction. 

“A gang of crooks and traitors,” answered 
Ray through his teeth, "pinching atomic 
secrets and selling them to die highest 
bidder. And double-crossing all sides. If 
they aren't stopped they’ll get some nation 
so jittery that it starts tossing H-bombs 
around.” 

“Tut, tut,” said Dick, who had got his 
M.M. in the war for walking calmly up to an 
enemy tank and sticking an adhesive bomb 
on its belly. “We can't 'ave that. Gimme the 
right answer to one question, and Ah’m in 
this with yer. But first, there’s one on 'em 
peerin' round yon comer. We’d 'vc bin right 
slap on top of 'im if Ah hadn’t backed." 

“I don't want to shoot if 1 can help it,” said 
Ray, creeping out and taking cover behind 
the bonnet. "I don’t want the police around. 
It's surprising to me wc haven't had them 
after us already.” 

“Wc may need ’em afore we’ve finished," 
grunted Dick as the gangster vanished and 
Ray leapt back into the car. “Ah dunno what 
yer think us two can do if we th catch 'em, 
unless yer changes yer mind about shootin'.” 
His keen ear picked up the sound of the 
Morris cautiously starting up out of sight, 
and the Jaguar purred into motion. Dick 
streaked past the turn where the other car had 
lurked and took the next, answering Ray's 
unspoken enquiry with: 

"Happen they’ve laid a trap there spikes 
on road, or wire across it.” 

"Well, what was the question?” asked Ray 
as the chase continued. 

"This are you and yer pals working for 
England?” demanded Dick. 

“In a way. We’re not working against 
England, anyway. I'd rather say we’re work- 
ing for all mankind." 

Dick pulled up. 

“Ye’re talkin' like a communist," he said 
slowly. 

“Then I must have put it badly. More of 
our chaps have got it in the neck on the other 
side of the Iron Curtain than on this side.” 
"Ah’vc got it! You're some sort o' Secret 
Service for this ’ere Atlantic Pact! Work in' 
for all the civilised countries against the Red 
Peril an’ the Yellcr Peril an’ . . 

His exuberant voice trailed into silence as 
Ray shook his head. 

“We’re working for all mankind, as I said 
before,” repeated Ray. “The one thing the 
ordinary people in all countries are longing 
for is peace. We're going to make it for them.” 

The Peacemakers 

“Ah see,” said Dick with a sigh. “Now Ah 
know why ye won’t shoot at them scallywags. 
You're pacifists. Well, Ah can respect yer 
views, but — ” 

“NoT interrupted Ray violently. “We’re 
not pacifists - we're pcaco-makers. We’re 
going to make peace insist on it - if wc have 
to fight before we can do it.” 

“Ah’vc 'card that one before," commented 
Dick drily. “Twice.” 

“This is different. You’ll see! And if all 
goes well, there won’t be any fighting. Some 
of the best brains in the world are — ” 

Ray suddenly broke off, and shut his 
mouth like a trap. 

“I mustn't tell you any more,” he said, 
"unless you decide to become one of us.” 
“Wot, buy a pig in a poke?” jeered Dick. 
“Not me! Wc don’t do that where Ah come 
from.” 

“You will when you're ready,” said Ray 
calmly. “Well, we’ve lost ’em they're miles 
away by now. Can't be helped. Thanks for 
the buggy-ride.” 

"Ah’m sorry Ah made ye miss ’em, lad. Ah 
reckon you're doin’ what ye believe is right, 
but when ye started on that claptrap about 
“all mankind” Ah had to be sure of ye before 
Ah went on clpuig ye.” 

“Of course, Dick.” Ray clapped him on the 
shoulder. “I understand. When you fed you 
can trust me, well be proud to have you. 
Where do we go front here?” 

“Back to where them gangsters stopped. 
Ah want to sec what sort o’ trap they laid for 



The story so far 



Chapter 3 

Blown to Smithereens! 

F ortunately Ray knew how to fail. 

He had let himself go limp, and though 
badly bruised and shaken he had broken 
no bones. 

When he recovered from the dare, he 
couldn't understand why the gangsters were 
still sitting in the car instead of piling on top 
of him and practising a Rugby scrum. Then 
he noticed that he had a gun in his left hand, 
and that it was pointed at the car. 

His wild grab at the gun just before the car 
threw him like a bucking bronco must have 
been successful! The gangsters little knew 
tliat he had no intention of shooting anyone 
if he could help it. 

He changed the gun to his right hand and 
climbed painfully to his feet. He decided that 
he would have to shoot at the tyres and, if 
necessary, “wing” his assailants. 

He took aim at a back wheel, and at that 
moment the Morris started with a jerk and 
drove off at speed. Only a second elapsed 
before he realised why; a long rakish car slid 
to a stop beside him, and a stocky, curly- 
headed figure jumped out and lifted him up. 
It was Dick Rawlings. 

“Yer want a lift?"’ asked Dick. 

“Ill say 1 do!” answered Ray, climbing in 
and sliding across to make room for the 
driver, “You just turned up in the nick of 

The car swooshed off before Ray had 



The sturdy young Northerner handled her 
beautifully, and she responded like a live 
thing to the gentle grip of his powerful hands. 
“Think you can catch ’em?” asked Ray. 
Dick snorted. “Know what this is?” 



“Didn’t notice,” admitted Ray, glancing 
along the sleek grey bonnet. 

“It's Doctor's three-and-’arf litre Jaguar,” 
grunted Dick, with ill-concealed pride. 
“Fastest thing on the road. Do ninety-five 
easy. Or a bit more fer me if ah need it, won’t 
yer, me lady? Catch 'em!” He snorted again. 
“But yon feller can drive.” 

The Morris twisted and turned, screaming 
round corners on two wheels, so that the 
Jaguar could never open out fully. Dick 
wouldn't abuse the car, especially as it wasn’t 
his, but its speed and his skill began to 
reduce the gangster's lead. 

“How did you conic on the scene?” en- 
quired Ray. “Did Jim and Ken see you?” 
“Are they mixed up wi’ same gang?” 
countered Dick. 

“Yes I didn't involve them though.” 
“Good. Them chaps is no playmates fer 
lads.” Dick pulled up hard at some traffic 
lights which the gangsters had ignored, and 
though Ray chafed at the delay, he saw the 
sense of it as a heavy lorry lumbered across 
their tracks. 

“Ken and 'is sister come fer me earlier on,” 
he continued, easing in the clutch as the lights 
changed, “with a wild tale about a wounded 
man Jim 'ad found in a coal-’ole. Ah went 
with ’em to get ’im out, but 'c weren't there. 
Nah yer don’t fool me!” Dick was now 
addressing the gangsters, who had turned left, 
screeched round a block, and then cut back 
to the right. “Ah’vc seen yer!” The Jaguar 
swooped along to the turn the Morris had 
finally taken. “Ah should’ve called it a cock- 
an’-bull yarn but fer one thing." 

“What was that?” enquired Ray. Dick 



never took his eyes off the road, but felt with 
his left hand in his jacket pocket and passed 
Ray a sorbo ball. 

“Found it in coal-’ole, Jim 'ad said feller 
was gagged wi’ a ball. Friend o' yours?” 

“Yes, he’s ‘one of us’," replied Ray, 
pocketing the ball. “I’ll keep this may come 
in handy. Look out!" 

The Morris had turned into a side-street, 
braked, and backed viciously out, trying to 
ram them. 

In Pursuit 

Dick didn't need Ray's warning yell. Given 
the choice of mounting the pavement and 
maybe damaging the Doctor’s car, or swerv- 
ing down the street the gangsters had backed 
out of and losing his lead, he chose the latter. 

Ray groaned, but Dick drove impertur- 
bably round the block and was soon in pursuit 
again. 

“So Ah sent the young uns home, and went 
back ter me job,” continued Dick as if nothing 
had happened. “Ah saw no more o' the kids, 
but Ah were just finishin' changin’ a wheel on 
this beauty when a car roared past end o' 
street wi’ a chap on roof. Ah didn't know as 
it were you, but Ah recognised car by the 
sound o’ th’ engine. Morris 14, pinched at tea- 
time from station yard. Ah finished tightening 
wheel afore Ah followed - good thing Ah did,” 
he added as he pulled the big car round a hair- 
pin bend. 

Suddenly he pulled up, stuck his head out 
of the window, and listened. “They’ve 
stopped,” he said quietly. “Keep yer eyes 
skinned an’ yer gun handy.” The car was on a 
slight rise, and Dick put her in neutral, re- 



us. in case someone else runs into it. Then ah 
mun get back to garridge." 

He started the car, turned her expertly, and 
pulled' up at the entrance to the side street 
where the gangster had peered round the 
comer. He got out, followed by Ray, and 
suddenly broke into a run. Ray came up to 
find him kneeling by the prone figure of a 
girl. 

She was lying unconscious in the middle 
of the road, her hands and legs tightly bound. 
Dick took a knife from his pocket and cut 
the cords, his jaw jutting and his eyes glitter- 
ing. Then he picked her up as if she had been 
a baby, and carried her to the car without a 
word. Ray opened the door and helped to lay 
her on the back scat. 

They got in the front, and then Dick spoke. 

"The devils!" he said quietly, but in such a 
way that you coutd almost feel sorry for them 
if ever he met them. 

"Who is she?” queried Ray, as Dick let in 
the clutch. 

“Pro. They must've nabbed her as she was 
going 'ome from my place. Mebbe they’ve 
still got Ken. D'ye realise that if Ah’d followed 
'em down that street we'd 'ave gone over her 
afore Ah could stop?” 

Ray nodded, soberly. 

“Now you see what we’re up against," he 

“Aye. An’ Ah don't care what you are, so 
long as you aren't a bolshie - if you’re agin' 
them devils. Ah'm with ye." 

Ray’s face lit up. 

“Then they’d better look out, now!" he 
teased. 

“They 'ad an' all!" grinned Dick. 

"Where arc you taking her?” asked Ray, 
jerking his head towards the -rear seat. 

"’Ere." said Dick, stopping the car outside 
a pleasant Georgian house. “’Ang on a 
minute." 

At the Doctor’s 

As Dick went and rang repeatedly at one of 
the two bells, Ray craned his neck to read the 
brass plate. "Dr. Briggs", it said. 

In a l< minutes the door was opened by a 
tall, stooping man in a dressing-gown. He 
seemed to know Dick, and they conferred in 
low voices. Then Dick relumed to (he car, 
and he and Ray carried Pru into the Doctor's 
consulting room. They waited anxiously 
whilst the poker-faced man bent over the girl. 

He straightened up again with a grunt that 
might have meant anything. 

“Will she be all right. Doctor?” asked Ray. 

“Urn.” 

“Ye’ll not get anything out of 7m,” whis- 
pered Dick, loud enough for the Doctor to 
hear. "Them chaps never commits theirselvcs, 
then if patient dies they can reckon they knew 
all along." 

The Doctor looked at Dick over his spec- 
tacles. "Really?" he said. "And what about 
you, shaking your head over my old car and 
saying nothing, until you got me so worried 



I went out and bought that Jaguar you wanted 
to play with?" 

He turned to Ray. "Nothing much wrong 
except that she's been chloroformed. Get Iter 
to bed and let her sleep it off. I'll drop in and 
see her later that's if Dick will be kind 
enough to let me borrow my car,” he added 
sarcastically. 

"Aye, Ah think we can spare ’er after we've 
run this lass 'ome," said pick, winking 
solemnly at Ray. Then he jerked up his head, 
shouted "Come on, Ray!" and dashed out of 
the door before the astonished Doctor could 
say a word. 

Secret Dungeon? 

As Ray followed him into the Jaguar and 
slammed the door he saw the Morris approach 
and then turn violently to the right. Dick’s 
keen ear had picked up the note of the engine 
whilst it was still a block away. He turned the 
long car as neatly as if it had been a London 
taxi, and they swooped off in pursuit. 

"Bit o’ luck, that!" chortled Dick.“Wonder 
where they've been all this time?” 

"Wish I knew! They seem to be leaving 

“If they get on a straight road, we'll catch 
'em." stated Dick. "What does a Peacemaker 
do then? Take ’em back to a secret dungeon 
and torture them till they reveal that their 
boss is called The Spider and ’is Identity Card 
is numbered AXXN 1153?” 

“I’m not rising to that one," smiled Ray. 
"You know we don't degrade ourselves by 
torturing people. I should think the simplest 
thing to do in this case would be to hand them 
over to the police on a charge of stealing the 
Morris. That'll put ’em out of the way for a 
bit. One of their big weaknesses is that they’re 
always doing something criminal, if we can 
only find out what it is." 

“And are you never up against the law?” 
enquired Dick innocently. 

"Depends on whose law you’re talking 
about," replied Ray. “The Resistance Move- 
ments in the occupied countries during the 
war were ‘illegal’, weren't they? A chap has to 
follow his conscience.” 

“Aye, that’s right," agreed Dick, serious 
for once. “But them chaps don't seem to ’ave 
one, and there’s many folks as 'as queer ones." 

A familiar sound came to their ears above 
the steady hum of their progress. Dick kept 
his eyes on the road and on the car they were 
rapidly overtaking, but Ray slewed round in 
his seat. 

“Police car!" he exclaimed. 

"'Bout time," grunted Dick. “Better let 'em 
takeover." 

He eased his foot off the accelerator, and the 
Jaguar slowed to less than a mile a minute. 
The police car raced past, its alarm sounding. 

“They're wide awake, them chaps." re- 
marked Dick approvingly. “Can’t think why 
they didn’t get on to us as we was chasin' 
round town unless most of 'em was at 
Police Ball. Good job they’ve turned up - Ah 



doubt if Ah could’ve shoved yon Morris off 
road without damagin' Doctor's car." 

The police car drew almost level with the 
Morris and prepared to crowd it into the side. 
A daring cop was already standing on the 
running board, ready to leap at the driver of 
the Morris if necessary, and Dick drew in his 
breath with a whistle of admiration. 

“Them chaps earns their pay,” declared 
Dick. 

"And more!” agreed Ray. 

"Ah were at pitchers the other night, and a 
chap next to me cheered when policeman 
were shot in the fillum. When we got outside 
Ah sloshed 'im. Any objection from Peace- 
makers?” 

"I'd have done the same," said Ray. 

Just as the police car got alongside the flee- 
ing Morris, the two cars reached a crossroads, 
and the gangsters’ driver swung crazily round 
to the left. The police car braked and got 
round too, even though it was on the outside 
curve. Both cars went into a skid. 




"They'll both crash!” breathed Dick, 
putting his foot down. 

But he was wrong. As the Morris rccoyered, 
spurts of flame spat from her, and the police 
car smashed into the ditch. Dick and Ray 
couldn’t see whether the shots had hit the 
driver or the tyres or what. 

The Jaguar slid to a stop beside the wreck. 
All four policemen were out by the time they 
got there, and only the man who had been on 
the outside seemed to be injured. “'Op in," 
invited Dick, opening the rear door behind 
him. Two of the policemen sprang in, leaving 



the third to stay with their injured comrade, 
and the Jaguar shot off to continue the 
pursuit. 

"Is he badly hurt?" enquired Ray. 

“I don’t think so," replied one of the cops 
in the back. 

"Look!" exclaimed the other. "They’ve 
turned left again. Going back to town. Know 
where they might be making for T' 

“We've an idea," said Ray. 

The Morris was now out of sight, and when 
the Jaguar came to a fork, Dick stopped 
whilst one of the policemen jumped out and 
looked for tyre marks. 

“Can't be sure," he said, springing back, 
“but I think left." 

Dick drove the Jaguar towards town in a 
way that earned him a word of commenda- 
tion from the police driver behind him. The 
young Northerner flushed with pleasure, but 
said nothing. 

"You work at the Ace Garage, don't you?” 

"Aye. Name o' Dick Rawlings. This is my 
pal Ray. Ah hope everythink's all right at 
garridge. We've been chasing yon stolen 
Morris a bit now. Where was you all night?" 

"Phoney call the other side of town," 
answered the police driver gloomily. “Same 
gang, doubtless." 

The police seemed to have assumed that 
Ray worked at the garage too, and he 
breathed a sigh of relief. A good thing Dick 
had anticipated the inevitable question. 

As they swept into the town there was still 
no sign of the Morris, so Dick made straight 
for the bombed house with the cellar into 
which Jim had fallen. As the Jaguar turned 
into the street they flashed past a youth who 
had just run out of a side-turning. 

“Isn’t that Jim?" snapped Ray, craning his 
neck. 

Before Dick could answer or even slow 
down, the Morris turned into the street from 
the other end and sped towards them. Dick 
held his course until it was clear that the 
gangsters would crash head-on rather than 
give way. 

Then he swerved at the last moment on to 
the bomb-site on his left, coaxing the car 
anxiously round piles of debris in an effort 
to find a clear way back to the road. At 
length, with a broken bathtub in front and 
jagged bits of iron all round, he stopped the 
car, and they all got out. The Morris had just 
stopped in front of the gang's hideout as a 
boyish figure ran up to it. 

The two policemen charged forward, one 
of them tripping over what looked like an old 
wire mattress. 

Ray shouted “Jim!” and Dick yelled 
“Ken!"; then both of them, battle-trained, 
fell flat on their faces as a terrific explosion 
shattered the night and a blinding sheet of 
flame spread from the crumpled Morris to 
the row of tottcrirfg houses. 



To be continued next week 





Bur Pt/swHvr, 

IN HU HASTE, 

HAS used his 
TELESCOPE BACK 
To FKOffT ... . 
IN FACT, IT IS 

(UT-THKOAT JAIT, 

HIS WORST 
ENEIAT, WITH 
A SHIP TWICE 
THE SIZE .... 




CRICKET COACHING by LEARY CONSTANTINE 





SCHOOL 

FOR 

SPIES 




Another real-life Spy story by 

BERNARD NEWMAN 



H O W do you become a spy? Quite a 
lot of boys seem interested in this 
question, to judge by the letters 1 
receive- One lad of 9 asked if I 
could recommend a good spy school, and if 
it had its own junior or prep, school ! 

Naturally, the War Office does not adver- 
tise for its agents: “Spies wanted, all sorts and 
sizes. Apply — ” 

Nor would it be of much use if you your- 
self were to advertise: “Boy, aged 14, offers 
services as spy. Knows French up to the pen 
of the gardener's aunt. Very good with a cata- 
pult. Can ride a bicycle. Has studied Dick 
Barton. What offers?” I can give you the 

However, I can tell you of two or three 
methods of entering the ranks of the secret 
agents. 

You are called up for your military service 
in war-time, let us say. You speak German 
very well: not just matriculation standard 
you have lived in Germany for some years. 
Your company officer soon notices that. 

Then one day your unit captures some 
prisoners. Your officer says. “Look, I want 
some information out of these fellows, 
quickly - can’t wait for the Intelligence Corps. 
You get busy on them." 

So, when an Intelligence Officer comes 
along, he finds that you have carried out the 
preliminary interrogation very efficiently. He 
makes a mental note. 

Then, later, he gets you transferred to his 
staff. At first you question prisoners, or read 
captured German documents. But one day 
your officer says: “There is a big batch of 
prisoners coming into Die cage. These 
Fritzes don't talk very freely. Now, here's a 
German uniform - get into it. Now I'll brief 
you — " 

He gives you a name and number. You 
belong to a unit just north of those to which 



the prisoners belong. You learn the name of 
its officers, and similar details. You are 
herded into the cage as if you were a German 
prisoner yourself. And men who refuse to 
talk to a British officer will perhaps talk to 
one of themselves. 

Next comes a precarious job. You crawl 
out in front of our lines, lie hidden near a 
German post, and listen to the conversation 
of German sentries. You can pick up all 
kinds of details - the morale and casualties 
in their unit, for example. Or you may get 
nothing and all the time lie under the fire 
of your own guns! 

One day a senior officer, sends for you. 
“The reports on you are very good", he says. 
“Your German is first-class, and your nerve 
is sound. Are you willing to have a go behind 
the lines T 

He will not press you - only volunteers are 
of any real use in espionage. 

But if you agree, a suitable background 
will be arranged, and before long you will be 
dropped or infiltrated behind the German 
lines, a fully-fledged spy. 

Or maybe you are a business man who 
often goes abroad - a commercial traveller, 
for example. 

Some astute man in Military Intelligence 
gets to know about you. First he makes some 
careful enquiries, to prove that you are 
thoroughly British, have a flair for intrigue, 
and control of yourself. Then he will ap- 
proach you - apparently quite casually. 

“Keep Your Eyes Open!” 

“You're going to Cologne next week, aren't 
you? Well, look, we Slink that the 21st Divi- 
sion has been replaced by the 60th. Could you 
just keep your eyes open?” 

That's a fairly easy job, and you do it. On 
your next journey the officer suggests some- 
thing else. 

After a long trial on petty tasks, you may 
be asked to do something bigger. You have 
the advantage of a good ready-made cover. 
You continue to do your job as a com- 
mercial traveller, and do your spying in your 
spare time, so to speak. 

A third method: you arc a naval, army, or 
air force officer, thoroughly trained, especially 
on the technical side. Your German is also 
very good, and you are a natural actor. If you 
are willing to volunteer for secret service 
work, you are sent to a spy school. That is not 



the military title of the establishment, but 
describes it very well. 

If a war is on, the course is short. In peace 
lime it is very thorough. When you pass out, 
you will not only be a trained spy yourself - 
you will be qualified to take charge of a group 
of sub-agents. 

You will learn a good deal about codes and 
secret inks I shall write more about these in 
future articles. 

You will be able to drive any make of 
British or foreign car - and ride a horse as 
well. You will have made several parachute 
jumps, and in emergency could take charge 
of an aircraft. 

Your languages have been given special 
attention, and you know a lot about dialects. 
The thrillers seldom mention this point, but 
it is important. A foreign spy who knew only 
“Oxford” English, for example, might be 
completely foxed if he overheard a conversa- 
tion in really broad Lancashire! 

You are taught to act as an ordinary man, 
and to look ordinary. If you belong to the 
R.A.F. and favour “handle-bar” moustaches, 
off they come! 

You learn a lot about radio - and about 
detonators for sabotage purposes. You be- 
come an accomplished burglar, and can pick 
an ordinary lock with ease. 

Naturally, you must keep in first-class 
physical condition, and your nerve is con- 
stantly tested. 

At one German spy-school the doctor 
would take the recruit out into the park 
surrounding the isolated building. Suddenly 
three or four men would run across the turf : 
a machine gun would open fire, and the men 
would fall and lie still. The recruit might be 
horrified - perhaps this was his first sight of 
sudden death. Immediately the doctor would 
pounce upon him to test his pulse and heart. 
Then the “dead” men would get up and walk 
away the episode was just a test of the spy- 
recruit's nerve. 

At another school the would-be spy was 
dressed in a pneumatic suit, which was in- 
flated. Then he sat on a mechanical contri- 
vance which whirled his chair round and 
round. Suddenly his scat collapsed, and he 
was flung wide. 

Jump from a Train 

The pneumatic suit prevented him from 
suffering injury. He went through this lest 
day after day - until he did it without the 
special protective suit. It proved to be first- 
class training for jumping from a moving cur 

All the while you are having lectures on 
your own technical subject, whether it be guns 
or aircraft. As a relief, you learn quite a lot 
about disguise. 

In the thriller the spy is a “master of dis- 
guise". He comes into a room disguised as a 
Chinaman: the police are after him: a few 
rapid passes with greasepaint, some business 
with wigs and whiskers, and he goes out 
through the window disguised as a Russian, 
singing the Volga boat song and kicking the 
snow off his boots! 

If you think that you could get away with 
wigs, whiskers and greasepaint, just try them ! 

I promise that you won't get very far! The 
local small boys will notice you even before 
the police do. 

The best disguise of all is a character. You 
are taught to live it, not to put it on. A back- 
ground is worked out for you, and all your 
passports and other papers are beautifully 



forged. If your name is to be Hans Schmidt, 
then you will use the name for weeks, so that 
you will get used to it. You know all about 
this Hans where he was born, details of his 
father, mother and friends. You know all 
about his work, too - and you will be pre- 
pared to do it, whatever it is! Thus, by a mass 
of details, you build up the character ofHans 
Schmidt, and it is your best protection. 

You may need some little changes in your 
appearance, in case you run into some old 
acquaintance. Ifyour hair is dyed, it will make 
a big difference to your appearance: and you 
are taught to keep it dyed to the same shade. 
For an emergency, even a detail like altering 
the parting of your hair can have its effect. 

You can appear to be about two inches 
shorter by practising a slouch. To pass an 
opponent who might recognise you, the shape 
of your face can be temporarily altered by 
stuffing slices of apple or potato under your 
checks. 

Injecting Molten Wax 

If your “ character " demands more perm- 
anent alterations, there are many possibilities. 
There arc solutions to darken your skin, and 
others to bleach it. You can alter the shape of 
your nose by injecting molten wax under the 
skin, and then moulding it into shape. For 
goodness sake don’t try this, for it is very, 
vpry painful. If you tlo try it, don't blame me 
when it hurts - as it will! 

You can imagine that after months or vears 
of this training you know a thing or two! You 
must study the politics of the country where 
you are going to work, and any local customs 
and peculiarities. 

Idioms and slip-shod habits in speech are 
important - one foreign spy couldn't under- 
stand when some people talked about drink- 
ing “minerals” - he thought that the word 
meant things like coal and iron, while the 
people were actually talking about lemonade 
and ginger beer! 

In war-time, as I said, training is naturally 
much shorter. Often a spy is trained for one 
particular job - say. reporting on the lay-out 
of factories in a munitions town. He must 
know the language, of course: lie will be 
taught how to use a radio transmitter, and 
how to use some codes for his messages. 
These “short term" spies are seldom very 
successful. 

Immediately after the first World War I 
went to a German spy school in Antwerp, 
and more recently to one in Hamburg. Both 
were very interesting. The Antwerp school 
specialised in naval spies. In one room were 
models of battleships, cruisers, destroyers, 
and so on - and the spy-recruits had to iden- 
tify them by their outlines or silhouettes. I 
saw some of the students' examination 
papers, and I must say that they weren't very 
good. Otic man mistook a mine-layer for a 

1 "know that it must be very disappointing 
for you to learn that a spy has to go to school. 
Not very glamorous, I agree! 

However, parts of the spy course arc more 
interesting than compound fractions and 
isosceles triangles. Another time, for example, 

I shall (ell you about some of the codes which 
spies arc taught to use. 

Another 
true spy story 
by Bernard Newman 




PROFESSOR BRITTAIN EXPLAINS 



A GIANT TELESCOPE 




MO - IT IS A VERY LARGE MIRROR 
WHICH REFLECTS A GIANT IMAGE 
OF 5AV THE MOON OR OTHER 
HEAVENLY BODIES, WHICH IS IN 
TURN PHOTOGRAPHED BY __ 

SCIENTISTS TOR STUOy LOOK 
LETS GO B Y PLANE AND [jjif 

iprtWnJ'Wlf® VISIT MT. RALOMAR Rfjl,. 



THIS IS A 

PORTRAIT OF 

GALILEO THE 
FIRST MAN TO 
MAKE A 
TELESCOPE. I 
WONDER WHAT 
HE WOULD THINK 
OF THE CHANT 



MAWy ANIMALS - IT is 
HIS MIND AND SPIRIT 
WHICH MAKE HIM STUD/ 
THE WORLD AROUND 
HIM AND TRY TO 
SOLVE THE gfffipSi 
MYSTERy OF r 
THE UNIVERSE. Fiji ,-1 



BRITTAIN ? 



THFRF IS MT. PAH) MAR DBSfOVAIOHV ITS VFRV 
HIGH IIP. THE ATM03PHERC IS CLEAR . THERE 
ARF NO CLOUDS AROUND THF SoMMJ I ANO 

vtsioiu ry is aiways good . the flat top mai 

MADE AN AIRFIELD POSSIBLE 



OVER 300 TONS- THE 
(LARGEST GLASS IN THE 
j WORLD. IT TOOK YEARS 
j TO PRODUCE. THIS IS 
j THE BACK OF THE GLASS | 
j WHICH IS HONEYCOMBED 
] TO MAKE IT STRONG ANP 
j LIGHT THE FACE OF THE 
J MIRROR IS POLISHED TO 
PERFECTION & COVERED 
I WITH A FILM OF 

ALUMINIUM. J 



NOW you CAN SEE THE 
SCIENTIST AT THE TOP OF 
THE TELESCOPE. SEE HOW 
THE MIRROR REFLECTS 
THE IMAGE BACK TO THE 
CAMERA CHAMBER - 
WHERE THE SCIENTIST 
TAKES HIS PHOTOGRAPHS. 



' AT THE BASE. THE Bio HORSESHOE CAN BE 
SWUNG OVER TO SWEEP THE SKY IN A HUGE 
SEMICIRCLE . THE WHOLE DOME OF THE 
I OBSERVATDRy CAN BE MOVED AROUND ON A 
RAIL TRACK LIKE A GREAT HEAD TURNING. 

the TELESCOPE CAN SWEEP IN A 
SEMICIRCLE AT RIGHT ANGLES WITH THE 
; HORSESHOE . LET OS CUMB UP TO THAT 

: platform at the top of the telescope . 



Write to Professor Brittain, c/o eagle, if you have any questions or problems you would like him to deal with. He will be on this page every fortnight. 



SETH AND SHORT Y - COWBOYS 





/■^HESAtSTMEY have a 

PALEFACE LEADING THEM 

THE PALEFACE ISGOINTO DRIVE 
jj-vTHE RANCHERS OFF THE RANGES^ 



SO THEY CALL HIM THE *- 
MYSTERY MAN DO THEY ? 
WAL. | WONDER WHO 
HE CAN BE ? 



WHAT5 THE \ 
PALEFACES NAME ? i 
COME ON / J 
OUT WITH 





^ rrm,/wF0w . 

UNDERGROUND RAILWAY 

«k a ' a .^ 



WONDERFUL 



ONDON’S 






















i~i 


ii .1 1 

nd 


MSwi 1 





SKIP PY 



V THE KANGAROO # 



BY DANET, DUBRISAY. GENESTRE 



PRO DUCT 1 C 





i'll cleave the skies 

TO FIND THEM 



ONLY ONE 
THING 
MATTERS 
NOW 





THE PATH OF 
GLORY ALWAYS 
LEADS TO DANGER. 






MY GOOD 
WOMAN ; BUT — 


1 A 













HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 




“Sr LAST WEEK. I TOLD ^ 
v VOII ABOUT THE FIRST 
ASCENT BY MAN IN A HOT- 
AIR BALLOON BY PILATRE 
ROSIER. FIRE BROKE OUT IN 
THE ENVELOPE Of THE BAUOON. 

L AS YOU WILL REMEMBER.WHEN 
THE OCCUPANTS WERE 
OVER PARIS. . . 



. . . FORTUNATELY THE FIRE WAS NOT AS 
SERIOUS AS WAS FIRST FEARED AND IT 
WAS EXTINGUISHED BY MEANS Of WATER 
AND A SPONGE . AFTER 25 MINUTES THE 
BALLOON CAME TO REST AFTER A 



ONE WEEK. AFTER de ROZIERS ASCENT, M. CHARLES AND M. ROBERT WENT UP 
IN A BALLOON, FILLED WITH MY0R06EN, FROM THE TUILERIES GARDENS - PARIS 



THE FLIGHT WAS WITNESSED BY 800,000 PEOPLE ON ht OECEMBER 1763/ 



FLIGHT OF ABOUT 5* MILES. 



1805 



HYDROGEN PROVED TO BE MOIIE 
EFFICIENT AND MUCH SAFER J 
THAN HOT AIR FOR OBTAINING | 
LIFT IN BALLOONS AND HAS 
BEEN USED FOR LIGHTER- fl 
THAN AIR CRAFT UP TO THE : 
PRESENT DAY. ALTHOUGH IT! 
IS HIGHLY INFLAMMABLE. I 
TOE ART OF BALLOONING 
QUICKLY SPREAD TO ENGLAND 
and Vincent lunaroi made 
THE FIRST HYDROGEN ASCENT 
ON 15-SEP 1784 FROM THE 
ARTILLERY GROUND CHELSEA 
Right on 7JANI785 1ME 

ENGLISH CHANNEL WAS FIRST 
CROSSED BY JEAN PIERRE 
BLANCHARD ACCOMPANIED BY 
D* JEFFRIES, AN AMERICAN. 
OARS WFRE CARRIED FOR 



NAPOLEON PROPOSED TO INUAOE ENGLAND BY A* USING 



HUGE BALLOONS CARHYIN6 3000 TROOPS EACH/ 
NEXT WEEK. DICK. NICHOLSON PROUDLY PRESENTS 



BUT PROVED T» BE USELFSl/J 



THE NEW PHANTOM' Mk I. JET FIGHTER.. 1 



DISCOVERING THE COUNTRYSIDE 




llL PULL AWAY THE SHEATH SO THAT VOO 
CAN SEE DOWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE 
SPIKE NOTICE THE BRISTLES POINTING 
DOWNWARDS.TME INSECT CRAWLS PAST THESE 
AND HELPS TO FERTILISE THE FLOWERS. BUT 
IMENAGTKANGE THING HAPPENS -HE FINOS 
HE CANT GET OUT AGAIN AS THE BRISTLES 
ARE NOW STICKING OUT AT A DIFFERENT 



yes -but not for the purpose 
OF KILLING. THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS. 
THE POIN TED SHEATHS UNFOLD IN 
THE SPRING AND SHOW THIS 
PURPLE SPIKE WHICH GIVES OFF A 
PECULIAR SCENT. INSECTS ARE 
ATTRACTED ANDCRAWL DOWN 
THE SPIKE TO EXPLORE^^ 



. LOOK OVER BV THE V 
HEDGE. ANN, THERE'S A > 
WILD ARUM, OR PERHAPS YOU 
CALL IT 'CUCKOO-PINT.' / 



/ oh yes 
SEE-ISNT IT SOME 
NO OF INSECT TRAP 
MR DYKE ? 



THATS RATHER TOUGH ' 



THEN. AS SUMMER APPROACHES 



THE SHEATH BECOMES LIMP AND 
CURLS OVER, SHRIVELLING- AWAY 
TILL THERE IS JUST ENOUGH TO 
v PROTECT THE SEGO CASES / 



OH.HE^~-I5*l 

jT doesn't have to 

/ WAIT LONG, JOHN, AFTER A 
( A WHILE THE BRISTLES 
WITHER AND THE INSECT, 
WHO HAS 0V THEN COLLECTED 
ENOUGH POLLEN TO FERTILISE 
V ANOTHER FLOWER, IS / 
Bk ALLOWED TO 



foil SEE THAT IN 
f THE AUTUMN. ANN . THEY 
f APPEAR IN BUNCHES OF BRIGHT \ 
SCARLET BERRIES - LOVELY JUICY ’ 

fare for th6 birds, but poisonous . 
lTO humans. FEW PEOPLE KNOW ) 
\TMEV BELONG TO THE WILD / 
[T ARUM. 





W. . >0 




LOST GOLD MINE 

Mail-clad Spanish explores, marching 
through the jungle of Panama, met natives 
wearing plentiful gold ornaments. The un- 
suspecting natives showed the Spaniards 
where the gold came from. They called it the 
Tsingal Mine. It lay in wild country two 
hundred mite north of Panama. 



The ruthless Spaniards built a strong stone 
fort beside the mine. They enslaved the local 
tribes and forced them to build a rough, 50- 
mile track to the coast. Hundreds of chained 
natives were driven with whips to work in the 

Between 1620- 1715, the Tsingal Mine sent 
a million pounds' worth of gold every year to 
Spain. Then Spain became weak. The Tsingal 



natives revolted, killed every Spaniard at the 
mine, tore down the fort, and dismounted the 
guns. The track to the coast was wiped out 
by fallen trees, boulders and streams. Tsingal 
Mine disappeared. 

Only one white man has seen the mine 
since then Mr. Hyatt Verrill, an American 
scientist, was guided to the spot in 1932 by a 
friendly chieftain. He saw great stones lying 



in the jungle, heavy brass guns bearing the 
date 1 565 under the royal coat of arms of 
Spain, and remains of the hidden road. The 
chieftain pointed to a shallow depression in 
the ground. “The mine was there,” he said. 
“We hid that also.” 

Now no-one knows where the mine is. The 
silent jungle helps guard the secret of its tragic 



A Fill in both sections (a & b) of this coupon. Section A will be used as 
a label for sending you your Badge, Certificate of Membership, 
Membership Card etc. 

BLOCK CAPITALS 

Name -• — — — - - — 

A ddress — „ i — 



if undelivered, please return to 

EAGLE, HULTON PRESS LTD., 43 SHOE LANE, LONDON, E.C.4 

Please enrol me as a Foundation Member of the 
Eagle Club, for which I enclose P.O. value 1/- 

BLOCK CAPITALS 

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Date of Birth. - — — — 

Post this coupon with your postal order for I/- 
to the Editor, EAGLE Magazine, 43 Shoe Lane, London, E.C.4 



Cadtarys Comer quiz 





WHERE WAS 
COCOA USED 
AS MONEY ? 



So far as we know 

Mexico had no coined money. They 
used either cocoa beans or gold 
dust. 



which faskim 

BECAME POPULAR BECAUSE 
A KING WENT BALD ? 



The wearing of periwigs during the 
17th and 18th centuries. Historians 
tell us that Louis XIII of France be- 
came prematurely bald, and when 
he started to wear a wig, the French 
court adopted the fashion, which 
spread to England, continuing until 
the reign of 
George III. 



WHO WAS REFUSED ADMISSION 
TO A CLUB BECAUSE HE WORE 

TrouSerS ? 

It is said that Almack's refused to 
admit the Duke of Wellington to 
its fashionable assembly because 
he was improperly dressed — in 
trousers. He was ten years tooearly 
-—he should have been wearing 





MAKING YOUR OWN MODEL RACING CAR 




SPORTING PERSONALITIES 





THE EAGLE CLUB 

AND EDITOR'S PAGE 




The Editor’s Office 
EAGLE 

43 Shoe Lane, London, EC4 

L AST time, we asked you to think 
about the various schemes which you 
would like the Eagle Club to organize 
and made a few suggestions about the 
sort of things you might be interested in. 

This week we should like you to tell us 
definitely what you prefer and to make your 
own suggestions. In Competition Corner you 
will find a coupon headed "What do you like 
best?" which gives a list of a number of ideas. 
Will you fill it in and send it to us here? You 
should show your choice by marking I 
against the one you like best, 2 against the 
second best and so on. And in the space at the 
end you can put down further suggestions of 
your own about ideas we haven’t included in 
our list. 

We are making this into a competition and 
we are offering a prize of £1 Is. Od. National 
Savings Certificate to the one who sends in 
the best list. 



Y ou will see that this is another 20-page 
issue of e AG1.F. - like the first one. For the 
time being, we are planning to make it 20 
pages one week and 16 the next. This is 
because of the difficulty of getting enough 
paper which is still pretty scarce. So many 
copies of eagle have to be printed to satisfy 
the demand tliat we can’t manage enough 
paper for 20 pages every lime just at present. 
So it means that some of the features like 
“Professor Brittain” and Bernard Newman's 
spy stories can only appear every fortnight. 
Some people have written to tell us that 
there isn't enough humor- 
ous stuff in eagle. We 
rather feel that ourselves 
but we should be glad to 
hear the views of other 
readers about this - and 
what kind of humour you 
like. So will you write and 
tell us if you have any strong views about it? 

The idea of having specially elected mem- 
bers of the Club called mugs - seems to be 
going over big. But we only want the special 
Mug's Badge to be awarded to deserving 
cases, as a reward for something really 
worth-while. So we are taking care to 
examine each case recommended to us. 

But, although the Mug's Badge is only 
awarded for special merit, 
it is open to anyone and it 
can be awarded for any 
kind of worth - while 
achievement. So it won’t 
only be won by the very 
brave, or those who are 
very good at sport, or those 
who are tall, dark and 
handsome. 





28 April 1950 



It might be won by any of these, but it 
can also be won by those who are not terribly 
brave, and those who are not very good at 
games and those who are short, fair and pug- 
nosed. The point is that mugs, without pre- 
tending for a moment that they are a lot 
better than other people or giving themselves 
airs, still do something useful for others. 

For the benefit of those who haven't read 
the first two issues of eagle, may we remind 
you again of the Rules of the Club: 

Members of the eagle club will: 

(a) Enjoy life and help others to enjoy life. 
They will not enjoy themselves at the 
expense of others. 

(*) Make the best of themselves. They will 
develop themselves in body, mind and 
spirit. They will tackle things for them- 
selves and not wait for others to do 
things for them. 

<r) Work with others for the good of all 
around them. 

(d) Always lend a hand to those in need of 
help. They will not shirk difficult or 
dangerous jobs. 

The other aims, you remember, are: First , 
to link together those who 
read and enjoy eagle. 

Second to organise meet- 
ings, expeditions, holidays, 
camps, etc., for members. 

Third , to make special 
awards to members who 
achieve anything really 
worth-while. 

On page 13, there is an 
Enrolment Form for Mem- 
bership of the Club. It’s worth filling it in and 
posting it straight away. (You can send it in 
the same envelope as your answers to the 
Competition "What do you like best?") 
because there are only about another two 
weeks left, during which you can get the Club 
Badge free, included in the 1/- membership 
fee. 

To become a mug you have to wait until 
someone else (parent or teacher, for example) 
sends in your name. 

Here is another Famous Mug of history: 
lxiuis Pasteur, the 
great scientist. Peo- 
ple thought he was 
cracked because he 
said that disease was 
caused by small liv- 
ing organisms. You 
remember, he found 
how to cure those 
who had been bitten 
by mad dogs. But 
his discoveries have 
saved the lives of 
millions of men and 
kinds of diseases. 

Yours sincerely, 

THE EDITOR 





COMPETITION CORNER 



1. A MATTER OF Tl ME John called losecasehool friend between seven and 
eight in the evening, and they were talking about school. John’s friend, Arthur, asked 
what time John had left school that afternoon. “Well, we finish school at four, 
though sometimes I play in the playground until about five. I left sometime between 
four and five, I do know that." He happened to glance at the clock on the manlleshclf 
at this point and then gasped : "Oh, yes. I remember now. Do you know, here’s a 
coincidence. When I left school to return home I remember glancing at the clock in 
the street outside, and do you know the hands of that clock were in exactly the same 
position as the hands of your clock are now - only, of course, with the hour and 
minute hands reversed !*’ 

From this, can you say exactly when John left school that afternoon? 



2. PICTURE PUZZLE 
Take a letter (NOT necessarily 
the initial letter) from the name of 
each object, in the order given, 
and find the name of a country. 

Solutions 

VN1HD »u3t| '(V) «hS 1(N) uaj 
'll) 3J1U5I :<H) JCH i(3) JTOO Z 
-uaxas ised satnuiui aanp 

-AlU3Ml J3AO )Snf SOM U0I1CSJ3AU03 

341 jo auiij twjj -tpop.o jnoj 
jsed satnuiiu uaxas-Aintp tv 7 




WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST? 



Please write numbers in the st/uares (/, 2, 3, etc.), to show the order of your choice. 
Use the blank Fines for any suggestions not on the list. 



Stamp collecting 


P«s 


[H Photography 


□ 








□ 


Caspentry 


.. | | Model aeroplanes 


[3 Engine spotting . 


□ 


Model railways 


| , Gardening 


[7J Leather work .j. 


O 




□ 




□ 




□ ...: 




n 




□ 




....... 



Member's Name 



Club Membership No 

Post this coupon in an unsealed envelope (Id. stamp) to 
HOBBIES, EAGLE. 43 Shoe Lane, e.c.4 



CHICKO by thelujell 




Cut this out 

To my Newsagent: please order EAGLE 
for me every week until further notice 

Name 

Address 



HAND THIS FORM TO YOUR NEWSBOYOR 
TAKE IT TO YOUR NEWSAGENT'S SHOP 




Lash Lonergan’s Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 




Chapter 3 

W HO'S The Hunchback?” snapped 
Lash as he surveyed (he scene of 
burglary and deslruction. 

“Nobody knows,” said a new voice behind 
them. They turned to see Sergeant Sneed, the 
mounted policeman whose job was to keep 
law and order in Yarrawarra and the sur- 
rounding territory. 

“This bushranger and his mob,” went on 
the policeman, "only started operations a few 
weeks ago. First of all they robbed the bank 
at Gaigun Crossing. Then they held up the 
hotel at the Thirty-Mile. They shot the land- 
lord through the shoulder and got away with 
a lot of dough. And now this job.” 

McPhce the bank manager cried in distrac- 
ted tones: "Why aren't you chasing those 
dingoes instead of standing there talking 
about them?” 

“Have a heart, Mr. McPhee," put-in Lash. 
"Not even the best blacktrackcrs in Australia 
could follow The Hunchback in this dust 
storm." 

“And not tomorrow either," sighed Ser- 
geant Sneed. “If the storm stopped now, 
they’d leave tracks in the dust that a blind 
man could follow. But you can see it's going 
to keep up all night and cover the tracks of 
the bushrangers.” 

“And," asked Rawhide O'Reilly, “where 
do you think this twisted bit o’ bedevilled 
mankind and his mob have their hidin'- 
place?” 

"Nobody knows," sighed the policeman. 
"Somewhere up in the hills, we think. They 
do their jobs at night and ride off before any- 
one can follow. They just disappear. We’ve 
offered a reward to — ” 

"Reward!" snorted the bank manager. 
"What I want is action!” 

“You're going to get it," replied the ser- 
geant calmly. "But I hope you don’t expect 
me to go straight out and capture a dozen 
armed bushrangers. Headquarters are send- 
ing out a troop of mounted police to help me 
hunt down The Hunchback and his mob." 

The sergeant turned to Lash and went on: 
“In the meantime we've offered a reward of 
live hundred pounds to anyone who gives in- 
formation leading to The Hunchback’s cap- 
ture. After tonight I should think the reward 
will be doubled." 

Rawhide cried, “Oh, 1 could jist do with a 
thousand o' those little bits o' paper they call 
quids!" 

“I could do with one little bit of paper 
called a will," said Lash quietly as he walked 
off. 

“Then we ll both go after him, cobber. You 
go after the will and I'll go after the reward." 

“I'm goin’ after him too!" piped a boyish 
voice. They chuckled as Squib slipped in 
between them. 

“Ain’t he an ugly-lookin' cove?" said the 




youngster with a shiver. “I don't mozzy why 
he don't wear a mask like the other bush- 
rangers?” 

"Oh, me poor ignorant child!" cried Raw- 
hide. "Do you think there’s a hundred Hunch- 
backs in these parts? What's the use o' 
wearing a mask on your face when you can't 
disguise your body?” 

"Aw, I savee.” The boy turned to Lash and 
asked. “Where arc we goin' to start lookin' 
for him?” 

“I’ll answer that question in the morning," 
replied the roughrider as he walked up the 
verandah steps and made for his bed. "Thai’s 
a problem I’ll have to sleep on. Goodnight. 

Gradually the sounds of excitement died 
away, and once more Yarrawarra lay asleep 
amid the drifting mist of dust. 



L ash was suddenly awake. Except for open- 
ing his eyes, he had not moved - but he 
was wide awake and alert. He saw it was still 
dark. The wind had dropped and the dust 
storm was over. 

Then he became conscious of a faint, warm 
touch on his lips. At once he recognised the 
aborigine's trick of waking a man without 
causing him to move or make an exclamation. 
Just a soft touch of a finger on the lips. 
"Missa Lash," whispered a voice in his ear. 
"Mopoke!" The roughrider’s reply was 
hardly more than a sigh. 

Rawhide's stretcher creaked a few yards 
away. The big Irishman grunted in his sleep 
and turned over on the other side. Then 
silence . . . 

After a time Lash felt the black’s warm 
breath on his ear as the purring voice mur- 
mured: “Mopoke no wantem all-fella savee 
this fella longa here." Which meant: “I don’t 
want everybody to know I’m here." Evidently 
the black was still scared of being arrested by 
the police for having stolen the horse on 
which he had ridden to warn the roughrider. 

Lash knew this was neither the time nor 
the place to assure Mopoke that his fears 
were groundless - so he simply waited and 



listened in the darkness. Mopoke whispered 
again. "Bushranger fella longa Opallown." 

Lash started with surprise. With a supreme 
effort he restrained himself from gasping out, 
“Fair dinkum?" Instead, he wailed and 
listened in silence. 

“Mopoke fella longa Opaltown humpy. 
Plenty fella wakem up. Bushranger fella no 
see Mopoke. This fella makem tracks very 
quick. You catchcm, eh, Missa Lonergan? 
Goodbye." 

Mopoke disappeared silently and swiftly 
into the darkness. 

Lash turned his head and looked out at the 
live brilliant stars of the Southern Cross, now 
low on the horizon. He knew that dawn was 
not far off. 

As he lay there he pictured in his mind the 
adventure of Mopoke . . . The dilapidated, 
decaying settlement of Opaltown, deserted by 
all men except the frightened, black fugitive 
sleeping in a tumbledown hut . . . The arrival 
of The Hunchback and his mob after the bank 
robbery . Mopokc's flight to seek out Lash 
and tell him the news . . . 

Did the mysterious Mopoke already know 
that The Hunchback had stolen something 
belonging to Lash? Or did he tell the rough- 
rider about the bushrangers because he 
wanted him to get the reward? These were 
puzzles (hat only the aborigine himself could 
answer. 

"The main thing," thought Lash as he 
watched the first streaks of dawn above the 
mulga trees, “is that Mopoke saw The Hunch- 
back up in Opallown." 

The night s adventure had not spoiled any 
appetites, and they breakfasted ravenously 
on steak and fried bananas. Meanwhile Lash 
thanked McPheefor hishospitality and told him 
they would be leaving straight after the meal. 

“Where arc you making for. Lash?” 

“Go longa walkabout," smiled the rough- 
rider, using a common aboriginal expression 
to disguise his real plans. 

The bank manager looked offended, so 
Lash added: "Oh, we’re just going to have a 
look round. I might be able to find out where 
The Hunchback stores.his loot." 



“But where are you three going to live for 
the present till you take over Coolabah 
Creek again?" 

“Will you keep it secret?” asked Lash in 
serious tones. 

"Of course I will, cobber." 

"Opaltown." 

McPhce started smiled and exclaimed : 
“Good idea! And it's not far from Coolabah 
Creek, either. Now what about money? Of 
course I can lend you a bit till — " 

“Not a bob!” laughed the roughrider. 

"Speak for your aggravatin' self!” cried 
Rawhide O'Reilly. "Now I’d like you to lend 
me the loan of — ” 

"Not a zac!" cut in Lash. “Not a tray-bit! 
Not a penny! We’re going to cam it. Do you 
realise, my hairy Irish friend, that there are 
several quids just waiting to fall into our 

"Eh? Where?" 

"If you'd washed the sleep out of your eyes 
this morning," grinned lash, "you'd have seen 
the notices stuck up all over the place. Sports 
at Oonawidgee tomorrow. Buckjumping, 
cattle drafting, trick riding, and so on." 

“Where’s Oonawidgee?” asked the inquisi- 
tive Squib. 

"It's a little place across the river. About 
twelve miles from here. Come on, kid, saddle 
up.” 

They were soon on their way through the 
bush, making for Opaltown. Rawhide pro- 
duced his battered banjo and twanged it 
noisily as he sang: 

“Once a jolly swagman came to a billabong. 

Under the shade of a coolabah tree. 

And he sang as he watched and waited till 
his billy boiled. 

Who’ll come a-waltzin' Matilda with 

Startled galahs and white cockatoos flew 
off screaming. Kangaroos and wallaroos 
thump-thumped away into the trees. Goannas 
scuttled into the dry yellow grass, and some- 
times a black snake or a death-adder glided 
across their path. V 

"You remind me," grinned Lash to Raw- 
hide, "of that cove in the old Greek stories . . . 
Orpheus, who used to charm animals and 
birds with his lute. Except you're in reverse!” 

Rawhide pretended not to hear, and went 
on singing: 

"Waltzin' Matilda, wallzin' Matilda, 

Who’ll come a-waltzin’ Matilda with me? 

And he sang as he watched and waited till 
his billy boiled. 

Who'll come a-waltzin' Matilda with 
me?" 



L ash decided the time had come to tell his 
companions about the other reason for 
his visit to Opaltown. He related his ex- 
perience with Mopoke that morning before 

It was a still and scorching afternoon by 
the time they reached the outskirts of Opal- 
town. All three dismounted in tire scrub and 
tethered their horses before approaching the 
settlement silently on foot. 

. Suddenly Opaltown lay before them. It was 
a township in ruins. Its little wooden build- 
ings were rotting and collapsing from decay 
and the overgrowth of lawyer vines and wild 
ivy, Corrugated iron roofs were eaten away 
with rust, and tanks had crumbled and 
collapsed. 

A bird shrieked in alarm, and a cloud of 
white cockatoos rose screaming and wheeling. 
Two goannas scuttled across the road, leaving 
streaky trails in the hot dust. 

Then came silence again . . . while the three 
investigators watched and listened for any 
sign or sound of human life. 

"If The Hunchback and his mob are here,” 
muttered Rawhide, “they're the silentest lot 
o’ bushrangers in the history o’ the bush.” 
Lash curbed the impatience of the Irishman 
for another twenty minutes of observation 
before making the next move. 

"Squib,” he said, “you stay behind and 
look after the horses. Rawhide, you come 

"Aw, gee ” began the disappointed boy. 




But Lash cut him short with a frown - which 
soon turned to a smile, accompanied by in- 
structions to follow when he heard the rough- 
rider's whistle. Lash and Rawhide walked 
softly and slowly down the road that led 
through the tumbledown town. Their glances 
darted from side to side, watching for any 
sign of ambush. But all they saw were lizards 
basking in the blazing sun. 

Nearly all the buildings houses, stores, 
pubs - were in such a state of collapse that 
they could sec right inside than. Only oik or 
two might possibly have concealed The 
Hunchback and his men - but it was most 
unlikely. 

Lash stopped and caught Rawhide's arm. 
“Somebody’s had a fire. I can smell ashes.” 

The other man sniffed hugely and replied 
poetically: “I can smell the odoriferous scent 
of the wattle blossoms borne on the breeze 

“Along here," said the roughrider, striding 
towards the building that had once been Opal- 
town's only bank. More strongly built than 
the rest, it had suffered less dilapidation than 
the others. 

Lash bounded up the steps and put his 
shoulder to the door. It swung open with a 
rusty squeal of protest. 

“Look!” cried Lash. “The strongboxes!" 

“Well, stone the crows and stiffen the 
lizards!” gasped Rawhide over his com- 
panion's shoulder. "They’re all busted open !" 

A dozen strongboxes were on the floor. 
Battered and broken open with an axe, they 
lay among the papers and documents strewn 
around the room. In the middle was a heap 
of ashes as if The Hunchback had started to 
bum the documents but soon gave up. 

“Look for Uncle Peter’s will,” instructed 
Lash as he began a hurried search of the docu- 

Their swift investigation was fruitless. A 
slower, more careful examination gave proof 
that the will was not among these papers. 

“Then it's burnt !” exclaimed Lash savagely. 
“When I gel my hands on that — ” 

“Easy now, cobber,” cut in Rawhide gently, 
“list quieten your fulminatin' and fumigatin' 
till you hear what I’ve discovered. All these 
strongboxes have got names on 'em.” 

“Well?" 

“Well, me boy, there's not one of 'em got 
the name o' your Uncle Peter." 

“Then there's still hope of finding it,” 
grinned Lash. “The Hunchback might still 
have it. Or he might have dropped it on the 
way up here. Or — ” 

A sound made him break off and twirl on 
his heel. Framed in the bright doorway stood 
Dago Messiter. 

Lash reached for the coiled whip at his belt. 
At the same moment Dago crooked his arm 
in readiness to flick the knife from his sleeve 
holster. Rawhide stood and gaped. 

Before any of the three could make a move, 
the barrel of a rifle was thrust through the 
door. It was followed by Greasy Joe. 



"A whip and a couple of hairy fists can't 
fight a knife and a gun,” said Dago in a 
smooth, oily tone. 

“What are you doing here?" snapped Lash, 
taking his hand off his whip. 

Dago, lowering his arm, replied : “Like you, 

I know there's a reward for the capture of 
The Hunchback. And, like you. I’m in- 
vestigating" 

He slid away from the door into a comer 
of the room, motioning Greasy Joe to follow. 
Lash and Rawhide backed into the other 
comer. 

Lash said quietly : “You don't happen to be 
looking for a certain document, 1 suppose?” 

Hale burned in the eyes of Dago Messiter. 
He stepped forward into the middle of the 
room and muttered : “I’ve always wanted to 
give you a good hiding with my bare fists. 
Come and take iL” 

“With the greatest of pleasure,” smiled 
Lash as he moved towards his challenger, at 
the same time conscious that the whole scene 
was dominated by the gun in the hands of 
Greasy Joe. 

The two men sparred for a few moments . 
Lash saw an opening and flashed out his left 
fist. Dago, with clever anticipation, moved 
back just in time to avoid it. 

All in a moment. Dago Messiter froze to 
immobility and, staring over Lash’s shoulder 
towards the door, cried in a choking voice: 
“The Hunchback !” 

Lash whirled about. The doorway was 

He knew he had been tricked even before ’ 
he felt the agonising pain on the side of his 
knee, where Dago kicked him with his heavy 
bool. Hissing through his teeth. Lash fell to 
the floor. 

Rawhide, shouting an ugly name, leaped 
to his friend's assistance. 

Greasy Joe jerked up the muzzle of the gun 
and squeezed the trigger, as a big, dark -green 
missile hurtled through the door. 

Wham ! The sound of the shot echoed down 
the dusty, deserted road and sent the cocka- 
toos wf reeling and screaming in a startled 
cloud above the derelict Opaltown. 



L fc»T behind to mind the three horses. Squib 
glumly retired into the scrub. He squatted 
in the shade of the gidyea tree to which 
Monarch, Skinny Liz, and Patch were 
tethered. 

For a while he listened intently for Lash's 
summoning whistle, but all he could hear was 
the far-off sound of cockatoos. 

Tired after the long ride, he became drowsy 
with the heat. He began to doze. 

He woke suddenly to see a huge bird moving 
through the trees about twenty yards away. 
As big as Patch the pony, the brown emu went 
stalking by in dignified and deliberate fashion. 

Squib, who had never been so close to an 
emu before, got up quietly and followed it. 
Another emu was sitting in the grass. It 





saw Squib and croaked in alarm as it struggled 
to its feet. The other bird croaked a reply - 
and both went thumping off into the scrub. 

“I wonder . . .” muttered the boy as he 
walked over to the spot where the emu had 
been silting. 

He was right! There was a wide, shallow 
nest with six huge eggs in it - six dark -green 
eggs so big that Squib had to use two hands 
to lift one from the nest. 

What a find! What a sight to show Lash 
and Rawhide! 

Suddenly the boy wondered if Lash had 
whistled while he had been dozing. Maybe 
he'd better go and see. 

He tucked the egg under his arm. Quietly 
and cautiously he sneaked through the trees 
and down the dusty road through Opaltown. 

He thought he heard voices from some- 
where ahead. Then he heard them again, un- 
mistakably in argument and one of them 
did not belong either to Lash or to Rawhide. 

At the foot of the steps, he heard the oily 
tones of Dago Messiter and then the 
challenge to fight. He reached the door in 
time to see Dago's brutal kick at Lash's knee 
that sent the roughrider to the floor, followed 
by Rawhide's entry into the fray. 

Greasy Joe raised his gun. Squib hurled the 
emu egg with all his might at the ugly face. 

As the huge egg smashed against Greasy 
Joe's forehead, the stockman staggered back 
and his gun went off. The bullet flew harm- 
lessly through the roof. 

While the yolk streamed down his face. 
Greasy Joe frantically worked the rifle to 
bring another bullet into the magazine. 

But Rawhide hurled himself on (he stock- 
man and brought him crashing to the floor. 

All Utis happened so swiftly that Dago 



Messiter stood immobile with surprise. Then 
he moved with the speed of a striking snake. 

His right arm flashed wide, flicking the 
knife from the sleeve holster into his hand. 
Staring down at Rawhide's unprotected back, 
he raised the knife. 

Lash, fighting against the agony of his in- 
jured knee, rolled over and snatched at the 
handle of his whip. The writhing thong leaped 
at Dago’s wrist, encircled it, and jerked it 
violently downwards. 

“Ah-h-h!” yelled Dago in pain, as the knife 
flew out of his hand and clattered on the floor. 

In a flash. Rawhide was on his feet with the 
captured rifle in his hands. 

“Dingoes!" yelled the Irishman, covering 
both Dago and Greasy Joe. Then he hooted 
with laughter at the sight of Joe, half-blinded 
by the yolk he was trying to wipe from his 
face. “Ha-ha-ha! Hoo-hoo-hoo! Joe's got the 
yellcr jaundice!” 

Lash struggled to this feet and limped over 
to the door, where Squib was standing, still 
half-dazed by the astonishing results that 
followed the throwing of the emu egg. 

“Bonzer shot, cobber!” grunted Lash, 
patting the boy's shoulder. Those few brusque 
words, spoken in a heartfelt tone, meant mote 
to Squib than a whole speech of praise. 

Lash turned to Dago and Greasy Joe. 
“Now get. And don't bother to pick flowers 
on the way. The Irishman will accompany 
you to your horses and wave you good- 
bye." 

Rawhide waved the rifle towards the door 
and the two stockmen silently obeyed. 

“Squib,” said 1-ash to the boy, “go and 
get the horses. I can't walk much with this 
gammy knee." 

Following the others. Lash limped out on 
to the verandah. 

Smiling malevolently over his shoulder. 
Dago Messiter said, “We’ll meet again soon. 
Loncrgan.” 

“Very soon. Maybe even tomorrow." Lash 
chuckled and added: “Remember how you 
said a whip was no good against a knife and 
a gun. Well, now you savee that the best 
weapon of ail is a well-aimed emu egg!” 

Fifteen minutes later the reunited trio went 
riding back along the road through Opaltown. 

“Too dangerous to stay right here in the 
place,” Lash told them, “now that Dago and 
company know we’ve been fossicking around. 
There's a big waterhole about a mile to the 
north. That’s where we’ll unroll our nap." 

“Now will you tell me,” said Rawhide as 
they turned off the road into the scrub, “why 
that dingo kicked you on the knee? It's a 
queer assault for sich a man.” 

“Aren't you forgetting that we’re going to 
Oonawklgee tomorrow?” 

“For the sports!” exclaimed the Irishman. 
“And o’ course that son-of-a-snake will be 
there with his mob to compete in the buck- 
jumpin'. And if your leg’s crook, he’ll win it." 

To be continued next meek 




ROB CONWAY IN SEARCH OF A SECRET CITY 










[iu^nU- 

ICE CREAM 9 






tommy walls 



I 



*? ■ 





t THE r RE'S A&5 REWARD AND 



WHAT A 



>P ER JTHIS WALL'S 
show/ supersJS 






THE GREAT ADVENTURER 




ALRIGHT CAPTAIN, / 
LET HIM STAND / , 



' , I MW flll’l, 

BfiOTWER - AS Clearly 
AS I CAM SEE YOU 
V MOW! > 



AWDYOUMEAkH^ 
YDUACTUALLY SfffS 
THIS SO-CALLED 
MESSIAH ALIVE 
AFTFR VtE'HAS, A 
, CRUCIFIED 7 / 



JERUSALEM 
1900 YEARS AGO 

SAUL OF TARSUS. A LEADER 
IN THE PERSECUTION OF THE 
NAZARENES (CHRISTIANS) IS 
QUESTIONING NAZARENE 
PRISONERS 



WHAT'S HE AFTER?- THREE 



IIS AlROF POWER 



TO MY MIND 



THE GREAT SEALED 

STONE BUCOOMS /GRIPPED PEOPLE 
THE TOMB HAD / — THAT'S WH\ 
BEEN ROLLED /HE COULD CURE 
AWAY..... / THEM 



— _ WASTE OF TIME, I RECKON 

SOLID DAYS HE'S BEEN AT IT ytSTDNE THE LOT, I SAY » 
NOW— ASKING THEM QUESTIONS \ * ^ 

AMD ARGUIUG WITH THEM X^ 



HE'S PROVED 

His claims to 
BE MORE THAN 
MERE MAN. 



BUND. SO I 
KNOW WHAT 
I’M TALKING 
ABOUT.... 



IF YOU'D HEARD \ BY "THE BEARD OF ABRAHAM! 



OW, TAKE THEM AWAY! 



THREE SOLID DAYS OF 
CROSS— EXAMINATION, 



HIM SPEAKING | WILL YOU JOQLS STOP 
YOU’D U4VEFELT / CALLING ME 
AS WE DO, / 'BROTHER* — f — > 

. BROTHER! /I'M NO FRIEND 

/ OF YOURS/ jgg 



— IVE NO MORE 
TIME TO WASTE. 

I MUST GET READY 
TO GOTO 

DAMASCUS 



- 1 iii'i i ■Vw-'r'*, / irtMi oicrncN 

BLOWS AND THREATS ■ BUT SOME OF THESE ARE 
AND 1 CAN'T MAKE ; WEEDY, IGNORANT OLD 

ANY OF THEM CHANGE / PEASANTS AND WOMEN 

THEIR BELIEF ' /WHERE DO THEY GET THEIR 

l /V STRENGTH FROM? IT 

CANT COME FROM ) — 

themselyes / 



WHAT AM I THINKING OF ? THIS IS 

II /-v unz-ivi I’O CVCT 



YOU CAN GUESS 
WHAT FOR'. 



IP^Wruth will be coming!! 
JWE MUSTVOTHE GRATING SOOT 

Warn the \ wrTH food she g*n 

/ BRETHREN \ TAKE A MESSAGE TO 
HERE THE MEETING 

SOMEHOW I ) TONIGHT 



r BUT WCW WILL 
THEY GET IT TO 
\ DAMASCUS 
BEFORE SAUL 



RIDICULOUS. HEIGWO, t*D BETTER 
TURN IN. I WANT AN EARLY START 
FOR DAMASCUS TOMORROW 



DID YOU WEAR *HM 
SAY HE WAS GOING 
TO DAMASCUS? 





xx 










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