Skip to main content

Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

See other formats


DAN DARE 



WELL, LET'S HAVE 
IT, DAN -ONLY IT 
HAD BETTER BE 
k GOOD/ 



BACK ON THE EARTH, SIR HULBERT 
GUEST, CONTROLLER OF THE 
SPACE FLEET, AND DAN DARE , 
CHIEF PILOT, ARE FLYING IN A 
WELICAR TO AN EMERGENCY 
CABINET MEETING 



YOU MEAN > 
YOU KNOW 
WHAT MADE THE 
SHIPS BLOW J 

js. UP?^ A 



EAGLE - THE MEW jJ A MATIOMAL STRIP CARTOOM WEEKLY 

rr- 



THUEEPENCE 



PILOT OF THE FUTURE 



EVERY FRIDAY 



EAGLE 



the remote wastes of space drifts the wreck 

OF7VJE WNGFISHER BLOWN APART IN THE LATEST 
ATTEMPT TO REACH VENUS, THE MYSTERY PLANET. 



' RIGHT- KINGFISHER 
WAS POWERED WITH 
IMPULSE WAVE ENGINES 
WASN'T SHE? 




the IMPULSE WAVES ARE BROADCAST INTO SPACE FROM 
STATIONS ON THE EARTH, MOON AND MARS, PICKED UP 8V 
THE SHIPS AND STORED IN IMPULSE CYLINDERS LIKE A 
BATTERY STORES ELECTRICITY. THEN THE WAVES ARE 
FED TO THE ENGINES AS REQUIRED — IT SAVES 
CARRYING TONS OF FUEL RIGHT ? 



YES DAN AMD 
C-A-T SPELLS 
CAT, WHAT'S THE 
POINT OF THIS 
ELEMENTARY 
LESSON p 







OP THE OLD ROCKET 
SHIPS, CARRYING ITS 
OWN FUEL. AND WITHOUT 
ANV IMPULSE WAVE 
MECHANISM I'LL BET 
TEN TO ONE IT GETS, 



YES- A SHIELD — SOME A 

KIND OF RAY WHICH IS 

HOSTILE TO OUR IMPULSE 
WAVES! 



YES, BY GEORGE,/ 
-Just whatcvd 
HAPPEN TO 'KINGFISHER 



rCAN YOU IMAGINE WHAT ™ 
WOULD HAPPEN WHEN A SHIP 
HIT THE BAYFIELD CARRY ING A 
HUGE LOAD OF IMPULSE 
kMYAYES IN ITS CYLINDERS ? > 



I O’! I 

through/ 



7 UM.ITSa 

' CHANCE ANv WAY, 
AND ANY CHANCE 
. IS WORTH TRYING - 
•Y WE'LL DO IT 
\ DAN I .A 




AND SO, AT BREAKNECK- SPEED, PLANS ARE 
RUSHED AHEAD FOR A NEW ATTEMPT TO 
REACH VENUS, USING ROOCET SHIPS TO GO 
THROUGH THE DANGER ZONE 



STOP YOU?- NO, DAN, I'M NOT 
GOING TO STOP YOU. I CUT MV 
TEETH ON ROCKET SHIPS BEFORE 
YOU WERE BORN — l'M COMING . 
WITH YOU' 



BUT WE'LL \ RIGHT SIR -AND I 
BUILD NEW AFTER THAT BRAIN 
ROCKET SHIPS/ STORM I DONT 
FOR THE / THINK YOU CAN 
v. JOBLaT STOP ME GOING 
fena OSS* ON THE NEXT 
HI TRIP TO VENUS/ 




WE'LL TAKE A 



DO 'EM GOOD/ TIME 



BE CAREFUL, DAN- 



WELL, THERE'S THE FIRST 
ONE , SIR HUBERT — THREE 
MONTHS FROM DRAWING 
BOARD TO FINISHED SHIP 
Sc YOU'VE HALF KILLED THE 
CONSTRUCTION BRANCH. 



SHE'S HAD NO 
(ROUTING, TESTS 
YET/ . 



THEY DID SOME WORK./ FIND OUT SIR,— LETS 
\ WHAT D'you THINK / TAKE HER UP. I 
\ OF HER DAN ? / 



CONTINUED 



7Ue AeUiesttusbe* P.C.49 



WHILE P.C. 49 
/SAT HOSPITAL 
LISTENING TO 
JIMMY'S STORY, 
JOAN IS AT 
COFFEE PAN'S 
ANXIOUSLY 
AWAITING NEWS 







WOULD 



PLOT AGAMST ttfE 





by Chad Varah 



Chapter 4 

The secret of the cellar 

F OR a moment Dick and Ray lay 
stunned. Then, as the two policemen 
rushed forward, they staggered to 
their feet, and Dick grabbed the fire- 
extinguisher from the undamaged Jaguar. 

Ray snatched it from him, yelling, "Go get 
the lire brigade!" and ran as fast as lie could 
across the rubbish-liaered ground towards 
the blazing wreck. 

“Two of ours, if they had Ken in the car, 
and three or four of theus." groaned Ray, as 
he leapt over a pile of rubble and reached the 
road “How long will it be before we put a 
slop to it all?" 

One of the policemen had managed to get 
the extinguisher from the wrecked car. burn- 
ing his hands in the process, and he and Ray 
tackled the blaze from opposite sides whilst 
the other policeman tried to pull the bodies 
clear. Ray kept his eyes on the job: he would 
look lor Jim and Ken when the fire was out. 

"Your pal gone for the fire-engine?” 
shouted the cop who was holding the hot 
extinguisher firmly in his blistered hands. 

"Yes. We may get this under, but we can’t 
save the houses." 

"They don’t matter they're due for demo- 
lition anyway,” called the policeman. 

Ray didn't answer. The gangsters had gone 
to such lengths to keep people away from 
their hide-out that he fell certain there was 
something important there. He didn’t want 
whatever it was to be destroyed by die fire. 
It suddenly occurred to him that perhaps the 
house with the cellar wasn’t empty alter all. 
his friend the atomic scientist might have 
been moved from the cellar to the house itself. 

Ixaving the two policemen to their grisly 
task amongst the charred and smoking 
wreckage of the car, he sprang at the door 
of the house, wrenched at the knob, and 
plunged through into the smoke-filled passage 
Strangely enough, the fire in this house had 
started in the upper storey, but it was rapidly 
spreading downwards. Rav shouted, "Ted, 



led!" but there was no response, and he 
lapsed into a fit of coughing. 

He dropped to his knees and pressed his 
cheek against the floor, gratefully breathing 
the clean current of air he knew he would find 
there. Then he began to climb the stairs on 
hands and knees, keeping his head low and 
banging it on each step. 

As he reached the lop. showers of plaster 
fell on him from the ceiling. 

He went to each room in turn, beginning 
at the back of the house, but found no one. 
A blazing beam came crashing down from the 
roof, accompanied by a hail of broken tiles 
and more plaster. The beam just missed him, 
and he managed to push it aside with his foot 
and edge past it. He reached the front room 
and then a whole tangled mass of burning 
limber fell into the well of the stairs and 
blocked his retreat. 



H i could hear regular heavy thuds front 
below, and knew that the policemen 
would search the rest of the downstairs 
rooms. He shut the door against the flames, 
and made his way to the window. The ceiling 
of the room was already beginning to bulge. 

The explosion had loosened the boards 
with which the window-opening had been 
nailed up, but they had been put on from the 
inside, and it was difficult to tear them aw;*v. 



He had made an opening big enough to get 
his head and shoulders through when the 
ceiling came down with a crash. At the same 
moment he heard the sweetest music that had 
ever fallen upon his ears - the clanging of the 
bell on the fire-engine. 

He leaned out of the window, gulping in 
deep breaths of the clean air of early dawn, 
and kicking backwards like a mule to try to 
keep the burning debris from him. The fire- 
engine screeched to a stop below the window, 
and a fireman was running nimbly up a 
ladder while it was still being extended to- 
wards the window. He felt himself dragged 
out by strong and skilful hands and a few 
seconds later he was lying on the road. 

He turned his head towards the house he 
had left. Hoses were already playing on it 
with a great hissing and spluttering. The fire- 
men would probably save tl<e ground floor, or 
part of it. Then lie looked along the street 
and sal up with a jerk. The manhole cover was 
lifted up, and out of the hole popped a tousled 
head It was Jim. 

Two men ran forward and pulled the boy 
out. He came running to Ray, who stood up 
shakily and put his arms round him. 

“I thought you were dead. Jimmy," he said 
chokingly. 

“Now you know what it feels like," mum- 
bled Jim, sniffing back a few tears. “For two 
years I thought you were dead. It was awful. " 

He wiped his nose on the back of his hand, 
and his lip trembled. 

“I'm sorry, old chap," said Ray. "I ought to 
have told you. I didn't realise it would hit you 
so hard when I let it be thought I was dead " 

Jim turned away. 

"If it was bad for me, what do you think it 
was like for Aunt Em? It broke her heart 
when you were reported dead, Ray. It was 
that that killed her. How could you let her die 
without knowing? I don't care how im- 
portant 

"I didn't,” said Ray quietly "She knew all 
the time. Thai’s why she wouldn't agree to a 
Memorial Service for me. And it wasn't a 
broken heart my mother died of. It was 
cancer. That’s another devilish thing our 
chaps are going to beat perhaps before 
we've beaten war." 

Jim goggled at him. 

"You mean Aunt Em knew' She hid it 
jolly well. Mind you. everybody said she was 
wonderfully calm, but we never suspected 
that you . Did she tell my Mum?" 

"Not until site was dying herself " 

Jim still looked troubled 



"All the same," he muttered, "she had the 
right to sec you when she was so ill. It wasn't 
fair to 

"I saw her whenever I was in England." 
interrupted Ray, "and I was with her an hour 
before she died." 

"What was she wearing?" 

"Eh?" 

"I saw her that day. loo. What was site 
wearing'.'" 

"Oh!" Ray's eyes narrowed. “So you’re 
testing me, are you? I thought you said you 

Jim stuck out his lip obstinately and kicked 
ai the ground, hanging his head. 

A man in a tweed suit and grubby mac 
came up and touched him on the shoulder. 

“I want a word with you. sonny," he said, 
"I’m a police officer. I have reason to believe 
that you know something about this explo- 
sion. Would you care to tell me .about 

"Arc you arresting me?” asked Jim fear- 
fully. 

"Not at the moment. You're not bound to 
make any statement, but 

“I'd rather not say anything, then." 

"In that case. I must ask you to come along 
with me to the Police Station." 

"All right,” whispered Jim. 



M ay I sav a word, officer?" asked Ray 
diffidently. 

"Certainly.” 

“I’m sure you haven't done anything 
wrong. Jim. and if you know anything about 
the explosion I think you should Idl the 

"You do, do you!" Jim still wouldn't look 
at Ray. 

“You remember what your Aunt Em said 
to you the day she died?" 

Jim jerked his head up. and his eyes 
searched his cousin’s face. 

"Yes," he said. "/ remember. " 

"She said, 'Be a good lad, Jim, and do your 
duty however hard it may be; then you’ll have 
nothing to fear'. Site was wearing the bed- 
jacket your mother lent her." 

The trouble faded from Jim’s face, and be 
returned Ray's smile. Then he turned to the 
plain clothes man. 

"I’ll tell you. sir," he said. "I was sleeping 
at Ken's house, and he was downstairs on the 
settee or so I thought I woke up in the night 
and went down to find Ken, but he wasn't 
there, and there was a suitcase where he 




should have been. It was ticking, and there 
was a loop of wire hanging out of it, and I 
thought it was a time-bomb." 

"Had you any reason to think anyone 
would want to blow that house up?” 

Jim was conscious without looking at him 
that Ray was hanging on his reply. 

"I never imagined anyone could be so 
wicked as to kill innocent people like that.” 
he said truthfully. “Anyway. I thought it was 
a bomb, and it seems I was right. I picked it 
up and ran out of the house, meaning to 
dump it over there" (he pointed to the middle 
of the bomb-site) “where it would do no 
harm. But I ran into a policeman — ” 

“We know about that," put in the officer. 
"Why didn’t you let him deal with it?" 

"I told him what it was!” 

"But you didn't mean him to believe you, 
did you?" 

“No, sir," admitted Jim. “Well, it wasn't a 
very nice thing to wish on anyone, was it?” 

"It was his duty to 'hold the baby’, not 

yours." 

"Well, I thought it was mine, as I'd found 
it, so I ran away." 

Ray and the policeman exchanged glances. 

"I don't know whether you deserve a 
medal or a good hiding, young feller-mc-lad," 
said the officer. “But where did you get to 
after he chased you?” 

"I tripped up and knocked myself out,” 
answered Jim, rubbing his head ruefully. “I 
don't know how long I lay there, but when I 
came round the thing was ticking in my car. I 
wasn't half scared. I can tell you.” 

“So would I have been!” said Ray. 

“So I grabbed it again, and ran on. and was 
just going to cross the road there” (he pointed 
at the place) "when a grey car nearly knocked 
me down. Again I was going to cross, when 
another car came the opposite way and tried 
to ram the first. It stopped where it is now 
or what’s left of it and a man with a gun 
jumped out." 

"How many men were in the car T’ snapped 
the detective. 

"Three, I think. I'm not sure." 

"No one you knew?” asked Ray. He spoke 
casually, but slowly and distinctly. 

Jim shook his head, and Ray let out his 
breath. 

"The man saw me and I thought he was 
going to shoot. I dropped the suitcase and 
lified that manhole cover and got down the 
hole. I'd just put the cover back when there 
was a terrific explosion, and the whole place 
shook. I fell right down into the cellar, and as 
I heard a sound like - like flames, and smelt 
burning, 1 stayed where I was. There was a 
door at the top of the cellar steps, but it was 
still locked." 

"Still?" queried the policeman. 

"The explosion hadn't bast it open," ex- 
plained Jim hurriedly. “Then when every- 
thing seemed safe I'd heard the fire-engine 
I came out. and here I am." 



"So I see,” commented the detective drily. 
"Well, you've had a lucky escape, young man. 
I shall want to ask you a lot more questions 
yet, but you ought to be in bed after the night 
you’ve had. If I let Rawlings take you home, 
will you promise me not to try to avoid me?” 

“Yes, sir" 

Neither Ray nor Jim had noticed Dick, 
leaning patiently against the Jaguar, and 
brooding mournfully over the wreck of the 
Morris. As the detective called Dick over, 
Jim murmured to Ray: “Inc- way ins-bay”. 

The detective turned. 

"What did you say?" he asked. 

“I want to stay,” said Jim. 

“Nay, lad. ye're cornin' wi’ me," stated 
Dick. “Ye don't want yer Ma worried, now 
do ye?” 

As Jim climbed into the Jaguar. Ray called 
out: 

“You won’t be needing me for a bit, will 
you. Dick?” 

Dick took the hint. 

“No. Get yerself suminat t eat, then ye can 
come round an’ finish yon decarbonisin' job.” 

The Jaguar drove off. 

“I'll see you and Rawlings together, later,” 
said the plain clothes man. “Meanwhile, 
thanks for picking up our chaps.” 

"How's the one that was injured?' asked 
Ray. 

“He’ll be all right. All in a night's work. 
Spunky kid, that youngster. You know him, 
don't you?” 

“He happens to be my cousin.” 

"H’m! Strange coincidence." 

"Yes, isn’t it?” 

The policeman wandered off to give some 
instructions about the corpses. Other police- 
men were turning away rubber-necks who 
had been attracted to the scene even at that 
early hour of the morning. Firemen were 
clambering over the ruins of the houses, 
previously damaged by German bombs, 
chopping out smouldering timber with 
their hatchets and searching amongst the 



R ay strolled nonchalantly towards the man- 
hole. The cover was still off. Waiting his 
'opportunity, he slid unobserved down the 
chute, and scrambled as quietly as he could 
down the heap of coal and into the further 
cellar. 

"Ine-way ins-bay." Jim had said. Well, here 
were the wine-bins. What had the boy dis- 
covered whilst he waited here after the 
explosion? He'd got plenty of grit, to go 
prowling around with the house burning 
above him, anyway! 

The bins were actually stone shelves or 
compartments built against the wall. There 
were an upper and a lower row. eight in all. 
each about a cubic yard in size. As Ray 
flicked on his lighter he coukl see the one in 
which his friend Ted, the atomic scientist. 



had been stuffed, for the dust in it and near it 
had been scuffled. 

He knelt down and peered into the bin. 
There seemed to be some smudges on the 
left-hand side. He squatted in the bin and 
scrutinised them closely. The marks were very 
indistinct if Ted had been tied up he may 
have had to make them with his nose (and 
Ray’s own nose twitched in sympathy as he 
saw the roughness of the surfacc). 

Ted had left a message! 

Ray held the little flame of his lighter as 
close as he could, and with difficulty made out 
the badly-formed letters. The message said: 
THE LORG IS I OF THEM NO MA El 

What on earth could it mean? “LORG” 
must be a mistake for "LORD”, but if ‘'1" 
was short for “ONE”, it didn’t make sense. 
Ted would never suggest (hat the Lord was 
on the side of that gang of crooks they were 
working against! Unless he meant some 
person who had the title “Lord"? And who- 
ever was “NO MA El”? Sounded Chinese. 

Must be some sort of a code, decided Ray. 
He was in no slate to cope with such puzzles, 
so he memorised the message carefully and 
prepared to leave the cellar. 




Then something occurred to him. That mes- 
sage couldn't have been the thing the gang- 
sters were so anxious to hide! If they’d found 
it they would have rubbed it off'! There must 
be something else. 

The gangsters had been prepared to kill 
everyone who might possibly know that they 
were asing this cellar. They had shot at Jim 
and tried lo kill him with a knife. They had 
tried to blow him up, and anyone he might 
have spoken lo. with a time-bomb. They had 
chloroformed Pru and put her where she 



would undoubtedly have been run over and 
killed but for Dick’s acuteness. Heaven knew 
what they had done to Ken. As for himself, 
they had tried at the risk of their own lives 
to ram the Jaguar in which he and Dick were 
chasing them, and they’d done everything in 
their power to throw off pursuit before return- 
ing to this cellar. 

All because of a message they could have 
rubbed off in two ticks? Not likely ! 

He would have to go and ask Jim what it 
was that he had found. He hoped he could 
get to Jim’s house without being stopped. 

He sat for a moment on the nearest shelf. 

Il gave a liulc. 

His heart bounding, he leapt off, and 
pressed on it hard with his hands. Again it 
moved, and as the front of the heavy flag 
went down, the back went up by an equal 
amount. It was pivoted in the middle! 

Quickly he tried the other shelves. None of 
them budged an inch. 

He returned to the one that moved. It took 
him some time to realise what was the point 
of it. Then, squatting on his haunches and 
pulling-at the slab whilst feeling the back wall 
of the bin with his other hand, he found the 
answer. 

The flagstone which formed the back of the 
bin was also pivoted, but wouldn't move 
unless the other was first swung clear of the 
top of il. After a struggle he managed to pull 
the vertical flag into a horizontal position. 
Lying flat on his stomach he illuminated the 
opening with his lighter. 

At the back of the cavity was a strong 
wooden box, so wide that it was obvious il 
would only just go through the opening. He 
tried to get his fingers underneath it. but it 
was as heavy as lead. 

Lead? He knew one important use of lead! 
He felt as certain as if he'd seen inside it that 
this was a box lined with lead and containing 
some radioactive or fissionable maicrialt By 
jove, they'd be coming back lor this all right ! 
Not the ones who’d been in the car, he 
thought grimly, but others of the gang. Well, 
they wouldn't find it here. 

He crawled forward and thrust his arm 
into the cavity, trying to get a grip on ihe 
back of the box. He heaved and tugged in 
the effort to move it, but in vain. In the course 
of his struggle he arched his back : and before 
he knew what was happening the stone 
swung into place again and trapped his arm. 
The pain was agonising, and he let out an 
involuntary yell. Then, realising that he was 
jammed in such a position that he couldn't 
release himself, he yelled on purpose. 

The only answer he got was the muffled 
clanging of a bell as the fire-engine drove 
away. Not so long ago that same sound had 
seemed to him like sweet music. Now it was 
more like a knell. He was trapped! 



(To be continued next week) 






CRICKET COACH I NIG by LEARIE CONSTANTINE 





THE UNKNOWN RIVER 

A number of wealthy and patriotic English- 
men founded the Royal Society in the year 
1780. The purpose of the Society was to 
explore the unknown interior of Africa. 

In 1792, the Society heard strange stories 
of a great river that flowed through the heart 
of West Africa. They named this legendary 
river the Niger and decided to find someone 
prepared to discover if it actually existed. 



The volunteer chosen by the Society was 
24-year-old Mungo Park, a tall and hand- 
some Scottish doctor. 

Park began his quest on 3 December. 1795. 
Alone he walked inland from the West Coast. 
His outward journey took seven months 
and he tramped 750 miles across deserts, 
swamps and fever-choked rivers. He was 
robbed of everything except the ragged 
clothes he wore, was taken prisoner by Arab 
slave-traders, escaped, and nearly died of 



hunger and thirst. But he found the river in 
July. 17%. trudged along its banks for 
another 300 miles, then turned round and 
struggled back to the coast. 

Ten years later. Park again landed in West 
Africa. Now his mission was to reach the 
Niger, sail down it (a voyage of 1,500 miles) 
and discover where the great river entered the 
sea. This time Park had an escort of three 
Englishmen and thirty-five British soldiers. 

Park and four others reached the Niger in 



August. The rest of the men had died of fever 
on the way. They procured a 40-foot canoe, 
named it H.M.S. Jolliha, and gallantly sailed 
off down the river. Before embarking they 
sent back a letter to the coast. 

That was the last ever heard of Mungo 
Park. He and his companions vanished. It is 
known that they covered 500 miles, and were 
then probably attacked and killed. 

But only the mighty Niger River knows the 
fate of Mungo Park, the Scottish explorer. 





SET H AND SHORTY - COWBOYS 



A captured 
Redskin has 
told of a 
“ Mystery 
Man” 
leading the 
Indians and 
planning to 
drive out 
the Rangers 




WE LL CALL AT OLI 
CHARLIE'S STORES 
HE GENERALLY 
KNOWS ALL WHATS - 
GOIN'ON , 



HIST/ BOYS 

BLACK TAKE AND HIS GANG 

HEW TURNED UP 

THEY BEEN SEEN IN 
I THE'BLUE DUCK' 



/ COME ON 
SHORTY / 

■ ET'S LOOK IN 
AT THE 
BLUE DUCK/ 



HH| 



WL 




FIRST 



FOUR-JET 



AIR-LINER IN THE 



WORLD 



L w ooo 



KEY TO NUMBERS 

I. Retractable aerial. 2. Captain. 3. first officer. 4. Radio operator. 5. flight engineer. 
6. Navigator. 7. Crew door. 8. Mail. 9. Kitchen. 10. Nose landing wheels (retracted). 

II. forward baggage hold. 12. “Rcdux” adhesive used to cement metal to metal on 
fuselage. 13. forward passenger compartment. 14. Double skin for temperature and 
sound insulation for high living. IS, Aft passenger compartment. 16. Ladies' dressing 
room and toilet. 17. Gentlemen's dressing room and toilet. 18. Wardrobe room. 
19. Passenger's entrance door. 20. Aft baggage hold. De llaviland “GHOST” Gas 
Turbine Lngine. 21. Air inlets. 22. Centrifugal air compressor. 23. Combustion 
chambers. 24. Turbine wheel driving air compressor. 25. Jet pipe. 26. Jet orifice, 
5,000 lb. static thrust. 



S K I P P V 



THE KANGAROO 



BY DANET, DUBRISAY, GENESTRE 



AN ANDRE SARRUT 
PRODUCTION 




OUTWITTED, By JOVE / 
HE'S MISSED THE ' 

( TRAPS. 

I VE HAD IT / 



IT'S CERTAIN^/ 
HOT WORK 
SETTING THESE 
TRAPS / 



AND NOW FOR A QUIET 
SNACK. NOTHING TO 
DO BUT WAIT. 



where's HE GOT 
TO? I CAN'T SEE 
A BLOOMING 

THING BUT 

HE'S ROARING X 
LOUD rV^Y 
ENOUGH. Lp-’Vi 



MY GUN, MY GUN 
— WHERE THE 
DEUCE IS IT ? 

ow/Tv - * , 

IT'S THERE / 



AND ABOUT A 

HUNDRED TIGERS. 

WELL-HERE GOES/ 




HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 




^PHA\TOM 



HERE ISA VIEW OFTOE'PMANTOM OUT ON THE AIR- 
FIELD JUST BEFORE TAKING ON FUEL. NOTICE THE 

Swept- back wings and tail surfaces and the 

STREAMLINED LONG-RANGE FUEL TANKS ON THE WING 
-TIPS. THEMAIN TANKS BEHIND THE COCKPIT ARE 
CURVED TO S'T SADDLE- FASHION OVER THE ENGINE. 



SHE LIVES UP TO OURN| 
(PECTATIONS, DICK, WE' 
IILL LEAD THE WORLD I 
I THE DESIGN OF JET A 
SOPELLED FIGHTE K^ 
AIRCRAFT. 



I'M SQNLDR DICK NICHOLSON\ 
YOU HAVE ALREAOV MET DAO | 
WHO HAS DESCRIBED THE EARLv| 
BALLOON FLIGHTS. THIS WEEK, 1 
|'M GIVING YOU A PREVIEW OF 
THE LATEST JET-FIGHTER | 
WHICH l'M ABOUT To TAK l^ 
UP ON A TEST FLIGHT fOfy^' 
THE FIRSTTIME. ..HER^r A 
SHE IS / V 



LAST MINUTE CHAT WITH THE DESIGNED 



OICKHAS - - - . 

AFTER MONTHS OF WORK. ANO TAX Y I N G TRIALS WE 
'PHANTOM' IS TOWED OUT FOR ITS FIRST FLIGHT 



I THE COCKPfrOF THE 



JZcastr on, CckU j /’'- 
THE 'PHANTOM' IS 
EQUIPPED WITH THE^ 
LATEST-TYPE EJECTION 
SEAT WHICH WIU. SHOOT 
DICK OUT OFTOf j 
COCKPIT I N TH E CASE S 
OF AN FMFR6ENCY / 1 



^EVERYTHING IS ^1 
CHECKED. I'LLTAKE 
HER UP TO T-.OOO 



GHT BOMBING. IN THIS ROLE THE FOUR CANNON IN THE WINGS CAN BE REMOVED 
LIED ON RACKS INSTEAD. WHILE STILL LEAVING SUFFICIENT ARMAMENT TO ALLOW 
£ OF HERSELF. WERE SHE IS fcEING FUELLED. TOP RIGHT IS TOE CRASH TENDER 
TOE TRACTOR USED FOR TOWING TOE 'PHANTOM ‘MAKES ITS WAV BACK TO TOE HANG AR 



DISCOVERING THE COUNTRYSI 






y I COULD WATCH THEM ALL \ 
DAV-THByfee FASCINATING BIROS 
AND THEVfee NOTATALL FRIGHTENED 
OP HUMAN BEINGS MANY OF THEM 
WILL BE SITTING- ON THEIR EGGS 
, NOW AND THE OTHERS STANDING- J 
\. ARE ON GUARD OUTSIDE 
THEIR BURROWS 



GOSH, JUST LOOK Y. 
VT ALL THOSE PUFFINS, 
MR DVKE WHAT A 
GRAND SIGHT. jk 




RE THEy^^VES.THey ARE, ANN - 
URROWS?/ MANY OF THEM RABBIT 
s' BURROWS. A FEW WEEKS 
7 — AGO WHEN THE PUFFINS 
' FIRST ARRIVED HERE FOR THE 
BREEDING SEASON, THE POOR 
RABBITS W6RE HOUNDED OUT OF 
THEIR HOMES. THOSE PUFFINS WHO 
DIDNT MANAGE TO TURN OUT A 
L RABBIT MADE A BURROW FOR 
1 ^^. THEMSELVES. 




PUFFINS SPEND THE WINTER ^ 
AROUT AT SEA, RIDING- THE WAVES 
N LARGE B ATCH6S. THGV RETURN 
TO THEIR. NESTING PLACES IN LATE 
MARCH OR EARLV APRIL. ONE EGG 
IS LAID IN EACH BURROW ^ 




AFTER HATCHING, THE CHICK STAYS IN 
THE DARKNESS OF THE RORROW AND EATS 
AN ENORMOUS AMOONTOF SMALL FISH 
CARRIED IN BV THE PARENTS . NEATLY 
ARRANGED HEADS TO TAILS. AFTER A 
FORTNIGHT OR SO TOE PARENTS LOSE 
INTEREST AND THE CHICIi'ff L£FT IN THE 
Burrow until itcan get our and 




EAGLE CLUB 

AND EDITOR'S PAGE 



5 May 1950 



The Editor's Office 
EAGLE 

43 Shoe Lame, London, EC4 

W E have now got the names of the 
hundred members whose appli- 
cations for membership of the 
eagle club were opened firet 
on April 19th. Twenty-live of them - those 
living in the Midlands are being taken, you 
remember, to Silverstone Grand Prix Races 
on May 13th. We have got 
seats for them near the pits 
and they are going to be 
introduced to the Italian 
team of drivers wlio are 
competing there Here are 
the names of the lucky 
twenty-five: 

Rita Beyer, Ferry Rd., New Marston. Oxford. 
Ronnie Bette ridge, Moira, nr.Burton-on-7 rent 
John Pitts, Radford. Coventry. 

John Lancaster, Clinton Lane. Kenilworth. 
John Michael Nugent, Byron Square, 

Trumpington. 

Henry Howard Boycott, L iverpool Road, 

Newcasdc-u-Lymc. 

David Kemp, Bcfn Coed. Merthyr Tydfil. 

Jack Carter, Old Whittington, Chesterfield. 
Robert Johnstone. Reed, Royston. 

John Grimmer, St. Georges Rd. Gt. Yarmouth 
John Newton. Catherine Street, Leicester. 
Norman Webster, Wei beck Avenue, Buxton. 
Gwyn Humphreys, St. Barnabas Road, 

Cambridge. 

Richard Stevens, Mill Street, Cannock. 
Graham Rogers, Cannon Hill, B’mingham,12. 
Trevor Ourow, Wood Street, Newark. 
Kenneth Pin, Wissage Road, Lichfield. 
Thomas Michael Bricrley, Bulwell, Nongham 
Michael George Gill, SignhUb Ave., 

Cleethorpes. 

Pauline Wooton, Islington Road. Towcester. 
Robert Rise, Aston Cantlow, Birmingham. 
Rt>y Brock lehunst. Grange Park Road. 

Chapel cn-le Frith. 
Victor Alan Tugby, North Street, Whitwick. 
David Davies, Oak Drive, Ellesmere. 

Anne Osborne, Mans/ m Hotel, Thurmaston. 

Hie other three parties of twenty-five who 
are going to Famborough Air Display, the 
Test Match and the Highland Games will be 
announced nearer the time. We should like to 
make it quite dear that the numbers on the 
membership cards have nothing to do with the 
order in which the applications were received. 
Your membership number may be. for ex- 
ample, 36 - but that doesn't mean that yours 
was the 36th application opened. 




P rofessor BRITTAIN asks us to thank those 
readers who have written to him about his 
description of Radar in the first issue. They 
quite rightly point out that sound waves do 
not travel at the same speed as light waves. 



Professor Brittain apologises for his mislead- 
ing statement. He knows, of course, that light 
is much faster than sound 
but he was talking about 
transmitted sound waves, 
i-e„ radio waves (he had 
just been demonstrating 
with a wireless set). Radio 
sound waves travel at the 
same speed as light. 

We have also had a great many enquiries 
from readers who are interested in "Making 
Your Own Model Racing Car”. They want to 
know where they can gel the parts that have 
to he bought and how much they cost. We 
shall be glad to send this information to any- 
one who writes and asks for it - but please 
enclose a stamped addressed envelope. 

There is one thing we especially ask all 
readers to do. There is a national shortage of 
copies of EAGLE.. The demand has been so 
great that it is impossible for the time being 
to supply enough copies to satisfy everyone. 
Wc are doing our best to produce more copies 
but, meanwhile, will you please pass on your 
copy when you have read it to someone else 
who has not been able to get a copy. 







e very glad to be able tc 
is week the boy chosen as the Eagle 
Club’s first MUG OF THE month. We think 
you will agree he deserves the honour but it 
was very difficult to decide between the names 



Wc have elected several members to he 
mugs and awarded them the special mugs 
badge to attach to their Eagle Badge. One is 
a boy who gi 
paid job to go to work it 
Africa because he heard that help was 
urgently needed that Another is a girl who 
dashed into the road to pull a small boy from 
in front of an approaching 'bus and got her 
leg broken in doing it. Another is a boy who 
has been ill for nearly a year, but instead of 
getting fed-up and doing nothing, is carrying 
on with his studies as best he can. 

Of all of them, the spiv type of person could 
sneer and say: “You are a mug'" So you sec 
the idea of being a mug? 

There arc several other mugs that we 
haven't room to tell you about now. bu* of 
them all, we decided 
that John Chown most \ f / f 
deserved to be mug oi 
this month. All the . 
mugs will have si 
privileges which will be 
announced from time 
to time. The twelve 

MUGS OF THE month at the end of the year 
will be taken on a very exciting trip, about 
which we are keeping quiet for the time being. 

Yours sincerely, 

THE EDITOR 



MUG OF THE MOHTH 

JOHN CHOWN 
At the age of 16, as be went home 
from looking at the Christmas Tree 
in Trafalgar Square, at 9 o’clock on a 
dark windy night, a woman rushed 
out of a house in Paddington waving 
her slippers in her hand and shouting 
“Stop Thief!'’ Immediately ahead of 
him, in Craven Hill Gardens John 
Chown saw the figures of two men 
making off. He gave chase, caught up 
with the slower of the two men and 
tackled him. In a flash the man 
turned on him - with a knife. John 
Chown was subbed in the chest and 
back. Both men made their escape, 
but John Chown was later able to 
give the police their description, and they were caught and tried at the Old 
Bailey. One got 8 years penal servitude, and the other 2 years imprisonment. 

John Chown was awarded the British Empire MedaL As a result of his 
injuries he was in hospiul for several days. He is still at school, a Bov Scout 
and Troup Leader; his ambition is to go into chemical research. The Scouts 
awarded him the Silver Cross. He is studying for the Higher Certificate, 
after *which lie is expecting to do his National Service. 




COMPETITION CORNER 

1. A CARD TRICK Here’s a card trick that anyone can do without any 
"sleight of hand". You arrange the 1 3 cards of one suit in a certain order, and hold 
them in your hand, face downwards. Then you hegm to spell out the names of the 
cards (Ace, Two, Three, etc.) in the following way: You put live top card at the 
bottom, saying "A”; then the next card, saying “C”; then the next, saying "E”; 
and throw die next card face upwards on the table, saying "spells ACE”; and to. 
it is the Ace! Then you go on m the same way, with T, W, O, spells TWO, and the 2 
is discarded. Then you proceed with THREE, and so on, until you are left with the 
KING. It looks most impressive! The only thing is, I haven't told you in what order 
to arrange the cards in the first place! Suppose you work it out? (You will get a 
slightly different result according to whether you speak of a KNAVE or a JACK.) 

2. QUIZ(I) How much of an iceberg is above water? (2) What planet is nearest die 
sun? (3) Is it true that there arc no poisonous snakes in Britain? (4) How can you tell 
which is the right hank of a river? (5) What fruit has its seeds outside T (6) Which 
would fill a tank more quickly: two ooc-inch pipes, or one two-inch. 

3. TRADES AND OCCUPATIONS 




S ‘6 ‘01 '801* ‘iper ‘z > *9 u»nf) ‘say L ‘8 ‘f «pio sqj ‘yoyf no<( j| 
S ‘6 ‘01 ‘axeuyj Tcxmf, 

C k 9 ‘aui* 33V L 8 £ aqj jo japjo sqi *3AVN* P*>m »ll 3 sii no* j| 



CHICKO by theluiell 




ANSWER 

to Competition in eagle No. I. 

j The winner of the picture crossword, who sent in the first 
I correct solution opened on Apnl 26th is J. Jarvis, 33 CoMen 
! A venue. Peterborough. A prize of 10/6 is being sent to him. 1 
The correct answer was: - Evesham, Animals, Ragwort. 
Swallow. Lapwing, Dogfish. Harwich. 

In the siorv competition for which we asked you to send in i 
ideas for a Strip-Cartoon Story, we have had so many entries [ 
i 'hat it is quite impossible to announce the name of die winner ; 
j this week. Wc shall try to do so next week. Meanwhile thank ! 
j you all for your suggestions. 



Lash Lonergan’s Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 





‘That's your crayfish line,” he said, hand- 
ing the hair to Squib. 

"Eh?" said the puzzled boy. 

"There's sure to be crayfish in the water- 
hole. so use that as -a line and lie on a bit of 
the goanna carcase For bait.” 

“Well, I’ve caught blinkin’ crayfish with a 
bit o' meat and string,” said the boy, “but 
horsehair. . . .” He eyed the black hair doubt- 
fully. 

"You're not going to catch sharks, me 
boy,” said Rawhide. “And if you don’t think 
there’s much strength in the skerrick o' 
Monarch's tail. I'll prove it to you. I’ll bet you 
a hundredweight o’ crayfish claws, to a pint o’ 
galahs feathers that I can hold you down on 
the ground with one single horsehair." 

“Belcher!” retorted Squib. 

Lash grinned at Rawhide's secret wink 
while handing him another hair from 
Monarch's tail. Obeying instructions. Squib 
lay down on his back. 

“There's only one little condition.” added 
Rawhide. “You're not to catch hold of me 
hands or the hair. Do you agree?” 

“Too right, cobber," chirped the boy 
cheekily. 

Rawhide knelt beside Squib and placed the 
middle of the hair across the boy’s nose 
about halfway down. With one end of the 
hair in cither hand, he lowered them to the 
ground and placed them firmly beside the 
boy's cars, at the same time drawing the hair 
tight. 

"Now git up,” he invited. 

Squib started to raise his head. "Ow!” he 
yelled as the horsehair bit into the skin of his 
nose. The pain was so fierce that his eyes 
watered. 

•‘Come on. me little skite,” jeered Rawhide 
good naturedly. 

Squib made another effort and yowped 
again. This time the pain was so intense that 
.his eyes filled with unexpected tears. Worse- 
still. the searing pain continued after he had 
given up the attempt, and he thought the hair 
was cutting his nose in two. 



The story so far 



Chapter 4 



Y ES Messiter'll win the buck- 

jumping tomorrow if my leg’s still 
crook,” agreed Lash. “So the first 
thing you do with that gun you 
pinched from Greasy Joe is to shoot a 
goanna." 

"Too right." agreed Rawhide, hugging the 
rifle. “It’s a beautiful bit of weaponry, isn't 
it?" The Irishman turned to Squib and said 
in a hoarse, croaking whisper loud enough for 
Lash to hear: “It’s a wonder me cobber let 
me hold it in tne hands. " 

Lash grinned at the boy and explained. 
“It’s the hot Irish temper I'm afraid of. He 
might start acting like Greasy Joe, and then 
one day he'll put a bullet into somebody. That 
wouldn't be polite. And I don't want any 
friend of mine to be impolite. So tomorrow, 
when he meets Greasy Joe at Oonawidgee, 
he's going to give him back his gun.” 

Rawhide's grumbles were cut short by 
their arrival at the big watcrhole. He helped 
Lash to dismount and unroll his blankets 
undcrneath.a coolabah tree. 

While Squib made a fire. Rawhide went off 
in search of a goanna. As the giant lizards 
were numerous in the district, he soon shot 
one. skinned it, and dumped the carcase into 
a billycan of water that was put on to boil. 

“I wisht I had a gun,” sighed Squib, as he 
eyed the rifle leaning against the tree. 

"You deserve one,” remarked Lash, “for 
saving the situation with that emu egg. Maybe 
I'll buy you a twenty-two as a reward . . . 
when I get some dough. But first of all you'll 
have to learn how to handle a rifle. ” 

“Well, 1 reckon began Squib. 

“I reckon you’re hungry!" bellowed Raw- 
hide. All three burst into laughter. 

“We’re going to have a feast in honour of 
young Squib," announced Lash. “There’s 
crayfish in the waterholc. And there’s kan- 
garoos not far away. I’ll bet." 

“And," pointed out Rawhide, “there's 
galahs gallivantin' in that tree jist over there. 
Grilled galah! Oh, the taste of it! Squib, hand 
me that gun." 

The boy picked up the rifle, jerked it to his 
shoulder, and fired. A galah tumbled from a 
branch of the bluegum tree as the rest took 
flight. 

Before the astonished eyes of Lash and 
Rawhide, the lad fired again this time at a 
bird on the wing. The galah somersaulted in 
the air and dropped like a stone. 

“S-s-sorry I didn't have time to git one 
each." said Squib breathlessly. 

“The circus!" cried Rawhide. 



“Of course." agreed Lash. “For a jiffy I 
forgot you used to be in a circus." 

“My uncle taught me sharp-shootin . ' 
grinned Squib. As if to provide him with 
another target for demonstration two brolgas 
flew over, with outstretched necks and 
slender, trailing legs. 

The boy raised the gun and pulled the 
trigger. Click! "It's empty," he said ruefully. 

“Now you've gone and used up all our 
ammunition." said Lash. “No kanagroo-tail 
stew tonight for you. I’m afraid. But I don’t 
really mind, because I'm always nervous with 
both the hairy Irishman and a loaded gun 
about.” 

Rawhide chuckled and fumbled in his 
pocket. "I took the liberty of extractin' the 
rest of Greasy Joe's ammunition before 
kissin' him goodbye." He hauled out a hand- 
ful and rolled them on the ground. 

Lash laughed and said: "Now do a get. 
And don't come back without a kangaroo- 
tail. all skinned and ready for the pot.” 

Now the goanna had boiled long enough. 
Fat gleamed on the surface of the water. Lash 
scooped it off with a spoon and put it in a tin 
mug. 

“Goanna oil,” he explained to the boy. 
“It’s an old abo cure for all sorts of aches and 
sprains. Bushmen swear by it. and they say it 
will even penetrate glass! Well, I know it does 
wonders Tor injuries like mine, so we re going 
to take turns massaging my knee tilVI can use 
it properly again." 



B y the lime Rawhide returned with the 
kangaroo-tail and a third galah Lash was 
already feeling much better. After chopping 
up the tail and putting it on to cook, the Irish- 
man took a turn at massage. Lash declared 
that the oil was making a miraculous cure. 

"Let the least be prepared!" he cried gaily 
as he got to his feet and walked across to 
Monarch with hardly a limp. Selecting one 
of the many long, black hairs in his horse's 
beautiful tail, he swiftly pulled it out. 



"I - I give in!" he gasped. 

Rawhide whipped away the hair and hauled 
the boy to his feet. “Now git on with your 
crayfishin’," he ordered. “And don't forget 
you owe me a pint o’ galah feathers." 

Rubbing the tiny smear of blood from his 
nose and regarding it with misty eyes. Squib 
looked so downcast that Lash slapped him on 
the shoulder and chuckled: “Never mind, 
cobber. Every kid in the bush has that trick 
played on him sooner or later. Here's a 
line with some bait on it. Haul out those 
crayfish." 

Squib proved to be a more skilled cray- 
fisher than the other two. Carefully hauling 
in the bait with the crayfish clinging to it. he 
waited till a whisker broke the surface before 
grabbing at the elusive creature. He never 
once missed while both Lash and Rawhide 
let several get away. Praised by the others for 
his skill. Squib soon recovered his high 
spirits. 

It was a wonderful feast. In the cool of the 
evening, by the side of the waterholc where 
the parrots and brolgas and other birds came 
down to drink, the three hungry comrades 
ate one of the most delicious meals of their 
lives. 

First came the crayfish, baked by the little, 
bright embers of a sandalwood fire. 

Then the galahs, grilled on stirrups held 
over the same fire. 

Finally, the kangaroo-tail stew, its rich 
flavour mingling with the taste of boiled yams 
ami a couple of the onions Rawhide always 
carried in his tucker-bag 

It was all washed down with billy lea made 
over the open fire the tea that all Australians 
declare is the best in the world. 

The feast over, they lounged in the purple 
dusk and yarned away the hours till the 
Southern Cross was burning high over the 
trees. It was an evening of such physical con- 
tentment, combined with the happiness of 
true comradeship, that Lash Lonergan almost 
forgot the duties and dangers that awaited 
him on the morrow. 



L ash, Rawhide and Squib were jogging 
along the road to Onawidgee when the 
Irishman said to the roughrider- 

“O’ course, it’s none o’ me business . . 
and I wouldn’t wish you to think I was bcin 
inquisitive . . . and o' course if you don't 
want to tell me you needn't, but . . ." 

“Out with it!” laughed Lash. 

"Well, me cogitatin' boy. what's your plans 
for the future?” 

“Find, I've got to win every contest I enter 
at the sports today. When Dago kicked me 
yesterday, it was part of his plan to drive me 
out of this district." 

“I see what you mean,” replied Rawhide. 
“He wants you to come a gulzer today so's 
the Champion of Champions will look ridi- 
culous at a little outback sports meeting." 

"Go to the top of the class,” grinned the 
roughridcr. "Dago wants to drive me away 
so that I won’t hang around trying to get back 
the property that’s rightly mine. He’ll try 
every dirty trick in his collection. I'm warning 
both of you that every time we get into a fight 
with Dago and his mob, we re running grave 
risks. They’ll use gun and knife and any other 
weapon, and they’ll make the excuse it's self- 
defence." 

“But how arc you goin’ to prove Coolabah 
Creek Station belongs to you?” asked Squib. 
“The will's gone." 

“Uncle Peter’s strongbox wasn't among 
that lot we found bust open," replied Lash, 
“so The Hunchback may still have it. And 
that means the will might still be in existence. 
Why did he smash open and leave behind the 
other strongboxes and not Uncle Peter's? I 
don't savee. But I’m going after that bush- 
ranger and I’m going to find out. Besides, 
there’s the reward. Even if I don’t find the 
will. I’ll get the reward and have plenty of 
money to fight Dago Messitcr in court." 

“The law!" exclaimed Rawhide scornfully. 
“I’d like to take the law into me own hands 
and squeeze the truth out o' that 



"Bui (he Iasi thing I warn lo da is lo go 
whining lo the law." cut in Lash. “I’ll fighi 
Dago Messitei man to man. And The Hunch- 
back, too." 

Rawhide hauled al Ihe sling of his banjo, 
grabbed the battered instrument , and 
twanged its strings as he sang: 

"Oh, we'll light those dingoes man to man. 
Believe me. that's no fib! 

'Oh, we ll get those robbers!’ say the three 
dinkum cobbers. 

Rawhide. Lash, and Squib." 

He chuckled and said: "Now isn't that a 
bonzer spur-o'-the-moment song! I’m sorry I 
had to put mcself first. Lash, but it was for 
the sake of the poetry of the beautiful last line. 
Now, mates, all together!” 

So they rode singing and laughing into 
Oonawidgcc. 



little settlement was crowded. Every 

I single person in town was making a great 
day of the annual sports meeting. From the 
surrounding sheep and cal lie stations came 
owners, stockmen, overseers, boundary riders, 
rouseabouls. and everyone else in the district 
who could ride or drive to Oonawidgee. 

Many aborigines had come front the 
various blacks' camps in the neighbourhood. 
I -ash looked intently at every dark face, hop- 
ing he might see his I'ricnd Mopoke. 

The only black face he recognised was that 
of Yabbayabba, the huge and ugly aborigine 
whom Messilei had claimed lo be one of 
those who found Uncle Peter's body up in Ihe 
hills. He recalled how Yabbayabba had lied 
and said that no opal had been found in the 
dead man's hand. The aborigine remembered 
too. and when he saw Lash he scowled and 
slunk aw-ay. 

"There's Lash L.oncrgan!" 

"Hi, Lash!" 

"There's the Champion of Champions!" 

So the comments flew as [lie trio rode down 
the street towards Ihe sports ground. Every- 
body knew the story of lash's banishment by 
his uncle because lie had refused -to Tide- 
Chuckle, die chestnut mare. Everybody also 
knew of Lash's successful career and his 



return to CooJahah Creek lo find Dago 
Mcssiter in possession. 

More exciting still, they knew that Messiter 
and his mob were there to compete in the 
sports. Would there be a clash between lash 
I onergan and Dago Messiter' 1 So the tongues 
wagged as the trio rode down the street 

On arrival al the sports ground, the three 
comrades dismounted. 

“Uh!" grunted L ash as lie swung out of the 
saddle. They turned inquiringly. "Just a 
twinge," he smiled. "Must have got a bit 
still'." 

But Rawhide and Squib, watching him 
limp across to the stewards' tent, saw that all 
was not well with Lash's leg, despite the 
goanna oil and their friend's assurances. 

Suddenly they heard a buzz of chatter . . 
excited talk that swelled into a low roar of 
excitement. 

"The Hunchback . . . The Hunchback . . . 
The Hunchback . . ." Over and over again 
they heard the name of live bushranger. 
Obviously some news had startled the 
crowd. 

Lash was in the stewards' lent, entering for 
various events, when the mounted policeman 
in charge of Oonawidgee came bursting in. 

"Look at this!” he shouted to the stewards 

all leaders of the little community as they 
sat around their table. “Look at that for 
cheek! I just found it pinned to my verandah 

They all stared at a scrap of paper on which 
was scrawldd in big letters: "The Hunchback 
is a sporting cove, so expect him at your 



S uos the whole place was seething with 
excitement, and for a time nobody 
bothered to gel on with the sports. 

“Do you really think," said Rawhide to 
1-ash, “that flabbergastin' bushranger and 
his mob would come gallopin' along in broad 
daylight and try to bail us all upT’ 

“Of course not," snorted the roughrider. 
-"Hc's up let-some dirty trick or other. That is, 
if he comes at all." 

"Do you mean to say." put in Squib, "that 



The Hunchback's gone and sent that message 
jist for a joke?" 

"It might be a hoax." replied Lash. "Some 
kid like you might have stuck that note up on 
Ihe sergeant's verandah post." 

But Sergeant Cleaver was taking no 
chances. He phoned Sergeant Sneed, of 
Yarrawarra, and got him to hurry over as 
soon as possible 

Yet the belief that the message must be a 
joke spread through the crowd. Nobody 
believed that The Hunchback would be crazy 
enough to give wanting of a visit, especially 
with such a strong enemy force ready to cap- 

“A thousand pounds!" Rawhide kept on 
saying. "A thousand splendiferous pounds! 
That's the reward they're offerin' now for that 
bank-robbin', blood-spillin' bushranger. To 
think that any man could be worth so much! 
Now what would I do with the dough ...?’’ 

The irishman’s ruminations were cut short 
by the announcement that the bending race 
was about to stan. Rawhide and Squib 
jostled for places on the edge of the ground in 
order to see lash compete. 

“I reckon his knee ain't too good," com- 
mented the boy. 

"I reckon your reckonin' is right." sighed 
Rawhide. "But that young scamperoon won't 
give in till the cows come home." 

Bang! went the starling pistol. 

With superb skill combining balance and 
agility of both man and horse each rider 
and mount weaved swiftly in and out of the 
upright poles without touching one of them. 

"Lash Lash Lash!" cried Rawhide and 

Nearby spectators, seeing that Lash and 
Monarch were in the lead, took up the cry 
of “Lash Lash Lash!" 

Amid Ihe applause of Ihe enthusiastic 
crowd, the roughrider caniered his horse to 
the winning post. 

Lash flashed his gay smile as lie rode from 
the field. But pain already dulled the bright- 
ness of his eyes when he reached his cobbers. 

"Your knee's crook again," asserted Raw- 
hide in anxious tones. 

"Just a skerrick," grinned Lash. "By the 



way. have you seen Dago Messiter about?" 

As if irt response to his question, at that 
moment Dago went riding by with Greasy 
Joe and others of the Coolabah Creek mob. 

Greasy Joe, turning his double chin, 
called to Rawhide : "We've got a little surprise 
for your cobber this arvo. Haw-haw-haw !" 




"Here's your gun back!" cried Rawhide, 
snatching up the rifle he had captured from 
the fat man the day before. He hurled it 
straight at Greasy Joe. 

The stockrider caught the gun with 
difliculty, bruising his pudgy fingers. He 
yelped and cursed as he rode on. 
shoulder as he rode on. 

Squib asked: "What's he gabbin' about? 
What sorter surprise?" 

"A surprise," smiled Lash, "is only a 
surprise as long as you don't know what it's 
going lo be. So let s wail and see. ' 

(To be continued) 



Announcing the new Table Game which has been generally requested 
by all Subbuteo "Table Soccer " owners 

THE HIT OF THE CENTURY! 

The NEW Companion Game to 

5f TABLE 
SOCCER • 

NOW AVAILABLE! subbuteo Regd. 

TABLE CRICKET’ 

The Replica of Test and County Cricket 
Played with teams of miniature men, ball and stumps with bails. Over-arm bowling, 
double wickets, and all the "outs" such as clean bowled, stumped, caught, etc. 
Googlies, breaks and even body-line bowling. Hits for six, four, and odd runs. 
HERE IS A CRICKET GAME BASED ON SUBBUTEO 'TABLE SOCCER" 
PRINCIPLES WHERE ALL THE FINESSE OF THE GREAT SUMMER GAME 
IS AT LAST OBTAINED. 

Be the first on the field in readiness for the forthcoming Cricket Season. 

Send stamp for full details and order form to 

P. A. ADOLPH, 66 The Lodge, Langton Green, TUNBRIDGE WELLS, Kent 




ivill be 
trained for a skilled trade, 
and. continue your general 
education. You will have far 
more opportunities for sport 
than most boys. You will be 
well fed and eared for. and 
receive good pocket money. 
And you may end up not 
only with a i ommission but 
with a (King commission. 




5HA *PBOY 



SMUGGLERS 



CODE S Z SHORT. 
*\ /LONG HASH, i 
/ I SUPPOSE ! > 



' Boy SAYS ] 
THERE'S 
5MUGGUN6 
L AFOOT/ 



MM.cosroMs 



REICH MUST C 
MEET TRAWLER 
2 MILES WEST 
, 12 SHARP , 



ATE, THERE'S A 
, A LOT ROUND ' 

these coasts! 



AYE. WE’LL 
GET THEM 
THIS TIME 



TWO MILES 
WE WEST 
Of SANDY 
COVE . WATCH 
TOR FLASHES 



J wait tor rr i 

LET THEM START 
LOADING/ < 



coo! that’s 
rr! now for 
THE FUN 



1 WHAT A LOVELY ) 
l HAUL ! TONS OF 1 
’ SHARP'S - THE 
WORD FOR TOFFEE! 
DO WE SHARE IT P 



Swrfirn on the 
SEARCHLIGHT/ 



CAUGHT RED- 
i HANDED I ( 
SHOULD SAY 



HTHE GAME'S UP/ 
C I CALL ON you 
TO SURRENDER/' 



ROB CONWAY IN SEARCH OF A SECRET CITY 











5 May 19S0 



ADVERTISER’S ANNOUNCEMENT 



1 QcM 

UBLa. ICE CREAM # 



TOMMY WAILS 







WHATS UPN 
i GINGER - 
GETTING . 
TIRED? / 



YOU'RE RIGHT 
GINGER- THEV'RE 
NO PLATELAYERS 



HELLO -WHAT'S ▼ OH- LAW ! -DON'T 
GINGER STOPPING ) SAY HE'S GOT A 
FOR ? .A PUNCTURE > 



*AND WE DIDN'T’ 
HAVE A SINGLE 
Bite! 



NO— LISTEN- DUMP 
THE BIKES AND TAKE 
A QUIET LOOK AT 
THOSE CHAPS OP ON 
THE EMBANKMENT 
I'M SURE THERE5 
SOMETHING FISHY 
ABOOT THEM . 



WHAT A 
FILTHY 
DAY 



GOSH THEV'RE 
Ripping a rail 
our 



■'THORNTON 
^EXPRESS IS DUE! 





•STOP; POT 

ON THE BRAKES 
QOICKLy ! 



-UNLESS — I HAVE A PLAN, BUT l'U_ 
NEED THE EXTRA ENERGY IN THAT 
WALL'S I HAD THIS AFTERNOON AND 



■ THE HELP OF THE 
MAGIC "W" SIGN 



A DETECTIVE 1 
I KNOW THESE 
MEN 



THEY'RE WELL KNOWN CROOKS 



FORGETTING 
WALLS AND 
THE MAGIC 



R’—THEY WOULD 
''have DONE, TOO 
IT WASN'T FOR 
THESE CHAPS 



WHATiS HAPPENED; 



CONDITIONS OH SALE AND SUPPLY. Thu periodical in sold Jubjccl lo 



ssslms ira »s s 





LISTEN, RUTH — WE HAVE SOME VERY 
IMPORTANT NEWS — BEND CLOSER 
SO THE GUARD WON'T HEAR ! > 



•JERUSALEM • 

1900 YEARS ASO. 

IN THE PRISON COURTVARD 
RUTH, .4 NAZAKENE fCHGUSr/#*) 
/S 7PK/NG FOOD 7V THE MGZTTEEHES 
/N THE CELLS 



“ SO IT'S DAMASCUS NOW, 
IS IT? WE'LL SEND A 
WARNING BY THE NEXT 
CARAVAN. 



SAUL OF TARSUS IS GOING TO 
DAMASCUS TOMORROW TO 
PERSECUTE THE NAZAR.ENES. 
THERE Tid 



PETER TONIGHT TO 
TRY AND GET WORD 
TO THEM 



THAT NIGHT RUTH GOES 
TO “HE SECRET MEETlMG 
OF THE* NA1ARENES 



YOU'RE RIGHT \ AND THE ROMAN 
BARNABAS— FA RA GUARDS AT THE 
IS A PINE HOCSE / DAMASCUS GATE 
/ARE USED TO SEEING 

n A me Ride in and 

^ r V our 



HE WON'T HAVE 



THERE WON'T BE TIME, PETER 
HE’S LEAVING IN THE MORNING 
AND WILL BE RIDING HARD- 
YOU KNOW SAUL- HE'LL BE USING 
THE BEST HORSES wE CAN 
^ FINP / 



CBN GEH- THROUGH 
WITHOUT A PASS 



ONE AS GOOD AS 
My FA PA 



T won't Bump into master 
SAUL. I'LL TAKE the EASTERN 
ROAD THROUGH JERlCHO 



8UT SUPPOSE YOU 
RUN INTO SAUL.? HE 
KNOWS YOU - YOU 
WERE BOYS 
TOGETHER 



KEEPYOUR^ 
EYES OPED T 
BARNABAS — 
THAT JERICHO 
ROA.D IS THICK 
WITH 



ban cits/ 



CONTINUED.. 



THE GREAT APVEHTURER