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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

EAGLE - THE NEWJd NATIONAL STRIP CARTOON WEEKLY 





IN THE EARLY MOBNING 
THE SPACE- SHIP 'BANGER', 
CABCYING DAN'S SOCKET 
SHIPS, IS LOADED ONTO 
A LAUNCHING RAMP L 
ALL IS BEADY FOR THE 
DESPERATE ATTEMPT TO 
BREAK. THROUGH THE 
RAYFIELD TO VENUS— 
THE MYSTERY PLANET 



7k* *4d4+e*tf *+te4 of P.C.49 



FROM THE FAMOUS RADIO 
series by ALAN STRANKS 



THERE WERE THREE Of THEM. ONE 
KNOCKED MY BAG- TO THE FLOOR. AS HE 
PICKED IT UP I NOTICED THE MIDDLE 
FINGERS OF HIS RIGHT HAND WERE MISSING. 




PLOT AGAMSr tW£ WORLD 



by Chad Varah 




The story vofat 






Chapter 5 



Writ ten in Blood! 

J I M sank back luxuriously on Ihc sprung 
uphoMery of [he Jaguar. He ached in 
every limb, and could hardly keep his 
eyes open. What a night k had been! He 
shivered with belaied apprehension as he re- 
membered all the dangers he'd been ihrough. 

Dick drove in silence, and Jim was jusl 
nodding off when the Ihoughl of Pru sud- 
denly returned 10 him and shocked him imo 
wakefulness. To think thai he had been ion 
busy to worry what had happened to her! He 
sat up straight, and seized Dick's sleeve. 

"Pru!" he croaked. "She never came hack! 
Did you 

"Easy, lad." said Dick. There was always 
something reassuring about his slow Northern 
speech. "Pru's all right." 

Jim sank back, again. He fell weak with 
relief, until Dick added: "Ifs Ken Ah'm 
worrited about." 

"Why?" Jim's voice was sharp with a new 
anxiety. "Did they — V 

"Ah don't know. When we found cellar 
empty, 'im and Pru wonl off 'ome together. 



knew as Pru weren't." 

'•Where was she. then' She wasn't in her 
old room. Did you go to their house'.'" Jim 
shot all this out in one breath. 

"She v. ere sleepin' in gangster's ear," 
answered Dick with his usual calm delibera- 
tion. Jim goggled at him, and clung menially 
to his previous assurance, "Pnt's all right". 
"Me and Ray was chasm" 'em, and they laid 
her in the road for us to tun over, but Ah 
wasn't 'aving any."' He permitted himself a 
momentary smile of satisfaction. "We took 
'er to Dr. Briggs's this is is car and left 'er 
while we chased 'em again. Ye know the rest." 

"What had they done to her?" demanded 
Jim fiercely, clenching his fists. 

"Anees - anathces - oh, be blowed! 
Drugged lier. Dr. Briggs said." 

Jim gritted his leeth. 

"The swine!" he hissed. "I'd like to tear 
them limb Trom limb and — " 

'Ye have," put in Di'k grimly. 

This sobered Jim. 

"Arc - are they - dead, Dick?" 

"Two on 'em - an' Ah doubt if t'othcr'Il 

"I never meant lo do it, Dick!" whispered 
Jim. "Honestly, when they came at me I jusl 
dropped the bomb and took cover. Whatever 
they'd done. I didn't mean lo kill (hem!" 



"Ah should ope nol," replied Dick shortly. 
"Well, 'ere we arc." 

"Oh, Dick. can't we go and sec Pru first?" 
pleaded Jim. 

"If you'd use yer eyes, you'd see this is a 
nicer 'ouse than yours," grunted Dirt, 
getting out and ringing the bell. 

For the first time Jim look notice or his 
surroundings. They were at Dr. Briggs's. He 
followed Dick to (he door as the Doctor 
opened it and beckoned Ihem in with a jerk 
of his head. 

"How is she, Doctor?" asked Jim. 

Without a word, the Doctor led them into 
ui- consulting room. Pru was lying on the 
couch, covered with a blanket. As Jim came 
in, she opened her eve* and smiled at him. 

"Hullo, Jim!" she said weakly. 

Jims tears look him by surprise. He dashed 
them away and flung himself forward, 
kneeling by the couch with his arms tightly 
round her. 

"Oh, />.„.' I thought . . ." He couldn'l say 
any more, but just clung lo tier. The Doctor 
cleared his throat, and Jim stood up sheep- 
ishly. 

"Now, Dick," said the Doctor in a quiet, 



you. Whal the jumping Jehoshephat do you 
mean by dumping this child here and then 
charging off like a madman in my car - if I'm 
permitted to call il my car? What in thunder- 






"Oo's 


Pete?" etiq 


ired Dick ii 


locenriy, 




'Don't 






,hc Docio 




t^lN't; 

(C "/ 


lis finger v 


lou'rc'h-.'m 


l of Dick 


it 


won't v, 


ork. You'r 


Irving lo m 


ike it le Ion 




tempt 


r." he bell 


wed. "in ihe hope lha 






blood-vessel and leave 




so 


thai 1 


u can use 


1 all the im 


e! You ui 




1 issued 


rascal, 1 c 


uld have yc 


u jailed to 


1 


Jim ga 
s Doct 


led. He w 


of address 


ned to sc 


m 


tes. bu 


t Dick seer 


led unpen u 


bed. 




'Why. 


you'd be to. 


stingy idle 


veroeytHi 










>nl.v girl i 


ih 


world 


and Ah v 


a* ihe only 




D 


ck, dodging the bl 


)W ihc Doct 


.r aimed i 



Pru giggled, and ihe Doctor glanced 

"Why don't von come on my panel. I 
invited the Doctor with a sinister grin 
Dodder won't do you any good. I've 
Stuff in my poison cupboard lhai wouk 



-, and then Ah'll 



to 


make her comfort 


We 


in 


he back. 


he 


1) 


utor came to 


i, A 


or 


iu! 


shook his 




D 


ck waved Bl I 


m i 


ih 




v fond ai 


its 




ve at babies. . 


nd s 


Plied in 


o the driv 


"g 




'1 want my at 


WH 


'"h 


JWl 


■d the Doc 






Dick stuck his 


>ea. 






he window 




he drove off. 














'Ah'll lend it y 


eaft 


r a 


Jit, 


r ye beta 


!" 


he 


shouted. 














Jim crouched 




ifor 


abl 


in Ihc ha 


ck. 


as 


Pru was lying 


n tin 




11 


• felt Shy a 


ter 


hi 


display ofenn 


lion 


1'iii 


s,t 


ned lo feel 


he 


sa 


me, for she die 


n't s 


x-ak 




( she glan 


ed 



Did 

When the Jaguar pulled up at Jim's house, 
Dick got out. 

"Bide where y'are," he ordered. 

He disappeared down Ihe passage "Inch 
led to the back door. 

"You all right, Pru?" asked Jim. 

Pru nodded. 

"I'm not hurt, only drowsy from that filthy 
stuff they doped me wild," she said. "What 
about you! Did anything more happen?" 



Jim repressed a hysterical laugh. Did any- 
thing more happen! 

"We had guile a busy night," he said, "but 
it's all over now. Don't worry - I'll tell you 
alt about it later." 

She closed her eyes. After a moment she 
murmured sleepily: "Did Ken gel back all 
right?" 

Jim didn'l know what to say. he looked 
round desperately loi inspiration - and saw 
Ken standing at Ihe front door in pyjamas 
beckoning to him. 

"Yes." said Jim, catching his breath. He 
nodded at Ken, who wenl back into Ihe 
house, leaving Ihc door open. In the instant 
between Ken's retreat and Dick's reappear- 
ance from Ihe passage, Jim bent and kissed 
Pru. 

It was the first time he'd ever done it. Il 
would probably, he thought, be the last time, 
loo - because Pru wasn't the "soppy" type. 
and emotional situations such as they were 
now in weren't likely lo be repeated the 
hoped). He got a whiff of the anaesthetic as 
his lips touched hers. He didn't know whether 
site was asleep or not. but she made no reply 
to his whispered "lioit ties-, you, Pru!" 

He got out of the car and closed the door 
as'quietiy as he could. 

"What happened?" he enquired softly, as 
Dick got into the driver's seal. 

"Ah went round back an' chucked lilllc 
stones al yer bedroom winder." said Dick. 
"Ah didn'l want lo wake yer Ma. Ken stuck 



"Borrowed on 
fortune-teller, | 






il balk 



cup in ihe shape of 'is 'oroscope. Don'l ask 
daft questions. Ah just 'ad a hunch 'e 
might've gone to soothe yer Ma." 

"[ don'l know whal Mum'l! say when she 
sees me!" confessed Jim. 

He felt a sudden blow between his shoulder- 
blades that made him hang his head against 
the car door. He turned swiftly to see Ken, 
now fully dressed, grinning al him. 

"The boy hero!" said Ken mockingly. 

"Oh, cut it out. Ken!" protested Jim. 
"What did Mum say when you told her what 
we'd been up to?" 

"I haven't seen her,'" replied Ken. 

"What! Why on earth—?" 

"This is no time for fooling, Ken." 
growled Dick. 

"I'm not footing! After we (eft your place. 
Rick, I sent Pru home, but I thought I'd 
better see if Jim's mother was waiting up, but 
she wasn't. She'd left ihe back door un- 
latched, and as I went upstairs, thinking I'd 
get a better sleep in Jim's bed than on our 
sellee, she called out 'Why are you so late. 
.Tim? Whatever lime is it?' I just mumbled, 
and she said in a sleepy son of voice 'I'll see 
you in the morning, you bad boy! Now get 
to bed before your Dad wakes up!" So I just 
chuckled to myself and got into your bed, 
Jim, and slepl like a top. Did you have a good 
night'.' Arc you feeling better?" 



.1 


•a ant 


D 


ck loo 


etl 


iespairmgly al one 










laughed hclplcsslv. 


He 


Jui, 


hey 


rmof'h 


red 


Ken noticed Ihe 
cron the back seat. 


Hi- 


siidr 


nK 






iic as chalk. 




Pru! 


he 










She's 


all 


.pthi. I 


d.' 


said Dick. "'Op in, 


W 


Ve"? 


Ah h 


1 tell V, 

1 a ihi 




t 'appened as we go. 


bee 


n sno 


ring 


yer 'ea 


oti 










c scat beside Dick, 


sli 


keep 


ng 


is eyes 


on 


is sister. 



"Busy an' bothers©] 



replied Dick. "We 



Better leave a message I'm yer Ma nol to wake 

you till the cops come wi' the Black Maria." 

"Thanks for everything, Dick." said Jim 

absent ty, as the car began to n 



luring I 



t the 



jnd. but his head fell like .. 

As so often happens, the minute he .stopped 
(logging his brain, something clicked. "Better 



leave a message for yer Ma" - message - Ma! 

Jim ran after the car, shouting. Dick heard 
him. and saved his weary legs by backing 
towards him. 

"Now what is it?" The stolid Northerner 
sounded as near to being irritable as Jim had 
ever heard him. 

"While I was in Ihe cellar I Tound a 
message in one of the wine-bins," said Jim 
breathlessly. "I suppose it was from ihat 
scientist we were trying to rescue. I managed 
to tell Ray to investigate the wine-bins, and I 
expect he's found the message, but I thought 
you ought to know as well, just in case." 

"Well, spit it out!" said Dick. 

"I can't make head or tail of it myself il 
seems to be in some sort of code. It had Ihe 
word 'Ma" in it - and you saying 'leave a 
message for yer Ma' reminded me of it." 

Dick was drawing his breath in slowly 
through his nose, compressing his lips and 
lapping ominously on (he steering- wheei. 
Before he could explode. Jim continued 
hastily: 

"It said 'The Lore is I of them no Ma ci' - 
that last word is spelt E-l." 

"Wail a minute, Jim," said Ken. "Ml 

He produced a ball-point pen and a scrap 
or paper with last week's Club football team 
on it, "You know, I think I'll have io move 
you to ("side right, if you don't mind, Jim," 
he added, studying the paper critically. "St. 
James's Club have goi — " 

The paper and pen were snatched from him 
by Dick, exasperated at lasi, and the pen fell 
on Ihe floor. 

"It's all right. Dick," said Ken, picking it 
up and handing it to him. "Ihe besi of these 

you've dropped them than Ihcy did before." 

"Grrr!" said Dick, trying lo wrile wilh 

nothing lo support the flimsy paper. "'The 

"Not "Lord". 'Larg'," corrected Jim. 
"L-O-R-G." 
Dick crossed oul the 'd' and put 'g', 
" 'No Ma E-l'," continued Jim. "What do 

"Ah'll 'avc plenty o' time to think about 
that when Ah've gol the sack." stated Dick, 
thrusting the paper and pen back at Ken and 
letting in the clutch. "Thai's if Ah'm still alive 

He drove off, Turning, and Jim irudged 
' o the house. Ken had left the 



front do 






lembcred thankfully that 



In the kitchen he got himself a hunk of 
cheese and an apple, and took alternate biles. 
Then he drank a cup of milk and scribbled a 
note which he propped in front of the clock : 
"Don't wake me till you have lo. Mum. I 
didn't sleep very well, l.ove, Jim." 

He crept upstairs, dragged oil his clothes 
and climbed thankfully into the rumpled bed. 
"Too tired lo wash or clean my teeth." lie 



muttered lo himself. I hen he rolled 01 
again, and said his usual "God bless Mut 
and Dad", and added a word of thanks th; 
they'd nil conic safeh ilirnugh ihe daiiycis i 
the night, especially Pru; and that Ray wasn 
dead afler all. He gol hack into hed agaii 
and just before he fell asleep he murmured 
"You know I didn'i mean to kill those gang- 



No one was awake al Ken's house either. 
Ken climbed in al Pru's bedroom window 
and stole down and opened Ihe from door. 
As soon ;is he and Dick had got Pru to tied. 
Dick drove of! in the direction of the Doctor's. 
He wouldn't stop for anything to cat. 

Ken put on the kettle and the grill, and 
began making toasl. His mind was so full of 
what Dick had lold hint in the car thai he 
burnt several pieces. Poor old Pru! Lucky it 
was no worse. He ought never to have left her 
to go home alone though it seemed as if he 
himself might have been dead by now if he 
hadn't. 

The rummest thing of alt was that Ray had 
turned up again. He had never ihought when 
Jim said he'd told "Ray" to investigate Ihe 



, Murr 



wine-bins thai he was referring lo his cousin. 

Ken studied Ihe scrap of paper on which 
Dick had copied the scientist's message. Il 
needed a cleverer brain than his! Who did he 
know that was well educated? 

He snapped his lingers triumphantly. The 
Vicar would solve it ! It began with something 
about the Lord', so it ought to be tight up 
his si reel! 

Ken made more (oast, and took it up to 
Pru with a cup of tea. She said she felt sick, 
but he made her have it. and brought her an 
enamel bowl in case of accidents. 



I Ken. He \ 







"We've had .i bit of an adventure during (he 
night. Jim found a chap who had been kid- 
napped by a eaoH, and after they cleared off, 
Pru and P went with Dick Rawlings lo gel 
him away but he'd disappeared. This gang 
chloroformed Pru - 

"What!" shrieked his mother. His rather 
groaned in his sleep, and turned ovci . 

"It's all right, Mum. Dr. Briggs has seen 
her. and he's coming in later this morning." 

He found he was talking to his molher's 
back. She had leapt out of bed and was 
pulling on her bathrobe. Ken followed her. 

"She's not hurl - lucre's nothing to worry 
about." Ken assured her. She was already 
bending over Pru. who had used the bowl and 
was looking belter. "I've got to go and sec Ihe 
Vicar now Pru'll tell you the rest." 

"No you don't!" declared his mother, 
planting herself firmly in front of Ihe door. 
"Not with that gang about!" 

"It's all right, Jim blew them up with a 
time-bomb," said Ken cheerfully. "Keep 
mum. Mum!" 

Before his mother had got over her 
astonishment. Ken nipped oul of the window 
and dropped nimbly into ihe back yard. 

As he ran along Ihe back-alley, he decided 
Ihat il would be best to go to the cellar and 
check Ihe message before asking Ihe Vicar. 

It was still quite early when he got there. 

prised lo see no constable on guard over the 
wreckage of the Morris. Not lhal anyone 
would wain to steal it. but the police always 
seemed to leave a man on duty anywhere 
where a crime had been committed. 

Ken lilted (he manhole cover and slid 
cautiously down on to Ihe pile or coal. Al the 
bottom he tripped over something soft. His 
heart thudding, he picked himself up. There 
was sufficient lighl from ihe manhole lo see 
niform and silver buttons. The mis- 
table had been thrown down here! 
'This is a good place lo gel oul of!" Ken 
d himself. Then he checked his momentary 
ind fell the huddled figure. Ihe police 



.[ill , 



Ken 



lar to complete his errand. 
-as sculTled near (wo of ihe wine- 
bms. In one he made out the faint original -of 
the message in his pocket, in the other he 
could find nothing hut some brown smears 
until he looked under the top flagstone. 
There, in letters that were still sticky, a 
finger had traced the words: 

1)1 BEHIND FLAG TRAPPED ARM R 
Gingerly Ken touched one of the letters, and 
examined his finger. Then he realised with 
horror that Ray's message hail been written 

(To be continued next week.) 



WASH 



BUT THE eww wtiettr OF THE MUTE 




CRICKET COACHING by LEARIE CONSTANTINE 





POSITION 

TAKEN UP FOR 

\ AGGRESSIVE STROKE 

NOTE: HE.ELLDOWN 










©.-.. 




WHAT DID THE fakfe} 

DISCOVER ? 




JWfap^k 



WHO DISCOVERED THE WORLDS 

d 400 (eet high 



WHO DISCOVERED 
mvtfbtS HAPPENS? 




<2ji 



Thoufih the ancient Greek! hu 
airy Englishman's head that Ic 









u 



^ .ffljaiuiiAoife 

W**™ LIQUORICE ALL-SORTS 




ISOhJ & CO. LTD, PONTEFKACT. YORKSHIRE 



GK£AT 9 *7>l*' &AK6AM Offtft 




425i 

^mamuim 



rl't'J: ^ Ex-Government SOLID LEATHER 

™d i« fai. lw.J.*li«=nd,M< n lUHfl UDIIS BOYS SHAH HEN 

«-. :SSr. IpD SEWHI 



THE SPY 
CATCHERS 



BERNARD NEWMAN 




NAPOLEAN used to say that one 
spy in ihe right place might be 
worth 20,000 men in the battle- 
field. Thus, if you captured that 
spy, you would have done a very good job. 

The spy-catcher is just as important as the 
spy. ir your country is on the defensive, he is 
even more important. 

I had intended to deal this week with codes 
and spy messages, but recent spy cases have 
aroused great interest in our spy-catching 
methods, so the codes can wait. 

Every country pretends that it doesn't 
employ spies. If you are an agent abroad and 
are foolish enough to get caught, your govern- 
ment will disown you. "That man one of our 
spies? Rubbish never heard of him." 
Naturally, no one is deceived. 

However, every country frankly admits 
that it has an organisation for counter- 
espionage, or catching spies. 

A brief glance at the British system may be 
useful. Several departments have sections 
devoicd to "Intelligence" or obtaining infor- 
mation - the Admiralty. War Office. Air 
Ministry and Foreign Office all have their 
specialised leant. They are supervised by the 
Joint Intelligence Committee which reports 
directly to the Prime Minister. 

Thejob of catching spies has been entrusted 
to one section, the fifth, of Military Intelli- 
gence - the famous M.I.5. You have heard 
of this very often, but the other sections, 
numbered from I — M. are very secret, and 
I doubt if you have ever heard them men- 
tioned. Their job is to yel information: that 
is to say, they direct spies in other countries, 
so naturally they don't talk about their jobs. 
But M.I. 5 only catches spies - yet its members 
often have more adventures than the others. 

M.I.S has a collaborator, the Special 
Branch of Scotland Yard, and never itself 
appears in public When it has nailed down a 
spy, it hands over the case to the Special 
Branch, which makes the arresl and sees the 
trial through. 

And how does M.I. 5 set to work? In war 
lime it has Ihe advantage of the censorship. 
Letters to and from foreign countries are 
examined at 









ink." 



docks are very useful allies. Watch the next 
lime you arc going on board a ship at a port. 
When you show your passport, the officer 
may refer to a rather fat pockel book. This 
contains a record of "wanted" people. 

M.I. 5 agents pay especial attention to 
factories where war weapons are made, or 
camps where they are being tested. 

The first spy lecture I ever heard was on 
the subject of "Trifles'. The tutor pointed out 
that most spies gave themselves away by 
some liny point, or a trifle which they forgot. 
I have proved for myself that he was righl. 

Many a spy has been betrayed because 
some quick-witted* observer - not necessarily 
an official has noled some little detail which 
was not quite right. 



: German spy who was landed 
1 on Ihe east coast of England by nighl, 
from a submarine. He got ashore safely, and 
destroyed his rubber dinghy. He was a 
dangerous man: he spoke very good English, 
and had a perfectly forged ration book and 
identity card. 

He wanted to get about. Two miles down 
the coast he saw a village. He walked along. 
Outside the village inn were a lot of bicycles. 
He stole one, and made off. Then he forgot a 
trifle - he forgot that the British rule of the 
road was the opposite to the German: he 
rode off on the right hand side of the road, to 
be held up by a village policeman before he 
had gone four hundred yards! 

Another German agenl, who landed in 
Scotland, went to a local railway station and 
asked for a ticket to Aberdeen. "2/10," said 
the booking clerk. The man put down two 
pounds ten shillings. This did not prove that 
he was a German spy - he might have been a 
shipwrecked Norwegian sailor who did not 
understand our money. But it did justify the 
clerk in laking further precautions. 

You see how important spy training is? 
Themanmusl know the smallest details about 
the country in which he is to operate. 

He must also have a calm nerve, especially 
in ihose awkward moments when first on the 
job. Two other Germans went to a booking 
office. One said: "Third-class to London. 
.Icrk issued it. and said to the 



ccood r 



•■The s 



And 




wilh such trifles free, so to speak. Sometimes 
- especially when they have a man under in- 
terrogation - they can lead a suspect on until 
he gives himself away. One friend of mine 
questioned a girl for five hours. She was 
word-perfect until she made a mistake 
about a bus fare. As my friend returned to 
the point again and again, she saw that he 
was suspicious, gol frightened, and confessed. 

Lord Baden Powell, the founder of the Boy 
Scouts, in his junior days was an Intelligence 
Officer, and revealed in a hook called My 
Adventures as u Spy how he gol out of an 
awkward situation. He was held on suspicion 
by a rural policeman in Germany until an 
inspector arrived. Lord Baden Powell asked 
permission to smoke. He rolled and smoked 
one cigarette and then another. After that he 
didn't care if a dozen inspectors came. He 
had made his notes on cigarette paper, and 
had smoked them. 

Yet this incident shows how my warning 
about trifles can act both ways. As I said, the 
story was published, and as every village 
policeman must have been a Scout at some 
lime the method became well-known. Thus, 
if Ihe suspect were being held, and asked to 
smoke, the dullest-witted policeman would 
make a grab for his cigarette papers. More 
than one spy went to his death because he 
forgot a spy-rule - that he should never use 
a melhod which has been revealed. The spy- 
catcher, of course, uses the point the oiher 
way round. He will suggest, that the suspect 
might like to smoke. Then he will produce 
matches, but let the man bring out his own 
cigarettes. 



You know how orderly the Germans arc. 
They like rules and regulations, and so 
oflcn depend upon "organisation". Our spy- 
catchers study this habit ortheirs very closely. 
In the second World War. for example, quite 
a number of German agenls were parachuted 
into Britain. Each man was given a standard 
spy kit. It included a portable radio set, 
identity card and ration book and £500 in 
cash. Since he might need food before being 
in a position to appear in public, the spy also 
carried a small slock of rations. These 
always included a German sausage! 

Ihe Germans were so methodical thai if 
you Tound a man in possession of this outfit, 
him of being a spy 



But 



1.5 c 



lo give ihcmseki's auav by i rifles, ll watches 
carefully places where spies arc likely lo 
operate, and "inliltrates" its own agents 
inside - that is to say, if a factory is making 
some hush-hush weapon, its security does not 
depend entirely upon the policeman at the 
gate: one or two M.I. 5 agents may be inside 
the factory - as ordinary workmen- A couple 
of years before ihe war, a man in Woolwich 
Arsenal foolishly fell to the approaches of a 
foreign agenl, and began to hand over plans 
and details of processes. He used lo lake these 
out of the Arsenal, photograph I hem, and 
then lake Ihem back. This went on for 
months. 

1 le had a girl who gol fonder and fonder of 
him. She was nice and Huffy, but so dumb 
that he didn't even send her away when he 
was taking his photographs. 

After his arrest that man got the shock of 
his lire. Ihe principal wilness at his trial was 
his "dumb" blonde. She was a brillianl 
counter-spy. 



M.I. 5 and the Special Branch would tell 
you or Ihis biggesl nuisance. During the war 
you heard many stories about Hashing lights, 
radio sets up chimneys, and so on. All ihese 
stories had to be. investigated - and about one 
in three million had something in ii. You can 
imagine Ihe time wasted. 

Now when a policeman catches a criminal 
in the act, he promptly arrests him. Acounlcr- 
spy ts not in such a hurry. He watches his 
first suspect, hoping that Ihe man will lead to 

Sometimes known spies have been left at 
large for years, carefully watched when they 
have made journeys, and their post examined. 
This method nearly always pays good divi- 
dends. At the outbreak of war in 1939 nearly 
600 Germans were interned. They were not 
all spies, but some had been noled in contact 
with spies, and others had the opportunity to 
spy if they were so inclined. 

There is one big difference between the 
British spy services and those of countries 
like Germany and Russia. We prefer com- 
paratively small services, staffed by lirsl -class 
and trained men. They prefer huge organisa- 
tions. The total strength of M.I, 5 and the 
Special Branch is only about 700: the 
Russians have tens of Ihousands of Security 
Police, or counter-spies. 

The best example of clever counter- 
espionage of the "trifles"' brand, occurred in 
the first world war. The Germans employed 
a Swiss girl as their messenger. She had to 
cross into France, visit resident agenls and 
collect from them details of where all our 
divisions were. At that time we had more than 
60 divisions in France. They were not lined up 
from the North in numerical order - first, 
second, third Division, and so on. They were 
hopelessly mixed - 2lsl Division, 30th 
Division, 7th - like that. 

How could the girl carry the details back 
to Switzerland? She could not memorise such 
a jumble of numbers. So she began lo 
embroider (hem. 

When entering France, she wore a plain 
petticoat. Before she left, she embroidered 
a rose patiern around its hem, back in 
Switzerland, all she had lo do was to count 
stitches. Starting from the scam, if the first 
ctnhroiileicd rose was made up of 21 stitches, 
that stood for the 21st Division: the next had 
30 slitches the idea was clever. 

For months the Swiss girl got away wilh it. 
1 hen ^he forgot a trifle. It went against the 
grain to buy a new petticoat for every journey 
and to throw il away after "using it only once. 
So she began lo buy very cheap ones. 

But one day a French woman counter-spy 
was searching her at Ihe frontier. The woman 
thought: "This is strange. This girl has done 
all this lovely embroidery - but she has done 
il on material so poor lhal ii won'l sianrj up 
lo half a dozen washes, why?" 

The question "why?"' is dangerous in war 
time. The girl was detained for enquiries, 
broke down and confessed. Eventually she 
was shot because she only paid 4/1 l.j inslcad 
of 6/ II \ for her petticoats. 

Just now our counter-spy service is being 
criticised because of the case of Dr. Fuchs. 
M.I. 5 only comes into the news when it 
appears to have Tailed. Its hundreds of 
successes are never made public. But I can 
icll yon (his tt is very good indeed. 

Another Spy S lory by fyrnartl Newman soon 



PROFESSOR BRITTAIN EXPLAINS: deep sea diving 




Any Questions! 

Write to Professor Brittain, e/o e a g l e , if you have any questions or problems you would like him to deal with. He will be on this page every fortnight. 



SETH AND SHORTY - COWBOYS 



• ! ! 


THESE 

LETS 


TH6 FIRST ^ 




•W%.ii 








Sin 


mik 


"i 






In 


« 




















sr:m ANts shorts 
aresi;ar( h(n(j 

FOR THE 

■'MYSTKRY MAN" 













SHORTY / 
WE GOT TO ClT 

AND TRAIL BLACK JAKE 
AND THE OTHER TWO _____ 




I la <^ 







( ^^^ftf/w^ 1Hl "«TEHV M*N 

__RJ*\ IT MiNtseinsiMsioe. it's 

KJK$_r NiexKAN 


jJfL _V 


___33-&*Ly i 

Km] 





MY IDENTITY MUST 
8fc KEPT SECRET. THE 
ND1ANS KNOW ME A3 THE 

1 MAN WITH TMEM 

I DRESS AS A 






S Kl P PY 



THE KANGAROO 



BY DANET. OUBRISAY, GENESTRE 




HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 



EDEE1 ^Ja^^^^t 




: HE SUSOEMD 
r lU£ ENGINE BENEATH THE 
OF THE AIRSHIP AND FIT A RUDDER 
SHOULD 6EA&LETPMAK.E AN AERIAL' 
JOURNEY. WEWII.L 
M'TWEtN THE ENVELOPE AND E«QI 
FR.EVENT AW DISTORTION OF THE FABRIC 



DISCOVERING THE COUNTRYSIDE 




REAL LIFE MYSTERIES 




THE TREASURE THAT WASN'T 

The old-time pirates of Ihc Pacific were fond 
of tilde Cocos Island, lying 3fl0 miles south- 
west of Panama. Often they called there to 
refill (heir water casks. Amongst the blood- 
thirsty fellows who came to Cocos were 
such famous characters as Captain Davis, 
Bemlo Bonito and Captain Thomson. 
The great days of the buccaneers ended. 



The world forgot peaceful Cocos Island. 
Occasionally Royal Navy vessels continued !o 
call there for waler. 

Until about 1850 when someone muttered 
the magic phrase: "There's treasure buried in 
Cocos Island.'* Adventurers hastily reached 
for maps. Cunning old sailors began drawing 
rough cham of the island, which they sold to 
foolish treasure seekers. 

The hunt starled. Ships came to Cocos 



Island from all over the world. Parties landed 
and started digging and blasting, ruining the 
island. Admiral Palliser in the warship, 
H.M.S. Imperi?u.ie, landed his entire crew on 
the island in 1896. They dynamited most of 
the island and sailed away disappointed. 

Between 1S99-I9I4 seven oilier expeditions 
searched Cocos Island. An American party 
camped there in 1920 and Canadians arrived 
soon afler the Americans left. 



The wild search is still going on - perhaps 
at this moment. No one will ever find the 
treasure for the obvious reason thai there Ls 
none. Only three pirates might have buried 
wealth on Cocos - Davis, Thomson and 
Benito. Davis look his loot to America. 
Benito shot himself when chased by H.M.S. 
Espiegh; and Thomson never had any 
treasure. Who starled the rumour? It has 
already thrived for a hundred years. 




fte Ovaltineys 

OWN CORKER /AMUSEMENT 



TH KRE is a very good 
the many thousands of Ovalti 
all over the country are such heatih'v, 
jolly boys and girls. 
Remember that every Ovsltiney 
makes it a golden rule to drink 
■Ovaltine' every' day. Thisdcli 
food beverage provides special 
nourishment which helps so much to 
build up strength, energy and fitness. 
Ask mother to make ' Ovaltine ' your 
regulardaily beverage. It-will help vou 
to be successful in sports and games 
and to do your best in schoolwork. 




MAKI NG YOUR OWN MODEL RACING CAR 



FRONT AXLE ASSEMBLY 



I 



^= ^ 7 ■ I —i h- —i i- j— jfl^na»- 



CONSTRUCTING 

THE 1^ LITRE 
E.R.A. RACING CAR 

PART in 

by G. W. Arftiur — &t*ar\ci , 




iri 




FRONT AXUE 



ASSEMBLY OF FRONT AXLE 
AND FUEL TANK TO CHASSIS 



You will treed firsta strip of 
mild sted b«-9inx%*ix%2n. 
Bend to Hie shape shown ottop 
left and drill the 1WO cento 
holes to take 6 BA,bolt5. Any 
material left on Hie ends may 
be filed <may. Nextthe axle 
stubs, which will depend, fbr 
diameter, upon the type of 
wheels if has been decided fc 
fit: They may either betumej 
down, as shown.-frran a wet 
of ^S in. bar and thnsaaed 
both ends; or adapted fror 
sftWorcl bolts and nufeoP — 
suitable sire, with the shanks passing through holes in the awe and 
■the- heads braied or soldered on -the inside . The, wheels may then be 
fitted with brass washers on the outersides, emd the whole ' — 
assembled to the chassis as shon/n. 
FUEL TANK This needs only a email hacksaw, light-tin shears solder 




and ik soldering icon. Cut the sides as shown m the GA.at left - , 
allowing tin extra 14-in. all round for the flanges. Now mark our a 
2^ in. sguare in the tentnes and trim the end6 off to the outside 
of the, cornei- witer-sections. Place over the end of a smaller block, 
of wood ayiA bend flanges over ait right angles. Malte sure both 
sides are. identical; -then cut and bend copper- tvttoing as shown ,-ind, 
with a brass wsaslTer cm either side, solder in ftoce, after 
drilling holes oPi*pprcipr-iate size, in the positions indicated. Finsh 
by odfiiB a strip |lm.tongX%in. wide, drillirg and soldering \e«t and, 
lastly, sweating round the flanges with the ends overlapping. Add the 
mounting plates and -fit "to the forward end of the chassis gap, using 
■ : -i1 >,nuta arxk wfcashcrs. 



ENGINE AMD SACK AXLE INSTALLATION 



Place the engine in position c 
the chassis, mark off mounting hole 
centres and drill for 6 BA. bolts. 

Bolt the bock axle in place on the 
toeare^s, lower the drive shoftto 
the universal coupling on the clutch 
drum and mark, off ¥brlengtb, 
allowing for the ball joint- CuT lb 
the required length and thread 
'A B.SF, after which scnew the 
bull joint tightly home.. 

The whole assembly may now/ be. 
finally installed using belong 
washers or lock-nuts to prevent 
loosening due +0 bumps ani vibration 



ADJUST TO AmavV 
l /fc4 APPROX 
END PLAV. 




TVIREAD SHAFT V^ B.S.F 
TO TAKE STANDAQD 
BALL. JOINT. 



SPORTING PERSONALITIES 




EAGLE CLUB 



AND EDITOR'S PAGE 



The Editor's Office 

EAGLE 

43 Shoe Lane, London, EC4 



■ OST t 



will by 



Mi'LUH Badge and Certificate of 
Membership at taut, thaw of 
you who applied in (he first week or two, We 
are sorry for the delay but we wore simpr) 
overwhelmed by the "ava- W^-SU^'W-;; 
fanche of letters that des- '}>Tg^\\f 

We had 60,000 letters in Sot^V^S^ 

very glad indeed to get 
ihem, but you will undcrsland that it takes 
: them all out, open 



Ihem and reply. Pa 



cthcy 






eadc 



pent 






the B 



hilling. The ■ 



offered the Badge 
free, included in the I/- Membership Sub- 
scription. And please send your application 
for membership to EAGie Colley House, 
New Street Square, London, E.CA. (Other 
letters to the Ldilor should go lo die address 
given at the top of this page). Usually we 
shall print a Form of Application for Mem- 
bership, but there is not room for it in this 
issue. But all ; 






h:; 



nbers 



□in the k 
Order Ibi 

the nama 



and t 



iheS 



have been 

Air Display on July 8ih.~They were in the 
first 100 applications opened on April 19th. 
C. F. Moulder. Chi! tern Road, Dunstable 
John Anthony Hooper, Christchurch Road, 
Tulse Hill, S.W.2, 
Brian Martin, Kenmore Avenue. Kenton. 
David Ball, Hallowcll Road, Northwood. 
Alfred E. Taylor, Glyn Road, E.5. 
Derek G. H, Hughes, Derringstone. Barnaul 
Anthony R. Pohlman. Grays Lane. Hiiehin. 
Raymond Gordon, Rayners Uoc, Harrow. 
Tony Brenton, Tovil, Maidslone. 
Richard Halliday, Victoria Road, Moldon. 
David Carpenter, Soulhchurch, 

Southend -i in-Scii. 
John C. Wright, Winton, Bournemouth, 
Fred Odgers. 144 Chapter Road, N.W.2. . 
Peter Bradshaw. Pemdevon Road, West 



Nigel Voller, St, Helens Park Roat 
I. Davis, Have n stock, Dinton. Nr 
Pamela Frances Alchin, Stafford 

Rachel Hedges, Burghlcy Road, 



Peter Wehb, Ladbroke Grove, 
George Frost, Robert Close, Chigwell. 
Gavan Thomas Hewitt, Knight Avenue, 

GtlliiiEham. 
Fred Tyler, King Georges Field, 

Stow-in-lhe-Wold. 
David Rutledge, I Arthur Street. Grays. 
Joyce Smith. 26 Stanford Road. Luton. 
Alan E. Gent. 203 Ley Street, llford. 

Again we want to make clear that the 
number on your member- 
ship card has nothing lo . 
do with the order in which 
applications were opened. 





WH ate very sorry that so many people 
have been unable lo gel copies oft a<jLL 
each week. The trouble is that there has been 
such a huge demand lot copies that we just 
have nol been able to print enough.. We arc 
doing our best to put this right as soon as 
possible and we hope before long lo lie able 
to supply everyone The punters are working 
24 hours a day and Ihe printing machine 
never stops running day or night. 

It can print a good many thousand copies 
'an hour but even that is not enough. Very 
ry is needed Lo prim 



r. been 



t has 
uidlherehastobeadill'er 



v pages ii 



md befon 
i'iuh Members 
'or then 



ong we hope t 



As copies of EAtiLh are so difficult to 
at present, will you help by doing I 
things; First, place a regular order with yi 
newsagent If he knows you warn a ci 
every week, he can put in a delinile order t 
e you gel your copy. Secondly, \ 




COMPETITION CORNER 

I. S ELECT I <) N CO MM ITT BE If von were a member of Ihe M.C.C 
Selection Committee, which Players would you choose to represent England in ihe 
first Test Mutch with Ihe West Indies on 8fh June. 1950? 



Complete the coupon above, stick il on a Post Card and send it lo Cricket. EAGLf 
4 New Slreel Square, London, L.C. 4. to arrive not later than Wednesday. 17th May 
I '»SD. IYoui Post Card should beat a 2d. stamp remember). 



the M.C.C). 

2. HIDDEN FAME A lot of yo 
at school, and one that is introduced in 
Now. then, how well do you know s 
A sentence from the plav - a famoi 
stpiares. You slan on a 
certain square (no tel- 
ling which!) and move 
up, down or sideways 
bul never diagonally 
If you take the right 
steps Ihe whole sen- 



:sponding lo Ihe Official Selection made r 
will have icau some of Shakespeare's pla; 



S.WE 



Some square 


show tust 


one feller, o 


icrs show 


others shot 


obiecls 


winch nuhca 


e a letter. 



to 



RY 



H 



OS 



£ 



All 



P 



ESm 



3l 



M 



M 



ME 



H 



W 



to mislead you. pjiqi Mp| iuoij |>-uqi ajcnbs au| uiojj yeis ;, 

COMPETITION RESULT 

The winner of the Slrip Cartoon Slory competition in the lirst issue of I 
Brian Herman, 2X King Ldwatd Avenue. Blackpool. (Aged 13), A prize o 
Niiiional Savings Certificate is beiny sent lo him. We had a grcal many 
among which were some very good stories, bul many went far over the linn 
winds and oilier, were nol suitable lor pieseiilinj? in strip cartoon form. W 
the winner because his story wax exciting and had several good ideas in il. Il 



thatc 



show 



>ell ii 



I lie following who shi 

David M.icmarl' 

i Monmm, St. Hclii 



CHICKO 



by thelwell 




■ Tn my 
fat me 


New 
ever) 


aL'.ciU 

week 


please onto 
mil further > 


1 *G If 




Aikln-h 










! 












THIS 

T TO 


\-on\- 
YOU 






HAND 
] TAKE 


TO YOUR N 
ft NEWSAGE 


EWSSOYOR 
NT'S SHOP ! 



hash Lonergan's Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 




Chapter 5 



MOUNTED musical thai 
under 14!" bawled' 
"Come cm. Squib!" cried Lash 
and Rawhide in unison. 
Squib scrambled on lo his pony. Paich, and 
fogged off ro ihe middle of the sports ground. 
Fourteen young competitors, mounted on 
animals of various shapes and sizes, lined the 
circle with thirteen chairs grouped in the 



To- 






The music slopped In a Hash, Squib slipped 
from Patch's back and raced for the middle, 
lie was one of the first three to fling them- 
selves on to the chairs. 

"That's bonzcr. Squib!" called Lash. 

"That's bosker. Squib!" shouted Rawhide. 

Then there were only thirteen hoys and 
twelve chairs. Soon there were twelve boys 
and eleven chairs. And so on . . . 

It was soon obvious to everybody that the 
event was going lo be won either by Squih or 
by a tall, skinn\ hoy who could not dismount 
as quickly as Squib, but coutd run faster once 
he touched the ground. 

"'Squib-Squib-Squib!" cried Lash and 
Rawhide and soon the cry was taken up by 

'Skinny-Skinny-Skinny!' cried the lanky 



lad's 



s and s 



c chairs left . . . 
then only two , . , then only one. 
Squib and Skinny circled it to the sound of 

wailing for the music to stop. 

Then Squib suddenly got an idea. If he 
stood on Patch's back he would be in a belter 
position to leap from his hoise at the right 
moment, and so he would be halfway there 
before Skinny coutd get out of the saddle. 

With the easy skill he had acquired in the 
circus, he placed his hands on the pommel 
and lifted his feel on to Patch's plump rump. 

A moment later he stood upright perfectly 
balanced on Patch's back as ihe pony went 

The surprised spectators applauded and 
cheered, while Squib got ready to leap the 
instant the music stopped. 

Hut Patch, not being a trained circus pony, 
was bewildered by his rider's trick. He did 
no! know that he was supposed to continue 
iii i circle around the remaining chair. With 
a snoif and a toss of his head, he started for 

"Hey. I'alch, git back !" cried Squib, vainly 
waving his arms. The crowd's cheers turned 
to roars of laughter. 

Patch bolted. The music slopped: Squib 
flung himself from the galloping, swerving 
pony and tell headlong into the dust. 

By the lime lie scrambled to his feet, 
spitting out the grit, he saw Skinny trium- 
phantly sealing Inruiclf in the chair. 



had entertained them with his trick riding. 

After Skinny was presented with Ihe first 
prize of ten shillings. Squib went up 10 the 
judge's box expecting to get the second prize 
or live shillings. 

"But." explained ihe announcer to the 
crowd, "we've decided this kid deserves a 
special prize for being such a clever nder. So 
young Squib gets ten bob, too." 

The delighted boy. after capturing Patch, 
rode back to his cobbers to receive their con- 
gratulations. 

'"You're a couple o' clever lads," said Raw- 
hide admiringly to Lash and Squib, "I can't 

Bui you jist wait till I capture The Hunchback 
and gil a thousand quid." 

"Skite!" laughed Iju*. "Out of my way, 
skite. I've got to win this cattle drafting 

Lash's bright manner concealed the misery 
of his pain as he rode into the ring. He won- 
dered how long he would be able to keep the 
grip on the saddle so essential in roughriding. 
Balance and grip - those were the two quali- 
lies lhat had made him Champion of Cham- 
pions. But one was nol much good without 
the other. 

A steer dashed from ihe dockyard. A horse- 
man galloped alongside, wheeling the animal 
round the first post . . . then round the 
second post . , . then towards the gate. 

The steer baulked and swung away. The 
competitor swiftly reined his mount and cut 
across to the other side. The sleei boiled back 
in the wrong direction. 

Twice the stockman vainly tried to drive it 
through the gate. And then — 

O-orA.'went ihe judge's whip, because time 
was up. 

"Poor cove," muttered Lash to himself. 
"He's been cracked off. I hope I can pick a 
sleer that'll run fasl and straight where 1 want 



"Messiter," called the announcer. 

Dago displayed perfect horsemanship lo 
gel his steer round the posts, through Ihe gale, 
and across Ihe finishing line in the excellent 
time of 52j seconds. However much Lash 
despised the man for his evil ways, he could 
not help admiring Dago's superb skill in the 
saddle. 

"Jackson," called the announcer. This com- 
pclilor took 68 seconds. The one after let Ins 
steer get right out of control, and he was 
cracked off. 

"Lonergan." called the announcer. 



liKuigh 



.lvement hurt his swollen 
o sit his horse wilh perfect 
and his smile was as bright and gay as 



At the stockyard, he ran his eye over the 
remaining steers. They were a wild lot. 
Choosing a wicked-looking animal that 
appeared last, he said lo one of the mounted 
stewards, "That's my rabbit." 

The stewards parted lo let him enter the 
yard, and then closed behind him. 

Culling out the steer was a matter of 
seconds. The stewards parted again. Out 
raced the steer into the ring - and the judges' 
stop-watches clicked. 

"R-r-r-run!" bellowed Lash at the racing 
steer as he scnl Monarch galloping in pursuit. 

Round the first post . . . round the second 
post . . . (Ah, thai knee!] . , . and on to the 
gate. 

The steer baulked and swung away. Lash 
I timed Monarch as if on a sixpence. 

"Get him, cobber!" muttered Lash to his 
splendid horse. 

Monarch strained forward and, at full 
gallop, thrust his chest against the steer's 
shoulder, urging and turning him towards the 




For a frightening fraction of a second. Lash 
thought they would hii one of the gateposts. 
Rut they escaped by inches. 

"Through!" cried Lash jubilantly, It was a 

finishing line. 

Breathlessly he waited for Ihe result. 

"Fifiy-one seconds!" A roar of applause 
broke out. Lash cantered across lo hi' smiling 
friends and received their congratulations. 
He knew that only by a miracle could any of 
the remaining contestanls beat his time. In 
due course he collected first prize. 

"Hey, cobbers, jist look at all those black- 
fellers with spears!" Squib exclaimed. 

"Run for your lives!" roared Rawhide, 
prelending lo panic. Then he laughed and 
explained lo Squib lhat it was an aboriginal 
spear- throwing competition. 

Lach of Ihe dozen compclitors carried 
three ironwood spears, tipped with glittering 
points of white quartz. 



ground. It plunged it,-, quartz t 
earth and stood quivering, msuh 
from the thrower. 

"I wonder it our cobber Mopol 
those abos," remarked Lash as 
the line of hlack faces.' 

Rawhide had a different thot 
mind. He spoke it bluntly, "L 
never ride a buckjumper today." 

The roughri 



un.lc, lev 






, I >;i,. 



:onds ! 



nger. 



Thi point oj the ipear hurivd itself in the gruiituJ. 



o" the upper air as my Chinese friends say 
thai you won't be siltin' on a horse for your 

"And what's thai goin' to be?"' queried 
Squib. 

For reply, Lash felt for the whip at his licit. 
He jerked the handle and unloosened the 
pliable coils of plaited leather, tipped wilh a 
white horsehair cracker. 

"You won't have any trouble wmnin" that 
coniesl," grinned Rawhide lo Australia's 
greatesi stockwhip expert. 

"But all the same, I'll give 'em all I've got. 
They'll expect me lo put on a show." 

Squib sighed enviously: "I wisht I could 
put on a stockwhip show and have everybody 

"So you shall !"' cried Lash in sudden in- 
spiration. "The hairy Irishman is always my 
partner in Ihese events, but loday you're 
going to be out (here in the ring with me." 

''Aw, gee " began the bewildered boy. 

"Duck!" bellowed Rawhide, dragging 
Squib lo ihe ground as Lash, obeying the 
order, dropped to his knees. 

Tchuk* 

The point of the spear buried itself in the 
ground only a few inches from Lash's 
crouching body. 



He leapt to his I'eet amid the crowd's uproar 
and stared across the ground at the 
spear-throwing competitors. The stewards, 
grouped round one of ihe blacks, were 
obviously expressing \trijiis disapproval. 

One of them turned and hurried over to the 
K'ughfidcr and his friends. 

"Sorry, Lash," he said. "But one of those 
abos got excited and threw a bit wild. You 
know what those coves are like when they 
lose their block. But he won't chuck any more 
spears today. We've disqualified him." 

"Who's ihe abo."' asked Lash casually. 

"Oh, just one of the blacks from ihe hills." 
replied the steward, glancing at his list. 

"1 don't suppose by any chance his name is 
Yabbayabba'.'" said Lash in meaning tones. 

"That's right. Yabbayabba. How did you 

"Oh, he always was a careless cove," re- 
marked Lash casually. The slcward eyed him 
sharply, then hurried otf. 

The rottghrider said to his friends: "See 




Chuckle, easy does i(." 

He recalled how, night after night, hi 
secretly slipped down [o the paddock 



yende stroking, combined with his inhor 

of the "wild mare", as they used to call hi 
on Coolabah Creek station. 

"..Mik- ihjng. rop.Miinj:' I host caresses, sirokin 
the glossy neck and murmuring words c 
atteclion and soothing encouragement. 
-Hike il e-e-easy. Chuckle, old girl. T;.k 



in his mouth and turned sideways, but 


oul Of 


"You know 1 haven't goi a hundred 


the mob were taken aback bv Lash's humbler 


the corner of his eve lie could set Lasl 


swing 


pounds." replied 1 ash. He added signi- 


They knew this was the mare (hat had 


the writhing whip. With a tremendou 


effort 


ficantly: "And you also know why." 


brought ahoul his disgrace three vears ago. 


ol will, the boy kepi his neck rigid a 


nd his 


Dago shrugged. "Verv well, then. 1 II hei 


and they expected him to show surprise or 


head perfectly steadv. 




vou a hundred to <me in pounds (hat you 


concern, angci or liiniditv, or even disdain - 


Snap! He shut his eves - opened the 




won't sit on this horse lor ten seconds." 




sec thai halt the feather had gone, 




"It's a go'" exclaimed Lash. "Shake!" 


""Poor Chuckle, murmured Lash. ""What 


Above i lie noise of the applause hi 


heard 


A handshake before the stewards, and the 


have thev done to vou'' 


Lash calling: ■Only one more nick. 1- 


ce me 


challenge was accepted. 


The scene in the paddock came back 


and stand perfectly still," 




"And now," said Lash, ""lei's see this 


vividly to his mind. His Uncle Peter. tall and 


Squib did as he was lold. The whip 


darted 


ferocious animal " 


smiling, challenging him to ride t huckle, the 


forward and Ricked the other half 


of the 


"With the greatest ol pleasure." smiled 


mare that only Uncle Peter could ride - or so 


leather from his mouth. 




Dago, leading the way to the stockvards. 


he ihocghi 


(1 leaped forward again - straight 


at the 


"This is your horse. ' he said when Ihcy 


He recalled the faces or the stockmen 


boy's face. Squib instinctively stalled t 


move 


reached the chosen yard. "And you're wel- 


gathered there to watch (he battle - some 


buck Then he saw 1 ash's expression 


Of da- 


come to it " 


anxious, some amused, but all wishing him 


mav. He froze into immoHity and h 


Id his 


Lash hauled himself up on to the rails and 




breath. The whistling lash nickered 


jefore 


looked down on the chestnut - saddled. 


The voice ol Dago broke into his thoughts. 


his eves - then suddenly eoikd itsell 


about 


roped, and closely penned. Ihe animal 


"Well," he called up to the voung man on the 


his neck as gently as a thread of silk. 




snorted, flattened ears, showed whiles of eves. 


stockyard fence, 'are vou going to lake up 


Shaking the coils tree. Lash ran 


o the 


Straining at the ropes, the brute gave the 


my challenge t 


astonished bov and slapped him on th 


t back 


impression of concentrating Ihe evil of all 


"Too right 1 am! ' Lash agreed eagerlv. 






horseflesh in one animal. 1-1 was certainly a 


Dago smiled mysteriously at Greasy Joe. 


"That was bonzcr!" exclaimed the 


Ough- 


fearsome sight. 


who gnlla wed behind his hand. 



He did not tell them that Lash had secretly 
made friends with Chuckle till she would let 
him ride her bareback. He did not tell them 
that Lash had refused to nde the mare that 



nuns: ii 



t. then it should 



n his. 



Meanwhile, over at the stockyard. Lash 
had persuaded Chuckle to slop trembling 
and straining at the ropes. He lold the hand- 
lers to take the ropes oil altogether. 

"That's a bonzcr girl!" murmured Lush 
delighted! 1 ., running his hand down the 



(To be continued) 




ROB CONWAY in search of a secret city 



' 




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