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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

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NIATIOMAL STRIP CARTOON! WEEKLY 






she's lanuing here — 
you're right, PIERR.E, IT 

IS A ROCKET KITE-WHAT 
HAVE WE JOINED MOW 

A MUSEUM!" 



( NOW WHAT THE 
HECK D'YOU RECKON 
\THAT IS, PIERRE ? 



LOOKS 

LIKE A ROCKET 
SHIP TO ME, 



HANK. 





LET'S ASK THE CHAUFFEUR OF 

THAT CONTRAPTION HEY, MAC, 

WE RE LOOKING FOR A 

WHY, DANf WHAT ARE YOU 
DOING IN THAT THING ? 




DON'T ^U LIKE \ V'fA/i/i-'* 



SO THAT; 

IT- A SUICIDE 
\CLU8- WELL YOU 
\CAN ELECT ME 

i 



HELLO HANK, PIERRE 
-GOOD TO SEE YOU 
\ TWO AGAIN 



MY LITTLE ROCKET 
SHIPS ^ YOU'D 
BETTER-BECAUSE 
YOURE GOING TO 
FLY ONE IN THE 
NEXT ATTEMPT 
ON VENUS . 



'for pete's ' 

.SAKE, DAN- 
\ WHAT GOES/ 
\ ON 





NO SUICIDE AT ALL , MAWK- 
COMEIKTIDTHE MESS 
- AND r'm GIVE YOU 
, J THE WMOCE 
l' 1 PICTURE 



'T....^T0U SEE, OUR LITTLE V- 
ROCKET KITES WILL BE CARRIED 
BY A BIG SHIP .LIKE P^NES ON 
THE OLD AIRCRAFT CARRIERS. 
UNTIC WE ARE SlEARTHE rWN^R 
ZOME. THEK VS/ELL BE 
SHOT OFF IN THE ROCXET^^'«B 



. AND IF MY THEORY IS RIGHT 
WE'LL SAI L CLEAN THRCHJSH 
THE RAYWELDTO VENUS , 



BUT SUPPOSE VOUR 
THEORVAlNT RIGHT? 



HAVE A NICE STRONG 
CUP OF COFFEE. 
SIR 



YEAH— ^ 
//=■ TOUR THEORY 
IS R1GHT_ . 



THANKS, DlGf 
(GULP) 





BUT THIS IS A l-'ERV 
DANGEROUS PROJECT, 
PROFESSOR 



PROFESSOR PEABOW MUSI 
ACCOMPANY YOU ^ 



JUST IN YOUR ^ 
SPARE TIME, I * 
SUPPOSE, PROFESSOI 



I'M AFRAID YOU MUST TAKE X ^'OM£N: 
THAT AS A DIRECT ORDER FROM] PAHf 



WERE READY TO TAKE 
OFF Sir, as ^OON 
AS THE EXPLORATION 
PACTY5 ABcMRO 



A WEBK. MTER 

IN THE EARLY MORNING 
THE SPACE-SHIP "RANGtt' 
CARRYING DAN'S ROCKH 
SHIPS, IS LOADED ONTO 
ALAUMCHING RAMP L 
ALL IS READY FOR THE 
DESPERATE ATTEMPT TO 
BREAK-THROUGH THE 
RAYFIELD TO VENUS— 
THE MYSTERY PLANET 



AN\ NTORE FOB THE 
Skylark,?-get 
YOUR TICKETS FOR 
VENUS HERE — 
CETUONS ONUY 



I DON'TStt WHAT ALL THE \ 
FUSS 15 ABOUT, SIR HUBERT, I M 
A FIRST-CLASS GEOLOGIST, 
BOTANIST. AGRICULTURIST AND 
THE CABINET AGREE I'M THF 
BEST PERSON TO RECONNOITRE 
VENUS AS A SOURCE OF f ODD 
— I'M A QUALIFIED SPACE^ 
PILOT AS WELL ^ 











P,C,<9 



FROM THE FAIMOUS RADIO 
series by ALAN STRANKS 



TH£R£ WERE THREE Of THEM. ONE 
KNOCKED /V\y BAG TO THE FLOOR. AS HE 
PICKED IT UP I NOTICED THE MIDDLE 
FINGERS OF HlS RIGHT HAND WERE MISSING. 











NOW THEN SWEETHEART, 
yOu'RE GOING TO FIND OUT 
WHAT HAPPENS TO LITTLE 
GIRLS WHO can't MIND THEIR 

OWN business/ 





PJLOr AGAINST Tȣ WOKLt> 




the story no far 




Chapter 5 



V/ritteu in Blood! 

J i M sank back luxuriously on <hc spruni; 
uphoKlery of the Jaguar. He ached in 
every limb, and could hardly keep his 
eyes open. What a nighl it had been! He 
shivei^ wiih belated apprehension as he re- 
membered all the dan^rs he'd been through. 

Dick drove in .silence, and Jim was just 
nodding off when the thought of Pru sud- 
denly returned to him and shocked him into 
wakefulness. To think that he had been too 
busy to worry what hud itappened to her! He 
.sat up straight, and .seizixl Dick's sleeve. 

“Pru!" he croaked. “She never came hack! 
Did you 

“Easy, lad," said Dick. There was always 
something re.issuring about his slow Northern 
speech. “Pru’s all right." 

Jim sank back again. He fell weak with 
relief, until Dick added: "It's Ken Ah'm 
womled about." 

“Why?" Jim's voice was sharp with a new 
anxiety. “Did they -T' 

“Ah don't know. When we found cellar 
empty, 'itn and Pru wciu off 'onie together. 



I 'card je tell yon hstbhic as 'ow Ken weren't 
slecpin' where he should've been, and we 
knew as Pru weren’t." 

“Where was she, then .’ She wasn't in her 
old rot>m- Did you go to their house?" Jim 
shot all this out in one breath. 

“She were slecpin' in gangster's car," 
answered Dick with his usual calm delibera- 
tion. Jim goi^led at him. and clung meniaily 
to his previous a.ssurance, “Pm's all right". 
"Me and Ray was chasin' 'em, and they laid 
her in (he rood for us to tun over, but Ah 
wasn't 'aving any." He permitted hunsclf a 
momentary smile of saiisfaaion. "We took 
'er to Dr. Briggs's this is 'is car and left 'er 
while we chased 'em again. Ye know the rest." 

“What had they done to her?" denunded 
Jim fiercely, clenching his ffsts. 

"Anees anaihees - oh, be blosvcdl 
Drugged her. Dr. Briggs said." 

Jim gritted his teeth. 

“The swine!" he hissed. "I'd like to tear 
them limb from limb and 

“Ye have," put in Di'-k grimly. 

This sobered Jim. 

“Arc are they - dead, Dick?" 

“Two on 'em - an' Ah doubt if I'oihcr'll 

"I never meant to do il. Dick!" whispered 
Jim. “Honestly, when they came at me I just 
dropped the bomb and took cover. Whatever 
they'd done. I didn't mean to kill them!” 



“Ah should 'ope not," replied Dick shortly. 
“Well, 'err we .irc," 

"Oh, DK'k, can't we go aitd see Pru lirsi?" 
pleaded Jim. 

"If you'd use yer eyes, you'd see this is a 
nicer 'ouse than yours." grunierl Dick, 
getting out and ringing the bell. 

For the first time Jim took notice of his 
.surroundings. They were at Dr. Brigg.s'.s. He 
followed Dkk to (he door as the Doctoi 
opened it and beckoned them in with a jerk 
of his head. 

“How is she, Doctor?" asked Jim. 

Without a word, the IJoclor led them into 
nis consulting room. Pru was lying on the 
couch, covered with a blanket. A.s Jim come 
in, she opened her eyes and smiled at him, 

"Hullo, Jim!" she said weakly. 

Jim's tears took him by surprise. He dashed 
them away and flung himself forward, 
kneeling by the couch with his arms tightly 
round her. 

“Oh, Piu! I thought . , He couldn't say 
any more, but just clung to her. The Doctor 
cleared his throat, and Jim stood up shcep- 

“Now, Dick," said the Doctor in a quiet, 
menacing lone. “I want an explanation from 
you. What the jumping Jchoshcphai do you 
mean by dumping this child here and then 
charging off like a madman in my car ifl'm 
permitt^ to call it my car? What in thunder- 




and-hailsloncs has lx.'cn going un in this town, 
anyway, for Pete's sake?" 

“'Oo’s Pete?" enquired Dick innocently, 

"Don't try me too far!" warned the Doctor, 
waggling his fingei within an inch of Dick's 
nose. "/ know what you're trying to do, and 
it won't work. You're trying to make nte lose 
my temper." he bellow^, “in the hope that 
I'll burst a blood-vessel and leave you my car 
so that you can use il all the time! You un- 
mitigated rascal, 1 could have you Jailed for 
forty-nine years for this!" 

Jim gap^. He was unaccustomed to see 
(lie Dix'tor's manner of addressing his inti- 
mutes, but Dick seemed unpenurbed. 

“Why, you'd be loo stingy to leave me your 
car anyway, even if you was ilic only girl in 
ilie world and Ah was the only boy," said 
Dick, dodging the blow ilw D<x.nor aimed at 

Pru giggled, and the Doctor glanced at her 
and continued more quietly 

“Why don't you come on my (wnel. Dick?" 
invited the Doctor with a sini.sier grin. "Old 
Dodder won't do you any gotnl. I've some 
•Stuff in my poison cupboard that would make 
all the difference in the world to your state of 
health.” 

"Ah would, only Insurance fcller'd raise 
me premium," repliexl Dick solemnly, "Now, 
Ah'il .iiisl lake lhe.se kids 'omc, and then Alt'll 
coiiK hack and tell ye whv Ah ad to btirrer 

He gathered up Pm. blanket and all. and 
carried her out to the car. As Jim was helping 
to make her comfortable m the hack, the 
Doctor came to the dsHir and shook his fist. 
Dick waved at him in the way fond aunts 
wave at babies, and slipited mio (he driving 

“I want my car imw'" howled Ihc Dtxtior. 

Dick stuck his head out of the window as 
he drove off. 

"All'll lend it ye after a bit. if ye behave!" 
he shouted. 

Jim crouched uncomfortably in the hack, 
as Pru was lying on the seal. He fell shy after 
his display of emotion Pru seemed to feel ihc 
same, for she didn't spe-ak; but she glanced 
at him from lime to lime, and sketched him ,t 
smile. 

“Ah'il call at 'Is Lordship's first." .said 
Dick, without looking round. “It's on the 
way." 

When the Jaguar pulled up at Jim's house, 
Dick got out. 

“Bide where y'are," he ordered. 

He disappeared down the pas-sage vshich 
led to the back door. 

“You all right, Pru?" asked Jim. 

Pru nodded. 

■'I'm not hurl, only drowsy from that lillhy 
stuff they doped me wilh," she said. “What 
about you? Did anything more hapiien?" 



J IM repressed a hysterical laugh. Did any- 
thing more happen! 

“Wc had quite a busy nighl." he said, "but 
it’s all over now. Don't worry I'll tell you 
all about it later." 

She closed her eyes. After a moment slic I 
murmured sleepily: "Did Ken gel back all I 
right?" 

Jim didn't know what to say. he looked 
round desperately for inspiration and saw 
Ken standing at the front door in pyjama.s 
beckoning to him. 

"Yes," said Jtm, catching his breath. He 
nodded at Ken, who went back into the 
house, leaving the door open. In the instant 
heiween Ken's retreat and Dick's reappear- 
ance from the passage, Jim bent and kissed 
Pru. 

It was (he first time bc'd ever done it. It 
would probably, he thought, be the last time, 
too - because Pru wasn’t the “soppy" type, 
and emotional situations such as they were 
now in weren't likely to be repeated fhc 
hopedj. He got a whiff of (he anaesthetic as 
his lips touched hers. He didn't know whether 
she was asleep or not. but she made no reply 
10 his whispered "God bless you, Pru'“ 

He got out of the car and closed the door 
as 'quietly as he could. 

"What happened?” lie enquired softly, as 
Dick got into the driver's seat. 

“Ah went round back an' chucked Utile 
stones at yer bedroom winder," said Dick. 
“Ah didn't want to wake yer Ma. Ken stuck 





IS cud oul. and Ah lold 'im lo conic lo from 

"How did you know he was in my bed- 

■' Borrowed one o' ihem crystal balls from 
a forEunc-teller, and saw some tea-leaves in a 
cup in the shape of 'is 'oroscope. Don’t ask 
daft questions. Ah just 'ad a hunch 'c 
might've gone to soothe yer Ma." 

“I don’t know what Mum'll say when she 
sees mel” confessed Jim, 

He felt a sudden blow between his shoulder- 
blades that made him bang his head against 
the car door. He turned .swiftly to sec Ken, 
now fully dressed, grinning at him. 

"The boy hero!" said Ken mockingly. 

"Oh, cut It oul, Ken!” prote.sied Jim. 
"Whai did Mum say when you told her what 
we'd been up to?" 

"L Itaven’l seen her.'' replied Ken. 

"What! Why on earth -?” 

"This is no time for fooling, Ken," 
growled Dick. 

"I'm not fooling! After we left your pktee. 
Dick, I sent Pru home, but 1 thought I'd 
belter see if Jim's mother was wailing up, but 
she wasn’t. She'd left the back door un- 
latched. and as I went upstairs, thinking I’d 
get a better sleep in Jim'.s bed than on our 
scilee, she called out 'Why arc you so late. 
Jim? Whatever linK i.s it"’' 1 just mumhlctl, 
and she said in a sleepy sort of voice 'I'll see 
you in the morning, you had boy! Now get 
to bed before your Dad wakes up!' So I just 
chuckled to myself and got into your bed. 
Jim, and slept like a lop. Did you have a good 
night? Are you feeling belter?" 



J IM an«l Dick knikctl despairingly at one 
iinoilKi'. and then both laughed helplessly. 
Before they recovered, Ken nolietd (he 
mmionlcss form of his sister on the back scat. 
He suddenly went as white as chalk. 

"Pru'" he gasped. 

“She's all right, lad." said Dick. "’Op in, 
now, and All’ll tell ye what 'appened as we go. 
We’ve all 'ad a throng night while you’ve 
been snoring ycr 'eait off," 

Ken got slowly into the scat heside Dick, 
still keeping his eyes on his sister. 

"A n'hai nighi'.'" he asked mechanically. 
"Throng." 

"And what does ihul mean where you 

"Busy an’ bothersome," replied Diek. "We 
can’t slop 'ere gos.siping Ah mun get back 
to garridge an’ .see if it's still there, Ah'll get 
the sack over this for sure. So long, Jim. 
Better leave a message for yer Ma not to wake 
you till the cops come wi' the Black Maria." 

"Thanks for everything, Dick," said Jim 
absently, as the car began lo move. There was 
something clamouring for attention at the 
back of his mind, but his head fell like a 
pumpkin and he couldn’t grasp what it was. 
As so oBcn happens, the minute he stopped 
flogging his brain, something clicked. "Better 



leave a message for yer Ma " mexsoKe - Ma ' 

Jim ran after the car. shouting. Dick heard 
him. and saved his weary legs by backing 
towards him. 

"Now what is it?" The stolid Northerner 
sounded as near lo being irritable as Jim had 
ever heard him. 

"While I was in the cellar I found a 
message in one of (he wine-bins," said Jim 
breathlessly. "1 suppose il was from that 
scientist we were trying to rescue. I managed 
10 tell Ray to investigate the wine-bins, and I 
expect he’s found the mes.sage. but I thought 
you ought to know as well, just in case." 

“Well, spit it oul!" said Dick. 

"I can’t make hetid or tail of it myself it 
seems to be in some sort of code. Il had the 
word "Ma* in it and you saying ‘leave a 
incs.sagc for ycr Ma’ lemindcd me of it " 

Dick was drawing his breath in slowly 
through his nose, compressing his lips and 
tapping ominously on the steering-wheel. 
Before he could explode, Jim continued 
hastily: 

"It said ‘The Lorg is I of them no Ma ci‘ 
that last word is spell L'-l.'' 

"Wail a minute, Jim," said Ken. "ril 

He produced a ball-point pen and a scrap 
of paper with last week's Club football team 
on it. "You know, I think I’ll have lo move 
you to inside right, if you don't mind, Jim," 
he added, studying the paper critically. “St. 
James's Club have got — " 

The paper and pen were snatched from him 
by Dick, exasperated at last, and the pen fell 
on the floor. 

"It's all right. Dick." said Ken, picking it 
up and handing it lo him. “the best of these 
pen.s is that they don't write any worse after 
you've dropped them than they did before. '' 

"Grrr:” .said Dick, trying lo write with 
nothing 111 support the flimsy paper, " "Tlio 
Lord is one of them 

"Not ‘Lord’. 'Lorn'," corrected Jim, 
"l.-O-R-G." 

Dick crossed out the ‘d’ and pul ‘g'. 

'■ ‘No Ma F -l'," coniinucil Jim, "What do 
you think it means'.’" 

"Ah'll 'avc plenty o' lime to think about 
that when Ah'vc got the sack." stated Dick, 
thrusting the paper and |vn back at Ken and 
letting in the clutch. "That's if Ah'm still alive 
after Ab've taken car hack lo Doctor." 

He drove off. fuming, and Jim trudged 
slowly hack to the house. Ken had left the 
front door open, and there was no one 
.stirring yet. He remembered thankfully that 
it was Saturday. 

In the kitchen he got himself a hunk of 
cheese and an apple, and took alternate biles. 
Then he drank a cup of milk and scribbled a 
note which he propped in front of the clock : 
"Don't wake me till you have lo. Mum, I 
didn't sleep very well, Love, Jim." 

He crept upstairs, dragged off his dollies 
and climbed ihankftilly into the rumpled bed. 
"Too iiml to wash or dean my teeth," Iw 



muitereii to himsclt. I lien he rolled out 
iigBin. anti said his usual "God bless Mum 
and Dad", ami added a word of thanks that 
they'd all come safely through the dangers of 
the night, especially Pru; and that Ray wasn't 
dead atter all. He got back into hed again, 
and just before he fell asleep he murmured 
“ You know I didn't mean lo kill those gang- 
sters, honest 1 didn't," 



N o one was awake at Ken's house eitlicr. 

Ken climbed in at Pru's bedroom window 
and stole down and opened the front door. 
As soon as he and Dick had got Pru to bed, 
Dick drove off in the direction of the Doctor'.s. 
He wouldn't .stop for anything to cat. 

Ken put on the keltic and tlic grill, and 
began making toast. His mind was so full of 
what Dick had lold him in the car that he 
burnt several pieces. Poor old Pru! Lucky it 
was no worse. He ought never to have left her 
to go home alone though it seemed as if he 
himself might have been dead by now if he 

The rummest thing of alt was that Ray had 
turned up again. He had never thought when 
Jim said he'd lold "Ray" lo investigate the 




Then wai no one on fcuar.l. 



wine-bins that he was referring to his cousin. 

Ken studied the scrap of paper on which 
Dick had copied the scientist's message. Il 
needed a cleverer brain than his! Who did he 
know that was well educated? 

He snapped his fingers triumphantly. The 
Vicar would solve il! It began with something 
about ‘the Lord', so it ought to be right up 

Ken made more toast, and took it up to 
Pru with a cup of tea. She .said she felt sick, 
hut he made her have it, and brought her an 
enamel bowl in case of accidents. 



"I'll send Mum in a minute," he said. 

Ho Miikf Ills mother with a cup of tea. 

"Moinmg. Mum." said Ken. He wailed 
whil.si slir her tea, then continued, 

“We've h;id hii of an adventure during the 
night. Jim loii.-’i; ,t cliap who had been kid- 
napped by a gar'll, and alter they cleared off, 
Pru and i went wti; Dick Rawlings to gel 
him away but he'd ilisiippcareil. This gang 
chloroformed Pru 

"H'hal!" shrieked Ins mi'i|;t-i His father 
groaned iff his sleep, and turncvl mei . 

■‘It's all right. Mum. Dr. Bnggs has ss'cn 
her, and he's coming in later this morning." 

He found he was talking lo his mother's 
back. She had leapt out of bed and was 
pulling on her bathrobe. Ken followed her. 

"She's not hurt there’s nothing to worry 
abmii." Ken a.ssured her. She was already 
bending over Pru. who had used the bowl and 
was looking better. 'Tve got to go and sec the 
Vicar now Pru'll tell you the rest," 

“No you don’t!" declared his mother, 
planting herself firmly in front of the door. 
“Not with that gang about!" 

“It's all right, Jim blew them up with a 
lime-bomb." said Ken cheerfully. "Keep 

Before his mother had got over her 
asicmishment, Ken nipped oul of the window 
anil dnipfied nimbly into the back yard. 

As he rae along the back-alley, he decided 
that it would be best to go to the cellar and 
check the mes.sage before asking the Vicar. 

It was still quite early when he gut there, 
and there was no one about. He was sur- 
prised lo sec no constable on guard over the 
wreckage of the Morris. Not that anyone 
would want to steal it. hut the police always 
seemed to leave a man on duty anywhere 
where a crime had been committed. 

Ken lifted (he manhole cover and slid 
cautiously down on to the pile of coal. At the 
bottom he iripiied over something .soft. His 
hcait thudding, he picked himself up. There 
was sufficient light from the manhole to sec 
the blue uniform and silver buttons. The mis- 
sing con.stable had been thrown down here! 

"This is a good place lo gel oul of!" Ken 
told himself. Then he checked his momentary 
panic, and fell the huddled figure. The imlicc- 
man was still alive, but unconsciou.s. Ken 
straightened him out on the Floor, and went to 
(he other cellar to complete his errand. 

The dust was sailFled near two of the wine- 
bins. In one he made out the faint original. of 
the message m his pocket, in the other he 
could find nothing but some brown smears 
until he looked under the top flagstone. 

There, in letters that were still sticky, a 
linger had traced the words: 

U? BLHIND KLAG TRAPPKD ARM R 
Gingerly Ken touched one nf the letters, and 
examined his finger. Then he realised with 
horror that Ray's message had been wnlien 

(To be continued next week) 



W" 



H 




fpvriTour. 
IWC'i?£ IN THE. 
I POWDER. 



MY 

L. Sox fi> 



Th£ first MAT£ 

CtAMSfRS UP 
TO HELP THE 
CRPTRIN, WHO 
IS STRUGGLING 
IN THE RIGGING 
WITH COT THRMT 
JAK£ 




. 1— .11— — r — M— 


-. - --. .. - - 




CRICKET COACHING by LEARIE CONSTANTINE 





POSITION 
TAKEN UP FOR 
[ AGGRESSIVE STROKE 
NOTE : HEEL DOWN 



RIGHT 
FOOT 
BACK 
AND 

ACROSS— ON TOE^-^ 






WRIST TORN 




OVER 












Cadburys Comer qwz 



WHAT DID THE 







In 1698, two Sinout French Scientists. Pierre 
and Marie Curie, who were husband and wife, 
obtained an important radio-active substance 
from pitchblende. Later, Madame Curie 
Prire forchemistry.What 



id they 






tVEREO THE WORU^ 



In IBSSifimousexplorer-missionarydiscovcr- I 




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LIQUORICE ALL-SORTS 




GKCAT ’4- STA9t 9AK6AtM 










THE SPY 




N APOLE AN used lo say ihal one 
spy m ibe right place might be 
worth 20,000 men in the battle- 
field. Thus, if you captured that 
spy. you would have done a very good job. 

The spy-cateber is just as important as the 
spy. If your country is on the defensive, he is 
even more important. 

I had intended to deal this week with codes 
and spy messages, but recent spy cases have 
arous^ great interest in our spy-catching 
methods, so the codes can wail. 

Every country pretends that it doesn't 
employ spies. If you are an agent abroad and 
are foolish cnou^ to gel cau^t, your govern- 
ment will disown you. “That man one of our 
spies? Rubbish never heard of him.” 
Naturally, no one is deceived. 

However, every country frankly admits 
that it has an organisation for counter- 
espionage, or catching spies. 

A brief glance at the British system may be 
useful. Several departments have section.! 
devoted to 'intelligence' or obtaining infor- 
mation the Admiralty. War Office, Air 
Ministry and Eoreign Office all have their 
specialised team. They are supervised by the 
Joint Intelligence Committee which reports 
directly to the Prime Minister. 

The job ofcaiching spies has been entru.!ied 
to one section, the fifth, of Military Intelli- 
gence - (he famous M.I.5, You have heard 
of this very often, but the other sections, 
numbered from I--M, are very secret, and 
I doubt if you have ever heard them men- 
tioned. Their job is to ge/ information; that 
is to .say, they direct spies in other countries, 
so naturally they don't talk about their jobs. 
But M.I.S only catches spies - yet its members 
often have more adventures than the others. 

M.I.S has a collaborator, the Special 
Branch of Scotland Yard, and never itself 
appears in public, When it has nailed down a 
spy. It hands over the case to the Special 
Branch, which makes the arrest and secs (he 
trial through. 

And how does M.I.S set to work'l In war 
lime It has the advantage of the censorship. 
Letters to and from foreign countries are 
examined and verv occasionally yield h cIih: 
.MiniciirTh» III («ir old fiieod 'invi.cilik ink,' 
which docs exist in ical litc. In fact, taler on 
wc will talk about,!! at 'ome length, tor it is 
a very iiucfcsiing subject. 

M.t.5 agents often listen lo foicign liitwd- 
casLs. which may he used to give Jiic-ctioiis 
to enemy spies. Immigration olliceis at the 



docks are very useful allies. Watch the next 
time you are going on board a ship at a port. 
When you show your passport, the officer 
may refer lo a rather fat pocket book. This 
contains a record of 'svanted' people. 

M.I.S agents pay especial attention to 
factories where war weapons are made, or 
camps where they arc being tested. 

The first spy Icclure I ever heard was on 
tlie subject of ‘Trifles’. The tutor pointed out 
that most spies gave themselves away by 
some tiny point, or a trifle which they forgot. 
I have proved for myself (hat he was right. 

Many a spy has been betrayed because 
some quick-wiitctf observer not necessarily 
an official has noted some little detail which 
was not quite right, 



I REMEMBER OIK German spy who was landed 
on the east coast of England by night, 
from a submarine. He got ashore safely, and 
destroyed hi.s rubber dinghy. He was a 
dangerous man: he spoke very good English, 
and had a perfectly forged ration book and 
identity card. 

He wanted to get about. Two miles down 
the coast be saw a village. He walked along. 
Outside the village inn were a lot of bicycles. 
He stole one. and made off. Then he forgot a 
trifle - he forgot that the British rule of the 
road was the opposite to the German: he 
rode off on the rigkl hand side of the road, to 
be held up by a village policeman before he 
had gone four hundr^ yardsi 
Another German agent, who landed in 
Scotland, went to a local railway station and 
asked for a ticket to Aberdeen. ‘'2/10," said 
the booking clerk. The man put down iwi> 
ptiunds ten shillings. This did not prove that 
he was a German spy - he might have been a 
shipwrecked Norwegian sailor who did not 
understand our money. But it did justify the 
clerk in taking further precautions. 

You see how important spy training Is? 
The man must know the smallest details about 
the country in which he is to operate. 

He must also have a calm nerve, especially 
in those awkward moments when first on the 
job. Two other Germans went lo a booking 
oflict. One said: "Tliird-class to London, 
'ingle.” the clerk issued it. and said to the 
•>u;oiid man: "The same for you. .vir?'" \nd 
the second man replied: ''Ja”, I'ancv losing 
his life merely becaii'e he viiJ “jc'" in 

Sometimes llic spy catchers arc pic-scntcd 



with such trifles free, so to speak, Sometimes 

especially when they have a man under in- 
terrogation - they can lead a suspect on until 
he gives himself away. One friend of mine 
quescioiKd a girt for five hours. She was 
word-perfect until she made a mistake 
about a bus fare. As my friend returned (o 
the point again and again, she saw that he 
was suspicious, got frightened, and confessed. 

L.ord Baden Powell, the founder of the Boy 
Scouts, in his junior days was an Intelligence 
Officer, and revealed in a book called My 
Advfniurrs as a Spy how he got out of an 
awkward situation. He was held on suspicion 
by a rural policeman in Germany until an 
inspector arrived. Lord Baden Powell asked 
permission to smoke. He rolled and smoked 
one cigarette and then another. After that he 
didn't care if a dozen inspectors came. He 
had made his notes on cigarette paper, and 
had smoked them. 

Yet this incident shows how my warning 
about trifles can act both ways. As I said, the 
story was published, and as every village 
policeman must have been a Scout at some 
lime the method became well-known. Thus, 
if the suspect were being held, and a.sked to 
smoke, the dullcst-wilted policeman would 
make a grab for his cigarette papers. More 
than oiM spy went to his death because he 
forgot a spy-rule - that he should never use 
a method which has been revealed. The spy- 
catcher, of course, uses the point the other 
way round. He will suggest that the suspect 
might like to smoke. Then he will produce 
matches, but let the man bring out his own 
cigarettes. 



Y ou know how orderly the Germans are. 

They like rules and regulations, and so 
often depend upon “organisation”. Our spy- 
catchers study this habit of theirs very ciosdy. 
In the second World War, for example, quite 
a number of German a^nts were parachuted 
into Britain. Each man was given a standard 
spy kit. It included a piorlable radio set, 
identity card and ration book and iSOO in 
ca.sh, Since he might need food before being 
in a position to appear in public, the spy also 
carried a small stock of rations. These 
always included a German sausage! 

I he Germans were so mclhoJical that if 
you found a niau in possession of this outfit, 
sou could salciv accuse him of being a spy. 

But M I..S docs not merely wait for spies 
to give ihcmscives away by trifles. U watches 
larefully places where spies arc likely to 
operate, and '‘inlilirales" its own agents 
inside - that is to say. if a factory is making 
soiTK hush-hush weapon, its security does not 
depend entirely upon the policeman at the 
gale: one or two M.I.S agents may be inside 
the factory - as ordinary workmen. A couple 
of years before the war, a man in Woolwich 
Arsenal foolishly fell to the approaches of a 
foreign agent, and began to hand over plans 
and details of processes. He used lo take these 
out of the Arsenal, photograph them, and 
then take them back. This went on for 
months. 

He had a girl who got fonder and fonder of 
him, She was nice and flulfy, but so dumb 
that he didn’t even send her away when he 
was taking his photographs. 

After Iris arrest that man got the shock of 
his life, fhe principal witness at his trial was 
his ''dumb” blonde. She was a brilliant 
counter-spy. 



M.I.S and the Special Branch would (ell 
you of this biggest nuisance. During (he war 
you heard many stories about flashing lights, 
radio sets up chimneys, and so on. All these 
stories had to be.invesligatcd and about one 
in three million had something in it. You can 
imagine the time wasted. 

Now when a policciran catches a criminal 
in the act, he promptly arrests him. A counter- 
spy is not in such a hurry. He watches his 
flrei suspect, hoping that (Ik man will lead to 

SoriKlimcs known spies have been left at 
targe for years, carefully watched when they 
have made journeys, and their post examined. 
This method nearly always pays good divi- 
dends. At the outbreak of war in 1939 nearly 
600 Germans were interned. They were not 
all .spies, but some had been noted in contact 
with spies, and others had the opportunity to 
spy if they were so inclined. 

There is one big diflerenee between the 
British spy services and those of countries 
like Germany and Ruasia. We prefer com- 
iwraiively small services, staffed by lirsl-class 
and (rained men. They prefer huge organisa- 
tions, The total strength of M.1.5 and the 
Special Branch is only about 700: the 
Russians have tens of thousands of Security 
Police, or counter-spies. 

The best example of clever counter- 
espionage of the "trifles" brand, occurred in 
the first world war. The Germans employed 
a Swiss girl as their mes.senger. She had to 
cross into France, visit resident agents and 
collect from them details of where all our 
divisions were. At that time we had more than 
60 divisions in France. They were not lined up 
from the North in numerical order first, 
second, third Division, and so on. They were 
hopelessly mixed - 2Ist Division, 30th 
Division, 7th like that. 

How could the girl carry the details back 
to Switzerland? She could not memorise such 
a jumble of numbers. So she began to 
embroider them. 

When entering France, she wore a plain 
peiticoai. Before she left, she cnibioidcred 
a rose pullern around its hem. back in 
Switzerland, all she had to do was to count 
stitches. Starting from the scam, if the first 
embroidered rose was made up of 21 stitches, 
that stood for the 2Ist Division: the iKxt had 
30 'btches the idea was clever. 

For months the Swiss girl got away with it, 
I hen 'he forgot a trifle. It went against the 
grain lo buy a new petticoat for every journey 
and to throw ii atvjy after using it only once. 
.So she began to buy very cheap ones. 

Bui one day a Freiicli woman counter-spy 
was searching her at the fionlicr. The woman 
thought: “This is strange. This girl has done 
all this lovely embroidery - but she has done 
it on material so poor dial it won't stand up 
to half a dozen washes, why?” 

The question "why?” is dangerous in war 
time. The girl was detained for enquiries, 
broke down and confessed. Eventually she 
was shot because she only paid 4/1 1 .,' instead 
of 6/ 1 1 J for her petticoats. 

just now our counter-spy service is being 
criticised because of the case of Dr. Fuchs. 
M.I.S only comes into the news when it 
apiKars to have failed. Its hundreds of 
successes arc never made public. Rut I can 
Icll you this it is very good indeed. 

Anolhtr Spy Siory by Rentarrl Newman soon 




PROFESSOR BRITTAIN EXPLAINS ; DEEP SEA DIVING 




Any Questions! 

Write to Professor Brittain, c/o e a G L E , if you have any questions or problems you would like him to deal with. He will be on this page every fortnight. 



SETH AND SHORTT - COWBOTS 




SHORTY, LOOK AT 
THC&C THREE COMIN' 

g THE PiRST 

JNE IS auACK JAKE , 
Lex's SIT DOWN ^ 



^TMA>ft3 SUORTV 
ARRSKARCHINCi 
KOR THE 
-MYSTERY MAN ' 







1- 1 




j 




WE GO 
UPSTAIRS 

senoh/ 




WE 

SHANT BE 
DISTURBED 
UP HERE 
SENOR/^ 











COOPER 500 c.c. 

There b a ifwcial race al Silveistooe for 
500 cx. cars. The bosI fsnoas Ativcr of 
(his Cooper b StMting Mosa, one of 
Brhaia’t yoangest friven. They are lined 
Hith cMief a Speedway J.A.P. or a 
Nortua ■mor-eyde Othera bare 

aa 1100 cx. e^pae. 



SK?-y W the KANG 





BY DANET. OUBRISAY, GENESTRE 



HEy/ THE BRUTES 
EATINO MV LUNCH . 






its 




;ia4a 



1«45 



THE MOOEt'\ 
WIIX FLV WHEN ITSATHERS' 
SUPflCIENTSPEEDATTVE, 
■ „ EMDOFTVEWIRE.^/ 



7KE EXPERIMENTS OF THE 
T TWO ENQUSH PIONEER.S 
HENSON AND STRIN6FELIOW 
ANDTHE FIRST AIRSHIP aiGHT 
ARE THr S06JECTS OF THIS 
NUM&ER.THEV ARE VITAL 
LINK.S IN THE CHAIN OF 
i\ EVENTS WHICH LED UPTO 
Ik THE TIME WHEN FLY'NG 
EV, 66CAME PRACTICAL, 



WILLIAM HENSON HOPED TO ACHIEVE PRACTICAL FLIGHT WITH AN 
AEROPLANE GUILT ALONG THE LINES ILLUSTRATED. HAOTHE 
PROJECT MATERIALISED (TWOULO HAVE GEEN POWERED GY 
A STEAM ENGINE, HOWEVER.LACK OF FUNDS PREVENTEDHIM 
AFTER A REPLICA IN MODEL FORM PROVED UNSUCCESSFUL 



STRINGFELLOW WHO HAD WORKED 
WITH HENSON CONSTRUCTED AMODEL 
POWERED GV A SMALL STEAM ENGINE 
WHICH FLEW SUCCESSFULLY GEFORE 
WITNESSES IN LONDON IN IE4E 



HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 





^IKIANGULAH PIECE 
OF CANVAS IS USED TC 
•, STEER THE AIRSHIP II 



GIFFARO ACCOMPLISHED IHL RRST CONTROLLED FLIGHT IN HISTORY ON SEPT 

HIS AIRSHIP HAD A 3H.P STEAM ENGINE, TRAVELLED I7MILESATA SPftDOF 5 yMPH. 





DISCOVERING THSCOONTRYSIDE 









REAL LIFE MYSTERIES 




THE TREASURE THAT WASN’T 

The old-time pirates of ihe Pacific were fond 
of little Cocos Island, lying 300 miles south- 
west of Panama. Often they called there to 
refill their water casks. Among.si the blood- 
thirsty fellows who came to Cocos were 
such famous characters as Captain Davis, 
Benito Boniio and Captain Thomson. 

The great days of the buccaneers ended. 



The world forgot peaceful Cocos Island. 
Occasionally Royal Navy vessels continued to 
call there for water. 

Until about 1850 when someone muttered 
the magic phrase; '‘There’s treasure buried in 
Coexw Island.” Adventurers hastily rcachetl 
for maps. Cunning old sailors began drawing 
rough charts of the island, which they sold lo 
foolish treasure seekers. 

The hunt started. Ships canre to Cocos 



Island from all over the world. Parties landed 
and started digging and blasting, ruining the 
island. Admiral Palliser in the warship, 
K.M.S. Imperieuse, landed his entire crew on 
the island in 1896. They dynamited most of 
the island and sailed away disappointed. 

Between 1899-1914 sevH) other expeditions 
seaiclied Cocos Island. An American party 
camped there in 1920 and Canadians arrived 
soon after the Americans left. 



The wild search is still going on - perhaps 
at this moment. No one will ever find the 
treasure for the obvious reason that theie Ls 
none. Only three pirates might have buried 
wealth on Cocos - Davis, Thomson and 
Benito. Davis took his loot to America. 
Benito shot himself when chased by K.M.S. 
Espiegh', and Thomson never had any 
treasure. Who started the riunour? It has 
already thrived for a hundred years. 





T HKRK is a very good reason why 
the many ihousa^s ofOvalcineys 
all over the tMuntry are such healthy, 
jolly boys and girls. 

Remember that every Ovaltiney 
makes it a golden rule w drink 
‘Ovahine’everyday. This delicious 
food beverage provides special 
nourishment which helps so much to 
build up strength, energy and fitness. 
Ask mother to make ‘ Ovaltine ' your 
regulardaily beverage, Itwill help you 
to be successful in sports and games 
and to do your best in schoolwork. 



ha^nncfii ot 



EVERY BOY AND GIRL SHOUIJD 
JOIN THE LEAGUE OF OVALTINEYS 
The been formed by the pro- 

si'^cNUi 



Ofhcitl Rule IkKik and Badge by s 

full name, eddrns end” to*"" THE 
CHmi-'OVALTINRY,(Dept.51).«2Uppcr 
Cimvenot Srml. l.ondon. W.l. 

Drink delicious 

Ovaltine 

for Health, Strength & Vitality 






MAKI NIG YOUK OWN MODEL RACING CAR 




SPORTING PERSONALITIES 



WOODCOCK 



MARTIN 




1946 



WOODCOCK 
(S TO FIGHT 
L£€ SAVOLD 
ON JUNE 6th. 
R?RTHE WORLDS 
+4eAVyW6lGHT 
CROWN 



BRUCE HAS A OeVASTATINO 
PUNCH IN EITHER &LOVE 
ANO WINS MOST OF HIS 
FIGHTS with the K.O. 





BRUCE WOODCOCK 

BRUCE W^A^aA'cHAMPIW IN 1939 
HE BEAT ALL HEAVYWEI&HTS HERE 
HE fought TAMI MAURIELLO IN AMERICA 
WHO BEAT HIM IN THE FIFTH ROUND 
WOODCOCK LEFT THE RING WITH A GASH ON 
HIS FOREHEAD WHERE MAURIELLO'S HEAD 
HAD CAUGHT HIM. 

WOODCOCK HAS BEATEN L£SN£VITCH, WORLD 



THE SPORTSMAN 




EAGLE CLUB 

AND EDITOR'S PAGE 



12 M(ty 195(1 



The liditor’s Office 
K A G 1. E 

43 Shoe Lane, London, EC4 

M ost of yo«. we hope, will by 
now have received your ea<ji.f 
c I I B Badge and Certificate of 
Membership at leaal, those of 
you who applied in (he hrsi week or two. We 
are sorry for the delay but we were simply 
overwhelmed by the ava- 
lanche of leticis that des- 
cended on us from readers. 

Wc bad 60,000 letters in 
ihe first week and wc scent 
to fittve been knee-deep in 
them ever since. We were 
very glad indeed to get 
them, but you will iindcrsland that it lakes 
rather u long time (o sort them all out, open 
them and reply. Patience is a virtue they say - 
so we ask you to be patient a little longer if 
any of you still haven't had your Badge. 

While we arc on the subject could you 
please inakc sure that when yoti apply lor 
membership, you send tour siibsctiplion by 
I'li'ial Older or Money Order and not 
stamps, cheque, foreign coiii.s. loose money, 
or anything else like that. 

Front now on, iJk Postal Order should be 
Ibr i/6 in.sicad of a shilling. The esira six- 
pence is to pay for the Badge, ll was only for 
Ihe first 4 weeks that u«c offered the Badge 
Ircc, included in the I/- Membership Sub- 
scription. And please send your application 
for membership to lAt.ir, Colley House. 
New Street Square, London, H.C.4. (Other 
letters to the Hditor should go to the address 
given at the (op of this page). Usually we 
.shall print a Form of Application for Mem- 
bership, but there is not room for it in this 
issue. But all you need lo do is to write saying 
you want to join the kagle runt and en- 
close a Postal Order for 1/6. 



H FkL arc the names ol Ihe twenty-live 
members living in Ihe .South of England 
who have been invited to go to Famborough 
Air Display on July Sth. They were m the 
first 1(K) appiicaiion.s opened on April I9ih. 
C. E. Moulder, Chilteni Road, Dunstable 
John Anthony Hooper, Christchurch Road, 
Tiiisc Hill, S.W.2. 

Brian Martin, Kenmore Avenue, Kenton. 
David Hall, Hallowell Road, Northwood. 
Alfred E. Taylor, Glyn Road. E.5. 

Derek G. H, Hughes. Derringstone. Barham 
Anthony R. Pohlman. Grays Lane, Hitchin, 
Raymond Ciordon, Rayners Lane, Harrow, 
Tony Bremon, Tovil, MaidMonc. 

Richard Halliday, Victoria Road, Moldon. 
David Carpenter, Suuihchurch. 

Soothe nd-on-Sca. 

John C. WrighI, Winton, Bournemouth. 
Fled Odgers, 144 Chapter Riwd, N.W.2. . 
Peter Bradshaw, Pemdevon Road, West 

Croydon. 




Nigel Voller, St. Helens Park Road. Hastings. 
T. Davis, Bavenslock, Dinion. Nr. Salisbury, 
Pamela Frances Alehin, Slalford Road, 

Caterham. 

Rachel Hedges, Uurghicy Road, 

Leylonstone, E.ll. 

Peter Wchh, Ladbroke Grove, W.ll, 
Geotge Frost, Robert Close, Chigwell. 
Cavan Thomas Hewitt, Knight Avenue, 
Gillingham. 

Fred Tyler, King Ge<Tgcs Field. 

Stow-in-the-Wold. 
David Rutledge. I Arthur Street, Grays. 
Joyce Smith. 26 Stanford Road, l.uton. 

Alan F. Gent. 203 Ley Sireel, Ilford. 

Again wc want to make dear that the 
number on your member- 
ship card has nothing to 
do with the order in which 
applications were opened. 

You may liave Number I 
KXJ2 on your card and | 
still be in the first 
opCTieil. And you may have 
Number 6 on your card and m 
hundred oircncd. 




W i. arc very sorry that so many people 
have been unable to get copies ofi agli 
each week. The trouble i. that there has been 
such a huge demand for copies that wc just 
liave not been able to print enough. We are 
doing our best to put this right as soon as 
possible and we hope before long to lie able 
to supply everyone. The printers arc working 
24 hours a day and the printing machine 
never slops running day or night. 

ll can print a good many thousand copies 
an hour but even that is not enough. Very 
complicaied machinery is needed to piini 
tAGLi because it has so many pages in full 
colour ami there ha.s to be a dilVercni section 
ol the machine for each colour, ll is really 
quite an awe-inspiring sight to sec it working 
and liefore long we hope to take a party of 
Club Members to see it so that they can see 
for themselves how' i ag l l is produced. 

A.s copies of EAtiLF are so driliculi to gel 
at present, will you help by doing ivvo 
things; First, place a regular order with your 
newsagent. If he knows you want a copy 
every week, he can put m a detinile order and 
make sure you get yoin copy. Secondly, will 




Yours sincerely, 



'THE EDITOR 



COMPETITION CORNER 

1. S liI.Et T J O N CO M M I 'I T E f: If you were a member of the M.t ,(.. 
Soleciion Commillcc, which Players would you choose to represent Fngland in the 
lirst Test Malch with ilie West Indies on kth June. 1S50? 

BLOC K LETTERS PI I ASF 

1 7. 

2. X. . 



4. .. .. 10. 

5 II. 

6. . ... 12th Man 



Addiess 



Club Membership No. 



Complete the coupon above, stick it on a Post Card and send it to Cricket, EAGLE, 
4 New Sireel Square. London, E.C.4, to arrive not later than Wednesday. I7ih May, 
1950. (Your Post Card should beat a 2d. stamp, remember). 

A prize of two lOs, 6d, National Savings Ccriificaics will be awarded for each of 
the first five correct selections which are sorted from out mail hags on Monday 
5th June, 1950. 

(N.B. crorrect .selections are those corresponding to Ihe Official Selection made by 
the M.C.C.). 

2. HT D i) E N FA.ME A lot of you will have icaii some of Shakespeare’s play t 
at school, and one that is introduced into most schools is. of course. '‘Julius Caewr" 
Now, then, how well do you know yout Shakespeare? 

A sentence from the play a famous sentence, at thal -is hidden in these little 
squares. You .stall on a 
certain squam (no tel- 
ling which!) and move 
up. down or .sideways 
hut never diagonally. 

If you take the right 
steps the whole sen- 

in correct sequence. 

Some .squat es show just 
one letter, others show 

others show obiccls 
wlucli indicate a letter, 

IcKers, or even a com- 
plete woid. 

One warning not 
all Ihe squaies are part 
of the actual sentence: 
some arc merely Iheie 
to mislead you. 

COMPETITION R E S i: I. ‘I‘ 

The winner of the Strip Cartoon Story competition in the fimt is-siie of i-agu is 
Brian Herman, 28 King Edwaid Avenue. Blackpool, (Aged I.'). A prize of a 10/6 
National Savings Ccriilicaic is being sent to him. We had a great many entries 
among which were some very good stories, but many went far ovei the limil of .300 
words and others were not suitable for presenting in strip cartoon form. We chose 
the winner because his story was exciting and had several good ideas in it. It was full 
of ihc kind of action that could be .shown well in pictures. From the ocher entries 
wc specially congratulate Ihc following who showed many .signs chat they may 
iMui imo v.Mvl story wmers David Mncmariin. 8 Content Street. Avr; Hilda 
Boden, Buckingham; L; n‘:,i.i Monann. St. Hcliei. Jersc\ . .nul Neville Granville. 
Cefn Cribbur, Bridgend 





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AHllU OJ. 1W<>.) 1,, isptiaj 33U3IU35 UMOp MO I 

piiqi ‘jj3| uioij pJiqi ajenbs aqi ujojj ubis . 




C«f this out 

To my Newsagent; pk-nsc orikr i a (i i i 
for me awry week lunil furiha lui/iee 

Name. 

Address. . ... 

HAND THIS FORM TO YOUR NEWSBOY OR 
TAKE IT TO YOUR NEWSAGENT’S SHOP 




Lash Lonergan’s Quest 

By MOORE RAYMOND 




The story so far 











Chapter 5 

OUNTED musical chairs lor boys 
under 14!’' bawled the announcer. 

"Come on. Squib!" cned Lash 
and Rawhide in unison. 

Squib scrambled on to his pony. Patch, and 
jog^d off to the middle of the sports ground. 

Fourteen young competitors, mounted on 
anjntats of various shapes and sizes, lined the 
circle with thirteen chairs grouped in the 

To-ra-m-ru ! wcT\\ the two cornets. Squiddh- 
eek-quiddlf-nek ' went the concertina. To the 
tunc of “John Pcpl". the boys trotted their 

The music stopped. In a Hash. Squib slipped 
from Patch’s back and raced for Che middle. 
He wa-s one of the lirst three to fling them- 
selves on to the chairs, 

"That's bonzer. Squib!" called La.sh. 

“That's bosker. Squib!" shouted Rawhide. 

Then there were only thirteen boys and 
twelve chairs. Soon there were twelve boys 
and eleven chairs. And so on . . . 

(t was soon obvious to everybody that the 
event was going to be won either by Squib or 
by a Call, skinny boy who could not dismount 
as quickly a.s Squib, but could run faster once 
he touched the ground. 

'“Squib-Squib-Squib!" cried luisb and 
Rawhiite and soon the cry was taken up by 

"Skinny-Skinny-Skinny!" cried the lanky 
lad'.s friends and supporters. 

ScKin there were only three chairs left . . . 
then only two . . , then only one. 

Squib and Skinny circled it to the sound of 
two comets and a concertina. Both were tense, 
wailing for the music to stop. 

Then Squib suddenly got an idea. If he 
stood on Patch's back he would be in a belter 
position to leap from his horse at the right 
moment, and so he would be halfway there 
before Skinny could gel out of the saddlc- 

Wtth the easy skill he had acquired in the 
circus, he placed his hands on the pommel 
and lifted his feel on to E*atch's plump rump. 

A moment later he stood upright - perfectly 
balanced on Patch's hack as the pony went 

I'he surprised spectators applauded and 
cheered, while Squib got ready to leap the 
instant the music stopped. 

Hut Patch, not being a trained circus pony, 
was bewildered by his rider's trick. He did 
nut know that he was supposed to continue 
ill ,1 dtclc around the remaining chair. With 
a smni .md a toss of his head, he started for 

"Hoy, Paiih. git back!” cried Squib, vainly 
wiiving his arms. The crowd's cheers turned 
to loars of laiighier. 

Patch bolted. The music slopped. Squib 
flung himself from the galloping, .swerving 
pony and kll headlong into the dust. 

By the time itc scramhied to his feci, 
spitting out the grit, he saw Skinny trium- 
phantly sealing himself in the chair. 



But the crowd's cheers were for Squib, who 
had entertained them with his trick riding. 

After Skinny was presented with the lirst 
prize of ten shillings. Squib went up to the 
judge's box expecting to get the second prize 
of five shillings. 

“But." explained the announcer to the 
crowd, "we've decided this kid deserves a 
special prize for being such a clever nder. So 
young ^uib gets ten bob, loo.” 

The delighted boy, after capturing Patch, 
rode back to his cobbers to receive their con- 
gratulations. 

"You're a couple o' clever lads," said Raw- 
hide admiringly to Lash and Squib, "1 can't 
even win a zac not even a silver sixpence. 
Bill you jisl wail till 1 capture The Hunchback 
and git a thousand quid." 

"Skite!" laughesi l.a.sh. "Out of my way, 
skite. I've got to win this cattle drafting 
contest.” 

Lash's bright manner concealed the misery 
of his pain as he rode into the ring. He won- 
dered how long he would be able to keep the 
grip on the saddle so es.senlial in roughriding. 
Balance and grip - those were tlie two quali- 
ties that had made him Champion of Cham- 
pions. But one was not much good without 
the other. 

A steer dashed I'rom the stockyard. A horse- 
man galloped alongside, wheeling the animal 
round the first post . . . then round the 
second post . . . then towards the gatc. 

The steer baulked and swung away. The 
competitor swiftly reined his mount and cut 
acros,s to the other side, The steer bolted back 
in the wrong direction. 

Twice the stockman vainly tried to drive it 
through the gate. And then -- 

Crack .'went the judge’s whip, because time 
was up, 

“Poor cove," muilercd Lash to himself. 
"He's been cracked off. I hope I can pick a 
steer that'll run fast and straight where 1 want 
him to go." 



Dago displayeil perfect horscman.ship to 
gel his steer round the posts, through the gate, 
and across the finishing line in the exccHcni 
time of 52i seconds. However much Lash 
despised the man for his evil ways, be could 
not help admiring Dago's superb skill in the 
saddle. 

“Jackson," called the announcer. This com- 
petitor took 68 seconds. The one after let his 
steer get right out of control, and he vk-as 
crack^ oft. 

"Lonergan," called the announcer. 

Again the huz2 of excitement arose when 
Lash went canlering across on Monarch. 
Though every movement hurl his swollen 
knee, he seemed to sit his horse with perfect 
ease and his smile was as bright and gay as 



A t the stockyard, lie ran his eye over the 
remaining steers. They were a wild lot. 
Choosing a wicked-looking animal (hat 
appeared fast, he said to one of the mourned 
stewards, "That's my rabbit." 

The stewards parted to let him enter the 
yard, and then closed behind him. 

C'ulltng out the steer was a matter of 
seconds. The stewards |sarted again. Out 
raced the steer into the ring - and the judges' 
stop-watches clicked. 

"R-r-r-nin!” bellowed Lash at the racing 
steer as he sent Monarch galloping in pursuit. 

Round the first post . . . round the second 
post . . . (Ah. that knee!l . . . and on to the 
gate. 

The steer baulked and swung away. I.ash 
turned Monarch as if on a sixpence. 

"Get him, cobber!" muttered Lash to his 
splendid horse. 

Monarch strained forward and, at full 
gallop, thrust his chest against the steer's 
shoulder, urging and turning him towards the 
gale. 



For a frightening fraction of a second. Ltish 
thought ih^ would hit one of the gateposts. 
Rut they escaped by inches. 

"Through !" cried l-ash jubilantly, It was a 
.simple matter to chase the steer across the 
finishing line. 

Breathlessly he waited for the result. 

"Fifty-one seconds!” .A roar of applause 
broke out. I.ash cantered acros-s to his smiling 
friends and received their congratulations. 
He knew that only by a miracle could any of 
the remaining contestants beat his time, in 
due course he coliccied first prize. 

“Hey, cobbers, jist look at all those btack- 
fcllers with spears!" Squib exclaimed. 

"Run for your lives!" roared Rawhide, 
pretending to panic. Then ho laughed and 
explained to Squib that it was an aboriginal 
spcar-ihrowing competition. 

Each of the dozen competitors caiTied 
three ironwood spears, upped with glittering 
points of while quartz. 

Tath also brought his woomera - a throw- 
ing siM.k wiih a socket for the butt of the 
spear. 

H'Ao.v/r went Use fust S|)far as it hurtled 
from the wrsomcra and viilcd ;icfo<s iltc spiwts 
ground. It plunged its uuarlz up imo the 
earth and stood quivering, ituaily 150 veuds 
from the thrower. 

"I wonder if our cobber Mo|»oke is among 
those abos," remarked lai.sh as he scanned 
the line of black faces. 

Rawhide had a difrcrcni thought on his 
mind. Me spoke it bluntly, "Lash, you'll 
never ride a buckjumper today." 

The roughridcr eyed him grimly. 'Tl! slick 
on any horse as long as Dago Mcssiier will 
and a few seconds longer." 

Rawhide .sighed: "I'm thankin' the powers 
o' Che upper air as my Chinese friends saj 
that you won't he sillin' on n horse for your 

"And what’s that goin’ to be?" queried 
Squib. 

For reply. Lash felt for the whip at his belt. 
He Jerked the handle and unloosened the 
pliable cods of plaited leather, tipped with a 
white horsehair cracker. 

“You won't have any trouble wmmn' ihoi 
contest.” grinned Rawhide to Australia's 
greatest stockwhip expert. 

"But all the same. I'll give 'em all I've gol- 
Thcy'll expect me to put on a show." 

Squib sighed enviously: “1 wishi I could 
pul on a sux'kwhip show and have everybody 

"So you shall!” cried loish in sudden in- 
spiration. "The hairy Iri.shman is always my 
partner m these events, but today you're 
going to be out there in the ring with me." 

“Aw, gee " began the bewildered boy. 

"Duck!" bellowed Rawhide, dragging 
Squib to the ground as Lash, obeying the 
order, dropped to his knees. 

Tchuk ! 

The point of the .spear buried itself in the 
ground only a few inches from Lash's 
crouching body. 



H r leapt to his feet amid the crowd's uproar 
and stared across the ground at the 
spear-throsving competitors. The stewards, 
grouped round one of the blacks, were 
obviously expressing strong disapproval. 

One of them turned and hurried over to the 
roughridcr and his friends. 

"Sorry, Lash," he said, "But one of those 
abos got excited and threw a bit wild. You 
know what those coves are like when ihev 
lose their block- But he won't chuck any more 
spears today. We've disqualified him." 
"Who’s the abo?" asked Lash casually. 
"Oh, just one of the blacks from ihc hills." 
replied (he steward, glancing at his list. 

‘T don’t suppose by any chance his name is 
Yabbayabba?" said Lash in meaning tones. 

"That's right. Yabbayabba. How did you 
know'?” 

“Oh, he always was a careless cove," re- 
marked Lash casually. The steward eyed him 
sharply, then hurried otf. 

The roughridcr said to his friends: "See 






how clever llano's mob are'.' Thai spear 
could have killed any one of us. and il would 
have been simply evpiained as an acciiiciu." 

"1 reckon," saki Rawhide, "ihai musi be 
ihc surprise ihe\ promised us for this afier- 

Lash's eyes narrowed shrewdly. "1 don'l 
ihink so. mate. I reckon Dado's t;ol anolher 
irick or iwo up his sleeve besides his knife." 

"I notice he’s nol wcarin' his sleeve holster 
today. Sleeves rolled up nice hare arms 
list like any other siockman " 

■'Stockwhip contest!" bawled Ihc announ- 
cer. "Ail in the ring for Ihc stockwhip 

"Come on, Sijuib," ordered laish, urging 
Ihc hoy forward. "All you've got to do is 
exactly whal I tell you. You’ll be absolutely 
safe if you obey orders and umi'i «*-vr when 
mu ihink you're voinn to he hi!. If you do. 
you'll disgrace both of us." 

Squib swallowed hard and siammcred; "I 
I won't move, cobber. You bet your sweet life 

As aniicipaied. ilie other compeliiors pm 
up a Icebie show compared with l.ash. who 
daified the spectators with a brilliant display 
from start to llnish. 

He b^an by cracking his whip at great 
speed in every possible position, and at limes 
the place seemed to ring with ride fire. 

Then, with Squih's help, he began his 
demonsirulion of precision work 

The boy held a candle in his band. Lash’s 
whip cut It in two. Then il Hicked a [seniiy 
I'rom llie lad’s lingers. 

.Squib’s ncrvousrwss disappettred - but very 
quickly returned when the Ush began lo play 
aboui his biKly, knocking chips oif his shoul- 
ilers and flicking "Isuiioas" of cottonwool 

The whip .sent the hoy’s hat flying. Now 
came the ordeal. Squib sIchxI with a feather 
in his mouth and turned sideways, but out of 
the airncr of his eye he could sec lutsh swing 
the writhing whip With a tremendous dTort 
of will, the boy kepi his neck ngid and his 
head perfectly steady. 

Snap! He shut his eyes opened ihem to 
see thai half ihe fcalhcr had gone. 

Above the noise of the applause he heard 
Lash calling; "Only one moiT trick, hace me 
ant! stand perfectly still," 

Squib did as he was told. The whip darted 
forward and flicked the other half of ihe 
fcalltcr from his mouth, 

(I leaped forward again straight at Ihe 
boy's face. Squib inslineuvely started to move 
back. Then be saw (ash's exprevaon of dis- 
may. lie froze into immohlity and iKid his 
breath. The whistling lush flickered before 
his eyes then suddenly ctsilcd itself about 
his neck as gently as a thread of silk. 

Shaking ihc coils free. I.ash ran lo Ihe 
asionishcsl boy and slapiKd him on Ihe back 
.imid tietiKndoiis applause. 

"That was Ixinzcr!" exclaimed the rough- 



ridei. "Totnorrow Mi buy you that nfle." 

Squib .seemed to irctid on air as he made 
his way hack lo where Rawhide was wailing 
lo add his coiigrulululions. 

But elation turned to anxiety when the 
buckjumpmg contest was announced. Though 
lash declared ih.ii his leg now tell a lot 
heller. Rawhide and Squib could see that he 
was in iH> fit slate lo ride a buckjumper. 

"But don’t you see." pleaded Rawhide, 
“il’s better for you to let ’em know the (ruth, 
It'll only be worse if you gii thrown and come 
a gutzer. You might injure that leg for life" 

lash quietly shtx>k his head. "No. my 
hairy friend, it’s no use trying lo make me 
change my mind. There’s a dingo over there 
that I've got to beat. Sec you later." 

"Have it yojr own way," gnimbied Raw- 
hide after him. "But when you fall ofl', don’t 
fall on your head, or you'll gn pociier than 

[ji.sli reached the stewards' enclosure to 
receive some surprising information 

"Messiter’s issued a challenge to you." 
said one of llie stewards, "He says that if you 
can stay on a certain horse for ten seconds 
he’ll withdraw from the contest." 

"What's the idea'!" asked the astonished 
rough rider. 

"Belter ask him yourself. Here he ciymts," 



D mpo's smile was both mvsieiious ami 
superior as he greeted Lash with a nod. 
"Are you game?" he asked curtly, 

"I'll ride anything you can," replied 1-ash 
with a grin. "And one or two nioie. maybe." 

"Tve brought a hiickiumpof along uxlay 
that I don’t think you can sit for ten seconds. 
Nobody else can not even me. If you can 
do it. Ml withdraw from the contest. What’s 
more. Ml Itel you a hundred pounds you 
won’t last ten seconds." 

"You know 1 haven't got a hundred 
pounds." replied l.a.sh. He added signi- 
(icanily: "And you also know why." 

Oago shnigged. "Very well, then. Ml bet 
you a hundred lo one in pounds that you 
w'on’i sit on this horse for ten seconds." 

"Il’s a go'" exclaimed Lash. "Shake!" 

A handshake before the stewards, and the 
challenge was aoccpied. 

"And now," said Lash, "let’s see this 
ferocious animal." 

"With the gretiicsi of pleasure." smiled 
Uagu, leading Ihe way to the stockyards. 

"This is your horse." he said when they 
reached (he chosen yard. "And you’re wel- 
come to it-’’ 

Lash hauled himself up on lo Ihe rails and 
looked down on Ihe chestnut - .saddled, 
roped, and closely penned. The animal 
snorted, flattened ears, showed whiles of eyes. 
Straining at the ropes. Ihe brute gave the 
impression of concentrating the evil of all 
horseflesh in one animal. It was certainly a 
fearsome sight. 



"Well, do you fancy your chances now?" 
asked [lagu Messiler loudly. 

1 ash’s reply surprised him suriiriscd the 
stewards surprised ihc crowd, who had 
heard aboui Ihe challenge hy this lime and 
weie discussing it with excitement. 

l-ash threw back his head and roared with 
laughter that amid be Itcard all over the 
sports ground- 

"Chuckle!" cried Lash. "ITs Chuckle! " 
The marc pricked her ears as if sh-, knew 
the voice, but she coilfinuetl lo roll her eyes 
horribly as she slrainetl at the ropes in fury. 




Losh \wnng the Kiilhing whip 

D.igo Mes-siicr. Greasy .loc, and the rest of 
the mob were taken aback by La.sh’s laughter. 
They knew this was the mare lhai had 
brought about his disgrace three years ago, 
and they expected him to show surprise or 
coocern. anger or timidity, or even disdain 
hut nol amusement. 

"Poor Chuckle,” munnured Itish. "Whal 
have they done to you'’’’ 

The scene in Ihc paddock came back 
vividly to hts mind. His Uncle Peter, tall and 
smiling, chaiiengiiig him to ride Chuckle, the 
marc that only Uncle Peter could ndc or so 
he thought 

He recalled the faces of the stockmen 
gathered Iheie to watch the battle some 
anxious, some amused, hut all wishing him 
good luck. 

The voice of Dago broke into his thoughts. 
"Well." he called up to the young man on the 
stockyard fence, ‘'are you going to take up 
my challenge T‘ 

"Too right I am!” Lash agreed eagerly. 

Dago smiled mysierioiLSly at Greasy Joe. 
who guflawed behind his hand. 



"But," added Lash. “I don't warn to mount 
hc[ in Ihe yard. Ml l.tke her out on to Ihc 
spxuls ground." 

"You're crazy, Lash," s.ud one of the 
stewards. "You'd better drop into Ihc saddle 
from where you are Once the handlers let 
her go. vou havon’l got a chanee of gelling 
your ft*« into the stirrup, let alone getting 



The young roughrider smiliiiglv shook his 
head. "I.ei me do it my way. cobber." 

"O.K. Il’s your luncral." 

[.ash leaned over and said lo Ihe handlers. 
"Slacken those ropes a hit." 

At Ihe same lime he pul his hami on 
Chuckle’s straining neck and stroked it 
gently as he muimured; "tasv does ii, 
Chuckle, easy docs n," 

He recalled how, night afier night, he had 
secretly .slipped down lo the paddrsek and 
gradually made friends with the horse (hat 
only his uncle could ndc. By soft talking and 
gentle stroking, combined with hts inborn 
knowledge of horses, he had made a friend 
of the "wild marc", as (hey used to call her 
on Coolabah Creek station. 

Now, three years later, he was doing the 
same thing, repeating those caresses, stroking 
the glossy neck and murmuring words of 
ahatlion and soothing encouragement. 

"Take il e-e-easy. Chuckle, old girl. Take 

While (he puzzled crowd wailed and won- 
dered, they discus.sed the exciting situation. 
The news of Dago’s challenge stxin spread 
Then the information that the huckjumiwr 
in question was the very mare that brought 
aboui Lash's disgrace three years before. 

’'Were you there?" some of them asked 
Rawhide O'Reilly. 

"I wa.s there that heaii-rendm’ mornin’," 
replied (he Irishman. 

But he did not make any 1'urthci comment. 
He did nol tell them that Lash had secretly 
made friends with Chuckle till she would let 
him ride licr bareback. He did not tell them 
that Lash had refused to ndc the mure that 
eeriain morning because he knew that if he 
did so. is would break his uncle’s heart. That 
was Uncle Peter’s great pride the fact that 
he was the only man on the station, or in all 
Oucenstaod for that ntaiisr. who could ride 
the wild mare. Rawhide did nol tell them this 
bccau.se he respected Lash’s secret. If Ihe 
young man wanted to reveal it. then it should 
come from his own lips. 

Meanwhile, over at the stockyard. Lash 
had persuaded Chuckle to slop Irembling 
and straining at Ihe ropes. He told the hand- 
lers to take the ropes oil altogether. 

"That’s a bonzer girl!" murmured Lash 
delightedly, running his hand down the 



^7o be conlhiued) 




ROB CONWAY IN SEARCH OF A SECRET CITY 





12 Uiiy ivao 






{i)(M 



ICE CREAM 



TOMMV WAU|S 









I'M GOING TO SWING 
HSR ROUND. GCTON 
THAT OUNWHAL£ ANI 
LEAN FOB v 



YOU'LL NEVER DO 
IT. TOMMY. THESE 
WAVES ARE TOO 
STEEP 



GOOD HEAVENS 
he's SROUGHT 
HER ROUND 
— WHAT A 

60 V/ j, 



GET YOUR UNE 
READY, JOE 



GEE. TOMMY. YOU 
WERE TERRIFIC 
IF YOU'D PANICKED 
WE'D HAVE &EEN 
FINISHED/ y 



YOU CHON'T DO 
SO &AOLY YOUR- 
SELF, B1U-- THAT 
WALL'S ICE CREAM 
YOU'RE HAVING 
V EVERY DAY IS 
\. DOING YOU GOOD 



CONDI I lONSOI 



ufti, wiyol'lraJ 
oTony publKilic 






TH£ GREAT ADVENTURER 




jEKUSALEH 1900 YEARS AGO 



AN ARMED CAVALCADE 
SWEEPS OUT OF THE CITY AS 
SAUL OF TARSUS RIDES TO 
DAMASCUS TO PERSECUTE THE 
NAZARENES (CHRISTIANS) 
THERE 



WRONG WITH \ 
SAUU? HES HARDLy SPOKEN ' 
AND 



HALT - WE'LL STOP AT 
THIS INN FOR THE 
NIOHT. 



SINCE we STARTED 
IF )00 SAy ANyrHING HE 
BITES yOUR HEAD OFF ' 



^4ND SINCE HE ^ 
QUESTIONED THOSE 
NAZAREN& 

V PRySONERSv 



^ I THINK TH£RE'S 
y SOMETHING STRANGE 

HAPPENING TO HIM 

V IN WS HEAD. 

AH weu- 
, wesHOuiPwoRRy 
"-/whatever it is ) 
-\DONt SUPPOSE 
k (yCS he 'll Raise 

ii iMyk ov** • 



>'h6'S been like ' 
THAT eVER SINCE 
THAT CHAP STEfHEN . 
V WAS STONED. ^ 



LOOK AT 



BROODING. 



NIGHT FALLS 
ON THE INN 




I'M AFRAID WE 
MUST PUSH ON . 



’ AND WE'LL 
PROBABLY Be ABLE 
TO REST UP FOR 
A COUPLE OF HOUI^ 
IN THE MORNING.^ 



BUT AWAY TO THE 
EAST UNKNOWN TO 
SAUL. BARNABAS 
RIDES THE DANGER- 
OUS EASTERN ROAD 
IN A BID TO WARN 
THE DAMASCUS 
NAZARENES 



But I'll walk 
FOR A SPELL... 



TIRED 

FARA?