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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

GLE - TfJE NEW jA NATIONAL STRIP CARTOON WEEKLY 



DAN DARE 

PHOT OF THE FUTURE 







■ IF TUIS RAY FIELD THEORY OF > 

■ YOURS IS WIGHT, DAW, WE 

ll SHOULD ALMOST BE IN THE 
RAYF1ELC WOW 


1 WILL YOU HAVE THE FI£ST SHOT AT 
^^ GETTING THROUGH? ICAM'T ALLOW 
^J* PROFESSOR PEABOPY TO TAKE THVT 
^ RISK 


1 VEWi 

■ good, 






•tfT^SS^ 








\ 


4 


^Y^W^"^^^^0* 






\ 


*> 







ALL SET; DIG? HERE WE GO THEN, 

CROSS ALL YOUR FINGERS AND 

WANG ON TO YOUR WAT 





OPCOO&S£ / - WHAT IDIOTS WE I IT CAUGHT FIRE, SlR : BUT 
ALL ARE I THE RADIO'S WORKED J I GOT THAT OUT WITH 
BY IMPULSE WAVES /AN EXTINGUISHER- 

TROUBLE IS THE 
'PLATES ARE BADLYf 
v STRAINED ONTHEfl 
5TAR BOARD 




I DON'T 

THINK THEY'LL 

HOLD FOR MUCH 

LONGER - AND 

OMCE TWEV GIVE 

WAY. . . . 



I KNOW, DIG - ONCE 
THE INSIDE SKIN GOES 
WE'LL JUST BE TWO 
MORE BITS OF SPACE 

DUST WELL, IT WAS 

A NICE TRY. 



PITY WE CAN'T RADIO 
THE OTHERS. ANDTELL 

T1HEM THEY'D 

GET THROUGH THE* 
RAYPIELD EASILY 
THEY' KNEW 








yiPt>££- WE CAN 
MLEOUT— IF THE 
KITE'LL HOLD 
TOGETHER WHILE 
WE 5LOW DOWN 


£1 tPv 




&/ 


^^s*"~J''m(B 


^^ "Y 




V\ ""^^B t_i' Ji^ 


1 \ ^ 


&t-m 


"look Sir' ^HB 




z&a? '4% 


TUB ATMOSPHERE ^ ^ 
LIGHTS ON! >f\j* 


amS&Di 




-WE'VE HIT THE AIR IJr 1 
ROUND VENUS! Ya 


^ 




""* \ 




\i 


CONTINUED ] 



J%* *4cU*e*tft4*e4 of P.C.49 



FROM THE FAMOUS RADIO 
series by ALAN 5TRANKS 




THIS IS THE PLACE, 
INSPECTOR 





YES - BUT WHER'i 
FORTYNINE? 




^tjTS/VCOUPLE OP PLAIN -CLOTHES 





ys 









VWUAT THE BLAZES IS J)[[ 


^Kgoing on here/ 


PBF^ 


QUICK, SIRf THE OTHERS- 


IPRESn 


TWO GOT AWAY TO THE 


II 1 H?OfJ V/B 


CANAL AT THE BACK/f 


mIml^^D 


r S?! 


IP^HANG ON TO 


nWffidhb. i 


W THAT LITTLE RAT 


{^■$f*m ml) 


f CONSTABLE 1 


kf ^HH|d 


WE'LL LOOK 


$y*F i tffi'*^%t&mi 


AFTER THESE 




OTHERS. COME 




ON SIR / 


■^^^B 


V 



LOOKS LIKE THEY'VE GIVEN US 
THE SLIP WRIGHT. BETTER CALL, 
REINFORCEMENTS 




I LL HAVE A 
CORDON THROWN ROUN0\ 
THIS AREA , INSPECTOR . 
LET^S TRY THE FRONT 





WE FOUND LOU PARSONS' GUN AT HIS 
HIDEOUT. HANDLED IT BY THE BARREL 
SO WE WOULDN'T DESTROY THE PRINTS 
AND PLANTED IT IN THE CAR TO FOX YOU 





pior ACA/Nsr me world 



by Chad Varah 




KCt "ff for the «. 



Chapter 7 
The Traitors' Lair 



WH E N he opened his eyes again. 
Ray found himself in bed in a 
room of most peculiar shape. Ii 
look him some time to remember 
what had happened to him. His head ached 
violently. and titan mnl throbbing pain in his 
right arm. He Celt for ii with his left hand, and 
was astonished when his fingers encountered 
bandages and (he hard outline of a splint. 

He tried to lift his head, but he couldn't. 
Someone liad strapped it down to the pillow. 
He felt his forehead, i|uit£ expecting lo find a 
leather band across it, but there was nothing 
there. No - they'd put a lead weight on the 
back of his head - that must be it. He fell for 
it. and winced as his hand encountered a 
tender swelling. He turned his head, and a 
firework display immediately burst in front of 
his eyes. He waited for it to finish, but didn't 
dare 10 (urn his bead back. Tim thug must 
have hit him hard' A wonder he hadn't 
cracked his skull! 

He closed his eyes. He could still see "fire- 
works", but they were dying down, and the 
pain was settling down into a numb ache. 
As the last rocket disappeared, he opened 
his eyes cautiously. Then he saw her. 



She was standing watching \ 
in her hand, She \ 
was very, very beautiful. As he looked al her. 
she put down the magazine on a chair from 
which she had evidently jusi risen, and came 
over to him. She settled him more com- 
fortably, working with the practised deftness 
of a trained nurse. 

"What's your name?" asked Ray, 

""You can call me "Anna'," she replied. 
She spoke softly, for which he was grateful: 
and he wondered whether there wasn't a trace 
of some foreign accent in her speech. 

"Where am 1 7" he asked. 

"Don't worry now. Drink this," .she com- 
manded. Yes, site max foreign. Ray was 
parched, and drank obediently. It didn't 
occur to him until it was loo late that the 
drink might be drugged. It lasted like pure 
water, but he had such a horrid taste in his 
mouth anyway thai he couldn't be sure. 

"I mu.tr know wliere 1 am," he repeated. 

Anna shrugged her shoulders. 

"You ate being cared for," she said, "and 
you must slay here until you are heller. Now 
try to sleep a liiUe." 

She gave him a brief professional smile, and 
went out of the room. He heard Ihe key turn 
in the lock afler she closed the door. He 
glanced towards the window: it was heavily 
barred. He was a prisoner. 

He would try to escape when he fell a bit 
better. Al ihe moment lit hadn't the energy 



At least he could study the details of his 
prison for future reference. 

Ii was as barely furnished as any cell. The 
shape of ii puzzled him, until he realised thai 
it was half an ociagon with a bit cut off. He 




He could signal In Ted in Morse code 



be in one of two rooms in an eight -sided 

Was there anyone in Ihe other room? Ted 
perhaps? 

He tapped on the wall, and was rewarded 
by an immediate response. 

There was a small metal ashtray on the 
table by his bed, and afler an effort he 
managed to reach it. As the partition wall 
was on bis right, it wasn'i too difliculi lo 
bring his good arm across and use (he ash- 
tray for lapping and scraping. "Tap" for 
"dot", "scrape'' for "dash" - he could signal 
to Ted in Morse code. 

"Tap-scrape-lap lap scrape-scrape scrape- 
sera pe-scrapo lap-scrape-lap tap-lap-lap lap," 
he signalled. 

The answer came back al once. 

"Scrape tap-tap- tap- tap lap-lap tap- tap-lap 
lap-tap lap-tap-tap. Scrape tap serape-tap- 
lap." "This is Ted"! The message continued. 
"Who are you?" 

"Number 49," replied Ray. "Whai hap 
pened lo you afler the lad found you in thai 
cellar, and where are we now?" 

The tap-scrape from the other side of the 
wall answered with feverish speed. 

''Never mind about that now - we may nol 
have much lime. Has the nurse given you any- 
thing to drink?" 

"Yes. I think ii was waier. Why, is she - ?" 

The taps from the other room interrupted 

"Don'i know. She does as she's (old. 
Lislen. I heard (hem tell her lo give you some- 
thing, and afler she had gone one of them 
whispered something ^o the olhcr." 

There was a pause. Ray wailed, bui when 
nothing further came, he tapped: 
"What was it?" 

Again i here was a pause, and I hen came the 
answer, hesilanlly: 

"I only heard the words dead in an hour'." 
"You think (hey meant me?" signalled Ray 
grimly. 

"Yes. I am still of value to them. I sup- 
Ray made no reply. He was thinking. The 
tapping from the other room began again, 
swiftly and urgently. 
"Where shall I go if I can get away?" ii 

'"Back lo the arsily lo reporl." 

"What is my best rouie lo the Varsity'.''" 

"Route *C\ ihis lime." answered Ray. 

" Have you found out anything? If so, 
better pass it on lo me in case I gel through, 
and you are poisoned." 

Ray didn't answer for a moment. He was 
trying lo collect his thoughts. His head didn'l 
ache quite so badly now. but he was still 
dazed, and rather tired from signalling. 
Whilst he paused another message came 
through. 

"You may not have much lime. Hurry. I 
am listening." 

Ray was looking worried, as well he might. 
V frown appeared on his face s 



sci (led himself more comfortably, and began 
tapping and scraping for all he was worth. 
Il was about twenty minutes before his rapid 
signals came lo an end. 

He waited for some acknowledgement, but 
none came. He tapped out an enquiry, bul 
gol no reply. There was no way of telling how 
much of his message had been received on the 
other side of his prison wall. 

Had he been able lo see through thai wall 
be would have recognised the lower half of 
the man who lay upon the bed in Ihe other 
room or the octagonal tower: and be would 
have recognised not only the sponge-bag 
trousers, but also the thin lips and the nose 
like the beak ofa bird of prey, which belonged 
lo Ihe man who sat by Ihe bed with a note- 
book and pencil. The two gangsters who had 
captured him in the cellar, and presumably 
moved the stolen uranium before bringing 
him here, had tried a more subtle method than 
(orture for worming oul of him the secrets of 
"The Peacemakers". 

The man in Ihe leather gaiters, who had 
been afraid lesi Ray should recognise his 
ng himself off (he bed. and stretched 



viih a 



•<-y >■ 



Then. 



i expression of resolution, he 



"I shall fall asleep if I stay there any 
longer!" he remarked. "Well, your little 
dodge worked. Did you get ii all down?" 

"Every word," replied Sponge-Bag trium- 
phantly, his cruel lips twisted in a mirthless 
caricature of a smile. "We've found oul more 
about the Conspirators in the last half hour 
lhan we've ever known before. But we still 
don't know where the place is, curse il. If we 
could only find thai out — " 

"Perhaps my mcih.i.ls will succeed in carry- 
ing on where yours left off.'' suggested 
Gaiters hopefully. "No harm in letting me 
have a go at him, anyway. I'm sure I could 
have broken down Hide, if only you — " 

"You're a fool!" snapped Sponge-Bag. 
"You have your uses, bul thinking isn't one 
of (hem. These men are fanatics, and torlure 
is useless. We might let you amuse yourself, 
you big ape, if il didn'l make any difference 
one way or Ihe other, bul if you mess up any 
of our plans, you'll be sorry!" 

"I was only frying — ■" 

"Well, don't!" cul in Sponge-Bag con- 
(emp(uously. "Just carry out your orders, and 
leave the planning to (hose wilh brains. Fetch 

Gaiters went out obediently. Hislear of the 
other man was proved by Ihe fact thai he 
didn't allow his face lo betray the slightest 
sign of resentment until he wason Iheothcrside 
of the door. Even then he made no rebellious 
geslure, but merely grilled his teeth and 
narrowed his piggish tittle eyes slill further. 

He ran quietly down Ihe spiral stone stair- 
case and entered Ihe room below Ihe one he 
had jusi left. The nurse was combing her hair 
in from of a mirror, and surveyed him with 
cold distaste as she lurned lo face him. 

"The boss wants you," he mumbled. 

"Right. Now get oul." 

She proceeded leisurely with her coilfure, 
i hen picked up Iter cap and began to adjust i(. 
Gaiters stood and watched her until she came 
towards him. 

"You still here?" she enquired, pushing 
past him indifferently. 

"'He's in no nwod lo be kept waiting." ex- 
plained Gaiters. 

She shrugged her shoulders, and preceded 
him up Ihe staircase. Sponge-Bag was tapping 
his foot impatienlly as they came inio the 
roont. Gaiters made as if to leave, but his boss* 
motioned bun to remain. He shut ihe door 
and stood by il. 

Sponge-Bag studied Anna calculatingly, 
wilhoul speaking. The girl met his gaze un- 
flinchingly, belraying none of the lfnfflffff*HI 
she fell. She could deal with the unwelcome 
atlentions of the lout by the door, bul there 
was something inhuman about the cold 
eyes fixed on her like those ofa newt. 

"You are beautiful, Anna." staled Sponge- 
Bag. "Don* our guest" (he jerked his head in 
the direction of the partition wall) "ramain 
unmoved, or do you think you could win his 
- er - good-will?" 

"I don'l know," replied the girl sullenly. 
"He has no reason to Irusi me." 

"Nor would we have, if you didn'l know 
your father was in our hands," answered 
Sponge-Bag smoothly. "You had better pul 



on a good act, hadn't you. my little Anna?" 

His bated teeth gave the impression more 
of animal menace than of a human smile. 

"I shall do what you tell me, of course," 
she said, without emotion. "1 have no choice." 

"Exactly. Now we have managed lo find 
out a good deal about the Conspirators, but 
we could not ask too obviously about the 
local ion o f thci r headquarters withoularuusing 
the young man's suspicions. He seemed to 
assume that his 'friend' knew all about the 
'Varsity', and about (he route he called "C 
for reaching it. You're sure be said' Varsity'?" 
This question was shot at Gaiters, who 
started to attention. "In his message, as you 
read it to me, the *V was missing." 

"He musfve missed it by accident," 
grumbled Gaiters, "There isn't no such word 

"Well, that's one of the things Anna must 
find out," said Sponge- Bag. "To make him 
trust you, Anna, you must be kind to him, 
and he must see one of us being unkind to 
you." Gaiters' eyes Dickered, and he licked 
his lips nervously. "If you tclt him part of the 
truth about your father, and add a few 'sweet 
nothings', that should do the trick. Begin by 
'sneaking' him some food." 

The girl turned lo the door. 

"You think you can manage to wheedle 
out of him the location of their H.Q.?" asked 
Sponge- Bag siikily. 

"I'll do my best." ■ 

"You'd better!" he snarled. She backed 
away from his sudden rage, and Gaiters closed 
the door after her. 



Kt.N was finishing his second breakfast thai 
day, whilst the Vicar was upstairs shaving 
and dressing, when the door-bell clanged. 
J-orgetting that he wasn't in his own house. 
Ken rushed to the door, just beating his host 
to it. When he saw the slight, bespectacled 
figure on the door-step, he knew a momentary 
disappointment, quickly changed to surprise 
when the Vicar hailed the new arrival as 
".Geoff". This chap wasn't Ken's idea of a 
Secret Service man! Why, the burly patson 
looked the part better, except for his collar! 
"You don't look a bit like my idea of a 
Secret Agent!" blurted Ken. Then he wished 



he hadn't said it, for it didn't sound exactly 
complimentary. He was quickly reassured. 

"Splendid!" exclaimed the man called 
Geoff. "That's the last thing we want lo 
look like. Now, tell me everything you know 
about this business." 

He made himself comfortable in one of the 
shabby chairs. His host offered him a cigar- 
ette, but he shook his head and took out a 
silver snuff-box. He helped himself delicately 
to snuff, and once again Ken wondered at the 
dandified air of this hunter ofdesperate spies. 
Then, meeting the frosty blue eyes that never 
left his face and seemed to bore right into him, 
he remembered the "Scarlet Pimpernel", and 
was glad he was on the same side as Geoff. 
Or was he? He was on Ray's side, no matter 
what might happen, and hoped that was the 

Ken related everything he knew, with 
occasional interpolations from the Vicar and 
shrewd questions from GeofT. He hadn't 
meant to say anything about Ray, but found 
himself pouring out the whole story as if he 
were hypnotized. When he had finished, Geoff 
cocked an enquiring eyebrow at his host, and 
reached for the 'phone. 

He made several calls, both trunk and local, 
speaking rapidly in the tones of one accus- 
tomed to be obeyed without question. When 
be had finished, he said, "Now we'll go and 
have a look at that cellar." 

They soon reached the bombed house from 
whose cellar the gangsters had operated, and 
Ken watched with awe as Geoff's slender 
fingers found the secret of the two pivoted 
Hags and revealed the hidcy hole - empty. 

For a long time the Secret Service man 
studied the hole by the light of the torch the 
Vicar held, but remembering what had hap- 
pened to Ray, he didn't put his hand in. At 
last he drew back, and studied once again the 
messages left by Ray and the missing scientist. 

"Seems genuine," he muttered. "A box as 
heavy as lead was concealed in that hole, and 
Ray was probably right in supposing that it 
was uranium. And Edward NitTe's message 
certainly means 'Gog is one of them'. He may 
be wrong, of course." 

"I don't think so," put in "Burglar Bill" 
quietly, "I know something of Ray's ideas, 



liberty to tell you that I shouldn't be a bit 
surprised if his friend Hide came here to 
interest Gog in their organisation, and found 
that the Gog was already involved with a less 
respectable one of his own." • 

"So you are a sympathizer of the Con- 
spirators, are you?" enquired Geoff, 

"Is that what you call them? I believe they 
call themselves The Peacemakers'. I don't 
know much about them, but I do know Ray. 
( would trust him absolutely. So you can put 




•nielli down the spiral Si 



me down as a sympathizer if you like." 
The Reverend Bill's jaw was thrust out 
and Geoff retreated in mock alarm. 

"At least we can work together in catching 
Gog." be said. "I probably know more than 
you about the Con — about the Peacemakers, 
and we've no proof that they arc disloyal at 
the moment. It's not illegal to persuade 
people, even atomic scientists, to leave the 
country voluntarily, but I'd like to know what 
they're up to wherever they take them." 
The man from M.I. 5 led the way back into 



the street, where Ken was surprised to find 
Dr. Briggs's grey Jaguar, with Dick at the 
wheel, and Jim sitting beside him. Ken ran 
across to them. 

"How's Pru?" asked Jim anxiously. 

"Oh, she's all right," returned Ken, with 
brotherly casualness. "How is it you aren't in 
a deep, dark dungeon?" 

Dick answered for him. 

"It's out o* the hands of police, now. 
They've nowt more to do wi' it. Secret 
Service 'as took over. Yon feller's in charge." 

He indicated Geoff with his thumb. 

Before Ken could reply, the Vicar and his 
friend came up and the Secret Agent was 
introduced to Dick and Jim. 

"Jolly decent of you to let us be in at the 
death!" enthused Jim. 

"Whose death, I wonder?" murmured 
Geoff — but they were all getting into the car. 
and only Dick beard him. 

"Are ye satisfied to work wi' a team of 
amachoors?" asked the Northerner. "Ah 
notice police 'as all 'opped it. 'Ave ye no pats 
on the job?" 

"I'm satisfied," smiled Geoff, ignoring the 
second question. "I should think you'd be a 
good man in a scrap, and I know 'Burglar 
Bill' is. These lads must confine themselves to 
scouting for us. You're under my orders, 

"Yessir!" chorussed Jim and Ken, trying 
to look alert and dependable. 

"Where d'ye wanl to go?" asked Dick, 
letting in the clutch. 

"You solved it first, Bill - tell him!" said 
the man from M.I.5. 

"The desirable modern residence - 3 recep., 
6 bed., h. and c, mod. con., and all the usual 
offices, standing, 1 assure you, in its own 
grounds," said the big man, "of that eminent 
scientist and traitor. Professor Gog!" 

Dick put his foot down, and the Jaguar 
swooped forward. 

"Ah bet we'll find bird's flown," he said 
gloomily. 



(I'u be t'irtiiHUi-d next week) 




THE MARY CELESTE 

Captain Morehouse of the barque Dei Gratia, 
130 miles east of Portugal, sighted the two- 
masted 282 ton brig, Mary Celeste in the 
afternoon of 5th December, 1872, Her master, 
Captain Benjamin Briggs. was his friend. The 
Mary Celeste had left New York for Genoa 
four days earlier than the Dei Gratia. As Cap- 
tain Morehouse warned to wave a greeting 



to Briggs, he ordered the helmsman to steer 
close to the Mary Celeste. When the two 
vessels drew abreast Captain Morehouse 
became alarmed. There was no one at the 
wheel of the Mary Celeste, no one on her 
deck. Captain Morehouse hailed her. There 
was no reply. He lowered a boat and rowed 
across. The brig's sails were set but the 
breeze was tight. The ship was empty. Cap- 
tain Briggs, his wife, their small child and the 



crew of seven had all disappeared. Captain 
Briggs' cabin was tidy. The lid of a har- 
monium stood open. In a sewing machine was 
a half-made garment. In the fc'sle hung the 
crew's clothes. There were no signs of vio- 
lence, and there was plenty of food and 
water. The last entry in 'he ship's log was 
dated eleven days earlier. After that the entire 
crew had disappeared. The ship's one small 
boat was missing. For ten days the ship had 



sailed herself 750 miles on the right coursc. 
Captain Briggs was a fine seaman; he had left 
a fourteen-year-old son ashore in their New 
England home. Captain Morehouse look the 
Mary Celeste in charge. An official enquiry 
offered no explanation. Captain Briggs and 
his companions were never heard of again. 
The Mary Celeste was sold and was finally 
wrecked in 1885, having provided one of the 
greatest mysteries of the sea. 



CRICKET COACHING by LEARIE CONSTANTINE 



RIGHT FOOT 

BACK AND 

ACROSS 





NOTE : 
SHAPING TO 
STRIKE TOP 
OF BALL 








BODY 

TURNING 

AWAV 

> CLEAR 

FLIGHT OF 

8ALL (SELF 

preservation) 





NEXT WEEK 
THROWING 

Iti-Fon 

ACCURACY 



MAKING YOUR OWN MODEL RACING CAR 



TANK INSTALLATION 




ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION LAYOUT 




CONSTRUCT I M Q 

THfe I Sfe LITRE 
E.R.A. RACING CAR 



PARTBZ" 

h y Q.W. ArH*mr-Brarto4 



-&4f -*-{— f-FUffg- 




SCALE EFFECT 

"To get best- result-. To provide 
Springs for* themodet use thwi 
ard of good aua|ity and shellac. 
rWe jig is made Arm (wood with 

tyo headless iWs down at the 

Appropriate, distance apart "Bro 
ot these stiould be made up, am 
for- the fhoof and one Par- Hie 
re-r "sprigs". 

Lay off (he strips to ther»iuire«j 
width fbr ttie leaves, then mark 
off- lengths and outoufc The 
master leap is now applied fc> 
Hie. jig, the ends passed round 
the nails and glued. When the 
glue is dry, flpply ohellrtt^the.i 
rve*t leaf and so en until each 
Spring is ComnWed. Apply ehellac 
all over and hann-todrytfx»uu^l 

The mounting pins lor the 
Springs arc made (rvn '/jj «- 
hand dewe-ll, the ftorrt-av>d>o» 
ones forming the tie bars 
fertile chassis erida- Before 
-f3t«ig, ^mnd eadn spring with 
coarse waned linen thread 
«id then oippW a ««■* o-f well 
■thinned black dope- 



REAR SUSPENSION 



lOBA.nutS fnttrf aw loya 




(ONT SUS-^eNSIOM 

of the springs m t+*s COS 



UH AND SHOWY - COWBOV! 



SETH AND SHORTY 

HAVE ESCAPED FROM 

BLACK JAKE AND 

HIS GANG 




JOHN COBB'S WORLD RECORD BREAKING CAR 



The Kailloii 'Mubir Special holder of [he Wurlil s I Jiiri 
Speed Kecord or 394.197 mph.. Bonneville Salt Haiv, I ink 
U.S.A. On one run Ihc average was 403.135 mph. 

The power unit is Iwo Napier "Linn" engines. iIh' n.11 
engine driving the forward wheels himI Hie forward engine ilr \\ jng 
■he rear wheels making a tntiil of 2,500 hpv 

The speeds available with lh« 3 speed gear box are: 150. 
250 and 400 mph. plav - 

Cooling by water and ice. Brakes - water cooled Iraiisiiiission 
and external air brake operated by vacuum cylinders. 




SKIP PY 



ta 



THE KANGAROO 



BY DANET. DUBRISAY, GENESTRE 




1 he's out|^H 

1 TO THE H 
1 WORLD. ■ 


1 what's he 

1 BEEN UPTOpI 








Y/ 


\ \ s^\ 
















§ J 








*r\ 










c V? 


±. 




■i^-.. 






/~Z- 


THE POOR 


en \ 




vj 


FELLOW'S 










EXHAUSTED 












BUT HE'S STILL 












BREATHING. 











1 SMELLING SALTS I 

1 DON'T SEEM TO W 

1 HAVE MUCH E F(= £CTjU| 


^LHHHIIIIIIIHI 


\ }r\ 


Iff 




I JUMPING 
I SNAKES ' 








1 WHAT'S THAT 
1 STUFF 

1 pyrMAMiTe? 












<: 


*/ 


HviiM 


^•—-^ r 


^^^ 1 \ i . 



HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 




EAGLE CLUB 



AND EDITOR'S PAGE 




The Editor's Office 

EAGLE 

43 Shoe Lane, London, EC4 

WE have just had to make a very 
difficult decision to reduce the 
number of pages in eagle to lb" 
each week instead of having 21) 
pages every other week as we have had so lar. 
We hope Ihis won't be Tor long, but the 
demand Tor lacle has been so great that 
many people have been unable (o get a copy. 
The paper we save by making this reduction 
will enable us to supply a great many more 
people. We had to choose between fewei 
pages for more people and more pages for 
fewer people and wc feel sure you will agree 
that the fair thing is to choose the first. 
As a 



shall increase the number 

of pages again. Meanwhile, 

we are sure you will agree 

that even with 16 

week eagle is very 

value for money. And from 

now on. their should not be so many of you 

disappointed at not (gelling your copy each 

This does not mean, of course, that you 
won't be getting those fortnightly features 
which many of you say you like so much; for 
example Professor Brillain and Bernard New- 
man's Spy Stories. We shall still be printing 
these whenever possible. 

Wc should like to thank all those of you 
who have written to us telling us what 
you like and do not like about eagle and 
making some very valuable suggestions which 
we arc going to follow up. 

We shall hope to write to you all personally 
but you will understand this takes a long lime 
as we have had so many letters. So please 
forgive us if you don't get a reply to your 
letter straight away. 

Here are the names of those living in Scot- 
land who were among the first 100 members 
of eagle Club. They are being taken to see 
the Highland Games at Oban. 
franco Pisaneschi, Watson Si., Motherwell 
John Swann, Carmichael St., Dundee 
Thomas McCrossan, Panmure St,, Glasgow 



Daniel Crawford, ( ou I ten 

Ave., Coatbridge 

Helena Newton, Hessing- 




Gordon Eraser, East Park / .' 

St., Huntly'L 
David MungalL, Croft Bank 
Farm, Uddingston 
Robert Nelson. Ducklage Collage, Crieff 
Agnes Bcveridge, Glasgow Rd., Hamilton 
John Whilelaw, Gladstone St.. Burn bank 
F.styn Griffiths, Campbell St., Banff 
Alice Burke, Wholerbank, Dundee 
David Roberts, Edinburgh Rd., Harlhill 
Nan Sneddon, Biidgeress Kd.. BcTness 
David M ago wan, Dal ton St.. By Cambushany 
James Welsh. Belses Drive, Cardonald 
Alislair Foster, Shearer St., Glasgow 
Vernon Wiseman, Albert Avenue, Glasgow 
James Cosgrovc, Deanhill Rd.. Kilmarnock 
Betty Kilputrick. New St., Riccanon 
Sidney Smith, Gowan's Terrace, Muirton 
Peter Mackay, Station House, Ballinluig 
James Stewart, Arnott Drive, Coatbridge 
Hector Adams. Alpine Terrace, Ardrossan 
Ian Taylor, Gladstone Road, Satlcoals 



We had a great many replies to the Fill-ins 
competition in Issue No. 2, A team of 
art eitperts from the various papers published 
by Hulum Press sorted out the entries and 
managed to make a short lisl from which we 
had to choose the winner. It was not at all 
easy to decide but in the end we came to (he 
conclusion that the best drawn and most 
original entry was sent In by Peter Denham, 
46 Downing Road, Dagenhain (aged 1 3>. A 
prize of a National Savings Certificate is 
being sent to him. 

Others who came very near to winning were 
Gordon Jones, 31 St. Matthew Street, 
Burnley, Lanes, (aged 12); Leslie Howard, 50 
Wendell Road, Shepherds Bush. London, 
W.12 (aged 13); and P, J. French, 2 Belvedere 
Villas. Pen hi 1 1 Road, Lancing, Sussex (aged 
12) and we congratulate them on their efforts. 



Yours sincerely, 

THE EDITOR 




COMPET/TION CORNER 



There are prizes for all these competitions lhi.\ week. A I0J6 National 
Savings Certificate will be sent to the senders of the first correct solu- 
tion of each competition (except No. 4, which witi be judged on merit) 
opened on May 31st. You can send all your entries in one envelope, 
but please put your answer to each competition on a separate piece 
of paper and put your name and address and Club number on each. 
Address to Competition. EAGLE. 4 New Street Square, London, B.C. 4. 



I. WHAT'S WRONG 

with this picture? See if 
you can find six deli- 
berate mistakes in it. 



2. AS BUSY AS A BEE and as obstinate as a mule are descriptions which 
have been applied to all of us at times. But can you name the animals to which 
these other descriptions are applied: (a) As agile as a ■•■-, (b) eager as a — , (c) friendly 
as a — , (d) lively as a — , (e) merry as a — , (f) nimble as a — , (g) quiet as a — , 
lh) timid as a 

3. TREASURE HUNT The pages of eagle arc full of treasures. For this 
week you need not look further than the headlines on various pages. By using certain 
words lo be found in the headlines on some of the pages it is possible to make 
another headline. For instance: eagle (page II) presents (page 151 mysteries 
(page 5) of the (page 10) countryside (page 10). 

Now see what you can make with some of the words to be found in the headlines 
on pages 8,4, 1 , 7, 5, 6, 14, 3. (The pages are not numbered in the right order). The 
prize will go to Ihe sender of the first correct headline opened. 

4. IN REVERSE There are certain names, such as Eve, Anona, and Hannah, 
etc., which have the peculiarity of reading the same either forwards or backwards. 
There are also little sentences which spell and read the same backwards, such as that 
gloomy saying ofNapoleon's: "Able was I ere f saw Elba!" I recently asked a young 
friend of mine if he could make up some of these sentences, and he derived a lot of 
fun in producing ''Eros saw I was sore " and "Ma's not a ton, Sam!" 

So I wonder how good you can be at making up similar sentences in reverse (or 
Palindromes as the dictionaries describe them). The best sent in wilt be printed in 
eagle, and receive the prize. 

5. BIRDS IN COMPANY You probably know that a number of part- 
ridges gathered together are described as a covey, but do you know the descriptions 

for a collection or (a) goldfinches, (b) nightingales, (c) larks, (d) snipe, (e) woodcocks. 
(f) plovers, (g) quails, (h) geese, (i) curtews? 



Here is the answer to last week's Competition 
No. 4 (The Belligerent Goats). The feast- 
touched pans are shown shaded. The centre 
oval, although in both circles, received no more 
cropping than the rest. 






CAPTAIN PUGWASH 



SAKKILS; 
MtVE ONLY A FBH 
MWUTtS SLfMt 
-THE MK6AUMECT 

wwfi Above, 

CMEW **M 

BOtMO&ieirlfV. 




Lash Lonergan's Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 



The slory so far 




AFTER sundown, darkness 
swiftly. But still the claypan by the 
creek was aglow with lires and lights. 
'What's goin' on over there?" 
asked Squib. pointing to a gathering group on 
the bank of the creek. They were forming a 
ring. Some brought hurricane lamps, burning 
kerosene with a soft, yellow flame. A few had 
carbide lamps that produced a hard, bright, 
g luring light. 

"Why don't you mizzle off and have a 
squiz. mc lazy lad?" muttered Rawhide. 

"I'm knocked up," yawned the boy, settling 
himselr against the bottle tree. 

"Cock fight in'." someone said. "There's 
goin' to be cockfighlin'." 

Squib was on his feel in a (lash. Lash and 
Rawhide followed at a more leisurely pace. 

The Irishman said quietly to his friend: "I 
don't savee why The Hunchback wrote you 
thai letter. Everybody knows you're jist about 
sumy-broke till you git Coolabah Creek 
station out o' the hands o' Dago the dingo." 

"Maybe he thinks I can get hold of some 
cash somewhere," replied Lash. "Maybe he 
thinks 1 can borrow enough from friends to 
outbid Messiter for the will, and then pay 
them back when I gel Uncle Peter's estate." 

Rawhide spluttered indignantly and 
squawked: "What does be take you for? 
Does he think you've got the dingbats? Stone 
the crows and stiffen the lizards!" 

"Cool down, cobber. Come and watch the 

But instead of being spectators, they 
immediately became contestants. 

"Come on. Lash," urged the self-appointed 
referee and master of ceremonies, lugging al 
the rough rider's sleeve. "You and Rawhide 
.limium Jack and Joe Cappy." 

But before the Cappy brothers could take 
up the challenge, another voice cut in: 
"We'll take you on!" 

I ash and Rawhide turned to see Dago and 
Greasy Joe with taunting grins on their faces. 
The crowd murmured, knowing Ihe deadly 
rivalry, sensing ihc tension between the two 

Lash chuckled. "Dago, why don't you and 

youroffsider go and crawl into a hollow log?" 
The overseer Hushed, and the fat man spat. 
"I'm thinkin'," chipped in Rawhide, "it 

might be a good idea to take the hide off this 

pair. I hear ihcv'rc givin' good prices for 

snakeskin." 

Evcrybod) laughed everybody buL Dago 

The latter snarled and made as if to attack 
the Irishman, but Dago smilingly restrained 
him and said suavely to Rawhide: "If it's 
stoush you want, you hairy hooligan, then it's 
sloush you'll get." 

Rawhide spat delightedly on his hands. 
"Oh. praise be to the powers of Ihe upper air 

as me Chinese friends say - for givin' me 
sich a bon/er chance o' goin' to bed happy." 

"A hospital bed. probably." smiled Dago. 
"Anil your friend." 

"Hey, listen - no rough stuff!" exclaimed 
the man who had organised the cocktightmg. 
fie knew that the game frequently resulted in 
bumps and bruises, but it looked as if this 
contest might be more serious. 

"Too right, mc boy. too right." said Raw- 



pain Dagt' flopped o 



ever you did see." 

Chuckling, be turned to the grinning rough- 
rider and invited him lo mount. 

Lash nimbly climbed the stooping Irish- 
man and sat on top of his shoulders, with one 
leg down either side of the huge chest. While 
Lash tucked each foot into the small of Raw- 
hide's back, (he irishman wrapped his huge 
arms about his friend's shins. 

Meanwhile Dago Messiter mounted Greasy 
Joe's shoulders. The fal man, despite his 
girth, was surprisingly powerful and nimble. 

"First two falls out of' three," said the 
referee. "Go!" 

As the contestants circled warily in the 
light of the lamps, they looked like a pair of 
lumbering giants about to engage The 
"mount" Ihe man underneath - had lo 
keep Ihe balance while his rider tried to grasp 
the other rider. Then, with a push or pull, the 
man on top tried to upset his rivals and send 
them tumbling to the ground. 

"Ga-a-ah!" bellowed Greasy Joe. He ran 
straight at Rawhide and crashed straight into 
him before anyone else involved knew what 
was happening. At the same time the fat man 
brought up his heavy knee and thrust it into 
Rawhide's stomach. 

"Ugh!" grunted the injured Irishman. He 
staggered and fell, bringing down Lash into 
the dust. 

"Foul!" yelled Rawhide, scrambling lo his 
feet. "Dirty foul!" 

The foul had been so well disguised that 
only Rawhide was sure it had happened, 

"One fall to Dago and company." called 
Ihe referee. The cheers were feeble. 

As Lash .scrambled on his back. Rawhide 
glared at Greasy Joe and muttered. 

Once more the giants circled each other. 

This lime Rawhide advanced on Greasy 
Joe. Above him. Lash reached out and 
grabbed at Dago's outstretched arms. 

At the same lime, Rawhide lurched against 
Greasy Joe and. with unexpected speed. 



stretched his neck and sank his teeth into the 
fat man's ear. 

"Ow!" roared Greasy Joe, stumbling back- 
wards and overbalancing. He crashed on his 
behind, with Dago on lop of him. 

"He's bit me ear orfT" howled Greasy Joe, 
reaching for the injury. 

"He shoved his ear right in me mouth," 
declared Rawhide to the delighted spectators. 
"I opened me gob to take a breath of air. and 
he slicks his flappin', floppin' ear into it." 

Amid laughter from the crowd, the referee 
declared a fall in Favour of lash and Rawhide. 



strummed on the strings as he sang one of his 
spur-o"- 1 he-moment songs, 

"Now Lash and Rawhide liad a go 
Al Dago Messiter and Greasy Joe. 
Thanks to Rawhide, thanks to Lash, 
Joe and Dago came a crash ! 
Bash, hash, bash! 
Smash, smash, smash! 
Joe and Dago came a crash!" 
Someone touched Lash's arm. tic turned to 
sec a big, well-dressed man in city clothes. A 
townie, thought the roughridcr. A com- 
mercial traveller, or some other kind of 
business man from town. 

"My name's Arkcll." said the man. holding 
out his hand. "William Arkcll, from Curly- 
horn. But you can call me Bill." 

I .ash grinned and shook hands with the 
wealthy owner of Curlyharn cattle station, a 
vast and rich holding on the olher side of the 

"Can I talk to you pnvately. Lash?" 

"O.K... Bill," said the roughridcr, im- 
mediately at ease with the newcomer, 

"Come over to the hotel." 

As they edged through the crowd, Arkell 
said: "I knew your Uncle Peter. Not very 
well, but welt enough to know he was dink- 
iiin And of course I know quite a bit about 
the famous Lash Lonergan as well." 

Lash received Ihc compliment with a smile. 

"My wife and I are on our way lo Sydney 
for a holiday," said Arkell when they had 
settled down in the deep squatter's chairs. 
"Thai's why I'm all dressed up like this. It's 
our first holiday for seven years, and we'll he 
away for several months. That's why I want 



THtv remounted and circled for the tinal 
and decisive fall. The two "mounts" 
moved closer. The furious Dago swung a 
closed list - an uppercut that grazed Lash's 

"Hey!" yelled the referee. "No punchin'!" 

Dago knew as well as anybody that fist- 
lighting was barred in cockfighting. Lash 
decided to give him no chance at another 
foul. 

The roughrider reached for Dago's throat. 
and the other man's hands came up in a pro- 
tective gesture. 

Lash swiftly caught Dago's right band in a 
thumb-lock and swayed to the let). 

Dago tried to resist. His face went white 
with pain as he clutched at his opponent. 

"Better give in." murmured Lash grimly. 

"No, no," croaked ihe victim. 

I_ash applied severe pressure With a grunt 
of mingled pain and dismay. Dago Hopped 
over on one side. Thrown off his balance. 
Greasy Joe staggered and fell into the dust. 

While the crowd cheered Lash's victory. 
Dago thrust his way through the spectators, 
shaking his hurt hand as he went. 

Back at the botlk tree Squib gasped, ad- 
miringly: "Gee, Lash, you slung 'em down 
with a couple o' fingers!"" 

"A judo thumb-lock I learnt in my travels," 

Rawhide picked up his battered banjo and 




o talk i 






"Up Ihe ritad!" punlcd the man breathlessly 



"No savee," smiled Lash. 

"I wanl you lo be overseer of Curlyhorn 
while I'm away." 

"F.h?" came the startled exclamation. 

"I've got a good manager who looks after 
all the routine stuff at the homestead. But 
I've always acted as overseer of the stockmen 
myself. I'd like to go on my holidays knowing 
I've left my men and my stock in the hands of 
a man like you. I've been worrying about it 
ever since i left Curiybooi, and as soon as I 
saw you here I knew you were the very 

"But ■-" 

"I know what you're going lo say," in- 
terrupted Arkell. "You've got to get Coola- 
bah Creek away from Dago Messiter and his 
mob. You've got to hunt down The Hunch- 
hack and get the will. I know all about that. 
But you can't do h single-handed or even 
three-handed, to include your two cobbers." 

"We'll try." replied Lash firmly. 

"You need Mr- a lot of he'p - more help 
than a couple of friends and a couple of 
mounted police can give. So I'll make a bar- 
gain with you. If you be my overseer Tor three 
months, when I get back I'll use all my power 
to see you gel your rights. I'll use my money 
my men everything to get lash Lonergan 
back to Coolabah Creek." 

Lash was silent for a while. 

"I'm sorry. Bill," he said al last. "It's no 
go." 

'"But, Lash 

"I can'l wait three months. I can't even 
wait a month, or even a week, I've got 
enemies, and I've got to go after 'em full till." 

Arkell sighed his disappointment. 

Lash went on : "'You've made me a bonzer 
offer. Bill, I only wish I could shake your 
dook and say yes. But well, what's the use 
of arguing. I've made up my mind about this, 
and no amount of talk will make me change." 

"Oh, well," laughed Arkell, "if you're still 
up the same gum tree when I gel back, I'll 
help you all I can." 

"If I need you," grinned Lash, "you'll hear 
my coo-ee from here to Curlyhorn!" 

The sound of music drifted down from the 
hall where people were gathering to sing and 

Lash said goodnight to Arkell and strolled 
up the road to Ihe hall. Already the dance was 
in progress, and he found the little wooden 
building packed with people. 

Spotting Squib. Lash beckoned him over. 



They both went up to the platform where 
Rawhide was siding. 

"Listen, cobbers," he said to his mates, 
"tonight we'll doss on the bank of the creek. 
I'll go mil now and see the horses are settling 
down for the nighl. 

He was interrupted by an uproar outside 
the hall. To I he sound of confused shouting, 
followed by several rifle shots, the crowd in 
the hall made for the door. 

"The Hunchback!" came the cry, "The 
Hunchback!" 

"J saw his ugly mug!" 

Lash caught the lasl speaker by the shoul- 
der. '"Which way did be go?" 

"Up the road!" panted the man breath- 
lessly, pointing into the darkness. "He just 
camcridin' nasi with a grin on his face. Some- 
body look a couple o* potshots at him, but I 
reckon he's gone." 

"Was anybody else with him?" 

"Not a one." 

Lash started to run, but a restraining hand 
caught his arm and held him back. 

"Don't waste your lime and strength," said 
Sergeant Cleaver, the Oonawidgee mounted 
policeman. Behind him stood Sergeant Sneed. 



A hne couple of coppers you are!" snapped 
Lash. A moment later he regretted the 
unjustified sarcasm. 

He shrugged and smiled. "I'm sorry, 
mates. Of course you're right. Thai bush- 
ranger is somewhere out ihcre- in the dark." 

"We were down at the bank wailing for 
him." said Sergeant Cleaver, "in case lie kepi 
his promise lo turn up." 

"Not a sign of him," said Sergeant Sneed. 
"And then we heard shouts and we saw him 
galloping up the road." 

"Did you do the shooting?" asked Lash. 

"Yes, but we couldn't hil him." 

"Whai!" exclaimed the roughrider. "Do 
you mean to tell me a couple of crack shots 
like you couldn't hil The Hunchback?" 

Sergeant Cleaver made a gesture of despair. 
"We couldn't fire at Ihe man because there 
were so many people about." he explained 
impatiently. "We fired over his head. We 
thought it might stop him, but it didn't." 



"So he didn't rob the bank?" said Lash. 
"Then why did become?" 

As if in reply lo his question, the answer 
came from the owner of Curlyhorn cattle 
station as he jostled his way through the 
crowd lo Ihe two policemen. 

"My wife's jewels!" stormed Arkell. 
"They've gone! The Hunchback's got them! 
All the bonder jewelry 1 bought her! A couple 
of thousands pounds' worth! Look at this!" 
He held out a piece of paper. 

Somebody held up a hurricane lamp. Lash 
leaned over and read the note. 

"Belter late than never," said the crude 
lettering . "Yours truly. The Hunchback." 

Lash took Sergeant Sneed on one side. 

"About those nines the bushranger sent to 
me and Dago," said Lash to the policeman. 
"What say you go and ask Dago what's he's 
going to do about his invitation?" 

"You don't think he'll tell me, do you?" 

"Maybe not," agreed Lash. "But Tve got 
an idea for a trap for The Hunchback. You 
remember his note - he wants a bid for the 
will to be put in a tin and dumped in the road 
through Opallown by Sunday sundown." 

"That's righL" 

"I'll write a bid and put it in a tin, and I'M 
put it just where The Hunchback expects to 
rind it. Then you and I, together with a few 
selected coves, will wait in ambush. But 
before I do (hat I'd like to gel some idea of 
what Dago Messiler is doing." 

"All right," sighed the policeman. He went 
to look for Messtter. 

They were discussing future plans when the 
sergeant returned. 

"Dago's gone," he said. "Greasy Joe says 
he's gone hunting The Hunchback." 

A smile spread over Lash's bronzed face - 
a knowing smile thai made the others stare. 

"Sergeant." he chuckled, "I've changed my 
mind again about Dago and The Hunchback. 
See you in the morning - all of you." 

"But — " began Sneed. 

But Lash had disappeared inio the dark- 
ness. Fifteen minutes later he rode Monarch 
at a steady canter along Ihe road to Coolabah 
Creek. 

To be continued 



iHi.Hm.ygu 





mous Empire Sate Building h 

Most of them were killed and onlookers 

watched the extraordinary ipeccade of 



tfwattt (ad6urus/ 



PROTECT YOUR 
FAITHFUL FRIENDS 

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FREfc ADVICE HI SHEA I 





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irs a^ISA 

GOLDEN WINGS! 



IT'S TIME -»-_, 

YOU HAD AltSA 




I'd be 9 
perfect pig... 

if I didn't tell you that for real 
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And the best magazine in the world 
devoted to that sport is 

MODEL AIRCRAFT 

price 1i6d monthly 

Ask your newsagent to show you a copy 
to-day, or fill in the coupon and post ft 
to us with one and sixpence. 




| To Prrctval Marshall * 


Co. Ltd. 


J 23 Great Queen St., Lond 


n, W.C.2 


1 Please send me the latest iss 




' of MODEL AIRCRAFT 




s 1 enclose Is. 6d. 




3 Name 








Date 





ROB CON WAY in search of a secret city 




EEHHEnaaEH 



&i& am ^Se^-iguuHBEnH^^i^] 




THE GREAT ADVENTURE R 









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I'M A JITI2EN 
Of JERUSALEM 
CENTURION — 
TOAV6LUN& TO 
DAMASCtl'j ON 
A LAWFUL 
JOURNEY WHtl 
I WAS S6T 
UPON BN 

THfeSI MEN