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Full text of "Darling Brothers Limited"

Digitized by: 




INTERMATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY. 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 

TECHNOLOGY 

HERITAGE 

LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 




'fT^ 







Digitized by: 




INTERNAIIONAl 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY. 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 

TECHNOLOGY 

HERITAGE 

LIBRARY 



www.apli.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN DARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 



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BULLETIN 41 -D 




CLASS "B" 



I 




OTTAWA • 



II It T II E K S LI M I T O 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL, CANADA 



HALIFAX . SAINT JOHN . QUEBEC - ARVIOA . TIMMINS 
TORONTO . WINNIPEO • CAlOARY - V A N C O V i « . ST JOHN S, N F I D. 




Our Guarantee 



WE guarantee all pumps made by us against defects 
in materials and workmanship for one year from 
date of shipment from our factory. Any part 
which should prove defective within that period must be 
returned to our factory all charges fully prepaid. We will 
then make such part good without any additional compen- 
sation. 

This guarantee is only effective when equipment has been 
set up according to our instructions. 

Our guarantee does not cover any of our equipment which 
has been altered or repaired outside of our factory ^ or motors, 
electrical appliances or auxiliaries not manufactured by us- 

AU our pumps are carefully inspected and thoroughly 
tested before leaving our factory, if they are properly 
connected and adjusted they will be satisfactory in oper- 
ation. 

All parts are made interchangeable. Duplicate parts are 
carried in stock and can be shipped promptly. 




Page Two 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL. P.Q. 



TESTING DEPARTMENT 

The finished Pumps are test- 
ed in our Testing Department 
under working conditions. 
We have special dynamome- 
ters, venturi tubes, tanks, 
etc.. together with all the 
necessary- electrical instru- 
ments and power for this 
purpose. Customers, if inter- 
ested, are invited to send a 
representative to witness test 
of any pump they might 
order. 




Figure 1 .—Dynamometer with Pump on Test. 




Figure 2.— Direct Connected Motor Driven Pump on Test. 




Figure 3. — Dynamometer Test and Control Panel. 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Page Three 



General Description 



EFFICIENT 
divided horizoiUalh 



ly on the ccmre line, with Ihe fl""" ,emov«l »nhout u..iuf bing 



^;;r;,';h rh^'iowi hali: Vhe upp.r hal< may H .. ^/;° ^^X^'iype.-whi.h give inc«a«d 






O^^. 



and quickly removed w 

the bearings or pii>e conneclions 

efficitncv and a smooth and uniformb ' 

'o o^Tra.e on high suCion hf„. The other water t 

reduce eddv lo&ses to a minimum, and 

provided for each size. They aie pr 

PERMANENT BEARING 'Vl K 
of the lower half casing. Th*^ mn 
operanon. secure accurnie and 
bearing brackets are made a? ^fp;»■ 

ANTI-FRICTION BEAR3 

in cartridge type contam^^T^, on 
shoulders, and Socked in r 
containers by means of ^ 
rings. WhenremovinK 

SLEEVE BEARINGS 

LARGE THRUST ai-.^:^ 
held against end movement :n l. ^ 
thrust which might occur due to un 

HEAVY WEARING RINGS 

They are held in position by machineci lL:^c:^;^^ u^ ... ..-s- .* ■ 

DEEP STUFFING BOXES are filled wan a 

rings. When pumps are used wuh .j >u.ii^-Hiiai. 

pressure in casing, are supplied, (.-lands are of broiuc. uciu ui ^ju^uju.i 

IMPELLER— The accurately b;i er i& of the non-ovi 

enclosed type. It is cast in bronze in one piece, i smoothly m 

smoothly filed water pas^:^e:5, 

LARGE SHAFT The 'haft i*= r>f neel. of hifih tensile ^tren^h ^ 
power. It runs well heIo\v il d. so that pu 



Lk^ patterns are 
luads. 

■n integral part 

^ ijL-r formed in one 

,- to secure where 

ire mounted 

liaft against 

iiit IS sealed in 

.y w-ater-shnger 

' water. 

c-in be supplied. 

lid contamer is 
lake rare of any end 



--.^iii^ir tAnr-ir anrt cTOOve typc. 

screws. 



I lU 



* -'r of packing 
, lo water under 
■i^cd bolts. 

double suction, 
nor surfaces and 



^ize to transmit 
trom\ibralion. 



SHAFT PROTECTING SLE^^T^ -^r.^-^ -r. Af br^^^n- i^prtior, *;pmred to shaft by means 
of right and left hand thrp^dn 



HEAVY BASE— Cast iron, of d 
located on top of ba^tOb\ialing dan ^c; l 

and dowelled in place on firi^v.^ r '.■.- 

COUPLING— To take carvoUhg^T ^, 

and pump, a safely flexible coupling iv usc;L i iii*i wupling is of the pin and metal lined rubber 
bush type. 

EFFICIENCIES— Higher pump et!iciencii'> and non-overloadin>r impellers, in many cases, 
permit the use of lower power motors, or prime movers without d;. ! o- erloading. 



nn bolt holes are 
aiiu .iKJLA , puwer are mounted 
^^itmbhng. 

:t and floating or vnd pl;iy in motive power 



Page Four 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.Q. 



9 



9 








Dar 


nrhme Driven < 


STEAM TURBINE Dki^t-^ 
erally u^'d. Sit-.m; Tur^ 
power failure, mv^ "^^' 
ing Plants, '^^-^ 

heating '^ 

Turbint- is i L diretlly to 


are rt 

rcfidil 
Conv. 


mtlhod of driving the pump. 





B" Centrifugal Pump. 




driven Pumps are more gen- 

n rrind-by in case of electric 

Rj]ldings or Manufactur- 

vhere forced hot water 

thi' exhaust steam from the 

11 a very economical and quiet 




m 



^e I>riven Darhng i IV Pump using V-belt drive. 

direct conoected motor driven 

■U drive. Forquiet operation on 

ates the motor from the pump. 

1 in capacity or head at 

^^•'■-' .-. LL^ ',;jeed of the pump can 

- t; js illustrated above with the 

ofderinc failure. 

js pumpiag units or as stand-by 
^vion on pafie eight. 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P,Q, 



oi 




Typical Sectional view of Single-Stage Centrifugal Pump, standard pattern, horizontally split 

case type, with individual parts numbered 



PART LIST— Class BA. BB. BC. and BH 
Horizontal Centrifugal Pumps 



800 Bottom Half Casing 

801 Top Half Casing 
805 Impeller 

806a Case Wearing Ring 

807 Gland 

807a Water Seal Ring 

818 Coupling 

820 Shaft 

823a Shaft Protecting Sleeve 



823b Shaft Protecting Sleeve 

832 Locknut for Ball Bearing 

833 Pin for Coupling 
836 Rubber Bush 

860 Ball Bearing Container 

861 Ball Bearing Container 

Cover 

862 Water Seal Piping 



863 Air Cocks 

864 Water Slinger 

881 Ball Bearing (Outboard 

End) 
88lA Ball Bearing (Inboard 
End) 

882 Shoulder Ring 

893 Spacer Sleeve (Coupling) 

894 Coupling Locknut 



In ordering repair parts ALWAYS GIVE SERIAL NUMBER OF PUMP. 

as shown on the name plate 

TYPICAL ENGINEER'S SPECIFICATION 

Furnish and instal where indicated on plans Darling Class "B" double suction pump. 

with horizontally split casing, having a capacity of [^^- G.P.M. when delivering 

water against a total head of feet, from all causes. Maximum suction lift of feet 

which is allowed for in total head. 

Pump to be driven through flexible coupling by a H.P. phase, 

cycle. volt, Rev.. 40°C. Rise motor. 

Motor shall be of ample capacity to perform the above duty without heating, or other indication 
of overload. 

Pump to be equipped with ball bearings, enclosed balanced bronze impeller, and steel shaft with 
bronze sleeves. Casing to have bronze wearing rings. Pump and motor to be mounted on heavy 
cast iron base. 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Page Seven 



Illustrations of Centrifugal Pump Installations 



< 






This illustration shnu^ n ro 

thfugal Pump insL, . 



i^t: Class ■ B" Cen- 



i 




^«»»«s&i 



4 Darling Class B" Ltntr 

are handling tl.v water su; , 

one (1) Darling \'erlical Sewage Pumy. 

illustration shows the Pump room and three of 




^\f)rks. Dorva], P,Q.. 
(MUration Plant, also 
^ urface water. This 



Page Eight 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Illustrations of Centrifugal Pump Installat 



ions 




contfo'l °Sr TmanT" ^'T 1^^" '"''*^" ^'^^'r\fu^^^ P"-p, operatin, under automatic 
con rol. CapaLity 1000 Imperial gallons per minute against 300 ft,, head, supplied to the CUy 
01 Vernon. Vernon. B.C.. for water supply purposes. 




3 Darling Class "B" Centrifugal Pumps supply water from the St. Lawrence River for process 
work at the McColl-Frontenac Oil Refinery, situated at Montreal East, near the City of Mont- 
real. The combined capacity of these pumps is 4200 G.P.M. against 236 ft., total head. This 
illustration shows 1—8" x 10" Class ■'B" Darling Centrifugal Pump, driven by 175 H.P. motor. 
capacity 2200 gallons per minute. 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Page Nine 




lUustrations of Centrifugal Pump Installations 




i 



S' X 10" Darling Centnfueal Pump ^^'ith beli-diive. capacity 2C>00 gallons per minute against 
fi.s nnnnri« nressiire. installed at WaiRf Works, in Uie Gty of Valleyfidd. 



65 pounds pressure, installed 




6' X 6" Darling motor dnven Class -B" Centrifugal Pump for brine circulation. Capacity 800 
gallons per minute against 50 ft., head. insUlled in Artificial Ice Arena. Lachine. Que. 



Page Ten 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



c 



INSTRUCTIONS 



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iShown ijui (if Ime) 



trtffully tested befon- shipment. It will deliver rated 
iJ r.ilrd spted.and isin perfect working order when 



for Che Care and Operation of Darling Claw '*B'' 
^ Centrifugal Pumps 

Kv. ■ ... 

ihjpped- 
Foundfltion : 

F^:mn mu^t havea good foundation, preferably concrete Locate founda- 

ti -. to dniwmK or template and arrani^e as shown tn Fig 1 Use 

pij- ,.. ve aUmt two and one half diameters larger than the bolt. 
Ahgnniicnt ; 

Pump and motor must be set level and properly lined up, A flexible 

cuujilm^i sMll not aimprnsate for misaliRnment, Every baseplate is elastic 
n.. rn ^rr.r huw heiivy It K. and will spnng to a certain extent. It can be 
«■ loufihtback to its original shape bv the use of wedges and founda 

Imn rxjiisaidtM-ribedbclo*. 

Wed^e the base up about ^'' above top of foundation: this leave<^ space 
for KTOUling (hig. 2). Adjust wedges and level base from machined pads on 
which pump and motor are mounted. 

Check alignment at ihr couplmg. A straight edge across coupling must 
resievcnlyonbothnmsat top. bottom and sides (Fig, 3k 

Wi.' ;Lr of msidt caiiper?! or a thickness gauge, check the distance 

oet\M . iiling halves at the pomts at which the straight edge was used 

(rig, 4 J. Distances should be equaL 

■^ ^'^ required these can be made by means of the 

^ •rn bolts. 

If the pump IS connected to driver by V-belt, check the alignment by 

(he UM." of a straij^ht edge across the sides of the pulleys. 

When the pump is driven by a steam turbine or handhng hot water, the 
whole unit should be lined vip, after it has been brought up lo temperature. 
Grouting : 

For ^uiid a dam around baseplate at least 2^2" high and fill 

wiih It After cement has hardened lighten anchor bolts and 

r-' lii^nment. Any misalignment apparent now must l>e corrected by 

pi. PS .HH-, .turns under feet of driver or pump, 

Piping: 

Pip^nt; should be arranged with as few bends as possible, and these should 
P' be made with lung radium. Pipint to discharge and suction 

IL _ pump should fit e,\acily» and under no conditions should piping 

exert strain on the pump, as this will throw the unit out of ahgnment or 
distort the casing, 

Sijriinri Une^ must t>c kept iibwlutely free from air leaks. It is advisable 
t* ! clwtk valve as well as a gate valve in the discharge line close to 

il On pumps withii flooded suction, gate valves should be installed 

cl' imp in both suctK'n and discharge Unes. 

It IS pr' to have a short length of rnpe, I wo or four diameters long, 

attached 1- Lm^ auction of the pump. 

On installation^ with vuciion lift it is advisable to install a foot valve for 
pnmnu: pur|x»^v A ptisitive head on suction is required when handling 
wairrahirtT 160^-. 

Stuffing Box«rs and Packing; 

Tivt lacking ?<htjuld not be made too tight as this may result in the burn- 
tr:. ■ ^' . ■ ' ; Tid cutfuii,; of tlir sh:ifi. The packing should be loose 
er. ^hl leakage ol liquid through the gland, 

DrMining : 

pr*. h\i»i ■ 
dnined. 

Starting: 

' '- pump unl ill! ha^hcen primed. The clearances Iwtwecn 

mi;-.. .: --! :i^ arc vi-ry small and ihey will bind or cut if the pump is 

run without water. Make sure that the driver rotates in the same direction 
a» the arrow on the pump casing, 

Crenie Lubrication : 

'Ilic Iiniorv i>acks these bearings with an amount of grease which ordina - 
nly will Milhic (01 a peruxl of six to twelve months depending upon obser- 
vable leakage ^md the sevent> of ihe service. Ah often as the above con- 
siderations render necessary, hearings should be cleaned and repacked ap- 
proximately one-half full with grease. 



liould be connected to tlie drain in the pump base. To 
i^.aip iTim\ freezmg m cold weather, the casing should be 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Page Eleven 



CAPACITY TABLES -Class "B" Pumps 





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Page Twelve 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTRE.^L. P.Q. 



tin 45D 



Note: ^'"'*'""0"* of these pumps and motors available on request either from dimension prints 
or in ready-templates. 















































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DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P-Q 



Page Thirteen 



"' T' '* '■•- 



THEORETICAL DISCHARGE OF NOZZLES IN U.S. GALLONS PER MINUTE 



Head 



[b: 



10 
13 
20 
25 

35 
40 
45 
50 
5S 
60 

?n 

75 

60 

85 

»0 

93 

100 

lOS 

HO 

[15 

120 

1Z5 

130 

135 

UO 

145 

UO 

175 

200 

250 

300 



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23 1 
34 « 
46 2 
S7 7 

80 B 



V«liKirr 



92 

103 
115 
127 
I3B 



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[61 7| 

164 6 
1*6 
207 
Zl^ 
210 
212 
254 
2^5 5 
2" 1 
28S fii 
300 2 
111 7 
133 3 
3)4 S 
31C 4 
104 1 
151 9 

>;7 4 

€?2 



47 Z5 
54 55 
61 

«6 85 
72 

77 



DIAMETER OF NOZZLES IM INCHF.S 



2 
2 

ai a 

86 25 



90 

94 

98 
102 
105 
109 
112 
US S 
U9 
122 
125 
12S 



tan 
i3:i 

I3fi 

139 

141 

144 

146 

149 

161 

172 

133 

211 



37 
45 
52 
56 
64 
69 
74 
Q 78 
83 
87 
90 
94 

98 
01 
05 
08 
Xi 
14 

1 \- 
l 2D 
1 23 

25 
28 
31 
33 
36 
38 
41 
43 
55 
65 
65 
02 



1 46 
1 81 
03 
^1 
56 
77 
96 



3 13 
3 3D 
3 46 
3 62 
3 77 
3 oi 
I 05 



18 
31 
43 

5S 



4 67 



79 
90 
01 
12 
22 
33 
43 
51 
62 
72 
18 
61 
39 
8 06 



3 3J 

4 06 

4 69 

5 25 



r3 
21 
64 
OJ 
41 
77 
12 
45 
TS 
08 
11 39 
9 67 



9 9 
10 2 
10 5 
10 B 
n 



II 

u 
tl 

12 

12 
12 
P 
12 

n 

14 S 
16 6 

18 2 



U 



5 91 

7 24 

8 35 

9 31 

10 2 
11 
11 
12 
13 
13 6 
14 
15 

16 
U 
IT 
17 
18 
18 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
22 1 



22 
23 
2 k 

26 
3* 
32 



M 



13 3 
16 3 

I'i B 
21 

23 

24 B 
26 6 

28 2 

29 7 

31 1 

32 5 



33 6 



35 2 


36 


4 


37 


6 


3H 


8 


39 


S 


41 


fl 


42 


1 


43 


1 


n 


1 


45 


1 


46 





47 


4R 





48 


9 


4U 


K 


50 


6 


51 


H 


ni 


6 


S^ 


^ 


66 


^ 


72 


n 



« 



23 

26 
33 
37 
40 
44 
47 
50 
52 8 
55 3 
5T 8 
60 2 
62 5 
64 7 
66 6 
68 9 
70 6 
72 6 
74 
76 
78 
80 
81 

e:s 

85 

86 

BB 

69 

91 

98 8 
lOii 
ItB 
129 



36 9 
45 2 
52 2 
58 3 
63 9 
63 
73 8 
7B 2 
62 5 
86 4 
90 4 
94 
97 7 

101 

104 

108 

111 

tl4 

117 

120 

122 

125 

128 

130 

133 

136 

136 

140 

143 

151 

165 

1B5 

202 



H 



53 
65 

la 
64 

n 

^»9 
106 
113 
119 
125 
130 
136 
141 
146 
150 
155 
160 
164 
168 
il72 
176 
180 
184 
186 
192 
195 
199 
202 
206 
222 
236 
26S 
291 



72 4 
6B 5 

102 

114 

125 

135. 

145 

153 

162 

169 

177 

181 

191 

198 

205 

211 

217 

2Z3 

229 

234 

2 to 

245 

251 

256 

261 

265 

271 

275 

280 

302 

321 

362 

346 



94 5 

116 

134 

149 

164 

177. 

188,9 

200 

211 

221 

231 

211 

250 

259. 

267 

276 

284 

292 

299 

306 

314 

320. 

327 

334. 

341 

347 

354 

360 

366. 

395 

423 

473 

517 



IH 



120 
147 
169 
189 
207 
224 
239 
253 
267 
260 
232 
305 
317 
327 
338 
349 
359 
369 
376 
388 
397 
406 
4U 
423 
432 
439 
4tS 
465 
463 
500 
535 
598 
655 



m 



146 
161 
203 
234 
256 
277 
296 
313 
330 
346 
362 
376 
391 
404 
418 
431 
443 
456 
467 
479 
490 
501 
512 
522 
533 
543 
553 
562 
572 
618 
660 
739 
BOa 



tH 



179 
219 
253 
283 
309 
334 
357 
379 
399 
418 
438 
45S 
4T3 
489 
S05 
521 
536 
551 
565 
579 
593 
606 
619 
632 
645 
656 
568 
680 
692 
747 
799 
894 
977 



IW 



213 

260 
301 
336 
368 
896 
425 
461 
475 
498 
521 
642 
563 
582 
fi02 
620 
638 
656 
672 
689 
705 
720 
736 
751 
767 
7S0 
795 
809 
824 
890 
950 
1063 
1163 



M 



269 

354 

409 

458 

501 

541 

578 

613 

647 

678 

708 

73T 

765 

792 

816 

844 

866 

892 

915 

937 

960 

980 

1002 

1022 

1043 

1063 

1082 

1100 

1L20 

1210 

1294 

1447 

15B2 



378 
463 

535 

598 

655 

708 

756 

801 

845 

886 

626 

964 

1001 

1037 

107C 

1103 

1136 

1168 

1196 

1226 

1255 

1282 

1310 

1338 

1365 

1390 

1415 

1440 

1466 

1582 

1691 

1891 

2070 



iH 



4T9 
585 
676 
756 
BSS 
895 
957 
1015 
1070 
1121 
1172 
1220 
1267 
1310 
1354 
1395 
1436 
1476 
1512 
tS50 
1588 
1621 
1659 
1690 
1726 
1759 
1790 
1820 
1653 
2000 
2140 
2392 
2615 



2H 



591 
723 

835 
934 

1023 

1106 
1182 
1252 
1320 
13B5 
1447 
1506 
1565 
1619 
1672 
1723 
1773 
1624 
1B70 
IB 16 
1961 
2005 
2050 
2090 
2132 
2173 
2212 
2250 
2290 
2473 
2645 
2955 
3235 



^H 



714 
BT4 

loot 

1126 
1286 
1336 
1428 
1512 
1695 
1671 
1748 
1819 
1888 
1955 
2020 
2080 
2140 
2200 
2255 
2312 
2366 
2420 
2470 
2520 
2576 
2620 
2760 
2715 
2760 
2965 
3190 
3570 
3900 



861 
t04l 
1803 
1S46 
U7) 
1691 
ITOI 
1802 
1900 
1001 
2085 
£165 
2260 
2330 
240S 

2ao 

ft»50 
2625 
26T0 
2755 
2S20 
2885 
3945 
3005 
3070 
3125 
3IB0 
3236 
8Z95 
3560 
3«00 
4150 
4650 



!_: i-^ . J 1 1 1 1 1 ' *— ■ — » ■ • ^ ■ 

Tnraciual quantity dit^hflrKifd by in JiilrwiH helps* ihsfuboveuWr A wttUapered *moot*nioi*le may tie assumed lo give about 94 ppr ctM ot the values inihr |3bl»' 



Feci 
Kead 



Prefsurv 
per sq- la, 



fi 

86 

1 30 

1 73 

2 16 
2 60 



3 03 



8 


3 46 


9 


3 90 


10 


4 33 


11 


1 76 


12 


5 20 


13 


5 63 


H 


6 06 


15 


6 50 


16 


6 93 


IT 


7 36 


18 


7 80 


19 


8 23 


20 


8 66 


21 


9 09 


22 


9 53 


21 


9 96 


24 


10 39 


25 


10 62 


26 


11 26 


2T 


n 69 


28 


12 12 


29 


12 55 


30 


12 99 


31 


13 42 


32 


13 66 


33 
31 


14 29 


14 72 


35 


15 16 


36 


15 59 


37 


16 02 


38 


16 15 


3t 


16 6'> 


10 


17 32 


11 


17 75 


42 


IB 19 


43 


18 62 


44 


19 05 


45 


19 49 


46 


19 92 


47 


20 35 


46 


20 7** 


4W 


21 22 


50 


21 65 


51 


22 09 


^2 


22 52 


.3 


22 95 



Feet 
Head 



51 

55 

54 

57 

58 

59 

80 

61 

62 

63 

64 

Us 

6'i 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

61 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

68 

8^ 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

9T 

9a 

100 
101 
102 

10:1 

101 

10s 



pvr aq. In. 



23 3 'J 

23 82 
2! 25 

24 69 

25 12 
25 55 

25 99 

26 iZ 

26 85 

27 29 

27 72 

28 15 
2H 38 
Z\t ^2 

29 45 
29 88 
.5" 32 

[0 75 
31 16 

31 62 

32 05 
32 46 

32 92 

33 35 

33 78 

34 21 

34 65 

35 06 
35 52 

35 95 

36 39 

36 82 

37 25 

37 68 
36 12 

38 55 

38 98 

39 42 

39 85 

40 26 



Feel 
HeiiJ 



Pre(«ure 
per sq. In 



40 
41 
41 



72 
15 
56 



42 01 
42 45 

42 88 

43 31 

43 75 
41 18 



41 

45 



45. IB 

45 91 



107 

1 118 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

11; 

116 

119 

120 

121 

122 

J 23 

124 

125 

126 

127 

126 

121^ 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

144 

1<5 

U6 

147 

148 

ll'i 

1^0 

151 

152 

153 

154 

155 

156 

157 

na 

15^ 



J5 34 

45 TH 



21 
64 



48 06 
46 51 
43 ^A 

49 38 

49 81 

50 24 
SO 66 



51 
51 
51 

52 



52 81 

53 28 



53 
54 



51 58 



65 
55 



55 Ba 

56 3| 
36 74 

57 18 

57 61 

58 04 
58 46 

58 91 

59 34 

59 77 

60 21 
60 64 



61 
til 
61 



07 
31 



62 37 

62 81 

63 24 

63 67 



64 
64 



10 
54 



64 9; 

65 40 

65 61 

66 27 

66 70 

67 14 

67 57 

68 00, 
66 43 
6a H7 



Feel 
Head 



ISO 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
I6fi 
167 
168 
X'i'.i 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
176 
179 

lao 

161 
1M2 
163 
184 
185 
lf(6 
167 
186 
169 
I'JO 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
20J 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 



Pressure 
per tt^- In. 



69 31 

69 71 

70 17 

70 61 

71 04 
71 47 

71 91 

72 34 
72 



* 1 

20 
64 

07 
50 



Feet 

Hc«d 



Pressure 
per iq^ In. 



71 94 

75 37 



60 
23 
67 
10 
53 



77 97 

78 40 
76 84 

79 27 

79 TO 

80 M 

80 57 

81 00 
61 13 

81 87 

82 30 

82 73 

83 i7 

83 60 

84 03 
l[4 47 

64 90 

85 33 

65 76 

86 20 

66 63 

87 07 
87 50 

87 93 

88 36 

88 80 

89 21 
69 66 
^0 10 

90 53 

90 96 

91 39 
91 63 



213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
246 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
270 
375 
280 



92 25 

92 69 

93 13 
93 56 

93 99 

94 43 

94 86 

95 30 

95 73 

96 16 

96 60 

97 03 
97 46 

97 90 

98 33 

98 76 

yy 20 

99 63 
100 00 
100 49 

100 93 

101 36 

101 78 

102 23 

102 66 

103 09 
103 53 

103 96 

104 39 

104 83 

105 26 

105 69 

106 13 
106 56 

106 99 

107 43 

107 66 

108 29 

108 73 

109 16 

109 59 

110 03 
110 46 

110 69 

111 32 
HI 76 

112 19 

112 62 

113 06 
113 49 
116 96 
119 12 
121 29 



Feet 
Hevd 



285 

290 
295 

300 
305 
310 
315 
320 
32S 
330 
335 
340 
345 
350 
355 
360 
365 
370 
375 
381) 
365 
390 
395 
400 
425 
450 
475 
500 
525 
550 
575 
600 
625 
650 
675 
700 
725 
750 
775 
800 
825 
650 
87S 
900 
925 
950 
975 
1000 
1500 
2000 
3O0Q 



Pressure 
per 9*1- In. 



45 
62 
78 
95 
12 
28 
46 
62 
7tt 
95 
IZ 
28 
45 
til 
78 
94 
10 
27 



123 
12s 
127 
129 
132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
142 
145 
147 
149 
151 
153 
155 
156 
160 
162 45 
164 61 
166 78 
168 94 
171 11 
173 27 
184 10 
194 8^ 
205 77 
216 58 
227 
238 
249 
259 
270 73 
281 56 
292 
303 
314 
324 
335 
346 
357 
366 20 
379 03 
389 
400 
411 
422 
433 
649 
866 
1.299 



42 

25 
09 

90 



40 
22 
00 
88 
72 
54 
37 



86 
70 
54 
35 
IB 
70 
30 
50 



Page Fourteen 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q, 



in 45 D 



Friction of Water in Pipes 

Fcr .moolh new wr.mght iro« pipe, multiply (fiction v»lg,» by .71. For old W.l, pipe multiply by I.S2, 
Low or (l^d .« Fe<t Dur to Fr«li™, per 100 F»t or Ne* Ord.nary Iron Pipe. 



VS. 


H'P'Pt 


H'Pipe 


iTipe 


l^i'Pip* 


IH'Pipe 


2'PlfM! 


2>i' Pjpe 


3" Pipe 


Minute 


Vel, 


Fric 


Ver 


Frio, 


\t\. 


Fnc, 


Vd. 


Fric, 


\'t-L 


Fric, 


Wl. 


Fric- 


Vel- 


Frier. 


\>L 


Fric. 


L3 

15 

» 

25 

30 

35 

40 

i& 

50 

TO 

90 

100 

120 

140 

IW 

ISO 

ZOO 

220 

210 

im 

380 

300 


1 08 

2 ID 

3 16 

4 21 

5 n 

to 52 

■ 


2 t 

7 4 

15 8 

27 

41 

147.0 


1 20 

1 80 

2 41 

3 01 
6 02 
9 02 

12 03 


1 9 

4 1 

7 

10 5 

3S 

SO 

130.0 

- - ' 


1 12 

1 40 

1 86 

3 72 

5 60 

7 44 

9 30 

a 15 

13 02 

N SB 


1 26 

2 14 

3 25 
11 7 
25 
42 
64 
80 

11V 
152 


S6 

1 07 

2 14 

3 2 

4 20 

5 30 

6 43 

7 51 
9 58 
9 65 

10 72 
\i 01 


57 
BA 
3 05 
A 50 
11 1 
lA 6 
23 5 
31 -i 
40 
M) 
60 
113 


63 

70 

1 57 

2 36 

3 15 

3 94 

4 72 

5 51 

6 3 

7 08 
7 B7 

n 02 
11 17 
15 7* 
1M 89 
22 01 


26 

39 

1 43 

3 

5 2 

7 8 

11 

14 7 

15 s 
23 2 
2B I 
53 
HA 

102 
143 

m 


1 02 

1 53 

2 04 

2 55 

3 06 
a 57 
1 08 

4 00 

5 11 
7 15 
9 10 

10 21 
12 25 
14 30 
16 34 
in 31t 
W 42 
22 47 
24 51 
34.6& 


50 

1 

1 82 

2 73 

3 84 

5 1 

6 6 

a 2 

9 9 

IS 4 

29 4 

35 8 

50 

67 

B'V 

107 

129 

151 

182 

211 


0f>5 

9S 

1 31 
1 63 

1 96 

2 29 
2 61 

2 94 

3 27 

4 58 

5 88 
b 54 
7 84 
9 15 

10 16 

11 76 

13 07 

14 38 

15 69 

16 99 
IB 30 
10 61 


17 

36 
61 

92 

1 20 

1 72 

2 W 

2 80 

3 32 
6 2 
9 H 

12 
16 S 
22 3 
29 
35 7 
43 1 
52 
61 
70 
81 
92.0 


45 
58 

91 

1 13 
1 36 
1 50 

1 82 

2 05 

2 27 

3 IB 

4 OU 

4 54 

5 15 

6 35 

7 26 

8 17 

9 OS 
9 9^ 

10 S9 

11 SO 

12 7] 

13 62 


07 
15 
25 
3S 
54 
71 

91 

1 15 

1 38 

2 57 
4 08 
4 96 
7 
9 2 

11 8 
14 8 
17 8 
21 3 
25 1 
20 I 
33 4 
38.0 










Lose ol Head ir 


Feet Due to Frictiun^ per 


OOFHtolNewOrd 


nary Cmt Iron Pipe 












US 


4'PFpe 


S'Pipe 


fi'P:[» 


8' Pipe 


10' Pipe 


12' Pipe 


14' Pipe 


15- Pipe 


16' Pipe 


20' Pipe 


GhUinib 
























Minutt 


Ver 


Fr.c. 


Vd. 


Ffic, 


Vd. 


Fric, 


Vd- 


Fric 


Vd. 


Fric- 


Vel 


trir. 


Vd, 


Ffic- 


Vd. 


Fric. 


Vel. 


Fric. 


Vd, 


Frir. 


40 


I 02 


22 




































45 


1 17 


28 


, 




































50 


1 28 


034 






































70 


1 79 


nin 


1 14 


21 


































75 


1 92 


73 


1 22 


24 


































lOO 


3 55 


1 Z3 


1 63 


30 


1 N 


14 






























120 


3 06 


I 71 


t 96 


57 


1 42 


25 






























126 


3 19 


1 86 


2 04 


M 


1 48 


28 






























ISO 


3 84 


2 55 


2 15 


88 


1 71 


32 






























175 


4 45 


3 36 


2 8G 


1 18 


2 DO 


48 


. _ 




























200 


5 11 


4 37 


3 27 


1 48 


2 -£9 


62 






























225 


6 32 


6 61 


3 67 


1 86 


2 57 


74 






























250 


6 40 


6 72 


4 06 


2 24 


2 80 


92 


1 60 


22 


























275 


7 03 


7 99 


4 50 


2 72 


3 06 


1 15 


1 73 


27 


























3D0 


7 «4 


9 3S 


4 90 


3 15 


3 40 


J 29 


1 90 


36 


























350 


8 00 


12 32 


5 72 


1 19 


3 9B 


1 ^ 


2 20 


41 


























400 


to 20 


15 82 


6 54 


5 33 


4 54 


2 21 


2 60 


56 


























450 


t1 50 


19 74 


7 35 


6 65 


5 12 


2 74 


2 92 


64 


1 80 


D 21 






















475 


12 30 


22 96 


7 SB 


7 22 


5 5S 


3 21 


3 10 


79 


1 94 


25 






















500 


12.77 


34.08 


a 17 


S 12 


5 60 


3 26 


3 20 


Bl 


2 04 


2S 


1 42 


Oil 


















550 






S 99 


9 66 


6 16 


3 93 


3 52 


>B 


2 ZS 


33 


1 57 


14 














, 




«00 






9 SO 


11 34 


6 72 


4 TO 


3 84 


1 16 


2 46 


39 


I 71 


15 


















uo 






10 02 


13 16 


7 2* 


5 50 


4 16 


1 34 


2 66 


46 


1 85 


19 


1 37 


00 


, 








, 




700 






11 44 


15 12 


7 84 


6 38 


4 46 


1 54 


2 86 


52 


2 DO 


22 


1 47 


n 














7M 






12 20 


17 22 


« 50 


7 00 


4 SO 


I 74 


3 U6 


59 


2 13 


24 


1 5S 


M 














800 










9 OS 


T 90 


5 12 


1 97 


3 28 


67 


2 27 


27 


1 6B 


IL 














ISO 










9 SB 


S 75 


5 48 


2 2B 


3 48 


75 


2 41 


31 


1 79 


14 














ODD 










ID "id 


10 11 


5 75 


2 4fi 


3 68 


B3 


2 56 


34 


1 80 


ID 














960 










10 72 


10 71 


« 06 


2 S7 


3 88 


91 


2 70 


35 


2 00 


16 


1 73 


12 










1000 










II 32 


12 (H 


6 40 


3 02 


4 OR 


1 01 


2 84 


41 


2 10 


19 


1 B3 


14 






. 




1100 










12 50 


14 31 


7 01 


3 &1 


4 50 


1 20 


3 13 


4y 


2 31 


23 


2 00 


16 








, 


1200 










13 52 


16 60 


7 67 


4 26 


4 01 


1 49 


3 41 


57 


2 52 


26 


2 18 


19 










1500 














9 60 


6 27 


6 10 


2 09 


4 20 


B5 


3 15 


39 


2 73 


0.28 


2 39 


24 






2000 














12 70 


10 71 


8 in 


3 50 


5 60 


1 43 


4 20 


€6 3 64 


47 


:i 19 


39 


..... 


, 


2ftOO 

sooo 


















10 10 


5 33 


7 00 


2 IB 


5 25 


1 01 


4 55 


72 


3 09 


56 






■ 
















12 10 


7 42 


S 40 


3 39 


6 30 


1 57 


5 40 


1 12 


4 70 


BO 


3 OS 


27 



Vd.— VBlccityfnt perHCond. Fnc— FfitlJtin h«id in feet. 



Friction of Water in 9QP Elbows 

Eqiiivaltnt Numbrr of Fwt StraiRhl Pipe 





BiMof Elbow. Inches 


6 


H 

A 


I 
6 


m 


IW 


s 


2H 

11 


3 

15 


4 

16 


5 


6 


B 


10 
30 


13 

40 


14 
54 


15 

55 


le 

55 


20 




Frittkoo Equivalent Feet 
SUmlght Pipe 


s 


s 


IS 


IS 


24 


70 


>A1 


RLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 


_ 




^^ 


^^ 


^^ 


^^ 


^^ 


Page Fifteen 



■vs " ?^; vi'^^^* ■:;;..^>:.; ; 1 :v ^ ■ W ■ \- 




HAl,F*K . SAINT iONN . QUEBEC . *«V.O* . , . M M . »l S \' 
• WINN...0 . CA.GARV . VAHCOUVER . s, ,oHN-S. N.IO. ' 



■%^^i^';*.v-^ 



eullehn 45D 




AIT8MATIC CONDENSATION PUMPS - - CLASS DC 




») 




B It II T II E K S L ni I T E D 

liO PKJNCE ST MONTRIAI, CANADA 



NAilVAX . lAiNf JOHN . QUlllC • AlVIDA « IIMMINt 
< WfMMt^lO • CAlOAiV • VAHCOUVtl • ir >OHN-t. HUP 







-.■r.\,-. 



RATING TABLE 





, Pfestuf 
Lht. 


U-S. 
J GoU, Appifl* 

Con- »°'J*' 
doaiale "■*^- 


Cap. 

Pump 
U.5, 
Gal£ 


AdCflivflt 


60 Ct- 


17SD A**alula9iiA P*' Mm. 


25 Cr. 


1440 R*TO]uMe» P*' Mln. 


Cap 
Sq. F 
HadjQ 

tiea 


Sir* 


Cap'r^ 

U.S. 
Gals 


Siia d 

7yp« aJ 
Pump 


MoTD 

H.P. 




Otidii 

No. 


Di- 
mtfD 

\ 


3i» & 

Typ» ol 

rump 


H.r Lba 


OudiV 


DJ- 


4.00G 


IS 
25 
30 
35 


2 
2 
2 

2 


40 
40 
40 
40 


8 
G 
S 
G 


17'x20 
17'x20' 
I7"i»20" 
17'jc20' 


23 
23 
23 
23 


M DAAC 
Vi DAAC 
^■4 DAAC 
I4 DAYC 


■'■J 
I 


425 
440 
440 

510 


4DCJ5 

4Dc;i 

4DCJC 

40*: 15 


1 
2 
2 
2 


i* OAAC 
%k DAAC 
^ OAYC 
U DAYC 


1) 1 435 

440 

I, 510 

] 540 


4DCU 
4DC34 
4DCa9 
4DC34 
4DC44 


1 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 




45 


2 


40 


G 


17". 20" 


23 


Ik DAYC 


r J 


540 


iT>r'.-' 


2 


H OAYC 


1< 550 




SO 


2 


40 


e 


I7*x20' 


23 


^ DAYC 


2 


550 


4DI. 


% 


H OAYC 


t 550 


4DC49 




GO 


3 


40 


6 


17 "1.20" 


2Z 


^ DAYC 


3 


550 


4DCG0 


1 ^ 




1 








L5 


3 


GO 


9 


I7"x20'' 


23 


3^4 OAAC 
V4 DAAC 


h 


425 


6DC: = 


' 1 


n DAAC 


>N 435 


6DCI4 


1 




SO 


3 


GO 


9 


l7-x20" 


33 


'. 


440 


6DC. 


3 


Vt DAAC 


440 


6DC19 


1 




2S 


3 


GO 


3 


l7-*20- 


23 


^4 DAAC 


>* 


440 


«i)CZi 


2 


H DAYC 


i, 510 


6[)C24 


2 


G.QOO 


35 


3 


GO 


9 


17-K20- 


23 


^4 DAYC 


1 


510 


6DC:i 


2 


^ OAYC 


1 540 


6DC34 


2 




40 


3 


eo 


9 


n-xlO" 


23 


Ak OATC 


1'. 


540 


GDC40 


3 


^ DAVC 


1^ 


5MJ 


6DC39 


2 




45 


3 


60 


9 


l^"'x20'' 


23 


*■* OAYC 


2 


S50 


6DC4-^ 


1 


^ DAYi: 


1 


550 


6 DC 44 


2 




GO 


3 


60 


9 


]7-it20'' 


23 


Vj DAYC 


3 


5S0 


6DC50 


2 














10 


4 


GO 


U 


I8"<24- 


za 


A'4 DAAC 


^^ 


420 


BDCiO 


J 


^ OAAC 


15 


450 


eDC9 


3 




20 


4 


60 


12 


iS'xJfl' 


28 


V4 DAAC 


'1 


455 


9DC20 


4 


^ DAAC 


^j 


460 


8DC19 


4 




25 


4 


80 


12 


ia"n24' 


28 


^ DAAC 


i* 


4SS 


8DC2S 


4 


1* OAYC 


U 


530 


eDC24 


4 


B.OOO 


30 


4 


eo 


12 


lB'x24" 


28 


iA OAAC 


1 


470 


BDC30 


4 


»ii OAYC 


X 


560 


BDCZ3 


< 




40 


4 


SO 


12 


18x24" 


28 


V4 OAYC 


1^ 


555 


aDC40 


« 


^. OAYC 


V. 


570 


8DC39 


4 




45 


4 


BO 


12 


lBx24' 


28 


3-4 DAYC 


2 


SG5 


8DC4S 


4 


^ DAVC 


t 


570 


8DC44 


4 




€0 


4 


BO 


J2 


ia"x24'' 


28 


^k DAYC 


3 


56S 


BDC60 


4 














10 


5 


100 


IS 


lS"x24- 


28 


1 DAAC 


'!l 


430 


JODCtO 


3 


1 DAAC 


"s 


45s 


10DC3 


3 




15 


S 


too 


15 


lB'x24- 


28 


1 DAAC 




455 


10DC15 


4 


1 DAAC 


J 


460 


10DC14 


4 




25 


s 


100 


15 


ia"ic24" 


26 


^ OAAC 


i. 


455 


10DC2S 


4 


H DAYC 


u 


530 


10DC24 


4 


10.000 


30 


5 


100 


ts 


iB*24" 


28 


Vi DAAC 


1 


470 


10DC30 


4 


\a DAVC 


1 


560 


10DC29 


4 




35 


5 


100 


15 


16'k24" 


3S 


V- DAYC 


1'^ 


555 


10DC35 


4 


^ OAYC 


1'. 


570 


10DC34 


4 




45 


5 


100 


15 


lflx24^ 


2B 


34 DAYC 


2 


5GS 


10DC45 


4 


^ OAYC 


z 


570 


IODC44 


4 




GQ 


5 


■ DO 


IS 


lB"x24' 


1 2fl 


Vi DAYC 


3 


565 


lODCBO 


4 














15 


7.5 


150 


2Z.5 


IB If 36 ■ 


42 


1 DAAC 




405 


15DC1S 


5 


] DAAC 


V. 


«so 


l5DCt4 


& 




20 


7-5 


150 


22.S 


16'x3G" 


42 


1 DAAC 


U 


465 


15DC20 


5 


1 DAAC 


li 


M» 


I5DCI9 


S 




2S 


7-5 


150 


22.5 


18^x36' 


42 


1 DAAC 


1 


500 


ISDC2S 


5 


1 DAYC 


1 


595 


i5DC24 


5 


IS^QOD 


35 


7,5 


ISO 


22.5 


IB-'kJG" 


42 


1 DAVC 


I', 


S95 


15DC35 


5 


1 DAYC 


r 


605 


t5DC3l 


5 




40 


7.S 


150 


22.5 


lS"x3S- 


42 


1 DAVC 


2 


GOS 


ISDC40 


5 


1 OAYC 


2 


605 


15DC39 


5 




50 


7.5 


150 


22,5 


ia"x3e- 


42 


V4 DAYC 


3 


590 


ISDCSO 


5 


1 OAYC 


3 


660 


15DC49 


6 




GO 


7-5 


150 


22.5 


1B-X36" 


42 


14, DAYC 


5 


645 


ISDCGO 


6 














10 


10 


203 


3D 


JB-X3G" 


42 


\V4 DAAC 




450 


20DC10 


7 


m OAAC 


; ■, 


490 


20DC9 


5 




20 
25 


10 


200 


30 


lfl"x36" 


42 


\i/4 DAAC 


'4 


485 


2DDC20 


5 


11^4 OAAC 


\i 


500 


20DC1S 


5 


20,000 


10 


200 


30 


1B'J.3£' 


42 


1 DAAC 


1 


500 


20DC25 


5 


IV4 OAYC 


I 


600 


20DC34 


s 


30 
35 
45 
GC 


10 


200 


30 


la'xSG^' 


42 


1 DAAC 


V . 


525 


20DC30 


5 


\ DAVC 


1'.. 


600 


30OC29 


s 




200 


30 


1B"k3S" 


42 


1 DAYC 


2 


600 


2aDC3S 


S 


I DAVC 


2 


600 


20DC34 


% 




10 
10 


200 
200 


30 

30 


iB'xSG" 
1B-JC3G' 


42 
42 


1 DAYC 
I DAYC 


3 

2 


GOO 
660 


20DC45 
20DC60 


5 

6 


l\\ OAYC 


3 


670 


200044 


G 




10 
IS 
20 
30 
35 
45 
oO 


12.5 


250 


37.5 


2l'x36" 


54 


Ui DAAC 


1 ., 


46S 


25DC10 


G 


Ufl DAAC 


1 


500 


25DC9 


9 
9 
3 
9 
9 
10 


2S.00O 


12 rS 

12,5 
12.5 
12.S 
12.5 
12.5 


250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 


37,5 
37-5 
37.5 
37.5 
37,5 
37-5 


2r'x3€'' 
21-'x3G' 
21-'ii36" 
2r'x36" 
2l-x3G- 
2rx36'' 


54 
S4 
54 
51 
54 
51 


li/* OAAC 

IV4 DAAC 

IV4 OAAC 

1 DAYC 

1 DAYC 

1 DAYC 


J4 
1 

2 

3 
5 


500 
515 
SSO 
GZO 
620 
G75 


25DC1S 

25DC20 
25DC30 
Z5DC35 

25DC45 
25DCGD 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
10 


II4 OAAC 
I't DAAC 

U* DAYC 
lU DAYC 
U-4 DAYC 


I4 
1 

2 
3 


520 
550 
625 
625 
660 


2SDC14 
2SDC19 
2SDC29 
25DC34 
25DC44 


30.0DO 


10 
IS 
20 
Z5 
30 
40 
GO 


15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 


300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 


45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 


24-X3S- 
24">i3G" 
24"x3e" 
24'x36'' 
24"x3G" 
24"x3G'- 
24-x3&' 


74 

74 
74 
74 
74 
74 
74 


1^ DAAC 
11-^ OAAC 
11^ DAAC 
IV4 OAAC 
iVt OAAC 
IVj DAYC 
1 DAYC 


^4 

1 

I', 

2 
3 
5 


470 
510 
5Z0 
550 
5G0 
625 
680 


30DCJ0 
3aDClS 
3ODC20 
30DC25 
30DC30 
30DC40 
SODCGD 


3 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
10 


V-^1 OAAC 
Wt DAAC 
\y^ DAAC 
IJ'4 OAYC 
U-i DAYC 
U'4 DAYC 
Hi DAYC 


1 

V . 

2 
3 
5 


530 
520 
550 
£25 
625 
68D 
750 


30DC9 

30DC14 

30DC19 

30DC24 

30DC29 

30DC39 

30DC49 


9 
9 
9 

9 

9 

10 

LO 


3S,00Q 


10 
15 
25 

30 
35 
GO 


17,5 
17,S 
17-5 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 


35J 
350 
350 
350 
330 
350 


52-S 
52.5 
52.5 
52-5 
52-5 
52.5 


24''x3S' 

24''x3S-' 
24"x36'' 
24''x36" 
24 "■36'' 
24"x3G'' 


74 
74 
74 
74 
74 
74 


11^ DAAC 
I^ DAAC 
1^^ OAAC 
IV; DAAC 
IV4 DAYC 
1*/* DAYC 


1- 
1 

1^ 
2 
3 
5 


470 
520 
550 

560 
GZO 
6B0 


35DC10 
35DCI5 
35DC25 

35DC30 
3SDC3S 
35DCG0 


8 
9 
9 

9 

9 

10 


]'■? OAAC 
1^ DAAC 
\^ DAYC 
1'^ OAYC 
l^'i OAYC 
n-i OAYC 


'4 
I 

I' . 
2 
3 
5 


520 
550 
620 
62 
660 
750 


35DC9 

35DC14 

35DC34 

35DC29 
35DC34 
35DC49 


9 
9 
9 

9 

10 
10 


40.000 


JO 
IS 
25 

30 
3S 
50 
GO 


30 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 


400 

400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 


GO 
GO 
GO 
GO 
GO 
GO 
60 


24'x4B" 
24"x4B" 
24x48" 

24''x4B" 
24"x48" 
24''x48" 
24"x48" 


35 

95 

95 
95 
95 
95 
95 


iMi OAAC 
]i^ DAAC 
l^ DAAC 
li^ DAAC 
11-^ DAYC 
1V4 DAVC 
U^ DAYC 


1 

1 

1'. 

2 

3 

5 

7'. 


540 
575 
605 
615 
BBO 
735 
810 


40DC10 
40DCIS 
40DCZS 
40DC30 
40DC35 
40DC50 
40DC60 


11 
11 

n 

11 

11 
12 

12 


IVj OAAC 
I''? DAAC 
iV, DAYC 
m DAYC 
\^'2 OAYC 
I'j DAYC 


1 

1 

V . 

2 

3 

5 


600 
600 
670 
670 
725 
800 


40DC9 

40DC14 

40DC24 

40DCZ9 

40DC3t 

40DC49 


11 
IJ 
1] 
11 

u 

12 


50,000 


LO 
20 
2S 
30 

as 

50 
GO 


25 
25 
25 
2b 
2S 
25 
25 


500 

son 

500 
500 
500 
5 DO 
500 


75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
7S 


24 x4B 

24'x4B" 

Z4"x48" 

24'k4B' 

24"x4B ■ 

24"x4B" 

24-V4S 


95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 


ILi DAAC 
1^ DAAC 
IV: DAAC 
li/2 DAAC 
1"^ DAVC 
U'S DAYC 
1'! DAYC 


I 

1', 

2 

3 

3 

5 

T 


540 
575 

eis 

615 
660 
735 
SID 


50DC10 
S0DC20 
S0DC25 
50DC30 
S0DC35 
S0DC50 
50DCGC 


11 
11 
U 
li 
11 
12 
12 


l^.'j DAAC 
\^--i DAAC 
W-i DAYC 
Pj DAYC 
Us DAYC 
Uj DAYC 


I 

I' . 
2 

3 
3 
5 


GOO 
SIO 
67Q 
725 
725 
BOO 


S0DC9 

50DCI9 

50DC24 

50DC29 

50DC34 

S0DC43 


11 

n 
11 

\i 

IZ 

12 






T H E R S 



I T E 




MONTREAL 



QUE 



OVERALL DIMENSIONS CLASS DC CONDENSATION 



PVMPS 




D 




E ' JXjPLFit Outfit 




=-*^*". ..... ..„„..,.,, ,., .„,„ „,„ „„ ,., ., ,^ ^^ ^^_,^_^ _^^^^^_ ^^^^^_^^ 



=§ 



*nsions No. 


Return 


Vent 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


1 

2 
3 


2" 


11/4" 


30" 


41" 


223/4" 


25i/z" 


41" 


2" 


IV4" 


33" 


46" 


223/4" 


251/2" 


46" 


21/2 " 


IV4" 


30" 


41" 


233/4" 


26I/2" 


41" 


4 


21/2" 


IV4" 


34" 


46" 


233/4" 


261/2" 


4S" 


5 


3" 


IV2" 


34" 


49" 


243/4" 


271/2" 


46" 


6 


3" 


IVa" 


35" 


50" 


243/4" 


271/2" 


48" 


7 


3" 


IVz" 


30" 


41" 


243/4" 


271/2" 


40" 


8 


31/2" 


2" 


32" 


47" 


253/4" 


301/2" 


40" 


9 


3>/2" 


2" 


34" 


48" 


253/4" 


301/2" 


45" 


10 


3"/2" 


2" 


36" 


49" 


253/4" 


301/2" 


47" 


11 


4" 


2" 


38" 


55" 


283/4", 


331/2" 


47" 


12 


4" 


2" 


40" 


55" 


283/4" 


331/2" 


49" 



TYPICAL SPECIFICATION 



=§ 



P^^^P ^o t« driven through a cast iron flexible coupling with njbber buffers by a HP Ph Cv 
Volts, 40C- motor running at a maximuni speed of 1800 revs, 

The heavy steel receiver is to be equipped with bronze noat and gear to actuate a butt contact float switch An 
adjuslmen. to be provided ^o that start and stop water levels in tank can be changed. Suitable thermal overload d^ 
vices to protect motor are to be provided, 

(If single unit having receiver smaller than 24" x 48" add the following paragraph) 

Alt pipmg connections between pump and receiver and electrical wiring connections between float switch starter if 
used, find motor, to be made by manufacturer. Pump, motor and receiver to be mounted on common cast iron baseplate. 



%> 



A R 1. I N G BROTHERS LIMITE 




O N 



QUE. 



^ ?. ^'-TVV • 



:-'.^^i 



OTHER TYPES OF 

DARLING ELECTRIC 
CONDENSATION PUMPS 






I I 



IITS, Used with hi9h 
les up to 250 lbs* 
:00 boiler horse power. 



■^.UES OF 
AILABLE 



« 



AUTOMATIC 
R FEED PUMP, 
- Systems. 



CLASS "VC" VERTICAL UMI73 
Used where return mains are cloi^^ 
to or below floor leveL Made in 
sizes from 2000 lo 50,000 sq. H. 
e.d.r, with discharge pres^iures up 
to 50 lbs. per sq. in. 




i 



Ldh o( Hedd la F««( Due Id 




FRICTION OF WATER IN PIPES 



U.S. 

p»f 
Mm. 

i 
2 
3 
i 

5 



^/rlPipe 



Vel. Fric. 



ID 
IS 
20 
75 

3C 



LOS 
2.10 
3.1B 
4.2t 
5.26 



V Pip» 



Ve!, 



2J 
7.4 

is.e 

27,0 



10,52 147.0 



35 

45 
50 
75 



100 
120 
140 
160 
ISO 



Fric, 



1^20 1.9 

i^ao u 

2.41 I 7.0 

3.01, 10.5 



^ P'pe IVi'Pino 



VeL 



6,02. 33.0 
9.02 ' BG.O 
12.03 13S.0 



1.12 

1,43 

t.ee 

3.72 
5. GO 
7.^4 
9,30 
11. IS 



Fric. 



1.2G 
2.U 
3.2S 

n.7 

25.0 
42,0 
G4.0 
69.0 



VbI. Fric. 



13-02: 119,0 
M.SB 152.0 



0,86 
1.07 

2,14 

3.2 

4,29 

5.3G 

6.43 

7.51 " 
8. SB 
9-B5 
10.72 



0.57 
0.84 

3,05 
6.S0 

11.1 

1G.6 

23.5 

31.2 
40.0 
SD.O 
60.0 



I'/ Pioe 



Vel,— Velocity ia Feat per Second. 

fri<^- — Fric Hon Head in Feel. 



Vel, Fdc. 



0.S3 
0.79 

1.S7 
2-3S 
3.iS 
3.94 
4.72 

5.51 
6.3 

7. OB 

7.87 

11.80 



Z'PiF^ ,2VrPip^ 



Vel. Fric. Vel. ' Frf 



0.26 
0.39 



1.43 

3.0 

5.2 

7.fi 
L1,0 

14.7 

L8,fi 
23.2 
2fi.4 ' 
SO.O 



1.0? 
1,S3 
2.01 
2,S5 
3.06 



3" Pipe 



Vel. Fric 



3,57 
4.08 
4.60 
5.11 
7,66 



0.50 
LOS 
l,B2 
2.73 
3.34 



0.65 
0,98 
J.3J 
h63 
J. 96 



1S.74 


102.0 


18,09 


J 4 3.0 


22.04 


190.0 



LO.ZI 
12.2S 
14.30 
16.34 
13.3B 



5.1 

G.6 
8.2 
3.9 

20.9 



2.29 
2.Gt 
Z.94 
3.27 
5.01 



0,17 
0.35 

0.92 
J. 29 



35.9 
50,0 
67,0 
8&.0 
107.0 



6,54 

7.B4 

9-15 

10.46 

n.7S 



1.72 

2.20 
2. BO 
3.32 
7.1 



IZ.O 
16.3 
22.3 
29.0 
35.7 



0.4S 
0.68 
0.91 
1.13 
1.36 

1.59 
J. 92 
2.0S 
2.27 
3.4 



4" Pipe I 5" Pipe S" Pip, 



Vgl. Fric. VeJ. Fn'c. Vel. Fnc 



4,54 
5,45 
6.35 
7.26 
8.17 



0.07 
0.15 
0,25 
0.30 
0.54 



0,71 
0,9t 
J. 15 
1.33 
3.05 



fl" Pipe 



Fric Vel, 



J -02 I 0.22 
1.17 0,28 
1.28, 0.34, 
1.92 0.73 ! t.22 



4.95 

7,0 

9.2 

M.8 

14.6 



2,SS 
3.06 
3,S7 
4.08 
4.60 



1.23 
l.7\ 
2.28 
2,9] 
3.G] 



1.G3 
1.93 
2.29 
2.G1 
2.91 



0.24 

0.39 
0.57 
0.76 
0,98 
1.Z2 



L,t4 
1.42 
1.58 
1.80 
2.04 



0.14 

0,25 
0,31 
0,41 
0.50 



FHICTION TABLE OF WATER IN 90^ ELBOWS 

Equivoleni Number of Fee! Siraighl Pipe 



Size oi Elbow, Inches 

Friction Equivalent Feet Straight Pipe 



1'- 






^ 



1% 
a 



8 



2Va 
II 



3 

IS 



IG 



5 
IS 



6 

18 



e 

24 



FEET HEAD TO POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH 



Feel 
Head 



3 
2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


g 

10 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
IG 
17 

je 

19 
20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Pressufe 
per sq. in. 



0.43 
0.86 

1.30 

J. 73 

2.16 

Z.60 

3.03 

3.46 

3-90 

4.33 

476 

5.20 

5.63 

6.06 

6.50 

G.93 

7.36 

7,B0 

8.23 

B.ee 

9.09 
9.53 
9.% 

10.39 

1Q.82 

11.26 

11.69 



Feel 
Head 



28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

SO 

51 

52 

53 

54 



Pressure 
per sq. m 



12.12 

12.55 

12.99 

13.42 

13.86 

14.29 

14.72 

15.16 

15.59 

16.02 

16.45 

16.89 

17,32 

17.75 

18.19 

18.E2 

19.05 

19.49 

19.92 

20.3 S 

20.79 

2U22 

21.65 

22.09 

22.52 

22.95 

23.39 



Feel 
Head 



ss 

56 
57 

sa 

59 
80 
61 

62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 



Preasurp 
per sq, in. 



23.82 

24.25 

24.69 

25.12 

25.SS 

25.99 

26,42 

28.85 

27,29 

27.72 

26.15 

26,58 

29.02 

29.45 

29,68 

30.32 

30.75 

31.18 

31.62 

32.05 

32.48 

32.92 

33.35 

33.7B 

34.21 

34.65 

3S.08 



feel 
Heed 



82 

83 

84 

85 

66 

87 

68 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

9S 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 



Pressure 
per aq. in 



35.52 

35.95 

36.39 

36.62 

37.25 

37.68 

38.12 

33.55 

38.98 

39.42 

39.65 

40.28 

40.72 

41,15 

41. SB 

42.01 

42.45 

42,88 

43.31 

43.75 

44.1 B 

44.61 

45.05 

45.48 

4S.9I 

46.34 

40.78 



Feel 
Head 


Fressuie 
per sq, in. 


103 


47.21 


110 


47.64 


Ul 


48.08 


112 


48.51 


113 


48,94 


114 


49.30 


115 


49.81 


116 


50.24 


117 : 


50.68 


118 


51. 11 


119 


51.54 


120 


51.9B 


121 


52.41 


122 


52,94 


123 


S3.2B 


124 


53.71 


125 


54.15 


126 


54.58 


127 


55.01 


128 


55.44 


129 


SS,88 


130 


56.31 


131 ' 


56.74 


132 


57.19 


133 


57.61 


134 ' 


58.04 


135 , 

1 


58.48 



Feci 
Hoad 



136 

137 

13S 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

144 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

ISO 

151 

152 

153 

154 

15S 

156 

157 

158 

159 

IGO 

161 

162 



PreBBuie 
per »q. in. 



58.91 

59.34 

59.77 

G0.2I 

60.64 

61.07 

61.51 

61.94 

62.37 

62,81 

63.24 

63.67 

64.10 

64.54 

64.97 

65.40 

65.84 

66.27 

66.70 

67.14 

67.57 

68.00 

68.43 

68.86 

69.29 

69.72 

70.15 



L I N 



ff B n n T ft B n fh^umij 




TREAL, QUE 



J 



DUPLEX CLASS "DC 



ff 



CONDENSATION PCMP WNITS 




Illustration shows a t>"pical arrangement of one of the larger sizes of 
Class ''DC* duplex units, made up of one receiving tank and two pumps, one 
of which always acts nvi a standby. A float switch is mounted on each end of 
the receiver so that each pump has its own starting equipment as well as its 
own motor and is therefore entirely independent- 



DF - CM 



A PARTIAL LIST OF DARLING PRODUCTS 

Pumps for any Service SYLPHON Temperature Regulators 

WEBSTER Si. terns of Steam Heotmg Heoters and Heot Exchangers 

WEBSTrR TrM.P,>.,n,eter Heoting Possenger and freight Elevators 

DAKLiNtj ..reom Speciolties SINCE 18S8 



B H (I T H E I! S LIMITED 

LlLllim J L *^O^T«EAl. CANADA 
«*i.-A» . .*.«, JOXN . 0„(„c , *.v.»* . ,,^M.«. 




printed in Cono* 



DARLING HEAVY DUTY ELECTRIC CELLAR DRAINER 



9) 



This dependable, electric 
iustallations, and is produced to 
sixty years. It has proved itself 
and elevator pits; and has been a 



motor-driven pump has bren designed and improved from long experience in practical 
the same hi^h *[u;ilitv standards which have characterized all Darling Pumps for over 
a profitable investment, with low maintenance costs, in draining boiler rooms, tunnels 
valuable emergency unit for towns, manufacturing plants and institutions. 



CASING; 
IMPELLER; 

SHAFT: 

PUMP BEARING; 

COLUMN: 



COVER: 
PUMP BASE: 
SCREEN: 

MOTOR: 



PROTECTION; 
STARTING: 

SUMPS: 

SUMP COVERS; 




SPECIFICATIONS OF STANDARD UNIT 

Volute type with \)i" elbow discharge, cast integrally- Impeller can be 
removed without disconnecting discharge pipe from casing. 

Enclosed type machined all over outside, file finished water passages, 
Mechanically balanced. Radial clearance on hub to prevent seizing. 
Provisiim to take up wear. Well rounded vanes iit entrance. 

%" diameter Ground Stainless Steel Shaft. 

Self-lubricating. 

lii" extra heavy steel pipe, machined at ends for pump and frame 
sockets. 



Com I lined casting, 

Ji or Ja h.p. (see capacitv table), continuously rated. 1 phase, 60 cycle, 
110/220 volt, 1750 R,P.M,, ball bearing, Repulsion Induction Type 
High Torque with low starting current inrush. Totaliy enclosed 
explosion proof motors available for special application. 

Thermal overload protection with automatic reset is built into single 
pljase motors. 

Heavy dutv 1 h.p., ilO volt or 2 h.p.. 220 volt, single phase rating, 
two pole float switch operated by a 7" diameter seamless cupper 
float and !«" I-P-S. brass pipe. 

Pumps are built for pits 24". 36" and 48" deep, maximum. Minimum 

diameter pit 16". 

Cast iron adjustable split covers are available for pits 16", 20" and 
24" diameter. Cover diameters. 20\ 24" and 28" respectively. 



U.S. G. P. M. 
CAPACITY 


HEAD IN FEET 


1750 
R.P.M. 


V* H.P. 


Va H.P. 


10 


19 


26 


20 


18 


25 


30 


15 


23 


40 


12 


20 


50 


4 


14 



BROTHERS LIMITED 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL, CANADA 



TIMMINS 



OtTAWA • 



HALIFAX . SAINT JOHN . OUItIC • AiVlOA 
TOtONTO . WINNIPtO - CAiOAtV - VANCOUVit • IT. JOHN'S, NFLO. 



Digitized by: 




INTIRNAttONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY. 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 

TECHNOLOGY 

HERITAGE 

LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of; 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 




♦ 



FOR SCHOOLS 



4 



GREATER 
COMFORT 

IMPROVED 
HEALTH 

BETTER 
ATTENDANCE 

HIGHER 
SCHOLARSHIP 



Wj^jbAHJn 



TRU-PERIMETER HEATING 




IN ARVIDA 









C 



L'ECOLE NOTRE-DAME 
de I'ASSOMPTION 



m 




•^1 



cPa-'*°^ 



(y^i 



>hM 




m 



^4 



X 



A Rigorous Test Case: 

A glonce ot the photograph obove shows the vost surface oreoi 
of the building, and especially the greot total window areo, which 
hod to be considered in choosing the heating system for this 
Khool on Hudson Street. When the problem was intensified b 
extremely low temperatures, high winds, ond often rapid chongei 
in rhe course of o day, which prevoif in this district, the matter of 
selecting odequote and dependoble heating become doubly 
Importont, 

Th« Choice Was Webster Wolvector: 

The responsible group, ofter thorough study of the available heot- 
mg systems, chose Webster Wolvector Tru-Perimeter Heating 
wthch was instolled in such multiple units as the specific conditions 
of each room required. Yet the heating units did not interfere with 
irteful space; ond octually odded to the simple ottractiveness of the 
room scheme* 



The Most Convincing Proof: 

After the experience of a severe winter, the Arvido school authori- 
ties have decided to instoll Webster Wolvector Tru-Perimeter 
Heoting in two odditional schools being erected in Arvido. 




* 



< 



For on independent analysis of the applicatiom or 
and Ventilation of School Buildings", by D. W. 
RA.I.C.. April 1 952. 



IN GRANBY 





iiWWWt^HW^msUu wttmnn* 




GRANBY HIGH SCHOOL 



Another Outstanding Instance: 

Vhcn Granby decided ro build a lorge extension to iH existing 
ligh School buiidmg— as shown by the section occupying The rights 
ond »wo-thirds of the photograph above, Webster Wolvector 
ru-Perimeter Heeling wos chosen and mstalled, with Syfphor Auto- 
matic Temperature Regulotor Valves in each room, 

r 

Exact Records of Dependability Kept: 

rhe teochers checked temperatures in each room ond corridors 
ieverol times daily on thermometers provided on the wolls. During 
fhe severe winter immediately following and despite the location 
on the brow of a hill and open exposure, in no room did the lem- 
perafure vory more then (wo degrees from the defermmed cowforf 
point. 

A Further Proof of Performance: 

The building superintendent, Mr. Lelond Cornish, hos advised that 
the Webster Wolvector system (in morked contrast to the system 
in the older wing) acts with remarkable rapidity. After week-ends 
when the building temperature is kept ot a much lower point for 
economy of fuel, the regulators are reset for normol. of^iy M'een 
minute, before .chool opening t.me, ond perfect comfort ,. e.lob- 
ffjhed in that short period. 



^ 



his type of heafing for schoo/s, see 'The Heoftng 
VSc, Consulting Engineer, in the Journal of the 



Archittd A. Utih ^mrry. MonUtat. 

Coniu"mg Engp"**' John P. Oodtor.. PS.Q., A,MJ-Mech. 

Eng.. Gronby. 
Centrot CantroctO'i ft. t Slewott Contlruchon. Shtrbr<fOkt 
Hoo'rng CoftfroeJoft Mogog Plumbing A Heating fftg'rf-* 

Mogog. 










'" "-^"^or. «. 







and in ST. JOHNS, Qu 

Amhitectt tlr DufrKtnt. Mon*r»o/ ond Hull. 
Conivihng Sngmteti. Tout. Sorraulf 4 Assoc., 

General Confrocrors Jeflfl Pavt Tro^on. St. ienn, 
H^otirtg ConfrocrofJ Induiinol Ptumbiog & Heoting 











i 




ARTS & CRARS SCHOOL of ST. JEAN 



Again a Comptex Problem: 

This new school to be operoted by the Provincial DeportmenI o 

Youth ond Welfare (Hon. Pool Sauve, Minister), colled for a heating 
system of greol flexibility as well as dependability. The building 
which h much more extensive than the photograph shows, is locotet 
on a flot terrain of open fields and recreational grounds— svbjecte* 
on four sides to driving winds in winter j 

Various Sizes of Rooms: 

Within the handsome structure are offices, classrooms, and worif 
shops of many different sizes, with varying proportions of outsld 
woll and window exposures. Ir> the huge shop wing (ot the reor i 
the picture) there ore great areas to be heated — the electrict 
shop for instance, is 72 feet long by 35 feet wide. Obviously th 
heating system must hove units which could be odopted to thes 
voried demands, 

Walvectors Were the Answer: 

The great flexibility of WebMer Walvector Tru-Perimeter Heotin 
supplied the answer to this complex demond. From the single n 
cessed unit, out of the way, under the window of Principol Gilli 
Chorbonneau's private office, to the extended multiple units olor 
the outside work-shop wolls, each different specific heoting requlf 
ment of this fine school has been adequately ond dependobly n 
with on ottroctive, efficient Wolvector installation. 



B It T II E in L HI I T E I 

140 PRINCE ST MONTREAL, CANAD 



HAIIFAX - SAINT JOHN • QUIBIC * AlVlDA • TIMWI 
• WINNI^Eft • CALOAiY > VANCOUVil • ST. iOHN*S, »tF| 




The new Webster Tfu-Perimeter Expansion 
Joinfs are rhe lafesr addition to rhe group 
of Webster Specialties for forced circulation 
hot water heating. Specify and use also; 

Webster Pressure Relief Valve, copacity 
776,000 BTU. Approved by A.S.M.E. and 
National Board of Boiler ond Pfessure 
Vessel Inspectors 

Webster Pressure Reducing Valve with 
built-in bypass 

Webster Return Heoder and Purge ond 
Balance Valves 

Webster Bypass Volves 

Webster CF-3 Control hr Hot Water 
Heating 

Whether your requirements ore for hot 
water or steam heating you con specify 
and use Webster equipment. 



Webster Tru-Perimeter 

Expansion Joints 

in %, 1 and 1*^ incli sizes 

Now, there is an Expansion Joint designed to meet the 
specific requirements of Tru-Perimeter Forced Hot Water 
Heating; designed to be completely concealed within the 
enclosure of Webster Baseboard Heating or Webster 
Walvector; clcsi^ucd to provide douhlc-prolcction against 
the possibility o\ K-akaije, 

These new Webster Tru-Perinieter Expansion joints pro- 
vide for one-half itich ninvenient, adet[ii:ite to meet all 
retinirenierits. They are made with a bi^ brass bellows for 
little tra\fl . . . Objfcti\f — lonp. trouble-free service, 
Doublt'-prntection against the extremely remote contin- 
gency of l>eliows failure is provided by two generously 
sized reirjforceinents of laNer-wonnd filire packing, a 
material tliat will expand if and when moisture should 
reach it. Made thiou-ilniut of non-corrosive, seamless 
brass tubing, with plain male ends for sweat fittings. 

TRU-PERIMETER FORCED HOT WATER 

BASEBOARD HEATING 



BULLETIN B-1620 

COPTBIGKT Ifli4 WAftftEN WEBSTER & COMPANY 



CONTINUED ON 6AC)C PAGE 



WEBSTER TRU-PERIMETER EXPANSION JOINTS 



Webster Tru-Pcrjmeier Expansion Joints have been designed 
espetially for use in Webster Baseboard Hearing and other 
Webster Tru-Perimeter installanons using Webster Walvector 
Made m i^j. 1 iind J '4 inch sires, ihev are designed lor mstalL*- 
tion between heating elements and set behind the Webster 
Basebiiatd or Walvccttir enclosure, thereby being completely 
concealed 




Fig, 1. Webitc Ifti-Pctimcter Enponimn Joint Showing Name Plate, Mode 
in V*, 1 and 1% inch jiiei. 

Material and Construction 

Webster Tru-Perimeter Expansion Joints are made entirely of 
nor-cortosive materials. Seamlew brass tubing is used together 
with greatly oversized seamless brass bellows Travel is limited 
to !'5 inch. While the probability of bellows failure is remote, 
double protection has been provided bv use of two generously 
sized remforcemencs of fiber packings one at each side. In the 
event that moisture should reach the fiber packing it will ex- 
pand and thus prevent flooding 

Ends are plain, sized for normal sweat fitting connections. 

TABLE 1 — Webster Tru-Perimeter Expansion 
Joint Dimensions — See Fig. 2 



A 


B 


C 


D 


1 


6'/a 


7 
7 
7 


ly- 

2'/4 



Oimension "A" 11 nominol tube Hie. All dimei(>oni nre In Jnchet and $ub]ect 
ro «^ight vorioTions, Jointi muiI be miToJIed of normal length "C". 

Installation 

Evpansion requirements arc indicated bv the figures in Table 
2 Ordinarily it is desirable to install one expansion lomi in 
the center of each straight run of 25 feet or more in length. 
Install |()int at normal length (O as given in Table I For 
runs uf 50 feet or more it may be desirable to provide an anchor 
point in thecenter of therun with expansion joints at both ends. 
In large installarions expansion joinrs can frequently be located 
in closets between rooms. 

Webster Tru-Penraeter Expansion Joints are designed exclu- 
sively for service in hot water hearing. They are suitable for 
working pressures up to 45 lbs per so ft 

Suggested Specifications 

Install where shown on plans or where required to meet ex- 
pansion requirements. Webster Tru-Perimeter Expansion joints 
of bellows construction with hard copper tubing and heavy 
brass shell incorporating supplementary protection with fiber 
packing w^hich will expand in the event' of bellows leakage and 
seal the ends of the casing 




Fig- 2- Webirer Tfu-Penmeler Exponiion JoinI — Oim^iior, Drawing. 

TABLE 2— Exponsion of Copper Tubing in 

Perimeter Heoting 

Boied on 60 F Initio! Woter Tempefolu'C Figure? m Cofumi 2 oilow for 

'/■" e*pon»ion oi eoch end of itroighr run p>ut rhe Vi" expomiofl provrded 

by Ihe Web^rer Exponsion Joinr, 



Final Warer 


Mojcimum Ltneol Feet for one 


Tempe'oture 


Exponiion Joinl with [oint 10 


F 


center of length 


100 


168 


110 


\24 


120 


112 


130 


96 


140 


S4 


150 


75 


160 


67 


170 


61 


180 


56 


190 


52 


200 


48 


210 


A5 



Packing ond Shipping 

Each Webster Tru-Penmeter Expansion Joint is packed in a 
separate cvlindrical cardboard carton Identifying label shown 
in Figure 1 appears on both the |ojni and on the outside of the 
tubular cardboard carton which is also stamped to indicate the 
size of rhe joint. 



Guarantee 

Webster Tru-Penmeter Expansion Joints are guaranreed to 
be free from original defect in material and workmanship under 
normal circumstances and the Companv w^ill furnish without 
charge new pans m exchange for any which mav be returned 
within one year after dare of shipment from itur factories, pro- 
vided transportation charges are prepaid Hi the Company at 
Camden, N J , and which upon examination shall disclose to 
the satisfaction of the Company, original defects. 

Inquiries and Quotations 

Webster representatives will gladlv cooperate to assure the 
success of installations of X^'ebster Equipment Request for 
further information should be addressed either uy the Home 
Office at Camden, N J . or lu the office of the nearest Webster 
represcn;ative Quotations and delivery esiimaies will be sup- 
plied promptly by the Webster representative Cimsult vour 
local telephone book or write us at Camden for his address. 

To protect ourselves in our constant endeavor to make 
Webster Systems oi Equipment even better, we reserve the right 
10 change spccihcations and prices without notice 



Form C-705— IR— Apr- 1954 SM 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

RepresenfaUves in Pnncipat CiUes - EsfabUshed IfiSS 

CAMDEN 5, NEW JERSEY 

CABLE ADDRESS: Delphic 

Dorling Brothers, Ltd., P. O. Bo* 187, Montreol, Conada 



Printed in U.S.A. 



^^ 



WEBSTER 

BOILER 

PROTECTOR 

£' for low pressurp ht>nting boilers 



^ 



turr«u . «Li) «d(J r 

' ^ *i * I'jMJiilr rifuJi 'Ill irii m*ur<iJ Ijuilrri. 



con hapip^n-^^vrhvyt •nlf *n4t bvt tKgl 
poitlbilrVy U cii«w)k !• w&rronf "it mOft 
4«^*stebt« *«4«ty 4m'tU^ - ^ . Iv«rr ^^ 



Many low-pressure heating boilers are put out of service 
each year because of cracked or burned out sections. 
Boiler failure has become greater with increased use of 
automacic heating devices and complicated mechanical 
apparatus. Reliable protection is essential, particularly 
with gas and oil burners, mechanical stokers^ vacuum 
pumps — automatic equipment of any kind. It is almost 
equally essential where boilers are operated by hand- 
wherever there is a possibility of carelessness or lack 
of regular actention. 

Whv IKoilorN Fail 

Boiler sections may crack or break as a result of 
improper introduction of fresh water or sudden return 
of water of condensation from the heating system when 
water in the boiler is at a dangerously low level. Failure 
to maintain adequate water level is usually due to the 
following contributory conditions: 

1. CARELESSNESS — Lack of minimum operating 
attention; dirt in piping connections* 

2. PRIMING — Improper pipings fluctuating pressures 
or failure to provide thoroughly clean boiler and 
system. 

3- FAILURE of automatic devices. 

Ilfftw to Proveiil RoiK^r Rr#^aka;i4» 

The Webster Boiler Protector is designed to prevent 
the boiler water level from dropping below the danger 
line. The Protector is so installed that its operating level 
is 1 " above the bottom of the water gauge glass of the 
boiler. Should the water line of the boiler drop to the 
Prortvror opiirating levA. the Protector automatically and 
adequately supplies water to the boiler and thus prevents 
damage. Fresh water is fed to the boiler through the 
regular return header and mixes with heated water 
already in the boiler. Danger of breakage caused by 
sudden introduction of cool water on exposed boiler 
sections is minimized. 

5lalorials T^-^ofl in Maiiiifardire 

All bearings, spindles, pins, valve parts and other 
interior elements are made of non-corrosive metals, 
specialiy selected for the service demanded of them. The 
water valve body is of steam brass. A seamless copper 
float actuates a Monel Metal pilot valve of the cone 
type using a sharp-edged Monel Metal seat. 

Cover and float casing are made of cast iron. After 

Biillelin Bw27F 




Fig. L UfhsJer Ekijler Protcttor iristilted ^hi low 
prcssun-. casi irun hoJtr, 

machining, they are Parlccrired. a process which pro- 
vides a rust-resisting finish base. Interior of these parts 
is then painted with Asphaltum paint :o further lessen 
deterioration due to rust. Synthetic gaskets are used 
between the various parts- 

The water valve utilizes the well-known Sytphon bel- 
lows and seats on a Jenkins composition disc specially 
treated to minimize adherence of disc to seat. Standard 
equipment includes a special Webster Dirt Strainer 
with extra heavy brass nipple for insertion in city water 
supply and a brass drain cock with iron nipple for test- 
ing purposes. 

The small bellows which makes possible a packless 
connection between cur-out switch mechanism and the 
float chamber is strong enough to v^.ithstand an external 
pressure many times that encountered in low-pressure 
heating boilers. 



Copyrghr T94l Worren Websie' & Co. 




( 



How II Work#« 

When wacer in boiler is at normal level, float (L) is 
submerged nnd its buoyancy is exerted through a lever- 
age to hold the small, cone-pointed Monel Meca! valve 
(K) on its square^edged seat. As long as boiler water 
level docs not get below Protector operating level. Boiler 
Protector remains inactive. City water pressure is sup- 
plied through protecting Dirt Strainer into connection 
(E), completely filling chamber (D) and holding water 
valve (F) on its seat. The inside of Sylphon bellows (J) 
is filled with water through intake orifice (Hj which is 
protected by a screen. Slots in screen are narrower than 
orifice, so that any particle of foreign matter that will 
pass through slots will pass through orifice also, 

If water level drops below Protector operating level 
float (L) drops and opens valve (K). Water flows through 
valve (K) because of difference between low boiler pres- 
sure and higher city water pressure inside bellows. The 
opening of valve (K) is larger than the opening through 
bellows intake orifice (H); consequently, water runs out 
of inside of Sylphon bellows more rapidly than it flows 
into bellows. This causes an almost instantaneous pres- 
sure difference l>etween inside of bellows and outside. 



Fig. 2. Model 34C-1 Wcbuer 
Boiler ProiccTor w«h cLcctricjl 
cut-out switch. 



This difference in pressure, exerted over lower surface 
of bellows, causes immediate wide opening of water 
valve, allowing FULL FLOW OF WATER through 
connection (G) to boiler. 

The entire operation occurs in just a few seconds, 
with net chani^e in water line of J^' or less. As soon as 
water line has been restored, float (L) rises, valve (K) 
closes. Pressure inside and outside the bellows is equal-* 
lied and spring of bellows plus diff^erence between city 
water pressure and boiler pressure closes water valve. 

If water continues to fall, the float lever extension (C) 
rises and trips cut-out switch (A) through mechanism (B). 
Switch opens electrical circuit and burner or stoker stops. 
A bell or buiier and lamp can also be wired to the switch 
to indicate at a remote station that the burner or stoker 
has stopped. If water line rises, switch is again tripped 
and circuit is closed to start burner or stoker. In most 
cases Protector will maintain water line at its operating 
level so that the cuf-out switch is not tripped and burner 
or stoker continues to operate. 

With hand-fired boilers where the cut-out feature is 
not needed, the switch may be used with a lamp and 
bell or buzser to signal operator that boiler water Mne 
has fallen. 



Reliable Aelioii 

The Websrer Boiler Protector ts an hydraulically oper- 
ated (pressure-actuated) valve embodying a powerful 
operating mechanism. The main water supply valve is 
not directly dependent upon the weight or buoyancy 
of a float to operate it — instead the float is used only to 
operate a small pilot valve. The lifting or operating 
forces on the main valve are the result of hydraulic 
power and the difference in area of the bellows dia- 
phragm and that of the main valve. This difference is 
so great that an initial water pressure of only 50 lbs. 
per sq, in. will produce a lifting force oi ISO lbs. per 
sq. in. on the main valve of the Boiler Protector. 



6000 
















































5 
X 

s 

,15 
S 

u 


































^^ 


.-J 


-^ 




































■^ 


-^ 


'^ 














5000 






















^ 


^ 


"^ 




































h 


-^ 


^ 


























4O0O 














^ 








































•- 


-y 






*T— ^ r ■ 


1 3 


4C- 


PRon 


XT( 


)RS 












3000 






A 


X 










































J 


r 








































JOOO 


r 
























































































lOOO 


















































L 


BS 


PEP 


SO 


IN 


-PFfl 


:55t 


JRC 


X - * i ^ ' I .-^ J ■- ' 








Q 







£ 





■ 





£ 







>0 


e 


>0 









M 




K 


1 


30 







Fig. 3. Injian£i> dsK'cXopcd nuwimum capacity is a feature 
of Wehsitf r Boiler Protectors. When protccnon is needed. 
VOUf boiler is safeguarded by a full free flow of tt'aier 
from the mam. The curve shown above gives rated 
capacirics m pounds of water per hour. 



Separate Water Inlet Valve 

The water inlet valve and operating mechanism are 
in a chamber separate from the float chamber. The low 
temperamre prevailing in this chamber (about U:) f.) 
reduces the likelihood of precipitation of sea e-forming 
matter. This is further minimized by the fact that a vet>' 
small volume of water passes direcdy through the oper- 
ating mechanism. 

Inspeetion and I leaning 

Webster Boiler Protectors have been so designed that 
the entire interior mechanism can he removed tor in- 
spection and cleaning without disturbing! pipmg con- 
nections. It is only necessary to lower the ^^^^^ >'"^ "J 
the boiler below the edge oi the u-atet inlet valve chamhe 
and remove a few bolts holding the various part, 
toyiether. 

|lo|Ktir?4 »fHl Hrplai-enM^iits 

BeinK sturdily made. Webster Boiler Protectors ^.-ill 
.ux Ion, service without the necessuy for repairs ^ 
Replacements, parncubrly if systematic proceaures are 
employed for regular inspecnon and cleaning. 



When repairs do become necessary such pares as 
gaskets, valve discs, electric cut-out switch assemblies and 
switch lever guide assemblies can be readily replaced in 
the field. 

For all other repairs and replacements best procedure 
is to order a replacement unit. These replacement units 
are thoroughly factory re-builf units. A liberal credit is 
allowed on the return of the unit removed. 

TesI Couueetiou l^rovJdod 

Protective or safety devices for maximum effectiveness 
should be subjected to regular inspection and test. In 
order to facilitate this, a separate blow-off or test connec- 
tion has been provided to the float chamber. A drain 
cock and short iron nipple ate screwed into this connec- 
tion as standard equipment on all Boiler Protectors. It is 
recommended that, at the start of each heating season 
and at least monthly thereafter, an operating test be 
carried out. Full instructions are given on the name plate 
of each Protector and in Installation and Maintenance 
Instructions contained in an envelope wired to the Pro- 
tector when ir is shipped from the factory- Installation 
and test connection should be made exactly as shown 
in the Webster Service Bulletin which is in agreement 
with the recommendations of the National Bureau of 
Casualt>' and Surety Underwriters. Boiler and Machitiery 
Division- 

ApplU*alioii Oala 

The Webster Boiler Protector is applicable to almost 
all sizes and types of low-pressure heating boilers, cast 
iron or steel, where the maximum boiler pressure will 
not exceed 15 lbs. per sq. in. The minimum city water 
main pressure must not be less than 25 lbs. per sq. in.; 
the maximum should not exceed 150 lbs. per sq, in. A 
minimum pressure difference of 10 lbs. between water 
supply line and boiler pressure is required for the Boiler 
Protector to operate. Minimum water pressure must be 
available directly ahead of Protector as considerable 
drop in pressure may occur in line from city mam. 

Webster Boiler Protectors are made in two models: 
No. 34 and No. 34d. the latter furnished with an 
electrical cut-out switch- The standard cut-out switch 
furnished is single pole, double throw and is electncaUy 




FiB- 4- WebsWT Boiler Protector Mode! 34C I iHusTTateJ 

has tlccirical cut-ouf for automatic heat. Model 34 i* 
for hand-fifed boilers. 



rated for 125-250 volts, alternating current, fa^^orse- 
power motor. Special equipment for other characteristics 
can be furnished at additional cost. Manufacturers of oil 
and gas burners, stokers, burner-boilers, et cetera, furnish 
wiring diagrams for application of cur-out switches ro 
rheir equipment. 

Webster Boiler Protectors are shipped in a strong box 
completely assembled with long brass nipple and with 
test cock and short iron nipple. The special Webster Dirt 
Strainer is loose in the box and must be assembled at 
the boiler by the installer. 

Webster Service Bulletin S-680 giving instructions 
for installation is included with each Protector when 
shipped. Additional copies of this bulletin will be fur- 
nished upon request to the Company at Camden, New 
JcTsey» or to its nearest Representative, 



IMPORTANT-USE PISING 
STEM VALVE'S£AI OPEN 



CITY WATER 




CHECK MUE 
CONNECT TO 
RETURN 
HEADER 
\US\Oi. ALL 
VALVES 



RETURN HEADER 



Fig. ^. InM.illniion and MmriEcnancc Dugf.^m for 
Wchifcf Boiler ProTcctor Pipe conntvcions (A) above 
and below water Im? ^irciu bcihc 6120 ol water column 
or rapping in boiler but not less <han 3/4". Remove 
plogs (D. E) And ck.in out rrguUrly »r len^i twice 
a ycat. Blow down cock (F) is used for testing. Use 
br:i&s nipple (tj) only ;ii shipped with Protector- Re- 
move plu^ Lind »frain^ ba>>kei (H) Jnd clean reguUrW 
at least twice a year. Webster "78" Strainer (J) la 
shipped with PfOTcctor. Electrical connections (K) arc 
found on Mv>dcl 34C-1 Protcciof onlv- Be sure ro 
make a cle.in instnlUnon. See that water supptv pipe 
U thoTOUfihly fluilifJ and that there are no chips be- 
tween Strainer and Boiler Protector. 






' lii^rB<H^e^7ho^c^or 



NO 34 i 34C **AJ^ BOiLE* pflesa is l*. 

FAT. HO. l,*TeOft. W*TE- f -ESi MAX ;W LO M.N 3tl Lft 

PAT HO v«er.«» 

TO INSTALL 

.1-StJU.L AS S-0**. Oh "t«TtO iNSTFuCTlO<.5 ^N ENVELOPE f^'^^^'^^^ 



PBOTCCTOB O^tWATINO LEVEL 



TO TEST 

^P(l, DRA^N COCit 1K TEST L-'.t BElO* UHTp. PPOTECTO" f^^}^ 

.*.T,L PBOTECTOfl OPtMTiNO LEVE'. l-i WlLfB IS ^t*^H£L»^ ^^Tl^^.^^^ 
BliTlfl BEOuiBEO B' BO'LfB uP TO NO*M*L *0«i".« ,fvEl MjS^ BE ff& 
BT hANO Trtflu "'■<□ (EED VALVE 

MAINTENANCE A REPAIRS 

CLEAN STBWNEP AND TEST PR0T£CTOn *T Sr*1T 0' -EAT.SG StAjO^ A"^ 
TtST HOt-THLt THEPCAfTH if eO^^'* '^^OM n«5; -J't SUjt ■'^'^^ 



*-.t*D Of f BOTECTO* l^'D S*^- "" ^^t*' "O'^^" "*^ "^^^^^ii^i'. 
-.f^^' ' CP*l»* Off •*ttB TO »£iO* PROTtCTO^ «Sl*OvE PftOTECTO" 
,^'fjs,0=f AND EJtA*i.F.£ JOlrOC'T QB &CA.E ClEAh *U ''ACTS I-OSOWGnlV 
BlAUEhBI-E ^•OTECTO", OPEK wATEI vALVt *N0 TEST 

fOm PUHTHtff lNF0»«*riON CALi. rOu* Kt*TiNG CONTMCTO* 
on VriKTE N(**EST WEBSTE" a^ANCM Of'.CE 

^WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY. Camden, M.J. 



Fig. 6. A reproduction of the namcplote Oti each 

Websrer Boiler Protector, Note that it gives initruc- 

tions for installation, test and maintenance. 



n A II It A :\ T Y 

Wc warrant apparatus manufactured by gs to be free (rom 
defects in materia! nnd workmanship under normnl uac and 
service; out obligation under this warmncv being limited to 
making good at our f.ic tory .■^ny parr or parts thereof which shall 
within one vcar af[er delivery ul Mich apparatus to the original 
purchaser, be returned to u& with tr^nAporcanon charges pre- 
paid, and which our examination shall disclose to Our ftatUfaC' 
tion to have been defective; fbis warranty being expre»K' in lieu 
of all other warr.intics expressed ur implied and ut alt other 
obligations or liabiUnes on our part, and we neither assume nor 
authorize any other person to assume for us any other liabiliCy 
in connection with the sale of our apparatus. 

This warranty does nut cover any labor chjn;es for replace- 
ment of parts, adjustments, repairs, or any other work done. The 
Companv assumes no rc^p^jnhibihiy for con&eLiucntial damagcB 
of any kind, and (he purchaser or user, by acceptance of fhi* 
equipment, assumes all reiponsibihiy for the consciiuence* of iti 
ui*e or mi«u»c, 

Tliii warranty shall not apply to any apparatus which shall 
have been repaired of altered outside of our factory m any way 
so as, in our judgment, to affect its stability, nor which has been 
subject to misuse, neghgciice or pressure in excess of stated ItmitL 



WAKRE.X WEKSTER A r<l3IPAXY 

I7th and federal STREETS. CAMDEN, N. J. 
Rcj>r«en[fliim in Principal \J. S. Citi«. In Canada: DARLING BROTHERS. Ltd.. P. O. Box 187. MONTREAL 

F„,»No 06078 (l|.5M0M)J.LR P,im«l i« U S A 



IVjiSbAXJuH 




RADIATION 

DESCRIPTIONS -DIMENSIONS 

for 

steam and 
hot water 
heating 




h««i «>«■ 



RATINGS 



m 




* HI 




BULLETIN B-1551C 



WARREN W 



COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1888 

CAMDEN 5. NEW JERSEY • Representatives in Principal Cities 



.V* ■[' A . 



Webster Tru-Perimeler Heating 

Webster 'Tru-Peiimciei * Healing uses Wrbstcr 
WaIvectoi% Webster Baseboard, or a combinauon of bolh, 
to replace the heat at the perimeter where heat loss occurs. 
Heating elements are mounted close to the floor along out- 
side walls, spreading the heal the entire length of the ex- 
posed walls. Webster ''Tru-Perimeter'^ Heating warms the 
air within a room, warms the floors, and wiirms the inside 
surface of outside walls where a normal coohiess occurs 
during the winter months. Gently moving warmed air is 
drawn to floor level and across the floor into the inlet open- 
ing of the radiation. Radianr heat rays strike the floor 
along the full length of the exposed wall. Floors are warm 
and comfortable even with slab floor construction, Web- 
ster "Tru-Perimcter^" Heating results are obtainable with 
either forced hot \vater or Moderator controlled low- 
pressure steam heating. 



COPYRIGHT 1954 WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 







UUSjaIsjh walvfctor radiation 



■^ -^ 



JE£& 



Webster Walvector Radiation 



TT7-EPSTP.R VValvcrtor is a thurou^hU proved idea 
V V in wall radiation v\hicJi is daiK xjlvin^ rngincei^' 
hcatinti design prnhlcnis. both in ucu buildinii> and in 
nK»dcrni/alion. Ucbsicr Walvcclor Ls an elongated 
convrrtor designed for nimmnng along the wall, close 
to the Hoor line and under windows. Il combines an 
aiuattive steel enclosure and a hitihlv rfllt ient non- 
ferrous heating surface, lo-ether with appropriate 
mountiui^ angles braces, end plates, conne* liji^ uiins 
and heatini^ element hangers, U*ed together, ihe^e 
conipnnenls provide a completed installation like that 
illuNtrated in \\^, K Or, ihe\ may be arram^ed in sep- 
arate units similar to cunvenlional u»nvectori. 

Heating Kh mt III 

The heating element used in all Webster Walvector 
installations is the familiar extended (in %urface ilhis^ 
Irated in Kig. 2. It is made with copper tubiin< and 
aluminuni fins in V and 4" fin sizes, lubinj^ i> spe- 
CjalN annealed c<ipper, tjood for saturated ^team pres- 
sure's up to HlO lbs. jjiT sq, in, arid ten}|)eratiires up m 
:i;JO F, I'ubint; for i" size is 1" nominal I "/b" out- 
side diameter) with \)Sy wall thii kness; for 4" si/e 
HibiuK IN l^"tiominaI i 1%" outside diameter i \\\x\\ 
.04 J" wall thickness, (Complete assembly is loated ^ith 
black paint. 



Standard production is with plain ends as illus- 
trated in Kig, 2 for sweat ctmneeiions. On special 
order, it ma\ be obtained with threaded brass connec- 
tions, one end male, other end female, as shown in 
Figure J. These conncciiom arc 1" I.RS. (or V size 
and 1/4"I.P.S. for4"sizc. 

Fins are square with rounded corner*. lil>erally 
ribbed for streni;th and stamped from ,020" alumi- 
nunL Spacint; Ham^e is siiunped intei;ral and e.vpandetl 
with the copper tube to form a sohd. permanent 
ihennal bond. Complete information as to sizes, di* 
mensioiis and ratings for this heating surface when 
used with or without the customary Walvector enclo- 
?.urc Ls ^i\en in the pa^rs that f<illow. 




irtid<<l Surfiiir Hr^itinL: Kli-mr'ni 
thi>wii withuul rTu luimri' i with 
pl.iiik i-iuK tor iw jii fiuiiik'i KiH 
Ubir of liX(-« "U'l.- pai£r I I 






Fig, I- Typii;il <ljs>iouri* int. rioi o[ Wal.ilon Hicii Sthool. Zifcmlon, N, Q... showing wjll-to-wall ^^^ '' Wrbtrrr H*.»([n*f Flr- 
inslalUition of Wrbstcr Walvi'f (or. hlankriirn; mtirr window arej and conc^'almc ^11 pipine rxtrpi mi-nt wiih trr-w»'d fonnrc tiimv 
for valve at IciL Arthiletl: Page E, Smith. Raleigh, N. C-; Heating Contractor: Bullotk 4 Pror> Adaplm arr braird to copprr 
tor Rjilt'iKh. N- C. ""i^^' *uii.^bl<- for srrvirr ac UiO 

lbs. per v\. in. and 330 F. 



1 



T R U 



F l» I M E 



Walvector Components 

Webster Walvector k a coniplett^ "package" incor- 
p<Drating the heating element and all coniptjnenLs 
needed for nmunling and enclosure. Each package 
includes tho^e items required from the fallowing list 
of components: 

a. Heating Element 

b. Mounting Angle with Gasket 

c. Enclosure 

d. Enclosure End Plates 

c. Enclosure Trim Pieces 

f. Enclosure Cornei Pieces 
g. Lower Braces 
h. Heating Element Hangers, single row 

i. Healing Element Hangers, double row 

j. Drive Scre^^'S 

k. Damper i nplional^available at extra tost) 

J. SlifTeniny Supports (see page 4 and Fig. 8j 
The manner in which these components are com- 
bined will be evident by examination of the exploded 
view in Figs, 4 and 7. 

Choice of Enclosures 

Webster Walvector is available with cabinet type 
enclosures havinti yrille-s in slopim^ from, or with plain 
cover with a solid front and perforated top. 

The cabinet type enclosure Is available in nominal 
lengths of 2 ft. to 7 l[., inclusive, in 1-fl. increments. 
Three diUcrcnl sizes provide four arrangements of 
healing element as follows; 

[ I ) Simple roWj 3" fin, in \ i" high enclosure pro- 
viding a basic steam rating of 5.85 sq, ft. E.D.R. 
per lineal foot of heating element, 
[2) Single row 4" fin, in I2J/2" high enclosure pro- 



vidin- a b^sic steam rating of 8.25 sq. ft- L.D.R, 
per lineal fool of heating element. 
H) Single row, 4" fin. in 21)" high enclosure pro- 
viding a ba-sic steam ratitiii of 10.15 sq. in. L.D.R. 
per lineal foot of heating element. 
(4) Double row, 4" fin, in 2U" hi^h enclosure pro- 
viding a ba:>ic steam rating of 11.80 sq. ft, E.D-R. 
per lineal foot of heating element- 
For design details and dimensions of above enclo- 
sures, see page U. , r _i - 
Plain cover with solid frcmt and perforated top is 
available in 2-ft. lo 6-ft. lengths for 3" fins, and 2-fl. 
to 8-fi. Icngihs for tJie 4" fin. Increments for both 
sizes are 1 ft. Basic steam rating is 4,7 sq. ft. E.D.R. 
per linea! foot of heating element for the 3" size and 
6.9 sq. fL ED.R- for the 4" size. Description and dia- 
gram of plain cover are shown on page 5- 

Walvector enclosure and mounting angle are made 
of 18-gauge cold rolled steel and are finished in a 
baked-on gray prime coat. 

Important Design Features 

A special effort has been made lo assure that the 
Webster Walvector Cabinet Type Enclosure meets 
W'ebster standards for clean heating. The unique 
sponge rubber -gasket thoroui;hly seals the space be- 
tween the enclosure and ihc wall, even if there arc 
wall irregularities. This feature, together with the flat 
2" horizontal surface and the slope front with specially 
de.signed directional louvers, have the effect of throw- 
ing convccted air flow well away from the wall. 

Walveclor hugs the wall, occupies no useful floor 
space and may be placed at any desired wall height. 
However, for best heating results, it is preferable to 
mount the W'alvector 4" above the floor line. 



MOUNTING ANGLE-UA 



'//' 0\A. SPONGE RUBBER GASKET 



1^ 

END PLATE Lb 

{L)-EPL K ^ 

BUTT TRIM - 



HEATING ELEMENT HANGER 
3" Single Row3H 
4" Single Row-4H 




4 Double Row 4D 



LOWER BRACE -LB 



END PLATE 

(R) — EPR 
Fig. 4 E«ploa.d ^iew oi V\Vl»ic-r W»lvr.u.r showing «,„.ponfnt (wru and .ymbol lor e«h. 




WALVECTOR RADIATION 



ph:intom \'\rw. 1 J' ;" Eric^lo^urr and 4" ftn i^ij-' Hcaliiift 
*' s ■ . ' 'k Wrbsd-r ^i" Siippiv \\iKr\ lornrr 

' ^- i"*i*r '_■" Kjdi;iti>r rr\(* with o^M't 



Iii->lalluliun Frort^ilure 

The advanui;cv of Wrl^^trr Wahrrtor uil! hrcotnf 
irKnra>ini;K cvitU-ni b> cxaminaiion t>f ihr MisLiHatiun 
procedure ior t'abinct Tvpc KiuUiMirrs. 

After deUTiTiinafion of ihc iiuation of ihc Walvrr- 
li»r, the lfl-iiau£;e prevM-d >toel Mounting An^jle is fas- 
trin'il to ihe wall in a Ie\el poviiinn. \ni;le is furTli^hed 
111 ^. I, 4- 3, (I anil ^-fixji leTll:I^^^. corresponding to 
the en* Unsure len^hs and provided with a */j" round 
sponge nibixT y;t>kel fa^stened in plaee. Abundant 
>|XHed holes are pro\i<led in the face *>f the ant^le for 
lai; M rews ftir wall umuntint:. and Nlotied holes in the 
l<*p 4)f the ani^le for fa^tenini; the em Insure. Moiuitin^ 
Angh'^ are further pro\ided ^^ith -ius^Net plale> at in- 
tcr\aU and oath liuvict plate Is drilled with four holes 
for pfisitionini; the hea\A wire Heatiui; T.IenKMU 
Han^erx. 

After installation of the Antjle, Heaiiny Klenienl 
Hitnurrs aie plated in posiiton antl the heaiiuL^ ele- 
ment suspended fnun them. Pipe filtiui: (an then jiro- 
eerd in the usual manner. After the pipini.; ha\ Iktu 
<oiiiplrled, the en(.l<isiire front is fastene<t in pLue to 
the Mounting; Ani^le. Knd Plates and Butt Trim Pieces 
ins(alle<l where recpiired, Knd Piates are left an<l rii;ht 
liand -ukI provided with knock-oiiLs for use when 
installation is of the t^[>l^ shown in Fi^. 6, I'inalK, 
l^iwer Braces are plaeed in position and fastened to 
the wall with lav; Mrews or other suitable tTieans, 

Stnh -This bulletin is not intended a> an irislalla- 
lion niafiuaL In all <iLses, installation should be ithidc 
in at*ordan<e with approved Wehsttr Ser\i<e. details 
whith are a\ailab!e at the office of the nearc-sl Wetister 
Repre>enlative. 



^'""luniiiiiiuin 





Kie, 6, Wrbsui \V;iKi'rtcjr ^hi>wij|i; doubk tui ul V hn ilcat- 
ink" Eli'mrnts with .-idiipfi-r conm-rlions. EmloKurf* is 20" hiifh. 
Stram piping pjH!ii's throuizh knoi k-oui in --n<l pjVcr of Erulo- 
»urt noir VVc-h*trr H" Supply \'-il\c-, mraiyhtw.^y body, a\\\1 
WrbiUr ' . ■ RadJjToi I r^ip jnd Offsit Adjpipf. both lotaltd 
oUtsid?^ Eni'Uliurr. 



\^ alvector Damper 

The WaKittor Daniper is formed of sheet steel, 
Syiy thick, with eaeh edt;e turned for rigidity. In 
closed p<isition shown in the e\pl*nli.d dr.iwim^. Fi^. 
7), it slops the How of air through the unit. Damper 
opens by turnim^ the knob operator in a rounter eloc It- 
wise direction. The knob '>peraled damper is a modu- 
lating t\pe that rei;ulales the imiount of heal deli\ered. 

The damper is faUorv assembled to eneI(Lsure with 
damper operator knob foinpleteI\ installed. 

nani|jers are a\;nlahk in same nominal len^ths a^ 
em Insure fr<«n 2' to T melusi\T. 





Fin. ". Cu^iWAV view shuwintf knob op^'r.iird Damper, 



T R 



f R I M E T t K 



c A T I 



SlinVniiig Supports 

Stiffening suppons are available for 4" single row 
and 4" double row Walvcclor enclosure for appluii- 
tions such as sihoolhousts v.lierr additional ri^idiU 
of cnrlohurc may be doirable. The sliflcpiing >upp«rt> 
are held in plate bv heating elenicnLs. .Spacing rcroni- 
mendcd is every 4 ft. on 4S ( I2/a") and cver>' :i fl. on 
4T or 4D (20") Walvcctor cntlosurr. Figure H sliow.-. 
-siiffctiinK support In place. Tabic below gives dinien- 
sioas of stiffening supports. 



tnntmmv h"*<»i 



T-. 



mnBHMtft hiHott 



r'""" .ek 



\ • 



■.t,- 



lillllr 




S*ia 


>^- 


Symbat 

45S 
411S 


4S and 4D— 
Wal vector 


5' 


4T— Woivecior 



fig. B, Stifli^mjig >up^Dr» in pbi 



Plain Cover 

A cover of No, 18-gaugr pressed steel, h^viiv^ a 
solid front and pcrforatrd lop, \s available in trn^ths 
extending;; over <dl Uic fin.s of lh<" healing clrinent. 
Clover h finished wilh a bakt'd-on prime coal. Perfora* 
lion> on lop are approximately y^" squart", spaced 
?-ifl" apart and provide 647' ^i^^ area, with tlie 
result (hat ihr a)\n reduce* heatin^^ (.iparit\ of the 
unit iin\) about y/^ . Clover en* lost.\ fn»ril and lop and 
pnnide» a 1" overhang in the h.itk. Il h, Iiand pK-^sfil 
in [Mjsition and Is removable wJthf)Ul look 




Fig, 10. Dir«cn»io.vs oi pUin cover, froni vkw and end view. 



Table I Dimensions of Plain Cover for 3 
Webster Heating Element— LeHers Refer to 

Figure 10 



Symbol 

3 G 2 
3 G 3 
3 G4 

3 G 5 
3 G 6 



length i 


c 


D 


2 ft. 






3 ft. 






4 ft, 


3v»" 


3" 


5 ft. 






6 U. 







Table II. Dimensions of Plain Cover for 4" 
Webster Heating Element — Letters Refer to 

Figure 10 



Symbol 


Length 1. 

2 ft. 


C 


D 


d G 2 






4 G 3 


3 ft. 






4 G 4 
4 G5 


4 ft. 

5 ft. 


4Vu" 


4" 


4 G 6 


6 ft. 






4 G 8 


8 ft. 







Hrarkel 

For use with or wiihoni plain cover, a onc-picee 
bracket is provided. Made of .072" cold rolled steel, 
it Is provided with an elongated hole for screw mount- 
ing; and three small unit holes for vertical aligning. 
Hin^e pcrmili expansion and contraction. Bracket is 
notched to ^uppon tube between fins. 




Fitf, 9. PU 





hic. li. Onc-pierr br^ckci for Uvath 



f 




W "^^Ojc^ W a L V E C T 



OR RADIATION 







3- »„■ HOLES 




Fig, 12. Dimensions for Bracket shown in Fig, 11, 



Table III Dimensions of Wall Bracket for 
Plain Cover— LeHers Refer to Figure 12 



Synibol 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


J 


3 6H 

4 BH 


\w 




2y,6' 

2'V,6'i 


yi6" 


3y,6" 


Spoce Br 


3cke'i □ 


apfatim 


otv\r 36' 


o i7' 













Special Loiigt Length Tube Ori6ees 

These orifices have been developed particularly for 
use with Weljster Walvecior Radiation. They incor- 
porate, in addition to the features of the standard tube 
orifice, spacin^^ element^ to assure the centerint^ of the 
distributing tube wirhin a lengthy heating element 
and distribution of Mcani through supplementarv ori- 
fices drilled along the tube, a-s illustrated in Fig. l}. 
This development makes it pos.sible to combine the 
advantages of Webster Moderator Control with use of 
modern Webster Walvector which effettivcly spreads 
(he heat delivery over the entire exposed wait area. 

OffHel Adapter 

The Webster Offset Adapter has been provided as 
a con\enient and economical means of as.suriny coiti- 
plete drainage of water from the healing element. 
Available with sweat or screwed connections on radia- 
tor end. 



wEBsreR 

Ri^OlflTOR TRAP 

\ 



WESSTER 
Of fSET ADAPTER 




Fig. 14. Wcbs(tr Offset Adapter [screwrd conncciion). Rclum 
liuv (not shown) h samt- as (n Fig, 15. 

Expausion 

Piping connections to Webster \\al\eclGr nmst be 
installed so thai it Ls free to expand and contract with 
changes of temperature without produring undue 
stresses on piping or equipment. Hangers in Walvec- 
tor enclosure permit healing clemeni to float, and ex- 
pansion is absorbed in piping connections. 

Where the Walvector Healing Klement is used plain 
or with plain cover, hinged brackets should be used to 
permit expansion and contraction. Table IV covcpi 
the rondiiions allowable using hinge brackets. 



Table IV. Allowable Expansion With 
Webster Heating Element 



Gauge PressLfrep 5 



10 



Maximum Run 30' 28' 



25 1 50 



24' 2r 



75 



19' 



100 



Not, 



li Bracket con b* uted to DttoniFnodol* dpprO'JTiatciy '/j- ^apanii 



Not* 7- Eapcnilon rtiuit be rnroiurtd f'Om anchor point ro moiT dnianl bfOEhvr 
If anchor poinf n ol ctnfer, rht mo.iirnjm fijn cq** b* dOfblfd 



Expansion Connections 

Copper expands approximately 1 % inches for each 
100 feet of run, ai 1 lb. gauge pres^^ure and 215" F. 
lemperature. When spare conditions permit the cus- 
tomary ,swing joints in return piping may be used to 
compensate for this expansion. 

In steam heatini^ imtallations where swing joints arc 
nof used Webster Expansion Connectors may be em- 
ployed. These are flexible tubes with standard screwed 



r 



i • 






UllllJllMMIlUlllllllJlllli 

Fig. 13. Orifice Tube in Webiwr Walvector Hcaiini? Ekmeni. 
5 



liiJililMlliJMIJJJJJii^ 



r 




U-PERtMETER HEATI 



connections, available in two sizes, /s" x J^" x 9" and 
%" X %" X 9". Installation is made as shown in Fig. 
14. Wcbslcr Expansion (-nnncctors are suitable for 
steam scr\ice up lo 100 lbs. per square inch pressure. 
For hot waUr installntions Webster Tru- Peri meter 
Expansion Joints in 1" and P/|" ^i^es may be used. 
Descriptive bulletin is available. 



(/>3h riul 



K^HSOi 'vtfrm 




Fig, 15. Wcbsic^r Offset Adapirr [sweat connection) and Trap 
with Esp-insion Connector for connection of Heating Element 
wiih croiipliiit:^ lo rtrlum pipiiiC- 



Table V. Dimensions of Webster OfFset 
Adapter and Trop With Expansion Con^ 

nector 


W[ 
Silt 


Trap 


OFFter Adopter Symbtrl 


c 


D 


E 


Sweat 
ConnecHon 

6402-5 

6436-S 
6436-S 


Screwed 

Cannec- 

han 

6402 

6436 
6436 


Sweof 
Can- 
nec- 
lion 

4' 

4" 
5" 


Screw 
Tion 

5" 

5' 
6" 


3' 

4" 
4" 




ir-u" 
1 r- 1 3" 

14"- 1 6" 



Sugge&ted SpecificatioDs 

The following paragraphs may be used as a basic 
specification for W'ebster Walveetor, modified where 
necessarv to meet special requirements, 

WALVeCTOR ENCLOSURES— Furnish and in- 



stall where shown on plans, Webster WaUertor^, as 
manufaclured b\ Warren Webster & Omipany, Cam- 
den 1, N. J. Eath Wahector shall l)e M.niplete with 
heating clenicnl, hangers and enclosure arranged ff>r 
installation as a unit, or wall to wall as shown on plans. 

Cabinet type enclosure lop and front shall be of 
one-piece No. I8-gauge steel ronstruction with stream- 
line grille stamped in 'Nloping portion. Enclosure top 
and front sheet shall !k' mounted on a full length 
angle support. Angle support shall ha\e sponge rubber 
gasket to prevent air leakage and shall be firmly at- 
tached to wall by lag screws or other ap[)ropriate 
means. Adjustable hea\y wire hangers shall suspend 
and position heating elcmrnl front angle support. 

Where Walvector enclosures are used a.s unit, the 
ends shall be enclosed to present a workmanlike ap- 
pearance. For wall-to-wall installation, Walvector en- 
closure shall finish against side wall. Where two or 
more lengths of cm losure are used side bv side, a trmi 
piece shall cover the joint between sections. Where 
two lengths of enclosure join at a corner, a trim piece 
shall be used covering the corner area. Ifl-gauye steel 
braces shall be furnished for strengthening enrlosurt 
and properly spacing lower edge from wall. All sheet 
metal parts shall have a grav prime finish. 

HEATING ELEMENT—Heatmg elements shall 
be non-ferrous, consisting of copper tube with ,020"- 
Ihick aluminum plate type fins. Tube shall be ex- 
panded into collars formed in fins for permatiern 
thermal bond. Heating elements sh;ill be fnrnishrd 
with plain ends for standard sweat littiny (onTK"itiijn> 
(or brass adapters having female pipe thread i. Com- 
plete assemhlv shall be coaled with black paint. 

PLAIN COVER— Plain t\ pe enclosure shall be of 
one-piece No. 18-gauge pressed steel with stolid front 
and perforated lop. Cover shall extend over all fins iif 
heating clement, enclosing front and lop and pro\id- 
ing 1" over-hang in the back. ^ipe< iai one-piece wall 
bracket, made of cold rolled steel, shall suspend and 
position heating element. 

RATINGS — Walvector ratings shall be approwil 
under the I-B-R code for fin Tube l>[je radiation. 




Fie- 16. UebsltT Walvector in Ciiii- 
cades School, Jackson. Mtthik-jn 
Archilt-tts Jii Engineers: Prrkin^ \ 
Will; HfMtin^ ConiMdm*; Vi^xx &i 
C^idy. Mason, Michigan. 



walvector 



RADIATION 



^ 



f 



WALVECTOR TRIM PIECES 

A minihcr of irini nieres arc nrovidefl for n^-* x^uv. w u . nr . .... 

plates inside corncr-^uiside cTncrT nnrn h , , 1^^^ V ^^T '""'"''' '^f" ^'"'^ ^'^"^ ^''"'^ '"^ 

Cvith acce.. door and a 12 inch jo "rsJc " th . lirTh ll" "™ J" ■'^^' ^ ■'"'' ^ '"^'^ ^'''^^- ^"« '^'"' 

lion i. contained in Table 6. ^ ^""'' ^ ''^^ ""'' '""^'^^'^^ «" '^is page and dimension informa- 




Fiii, !7. Walvortor 
Li>ft Hand End 



svmbol 
I -I 4S 



Width at 

3V-" for 

3S Enrlo- 

z lor sym- 

En closure. 



Fig. 18. 9" Walvtctor 
Acc'css Door, Available' 
for all enclosure sizes- 





Fi*r, 10 9" Walvector 

Joint Scitiori with three 
rows of louvera. 




Fig. 20, Walvector Butt 
Trim- Furnished in 2!V\ 
4" and 6" widths. Avail- 
able for all enclosure 
sizes. 




:^ 



w 



• 






Fig. 21. ir Walvcnor Joint 
Seciion with four rows ol 
louvers, .-\vailable for all enclo- 
sure sizes. 





Fie- 22. Walvector Inside Cor- 
ner Trim. Available for all en- 
closure sizes. 



rig^ 23, Walveilor Outside En- 
closure. Available for all enclo- 
sure sixes- 



p 



1 METER HEATINC 






l-B-R RATINGS 



WEBSTER WALVECTOR Hos Been Tested and Approved Under the l-B-R Code for Fin Tube Type of Rodiation 



Wchslcr Walvcctor has been tested and iipproved 
under ihe l-B-R Code for Fin Tube Type of Radia- 
tion. Complete rating information is ^iven in Tables 
VI toXr 

Tabic VI gives basic ^leam rating?; for Walvector 
for 1 lb. sleani 65" E.A. and ba^ir water ratings (fy 
200^ F. a\erage water temperature, 65 E.A. 

When steam conditions are other than 1 lb. 65° i\ 
E.A> tnuliiply basic rating by selected correction factor 
shown in Table \TII. 

\\"aler rating for various average water temperature 
and 65 F- E.A. are shown in Table \'II. 1 nr condi- 
tions other than those shown, use Table IX — muiliplv 
basic water rating (200" F., 65^ E^A.) from Table 
\1 by factor selected from Table IX. 

.All hot water rating shown arc based on velocity 
of 2.0Vscc- or above. If velocity is less than 2'/scc, ap- 



ply factor shown in Table X lo water ralim; selected. 
Basic ratings include heatin? eflfecl in prrtentase 
shown when installed at minimum heights a^ ilhi^-' 
trated in catalog details and shown in Fable VF 
installed height" fr»r a Walvector with cover or en- 
closure is ihe vertical distance from Hoor lo— 

1. The center of the free opcnine '»f the inclined 
outlet in AValvcctor cTuhjsnre as in^^alled, 

2, The under side of the horizontal opening of a 
top outlet cover a* installed. 

The "installed height of a \Vaiveclor element bare 
(no cover) is the vertical distance from floor lo ihc 
top of the uppermost element. 

Factors for correcting ratings of Walvector when 
installed at other than minimum height arc shown in 
Table XI. 



TABLE VL Basic Ratings of Webster Walvector 



Rn Sliv 


Cawer 


Enclotiy* Arrgigemen' 


SIE 
■g»d on I lb. St 

Sq.ft. EDB. 
per linflal Fool 


som, tS" Em, Ah 

B.f.b. per 
Lifieo4 Foot 


MOt WHIES 

Averogv Wafer Temp.. 
AS Eni. Air 
[0.66 facier) 


HEATMG WrtCI 




12%' 


faflof 

% 




3S 


One Row ^11' Wolvector Enc. 


5.85 


14T0 


1210 


12 


3" 




One Row — No Cover 
*Two Rows --No Cover 
'Three Rows — No Cover 


4.95 

8.60 
11.90 


1190 
2060 
2850 


1020 
1770 
2450 


7* 

13' 
19' 


15 
15 

14 




3G 
3G 
3G 


One Row — Ploin Cover 
'Two Rows — Plain Cover 
"Three Rows — Plain Cover 


4.70 

8.20 

tl.40 


1140 
1970 
2720 


980 
1690 
2340 


7' 

13' 
19' 


15 
15 
14 




4S 

4T 
4D 


One Row —1 2^/2' Wolvector Enc. 
One Row _20" Wolvector Enc. 
Two Rows —20" Wolvector Enc. 


8.25 
10.15 
11.80 


1980 
2440 
2830 


1700 
2100 
2430 


13H' 
20%- 

2oyi- 


12 
9.6 
9.6 


4" 




One Row —No Cover 
tTwo Rows — No Cover 
tThree Rows — No Cover 


7.25 
12.80 
16.80 


1740 
3070 
4030 


1500 
2640 
3470 


8- 
25' 


15 

15 

8 


' X' r»i. 


4G 
4G 

4G 


One Row ^Ploin Cover 
tTwo Rows —Plain Cover 
tThree Rows— Ploin Cover 


6.90 
12.20 
16.05 


1660 
2930 
3850 


1430 
2520 

3310 


8' 
16'/i' 
25" 


15 

15 

8 



NoT» ThM* rolinat or* boied on ocliva (Rnntd) langlh. Sev poqm 10 fv dlmftniJoni. All ala-nenhi hovt a(.pra>|,y><>tBlv SO flfn pmr fool 



B 



W^'^^iJjL 



/«_ 



walvcctor 



■RADIATION 








\ • 



Table VII. Extended Hot Water Rating Woivecter Based on Indicated Average 



Fin 

s>» 



Ccver 

Srnbol 



3S 



3G 
3G 
3G 



4S 
4T 

4D 



Temperoture and 65 Entering Air 



Water 



Enclotur* ArrahQ#fne<it 



One Row -IT Wolvector Enc 

One Row ^No Cover * 

•Two Rows — No Cover 
•Three Rows— No Cover 

One Row —Plain Cover 
•Two Rows — PJoin Cover 
*Three Rows— Plain Cover 



4G 
4G 
4G 



, *"'a9* Wote/ Iopip*ror^,e F and Fot*o' jSe« Noi«f 



nUTiNG EFFECT 






1410 

1190 
2060 
2850 

1140 
1970 
2720 



JOO" F, 



12T0 



190^ F. 



1100 



I BO" F. 



970 



One Row — 12'/a'' Wolveclor Enc. 1980 
One Row —20" Walvector Enc. 2440 
Two Rows —20' Walvector Enc. 2830 



1020 I 930 820 
1770 1610 1420 
2450 2220 i 1970 



980 890 790 
1690 1540 1360 
2340 , 2120 , 1880 



I 70" F. 



860 



l*0^f. 
0.i3 



ISO* F. 
0.45 



750 630 



iiutair*d 
HvieM 



Factor 

% 



i2y«'i 12 



1700 I 1540 : 1370 

2100 1900 1680 
2430 2210 1950 



730 630 540 

1260 ' 1090 930 
1740 I 1510 1280 

700 j 600 1 510 

1200 1040 890 
1660 1440 1220 



One Row — No Covet 
tTwo Rows — No Cover 
fThree Rows — No Cover 

■One Row —Plain Cover 
tTwo Rows — Ploin Cover 
tThree Rows — Plain Cover 



1210 I 1050 890 
1490 ' 1290 1100 
1730 1500 1270 



7- 
13' 
19' 

7' 
13" 
19* 



1740 
3070 

4030 

1660 
2930 

3850 



1500 
2640 
3470 

1430 
2520 

3310 



1360 
2390 
3140 

1290 
2290 

3000 



1200 
2120 
2780 

1150 
2020 
2660 



1060 920 
1870 1630 
2460 2140 



1010 
1790 

2350 



780 
1380 
1810 



2078' 

20'/«' 



8' 

16'/i 
25" 



15 

15 
14 

15 
15 
14 



12 
9.6 
9.6 

15 

15 
8 



880 I 750 

1550 1320 
2040 1730 



■ 6 Cenlert. 
I S'A' Cenliti, 

Nol^- l-B-d Hoi Wolf. RoMng. ha..- beex dOfrmm.d by npvW">% faclor. ,t>own to IB-P apB'o,.^d Si»o, 



8" 15 
l6'/3", 15 
25" I 8 



PaT"^0«. 



Table VIIL Correction 


'actors for 


Steam Pressures and Air Temperatures Other Than 


Standord 




STEAM PRESSURE 


STEAM- 

Tomp. " F, 


ENTEBING AIR IiMP£B*rUflE. f 




GauBB 


Abi. Pii 


*s 


iS 


ts 


70 


7S 


so 




Psi 
.899 
5 


14.696 

15.595 
19.70 


212.0 

215.0 
227.1 


1.19 
1.22 
1.34 


1.09 

1.11 

1.22 


0.97 

1.00 

1.11 


0.92 
0.95 

1.05 


0.87 
0.90 

1.00 


0.82 

0.84 
0.95 




10 

15 
20 


24.70 
29.70 
34.70 


239.4 
249.8 

258.8 


1.45 
1.55 
1.63 


1.33 
1.43 
1.52 


1.22 1,17 
1.31 1 1.26 
1.40 ' 1.33 


1.11 

1.20 
1.28 


1.05 
M4 

1.23 




25 

30 
40 


39.70 

44.70 
54.70 


266.8 
274.0 
286.7 


1.71 
1.78 
1.91 


1.59 
1.66 
1.79 


1.47 1.41 

1 .54 1 .48 
1.66 1.61 


1.36 
1.42 
1.54 


1.30 
1.37 

1.49 




50 
60 

70 


64.70 

74.70 
84.70 


297.7 
307.3 
316.0 


2.02 1.90 
2.10 2.00 
2.20 2.09 


1.77 1.71 
1.87 1.81 
1.95 1.89 


1.65 
1.75 

1.83 


1.60 
1.69 
1.77 




80 
90 

100 ' 


94.70 
104.70 
1 1 4.70 


323.9 
331.2 
337.9 


2.27 
2.36 
2.43 


2.17 
2.24 

2.31 


2.03 1.97 
2.1 1 2.05 
2.18 2.11 


1-91 

1.98 
2.05 


1,85 
1.93 
2.00 





■ F'Om Xtenon & Kty» — Linpor InTerDolorign. 

No'fl- Goug# prtiiufit jhovid be correried 'o' o^tiludfl- 





TRU-PERIMETER 



M 



A T i 



i^ 



■3.'- --- i-r- 



Correction Factors 



Table IX, Correction Factors for Water When 

Average Water Temperoture and Entering 

Air Are Other than 200 F. and 65 F- 



Epffliing Ail Tpmperalure F 



A.g Ware' 
temp F 

150 
160 
170 
180 
190 
200 
215 



45 

-640 
.750 
.665 
.980 
1.11 
1.22 
1.42 



55 

.581 
.684 
.787 

.890 
1.01 
1.11 
1,29 



65 

.525 
.617 
.710 
.805 
.910 
1.00 
1.T6 



70 



7i 



ao 



.498 .473 .440 

,587 .556 I .518 

676 .640 .596 

,764 .725 .675 

.864 .820 .762 

.950 .900 .840 

1.10 1-05 .978 



Table XL Factors for Correcting for Vorious 
Installed Heights 

If Wolvector units ore instolled ot greoter height ihor^ 
recommended, l-B-R Rating must be odiusted os fol- 
lows: 

Foctor for Actuol Installed Height 

l-B-R Rating X — — TTi^" ~ ,_* 

Foctor for Minimum Installed Height 



lWL-)T<pLY BoiiC Ho' WnTfr Rornngi in Tofale VU br The r FoCiO'T 



Table X. Water Velocity Correction Factors 

Woter V*r«ilT 
m. P*r S«.J '^«'°' 

0.5 947 

1.0 975 

2.0 or more ' 000 



Example fur Table \I 

One row 3" Wailvrrtor U" Entlosuiv with "installed height" 
of 2r on I lb. sif'iiin fi5 F,-.\. 

Then; M*-R B.utr K^un^: (5.85 »q. fi.fl.) ^JJ2~^^ ^^' ''' 





Factor fm No Co**' 


tniialJ«d Keighr 


ond P<BHk Cove' l 


36" or more 


1.00 


34" 


1.01 


32" 


1.02 


30" 


1.03 


29" 


1.04 


28" 


1.05 


27" 


1.06 


26' 


1,07 


25' 


1.08 


24' 


1.09 


23" 


1.10 


22' 


1.11 


21" 


1.12 


20" 


1.13 


19" 


1.14 


1 8" or lesi 


1.15 



Cotmn 



1.00 

1.008 

1.016 

1.024 

1 032 

1.040 

1.048 

1.056 

1.064 

1 .072 • 

1.080 

1.08B 

1.096 

1.104 

1.112 

1.120 




rii;, 21, Wibsirr Wiihiilor In auditorium of Norfolk Catholir Hi^h School. Norfolk, \'.i, .\nhiii-<ii.. (;i..-soii ,V Mulruom-v. I'liil.i- 
dolphi;). .'\sH>i:idIi' .^nrliiicil; 1. David Fitz^bbun. Nurfulk, Consulling; Engineer: William G. Fluiir. fhiljitrliihi.i. |[<.iiinic 
Coiitmctor; Colcy nnd Pclcrjon, Norfolk. 



10 



c 



^^vj^W A L C CTOP RADIATION 





I • 



Dimensions of Walvector Heatinq El 



g tiement 



A 



C 



][ 



**— A 



Fig. 25, Plain t-nrf Hc-Aiini* F.lcmcnt 




Table XIL Dimensions of 3 Fin Size Plain 
End Heating Element 



SrihboJ 



3HP2 
3HP3 
3HP4 
3HP5 
3HP6 



NoimpnQr Actual 

Lef^glh Length 



2 ft. 


2'2V4' 


3 ft. 


2 214' 


4 fl. 


4' 2%' 


5 ft. 


5'2%'l 


6 ft. 


62%' 



Vh 



»9 



It 



0* 



It 



Table XIII. Dimensions of 4 Fin Size Ploin 
End Heating Element 



Symbol 

4HP2 
4HP3 
4HP4 
4HP5 
4HP6 
iHP8 



Nominot 


Actual 






Lenglh 


lengrh 


A 


6 


C 


I 






2 ft. 


2'2H' 






3 ft, 


3'2%' 






4 ft. 

5 ft. 


4-2H' 
5'2H* 


1 V,." 


4" 


6 ft. 


6'2H- 






B fl. 


8'2'/4' 







0* 



iw" 



* D— Nomino^ Z^p^^t T«be Siie 






DftPETAP 



Fig. 126- Hcatint; Elimcni uith ihn^jidrd ^xtha Ad^ptcn 



Table XIV, Dimensions of 3 Fin Size 
Heoting Element with 1 " Threaded 
Brass Adapters 






3HA2 

3HA3 
3HA4 
3HA5 
3HA6 



Nomnol 


Ungfti 


1 c 


2 ft. 


3 ft. 


4 H. 


5 H. 


6 ft, 



A<rvat 
Lengtfk 



2' 4' 
3' 4' 
4' 4* 
5' 4' 
6' 4' 



,// 




I. P. s. 



// 



Table XV> Dimensions of 4 Fin Size 

Heating Element with VM Threaded 

Brass Adapters 



Symbol 

4HA2 

4HA3 
4HA4 
4HA5 
4HA6 

4HA8 



Nominal 


Atfuoi 


Irngfh 


leng"! 


C 


L 


2 ft. 


24'/.' 


3 ft. 


3'4'/«' 


4 fl. 


4 4Vi' 


5 ft. 


'5'414'l 


6 ft. 


6'4'/i' 


8 fl 


8' 4'/,' 



P, s. 



2v„ 



// 



it 



i%" 



11 



I 



1^ 



R U - P E 



T I 



Dimensions of Walvector Enclosures 



DAMPER OPEHiTW 



v;x?'lag sew* 

BV OTHERS) 







KNOB 
OPERATED .MUM^- '- 
DAMPER ■iP'^"' ■ 



HNISHED FLOOfl 



£MIN. 
f 

KNOCKOUT IN 
4-MlN. BOTH ENDS Ug-^ 




Walvrr tor uftinf! 
M»li>lr row of 'V or 
4' Heating Elcmtnt. 



'^m7;7^9777^^^m7mW7^^^i777^^:^^^7^ 



//////////j^////////////////////A 



Table XVL Dimensions of Webster Walvector Using Single Row of 3" or A" Heating Element 




Fin 

Siie 


Cover 

Symbol 


A 


B 


c 





E 

1%" 


F 


Enclosure iength L 




Swaot Cndt 
Nom. Tub* 

r 


Scawvd 


Nominal ^ 


Acfvol 




3" 


3S 


n" 


1%' 


ll'/g' 


SVi" 


1" 
1'/4" 


2', 3', 4', 
5-, 6, 7' 


2'4VJ", 3'4'/i". 4'4'/i', 
5'4'/2", 6'4Va*,7 4/3" 




4' 


4S 


\2W 


2V4'' 


i2yi' 


4!/i' 

4'/!" 


2%- 


iw 


2', 3', 4', 
5',6',7' 

2', 3', 4', 
5'. 6', 7' 


2' 4'/2', 3' AVi'. A' AW. 
5- A'A'.e' AVi'.?- AVi' 

2' AW. V AW. 4' AW. 
5' AW. 6' 41/1'-. 7' 41/1" 




4" 


4T 


20" 


2V4" 


20'/8' 


2'/4'' 


iw 




* Two brocei ore used where nominof lengthi ore 2 lo 5 ff., mqlgdvfl; three bfocei where nominol fenfltht ore 6 or 7 ft. 
Hofe: For cOntJnuObrs unit^ ipoce braces oppronimotely 3 fr. 





iBr 0'M£H5I 



— - L 



HINGE 



I MOUNTING aNa.E DflNIPEB OFERATCn i- " ''* 




^ 



GASKET 

^ -4 V 



END PLATE' L HANGER 

HEATING 





\ ENCLOSURE 



4"HJN, 



j^. LCWER BRACE 



! FINISHED FLOOR __ 




lig. 28, Wrbitcr 
Waiver Uir u»ing 
double rt»i« of 4" 
Hcalinii Elcmctil- 



KNOCKOUT IN 
BOTH ENDS 



^^//////////////////M 



Table XVII, Dimensions of Webster Walvector Using Double Row of A" Heating Element 



Fin Sixe 



Cover 
SymboJ 



4" Double Row 



AX> 



Enclotvre Lengrh L 



Nominal * 



Achml 



1\ V, t'. 5', 6\ 7' I 2' A^i', 3' 47:'. 4' 4^2', 5' 4i/j', 6' AW. 7' AVt" 



* Two brac=^ eo(h ore us«d where nominal length, or* 2 lo 5 ft., incluiivoj fhreo brocei where nominal lengm, ore 6 Of 7 fi 
Note: ^D^ conhnuoui urnJ? spoce broce? opproKimotely 3 ft. 



12 



w 



"^J-^t^ W A L V E C T 



OR RADIATION 







Offic. Bu.ld.n?, Tr,n.on, N, J Supply pi|>i.n; .ndhr-l- 
ms .- m.-m 4rc >how>. ,„ red. R, ,.,„. li.K, arc ,l.«wn 
as doiud hues. Sec ;ilso tig I. 



•■¥ 



Fig. 30. Atrial virw of .\,>\^ 
Jrrsty Slalr Hiiihway Offi 
Building. Mickhwrieht i; 

Momitford, Trenton, Archiiccu. 
Runyon and Cari'V. N^w.irk. 
Consuiiine; EnE-intrri. Philip S. 
Sbrk & Co.. Tu'nion. Heating 
Contractors. 



i % 





Figs. 31 & 32. W't'bstrr Walvector in East Branth, Naiional Bank of PoH5ro\wi. Poitsiowr* 
phia. Pa,. Archit<"Ci*, E, A. Vanderslice. EnginttT. Rodnt-y Morris & Son, Norrisiown, Pa. 
«howp ititcrior of bank. Fig. 32 on right shoxv» Conference Room, 



Pa. Howell Lewis Sh.i>, Philadrl- 
Heating Contractors- Tig, 3| oti kfi 



13 



. \:\:- 



T R U - P E 



H E A T I N 



f. 



V: 



INSTALLATION VIEWS 
WEBSTER 
WALVECTOR RADIATI 



Fig, 33, Interior typkal living room. 
'*m Fl.imineo Ap-irtrnt-nU. showing VV al- 

vc( (or installation. 



-'*- 




Fig. 34. Pi nmt'ler ht^atins;. Piping for Flamingo Ap.uim^-nii Broad 
Slrci-t, Philadelphia- Supply piping and Wnlvccior radialioM *howr. 
in solid red. Reiums, dotted led. Zone 1 scrvt* 2nd lo Ttli fltn-is 
Zone 1 si-nc* Bth lo 15lh floois. Continuous hciUinu; wrih forced tir- 
culatiou hot water. Temperature ViUJ^^d aulomatiLiUly foi chance* in 
outdoor trmprrniure. 



14 




¥ 



I • 





'''''''''''^'niii^^l^^^^"'^' ■-••ins=BB5 



Fig- 35, Wall-to-wall ConMtioi^ uncli^r 
windows. LiifaycUt' Sihooj, WjutI(h>, N, Y- 
Arohit^'it: Carl Adc; Heating Conimrlor; 
A. Burtjarl. Inc. 







hi;. 37- Walvriior in fully air-fontliti^ n'U Pliysi- 
cians and Su/^i'ons Btiiidiiig. Columbus, Ohio. 
AnhiliTts. TibbiiU, Crunjk-y & Mmwn. Ti^riL^iin-r, 
R- S, Cvirl and Asiotijlt-i. tlornnirtgr, fTulfrtiun 
Wolfe Company. 




D • 





lit.", '(*^. W.;lvcitor ID upiial *iu'liL*i's 

r.jom, McCoriniik Tii«'t>luk;i*.>d '^^ irn- 

k.ir>" doinnUirv. EUwin H- \\\ 
Ijii^hir ;»tid Kdw.iid W. T'^iufi Ii'i. 
\i-' hilc Tts. Krarik W. Ri' jJri< i i.\o%\' 
iiliMii? Knifim-cr. AJvaiitc H<Mtiri< Ik 
AJj'CondjiioniuL; Cuinpany, lltMliilg 
ConU'Afiors. 



TRU-PERIMETER HEATING 




rig, 40. UVbsCrr Walvi't'ior in offirr building. En* loiun-s and hr-^Tinii < I.tutu* run column lu .olunin with downff^-d Kup(>lv ;»nd 
rrmrn risers local*-d ar columns, HiMlin^ cltnu-nU ari: provided iwiih Wrbslcr Extended Tubt OiifKts diMiibuliny m-^ix: iht- ^-nilrr 
U-ncth of intlosuiv. 



How to Obtain Websler Walvector 

Inquiries for furtliLT information, prices and deliv- 
eries on Webster WaheeU^r should be addressed la 
the nearest Webster rep^esenlati^'e or Xo the Gompan> 
at Camden, Neu Jersey. Webster Wal\eclor is speci- 
fied by architects and engineers and sold and installed 
by reliable heating conlrarioi's. Your architect, engi- 
neer or contractor will be glad to obtain further infor- 
mation for you from the \Vebster representative. 



Guam litre 

Webster Wal\ettor Radiation is guaranteed to de- 
liver full rated rapacity when installed as required by 
oin" stand^Trd^ and M'hen operated under the conditions 
iipnn v^hith the rated capacity is based. 

We further warrant equipment of our manufacture 
to be free from defects in workmanship and material 



for a period of one year from date of shipnienl from 
our factor). This guarantee is Hnuted lo repairing or 
rtphuing at our option any parts which prove defec- 
tive within one year, f.o.b, Camden, New Jersey. This 
guarantee does not include lialiiliiy for in^^tallation 
cost or contingencies of any charatier. 



Olber W ebsler Produels 

In addition lo Webster Walvector, WarrcTi Webster 
& Company manufacture a complete tine of steam and 
hot water heating system equipment, including radia- 
tor valves, thermostatic traps for radiators and process 
application, float and thermostatic traps, dirt strainers, 
btjjler protectors, boiler return traps, vent traps. MikI- 
eratur Controls for ste;iiTj heating, hot water healing 
tontnit-s, Webster System Radiators and Webstci Base- 
board Healing, 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

Repr»snla1iv«t in Principal Cltiti > Eilsbliihvd TA8I 

CAMDEN 5. NEW JERSEY 

CABLC AODRESS O^lphlc 

Darling Brothers, Ltd.. P. O. Box 187, Monlreal, Canada 



16 




WjJb^UjLn. W A L V E C T 



OR RAOIATIO 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

Factory ond Main OHice: I7th o.d Federal Street.. Camden. New Jersey, U. S. A 




» • 



REPRESENTATIVES IN THE UNHED STATES 

LOOK FOR WARRF.N WEBSTER » COMPANY IN THE LOCAL TELEPHONE BOOK 





i^ 



Albany 4, N, V, 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Atlanta 3, Ga, 
Atlantic Citv, N, J, 
Baltimore 18^ Md, 
Bethlehem, Pa. 
Birmingham 3, Ala. 
Boston 10, Mass. 
Buffalo 2, N. Y. 
BuTTEj Mont. 
Chattanooga 2, Tenn. 
Chicago 6. III. 
Cincinnati, 6, Ohio 
Cleveland 15, Ohio 
Columbl\, S. C. 
Columbus 15, Ohio 
Dallas 4, Texas 
Dax'enport. Iowa 
Davton 2, Ohio 
Denver 4, Colo. 
Des Moines 9, Iowa 
Detroit 3, Mich. 
EriEj Pa- 
Grand Rapids % Mich. 
Harrisburc, Pa. 
Houston I, Texas 
Indianapolis 4, Ind. 
Kansas Crrv 8, Mo. 
Kingston, Pa. 
La Porte, Ind. 
Los Angeles 13, Calif. 
Louisville 4, Kv. 
LuuBocK, Texas 



Mcnands Market Bldg. 

4607 Lomas Blvd,, NX. 

152 Nassau Street, N.W. 

6i0 Guarantee Tmst BIdg. 

2301 N, Charles Sl 

1020 Highland Avenue 

2224 Comer BIdg. 

127 Federal Street 

220 Delaware Avenue 

909 E. 2iid Street 

720 James BIdg. 

549 W, Washington Boulevard 

2910 Woodburn A\^nue 

233 Hanna BIdg- 

401 Wildwood Avenue 

20 S. 3rd Street 

P.O. Box 507 

320 Western Avenue 

1136 Knott BIdg. 

1228 California Street 

506 Securities BIdg. 

12950 Hamilton Avenue 

3902 Eiiot Road 

331 Ottawa Avenue, N.W\ 

835 S. 13ih Street 

1017 Rosine Street 

333 N, Pennsylvania Street 

3252 Roanoke Road 

303 Market Street 

516 Lake Shore Drive 

320 Crocker Street 

519 Barret Avenue 

1415 A\cnue M 



Memphis 3, Tenn, 
Milwaukee 3, Wis. 
Minneapolis 3, Minn, 
Newark 2, N. J. 
New Haven 10, Conn. 
New Orleans 12, La. 
New York 16, N. Y. 
North Hero, Vt. 
Oklahoma Crrv I, Okla. 
Omaha 2, Neb. 



668 S, Main Strccc 

6088 Plankinton BIdg. 

1 1 11 Nicollet Avenue 

1060 Broad Street 

902 Chapel Street 

209 Vincent BIdg. 

95 Madison Avenue 

1604 N.W. Fifth Street 
2311 Doughs Stieet 



Orlando, Fla. Rooms 216-217, Church & Main BIdg. 



Philadelphu 3, Pa. 
Putsburgh 22, Pa. 
Portland 9, Ore, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
RlCHMONU 19, Va. 
Rochester 4, N. Y. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
St. Louis 5. Mo. 
Salt Lake Citv 4, Utah 
San Antonio 6, Texas 
San Fr,\ncisco 11, Calif, 
Seattle 9, Wash. 
Spokane 7, Wash, 
Syracuse 2, N. Y, 

Trenton 12, N. J 

Toledo 2, Ohio 



26 S. 20th Street 

1005 Empire BIdg. 

1801 N.W.Northrup Street 

1202 Newborn Avenue 

300 E, Main Strt^ei 

412 Valley Cadillac BIdg. 

2340 Mei^hon Street 

6219 Dehiur Blvd. 

44 W, Eighth South Street 

109 Barrcra Street 

420 Market Street 

314 Ninth Avenue, North 

2932 E. Trent Avenue 

605 Eckel Theatre Bids. 



751 Pilgrim Avenue 
Colton BIdg., 701-12 Madison A\e. 
Tulsa, Okl,\. Loeffler-Greene Sup. Co., 1912 E. 6th St. 
Washington 7, D.C. 102 Hamilton Nal'l Bank BIdg. 
WiGHFTA 2, Kans. 434 N, Rock Island Street 

Wilmington, Del. P.O. Box 1501 

Woodward, Okla. 1 118 Sante Fc Street 






Licensees and Manufacturers for the Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland 
DARLING BROTHERS, LTD., P-O. BOX !87. MONTREAL, CANADA 

BRANCHES 

TORONTO CALGARY VANCOUVER SAINT JOHN, N. B. ST. JOHN^S, NFLD. 

ARVIDA, P. Q. WINNIPEG QUEBEC OTTAWA HALIFAX, N. S. TIMMINS, ONT. 



Form C'$78A—AI,S -March, 1954— 25M 



V 



5 



t - 



I 






\9 



i 



i 




WjLgfAisji: 

)\ \r^ Kl Toil 



II A l» I A T I O > 




BULLETIN No. 25 




whtlock 



TYPE "R 



11 



SEMI- 

INSTANTANEOUS 

HEATERS 





« ..^^-^H*'. Th 



DESCRIPTION AND 
APPLICATION 






7 







Healing leci.on of SemMniianloneoui Healct 
showing hoWei lor direclionol flow. 



The Darling Scmi-Insiantamous Hratct was designed 
for certain conditions ^^h(•^r the conventional instantan- 
eous heatn design was found unsatisfacton. One such 
condition would be for a radiant heating svstem with 
relatively low watn temperatures and high steam pres- 
sure. «hich would require, ordinarily, an instantaneous 
heater abnomially large in diameter with a verj' short 
shell. 

To overcome this necessity, the Darling Seinl-Instantan- 
rous Heater was designed and is highly recommended 
for this and many other applications. This design, with 
water in the shell and steam in the tubes, meets the 
requiremcnis for conventional dimensions and also 
provides facilities foi good temperature legulation. 
besides being veiy Rexible over a lai-gc range of capa- 
cities. 

The Darling Semi-Instantaneous Heater is ideally suited 
to the many large industries which are installing a 



number of washrooms throughout their plants where 
reduced costs and limited space arc important factors. 
Lsually in plants of this si»- an adequate amount of 
steam is available and the consumption of steam for the 
production of hot water is a minor iiem in the steam 
load. Wc do not recommend, however, the use of the 
Scmi-lnstantaneous Healer in apartment houses, «c., 
where the demand could cause objectionable peaks and 
draw heat away from the heating system. 

There is a considerable field available for the Scrni- 
Instantaneous Heater in Hotels. Restaurants. Cafeterias 
and Laundries, as boost.r healers to raise the tempera- 
tures of the ordinan' hot water service up to the high 
temperatures required for dish washing machines and 
laundiy washers. 

Many other conditions are suitable for Semi-InsUn- 
tancous Heaters, among which arc warm water service 
for removing snow and ice from cars and trucks in 
wmtcr. and many other appli. ations. 



%. 



D A R L 1 N 




B 



ffl 



T H E R S LIMITS 




*=: 




TYPICAL LAYOUTS 






HOI W*ri< IN HI4Ttl 

UAlhTAlMO AT A COKlfAHl TtMftlMUME 



ItHrfVATUH 
■(GVLA*OI 



tll4lHEI 



SlfAH 






ro HOT wAnt MiATiho iTtrit« 




Typical 
for hot 
heating 



layout 

water 

system. 



HtAUt 



Typical layout 
for combined 
domestic 
woter supply 
ond booster 
service for 
dishwashing, 
laundry, etc. 



Typical layout 
for doiiiestic 
hot water sup- 
ply (Industrial 
Application). 



■ton HOI •TAIII -IfATMS tUflH 






til lllfXOM 



tfOlA^l HAT It HCAIU 







STmKIl 



SHAM 

JUfKT 




|AC< <IKVLA1I0H UHl 



<OtO W.HI IXlf I 



HOT WIMI jyfPLItft to >»niiM». ITC 
AT A C0N1TA1T 1tl4MIATll«t 





daainC 

M*nHlTAbTJ>M(CUl 
H(Al|> 



i.C«<ii(tAAtlO» I'M 



(ftp w*»H 

("in 



DARLING BROT 




M I T E D 




CAPACITIES IN U.S. GALLONS PER HOUl 



Temperature Ror^ges^ — 120 -laO'F., 160-180'^F., 190°-2I5^F., Hot Woter Hearing Systems — U0°-1B0^F., Booster 
Heoter for Dishwasher, Laundry, etc. — iC'-UO^F,, 40°-ieO'^F,, Domesric Ho* Woter Supply. 



Heittr 



2'& FSI6 SrFlH 



Tcmpcririrre Khf of Wilir 



HO' 



180" 



MO". 

190' 



«to 



11ZD 



1310 



to 



11 



11 



u 



u 



IS 



Tt 



17 



11 



ir/i 



JUL 

70 



J"! 
3SH 



44fl 



s(oa 



moo' 



27"!00 

32100 1 um 



m 



m 



m 






J400 

lira 



z» 



3t0 



oo 



S7B 



711 



lua 



IDTO 



3(90 



J94fl 
iUO~ 

"n*o 



9IS0 



nVOO I MIDO 



BtO 



uso 



im 



TiOD 



3U0 
2t« 



3410 



40V 

HO* 



*0* 
tflO' 



140 



no 



370 



490 



no 



740 



fiO 



1130 



U40 



1140 



2470 



3040 



4340 



ST40 



7120 



V400 



1710 



4940 



130 



Ufl 



200 



240 



1)0 



400 



S3D 



440 



J30 
JOOO 
1330 



10 PSI6 STEM 



TcBperilure Rise «f Wtl«r 



130'- 

140' 



1010 



1IS0 



J430_ 
2170 



160*- 

lao' 



410 



140 



2720 



3240 



4340 



S440 



mo 

IMO 



1170 



1720 



2040 



2740 



3m 

'42tO 



190"- 



HO' 
)80" 



JO"' 
UO" 



40' 

J Be- 



rn 



110 



ISO 



420 



S40 



710 



400 



sto 



770 



97D 



850 I 1U0 



1110 [ 1SS0 



H20 IfSO 



SI SO 



1440 



2D110 



7M 



4010 



7420 



31SQ0 17300 10100 

35SDQ niCO " 11500^ 

^04^00 , nm 1 11000 

4i90yTj4400 .14400 



1440 



ttSD 



jiao 

4000 

siio 



moo I S9B0 



12100 4400 



1770 2420 



2120 I 1910 



10900 I 4010 I 7040 ' IIIO 



200 



3(0 



430 



S7D 



720 



140 



11S0 



1440 



1100 



2140 



_U0 

m 



n fSlG S1EAK 



Teaptratvre hit <f Witcr 



(30' 
»40' 



1200 



1S00 



130 



410 



490 



i40 

Voo 



1030 



1230 



1)400 0400 3S&0 [ 4B40 



2110 ' USO 



3410 2040 



14300 ' tOlOO I 4240 I »30 I 4330 I 2480 



lUOO 127D0 _547D 
J4800 U9DG 
374QD lObOO 
"aai&D J4H30 
41400 I 1740D~ 



7740 I S740 I 32«C 



7000 I 9470 
0S40J 11 400" 
9970 riUOO 



48900 I 30900 



11340 j 15500 



13700 [ 17S00 



nm 34400 : 14100 I 19400 



7110 I 4040 



1440 I 4940 



10100 I &7B0 



11S00 J 4590 



11DD0 [ 7420 



14400 I B2S0 



1100 



2410 



3010 



1420 



4820 



4030 



7SI0 



9020^ 
l|000 

18100 
24100 



»oo- 

ISO* 



790 



fOO 



1110 



ISOO 



1180 



2370 



1140 



39iO 



4*40 



5920 



)90-- 

?is' 



140 



(iO 



SSO 



710 

no 



1100 



1470 



1840 



2100 



27£0 



7910 ; 3400 



2f700 



42400 



_989^ I 4410 
IIBOOTSSIO" 



1*0" 



4(0 



550 



0(0 



000 



1110 



J310 
J770 
2220 



40" 
140' 



*o- 



1001 100 



4(0 



1770 



J320 
4440 



15800 I 7350 



J5S0 
44(0 
8850 



_(!0 

770 

_020 

I2J0 
J540 
J«~0 

2)10 



J470 
J0(0 

4(40 
"(170" 



m 
v% 

3(0 



4S0 

Ml 



720 
11)0 



1)40 



lOtO 



27J0^ 
3(20 



19500 I mo 10M0 I T(U T447 

23800 ; 11000 13300 " 9200 ' S450 



40200 



54100 



40300 



77700 I 13900 . 15500 10000 I 41(0 



31400 I 14700 1T700 I 12300 



35400 I 14500 f 19900 I 11900 



19400 I 10400 I 22200 I 15400 



or 



li PSIG 51UH 



Temperitujs Riw M Wil(r 



130* 



T60" 

160" 



3 



10 



13 



14 



15 



1370 



940 



17T0 



JOSO 
2710" 



3410 



_41I0 
4850 



1200 



1440 



1920 



2^00 
"2890 



IQO"' 
3IS" 



500 



(10 



7(0 



1010 



1270 



140*- 



520 



(40 



700 



1050 



1120 



1510 



8550 



10200 



3B40"^T"mo 

4810~T~2540 



(000 I 1180 



7700 ! 3110 



13700 ! 9420 5100 



1590 



40'- 
140" 



tO'- 
190" 



340 



200 



430 



510 



400 



240 



110 



410 



t(0 520 



1030 420 



211 1170 I BIO 
24S0 I 1720 ; 1040 



3)00 



19(0 



5300 



1( 



17 



IB 



10 V, 



19 



20 



((20 



50 P5JG SlflH 




TdBpcnture flife fit W*tcr 



T?0' I IflO"- 

140' I lao* 



1440 I 1370 



3080 



2S00 



1)30 



4170 



50)0 



1590 



1910 



2540 



3110 



3870 



4440 5090 



2140 1100 



257C 



3440 



4330 



_i7ioo_[nooa _4j4oJ 

20tOD ' M4fl0 L_'45'' - ---- 

77300 iVjoo "iioiooTiosoo'l (B(0 



7950 51(0 



1540 
7080 
7(10 



3130 



33800 I 23m i12S00 
41200 T"78900~T5100 



13000 I 8400 



15900 



4B100 33700 , HB^DoTlB'SOO 



30300 31100 



10300 



nooo 

1)700 



5470 I 38 400 ^ 

^U00_ O30n"22900_73a00_i 1SJ00 

48(00 " 48100" 25400 3(500 '17300 ' 10400 



41(0 



JMO 
(3(0 



B340 (370 



10400 



17500 
'1(700^ 



7no 

'9540 



190"- 
31S' 



140V 
"90" 



7(0 



9S0 



1140 



U30 



1910 



2290 



(80 



40" ■ 
140' 



400 



850 



1020 



1)40 



1710 



2050 



1050 f 2720 



1B7D 



4770 



13700 



15900 



30B^]0 

" 2^000"^ J^920^, ^ 

^333"00~1 25400 r 15200 



5710 



7(50 



_»550 

nsoV 



7320 



01)0 

"9380" 



411O0 |J140rrTllOD 

5om"3L3a3"oo^33m 

5BS0 I 44700 3(BDD 
(4400 I 50900" 
75000 



1410 



42(0 



S110 



(830 



BS30 



urn 



510 



(10 



010 



1020 



1210 



1(10 



40" 
ISO 



350 
330 
3~B0 



510 



75 PSIG STEIN 



Temptritufc Ri» «t Vittr 



130- 
140' 



1900 



1*0'- 
ifiO' 



190' 
J<S" 



isool no 



23B0 I 1180 



3150 I 7250 



(40 



740 



1020 



2030 



2550 



3010 



40W 

5110 



4140 



81(0 



13400 



57100 



41700 



^000 
30500] 
31900 



10000 



12300 



14300 



30500 27700 



14400 I 10700 



30200 I 14100 



J4300 

18400^ 



20400 



1280 



1400 



1910 



2550 



3200 



3140 



J100 
(300 



7(70 



09(0 

fono" 



11500 



tr 



100 PSIG S1EAH 



12700 



3800 
4740 



5730 



3010 
37"(D~ 



1170 



1400 



JI170 
2350" 



140" 
190" 



7f0 



ffO 



1190 



1590 



7(10 



9530 



11900 



14200 



19000 



73800 



20(00 



18000 



4700J[ 

44900 
74100 



nm 

"95300 



4520 



4010 



7530 



9400 



11700 



15000 

Toloo" 



J^BIO 
17S0 



4700 



58(0 



7030 



9400 



11700 



_19tO 
2190 



1100 



4T70 



5940 



7970 



40'- 
T40* 



450 



S(0 



470 



Tiio 



13(0 



1010 



22(0 



20)0 



1)00 



4540 



40'- 



100 



1(1 



430 



570 



720 
0(0 



uso 



14)0 



1000 



21(0 



9940 

2240 i 141 00 I f30Db 
30100 I 11700', 15900" 



J(« 
(008 



9050 



20f0 



3(10 
4)40 



5770 



)7100 23100 I rnb'o j moo ; 712B~ 



45100 



^3100 
(0100' 



20100 I 2)900 1)(00 0(00 



33V00 78000 15900 10100 



(7400 



7S100 



37500 I 31 BOO , 18100 



41100 15000 



47000 : 19800 



10300 



1150O~ 



13000 



TnipertlDrt RUe ol Wafer 



'3D' 
1*0" 



uov 

1 HO' 



7040 I 1(40 



2550 I 2000 



30(0 7500 



190" 



1000 



11S0 



1420 



4070 I 3310 j 2170 



5110 4170 y 2770 



(110 ( 501O I 33(0 



10 



- 11 



tl 



13 



14 



IS 



14 



17 



8150 I (((0 I 4340 



10710 I 8340 i 5440 



127S0 I 10400 I 4790 



15110 : 12500 I fl40 



2040Q U70D ' lOiOO 



140V 

160" 



*0v 

TiO' 



000 



1110 



2110 

1770" 



_490 

(To 



m 
m 



2220 I 1220 
2(70 I J^70] 

19(0" 
"3450 



3550 



4450 



5550 



((50 



8900 



3330 



3(70 



4910 



75500 30flD0 13500 , 11100 j ( 140 

"i33irr7"3"(o" 

17700 fOOO 



3070Q 35000 . 14300 



40700 313DO , 71700 



503OO 41100 74800 I 2lfOO 



18 



18% 



It 



\r^ 



70 



(1300 I 50100 [ 32(OTT"2(7O0 



12100 

14700 



71(00 I 58500 I 30100 | 31700. 17"700 



40' 
ISO' 



125 PSJG S1EAH 



22(00 14400" 



lenpcrtrure RHe tf Wahr 



130V 
UO' 



310 



m 

470 



(20 



700 
^940 

1250 



1570 



19(0 

2150 

JISO 

3940 



4130 

(790^ 

"7700 



9400 



B1500 I (((00 1434007 35500 



tIfOO I 75000 [4BH0 j 40000 



11000 
19400 113400" 



laov 

190' 



loo'- 

31J' 



140'- 

leo' 



2330 



1770 



3330 



4440 



5540 



(480 



8800 



11100 



13B00 



14400 



1B70 
3170" 



1H0 J 950 



1490 I 1190 



7720 1790 



1430 ' 2390 



4550 



54(0 



7240 



TlOO 



11)00 



13400 



3000 



1400 



4700 



StfO 



7400 



09(0 



77200 I 1B700n3DD0 



1410 



1910 



2190 



1)75 



3010 



4790 



5970 



9570 



nm .j3mj_H90D__[^i98o' 

73400"; 77300 1b"do"0_iT44"o"0~ 

44400 T^joobTYiioo i 19100" 



40V 

MO' 



510 



(SO 



700 



1040 



1300 



40" 

190' 



330 
420" 

soo" 



150 P5IG 51E(M 



Ttnper«turt Rite tl'Vitcr 



120'- 

140' 



160' 
LBO 



T90V 
31S' 



1)00 



33ao__1940^ 

7970 I 142071(20 
1940 



3570 



140 



15(0 



2070 



1(00 



3240 



IRfO 



5200 



1010 



1340 



_7100 
2520 



33(0 



(500 I 4110 

782^0 I 5050 

10300"| (710 



54700 |J4«0 I 79500 | 73(00 ] 13800 ! 8700 



.(U00jj44do] 3(000 J 2m0 ' 15"4"0"0 ' 10100 



37000 I 14100 



103100 13400 S44C0 44500 74500 15700 



?B0O0_ 4J|IJL_l^l'!?_i JJM_iJJl.ofi ' 1 "O" 
88800 I 72400 , 47B00 I 38700 I 3070O i ll^oT 



loooo^&jjyo£!ji9o^i_nioo_n4oo i isjoo 
111000 nooo riHoT am < 24obFT4BDD 




4750 

JUO 

9510 



29]0 
3880 



140 V 
t9D' 



40V 

T40" 



40" ■ 

tBO< 



1020 



1200 



1530 



__2S90^| lOSO 

4040 [ 1250 r"2S(0] 

1080^ 

Oljlfl^ 

5130 



S040 I 3900 



7740 I SI 90 



1 1 m^i_9m 4S0"0" 
J4B00 1 12100 , on'o" 

17800 I HSOQ I f7"20 



718001 1t4ODjJl0b^ 
29IOD~r3l30"0 il4"3"oT 



(4^00 
"7(0b" 



400 



010 



1090 

im 

^100 
2710" 



10200 

12000 



3410 

wV 

5470 

~4B40 



)S0 



440 



530 



710 



y>m , 39^00 J95D0 !"!54oo 1 nio 

47500 I 18800 I J^SHO TlOSOO iJ0900" 
_5_B4"0b _478Q0 33D00' 75100 13500 
JISJIO 

25"l0D 

mi 00 

119100 



5^9400 _3900fl 10800 1(400 ■ 
(B10"O I 45400 J_1400D 1?200~ 
™0__5im__4l000 :_3"1800"I 
87400 I 58400 4(100^ 7*400 ' 
97100 (SOOb" 51i0p" 27J00" 



__l»0 

_l4n 

JTM 

2120 

2(« 

15(0 

4450 

5)40 

' 7100] 

^0770 

10700" 

17500 

HIOT 

uooo 

I7B0O" 



s limiteB 



SIZES AND ROUGHING- IN DIMENSIONS 





HEATER SIZES 3-1 3 



TEMfCBATUHE JrEGUlATO> 



NOT wATu ounti 







ItGUlAlC* Vjit 



HEATER SIZE 



N« 



.3 i Ho.< I Ho. S No. 4 Mo. T Ko. 8 , Ho. * Hd. 10 Ho. U ! Ho. H 'Ho- H ! H». 14 



Hi.1S.Hr HI Hi. 17 



Hr II 



Ho^ H«. 

US Ho It, iVi n%n 



WA 



10%" 



1fl%" 



r-r : 2 B 



i" 



r-O' 



IflV*" 



3'-10' 



111%" IttV." 



4-7 



5-4 



uv.''nv. 



r 



!l%" |U%-'iUV*" !fV4-i1IV4 



MO" iV 



10 



IB" 



14^ ^ 14" 



1!V."|HVi" 



lav.'-iisv. 



14" U' 



u 



SB 5 



J- 1*1 '4 1- vr 4 ir 4 10 <> 



IS 



»y. 



II 



4-4- 1 rt' 



ISVi 



»' 



rii' 



2SV*" 



30 



rr 



D, E AND f MAD£ AS BEQU/BfP 



HEATER SIZES 14-20 



TEwPESATURE ftICUl*TO" 



STEAM 



® 




SCAVLESS 



rtOT wAiEt ounn 










." K 




^ 



wATi" <Hin 



-(T) ^'*°^ 



TEH^lAfUal 
HOULAIOI 

AT *»■ 
Ai4Clf 



DARLING 




E R S LIMITED 



\ 




INSTALLATIONS 



¥: 
% 



'^^ 






.1 



u 



I . 



fcrBi'^^ 



Whillocli-Dorling Semi-lnstonloneou* Meote' on lavndrv lervice. 
OMowo Gcnerol Hotpirol. Oltowa. 



1 te 






'-"N 



WhrMof k-Oarhng Semi-lnt^onrorreoL't Heoter ImloliolJon ol 
Slardard Bronds Lirnited, ViEle La Salic. 






r 



'J 



J 



[Jl 

Ml 



t>^\ 



**^ 



u 



WhrOo<lL Darling SemMnilonfofieou^ Heortr, Sylphon Number 

931 Temp, R^gulotor. Oortioct Clati [> Cenlrifugol Pump^, 

Turner & NewolJ (Conodo) Lrd.. Monlreol. 



W*iiriock'Oofling Semi-trt&tanloneout Booster Meote» end Tortli 

Heolcr wllh No. ^30 Sylphon Tempefolure Regularor ol 

Prtlchard Botht. Winnipeg, 



R L I N 



E R 



LIMITED 



SYLPHON TEMP. REGULATORS 




Fi0. K 





No. 931 Regulotor 

Thr No. 931 leinprraiurc tcculAlor i* 
lar^rly used in industrial proccMrs whrrc 
one dcfiniic trmprraturc is rcquirrd ftoni 
day to day. It is also wjdr^ ii»rd lo ^i>n- 
irol icmprraiutc of hoi Wiitcr itotagr 
tanks, etc. 

The No. I2B bulb h scand<ird and h 
diinrn^ionrd in table at right. It is madr 
of copper and its fittings arr of brass. 
Brass armor covrrs the flexible copper 
tubing between the bulb and ref^uUtor 
proper This armored tubing: i* ret'ul-irly 
furnished 9 feet long. Longer lengthi 
avai];iblr, Bulb and its littini^i, M well as 
Hexible tubing and its ajmor. can be 
furnished made of other meials. 
This regulator is made in \alve slices W to 5', inclusive 
Sizes //' to 4", inclusive, arc equipped with type "F" direct- 
acting valve. 5" siie is equipped with t>T)c "E^' dircci-acting 
valve- Bronze trim supplied unless otherwise ordered. A re^erw- 
acting valve will be furnished on order. Sjics Vi" 10 lV/*i 
inclusive, hnve screwed ends. Sizes 2" and above, flanurd ends 
(125 lbs. A.S.A. Rating.) 



Pressure Limits 

The standard No. 931 regulator is not suitable where the 
pressure drop across valve exceed* the limits given in table at 
righl. A stainU-is steel trimmtd volvf ihoutd h^ uied for prff 
surts above 50 lbs., or /of ^upfthtated steom. 



Installation 

Bulb is to be inserted in the vessel so il will conUei the 
liquid under control. A strainer should be installed ahead ol 
Ihr regulatinE! valve. (Strainers ^rr listed on back pa«r i 

Temperature Adjustment 

This regulator can be set to control at .tty point within its 
temperature range by merely turning the adiuMment wheel 
located just below the regulator head. 

No. 931 -OR Regulator 

If it is necessary for ihe regulator to w.tbMand, without 
dama.e trmperatures at the bulb of more than Jt- above top 
JndV the 'adjustable ran.e, then the "^^er^Run e^^^^^^^^^ 
musi he supplied. This feature will protrrt a.a.nst tempera 
,ure. up CO 100^ above lop of the range, and. m ,ome case., 
higher temperatures. 

The -Over-Run" fralurc^ is not normally required or re 
gerating ranges since the bulb temperature .s norm.lh lo... 
than the (bellow>i temperature at head of regulator. 

When supplied with "Over-Run" feature, the '^^^^^'^^ 
designated as No. 9.1-OR. VaK. sue. P^^^^^^^^^^^ 
temper-iture ranges same as for No 931 excepl '^^^ 
in sLs r and above is not available w.th *in tempera.«r< 
ranges: and, in any M.e with 80^ or l^iO" ranges. 



Temperature Ranges 



TrmperatuiT raniics below 
description of No, 9'JI-UR 
number. 



aic for No f*1l reuulnior. Sec 
for LIS ranges, Order bv ran^e 



W iUngf!) 



NoT 
^H 

MJ-H 

62-H 
66-H 

71- H 

t(MI 
U^H 

117 -K 



40'— au* F. 
6ir — UNr F. 

ciir— livr F 

l(h>'— H<i" F 



6O*,B0'»ndl2O " RAOgf^ 

lO'-lDO- F. 

bO' i:pj" f 






ibtr F, 

iBir F 
■ym' F. 

■ F. 
' F, 

■ F- 
' F 

■' F. 

■ F. 

-:y ¥. 
^w-13n- F. 



No 

46-K 
W-K 
S6-K 

A6-K 
TO-K 
14^K 

76-K 

80-K 

H4-K 

ttT'K 

96-K 
llOK 
IICUP 

•no- WD 



90'- 1 51*" F 

loti'-ieo' T. 

I2t»""l80- F, 

I*)'— 200" F 
ISO'— 22i>" F 
IW— 2*1' F 
190'— 2y.>* F 
2lO"-27n* F, 
2;0^— 280" F. 
210'— 2W F. 
Ji-i'— M)5' F. 
2'Jy -315' F, 
290'— 150* F, 
360'— 420- r. 
JtU" -MO' r. 
Wl'— «0' F. 



'lUniF llO'WD il no' **miUMt for rpguUtor »»» 2" bimI Umcr. 



Dimensions 



II 

*v 

J 

i .. 

:^hLpt»uifl 
Weigh. 

\ 

& 

D 

E 

K 

L 

M 

\ 

O 







t 
1 1 11^ 


230 


150 


350 250 
1 


i- 




: ' M 



m 


2 . 21* 


a 


4 


S 


22> 


1 


5S 


40 


3n 


68 


ItW 1 t " 


1 '!» 


2"f* 


2^0 



.1' .. lfrVirt'l7V* ,l8',,o I 
IWi* 1+^..- i+h" J**i<i I4*iail44s* l*'ii, i^-i i-'i 

-,t 1^^ ■ 7 '--ik I Bl3 I ^, 

-^i, 7^k , 7a* J?l* 7H 



7% 



'H 



74* 



"I- 



71* 



a?* *■% 4N l^^^ri lflt,(i 
,'^11 11 i,,r irrtii^n.^*'!" fun*'* l^tf-nninn at liH^'F ur above. 




3 I *-' 

ip.^ uu ii^ hit.int umma i naii^j 

Si-ndi.»H bull, lui inr^iwracirf rtPirr, bf^iriiiintf Mn* lOO'F- lender 



?,iXi;i:i;r !;v lit, ii^. i;^. iinliii. 



!| 



STANOAftD 

~] LENGTH. B FT. 




D A R L 




I M I T E D 



> 



V 



DARLING Y TYPE STRAINERS 



I 



PijjL" SI aU\ scdiiiK'iU. bits of pat king and othfi fort" ign 
niallrr is ofttn iho t ausr of damage to steam traps, prcs- 
%ui-c rt'dut'ini; valvrs, trmpt'iaturc regulators, etc. and 
unsatisfat lory opftation or cvrn roniplctr failure can 
firqui-ntly bi- Jliributrd lo jjipr linr inipurili^s, l^brir- 
fore the installation of a strainer is always reeoiimimdcd 
to protec'l such equipment. 

Oarling Srrirs 29 Strainers ai e so eonstrueted thai thry 
do not reduer thr volunir of fluid pas'^inq; ihnuiph tlii-iii. 
The stieen h plai rd with one end open to the inii t pent 
and the other end open lo the blow-ofl'. The flow passes 
from inlet lo outlet poii ibiougb the sereen so that 
M foreign matter is trapped in fhr' eylinder sercen, from 
wheic it is readily removed, 

Ada]JiabIe to both horizorital and vertieal downward 
flow pipe lims. In either position these strainers must be 
installed with the cap down. 

Darling "Y" Type Strainers have heavy cast iron 
bodies \vith perforated brass strainer cylinders, areas of 
which are several limes iaigir than coi responding pipe 
sizi'^. Si'rics 29 aie Miewed pallcrn made in sizes '/i" 
to 2" inclusive. Standard cyhnder screens have .040 inch 
.diameter perforations 256 holes to the sq. in. Screens of 
monel metal can be supplied at extra ehar^e. Fine mesh 
screens made of brass wiie cloth can hi- furnished when 
specified. 

Flanj^ed Strainers arc avaihifilr in larger sizes. 



Fig, 2^Dorllrtg Series 3? 
Dtrl Sl'oineri 



Scrflwvd Pgilflrn — - (na&imhi>K wording 
pfaiiurv MO lb>- par iq. iti. 




Dimensions of Series 29 Dtrl Strainers, 




PfRFORATED BfiASS 
STRAINER 



5'i* 
















Inchu 


Symbor 
792 


A 


> 


c 


D 


c 


W»i 


Vi 


3% 


7% 


2V^ 


Vi 


"m 


' 


V- 


293 


4V- 


3H.i 


'A. 


^yin 


\'/t 




1 


294 


3'A 


4 


nu 


2W 


4 


IV- 


795 


S^=*(rt 


4>4 


3% 


yy* 


JVj 


t 


"A 


294 


iVi 


S'^irt 


3V- 


nto 


^'4 


■ 


2 


296 


a 


6^\a 


4>/i 


nU« 


3% 


\: 



An difnartiiom in incKet and lubjvct to lUglil vgrjalion. W*i0hl In pcvndi 



% 

i 

I 
I 

I, ■ 



"There is hardly anything in the world that 
some man cannot make a little worse and 
sell o rittJe cheaper, and the people who 
consider price only are this man's lawful 
prey," 

— RuslcJn 



BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 



HALIFAX, N.S. 

E. S- Slephenson £< Co., Ltd, 155 Gronvflle Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.B- 
E, 5. Stephenson & Co.. Ltd. 15 Dock Slreet 

QUEBEC, P.O. 
W. J. Bonks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIDA, P.Q, 
Rene Beoudet i Cie Ltee 122 High Street 

TIMMINS, ONT, 
Pratricio Engineering Ltd. 168 Third Ave. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 
Darling Brothers Limiled 18 ftideau Sireer 



4. 




TORONTO, ONT. 

Darling Brothers Limited 137 WeHinglon St. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Darling Brothers Limited 123 Princess Str. 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H. F. Clofke & Co. Lid. ]}]4 fifth St. ' 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Fronk Dorling & Co. Ltd. 1144 Homer 

ST. JOHN'S, NFID. 

Cloyton Constryction Co, Ltd. 198 Woter 

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS 



BROTHERS LIMITED 

' <0 PRINCE ST. MONTR EAl, CANADA 



"wittsit 



Bulletin No. 65 



MANUAL OF 
HOT WATER 

HEATING 
EQUIPMENT 






..r<^^- 



t^^. 



^ 



/ - 



-^ 



^. 



«*•. 



fi 



••a 



' -^ 






— ^ 



* '> 



»4- 



"V 



•w ^ 



v,.' v,:/ \;A't>.. \ 



*■''-'- 'A >?.. 




FOREWORD 



This manuc! h prepo.ed os on oid in the *dechon of eq^-ipmenf for those who« re*pof».ibility 
\i the design of Hot Woler Heating Systems. 

The Whitlock-Darling Type "R- Converter u*ed in Hot Woler Heoting System*, h oi welt k"Ow, 
Q. the fomou. Cfasi '"D" Centrifugal Circolaling Pur^p, The WhHlock-DofUng Convenor or>d Cl( 
■D" Pump, wi!h such octe«ories as Sylphon Temperature Regulators ond Webster Steam Tr op 
offer o selection of equipment which not only provides undivided engineering responsib.hty, b^ 
also carries our sTandord guarantee of performance. 

For the convenience of engineers and designers, we have compiled doto on these ossocialed 
products in this catalogue- We hope that all who have occasion to y« this man«ol 
will find it o source of practicol information. 



WHITL0CK-DARLIN6 TYPE "R" U-TUBE CONVERTORS 



The Converiora described in this manual are 
primarily desiened for Forced Hoi Water 
Heating Systems. They consist of a steel 
shell with removable heating section* both 
designed to operato at a maximum pressure 
of 100 p.s.i. The df'^iign is e^^entiaUy Ihal 
shown in Fig. L 

HEATING SECTION 

The heating section is fabricaied of seamless 
drawn heavy gauge copper l ubing assembled 
in the familiar 'U' bend patttTn. Both ends 
of the lube are expanded into a heavy rolled 
steel tube sheet. This operation is automati- 
cally coDtroUed by expanding machines thai 
deurmine the exact amount of expansion 
necessary to assure a leak proof joint 
between tube and tube sheet. 

The 'U' tube design make© a particularly 
compact lubt bundle that can be readily 
removed from the abeU when necessary. 
With this ivpe of eonatruclion. the heating 
secrioik is lixed to the aheU at one end only 
so ibai any amount of expansion and con- 
traction of aheil or heating section is 
automatically takvn core of independently 
of any 'jther part. 

SHELL 

Shells, whether for low or high pressure 
steam, are madeofeleel. Where poaaible^ the 
shell will be of standard steel P>pe. Where 
pipe cannol he employed, especially on the 
larger convert ors. T he shell will be fabricated 
of Steel plate. Shells 16" diameter and under 
have a steel welded-in flat plate rear cover 
while those IS" diameter and over are 
separate botled-on dL*hed covers- 
Front heads or channels are ordinarily 
furnished of heavy cast iron. 

In reading the capacity tables, the last 
ligure of the si^e number is the nominal pipe 
size diameter. The actual outside dioraeter 
is given tn the dimension tables. 




While we have described steel shells, cast 
iron are availabirr These do not conform to 
the dimension tables on page h^. but capacity 
and dimension information can be furnished 
when required. 

THE NUMBER OF PASSES 

Determination of the number of parses ti-e,. 
the number of limes the liquid being heated 
travels I he length of the heating sect ion I. is 
an important element of design but is never 
more than a means to an end. 

With the proper size heater chosen for any 
given set of operating conditions, the next 
step is to adjust ihe relation between the 
beating surface and the croaa sectional area 
of the liquid passages^ This is necessary in 
order to obtain maxinium effectiveness 
from the heating surface by maintaining 



fig. K Type ''R" Conyerfon 

reasonable liquid velocity- -while alill r 
taining the pressure drop on the liquid 

within permissible limiJs. 

The number of pass<^ required for a j 
capacity and temperature rise is repreiw 
by the second number of the convertoi 
in Table 1. The pressure drop ihroui-h 
convertor at rated capacity is show 
Table 2. 

DIMENSIONS 

Reference to page 5 will show the eoH 
dimensions of the convertors listed ii 
capacity table on page 4. Aa a conven 
and time aaver for the draftsman. Df 
Read V'Tem plates in ',", '4" and i^" 
on all sizes are available on request . 

SUPPORTING CRADLES 

Caat iron supportins cradles cttn be 
nished for all convtrffirs. Thi-nr- ca 
supplied in ejth^T thi.' tUxtr or pjpe 1 
mounting type. 



TYPICAL SPICIFICATJON Furmiti «ntf mitill wti«re iddtciffld on plini-WhitLoch-Oftflinc Su« Type " 

Coriiferlor, hivtng i capactty to heat U S G.P fM of *tlei fi^m 'F to f. when lupplied wi 

ufficteni ite>m at \hi pr«»ure ind op^rttirt^ with forced ortulalion in (he lifbc ciftuLI ConfOrtDr io torn 

of removible copper lube lie»t>nf t«tion tilted into 1 ' diimeler ttnl thill, length 0I which muit nol «■» 

'aver«tl * Shell to be titt«d with '(1^0 lb. il>nd*r4 nintedor urtH«a> ittinnnlvi connect ion * d 
connection aiij miiabie feltet valve connvElion 

Healing leclion tabncBtei} ot tetfniest drawn heivjr BBuee copper tubing aiiembled m U' bend pattern wi 
rolled ^TeeE rube sheet end U£l I'on front head having *mle1 and outlet (150 lb itandird flanged or icrewc 
conneclioni PreiiurE diop through Tube circuJi noT to eiceed p 1 1 if lated capacity 

Design pie»ure lor lube »nd shell ciKuiTsto be tOO p s 1 Ca&l iron cradles (shall or ihjtjl rtoi) be fu^mahed 
NOTf In Orde* to provide ivfflcrflnf ipac« lor lubfl renwal 




IvtAlAJ^atioiU. 




WHITLOCK-DARLING 

FOR FORCED CIRCU 



NOTE: When showing these units on 
plans or in specifications please specify 
flow of woter in US GPM. It is also important 
when placing an order that the capacity, temperature rise and steam pressure be 
given as well as the size of heater chosen. Remember that this table is based on forced 

circulation only — always state on your order the pump capacity. 

Tabl« 1 — Copociti«t 




'i* 



t 




REVISED 



CAPACITY TABLES 

FOR 

F.C. CONYERTORS 

20 o F Temp. Rise 



r '' 




MAY 1954 




Bulletin No. 65 




CAPACITY TABLES 

P.D>-Pft£SSURC DROP THflOUGH CONVERTOR IN FEET OF WATER. M,B,H. - U.S. G,?M. ■ 10 




LBS. 
P-ILC 


TEUP. msF 

OF WATEfl c 


20 


25 


30 


40 


n.ow IN u.s 

50 60 70 


GALLONS 

60 90 100 


PER MINUTE 

125 150 175 


200 


225 


250 


300 1 400 1 500 







lir 1«- 


" ^^-^A !-?-<* ^^^e 3-^» 4-?^ 


5-MB 


V2-4B 


?-MB 


7-Me 


A-MB 


0-MB 


11^ MOB lO-MOG 


tO-MOt 


10-2- lOB 


1^^12B 


l^^'I2B 


\y2-\7B 


14-M4A 


1^2-16* 




P.D. 


2.1 


).B 


Z.Z 


1.4 


La 


ir 


16 


L4 


LI 


13 


17 


L4 


L9 


14 


10 


L7 


10 


n 


1,3 


19 




lir-w 


1-J(J 


^^u 3.?-M 


3-2-^ ^I4a 


C-24B 


6-MB 


l-MB 


a-MB 


0>M8 


S-HB 


lO-MOB L1-2-1DB 


tU2-lOB 


ll-2-lOfi 


1^2-128 


1}M2B 


11-2-128 


t4-tt4A 


IVMU 




P.D, 


2.1 


4.S 


Z.S 


13 


L9 


10 


12 


L5 


1-9 


13 


3JI 


1-4 


10 


li 


12 


L9 


12 


11 


12 


19 




lEO'-lBft'F 


3.?-*^ 


3-J-W 


S-ME 


6-t5B 


7'Z-68 


a-T^ 


6-246 


10-MB 


lO-MB 


11-MB 


11-MB 


13-2- loe 


11-MDB 


13-MOB 


13- MOB 


i*-a-i2A 


14-2-12* 


Ifr2-]2B 


16- M4* 


tA-2-lfi* 




P.D, 


3,1 


VD 


2.9 


4.6 


2.3 


16 


iO 


1.B 


Z.3 


11 


3.7 


li 


14 


11 


3-1 


4,0 


18 


12 


3.9 


19 




INT-JSO'F 


S-J-M 


t?'Se 


&3-se 


6-2-46 


S-i-fiB 


9-246 


t-HS 


11-246 


I2-M8 


l^MB 


1^MB 


14-2-10* 


14-MOA 


n-j-m 


]5-M2* 


16-M^ 


16-2-126 


I7-M4A 


Iftk-^lfiA 


ini-2.1£A 




P.O. 


1.^ 


13 


3.< 


1.6 


L9 


4.2 


S.9 


7.0 


la 


IS 


1[ 


16 


J,4 


14 


16 


Z« 


11 


17 


19 


4-2 




IKT^JDCTF 


6-4^A 


7-4^ 


».2^B 


lO-t^G 


ID-MB 


124-10* 


174-10* 


ll-tUA 


L3-4-L2A 


15-MDA 


15-MO* 


I6-M2A 


16-2- U* 


17-4- IBA 


U-4^1B* 


lo-iia* 


1A-4-IAA 


19-4-2DA 


2I>124A 


21^4-17* 




P-D. 


U 


5.e 


IJ 


3.6 


SJ 


4.3 


5.1 


16 


4.4 


L6 


ID 


10 


16 


5.4 


16 


IJ 


5.1 


i; 


4.6 


19 




2 


la-'WF 


i'UA 


1-24* 


2>2-5B 


^^SB 


4-2-EB 


^74& 


^24B 


6-24B 


7-MB 


7-24D 


7-MB 


4-MOB 


9- MOB 


LD-^lOB 


IftMDB 


11-2-126 


11-M2B 


12-M26 


klMU 


14-2- ItA 




P.D, 


11 


3J 


U 


3J) 


La 


2.1 


la 


1.3 


LI 


12 


15 


L3 


L7 


14 


10 


1-6 


15 


U 


IJ> 


17 




lao-'iscfF 


i-;-w 


1'2-4A 


^^SB 


2-2-56 


4-2-E8 


S-J-fiB 


S-MB 


T-MS 


7-MB 


7-24B 


S-MB 


9-MDB 


lO-tUB 


10-MDB 


10-2106 


1^^UB 


12. MS 


I^^tZB 


13-MU 


14-M6A 




P-D, 


11 


11 


?-? 


3.0 


Lfl 


2.? 


3.7 


1,4 


1.1 


11 


17 


L3 


LI 


14 


19 


1.7 


10 


17 


19 


17 




lar-iicrF 


l-UA 


?-2-4A 


t-J-K 


i-T-SB 


&-2-GB 


7-2-66 


7-UB 


*?4B 


f-MB 


9-MB 


[Q-Me 


I^MOB 


1^M0B 


12-MOB 


12- MO* 


14-2-126 


14-2-126 


11M26 


t&2-14A 


17-MtA 




P.D. 


U 


1.3 


U 


3.6 


10 


13 


4.S 


L6 


ID 


2.5 


13 


16 


11 


2,7 


4.3 


ID 


2.4 


12 


19 


IS 




irr-arf 


IJM 


3-2-U 


S-iSB 


B-^SB 


?-2'6fl i-^iB 


a-^&B 


ia-2-«B 


ID- MB 


11-248 


11-24B 


13-2-106 


11-2-lOB 


13-M08 


13-2- 106 


14-2-12* 


t4-M2* 


Ifr-MZB 


17'MU 


1»MU 




P,D. 


3.0 


5.0 


11 


4,6 


12 


16 


5.0 


IJ 


13 


1.1 


3.6 


La 


14 


11 


U 


ID 


4,1 


4,2 


4.3 


3,1 




utr^ao-F 


t^Sfl 


(-2-5G 


ft-tSB 


e-2'«B 


9-2^6 


9-2-66 


11-24B 


U^MB 


U'MB 


l^Me 


12-MB 


14-2-10 A 


14-MOA 


15- MD* 


16-M2B 


16-2.126 


16-M2B 


1S-2-16A 


llt-M6A 


19S-2-U* 




P,D. 


I* 


13 


13 


L6 


3:9 


12 


U 


11 


IB 


14 


4^ 


16 


1-4 


19 


2.1 


15 


ID 


I« 


19 


19 




ISfr-ZlCF 


^4-W 


UM4B 


LO-i^B 


H>-«4B 


12-4-lOA 


iZ-t-lOA 


134-12A 


1^2-10* 


144-12* 


16-M2* 


16-2-12* 


17-1- IGA 


17-4- I6A 


17-4-16* 


int-4-iaA 


114^4- U* 


Hh-*.1BA 


I9lr4-ZDA 


1 

20»-4-?4* 


22*27* 




PO 


3.6 


1.» 


U 


3.6 


10 


i3 


11 


L2 


5.0 


L2 


1.4 


11 


12 


5-4 


3.9 


16 


15 


5uD 


4J 


11 






Iffl-'IVF 


1-7'4A 


I'MA 


2-tsa 


Z'J-SB 


>^6B 


1-^«B 


4-MB 


fr-MB 


i-l-AH 


6.2-BB 


t-24B 


6-2-10* 


9-2-106 


9-tlOB 


9-M06 


10-M2B 


11-2-126 


n-M2B 


l^M4* 


14.2- IBA 




P.D- 


2.3 


II 


12 


3J] 


1.6 


14 


15 


1.3 


L6 


10 


14 


L5 


1.7 


12 


17 


L5 


L9 


16 


17 


17 




l3D''ISff'F 


l'Z-4A 


l'2-« 


2^56 


?'MB 


J-*fiB 


4-2^ 


4-246 


S-MS 


&24B 


7-24B 


7-24B 


»-2-10B 


9.2-106 


9-MDB 


9-2-lOB 


11-M2B 


n-M26 


11-^126 


11^M4A 


l4-MtA 






P.O. 


Z} 


U 


2.1 


U 


LI 


li 


IS 


L3 


U 


11 


U 


U 


L7 


U 


17 


1.6 


LI 


16 


19 


17 






ffr-itt'F 


\rh4A 


?■;■** 


l■^S8 


3-^5e 


S-3-6e 


i-Ht 


5-MB 


a-24B 




t-MB 


9-Me 


»-MB 


10-MDB 


11-2-ID6 


l-i-lOB 


1-2-lOB 


3-^128 


^2-126 


3-M2B 




U2-1U 


1«-M£* 




5 


p,a 


12 


*.3 


n 


1.2 


La 


U 


il 


L5 


tJ U 


W 


LI 


L9 


15 


11 


LB 


12 


11 


11 


11 




JD'-WF 


hUA 


r-MA 


<-^5e 


4-^5e 


t-MB 


7-»B 


7'2-«B 


t-MB 


$-246 


4-MB 


l-MB 


Ll-MOe 


11- MOB 


12-MOB 


11-2-106 


I4-M2B 


UJ-liG 


I4.M26 


I&-2-I4* 


l&flU 






p-a 


th 


4-1 


Zi 


t» 


ID 


12 


11 


L« 


U 


15 


a 


L4 


11 


17 


13 


10 


14 


12 


It 


11 






«• acF 


t^M 


3-J4A 


s-^se 


V^5B 


i-m 


1-^66 


6-MB 


10-246 


O-MB 


LO-MB 


I- MS 


3-^KlB 


1^2-lDB 


1-M06 


112- 1D6 


4-2- I2A 


14- M2* 


tV2-129 


lt-M4A 


l»-2-lU 




_ 


P.D: 


ID 

■ — — - 


i* 


2.1 


u 


12 


li 


4,4 


LI 


13 


17 


It 


LI 


14 


10 


U 


L9 


4.T 


),4 


11 


IB 




I 


»'-?hrF ( 


-hiA 


^^SB 


(-M8 


ft-^4B 


t>»B 


f-»a 


f-24B 


IMS 


tHB 


L^M8 


2-24B 


t^MOA 


It-^U* li^MQ* 


I^MIA 


iv>m 


6-2-126 


17.MU 


Uh-l^ltA 


ia»-»^ifi* 




_ 


P-0. 

1 


L* 


11 


13 

*- 


Li 


l« 


4.1 


&2 


ID 


U 


14 


4^ 


15 


14 


4.) 


U 


15 


10 




le 


U 


11 




a 


IT'OTF ? 


U* 1 




0>446 


M^ie 


&44« 


M-UA 


H-IDA 


i4-l2A 


V2-10A 


5-2- UU 


lt^l2A 


L&2-U* 


^4-ttA 


^«■UA 


M16A 


»H-IA* 


M-^UA 


lftf-4-UA 


I9H4-2A* 


aVA^lM 


tUDA 






PD. 


J.^ 


M 


i( 


LI 


U 


U 


tr 


LI 


u u 


U 

L 


11 


11 i.1 


U 


U 


iA 


Ul 


u 


u 








1 ^ 1 


PPESSUF 


CAPACITY TABLES 

tE DROP THROUGH COKVERTOR IH FEET OF WATER 




1 .iVM 

PRESS. 
LBS. 


TEUP, RtSE 
OF WATER 


15 


20 


25 


30 


40 


FLO 

50 


W ll> 

60 


i u.s 

70 


GAl 

80 


.LONS 

90 100 


PER MINUTE 

125 150 175 


200 225 250 


300 


400 


500 




10 


IV-ltt-F 


1-24A 


]-^4A 


^^^ 


2-^» 


3-^fia 


V2-6B 


3-2-6B 


6-^B8 


6-MB 


6-2-86 


t34B 


^MOA 


S-2-10A 


S-MOA 


l-MOA 


io-M2e 


Ifr2-UB 


1D'M2B 


It2-HA 


14-2- 16A 




P,D. 


2.1 


IB 


12 


IQ 


L& 


14 


3.3 


1,3 


1.6 


10 


14 




1.5 


10 


15 


U 


i-s 


l-B 


14 


17 


V 




Ur-ISD-F 

1 


l^u 


1-2-4 A 


2-2-56 


2-I-5B 


>2-6B 


3-248 


3-^SB 


6-24B 


S-^-BB 


6-24B 


&-?-«B 


8-MDA 


t-MOA 


B-MOa 


%^m 


10-2-128 


1D-M2B 


11-?- 126 


I^2-14A 


14-M6A 




P.D. 


L3 


3.1 


2.2 


10 


LG 


13 


J.2 


1.3 


1,6 


3-0 


13 


L.4 


L9 


12 


17 


1,5 


14 


16 


17 


17 




IfiO-'IKfF 

1 


L-HA 


l-Z'4A 


2■^w 


2-2-58 


4-?-W 


5-2-6B 


5-2-6S 


?-?-flB 


I-24B 


7^BB 


^2-68 


VMOe 


LO-MQB 


l^tlOB 


10-2-108 


12-2-126 


12-MiB 


12-M2e 


13-M4A 


14-M6A 




P,D- 


1? 


U 


11 


2.8 


L7 


16 

f — 


U 


1,4 


IJ 


ID 


16 


1.2 


1 

LI 


11 


IB 


1.6 


1.9 


16 


24 


16 




ITT-IICF 


1-MA 


^■^4A 


J-2'5B 


3-2'SB 


5-2-6B 


6-2-68 


6-^6B 


1-2-18 


^^-8B 


fi-2-AB 


3-?46 


lO-MOB 


11-2- 106 


11-2- 108 


11-MOB 


I3-M2e 


13-M2B 


11-2-126 


14-2- IIA 


15-M6A 




P.O. 


12 


4.2 




13 


3.2 


LB 


19 


4.0 


1.4 


LB 


12 


19 


L3 


L9 


14 


3.0 


18 


11 


19 


3.0 


17 




iBr awF 


J-J-U 


2-2-4A 


3■^se 


(-2-SB 


^2-«B 


6-2-68 


6-2-68 


V24fl 


9-24B 


9-2-Be 


^-^6B 


n-MOB 


11-2-106 


l^2-106 


12-MOB 


L3-M2B 


1>M2B 


1«'2-I28 


I5-2-14A 


16-M6A 




P.0, 


IG 


4-2 


13 


3.S 


10 


1» 


4-0 


1.6 


10 


14 


19 


L4 


1.4 


16 


3.3 


14 


11 


3,2 


3.3 


27 




W-Z]0'f 


2-2'U 


a-z^A 


4-^se 


5-2-5B 


J-2-6B 


7-WB 


^2-68 


9-2-BB 


ia-2-BB 


10-246 


1&24B 


12-2- 106 


13- MOB 


13-2- lOS 


13-2-106 


14-M2B 


14-^128 


15'^ 128 


16-2<14A 


17-2- 16A 




P,0. 


2.S 


4.B 


2.5 


3.B 


12 


3.1 


41 


16 


12 


17 


3.2 


L5 


2.4 


3.0 


3.8 


1-9 


13 


3.4 


It 


1.4 




av-?arF 


V^W 


G-^5a 


s-2-se 


&-?-^B 


S-2-GB 


9-2-68 


9-2-6B 


U'2-flB 


11-2-66 


I^^BB 


17-246 


13-2-108 


11-2- lOA 


14-MOA 


14-MOA 


15-M2A 


IS-MZA 


16-M2B 


17.M4A 


taVM6A 




P.D. 


LI 


13 


u 


4.4 


14 


4.1 


5.7 


2,0 


15 


10 


3,9 


L7 


3.0 


4,3 


5.5 


4.1 


5.1 


4.0 


4.? 


4.0 




IS 


lar-iw-F 


1>?-4A 


1>2-4A 


2-2- SB 


2'2-SB 


3-2-6B 


3-2-4B 


3-2-68 


6.2-8B 


6-2'B8 


6-?-Be 


6-f46 


l-MOA 


a-2-IOA 


B-^lOA 


a-^ioA 


I0-M26 


10-2- 1?B 


10-M2B 


12-2-14A 


14-M6A 




P.O. 


13 


3.a 


12 


3,0 


1.6 


14 


3-3 


1,3 


1.6 


10 


14 


1-5 


10 


15 


3.2 


15 


1.8 


14 


17 


17 




iir-ltt-F 


1-2-4A 


1'2-4A 


Z'tSB 


2-2-iB 


3-2-6B 


3-2-4B 


^2-68 


6-2-ea 


6-2-8B 


6-2-aB 


&-24B 


B-MOA 


B-MOA 


B-2-10A 


6-2- 10 A 


I0-M2B 


E0-2-1ZB 


1D-M2G 


12-M4A 


14-M6A 




P.O- 


13 


a,s 


12 


10 


i.e 


13 


12 


L3 


1.6 


10 


13 


1.4 


1.9 


i.% 


3,1 


L5 


i.a 


1* 


17 


17 




IHJ'-IBO'F 


1-Z'« 


1'^4A 


2-2'5B 


I-2-5B 


3-Z-6B 


4-Z-4B 


4-2-6B 


6-2-8B 


e-2-aB 


h-2-i^ 


7-2-aB 


9-MOB 


9-2-106 


J- MOB 


1I>?-10B 


I1M2B 


11-M28 


12-M28 


11-2'HA 


14-2- 16 A 




P.D. 


12 


3.S 


11 


IB 


l« 


14 


3,4 


1.3 


U 


l.S 


14 


1.2 


L6 


It 


U 


1.5 


LB 


16 


18 


16 




iJcr-iso-F 


l.t4A 


I-2-4A 


2-Z-SB 


2-2'5B 


tZ-6B 


5-E-5B 


S^2-6B 


7-2-flB 


7-2-flB 


7-246 


a-246 


9-2-ioe 


10-MQB 


10-M06 


lO'MOS 


I2-M2B 


1^M2B 


12-M28 


11-M4A 


14-M6A 




P.O. 


12 


3i 


11 


U 


LT 


15 


a.5 


L3 


1.7 


2.0 


16 


1.2 


L7 


12 


IB 


1,6 


1.9 


16 


16 


1^ 




1 — — 1 

lar-aJCF 


1-MA 


2-2-4A 


3- 2-58 


3-2-58 


5-2'6B 


5-2-66 


6-2-SB 


S-2-fle 


B-24B 


8-248 


B-246 


L0-2-IQB 


LD-7-10B 


11- MOB 


11-M06 


tl-MZB 


1S^M28 


ll-MZB 


t4-M4A 


1^2- 16A 




P.O. 


11 


1-2 


13 


3.1 


la 


15 


4.0 


1.4 


1.B 


11 


15 


13 


12 


14 


U 


LI 


11 


19 


10 


17 




ISO'-JIO'F 


2^4A 


2'?-4A 


3-^5B 


4-2-58 


6-2'&B 


6-248 


6-2-68 


9.2-aB 


9-2-68 


S-24B 


9.2-BB 


11-M06 


11-2- 1QB 


l^^I06 


12-M06 


13-M2S 


13-2-128 


I^M2S 


1S-M4A 


I6-M6A 




P.D, 


IS 


4.2 


13 


3.4 


10 


IB 


3-9 


L6 


ID 


14 


IB 


14 


L9 


16 


U 


14 


11 


3.1 


12 


3.0 




Mr-i2D'? 


?.?.a 


3'?^A 


4-?-» 


s-^sB 


J-2-6B 


7-2-6S 


7-2-68 


9-2-83 


lO-2-Be 


tO-2-B3 


10-24B 


12-MOB 


12-2-106 


13-MDe 


13-MOB 


14-2-128 


14-2-128 


15-2-128 


16-2- t4A 




17-M6A 




P,0- 


1* 


4.0 


1* 


3.7 


12 


3.1 


4-3 


L.6 


12 


2-7 


3.L 


L5 


10 


3.0 


^7 


n 


2.1 


3.4 3.7 


n 




i 


^ 

^ 


^^^^^5^^^*^^ DARLING BROS. LTD. 

iJ^^^^^^^^ MONTREAL QUEBEC 
^^^^ MAY 1954 
















— 



































€ 



ASK US ABOUT WEBSTER CF3 CONTROL 
FOR HOT WATER HEATING SYSTEMS. 




BROTHERS LIMITED 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTRCAl, CANADA 



HALIFAX . SAINT JOHN ■ QUtBGC - ARVIDA - TIMMlNS - OTTAWA 
TORONTO - WINNlPCe - CALeARY - fiOMONTON - VANCOUVCIt - ST. JOHNS, NFLO. 



*R" U-TUBE CONVERTORS 

lOT WATER HEATING SYSTEMS 



-1 

f 



Ail connecttoni 3'andover 
F. 4 D,. 150 U.S. Std. 
D^(ign Prc»ture Tube & 
Shell* 1 6" dio. ood under — ^^e" ClrcuiTi 1 00 PSIG. 

welded-^n end plare. 

Table 7 — Dimension & Pressure Drop Do!a 




Hffi 



"C 




Shelli 1B"d;a.&over 
^(eparote cover. 



175 

4' 

5- 
21" 

]03-l?B 

15;' 

uv 

2'6- 
0% 

U-2-\2B 
16"/ 

IB;- 

i?r 

0.51 

13 2 i:e 
n.' 

59 
16;- 

!?;• 

5 V 

UJ 

15-2-12B 

16S- 

1?;' 

6-4' 

75 

16-M2Q 

16- 

\2l' 

z-y 

0,82 

IM-16A 

3,07 
18-M6A 

16- 

9' 10" 

141 

IS! J 16A 

IC' 

3 8? 



300 
4" 



11 - 

- J 



ll'M2B 

It;- 

i^r 

3 0- 

05» 

I2-M2S 

I6i- 

\2r 

13-2- 12Q 

IB:- 

!?!• 

J-S" 
0,80 

i2r 

0.51 
I5M2B 

16- 

i2r 

6-1- 

1.00 

16-2I2B 

12:' 

11? 
1744SA 
23- 
18' 

1,64 

E3 J ISA 

23r 

!fil4-lBA 

la- 

/' 1- 
t^ 

19 4 ISA 

■ nr 

13- 
l9b-4-iaA 



11, ' 

18' 

9'-&' 
2.4S 



3 50 

5* 

6' 

I"' 

■- 1 

1*214* 

19;- 

ir 

31- 
0.» 

13-M4A 

19;' 

:r 
yw 

59 

14-2 14A 

19r 

14* 

A--r 

0.68 

15-2-UA 
19!' 

14" 

5"4- 

0.77 
I6^M4A 

i9r 
u- 

6'-9' 

0.85 

17-3-HA 

n- 

8'^ 

Q91 

1S-4-20A 

25- 

a- 

S'-4- 
1,32 

l8i-i-20A 

25r 

1.46 
19'4-20A 

Jb;- 

20' 

h- U' 

l« 

19; 4:0A 

?o- 

l?4 

2O4-:0A 
25- 
20- 

3 5' 
1.88 

?0', iliiA 

25r 

$-■4* 

_■ jj 



300 

S' 

6' 
21" 

U2UA 

19- 
W 
3' 10' 
OiS 
14-MiA 

w;* 

14' 
4''7* 

1 ^ 
15-MU 

i9r 

14* 

5'-4' 

M5 
I&214A 

191- 

U' 

6-9' 

1.30 
17-2' I4A 

!9r 

14' 

3'-2' 

1.44 
I8-4-20A 

»r 

20' 
5-4' 

2.Qt 

18;4-20A 

25- 

20' 

5--2' 

2,27 

]9d?0A 

»;• 

20- 
6MI' 

24S 
19S-4 20A 

2b',' 
20- 

;■ 8- 

20 4 M 

25r 

20- 

8.5' 

230 

?0i420A 

25; ' 

?r 

9 4" 

21 4 20A 

2D- 
lO'-J* 

-■s2 



400 

6' 

6' 

21' 

l4^MtA 

22'/ 

16' 

3'9- 

0.83 
!5'M6A 

22r 

16' 
l'4' 

98 
16'2'[6A 

le* 

5-5- 
1,13 
17-216A 
221' 
16' 
6-7' 

lis 

I8-M6A 

22- 

16- 
7-9" 

1.43 

iei-M6A 

n\' 

16" 
8-11' 

]17 

I94-24A 

29- 

24" 

5'-6' 

2J0 
19'.4 24A 

29i* 

24' 

6'4' 

2.36 
20-4-24A 

291' 

24- 

6'B' 

2.S2 

291- 

24- 
7-4' 

:6« 

21-4-24A 
29- 
24* 

B'O- 
2.84 

:i' 4 24A 

»;• 

24- 

300 
Z2 4 24A 

29;- 

24- 

9-5' 
116 



500 

6' 
6- 

2;- 

tS-MSA 
221' 
18' 

3'-7" 

0.93 

16-2I8A 

231- 

18- 
4-6- 

!04 
!7'2-iaA 

23' 

W 
5'-4' 

1.15 

182-13A 

231- 

IB" 
6'-4' 

1.26 

LSI-MSA 

23- 

18- 
7'-3- 

. 1J7 

19-2-I8A 
31' 

IB' 

B'-l' 
UB 
191-2 ISAl 
23- 
ifl' 
9'-D' 
1.59 
204-37A 

3ir 

26r 

S'3- 

164 

2I-4'27A 

31- 

ftj- 

63' 

2m 

?li-4'^7A 

3ir 

26r 
6' 9' 

221 
2^4^2;A 

3i:* 
ar 

7'3' 

2.40 
^2J4:;a 

311' 

26- 

B'4' 

2.SS 
?34^7A 

31- 

26J' 

9.r 

2.77 





Darling Clo»"D"Pump 



DARLING CENTRIFUGAL 
CIRCULATING PUMPS 

Fig, 2 illustrates the well known Darling 
Class "D" Centrifugal Circulating Pump 
with V^ belt drive and separate extra 
heavy cab^t iron bases into which are fitted 
Darling Vibration Dampers. 

Experience has shown that in locations 
wh*Te the noise level must be kept to a 
mintmum. as in hospitals, institutions and 
apartment houses, the 'V' belt driven unit 
is ihe most satisfactory solution to the 
problem. Only in this way can operational 
noise be isolated from the healing system 
piping- With this method, standard pucops 
and mcilors can be used, thus reducing 
initial cosls and simplifying maintenance 
routine. 

The Darling Class "B" Pump of horizontal 
split case design is also widely used on 
larger heating systems. For data on this 
type of pump refer to Bulletin No. 41-C, 

On both Class "D" and "'B" Pumps, our 
standard 'V belt drive will operate the 
pump at 1150 R,P,M, when using a 1750 
R-P-M. motor. It is, therefore, important 
when sizing a *V' belt driven pump to 
choose capacities and heads at the 1150 
R.P.M. speed. 

Dimensions and typical specification for 
the Class ""D" Pump may be obtained 
from Bulletin No. 46-D. Darling Ready- 
Templates in \ ', I4" and '^" scale are 
available on request for Class "D" and 
"B" Pumps, in both direct connected and 
'V belt drive types. 









Ta 


ble 3 — Capocity 


Tabre 






1 


Key: RriT Figure — stzt dlichurge j to>t Figvre — H.^. of mofOT- 






HEAD IN FIftV 




to 


19 


ao 


25 


JO 


M 


40 




10 




! WKC \ 
1 »"C * 


t OMrc k 
! 0*wc 1 
1 »« * 


1 w« 1 
1 DMC 1 
1 DAK 1 


t DAAC t 

1 ftw t 

1 DMK 1 


1 MAC 1 
1 OAAC t 

1 DAWC i 


1 DACC t 
1 OAK t 

i oiwc t 


1 DACC t 
I DAK t 
1 D"C 1 




M 




1 MVfC 1 


IL MHC 1 
1 MlfC 1 


i MAC t 
1 MWC 1 
1 MWC t 


1 OMC i 
1 MAC 1 
1 MWC 1 


1 OAAC i 
t DAAC 1 
1 DUC 1 


1 OKC 1 
1 MAC 1 
I MHC 1 


1 DACC 1 
1 DAK 1 
I DAK 1 




ao 


]7ffl 


11 MK t 

l| MHC \ 


1| MWC k 


1 DMC t 
It MWC 1 
1 MWC 1 


■1 OUC 1 

} MAC t 
1 MWC 1 


11 MAC t 
1 OAAC t 
1 MWC t 


I MCC 1 
1 OAAC 1 

1 MHC 1 


1 OKC 1 
1 DAK I 
1 DAK 1 




35 


14S0 


i( cue 1 

11 D«HC » 


11 M*C 1 
l| M11C 1 
It M>IC 1 


It MAC 1 
U MWC i 

a MWC t 


11 owe t 

1 MU t 

■ t MWC 1 


U OMC t 
1 OAK 1 

l| MWC 1 


It DACC 1 

1 OMC 1 
n DAWC 1 


It DACC 1 
It DAK 1 
1 OAK t 




90 




II OMC i 


It BANC 1 
It M1«; 1 
U 0A1« t 


It MM t 
It MWC 1 
IJ MttC 1 


It t>AAC 1 
11 MAC t 
II MWC 1 


II DMC 1 
T) MAC 1 
1| DAWC 1 


II DACC 1 
n OAK 1 
11 DMC 1 


U DACC 1 
11 OAK J 
1| DMC 1 




IS 




It M«C 1 


]| D<WC t 
]| MK t 
It MK t 


It MAC 1 
l| MWC t 

II om t 


11 MAC 1 
It M« 1 
■t MWC t 


11 «AC 1 
It OMC 1 

It DAWC 1 


It MCC 1 
It DAK 1 
11 DAK 1 


l| DKC 1 
It OMC J 

It MK 1 




40 




It MWC L 


2 MHC 1 

It MWC \ 
It Wit 1 


II MAC t 
1| MHC t 

It MWC t 


■ t »K ) 
It MAC ] 
It MWC 1 


It OMC } 
It DAAC T 
It DAWC 1 


11 MCC 1 
It OMC 1 
J| OMC 1 


It MCC 1| 
It OAK 1 

It DMC 1 




90 


ITS 


1 MHC 1 


? MWC t 
7 MHC t 
\\ MWC t 


It OAAC 4 
1 DAWC 1 
■t MWC 1 


■ 1 MAC 1 
It MAC 1 
1| MAC I 


1\ DAAC 1 
It MAC 1 
H DAAC 1 


M DACC k 
1| MK t 

It UUC 1 


U OKC l| 

l\ OAK 1 
I| OMC 1 




40 


2 MIW \ 
If MWC j 


2 OAWC f 
? MHC 1 
It DAViC 1 


It MAC i 
I MWC 1 
H MWC 1 


11 MAC 1 

II MAC 1 

It out f 


It OAK 1 
It DMC 1 
It OMC i 


It wee 1 

■ t OAK J 
It DUC 1 


H OKC Jt 

It DAK It 
It MAC 1 




7S 


1U0 


; MHC 1 
]| M« 1 


t MWC 1 
1 MHC 1 
I MWC 1 


It MAC t 
1 MWC f 

Z MWC 1 


It MAC 1 
It DAAC 1 
1) OMC 1 


■1 DACC 1| 
\i MK 1 

1| DAAC 1 


It DAtt It 
H OAK It 
t| DAK l| 


It MTt t| 
It DAK It 
U OAK 1| 




100 


1450 


I M«C I 
; MUfC I 
I M«C 1 


7 DAAC 1 
2 MWC f 
J MWC 1 


I MAC i 
t MWC 1 
? MWC I 


i MAC It 
1 MAC It 
t MAC 1 


1 OAAC l| 

2 tUUC ]| 
1 MK It 


2 DVtt 2 
2 MK 9 

J DAK 2 


t OXOC 2 
2 OMC r 

2 MK 2 




t3S 


17» 


? MjV 1 
7 MVC I 
1 MWt t 


1 MAC 1 

2 MttC I 
7 MWC \ 


2 MAC 1 

I MAC 1 

1 MWC 1 


1 MAC It 

3 auc It 

Z MAC l| 


7 DAK It 
2 OAK It 
7 DAK 1| 


7 OKC 2 
2 OMC 1 
7 OMC 2 


r Dxcc 2 

2 MK 2 
2 MK f 




1»0 


JtE4 
l«0 


1 M>C I 
I MAC i 
3 DAAC r 


3 MAC 1 
3 MAC 1 
) MAC 1 


1 MAC It 
1 MAC l| 
? MAC || 


9 OMC 1 
I MAC t 

t MAC 2 


9 MAC 2 
2 DAAC 7 
7 DAK 2 


1 taCK 9 

2 OMC 9 

2 DAK 2 


7 Dgnc 9 

1 OAK i 

1 DAK 9 




ITS 


US 
Ittt 


) (MM t 

3 Omc L 
3 DAAC 1 


1 MAC 11 
3 MAC II 
3 MAC \\ 


3 OAAC 4 
3 MAC L| 
i MAC Lt 


> MAC 2 
} OAAC 7 
3 MAC It 


3 DAK 2 
3 MAC 2 
9 OAK 1 


2 MTC 1 
2 OAK J 
7 DAK 9 


2 DIYC 9 
7 OMC 9 
2 OAAC 3 




100 


iiso 

143 
i;» 


1 MAC 1 
J MAC ] 
] MAC 1 


3 [LUC It 

I MK It 

I owe It 


3 MK 2 
3 DMV It 
3 MAC It 


3 OAAC 2 
3 OAK 7 
9 DMC 1 


1 DXCC 9 
3 OAK 7 
3 DMC 2 


9 OKC 9 
3 DAK 9 

9 DAK 9 


9 Dice 3 
3 OAK 9 
9 MK 1 




33S 


3 QAAC \\ 

3 MAC 1| 
3 OUC l| 


I MAC It 
I MAC It 
1 MAC It 


i MAC ? 
3 MU 2 
1 MAC I 


9 MAC 2 
3 OAAC 3 

X DAAC 2 


i DKCC i 
1 MAC 9 
9 DMC 9 


I DJUX 1 
i DMC 1 
1 MAC 1 


3 OKC 9 
9 OUC 9 
9 OAK 9 




3S0 


titt 


t MM It 
J UK It 
I MAC II 


1 MAC I 
3 MAC ? 
J MAC i 


1 MAC 1 
> MAC 1 
1 MAC 1 


9 MAC 3 
9 MAC ] 
9 OAAC 3 


9 ODCC 3 
3 UW 9 
9 DMC 3 


1 one 1 

9 MK 1 
3 OAK 1 


9 DKC 9 
J DAK 1 

3 OMC S 




»0 




1 CrXAC \\ 
I MAC ? 
3 MAC 1 


4 OXAC 2 
] MAC % 


4 OMC 3 
3 OMC 9 
3 MV ] 


1 Due 3 

3 OAK 9 

9 OMC 3 


t DIK 9 
3 OAK 1 

9 OMC ( 


* oixn 1 

9 OMC « 
3 OMC 1 


t Wit f 
9 MK i 
9 MAA i 




«50 


IttO 

ino 


< OMC r 

3 MK 2 

i oam: i 


4 DXAC 1 
] MAC 1 
4 MAC 3 


4 DMC 3 
3 MAC 3 

i MAC 3 


« OXK i 
3 MAC i 
9 MAC 5 


4 DMC \ 
1 DMC i 
9 MK i 


4 orrc s 

3 OMC i 
9 MK ) 


< Dm 1 

9 DDtC i 
9 DMC 9 




400 


liSQ 


1 OlJ< 2 


4 DUC 3 
1 MAC 3 


4 MAC 3 
t DUC 3 
4 MAC 3 


4 MAC S 
« DUC f 
9 DAAC S 


* Dm s 

1 OMC 1 
1 MK I 


4 one ( 

t OMC 1 

9 DAAC i 


« ont 1 
« 091K rt 
9 OAK H 




490 




4 DJUC 3 
4 DUC I 


i MAC 3 
« DUC 3 


t MAC 5 

4 MAC i 
4 OXAC f 


* DUC S 
4 MAC i 
« OAC 1 


* mrt f 

4 DIAC S 
< DMC f 


i om 1 

4 DMC i 

* ouc s 


* om 7\ 

* OMC 2t 
t OXK 2t 




900 




< MAC 3 
« MAC ) 


4 0KAC J 
4 tUUC $ 


4 MAC S 
4 MAC » 
4 MAC i 


4 Wit 1 
4 MAC i 
4 sue 9 


< one ( 

4 ffXAC 9 

< DMC 9 


t one 21 

4 DUC '1 

4 DMC ?J 


* om rt 

4 DUC Tt 
4 DMC rt 









Tobre 4 



( 





TCMPHATUiE tANGES 



fto. 
«-H 

5D-H 

se-H 

58-H 
62H 
66-H 

7J-H 
76'H 

fl2'H 

a7-H 
93- H 



flingfl 

2!0=-2B0^ 
230^-270^ 



60'. 80^ an d !70^ Rtngvi 

Ho 
4fi-K 
50- K 



56- K 
58- K 
e2-K 
66- K 
70- K 
74- K 
76- K 
ftO-K 
87-K 
B4-K 
9J-K 
93-K 
96'K 
llOK 

nap 
•iio-wc 



.^^ f. 

0" F. 

f. 
F. 
F. 

: j-r 



'flange 110 WD is nol available for itgufator vi« 2' and ffltgej 

DIMIN5IONS 



Vilvo 
$tze. 

IjKhSS 


\ 


J 


1 

250 
53 

16A 
MA 

7 

li 


250 


u 

225 

68 
3A 

?1 

3i^ 


fl5 

103 

»A 

n 


2i 
fiS 

129 
14A 

7i 

ii 


3 


1 


5 


•PlBSSUCB 

Liniil, 
Pound 1 


250 

49 

HA 


250 

50 
16A 

HA 
J' 


55 

170 
201 

71 

t\ 

3ti 


*Q 


30 


Shipping 
Weight. 

Poundt 


G4 

16A 

14^ 

ii 


" 


A 
B 

D 
E 

K 
L 

M 

H 




*'■ .1 

u 


151 

71 

10;, 
15i 



■Preuure drop acro&s valve. 

Srand^'d buth for rempeiarure 'ange^ begLnnlnE at lOO^F. ar above 



G 


1 


1 


I 


J 


1 


I 


I 


I 


1 


u 


H. 


9 


9 


'i 


9 


9 


13 


13 


ir 


[7 


Lf> 


T 


1- 


I- 


1- 


i- 


i- 


1-- 


1- 


I" 


t- 


li 




n\ 


in 


lU 


lU 


tu 


HI 


lU 


IH 


1U 


in 



Slantfard bulb lor temperalure ranges beflmning befow iOO^f Und^r 
«rtairi cDndilions. smaHer bulbs may be ui«d. Inlotmsliun on itfqueii. 



G 


U 


11 


ii 


U 


N .,.„ 


24 


24 


M 


T, 


11- 


IH 


li- 


11^ 




il\ 


IM 


ii) 



Hi 



111 

24 



2i' 



1 \- I It- 



2I' 

1!; 



j1' 



3i' 
iil 



Sr-ANOAf?0 





Fig, 3 



Fig. 4 



No. 92} REGULATOR 

The No, 931 lemperttluri- regulator is, largely uaed in 
indufllrial processes where one df^6nite lemperafurt in 
required from day to dny. It is aiau widely used to 
i:unfto] (cmperature of hcii 
water storage tanks and 
converl.ora. 

Thi No. 12B bulb Is 
standard and ia dimen- 
sioned ill lablv a1 left, [t 
b mnde of copper and ilfl 
Aitings are rif hrjis?^. Mra«is 
armor covers The lUxihl*- 
copper tubing beCwevn Mu- 
bulb und regulator projh'r 
Thia armored lubing in 
rvgularly furniehod H feiM 
long. Longtr lengths iivail- 
tfbk'. Dulb and its (juin^cs, 
aa well as riexibie tubing 
nnd ift^ armor, can be fur- 
niBhvd made of oLher 
nittal^i. 

This regulator ia made 
In valve sizes t^" to 5" 
inclusive. Sizes 4" ro 4" 
Inclusive, are et|uippeH 
with type "F" dirt ct-at'ling 

valve. 6" size is equipped with lype "E" direcl-acling 
vjalve. Bronze trim supplied unless otherwise ordered. 
A r**verae-acling valve will be furnishrd on order. 
SizA^a *^" t<j 1 ^j", inclusive, have screwed i^nds. Si/a's 
2" and above. Hanged enda iLlLS lbs. A.9.A. Kalmga.i 

PRESSURE LIMITS 

TIk ^tandurd No. 9.11 regulator ia not suiiable where 
Ihi- presaurc drop neross valve exceeds the limits given 
in table at left, A utainlens stt^l frtmm*^ iffi/t'r nhou!d 
he usrd for prrfi^un's afiofff 50 iha-y or for nupcrhcated 
tlrom. 

INSTALLATION 

Bulb is to be inserted in (he vessel so it will contflcl (he 
liquid under control. A strainer should tx- inslatted 
ahead of the regulating valve. 

TEMPERATURE ADJUSTMENT 

This regulator can be act to conlrol at. any poinl 
within Its (emperulure range by merely turning the 
adjustment wheel located just below the regulator 
head. 

No. 93f OR REGULATOR 

If it is necessary for the regulator to withstand, with- 
out damage, temperatures ai the bulb of more than 
20^ above lop end of the adjuatabJe range, ihen the 
"Over-Run" feature must be supplied. This feature 
will prQttc( against temperaturea up to 100* above 
top of the range: and, in some casesn higher tem- 
peratures. 

The "Over-Rtui*' feature ia not normally required 
for refrigerating ranges since the bulb temperature ia 
normallv lower than the ibellowsi temperature at 
head of regulator. 

When supplied with "Over-Run" feature, the regu- 
lator is designated as No. d3l'OR. Valve sLeea. 
pressure limits and temperature ranges same aa for 
No, 931 except No, 93I-OR in si^tes 3" and above ia 
not available with 60^ temperature ranges; and* in 
any aize with 80'^ or 120^ ranges. 



t > 



--*-;; 





T/op, 5u* 126'J. Tht 326T it 



Working Pressure To 15 Lbs. per Sq. In. 

SERIES 26-T: Heavy duty traps, capable of handling Urge volumes of coridens, 
t ion and air. Compact and light in weight ^ Suited for drips of maJn^, air conditio 
ing coils, blast radiation, unit heaters, hot water convertors. fan heater coiJfi, ar 
similar applications. Side outlet openir^. The most used aixes [00026. 0026. 02< 
incorporate the outward opening discharge valve — which permils the valv* 
open when excessive pressures prevail, and (hus 
prevents waterlogged piping or equipment. 

ConitrucHon Features: Brass valve pieces and 
seals on water discharge end. Thermostatic air 
vent diaphragms are Monel MeLai with valve 
pieces and seats of brass. Other interior parts are 
copper, brasaor iron. Cast iron bodies and covers. 

Size 00026 has one inlet opening and one 



outlet on cover plate. A choice of two inlet openings in opposite sides of body and two 

outlet openings at bottom is provided in sizes 0026 and 026. Pipe plugs included for 

one inlet and outlet. These sizes can be mounted in pipe line without other support. 

Sizes 126 and 226 have single end inlets and outlets and require a supporting bracket 

when installed. Large ball float and long lever provide 
ample power for operation of inward opening valve^ 




SERIES 26-0: SimUar to the 26-T 
but with plain cover instead of 
cover incorporating thermostatic 
element and by-pass, l^sed where 
concentration of air does not 
occur* such as on ends of mains 
and risers, on flash tanks and for 
dripping gravity heating systems 
into vacuum return lines^ Provi- 
sion is made for e)cl«rnal air 
by -pass. 



Fi0- 7 Yftbtltr Heavy Oifr^ 
D/jp 7r9p. Sf» 0Oi6J Iha 
076-J 'I umilv trctotmg that 
tiaa* Iftfifit II bo 'fad 'ftltv^ 
9f tlaifiDt-i 




f 



he. 6 Wmbitv Hma¥r Ouly Dr» 
hop, Sia 00036-J. . 



Float and ThirfnaifiiftE T<opt Jn Lbi Aar*f fttt Hogr 






Pre^ure Difl«renc« Atioii Trap m Ibi iwi Sq. In, 



Symbol 



I k « M 



DO0?e-T artd D 

00?G-T4<i(I0 

026 T and 

126 T and 

276 r ind 



5D' 
125 

30O' 

600 

12^ 



70 
175 
425 

17?5 



100 

600 

250O 



120 
JOO 

14/Q 
30G0 



1 

HO 

ISO 

850 

1700 

15W 



10 15 



200 

1200 
7400 
5000 



210 220 

«5 550' 

JZEO n?o 

if520 26<D 

5250 5500 



72\ 

s; 

2761 
575< 



ConvEFiion FaclO'! To converl ralings given m Ibi pe* ^our ol waler To iq ri edr 
3T 240 B I u multiply by 4 Palmgs aie in accorflance wiTh sfandsrdi adopred by lh< 
SlMm Healing EquipmenT Manulac'ureti Aisociahon prnvidmii Tor Iht conTiftuoL 
fliTTiinatiOfi cT St' when (he traf> ij pppiafme al ir^ mamrmm 'aling 



BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 



HALIFAX, N,S. 

E- S, Stephemorf 8. Co,, Ltd 155 Gronville Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.B. 
E- S. 5fephenjon & Co., Ltd- 1 5 Dock Street 

QUEBEC, P.O. 

W' J- Banfc* 1 40 St, John Street 

ARVIDA, P,0, 

Rene Beoudef & Cie Ltee 122 Dovii Sireer 

TIMMINS, ONT, 
Potricio Engineering Ltd, U8 Third Ave. 

OTTAWA. ONT. 

Darling Brother! Limited T8 Rideou Street 



TORONTO. ONT, 

Dorling Brothers Limited 137 WellingJon St- W, 

WINNIPEG. MAN. 
DorWng BfOthefs Limited 123 Prince« Street 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H, F. Oorke & Co. ltd- 1 1 M Rfrh St. W. 

VANCOUVER, B-C, 
Frank Dorling & Co. Ltd. 1 1 44 Homer St. 

ST, JOHN'S, NFLO 
Clayton Con^tniction Co. Ud. 198 Woler St. 





HEAD OFFICE AND WORRs 

HERS LI )\ ITTi) 

C_E__SJ^_M O^NJMIJjl^l , CANADA 
SINCE 1888 




.■7.^- 




flG t. IV*'- 1 1"^- CloM "OG" Pump V-Bsif driven by 
l,j HP, SplH PKa»e MoMf oil mounled on C.L 6oi*. Da- 
tignvd ond buJIl to Oar ling ttqndnrdi. 



APPLICATION 

Designed primarily for circulating 
water at low dischorge heads such as 
required in the smaller forced hot water 
heating systems. 

Capacities range from 2 IMP- GPM up to 
25 IMP- GPM and heads from 2 ft. to 25 ft. 
as shown in curves at nght. For quietness 
of operation, with a minimum of 
attention this unit is ideal. 



BULLETIN No. 50 



FIG. II 1750 ItPM - 60 CYCLE 


R! njiuli.j«C A-Q'r-fi' . .-"'■ffo .-''.' .' 


1^ ' ' 1 "^T 1 ch^^'w.^, ; , . - .■ 


■*'''' ^-i'rf- 1 ^° «^.-,/-^.'^^ ,j,_-..o.* , 


- —]jt ■»*——-■ =^f- f'- 1 T T — 




'•'_.' _. MJ * t ' n ^ 'i r * 


i\ , rr 1 n 


fc^^^^ X- T- ^ 


■ »iit>«. y^kriniiiv* wA- 'J - 




"aihi: " ^ - : _:^: """:::'": :::::.::.± 


-^r^^ x _x - 


_i__.^^_4_ — -- 


i\ L. rj 


n Sn 


:!? ?s=Jz:&2ia - - - ^ 








3 .«■ t 1 "^v. h . - ' ■' '•>** 


■ 1 -"T-i — '-^^L^^^^-tJj rrrrtn> 1 


H ' ■ ■ ■ -^y TmH 11 TT^TSL 




._^___..^^-.-£=____^i4^_ i,-v ^ 


" r 1 h ^ 


" i Jt i N 1 fi. V ' 1 ' 





no. Ill 



14S0 ftPM - » CYCLE 




COHSTRUCTION FEATURES 



e- 




The special feotures incorporated 
in the design of this pump 
ensure quietness of operation 
and minimum attention. Special 
features include sleeve bearings, 
packless gland ond isolotion 
of motor from system and building 
by V-Belt drive and rubber 
trunnion mounting. Adjustoble 
speed pulley on motor permits 
running standard pump at 
different speeds to obtain desired 
head and capacity. 



<M 



-^ 



TYPICAL SECTION CLASS "DG" CENTRIFUGAL CIRCULATING PUMP 




Si-,, leaa 



^ 



PUMPS FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

For land ond morine lervice we design and 
monuFocrufc Single ond Duplex Horiiontal ond 

Vertrcof Sleom Pumps for Boiler Feed, Vocuum and 

Tortk Service, olso Single ond Mulfistoge 
Centrifugal Pumps for o|| purposes. 
Honzonlol and Verticol Condentote Pumps, 



fkirling Brothers limited 



MONTREAl CANADA 

ENGINEERS - MANUFACTURERS • FOUNDERS 

HAIIFAX - SAINr JOHN, H,% - OUCaEC ' AtVIDA 

rOROHlO • OlIAWA • 1IMMINS - WlNNIPfG • CAIGARV 

VANCOUVia • II JOHN S, NMd, 




1 



f 



':-' ■■■U'^>:.:.. 



^ 



'■^ 



) 



C T R O N I C 




Af T^^i^ 




WEBSTER 



ODERATO 



SYSTEM 

E STEAM HE ATI 




IftADE MARK ktG. U.S. PAT. OFF 





"G)ntroIled to. the weather'* 



I 



WARRE 



Bulletin B-900-4B 



WEBSTER & COMPANY 



CAMDEN 5, NEW JERSEY 




) 




IF yon have a building to be heated with 
steam, you can lieat it better (greater 
comfort, rednttinn of overheating antl 
nnderheating^ and at lower cost with 
a "Conlrnlled-ln-the-W father" Webster 
Moderator System. 

That's the conclusion of architects, 
engineers and contractors who have speci- 
fied or installed the Webster Moderator 
System in thousands of steam heated 
bi[ilf]ings. 

Bnilfling owners and managers liave 
fuel savings records to prove the soundness 
of the heating plans. For example: 

An office building cut steam consump- 
tion $5,671 in three years. . , , A new 
hospital used 18^ less steam than the con^ 
serA'ati\ e engineering estimate, . . , A group 
of 14 university buildings cut heating costs 
S9,51KI in 12 months. . . , An apartment 
building saved $567 in the first year, 

A heating plan that inchides a Web- 
ster Moderator System is simple, flexible 
and comfort producing . . . 

—simple because there are just four 
control elements for each zone. The bal- 
ancing of the system is done from the 
heating plan by the accurate sizing of 
Webster Metering Orifices in radiator sup- 
ply valves. 

— Hexible because each system is "tailor 
made" for tlie building iii which it is 
installed. Eacli section of the building 
receives the desired amount of heat^ Shut 
off a single room or an entire Hoor and the 
system automatically compensates for the 
decreased demand. 

—comfort producing because the Web- 
ster Outdoor Thermostat speeds up the 



delivery of heat when the outdoor temper- 
ature falls and slows down the delivery 
when the outdoor temperature rises, 

PROVEN 
IN SERVICE 

It is now more than twenty-five years 
since the installation of the first Webster 
Moderator System of Steam Heating Dur- 
ing this period, the fundamental features 
of continuous steam flow, balanced distri- 
bution by the use of metering orifices, 
automatic control bv Outdoor Thermostat, 
and niaimal supplementary control at a 
central point have been continued with- 
out change. 

Of course, the detailed mechanical 
means for accomplishing these fundamental 
features have been continuously refined, 
resulting in lower costs of the complete 
installation, lessened maintenance and 
improved operation. As a result, toda> tlie 
cost of the Webster Moderator System 
makes its application practical in much 
smaller buildings than was the case 
twenty years ago. This year . . . just as in 
every year since its introduction . . . has 
seen a wider use of this modern system 
than in any preceding year. 

We solicit consideration of the Web- 
ster Moderator S\stem primarily on the 
basis of proven performance. The Com- 
pany's products and services are backed by 
an ample modern plant and resources, a 
corporate experience extending o\er more 
than half a century, and sales and service 
facilities in 60 United States cities and 
Canada. 







The f;iNuuii E^iuiUbk' BtiiWinj-, a \'cw Yf^rk Cily nniudw;iy 
landmark since 1914, has 4.K(K) Web^Ur Sylpli.'u TruiJS. W- 
st.illtd ill the origrnsil Wihslor V.uuutij System lA -SUam ll^iil- 
jiiy. Ill 1949, atter chetkiii^ with 5fl leadrrs in the l)i»M(hnv 
inaiiafifmeiit hi^lfj in W\v Vcirk, tht- imncrs clrtided lu *'"ti- 
\erl their nisIalUli.in In a Wrfislrr Mud<'ra(ui Sy^U'in ■•! Slriim 
Ih'dting, with lieatiiig "ConlniHed-hv-the-Wfiilitrr." 

Original Installati.jn Art-hiU-el: EriiesI R. Grahuiu, ilf*aing atid 
General Ccmtratlors: TljcniipMin-SlaTrell df.. Inc. HeiilliiB 
Muderniziilioii, CnnsuUiufi! Eii^-iiieer^: Fnti»khn J. LeerWrgrt 
and Jiiseph R, Wtisv, Ccmttavlitr: Car) E. Jipet'ks- 



Webster Moderator 

Steam Heating Systems 

for New Buildings 

and Modernization 



lieatinp speeifieations for this ISO-bed Easl Tennessee 
TB HimpiLil. Knowille, Tenu,, said: "I'hvTe shuli be 
ctmtiuut'iiK jiow iff Ktcam (ti the wjsii'm with fnU *n frnc- 
tUinai heating of rmlwhn^ nf ail fimcs whcsi hvut i.*i on." 
A 4-2ane Webster Moderulnr System of Steam Heating 
meets this spceifiLatiun, supplying steam att*»rdin^ to 
need for nursinj; llmirs, senile and trealnienl uints, 
operating rooms and lalwratories. 



Architects and Engineers: Baimianii and Bautiniiin. Will 
\\\ Griffin and Shi G, Cc*odwyne A5s*jciale>, I li-.ihih^ 
G>ntractori: JoJin F- Humplirey Company. Know ilk- 
Medical Consultants: Dr. R. \\. llutcheM>n, Commiwionef 
of Public Health AUi\ Secretary of th*- Tcnne^isee TB 
Ciminiission, and Dr. W. W. Hubbaid. Director of 
Hospital Service for the State of Tennessee. 





\ J 




o 



WEBSTER HEATING SYSTEMS 

There is a type of Webster Heating System to meet 
prattically every need and purpose. These include 
Webster Steam Heating Systems for larger buildings 
of almost every type, and Webster Baseboard Heating. 
a hot water system particularly suited for small resi- 
dences and other small buildings. 



WEBSTER MODERATOR 
STEAM HEATING SYSTEMS 

Webster Moderator Steam Heating Systems are all 
low-pressure. Iwo-pipe systems ot steam circulation in 
which sleam is delivered to radiators and other heat- 
ing surfaces through supply piping. Water of conden- 
sation and air are removed through separate return 
piping, Webster Radiator Valves and Thermostatic 
Traps are installed respectively on the supply and 
discharge connection of each radiator. Webster ther- 
mostatic or float and thermostatic traps provide for 
prompt removal of water of condensation and air 
from the piping. 

Webster Moderator Steam Heating Systems are 
available with vacuum return, or with open return 
(vented to the atmosphere) with either condensation 
pump or Webster Boiler Return Trap and Vent Trap 
to return water to the boiler, or with \>nt Trap alone 
where condensate is wasted to the sewer, and in ap- 
propriate small installations. 

\"acnum returns may be employed where vacuum 
return pump installation is desired. 

These modern Webster Systems should never be 
confused with old-fashioned steam heating or with 
crude one-pipe steam systems. While utilizing steam 
at low pressures and thereby incorporating all of the 
manv advantages inherent in its use, the modern 
Webster Moderator Systems of Steam Heating pro- 
vide a combination of features which makes them 
particularly deserving of considemtion for larger 
buildings of almost every type. 



STEAM SUPPLY 

Webster Moderator Systems take steam from any 
source at any pressure. In most cases they are supplied 
from low-pressure sources, usually low-pressure boiler 
plants which may burn coal, coke, oil, gas or other 
fuels. Or they may lake steam from a central heating 
plant or a "city main." Where a high-pressure source 
exists, steam pressure is reduced to the desired pres- 
sure through one or more pressure reducing valves 
before being supplied to the heating system. 



STEAM 
DISTRIBUTION 

Steam at low pressure is ideal for distribution. It 
goes from place to place b) virtue of the pressure 
created in its generation, and surprisingly little pres- 
sure indeed is sufficient to cause it to move from the 
point of supply to the point of use. No fans or pumps 
are necessary when heat is moved in the form of steam. 

Steam distribution piping can be arranged with the 
utmost flexibility- Steam mains may run in a loop 
around the circumference of a building, or a trunk 
main may run directly through the center with 
branches taken off at right and left. The distribution 
mains ma> be located in the basement with vertical 
connections rising to the various floors. Or, if desired, 
the distribution mains may be located at the top floor 
with vertical connections feeding downward. In other 
instances, distribution mains may be located at an 
intermediate level, with risers feeding both upwards 
and downwards. There are practically no restrictions to 
the arrangement of distribution piping; when yuu use 
a Webster Moderator System of Steam Heating. 

Distribution piping is ordinarily insulated to reduce 
heat loss. This should be done for maximum steam 
economy and most effective control. However, where 
minimum first cost is of greatest importance, the dis- 
tribution piping may be considered a part of the 
effective heating surface with a consequent reduction 




in the size of tlit' radiators rr<iiiirfd, Th** closeness of 
control will of unirst- hv decrt^ast-d \incc ihc heat out- 
put of the risers will not ht- t^ntrolk-d. 

Easy and quiet distribution, which h Isolh quick 
and effective, is assured by selection of prnpt-r size* 
of pipes and by proper gradinji. This distribution is 
further assured by selection of proper si/e and l>'pe 
of Wtbster Radiator Supply \'alves and Webster Re- 
turn Traps for each radiator, Webster Tliermostatic 
or combination I'loat and Thermostatic Traps are used 
at appropriate locations in the distribution piping in 
order to assure that all pipinii will hv kept antnmnti- 
cally eleared of air and wat<'r ol etnidensulioji. 

RADIATORS 

The jjreal fiesil)ility oi Webster Moderator Systems 
of Steam Mealing is again illuslraled by the wide 
choice oHt-reti in the sdection of radiators or heat 
transfer surfaces. Many Webster Systems employ the 
widely ust'd conventional cast iron "standing' radi- 
ation, either exposed in the roi>n) or eoitcealed l>ehind 
grilles. Cast iron, steel or non-ferrous finned t^n- 
vectf>rs mav Ik* used. 



ORIFICES 
AND CONTROL 

All radiators in Webster Moderator Systems get 
steam at the same time and subst.ojtiatl> in pro[>or' 
lion to the need for steam. This important re>nll is; 
obtained thrtvuch thr install.ttion of accurately sized 
metering orifices in Webster Kadiator Supj)l> \ alves 
and also, where required, by nsv ol Intermediate 
Metering Orilia*% at suitable points in branch mains, 

K;fcch Webster Mcnlerator System is effec-tiveb e*>n' 
trolled 1i> assure maximum ecmiomy and comfort. The 
widf HexJbihl> of Webster System* is further illus- 
trated when the subject of control is considered. 

WrIwIcT MiHleralor Systems may \ye used with 
thermostatic control of supply valves on radiators. 



and with the complex controls frequently used with 
school unit ventilators and other wmpletc temper- 
ature control systems. 



MaM, 




Fig. L AUual prmif of low radiator Umin r..mrf s 
Jfrrr nTf uclu;t) trmiwrnnirr* ;it nim- \WHiis iiim 
\ln>wMi« iivi-ram ipuli.itin n-TiMJtTiUnri'* of J 12" P- 
, . . diir Ui ^di'iililitalh tiihlrnUr*! hirSnlinCT. 



Webster Electronic Contiunons Flow \b*ilerator 
Controls work like an automobile engine throttle- They 
speed np or sltjw down the heating of the radiators 
and elnninati stuivand-go 'triiffic" in the heating 
!iystem, The days when thi- objcttion could be raised 
that, witli st<*ain, mdiators are too hot. Iiave got»' for- 
ever will) modern controlled Webster Moderator 
Systems. Due lo the combined eiiect of balanced 
steam <listribntion tbroui^h oriiices and throttling c^-n- 
tral controls, radiators in Webster Sjstems of Steiini 
lle.itin^ iua> now base low radiator temperatures 
unnpsirable uitli thove obtained pn*viouvK onb with 
(H>n1rolled hot water heating. 

Wel>stei Moderator Systems, from the simplest 
to the most elaboriite, provide <er1ain fundament<il 
clLiracteristics. (Comfort, rather than exact temperaton 
(ontrol, has been the prime obj«-etise. This has Itcin 
attained In |ir<i\iding a sy?^tein and control in which 
the radiattir^ are atuay^ jJvamnllij uarfn ami iiei^^r 
liftftlva^tttty hot. 

Kxamine the illustration in Figure 1> The trni|M'i 
atures sb^twii iti this illustration are taken frcnn attual 




EBSTER MODERATOR CONTRO 



v 



) 3 




rt^adin^s nl a ritdiator in a WVbsler Moderator System 
of Stfiun lieatinj^. With steam at atmospheric pressure 
and consec|iiently 212" R temperature in the supply 
pipinj^ radiator, temperatures nevertheless average only 
112 F. This umque result is not due to '^ high vacuum" 
hut to the creation o( turbulence which produces a 
dose intermixture of steam and air right in the ra- 
diator. How this turbulence is produced in cast iron 
radiation is shown in the ilhistration of Fig. 2. But it 
is not only with cast iron radiation that this effect is 
obtained. 

In many installations Webster System Radiation is 
employed. This non-ferrous heating surface includes 
a substantial furniture steel cabinet which may either 
be exposed or concealed within the walls. Inside this 
cabinet is placed a single unit which incorporates a 
Webster Supply \'alve with orifice, a copper tube and 
atumtnuTu fin heat transfer surface, and a Webster 
Thermostatic Trap together with two solid bniss union 
connections. 

When Webster System Radiators are used, a com- 
pletely prefabricated unit is provided, requiring only 
(he pipin^i to and from the unit. Among the advan- 
tages obtained by the use of Webster System Radi- 
ators, aside from concealment and lessened installation 
expense, is the delivery of a maximum amount of heat 
from a giveji amount of space occupied. Comparison 
of the space required for a Webster System Steam Ra- 
tliatnr with the corresponding space required for ordi- 
nary radiators will show a substantial space saving. 

With Webster System Radiators, the outlet air tem- 
peratures are always low and heating is effected in 



colder weather by the more rapid circulation of gently 
warmed air. 

Where space conditions make it desirable, Webster- 
Nesbitt Unit Heaters mas be emplo)ed \\i Webster 
Systems, or unit ventilators or fin surface. In fact, all 
types of heat transfer surface arc operated at their 
best when steam is pro\ ided through a Webster Mod- 
erator System of Steam Heating. 

The Electronic Webster Moderator System provides 
coutimious stL'am flow and is in general suitable for 
medium to large buildings and groups of buildings 
reepiirint; one or more control valves. Webster Moder- 
ator Controls are extremely flexible and. by modi- 
fication and additinn of supplementary equipment, can 
be supplied to meet almost any requirement from the 
large residence to the largest building groups in the 
woHdn 




Fig, 2, i urImltiK* riNuiUii^ Iriim (uckring ^tiam 
into radijtiir^ t}ir<mgli ji'ls ul liicli vt'loLily i)p.*tiin.os 
a close irilermivtun' of sleum imJ air riyhl \ti Uitr r.i- 
diiitor and results In Iom- niciuUnr tf-mpiTaturci iu 
mild weutlier , , . wilJujul risort In high vuc'inmi- 
Indi^idiul control at t)"- ratli;ilur is iirciMtkci b> Uu- 
Webster Svipply Valie. A WY'Ksti'r HadMkir Triip 
keeps tht' r^idiator freed of condemiilimi aE all limes. 



> 



^ 



IW/filM"^' 



.»i_,'^:-* ^^ 



7S-.I \ ■-■! 




TYPICAL ARRANGEMENT OF 

ELECTRONIC MODERATOR SYSTEM 



iiiTii»ln-iJ h'MIi 



WHAT IS THE WEBSTER ELECTRONIC MODERATOR SYSTEM? 



3 



^ 



The Webster Electronic Moderator Control is an 
electrically operated central uoutrol providint^ con- 
tinuous bnt automatically graduated nr throttled 
steam flow to all radiators. It is literally "controlled b> 
the weather/' An Outdoor Thermostat automatical!\' 
varies the rate of steam delivery to radiators with 
changes Ju outdoor temperature. A Variator. manually 
operated (shown in Fig. 6), modifies the action ot the 
Outdoor Thermostat for such requirements as quick 
healing-up, changes in occupancy, and weather con- 
ditions other than temperature. Experience has shown 
that greater econom>' is possible when these factors 
are provided for by manual adjustment. Optional 
equipment to provide complete!) automatic operation 
includes: (1) pilot light on \'anator; (2) automatic 
overheat limit Indoor Thermostat; and (3) electric 
time switch for automatic heating-up, return to nor- 
mal and shut-off. 




Fig. 4. AUTOMATIC OUTDOOR THERMOSTAT. 

SS" diamtter by IP-" higU^ Interior parts are 
ninuiiti.^d (in cast inm bast ami sealed by a meta! 
luuisitic. Entire devicx' is pn'tt-cted Jnn" din-Ll rays 
of sun by a metal shield. Ample space belweeii sineiti 
and lnniMiijz i.s ptovitlt'd bir air Lireiilalifin. Thernm- 
static element is a bimetallic ct^il espanJinp ^nid cnn- 
liaeting tn ninve a cimtact ami o\er au electrieal 
resistanee. Change in resistance energizes ecn^r"! 
\alvt' mc>t<}r wliith adjnsts the CiJhtriil Vab e. At lU 
F. or higher outdnnr l*-mpfralure, the Control Vahr 
\s con^pletely closed. 

Inst;il|ation-Placed on roof or outside wall osoip 
vertieal pipe stand or liori/oiila! hraekd of comhur 
witli tondulet. Fittings bir mounting not fnrnisln"<l 
with Ihemiostat- Approximiite weight is 8 lbs. 



A t>pical arrangement ( Fig. 3) uses a single 
Webster Main Steam Control Valve. For most instal- 
lations oi average size where occupancy conditions 
are uniform throughout the building, the single valve 
arrangement is adequate and wi)l be preterred be- 
cause «f lower first cost. Two valves may be provided 
with a dual Outdoor Thermostat- For large instal- 
lations, particularly where occupancy conditions vary 
in different portions of the building or fn different 
buildings in a group, making a mulliplicit\ ol valves 
desirable, a single Outdoor Thermostat plus a mijlti- 
zone Thermostat Control Cabinet is applied. Where 
zoning for exposure is desired, hvo or more valves 
with separate Outdoor Thermostats may be used. 

HOW IT WORKS 

For the purpose of describing the Electronic Mod- 
erator System. Fig. 3 will be used, Steajn may be 
delivered from high or low-pressure boiler ur from 
any other source. Pressure reducing equipment should 
be used if initial steam pressure exceeds 15 lb. per sq. 
in. or more. Return piping may be either "open" or 
"closed." as the Electronic Moderator Control regu- 
lates the pressure difference between supply and re> 
turn, and will function equally well regardless ol 
whether the pressure in tlie return piping is at atmos- 
phere or below. 

The Main Steam Control \'alve is adjusted auto- 
matically by the Electronic Moderator Control. The 
valve is motor operated. The Moderator Control serves 
siniph' to reverse the direction of the \alve motor, 
causing it to move the valve in the closing direction 
when less steam is retjinred and in the opening direc- 
tion when more steam is reciuired. 

The electrical Outdoor Thermostat provides the 
automatic "Control-by-the-Weather" feature, varying 
steam flow in accordance with changes in outdoor 
temperature. At 70 F. outdoor temperature, the \hiin 
Steam Control \'al\e will close. At the extreme of 




r>g. 5, TVPE -E" MAIN STEAM CONTHOL 
VALVE, fytnivlied for Webster £-5 Electrmuc Mod- 
erator Sy^lems iti size's frum I'J" to 12". Senes to 
llirottlr juiLciuiit iA '^liiinJ .itlniiHeil (o heating sys- 
tem tcj tijuintuiij pnipiT |)ri'ssure rliff<'ic'iirial ucTo^vs 
sjsteni iiT iicford.Kit*' willi dt-nuiiid, Installetl in in,iiti 
\lfutij supply pipe uhead of ull uniU ot nK!i;ilicio. 
Tfie Webster E-lN Model H Wdw slin^Mi is -I" sv/.v. 
Nute ihpit niol<>r is ini'iinli^d lu-luw and ui'll to the 
side for aet'essibiltty, CoTislnietion iif Iitat-kt-l pr<*- 
sides niiiiitninii Uvul coiiJin:t3on Irom main tn iiiolcir, 

Symbol E-l\ Model B \'aKes, as illusiratfd, are 
provided lor 2'.i" to 6" sizes^ inilusive. Bodies are of 
higlj It-iisile fast iron, globe pattern, senii-baliJ^ced 
disc, double-seat type. Bodies are Hanged for stand- 
ard 125 lbs- Valves an- equipped with phosphor 
bron/e disc cage and renewable seals. The motor is 
monnted below imu] at the -iide ol the \ al\ e by means 
of a eombination part uasl and part pressed ?ilrel 
bracket. 

All models are regidarlv furnished with motors 
monnted on the le(ldi;nid skh-, \ irwed from the inlel 
side of the valve bod\ as sliown. I! inslallatioo ar- 
raii^rnH'iUs mak<' it desirable t^ havr valve braeki-l 
and inc»lor u\t ifie rijjht-hand side, tins ehiiti^e chit 
be iMiule in the field, 

Tvpe EA is supplied in 8". 10" and I2" si/es, 
Type E-2N in 3" and smalh^r. 



0° F, rmtdoiJr tfinpcralure (or —10" F. or -|-10° F. 
etc., depejidins on climate), the Outdoor Thermostat 
will cause the valve to open sufficiently to keep the 
radiators filled with steam. At iTitermediate outdoor 
temperatures, the Main Steam Valve is adjusted pro- 
portionately and radiators are fractionally or i>artially 
filled with steam. Tlie position of the Control N'alve 
thus selected automalieally b>' the Outdoor Thermostat 
may be advanced or reduced by the \'ariator to give 
more or less steam than is called for by the outdoor 
temperature, 



COMPENSATION FOR 
PRESSURE CHANGES 

Flnctuatioiib in boiler pressure, in vacuum, in 
number of radiators turned on, etc, change the pres- 
sure difference in the heating system from that called 
for by the joint action of Outdoor Thermostat and 
N'arialor. These changes in pressure ditference arc 
compensated for automatically by a pressure-actuate<l 
mercury "U" tube in the Control Cabinet, 

One end of this V" tube is connected to the steam 
supply miiin and the other end to the rt^turn main 
(see Fig. 3)- If. for example, the suppiv pressure 




IS 



Fig. 6. \'AHIATOR- 

A small UHlal cabinet 

6tfl \ in* \ '^ Ml 

size with lock, eonlain- 

iiig ( 1 ) adjustable 

knob for manual con- 
trol of the sleam sup- 
ply, and l2) i-wiiy 

swilcli III ilose Matn 

Steam CunUoI VaKt\ 

to place valve under 

aulomatio control of 

Outdoor Tliermostai 

and Vari^iti^r, and In 

open valve at tuU heal 

position, and 13) (np- 

Itonal } ojicraliii^ 

schedule card 1 1 o I ( 1 1.- 1 , 

One V'ariator required 
for each vuUr tcintrolli'd. 

OpcraticHi— Modifies action of Oiitduoi ThennosUI^ 

["nnnn^ knoh lo left reduces -(ti'inn vujjpK ; turniiij; 
right ineTfa%es supply h> desired ptTti-nlagc. I'sed 
prineipiilly for heating-up dnriiig earl) momirjg hours 
and hir reduced esenhii^ or ni^ht healiinj. Oecasifin- 
ally tor cvceptuma) WT-alfiiT t'ondilmns mkIi as winds, 
hot sun. t'l'mdiness, eU'. I lowt'\ vt. "mtrnial" M'Uuip 
will takt- c^ire of aver^ig^ cOLiditions i>t wind, hun and 
shade. 

Inslallatiou— Can he loeatrd cm %^all al any ion- 
\rnienl operating slalii*n— tin- hinler room, superiu- 
teiKlciil's iilfiLC. beside pri\ ate exchange, etc. Ap- 
prnvimatc weight, 7 lbs. 

unduly increased, mercury rises in the "U " tube to 
unbalance resistance contained therein, and the Main 
Steam Valve begins to close. When the pressure 
difference decreases to that called for by tUv control 
equipment, the resistances are balanced and the Maiu 
Steam Valve stops. A reverse action takes place when 
the pressure difference falls below that called for b\ 
the control ecjuipmeiitH 




WEBSTER MODERATOR CQN 




10 




i> 9 




I ^ 



DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 

To design a Wpbsttr Moderator System, ttir mua\ 
mfthods of radiator selection and pipe sizing are fol- 
lowed. The Webster E-IN Control VaKe or Valves 
can be selected from Table 1 using a pressure drop 
thr<Hii;b the \alve of J pounds ptrr stpiare inch. 

Installatimi— (^oiilrol CJjil>iiiet is bolted or screwed 
to wall near Control \'alve. Electrical servic<' l UK) 
watts, 110 volts, fiO cycles a-c) to operate control sys- 
tem is brought throut^b Iranstonner ^110-241 to this 
cabiJiet, For d-c. a Rotary Converter should be pro- 
vided. Piping connections made from cabinet to steam 
and retuni mains. A Webster 00026-0 Drip Trap. Re- 

TABLE l-CAPACITY IN LBS, PER HOUR OF WEBSTER 
MAIN STEAM CONTROL VALVES 




'Pfnsun? drup across vuKt e<|ti,il* mitml sienw prt-^urc mimM mii'ii- 
iiium ilpjim drli%i-r>- prswiire on lyilem side o( v^ilvc. 



Fig T. PKESSlHK 
CONTKOL CABI- 
NET. ConUins slaml- 
urd riectrica! appiir;i- 
iiis iuch Hi rrsiJiUiiices. 
relays, etc, in uddi- 
tloii t" spedally de- 
sign«^d mercury cfiii- 
tact "U" IuIk> Has 
f^ingr-d ins IT fur ac- 
eessihilil> , with Icttk. 
One cabinet reqiiired 
for each \ulve con- 
trolled. Type E-5 
Pressure Omlmj C.nh~ 
met IS 14 X 22 \ t 
in ri7e. 




lief Viilve and Clheek Valve are included- Approximate 
weight 70 lbs. 

Eaeli lieatint^ zone requires a separate Variator and 
Control Cabinet- An Outdoor Thermostat mnst be 
provided lor eacli zone. This can be accojnplished 
with an individual Outdoor Thermostat or a Dual 
Outdoor Thermostat for 2 valves or with an Outdoor 
Thermostat and a Thermostat Control Cabinet for 3 
or more. 

Day and [light control, automatic morning pick-up 
limit ccMitrols. and other accessories can be specified 
as considered necessiiry. Desired operating require- 
ments can be met by incorporating int(j tln' contrnl 
sy-item one or more of the items of optional equipment 
mentioned earlier. 

It is important in desit^ning the control system to 
properK locate the control units and to provide ade- 
quatc work room around this eciutpment. Dimensions 
can be obtained from appropriate Webster Serxice 
Details. 

Care .sliould be used in locating the Control C^abinets 
and \'ariators so that they will be convenient for use 
by the desii^nated operators, yet so l<»cated that un- 
authorized persons wilt not interfere with them. All 
tontrol units are provided with secure locks and keys 
to prcM-nt nnauthori/ed operation. 

If couvectors are used, it is important to select con- 
vectors with heating elements which can be provided 
with orifices without difficult), W hile most convectors 
are maimfactnred to meet these reipiirements, there are 
exceptions which nuist be avoided if the system is to 
operate. For t iid teed convectors, cup type orifices are 
normally used. On bottnm feed coinectors, tube type 
orifices are necessar>' to avoid noise. Cup type orifices 
are n(»rmally ust-d on cast iron radiation arid tube type 
orifices for fin type radiation. 

The sizing of the orifices is done by the Webster 
Kepresentative after order for the materials has been 
received from the contractor. The orifice sizing is nol 
considered a function of the initial design. All that is 
required of the engineer is specification of the type 
of orifices required. 



lAuiK' 






ONTROl-BY-THE-WEATHER" 




11 



SPECIFICATIONS FOR WE 

MODERATOR 

General 

The conliol iyslem shall be capable of varyhig and 
controlling the pressure diflereiice between the supply 
and return mains in relation to outdoor temperature 
changes. There shall be continnous flow of steam to 
the system with full or tractional heating ot radiators 
at all times when heat is on, accomphshed by an 
electrical balance between Outdoor Thermostat Con- 
trol Cabinet, and \anator Steam is to be admitted to 
the heating system tiirongh a motor-operated control 
valve. There shall be installed in the supph" connection 
to each radiator an orifice to maintain even heat dis- 
tribution. 

This ctjntract is to include all material labor, per- 
mits, etc.. necessary for the complete installation of the 
cnjitrol system. All materials must be new and in- 
stalled according to the best practice. 

The contractor mnst comph' with all state and cit>' 
ordina?»ces and rules governiti^ work of this char- 
acter. He shall also be responsible for any accident 
to men. material nr property imtil the control system 
has been accepted by the owners^ 

It is not intended that the drawings shall show 
e\'ery pipe, fitting and appliance, and it is understood 
lliat while the drawings mnst be followed as closeK 
as circumstances will permit, the contractor is held 
responsible for the proper installation according to the 
tnie intent and meajiing of plans and specifications. 

All cutting of walls, floors, etc.. necessary to accom- 
modate the work shall be done by the contractor and 
he shall refinish same to meet the approval of the 
owner. 



Outdoor Thermostot 

Tln' Outdoor Thermostat shall consist (»f a bimetallic 
coil element which operates a contact arm over a 
wire-wound resistance element In response to changes 
in temperature. Changes in outdoor temperature change 



BSTER E-5 ELECTRONIC 
CONTROL 

the value of the electrical resistance which is con- 
nected electrically to the Control Cabinet, 

The bimetallic assembly is to be mounted on a 
cast base and a cover of spun aluminum is to enclose 
the entire assembly. 

The Outdoor Thermostat shall be mounted on the 
north wall outside of the building or as indicated on 
plans in location as approved by Warren Webster 6 
Company. 

Control Cabinet 

The Control Cabinet shall consist of a steel box 
with hinged door and painted with blacl; trx'stalltne 
enamel. The cabinet shall be located as near the Con- 
trol Valves as possible. 

The cabinet shall house a mercur> pressure tube 
and contactless electronic relay. The cabinet is to be 
con[jected by piping to the snpph and return mains, 
The Ontd(X)r Thermostat and Control Valves, etc.. 
shall be connected as specified and shown on plans. 
All piping and electrical comiecti(»ns shall be made in 
accordanc-e with the details as furnished by Warren 
Webster & Company. 

Voriotor 

The \'ariator shall ha\e an adinsting dial. The dial 
is to be marked "NtJrmal.'^ "Mure Heat," and "Le^s 
Heat." There shall also be a three-position switch for 
manually setting the control to 'Toll Iteat," "Auto- 
matic" or "No Heat" 

The Variator is to be used as a manual adjustment 
to vary the heat input for subMionnal or abnormal 
weather conditions. 

Control Valve 

The Control Valve is to be installed where shown 
on plans and is to be electrically connected to other 
equipment Control Valve motors are to 1k^ liea\ v-dut\ 
oiUimmersed. modulating, low-voltage tvpe. The motor 




12 




shall hv connected to the valve stem by appropriate 
linkage. All valve bodies are to l>e 12o-lb. design and 
constructed to operate satisfactory on 15-lb. satnrated 
steam pressure. Valve sizes 1" to 2" are to be sinRle 
seated, brass body, with bronze valve piece, screwed 
Ivpe- \'alves 2)i" and larger shall be high tensile cast 
iron body, double seated, with brass trim, flanged type. 
Naive seats are to be renewable. 

Radiator Orifices 

There shall be installed in each radiator supply con- 
nection Webster metering orifices of a type suitable 
for inslallation in the radiation supplied. These orifices 
shall be accurately sized for the heat loss and distance 
from the source of supply. Orifices shall be installed in 
accordance with locations shown on plans. 

Wiring 

All wiring shall be done by the contractor in accord- 
ance with details furnished by Warren Webster 
& Company. All labor and material required to make 
a complete job shall be furnished by the contractor. 
All wiring except service to transformer shall carry 
24 volts. The transformer shall be mounted in a stand- 
ard metal box. The 115 volts service line to trans- 
former shall be equipped with switch and 6-ampere 
fuses. All wiring shall be done in strict accordance 
with state and city ordinances regarding work of 
this character. 

Inspection 

Upon completion of all of the work, a represent- 
ative of Warren Webster & Company shall inspect 
same and put control system in operation. Should this 
inspection disclose any defects in worknianship, mate- 
rials, etc. then the contractor shall rectify same at no 
expense to the owner. Complete operating instrnctio^is 
shall be ^iven the operators when the system is placed 



in operation h\' a Warren Webster & Company Repre- 
sentative, 

Guorontee 

.Ml materials and workmanship shall be guaran- 
teed for a period of one year from date of acc*'ptant^- 

OPERATING AND 
SERVICING DATA 

Complete bulletins providing all details of inslal- 
lation, operation and servicing accompany all Webster 
Electronic Moderator System equipment. 

These bulletins include a suggested funn for a 
daily Heating Log and show how to operate this 
system to meet varied conditions within h<niliug area. 

THE COMPANY 

WarrL-ii Wi-bstir 61 Company have spcciali/ccl for 
more than sixty years in the ficia of steam circulation 
and steam distribntinn. particularly vacuum, vapor 
and tow-pressure steam heating of buildiiins. and mir- 
(hum-pressnre steam in industrial und process heating 

applications. 

This specialized experience is available through 
trained engineers at the Home Office and through the 
Representatives hsted on inside back cover. These Bep- 
resentatives are thoroughly conversant with methods 
and equipment to control steam distribution and Iieat 
transfer, assuring maximum heating effectiveness with 
minimum fuel or steam consumption. Webster Repre- 
sentatives are prepared to supply on request full techni- 
ail. availability and price information on all Webster 
Systems and products. For information beyond the 
scope of this bulletin, please communicate with the 
Representative nearest you. 



» 



I 9 




TROl-BY-THE-WEATHER 




13 



i 









■:« 






iWL. i 



;23V.V.V,V.:| WEBSTER MODERATO 

flaBBH.-H^ ■ 






a u B 

iiiiiBv! a 

xiiiii; a a a 2^ ■ ■ ^ ^iiii 
Mini ■ a ^^^aaaii'" 
a 






B ■ a iiiii 

aHlliaii 

aiiai 
B a a a ■■■■■■ ■ 

Baa^^V^»»"" 



Biaaa 



"%% 




A Air-tiinilJlJniH-(l Dim ^ Hi.itlslnvl Dtiiltling ^'^' ■! i 
eftectnrly rimtrcillrd h\ .i Webslt-r Mulrr.irur Syslem 
in two /rmes. assurrs tumhirl liejljiiy hir hr^t-Hnil^ 
storey. As \\W\\ ;tUm)Sl rvcn- cniKtuiKliii^ MiiiihiiH.ui 
hiiil<1ii>u, MfMiii is I III liiuiKl.itXTii \i>r .ill lu'.il rt-fjiiirc- 
nifiil^ An iiitrols: Hi'inluinl. ) InlitirisUr ^ W.iUjiiiM. 
CoitMifliny E^^^i^u'r^s: Sy-ikj & Hmm-'isv. MtMtnig .and 
HAir-C"iuitIiticiniii^ C'tinlriittcirs: Kt-rhy Siiiiiiclfrs, Inc. Geii- 
CT.il ConliMiliir; G(*«}rgp A- FiilU't Cumpiitiy. 



M 



I n II I II IJ ■ 



III I I II 

HI » E I I 




A The Ti.i\ Hi-fv ln^nrsiiKc Cm. l>uiltliti;[[ group, Murlhirti, 
0»iiu,. i.'iiji]i!i'li'd a wi-H-pLniTU'il lit'iilin'^ ii>"tit'niJ/iilioLi 
pfcij;ruin in U)4S. Il iiitlmli-s .i Wi-liNdr Moflerutcii Sys- 
Ifiii viith iiu II-/OL1P coiitmlly Kit^ted cdntnil paiu^l and 
il \ww IjiidtT plant. Savings of iipproxiniulcly 40" wer^ 
tiidkvjtcd. Arcliilrt-ts: \'oidifi->. Walker. Foli-y & Smith, 
C'lin'-nlHii'i Eh^itK'fT'i: Mt-yer, Strong & Jones. Heating 
CimlrhU'lrir Libbv &; Bliun, Inc. 



I 



^.:M^ 



*■*■• 



BlUi 



^.t 



A i'^>rl Aiilhori(> Bus Tenmn.d, \i.'n V.irk City, Ims a 
T-znne Webster \todi'rat")r S> sW\\\ fur lenaiil-octupied 
spaci's. sbi'ps iind nHiL'es. it's the fifth Ni^w York Port 
Aulbnrity l)uildiiiii with a Webster Moderalur System, 
Builders: Turner Construction Co. Heating Contractor: 
Piggs Distler & Co.. Inc., New York. 



SYSTEM MEETS VARIE 



HEATING REQUIREMEN 




A r.irk \'Ww ApartnK'nt^. Ci)lli]uis\M)od, N. J., is the |.irgr-\t post-wi 
aparlnu-nt m the PhiLidelpiua area, The Wc'bsli-r Mud^-fatof System haliuf. 
Iieiit delivers to lu|l\ rei essud Webster System Badnlors in each apailmen 
Tlieres a VVt-bster Radialor VaUe for KKJX he;»t shut-off from paeh coij 
vector— no dampers Lire m-eded. Ardiitett*;: J. Hni^mond Kuoot iUid Sanm 
J, Oshi^iT i .issot:iale K Binlderv: S, J, LoweiT and K. J. Fianteh Engineer 
Robert E. \tt.Lougli!iu. SaKal^^ri- S, Go/vardi, and Kobertson and Jolinso 
Meatiug Conlnu.tor^ HeuiLimfu LessruT Co,. Inc. 



^ 



<^f^^^^'2 




^'%l 



A AVareliouse oi Great Atlantic & Pacific Teii Company, Albany. N. Y,. nu 

the Webster Moderator System to meet threr basii^ refpiiremeuts of gon 
warehouse beating— economy, effective liejU dislnbulion, maiutc-nance-fn 
operation. Heating Contractor; E. W. T"uipkins Company. \\w. 





I n I 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 V 1 

■ ■■■''''''liiii 

••>■ Iiiii 

■ * ■ ■ Iiiii 

"" i. !■ Ill 
!■■■ Hi III! I 



( 



A Delaware Hospital, W'ilmington, Del., completed iti 1942, eHeil* ma\mui 
licating eciMKiufcies with a fi-7c^ne Webster Moderat*ir S\ strin ;nu| tare! 
plant operation, ControUabilit>. a feature <if thi- \btderalor SysU-nj pr 
rents u^jsleful overlicatiug. Architects- Masseiui & dut'ont. Wilminvitth 
Consuhiiig Engineers: Jaros, Baum & Bolle.s, New York, General Coutrjrto 
Turner Constnulion Co,, Philadelphia. Heating Contractor: Bennimin 
Shaw Co., Wilmington. 



• 



For Webster Scrui'cc . . . 



WARREN WEBSTER S COMPANY 

FACTORY AND MAIN OFFICE: 17TH AND FEDERAL STREETS, CAMDEN 5, N- J, 



REPRESENTATIVES ARE LOCATED AT THE ADDRESSES BELOW— FDR TELEPHONE NUMRER. LUOK 
FOR WARREN WEBSTER Jk COMPANY IN YOUR LOCAL TELEPHONE BOOK 



ALBANY 6. N. Y* 
II. A, Bond 
332 Ceiiirul Ave, 

ATLANTA 3. HA. 
K. W. Kldn A Co, 
132 NaBMU Si,. N. W> 

ATLANTIC CITY. N. J. 
H. M, SlroiiBfi 
610 r.tiaran(« Tnisl Bhlg- 
N. CacoliHft & Aibiiiic Avos. 

BALTIMOBE IB. MD. 
ir M. llarriB 
snoi N-CharleaSl, 

BCTHLEHEM. PA, 
E- K, Uehflier, Jr. 
ID20 lliKlilaiiil Av«- 

niRMlNOHAM 3 AL^. 
llayiln Mjrcr Co.. InC- 
222* Comer Bldg. 

BOSTON 10. MASS. 
J. F, TulUoCo. 
Hoom 21 „ 
127 Federal Si. 

[IBUNSWICK. ME; 

Uiid^r ttOB<oii 
C. Claud Clark 
Hoi 476 

BUFFALO 2. N. Y. 
Ifoward P, Annua 
S02 Jacktuu Bid If - 
220 Delaware Ave. 

BUTTE. MONT. 

SuHivan Valve & Eugt. Co- 
^09 E. 2nJ Sl- 
\\ O- Boi 1931 

CriATTANnOCA 2. TENN. 
IJmli^r ImliaiiopolLs 
C. E- Milli 
720 JaroeH BMg. 
7.15 Brood Si. 

CMICACO ft. ILL. 
P W. SLickney 
S06 Machinery Mall Bldg. 
549 W. Waihiiigtoii Blvd. 

CINCINNATI 6. OHIO 
<;. B. lloulisLon 
2910 Woodbuni Ave. 

CLEVELAND IS. OHIO 

A- L. Vanrierhoof 
2^^ JTunna BIdff. 
1401 Prospecl Ave. 

COLUMIUA. S. C. 
Under Ailariia 
R. F, Donovan 
I- O. Boi S2III 
401 Wild^ood Ave- 

COLUMBUS 15. OHIO 
Boberi A. Wilimn 
22il l^iiman Bliltf^ 
2(1 S. Third Su 



DARLINC BROTHERS, 



DALLAS 4, TEXAS 
J. B, Do«den&Co. 
P. O. Boi 507 
4024SwiE8 Ave. 

DAVENPOBT. IOWA 
H. H, EvQiiBon 
320 WolfTM Avi-. 

DAYTON 2, OHIO 

Under Cincmnati 
C. D- Wpovef, Jr. 

in6 U. B, Blda- 

DENVER i. COLO. 
H. K llorniaTt 

122U CaJirorriiD St. 

DES MOINF.S 9. IOWA 
H. E. Drain 

S06SocuTiliw BMe. 
41S5evenlhSl. 

DETROIT 2. MICIL 

A. B. Krii^til 

Boom t, Mdwood BL'U, 

8316 Wood wartl Ave. 

GHAND BAPIDS 2, MICH. 
Hero D, Ucaii 
,131 Oltfl*a Ave., N. W, 

TiABBisruiJu:, PA, 

Krod W. Stiiimmol 
UJSS, LlLhSU 

HOUSTON L TEXAS 

Bn1|>li IV Jnliiiean 
1017 HoaitieSt, 
r. O. Box 1961 

INDI^N^P0L1S 4, IND. 

S. E, Fcneleiinuktr 

9:^7 Ardi'B. & BIdrB. Bldj-. 

33:i fS. PerinayUanm Si, 

KANSAS CITY 8, MO, 

F. N- Schua-i 
3252 Bonnolie Bd. 

KINGSTON. PA. 
Aflbur II. Bo*a 
Room 210 

Zf}i MjifkeL St. 

LOS ANGELES 13. CALIF. 
B, M. Gui.iel 

320 Crot=ker Si, 

IflUlSVlLLt 4. KY. 

Under Indianapolis 
Clarke Kflye & Co 
519 Uarrol Ave. 

LUBBOCK. TEXAS 

Under D«ll»» ^ 
J. B. Dowdell & Co. 
1415 Avenue M 

MEMPHIS ,1. TENN. 

T, J. O'Brien 
6fia5. Maiu Si, 

MILTON. NY. 

Under Ne* York 
W. C- Bad^y 
Milton. N. Y. , 
Nrac PoiiEhkePi*j* 



MILWAUKEE 2. WIS. 
A. M. Freeman 

f.(\m rinnkinlniL BIdtf, 
161 W. Wiaconiin Ave. 

MINNEAPOLIS 3. M1NN» 
H, E, (fcrrjah 
370 InsnnincA iMdg. 
1IU NicolleL Ave. 

NEWARK 2. N. J. 
['idword Mayr 
BcHjiu :(57 
10'.>0 Broad Si. 

NEW Haven io» conn. 

II. B. Brii^gB 
Boom ^1 1 
902 Chmii-l Si, 

NEW OBLEANS 12, LA, 

W. H. t;ront 
209 Vjnrrnl Bld^- 
615 CMmmerdaJ Plac^i 

NEW YOBK 16. N. Y. 
J. I'\ Urttdinry 
95 Madintni Ave. 

NOBTll HEBO, VKBMONT 

U<*drr hnfllon 
H. J. Clark 
Norlh Hero. Vl 

uKL/vnoMA CITY L OKLA, 
F. X l-ipllk-r 
ir.ftl N- W-?tihSi, 
KoT Mail; P.O. Ilo. 529 



OMAHA 2. NEBB. 

M, E. Wfliii 
2:iU DuJiehiBSl. 

OBLANDO. FLA. 

<; U Mjiirriamarii 
Roama 21^-217. Cl.urch 
ift Main Uldtf. 

pHlLAni^T.PlTlA 3. PA. 

Karl Unfurl 

26 S Trtenriplli SI. 

riTTSBUBGll 23, PA. 

11, It. Srai-cer 

lOOG EnjhirHi Bldg. 

LU-er ly ^^ve. A S^anwu SI. 

PORTLAND 9. OBE. 
n B Mnnro 
IBOI N- W. NorilirupSl. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

Allen sail Co, 
P.O. llui 121 
1202 Newlwrn Ave. 

niCMMOND 19. VA. 

L. A. BeriiL^rt 

300 E- Main St. 
nOClHUSTEB 4, N- Y^ 

-li2 VjiUcy Csdillflc BUli". 
339 En*l Ave- 



1.^ P O Box 187-MO Prince street. MOVrnEAl., CAN 
Ltd-. P- 0. Box |8.^^^^^^ ^^.^^^.^^ 6-3 .51-(.3«9 



SAGINAW, MICH. 
W. A. WiilicridKe 
2340 Menhon b1. 

ST. UJL'IS 1. MO. 
HpAlrF'Brndley Co. 

2U:15 Watliiodlon lUvd. 

SALT L*KE CITY i. UTAH 
Middlcy'llntiaf 
44 Wfai EiKliihSoiiLliSl. 

SAN ANTONIO 5. TEX. 
B. S Byden 

401 I r»i»uf Jiri<.« Ulilgn 
60J N. Si. Mary'a'il. 

SAN fBANniSCO II,CM Ih, 

1-: ir <:o>nH 

22.^1 TiMt^n Sole* Bldi;, 
420 Markel Si. 

SEATTLE 9. WASH, 
W, W- Cot 
314 Ninlh Ave.. Norlli 

SPOKANK 7. WASIL 
Under Bniip 
SidlivEin Vnlve Hl Ennr. Co, 

nn< :-'rin 

2'»:i2 [■:. Trmil Ave. 
(fur Lu]<i4(riiiii») 

SYRACUSE 2. N. Y. 
B, H- Ba<on 
fi05 l^cki-l TJi'vIre tfld^. 
214 E, FnyBlKSl. 

TOLRDO 2. OHIO 
IJnd" (-Inelnfid 
F C Bi*-Iirir(l*[iii, Jr. 
Rcjom 102. Collufi \Uiia- 
702-12 Mjidiwn Arenun 

TLTLSV, OKl.AlUiMA 
llndrr Okl-diomu City 
CiU^ J Unllnt 
Loellkf-*jr«ne Supply Co. 
Fur .Miiil. Boi 1137 
1912 E <>ih?il' 

WASHINGTON 7. D. C. 

H S Ivlna 

102 llaioiPon Null Bank Pl-U. 

12(H Wiioonain A*C,. N, W. 

WICIHT* 2, RANS. 
Undf-r tsruiuis Cily 
Ray V- Rftorr 
4SI N- Bock lilund Si. 

WILMINGTON. OEL. 

Under Phtlkidelidim 
WiT>, J H4d>KiM>n 
P.O. Boi 1301 

WnODW^RD, OKL*. 

Und« OkliihJtnin City 
COft- W Hot'"*" 
lURS.iida Vr Si. 
P. U Boi 112 



ADA, Licen54!cs nnd Mamif«clurers 



,„.r?SS:».S.S.„U. »BW ...M.„.: 

'"■■*"'"'■ - , . It 1% Timfniim. Ont. 



cigar,. AU... V.„™..«r 1«- C.^- ';""- --^O.^.: Arvid-, I*. -J . T.«min-. 
Toronlo. Oiil.i Oi*ewK» *^" ^- " 






Pvintfl^ in t'.b^Ah 



Uulli'hi. B-yi)t)-4»-J*»n"*tfy. lW.--i-lOM 1 




^^ WEBSTEK W 

MODERATQH 

^ . J^ 



SYSTEM 

G>ntrolled^ hyfUe weather" 



ft 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY, CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 

THE WEBSTER 

EH-10 MODERATOR SYSTEM 

OF STEAM HEATING 



:> 



WEBSTER 




I 



oderato 



SYSTEM 



'Controlk* 

The Webster EH-IO Moderator System is a steam 
heating conrrol of :he '^pulsating flow** type for new 
or existing buildings. With the EHIO Moderator Con- 
crol steam is delivered to all radiators of the system 
during "on'* intervals at a fixed pressure difference. 
These "on" intervals occur frequendy — every thirty 
minutes in the average installation, but alternate gear 
trains are available without extra cost co provide for 
other intervals from twelve to sixty minutes. The 
length of the "on" interval ranges from zero minutes, 
or steam off entirely when the outdoor temper.irure is 
at 70° F, or at other maximum temperature if desired, 
to "on" a full thirty minutes or 100% of the time when 
the outdoor temperature isO° F., or at any other selected 
minimum. The length of "on" interval is varied auto- 
matically by an Outdoor Thermostat. However, the 
automatically selected length of "on" interval may be 
modified manually through a knob conveniently 
mounted on the Control Cabinet. The results pro- 
duced by the EH-10 Moderator System include avoid- 
ance of overheating and underheating. elimination of 
"cold 70" which results with controls which produce 
long "off" intervals and short "on*' intervals in variable 
cycles. Substantial fuel savings result in installations 
which have previously been overheated due to inadc' 
quacy of control means. 

Where Used 

The Webster EH-IO Moderator Control is designed 
chiefly for the small and medium sized building, and 
for zoning in larger buildings. It may directly control 
operation of burner, stoker or blower motor. It is also 
applicable to a motoriied Webster Control Valve 
placed in the steam supply main of the building served 
by a boiler or by **5treet" steam. 

While used most frequently on two-pipe steam heat- 
ing systems, the EH-10 System may also be applied to 
advantage on certain one-pipe installations. 

Like other Webster Moderator Svstems the EH-10 
can be applied to open return systems using Webster 
Boiler Return Trap or condensate pump, and to vacuum 
steam heating. 

Equipment Available 

The minimum equipment for an EHTO System in- 
cludes a Pressure Difference Controller, a Control Cab- 
inet with an Outdoor Thermostat attached by capillary 
tubing and orifices in radiator supply connection. 

BULLETIN B-960 

COPTRIGMT \949 WARDEN WEBSTER & COMMNY 



le weather" 

These units work together to open and close a Webster 
Control Valve in the steam main or to start and stop 
the automatic firing device at the boiler, generally 
through a relay. Optional equipment may include a 
schedule clock for automatic turn-on at hearing up 
rate, return to normal operation, and night shut off 
or an indoor thermostat with or without clock. 

A feature of the Webster EHTO System is the Pres- 
sure Difference Controller w^hich maintains the correct 
pressure difference between supply and return piping. 
In combination with Webster Metering Orifices, this 
device assures even distribution of steam to all radiators 
and prevenrs the over-heating and under-heating that 
has been characteristic of controls not incorporating 
these features. 

How It Worlci 

Control is accomplished by varying the length of 
intervals Jurins which steam is delivered to radiators. 




Fig. I. Gcncriil an-atievmcni of ^'cbsier EH-10 Mtxlctaior 
SysKm controlliriB moronzcJ Wcbitcr Conrrol Valve in 
srenm niam of builJmgicfveJbv cenrral station of "street" 
aieam 



CONTINUED ON OPPOSITE PAGE 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY. CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



I 



These intervals arc longest in cold weather and shortest 
in mild weather. However, the longest "oC interval 
is comparatively short so chat heat output from radia- 
tors is practically continuous. 

The timing mechanism inside the cabinet is actuated 
by a synchronous motor which turns a cam. Timing 
gears betw'een motor and cam determine the length of 
the operating cycle. Riding on the cam is a roller con- 
nected to the arm of a switch. When the roller is on 
the "high'' part of the cam. the switch is in the posi- 
tion for opening control valve or starting firing equip- 
ment. When the roller is on the "low" pan of cam^ the 
switch is in the position for closing the control valve 
or stopping the firing equipment. The length of the 
ON interval is changed automatically by the Outdoor 
Thermostat or by adjusting the Variator by hand. The 
usual length of cycle is 30 minutes. Other gears can 
be furnished for cycle lengths from 12 to 60 minutes. 

The Control Cabinet includes in addition to the 
Variator, a switch for manual selection of "OFF", 
"AUTOMATIC" or "FULL HEAT" positions, and 
a bulTs-eye light which is "ON" when control is in 
operation. 

The Outdoor Thermostat is a liquid-filled bulb con- 
nected to an expanding element in Control Cabinet 
by capillary tubing. Change in outdoor temperature 




m 



Fig. 5. Webster EH'lO Moderator Conirol Cobinci anti 
Outdoor Thtmiosraj which piovidci auiomatic ht3t var- 
iation, Contcol Cabmei i^ approKimafclv 7!a ^^' Wide. 
IIK In. High, and 7Ji In. Deep. Weight is 17 Lbs, 



expands or contracts the element which changes rela- 
tionship of the switch arm and roller to the cam b^ 
moving the switch. This relationship governs the 
length of the ON period. When the outdoor tempera- 
ture is 70" F. or higher, steam will be shut off auto- 
matically provided the Variator is at NORMAL. 



c 



I 




WHICH RADIATOR IS YOURS 



Fig. Z. General arrangement ol Wcbsrcr EH-10 Moderator 
System controlling burner of steam boiler. Time Switch 
and Indoor Thermostat are optionaL Similiir arrange- 
mcni* arc used for stoker or blower control 





Erc«it amount of ttaAm 
for 430 outtids iBmpflrsfufe 

APPROXIMATE WASTE &7«/o 



u u u u 



Corr*cf amount of if#ftm 
for 43» out(fd» Iflmpirdturt 

NO WASTE 



100 






fl^ 






67 






SO 




31 






IT 


C 


















T—r 


DERCENT OFSTC*WWASTED 1 J>^ 


















1 


IF LEFTONFULLHOUfl ^p<| 1 


■ ^ 












_ 




. 


















t 


■ 




















1 
















.-■ 
























, 














r-" 




































■ 


^'^ 












35 
















' 






. > 


S"^ 






























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^ 


J 






















- 


- 


r 


, 


- 


. . 


- -* 


-.'' 


































. > 


If ' 
























■i^ 






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f 


r* 
































^ 


































fts 


,^'l 1 

































ID SO 30 40 SO 60 

TIME IN WINIJTES PER HOUB STEAM *S NECESSARY 

¥ig. 4. This chare illustrates the wasic that m;iv ot^nr 
when radiators arc continuously filled with steam except 
in coldest weather. Note the dotted lines. At ^V out- 
side temperature, the waste is nearlv 67%, The >X'cbstcT 
Moderator Svsfem prevents this waste hv furnishing the 
proper amount of heat at all times 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

Representatives in Principat Cities • Bsfahlished 1888 

CAMDEN 5, NEW JERSEY 

CABLi ADOftESS: Delphic 

Dorling Brolher^ Ud.. P. O. Box 187. Monkeol, Canodo 



Form C-685A— Lft-DKfmbfff 1952 6M 



Primed ifi U.S.A. 




) 



\ 




lU 



I 



J 




■ 




"meets the weather 
outside the door , , ,' 






BULLETIN B-200B 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

CAMDEN 5, NEW JERSEY 



Control off your heating system 



Control of a heatine system is like control of any 
otiier kind. Control can l>e vers,' simple ... or very 
complex. It is a far cry from riding bareback, with 
control limited to the pressure on the neck of the 
horse, to dri\ing a modem luxurv^ motor car with 
power steerine. power brakes, and autronic eye. 
Vet, essentially, these are really degrees of dif- 
rences in control. 

The simple open fireplace is a popular means of 
heating, yet there are few forms of heating that are 
less efiectively controlled. About all you can do is 
put on another log and stir up the fire, or let it die 
down. 

The older, hand-fired coal heating systems could 
be directlv controlled orilv to a \erv limited extent 
— by varj ing the rate at which the coal is added 
or by \'ar>ing the draft, or the rate at which air 
was fed through the fire. If the coal was used 
to generate steam, an added degree of control 
could be effected by regulating the pressure of 
the steam. Moreover if the steam was distributed 
to radiators, then a further control could be 
pro\'ided b\' radiator \alves. These are mostly 
manual but may be automatic, as. for example, 
when pneumatic valves are actuated b\' room 
thermostats. 

With the advent of stokers for burning coal oil 
burners and gas fuel, some sort of automatic 
control became an absolute necess!t>\ The early 
forms of such control were primitive and many of 
them are still "on and off,"* "stop and go" devices. 
Even these do satisf)' the minimum requirements 
of safet)' and they provide some degree of economy. 
Thev' fall far short, howe\'er, of providing anything 
like the ultimate id comfort. 

Continuous flow and outdoor 
thermostat pioneered by Webster 

With a clear understanding of the fundamentals 
and a background of previous knowledge of heat- 
ing s> stem control, W'ebster engineers started early 



in the 1920's the development of what later became 
knoun as the Webster Moderator Systems of Steam 
Heating. Basic to tliat development program were 
these two fundamental requirements: 

(1) Continuous heating, fully controlled 

(2) Heating at a rate varying with the need 
for heat through control by a thermostat 
located outdoors 

These two fundamentals, incorporated ^ in every 
Webster Moderator Control for more than 26 years, 
are both now widely copied — a fact that is in itself 
conclusive evidence of Webster "know-how" on the 
subject of heating. 

In fact, the only reason that continuous flow with 
outdoor thermostat control was not long ago uni- 
versal is that the design and construction of a sat- 
isfactor)' device requires a high degree of skill 
and in addition, the purchase of this truly ade- 
quate and effective comfort control involves a 
larger sum than is required for a simple "on and 
off' control. Moreover many thousands of home 
ouTiers and prospective home owners who can 
readily afford this qualit\' of control have been so 
mystified and confused by trick sales phrases that 
the>' have not availed themselves of this really 
sound investment. 



Webster CF hot water control 

More than six years ago Webster engineers pro- 
duced a continuous flow control for forced circula- 
tion hot water heating. This control, refined and per- 
fected, has now been proven in a wide variety of 
installations. In its latest design, the CF Control is 
a worthwhile feature which should be considered 
for any forced circulation hot water heating, 

for Baseboard Heating 

for Convector Heating 

for Badiator Healing 

for Panel Heating 
and of course, for WEBSTEK Baseboard Heating. 




^b«»»tf I* U S A 




For All Types and Sizes of Buildings 



Webster CF Hot Water Controls are not limited in 
application to residential installations. Like the 
Webster Moderator Systems in the steam heating 
field they bring to any building, regardless of size 
and type, the fundamental advantages of: 

Control by outdoor temperature with fret-duLn 
from dependence on control of an inside t^''-"^*>- 
Stat located at some given point not rejn i- 

tive of requirements throuj^hout. 
Control through a few rugged units instead of 
by devices spread throughout the building. 

Control independent of window opening, a sure 
means to fuel economy in larger buildings 
particularly. 
Webster CF Control has been applit'd to control 
of water temperature in large air conditioning in* 
stallations where hot water is circulated through the 
air conditioning units in the winter and eoid water 
in the summer. It has been applied to control of 
steam fed to a heat exchanger where the latter 
supplies water for a hot water heating system. 




,0 V.llage, Bgteigh. N. C. (obov* end fighfj. Cho«- Gord.« 
ent c. I. Ve.r' fo. 194. b. ihe N KH.t. ;;^*^;'' »--^- 
H«.ing with Webiler Conhnuoui Mpw Con.rol end l"^-'^-<»' ^P"^ 
m«n» Control S.m.lor cqmpment uied in oddilion bu.ll .« >95a. 



Comero 
Aportm 




W.btl«f Co-ti-tt^Ou* r*fl* Hot "HmHf M.01U9 Co«lt»l .1 vi-d in 
I,,. ,oy {^h^^^t^ obo*<( a«d Tli# ■<t.«ftho-« CJo'tdg* 



^Tt 






H.^ e.ountds Senior High School, N.w Bro.r^rel. Te-o,, ;;0-«^^- 
ceouloted Web>1er Cf Coar,ol for fuel economy independent of w^'^do* 



'*9 

opening 




Like tt bol"y "'g**' *" J""*' 



<ttinlO'i 




Fig. 1. Arrangemenl of Webster CF ConHnuous Flow Hoi 
Wotcr Heating Control, for control of gos ftome and circulator. 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY • CAMDEN, N.J, 

4 



J 




CF OS a basic control 

Thcru are many variables possibU' in ilir applica- 
tion nf the Webster CF Control. Tlu' simplrst 
applicalion involves its use as a basic tontrnl where 
the hot water heater serves only to supply water 
for the heating system {in cases like this, the 
tlomestic hot water supply mnst be provided by 
an independent unit). This basic application is 
illustrate d in Fig. 1, pa^e 4. Here are shown the 
three components of the CF Control: 
(a) An Outdoor Thermostat bulb mounted well up 
in an inconspicuous location on an outside wall, 
preferably on a north wall, and protected by an 
aluminum sun shield from the direct rays of the 
sun. The function of this thermostat is to 'show" 
the heating system at all times the outdoor air 
temperature. 

tb) A Supply Main Bulb in the main through 
which water flows to the heating system. This bulb 
in its turn "shows" the control system the tempera- 
ture of the water available to do the heating job 
required by the outdoor temperature, 

kl The Control Cabinet. A simple, attrnctive 
unit about 9" wide and 10" high, projecting 3" 
from the wall (unless provided in a flush wall 
installation). This control unit houses the switches, 
diaphragms and levers necessar)' to make the two 
bulbs do their job. In addition, it provides two 
con\enient manual controls, a SWITCH and a 
VARIATOR. 

Fig. 2. Websrer Con- 
tin uoui Flow Hot Woter 
Heating Control Unit, 
Type CF. This compoct 
unit is contained in on 
attractive cabinet de- 
signed for mounting on 
wall or column, in the 
bosementof a»any other 
convenient point. Sup- 
plied with it are the out- 
doof and supply main 
thermostat bulbs and fit- 
lings, and a thermom- 
etef well for installa- 
tion in the supply main. 

The switch 

''OFF"' POSITION The switch can he snapped 
to "Off/" therehy completely shutting down 
the heating system with tlie possible exception 
of a pilot liftht burner where a gas firetl 
heater is concerned. 

"ON" POSITION In this position the heating 
system will run continuously and "Tull out." 
rej^ardless of how warm it is outdoors or 
indoors. The burner will only shut off when 
the Aquastat. a device which is part of the 
gas burner control, shuts off the fuel because 
the water temperature has reached the maxi- 
mum for which it is set With the Webster 




CF Control, the Aquastat is not part of the 
cnmfurtcreatina control but a limiting safety 
device. The principal use of this "on" position 
is for quickly heating up a cold house which 
has been unnccupieil for some time with the 
heat completely turned off, 

"AUTOMATIC POSITION With the switch in 
this position, ihe CF Control is in full opera- 
tion. This is the position in which the switch 
will remain 99$ of the time. 

Here \% how the basic control just described works 
in an actual installation. As long as the temperature 
outdoors is above 70**, the system is completely 
shut down. In a gas-buming boiler the pdot light 
will probably be burning, as most gas companies 
recommend that this he kept on winter and summer 
to prevent condensation and corrosion of the vent 
pipe or chimney. The moment the temperature 
outdor>rs drops below 70° and before you have 
become the least bit aware inside of the necessity 
for heal, the CF Control will start the Circulator and 
water from the boiler will flow throughout the 
system. This water at the start may be only 80° 
or 85'^ as warmed by the pilot light and a rise in 
outdoor ti^rnperalure above 70*^ may shut down the 
Circulator before you are aware that your heating 
s>steni has been on the Job, You will not "feel" 
anv heat On the other hand, neither will vou be 
cf>nscious of any draft or any chilly feeling. 
However, when the outdoor temperature moves 
below 70° and as long as it renwins behw 70° 
your Circulator will run continuously. This is the 
basis of continuous flow control heating. 

As the outdoor tempcrahirc drops, indicating a 
nee<l for a higher water temperature, the CF Con- 
trol unit will turn on the burner and raise the 
v^ it.r temperature so that the two are always in 



Manual varlaf or 

This is the second item on the Control Cabinet, 
It is a dial 1 ' center and bearing the 

markings "NOi\i%tAL iuO." The word "More" is 
at the right and the word "Less" at the left and 
there are numbers downward from 100 at the right 
and upward at the left. In many installations this 
control will be untouched. However, it is desirable 
that the control unit be located where it is easily 
accessible, in a hall near a coat closet, for example. 
If it is accessible, you will find yourself using it, 
You may occasionally want higher than NORMAL 
heat because of small children who arc visitors, or 
because of illness in the house. The movement of 
this dial from 100 for normal to 110 or 120 will give 
this result without in any way impairing the con- 
timiom anfl automatic heating enjoyed when the 
control is at normal. 

Perhaps you may want to reduce the heat without 
shutting it off entirely. With the ordinary "on and 




.-,>-' ^ ' V 



ofF" control, you would set the thermostat back to 
60''. With the Webster CF Control, you set the 
Manual Variator back to 50. This will reduce the 
amount of fuel used for heating while you are 
away from the house. But again, it has not in- 
terrupted the work of the CF Control If during 
your absence the temperature goes above 70° the 
Circulator will be shut down. If when you leave 
the temperature is, say SS"", and it later goes up 
to eO'', the setting on the Variator dial means that 
50 per cent of the heat required for an outdoor tem- 
perature of 60° will be delivered— no more. If the 
temperature goes down to 0° the control will in- 
crease the amount of heat so as to deliver 50 per 
cent of the heat required at 0*^ outdoors. 
You can see from (he above description what per- 
fection of control is pro\'ided by the three simple, 
reliable components of the Webster CF Control 
System, 

Basic control with 
summer-winter hook-up 

If your heating system is one served by a hot 
water boiler with summer-winter hook-up, with 
the same oil burner providing botli domestic hot 
water and hot water for heating, you can obtain 
the same results as with the basic control just 
described by the addition of one more unit, a 
Webster Mixing Valve- This is shown in the 
illustration of Fig. 3. The CF Control units are 
connected to the motor on this \alve instead of 
directly to the burner. Through this motor the 
control continuously provides for a mixture of water 
newly heated from the boiler with water just re- 
turned from the heating system. Once the mixture 
has been provided at the right temperature, opera- 
tion is exactly like that of the basic system, 

Bosic controls plus zoning 

In our discussion of the basic control no mention 
was made of zoning. In many small installations 
no zoning is warranted- Reduction of heat in bed- 
rooms can be provided through dampers on Web- 
ster Baseboard Heating, for example, or through 
use of a Bypass and a Bypass Valve. Both of these 
features are fully described in the Webster Base- 
board Heating catalog. 

Another method of providing reduced heating to 
bedrooms with the basic control is also shown in 
the illustration of Fig. 1. The upper loop to the 
heating system is provided with a motor-operated 
shut-otf valve connected to a clock thermostat in 
one of the bedrooms. With this addition, without 
changing in the slightest the operation of the basic 
system, the heal delivered to the bedrooms can be 
reduced or held to a lower temperature. The 
thermostat will shut off the flow of water to the 
loop serving the bedroom whenever the set temper- 
ature is exceeded. 



In large installations a complete plan of zoning is 
desirable. A typical complete zoning arrangement 
is shown in Fig. 3. Here again the basic control 
may be without the Mixing Valve, or with it, so 
that the entire system is provided with a con- 
tinuous supply of water heated to the degree 
necessary to meet outdoor temperature require- 
ments. The piping, however, is arranged in three 
zones. 

Zone 1 serves the kitchen, pantry, servant's 

room and adjacent space. 

Zone 2 serves the living rooms including, of 

course, the dining room and study and the 

connecting halls and corridors. 

Zone 3 serves the bedrooms. 
Each of these three zones is under the control of a 
motor-operated valve connected to a clock thermo- 
stat located at some suitable point in the zone 
ser\'ed. 

There may be some portion of the home, possibly 
just the bathrooms, or a room for someone who is 
chronically ill, for which consideration should be 
given to providing a direct line from the basic con- 
trol, not under any zone key room thermostat control. 

Other applications 

In addition to the three control arrangements 
described, various other applications will be found 
useful. 

One such application is control of steam supply 
to a converter where steam is available and a hot 
water system is employed. Tlie CF Control is con- 
nected to a motor-operated Webster Type E Valve 
which modulates the flow of steam to the con- 
verter, thus varying the temperature of the water 
in accordance with changes in outdoor tempera- 
ture. With this arrangement, one motor-operated 
valve serves in place of both the Mixing Valve and 
the Converter Regulator. 

Advantages 

Many of the advantages of the Webster Type CF 
Control will have been evident from the description 
of its application. There are. however, some further 
advantages which should be noted: 
{(]} Webster CF Control insures the (juietest 
heating system made. Continuous operation of 
the Circulator at temperatures below 70° outdoors 
and gradual change in water temperatures eliminate 
the possibility of noises that may occur with sudden 
heating and cooling of piping. 

(b) Complete freedom from "Cold 70^" With 
Webster Continuous Flow Control, there is never 
the chilly feeling that frequently occurs just before 
the ordinary indoor thermostat turns heat on and 
there is never the study feeling and awareness of 
heat that occurs just before the thermostat shuts off. 

(c) Economy results from the elimination of "over 
ride," Delivering the heat continuously permits 




WARREN WEBSTER & 



COMPANY • 

6 



CAMDEN, N , J , 



1 



ZONES ^ 



ZONE B (^ 



-•*- 






<A 




2nd flOOR PLAN 



L _ 




) t 




Fig. 3. Typicol complefe rhreeione orfongcment of Webiier Baseboard Healing, wiih Wcbfi«r CF ContJouout 
Flow Control. Each zone is conTrolled by o motor-opera ted rictuaivd by o ihermostal in the tone vefved. 



tleli\t'niii^ jiist enough for the ciirrt^hlly prC' 
conditions. Excessively healed air is thus nevt-r 
packed up under the ceiling because !}] 
such tiling as excessive heating with the »'»tiJ>m 
CF Control. 





Fig, 4. Outdoor thermostot bulb is protecled 
by an olummum sun shield. It is connected to 
the Webster CF Control Unit by 35 feet of 
capillary tubing. Its function is to ''show" the 
heating system the outdoor air remperolure. 



Locotlon 



I. 



i^ provideil with ample 
(i at a iX 

III or ;t" -yi ''ifut 

; over I _.. . n in the 
I'S. The unit may be 
h with the wall. 



Control unit 

The U'cbstcr CF Control Unit is nii^^edly de- 
^d. and listed by the National Board of Fire 
r^ as an ' *■ 

iiriL^ Yiv the use o( 
_ . are of the 
r'cl on sp; -hing scales and are 

ss HMh the autoniatic and 
■ :fe ^riap action 
upt'i-iuiij^ ir-MMJk lions are pro- 
%,ue- ^ - -■' 'iver plate below each cabinet. 
-^1... n,.i,]oor Th'-'^'^^f""^*^t Bulb is connected to the 
( .,it by t of capillary tubing. The 

Hot Water Bulb is connected by -30 feet of tubing. 
Each unit is indt\idually tested under operating 
conditions before shipment, 



{ 
i 
< 

3 

prac 

1 





I 



Installation procedure 

Webster Continuous FIuw Hot Water Heating 
Control is delivered to your heating contractor, 
together with Webster Service Details, supple- 
mented by whate\'er instructions are necessary to 
enable the contractor to make proper installation. 

After the installation has been made and the system 
is in operation, the contractor or a Webster Service 
Engineer examines the operation of the installation 
and makes the adjustments necessary to accom- 
modate the operation of the control to your require- 
ments. The control components have been designed 
especially to facilitate this adjustment and the in- 
corpnrtition of the adjustable means is one of the 
outstanding features of the unique design of this 
Webster Control. 

Once made, these adjustments are permanently 
locked and will normally need no further change 
unless, of course, the occupancy requirements 
change materially or there is a change in some 
important feature of your installation as, for ex- 
ample, the substitution of a stoker for an oil burner 
or vice versa> 

Specificotion 

The followmn is sugge*:ted specification wordint; 
designed to insure the use of a contn^l accomplish- 
ing the n'sults which may be expected with Web- 
ster Contiunous Flow Hot U'ater Hcatint; Contrnl: 
ONE COMPONENT Install as indicated on 
plans a continuous How heating coritnil device, 
acting on the burner to maintain circulating 
water at a temperature in ijjverse rLititj to 
the outdoor tetn])eraturc. Control shall oper- 
ate to maintain water temperature at ° 
with outdoor temperature of 0^, re<lucing the 
water temperature maintained in straigtit line 
ratio as the ovitdoor temperature increases. 
Control sIkiII also incorporate atitomatic shut- 
off of circulator at outdoor temperature of 



70*^ and shall include manual Variator and 
tlircc-position switch. The circulator and 
burner shall be stopped when switch is placed 
in "OFF" positioTj aT>d circulator and burner 
shall ruTi when switch is placed in "ON" posi- 
tion disregarding; outside tempiTatnre. Tlie 
control unit shall (urther incorp*irate a switch 
which will stop the circulator or circulators 
\\'lien the outdoor temperature reaches 70" F, 

TWO COMPONENTS Install as indicated on 
plans, a contiTiuous How lieattng control device 
which will predetermine the temperature of 
circulating water in accordance with outside 
temperature recjuiremcnts. The control unit 
shall operate the control valve to blend the 
water from the return main with water from 
the heat source to produce the desired temper- 
ature. The control unit shall include manual 
Variator and three-position switch pro\iding 
a choice of automatic operation, full heat or 
off. The circulator shall stop and control valve 
close when switch is in "OFF" position. The 
circulator will run and control val\ e open fully 
when the switch is at "ON" position. The 
control unit shall further incorporate a switch 
which will stop the circulator or circulators 
when the outdoor temperature reaches 70*^ F. 

How to obtain the 
Webster type CF control 

Inquiries for further information, prices and deliver- 
ies on Webster Continuous Flow^ Hot Water Heat- 
ing Control should be addressed to the nearest 
Webster Representative or to the Company at 
Camden, New Jersey, Tlie Webster CF Control 
Unit is specified by architects and engineers and 
sold and installed by reliable heating contractors. 
Your architect, engineer or contractor will be glad 
to obtain further information for you from the 
Webster Representative. 



r^j jfritUd rrtirn-lcei m our .•.yi.^-t.iuT ,-rnLtivor ro makf WrJ^rtcT Sytti-mt vt Stt/im llmlini- and 
Wrhiti-r Syttttn Ettuiptm-nt nor hcttcr, we rcMPrvi' the riaht to cbimat' tpcciiicatumt and pncci 
Without ttolifir. 




WARREN WEBSTER A COMPANY 

CAMDEN 5, N. J. . REPRESENTATIVES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES 

Look for Warren Webster & Compony in your locol telephone book 
IN CANADA, DARLING BROTHERS, LIMITED. MONTREAL 



r*'i> c *s*A tuit i*%* 10 M |.|.| 



^ •:.. r,::-i''-^''-: J-T--:/.'.: i. ■. ./^, 




n 



t 



SERIES "78" THERMOSTATIC TRAPS • SERIES "79' flOAT-ANO-THERMOSTATIC TRAPS 
SERIES 7.M THERMOSTATIC TRAPS • SERIES "78" DIRT STRAINERS 

BULLETIN NO. 1200 J 



WARREN 



lT.Tj 



ESTABLISHED 1888 — THE PIONEERS OF VACUUM STEAM HEATING 

CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



ik^ 




TABLE or CONTENTS 




PAGE 

Assuring Circulation wilh Process Steam 3 

Compensalion for Pressure ^ 

Description of Webster Series "78" Thermostatic Traps . . . , 5 
For pressures up io ISO p. s» i- 

Description of Webster Series '78" Dirt Strainers 8 

for pressures up to ISO p. s. i. 

Description of Webster Series 7-M Thermostatic Traps , . • . 8 

For pressures up to 25 p. s. i. 

Description of Webster Series "79" Floatand-Thermostalic Traps 9 
For pressures up Io ISO p. s. i. 

Rated Capacities of Webster Traps 10 

Dimensions of Webster Traps and Strainers 11 

Data for Ordering Webster Traps and Strainers 12 

Methods of Application 13 

Discharging Into Vacuum Return , . , - . 13 

Avoid Superheat 14 

Drip Points of Supply Mains 1^ 

Uni( Heaters 15 

Sterilizing Equipment _ . . 16 

Cooking Equipment 21 

Laundry Machinery 24 

Paper Making Equipment . . . . , 27 

Hosiery Drying . 27 

Open Tanks or Vats 27 

Air Vent for Hot Water Generator 27 

Industrial Autoclaves 28 

Ship Healing 28 

Food Processing 29 

Appendix: Steam Requirements of Process Equipment 30 

Webster Representatives 31 




Cot^tlghl, 1949. by Warivn Wcbaif-i & Compuir 



i 



i 



I 



L' 



60 DAYS' TRIA 



We want to see the Webster Proces 
Steam Traps in service every place the 
will save you money. 

But, most decidedly, we do not want t 
see the Webster Process Steam Traps i 
service any place where they will not pa 
a profit on the investment. 

And who is a better judge in such ma 
ters than you yourself? 

We therefore give you this invitalior 
"Give us the simple fads about your re 
quiremenfs. // the Webster Process Steai 
Tr&ps offer fhe possibility o( a saving k 
you, we will gladly deliver one on 6' 
days' trial. You are to be the judge o/ it 
value." Simply address Ihe nearest Wet 
Bter representative or Process Steam Di 

PARTMENT. WaRREN WeBSTER 4 COMPANV 

Camden, New Jersey, 



i 




r) 



9 




I 



) 



J 



ASSURING CIRCULATION 

IN ^^ PROCESS 

STEAM" INSTALLATIONS 



The arl and science oi controlling and circulating 
sieam at extremely low pressures has been de- 
veloped to a very high slate oi perfection— prob- 
ably besi exemplified by the Webster "Moderator^' 
System of Steam Heating. In this field it was early 
learned that quJcfe, continuous and complete dis- 
charge of air and wa(er of condensafion was an im- 
portant essential in securing adequate circulation 
with minimum steam consumption. 

The problem of securing the same result at proc- 
ess steam pressures — i. e., 5 to 150 pounds per 
square inch^is not fundamentally different, but is 
intensified by the use of various steam chambers 
and pipe coils of such form and arrangement that 
the air is not easily discharged. 

In investigating scores of installations oi process- 
steam-using equipment, Webster engineers have 
found again and again that the importance of free 
and continuous discharge oi air has not been fully 
realized. In other words, air removal was found to 
be the crux of the problem oi process steam distri- 
bution. Air is present in two forms. It fills the 
steam compartments when the machine is cold. 
The second form is in mixture with the steam, car- 
ried over from the source of supply. This air must 
be completely discharged before ihe apparatus 
can function at full efficiency- Obviously, the more 
quickly this discharge can be accomplished the 
sooner the apparatus will reach its maximum 
output. 

The presence of air, of course, retards the trans- 
mission of heat and its existence either in air-bound 
pockets or in mixture with steam will reduce the 
output of any healing unit. The result of the pres- 
ence of air is shown by the chart. Figure 1. 

The second problem in obtaining free and eco- 
nomical circulation is the complete discharge of 
water of condensation. Our investigators did nol 



find this to be so acute. Various bucket and float 

types of traps when properly appUed will handle 
large volumes of condensation, but they are less 
effective in removing the air. 

Webster engineers, therefore, concentrated their 
efforts on the development of methods for assuring 
prompt, complete and continuous discharge of both 
air and condensation. The apparatus developed 
for this purpose consists of a series oi thermostatic 
traps— Websfer Series "78" and Series 7-M Traps; 
and a series of combination float-and-thermostalic 
traps for larger volumes and hot condensate — 
Webster Series "79" Traps. 

Webster Process Steam Traps have now been 
placed in thousands of installations where they 
have definitely proved all that was claimed for 
them — quick, continuous and complete discharge 
oi air and water of condensation with resulting im- 
portant economies and marked production in- 
creases. 









6S% 



g 60% 

'— ■ 

u 






so 



1 


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1 








K 


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1 














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yfiff di^^ea/r*Thoreut**ffM"t¥. 








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^^^shaf^ ^t'9perm*urt 










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1 
1 










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^ 














\, 














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h 




— 








\ 
















\ 


\ 














^ 
















N 
































\ 














1 1 

i 












IN 


— ■ 











1* 



i$ 20 if ^^ ^s 40 ^ M SS CA ^ fA V 



Per Cent of Air in Steam Compdrtment 

Fig, 1 — Showing ellecl oi air in steam chamber on healing elfi- 
deocy ol process s (earn -usmg apparatus 



-^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^^^^^^_ 


^^^H 


r ! : 1 1 ^l^^l 


^B 






r^^^B 








m 


^^^^^H ' ' 


I : L . -^- - 




m 


^^^^^K' 


m 




M 


^^^^H 


1 


^^^m 




T 


^H 










^^^^P 








^^^B 










^^^H 




^^^H 




^^^B 










^^^^^^^^^^^F 










^H ' 












^^^B 




^^^B 






^^^H 








^^^B 








^^^H 










^^^^E 




^^^^R 




J 


^^^B' 






^^ 


■^^^^^ 


■ 


^mm 


H 


^^J 



FSg. 2— Showing how Webster Series "78" Traps are tully 
compensated ior pressures within their operating lange 



COMPENSATION FOR PRESSURE 

Webster Thermostatic Traps oi all types are 
fully compensated for pressure and will function 
at all pressures between the maximum obtainable 
vacuum and the maximum pressure. The maxi- 
mum pressure stated in the table is in all cases 
considerably below the actual maximum at which 
failure to function may occur. An indication of the 
reserve strength is given by the test illustrated in 
Figure 5. 

The amount of power developed by a thermo- 
static trap is fixed and not variable. Hence, as the 
pressxue differential to be overcome in opening the 
Irap increases, the seat opening must be reduced 
in area to permit the available drop to cause the 
trap to open. Hence, the only difference in traps 
for various pressure classifications is in the size of 
the seat opening. 

It is also naturally true that the life of a trap or 
any other mechanical device subjected to steam 
pressures tends to decrease as the pressure to 
which it is normally submitted increases. It is ac- 
cordingly always desirable to operate all classes 
of steam-using equipment at the minimum pres- 
sure consistent with the temperature desired. 



WHAT IS MEANT BY COMPENSATION 
FOR PRESSURE? 

A trap that is fully compensated for pressure will 
operate with equal success under all the various 
pressure conditions met. It will open to discharge 
water and air and close against steam regardless 
of whether the pressure inside the radiator or 
steam space is atmospheric. 1 pound. 10 pounds 
or 100 pounds, or sub-atmospheric with 5, 10. 15 
or more inches of vacuum- 
It is possible to provide a trap that will meet 
this requirement because of the quality of steam. 
There is a definite relationship between pressure 
and temperature of pure steam. This relationship 
is shown by the heavy line of Figure 2. As soon 
as the content of the trap is impure, i, e., contains 
water of condensation, air or other non-condens- 
able gases, its temperature is lower. The diaphragm 
is in effect a spring with its normal "set'' in the 
open position. It is charged in such manner that. 
when surrounded by dry steam at any pressure 
and temperature, an internal pressure is generated 
sufficiently in excess oi the surrounding or ex- 
ternal pressure to overcome the spring of the dia- 
phragm and cause the valve to seat. This nice bal- 
ance between the "spring" cf the diaphragm plus 
the pressure outside the diaphragm and the pres- 
sure inside the diaphragm is shown by the second 
line of Figure 2. It will be noted that the tempera- 
ture and pressure conditions at which the trap 
seats parallel the steam curve with a difference in 
pressure sufficient to overcome the spring tension. 

RE-EVAPORATION 

At times thermostatic traps are assumed to be 
leaking when in reality re-evaporation of the dis- 
charge is occurring. Pure steam, whether wet or 
dry, at atmospheric pressure has a temperature of 
212 degrees F, At 50 pounds pressure above at- 
mosphere it has a temperature of 297 degrees F. 
If water is discharged from an enclosure where 
this condition prevails into a space at atmospheric 
pressure the 297 degrees F. water will boil or turn 
to steam, and this action will continue until the 
temperature of the discharged water has been re- 
duced to 212 degrees F. The action of water turn- 
ing to steam in passing from a higher pressure to 
a lower pressure is known as re-evaporation. Its 
existence in a trap discharge is, in fact, reliable 
proof of proper trap operation. 



I 



n 



3 




) 1 



WEBSTER SERIES "78" 
THERMOSTATIC TRAPS 

For Working Pressures up to ISO Pounds per Square Inch 
MONEL METAL CAP SCREWS 



COPPER ASBESTOS 
GASKET 



HEAVY GAUGE i 

MONEL METAL * 

DIAPHRAGM -^« 



STEAM BRASS 
BODY a CAP 



WfULLY MACHINED NUT 
^"■^^IT-lJ FROM HOT BRASS FORGING 




'^<1 



RENEWABLE SEAT WITk 
STAINLESS STEEL INSERT 



STAINLESS STEEL 
VALVE PIECE 



IPPLE TURNED FROM 
SOLID BRASS BAR STOCK 



Fig. 3— Webster Series "78" Thermoalalic Trap— '^ inch 782 aiie 



Webster Series "78" Thermostalic Traps, when in- 
stalled as recommended on Webster Service 
Details, provide automatic, quick and complete 
discharge of air and water of condensation from 
process-steam-using equipment. 

WILL OPERATE AT LOW PRESSURE 

While intended primarily for steam pressures 
above 15 pounds. Webster Series "78" Traps will 
work equally well at low pressures, although, of 
course, Ihe capacity will decrease with the pres- 
sure. 

A SPECIALLY DESIGNED 
PROCESS STEAM TRAP 

Webster Series "78" Traps have been developed 
(rom the ground up for operation at the stated pres- 
sures. They are not just an adaptation of a low- 
pressure design to high-pressure duty. That this 
is the case will be quickly realized by an examina- 
lion of the sectional illustration in Figure 3 and 
description of its design and construction. 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 

All materials entering into the construction of 
Webster Series "78" Traps have been selected for 
their ability to withstand the severe service in- 



volved in handling steam at pressures up to 150 
pounds per square inch. 

The body and cover of the trap are made of steam 
brass. The cover is fastened to the body by Monel 
Metal cap screws, except sizes 780 and 781, which 
use a threaded cap, A copper-asbestos gasket fit- 
ting into a recess insures a tight jolnt. 

The expansion member is made of Monel Metal, 
heavily ribbed. It is held securely in position in the 
trap body by means of a heavy gauge brass cir- 
cular plate to which it is boiled and which rests in 
a recess turned in the body. An extra thick shoul- 




1 



Fig. 4 — Sectioned diaphragm ol Series "7B" Trap. Made of Monej 
Metal which retains ils "spiipg" chafaderiaUca under varymg 
conditions ol (emperatuie and pressure. Note joints which are 
triple-sealed: tinned, rolled and soldered vrilh pure tin to 
assure tightness. 




sirroRc 



AFTEB 



der keeps the upper part of the diaphragm far 
enough away from the plale to permit steam to en- 
tirely surround the diaphragm. This construction 
also allows the interior to be easily removed for 
blowing scale, sand, grease, etc., out of the piping 
when first starting up, and also tor later inspection 
and renewal of parts. 

The cone-shaped valve piece closes against a 
sharp-edged seat. The valve piece and seat insert 
are made of Stainless Steel, The seat has a hexagon 
head and is screwed into the outlet of the trap 
body, permitting easy replacement. 

SELECTED MATERIAL A FEATURE 

The materials selected for each part fol- 
low the best metallurgical practice. This is 
typical oi the policy followed through- 
out in making Webster Series "7S" Traps 
especially for process steam pressures. 
Stainless Steel selected for valve piece 




and insert seat is admirably adapted to withstand 
the severe scoring action of steam at high velocity. 
Monel Metal used for the diaphragm and cap 
screws is widely known for its strength and resist- 
ance to corrosion and erosion. Note the fully ma- 
chined nut from brass forging and the nipple turned 
from solid brass bar stock, with broached lugs. 

SIZES AND TYPES 

Webster Series "78" Traps are made in the angle 
pattern only. Standard body has union male inlet 
and female outlet as shown in Figure 6. All sizes 
and models are made in two pressure classes. 
Class 2 Traps are adapted to pressures up to 60 
pounds per square inch. Class 3 Traps 
are for pressures from 60 to ISO pounds 
per square inch. The only difference in 
these classes is in the size oi the seal 
opening, which is made smaller for the 
higher pressures. 




?4 inch— 780 

\A inch— 781 ^ ^^^^^ 



Vi inch— 762 



^ Inch— 763 
Fig. 6— Webatet Series "78" ThetmoBldtic Trapi 



I mch^78* 




> » 



<« 




"^n t"^^""' '^^^^ **^^'^ ^^'^'^ Websler Series 
70 Trap is lested w.th both ho» water and sieam 

INSPECTION AND TEST 

Unusual care is taken throughout the manuiac- 
lure of Series -78" Traps to insure uniformity and 
long service. After complete assembly each trap 
IS placed on a test table and (1) tested for casting 
defect, i. e.. leakage under pressure. (2) given 
steam tests at both low and maximum pressures 
to assure satisfactory closing. (3) given a pressure 
cold water test to assure satisfactory opening, and 
Ihen (4) subjected to a mirror test which detects 
leakage around the cap joint not visible to the 
naked eye. 

No trap is permitted to leave the factory that has 
not passed all tests, and proved that it will func- 
tion properly. 

CAPACITIES iSee Page 10} 

The maximum capacities of Webster Process 
Steam Traps given on page 10 are the result of 
actual tests and are based on continuous discharge. 

SERIES "78" THERMOSTATIC TRAP capacities 
were obtained with condensate 10 F, lower than 



the corresponding steam temperature at the oper- 
ating steam pressure^ Where condensate to be 
handled is 5^ F. lower than steam temperature, the 
maximum capacity can safely be taken at Vi oi the 
figure given in the table. It is good practice to 
select thermostatic traps on the basis of capacities 
at the lower temperature difference. 

SERIES "79" FLOAT-ANDTHERMOSTATIC 
TRAP capacities were obtained with condensate 
at or about steam temperature. The practice of 
heating engineers varies somewhat but the usual 
basis is to select a trap whose capacity is about 
twice that of the maximum indicated load require- 
ment. This is most likely to occur when first start- 
ing up cold apparatus or when performing maxi- 
mum work for which the apparatus is designed. 

Pressure differences given refer to pressures at 
inlet of trap and in return Une. Series "78" Class 2 
Traps should be selected when the maximum work- 
ing pressure will not exceed 60 lbs. per sq. in. and 
where the prevaiUng operating pressures will be 
between 15 and GO lbs. If prevailing pressure dur- 
ing the greater portion of the operating time will 
be below 25 lbs., and more ample capacity is de- 
sired in this lower range of pressures, considera- 
tion should be given to use of Webster Series 
7^M Traps, 

Similarly, Class 3 Traps should be selected 
where maximum pressure will reach 150 lbs. per 
sq. in. and prevailing pressure will reach between 
60 and 150 lbs. 

Where large volumes of very hot condensation 

must be handled more quickly than is possible 
by thermostatic traps alone, a combination float- 
and-thermostatic trap (Webster No. 794-T) should 
be used. This trap is made in five pressure classi- 
fications, the only difference being in the size oi 
the float-controlled seat opening. Selection can 
be made from Table III in a manner similar to 
that described for Series "78" Traps, 




til 

f 

! 



WEBSTER SERIES ^^78" DIRT STRAINERS 



Fot Working Pressures up to 

WebsJer Series "78" Dirt Strainers have been 
provided to be placed ahead oi Webster Process 
Steam Traps located al drip points in the supply 
piping or attached to apparatus which is likely to 
contain core sand, pipe scale or sediment. Class 3 
Traps in particular should thus be protected be- 





iSO Pounds per Square inch 

The bodies of Webster Series "78" Dirt Strain- 
ers, except Model B Strainers, are made ol cast 
iron. The baskets are of perforated brass, having 
an ample free area as listed in Table L Monel bas- 
kets can be obtained on special order at additional 
cost. A heavy brass plug holds the basket firmly 
in position. It is only necessary to unscrew this 
plug in order to remove the basket for cleaning^ 

Model B Strainers are similar to the other sizes 
except that they have brass bodies. They are made 
primarily for use with sterilizers, coffee urns, and 
other procesS'Steamusing equipment when appear- 
ance and frequent cleaning are important factors. 

Table I — Fiee Aiea Through Baabets oi SerieB "78" SiTaineia 
Using Brass or Monel Screen With No. 4 Holes (Diameler .04S"J, 
225 Holes per Sq, In, 



Exterior Section 

Fig. a— WebslGT Series "79" Dirt Sirainer 

cause the valve seat opening is necessarily smaller. 
It is better to install a Webster Series "78" Dirl 
Strainer in all ccses and be on the safe side, than 
to save a few dollars and be required to purchase 
repair parts later. 







Fr*» ArvK 


Pipa Ar*B 


Ratio Trmm 


Su« 


Sfmbol 


in S<)uar« 


in Squars 


Ar*ft to 






lnch*H 


lnt:h*B 


Fip« Ar«a 


%" 


762-1 


L71 


.191 


8.9 to 1 


Vi" 


782-1 


L71 


.304 


5.6 to 1 


Vk" 


783-1 


2.09 


.533 


3.9 to I 


%" 


784-1 


3.04 


,533 


5,6 to 1 


I" 


784-1 


3.04 


.863 


3.5 to 1 


11/4" 
1V4" 


785- 1 


4 59 


150 


3 1 to I 


786-1 


7.89 


t.50 


5.1 to 1 


\w 


786-1 


7.89 


2.04 


3,7 to 1 


2" 


78S-I 


1L04 


3.36 


3.3 to t 



Dimensions— See Table VI, page IL 
D^ta lor Ordering— See Table X. page 12. 



WEBSTER SERIES 7-M TRAPS 

Foi Wotkinq Prassuies up to 25 Pounds per Square inch 




If normal work- 
ing pressures with- 
in the apparatus 
served do not ex- 
ceed 25 pounds 
per square inch. 
and if more ample 
capacity is desired 
al these pressures, 
Webster Series 
7'M Thermostatic 
Traps should be considered- Select trap by ratings 
given in Table IV on page 10. These ratings are 
conservative and, in general, can be used without 
further safety factor. 

Consfrucfjon— Like all Webster Thermostatic 
Traps, the Series 7-M is fully compensated for 
pressure (see page 4). The Iriple-sealeJ, Uquid- 



Fig. 9— WebsiM Siie 702 Trap 



filled diaphragm which is the thermostatic ele- 
ment is made from Monel Metal and is assembled 
and permanently adjusted at the factory with its 
Stainless Steel valve piece. The renewable sharp- 
edged seat is brass with Stainless Steel insert. 
All sizes and models use high-grade steam brass 
bodies. Caps are hot brass forgings. Nipples are 
turned from solid brass bar stock while the nut is 
a fully machined hot brass forging. 

App/jcatjon— Methods of appUcation for the 
Series "78" Trap, described on page 13 and pages 
following, in general apply to the Series 7-M Trap- 
Avoid superheat by using a coohng leg which 
will dissipate the heal before it reaches the trap, 

flawed Capacities—See Table IV. page 10. 
Dimensions—See Table VIII. page 11. 
Data /or Ordering— See Table XIL page 12. 



WEBSTER SERIES 



» 



"79" TRAPS 

For Wotking Pi^ssut^s up to ISO Pounds pe^ Square Inch 



II^NfWABLE SEAT Wl!H 
STAINLESS STEEL INSERI 



COPPEft.ASBESTOS GASKET 



STftONC CAST IRON BODY 



HEAVY COPPER FLOAT 



CLEANOur PLUGS 




MQNEL METAL 
THERMOSTATK AIR VENT 



STEEL CAP SCREWS 



Fig. lO-Wefaste. Series 794 Floal-ard-Thetmos«a»ic Tiap 



STAINLESS STEEL SEAT 



ONEL METAL VALVE 
PIECE 



OUTLET 

(AN INLET OPENING IS ON 

EACH SIDE) 



Where larger volumes of very hoi condensate 
roust be handled quickly, Webster Series 79 Traps 
should be used. These are float-and^thermostalic 
traps designed especially lor normal working pres- 
sures between 15 and ISO pounds per square inch. 
Water of condensation is passed through a float- 
controlled seat opening while air is released into 
the return piping by a ihermostalically controlled 
vent* 

The Webster Series 79 Trap meets the need for 
a rugged, heavy duty trap yel is compact and 

light in weight so 
that it can be readily 
mounted right in a 
pipe line without 
other support. 

Construction — As 
can be seen in Table 
III, page 10. Webster 
Series 79 Traps are 
made in five pres- 



FLOAT T»*P 






Fig. 11— Serlea 794 Tiap and Nameplale 




sure classifications, the only difference being in 

the size of the float-confroUed seal opening. Cast 
iron body and cover are bolted together with 
steel cap screws. A copper-asbestos gasket is in- 
serted between these parts to form a light joint. 
Valve piece and stem are Monel Metal while the 
seat is Stainless Steel. The valve bracket is held 
in place by a steel clamp and Monel Metal set 
screw. 

The air vent unit is a duplicate of that used in 
the well-known Webster Series 780 Thermostatic 
Trap. Here the diaphragm is Monel Metal while 
the valve piece and seat insert are Stainless Steeh 

Appiicalion— Webster Series 79 Traps can be 
used wherever process steam, i. e.. up to 150 
pounds per square inch is used. Superheat must 
be avoided by employing a cooling leg or other 
means (o dissipate heal before it reaches the trap. 
The general method of installation is shown in 
Figure 14, page 13. Use of a Webster Series 78 
Dirt Strainer is always recommended. 



Cdpacities—See Table III. page 10. 
Dimensions— See Table VII. page 11. 
Data for Ordering— See Table XI. page 12. 



-^^y^/7^.' 



Capacities and Ratings in Lbs. Water per Hour' 

IMPORTANT: See eicpUnalion on page 7 beiore using ubies 
Capacities at Normal WorkiDq Pressures are given in bold face lype 

Table II— Webster Series **78" Traps 

CapaciUes given are adual Mooded capacities with condensate tempeialuie 10" F, below corresponding steam lempeiature. 



Sjrmbol «[ Tf«p 



Pr«aur« DifivnntLal. Um. p*r aq. in. 



13 



ZS 



30 



40 



90 



60 



80 



M 



100 



139 



ISO 



Cla«a 2 — Working Pressures up to 60 lbs. per sq. in. 



780-2 


190 


300 


360 


400 


440 


480 


530 


590 


620 


650 


700 


760 


781-2 


200 


310 


360 


420 


460 


510 


550 


620 


650 


680 


740 


600 


782-2 


350 


550 


660 


740 


S30 


920 


1000 


1100 


1170 


1220 


1350 


1450 


783-2 


560 


880 


1080 


1 160 


1300 


1430 


1530 1 


1700 


1790 


1870 


2040 


2210 


784-2 


970 


1620 


1870 


2020 


2280 


2460 


2660 1 


3020 


3150 


3320 


3620 


3860 









Class 3 — Working Pressures up to 


150 lbs. 


per sq. in. 








780-3 


150 


250 


300 


320 


370 


400 


430 


480 510 


540 


590 


630 


781-3 


170 


270 


340 


360 


400 


440 


480 


530 1 560 


560 


640 


680 


782-3 


250 


400 


500 


540 


600 


660 


720 


810 


850 


690 


980 


1060 


783-3 


310 


480 


600 


650 


720 


780 


850 


1 950 


1000 


1050 


1 160 


1250 


784-3 


680 


1050 


1300 


1400 


1570 


17S0 


1850 


2100 


2200 


2300 


2500 


2700 



Table Ill—Webster Series "79" Traps 

Capacities given are flooded capacilies with condensation at about steam tenipetature. 



Sj-mbol o( Tf»p 



PreaBure Differential in IbS' p4r vj- in. 



10 I 15 20 29 30 



40 



SO 60 70 7S 



BO 



90 



100 UO 120 



130 



140 150 



Class 2A — Working Pressures 15 to 30 lbs- per sq- in. 



794-T-2A 



1260 



1640 



1900 



214012320 



2500 



Class 2B — Working Pressures 30 to 60 Iba. per sq- in. 



794-T-2B 



630 



SOO 



930 



1040 



1150 



1200 1340 



1450 



1540 



Class 3A — Working Pressures 60 to 90 lbs, per sq. in. 



794-T-3A 



320 



420 



470 



540 580 



630 



700 I 750 



800 



830 



860 



880 



920 



Class 3B-1— Working Pressures 90 to 120 lbs. p«r sq. in. 



794.T-3B-1 



230 



310 



360 



400 



440 



470 



530 



570 



610 



640 



660 



680 



700 720 



740 



760 



Class 3B-2"'Working Pressures 120 to 150 lbs. per sq, in. 



794-T-3B-2 



180 



220 



260 



300 



340 360 



400 



440 



470 



510 



530 



540 



560 



580 



630 



640 



660 



€80 



700 



Table IV— Webster Series 7-M Traps 

Figures given are conservative ratings, not full Hooded capacities. 



Symbol of Trap 






Prvnun DiH«r«ntial in lb«. 


par wq. in. 








1 


3 


5 


10 


IS 


ao 


SB 


702M 
7i3M 
724M 


41 

83 

146 


56 
1 16 
203 


■ — ■ 

93 

163 

320 


133 
263 
460 


160 
319 
686 


186 
3 69 
640 


210 
410 
725 






L 1 








----- 


— 



I* ^ , ^i^Trft ?'?v!l '" i ^', °* water to >q. It. e.d.r. ai 240 BT.U. multiply by 4. To convert faiings given in sq 
It, e,dT, al 2^0 BJ,U. lo lbs. per hr. ol waler, divide by 4. To convert ratings given in lbs. per hi- of water lo liters oei hr 
multiply by 0.4SS. To convetl ratings in sq, fl, ©-d-i. lo liters per hi. multiply by 0-114. 




Table V— Dimensions of Webster SeHes "78" Traps 



) > 





Symbol 


tnlal 


OutUt 


A 


B 


c 


o 


780t 


% 


2A 


lA 


IH 


ly* 


781 


'/2 


23/4 


I A 


m 


I'A 


782* 


^h 


3,^ 


li^ 


m 


1% 


783 


% 


Va 


3n 


ItV 


2% 


»i^ 


784 


1 


1 


4»A 


2 


2i^ 


2y8 



All dimennona in lachei uid lubiocl lo alifjhl vofMlicMi. 

t?8D Trap turnjshed with ^g inch f«inAio nipple on >p«cial OrdBr^ 

Dimension A = ZV4 inches, 
5!iTAq 7ftn kny4 70I o^ fAi ■ ■ * ?B2 Trap fufninhed on apecjal oidei with 't-incb male nipple, 4I10 

iiies /HU and 78l Sue 782 and larger a^inch or flinch lemale n.ppJe to l.i Biandard : -mch unfon nv.1. 

Dimension A = 3^ inches. 

Table VI— Dimensions o£ Webster Series "78'' Strainere 



NOTE — Ljsted here in 'b inch \o 2-mch 
Bix«a only. AUo available in casi iron 
only in sizes 2*.^, 3< 4, 5 and 8 inches 
wilhlUngedconnecJionaHSlandaid weight 
for 125 lbs. sq. in- service. Dimensions 
and com pie le iniormalion on request. 



OJTUCT 




Sy 


Tibol 


AU Madala 


C^at Iron Body 


Sru* Body 


Caat Iron 


Bruii 


tnlal 


Outl*t 


Plua-P 


A 


E 


A 


c 


782-1 


782B-1 


% 


% 


% 


33/4 


21/4 


33/4 


2V4 


782-1 


7826- 1 


^/?. 


»/^ 


% 


33/4 


2V4 


33/4 2V4 


783-1 




V4 


V4 


3/« 


4'/8 


2V4 


Not Made 


784-1 


784B-1 


% 


¥4 


V7 


45/8 


3V8 


4% 31/8 


784-1 


784B- 1 


1 


1 


J^ 


45/8 


3Vr 


45/8 3V8 


785-1 




n/4 


IV4 


51A 

e>4 


31/2 


Not Made 


786-1 


786B-1 


I'/i 


»V4 


V4 


4 


6 


4 


786-1 


786B.1 


IV7 


11^ 


V4 


6'/4 


4 


6 


4 


788-1 


788B-1 


2 


2 


V4 


7Vg 


43/4 


7 45/g 



CIXAHOWT ftJX-P 



When orderin? slat* both symbol and sise. 

AI] dimensions in inches and vubied lo flight vaiiation. 

B ModeU have tasl biaaa body. S'andard models have painted, casl-iron bodlBC- 





Table VII— Dimensions of Webster Series "79" Traps 
Float-and-Thermostatic Type 



Sl/C 



Symbol 


Si» 


B 

6% 


c 


D 

4V2 


C 

31? 


r 


o 


H 

2)1 


J 


794-T 


I 


IVa 




8% 


1 



(j^lit] jy^ dimensionB in iAches and subjeci to flUqht variation. 



B— V-^ 



— ?■« 



J'J'IC OfCLC»'-CiUt Pi.LTCi 



Table VIII— Dimensions o£ Webster Series 7-M Traps 



,— -J— T UfTMANOTfla^ 



WOOEL R 



) > 




SyrnboL 


Modal 


Sax* 

V4 

1 


A 

23/4 
23/4 

234 
3A 


B 

IVs 


C 

in 


E 

3/4 

V4 





H 


J 


702M 


H 
G 


lA 
lA 

l5^ 
1% 

I'/s 


2V4 







R&L 


IV2 


IH 

in 

2A 


IVs 


713M 


H 




G 


3^ 
41/4 






724M 


H 





All dlmensiona tn inches and lubied to slight variBlion, 



Table IX— Data for Ordering Webster Series "78" Traps 



Six*. InchM 


Pr«H>urB Rano*. tibft. 


Symbol 


Nat Waight. Lb*. 


Cod. Word 


% 


25- 80 


780-2 t 


IV2 


Sevmag 




60-150 


780-3 t 


IV2 


Sevmagry 


V2 


25- 60 


781-2 


13/4 


Sevmek 


>A 


60- ISO 


781-3 


13/4 


Sevmekry 


V2 


25- 60 


782-2* 


3 


Sevmut 


y^ 


60-150 


782-3* 


3 


Sevmutry 


3/4 


25- 60 


783-2 


41/4 


Sevnip 


V4 


60-150 


783-3 


41/4 


Sevnipry 


1 


25- 60 


784-2 


7 


Sevpeg 


1 


60-150 


784-3 


7 


Sevpegry 



+ 780 Trap lumished with ^" lemdle nippl© on special order, 

■762 Ttap fumjshed on sp«dat ordei w;1b H" male nipple also ^\" 01 \\" t«male nipple ro lit siandaid W union out- 



« 



i 



Table X— Data for Ordering Webster Series "78" Strainers 



SymboL B models have braan body. 
IMPORTAKT ■ 



Sir«, Inches 


MauTnum Pr««aur«i Lba. 


Symbol 


Net Waight, Lbs. 


Cod* Word 


% 


150 


782-1 


1% 


Sevra 


Vi 


150 


782-1 


1% 


Sevrabt 


V4 


150 


783-1 


IV2 


Sevrads 


3/4 


150 


784-1 


2% 


Sevrack 


1 


ISO 


784-1 


25/8 


Sevrage 


IV4 


150 


785-1 


4V4 


Sevrehn 


IV4 


150 


786-1 


6V4 


Sevrek 


IVz 


150 


786-1 


61/4 


Sevrelt 


2 


150 


788-1 


9 


Sevremp 


% 


150 


782B- 1 


1% 


Sevren 


y^ 


150 


782B- 1 


1% 


Sevrip 


3/4 


150 


784B.1 


2% 


Sevrisk 


1 


150 


784B- 1 


2% 


Sevrose 


l'/4 


150 


786B-1 


6 


Sevroty 


HA 


ISO 


786B-1 


6 


Sevrow 


2 


ISO 


788B-1 


8 


Sevrux 



« 



Olhet models with cast iron painted body. 
When ordering give both aiza and symbol. 



Table XI— Data for Ordering Webster Series "79" Traps 



Six*. Inchts 


Pr«aaurfl Rang*. Lba- 


Symbol 


Nat Waight. libs. 


Coda Word 




15- 30 


794-T-2A 


121/2 


Nintosk 




30- 60 


794-T-2B 


121/2 


Nintowt 




60- 90 


794-T.3A 


12V2 


Nintunt 




90-120 


794-T-3BI 


121/2 


Nintuve 




120-150 


794-T-3B2 


12V2 


Nintux 



Table XII— Data for Ordering Webster Series 7-M Traps 

Opeidting Pieasuie Range up lo 25 lba. pei aq, in. 



Sia*. Inchos 


Symbol 


Body Medal 


Nat Waight. Lba. 


Coda Word 


»A 


702M-H 


Angle 


IV4 


Sevbanem 


^k 


702M-G 


Straight 


1% 


Sevbanemog 
Sevbanemar 


^A 


702M-R 


Right Offset 


1% 


y^ 


702M-L 


Left Offset 


1% 


Sevbanemel 


V4 


713M-H 


Angle 


23/4 


Sevcupem 


V4 


713M-G 


Straight 


3 


Sevcupemog 


1 


724M-H 


Angle 


33/4 


Sevgivem 



i 



c 



12 




) > 




i » 



.'^. 



METHODS or APPLICATION 



VALVE 




aPECT CONNECTION TO OUTLET 
or APPARATUS TO BE DRAINED 



WEBSTER SERIES 7& 
THERMOSTATIC TRAP 



WEBSTER SERIES 7b 
HIGH PRESSUFC STQAINER' 



Fig. 12 



HORI20MTAL SWING 
CHECK VALVe WITH 
METAL DISC AND 45 
DEGFCE METAL SEAT. 



General Method ol Applicaiion. Series "'78" Trap 



^mSp 



GENERAL APPLICATION 

Websler Process Steam Traps are usually ap- 
plied so as to remove bolh the condensation and 
air (or other non-condensible gases) from Ihe 
steam chamber ol the apparatus or surface heated 
to the condensation return system, usually {or re- 
turn to the boiler. At other times they may be used 
solely to assure prompt and efiective venting of 
the heated space, i. e., sterilizing chamber, cooking 
compartment, etc. 

REMOVAL OF CONDENSATION AND AIR 

Webster Process Sleam Traps are connected 
to the outlet of the apparatus to be drained 
(see Figures 12 and 14), 

Note that a horizontal swing check valve is 
placed in the discharge pipe from the trap. The 
valve should be of lirsl-class make and of the type 
having a seat at an inclination of 45 degrees and 
with Ihe disc made of metal. A check valve with 
composition disc should never be installed, as 
there is always a likelihood of Ihe disc curling up 
after a period of use, causing (he valve to leak. 

The discharge pipe should be vented to the at- 
mosphere so as to permit the rapid escape of air 
which has been passed by the trap. A very effec- 



VALVE ^-^ 



live arrangement, is to connect the discharge pipes 
from the various traps of the inslallation into a com- 
mon return which is run lo a vented receiver. 

The traps should never discharge diTectly into a 
vacuum return main, as the high temperature con- 





1 = Webstei Heavy Duty Trap Seriea Z6-0. 

2 ^ Webarer Diil SUainer Series 78. 

3 - Helum (rom Hjqh Preasute Traps. 

4 - Ai leaal 2" Pipe. 

5 = Same Siie av Outiei W, 

G ^ Venr to hear Main or lo Almospheio. 

2 Pipe Siies Laiqet than Outlet W. 
7 - Connection fo Main Vacuum Helurn. 
B = Same Size aa lolet lo Trap. 

Fig, 13-Melhod of Draining Condensaljon from WefaaJer Hirjii 
Pressure Traps, inro Vacuum Relum Through Webster Heavy 
Duly Trap 

NOT LtSS THAN 
3" LONG NfPPLi 



WFIBSTtR 
SCpfLS ^9 TRAP 



CONNECT rO APPARATUS 

BC>nO DflAiNCD or 

CONDENSATION AND Alfi 




WC8STCR SERIES 
76 STRAIN E« 



CONNECT TO 

HP qeturn main. 



h 



Fiq 14 General Method ol Application. Series "79" Trap 




^^x'^C't 



lA- MCH.4 ■J-'Vi 




1WUTI* |UHa«HIPV T^i** 



Fig. IS — Merhod oi Connecting Discharge irom Webster Series 
"78" Traps lo Vacuum Remro Through Flash Tank and Webslei 
Series 2G Trap 



cannot be avoided and there is possibilily ol it 
entering the trap, some provision such as a suit- 
able "cooling leg" should be employed between 
the apparatus and the trap, 

A SEPARATE TRAP 
ON EACH UNIT 

Since the development of the Webster Series 
"78" Thermostatic Trap, hundreds of concerns us- 
ing steam on process operations have done away 
entirely with the old-fashioned "master" traps and 
are using a separate "78" Trap on each steam-using 
unit. This is now accepted engineering practice. 

When the condensation to be handled is very 
hot or exceeds the rated capacity of a single Series 
"78" Trap, a Webster Series "79" (combination 



densate will re-evaporate upon entering the region 
of lower pressure and the vapor thus formed may 
seriously lower the vacuum and require the use of 
jet water at the pump. One protective measure per- 
mitting discharges into a vacuum return main is 
shown in Figure 13. Another method is shown in 
Figure 15. 

In Figure 13 the condensate passes through a 
Webster Series 26 Heavy Duty Trap of the proper 
size into the vacuum return main. From the top of 
the vertical separating pipe marked (4) and from 
the outlet W on the top of the Heavy Duly Trap, 
vent pipes are run and joined together, discharg- 
ing into a heating main or outboard to atmosphere. 

VENTING 

The second general type of application is to 
vent or assure the prompt, continuous and com- 
plete removal of air from the chamber heated in 
those cases where condensate is otherwise dis- 
posed of or where it is not desirable to return the 
condensation to the receiver. 

Frequently two traps are required, one serving 
for removal of both air and condensation from a 
jacketed space and the other serving primarily to 
vent the air from the chamber, such little conden- 
sate as may be involved being discharged directly 
to a drain. 

AVOID SUPERHEAT 

The use of superheated steam in apparatus 
served by Webster Series "78" Traps should be 
avoided except where the construction of the ap- 
paratus is such that the superheat is dissipated be- 
fore it reaches the trap. Where superheated steam 



Su"Lr Ri^cn 




TO OfliP «HMT COHrfCnOM 

Omjuoo fif Turn main must 

BE VtHTED TO ATuOSPXRC 



OCLH WdJA. 




HCBsrtn uncs 






PPC VUST EhTCfl 

""- TOP ai atn^m 

3 



W^ERE DRIP PaWT IS ABCVE RETuftN MAfl^ 



i« 5*JPPL.r (hsm 



lOP Of (ttruAfI 




v\f4 ii^PLi yA^pu - 
rULL mc TO DAP 
PONT COhNECTiD^ 



TO *TMOai»Hf>»E 



B 



GAtt 

wtasTtP sues 



19 TRAP 



WHEftE ORtP POINT (5 BEuDW RETURN MAIN 



TO* OF 



auPPLT nsDi 




X 



t^t^fit^to Brrufft M4IN 



m 5TIUIH01 






CttfOt VJt^[ 



DRfPPJNG MAIN SUPPLY RISER OR MAIN 
ENTTEftlNG Ofl LEAVING BUILDING 

fig. 18— Three Merhods ol Installarion ol Webslei SerieE "76'" 
Trap at Drip Pointa. Installaiion ot Senea "79' Tiapa ib aLmilai, 

Wore; Conned teXuta Irom liap to high preaiuTG drip return 
pipe, which muat be veoied to atmosphere. Do nol connect 
directly to vacuum return main as inlioduclion ol high tempera 
ture condenaatioa will cause a lowering ol vacuum. II neceuary 
to discharge condensaljon into vacuum return line lollow special 
Webster service deldila showmg pioiecltve measures necMtary 



t 



> 



noal^„d-lh«mos,a,ic) Trap can be u=ed. o, ,wo 
or .hiee Sene. "yS- Traps can be connected"^ 
^^^ane, ^and a™,ed ,o d..ba,,e .„,„ a ootL" 

BLOWING OUT SYSTEM 

Before puttmg Ihe appata.us into use. i, may be 
desirable .o remove the expansion members Lm 
.he traps and blow out the entire high-pressure pip- 

sand^etc. Where a Series '78- Strainer is placed 
ahead o each trap, this preliminary blowing out 
wil be less necessary, although it may be advis- 
able. 

CONNECTION AT DRIP POINTS 

Three methods of applying Websler Series "78" 
Traps at drip poinis aie shown in Figure IG. Detail 
(A) appUes where the drip point is located above 
the return main and the flow of condensate is 
downward by gravity through the trap and into 
the return. Details B and C are to be followed when 
the return main is above the drip point and the 
condensate has to be raised. The vertical distance 
through which it is possible to lilt the water will 
depend upon the differential pressure existing be- 
tween the minimum steam pressure in the supply 
main and the maximum back pressure which may 
be built up in the return main. 

It is preferable to locate the trap at the top of the 
vertical lift pipe if there is sufficient space between 
the overhead return and the ceiHng to permit in- 
stallation of (rap, check valve and strainer and con- 
nection of discharge pipe into top of return pipe. 
The trap should not be attached directly to the 
drip point. A horizontal pipe at least 6 feet long 
should be provided in every case> to serve as a 
reservoir for the sudden floods of condensation 
which will occur whenever steam is turned on a 
cold piping system, 

SIZING OF TRAPS FOR DRIP CONNECTIONS 

No exact method can be given for selecting the 
proper sizes of traps for dripping mains and risers 
They must be adequate to handle the condensation 
at starling up periods when the steam pressure in 
Ihe supply main is naturally lower than after the 
system is heated up. 

UNIT HEATERS 

Figure 17 shows a method of connecting up a 
single unit heater using steam at pressures between 



WT nwtLEi^^ 



UHfJ HE»TTft 







USING Fuafc T *N0 T*f O^^OCTATfC TRAja 

13— 4 



VALV£ 
tCONNErlTlO^l a) 




WttSTtfl l£BltS'T»^ nttf* 



TO NIC** PHE^SUtt 



.VttMTEfl SEACs'n'rM/' 



•*OT LESS Tt^At* 3 rttt 



0€C^ Wlit 



Fig 17 MelhodoJ Dripping Unit Heater Through a WebaJer 
and SrV' ^^^^^^' High-Preaaure Trap-Series "7B'- 



15 and 150 pounds per square inch- The dis- 
charge is connected direct to high-pressure return 
main, which may be above if trap discharge pres- 
sure exceeds static head in discharge pipe plus 
pressure (if any) in return main. Figure 18 shows 
method of dripping a blower-type heater using 
Webster Series '79" and "78" Traps. Under 15 
pounds pressure, Webster Low-Pressure Traps are 
recommended. 

SIZING TRAPS ON UNIT HEATERS 

In selecting the proper size of Process Steam 
Trap for the unit and also for the drip, the engineer 



HICH F5n£SSuH£ 
5tt*M SUPPL* - 




DIPT ^TQJktNCA 



'.'^VE 












COOntK 

Fig JB-Method of Dripping Blower-Type Heater Through a 
Webster Ditl Strainer and Webster High-Preasure Trap 
Series "79" ^ 




should bear in mind that the steam piessure at 
times, especially when starting up with a cold 
system, may be considerably lower than the oper- 
ating pressuxe. as specified or as canied under 
normal conditions. For this reason it is recom- 
mended to select a trap having the proper rating 
at a low differential of say 10 or 15 pounds. When 
sized on such a basis, the trap will be large enough 
to quickly pass the condensation under the sever- 
est conditions- It is recommended that a Series 
"79" Combination Float-and Thermostatic Trap be 
used except for small units where the Series "78" 
Trap may be used. 

STERILIZING EQUIPMENT 

Be<juiiements /or SferiJizing — Authorities agree 
that hve steam at 250 degrees F.. thoroughly p>ene- 
trating for five minutes, will sterilize completely. 



CONTROL 
VALVtS 



STEAM 
SUPPLY 




WEBSTER SERCS 
78 TRAP 



CHECK VAiyL 



VCBSTER 

78STRAJNER 



TO DRAIN 



-^7 



Fig. 19— Secboo^ Oevatioa ol DraMJag Staainr 

While perfect sterilization may be done with some- 
what lower temperature, the lime necessary for 
sterilization increases very rapidly. 

Owing to its penetrating properties, the sterili- 
zation temperature by direct contact of the steam 
with the material is usually accepted as 250 de- 
grees F.. and the maximum temperature as about 
260 degrees F. These temperatures call for steam, 
unmixed with air. at pressures ranging from IS to 



20 pounds. If air is mixed with the steam, the lem 
perature at the same pressure will be lower, de- 
pending upon the amount of air present. The pres- 
ence of air in steam, therefore, reduces the steriliz- 
ing properties- To ens\ire complete penetration 
with a reasonable factor ol safety, from thirty to 
fifty minutes should be allowed for the steriliza- 
tion period, or if more pressure is available 35 
to 60 pounds will speed up the operation, 

TYPES OF STERIUZING EQUIPMENT 

The most widely used types of sterilizing and 
similar hospital equipment are the following: 



DreManq SittrlliiUB. 

Warn Stcriliiea. 

InsCruttMil uid Uteoail S*entixert^ 



Milk Pvtounssfs. 
Bed Pwi Slsnlttws 
Blanlcei W^rraera- 



These are described briefly. Following the de^ 
scription is a hill discussion of the application of 
Webster Series "78* Traps to this class of appara- 
tus. 

DRESSING STERILIZERS 

Dressings, towels and gloves are steriiiied by 
direct contact with steam in a Dressing Sterilizer 
One form of this apparatus is shown in Figure 19. 
It consists of a sterilizing chamber (A) surrounded 
by a large shell and forming a steam jacket out- 
side the chamber. Access tc the chamber is 
through a tight-closing door (B). 

After placing the material in the chamber and 
cloong the door, steam is admitted by band-con- 
trol valves or automatic valves through pipe (CI 
to the steam jacket and through (D) to the cham< 
ber at 35 to 60 poimds pressure. Both air and con- 
densate are discharged through Webster Traps 
"E" and "F" to the drain which is open to the at- 
mosphere. After sterilization has been carried on 
for ihe proper time, which varies with the form 
and kind of material, the steam supply valve "H" 
is closed. The trap "F" continues to function to 
discharge any air or condensation still remaining 
in the chamber. As the pressure in the chamber is 
reduced, the moisture in the dressings, or other 
material, resulting from sterilization by steam, will 
vaporize due to the continued heating of the jacket 
This vapor will pass out through Ihe Webster Trap 
as fast as it forms. In large sterilizers from two to 
five minutes will be re<iuired to dry dressings suf- 
ficiently for immediate use and storage. Trap "E" 
will operate continuously, removing air and dis- 
charging condensation as formed. If desired, the 
discharge from Trap "E" could be returned to the 




^ • 



I 



• 



condensate return system sinrp in » 

WATER STERaiZEHS 

i« !r'T', f '"''°" °' '^^« ^aler used in surgery 
s abso ute y necessary to secuxe pro.ect.on agaTns^ 
surg.cai infection. The water must be heated to a 
bgh temperature, ,hat is. under pressure. I, is no. 
safe practice to simply boil the water 

Authorities state that all forms of bacteria will be 
destroyed in filtered water maintained at a tern- 
perature of 250 degrees for 20 minutes, and that 
such water is satisfactory for all surgical work ex- 
cept for making solutions, in which case the water 
must be distilled. 

Water steriUzers are invariably furnished in pairs 
one for hot and one for cold sterile water, of a ca- 
pacity for one maximum day's requirements only 
The use of this apparatus insures continuous safety 
m handling the water from the time of actual steri- 
Uzation to a final drawing off for use. The sterilizer 
tanks range in capacity from 6 to SO gallons each 
Except in very large institutions water stills are not 
larger than 3-galIon capacity. 

A spiral-shaped coil of annealed copper tube is 
provided for each sterilizer tank, having inlet and 
outlet in the base of the tank. It contains a suffi- 
cient amount of surface to raise Ihe water to Ihe 
sterilizing temperature of 250 degrees in from 10 
to 20 minutes, depending upon the capacity of the 
lank. 

The coil in the cold tank is so valved that it may 
be used for either heating or cooling. Attached to 
the tanks are a water gauge, a thermometer, and a 
safety valve. 

The water for the sterilizer is first filtered by be- 
ing passed through a porous stone. AH sediment 
held in suspension in the water collects on the out- 
side of the stone, which may be taken out and 
cleaned. 

The water still which usually accompanies a pair 
of sterilizer tanks makes use of the steam gener- 
ated in the hot water tank during the sterilizing 
process. The still has a cooling coil against which 
the steam condenses. A considerable amount of 
distilled water may be made every time the tank 
is sterilized with no additional hea! supplied. If 
more distilled water is needed the heat is left on 



the hot sterile tank until sufficient steam has been 
generated and condensed. As the still itselt con- 
tains no healing element, no trap is required for 
this piece oi apparatus. 

INSTRUMENT AND UTENSIL 
STERILIZERS 

Instruments and utensils may be sterihzed by 
boilmg or in steam under pressure. BoiUng is gen- 
erally accepted as the correct method. 

The instrument sterilizer consists of a tank with 
hinged cover and provided with a tray upon which 
Ihe ariides to be sterilized are placed. In the in- 
strument sterilizer the cover and tray are raised 
and lowered by a lifting device operated by a 
pedal. ' 

The utensil sterilizer is required to handle 
heavier and larger material and the lank is there- 
fore larger and the tray-lifting mechanism is more 
rugged. 

The heating element in each type of sterilizer 
usually consists of a pipe coil placed in the bottom 
of the tank and containing sufficient heating sur- 
face to raise ihe water to a boiling point in a very 
short time. At the back of the tank near the top. a 
vent opening is provided for venting Ihe sterilizer. 
Proper connection of this vent opening to the out- 
side of the building will carry away most of the 
steam which otherwise would escape into the room. 
The tanks are made in several sizes, depending 
upon the number and size of equipment to be ster- 
ilized. The steam supply and return outlels of the 
coil are located on the underside of the tank. 

MILK PASTEURIZERS 

Pasteurization of milk calls for quick healing to 
pasteurization temperature, maintaining this tem- 
perature for a definite period and then quickly 
cooling to SO degrees F. 

Pasteurization temperatures range from 145 de- 
grees to 180 degrees, and the time for maintaining 
these temperatures varies with different authorities. 

Quick cooling is provided by the circulation of 
waler Ihrough the tank and out through the over- 
flow tank. 

The general construction of the pasteurizer is 
similar to the instrument sterilizer. It consists of 
a tank with cover having a foot pedal (or raising 
and lowering. The water is heated by a pipe coil 
placed on the bottom of the tank or cast in the base 
if the latter is made in the form of a casting. 




table XIIl— Weight oi Steam Required lo HaiBe a Given Weight oi Water from 70 degrees to 212 d^te»> F. 



PreoAur* 
Pounda 



10 
IS 
20 
35 

30 
40 
SO 
60 
70 
SO 
90 
100 



tur* 
Dag, r*h- 



Wwffht of W*tar in Pounda 



239.4 

243,0 
Z38.e 
2BS.9 
274.1 
266-7 
297-7 
307,3 
316,0 
323.9 
331.2 
337,9 



LaUnt Msat ! 
par Pound 



992.5 

94S.5 
939.3 
933.7 
928.5 
919.3 
811.2 
903.9 
897.3 
S91.I 
885.4 
880. 



60 



eo 



70 



80 



90 



IDO 



12S 



150 



200 



250 



300 



« 



400 



Waight &£ 6t«un Rwruind in Pounds 



7,35 

7.5 

7.se 

7.6 

7,63 

7.72 

7,8 

7,es 

7-91 

7,97 
6 02 
8-07 



6,82 

9.0 

9,07 

9,12 

9.16 

9,27 

9.36 

9.42 

9.49 

9S6 

9.ea 

9.88 



10.29 

10,6 

10.38 

10.64 

10.71 

10.82 

10.92 

10.99 

11.07 

n.i9 
n 22 

1K29 



11,78 

12.0 

12.09 

13.16 

12.24 

12.37 

12.48 

i2.se 

12.65 
1274 

12.82 
12.90 



13.fl3 

13.5 

13.6 

13,88 

13.77 

13,92 

14,04 

14.13 

14.23 

14.33 

14.43 

14.S1 



14.T 
13.0 
16,12 
16,2 

15.3 

15.44 

15,6 

15.7 

1582 

1S.94 

18.04 

16.14 



18.38 
18.75 
18.9 
19.0 

19.13 

19.3 

19.S 

19,63 

19.78 

19.93 

20,05 

20.18 



22.05 
22.6 
22.68 
22.8 

22.99 
23.16 
23.4 
23.39 

23.73 
23.91 
34.06 
24.21 



29.4 

30,0 

30.24 

30.4 

30.6 

30.86 

31.2 

31.4 

31 64 

31,88 

32.08 

33.28 



36.78 

37.3 
37.8 
30.0 
38.2S 

38.6 

39 

39. 3S 

39,55 

39.85 

40.1 

40.36 



44.1 

48.0 

45.36 

45.8 

45,9 

48.32 

468 

47 1 

47 46 

47,82 

48.12 

48.42 



58.8 

€0.0 

60.46 

60.8 

61 2 

61.75 

63.4 

62.8 

63.28 

63.76 

64 16 

64,56 



600 



73^ 
75,0 
7S.6 
76.0 
76,6 
77.2 
78.0 
76.5 
79,1 
79.7 
80,2 
60.7 



roolnolo lo table — Foi inilial w^ler TempeiatuieB orhei (han 70 de- 
Qfees muU^ply the vaJuea qtveo in (he ahov? taH* by 1h« toilowiag 
lacloia. 

Inilial Tempoialuie Factoi Initial Tempeiaiure Factor 

40deg, 1.21 60 deq. 1.07 

50 deg. l.U 80 deq. .83 

The supply and return outlets are located in the 
same relative position as the instrument and utensil 
sterilizers. 

Note: The vaiious piecGs ol sterUizing equipment descsihed 
on pages 16 and 1? aie mounted upon welded pipe stands. 
They are Uequenlly insfaWed singly, bur more otten in bat- 
teries, the number, type and Airangement depending upon the 
use to which they sxe ptit. 

BED PAN STERILIZERS 

The bed pan sterilizer consists of a hopper, hav- 
ing tight-fitting cover, into which live steam is 
admitted. There is no heating element and there- 
fore no thermostatic trap is required. 

BLANKET WARMERS 

Blanket warmers frequently form part of the 



An exompl? ol tbe calculation called fO( al ih* letl follows; Th» 
weighl oi Hioam required lo heal 300 pounda ol waiai from 70 degie#« 
lo 212 deqiees wilh sieara al SO poundi presfiur* ia 47. 1 pound*, li 
the initial fempeiaiuie is SO degrees, Ihe sieam iaquii«d i> 47.1 x 
1.14 = 53.7 pounds, 

equipment furnished by manufacturers ol steril- 
izer apparatus. The warmer consists ol a metal 
cabinet with hinged door, and containing a series 
of perforated shelves. There is a continuous steam 
coil extending under each shelf. The bottom of the 
cabinet is raised about B inches above the tlooi 
lo provide room for the supply and Return con- 
nections of the coil. In the newer hospitals a re- 
cess or niche is provided lo receive the cabinet. 
One standard make of blanket warmer is 24 
inches wide, 24 inches deep. 72 inches high, has 
live shelves and contains a steam coil having 25 
lineal feet of Vi-inch pipe. The steam supply and 
return cormections are each Vi inch- 



TABLE XIV— Sieara HequiremenlB ol Sterilizers 
Pasteuriser or Bottle Sterilizer 



Far pasteuriEatiEjEi^ assumv 7" ol wafar at 70° F, hamted to and 
rrLaintamBd al 150^ F, (or 30 minutes. For bottle Bteriliiation. 
aasume 3" ol wrater at 70° F, hcatfid to boiling and n^dintainad 
for ZO mi]\ut«9r St«am cDnsumplion in aifhtr COH will ba about 
th* aam«, •> foUowB- 



Pressure Steam Sterilizers for Surgical Supplies 

StvriLixmg Period — 30 minutu mi 240^-350° F, 



Six« Steriliser 



SG'bottls capacity 
S4-botttB capacity 
72 -bottle tapecity 



Steam Heat at 40 

Pounds Presaur* 



Pounda of Staam for 
Ona Pcrfoimance 



U 
17 
23 





SiE« Startlixer 


Steam Heat «t 40 
Pounds Praeaure 




Pounda of Steam for 
One Farfernianm 


WxXi" .. 




11 


16" I 24" 




14 

19 
37 
30 
38 

4» 


I6"x36" 

ao''.2e'' 

20" ■36" 


. - 


SO" It 48" 




ZO-'uBO" 





Non-Pressure Instrument and Utensil Sterilizers 

Starting with water of depth indicated, at 70" F. and maintenance 
ol Wgoroue boiUng for 20 n\inulas. 



Pressure Instrument fiteiili8«F 
SteHlizing Period^tO minutes at 240^.330* T- 



ia-i20'" 

i4"iia2" 

16-K24- 



B 
]Q 
12 



€ 



« 







Sleam Haat at 40 




Depth 


Pounds Preasura 




Pounds q{ Steam for 






One Performance 


a"» 9" I IS" 


3^" 


» 


9"ii 10"<20" 


3^- 


10 


10" ■ 12" m22" 


4" 


13 


12- X I6"m24- 


4" 


SO 


]0"x 12" 1 3G" 


4" 


22 


16". IS'-kM" 


10- 


31 


20" ■ 20" ■ 24" 


10- 


48 



PresHure Laboratory Sterilizer (Autoclave) 
Btariliaina Period — 30 mmutee at 340°'2S0° T. 

■ 34" 

U'^-aM- 

aiH-^so- 



''^. 



12 
14 

ao 



Water Sterilizers One Reservoir Only 

Starting with water at 70* F. and maintalnino temparatiua^ 
240^ 250^ F for 15 minutee. ^^ 



6 gallon* 

10 galLona 
IS galtoHB 

25 gallortft 
SO gallona 



I 



IB 
30 
49 
7S 
ISO 




I • 




The blanket wanner is sometimes furnished in 
combmauon with a solution warmer oTbed oan 
warmer, bu, the p.pi„g details are no, change/ 

STEAM REQUIREMENTS OF STERILIZERS 

We have compiled Table XIV typical sizes of 
s.ern.zers showing the pounds of Z.ru req^J.ed 




gy . aw*t CKCii «cvr WltK 



4i£/Z£ut£^^^^^ 








ft*»«fr n*»^ 






■***vt»i 



StoriSLT*^^""""" *' Webster Trap lo D,ej«i 



nq 



to complete one performance. In all cases the 
.n.tial water temperature has been assumed as 
/O degrees F. and the steam pressure is 40 pounds. 
Ihe compartment or tank of the sterilizers is as- 
sumed to contain water of depth shown in tables 
ttor water sterilizers it is assumed to be full of 
water). The final water temperature is 250 de- 
grees for sterilizers except when noted otherwise. 




ALL MITjU Oi^C 

©"fTuffHiwirBflMsrtft,o;w 
® ■ lyppLv P*t TO srcsiu^t" 

@'<'Wlh hOHlJiiMTjU, SUPPLt 






^■^-^^'^-'^--rvv-r 








PLihOFPkPiNG 

■•■ ^nETunrjatrTiir 
— ■ 'iirpn<P.p(^ 

: ■S«"\»4fliiiiflhHiJt« 



Fig 22 -Apphcalion o( Webster Trap lo Water 



• 








M< cimr ffii r ■ctsmi *v*c 



(J • MAN HOBJJjKTii KThiBn vtHTfD 




'VN or PiFlP< 



riq. 21 -ApphcAlion oJ Webatoi Trap to Utonsij 
Similar 











©' iW'Nti ChCCK V*l.Vf WlFH MfT*LOaC 
0= 50PPl-'PlPTT0V[HiLlT£ff 

V ' M«*. Htflif DhlAl SUPPtT 



^77Z^j^A7^yAA^^y7^.> . > 




i 



S^''^ 



rs 






Fig. 2a— Application ol Webster Trap to laalrumeni 
SlefUiaer 



-% 




OPERATING STEAM PRESSURES 
FOR STERILIZERS 

Sterilizer manuiacturers generally require an 
operating steam pressure of not less than 30 
pounds per square inch and not over 60 pounds. 
For salisJaclory all-round results they specify a 
pressure of 40 pounds at the sterilizer. 

APPLICATION OF WEBSTER TRAPS 
TO STERILIZERS 

The application of Webster Traps to sterihzer 
units is shown in Figures 20 to 23, inclusive. 

BATTERY OF STERaiZERS 

The method oi attaching Webster Traps to a 
battery of sterilizers and also the details ol si earn 
supply and return piping are shown in Figure 24. 
A Webster Trap is installed with a check valve 
in the return line from each piece ot equipment, 
according to the standard Webster practice shown 
in Figure 12. It will be noted on the side elevation 
(Figure 24). that instead of connecting the trap di- 
rectly to the horizontal return pipe marked 3, a 
small reservoir is formed back of the trap by the 
use of two elbows and a nipple. We believe that 
this arrangement will result in smoother operation 
of the trap and is the preferred method. 

With the standard size of sterilizer furnished by 
a number of manufacturers, the size of the return 
pipe from the individual fixture is generally ^/a 
inch. When the return piping arrangement shown 




'J or * BiiirTiB¥ or irvt^szzn 








Tn STDHjITfO 



* ' inUJlT" ^ »■! TUP 

— ■»^C*i'«i, *i*iitO*n **« WITH 



:'»^>tftvv»' 



Fig. 24— Application oJ Webslet Traps lo a Batlery 
of SEerilizera 



on our illustrations is followed, the trap with Va- 
inch nipple should be used and the change in size 
from Vb inch to V2 inch made in the upper one of 
the two elbows, forming the offset of the reservoir. 
If there is not sufficient space under the fixture 
for this method, the trap can be attached directly 
to the horizontal return pipe, using the ^ a -inch 
nipple and a coupling and locating the trap at 
about the same relative distance away for the ster- 
ilizer outlet. 

■'MASTER TRAPS NOT SUITABLE 
FOR STERaiZER BATTERIES 

While a separate trap for each piece of appa- 
ratus is accepted practice today, some older instal- 
lations still use a single "master" trap to handle all 
condensation from sterilizer batteries. Heating up 
is slow and when a second piece of apparatus is 
turned on after the first one is in operation, the con- 
densate backs up through the return outlet, produc- 
ing snapping and water hammer, even if care is 
used in manipulating the valve which is always 
placed on each return outlet. Since the pressure in 
the main return pipe leading to the "master" trap 
is nearly as great as that in the supply piping, the 
movement of air out of the coil in the fixture is slug- 
gish. The "master" trap does not pass the air read- 
ily and the apparatus does not heat up quickly- 
Frequently il has been necessary to provide air 
cocks to relieve the air from the system. 

The use of Webster Series "78" Traps over- 
comes these disadvantages. It reduces the time 
of heating up to a minimum. When steam is first 
admitted to the sterilizer, the trap is cool and wide 
open, producing a relatively large opening for the 
rapid escape of air into the return piping, which 
should be vented. The pressure in the return pip- 
ing is very low and the high differential pressure 
between the supply and return pipes produces a 
rapid discharge of condensate as soon as il accu- 
mulates. This results in quick heating up, obviously 
a most important feature, especially in the case of 
sterilizing apparatus in a hospital. 

When the Series "78" Traps are used, the valve 
in the return outlet, which was generally supplied 
by the manufacturer as a part of his equipment. 
may be omitted, as the check valve in the dis 
charge pipe from the trap prevents any backing 
up of water into the heating element when the 
apparatus is turned off. 



• 



Figures 20. 21, 
22 and 23 show 
the application of 
the Series "78" 
Trap to each of 
the individual 
pieces of steriliz- 
ing apparatus. 

The method of 
attaching a trap 
to the outlet of a 
Blanket Wanner 
is indicated in 
Figure 25. If the 
lower shelf is re- 
movable, the re- 





t44 



78 Trap to Bla,ike! W^^m^r 



turn piping, with trap and stringer, can be installed 
under the warmer as indicated m full Imes, Other- 
wise the pipe should be placed at the s.de, as 
shown, so that the parts will be accessible, 

COOKING EQUIPMENT 

In this classification we include equipment in 
which cooking is done on sufficiently large scale 
10 warrant the use of steam-jacketed utensils oper^ 
atmg at pressures from 15 to 35 pounds per square 
mch. We exclude, however, large-scale cooking 
such as is done in confectionery and other food 
manufacturing plants. These latter are classified 
under the "process industries." 

The principal classes of cooking apparatus in 
this group include: 



Coffee and Hoi Water XJim. 
Urn Stands (conraining dish 

hearing compartments). 
Low Diah Healers. 
High Dish Healeri. 
Jacketed Ke files. 
Steam Cookers. 



Roll Wameis. 

Bakers' Proof Bones. 

Oystei Cookers. 

Steam Tables. 

Bain Maries- 

Egg Boilers. 

Dish Washing Machines. 



ORNS 

Coffee and water urns are somewhat similar in 
construction to water sterilizers, and when heated 
. by steam are provided with spiral coils, the inlet 
and outlet of which are located in (he base. They 
are used either singly or in batteries of two or 
three. In the latter case the middle urn is usually 
for hot water and is provided with a valved con- 
nection to feed water to each of the cofiee urns. 

The following is a list of standard sizes of bat- 
teries of three urns supplied by one manufacturer. 

Urns are usually mounted on stands which some- 
times contain a plate or cup warmer. This consists 



FOR APPROXIMATE UNIT STEAM 

CONSUMPTION OF KITCHEN APPLIANCES 

SEE APPENDIX ON PAGE 30 



of an enclosed chamber, equipped with sUdinq 
doors on the from and having several rows of 
shelves under which are run pipe coils of Vi-ioch 
or y,-mch pipe, supplied with sleam in the usual 
manner. Sometimes an egg boiler is placed on a 
shelf attached to the urn stand. The heating ele- 
ment ,s a con of small s.ze brass p.pe lying on the 
bottom of a rectangular tank holding the water. 

A size 782 Trap is adequate to take care of an 
egg boiler, a warming closet or any one of the urns 
listed above. Where larger urns are installed the 
quantity of gteam used can be readily figured ac- 
cording to the method described for sterilizers 
when the water content of the urn. the available 
steam pressure and the heaUng-up period are 
known. 

JACKET KETTLES 

Jacket kettles are used for making soup stock. 
boiling potatoes, making pastry and candy and in 
fact for any process where boiling is done. They 
are made of cast iron, copper, nickel or aluminum. 
Usually the jacket consists of an outer shell cov- 
ering the bottom and extending about twothirds 
up the sides. Steam is admitted into the apace be- 
tween the inner and outer shells, through a lapped 
opening part way up the side. The return outlet 
is at the lowest point of the bottom. 

The limit of sleam pressure for aluminum jacket 
kettles is 40 pounds. The makers usually supply a 
safety valve which is attached to the steam supply 
pipe and serves to prevent the pressure in the 
jacket space exceeding this amount. Jacket kettles 
are made in the following capacities: 10, 25. 40. 
60. and 75 gallons and upwards. 

STEAM TABLES 

A steam table is a large water pan containing a 
pipe coil which rests on the bottom. A cover is 
provided over the entire top with holes into which 
dishes and pans of various shapes and sizes are set. 
The pan is partly filled with water which is brought 
to a boiling point by admitting steam to the pipe 
coil. Steam tables are made with and without warm- 
ing closets, depending upon the particular require- 
ments of the installation. 



f 




BATN MARIES 

The Bain Marie has a large water pan and pipe 
coil similar to the steam table. There is a perforated 
lalse bottom raised 2 inches above the bottom oi 
the pan. No cover, with openings, is provided, the 
pots resting upon the false bottom and being sui- 
rounded by the heated water. 

STEAM COOKERS 

There are two types of steam cookers. One is 
usually rectangular and made up of one or more 
rectangular compartments provided with gas- 
keted. tightfitfing hinged doors on the front. In 
operation the material to be steam cooked Is 
placed in the compartment. Steam is usually sup- 
phed through a pressure-reducing valve and a 
hand-control valve and at a pressure to provide 
ihe desired cooking rate, usually 5 to 6 lbs. As the 
compartment is completely filled with air each 
time the door is opened, a Webster Process Steam 
Trap is provided to assure quick venting of this 
air and consequent faster cooking. To assure max- 
imum venting speed the Webster Process Steam 
Trap discharges directly to the atmosphere since 
it is located above the condensate level Conden- 
sate is accumulated in the bottom of the cooking 
compartment and later discharged to a drain. 

In free-venting steamers a loop seal is provided. 
serving the twofold purpose of discharging accu- 
mulated condensation and acting as a water seal 
to prevent discharge of steam into the drain. This 
type employs no traps and must be provided with 
an open vent. 

The second type ol steamer has a steam jacket 
covering the bottom surface. Steam is supplied to 
this jacket when the apparatus is used for boiling. 
In addition a perforated pipe coil may be provided 
in the boiling compartment under a false bottom, 
providing live steam for cooking. A Webster Proc- 
ess Steam Trap is used to drain the condensation 
from the jacketed bottom. 

WARMING CLOSETS 

Warming closets, detached from urns or steam 
tables, are used in many hotels and restaurants, to 
warm plates, cups. etc. They are made of sheet 
metal in various sizes and contain a series of 
shelves beneath which are installed return bend 
pipe coils. Tight-fitting hinged or sliding doors 
serve to retain the heat during the warming-up 
period as well as to give access to the interior. 



PROVING BOXES FOR BAKERIES 

Many bakeries employ proving boxes to prove 
bread, rolls, etc. They are similar in design to the 
warming closets and contain in addition steam 
atomizers to spray steam vapor into the compart- 
ment. 

DISH WASHERS 

In a number of types of dish washers which have 
come under our observation, live steam is admitted 
directly to Ihe compartment into which water is 
sprayed. With such an arrangement no trap is 
required. 

OPERATING STEAM PRESSURES OF 
COOKING APPARATUS 

The operating steam pressure recommended by 
manufacturers of cooking apparatus varies from 25 
to 40 pounds, depending somewhat on the type of 
apparatus used and the volume of work which it 
has to perform. The Umit of pressure allowable in 
aluminum jacket kettles is 40 pounds per square 
inch. 

A seal on the return outlet of the compartmBnt 
steamer will blow at very low pressures. It is neces- 
sary either to install a separate reducing valve for 
this piece of apparatus or to throttle down the pres- 
sure by the valve in the supply pipe. When the 
installation is of any size, the iirst^mentioned 
method is preferable. 

In one case the manufacturers requested that 
the steam supply to the urns be reduced to 15 
pounds, although the reasons for this reduction 
were not given- 

STEAM REQUIREMENTS AND SIZES OF 
TRAPS FOR COOKING APPARATUS 

The process of cooking, as in the case of sterili- 
zation, involves a transfer of the heat in the steam 
to the liquid or material. The quantity of steam used 
can be estimated in the same manner as lor steril- 
izing equipment when all of the conditions are ac- 
curately known. In the case of Sleam Tables. Bain 
Marie and Warming Closets it is necessary to know 
the square feet of healing surface. 

Webster Series "78." Class 2. Traps are the 
proper ones to use on cooking apparatus unless it 
is found that for some special reason the operating 
steam pressure is greater than 60 pounds per 
square inch. 







ARflXKiCMf NT Of ncruHH Piping Am 

Sr£4H>ffPi* phX««^ HOT «>«wN 
Narc5 

O^fl-TlS; MUM HFESMBr TO « M 



f"0».T 




5S« 'a^d^wtt^nl arr'"^ ^^'"'" "'^^' «> "-■ ^^ 




.^i*e 



gr ^^j-.j^j'T^r Hrt 



0: 

n- . - 

■- ■'■'■- ^' nt «( nr. 



tLCV*TlOf^ or JACKET iltrTLE 



Fig. 27— Method o! Connecting 
Websler Tiap lo Jacket Kettle 



■ 



® 



o 



■■■/ 
■0 



PLAN or pipit*; 



URNS AND EGG BOILER 

For most coffee and water urns (see APPENDIX 

on page 30) and for the Egg Boiler, the size 782 

Trap will be found adequate to lake care of the 

increased amount of condensation when first lurn- 

A ing steam into the cold apparatus. 

WARMING CLOSETS 

In the case of Warming Closels, containing pipe 
coils, the condensation is estimated in the same 



^£^A 













S>D£ EttViTIOh 3H0W■^^G 

P'5»*Ll filTLiShPlr'iStTrtMftl 

Fig. Z8— Method of ConnecKng 
and Warming Cloaet 



ooo n Di} 
— t 




PLA^ or Pipitvi 



l*< ■ HWirOrfl*! >WilHQ cutcd WLve 
WIT" Hn"L oiic 
"(--BrripOP^OUTLtT 



Websrer Tfapa fo Sieiiin TabJe 



0- "rTuih PWT 'Kb" MBlWC 

UAfT 

^ >TA4)ViiCiie 



FflOKT tLCWTiOn 



^"®o 



]l 




<y • VAfUTrHTfl VRiftTPAB 

w . »«wiiarirAi >-vi»^ cHuv ^Lvc 



SOC CLCv*TlOh 



Fig, 29— Method oi Connecting Webster leap lo Waiminq 

Closet ^ ^ 

way as for any pipe coil installed under similar 
conditions. It will not exceed V2 pound of con- 
densation per square foot of heating surface per 
hour. With a differential pressure as low as 20 
pounds, the size 782, Class 2. Trap has a rating of 
100 pounds of water per hour. This is equivalent 
to 200 square feet of heating surface in the warm- 
ing coil, assuming the unit condensation rate of 
H pound per square foot. Unless the warming 
closet is of very large size, it is not likely to con- 
lain heating surface of this amount. 



1 

I 



HEAT TRANSFER RATE OF COILS 
IN TANKS 

The heat transfer rate of a coil of steel or wrought 
iron pipe immersed in a tank of still water such as 
a Steam Table or a Bain Marie is 150 B.t.u. per 
square fool per hour per degree difference be- 
tween the average temperature of the water and 
Ihe steam temperature. Assuming initial and final 
temperature of the water as 50 degrees and 212 
degrees, respectively, the average temperature is 
131 degrees. The temperature of steam at 30 
pounds pressure is 274 degrees. The total heat 
transfer per square fool ol heating surface per 
hour is 150 >: {274 — 131) = 21.450 B.l.u., which 
corresponds to an average rate of approximately 
25 pounds of steam per hour. Comparing the trans- 
mission rate of pipe coils in the pan of the steam 
table and in the warming closet, it is seen that the 
rate is nearly 50 times more when the coil is in 
water than in air. When first turning on steam the 
temperature difference between the water and the 
steam is greater than the amount given and the 
condensation rate is correspondingly increased. 
After the water reaches the boiling temperature, 
Ihe rate is less than the amount stated. 

When it is possible to obtain the dimensions of 
the water lank, the depth of water and the permis- 
sible heating-up period, the amount of steam re- 
quired to raise the water to the boiling point in 
the given time can be readily found, following the 
methods given above and from this the hourly rate 
of condensation can be figured. This quantity can 
then be checked against the condensation rate of 
the coil to determine whether the heating surface 
is adequate to do the work in the desired time. 

APPLICATION OF WEBSTER SERIES "78" 
TRAPS TO COOKING EQUIPMENT 

The application of the Series "78" Traps to a bat- 
tery of urns, with egg boiler and warming closet 
attached, is shown in Figure 26. Steam supply pip- 
ing is not shown. 

The piping connections to a Jacket Kettle are 
found in Figure 27. The manufacturers of alumi- 
num kettles limit the steam pressure which is to 
be carried and furnish a pop safely valve which 
is to be placed in the supply piping to prevent ex- 
cess pressure. 

Steam tables are supplied with and without 
warming closets. The application of Series "78" 
Traps in the former case is shown in Figure 28. 



In case that there is no warming closet, it is per- 
fectly clear from the drawing what portion of the 
piping should be omitted. 

For connecting individual wanning closets. Fig- 
ure 29 should be followed. Since the healing ele- 
ments in the apparatus shown on both drawings 
consist of pipe coils. Webster Series "78" Strain- 
ers should be installed ahead of the traps to inter- 
cept the pipe scale, chips and bits of metal inevi 
tably found in coils. 

Note: With all of above apparatus it is recom- 
mended that the piping contractor follow the ap- 
paratus manufacturers' instructions in installing 
supply piping, 

LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

Laundry machinery using steam for heating in- 
cludes the following: 

Fiat Work Ironers. CoUai Pieaaes, 

Drying Tuinble;a, Conveyor Dry flooms. 

Prim Press es. Stocking Dryero. 

Starch Cooteis. 

FLAT WORK IRONERS 

Flat Work Ironers are used for ironing sheets, 
towels, tablecloths, blankets, napkins, and similai 
pieces. One type consists of two, four, six or eighl 
hollow cast iron rolls, covered with felt padding 
and operating in cast iron steam chests, concave 
in shape, to conform to the padded rolls. The 
other type consists of one or more steam cylinders 
with padded rolls. Two ol the largest manufac- 
turers make ironers having rolls 100 and 120 
inches long. 

DRYING TUMBLERS 

Drying in a tumbler is accomplished by forcing 
thoroughly heated air through the goods as they 
revolve in a screen cylinder. The air is previously 
heated by passing over pipe coils. In some cases 
a portion only of the air is exhausted, the balance 
being re-circulated with the addition of the proper 
quantity of fresh air. The machines are made in a 
number of sizes, each having a different length of 
cylinder- The cylinder diameter is the same in all 
cases. The size of the coils is substantially in 
proportion to the length of the cylinder. The ma- 
chine Is used for drying such material as Turkish 
towels, which are first passed through an extrac- 
tor to remove as much of the water from them 
as possible. When first placed in the drying 
tumbler the towels are cold and damp and the con- 




->V-44B »ITU»« IJ^trifeMlf 



Mr><Ml 



Oiata- 




^V^j^-^^^■■l>.:li/^^ 



*n^flbii<y|l>«rHrt.E 




Fig. 3i^-Method ol Coimeding Websler Series "78 ' Tiap to 



Sleam Press 



OnucwBrrbfl-ULUMAit H(T-to>^ 




atPn<f#t 




w^urrv n v«o ter ]ni_n 



ClC* Wbvc 




w^ 



/v.'^v;' '^ii^'i\ xr^ \\\'^y.^4-yx^-^. 



M^iH ttlMH WfnCJ b ikTHivoH 



Fig, 31— Method of Connecting Webster Series "76" Trap 1o 
Cotlar tioner 

densation rate is accordingly very heavy. The proc- 
ess is continued until they are dry, 

PRIM AND COLLAR PRESSES 

White linen coats, aprons, etc, are ironed in a 
prim press which consists of a hollow cast iron 
buck and a movable hollow iron head into which 
steam is admitted. The buck is covered with a 
soft thick felt padding. In the collar press there 
is a hollow cast iron sleam chest of compound 
curve shape against which the material is pressed 
by means of a movable padded plate. The ma- 






N 






. ^U^' 




ttak-i 



*«HTM Utanrtt^ 



^»CD V0Lk» 




yjg~-v-^-=Vr '-I'^v"*'^; -,-^: ?>,*' SV-~Z^- 



Fig, 32- Method of Connecling WeUler Seriea "78" Ti*D to 
nve Boll Flat Woit Iro&er 











1^ L~* iaq«i 1*4 



Fig, 33^Method of Connecting Webster Series "78" Tiap to 
CulL Yoke and Neckband Press 

chine is used for pressing either the collar or 
collar-attached shirts or the neckbands of plain 
neckband shirts. 

CONVEYOR AND COMPARTMENT 

DRY ROOMS 

The conveyor dry rooms are heated by coils 
which extend along two sides and the rear of the 
room. These coils are usually made of P^-inch 
pipe, with return bends. In a compartment dry 
room there are center coils extending from front 
to rear. Each should have its own trap. 



STARCH KETTLES 

Slaich, lo work easily and to ih© best advantage, 
must be kepi at a high temperature, and for this 
purpose jacketed steam kettles are used sometimes 
encased in an insulated covering to retain the heat. 

OPERATING STEAM PRESSURES FOR 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

The manufacturers recommend an operating 
steam pressure ranging from 100 to 125 pounds per 
square inch with the exception of certain pieces 
of apparatus such as starch cookers, which may 
require a lower temperature. 

STEAM REQUIREMENTS AND SIZES OF SERIES 
"78" TRAP FOR LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

All apparatus subjected to steam pressures of 
from iOO to 125 pounds pressure will of course re- 
Table XV— Sizes of Webslei Process Sieam Traps Required lor 
Typical Laundry Equipment 



Nam a of Machin* 


Nurnbvr Knd Six* of Trans lor 
Stvaro Praoaurai up to ISO lb*- 


nat Work Ironer — 2 Roll 

rut Work Ironei— 4 Roll 
Flat Work Ironer— 6 Roll 
Flat Work Ironer— 8 Roll 


2— Vz" Model 782 Traps 
4— V2" Model 782 Traps 
S—V2" Model 7B2 Traps 
Q—Vt" Model 782 Traps 


Drying Tumblers 


3/4" Model 783. 1" Model 
784. or 1 " Model 794-TTrap 
(as required by size of 
machine) on each heat- 
ing coil 


Small Presses for Collars, 
Cuffs, etc. 


1— V2" Model 782 Trap 




OfTWL A 



^^1 vT „.r. ■ 



'LT' 



J TVf* cat 
' ■ : L *4ioi 

■\ f .\ IHltf 
■:'■» KK 

fin "TH'ttl IB TMBlhCIK 




R£TLPRN MAIN 



Fig. 35— Diagiamraaric Ananqemenl ol Rollers in Paper Drying Process Showing Steam and 
Relurn Connediona 



DETAIL t 
cot. V riCUKB on MiTfll VtPt 



Fig. 34 — Application of Websier Senes "70" Traps !o Pipe Coils 
ol Header and Return Bend Type Inslalled in Open Tank* 

quire the Class 3 Trap of the proper size. Where 
special apparatus is installed operating at pres- 
sures which will not exceed 60 pounds, the Class 2 
Trap can be used. 

All data received Irom the manufacturer is given 
in terms of total pounds of steam used in an hour 
STEAM MAf. without regard to the 
maximum condensation 
rate when first starting 
up the apparatus or 
when introducing a lot 
of cold damp material. 
A trap sized on the 
manufacturer's figures 
would be inadequate 
for the maximum load 
and the machine would 
be slow in heating up 
due to holding up of 
condensation. 

In order to assisl in 
selecting the proper 
size of Series "78" Traps 
for laundry machinery, 
we have prepared the 
table above. The traps 
are not sired upon the 



Sn.»M INUT 




V*4.Wt 






TRAP 



ng. 36 Method ol CoonecUog WeUler Seiiw 78 Trap to 

tolal condensalion taking place for the period of an 
hour, but upon tlie hourly rates under maximum 
or peak load conditions, occurring usually when 
the apparatus and the material are warming up. 

PAPER DRYING MACHINES 

Drying machines are used in the manufacture 
of paper and consist of many large steam cylin- 
ders. See Figure 35, These cylinders revolve as 
long continuous sheets of paper pass over and 
around them. As the paper comes in contact with 
the first cylinder it is very wet and gradually dries 
as it continues down the long battery of hot roll 
ers. The condensation rate of the different rollers 
is. of course, quite variable and individual traps 
will provide greater efficiency than a master trap 
for several rollers, 

REVOLVING CYLINDERS OR PANS 

Frequently condensate must be drained from a 
revolving cylinder or drum and must be removed 
through the trunnion while the steam container is 
in motion. Cases of this are tilting pans and re- 
volving drums such as those used in paper dry- 



ing. Figure 36 shows piping detail for a revolving 
cylinder. It will be noted that a condensate pipe 
"5 mserted into the bottom of the container where 
he condensate gathers. The pipe is located above 
the trap so that nearly complete drainage will be 
accomplished. 

HOSIERY DRYING 

Hosiery dryers are generally hollow aluminum 
forms over which the product is placed and steam 
IS admitted to the inside. Sometimes 10 or 12 of 
these forms are on one supply header, the con- 
densate and air from the header being dripped 
through one trap. See Figure 37. 

OPEN TANKS OR VATS 

Open tanks or vats containing pipe coils con- 
stitute one of the commonest types of steam-using 
equipment in the process industries, textile and 
other fields- 
There are two well-known forms of coils, the 
return bend type and the header type. Figure 34 
shows the method of attaching Webster Series "78" 
Traps to both types. Instead of running the return 
pipe from the outlet directly through to an open- 
ing in the end of the tank, it is carried up over 
the top and the trap with the strainer is installed 
on the outside of the tank. 

Tests and actual installations show that this 
method will satisfactorily pass the air and conden- 
sation from the coils. It was also found that the 
trap would discharge with more uniform regularity 
when a Webster Lift Fitting was placed in the low- 
est point of the return pipe at the point marked 
three. 



*LUMPNUM STOCKJNG 





Acssrcn nup 



**«»«0* *• TO O" 



Tig- 37 Method o( Connecflnq Webster Series '7a' 
Din Slr«in«r and Webster Trep to Stocking Dryei 



HOT HKTCr OWTtJT 



«0^ 4HTEI' 






TtMPflUTuflE t€CkfLAlCm 



H>^ MjO 



:::^ 




ncDuciNC ox 



OPT TTflAIMCl 






Tiq. 39 -Method ol Dripping Hot Watei Generator Through 
Webster Se^l&s 23 Heavy Duty Trap wllh Webster Series "73" 
Tiap ioi Venting Air 





AOTOCLAVE 



3Tt*»1 












Fig. 39— Method ol Applying Webster Series "78" Tiap to 
Industrial Autoclave with Mechanical Mixer 

H the conditions are such that it is necessary to 
install the main vented return pipe at the ceiling. 
the discharge pipe from the trap can be run ver- 
tically upward as shown by the dotted lines. The 
height to which the condensate can be elevated 
will depend upon the diiferences between the mini- 
mum pressure in the coil when steam is turned into 
the cold pipes and the maximum counter or back 
pressure in the return main. 

The lift will be more effective if the trap is placed 
at the top of the vertical pipe discharging through 
a check valve into an outlet in the fop of the hori- 
zontal return main. 




^TCAM 



lNDLJSTf?lAL 

Autoclave 




1« Scries TwAr 




Check i/a^vi 

Fig, 40 Method of Applying Webftlei Senea "78" Tiap lo 
Typical Indualiial Autoclave 

SHIP HEATING 

Steam is the most widely used medium for ship 
heating. Steam pressures utilized range from about 
15 pounds to 75 pounds per square inch, although 
present-day practice generally calls for 15 pounds 
to 25 pounds. Series "78" Traps because oJ their 
efficiency and, more important, their dependability 
have been placed on ships of various type. 

All sizes of Webster Series "78" Traps and 
Strainers have been approved and installed on a 
number of U. S. naval vessels under Navy De- 
partment specifications. 

OTHER APPLICATIONS 

There are innumerable other industries or opera- 
tions in which process steam is used and to which 
the Webster Traps may be applied, A few of 

these are here hsted: 

Vulcanizing 
Heating glue pots 
Drying gloves 
Mel ling and coobng 

candy 
Heating ha! molds 
Drying ovens in 

laboratoiiea 
Food dehydraloTS 
Many chemical processes 

Fox application of Webstet 
Tiaps to these processes . 
write ihe Company al Cam- 
den, New Jersey, ^i the 
Webster Hepresenlative 
nearest you. 



Fig. 41 The S. S. Monteiey, 
shown at left, and her aisler 
ship. The S. S, Lurline, are 
equipped with Webster Se- 
ries "78 ' Traps, 



REVOLVING DRUM 




KNIFC 




«£VOLVIf*G DflUM 



SPREADER 




STCAM 



OIRT STRAINER 



4GITATCR ftND FE£0 FAN 



Thermostatic or 

FLOAT AftO THERMOSTATIC TRAP 



WfflSTtft T»«aiiOSTftTFC a^RV*LV£ 



FOOD DEHYDRATION 

Steam is used extensively for the dehydration 
of food. In many cases the sieam is used to heat 
air {by means of fin type units), which is then 
picked up by fans and passed over the food to be 
dried. In other cases large revolving cyHnders, 
as in Figure 42. are heated by steam and the food 
[generally juices) to be dried is spread over the 
revolving drum, where it is dried and then by 
means of scrapers is collected into a pan below 
the drum, 

FOOD PROCESSING 

Steam is also used extensively for processing 
food. The food after being placed in containers is 
loaded into large kettles, where it is cooked (see 
Figure 43). It is necessary to drain off the conden- 
sation from the bottom of the kettle. Another im- 
portant thing is the quick removal of air from the 
kettle when starting. For this purpose a Webster 
Thermostatic Air Relief Valve is installed at the 
top of the kettle. When all the air is removed the 
trap closes to prevent the loss of steam. 



TMERMOMert" 



S*FET vatvE 



STEAU 5UPPL* 




TO HiGH BflESSUftt 
ACTtJAlt MAIN 



Fig. 43— Melhod of Draining Condensalion and Venting 
Air From Food Processing KeltJe 



STANDARD GUARANTEE— We guarantee Webster equipment against defects 
in workmanship and material for a period of one year from date of shipment 
from our factory, but this guarantee will be limited to furnishing new parts in 
exchange for any that may prove defective within such period, f.ob. Camden, 
N, J., provided the installation has been made and the heating plant operated 
in accordance with our Service Details and Instructions. 

This guarantee does not include liability for installation costs or contin- 
gencies of any character. 



:Aft.=-Ci- 



APPENDIX 

NOTE- The lablea on this page are provided as an aid 4nd check in deleiminmg steam requiiemerHs oJ procesfl equipment. They 
should be used wilh discretion since Ihete are many variables In Ihe individual installation which may ailed aleam conflumpiion- 
Tli© data given are excerpls Iiom a lepofl published fof Ihe National District Healing Assodalion, li. M. McOui«y- author- 



HEAT TRANSMISSION OF PIPES IMMERSED 

IN WATER 

(For Storage Type Water Hesters, Steam Tables. Etc) 





Btu.ysq. r*. 


T«mp*rAtuFfl 




Bslwefrn 


per Hr, 


5T«ani 






«nd Watsr 


BraH 


Iron 


6 


32 


31 


10 


48 


31 


30 


72 


46 


30 


103 


6S 


40 


L2S 


80 


so 


144 


92 


60 


167 


107 


70 


156 


119 


BO 


213 


136 


90 


233 


149 


100 


£50 


160 


110 


273 


175 


120 


292 


187 


130 


307 


196 


140 


331 


20S 


150 


333 


Z13 


160 


343 


330 


170 


359 


230 


IBO 


372 


238 


190 


3B7 


249 


200 


400 


256 



laoT, 

36° 



108^ r, 

228" 
.105° 



EiKmpt* 

Temperature of water to ba 

healed 

Temperature of water belore 

heating .,.,.,,,..-,- 

Mean temperelure of water 

heatvd 
Asaume steaiti temperalura 

S= gauge 

Mean lemperatUr* ol water. 

130' 
Btu transfer a1 120^ differential for 

Iron pipe =187 ^ 120 ^ 22,440 per hr. 
Latent heal oi vapor ai steam at 

5: ^983 Blu, 
Poundi Meam prr iquare foet mur- 

Iace = 

22.440 

- = 22.S 

S83 
Note: Above data allow for normal 

(ouLing of haatiTig surface. 



STEAM REQUIREMENTS OF PROCESS EQUIPMENT 





Operating 

Preaaure. 
Pounds 
Gauge 


Pounds Steam Use 




PerHr. 


Per 


Clothes FresHes 


Max. 


InUu 


Waek 


U, S Hofl-Man (electric 

vacuum) 
Excelsior Mach. Corp^ Mod^ 4B0 

U. S. HoFf'Man 'electric 

uacuum) 
U S. Hofl-Man Mod. U.CO-S 

fsteatn operated vacuum) . . 
Steam Vac Jet on HoH-Man 

Prega. Venturi Type, Man- 

InfilantaneouB Use (Jot Only) 
Large Frees t^team vacuum) 
Large Fress f elaclric vacuutn) , , 


18 
30 

30 
50 

50 
65 
65 


67.S 

56.0 


25 

25 
38.1 

'30 
20 


l.OOQ 

1.7W 

800 


Laundry Equipment 










Tumbler Idrying machine) 

Si«40-x94'' 

SizeSCxaG" 

Mangle (ftai work iron^r] 


80-100 
BO- 100 

00-100 
SO- 100 
QO-lOO 
80-100 
80-100 

eo-ioo 


--. 


360 
225 

480 
415 
190 

15 
103 

175 








Cuff and NecU Band Preu 

Feather cleaning and alarilii- 
■ng icapacity 15 plltows per 
hour) .... 





STEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PROCESS 
EQUIPMENT 



Cmp. 
Bottlaa 




Operating; 

Preaxure, i 
Poundi 
Gauge 



Lb. &t««m 
per Hour 

Mu. ^ In Un 



Stsriliiara (Non-Praaaure Type) 
For Bottlea or Paateu rite tie n 
Sia*t with water at 70^ 36 
F. Then mainlainBd at 54 
boiling (or period of 20 72 
minutea 

For Enalrument* and UtanniU 

Siae 

Start with water 8" n 9" • 18" 
at 70". Then boil 9- a 20" ■ 10" 
vigoroueLy f or 10" x 12" . 22' 
period of 20 12" w le" k 24" 
minutes- 10" ■ 12" 

16" . 15" 
20"' ■ 20" 



H 36' 
- 20' 
« 24 



3- 
3- 



3»V 

4' 
4- 

10- 

10- 



40 
40 
40 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



3d 
SI 
69 



27 
30 
30 
60 
66 
91 
144 



38 
91 



a? 

30 
3S 
60 
86 
92 
144 



Sterilixera (Pressure Type) 



&iie 








For Surgical SuppLias. 12" , 30" 

Sterilixing period. 30 min- M" ■ 22" 
utee at temperature of 240^- 16" x 24 " 
250^ F. 16" X 36" 

20"- X 28" 
20" a 36" 
20" X 48" 

ao-xeo- 


40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 


23 
28 
36 
S4 

60 

78 

88 

124 


22 
28 
38 
54 

60 
78 
98 
124 


10" x 20" 
24" X 48" 


35-00 

3B-eo 


0.8 
SO.O 


8.9 
50.0 


For Inxtruments- 12" * 20" 
SteriliiingPeriod-^minutaa 14" x 22"" 

at 240^-250° F 16-x24" 


40 
40 
40 


46 

60 

7a 


48 
60 
72 


Sterjlaxen IPraasure Type) (Autoclave) 


40 
40 
40 


24 
32 
40 




Site 
SterlliELug period, 30 min- IS^/V" x 24" 
utexat 240^-250° F ..17V-26" 

ap.,"x30" 


24 
32 
40 


24'a36" 
Water Sterilizers 


35*60 


42 


42 


Cap . Gals. 








Start with waler at 70'' and 6 

maintain at temperature of 10 
240'^250^ F. for 15 minutes. . 15 

25 
50 


40 
40 
40 
40 
40 


76 
120 
180 

300 
600 


76 
120 
180 

300 
600 


Unit Regulrementa for Water Sterilixer 
Lb' stearn per gal, starilixed 


'2.S 

35-60 






Mattreaa Disin factor 










35-60 
35-60 

35-60 


... 


43 




318 


Blanket Warmer 


S;» 18'.24"x 72". 


4 


APPROXIMATE UNIT STEAM CONSUMPTION 
OF KITCHEN APPLIANCES 



Appliance 



Stock and Vegetable Kettles fpor 5 gaL) 30.0 

CoHce Urns (per gahj ... 3,4 

Water Urn Ipar gal) ^ 5 

Steam Tabtea "per aq. ft ) |,T 

Plato and Cup Warmers (per 20 cu. |l.» 35.0 

Stearn Cookera ^per compt.) ...... 40.0 

Soup Warmer. 30" x 30" ■ 28" . ....-- 100.0 

Clam, Lobater &nd Potato Sloamera <paf compt.)... . 40.0 

Ecrg Soilera (3 Comptn.) . . . , , .,,,,. IS.O 

Oyster Pots . . . |6,0 

Bain Mane (per a^. ft.) 3,4 

Food Warming Ovenx (per 20 cu. ft.) 15.0 

Silver Burnifihar and Waahar. . , . , , 68,0 

Dish Waaher (per tray) . ... ... .^ . ^ . ^ .....,..,.,., . 60.0 

Note; Above figures repraaent average operating eonditi&na aflu 



Lb- Steam 
par Hour 



warn^'Up period and do not include hot water. 
Preaxurea will vary Erom 7 to 20 lb. gau^e. 



WARREN WEBSTER & COMPANY 

Factory and Main Office: I7th and F»H„ i c. ^ '-■ ^» •• f^AV A 

e . 1 /th and Federal Streets. Camden. New Jersey. U. S. A. 

REPRESENTATIVES IN THE UNITED STATES 
...... . .T "" """" """" ^ ^°™^ ■" ™^ ^-- —OKE BOOK 

ALBUQUERQUE. „. „,x. «crL:i":';' s'l ir.rr ^^"-'^^ 

ATLANTIC CITY, N, J 630 Gu3,a.,rT,l rm ""-WAUKEE 3. WIS 6089 Pl^k.n.on Bldg. 

BALTIMORE ,8. MD. 230 Tc Jd^su e, "'^'^^'^''O'-'S 3, MINN, . , Ul, Nicdle, Av.nue 

BETHLEHEM. PA ,ojo IhUnd ^1 '**"'' '' " ^ '«6(, B.c.d S».«. 

BOSTON 10. MASS 1 "kdeMTsT ,' "^"^ °''"''' "" '■'^' ^"^ "'"«■" ^Id,, 

BUFFALO 2, N. Y. 2V0 dLw",: L 1 "™ '^°'"^ '^. " V. 35 M.dis.n Av.nu" 

BUTTE. MONT, . . 909 E 2nd S,! ''°''™ "'^*'°- "" 

CHATTANOOGA 2, TENN. ,20 lames Bld^ OKLAHOMA CITY 1. OKLA. . 1604 N. W- Fiflh SKeol 

CHICAGO 6, lU S*9 W. W..hi.,,o. Boulevard o™n T,? » "H D.u,.., S.,ee, 

CINCINNATI G, OHIO 2910 Woodhum A„=„ OHLANDO, FLA. ,. Rooms J1S.2I7, Chuich i Mam BIdq. 

CLEVELAND 15, OHIO mnLTZ """-^^^"HIA 3, PA ^6 S, 2D,h S„e., 

COLUMBIA. S. C. . . 40V WiidwoorAvl J. ^'"SBURGH 2., PA. ,00S E-pi.o B.dg. 

COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 20 S 3,d sl^ PORTLAND 9, ORE ,eOI N. W. No-.h,>,p S..... 

DALLAS 4. TEXAS * ' " p n R„ 7n-, RALEIGH, N, C , , . . n02 Newhern Avenue 

DAVENPORT. IOWA 3,0 w.L. 7 S'CHMOND 19. VA 300 E. Main S-<e«. 

DAYTON 2, OHIO h": , T." «°^«ESrEH 4, N. Y 4>2 Va,,.. C.dm-c Bid,. 

DENVER 4 COLO ,„= ^* SAGINAW. MICH. 3340 M«shon S..«e, 

D™ •> mV» ' '''"""' '""' ^""-^ ^'^'^^ ^'" -■ "^'^" « * ^'^'^"' S<..,h S„.e, 

FH,r V. '^^^° Hamilico Avenue SAN ANTONIO 6, TEXAS 109 Ba.te.a S-.ee. 

"'^' " 3902 Eiiol Road SAN FHANCISCO II. CALIF, 420 Ma.ltel Slieet 

GRAND RAPIDS 2. MICH 331 Ollawa Avenue. N. W, SEATTLE 9, WASH 3|4 Ninth Avenue, Hotlh 

HAHRISBUBG. PA, 835 S. 13th Sl.epf SPOKANE 7. WASH. . 293z E. T.enl Avenue 

HOUSTON 1. TEXAS mi Rosjnp si,eel SYRACUSE 2. N, Y, 605 Eckel Theai.e BIdq, 

INDIANAPOLIS 4. IND 333 N, Pen nsylvama Sl.ee. TRENTON 12. N. 1 751 Pilgnm Ave. 

KANSAS CITY 8, MO, 3257 B„;,„„v. B. ^ TOLEDO 2. OHIO. Colt™ BIdq,, 702-12 Madison Ave. 

303 M 1- s"l, ™^^'°'«-^- L-«'-G— eSup.Ca,..912E,6,hS,. 

LA PORTF INn WASHINGTON 7. D. C, 102 Hamdion Na.l Bank Bldg. 

L^ ANrn^ „ .a, ,. ^^ ^""^ """' ^'^"'^^ ^' '=^"^' "^ "■ «"=" '^^"'' S„ee, 
LOS ANGELES 13, CALIF, 320 Crocke, S.iee. WILMINGTON, DEL. P. O, Bo. 1501 

LOUISVILLE 4, KY 50 Bai.et Avenue WOODWARD, OKLA. 1119 Sanla Fe SHeel 

Licensees and Manufacturers for the Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland 
DARLING BROTHERS. Ltd.. P. O. Box 187. MONTREAL, CANADA 

BRANCHES 

TORONTO CALGARY VANCOUVER SAINT lOHN. N. B. ST. JOHN'S, NFLD, ARVIDA. P. Q. 

WINNIPEG QUEBEC OTTAWA HALIFAX. N. S. TIMMINS, ONT. 



I 



Licensees and Manufacturers tor Chile 
SOCLIMA. S- CARRASCO A . Nuble 72, CASILLA 3028, SANTIAGO 



VALPARAISO 



CONCEPCrON 



BRANCHES 

TEMUCO VAl HfVJA OSORNO MAGALLANES 



• 



PATENT NOTICE Websier SysTems of Steam Hearing and Websrei Sysiem Equipmenl aie manulaciuxed 
and aold undei Ihe toUovjinq United States patenis eilher owned by Waiien Websier fi Company or undei 
which Warren Webafei & Company are hcensed. Purchasers ot useis of Webslei Syslema or Equipment 
protected by these patents are licensed thereunder, but only inaofar as the inveniions of &aid parents are 
requited to use such equipmeni in accojdance wilh operating insfructjons suppLied by W^rien Webaier 6 
Company: 2,030,5^2; 2,030.543; 2,030.544; 2.040.447; 2.04I.2B2; 2,047,803; 2,0S2.7l9; 2,064.386; 2,065.198: 
2^078,775; 2,090,073. 2,097.802; 2.103,536; 2,137,021; 2,181.490; 2.184,849, 2,108.836; a.2[3.I47; 2,250.330; 
2.297.70S; 2,297.706; 2,450,203; 2,454.357; 2,458,189; Z,459.069j Z.461.046; 2.477,728; 2,477.729; 2.482.595; 
Z. 487, 257; 2,487.287; 2,501,147; 2,547.933; 2,554.945; 2,584,856; Re 19,507; Be 20.24D; Des. 151,022- Orhei 
U- S. ADd foreign parents have been issued or ate pending. 



To protect ourselves In our constant endeavor to mate Webster Systems ot Steam Heating and Websfer System 
Equipment ever better, we reserve the right to change specitications and prices without notice. 



Foim No, C6^0B F. January, 1954 iOM 



Printed in U.S A 




fe 





FOR 



PROCESS STEAM HEATING 




suLLrriN No ss< 



ATiRIEL^Tfe CHAUFFAG 




ROBINETS DE RADIATEURS WEBSTER 







V 



fig. ? — Lo gorftiJure du pobincf WebiJer (Serie 600P) 
Typp "WB-P" eil retenuv pdr v" resiorl. 

Type WB-P pour chauffage a basse pression 

Ix" lobini'l VVcbstci '['vpr \\ li-P prul elir sprrihr it 
it'i'<^nirii,indr Ii>iM|uc- di-s inbinrls dr radiatcurs dr to\Jlr 
\n< niirir qiialitc' sont desires, 

Lr tobiiHl Typi- WB-P i-s[ in pajfaiti- tonlonnltc 
.ivrc Irs dcvis rxigcant un lohinct "a rrssort sans E^arni- 
liiM-", L'n *nlidr rrs,s<»i'i rxnri- autoiualiqui nirnt unr 
[iM-sMon sui la s^'nilurr d'anncatix ni^ialliqucs nialrirrs, 

liirn c|u<- la e<iiE)ituir iiit trrs liirrnicnt a Hrc nnou- 
vrU'r, If (fjhirn't < st (<>n<;ii dr fa^on a pou\nir rnlr\rr la 
^irillr ^arnilLiir rt a r-n poser' 61- l.i iiouvrlK- lout rn 
I otii^crvant la pir>sion sur h- svslrnn'. 

Pression 

Pom vafK'iii ;l ha^M^ pir^sioti rr ■ liaullcii^r' a var>f'Uf 
\tA\ li' \idr. 



Partkularites de fabrication 



ulijnr( 



i-i\ 




Ml 
II 



Un xc>l,i[kt ur siih-iulljril (J^h> omir U 

L'fl ftjrl rr5M>r! rxrrn- .iulotrj;slJ*|ijc iiif nt unr (JirsMitn 
lUL la surnituir pour crjtpcihrr (uuir luitr- dr \,ipf-ur. 
Lr« filrti Acme, profonds i-t lonirs, dr la ti^<^ du 
rohinrt .iriordrnt unr urandr rrsistam'c Pl fatjlitritt 

Corp* in luurr pour hi s;tprur. A rrniiirqut^r I'cprtii- 

«'«r lihrrnk rl imifornir du inrl.il 

Lr disqifr pl;i4liqur n'Titni\ flablr dii»s liii rtihiisti 

pnrtr-disei"* <n < iii\ rr ii*5ur<- iinr parfiiih ri;imhi'itr. 

[.«■ doiiillt di ni^dLtULtion { non i11u»(rrr 1 rti fournir 

<ui dm^'indc M'lilr mrnt mr Irs dMnt^tni dr '/j, H 

i-| ]". MlO^ riiiuiiit li't^rir- major^ilitm. 

Lfl u^irnttnrr ;in(uj]jiiir m r1iri.1I iii.iErii *' 'iiipri hi 

lr» fuilr* ri lubrifir la tltei- du roblmt qui prur i^iir 

rrtf^rni kuj& prrfftion. 

Lr I h^ipf-^u rvl rn i Hi^ rr. Dr^ fl^c hn jndiqur nl \.s 

dirrr1]»n dr I4I )rl;lm>ru^ri . 

V/rrrou-uuidr <\t- In Uu* , rnlicn riM nt iiiinr, injiih- 

(irnl toutf* Irs pictrH dlicnrira. 

ErroM dr i uivrr rniitrrmrtii uMnr- 

l. n nirnlddrirt mrrpiii* fournil unr rrsiitanrr mpph'- 

ritrnU'iJn- 'lu ^ul;l^^ 

[,r [ri.diir Inn di I'union ril uiinr a mririr unr liKr 

dr I ill\ fi- ^i-'lldi 



Table 1- Dimemiom dei roblncrt Type WB-P, ntodAla d^iquerre 







■ ^. 




STvbol* 


P0UC41 


DrinBntlont appcoK,, Doir(«i 






J- — ^ — ,. 






w 


En- 

TT 
"^ 

1 

M. 
I'2 




A 


B 


C 


D 


c 


< 








W602PH 

Wa03PH 
W60JPH 
W60iPH 
WAO«PH 


■'1 
1 


2"^ 

4 


1% 
l='h 
2 


3'"-* 
35r 

5 


2^< 

a'* 
3 


I'^il. 




! 1 '1 




^ 


e 

1 


'^■--* 


I 


- 




^.-) 1 


1% 



LCPT HAND ^*^VE 
'^ OUTLET 



RjGHT Hfl HP Vim 
»COEL'«. 




bjneli Type Wfl-P, medelei pour 
la droile el la gauche. 




-t;-< 



tiODEL'V 



Svnbolc 


|1«UE*| 


A 


B 


E 


G 


J 


c 




Enl. 




D 


WftlJPH, W622PI 


^* 


2^^ 


l^ln 


^ 


'-'^111 


i"jn 


3--V 


?h 


Wftl3PP, W623n 


-n 


'■i 


^i 


l^lil 


^H 


Hjij 


i^'m 


3'^ 


2'* 


W6I4PR. WA24PL 


' 


1 


Vk 


lUs 


Tm 


rijh 


3'»« 


3^«m 


aU 



Table M- Dimentjons dei robmeit Type WB-P, modeLe droii, □ une ou 

deujt uniont. 




Mgt?tL-ft S^WGLE UWION 



HODEL-Gi; OQUBLE UfilOh 



Symholi 



Dla, paufet 



DlfnAfli^Dni approM^. poucvt 



Enrr4B SarriB 



DROIT, UNE UNION ^MOD£L£ C 



w*j:pg 


='» 


U 


3 


1 


3>^W 


2^4 


T^fc 


W433PG 


^i 


'^4 


3 


1 


3>ri-m 


2\\ 


1^ 


W634PG 


} 


1 


3^!- 


lU 


a'^iij 


3U 


m 





DROIT. DEUX UNlON< 


- MODULE GU 






W«47PGU 




;^, u 


3 


1 1 3t:r,n 


3^ 


21' m 


W«43P(1U 




■'1 '!| 


3 


1 3l-Vi^ 


3'l 


21^1,1 


Wfr44PCU 




1 1 1 Slj. 
' 1 


n> 3iMfi 


au 


J^''.h 



D A 




B R 



O^T 



E R 




I M I T E D 



I 




PURGEURS THERMOSTATIQUES 
WEBSTER 

Serie 7 pour applications d bosse pression 

L( pLirgt'Ur ihtTiiiostatiqu*' WcbsltT Sriir 7 i-sl du 
tvpc a diapliiasmr rt ron(;u pour la vaprur a bassr 
pii-ssion ri Ic chautTasr a vaprur par le vide. La prr-s- 
sioii dr iiiarrht^ inaxiMiuni rtvommandcr c^t dc 15 livrrs 
all ptmn' («ure, bk'n tjur dc pin-; haulrs pu-ssions 
piiissnU orcasionnt'Ik'meni clrc tolercrs. Cf purgrur est 
rrromniandc pour lou^ lypc*; dr radialrurs. points 
d'ctronltrjiirni. niarhincrit' a vapc-ur ct autrfs applii a- 
lions daii'i Toidrc dr j^a prrssion ci dr son rcndriiu'nt. 




Fig. 2 — Pur^i'ui iKf r most iiU que WrbsU'r 701iH. 

Compense pour toutes pressions 

A\('* If puigrur Wrbslcr Scrir 7, la vaprur rsl irtriiur 
dans Ir radiiUcur iiiK|n*a *c quVIlr ail iransniisc sa 
1 halriJi utile. Cc puigt^ur nr s'ouvn- pas irop tot pour 
e;aspilW !a vaprur dans les ronduilrs dc rrtour, pas 
plus qu'il nr sr frrmc trop vile pour iricnir la londrti- 
s.Tiion r! ah.iissrr Ir irndrmrnt du tadialrui. L'rau dr 
londrrisation. I'air rl Irs aulrrs gaz sont rntirrrmrnt rt 
rontinurllrmrnt cvarues. qur la pression a Tinierirui du 
radiatrur soit dc 15 livrrs, soil sous uii faihir vidr nu a 
loulc autrr |>rr^si<m intf'iincdiairr. Crri s'arcoTn|jlit en 
€i>mjtfu.\ant pour la ioriation dv la pifssion, unr paili- 
cularitc do tous W puie^urs thrrniostaliqui-s \^'rhsl^r 

Fabrication de haute qualite 

LVlrnirnt lhrrrnost*Ttit]ur du pur^rui \\<'l^siri Srrif 7 
rst ioiii|X)sc d'un robustr diaphia^^mr double rn metal 
monrl—mctal non rorrosif qui ronscrvc son "clastic iic" 
dans drs conditions dc temperature et de pirssion tres 
varices. A icmarc|ucr dans Tillustration c^uc Irs ioints du 
diaphiaoinr sont a triple eianeheitc. c 'cM-a-dirr, ctaincs. 
rnroules et soudes. Les nervurcs eoneourcnt a la resis- 
tance strtu turale. Le pointrau de euivrc est regie en 
pcrriianenee. Sa ronJritc de 60^ fournil une fennrtiiir 
sure et ctamhc. Tout opcialcur cxpcriniente eonnalt 
la valcur de tr rnodcle pour conserver un chaufiagc 
lihjc dc toute interruption causer par ta satcte, 

Lr corps ct !e chapeau sonl c n cuivre de haute C|ualite 
\xmT la vapeui, Lcs sujfine^ usinccs metal rontie metal 
assurent des joints rtanchcs. Lr* sie^e a boid aipu est 
en euivrr: il est filrtc poui^ rn faciliter Ic remplacement. 
LVnou et le inamelon de Tunion sonl en i uivre r'l 



ATERIEL DE CHAUFFAGE 



possedent loutc la rohustessr voulue |3*>ur wuUnii Ics 
rudcs traitements de la pose. 

Cne foi'i assemble, chaqur pureeiir rsl epiouve a Teau 
(haude et a la vapeur. Au^un puigeur nr sort de nos 
usincs sans avoir subi tous Irs exaim-ns et essais el d^- 
iiinnlie un fomtionnement parfait. 

Serie 7M pour pressions moyennes 

Lc puigeur Webster Serie 7M. livie avet (>c»inieau 
et siege en aeirr inowdable. est recomniande pnui drs 
pressions de manhr jusqu'a 23 livr<-s au poure earre, 
rt oerasionnellemrnt jusqu'a 50 livres au pnui e rarre. 
Sous tous autrrs rapports, le pur^eur Serie 7M est idrn- 
tique a c elui dc la Serie 7. 



Symbolfl 


Old, 


■1 Ijvrai Qu gcwcB tQH9 


Anfreq o la ioffi« <fb purgtuf, 


V- 


'A 


1 


^'h 


2 


a 


10 


\5 


702 
713 
724 




65 
165 
3«0 


T70 
230 
410 


IA3 
330 


700 
400 
700 


7li 
BIO 


370 
7J0 

UBO 


330 

1010 


440 
1300 

7300 



*OoAn^e) botVvt kUf 74tj B *.b- [bl^ltt the'miqu«( brjIainiQUVll ow p»«d 
Eorr« d f h«urfl let copac>tei tonf conformfli a^r kigndQidi r«(4iTimef*dei «■ 
odopTpi oar lo Steam Heai^ne GQufpxiFni Manufatfurs'i Aiiot'VfJarF CK«i- 
<iiiej le purgvur direcrvmenf de )o loble n-drviui. povr la plui ba> 
d Hvenlpal qkfi puiiEc e'ntpi dQni le iriT^me 



-1 G ' - A 




.M.»Jvl H 



r-H 





Model G 



Model I RdnJ L 



Dimensions du purerur Scrjr 7. D^^qucrrr (H), droit (G), 
modcks poiir In droiir fR' <'t la iraiirhr fLi 

Tobke IV. Dimeniiom du purgeur Sene 7. Model*j H, G. R. ti I. 



Oio. 


Svmbclft 


Model* 


A 


■ 


c 


G 


G 


H 


J 




702 
702 
702 


H 
G 




Hit 


1 >'^iii 


^ 




n-'hn 


1^ 


^1 


713 
713 


K 
G 


3i'|fi 
3l*ifl 






^* 


1=1* 


a^ 




1 


724 


H 


*U 


iia,« 


3hii 




17* 







Tuii 



P-, \r^ diti^PTJoni ion( rn ooi/ce. ■! iuie'i«i a d* irgcr«t varlgiFsnt. 



Dimrnsions du purgtur 
702V, modck' vortical, k unr 

union, rnlter ' .", ^orijc Vi"- 
Pour r.idiateurt convrtirur* 
v\ autrcs applit^iions. 










DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 




ATERIEL DE CHAUFFAG 





PURGEUR D'EGOUTTEMENT 
THERMOSTATIQUE ET A FLOTTEUR 



WEBSTER 



|usqu a 
carre 



15 llvres 




Wit- 3 — PitntPiii (f>v<Miiirmriii 
WclHirr k uimtiil rcnrkinrnr ifraii- 




) 



Pressions de marche: 
ou pou<e 

SERIB 26-1': PuiK'ur a ^nind irndmirnt, c^ifuMr 
dV\aru(i dr forts volumrx dr londi nx-ition d d'aii. 
Compact rt Icgrt, Appropnc |xmr ri;<)ullrmrnt dr ( oii- 
diiitcs pi in* ipahs, pom m']|x ntim dr rlimalinal^urs. 

pour ff c nc r a t r m- s d ' r a u 
rhaudf, ixnir divri^ lvpr% 
d<' c haiillai^r par radialrtini 
rnoiori&ci oil a r^antaiU. rt 
auur^ .ipplif .tli(iii\ \iinil.ii- 
u-\. Oiili*'- tir sniur lairralr. 
I,rs ^raiidrur^ Irs plus riii- 
plovcr* [00026, lH)26. 026 
( oiii pr cniM'nl \.\ \<Mip.ipr 
:rr\;»< ualion a orih* r r\- 
urnr t|ui prrmrl a \a sou- 
papr dr s'ouvrir lorsqiir dr 
tor Us ptrxsioris rrutirni vi 
nnpcL )irnl ain^i la ttoaii- 
Irrir ou la uiarhinrrir dr 
sVnjplir d*rau, 

Parlii ulaiitr*^ dr lahrira* 
lion- Poiritrau r| siryr rn 
1 iiivrr sur la sortu- d*rau, Lr dlaphra^Eur ilj<iTiKistatii|iir 
pMUc Tail est rn nirlal nioncl avrc ptuntrau rt sirpr rx\ 
luivtx'. Lrs aulirs pirrrs intcrirurc^ voiH <n l.uton, rn 
ruivn- ou rn Irr. Lr corps rl lr touvrri lr >oiit rn fontr, 

L,i t-r.indi'UT 00026 a un ojitit r d^mirrr rt un dr 
soitir danv lr touvriilr. Vn ilioix dr dru\ oriliirs 

dVnircr sur Irs parois op* 
poser* du (orps rt dr dr\i\ 
orifirrs dr MUtir au fond rsl 
oHrtt sui \r\ gr^utdrni^ HH^d 
rt 026. Drs IxKH hnn^ malr% 
sont livrrs pour unr rntrrr 
rl uTir \orlir, Crs RrandruiA 
pruvrnt rlrr [iionirr> sui la 
ranalisalinn sans Taidr d'au- 
I un "vupiw^rt. 

Lcs Rrandturs 126 rt 226 
ont un srul orilitr d'rntirr 
rt dr M>iiir dam lr bout rt 
doivriU rttr installrrs avfT 
un vupf>orl. Un pros Hottrur 
rt un loni; Irvirr (ournissrnt 
aiuplrntrnl dr puissanrr 
pour lr font tioruinnrnc dr 
la soiipapr s'ou\ rant intr* 
lirumnrnl. 




F.tf, 



■iiirriLi d ^"itirrnirni 




itriir ■Kl'^-I t,r 0>-T rti Mtn- 
bUblr ^'iil ■i>ir I'MtfriiFiii iIm 
flmiriir o-l imuU-imr jti Uru d'rlrr 

Sf:RIK 26-0: Cr purgrur rsi smihlahl*- au 26- 1\ nuii* 
iinssrdr un rotjvriilr uTii au liru d'un touvrrtir rom- 
pirn.int TrlrnKnt thrrniostalitiur rt It In-p.iss. 11 s'rtii- 
ploic" ou il n'y a pas dr (omrntration d'air. roinmr 
dans Irs bouts dr ronduittA piiniipalrs rt dr tuvau\ dc 
MunHrr. \U\ Irs rrsrivoirs d'r< hapjJrnic-n( dr \.i|k-ut rt 
pour IVtoutti tnrnt drs ihauOaers pai t;ra\jtr dan^ Irs 
ronduitrs dr rrtoui par lr %idr- II <'sE pirparr pour un 
by-pass d'aii rxtrinr. 








I— B 
E 



i^ 






em:D 




J' A' c 




C^lb .-iiui Olt Si;c 



^ ifi * *tt ^ r 




M« 1 f 1ft d W 



P , ScMi- Jfi 



i?A .r>j :y*<L-,- 



TobU V. 0>ffi*niiont d«t pwrgturt (}'«g«utt«m*nT Wtbittr S*'i* ?6 



00074 T 
OOO^A O 

007« r 

0076 



I e.i r 



'oidi fk*! 







07«O 


1'. 


a'. P. 


p, 






J". 


10 




It 


176 1 
I76 










• : 


A 


Q 




t 


776 


i 
1 




1 ' 

1 -, 










■ . 





la 4^**4., 0* N *tl da \m' •*' ^ 00034 

Tav<#i Iff* -T'rT.VFii Dn- *d<- *" nCk'it' •< »ki«>*fti Q d« !«-(«<■« >4'iD>ia''* 



Table VL Copocii#i rvfommondtat povr l«t purgtwri d •^ouVUiivnt 







O.AikisAi* da ^ft«i*vi« <»■ t afttraa a *« lOvit* du 








^■0*U', 4n l^vr*! Ou 0SH(8 (4"' 




'ftwt« 

Oka 


Svflikala 







S 




» 70 100 170 140 700 7'D 270 730 




OOOJa r *f o 




1 


007« T ai O 


US 17S 7S0 ica )io joo 1:^ ^I'h j^i 




M. 


0J6-J ar O 


JOO 475 400 73S fl)0 'J' '310 




I'" 


»J«T«r O 


400 830 1700 t«70 i^OO J4u< h j740 




J 


?76 T ai 


'Jya >77) 7)00 3040 3J)0'5OOC iJ30 3JH>0 37)0 




f4(f*k"> d* (OAvtT'lkan 


favf fhano** Ui danncai ai ii-i*> d *aif A i H*v'« a« 




f^adt (ar'*i ria (hori'Vava d'«a«* ftqvufs'ani (a d p I a 740 A * u ■^vCipraf 




r>oi 4 


lat lOOQi'tf* lan* toffa'^at owt t>4Atf4f4t '*<«nmii'>d«t ■( 4dapr*i 




fffl' >« 


Staa* Haa'i^fl 


Eqwlfiina"! Ma"w<ar>w'a'> 4»4ir«iidfl p«w' L •*a(ba*'«n 




(SiliAW* 4* I a>f f«ri4w4 It ^UigtV tCiM''4nH« n 14 'flpon'ff moi'Mw*. 





I M I T E 




E CHAUFFAG 




SEPARATEURS DE SEDIMENTS EN "Y" DARLING 



Lrs ctaillrs dc tuvau, Ks nionraux dr garnitun rt 
autrcs nialims t'tran^cns soni souvrnt la i ausr dr 
doinniagT' aux purgruis a vaprui, auv icdurH'urs dc 
pirssinn. au\ irgulalcurs di- u-nipt'ialinr. r'ti . L'ur 
fomlionnriTii-nl itii'diorrr rt paifois Irur coniplct arret 
pruvrnl souviiit rrmonttT a drs sedinunts dans ks 
lanalisalions- 11 rst dnm tnujours r^-rnnuiiandablt* d'lns- 
lallci un scparalfui pom pJoltgiT rr-s appairils. 

Lis scpaiateurs dc scdinnnU Darling Seric 29 sonl 
(onslruits dc fagon a nr pas loduiu' Ir volunir dr fluids 
(|ui Ics tiavcisr. Lr filtti' "'st place avn un html nuvt-rt 
sur I'rnticf vt Tautrc b<nU oiivrrl poui la vidjngr. Lc 
fluidr s'et'oulf dr rcnlrec a la w>rtic rn passant au travris 
du filtrc ijui iftirnl toutE' nuiirir ctrangerc ri d'oii rllr 
prut ais mrni ein- vidaniicr. 

Ci- scparaKui dc st^diincnis s'adaptr aux londuitt's 
horizorjtaK^^ ou vcMualcs avtx ccoulcmrnt rn drMon- 
dant. Dans I'unr ou rauin- position, Ir hou* htm dr 
vidangr du scpaiairui doi( pointii mi^ \r has, 

Lt lOfps dfs scpaiatruts c-n ""^"" Dai ling rst (*n 
fontf avcc filtrc rylindiiqur rn ruivn- doni la suprrftrir 
drs perforations t-st dr plusirurs fois supcrirurr a t rllr 
dc la taillr du tuyau ^otnspondani. Lr scparatrur 
Scrir 29 rst laiaudr rl ollrit dans Irs dianiriri's dr J/j" 
a 2" inclusivcmcnt, Lrs filtrrs tytindriqurs rcgulirrs ont 
2-% prr/orarions dr .040 pourr au jwu* c <arrr. Drs 
lillir** <'n incial nionrl pru\'rtU etn- fouinis moyrnnanl 
niajoration, Drs hlurs [ins. fahiiqucs dr lojlr dr c uivrr, 
pruvrnt cirr livrcs sur drniandr. 

AUTRES SPECIALIT^S 

BuJl«rin No 
PImihe rodiofeur Webfter o fort renctement 8-1601 



Fig. 6 — Seporoleur de bcdinienlf 

Darling Serie 29 



mvm. \50 li*r«» ow poucv carre. 




Table VM. Dimentioni det aeporoleurt de i^d-nentt Seri« 39 

A 




FIITRE DE CUIVHE 



Poucai 

Vi 

I 

"/* 

"A 

7 



293 
394 
795 
J9* 
39B 



3V. 



B 


C 


D 


E 


2',t 


7Vt 


Vi 


»V* 


3- if. 


7V, 


'"•n 


IV, 


• A 


3'-*i., 


"l.. 


3'A 


4V, 


3Vi 


»v. 


J'/t 


5'-.^ 


3'u 


»M*- 


i% 


1 


r 


Hh^ 


3*1 



Tfi^frvi let dirnvntrom toil en pDvcet e) iu|*1(v> o de Ir9fr*i vatidMoni 



Wall Vectors Webster 
Radiateurs WJ, 
Plinthe rodialeur Webster 
Commande d'ecoulement continu 
pour (houfToge o eov choude 



Webster 



B'1551 

8<1550-C 

6-S-CE 

B<?00 



DE CHAUFFAGE WEBSTER 

Purgeur 6 vap«ur Webster povr mochinerle 
Joints d'exponiion Webster Type "N" 
Joints d'exponsion Webster Type '*C" 
ProtecVeur de <baudieres Webster 
Commondei a modercteur Webster E-5 




Bulltlin No 
IQOO-M 
B.n03-B 
B-1 lOt-B 
a-727-E 
B-9004-A 



SUCCURSALES ET REPRESENTANTS 



HALIFAX, N.S. 

E. S. Srephenson & Co., Lid. 155 Gronville Streef 

SAINT JOHN, N.B. 

E. 5, Stephenson & Co., Ltd. 15 Dock Street 

QUEBEC, P.Q. 

W, J, Banks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIDA, P.Q. 

Rene Beaudet & Oe Ltee 122 High Street 

TIMMINS, ONT. 

Potricio Engmeering Ltd. 46 Vi Third Ave. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 
Darling Brothers Limited 18 Rideou Street 




TORONTO, ONT, 

Dorfing Brothers Limited 137 Wellington Si. W. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Darling Brothers Limited 123 Princess Street 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H. F. Clarke & Co. Ltd. 1114 Fifth St, W. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Frank Darling & Co. Ltd. 1144 Homer St. 

ST. JOHNS, NFLD. 

Cloyton Construction Co, Lid. 198 Woter St. 

SIEGE SOCIAL ET USINES 



BROTHERS L I )l I T E D 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL, CANADA 



DEPUIS 1888 




Bulletin No. SS-3 



TRAINERS AND FILTERS 




Y" TYPE STRAINERS 




Fijic scale, sediment, bits of patkin^i;. jnd other foreij^n matkr 
i* often the ciuse of damage to pressure rcducmi; valves, 
lempcratitre regulators, steam traps, etc. and unsaiisf.jctory 
opcfition or cvco luiuplttt failure can frei]uciii)y be altrtbuied 
to pipe Irne impurities. Therefore, the installation uf a strainer 
IS always recommended hi protect such etjuipment. 

Darling Series 29 and Series 30 Strainers are so constructed 
that they do nor reduce the volume of fluid passing throu|;h 
them. The screen i\ placed with one end open to the inlet port 
and the other end open to the bh»w off, The flow pa.sscs from 
inlet to outlet port through the screen so that all foreign matter 
is trapped in (he cylinder, from where it is readily removed. 

Adaptable to both horizontal and vertical downward flow 
pipe lines. In either position these strainers must be installed 
with the cap down. 

Darling "Y" type Strainers have cast iron bodies with 
perforated brass strainer cjlinders, area of which are several 
times iar^er than corresponding pipe sizes. Series 19 are strewed 
pattern made in sizes 1.^2" to 5" inclusive. Series 30 flanged 
pattern arc made in siaes 2l^" to 6" inclusive and in two 
wei>;hts, standard for pressures up to nO lbs, per scj. in. and 
extra heavy for pressures up to 250 lbs. per stj. in. Standard 
cylinder screens have ,0-tO inch diameter perforations 225 
holes to the sq. in. Screens of monel metal can be supplied at 
extra char^£;e. Fine mesh screens made of brass wire cloth can 
be furnnhed when specified. 



Fi^- I, Darling Series 29 
Din S[r.iinerss 

ptF^ture ISO lb«- per sq. in. 




TABLE J — t^imen^ion^ of Strits 29 Din Strainers, 

■A 




5iu 
Inches 




Symbol 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


Wcithi 


2V1 


i\ 


Z'ti 


2'h 


%n 


l!4 


2 


2*/\ 


*U 


3'.I<i 


2W 
2'^W 


Vii 


» 


^9-1 


5'h 


4 


t;u 


a'* 


4 


2tfS 


5*:i|» 


t^,n 


3% 


»'* 


2\i 


6 


Z9fi 


6^3 


*^ 


nlin 


2'U 


H 


29B 


B 


S'A; 


i^l 


3^ 


H 


29tO 


9^\ 


5*, 




22 


29T* 


iKj 


9U 


«^ 


5 


56 



] 

2 

J'v 



,1// dimtmioitr im mtbtt <fnd ttilritti t/> tiigbi fmi<aitam§. \^'tight in p/mmJ\. 



Fig, 2- l^^irlinj: Series SO 

Oiri SiMJners, 

Siflndafd MiinnrJ rj^cm — mAw- 
mum wiifk*ni: pfi."«i*io ISO Ibi. 
pi'f iij in, Kcrj bejw (Unncd 
pjllcrn — miihEiTiurn Horkjn^ pr«- 
»urc ?^li Ibi. per si\. m. 




TABLE It — ^ DLmcnstons of Scries 3tJ n^n Strainers. 

■A 







TaPFD0 6LOW OFi 



Siandard Pancrn 



Sizr 
Incbci 


Symbol 


A 


B 


c 


n 


t 


WdRhc 


2" ' 


*010 


U 


\AU 


I an, 


i'-j 


- 


"0 


5 


*flU 


u 


IS 


ll'» 


3"^ 


*>.. 


so 


4 


^otf^ 


I6K 


IH', 


I.V^i 


n- 


9 


no 


S 


.^020 


lfr\ 


;q'v 


IS'*. 


5 


11 


190 


A 


3024 


2(f% 


22' K 


I63v 


5'^ 


11 


250 



Extra Hcdvv Paciern 



Inches 


Symbol 


A 


U 


t 


D 


1: 


Vi'ci>!hr 


;»-- 


i<ULD 


u 


14^^ 


lO'h 


5''i 


7I.J 


WO 


5 


f012 


H 


n\ 


M'^j 


4^h 


«'i 


100 


A 


501 ^» 


l(>i<p 


19 


14 


5 


1 to 


IMO 


5 


3020 


I»H 


2\ 


15 < » 


5"*. 


II 


z:o 


A 


3024 


2Uti 


Jii^H 


r^ 


6' 4 


I2lj 


ISO 



,1// dimfmiftnt iti imhti jnd mhittt lo ifight rtfttatiom. W'tigbl in pffi/niil. 



AtfLi/K T ^rmt/T/w 




v^-TiiT or *'«w*'cj rj m 










Fig. 5- Typical InMallation with Webster "78" Trap. 




G^lKOTHERS^nSnTED'W^ 




STRAINERS AND FILTERS 



TYPE "D ' DUPLEX STRAINERS 




Fig. 4. Duplex Strainer. 

This duplex strainer has a wide application in many 
induscrics. but is particularly suited to Fuel Oil Burn- 
ing installations- 

The principal advantages of Darling Type "D" 
Duplex Strainers are as follows: 

No valves — a 90-degree turn of the handles changes 
from one to the other basket. 

Positive adjustment of tapered plug valve by means 
of jack screw. 

Strainer basket being m two parrs is more readily 
cleaned. 

TABLE ill 





A 


B 


C 




Size 


Std, 


Ext- Heavy 


D 




Flange 


Flange 








iVz" 


83/^" 


9V4" 


12" 


71/3" 


10" 


2" 


i03/g" 


10%" 


16" 


8" 


12" 


21// 


12" 


13%" 


18" 


10" 


nVz" 


y 


13" 


im" 


19" 


12" 


17" 



Double basket (the combined area of whose per- 
forations is from six to ten times the cross sectional 
area of the pipe and about cwice the area of other 
makes of strainers). 

Designed so that when well cover is removed level 
of liquid in well is lowered, exposing the top of basket 
for removal- Tongue and Groove joints on well covers- 
Handle partially covers basket-well which is in use, 
leaving exposed the well which is out of commission 
and free to be cleaned. In no position of handle is it 
possible to stop the flow. 

Elimination of the many joints necessary in a duplex 
strainer made up with valves. 

Maximum working pressure 100 lbs. Available in 
cast steel for pressures over lUO lbs. 




4 



RLING 




OTHERS^IMITED 




STRAINERS AND FILTERS 




WEBSTER SUCTION STRAINERS 



^S. n ^ 



rf mt> m ff oo.'^ 







Size 
A 


B B, 1 C 


F G H 




1 i 




2 


5H; 4 9H 


6 1 6% 5', 


h 


0>4i *% II 


■''i' S'k 5', 


4 


S*^ 5*i ISU 


9 10». -1, 


» 


9^ 61^ 15*.^ 


li> L2<.i», SS 


6 


IOt» -^ l^\ 


It |13>.^I 9S 


H 


I4v, 9^. 24 


I3S3I 14^ 


lU 


|7'% ||». 2S'., 


16 24% 16>. 


12 


ai I2%3i% 


19 29 |20 





^tl-'- '-- '- 



A 

2 

6 

A 

ID 

12 



M I N 



4'^ 


4-Hx2 


■'* 


', 


6 


4-Sii2', 


^ 


■* 


■^ 


ft-^.iiJi, 


■^ 


^ 


»S 


S'Nii?', 


^ 


*« 


9'^ 


8'*^\2'4 


s* 


*^ 


tl>4 


s->.xi'. 


S 


f 


Uv, 


1 2-' -..3^1 


N 


1 


1' 


U-'iiJ^ 


*4 


« 



TABLE IV — Dimensions of Webster Suction Siramers. 



InhialleiJ ahc^d o( vjcuuiti 
pufiip to prevent din <ind scaIc. 
t>n.»u;:ht do\*n w iih contten^i- 
lion from hc^nng >yf(cm, from 
dima^ine pum|> uilh resulum 
troubles. 

A liippin^ is provided for in- 
irodudion of told water make- 
up when iha: i% desired: another 
for tonnec I i»>n to a vjtuum 
pau^t- Made ni heavy cast iron 
with Handed tonncttUm%. Com- 
panion flanges .ire extra equip' 
mem. Cleamiui tovec is bolted 
on V, iih rubber ^-askct joint. 
Screen basket is made of sheet 
brjss with No. 4 holt^ (,045 in 
dia.), 22$ holes per ^q. in. and 
is easily removable for clean- 
in^. Maximum working pres- 
sure, fi lbs. per sq. in. 




io^ 



T't,. 




Fig, 5. Webster Suction 
Strainers. 



DARLING TYPE W" DUPLEX SUCTION STRAINERS 





Fig. 6. Dariinp Duplex Strainers, 
The principal jdvaniu^es oi [ht duplex sutrion irrjjntr is aheft tontinunu* 
optfjiiun li required; u i* possible to *huc off one tirjmcf jnd uwf tht 
odier, ptrmittmg ihe fitit one to be clcJocd aad midc itjdy in a ftu 



Of ru^^cd design, it is a Jtpcndable unii and often tiscii 
in suction lintrs from oil tanks .md i>tbcr spttiiil itppluations. 

Made iti sizes from 4 " to «". 

Companion flanges included as part of the unit. 

M,ixtJTiuJii working pressure 1^ lbs. per sq, in, 

TABLE V — Dimensions of Darting Duplex Siraincrs. 



Sw 


Face 
to Face 


Overall 

Width 


Overall 
Height 


Extra space for 
strainer removal 


^'eiphi 


4 


24 


28 

32 'i 


21"- 


14\ 
I4i< 


mo 



pt^rmitting 
mom en r^ for future use. 



DARLING WATER SUPPLY FILTERS 



An adaptation of the Darling Feed water filter shown on 
page -1. The filtering media is Linen Terry (Turkish towel- 
ling). The body is of welded steel construction. This filter is 
recommended for use on water supply systems where it is 
necessary to remove suspended matter. Spare filler cartridges 
are available which will facilitate the servicing of these units. 




Inlet 



/ 



Ou TL E r 




Fir, 7. 




'head office & WORKS: 140 PRINCE ST., MONTREAL 



't^:^.>:-<:'0 




STRAINERS AND FILTERS 

FEED WATER FILTERS 



1 



D^rlirii; Feed Water Filler* 
are suitable for wattr pres- 
sures up til 250 Ibv 

Fx^!;. 8 shciw^ exrerii>r view 
<*f the larger sj^es Ni>. S, f> 
iind 7- Tht Interior of filter is 
same a^ shtjwn in fig. II- 



Fig. H. Darliri); Fted Waier 
Filier. 

Thcso illustraiions show ihe Darlinj- 

Ftt'd Water Filter, lis funtiii>ti is to 
remove oil (rom hoiltr feed waier. 
The filler is usually tonnetied between 
the feed pump and ihe boiler. Sinj-lc 
or duplex lypes cm be supplied. 

Fig. 9 illustrates assembly and tum- 
pact arranjremtnt of control \alves of 
No, I, 2, 3 and 4 si^es of filler, to 
permit by-passing when ehangin;: fil' 

lerinj; media: this valve arranj>cment 
is (urnj'»htU as an extra only. 




Fig. 9- Darlinj; Feed Water 
Filter with manifold. 



By reference lo ihc sectional illustration Fi^. 11 Ihe opera- 
tion of the filter v^ill be readily understood. The water enters 
at (he lop and passes into the central porlion of the Lhamber 
wliith is t>cajpied by the filter cartridge which extends hori- 
zontally the entire length. Note Blow-off for cleaning filter 
body. 

The filtering material employed is what is familiarly known 
as Linen Terry (Turkish towelling) of fine quality. This can 
be cleaned several times. New towelling can be had at reason- 
able price. 

fl presents a very large filtering area, having at least 150 
tinie> the area of the feed pipe. 

In connecting the filter a by-pass should be provided so 
that the same may be cleaned and fresii filter cartridge insert- 
ed without shutting down the plant- An extra filter cartridge 
IS supplied with each filter. 



Ftg. 10. 




Fig, 10 shows <miline nf valve arran|;tment for dupli-v 
fillers in ihe larger si^es. The advantage of usinj; \iime 
is that ime filter is available at any unie lor (leaning. 
This valve arrangement is furnished as an evtra onh. 



f 



TABLF VI — Capaoty Darling Feed Water Filters. 



No. 


Sijie 


WtigKi 


C^jpjciTy Lbs. 
per hnuf 


1 


1 


1^0 


'^.OOO 


2 


]Ih 


190 


IQ.OrtO 


3 


1 


340 


17,000 


4 


2'". 


360 


20.000 


* 


3 


Aoa 


sa.Doo 


rt 


y'i 


650 


50.000 


7 


A 


HOD 


fis.ooo 



By-Passing MamU'ht lutuixhid .it €\ira prht 0'/f>, 
$iit$ tt 2, i, 4 art hi^tituui^i pjrurv^ 
Siic$ Jfl 6i 7 art irrlifMt partttn. 



BafFle 

Grids 

Open End 
Rate 

pjiterGrids" 

Outlet — ' 

hlter Cloth 

Cards 
Body 




Fig. 11. 



Cover Studs 

" Cover 

Cartndge Studs 
Spring 

Spring Center 

Closed End 

P'ate 
Lead Gasket 
Cover SluO$ 

■BLOW OFF 

Settional Vieu Darling Feed Water Filter — Si^te* 1, I, 3 and 4, 



I 



: A 




Bulletin No SS-3 




PARATEURS ET FILTRES 




Separateurs de sediments en ''Y" 



L« ciailles dt tuyau, ic$ morce-jux lie gjrnirurt ti iiutf« m.itieres 
cCMD^ercs sont ^ouvtnt Jj cause dt dtimma^t ^ux pur^eurs j v.ipeur. 
■lUX reduccears de ptessKm. aux repuUtcurs dt rtmperaEurc. trc. Ltur 
forrctumntmtof mediocre t) pdrIoi\ k»r Lumplti jrm ptuvent sou- 
vi'ni rcmonitr j dts ^tdimcnis djns ks c^nnlisations II tsr doni 
ttmnmrs leoimnufidable dinsc^llcf un s^parjteur de sedimcnr^ pour 
pTotcgct cci apparcjZs. 

L« separateurs de sedimems Durlm^ Serie 29 et Serie 50 soni 
ConsiruJis de fjcori a nc pa* reduire le volumt dt fluide quj Its 
tr.ivtrst. Lc filirc tsc plate avec un K>u( Duvtrr sur I tntrtt er I'juue 
K^ut auven puur la vidan^c. U fluidc s etoult de lenirce a. la 
*ortic en passant au travers du iihtt qui rcrieni route maiieie ftran- 
gcrc dans son cyhndre, ei d'ou ellt peui aisemcnr tire vidanpec. 

Ce separareur de sediments s'adaprt aus ciniJui:£s horizonialts ou 
^cfticales avec etouJement en dcsandani. Dans I une ou 1 auire 
posi[ion. k bouchon dt vidange du sepatartuc doit pointer vets le bas. 

Lc corps des separateurs en Y Darling esc co t'onte avec filrre 
cjlindfujue en cuivte, donr la superficie des perforacjons est dt plu- 
sicurs fois superieure a celle de fa laillt du luyau tor respond am. Lc 
separateur Serie 29 es[ raraude ci offerr dans les diametres de V2" 
a 3" jnclusivemcni. Cefui dt la Sent M>. a Sndcs, est prestnte dans 
le* diametres de 2V2" a 6" inclusivtmeni et en deux types: sene 
noimak- pour pressions jusqu'a 150 livrts au p*iuce Carre et serie 
exira-lourde pour pressions jusqua 250 livres au poute carre. Les 
filfre* cylindrjques rcguliers oni 22^ ptrfoTanons de 040 pouce au 
pouct caire. Des filtres en mcEjl nmnel pcuvent eire fournis moytn- 
nam ma|oration. Des fjifres fms, fabriques de toiic de cuivre. peu- 
veni eite Ijvres sur demande. 



Fi^. 1 — Sepacaceur de sedimtniN 

Darlinj; Serie 29. 
Tjfjud^ — piirmon dc martbe nijxi- 
rnum ; 150 Nvrc& m pouce carrc. 




TABLE J — Dimensions des separateurs de sediments S^rie 29. 

A 




Du. 
Pdijcc» 


Svnibolf 


A 


6 


C 


D 


£ 


Pufdi 


'■i 


291 


y^ 


2> 


2'^ 


\... 


n-j 


2 


\ 


293 


4U 


i'lo 


21" 


I'll 


J 


I 


294 


5^S 


4 


2>':|.^ 


I'^i; 


2^^ 


4 


V^ 


299 


^ifiti 


5%« 


3^ 


\u 


2f^> 


6 


vl 


296 


6'i 


y^4 


l'u\ 


2\ 


8 


2 


Z9B 


S 


6Ki 


4-ii 


1J>]IL 


5\ 


n 


2H' 


2910 


9J^4 


?1A„^ 


5''l| 


2'li,i 


4\ 


23 


5 


2912 


nu 


9U 


6^4 


3'1: 


5 


36 



ToMlri /ft tiimfnii/rni tHHt m fri/utrt rl injrltn a dt UgJrri variafitmi, 
Lt pottti i'tulrthi t*t titrft. 



Fi^. 2 — Sepitraieur de sedi- 
ments iJarlinK Serie 30. 

Mudtic normjl, .i brides — pin- 
iitin de mu'thi; minimum ' t^n 
livrcs AU ftuucL- cirrt- Modtic 
thtrj'foutd. ii brides — ptc^siun 
d? ntarchr riukimuin; ?50 livres 
ju puutc Caiir. 




TABLE Jl — Dimensions des separateurs de sedimenis Serie 50. 
i A 




Btiui-hon dc vjdan^ 



Mi>de]e normal 



Dia. 
Pouce 1 


Symbok 


A 


D 


C 


D 


E 


Poidt 


2'- 


30tO 


13 


U'< 


lo'u 


3»'> 


7 


TO 


3 


5012 


14 


15 


nU 


3^1* 


7H- 


GO 


i 


3016 


16i<> 


18^ 


J3^^ 


■iiH- 


9 


170 


s 


3020 


l»\ 


20U 


iS'h 


5 


10 


no 


6 


30Z4 


20'"^ 


22'k 


I6\ 


5"^ 


11 


250 



Modele extra-tourd 



Poucvt 


Symbole 


A 


B 


^ 


D 


E 


Puid^ 


2^ti 


30tO 


13 


14H 


lO-h 


3.'i^ 


7^-J 


m 


3 


5012 


1-1 


is\ 


ll"'> 


41 h 


Sl4 


100 


4 


3016 


161,^ 


19 


U 


5 


10 


lao 


5 


3020 


IB^ 


21 


15i'j 


5"*j 


It 


220 


<( 


3024 


20^1 


!i\ 


t^K 


61, 


I2'<- 


2H0 






SipjUJTCuf DAtlin^ en Y 




CLitinclifin dirccic J ii 
iottic lie 1 jppaictl <i 
dtiimer 



Purficur 



CUpcr dc rertnuc fiun;run(jl dvtc 
di^qiic mcEiliique et siege 



^ 




Fig. 3 In^1alla|io^ typique avec purgeur Webster ~"^8^'. 




ARLINiT^ROTHnTTlMITElT^ 



S ET FILTRES 



ti v^fr 



Separateurs de sediments doubles, type "D 



i 



Fig. 4 — S^paraieur dt si^dimeni^ double. 

Ce separateur de sediments double possede de nom- 
breuscs applicatu^ns mduSErielles. mais il est parcicu- 
lieremcnt jpprupnc pour les installations de bmleurs 
a rhuilc. 

Les pnncipauK avanta^es du separateur double 
Darlini^ type D " sent les suivants: 

Aucunc soupape — un tour de de de 90^ fait passer 
le litjuide dun filtrc a lautre, 

Re^lage siir du hoisseau par un verin a vis. 

Le filrre en deux morceaux rend le nettoyage plus 
facile, 

TABU HI 



Filrrc double (done la superficie combinee ties per- 
forations est de six a dix fois celle de la coupe rrans- 
versale du tuyau et denviron deux fois la superficie 
des autres marques de separateurs). 

Con^u de fa^on a exposer le dessus du filrre lorsque 
le couverde esr enleve. Joint a rainure et languette sur 
le couvercle. 

La cle recouvre partiellemenc le filtre qui est en 
usage, laissant a decouverr celui a nertoyer. La cl^ ne 
peut en aucune position arreter le liquide. 

Supression des nombreux joints necessaires sur les 
separateurs doubles fabriques avec suupapes. 

Pression de marthe maximum: 100 livres. Offerts 
en acier coule pour pressions de plus de 100 livres. 





A 


B 


C 




Dia. 


Brides 
normalcs 


Bndes 


D 


r 

2l/i- 


10-%- 

ir 




12'" 
16" 
18" 
19- 


a" 

\2" 


10" 
12'" 





RLINGBROTHtllS LIMITED 




PARATEURS ET FILTRES 



Separateurs Webster a aspiration 





-a --KB- 

K — No et (iille Jci bouJunt 



A 


B 


Bi C 


£ 


G 1 H 












^ 


**4 


4 9H 


f> 


8%. **i 


i 


6'.^' 4t*;u 


''S 


4 


M'1 5*%il3'/ii 


9 


I0*»i ?»fc 


5 


9H 6»4;15l^ 


10 !l2>', B'.< 


6 


lOH 7 i|7>i 


1 J LVj 9», 


b 


14^' 9% 24 


ti'i 21 ;i4'. 


LO 


I"', 11*. 2fl^ 


16 24*'.iL6>. 


U 


Jl I2^.i33'.,|l9 .29 |20 




ilu driin 



Did. 
A 


J 


K 


M 


N 


2 


4",i 


4-Sx2 


W 


*■< 


3 


6 


4-''^ic2V. 


H 


H 


4 


7\i 


e'^,x2S4 


v^ 


>* 


S 


S'l 


S-'ix?"/, 


■4 


^ 


6 


9', 


8-'4x2V, 


H 


■4 


H 


IP, 


e->,*5'4 


*« 


I 


lU 


Us 


12-T..x3l^ 


^ 


I 


11 


l"* 


»2-%»i^ 


H 


1 



TABLE IV ^ Dimension* des separaieurs de tediments Webster 

a asp i ration. 



Se pofcni avani la pt>nipc k 
vide pour emptiher le» sedi- 
rneni% et !« etjilles apporic* 
par la tondensaEion du systemt 
dc chaufJa^e d'endonima^tr U 
ponipc el pnur eviier |e% en- 
nuts qui s'enNuivraieni. 

11 y J un urjfice laraude pour 
refaire le plein d'eau fruidt au 
besain, ei un autre pour I'indi- 
CJieur de vide, FabrJque en 
fonte limrde avet connexions a 
bridts. Les tontre-hride* ne sunt 
pa^ livrees avef TappareiL Le 
touverde de vidange est bou" 
ionnc et comporie one rondelle 
de taoutchouc. Le filtre memo 
e*i fail de tuivre en feuille avec 
perforationi No 4 (.045 pouce 
de dia.), 225 irous au pouce 
carre. et %'enleve faiifemen[ 
pour le netiii>a|;e- Prc^iim Je 
mafthe maximum: 15 livres au 
pouce carre- 




Fig. 5 Separaieur de sediments 
Webster a aspiration. 



SEPARATEURS DOUBLES DARLING TYPE "W" A ASPIRATION 





Fig. 6. — Separateur double Darling, 

Ce upjrjreur oUrt ufi j^anugc pjrfjcuhtr li ou il ne don y avoir Jucun 
atrit d^m \c foncdunnvrntni ; il ptcmet de ictirtnc un frlirc ti de tc nm^ 
(oyer pendjnr que le Jiquidc: »[ dirige ven le dviuieme hliie. 



De construction robuste. ces separateurs de sediments sont 
surs et sont suuvent employes sur les conduites des reservoirs 
d'huile et pour d autres appjicitions. 

Offerts dans ies diameires de 4" a 8", 

Les conEre-brides sont livrees avec I'appareiL 

Presiion de nfiarche maximum: 15 livres au pouce carre. 



TABLE V — Dimensions 


des separateurs doubles Darling. 


[>ia. 


Erart. des 
brides 


Largeur 
total e 


Hauteur 
iiitale 


Espace supple- 
pour oter filire 


Poids 
Livres 


4 
5 
6 


24 
28'^ 

30 


28 

32^4 
34 


2m 


14':, 

15'i 


600 
950 




FILTRES DARLING POUR L^ALIMENTATION D'EAU 

ENTREE 



Ces filtres sont une jdaptation du filtre pour Talimcntalion 
d'eau des chaudieres illustre a la page 4, Le filcre meme est 
compose de toile boudec a serviette (serviette turque), Le 
corps est d'acier soude. Ce filtre est recommande pour les 
systemes d 'alimentation d'eau ou il est necessaire d'enlevcr 
les matiercs en suspension, Des cartouches fillrantes de re- 
tlian^ie peuvent etre ubtenues en vue de faciliter le service. 




Fig. 7. 



Siege social et usines: 140, rue Prince, 





SEPARATEURS ET FILTRCS 



Filtres pour ralimentation d*eau des chaudieres 





Lts (ilirev IJarJinp pour 
raiinitnution d'eau de* chau' 
di^rts soni pour une preNsion 
de nurthc hydrauMqae dc 25U 
livres. 

La fig. H montre lexierieur 
de^ plus ^Tus modeles: Nos '^, 
fi ei y. L'int^rieur du filirt 
t^t lel qu'a la (ii:, 1 1, 



Fig- H — Fdirt narling pour 
rjlimentatitin d'tau dcs thaudiercs. 

Ces i I lustra I ion*, monirtm le filire 
Darling pour I'atimentaiion d'eau. Sa 
fonttion est d'enk-ver Thuile dans 
Feau d'alimtntaiion dcs chaudieres. 
Le filife e*i hahiiutllcmcni ractorde 
tmre la pnmpe d aJimeniaLion ei la 
thaudiere. fZ eM i>ffer( en lypt simple 
ou double. 

La fig, *J illustrc Tassemblage ei 
I'iigencenient (onipaci di;s soupapes de 
cnmminde des Nos l. 2. 3 ti 4, pour 
permeitre le by-pass Ion du change' 
ment de la cartouche fjlirame. Cei 
-igcniement 4Vet soupapts n'esi livre 
que iur dcm.inde ei m^ijcnnani maju- 
raiion. 




Fig. 9^ Filirt Oarling 

pour Talimentaiion d'eau 

avcc tollecieur. 



Lc fonctionnement du filtre est vite compris en regardani 
la coupe a la fi^, II, L'eau enfre par le dessus ef passe dans 
la partic cenlrale du corps c|ui est octupe en loule sa lon- 
gueur par la cariouchc filtrajile. A noter I'orifice de vidan^e, 

Le fjltre employe est de la toile bouclee a serviette (serviette 
turtjue) de bonne t^ualile. Ce tissu peut etrc nettoye plusieurs 
fois; '}] se remplace A bon comple. 

Cettc cariduche forme une Ires grande surface de filtrage, 
ayant au moins 1^0 fois la superficie du tuyau d'enlree. 

Lors du raccordemert dun filtre, on devrait poser un 
by-pass, afin de pouvoir nettoyer et remplacer la cartouche 
flltrajile sans arreter le fonctionnement des machines, Uoe 
cartouche filtrante de rechange est livree avec chaquc filtre. 



Fig. W. 




La fig, 10 monire t'agencemem des loupapes pt»ur 
filires doubles danN le?* grands diameires. L'avaniage d"un 
filire double est qu'il y a iou|ours un filtre dc disponiblc 
ptndant le neiioyage dt l'au[re, Cei agentemeni de sou- 
papts n'csi fourni qut moyennani maforaiion. 



■ VEni 



TABLF VI ^ Rendcmcnr dts liUres Darling pour 
ralimeniJiion d'eju des chaudieves. 



Nu 


DMmt'ir; 


Foids 


Rcndrcneni 
Jivref J I'heurc 


I 


1 


ro 


-.000 


2 


II*. 


190 


10.000 


3 


2 


540 


P.OOO 


4 


3H 


3W> 


;H.ooa 


5 


J 


600 


3B.0DO 


6 


3'*. 


hStj 


so,oon 


7 


4 


HOD 


65 .0011 



Chicane 
Grille? 

Plaque de hour 
ouverte 

GrilleS'filirts — , 
SoriK-* 

TJMu-fihrt 
Cardt' 
Corps 



(.oltfifftn 4ti r< hy-f'jit htti m"\tnnjnt mjjnratitnt. 
Lit \'flj I. 2, 9< 4 siini du tHoJih butiiotttaf. 




Goufons du cou\ 

(unis) 
r<mvtrclc 
Goujons a rcssu 
dc h (arcouche 

Cenrrc du ressnn 

PKiqut dt K)Ut 

Rondellc dt plon 

Goujorts du cou\ 
(icharniere 



S V itljniLc 



Fip, II — Coupe dun filire Darling pour lalimcniation deau des 
chaudieres — Nos i, 2, 5 ei 4. 



i 



« 




BUlLfTlM No SS-I 



ATING SYSTEM EQUIPME 



WEBSTER RADIATOR VALVES 





Fig. I— Websfer ISeries 600PJ Type "WB-P" Volve ho* 
iprmg-reromed pocking. 

Type WB-P For Low Pressure Heating 

The Wi'hsti'i Typr WB-P Valvt' can be spaiH'^d and 
rft-onuiirndrd when radiator supply valves of highest 
quality arr desiied. 

The Type WB-P Valve nu-rl^ lullv spcrifirations tall- 
iiiR for a "spring parklrss'* vaKr. A hravy sprine; auto- 
iiiatirally maintains pressure on die-nioldrd rnciallic 
rin^ parking. 

Allhouph parking seldom mqijires renewing, this 
valvr is so designi'd that old parking ring ran be M'tnoved 
and a new on<* installed whili' pn^ssure is on the healing 
sysntrm. 

Pressures 

For luw prrssurr vapcii iind vaeuuni steam healing 
servirr. 




Construction Features 

I. Non-hrat tondui rint: whc<'l hrindlr opms vaKc in 

less ihan a turn, non-rising stem. 
2^ Heavy spring automalicnlly maintains prrssurr on 
the packing to prevent stt'am leakacf, 

3. Extra deep and wide At mc form thrrads on vaKc 
Stem nut give unusual strength and provide ease 
in opening. 

4. Stt-am biass body. Note grnernus thitknfss vf metal 
at all points, 

5. RcnrwabU" composition disc in Murdy brass rrtainer 

assures li^hl i losini^- 

6. Modvilation slrrvf (not illusiratcd ^ (s furnished on 
spef lal order for 'i', ^ and I inch sizes onlv and at 
slieht added cost. 

7. Dir-molded metallic ring packint: prrvenis le-ikapr 
,ind lubricates valve stem. Can be repatkrd under 
pressure. 

B Bonnet or cap is brass. Arrows show direction of 

turning, 
9. Fully machined stem nut i^iude holds all parts in 

ali.^nmrnL 
\[\, Kuliv TTiai hinrd brass nut. 

11. Ovcrsi/ed broached lu^ prm ides extra strength. 
I J. Nipple turned from solid brass bar stock. 



Toble I, Dimeniiont of Type WB-P Volvei, Aftqte Model. 



hilr- 






Sfinbvl 


Siie. 
Inchet 


AopraipmtLle UiniflA., 


n. 


1^ "^ -. 










t 


-^ 


In- 
W 


Our- 

lar 


A 


B 


C 





G 




iT^ 






* 


rr^f^~i 


W402PH 


''J 


U 


3*, 


i^k 


2^li 


1*1 


*^Hk 




W603PH 


=»* 


^i 


i'h 


i% 


3H 


2U 


>^Ul 


"tI 


Ji™ 


W404PH 


1 


r 


3th 


y-K 


V^,u 


3h 


1>L.l 




• 

1 


VttV 






Wa05PM 


1^ 
Mi 


Mi 


4 


1^ 

2 




3 
2 


n.W 






1^ 




c 1 . _^ 





\,IF7 UhO WLVE 
■^ CurLET 




TAfiLE lA. DimentiQni of 

Type WB-P Volvei. ffighf 

and L«lr Hond Modelt, 




-C^ 



HQKL'R 












mquj.:L- 






Synbol 


S.ie, 
lnch«fl 


A 


B 


E 


G 


J 


C 




In 


Out 


D 


W617P0. W673n 


^ 


y^ 


2W4 


l*lfl 


% 


'-■'IH 


I'^iti 


3^H 


3h 


V/6»3PR, W633PL 


^4 


^4 


^% 


l*iH 


% 


'^l-i 


I'^in 


^H. 


3W 


WfiUPS, W434PL 


1 


1 


Vi^ 


»^ 


h» 


m« 


2M>i 


3ll„, 


3'^ 



TABLE ir Dimenslofli ot Type WB-P VaNes, Slrolght Modeli, Double 

Single Union. 



ond 




MQOCL ■ C SrNSLE WiQN 



MQPEL CU DOUHLf UH>Oft 



Svnibal 



Siao, Ipchs* 



Appro' Dim«n>>4ni, Int1i«i 



lnlsl I Ouller 



STRAIGHT SINGLE UNION— G NlOt>El 



W632PG 


=»* 


h 


3 


1 

1 


3'^IH ■ 


3", 


1% 


W633PG 


^i 


'■"i 


3 


1 


3iaift 1 


3^1 


ItV^ 


W434PO 


1 


1 


1 V-i 


1 "' 


V^w 1 


2U 


I'l. 





STRAIGHT 


DOUBLE irNION<»GU MODEL 






WA42PGU 


% 




li 3 1 1 3^^^,, 


2^ 


3",.i 


W6*3PGU 


"* 




'l 1 3 1 3l-'H. 


2\ 


2»Sr. 


WA4iPGU 


1 


1 3': 1N 2^'-}., 


3'i 


3l^.i 



DARLING BROTHER 




I M I T E D m 




EATING 



WEBSTER 
THERMOSTATIC TRAPS 

Series 7 for low Pressure Applications 

Thr VVrbsUT Srrirs 7 liap is a diaphiagm lyp''. 
(hrnrmMatit tiap drsignrd for low pn'ssuir vapor and 
vvuuuni *^Uain hiiiting service. R(< tmNinndcd iDaximum 
oprrating fncssun- is 15 lbs, per sq. in . althoti£;h higher 
CHf-aMonal pn-ssuns an- pcrmissihlr Ii is rtioniinciidrd 
int all types "f radialois. drip poitils. sleaTii-using 
rLjui]jriu-ni, and oXhn appliiations within its pressuri' 
and raparily rangr. 




mj^Jww*^" 



Fig, J-'WrbMrr 70LMI Thrnnouatic Trap. 

Compensoted for All Pressures 

With UVbsUr Series 7 'liaps. steam is held in ihc 
radiator until it has givrn Up its useful heal. These 
llap^ do n(»t open tr>o soon and \*aMr strani into the 
ietuiik\. Neithri df» ihey elose too quii kly so ihai 
(ondeu.saU' builds up and rrduKs radiator outpLiL 
Watef of < ondrnsation, air and other gases arc rom- 
|jl*'(i l\ and lontinuouslv dis( harmed whether the pre-isure 
mside the radiator is 13 lbs., a low \a(uun] or al any 
inunnediate iKjini. This h aeeoniplished by (owpensat- 
iu'^ for pr^tiiur zarialwn. a fealun' of all Urhster 
'IhrriuoMalie Traps. 

High Qiiolity Consfruction 

The themiostdtir element of Webster Series 7 Traps 
i* a 4tronp double diaphraj^ni of Monel Metal, a n<m- 
eonosiM- niel;*l that retains its "spring" eharaeteri*lie 
undei wideb varsin^f cnndiiion^ of trinp<rature and 
pressun . Noir in ihe lUustiation that diaphragm joints 
aie tiiple^M-aled. i.e., tinned, rolled, and M>ldered to 
a*Mjre iightn['ss, Rih> are provided for slruelural 
strength. The inMnnd vaK<' pieir Is jxipnanenth adjust- 
ed. 'Ihi* valve, of brass, ha* a 6() degrte i one shajX' to 
give positive and lighi < losing. Experirmed ofx-raling 
men know the \alue of ibis deM^ in kcTping a healing 
systen» (ire from inierruptiims due to dirt. 

HikU and eap aie hieh qualiiv st« am brass Maihincd 
mctal-to-mrtal suifa< e^ pro\idi tight joints. Sharp-edged 
«'at i« bras*, and is threaded for ease of rrpb*-<iiKnt. 



i^rr 




M EQUIPMI 



Union nut and nipple are brass and of ample slrengll 
to withstand rough handUng during installation- 
After eomplile assembly, ea< h trap is tested with botl 
hf>l water and snam. No trap is permitted to leave tli' 
faMon thai has not pass<'d all inspeeiions and teUs anc 
proved that it will function pro|x riy. 

Series 7M for Medium Pressures 

The Webster Series 7M Trap whirh is provided wit! 
a stainless steel valve pieee and a stainless steel se;i 
insert is recommended for operating f>re,ssui<s up to 2' 
lbs. per sq. in ., and for oreasional pressures up to !>( 
lbs, per sq in. In ever>- other respeet the Series 7N 
is idenlii al to the Scries 7. 

Toble Ml. Recommended Ralingt rn Sq, Fr. E.DR * 




SvmtHsl 



Sij 



7oa 

713 
724 



t 



Praiiur* Oiflsranc* Aooii tra|i in Lb. par Sq, In, 



•ft 

16S 
390 



V, 



230 

410 



IVI 



145 »0 73S 370 S30 
330 400 465 730 1090 
5B0 ' 700 aiO I W80 1S40 



10 



1A 



«40 

1300 
7300 



'Aaifld OP 340 S.<.L> pfli iq H p«i houi Raringi or« in a^fai^anc* «¥»rti 
rhe re(oinn>«nd»d iioodcrdi odopiad bjf rh* Sfam Hta'inv fqwipmaii 
MonufoduFC'i Aiisdcdon Svkfltf 'rap djp«(fl|f froTi (h« obftf* ■obia, for 1*>i 
lowsir diflvrtriijoh thar may tiiti 'f> "i* tyi'am 






- 


H -h — A — ^ 




t 


s 


, '-^ 




1 




rbr 


1 

T 


I 

n 




^. — _Ulin 


F 


u 




1/ 


1 


— 




\ 







_-jG ,—— A — n 




MoJd a 



MoJdi R*ri.1 L 



Srrir* 7 Trap DimriiKioni. AnsU- (H\, Sirainhtwav fOl, 



Tobre IV 


Sergei 


7 Trcip Oimentiont Mod«lt H, G. R ond I 


Slit 


Srmbol 

70? 
70» 
703 


Mod«1 


A 1 ■ £ 1 E G 1 H J 


■ 
1 _ 


H 
G 


j*i m n^M 1^ 1 Ins,,. ' 
14* i' 



713 

713 



3"ln I l*.h I H^iH 



3" I 



■J" ' 
lO|»l t 



1H 



t** 



r. 



714 



41, 



Sh-. 



All diTicni-orii .n ni>it1 G^d ILfbittr >□ it^ghi to'ioltf^ 



Dm)rn(ionK of SinRk 
Union Wrliral Model 
7n2VTrap '/." Inlri, '/." 
Outlrt. For (^onvrrlor 
RjdJ;iloi)L and othrr Ap- 
plii-aiii/nt. 

A— 5" C— 2" 





# 



-» — 



DARLING BROTH 




M I T E D 




HEATING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT 





Fi«. 3— Webster Heaw Duiv 
Drip Trap, Size 00026-T 





WEBSTER FLOAT 

AND THERMOSTATIC 

DRIP TRAPS 



Working Pressures To 1 5 Lbs. Per Sq. In. 

SERIES 26-T: Hravy duty traps, capable of handling 
lar^c volumes of rondensation and air. Conipat t and 
V\0i\ in \M'i^ht. Suitrd for drips of mains, air condition- 
ing t'oils. blast radiation, 
unit heaters, hot water gen- 
erators, fan heater coils, 
and similar applit^ations. 
Side outlet opening. The 
most used sizes (00026, 
0026, 026) incorpoiate the 
outward opt-ning discharge 
valve^whit h peiTiiits ihe 
valve to open when ex- 
cessive pressures prevail, 
and thus prevents water- 
logged piping or equipment- 
Construction Features: 
Brass valve pieces and scats 
on water discharge end. Thermostatic air vent dia- 
phiatjms ;iir Monel Metal with valve pieces and seats 
of hiavs- Other interior parts are copper, brass or iron. 
Cast iron bodies and covers. 

Size 00026 has one inlet openint; and one outlet on 
cover plate. A choice of two inlet openings in opposite 
sides of hodv and two outlet openings at bottom is 

provided in sizes 0026 and 
026, Pipe plugs included for 
one inlet and outlet. These 
sizes can he mounted in 
pipe line without othn sup- 
port. 

Sizes 126 and 226 have 
single end inlets and oulets 
and require a supporting 
biai kct when installed 
Large ball float and long 
lever provid<- ample power 
for operation of inwaid- 
opening valve. 

SERIES 26-0: Similar to 
the 26-T but v^ith plain 
I over instead of cover in- 

)corporatini; thermostatic element and by-pass. Us<d 
wh.re eomentralion of air does not oetur. such as on 
ends of mains and lisers, on flash tanks and for dripping 
gravitv heating systems into vai uum nturn lines. Pro- 
vii^ion is made for extn nal air by-pass. 



3 




Fit 1 WfhUt-i tlraw Dutv 
Drip Tr;ip, Si/e an2fi^T, 
Thr 0'26-T tt itriiilar i-xccpi- 
JnK that floiU interior \% 
bulird mstriid of . I.mipt-d 




Fig. 5— Wtbstrr Hmvy Duty Drip Trap, Size 126-T, 
Thf JJh-'l is iimilar. 



— E— 




' 



N 



^ 



Id 

L 




00026 Siti; 

,W1 




J-- A 

0026 niKl 0:6Si:c 




IP4 T H6-0 »" 



Dimensions of Wrbster 
Srrit^s ^6 Drip Trap?. 



lZ6.mJ 226 Sue- 



Tobte V Dunension^ o1 Webile' Series 26 Orip Trnp^ 


Svintial 


* 


B 


c 


D 


E 


f 


- 


H 


JsrP 


Lbt, 


00026-T 
0002&.Q 


^ 


4^^ 
6^*^ 


11^ 


3^U 
3'^ 


6Ih 


3rK 

3'K 


6"'s 


2-«* 

aii'iii 




kO 
TOi| 


0026.T 
002A'O 


1 
1 






41 '> 
4>v 


3'*' id 


3'"'^,; 


71 „; 


1 
1 


I3ii 


026^ 
02ft-O 






2I<'. 
2U 


5'^ 






»0l» 
8" in 

101 H 


3>S 
31k 


I'l 


^9 


I2&'T 
^26-0 


Mi! 






_ — . — ^ 

15 

15 


4H 
4rH, 






4S 
3S 

67 

55 


224-T 
22* O 


7 

2 










5U 12 

Sl„ WK 


1 1'' 


00D26 Dkmanfian N ■( -^i'^ 
All diFnariPoni in 4^cK«( Qnd lubted Id ihghl ^ar'oUon 



Toble VI. Recommended Rolmgi of WebiJe* Seriei 36 
Ftool ond ThermoitDfic Jiapi »n Lbi. Woret per Hour 





1 Pretiufa DtfTe^anca Acio» Imp m Lhi. per Sq- In, 


Inctiet 


Symbol 


1 


*A 


*A 


Vi 


V. 


t 


J 


s 


10 


IS 


^U 


00026-T ond O 


50 


70 


100 


130 


uo 


300 


210 


220 


330 


1 


002b T and O 1 125 \75 


250 


JOO 


350' 500; 525 


5501 575 i 


"* 


Cao T Dod O 300 A15 


600 735 


950 1300 '1260 1320 ■ IBO 1 


\\., 


126-T and O 600 S50 WOO U70 170O 2J00 3530 3640 2760 


7 


226-T ond 1250 1775 2500 3060 3550 SOOC 52SC 5500 5750 


Cau'Viion Fallon. lo top'^ri talyngt g'vfli m Ibi per hour o^ foiet tu 


tq II e d r 01 ?40 B 1 u mi^ifjplv by 4. Rolingi Drfi m actordanta wiih 


iTortdO'di odop'ad by the Sieom Haoling EquipntenT Monufoclve'i Anqtio'i^n, 


Droviding lor Iht taMJnuauk ■llfnknalJ4n of oir whan fhs IfQp it eperolino oi 


iti 'noiiiiu'*! ralinp 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 




, r 

EATING SX^TEM EQUIPMiHj 



DARLING ' Y TYPE STRAINERS 



Pipe scalr. srdimcni. bits of paiking, and oihrr (oivi^n 
matter is often the f^ause of damage to steam naps, pres- 
sure rcduring valves, temperature regulators, etc. and 
unsalisfac tor>- operation or even complete failure can 
frequently be attributed to pipe line impurities. There- 
fore the installation of a strainer Js always recommended 
to protei t such ct|uipment. 

Darling Series 29 Strainers arc so constructed that they 
do not reduce the volume of fluid passing through them. 
The screen is placed with one end open to the inlet port 
and the other end opm to the blow oil. The flow passes 
from mU't lo outlet port through the screen so that 
all foreign matter is trapped in the cylinder screen, from 
where it is readily removed- 
Adaptable to both horizontal and vertical downward 
flov\ pip<" lines. In rithei position these strainers must be 
installed with the ^ap down. 

Darling ''\'*' tvpe Strainers have heavy cast iron 
bodies with perforated brass strainer cylinders, area of 
which are several Umes larger than corresponding pipe 
sizes. Series 29 are screwed pattern made in sizes '/^" 
to 2" inclusive. Standard lylindci si reens have .040 inch 
diameter perforations 256 holes to the sq, in. Screens of 
monel metal can be supplied at extra charge. Fine mesh 
screens made of brass wire cloth can be furnished when 
spec i lied. 



Fig. 6 — Darling Series 29 



Sfr*i»»d follarn — tnanimutn working 
prfliiurft 150 Ibi, ptr iq. fn. 




TABLE VM. Dimeniiont of Seftei 3? DJrl Slroin«r«. 

A 




PEPFOP-ITEO fcDASS 
STQAINei^ 



SIM 
IflCllft 



V- 
\ 

PA 



Syqbal 
292 


A 1 


3% 1 


293 


*Vi 


294 


5V* 


29S 


S»4J,; 


296 


6Vi 


298 


8 



2% 

4 
^% 



I"* 

3Vj 
4'/. 



D 


E 


% . 


IVi 


J*lu 


I'A 


Ml« 


^'/t 


1^4 


Vh 




2'/i 


3% ^ 



Weiohi 



2 
3 

4 

6 

8 

13 



M\ dimeniioni Fn iitrKai qittf ighJBTt f» ilipM vorlaVlen, W«1gM *n pavn^i- 



OTHER WEBSTER HEATING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT 



Webster High Copaciry Boseboord 
Webiter WoJIvectors 
Webster W, I. Rodiation 

Webiter Boseboard Heating 

WebiTer Continuous Flow Control 

for Hot Woter Heating B-IOO 



Bullelin Number 
. S-1601 
B-1551 
B-1550-C 
.... 5-CE 



Webster Process Steam Traps 

Webiter Type "N" fxpanslon Joints 

Webster Type "C" Expansion JoifTti 

Webster Boiler Protector .„„„..„.. 

Webster E-5 Moderator Controls 



BvHetin Number 

iaoo-H 

B-1 101-B 

B-717-C 

6-90O4-A 



BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 

TORONTO, ONT. 

Dorfing Brothers Limited 137 Wellington St. \A 



HALIFAX, N.S. 

E. S. Stephenson & Co., Ltd, 155 Gronvllle Streel 

SAINT JOHN, N.B. 
E. S. Slephenson & Co., Lrd. 15 Dock Street 

QUEBEC, P.O. 
W. J. Bonks 140 St, John Street 

ARVIDA, P.O. 

Rene Beoudet & Cie Uee 122 High Street 

TIMMIN5, ONT, 

Patficia Engineering l\6. AtVi Third Ave. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 

Dofling Brothers Limited 16 Rideou Street 



WINNIPEG. MAN. 

Dorlrng Brothers Limited 123 Princess Strec 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H. F. Clarke & Co. Ltd. 1 lU Fifth St. V^ 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Fronk Darling & Co, Ltd. 1 144 Homer S 

ST. JOHN S, NFLO. 

Clayton Construction Co. Ltd. 198 Woter S 




HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS 

BROTHERS LIMITED 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL, CANADA 

SINCE 1888 



i 



€ 




Bulletin No. $S-3 



STRAINERS AND riLTERS 



TYPE STRAINERS 



Pipe scale, sediment, bils of packing, and olher foreign matter 
is often Ihe cause of damitge Co pressure reducing valves. 
tcmptrraiure regulalors, steam traps, etc. and unsaCisfaaory 
operJhon or even complete failure can frecjuenily be attributed 
to pipe line impurities- Therefore, the [nstallation of a strainer 
is always recommended to protect such equipment. 

Darling Series 29 and Series 30 Strainers are so constructed 
that they do not reduce the volume of fluid passing through 
Hiem. The screen is placed with one end open to the inlet port 
■ind the other end open t<* the blew off. The flow passes from 
jnlet to uullei purt through the screen so that all foreign maittr 
is trapped in the cylinder, from where it is readily removed. 

Adaptable to botfi horizontal and vertical downward flow 
pipe Jines- in either position these strainers must be installed 
wjtii the cap down. 

Darling "Y" type Strainers have cast iron bodies with 
perforated brass strainer c)'hnders. area of which are several 
limes larger than corresponding pipe sizes. Series 2y are strewed 
pattern made in sizes 1/2" ^o 3" inclusive. Series 30 flanged 
pattern are made in sizes H/j" to 6" inclusive and in two 
weights, standard for pressures up to 1 ^0 !bs, per scj. in, and 
extra heavy for pressures up to 250 lbs, per s<^. in. Standard 
cylinder screens have .040 inch diameter perforations 225 
holes to the scj. in. Screens of monel metal can be supplied at 
extra charge. Fine mesh screens made of brass wire cloth can 
be furnished when specified. 



Fip. I. Dpirlin^ Series 29 

Dir[ Sirainers. 

Screwed Paiitrn — iD.LKimuiTr uorkm^ 
pptaauft 150 Ihs. per iq. CI- 




TABLE J — Dimensions of Series 2*) Dirt Strainers. 

A 




Silt 


Symbol 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


Wciflht 


It. 


292 


^% 


2^ 


2>f, 


^ 


lU 


y 


■'1 


29^ 


■<'i 


21^ 


'1^.1 


Vh 


3 


1 


2*}i 


^M 


4 


2^'|.^ 


vu 


5th 


4 


t'l 


2yS 


5^'% 


■IfN 


i% 


l'+ 


2'^ 


6 


V-z 


296 


Ai^ 


S^'^l.i 


3^^ 


l*'jl; 


2'*. 


B 


2 


29B 


s 


6i'j,^ 


41*. 


l^lll 


*> 


13 


2**i 


2910 


9'-U 


7if.^., 


5^4 


2V.„ 


4-% 


ti 


3 


2912 


It'. 


9'i 


fi^ 


5 


36 



Fig. 1. Darling Series M) 

Diri Strainers. 

SciniTird (Imfed p^ticrn — mjvi- 
mum ^^o^kl^E prtiiurc ISO lb*, 
per ^t^r in. Fxifj htjty ^jn/frd 
pjicern— nummum <Aorkin^ pfes- 
iUfc J50 \b%. pvt m. m. 




TABLF Jl — Dimensions of Scries 30 Dirt Sirainers. 




PEOFOOAieD &PASS 



TOP FOQ BUDW CFF 



SianiJarU Pattern 



Site 
Inches 


Symbol 


A 


B 


C 


D 


I. 


NV>iRh< 


2"'- 


30E(] 


15 


U<, 


lO'-'j 


5'ti 


^ 


^11 


\ 


3012 


14 


15 


HI, 


3^S 


Ti„ 


au 


1 


ioi6 


16>i> 


I8I4 


li^ij 


i^i 


9 


no 


5 


3020 


18 V 


20f.* 


151^ 


5 


10 


11x1 


6 


302J 


20^'+ 


22li, 


lf.-\ 


5'S 


n 


2^0 



Extra Heavy Pattern 



Size 
lnch« 


Symbol 


A 


l\ 


(. 


u 


£ 


%cr^h< 


2>" 


3010 


13 


u\ 


IO'm 


3^1 


7I'» 


«0 


3 


31112 


H 


15"H. 


iV-y 


4^ 


a>a 


100 


-t 


3U1A 


r6f« 


19 


14 


5 


10 


18U 


5 


3020 


»*^ 


21 


t5''i 


V'l 


11 


>:o 


6 


3024 


20:ki 


23"^ 


r\ 


6^* 


12"- 


290 



l^i dimemtnni m iiHhti and tubftcl 10 tUsht uniuiiaat. \liishl in pmmdi. 



AvTijfK V ^rminiit 














All AimetisioHt in iiifbti and ttthial t*> flight larialitrns, Ueiibi iit pitundt. 



Fig, 5- T>pi<al Instillation with Webster ""^8" Trap. 




ARLING BROTHER 



,>HA^." 




^STRAINERS AND FILTERS 



TYPE D" DUPLEX STRAINERS 




Fig. 4, Duplex Sirainer, 

This duplex srrainer has a wide application in many 
industries, bur is particulariy suited to Fuel Oil Burn- 
ing installations- 

The principal advantages of Darling Type "D" 
Duplex Strainers are as follows: 

No valves — a yt)-degree turn of the handles changes 
from one to the other basket. 

Positive adjustment of tapered plug valve by means 
of jack screw. 

Strainer basket being in two parts is more readily 
cleaned. 

TABLE III 





A 


B 


C 




Size 


S[d 


Exi, Heav)- 


n 




Fiance 


Flange 








IVa" 


8%" 


9V4" 


12" 


71/2'- 


W" 


2" 


103/8" 


10%" 


16"' 


8" 


12" 


iW 


12 ' 


l^%" 


18" 


10' 


i^Vz' 


y 


13' 


133/," 


19" 


12" 


17" 



Double basket (the combined area of whose per 
forations is from six co ten rimes the crnss sectiona 
area of the pipe and about twice the area of othe 
makes of strainers). 

Designed so thai when well c(5ver is removed leve 
of liquid in well is lowered, exposing the top of baske 
for removal. Ti>ngue and Groove joints on well covers 

Handle partially covers basket-well which is in use 
leaving exposed tiie well which is out of commissioi 
and free to be cleaned. In no position Of handle is 1 
possible to stop the flow. 

Elimination of the many joints necessary in a duple- 
strainer made up with valves. 

Maximum working pressure 100 lbs. Available ii 
cast steel for pressures over luu lbs. 




i 



i 



RLI 




ROT 



$ 




TRAINERS AND FILTERS 




WEBSTER SUCTION STRAINERS 



c— 





Q 



or 



ft— 4 



« H" AHO S^^f or dOLTS N T-^ptrOflND BlUCL(0 



Size 

A 


B 


B.JC 


E 


G 1 H 


2 


fH 


4 i 9>*i 6 6% 5', 


\ 


6-^ 


4% 11 1 -^"^ S-, i>. 


4 


«H 


W!l3', 9 lOs; ■'■■ 


S 


S»"i 


6*.,'l)i^il0 I2sl «■. 


6 


LOH 


^ 17%lll 15'* 


9S 


It 


L4*k 


9''» 24 113^^21 


I4N 


lU 


iri.. 


\V\ Z8ii'l6 24>^ 16', 


12 


-=1 


12^ 53% 19 29 ,20 




A 


J 


K 


M 


N 


2 


4^^ 


4-HkZ 


^ 


>.. 


* 


6 


4-Hii2'. 


■i 


•^ 


4 


'rt 


B-Sii2!l, 


't 


*. 


5 


B», 


fl-».ii2S 


^ 


^ 


6 


9»t 


8-*.t2', 


W 


** 


f 


IIS 


fi-sii''> 


^ 


t 


10 


M^< 


l2-V.ii3'.V 


S 


I 


1-* 


l"* 


12-.UOW 


4i 


I 



TABLE IV — Dimtnsions of Webster Suciion Sirjinets. 



IniktiilkJ Ahead of vacuum 
pump to prt^em iJirt and stale. 
brought down %^ iih conden%a- 
lion from heating sysicni. Ir(>cn 
d,iinjging pump with resulumt 
troubles. 

A uppinp is pn>vided for in- 
rn>dutMon of ailt! water make- 
up when ihat is desired ; another 
(it conneuion to a satuum 
^au^c. Made of heavy cast iron 
with flanged umnections. Com- 
panion flanges are extra ecjuip- 
meni, Cleanout tovtr is bulutj 
iin ftith ruhhtf jiaskei ioini. 
Screen ha^kci is made of sheet 
brass with No- A holes (-04'> in 
dia.). 22S holes per sv{. in. ^d 
is easih removable for clean- 
inpt Ma\mium »orkxnp pres- 
sure* IS Ih*. per sq. in. 




Pip, 5. Webster Suction 
Sirainers. 




DARLING TYPE W DUPLEX SUCTION STRAINERS 



Of rugged dcsi^jn. it is a Jepentiabif luiil anJ oOcn used 
in -suction lines from oil tanks jnJ other special appiiahon^. 

Made in sizes from 4" to »". 

Companion flanges included as pari of ihc unii. 
Maximum working pressure l^ lbs. per sq. in, 

TABLF V^ Dimensions of Darlini; Duplex Strainen, 




Fig, 6. Darling Duplex Strainers, 
The princ^p;*! jdvinfiKci of the duplex lutnon «rjmcf is wh«e ioniinuoui 
opefjiion i\ re(juiK4i; lE is possible lu shui ol( one *rr,iiner jnd use ihe 
o[hef. pcjmitiinR [he first one tu be tkjned jnd mjdc fcjdy in a (c« 
infimtntii for future use- 



Si«e 


Fate 
to Face 


Oserali 

W'idrh 


Overall 

Height 


t'xtra %p.ite for 
strainer remosal 


Weight 


4 
5 
6 


24 

2«'. 
^0 


28 

^4 


16'^ 
19", 


I4\ 
14S 
ISS 


790 
9^0 



DARLING WATER SUPPLY FILTERS 



An adaptation of the Darling Feed water filter shown on 
page 4. The filtering media is Linen Terry (Turkish towel- 
ling). The body is of welded steel construction. This filler is 
recommended for use on water supply systems where it is 
necessary to remove suspended mailer. Spare filter cartridges 
are available which will facihtate the servicing of these units. 




Inlet 



/ 



Outlet^ 




Fig. 7, 




HEAD OFFICE & WORKS: 140 PRINCE ST.. MONTREAL 




STRAINERS AND FILTER^ 

FEED WATER FILTERS 




Darling Feed Water Fiher-i 
are sua able for waief pres- 
sures up u» I'm lbs- 

Fif;. ft shows exterior view 
of ihe larger sizes No. 5, 6 
and 7, Tht interior of filter is 
same as shown in Fig. IL 



Pip. H. Darling Feed Water 
Filter. 

These illusirarions show the Darling 
Feed Water Filter, Its fanttion is to 
remove oil from boiler feed water. 
The filter is usually connetted between 
ihe feed pump and the boiler. Sinj;le 
or duplex types can be supplied. 

Fi^;, 9 illusiraies assembly and com- 
paei arrangement of control valve? of 
No, 1. 2, 5 and 4 sizes of filter, to 
permit by- passing when thjnginp fil- 
tering media; this valve arranj-ement 
is furnishtd a. rtn extra only, ^-^ ^ Darling Feed Waier 

Filter with manifold. 

By reference lo the i>ectionil i[luslratior Fig, U the opera- 
(ion of the filter will be readily understood. The water enters 
at the lup and pas-^es into the central portion of the chamber 
which is occupied by the filter cartridge which extends hori- 
zontally the entire length. Note Blow-off for cleaning filter 
body. 

The filtering material employed is what is familiariy known 
as Linen Terry (Turkish towelling) of fine quality. This can 
be cleaned several times. New towelling can be had at reason- 
able price. 

It presents a very large filtering area, having at least 1^0 
times llie area of the feed pipe. 

In connecting the filter a by-pass should be provided so 
that the same may be cleaned and fresh filter cartridge insert- 
ed without shutting down the plant. An extra filter cartridge 
is supplied with each filter. 




Fig, 10. 






Fig. 1(1 shows outline nf valve arrangement for duplet 

filters in ihe larger si/es- The advanca^t *'f u.sin^ same 
is that one filter is available at any time Un ilcaning. 
This valve arrangement is furnished as an extra only. 



i 



TABLE VI — Capacity Darling Feed Water Filters. 



No. 


Si/r 


Wti*rht 


C.jpacity Lbs. 

ptT hllUf 




1 


170 


".aoo 




Vis 


190 


10.1)00 




s 


i-JO 


17.000 




2'i 


360 


?H,Ol>0 




3 


(MO 


3H.I>00 


6 


3"j 


r.50 


^O.OOU 




'I 


RIIO 


^5,000 



By-Paiirits ^i^niff/iii furiinijfti ai rxtia price r/u/t^ 
Siin /, 2. 3, 4 (Iff hf'moatal pattvtn. 
Sittt it 6, 7 are t'trtical ftatittn. 



BoFFIe 
Grids 

Operi End 

Plate 
FilterGrids 
_Oatlet — ' 
Klter Cloth 

Cards 
Body 




Cover Studs 

Cover 

Cartndqe Studs 
Spring 

Spring Center 

Closed End 
plate 

Lead Gasket 

Cover Studs 

■BLOW LjFP 

Fig. J I. Sectional View Darling Feed Water Filter — Size* I, 2, 3 and 4. 



i 



BULLETIN 5CE 




C^AtK 







EUMINATK ORim/ 



WMm 



OOfS NOT SOIL MMLLS/ 



THEY'RE TALKING ABOUT 




4 




Wjl£AJt£K. 



.1 



BASEBOARD 
HEATING 






4 



YOU 



INTERESTED 



WHAT THESE 
SAYING: 



^ ■■*''" 




.-.•-^ 



«^- 



<^^'^ 



•bv 



. ^^ 



J^ 



'-l-" 









"r^r- 



^ 



*^ 



'^r'^--' 



■"•i. 



■■■ .... 



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BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 



HALIFAX, N.S. 

E. S. Stephenson & Co., Ltd. 155 Granville Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.B. 
E. S. Stephenson & Co., Ltd. 15 Dock Street 

QUEBEC, P.p. 
W. J. Banks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIDA. P.p. 
Rene Beaudet & Cie. Ltee 122 Davis Street 

TIMMINS, ONT. 
Potricio Engineering Ltd, 168 Third Ave. 

OTTAWA. ONT. 
Darling Brothers Limited 18 Rideou Street 

TORONTO, ONT. 
Darling Brothers Limited 137 Wellington St. W. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Darling Brothers Limited 123 Princess Street 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H. F. Clarke & Co. Ltd. 1114 Fifth St. W. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Frank Darling & Co. Ltd. 1144 Homer St. 

ST. JOHN'S. NFLD. 
Clayton Construction Co. 198 Woter St. 




CAPACITIES 




FIG- I- 1^^* ■ I'M" CloM "DG" Pump V-Bsll driven by 
<u H.P, Split Phai* Mat»r oil moivntfid «n C L Bote, Db- 
kignvd ond buill ta DarUng iiondo'ifi. 



APPLICATION 

Designed primarMy for circulating 
water at low discharge heads such as 
required in the smaller forced hoi water 
heating systems. 

Copocities range from 2 IMP. GPM up to 
25 IMP. GPM and heads from 2 ff. to 25 ft. 
as shown in curves ot right. For quietness 
of operation, vt^ith a minimum of 
attention this unit is ideaL 



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W ] , M Id*-.* -. -;«mJ : 



BULLETIN No. 50 



F 


IG. II H 




^^^^m. 












1750 SPM ^ 


60 CYCLE 


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FIG. Ill 



1450 RPM -IS CYCLE 




CONSTRUCTION FEATURES 




4 



The special features incorporated 
in the design of this pump 
ensure quietness of operation 
and minimum attention. Special 
features include sleeve bearings, 
packless gfond and isolation 
of motor from system and building 
by V-Belt drive ond rubber 
trunnion mounting. Adjustable 
speed pulley on motor permits 
running standord pump ot 
different speeds to obtotn desired 
head and capacity. 




TYPICAL SECTION CLASS "DG" CENTRIFUGAL CIRCULATING PUMP 




PUMPS FOR EVERY PURPOSE 
For land and morine lervice we deiign and 
manufacture S.ngle and Duplen Harirontol and 

Vertical Sfeom Pumpj for Boiler feed. Vacuum arid 

Tonk Service, alto Single and Moili»to9e 
Cenififugof Pumpi for ali pi^rpoiev 
HoriioniaJ and Vertical Condensate Pump*. 




Darling Brothers limited 

MONTtlAl CANADA 

fNGINEMS • MANUFACTURERS • fOUNDIRS 

- SAINT X>NN, MB • OUE»C - 
OIIAWA ■ TIMMINS ' WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER - SI JOHN'S, NNd^ 



HALIFAX 
TORONTO 



ARVIDA 
■ CAIGART 



i 



I 





WKBSIER TYPE N 




E X !• A X S I O N 


J III X T $ 


Internallv Guided - 


- Cant 


Iron 






\V*-bhl<t ^^inuli* Slip 

JoJnr. fnlrnuiUy < >i 

fi Jrili-tfriil \iir)i4ir. '"< 

tri 


:T»:r 




1 





Webster Type N Expansion Joints are designed 
lo meet specifications railing for an internally 
guided, cast iron jniiiL SlandanI weiglH nuideU 
arr provided far maximum operating steam pres- 
sures up lo 125 lb. per sq. in. Extra heavy models 
are provided for maximum operating steam 
pressures up to 250 ll>. per sq. in. The maximum 
operating lemperature for both standard and 
extra heavy weight models is t5i) degrees F.» con- 
forming to the A.S.M.E. Boiler CfKJe. 

Application 

The fundamental purpose of Websler Expansion 
Joints is» of course, to lake up linear expansion 
of pipe lines caused by lemperature change. The 
Type N Joint is made especially fur those appli- 
cations where spare is limited yet where accurale 
f^uiding and ali^nmenl are essential. Tbey serve 
equally well in pipe lines carrying hot oil, hot 
gas. steam or hot water, and in underground 
mains and riser lines in buildings. 

Design Features 

Accurate guiding i[k the Wehsler Type N JoinI 
is obtained by four long spiral internal guides 



Avhicli krrp in contact \\ilh the slip tube Ifu'ougli- 
out Iho rnlirf traverse. All sizes have lienvy 
anchors inlc^rnl willi the bod> and designed lo 
wilhstimd full line pressure. Packing space is 
large and pni\ided N\itli plugged openings into 
v^liicli pn^ssure fillings can later be inserled if 
VSebster I'luking LubricanI is lo be used. Tliese 
linings are nol slandnrd equipment. All joints 
are provided \tith a plugged drain opening and an 
inlernal slop. 

Packing glands are easily adjustable by drawing 
up the nuts of the gland bolts, I^imil holts (tie 
rods) of ample size prevent the slip and body 
from coming apart during handling and instal- 
lation. Pads for service connections are provided 
on all double slip joints. These pads are drilled and 
lapped ouly on special order and at extra cost. 

The purchaser of Webster Type N Joints is as- 
sured the same high quality as other \Vel>ster 
Equipment resulting from the use of good material, 
accurale workmanship and careful inspection. 

Malerials of Construction 

liodies a[»d packing glands are cast iron which is 
the besi oblainable and fully meets specifications 



Riilklin B-1I03K Expansion JoinU 



BY THf MAKERS OF 



Copyriglit 1^12 by Wairpn Wcbafer & Co. 




HEATING SYSTEMS 



WEBSTER TYPE N EXPANSION JOINTS 




All joints shall be flan^^^ 

Joints sliall t>e Webster Type N Internally (fuided or 
equal, and dimensions shall acrord with Iho^ in Web- 
ster Bulletin B-II03A, 

Guarantee 

We guarantee Webster i%xpansion JoiiiU againsl de- 
feats in workmaiiship and tiialerial for a period of one 
year from dale of shipineiil fnitn i>ur fartory but this 
guara[i(ee wil] he Inniled lo furiusliiij^ new parts in 
exchange for any that rnay prove defective within 
such period, F.O.B. factory, provided the installation 
has been ina<Ie and the joints used in acrordaiice with 
our Service Details and inslruclLoiLs. The guarantee 
does not include liability for installation costs or con- 
tingencies of any character. 



for "senii-sleel." Standard slip lubes are of steel, 
accurately lurned, finished siuootji and heavily hard- 
chrome plated. Brass slip tubes van be furnislifd on 
spt*cial order: Flanges rnay be either cast iron or steel 
at our option, (ihiuti hf^HsiOid limit UiUsarc hoth steel. 
Webster Standard Pa(kinK is furnished suitable for 
steam and wnler -M pressures sUited. Special puckin^' 
can b<' provided at extra cost. 

Typical Specifications 

Expansion joints shall be designed for a maximum 

working pressure of lb. per sq. in. Bodies shall 

be cast iron and shall include an integral anchor of 
ample strength. Slip tubes shall be steel, smoothly 
linished, and heavily bard-chrome plated. Joints shall 
be fully guided for the full length of traverse by extra 
long internal guides cast in a helical form integral 
with the body of the joint. Packing shall be installed 
at the factory and suitable for steam (oil) (gas) (water), 
maximum working pressure of . . . lb. per sq. in. and a 
maximum temperature of degrees Fahrenheit. Limit 
bolls shall be provided to hold body and slip together. 

Joints shall be of the single or double type as called fur 
on the plans and designed for a maximum traverse 
of either 4 inches or 8 inches per slip. 



SlM'cify STANDARD ami (iouscrvc Time 
anil Materials 

'I he s.i/rs ;i\ailalile and materials uw'd for 
»-taii<laril W ehster T>pe \ K\pan»iion Joints as 
described in tins calidug ha\e b-en seJeited for 
iiniversjd s«Tvice, \Ne ask that you av^nd speci- 
lieali(»ns depurling from lliese ^t^iulards and 
incorporaling special or non->lnrulard reipiire* 
meut.s. B> so doing \mi vvill assist in ionser\ing 
niaterial and machine lime: permit quicker dc- 
iiseries at losver cijsl. However, where the pro- 
posed use of I he expansion joint makes absohili'lv 
necessary n»aterials and sizes other than our 
slandard, wrile us your nKjuirements. We will 
then tell jou if vie can make jtnnXs to meet them. 




In<Iiiirie& and Quotations 

Inquiries for further informalicm <>ii Webster Expansion 
Joints and Webster Steam Healing KquipmenI may be 
addressed to the Company at Camden. New Jersey, 
or to the nearest Sales Representative. Look 
for Warben Webster & Company in your 
local telephone book or write us at Camden 
New Jersey, for his address, Qm^tations will 
be made promptly by our llepresentatives. 

Other % ebster Products 

We are manufacturers of Webster Process 
Steam Traps and Strainers (15U lb. maxi- 
mum pressure), the Webster Moderator 
and Hylo Steam Heating Controls, and 
Webster Systems Equipment including 
radiator supply valves, radiator traps, drip 
traps, dirt strainers, boiler return traps 
vent traps, boiler protectors, light-weight 
con vector radiators, elc We are also 
exehisive nalicnial distributors of Webster- 
Nesbilt Unit Heaters. Your inquiries about 
these products are solicited. 



Page 2 




• 



WKBSTER TYPE N EXPANSION JOIN 



TS 




Fig, 4. Sin|rle,Slip 



Fig, S. Doulili; Slip 



125 Lb. |.or Sq. In, M««.m,„. (JpsriilmK I'res9ure-45tl F. Maunrnm Oporatin^ Tern per.. Uin.. 
Tubic I. STANOARI) SINGLE SLIP EXPANSION JOL\TS-Dlmc„»io„« >„ I„,he» 





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Number 
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erie 


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115 


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94 


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210 


225 


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29 4 


94 


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164 


9 


64 


12 


1 


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290 


315 


12 


25 H 


ly* 


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19 


11-4 


12 


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17 


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7 


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390 


425 



*K\{ Jifii hnr^ <trillisl wjih 4 luii K-jr U>h ti'>li-« •^i/.t H 



Table ir. STANDARH I>OtBLE SLIP EXPANSION JOINTS -Dimenwonr. in Inohr« 




# 



3i*« 


T-4' 
Trav- 


T-e- 

Trav- 

erse 


D 


H 


K 


L 


M 


N 





P 


R* 


& 


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\piiroiiiaiule 

Shiftpinw 

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A 


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or Mollis 


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Cirtk 


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Trow- 

ene 


2 

2Va 
3 


36Ji 

36H 
37 ^^ 

37 4 
39?4 


iri 1-5 

47H 


4H 

5 

6 


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4 
4 
I 
I 
1 


H 
H 
H 
H 


34 

3H 
\H 
5K2 
6 


64 

-T 


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til 

s 


2H 

24 

3 

3 

3K 


44 

m 

5*8 

6 

6H 




5 

5 

54 

5H 

6 


4 

4 
4M 


H 
'A 
H 


1 

Z 
2 


H 
H 


35 
47 
60 
70 
90 


38 
52 
70 
80 
100 


3>^ 
4 
5 
6 


36K 
375-4 
39 J4 
42 Ji 


183^ 

51H 
54?4 


8H 

9 
10 
11 


1 


8 
8 
8 
8 


H 


7 

7H 
«4 
9H 


m 

9H 
11.4 


54 
54 
6 

7 


3?4 

5 


7H 
7?'8 

8J/8 

8^ 


H 
% 
H 
H 


64 
64 

7 
8 


4Ji 
5 


H 
H 
H 


-7 

24 

24 
24 


H 

1 


120 
140 
166 

245 


140 
167 
190 
270 


8 

to 

12 


17 
50 li 


56 
59 
62 H 


13.4 

16 

19 


IH. 
IH 


8 
12 
12 


% 
1 
1 


17 


14 
164 

19S 


8 

9 

10 


5!i 
64 

-r 
i 


12 

13'S 


H 
1 
1 


9 

10 
11 


6*4 

74 

8 




3 
3 
3 


1 
1 

1 


350 
485 


385 
535 
720 



•All umbora drdiud wilh % andiOf boh holes 
Nole — ServiDE coauncEioD pad iff driUrd aud 



Un.«d when *p«ifiod only and .il «<" ccL >o di-ngr »ti duT«oaiOfl A. 



Page 3 



WEBSTER TYPE N EXPANSION JOINTS 




Fig. 6. Sin^Je Slip 



Fig. 7. Double Slip 



250 Lb, ptrr Sq, In. Maxiiiiunt Operating Pre^uri.' — 450'' F. Majiiiiium OiM-raling Teniperature 
Tahk III, EXTRA HEAVY SINGLE SKIP EXPANSION JOINTS-Dimmei^nn in Inchr» 





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K 


L 


M 


N 


B* 


V 








A 


E 


A 


E 


Diam- 


Thick- 


Number 


Boll 


4* 

Tr*v- 


8* 
Tniv- 












tier 


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»r llofr'a 


f-ircle 
















enc 


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23 H 


81^ 


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3 


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43 


43 


2 


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54 


58 


2'/2 


18=8 


t>i* 


2-1 '-8 


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•ih 


I 


8 


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5f-S 


7H 


5 


:»!^ 


fi'-ii 


H 


H 


»R 


76 


81 


3 


16H 


6H 


24H 


ai-i 


m 


ih 


8 


'A 


6H 


8!4 


3H 


4 


:i^ 


?4 


Vg 


.4 


100 


107 


3V4 


20 


6H 


26 


85.'R 


9 


IK. 


8 


H 


7!4 


9k 


6 


4W 
4k 


7H 


H 


^ 


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121 


130 


4 


2(1% 


JM 


265^ 


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IW 


8 


% 


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lOH 


6 


8H 


?< 


4 


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\\\ 


li^7 


S 


21 H 


i*A 


27 K 


yf-J 


u 


!*« 


8 


% 


«>'4 


11 


J 


5 


9 


''S 


'S 


M 


186 


2(»3 


6 


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■^H'A 


!iH 


11>J^ 


iHi 


12 


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12 H 


7(^ 


5!^ 


93< 


H 


H 


H 


S.'iO 


275 


8 


2\H 


7h 


301^ 


tH 


15 


IH 


12 


1 


13 


13J4 


9 


6H 


11^ 


1 


1 


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:tto 


370 


■n 


26J4 


Sk 


32 H 1014 


171^ 


Hi 


[6 


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1.1 '4 


18'^ 


10 


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1 


52j; 


565 


12 


-*'M 


tih 


33!^ loa^ 


20 rs 




16 


IM 


1T?< 


21 


II 


84 


lili 


m 


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I 


67n 


7.10 



*AII imi-liun dnll>^f whh I iirii hm- Ixill hoN^ «i/r H. 



Table IV. EXTRA HEAVY DOIBLE SLIP EXPANSION JOINTS-m.„«^n-i,m^ in in.hr« 





T^- 


T'B- 
































»IU 


Trm»- 

PfB« 


Triiv- 
■■■nc 

A 






D 




II 


h. 


L 


M 


N 





V 


R" 


s 


V 


^l>ll^■Jtllnl1if 
Wrtffhl 




A 


Uidfu- 


nikk- 


Niiirihr 


ii<>ti 


4- 


«' 








eUtr 


rii»AB 


ofKoitv 


Cjrrle 
























r<nia 


1% 


3515 


47!5 


6i; 


'*f« 


1 


% 


V4 


6H 


t'J 


3 


5^ 


^4 


5^2 


I 


^ll 


1^4 


H 


74 


- — 

78 


2 


35^^ 


17H 


61^ 


i^ 


8 


^ 


5 


6% 


4*i 


3 '4 


6 


^« 


5?i 


1W 


^^ 


Ui 


H 


93 


10'^ 


21/1 


16 ?4 


WH 


7H 


1 


ft 


^ 


sHi 


-!% 


5 


3H 


6J^ 


H 


6 


4U 


H 


*> 


i^ 


130 


i:itf 


3 


T.% 


19 Ji 


8i4 


i' = 


8 


'A 


6H 


m 


5!'^ 
6 


4 


TJ4 


H 


6J^ 


5 


% 


2 


H 


168 


185 


31/a 


ro 


.■i2 


9 


m 


8 


U 


7H 


9H 


1'. 


'H 


M 


- 


■>Vi 


H 


7 




205 


225 


t 


11 '4 


53 ^4 


!? 


\h 


ft 


A 


';'» 


lO^s 


6 


H4 


«!, 


H 


i 


^'li 


H 


?H 


240 


270 


6 


13 ' 1 
133i 


55 H 
57M 




1^ 


8 
12 


A 
H 




11 

12^ 


7^ 


S 
5H 


9 
9?i 




H 


6 
6^ 




2J4 


310 
425 


310 
470 


8 


48 H 


60H 


!5 


I?ii 


12 


I 


13 


15^4 


9 


6?i 


n>^ 


1 


10 


7^ 


I 


3 


1 


565 


6'7 


10 
12 




61"^* 
66J2 


17 4 

20^2 


H-% 


16 
J6 




I.H4 
ITK 


18! i 

21 


10 
11 


«!2 


13 




12 


9J^ 


1 

i!8 


3 
3 


I 
1 


880 
IIUO 


9f»0 
1220 



'Ml i>iif Knrs itrill<-.| ^iih i jmdior U4t hitlrt «ac W. 




WARREN WEBSTER & COMFAN 



Fa^r 1 



ram No. C«IIA. •.■■(« ^rialtrf » r H * 





WEBSTER TYPE C 




EXPANSION 


JOINTS 


Crossliead Guided - 


- Cast 


Iron 




) 





SpLH'ilR'aliniis calling fur bolh inlernaUy ttnJ ex- 
ternally guided, cast iron juinls are iiiel by Ihe 
\\rl)sler Type C KxpaEisicKi Joints. SlaiKiard 
weitrht models are provided I'ur inaxiinuni oper- 
alini; sleaiii pressures up to 125 Ih. per sq. iu. 
Kxtra heavy models are provided for niaximutn 
operaliiif; sleani pressures up lo 2S0 lbs, per sf|- 
in. The maximuTu operalirij: (emperalurp tnr bolh 
staiKlard and e\lra lieavy weight nuHlels is 150 
degrees F., roiiforming to ihe A.S.M.Il Boiler 
(.-(>de. 

Appliculion 

1*hc fundaTueulal purpose oT all Webster Ex- 
pansion Joints is. of course H lo take up linear ex- 
pansion of pi[>e lines caused by teinperaUire 
cbange. The Type C Joint is designed fur uni- 
versal service >el gives unusual accuracy ulalign- 
inenl because uf the Iwo-puint guidirig, Tliese 
joints serve e<inally well in pipe lines carrying hot 
oil, hot gas, steam ur hot waler. 

Dc^sign Features 

The external guiding feature is a machined cross- 
head which has tuur contact surfaces with the 
flange of the slip tube. Type C Joints inclnde 
stops which limit travel in both directions and 




liud with Inli^KOil 

rtitin- lrH*rni»-, 



prevent the slip lube from separating from the 
bod>, liUernal gnidii]g is obtained by lour long 
spiral guides which keep in contaci with the slip 
lube throughout the entire traverse. All sizes have 
lieavy unchurscast integral with the body. 

Packing spare is large and provided with plugged 
opeTiiiiKs into which a pressure fitting can later be 
inserled if Webster Packing Lubricant is to be 
used. These littings are nut standard equipment. 
Packing glands are easily adjustable by drawing 
np Ihe nuts of the gland bolls. All joints are pro- 
vided with a plugged drain opening. 

Pads for service connectiuiis are pnivided on all 
double slip joinlsH These pads are drilled and 
tapped only on special order and at extra cosU 

The purchaser of Type C Joints is assured the 
same high quality as other Webster blquipment 

resulting fn.im Ihe use of good material, accurate 
wurkmaiiship, aud careful iaspectioii. 

Materials of Construction 

Bodies, crossheads, and packing glands arc cast 
iron which is Ihc b<'st obtainable and full> meets 
specifications for ■"semi-alecl. " Sliindard slip lubes 



Bullelin B-llOlB Expansion Joints 



ev THE MAKERS OF 



Copyritflil 1912 by Warrc^n Wcbatcr A Cd, 




HEATING SYSTEMS 



:<*s=>c 



WEBSTER TYPE C EXPANSION JOINTS 




■■■MlHtL'B"" 



nre of sU-A. atrurntcly turrif^l. iiriislit^ sitiouUi, nnd 
heavily luirdKhnini-- plalf^. Brass slip Uibes rjui b*- 
I'urnishfrd cm sprc'inl ord^T. Klaii^t'S an- vnsi iron, (iland 
hnllN Mf sUtA. \\ ibstrr Sliindard I'arkiii'r is furnislicd 
Mjilablt- for steam and Wiitrr at pn-ssiin-s slalrd. 
SptTial packing ran bt* provided at rxlra rosl. 

Typical Specifiralion?* 

Hxpaiision joints sliall be designed for a maximum 

working pressure of lb. per sq. in. Bodies shall 

be rasl iron and sliall include an inte^al anrliur of 
ample ^tren^th. Slip lul>es shall be sleel. smoothly 
linished, and heavily hard-rhrome plated. Joinls shall 
be fully guided for the full length of traverse by a 
machined external crosshead iriiide and by extra lonp 
internal guides cast in a helical form integral with 
the body of the joiutn Packintr shall be installed at 
the factory and suitable for sleara (oilj (gas) (wat€r), 
maximum working pressure nf . . , lb. per srj. in. and a 
maximum temperature of . . . degrees Falirenheil- Limit 
stops shall be provided to prevent excessive travel of 
the joint. 

Joints shall be of the single or double l\ pe as called for 
on the plans and designed for a maximum traverse 
of either 4 mches or 8 inches per slip. 



All joints shall be flanged. 

Joints shall be Webster Type C Crosshead Huided or 
equal and dimensions shall accord with those m Web- 
ster Bulletin B-UOIA. 

Guarantee 

We guarantee Webster KKpansi<*n Joints against de- 
fects in workmanship and material for a period of one 
year from date of shipment fnun our factory but this 
guarantee will be limite*i to furnishing new parts iu 
exchange for any that may prove defective within 
such period, F.O.B. factory, provided the ii»staltation 
has l>een made and the joints used in ttcc^)rdance with 
our Service Details and instructions. The guarantee 
does not include liability for installalion ri>sts or con- 
tingencies of any character. 



i 



Si>e<:ifv STANDARD aiul Coni^ervc Time 
and MatcriaU 

Tin* sizes u\ai!ablc and materials utmhI for 
slundard Webster Tvpe (' Kxpansioti Joints a?« 
describ^'d in this catalog ha\e b»"cn w^h'i'ted for 
uni^ersiil ser\ ice. \\<^ ask that sou a\oid spit'Hi- 
cations departing from these slandiirds and incoi- 
|M}raling special or non-»tanilard retpiirements, 
Bv sf> doing ><tu will assist in conscrvint: inatiTial 
and machine lime: permit (|uickcT deliveries at 
lower cost. Il<iwe\er, where the propoM-d use 
of the expansi<in joint makes absolutely mvessary 
materials and sizes other than our standard, 
write iJS >our reipiiremenls. We will then tell you 
if \\e can make joints to meet t)icm. 





Inquiries and Quotations 

Inquiries for further informatiorf an Wel>ster Kxpansion 
Jcant^ and Webster Steam Mealing r>[uipment may be 
addressed to the Company at ("anulen. New Jersey, 
or to the nearest Sales Bepre^utative. Loo4i 
for Warren Wkbsteb & Company in your 
local telephone book or wTite us at ('amden. 
New Jersey, for his address. (>uo1aliiftnH will 
be made promptly b> our Bepre&enlatives- 

Olher Webster I'rodnctfi 

We are manufacturers of Webster Process 
Steam Traps and Strainers (150 lb, maxi- 
mum pressure), fhe Welwler \I*^Klerat<ir 
aiul H>lo Steam Heating t_lontrols. and 
Webster Systems l->iuipmenl including radi- 
ator supply valves, radiator traps, drip 
traps, dirt strainersn boiler return traps, vent 
Irap^. boiler protectors, light-weight Ci>n- 
vector radiators, etc. We are also exdusivf 
national distributors of WebsterAesbitl Tnil 
Healers, ^ our inquiries a!>oul tliPse product? 
are solicited. 



Page 2 



WEBSTER TYPE 




EXPANSION JOINTS 







Fig. 4. Smdle Sli,, 




Fig. 5. Double Slip 



125 Lb. per Sq. In. MaAii.mm Ooeralm,, P 

"Peraiing Pressure— 150 " F \U-,;„„. r> 

- rviax.mum Operating Tcmpcratury. 



Table I. STAMMKIJ SINGIX SUP K\ 



-VPANSION JOINTS-Oi 



riii^n*4ion» in liirltes 







>• 



S» 



T-4- 
Tmv- 






Table II, 



Trav. 



H '4 
I7M 



■WJi 


18 »< 


37Ji 


W'^ 


ith 


51?^ 


i2ii 


54 ?< 


M 


56 


17 


59 


30!i 62M 



STANIURi) DOl KKE SLIP EXP\.\SION lOINT^^n - . 



DiaiD' 
cler 



ThkL- 



6 

7 
TJ^2 



9 
11 






13 ^i 

16 
19 



1 






lis 



u 



of ll<li(4 



1^ 

H 
H 
H 



12 
\1 



H 



H 



BolT 



G 



3!4 

3^« 

6 



8H 
9H 



7H 
8 



17 



\2% 
12H 



17H 
20 Ji 
21 



K 



■i.;.i 

5 



515 

6 

7 



8 
9 

10 



2'A 

3 
3 

3}4 



3Ji 

4 

5 



5?i 



'Alluii.lii.r. dhlW wiih I 



M 



5?., 



7J-8 

8?i 



12 



N 



J4 

I 



5b 






'A 







5 
5 

6 



9 

10 

n 



6!^ 


4?i 


OJ^ 


iH 


1 


5 


8 


6 



3K 
4 



6?i 
7H 






dimcudoa A. 






'A 
H 
H 
14 



H 
1 



I 

iM 



2 

2H 
2Si 
2!^ 






K 



A|tj>n»kiiiij)ii* 



4' 

Trav- 



71 

a? 

136 
J 70 



Trav- 
Drao 



202 
235 
215 
420 



80 

97 

120 

155 

200 



595 

7T0 

10^0 



'220 
255 
270 
460 



645 

835 

1190 



Page 3 



-f'*^*^ 



* 



VEBSTER TYPE C EXPANSION JOINTS 




Ttg. b. Single Slip 



Fif. 7. Duubk Slip 



250 IJj, per Sq, In. \faximun) Opr-mtin^ Prnvwrr — i50' F. Maximum <)|irrstiiig Trfiiprraturr. 
Tablr III. HXTRA IIKW^ SINGLE SLIP FAPANSION JOINTS-Dim.-n«.m. in Inrhr. 



*• 






k 


B 


3 

VA 
4 
5 
6 


r- 

20 


6» 

ft' 



6 2l>i 
II 2TH 




Sn I 'i^''% 



.'9 
■ , 10 

9'. I2lj 






1 e 
2 






;^ 



12 
16 
16 



VI 









1^ ^ 



\ 



>i 



- ; 


1-'. 


6 


> 


1.1'. 


6 


'>■-, 


11'. 


7 


lOn 


16^4 


7,4 


n 


l»H 


9 


ISli 


s*i. 


10 


i:K 


2SS 


II 



I'i 

5 



6J, 



1 ''*! 




' T.. 




81. 
9 




o'r 


1 



ll'4 

13 

lis 



I 



1 




A 


, * 




n 


1 


9i 


1 


I 


IS 


1 



lui 
126 



2S0 

12' 



Hl'> 

7n 



>nU^-S*T**«v T^tfiifci i t ki M aA4 svailiililr villi mtt^ ilv jotaU. 



Tr*-. 



108 
110 
I TO 

■1 'I 

f>lo 

RIO 



Table IW EXTRA HEAVY I>Ol RLE SUP EXPANSION JOrNTS-nimrn.-on- in Inrbr* 



T-4' 




A 


A 







•ud8i»r 

of Ilf>l4 





















» .- . — ,1, 














1 






< 


c 


k 


L 


M 


H 


O 


p n- 

1 


8 


V 





2 

2>yl -r. ^ iu ^ ^ \ 

S I 37H I 49M I Sfi I IS 



41 



10 






*5H ; s:Ji I 12ij lii I 12 



1 • - "J ' . 

5 »»i 

-.-, II'. 

h-. I.' 

■ . '-'. 

: p. Its 



1 1., 

#1 



.1 

I 

» 4 



'>S 



fl»4 
4* 



v. 



'4 



6 1» . 



I I 

I ' 

'\ 

■I 



■*s 

6 




frS 




- 1 


1 
1 
1 1 , 



131 


ML 


\<*'. 


iNr> 


: v* 


:>'" 


JSK* 


i:<fc 


ir. 


tH'> 


ijo 


tr» 


r.<' 


'.(HI 


610 


h:yi* 



97S I in-h 
T2W1 \i2l' 




CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



rmwm H^ C^UB. 11^, ftkt JH, Fti»ta4 ta tJ. ft. A 




BULLETIN 40D 



The Dorling VC Pump 1% de- 
tigned and built for long 
service under the exacting 
conditioni required for re* 
turning condensate from 
heating systems and process 
steam equipment to boiler or 
hot well. The Receiver may 
be instolled on the floor or in 
a pit for returns from above 
or below the floor level, A 
vduci off over 60 yeaT%* 
p*rience in pump design 
and manufacture by Darling 
Brothers Limited. 






IMPROVED 



Automatic Electric 
VERTICAL CONDENSATION 

RETURN PUMP 



* Within its range of capacities ^ the Darling VC 
pump, engineered for the |ob, offers nev/ design 
features for economy and long life. 

^ Unusually high efficiencies are obtoined with 
reduced motor sizes and operating costs. 

A Designed to prevent vopor binding ond to handle 
condensation at high temperatures. 

"At a nev/ and improved type of enclosed impeller 
increases efficiency. 

"k Efficient hydraulic and mechanical baton ce con- 
tributes to high performance stondords. 

^ New submerged shaft bearing, self-lubricating, non- 
metallic type for high temperature condensate 
service. 



flarling Brothers limited 



140 PRINCE ST. 



Srnca 7855 



MONTREAL 



Molifax • Saint John < Quebec - Arvida * Ottawa - Toronto 
Timmins ■ Winnipeg - Calgary • Voncouver • St. John's, NHd. 



^gaIl 





Russedly Built 

Yet Easily 

Dismounted 



Improved 
Pump Unit 



Heavy Steel 

Receiver 



Thermal 
Protection 



AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC VERTICAL 
4^(^ CONDENSATION RETURN PUMP 



Heavily constructed to withstand sustained service demands, the DoHing VC Pump 
consists of Q vertical centrifugal pump suspended by o heavy column from a cast 
iron base on which a verticol electric motor is mounted. The base forms the cover 
of the cylindrical Receiver. To facilitate dismounting and reassembly, the pump is 
constructed independently of the Receiver so that it can be lifted out simply by 
disconnecting the piping and electrical connections. The pump end motor components 
are located in position by machined spigots. Correct alignment is thus ossured 
on reassembly- 



The submerged Centrifugal pump is fitted with on improved design of bronze en- 
closed type impeller for increased efficiency. The impeller is secured by Key ond 
Bronze locknut to topered stainless steel shaft, polished to a mirror finish. The shoft 
is supported at the submerged end by a recently developed self-lubricating non- 
metallic bearing capable of operating at high condensate temperatures, with longer 
pump life and reduced maintenance, 



The Receiver is of welded steel construction, with reinforced openings for pipe con- 
nections. A condensing seal prevents the escape of vapor at the cover. Piping con- 
nections belween pump and receiver cover and electric wiring connections between 
the outomatic float switch, thermal protection unit and motor, are built into Ibe unit_ 



The Darling VC Pump is powered with standard makes of verticol motors mounted 
on a combination bearing housing and motor support. Single phase motors ore of 
the repulsion induction type; polyphase motors are of squirrel cage design, whi(e 
shunt type motors con be supplied for direct current. All types are equipped with 
self-lubricating ball bearings and provided with thermal protection. 




Automatic 
Control 




Tested Under 
Operating 
Conditions 




Warranty 



A quick make and break heavy duty butt contact switch mounted above the Receiver 
cover is actuated by a heavy gouge seamless copper float in the Receiver and 
a rod equipped with adjustable stops for changes in start and stop woter levels, 
which can be quickly mode. 



Thorough tests on all pump units monufactured by Dorling ore mode for copocities, 
pressures ond horsepower. Electric current of commercial frequencies and voltages 
is ovoilable ot oil times to the Testing Department so thot pumps moy be driven 
by their own motors, ensuring careful tests and inspection during actual operation. 



All goods supplied by Darling Brothers Limited are subject to a guorontee, which is 
limited to furnishing f.o.b. our works such ports as prove defective in materiol and 
workmonship within one year from dote of shipment. 



TYPICAL SPECIFICATION FORM FOR DARLING TYPE VC 

CONDENSATION RETURN UNITS 




Furnish and install where indicated on plans 
Type VC Darling Automatic Electric Ver^ 
tical Condensation Return Pump and Receiver, for 
returning condensate to hot well or boiler. Pump to 
have a capacity of U.S. gallons per 

minute against a pressure of pounds per 

square inch at pump discharge. Receiver to be 
in diameter by in height. 

The unit shall consist of o steel receiver and a 
single suction verticol centrifugal pump, suspended 
by a column from the receiver cover. A vertical 
electric motor shall be mounted on a stool cost 
integrally with the cover, together with the motor 
control unit and thermal protective device. Pump 
to be furnished with bronze enclosed impeller 
secured by bronze locknut on keyed and tapered 
end of stainless steel shaft. Submerged shaft 
bearing to be of the non-metallic self-lubricoting 
type for high temperature Condensate service. 
All parts of the pump are to be positively located 
in position by spigots and shoulders. 



PARTS LIST 



1 —Float Switch. 

2— Float Switch Stand. 

3 — Limit Stops. 

4— Float Rod. 

5_Float Rod Guide and 
Condensing Seal 

6'Oischarge Pipe. 

7_Coupling Key. 

S^GIand. 

9— Base and Receiver 
Cover. 

10— Gosket for Receiver. 

II^Receiver. 

12— Impeller. 

13 — Float, 



14_Shaft Nut. 

15 — Pump Cover. 

16— Impeller Key. 

17— Pump Casing. 

18 — Non-metallic 

Pump Bushing 

19— Tie Rods. 

20— Pipe Column. 

21— Stuffing Box. 

22— Stainless Steel 
Pump Shaft. 

23 — Dog Pointed Set 
Screws. 

24_Sheift Coupling. 
25— Motor. 



Motor to be H.P. R.P.M. Phase 

Cycle Volt, continuous rating. The automatic 

control to be a totally enclosed heavy duty butt 
contact float switch actuated by on extra heavy 
seamless copper float and a rod equipped with 
adjustable stops for changes in start and stop 
water levels. 

All piping connections between pump and receiver 
cover and electric wiring connections between the 
outomotic float switch, thermal protection unit and 
motor, shall be supplied and installed on the pump 
by Darling Brothers Limited. 



t 





^'ysEsr 




JJa^vivL^flanc 



Pumps for 
Every Purpose 

For ttiftil nrnt tnarirtp 
fifriivi' tt-^ tlt^niiin ttriii 
tnttnu/aflurfi Si ngl^ 
ami Ihiplex Httrizttntal 
ami I tfrticat Stenin 
Piimpj' fur ffiJi/fT Feed. 
I nvuuttt attti Tank Ser- 
vice: aha Single and 
MiiUliktnite Cvntrijugal 
I'laniitnjor Horuienj^nti^, 
iSilgr, Sump, Seua^e^ 
Cimitatinfi, I acuuni 
anil /'forr-ifl tmrk. 

DISCRIPTIVE LITltATUaC 
ON tEQUEST 



ZuG/li4^4^UZ PUMPS 




for /ong L/fe and Service 


( 


%je W 




Vertical Condensation 




Return Pumps 




DIMENSIONS. CAPACITIES* RATINGS 




CAPACITY 


1 Di- i 


'm LVCLIJ. — ITrflj U.l'.M, 


'2J CYrLE:^— M.VJ ILl'M. 




DiQicn- 

«on 




rs. 

.Si| Fi 1 Gill*. 
E D il pi'i 


rharfET 
Pres- 

1 Lbr. 


Symbd 


Motor 
H.T. 


RECEn^R 


Ship- 
ping 


Motor 
H.F. 


UECE1VKR 




8iH 

diariEP 
Ilia, 


Inkl 
fru 




I^am. 


HtiEhi 


l^ain. 


Hpj«ht 




Mm. 


1 « ^'f 






Ib» 


Ins 


Lbs. 




Infl. 


iMii. 


LU, 












Sij In 






"A" 


"B" 






"A'' 1 ..^.^ 


f 
1 








15 1 J-V-IJi 


is 


IS 


IS 
IS 


300 
300 


15 


18 IB 


:f20 
320 


I 


2 

Z 


3^ 




4,000 1 G 


20 


i-\'-ao 


*» 


18 


16 


320 


4 


IS 


IS 


840 


1 


2 


3U 




i 


25 


■i-\'-a3 


H 


IS 


IS 


360 


h 


26 


IB 


300 


1 


3 


3H 








30 
10 


4-V-30 




IS 
IS 


18 
18 


410 
300 


\ 


2ii 


IS 
IS 


450 
320 


1 
1 


2 
2 


3i^ 






fi-VOO 


^ 


IS 








U. 


'i-V^lfi 


ii 


IB 


18 


300 


18 


18 


320 


1 


2 


3H 




fi.OOO 





2U 


tf-V-20 


IS 


IS 


320 


i* 


IS 


16 


340 


1 


2 


3Lk 








25 


tt-V-^25 


^ 


IS 


18 


zm 


H 


26 


18 


3M 


1 


3 


3li, 








10 


O-V-30 




IS 
20 


IB 
24 


410 
3 to 


1 


2fl 


IS 
24 


450 
330 


1 
1 


2 
2 


3H 

3W 


1 




8-V-10 


H 


20 


1 




15 


8-V-I5 


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30 
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P. 




L«rc*r Sim A»il.bl* 'Wh«*i orderinc tUt. el«ctric currtnt »»(Ubl>, 




Tkirline Rr others limited^ 




Head Office and Plants 




MONTREAL 




Frlnlvd Ln Conod«-Cl-ftF-l949 


1 


[S/nce 7888^^^B 





^':t '" i"- 7^r* ' ;'*'*w^ ' 





CLASS "D" 



END SUCTION 



CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 




DARLING 



PUMPS 




:? 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT -^ 

Pumps of every type and capacity toke shape on rhese draughring 
boards Skilled droughJimen design equipment to suit the individual 
requirements oi every client. New modificotions ore under constant 
review, and continuous rmprovement h the byword. 



PATTERN SHOP ^A 

Experience gained by over sixty years of pattern making gives 
this deportment a "know how" unique '\n »he business. Constont 
high standofdi are moinlained by men who know potterns 
thoroughly. Fiom these intricate patterns come the fine castings 
from which famous Darling pur»ips ore made. 




-atftSra^ 




C60CC/S 



« 



'^ 



'at 

4j 



^„v (fiuavantee 






IP- 

IS* 






C3 

0*. 

.■«■ 






:??n'TnoUV. 



If 



FOUNDRY 

More Ihon molten metals are poured into the 
moulds if> our foundry. High grade materioU, 
long yeO's of experiencen pride ond coftsmon- 
ship ore some of the ingredients which flow from 
the cupola in(o these fine costings; rugg 
enough to totte the kind of wear Darling purr 



rom 
cupoia inio rnese nne cosTmgs; rugged 

igh to totte the kind of wear Darling pumps 

ore fomous for. 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 




U M P S 



i 



PUMP ASSEMBLY 
Heie skilled filters assemble the componenr 
parts o# every pump. One of ouf most 
modern deporrments, pump o^iembly tokei 
great pride and core Jn thi& important 
opefotion^ the lost step before the com- 
plete pump h tested for ihipment. 




MACHINE SHOP 

A prime factor m the envioble repulotion of DorlTfig pumps is the 
corisumote skill of fhe master craftsmen in ou' mocNne shop- 
Modern mochine tooK enable these machiniits to turn out consistent 
high quality workmanship. Par» of the secret of this consislency is 
'he infmUe zarc token in every Operation, one of the reosons why 
Ihe famous Doriing ingot stomp of quality stands m such high esteem. 



TESTING DEPARTMENT 

Every pump manufactured by Darling Brothers is pu' through it* 
paces in the testing deportment. Rigorous pressure ond running 
tests to simulate field conditions ore conducted here. Only one 
standard is occepted in this department efficient operolion 
only then ore the pumps shipped corrylng the seal of approval, 
tHe famous Dorling ingot stomp, denoting 'op performonce under 
the most exocting condirions. 




DARLING BROTHERS I IM I T E D - MONTREAl 



PUMPS 




D A 



PUMPS 




2 3 



M 



Process Pumps 

Conadci & Dofrxnion Sugar Co, Distillery 

Mon»reol, Que, 



Condensofe Pumps 

Northern Electric Co., Wire & Coble 

PJont, ViMe St, Pierre, Que, 



^'jll Pumps 

Car^odo & Dominion Sugar Co. Distillery 

Montreal, Que. 



Boiler Feed Pk;mp & BfJne Heater Pump$ 
Canado Cold Storage Co., Ltd., 
Montreal, Que, 



Cold Water Supply Pump^ on Boiler Feed Service 
Northern Electric Cos, New Wife & Coble Plartl 
Ville St, Pierre, Que. 



Circuloting Pump 
Y.M,H.A. Swimming Pool 
Montreal, Que. 



8 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED - MONTREAL 



■^.^v-C'iS 



•™'» 



DARLING 




P S 



-515- 

DRAIN PLUG 

(DRIP PAN) 

-516- 
[— OIL GAUGE CUP 

-517- 

CAP SCREW W.5. 

{BRG. COVER) 

_ -503- 
BEARING 
COVER 



-524- 

GASKET - NOT SHOV^N 

(BRG. COVER) 

-518- 
|— VENT PLUG 

-502- 
STAND 



-513- 

GASKET 

(CASING) 

-519- 
,— STUDS & NUTS 
(CASING) 

-520- 

AIR COCK 

-501 - 
CASING 



~: 




PUMF 
SERIAL I 



- 507A - 

BALL BEARING 

(INBOARD) 



-510- 
- SHAFT 

-507- 
l_ BALL BEARING 
(OUTBOARD) 

-508- 
OIL SLINGER 
(OUTBOARD) 



-506- 
(GLAND) 



-509- 
Vv^ATER SLINGER 



- 508A - 

OIL SLINGER 

(INBOARD) 



-521 - 

DRAIN PLUC 

(CASING) 



-522- 

IMPELLER 

KEYS 



-505- 
l_ IMPELLER 
NUT 

-514- 

STUFFING BOX 

PACKING 



-523- 

BOLTS & NUTS 

(GLAND) 



Darling Class "D" Centrifugal Pump 



i 



I 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



D A R L I 




U M P S 



« 




STEAM TURBINE DRIVE 



^ 





AIR COOLED 
GASOLINE ENGINE 
DRIVE 



2 STAGE PUMP 
MOTOR DRIVE 



m 





V BELT DRIVE 

SEPARATE BASES 

WITH DARLING 

VIBRATION DAMPERS 



GASOLINE ENGINE DRIVE 
HIGH CAPACITY PUMP 



VERTICAL MARINE TYPE 
MOTOR DRIVE 




DARLING BROTHER 




MITED - MONTREAL 



■ .;'';^,^^p.^ 



D A R I ^ 



PUMPS 



Impeller is of the efficient 
closed design toper bored 
for easy removal from 
shaft. 

Pump Casing with Top 
Horizontal Discharge pre- 
vents vapour binding. 



Hydraulicolly balanced Im- 
peller reduces load on bear- 
ings and pressure on packing. 



Casing Bearing eliminated, 
removing weakness of end 
suction pumps. 



Pump parts positively located 
In position by spigots and 
shoulders. 



Large diometer shaft insures 
smooth operation ond reduced 
wear. 



Oversize boll bearings mounted 
on widely spaced centers carry 
radial and thrust loads. 




Ball bearings running in oil both 
require minimum attention. 



Impeller driven by key 
and secured in position 
on shaft by capnut. 



Casing Secured to Frame by 
Studs ond Nuts- 



Base with three point mountinc 
prevents distortion of frame. 



TYPICAL SECTION OF 
STANDARD CLASS D PUMP 



DARLING BROTHERS I I M I T E D • M N T R E A L 



m 



1 

I 

i 



tm 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION CLASS "D" PUMP 



CASING: Close Groined Cast Iron, hydrostafically 
tested, and studded for connection to frome 



FRAME: Cast Iron, rigrd box type with three point ba 
mounting to prevent distortion. 



se 



PACKING: Six rings of the best quality graphite 
lubricated asbestos pocking, 

STUFFING BOX: Extra deep, cost integrot witti frame, 

GLAND: Cast Bronze, bolted type with ample room for 
repacking. 

MECHANJCAl SEALS: Mechanical Shaft seols can 
be supplied as an alternative. 



STANDARD BALL BEARING PUMP 
TYPJCAL ENGINEERS SPECIFICATION FOR 
DIRECT CONNECTED UNITS 



IMPELLER: bronzed closed type with topered bore and 
keywoy. Balancing hub and holes to keep 
impeller in hydraulic balance. Woter passages 

file-finished. 

SHAFT: Polished Steel, extra large diameter to pievent 
vibration, tapered to mount impeller. 

SHAFT NUT: Bronze, cap type to protect shaft threads. 
(Shouldered to tofce end thrust). 

BEARINGS: Deep Groove Ball type running in oil bath, 

COUPLING: Cast Iron, Pin and Rubber Bush type. 

KEYS: Fitted, without setscrews. 

GASKETS: HydroL 



STANDARD BALL BEARING PUMP 
TYPICAL ENGINEERS SPECIFICATION FOR 
V BELTED UNITS 



t 



M 



Furnish and instoll where indicated on plans Class 

D DARLING Horizontal End Suction Boll Bearing 

Centrifugal Pump having a capacity of (Imperial) 

(U,S.) gollons per minute against o totol head 
of feet from qU causes including Moximum Suction 

Lift of feet. 

Pump to be driven ttirough o cost iron coupling of the 
Pin and Rubber Bush type by o H.P„ 

Phase, Cycle, Volt, Rev,, 40^^ rise 

motor. 

The pump is to be equipped with a bronze enclosed 
impeller secured by a bronze cap nut on overhung end 
of threaded, keyed and topered shoft wtiich runs in 
Two oil lubricated deep groove ball bearings so arranged 
thot the liquid being pumped does not comt in contocf 
with the beorings. All parts of the pump to be positively 
located in position by spigots and shoulders. Pomp and 
motor to be mounted on cost iron baseplate. 



Furnish ond install where indicated on plons 
Class D DARLING Horizontol End Suction Ball 

Bearing Centrifugal Pump having a capacity of 
(Imperiol) |U,S. ) gallons per minute ogainst a 

total head of feet from all causes including o 

Maximum Suction Lift of feet. To prevent noise 

from unit being carried through building, the pump and 
motor ore to be mounted on heavy separate cost iron 
bases equipped with DARLING Vibration Dampers. The 
pump is to be run ot Revs, being driven through 

Q multi '^V" Belt Drive by o H.P. Phase, 

, Cyle, Volt, Revs Motor 

The pump is to be equipped with a bronze enclosed 
impeller secured by a bronze cop nut on overhung end 
of threaded, keyed and topered shaft wtiich runs in 
two oil lubricated deep groove boll bearings so arranged 
that the liquid being pumped does not come in contoct 
with the bearings. All ports of the pump to be positively 
located in position by spigots and shoulders. 



ING BROTHERS LIMITED - MONTREAL 



DARLING 



PUMPS 



AXrALLY ADJUSTABLE IMPELLER 
L" SPECIAL FEATURE 




m 



WATER SEAL RING 
"W" SPECIAL FEATURES 



, 




^"^ 




. 


1 ^ 










'T 


^ i', _„a^^^t«si^— ^^^^— 








Tl 


1 V, 




b. 


J 11 



OPEN IMPELLER 
TYPE "O" 




ZD- 



SHAFT SLEEVE 
'S" SPECIAL FEATURE 




CASING & IMPELLER WEARING RINGS 
"C & T- SPECIAL FEATURES 





CASING WEARING RINGS 
"C" SPECIAL FEATURE 




] 



X CRANE SEAL RING— DOUB 
F" SPECIAL FEATURE 




DARLING BROTHERS IIMITED - MONTREAl 



tm 



I 



DARLING 



DEEP GtAND SPACER 
"A" SPECIAL FEATURE 



PUMPS 




DEEP GLAND FRAME 
Z" SPECIAL FEATURE 



10 




1^ 



JACKETTEO GLAND 
E" SPECIAL FEATURE 




WATER COOLED BEARING 
"Q" SPECIAI FEATURE 




J. CRANE SEAL RING— SINGLE 
•G' SPECIAL FEATURE 




TWO STAGE PUMP 
CLASS D 




JACKETTED SPACER 
D" SPECIAL FEATURE 




SANITARY PUMP 
"N" SPECfAL FEATURE 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED - MONTREAL 



I 



11 



DARLING 



PUMPS 



I \mitm 




SPECIAL CLASS "D" PUMPS 



i 



DARLING Class D Vertkol Dry PU pjmps with LU features con be 
supplied with flexible *hott drive for ^'Sewoge^' or "Prewure" 
sefvice. Additional fealurei shown on Poget 9 ond 10 con be 
incorporoted. The use o* o flexible shaft decreases inslalloDon costs, 
and olso e(iminates troubtes due to misolignmenf- By the use of infer- 
mediote shofis ond beorings, deep pit installations are procticoble. 
The revoking element of the pump con be easily removed for 
inspection. 



DARLING Class D Verticol Direct Connected Motor 
Driven Pumps with VLJ Speciol Feolufes can be used 
in festricled spoces such os ore met with in Mcrine 
work. 

The Base Casting con be mode with one or more 
suction connections, which in some initollotions, would 
elimino'e manifolds- Other feotures illustroled on 
Pages 9 and 10 con be incorporoted in Ibis design^ 




DARLING BR 



LIMITED 




DARLING 



i« 



PUMPS 



12 



tm 




for hondlmg fibro^ys stock we hove developed o spedol Clo« D Pump with "l" 
Special Feature in which rhe pgmp impeller h adjustable aiially to permit 
setting impeller cteorance to suit. 

The thrust bearing h mode with a smalt axJol cleoronce to per nil impeller to bock 
off agoinsl hydraulic !hr-jst should ony fibre* gel between impeNer ond coding. 

By removing flexible shaft ond unbolling fromc from bote ond casing, the 
whole rototing element con be femoved from cosing wilhoLff disturbmg pipe 
connections. As the hydraulic bafondng device hos been eliminoted, on overvize 
thrust bearing is u&ed. 



^ ^ 




For use in locolions where cKtreme quietness of opciolion is desired 
we have developed Ibe Closs D Pump with sleeve bearings and 
Mechanical Shaft Seal. This pump is designed to be used with o "V" 
Belt drive os specified on Page 8. 



Dorling Class D 2-Stoge Centfifugot Pumps ore designed to work 
agoinsi pressures up to 200 pounds per square inch. 
With VU Feotures as illustrated they occupy small floor orea, ond are 
suitable for use where spoce h reitficted, as in Marine practice. 





DARLING BROTHERS IIMITED - MONTREAl 



13 



DARLING 




U M P S 



HEAD IN FEET 



WD 



10 



15 



20 



25 



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DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



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DARLING 



PUMPS 



14 



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300 


350 


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250 


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HP, of Moror 


300 




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B*t 10 


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DfK 40 








CONVERSIONS: 
1 U.S. GAL' ,833 IMP GAL 
1 IMP, GAL, ^1-2 U-S- GAIS, 


400 


I r)o 


OK If 


frMTC JO 


Oi»'C ?5 

01 *t >-i 


awt jj 




D-f< 31 


DH»( 40 


Qf'C 40 


DiU'C 40 


( DMre 40 


4 [M4fC 90 


4 OtafC 1& 


450 




0«'C JO 
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4W*C IJ 
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DdPC 1) 






0*FC »D 


f^rc to 


O^-C ID 


tPPBt JD 


DM'C 30 


DHPC flO 


1 llTfH^.?642 US. GALS, 


500 




OH«f JO 

04>*C J1 


or-c 31 


0»K J) 
Dire J> 


ttwrC ID 








DiVC 30 


D«'C to 


pJ4fC 30 


OMfC 40 


DM*C eo 


1 U.S- GAL- -3785 LITERS 


600 


■ >» 














M-K 34 
&»« SO 


burc 3D 


ftiKPC *D 


Diwrc H 


OMPC DO 


4PH*C /J 


1 METER ^3,28 fEET 


700 


'10 


ftM>C ja 




»*>*( 10 

DM'C '0 


EMtC JO 
Ojw'C '0 


OKix: 4b 


0«PC 10 


0*'C SO 


4i-»C fO 


ftPk-K to 


PirtK 75 


PM'C 'i 


eP4fC '9 


1 FOOT -.3048 METERS 
* GAL -GALLON 


800 


1 lU 

rao 




om;c <n 








>JC Id 


DMic eo 


DHIC TJ 


DHIC 71 








NOTE. WE RESERVE RIGHT TO 


1000 


1S« 






4««( ■« 


PMK ^fr 


OHlt *0 


DHK *0 


D*ac '1 


ante Ji 




I 






CHANCE SIZE OF PUMP O* 
MOTOR. 


1250 


■10 1 


OicC 10 > 


0-'^ » 


«>4lC 'if 


dMl£ »S 


bHK '1 


CmK /I 


DPiJic mo 




















DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED - MONTREAL 



IS 




LING 



PUMPS 



TABLE No. 1 



tL:Ai 




4 - Wot e J 





*■ 


^ 








l™<r^ 


rr>NA\ 


J 




ff^ 


'^"j)] 




M 


£ 


Vt^ 


^^ 


o 


# 


' //. 


^fi-- 



i 



-Sjf H - ^ * L'd«f 4 cir f 4* O 



n^E CONNECTLOr^^ 



DixhoTf* , Stfction 



14' 



!;■; 






Is 

So 

- 1 
3 



C CLO&EO IMf. 



Claii 



*,■ D*AC ' ill' 
\- DACC 3»,' 

^' DATC 4',' 



rowwc 3'.' 

I' DAWC , 3'." 

I'OAAC 4Vf 

I' OACC 5V[ 

I ■ D*YC I 6 V 



5' 

7»,' 

S' 

J" 



,o*cc , sv, 



■ »,' as- 

8'.- 7 1' 

ft '.'I iU' 



'»- DAVC 

I .' CiWWC 
' .- D*WC 

► ' D4AC 
' ' WAC 

► ■ DACC 
' ,' DATC 



3V 









8',' 3'.' 
9".- 3'.- 
B^-, 3",- 



3' DWWC 
J' DAWC 
r DAAC 
J' DIAC 
I- CUCC 
J- OITC 

J' DAAC 
)' DIAC 

S' OKCC 
3' 0>TC 
3- one 

4' DIAC 

4' 0*TC 
4' OMFC 

y DMVC 
S- 0N2C 

a- owTC 

d' DN/C 



1 *►,' 


i 1 














7" 
7" 

7"r^ <• 



■ *.' 



10' 

I J' 



7X' 

a ... 



10'--. 
10",'| 



3A 

3' . 
3'. 






4V 



11 Vl 5K 






O OPEN mf 



CiDit 



■,' OWWO 3^, 
*;- OAWO 3-. 
i^'CJAAO I *l3 



■ s- 






7" 
■ V 



1-OWWO, J^." 
1- DAWO 3V 
1' DAAO 4// 



)',' OAAO 



1 1 / OAAO 

I 1 :' DJUO 

1 I / DAYO 



1- DaaO 

3' {HAO 

3' DXCO 
3' DXYO 

3- OAAO 
3- OAAO 



<V 






iW 



S' 

4V 



SH' 



7W 

a*t" 



ih' 



3»r " f 

I 






M 



II 



3>. 
3(1 



2W 



i;^ 



• *.' >0',' 3', 

7- flV <»,■ 
7' 10*/ *V 



-S' SCS£EHLESS (HP 



Gqh 



A-DAAS 
}' OKAS 



3' DAAS 
S' DXA& 

J- Dxrs 



A' [>U« 

4-UEYS 



3' DfAYS 






■li' 




9',' <■- 

"OS' *'2 



IIS' 









n» 13.V 4'» 



6' OMT^ «»/. (a' 

6- DHIS »*,- 13' 



14". 
US' 



j;. 



K3I» Ail TYPES OF i»MilE"5 



A' 



I. 



7- 

m,'! a- 

lit/ S' 

M I ■ 8' 



Ill/ 

in;-. 



1 1 > 
1 1 ■ 
1 1 > 
n- 

I r ' 
\ \ ' 

t y < 



10 V 
I1 1 .'I 

!"'/■ 
1(1/ 
11',' 

II',' 
II'.' 

1 1 I ' 
II',' 



IP/ 

^/ 

!»■/ 
30- 



7' 
a" 



»' 



lOH* 

101,'! 
lO^i' 

io»r 

B' 

io»*- 

i'/ 

10/ 

10 . 
10 , 
10, 



B' 



B' 

10*, 
lOlj' 

IJ' 

13' 
13' 






IS' 



IS' 



10H' 

11- 

13' 
13' 
Nik' 

13' 
13' 

I4l4- 
33!|' 



7' 

7* 



7' 
7' 

74- 



7' 
7' 



:;:! 






ft' 




10', 




10', 




13- 




ro*,' 




10 ^- 





J* ■ 

^- - 



?■■'■ 

7" 

7' 



ir 



1 ■ - 



IS" 

1 ■ - 






•*' 






Sp- 

f 

A4< 



DnnJ 



t 



'NOTC-STlUlCNr MS£-WHEN A-U t^ l-V OB WHEN DiFPEI'ENCE 8E1WE(H A&UOBftLViS 2*%' 0« LBS — TAKE LABGEt OFA«fU*>diorV 



H,P, AT KP, At 

1300ILP.ML IJOO LPJA 




H,P- A! 


H^ AT 


MOTOt 
















IBOO ap.K 


3M0 VJK 


nUME Na. 


u 


o 


^ 


» 


s 


T 




1 


m 


»3 


«■ 


5* 


31*- 


_ 


TH- 


isH- 


lOH' 


l)« 


? 


304 


14" 


y 


314' 


— 


IH' 


lA 1* 


lOM' 


7 


1 


334 


%■ 


y/i' 


3%* 


— 


1«' 


17 !• 


im- 


3 


3 


M3 


**• 


i'^' 


J»- 


— 


t*6' 


17 *• 


MH' 


5 


7W 


354 


N* 


6'A' 


i%' 


f|%' 




71 Vi' 


IS' 


'« 


to 


3A4 


H- 


7' 


3M' 


1B%' 




aiw 


13" 


*0 


IS 


374 


?*• 


B' 


3Vi" 


30A' 




33ft' 


17' 


li 


70 


374 


ft- 


• ' 


1«- 


SOW* 




33H* 


IT- 


30 . 3S 


2S ,}0 


344 


1*- 


*■ 


4* 


II H' 




77H' 


UK' 


30 


AO 


34S 


H' 


9' 


4' 


3IK' 


7' 


37ft' 


IBH' 


40 


50 


*a* 


%- 


10- 


*yk' 


»ai*- 




MVk' 


31' 


SO 


eo 


40i 


&' 


10' 


4Vt' 


3Srt' 




30W' 


31" 


00 


7i 


AAA 


H- 


U" 


s* 


»»- 




3<^- 


74' 


7S 


100 


J A3 


%- 


II' 


J- 


w^*• 




34%&' 


34- 


100 


I7S 


504 


1' 


17W' 


s^^• 


3** 


yvt' 


34 VV' 


37- 


l}S 




SO 3 


T 


I3VV 


41^- 


^fr 


7V>' 


V4Vk- 


V 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 




DARLING 



PUMPS 



TABLE No. 2 



»^ 




(B'£:*^*C) 



U -hk^ * J-^iggfg £>■ H tH "iC 




Motor Jm*^!— u/ 






J. Add ^' fo Dim 'E' Whert Uiod Wirh Maion Mnrhed With * 
^ Add 1 V TO Oim. f Whert Uied Wiih t^ot^r Mafl-ed Wirh .^ 



SIZE 



SUCTION 



%' owwc I 1 



^# 



^- OAAC 1 1- 


I' DWWC ' 114" 


t' OAAC 1 W 


PA" OWWC ! V/i- 


114' OAAC IW" 


Py^' OWWC 1 2" 


1 V4' OAAC 1 a- 


J" OWWC 3" 


1' OAAC 1 3- 


3' OAAC 1 4' 



3H' 


1 i:v ■ 


V 


1 Wn 


*H' 


T35i* 


'^- 


. W-i 


Jtt- 


12%- 1 


V 


1 W'l- 


*%• 


1 i*V 1 


%• 


1 W-- 



4' OK AC 



5" 




'A* 

!A' 
^' 
'A" 

'A' 



H.P. ol 
900 R,P,M. 



W 



^ 



PA. 2 



K.P. ot 

1200 R. P.M. 



m 



3* 



H P Ol 
^00 R.P.M. 



H P or 

I eoo i»,p-M- 



MOTOfi 
FRAME No. 



O 



w 



m 



203 



204 



m 



274 






225 



l6'/i' 



354 



5* 



7WO 



?Si 






TO' 

1 I Vi 

»2vr 

"51/3 



12" 



13V^" 



*5' 






3'A' 
'3H' 



^2H* 
22H'" 



UW 



V- A- 



13W 



*i' 



14W 



1- 



13' 



nw' 



4* 



22^" 



14%' 



17W 



17V4' 



j3w:_ 



23- 



1«W 



PA' 



5>A- 



33' 



1754' 



?W' 



'A' 



W 



* g ygvW> 





TABLE No. 3 



4= ME T**lE Mo I Ort PAOE 15 fOS ThiSE OIMENSIOM^ 



16 



I A '- /'Agf T^^Da^^fv 



PIPE CON- 
NECIIONS 




^ OPEN (MPIllta 


^' ^CBEEMESS IMPELLED 

Cto.i H I 


FOP ALl rrPEA OF IMF CilERS 




A fl C D 1 M 


iw r 


)-/i' D*CC'U 7 ,' 37*':' 


1!,-, DWO-U J"-*' 30'.* 

1 




Ifl- ^1' ISH' flH" 31^' li' 
IB' %■ ISh' flH' 3^' i4' 
IB' ^' IS«' fl«' 31^- W 
rS' ^" IS14' flW 3TA' »' 


3' 1' 

r y 
J" y 


: DjICC-U *14' J2^" 


I'DHaO'U fl'.' 33*4" 
J'DXCOU fl'.' 33^^' 

J" orrO'U fl'/ 3Jrt' 


7- D*AS-tl lO'/i' 3J .' 
2' DtAS-U lO'-i' ii"'.' 


13- M' IS'A' 10' 4M' r 
ir M' 15^' 10' 4Vi' 1* 
IB" it' ISW 10" ^Vi' i' 

Ifl" %- IS*- iir *Vt' I' 


1' *' 

a- 1 1- 


r D4ACU H%" 3» ." 
y SXaCU IIH' 35- 

1- DjtC-U 1 iH' W>fc' 

1 


3' CWaO U M'A- 31 V 


3" OJWVU 12 ,' 40^" 
3'DVVS-U ' t2>^' 43/ 


Ifl" M' \5%- W i'A' T 
Ifl' *i' 1S%" IT 5Vi- T 

Ifl' H' is»4' IT sw r 

Ifl- *4- IS-*- IT iVt' T 
Ifl' «' TS*" IT SW ]• 
IB' ^- IStt' IT 5»" r 


4" 1 S' 






4-Dif*5u ir '"** 

J' DTtS-U ll"*' 4J' 


IB' W 15^' IT Sit" T 
IB" ^' 15^' IT S'A" T 
ir »' >5W' IT SW" 1" 
J4- 14' 3T J4' VA' IW 


j: j j: 


i-OMTC-U u«" ir 
5" DHZC-U M''^' saVi' 




S'DWyS4/ 1*»' *?V 


la- %■ ij^' >r 1 *• 1' 

W 54' 31' !*■ »»• IW 




a" 


6' DHlC-y la / S8*4' 




6' DwtS-U leH' 5H^' 

s'fiMJS w IB ,' ej'.' 


7A' J4' *r , iv , 7rt" !»' 

1 1 1 



DARLING BROTHERS IIMITED - MONTREAl 



17 



DARLING 



PUMPS 



THEORETICAL DISCHARGE OF NOZZLES IN U.S. GALLONS PER MINUTE 





HfAO 


ot On- 
F»i 
Set 


DIAMHW OF MOZZLE ^N JNCM€S 


Ppundt 


\ 

Fee' 


Vx 


'h 


% 


^ 


Vk 


1 


Vh 


1M 


IH 


ft 


to 


— 1 — 

1 Z3.1 


3S-6 


13.3 


23,6 


36.9 


53.1 


72.4 


94.5 


130 


148 


179 


313 
360 
301 
336 
368 


13 


34.fi 


47.35 


1*,3 


28.9 


45.3 


65,0 


88.5 


116. 


147 


181 


219 
253 


70 


46.2 


54.55 


le.e 


33-4 


52.2 


75,1 


102. 


134- 


169 


309 


J5 


57.7 


61.0 


31.0 


37,3 


58,3 


84.0 


1 14. 


149- 


189 


334 


3B3 


30 


6t.^^ 


dA.85 


23,0 


iO.9 


63.9 


93.0 


125. 


164. 


207 


356 


309 


as 


eoa 


72.2 


34.8 


44.2 


69.0 


99.5 


135, 


177- 


334 


277 


334 


398 


*o 


93.4 


771 


26.6 


47.3 


73.8 


106 


145, 


189. 


339 


396 


357 


425 


45 


103.9 


81. S 


28.2 


50, r 


78,2 


M3 


153, 


300- 


353 


3^3 


379 


451 
475 


50 


1 115,1 


ft«25 


29,7 


52J 


82.5 


M9 


162, 


311- 


267 


330 


399 


55 


1 1 37.0 


9Q.4 


31 1 


55-3 


86,4 


135. 


169. 


23t. 


380 


346 


418 


498 


«0 


na.fi 


94,5 


32.5 


57.8 


90-4 


130, 


177. 


231. 


293 


363 


438 


831 
943 


65 


150.1 


98.3 


33.8 


60.2 


94 


136. 


164, 


341- 


305 


376 


455 


70 


141.7 


I02J 


35.2 


62.5 


97.7 


141, 


191, 


250- 


317 


391 


473 


563 
587 


75 


173,2 


105,7 


36.4 


64.7 


101- 


146- 


198, 


259. 


327 


404 


489 


SO 


184 a 


109 J 


37.6 


66.8 


104. 


150. 


205. 


267- 


338 


4T8 


505 


603 


«5 


1VA.3 


112-5 


38.8 


63,9 


108. 


155, 


211, 


274. 


349 


431 


531 


620 


90 


707.9 


115.8 


39.9 


70.8 


111. 


160. 


217. 


384. 


359 


443 


536 


638 


95 


?1fl.4 


119,0 


41,0 


72.8 


114 


164 


333. 


293, 


369 


456 


551 


656 


100 


230.9 


122,0 


42,1 


74.7 


117, 


168, 


229, 


399- 


378 


*67 


565 


673 


105 


242.4 


125.0 


43 1 


76,5 


120. 


172, 


334, 


306- 


388 


479 


579 


689 


110 


' 754.0 


128.0 


44.1 


78.4 


122. 


176. 


340. 


314, 


397 


490 


593 


70S 


lis 


■265.^ 


130,9 


45. r 


80.1 


135. 


IBO. 


345, 


320. 


406 


501 


606 


720 


130 


277.1 


1337 


46.0 


81-8 


128, 


184, 


25L 


327- 


414 


513 


(VI9 


736 



NOTE Th* etiuol ^uOplifTji wlJ i^arv from ihffu Agi^r^i, (h» omoun' of waridi»0'> depending tjpon ih# (hop» of noiile ond i'i# of pipv Q< ***■ po^"' nrliftrc fhe pretiurv ii (fale'i^ip^'d 
WirK ii^o^rh laper noriJet rh= ocdjal duch^rge >i oboui 94 par ceni d* IN« fiourci glwo in the loblci. 

WATER HEAD IN FEET WJTH EQUIVALENT IN POUNDS 
PRESSURE PER SQUARE INCH 



H«od 


Preiiurv 


Htfld 


Pfe»n;#e 


Head 


Preiivr* 


n^ad 


Tt^wiv^ 


Heod 


Pf«Hur« 


H«ed 


P'*IW* 


h#cid 
210 


Prftiiu'« 


J 


434 


31 


911 


4t 


17.79 


61 


26.47 


8» 


35,15 


:05 


45,57 


9L14 


3 


^68 


22 


9 54 


42 


18.23 


62 


36.90 


83 


35.58 


1 10 


47.74 


330 


95.48 


3 


1.30 


33 


9.88 


43 


^B.66 


63 


27 34 


83 


36.03 


115 


50.91 


230 


99 95 


4 


1.73 


24 


10.41 


44 


19.09 


64 


37.76 


B4 


36 45 


130 


52.08 


340 


104 15 


5 


3.17 


35 


10 85 


45 


19-53 


65 


28.21 


85 


36,89 


125 


54 25 


250 


108 50 


6 


3.50 


26 


Tl,06 


46 


r9,94 


66 


38.64 


86 


37.32 


130 


56,45 


360 


112.8« 


7 


3.03 


37 


11.71 


47 


30.39 


67 


39,07 


87 


37.75 


135 


58 63 


370 


117.66 


8 


3.47 


2fi 


U 15 


48 


20.83 


68 


39.51 


88 


38,29 


140 


60.76 


380 


131 53 


9 


3,90 


39 


13 sa 


49 


31.36 


69 


29.94 


99 


38.63 


145 


63 93 


390 


135 86 


10 


4.31 


30 


13 03 


50 


21,70 


70 


30.38 


90 


39.06 


150 


65.10 


300 


130 50 


11 


4.77 


31 


1345 


51 


23,17 


71 


3D.B1 


91 


39.49 


155 


67.37 


350 


1 53 30 


13 


5.30 


33 


13 88 


52 


23,56 


72 


31,24 


93 


39.92 


T60 


69.44 


400 


173*0 


13 


5,65 


33 


1432 


53 


23.90 


73 


31.68 


93 


40,36 


165 


71 61 


450 


195 30 


14 


6.07 


34 


U.7S 


54 


33.43 


74 


32. T1 


94 


40.79 


170 


73,78 


500 


317.00 


15 


6.51 


35 


15 19 


55 


23.87 


75 


32,55 


95 


41.33 


175 


76.90 


600 


260.40 


16 


%l% 


36 


15,6? 


56 


34,30 


76 


32.98 


96 


41,66 


180 


78 12 


700 


303,80 


J7 


7.37 


37 


16.05 


57 


24.73 


77 


33.41 


97 


43.09 


185 


80 39 


BOO 


347-30 


18 


7,81 


38 


16.49 


58 


25 17 


78 


33.85 


98 


42.53 


190 


82.46 


900 


390.60 


19 


8,34 


39 


16.93 


59 


25.60 


79 


34,28 


99 


42 96 


195 


84 63 


1000 


434.00 


20 


8.68 


40 


17,34 


60 


36.04 


80 


34.73 


100 


43,40 


30O 


86.80 


tsoo 


651 00 



RELATIVE QUANTITIES OF WATER 

D*liT'^d in I M»iiu>p. m 1 Hou* ond m 34 Houri 



Call. In 


Call *p 


Gaii Fn 


Gait. In 


0«U Ik 


GdU. Ip 


G0U Ifl 


Golk U 


Ggli li% 


1 Min, 


1 Moor 


24 Houit 


r Min 


1 HMr 


24 Hoi-'$ 


t Mm, 


1 Houf 


34 Hourk 


3.4 


208 


5,000 


138.8 


8.333 


300.000 


486.1 


39.166 


700 000 


6.9 


416 


1 0,000 


173,6 


10,416 


350,000 


520.8 


31,350 


750,000 


10,4 


625 


15,000 


308,3 


T 2.500 


300.000 


555.5 


33.333 


800,000 


13,8 


833 


30,000 


343,0 


14,583 


3 50.000 


590.3 


35.416 


850,000 
900 000 


17-3 


1,041 


3S.O00 


377.7 


■ 6.666 


400,000 


625 


37,500 


34,7 


2,083 


50.000 


312,5 


18.750 


* 50 ,000 


659.7 


39,583 


050 000 


41,6 
53-9 
69.4 


2,500 


60.000 


347.3 


30,833 


500,000 


694.3 


41.666 


1 .000,000 


3.135 


75.000 


381.9 


22,916 


550.000 


1,041.7 


62.500 


1. 500.000 


4,166 


■ 00,000 


416.7 


35,000 


600,000 


1,388.0 


83.333 


3,000 000 


1 D4 1 


6.250 


1 50.000 


451.3 


27.083 


650,000 


».736,0 


I04J66 


3.500,000 



WATER REQUIRED PER MINUTE TO FEED BOILERS 



lUtinp 'hm 'Ctniaimal StofidgrJ- — 30 pounds y 3.6 ooHg** o* *dief pgr hy^tpow^t ptr hojf, evaporottd from lOO f to 70 povndt «*«or« p'*Hu«< p«f .q^or* inch 






Wot»* 

U.S Golloni 



20 
35 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 



1.3 
1.5 
1.8 
2,1 
3.4 
2.7 
3.0 
3.3 



H.P 

8Qnvf 



60 
65 
70 
75 

80 
85 
90 
100 



DARLING BR 




Aft dllo»orK« hot le b* fnad« <m ebo»* 8QVf«i 01 bf>.T*f( 9't oh** driwon bariMd lti«k noMJool f^tin^- 



S LIMITED 



D A R L I 



PUMPS 



18 



m 



Gallsna. 

I 
? 

3 
4 



u. o> H»d .n F». ov. >a .,>crr« ., p,, I QQ F„, p, 1 5 ,„, .„ 0,^^51'.!^!^.^'' WATER IN PJPES 

Vol.— VftlocJiy in F^ei par Svcond 



*4" Pip. 



V#l, 



K30 
UO 
3h4 



Frk, 



1.9 
4.1 
7.0 



1" Piw 



KI2 



Frfe. 



1,76 



1-49 2.U 



1 M " npt 



V*(. 



0,S6 



Frfc, 



Fric— FticTioft Htod in ftmt 



3 ' 101 10.5 l,6«| 3,25 K07 0^84 



W 



10 

T5 
10 
35 

30 

14 
40 
45 
30 
40 

75 
100 
130 
140 
160 

180 

300 
335 
350 
375 

300 
350 
400 
450 
475 

500 
550 
400 
A50 
700 

BOO 
900 

1000 

noo 

■ 300 



8.03 ' 38,0 

9.03 60 

13.03 i26 



1300 

3000 



3-73 

s.ao 
7.44 

9.30 

n 15 



11.7 

25.0 
42.0 
64 
B9.0 



13.03 
14.88 



119-0 
153-0 



3-14 

3-2 

4,39 

5,36 

6-43 



7-51 
8.58 
9.65 

10.72 
13.87 



3-05 
6,50 
11.1 

16.6 
33-5 

31-3 
40,0 
50.0 
A 0.0 
83,0 




0-57 0.83 ! 0.36 



1.57 
3.36 
3,15 
3.94 
473 



r43 

3.0 

7.8 
NO 







5,51 


P4-7 


6.3 


16.8 


7oa 


33 7 


/.87 


38.4 


9-44 


39.6 


11.80 


60-0 


15.74 


102.0 


10 89 


1430 


23.04 


igoo 



1,03 
1.53 
3,04 
3.55 
3.06 

I 3.57 
4.08 
4,60 

' 5-11 
6.13 

I 7.66 
'1021 
13 35 
U.30 
16.34 



0-50 
1.08 
1,82 
2.73 
3-S4 



5-1 

6.6 
8.3 
9,9 

13.9 

30,9 
358 

50 
67 
86.0 



0.65 
0.98 
1.31 
1,63 
1-96 



0.17 
0,36 
0,61 
0,93 
t.29 



18.38 107 
30.42 139 



3.39 

2.61 

2.04 

I 3.27 

I 3,92 

5.01 
6.54 
7.84 
9,15 
10.46 

rr 76 
13 07 
14,71 
16.03 
fSJO 



1-73 

3,20 
2.80 
3,32 
4,65 



7.1 
12.0 
16,8 
32.3 
39,0 

3S-7 

43,1 
54.3 

66,0 
81,0 



0,45 


0,07 


0.68 


0.\5 


0,91 


0,25 


1.13 


0.38 


1.36 


0.54 


1,59 


0.71 


1 87 


0,91 


3 0,^ 


1.15 


3.27 


1.38 


3,72 


1-92 


3.4 


3-05 


4.54 


4.96 


5.45 


7.0 


6.35 


9.2 


7.26 


11.8 



1.03 
1-17 
1.3a 
1,53 



0,2; 
0-28 
0.34 
0.47 



0-98 



1-92 

3.55 
3,06 
3,57 
4-08 



073 
K33 
1,71 
2,38 
2,91 



1.J3 
1.63 
1,96 
2,29 
2.6? 



0,16 



0,34 
0,39 
0.57 
076 
0.98 



1,14 
1.42 
1.58 
KSO 



0.14 
0.35 
0.31 
0.41 



8.17 

9.08 

10.0 J 

11.33 

13.50 



14.8 
17,8 
22,3 
37.3 
33.5 



19.61 



93.0 i 1 3.62 



38-0 



4. 60 
5.11 
5,77 
6.40 
7.03 



3.61 
4-37 
5,45 
673 
7.99 



2-94 
3.37 
3,67 

4.0a 
4.50 



6,76 

8,90 
10.2" 
11,50 
T3.20 



I 9 30 
13.32 
16,00 
19.80 
33.96 



4,90 
5.72 
6-54 
7.35 
7,76 



1 32 
-48 

1,86 
2,34 
373 



3,T4 
4.T9 
5.40 
6,70 
7.42 



3,04 
2-28 
2.57 

2,80 
3-06 



0-50 
0-63 
0,74 
0,92 
K15 



T 2, 77 134.00 




3.40 
3.98 
4.54 
5,12 
5-55 



8.J7 8,13 
8-99 ' 9.60 

9-80 ;n. 30 

0.62 F3.3D 
11.44 15.10 



FRICTION LOSSES THROUGH PIPE FITTINGS IN TERMS OF EQUIVALENT LENGTHS OF STANDARD PIPE 



Nominal 
lAchflk 



1 
I** 

m 
3 

3H 
3 

4 
5 

6 



10 

13 



Actual 
IniJdc 

Inchti 



0.824 
1.040 
1 3£0 
1.610 
3.067 
2.469 
3,068 
4.026 
5.047 
6 065 
7,981 
10,0:0 
13,000 



Srondord 
£lbaK ar 
On Run af 

ducvd ifi 



3.3 

3.6 

35 

4.1 

5.3 

6.5 

8-0 

10-5 

13.0 

160 

30.3 

25 3 

30.2 



Long-SwdVp 
Elbow or 
on RvP of 
Slandord 


45* 

ELbo. 


Through 

Side 


Gale 

VoFve 
fvll 


Glabv 

Valve 
Full 


(Approii,) 


Angle 
Vol»e 

FlpII 




Ovrlcr 


Open 


Optn 


vari#) w(|h 


Open 


1.4 


1-0 


4-S 


46 


31 


5.5 


11.0 


17 


1.3 


5-3 


0,56 


37.2 


7,5 


14.7 


2-3 


1.6 


7-3 


76 


37,9 


9.0 


I8.a 


27 


1.9 


8.9 


90 


45.2 


10.5 


31,0 


3,5 


3.5 


11.0 


1.15 


55.6 


135 


29.0 


4 1 


3.9 


14,0 


1 32 


67.8 


16.0 


33.7 


5.1 


37 


16.0 


1.6 


86 00 


20.4 


41.0 


7.0 


5.0 


20.9 


2.3 


nO.OO 


26.7 


55,0 


e.8 


6.1 


254 


27 


143 00 


13.3 


71 


10-3 


75 


33 1 


35 


160 QO 


40-8 


82.0 


14.1 


10.0 


43.9 


4,5 


234. OQ 


53.3 


113.0 


17.0 


12.7 


52 1 


5.3 


275 00 


67 


141,0 


20,0 


15,0 


63,8 


6.8 


336.00 


78.7 


160,0 



Clots 
Refurfl 
fiend 



5,r 

6-1 
8.5 
10,1 
13.0 
15-3 
16,5 
34.8 
30-2 
37.0 
50.0 
63.0 
72.0 



SUCTION HEAD REQUIREMENTS WHEN PUMPING HOT WATER 



SifCl>an Head Avgvpred for Cinirifugol Punipt when H^ndNng Hoi Wafer oi Oifte'ent Alliludci. 



Aflo«.abl* 




on SuctloA 


120 


Ar tao Jevtr 
Ar 3,000 oil 
Ar 4^000 oir. 
Ai 6,000 oir, 
Ai 8.000 oir 
At 10.000 alt. 






+ 2 








130 




+ T 
■f 3 
t 4 



UO 



^ I 

+ 3 

+ 3 

* 7 



TEMPERATURES OF WATER IK DEG»EfS F. 



)50 



+ 1 

+ 3 

+ 5 

+ 7 

+ 9 



160 




+ 1 

tl 

+ 9 



170 



130 



190 



300 



210 



+ 3 


+ 5 


^ 7 


-flO 


+ 13 


4- 5 


+ 7 


-hlO 


T-12 


+TS 


-\- 7 


+ 10 


-+-I2 


fl4 
il6 




*J0 


4-12 


i-14 




+ 12 


-14 


-t-16 






-14 


-H6 


-r-18 




_ 



DARLING BROTHE 



I M I T E D 



M N T R E 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL 



'9- 



THE DARLING ELECTRIC CELLAR DRAINER 

With our long experience of over thirty years in the design and manufacture of Vertical Centri- 
tugal Fumps, we have produced a dependable electric motor driven Cellar Drainer. This unit is 
useful for draining boiler-rooms, tunnels, elevator pits, and is a very handy emergency unit for 
towns, manufacturing plants and institutions. 

SPECIFICATIONS OF STANDARD UNIT 

PUMP. The casing is of cast iron with large water passages to 
avoid clogging, 

IMPELLER. Enclosed type, hydraulically and mechanically bal- 
anced. 

SHAFT. Made of non-corrosive stainless steel. 

BEARINGS. Self-lubricating pump bearing is supplied, also suitable 
ball thrust. 

SUPPORT COLUMN, Made of IV2" extra heavy steel pipe. 

BASE AND SCREEN, Combined In one casting of cast iron, with 
circular base, providing rigid support for pump. The screen has except- 
ionally large water passages, and is many times the area of the suction, 
J MOTOR. Vi H, P. repulsion induction motor, ball bearing type is 

furnished, direct connected to impeller shaft by flexible coupling. Com- 
plete current characteristics must be given when ordering. 110 volt 
single phase unit can be supplied from stock. 

SWITCH. Heavy duty automatic float switch is mounted on the 
motor. Operated by seamless copper float. 

COVER. Cast iron split cover easily adjusted vertically to suit 
depth of pit, can be supplied at extra cost, suitable for 18" diam. pit or 
tile pipe basin. Outside diameter of cover is 20". 

THERMAL OVERLOAD PROTECTION. {Supplied at slight addi- 
tional cost) is the enclosed circuit breaker type which can be reset by a 
push button. 

ADAPTABILITY. Cellar Drainers are made standard for pits 
24" to 84" deep, and require a minimum diameter of 15", and are furnish- 
ed at same price irrespective of which depth is required. 

PERFORMANCE CHART 




G. P. M. 
Capacity 


Head in Feet 


Motor H. P. 


1750-1450 
R.P.M. 


1750 
R,P,M. 


1450 
R.P.M. 


1750-1450 
R.P.M. 


10 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 


21 
19 
16 
17 
16 
14 
12 
10 


18 
17 
16 
15 
13 
12 
10 
6 


y* 
y* 

H 

H 


Electric Current Characteristics: single phase and 
poly phase 60 or 25 cycle. 

Shipping Weights 2 Ft. Unit 100 Pounds, 

Less Cover 3 Ft. Unit 110 Pounds. 

|4 Ft. Unit 120 Pounds. 



Darling Rrothers limlte 



140 PRINCE ST. 



MONTREAL, CANADA 



Saint John — Quebec — Ottawa — Toronto — Timmins — Winnipeg- 
Cornwall — Calgary — Vancouver — St. John's, Nfld. 



Digitized by: 




NTERNATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATtON TECHNOLOGY. 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 

TECHNOLOGY 

HERITAGE 

LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 



BULLETIN No 60 





PAflLIN6 e»UPk.fX 



MftLINQHtUEF VI^LVE 



^ytPHOn iNnaiocKiftovALvfi 



lUuCF VALVE 



MMr 60VtKM0« 



raA\peAATu#£ 










rMCBJ^OMeTlft 



FCriL OIL HCATCIC 



m^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^1 /«f^^ 



DRIP TAAV 



DAFtLlN^ [MJPLEIL FUEl OIL PUMi\PlN& 
AND HEAFlNft ter - 



FU£L OIL STORAGE 







^ 



.^ 



rypes of 
pumping and 

heating 
equipment 



The several types of Darling Twin Fuel 

Oil Pumping and Heating sets shown 

represent combinations of equipment 

thof the customer has specified to 

-nf p» the requirements of a particular 

U burning installation. These 

ary from job to job but 

^,nti<t mainly of mC' Ificotions to 

L-gfnpuig equipment, prime movers 

and controls, 

1 . Dorling Fuel Oil Pumping set only, con- 
sisting of two Dorling Sleom-Driven Fuel 
Oil pumps with pump governor, pressure 
gouges, thermometer ond relief volves. 

2* Dorling Horizontot Steam-Driven Duplex 
Fuel Oii Pump, Northern Nitroltoy Steel 
Rotory Fuel Oil Pump with electric drive 
over three Whitlock- Darling Type "V" Fuel 
Oil Preheoters, factory assembled. 

3> Darling Twin Fuel Oil Pumping and 
Healing set consisting of two Steom-Driven 
Fuel Oil pumps ond two Whitlock-Dorling 
Fuei Oil hcoters with all accessories* 




a« 



pumping and heating set 



I 



Darling facrory assembled Twin Fuel ON Pumping ond 
HeoMng sers help ro solve mony of the problems 
Ofiiing from the instollation of Fuel Oil Burning 
Equipmenr. The unih ore correctly sized to hondle 
with ease Ihe specified copacities, temperatu/e rise 
and oil pressures. 

All piping, volves ond fittings necessary lo connect 
rhe components are corefully felted by experienced 
mechonics to ossure leok-proof piping systems. The 
pump and heaters ore orronged ro operate in ony 
combinalion fhot will meet o given operating ond 

lood condition. 

Accessory equipment includes Darling Oil Relief 
Volves, Sylphon Temperolufe Regulators and Pump 
Governors. Darling Duplex Suction ond Discharge 



Stroiners oH of which may be assembled into one of 
these compact reody-JO'Operote units. 

Installalion costs con be reduced by the use of 
Darling Fuel Oil Pumping and Heating Sets, for they 
eliminate much of Ihe difFicull piping on the job site. 
DorFfng Pumping and Heating Sets ore ovoiloble in a 
wide range of capacities and oil pressures. 

Photo below shows Combination Electric and Sleom 
Turbine Driven Northern Rotary Fuel Oil Pumps ond 
No. 16 Type "V" Whitlock-Darling Fuel Oil Preheoler, 
comprising o Darling Fuel Oil Pumping ond HeaMng 
Set supplied to Combuslion Engineering Corp, Ltd., 
for installation at Dominion Bridge Co, Ltd., Lochine, 
Que. 



i 



the preheating 
of fuel oil 



For most effective combustion, fuel oil must be 
properly ofomrzed at ttie burner, ond otomizing 
is best effected ot one viscosity. Extensive experi- 
menrotion has shown this viscosily to be 150 
seconds Soybolt Universal; similarly 375 seconds 
Saybolt Furol has been *ound \o give The most 
desirobfe pumping vtscosity. 

With heovier industrial fuel oils, therefore, pre- 
heoting is necessary before admission to the 
burner. The temperature to which the ofl must be 
preheated is primorily dependent upon two foctors: 

First, the viscosity-lemperoJure charocleristics 
of the or], and 

Second, (he mechanJcol design of the burner 
nozzle. 

The first point hos been covered above, and for 
the second point we can soy generally fhot the 
heat supplied by the heoter, plus the heat supplied 
at rhe burner, should be sufficient to reduce the 
relative fluidity of the oil to approximately 150 
seconds Saybolt Universol. Thus, steom otomizing 
and io\ory cup burners can occept oils ot a higher 
viscosity Ihan the pressure atomizing burner, since 
»hey supply additional heaJ \o the oil al the nozzle. 

It is probobly well to point oul here thaf, conJrary 
to a belief accepted by some, specific grovity is no 
index of the viscosity, or of the temperoture to 
which oil should be preheoled for proper oJomiz- 
ing. Oils of the some specific gravity may hove 
vastly different viscosiMes ot the some temperoture, 
and the temperature to which one oil must be 
headed for the best atomizing moy be entirely too 
low for another oil of the same specific grovity. 





-T«» w^*-«t<Nn>*ftt-r 






TpT'^ T T -^ r 


y 




























f 

t 
t 
i 








- 


— 


^ 




1 


^ 






— 1 




: — 7 




1 






— 


-ii 


- * — 

1 










v» 
















\ 


























I 










— ten 


















\ 

\ 

1 



























\ 
\ 
I 












^ 












" 




'—I 




















_ . 1 










J 


























i 






































' 




1^ 








-6* % 


















cl 


? 




_ 




















- — 


- 1 


T" — T — 

-t 


_ 




r. 


"-J 
i 

r 








1 




' 


— 




1 








-"! 


/ 
















1 








m f\ 


















I 








"* ffl 
















\ 
\ 










>■ 


J 
f 

K 
1 

t 

s 

t 





' 














1 


^ 








fr 


















I 








.»i^ 













































f 












r 




















\ 








7 
rT 




















\ 
\ 








r- 
2 




















\ 
\ 
\ 

1 








c 








— 




















I 




■^ 




















\ 

\ 

i 
\ 








1 ' 

4 lb %Q 


'^ 








• 


-^ 







4B m^ ^B 'fe« 



^ 



Chart caurr«v of Sintmoi^i-Bcardnien PbDlLiti'ng Ca, 
fig. 1 — ' Viicosity-Tempefotufc ChoracTeriitici of Fuel Oili. 

The Viscosity-temperature chorocteristics of fuel oils 
when plotted on o double logarithmic scole, result in 
stroight lines with a common origin — shown above 
as Point A. Knowing the viscosity of an oil at any one 
temperature, we can plot this one poinJ and join it 
wirh the common point A to obtoin the complete 
viscosity-temperature characteristics. 



Example to Show Use of Viscosity-Temperature Chart 



KNOWN^ ViKOtity of Fuel Oil X — 500 seconds 
Saybolt Fiirol at 140 F 

WANTED; Temperotu'e required to reduce viscosity 
to 50 seconds Savbolt Furol 



Plot Point S FJ an 

A 50 SSF 

p^fQti^ft 210 F. of Pl 
Ft^ 




fuel oil heaters 




ft*««J itfu>gM tkjto4 



w%itt ^*iin«th*« 



4 Of AfUtti 



EASY CLEANlNG:-Uo* V u of a Kro.ghl F«bc. Ri«d iK«l det.Qt which pe-miU eo»y mtchonicol i^eoa-og a»tcr m.r.Jy .♦mo.^'.g «hr 
f'oni ond reor heodi. The onH hoi o minimwn of |oinli. w.rh no boli«d (om'i on Ihv ileom udo. Type V n dciigned ror at\ and tltam 
wo:kin9 preavr^i vp to 300 p\i and i«eom r«mpcforwrei vp to 410 F. 

CONSTRUCTION- — Shdb: ScOffil*« il«cr p^pe. Tube Shcet«: RDll^d ifee^ v^old^d ro the *hel» endi Oil DitVributing Hcadi: Srpfll or 
cDil Kor. Tube*: ^ OD. ■ 16 ftWG icomleM ilecJ Support Bro<ke1>: Moy be luppfied if rcqwired. 



TABLE I — HEATING CAPACITIES OF TYPE V FUEL OIL HEATERS 

IN PODNOS P£« HOUR OF BUNKER C^ FUEt OIL 



2 

4 
S 
« 
7 

a 

9 

10 

n 

12 

13 

li 

15 

\A 

17 

18 

IBVj 

19 



OPStG 



W m' 90' 175' »0"-Iflr iriTS' 90' m"9r !3S' »0' Ur 9r ?00' 9IJ' 735' 9r-?5r 90' Vy 90* MO' 90" ?35- 90' ISO 




S PSIG Sfeofn 



25 PSIG Sleom 



Temp. Range Temp, Rar>9« of Qrl 



SO PSIG Steam 



T«mpero1uPc Rangt of Oil 



100 PSIG Slcam 



Tomperarurc flong^ of 0*1 



2--'. 
tab 

94Q 



410 

Mil 
ft ^ '■ ■ 
511. 

1 1^:, 
I M'? 

I ron 
JS.iO 



11)0 


3300 


k3lO 


AJ«C 


laflo 


^330 


J?70 


a 400 


1030 


4500 


3100 


MAiO 


4300 


oaoo 


* ■n/\/- 


1 ' nrtJ-i 



2*0 
3flr) 
«40 
570 

715 
iaO 

I rsc 

r430 

i7ao 
jaso 

3S70 
43C0 
SJOO 
7150 

aaoo 



i«o 
;40 

3es 

43S 

590 
77 i 

970 

1450 

2^00 

4H^0 
5800 



«4t) 

eoo 

1370 
1590 
igOO 
2530 

3iao 

400C 
4750 
6350 

aooo 

9 500 

13700 
15500 

1^000 
i^lOO 




440 

550 
««0 
AJi 
1100 
IIJO 
750 
3300 
2740 
2300 
4400 
5500 

6aoo 

3710 
IE 000 
UJOO 
15400 
t7S« 



jao 


930 


3ao 


1140 


J40 


1400 


450 


tB50 


170 


7330 


oao 


2790 


900 


J710 


1130 


4650 


uia 


5aoo 


1700 


6950 



3360 
3830 
3400 
4 500 
S700 
«B00 

aooo 

VOOO 



9300 
M600 
13950 

lajoo 

3370C 
77400 
33«00 
37)OL 



a«0 

830 

990 

134J 

1085 

3070 

3690 

3370 

4300 

3050 

«7)0 

44 20 

I C I oo 

I 34JO 

;d;oo 

J 3600 
7*900 



500 
6» 
730 

1000 

■ 750 

■500 

7000 

3500 

3100 

3700 

5000 

A 700 

7*50 

fOOOO 

"3500 

15000 

I74M 

Jf^'lOO 



3B0 

<70 

570 

730 

940 

M30 

1500 

1IB0 

7350 

3450 

3770 

4700 

3650 

7500 

9400 

M300 

t320O 

13000 



T2S PSIG Sicom 



Tomp«roturft RQAg*^ 



r.: 



150 PSIG Sicom 



Tcmperalure Rango ol Oil 



200 PSIG Sveam 



Temp«rahrre tongo of Oil 



n' 20D° 


jflvjjr' 


720 


540 


900 


670 


1080 


310 


1430 


1075 


1800 


1350 


2^50 


r620 


2S70 


3'SO 


3450 


7 650 


4500 


3400 


5370 


4000 


7150 


5300 


9000 


6750 


10750 


0070 


14300 


10750 


laooo 


13300 


31500 


ifllOO 



90' /JU vJ 2h 90"23S' ■90'250" 90° 275* 90^00' 90V?25* 90*250'^ 90' 2TS' 90* HQ 



35300 
38700 



410 

310 

«70 

•30 

tO30 

^340 

i«40 

3030 

7370 

310C 

4100 

5150 

A700 

3300 

t0300 

13400 

P4S00 

14400 



370 

J8G 
630 

aoo 

9oO 
I 250 
1340 
3000 
J 400 
3:0!J 
400<- 

4aoo 

4300 

aooo 

9600 
IT 300 
■ 3800 



070 

340 

1000 

1330 

E670 

3000 

3*70 

3350 

4t60 

5000 

6700 

3350 

10000 

T3300 

16700 

30000 

23400 

26700 



310 

640 

770 

1030 

k3eo 

1550 

3050 

7370 

1200 

3830 

SfSO 

AlOO 

7700 

10300 

13^00 

I55CO 

I aooo 

30500 



SAO 
460 
560 
700 
870 
r050 

T400 

laao 
71 ao 

2830 

3300 

4170 

3250 

700C 

B7D0 

T0500 

17700 

14000 



360 

440 

550 

630 

830 

lOaO 

H*0 

1700 

2040 

3700 

3400 

4050 

5100 

eaOO 

8300 

9300 

lOiOO 



830 

1060 

1340 

1*65 

3090 

230O 

3330 

4130 

3700 

*350 

8330 

T0400 

T23O0 

1*650 

20400 

35000 

79100 

33300 



«40 

*00 

9aO 

"300 

1*25 

T950 

3*00 

3?*0 

4000 

4900 

6500 

8130 

9800 

^1000 

'6250 

19900 

37400 

2*000 



sro 

6 30 

760 

f033 

1233 

1550 

2030 

7570 

3700 

3830 

5»30 

*400 

7730 

10350 

17850 

15300 

TftOOO 

1O300 



3*0 
450 
340 
770 
900 

ro40 

T440 

1800 
2230 
7700 
3600 
4500 
54TO 
7^00 
9000 

loaoo 

■ J-,00 
**>3 



whitlock-darling 




Thfs heater can be used \o heot any grade of oil up lo o 
temperoture of whkh it will flew reodily to facilJFale ils 
withdrawal from large storoge tonks. Since the oil is 
heored only as it is drawn off, it is not necessory to 
mointQJn the contents of ^he whole tonk in a heaTed 



fuel oil preheater 
suction type 



condition. This reduces rodiotion losses to a minimum. 
The entire heating element, wirh the exception of a few 
inches of the upper surface ot the far end, is enclosed 
in a sleel shea'h through which the oil is drown from 
the tank. The tubes ore medium size seamless steel made 
up in the form of U-bends. with the ends expanded into 
o rolled steel tube sheet. The sreom distributing chomber 
which directs sleom through the tubes is of cost iron or 
cost steel depending on the steom pressure. The heoter 
is furnished complete ready for welding, riveting, or 
bolting to the storage tonk as moy be required. The use 
of collar studs enobles the head to be removed for 
inspection of the tubes without draining the storoge lonk. 
Capacities are based on heofing Bunker C oil from 20 F. 
to 100 F. with steom of 100 psi. Tank dimensions should 
be given when requesting prices. 

Preheaters for Vertical instollotion are mode to suit 
individual requirements. 



-..c r ri - CAPACITIES ond OlMtNilONS — WHITLOCK-DARUNG HORIZO^JTat "irtrnoN TYPE t 



No, 


Copocity 
lbs .'Hf, 


Heod 

Flange 


AppfOJi. 

Overall 
Length 


MTniFTium 

Diam of 

Opening 

in Tank 


Dfom of 

Ploin Tonk 

AllDc^Fnenl 

Flonges 


Oil 
Conneclroni 


Sleam 
Connet^On* 


Cond. 
Conne^riont 


3 


580 


10%" 


I'-ii" 


7" 


13" 


%" 


%" 


%" 


4 


750 


10'/," 


2'-4" 


7" 


13" 


%" 


^^" 


Vi" 


5 


910 


1 V4 " 


2'-9" 


7" 


13" 


1" 


y«" 


%" 


6 


1,200 


1 V, " 


3'-6" 


7' 


13" 


1" 


%" 


%" 


7 


1,500 


1 y< " 


4'-4" 


7" 


13" 


1" 


y-" 


a//' 


a 


1,800 


1 % " 


5'-l" 


7" 


13" 


1 % " 


y*" 


y*" 


9 


2,400 


loy," 


6'-9" 


7" 


13" 


1 % " 


%" 


'A" 


10 


3.000 


i3y." 


4'.4" 


9" 


16" 


1 % " 


y/' 


J//' 


11 


3.700 


1 3 % " 


5'-4'* 


9" 


16" 


7" 


%" 


V4" 


12 


4,500 


13%" 


6'-4" 


9" 


16" 


2" 


V4" 


%" 


13 


6,000 


1 3 V4 " 


7'-3" 


9" 


16" 


2 % " 


%" 


%" 


14 


7,500 


1 6 V4 " 


7'.11" 


11" 


19" 


2 % " 


%" 


%" 


15 


9,200 


UV4" 


9'-4" 


11" 


19" 


3" 


y/' 


%" 


16 


12,000 


i6y4" 


1 2'-3" 


11" 


19" 


3" 


%" 


%" 


17 


15,000 


1 9 y, " 


8'-0" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


4" 


%" 


y/' 


18 


18.000 


19%" 


9'-7" 


I 4 % " 


22" 


4" 


%" 


%" 


lay, 


21,000 


19%" 


ir-1" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


4" 


%" 


y4" 


19 


24,000 


19%" 


1 2'-6" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


5" 


1" 


I" 


19 'A 


27,000 


22 % " 


lO'-O" 


1 6 % " 


25" 


5" 


I" 


1" 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 


30,000 
37,000 
45,000 
60,000 
75,000 


22 % " 
25 % " 
25 % " 
29 % " 
29%" 


12'-0" 
9'.11" 

11 '-9" 

ir-o" 

13'-6" 


1 6 % " 
20 Vi " 
20%" 
24 % " 
24%" 


25" 
28" 
28" 
32" 
32" 


5" 
6" 
6" 
8" 
8" 


I % " 
1 % " 
1 % " 
1%" 
1 % " 


i%" 
I % " 
i%" 

PA" 

ivi" 



M 



northern rotary 




The Northern Series 4000 Rotary Fuel Oil 
Pump is fabricated of Nitrollc/ Steel and 



fuel oil pump 
series 4000 

built to extreme fine limits of accuracy. It 
offers the known value of quick and 
convenient inlerchangeability of component 
parts. Available in a wide range of capa- 
cities and for pressures up to 300 lbs. 
Used OS standard equipment on Darling 
Fuel Oil Pumping and Heating Sets. Pumps 
can be supplied with either electric or 
steam Turbine Drive, 



Northern Rotary Gear Pumps Specifications for Handling Bunker ''C Fuel Oil 

Viscosities oi 1000 ro 5r }. Moj:inn>m ixt^fton lift 15" Hg, 



I 



Dischaige 100 PSI 



GPM 



.39 
.77 

1.16 

t.55 

K94 

2,9 

3.9 

5.8 

7.78 

4.55 

6.07 

9.1 



GPM 



7,47 
9.9 

15.2 
20.0 
24.8 
37.0 
49,5 
54.0 
72.0 
90,0 
108.0 



Pump 
Siie 



Pump 

Speed 

RPM 



4300-02 

4300^04 
4300-06 
4300-08 
4400-05 
4400-07 
4400-10 
4400-15 
4400-20 
4500-07 
4500-10 
4500-15 



Otscharge 100 ?S\ 



PufT>p 



Pump 

Speed 

RPM 



4600-07 
4600- 10 
4600-15 
4600-20 
4600-25 
4700-30 
4700-40 
4800-30 
4800-40 
4800-50 
4800-60 



850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 



BHP 



G^M 



1150 


.19 


.37 


1150 


.22 


,74 


1150 


.28 


1.12 ' 


1150 


.40 


1.48 : 


1150 


.47 


1,66 


1150 


.57 


2.78 


1150 


.65 


3.73 


1150 


1.0 


5.55 


1150 


1.3 


7.45 


1150 


.85 


4.36 


1150 


1.0 


5.81 


1 1150 


1.4 


8.74 



Pump 
Siiq 



JOO Pil 

Pufnp 

HPm^ 

M50 
WSO 
1150 
n50 

M50 
1150 
1150 

1150 
/ '- -n 1 ]50 

^ ; nso 

4500.10 U50 



4300-02 
430004 
4300-06 
4300-08 
440005 
4400 07 
4400-10 
J400-I5 



BHf 



GPM 



il 


.35 


,30 


.71 


,35 


1.08 


.5 


1.42 


.63 


1.78 


,75 


2.66 


.98 


3,56 


1.3 


5.35 


1.7 


7.13 


1.2 


4.17 


1,35 


5,58 


1.9 


8.35 



TABLE IV — CAPAC trj iN US. GPM AT 850 RPM 



Pump 
Siia 



4300 02 
430004 
430006 
4300-08 
4400-05 
4400-07 
4400-10 
4400-15 
4400-20 
4500-07 
4500-10 
4500-15 



300 P$l 
Pump 
&pc*d 
BPm 

1 150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 



'31 



Ortcharg* 300 PSI 



BKP 



1.5 

2,0 

3,0 

4.0 

4.9 

6.5 

8.0 

9.0 

11,8 

15,0 

16.5 



7.13 

9.5 

14.3 
19.2 
23.8 
35.5 
47.5 
51.8 
69.0 
86.0 



?.-.f 



■ J 15 
4600-20 
4600 25 

4700-30 
4700 40 
4800-30 

4800-40 
4300-50 



-i^-'ip 

Speed 

■PM 

850 

850 

850 



BHP 



GPM 



Pump 
Site 



2.0 

2.6 
3.9 



6.85 
9.1 
13.6 



850 


5.0 


18.3 


850 


6.3 


22.8 


850 


8.5 


34,0 


850 


11.0 


45.5 


850 


12,2 


49,6 


850 


16.0 


66.0 


850 


26,5 





4600-07 
4600-10 
4600-15 
4600-20 
4600-25 
4700-30 
4700-40 
4800-30 
4800-40 



Pump 

Speed 

RPM 

850" 

850 

850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 



BHP 

.23 

.36 

.43 

.6 

,74 

,95 

1.2 

t.7 

2,3 

1.4 

1.8 

2.5 



BHP 



2.5 

3.2 

4.8 

6.3 

7.7 

10.7 

14,7 

15,4 

20.0 



^yA>:"Oi'r 




steam pumps 



The Darling Horizontal Duplex Steom-Driven 
Fuel Oil Pump has many features especially 
designed for pumping commercial grodes of 
Fuel Oil. 



These include snap ring plungers in the oil 
end and "Durablo" metal valves os standard 
fittings. Steel Liners and Stainless Steel Piston 
rods can be supplied if required. 



The attention to detail and the expert work- 
manship built into these pumps is proved by 
their wide acceptance in Fuel Oil applications. 
Available for oil pressures to 300 lbs. per 
square inch and steom pressures to 175 lbs. 



3 i! K 3 .0^1 U,S.G. P.M. \M 2 2.46 

41x2^ 4 .103 U.S.G. P.M. 4.1 S.) 6.1 

I 

5i«3ix 5 .308 U.5.G. P.M. 8.3 lO.-l 12.5 

6 x1 X 6 .326 U.S.G. P.M. 13 

HHit i .SS) U.S.G. P.M. 22 37.5 33 

7U4J.10 ,689 U.S.G. P.M. 27.5 3M ^1.3 

74i5 ilO .850 U.S.G- P.M. 34 42.5 51 

10 ii M 1.331 U.S.G. P.H. 48.9 61 73 

13 i7 xl2 2. U.S.G. P.M. 80 100 120 





Screwed Connacrlon ifltiitgoi ConneDk 



nstallations 
of fuel oil 
pumping and 
heating sets 



1 . National Cei/u/ose of Canada limifed^ 
Toronto, Oni. — Unit consisting of two 4 Vi" 
X 2%" X 4 " Dorling Horizontoi Duplex 
Steam-Driven Fuel Oil Pumps over two 
Whitlock-Oorling Type "V" Fuel Oil Pre- 
heaters. Accessories include No, 931 
Sylphon Temperature Regulator, Fisher Pump 
Governor, Dorling Oil Relief Volves ond 
Duplex Suction Strainer, 

2. S*. Joseph s Hospiial, Lacbine, Que — 
Unit includes 3" x 7" x 3" Darling Horirontol 
Fuel Oil Pump series 4000 electric-driven 
Northern Nilrolioy Steel Rotory fuel Oil 
Pump over two Whitlock-Dorling special 
type Fuel Oil Preheoters. Accessory equip- 
ment includes Spence Temporoture Regula- 
tor and Spence Governor, Darling Oit Relief 
Valves. 

3. Montreal Locomotive Works. Montr^Ml. 
Que. — Unit consisting of one 7Vi" x 4 Vi 

X 8" Darling Horizontal Duplex Steam Pump, 
one series 4000 electric -driven Northern 
Nitfotloy Steel Rotary Fuel Oil Pump over 
three Whitlock-Dorling Fuel Oil Heoiers, 
Accessory equipment includes No. 931 Syl- 
phon Temperature Regulator, Fisher Purrr^ 
Governor, Dorling Oil Relief Valves. Darl^ 
Duplex Suction and Discharje Strainers, 




I 

w 



S'J. 



i \ 





bronze oil relief valves 



Automatic fegulQting with boll leot design volve. There ore no gu.des ro bock the po. 
oreo arid the spherical valve is self deoning. Availoble in both the hond wheel adiustm. 
or prelected bonnet types. The laller for use where a permonenl odiustment is required t 
moinloin a fixed pressure releoie. The exiro long spring assures smooth pressure regulatio 
free from chattering. Springs ore reodily interchongeoble to prov.de o w.de ronge of pressur 
odiustment. 

TABLE VI 



Outlet 



S)jc 


A 


B 


c 


:.," 


6\, 


'■". 


»■% 


I" 


8'Sm 


1^ 


1^ 


,,- 


9% 


2^' HI 


2^U 




9% 


2^U 


2-'i« 


»2" 


12 


V'n 


3Vh 


•2L/' 


12 


3V« 


3'h 





€ 



'ftonnel Type Onl^f 

All dimentioii in inchei. 



HAND WHCEL 
ADJUSTMENT 




darling duplex suction strainers 




type "W 



ff 



Of rugged design, \t is o dependable unit and often used i 
suction lines from oil tanks and olher special application- 
Made Jn sizes from 4" lo 8'\ 
Companion flonges included os port of the unit. 
Moximum working pressure 15 lbs, per sq, in. 

TA8LE Vn — DiMENSIONS OF DARLING DUPLEX STRAINER 



TKe duplet suction slfoinef shows to greatest odvonloge 
where continuous operation is required; it it possible to 
shut off one stroiner ond use the ott^ef, permitting the first 
one to be cleoned ond made feady in o few moments for 
future use. 



4 
5 

6 



ro f ICC 

24 

28% 
30 



l)f«r«ll 



OTtriH 



28 


16^ 


32 Vi 


19% 


34 


2iy, 



irffintrrrnitvflJ 
15% 



«t>gM 

ibt. 

600 
790 
950 



< 



All d>Ai«fii.DA» jn inctiti. 



i>« 



ii« 



(9* 



d 



arling 



duplex discharge strainers 




This cast !ron duplex strainer has a wide appli- 
cation in many industries, but is particularly 
suited to Fuel Oil Burning installations. 

The principal advantages of Darling Type "D"' 
Duplex Stroiners ore as follows; 

No valves — a 90-degree turn of the handle 
changes from one basket to the other. 

Positive adjustment of tapered plug valve by 
means of jock screw. 

Strainer basket being in two parts is more 
readily cleaned. 

TABLE VIH 



SJie 




type ' D 



n 



Double basket (the combined area of whose 
perforations is from six to ten times the cross 
sectional area of the pipe and about twice the 
area of other makes of strainers). 

Designed so thot when well cover is removed, 
level of liquid in well is lowered, exposing top 
of basket for removal. Connection provided at 
base for draining oil if required. 

Handle partially covers basket-well which is in 
use, leaving exposed the well which is out of 
commission ond free to be cleaned. In no posi- 
tion of handle is it possible to stop the flow. 
Maximum working pressure 100 lbs. Also avail- 
able in cast bronze or cost steel for higher 
pressures if required. 




Fig. 3 



whitlock-darlingi special type 'V 

fuel oil heater 



i 




Type "V" Fuel Oil Heoter unit exlension type head. This 
lype of head has verHcol oil connections thus ellminoting 
the necessity of disconnecting piprng when cleoning tubes. 
Available with top brocket if required. 



i 




BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 



HALIFAX, N.S. 

E. S- Stephenson & Co. Ltd. 155 Granville Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.ft. 
E. S. Stephenson & Co. Ltd, 15 Dock Slreet 

QUEBEC, P.Q. 
W. J. Banks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIDA, P.O. 
Rene Beaudet & Cie Ltee 122 High Street 

TIMMINS, ONT. 

Polricio Engineering Ltd, 168 Third Ave, 

OTTAWA, ONT. 

Darting Bros. Ltd. 13 Rideou Street 



TORONTO, ONT. 

Dorling Bros. Ltd. 137 Wellington St. W, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Darling Bros. Ltd. 123 Princess Street 

CALGARY, ALIA. 

H. F. Clorke & Co. Ltd. Ml 4 Fifth Si. W. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Frank Darling & Co. Ltd, 1 144 Homer Street 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Cloyton Construction Co. Ltd. 198 Woter Street 




HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS 



It K II T II E K N L nil T E I) 

140 PRINCE ST, MONTREAL, CANADA 



€ 



SINCE 18 8 8 



r^Mcsr:^- 



BULLETIN 40A 



y 



i!s>'^ 



/ 



--\ 




n!\V 



^s^^ 



•s'z 



FOR HOSPITALS - LAUNDRIES - TEXTILE MlLiS - FINISHING PLANTS * 
HOTELS * APAATMENT HOUSES * SCHOOLS - COLLEGES - PROCESS 
AND GENERAL INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 



THE WHITLOCK MANUFACTURING CO., HARTFORD 10, CONNECTICUT 





I 




The Whitlock Type K Storage Heater needs 
no iniroduction to our many friends throughout the 
country. The advantages of the storage type of 
heater for varying hot water demand rates is well 
known. This bulletin has been written for the con- 
venience of architects, engineers and purchasers to 
facilitate their seleCTion of Whitlock Type K Storage 
Heaters for conditions normally found in buildings of 
various classifications. 

Where the demand for hot water is intermittent, 
and/or where the sieam or heating medium supply is 
intermittent, the storage heater is preferable to an mstan- 
taneous heater. For example, consider a typical case where 
the hot water demand rate at 180°F. is as follows during a 
one hour period: 

First 40 minutes — No hot water drawn. 
Last 20 minutes — 1000 gallons of hot water 

withdrawn. 
Since the 1000 gallons was drawn in 20 minutes, the 
actual average flow rate is 50 G.P.M. or 3000 G.P.H. An instan- 
taneous heater to handle this requirement would have to be 
designed to heat at the rate of 3000 G.P.H. and would require 
steam at the rate of 105 boiler H.P. The Whitlock Type K Storage 
Heater, with a storage capacity in excess of 1000 gallons, will heat 
this 1000 gallons over a period of one hour and will use steam ai 
the rate of 35 boiler H.P. 

A Whitlock Type K Storage Heater, properly sized for the 
requirements, will absorb heat from any available quantit)' of exhaust 
steam or condensate, even at non-uniform flow rates, and deliver hot 
water at the desired temperature, also at irregular demand rates. If the 
quantity of exhaust steam or hot condensate is insufficient to produce 
enough hot water, additional live steam may be supplied through a 
separate heating element provided for this purpose when required. 




4 



1 



Cvpyrighf I9y0 hy T*# WhUhtk 



' 



to 



9» 




The Whitlock Type K Storoge Heater is nexlbfe 
in design to focilitate its selection for individual 
requirements. 

HORIZONTAL HEATERS 

This h [he preferred posiiion jnd ihe heater h 
furnished and equipped accordingly unless otherwise 
specified- The healing element is installed close lo the 
bottom of the shell 10 ukc maximum advatiuge of hot 
water ^corage. Bronze tube supports are furnished when 
dne length of tube bundle indicates their use, and 
these, in turn, are secured to the shell. The entire 
bundle is removable for inspection. Heaters are fur- 
nished w ith supporting cradles drilled for anchor bolts. 

VERTICAL HEATERS 

>Xhen space ts limited, this may be the preferred 
method of installation, and when so ordered will be 
furnished and equipped accordingly. Vertical heaters 
are supported by three removable pipe legs complete 



with floor flanges or when indicated by purchaser the 
heater may be supported from the floor by means of 
structural steel supports. Unless otherwise specified, the 
distance from bottom of hearer to floor level will be 12", 

COMBINATION HEATERS 

When heat is supplied from several sources, il is 
desirable !o use a separate heating element for each 
source of supply. For example, if a part of the heating 
is to be done with exhaust steam and the balance 
with live steam, the exhaust steam heating element 
should be located low in the shell to get the maximum 
use from the exhaust steam. A separate heating element 
for live steam should be used and installed above the 
exhaust steam element, either in the same end or at the 
opposite end. Likewise, if part of the hearing is 10 be 
done with hot condensate, or condensate flash from a 
receiver, the heating element should be located low in 
the shell, or. if more convenient, in a separate shell 
entirely. While the accompanying photograph indi- 
cates two separate heating elements — one for the pri- 
mary heat source and the other for the live steam — the 
combination heater can be furnished with a single heat- 
ing element, properly partitioned, to accept both heat- 
ing sources — each at a different pressure. The com- 
bination heater can be furnished for vertical or 
horizontal installation. 




WATER OUTLn_ TMtRMOMfTEB CONN. WATEB fWlf VALVE CONN 
^* 4 » 



CIVCUIATION 



THERMOSTAT 
CONN 




} t ^ \ CONDENSATC OUTlET 

WATER INIET 



Fig. 1. Type K Storage Heater, Horizonul Design 




WATEB INIET 



*AT1> IH|*» 



HUD ILOW 



riKULATlOH 



WATCH OUTlET 



THERMO WETEI* 
CONNECTION 

WATER RELIEF 
[lar itdfl) 




■ a£GULATO» 
CONNECTION 



STEAM INLET 



At» RcLlEt 

connection 

condensate 
Outlet 



VACUUM BREAKER 
CONNfCTlON 



Fif . 1- Type K Storage Heater, Combination Design 



Fig. 3. Type K Storage Heater, Vertical Design 





MATERIALS 

O F 

CONSTRUCTION 




I 



The shells and heads of Whitlock Type K Storage 
Heaters may be constructed of carbon steel, stainless 
steel, Everdur, copper, nickel, or of any other material 
which can be formed and welded, including also 
stainless steel-clad steel or nickel-clad steel, etc. The 
choice of materials depends upon the local water 
conditions, purity of hot water desired, and, of course, 
the economic considerations. 

STANDARD STEEL SHELL HEATERS 

It is well known that steel in contact with water 
is generally subject to corrosion. This is particularly 
true of steel in contact with water which is being 
heated, because the oxygen released as the water 
temperature is raised attacks the steel, producing iron 
oxide or rust As a general rule, however, the race of 
corrosion, rusting or pitting is slow — so slow, in 
fact, that many Whiilock Type K Storage Heaters 
with steel shells which were installed over a quarter 
of a century ago are still in satisfactory every day 
service. Corrosion or pitting is quite independent 
of the grade or class of steel used, and the rate of cor- 
rosion or pitting is much more rapid in some locali- 
ties than in others. It is good practice, therefore, 
to add a corrosion allowance of * ,,/' to * a" to the 
thicknesses shown in the tables on Pages 8 and 9. 

Note: It is not necessary and is actually more 
expensive to specify a higher design pressure than 
conditions warrant instead of specifying a corrosion 
allowance. Per example, in specifjing an A.S.M,E, 
60" X 16S ' Type K Storage Heater for U)0^ design 
pressure, the minimum thickness required for lOOri 
design pressure is W shell and Vi^j" heads. If a 
heavier shell is preferred, say, Vh" x ^4" <to insure 
longer life against corrosion) it will be noted that 
this heavier thickness appears under the heading of 
175# design pressure. However, if the design pressure 
is specified as I75#, it is necessary to design the 
bolted joints and all other parts for the full working 
pressure of 175#, which results in an unnecessary 
expense. The specifications should read as follows: 
■Furnish 1— Whitlock 60" x 168" Type K 

Storage Heater designed for lOOfr per sq. in. 

working pressure, shell to be Vs" thick with 

¥4" thick heads'". 
The low cost of Whitlock Type K Storage Heaters 
with steel shells favors their use in buildings where 
slow corrosion is tolerable. 

EVERDUR SHELL HEATERS 

The Whiilock-Everdur Type K Storage Heater is 
standard equipment for installations where the water 
is known to be actively corrosive to steel and in 
installations where it is imperative that the hot water 
be not contaminated with iron oxide. 



Everdur is a silicon bronze with a corrosion 
resistance comparable with copper and having a 
tensile strength comparable with thai of steel, 
Whitlock-Everdur Heaters are equipped wiih non- 
ferrous tube sheets, tubes and manhole covers so that 
the water passing through the shell comes in ct>ntact 
with nothing but non-ferrous metals. 

ETERNO (COPPER-LINED) HEATERS 

Whitlock-Eterno Heaters have a flange quality 
steel shell lined with electrolytic sheet copper. The 
steel shell is sufficiently heavy to accommodate the 
full working water pressure, while the sheet copper is 
of a thickness ample to prevent corrosion. 

Extreme care is taken in the forming, fitting, and 
joining of the copper sheet to assure tightness and to 
assure protection of the steel shell. 

Small tapped openings are made through Everdur 
spuds welded to both the steel shell and to the copper 
inner shell. Larger connections are made through a 
sleeve of copper which is rolled back over the outer 
shell flange. 

ALLOY SHELL HEATERS 

Where conditions demand iheir application, 
stainless steel, nickel, monel and stainless steel-clad 
or nickel-clad shells can and have been furnished. 
Your local Whitlock representative will be glad to 
examine your individual requiremenis and offer 
recom mend a 1 1 o ns . 

NON-METALLIC COATED STEEL 
SHELL HEATERS 

The application of non-metallic coatings — enam- 
els, plastics, cement, etc, to the interior surface oi 
a steel shell — provide low cost protection against 
shell corrosion. Whitlock Manufacturing Standards 
cover detailed procedure and steps for the effective 
application of approved coalings. Recommendations 
are available upon request* 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Both shell and heating elements of Whitlock 
Type K Storage Heaters are hydrostatically tested 
to pressures required by the customer, state regula- 
tions or special codes. In lieu of an indicated test 
requirement, Whitlock Manufacturing Standards 
require that the heater be tested at a pressure not 
less than 150'i of the specified working water 
pressure. 

Construction is available according to Whitlock 
Manufacturing Standards, A.S.M.E. Code for Unfired 
Pressure Vessels, and other special codes. 



T 




Fig. •■ Norwalk General Hospira!. Norwalk. Conn. 



Fig, 9, Manheim Laundr>'« Philadelphia, Pa« 




HORIZONTAL STORAGE 
HEATER DIMENSIONS 



-C-* 



CONNECTION 




S-SIEAM 
tNLET 




O'WATER 
OVTIET 



rfiEllEF VALVE CONNECTION 




T -CONDENSATE 
OUTLET 



Vt- VACUUM 
lltEAKEB 

CONNECHON 



AIR VENT 
CONNECTION 




shells hdvei"fB"hoo<J- 
hoie on cent«rline. 

30" diomefc »KeH hoi 
1 1" ji 15" monhoJ* on 
cer>ler1in«, 

36"dkom0ief ond toro*r 
iheMi hoY* M" K 15" 
mo n hole off «n»erf(ne, 
o% shown. 



11" ■15" 
MANHOIE 



D-WATER 
INLET 



F-CIRCUUTION 









TABLE A-Shells 


















1A 


BLh 


B-l 


iea 


ting ti 

~ — i- 


em 


en 


rs 


— 


















~ 










Stanoahd 


PiPi 


Lrt. 




























(4 















£ 


-3 








CNADLES 


CKADLFS 



























E 

Z 


C 
if 

c 

^ ' 

r 
S 

c 




< 




< 

T 

X 


c 
Jt 

Im 

ft — 

H 


d 


3 


e 

c 
n 

Lb 


C 
^ 

c 

n c 


S 





1 c 
zx 





Oh 


c 

. 

"^ e 

fT- 




c 

Id 

\ 


Uh 

^0 






- 




Si 
1 

z 





ij — 

^ 

ltd 
lii 

r^ = 


•■rm — 



il 

Is 




Q 1 

Al 


m 

<: 

6t 


*= e 

1 ^ 

is 


3c 

IT] C 


If*- 

^£ 

c 
_ b 


= 

St 

1 fl 


c 


Id 
ts 

1 


1 
4 


iin 

HO 

no 


18 

24 

24 


60 

72 
60 

72 


400 
450 
600 
700 
ftOO 


2 
2 
2 
2 


2 
■» 
1 
2 




10 
lU 

n 
n 
11 


^0 
36 
^0 
36 
42 


22 

IT 

2i 

2) 
23 


IB 
18 
19 
19 
19 


24 
36 
22 
34 
46 




ll.? 

I'. 2 

1 *:» 
1 ^ 
1 >.; 


n 
11 

14 
14 
14 


iv; 


12^ 
12>^ 

P 

17 


HO 
Hi 
H2 
H5 
[£4 
H5 


100 

150 
200 
250 
500 
3^0 


48 
60 
72 
84 
108 
120 


7S 

80 

90 

100 

110 

115 


9>.. 

9V.' 
9'^ 
9 'A 
9V.i 


6", 
6>.. 
61-. 

6"^ 
6^^ 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


at 


< 

X 


l^ui 
Ivm 
I'm 

iMii 

1^., 


2 

2 

2 
2 


6 

H 
■3 


170 

im 

J40 
2 MO 


50 
^0 
M) 
SO 


60 
72 
84 

96 


750 
850 

1050 


3 
3 
3 
5 


2 

> 

1 

2 




12 
12 
1 1 

12 


30 
M^ 
42 
4B 


24 
24 
24 
24 


20 
20 
20 
20 


20 
52 
44 
56 


3 

i 

3 


1"* 

1 U 


19 
19 
19 
19 


2<^ * 
2^2 

21 t 


2P , 
21".. 
21" , 
21'.^ 




H6 
H7 
lift 
H9 


400 
500 
550 
600 


60 

72 
72 
84 


200 
210 
215 
220 


12' > 
12"? 
12" 7 

l7iT 


7>'i 




2 
2 
2 

3 





Ik 




LO 
M 


s4n 

400 

4sn 
5un 


36 
46 


R4 


1 ^00 


^ 


1 




T4 


41 


76 


2? 


40 


^ 


1 ^'^ 


21 '-2 


2'^ 


24;, 




HIO 


-00 


96 


250 


12'7 


'I' 




2 


-- 




•J6 
108 


14^0 


i 


] 




14 


4H 


?6 


31 


57 


5 


l"4 


21"-i 


2'> 


24^^ 




Hll 


800 


96 


260 


12>7 


7^3 




2 


J^ 


■5!" 




HiOO 


^ 


1 




14 


^4 


^6 


7? 


64 


3 


^N 


2P.> 


2'J 


24*. 




H12 


900 


108 


270 


12".; 


7»j 




k. 




2^'^ 






\(* 


l?0 


1800 


s 


> 


■> 


14 


6U 


26 


22 


"6 


3 


IV4 


21'^ 


2^1 


24^.. 




H13 


1000 


120 


285 


\2Vi 


ni 




2 


2^^, 




U 
15 
16 
17 


5*0 


4' 


96 


1850 


■1 


"* 




r 


48 


'9 


?6 


44 


3 


7 


25 1-, 


2''> 


291? 




HU 


1250 


84 


370 


15l;» 


71? 




2 


2Vi 




42 


1 ''0 


2 150 


'1 


-y 


? 


17 


60 


''■I 


26 


68 


3 


1 


25J? 


21^ 


29J, 




H15 


1500 


108 


425 


I5U 


/^'i 






^ 


2^., 




M-l 


2500 


4 


J 


> 


IT 


— 1 


29 


26 


92 


s 


2 


2 5 ''J 


2'.j 


29' J 




H16 


1750 


120 


450 


1 5 '.., 


7'.; 


> 


2 


X 


2J:» 




TO 


42 


16ft 


2900 


4 


1 


> 


1" 


84 


29 


26 


1L6 


3 


2 


25 '/J 


^'J 


291 1 




H17 


2000 


96 


570 


181. 


81/ 


fl 


2L^ 


31. . 




1H 


a"o 


AH 


1>0 


JB50 


4 


1 


; 


18 


M\ 


^0 


27 


66 


2:'ii 


2 


29 


3 


14 




1118 


2400 


120 


620 


IHI . 


8'/ 


6 


7N 


T 


^1'* 




lOSCI 


4H 


144 


*25C 


4 


» 


1 


IH 


-1 


30 


>T 


9l» 


2 K 


t 


29 


3 


34 




HI»A 


2500 


120 


630 


I8>. 


8". 7 


6 


I'-f 


< 


3 * 




■>Q 


1^50 


4H 


168 


*70( 


4 


; 


1 


18 


84 


iO 


27 


H4 


2 A 


2 


29 


3 


14 




my 


2K00 


132 


670 


181., 


Hi> 


6 


2* F 


n 


*> * 




71 


1400 


4a 


|y2 


4L0( 


4 


J 


1 


IH 


96 


50 


Zf 


L38 


2>s 


I 


29 


5 


54 




Hi9A 


3000 


132 


695 


18" , 


8": 


6 


2 b 


-r- 


3V. 




T 


nao 


S^ 


120 


^250 


4 




* 


20 


60 


32 


30 


60 


2^/8 


2 


33 


3 


38 




H20 


3200 


96 


860 


21 


9^^ 


8 


2l.> 




4"'1M 




Jl 


1 sou 


S4 


UJ 


M0(. 


4 




2 


20 


!l 


32 


30 


84 


'l'^ 


2 


33 


3 


^8 




H20A 


5500 


lOB 


005 


2\ 


9-Vf, 


H 


7U 


r\ 


4-'n, 




24 


1500 


S4 


Kit 


4201 


A 




1 


JO 


84 


\z 


30 


10ft 


2 'fl 


2 


33 


3 


38 




H2I 


3600 


108 


92 r 


2^ 


9^S 


8 


11 




4'^,: 




2S 


L800 


54 


192 


4700 


4 




1 


20 


90 


32 


30 


152 


2 P 




33 


3 


38 




H22 


4000 


120 


950 


21 


9Vw 


A 


2tj 





4--,n 




26 

17 


L300 
1 ftOO 


60 
60 


120 
144 


450c 
■190C 


4 
4 




1 
5 


20 
20 


60 

-r ■* 


32 
12 


30 
30 


60 
84 


3 


2 
2 


37 
37 


3 
3 


42" J 

42>^ 




H23 
H2 3A 


4400 
4500 


132 
132 


I02t 
1040 


21 
2 1 


9^» 
9*S 


8 
8 


2'. 
2Vi 


^■^ 


4Vin 




28 
79<" 


I'^OU 

2:00 

19^0 
2650 


60 
60 
66 
66 
66 


L6H 
192 
14^ 
I6B 
192 


S60t 
620C 
SiOC 
600C 
715C 


4 
4 

4 
4 
4 




2 

> 

2 
> 


20 
20 
2» 
22 
22 


84 
96 
84 
84 
96 


32 
32 
34 
34 
34 


30 
30 
32 
32 
52 


tOft 

132 

80 

104 


3 

\ 
\ 
3 


2 

1 

2 
2 


3.' 
17 
41 
41 
41 


3 

3 
4 
4 

4 


42" n 

J2I ' 
46" . 
46' ■ 
461 1 




H24 
H24A 

H25 
H26 


4 SOU 
5000 
540U 
60D(, 


96 

96 

108 

!20 


1200 
1215 
1 300 
158C 


24 
24 

24 
24 


9^^ 

9*H 

9^h 


LO 
10 
10 
10 


3 

3 
3 




5-"'in 
5^1.. 




30 
S2A 


noo 


71 


L44 


570{ 


4 




71-S 


>3 


77 


35 


34 


-/ 


i 


6 


40 


4 


51 




H27 


7000 


108 


1900 


28 


11 


10 


i 


If 


GVh 




J70O 
2 "00 


71 


I6f4 


64 0( 


4 




?l -• 


?^ 


84 


15 


34 


lor 


* 


6 


4fl 


4 


51 




HlTfl 


750( 


108 


1965 


28 


11 


11! 


4 





6Si 




78 


14-1 


'^20( 


4 




' i.n 


?-! 


7-> 


36 


36 


77 


3 


6 


40 


4 


55" . 




H2ft 


800t 


120 


205^ 


28 


11 


h; 


1 


s 


6V* 




^ '00 


7ft 


I6H 


805( 


4 




21* 


7J 


fiA 


^r 


36 


9^ 


1 


6 


40 


4 


551 , 




H29 


900< 


152 


2I6C 


28 


11 


LO 


1 


a. 


<»'« 




5:C 


.roo 


78 


192 


«90t 


4 


2^? 


1^2 


24 


96 


36 


36 


IIL 


3 


6 


40 


4 


551 . 




H30 


lOOOf 


1 14 


230( 


2ft 


LL 


10 1 3 


■< 


6^■« 






VERTICAL STORAGE 
HEATER DIMENSIONS 




C -WATER 
OUTIET 



K" THERMO 
CONNECTION 



L- STEAM 
INLET 

W VACUUM 
BREAKER 
CONNECTJON 
T 

1' 



E- CIRCULATION 





1" ftEHEF VALVE 
CONNECTION 



CONNECTION 



H' AIR 

RELIEF 

CONNECTION 



M-CONDENSATE 
^^ OUTLET 




18" and 24" dJomef*r 
ihelU ho-e 4" " S'" 
hondhale off ceni«rline. 

30" dio meter end lor9er 

ihelli hc]«« 11" m IS' 
pnonhoJe off c<n*fl»ne, 
01 ihown. 



y////////////^ 









TABLE 


C-Shell5 








TABLE D— Heoting Elements 


















'rf 






Pipe 






























c 
















LJ^f- 

Si" P P* 1 Ff T 








^ 
u 






c 


-J 








w 

*- 
c 


in 


B 

? 

m 

C 



(5 


C 
b 

i 


O 

c 

a 

LA 

7 

Id 


c 

¥. 


1 


c 

e 


If 

.2::i: 


— Zj 

c e 


c 

'— 

£ c 


C 
b 

F 


— 






= 11 

■- 


1! 




it 


2 ' 


'd 
£c 



11 

= e 

- c 


IB* 

c — 

1^ 






□ o 

i. fl — 


3 
2 




1 
< 


u 
& 


1 "^ 

JO 


Q 


1- ^ 


S 

;^-= 


1 " 


3 
^ 


—• 




Z 




25 


3if 




^ 

^ 

^ n 




1 c 


1 a 


ii 


1 ^ ^ 


IV 


60 


18 


60 


400 


1 


■> 




10 


12 


9 




• 


HV-i 


150 


18 


160 


12 W 


3 


2 


2*i 


3rb 




IB 


zv 


75 


18 


72 


450 


2 


2 




10 


12 


9 




^ 
■ t 




HV-2 


2U0 


24 


n» 


121/j 


3 


2 


2% 


3H 




21 


5V 


no 


24 


60 


600 


2 


2 




11 


15 


10 




1' . 




HV-5 


250 


24 


2 50 


I2li 


3 


2 


IVa 


3H 




2t 


4V 


nn 


24 


72 


700 


■? 


■> 




11 


15 


10 




V , 




HV-4 


300 


3'* 


255 


I2'/J 


5 


2 


1^4 


3n 




27 


5V 


150 


_'4 


84 


800 


2 


^ 




11 


15 


10 




ll , 




HVo 


350 


36 


260 


I2l.i 


J 


2 


2'/i 


3iS 




27 


6V 


ITO 


^0 


60 


750 


S 


1 




12 


17 


11 




IV. 




HV-6 


400 


42 


335 


I2«.z 


i 


1 


2% 


)^ 




30 


TV 


200 


SO 


7? 


850 


s 


2 




12 


17 


11 




1'.. 




HV ' 


500 


30 


340 


151-1 


5 


2 


2T-* 


4J^ 




24 


av 


240 


^0 


84 


950 


1 


2 




12 


IT 


11 




1' . 




ti\ ^ 


550 


30 


350 


15'. 


J 


y 


2U 


4>^ 




24 


9V 


280 


SO 


96 


1050 


* 


2 




12 


17 


11 




1'- 




{i\ -J 


600 


36 


360 


151^ 


5 


2 


24i 


4Vi 




27 


lOV 


340 


sr. 


84 


1300 


* 


2 




14 


19 


11 




2^2 




HV^IC 


700 


36 


375 


I5V-, 


5 


I 


2*i 


4\^ 




27 


IIV 


400 


sr. 


"J 6 


1450 


* 


2 




14 


19 


11 




2^ J 




Hv^n 


800 


42 


.385 


15^ 


5 


2 


24^4 


4^^ 




30 


I2V 


450 


Vt 


108 


1600 


\ 


? 




14 


19 


11 




21 > 




HV0 2 


900 


36 


400 


181; 


6 


2>j 


iV4 


5!^ 


6 


28 


13V 

14V 


500 


^(•> 


120 


1800 


3 


' 


1 


14 


19 


M 




21 ■ 




HV-13 


1000 


42 


415 


18U 


6 


III 


3^^ 


5'-^ 


6 


31 


5^0 


p 


^6 


1850 


4 


' 




17 


21 


M 




21 » 




HV-I4 


1250 


48 


570 


18 V^ 


6 


2'.j 


31^; 


5Vl 


6 


34 


15V 


6S0 


4' 


I'O 


2150 


4 


1 


2 


17 


21 


13 




21 > 




HV.15 


1500 


42 


600 


21 


B 


2' J 


4'%^ 


6Ji 


6:k 


31^ 


16V 


sno 


4? 


144 


2500 


4 


1 


2 


17 


23 


15 




2 1 ■ 




HV.16 


1750 


48 


790 


21 


B 


2'^ 


4^*,« 


fir- 


6:* 


34?ii 


ITV 


970 


4' 


168 


2900 


4 


2 


2 


17 


23 


15 




2' 2 




HV-l- 


2000 


^4 


830 


^1 


8 


2'.i 


4.'V,„ 


CJ& 


6/8 


373^ 


18V 


870 


4^ 


no 


2850 


4 


7 


7 


18 


24 


15 




2 1 ' 




MV-18 


2400 


60 


BSO 


21 


8 


2'j 


4ri., 


6Vb 


fi^'B 


40T'( 


19V 


1050 


48 


144 


3250 


4 


2 


2 


18 


27 


IB 




2' j 




HV.19 


2800 


54 


1340 


24 


10 


3 


55tfl 


8U 


7!-i 


38!/fl 


TQV 


P50 


-tn 


168 


3700 


4 


7 


7 


18 


2T 


IB 




2' J 




KV^20 


3200 


60 


1430 


24 


lU 


3 


5Ha 


evb 


7V* 


41 Vk 


'IV 


MOf) 


48 


|0^ 


4100 


4 


1 


> 


18 


27 


18 




2W 




HV-21 


3600 


66 


1470 


24 


10 


J 


5^-> 


81.1, 


7!,'H 


44'i, 


22V 


1100 


54 


PO 


3250 


4 


? 


7 


20 


29 


18 




3 




HV.22 


4000 


U 


1510 


24 


10 


3 


y-u 


8r« 


7H 


47 Vh 


2iV 


1300 


54 


144 


3700 


4 


7 


7 


20 


29 


18 




S 




HV-2 3 


4400 


V2 


1560 


28 


10 


5 


6^T1 


P'^i 


744 


47^/4 


24V 


1500 


54 


168 


4200 


4 


2 


7 


20 


29 


18 




3 




HV-24 


4800 


72 


1600 


2B 


10 


3 


6V« 


9^h 


744 


47 H 


25V 


J 800 


54 


1^7 


4700 


4 


2 


? 


20 


29 


18 




3 




HV-25 


5400 


/2 


1700 


28 


10 


J 


6^ 


9^ 


74^ 


4744 


26V 


1300 


60 


I'O 


4300 


4 


2 


2 


20 


33 


20 




4 




HV-26 


6000 


84 


1800 


28 


10 


3 


6H 


9T^ 


744 


53 »/^ 


27V 


1600 


60 


144 


4900 


4 


2 


T 


20 


33 


20 




4 




HV'27 


7000 


84 


2440 


30 


12 


4 


SVi 


10"^ 


BH 


54^ 


28V 


[900 


60 


168 


5600 


4 


7 


2 


20 


33 


20 




4 




HV.28 


8000 


84 


2500 


30 


12 


4 


6Vi 


IO!j 


BJ'S 


54Vi, 


29V 


2200 


60 


192 


6200 


4 


2 


2 


20 


33 


20 




4 




HV-29 
HV^30 


9000 
10000 


84 
84 


2880 
3070 


36 
36 


14 
14 


5 

5 




12^4 
12^4 


10 
10 


56 
56 



I 



PRESSURE THICKNESS 

TABLES 
STEEL SHELL HEATERS 



Corrosion Allowance: Assree! is sub)^e to moderate 
corrosion by oxj'gen released from water being heated, 
it is good practice to add an allowance of ^\s' ^o ''*" *° 
the pressure thickness to act as corrosion allowance 
for greater durabilit}'. 



TABLE E — Whitlock Standard Steel Shell and Head Thicknesses 
Design Pressure lbs. per sq. in, -^ Dimensions in Inches 




SHELL 
OIAM. 


75 


100 


125 


150 


175 


200 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICXNESS 


SH£LL HEAD 


SHELL f HIAD 


SMtLL 1 HFAD 


SKILL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 1 HtAti 


SHELL 1 HIAD 


II 


1;4 




1 4 


3/2 


14 


3 « 


1 4 


3 8 


1 4 


3 


1 4 


3,2 


24 


1/4 




1 4 


3/2 


14 


3 e 


1 4 


38 


1 4 


3 


5 16 


1 2 


SO 


1/4 




1 4 


3.2 


1 4 


3 • 


S \<, 


1 2 


5' 16 


1/2 


3/0 


1 2 


M 


1/4 




1 4 


3/2 


S/16 


1 1 


5 16 


1.2 


3'B 


I /I 


7.16 


9 16 


42 


1/4 




1 4 


3/2 


5/14 


1 1 


3 • 


1 2 


7/16 


9'16 


9/16 


11/16 


42 


S/16 




5 U 


1-2 


3 2 


1 1 


" 16 


9 16 


9 16 


M 16 


58 


3-4 


54 


3/2 


1 4 


3 '2 


1.'2 


7 '16 


9 16 


12 


3 B 


9 16 


M 16 


5 8 


3 4 


40 


3/2 


* 


3 2 


1/2 


7 14 


9 16 


9 16 


M 16 


5 8 


3 4 


3 4 


" 8 


66 


3/2 




3/fl 


1 "2 


I .^ 


5 Ji 


9 16 


M 16 


3 4 


7 8 


3 4 


15 16 


72 


5/16 




1^2 


s a 


916 


11 16 


i-B 


3^4 


3/4 


7.'B 


7 8 


1 


70 


3/8 




l'2 


*■» 


9 16 


II 16 


3 4 


7/8 


13/16 


1 


15 16 


1-1 8 


24 


3/8 




1,2 


5/2 


S/8 


3 4 


y* 


15 16 


7'B 


]-] 16 


1 


1-3 16 


» 


7/16 


9 16 


9/16 


11/16 


3 4 


7 8 


7/8 


I-l 16 


I 


1-14 


1-1 8 


K3 8 


too 


1/2 




3/4 


7/8 


-^ B 


1 


IS 16 


1-3 16 


1-1 16 


1-3 8 


1-1 4 


1-9 16 


130 


9 16 


11 16 


3 4 


■' 8 


' 8 


1-1 8 


1-1 16 


1-5 16 


1-3 16 


1-9 16 


1^3 8 


1-i 4 




TABLE F - Minimum Steel Sheri and Head Thicknesses 
Furnished for A.S.M.E. Code Stamped Heaters 








De 


sign Pressure lbs, per 


sq. in. - 


- Dimensions in 


Inches 








SHtLL 
DIAM. 


75 


100 


125 


150 


175 


200 

THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


SHFLL 1 HIAD SHEIL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 1 HEAD 


1 SHELL : HEAD 


SMELL 1 HEAD 


SHEIL 


HEAD 


14 


ShHL and head (hickneu« n-ill aoi be furnished 






14 

5 16 


5.-16 
3 8 


\cii fhan i^- Btrhough A.S.M.E. Code ma 
resier fhrcJin^uei for ihcsc condicioni. 


y allov 


1 4 


5/16 


1/4 


3 2 






30 




1 4 


5.16 


5 16 


3 '8 


5 16 


7 16 


3 8 
7 16 


I '2 
9 16 


34 




1/4 


5 16 


5'14 


3 '2 


5 16 


7 16 


3 8 


1 2 


42 




t/4 


3 i 


S/14 


7/16 


3. '2 


1 3 


■^ 16 
1 2 


9 16 

11 16 


1 2 
9 16 


n 16 

3 4 


48 


1/4 


5/16 


5/16 


3 2 


3/B 


12 


7/16 


9/16 


24 


1 4 


316 


5 16 


3 B 


7 16 


1 2 


1 2 


9/16 


9 16 


tM6 


5 8 


3 4 


60 


5 16 


5 16 


3 8 


7 16 


7 16 


9 T6 


9 16 


5 8 


5 '8 


3 4 


M 16 


■^ 8 


66 


5 16 


3 8 


3 B 


12 


12 


5 8 


9 16 


11/16 


11 16 


13 16 


3 4 


15 16 


72 


5 16 


3 8 


7 16 


I 2 


9/16 


5 8 


5 8 


3/4 


3/4 


7'8 


13 16 


1 


76 


3 B 


7 16 


12 


9 16 


9 16 


11/16 


11^16 


7/8 


13 16 


t 


15 16 


1-1 8 


24 


3 8 


1.2 


1/2 


5 e 


S 6 


3/4 


3 4 


15/16 


7 8 


1-1 16 


t 


1-3 16 


94 


7; 16 


9 16 


9 16 


]] 16 


11 16 


7.8 


7 8 


1-1 16 


1 


1-1.4 


I-I/8 


1-* 8 


108 


12 


5/8 


5.8 


13/16 


13/16 


1 


15 16 


1-3 16 


1-1/16 


1-3/8 


1-1/4 


1-9 16 


tlD 


9 16 


11 16 


11 ^f» 


'' B 


"^ S 


T-I 8 


!-l 16 


1-5 16 


1-3 16 


1-916 


1-3 8 


1-^ A 



NOTES: Thicknerises are e>:pTi'Ssed in noc less ihan multiples 
of sixteenihs of an inch, ManhoU frame is properly rein- 
forced to meet A.S.M.E. Code requirements, and gasket 
surface is machined- 

■ 

Plate and heads as listed in above tables are regularly 
carried in our stock for many sizes of heaters. Stock is 
held within a reasonable minimum by eliminating the 
stocking of less commonly used sizes. Sizes shown in bold 
face type represent heaters for which raw materials are 
carried in stock at all times. 

fOR All WHITLOCK TYPE K STORAGE HEATERS - Shells \0" 

in diameier and larger are pro\ided with 1 1' x 15" manhole 
m one head- Shells smaller than 30" diameter are provided 
with G X 8" handholes. 

A.5.M.E. CODE STAMPED HEATEBS (TABLES F AND K) - The 
thicknesses giien are m accordance with the rules a-cording 
to the 1949 A.S,M,E. Code forUnfired Pressure Vessels. These 
rule* were continued in the 1950 Code, accompanied bv an 
alternate basis for design which, in general, permits sli^tly 
lesser shell and head thicknesses for a given diameter of 
shell and a given design pressure, but only when accom- 
panied by compliance with certain additional requirements 
as to manufacturing procedure, etc. 



The implications of these permissive alternate rules have 
been carefully analyzed and it is our present considered 
opinion that adherence to the rules of the 1949 Code will 
give to the user of a steel shell storage type water heater 
a better value for the investment than adherence to the 
alternate permissive rules We are therefore continuing, in 
this edition of Bulletin No, AOA. the above table unchanged. 

There is another consideration which must he kept in 
mmd. A number of states and cities currently require that 
all storage type water heaters installed within the limits of 
their respective iunsdicfions comply with the requirements 
of the existmg (1949 and earlier) rules of the ASME 
Code for unfired pressure vessels. Until these authorities 
have formally accepted the 1950 Code, with the alternate 
permissive rules referred to above, ii will presumably be 
necessary to conimue compliance with the 1949 Code in 
connection with the manufacture of storage t\pe water 
heaters to be installed within fhe limiu of their respective 
lurisdictions- 

A heater w-hich does not bear the A.SME. clover leaf 
stamped on ihe shell is not €omiructed tn full accordance 
w.th the ASME Code. All Whitlock heaters which are 
constructed in full accordance with the A.SM.E. Code are 
so stamped, 

LOOK FOR THE CLOVER LEAF. 




8 



I 




PRESSURE THICKNESS 
• TABLES , 

EVERDUR SHELL HEATERS 




SHELL 
OIAM. 



24 

30 
» 
42 
44 

54 

60 
44 
72 
74 
14 
94 
104 
110 





SHHL 
OrAM> 



Shell and head thicknesses as ihey appear in Tables G 
and K below have been carefully calculated to minimize 
the effect of stress corrosion cracking which can result 
with certain water conditions when high stress and tem- 
perature levels occur in service. 



ABLE 



G-Minimu fv^rdur Shell and Head Thicknesses 
Whittock Sfcndard Construction 

(Test Pressure ^ 1 H times Design Pressure) 
Design Pressure lbs. per sq, in. - Dimensions in inches 




75 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



)00 



125 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



0.06^ 
0.090 
0,112 
OJ34 

0,15:- 

0.179 
0.201 
0.224 
0,246 
0.269 
0.291 
0-3 14 
0.3^9 
0,405 
0.44"' 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



150 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



175 



200 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



107 

0.125 
0.1-13 
0.178 
0.2 1 4 
0,2^0 
0,2B6 
0.321 
0.355 
0,593 
0.427 
0,464 
0.535 
0.606 



0,090 
0.120 
0,150 
0.180 
0,210 
0.240 
0-2"0 
0,300 
0,330 
0.360 
0,390 
0.420 
0.480 
0^40 
f.OU 



HEAD 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



0.143 


0,112 


o,rs 


0,134 


0.214 


0,157 


0.25U 


0.178 


0.285 


0,166 


0,t49 


0,20S 


0,179 


0,250 


0-209 


0.291 


0-238 


0.334 


0. 190 


0,186 


0.238 


0,224 


0.286 


0.261 


0,333 


0.298 


0,381 


0.238 


0.224 


0-298 


0.268 


0.358 


0.315 


0.416 


0.357 


0-475 


0.286 


U.26I 


0.357 


0.313 


0.428 


0.J65 


O-500 


0.417 


0,571 


0.333 


0.298 


0.416 


0.358 


0.5OO 


0,417 


0.583 


0,476 


0.666 


380 


0-336 


0,476 


0.404 


0.570 


0.47O 


0-666 


0-535 


0-761 


0,42*> 


0.373 


0.536 


0.448 


0.642 


0.522 


0.750 


0.596 


0.856 


0.476 


0,410 


0.596 


0,492 


0-714 


0.573 


0.831 


0,655 


0,951 


524 


0.447 


0.655 


0.538 


0.785 


0-626 


0.915 


0.714 


1,049 


0.5''l 


0.485 


0.715 


0.582 


0,856 


0-676 


l.OOO 


0.772 


1.142 


0.619 


0.522 


0.775 


0.627 


0,950 


0.-'30 


1,081 


0,832 


1,238 


0^14 


0,596 


0,895 


0,716 


1.072 


OJ35 


1,250 


0.951 


1.430 


HIO 


0,672 


1.010 


0.8OG 


1.140 


0,940 


1,330 


1.070 


1.525 


n.904 


0^46 


1.075 


0,8OS 


1.285 


1.045 


1.500 


1.190 


1 7ic> 




ABIE H~ 



dur Shell and Head Thicknesses 
Code Construction 



J 







Design Pr 


assure 1 


bs. per 


sq. in. - 


- Dimensions in 


Inches 








SHELL 
DIAM. 


75 


too 


125 


150 


175 


200 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


«HtLL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 


HE4P 


SHELL 


HEAtt 


SHELl HEAD 


^HELL HEAD 


SHELL HEAD 


11 


0.084 


0-115 


0.112 


O.MO 


0.140 


0-188 


0.168 


0,200 


0.195 


0.205 


0.223 


0.300 


14 


0,113 


o.n2 


0.150 


o.ns 


0.188 


0.188 


0.228 


0.26 i 


0-261 


0.307 


0-298 


0.350 


30 


0.141 


0.150 


0.T88 


200 


0,234 


0,250 


0.279 


0.300 


0.326 


0,350 


0-372 


0.400 


34 


0,169 


0-188 


0.224 


>50 


0,280 


0,313 


0.555 


0.375 


0,591 


0.438 


0-446 


0^00 


41 


0,19" 


0.225 


0.261 


CI. 100 


0.327 


0.5T5 


0-391 


0-450 


0.456 


0.525 


0.521 


0.600 


4a 


0.225 


0.265 


0,299 


0.450 


0,573 


0.418 


0.44" 


0,525 


0.522 


0.613 


0,595 


0."^00 


S4 


0,2 53 


300 


0..U6 


0.400 


0,420 


0,500 


0.502 


0.600 


0.586 


O,"00 


0.67O 


800 


60 


0.281 


0.338 


0.5^5 


(J. 4^0 


0,466 


0.565 


0.558 


0.675 


0,652 


0.788 


0,745 


0.900 


66 


0-509 


0.375 


0.411 


0.500 


0.513 


0.625 


0,615 


0.750 


0,716 


0.87 5 


0,819 


1.000 


71 


0,337 


0413 


0.448 


OS5<i 


0.560 


0.6BA 


0,670 


O.B25 


0,782 


0.965 


0.892 


1. 100 


71 


365 


0,450 


0,485 


0.600 


0.606 


0.750 


0.726 


0.900 


0,846 


1.050 


0-966 


1.200 


•4 


o/\^\ 


488 


0,525 


650 


0.65i 


0,813 


0,782 


0975 


o.9n 


1.138 


1,040 


1.^00 


94 


0.449 


n ^6* 


O-iO- 


0-^0 


0.'44 


0.95S 


0.894 


1 125 


1.041 


l,m 


1,190 


1.500 


108 


0.505 


6^8 


0.6" 2 


850 


0.840 


1.063 


1 .006 


1.200 


].1"2 


1 400 


1-340 


1.600 


110 


0.56r 


Til 


" U> 


950 


0.934 


1.12S 


[.118 


1.350 


1.302 


l.^"'5 


1 485 


1 8011 




TABLE K — M^^^^^Br^rdur Shell and Heod Thicknesses 
Where Working I ^^^H^" ^^^ Exceed 42V2% of Test Pressure.^ 

{for special Municipol or State Regulations) 
Pressure lbs. per sq, in. — Dimensions in Inches. 



Test Pressure 



200 



250 



300 



350 



Working Pressure 



85 



THrOCNESS 



sunt 



HEAD 



106,25 



THICKNESS 



18 


0.096 


14 


0.12^ 


30 


0,159 


36 


0,191 


41 


U.22h 


48 


0.254 


54 


0,J86 


60 


0.M8 


66 


0J49 


72 


481 


78 


0.4M 


U 


0,445 


96 


0.5D8 


T08 


0.572 


)30 


it.fi\'' 



0.1 2H 

0.14'^ 

0.1 "n 
o.:i3 

0.255 
0.2'>8 
0.14(1 

4J5 
0.4ft8 
0.510 
0.5^* 
0.6*8 
0.7?^ 
O NOH 



5HEM 

0.120 

0.1 5y 

O.IO'J 

0,23« 
0.2 7H 

0.158 
0. V.J8 

o,nr* 

0.476 
0.516 
0.55^. 
0635 

0-795 



HEAP 



127,5 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



148.75 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



0160 
0,U6 

0.2 I .4 

2f>f» 
03L9 
0-372 
0-425 
0.478 
0,531 
0,5H4 
0.fi3"7 
0,690 
0.7% 
0.V03 

1 009 



0.143 


0.192 


0. 1 C16 


0,224 


0.191 


0.224 


0-221 


0,261 


0,23« 


0.255 


0-277 


0.298 


0.2S6 


0-3 J 9 


0-^32 


0-3"* 


0.333 


0,38* 


0-18"' 


0-446 


0-3H1 


0.44" 


0.44 3 


0.521 


0.428 


0.510 


0.497 


0.595 


0.476 


0.5-4 


0.552 


0.6^0 


0.524 


0.03S 


0.609 


O-T'^J 


0-571 


0.^02 


0.fi65 


0.819 


0-6 IH 


0.-6f. 


0.720 


0.893 


0.66ri 


n.H29 


O.T75 


1 .042 


0.761 


0.957 


0.785 


l-[ t6 


0,1156 


LOK-i 


995 


I 190 


0.951 


1 NH 


r.10^ 


1 1^*1 



•Thkknewe* also suitable for A-S,M.E. CoJt- 



i ^nl^^nll. f iiin 



fcir wiirkjnp prt^ssurcs inclic.iied. 






SELECTING 
PROPER SIZE HEATER 



I 



The size of Whiclock Type K Storage Heater re- 
quired for different types of buildings can be 
determined from Table L as follows: 

Hourly hearing capacity = Hourly requiremeni 
X Hourly heating capacity factor. 

Storage capaciry t:^ Hourly heating capacity x 
Storage capacity factor 

Reference to Tables A to D will show correct size of 
shell and heating section at once. 

EXAMPLE: 

To illustrate the above method of selecting the 
proper heaien take the hot water requirements of a 
small hotel. 



Private lavatories 

Public lavartories 
Baihcubs ._ ,. 
Dishwashers 
Kiichen sinks 
Paniry sinks 
Showers 
Slop sinks 



100 ® 2 gals, each 200 gals, per hr 
10 t& S gals, each 80 gals, per hr. 
75 @ 20 gals, each 1.500 gah- per hr, 

2 @ 50 gals, each 100 gals, per hr. 

3 fT^ 20 gaU- each 60 gals, per hr, 
2 C^ 1 gals, each 20 gaU. per hr. 

24 @ "^5 gals, each 1,800 gals, per hr. 
8 @ 30 gals, each 240 gals, per hr. 



Maximum hourly 

requiremenis (totsl) 4,000 gals, per hr. 

Hourly heating capacity- equals 4,000 multiplied by 25' V 

<hourly heating capacity' iacion or I.OOO gal- per hour. 

Storage capacic> equals 1,000 multiplied by H0% (storage 
capatitj factor) or 800 gal. ^"iJ"se 



Shell si?e for 800 gal. No. 16 (42 x 144 in). Healing 
section of KOOO gaL capaciiv is No. HI 1. Heater required 
is Whiilock Type K No. 16H13 (or No, I6V HVI3 
vertical >. 

STEAM REQUIRED TO HEAT WATER 

The amount of steam per hour required to heat a 
given quantitj' of water through any temperature 
range and with any steam pressure can be determined 
from the following formula: 

Gallons per Hour X 8-35 
X Degrees Rise 



Latent Heat of Steam 



Pounds of steam per hour. 



Example; Required the amount of steam at 50 lbs. pressure 
CO hea( 10.000 G-P.H- from 40 lo l80^ 

10,000 X M3 X 140 ,.„„ .. . 

— -— Y — ^12,801 lbs. steam per hour. 

TABLE M - Latent Heat of Steam 



Sicam Prtuure, Ibi ejge 5 10 J5 20 30 35 40 

Latent Heat (B.iu.} .970 960 952 945 9J9 928 924 91^ 



Srearn PrtHure, Ibi, gage 4S 50 55 60 65 70 75 SO 
Laicnr Hear (B.Mi.) , 915 911 908 904 901 898 893 891 



Si earn Prt«ure. 

lbs tjpe 85 90 95 100 10^ HO 115 120 125 

L^itent Hear iB.i.o-l 888 886 883 880 8" flTS 872 N''0 86S 




TABLE L - Hot Water Fixture Copacity for Various Types of Buildings 

GoNons of 180°F. Water per Hour per Fixture 






Apart- 


Club 


nativm 


plfal 

1 


Hol«l 


Indus- 
trittl 
ploot 


Office 1 

build- Public 
ing bath 

1 


1 FrU 

r«ii- School 
d^ncfl 1 


C. A. 




Basins, private lavatory 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Z 


1 

2 


2 




Basins, public lavator>' 


4 


6 


8 


6 


8 


12 


6 


12 




M 


8 




Bathtubs 


20 


20 


30 


20 


20 


30 






20 


' * 


30 




Dishwashers 


15 


50 150 


' - 


50-150 


50-200 


20-100 


. . 




15 


20-100 


20-100 




Foot basins 


5 

_ 


3 


12 


3 


3 


12 


^ , 




3 


3 


12 




Kitchen smk 


10 


20 


■' 


20 


20 


20 


^ , 




10 


10 


20 




Laundry, stationary tubs 


20 


28 


-' 


28 


28 


■ ■ 


. . 




20 




28 




Pantry sink 


5 


10 


■ ■ 


10 


10 


■ ' 




9 


10 


10 




Showers 


75 


150 


235 


75 


75 


225 


■ V 


225 


75 


225 


225 
20 




Slop sink 


20 


20 


" 


20 


30 


20 


15 




15 


20 




Hourly heating capacity factor 


30% 


30*^ 


40% 


25% 


25% 


40% 


30% 


50% 


30% 


40% 


40'"o 




Storage capacity' faaor ^2^% 90% 


100% 


60% mr, 100% 


200% 


120% 


70% 


100% 


100% 































10 





The heating capaciiies of standard Whulock Tvne 
K. heating elemenis listed on Paiges 6 and 7 are based 

on heating ihe indicated flow rates from 40 CO 180 F 
when using steam at atmospheric pressure. In actual 
practice, however, conditions such as sieam pressure 
initial and final temperature may vary considerably 
Irom these standards. In order to compensate for 
these variables we list below suitable Conversion 
Factors which are generally adequate for installations 
where the ratio of hourly heating capacity to storage 
capacm- does not exceed approximately 4 to 1. 

To apply these factors locate the appropriate steam 
pressure table, start at the top of this table with 



the proper initial water temperature, and move down 
mat column to the required outlet water temperature 
indicated in the vertical columns to the left. The 
factors thus obtained, when multiplied by the stan- 
dard racings on Pages 6 and 7, give ratings for the 
required conditions. Typical examples of the use 
of the tables may be helpful: 

Example No, l. [Jetermint trapacit>' of H-i; heating ele- 
ment when heatiiig water (rom 50^ to 150 F- with iieam 
at 25 lbs. gage. Using tht^ labits as indicaiej abo\e we 
arrive at a factar oi l.H^. Vt'iih the standard rating of an 
H-13 healing clemeni 1.000 G-P,H.. we muhiplj KOOO x 
2.K~ which gives a rating of 2,8"0 G.RH. for the required 
conditions. 

Example No. 2. Determine standard heating element re- 
quired to heal 2,-100 G,P-H. water from 60 to IHO t. when 
supplied wiih 40 lbs. gage iteam. Again determining the 
conversion factor a^ above we arrive at 2,42. Now di\ idrng; 
2,400 ^ 2,42 equals 992 G.P.H. (standard rating). An 
HI 3 heating element with a standard 1,000 G.P.H. rating 
is satisfactory. 



'ersion Factors 




STEAM PRESSURE, 




^ . — - 


- 


LBS. GAGE 









INITIAL TEMP. 


40 


so 




fiNAL TEMP: 








100 


593 


4.r 1 




120 


2.69 


2 '--^ 




140 


1.94 


1 




150 


L65 


J 




160 


t 41 


! i' 




ISO 


1-OC 


J 1 




190 








300 




1 


- 


STEAM PRESSURE. 




25 




LBS. GAG£ _ ...... 






INITIAL TEMP, 


40 


so ' 




FINAL TEMPI 








100 


5--^5 


6.'^ 




110 


4.08 


4,54 




140 


5-06 


J. 30 




ISO 


2-6"^ 


> ,i " 




160 


J.36 


■*-..' 




ISO 


1.85 


l.'>4 




190 


}.6A 


1,-1 




ioo 


1-45 


rsi 


— 


STIAM PRISSURt 




70 


- 


LBS. GAGE 






INITIAL TIMP. 


40 


50 




riNAL TEMPt 








100 


7,B4 


9-2 B 




120 


5-62 


650 




140 


^.26 


4<W 




ISO 


y-B 


4 TfS 




160 


3-36 


J i.o 




leo 


2-71 


2.S6 




190 


2-45 


25* 


- 


200 


2,21 


:.32 


■► 



10 



40 



SO 



i Bl y5S 



60 



15 



40 



SO 



60 



20 



40 



50 



60 



H 




40 






SO 




60 




! «o 


40 


so 


60 


40 


50 


60 


40 


SO 


60 




1 

1 


., ■- 1 


T66 


9,42 


fi,09 


B.24 


10.08 


7.40 


8-77 


10.73 




■ 


-i n- 


5-18 


5.90 


4MH 


5,58 


6,38 


5,30 


5-93 


6.78 






J.SO 


j-ei 


4.20 


3-TB 


4.12 


4,^2 


4.02 


4.37 


4.81 






1 11* 


3-32 


359 


i-34 


3 59 


J. 89 


3.55 


3.82 


4-17 








2,91 


3.13 


2.96 


3.17 


3.40 


3,16 


3.37 


3.63 








2.28 


2,42 


2.37 


2,50 


2,64 


2.S1 


2.68 


2.83 








Z.Q4 


214 


2,13 


223 


2J5 


2.29 


2.39 


2.53 






..-4 


1 81 


1 90 


K92 


2.00 


2.00 


2,06 


2,15 


2 27 







90 




100 


125 




« 


so 


60 


40 


50 


60 


40 


50 


60 







'- — ■ 

lO.M 


1244 


9,00 


10.61 


13.00 


9,64 


11-71 


15-23 






A. 94 


"91 


6.46 


T.2B 


8,33 


7.16 


S.05 


9.16 






5.16 


5 66 


4.95 


5,40 


5.97 


5-47 


5,98 


6.50 






4 52 


4.92 


4-3B 


4.75 


5.16 


4.87 


5-27 


5-75 






, 00 


4JI 


393 


4,20 


4.55 


4.37 


4.67 


5.05 




02 


320 


339 


3.19 


3.37 


3-58 


3.55 


3.76 


4.00 




75 


2 89 


305 


2.86 


3.03 


3-20 


323 


3,39 


3.39 




2M^ 


2 61 


2."^ 


2.63 


2 74 


2,90 


2,95 


3 08 


3 25 




-^ — " 





















11 




I 



Whitlock Type K Condensate Coolers are de- 
signed to cool recurns from steam beating systems 
and steam-accuared equipment, thus partially or 
completely h^atitig the required service water. The 
condensate passes through the heating element, giv- 
ing up its heat to the water in the shelh Specifically, 
the condensate cooler 

(1) effects a considerable fuel saving where the 
condensate would otherwise be dumped to 
waste or would flash upon its introduction to 
a receiver, 

(2) cools condensate to a temperature at which 
it may be returned to the receiver or dumped 
to waste. In many cities local ordinances for- 
bid the discharge of hot wastes to the sewer. 

The Type K Condensate Cooler can be furnished 
in 3 standard single element design, with the con- 
densate handling all of the heating load, or in a com- 
bination element design, as explained on Page 3, 
where the condensate as the primary heal source is 
augmented by live steam as required. 

The storage tjpe of condensate cooler is preferable 
to the instantaneous type when the demand for hot 
water is intermittent. 

The capacity table lo be found on this page pro- 
vides full data for the selection of the suitable heating 
clement si/e for the required installation. Physical 
dimensions for these heating elements will be found 
on pages 6 and 7, To determine the appropriate 
storage heater shell size refer to sizing data on Page 



10. The capacity table below expresses the condensa- 
tion in terms of pounds per hour and E.D.R, (Equiva- 
lent Direct Radiation — square feet). Economically it 
is reasonable lo design the installation to recover as 
much heat as is possible from the condensate* and 
ratings are designated for three condensate outlet 
temperatures. 

TABLE P - Capacity of Whitlock 
Condensation Cooling Sections 

(For best economy select cooler large enough lo oxtroct 
mo5l of the woste hcot.^ 





Equiva- 
lent 
coaden- 


CooNng 
Coadcnsadon 


Cooling 
CondcnMbon 


Cooling 
Condrntiiiion 

200' -89^ 
while hear- 
ing three 
tjmci the 


Sq Ft. 
r:idia- 


200''125^ 
while heal- 


2O0- 100' 
while hcjt- 


tail on, 


ing an equal 


ing cwKf ihe 


iion 


lbs. 


oQiouni of 


amount of 


amount of 




ptr hr. 


service 


WfVICC 


service 






50<»-l25* 


wafer. 

50^.100" 


wafer, 

50^-8?^ 


i.oon 


250 


HO 


H-O 


H'O 


L500 


375 


£ HI 


t HI 


C HI 


2,000 


500 


^ HI 


'2 H-2 


^ H.2 


2,500 


625 


'^'^ H-2 


"^^ H -1 
7 H 4 


'.S H 4 


3,000 


750 


= H-3 


= H-4 


^,500 


875 


^- HJ 


£= H-5 


^== H-5 


4,000 


1.000 


-^ S H-4 


^? H 5 


'^ * H 6 


5,000 


1.250 


t ^ H 5 
-^ H-fi 

ffl= H^7 


t - "-' 


:; - H" 


6,oon 


1,500 


^= H H 


-1 HH 


i.iioo 


L''^0 


y H-IO 


Bc HLO 
■y U-l} 


8.000 


2,000 


-^ H.fl 


lO.OOO 


2.500 


i-.. 11-12 


^j^ HU 


■S^ HM 


U,500 


J.135 


■^^ HM 
H^ H.I4 


H** HIS 


1 5,000 


3,750 


1",S00 


4.275 


= ? H-14 
^^ HI5 


eft HI 5 


ok H'16 
"S HI' 


20,000 


5,000 


^S H16 


25,000 


6,250 


Sh H-lfi 


^r- H'18 


t^ H18 
t H-19 


30,000 


^.500 


t H 17 


1; HI 9 


^5,000 


8. "50 


q: H^ie 


DC H-20 


« H'?0 


■jn.nno 


1 0.000 


H-19 


U2l 


H-2 2 




rif. 10. Initaltation of Condensation Cooler utilizing condeo' 
Mie iroto fttoragc hcaicr and building healing lysiem 



i\9. II. Insullation of Type K Heater with combined headn 
and coodensatioo cooling &ecuon — handling condeoiaiion froi 
heating seciioo only 



WAIQ KL*! >«^ 



neiBOtffai -or w&m 




Hiv mttr 



IKfOi 




1 %^ ■ nx- 



MfCnCM to Puitf 



\^,-"\^ 



{ 



12 




SUBMERGED 
HEATERS 





of Submerged Stor^ee Hcatcf 



With the Whitlock Submerged Type K Heater the 
heating element Js placed below the water line of the 
boiler. Boiler water heats the domestic service supply 
with a relatively small but steady transfer of hear 
from boiler water to domestic supply- The removal 
of heat from the boiler in this manner, since the 
amount is relatively small and is steady, does not 
appreciably reduce the steaming capacity of the 
boiler. 

Advantoges include: 

1. Lower head room required which does away 
with the necessity of additional excavation, 

2. Condensation return troubles eliminated. 

3. Hot water available at all hours, 

4. Automatic temperature control usually not 
necessary. 

Typical below-the-water line ratings for standard 
Type K heating elements are included in the table 
at the right. 



TABLE Q 
Gallons Per Hour Ratings 



fiOllEJ) WATER 
TEMPERATURE 



SERVICE WATER 
TEMPERATURE RANGE 



WHITLOCK HCATrNG 
ElEMENT SIZE 

H-O 

H-l 

H-1 

H-3 

H-4 

H'5 

H-« 

H-7 

H.8 

H.9 

H-IO 

H-11 

H-12 

H-13 

H'14 

H-IS 



212°F, 


20O F. 


ISO'F. 


'40 - 


SO- 


40 - 


SO - 


40 - 


50^^ 


140-f. 


ISO^F. 


140'^F. 


150 = F. 


140-F. 


150-F. 


TJ 


fi5 


64 


57 


49 


41 


108 


9" 


95 


84 


73 


62 


UA 


150 


127 


IB 


98 


83 


160 


162 


158 


141 


122 


103 


217 


195 


191 


170 


147 


124 


2 52 


22? 


222 


198 


n 


145 


289 


i60 


2S5 


226 


196 


1(^6 


361 


325 


318 


282 


245 


207 


390 


351 


543 


305 


265 


224 


43i 


390 


3BJ 


559 


294 


249 


505 


455 


445 


596 


M5 


290 


57T 


520 


509 


452 


392 


5J2 


650 


585 


57Z 


508 


441 


573 


722 


650 


657 


566 


488 


4E4 


903 


A12 


794 


707 


61? 


516 


lOK? 


^--s 


955 


048 


"3i 


(,12 



13 



m 




WHITLOCK 

SALES & SERVICE 



PRINCIPAL CITIES 



c 





I 





c 



Distfizf Offices; 

BOSTON. MASS. 
CHtCAGO. ILL, 
DETROIT, MICH. 
HARTFORD, CONN. 
NEW YORK, NY. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA- 

ff •prese n to 1 1 v e s: 

AMARIllO, TEXAS 
ATLANTA, GA, 
BALTIMORE. MD. 
BIRMINGHAM, AlA. 
BUFFAIO, N. r 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 
CLEVEIANO, OHIO 
DALLAS, TEXAS 



DES MOINES, IOWA 
HOUSTON. TEXAS 
INDJANAPOllS. IND. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF, 
LUBBOCK, TEXAS 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 
MfLWAUKEE, WIS 
NASMVIUE, TENN. 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
NEW ORLEANS, lA. 
PITTSBURGH. PA. 
PORTLAND, OREGON 
PROVIDENCE, «. I, 
RICHMOND. VA. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y, 
SAIT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



Manutactvrers tot Canada 

DARLING BROTHERS, LIMITED - 140 PRINCE ST, ^ 



SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
SAN JOSE. CALIF. 
SEAHIE, WASH. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
SYRACUSE. N, Y» 

Agents AUo In: 

BUENOS AIRES. ARGENTINA, S. A 
CARACAS. VENEZUELA, S, A. 
HONOLULU, HAWAII 
MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 
MONTEVIDEO. URUGUAY, S. A, 
MONTREAL, QUE. CANADA 
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RJCO 
TORONTO, CANADA 



MONTREAL, P, Q, 



MrtU,^ in a S A 
JMJF.G 152 



The WHITLOCK 

MANUFACTURING CO. 
HARTFORD 10, CONN. 




BULLETIN 400 



The Darling VC rump is de* 
signed and built for long 
service under the exacting 
conditions required far re- 
turning condensate from 
heating systems and process 
sleom equipment to boiler or 
hot welL The Receiver may 
be installed on the floor or in 
o pit for returns from above 
or below the floor level. A 
product of over 60 years' 
ixperience in pump design 
and monufacture by Darling 
Brothers Limited. 



IMPROVED ^ 



Aut-omafic Electric 
VERTICAL CONDENSATION 

RETURN PUMP 

"^ Within its range of capacities, the Darling VC 
pump, engineered for the job, offers ne^v design 
features for economy and long life. 

. '^ Unusually high efficiencies are obtained with 
reduced motor sizes and operating costs. 

"k Designed to prevent vapor binding and to handle 
condensotion at high temperatures. 

'k A new and improved type of enclosed impeller 
increases efficiency, 

^ Efficient hydraulic and mechanical balance con* 
tributes to high performance standards. 

'A' New submerged shaft bearing, self-lubricating, non- 
metallic type for high temperature condensate 
service. 



IVirling Brothers limitedl 



140 PRINCE ST. 



5mcA 1888 



MONTREAL 



Halifax • Saint John * Quebec • Arvida • Ottawa - Toronto 
Timmins - Winnipeg - Calgary * Vancouver > St. John's, Nfld. 



OSf^^/?^ 




jil^&tr 




JbCi/llLH(l PUMPS 

for /ong U^e and Service 

Vertical Condensation 
Return Pumps 

DIMENSIONS • CAPACITIES • RATINGS 



Pumps for 
Every Purpose 

/'frr ffjHf/ nn^ irinririF 

inanufttrlure Si nfitt" 
anti f>iJpJ<>i HoriMrrtfal 
and \ eriicQl ^feont 
Pntitpik for ftoiler feed, 
J artiiirn ond Twnk Spr- 
rirei atiHt Single and 
\tttitiniage t'enlrifujiat 
Pumps/*tr f-ttntiemtale^ 
Hilgp. Su mp. Seteage^ 
Virrtilating, I acitum 
4inti Proeesn u-ork. 

DESCtlPTIVl LlTIRATUiC 
ON REQUEST 



C APAt ITY 


Pr¥»- 




'W CYC LE:s- 


-ir-Y) K i^M, ; 


•25 rVCLf^s- 


-1450 HP M 










r s. 

>-, Ki Ciale. 
E D,R pTT 

Mir, 




RECZntR 


Ship- 




RECEIVER 


Shiv- 






Sj-mboJ 


Motflr 
H P 


Ids 


liu* 


Lbs. 


Moior 
HP 


Ins. 


! 
He.|Eht 
Inf. 


er 

Lt» 


Ine- 




lni> 




-., \„ 






■■A" 


H" 






".V 


"H" 














\ii 


i \ Ui 


1 


IS 


IH 


;joo 


?i 


18 


IS 


Mtt 




J 


i-i' - 




4.000 


30 


4-V-15 
1-\--20 


1 


]!4 
18 


18 
18 
18 


300 
320 
MO 


i 

k 


18 
18 

2* 


18 
18 
IS 


320 
340 
3flO 


1 


3 
2 
3 








4-\-ao 


18 


18 


410 


1 


24^ 


18 


450 




2 


34 




, 


10 


fV-V-10 


1H 


18 


300 


H 


IS 


IS 


320 




2 


.11 . 




1 


i:> 


ft.V-15 


U 


\H 


18 


300 


h 


18 


18 


320 




2 


'• ' , 




G,000 ■> 


2D 
Z5 


u-v-ao 

tt-'S"-25 


'a 


IS 
IS 


1ft 
18 


320 

36(^ 


ij 


18 
2ffc 


18 

IS 


340 

aoa 


1 


2 
2 






1 


30 


6-V-30 


1 


18 


IS 


410 


1 


20 


18 


450 




2 


1 




1 


10 


S-V-10 


h 


2(1 


24 


310 


n 


£0 


24 


330 


1 


2 






15 


**-\-l5 


^i 


2tl 


24 


330 


20 


24 


350 




2 


' ' 




t,000 12 


20 
25 


S-\'-25 


;i 


211 
20 


24 
24 


330 
370 


ij 


20 
20 


24 
18 


350 
40U 




2 
2 






f 


30 


S-^"-30 


1 


20 


24 


420 


1 


28 


18 


400 




2 

24 


■' ■* 






in 


10-V-lO 


u 


20 


24 


310 


H 


20 


24 


330 








IS 


IO-V-15 


i^ 


20 


24 


380 


^5 


20 


24 


:i,i(i 




24 


^4 




10,000 1- 


20 


J*VV-2iJ 


20 


24 


330 


^ 


20 


24 


400 




2>-S 


■i', 






25 


lft-V-2.^ 


H 


20 


24 


370 


28 


18 


400 






'', 






30 


lo-v-so 


r 


20 


24 


420 


1 


26 


IS 


460 
380 




3 


■4 






Ki 


IS-V-U) 


*!J 


24 


24 


340 


H 


36 


24 


1 1^ 






IS 


15-V-15 


^i 


24 


24 


340 


H 


28 


24 


410 




3 


i 4 




IS.OOO 


20 


lS-V-20 


»i 


■24 


24 


380 


H 


2G 


24 


410 




3 


34 






^S 


|pVV-2S 


1 


24 


24 


430 


1 


2fi 


24 


470 


a 


3^, 






30 


i.vv-ao 

20-V-lO 


14 


24 


24 


^oo 


I'j 


2ti 


24 


560 




3 






10 


S 


24 


24 


340 


4 


2ft 


24 


380 




3 


»j* 






15 


2IKV-15 


H 


24 


24 


360 


H 


2ft 


24 


410 




3 


3 4 




20,000 f 1 


20 


2ft-V-20 


I 


24 


24 


430 


1 


2fi 


24 


410 




3 


3 4 






2.'> 


20-^-^25 


1 


24 


24 


430 


1 


26 


24 


470 


Ik 


3 


34 






m 


2O-V-30 
S5-V-10 


4 


24 


24 


.500 


14 


28 


24 


560 


" ■■ 


3 


34 

14 






10 


24 


3G 


420 


H 


26 


36 


440 


IH 


4 




1 


15 


2*^V-l.i 


^ 


24 


38 


460 


26 


36 


490 


*}* 


4 


4 4 




25,000 7 


3^* 


25-V-20 


I 


24 


30 


510 


I 


26 


36 


550 


"t' 


4 


14 






25 


25^V-25 


n> 


24 


3li 


5^1 


I'l 


1 -^ 


»6 


640 


IW 


« 


44 






ao 

10 


2&-\-30 
30-V-lO 


1'^ 
4 


24 


3fi 
36 


5W 


1 14 


1 26 


36 


ft40 


1^ 

14 


4 


44 






24 


420 


il 


1 26 


36 


440 


4 


4 4 






15 


3I>-V-I5 


Ki 


24 


:«!> 


4rtl 


38 


36 


400 


m 


4 


*4 




10.000 4^' 


20 


30-V-2n 


1 


34 


:ni 


510 


1 


28 


36 


3^ 


i^ 


4 


<4 






2,> 


:U>-V-25 


P; 


24 


3ri 


."iMl 


i'j 


26 


3R 


' 1^0 


■ * 


1 


»4 






:Vi 


M h V -:« * 


Pi 


24 


;u'- 


.hSil 


14 


It', 


M^ 


I'lO 


■ 4 


4 


14 





LMrgtr Sixn AvtiUbl* 



'Whvn ordvrirtt. «l»tc et*«tric current >vailabl*' 



Harlin g Brothers limitedl 



Head Office and Plants 

MONTREAL 



Prlnlvd in Conflda-CC-aF-l949 



Since 188 8 




BULLETtN No. 49 







The ^'UNICON" is the latest addition to the 
quality line of Darling Condensate 
Pump and Receiver Units, 

New in design and produced in quantity 

by the most modern of machine tools, 

it IS o competitively priced quality product. 




as o universal application, wittiin its range 
of capocities, to horizontal or vertical pump 
installations. It is designed for maximum 
efficiency and long life rn returning condensate 
to boiler, and as a condensate transfer unit 
from all types of heating and process 
equipment. Duplex Pump Units are available. 

The rectangular cast iron receiver, of novel 
design, occupies the minimum area of usoble 
floor space and can be installed at floor level 
or in a pit 14" deep v/ith the return line 
2V4" below the floor. This type of installation 
permits the running of low level pipe lines 
and will avoid damage by flooding, as the 
motor and electrical controls are above 
floor level. 

While the standord unit is operated by a 
Va H.P., 1 10/220 volt, 60 cycle, single phase 
motor, Polyphase motors con be supplied. 

The "^UNICOr^" is a complete factory 
assembled unit ready for connection to return, 
vent, and discharge pipe lines, and is wired 
between motor and switch, ready to receive 
electric supply, "UNICON ' Condensate Units 
are given rigid capacity, pressure, and 
horsepower tests before shipment. 



Oi^CMA£f>SC 



Typical 
Specification 

Supply and instoll where indicated on 

plans DARLING No 

•'UNICON" Condensafe Pump & Receiver 
Unit(5). Pump to be of centrifugal type 
having volute cosing, column, elbow 
discharge pipe and motor stool cost 
integrally to insure correct alignment. 
Pump to be fitted with machined bronze 
enclosed impellor, hydraulically balanced, 
secured to threaded stainless steel shaft. 
Shoft to be fitted with glond and 
follower at receiver cover. Lower sub- 
merged shaft bearing shall be of the 
Graphite type, requiring no lubrication 
ond shall not be subjected to pump 
pressure. 

Pump shall be operoted by V2 H.P., 
3500 R.P.M., 1 10/220-vott, 60-cycle, 
single-phose Motor of a type readily 
interchangeable among Canadian manu- 
facturers. Motor fitted with built-in ther- 
mal overlood protection. Motor shall be 
controlled by heavy-duty two-pole float 
switch actuated by a 3%" dio. seomless 
copper floot. All working parts of control 
shall be of Everdur. copper or bronze. 
Pump ond Motor unit sholl be mounted 
in cost iron rectangular receiver with 
rounded corners. 



Rating Table Class "U" 




UNIT No. 


SO. fT. 
EDR 


RECEIVER 
CAPACITY 
US- GAIS. 


PUMP 
CAPACITY 

U.S. 6PM 


PUMP 

DISCHARGE 
LBS SO IN. 


HP 
MOTOR 


DIMENSIONS 


WEIGHT 


W 


I 


H 


VENt 


RET 


PUMP 
DISCH. 


320 U 


3,000 
6,000 

10,000 
10,000 


6 
9 

15 


4'/2 

9 

15 


20 
20 

20 
20 


'/3 

V3 
'/3 


UV4" 


16'/i" 


26'/i" 


1" 


1!^" 


1" 


125# 


620 U 
1020U 


13" 
17" 
17" 


19" 
27" 
27" 


26y2" 
26'/2" 
26 '/2" 


VA" 
VA" 
VA" 


2" 
2" 
2" 


V 
1" 

1" 


152# 
222# 
284# 


1020 U 

DUPLEX 


IS 


15 



Scnet fSSf 




BROTHERS LIMITED mo prince street, Montreal, can 



ADA 

HALIFAX • SAINT JOHN - QUEBEC ARVIDA - TIMMINS 

OTTAWA • TORONTO • WINNIPEG - EDMONTON • VANCOUVER - ST. JOHN'S, NFLD, 

. CALGARY . 




ELECTRIC CONDENSATION 

RETURN PUMPS 





(K^mlnft-i -- _ ation Relurii \ are 

'■^r Plants witS ll<ill*?r» cairylnii up ro ISO lb"*., preisure. 
The (||uf"*ff'^n ^ihrvwi* nnr nf thi* !:irtf**r units 



flarlin g Rrothers 

140 PRINCE ST. 



le 




MONTREAL, CANADA 



*v 



»r 




Deming-Darling rrpe -PC" Electric Condensation Return Vnits are suitable 
for Plants with BoUers carr>Tnfi up to 150 lbs., pressure. 
The illustration shows one of the smaller units. 



The Deming-Darline t^pe "P.C." Electric Condensation unit is self-contained and mounted 
on suitable channJ.ron or cast iron base. and is u^ for returning condensation fro. Heat. ng S,-sten. 
and other Process work, to high pressor* boilers carr>-.ng steam pressures up to 1-:^ 11^. ^^ h. le U.s 
^uhe e^■ident that a steam driven unit is capable of doing the same work ther. .s th.s advanta^ 
Lt in the event of the steam pressure being lowerM at night or on week ends, the electnc un.t ».ll be 
more dependable and positi^■e in operation. Urge economies are obtained b> retummg hot conden- 
sate to the boiler. Inits for pressures in excess of 150 lbs. can be furnished. 

Pump -This is a horizontal double-acting "Oil-Rite" Deming- Darling Pump, of the splash 
lubricated t>T)e. equipped with Timken roller bearings, helical cut gears and stainless steel shaft, stain- 
less steel piston rod. special packed piston, stuffing box packing and vaK-es. all designed for hot water 
ser%"ice. and all working pans are easily accessible. 

jjyjye _Xhis unit is dri^-en by a \'-beli dri\-e of ample capacity, making a smooth running unit. 

Receiver. The recei\-er is of welded steel and is supported on a steel leg. which is bolted to the 

solid base. Suitable openings are pro\^ded on each size receiver to suit its capacity. .\11 fastenings 
are made with through bolts or studs. Suction piping from receiver to pump is pro\ided. Gauge 
glass and fittings are not included with this outfit, but may be supplied at extra cost if required. 

Automatic Control Gear. — Mounted on the end co\-er of the recei\-er is the float switch, 
which is enclosed and has quick make and break contact. »-ith two poles for single phase, and three 
poles for three phase motors. The switch is actuated by an extra heavy seamless copper float, through 
bronze links and rocking shaft. The rocking shaft passes through a screwed bronze stuffing box. 
Changes in stop and start water Ie\-els are easil>- made. Electric wiring from motor to float switch 
is provided but main line switch is not included. 



Page Two 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL. P 





Motors. — Standard makes of motors only are used. Single phase motors are of the Repul- 
sion-induction type. Direct current motors are Compound Wound. Polyphase motors are of the 
Squirrel cage type. The temperature rise of all above motors is 40 degrees C. at full load, continuous 
rating. Motors are of the ball bearing type. While the motor cannot be over-loaded by the pump, 
mechanical overloads such as the stuffing box being too tightly packed, or electrical conditions such as 
low or high voltage or open phase might arise. To protect the motor against such conditions, we re- 
commend the use of some kind of time limit fuse or other overload protection. Suitable protective 
devices can be supplied as an extra- 
Operation, — The condensation returns enter the receiver at the top. When it reaches a pre- 
determined height, determined by setting of water level adjustment, the float closes the switch, starting 
pump and motor, and when receiver is nearly empty the float opens the switch and stops the pump 
and motor. 

Testing. — All Darling pumps are tested for capacity, head and horsepower used. Our testing 
department is equipped with all necessary apparatus to make accurate tests on all outfits built by us. 
Electric current of different frequencies and voltages is available so that all units can be run with their 
own motors. Customer may witness test, if desired. 

Guarantee. — We guarantee this outfit against electrical and mechanical defects for the period 
of one year. Unless some form of suitable protection is supplied our guarantee does not apply to motor. 



9 



RATINGS AND DIMENSIONS 
Applicable to both 25 and 60 cycle 1450 and 1750 R.P.M. Motors 



Size 
No. 


CiMcllT 

u.a. 

G.P.H. 


Boilo- 
H.P. 


9q. FL 
DirMi 


workim 

Presj^ufF 
Pa unds 


Dlim. Pump 

C>lliift«ri«fld 

SLnke 


Pnmp 
FiRure 

Na. 


Incbcs 


H,P. 

Mntar 

Fuinisbed 


Silt 

Rtlurn 
IdLcI 


Ditm. i&d 


Pl«r Sm« 


Appni. 
Wdcht 


1 PC 50 
] PC 7S 


2 
2 


10 
10 


lODO 
1000 


50 
75 




1«90 
1H90 


^ 


1/e 


2' 
2' 


15 'US' 
15 "lis* 


24130 
34t30 


300 
310 


2PC 50 
2PC 7S 


4 
4 


20 

20 


2000 

2000 


50 
75 




IftOO 
1S30 




H 


2' 
2' 


15 '118' 
IS "lift' 


24i30 
24130 


310 
320 


IPC M 
4 PC 75 
4 PC 100 
4 PC ISO 


G 
6 


40 
40 
40 
40 


4000 
J 000 
4000 
4000 


SO 

75 
100 
150 


2^^-13' 

2U'i3' 
2W'i3W 


1803 
IH09 
1809 
IS09HP 




H 
1 


2* 
2' 
2" 
2' 


I7'<20' 
I7'i20' 
17-120' 
17 "120' 


33(33 
33i33 
33«33 
39t3S 


500 
510 
520 
710 


r. PC M 
liPC 75 
t PC 100 
BPC 150 


9 


60 
GO 
fiO 
GO 


fOOO 

fiooo 

6000 
6000 


50 

75 

100 

ISO 


2H'"3' 
21^ '.3- 
2H*n' 


iH09 
INOU 
IKOO 
1809 HP 


iVi' 


H 
H 


2' 
2' 
2' 
2" 


17'i20- 
I7'i20' 
i7'i20' 
I7'i20' 


33133 
33<33 
33i33 
39i35 


510 

S20 
530 
710 


HPC 30 
«PC 75 
ft PC 100 
ft PC ISO 


12 

n 

12 
12 


HO 
80 
HO 
SO 


ftOOO 
ftOOO 
8000 
fiOOO 


so 

75 
lOO 
150 


3' i3M' 
3* i3Ji' 
3' i3H' 
3' i4H- 


1800 
IS09 
1803 
IJJ09 HP 






2H' 
2W 
2H' 

2H' 


I8'ii21' 
I8"i2l" 
IS'iil" 

18 '121 • 


39i38 
39i38 
39i38 
48142 


700 
710 
720 
980 


10 PC 50 
10 PC 75 
ID PC 100 
I0PCI50 


l£ 
15 
15 
15 


100 

100 
100 
100 


10000 

iDDon 
inooo 

10000 


SO 

75 
100 
150 


3' i3W 

3' xm' 

3' 13^' 


IM» 

1809 
1809 
IftOO HP 


nr 

IH' 


m 


2hi' 
2H' 
2H' 


I8'i2l' 
t8'i24' 

l«'i24' 
I8'i24' 


39138 
39i38 
39138 
48x42 


710 

720 

750 

1000 


13 PC SO 
inpr 75 

12 PC JOU 

13 PC ISO 


IS 
IK 
IS 
IS 


120 
120 
120 
120 


12000 
12000 
12000 
13000 


50 

75 

100 

ISO 


y uH' 
y >4H' 
3- uyi' 
y im' 


1809 HP 
1809 HP 
1809 HP 
1809 HP 




m 


a- 

3" 
3' 
3' 


Ift'rtG' 

le'iSfi' 

|R**36* 
IB'i3fi' 


4Hi42 
48i42 
48)42 
48i42 


980 
1000 

toio 

1020 


15 PC 50 
15 PC Tfi 
IS PC 100 
15 PC ISO 


21H 
21 H 

am 


150 
150 
150 
150 


isooo 

15000 
ISOOO 

Isooo 


SO 

75 

100 

ISO 


4' xiH' 
i' HH' 
4' i4^' 
3' iS' 


1809 
1«09 

iftoa 

1896 


2- 

2' 

a* 

2" 


s 

5 


y 

3* 
3' 
3' 


Ifi'iSfi' 
rs-i36' 
lB'i3B' 
18 '■30* 


48i42 
48i42 
70x42 
74t46 


10OO 
1020 
1040 
1350 


20 PC 50 
20 PC 75 
20 PC 100 
20 PC 150 


30 
30 
30 
30 


200 

2W 
200 
200 


2WH0 
20000 
20000 
20000 


50 

75 

100 

ISO 


*' i4Vi- 

4' t4^' 
4' i5" 


1809 
1809 
1809 
1890 


2' 
2' 
2' 
2' 


2 
3 
5 
5 


3* 

y 

y 

3' 


Ifi'ii36' 
ia'l3G' 
I8'i36' 
18'i36' 


48i42 
48142 

70i42 
T4i45 


1010 
1020 
1040 
1400 




Pressure given above J» at the pomp. Allowance mast be made for height of boiler water line 
and friction of pipe and fittingly between boiler and pump. 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q- 



Page Three 



HELICAL 

MACHINE CUT 

GEAR AND 

PINION 




SUCTION 



iMATlCALLY 
OILED 



eRONIE STUFFING 
BOX GLAND 



STAINLE5S STEEL 
PISTON ROD 



BRASS 
CYLINDER L»NEft 



Sectional illustration of Deming-Darling *^Oil-Rite'' Horizontal 

Piston Pump, with names of principal parts 

as used on the larger units. 

TYPICAL FORM OF ENGINEER'S SPECIFICATION FOR DEMING-DARLING 

ELECTRIC CONDENSATION RETURN PUMP 

Furnish and instal where indicated on plans type "P-C."^ Deming Darling Klectric 

Condensation Return Pump and Receiver for automatically returning condensate to boiler. Pump 

to have a capacity of Imperial Gallons per minute against a pressure of 

pounds per square inch at pump discharge. Receiver to be suitable to handle square 

feet direct radiation. Receiver lu be X with electric service for 

Current Phase Cycles. 

The unit shall consist of one Deming-Darling Pump of suitable size with electric motor, "V" 
belt drive and tme receiver made of heavy steel plate. Pump, motor and receiver to be mounted on 
one base. All piping connections between pump and receiver and wiring connections between control 
switch on receiver head and motor, In he made by Darling Brothers Limited. 

Pump to be single cylinder horizontal double acting power piston pump, of suitable size, entirely 
enclosed and automaticalh- oiled, and fitted with Timken Roller Bearings, and stainless steel pi^tim 
rod- Special packed piston, stuffing box packing and pump valves are to be suitable for hot water 
service. A "V" Belt Drive of ample capacity to operate the pump, to be provided. 

Control. — Mounted on receiver cover, consisting of a totally enclosed Butt contact float switch 
actuated by an extra heavy seamless copper float. The rotating float shaft to run through a screwed 

bronze stuffingbox. Float switch to autoniaticallv start motor when receiver is (ull. stopping it when 
water has been pumped out. An adjustment t<» be provided so that start and stop water levels can 
be changed. 



Page Four 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P,< 



DF-BM 



Printed tn Canad 



IRsonians 
Darling 



MANUAL OF 

Heavy Duty 

Automatic Electric 

VERTICAL CENTRIFUGAL 

PUMPS 

i^pe ys 

For Unscreened Sewage, Thick Liquids 
and Liquids Containing Solids. 

Type VB 

For Waste, Flood Water and 
General Drainage Purposes. 



v* 



fe^" 



av 



^^.^ftNUFACrOfff,^^^^ 



Suia /sii 



"% 

^ 



DARLING BROTHERS 

LtmiTCD 
140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL 

Holifox - Scint John - Oi/ebec - Arvido - Ottawa - Toronto 
Winnipeg - Calgary - Voncoover - St. John's, Nfid. 



:*u!fr>_.>t-. 








Foreivord 



ExDGricnCe ^^^'W ci hall century of experience and development by Yeomcms Brothers 
J D I* ^^^ Darling Brothers in the design, manufacture and application of Bilge 

ana rOllCy qj^j Sewage Pumps, has resulted in products of Ihe highest efficiencies, a 
fact attested by the repeated selection of Yeomons Darting Equipment by the most ex- 
acting engineers* There is no worthier tribute to the knowledge and skill of our designing 
engineers and to Ihe craft of the artisans in our foundry and manufacturing plant. Be- 
hind the name of Yeomans Darling is an unimpeachable policy for quality of workman- 
ship and periormonce, a first charge upon the engineering skill and resources ol an 
organization whose products are known to engineers from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

MonufaCtUrina Yeomans Darling Bilge and Sewage Pumps are manufactured in 
P .I*.- the Montreal Plant of Darling Brothers Limited, facilitating replace- 

ruillllica ments should the necessity arise during the Hie of the pump. Complete 

records are kept for all pumps sold, thus engineering details and lest data are always 

available. 

EnoineBrina '^I'hough the purpose of this manual is to present in concise form es- 
^ - senfial data on Yeomans-Darling Bilge and Sewage Pumps, and to 

services indicate their field of application, no attempt is made to present a tech- 

nical treatise on pump characteristics, or other detailed engineering information bearing 
on the development or manufacture ol the pumps. Long experience has proven that the 
pump users interest can best be served if he submits detailed information on his propos- 
ed apphcation and permits our engineers to recommend a pump which will give the 
most ethcient and reliable service. 

Guarantee f ' 9°ods suppUed by us are subject to our guarcmtee. which is limited to 

workmonshb ^Z7 °T "".'' '"'' ^"^'^ "^ ^'^^^ ^^'-"^ " -°'"-l -^ 

worKmonsmp witnm one year from daif* nl ch;^^^^^! r\ . , , 

-,_; J ^ J . - ^' Shipment, Our orqanization is com- 

l::.ot:iL"'"' "^l"" " *"" "-"' ""--'^ -^ -"-«V co„ce,led To- 

ucies oi me founders, men with lona venrQ «( ^w^^ti^^i - . v- ^^ 

a firm obligatron. pnnc.ples and trad.hor^ make this guaroi^tee 



Page 2 



Yeomans darling 

Index 




Foreword . . ^ 

Sewage and Bilge Pump Features 4, 5 

Factors in Selecting Pumps ^ 

Construction and Equipment 7* 8. 9 

How to Select a Sewage or Bilge Pump 10' ^ 

Representative Installations, illustrated 12, 13 

Pumps for Municipal Use 1^ 

Standard Iniormation Tables 15 

Selection Chart, Sewage Pumps 16 

Selection Chart, Bilge Pumps 1? 

Duplex and Single Pump Typical Dimensions 18 

Typical Specifications 1^ 

Pumps for Special Applications * 20 

Parts List 21 

Partial List of Installations 22 

Testing Department 23 

Branches and Representatives 23 

Other Types of Darling Pumps Back Cover 



^tfi 



j','^ 



-,j 




Pa9« 3 



CONSTRUCTI 




The Yeomans Darling Automatic Eiecti 



M 



1*^ 



Control — 

Enclosed heavy duly ileal op- 
erated pilot switch and mag- 
nelic slarler mounted on pipe 
support: actuated by heavy 
copper iloat. guided brass rod 
and adjustable stops. 



Coupling — 

Safety type pin and rubber 
buUer coupling keyed to shaft. 



Top Bearing — 

Oil immersed self-aligning ball 
thrust bearing; renewable 
bronze bushing. 

Large Shaft - 

Large ground steel shaft runs 
below first crilical pump speed. 



Shaft Bearing — 

Renewable bronze bushings. 



Trash Guard -^ 

Prevents stringy material from 
binding shall. 

Pump Casing — 

Special design casing of close 
grained cost iron. 



Impeller — 

Balanced two-port enclosed 
bronze impeller enables small 
pumps to handle a minimum 
of 21/2 inch diameter solids. 




Motor — 

Vertical ball bearing type 
motor, wilh drip cover, spig- 
otted on integrally cast com- 
bination slool, base and pump 
bearing. 

Thrust Bearing — 

Weight of rotating element 
and pump thrust transmitted 
through shaft nut to oil im- 
mersed ball thrust bearing. 

Discharge Pipe — 

Overall efficiency increased by 
large diameter discharge pipe, 
which is calked in cover to 
eliminate strains and misalign- 
ment. 



Suspension Pipe — 

Rigid shaft housing of heavy 
steel writh cast iron spigoted 
flanges screwed on and re- 
faced in lalhe. 



Pump Bearing — 

Renewable oil immersed bronze 
bearing protected from water 
by self-adjusting seal ring. 



Wear Adjustment — 

Impeller clearance adjustable 
axially by adjusting nut to 
compensate for wear. 

Casing Easily 
Removed — 

Bolted flanged joint on dis- 
charge pipe facilitates removal 
of casing. 



Page 4 



TYPE YDS SEWAGE PUMP 

Design features shown above apply also to Bilge Pump excepting impeller, impeller wear adjustment and pump casing. 



"FEATURES OF 




vy Duty Vertical Centrifugal Pumps 



' " 



fa-t-rr-^f^ L^Curn/r 



Thrust Bearing Section 



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Fig. 1 

Thrust loads are handled by sell-align- 
ing ball bearing located above cover 
plate away irom grit and moisture. 



ADDITIONAL FEATURES OF 
SEWAGE AND BILGE PUMPS 

Assembly — All component parts 
attached by through bolts or studs 
with nuts and alignment secured by 
machined spigots. 

Bearing Wear Reduced— Over- 
hung impeller design and oii immersed 
bearing reduces bearing wear. 

Shaft Alignment —Motor align- 
ed by spigot on integrally cast com- 
bination stool, base and pump bear- 
ing. This maintains alignment oi shafts. 

Lubricant Protection— o v e r- 

hung impeller design with combination 
water and oil seal ring prevents loss 
or contamination of shaft lubricant. 



Pump Casing — Heavy close grained cost iron, 
streamlined for flow, rigidly attached by flanged 
joint to shaft housing and discharge pipe. 

Impeller — Patterned aiter our well known Class 
D Horizontal Pump impeller, with water passages 
file finished to increase efficiency. 

For Other Construction and Equipment 
Features, see page 7. 




TYPE YDB BILGE PUMP 



Po9e 5 



Factors in Selecting Pumps 



Consider these Facts 

The buyer of sewage or bilge pumps is primarily 
interested in getting rid ol waste simply, efficiently 
and as economically as possible. The assumption 
that any pump will do the work is the wrong ap- 
proach to pumping problems of this nature. Since 
two sets ot conditions are seldom alike, each pro- 
blem must receive careful consideration of all the 
contributing factors in order that a satisfactory in- 
stallation may result. All too frequently trouble is 
caused by the installation of the wrong type ol 
pump resulting in damage to property, equipment 
and unhealthy conditions. While experienced en- 
gineers are familiar with these problems we do not 
believe this manual would be complete without a 
review of the facts. 

Manufacturer'^s Recommendation 

Years ol experience in the specification and de- 
sign ol sewage and bilge pumps by Yeomons 
Darling pump engineers has given us the know- 
ledge and engineering skill to gain a most envi- 
able reputation amongst architects and engineers 
throughout the Dominion. Like any other piece of 
equipment involving a multitude of variable factors 
there are many points to consider before a pump 
can be recommended. II these points are empha- 
sized to the buyer and applied in the purchase ol 
the equipment the transaction will result in long 
years of satisfactory service, barring accident or 
subsequent changed conditions- 
Knowledge of Application 

The reputation of the monufocturer, knowledge of 
the application and the capacity of the pump to 
pass large solids or handle waste efficiently, are im- 
portant considerations in specifying a pump. Take. 
for instance, speed as related to operating head. In 
most cases abnormally high head conditions will 
require high speed motors for average sewage 
pump capacity, on the other hand, high speeds for 
low heads frequently result in a noisy pump and 
short life. 



There is sometimes a tendency among specifica- 
tion writers to indicate that pumps passing 2" or 
even IV2" spheres will be accepted because of an 
oHer of relatively high efficiency as compared with 
pumps passing larger solids, especially in the case 
of small capacity pumps operating on high heads- 
In order to obtain high efficiency in pumps ol this 
type, il is essential that the entrance or eye and 
water passages of the impeller and casing be very 
much restricted, but with this design it is not pos- 
sible to handle solids larger than IV?" or 2" in dia- 
meter. Therefore, where there is any chance thai 
larger solids will be present it is necessary to sacri- 
fice efficiency by designing the pump with larger 
water passages. In smaller passages rags and 
articles of clothing, invariably found in imscreened 
domestic sewage, are certain to cause stoppage. 

The bore of a standard water closet is 21/2" dia- 
meter, and that dimension may well be taken as 
the minimum water passage in any pump handling 
unscreened sewage. We strongly urge that unless 
screens v^hich will intercept large rags and articles 
ol clothing are provided ahead of the sewage 
pump, specifications require that the pump shall be 
capable of passing spheres not less than ZVz" dia- 
meter. 



Price Consideration 

In specifying sewage pump speeds, ii the selec- 
tion is made on the slowest practical speed lor the 
head condition there is assurance of good service, 
with the exception, perhaps, of very large pumping 
stations. The annual saving in power resulting from 
higher efficiency of the pumps passing smaller 
solids is not worth the labor, annoyance, inconve- 
nience and unsanitary conditions incidental to fre- 
quent withdrawal oi the pumping unit to clear the 
inlet or restricted water passages in the pumps* For 
added protection Duplex Pumps are recommended. 
See How to Select A Bildge or Sewage Pump, 
page 10, 



Sewage Pump 

The Yeomans Darling Centrifugal Submerged 
Screenless Sewage Pump is furnished as a unit, 
the main parts consisting of the pump casing, im- 
peller, shaft, suspension and discharge pipes, Ihrust 
bearing and flexible coupling, factory assembled on 
a baseplate with a sump cover, together with motor 
and automatic control equipment. Cast iron or steel 
basins and curb rings are available as optional 
equipment. 

Pump casing is the screenless cast iron type equip- 
ped with a new and improved balanced two-porl 
cast bronze impeller, the design permitting small 
pumps to handle solids with a minimum diameter ol 
2V2 inches. larger units in proportion. The impeller 
is mounted on the tapered end of the shaft and 
secured in position by a fitted key, and aginst axial 
movement by a cap nut- The impeller clearance is 
adjustable to compensate lor wear> 

The pump is hung from the baseplate by a 
wrr ought iron suspension pipe enclosing the pump 
shaft, which runs well below the first critical speed. 
In addition the pump is supported by the discharge 
pipe extending upward from the pump through the 
baseplote. With duplex sets the pumps are hung 
from individual baseplates mounted on the main 
catch basin cover, so that one pump may be re- 
moved without disturbing the other. 



Puxnp & Bearing Assembly — Dry Pit Type 



S-i#k»- 



O- 9h. 



PAc^dmjs 



Cabins co^%m- 



ClAai-^'B 







Oik <»*W-'fc*iBD 



C£i-hhJD 



inp«h<A«- ■.•* 



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Fig. 2 — The packing gland ia bronze, split Type. 1o 
protect the lower sleeve beahng irom abrofiives- The 
sealing ring is designed tor waler or grease; be- 
cause ot the balanced impeller design pressure en 
the packing box is low resulting in reduced wear. 



sleeve bearing running in on oil bath is located in 
the pump cover immediately above the impeller. 

Because any long unsupported shaft may whip 
and vibrate, intermediate guide bearings are pro- 
vided on shafts for deep sumps. One intermediate 
guide beoring is iumished for basins over 6 feet 
and up to 12 feet deep, more for deeper sumps* 



Bilge Puntp 

The design and performance features of the Yeo- 
mans Darling Submerged Bilge Pump are the same 
as those of the Sewage Pump with the exception of 
the impeller, impeller wear adjustmeni and pump 
casing. The impeller is casi bronze, enclosed type, 
with water passages file finished and balanced and 
secured on the shaft by keyseated tapered bore and 
locknut. Our bilge pump impellers are made with 
a hydraulic balancing device to take care of axial 
thrust. The vanes of an efficient design developed 
in our hydraulic laboratory. 

In all other respects the design and performance 
features described in this manual apply to both 
types ol pumps. 

Bearings 

Weigh! of pump shaft, impeller and coupling is 
carried by a single self-aligning oil immersed ball 
thrust bearing mounted in a housing above the 
baseplate. A renewable self-lubricating bronze 



Motors 

On our standard pump motors are vertical ball 
bearing type with drip covers and flanged base 
spigotted lor correct ahgnmenl on pump base. Mo- 
tors on our standard vertical pumps are built to 
NEMA specifications, thus should changes or serv- 
icing be necessary a motor of any standard Cana- 
dian manufacture o! equivalent rating can be 
mounted on the motor stool. When increased capa- 
city is required this can be accomplished in many 
cases by increasing the size of the impeller and 
the motor. The lemperature rise of our motors is 
40 Deg. C continuous rating. 



Easily Dismounted 

Yeomans Darling Submerged Pumps are entirely 
independent of the sump and by disconnecting wir- 
ing and discharge pipe can be removed without 
disturbing sump cover or draining sump. As all the 
parts are spigotted removal is simplified vrilhout 
danger of misalignment on reassembly. 



Yeomans-Darling Automatic 
Oil Economizer 

Probably 99% of all verlicol shah cenlrilugal 
ejectors installed ior pumping sewage and drainage 
are equipped with automatic start and stop control 
and in many of these installations the ejector may be 
idle for long periods of reduced inflow, (his being 
especially true of reserve units arranged to cut in 
automatically under peak conditions- 
It is obvious that if the guide and thrust bearings 
oi these ejectors are supplied with oil from the 
ordinary sight feed lubricator, the lubricant con- 
sumption will be continuous. This can be overcome 
by the use of oil economizer. 

The Yeomans- Darling Oil Economizer supplies otl 
to bearings only when the ejector is running, and 
thus accomplishes the following results: Stops need- 
Jess waste of oil; lessens danger of bearings running 
without oil; lessens frequency of filling oil container. 
cuts down maintenance and repairs. 

The Economizer consists of a suitable lubricator 
of liberal capacity with individual adjustable sight 
feeds for all guide and thrust bearings requiring 
lubrication, the needle valve in the oil container 
is automatically opened and closed by a diaphram 
connected through copper tubing and piping to 
pump discharge. Pressure on the diaphram opens 
the oil valve when the ejector is running. The Econ- 
omizer is ordinarily mounted on a flanged pipe sup- 
port on sump cover or baseplate close to the motor. 




Fig. 3 — Aulomcilic High Water 
Alarm. 




Fig, 4 — yeomans Dar- 
ling Fully Automatic Oil 
Economiiei. 



High Water Alarm 

In the event of power iailure or inflow too great 
lor the pump to handle, the Yeomans Darling high- 
water alarm. Fig. 3. rings a warning bell. It is 
mounted on top of the basin with an open tube 
extending down almost to the normal high water 
level. If the water rises above this point, the tube 
(A) is sealed and the increasing pressure com- 
presses the air trapped within- This acts upon a 
sensitive diaphram (B) which in turn closes an 
electric circuit and rings the bell (C). The latter 
may be located at a distance from the pump il 
desired and may be operated by battery or irom 
lighting circuit. 

Flexible Shaft 

Fig. 5 — Illustrates the Watson Spicer flexible 
needle-bearmg shafting that handles misalignment 
to eight degrees, operates smoothly and without 
noise, cuts mstallation cost by minimizing frame- 
work and Imjng up, and eliminates the whipping 
bearmg failure and motor heating that misalign- 
ment causes. See drawing and appUcation in- 
lormation on page 20. 



Fig. 5 — Aulorootivd 
Type HexibU Shaft- 



(?on5ttuctlon 



an 



(Luipment 



Sump Covers 

The recommended method is to pour a concrete 
slab over the sump and instali Cast Iron Curb 
Rmgs to take pump base and float openings. This 
method reduces required floor area to a mininiiim. 

The sump can also be covered with a steel plate 
having suitable openings lor motor base and float 
confroh It can be grouted in for a gas tight installa- 
tion obviating the use of a curb ring. 

Minintutn Floor Space 

Due to compact design our pumps require little 
0oor space, an important consideration where 
space is at a premium. The covers should be in- 
stalled flush with the floor. See drawing and sug- 
gesled minimum plate dimensions. Page 18. 



For Duplex Pumps all control devices can be 
mounted on a common control panel, ^s illustrated 
in Fig. 6. Starters and swlches are set close to the 
motors which they control. A double-throw transfer 
switch interchanges float switches and motors. 
Wiring connections are simpliiied. 

Automatic Alternation 

In duplex sets, one unit will do most oi the work 
unless service is alternated. To provide a simple 
and positive means for mechanically alternating 
the operation of two pumps in a duplex system, 
Yeomans Darling offer a mechanical alternator. It 
cuts in first one unit, then the other, and provides 
the additional function of starting the "second" 
pump when extra capacity under peak conditions is 
required. It resumes cyclic operation when the 
emergency passes. Wear in pumps is equalized 
without constant attention. 



f\' 



Float Pipe 

To protect the float from injury and interference 
from heavy inflow to basin, and from floating ob- 
jects, a pipe to enclose the float along the line oi 
Boat travel is recommended as a guarantee of 
longer life and greater ease oi operation. This 
protective pipe is illustrated in Fig, 9 on page 
14, In addition the float is protected by ribs to pre- 
vent abrasion. 

Efficient Lubrication 

All Yeomans Darling pumps are efficiently lubricat- 
ed for long life vrith minimum wear. The weight of 
the rotating element is carried by a self-aligning 
ball thrust washer immersed in an oil bath> The 
overflow from this bath is led by gravity to the 
lower bearing by channels drilled in the motor 
baseplate. 

The lower pump bearing is the oil immersed type 
fed by the drips from the upper thrust bearing. The 
oil is kept in the bearing by a dual seal ring, the 
outer part keeping the water out and the inner ring 
keeping the oil in. 

For shaft spans greater than six feet- bronze lined 
intermediate bearings are used. The bearings are 
lubricated from the motor base level through tubing 
from the oiling device. All oil pipes are copper or 
brass held securely in position by clips. 

Automatic Control 

Yeomans-Darling pumps are controlled from the 
water levels in the sump by an automatic control 
device which may be either a iloat acuated switch 
or electrode type control. Either type of control 
device is mounted on steel support together with 
necessary magnetic motor starting equipment. 










m 



Fig. 6— Centra! Duplex 
Control Panel. 



I 



Yeomans Darlinc 



he 



A Guide to Determine the Proper Size 



Selecting Size of Pump 

While many charts and guides have been devised 
to aid in the selection of sev^rage and bilge pumps, 
service conditions alone determine the exact pump 
lot a given duty- Factors iniluencing the decision 
are: 

1. Nature of area to be drained, 

2. Type of suspended matter in the liquid to be 
pumped, 

3. Distance below sewer level. 

4. Extent of waterproofing in basement. 

A large safety factor to offset the unexpected 
should also be included, since the safety of prop- 
erly and equipment may depend upon Ihe ability 
of pumps to dispose of the drainage. Unusual flood 
conditions can tax a pump beyond its ability to 
deliver. 

First and absolutely necessary determinates are: 

# The amount of drainage to be pumped in gal- 
lons per minute. 

A The discharge head (height to which the drain- 
age must be pumped), together with length ol 
pipe and number of fittings from discharge oi 
pump to drain. 

How to Determine Capacity 

To determine the gallonage to be pumped, consult 
the following table, which details the approximate 
flow in gallons per minute from various plumbing 



fixtures which contribute largely to ordinary drain- 
age pumping. 

Lavatory — two %-inch cormections 5 gpm 

Bath tub — two V2-'inc:h cormections 8 gpm 

Kitchen or pantry sink — two V2-inch con- 
nections 5 gpm 

Shower, overhead spray only — two Va"^^^ 

connections '0 9P™ 

Shower, with side spray in addition to over- 
head spray 20 gpm 
Slop sink — two Va-inch connections G gpm 
Slop sink — two V4-inch connections 10 gpm 
Laundry tray — two ^/z-'^ch connections 10 gpm 
Water closet, tank type — one Ve-i^^h con- 
nection 5 gpni 
Water closet, flush valve — one 1-inch or 

one lV4'inch connection 5 gpm 

Urinal stall — one Vfl-inch connection Va SP^" 

Drinking fountain — one Vs->^<^h connection 1 gpm 
Floor, drain, each 1 gpm 

Drain tile — In clay or slow-seeping ground, 

per 100 sq, ft. 1 gpm 

In sand and new made ground 

per 100 sq. It. 5 gpm 

Final calculations will depend on nature of soil and 
other varying conditions. 



Typical Basement Diagram with Drainage and Sewage Connections 

Fig. 7 — Typical malatJalion in basemeni where (ixJures are below level oi sewer. A scrfien- 
less sewage pump is used to handle waste Irom iavalones. furnace pits, kitchens and 
other drainage conlaming loteig^n mailer. 




r 



Selection Guide 





Use Factor (or Various Building Types 

Because tyoes oi buildings vary in the use made 
ol plumbing iixtures. the totals found by means 
oi (he previous table should be multiplied fay the 
following percentages, as illustrated in the typical 
example below. 

Schools G5% Oflice Buildings 35% 

Mercantile BIdgs. 40% Private Residences 20% 

"°^P''°*s 65% Hotels and Clubs 40% 

Apartment BIdgs. and Apartment Hotels 40% 

Determining Depth of Basin 

To allow ample storage of drainage, etc. pro- 
vide at least 3 feet of depth below lowest inlet to 
the catch basin or sump. This will aUow reasonably 
long cycles of pump operation and idleness. It will 
eliminate loo-trequent starting and stopping of ap- 
paratus, which causes unnecessary wear and re- 
duces the life of the equipment- 

A Typical Example 

A Hospital requires a sewage pump to handle 

the following fixtures located below sewer leveh 

10 Lavatories @ 5 GPM— 50 GPM 

5 Water Closets @ 5 GPM— 25 GPM 

3 Kitchen Sinks @ 5 GPM— 15 GPM 

2 Pantry Sinks @ 5 GPM— 10 GPM 



100 GPM 
Using a factor from the above table of 65% for 
this type of Building shows a net capacity of 65 
GPM; to this we must add 50% as a 
margin of safety and arrive at a pump 
capacity ol 97.5 GPM or approx. 100 
GPM. 

Assuming that the catch basin inlet 
enters at 2 feet below the floor and that 
the bottom of the basin is 3 feet below 
the inlet, a basin depth of 5 feet is re- 
quired. If the sewer is 8 feet above the 
floor and friction amounts to 2 addition- 
al feet, a total head of 15 feel must be 
met. The selection tables on pages 16 
and 17 show three pumps available (or 
this duty, the exact pump depending on 
the motor speed desired. 



Aliout Discharge Pipe Sizes 

As the dimension tables indicate, discharge pipes 
at the pump casing in Yeomans Darling Pumps are 
figured generously to reduce excess current re- 
quirement. The latter condition occurs when there 
is excessive pipe friction. On short discharge pipe 
runs, the some size pipe as listed in table on Page 
18 may be used. In long rims it is far more econ- 
omical to use larger pipe beyond the gate and 
check valves than to use smaller pipe and be 
obliged to operate the pump with greater input of 
electric power. 

Basin Diameters and Adequate storage 

Depending on local requirements and ordinonces. 
basins of concrete, steel or cast iron may be used 
with these pumps. Basin diameters recommended 
in this bulletin are calculated on the basis of; 
K Ample usable storage capacity. 
2. Minimum periodicity of pump operation. 

Where quicksand, water-bearing strata and other 
imderground difficulty occurs and the construction 
ol a suitable basin is costly, proper storage capa- 
city can. of course, be secured in a basin of larger 
diameter. In most instances, however, the recom- 
mended diameters will secure the best operating 
results. As a guide we suggest that the basin have 
a storage capacity between inlet level and one foot 
above bottom of sump, equal to the amount of 
water pump will handle in one minute. 

How to Handle Back Pressure from Street 

Fig. a — In certain cases- il is necessary (o pump sewage 
into sireel drains during limes when they are overloaded 
causing □ back pressure on the building drainage system. 
The melhod oi installing a sewage pump iat these con- 
djiions is shown in Fig. 8, 



G^kTb kAAuVb 





"^ — CnhCK. v.Ad^'Nf b 




Trans-Canodo Air lines, 
Moltor>, Ont. 



Canadoif Lfd.. Montreal, P.Q- 
(Combination Drive] 



Bonk of Novo Scotio, 
Saint John, N.B. 




Civic Workshops, 
Ottav/o, Onr. 



T. Eaton Co., Limited, 
Edmonton, Alta. 



Canadian Bonk of Commerce BIdg. 
Toronto, Ont, 




Monfreol General Hospital, 
Montreal, P.O. 



Transportation Building, 
Montreal, P.O. 



General Post Office, 
Vancouver, B.C. 




Winnipeg Free Press, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
Montreal, P.O. 



Post Office Building, 
Halifox, N.S. 



Yeomans Darling 

Bilge and Sewage 



P 



UMPS 



IN SERVICE.. . 




Dominion Afsenol 
St. Malo, P Q., 





Ayer*t McKenno & Harrison Ltd. 
St. Lourent, P,Q. 



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Yeomans Darling Pumps for 

Municipal Service 
Grade Separation 
Tunnel Drainage 

Fig- 9 — Shows a Yeomans Darling Pump as 
usually installed to raise the sewage in a city 
sewer system so it will flow oH by gravity. Con- 
crete wet wells are used in place of cast iron 
basins lo provide more storage capacity for 
flood periods and to lessen the frequency ol 
pump operations. 

Fig, 10 — Illustrates another type, the "dry pit" 
booster station. Here the pump is removed from 
the wet well and placed in a separate pit; the 
sewage is piped to the pump suction. This con* 
struction allows ready inspection of the pump 
and makes it easier to seal the wet well against 
the escape of gas and odors. The extra concrete 
work makes this a little more costly than the 
sumerged type installation. 

For pumping drainage at grade seperations 
and tunnels a sewage pump is recommended 
to handle matter usually found in this type of 
drainage. Various types of pumps are manu- 
factured by Yeomans Darling to provide sale 
and dependable pumping for this service. We 
have had long and extensive experience in 
the manufacture of sewage and bilge pumps 
for municipal service — requests tor infonna' 
tion will be promptly handled by our Branch 
^ or Representative in your territory listed on 

page 23. 



Loss 



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1.14 

14;; 

l.ft4) 

2.04 



2.28 
2.57 
IJ.SO 
a. 06 
3,40 



0,14 

0.25 
0.31 
0.41 

0.50 



o,e2 

0.74 

0.92 
1,15 

1.29 



3.08 1.75 
4.S4 2.21 
ri.l2 2-es 
2-B5 
a. 30 



o,S0 



fi.Tl 
T.2S 
7.S4 
^■,08 



10.30 
11.32 

12,50 
1^ ..'>2 



3,93 
4.70 
3.40 

^.30 

s.oo 



10.11 
12.04 

14, ai 

lK.fi9 



1.60 
1-73 
1.90 



2.20 
2.60 
2. 92 
SpIO 
3.20 



3h:>2 
3,84 
4.1)1 
4,4R 
,1.12 



ti.40 
7.03 
7-67 
t'.fiO 



12.T0 



0.22 
0.27 
0.32 



0.42 
fl.54 

0.68 
0,76 
0,82 



0,1"T 
1.14 
1-^4 
1-^4 
1.07 



2.46 
3,02 
3.51 
4, IS 
6-27 



10.71 



. ■ ■ * 



. - . - » 



t,so 

1.^4 
2>04 



2.25 
2.4« 
2,66 
2,8fi 
^.2B 



i(.«S 
4. OR 
4-,i0 
4.91 
6-10 



s.in 

10.10 



I ■ • * 
« * ■ ■ 



0.21 

0.25 
0.28 



Q.3H 
0.30 
0.46 
0.52 
0.67 



0.S3 
1.01 
1-20 
1.46 
2,U9 



3.65 

5.33 



t •■ ■■ 

■ > ■ ■ * 



1,42 



1.57 
1.71 
1,S5 
2.00 
2,27 



2.56 
2. SI 
3,13 
3.41 
4.20 



5.60 
7.O0 



• • 1 1 

4 * ■ ■ 



• ■ ■ < ■ 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

1 1 r r ■ 

- - . I ' 



0.11 



0.14 
0,15 
0,tT» 

D.aa 

0.27 



0.34 
0.41 
0.49 
0-57 
O.fln 



i.ta 

2.28 



Friction of Water in 90° Elbows 



Equivalent 


Number ol Feet 


Straight Pipe 




Sito uf ElbcT^v, Iiii'h''. 
Krinion Eciuival«nt FhC 


1 3 


2', 
11 


a 

15 


4 
1« 


a 
16 


6 
18 


8 
24 


10 
30 


12 
40 



Relative Quantities of Water 

Delivered in 1 Minute, in 1 Hour and in 24 Hours 



1 Mln 

to.t 
l^fl 

IT.l 
W.T 
4t.« 
^2-P 

fi'i 1 
Ml I 



CmU. In 



415 

lp041 

2,083 
£.500 
11.125 
4.1«A 



! I liuUf i 



1 '•.Win 

S^.OOO 
RO.Ooy 
110,000 
7,1.000 
too .000 
t?iO.OOO 



■ .■>!•, In 


Gdla, in ' 


1 ^In. 


1 Houf 


1 ' I - 


».33:i 


I >'.',.'' 


I0.4l<f 


208. » 


I2.A00 


£13.0 


14.5ST1 


S77.T 


lli.filj't 


aiK.:/ 


in, 7 50 


347.2 


20.833 


38I.ft 


22.916 


41H.7 


25.000 


i;.i..s 


27<08S 



:jl Haum 



200,000 
250.000 
300.000 
350.000 
400,000 
450.000 
.500,000 
5nO,000 
liOO.OOO 
6-'iO.000 



CpmI*. In 

1 Min. 



486,1 

520.8 
555,5 
n!l0.2 

liJ5.l| 

fl5<.(.7 

IJ64.3 

1.041.7 

1,38B.O 

1.736.0 



OjiIb. In 

I tliiur 



2'J,lilii 
31.250 
^3.333 
35.416 
37.500 
:i!l„583 
4t.f;6ti 
fi2,500 
«3h333 
101. 1G6 



Gb1>. In 
2 I lluur* 



TOO.OOO 

750.000 
SUO,i>00 
S,»0,000 
1100,000 
W50,000 

l.ooo.;>oo 
i.50o,cin[) 

2.00)1,000 
2.500,000 



Yeomans Darling Screenless Sewage Pump 



I 



( 



RPM 


HEAD 

IN 
FEET 


CODE 
MOTOR 








CAPACITY US 


GALLONS PER MINUTE 










50 


75 


1^ 


125 


150 


200 


250 ! 


30U 


400 


500 


6 




1^ 


10 


roDK ! 

MOTOE 




TYSIOA 

^ HP 


^J HP 


lliVSiDA 

"I HP 


15YS10A 
t, HP 


^oYSlOA 
1 HP 




;iiiYajoA 
—14. HP 


40YS10A 
2 HP 


as 

-J 

< 

< 

N 
OS 

o 

a: 


V 

C 


< 
i 


15 


CODE 
MOTOR 




7YSUA 
^, HP 


lUYSirtA 

1D1«#A 
1 HP 


UYSiliA 
I HP 


liY^^ir-A 
1 HP 


20YSUA 


] _ HP 


VS.;"' A 

Jl HI' 


I0YS15A 
JIHP 


20 


M(JTOR 


5YS3nA 
I HP 


7yS20A 
I HP 


13YS20A 
P^jHP 


1,^YS20A 
Pl-HP 


20YS20A 

11^ HP 


2SYS,' 
^ HP 


I0YS20A 
i HI' 




10 


MOTOR 


"pYtiliib 
i-jHP 


Is HP 


l(iV:?liiL: 
1 HP 


^1 HP 


i:iYdliiU 
;i4HP 


joYSl^iEl 
1 Hf 


.^'.Ytil"H 
I'j HI' 


Pj HP 


2HP 


15 


CODE 
MOTOR 


5YS15B 

S HP 


TYSISB 

1 1 H P 


l2YS1oB 
1 HT' 


iSYSlolJ 
1 HP 

IaYS2&H 

H'jHP 


.■'-YSr.B 
I'aHP 


2:.VS1mB 
l"l;Hr' 


Thf 


4AYS1^B 
3 HP 


20 


CODE 
MOTOR 


oYS20B 
1 HP 


TY'SaoB 
I HP 


HiYS2nB 

in^f|#B 
l^'.' HP 


12VS2'>B 
11.2 HP 


20YS2tiB 
2 HP 


asYSJiiB 

:>H^g 


■&YS:;'i: 

. If 


4OYS20B 
3 HP 


25 


COUE 
MOTOR 


1'^ HP 


TYSi;.iB 

1".'HP 


L' HP 


lSYS2oB 
2 HP 


20YS25B 
:l HP 


2:,VSJ-.p 
:i H]' 


^yp:'->b 

.; H r 


4«YSif>B 
o HP 


S 


10 


CODE 
MOTOR 


nVSIOC 
il-HP 


7YS10C 
-1*HP 


lOYSlOC 
'"UHP 


12YSIUC 


iriYSmc 

1 HP 


i HP 


j.'pYSIOC 
tlvHP 


:;oYSioC 

P'jHP 


IDYSKiC 

:; HP, 


15 
20 


CODE 

MOTOR 


oYSI5C 

^4 HP 


7YSI5C 

Hi HP 


IftYSlSC 
IHP 


tl^YSlSC 
1 HP 


i5ysisc 

I'^jHP 


20Y,^1 r.C 
I'^HP 


»YS15C 

«HP 


30YS15C 
2 HP 


*0Y"S15C 
SHP 


CODE 
MOTOB 


SVS20C 
1 HP 


7Yfi20C 
IHP 


10YS20C 
1 ijHP 


ll'YS20C 
Ht-HP 


15YS20C 
I'^HP 


20YS2DC 
2HI' 


^SY320C 

SUP 


30YS30C 
:i HP 


JftYSL'OC 
SHP 


25 


CODE . 

motor" 


&YS2:iC 

n.5HP 


7VS25C 
IK HP 


L0Y525C 
U^HP 


2 HP 


IdYS2SC 
2 HP 


20YS25C 
a HP 


'l^YSir.C 
-.i HP 

2SYS30C 
SHP 


aoYSJ.'tC 
i HP 


4uYSzf»C 
■. HP 


50 


CODE 
MOTOR 


SYSaOC 

■2 nv 


TYsaoc 

J HP 


10YS30C 

7. HP 


i^Ysaoc 


i:iYS:4<JC 

:[ HP 


2ftYsaoc 1 

:[ HP 1 


30YS»0C 

:, UP 


40YS^"i^ 
-HI' 


10 


CODE 
M* iTnR 




TYS40C 

■A HP 


11IYS4UC 

:. HP 


il:yS4oC 
Th HP 


, ir-YS4nc 
r* HP 


:^mYS4(iC 
-^ HP 


2SYSJIIC 
r. HP 


IImYSIOC 






10 


CODE 
MOTOR 




7YS10D 
^4 HP 


lOYSlOD 
^HP 


1:>YS]0D 
■UHP 


loYSMD 
IHP 


2UYSHiD 
1^2 HP 


I'^HP 


SOYSli^D 
2 HP 


*uYSlOD 
3 HP 


15 


CODE 

MOTOR 




7YSISD 

I HP 


lOY'SlnD 
iHi- 


12YSISD 

1"^. HP 


15Y"S15D 

I'^HP 


20YSi:iD 
P'jHP 


2.^YSISD 
2HP_ . 


30YS15D 

a HP 


4DYS1^D 
3 HP 


20 


CODE 
MOTOR 




7YS2(ID 


PjHP 


1-YS2HD 
l»^HP 


lrtYS20D 
Pi: HP 


20YS20D 
2 HP 


2r.vs2"r* 
;iHi 


S0YS20D 
i HP 


40YS2aD 
&HP 


25 


CODE 
fttOTOR 




TYS25D 

mHP 


PvHP 


12YS2SD 

J HP 


15VS25D 
2 HP 


20YS2SD 
3HP 


2oYfiJM' 
■ UP 


30^S2dD 
#HP 


*0YS2.iD 
5 HP 


30 


CODE 
MOTOR 




TVSatJD 
a HP 


IDYSaoD 
3 HP 


13YS30D 
3 HP 


15YS30D 

3 HP 


20YS30D 
3 HP 


2:iYS-^''l' 
o HP 


'YSaoD 
SHP 


loYsaaD 

?. HP 


40 


CODE 

Morr^R 




7YS40D 
:*HP 


lOYS-idD 

:i HP 


12YS40D 
a HP 


tSYS-lOD 
^HP 


20YSfltiD 
o HP 


2rkYS40D 
:. HP 


aOYS4<tD 

-'■^ UP 


4i|^0D 


10 


CODE 
MOTOR 




















IS 


CODE 
MOTOR 




7YSl;iE 
1 HP 


MYSi:,E 


t2VSlflE 

ir^HP 


UYS15E 
V/i HP 


20Y'SlaE 
iHP 


2:>YSi:>E 

2 HP 


3MYS1SE 
3 HP 


40YS]^£ 

h HP 


20 


CODE 
MOTOR 




TYSaOE 
Hi HP 


V's HP 


1 iys2<>E 

14HP 


ISY'S30E 
2 HP 


2nYS2f»E 
::hp 


it.ysj^it: 

a HP 


^^■S20E 
^PHP 


40YS2OE 
5 HP 


25 


CODE 
MOTOR 




7VS25E 

US HP 


f 1^^ HP 


12YS2liE 
-HP 


ISYS25E 
SHP 


20yS2SB 

3 HP 


■ 
S5YS2BE 

3 H^^ 


^Bs2jE 
^BlP 


*nYS2:iE 

5 HP 


30 


CODE 
MOTOR 






10YS30E 
aHP 


12YS30E 
3 HP 


UYSSOE 
3 HP 


20YS80E 
3 HP 


25YSS0E 
^HP 


SOYSSOE 
5 HP 


4oys:kie 

5HP 


40 


CODE 1 

MOTOR 






lOYSjnE 
:i HP 


12YS4IIE 
a HP 


ISYSIOE 


20YS10E 
' H P 


2,',YS40E 

: HP 


UOYS40E 

Ti^ HP 


40VS40E 
TifeHP 




^SELECTldN-CHART 

Yeomans Darling Bilge Pumps 



'nam 




Recommended Dimensions and Details 



SfiTi 




»« 



I 



-\ 




1 — r 




BIB 




I 



I 







I 



^^-5J "-_! '^ 



:«■_■■ .-t^' 




Typical Specifications 



SEWAGE PUMP: 

Furnish and install where indicated on plans one 
Single Duplex Yeomans Darling Type YS Heavy 
Duly Screenless Sewage Pump, having a capacity 
of U-S.G,P.M. against a total head ol feet 

from all causes, in a sump (eel in diameter 

by feel deep. 

Pump shall be fitted with a special screenless 
nickle-iron casing and bronze enclosed impeller, 
both capable of handling solids 2W' minimum dia- 
meter. Impeller to be secured to tapered, keyed 
and threaded end of large ground steel shaft by 
means of bronze cap nut. Shaft and ball thrust 
bearing to be designed for axial odjustment to 
maintain clearances bet^veen impeller eye and 
casing. 

Pump shall be suspended from base by a rigid 
suspension pipe. a( the lower end of which is a 
sealed oil immersed sleeve bearing separated from 
casing. One intermediate oil lubricated guide bear^ 
ing shall be furnished for each 6 feet of sump depth- 
All parts of unit are to be positively located 
in position by machined spigots or shoulders in 
base- hanger pipe, casing, shaft and impeller, and 
to be fastened together by studs and nuts or through 
bolts. All keys to be fitted on top and sides without 
use of set screws. 

MOTOR: 

Motor shall be mounted on a spigotted stool cast 
integrally with the base. Supply a continuous rated 
40 C rise RP. R.P,M- vertical NE^4A frame 

motor with drip cover to drive pump through a pin 
and rubber buifer flexible coupling. Motor to operate 
on phase cycle volts electric current. 

CONTROL: 

Automatic control equipment shall consist of a 
heavy duly butt contact float actuated switch, con- 
trolling the pilot circuit of a magnetic contactor 
starter fitted with overload relays. 

All the above mounted on a heavy steel stand 
bolted to the pit cover. Float and guide to be re- 
movable from pit without disturbing pump or sump 
cover. 

COVER PLATE: 

Sump cover plate shall be of steel of a suitable 
diameter and thickness for a diam pit. Vent 

opening shall be provided. 

EXTRA EQUIPMENT: 

Float guide pipe, slower speed motors, curb rings, 
high water olarm, electronic control and oil econ- 
omizer: special alloys and construction should be 
noted by Engineer in his specification. Automatic 
alternation of pump operation can be provided by 
the use of an alternator for Duplex Pump sets. 



BILGE PUMP: 

Furnish and install where indicated on plans one 
Single Duplex Yeomans Darling Type YB Heavy 
Duty Bilge Pump, having a capacity of 
U.S.G.P.M. against a total head of feet from 

all causes, in a sump feet in diameter by 

feet deep. 

Pump shall be fitted with nickle-iron volute cas- 
ing and bronze enclosed impeller. Impeller to be 
secured to tapered, keyed and threaded end of 
large ground steel shaft by means of bronze cap 
nut and key. 

Pump shall be suspended from base by a rigid 
suspension pipe, at the lower end of which is a 
sealed oil immersed sleeve bearing separated from 
casing. One intermediate oil lubricated guide bear- 
ing shall be furnished for each 6 feet oi sump depth. 

All parts of unit are to be positively located in 
position by machined spigots or shoulders in base, 
hanger pipe, casing, shaft and impeller, and to be 
fastened together by studs and nuts or through 
bolts. All keys to be fitted on top and sides without 
use of set screws. 

MOTOR: 

Motor shall be mounted on a spigotted stool cast 
integrally with the base. Supply a continuous rated 
40^ C- rise H.P. R.PJ^. vertical NEMA frame 

motor vrith drip cover to drive pump through a pin 
and rubber buffer flexible coupling. Motor to operate 
on phase cycle volts electric current. 



CONTROL: 

Automatic control equipment shall consist of a 
heavy duty butt contact float actuated switch- con- 
trolling the pilot circuit of a magnetic contactor start- 
er fitted wih overload relays, 

AH the above mounted on a heavy steel stand 
bolted to the pit cover. Float and guide to be re- 
movable from pit without disturbing pump or sump 
cover, 

COVER PLATE: 

Sump cover plate shall be of steel of a suitable 
diameter and thickness for a . diam. pit. Vent 
opening shall be provided. 

EXTRA EQUIPMENT: 

Float guide pipe, slower speed motors, curb 
rings, high water alarm, electronic control and 
automatic oil economizer; special alloys and con- 
struction should be noted by Engineer in his spe- 
cilication. Automatic alternation of pump operation 
can be provided by the use ol an alternator for 
Duplex Pump sets. 



Page 19 



■,:^^>- 




eoma/fs darling Pumps for 

SPECIAL APPLICATIONS 




V&GTlCAl- r^CfTOG 










Class D' ball, 

£PurnP STANID 



Fig. 11 — The Automatic Type needle bearing flex- 
ible driving shaft handles misalignment up to 8 
degrees, vhth on axial adjustment of from 3 16" 
to 1/2", depending upon size, taking care of ox- 
paasion or contraction. One or more sections of 
shalting are used, according to the Jength required. 
When more than one section is used, one ball bear- 
ing pillow block is supplied writh each intermediate 
section to carry the radial ioad. Inspection oi pump 
is simplified by disconnecting at pump shaft and 
swinging the intermediate shaft out of the way* 
enabling pump cover with bearings and impeller 
to be removed as a unit from casing wthout dis- 
connecting piping- 



'' ^ 







u : V 



Fig, 11 



) 








txTfeA r^OTOfe STOOL 
Vs/AT50'^i--»CJiCfc^ 
&TO r^OTO^ 5TOOU 



Fig. 13 



Fig. 12 



Fig, 12 — In the event of power failure, an auxUiary 
drive can be furnished, either gasoline engine or 
turbine which would drive the vertical pump shalt 
through a righl angle drive. We have installed 
many ol these units for municipal and industrial 
service. 

Fig, 13 — For certain inslallalions where there is a 
possibility of power failure and consequent danger 
of motor and control equipment being damaged by 
flood water, the use of a raising piece to elevate 
motor beyond probable high water level is recom- 
mended. This equipment can be supphed with 
pump or al any time in the future- 



Poge 20 



PlOat Switch 



L^Mlt STODS, 




a3IB 



PlOAT &Vs/(-TCM 5TAMO 



STACTfcfe 




f*OoToe. BTANio 



CauPLl^iS COCktMUT 



^LEVlBLfc C<X*DUMG 



P»T COvta oi_ATfc 



On- Pip& 



0«3CHAeafe ratofe 



DuMO aHAPT 



&ii_ca& oui-^o 



OtV/'Adfc PUt^O 



OUMO &tA«^rsi<5 



Pump covfcG. 






t^ 



r 

Partial List of Installationsj^ 

Yeomans Darling Sewage and Bilge Pumps 
Industrial Public and Institutional Buildings 



Alberta Nitrogen Co. Lid CalgarY* AUa. 

Hudson's Bay Railway Building Churchill Man. 

Cornwall Armories Cornwall, Ont. 

R,C,A-F. Aircraft Repair Depot DottmoutlL N.S. 



RM.C.S. "Comwallis", 
Naval Training School 

T, Eaton Co, Limited 

Royal Canadian Navy Barracks 

R,C.AJ". Airport , 

Post Oflice Building 

Zellers Limited 

Aluminum Co, of Canada, Limited 

Dominion Engineering Works, 
Limited 



Hopito! St Joseph de Lachine 



Deep Brook, N.S. 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Esquimau, B.C. 

. Gander, Nfld, 

Halifax, N.S, 

Halifax, N.S, 

. Kingston, Ont, 

. . . Lachine^ P-Q- 
Lachine, P.Q- 



Ayers Limited 



Lachute Mills. P,Q. 



Freres des Ecoles 

Chretiennes Laval des Rapides, P.Q, 



Hotel London 

La Municipahte Scolaire 

Catholique de Montreal . ... 

National Steel Car Corp,, Limited 

Imperial Tobacco Company 
of Canada, Limited 

Canadian Car & Foundry Co,, 
Limited, Turcot Plant 

Coca-Cola Co. of Canada, Limited 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Co., Limited 

Commercial Alcohols, Limited . . 

Mount Royal Hotel . . . 

Dominion Rubber Company 
Limited ..... 



, London. Ont. 

Longueuil, P.Q. 
Malton, Ont, 

Montreal. P.Q, 

Mcntreal, P,Q. 
Montreal, P,Q. 
Montreal, P-Q. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
Montreal, P-Q- 

Montreal, P.Q, 
Montreal, P.Q, 



Canadian Pacific Railway Garage 

Botanical Gardens Montreal. P.Q, 

Y,M,C.A Montreal P.Q. 



City of Montreal Comfort Stations Montreal, P- 



Rev, Soeurs Grises 

Montreal Convalescent Home 

Uplands Airport . 

Civic Workshops 

Abattoir de Quebec Inc. 

Provincial Government Building 

Rev. Peres Dominicains 

Town of Lloydminster 

Scarboro Township School 

R.CA,F- No, 4 Repair Depot 

Marine Industries, Limited . , . 

Seminaire St. Jean 

Les Hotelleries A, Maurice Inc. 

Bonk of Nova Scotia 

City of St- Hyacinthe 

R.C,A.F, No. 131 Service 
Flying Training Station 



Montreal, R( 
Montreal. P.< 

Ottawa. Or 

Ottawa. Or 
Quebec, P,< 
Quebec. P.< 
Quebec, P.< 
Saskatchewa 
Scarboro, On 
Scoudouc. NJ 
Sorel P.t 
St. Jean. RC 
St. Jerome, P.C 
Saini John. N,I 
St. Hyacinthe. P,C 



St, Hubert. P.C 



H, J. Heinz Company of Canada, 
Limited 



Toronto. On^ 

Canadian Breweries, Limited Toronto. Om 

Globe and Mail Building Toronto, Oni 

Bonk of Montreal Toronto. Onl 

St. Mary's Training School Toronto- Ont 

United Slates Army Project The Pas, Man 

Dominion Arsenal Valcartier. P.Q 

General Post Office Vancouver, B.C 

City of Windsor-Subway Windsor, Ont 

Winnipeg Free Press Winnipeg, Man 

Firestone Tire and Rubber Co, 
ol Canada- Limited Woodstock, Onl 



Poge 22 



Ik* 



EVERY YEOMANS DARLING 
PUMP FULLY TESTED 



L 



• A section of our Testing 
Department, where every 
Yeomans Darling Pump 
manufactured is subjected 
to a thorough test to ensure 
satisfactory operation under 
the conditions specified by 
the purchasor. 




Testing Department 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 

Branch Offices and Representatives 

HALIFAX, N.S E. S. Stephenson & Co., Ltd ]55 Granville Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.B E. S. Stephenson & Co., Ltd 15 Dock Street 

QUEBEC, P.Q W.J. Bonks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIDA, P.Q J. R. R. Beoudet ] 22 High Street 

OTTAWA, ONT Darling Brothers Limited 18 Rideau Street 

TORONTO, ONT Darling Brothers Limited 137 Wellington Street W. 

WINNIPEG, MAN Darling Brothers Limited 123 Princess Street 

CALGARY, ALTA H. F. Clarke & Co. Ltd 1114 Fifth Street W. 

VANCOUVER, BC Frank Darling & Co. Ltd 1144 Homer Street 

ST. JOHN'S NFLD Clayton Construction Company. 198 Water Street 



Page 23 



Other 




\ 



V 



a^--^ 



Centrifugal 
Pumps 



W 





MANUFACTUHe 
rnt tULLOWING TYPES 



zontal bphJ Case Double 
n Mil' ^}e. 

'lonlaL ^piit Coia Single 
n MulH-Stage. 

End Sucfion Two 
^fog*.- Upposed Impeller. 



Horizonvol Non- 
Clogging. 

Gi Liuanc Cellar Droiners 



Oirecl Acting Sleam Pumps 



Darling Brothers Limited 



Head Office and Plant 

MONTREAL 



STEAM PUMPS 



BULLETIN 44D 



SINCE 

1888 



(T 



V.i 





BROTHERS L I H I T E B 

140 Pt»NCE ST MOKTftEAl, CANADA 

HAiir*M • SAINT JOHN • OUI«IC « AlVlttA • tlUlMjKl 



ff- 




DyrtamomeUr with Pump on T«st 




Direct Connected Motor Driven 
Cenlrifugel Pump on Test 



Oi 



....*;' 



^t 



uX . 



\«^- 



0yn4mom«t«F Tctt tnd Conbol P«nel 



Carruthers- Darling Vertical Singlex Pump 



BOILER FEED AND GENERAL LAND OR MARLNE SERVICE 
220 Pounds Maximum Steam and Water PresmreB 




Steam Cylinder 
Plmp End 

Pistons 



Rous 

Steam 
Valve Gear 



Standard 

FlTllNt-S 
KXTRAS 



Testing 



STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS 

Hard close-grained cast iron. 

Cast iron fitted with removable cast bronze liners and va 

seats with spring loaded metallic disc valves. 

Steam Piston — Cast iron, with cast iron spring rings. 

Pump Piston — Bronze, fitted with two ebonite cut pack 

rings. 

Steam Piston Rods^mild sleeL 

Pump Rods — rolled bronze. 

Bronze bushed with large working surfaces. Cold rolled si 

used extensively in construction. 

The steam supply to the cylinders is controlled by a piston va 

operated by a small pilot valve driven from the piston ro<l en 

head. Piston valve fitted with position indicator. The valve g 

is positive in action, and can be regulated to make a const 

length of stroke. 

Comprise drain valves. Steam cylinders are insulated with m 

nesia and covered with planished sheel steel. 

Steam and exhaust valves, relief valves, air vessels, press 

gauges, foundation bolts and washers, mechanical lubricators 

steam cylinder lubrication, and cast iron drip ledge baseph 

Durabia Valves (for description see page 7). Bronze pump ei 

Steam piston rods and pump rods in stainless steel or Monel mt- 

All pumps are fully tested and test certificate r^n be lurnis 
if desired. 






capacities of carrutiiers-darling vertical singlex boiler feed and general service pvmph in l^H. C.P.M, 




30 pDundi Of 3j6 If .a GtBoiU nS water p« Hor^powrr ftri hour, t vaporal^ from lOCT F to TO Pound* Stnm Piyuufr pr« h|Im«i- tAih. 
All t 'mrtrciion* »tt hlangrd. 

* NiKc Uw Urftr diAcnrtrr Btrkm eyUlidrt whtrt apcatint with Wwtrr Line coolrolt. 
OUicf r«tt« av«L]*blc on iv<]urt1 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Page 



Ri 
J 

J 

) 
J 



\ro 



•^ 



Twin Feed 
Pumps 

UODERN Power Plants usually have 
two Feed Pumps, and for convenient 
operatiun we can supply steam mani- 
folds, and suction and discharge mani- 
folds. 

The illustration shows Twin Feed 
Pumps with suction and discharge 
manifolds, mechanical lubricators, cast 
iron drip ledge baseplates. In general 
with this arrangement, only one pump 
is in commission at a time, the other 
serving as a spare, and the changing 
over from one pump to the other is 
quickly and easily accomplished. This 
is a very desirable arrangement where 
continuous service is required. 






Carr at hem- Darting Vertical Singlex Twin Feed Pump 



Recommended Spares for 



VERTICAL SINGLEX PUMPS (Page 2) 

One full set of pump valves and springs. 
Packing rings for one steam piston. 
Packing rings for one pump piston. 



VERTICAL DUPLEX PUMPS (Pages 4 and 5) 

One full set of pump valves and springs. 
Packing rings for two steam pistons. 
Packing rings for two pump pistons. 



^ 



Additional Spares 

One steam piston with rod and nut. 
One pump piston with rod and nut. 
One suction and one delivery valve seat. 
One suction and one delivery valve guard. 



Additional Spares 

One steam piston with rod and nut. 
One pump piston with rod and nut. 
Two suction and two delivery valve seats. 
Two suction and two delivery valve guards 



Paffe Three 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Carruthers - Darling Vertical Duplex Pump 




BOILER FEED AND GENERAL LAND OR MARINE SERVICE 



220 



Pounds Maximum Steam and Water Pressures 




Steam 
Cylinders 

Pl'mp Ends 
Pistons 



Rods 

Steam 
Valve Gear 

Standard 
Fittings 

Extras 



4^90 



Testing 



STANDARD SPECIFICATION 

Hard close-grained cast iron. 

Cast iron and fitted with removable cast bronze Hners anc 
valve seals with spring loaded metalhc disc valves. 
Steam Pistons^Cast iron, with cast iron spring rin^is. 
Pump Pistons— Bronze, fitted with two ebonite cut packm^ 
rings. 

Steam Piston Rods— mild steeK 
Pump Rods — rolled bronze. 

Bronze bushed with large working surfaces. Shaft bushi^s art 
adjustable. Actuating levers and rock shafts cast of steel m 
one piece. 

Comprise drain valves. Steam cylinders are insulated with 
magnesia and covered with planished sheet steeL 
Steam and exhaust valves, relief valves, air vessels, pressure 
gauges, foundation bolls and washers, mechanical lubricators 
for steam cylinder lubrication and cast iron drip ledge base- 
plate. Durabla valves (for description see page 7). Bronze 
pump ends. 

Steam piston rods and pump rods in stainless steel or Mone! 
metal. 

All pumps are fully tested and test certificate can be furnished 
if desired. 




CAPACITIES OF CARRUTHERS^ DARLING VERTICAL DUPLEX BOILER PEED AND GENERAL SERVICE PUMPS IN U.S,G-P-M. 



Stic 



4Hi3 iS 

6 x4 kA 
6 x4^£ii7 

T m5 iS 
S I 5H 1 9 

» 1 6H K 10 
10 ■ 7 » 10 
10 ■ 7H X 12 
12 « S x 13 
)4 ft 9 K 12 

U K 10 > IS 
IS lU lis 



tJ.S. 
GjiJa. 

Mrokt 



.139 

.225 

.396 
.612 



Sinalt stroke* Each Side Pci Minute 



I 31S 


1 S23 


2 017 


2 4SR 


3 073 


4 56.1 


5-740 



P.Kli'i H.H. 
V SO P.M 
Botler 11 [V 

i*...l-f H P 
l'S.<i I* M. 
ll..ilcr II P 
r v (; p M 

rsti P M 
BaiU'T H I" 
L'SC, i'.M. 

(irpjl^r H P 

r ^r, p M 

Hiiilp-r n V 
USO PM 
Uotk't H.P- 

v: s r. p M 

B.hIh-t U P 

I.' s *i y M 

H'akr H P 

r s t; P M 

Hiiilrr H P 
f S Cj P M 
boilrr M y 
i:SG P M 




Sizr Pipe 
Ci>fift<'rlir»n* 



30 pouBda «« 3-0 tJ & G«lloni of wat«> per hon^pomvr per hour from 100° P. to 70 ftoundt 9l«ni prrwiuc prr squafv IiKh. 
AU CoonecUom arr FUnied. 

DARI ING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL. P-O^ 




fage Four 



*^* 



> 



Carruthers- Darling Vertical Duplex Pumps 

BALLAST, BILGE, SANITARY AND LOW SERVICE 

220 Pounds Maximum Steam Pressure 
90 Pounds Maximum IVater Pressure 




Steam 
Cylinders 

Pump Ends 



Pistons 



Rods 

Steam 
Valve Gear 

Standard 

FiTTLNCiS 

Extras 



Testing 



STANDARD SPECIFICATION 

Hard close-grained cast iron. 

Cast iron and fitted with removable cast bronzp 
liners and valve seals with spring loaded metallic 

disc valves. 

Steam Pistons — Cast iron, with cast iron spring rings. 
Pump Pistons — Bronze^ fitted with suitable packing 
for the service desired. 

Steam Piston Rods — mild steel. 
Pump Rods — rolled bronze. 

Bronze bushed with large working surfaces. Shaft 
bushes are adjustable. Actuating levers and rock 
shafts are cast of steel in one piece- 
Comprise air and drain valves, test cocks, steam 
cylinders are insulated with magnesia and covered 
with planished sheet steel. 

Steam and exhaust valves, relief valves, air vessels, 
pressure K^ti^es. foundation bolls and washers. 
mechanical lubricators for sleam cylinder lubrica- 
tion and cast iron drip ledge baseplate. Durabia 
valves (for description see page 7). Bronze pump 
ends. 

Steam piston rods and pump rods in stainless steel or 
Monel metal. 

All pumps are fully tested and test certificate can be 
furnished if desired. 



CAPACITIES OF CARRUTHERS -DARLING VERTICAL LOW-SERVICE DUPLEX PUMPS IN U.S.G.P.M. 



k»» 







U.S. 

tJals. per 

Stroke 

Earh 


Single Strokes each side per Minute 


Size Pipe 

Connections 




Sixe 


Continuous Service 


Inlermlttent Service 


Ral- 
last 

150 


B 

4-1 


[fl 




hi 

Q 






20 

13 

23 
28 
40 
76 
9b 

132 
160 

433 


25 

16 
29 
55 
50 
94 
120 

165 
200 
286 
404 

542 


30 

19 

35 
42 

60 

113 

144 

198 
240 

343 
484 
650 


35 

22 
41 

49 
70 
132 
168 
231 
280 
400 
565 
759 


40 

26 

46 
56 
80 
152 
192 
264 
320 
458 
646 

8&7 


SO 

S2 

58 
70 

100 
189 
240 

330 
400 

572 

808 

108.^ 


60 

38 
70 
84 
ll'J 
228 
288 
y)(} 
480 


70 

45 
82 
'^8 
139 
2fir> 
33<i 
462 
5f)0 


80 
52 


90 

58 
105 
126 
179 
341 
432 

5<*4 
720 

1030 
1453 


100 

64 
117 
140 
198 
378 
480 


110 

71 
129 
154 
218 

4l'i 

528 

726 
880 

1258 
1775 
2380 


120 

77 
140 

168 

238 
454 
570 

792 
960 

1372 
1935 
2600 


130 

84 
152 
182 


140 


u 

^ 


44x4Hx 


5 
6 
6 
7 
8 
Q 

10 
10 

12 
15 

15 


Mi: 

.5852 
.6^58 

.9914 

1 8<J33 

2 .1977 

4 OOOS 

5 7 MS 
a 09> 

10 831 


90 


97 

176 
210 


H 

I 

1 

I 

1!^ 

2 
2 


1 

\H 

V4 

\H 

\H 

2 

2 

2,4 
IH 
3 
3 


3K 

4 

VA 

5 

6 

6 
8 
8 

8 
10 
12 


3 

3J^ 
4 

5 

5 

6 
6 

8 
8 

8 

10 


800 


5t5xS.4x 
6 x6 X 


94 
112 
159 
304 
384 
528 
(AO 

916 
1292 


164 
196 
278 

672 

924 
1120 
1600 
23f)0 

3035 


[050 

1250 


X 7 X 
7 x8Hx 


258 
492 


298 

720 
990 

1200 
1720 
2420 

3250 


1350 

2000 


S %9 X 


624 

858 

1040 

1486 
2100 

2820 


2.100 


9 X 10 X 

10 X 11 X 


6m 

800 

1144 
lf>15 


2800 
3200 


10 X 12 X 
12 X 1.1 X 


686 

9(.8 

1300 


800 
1130 

1515 


4000 
4550 


U X 15 X 


1735 


1950 


2117 


5800 



All connections are flanged 



Fagv Five 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q 




Carruthers - Darling Pumps 

Vertical Singlex Type 



C 



PART LIST 



1 Cylinder 

2 Cyhndrf Covtr 

5 Pislon Valvtf Casing 

6 Valve Casing End Cover* 

7 Valve C-ising From Covtr 
6 Valv* Gear L4?«Tfi 

9 Valve Gmt CrowpJece 

10 Valve Gear Sliding Pin 

1 1 Cro^bp^d 

12 Pilot Viilve Sp. Tail Piece 

13 Cros^hcad Pin 

14 Pilot Valve Spindle 

15 Pilot Valve Spindk' Nul 

16 Operating Rod 

17 Valvp Spindle Couplina 

18 Front Stay 

19 Fulcrum Buih. 

20 FuTcrum Pm 

21 Pilot Valvp 

22 Steam Pi^trjii 

23 Strata Pitti>n Ain^s 

24 Steam Pision Rod 

25 Steam PUiuii Rod Nut 

26 Pump PiFion 

27 Pump Pigton Ring* 

28 Pomp Piston Rod 

29 Pump Piston Rod ^Jurs 

30 Side Stays 

31 0|x.-rating Rod Guide 
33 Pump 

35 Pump Cover 



37 Pump Liner 

3B Pump Cheat Cowrt 

41 Valves (Kinehorn) 

43 Valve StaU (Suet,) 

44 Valve ScaU (Di«hJ 

45 Valve Guards (Klnghgrn) 
47 Valve iatuds 

49 Valve Springs 

50 Sieam Piston Rod Gland 
5! Pump Pi'icm R(jd Glatid 

52 Sleam Piftt-m R"d Neck Rinfi 

53 Pump Piston Rod Neck Rma 

54 Valve Spindle Glandi 

55 Valve Spindle Nt-ck RinE (T<ip> 

56 Liner Lotli-ng Bull 

57 Pump Ping 

58 Pump Pocket Plug 

59 Pifton Valve 

60 Piston Valve End Spindte Gland 

61 piston Valve End Spindle Neck Bn'^h 

62 Valve Spindle Neck Rina <Bott,J 

63 Piston Valve End Spindles 

64 Set Sc^e^v for Valve Spindle Nut 

65 Spring for Valve Spi-tdle Nut 

Serial number and mUe of pump thoutd frc 
pit-en when ordering Mpafe parte 



Carruthers - Darling Pumps 



Vertical Duplex Type 

PART LIST 



1 


CyHnder 


26 


Pump Piston 


2 


Cylinder Cover 


27 


Pump Piston Ringi 


3 


Canmg Cover 


28 


Pump Pi*ton Rfjd 


4 


Steam Stool 


29 


Pump Piston Ryd Na(* 


6 


Column 


33 


Pump 


7 


Bracket Covet 


35 


Pump Cover 


8 


Bracket Bu^hs 


37 


Pump Liner 


9 


Wyppr Shaft ^LongJ 


38 


Pump Che5t Cover 


10 


Wypcr Shall [ShorlJ 


40 


Pump Stool 


11 


Crofishtad 


41 


VaWes 'Kinghorn) 


12 


CrosBln^ad Linbb 


43 


Valve Seats (Suci,) 


13 


Crofahead Link Pins 


44 


Valve Seats (Disch.) 


14 


Valvi- Spindip 


45 


Valve Guards (ICinghom) 


lb 


Valve Spindle Nn(5 


47 


Valve Stud 


16 


Valve Spindle Forks 


46 


Valve Stud SprinBs 


17 


Valve Spindle Links (LonitJ 


49 


Valve Spring 


1» 


Valve Spindle Links fSliori} 


50 


Steam Pieiton Rod Gland 


19 


Valve Spindle Link Pins 


51 


Pump Piston Rod Gland. 


au 


Vfltve Spindle Link Buh1ic5 


52 


Steam Piston Rod Neck Ring 


•i\ 


Shde Valve 


S3 


Pump Piston Rod Neck Rine 


22. 


Steam Piston 


&4 


Valve Spindle Gland 


23 


Steam Piston Ringi 


55 


Valve Spindle Neck Ring 


21 


Steam PiMon Rod 


56 


Liner Locking Bolt 


25 


Steam Piston Rtid Nut 


57 


Pump Plug 



Serial number and 9ixe ot pump should be given when ordering •pore parU 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P,0- 




pQOe SU 



• 



LUBRICATORS 




» 



ltUU.\feConna Sinfite Feed Metal 

Uttdf Type Force Feed Lutiricotor 

l-Fint Size 



THE mechanical type of lubricator is a valu- 
able accessory for use with steam pumps. 
Once set they supply a metered quantity of 
oil (proportionate to speed of pump), to the 
steam cylinders. They save oil and insure 
continuous lubrication of the equipment. 

We illustrate two different makes of lubri- 
cators. The Hills-McCanna two-pint ratchet 
dri\'e, single feed, duco finish lubricator, fit- 
ted with blinker sight feed to give operator 
visible evidence that oil has left the pumping 
unit. Vacuum check valves are also included 
to be placed in the oil line between the lubri- 
cator and the pump cylinder. Larger capaci- 
ties and nickel-plated finish are also avail- 
able. Detailed information will be furnished 
on request. 

The Dunbar & Slater one-pint size duco 
finish is suitable for use with small size steam 
pumps. Included with this unit are also suit- 
able sight feed and check valve, 




Dunbar & Stater "Standard" 

Force-Feed Lubricator iVo- SDD. 

I -Pint Size 




Durabla Metal Pump Valves 



These Valves differ from cast or 
forged valves in that they are die 
formed from special ihin non-cor- 
rosive metal alloy sheets^ rolled 
and heat-treated for this purpose. 

DURABLA Valves are the light- 
est and strongest valves made. 

DURABLA Valves make con- 
tact only at the inner and outer 
areas of the valve seats. The arched 
design prevents warping and great- 
ly adds to the strength. 

DURABLA METAL PUMP VALVE SERVICE, 
as shown al>ove, consists of Valve, Guard-stem. Spring, 
and Seat. 

DURABLA METAL VALVES can be installed on 




With Guard 
Patent 



-el em Styte .Vo. 402 
\o, l.£Si.3S4 



a1I valve seats which have suitable 
diameters for the valves; in any 
type of Reciprocating; Pump. Gas 
Engine. Gas Compressor, or Air 
Compressor; for any type of service 
(water, oil. gas, air and acid); and 
at any temperature and at any 
pressure. 

DURABLA Valves maintain 
their efficiency continuously. 

When making specifications for 
new pumps, or valve replacements, 
be sure to specify '* DURABLA 
METAL PUMP VALVES." 



Note: DURABLA METAL PUMP VALVE 
SERVICE will increase general pumping effic- 
iency and decrease maintenance costs. 



Pcae Seven 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Darling Horizontal Duplex Pumps 

BOILER FEED OR GENERAL SERVICE 



150 Pounds 

Maximum Steam 

Pressure 




150 Pounds 

Maximum Mater 

Pressure 



THE pump illustrated above shows our stand- 
ard high pressure duplex packed piston, valve 
plate type with end suction. Size 5^4" x 3J^" 
X 5" and smaller are constructed with steam 
cylinder, yoke and water cylinder cast in one 
piece. The pump is heavily constructed and 
all parts are interchangeable. 

We regularly furnish cast iron water pistons 
and followers with bronze cylinder linings- The 
piston rods are of bronze unless otherwise 
ordered. The water end is fitted with bronze 



valve seats, valve holts and s[jrings, with 
either hard rubber, soft rubljcr or bronze 
valves, as the service may require. Steel rods 
and all iron fitted water ends can l>e supplied 
when required. Pumps can be fitted with air 
chambers at extra cost. 

Note: DURABLA Metal Pump Valve Ser- 
vice will increase general pumping' efficiency, 
and decrease maintenance costs. This can be 
supplied as an extra. ^See page 7 for complete 
descriptionO 



CAPACITIES OF DARLING DUPLEX HORIZONTAL BOILER FEED AND GENERAL SERVICE PUMPS IN U.S.G.P.M, 




ii 

si 

1/) 




At Single Strokes Each Side Per Minute 


Pipe Cunneclions 


Flour 

Space 




Size 


Boiler Feeding and Fuel Oil 


General Service 


II 


E 

• ^ 

•1 


'A 


C 


■- 

u 

5 
■1 


a.' 

C 
ft' 
1 

26 
43 




4-1 

X 






20 


25 


io 


35 


40 


50 


GO 


70 


80 


90 


100 


no 


120 


is 


3 xS x3 


-Oil 

,IU3 
.208 


Boiler 

U.S-G. 

Boiler 
U.S-G. 

Boikr 

u.s,a 


HP 

P M, 

HP. 

P.M 

HP. 

P.M. 


27 
t.G4 

4.1 

H.3 


»4 

2 

h.i 

I7Z 
1U.4 


41 

2.46 

102 
6.L 

207 
12.5 


4^ 

2,B7 

119 
7,2 

24U 
14,5 


54 

3,28 

ISA 
H,2 

276 
16.6 


68 
4,1 

170 
10.3 

945 


HI 
4.9 

2<14 
12.3 


95 


108 
6.5 

273 
16.5 

33.2 


123 
7.4 

308 
IN. 5 

621 
S7.4 


137 
8,2 

342 
20,6 

690* 
41.6 


150 
9.(12 

376 
22.6 

760 
46.7 


163 
9.8 

410 
24.7 

03H 
5.0 


•P4 


•1^ 

•2 
•2H* 


9*-, 
12^ 
1G 


13 
17 
17 


12& 


4^x2^x4 


2 as 

14.4 

4h3 
29.1 


330 


5^x3^xE 


414 
24. 9 


&S0 


c xi XG 


,326 


Boiter 
U.S.G- 


H,P, 
P.M- 


2]e 

13 


270 
IS-.1 


324 


3TS 
22. « 


432 
26 


540 
S2.6 


64S 
39.1 


756 
45.6 


H65 
52,1 


974 
50.6 


10S2 
65 


1190 
71.7 


1296 
78,2 


•1 


•n^ 


'3 


'E 


46 


16 


22 


700 


7>A]c4Vjite 


.i>5l 


Bniler 
U.S.fJ. 


H.P. 
PJ4, 


L'2 


45H 
27-5 


550 
33 


«43 
3H.6 


743 
44 


D1H 
55,1 


UU2 
66.1 


12S5 
77.1 


1470 

Ha.2 


1653 
99.2 


1037 

nu.2 


2020 
121.2 


2203 
132,2 


MH 


•2 


t4 


t3 


6» 


23 


29 


IfiOO 


7%xV^icl<f 


,689 


Boiler 
V.S.C.. 


H.P. 
P,M- 


27,5 


571 
34.4 


6H5 
41. a 


SOU 
4H.2 


914 
55.1 


1142 


1371 
82.6 


ifiou 

96.4 


1H29 
110 


2059 
124 


2287 
138 


2516 
151 


274« 
165 


•IVj 


•2 


t4 


t3 


64J 


21 


29 


1650 


7»^3t5 xlO 


,S50 


Bnikr 
V-S.fi. 


H.P, 
P.M. 


&«4 
34 


7l>fi 
42 „S 


K46 
51 


9H7 
S9.ft 


112? 
66 


I4ir» 

MS 


1692 
1U2 


1974 
119 


2257 
136 


2539 
153 


2f*22 
170 


3104 
187 


3386 
204 


■iVj 


•2 


t4 


n 


62 


21 


29 


16TS 


in 16 xlO 


ITU 

2. 


Boikr 
V.S.C. 

Briler 
V-SM. 


HP. 

P M. 


S2T 

J.S,9 


1033 
61 

1660 

I'HJ 

L 


12411 
73 

1S92 
12<» 


1447 
H5 

2324 

Un 


1654 
9f| 

2656 
16U 


an67 
122 


24ti| 
147 

3984 
240 


2094 
171 


325«r 
196 

5312 
320 


3657 
220 

5977 
360 


4063 
245 

6640 
400 


4470 
269 

7304 
440 


4H76 
294 

7968 
480 


■2 
•2Vj 


•21^ 
•3 


ts 


t4 

ts 


66 
79 


26 
32 


32 
35 


l»50 


12 xT Xl2 


HP. 
P.M- 




41)4^ 


2260 



30 pounds or 3.6 U,5. gallons of water per horsepower per hour from 100= F. to 70 pounds steam pressure t«.r square inch. 

•Screwed Connection twanged Connection 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.O. 




Darling Horizontal Duplex Pumps 



TANK OR LOW SERVICE 



150 Pounds 

Maximum Steam 

Pressure 




75 Pounds 
Maximum Water 

Pressure 




TANK or low service work, where ordinary 
'steam pressures are used, does not require 
cylinders with as high a ratio as the boiler 
feed type of pump, therefore we recommend 
the use of pumps where steam and water 
cylinders are nearer the same diameter. 

Pumps built in this way for use on this type 
of service are more economical and effective. 
They combine large pumping capacities with 
small expenditure of steam. They cover a 
large range of service such as refineries, dis- 
tilleries, irrigation work and so forth. 

The pump illustrated above shows our 
standard duplex piston packed valve plate 
type with side suctions. Size SK x 4K ^ 5" 
and smaller are constructed with steam 



cylinder, yoke and water cylinder cast in one. 
The pumps are heavily constructed. All parts 
are interchangeable. 

We furnish regularly, iron water pistons and 
followers, properly packed with square fibrous 
packing, bronze cylinder linings. The piston 
rods are of bronze unless otherwise ordered* 
The water end is fitted with bronze valve 
seats, valve bolts and springs, with cither 
hard rubber, soft rubber or bronze valves, as 
the service may require. Steel rods and all 
iron fitted water ends can be supplied when 
required. 

Special types of valves such as Durabla or 
ball type can be supplied for pumping heavy 
liquids. See page 7 for complete description- 



Size 



3 x2?4x 3 
4Hx3Kx 4 
5!4x4?i)t 5 
6 X 5?i X 6 
6 X 6 X 6 
7VSx74x 6 
7!a X X 10 
7!'2x7 X 10 
7*2 X 8»>i X 10 
10 X 10 X 10 



CAPACITIES OF DARLING HORIZONTAL DUPLEX TANK PUMPS IN U.S.C.P.M. 



U,S. 

Gals. 

per 

Stroke 

Bach 
Cylimlef 



Single Strokes Each Side Per Minute 



Continuous Service 




Intermittent 
Service 



Emer- 
gency 



Connections 






I' 
IW 

2' 

2" 
2- 
2" 

1" 



u 



2H' 

i' 

4t 
6t 

5t 
61 
6t 
8t 



1* 
2' 

5t 

4t 
St 
51 
61 



Floor Space 



on 
c 
if 

-J 



28 

38 

44 

49 
49 
55 

62 
05 
65 
73 



[Oh 
13 

16 
19 
19 

27 

21 
23 
28 
30 



X 



16 

19 
20 

22 
24 
30 
31 
33 
35 
38 






150 

400 

650 

850 

850 

1550 

1300 
1650 
1990 

2900 



■Screwed Connection. tFlanged Connection 



Page Sine 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.O 




Directions for Setting and Operating Pumps 



pump wut. .i. .^ it. ("11 c»I»a,y. .o -h^c H.l. or no w.t.. w U b. obi ,^^;^„ 

W. ,«™n.«nd .iway. "jinR a .actio;. ^^T.^j^^-^J.^^^tro;^., .hl^'iSirpi^ b^.^ .hr /yUnd.r h». .octjon 



- iBDISCtlAROE 



op.n"|. on born "id.:, w^ p.el.r pacing th, •"«^" fi' '•'»';;^'„7^^';':f7h;r;! nd« r.'.U^Uo.. ,ir Chamber, « shown 
t^;,ml <••> «n^ ^idr only, the suConpip* may be P »'™ ""■f'^^/^'lJJ'™ ^ p>e« o( pipe same siie a* ■he iuclion pipf. 
in il.e illu-ltalion in dottrd iin^fi. Tlus suclion "'' ^'5^'"° " 'rf To th "w^^ cylinder by a short nipple, »nd an 'Ibow or 
and from four to si« r«.l Ipng, capped on thr lop and »J""7X;",'|,""ump^, ,unnmg a. high 5P«d. Ihi, air chamber 



along-^icon pip<., in high ''V^- °^ *"*Vo formXw IT w. ^ -h-^^^^^ P'l-' '"I 



fAJfruflf^n Cd'ii /or «crf Jnf Steam 
ValtvB la auppiird tpllt> tactiFump 



Trrn^,^ ,o o, .ron, the pu^P, avoi. tH. -^^'^^^^::X ^^^''^^^^'^^^'^'^ '"- '^^ 
Wat... .1 high lemperalu.e ?"™^'^ '^^^"nVmTanT^ekls UiT^^ walrr^ con«quen.ly. to pump 

ZZ^I^.i'-^^^^itl^lC^^f^^'^^i'^^ l^i^r^'^Mied .on, . head. 

V^ goort cylinder oil only, and oil s>«m ei.d jus. '^fl^/l^JlT^L'uVinrevenl leakage without e«ce«ive friction. 
Keep%li.ffing bo.e. fiill vf good n^^f '"« XVa\« vtwV.^^^d fa J^^^^ f"'*"" "amin.ns .he steam end. 

A^way* S^ that the pt-mp h., a full and steady supply of water, or .,iher fluid. 



Darling Duplex Pump Part List 



V7S 



(i5 




156 157 76 150 



148 
148A 



142 145 7, 15A 52A 32E 32B 





§' M 4' s <' OAd iarper 

6'zi^,' x«' andtarg€r 

you Screi£t4i Clandt 
U0*d on f*u/np« up fr> 
S* Stroke takt Fori 
SumberM »> 27, 154. Si 

Pump^Sh' *m'i5' 
dn<J «maJfrr ar« madt 
ifiith ateam and water 
cBtind€r9 c^Ml on ifake 



35 51 56A 141 24 36A 51 55 00 56 56A 5 



—Steam Cylinder Foot 

00 — Water Cylinder Foot 

2 — Steam Cylinder 

3 — Water Cylinder 

4 — Steam Cylinder Head 

5 —Water Cylinder Head 
7 — Valve Chamber Cover 
B —Steam Chest 

15 —Rubber Water Valves 
ISA— Metal Water Valves 

18 —Steam Valve 

19 — Steam Chest Cover 

20 —Steam Piston 

21 — Steam Piston Rings 

22 —Water Piston 

23 — Water Piston Follower 

24 —Piston Rod 



26 —Piston Rod Gland Nut 124 - 

27 —Piston Rod Gland Follower 141 - 

29 —Water Valve Plate 142 

30 —Water Cylinder Lining 143 - 
32 —Water Valve Seals U4 
32A— Water Valve Bolts 145 - 
32B— Water Valve Washers 146 ■ 
32E— Water Valve Springs 147 - 
35 —Piston Rod Stuffing Box 148 ■ 
36A— Piston Rod Stuffing Box Gland USA- 

50 -Water Piston Packing 149 - 

51 —Piston Rod Packing ISO 
56 —Water Piston Nut 156 
56A— Water Piston Jam Nut 157 
72 —Valve Rod 158 
76 —Valve Rod Stuffing Box Gland Nut 

tn ftrdtrirtf rtpai't, give ahop number end »ixe ol pump 



-Steam Piston Rod Nut 
-Piston Rod Spool 

Upper Rock Shaft 
-Lower Rock Shaft 
-Cross Stand 
'Long Lever 
-Short Lever 

Valve Rod Nut 
-Long Valve Rod Link 
-Short Valve Rod Link 
-Valve Rod Head 
-Valve Rod Head Pin 
-Valve Rod Stuffing Box 
-Valve Rod Stuffing Box Packing 
-Piston Rod Stuffing Box, Screwed 
Type 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q- 



Page Ten 



*• Darling Steam-driven Condensation Pumps 



• 




DAKLIN(. Steam-Driven Condensation Return Units are iUua- 
tr;,tr*i. rquipp.fd with ekfuT simplex or duplex pattern pumps, 
While ihe simplex pump is mucfi more economical in steam 
consumption, ihe duplex is often preferred by operating engi- 
iittT»; on this account we are prepared to supply either pattern. 
Both styles are made in singie or duplicate units, the advan- 
tagr of the duplicate unit being that it provides a stand-by and 
enables repairs lu be made to one pump \*'ithout affecting the 
operation of the plant. 

The Receiver and Pump are arranged compactly upon one 
drip p,Mi base plate, the receiver being set to allow condensation 
to rtott from the lowest line of pipes in the heating system. 



Datlintt it/trisijntai 
SimpttT Steam- 
driven 
Vondenmat ion Pump 



Steam control float valve is of improved design, very sensitive 
and reliable. Valve spindle glands are accessible and easily 
packed. Copper float is seamless, ensuring long life. 

Where steam is used for heating purposes, as in hotels, apart- 
ment houses, factories and large buildings, it has been found 
advantageous to feed the water of condensation direct to the 
boilers at the highest possible temperature. 

Lubricators are not included as regular equipment, but either 
forced feed or sight feed styles can be supplied at extra cost. 
For illustrations of makes we recommend and carry in stock, 
see page 7. 



Darting tiori^antal 

Duptex Sleani- 

driren 

Condeimation Pump 




SIMPLEX t:ONt>ENSATION RETlfBN PUMPS AND RECEIVERS 



Codt; 


No. 


Sizf Pump 


Siio fttcciver 


No. and Siic 


Longth 


Width 


K»shi 


Cap Sq- Fl- 

of RadiatiDJi 


Wfighi 










Rcc- Inlet 








in Lbs. 


K\t<j 


2B 


4 ]t2^x 5 


Oval 


1—2' 


30 


24 


26 


6200 


575 




«a 


5 >3 t B 


15x26 


2— 2h' 


46 


30 


32 


10000 


900 


K^nl 


5B 


54x3'<i< 7 


15x36 


2— 2^- 


46 


30 


32 


14000 


1250 


Kirvie 


7B 


6l.x4 < 8 


15X.16 


2— Z^' 


47 


33 


36 


20000 


1360 


K una 11 


eD 


7 <4"a*in 


xsiCie 


2—24' 


S8 


36 


36 


32000 


2200 


9B 


8^',]<5 nlO 


24)c3a 


a— 4- 


(\\ 


41 


36 


40000 


2350 




lOB 


10 x6 *12 


24k^ 


2—*' 


68 


43 


39 


60000 


3000 


MH 


IZ %B xl2 


24i3n 


2—4' 


71 


44 


39 


lOOOOQ 


3900 



DUPLEX CONDENSATION RETURN PUMPS AND RECEIVERS 



Code 


No. 


SUe Pump 


Si«" Reed V IT 


No. lind Size 
Ret Inlet 


Length 


Width 


H.-islJi 


Cap. Sq. Ft. 
uf Radial tun 


WeiBhl 


DuptiuM 
Uuptvr 
Dupnr»» 
Dupat«. , , , - 


ID 


3 x2 T 3 


Ovat 


1—2" 


26 


24 


28 


4000 


500 


2D 


44x2«4J( ^ 


15x26 


2— 2h' 


36 


26 


32 


10000 


900 


5D 


S'iitS^'ji 5 


15x36 


2— 2^' 


46 


32 


36 


IBOOO 


1250 


7D 


6 x4 1 6 


15x36 


2—24" 


46 


32 


36 


26000 


1430 


8U 


7 t4 4ii 8 


24x38 


2—4- 


70 


36 


40 


40000 


4000 


9D 


7Hi5 nlO 


24x:iH 


2—4- 


78 


54 


40 


GOOOO 


4?nn 



Sundard R«i^ivrr5 arr ca^t iron, St«l rewivera supplied on special order. 



Page Eleven 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.Q 



Darling Horizontal Simplex Pumps 

BOILER FEED OR GENERAL SERVICE 



C 



Maximum 

Steam Pressure 
150 Pounds 




Maximum 

Water Pressure 

150 Pounds 

* 



THIS illustration represents our Darling Horizontal Simplex T^imp, 
economical in steam consumption for general service, such as boiler 
feeding and other high duty work. This pump is double-actmg and has 
piston arranged for square fibrous packing, and is suitable for handling 
hot or cold water; it is fitted with bronze piston rod, bronze water lin- 
ing, bronze valve seats and bolts, and rubber valves, unless otherwise 
ordered; but bronze valves may be used if so desired. All water valve 
seats are screwed in place; rubber or bronze valves are interchangeable 
on same seats, bolts and springs. Durabla metal pump valves supplied 
as an extra. (For description see page 7.) 

CAPACITY OF DARLING SINCLEX HORIZONTAL BOILER FEED AND GENERAL SERVICE PUMPS IN U.S.C.P.M. 



e 





St 

^^ 

.106 

-183 

.434 

.69 

85 

1,02 

1-72 
2.00 
2.61 

:{ 48 












Single 


strokes per Minute 












Size Pipe 
Connections 


Floor Space 






1 


E 
n 

LI 
>- 
i/i 


n 

K 
til 


1= 

c 


h 
fl 

X 
u 

ET. 

a 


u 

c 




at 
X 




Silt 


Boiler Fec<l 


General Service 


Emeraency 






20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


60 


70 


80 


90 


100 


110 


120 




4 1i2Hte 5 


Boiler H,P, 
U.SG.P.M. 

Boiler H.R 
U.S-G.P.M. 

Boiler H,R 

Boiler H.P. 
U.S.G-P-M- 
Boiler H-P. 
U.S,G.P.M. 
Boiler H.P- 
U.S^CRM. 

BoiliT H.P. 
U.S,G-P-M. 

BciiltT HP. 
U,S.G.P,M. 
BoL^trH.P. 

as.G.p.M. 

Boiler H,P- 
U,S.G P.M- 
Boiler H.P, 
U S.G.P.M. 


35 
2 12 

61 
3.66 

144 
8.7 

229 
13. S 

262 

17 

338 

20.4 

571 
34 

664 
40 

866 
52 

1155 

70 

1606 

109 


44 

2.65 

76 

4 58 

180 

10,8 

286 

17,25 

353 

21 25 

423 

25.5 

714 

43 

830 

50 

1083 

65 

1444 

87 

2257 

136 


53 

3.18 

91 
5.49 

216 

13 

344 

20.7 

474 

25 5 

508 

30 6 

856 

52 

990 

60 

1300 

78 

1733 

104 

2709 

163 


62 

3.71 

112 

6-4 

252 
IS. 2 

401 

24 1 

494 

29.7 

593 

35.7 

999 

60 
1162 

70 
1516 

91 

2022 
122 

316U 
190 


71 

4.24 

122 

7.32 

288 

17.4 
458 

27.6 

564 

34 

677 

40 8 

1142 

6fi 

132fi 

80 

1733 

104 

2311 
140 

3612 
218 


79 

4.77 

137 

8 23 

324 

19. S 

515 

31 
635 

38 
762 

46 


88 

5.3 

152 

9 15 


105 
6.36 


123 
7.42 

213 
12 8 

504 
30.4 

802 
48.2 

988 
59.4 
1185 
71.4 

1998 
12c 

2324 
140 

3033 
182 


141 
8 48 

243 
14,6 

576 
34 8 


158 
9 54 

273 
16 4 

648 
39 
1030 
62.1 
1269 
76 5 
1523 
92 
2570 

155 
2988 

160 
3899 

235 

5199 
313 

8127 
490 


176 
10 6 


193 
11.66 

334 

20,1 

792 
47.7 

1260 
76 

1552 
93 

1862 
112 

3140 

189 
3652 

220 
4765 

287 
6354 

383 
9933 

598 


211 
12 72 

364 
21.9 

865 
52 

1375 

83 

1693 

102 

2031 

122 4 

3426 
206 

3984 
240 

5199 
312 

693Z 

416 

10836 

652 


' % 

•1 
-I 

•ih 

•2 

•2 


• H 
*1 

•1 

*1S, 

*1H 

»2 
•2 
•2 

•2 Hi 

•2H 


-2 
•2H 

•3 
•3iv 

■3H 

14 

»s 

16 

re 


'iH 
•2 

•3 
•3 

t3 
t4 

ts 

IS 
t6 


30 
35 

47 
54 
61 
61 
68 
69 
71 
95 
97 


7 
8 

10 

12 

15 
15 

18 
19 
23 

24 
25 


22 
25 
30 
37 

43 
43 

46 
52 
60 

6! 
65 


190 


5 i3 t 6 


182 

10 98 

432 

26.2 

687 

41 4 

847 

51 
1015 
61,2 

1713 
104 

1992 
120 

2599 
156 

3466 
208 

5418 
326 


304 
18.3 

720 
43.4 

1145 
69 

1411 
85 

1693 
102 

7ft^5 
172 

3320 
200 

4333 
261 

5776 
348 

9030 
544 


280 


6^x4 I E 


360 
21.7 

573 
34.5 

705 
42.5 

646 

51 

1427 

B6 

1660 

100 
2166 

130 

7888 
174 

4515 
272 


475 


7 x4HilO 


916 
55 2 
1129 
68 
1354 
81 6 

2284 

136 
2656 

160 
3466 

20B 
4621 

280 
7224 

436 


700 
850 
B60 


10 16 xl2 

12 i7 %\2 

n 18 J112 


1286 
77 

1494 
90 

1949 
117 

2600 
156 

4063 
245 


1600 
2300 
2500 


14 x8 1I6 
16 ilO ]il6 


4043 
244 

6321 
380 


2900 
3900 



30 pounds or 3.6 U.S. ftallona of water per liur^ power per hour frum 100^ p. 10 70 pQundi sttam presiure per square inch. 

•Screwed Conneclion tPlanaed Conn^cticm 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P. ■ 



c 



Page Twelve 



>•• 





Darling Horizontal Simplex Pumps 



TANK OR LOW-SERVICE 



Ataximum Steam Pressure 150 Pounds 
Maximum Water Pressure 75 Pounds 




TANK or low service work^ where ordinary steam 
' pressure is used, does not require cylinders with as 
high a ratio as the boiler feed type of pump, therefore 
we recommend the use of pumps where steam and 
water cylinders are nearer the same diameter. 

Pumps buill in this way and used on this service 
are more economical and elTeclive. They combine 
large pumping capacities with small expenditure of 
steam. They cover a large range of service such as 
re5nerieSj distilleries, irrigation work and so forth. 



We furnish rej^ularly, iron waler pistons and fol- 
lowers, properly packed with square fibrous packing, 
bronze cylinder linings. The piston rods are of bronze 
unless otherwise ordered- The water end is fitted with 
bronze valve seats, valve bolts and springs, with 
either hard rubber, soft rubber or brass valves, as 
the service may require. Steel rods and all iron filled 
water ends can be supplied when required. 

Special types of valves such as Durabla or ball type 
can be supplied for pumping heavy liquids. See page 7 
for complete description. 



C\rACITIES OF DARLING 


HORIZONTAL SIMPLEX TANK OR LOW SERVICE 


PUMPS IN U.S.C.P.M. 






VS. 

per 
Stroke 


Single Strokes Per Minute 


Connections 


Floor Spire 






r- 

c 


PS 


o 
to 


to 

L. 

Q 


no 

1 


10 
10 
12 
15 
15 
18 

21 
24 
26 


j: 


si/c 


Continuotis Service 


hUerniittent Service 






20 

4.1 

8 2 
14 7 
24 5 
33 
52 

81 6 

117 

214 


25 

5 2 

10 2 
18 3 
30 6 
42 
65 
t02 
147 
267 


30 

6 2 

12 4 

22 

36 7 
50 

78 

122 
176 
320 


35 

7.3 

14 4 
25 7 

42 8 

58 

91 

143 
206 
374 


40 

8.2 
16 4 
29 4 
49 

66 
104 

163 
234 

427 


50 


60 


70 

14 6 

IS. 8 
SI 4 


80 

16,4 

32 8 
58. 8 

98 

133 

208 

326 
468 
854 


90 

18,7 

37 

66 

no 

150 

235 
367 
523 
960 


100 


no 


120 




4 X S^ix 5 
^ X 4**^ 6 
5^^ 6x6 


.308 

412 
.733 

1 223 

1 665 

2 610 

4 080 

5 870 
10 65 V 


10 4 

20 4 

36 6 

61.2 
84 

130 

204 
294 
534 


12 4 

24,8 
44 

73.4 

100 

156 

244 

352 

MO 


20 8 

41 6 
73 2 

122 4 
167 
261 
408 

587 
1066 


23 

46 4 

80 7 

134 
183 
287 
449 
646 
1176 


25 
49 6 

88 

147 
200 
31 > 
488 
704 
1280 


"A 

•■'4 

n 
•1 


•1 
M 
'I 
Ml, 

•2 
■2 

*2H 


•2ir 

'3 

*3 

14 
t4 
t5 

is 

t8 

tio 


•2 

t3 
t3 
t4 

t6 
16 
t8 


33 

36 
40 
51 

56 
67 

72 
78 
88 


280 
410 
f>00 


Gfkx 6 xlO 

7 X 7 xIO 

8 X 8 xli 
10 xlO xt2 
12 xl2 xl2 
U xt4 xl6 


S5 . 6 

116 

182 

286 

412 

746 


670 
750 
1550 
20CK1 
2600 
4000 



'Screwed Connection ff^l^ng^d Connection 



Page Thirteen 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.Q- 



Darling Simplex Hydraulic-Pressure Pumps 

Maximum Steam Pressure 150 Pounds 
Maximum Water Pressure 2,000 Pounds Cast Iron Cylinders 
Maximum Water Pressure 5.000 Pounds Forged Steel Cylinders 





DIRECT-ACTING Hydraulic- Pressure Pumps are used in connection 
with oil and cotton presses, testing machines, hydraulic nvettmg, 
punching and flanging machinery, and all high-pressure work. 

These hydraulic pumps are huilt with cast iron water cylinders, 
for which the pressure is stated below. For higher pressures, up to 5.000 
pounds per square inch, the entire water cylinder is made from a solid 
open-hearth-steel forging. The valves are of steel, seating on steel seats 
which are part of the cylinder itself. Monel metal valves and seats giving 
better wearing qualities can be supplied at extra cost. Separate bronze 
plugs are provided by removal of which each valve may be reached 
independently. 

CAPACITIES OF DARLING SIMPLEX HYDRAULIC- PRESSURE PUMPS IN U.S.G.P.M. 



Ca 







U.S. 
Gals. 










BaL 
Pressure 


Max^ 
Pressure 










Code 


Size 


Steam 


Ex- 


Suc- 


Dis- 


at 85 


for 


Length 


Width 


Height 


Weight 






per 
Stroke 




haust 


tion 


charge 


Pounds 


Casi-lron 






















of Steam 


Cylinders 










Salvo 
Solo 




0238 
0301 




1 
1 


I 

1 


H 
Va 


2300 
1800 


2000 
2000 


82 

82 


11 
U 


19 
19 


520 
520 
520 
850 


Spero 


5)axP^x 7 
fiJ^xlHxlO 


0371 
053 


1 


I 


I 

IK 


I 


1480 
3530 


2000 
2000 


82 
102 


11 
13 


19 
21 




SS^xt^'MxlO 


064 


1 


\H 


l!4 


1 


2920 


2000 


102 


13 


21 


850 


8!^xl"^xlO 


076 


I 


\H 


IK 


1 


2450 


2000 


102 


13 


21 


850 


Salem 


Bi^ixlHxlO 

8 xlMxI2 


089 
0636 


1 
1 




IH 


1 
1 


2090 
5130 


2000 
2000 


102 
115 


13 
12 


21 

27 


850 
900 


Sheridan 


8 xlHxl2 


m\2 


I 


IH 


V4 


1 


2170 


2000 


115 


12 


27 


900 


Shepherd 

Shelby 
Sharon 


8 xX^jiU 


12+8 


I 


VA 


Pi 


I 


1600 


2000 


115 


12 


27 


900 


8 k2 x12 


1632 


1 


l!4 


IH 


V4 


1200 


2000 


lis 


12 


27 


1200 


a x2'/2xl2 


2544 


1 


IM 


VA 


IW 


800 


1000 


115 


12 


27 


1600 


San ford 


10 3(14x12 


0912 


1!^ 


2 


V4 


I 


3400 


2000 


116 


14 


30 


1100 


Sanitac 


10 xl>4xl2 


1248 


\H 


2 


V4 


I 


2500 


2000 


116 


14 


30 


1300 


Scolta . 


10 x2 k12 


1632 


m 


2 


Vi 


IK 


1910 


2000 


116 


14 


30 


1300 


Silhton 


10 x2!-ixl2 


.2544 


iH 


2 


VA 


VA 


1200 


1000 


116 


14 


30 


1700 




12 x143c12 


om2 


VA 


2 


V4 


1 


4890 


2000 


120 


16 


31 


1300 


Scio 


12 xl>ixl2 


.1248 


m 


2 


VA 


I 


3590 


2000 


120 


16 


31 


1650 


Scipio . . - 


12 x2 xl2 


1632 


iH 


2 


XYi 


iVi 


2750 


2000 


120 


16 


31 


1650 


Sager 


12 x2f-ixl2 


.2544 


\H 


2 


V4 


VA 


1700 


1000 


120 


16 


31 


2100 


Selkirk 


U xl?^xl2 


.1248 


2 


2M 


Ui 


I 


4900 


2000 


120 


18 


32 


1900 


Seneca 


U x2 xl2 


1632 


2 


2H 


VA 


IK 


3750 


2000 


121 


18 


32 


1900 



c 



DARLING BROTHERS, LIMITED MONTREAL. P.Q. 



Page Fourteen 



Darling Vacuum Pumps 



150 lbs. Maximum Steam Pressure 
High and Low Vacuum 




Low Duty 




THE Darling Low Duty Vacuum Pump shown 
'in the illustration is especially designed for 
continuous and heavy service. They have 
generous valve area, and are heavily built to 
withstand rough usage. They are especially 
recommended for use with condensers, for 
handling condensation from paper machines, 
dry kilns, vacuum heating systems, and for 
any other purpose where an ordinary degree 
of vacuum is required. The capacities given 
in sq, ft. equivalent direct radiation are very 
conservative and may be increased for tight 
systems. 

These pumps are bronze fitted, having roll- 
ed bronze piston rods, bronze cylinder liners, 
bronze valve seats, bolts and springs, and are 
furnished with soft rubber valves unless other- 
wise specified. 



High Duty 



THE Darling High Duty Vacuum Pump is 
for continuous and heavy service. They have 
large valve area, which permits their use with 
jet condensers operating on the wet system. 
They are equipped with water-seal gland for 
piston rod, so that they may be used at 26- 
inch vacuum, and the operator may be assured 
that the stuffing box will hold tight under 
these conditions with a minimum amount of 
attention. 

These pumps are bronze fitted, having rolled 
bronze piston rods, bronze cylinder liners, 
bronze valve seats, bolts and springs, and are 
furnished with soft rubber valves unless other- 
wise specified. 







CAPACITIES OF DARLING VACUUM PUMPS IN U.S.C.P.M 


- 








•Code: 


1 as. Gals. 


Cu, Kt. 




Approx. 


















High 


Size 


Per 


I'er 


Sq. Ft, 


Number 


Steam 


Ex- 


Suction 


Dis- 


Lenji^h 


Width 


Height 


Weight 


Duly 




Stroke 


Stroke 


Rad. 


of Strokes 




haust 




charge 






U pshaw 


5 n 6 X A 


7338 


,09 


6,000 


36 


'H 


'^ 


•3 


•2!-^ 


37 


11 


19 


400 


Ursa 


5 » 7x 10 


1 fi65 


,222 


15,000 


28 


'% 


■1 


t4 


t.l 


54 


12 


23 


690 


Usal 


6K X 8 k 10 


2 175 


29 


20,000 


28 


'H 


•1 


t4 


t3 


58 


15 


24 


850 


t'ndine 


S X 10 X 12 


4 08 


.545 


30,000 


22 


•1 


•IW 


tfi 


t5 


65 


18 


27 


1320 


Utopia 
Umoria 


10 X 12 X 12 


5 87 


.785 


40,000 


22 


•1'4 


•2 


t8 


t6 


71 


20 


30 


2000 


10 K 12 X 16 


7 8.1 


1 05 


50,000 


22 


MH 


•2K 


t8 


t6 


79 


20 


30 


2200 


Upron 


10 X U X it 


10 659 


1 42 


80,000 


22 


'V4 


•3H 


tio 


11 


79 


22 


35 


2400 


tlpset 


12 X 16x 20 


17 4 


2 32 


1(H), oon 


21 


•m 


•2H 


tio 


112 


25 


43 


4000 


Upart 


12 X 18 X 20 


2i 02 


2 94 


uu.ooo 


20 


•Hi 


•i'^ 


tl2 


tio 


118 


28 


48 


4200 



Other Steam and Air Cylinder Ratios available. ■ Screwed Connections 

Cast iron yoke type size 8 x 10 x 12 and smaller. f Flanged Connections 

Tie rod yoke type size 10 x 10 x 12 and larger. 

Code words are for High Vacuum Pumps, if Low Vacuum Pumps are required> add the letter "Z" to Code word. 



Foge Fifteen 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.O. 



Darling Magma Pumps 



150 Pounds 
Maximum Steam 

Pressure 



THESE pumps are designed to deal vdth 
i^rmi-fluids and are of the double-acting 
singlex t\pe. A large suction branch is arrang- 
ed at the centre of the pump to allow the 
semi-liquids to flow easily to the pump and 
be drawn into the barrel. The long piston 
passes across and closes this opening, and 
expels the fluid through the large discharge 
vaUes, one on each end of barrel- 




75 Pounds 

Majimum Liquid 

Freuure 



There are no suction valves, and few mov- 
ing parts. 

Special attention has been given to render 
the \-alves easily accessible. The cylinder pass- 
ages are direct and of large area. 

The steam olinder is fitted with our stand- 
ard Valve Gear, which can be regulated to 
gi\-e a constant stroke. 



Fisher Pump Governors 

ANGLE and GLOBE PATTERN. SCREWED or FL.\NGED OPENLNGS-M VDE IN SIZES 



TO 6 



page can be furnished in either angle or globe 
paitems. Standard valves in sizes '.<" to 3" 
screwed for pressures up 10 250 pounds pres- 
sure per square inch or ^4'' to 6" flanged for 
125 or 250 pounds pressure per square inch. 

Valves for high<r pressures mui superheat avaiiable an application. 



SINCE i8t>i Fisher Regulating De\-ices for 
^team pumps have been regarded as stand- 
ard for boiler feed pumps, rehner\- pumps and 
steam pumps for all industrial applications, 
The pump governors illustrated on this 



Constant Pressure 



lUU 



and 
- :^ 
f'jvi- 



.^es. 



S^t^t 



Governor * . - Type 1 
Purpose: 

This valve is built for com 
maintainiTig a constant '. 

or -"' ' "■-■ = 

pr. ^ - . .- 

Appro\'ed and listed as standard by the 
" -:rr»riter& Laboratories for fire pump 

FUied aiih test val\"es and top wr^'-' 

irge pressure setting adjusted by 

Recommended diicharxe pressure ranges 
Pounds per square inch: 

40 lbs. to 100 1^^ 160 lbs. to 400 lbs. 

&5 :bs. to 210 lis 200 lbs. to 500 lbs. 

120 lbs. to 300 lbs. 



Excess or Differential Pump Governor Type 444 
Purpose: 

This 'val^-e is built for maintaining a 
fixed differential or over-pressure on feed 
water lines on boiler feed water pumps of 
either the reciprocating or turbine dri\ien 
t>T>es. 

This \-aIve built »-ith a spring-OHitrolted 
diaphragm. 

Long calibrated steel spring, *hich op 
poses the differential pressure on the dia- 
{^ragm. gives easy throttling control. 

Reconunended diflerential pressure 
ranges- Pounds per square inch: 

10 lbs. to 25 lbs. 20 lbs. to 60 lbs. 

10 lbs. to 35 lbs. 40 lbs. to 100 lbs. 




DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q 



Pd^e SUtten 



Darling Simplex Pump Part List 



IIIA mi 




TZ — : 



"'"*^ 




• 



2 Outside Sttam Cylindtr Hca-1 

3 Ineiile Steam Cylinder Head tut Yoke 
6 Steam Pistnn 

9 Walei CyUnder Hrad 

10 Wawr Piston Head 

11 \Vati:r Pi«on Follower 

12 Pi^fon Rod 

16 Ail Chamber 

19 Strani Valvp Clifit 

20 Steam Valve Chc!l Heads 

21 Sl*-am Che-^t Piston 
30 WaicT t ylindt-r L-Lnin^ 
34 Air Chamber Plug 

lib Auxiliary V^alvc Stem Stuffing Box NuU 



36A PUlon Rod Glands 

37 Steam Cylinrlcr Rin«t 
37A St^arn Clie^i Rins* 

38 Water Piston Packins 

39 Sttam Cylindtrr 
44 Water Cylinder 

47 Water Valvt- Plate 

48 Water Valve Bolt. 
48A Water Cylinder Hood 
58 W'altT VjWe Seals 

68 Vitke and Cylinder Head or Tie Ro<l» 
86 Watef Valve Slirine^ 
67 W.itcf Piston Jam Nuta 
92 Piston Rod Guide 
101 Auxiliaty Valve Stem Stuffing Boxw 



103 Auxiliary Valve Stem Sluffinj; Bo* Ghmds 
lO'l Mam Slide Valve 

105 AuxiUarv Slide Valve 
105! j Auxiliary Valve Stem 

106 AciuaLinu Lever 

108 Standard for Actuaring Lever 

109 Right and Left Cam Blocks 

110 Actuaiin^ Lever Stud 
lU Pistan Rod Stud Collar 
lllA Collar on Valve Stem 
112 Piston Rod Guide Stud 

115 W.iUT Cylinder Head for Yoke Ri-dfl 

lIG Clamn Tor Actuaunc Levtr Standard 

Cast Iron Yoke Type— alze 8^ ij x 5 i 10 and amaller 

Tie-Rod Yoke Type— size 10 x 6 « 12 and Jarfler 



Darling Hydraulic Pressure Pump Part List 



2 ^Hydraulic) Di^icliarge V.-itvei 
ZA (Hydraulic) Outride Steam Cylin- 
der He^td 

Suction VaWea 

Plunger* 

Steam Piston 

Discharge Valve Caps 

Leat»iEr Washers for D.V, Caps 

Piston 

Di^harge Valve Seat* 

Suction Valve Seats 

\Va*er Viilve' 

Air Chamber 

Steam Valve CJiest 

Slf^m Valve Chest Heads 

Sli'am Chest Pinion 

Atr Chamber Plug 

Piston Rod Stuffing Box 
36 A Plunger Glands 
37 Steam Cylinder Ring^ 
37A Steam Chest Rin«5 

39 Steam Cylinder 

40 Water Cylinder Base 
44 Water Cylinder 

47 Watrf Valve Plate 

48 Water Valve Bolt^ 
48A Water Cylinder Hood 



3 

4 
6 
7 

12 
13 
14 
15 

IB 
19 
20 

21 
34 
36 



98 Piston Rod Cro^head 

100 (Hydraulic) Short Side Rod 
lOOA iHydrauUc) Long Side Rod 

101 Auxiliary Valve Stem Stuf^ng 

Boxes 

102 Amaliary Valve Stem Stuffing 

Box r4ut« 



103 Auxiliary Valve Stem Stuffing 109 

Box Glands 110 

t04 Main Slide Valve 111 

105 Auxiliary Slide Valve 1 1 lA 
lOSH Auxiliary Valve Stem 112 

106 Actuating l^ver 

1061^ Actuating Lever Rod 116 

108 Standard for ActualiriK Lever 



Right and Left Cam Blocka 
Actuating Lever Stud 
Guide for Acluatin^j l^vcr Rod 
Collars on Valve Stem Rod 
Stud Bott for Actuating Lever 

Rod Guide 
Clamp for Actuatine Lever 

Standard 




5B 

68 
75 
86 

9\ 

92 
93A 



Water Valve Seal* 
Tie Rnd^ or Yoke 
Side Rod Nut^ 
W'jrrr \'alv'" Springy 



}\ 



SMlF=^^r^ 



'«• 



Jd 




1^ 



^s-^if^. 




When ordering repair nartfl give size oE pump and serial number 



PaQe Seventeen 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



Darling Twin Fuel Oil Pumping Units 



THE niustrations on this page show Darling Twin Oil 
Pumping Units specially designed for fuel oil service. 

The first illustration shows a Twin Pumping Unit 
using 3" X 2" x 3" duplex steam pumps completely 
connected up and mounted on a drip pan base. Fit- 
tings include oil pressure governor, mechanical lubri- 
cators, pressure gauges, air chamber, relief valve, 
thermometer and the necessary valves, unions and 
piping as illustrat.-d. 

The second illustration shows a Twin Pumping and 
Heating Unit using 5^" x 3^" x 5" duplex steam 
pumps mounted in a drip pan over suitable oil heaters. 
The heaters have steel shells, tube plates and tubes 
with semi-steel heads easily removable for cleaning 
tubes; the shells are insulated and covered with plan- 
ished steel. The fittings include oil pressure governor, 
mechanical lubricators, pressure gauges, air chamber, 
relief valves, thermometers and the necessary valves, 
unions and piping all connected up so that either 
pump can be used with either healer. 

These units can be buill to meet a wide variety of 
specifications as regards capacities, pressures and 
temperatures for either land or marine service. 

Maximum working pressure for the heater shell is 
150 lbs, per square inch. The pumps are designed for 
200 lbs. working pressure. 




Two Duplex Piwion Packed f umps, wUh Duplicate Oil Healert 

Size, 5\" X 3^2" r^" 




Two Dupiex Piston Packed PumpM Size, 3" x t" x 1" 

The pumps are equipped with bronEe-lined fluid 
cylinders, steel piston rods, cast-iron steam pistons, 
oil pistons, fitted with snap rings. If bronze fitted 
pumps are required, bronze fittings should be specified 
when placing an order, Durabla metal pump valves 
can be supplied as an extra. For description see page 7. 

CAPACITY TABLE 





SlK 

of 


= = £ 


I'- 

3 G 3 J 








Pipe Sim — Inches 


Code 




M 

til 




1 


Oakley 
Oblejtd 

Obvcrc 


3 x2 x3 

5f.ix3!^x5 
6 x4 k6 


3' 6 

9-18 

18-36 

25-50 


300- 600 
9001800 

I80n-;i600 

2500-5000 


36 
45 
54 

57 


26 

30 
36 
36 


55 
5S 
64 
66 


'A 

1 

1 




2H 

3 


1 



We make other Equipment for Oil Burning 
Installations, including: 



Rotary Fuel Oil Pumps 
Fuel Oil Hearers 

Sylphon Temperature Re- 
gulators for controlling 
the temperatures of fuel 
oil 

Anti-Syphon Valves 
Tank Gauges 
Observation Doors 



IVM 



Steam Traps 

Strainers. Basket, 
and Duplex type 

Oil Relief Valves 

Pressure Reducipft Valves 

Sylphon Interlocking 
Valves 

Sylphon Damper Regula- 
tors 



Write for Bulletin No. O.B. 15 



DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED. MONTREAL, P.Q, 



Page Eighteen 



FRICTION OF WATER IN PIPES 

LoM (rf Hv^<t In Frrl Dur to FHclton. jwr 100 Keel ol 15 year old Or.iinarv Iron TiiK- 

i-or imooth iww wmuKlit iron yiiw. muliiply Iritiion value* bv 7i. I'or old W.l. Pipe muUlply by 1.52. 



Vd — VHocUy In Ffpi [ipr SKond, 

trie.— Frklion Head in Kcei. 



» 



n s. 

(Gallon* 


H-Pipe 


N'Pii* 


1-Pipc 


IWPipe 


tH' Pipe 


a* Pipe 


2^Plp« 


3' Pipt 


4- Pipe 


S'PJp* 


6* Pipe 


8' Pipe 


Minutp 


ros 

2 10 

3 16 

4 21 

5 26 

10 52 

. . . 


Fric- 


Vti. 

fio 

reo 

2,41 
3,01 

6,02 

9 02 

12.0:1 


Frlc. 


VeL 


Fric. 


Vcl- 


Fric. 


VpL 


FHc. 


VcL 


Fr[c. 


Vpl, 


Fric. 


Vpl. 


Fric. 


Vfl. 


Frlc- 


Vpl. 


Fric, 


Vcl- 


Fric- 


Vtl. 


FrIc. 


L 


2 1 

7 4 

15. A 

27.0 
41.0 








































2 


7 
10 5 


1 12 
1 49 
1 86 


i.26 

2 14 

3 25 


086 

1 07 

2 14 
3.2 
4 29 
5.36 
6.43 


































3 




























4 


57 
84 

3.05 
6.50 
IKI 

16.6 
23.5 

31 2 

40 
50 
»iO 


6 63 

79 

1.57 
2.36 
3 [5 
3 94 

4.72 


26 

39 




0.65 
98 
1.31 
1.63 
1,96 

2 29 

2 61 
2.94 

3 27 
5.01 
























G 


. . , , 















- -, , , 






> ■ - - - 


10 
16 


147 


36.0 

80 

136.0 

• • • . 1 


3.72 
5 60 
7 44 
9.30 
IMS 

13.02 

14 88 


11 7 
25 
42 

64.0 
89.0 


1.43 
3 
5 2 

7.8 
11.0 


1 02 

1 53 

2 04 

2 65 
3,06 

3 57 

4 08 
4 60 
5.11 
7.66 

10 21 
12 5 

11 :io 
16 34 

IS :t8 


0.50 

1 08 

1 82 

2 ?a 

3 84 


0.17 
0.36 
0.61 
0.92 

1.29 

1 72 
2.20 

2 80 
3.32 
7.1 

12.0 
16.8 
22,3 
29 

35. 7 


0.45 
0.6a 
91 
1.13 

1.36 


0.07 
0.15 

1^^5 
38 
0.64 


, 
' 
















20 
















25 
30 




' - ■ . 



















■ - ■ . . 


^^m^^ 


^^"^^^ 






3B 
40 






119.0 
152 


7 51 

8 58 

9 65 
10 72 


5 51 
fi 3 
7 08 
7 87 
11.80 

15 74 
IH K9 
22 04 


14 7 

18 A 

2^ 4 
60.0 


5 I 

6 r» 

8.2 

9 9 

20.9 


1.59 
1.82 

2 05 
2 27 

3.4 


0:1 

91 

1 15 

1.16 
3.05 


1 02 
1 17 
1 2H 
1.92 

2.55 

3.06 
3 57 
4.08 
4.60 


22 

Z8 
34 
0.73 






45 


i-2* 

1.63 
1.96 
2.29 
2,61 
2.94 

3.27 

3.67 
4.08 
4 50 

4 90 

5 72 

6 5'1 

7,35 

7 76 

8 17 

8 99 

9 80 
10 62 
11,44 


0^24 










SO 


1,14 
I 42 

1.58 

1 HO 

2 04 

2,Z8 

2 57 
2.80 

3 06 
3,40 








73 


. . P w • 


^~ ^~ 














103 
120 
140 


, - 4 ^ ^ 






102 
113 
190.0 


35.8 

50 

b7.0 

86 

107 


6.54 

7.84 

9 15 

10.46 

11 76 

13.07 
14.71 
16.03 

18.30 
19.61 


4.54 
5.45 
6 35 
7.26 

8.17 


4.96 

7.0 

9 2 

11.6 

14.8 

17. H 

22 3 
27 2 
32 5 

38.0 


1.23 

t . 1 
2. 28 
2 91 

3.61 

4.37 

5 45 

6 72 

7 99 
9 30 


0,39 

0.57 
'6 

98 

1 22 

1.46 

1 86 

2 24 
2 72 
3.14 

4.19 

5 40 

6 7^J 

7 42 
8.12 


14 

0.25 
31 
0.41 
0.50 

0,62 

74 

0.92 
1.15 
1.29 

1 75 

2 21 
2 65 
2.95 
3.30 


1 60 
1.73 
1.90 




ItiO 
100 




,, ,. 






"^^^^^ 


• - • - 










aw 

22S 












-■ ■' 


20.42 


129.0 


43.1 
54 3 

56 
81.0 
92.0 


9.08 

10 02 

n 32 

12 50 
13.62 


5 11 

5 77 

6 40 

7 03 
7.66 

S 90 
10 21 
n.50 
12 20 
12,77 




250 




















22 


275 
3U0 






- • - - 


' ' 


.> I - . ■ 


, « ■ ^ L 


' ' 


— — 


., . , 


27 
32 


350 


— 1_ 


,:, 














'_ ■ 












12 32 
If} 00 
19.80 
22.96 
24.00 


3 98 

4 54 
5.12 

5 55 
5.60 

6 16 

6 72 

7 38 
7 84 
9 08 


2 20 

2 m 

2 92 

3 10 
3 20 

3.52 

3 84 

4 16 

4 46 

5 12 

5 75 

6 40 


^_ 

4'^ 


400 








, . -. 


:: 


M 


450 












riM 


475 



















J . 





Hi 


500 
















82 










L J > . . 










. . t . 








. . . 


_11__ 


—- — 


' • - - 




.,,-,. 




- 


' 


■ 


' 


9 60 
11 30 
13 20 
15.10 


3.93 
4 70 
5.40 
6.20 
8 00 


97 

1 14 


650 

TOO 










]'i*^ 


bUU 


_1_ 


- 


-:!:_ 




. . ■ F . 




I 97 


1000 





... 
















. , - . . 












10.30 
11 32 


10. n 
12 04 


2 46 

3 02 



CAPAf^lTY OP rVLlNnKRS IN U,S. GALLONS 

Tile following labU' 15 arrjnitt.'rJ ty-> ihow I lie diJinn-i.ts. k-iiKili iit Hiri^^k'-n in im br*. wiili caimdlipi por ^trolet in U,S. 
ftallonpt, ciT Siii||(li''Arlii]Jt Pump I vUniU-rv Tu usifrEiim ihc cap.iLily tt\ \ yliiidcrr* witti Uiiijirr ilrt^k*' th^in linlH. udH or 
mukiply tht' cftfMii(»'H u[ nnh l.iiKih* ^n will flK*ri"BaU' iiiv Irnnih reouiri'd, Tu merftmn ibr nmuiini ut waivj di^- 
chjrHi^il per minuLt. mulriply (hf capacily us raltd per 4trukr by Uii: number ol atrokoa per miftiitr?^ 







Lrnilh of Sifoke in Inche*, vriih CjpAtiry of Cylmd^n, \tr Slmkci in U. S. Cjlluni 



M 



,U|3J 
.OLM 
.OLT« 
MIH 
02 AH 

0:1 1 n 

,0715 
.01 N 

OJin 
io;i^ 

,]IMI 

.137;^ 

.1404 

.IMI 

.J4U7 

ISM 
.HUIA 

1.U7.S 
L.JO,V 

I ^i:.^n 

i (H'i'l\ 
'i u. 

:i.W7H|5 

4 



1.170 J 



.0IW8 
.00^ 
.DIM 
.0121* 

msi 

.Q17H 

.o:fo>t 
.o2:iH 

.0272 

.u:i4t 

Oh\4 
.OiMJ 
.07 1* 
,I|HJ2 
,00 M 

AJ2b 
.1375 
.1S34 

.1172 

.21411 



.UL02 
JDL20 
.0150 
0102 
,D22'4 
.02*17 

,o:li2 

,D3&7 
.I>I08 

mill 

.0771 

.ndin 

.1077 
.1Z4H 

,1131 

.»S,1B 
,20M 
,ZJI»1 
.2M7 
.2WW 
LLDH4 
iOUO 

1 n2iio 



UJH4 I tn7'> 
I \tHH,l V2.I2 
1 ;i:i24 I 9UP«> 

1 biOOl 2 2000 
I.740(J 2.0IOC 

Lj jo^k:i.3D:ia 

2 7;!O0 4OWW 

J :.'W^ 4 03ii:j 
mao&H74(i 



4^004 



7. MM 



M1fi0.lllH|V I7VI 



.0204 
02 M 
J)3IM 
.03H4 

,0331 
-0024 
,0714 
.0HI6 
,1032 
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l^,'>00 

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Pflflf Nineteen 



DARLING BROTIIbRS LIMITED, MONTREAL. P.y. 



Other Darling Pump 










til 



f 




G 



f(f 



Dirhnj lypT "VC ' V«nic«] 
CondcntAiion Return Pump. 





Dirlinc txpt 'DC Horifonial 
CondvniAiioA Return Pump 



B R T H E R N L Ml I T E D 

1^0 r.lNCE ST MONTREAL CANADA 



■ •iivf JOHH - QUIftIC . AflVIDA . IIMUlNf 
« • CALOAIV . VANcoyvia 



''ft 




eULLETIN No. 60 



1 







-DARLING HEUEF VlhLVC 



VfLPHOH iNnOUXKlNQVALVi 






KMUtW VJM.VE 



PUMP «0 VB.lt VGA 




\ fttGULATOn BULa 
AMD CHAM»CK 



t>lE«MOMETC«. 



fmi/immi' \<m/fm^^^MiM^^^imiti^^ 



oaip TftAP 



DAftLlWfc PUPLEX fUEL Otl PUJAPIN& 






FUEL OfL STORAGE 







^ 



i 



i 









1 

i 



^ 






m^^^ 




ypes of 
pumping and 
heating 
equipment 




1 



The several types of Darling Twin Fuel 
Oil Pumping and Heating sets shown 
represent combinations of equipment 
rhat the customer has specified to 
meet the requirements of a particulor 
fuel oil burning installation. These 
factors vary from job to job but 
consist mainly of moc ficotions to 
pumping equipment, prime movers 
and controls. 

K Darling Fuel Oil Pumping set only, con- 
sisting of two Darling SteonD-Driven Fuel y 
Oil pumps with pump governor, pressure 
goi^ges, thermometer and relief valves, 

2» Darling Horizontal Steam-Driven Duplex 
Fuel Oil Pump, Northern NnraKoy Steel 
Rofory Fuel Oil Pump with electric drive 
over three Whiftoclc-Darling Type "V" Fuel 
Oil Prehcaicrs, factory assembled. 

3, Dorfinq Twin Fuel Oil Pumping ond 
Heoung set consisting of two Steom-Driven 
Fuel Oil pumps and two Whitlock-Oorling 
Fuel Oil heoters with oil occessories. 





^ 



pumping and heating set 



Darling factory-osiembled Twi.. Fuel Oil Pumping ond 
HeoHng sers help to solve many o# the problems 
O'iiing from the installation of Fuel Oil Burning 
Equlpmenl. The units are correctly siied to handle 
with ease the specified capacities, remperoture rise 
and oil pressures. 

All piping, volves ond fittings necessory to connect 
rhe componenrs are corefuHy fitted by experienced 
mechonlcs fo assure leak-proof piping systems. The 
pomp ond heaters are orronged to operote in ony 
combination thot will meet o given operoting ond 
lood condition. 

Accessory equipment includes Darling Oil Relief 
Volves, Sylphon Temperoture Regulators ond Pump 
Governors, Darling Duplex Suction and Dischorge 



Slfoiners oil of which moy be assembled into one of 
these compact reody-to-operote units. 

Instollohon costs can be reduced by the use of 
Darling Fuel Oil Pumping ond Meeting Sets, for they 
eliminate much of Ihe difficult piping on Jhe iob site- 
Dorling Pumping and Heating Sets ore availoble in a 
wide ronge of copocities and oil pressures. 

Photo below shows Combinohon Electrtc and Steom 
Turbine Driven Northern Rotary Fuel Oif Pumps and 
No. 16 Type "V" Whitloclt-Darling Fuel Oil Preheoter, 
comprising a Darling Fuel Oil Pumping and Heating 
Set supplied to Combustion Engineering Corp. Ltd., 
for Installation at Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd., Lochine, 
Que. 




:iV \^, - 



the preheating 
of fuel oil 



For most effective combustfon, fuel oil mi/sl be 
properly otomized of Ihe bu'ner, ond atomizing 
is best effected ot one viscosity. Extensive experi- 
mentation has shown this viscosity to be 150 
seconds Soy bolt Universol; similarly 375 seconds 
Saybolt Furol hos been found to give the most 
desirable pumping viscosity. 

With heovier industriol fuel oils, fherefore. pre- 
heotinQ is necessary before admission to the 
burner. The lemperatore to which the oil must be 
preheated is primarily dependent upon two foctors: 

First, the viscosity-temperotufe chofocteristics 

of the oU, and 

Second, the mechanical design of the burner 
nozzle- 

The first point hos been covered obove, and for 
the second point we con soy generolly that the 
heat supplied by the heater, plus the heot supplied 
at the burner, should be sufficient lo reduce Ihe 
relative fluidity of the oil to opproximotely 150 
seconds Soyboll Unlversot. Thus, sfeam otomliing 
□ nd rotory cup burners can accept oils at o higher 
viscosity than ihe pressure atomizing burner, since 
they supply additional heot to the oil ot the noizle. 

It is probably well to point out here thol, contrary 
to a belief occepted by some, specific grovity Is no 
index of the viscosity, or of the temperature to 
which oil should be preheated for proper atomiz- 
ing. Oils of the same specific gravity moy hove 
vostly different viscosities at Ihe same temperoture, 
ond the temperature *o which one ofl must be 
heoted for the best otontzing moy be entirely too 
low for onother oil of the same specific grovity. 







Fig. I — Viicoiify-Temperolure Chocatrenilici of Fuel Olli, 

The Viscosity-temperotofe charocteristics of fuel oils 
when plotted on a double logarithmic scale, result in 
stfoighl lines with o common origin — shown obove 
OS Point A. Knowing the viscosity of on oil at any one 
temperalure, we can plot this one point and" join It 
v/lth the common point A fo obtoin the complete 
viscositylemperoture charocteristics. 



xample fo Show Use of Viscosity-Temperature Chart 



KNOWN. Viscoiity o* Fuel Oil X — 500 second* 
*^"^boll Furol al UO F 



w. 



ijr^ r4»qo<f^ct ?o reduce viscosity 



to i 



Plof Poinf e fSOO SSF— UO F ) nnrl Enin wfth P..:..f 
A — int , 50 S 

pcro F, ot p 

F 

f 

V. 




f 



uel oi 



heat 



ers 




y 

r ■ 



fu«J Oil Prcfc«of«f. 



tiroight ivb« 



WhinoH-UOfling lypc V fu(! O,. 

iniuloiffd with 2 inchet ol 43% " 




EASr CLEANING: — Ttp« V U o( o jlfo^ghT rube, fined sheel design which permirs eoiy mechanJcol cleomng aHer merely removing rhe 
!ron» ofld reor heods. The urtii hai o minimum of rointi. wirh no boiled joinfi on the sleom lide. Type V ii desrgned 'or oM ond ireom 
wo'kmg preiiuret up »o 300 pai ond iTeom remperoturei up To 410 F. 

CONSTRUCTION: — Shcllj: SeamlcM >le«l pipe. Tube Sheets; Rolled sEeel warded lo rhe shell ends. Oi» Distributing Heads: Slecl Of 



[Oil iron 



Tubes: ^/^ GO. ji lA aWG leomleii deel. Support Brockets: May be supplied if required. 

TABLE I — HEATfNG CAPACITIES OF TYPE V FUEL OIL HEATERS 

IN POUNDS PER HOUR OF BUNKER C" FUEL OIL 



m 



m 

M 



Siic 
or 

Hegter 
No, 

3 

4 

5 

7 

« 
10 
t\ 

11 
k4 
"J 
'4 



S-c« 

0' 

Heolv 

No. 

) 

4 

5 

6 
/ 
• 

lO 

II 
13 
13 

LA 

ia 

tSVi 

19 



0P5IG 
Sleom 
T«inp. 
Ronge 

23C 

no 

jeo 
4a5 

s&o 

*35 
1165 

UOO 
I £70 

7nt} 

7flOO 
3700 
4«5C 

5A00 
»560 
7500 



S PSIG Sleom 



25 PSIG Sleom 



50 PSIG Sfeom 



100 PSIG Steam 



Temp- Range Tomp. Range of Oil 



Temperature Ronge of Oil 



Temperalurft Range of Oil 



tr MV 90* 200* 90' WSMO* 2O0''90"-32S' 90M75' *fl"IO0° »0"-225' 90"-250°;»0° 175 



JfiO 
31^0 
390 

SI5 
4>0 

7R0 

ro^n 
r?vo 

raio 

2SS0 

]0f)0 

oiOO 

7900 

4100 

10300 



leO 

;o0 

240 
303 
130 
J&) 
OOO 
7^5 
OO 
T130 

iiro 

J-VO 
1010 
3900 
4 500 
530C 
60OO 



430 
5-0 
450 

a SO 

n65 

i?eO 

1700 
2130 
;5B0 
3?00 

5330 
6*00 
9500 
'1650 
1 JSOO 
150OO 
17000 



2«0 

360 

440 

570 

715 

360 

1 \bC 

1430 

I7&0 

3140 

^850 

3i?0 

43C0 

S700 

7150 

8600 

10000 

1 1500 



100 

340 

200 

3SS 

485 

5 BO 

77i 

970 

1210 

1450 

1940 

3430 

7900 

3850 

4B50 

5800 

6800 

7750 



640 
800 
960 
1270 
1590 
WOO 
2530 

31 eo 

4000 
4750 
6350 

aooo 

MOO 
13700 
15900 
"9000 
?23(XI 
25300 



440 

550 

660 

875 

1100 

i3?0 

r750 

2200 

2740 

3300 

4400 

550C 

6600 

87 SO 

nooo 

13700 
15400 
17500 



330 
400 
4 80 
635 

aoo 

960 
1 J7Q 
1600 
2000 
2400 
3200 
4000 
4800 
6350 
BOOO 
9600 
M200 
12700 



270 

380 

340 

450 

570 

690 

900 

M30 

1410 

1700 

3360 

2830 

3400 

4500 

570O 

6800 

BOOO 

9000 



930 

1160 

1400 

1^50 

3330 

3790 

3710 

4650 

580O 

6950 

9300 

11600 

13950 

1S500 

33300 

27400 

33600 

J7I0O 



90^200" 

660 ' 


90'-2?S'* 


500 


830 


630 


080 


750 


1345 


1000 


1685 


1250 


7030 


1500 


3690 


3000 


3370 


2500 


4300 


3IQ0 


5050 


3700 


6730 


50OO 


8420 


6200 


fOIOD 


7150 


13450 


lOOOQ 


16850 


u5ao 


30 300 


15000 


23600 


17400 


26900 


20000 



90^250' 

380 

470 

570 

750 

040 

1130 

1500 

1880 

2350 

2850 

3770 

470C 

5650 

75O0 

9400 

11300 

13200 

15000 



125 PSIG Sleom 



150 PSIG Sfeom 



Tempefotu'e Ronge of OH 



10- 200" tV 22S= 90' 2S0' 90' HS* 



TemperoTure Rongo of Oil 



200 PSIG Sleom 



Temperoture Ronge of Oil 



90'-225" i90" 250° 90*275" 90"'3flO" ; 90* 225" 



730 

900 

t030 

1430 

T300 

3150 

Jfl70 

34^0 

4^00 

5370 

7(50 

OOOO 

10750 

14300 

leOOD 

21500 

25300 

38700 



140 
•70 

S10 
1075 

1350 

>«20 

2T30 

2690 

1400 

4000 

5J00 

6750 

8070 

10750 

1}500 

16200 

kaooo 

31500 



410 

510 

630 

670 

t030 

1240 

1640 

3050 

2570 

3100 

4100 

5)50 

6200 

8200 

10300 

J 2400 

14500 

16400 



320 

400 

480 

630 

800 

060 

1280 

1540 

2000 

3400 

330O 

4D0D 

48 OO 

6300 

aooo 

9600 
fIJOO 
rJSOO 



670 

B40 

1000 

1330 

1670 

2000 

2670 

3350 

4160 

5000 

6700 

8350 

10000 

13300 

16700 

20000 

23400 

26700 



510 
A4D 
770 

1030 

1280 

1550 

2050 

2570 

3200 

3850 

5150 

6400 

7700 

10300 

12800 

15500 

laooo 

20500 



360 

460 

360 

700 

870 

1050 

1400 

1680 

2180 

2620 

3500 

4370 

5250 

7000 

8700 

10500 

12200 

14000 



280 

360 

440 

550 

680 

820 

1080 

r360 

1700 

2040 

2700 

3400 

4050 

5500 

6S00 

8200 

9500 

^0300 



90'-25B' 



B20 


640 


1060 


800 


1240 


960 


1665 


k3D0 


2090 


1625 


350O 


1950 


3330 


2600 


4180 


3360 


5300 


4060 


6250 


4900 


8350 


6500 


10400 


8130 


135DO 


9 BOO 


16650 


13000 


20400 


16250 


25000 


10500 


20 300 


33BOC1 


33300 


26000 



90'-27S' I 9D'-300' 



510 

630 

760 

^035 

^285 

1550 

3050 

2570 

3300 

3850 

5150 

6400 

7750 

10350 

12850 

15500 

18000 

2O5O0 



360 

450 

540 

770 

000 

1080 

1440 

1800 

2350 

2700 

3600 

4500 

5400 

730O 

9000 

10500 

12600 

14400 



whitlock-darling 




This heater con be used to heat any grade of oif up \o a 
temperature ot which ft will flow readily to focilitote fts 
withdrowol from lorge storoge tanks. Since the oil is 
healed onl/ as it is drawn off, it is riot necessary to 
mointoin the contents of the whole tont in o heoted 



fuel oil preheater 
suction type 



condition. This reduces radiation losses to O minimum. 
The entire heating element, with ihe exception of few 
inches of the upper surface ot the far end. rs enclosed 
in o steel sheath through which the oil is drown from 
the tank. The tubes ore medium size seomless steel mode 
up in the form of U-bends. with the ends expended ir>lo 
o rolled steel tube sheet. The steon> distributing chomber 
which directs steom through the tubes is of cast iron or 
cost steel depending on the steom pressure. The heoter 
is furnished complete ready for welding, riveting, or 
bolting to Ihe storage tonk os may be required- The use 
of collof studs enables the head to be removed for 
inspection of the tubes without draining the storoge tank. 
Copocities ore based on heottng Bunker C oJI from 20 F. 
to TOO F, with steom ot tOO psi. Tank dimensions should 
be given when requesting prices. 

Preheaters for Vertical installotion ore mode to suit 
individual requirements^ 



■Ad DIMENSiJNS — WHITIOCK-DARUNG HORIZONTAL SUCTION 



S'le 


Copocily 


III 


Apprajc. 
Overall 
length 


Minimum 
Diam, of 


j,am. of 
Plain Tonk 


Oil 


Steom 


Corid. 


No. 


Ibl./Hf, 


Opening 
in Tonh 


Allochmenr 
Flanges 


Connecliom 


ConnecKont 


Conneclioni 


3 


580 


lOW" 


I'-n" 


7" 


13" 


%" 


%" 


%" 


4 


750 


lO'A" 


2'-4" 


7" 


13" 


V*" 


%" 


%" 


5 


910 


10'/," 


2'-9" 


7" 


13" 


v 


y." 


V*" 


6 


1,200 


10%" 


3'-6" 


7" 


13" 


1" 


v/' 


%" 


7 


1.500 


1 % " 


4'.4" 


7" 


13" 


1" 


%" 


%" 


8 


1,800 


1 V. " 


5'-l" 


7" 


13" 


1 % " 


y." 


y*" 


9 


2,400 


1 V. " 


6'-8" 


7" 


13" 


1 Vi " 


y»" 


y." 


10 


3,000 


1 3 V. " 


4'-4" 


9" 


16" 


1 % " 


Va" 


w 


II 


3.700 


1 3 'A ■■ 


5'.4" 


9" 


16" 


2" 


y/' 


y*" 


12 


4,500 


13V." 


6'.4" 


9" 


16" 


2" 


vr 


y*" 


13 


6,000 


1 3 % '■ 


7'-3" 


9" 


16" 


2 % " 


y/' 


%" 


14 


7.500 


1 6 V. " 


7'.I1" 


11" 


19" 


2 V2 " 


y." 


y," 


15 


9,200 


1 6 V. " 


9'.4" 


11" 


19" 


3" 


Va" 


y*" 


16 


12,000 


1 6 '/, " 


12'-3" 


11" 


19" 


3" 


3//' 


y*" 

V*" 


17 


15.000 


19%" 


8'.0" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


4" 


%" 


18 


18,000 


1 9 % " 


9'-7" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


4" 


y»" 


y*" 


18'/j 


21.000 


19%" 


IIM" 


1 4 v. " 


22" 


4" 


%" 


Va" 

1" 


19 


24,000 


19%" 


1 2'.6" 


1 4 % " 


22" 


5" 


I" 


19 V, 


27,000 


22 % " 


1 0'-O" 


1 6 % " 


25" 


5" 


1" 


1 
1" 


20 


30,000 


22 % " 


12'-0" 


1 6 % " 


25" 


5" 


1 % " 


1 

1 % " 
1 % " 
1 % " 
i%" 

1 Vj " 


21 


37,000 


25 % " 


9'-11" 


20 % " 


28" 


6" 


1 % " 


22 


45,000 


25 % " 


1 1'-9" 


20 % " 


28" 


6" 


1 % " 


23 


60,000 


29 % " 


11 '-0" 


24%" 


32" 


8" 


1 Vi " 
1 V( " 


24 


75,000 


29%" 


1 3'-6" 


24 % " 


32" 


8" 


■ — — '. — ^ 










northern rotary fuel oil pump 




The Northern Series 400C '- 
Pump is fabricated of Nitrall'. 



■Jel OH 

:l and 



series 4000 

built to extreme fine limits of accuracy. It 
offers the known value of quick and 
convenient interchangeability of component 
parts. Available in a wide range of capa- 
cities and for pressures up to 300 lbs. 
Used as standard equipment on Darling 
Fuel Oil Pumping and Heating Sets, Pumps 
con be supplied with either electric or 
steam Turbine Drive. 



Northern Rotary Geo ,^ Specifications for Handling Bunker "C" Fuel Oil 

Viscosities of JOtiO 10 5000 SSU, Moxrmum suction lifl 15' Hg. 



S. G 



AM 



» 



GPM 



.39 
.77 
1.16 
1.55 
1.94 
2.9 
3.9 
5.8 
7.78 
4.55 
6-07 
9.1 



GPM 

~7.47 

9.9 
15-2 
20.0 
24.8 
37.0 
49.5 
54.0 
72.0 
90.0 
108.0 



Ditchotge 100 PS 



Pump 
Size 



Pump 

Speed 

RPM 



4300-02 
4300-04 
4300-06 
4300-08 
4400-05 
4400-07 
4400-10 
4400-15 
4400-20 
4500-07 
4500-10 
4500-15 



1150 

1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1 150 
1150 



Dixharge 100 PSI 



Pump 
Size 



Pump 

Speed 

BPM 



4600-07 
4600-10 

4600-15 
4600-20 
4600-25 
4700-30 
4700-40 
4800-30 
4800-40 
4800-50 
4800-60 



B50 
850 
850 

850 
850 
850 

850 
850 
850 
850 
850 



BKP 



GPM 



Diithorge 

Pump 
Slie 



!Q0 PSI 



ifi 



Diichoige 300 PSI 



Pi;nip 

Speed 

RPM 



BHP 



GPM 



Pump 
Size 



Pump 
Speed 

RPM 



.'5 

.22 

,2? 
.40 
.47 
.57 

.6f 

t 
I .■ 
.0 .:■ 
1.0 
1.4 



.37 

.74 

1.12 

1.48 
1.86 
2 73 
3.73 

■i.5i> 






4300-02 
4300-04 
4300-06 
4300-08 
4400-05 
4400-07 
4400-10 
4400-15 
4400-20 
4 500-07 
4500-10 
4500- 15 



1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 



.21 


.35 


.30 


71 


.35 


1,08 


.5 


1-42 


.63 


1.78 


.75 


2.66 i 


.98 


3.56 


1.3 


5.35 


1.7 


7.13 


1.2 


4.17 


1.35 


5.58 


1.9 


8.35 



4300-02 
4300-04 
4300-06 
4300-08 
4400-05 
4400-07 
4400-10 
4400-15 
4400-20 
4500-07 
4500-10 
4500-15 



1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 
1150 



TABLE iV — CAPACITIES IN U.S. GPM AT 850 RPM 



DiicliC''ge 200 PSI 



Diichofge 300 PSI 



BHf 



1,5 
2.0 

3.0 

4.0 

4.9 

6.5 

8,0 

9.0 

It. 8 

15.0 

16.5 



GPM 

9.5 
14,3 
19.2 
23.8 
35.5 
47.5 
51.8 
69.0 
86.0 



Pump 
S<ie 



Pump 

Speed 

RPM 



BHP 



GPM 



Pump 
Size 



4600-07 

^600-10 
4600-15 
4600-20 
4600-25 
4700-30 
4700-40 
4800-30 
4800-40 
4300-50 



pump 

Speed 

RPM 



850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 



2.0 
2.6 
3.9 

5.0 
6.3 
8.5 
11.0 
12.2 
16.0 
26.5 



6.85 

9.1 
13,6 
18.3 
22.8 
34.0 
45.5 
49.6 
66.0 



4600-07 
4600-10 
4600-15 
4600-20 
4600-25 
4700-30 
4700-40 
4800-30 
4800-40 



850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 
850 



BHP 



.23 
.36 
.43 
.6 

JA 
.95 

1,2 

1.7 

2.3 

1.4 

1.8 

2.5 



BHP 



2.5 
3-2 

4,8 
6,3 
7,7 
10.7 
14-7 
15.4 
20.0 



-m -^t^M^^r"^ 




steam pumps 



The Dorling Horizontal Duplex Steam-Driven 
Fuel Oil Pump has many features especially 
designed for pumping commerciol grades of 
Fuel OIL 




These include snap ring plungers in the oil 
end and "Durobia" metal valves as standard 
fittings. Steel Liners and Stainless Steel Piston 
rods can be supplied if required. 



The attention to detail and the expert work- 
manship built Into these pumps is proved by 
their wide acceptance in Fuel Oil opplrcations. 
Avoilable for oil pressures to 300 lbs. per 
square inch and steom pressures to 175 lbs. 




A f>L I 



RIZl 



Al Single Slrokei Each Side Per Minule 



Size ='£ 

ID « 



Fuel Oil 



' 20 I ;s 30 



TANK SEBVICE 



35 40 



50 



3 <2 X 3 M 

^U2';< ^ .103 

51<3h 5 .208 

6 '1 I 6 .326 

HtAU B .551 

7J<ni10 .689 

7^15 >I0 .850 

10 x6 <I0 \m 

12 .7 il2 2. 



U.S.G. P.ll. 

U.S.G, P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 

U.S.G. P.M. 



1 

Ibi 2 


2.46 


l\ 5,1 


6.1 


e.3 ID.'I 


12.5 


13 16.3 


19,5 


23 27.5 


33 


27.5 2U 

1 


41,3 


34 42.5 


51 


18,9' 61 


73 


60 100 


120 



60 70 60 90 }00 



no 



B.2 U2 



Size 
Pipe ConnecTtont 






120 






9.8 





FToor 






Space 




■C 


-C 


-C 


en 

c 


TJ 


51 


B 


. * 


X 



• 1 



2.87 3.28 ^.1 4.9 5.7 5.5! 7.4 

7.2 8.2 10,3 12.3 14,4 16.5.18.5 2D.6| 22,6 24,7, ' i ' '^ 
14.5 15.6 20.8 24.9 29,1 33.2 37,4| 41.6 45.7 50 M 



22.8 26 32.6,39,1 45,6 52,1 
38,6 44 55,1 66.1 77,1 88.2 
48.2 55.1 68,9 82.6 96.4 



59.5 68' 85 



102 119 



85 



98, 122| 147' 171 



][m 



58.6 65 71.7 



78.2 -1 



99.2 110.2 121.2,132.2' 'U 



110 124 138: 151 165 

I 

136 153 170 187, 204 

'96 220 245 269 294 



•2 



140 160 200 240 280 3201 360 400, 440 480 '1^ 



■2 
•2 
'2 

'7\ 
'3 



■u 

•2 

•21 

•3 

t4 

f4 

ts 

ti 



'1 26 9i 
'U 36 12i 
•1-i 43 16 
*3 46 U 
23 
21 



13 63 
t3 60 






13 125 

17 330 

17 550 

22 700 

29 1500 

29 1550 



13 52 21 29 1575 



H 66 

15 79 



25 
32 



32 1950 
35 ' 335 



•Screwed Conneelion fFlai^ed Connecli 



on 




^ y^tallations 



of fuel oil 
pumping and 
heating sets 



1. • 






^-a^ 



Gr^^* Dor , , 



e- 



7 

L 
F 

^ 

p. -. 









tr 



*s 



3. -^ 



' V 



W^^t^-Oc 



.r, -- 



L.frn * mj\^- 



i.^- 



c 



Oac«i: 






^9uio 2 




er 



Sy* 




*1 



- 4|Hi 


Hi 







.^ 



darling! bronze oil relief valves 




is:t^;^- ;r J^r-;:r c;^n-r -^~^ 

free from cheering. Springs are readily in.erchongeable to prov.de o w.de ror^ge o( pre»L.r 

adjustmenl. 

TABLE VI 



Siic 



^'," 



8^,; 



■ v, 



!■■' 



8'',r. 



l'''i 



1- 



11," 



9\ 



2'\„ 



2'' 1.1 



OuTLtr 



nv 



9K 



2^ci 



2-Sn 



12 



3' 



3'.H 



■2>2" 



12 



31 



y» 



3> 



:s 





'Bonnel Type Only 
AU dimennons in inch* 



HAND WHEEL 

ADJUSTMENT 



&ONNET 

TYPE 



e 



^ 



darling duplex suction strainers 




type "W 



n 



Of rugged design, it rs o dependable unit and often used 
suction lines from oil tanks and other ipecfol opplrcatiof 
Mode in sizes from 4" to 8". 

Companion flanges included os part of the unit. 
Maximum working pressure 15 lbs. per sq. in. - 

TABLE Vjl — DIMENSIONS OF DARLING DUPLEX STRAINE 



The duplex suction strainer shows \o greatest odvanloge 
where confinuous operation fs required; it is possible to 
shut off one stroiner and use the other, permitting the first 
one to be cleoned and mode reody in a few moments for 

future use. 



Si» 



UFacc 
24~ 

30 



Overall 
Wttfth 

28 

32 '/4 
34 



Overan 
H«jghl 

16V8 
21 Va 



tlrjiflcrrentfligl 
1 15 'A 



Wei9^ 
lb$. 

60C 
79C 
95C 



AM diin«niioni in inches. 



C 



'^^''''"g] duplex discharge strainers 



r* 




type "D 



ff 



This cast iron duplex stroiner has a wide appli- 
cation in many industries, but is particularly 
suited to Fuel Oil Burning installations. 

The principal advantoges of Darling Type "D" 
Duplex Strainers ore as follows: 

No valves — o 90-degree turn of the handle 
changes from one basket to the other. 

Positive odiustment of topered plug valve by 
means of jock screv/. 

Strainer bosket being in two parts is more 
readily cleaned, 

TABLE VIII 



S^ze 


A 


1 

1 e 


c 





1 V2 " 


8 V4 " 


12" 


7 Vi " 


10" 


2" 


10%" 


16" 


8" 


12" 


2 V2 " 


12" 


18" 


10" 


1 3 '/, " 


3" 


13" 


19" 


12" 


17" 



Double basket (the combined area of whose 
perforations is from six to ten times the cross 
sectional area of the pipe and obout twice the 
area of other makes of strainers). 

Designed so that when well cover is removed, 
level of liquid in well is lowered, exposing top 
of basket for removal. Connection provided at 
base for draining oil if required. 

Handle portially covers basket-well which rs in 
use, leaving exposed the well which is out of 
commission ond free to be cleaned. In no posi- 
tion of handle is it possible to stop the flow. 
Maximum working pressure 100 lbs. Also avail- 
able in cost bronze or cast steel for higher 
pressures if required. 




fig, 3 




\\ 



V 



r t 



fuel oil heater 




Type "W" Fuel Oil Healer unit extension type head. This 
type of heod has vertical oil connections thus eliminarmg 
Ihe necessity of disconnecling piping when cleaning rubes. 
Atfoilable with top bracket if required. 




BRANCH OFFICES AND REPRESENTATIVES 



HALIFAX, N.S, 

E. S- Stephenson & Co. LJd, 155 Granville Street 

SAINT JOHN, N.B. 

E, S- Stephenson & Co. Lid. 15 Dock SlreeJ 

QUEBEC, P-O. 

W. J, Bonks 140 St. John Street 

ARVIOA, P.O. 

Rene Beoudet & Cie Llee 122 High Street 

TIMM1N5, ONT. 

Patricio Engineering Lid, 168 Third Ave. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 

Dorling Bros. Lid. 18 Rideou Street 



TORONTO, ONT, 

Darling Bros, Ltd, 137 Wellinglon St. W. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Dorling Bros. Lid, 123 Princess Slreef 

CALGARY, ALTA. 

H. F. Gorke & Co. Lid. 1114 Fifth Si, W, 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Ffonk Darling & Co. Ltd. 1 144 Homer Slreel 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Cloyton Construction Co. Ltd> 198 Woter Street 




HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS 



It II II T HE It S L ni I T K II 

140 PRINCE ST. MONTREAL, CANADA 



SINCE 18 8 8 




'k 



m\ JT I D (ix- U;\;] um 



Ziffle ''/C 



rr 



h\ u ;j i 



STORAGE 
HEATERS 



if^ 



DRRLinG BROTHERS LimiTED 



140 PRinCE STREET 



mOHTREflL, CDRflDfl 






i 



i 






4 



*3 



IFAX • SAINT JOHN, NJ. * QUEBEC - OTTAWA • TORONTO • TIMMINS • WINNIPEG • CALGARY • VANCOUVER • SL JOHNS. NFLD 



UIHITLOCK-DRRLinG 
STORHGE HEATERS 



consTRUCTion fln 

inSTRLLflTIOn DETAIL 



SIIHDIM 

CDKiouns 




- WIITEDCK aJKTI'HL 
CONIOUIS 



Sr[[l IICKING 
STEIM [IPIHSIBN rihg 

CNtHflEI 

CONPINIOK aJNG[- 
SIEIH etFUE 

MEIN INLCI 



MJinl 




FIG. 1 — ComparAtiv^ Head Contours 



CONDEHjll! OUTLET 

TO ^9m raiES 
FIG. 2— Detail of Wetded Head Port 



MQNEE %nil 






p-y 



VEtO 

MDMEl IHEU 




FIG, 3 — Tube Support and Spacer 



FIG. 4 — Detail o( Monel Connection 
to Heater Shell 





FND Vl£« 
1T< ciiiBr»iici 






IIEMIIIM >i||f 










MUV ■ ' " ^ _^fc^»^. 

FIG. 5-Whi.lock.D.rling Type "K" Monel H«ate«-Typi«I lns.«llMio« L«youll 



SM - MAV tMl 



GERERflL 
D^ DESCRIPTIOn 



LUHITLOCK-DRRLinC 
STORRCE HfflTERS 



Storap^ Hi'fth'ns arf- usihI for any fiorvio*' n''|uirintr larRe qijaiititii^,-^ of hot wanr ai irroKuUr inivrval*. 
Ak illosiraiioiis oii hack rc.vrr hSow. Typr "K" Moi*.l llralris nrr iiiHiallr^l m HospitnU, oiru-i- liuiUUiigs. 
I-jumiiriis, Motc'l^ AparlriK-iu Iloutit-a. StliuoU, Tixlile Mills und (Jeiieral Inilusirial I'laiUs. 



WITEN RELICF 
VALVE CONHECOON 



THERMOMETEA CCNMECriON 



WITER OUTLET 



O 







(O 



J 



THEAMOSTAT 

COHNECTLON 




CONDENSATE 
OUTLET 



WATER INLET 



^ CKCULATION 
MUD BLOW 



F19, 6 Typ* "K" Monvl Slotag* Hc«tcf— HoritonuJ Dtit^n 



ADVANTAGES OF TYPE 
HEATERS 



K" STORAGE 



\Vhi1lo('k Typi- "K^' Moiicl Ston^r Hralir^ 
havo pnnTci so siircv^SJ^fiil in siipplyini! hot watrr 
for finmy kitiil-* uf wrrvin's ihat Uu-y havr wun tht- 
approval of owiutj'. arrhittTLH. engineers, ami 
roinrartors all over thr roiinlr>'. 

Tlirsr hfrilcrs arc of \\\\- Mvvlvw arlnatnl \\'\M' 
anil f-fjnf^ist of w Moru-I s1orn^<' slii-ll in wltic-li is 
inr^tnllrd ji n-jnovahlc, f*<»pi"'r \\\\m\ lir-atiiii; 
>!('rlioiK Tsing strain at a fairly iinifonii ral*\ 
these heaters proline rnst free hot water coii- 
linnally and recover after heavy <lraft!^ so thai an 
ample supply is always available for the next 
"peak load" eondition. 

[f there is a supply of exhaust steaiti available, 
this ran he useti to goo<I advantage in the storage 
liealcr, as this heal can he stored in the form of hot 
water wlien olh^Twise it winiM he wasted If hiyh 
or low pressure steam direet from the hoiler is 
useii, the ^tora^e [)rinri;>h> greatly helps the 
hoiler efficiency by luakini; the steam load more 
unilorm. 



AVAILABLE TYPES OF STORAGE HEATERS 

Horizontal— Tyf}« K " Mi*nel Slorau*- Heaters 
are in^taUed iLsualfy in a horizontal pi)>itiort, us 
ilhisiratrfl in Fig. \\ with the tulx* bundle located 
low ill the sliell where it Ls most elT»*elive ami sup- 
ported, if recpiired, hy a bni>« plate. 

Vertical— t)ceasionull> ^pacr rrqiiirements make 
it more convenient to install a Htorage healer 
vertically in which eaw the verti'-al design j^hown 
in Fi(£. 7 U UM-d. These heaters are suppi^rted on 
structural stf>el legs. 

Combination— This di-si^u. Fig..'), i^ provided tutli 
a heating section having two separate units one 
to UM* exhau-sl stearic rondensate, or oilier primary 
supply of heat, and the other tu us** live steam 
under thennostatie control to "make up" the 
Iota) amount requirecL These two units are 
enlir< !y sepanili'<l, each having its own supply and 
drip ri>nneetions. 

Submerged— ^Heaters of this type are iimnecteil 
ju^t ixUm ihe water line of the »teaiii }>oiler ^^o 
tlmt the artuul lieatinf! is done by hoi water 
instead of steam. 




UlHIUOCK-DRRLinC 
STORAGE HEATERS 



THCRHDMCTCR 
CONNCCllOH 



WilTER DUTLfT 




V4LV( caNNCCTJON 



IHEHMOITAT COHNECTlOh 



ElHAtfll I TEAM 
IMLET 



ouriET 



VnkrEH LNLEI 



Fig, 7 Type "K" Moncf Slorage H«*l€f— Vertical Design 

IMPORTANCE OF PROPER SHELL MATERIAL 

Kronuiniciiliy and technically it is sound to 
i^elet't a storattP lu'ater n-hidi i?^ "goml for tlie 
life of \\io huM'm^" in whifli it is to he instalk-d. 
This fact hct'onirs ohvious when yon consiilcr 
that tho size of the usual heater' ant! tlie cramped 
!)a.senienl (juarlers in which it is inslahed fre- 
queiilly makes replacement all Injl impossible, 
and it is always expensive. 

In ad-iitiori, since a heater is installed to prtj- 
vido an ever available :^upply of t-lean Imt water, 
any interruption in (his service causes trouble, 
railing from simple incnnveuienee to a eoiuplete 
plarjt shnt<lo\vn- 

The seleelion of the proper nuUerial depends 
almost eulirely upon the local water conditions. 
Some water supplies have litth^ corrosive pro- 
perties while others contain inn"'t'dients which 
render them highly corro^^ive— and always more 
actively so when the water is heated. Under some 
conditions, steel shells may have to be replaced 
within a few years an<l ^rc^l" water troubles may 
begin almost immediately upon installation. 



flOVRRTflGES OF 

monEL corsiructior: 

Moneh* a native Canadian alloy of ^i Niekle 
and '3 ('opi>er. is a solid non-ferrous niet-al, 
Monel with its silvery, smooth surface, its al'solute 
imTnunily to rust and its hi^'i resistance to cor- 
rosi<ui, insures a supply of dean rustless hot waler 
Jit all times. Solid Monel lias no cojilin^ to wt^ar 
off. Its high strength ami inrrosion resistance 
contribute to the elimination of needless dead 
weight necessary when designed in other materials. 

Monel is welded readily. The weld being of hi^li 
eflfieiency, its strength is close to that of the 
parent melal. Hiveis are done away wilh and ihe 
Monel shell gains all the advantages of one piece 
construction. This welde<I consfruelion. coupled 
with the high strength and corrosion resistance of 
Mooch contribute to a design wlueh enal*les 
Monel taTiks to be nnmufaelured Jind sohl at 
prices offering real economy. 

Repairs, nuiinlenanec and costly replacements 
are reduced to a ininimuni. Tjiinlcrrupted rustless 
hot water service is assured. 

•'■Mond'^ It u ri'eisKTcd irnde nmrk i»f The InirrnMional Nickd 
Cciijipiiiiy of CuiiiiiEu J.iiiiiinj 



20 YEAR GUARANTEE 



On all Whitiock-Darling Monel f^torage Heater 
installatiojis the owner is provided wUh i\ eerti- 
lieate reading as follows: 

''If the Monel Hot Water Storage Tank 
ffoltl hcrenmhr. leaks, fails or brenks (loum 
ati a result of rust, eorrosion or other 
vhemicnt oct/ori of the flomc^fic awcr 
supplff. af otuj time wilhiu TWESTY 
YKAHS from the date of instidlution,- we 
guarantee to snp/ilif the owner a new Monel 
Hot Water Storuge Tank in exrhange for 
the originol, without charge, provided that 
the tank aholl hare been in u«e to serve only 
the hot water rvtjnirement^H of the owner. 

We shiilt have no liahijittj for damnges to 
person or propert}/ or for ang hhor cost. 
Our antg oldigation by virtue of thts gaar- 
QfUee shall be to supply a new tank withimt 
charge, as stated above.'' 



f? 



1^^ 



SELECTinG PROPER 
SIZE HEATER 



UJHITLOCK-DflRLinG 

STORflCE HEATERS 



TABLE "A" - HOT WATER FIXTURE CAPACITIES FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF BUILDINGS 

U.S. gdllons oE water per hour per fixture Figured at a final temperature of 180 Fahrenheit 



\ ^^ 


Of 




6 

= 

H 
>- 




EC 


3. = 




II 




■-r 

7^ 


< 


' "^ I'.isins, Priviite Lavivtory.. 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 .sins, Public Lavatory-.- 


4 


6 


8 


6 


8 


12 


6 


12 


h I 


15 


8 




7.0 


^0 


30 


20 


20 


30 




45 


20 


30 


1 


15 


50-150 


. , 


50- loO 


50-200 


20-100 


, . 




15 


20-100 


■20-100 


)t liasins 


3 
10 


3 
20 


12 

■ « 


3 
20 


3 
20 


12 
20 


■ ■ 


, . 


3 

10 


3 

10 


12 


ben Sink 


20 


^m1^ '^tlry, Stationary Tubs 
^ 'v\- Sink 


20 


28 


' ■ 


28 


28 




' H 


' ' 


20 




28 


5 

75 
20 


10 

150 

20 


225 


10 
75 
20 


lU 
75 


225 
20 


15 


225 
15 


5 

75 
15 


10 

225 

20 


10 


'wers. . . .' 


225 


Sink 


20 


Hourly Heating Capacity 
I'actor ; 


30% 


30% 


40% 


25% 


25% 


40% 


30% 


50%. 


30% 


40% 


40% 


^ f*»rage Capacity Factor,,, 


125% 


90% 


100% 


60% 


80% 


100% 


200% 


120% 


70% 


100% 100% 



3 



y si^c of WhitliX'k-Darlinji Type "Tv" Moncl Stomgo Heater reqnirttl for a certain Iniilrling run he found from this taiile as 

Hourly hoatltig caiiflcity = Hourly rcqiiiremenls fium tjible X Huudy luratiiig capacity factor- 
Storage capacity = Hourly heating eapacityXStorage capacity factor. 
Kcfcrcnce to tahic C on pn^je 7 will show correct aixe uf shell aoci hi^atoi*^ rii^ction at once. 



H^ 



Xo illn-ifrnte tin' aliovi? methrui of spleclinp the pro|)c>r heat- 
w- tt itl lake IhL' hat water refioireowota of :t ^^Tnall liotel. 

' ' *r' lavatories. . 100 @ 2 gals- eaeh 200 gjtis. \\v\- hr, 

I f:iV]!tones . 10(^1 8 g;als, eacli S<] j^jils. jht hr. 

■ I ,r4 7.1 ^' 20 sals, earh l-iOO t-als. prr hr. 

i^lit-re. . . 2 ^j 30 sals, oarh *)0 kuI'* t"^r lir. 

I sinks. 3 fe' 20 V'^i\^ ''ii*'^ *■** t'-^l-'^- \^'^ hr, 

rjk- 3 & lO>iaLs. i-'ach 30 gub, (ht hr. Nearest, shell size t<j 800 nal. is No. 22 U2 x U4 iri,.i- nejiLitig 

24 (o 7.1 Kals. .-ar-h 1800 g!*Is, i»er hr. soctioo of 1000 gaU eapaeitv is No. ni3. HeatiT n^uoir<-cl ia 

^J " ^" ^^ ^^^^- ^-^^^^ ^^** «''^"' '^■■'' ^''- then Wliitlork-Darling Type -K" X.>. 2211 13, 

M^jtiumto hourly rc<iiJix'eiiients it<»tjUj 4000 gals, jier hr. 



TTinirly heatioji eafiacity (equals 4000 rtnilMplied hy 25% ur 
10()0 gal, per lumr. 

Storage capacity equaled 1000 multiplied l>y 80% or SOO gal. 



UlHITLOCK-DflRLinG 

STORRGE mms 



TyPICflL 
SPECIFICRTIOn 




A 
A to 
GRAPH 
sections. 



romplelp sperifitiitioo iiirludos piiragruphs 

C; indu^ive. Note the OPTIONAL PARA- 

at the end covering ciuuhlc hpatiuf^ 

A-GENERAL 

Furnish imd install in liorizontal position as 
filiowji on plans one Wliilloek-Darlintr type K 
inonet metal storage hrater, as nuiiiufa«'tureii by 
Darling Hrotlicrs Limited. Montit^aL 

B — STORAGE CAPACITy 

The heater shall liave a storage rapacity of 

U.S. gallons. The shell ?^hall l»e ^. . , 

inrhe? in diameter by inches Uii\^. Shell 

thirkness head thickness inehes. 

suitably welded to ^vith^tand a workinjr pressure 
of..,.! . ,,lb^. l^elecl ^Inll and he;id thickness 
from table BJ 

C- HEATING CAPACITY 

The heater shall be tilted with a heating section, 

capable of heating V f*- gallons of water 

per hour fmm 40^ to ISO**?, when supplied with 
euffident r^ieam at lbs. gauge pressure. 



D -SHELL CONSTRUCTION 

The shell shall Ijo eonstnit-led of en 
Monel boiler plate with welded seams 
designed for the specified working pressni 
sary eonneetions, of sizes ['eeonnnendT-i 
heater manuf^u-liirer for sp{"eihed iiut\ 
11" X 15" manhole in rear head shall be [ 
All parts in eontaet with water shall in 
ferrous material. 



Id rolled 
properly 
e, neces- 
I by the 

and an 
irovideii. 

of non- 



TABLE "B" - MONEL SHELL AND HEAD 



E- HEATING SECTION 

The heating section sliall consist of seamless 
drawn eopper tubing made up into U-bends witli 
ends expanded into a bronze tube sheet. The 
h* ating section shall be properly supported in the 
shell of the heater, shall be easily ai-eessilile and 
arranged so that the entire heating Heetion can l)e 
easily removed from the shell for cleaning or 
inspection. 

F-DISTRIBUTING HEAD 

The steam distrilmling head, baflie at inlet 
an<i supporting cradles (if horizunlal lieaterj shall 

lie of cast iron. 

G-TEST 

Before shipment, sludl and heating section shall 
be submitted to a liydrostatic test pressure as 
required by the laws of the Province in which it is 
to be installed, witli a minimum test pressure of 
50% in excess of tlie working pre?>sure, 

OPTIONAL PARAGRAPH 

C-1— IF DOUBLE HEATING 
SECTION IS WANTED 
The heating section shall be capable of heating 

U.S. gallons of water an hour from 40°F, 

to 180°F. when the primary heating section is 

supplied witli- . . lbs. of exhaust steam of 

condensate at **F. and the auxiliary heating 

section is supplied with live steam at. ....... lbs. 

gauge pressure, under control of a temperature 
regulating valve of approved design. 

THICKNESSES FOR TYPE "K" HEATERS 



To meet the requirements oF the Departments oF L^bor, Boiler Inspection Branch, 

Provinces oF Ontario and Quebec. 



Shdl 
LJi:iiiictcr 


2m lbt< Tvbl Pr«s9<ire 
Hb Iba. WurkiliK Preaaure 


2,tO llw TpBt PresHurp 
LOti Ibp. WorkJiif; Prnsurp 


30Ulbi, Trat Pfcwure 
127 Ltu, WtirkiuK Proaure 


SKdl H^ad 


ShtJI 


Hrud 


Shtll 


HMd 


18 


.U4S 


.070 


oriS 


,087 


.057 


.104 


24 


. m^ im 


-075 


.124 


.OSH 


,130 


3U 


.079 1 .na 


.100 


,140 


,119 


,174 


:ta 


. mr, 


.140 


.120 


.174 


,143 


,208 


A2 


-111 


,103 


-HO 


.203 


.167 


.243 


4B 


.127 


.186 


.160 


. ^ 

-232 


.101 


.278 


34 


,143 


.209 


-179 


.260 


-214 


.312 


60 


.160 


.232 


,199 


.290 


.238 


-347 


flfl 


.176 


.255 


.219 


.31S 


.262 


,3I»2 


72 


.192 


.278 


-239 


.347 


.280 


.416 






CflPflciTifs flno DimEnsions - HORizonifli mi -r hertcrs 



-Q 



6 i Q OVERAIL 

— a^^ 



I" RELIEF VALVE 



^ ' THERMOMETER 



CONNECTION \ CONNECTION \ 



*? 



*^ VACUUM 




EWATEH 
OUTIET 



II I 15 ' 
MANHOLE 



E-WATER INLET 



G-CIRCUUTLON 



'^ 



3 



*•) 





TABLE 


"C 


II 


WHITLOCK-DARUNG 


TYPE ■K" MONEL 


STORAGE 


HEATERS (HORIZONTAL) 




SHELLS 


HEATING SECTIOXS 


£ 






«"C 
















StAodHrd 




i'ipp leg 


















I 


H 1 


■o 






-0 


. 


c 


^ 








crndles 




cradk4 






*— 












9 




i ■ "S 

1 = 
( — 

% 1 T 


- b 
I i 






if 


p 



■3.1 
-1 

n 


J % 


□ 

^1 




1 

4-1 
•4 


t 


■SI 


EC 




•3-4 

* 

''J 

1 ? tJ 

'it 


t 

^ 

3 

y. 


■ 
a 

a 


5 


,^1 


■si 

n 






« - 
■5- 

•* :: 

a ■- 

0=7 




^ s 
s □ 


_ c 

fl 


'Kji 18 


60 


215 




2 2 


10 


22 


IS 


24 


4 


2H 


U 


2 


m 15 


HO 


100 


t8t60 


75 


BH 


8W 


2 


1 




lift 


73| 18 


72 


24i 




2 2 


10 


22 


18 


38 


4 


2Vr 


11 


2 


IH 15 


HI 


150 


I816O 


80 


fiij 


8if 


2 


1 




11^ 


^51 18 


K4 


255 




2 2 


10 


22 


J8 


48 


4 


2H 


11 


2 


m. 15 


H2 


200 


lSx72 


00 


9?'^ 


64 


2 






2H^ 


110! 2^ 


t>0 


am; 




2 2 


n 


23 


10 


22 


6 


3 


14 


2h 


2 


17 


H3 


250 


18x00 


175 


12>i 


7"^ 


31- 


■> 




Ih^ 


24 


72 


auo 




2 2 


11 


23 


10 


34 


8 


3 


14 


2-^, 


2 


17 


H4 


300 


:Sii60 


185 


12^ 


7^ 


3M 


2 




2H 


t.y 


24 


84 


410 




2 2 


11 


23 


to 


441 


8 


3 


14 


2!^!^ 


2 


17 


Ho 


350 


]8iili0 


too 


12M 


74 


3^i 


2 


v^ 


2H 


I7u; 24 


■Jti 


441J 




2 2 


Ji 


23 


10 


.iO 


8 


3 


14 


24 


2 


17 


ITfi 


400 


I816O 


200 


1214 


74 


34 


2 




wij 


iroi' a') 


m 


4W] 




3 2 


12 


24 


2^\ 


20 


7 


3 


19 


3 


■1 


22 


H7 


5<1f] 


]8i72 


210 


121^ 


7H 


1U 


2 


2H 


;joo' 30 


72 


62<J 


S 

3 


3 2 


1:^ 


24 


20 


22 


7 


3 


to 


3 


2 


22 


HS 


550 


18ii72 


215 


1244 


7U 


3ii 


2 


r- 


1^ 


J-1<»l 3lJ 


H 


550 


3 2 


12 


24 


20 


44 


; 


3 


19 


3 


2 


22 


H9 


800 


18H&1 


220 


l2^4 


73^ 


3H 


2 


EC 


jsni 30 


»«i 


580 


1 


■ 3 2 


12 


24 


2(1 


5r^ 


7 


3 


19 


3 


2 


22 


HIO 


im 


24i60 


300 


15 ^ 


74 


5 


2 


£ 


2^ 


:jii: 30 


108 


81X1 


Cm 


3 2 


12 


24 


20 


84 


'/ 


3 


19 


3 


2 


22 


UU 


KOO 


24x06 


260 


121^ 


7H 


34 


2 


= 


2^4 


,<hi' ;i(» 


72 


VOO 


It 


3 2 


14 


2fi 


22 


32 


8 


3 


am 


3H 


2 '-J 2551 


tlL2 


W\U 


30*108 


270 


I2M 


74 


34 


2 


a 


?A 


■Ki an 


84 


74(1 




3 2 


t4 


26 


22 


40 


8 


3 


21b 


3^ 


24. 25it 


HI3 


1000 


3Ril20 


285 


12Vi 


74 


3H 


-> 


J" 


?H 


HNJ| Jfl 


m 


;80 


^ 

b 


3 2 


14 


2e 


22 


Jj2 


« 


3 


21 h 


3h 


2^i 


ii5>i 


Efll 


I^'jO 


24x84 


370 


15}^ 


7H 


5 


2 


ifl 


2% 


i.'.o 36 


infl 


820 


i 


3 2 


14 


2tt 


22 


M 


8 


3 


21 h 


3H 


2U 


251* 


Ht5 


1300 


3O1IO8 


425 


15 Li 


74 


5 


2 


3 


2N 


r.in^ 


m 


120 


Hm 


ii 


3 2 


14 


28 


22 


V« 


8 


3 


21 U, 


3S 


34 


251* 


H16 


1750 


36ji120 


450 


15^ 


74 


5 


2 


w— 


2^ 


ifHi 


42 


84 


H60 


»* 


J 2 


17 


20 


2ti 


40 


8 


3h 


25h 


3'v 


3 


28 


H17 


200tJ 


30^98 


570 


18 !i 


aS 


6 


24 




-^ 


■<») 


42 


un 


io;io 


C 




■i 


W 


20 


2tt 


44 


8 


3W 


251!, 


3'^ 


3 


28 


HIS 


2400 


3rticl20 


G20 


18. Lj 


84 


6 


?4 


u 


010 


42 


108 


ItOO 






2 


1; 


20 


2ti 


84 


8 


3^ 


25 1 'i 


3.-* 


3 


28 


H18A 


2.>00 


36x120 


830 


18 i* 


s>^ 


6 


2M 


73 


33 


■••^i 42 


120 


1180 


TJ 




2 


17 


2fl 


2<l 


m 


8 


3H 


25H 


3V 


3 


26 


HIO 


2800 


42itl44 


870 


I8k 


84 


8 


?4 




^!^ 


^W. 42 


144 


1320 


SJ 




2 


IV 


2U 


2rt 


02 


8 


3K 


25 H 


3'^ 


3 


28 


HlOA 


;wiO(" 


42x144 


805 


18 H 


84 


6 


2^ 


^ 


'^70 42 


lltH 


tnW 


ex 




2 


17 


211 


28 


118 


8 


3H 


25 H 


3'w 


3 


26 


H24) 


32rHi 


38x08 


880 


21 ii 


OH 


8 


74 


4^ 


:-Hy ts 


Ul> 


IHWI 


"D 




2 


L8 


30 


2V 


44 


H 


4 


29 


4 


3 


244 


H20A 


3500 


38x1 OS 


OOS 


21H 


0»^ 


S 


?H 


IT 


4^ 


' M>, 48 


IQS 


UtiU 






2 


18 


30 


27 


80 


M 


4 


29 


4 


3 


24H 


H21 


3600 


38x108 


020 


2Ui 


oS 


8 


2S 




i% 


.711 IS 12a 


1,'fiO 




2 


IS 


30 


27 


66 





4 


29 


4 


3 


24H 


H22 


4000 


hIBx 1 20 


O.VI 


21 V^- 


OH 


S 


?4 


^ 


A% 


|-,u m 'l44 1760 


L^ 




2 


is 


30 


27 


m 


It 


4 


20 


4 


3 


24 k 


H23 


4400 


121144 


1020 


21!^ 


OH 


S 


2^ 


' 


4S 


.^^^< 48 ;i68 'l02Ui ^ 




2 


18 


Mi 


27 


114 





4 


20 


4 


3 


2+^ 


H23A 


4. TOO 


42il44 


L040 


2L'-i 


^H 8 


24 


:P 


4]^ 


SJO 48 18(» 210O 


■^ 




2 


18 


m 


27 


138 


t» 


4 


2*^ 


4 


3 


24 M 


H24 


4800 


36t98 


1200 


34 '4 


9H' 10 


3 


94ft 


. JUO 54 I OS 


1760 


43 




2 


20 


32 


30 


m 





4V3 


33 


4b 


4 


27 


H24A 


5000 


36x90 


L235 


24 ^i 


OH 10 


3 


: 


5% 


MOO 54 


120 


iwto 






2 


20 


32 


30 


60 





4H 

4H 


33 


4^ 


4 


27 


H25 


5400 


36x108 


1300 


24^4 


OH 


10 


3 


< 


54fi 


::j<iO 54 


144 


2120 






2 


20 


3^ 


30 


84 


H 


33 


4^ 


4 


27 


R28 


8000 


36x120 


1380 


24 ti 


OH 


10 


3 


-4" 


5i£ 


^fX^i 54 


IfiN 


237rj 




2 


20 


32 


30 


108 


11 


4W 


33 


4H 


4 


27 


H27 


7(X}0 


42x96 


1950 


30 ^^ 


11^ 


12 


4 




G^ 


^ I0| h54 1U2 


^(WO 




2 


20 


32 


31} 


132 





41-^ 


33 


44 


4 


27 


H28 


8000 


42x06 


2000 


30 U 


11^ 


12 


4 




614 


JD GO ;I20 


2:120 


2 




2 


20 


32 


30 


60 


10 


5 


37 


4M 


4 


31 


U20 


flOOiJ 


42x10$ 


2300 


30.^4 


11^ 


12 


4 




«^ 


',jO m t44 2620 


(^- 




2 


20 


32 


30 


84 


10 


5 


37 


4H 


4 


31 


H30 


irjooo 


42x120 


2460 


30 1^ 


ll;« 


12 


4 




64 


■H(ri ttO IttS l2fllO 


If 




2 


20 


32 


,fu 


108 


10 


5 


37 


i.H 


4 


31 




















_ ^0 60 192 13210 

^30 flfl 144 laiiyi 


:Q 




2 

2 


20 
22 


32 
34 


30 
32 


132 

8{l 


10 
10 


5 

<1 


37 
30 


4'-j 

a 


4 
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PARISIAN SANllAliy LAUNDRY 
HAMILTON. ONTARIO 



lllHITLOCKDflRLinC Type "K" IHOnEL 

Storage Jleatersnre used for any sfrvire rpquiriTiE hirjif* 

qimntilics of rust-free hot watrr at irrrgTihir intf-rvals. 

TIjc illustrations sliown aro irpresentativp of Whiltock- 

Darlint; M<inol Hratcr installations in 

HOMMI'\l.S SCHUCJLS AM) t'OLLKGES 

l.ArNDlUKS OFFICK BriLDINnS 

AVAUTMKNTS HOTELS 

CU BS Pl'BT.ir BlILDINCS 

TEXTIU: AND OTHER IXm STUIAL PLANTS 

For qnoMions or/iirtficr informtition, ur/ite 

DARLING BROTHERS LIMITED 

140 Prince Street, Montreal 



/V J\DtS7k 



9S fi 



BANK OF COMMERCE 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 








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BULLETIN 40A 



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'%W 



FINISHING PLANTS - 

:oiLEGES ' Process 



• n c 



NNECTICUT 



■^.;v*'.^''i 




PARISIAN SANITARyLAL 
HAMILTON, ONTAftI 






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FOR HOSPITALS * LAUNDRIES • TEXTILE MILLS * FINISHING PLANTS - 
HOTELS • APARTMENT HOUSES * SCHOOLS - COLLEGES * PROCESS 
ANO GENERAL INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 



THE WHITLOCK MANUFACTURING CO., HARTFORD 10, CONNECTICUT 



i 



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1 



^^K 1 r 



* 




WHITLOCK TYPE K 
STORAGE HEATERS 



The Whitlock Type K Storage Heater needs 
no iniroduction to our many friends throughout the 
country. The advantages of the storage rype of 
heater for varying hot water demand rates is well 
known. This bulletin has been written for the con- 
venience of architects, engineers and purchasers to 
facilitate their selection of Whitlock Type K Storage 
Heaters for conditions normally found in buildings of 
various classifications. 

Where the demand for hot water is intermittent, 
and/or where the steam or heating medium supply is 
intermittent, the storage heater is preferable to an instan- 
taneous heater. For example, consider a typical case where 
the hot water demand rate at ISO^K is as follows during a 
one hour period: 

First 40 minutes — No hot water drawn. 
Last 20 minutes — 1000 gallons of hot water 
withdrawn. 

Since the 1000 gallons was drawn in 20 minutes, the 
actual average flow rate is 50 G,P.M. or 3000 G.P.H. An instan- 
taneous heater to handle this requirement would have to be 
designed to heat at the rate of 3000 G.P.H. and would require 
steam at the rate of 105 boiler H,P. The Whiclock Type K Storage 
Heater, with a storage capacitj- in excess of 1000 gallons, will heat 
this 1000 gallons over a period of one hour and will use steam at 
the rate of 35 boiler H.P, 

A Whitlock Type K Storage Heater, properly sized for the 
requirements, will absorb heat from any available quantitj- of exhaust 
steam or condensate, even at non-uniform flow rates, and deliver hot 
water at the desired temperature, also at irregular demand rates. If th. 
quantity of exhaust steam or hot condensate is insufficient to produce 
enough hot water, additional live steam may be supplied through a 
separate heating element provided for this purpose when required 





Cppnig^ J9J0 h, Thw irUl/oa M 



M 



Ca 




The Whitlock Type K Storage Heater is flexibre 
in design to facilitate its selection for individual 
requirements, 

HORIZONTAL HEATERS 

This is the preferred position aad the heater is 
furnished and equipped accordingly unless otherwise 
specified. The heating element is installed close to the 
bottom of [he shell to take maximum advantage of hot 
water storage. Bronze tube supports are furnished when 
the length of tube bundle indicates their use, and 
these, in turn, are secured to the shell. The entire 
bundle h removable for inspection. Heaters are fur- 
nished with supporting cradles drilled for anchor bolts. 

VERTICAL HEATERS 

When space is limited, this may be the preferred 
method of installation, and when so ordered will be 
furnished and equipped accordingly. Vertical heaters 
are supported by three removable pipe legs complete 



with floor flanges or when indicated by purchaser the 
heater may be supported from the floor by means of 
structural steel supports. Unless otherwise specified, the 
distance from bottom of heater to floor level will be 12". 

COMBINATION HEATERS 

When heat is supplied from several sources, it is 
desirable to use a separate heating element for each 
source of supply. For example, if a part of the heating 
is to be done with exhaust steam and the balance 
with live steam, the exhaust steam heating element 
should be located low in the shell lo get the maximum 
use from the exhaust steam. A separate heating element 
for live steam should be used and installed above the 
exhaust steam element, either in the same end or at the 
opposite end. Likewise, if part of the heating is to be 
done with hot condensate, or condensate flash from a 
receiver, the heating element should be located low in 
the shell, or, if more convenient, in a separate shell 
entirely. While the accompanying photograph indi- 
cates two separate heating elements — one for the ori- 
mary heat source and the other for the live steam^the 
combination heater can be furnished with a single heat- 
ing element, properly partitioned, to accept both heat- 
ing sources — each at a different pressure. The com- 
bination heater can be furnished for vertical or 
horizontal installation. 





MATERIALS 

O F 

CONSTRUCTION 



i 



•s 



1 



The shells and heads of Whiilock Type K Siorage 
Heaters may be conscrucced of carbon steel, scainless 
steel, Everdur. copper, nickej. or of any other material 
which can be formed and welded, including also 
stainless steel-clad sieel or nickel-clad steel, etc. The 
choice of materials depends upon the local water 
conditions, puritj' of hot water desired, and, of course, 
the economic considerations. 

STANDARD STEEL SHELL HEATERS 

It is well known that steel in contact wiih water 
is generally subject to corrosion. This is particularly 
true of steel in contact with water which is being 
heated, because the oxygen released as the water 
temperature is raised attacks the steeK producing iron 
oxide or rust. As a general rule, however, the rate of 
corrosion, rusting or pitting is slow — so slow, in 
fact, that many Whttlock Type K Storage Heaters 
with steel shells which were installed over a quarter 
of a century ago are still in satisfactory e\er) day 
service. Corrosion or pitting is quire independent 
of the grade or class of steel used, and the rate of cor- 
rosion or pitting is much more rapid in some locali- 
ties than in others. It is good practice, therefore, 
lo add a corrosion allowance of Im" ro Vs" to the 
thicknesses shown in the tables on Pages 8 and 9. 

Note: It is not necessary and is actually more 
expensive to specify a higher design pressure than 
conditions warrant instead of specifying a corrosion 
allowance. For example, in specifying an A.S.M.E. 
60" X 168" Type K Storage Heater for lOOi design 
pressure, the minimum thickness required for iOO# 
design pressure is Ys" shell and ^n;" heads. If a 
heavier shell is preferred, say, W x W do insure 
longer life against corrosion) it ^ill be noted that 
this heavier thickness appears under the heading of 
175# design pressure. However, if the design pressure 
is specified as I75#, it is necessary ro design the 
bolted joints and all other parts for the full working 
pressure of 175#. which results in an unnecessary 
expense. The specifications should read as follows: 

"Furnish 1— Whitlock 60' x 168" Type K 

Storage Heater designed for I00# per sq. in. 

working pressure, shell to be ^s" thick with 

Va" thick heads ■. 
The low cost of Whitlock Type K Storage Heaters 
with steel shells favors their use in buildings where 
slow corrosion is tolerable. 

EVERDUR SHELL HEATERS 

The Whitlock-Everdur Type K Storage Heater is 
standard equipment for installations where the water 
IS known to be actively corrosive to steel and in 
installations where it is imperative that the hot water 
be not contaminated with iron oxide. 



Everdur is a silicon bronze with a corrosion 
resistance comparable with copper and having a 
tensile strength comparable with that of steel, 
Whitlock-Everdur Heaters are equipped with non- 
ferrous tube sheets, tubes and manhole covers so that 
the water passing through the shell comes in contact 
with nothing but non-ferrous metals. 

ETERNO (COPPER^INED) HEATERS 

Whitlock-Eterno Heateis hav2 a flange quality 
steel shell lined with electrolytic sheet copper. The 
steel shell is sufl^ciently heavy to accommodate the 
full working water pressure, while the sheet copper is 
of a thickness ample to prevent corrosion. 

Extreme care is taken in the forming, fining, and 
joining of the copper sheet to assure tightness and to 
assure protection of the steel shell. 

Small tapped openings are made through Everdur 
spuds welded to both the steel shell and to the copper 
inner shell. Larger connections are made through a 
sleeve of copper which is rolled back over the outer 
shell flange. 

ALLOY SHELL HEATERS 

Where conditions demand their application, 
stainless steel, nickel, monel and stainless steel-clad 
or nickel-clad shells can and have been furnished. 
Your local Whitlock representative will be glad to 
examine your individual requirements and offer 
recommendations, 

NON-METALLIC COATED STEEL 
SHELL HEATERS 

The application of non-metallic coatings — enam- 
els, plastics, cement* etc to the interior surface of 
a steel shell — provide low cost protection against 
shell corrosion. Whitlock Manufacturing Standards 
cover detailed procedure and steps for the effective 
application of approved coatings. Recommendations 
are available upon request. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Both shell and heating elements of Whitlock 
Type K Storage Heaters are hydrostatically tested 
to pressures required by the customer, state regula- 
tions or special codes. In lieu of an indicated test 
requirement, Whitlock Manufacturing Standards 
require that the heater be tested at a pressure not 
less than 150'; of the specified working water 
pressure. 

Construction is available according to Whitlock 
Manufacturing Standards, AS.M.E. Code for Unfired 
Pressure Vessels, and other special codes. 




i 



^3 



Fig. 8> Norwalk General Hospical, Norwalk, Conn. 



rig, 9. Manheim Laundry, Philadelphia, Pa, 



.^ 



^ 



HORIZONTAL STORAGE 
HEATER DIMENSIONS 




TABIE A-5hells 




* • 



^7 A s^ -_±: 



IP 



TABLE B-Heoting Elements 



= :e i*EC e--r 



I I 



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4 4C 
4 £ 






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HI' 



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a 
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-6 




VERTICAL STORAGE 
HEATER DIMENSIONS 



C -WATtft 
OUTIET 



V-THBMO 

CONNECTION 



L'STEAM 
INLET 

W VACUUM 

BREAKER 

CONNECTION 



E' CIRCULATION 






1" RELIEF VAIVE 
CONNECTION 

l\i" REGULATOR 
/CONNECTION 

W AIR 

RELIEF 

CONNECTION 



M- CON DENSATE 




IS" ond 24" diam«ler 

vhclli have 6" x 
handhold oA (ontBrlinv- 

30"dio'nel0'O'kdbr9ef 
ihelh hove 11" < 15" 
manhQl« off centerlme, 
at ihown. 



J -SIZE OF 12' 
PIPE LEGS \ 

y////////////y^ 



TABLE C-Shells 






TABLE D 


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1250 
1500 
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2000 
2400 
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570 
600 
790 
830 
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8^ 


54H 




29V 


2200 


60 


IV2 


6Z00 


J 

^ 


1 


2 


20 


33 


20 




3 




MV-29 
HV 50 


9000 
10000 


84 
H4 


2880 
3070 


36 
36 


U 
14 


5 
5 




12*4 


10 
10 


56 
56 





^RESSURE THICKNESS 

I TABLES 

I STEEL SHELL HEATERS 



Corrosion Allowance: As steel is subject to moderate 
corrosion b> oxygen released from water being heated, 
it is good practice to add an allowance of ' ib" to "^ to 
the pressure thickness to act as corrosion allowance 
for greater durabilit)'. 




TABLE E — Whitlock Standard Steel Shell and Head Thicknesses 








De 


Sign Pressure lbs, per sq. in. - 


- Dimensions in 


Inches 










SHELL 
DIAM. 


75 


100 


125 


150 


175 


300 

THICKNESS 
SHELL HEAD 




THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 
SHELL MEAn 


THICKNESS 
IHCLL HEAD 




IS 


SHELL 
t,4 


HFAD 
3 '8 


SHELL 
14 


3 8 


SHEl-E. 

14 


3 8 


1 4 


2/8 


14 


3 8 


1 4 


3/i 




24 


1/4 


3 /a 


1 4 


3 8 


14 


3 8 


1 4 


1/8 


1/4 


3/8 


5 16 


I 2 




30 


1/4 


3/8 


1 4 


3 8 


14 


3 8 


6 16 


12 


5 16 


1/2 


3/8 


12 




36 


1/4 


3/8 


1'4 


38 


5 16 


1 2 


5 16 


1 2 


i 8 


I 2 


7,' 16 


9.16 




42 


14 


3/8 


14 


3 8 


S 16 


1 2 


3.8 


1 2 


7 16 


9 16 


9/16 


U 16 




4t 


S 16 


1'3 


S 16 


1 2 


3 8 


1 2 


7 16 


9 16 


9 16 


11 16 


5/8 


3 '4 




54 


3 8 


1 2 


3 8 


1 a 


7 16 


9 16 


12 


5 6 


9 16 


11/16 


5 8 


3 4 




69 


3 8 


1 2 


3 S 


1 3 


7.16 


9 16 


9 16 


1116 


5 8 


3/4 


3 4 


7 8 




66 


5/8 


I a 


J'8 


1/2 


1/2 


5 8 


9 16 


1M6 


^ 4 


7/8 


3/4 


M 16 




72 


5/16 


1/2 


1/2 


5/8 


9/H 


11 16 


5 8 


34 


5 4 


7/8 


7/8 


1 




78 


i/B 


1/2 


l/Z 


5/8 


9/16 


11 16 


3 4 


7/8 


11.16 


1 


15 16 


I-I 8 




84 


3/8 


12 


1/2 


5/8 


SB 


3 4 


3/4 


15/16 


7 8 


1-1 16 


I 


1-3' 16 




96 


7/16 


916 


9 16 


11/16 


5 4 


7 8 


7/8 


l-l 16 


I 


1-1/4 


1^1/8 


1-3 8 




108 


1/2 


5^6 


3/4 


7/8 


7/8 


1 


15 16 


1-5 16 


I-l 16 


1-3.8 


1-14 


1-9 16 




120 


^'irt 


11 Its 


Vfl 


7/e 


7 8 


1-1 8 


1-1 16 


]-S 16 


1-^ 16 


!-<> 16 


1^3 '8 


l-i 4 






TABLE F- Minimum Steel Shell and Head Thicknesses 
Furnished for A.S.M.E. Code Stamped Heaters 








Design Pressure lbs. per 


sq, in. - 


- Dimensions in 


Inches 










SHELL 
DIAM- 


75 1 100 1 125 


150 


175 


200 




THICKNESS THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 




SHEIL ! HEAD 1 SHELL 1 HEAD 


1 SHELL HEAD 


SHELL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 1 HEAD 


SHELL f HEAD 




IB 
24 
30 
36 


Shell and bead thitkntaei wilt nor bf furniihed 






1/4 


5/16 




le« ihjn 1 ., " ;iliho<jgh A.S.M.F. Code mj 


V alio* 


1 4 

^ 16 
5 16 


5 16 

3 8 

7 16 


1 4 
5 16 

3 8 


3/8 

7 16 

1 1 


5T6 

3 8 

7 16 


3 8 

1'2 

916 




lv?,it:t (bicLne^rS tat thcK coad^tions- 


1 4 
5 16 


5 16 
3 B 






1 4 


5 16 




42 
48 




1 4 
5 16 


3 e 

3 8 


5 16 
3 B 


7 16 
1 2 


3.'8 

7 16 


1/2 
9 16 


7 16 

I 2 


9 16 

11 16 


1 2 
9 16 


M 16 
3 4 




1.4 


5 16 




54 


14 


516 


S ]6 


3 8 


7 16 


1 2 


1 2 


9 16 


9 16 


11 16 


5 8 


5 4 




60 


S 16 


5 16 


3 B 


7 16 


7 ■16 


9 16 


9 16 


S 8 


5 8 


5 4 


1M6 


' 8 




66 


5 16 


3 8 


3 8 


i 2 


I 2 


5 8 


9 16 


1116 


n 16 


13/16 


3 '4 


15 16 




71 


5 16 


3 8 


716 


12 


9/16 


5 8 


5 8 


3/4 


3 4 


7. 8 


13 16 


I 




78 


3 8 


7 16 


1 2 


9 16 


9 16 


11 16 


11 16 


7/8 


15 16 


I 


15 16 


I-l B 




84 


3 B 


I '2 


va 


5/8 


5 8 


3 4 


3 4 


15/16 


7.8 


l''M6 


1 


1-3 16 




96 


7 16 


9 16 


9 16 


11.'16 


11 16 


7 8 


7 8 


l-t 16 


1 


1-1 4 


1-1/8 


i-i 8 




lOB 


12 


5^8 


5 H 


t3 16 


13 16 


1 


IS 16 


1-* 16 


l-l 16 


1-3 a 


1-1 4 


1-9 16 




120 


9 16 


11 16 


II 16 


^ B 


7 R 


1-1 S 


I-l 16 


1-^ U> 


1^3 16 


l-Q 16 


1-3 8 


I-^ 4 





NOTES: Thicknesses are expressed in noi Less than multiples 
of sixreenths of an inch. Manhole frame is properly rein- 
forced to meet A.S.M.E, Code requirements, and gasket 
surface is machined. 

Plate and beads as listed in above tables are regularly 
carried in our siock for many sizes of heaters. Stock is 
held within a reasonable minimum by eliminating the 
stockiag of less commonly used sizes^ Sizes shown in bold 
face type represent heaters for which raw materials are 
carried in stock at all times. 

FOR AU WHITLOCK TYPE K STORAGE HEATERS - Shells 30" 
in diameter and larger are provided ^ith 11" x 15" manhole 
in one head. Shells smaller than ^0" diameter are provided 

with 6" X 8" handholes, 

A.S.M.C. CODE STAMPED HEATERS (TAeLES F AND K} - The 
diicknesses given are in accordance with ihe rules according 
to the 1949 A.S,M.E Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels. These 
rules were continued in the 1930 Code, accompanied by an 
alternate basis (or design which, in general, permits sUghdy 
les^r shell and head thicknesses for a given diameter of 
shell and a given design pressure, but only when accom- 
panied by compliance with certain additional requirements 
as to manufacturing procedure, etc. 



The implications of these permissive alternate rules have 
been carefully analyzed and it is our present considered 
opinion that adherence to the rules of the 1949 Code will 
give to the user of a steel shell storage r>'pe water heater 
a bener value for the investment than adherence to the 
alternate permissive rules. We are therefore continuing, in 
this edition of Bulletin No. 40A» the above table unchanged 

There is another consideration which must be kept in 
mmd. A number of states and cities currently require that 
all storage tjpe water heaters installed within the limits of 
their respective jurisdictions comply with the requirements 
of the existing (1949 and earlier) rules of the A.S.M.E, 
Code for unfired pressure vessels. Until these authorities 
have formally accepted the 1950 Code, with the alternate 
permissive rules referred to above, it will presumably be 
necessary to continue compliance with the 1949 Code in 
connection with the manufacture of storage i>pe water 
heaters to be installed within the limits of their respective 
jurisdictions. 

A heater which does not bear the A.S,M.E. clover leaf 
stamped on the shell is not comtructed in full accordance 
With the A.S.M.E, Code, All Whitlock heaters which are 
construaed m full accordance with the A.S.M E. Code are 
so stamped. 

LOOK FOR THE CLOVER LEAF. 



w 



ffl 



PRESSURE THICKNESS 

TABLES 
EVERDUR SHELL HEATERS 



Shell and head thicknesses as they appear in Tables G 
and K beJow have been carefully calculated lo minimize 
the effect of stress corrosion cracking which can result 
with certain water conditions when high stress and tem- 
perature levels occur in service. 




SHELL 
OlAM. 



IB 
24 

30 

42 
49 
54 

60 

66 
72 

7a 
u 

96 

108 
f30 




SHELL 
DIAM. 



IB 
24 
30 
36 
42 
4B 
54 
60 
66 
72 
70 
84 
96 
IDS 
110 



U 



TABLE G - Minimum Everdur ShelJ and Head thicknesses 
Whttlock Standard Construction 




(Test Pressure — JVi times Design Pressure) 
Design Pressure lbs. per sq. in. -* Dimensions in Inches 



75 



THICKNESS 



5HELL 



HEAD 



100 



THICKNESS 



5HELL 



HEAD 



125 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



150 



THICKNESS 



5HELL 



HEAD 



175 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



200 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



0,06" 
0.090 
0.112 
0.134 
0,157 
0,179 
0.201 
0.224 
0.246 
0.269 
0,291 
0-314 
0.359 
0,403 

n 44" 



0.107 


0,090 


0.125 


0-130 


0.H3 


0,150 


0,178 


0,1 SO 


0.214 


0.210 


0.250 


O.240 


0,2S6 


0-270 


0.321 


0.300 


0.355 


0,330 


0-393 


0.360 


0,427 


0.390 


0.464 


O.420 


0,535 


0-4fl0 


0,606 


0,540 


0,67^ 


0.600 



0.145 
0,166 

0,190 
0,238 
0.:S6 
0-333 
0.380 
0.429 
0.476 
0,524 
0,5''l 
0,619 
0-714 
0,810 
0,904 



0.112 


0.178 


0. L34 


0.214 


0.149 


0,208 


0,1-9 


0,250 


0.186 


0,238 


0.224 


0,286 


0.224 


0.298 


0,266 


0.358 


0,261 


0,357 


0,3 H 


0.428 


0.298 


0,416 


OJ58 


0,500 


0,336 


0.476 


0.404 


0.5 70 


0-373 


0,536 


0,448 


0.642 


0,410 


0-596 


0.492 


0,714 


0.447 


0,655 


0.538 


0.785 


0,485 


0.715 


0,582 


0.856 


0.522 


0.775 


0.627 


0,930 


0,596 


0,895 


0.716 


1.072 


0,672 


I.OIO 


0,806 


1.140 


0.746 


r.07^ 


0.895 


1.285 



0.157 
0.209 
0.26] 
0,313 
0.365 
0.417 
0.470 
0.522 
0.572 
0-626 
0,676 
0.730 
0.835 
0,940 
1.045 



0.250 
0.291 
0,333 
0.416 
0.500 
0.583 
0,666 
0.7 50 
0.831 
0,915 
1.000 
1.081 
1.250 
1.330 
1.500 



0.178 
0,238 
0-298 

0.^57 
0,417 
0.476 
0.535 
0.596 
0,655 
0.714 
O.-'TJ 
0,832 
0.951 
1,070 
1 . 1 90 



0,285 
0,334 
0.381 
0,475 
0,571 
0.666 
0.761 
0,B56 
0.951 
I 049 
1 142 
1.2^8 
1,430 
1-525 
l.7|0 




TABLE H - Minimum Everdur Shell and Head Thicknesses 

A.S.M.E. Code Construction 

Design Pressure lbs, per sq- in, — Dimensions in rnches 



d 



75 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



100 



THICKNF-SS 



SHf tt 



HEAD 



125 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



T50 



175 



200 



THICKNESS 



SHELL 



HEAD 



THICKNESS 



5HfLL 



HEAD 



THICKNESS 



SHELf 



HEAD 



0.084 
0,113 
0.14] 
0,169 
0.197 
0.225 
0,253 
0-281 
0-309 
0-337 
0,365 
0,393 
0-449 
0.505 
0.561 



0.113 


0,112 


0,150 


n.132 


0.150 


o.n^ 


0.150 


0.188 


200 


0,188 


0.224 


0.250 


0.225 


0-261 


0.300 


0.263 


0.299 


0.350 


0-300 


0-336 


0,400 


0.338 


0-373 


0.450 


0.^75 


0,411 


0.50O 


0,413 


0-448 


0.550 


0.450 


0.485 


0.600 


0,488 


0.523 


0.650 


0,563 


0,597 


0,750 


0.61R 


0.fi72 


0.850 


"^M 


0.746 


0.950 



0.140 
0.1 8B 
0.234 
0,280 
0.327 

0.373 
0-420 
0.466 
0-513 
0-560 
O.606 
0,653 
0.744 
0,840 
0-934 



0-188 
0.188 
0.250 
0.313 
0.^75 
0.438 
0,500 
0.563 
0.625 
0.688 
0.750 
0.813 
938 
1.063 
1,125 



0.168 
0.22fl 
0.279 
0,335 
0.391 
0-44- 
0.502 
0.558 
0.615 
0.6T0 
726 
0,782 
0.894 
1-006 
1,118 



0.200 


0.195 


0,205 


0-223 


0,263 


0.261 


0,307 


0.298 


0.300 


0.326 


0,350 


0.372 


0-375 


0,391 


0.438 


0.446 


0,450 


0.456 


0.525 


0.521 


0,525 


0.522 


0.613 


0.595 


0,600 


0.586 


0-700 


O-670 


0.675 


0.652 


0.788 


0,743 


0.750 


0,716 


0,875 


0.S19 


0,825 


0.782 


0.963 


0.892 


0.900 


0.846 


1.050 


0-966 


0.975 


0.913 


1-138 


1.040 


1.125 


1.043 


1.313 


1.190 


1-200 


i,r: 


1.4O0 


1-340 


1.350 


1-302 


1 5"^ 


1.4B5 



0.300 

0.350 
0.400 
0,500 
0.600 
O.7O0 
0.800 
0-900 
kOOO 
1-100 
1.200 
1.300 
1-500 
1.600 
l.SOO 




TABLE K — Minimum Everdur Shell and Head Thicknesses 
Where Wor king Pressure Sholl Not Exceed 42^2% of Test Pressure.* 

(For Special Municipol or State Regulations) 
Pressure lbs. per sq. in. — Dimensions in Inches. 




SHELL 
OIAM. 


Test Pressure 




200 


250 300 


350 




Working Pressure 




85 


106.25 


127.5 


148.75 




THICKNESS 


THICKNESS 


THICKPJESS 


THICKNESS 




SHELL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 1 HEAD 


SHELL 


HEAD 


SHELL 


HEAD 




It 


0-096 


0J28 


0.120 


0,160 


0.143 


0.192 


0J66 


0.224 




14 


0.127 


0.149 


0,159 


0.186 


0.191 


0.224 


0,221 


0,261 




30 


0,159 


0.170 


0,199 


0.215 


0,238 


0.255 


277 


298 




» 


0.191 


0.213 


0.238 


0.366 


0.286 


0.319 


0.332 


0.372 




42 


0.224 


0.255 


0.2 va 


0.319 


0.333 


0.3B3 


0,58'" 


0.446 




4i 


0.254 


0.298 


0.31a 


0.372 


0.381 


0.447 


0,443 


0.521 




54 


0.286 


0,340 


0.358 


0.425 


0.428 


0.510 


0,497 


595 




60 


0..*18 


0-383 


0.398 


0,478 


0.476 


0.574 


0.^52 


670 




«6 


0.349 


0-425 


0.436 


0.531 


0.524 


0.638 


609 


744 




72 


0.381 


0.468 


0,476 


0.584 


0.571 


0.702 


665 


819 




78 


0.413 


0.510 


0.516 


0.637 


0.618 


0.766 


0.720 


0.893 
1.042 




84 


0.445 


0,553 


0.556 


0.69O 


0.666 


0,829 


0.77S 




ft 


0,508 


0.636 


0.63S 


0.796 


0,761 


0.957 


0-7B5 


1 116 




10s 


0.572 


0.723 


0,-TI5 


0.903 


0,856 


1.085 


0.995 


1 190 


120 


0.635 


0,808 


0.795 


1.009 


0-9S1 


1148 


1.10* 


1 U9 





^^Thicknesses also suitable for A.S.M.E. Code consiruccion for working pressures indkaced. 








VI 



.v^L< 




The size of Whitlotk Type K Storage Heaicr re- 
quired for different t>pes of buildings cao be 
determined from Table L as follows: 

Hourly healing capacity — Hourly requirement 
X Hourly heating capacity factor. 

Storage capacity =: Hourly heating capacity x 
Storage capacity factor. 

Reference to Tables A to D will show correct size of 
shell and heating section at once. 

EXAMPLE: 

To illustrate the above method of selecting the 
proper hearer, take the hot water requirements of a 
small hotel. 



Privace lavacorf« 
Public laviinories 
Bafhcubs 

Kitchen sink^ 
Paniry sinks 
Showers 
Slop sinks 



100 ^ 2gaReach lOOpaU per hr 
10^8 ^als. each 80 gaJs. per hr 
o @ 20|sajs.each K5(X)gah. per hr 

2 @ :jO gaJs, each 100 gdh. per hr, 

3 (§ 20fiais, each 60gjU per hr 
2^ lOgaU.each JO^aU- perhr. 

24® 5gals, each 1,800 gab. per hr 
S @ 30 gals, each 2-10 gah, per hr. 



4.000 gaK per hr. 



Maximum hourl> 

requiremenrs I coral t 

HouH) heating capacir, equaU 4.000 multiplied by 25^^ 
(hourly heatmg capadn. factor} or 1,000 ^L per hour' 

Siorage capacit> equaU 1,000 multiplied by 80'V isiorace 
capacio iactor) or 800 gal. J " f tsiorage 



Shell »fe for »00 gal, No. 16 f 42 x 144 inj. Hcatinft 
section of 1,000 gti. capacity Ji No, HH. Heater retiLJired 
» Whitlock Type K No. l6Hli (or No. J6V HV15 
venical t 

STEAM REQUIRED TO HEAT WATER 

The amount of steam per hour required to heat a 
given quancjt)' of water through any temperacure 
range and with any steam pressure can he determined 
from the following formula: 

Gallons per Hour X 8.53 
X Degrees Rise 



UienrHeiTo-f S<«m =P^""*'* *>' ^'""^ P^' h^"'- 

HXAMPLE: Required the amounf of tteam at 50 lb*, preifure 
to heat 10.000 G.P.H, from 40 to 180". 
10,000 X a,33 X 140 



911 



= 12,S0] \bs. tteam per hour. 



TABLE M ^ Lafent Heot of Steam 



^rr»ni Prtuure. Ibi. gtgt O 5 10 J S :o 30 35 40 

LnwnfHMrfB.ru.).... 9^0 960 952 945 939 928 924 910 



Src4m Pfetturc. Ibi,^^ 4's $0 55 fio 65 70 75 80 
Ijicnt H«i (Bru.) 915 9M 90S 904 901 898 893 89t 



Sicaoi Prcvurc, 

lb» gage 85 *)0 95 

Urc!(ir Hrii [B.r.u.) BBS S*tft 8s\ 



100 
SBO 



J 05 



110 



115 

872 



120 

B70 



125 
868 




t 



m, 



.'i 




TABUl-^Hot Water Fixture Capacity for Various Types of Buildings 

Gallons of 180=F. Woter per Hour per Fixture 





Hourly hearing capacity factor 



Siorage capacicj' factor 



( 



10 




The heating capaciiies of standard Whidock Type 
K heating elements listed on Pages 6 and 7 are based 
on heating the indicated flow rates from 40^ to 180^F, 
when using steam at atmospheric pressure. In actual 
practice, however, conditions such as steam pressure, 
initial and final temperature may vary considerably 
from these standards. In order to compensate for 
these variables we list below suitable Conversion 
Factors which are generally adequate for installations 
where the ratio of hourly heating capacity to storage 
capacity does not exceed approximately 4 to 1. 

To apply these factors locate the appropriate steam 
pressure table, start at the top of this table with 



the proper initial water temperature, and move down 
that column to the required outlet water temperature 
indicated in the vertical columns to the left. The 
factors thus obtained, when multiplied by the stan- 
dard ratings on Pages 6 and 7, give ratings for the 
required conditions. Typical examples of the use 
of the tables may be helpful: 

Example No, L lletermine capac:jty of H'l5 heating ele- 
mern when healing waier from 50^ to 150'F. with steam 
di 25 lbs. ^ge. Using ihe tables as initicated above we 
arrive at a facior of 2.8^. With the standard rating of an 
H-13 heating elenieni LOGO G.P-H.. we mulriply 1,000 x 
2.87 which gives a rating of 2.870 G.P.H. for the required 
conditions. 

Example No. 2. Determine standard heating element re- 
quired to heat 2,400 G.P.H. water from dO' to ISO F. when 
supplied with 40 lbs. gage steam- Again determining the 
conversion factor as above we arrive at 2.42. Now dividing: 
2,400 ^ 2-42 equals 091 G-P-H- (standard racing K An 
H-lj\ heating element with a standard I.OOO G-P.H. rating 
is satisfactory- 




TABLE N — Conversion Factors 




STEAM rnCSSURL 





s 


10 


IS 


20 




iNtTlAt TEHV. 


40 


10 


*0 

5-53 

3.36 
2.26 
I.S8 
1.57 
1.08 


40 


90 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


50 


60 


40 


SO 


60 




riNAL TtM»; 

too 

130 

140 


3.93 
2.69 
ISA 
1.65 
1 41 
1.00 


4,57 
2-9fl 
2.08 

1-76 
1.48 
1,04 


4.41 
3-05 
2.23 
1.92 
1.66 
1-23 
1.05 
0,88 


5 12 
3.5S 
2,41 
2.05 
1.76 
1.29 
1,09 
0.906 


6 22 
3.83 
2,61 
2-20 
1.87 
1-34 
1-13 
0.934 


4.81 
335 
2.47 
2.15 
1.87 
1 42 
1 23 
1.06 


5,58 

5^72 
2.67 
2.29 
1.99 
1.48 
1.28 
1 09 


6.83 
4.23 
2 91 
2.47 

2-n 

1,56 

1.33 
1 14 


5,14 

3.61 
268 

2,33 

2.05 
[58 

1.38 


6.04 
4.02 
2-89 
2-50 
2.17 
1.65 
1.44 
1.25 


7.34 
4.56 

3.16 
2,70 
2,27 
1 73 
1 51 
1 30 


5.47 
3-85 
2,87 
2.51 
2-21 
1,72 
1.52 
I 34 


6.42 
4,30 
3.12 
2,69 
2.55 
1,80 
1.58 
1.39 


7.B2 
4-89 
3-41 
2,91 
2-51 
1-90 
1,66 
t.44 




UO 
110 
190 
2CH> 





5TCAM PftCSSUftt, 
LBS. OAOE 


25 


30 


40 


SO 


60 




INITIAL TtMF. .. . . 


40 


50 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


SO 


to 




FINAL TtMP; 


































100 


5.75 


6.76 


8.25 


6.03 


7,06 


8.64 


6.53 


7,66 


9.42 


6,09 


8.24 


10,08 


7.40 


8.77 


10,73 




110 


4.08 


4.54 


5.17 


4.26 


4-78 


543 


4.63 


5-18 


5,90 


4,98 


5,58 


6.38 


5.50 


5.93 


6.7e 




140 


J.06 


330 


3.62 


3.20 


3.48 


3-S2 


3.50 


3-81 


4.20 


3,78 


4,12 


4.52 


4,02 


4.37 


481 




1S0 


2 67 


2,87 


3.10 


2.81 


3.02 


3.28 


3,09 


3.52 


3-59 


3.34 


3.59 


3.89 


3.55 


3.82 


4.P 




160 


2.36 


2-50 


2.68 


2.49 


2.64 


2.83 


2.73 


2.91 


3.13 


2-96 


3.17 


3.40 


3.16 


3,37 


3 63 




ISO 


1.85' 


1 94 


2,04 


1.96 


2.06 


2-17 


2,17 


2.28 


2.42 


2-57 


2-50 


2,64 


2,51 


2.68 


2.83 




1«0 


I.G4^ 


1-71 


1.79 


1.74 


1-82 


1,91 


1 95 


2.04 


2.14 


2.13 


2-23 


235 


2,29 


2-39 


2,53 




aoo 


1 45 


1.51 


1-57 


1,55 


1.61 


1.68 


1.74 


1.81 


1,90 


1,92 


2.00 


2.09 


2.06 


2.15 


2 27 





STEAM PHSSUnr 
LBS. CAGE 


70 


80 


90 


100/ 


125 

. 




INHIAl TIMP- 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


50 


60 


40 


SO 


60 


40 


SO 


60 




FINAl TIMP: 


































100 


7.84 


9.28 


11-50 


8,25 


9.74 


11.80 


8-60 


10.14 


12-44 


9,00 


10.61 


13.00 


9,84 


11,71 


15.23 




120 


562 


6.30 


7,19 


5.91 


6.65 


7.58 


6.17 


6.94 


7.91 


6.46 


7,28 


8,33 


7.16 


8.05 


9.16 




140 


4,2t> 


4.64 


5^3 


4.51 


4,90 


5-42 


4.72 


5.16 


5,66 


4.95 


5,40 


5-97 


5.47 


5.98 


6.60 




ISO 


3.78 


4.08 


4,45 


4.00 


4-31 


4.69 


4-17 


4,52 


4.92 


436 


4.75 


5-16 


4.87 


5.27 


5.75 




UO 


3 36 


3.60 


3.88 


357 


389 


4.12 


3.73 


4.00 


4.31 


393 


4,20 


4.55 


4-37 


4-67 


5-05 




110 


2,71 


2.86 


3,04 


2.88 


3.04 


523 


3.02 


3.20 


3,39 


3.19- 


337 


3.58 


3.55 


576 


4.00 




1V0 


2.45 


2-57 


2,71 


2.60 


2.74 


2.89 


2,75 


2.89 


3.05 


2.86 


303 


3.20 


3.23 


339 


3-59 




300 


2.21 


2,32 


2.42 


236 


2.47 


2.59 


2.46 


2.61 


2,73 


2 6^ 


7 74 


3.90 


2 95 


3-08 


3-25 





n 





Whitlock Type K Coadensate Coolers are de- 
signed lo cool rerurns from steam heating sysiems 
and sieam-actuaied equipment, thus partially or 
completely heating the required service water. The 
condensate passes through the heating element, giv- 
ing up its hear to the water in the shell. Specifically, 
the condensate cooler 

( 1 ) effects a considerable fuel saving where the 
condensate would otherwise be dumped to 
waste or would flash upon its introduction to 
a receiver, 

(2) cools condensate to a temperature at which 
it may be returned to the receiver or dumped 
to waste. In many cities local ordinances for- 
bid the discharge of hot wastes to the sewer. 

The Type K Condensate Cooler can be furnished 
in a standard single element design^ with the con- 
densate handling all of the heating load, or in a com- 
bination element design, as explained on Page 3, 
where the condensate as the primary heat source is 
augmented by live steam as required. 

The storage type of condensate cooler is preferable 
to the instantaneous type when the demand for hot 
water is intermittent. 

The capacitj table to be found on this page pro- 
vides full data for the selection of the suitable heating 
element size for the required installation. Physical 
dimensions for these heating elements will be found 
on pages 6 and 7, To determine the appropriate 
storage healer shell size refer to sizing data on Page 



10. The capacity table below expresses the condensa- 
tion in terms of pounds per hour and E.D.R. (Equiva- 
lent Direct Radiation^square feet). Economically it 
is reasonable to design the installation to recover as 
much heat as is possible from the condensate, and 
ratings are designated for three condensate outlet 
temperatures. 

TABLE P - Capacity of Whitlock 
Condensation Cooling Sections 

(For be«t economy select cooler large enough to evtrad 
most of the waste heot-} 





Equiva- 
lenr 


Cooling 
Coiiden53iion 


Cooling 
Condeniarron 


Coo tine 
CondensDiion 
200^-89" 
while heat- 
ing three 
cimei the 


Sq, ft. 


200-'l25 = 
while heat- 


200^-100^ 
wbile heat- 


radia- 


5 anon H 


ing' an equal 


ing rwjce ihe 


CI on 


lbs. 


imounf of 


umouni of 






per hr. 


service 


service 


icrvice 






waitr. 


water. 


water. 
50'.87- 






50''12^^ 


SO'-lOO^ 


1.000 


230 


H-0 


HO 


H-0 


LSOO 


J75 


C HI 


t HI 


t H-1 


2.000 


500 


^ H'J 


-= H-2 


=f H-2 


:.50o 


62^ 


^^ H-2 


^^ H-3 
V H J 


'^ H-< 


3.0OO 


"50 


=i H-3 

1= H-3 


= H-4 


V^OO 


875 


M^ H-5 


^r:: H-5 


■i.nno 


1,000 


^ * H-4 


^ * H-5 


^ is H-6 


ShOOO 


1,250 


COi H^ 
Z^ H-8 - 


S- H-' 


^^ H-7 


6.000 


1,500 


-2£ H-fl 


<£= H-8 


7,000 


LT50 


(0= Hy 

. '^ HIO 


Cflz H-10 
y H'H 


8.000 


2.000 


10.000 


2.500 


^:!^. HIO 
•%.. H 12 


1^ HI2 


-^^ H-13 


12.500 


3tI25 


%. HI4 
H* H-14 


■i.. H-14 
r-^ H-15 


H,000 


iJ50 


I7.S00 


4.275 


Ql H-14 


i; H-15 


ok H-16 

"£ H-K 


:o.oor* 


5.000 


"£ H-16 


: 5,000 


6,250 


£H H-lf. 


, tH H-18 


EH H'I8 
t H-i9 

cc H-20 


30.000 


7,500 


t H-17 


^ H09 


^5,000 


8750 


K n 18 


OS H-:o 


40,000 


10.000 


H 10 


H^21 


H-22 



rif. 10. InsuLlaiion of G>ndea&acion Cooler utilising condcn 
sate from storage heacer and building hcsiing system 



Hg, IK In&taila(ion of Type K Heater wiih combined healing 
and condensauon cooling &ecuon — haodling condensation from 
heating section only 



^Atn mjtr v^ivt 



nvflHOvrri 




HUTHO 

<010 WATH |»4tr 







VMlOll 



■W*«| 



Kxaut 



««0« cm LM( 

■MJlKXt 



■^ JB ^, a n< 



ftOOtllvK 



UCIO. TD Vuitf _-^ 




( ./^ A 1 



m 



^^. 



12 



^ 



SUBMERGED 
HEATERS 



» 




Fig< \7. Jn&ialUiion of Submerged Storage Heaief 



» 



With ihe Whiilock Submerged Type K Heater the 
heating eJemenc is placed below the water line of the 
boiler. Boiler water beats ihe domestic service supply 
with a relatively small but steady transfer of heat 
from boiler water to domestic supply. The removal 
of heat from the boiler in this manner, since the 
amount is relatively small and is steady, does not 
appreciably reduce the steaming capacicj- of the 
boiler. 

Advantages include: 

1, Lower head room required which does away 

with the necessity of additional excavation, 
2* Condensation return troubles eliminated. 

3, Hoc water available at all hours. 

4. Automatic temperature control usually not 
necessary. 

Typical below -the- water line ratings for standard 
Type K heating elements are included in the table 
at the right. 



TABLE Q 
Gallons Per Hour Rotings 



BOILER WA.TER 
TEMPERATURE 


2T2"F- 


200' F. 


180 F. 


SERVICE WATER 


40 "1 SO^- 


40°^ 50=- 


40 = - 


50 = - 


TEMPCRATURE RANGE 


i4o^r, iso'p. 

1 


140 "F. )50°f. 


140' F. 


150'F. 


WHITLOCK HEATIh4G 














ELEMENT SIZE 














H-0 


72 


65 


64 


57 


49 


41 


H-1 


108 


97 


95 


84 


""3 


62 


H-2 


144 


130 


127 


113 


98 


83 


H.3 


180 


162 


158 


141 


122 


roi 


H-4 


1 1 - 


195 


191 


l"0 


u-- 


124 


H,«l 


'52 


227 


222 


198 


171 


145 
166 


H-6 


289 


260 


255 


226 


196 


H-7 


361 


325 


318 


2S2 


245 


207 


H-8 .__ . _. . 


390 


551 


343 


505 


265 


224 


M.Q 


433 


590 


382 


33y 


294 


245 


H-10 


505 


455 


445 


396 


343 


290 


U.11 


577 


520 


509 


452 


392 


332 
373 


H-1 2 


650 


585 


572 


508 


441 


H-n 


^22 


650 


637 


566 


48S 


414 


H-14 . ^^ „,™„,.,„. 


903 


812 


794 


707 


612 


5111 


H-IS 


10&2 


975 


955 


84S 


735 


622 



13 



WHITLOCK 

SALES & SERVICE 



PRINCIPAL CITIES 




Distritt Offices: 

BOSTON. MASS 
CHICAGO. III. 
DfTPOlT. MJCH. 
HAPTFOPD. CONN. 
NEW YOPK, M ¥ 
PHlLAO£LPri?A, PA. 

AMARUIO. TEXAS 
ATLANTA. GA. 
BALTIMORE. MD. 
&IPMtNGHAM. AU. 
BUfFAlO N. T 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 
CLEVEIANO OHIO 
DALLAS, TEXAS 



DE5 MOINES. IOWA 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

js:djanapous, ind 
kansas city, mo. 
knoxvihe. tenn. 
los angeles, calif, 
lubbock. texas 
memphis, tenn, 
milwaukee. wis 
nashvtlle, tenn. 
new haven, conn, 
new orleans, la. 

PfnSBUHCH, PA 
PORTLAND. OREGON 
PROVIDENCE. R. I. 
RICHMOND, VA. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y, 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 
SAN FRANCESCO, CALIF 
SAN JOSE, CALIF 
SEATTLE, WASH 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
ST LOUtS, MO. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
SYRACUSE. N, y. 

Ageols Aljoln; 

aUENOS AIRES. ARGENTINA, S, A 
CARACAS. VENEZUELA S A 
HONOLULU, HAWAII 
MEXfCO CITY. MEXICO 
MONTEVIDEO, URUGUAY S A 
MONTREAL. QUE, CANADA 
SAN JUAN. PUERTO RICO 
TORONTO. CANADA 



Monulocfvrers *or Canada 
DARUNG BROTHERS, LIMITED - ,40 PR,N« ST. - MONTREAL, P. Q, 



2m J F G ^ M 



S, A. 



The WHITLOCK 

MANUFACTURING CO. 
HAHTfORD 10, CONN. 



^ 







RegulatorSf Etc. 



Heating and 



Ventilating 




FULTON SYLPHON DIVISION 

Robertshaw-Fulton Controls Co. 
KNOXVILLE 4, TENNESSEE 



jdU 



I 



SYLPHON REGULATOR TYPES 




VAPOR PRESSURE TYPE 



Regulators Nos. 885. 88fi. 945. 998-A and 999 aeriea de- 
scribed in this catalog are vapor pressure type and are oper- 
ated by power developed from vaporization of a liquid von- 
tained in the bulb. The liquid boils at !ou- temperature and 
gives off vapor when bulb is subjected to heat, thereby cre- 
ating pressure within the bulb. Since end of the capillary 
tube is always below liQuid surface in the bulb> the vapor 
pressure forces liquid out of bulb, through connecting tubing 
into bellows chamber to move the valve stem in accordance 
with temperature changes at the bulb. 

This familiar type regulator is usable over a wide spread 
of ranges and for either heating or cooling applications when 
equipped with proper type valve and bulb. Common appli- 
cations are: storage water heaters, fuel oil preheaters, brine 
cooled refrigerators, etc. 



HOT CHAMBER TYPE 

Temperature regulators listed in this catalog other than 
those mentioned at left are "hot chamber type" as illustrated 
below. Steam surrounds the bellows or hot chamber even 
when valve is closed — keeping the chamber constantly hot. 
The bulb is completely filled with a volatile liquid and con- 
necting tubing is partly filled when bulb is cool. When bulb 
is subjected to heat, this liquid expands and moves into hot 
chamber where it flashes into vapor. This vapor builds up 
pressure to move the valve poppet in accordance with tem- 
perature changes at the buln. When temperature at bulb 
drops, the vapor condenses and cycle of operation is reversed. 

The advantages of this type of regulator are: narrow pro- 
portional band, dial type adjustment, packless valve, com- 
pact construction, etc. Particularly suitable for heating and 
ventilating control applications. For steam service only. 




Typical applications of MODULATING controls 



*'T 

I 



.,JINIt||f||||lMl 



5] 



; 



HEi:^ 



■ S 



- *.--»MFl- 



9. '> 




tss»- 




HEATING 

(Radiators and Convectors) 

(A) No. 885— Automatic radiator valve located on steam 
inlet to a standing radiator. For two-pipe steam system 
(under certain conditions suitable for not water heating 
systemK No. 885 described on page 8. 

(B) Shows No. 895 controlling concealed cast iron radiator. 
For two-pipe steam system only. For description of valves, 
see page 8. 

(C) No. 895— Automatic radiator valve located on steam 

inlet to a convecior. 

CD} No. 522-A— Installed on hot water convector. See 

description of regulator on page 7. 



HEATING 
(Wall Radiators} 

(A) No, 7— Self-operated regulator with adjustable room 
thermostat T controlling steam suppiv to a wall type 
radiator. See page 6 for description of regulator. 

iB) No. 891— Electric, low-voltage, on-ofT type regulator 
controing steam supply to finned pipe wall radiator. Valve 
controlled by wall thermostat T" located at remote point 
this type control preferred to modulating tvpe iNo. 7, etc ) 
for long runs of heating surface or wide heating "zone" or 
where installation of armored tubing of No. 7 would be 
dimcult. See page 8 for description. 





HEATING AND VENTILATING CONTROLS 



ON pages 2 to 5. inclitsive, are shown some of the most 
cojiimon applications of Fulton Sylphon controls for heating 
and ventilating systems. These simple drawings and prin- 
apies depicted w}\\ sugge.-^t other applications or arrangements 
to meet specific re*iuirement.s. 

The controls recommended on the application drawings, 
as well a-s other products applicable to llie heating and ven- 
tilaling field, are described brietiy on the following pages of 
thi? condensed catalog. Complete information on any item 
cataloged will be supplied promptly by our representative in 
your ncinity and he will gladly assist in the solution of any 
control problem— his name and address available on request. 

Notes on System Design 

Careful allention to the following points uill contribute 
much to the success of the control installation: 



(a) Good air diffusion without blasts at points of delivery 
is essential. 

(hi Proper thermostat location. Room thermostats should 
be located at points of good air movement and repre- 
sentative space temperatures. They should not be sub- 
jected to "false" heat or cold exposure. 

Duct thermostats should be located at point of mean 
duct temperature and not close to heating coil face. 

(c) Coils and fans should be selected and arranged to mini- 
mize temperature stratification in ducts and thus avoid 
false temperatures on discharge control thermostats. 

(d) Effective drainage of condensate, which is essential to 
good temperature control, must be provided- 
Other instructions relating to the installation and operation 

of the regulator are contained fn instruction sheet supplied 
with each regulator. 



OTHER ITEMS IN THIS CONDENSED CATALOG 



In addition to the controls for heating and ventilating 
systems, the fullo^^^ng products are briefly described in this 
condensed catalog: Controls for fuel oil heaters^ storage 
water heaters, etc. (regulators Nos, 99S-A and 999 serie^i): 

dryer or duct control ;.Nos. 945 and 999 -^erie^ with fin type 
bulb); pressure regulation (Nos. 991. 99:^); safety regulators 



for oil fired boilers, furnaces, etc. (Nor, 955, 955-HKi; ex- 
pansion joints for risers carrj'^ing steam or water (Nos- 110-M, 
Ill-M^; expansion joint for hot water lines such as used for 
baseboard radiation, etc. <96066^ 

For a listing of other Fulton Sylphon products, see page 1 1. 




Simple . . . Setf'Operated • . . Accurate . . . BasUy Installed . . . Long Lasting 



HEATING 

(Unit Heaters) 

(A) No- 7 — Self-operated regulator with adjustable room 
thermostat *'T" controlling steam supply to a unit heater. 
For description of regulalor. see page 6. 

iBi No. 9"JS-HI- Self-operated regulator controlling steam 
supply to a unit heater. Adjustable thermostat "A" located 
behind fan in path of air entering heater. Fan operates 
continuously to distribute heat. For description of regulator, 
see page 6. 

TneHe regulators are modulating /gradual i in action. 
Where high velocity air si^tream from heater at low temperature 
(valve nearly closed) would be objectionable, a strap-on 
thermostat or other means should be used to stop the fan 
■Ahen steam supply is shut oil by the regulator. 



HEATING 

tHof Water or Radiant) 

Nos. 928-PL 9:iS-Ql, yj?^-Sl, 9J«-T! Provides contrr)! of 
hot water or radiant panel heating system using a steam 
c*>nvertor for primary heal source. Adjustable liquid con^ 
trol thermostat "B" in healed water leaving converter. 
Weather compensating bulb "C" located in outdoor air. 
Tompensated to give ri.'jing water control temperatures with 
falling weather temperatures in accordance with system 
design characteristics. See description, page 6. 

No. 9606fi Expansion Joint- Packless joint designed to 
absorb expansion of radiant heating system piping. See 
description on page 10. 





-^^ 




^' 


1 


^ ^ 


^ 










. 










K 




B*- 


r 






— 




■ve 


■■ — ^ . 


rS- 




-j-^ 


hi 








' 1 ritje 






HOT mr£js 









^Tt'iZ' . T^*^ 



i¥AT£f>ffiTURN 






,-- — -- -_.— . ..■ 



CONveOTQR 



r—^rRAf> 



FULTON 



TEMPERaTUl 
CONTROL 



W t V t T? it 



,£i^ 



JrTT7 1 1 1 



-?^ 



n 




joafj 



'^Qb 



r 



I 



M>r(ALni>^rt) 



r-r-i-f-p-n 



1 T ] ! r 



I f*^i« -t"? 



HCJ^Tffi 



7 ^N0Se9-C7IALT€/ff**rE> 



™i"5« 4'* 




**£Ar€f 



APPLICATIONS 




HEATING 

(Zone Contro/J 
No 891— Provides .steam supply control to ^aoh zftne or 
area having same exposure and healing characlenstics 
Electric valve on common supply line to the zone and operated 

by wall thermostat "T" located in controlled apace. See 

'^DrjTwine "B" shows zon^ control from a wall thermostat 
eovernine a number of radiators indivulually equipped with 
No 891 regulator. For description of regulator, see page 8. 



HEATING AND VENTILATING 

fCenfro/ Fan System, low % ^'"©5^ ^'^^^ 
No. 928-Hl— Maintains space temperature where steam 

coil in duct system is the primary source of heat and where a 
small per cent of fresh air is used with recirculation. Ad- 
justable thermostat "A" located in return air. Self -ope rated. 
modulating tvpe regulator, described on page 6. 

Alternate No. 7— The No, 7 regulator would be used for 
this application if it is desired to control from a room ther- 
mostat "T/^ For description of No. 7 regulator, see page 6. 



» 



HEATING AND VENTILATING 

fCenfro/ ?Qn System, High % Fresh Air) 

No. 889-C — Dual valve regulator used to modulate steam 
supply to heater coil. Main supply port modulated by ad- 
justable thermostat "A.'' Secondary port controlled by 
adjustable thermostat '3" and weather compensating bulb 
"C." Bulb "B" functions to maintain desired "low limit" 
control in event main control becomes satisfied and closes. 
"Low limit*' control may be provided for constant delivery 
temperature fload droop compensation) suitable (or most 
systems or for rising discharge control temperatures as 
weather temperatures fall {rise compensation [. See page 7, 

Alternate No. 889-C7— Main supply port modulated by 
adjustable room thermostat "T'* located in controlled space. 
Otherwise, same as No. 889-C application. 





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HEATING AND VENTILATING 

(Unif Conditioners) 

(A) No, 889-C — Dual valve regulator used to modulate 
steam supply to heater coil. Main supply port modulated 
by adjustable thermostat "A." Secondary port controlled 
by adjustable thermostat "B"* and weather compensating 
bulb "C." Bulb *"B"' functions to maintain desired "low 
limit" control in event main control becomes satisfied and 
closes, "Low limit" control may be provided for constant 
delivery temperatures (load droop compensation) suitable 
for most systems or for rising discharge control temperatures 
as weather temperatures fall (rise compensation). See 
page 7. 

iB^ No- 928-Hl Modulates steam supplv to healer- Ther- 
mostat "A" responsive to space temperature. For descrip- 
tion of regulator, see page 6. 



APPLICATIONS 




HEATING AND VENTILATING 

(Split System. High % Fresh Air) 
No, 885 or 895-^ This system involves a duct ventilallne 
^supply and radiators. conve(!tors or other similar primary heat 
sounds: and, prevents cold drafts due lo high percentaee 
fres^i air mtake. No. 885 thermostatic radiator vahe i. here 
used ror standing radiators and No. S95 for convector^, con- 
cealed radiators, etc. These valves modulate the steam 
suppjy to each heal source to indiWdualize space temperature 
coniroh For descnption of these valves, ?,ee page 8. 
y -*^; ^r-^'u'^ *^" tempering heater, maintains desirei "low 
limit discharge temperature by modulating ^team i^upplv 
under control of adjustable thermostat "B"' and wealher 
compensating bulb "C " For description of regulator, see 
page i. 




HEATING AND VENTILATING 

(Split System. High % Fresh Air) 

No. 7— Used on reheatersin individual zone^ and modulates 
sieam supply to heater coil by means of adju.stable thermo- 
stat "T" located in controlled space. For description of 
regulator, see page 6. 

^ ^J*>' 9^S-Ml -On tempering heater- maintain^ desire:! 
"low limit" discharge temperature bv modulating steam 
supply under control of adjustable thermostat "B" and 
weather compensating bulb "C," "Low limit^" control mav 
be prov-ided for constant delivery temperatures iload drno'p 
compensation J or for rising discharge control temperatures 
as weather temperatures fall irise compensationj. For 
description of regulator, see page 7. 



VENTILATING 

(Central Fan System, 1 00% Fresh Air) 

No. d28-Ml--Modulates steam supply to duct heater coil 
by means of adjustable thermostat "B" and weather com- 
pensating bulb "C>" For constant delivery temperatures 
'required by most systems), the weather compensation is for 
load droop only. For systems requiring a rising discharge 
temperature with falling weather temperatures, rising com- 
pensation of the instrument is required. For description of 
regulator, see page 7. 




VENTILATING 

(Unit Ventihtors, 1 00 % Fresh Air) 

No, 928-Ml Modulates ^tearn -supply to heater coil in 
unit type ventilator used to supply industrial ventilation or 
make-up for air being exhausted. Control thermostat "B" 
located in discharged air and compensating bulb in fresh air 
intake. 

For constant delivery temperatures ^required by most 
systemsi, the weather compensation is for load droop only. 
For sy-tems requiring a rising discharge temperature ^lilh 
falling weather temperatures, rising compen^iation of the 
instrument is required. For description of regulator, see 
page 7, 



FULTON 



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TEMPERATURE 
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TEMPERATURE REGULATORS 




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Nos. 7, 7-2, 7-3 , ^. -r 

Temperature Regulators for Aif and Oases 

Sturdy, seU-powereH temperature reeulalors for conlrollSng; 
steam supply to unit heaters, wall or ce^hng type raCator. 
^uct control etc. where operating temperatures do not 

'"'^ese reeulalors differ principally in capacity and pressure 
limits Nos, T-2 and T-3 are suitable for steam pressures up 
to 75 lbs.: No, 7. up to 15 lbs. Packless construcnon ^ 

Valve sizes: No. 1. I2' to 4\ mclusjye: No. 7-i H to 
1]/ inclusive: No. 7-3. 1' to Ih - inclusive. Supplied 
wifh any specified 20' range between 35 F. minimum and 
170' F. maximum. 25-ft. length connecting tubing between 
thermostat and valve. 



Nos. 928-Dl , 928-El , 928-Fl , 928-Gl 

Temperature Regulators (or Liquids 

Suitable for low pre^isure steam cuntrol such as hot water 
storage heaters, etc., where accurate temperature control 
is essential and where operating temperatures do not exceed 

170 F, 

These regulators differ principally in capacity and pressure 
limits. Nos, 928-DI and S'lS-El are suitable for steam pres- 
sures up to 15 pj^ig: Nos. 928-Fl, 928-Gl. up to 75 psig. 

Valve sizes: No. 92S-D1. U" to 1 ?■>'", inclusive: No. 
92&-E1, 2- to 4". inclusive; No. 928-Fl, T lo I', inclusive: 
No, 928-Gl» 1" to I'o"- inclusive. Supplied with any speci- 
fied 60^ temperature' range between 35 F, minimum and 
170° F. maximum. 10-ft. length tubing between bulb and 
valve- 



Nos, 928-P1, 928-Ql, 928-Sl, 928-Tl 
Regulators for Space Heating Systems 

Outdoor compensated liquid coniruls lor steam-liquiil 
convertors for hot water or liquid space heating system?. 
Suitable for temperatures up to 170' F. 

These regulators dilTer principally in capacity and pre.^sure 
limits. Nos. 928-Sl and 928^T1 are suitable for steam 
pressures up to 75 lbs,: Nos. 928-Pl and 92K-Q1. up to 15 
lbs. Packless construction. 

Valve sizas: 928-Pl, } ->" to 1 H>", inclusive; 928-Ql. 2* 
tn 4"Jnclusive:928-Sl,'^'tol",incl[]^ivp:92S-TK 1" (o I V-" 
inclusive. Adjustable over any specilied 60 temperature 
range between 35" F. minimum and 170" F. maximum. 
Connecting tubing lengths: adjustable bulb to valve, 10 ft.; 
compensating bulb to valve. 25 ft. 



Nos. 928^H1 , 928-J1 , 928-Kl , 928-L1 
Temperature Regulators for Air and Gases 

Especially suited to control of air temperature in ducts, 
drying machines, etc., where temperatures do not exceed 170° 
F, Bulb constructed of coiled copper tubing. Packless valve; 
dial-type adjustment; sensitive operation. 

These regulators differ principally in capacity and pressure 
bmils. Nos, 928-Hl and 928-Jl are suitable for steam 
pressures up to 15 psig: Nos. 928-Kl. 928-Ll, 75 psig. 
«.»y^r\'^,^^^L ^"^ 928-Hl. !-/ to lU-p inclusive: No. 
v'^ilrr i'^V: ^"^^';^ve; No, 928-Kl, !■>- to 1", indumve: 
?^i^^^'^ ^^ ^'-' ' *"^'l"^»ve. Supplied with any apeci- 
Ht^S temperature range between 35^ F. minimum and 
WO t. maximum. IS-ft, length tubing between bulb and 
valve. 



» 



TEMPERATURE REGULATORS 




Nos. 928-Ml,928-Nl 

Temperature Rcsulalors for Air and Gases 

Single valvG regulator for moci^jJitlinK .-onlrol u( heaituv 
and v«fnti!ating systems. Main c-onlrol (jull> fwith niliu^l- 
menl) is compenaateii hy other bulb ^hown. Aiitomuli'-iilfv 
iiiljuats oantroj bulb lo prevent "drcu-p" where n con^tun'i 
discharge? Iemr>eratiire is desired or, \\h.-n ^peL'ifk'd provides 
a "nsiriK ihuractenstii" where a pruportionalely hinher 
control disi'harge temperature is desired. 

Suitable for steam pre.'^Miires up to 15 \bn. Packless con- 
struction. Sizes ^-2" to P/. inclusive, are desiiiriaTed as 
No, 92«-Ml, larger size.^ as 912S-N1. Connecting tube 
lengths; adjustable bulb to valv■t^ 15 ft.; cttrnpenaating bulb 
to valve. 10 ft. Regulator can be supplied with compen* 
sating bulb for temperaturp^d down to ir F, and with control 
bulb for any 6f)° range up to 170 F. 



No. 889-C 

Temperature Regulator for Air and Gases 

Modulating, dual fiinclion regulator for ronln^l of duct 
bi-ating and ventdaiing systems. Twii indepj-ndenl valves 
JM single body. Upper valve equipped with adjustable con- 
trol thermostat. Lower valve eouipped with adjustable 
Ihermoatat with eompenaatinn which automatically prevent.^ 
"Mronp" where constant discharge temperature is desired or. 
when sppcib^d, provides "rising characteristic" when pro- 
p<irtitinatc*ly higher control discharge temperatur*- \a desired. 



tor steam pressures up to ]^ jbs. Valve si/en: ^ 



to 




Pi , inclusive. Tube lengths: ihermontat to upper valve, 
lift-ft,; adjustable thermostat to bwf?r valve, 15-ft,: compen- 
sating bulb to lower valve, 10-fl. Adjustable over any speci- 
Jied 20 " range between 35^ F. minimum and 170° F. maximum. 





•' '^ 




No- 889-C7 

Temperature Regulator For Air and Gases 

Modulating duid-function regulator for control of duct 
beating and ventilating systems. Two independent valvps 
in single body. Upper valve governed by a room tliermo.'iiat, 
Lower valve e*iuippe'l with adji^slablc ihermo'-tul with com- 
penf^ation which autiimattcally prevents "droop" where con- 
stant discharge temperature is desired or, when specified, 
provides ''rising characteristic" where proportionately higher 
control discharge temperature is desired. 

For steam pressures up lo 15 lbs. Valve sizf";: ^.| " to 1 ' _>', 
incluf^ive. Tube lengths: room thermostat to upper valve, 
^5-ft.; adjustable thermostat to lower valve, 15-ft,; compen- 
sating bulb to lower valve. 10-ft. Room thermostat and 
lower valve thermostat adjustable over any specified 20" 
range between 35^ F. minimum and 170 F. maximum. 




Nos. 522-Al,522-A2 

Regulators For Hot Water Heating Systems 

Sfrnsitive. sturdy, self-powered. Providew positive, accu- 
rate an<i reliable control of hot water Mow, ILsed on radiators 
or convectors to control room temneraturc Also applied 
to convectors where rebeating is used in coding system. Un 
certain types of year-round air conditioning systems, this 
regulalorcan be applied to heating surfaces of induction units 
where such units are used in place of radiators or convectors - 
serving to control room tempprature during holh heating and 
cooling Heason. 

No. 62i;-AI has plain nebular bulb rillustrale I). No. 
522-A2 has tinned tubular bulb. '2" packless valve Stand- 
ard temperature range 60" 80 F. Tube lengths: 4ft'. 



11' ^^f^u 




FULTON 



tempeiTature, 

vCONTROL 







AUTOMATIC RADIATOR 

VALVES AND 

TEMPERATURE REGULATORS 



Nos. 885, 886 
Automdtic Radiator Valves 

Pruvidea low coat control oi room temperature. Self- 
c?omained, aelf-powered. Requires no complirated wiring, 
piping or auxiliary equipment. Automatically controls 
_steam supply to exposed radiators of a two-pipe ateam sys- 
tem where pressures do not exceed 15 lbs. Under certain 
conditions suitable for hot-water heating systems. 

Packless construction. Brass valve body with union ends. 
Valve sizes: .'v* to 1 ^^"' inclusive. Adjustable range 
60''-— 75^ F. Can be set to operate at desired temperature 
by merely turning head of valve. Adjustment can be locked 
to prevent tampering. Typical installations shown on pages 
2 and 5. 



Nos. 895, 896 
Automatic Radiator Valves 

Stiitable for convector.s or enclosed radiators and for any 
two-pipe steam heating system where steam pressure does 
not exceed 15 lbs. Provider automatic, low-cost control of 
room temperature. Self-contained, self-powered- No com- 
plicated piping, wiring or auxiliary equipment required. 

Brass valve body with union ends. Valve sizes: '2* to 
1 ^ »''t inclusive. When installed, attractive adjustment 
knob only exposed part. No. 895 has angle type body. No, 
S96 has globe type body. 

Standard tubing lengths: adju.^tment to valve, 36'; bulb 
to valve. 48". Temperature range 40 90^ F. Knob ad- 
justment. By readjusting factory setting can be set to con- 
trol over any 50* range between 35^ and 130" F. 



Nos- 890, 891 

Electrically Operated Temperature Regulators 

Electric, low-voltage i24 volts). on-ofT type control for 
one- or two-pipe healing systems where steam supply pres- 
sure does not exceed 15 lbs. Used for either exposed or 
concealed radiators and unit heaters. For control of in- 
dividual rooms, zones, or entire buildings. Valve operates 
on 20-25 volts AC or DC. Packless construction. No. 
S90 available in sizes ^j" to 1 ' :/, inclusive, and has angle 
type bodyn No. 891 has globe type bodv and sizes range 
from ^2" to 4' with sizes 2" and larger having flanged ends. 

Valve controlled by a wall type thermostat such as de- 
scribed l>elow. Suitable transformers available. 

Preferred to modulating type (No. 7, etc.l for long runs 
of heating surface or wide heating "aone" which requires full- 
open or full-closed operation to get proper heat distribution. 



Room Thermostats 

No. 91T6G— On-off type thermostat for 20-25 volts AC 
and suitable for No. 890 and 891 valves in one- or two- 
pipe heating systems. Contacts close on increase of room 

temperature Will control up to ten valves. Temperature 
range 55 --S5°F. Silver lacquer finish. 

as No 91766~"'^ ""'^^^ set-back feature: otherwise, same 

No. 91743— Heat anticipating type. By making and 
breaking its contacts before the valve can fullv open or 
^ffo^; * i! \hermos at will provide a modulating or throttling 

effect. Not suitable for a one-pipe healing sv^em or service 
recitnring on-off control -for such service use No. 91766 

as n'o. 91743. ' "'^^ '^'"^^'^ ^^^^^''^^ otherwise, same 







TEMPERATURE REGULATORS 

AND 

PRESSURE REGULATORS 




Noi. 998-A 

For Fuel Oil Preheaters, Instantaneous Hesters, etc. 

Nu,39VA H*H'ommeiuUl where a \vule range of lemnera- 
ture a<ljLisiment h rettuireti. Used for fuel ^.m! preheaters 
tJciMIe am] can washers, in^tantaneou.^ type waier heaters 
pi'troleum heaters an^i ireaters and fur general induslrial 
l»rcioes,s applications. "Over-run" temperature feature— 
iiroierls regulator against damage in event temperature at 
bulb exceeds range of regulator. 

Valve sizes H' to l'^.', inclusive. Valve type: W to ^ii" 
type -C": ^o-, type 'A "; U' to I ' ,". tvpe "F. ' Tempem- 
ture ranges start at 45 F; end at 480 F, Adjustable over a 
range of approximately 80"^ F. Press-formed frame of stain- 
less steel. Bulb for liquids shown: for fin tvpe bulb for air 
description of valves, etc.» see page 10, 




Nos. 999-A, 999-B, 999-T 

For Hot Water Storage Heaters, etc. 

No. 999-A— Powerful, sturdily constructed. Pre^s-formed 
frame of stainless j^teel. Ideal for industrial proceiises anti 
other applications requiring accurate. depen<iable temperature 
control. "Over-run" temperature feature . , . protects regu- 
lator against damage in event temperature at bulb exceeds 
range of regulator. 

Valve sizes ^i" to i^i', inclusive. Valve type: li' to 
U\ type "C": ^r. type "A"; H' to 1' ,'. inclusive, type 
"F". Temperature ranges start at 40^ F.; end at 420^ F. 
40° or 60 range of adjustment. Bulb for liquids ^hown; see 
page 10 for bulb for air. de.scription of valves, etc. 

No. 999-B Same as No, 999-A except supplied in sizes 
2' to 4", inclusive. Type "F " valve, i No. 930 available in 
sizes 5" to 10"h inclusive-) " " 

No. 999-T- Same as Nos. 999-A or 999-B except No. 999-T 
illustrated I equipped with thermometer ^ — ■'-* 



No. 945 

Direct Connected Temperature Regulator For 
Liquids, Air or Gases 

No. 945 is used for controlling air temperature in ducts, 
dryers, etc., or for temperature control of liquids in open 
tanks, vats, etc. 

Valve sizes ii" to l^i*, inclusive. Valve type: K" to 
Jb'. type "C ■; 'o*. type "A": larger sizes, type "F". Tem- 
perature ranges start at 50' F.: end at 340' F. 40° range 
of a^ijustment. 

Thl,^ regulator is available with temperature ranges start- 
ing at minus 50 F. and above for control of refrigerating 
boxes, water coolers, etc. 



FULTON 



TEMPEfiiTU, 
" CONTROL 





Nos, 991, 992, Pressure Regulators 

Used as automatic pressure regulator for reducing from 
high to low pressure or to insure a constant pressure when 
fluctuating supply pressure is encountered- May also be 
used as "bellows motor" control valve in pneumatic or hy- 
draulic control jiyslems. 

All metal construction. Two-ply seamless metal Sylphon 
belh.ws pcjwer-element. Stainl*^ steel frame. Valve type; 
y^" to ^.', ivpe "C": ^/. (ype "A": larger sizes, type "F". 

No. 991 -Valve sizes W to Pj". inclusive^ Maximum 
initial pressure 150 lbs. Reduced pr&ssure 5 to 55 lbs. 

No. 992 Valve sizes H" to V, inclusive. Maximum 
initial pre'^sure 250 Iba. Reduced pressure ranges: 2 to 25 
Ib^.: 3 to 40 lbs. 

When equipped with proper valve, can be used a^ pressure 
relief valve /Regulators Nos, R-991. R-992) to protect other 
ei|uipment against excessive pressures by bleeding-olf or by- 
pasuEing medium involved. 





A 





FULTON 

Li j .1 



TEMPEfiATURE. 



CONTROL y 




VW01* IIAWLUI tlihia-i ■(tLDWI 







SAFETY REGULATORS 

AND 

EXPANSION JOINTS 



Nos. 955, 955^HK 

Safety Regulators for Oil Fired Boilers, 

Furnaces, etc. 

No. 956 is used to protect oil fired boilers or furnaces 
hv automatically shutting off oil supply when atomizing 
pressure fails or is reduced below requirt'd minimum. 

Complete information regarding tripping pressures, maxi- 
mum atomizing pressures, range of adjustment, etc.. §upplieH 
an rt'Quest. Sizp^ 'j" to 2'. type "C"^ valve; 2^^", type "L" 
valve. 

No. 955-HK is dual purpose regulator provules name pro- 
tection as No. 955 and in addition stops flow to burners in 
pvent fuel oil 'supply pres'^urc fails or if> reduced below the 
pfRdelermined mmimum. 




MU4T>#L« ^JtM.Elt a»V*nOW 
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lEHmRAHi 




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No. 110-M 

Packless Expansion Joint For Steam Lines 

The ideal means for absorbing e\pan^ion of heating risers. 
Packless cun^t ruction- Eliminates cumbersome loop con- 
struction and the costly job of repacking expansion members. 
May be installed either vertically or horizontally. 

Complete, factory assembled unit — ready to be installed. 
Two-ply seamless Monel Sylphon bellows lakes care of any 
movement of heating riser up to Wi"^ Iron body castings 
alloyed with nickel and chromium to reduce porosity- Size:^ 
54" to 3". inclusive. Working pressure limit: ?4''. I' and 
IK"— 100 lbs,: IH'— 60 lbs.; 2- and 2i^-— 50 lbs.; 3'— 
40 lbs. May be temporarily subjected to test pressures up 
to 40*.^ above working pressures. 



No. 11VM 

Packless Expansion Joint for Water Lines 

The most satisfactory means for absorbing the expansion 
of hot water heating system lines, service water line^. etc. 
A complete factory assembled unit^ready to be installed. 
Combines packless construction with ernergency packing 
feature. May be installed either vertically or horizontally. 

Multi-ply Sylphon bellow^s absorbs line expansion up to 
1^4" and eliminates leaks and repacking expense. Seamless 
Monel bellows, steel bolts, other parts brass. Suitable for 
pressures up to 100 psig. 



No. 96066 

Packless Expansion Joint for Steam or Hot Water 

Lines 

A simple, compact means for absorbing expansion of 
baseboard radiation, finned convectors, horizontal supply 
lines, etc. A compleit- factory assembled unit. Can be 
easily installed or removed from line. 

A two-ply seamless Sylphon bellows absorbs pipe line 
fn'^^T.?,'!'^"'* prevents leakage. Bellows ends silver brazed 
to end nt ,ng.. Be lows made of phosphor deoxidized copper. 
other parts made of brass. ^^ 

Presently made for pipe sizes ^i\ r. IJ^- and 2", Sizes 
.4 -. 1 and \H have solder type end fitting^: J- size 
screw;ed ends. Absorbs line expansion up to »,^ Maximum 
workmg pressure 40 psig; maximum test pressure. 60 S 





A 




PRODUCTS 

W T«mperdtufe reguUton for healin9 end ventilatins 

M Temperature reguUtort For industrial proce» control 

w Internal combuvlion engine controls 

W Paclcleis valve* of many types «nd sues 

M Sylphon bellows assemblies as customers require 

* Seals fof compressors, fluid drives, etc. 
^ Motor thermostats for automobiles, etc, 

"^ Pressure regulators and pressure reducing valves 

^ Safety regulators for oil fired boilers, furnaces, etc. 

^ Automatic radiator valves 

^ ENpansion joints for steam or water lines 

"^ Hot'Cold water mixers 

* Vacuum regulators for can closing machines, etc. 
^ Damper regulators for heating botlers 

"ic Steam-water mixers lor industrial service, etc. 

lA" Plastic and metallic seals for shafts, etc, 

^ Literature describing these products is available 
on request 

REPRESENTATIVES 

IN ALL 
PRINCIPAL CITIES 



u 



9' 




FULTON SYLPHON DIVISION 

Robertshaw-Fulton Controls Co. 
KNOXVILLE 4, TENNESSEE 








..4' 






Digitized by: 




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ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 
TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



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www.cca.qc.ca