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Full text of "DOW85 DIGITAL MAGAZINE JANUARY 2013"

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the 
age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the 
season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the 
winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all 
going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way. CHARLES DICKENS 

The year 2012 is gone and 2013 has set in. As we reflect on the past year our feeling may not be 
different from those of Charles Dickens when he penned down the opening lines of one of his 
novels A Tale of Two Cities. How can we describe the way the world changed in the past year, 
twelve months and three hundred and sixty five days? 

We can turn the clock back and move forward frame by frame analyzing the events in real time 
as they unfold while putting on our own glasses. Or we can choose one event that we consider 
as the best thing, and one event as the worst thing that happened in the past one year. The next 
step would be to capitalize on the best, and to try and prevent the worst from happening again. 

While we do this individually or discuss it collectively, let's ponder over this short chapter from 
the Holy Quran. 

( j-fl^b Ij^Ijjj <j^b tj^tjjj CAW \r\\ 

Wi (THE TOKEN OF) TIME (THROUGH THE AGES) 

VfeRIL^MAN IS IN LOSS 

EXCEPT SUCH AS HAVfe FAITH, AND DO RIGHTEOUS 

DEEDS, AND (JOIN TOGETHER) IN THE MUTUAL 
TEACHING OF TRUTH, AND OF PATIENCE AND 

CONSTANK 



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BY IZHAR KHAN FRCP 
DOW 1985 




MY MADELEINE MOMENT 

In his seminal work, In Search of Lost Time, the French author Marcel Proust introduces the 
concept of involuntary memory (fench souvenaire involontaire). Dipping a madeleine (a 
traditional small French cake) in a cup of tea awakens Proust's memories of childhood in 
Combray. Such arousal of suppressed memories by otherwise mundane and inconsequential 
acts is termed "involuntary memory". The event unlocks one's past and unleashes a flood of 
nostalgic memory hitherto hidden within deep recesses of one's mind. 

I had one such experience recently when I was invited to examine for the Royal Colleges in 
Dubai. I had been in Dubai once before and did not particularly enjoy the experience. For me 
Dubai was a gigantic temple to consumerism where material wealth and its acquisition and 
display seemed to be the main pursuit of its inhabitants, and any cultural experience which one 
might desire was as scarce as rain in the emirate's harsh and desiccated climate. I once 
remarked to a local examiner that Dubai had hardly any antiquarian bookshops, to which she 
casually replied, "People in Dubai are not much inclined to read". 

We were put up in a luxurious hotel with enough stars to its name to make a constellation. I was 
checked in by a pleasant well-mannered young man from Rawalpindi with whom I exchanged 
our feelings of despair at the parlous state of our country, and who upgraded me to an even 
superior room. 

After the first night's dining in the hotel's nice but unoriginal "Italian" restaurant, I wanted to 
experience the ethnic Dubai cuisine. So the next night I left my fellow examiners to dine in yet 
another European restaurant and took off to explore the 'real' Dubai. Leaving the air- 
conditioned lobby of the hotel I suddenly found myself in the hot, oppressive outdoors, 
reminiscent of summer evenings in Karachi. I crossed the multi-lane motorway and soon found 
myself in a bustling old part of town where most people spoke Urdu or Punjabi. So where were 
the indigenous folk? I felt like I had been transported back in time to Sadar or Burns Road. I lost 
myself in the narrow alleys and streets with neon lighted shop fronts, where Pakistanis, Iranians 
and traders from many other nations were selling their wares. Many of the shops specialised in 
niche electronic goods. Some sold only i Phone covers or electrical gadgets for cars. Mobile 



phone shops seemed to be the order of the day. Others sold electrical plugs and computer 
cables. 

The heat was oppressive and I was feeling quite thirsty and peckish. Soon I spotted a neon lit 
sign "Karachi Darbar Restaurant". The place was a hive of activity and following the old adage 
for choosing restaurants when abroad- "if the locals are dining in it the food must be good"- 1 
stepped in. The manager, a rubicund corpulent man, was seated behind a counter next to the 
door. Behind him were displayed gulaab jamuns, barfi, kheer, halwa and other mouth-watering 
Pakistani desserts. The downstairs dining hall was full and waiters carrying steaming plates of 
food were scurrying about like busy bees. I proceeded upstairs to the "family" room which was 
quieter and with better air-conditioning. It was dimly but sufficiently lit and appeared clean. 
There were around six tables and a few ladies and gentlemen were dining. A young man showed 
me to my table. He spoke good Urdu, although he was Bengali. He soon brought me a menu. I 
wanted to eat a proper Pakistani meal. Having lived in Scotland for twenty six years (I had been 
back to Pakistan only twice) I felt this was the next best thing to being in Sabri's or the Delhi 
Muslim Restaurant at Lighthouse. Although the British love Indian food, the stuff you get in 
British Indian restaurants bears little resemblance to real Indo-Pak street cuisine. So I took my 
time perusing the menu. Bhindi Gosht, Chicken jalfrezi, Aloo Keema, Nihari, Daal, Biryanis of all 
sorts, I was in food heaven. And then right at the end of the menu under "Evening Specials", I 
could hardly believe my eyes. Here was the object of my desire which led to a surge of Pavlovian 
juices whetting my appetite. I had found manna. "Maghaz Masala!" 

Without a moment's hesitation I ordered the dish with freshly baked tandoori naan. The five 
minute wait before this heavenly delight arrived at my table seemed like an eternity. The waiter 
placed the aluminium bowl with the maghaz masala along with a platter of hot tandoori naan 
on my table. In a small plate accompanying my dish were green chillies, lemon and parsley. It 
had been a wait of twenty six years. The health and safety mafia had put paid to sale of sheep's 
brain in Scotland many years ago for fear of prion disease and dementia. Since the age of five 
years my mother had fed me the stuff on a regular basis and so far the only signs of dementia 
are when I misplace my reading glasses or my golf glove. 

Here I was, on a sultry Dubai evening, breaking bread, the hot fresh naan, with a scent straight 
from tandoori heaven carried along the steam emanating from the freshly baked wonder. I took 
my first morsel of naan and maghaz, cooked in herbs, spices, tomato and onions along with a 
bite of the strong green chilli. 

And that my friends, was my "madeleine moment". The taste of maghaz can best be described 
as subtle, soft, not overpowering, but so satisfying; a bit like the consistency of a perfectly 
cooked half boiled egg, but with a hint of spices and tomato. I closed my eyes and was 
transported back in time. In my reverie I was in the canteen in Civil Hospital, opposite boys' 



Hostel Four with my mates Farrukh Hash mi, Qamar Abba, Munir and Asrar. We had been 
canvassing for our party and were tired and hungry. I order maghaz with a fried egg on top and 
naan and we are all content. Remember the hot afternoons having lunch with ice-cold bottled 
Coke? For about an hour at the Karachi Darbar in Dubai I reminisced about my Dow days. A 
flood of memories that had hitherto lain hidden in the deep remoteness of my mind was 
released by my delicious Maghaz masala and tan door i naan meal. That first lecture by Professor 
Waheed, DrShakir's mysterious biochemistry lectures and Shabuddin's stern yet helpful control 
of the dissection hall. The snack corner and the place under the bunyan tree. The departing fleet 
of college buses at the end of the day. The political canvassing and arguments, the tolerance 
and the intolerance of colleagues. The dusk chorus of birds among the trees in the space 
between Medical 4 and Orthopaedics. A veritable kaleidoscope of memories was evoked as I 
enjoyed my beloved maghaz masala. 

That evening I re-lived my Dow days, thanks to the chance discovery of my favourite dish in a 
Dubai restaurant in a street whose name I cannot recall. 

The next morning at breakfast, tucking into his bowl of cereal, a fellow examiner asked me 
where I went for my meal last night. With a smile of satisfaction on my face I replied "Karachi", 
and I was so right too. 




Izhar with his favourite dishes 



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DOW 1985 




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JfurmirBtiajtaf Kramer 

t am a parent dear Lord 

I ask nothing frowx you for me. 

I pray only that in your wiercy 

you would grant my children their needs 

May their fives be long and healthy 

May they achieve all their dreavns 

May they always five in a world that is free 

May they be who they were born to be 

And w«y they know to their last days 

that they were deeply loved by me. 

Amen 






SHARE TBFS PRAYER. 



*le Thomas Edison: 

Tomorrow Is My Exam But I Dont Care 
Because A Single Sheet of Paper 
Can*t Decide My Future. 





Ten Ehi Galaan Menu Parhan Nai 
Dendian Thomsaa:-D 



SHARED BY KEHKASHAN QAMAR 



Shared by Sam Khan 





Shehla 'Lily' Hussain Sam, please thori dhair kay 
liya phone bund kar dijiyae. Shukriya 




RECENT VISITORS TO KARACHI 
ARIF HUSSAIN AND ZEBA HAFEEZ WITH FRIENDS 




A JAMES BOND IN THE MAKING 



Shah Muhammad Vaquas and Shams Sadruddin Vaquas 




Naufil Vaquas Mr. BOND 007 
Birmingham 2001 




MR AND MRS ZAHID JAMAL 



A TASTE OF HISTORY 



Syed Zahid Jamal was with Naila Zahid . 




WHY IS THE SWORD IN ZAHID'S HAND? 



Shared by Saleem A Khanani 



Saleem Khanani 

Tawakkul. LScp 

It's a beautiful concept but almost equally misunderstood by an average Muslim. 
Let's look at what Rumi and Iqbal have to say about it 
Rumi says: 

If you are putting trust in God, put trust in Him as regards your work. Sow the seed and 
then reply upon the Almighty. 

Kilt-Mi I JJUO^^U l 'lj\J\_J\fJ jO^) 1 _rLAJVA/ ijj I 

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Yes he said but if trust in God is the true guide, yet the use of the means too is the 

Prophet's Sunnah. 

The Prophet said in a loud voice, "While trusting in God first tie the knees of your 

camel". 

Listen to the secret that the one who works for his livelihood is Allah's beloved. 

Do not ignore the means because of trust. 

Iqbal also does not endorse the claims of indeterminism. He believes man to be 

outwardly determined and inwardly free. 

He says: 

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What should I say about its character 

Outwardly it is determined, inwardly it is free 

Such is the saying of the Lord of Badr 

That faith lies between determinism and indeterminism 



Farrukh Hashmi 

River Ravi and D-85. 



* 




TWO DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN: FARRUKH HASHMI AND AMJAD ALI 

BEFORE AND AFTER THEIR MARRIAGE 

PLEASE PAY ATTENTION TO THE IMAGE BEHIND THE PHOTO ON THE LEFT, AND THEN ON THE RIGHT. 



FREEDOM OF THOUGHT AND IMAGINATION WAS RAMPANT BEFORE MARRIAGE. 
THE DOOR IS CLOSED AFTERWARDS 



SHARED BY FARRUKH HASHMI 



Samira Zoberi , enjoys Listening to her own SELF. She usually calls herself 
when No one calls her just fro Company. 




Saleem Khanani Samira 's answer to Farrukh Hashmi 's comments with 

apology to Momin khan Momin 

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SEE ME IN THE COMPANY! 




NADEEM ZAFAR 



MY STRENGTH, DYNAMISM AND ENERGY COME FROM MY FAMILY! 




The moderator of Dow 85, past chairman of Endow, associate professor 

of Pathology, political activist and, above all, a family man and a friend, 

is seen here with his better half Dr. Seema Abbasi and son Inam. 

A MESSAGE FROM NADEEN ZAFAR 



Alhamdolillah, I have been elected secretary to the Board of Directors at Midsouth Food Bank. Why that 
is special- the first Muslim American to be a part of this board and did not have to lobby or convey an 
interest even in passing. I also owe it to my team members at Halal Food Pantry at Masjid Al Mu'minun. 
Their work ethic and their enthusiasm for their work and their love and respect for the food-insecure has 
been noted and has conveyed this impression to the folks at the food bank that Muslims are genuinely 
hard-working and caring folks and genuinely care for all, not just Muslims themselves. 

It pays to work for the benefit of the greater good of the community at large. The community at large is 
our community and will shape our lives and that of our children and grandchildren, <&l *L&I 
We can either shape our future or be marginalized as irrelevant. The choice is entirely ours. 



A MAN OF MANY TALENTS, KAZI SALAHUDDIN 




SALAHUDDIN SNAPS HIMSELF WHILE OTHERS ENJOY HIS TALENTS 
^j-o^ yl JuLJuuy jljul /\j 15 lSJuLajlm ^^> 




SALAHUDDIN CASTING HIS SPELL ON WAMIQUE AND MUSLIM JAMI 



DOW 85 IS EVERYWHERE 




Progressive Panel for PMA Biennial 
Elections Quetta 

SHARED BY SAMRINA HASHMI. 



The Progressive Panel for Change in Politics of Doctors . To bring New 
Leadership to the front, so that Doctors can be united on an active 
platform. The strong platform will fight for Doctors' community, their 
problems and their rights. 

Cochlear Implant in Dow University of Health Sciences 

For the 1st time in history of Public sector Hospitals, the cochlear Implant Surgery for deaf has started. It is free; 
otherwise it costs $25000. Prof Umar Farooq (FCPS, FRCS) , was trained in UK, last year, for this. This is highly 
appreciable . Those who need help should contact ENT Unit 2 ,CHK , or Prof Umar Farooq Pro VC, DUHS. 
Philanthropists are requested to come forward and donate generously to maintain the project. 




SHARED BY SAM KHAN 

AWESOME REPLY BY AIR HOSTESS 
READ IT - SHARE IT 

This happened on TAM airlines. 

A 50-something year old white woman arrived at her seat and saw that the passenger 
next to her was a black man. 

Visibly furious, she called the air hostess. 

"What's the problem, mam?" the hostess asked her 

"Can't you see?" the lady said - "I was given a seat next to a black man. I can't seat 
here next to him. You have to change my seat" 

- "Please, calm down, mam" - said the hostess 

"Unfortunately, all the seats are occupied, but I'm still going to check if we have any." 

The hostess left and returned some minutes later. 

"Madam, as I told you, there isn't any empty seat in this class- economy class. 
But I spoke to the captain and he confirmed that there isn't any empty seats in the 
economy class. We only have seats in the first class." 

And before the woman said anything, the hostess continued 

"Look, it is unusual for our company to allow a passenger from the economy class 
change to the first class. 

However, given the circumstances, the commandant thinks that it would be a scandal 
to make a passenger travel sat next to an unpleasant person." 

And turning to the black man, the hostess said: 

"Which means, Sir, if you would be so nice to pack your handbag, we have reserved 
you a seat in the first class..." 

And all the passengers nearby, who were shocked to see the scene started applauding, 
some standing on their feet." 




NADEEN ZAFAR 
SELF DISCOVERY THROUGH ECSTASY 




II THAT EABE MOMENT OF £GSTASV 
I CAME TO KNOW WHO I All 



HUNDRED SUNS REVC 



I All WHO I AM! 



(Saleem A Khanani) 



ON COMPLETING HIS TERM, THE FIRST IN THE HISTORY OF PAKISTAN 



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Mission Completed 

27 December 2007- 39 5e=ttembeh mob 



PAKISTAN 








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■ 







EDITOR'S CHOICE 



FROM WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

A SONNET 

When I do count the clock that tells the time, 

And see the brave day sunk in hideous night; 

When I behold the violet past prime, 

And sable curls, all silvered o'er with white; 

When lofty trees I see barren of leaves, 

Which erst from heat did canopy the herd, 

And summer's green all girded up in sheaves, 

Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard, 

Then of thy beauty do I question make, 

That thou among the wastes of time must go, 

Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake 

And die as fast as they see others grow; 

And nothing 'gainst Time's scythe can make 
defence 

Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee 
hence. 




th 



Allama IqbaPs tribute to William Shakespeare on his 300 anniversary in 1916 



The flowing river mirrors the red glow of dawn, 

The quiet of the evening mirrors the evening 

song, 

The rose-leaf mirrors spring's beautiful cheek; 

The chamber of the cup mirrors the beauty of 

the wine; 

Beauty mirrors Truth, the heart mirrors Beauty; 

The beauty of your speech mirrors the heart of 

human being. 

Life finds perfection in your sky-soaring 

thought; 

Was your luminous nature the goal of 

existence? 



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When the eye wished to see you, and looked, 
It saw the sun hidden in its own brilliance. 
You were hidden from the eyes of the world, 
But with your own eyes you saw the world 
exposed and bare. 

Nature guards its mysteries so jealously, 
It will never again create one who knows so 
many secrets. Mustansir Mir 



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a Visit to Karachi 

FAWAZ SHAIKH, INAVAT AU KHAN AND SALMAN HAEOON 

A TEA¥ELOG Sf FAWAZ AHMAD SHAIKH FECP 
VISIT TO PAKISTAN DECEMBER 22 - 31 2012 

As in the previous year, I visited Karachi during the recent winter vacations. My 
principal aim was to see through a joint meeting of the Pakistan Headache Society 
with the British Association for the Study of Headache (BASH), the first meeting of 
its kind in Karachi. I had a vision for a long time that once I become the chair of 
the BASH, I will bring this prestigious event to the home country. 

th 

On the 24 of December I was invited to deliver a lecture on 'the recent advances 
in migraine' at the Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS). Our D85 pro-vice 
chancellor Dr Umar Farooq was the man behind this, and the hospitality I received 
was excellent. I was treated with the famous Dow Canteen Samosas with chutney 
that reminded me of the old college days. I met Asifa Aslam now Asifa Hussein 
(my group mate) after 26 years. I didn't feel that we had not seen each other for 
2.5 decades. I was taken to a tour of the recent developments in the education 
centre. The state of the art technology with video conferencing, electronic library 
and simulation theatre and lab was better than I have seen in many western 
organisations. Professor Hameed and Umar Farooq deserve all the credit for their 
initiative. 

On the 27 December the top docs of D85 in Karachi warmly welcomed me with 
Inayat (Lamba) and Salman Haroon (CR). Intikhab, Jameel, Shahab Baig, Samrina, 
Samina, Sonia, Shehnaz, Shaheena, Jamal Raza, Afzal, Umar Farooq and Hanif 
Khatri were present. Umar Daraz Khan (D86) made his surprise entry and 

nrl 

provided free copies of a book written by his mother before the launch date of 2 
January 2013. 

On the 28 th December we had the joint meeting at the Pearl Continental Hotel 
where British and Pakistani migraine experts delivered their research papers and 



lectures providing updates on the recent advances in the field of headaches and 
migraine. The delegates were invited at the Governor House on the same evening 
for a reception. 

On the 29 December I visited the house of Professor Mohammad Akram (late) 
and met Madam Salma Akram. Since she lost her husband, she had lost the lustre 
that I had seen over the years and she looked much different than I had seen her 
just a year ago when Prof Akram was alive. I conveyed the condolence on behalf 
of the entire D85. 

SOME PHOTOS FROM THE RECEPT TRIP 




AFZALS¥ED,FA 

iaYat ali khan. 



AZ SHAIKH, SAM KHAN, SOMA P0SHNI, 

UtRINA HASHMI, SHAHEENA SALEH AND 

ES. fa¥¥az shaikh 




HAIKU WITH ASIFA AMD UMAR FAROOQ 




INTEKHAB, SALMAN, UMAR FAROOQ, FAYYAZ, HANIF KHATRI, 
SHAHAB AFZAL BAIG, UMAR DARAZ, INAYAT ALI KHAN