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Full text of "Water resources survey: Lewis and Clark County, Montana"

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Parti: 

HISTORY OF LAND AND WATER 

UCE ON IRRIGATED AREAS 

and 
Part II: 

MAPS SHOWING IRRIGATED 
AREAS IN COLORS/ DESIGNATING 
THE SOURCES OF iSUPPLY 



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Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana, June 1957 



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WATER RESOURCES SURVEY 

LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 

MONTANA 

PARTI 

History of Land and Water Use 
on Irrigated Areas 




I I Counties surveyed 



Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana 

June, 1957 



STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Fred E. Buck State Engineer 

Hans L. Bille Assistant 



STATE WATER CONSERVATION BOARD 
Governor J. Hugo Aronson Chairman 

C. H. Raymond Vice Chairman and Secretary 

Fred E. Buck Member and Consultant 

D. P. Fabrick Member 

H. J. Sawtell Member 

George F. Sahinen Chief Engineer 

R. J. Kelly Assistant Secretary 



MONTANA STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

O. W. Monson, Irrigation Engineer and Consultant, Bozeman 



THURBER'S ffaf^ KSgio H EL ENA 



June, 1957 

Honorable J. Hugo Aronson 
Governor of Montana 
Capitol Building 
Helena, Montana 

Dear Governor Aronson: 

Submitted herewith is a consolidated report on the Water Resources Survey 
of Lewis and Clark County, Montana. 

This work is being carried on with funds made available to the State Engineer 
by the 34th Legislative Session, 1955, and in cooperation with the State Water 
Conservation Board and the Montana State Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The report is divided into two parts. Part I consists of history of land and 
water use, irrigated lands, water rights, etc., and Part II contains the township 
maps in the county showing in color the lands irrigated from each source or canal 
system. 

Work has been completed and reports are now available for the following 
counties: Big Horn, Broadwater, Carbon, Custer, Deer Lodge, Gallatin, Golden 
Valley, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Meagher, Musselshell, Park, Rose- 
bud, Silver Bow, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Treasure, Wheatland and Yellowstone. 

The office files contain minute descriptions and details of each individual 
water right, water and land use, etc., which are too voluminous to be included 
herein. These office files are available for inspection to those who are interested. 

The historical data on water rights contained in this report can never become 
obsolete. If new information is added from time to time as new developments 
occur, the records can always be kept current and up to date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED E. BUCK, State Engineer 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

A survey and study of water resources involves many phases of both field and 
office work in order to gather the necessary data to make the information complete 
and comprehensive. Appreciation of the splendid cooperation of various agencies 
and individuals who gave their time and assistance in aiding us in gathering the 
data for the preparation of this report is hereby acknowledged. 

County Officials 

J. Morley Cooper, Commissioner Charles D. Greenfield, Commissioner 

R. E. O'Connell, Commissioner 
David R. Kemp, Clerk of District Court 
Florence T. Fauver, Clerk and Recorder R. G. Lutey, Assessor 



Robert G. Dunbar 

Historical Data "Foreword" Prof, of History, Mont. State College 

Dr. M. G. Burlingame "History and Organization" Dept. Head of History, 

M.S.C. 

R. A. Dightman "Climate" State Climatologist, U. S. Weather Bureau 

Clinton Bourne "Soils" Research Associate, Mont. Agric. Experiment 

Station 

James Sargent "Crops and Livestock" County Extension Agent 

Frank Stermitz "Stream Gaging Stations" District Engineer, U.S.G.S. 

W. C. Ackerman "Mining" Geologist, Montana School of Mines 

Herman Kraus "Soil Conservation Districts" . _Work Unit Conservationist, 

S.C.S. 

Eric P. White "National Forests" District Ranger, U.S. Forest Service 

Cliff Ellis Secretary, Dearborn Canal and Water Company 

W. A. Rossiter Secretary, Helena Valley Water Users Association 

Albert Hrella Secretary, Lakeside Water Users Association 

Harold T. Jackson Secretary, Nilan Water Users Association 

The State Engineer's Office, Water Resources Survey, hereby expresses sincere 
appreciation to the many ranchers, farmers and stockmen who have given their 
helpful cooperation in this survey. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Foreword 



Method of Survey 



Lewis and Clark County 

History and Organization 6 

Transportation 1 

Climate 11 

Soils 13 

Crops and Livestock 14 

Sources of Water Supply 15 

Stream Gaging Stations 16 

Mining 24 

Soil Conservation District 27 

National Forests 29 

Summary of Irrigated Land 

Counties Completed to Date 33 

Lewis and Clark County 34 

Ditch Companies 

Dearborn Canal and Water Company 38 

Helena Valley and Lakeside Water Users' Association 39 

Nilan Water Users' Association 41 

Water Marketing and Water Purchase Contracts 43 

Water Right Data 

Appropriations and Decrees by Streams 44 



FOREWORD 

MONTANA'S WATER RIGHT PROBLEMS 

Our concern over surface water rights in Montana is nearly a century old. When the first Terri- 
torial Legislature, meeting in Bannack, adopted the common law of England on January 11, 1865, the 
Territory's legal profession assumed that it had adopted the Doctrine of Riparian Rights. This doctrine 
had evolved in England and in eastern United States where the annual rainfall is generally more than 
twenty inches. It gave the owners of land bordering a stream the right to have that stream flow past 
their land undiminished in quantity and unaltered in quality and to use it for household and livestock 
purposes. Since the law restricted the use of the water to riparian owners and forbade them to reduce 
appreciably the stream flow, the early miners and ranchers in Montana favored the Doctrine of Prior 
Appropriation which permitted diversion and diminution of the streams. Consequently, the next day 
the legislature enacted a law which permitted diversion by both riparian and non-riparian owners. 
Whether or not this action provided Montana with one or two definitions of water rights was not 
settled until 1921 when the Montana Supreme Court in the Mettler vs. Ames Realty Co. case declared 
the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation to be the valid Montana water right law. "Our conclusion," it 
said, "is that the common law doctrine of riparian rights has never prevailed in Montana since the enact- 
ment of the Bannack Statutes in 1865 and that it is unsuited to the conditions here ..." 

The appropriation right which originated in California was used by the forty-niners to divert water 
from the streams to placer mine gold. They applied to the water the same rules that they applied to 
their mining claims — first in time, first in right and limitation of the right by beneficial use. Those who 
came to the Montana gulches brought with them these rules, applying them to agriculture as well as to 
mining. 

The main points of consideration under the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation are: 

1. The use of water may be acquired by both riparian and non-riparian landowners. 

2. It allows diversion of water regardless of the reduction of the water supply in the stream. 

3. The value of the right is determined by the priority of the appropriation; i.e., first in time is 
first in right. 

4. The right is limited to the use of the water. Stream waters in Montana are the property of the 
State and the appropriator acquires only a right to their use. Moreover, this use must be beneficial. 

5. A right to the use of water is considered real property only in the sense that it can be bought or 
sold; its owner may not be deprived of it except by due process of law. 

The State Legislature has provided methods for the acquisition, determination of priority and ad- 
ministration of the right. No right may be acquired on a stream without diversion of water and its 
application to a beneficial use. On unadjudicated streams, the Statutes stipulate that the diversion must 
be preceded by posting a notice at the point of intended diversion and by filing a copy of it within 20 days 
in the County Clerk's office of the county in which the appropriation is being made. Construction of 
the means of diversion must begin within 40 days of the posting audi continue with reasonable diligence 



— 1— 



to completion. However, the Montana Supreme Court has ruled that an appropriator who fails to com- 
ply with the Statutes may still acquire a right merely by digging a ditch and putting the water to bene- 
ficial use. 

To obtain a water right on an adjudicated stream, one must petition the District Court having jur- 
isdiction over that stream for permission to make an appropriation. If the other appropriators do not 
object, the court gives its consent and issues a supplementary decree granting the right subject to the 
rights of the prior appropriators. 

Inasmuch as the Montana laws do not require water users to make official records of the com- 
pletion of their appropriations, it becomes advisable, as soon as the demand for the waters of a stream 
becomes greater than its supply, to determine the rights and priorities of each user by means of an ad- 
judication or water right suit. This action may be initiated by one or more of the appropriators who 
may make all the other claimants parties to the suit. Thereupon the Judge of the District Court ex- 
amines the claims of all the claimants and issues a decree establishing priority of the right of each water 
user and the amount of water he is entitled to use. The court decree becomes in effect the deed of the 
appropriator to his water right. 

Whenever scarcity of water in an adjudicated stream requires an allocation of the supply according 
to the priority of rights, the Judge upon petition of the owners of at least 15 per cent of the water rights 
affected must appoint a water commissioner to distribute the water. These rules were formulated to 
protect the rights. However, they constitute a system of local regulation which imposes such a limited 
control upon the individual's use of the water that they often fail to protect him. 

The recordings of appropriations in local courthouses provide an incomplete record of the water 
rights on unadjudicated streams. In fact, the county records often bear little relation to the existing 
situation. Since the law places no restriction on the number and extent of the filings which may be 
made on an unadjudicated stream, the total amount of water claimed is frequently many times the avail- 
able flow. There are numerous examples of streams becoming over appropriated. Once six appropri- 
ators each claimed all of the water in Lyman Creek near Bozeman. Before the adjudication of claims to 
the waters of Prickly Pear Creek, 68 parties claimed thirty times its average flow of 50 cfs. Today, the 
Big Hole River with an average flow of 1,131 cfs has filings totaling 173,912 cfs. A person is unable 
to distinguish in the county courthouses the perfected rights from the unperfected ones since the law 
requires no official recordation of the completion of an appropriation. Recognition by the courts of 
unrecorded appropriations adds to the incompleteness of these records. To further complicate the situ- 
ation, appropriators have used different names for the same stream in their filings. In Montana many 
of the streams flow through several counties, consequently, water right filings on these inter-county 
streams are found distributed in two or more county courthouses. Anyone desirous of determining ap- 
propriations on a certain river or creek finds it difficult and expensive to examine records in several 
places. In addition, the records are sometimes scattered because the original nine counties of 1865 have 
now increased to 56. As the original counties have been divided and sub-divided, the water right filings 
have frequently not been transcribed from the records of one county to the other. Thus, the record of 
an early appropriation in what is at present Powell County may be found in the courthouse of the 
original Deer Lodge County. 

It can be readily seen that this system of recording offers little protection to rights in the use of 
water until they are determined by an adjudication. In other words, an appropriator does not gain a 

—2— 



clear title to his water right until after adjudication and then the title may not be clear because the 
Montana system of determining rights is also faulty. In the first place, adjudications are costly, some- 
times very costly when they are prolonged for years. It is estimated that litigation over the Beaverhead 
River, which has lasted more than twenty years, has cost the residents of the valley nearly a half a mil- 
lion dollars. In the second place, unless the court seeks the advice of a competent irrigation engineer, 
the adjudication may be based upon inaccurate evidence. In the third place, if some claimant has been 
inadvertently left out of the action, it is not final and may be reopened for consideration by the aggrieved 
party. Another difficulty arises in determining the ownership of a water right when land under an ad- 
judicated stream becomes sub-divided in later years and the water not proportioned to the land by deed 
or otherwise. There is no provision made by law requiring the recording of specific water right owner- 
ships on deeds and abstracts. 

There is no provision of law for the distribution of water from an unadjudicated stream. Adminis- 
tration of water on an adjudicated stream is done by the District Court, but it has its drawbacks. The 
appointment of a water commissioner is often delayed until the shortage of water is acute and the court 
frequently finds it difficult to obtain a competent man for a position so temporary. The present admin- 
istration of adjudicated streams which cross the county boundaries of judicial districts creates problems. 
Many of the water decrees stipulate headgates and measuring devices for proper water distribution, but 
in many instances the stipulation is not enforced, causing disagreement among the water users. 

Since a water right is considered real property and may be bought and sold, the nature of water 
requires certain limitations in its use. One of the major faults affecting a stream after an adjudication 
is the failure of the District Court to have some definite control over the transfer of water rights from 
their designated place of use. The sale and leasing of water is becoming a common practice on many 
adjudicated streams and has created serious complications. By changing the water use to a different 
location, many of the remaining rights along the stream are disrupted, resulting in a complete break- 
down of the purpose intended by the adjudication. To correct this situation, legal action must be in- 
itiated by the injured parties as it is their responsibility and not the Court's. 

At one time or another all of the other Western Reclamation States have used similar methods of 
local regulation of water rights. Now all of them except Montana have more or less abandoned these 
practices and replaced them by a system of centralized state control such as the one adopted by the 
State of Wyoming. The key characteristics of the Wyoming system is the registration of both the initia- 
tion and completion of an appropriation in the State Engineer's Office, the determination of rights and 
administration by a State Board of Control headed by the State Engineer. These methods give the Wyo- 
ming water users titles to the use of water as definite and as defensible as those which they have to 
their land. 

When Montana began to negotiate the Yellowstone River Compact with Wyoming and North 
Dakota in 1939, the need for some definite information concerning our water and its use became ap- 
parent. The Legislature in 1939 passed a bill (Ch. 185) authorizing the collection of data pertaining 
to our uses of water and it is under this authority that the Water Resources Survey is being carried on. 
The purpose of this survey is six fold: (1) To catalogue counties, in the office of the State Engineer, 
all recorded, appropriated and decreed water rights including use rights as they are found; (2) to map 
the lands upon which the water is being used; (3) to provide the public with pertinent water right in- 
formation on any stream, thereby assisting in any transaction where water is involved; (4) to help State 
and Federal Agencies in pertinent matters; (5) to eliminate unnecessary court action in water right dis- 

—3— 



putes; (6) and to have a complete inventory of our perfected water rights in case we need to defend 
these rights against the encroachments of lower states. 

In conclusion, some mention should be made regarding the enactment of laws for the orderly de- 
velopment of our ground water supplies. Delay in the enactment of these laws by other states has con- 
tributed to the over-development of these valuable natural resources. This in turn has caused financial 
losses and innumerable legal difficulties. A knowledge of the ground water hydrology with an estab- 
lished ground water code in Montana would protect the interests of those who have already developed 
ground water supplies as well as protect those who may drill wells in the future. 



—4— 



METHOD OF SURVEY 

Water Resources data contained in Part I and Part II of this report are obtained from court- 
house records in conjunction with individual contacts of land-ownership. A survey of this type involves 
extensive detailed work in both the office and field to compile a comprehensive inventory of water rights 
as they apply to land and other uses. 

The material of foremost importance used in conducting the survey is as follows: From the files of 
the county courthouse the data required includes: land-ownership, water right records (decrees and ap- 
propriations), articles of incorporations of ditch companies and any other legal papers in regard to the 
distribution and use of water. Deed records of land- ownership are reviewed and abstracts are checked for 
water right information when available. 

Another important part of the survey is complete aerial photo coverage of each county in order to 
map accurately the land areas of water use. On the aerial photographs, section and township corner loca- 
tions are determined by the photogrammetric system, based on Government Land Office survey plats, 
plane-table surveys, county maps and by "on the spot" location during the field survey. Shown on the 
aerial photograph is all the information pertaining to the location of the irrigation system with irrigated 
and potentially irrigable land areas under private and incorporated ditches distinguished by different 
colors. 

Field forms are prepared for each landowner, showing the name of the owner and operator, photo 
index number, a plat defining the ownership boundary, type of irrigation system, source of water supply, 
and the total acreage irrigated and irrigable under each. All of the appropriated and decreed water rights 
that apply to each ownership by the description of intended place of use are listed on the field form. 
During the field survey, all water rights listed on the field form are verified with the landowner. When- 
ever any doubt or complication exists in the use of a water right, deed records of the land are checked to 
determine the absolute right of use. 

So far as known, this is the first survey of its kind ever attempted in the United States. The value 
of the work has become well substantiated in the counties completed to date by giving Montana its 
first accurate and verified information concerning its water rights and their use. New development of 
land for irrigation purposes by State and Federal agencies is not within the scope of this report. The 
facts presented are as found at the time of completing each survey and provide the items and figures 
from which a detailed analysis of water and land use can be made. 

The historical data contained in these reports can never become obsolete. If new information is 
added from time to time as new developments occur, the records can always be kept current and up-to- 
date. 



-5— 



HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1805, working its way up the Missouri River, was made up 
of the first white men of record to explore the region that is now Lewis and Clark County. 

On the 18th of July, 1805, Captain Lewis and his party passed south of the Dearborn River, 
which he named for the Secretary of War. The next day, on July 19, Meriwether Lewis and party made 
their way through the gorge that the Missouri had cut through the Big Belt Mountains and they named 
it "The Gates of the Mountains." The same day that Lewis was passing through the gorge of the Mis- 
souri, Captain William Clark crossed over into a nearby valley containing an extensive growth of Prickly 
Pear. So abundant was this growth, that Captain Clark was forced to halt and remove seventeen of the 
agonizing spines from his feet and that is the reason the valley and the creek that runs through it were 
named "Prickly Pear." 

On his return journey from the Pacific Coast in 1806, Captain Lewis crossed the Continental Di- 
vide through what is now known as the Lewis and Clark Pass, at the head of the North Fork of the Dear- 
born River and traversed the northern part of Lewis and Clark County, sixty miles northwest of Helena 
in the vicinity of the present town of Augusta. 

Neither Lewis nor Clark ever recorded seeing any permanent Indian camps in the area. They did, 
however, record that game animals were decidedly plentiful. It is therefore believed that the area was 
never occupied as a regular place of abode by any of the Montana Indian tribes, although it was oc- 
casionally visited by the hunting parties of different tribes as indicated by the finding of such Indian 
relics as stone arrowheads, skinning knives and cutting tools. Throughout the area many of the valleys 
were infested with rattlesnakes, which was perhaps the main reason why the Indian did not make it his 
permanent headquarters. 

History does not record any additional exploration of this region by white men between 1806 and 
1853, but indications are that traders and trappers were in the area at irregular intervals. 

In 1853, Lieutenant John Mullan of the U. S. Army, surveyed the route for a wagon road which 
passed through the Little Prickly Pear Valley and extended on to the foot of the next dividing ridge, 
which is now called Mullan Pass. The Northern Pacific Railway follows this route, crossing the Con- 
tinental Divide by means of the Mullan Tunnel. 

In January, 1854, Lieutenant Grover of the United States Army, with a party of five men and dog 
train, made passage from Ft. Benton on the Missouri River to the Bitterroot Mountains by way of Lewis 
and Clark Pass at the head of the Dearborn River. In going over this pass they encountered cold weather 
as intense as thirty-six degrees below zero. Again in March, 1854, Lieutenant Grover, starting from Ft. 
Benton with a loaded wagon hitched to four mules, followed a level prairie road to the valley of Little 
Prickly Pear and found it an easy road for wagon. He crossed the Continental Divide at Mullan Pass 
and said "indeed the ascent and descent were so exceedingly gradual that it was not necessary to lock 
the wheels of the wagon in descending, but it was driven with the animals trotting." 

It was in 1858 that Lieutenant Mullan began construction of the military wagon road from Ft. 
Benton to The Dalles, Oregon, along the general route of the survey he had made in 1853. By 1860, the 
road was ready for use through the Helena region and in 1862 the entire 624 miles of the wagon route 
was completed. The road passed through Wolf Creek Canyon, forty miles north of Helena and ascended 

—6— 



the Little Prickly Pear Valley, crossing the Continental Divide at Mullan Pass. Many road houses and 
stage stations were built along this well traveled route during the next ten years. 

In the fall of 1862, an immigrant wagon train following the Mullan Road, stopped near what was 
then known as the Three Mile House, not far from the present railroad station of Silver on the Great 
Northern Railway and a distance of about fourteen miles north of the present site of Helena. After some 
discussion and looking around, the immigrants decided to settle in the Little Prickly Pear Valley and 
accordingly they constructed houses there for the winter. These people were the first white settlers in 
the area. 

Prospectors as early as 1862, making their way north must have passed directly over the present 
site of Helena. They continued on north about 18 miles to Silver Creek where fair placer ground was 
discovered and soon the busy mining community of Silver City sprang up there. Silver City's import- 
ance was increased by the establishment of a stage stop for stage and freight lines operating between Ft. 
Benton and Virginia City. Quartz mines containing silver and gold were open near Silver City and this 
added to the population and importance of the community. At the time gold was discovered in Last 
Chance Gulch, Silver City, except for Virginia City and Ft. Benton, was the most important town in the 
Montana Territory. 

In 1863, while western Montana was still a part of the Idaho Territory, L. C. Miller, who repre- 
sented Bannack in the Idaho Legislature, succeeded in obtaining the passage of a bill establishing the 
counties and boundaries in western Montana for the first time. With the exception of Lewis and Clark 
County, at that time a part of Jefferson County, the same boundaries fixed by Mr. Miller's bill were 
confirmed and re-established by Montana's First Territorial Legislature at Bannack. In May, 1864, after 
a connection of a little more than a year with Idaho, Montana was created as a separate territory and 
Sidney Edgerton, at the time Chief Justice of Idaho, was made governor. Included in Montana's nine 
original counties was Edgerton County, named for Montana's first Territorial Governor. By an act ap- 
proved by the Legislature on December 20, 1867, the name of Edgerton County was changed to Lewis 
and Clark, the change to become effective as of March 1, 1868. Four years later, on March 12, 1872, 
the boundaries of Lewis and Clark County were permanently defined by an act of the Legislature and 
only four minor changes have occurred since that date. 

Helena owes its existence to placer gold discoveries made in Last Chance Gulch, which is now 
Helena's main business district. Gold was first discovered there in July, 1864, by a party of pros- 
pectors consisting of John Cowan, Robert Stanley and Gabe Johnson. These men found some good 
colors panning the sands and gravels of the gulch, but were not quite satisfied with their discovery and 
left to try their luck farther north. Finding conditions unfavorable in the north they returned to the 
gulch late in the fall, agreeing among themselves that it was their "last chance" for that season; hence 
the name "Last Chance," which they gave to the gulch. After more extensive exploration and prospect- 
ing the men found that the gulch was fabulously rich in placer gold. News of the gold strike spread 
rapidly and in a few weeks a tent and log cabin city sprang up around the diggings. 

It was a public meeting held in Captain Wood's cabin October 30, 1864, (the minutes of which 
are still preserved) that the name of Helena was selected on a motion and suggestion of Mr. John Som- 
erville. At the meeting, Somerville announced that Helena (Hel-e-na, with the accent on the second 
syllable) was the best town in Minnesota and that the thriving mining camp must be named after the 
Minnesota town. However, the miners did not like the way Somerville pronounced the name and 

—7— 



changed it so. the accent is on the first syllable with all the e's short which is the pronunciation of 
Helena, Montana, today. 

As a result of action by the Territorial Legislature and an election, Helena became the capitol of 
the territory in 1875. Virginia City made a strenuous campaign to retain the capitol, but Helena was 
now the largest town in the Territory and the general election was heavily in favor of Helena. 

When Montana became a state September 8, 1889, Helena became the temporary state capitol un- 
til an election could be held in 1892. Almost every town in the state entered the contest, but Helena 
emerged the victor. This election did not satisfy the town of Anaconda, the runner-up in 1892, and in 
1894 a second election was held to decide the matter again. Helena was sponsored by W. A. Clark, 
wealthy banker and mining operator, who later became a U. S. Senator from Montana. Anaconda had 
the support of Marcus Daly, who founded the City of Anaconda and the Anaconda Copper Mining Com- 
pany. The election was bitterly contested, but when the votes were counted it was found that Helena 
had won by nearly a 1,000 vote majority. The bitter contests over the location of the capitol were 
caused by the intense rivalry between Clark and Daly, both of whom were engaged in developing the 
mines at Butte and who were striving for supremacy in politics as well as in mining. Daly was more 
popular in Butte and Anaconda, but in other sections of the state Clark had more influence. 

Helena's growth during the 1870's was accelerated by other rich mining discoveries nearby. In 
those years gold and silver mines were opened at Rimini, to the southwest; at Marysville, to the west; 
and in the Gould-Stemple District, forty miles northwest. Across the Missouri River such placer gulches 
as Confederate, Whites, Avalanche, Hellgate, Magpie, Cave, Oregon and York, yielded gold estimated 
at $30,000,000. Prospectors and capitalists of Helena discovered and developed rich silver and lead 
deposits at Wickes, Corbin and Elkhorn in Jefferson County. Also sponsored by Helena's capitalists 
was the smelter at Wickes, where the mines of that section yielded $50,000,000 before 1892. When the 
East Helena smelter was built in 1888, the plant at Wickes lost favor and in 1892 was purchased by 
the American Smelting and Refining Company, dismantled and moved to East Helena. 

A great mining center, Helena, in the early 1890's was said to be the richest city per capita in the 
United States, numbering among its residents fifty millionaires. The people were flush with the profits 
from the mines and soon there began an orgy of ornate residential building. One result of their splurge 
is seen in Helena's west side residential district and in the suburbs known as Lennox and Kenwood. 

With the slump in the price of silver in 1893, it looked as though Helena would be nothing more 
than the capitol of Montana. Many people who had built elaborate homes moved away and pessimisti- 
cally predicted that the town was doomed. The prediction was that within one years time you could 
buy the best building in town for one hundred dollars. Many of Helena's millionaires who had invested 
their money in the city became disgusted and departed. What these people did not know was that stock 
raising, sheep raising, wheat growing and various industrial enterprises would supplement the loss of 
the mining boom. 

Agriculture today is the most stable industry in the county and its development began simultan- 
eously with the first discovery of gold. Many of the immigrants who came to Montana in the early 60's 
found that there were no more mining claims to be had and as a second choice decided to turn to farming 
and stock raising. 



The pioneers of farming and livestock operations in Lewis and Clark County are far too numerous 
to mention all of them in this brief historical summary. Each of them in his way helped contribute to 
the early agricultural development in the area. 

Among the first settlers in the county who engaged in farming and ranching were A. B. Morgan, 
Malcolm Clark and Edward Lewis. According to Captain Fisk in his diary of September 15, 1863, 
the Morgan ranch was the only settlement encountered as the Fisk wagon train passed through the valley 
of Little Prickly Pear. This ranch was perhaps the first in the county and consisted of a large log house, 
stalls for the horses and a corral for the livestock. The ranch buildings were surrounded by a wooden 
stockade, ten feet high, which covered a considerable area. Morgan supplied vegetables, grain, horses 
and cattle to the immigrants and wagon trains traveling through the country over the Mullan Road. With 
the increasing travel over the road he undoubtedly did a large business. 

Malcolm Clark, an early-comer to the territory, lived near the mouth of Little Prickly Pear Can- 
yon. Clark, a graduate of West Point, through some trouble resulting from horse stealing by the Indians, 
was murdered by these same Indians at his ranch home on the night of August 23, 1869. They also shot 
his son Horace through the face and left him on the ground for dead, but he recovered. The Indians 
intended to carry off Clark's wife and three daughters, but they were too busily engaged in securing 30 
to 50 head of horses to do it that night. Major Clark had lived among the Blackfeet and had married 
into their tribe which made his murder by these Indians remarkable, since he had spent a fortune in 
administering to their wants as their friend and counselor. He was personally known to nearly every 
settler of Montana and had displayed hospitality with a liberal hand to many weary immigrants who 
were not of means, on their way from the states to the rich gold fields of the territory. He was buried 
near his home, on a knoll overlooking the valley and his grave was later visited by a classmate, General 
Sherman, when he came west on a military mission. The Montana Pioneer's Historical Society have 
preserved the burial ground of Malcolm Clark and family as a State Historical Cemetery. 

Edward A. Lewis also settled in the Little Prickly Pear Valley and was a close friend and neighbor 
to Malcolm Clark. In the spring of 1866, Malcolm Clark and Edward Lewis sold their charter for a 
toll road through Little Prickly Pear Canyon to Warren C. Gillette and James King. The road cost forty 
thousand dollars when completed and was ready for travel to Ft. Benton before the end of that season. 
Although the tolls were high, it took Gillette and King about two years to get back their original 
investment. 

Some of the other prominent men who played an important role in the agricultural development of 
the county during the period 1864-1880 were: William Reed, Gilbert Benedict, Joseph Cobell, Frank 
Garnish, Paul Vermet, Harvey English, John Jones, Robert S. and Clark Tingley, John Merry, Elizur 
Beach, Dr. W. L. Steele, D. A. G. Floweree, Albert G. (China) Clarke, W. R. McComas, Wallace L. 
Millegan, Sam Ford, Akin W. Kingsbury, Thomas Benton Persell, Lazare "Curley" Eroux, Hugh Kirken- 
dall, James Fergus, Frank Powers, Charles M. (Three Mile Charley) Wirth, Joseph Sargent, William 
Kemp Roberts, Ben Toole, Herman Gans, Lewis Gans, Henry Klein, Calvin Beach, D. J. Hogan and 
Con Kohrs, to name a few. Most of the original settlers were of English, Irish, Scotch and German 
descent. Descendants of these pioneer families still account for a large percentage of the present popu- 
lation in Lewis and Clark County. 

Helena, the state capitol of Montana, is the most important town in Lewis and Clark County and 
has survived as a semi-industrial and agricultural community. Political and commercial developments 

—9— 



grew in spite of the predictions of doom. As a governmental center for Federal, State and County 
agencies, Helena can support its present population and will continue to grow if the natural resources 
of the region receive more intensive development. Helena today is no longer a mining camp but a 
typical American city. 

Other towns of importance within the boundaries of Lewis and Clark County are: East Helena, 
Augusta, Wolf Creek, Lincoln and Marysville. 

East Helena is the largest town outside of Helena in the county and has the American Smelting 
and Refining Company located there. Augusta, located in the northern part of the county, is a typical 
rural community and owes its existance to the farm and ranch operations in the area nearby. Wolf Creek 
at the junction of State Highway 33 and U. S. 91 is a small rural community and derives most of its 
trade from tourists, traveling north and south from Helena, Great Falls and Glacier Park. Lincoln, a 
small community in the western part of the county on State Highway 20, has some lumber industry, with 
several sawmills located there. It is also a favorite recreational area for local people and out of the state 
tourists, having summer home sites, outdoor sportsmen's activities and scenic attractions. Once a thriv- 
ing mining town, Marysville, about twenty miles northwest of Helena, still has a few mines which oper- 
ate intermittently. 

Lewis and Clark County, located in the west central part of Montana had a population in 1950 of 
24,540 and covers an area of 3,477 square miles. 

This brief history of Lewis and Clark County is merely a summary of the most important recorded 
events. In every county, from the early days of pioneer settlement down to the present industrial and 
cultural development, there are certain high lights in its growth and life. Lewis and Clark County is no 
exception to the rule. Its growth has been both stormy and calm. The county has passed through periods 
of prosperity and depression until finally reaching its present stature with the steady development of in- 
dustry and agriculture. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation facilities in Lewis and Clark County are much better than those that are found in 
most other counties in Montana. From Helena sixty-five percent of the population can be reached at 
the lowest cost distributing rate. The markets of the larger cities of Butte, Great Falls, Anaconda, Mis- 
soula, Bozeman, Deer Lodge, and Livingston are all within a 125 -mile radius. 

The main highways that serve the county are: U. S. Highway ION., which enters the county from the 
southeast at Clasoil or Louisville, continues in a westerly direction through Helena and leaves the county 
at McDonald Pass. U. S. Highway 91 enters the county two miles southeast of Helena and follows a 
northerly direction to Wolf Creek and Great Falls. 

At Wolf Creek, State Highway 33 starts from U. S. Highway 91 and continues north to Augusta, 
connecting with U. S. Highway 89 at Choteau in Teton County. This highway has considerable travel 
as a short-cut route from Helena to Glacier National Park. Beginning at the junction with U. S. High- 
way 89, eight miles west of Vaughn, State Highway 20 crosses Lewis and Clark County in a south- 
westerly direction to the community of Lincoln and connects with U. S. Highway 10 at Bonner, in Mis- 

—10— 



soula County. West of Lincoln this route is still under construction for a distance of about 25 miles. 
From the junction at Simms in Cascade County, State Highway 21 branches off from State Highway 20 
and follows a direct route west to Augusta where it connects with State Highway 33. All of the Federal 
and State Highways are maintained by the Montana State Highway Department which have their head- 
quarters in Helena. 

The county is well supplied with improved gravel roads to the outlying rural and recreational areas. 
There are two paved roads maintained by the county which should be mentioned. One starts from 
U. S. 91 about a mile north of Helena and follows a northeast direction for seven miles to the vicinity 
south of Lake Helena. The other paved county road leaves U. S. 91 ten miles north of Helena and ex- 
tends to the rural community of Canyon Creek. 

Both the Great Northern and Northern Pacific Railways serve Lewis and Clark County. Entering 
the county from the northeast, a branch line of the Great Northern Railway between Great Falls and 
Butte passes through Helena. Another spur line of this railway leaves Great Falls and enters the county 
along the northeast boundary and courses westerly to the town of Augusta. The main line of the Northern 
Pacific Railway crosses the extreme southern part of Lewis and Clark County, connecting Helena with 
all points east and west. 

The Northwest and Western Airlines afford travel facilities by air in all directions from the city 
of Helena. The Northland Greyhound, Intermountain, and Canyon Bus Lines and many national truck- 
ing firms serve the area. 



CLIMATE 

Extending from Latitude 46° 23' south of Unionville northward to 47° 59' at headwaters of the 
North Fork of the Sun River, and having the Continental Divide either within its boundaries or along 
the western edge throughout the entire length, it is not surprising that topography plays a large part 
in the pattern of the climate of Lewis and Clark County. The Missouri River runs through rugged hills 
in the southeastern part of the county, and the Sun River forms much of the northern boundary. Much 
of Canyon Ferry Reservoir lies within the southeast corner. The county is one of the most mountainous 
in Montana, containing fairly large valley areas only around Helena, along the Sun River in the Augusta 
area, below Holter Dam to the Cascade County line, and to a lesser extent on the Blackfoot River near 
Lincoln. The latter area, incidentally, lies west of the Continental Divide. Differences in climate within 
the county are fairly large, as should be expected from the topography and from the distance (almost 
100 miles airline) between southern and northern extremities. 

There have been several stations where records have been kept of temperature and/or precipitation 
during recent years, and fairly long records are on file for Helena, East Helena, Canyon Ferry, Helena 
6 NNW, Canyon Creek, Holter Dam, Gibson Dam, and Augusta. Records are available for shorter 
periods for Austin 1W, Unionville, Rogers Pass, Lincoln, and Lincoln 14 NE. These records give a 
fair sampling of county climate, except that the more mountainous areas are represented only by the 
very short periods of record from Unionville, Austin 1W, and Rogers Pass, and by the fairly long 
record at Gibson Dam. All these records are available through the U. S. Weather Bureau State Clima- 
tologist in Helena. 

—11— 



The county's climate, while following to some degree the pattern of other Montana counties on 
the east slopes of the Continental Divide, varies widely from the warmer lower elevations along the 
Missouri River below Holter Dam to the colder higher elevations on the headwaters of such streams as 
the Sun River, Blackfoot River, and Ten Mile and Prickly Pear Creeks. Precipitation also varies 
widely from the semi-arid totals measured in some parts of the Helena and Canyon Creek areas to fairly 
large amounts at higher elevations. Along with these basic variations, wind conditions very often differ 
greatly from the Sun River area to the more sheltered valleys around Helena, particularly during the 
winter. When winter "chinooks" start to blow along the Sun River, warming can be sudden and amount 
to as much as 50°F. in a few hours. Usually, however, these warm winds do not penetrate the cold 
air layer in the Helena Valley for several hours, or even days, and sometimes the "chinook" will not 
reach the valley floors in the southern third of the county. 

Although the usual seasonal precipitation pattern is similar to that of much of the eastern slope 
area of Montana, there are important differences in the higher elevations along the Continental Divide. 
While the valleys receive normally from two-thirds to three-fourths of their annual precipitation during 
the growing season, with definite seasonal peaks in May and June, and again in September, the moun- 
tain areas and the Blackfoot Valley have another important peak during the winter months. This winter 
high elevation precipitation peak coincides with the normal accumulation of mountain snowpacks which 
show up each April-June period in increased stream flow. In the valleys the winter months normally 
are quite dry — the annual snowfall average for Helena 6N is only 24.8 inches a year. In the mountain 
areas, however, snowfall is usually quite heavy — 254 inches fell during 1955 at Rogers Pass. 

Most of the year's cloudy weather over the valleys occurs with the spring rains, but in the mountain 
sections cloudy weather is the rule from late fall well into the following summer. Steady type rains or 
snows don't occur very frequently over the valleys, but when they do they are associated with wintertime 
cold waves (snow) or with the rainy May-June season. Most summer precipitation over the valleys 
falls in showers. High relative humidities rarely are observed, and when they do occur they are ob- 
served with temperature well below the oppressive range. Severe storms seldom occur, but the 
"chinook" westerlies or southwesterlies sometimes become very strong (infrequently of hurricane strength) 
along the Sun River slopes. Hail sometimes causes some crop damage locally during the growing sea- 
son, and lightning strikes occasionally damage power installations. There is no record of tornado dam- 
age in the county, and the very few funnel clouds reported over the years have been observed in open 
country. 

Length of the average freeze-free season varies widely — from 139 days at Holter Dam and 134 
days at Helena to 104 days at Augusta and 87 days at Gibson Dam. During almost all winter seasons 
there are a few invasions of cold air from the north during which temperatures usually fall to zero or 
below. The below zero cold usually lasts only for a few days, but in a few years at least one of these 
cold spells has lasted a week or more. Snow and blowing snow sometimes accompany these cold waves, 
mostly in the northern parts of the county. On the other hand, the cold waves usually "break" first in 
these same northern areas. 

—12— 



The following list contains a condensed summary of some of the county's older weather records: 





YEARS 


AVERAGE 
ANNUAL 






AVERAGE 
ANNUAL 








OF 


TEMPERA- 






PRECIPI- 


WETTEST 


DRIEST 


STATIONS 


RECORD 


TURE 


HIGHEST 


LOWEST 


TATION 


YEAR 


YEAR 


Augusta 


55 


43.2* 


103 


-51 


13.59* 


24.00 (1927) 


7.07 (1931) 


Canyon Cr. __ 


_12 


— 


— 


— 


10.93 


13.97 (1948) 


7.79 (1949) 


Cyn. Ferry $__ 


__51 


43.7 


104 


-41 


11.40 


17.43 (1947) 


6.01 (1919) 


East Helena _ 


__24 


43.7 


105 


-45 


9.82 


15.06 (1947) 


4.98 (1935) 


Gibson Dam 


_44 


41.8* 


106 


-49 


16.88* 


29.40 (1916) 


9.19 (1935) 


Helena 


77 


43.0** 


103 


-42 


11.30** 


20.04 (1881) 


6.28 (1935) 


Helena 6N __ 


__33 


— 


— 


— 


9.80* 


14.86 (1948) 


3.75 (1935) 


Holter Dam__ 


„52 


47.8* 


108 


-44 


12.73* 


24.80 (1916) 


4.54 (1919) 



JOld Montana Power site 1900-1950 inclusive. 
*Average for 1931-1952 inclusive. 
** Average for 1921-1950 inclusive. 

Extremes and averages for other periods than indicated by ** or * are for entire period of record 
indicated in the first column. 

Coldest of record in the county was -69.7°, January 20, 1954 at Rogers Pass, a national record 



low. 



Warmest of record in the county was 108°, July 30, 1936 at Holter Dam. 



SOILS 

The kinds of soils in an area tend to vary with climate, native vegetation, topography, geology 
and the length of time during which soil formation has occurred. Considering the wide variations of 
these factors in Lewis and Clark County, it is not surprising that a wide variety of soils exists. L. F. 
Gieseker in Montana Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 445, "Soils of Lewis and Clark County," 
Soil Reconnaissance of Montana, groups the soils into 46 mapping units. Each mapping unit represents 
a distinctive soil landscape. Most are complexes of several soil types. The characteristics and suitabili- 
ties for agricultural use of each mapping unit are described in the bulletin. 



More than 70 percent of the county is mountainous, 
graphically as foothills and intermountain basins. 



The remainder may be described physio- 



The foothills section extends along the eastern front of the mountains from Wolf Creek to Augusta 
and northward. Between Wolf Creek and the Dearborn River, the topography consists of smooth, stony 
slopes, low ridges, basins, and narrow entrenched stream valleys with steep sides. Between the Dear- 
born River and its South Fork, it is dominated by rather barren shale outcrops. To the north, the foot- 
hills area consists of high, broken sandstone and shale ridges which are capped with glacial drift. The 
relief of several townships south of Riebeling, where the bedrock is soft shales, is more subdued. 
Tablelands and benches of varying age and elevations occur along the major streams, particularly in the 
vicinity of Augusta. The principal soils are loams and clay-loams of varying depths. Many areas are 
stony. They grade from Chernozems (black grassland soils) adjacent to the mountains through Chest- 
nuts (dark brown soils) to Brown soils at the lower elevations. 



■13— 



The principal intermountain basin occurs in the vicinity of Helena. Smaller basins are scattered 
northwestward through the mountains. The terrain of these basins is generally smooth and gently to 
strongly sloping with broken slopes along the entrenched drainage courses. The soils are developed in un- 
consolidated, more or less gravelly silts, sand and clays deposited in previous ages by water and wind The 
normally developed soils belong to the Chestnut and Brown great soils groups. Some saline and im- 
perfectly to poorly drained soils occur near the streams and in the lower parts of the basins. 

CROPS AND LIVESTOCK 

Lewis and Clark County has a land area of 2,225,280 acres of which about half is in farms and 
ranches, and the remainder is largely mountainous, mostly in National Forests. The Bureau of Land 
Management and the Department of National Defense also have control over some acreages in the 
county. According to the 1955 Census of Agriculture, there are 382 farms and ranches in the county. 
Of these, 297 are classed as commercial farms. 

Lewis and Clark is predominately a range livestock county with over 70% of the land in range. 
Beef cattle are the major source of agricultural income and most of the farms have some cattle. 
Ranchers reported receiving nearly $2,000,000 from cattle sales in 1954. 

The number of sheep ranches has decreased for several years, but from the previous census in 1950 
the number of farms reporting sheep were 43 and 68 farms in 1954. There are over 30,000 head 
of sheep in the county controlled by six large sheep ranchers, the rest are in farm flock operations. 
About one-third of the farmers have some hogs, but they are not considered as a major livestock enter- 
prise. One packing plant, the Montana Meat Company, is located in the Helena Valley. Dairying is 
centered in the Helena Valley, although there are several dairy farms in the Wolf Creek-Craig area. 

There are approximately 38,000 acres of irrigated land in the county. Most of the irrigated acre- 
age is used for the production of hay, small grains, pasture, potatoes, and a few sugar beets. 

Both winter wheat and spring wheat are produced, with spring wheat predominating. About 
15,000 acres of wheat are grown each year. Oats and barley are also produced. Crops used for hay in- 
clude small grains, wild hay, alfalfa, clover, and mixed hays. Except for wheat most of these crops are 
used locally. Potatoes are grown in the Helena Valley for the consumers market, with more than 50,- 
000 hundred-pound bags sold each year during the past few years. Vegetables and some fruits are 
grown on many farms and ranches for home use. 

The State Nursery and Seed Company located in Helena, has been in business since 1890 and 
its nursery and greenhouse products are sold throughout Montana. The Knox Flower shop also does 
some shipping outside of Helena. There are numerous small greenhouses scattered throughout the 
county catering mostly to local trade. 

Sawlogs and fence posts are the main products from the farm forest land in the county. This 
harvest from the forest lands has become increasingly important during the last few years. 



—14— 



SOURCES OF WATER SUPPLY 

The Continental Divide crossing the western part of Lewis and Clark County, separates the county 
into two major river basins; the Missouri and the Columbia. The Missouri River Basin being by far the 
larger of the two in the county. 

Missouri River Basin 

The east slope of the Continental Divide in Lewis and Clark County drains into the Missouri 
River by the means of four minor stream basins: Prickly Pear Creek on the south; Little Prickly Pear in 
the south central; the Dearborn River in the north central; and the Sun River along the northern boun- 
dary. On the eastern side of the Missouri River the drainage starts from the western slope of the Big 
Belt Mountains. This is of minor consideration, since only a few small streams drain from this area into 
the Missouri. 

Including the Missouri River, the tributaries of principal irrigation importance are the following 
creeks: Magpie, Spokane, Trout, Prickly Pear, Ten Mile, Seven Mile, Silver, Three Mile, Beaver, Little 
Prickly Pear, Canyon, Rock, Dearborn River, Flat Creek, Sun River, Willow Creek, South Fork of 
Sun River, Elk, Smith, and Ford Creeks. 

About 4,500 acres in the Helena Valley are irrigated from the Missouri River (Lake Helena) by 
pumping to two separate ditch systems operated by the State Water Conservation Board as the Lake- 
side and Helena Valley Water Users' Associations. This same area is included under the Helena Valley 
Irrigation District now under construction by the Bureau of Reclamation. Additional acreage in Helena 
Valley is also included in the new irrigation district. 

From Ford and Smith Creeks on the Sun River drainage, the State Water Conservation Board 
operates another irrigation system of 750 acres under the name of the Nilan Water Users' Association. 

From the Dearborn River, the Dearborn Canal and Water Company supplies water for the irri- 
gation of about 2,400 acres. 

Columbia River Basin 

Montana west of the Continental Divide drains into the Columbia River through the Clark Fork 
and Kootenai Rivers. That portion of Lewis and Clark County in the Columbia River Basin drains into 
the Blackfoot River and its tributaries, which joins the Clark Fork at Bonner, in Missoula County. 
Before the United States Board of Geographic Names designated "Clark Fork River" as extending from 
Butte to Pend Oreille Lake in Idaho, the stream was locally known as Silver Bow Creek, then Deer 
Lodge River to Garrison, then Hell Gate River to Bonner where it became Missoula River to the con- 
fluence of Bitter Root River, thence Clark Fork River. 

Tributary streams of irrigation importance in Lewis and Clark County that drain into the Columbia 
River are: the Blackfoot River, Poor Man's, Keep Cool, Beaver, and Willow Creeks. 



-15— 



STREAM GAGING STATIONS 

The U. S. Geological Survey carries on the work of measuring stream flows, cooperating with funds 
supplied by the state and several federal agencies. The results are published yearly in book form, the 
last publication being for the year 1955. Later data may be obtained in advance form from the U. S. 
G. S. office. That ageny's records and reports have been used in the preparation of this resume. 

Data given below covers all of the stream gaging which has been done in Lewis & Clark County 
from the beginning of measurements through the water year 1956. The water year begins October 1 
and ends September 30 of the following year. Storage reservoirs that regulate stream flows at some of 
the stations are Lima Reservoir (built 1902), Ruby Reservoir (1938), Willow Creek (1937), Hebgen 
(1915), Madison, Ennis Lake (1900), Whitetail (1921), Lake Sewell (1898), Hauser Dam (1907), 
and Holier Dam (1918). 

Where diversions for irrigation above the gage are shown, the acreages have been estimated by 
the Geological Survey and will not necessarily agree with the final results of the Water Resources 
Survey. 

For convenience of the layman, the gaging stations have been grouped by drainage basins rather 
than taking them in order, beginning with headwaters and progressing downstream as was done in the 
U. S. G. S. published reports prior to 1951. 

Following are equivalents useful in converting from one unit of measurement to another: 

(a) In Montana, one cubic foot per second equals 40 miner's inches. 

(b) One acre foot is the amount of water required to cover an acre one foot deep. 

(c) One cubic foot per second will nearly equal two acre feet (1.983) in 24 hours. 

(d) A flow of 100 miner's inches will equal five acre feet in 24 hours. 

(e) One miner's inch flowing continuously for 30 days will cover one acre \Vz feet deep. 

MISSOURI RIVER, MAIN STEM 
Missouri River at Canyon Ferry 

The gage is located at old Canyon Ferry Dam Vi-mile, downstream from Magpie Creek. The 
drainage area is approximately 15,700 square miles. Records are available for only three months, Sep- 
tember through November, 1889. The gage was manually operated. The maximum discharge observed 
was 2,834 cfs (November 21) and the minimum observed, 1,693 cfs (September 1). There were many 
diversions for irrigation above the gage. 

Missouri River Below Hauser Dam 

The gage was located ^-mile below Hauser Lake Power Plant. The drainage area is approximately 
16,600 square miles. Records are available from October, 1922, through September, 1942. A water 
stage recorder was used. The average discharge for the 20 years was 4,115 cfs. The maximum daily 
discharge was 33,300 cfs (June 15, 18, 1927), and the minimum daily, 280 cfs (March 3, 1938). The 
highest annual runoff was 4,652,000 acre feet (1928); the lowest was 1,723,000 (1934); and the aver- 

—16— 



age, 2,979,000 acre feet per year. There are many diversions above the gage and the flow is regu- 
lated by several reservoirs and power plants. Much of the above information was furnished by the 
Montana Power Company. 

Missouri River Below Holter Dam* 

The gage is located Va -mile below Holter Dam and 3 miles southeast of Wolf Creek. The drain- 
age area is approximately 16,900 square miles. Records are available from October, 1945, to the pres- 
ent time. A water stage recorder is used. The average discharge for the 11 years (1945-1956) was 
5,212 cfs. The maximum was 34,800 cfs (June 8, 1948) and the minimum daily, 830 cfs (May 22, 
1955). The highest annual runoff was 5,653,000 acre feet (1948); the lowest was 2,262,000 (1954); 
and the average, 3,773,000 acre feet per year. There are diversions for irrigation of about 574,000 acres 
above the station and the flow is regulated by reservoirs and power plants. 

Missouri River at Craig 

The gage was located on the highway bridge at Craig. The drainage area is approximately 17,600 
square miles. Records are available from October, 1889, through September, 1892. A staff gage was 
used. The maximum discharge observed was 28,650 cfs (June 11, 1892) and the minimum observed, 
1,742 cfs (at times during October and December, 1890, and January, 1891). There were many diver- 
sions for irrigation above the gage. 



PRICKLY PEAR CREEK BASIN 

Prickly Pear Creek at East Helena 

The gage was located at the Northern Pacific railroad bridge. The drainage area is 254 square 
miles. Records are available from July, 1908, through September, 1913. Some of the records were 
estimated from weather records and some taken from House Document 238, 73rd Congress, 2nd Ses- 
sion. A staff gage was used. The average discharge for the 5 years was 67.5 cfs. The maximum ob- 
served was 535 cfs (June 19, 1909) and the minimum was not determined. The highest annual run- 
off was 72,000 acre feet (1909); the lowest, 40,000 acre feet (1912); and the average, 48,870 acre 
feet per year. 

Ten Mile Creek Near Rimini* 

The gage is located at Moose Creek Ranger Station 500 feet upstream from Moose Creek and 3 
miles north of Rimini. The drainage area is approximately 33 square miles. Records are available from 
October, 1914, to the present time. A water stage recorder and a Cippoletti weir are used. The average 
discharge for the 42 years (1914-1956) was 18.4 cfs and the maximum, 781 cfs (May 27, 1917). At 
times there was no flow. The flow is regulated by Chessman Reservoir (capacity, 1,750 acre feet) on a 
tributary above the gage. The highest annual runoff was 38,500 acre feet (1917); the lowest was 2,- 
610 acre feet (1931); and the average, 13,320 acre feet per year. There is a small diversion above the 
station for the water supply of Helena. 

—17-- 



Ten Mile Creek Near Helena 

The gage was located opposite the old Broadwater Hotel. The drainage area is 102 square miles. 
Records are available from July, 1908, through September, 1954. Prior to September 18, 1925, a 
staff gage was used and to March 15, 1929, a water stage recorder at a site 100 feet downstream at a 
different datum. The later readings were made with a water stage recorder and concrete control. The 
average discharge for the 46 years (1908-54) was 27.2 cfs. The maximum was 995 cfs (May 28, 1917). 
There was no flow at times. The highest yearly flow was 53,300 acre feet (1927) and the lowest, 3,180 
(1931), with an average of 19,690 acre feet per year. There were diversions for the irrigation of 
about 1,200 acres above the gage and for the water supply of Helena. 

Seven Mile Creek at Birdseye 

The gage is located at a private farm bridge at Birdseye 5Vi miles upstream from the mouth and 
7 miles northwest of Helena. The drainage area is approximately 32 square miles. Records are avail- 
able from October, 1908, through September, 1913. A staff gage was used. Average discharge for 
the 5 years (1908-1913) was 7.60 cfs. The maximum was 76 cfs (June 9, 1909) and the minimum 
daily, 0.1 cfs (July 30, August 5, 10, 1910). The highest annual runoff was 7,770 acre feet (1909); the 
lowest was 3,140 (1911); and the average, 5,500 acre feet per year. The entire flow of the creek is 
appropriated for irrigation. There was some regulation by placer mining above the station. 

Seven Mile Creek Near Helena 

A few gage heights only were taken on Dr. Head's ranch. 

LITTLE PRICKLY PEAR CREEK BASIN 
Little Prickly Pear Creek Above Deadman Creek Near Marysville 

The gage was located ^-mile above Deadman Creek and 6V2 miles northwest of Marysville. The 
drainage area is approximately 20 square miles. Records are available from May, 1909, through De- 
cember, 1911. A staff gage was used. The maximum discharge observed was 86 cfs (May 27, 1909) 
and the minimum observed, 1.2 cfs (March 7-13, 1911). There were several diversions for irrigation 
above the gage. 

Little Prickly Pear Creek Near Marysville 

The gage was located V^-mile below Deadman Creek and 6 miles northwest of Marysville. The 
drainage area is approximately 44 square miles. Records are available from April, 1913, through De- 
cember, 1932. The maximum discharge observed was 454 cfs (May 25, 26, 1917) and the minimum 
observed, 2 cfs (March 1-11, 1914). The average discharge for the 19 years (1913-1932) was 25.7 cfs. 
The highest yearly flow was 36,600 acre feet (1917); the lowest was 6,340 (1931); and the average 
was 18,610 acre feet per year. There are some diversions for irrigation above the gage. 

—18— 



Little Prickly Pear Near Canyon Creek Post Office 

The gage was located Vi-mile below Canyon Creek and 1 mile northeast of Canyon Creek Post 
Office. The drainage area is 183 square miles. Records are available from April, 1909, through De- 
cember, 1924. A staff gage was used. The average discharge for 13 years (1909-1911, 1913-1924) 
was 48.2 cfs. The maximum flow observed was 665 cfs (May 29, 1913). At times there was no flow. 
The highest annual runoff was 69,900 acre feet (1917); the lowest was 9,090 (1919); and the average 
was 34,900 acre feet per year. The flow is greatly affected by irrigation diversion above the gage. The 
published records are known as "Near Marysville" 1909-11. 

Lost Horse Creek Near Marysville 

The gage was located at the Johnson ranch }4-mile above Deadman Creek and SVi miles west of 
Marysville. The drainage area is approximately 13 square miles. Records are available from April, 
1909, through June, 1911. Winter records are missing. A staff gage was used. The maximum dis- 
charge observed was 42 cfs (June 13, 1909). There was no flow at times. There was one small diver- 
sion for irrigation above the gage. 

Deadman Creek Near Marysville 

The gage was located on the Johnson ranch Va -mile above Lost Horse Creek and 6 miles west of 
Marysville. The drainage area is approximately 10 square miles. Records are available from April, 
1909, through June, 1911. A staff gage was used. The maximum discharge observed was 132 cfs 
(May 28, 1909) and the minimum observed, 2.4 cfs (September 10, 1910). There are two small di- 
versions for irrigation above the gage. 

Marsh Creek Near Marysville 

The gage was located at Hartmiller ranch 2Vi miles above the mouth of the creek and 7 miles 
northwest of Marysville. The drainage area is approximately 6 square miles. Records are available 
from April, 1909, through December, 1911. A staff gage was used. The maximum discharge observed 
was 15 cfs (June 9-13, 1909); the minimum was as low as 1.3 cfs at various times but was not definitely 
determined. There was a small diversion for irrigation above the gage. 

Canyon Creek Near Canyon Creek Post Office 

The gage was located on the Van Cleve ranch 300 feet above Cottonwood Creek and 3 miles 
northwest of Canyon Creek Post Office. Records are available from May, 1921, through July, 1923. 
A wire weight gage was used. The drainage area is approximately 74 square miles. The maximum 
discharge observed was 268 cfs (May 20, 1922) and the minimum observed, 5.6 cfs (March 27,1922). 
There is one small diversion for irrigation above the gage. 

Cottonwood Creek Near Canyon Creek Post Office 

The gage was located on the Van Cleve ranch a few hundred feet above the mouth of the creek 
and 3 miles northwest of the Canyon Creek Post Office. A staff gage was used. The drainage area is 
approximately 17 square miles. Records are available from May, 1921, through September, 1922. 

—19— 



The maximum discharge observed was 14 cfs (March 22, 1922) and the minimum observed, 0.9 cfs 
(June 14 and September 1, 1921). There are no diversions or regulations above the gage. 



DEARBORN RIVER BASIN 

Dearborn River Above Falls Creek 

The gage was located V^-mile above Falls Creek, IVi miles southwest of Clemons Post Office and 
16 miles south of Augusta. The drainage area is 69.6 square miles. Records are available from May, 
1908, through December, 1911. A staff gage was used. The maximum discharge was estimated to be 
about 4,000 cfs (June 2, 1908) and the minimum observed was 13.7 cfs (anuary 17, 1911). There 
were no diversions above the gage. 

Dearborn River Near Clemons 

The gage was located 300 feet above the highway bridge, Vx mile southeast of Clemons Post Of- 
fice and 2 miles below Falls Creek. The drainage area is 123 square miles. Records are available from 
April, 1921, through September, 1923, and May, 1929, through September, 1953. A wire weight gage 
was used prior to April 8, 1931, and then a water stage recorder thereafter. The average discharge for 
the 26 years of record was 116 cfs. The maximum observed was 2,970 cfs (June 4, 1948) and the 
minimum, 7.4 cfs (October 22 and 23, 1936). The highest annual runoff was 155,200 acre feet 
(1948); the lowest was 28,810 (1937); and the average, 83,980 acre feet per year. 

Dearborn River Near Craig* 

The gage is located at a bridge on Highway 33, 5 miles below the South Fork and 12 miles above 
the mouth of the river. The drainage area is 325 square miles. Records are available from October, 
1945, up to the present time. A wire weight gage was used prior to October 1, 1946, and a water 
stage recorder has been used since then. The maximum discharge was 7,960 cfs (June 4, 1953) and 
the minimum observed, 12 cfs (August 2, 1956). The mean discharge for the 11 years (1945-1956) 
was 225 cfs. The highest yearly flow was 263,800 acre feet (1948); the lowest was 74,270 (1946); and 
the average, 162,900 acre feet per year. 

Falls Creek Near Clemons 

The gage was located 500 feet above the mouth of the creek, W2 miles southwest of Clemons Post 
Office and 16 miles south of Augusta. The drainage area is approximately 38 square miles. A staff 
gage was used. Records are available from May, 1908, through December, 1911. The maximum dis- 
charge observed was 540 cfs (June 6, 1909). The minimum was not determined. There were no diver- 
sions above the station. 



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SUN RIVER BASIN 

North Fork of the North Fork of Sun River Near Augusta* 

The gage is located 400 feet above Medicine Creek and 1 mile above the confluence with the South 
Fork. The drainage area is 258 square miles. Records are available from May, 1911, through Septem- 
ber, 1912, and from October, 1945, up to the present time. A water stage recorder is now used. Prior 
to July, 1946, a staff gage and wire weight gage were used. The maximum discharge was 4,840 cfs 
(June 3, 1948) and the minimum, 27 cfs (November 21, 1949). The mean annual flow for the 12 
years (1911-12, 1945-56) was 369 cfs. Highest annual discharge was 324,000 acre feet (1954); 
lowest was 200,400 (1949); and the average was 267,100 acre feet per year. There are no regulations 
or diversions above the gage. 

South Fork of the North Fork of Sun River Near Augusta 

The gage was located 1 mile above the confluence with the North Fork and 24 miles northwest 
of Augusta. The drainage area is 252 square miles. A staff gage was used. Records are available 
from May, 1911, through September, 1912. The maximum discharge observed as 2,740 cfs (June 3, 
1911). The minimum was not determined. There were no diversions or regulations above the gage. 

North Fork of Sun River Near Augusta 

The gage was located about 150 feet above the Diversion Dam and 18 miles northwest of Au- 
gusta. Records are available from August, 1889, through December, 1890, and July, 1904, through 
September, 1940. The drainage area is 609 square miles. A water stage recorder was used after Sep- 
tember 30, 1936. The maximum discharge was 32,300 cfs (June 21, 1916) and the minimum, 3.4 cfs 
(April 18, 1938). The mean discharge for the 37 years (1889-90, 1904-40) was 820 cfs. The highest 
yearly runoff was 1,173,000 acre feet (1916); the lowest was 272,000 (1931); and the average, 593,- 
700 acre feet per year. 

South Fork of Sun River at Augusta 

The gage was located at the old highway bridge ^-mile from Augusta and 6 miles above the 
mouth of the river. A staff gage was used. The drainage area is 157 square miles. Records are avail- 
able from October, 1904, through November, 1924. The maximum discharge observed was 4,300 cfs 
(June 2, 1908); there was no flow at times. The average annual discharge for the 20 years (1904- 
1924) was 94.4 cfs. The highest annual runoff was 154,000 acre feet (1917); the lowest was 14,800 
(1919); and the average, 68,340 acre feet per year. There were diversions above the gage for irriga- 
tion of about 4,500 acres. 

Willow Creek Near Augusta 

The gage was located just below Little Willow Creek or 5 miles northwest of Augusta. The drain- 
age area is approximately 96 square miles. Records are available from June, 1905, through September, 
1925. Prior to August 22, 1905, a staff gage was used and thereafter a chain gage. The maximum dis- 
charge was 1,150 cfs (June 23, 1916). The minimum was no flow (July 17, 1910). The average an- 
nual discharge (1905-25) was 27.7 cfs. Highest yearly flow was 56,200 acre feet (1916); the lowest 

—21— 



was 5,190 (1919); and the average, 20,050 acre feet per year. There are diversions above the gage for 
the irrigation of about 2,000 acres. 

Smith Creek Near Augusta 

The gage was located 5 miles above Ford Creek or 13 miles southwest of Augusta. The drainage 
area is 25.0 square miles. A staff gage was used. Records are available from April, 1906, through De- 
cember, 1912. The maximum discharge was 1,500 cfs (June 4, 1908) and the minimum observed, 6 
cfs at times during 1906 and 1911. The mean annual discharge for the 6 years (1906-12) was 37.6 cfs. 
The highest annual runoff was 40,900 acre feet (1909); the lowest, 15,300 (1910); and the average 
27,220 acre feet per year. There were no diversions or regulations above the gage. 

Smith Creek Below Ford Creek Near Augusta 

The gage is located 2 miles below Ford Creek or 4 miles above the mouth of Smith Creek. The 
drainage area is 74.0 square miles. A staff gage was used prior to July 9, 1946, and a water stage re- 
corder thereafter. Records are available from October, 1945, through September, 1952. The maximum 
discharge was 1,830 cfs (June 5, 1948) and the minimum daily, 12 cfs (December 19-21, 1945). 
Average annual discharge for the 7 years was 65.7 cfs. Maximum annual runoff was 81,370 acre feet 
(1948), and the minimum, 20,760 (1946). Average runoff was 47,560 acre feet per year. There 
were diversions for the irrigation of about 1,000 acres above the station. 

Ford Creek Near Augusta 

The gage was located on Ford ranch 14 miles west of Augusta. The drainage area is 19.4 square 
miles. A staff gage was used. Records are available from April, 1906, through December, 1912. The 
maximum discharge was 1,230 cfs (June 19, 1909), and there was no flow on November 2-3, 1906. 
Average annual discharge for 6 years (1906-12) was 32.2 cfs. The highest annual runoff was 35,800 
acre feet (1909); the lowest was 15,700 (1910); and the average was 23,310 acre feet per year. There 
was one diversion for irrigation above the station. 

Crown Butte Canal at Riebeling 

The gage was located at the railroad station of Riebeling Vi-mile below the headgate and ll 1 /^ 
miles east of Augusta. The drainage area was not measured. Records are available for only 4 months 
(June through September) in 1912. A staff gage was used. The maximum daily discharge was 62.6 cfs 
(June 17) and the minimum daily, 3.4 cfs (September 16, 17, 21-26). This canal diverted from Sun 
River. There were no diversions between the headgate and the gage. 

* These gaging stations are still being operated (1957). 



RESERVOIRS 

Details of the operation records since 1939-40 of the following reservoirs are available in the 
U. S. Geological Survey publications. All records prior to 1939 may not be available in the U. S. G. S. 
office but might be obtained from the reporting agency. 

—22— 



Lake Sewell 

The old Canyon Ferry Dam, which created Lake Sewell, was built in 1898 and located 15 miles 
east of Helena. The reservoir had a usable capacity of 37,800 acre feet. The old dam was submerged 
by the new Canyon Ferry Dam on April 8, 1953. Records were furnished by the Montana Power Co. 

Canyon Ferry Reservoir 

A water stage recorder is located in the new powerhouse control room. The drainage area is ap- 
proximately 15,860 square miles. Records are available from April, 1953, through September, 1956. Con- 
struction of the new Canyon Ferry dam began in 1949 and was completed in 1953. Storage began in the 
new reservoir in March, 1953. The old Canyon Ferry Dam was submerged on April 8, 1953. The 
maximum daily content during the period (1953-56) was 2,043,000 acre feet (July 15-29, 31, 1955 
and July 2, 5, 6, 8, 1956). The total capacity of the reservoir at the controlled spillway elevation is 
2,043,000 acre feet exclusive of 8,000 acre feet of dead storage. The minimum power operating eleva- 
tion is 3,728 feet (reservoir contents 428,060 acre feet exclusive of dead storage) . 

Lake Helena 

Lake Helena is separated from Hauser Lake by control works permitting independent regulation. 
It has a usable capacity of 10,400 acre feet. Records are available since April, 1945, furnished by the 
Montana Power Company. 

Hauser Lake 

The Hauser Dam, 13 miles northeast of Helena, was completed in 1907. The reservoir has a 
usable capacity of 52,100 acre feet. Records were furnished by the Montana Power Company. 

Holter Lake 

The Holter Dam, 26 miles north of Helena, was completed in 1918. The reservoir has a usable 
capacity of 81,900 acre feet. Records were furnished by the Montana Power Company. 

Gibson Reservoir 

Gibson Reservoir is located on Sun River 20 miles northwest of Augusta. The dam was completed 
in 1929. The reservoir has a usable capacity of 105,000 acre feet for irrigation (88,560 acre feet prior 
to 1941). Records were furnished by the Bureau of Reclamation. 

Pishkun Reservoir (off-stream storage) 

Water is diverted from Sun River 18 miles northwest of Augusta into the Pishkun Reservoir which 
was completed in 1925 for irrigation. The usable capacity is 32,050 acre feet. The records were fur- 
nished by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. 

Willow Creek Reservoir on Willow Creek 

This reservoir is located 5 miles northwest of Augusta. It was completed in 1911 and has a 
usable capacity of 32,300 acre feet for irrigation (16,700 acre feet prior to 1941). A supplemental 
supply to the reservoir is diverted from Sun River. Records were furnished by the Bureau of Recla- 
mation. 

—23— 



Nilan Reservoir (off-stream storage) 

Water is diverted from Smith and Ford Creeks about 10 miles southwest of Augusta. The reser- 
voir was completed in 1951 for irrigation with a usable capacity of 10,090 acre feet. Records were 
furnished by the Montana Water Conservation Board. 

MINING 

Lewis and Clark County lies along the Rocky Mountain Front and except for a small section in 
the northeast portion of the county, is very mountainous. Metal mining is one of the chief industries 
in Lewis and Clark County. In 1956, the county produced gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc valued 
at $1,477,735, second only to Silver Bow County in total value of metals mined. From 1940 through 
1955, a period of sixteen years, the county produced well over $48,000,000 in recoverable metals. By 
1956 the producing mines in the county consisted of thirteen lode claims and one placer. Other lode 
mines and placer claims have been intermittently mined increasing or decreasing the total number of 
mines worked during any one year. 

Placer mining became prominent again after 1935. It ranks second to Madison County in the 
production of placer gold. 

Sand and gravel mining has increased in recent years and the production of these commodities 
doubled during 1952. Clay mining for brick and terra-cotta continues to increase and granite riprap is 
quarried from the Wolf Creek quarry for the Great Northern Railway Company. 

Coking coal is plentiful in and around Augusta, in the northern part of the county. There are 
several mines in this neighborhood. 

Drilling for oil and gas within the county has been undertaken and several shows of gas have 
been reported. It is possible that with depth, the area may show more promise. 

Austin (Greenhorn) District 

Austin is on the Northern Pacific railroad, approximately 10 miles northwest of Helena. The 
mines within this district lie in the mountainous region surrounding the town. The placers of Seven 
Mile Creek have been worked for a distance of 12 miles and have yielded an estimated $1,200,000 
in placer gold. Lode mines worked since 1880 have yielded over $300,000 in recoverable metals of 
gold, silver, copper, and lead. In the period from 1940 to 1955, production has diminished and the 
total value of recoverable metals mined has been valued at approximately $3,000. The district includes: 
The War Eagle, Blue Jay, Copper Hill, Osage Chief, King Tut, Baldy Smith, Parnell, Christiana, Ben- 
son-Pood, Ted Swan, Landon, and Scallon- Vinson mines. 

The lodes are mainly irregular pockets or pipe-like bodies of different sizes found in limestone 
near the contact of quartz monzonite. The limestones and shales of the Belt Series, quartzite, shale, 
and limestone and Cambrian and Devonian age and the Madison limestone of early Mississippian age, 
were all intruded and metamorphosed by the quartz monzonite of the Boulder Batholith. 

Gould-Stemple (Fool Hen, Poorman) District 

This district lies along the Continental Divide, 30 miles northwest of Helena. The mines are dis- 
tributed through an area of about 9 square miles that include the upper part of Gould and Virginia 
Creeks, and Granite Peak to the south. The principal mine in the district, the Jay Gould, has pro- 

—24— 



duced over $2,500,000 in gold since its discovery in 1884. Other mines that have produced include: 
The Hubbard, Prize, Homestake, Last Chance, Batchelor, Rover, Nakoma, Alpha and Omega. Al- 
though production has steadily waned in recent years the district produced slightly over $500,000 in 
the period from 1940 through 1953, in recoverable metals of gold, silver, copper, and lead. 

Placers of Virginia Creek and its tributaries yielded approximately $600,000 in gold, whereas, the 
yields from Poorman and Canyon Creek placers were much smaller. 

The district is underlain by pre-Cambrian Belt series of sedimentary rocks which have been in- 
truded by granite. These sedimentary rocks consist chiefly of purple and greenish-grey shales or argil- 
lites. The ore bodies in the district are veins which consist chiefly of quartz and minor amounts of 
calcite. The veins average 3 to 4 feet in width, and are persistent along the strike and down the dip. 
The principal ore is gold ore with minor amounts of silver, copper, and lead. 

Heddleston (Big Blackfoot, Silver) District 

The Heddleston district is near the head of the Blackfoot River about 35 miles northwest of 
Helena. Although discovered in 1889, its development has been retarded until recent years when the 
Mike Horse Mine became one of the principal producers of lead and zinc ore in the state. Production 
from this mine began to increase in 1940 until in 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, and 1949, the total value 
of recoverable metal neared the million dollar mark for each of these years. The mine was closed in 
1952 and since then has produced some copper and lead ore on a lesser scale. Intermittent production 
within the past 15 years has come from the Carbonate, Rogers Pass claim, Mazuma, Consolation, Pass 
Creek, Mayou, and other mines. The total productivity in recoverable metals of gold, silver, lead, zinc, 
and copper for the periods from 1940 through 1952, has been valued at $11,195,822. 

The ore deposits consist of filled breccia in which replacement has occurred and forms regular 
veins. They are several feet wide and persistent in strike and dip. The argillite, quartzites or sandstones 
of the pre-Cambrian Belt series sediments, have been intruded by a diorite sill, 500 feet thick. 

Helena (Last Chance, Spring Hill, UnionviUe) District 

The district includes the placer areas in and around Helena. It was discovered in 1864, and by 
1928 had yielded over $16,000,000 in placer gold, and $6,304,000 from lode mines, chiefly from the 
Spring Hill and Whitlatch-Union mines. Placer mining was again revived after 1935, with the installa- 
tion of two bucket-lift dredges. Lack of additional gravel to treat, forced the dredges to close down after 
1950. 

Intermittent production within the district since 1940 from lode properties, has come from the 
Sara Jane, Independent Property, Humboldt Claims, Spring Hill, Court House, Whitlatch, Peck Con- 
centrator dump, Crescent and Franklin D., Copper Cliff, Victory mines and others. The total value 
in recoverable metals from this district of gold, silver, and minor amounts of lead, zinc, and copper, 
for the 15 year period from 1940 through 1954, is approximately $2,374,482. 

The sedimentary rocks of limestone, shale, and sandstone of pre-Cambrian and early Palezoic age 
and their metamorphic equivalents are folded and faulted along the south and west and were intruded 
by the quartz monzonite of the Boulder Batholith, along with basic dikes and sheets which are very 
apparent throughout the district. The ore deposits occur chiefly along the contact zone and are char- 
acterized by contact metamorphic silicates, tourmaline, quartz, and pyrite. 

—25— 



Lincoln Area 

The Lincoln area is 26 miles north of Avon and it is essentially a placer mining district. The area 
was discovered in the late 1860's and has yielded up to $14,000,000 in placer gold from Lincoln, Seven 
Up Pete, McClellan, Sauerkraut, and other gulches. Within the past fifteen years dredging and sluicing 
has been going on intermittently, on Abraham, Bluebird, Dollar, and Half Dollar placers, on Poor Man, 
McClellan, Park, Lincoln, and Sauerkraut gulches. The total production within this district from 1940 
through 1954, of recoverable metals, is valued at $111,501. The more productive years were 1948, 
1949, and 1951, when over $30,000 a year in placer gold were removed from Poor Man and McClellan 
Creeks. 

Marysville-Bald Butte (Ottawa) District 

Marysville is 18 miles northwest of Helena. The district was discovered in the 70's and since has 
produced over $31,000,000 in gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc. The major production from this dis- 
trict is credited to the Drumlummon Mine. Other important producers are: The Bald Butte, Belmont, 
Cruse, Penobscot, Empire, Piegan-Gloster mines. Minor amounts of metal production came sporadically 
from the Eck, Shannon, Neenon, Shakopee, Towsley, Earthquake, Enterprise, Big Ox, Golden State, 
Trinity, and Nile dump. The total value in recoverable metals from 1940 to 1953 is estimated to be 
well over $2,300,000. Production from these mines declined rapidly in 1952 and 1953, and at the 
present time, the Drumlummon is far below its former rate of production. 

The ore deposits occur along the margins of the Marysville Batholith, a quartz diorite intrusive into 
pre-Cambrian Belt series sediments. The ore minerals are found in both sedimentary and igneous 
rocks. Three vein systems are recognized. The ore occurs in fissure veins filled with quartz containing 
gold and sulfides and sulpho-antimonides of silver. Partly replaced wall rock is often included in mining. 

Rimini (Vaughn) District 

The Rimini district is on Ten Mile Creek 14 miles southwest of Helena. The district was dis- 
covered in 1870, however, the most productive period was from 1885 to 1900. Within the last fifteen 
years production has come from the Bunker Hill, Lee Mountain, Sally Bell, Copper Dyke, Evergreen, 
Lexington, Little Jimmy, Little Sampson, Free Speech, Eureka, Stanton and Sampson dumps, Valley 
Forge, Anna May, Broadway Group, Peerless, and others. The total value of recoverable metals in 
gold, silver, lead, zinc, and copper in the period from 1940 to 1953, is estimated to be $6,600,000. 

The principal country rock is a quartz monzonite with rhyolite forming the capping of Red and 
Lee Mountains. The ore deposits are auriferous silver-lead deposits enclosed in granite. The prominent 
joint system that trends N. 85° E., and dips 80° S., apparently controls the emplacement of the ore bodies 
to the system of jointing. The ore occurs in chambers or shoots, scattered through zones attaining a 
width of 50 feet in places. Two periods of mineralization are recognized, an older or late Cretaceous, 
and a younger or late Tertiary. 

Scratch Gravel and Grass Valley District 

This district is four miles north of Helena. Lode mining began before 1872 and the greater portion 
of the production came from the Franklin and Scratch Gravel gold mines. The area is underlain by 
shale, sandstone, and limestone of the Belt series, which has been intruded in the central and southern 
parts by quartz monzonite. The ore deposits are of two types, contact metamorphic and veins that have 
filled open fractures and replaced the wall rock. The vein deposits occur in the quartz monzonite and 

—26— 



bordering area of metamorphic rocks. They occur as narrow tabular bodies of two types, gold veins 
and lead-silver veins. The contact metamorphic deposits are characteristically irregular. 

The records show that in the period from 1940 through 1953 the district intermittently produced 
in recoverable metals of gold, silver, copper, and lead, valued at $137,584. The producing mines dur- 
ing this period were the Franklin, Ajax, Nettie, Oom Paul, Magpie, Umatilla, Julia, Helena Group, 
Scratch Gravel dump, Herb W. Claim, and others. 

Smelter District 

Since the start of the zinc fuming plant in 1928 by the Anaconda Company to treat the slag pile and 
current slag of the American Smelting and Refining Company, the slag pile and plant has been listed 
as a mining district. However, a considerable portion of the zinc recovered undoubtedly originated in 
Idaho and elsewhere, and should not be properly classified under mining districts or lode production of 
Lewis and Clark County. 

Wolf Creek (Gladstone) District 

The mines of this district lie south and west of Wolf Creek station on the Great Northern Railway, 
about 30 miles north of Helena. Development began about 1890 and has been carried on sporadically 
since. The area is underlain by Belt series sediments intruded by a few sills and diorite dikes. To the 
northeast these sediments are overlain by a great mass of volcanic rocks, chiefly andesite flows tufts, 
and breccia. The lodes are widely distributed in the Belt rocks, and are narrow but persistent in length 
and depth in veins. The district has produced very little in recoverable metals of gold, silver, or copper, 
since 1940. The total value is estimated at less than $1,000 for this period. 

York District 

The York district is on Trout Creek in the Belt Mountains about 15 miles northeast of Helena. 
Placer gold was discovered in 1864. The district is underlain by quartzites, limestone, and shales of 
the pre-Cambrian Belt series. Intrusive rocks forming sills, dikes, and small stocks are sparingly dis- 
tributed throughout the district. 

The ore deposits are both lodes and placers. Most of the small gold-quartz veins occur along 
fractures in quartz diorite dikes or bedding planes in the shale. Ore shoots vary greatly up to several 
feet in width and several hundred feet in length. At the Golden Messenger the ore occurs as a replace- 
ment deposit along fractures in diorite. The ore shoots are as much as 30 feet thick and are irregular 
and tabular in form. 

The records show no production in recoverable metals from this district since 1940. 



SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT 

Lewis and Clark County is all contained within the boundaries of the Lewis and Clark Soil Con- 
servation District. The district also includes a portion of Jefferson County lying north of Township 6 
North. This district was organized in 1949 with headquarters in Helena, Montana. It is a legal sub- 
division of the state and was established by the farm and ranch operators and owners. 

The district is governed by a board of five supervisors who are elected by the land occupiers of 
the district. They carry out a program of soil erosion control, water conservation, soil fertility man- 

—27— 



agement and proper land use. Furthermore, they have the powers, under state law, to call upon local, 
state, federal and other agencies to assist in executing the district's program. To date the district su- 
pervisors have supplemental memorandums of understanding with the U. S. Soil Conservation Service 
for providing technical assistance and with the State Extension Service to provide educational assistance. 
In addition, they have requested and received assistance from many local organizations, business firms 
and other groups. 

With the assistance which the District Governing Body secures from the various agencies and or- 
ganizations, a work program is developed and carried out. The work program outlines the major soil 
and water conservation problems. It furthermore indicates the work needed to solve these problems. 
An annual work plan is prepared each year by the governing body for the scheduling of actual activities 
which will be stressed and carried out during the year. 

Each year the Lewis and Clark District Governing Body publishes a printed annual report show- 
ing the accomplishments. This report is distributed to all farm and ranch operators and other inter- 
ested parties. 

The district directly assists farmers and ranchers on a voluntary basis in planning and applying 
conservation to the land. Most of this assistance is technical, but some assistance is given in other 
ways, such as, providing earth moving equipment through cooperation with contractors. The technical 
assistance is provided without cost to the farm or ranch operator. The earth moving work is paid for 
by the farm or ranch operator. 

In Lewis and Clark County there are 382 farmers and ranchers operating about 1,119,000 acres. 
There is a total of 2,225,280 acres of land in the county including public owned land. The district 
provides technical assistance on the privately owned land only. 

Considerable technical assistance is provided farm and ranch operators to develop basic conserva- 
tion plans for their land. These plans include detailed soil surveys, range site and condition surveys, 
ground water surveys and other surveys mostly of the engineering type. The various surveys indicate 
the kind and amount of conservation work needed to prevent erosion and to develop the resources of 
the farm or ranch to the maximum. Conservation planning is done with individuals or groups of farmers 
and ranchers working jointly with the Soil Conservation Service technicians assisting the district. 

The farmers or ranchers make the final decisions recorded in the conservation plan based on the 
various surveys and the counsel of the technicians. 

On irrigated land the assistance is given primarily on irrigation systems, land leveling, drainage, 
pumping plants, water control structures, proper application of irrigation water, soil fertility manage- 
ment and crop rotatons. Considerable of this type of work is being done under the 3,000 acre Nilan Ir- 
rigation Reservoir Development near Augusta. Also considerable work is anticipated under the Helena 
Valley Irrigation Project near Helena. 

On dry lands technical assistance is given primarily on stubble mulching, weed control and im- 
proved tame pastures. On range lands technical assistance is given on deferred grazing, proper utiliza- 
tion, range reseeding and livestock water development. On woodlands most assistance is for timber 
stand improvement and selective cutting. 

Since the district has been operating, over 5,000 acres of new irrigation has been established on 
privately owned lands. Improvement on irrigation systems has been made on over 18,000 acres. 
Seven group irrigation projects and two drainage groups have been assisted. More than 2,500 acres of 

—28— 



hay land have been improved through drainage. Over 15,000 acres of crop land have been leveled for 
border dike irrigation. Other accomplishments on dry land, range land and wood land are equally im- 
pressive. 

Excellent progress has been achieved in attaining sound land use. Outstanding cooperation by land 
owners and operators, various federal, state and local agencies and community groups contributes to the 
success of the district. The general public realizes the need and importance of community action to con- 
serve water, soil and vegetation for sustained benefits now and for future generations. 



NATIONAL FORESTS 

The national forests furnish water, recreation, wildlife, timber, forage, and minerals from lands care- 
fully managed as multiple-use public properties. These natural resources are vital to America's industry 
and people. 

Portions of the Flathead, Helena, Lewis and Clark, and Lolo National Forests lie in Lewis and 
Clark County. These are four of the ten national forests located in Montana. The area of these forests 
in the county contains portions of seven ranger districts. On the Helena Forest these districts are: the 
Canyon Ferry District which includes, besides areas in other counties, the area on the west slopes of 
the Big Belt Mountains from lower Magpie Gulch north to include Willow Creek, all located east of the 
Missouri River; the Helena District which includes Upper Dog Creek, a tributary of the Little Blackfoot 
River on the west slopes of the Continental Divide, and Little Prickly Pear, Silver, Seven Mile and Ten 
Mile Creeks, all draining into the Missouri River; and the Lincoln District, the most part of which lies 
on the west slopes of the Continental Divide and includes the Blackfoot River and its tributaries, which 
drain into the Clark Fork of the Columbia River. 

On the Lewis and Clark Forest these districts are the Sun River District, which includes the area 
drained by Falls Creek, the Dearborn River and its tributaries, tributaries of the South Fork of the 
Sun River and all of the North Fork of the Sun River south and west of this drainage as far north as the 
Moose Creek divide, and the Teton District, which includes all of the area west of the North Fork of 
the Sun River north from and including Moose Creek. 

On the Lolo Forest, a part of the Seeley Lake Ranger District is located in the county. This is 
drained by the North Fork of the Blackfoot River and its tributaries, Dry Fork and East Fork. 

On the Flathead Forest, a part of the Big Prairie Ranger District is included in the county. This 
is drained by Danaher Creek, a tributary of the South Fork of the Flathead River. 

The Helena area was crossed by Lewis and Clark in July, 1805. Meriwether Lewis camped at 
the present site of the Meriwether Forest Campground, twenty-seven miles north of Helena in the 
scenic Gates of the Mountains area. 

Lieutenant Mullan built the famous military road for the U. S. Army through a pass on the Con- 
tinental Divide now called Mullan Pass located on the Helena Ranger District and first crossed this Pass 
with a four-mule wagon on March 22, 1854. At this Pass in 1862 the first Masonic meeting was held 
in what is now Montana, which was then in Dakota Territory, by a group of settlers enroute to Oregon. 
A bronze and rock monument now marks this site. 

Many of the rich gold discoveries in what is now Lewis and Clark County were made in or near 
the Canyon Ferry and Helena Ranger District areas. Besides the rich strikes in Last Chance Gulch, 

—29— 



large values were removed from Rimini, Unionville, Marysville, York, Eldorado Bar and from other 
locations. Mining activity in these areas at the present time has greatly diminished. 

Since a substantial portion of the national forest area in the county was made up of grassy stream 
bottoms and open or partly open mountain slopes or ridge tops, livestock raising proved to be an im- 
portant part of the local economy for the early settler and to those who followed him. 

After the original area of public domain was set aside by Presidential Proclamation as the Helena, 
Lewis and Clark, Lolo, and Flathead National Forests in 1906, the use of the grazing areas within their 
boundaries was controlled by a permit system of grazing, designed to properly use available grazing lands 
so that they would continue to produce livestock feed year after year. This system has continued until 
the present time. In 1956 a total of 4,100 cattle, 150 horses, and 11,000 sheep were permitted to graze 
on national forest ranges in this county on some 43 allotments. 

Seasons of use vary between allotments and are based on the vegetative readiness and climate lim- 
itations on each allotment. The average season for cattle is from June 1 to September 30 and for sheep, 
July 1 to September 15. In order to provide for the maximum quantity and quality of water produc- 
tion and obtain optimum use of range forage, the primary objective of the Forest Service is to leave half 
of the available forage each year after livestock use. 

Nearly all of the cattle permitted are owned by stockmen who have obtained a preference use of 
these ranges through prior use over a long period. Each permittee, to qualify, must own a ranch which 
will produce hay and forage sufficient to carry his permitted stock through the period they graze off 
the forest range. In this manner the forest permit rounds out a complete and economic ranching oper- 
ation. A fee is charged each year for the privilege of grazing on national forest range. This fee is 
based on livestock sale prices for the preceding year adjusted to a previously established base. 

In line with the principle of multiple and wise use of the natural resources, all uses of the national 
forests are managed and coordinated for maximum good water management. The Helena National 
Forest supplies the domestic water supplies for the cities of Helena and East Helena in the amounts of 
6% to 9 million gallons, and 140 to 200 thousand gallons daily, respectively. 

The national forest area in this county, located east of the Continental Divide, supported a fair 
stand of Ponderosa Pine, Douglas Fir, Lodgepole Pine and Engelmann Spruce, commercial timber of 
the type found in central Montana. Most of this merchantable timber was logged as a result of the 
heavy demand through the years for the many forest products used in the growth and development of 
the railroads, the City of Helena, other adjacent towns, early mines, ranches and farms. In this area 
much of the remaining stand is predominantly second growth or in small virgin stands not tapped by 
roads. On the west side of the Continental Divide where better timber sites prevail, there remain larger 
areas of uncut merchantable timber. All timber cut from the national forests is in accordance with an 
over-all management plan designed to harvest ripe timber and leave the residue stands in thrifty condi- 
tion both to regenerate timber for the future and to maintain and improve watershed values at optimum 
levels. 

Timber sale contracts require that the operator either dispose of the resulting slash in a manner 
conducive to good fire prevention and erosion control principles or deposit funds into a cooperative 
work allotment to be used by the Forest Service in doing such work. This reduces the fire hazard and 
provides for erosion control on sale areas where abuse of unstable soils would contribute to serious 
siltation of existing streams. 

—30— 



Recreation has become a major use of the national forest lands in the county. This use will 
steadily increase in the future, with increased leisure and population. In 1956 the estimated number of 
annual visits by recreationalists to the national forest areas in the county approximated 150,000. 

Camping and picnicking facilities are provided on several improved campgrounds in the various 
districts. These are McDonald Pass, Cromwell Dixon, Ten Mile and Crystal Creek Campgrounds on 
the Helena District, the Meriwether Campground on the Canyon Ferry District, the Aspen Campground 
on the Lincoln District, and the Bench Mark, Home Gulch and Beaver Creek Campgrounds on the Sun 
River District. 

These areas are developed so that adequate sanitation measures as called for by State law are pro- 
vided, such as safe drinking water, fiyproof and sanitary toilets and adequate garbage disposal. These 
measures protect not only the health of the recreationalist but also prevent contamination of adjacent 
streams or springs. 

There are many summer home residences under Forest Service special use permits scattered over 
the national forest area. These must be built on designated sites so that there is no danger of stream 
pollution and the fire hazard is at a minimum. 

One of the important recreation uses of the national forests in the county is made by hunters and 
fishermen. It is estimated that hunters use the national forest area 22,050 hunter-days and fishermen 
25,600 fishermen-days. This area provides a habitat for 6,000 elk, 20,500 mule and 2,100 white-tail 
deer, 45 moose, 650 black and 80 grizzly bear, 300 mountain sheep and 300 mountain goats. 

A portion of the 990,900-acre Bob Marshall Wilderness Area is located in the northernmost corner 
of the county in Flathead, Lewis and Clark and Lolo Forests. This is primarily a country for extensive 
saddle and pack trips. It contains beautiful camp spots, with abundant horse feed. There are many 
streams and a few lakes affording excellent fishing. Game animals of all kinds are abundant. The Chi- 
nese Wall, which breaks to the east in sheer 1,000-foot cliffs for 20 miles along the Continental Divide, 
is a unique attraction. 

There has been a sharp increase in deer numbers in the past decade to the extent that damage is 
noted on critical winter deer ranges. Special efforts through the Montana State Fish and Game Depart- 
ment have been and are being made to protect the watershed values by the reduction of deer numbers 
through increased bag limits, either sex kills and special seasons. Big game numbers under a multiple use 
scheme of management should be kept in balance with other uses made of the national forest lands. 

Forest lands must be protected from fire, insects and disease. Fires are detected by a combination 
of fixed lookouts, local cooper ators and aerial patrols with telephone and radio communication. In the 
Lewis and Clark county portion of the national forest areas, eleven lookout stations are manned during 
the fire season. Smokejumpers are called from the Aerial Fire Depot at Missoula when fires occur at 
inaccessible locations. An average of 50 fires occur annually in this area, of which 13 are man-caused. 
Unfortunately, the man-caused fires are usually the largest and most costly to extinguish. 

An infestation of spruce budworm, a defoliator, which attacks Douglas Fir Trees in this area, has 
necessitated an aerial spray program in which state and federal agencies cooperate with the local land- 
owners. Unless controlled, this infestation will seriously damage watershed values in the county. 

^31— 



By law, twenty-five per cent of the earnings from timber sales, grazing fees and other commercial 
uses of the national forests is returned to the State each year for distribution to the counties in which 
national forests are located to help maintain public schools and roads. An additional ten per cent is 
used locally for construction and maintenance of roads and trails. The remaining sixty-five percent is 
deposited in the U. S. Treasury and may be disbursed only by congressional appropriation. For fiscal 
year 1956 Lewis and Clark County received, as its share of the twenty-five per cent fund disbursement, 
$21,947.35. 



—32— 



SUMMARY OF IRRIGATED LAND BY RIVER BASINS IN THE 
FOLLOWING COUNTIES COMPLETED TO DATE 

Big Horn, Broadwater, Carbon, Custer, Deer Lodge, Gallatin, Golden Valley, Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, 

Madison, Meagher, Musselshell, Park, Rosebud, Silver Bow, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, 

Treasure, Wheatland and Yellowstone* 



RIVER BASIN 

^Missouri River Drainage Basin 

*Missouri River 

Jefferson River 



Beaverhead River_ 
Big Hole River _ 

Madison River 

Gallatin River 

Smith River 

Sun River 



Musselshell River 



Grand Total Missouri River Basin. 

^Yellowstone River Drainage Basin 

Yellowstone River 

Stillwater River 

Clarks Fork River 

Big Horn River ._._ 

Tongue River . 

Powder River 



Grand Total Yellowstone River Basin 

| Columbia River Drainage Basin 

Clark Fork (Deer Lodge, Hellgate, Missoula) 
River ___ , 

Grand Total Columbia River Basin 



Grand Total In Counties Completed to Date_ 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 



Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 



Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 



71,442 16,476 87,918 

61,291 9,713 71,004 

40,77 1 6,076 46,847 

23,775 1,950 25,725 

39,445 7,660 47,105 

111,914 21,097 133,011 

30,304 18,398 48,702 

11,157 2,313 13,470 

64,789 57,870 122,659 



454,888 141,553 



596,441 



299,053 96,088 395,141 

27,489 16,403 43,892 

91,768 24,195 115,963 

65,395 25,579 90,974 

22,137 7,479 29,616 

8,264 1,804 10,068 



514,106 



171,548 685,654 



17,535 1,988. 



19,523 



17,535 
986,529 



1,988 19,523 

315,089 1,301,618 



JTotals for each stream includes all tributaries except those specifically listed. 

*Names of streams indented on the lefthand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream named above 
which is not indented. 



—33— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



MISSOURI RIVER BASIN 

*Missouri River 

Magpie Creek 

Spokane Creek 

Mitchell Gulch Creek 

Mud Springs (Dahlhausen) 

Trout Creek 

Soup Creek _. 

Unnamed Spring 

Prickly Pear Creek 

McClellan Creek 

Wells 



Unnamed Springs and Waste 

Stansfield Lake 

Waste & Drain 

Ten Mile Creek 

Moose Gulch Creek 

Lazyman Creek 

Bear Gulch Creek 

Walker Creek 

North Fork Walker (Big Porcupine) 

Creek 

Negro Gulch Creek 

Little Porcupine Creek 

Norton (Sweeney) Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Colorado Creek 

Blue Cloud Creek 

Nursery Wells 

Seven Mile Creek 

Austin Creek 

Greenhorn Creek 

Park Gulch Creek 

Wells 

Silver Creek 

Three Mile Creek 

Wells 



Smith Fork of Prickly Pear (Spring) Creek 
Unnamed Springs 



Total Prickly Pear Creek and Tributaries 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 


Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 


Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 


5,107____ 


1,184 


6,291 


33 





33 


47 


33 


80 











31 





31 


67 


13 


80 





39 


39 


4 





4 


4,543 


669 


5,212 


252 


138 


390 


37 


13 


50 


90 





90 


32 





32 


89 


34 


123 


3,051 _ 


415 


3,466 


20 





20 


10 





10 


10 





10 


67 





67 


38 


0. 


38 


8 


0___ 


8 


87 





87 


109 





109 


6 





6 


44 





44 





10 


10 


10 





10 


1,039 


58 


1,097 


19 





19 


23 





23 


55 





55 


3__ 


15 


18 


511 


122__ . 


633 


127 





127 


5 


0. 


5 


8.. _ 





8 


39—. 





39 


10,332 . 


1,474 


11,806 



—34— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



MISSOURI RIVER BASIN— (continued) 



Beaver Creek 

Hunters Gulch Creek 

Towhead (Ming) Creek 

Sperry (Bear Tooth) Creek 
Well 



Rose (Falls Gulch) Creek 

Timber Gulch Creek 

Spring Creek 

Little Prickly Pear Creek „ 



South Fork Little Prickly Pear (Beaver) 

Creek 

Deadman Creek 

Cottonwood Creek 

Lost Horse Creek 

Marsh Creek 

Three Springs 

Canyon Creek 

Virginia Creek 

Gould Creek 

Mill Creek 

Sawmill Creek 

Big Sheep Creek 

Clark Creek 

Wolf Creek 



Long Gulch Creek 



Total Little Prickly Pear Creek and Tributaries 



Rock Creek 



Wells Fork Rock Creek 

Dog Creek 

Stickney Creek 

Dearborn River 



North Fork Dearborn River 

demons Creek 

Cunniff Creek 

McClain Creek 

Middle Fork Dearborn River 

Skunk Creek 

Little (South Fork) Skunk Creek_ 

South Fork Dearborn River 

Routt Creek 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 


Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 


Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 


235 





235 


6 





6 


221 


215 


436 


96 





96 


20 





20 


42 





42 


8 





8 





12 


12 


2,628 


260 


2,888 


59 





59 


125 





125 


10 





10 


10 





10 


165 





165 


50 





50 


1,280 


290 


1,570 











165 





165 


50 





50 


14 





14 


25 





25 


40 





40 


12 





12 


8 





- _ 8 








4,641 


550 ._ 


5,191 


481 


233 


714 


17 





17 


154 





154 


8 





8 


39 





39 


2,466 


707 


3,173 


45 





45 


98 





98 


24 





24 


97 





97 











5 





5 


439 


98 


537 


5 





5 



—35— 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



MISSOURI RIVER BASIN— (continued) 



Roberts Creek 
Johnson Creek 
Flat Creek 



Total Dearborn River and Tributaries. 



Sun River 



North Fork Sun River 
Willow Creek 



Little Willow Creek 
Barr Creek 



Rose (Furman) Creek 

South Fork Sun River 

Smith Creek 

Ford Creek _■___ 



Elk (DuBray) Creek 

Blubber Creek 

Goss Creek 



Miscellaneous Drainage 

Lemon Springs 

Dry Creek 



Simms (Spring) Creek 



Total Sun River and Tributaries- 
Total Missouri River Basin 





Irrigable 




Present 


Acres Under 


Maximum 


Irrigated 


Present 


Irrigable 


Acres 


Facilities 


Acres 



5. 

5. 

391. 



3,619 

653- 

273 __ 

1,004_ 

824._ 

89- 

43- 

4,526_ 

1,432._ 

1,888... 

584... 

0___ 

52... 

164... 

12... 

144_. 

169... 



5 

5 

391 



805 4,424 



339. 



57 

149. 

29. 





0. 

198. 

122. 

25. 

0. 

16. 

0. 

0. 

62. 



992 

273 

1,061 

973 

118 

43 



1,316 5,842 



1,432 

1,386 

706 

25 

52 

180 

12 

144 

231 



11,157 2,313 13,470 

36,326 6,871 43,197 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN 

Clark Fork of the Columbia (Missoula, 

Hellgate) River 

Blackfoot River 

Alice Creek 



Toms Creek 



Landers Fork of Blackfoot River- 
Indian Meadow Creek 

Wells 

Poor Man's Creek 

Humbug Creek 

Keep Cool Creek 

Sucker Creek 



Liverpool Creek 

Stonewall Creek 












385 


443 


828 


18 





18 


16 


0. 


16 











27 





27 


33 





33 


241 





241 


11 





11 


295 







295 


33 


33 


55 





55 


90 


107 


197 



—36- 



IRRIGATION SUMMARY OF LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY BY RIVER BASINS 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN— (Continued) 



Park Creek 
Beaver Creek 

Lincoln Creek _ 
Clear Creek _ 

Willow Creek 

Bear Creek 



Total Blackfoot River and Tributaries 
Total Columbia River Basin 



1,899 
1,899 



Present 

Irrigated 

Acres 


Irrigable 

Acres Under 

Present 

Facilities 


Maximum 

Irrigable 

Acres 


23 







23 


470 









470 


16 




16 


48 







48 


120 







120 


18 







18 



550 2,449 

550 2,449 



Total All Irrigation Lewis and Clark County, 



38,225 7,421 



45,646 



* Names of streams indented on the left hand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream named 
above which is not indented. 



—37- 



DEARBORN CANAL AND WATER COMPANY 



HISTORY 



The lands now served by the Dearborn Canal and Water Company were first included in a Carey 
Land Act Project in the year of 1905. At that time the Dearborn Project planned to store and divert 
the waters of the Dearborn River for the irrigation of 36,000 acres south of Gilman. After construct- 
ing 20 miles of ditch at a cost of $200,000 the project was dropped. On November 8, 1911, the con- 
tract with the Dearborn Canal Company was declared void and the land relinquished to the U. S. 
Government. 

On the 29th day of May, 1913, the Dearborn Canal and Water Company was incorporated for 
a period of 40 years. This new canal company includes only a small part of the land area proposed for 
irrigation by the Dearborn Project of 1905-1911. Among the first water users in the Dearborn Canal 
and Water Company were: S. W. Mosher, Jacob C. Fey, John Barrett, Levi La Chapelle, C. E. La 
Chapelle, Edmond La Chapelle, and W. J. Myles. Capital stock of the incorporation was set at $50,000, 
divided into 5,000 shares at a par value of $10.00 per share. The stock of the company was to be 
declared as non-assessable. 

After expiration of their Articles of Incorporation May 28, 1953, the Dearborn Canal and Water 
Company re-incorporated for another 40 year period. 

PRESENT STATISTICS 

Location: The Dearborn Canal diverts water from the North Fork of the Dearborn River in NE*4 
SW14 of Section 27, T. 18N., R. 7W., and follows a northeasterly direction for 4.1 miles where it 
spills into the headwaters of Flat Creek in SWV4NWV4 of Section 18, T. 18N., R. 6W. Using this drain- 
age as a carrier for 1.8 miles it takes out again in the NW^SE 1 /^ of Section 8, T. 18N., R. 6W., and 
continues northerly 5.5 miles to NEV^SWVi of Section 29, T. 19N., R. 6W. Water is also spilled into 
Flat Creek from the canal in NEJ4SEV4 of Section 8, T. 18N., R. 6W., and taken out of Flat Creek 
by various private diversions. 

Land irrigated under the canal is located in Sections 7, 16, 17, and 21, Township 18N., Range 
4W.; Sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 19, 20, 29, and 30, Township 18N., Range 5W.; Sections 2, 3, 4, 
7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 17, 18, and 24, Township 18N., Range 6W.; Sections 23 and 24, Township 18N., Range 
7W.; and Sections 19, 20, 29, 30, 33, 35, and 36, Township 19N., Range 6W. 

Length and Capacity of Canal: Total length of the main canal system is 9.6 miles, exclusive of 
the drainage used as a carrier for the canal water. The capacity of the canal is about 100 second feet, 
which is more than sufficient for the acreage irrigated. 

Operation and Maintenance: Assessments for O. & M. have averaged only 20 cents per share of 
stock owned in the company for the past several years. One share of stock is equivalent to 1 miner's inch 
of water. 

Present Users: All of the 5,000 shares of stock in the corporation are subscribed to in various 
amounts among 8 water users. 

Acreage Irrigated In 1956 there were 2,437 acres irrigated from the Dearborn Canal, with 707 
acres potentially irrigable under the system. 

—38— 



WATER RIGHT DATA 

Claimed by the Dearborn Canal and Water Company are two appropriated water rights as follows: 

1. From the Dearborn River by the State Board of Arid Land Commission, 16,000 miner's inches 
as of the Date December 6. 1899. (Ref: Book H, Page 550 of Ranches and Ditches, Lewis and Clark 
County Courthouse, Helena, Montana). 

2. Appropriated by Donald Bradford from the Dearborn River as of the date July 18, 1888 for 
300,000 miner's inches. (Ref: Book F, Page 446 of Ranches and Ditches, Lewis and Clark County 
Courthouse, Helena, Montana). 

(See Maps in Part II, Pages 30, 31, 32, 33 & 34). 

THE HELENA VALLEY AND LAKESIDE 
WATER USERS' ASSOCIATIONS 

HISTORY 

The irrigation project which is now known as the Helena Valley Water Users' Association and the 
Lakeside Water Users' Association, was created on June 10, 1912, under the name of the Montana 
Reservoir and Irrigation Company, a subsidiary of the Montana Power Company. From the date of its 
incorporation in 1912 this company operated continuously for a period of 22 years. The beginning of 
the drouth and the depression in the early 1930's resulted in the Montana Power Company taking pos- 
session of the project from the Montana Reservoir and Irrigation Company in 1934. 

In January, 1946, the Power Company deeded the entire project over to the Montana State Water 
Conservation Board. Management of the project by the State Water Conservation Board required the 
formation of the Helena Valley Water Users' Association and the Lakeside Water Users' Association, 
both of which are operating at the present time. 

When the Montana Power Company deeded the project to the Water Board in 1946, it was agreed 
that the Board would continue operation of the project until such a time when the proposed Helena 
Valley Irrigation District project for the same area would be completed by the Bureau of Reclama- 
tion. This project is now under construction and when completed it will furnish water to all the land 
now irrigated by the Helena Valley and Lakeside Water Users' Associations, a supplemental supply to 
the City of Helena, totaling 13,000 acres in the Helena Valley. 

The Helena Valley Irrigation District was created by a Decree of the District Court (First Judi- 
cial District, Helena) on June 30, 1955. Briefly, the project consists of pumping water from Canyon 
Ferry Reservoir, diverting it through a tunnel which will pierce the Spokane Hills; carrying the water 
through a canal to a regulating reservoir on the Spokane Bench, from which water will be diverted 
through a canal system around the south, west, and north edges of the Helena Valley, terminating at 
the northeast corner of the valley where the tail water will be discharged into Lake Helena. The con- 
struction of the tunnel through the Spokane Hills began on February 22, 1957, and it is planned to 
have water delivered to the project land by May 1, 1959. 

PRESENT STATISTICS 

Location: The Helena Valley Water Users' Association irrigation system consists of a pumping 
plant containing three (3) 600 H. P. electric pumps and is located on the north shore of Lake Helena 

—39— 



in SViSE 1 /^ of Section 13, T. UN., R. 3W. At the pumping plant water from an average lift of 110 
feet is discharged into two canals. The land irrigated is located in Sections 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 
21, 22, 28, 29, 30, and 31, T. UN., R. 3W.; and Section 18, T. UN., R. 2W. 

The Lakeside Water Users' Association has its pumping station located on the east shore of Lake 
Helena in SWV4NEV4 of Section 19, T. UN., R. 2W. Pumping facilities consist of two (2) 900 H. P. 
pumps, which discharge water into the main canal at an average lift of 165 feet. Lands irrigated are 
located in Sections 17, 19, 20, 21, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, 34, and 35 in T. UN., R. 2W.; and in Sections 
1, 2, 3, 10, 11, and 12, T. 10 N., R. 2W. 

Length and Capacity of Canals: Length of canals "A" and "B" for the Helena Valley Water Users' 
Association are 5.2 miles and 7.6 miles respectively, with both canals having an initial capacity of ap- 
proximately 85 second feet. 

The main canal for the Lakeside Water Users' Association is about 9Vz miles long, with an in- 
itial capacity of 75 second feet. 

Operation and Maintenance: Water charges for the Helena Valley Water Users' Association in 
1956, including O. & M., were $4.75 per acre for 2Vi acre feet of water or water entitled to be used. 
A special rate is given the number of acre feet used over the amount each water user is entitled to use. 
This special rate is 25 cents per acre foot, plus the power charge, making a total of $1.40 per acre 
foot for additional water. 

Water charges for the Lakeside Water Users' Association in 1956 were $4.60 per acre foot of water 
used which includes operation and maintenance of the canal system. 

Present Users: During the irrigation season of 1956 there were 31 water users under the Helena 
Valley project using 7,010 acre feet of water. 

The Lakeside project water users totaled 17 in 1956 and purchased 1,797 acre feet of water. 

Acreage Irrigated: In 1956 there were 2,937 acres irrigated from the Helena Valley Water Users' 
Association canal system and 423 acres potentially irrigable under existing ditch facilities. 

The Lakeside Water Water Users' project had 1,559 acres irrigated in 1956 and 726 acres poten- 
tially irrigable. 

WATER RIGHT DATA 

The water rights that apply to the Helena Valley and Lakeside Water Users' Associations were 
transferred by deed to the Montana Power Company by the Montana Reservoir and Irrigation Com- 
pany on May 5, 1934. 

These water rights are described as follows: 

1. Two thousand (2,000) cfs, legal measurement of the waters of the Madison River in Galatin 
County, Montana, appropriated by Max Hebgen on April 30, 1906, and recorded May 5, 1906, on 
page 154, Book 3 of Water Rights in the records of Gallatin County, Montana. 

2. Six thousand (6,000) cfs, legal measurement of the waters of the Madison River in Gallatin 
County, Montana, appropriated by J. L. Templeman on May 29, 1906, and recorded June 6, 1906, on 
pages 159 and 160, Book 3 of Water Rights in the records of Gallatin County, Montana. 

—40— 



3. Also a certain water right described as three thousand (3,000) cfs, of the waters of the Missouri 
River in Lewis & Clark County, Montana, appropriated by the Helena Power Transmission Company 
on August 10, 1906, and recorded August 27, 1906, on page 568, Book "L" of Placers in the records 
of Lewis & Clark County, Montana. 

(See Maps in Part II, Pages 2, 8 & 9) . 



NILAN WATER USERS ASSOCIATION 

(Including the Florence Canal) 
HISTORY 

This project is located in the northern part of Lewis and Clark County, seven miles west of the 
town of Augusta. It consists of a diversion canal from Smith and Ford Creeks diverting water to a 
bench reservoir, where two outlet (supply) canals furnish water for the irrigation of lands along Willow 
Creek, Smith Creek and the South Fork of the Sun River. 

The Nilan Storage Project was built by the State Water Conservation Board, which required the 
formation of the Nilan Water Users Association, and water purchase contracts between the water pur- 
chaser, the Association and the Board. (See Water Marketing and Water Purchase Contract Page 43). 

Prior to awarding the construction contract in September 7, 1950, the Nilan Water Users Asso- 
ciation filed articles of incorporation on June 20, 1950, for a period of forty years. 

According to the Engineering Report of October 27, 1951, the Nilan Storage Reservoir will supply 
supplemental water to about 9,000 acres and a full supply to 1,000 acres under the project. The project 
first operated during the year of 1952 under the Nilan Water Users Association. 

PRESENT STATISTICS 

Location: The diversion canal diverts from the north bank of Smith Creek in Section 4, T. 19N., 
R. 8W., crossing Ford Creek in Section 26, T. 20N., R. 8W., where it empties into the Nilan Reser- 
voir in Section 24, T. 20 N., R. 8W. The reservoir occupies parts of Sections 17, 18, 19, and 20, T. 
20N., R. 7W. and Section 24, T. 20N., R. 8W. From the reservoir the east supply canal diverts in 
Section 20, T. 20N., R. 7W., and courses southerly to where it empties into Smith Creek in Section 33, 
T. 20N., R. 7W. for irrigation of lands on the both sides of the South Fork of the Sun River in the 
vicinity of Augusta. The north supply canal diverts from the reservoir in Section 18, T. 20N., R. 7W., 
and follows a northerly direction to its confluence with Willow Creek in Section 7, T. 20N., R. 7W., to 
serve lands along the south side of Willow Creek northwest of Augusta. Lands to be irrigated are lo- 
cated in parts of Townships 20 and 21N., Ranges 6 and 7W.; Township 20N., Range 5W.; and 
Township 20N., Range 8W. 

During the year of 1956 the upper part of the diversion canal from Smith Creek to Ford Creek 
was not used, due to a wash out in 1955 along the bank of the canal. Repair work on this part of the 
diversion canal has been completed and it will again be in operation for the year of 1957. 

Besides furnishing water to private ditches out of Willow Creek, Smith Creek and the South Fork 
of the Sun River, the project also supplies water to the Florence Canal. Point of diversion for the 
Florence Canal is from Smith Creek in the SEW of Section 33, T. 20N., R.. 7W. It has a capacity of 
75 second feet and is approximately 15 miles long. During the summer of 1956 some reconstruction 

—41— 



work on the Florence Canal was made and when the distribution systems for the individual water users 
are completed, about 4,000 acres will be irrigated from this canal. 

Principal Features: The diversion canal from Smith Creek to Ford Creek has a capacity of 200 sec- 
ond feet and is 4.1 miles long. From Ford Creek the diversion canal has a capacity of 300 second feet and 
a length of 1.8 miles to the reservoir. At both Smith and Ford Creeks the diversion dams are built of 
concrete. The crest length on the Smith Creek diversion structure is 108 feet, with a height of 1.75 feet; 
on Ford Creek the diversion structure has a crest length of 63.3 feet and a height of 5.5 feet. 

The total drainage area above the diversion canal is 44 square miles, with 26 square miles above 
the Smith Creek gage and the remaining 18 square miles above the Ford Creek gage. 

The Nilan Reservoir was created by utilizing an old glacial lake. In order to utilize and control 
the storage it was necessary to construct two dams — one on the north side and the other on the east 
side of the lake. The reservoir has a storage capacity of 10,000 acre feet and covers a flooded area of 
525 acres. 

The North Dam is an earth fill structure 530 feet long, a bottom width of 225 feet; height above 
the bottom outlet conduit 54 feet; also a dike 1,300 feet long. From the dam the outlet canal to 
Willow Creek has a capacity of 75 second feet and is 1.1 miles long. 

The East Dam is also an earth fill structure, with a top width of 20 feet and the height above the 
bottom outlet conduit of 51 feet. The outlet canal to Smith Creek has a capacity of 75 second feet 
and is 3.6 miles long. 

Another feature of this project is to raise the level of Soap Lake for the additional storage of 1,600 
acre feet of water. 

Operation and Maintenance: Water charges for the project are $1.50 per acre foot which include 
50 cents for operation and maintenance and $1.00 for construction. In the Florence Canal the water 
charge is 25 cents for O. & M. and 33 cents for construction in addition to the $1.50 per acre foot paid 
to the Nilan Water Users Association for storage water. 

Present Users: In the year of 1956 there were twenty-two water users (including the Florence 
Canal) under contract to purchase 5,800 acre feet of water from the Nilan Storage Project. 

Acerage Irrigated: Under this project in 1956 there were 936 acres furnished a full supply and 
3,273 acres receiving a supplemental supply, with 284 acres potentially irrigable under existing ditch 
facilities. 

WATER RIGHT DATA 

Water right filings for the Nilan Storage Project were made by the State Water Conservation 
Board on August 30, 1950, and are as follows: From Ford Creek and tributaries all the unappropriated 
waters as of the date August 22, 1950. Reference: (Recorded and filed in Book 48, Miscellaneous 
Records, Page 220, Lewis and Clark County). From Smith Creek and Tributaries all the unappropri- 
ated waters, dated August 22, 1950. Reference: (Recorded and filed in Book 48, Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords, Page 221, Lewis and Clark County). 

(See Maps in Part II, Pages 34, 38, 39, 40, 41, and 42). 



—42— 



WATER MARKETING CONTRACT 

This is an agreement between the Water Users' Association and State Water Conservation Board; 
whereby the Board agrees to sell to the Association all of the available water of the project and the 
Association agrees to distribute same to water purchasers and provide method of payment of sums 
due, levying of assessment for operation and maintenance cost, time of notification of such levy to be 
given water purchasers, time of default and remedies in the event of default. 



WATER PURCHASE CONTRACT 

This is a three party contract entered into between the individual water purchaser, the Associa- 
tion and the State Water Conservation Board; whereby, the individual agrees to purchase a definite 
amount of water and to pay therefore a definite sum of money on or before a definite day, until a 
definite future date; in addition to such definite annual sum, the individual agrees to pay such addi- 
tional sum or sums as may be required annually as his proportionate share of the cost of operation and 
maintenance of the Association. This contract is void unless the water purchaser executes a Subscrip- 
tion and Pledge Agreement, 



—43— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's Cu. Ft 
Decrees Inches Per Sec. 



MISSOURI RIVER BASIN 
*Missouri River 

Correll Creek 

Cotton Creek 

Scott Creek 

Hellgate Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Spring Creek 

Little Hellgate Creek _ 

Unnamed Springs 

Magpie Creek 

Fox Gulch Creek ... 

Unnamed Spring 

Cave Gulch Creek 

Cave Gulch Springs . 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Spring 

Horse Gulch Creek 

Unnamed Slough 

Oregon Gulch Creek _ 

Clarks Creek 

Spokane Creek 



27 10,442,060 261,051.500 



1. 
1_ 
L 
6. 
1. 
4_ 
L 
2.. 
8_. 
1_ 
1_ 
10. 
1. 
L 
1. 
2_ 
1. 
6. 
4_. 
7_. 



Unnamed Springs 

Willow Springs 

Mitchell Gulch Creek .... 

Mudd Springs 

Mud Springs 

Unnamed Spring 

McDonald Gulch Creek. 

Centennial Gulch Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Springs 

McGuire Creek 

McGuire Spring 

Cedar Gulch Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Trout Creek 

South Fork Trout Creek 
North Fork Trout Creek 

Station Creek 

Goodman Gulch Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Blacksmith Gulch Creek.. 

Unnamed Spring 

Kelly Gulch (Billie) Cr. 

Browns Gulch Creek 

York (New York) Gulch 

Creek 

Rattlesnake Gulch 

Creek 

Little Rattlesnake 
Gulch Creek 



42 



500. 

150. 

200. 

800. 

200. 

470. 

200 

130. 

800. 

All. 

200. 

664 



10 
150. 

1,000. 
205 
164 

2,110. 



95. 

50. 
500 
100. 
150.. 

10. 

50. 
0. 
4. 

60. 

50. 

100." 
AIL 

2.. 

100. 

37,220. 

200. 

All. 

50. 

0. 

400. 

0. 

100. 

35. 

0.. 

100. 

100. 

50. 



12.500 

3.750 

5.000 
20.000 

5.000 
11.750 

5.000 

3.250 
20.000 10572 



2 150 3.750 



5.000 
16.600 



.250 

3.750 

25.000 

5.125 

4.100 

52.750 2187. 

5764 1 . 

73 2 .. 

9198 _ 



1 90 2.250 

1 90 2.250 

1 .. ... 300 7.500 

1 100 2.500 



2.375 
1.250 
12.500 
2.500 
3.750 

.250 
1.250 
0.000 

.100 
1.500 
1.250 



2.500 



.050 
2.500 

930.500 16631 

5.000 



775 19.375 



1.250 
0.000 
10.000 
0.000 
2.500 
875 
0^000 16631 

2.500 

2.500 

1.250 



(See Trout Creek) 



* Names of streams indented on the lefthand margin indicate that they are tributaries of the first stream named 
above which is not indented. 



—44— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 
Decrees Inches Per Sec. 



Unnamed Spring 1 

Kingsbury Gulch Creek 5. 

German Gulch Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1 

Soup Creek 9. 

Ballaret Creek 3. 

Sweats Gulch Creek 1. 

Bull Run Creek 3. 

Spring Creek 1. 

Prickly Pear Creek ... 50. 



Morrows Gulch Creek 1. 

Unnamed Swamp 1 

Spring Creek 0. 

Clancy Creek 0. 

Crystal Creek 

Lump Gulch Creek 



Lost Creek 
Jackson Creek 

McClellan Creek 

Holmes Gulch Creek 

Unnamed Creek 

Rinker Spring 

Unnamed Spring 



0. 

0. 



1. 

2. 

1. 

1_ 

Wildcat Slough 2_. 

Unnamed Creek 2. 

Unnamed Springs 3. 

Unnamed Drain 2. 

Flowerree Slough 2 

Unnamed Springs 2. 

Ten Mile Creek 45. 

Butlers Lake 1. 

Capital Creek 1. 



Coon Hollow Creek- 
Hunter Gulch Creek 

Right Fork Hunter 

Gulch Creek 

North Fork Ten Mile 

Creek 



Potts Spring 1 

Try Again Creek 2 

Unnamed Creek 3 



Unnamed Springs 2_. 

Monitor Creek 1__ 

Unnamed Spring 1.. 

Ruby Creek 5_. 

East Fork Ruby Cr. 3_. 

West Fork Ruby Cr. 1. 

Banner Creek 5_. 

Left Fork Banner Cr. 1_. 

Beaver Creek 14_. 

S. Fork Beaver Cr. 1. 

Lee Mountain Creek .... 2_. 

Clear Creek 2_ 

Spring Creek 4_. 

Wilson Creek L 

Minnehaha Creek 5.. 



30_. 
140.. 
AIL 

10- 
1,500 
700_ 

40. 
210_ 
100 
14,798- 



500- 

100- 

0- 



0. 

0_ 

0- 

0. 



150. 

200- 

100. 

25- 

800- 

110. 

200- 

325_ 

100- 

160 

14,740- 



300- 

20- 

10_ 

200-. 

50.. 

1,500.. 

110.. 

145-. 

AIL. 

25.. 

1,900. 

325_. 

25.. 

3,900- 

400. 
3,160- 

A1L 

i so- 
so. 

1,252.. 

150- 

1,800. 



.750 
3.500 



.250 








37.500 








17.500 








1.000 








5.250 








2.500 








369.950— 


__ 668 3 _. 


— - 27 3,737.5 


.- 93.438 




.. 4643 4 .. 


- 32 2,530— 


____ 63.250 




... 10316_ 


- 1 720— 


.__. 18.000 




...20645.. 


. 2 634— 


— 15.850 


12.500 








2.500 








0.000— 


- 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


... 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


... 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


... 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


... 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


... 668 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


0.000— 


...20645 


(See Prickly Pear 


Creek) 


3.750 








5.000 








2.500 








.625 








20.000 








2.750 








5.000 








8.125 








2.500 








4.000 








368.500— 


__ 4989- 


- 55 5,453— 


—136.325 




- 9014- 


1 240— 


— 6.000 


7.500 








.500 








.250 








5.000 








1.250 








37.500 








2.750 








3.625 








.625 








47.500 








8.125 








.625 








97.500 








10.000 








79.000 









3.750 
2.000 

31.300 
3.750 

45.000 



-45— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


Case No. of 


Miner's Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


No. Decrees 


Inches Per Sec. 


Rock Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Tributary of Minne- 












haha Creek 


2 


150 


3.750 






Whiskey Creek 


3 


200 


5.000 






Unnamed Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 






Deer Creek 


7 


1,800 


45.000 






Moose Creek 


4 


700 


17.500 






Lazyman Gulch Creek 


1 


All 








Bear Creek 


3 


310 


7.750 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


50 


1.250 






Walker Creek 


13 


2,100 


52.500 






Right Fork Walker 






Creek 


1 


40 


1.000 






Unnamed Spring ____ 


1 


500 


12.500 






Tributary of Walker 












Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 






W. Fork Walker Cr. 


2 


300 


7.500 






N. Fork Walker (Big 












Porcupine) Creek.. 


3 


200 


5.000 






K. C. Springs 


1 


40 


1.000 






Negro Gulch Creek 


1 


All 








Little Porcupine Cr. 


2 


60 


1.500 






Unnamed Spring. 


1 


25 


.625 






Allbrights Gulch Creek 


1 


200 


5.000 






Norton (Sweeney) Cr. 


2 


260 


6.500 






Unnamed Creek 


2 


150 


3.750 






Motor Creek 


1 


25 


.625 






Unnamed Creek 


2 


160 


4.000 






Willow Creek 


6 


2,210 


55.250 






Unnamed Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Colorado Creek 


6 


600 


15.000 






Left Fork Colo. Cr. 


1 


100 


2.500 






Middle Fork 












Colo. Cr 


1 


200 


5.000 






Unnamed Creek.... 


1 


200 


5.000 






Spring Creek 


1 


20 


500 






Primrose Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Trib. Primrose Cr. 


1 


40 


1.000 






Nelson Gulch Creek 


2 


512 


12.800... 


. 902 O. S. 1 


. All.. 


Cedar Springs 


1 


10 


.250 






Kaiser Gulch Creek 


1 


25 


.625 






E. Fork Kaiser 












Gulch Creek 


1 


400 


10.000 






Blue Cloud Creek 


5 


100 


2.500 






Champaign Creek 


1 


250 


6.250 






Snowshoe Gulch Cr. 


1 


100 


2.500 






Pilgrim Gulch Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Sherry Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Cordwood Gulch Creek 


1 


All 








Independence Gulch Cr. 


3 


70 


1.750 






Shaffer Gulch Creek.... 


1 


20 


.500 






Unnamed Creek 


3 


160 


4.000 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


60 


1.500 






Grass Valley Springs 


1 


50 


1.250 






Unnamed Springs 


3 


190 


4.750 






Daisy Lode Spring 


1 


75 


1.875 






Unnamed Creek 


1 


20 


.500 






Unnamed Swamps 


3 


700 


17.500 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


12 


.300 






Seven Mile Creek 


21 


5,475 


136.875.... 


.. 5860 15. 


..2,011 50.275 



—46- 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


Case 


No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


No. 


Decrees Inches Per Sec. 


La Fontaine Springs 


1 


1 


.025 






Rocky Spring 


1 


5 


.125 






Austin Creek 


4 


630 


15.750.... 


. 5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 


Coal Gulch Creek 


1 


All 








Branch Austin Cr. 


1 


6 


.150 






Mullan Gulch Cr. 


1 


10 


.250 






Unnamed Creek __ 


2 


3 


.075 






Greenhorn Gulch Cr. 


13 ... 


1,460 


36.500 


5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 


Summit Gulch Cr. 


2 


100 


2.500 




Unnamed Spring __ 


1 


100 


2.500 






Granite Creek .. 


7 


640 


16.000 


5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 


Unnamed Spring.. 


1 


150 


3.750 




Sump 








0.000... 


. 5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 


Bell & Brown Spring 


2 


100 


2.500 






Skelly Gulch Creek 
E. F. Skelly 


12 .... . 


3,770 


94.250 


5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 










Gulch Creek 


3 


320 


8.000 






N. F. Skelly 












Gulch Creek 


1 


1,000 


25.000 






Unnamed Springs . 


3 


615 


15.375 






Hamlin Creek 


1 


100 


2.500-- 


.. 5860 


(See Seven Mile Creek) 


Lincoln Gulch Cr. 


4 


100 


2.500 






Spring Creek 


4 :_ 


2,000 


50.000 






Jeff Davis 












Gulch Creek 


4 


525 


13.125 






Paymaster 












Springs 


1 


25 


.625 






Unnamed 












Springs 


3 


210 


5.250 






St. Lewis Gulch 












Creek 








0.000 






Spring Culch 












Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


30 


.750 






Park Gulch Creek.... 


6 


750 


18.750 - 


_ 1252. 


1 100 2.500 


Unnamed Springs.. 


2 


275 


6.875 






Sheep Camp 












Gulch Creek 


2 


128 


3.200 






Sage Brush Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 






Unnamed Springs 


4 


1 10 


2.750 






Unnamed Slough 


1 ... 


200 


5.000 






Cherry Creek 


10 


1,150 


28.750 






Grass Valley Creek.. 


1 


150 


3.750 






Lone Tree Spring 


1 


25 


.625 






Wilson Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 






Crystal Springs Creek.. 


2 


75 


1.875 






Crystal Springs 


2 


350 


8.750 






Stuewe Springs 


2 


600 


15.000 






Last Chance Gulch Cr. 


6 


300 


7.500 






Grizzly Creek 


9 


585 


14.625 






Glenns Spring 


1 


5 


.125 






Unnamed Springs .. 


4 


15 


.375 






Unnamed TunneL. 


1 


3 


.075 






Oro Fino Gulch Cr. 


7 


120 


3.000 ... 


.. 5452. 


-.- 1 All 


Arastra (Keenes) 












Gulch Creek 


5 


60 


1.500 






Left Fork Oro Fino 












Gulch Creek 


1 


5 


.125 






Right Fork Oro 












Fino Gulch 












Creek 


1 


All 









—47— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of 
Decrees 



Miner's Cu. Ft. 
Inches Per Sec. 



Roberta Spring 1. 

Unnamed Drain____ 1. 

Unnamed Springs . 4„ 

Dry Gulch Creek .... 10. 
Left Fork Dry 

Gulch Creek 3 

Right Fork Dry 

Gulch Creek 2. 

W. Fork Dry 

Gulch Creek ____ 0. 

Unnamed Spring .. 1_. 

Tucker Gulch Cr. 2_ 
Unnamed 

Springs 2_. 

Unnamed Springs — _ 4. 

Waste 2_ 

Silver Creek 26. 

Hendricks Gulch Creek 2_. 

Soft Bed Creek 1_. 

Unnamed Creek 1. 

Unnamed Springs 2. 

Ottawa Gulch Creek 6. 

Unnamed Spring 1_. 

Rawhide Gulch Creek 3_. 
South Fork Rawhide 

Gulch Creek 1_. 

Unnamed Tunnel 1_ 

Waste 1. 

Jennies Fork Creek 3_. 

Sawmill Gulch Creek.. 3.. 
South Fork Sawmill 

Gulch Creek 1. 

China Gulch Creek ._ 1. 
Trust to Luck Gulch 

Creek 3. 

Warren Gulch Creek 1. 

Trust to Luck Spring 1_. 

Mount Lookout Spring 2. 

Three Mile Creek 6. 

Left Fork Three Mile 

C ree ]£ \ 

Calf Gulch Creek .._ 1. 

Mudd Springs 1_ 

Unnamed Springs 6 



Unnamed Well 1. 

Smith Slough 1. 

Unnamed Springs 2. 

Unnamed Drain 2. 

Buck Gulch Creek _„_ 2. 

Diamond Springs 2_ 

Fouls Spring 1_. 

Unnamed Springs 4. 

Noyes Embody Spring 1. 

Unnamed Springs 5. 



Unnamed Creek 
Unnamed Pond 
Unnamed Well 



Butte Springs 1_ 



80. 
30_ 
50_ 
56. 



AIL 

0__ 
AIL. 
A1L_ 



40.. 
4_ 
200. 
6,925.. 
300. 
AIL 
100. 

26. 
340.. 
All. 
AIL 



Antelope Creek 
Unnamed Drain 



All 
50. 

120. 
70. 

400. 

150. 
10. 

90. 

20. 
AIL 

35. 
200. 

20. 

40. 
200. 
140. 
200. 

50. 
400. 
700. 
140. 
All. 
All. 
110. 
AIL 
810. 
300. 
200. 
100. 
100. 
365. 

40- 



2.000 

.750 

1.250 

1.400 



0.000. 24156 1. 



AIL 



1.000 

.100 

5.000 

173.125 4999 

7.500 



21 800 20.000 



2.500 

.650 

8.500 



1.250 

3.000 

1.750 

10.000 

3.750 
.250 

2.250 
.500 



.875 
5.000 4999 

.500 

1.000 

5.000 

3.500 

5.000 

1.250 
10.000 
17.500 

3.500 



(See Silver Creek) 



2.750 

20.250 
7.500 
5.000 
2.500 
2.500 
9.125 
1.000 



—48— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 
APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's 
Decrees Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per Sec. 



Smith Fork Prickly Pear 

(Spring) Creek 4 

Lone Tree Gulch Creek 3_ 

English Slough 2_ 

Unnamed Springs 3_. 

Unnamed Slough L. 

Beaver Creek 11_. 

Dry Creek 1_. 

Porcupine Creek 2_ 

Unnamed Spring L 

Bridge Creek 0_. 

Cottonwood Gulch Cr. 2_. 

Cottonwood Springs L. 

Hunters Creek 3_. 

Tow Head (Ming) Creek.... 10._ 

Fir Gulch Creek 2_ 

Unnamed Spring 1__ 

Sperry (Bear Tooth) Cr. 4_ 

Sawmill Gulch Creek 2.. 

Right Fork Sawmill 

Gulch Creek 1_ 

Unnamed Well 1_. 

Unnamed Spring 1__ 

Unnamed Spring L_ 

Willow Creek 9__ 

Crystal Spring L. 

Elkhorn Creek 13_ 

Left Fork Elkhorn Cr. 1_. 

N. Fork Elkhorn Cr.._. L. 

Right Fork Elkhorn Cr. 1_ 

Sulphur Creek 1_. 

Sun Set Creek 1__ 

Unnamed Spring 1__ 

Culbertson Creek 1__ 

Cottonwood Creek 6_. 

Unnamed Spring 1__ 

Unnamed Creek 3_ 

Dog Coulee Creek 1__ 

Goat Coulee Creek 1_. 

Mount Peck Coulee Cr. 1__ 

Rock Spring L. 

Wood Gulch Creek 1_. 

Ox Bow Creek L. 

Log Gulch Creek 1__ 

Rose (Falls Gulch) Creek.. 2__ 

Timber Gulch Creek 1_. 

Spring Creek 4__ 

Unnamed Creek 1__ 

Little Prickly Pear Creek.___ 35_. 



North West Fork Little 

Prickly Pear Creek L. 

Right Fork Little Prickly 

Pear Creek 1_ 

North Fork Little Prickly 

Pear Creek 4_ 

South Fork Little Prickly 

Pear (Beaver) Creeks. 1_ 
Unnamed Springs 2_ 



150.. 

1,1 00_. 

100. 

250_. 

400__ 

5,215.. 

25_. 

125__ 

50__ 

0.. 

660__ 



700_ 
2,900. 
250 _ 
500. 
630 
50- 



AIL 

100__ 

30__ 

5_ 

4,785_. 

20„ 

15,094__ 

200.. 

100__ 

300__ 

100. 
75__ 
80_. 

150 _ 

5,735__ 

10__ 

150_. 
50__ 
50_ 
50__ 
75.. 

300_. 

150_. 

250.. 

800__ 



550_ 

240_. 

28,180. 



All. 
150. 
490_ 



3.750 5202 2.... 

27.500 

2.500 

6.250 
10.000 

130.375. 16631 (See Trout Creek) 

.625 

3.125 

1.250 

0.000 
16.500 



100 2.500 



17.500 

72.500- 6209 

6.250 
12.500 
15.750 

1.250 



3 500 12.500 



2.500 

.750 

.125 

119.625 

.500 

377.350 

5.000 

2.500 

7.500 

2.500 

1.875 

2.000 

3.750 

143.375 

.250 

3.750 

1.250 

1.250 

1.250 

1.875 

7.500 

3.750 

6.250 

20.000 



13.750 
6.000 

704.500 5627. 

14056 

4041* 



32 4,217 105.425 

2 75 1.875 

1 500 12.500 



160. 
170_ 



3.750 

12.250 

4.000 5627 (See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 

4.250 



—49— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


Case 


No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


No. 


Decrees Inches Per Sec. 




4 


1,150 


28.750 — 


. 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Hot Water Spring 


1 


75 


1.875 






Middle Fork Deadman 












Creek 


1 


500 


12.500 






N. Fork Deadman Cr._. 


1 


400 


10.000 






S. Fork Deadman Cr.._ 


3 


840 


21.000 






Cottonwood Creek 


1 


150 


3.750 — 


_ 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Lost Horse Creek 


4 


400 


10.000- 


- 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Spring Branch Creek 


1 


All 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


All 








Right Fork Lost 












Horse Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 






Left Fork Lost Horse 












Creek 


1 


500 


12.500 






Trib. of Lost Horse 












Creek - _ .. 


1 










Combs Gulch Creek 


14— - - 


6,500 


162.500 






South Fork Combs 












Gulch Creek 


1 


15 


.375 






Whipporwill Gulch 












Creek 


1 


500 


12.500 






Unnamed Spring 


1__ __ 










Empire Gulch Creek 








0.000 






Towsley Gulch 












Creek 


2 


250 


6.250 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


100 


2.500 






Marsh Creek 


12 


7,510 


187.750— 


.. 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Miller Creek 


1 


150 


3.750 






Left Fork Marsh Creek 


1 


300 


7.500 






N. Fork Marsh Creek 


2 


500 


12.500 






Hawkins Gulch Creek 








0.000 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


10 


.250 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


30 


.750 






Spring Creek 

Unnamed Spring 


2 


130 


3.250 






1 


40 


1.000 






Piegan Creek 


4 


650 


16.250- 


.. 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Drinkwater (East Fork 












Piegan) Creek 


6 


400 


10.000 






N. Fork Piegan Creek — 


1 


100 


2.500 






Old Sawmill Gulch Cr. 


1 


150 


3.750 






Right Fork Piegan Cr. 


1 


100 


2.500 






Trib. of Piegan Creek 


1 


All 








Woodchuck Spring 


1 


200 


5.000 






Unnamed Spring . . . 


1 ._ 


75 


1.875 






Deer Creek 








0.000- 


__ 5627 


(See Little Prickly Pear Cr.) 


Meagher Gulch Creek 


3 


230 


5.750 






Unnamed Spring 


1 


All 








Canyon Creek 


26 


25,186 


629.650 „ 


_ 342 . 


1 1,760 44.000 










__ 6263 . 


2 828 20.700 










__14127_ 


1 50 1.250 










__10729* 


1 


Kelly Creek 

Right Fork Canyon Cr. 
Road Creek 




100- 


2.500 








All 










50 


1.250 






S. W. Fork Canyon Cr. 




All 








Trib. of Canyon Creek 












Shineburger Creek 




150 


3.750 






Little Mill Creek 




50 


1.250 






Unnamed Spring 




60 


1.500 






Virginia Creek 


12 


2,150 


53.750 







—50— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


Case 


No. of Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


No. 


Decrees Inches 


Per Sec. 


Kennion Creek 


1 


500 


12.500 








N. Fork Virginia Cr.._ 








0.000 








Silver Springs 


1 


20 


.500 








Unnamed Springs 


2 


19 


.475 








Homestake 














Gulch Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 








Big Spring 


1 


20 


.500 








Rooster Bill Creek 


1 


All 










Fool Hen Gulch Cr. 


1 


500 


12.500 








Stemple Creek 


1 


All 










Goulds Creek 


10 


2,100 


52.500— 


_ 7765. 


4 35 


. .875 


Hubbard Creek 


1 


1,000 


25.000— 


_. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




N. Fork Goulds Cr. 








0.000— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




S. Fork Goulds Cr. 


2 


1,000 


25.000— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




South West Fork 














Goulds Creek 


1 


200 


5.000— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


300 


7.500— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




Bears Gulch Cr. 


1 


250 


6.250— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




Sawmill Creek 








0.000— 


.. 7765 


(See Goulds Creek) 




Trout Creek 


8 


4,860 


121.500 








Right Fork Trout 














Creek 


1 


600 


15.000 








Mill Creek 


1 


500 


12.500— 


- 6060. 


. 2 60— 


. 1.500 


Rattlesnake Creek 


8 


731 


18.275 








Cottonwood Creek 


7 


2,020 


50.500 








Middle Fork Cotton- 














wood Creek 


1 


150 


3.750 








Gravelly Range Lake 
Lake Creek 


5 


14,300 


357.500 








3 


440 


11.000 








Unnamed Creek 


2 


100 


2.500 








Trib. Cottonwood Cr. 


1 


80 


2.000 








Sears Gulch Creek 


3 


400 


10.000 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


100 


2.500 








Demijohn Gulch Creek 








0.000 








Unnamed Springs 


1 


10 


.250 








Unnamed Springs 


3 


150 


3.750 








Trinity Creek 


5 


55 


1.375 








Spring Creek 








0.000 








East Fork Spring Cr. 


1 


100 


2.500 








Upper Willow Springs 


1 


All 










Cayota Gulch Creek 


2 


100 


2.500 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


25 


.625 








Willow Creek 


1 


50 


1.250— 


.. 3193. 


.. 1 AIL 




Eagle Creek 


2 


58 


1.450 








Middle Fork 














Willow Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 








Long Gulch Creek 


4 


425 


10.625 








Roberts Spring 


2 


375 


9.375 








Unnamed Springs 


2 


510 


12.750 








Little Sheep Creek 


1 


20 


.500 








Big Sheep Creek 


7 


3,475 


86.875 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


20 


.500 








Clark Creek 


1 


75 


1.875 








Mitchell Gulch Creek.. 


2 


250 


6.250 








Unnamed Creek 


2 


350 


8.750 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


All 










Saw Mill Gulch Creek... 


1 


400 


10.000 








Medicine Rock Creek 


1 


60 


1.500 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


40 


1.000 








Lyons Creek 


12 


9,050 


226.250 









—51— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 
Decrees Inches Per Sec. 



Bear Creek 

N. Fork Lyons Creek . 

Logging Creek 

S. Fork Lyons Creek _ 

Burnt Run Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Willett Creek 

Spring Creek 

Sheep Creek 

Glen Marie Creek 

Spring Creek 

Little Creek 

Shaw Spring 

Wolf Creek 

Woods Coulee Creek.___ 

Allen Creek 

Pine Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

French Creek 

Spring Creek 

Rockie (Carter) Creek 

Lemline Springs 

Unnamed Springs 

Long Gulch Creek 

School House Coulee Cr. 

Unnamed Creek 

Rock Creek 

Right Fork Rock Creek _ 

Spring Creek 

Wells Fork Rock Creek- 
Unnamed Springs 

Johnson Creek 

Willis Creek 

Butcher Spring 

Evans Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Huff Creek 

North Fork Rock Creek _ 

Butcher Creek 

La Rock Springs 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Creek 

Dog Creek 

Gap Creek 

North Fork Dog Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Colburn Creek 

Spring Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Wegner Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Rocky Fork Creek 

Spring Creek 

Stickney Creek 

N. Fork Stickney Creek,. 

Fall Creek 

Peters Spring 

Dearborn River 

N. Fork Dearborn River . 
Grizzly Creek 



1_ 
1_ 

1_ 

5_. 

1_ 

1_ 

1_ 

2_. 

6_ 

1_. 

1_ 

3_. 

1_ 

7_ 

1_ 

0-. 

1_ 

1_ 

3. 

2.. 

2_. 

1. 

2_ 

1. 

1. 

1- 

4. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

2_. 

2.. 

2. 

1_ 

1. 

1_ 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

2.. 

8. 

1. 

1. 

1_. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

2.. 

1. 

0. 

1_ 

5_ 

1. 

3_ 

1. 
21. 
11 

2. 



100_. 

500_. 

100. 

1,775_ 

50. 

10. 
400. 

12. 
3,150. 

50.. 

40- 

700.. 

100, 

4,400. 

50. 
0. 

40. 
120. 

45.. 
200. 
200.. 

75_. 

20 
150. 

75. 
AIL. 
460. 
250. 
500. 

75_. 
150. 
140. 
250.. 

50. 

50.. 

40_. 
100. 
200. 

30. 

30.. 

30. 

80. 
5,255.. 

50. 
100. 
All. 

50. 
160. 

50. 
500. 

50. 
0. 

40. 

1,700. 

100. 

380. 

A1L. 

334,533. 

51,450. 

1,250- 



2. 
12. 

2. 
44. 

1. 

10! 

78! 
1. 
1. 
17. 
2. 
110. 
1. 
0. 
1. 
3. 
1. 
5. 
5. 
1. 

3! 
1. 



500 
500 
500 
375 
250 
250 
000 
300 
750 
250 
000 
500 
500 
000 
250 
000 
000 
000 
125 
000 
000 
875 
500 
750 
875 



2 

131 

1 

2 



500 
250 
500 
875 
750 
500 
250 
250 
250 
000 
500 
000 
750 
750 
,750 
000 
375 
250 
500 



,250 

000 

250 

.500- 

250 

000- 

000- 

500 

.500 

,500 



.10287 



5 815 20.375 



.10287 (See Wegner Creek) 
-10287 (See Wegner Creek) 



8,363. 

1,286, 

31. 



325.. 

250 

250 



7608 5 (See Flat Creek) 



-52— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. Case No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. No. Decrees Inches Per Sec. 


Grizzly Creek Springs 


1 


200 


5.000 




Joslin Creek 


1 


300 


7.500 




Unnamed Creek 


1 


200 


5.000 




Cascade Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Falls Creek 


4 


31,200 


780.000 




Dry Wolf Creek 


1 


1,500 


37.500 




Canyon Brook 


1 


500 


12.500 




Lime Kiln Spring 


1 


200 ... 


5.000 




Unnamed Creek 


1 


200 


5.000 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


600 


15.000 




Clemons Creek 


5 


1,887 


47.175 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


20 


.500 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


300 


7.500 




Poplar Creek 


1 


500 


12.500 




Summit Lake 


2 

1 


1,000 


25.000 
2.500 




Spring Lake 


100 




Spring Creek 


1 . 


20 


.500 




Unnamed Springs 


2 


130 


3.250 




Cunniff Creek 


6 


1,230 


30.750 




S. Fork Cunniff Cr.__ 


1 


300 


7.500 




Unnamed Springs 


2 


75 


1.875 




McClain Creek 


3 


350 


8.750 




McDonough Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Unnamed 










Springs 


2 


225 


5.625 




Unnamed Spring.. 


1 


50 


1.250 




Unnamed Creek 


1 


75 


1.875 




Unnamed Slough 


1 


100 


2.500 




Middle Fork Dearborn 










River 


6 


2,000 


50.000 




Indian Creek 


2 


470 


11.750 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


450 


11.250 




Green Creek 


5 


1,190 


29.750 




Bed Rock Creek 


4 


1,150 


28.750 




South West Fork 






Bed Rock Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Wolf Breed Creek _ 


1 


100 


2.500 




Spring Creek 


1 


40 


1.000 




Hardgrove Creek 


3 


300 


7.500 




Unnamed Spring ____ 


1 


75 


1.875 




Spring Gulch Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 




Skunk Creek 


10 


1,745 . 


43.625 




Little (South Fork) 










Skunk Creek 


5 


770 


19.250 




Unnamed Spring ____ 


1 


25 


.625 




Krone Creek . ... 


2 


50 


1 250 




Berry Creek 


1 


120 


3.000 




S. Fork Dearborn River .. 


9 

2 


3,250 


81.250 
4.000 




Unnamed Creek 


160 




West Fork of South 










Fork Dearborn River 


1 


75 


1.875 




Sawmill Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Roberts Creek 








0.000 




Spring Creek 


2 


200 


5.000 




Unnamed Spring 


1 


100 


2.500 




Johnson Creek 


3 


270 


6.750 




Dry Pole Patch Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Bessette Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 




Borrell (Lime Kiln 










Mtn.) Creek 


3 


300 


7.500 





—53— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 
STREAMS Filings 


Miner's 
Inches 


Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 


Case 
No. 


No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 
Decrees Inches Per Sec. 


Unnamed Spring 

Russel (Pruden) Creek 

Unnamed Springs — 
Jeffries Creek 

Unnamed Springs 


1 

1 

5 

2 

4 

6 


50 
150 


1.250 
3.750 
6.250 
7.500 
5.650 
34.375 

.500 
5.000 

.625 

.625 
1.250 
3.125 

.375 

1.250 

1.000 

7.500 

14.000 

7.000 

206.250-- 

17.500 

1.250 

25.000 

2.500 

0.000-. 

1.250 

.775 

2.500 

21.250-- 

7.500 
32.500 
12.000 
.250 
0.000 
5.000 
2.750 
12.500-- 
38.250 
10.500 
5.000-- 
0.000-- 
2.500 
2.500 
2,172.500— 
2,765.000- 
1.000 
.125 
.250 
5.000- 
.625 
303.125- 
2.500 
1.250 
1.000 

5.000 

7.500 

.250 

123.000_. 

5.625... 


.. 7608 . 

7608 
7608 

7608 

7608 
7608 

_. 4742 s . 
4742 

4742 
4742 

4742 

. 4742 
. 4742 




250 
300 

226 

1,375 




Unnamed Spring 

Gillette Creek 




20 
200 

25 

25 

50 

125 

15 
All. 

50 

40 

300 

560 

280 

8,250 
700 

50 

1,000 








Willow Coulee Creek 






Spring Coulee Creek . 
Unnamed Spring — 
Unnamed Spring — _ 










2 




Unnamed Creek - - ~ 




Unnamed Spring 

Coal Mine Gulch 










Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Slough 

Dead Man Creek 

Four Mile Coulee Creek. 
Flat Creek 










4 

2 

20 

3 

1 

1 

1 



1 

4 

1 

6 

1 

2 

1 

1 



2 

8 


15 3,345 83.625 


North Fork Flat Creek 
Unnamed Spring . . 




Unnamed Lake . ... 




Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Unnamed Springs 

Unnamed Creek . ~ 


100 



50 

31 

100 

850 

300 

1,300 


(See Flat Creek) 


Hogan Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Black Rock Creek .. . 


(See Flat Creek) 


Myles Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Henry Creek 

Sheep Creek 

Unnamed Springs 

Willow Creek 

Long Coulee Creek . . 


480 

10 



200 

110 




1 

5 

2 

1 



1 

1 

10 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

16 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

11 

3 


500 
1,530 . 


(See Flat Creek) 


Unnamed Creek 
Slew Creek . 


420 
200 

100 
100 
86,900 


(See Flat Creek) 


Trib. of Flat Creek 
Twin Bridge Coulee Cr. 
Hultin Gulch Creek 
Sun River . 


(See Flat Creek) 
1 56 - 19,511 487.775 


North Fork Sun River 


110,600 


(See Sun River) 


Unnamed Spring 


40 
5 

10 
200 
25 
12,125 




Unnamed Well 




Unnamed Spring 

Buttolph Creek 

Unnamed Spring 

Willow Creek 


(See Sun River) 
(See Sun River) 


McCarthy Creek 

Schaffer Creek 

Hudson Creek 


100 
50 
40 

200 

300 
10. 
4,920 




Half Breed (Breed) 
Creek 

Anderson Lake 

Beale Spring 

Little Willow Creek 


(See Sun River) 

(See Sun River) 
(See Sun River) 


Cut Rock Creek... 


225 



—54— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) DECREED RIGHTS 



No. of 


Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


Case 


No. of Miner's 


Cu. Ft. 


STREAMS Filings 


Inches 


Per. Sec. 


No. 


Decrees Inches 


Per Sec. 


Unnamed Spring 








0.000.- 


._ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Unnamed Creek 


1 __ 


100 


2.500- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




McGuire Creek ____ 


1 _____ 


200 


5.000 








Unnamed Well 


1 __ 


300 


7.500 








Barr Creek 


3 


920 


23.000- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




N. Fork Barr Cr. 


1 


100 


2.500 








Unnamed Lake.. 


1 


160 


4.000 








Rose (Furman) 














Creek 


2 .__ 


260 


6.500- 


. 4742 


(See Sun River) 




West Fork Barr 














Creek 


1 


200 


5.000 








Unnamed Spring ... 


1 


150 


3.750 








Unnamed Spring 


1 


150 


3.750- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




South Fork Sun River 


27 


112,640 


2,816.000- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Smith Creek 


9 _____ 


87,900 


2,197.500— 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Larance Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 








Ford Creek 


7 


9,950 


248.750- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Laundre Creek 


1 


200 


5.000 








Walker Creek 


1 


100 


2.500 








Duval Creek ... ... 


1 


75 


1 875— 


. 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Beaches Coulee 














Spring 


2 


75 


1.875 








Haystack Butte 














Spring 


2 


150 


3.750 








Iron Spring 




50 


1.250 








Pine Coulee Spring 




50 


1.250 








Sulphur Spring 




50 


1.250 








Summit Spring 




100 


2.500 








Smith Lake 




250 


6 250— 


. 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Elk (Du Bray) Creek- 


14 


4,860 


121.500- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Big Spring 




100 


2 500 








Elk Creek Spring 




40 


1 000 








Unnamed Spring 




4,000 


100.000 








Unnamed Creek 




288 __ 


7.200 








Sheep Mountain Cr. 




100 


2 500 








Unnamed Spring 




All 










Hay Coulee Creek 








000— 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Coulis Creek 




160 ._ 


4.000 








Crains Creek 


2 


150 


3.750 








Unnamed Creek____ 




500 


12.500 








Blubber Creek 




50 


1 250 








Goss (Frank Goss) 














Creek 


2 


475 


11.875- 


. 4742 


(See Sun River) 




West Creek 


2 


150 


3.750- 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




Haystack Butte Cr. 


2 


250 


6.250 








W. Fork Hay- 














stack Butte Cr. 


1 


1,000. -- 


25.000 








Unnamed Lakes 


1 


320 


8 000 








Unnamed Springs 


2 


50 


1.250 








Unnamed Drain 


2 


320 


8.000 








Unnamed Creek 


1 


80 


2.000 








Lemon Springs ____ 


1 


200 


5.000 








Spring Coulee Creek 


8 


9,085 


227.125 








Unnamed Springs 


2 


22 


.550 








Dry Creek 


13 _ 


3,330 


83 250 - 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 




South Fork Dry Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 








Unnamed Lake . 


2 


160 


4 000 








West Fork Dry Creek 


1 


50 


1.250 









-55— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's Cu. Ft. 
Decrees Inches Per Sec. 



School Spring Coulee 

Creek 1. 

Unnamed Spring 1. 

Rock Camp Creek 3_ 

Unnamed Creek 2- 

Unnamed Springs 3_ 

Unnamed Creek 0_ 

Cooper Creek 2. 

Unnamed Spring 1_ 



Sheep Creek 

Little Dry Creek 

Unnamed Creek 

Simms (Spring) Creek 
Tree Claim Creek 



3_ 
1_ 
1_ 
3_ 
1. 

Benjamin Creek 2. 

1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 



Unnamed Spring 

Valentine Creek 

Davis Creek 

North Fork Simms Cr. 

Unnamed Spring 

Johnstone Creek 



100 


2.500 






50 


1.250 






450 


11.250 — 


_ 4742 


(See Sun River) 


350 


8.750 






50 ... 


1.250 









0.000____ 


. 4742 


(See Sun River) 


100 


2.500 






200 


5.000 






350 


8.750 






25 


.625 






All 








650 


16.250 






200 


5.000 






130 


3.250 






40 


1.000 




■': . 


80 


2.000 






2 


.050 






400 


10.000 






10 


.250 






150 


3.750 











TOTAL 1.754 1 1,701,804 292,545.100. 



1400 



.49.526.5 1,238.163 



1 This decree is recorded and filed in Lewis and Clark County. It applies to both Lewis and Clark and Broadwater 
Counties. , 

2 This decree is recorded and filed in Jefferson County. It applies to both Lewis and Clark and Broadwater Counties. 

3 This decree is recorded and filed in the Federal Courthouse at Helena. It applies to both Lewis and Clark and Jef- 
ferson Counties. 

4 This decree is recorded and filed in the District Courthouse at Helena. It applies to both Lewis and Clark and Jef- 
ferson Counties. 

5 One right for 600 inches from the Dearborn River is carried in the Flat Creek Decree. However, the Dearborn 
River is not adjudicated. 

6 This decree is recorded and filed in Cascade County. It applies to Lewsi and Clark, Cascade, and Teton Counties. 
* Ditch Decrees. 



—56- 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 

Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of Miner's 
Decrees Inches 



Cu. Ft. 

Per Sec. 



COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN 

Clark Fork of Columbia (Mis- 
soula) (Hellgate) River^ (L 

Little Blackfoot River 0_. 

North Fork Little Black- 
foot River 2. 

Uncle George Gulch 

Creek 2- 

Unnamed Spring L. 

Dog Creek 15.. 

Jackson Gulch Creek 1__ 

Left Fork Dog Creek 1__ 

American Creek 14_. 

La Salle Gulch Cr. 1.. 

Meadow Creek 7_. 

East Fork Meadow 

Creek 1_. 

Slaughterhouse 

Gulch Creek- 1_. 

Hope Creek 18 

Hope Gulch Spring 2.. 

Unnamed Creek ._ L. 

Spring Gulch Cr._ 3_ 

Faith Gulch Creek 2. 

Big Spring 1_. 

Unnamed Springs.. 2_. 

Snowshoe Creek 2_ 

Unnamed Creek 1_. 

Ophir Gulch Creek 3_. 

Cayuse Gulch Creek 1_. 

East Fork Ophir Gulch 

Creek 1_ 

Left Fork Ophir Gulch 

Creek 2_. 

Unnamed Spring L 

Unnamed Spring 1_ 

Blackfoot River 19 

Anaconda Creek 2.. 

Teepee Lodge Creek 1_ 

Mike Horse Creek L 

Bear Trap Creek 4_ 

Shoue Gulch Creek 2_ 

N. Fork 

Shoue Gulch Creek 1_ 

Pass Creek 1_ 

Unnamed Spring 1_. 

Cadotte Creek . 2 

Willow Creek 0_ 

Jones Creek 1_ 

Trail Creek 1_. 

Sanborn Creek 1_ 

E. Fork Sanborn Cr. 1_ 

W. Fork Sanborn Cr. 1_ 

Huckleberry Creek L. 

Alice Creek 5_ 

Toms Creek 1_ 

Lizzie Creek 1_ 

Spring Creek L 

Horsefly Creek 1_ 

Hogem Creek 4_ 



0. ______ 



450 

750 

50_ 

5,630—. 
A1L_..__. 

15 

2,680 

150 

3,600.__.__. 

30 

30_ 

3,275 

100._. 

30___ 
362__ 
100._.___. 
100„___. 

20.__. 

AIL 

All. 

650„_.__. 
100______. 

All 

400______. 

75 

75—. 
22,700— 

100__.___. 

300___.__ 
10______ 

170— 

750_ 

40_._. 

300_ 

All 

280^ 

0___ 

30_ 

150^ 

150__.___ 
200______ 

100___. 

100___ 

5,500„.___ 

500 

500 

500 

160_.__ 
850— 



0.000 
0.000 

11.250 

18.750 

1.250 

140.750 



.375 

67.000 

3.750 

90.000 

.750 

.750 

81.875 

2.500 

.750 
9.050 
2.500 
2.500 

.500 



16.250 
2.500 



10.000 

1.875 

1.875 

567.500 

2.500 

7.500 

.250 

4.250 

18.750 

1.000 
7.500 



7.000 

0.000 

.750 

3.750 

3.750 

5.000 

2.500 

2.500 

137.500 

12.500 

12.500 

12.500 

4.000 

21.250 



—57— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 
(Filings of Record) DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of 
Decrees 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 

Per Sec. 



Right Fork 




Hogetn Creek 


1 


Black Diamond Creek _ 


1 


Landers Fork Blackfoot 




River 


4 


Indian Meadow Creek _ 


1 


Copper Creek 


7__ 


Seven Up Pete Creek 


6 


Camp Spring _ _ 


1 


Donnelly Spring 


1 


Erickson Spring 


2 


Mountain Trout Creek 


2 


North Fork Seven Up 




Pete Creek 


3 


South Fork Seven Up 




Pete Creek 


5 


Watts Spring 


1 


Wulff Spring 


1 


Unnamed Springs 


2 


Dannen Creek 


1 


Poor Mans Creek 


17 


Evans Creek 


1 


Right Fork Poor Mans 




Creek 


1 


Swamp Creek 


2 


North Fork Poor Mans 




Creek 


4 


Silver Bell Creek ______ 


2 


S. Fork Poor Mans Cr. 


14 


Junction Gulch Creek 


1 


Rodchester Creek 


2 


McClellan Creek 


1 


Unnamed Spring ____ 


1 


Crevice Creek 


5 


Unnamed Spring _ 


1 


Fields Gulch Creek 


1 


Humbug Creek 


5 


Dallas Spring 


1 


Sharps Spring 


1 


Duck Creek 


1 


Spring Creek _ 


1 


Keep Cool Creek 


8 


Branch Keep Cool Cr. 


1 


Sucker Creek 


3 


Mill Creek 


1 


Liverpool Creek __ _ 


2 


Stonewall Creek 


10 


Unnamed Springs 


2 


Spring Creek 


1 


Park Creek 


1 


Little Beaver Creek 


1 


Beaver Creek 


4 


Spring Creek 


5 


Little Spring Creek. 


1 


Lincoln Creek 


4 


Feeder Springs 


1 


North Springs 


1 


South Springs 


1 


Unnamed Spring 


1 


Clear Creek 


3 



100 2.500 

40 1.000 

6,700 167.500 

2,000 50.000 

76,000 1,900.000 

1,450 36.250 

10 .250 

15 .375 

27 .675 

350 8.750 

120 3.000 

230 5.750 

15 .375 

15 .375 

405 10.125 

1,000 25.000 

10,934 273.350 

300 7.500 

60 1.500 

80 2.000 

1,365 34.125 

280 7.000 

2,130 53.250 

500 12.500 

400 10.000 

1,000 25.000 

40 1.000 

675 16.875 

300"_Z"_Z 7.500 

850 21.250 

All 

144 3.600 

All 

1,400 35.000 

2,800 70.000 10475 

50 1.250 

1,500 37.500 

30 .750 

800 20.000 

1,920 48.000 11517 

70 1.750 

150 3.750 

200 5.000 

288 7.200 

3,500 87.500 

3,480 87.000 

300 7.500 

1,100 27.500. 5389 

12 .300 

80 2.000 

80 2.000 

3 .075 

28,200 705.000 5389 



1 500 12.500 



1 200 5.000 



4 680 17.000 



(See Lincoln Creek) 



—58— 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 

APPROPRIATIONS 

(Filings of Record) 



DECREED RIGHTS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



Case 
No. 



No. of 
Decrees 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 

Per Sec. 



East Spring 1 

West Spring 1 

Willow Creek 7 

W. Fork Willow Creek 1_ 

Bear Creek 3_ 

Sauerkraut Creek 6_ 

Fountain Gulch Creek 1_ 

Willy Miller Creek _„ 1. 

Center Gulch Creek 1. 

N. Fork Blackfoot Riveer 2.. 

Klondike Creek L 

Nevada Creek 0_ 

Jefferson Creek 1_ 

Unnamed Spring L. 

Madison Creek 5_. 

Unnamed Lakes 1_. 

Buffalo Gulch Creek— 2_ 

Flathead River 0_ 

S. Fork Flathead River___. 0_ 

Danaher Creek 0_. 

Barr Creek 2- 

TOTAL 3 29- 



1,000 25.000 

1,000 25.000 

1,440 36.000 

200 5.000 

1,200 30.000 

3,000 75.000 

50 1.250 

50 1.250 

50 1.250 

80,000 2,000.000 

80 2.000 

0.000 

200 5.000 

40 1.000 

160 4.000 

150~"ZZ1 3.750 

0.000 

0.000 

0.000 

360 9.000 

294,540 7,363.500 6 1,380 



34.500 



WATER RIGHT DATA — LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY 
APPROPRIATIONS AND DECREES BY STREAMS 



STREAMS 



No. of 
Filings 



Miner's 
Inches 



Cu. Ft. 
Per. Sec. 



DRAINAGES IN LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY NOT LOCATED 

Bingsas Creek 

French Gulch Creek 
Friday Gulch Creek 

Hamilton Creek 

Hanson Creek 

Murray Gulch Creek 
Rock Canyon Creek 



Seymour Gulch Creek 2. 

Spring Creeks 4„ 

Unnamed Creeks 19_ 

Sarvasin Spring L 

Unnamed Springs 41_ 

Unnamed Tunnel 1_ 

Waste 8_. 



200 

60 

25 

AH 

500 

100 

150 

70 

245 

1,710 

1 

2,952 

5. 

295 



TOTAL. 



83 6,3 13 



5.000 

1.500 

.625 

12.500 
2.500 
3.750 
1.750 
6.125 

42.750 
.025 

73.800 

.125 

7.375 

157.825 



—59— 



WATER RESOURCES SURVEY 

Lewis and Clark County, Montana 



PART II 
Maps Showing Irrigated Areas 



Published by 

STATE ENGINEER'S OFFICE 

Helena, Montana 

June, 1957 







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