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Full text of "Graduate Catalog 2005-2006"

Southern Adventist University 

Graduate Catalog 2005-2006 



Mailing Address: 

Graduate Admissions 
(Respective School) 
P.O. Box 370 
Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 

FAX: 423-236-1899 

E-mail: admissions@southern.edu 



Admissions Information: 

Nationwide: 1-800-768-8437 
(1-800-SOUTHERN) 

All Other Inquiries: 

General Number: 423-236-2000 
School of Business & Management: 

423-236-2527 
School of Education & Psychology: 

423-236-2765 
School of Nursing: 423-236-2940 
School of Religion: 423-236-2976 



Picture 



In publishing this catalog, every reasonable effort has been made to be factually accurate. The publisher assumes no 
responsibility for editorial, clerical, or printing errors. The information presented is, at the time of printing, an accurate 
description of course offerings, policies, and requirements of Southern Adventist University. The provisions of this 
catalog, however, are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the University and the student. The 
University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time, without prior notice. 



Contents 



Degrees Offered 4 

Academic Calender 5 

This is Southern Adventist University 6 

Mission Statement 6 

Guiding Principles for Graduate Programs 6 

History 7 

Setting 7 

Accreditation and Memberships 7 

Distance Learning 8 

Facilities 8 

Admissions 10 

Where to Write 10 

Admission Procedures 10 

Admission Categories 10 

Academic Policies 12 

General Requirements for Master's Degree 12 

Enrollment 14 

Grade Policies 14 

Petition and Academic Grievance Procedures 15 

Financing Your Education 16 

Federal Stafford Loan Requirements and Disbursements 16 

Ability to Benefit 16 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Students Receiving Financial Aid 17 

Requirements 17 

Time Frame for Receiving Financial Aid 17 

Progress Review 17 

Financial Aid Budget 19 

Fees and Charges 18 

Tuition 18 

Special Fees and Charges 18 

International Student Deposit 19 

Refunds 19 

Credit Cards 20 

Summer Residence Hall 20 

University Apartments 20 

Books and Supplies 20 

Release of Transcripts or Diplomas 20 



Schools of Instruction 

Business and Management 22 

Education and Psychology 38 

Nursing 60 

Religion 82 

Faculty Directory 96 



Graduate Studies 



The Board of Trustees of Southern Adventist University has authorized master's 
degrees in the following areas: 

School of Business and Management 

Master of Business Administration 

- Accounting 

- Church and Nonprofit Leadership 

- Healthcare Administration 

- Human Resource Management 

- Management 

- Marketing Management 
Master of Financial Services 
Master of Science in Administration 

School of Education and Psychology 

Master of Science 

- Community Counseling 

- Marriage and Family Therapy 

- School Counseling 

Master of Science in Education 

- Curriculum and Instruction 

- Educational Administration and Supervision 

- Inclusive Education 

- Literacy Education 

- Outdoor Teacher Education 

School of Nursing 

Master of Science in Nursing 

- Adult Nurse Practitioner 

- Family Nurse Practitioner 

- Nurse Educator 

- Post Master's Certificate 
Dual Degree — MSN and MBA 

- Accelerated RN to MSN 

- Accelerated Dual Degree 

School of Religion 

Master of Arts 

- Church Leadership and Management 

- Evangelism 

- Homiletics 

- Religious Education 

- Religious Studies 



Academic Calendar 

2005-2006 



Summer 2005 

Business & Management 
Education & Psychology 
Nursing 
Religion 

First Semester, Fall 2005 

Aug 25 - Dec 14 
Business & Management 
Education & Psychology 
Nursing 
Religion 

Second Semester, Winter 2006 

Jan 9 - May 4 

Business & Management 

Education & Psychology 

Nursing 

Religion 

Note: 



1 . Late registration fee applies the day after each registration, 

2. Last day to add a course is two weeks after each registration. 

3. Last day to drop and automatically receive a "W" (equals two-thirds of the class 
days.) 

4. All withdrawals after two-thirds of course will receive an "F" (equals to 90% of 
class days.) 

5. No tuition refunds after half of class term is over. 

6. Registration for on-line classes is within first two weeks of each term. 

REGISTRATIONS 

All registrations may be done online. 

► Obtain a Southern e-mail account by going to: access.southern.edu click on 
The Place, obtain user name and password. 

► Using access.southem.edu, supply user name and password, click on Student, 
click on Registration. 

► Grades may be obtained via Datatel Web Adviser as well as unofficial transcripts 
and degree audit. 

► Prior to web registration, financial arrangement and health records must be 
cleared by Student Finance (423-236-2835) and Health Services (423-23 6-2713.) 



This is 
Southern Adventist University 



Southern Adventist University is a co-educational institution established by the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church, offering master's, baccalaureate, and associate degrees, 
and one-year certificates. 

The Mission 

Southern Adventist University as a learning community nurtures Christ-likeness and 
encourages the pursuit of truth, wholeness, and a life of service. 

Core Values 

• A Christ-centered campus 

• Academic and professional excellence in a distinctive Seventh-day Adventist 
environment — theologically, socially, morally, and intellectually 

• Demonstrated hospitality and service 

• Affordable education 

Institutional Goals 

• Graduates who master the basic skills of critical reasoning, independent thinking, 
computation, communication, collaboration, and creativity needed to enter the 
workplace with confidence, to pursue lifelong learning, and to exercise leadership 
as contributing citizens who advance their families, communities, the church, and 
society. 

• Competent and diverse faculty and staff who model balanced eithical lives, 
integrate faith and learning, demonstrate scholarship through teaching, research, 
and other scholarly and creative activities, and celebrate and energize the student 
spirit as they respect and support the different ways students develop their minds, 
their persons, and their citizenship. 

• Campus learning communities that engage students with ideas that mark educated 
persons, global and multicultural perspectives, and advanced technology to 
develop both ethical principles and intellectual flexibility. 

• Active partnerships with alumni, church, community, business and industry, civic 
organizations, and government in order to analyze, project, and respond to 
changing needs to help ensure that graduates are prepared for a life of service. 

• Responsible stewardship of resources entrusted to the university through effective 
fiscal management to fulfill the mission, vision, and goals of the university. 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

In keeping with the institutional mission statement, graduate education at Southern 
Adventist University provides an opportunity for motivated students to combine the 
acquisition of knowledge with refinement of their intellectual skills in the pursuit of 
truth. This experience extends beyond the transmission of information in the 
traditional disciplines. Rather, the learning environment consists of a community of 



scholars where students and professors jointly share dilemmas as well as discoveries 
and insights, resulting in a mutually fulfilling growth experience. Such opportunities 
motivate the student to engage in open dialogue, debate, critique, thoughtful query 
and independent thinking. Previous knowledge and understandings are examined, 
reconsidered, and synthesized in light of new learning; and accepted practices 
undergo the rigor of thoughtful analysis. 

Students study and integrate theory, research, and practice in specialized areas of 
expertise. Considerable emphasis is placed upon independent and collaborative 
projects, which require a complexity of skills, including problem identification, 
inquiry, problem solving, analysis, and synthesis. Depending upon the particular 
graduate program; comprehensive examinations, capstone seminars, portfolios, and 
theses afford additional demonstrations of scholarship and the potential for 
contributions to the field. Sound scholarship is expected, and these projects may lead 
to formal papers, professional presentations, or publishable manuscripts. 

At Southern Adventist University, the quest for truth relates to matters of Christian 
faith. Because Biblical ideals lead to an appreciation of human dignity, participants 
in the community of scholars seek to apply theory in ways that preserve human worth. 
Christian education combines faith and learning, understanding and practice, 
erudition and service. 

HISTORY 

In 1 892 the educational venture that developed into Southern Adventist University 
had its beginning in the small village of Graysville, Tennessee. The school became 
known as Graysville Academy. In 1 896 the name was changed to Southern Industrial 
School and five years later to Southern Training School. 

In 1916, because of limited acreage available for further expansion of plant 
facilities, the school was moved to the Thatcher farm in Hamilton County, Tennessee. 
The name "Collegedale" was given to the anticipated community. At its new location, 
the school opened as Southern Junior College and continued as such until 1944 when 
it achieved senior college status, after which the name was changed to Southern 
Missionary College. In 1982 the name was changed to Southern College of 
Seventh-day Adventists. University status was achieved in 1996 when the name was 
changed to Southern Adventist University. 

SETTING 

Southern Adventist University's 1,100 acre Collegedale campus is nestled in a valley 
18 miles east of Chattanooga. The quietness and beauty of the surroundings are in 
keeping with the University's educational philosophy. 

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

Southern Adventist University is approved by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 
30033 -4097; telephone number 404-679-4501 ) to award one-year certificates, associate 
degrees, baccalaureate, and masters' degrees. It is also accredited by the Accrediting 
Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges, and Universities. Additional 
information regarding the University may be obtained by contacting the State Board of 
Independent Colleges and Universities, Department of Education, Tallahassee, FL 
32399 (850-488-8695). The Master of Science degree in School Counseling is 
approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education. 



The Schools of the University are also accredited by various organizations. The 
Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Science degree programs in 
nursing are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (61 
Broadway, New York, NY 10006, telephone number, 1-212-363-5555 ext. 153). The 
School of Nursing is an agency member of the Council of Baccalaureate and Higher 
Degree Programs and the Council of Associate Degree Programs of the National League 
for Nursing. The School of Nursing is approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing. 
The School of Education and Psychology teacher education program is accredited by 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. The University is 
approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education for the preparation of secondary 
and elementary teachers. 

DISTANCE LEARNING 

Distance learning offers the MBA graduate program online. The distance learning 
program provides the same quality of educational experience as the main campus to 
those students who cannot attend classes in Collegedale. 

FACILITIES 

The following buildings house the academic and other activities of the University: 
Brock Hall — Art and Graphic Design, Business and Management, English, 

History, Journalism and Communication, WSMC FM90.5 
Daniels Hall — Social Work and Family Studies 
Hackman Hall — Religion 
Hickman Science Center — Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Mathematics, 

Physics 
J. Mabel Wood Hall — Music 
Ledford Hall — Technology 
Lynn Wood Hall — Heritage Museum, Conference Rooms, Campus Safety, Alumni, 

Development 
Mazie Herin Hall — Nursing 

McKee Library — Main Campus Library, Center for Learning Success 
Miller Hall — Modern Languages 
Student Center — Cafeteria, Counseling and Testing Center, Campus Ministries, 

student activity rooms, K.R.'s Place, Student Services 
Summerour Hall — Education and Psychology, Teaching Materials Center, 

Ed Tech Classroom 
William lies Physical Education Center — Physical Education, Swimming Pool 
Wright Hall — Administration 
Other facilities on or near campus that may serve student needs: 
Arthur W Spalding Elementary School — laboratory school 
Charles Fleming Plaza — shopping center with businesses serving the 
University and community. Includes: 
Adventist Book Center 
Campus Kitchen — fast food 
Campus Shop — student bookstore and gift shop 
Collegedale Credit Union 
United States Post Office 
Village Market with grocery, deli, bakery 
Collegedale Academy — secondary laboratory school 
Collegedale Korean Church 
Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church 



Health Service — located at the east end of the Thatcher South 

Recreational Area — tennis courts, track, playing fields 

Southern Village — residence village 

Spanish Seventh-day Adventist Church 

Student Apartments 

Student Park 

Talge Hall — men's residence hall 

Thatcher Hall — women's residence hall 

Thatcher Hall South — women's residence hall 



10 



Admissions 



Southern Adventist University welcomes applications from students who will 
commit themselves to an educational program that unites academic integrity and 
Christian principles. The University does not discriminate in admissions on the hasis 
of age, gender, race, color, ethnic or national origin, religion, or disability. 

WHERE TO WRITE 

Inquiries regarding application and acceptance should be addressed to: 

School of (Business and Management, Education and Psychology, Nursing, or 

Religion) 

Southern Adventist University 

P. O. Box 370 

Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The following materials must be submitted to the School of Business and Management, 
Education and Psychology, Nursing, or Religion before the applicant can be considered 
for acceptance: 

1. A completed graduate application form. 

2. A non-refundable application fee of $25. 

3. Official transcripts from all institutions attended at the undergraduate and 
graduate level. 

4. Scores for entrance examinations as required by the respective School. 

5. Two professional recommendations as requested by the School. 

ADMISSION CATEGORIES 

Regular admission is based on the following criteria: 

1. Graduation from a regionally accredited four-year college or university as 
evidenced by a transcript showing the completion of a baccalaureate degree. 
(Except for approved accelerated program in Nursing.)* 

2. Completion of appropriate undergraduate prerequisites as determined by the 
respective School. 

3. Minimum GPA, TOEFL, and entrance examination scores as required by the 
individual School. Additional criteria are described in each School's section in 
this catalog. 

4. Two satisfactory professional recommendations. 

Special student: 

An applicant who does not satisfy the graduate admission requirements may be 
permitted to enroll in specific classes as a special student while completing such 
requirements. A maximum of nine (9) semester hours may be taken on this basis. 



*Nursing has an accelerated program where a student who has a RN may receive the MSN. 



LDMISSIONS 



11 



Provisional admission may be granted to students who do not meet all of the 
criteria for regular admission: 

1 . Students with a combined GPA and entrance examination score within a range 
as prescribed by each School. See respective Schools for additional criteria. 
Regular admission status will be granted if the student's GPA averages 3.00 or 
higher at the end of the first 12 graduate semester hours. However, students 
who have not achieved a minimum GPA of 3.00 per 12 hours will not be 
permitted to take additional courses. 

2. Positive work experience in areas related to the desired graduate specialization 
may be considered by the School for provisional admission. 

3. Students who have not completed a four-year baccalaureate degree,* or the 
equivalent, from an accredited institution may be accepted provisionally upon 
the completion of all of the following: 

a) A four-year baccalaureate degree* or the equivalent from an American 
institution not recognized by a regional North American accreditation 
association. 

b) The minimum entrance examination requirement established by the School 
to which application is being made. 

c) A school recommendation that the student has had an adequate general 
education with any deficiencies to be earned from an accredited institution 
prior to acceptance. 

d) A recommendation by the School affirming adequate preparation in the 
subject areas as evidenced by a nationally normed test, where appropriate, 
with any deficiencies to be earned at the upper-division level from an 
accredited institution prior to acceptance. 

Non-degree admission may be granted on a space-available basis. Students must 
have a bachelor's degree and approval from the School which offers the courses. 



*Exception is made for the accelerated MSN/MBA and MSN program. 



12 



Academic Policies 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE 
Admission, Progression and Degree Candidacy 

Students admitted under regular admission criteria are regarded as candidates for 
their declared degrees as long as they maintain a grade point average of 3 .00, including 
no more than two classes with a minimum grade of C. 

Students admitted provisionally will progress to candidacy after successfully 
completing 12 semester hours of graduate work in residence with a grade point average 
of 3.00 with no grade lower than C, including a maximum of one course with a grade 
ofC. 

Applicants who do not satisfy the graduate admission requirements maybe permitted 
to enroll in specific classes as special students while completing such requirements. A 
maximum of nine (9) semester hours maybe taken on this basis. 

Credit and Course Requirements and Limitations 

Students are responsible for meeting the semester hour requirement for the chosen 
degree. 

A maximum of six semester hours taken for graduate credit from courses numbered 
450 or higher, under special circumstances, may be applied to a student's graduate 
program. Such courses must be approved by the student's School and carry grades of 
B or better. A student may receive credit for the course from only one program (ie. 
graduate or undergraduate). 

Only earned credit that applies to its graduate programs is recognized. Credit by 
validation exam is only permitted when a student has successfully completed a 
predefined structured course of study for which a validation exam has been established 
and approved by the School. Credit obtained by validation exam is considered earned 
credit. A maximum of 12 hours of credit may be obtained by validation exam. Credit 
for experiential learning, credit by challenge examination, and other categories of non- 
traditional credit may not apply to a graduate degree. Students may validate their 
knowledge in specific courses by waiver examinations but must also complete a 
commensurable number of hours in approved courses to meet the minimum amount of 
earned credit for graduation. 

Graduation Requirements 

In order to graduate, a candidate must: 

1. Complete an application to graduate which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 

3. Pass a comprehensive examination and/or a defense of a thesis/research project, 
portfolio, or case study, as may be required by the respective School. For 
additional graduate requirements, see catalog section on degree to be earned. 

Second Master's Degree 

Degree programs for students who have already completed a master's degree will be 
arranged individually. The amount of applicable class work from the first degree will 
be determined by the age of previously earned credit and its appropriateness to the 



13 



program. Ordinarily, theory courses that are more than ten years old and technology 
application courses that are more than five years old must be repeated or waived by a 
validating examination. Students must complete a minimum of two-thirds of the credits 
required for a second degree which may include independent study in residence. A 
thesis or research project may be required. The GRE/GMAT is not required for a 
student pursuing a second master's degree from a U.S. accredited institution. 

Thesis Requirement 

If a thesis is required by the School, the student must secure the Advisory 
Committee's approval of the thesis topic and research design. Research and thesis 
preparation are under the direction of the student's Advisory Committee. 

Two copies of the approved thesis, one of which will be placed in the library, must 
be provided to the School. 

Time Requirement 

The time required to complete a degree is as follows: 

School of Years 

Religion 7 

Education & Psychology 7 
Business & Management 

& Nursing (MSN/MBA) 6 

Business (MBA, MSA) 5 

Nursing (MSN) 5 

Business & Management (MFS) 4 

Ordinarily, theory courses that are more than ten years old and technology application 
courses that are more than five years old must be repeated or waived by a validating 
examination. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer courses must be taken at an accredited institution, carry grades of B or 
better, and be approved by the School. A maximum of twenty-five percent of 
transfer credit is allowed for a degree. 

Ordinarily, theory courses that are more than ten years old and technology application 
courses that are more than five years old must be repeated or waived by a validating 
examination. 

Veterans Educational Benefits 

VA benefits will be terminated if the student's cumulative grade point average falls 
below 3.00. Practical training or Internships required for graduation may be certified 
to VA and must meet the same standards of progress as students pursuing resident 
courses. 

Withdrawal From a Course 

The last day to drop and automatically receive a " W" equals two-thirds of the class 
days. 



14 



ENROLLMENT 
Advisement 

Each graduate student will be assigned an adviser who will provide academic 
counseling, approve course scheduling, and supervise research. 

Attendance 

Students are responsible for attending classes regularly and must comply with the 
attendance policies described in the course syllabi for courses in which they are 
enrolled. 

Enrollment Status 

Nine semester hours co nstitutes full-time status and five semester hours is equivalent 
to part-time status. The maximum number of hours for which graduate students may 
enroll is 12, unless special permission is given through the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Independent Study 

A maximum of six semester hours may be taken as independent study within the 
graduate degree. 

Maximum Course Load 

No more than one credit hour per week for any given course may be earned. 

Registration 

Students must register for course work (on-line or regular) no later than the beginning 
of the second week of class. 

Repeated Courses 

A course may be repeated on the resident campus for the purpose of improving the 
GPA or to remove a non-passing grade. A maximum of two courses may be repeated. 

Second Emphasis 

Each emphasis must include a minimum of 18 hours that do not overlap with any 
other emphasis. 

GRADE POLICIES 

Grading System 

An institutional grading system is not followed as course syllabi describe methods 
of evaluating students' work and the grading system for each course. The following 
equivalencies are used: 

A 4.0 grade points per hour 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C 2.0 

F 0.0 

CR 0.0 Credit 



I 


0.0 Incomplete 


IP 


0.0 In Progress 


NR 


0.0 Not Reported 


P 


0.0 Pass 


S 


0.0 Satisfactory 


w 


0.0 Withdrawal 



15 



Minimum Grades 

A maximum of two courses with C grades may count toward a master's degree. 
Grades lower than C (2.0) are not applied toward completion of a graduate program. 

PETITION AND ACADEMIC GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES 

Academic Grievances 

The student, believing that he or she has been unfairly treated or disciplined, may 
enter into an academic grievance process. The student shall first discuss the grievance 
with the instructor, within two weeks, of the grievance in an informal conference. If 
the student believes that the solution is not appropriate, the student may submit the 
grievance, in writing, to the School's Dean within four weeks of the informal 
conference. If the student believes that the resolution facilitated by the School Dean is 
not appropriate, the student can appeal to the Vice President for Academic 
Administration within six weeks of the informal conference. The Vice President will 
ask the Graduate Council to appoint a Grievance Committee according to the policies 
of the Employee Handbook. The decision of the Grievance Committee shall be final. 

Academic Integrity 

Students are expected to practice academic integrity in all instances. The penalties 
for dishonesty including plagiarism may include the following: 

a. Record a failing grade on the exam, assignment, or project. 

b. Assign a failing grade in the class. 

c. Allow the student to resubmit the assignment with a reduced value for the 
assignment. 

d. Assign the student a paper, project, or activity that improves the student's 
understanding of the value and nature of academic integrity. 

e. Dismissal from the University. 

Disability Act 

Students with disabilities should contact the Center for Learning Success (CLS) by 
phone: 423-236-2574 (or 2838), e-mail :cls (Sjsouthern.edu (e-mail communication 
cannot be guaranteed confidential), or in person (physical location: second floor of the 
McKee Library.) Southern is in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act 
(1973) and has established the CLS to assist in advocating for reasonable 
accommodations. However, the university does not assume responsibility for 
providing accommodations or special services to students who have not voluntarily 
identified themselves as having qualifying disabilities or to those who have not 
provided the CLS with appropriate documentation of their disabilities. For information 
on Southern's formal grievance procedure, contact the Counseling Center or the CLS. 

Petitions 

Students may petition the Graduate Council for exceptions to policy. Petitions 
should include reasons for the request. The form may be obtained from the Records 
and Advisement Office. 



16 



Financing Your Education 



Southern Adventist University operates on the basis of each graduate student 
assuming the primary responsibility for his/her educational costs. Financial aid is 
available to U.S. citizens and permanent residents in the form of low interest federal 
and private educational loans. Repayment of these loans does not begin until after a 
student drops below half-time status. A limited number of private institutional 
scholarships and graduate assistantships are available for students in the Master of 
Business Administration, Education, Counseling, and Nursing programs. (Students 
may apply for these scholarships/assistantships through the school in which they are 
enrolled.) 

Students receiving a Seventh-day Adventist conference subsidy/assistance for tuition 
and living expenses may not be eligible for financial aid. Specific assistance may vary 
between the conferences, therefore tuition and expenses not covered by the subsidy 
must be paid at, or before, registration. International students are not eligible for U.S. 
federal financial aid. 

Federal Stafford Loan Requirements and Disbursements 

Students must register for, and attend, a minimum of five credit hours per semester 
to receive a Federal Stafford Loan. The first half of the loan amount will be credited 
to the student's account after the student's attendance in at least five credits has been 
verified. Anyone who drops below five credit hours or does not attend at least two 
class periods of the second course will not receive loan funds. 

The amount that graduate students may borrow per year is up to $18,500 ($8,500 
Subsidized, $ 1 0,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan) or the cost-of-attendance, whichever 
is less, at an annual interest rate of approximately 2.77-8.25%. Principal repayment 
begins six months after the student ceases to be enrolled in at least five credit hours. 
Students receiving a Federal Stafford Loan will need to complete and mail the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and a loan application six to eight weeks 
prior to registration. Loan fees of about 4% are deducted from the loan amount before 
the funds are disbursed to Southern. Student borrowers may not receive anticipated 
loan funds unless the amount borrowed exceeds the direct costs, and the funds have 
been received by Southern. If extenuating circumstances occur, students may appeal 
to the Financial Appeals Committee. 

Ability to Benefit 

The federal government requires that the university have a copy of the b accalaureate 
transcript from an accredited institution prior to disbursement of federal financial aid 
to graduate students. Therefore, students accepted provisionally will not receive their 
loan proceeds until a copy of their baccalaureate transcript is received by the Records 
and Advisement Office at Southern. 

Students eligible for financial aid who are completing their first undergraduate 
degree and who are also enrolled in the graduate program at Southern will receive 
financial aid at the undergraduate level until they complete their undergraduate 
requirements. Those seeking a second undergraduate and a graduate degree atthe same 
time, if eligible, will receive financial aid as a graduate student. 



17 



Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy 
for Graduate Students Receiving Federal Financial Aid 

Government regulations require all financial aid recipients to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress toward a degree, as measured both qualitatively and quantitatively, 
in order to receive financial aid, including federal loans. This requirement applies to 
the entire period of enrollment in Southern Adventist University's graduate 
program — including periods during which a student does not receive financial aid. 
Failure to comply with this requirement may result in a student becoming ineligible for 
financial aid. 

Requirements 

A student must maintain a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.00 
and complete at least 67.00% of attempted credit hours per semester. 

"Attempted credits" are those credits for which a student registers and of which 
he/she attends at least two class periods. Aid is awarded based on these credits. 
(Incompletes, withdrawals, and failed classes count toward the total attempted credits. 
A repeated course counts as attempted credit each time it is taken.) 

"Completed credits" are those that apply to a student's degree and for which a 
passing grade is received. (Incompletes, withdrawals, failed classes, and audits do not 
count as completed credits.) 

Time Frame For Receiving Financial Aid 

The maximum time to receive financial aid is 150% of the established course length. 
A student may receive financial aid for up to two graduate degrees. 

Progress Review 

Student Finance will review each student's academic progress at least once per 
semester and will send a notice, in writing, if a student has not maintained satisfactory 
academic progress as outlined above. 

A student whose financial aid/loans have been suspended as a result of failing to 
comply with this policy, and who feels that unusual and unavoidable circumstances led 
to this suspension, may appeal to the Financial Aid/Academic Progress Committee. 
Student Finance will advise the student, in writing, of the committee's decision. 



18 



FEES AND CHARGES 
2005-2006 

Tuition 

Southern Adventist University requires full payment of tuition at or before 
registration for each graduate course. Students receiving loans that are equal to or 
greater than their tuition expenses and are guaranteed by the lender prior to registration 
are not required to pay until the loan proceeds are received by Southern. 

Effective May 1, 2005, graduate tuition is $397 per credit hour. 

Special Fees and Charges 

The following special fees and charges are assessed individually as applicable: 



Application fee 


$25.00 


Cancellation of program 


100.00 


Graduation fee 


40.00 


Incomplete grade recorded 


20.00 


Insufficient funds for check 


25.00 


International Graduate Study Tours 


1/3 regular tuition rate 


Lab fees: 




Lab fee 1 


10.00 


Lab fee 2 


15.00 


Lab fee 3 


20.00 


Lab fee 4 


27.00 


Lab fee 5 


54.00 


Lab fee 6 


81.00 


Lab fee 7 


108.00 


Lab fee 8 


135.00 


Lab fee 9 


162.00 


Lab fee 10 


189.00 


Lab fee 11 


216.00 


Lab fee 12 


270.00 


Lab fee 13 


300.00 


Late registration 


35.00 


Parking fee 


45.00 


Replacement of ID card 


15.00 


Transcript fees: 




Same day service 


10.00 


Single request for six or more 


10.00 


Overnight service 


15.00 


International fax service 


15.00 


Validation exam recording fee 


35.00 



19 



Financial Aid Budget 
2005-2006 Academic Year 

Program Length 
Degree Programs (# of months/acad.yr.) 

Business (all emphases) 12 

Education (Outdoor Education emphasis) 12 

Education and Psychology (all Counseling emphases) 12 

Nursing (all emphases) 12 

Education (all emphases excluding Outdoor Education) 4 

Religion (all emphases) 4 



(12 mos.) (8 mos.) (4 mos.) 



Tuition (9 credit hrs) 


$10,719 


$7,146 


$3,573 


Housing 


5,400 


3,600 


1,800 


Board 


3,000 


2,000 


1,000 


Books and Supplies 


1,050 


700 


350 


Personal/Transportation 


3,000 


2,000 


1,000 



Financial Aid Budget* $23,169 $15,446 $7,723 

*Estimate: Figures are estimated and will vary, depending upon individual needs and 
number of credit hours for which the student has enrolled. 

Refunds 

If a student officially withdraws during the course or semester, a refund of tuition 
for hours dropped is made according to the date on the withdrawal form. All required 
signatures must be obtained and the form must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office. 

Tuition refunds, when a student withdraws from a course, are calculated as follows: 

• during the first two class periods 100% 

• from the third class to course midpoint 50% 

• from midpoint to course ending date 0% 

Students withdrawing from all classes will be charged a cancellation of program fee 
of $100. 

International Student Deposit 

In addition to regular University charges, international students must provide an 
International Student Deposit of $3,000 U.S. This applies to all international students 
except documented permanent residents of the U.S. or residents of Canada. The deposit 
must be received by the Enrollment Services Office before a U.S . Immigration Form I- 
20 is sent to the prospective student for entry to the U.S. Because mail service from 
many foreign countries takes time, this deposit should be sent at least eight weeks prior 
to enrollment. This deposit, once paid, remains untouched (with interest paid at the rate 



20 



of two percent) until the student graduates, withdraws from Southern, or is unable to 
pay his or her student account, at which time the international deposit will be applied 
to the student's account. If the student's accounthas been paid in full, the deposit will 
be refunded after the final statement is issued. 

Credit Cards 

The Cashier's Office honors VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express 
cards for making payments on a student's account. No cash withdrawal service is 
available from the Cashier's Office. This service may be obtained from a local 
financial institution or ATM. 

When using a credit card to pay on an account, the following information must be 
supplied: 1) type of credit card being used, 2) cardholder's name, 3) credit card number, 
and 4) expiration date. 

Summer Residence Hall 

A refundable deposit of $250 is required of each student. This deposit is held in 
reserve until the student permanently moves out of the residence hall. Seventh-day 
Adventist conference-sponsored students enrolled part-time in the summer program are 
exempt from this requirement. 

The rental charge per person for dual occupancy is $10 per day. When available, 
single occupancy is permitted at $15 per day. Room charges will be posted to a 
student's account monthly, based on the number of days a room was occupied/reserved 
during the month. 

Pets and children of students are not permitted to stay in the residence halls. 

University Apartments 

The University apartments are available on a first-come first-served basis. Rental 
arrangements are made with the office of the Vice President for Financial 
Administration. The first month's rent and a $250 housing deposit is required before 
a rental agreement is issued. An additional $5 per key deposit must be paid before keys 
to the apartment are issued. These deposits are fully refundable unless there are unpaid 
rental charges, cleaning charges and/or unreturned keys. Additional charges will be 
assessed if the deposit is insufficient to cover these costs. Semester rental charges will 
be posted to the student's account to be paid monthly. Subject to change without 
notice. 

Books and Supplies 

Textbooks, school supplies, and other class materials are available at the Campus 
Shop. 

Release of Transcripts or Diplomas 

It is the policy of the university to withhold transcripts, diplomas, certificates of 
completion, and other records if a student has an unpaid or past-due account at the 
school, any unpaid account for which the university has co-signed, or if a federal loan 
borrower has not completed a Federal Stafford Loan Exit Interview. 

When payment is made by personal check, the transcript will be held for up to ten 
working days to allow the check to clear. 

Any student that has an amount that has been written off due to an uncollectible 
account, settlement, or lost account must pay the written off amount prior to enrolling 
in any class or being accepted or re-accepted as a graduate student. 



21 



Any student with an account that has not been paid in full due to a bankruptcy filing, 
must be paid in full before acceptance or enrollment unless (1 ) the student has received 
a hardship discharge from the bankruptcy court and provides a copy of the same to the 
University or (2) the student can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the University that 
his or her account falls outside of the educational benefit discharge exception of Section 
523(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code. 



22 



School of Business 
and Management 



Dean: Don Van Ornam 

Faculty: Robert Gadd, Jan Haluska, Rob Montague, Cliff Olson, Mark Smith, 

Don Van Ornam, Neville Webster, Jon Wentworth 
Adjunct Faculty: Herbert Coolidge, Letitia Erdmann, David Gerstle, Josef Ghosn, 

Ralph Trecartin, Greg Willett, Ben Wygal 

The mission of the School of Business and Management is to provide a high quality 
professional education within the context of the Seventh-day Adventist Christian 
community. A God-centered environment that integrates personal integrity, ethics, 
respect, and dignity in all relationships is valued. The emphasis is excellence in 
teaching at the graduate level with value given to the development of knowledge. 
Programs and instruction provide both theory and application to promote strategic 
outcomes in a free market society exemplified by qualified alumni committed to 
dedicated service. 

Programs Offered 

The School of Business and Management offers a Master of Business 
Administration (MBA), Master of Financial Services (MFS), and a Master of Science 
in Administration (MSA). 

The emphases in the MBA are: 

► Accounting 

► Church and Nonprofit Leadership 

► Healthcare Administration 

► Human Resource Management (by special arrangement) 

► Management (SAU Campus, Websouthem) 

► Marketing Management (by special arrangement) 

Online Program: 

The Master of Business Administration (Management emphasis) degree program is 
available online. You may contact http//:business. southern.edu or the School of 
Business and Management (423-236-2527) for more information. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the admission requirements for graduate study, a candidate for a 
Master of Business Administration, Master of Financial Services, or a Master of 
Science in Administration will comply with the following requirements. 

1. A Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution in any major. 

2. A cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 or higher. 

3. A Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) taken within the past five 
years. Students will be admitted based on the following formula: GPA x 200 + 
GMAT= 1000. 



23 

4. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600 having taken the 
test within the past year or demonstrate proficiency in the use of the English 
language. 

Note: All graduate admission documents are to be sent to the School of Business 
and Management. After initial processing, documents will be forwarded to the Office 
of Records and Advisement. 

Provisional Admission: 

An applicant with less than a 3.00 grade point average or a combined GPA/GMAT 
score of less than 1000 may be admitted provisionally. A student accepted 
provisionally will be admitted to regular status upon the completion of 1 2 credit hours 
taken on the resident campus with a minimum grade of "B" in each course. Students 
are not permitted to repeat courses in order to satisfy this requirement. Students who 
do not satisfy this requirement will not be permitted to continue in the program. 

Special Student: 

An applicant who does not satisfy the graduate admission requirements may be 
permitted to enroll in specific classes as a special student while completing such 
requirements. A maximum of nine (9) semester hours may be taken on this basis. 

Admission to the Programs: 

Full-time students may be admitted into the program during the fall semester. Part- 
time students may enter the program at the beginning of any semester. (Fall, Winter, 
Summer) 

Time Limits: 

The programs are structured to meet the needs of the part-time as well as the full- 
time student. Normal progress through the programs for the full-time student will be 
four courses per semester (five for the MFS). Normal progress for part-time students 
will be one or more courses per semester. The time allowed from enrollment to the 
graduate program to the conferring of the Master of Business Administration degree 
may not exceed five years (four years for the MFS). Application for an extension will 
be considered on an individual basis. 

Residence: 

The last 30 semester hours (24 hours for the MFS) must be taken through the 
Southern Adventist University School of Business and Management. 

Progression: 

1. A maximum of six semester hours with a minimum grade of "B" may be 
transferred into the program to satisfy graduation requirements provided they are 
equivalent to course requirements. 

2. A course may be repeated one time on the resident campus for the purpose of 
improving the GPA or to remove a non-passing grade. A maximum of two 
courses may be repeated. 



24 

Graduation Requirements 

A candidate must: 

1 . Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. A 
maximum of two courses with C grades may count toward a master's degree. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The MBA program consists of 36 hours of courses. The regular schedule is a three 
semester regimen of four courses each. The areas of emphasis are: Accounting, Church 
and Nonprofit Leadership, Healthcare Administration, Human Resource Management, 
Management, and Marketing Management. 

Objectives: 

1 . To give the student a broad background of knowledge of the free enterprise 
system within a framework of moral and ethical guidelines. 

2. To assist the student to develop a sound Christian business philosophy toward 
our current economic environment and the ever-changing business world of the 
future. 

3. To provide the student with a quality academic program at the graduate level 
with skills required for today's job placement. 

4. To prepare the student to serve in a position of business leadership. 

5 . To provide the necessary academic background for entrance into terminal degree 
programs in business or related areas of concentration. 

Courses for the Master of Business Administration 
Emphasis in ACCOUNTING: 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 3 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 3 

ACCT Accounting Electives 12 

Total Hours Required 36-39* 



*ACCT 505 is required for students who have not taken two semesters of undergraduate accounting. 



25 



Emphasis in CHURCH AND NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP: 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 

BHRM 510 Human Resource Management 

NPLD Church and Nonprofit Electives 

Total Hours Required 

Emphasis in HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION: 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 

BHRM 510 Human Resource Management 

HADM Healthcare Administration Electives 

Total Hours Required 

Emphasis in HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 

36-39* 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 

36-39* 



*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 

BHRM 510 Human Resource Management 

BHRM Human Resource Electives 



Total Hours Required 



36-39* 



26 

Emphasis in MANAGEMENT: 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 3 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 3 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

BEXM Management Electives 6 

Total Hours Required 36-39* 

Emphasis in MARKETING MANAGEMENT: 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 3 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 3 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

BMKT Marketing Management Electives 6 

Total Hours Required 36-39* 

*ACCT 505 is required for students who have not taken two semesters of undergraduate accounting. 



MASTER OF FINANCIAL SERVICES 

The Master of Financial Services is designed to meet the needs of three distinct 
groups of applicants: (1) applicants who have completed an undergraduate degree in 
accounting, (2) applicants who have completed an undergraduate degree in finance, (3) 
students pursuing a dual BB A-FS/MFS degree. Graduate admission requirements for 
each group is listed below. 

Applicants without an accounting or finance undergraduate degree will be required 
to complete prerequisite accounting courses (see admission requirements). 



27 

Objectives: 

1. To give the student a broad background of knowledge of the free enterprise 
system within a framework of moral and ethical guidelines. 

2. To assist the student to develop a sound Christian business philosophy toward 
our current economic environment and the ever-changing business world of the 
future. 

3. To provide the student with a quality academic program at the graduate level 
with skills required for today's job placement. 

4. To prepare the student to serve in a position of financial leadership. 

5 . To provide the necessary academic background for entrance into terminal degree 
programs in business or related areas of concentration. 

6. To meet educational requirements and/or training for students desiring to write 
the CPA exam. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the admission requirements for graduate study, a candidate for a 
Master of Financial Services will comply with the following requirements. 

1. A Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution in accounting, finance, or 
financial services. Applicants with a bachelor's degree in another area are 
required to add ACCT 505, ACCT 507, and ACCT 508 to their programs unless 
they can show credit for such courses at the undergraduate level. 

2. A cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or higher. 

3. A Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) taken within the past five 
years. Students will be admitted based on the following formula: GPA x 
200+GMAT=1000. 

4. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600 having taken the 
test within the past year, or demonstrate proficiency in the use of the English 
language. 

Note: All graduate admission documents are to be sent to the School of Business 
and Management. After initial processing, documents will be forwarded to the Office 
of Records and Advisement. 

Admission Requirements for Dual BBA-FS/MFS Degree Applicants (five-year 
program): 

1. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or higher. 

2. Successful completion of the following undergraduate courses: 

► ACCT 311,312 (Intermediate Accounting I, II) 

► MATH 120 (Precalculus Algebra) 

► BUAD 22 1 (Business Statistics) 

► ECON 224, 225 (Macro/Micro Economics) 

► FNCE 315 (Business Finance) 

Special Students: 

Applicants who do not satisfy the graduate admission requirements may be 
permitted to enroll in specific classes as special students. Such students will be allowed 
to take a maximum of nine (9) semester hours. 

Admission to the Program: 

Full-time students may be admitted into the program during the fall semester. Dual 
degree students may be admitted into the program at the beginning of the fall or winter 
semester. 



28 

Time Limits: 

The program is structured to meet the needs of both the full-time and part-time 
student. Normal progression through the program for the full-time student will be five 
courses per semester. Normal progression through the program for the part-time 
student will be two courses per semester. The time allowed from enrollment to the 
graduate program to the conferring of the Master of Financial Services degree may not 
exceed four years. Application for an extension will be considered on an individual 
basis. 

Residence: 

The last 24 semesterhours mustbe taken through the Southern A dventist University 
School of Business and Management. 

Progression: 

1. A maximum of six semester hours with a minimum grade of "B" may be 
transferred into the program to satisfy graduation requirements provided they are 
equivalent to course requirements. 

2. A course may be repeated one time on the resident campus for the purpose of 
improving the GPA or to remove a non-passing grade. A maximum of two 
courses may be repeated. 

Graduation Requirements 

A candidate must: 

1 . Complete an application to graduate which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 

3. A maximum of two courses with C grades may count toward a master's degree. 

Courses for the Master of Financial Services 

The program consists of 30 hours of courses. 

Courses are as follows: 

Core Credit 

*ACCT 507, 508 Intermediate Financial Accounting 6 

ACCT 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 504 Communication Skills for Managers 3 

FNCE 510 Financial Management 3 

ACCT 564/FNCE 564 Financial Statement Analysis 3 

TOTAL 12-18* 

*ACCT 507and 50 8 is required for students who have not taken undergraduate intermediate accounting. 

Electives 

Select six (6) electives from the following: 18 

ACCT 520 Accounting Theory 3 

ACCT 530 Controllership 3 

ACCT 550 Advanced Accounting 3 

ACCT 552 Auditing 3 



29 

ACCT 556 Federal Taxation 3 

ACCT 557 Advanced Federal Income Taxes 3 

ACCT 558 Federal Tax Problems/Research 3 

ACCT 585 Contemporary Issues of Professional Practice 3 

ACCT 587 Accounting and Reporting in the SEC Environment 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

FNCE 520 Finance Theory 3 

FNCE 525 International Finance 3 

FNCE 545 Mergers and Acquisitions 3 

FNCE 552 Money and Banking 3 

FNCE 555 Fundamentals of Investments 3 

FNCE 561 Portfolio Management 3 

FNCE 585 Contemporary Issues in Finance 3 

Total Hours Required 30/36** 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 

The Master of Science in Administration degree is designed for students with a non- 
business undergraduate background or who desire further preparation in leadership. 
Students with an undergraduate degree from an accredited four-year institution maybe 
accepted in the program without further prerequisites upon compliance with the 
admission requirements for graduate study. 

Objectives: 

1 . To give the student an interdisciplinary training in business administration and 
leadership in the chosen professional field. 

2. To assist the student to develop a sound Christian business philosophy toward 
our current economic environment and the ever-changing business world of the 
future. 

3. To provide the student with a quality academic program at the graduate level 
with skills required for today's workplace. 

4. To prepare the student with a balance of business skills and professional area 
skills to serve in a position of leadership and administration. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the admission requirements for graduate study, a candidate for a 
Master of Science in Administration will comply with the following requirement. 

♦ In some instances a Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) taken 
within the past five years may be required. In such situations students will be 
admitted based on the following formula: GPA x 200+GMAT=1000. 

Note: All graduate admission documents are to be sent to the School of Business 
and Management. After initial processing, documents will be forwarded to the Office 
of Records and Advisement. 



30 

Admission to the Program: 

The program is designed for part-time students. Part-time students may enter the 
program at the beginning of any semester based on when courses are offered. 

Courses for the Master of Science in Administration 

The program consists of 36 hours of courses including eight courses (24 hours) in 
the business area and the emphasis of four courses (12 hours) in the professional area. 
Select one of the areas of emphasis either in Church Administration or Outdoor 
Education. 

The Business Courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

*ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 3 

BHRM510 Managing Human Resources 3 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

NPLD 530 Strategic Management in Nonprofit Organizations 3 

MBA (ACCT, BUAD, BEXM, BHRM, BMKT, FNCE 6 

(HADM, NPLD) Electives 
TOTAL 24-27* 

*ACCT 505 is required for students who have not taken two semesters of undergraduate accounting. 

Emphasis in CHURCH ADMINISTRATION 12 

The following courses are required: 

RELP513 Effective Church Leadership 3 

RELT 581 Biblical Ethics and Contemporary Society 3 

Select six (6) hours from the course offerings in the School of Religion. 6 

Total Hours Required 36-39* 

Emphasis in OUTDOOR EDUCATION 12 

Choose one of the following course combinations: 3 

EDOE 503/504 Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education/Field Exp 
EDOE 523/524 Leadership in Outdoor Education/Field Experience 
EDOE 533/534 Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites/Field Experience 

Select nine (9) hours from the elective course offerings in EDOE from the 9 

School of Education and Psychology 

TOTAL 12 

Total Hours Required 36-39* 



31 

Business Administration General Courses 

BUAD 504. Communication Skills for Managers 3 hours 

The course analyzes basic models of communication applicable to the workplace. This analysis 
provides a theoretical framework for effective communication. Emphasis is placed on the 
connection between communication and the functions of management 

BUAD 505. Management in a Changing World 3 hours 

Presents an overview of the fundamental issues underlying a post-industrial society, such as the 
changing concepts of technology and knowledge. The impact of technological and workforce 
changes on society, on organizations, and on the role of the manager are explored in depth. The 
nature of organizations in a changing environment, the evolution of management thought and its 
relevance for modern managers. Organizational theory, structure, and design are emphasized. The 
relationships between individuals and organizations, the social responsibility of organizations and 
ethical issues for managers, workforce diversity, and the challenges of managing in today's 
complex organizational environment are studied. 

BUAD 510. Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or a course in Principles of Accounting. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 510. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

Review of basic financial accounting and financial statements. Study of the use of accounting for 

the planning and control of a firm, application of accounting techniques for budgeting, pricing, and 

decision making. 

BUAD 520. Financial Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: A course in Principles of Finance or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
This course is cross-listed with FNCE 51 0. A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 

Understanding and analyzing information for decision making. The financial environment, 
financial statement analysis, operating, cash and capital budgeting, working capital management, 
interest mathematics, and cost of capital are discussed. 

BUAD 530. Organizational Behavior 3 hours 

Leadership, motivation, group dynamics, decision making, interpersonal relations, change. 
Designing and implementing the organizational structure: corporate divisions, departments, 
support groups. Organizing work: positions, specifications, performance standards and review, 
reward systems, program and project management 

BUAD 540. Marketing Management 3 hours 

The marketing process, product development, pricing, packaging, promotional strategy, 
development of channels of distribution integrated into a program for profit and nonprofit 
organizations. Contains a research component. 

BUAD 555. Leadership and Change 3 hours 

Examines theory and leadership practices in various types of organizations. Particular emphasis 
is placed on the strategic role of leaders in leading organizational development and change in an 
age of rapidly changing markets and technologies. Examines why organizational change efforts 
succeed or fail, and what leaders can do to anticipate and effect needed organizational changes 
successfully. 

BUAD 560. Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 hours 

Examines the theory and practice of entrepreneurship and how the field fits traditional business 
models. A business plan is developed and presented, including market research, legal organization 
business forms, and a human resource plan. Includes case studies devoted to successful 
entrepreneurial businesses. 



32 



BUAD 570. Strategic Decision Making 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of dean or program coordinator if taken before completion of core 
curriculum. 

A capstone seminar in which the applied behavioral aspects and the impact of the continuous 
changes affecting post-industrialized society are linked to the key organizational function known 
as decision making. The course integrates previous course work. Focus is given to effective 
decision strategies, ensuring decision quality, differences between group and individual decision 
making, and a variety of constraints facing decision makers. Utilizing a case approach to integrate 
earlier course work, the course enhances decision making skill by providing students the 
opportunity to analyze the effects of various decision strategies on organizational outcomes. The 
use of technology to enhance research and decision making skills are key components. 

BUAD 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

Accounting and Finance Courses 

ACCT 505. Financial Accounting 3 hours 

An introduction to financial accounting. Emphasis is on uses of information contained in financial 
statements. Students are also introduced to the principles of managerial accounting. (ACCT 505 
is required for students who have not taken two semesters of undergraduate accounting or can 
validate equivalent work experience approved by the dean or accounting professor.) 

ACCT 507. Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or a course in Principles of Accounting I & II. 

An in-depth course in financial accounting. Topics include the accounting conceptual framework, 

the hierarchy of GAAP, accounting for assets, liabilities and owners' equity. (Summer only) 

(ACCT 507 and 508 are required for students who have not taken undergraduate intermediate 

accounting.) 

ACCT 508. Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 507. 

Continue an in-depth study in financial accounting. Topics include revenues and expenses, income 

taxes, leases, pensions, and financial statement reporting and disclosure requirements. (Summer 

only) (ACCT 507 and 50 8 are required for students who have not taken undergraduate intermediate 

accounting.) 

ACCT 510. Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or a course in Principles of Accounting I & II. 

This course is cross-listed with BUAD 510. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

Review of basic financial accounting and financial statements. Study of the use of accounting for 

the planning and control of a firm, application of accounting techniques for budgeting, pricing, and 

decision making. 

ACCT 520. Accounting Theory 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 508 or equivalent. 

This course provides a survey of theories applied to accounting. Emphasis is given to theories 
applicable to financial accounting and reporting, but other theories frequently used in managerial 
accounting, taxes, and accounting systems may also be introduced. These theories are then used 
to evaluate critically the U.S. accounting standard-setting process, both past and present. 

ACCT 530. Controllership 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent. 

This course provides an advanced study of accounting techniques, concepts, and procedures as they 
relate to the functions and responsibilities of the controller. Topics will include planning and 
control functions, management reporting systems, and investment planning. 



33 



ACCT 550. Advanced Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 508 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with A CCT 450 in the BBA program. A student may receive credit for 

this course from only one program. 

This course is an in-depth study of selected accounting topics such as consolidated financial 

statements, partnerships, business firms in financial difficulty, estates and trusts, foreign exchange, 

and segment reporting. 

ACCT 552. Auditing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 550 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 452 in the BBA program. A student may receive credit for 
this course from only one program. 

This course is primarily a study of generally accepted auditing standards promulgated by various 
standard-setting bodies. It includes a study of the AICPA code of professional ethics, audit 
planning, and audit procedures. It also includes a consideration of various attest and other quasi- 
audit services. 

ACCT 556. Federal Taxation 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 556 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 456 in the BBA program. A student may receive credit for 

this course from only one program. 

This course is a study of the Federal tax system. The primary emphasis is the Federal income tax 

as it applies to individuals. A study of other federal taxes and the taxation of other entities is 

included. 

ACCT 557. Advanced Federal Income Taxes 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 556 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 457 in the BBA program. A student may receive credit for 

this course from only one program. 

This course is a continued study of the Federal tax system. The primary emphasis is the Federal 

income tax as it applies to for-profit and not-for-profit entities other than individuals. A study of 

other Federal taxes is included. 

ACCT 558. Federal Tax Problems/Research 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 557 or equivalent. 

This course is a study of tax law sources, tax research methodology, research documentation, and 

the preparation and presentation of research-based solutions to selected Federal tax problems. 

ACCT 564. Financial Statement Analysis 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 508, 550; FNCE 555 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 564 . A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

A capstone class designed to synthesize financial information learned in previous courses. 

Utilizing information from financial accounting and finance courses, students analyze financial 

statements of various companies and make investing, lending, and management decisions based 

on the information provided in those statements. 

ACCT 585. Contemporary Issues of Professional Practice 3 hours 

Using contemporary issues facing the accounting profession, the content for this course will vary 
each semester to include recent issues the accounting profession is facing. Topics may include 
professionalism, non-audit attest services, independence, practice organizational form, and non- 
attest services. 

ACCT 587. Accounting and Reporting in the SEC Environment 3 hours 

The course investigates accounting issues that arise in a SEC/environment, both from the 
perspective of the corporation functioning in a SEC environment and from the perspective of the 
public accounting firm auditing a SEC corporation. 



34 



ACCT 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Designed to develop specialized knowledge in an accounting topic, the student will perform 
individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

ACCT 597. Accounting Research 3 hours 

Designed to develop research skills, this course requires the student to conduct a research project 
under the supervision of a faculty member in the discip line. The research includes a review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 

FNCE 510. Financial Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: A course in Principles of Finance or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
This course is cross-listed with BUAD 520. A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 
See BUAD 520 for course description. 

FNCE 520. Finance Theory 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 5 1 or equivalent. 

Designed to familiarize students with significant problems currently facing the financeprofession, 
to examine in depth various solutions proposed by finance scholars and others, and to strengthen 
student understanding of today's critical issues in finance theory. 

FNCE 525. International Finance 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 5 1 or equivalent. 

Covers a detailed examination of the foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination, 
international financial institutions, and the management of the risks associated with international 
business. 

FNCE 545. Mergers and Acquisitions 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 5 1 or equivalent. 

An examination of corporate acquisitions, including firm valuation, bidding contests, and defense 
managers, as well as the corporate tax and legal environment. 

FNCE 552. Money and Banking 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 452. A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 

Studies mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the Federal Reserve 
System and other financial institutions, and the impact of monetary policy on financial business 
procedures and decisions. 

FNCE 555. Fundamentals of Investment 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 455. A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 

A practical, as well as a theoretical, approach is taken for the potential investor of institutional or 
personal funds through the use of problems, readings, and cases. Topics covered will include 
stocks and bonds in the security market, real estate, and fixed equipment investments. 

FNCE 561. Portfolio Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 555 or equivalent. 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 461. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

Includes consideration of investment instrument choices that are available to the investor and the 

purpose and operation of U.S. and global capital markets. The course also covers the methods of 

evaluation for current and future investment opportunities in the expansion of a portfolio of 

investments that satisfies an investor's risk-return goals. 



35 



FNCE 564. Financial Statement Analysis 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 508, 550; FNCE 555 or equivalent 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 564 . A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 
See ACCT 564 for course description. 

FNCE 585. Contemporary Issues in Finance 3 hours 

A seminar format with guest lectures relating to current issues developing in Finance. 

FNCE 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

FNCE 597. Finance Research 3 hours 

A research project under the supervision of a faculty in the discipline, which includes review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 

Church and Nonprofit Leadership Courses 

NPLD 530. Strategic Management in Nonprofit Organizations 3 hours 

The integration and application of strategic management principles, concepts, and practices in 
nonprofit organizations are discussed. The development of mission statements, goal-setting 
concepts, and strategy formulation and implementation approaches are included. Students are 
provided the opportunity to design organizational plans and strategies relevant to their specific 
needs and the needs of their organizations. 

NPLD 585. Contemporary Issues in Church and 

Nonprofit Leadership 3 hours 

A seminar format with guest lectures relating to current issues developing in nonprofit 
organizations. Key issues include the role of spiritual values, ethics, religious leadership, 
motivation, change, etc. 

NPLD 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

NPLD 597. Nonprofit Leadership Research 3 hours 

A research project under the supervision of a faculty in the discipline, which includes review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 

Healthcare Administration Courses 

HADM 530. Healthcare Administration 3 hours 

The theory and practice of healthcare in Western culture. Different types of care delivery studied. 
Environments, services offered, process of entry into care systems. Health and quality of care, 
medical ethics, environmental health, and delivering of services addressed. Designed for all 
avenues of healthcare. 

HADM 536. Advanced Nursing Leadership and Role Development 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of program coordinator. 

This course is cross-listed with NRSG 578 in the School of Nursing . A student may receive credit 
for this course from only one program. 
See NRSG 578 for course description. 



36 



HADM 550. Entrepreneurship and the Healthcare Professional 3 hours 

Creates a focus toward valuing and growing new businesses. Learning how to be an entrepreneur 
by creating a business and learning to be a key player and leader of a business team are key 
outcomes. Discover how to build a meaningful business from seasoned professionals through guest 
corporate lectures, classroom experience, workshops, mentorships, and internships. 

HADM 585. Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Administration 3 hours 

A seminar of open discussion and guest lectures relating to current issues developing within the 
healthcare industry. Included in the discussion will be topics in healthcare finance and legal issues. 

HADM 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

HADM 597. Healthcare Administration Research 3 hours 

A research project under the supervision of a faculty in the discipline, which includes review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 

Human Resource Management Courses 

BHRM 510. Human Resource Management 3 hours 

Provides a framework for understanding and thinking strategically about employment relations and 
the management of human resources in organizations. The course builds on insights from the 
social sciences to explore how employment relations are influenced by economic, social, 
psychological, legal, and cultural forces. Specific topics include: recruitment and selection; 
performance evaluation; compensation and benefits; promotion; job design; training; layoffs; 
retention and turnover; and the human resource implications of various strategies. 

BHRM 530. Human Resource Development and Training 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BHRM 510. 

Human Resource Development is the guiding force in developing a high quality workforce from 
the executive level through the production worker. The human worker is capable of being 
developed and trained to perform optimally. Topics covered are needs assessments, setting training 
goals and objectives, and training effort assessment. 

BHRM 540. Benefits Administration 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BHRM 510. 

Benefits administration is an increasingly important duty of the HR function. Covering employees 
with medical, disability, retirement and other benefits is an important component in attracting and 
retaining a high performance work force. Emphasis is placed on designing a benefits system that 
is reasonable to build, implement, monitor while keeping within budget constraints. 

BHRM 585. Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management 3 hours 

A seminar of open discussion and guest lectures relating to current issues developing in human 
resource management. Topics will include key concepts in compensation systems, development 
and training, benefits, motivation of employees, and other related issues. 

BHRM 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

BHRM 597. Human Resource Management Research 3 hours 

A research project under the supervision of a faculty in the discipline, which includes review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 



37 



Management Courses 

BEXM 505. Legal Framework of Decisions 3 hours 

Examines the legal environment within which legislative bodies, courts, and administrative 
agencies act upon the operation of business and government. Contracts, judicial and legislative 
process, and administrative rule-making reviewed. 

BEXM 520. Corporate lntrapreneurship 3 hours 

Presents concepts, tools, and techniques for managing new business creations, or creating an 
environment of innovation/entrepreneurship within larger existing organizations. The spectrum 
of activities to be considered is broad including new ventures launched by both corporate and 
division managers in established and emerging businesses. 

BEXM 585. Contemporary Issues in Management 3 hours 

A seminar of open discussion and guest lectures relating to current issues developing within the 
science of management. Topics include key concepts in leadership, motivation, management of 
change, societal issues, community relations, and organizational development. 

BEXM 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

BEXM 597. Management Research 3 hours 

A research project under the supervision of a faculty in the discipline, which includes review of 
literature, research design, data collection and analysis leading to a paper appropriate for 
professional publication and/or presentation. 



Marketing Management Courses 



BMKT 550. International Marketing Management 3 hours 

Analyze international markets and development of strategic and tactical options for marketing 
across national boundaries. Cultural norms, behaviors and nuances are evaluated for appropriate 
marketing strategies and tactics. Develops students' knowledge of theoretical concepts and 
practical aspects of marketing for firms competing in countries with different cultural, legal, 
economic, and political environments. Designed for those who plan to work for multinational 
companies and those who want to enrich their knowledge of the international marketplace. 

BMKT 585. Contemporary Issues in Marketing Management 3 hours 

A seminar of open discussion and guest lectures relating to current issues developing within the 
healthcare industry. 

BMKT 595. Independent Study 3 hours 

Individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. 

BMKT 597. Marketing Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT 5 1 and Statistics. 

Provides study of and experience in the systematic design, collection, analysis, and reporting of 
data relevant to a specific marketing situation facing an organization. Through a marketing 
research project students develop research objectives and a research plan, collect and analyze the 
data, and interpret and report the findings. 



38 



School of Education 
and Psychology 



Dean: Alberto dos Santos 

Faculty: Krystal Bishop, Charles D. Burks, Myrna Colon, Robert Coombs, 
Alberto dos Santos, Denise Dunzweiler, Carleton L. Swafford, 
John Wesley Taylor V, Penelope Webster, Ruth WilliamsMorris 

Adjunct Faculty: Gerald Colvin, Leona Gulley 

The mission of the School of Education and Psychology is to prepare professional 
educators and psychologists at both undergraduate and graduate levels who can function 
effectively in a culturally pluralistic society and who are dedicated to assisting students 
in reaching their maximum potential in service to God and humanity. 

The School of Education and Psychology is approved by the Tennessee State Board 
of Education for the preparation of secondary and elementary teachers. The Master of 
Science degree in School Counseling is also approved by the Tennessee State Board of 
Education. 

Programs Offered 

The School of Education and Psychology offers a Master of Science degree with 
three emphases in Counseling and a Master of Science in Education degree with five 
emphases. 

The emphases in Counseling are: 

► Community Counseling 

► Marriage and Family Therapy 

► School Counseling 

The emphases in Education are: 

► Curriculum and Instruction 

► Educational Administration and Supervision 

► Inclusive Education 

► Literacy Education 

► Outdoor Teacher Education 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Community Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy and 
School Counseling 

Objectives: 

1. To enhance competency in several areas of counseling services. 

2. To facilitate placement in the professional field. 

3. To provide studies in preparation for more advanced programs. 

4. To prepare candidates to obtain the appropriate credentials and/or licensure. 
Note: Each candidate is responsible for the realization of this goal, as each state 
has its own standards. Our programs are designed in keeping with the Council 
for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) 



39 



standards for Community Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, and School 
Counseling. Upon completion of a program, students will have met the 
academic eligibility requirements for TN Licensed Professional Counselor 
(LPC) or School Counselor Certification. 
5. To train candidates to effectively serve others. 

Prerequisites for Admission 

In addition to the admission requirements for graduate study, a candidate for the 
Master of Science program with emphases in Community Counseling, Marriage and 
Family Therapy, or School Counseling will comply with the requirements listed below. 
Students who have not met all requirements for regular admission upon completion of 
12 semester hours will be prohibited from registering for additional credits until all 
requirements are satisfactorily completed. 

1. The completion of a minimum of nine semester hours in psychology or 
behavioral sciences on the upper division of the undergraduate level or on the 
graduate level, including one class in research and/or statistics. 

2. The absence of any felony or pending prosecution for felony. (Completion of 
form verifying such). 

3 . Two recommendations, including one from a college professor and another from 
a work supervisor, attesting to the qualities of the candidate in terms of 
relationships and stability. 

4. An interview by members of the psychology area of the School of Education and 
Psychology to assess the candidate's values, commitment to multiculturalism, 
attitudes, and communication skills. (The interview may take place before 
admission or during the first session of classes.) 

5. Prior to the faculty interview, candidates are asked to complete a written 
"Statement of Purpose" regarding their motivation for joining the counseling 
program as part of their application. This will be used to assess the candidate's 
written expression skills. 

6. Academic records are examined to determine whether the applicant has 
established a firm basis for graduate work in the proposed field of study. In 
harmony with accepted academic practice for regular admission status, a 
minimum of 3.0 grade point average on undergraduate credit or 3.0 average on 
12 semester hours of graduate credit is required. Students with a grade point 
average less than 3.0 may be considered for provisional admission on an 
individual basis. Regular admission status will be granted if the provisional 
student's GPA averages 3.0 or higher at the end of the first 12 graduate semester 
hours. 

7. The results of the required Graduate Record Examination General Test (GRE) 
provide additional evidence of the applicant's aptitude and knowledge. 
Consideration is given to scholarly promise as well as achievement. 
International students whose first language is not English and who are applying 
for on-campus programs will be exempt from taking the Graduate Record Exam, 
but must submit their score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL). 

8. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory results on record before the end 
of the first session of classes. 



40 



The School of Education and Psychology reserves the right to revoke admission 
should a candidate be deemed inappropriate for a counseling degree. 

Graduation Requirements 

A candidate must: 

1 . Comp lete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 

3. Pass a written comprehensive examination designed by the faculty. 

4. Pass an oral defense of a video case presentation and/or a final position paper. 

Courses for Master of Science: Community Counseling Emphasis 

The program includes 55 semester hours of courses and field practice. Additional 
semester hours maybe required for candidates who need to remove deficiencies or who 
have particular interests. 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

COUN510 Advanced Lifespan Development 3 

COUN 514 Drugs and Addictions 3 

COUN 516 Career Counseling 3 

COUN 520 Principles of Counseling 3 

COUN 521 Psychopatho logy 3 

COUN 522 Theories of Personality 3 

COUN 526 Ethics and Legal Aspects of Counseling 2 

COUN 530 Assessment and Appraisal 3 

COUN 553 Group Therapy and Procedures 3 

COUN 555 Theories and Techniques of Psychotherapy 3 

COUN 560 Multiculturalism Seminar 2 

COUN 570 Counseling in Community Agencies 3 

COUN 575 Administration of Counseling Services 3 

COUN 582 Clinical Practicum I 1 

COUN 583 Clinical Practicum II: Community Counseling 2 

COUN 584 Clinical Internship: Community Counseling 4 

COUN 588 Statistics 3 

COUN 590 Marriage and Family Therapy I 3 

COUN 593 Child and Adolescent Problems and Treatment 3 

COUN 596 Psychological Research 2 

TOTAL 55 



41 



Electives: 



Candidates who wish to meet the requirements for the state licensure (LPC) exam need 
a minimum of five (5) additional hours to equal the recommended sixty (60) hours: 

Select five (5) hours from the following courses as available: 5 

COUN 508 Sexuality: Issues in Therapy 3 

*COUN551 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 3 

COUN 558 Crisis Counseling 2 

COUN 565 Topics in Psychology 1-3 

COUN 591 Marriage and Family Therapy II 3 

COUN 592 Marriage and Family Therapy III 3 

COUN 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Total Hours Required 60 

*COUN 551 is offered in summer only 
NOTE: Availability of courses may vary 

Courses for the Master of Science: 
Marriage and Family Therapy Emphasis 

The program includes 55 semester hours of courses and field practice. Additional 
semester hours may be required for candidates who need to remove deficiencies or who 
have particular interests. 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

COUN 508 Sexuality: Issues in Therapy 3 

COUN 510 Advanced Lifespan Development 3 

COUN 514 Drugs and Addictions 3 

COUN 520 Principles of Counseling 3 

COUN 521 Psychopathology 3 

COUN 522 Theories of Personality 3 

COUN 526 Ethics and Legal Aspects of Counseling 2 

COUN 530 Assessment and Appraisal 3 

COUN 553 Group Therapy and Procedures 3 

COUN 555 Theories and Techniques of Psychotherapy 3 

COUN 560 Multiculturalism Seminar 2 

COUN 582 Clinical Practicum I 1 

COUN 583 Clinical Practicum II: Marriage and Family Therapy 2 

COUN 584 Clinical Internship: Marriage & Family Therapy 4 

COUN 588 Statistics 3 

COUN 590 Marriage and Family Therapy I 3 

COUN 591 Marriage and Family Therapy II 3 



42 



COUN 592 Marriage and Family Therapy III 3 

COUN 593 Child and Adolescent Problems and Treatment 3 

COUN 596 Psychological Research 2 

TOTAL 55 

Electives: 

Candidates who wish to meet the requirements for the state licensure (LPC) exam need 
a minimum of five (5) additional hours to equal the recommended sixty (60) hours. 

Select five (5) hours from the following courses: 5 

COUN 516 Career Counseling " 3 

*COUN551 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 3 

COUN 558 Crisis Counseling 2 

COUN 565 Topics in Psychology 1-3 

COUN 570 Counseling in Community Agencies 3 

COUN 575 Administration of Counseling Services 3 

COUN 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Total Hours Required 60 

*COUN 551 is offered in summer only 
NOTE: Availability of courses may vary 

Courses for Master of Science: School Counseling Emphasis 

This program includes 51 semester hours of courses and field practice. Additional 
semester hours maybe required of candidates who need to remove deficiencies or who 
have particular interests. Because of the State of Tennessee certification requirements, 
school counseling candidates without prior teaching experience will need to participate 
in a semester long orientation experience, including observation, participation in and 
analysis of classroom teaching, in a school setting, as an early part of their academic 
program. 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 2 

EDUC 541 Principles of Counseling 3 

COUN 502 Foundations of School Counseling 2 

COUN 506 Developmental Psychology — Growth Years 3 

COUN 514 Drugs and Addictions 3 

COUN 516 Career Counseling 3 

COUN 526 Ethics and Legal Aspects of Counseling 2 

COUN 530 Assessment and Appraisal 3 

COUN 553 Group Therapy and Procedures 3 

COUN 555 Theories and Techniques of Psychotherapy 3 

COUN 558 Crisis Counseling 2 

COUN 560 Multiculturalism Seminar 2 

COUN 577 Administration of School Counseling Services 3 



43 



COUN 582 Clinical Practicum I 1 

COUN 583 Clinical Practicum II: School Counseling 1 

COUN 584 Clinical Internship: School Counseling 4 

COUN 588 Statistics 3 

COUN 596 Psychological Research 2 

TOTAL 45 

Electives: 

Select six (6) hours from the following courses: 6 

*COUN 55 1 P sychology of the Exceptional Child 3 

COUN 590 Marriage and Family Therapy I 3 

COUN 593 Child and Adolescent Problems and Treatment 3 

COUN 595 Independent Study 1-3 

*EDCI 546 Improving Instruction 3 

*EDCI 570 Educational Assessment 3 

EDOE 593 Adventure-based Counseling 2 

*EDUC 577 Reading Assessment and Remediation 3 

Total Hours Required 51 

These courses are offered exclusively during summer sessions and are generally scheduled for morning 
and/or afternoon. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
Objectives: 

1 . To provide knowledge about school administration, educational curriculum, and 
effective methods used in elementary, secondary, and college classrooms. 

2. To enhance the proficiency of career educators in their chosen areas of 
specialization. 

3. To instill in students the desire to effectively serve others. 

4. To encourage students to perceive education as an on-going process. 

5. To lead students to a broad vision of education as a tool for analyzing and 
processing social trends. 

Prerequisites for Admission 

In addition to the admission requirements for graduate study, a candidate for the 
Master of Science program in Education will comply with the following requirements: 
1. Academic records are examined to determine whether the applicant has 
established a firm basis for graduate work in the proposed field of study. In 
harmony with accepted academic practice for regular admission status, a 
minimum of 3.0 grade point average on undergraduate credit or 3.0 average on 
12 semester hours of graduate credit is required. Students with a grade point 
average of less than 3.0 may be considered for provisional admission on an 
individual basis. Regular admission status will be granted if the provisional 
student's GPA averages 3.0 or higher at the end of the first 12 graduate semester 
hours. 



44 



2. Completion of a minimum of nine (9) semester credits in education courses. 
Generally, candidates who have graduated from undergraduate education 
programs easily fulfill this requirement. Candidates who have not completed this 
requirement may be granted provisional admission for a period of time mutually 
agreed upon with the Dean. Candidates for the Master of Science in Education 
with an Outdoor Education emphasis are exempt from this requirement, but are 
required to be interviewed prior to admittance to this program. 

3. The results of the required Graduate Record Examination General Test (GRE) 
provide additional evidence of the applicant's aptitude and knowledge. 
Consideration is given to scholarly promise as well as achievement. 
International students whose first language is not English and who are applying 
for on-campus programs will be exempt from taking the Graduate Record Exam, 
but must submit their score on the Test Of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL). 

Graduation Requirements 

A candidate must: 

1 . Comp lete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 

3. Pass a written comprehensive examination designed by the faculty and/or 
present a cumulative portfolio (Outdoor Education emphasis). 

Courses for the Master of Science in Education 
One of the following emphases is to be selected: 
Emphasis in CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 
The REQUIRED courses are required as follows: 

Courses Credit 

EDCI 545 Foundations of Curriculum Development 3 

EDCI 546 Improving Instruction 3 

EDCI 560 Curriculum Design 3 

EDCI 570 Educational Assessment 3 

EDCI 580 Field Work 2 

EDIE 502 Inclusive Education: History and Foundations 3 

EDUC 531 Technology and the Educator 3 

EDUC 588 Statistics 3 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 

TOTAL 25 

Select three (3) hours from the following courses: 3 

EDCI 565 Seminar: Trends in Education 3 

EDCI 595 Independent Study in Curriculum and Instruction 1-3 

EDUC 577 Reading Assessment and Remediation 3 

EDUC 599 Master's Research Project 3 



45 



Select eight (8) hours of electives from EDAD, EDIE, EDLE, EDOE, 8 

orEDUC. 

NOTE: Availability of courses varies from year to year. 

Total Hours Required 36 

Emphasis in EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION & SUPERVISION 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

EDAD 524 Foundations of Educational Administration 3 

EDAD 545 Supervision of Instruction 3 

EDAD 570 Personnel Administration 3 

EDAD 574 Legal Aspects of Education 3 

EDAD 579 School Finance 3 

EDCI 545 Foundations of Curriculum Development 3 

EDUC 531 Technology and the Educator 3 

EDUC 588 Statistics 3 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 

TOTAL 26 

Select two to three (2-3) hours from the following courses: 2-3 

EDAD 575 Internship in Administration 1-2 

EDAD 576 School Public Relations 2 

EDAD 578 Educational Facilities Planning 1 

EDAD 595 Independent Study in Educational Administration 1-3 

EDUC 599 Master's Research Project 3 

Select eight (8) hours of electives from EDCI, EDIE, EDLE, EDOE, 8 
orEDUC. 

NOTE : Availability of courses varies from year to year. 

Total Hours Required 36-37 



Emphasis in INCLUSIVE EDUCATION 

(Special Needs in the Regular Classroom) 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

EDIE 502 Inclusive Education: History and Foundations 3 

EDIE 531 Behavior Management of Exceptional Individuals 3 

EDIE 541 Assessment of Exceptional Individuals 3 

EDIE 557 Leadership in Inclusive Education 3 
EDIE 567 Curriculum and Strategies for Children with Learning Differences 3 

EDIE 580 Field Work " ' 2 

EDUC 531 Technology and the Educator 3 

EDUC 588 Statistics 3 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 

TOTAL 25 



46 



Select two to three (2-3) hours from the following courses: 2-3 
EDIE 512 Counseling and Psychology of Exceptional Individuals 

and Their Families 3 

EDIE 595 Independent Study in Inclusive Education 1-3 

EDUC 577 Reading Assessment and Remediation 3 

EDUC 599 Master's Research Project 3 

Select eight to nine (8-9) hours of electives from EDAD, EDCI, 

EDLE, EDOE, or EDUC. 8-9 

NOTE: Availability of courses varies from year to year. 

Total Hours Required 36-37 

Emphasis in LITERACY EDUCATION 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

EDLE 527 Implementing Reading Workshop 3 

EDLE 537 Implementing Writing Workshop 3 

EDLE 565 Critical Thinking in Content Literacy 3 

EDLE 567 Literacy Instruction in Primary Classrooms 3 

EDLE 580 Literacy Internship 2 

EDLE 585 Professional Applications in Literacy 2 

EDUC 531 Technology and the Educator 3 

EDUC 577 Reading Assessment and Remediation 3 

EDUC 588 Statistics 3 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 

TOTAL 27 

Select nine (9) hours of electives from EDAD, EDCI, EDIE, EDOE, 

or EDUC. 9 

NOTE: Availability of courses varies from year to year. 

Total Hours Required 36 

Emphasis in OUTDOOR TEACHER EDUCATION 

This program is designed for classroom teachers, outdoor professionals, youth 
workers or anyone who wants to use more effectively God's book of nature in teaching 
and outdoor programming. Generally, the classes and field experiences involve 
examining, evaluating, developing, and implementing outdoor education programs. 
Activities, such as canoeing, kayaking, backpacking, and rock climbing, are included 
as part of many of the courses, but are not the primary focus. Students can complete 
their coursework in three to four semesters, and may choose from two attendance 
options. 



47 



Option 1 : The Outdoor Professional Intensives 

These intensive sessions are designed for outdoor professionals (camp directors, 
naturalists, etc.) who need to continue working while enrolled in classes. To 
accommodate the work schedules of such professionals, each semester requires 
attendance to a ten day intensive, with additional projects and/or assignments to be 
completed individually in an outdoor setting after the session. Participation in these 
intensive sessions represents a commitment to the outdoor education field and is an 
opportunity for students to test their skills, knowledge, desires, and career goals while 
sharing topics of discussion and interest with the instructors and each other. Students 
in this attendance option must be employed or have access to an outdoor facility in 
order to complete field experiences required. 

Option 2 : The Classroom Teacher Summer Field School 

The summer field school attendance option is designed for K-12 teachers who 
would like to use outdoor laboratories to enrich the classroom curriculum. Typically 
the student will attend three consecutive eight-week summer field school sessions in 
order to complete the degree. Some students may elect to do Independent Study or 
Internship as part of their coursework. Independent Study allows the teacher to develop 
outdoorunits of study within their classrooms. Internships allow the teacherto network 
with outdoor professionals in their home community. Resources used for Internships 
typically include nature centers, parks, zoos, aquariums, museums, and government 
agencies offering outdoor education programming for teachers and schools. All 
students attending the summer field school should come prepared with outdoor 
appropriate clothing and basic camping gear. Suggested schedules for Summer Field 
School and a list of items typically required for classes are available from the School 
of Education and Psychology. 

The REQUIRED courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

EDOE 538 Technology in Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 543 Environmental Ministries for Teachers and Youth Leaders 2 

EDOE 593 Adventure-based Counseling 2 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 

TOTAL 8 

Select twelve (12) hours from the following courses: 12 

EDOE 503 Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 504 Field Experience in Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Educ 1 

EDOE 513 Nature Study 2 

EDOE 514 Field Experience in Nature Study 1 

EDOE 523 Leadership in Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 524 Field Experience in Leadership in Outdoor Education 1 

EDOE 533 Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 2 

EDOE 534 Field Experience in Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 1 

EDOE 535 Outdoor Therapy: Design and Procedures 2 

EDOE 536 Field Experience: Outdoor Therapy 1 



48 



Electives: 



Select fourteen (14) hours from the following courses. Eight (8) 
hours must be EDOE courses. 
BUAD 555 Leadership and Change (online) 
BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship (online) 
COUN 520 Principles of Counseling 
COUN 553 Group Therapy and Procedures 
COUN 551 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 

OR 
EDIE 512 Counseling and Psychology of Exceptional Individuals and 

Their Families 
EDIE 531 Behavior Management of Exceptional Individuals 
EDOE 528 Interpretation of Natural and Historical Resources 
EDOE 537 Lab Experience: Technology in Outdoor Education 
EDOE 539 Outdoor Recreation 
EDOE 553 Ecology Education 
EDOE 563 Wilderness Stewardship 
EDOE 565 Nature Journaling 
EDOE 568 Nature Photography 

EDOE 573 Outdoor Curriculum and Methods, Grades 1 - 6 
EDOE 574 Outdoor Curriculum and Methods, Grades 7-12 
EDOE 575 Internship in Outdoor Education 
EDOE 585 Workshop in Outdoor Education 
EDOE 595 Independent Study in Outdoor Education 
EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 
EDUC 599 Master's Research Project 



14 

3 
3 
3 
3 



1 
1 

1-2 
1-2 
1-4 
1-4 
1-3 
2 
3 



Total Hours Required, 



34 



Suggested Schedules for OUTDOOR PROFESSIONAL INTENSIVES 



Winter Outdoor Site Development Intensive (even years) 

EDOE 513 Nature Study 

EDOE 514 Field Experience: Nature Study 

EDOE 528 Interpretation of Cultural and Historical Resources 

EDOE 533 Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 

EDOE 534 Field Experience: Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 



Winter Outdoor Perspective Intensive (odd years) 

EDOE 503 Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 504 Field Experience: Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education 1 

EDOE 538 Technology in Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 539 Outdoor Recreation 1-2 

EDOE 593 Adventure-based Counseling 2 

EDUC 596 Educational Research 2 



49 



Fall Outdoor Leadership Intensive 

EDOE 523 Leadership in Outdoor Education 2 

EDOE 524 Field Experience: Leadership in Outdoor Education 1 

EDOE 543 Environmental Ministry for Teachers and Youth Leaders 2 

EDOE 563 Wilderness Stewardship 2 

EDOE 565 Nature Journaling 1-2 



COURSES 

COUN 500. Individual Study and Research 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research in psychology, especially designed to make up deficiencies in a 
student's undergraduate degree. This class is designed to make up deficiencies in a student's 
undergraduate preparation and is not applicable to the graduate degree program. 

COUN 502. Foundations of School Counseling 2 hours 

Includes the history, philosophy, and trends in school counseling. This course gives a background 
for understanding the school setting, curriculum, and function of the school counselor. 

COUN 506. Developmental Psychology — Growth Years 3 hours 

A study of human growth and development emphasizing the relationship that exists between 
physical, cognitive, emotional, and social aspects and its importance for the individual. 
Multicultural similarities and differences are also considered. 

COUN 508. Sexuality: Issues in Therapy 3 hours 

Provides foundation of knowledge concerning basic human sexual functioning, knowledge of 
sexual diseases, awareness of sexual variance, knowledge of sexual dysfunction and an 
understanding of basic treatment and sex therapy techniques. 

COUN 510. Advanced Lifespan Development 3 hours 

Issues in development throughout the life cycle are studied. The impact of early physical, 
cognitive, and psychological developmental issues and the effects of significant periods of life 
changes are considered along with their impact on family and community systems. 

COUN 514. Drugs and Addictions 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of drugs and addictions. Particular focus will be placed on physiological 
functions related to the etiology and treatment of addiction in both therapeutic and educational 
settings, as well as on the Adventist perspective of wholistic health. 

COUN 516. Career Counseling 3 hours 

Vocational and academic information; vocational theories, trends, and experiential approach to 
career choices; study of how changes in society and technology bring about changes in the 
academic and work world. Guidance centers, vocational interest testing, guidance technology, and 
materials are also considered. 

COUN 520. Principles of Counseling 3 hours 

Counseling theories, trends, and principles of effective counseling are studied. The quality of the 
counselor's personality, the fundamental factors in the counseling relationship, basic behavioral 
dynamics such as ethics and multiculturalism and an introduction to practical approaches are also 
considered. 

COUN 521. Psychopathology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: COUN 520. 

The course emphasizes diagnostic criteria for the disorders included in DSM-IV. A descriptive 
approach is adopted. Mental disorders in terms of their behavioral signs and symptoms are defined 
and categorized on the basis of their shared characteristics. Cultural variations in symptoms are 
discussed with each disorder. Gender and age-related features of the disorders are also described. 



50 



COUN 522. Theories of Personality 3 hours 

Theories of personality and human behavior are analyzed in the light of social realities and 
learning theories. Factors such as communication, multiculturalism, cybernetics, etc. are 
considered as explanations and examples of human social structures. 

COUN 526. Ethics and Legal Aspects of Counseling 2 hours 

Analyzes counseling ethics and legal factors related to the counseling profession. Real case studies 
are considered. 

COUN 530. Assessment and Appraisal 3 hours 

Theoretical principles and practical applications of standardized instruments used in counseling 
and education. This course covers the selection, administration, interpretation and reporting of the 
results of appropriate instruments of assessment. Emphasis is placed on personality, aptitude, 
achievement, and pathological testing. 

COUN 551. Psychology of the Exceptional Child 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDIE 512. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

See EDIE 5 12 for course description. (Summer) 

COUN 553. Group Therapy and Procedures 3 hours 

Prerequisite: COUN 520 

Group therapy dynamics, leadership, stages are studied. Group populations and types of groups 

are discussed. 

COUN 555. Theories and Techniques of Psychotherapy 3 hours 

The study, diagnosis and treatment of psychological and behavioral disorders. Interventions from 
psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, family, group and feminist therapies, 
community psychology and crisis intervention are covered and practiced. Issues related to elderly 
clients and members of culturally-diverse groups are discussed. 

COUN 558. Crisis Counseling 2 hours 

A study of major theories and strategies for identifying and treating crises which affect individuals 
in both community agency and school settings. 

COUN 560. Multiculturalism Seminar 2 hours 

Study of contemporary issues related to multicultural settings. Topics are selected according to 
interest and to satisfy specific individual needs. 

COUN 565. Topics in Psychology 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in psychology chosen from such areas as religion, ethics, child and/or youth 
psychology, practice of school counseling, etc. This course may be repeated with an appropriate 
change in topic. 

COUN 570. Counseling in Community Agencies 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 22 semester hours in degree program. 
Emphasizes developmental and preventative modalities as indicated by the community counseling 
discipline, along with a noted emphasis on education, growth and short-term interventions. 
Professional identity issues will also be covered. 

COUN 575. Administration of Counseling Services 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 30 semester hours in degree program. 
The standards of counseling practice, procedures, paperwork, and issues related to private, group, 
and state facilities are studied. Emphasis is placed on the needs of the client and the 
professionalism of the service rendered. As the capstone course, this includes the completion of 
a position paper. 



51 



COUN 577. Administration of School Counseling Services 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 25 semester hours in the degree program. 
This is the capstone course for School Counseling and the organization, administration, and 
coordination of counseling services in schools or school systems is the focus of this course. 
Includes methods of enhancing teamwork in the school community, as well as designing, 
implementing, and evaluating of a school counseling programs. 

COUN 582. Clinical Practicum I 1 hour 

Orientation to the field experience. The student will be oriented through the use of books, videos, 
presentations, discussion, observation, and practice sessions. 

COUN 583. Clinical Practicum II: CC/MFT 1-2 hours 

Prerequisites: COUN 520, 526, 553, 582. COUN 555 may be taken concurrently 
Supervised field experience in a psychological setting. A minimum of 100 hours of direct 
observation, consultation in the clinical area, and practice of counseling skills is required. The 
student must attend a weekly hour-long individual supervision session with a supervisor and a 
weekly 1-1/2 hour group supervision. Videotaping of counseling sessions is essential. A lab fee 
is required. Applications for first semester Practicum II experiences must be submitted for 
approval by April 15 of the previous school year. Applications for second semester Practicum II 
experience must be submitted for approval by October 1 5. 

COUN 583. Clinical Practicum II: School Counseling 1-2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 541 ; COUN 502, 516, 526, 553, 582. COUN 555 may be taken 
concurrently. 

Supervised field experience in educational settings. A minimum of 1 00 hours of direct observation 
and classroom work, practice of counseling skills and consultation in a school setting is required. 
The student must attend a weekly hour-long individual supervision session with a supervisor and 
attend a weekly 1-1/2 hour group supervision. Video-taping of counseling sessions is essential. 
A lab fee is required. Applications for first semester Practicum II experiences must be submitted 
for approval by April 15 of the previous school year. Applications for second semester Practicum 
II experience must be submitted for approval by October 15. 

COUN 584. Clinical Internship: Community Counseling 1-4 hours 

Prerequisites: COUN 583; Completion of 42 semester hours in degree program. 
Supervised field experience in a community agency. A minimum of 600 hours of clinical work 
is required. At least 240 hours will be direct client contact in the capacity of a community 
counselor. A wide range of clients will be chosen. This internship will be done under the direction 
of a certified or licensed professional and will also include consultation with an assigned faculty 
supervisor, research on clinical issues, and attendance at a weekly supervision group. Applications 
for summer or first semester Internship experiences must be submitted for approval by April 15 
of the previous school year. Applications for second semester Internship experience must be 
submitted for approval by October 1 5. 

COUN 584. Clinical Internship: Marriage and Family Therapy 1-4 hours 

Prerequisites: COUN 583; Completion of 42 semester hours in degree program. 
Supervised field experience in a community or family therapy agency. A minimum of 600 hours 
of clinical work is required. At least 240 hours will be direct contact primarily with couples and 
families. A wide range of clients will be chosen. This internship will be done under the direction 
of a certified or licensed professional and will also include consultation with an assigned faculty 
supervisor, research on clinical issues, and attendance at a weekly supervision group. Applications 
for summer or first semester Internship experiences must be submitted for approval by April 1 5 
of the previous school year. Applications for second semester Internship experience must be 
submitted for approval by October 1 5. 



52 



COUN 584. Clinical Internship: School Counseling 1-4 hours 

Prerequisites: COUN 583; Completion of 36 semester hours in academic program. 
Supervised field experience in a school setting. A minimum of 600 hours of clinical work is 
required. This will include a variety of activities that a regularly employed school counselor is 
expected to perform. At least240 hours are required in direct client contact, individual counseling, 
group work, developmental classroom guidance, and parent/community conferences. This will be 
done under the supervision of a certified school counselor and will also include consultation with 
an assigned faculty supervisor, research on clinical issues, and attendance ata weekly supervision 
group. Applications for first semester Internship experiences must be submitted for approval by 
April 1 5 of the previous school year. Applications for second semester Internship experience must 
be submitted for approval by October 15. 

COUN 588. Statistics 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDUC 588. A student may receive credit from this course for only 
one program. This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge of descriptive and inferential 
statistics to be applied to educational or psychological research: measure of central tendency and 
variability; correlation and regression; testing of hypothesis using the normal; binomial, t, F, and 
chi-square distribution. 

COUN 590. Marriage and Family Therapy I 3 hours 

An overview of major family therap y treatment models and their application utilizing case studies. 
Communications theory, structural, strategic, the Bowenian model, short-term brief, and other 
theories will be considered. Family counseling in schools is also discussed. 

COUN 591 . Marriage and Family Therapy II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: COUN 590. 

Issues of marriage and fami ly will be explored in the context of family systems. These will include 
an in-depth study of human sexuality, sexual dysfunction and treatment, crisis counseling, 
addictive disorders, orientation to AIDS education and therapy, and other issues. 

COUN 592. Marriage and Family Therapy III 3 hours 

Prerequisite: COUN 591 and completion of at least 30 semester hours in degree program. 
An intensive study of selected treatment techniques focusing on identifying a therapeutic style best 
suited for the individual learner. This course should be taken with the Clinical Internship as it 
requires the presentation of case work in a model. As the capstone course, this includes the 
completion of a position paper. 

COUN 593. Child and Adolescent Problems and Treatment 3 hours 

A study of the major aberrant behavioral problems of children and adolescents. Appropriate 
interventions will be discussed and practiced. 

COUN 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research in psychological issues under the supervision of the graduate faculty 
members. Only two independent studies (a total of no more than six hours) are allowed to apply 
toward a student's degree. 

COUN 596. Psychological Research 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDUC 596. A student may receive credit from this course for only 
one program. 

Fundamentals of research methodology. Analysis, critical reading, evaluation, and application of 
research needed for development of skills in research proposals. Includes the presentation of a 
proposal and the carrying out of a research project under supervision. 

EDAD 524. Foundations of Educational Administration 3 hours 

This course discusses the purposes, organization, and administration of educational programs and 
institutions; the structure and control of school systems; the nature of administration; and 
conceptual foundations of educational administration. 



53 



EDAD 545. Supervision of Instruction 3 hours 

Designed for principals, superintendents and instructional supervisors concerned with the 
improvement of teaching and learning through instructional leadership and professional supervision. 

EDAD 570. Personnel Administration 3 hours 

Explanations of personnel policy determination; procedures employed in recruitment, selection, 
appointment and induction of personnel; the formulation and administration of salary schedules; 
provisions for professional welfare and in-service improvement of personnel. 

EDAD 574. Legal Aspects of Education 3 hours 

Legal issues affecting teachers and educational administrators, including governmental relations, 
church-state issues, teacher employment, student control, children's rights, special services and 
school board operations and procedures. 

EDAD 575. Internship in Administration (by arrangement) 1-2 hours 

Planned administrative field experience in a school, school district, or educational agency; a 
practical or creative project dealing with an actual situation in an educational institution under 
supervision of a faculty member in the area of educational administration. Plan approval and 
permission of supervisor is required one semester in advance of registration. This course may be 
repeated. 

EDAD 576. School Public Relations 2 hours 

The interpersonal process in educational organizations, communications and group dynamics for 
educational administrators. A study of the means for securing cooperative educational planning 
through mutual understanding between the school and its public. 

EDAD 578. Educational Facilities Planning 1 hour 

A study of procedures in school plant planning: selecting a site, determining educational 
specifications for the building, selecting and working with an architect and managing school 
facilities. 

EDAD 579. School Finance 3 hours 

Financial and economic issues affecting educational institutions, including school support, costs of 
education, sources of school revenue and school budgeting processes. A study of school financial 
statements and budgets. 

EDAD 595. Independent Study in Educational Administration 1-3 hours 

Individual research/study project in educational administration under the supervision of a graduate 
studies professor. This course may be repeated. 

EDCI 535. Philosophy of Education 3 hours 

The study of philosophical concepts as they apply to education. Scriptural principles and Christian 
education principles as expounded by E. G. White are also covered. 

EDCI 545. Foundations of Curriculum Development 3 hours 

The foundations of curriculum development are studied. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of 
curriculum development to the designing, implementation, and assessment of curriculum at any 
level. 

EDCI 546. Improving Instruction 3 hours 

The strength and effectiveness of teaching models are presented. Innovation in lesson preparation, 
delivery and assessment are studied as well as integrating technology in the classroom. Students 
develop their ability to reflect on their own teaching performance and become skilled in supporting 
other teachers. 

EDCI 560. Curriculum Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: EDCI 545. 

This course is designed to help educators who seek to analyze, develop, and improve curricula at 

specific levels of schooling. 



54 



EDCI 565. Seminar: Trends in Education 3 hours 

Trends and issues in curriculum and instruction are discussed, as well as ideas of educational 
reformers and recognized leaders, and their critics. 

EDCI 570. Educational Assessment 3 hours 

Designed to increase the student's understanding and application of traditional and innovative 
techniques of educational assessment including use of technological resources. Both learning and 
teaching assessment are covered. 

EDCI 580. Field Work 2 hours 

Supervised curriculum and instruction experience in approved educational institutions and agencies. 
All areas from elementary to higher education may be considered. Arrangement for this course need 
to be made a minimum of three months ahead of time. 

EDCI 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual research/study project in curriculum and instruction under the supervision of a graduate 
professor. 

EDIE 502. Inclusive Education: History and Foundations 3 hours 

A survey of the history of inclusive education with attention to movements in educational 
philosophy, curriculum planning, and government legislation. Includes a comprehensive survey 
of the psychological and educational problems faced by exceptional children in the regular 
classroom. Consideration is given to exceptionalities such as hearing impairment, speech and 
language difficulties, mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, visual 
impairment, physical handicaps, and the gifted child. Procedures for including the exceptional child 
into the regular classroom are emphasized. 

EDIE 512. Counseling and Psychology of Exceptional Individuals 

and Their Families 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with COUN 551. A student my receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 

Consideration and practice of counseling techniques for use with exceptional individuals and their 
families. Included is a discussion of the psychological aspects of exceptionality, including 
giftedness, and disabilities in language, sensory, physical, intellectual, perceptual, and emotional 
areas with implications for counseling and classroom learning. 

EDIE 531. Behavior Management of Exceptional Individuals 3 hours 

In-depth examination and administration of various models and techniques for the management of 
exceptional individuals within the classroom, home, and community. 

EDIE 541. Assessment of Exceptional Individuals 3 hours 

Examination and administration of assessment measures for exceptional individuals. On-site field 
experience required. Teachers will learn how to administer screening instruments and draw 
instructional implications from these. Case studies will be reviewed and teachers will be assisted 
in determining when a student should be referred for further professional testing. 

EDIE 557. Leadership in Inclusive Education 3 hours 

A philosophical and practical course designed for teachers to develop leadership in organizational 
skills and planning strategies for inclusive classrooms and schools. A review of historical and 
current research in inclusive school communities and the administration of these schools will be 
included. 

EDIE 567. Curriculum and Strategies for Children with 

Learning Differences 3 hours 

Planning, developing and implementing curriculum for exceptional students. Study will include 
the identification of students with special learning needs and strategies for inclusion in the 
multiage classroom. A special emphasis is given to cognitive studies. 



55 



EDIE 580. Field Work 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours of Inclusive Education classes. 

Designed to meet the particular needs and interests of the individual participant. Action research 
forms the basis for field work. 

EDIE 595. Independent Study in Inclusive Education 1-3 hours 

Individual research/study project in special education in the regular classroom under the 
supervision of a graduate studies professor. Must be conducted at a school where exceptional 
children are in the regular classroom. 

EDLE 527. Implementing Reading Workshop 3 hours 

A course designed to immerse the graduate student in the rationale and instructional structures of 
a Reading Workshop approach to the teaching of reading. The course includes a significant 
applications component designed to assist students in translating theory into practice. Offered 
concurrently with EDLE 537, Implementing Writing Workshop. 

EDLE 537. Implementing Writing Workshop 3 hours 

A course designed to immerse the graduate student in the writing process as well as in the rationale 
and instructional structures of a Writing Workshop approach to the teaching of writing. The 
course includes a significant applications component designed to assist student in translating theory 
into practice. Offered concurrently with EDLE 527, Implementing Reading Workshop so that 
students see the interconnectedness of reading and writing. 

EDLE 565. Critical Thinking in Content Literacy 3 hours 

Study given to the theoretical framework for teaching literacy in the content areas. Instructional 
strategies for facilitating critical thinking are modeled and practiced. Strategies are also taught that 
are designed to enhance academic performance in reading, writing, listening, talking, viewing, and 
visual representation across the various subjects taught in the elementary/middle schoolcurriculum. 

EDLE 567. Literacy Instruction in Primary Classrooms 3 hours 

An advanced course focusing on the literacy development of K-3rd grade students. Theory and 
research relevant to literacy instruction in the primary grades studied within the context of 
developmentally appropriate instructional approaches and practice. The course also examines the 
implications and practices for facilitating successful literacy instruction for English Language 
Learners. 

EDLE 580. Literacy Internship 2 hours 

Designed to meet the particular needs and interests of the student as those relate to classroom 
instruction in literacy. A proposal will be submitted by the student using action research as the 
design. 

EDLE 585. Professional Applications in Literacy 2 hours 

Provides opportunity for individual students to identify an area of particular passion in literacy. 
In cooperation with the professor, students design a proposal specifying a plan for applying what 
has been learned within the context of the professional community rather than the individual 
classroom. This class will enable graduate students to work in collaboration with the university 
professor to enhance literacy development in a community of professional setting. 

EDLE 595. Independent Study in Literacy Education 1-3 hours 

Individual research/study project in literacy education under the supervision of a graduate 
professor. 

EDOE 503. Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education 2 hours 

Co-requisite: EDOE 504. 

Basic concepts and the history of the outdoor education movement. Scope of contemporary 
programs in the U.S. and abroad. Examination of the teaching of learning processes relevant to 
outdoor and environmental education. An additional lab fee will be required. 



56 

EDOE 504. Field Experience in Principles and Concepts of 1 hour 

Outdoor Education 

Co-requisite: EDOE 503. 

Experiences in this course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations 
presented in Principles and Concepts of Outdoor Education (EDOE 503) by on-site examinations 
of schools, nature centers, and residential camps. 

EDOE 513. Nature Study 2 hours 

Co-requisite: EDOE 514. 

A field course for teachers and outdoor leaders to increase their knowledge, confidence, and 

awareness of nature. Interpretation of urban and rural wildlife that could be encountered by the 

teacher and students in the outdoor classroom will be covered. An additional lab fee will be 

required. 

EDOE 514. Field Experience in Nature Study 1 hour 

Co-requisite: EDOE 513. 

The experiences in this course are designed to support and supplement the lectures presented in 
Nature Study (EDOE 5 13) and provide practical field experiences for helping outdoor teachers in 
using field keys, observing nature, and acquiring skills needed for studying plants and animals in 
a variety of habitats. 

EDOE 523. Leadership in Outdoor Education 2 hours 

Co-requisite: EDOE 524. 

This course is for outdoor leaders and gives training in planning, organizing, and implementing 
outdoor programs for children, youth, and adults. Experiences include evaluating the operations 
of camp, recreation and residential programs. 

EDOE 524. Field Experience in Leadership in Outdoor Education 1 hour 

Co-requisite: EDOE 523. 

The experiences in this course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations 

presented in Leadership in Outdoor Education (EDOE 523) and to provide opportunities to 

conduct on-site evaluations of outdoor education programs, their curricula, staffing, and financial 

management. 

EDOE 528. Interpretation of Natural and Historical Resources 2 hours 

This course will examine the fundamental principles of natural and historical interpretation. 
Students will research local resources in order to develop interpretive programs. Particular 
attention is given to contemporary methods of interpretation in parks, nature centers, camps, and 
other outdoor settings. 

EDOE 533. Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 2 hours 

Co-requisite: EDOE 534. 

This is an intensive seminar designed to provide practical field experience in developing a wide 
range of activities for the school yard, park or use in a resident facility. Participants in this seminar 
will develop materials in the evenings and implement them at a camp or environmental school site. 
An additional lab fee will be required. 

EDOE 534. Field Experience in Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites 1 hour 

Co-requisite: EDOE 533. 

This course is designed to support and supplement Developing Outdoor Teaching Sites (EDOE 
533) and to provide practical field experiences in developing curriculum, as well as trails, gardens, 
ropes courses, or other physical needs of an outdoor site. The students will complete a project at 
a camp, nature center, or school yard site. 

EDOE 535. Outdoor Therapy: Design and Procedures 2 hours 

Co-requisite: EDOE 536. 

An examination of design, procedure, and group therapy dynamics used as a therapeutic tool in the 

outdoor setting. 



57 



EDOE 536. Field Experience: Outdoor Therapy 1 hour 

Co-requisite: EDOE 535. 

The experiences in this course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations 
presented in EDOE 535, Outdoor Therapy: Design and Procedures, and to provide hands-on 
training in outdoor therapeutic settings. 

EDOE 537. Lab Experience: Technology in Outdoor Education 1 hour 

Must be taken concurrently with EDOE 538. 

This course is designed to support and supplement Technology in Outdoor Education (EDOE 538) 
and to provide practical laboratory experiences in surveying, sampling, or collecting data for 
biological research. 

EDOE 538. Technology in Outdoor Education 2 hours 

This course will provide participants with knowledge in using various types of equipment used in 
surveying, sampling, or collecting data for biological research. Students will work with 
professionals in the field to develop the skills needed to use equipment, and then learn ways to 
involve their students in similar activities in the outdoor classroom. 

EDOE 539. Outdoor Recreation 1-2 hours 

This course focuses on programming and leadership of adventure activities. Topics covered may 
include, but are not limited to backpacking, spelunking, canoeing, and wilderness living. It may 
be repeated with different skill emphases. It will be taught at a location suitable for the particular 
activity being offered. An extra lab fee will be charged. 

EDOE 543. Environmental Ministries for Teachers and Youth Leaders 2 hours 

This seminar will focus on the use of nature study to lead children and youth to Christ. It is 
designed for teachers and youth leaders who want to learn more about using nature as a tool for 
witnessing. Participants will learn to use nearby and/or familiar locations for environmental 
understanding and inspiration. 

EDOE 553. Ecology Education 2 hours 

A study of the interrelationships of plants, animals, and their environment. Field work will 
introduce the teacher to actual activities and simple sampling techniques that can be reproduced 
in the classroom and outdoor teaching site. Lab fee will be required for equipment to be taken back 
to the teacher's classroom. 

EDOE 563. Wilderness Stewardship 2 hours 

An intensive back country camping course to be taught entirely in the field. It will provide the 
student with basic knowledge and understanding of minimal environmental impact on nature while 
pursuing outdoor recreational activities. Professional reading wi 11 be required pri or to the trip from 
writers such as Thoreau, Leopold, Muir, Carson and other voices of stewardship. Field trip fee 
will be charged for food and transportation. 

EDOE 565. Nature Journaling 1-2 hours 

This class will help the student explore the natural world through journaling. It focuses on writing 
and revising a journal. The following will be discussed: the creative process, and the elements of 
good writing, including the discovery process, writing introductions and conclusions, using 
concrete and specific language and appropriate style. 

EDOE 568. Nature Photography 1-2 hours 

A theoretical and practical study of photography as a means of communicating and recording 
nature. Topics will include outdoor lighting, composition, exposure, color, and choosing equipment 
and film for nature photography. Students need their own cameras. A lab fee will be charged for 
film processing. 



58 

EDOE 573. Outdoor Curriculum and Methods, Grades 1-6 1-2 hours 

This course may focus on any of the following areas of emphasis: art, music, language arts, math, 
social studies, science, technology, health and physical education. The student will collect and 
organize a file of teaching materials appropriate for outdoor education and evaluate outdoor 
education activities. Twenty hours (20) of field experiences in selected outdoor schools and 
attendance at selected professional meetings are considered a part of this course. (One to two hours 
may be taken in each emphasis.) 

EDOE 574. Outdoor Curriculum and Methods, Grades 7 - 12 1-2 hours 

This course may focus on any of the following areas of emphasis: English, history, math, social 
studies, science, technology, health and physical education. Students will collect and organize a 
file of teaching materials appropriate for outdoor education and evaluate outdoor education 
activities. Twenty (20) hours of field experience in selected outdoor schools and attendance at 
selected professional meetings are considered a part of this course. 

EDOE 575. Internship in Outdoor Education 1-4 hours 

An internship designed to meet the particular needs and interests of the individual participant. 
Internship will be conducted in cooperation with a day or resident outdoor education facility. A 
minimum of forty (40) clock hours are required for each semester hour of credit. This course may 
be repeated for a maximum of four (4) semester hours total. 

EDOE 585. Workshop in Outdoor Education 1-4 hours 

Various topics in outdoor education, including nature study, adventure programming, curriculum, 
and wilderness medical certification may be covered. This course may be repeated with different 
topics. The class will be taught in a location suitable for the topic being covered. A lab fee will 
be required. 

EDOE 593. Adventure-based Counseling 2 hours 

A survey course introducing teachers, camp professionals, and other outdoor professionals to the 
field of adventure-based counseling. Adventure games, initiative problems, and trust activities will 
be used to guide the class in theory, concepts, methods, and philosophy of educational, vocational, 
health, and civic/ ethical/social guidance. 

EDOE 595. Independent Study in Outdoor Education 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: EDOE 503 and consent of the School of Education and Psychology. 
Individual research/study projectin outdoor education under the supervision of a graduate studies 
professor. May be conducted at a school or camp site. Independent studies must be limited to two, 
with a maximum of six semester hours of credit earned total. 

EDUC 520. Theories of Learning 2 hours 

A Biblical view of the learner and the learning process is used to examine current approaches to 
learning theory. Behavioristic and cognitive-field learning theories, as well as teaching practices, 
are examined as they relate to theoretical perspectives. Theoretical principles are then used to 
devise practical teaching methodologies. 

EDUC 531. Technology and the Educator 3 hours 

Study and analysis of the integration of technology in learning environments. The course examines 
technology-related issues from instructor, student and administrator perspectives. Issues include 
the philosophy of and need for technology, learning outcomes associated with the use of 
technology, implementation of and problems associated with technology in the instructional 
environment and technology related to administrative function and professional development. This 
course also seeks to provide the educator with an array of professional competencies so as to 
optimally leverage technology for instructional ends. This course incorporates a hands-on 
approach and assumes basic competencies in word processing, presentation software, Internet 
usage, and the Windows operating system. 



59 



EDUC 541. Principles of Counseling 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with COUN 520. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

See COUN 520 for course description. (Summer) 

EDUC 577. Reading Assessment and Remediation 3 hours 

Examines the various causes of reading difficulties and the instructional procedures, strategies, and 
materials for remediating those difficulties. 

EDUC 588. Statistics 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with COUN 588. A student may receive credit from this course from 

only one program. 

See COUN 588 for course description. 

EDUC 596. Educational Research 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with COUN 596. A student may receive credit from this course from 

only one program. 

See COUN 596 for course description. 

EDUC 599. Master's Research Project 3 hours 

This is a concentrated study on a problem or issue to be examined in the light of research. The 
student is urged to work closely with his/her advisor during each phase of the development of the 
research project. 



60 

School of Nursing 

Dean: Barbara James 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Holly Gadd 

Faculty: Desiree Batson, Holly Gadd, David Gerstle, Barbara James, 
Mary Ann Roberts 

Mission Statement 

Southern Adventist University's School of Nursing provides a Christian learning 
environment that fosters personal and professional excellence in caring for individual, 
family, and community health needs. 

The School of Nursing's graduate program is designed to provide opportunities for 
advanced practice and upward mobility within healthcare. The purpose of the graduate 
program is to provide an SD A Christian graduate nursing education for individuals who 
desire to serve the Seventh-day Adventist world church and local communities in 
advanced nursing roles. 

Programs Offered 

The School of Nursing offers a Master of Science in Nursing with the following 
emphases: 

► Adult Nurse Practitioner 

► Family Nurse Practitioner 

► Nurse Educator 

The School of Nursing in collaboration with the School of Business and 
Management offers a dual degree: 

► Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA) 

The School of Nursing offers an accelerated RN to MSN program for Registered 
Nurses with an Associate Degree or Diploma in nursing. The emphases include: 

► Adult Nurse Practitioner 

► Family Nurse Practitioner 

► Nurse Educator 

► Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA) 

The School of Nursing offers post-Master's certificate programs with the following 
emphases: 

► Adult Nurse Practitioner 

► Family Nurse Practitioner 

► Nurse Educator 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

MSN Admission Requirements 

1. Completed application to the School of Nursing. 

2. A baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing from a recognized college or 
university with an accredited program. 

3 . Current licensure as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate license 
with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee. A Georgia license is 
recommended for nurse practitioner students. 



61 



4. Three hours in statistics. 

5 . An undergraduate GPA of 3 .00 or better. If the candidate has previously taken 
12 or more graduate credits from another college or university, the graduate 
GPA may be substituted in the formula for the undergraduate GPA. 

6. Applicants with less than a 3.00 grade point average may be admitted 
provisionally, but may progress through the program with a maximum of one C 
grade. 

7. Personal interview and two professional references. 

8. One year of nursing experience after graduation or recommendations from 
nursing faculty. 

9. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600 with testing 
within the past year. 

Admission to the Program: 

Full or part-time students may be admitted to the program during the fall or winter 
semesters. 

Application Process: 

1 . Submit completed S AU nursing graduate application and all required documents 
prior to July 31 for fall admission, and by December 1 for winter admission. 
Priority is given to early applicants and applicants with current nursing work 
experience. Enrollment in the nurse practitioner emphasis is limited. 

2. Arrange for a personal interview with the graduate program coordinator prior to 
the application deadline. 

3. Provide proof of current Tennessee RN licensure or multistate RN licensure, 
current immunization, and Health Care Provider CPR certification. 

4. Complete essay of 250 words or less (see application). 

5. A criminal background check, paid for by the student, must be submitted with 
the application. 

Time Limits: 

The program is arranged to meet the needs of part-time and full-time students. 
Normal progression through the program for the full-time student requires registration 
for 9 to 12 hours per semester. Normal progression for the part-time student requires 
registration for a minimum of one course per semester. Time permitted from 
enrollment in the program to conferring of the MSN degree may not exceed five years. 
Application for an extension will be considered on an individual basis. 

Residence: 

The last 30 semester hours must be taken through the Southern A dventist University 
School of Nursing. A maximum of 25% of program requirements are allowed as 
transfer credit. Transfer courses must be taken at an accredited institution, carry grades 
of B or better, and be approved by the School of Nursing. 

MSN Graduation Requirements 

1 . Completed application to graduate, to be filed with the Records and Advisement 
office a minimum of two months prior to expected graduation date. 

2. Completion of the program with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and no more than two 
courses with C grades (one C grade for students admitted provisionally). 

3. Successful completion of NRSG 598 with a minimum of four credit hours or 
NRSG 596 with a minimum of three hours. 



62 

Courses for the Master of Science in Nursing 
The CORE courses are as follows: 



Courses 

NRSG 515 Theoretical Concepts of Nursing 
NRSG 520 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 
NRSG 526 Nursing Research: Design and Critique 
NRSG 530 Nursing Research: Methods and Application 
NRSG 54 1 Health Care Policy 
NRSG 596 Nursing Project 

OR 

NRSG 598 Thesis 



Credit 

2 
3 

2 
3 
2 
3 



TOTAL 



15 

(16 thesis) 



One of the following emphases is to be selected: 



Emphasis in ADULT NURSE PRACTITIONER* 

Objectives: 

The Adult Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 

1. Provide advanced nursing care for adults, families, and communities. 

2. Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

3. Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for adults, families, and communities. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence health care policy and the future direction of nursing. 



Courses 



Credit 



NRSG 550 
NRSG 552 
NRSG 554 
NRSG 556 
NRSG 560 
NRSG 562 
NRSG 564 
NRSG 566 

TOTAL 



Advanced Pathophysiology 
Advanced Pharmacology 
Advanced Physical Assessment 
Family and Community Systems 
Primary Care of Adults 
Practicum: Primary Care of Adults I 
Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 
Practicum: Primary Care of Adults II 



3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
2 
4 

26 



Total Hours Required 



41 

(42 thesis) 



*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification 
examination. 



63 



Emphasis in FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER* 

Objectives: 

The Family Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 

1. Provide advanced nursing care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, 
families, and communities. 

2. Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

3 . Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, 
families, and communities. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence health care policy and the future direction of nursing. 

Courses Credit 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 552 Advanced Pharmacology 3 

NRSG 554 Advanced Physical Assessment 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 560 Primary Care of Adults 4 

NRSG 564 Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 2 

NRSG 570 Primary Care of Children 3 

NRSG 571 Practicum: Primary Care of Families I 5 

NRSG 573 Practicum: Primary Care of Families II 5 

TOTAL 31 

Total Hours Required 46 

(47 thesis) 

*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification 
examination 

Emphasis in NURSE EDUCATOR 

Objectives: 

The Nurse Educator program will prepare graduates who will: 

1. Demonstrate competency in curriculum development, classroom, and clinical 
education, evaluation, and use of instructional technology. 

2. Demonstrate expertise in a defined area of clinical interest. 

3. Utilize the process of scientific inquiry to validate and refine knowledge. 

4. Implement wholistic, Christ-centered education for students. 

5. Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 

(See the School of Education and Psychology for EDCI/EDUC course descriptions) 

Courses Credit 

EDCI 535 Philosophy of Education 3 

EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 2 

EDUC 53 l_Technology and the Educator 3 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 576 Assessment for Advanced Practice 2 

NRSG 580 Nursing Curriculum Design & Evaluation 4 



64 



NRSG 582 Teaching Practicum: Area of Emphasis 3 

NRSG 584 Clinical Education Practicum: Area of Emphasis 1 

NRSG 591 Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 2 

TOTAL 26 

Total Hours Required 41 

(42 thesis) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING/ 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Objectives: 

Graduates of the MSN/MBA program will: 

1. Demonstrate interdisciplinary expertise in nursing, business, and healthcare 
administration. 

2. Develop a wholistic Christ-centered nursing and business philosophy related 
to the dynamic healthcare arena. 

3. Acquire a balance of nursing, administrative and business skills for service in 
positions of leadership and management. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 

Prerequisites for Admission 

The Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA) 
is designed for students with a baccalaureate degree in nursing and ability to 
demonstrate competency in healthcare management. Individuals with minimal or 
no business/management background may be required to demonstrate basic 
knowledge and/or skills in these areas. 

MSN/MBA Admission Requirements: 

1. Completed applications to the School of Nursing and the School of Business 
and Management. 

2. A Baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing from a college or university 
with an accredited nursing program. 

3. Current licensure as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate 
license with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee. 

4. Three hours in statistics, equivalent to MATH 215. 

5. A Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) taken within the past five 
years. Students will be admitted based on the following formula: GPA x 
200+GMAT= 1000. 

6. Applicants with less than a 3.00 grade point average or a combined 
GPA/GMAT score of less than 1000 may be admitted provisionally provided 
their combined score is above 850. 

7. One year of nursing experience after graduation or recommendations from 
nursing faculty. 

8. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600, with testing 
within the past year. 

9. Personal interview with the Graduate Program Coordinator and two 
professional references. 

10. A criminal background check, paid for by the student, must be submitted with 
the application. 



65 



Admission to the Dual-degree Program: 

Full-time or part-time students may be admitted to the MBA program during the fall, 
winter, or summer semesters and the MSN courses for the fall or winter semesters. Fall 
applications must be made by July 3 1 and winter applications by December 1 . Students 
may choose to take the MSN core courses and MBA courses at the same time or 
complete one program of study prior to entering the other. 

Time Limits: 

The programs are structured to meet the needs of part-time and full-time students. 
Normal progression through the dual-degree program for the full-time student requires 
registration for a minimum of 9 to 12 hours per semester. Normal progression for the 
part-time student requires registration for a minimum of one course per semester. Time 
permitted from enrollment in the dual-degree program to conferring of the MSN/MBA 
degrees may not exceed six years. Application for an extension will be considered on 
an individual basis. 

Residence: 

The last 3 semester hours must be taken through the Southern Adventist University 
School of Nursing and/or the School of Business and Management. A maximum of 
25% of program requirements are allowed as transfer credit. Transfer courses must be 
taken at an accredited institution, carry grades of B or better, and be approved by the 
School. 

MSN/MBA Graduation Requirements 

1. Completed application to graduate, to be filed with the Records and 
Advisement office a minimum of two months prior to expected graduation 
date. 

2. Completion of the dual-degree program with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and no 
more than two courses with C grades. 

3. Successful completion of NRSG 598 with a minimum of four credit hours or 
NRSG 596 with a minimum of three hours. 



Courses for the Master of Science in Nursing/ 
Master in Business Administration 

The Nursing CORE courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

NRSG 515 Theoretical Concepts of Nursing 2 

NRSG 520 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 3 

NRSG 526 Nursing Research: Design and Critique 2 

NRSG 530 Nursing Research: Methods and Application 3 

NRSG 541 Health Care Policy 2 

NRSG 596 Nursing Project 3 

OR 

NRSG 598 Thesis 4 

TOTAL 15 

(16 thesis) 



66 



The Business Administration CORE courses are as follows: 

(See the School of Business and Management for course descriptions) 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 

BUAD 520 Financial Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 3 

TOTAL 24 

Emphasis in HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION 

(See School of Business and Management for course descriptions) 

Required nursing emphasis course: 

NRSG 578 Advanced Nursing Leadership and Role Development 3 

Select nine (9) hours from the following courses: 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

HADM 530 Healthcare Administration 3 

HADM 550 Entrepreneurship and the Healthcare Professional 3 

HADM 585 Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Administration 3 

TOTAL 12 

Total Hours Required 51 

(52 thesis) 

ACCELERATED 
RN TO MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The accelerated RN to MSN program allows the RN to move more quickly through 
the nursing requirements toward a professional career goal. In this program there is no 
BS degree. Instead the student moves through a combination of BS and MSN course 
work and is awarded only a MSN degree at completion of all MSN requirements. 
Students choosing not to complete the accelerated RN to MSN program may receive the 
BS degree in nursing only by completing the regular BS program requirements (see 
undergraduate catalog). 

RN to MSN Admission Requirements: 

1. Completed application to the School of Nursing. 

2. An Associate degree or diploma with a major in nursing from a recognized 
college or university with an accredited program. 

3 . Current licensure as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate license 
with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee. A Georgia license is 



67 



recommended for nurse practitioner students. 

4. Completion of all Southern Adventist University general education and cognate 
course requirements for the BS degree with a major in nursing, or an approved 
plan for concurrent completion of these requirements. 

5. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.25. 

6. Personal interview and two professional references. 

7. One year of nursing experience after graduation or recommendations from 
nursing faculty. 

8. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600, with testing 
within the past year. 

Admission to the Program: 

Full-time or part-time students may be admitted to the program during the fall or 
winter semesters after completion of BS general education and cognate requirements. 

Application Process: 

1 . Submit completed S AU nursing graduate application and all required documents 
prior to July 3 1 for fall admission, and by December 1 for winter admission. 
Priority is given to early applicants and applicants with current nursing work 
experience. Enrollment in the nurse practitioner emphasis is limited. 

2. Arrange for a personal interview with the graduate program coordinator prior to 
the application deadline. 

3. Provide proof of current Tennessee RN licensure or multistate RN licensure, 
current immunization, and Health Care Provider CPR certification. 

4. Complete essay of 250 words or less (see application). 

5. A criminal background check, paid for by the student, must be submitted with 
the application. 

Time Limits: 

The program is arranged to meet the needs of part-time and full-time students. 
Normal progression through the program for the full-time student requires registration 
for a minimum of 9 to 12 hours per semester. Normal progression for the part-time 
student requires registration for a minimum of one course per semester. Time permitted 
from enrollment in the program to conferring of the MSN degrees may not exceed five 
years. Application for an extension will be considered on an individual basis. 

Residence: 

The last 30 semester hours must be taken through Southern Adventist University 
School of Nursing. A maximum of 25% of program requirements are allowed as 
transfer credit. Transfer courses must be taken at an accredited institution, carry grades 
of B or better, and be approved by the School. 

Accelerated RN to MSN Graduation Requirements 

1 . Completed application to graduate, to be filed with the Records and Advisement 
office a minimum of two months prior to expected graduation date. 

2. Completion of the program with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and no more than two 
courses with C grades. 

3. Successful completion of NRSG 598 with a minimum of four credit hours or 
NRSG 596 with a minimum of three hours. 



68 



Substitutions for BS to MSN 



BS level courses: 

NRSG316 

NRSG 322 

**NRSG 328 

NRSG 340 
*NRSG 389 

**NRSG 434 

***NRSG485 

****NRSG 492 

****NRSG497 

****NRSG 



Applied Statistics for Health Professions 
Transitions in Professional Nursing 
Nursing Assessment 

Substitute NRSG 554, Advanced Physical Assessment (3 hrs) OR 
NRSG 576, Assessment for Advanced Practice (2 hrs) 

Community Health Nursing 
Nursing Pharmacology 

Substitute NRSG 5 52, Advanced Pharmacology 

Pathophysiology 

Substitute NRSG 5 50, Advanced Pathophysiology 

Nursing Leadership and Management 

Substitute NRSG 5 78, Advanced Nursing Leadership & Role Development 

Senior Nursing Practicum 

Substitute MSN emphasis course 

Research Methods in Nursing 

Substitute NRSG 526, Nursing Research:Design & Critique and 
NRSG 530, Nursing Research: Methods & Application 

Nursing Electives 

Substitute MSN emphasis course 



*=Adult Nurse Practitioner and Family Nurse Practitioner emphases only 
**= Adult Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, and Nurse Educator 
emphases only 
***=MSN/MBA only 
****=A11 emphases (Adult Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse 
Educator, and MSN/MBA) 

Courses for Accelerated RN to Master of Science in Nursing 



The Nursing CORE courses are as follows: 



NRSG 515 
NRSG 520 
NRSG 526 
NRSG 530 
NRSG 541 
NRSG 596 

NRSG 598 
TOTAL 



Courses 



Theoretical Concepts of Nursing 
Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 
Nursing Research: Design and Critique 
Nursing Research: Methods and Application 
Health Care Policy 
Nursing Project 

OR 
Thesis 



Credit 



15 

(16 thesis) 



69 



One of the following emphases is to be selected: 

Emphasis in ADULT NURSE PRACTITIONER (accelerated option)* 

Objectives: 

The Adult Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 

1. Provide advanced nursing care for adults, families, and communities. 

2. Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

3. Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for adults, families, and communities. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence health care policy and the future direction of nursing. 

MSN Core 15-16 

Emphasis courses: 

BS level nursing courses: Credit 

NRSG316 Applied Statistics for Health Professions 3 

NRSG 322 Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 

NRSG 340 Community Health 5 

NRSG 485 Nursing Leadership and Management 3 

Master level nursing courses: 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 552 Advanced Pharmacology 3 

NRSG 554 Advanced Physical Assessment 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 560 Primary Care of Adults 4 

NRSG 562 Practicum: Primary Care of Adults I 4 

NRSG 564 Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 2 

NRSG 566 Practicum: Primary Care of Adults II 4 

TOTAL 40 

Total Hours Required in Major 55 

(Excluding general education and cognates) (56 thesis) 

*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification 
examination. 

Emphasis in FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (accelerated option)* 

Objectives: 

The Family Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 

1. Provide advanced nursing care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, 
families, and communities. 

2. Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

3. Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, 



70 



families, and communities. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence health care policy and the future direction of nursing. 

MSN Core 15-16 

Emphasis courses: 

BS level nursing courses: Credit 

NRSG316 Applied Statistics for Health Professions 3 

NRSG 322 Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 

NRSG 340 Community Health Nursing 5 

NRSG 485 Nursing Leadership and Management 3 

Master level nursing courses: 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 552 Advanced Pharmacology 3 

NRSG 554 Advanced Physical Assessment 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 560 Primary Care of Adults I 4 

NRSG 564 Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 2 

NRSG 570 Primary Care of Children 3 

NRSG 571 Practicum: Primary Care of Families I 5 

NRSG 573 Practicum: Primary Care of Families II 5 

TOTAL 45 

Total Hours Required in Major 60 

(Excluding general education and cognates) (61 thesis) 

*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification 
examination. 

Emphasis in NURSE EDUCATOR (accelerated option) 

Objectives: 

The Nurse Educator program will prepare graduates who will: 

1. Demonstrate competency in curriculum development, classroom, and clinical 
education, evaluation, and use of instructional technology. 

2. Demonstrate expertise in a defined area of clinical interest. 

3. Utilize the process of scientific inquiry to validate and refine knowledge. 

4. Implement wholistic, Christ-centered education for students. 

5. Influence health care policy and the future direction of nursing. 



71 



MSN Core 15-16 

Emphasis courses: 

(See the School of Education and Psychology for EDCI/EDUC course descriptions) 

BS level nursing courses: Credit 

NRSG316 Applied Statistics for Health Professions 3 

NRSG 322 Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 

NRSG 340 Community Health Nursing 5 

NRSG 389 Nursing Pharmacology 3 

NRSG 485 Nursing Leadership and Management 3 

Master level courses: 

EDCI 535 Philosophy of Education 3 

EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 2 

EDUC 53 1 Technology and the Educator 3 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 576 Assessment for Advanced Practice 2 

NRSG 580 Nursing Curriculum Design & Evaluation 4 

NRSG 582 Teaching Practicum: Area of Emphasis 3 

NRSG 584 Clinical Education Practicum: Area of Emphasis 1 

NRSG 591 Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 2 

TOTAL 43 

Total Hours Required 58 

(59 thesis) 



ACCELERATED 
RN TO MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING/ 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Objectives: 

Graduates of the RN to MSN/MBA program will: 

1. Demonstrate interdisciplinary expertise in nursing, business and healthcare 
administration. 

2. Develop a wholistic Christ-centered nursing and business philosophy related to 
the dynamic healthcare arena. 

3. Acquire a balance of nursing, administrative and business skills for service in 
positions of leadership and management. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 

Prerequisites for Admission 

The accelerated RN to Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business 
Administration (MSN/MBA) is designed for Registered Nurse students with the 
ability to demonstrate competency in healthcare management. Individuals with 



72 



minimal or no business/management background may be required to demonstrate 
basic knowledge and/or skills in these areas. The accelerated RN to MSN/MBA 
program allows the RN to move more quickly through the nursing requirements 
toward a professional career goal. In this program there is no BS graduation. 
Instead the student moves through a combination of BS, MSN and MBA course 
work and is awarded both the MSN and MBA degrees at completion of all BS and 
MSN/MBA program requirements. Students choosing not to complete the 
accelerated RN to MSN/MBA program may receive the BS degree in nursing only 
by completing the regular BS program requirements (see Undergraduate Catalog). 

RN to MSN/MBA Admission Requirements: 

1. Completed applications to the School of Nursing and the School of Business 
and Management. 

2. An Associate degree or diploma with a major in nursing from a college or 
university with an accredited nursing program. 

3 . Current licensure as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate license 
with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee. 

4. Completion of all Southern Adventist University general education and cognate 
course requirements for the BS degree with a major in nursing. 

5. A Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) taken within the past five 
years. Students will be admitted based on the following formula: GPA x 
200+GMAT= 1000. 

6. Applicants with less than a 3.25 grade point average or a combined GPA/GM AT 
score of less than 1 000 may be admitted provisionally provided their combined 
score is above 850. 

7. One year of nursing experience after graduation or recommendations from 
nursing faculty. 

8. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600, with testing 
within the past year. 

9 . Personal interview with the Graduate Program Coordinator and two professional 
references. 

10. A criminal background check, paid for by the student, must be submitted with 
the application. 

Admission to the Dual-degree Program: 

Full-time or part-time students maybe admitted to the MBA program during the fall, 
winter, or summer semesters and the MSN courses for the fall or winter semesters after 
completion of the BS general education and cognate courses. Students may choose to 
take the MSN core courses and MBA courses at the same time or complete one program 
of study prior to entering the other. 

Time Limits: 

The programs are structured to meet the needs of part-time and full-time students. 
Normal progression through the dual-degree program for the full-time student requires 
registration for a minimum of 9 to 12 hours per semester. Normal progression for the 
part-time student requires registration for a minimum of one course per semester. Time 
permitted from enrollment in the accelerated dual-degree program to conferring of the 
MSN/MBA degrees may not exceed six years. Application for an extension will be 
considered on an individual basis. 



73 



Residence: 

The last 3 semester hours must be taken through the Southern Adventist Univeristy 
School of Nursing and/or the School of Business and Management. A maximum of 
25% of program requirements are allowed as transfer credit. Transfer courses must be 
taken at an accredited institution, carry grades of B or better, and be approved by the 
School. 

MSN/MBA Graduation Requirements 

1 . Completed application to graduate, to be filed with the Records and Advisement 
office a minimum of two months prior to expected graduation date. 

2. Completion of the dual-degree program with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and no 
more than two courses with C grades. 

3. Successful completion of NRSG 598 with a minimum of four credit hours or 
NRSG 596 with a minimum of three hours. 

Courses for Accelerated 
RN to Master of Science in Nursing/ 
Master of Business Administration 

BS level nursing courses: Credit 

NRSG 316 Applied Statistics for Health Professions 3 

NRSG 322 Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 

NRSG 328 Nursing Assessment 3 

NRSG 340 Community Health Nursing 5 

NRSG 389 Nursing Pharmacology 3 

NRSG 434 Pathophysiology 3 

TOTAL 20 

The Master of Science in Nursing CORE courses are as follows: 

Courses Credit 

NRSG 515 Theoretical Concepts of Nursing 2 

NRSG 520 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 3 

NRSG 526 Nursing Research: Design and Critique 2 

NRSG 530 Nursing Research: Methods and Application 3 

NRSG 541 Health Care Policy 2 

NRSG 596 Nursing Project 3 

OR 

NRSG 598 Thesis 4 

TOTAL 15 

(16 thesis) 

The Business Administration CORE courses are as follows: 

(See the School of Business and Management for course descriptions) 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BUAD 510 Accounting for Control and Decision Making 3 



74 



BUAD 520 Financial Management 3 

BUAD 530 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUAD 540 Marketing Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change 3 

BUAD 560 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 3 

BUAD 570 Strategic Decision Making 3 

TOTAL 24 

Emphasis in HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION 

(See School of Business and Management for course descriptions) 

Required nursing emphasis course: 

NRSG 578 Advanced Nursing Leadership and Role Development 3 

Select nine (9) hours from the following courses 

BEXM 505 Legal Framework of Decisions 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

HADM 530 Healthcare Administration 3 

HADM 550 Entrepreneurship and the Healthcare Professional 3 

HADM 585 Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Professional 3 

TOTAL 12 

Total Hours Required in Majors 71 

(Excluding general education and cognates) (72 thesis) 

POST-MASTER'S CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Prerequisites for Admission 

1. Completed application to the School of Nursing. 

2. A masters degree with a major in nursing from a recognized college or 
university with an accredited program. 

3. Current license as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate license 
with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee. A Georgia license is 
recommended for nurse practitioner students. 

4. A graduate GPA of 3.00 or better. 

5. Applicants with less than a 3.00 grade point average may be admitted 
provisionally, but may progress through the program with a maximum of one C 
grade. 

6. Personal interview and two professional references. 

7. One year of nursing experience or recommendations from nursing faculty. 

8. International students must have a TOEFL score of at least 600 with testing 
within the past year. 

Admission to the Program: 

Full or part-time students may be admitted to the program during the fall or winter 
semesters. 



75 



Application Process: 

1 . Submit completed S AU nursing graduate application and all required documents 
prior to July 31 for fall admission, and by December 1 for winter admission. 
Priority is given to early applicants and applicants with current nursing work 
experience. Enrollment in the nurse practitioner emphasis is limited. 

2. Arrange for a personal interview with the graduate program coordinator prior to 
the application deadline. 

3. Provide proof of current Tennessee or multistate RN licensure, current 
immunization, and Health Care Provider CPR certification. 

4. Complete essay of 250 words or less (see application). 

5. A criminal background check, paid for by the student, must be submitted with 
the application. 

Time Limits: 

The program is arranged to meet the needs of part-time and full-time students. 
Normal progression through the program for the full-time student requires registration 
for 9 to 12 hours per semester. Normal progression for the part-time student requires 
registration for a minimum of one course per semester. Time permitted from enrollment 
in the program to conferring of the post-masters certificate may not exceed five year. 
Application for an extension will be considered on an individual basis. 

Residence: 

The last 20 semester hours must be taken through the Southern Adventist University 
School of Nursing. A maximum of 25% of program requirements are allowed as transfer 
credit. Transfer courses must be taken at an accredited institution, carry grades of B or 
better, and be approved by the School of Nursing. 

Post-Master's Certificate Graduation Requirements 

1 . Completed application to graduate to be filed with the Records and Advisement 
office a minimum of two months prior to expected graduation date. 

2. Completion of the program with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and no more than two 
courses with C (one C grade for students admitted provisionally). 

Courses for the Post-Master's Certificate 
One of the following emphases is to be selected: 

Emphasis in ADULT NURSE PRACTITIONER* 

Objectives: 

The Adult Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 

1. Provide advanced nursing care for adults, families, and communities. 

2. Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

3. Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for adults, families, and communities. 

4. Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

5. Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 



76 



NRSG 520 
NRSG 550 
NRSG 552 
NRSG 554 
NRSG 556 
NRSG 560 
NRSG 562 
NRSG 564 
NRSG 566 



Courses 

Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 
Advanced Pathophysiology 
Advanced Pharmacology 
Advanced Physical Assessment 
Family and Community Systems 
Primary Care of Adults 
Practicum: Primary Care of Adults I 
Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 
Practicum: Primary Care of Adults II 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
2 
4 



TOTAL (does not include core) 29 

*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification examination. 



Emphasis in FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER* 

Objectives: 

The Family Nurse Practitioner program will prepare graduate nurses who: 



Provide advanced nursing care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, families, 

and communities. 

Integrate theoretical knowledge as a guide for advanced practice. 

Promote wholistic Christ-centered care for infants, children, adolescents, adults, 

families, and communities. 

Contribute to nursing knowledge through active involvement in research. 

Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 



Courses 



Credit 



NRSG 520 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 

NRSG 550 Advanced Pathophysiology 

NRSG 552 Advanced Pharmacology 

NRSG 554 Advanced Physical Assessment 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 

NRSG 560 Primary Care of Adults I 

NRSG 564 Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 

NRSG 570 Primary Care of Children 

NRSG 571 Practicum: Primary Care of Families I 

NRSG 573 Practicum: Primary Care of Families II 



TOTAL (does not include core) 34 

*Successful completion of the program satisfies eligibility requirements for certification examination. 



77 



Emphasis in NURSE EDUCATOR 

Objectives: 

The Nurse Educator program will prepare graduates who will: 

1. Demonstrate competency in curriculum development, classroom, and clinical 
education, evaluation, and use of instructional technology. 

2. Demonstrate expertise in a defined area of clinical interest. 

3. Utilize the process of scientific inquiry to validate and refine knowledge. 

4. Implement wholistic, Christ-centered education for students. 

5. Influence healthcare policy and the future direction of nursing. 

(See the School of Education and Psychology for EDCI/EDUC course descriptions) 

EDCI 535 Philosophy of Education 3 

EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 2 

EDUC 531 Technology and the Educator 3 

NRSG 520 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 3 

NRSG 550_Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

NRSG 556 Family and Community Systems 3 

NRSG 576 Assessment for Advanced Practice 2 

NRSG 580 Nursing Curriculum Design & Evaluation 4 

NRSG 582 Teaching Practicum: Area of Emphasis 3 

NRSG 584 Clinical Education Practicum: Area of Emphasis 1 

NRSG 591 Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 2 

TOTAL (does not include core) 29 

Master of Science in Nursing Core Courses 

NRSG 515. Theoretical Concepts of Nursing 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
A survey of the theories and concepts of nursing science as applied to the increase in substantive 
nursing knowledge. A wholistic Christian perspective is taken on major issues involved in the 
development of nursing knowledge. Critique of theory is applied to the Neuman SystemsModel and 
other selected models and theories. 

NRSG 520. Health Promotion Across the Lifespan 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
Focuses on assisting clients in retaining, attaining, and maintaining optimal health through 
management of stressors across the five variables of the client system. Change theory, nursing 
theory, learning theory, and health promotion principles are used to design and evaluate 
interventions that enhance client's flexible line of defense. 

NRSG 526. Nursing Research: Design and Critique 2 hours 

Pre- or co-requisites: Basic statistics course equivalent to MATH 215 and NRSG 515. 
Examination of the fundamental elements of quantitative and qualitative research designs utilized 
to ethically address nursing research questions related to stressors and their impact on equilibrium 
in client and nursing systems. Evaluation and critique of existing research is emphasized. 
Development of an area of research interest and related research questions are achieved through an 
initial review of literature. Assumes basic computer skills. 



78 



NRSG 530. Nursing Research: Methods and Application 3 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 526. 

Continued review of literature, examination and application of quantitative and qualitative research 
methods, leading to the development of a research proposal. Emphasis is placed on ethical data 
collection, management and analysis in investigating research questions and hypotheses in client and 
nursing systems. Application of descriptive and inferential statistics is included. 

NRSG 541. Health Care Policy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of dean or program coordinator. 

Examines health care policy issues affecting nursing education, administration, advanced clinical 

practice, clients, and client systems. Includes an overview of health care policy in the public and 
private sectors and provides the student with essential skills to understand and influence current 
health care policy formation as it relates to areas of interest for nurses such as clinical practice, 
health promotion and disease prevention and intervention at the primary, secondary, and tertiary 
levels. 

NRSG 545. Supervised Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Senior status and permission of dean or program coordinator. 
Participation in a faculty research study including assigned experiences at various steps of the 
research process, culminating in a scholarly paper appropriate for professional publication and/or 
presentation. 

NRSG 596. Nursing Project 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Senior status and permission of the dean or the program coordinator. 
The student addresses a practice problem, issue, or need within his or her area of emphasis by 
writing a proposal and carrying out activities directed to solving the problem, resolving the issue, 
or meeting the need. The project may involve research, producing a product, or instituting change 
in a practice setting, or any combination of these three. The student is supervised by a faculty 
mentor. The project should lead to a scholarly paper, a presentation, an implementation, a product 
usable by others, or a publishable manuscript. 

NRSG 598. Thesis 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 530, senior status, and permission of program coordinator. 

Student designed research under the supervision of a faculty committee culminating in a master 

thesis. 

Adult Nurse Practitioner Courses 

NRSG 550. Advanced Pathophysiology 3 hours 

A study of alterations in physiologic systems frequently encountered in primary care, with in-depth 
analysis of risk factors, pathophysologic changes, and associated clusters of signs/symptoms. 
Pathophysiologic theories and research are presented as a basis for advanced practice. 

NRSG 552. Advanced Pharmacology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in core courses or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
Focuses on the appropriate clinical use of medications in the maintenance and strengthening of the 
client system's lines of resistance and defense. Emphasis isplaced on therapeutic prescription/use 
of medications in common recurrent health problems. 

NRSG 554. Advanced Physical Assessment 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in core courses or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
In-depth focus on history taking and assessment of the five variables of the client system. Builds 
on basic assessment skills through didactic and clinical app lications. Includes advanced preparation 
in obtaining and interpreting ECGs and analyzing radiologic films. Includes a minimum of 60 hours 
clinical practice. 



79 



NRSG 556. Family and Community Systems 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of core courses or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
Perspectives of family composition, culture, values, ethics, development, growth, and behaviors that 
influence the well-being of the client in the framework of the community. Methods in assessment 
of family structure, dynamics, performance, epidemiology, and strengths/weaknesses furnish the 
basis for developing approaches for primary, secondary and tertiary interventions and improvement 
of family functions. 

NRSG 560. Primary Care of Adults 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 550, 554; Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 552. 

Comprehensive primary care course emphasizing primary, secondary, and tertiary care of well and 
ill adults. Concepts of health promotion, pathophysiology, epidemiology, pharmacology, and 
physical assessment are integrated throughout as common and chronic health problems are studied. 
Diagnostic tests are reviewed. Differential and actual diagnoses are discussed based on client 
presentation. Management plans are formulated based on standards of practice and best evidence. 

NRSG 562. Practicum: Primary Care of Adults I 4 hours 

Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 560. 

Clinical practicum in the differential diagnosis and management of common and chronic adult health 
problems. Includes intensives for clinical procedures and wound management. Precepted by nurse 
practitioners and other healthcare providers. Includes a minimum of 240 hours of clinical practice. 

NRSG 564. Role Development for Nurse Practitioners 2 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 560. 

A capstone course focusing on professional and clinical issues, roles, relationships, legal and ethical 
situations, practice management, and preparation for professional NP certification. 

NRSG 566. Practicum: Primary Care of Adults II 4 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 562; Co-requisite: NRSG 564. 

A continuation of clinical practicum with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and management 
of the more intensive common, acute, and chronic adult health problems. Precepted by nurse 
practitioners and other healthcare providers. Includes a minimum of 240 hours of clinical practice. 

Family Nurse Practitioner Courses 

NRSG 570. Primary Care of Children 3 hours 

Pre- or co-requisites: NRSG 550, 552, 554. 

Theoretical concepts in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention in infants, children, and 
adolescents includingthe assessment, health promotion, diagnosis, and therapeutic management of 
common acute and chronic health problems. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the 
pathophysiologic stressors as well as the impact of the family on the health of the child. 

NRSG 571. Practicum: Primary Care of Families I 5 hours 

Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 560, 570. 

Clinical practicum that promotes application of theoretical concepts and development of skills in 
primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention and healthcare across the lifespan. Diagnosis and 
therapeutic management of common acute and chronic health problems is precepted by nurse 
practitioners and other healthcare providers in a variety of adult, family, pediatric, outpatient, acute, 
and long-term care settings. Includes intensive for clinical procedures and wound management. A 
minimum of 300 hours clinical practice is required. 



80 



NRSG 573. Practicum: Primary Care of Families II 5 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 571; Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 564. 

Clinical practicum that promotes competence for entry into advanced practice in health 
promotion/disease prevention; management of patient illness; nurse-patient relationships; teaching- 
coaching function; professional roles; managing and negotiating healthcare delivery; quality 
assurance; and meeting cultural and spiritual needs of families across the lifespan. Includes a 
minimum of 300 hours clinical practice. 



Nurse Educator Courses 



NRSG 576. Assessment for Advanced Practice 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in core courses or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
Advanced studies in history taking and assessment of the five variables of the client system. Builds 
on basic assessment skills through didactic and clinical applications. Applies pharmacogic 
principles to assessment findings. Not open to students in nurse practitioner emphasis. 

NRSG 580. Nursing Curriculum Design and Evaluation 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in core courses, or permission of dean or program coordinator. 
A study of curriculum development, design, implementation, and evaluation in nursing education. 
Theories and models for curriculum design and evaluation are examined. The Neuman Systems 
Model and selected educational and nursing theories are evaluated for usefulness and 
implementation into the nursing classroom situation. Curricular strategies and evaluation methods 
that address the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains of learning within classroom and 
clinical settings are analyzed. Test design, construction, blue printing, and analysis are included. 
Some objectives for this course are met through attendance at an off-site "boot camp" for new nurse 
educators. 

NRSG 582. Teaching Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 3 hours 

A capstone course that provides a setting for practice of the nurse educator role. Opportunity will 
be provided for the student to integrate theories such as the Neuman Systems Model, concepts, 
strategies, and technical innovations in the classroom. Some objectives for this course are met 
through attendance at an off-site "boot camp" for new nurse educators. One hour theory, two hours 
clinical (90 clock hours). 

NRSG 584. Clinical Education Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 1 hour 

Provides opportunity to apply educational strategies with students of nursing in the clinical area of 
choice. Includes 60 hours of clinical practice. 

NRSG 591. Practicum: Area of Clinical Emphasis 2 hours 

An individualized clinical practicum in the specific area of clinical emphasis chosen by the student 
designed to foster growth in clinical expertise and enrich the nurse educator role. Ninety clockhours 
of practice. 

Master of Science in Nursing Courses 

NRSG 500. Individual Study and Clinical Practice 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of dean or program coordinator. 

Particularly designed to make-up deficiencies in a student's undergraduate program. Hours do not 

count towards MSN degree. This class is designed to make up deficiencies in a student's 
undergraduate preparation and is not applicable to the graduate degree program. 

NRSG 505. Directed Study and Research 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of dean or program coordinator. 

Directed study and/or research in nursing designed to meet the needs of the individual student. 



81 



NRSG 565. Graduate Studies - Topics in Nursing 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of dean or program coordinator. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of nursing not 

covered in regular courses. This course may be repeated for credit. 

NRSG 578. Advanced Nursing Leadership and Role Development 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of program coordinator. 

This course is cross-listed with HADM 536 in the School of Business and Management. A student 

can receive credit for this course from only one program. 

Examines the role of the nurse executive or manager within the managed care system through 

analyses of selected leadership, management, and nursing theories. The concepts derived from these 

analyses are applied to the various role functions (leader, strategic planner, organizer, facilitator, 

evaluator). Leadership principles, continuous quality improvement, human resources management, 

negotiation skills, marketing, and strategic planning are emphasized. The learner will complete a 

project focusing on one of the roles of the nurse leader under supervision of the course professor and 

a preceptor in a mid- to top-level administrative position at a health care facility. 

NRSG 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research under the supervision of the graduate faculty. Only two independent 
studies (a total of no more than six hours) are allowed to apply toward a student's degree. 



82 

School of Religion 

Dean: Ron E. M. Clouzet 

Faculty: Ron E. M. Clouzet, Michael G. Hasel, J. Douglas Jacobs, Greg A. King, 

Jud Lake, Donn W. Leatherman, Carlos G. Martin, Edwin Reynolds, 

Philip G. Samaan 
Research Faculty: Norman Gulley 
Adjunct Faculty: Gordon Bietz, Jack J. Blanco, Ganoune Diop, Derek Morris 

The mission of the School of Religion is to equip students to carry out the global 
mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church more effectively. 

The Master of Arts programs in Church Leadership and Management, Evangelism, 
Homiletics, Religious Education, and Religious Studies are designed to provide quality 
education in preaching, church leadership, outreach, teaching, religion, and lay ministry. 
The purpose of these programs is to enhance the ability of students to serve a culturally 
diverse church and society from a biblical perspective and to deepen each student's 
personal relationship with Jesus Christ. 

Programs Offered 

Master of Arts (MA) with the following five emphases: 

► Church Leadership and Management 

► Evangelism 

► Homiletics 

► Religious Education 

► Religious Studies 

Courses for the Master of Arts Degree 

The curriculum of the Master of Arts consists of a minimum of 36 semester credit 
hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. Electives must be approved by the School of 
Religion. A maximum of six (6) semester hours of transfer credit are allowed from other 
institutions. All degree requirements must be completed within seven years from first 
enrollment. Most courses will be available as class intensives during the summer. 

Guidelines for Intensives 

1 . Students must receive permission to take classes before registering for their first 
course. 

2. Students can only take up to 12 hours of course work before completing all 
prerequisites for admission and being formally accepted in the MA program. 

3. Students should expect pre-session assignments for graduate intensives. Typical 
pre-session assignments include 1000-1500 pages of reading, depending on 
other pre-session assignments. 

4. Pre-session assignments are due the first day of the intensive. Only assignments 
handed in on time will receive full credit. There will be no credit for pre-session 
assignments that are handed in following the completion of the intensive. 

5. Post-session assignments give the student opportunity to apply information 
learned during the intensive to the local ministry context for further research on 
the subject. These will be due five months after the session is over. Late work 
may not be accepted for credit after the due date. 



83 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Prerequisites for Admission 

In addition to the general application and application fee requirements for graduate 
study, the candidate will comply with the following requirements: 

1. Two recommendations. If the applicant works for the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church, a recommendation from the applicant's employing organization is 
required. 

2. If applicable, a record of denominational employment indicating the places and 
dates of service, and the capacity in which the applicant was employed. 

3. Completion of 16 Personality Factor Profile concurrently with the first course 
taken in residence at Southern Adventist University or submit results from a 
16PF taken within the year preceding registration for the first course. 

4. Upon request, the student will need to take the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) and submit a score based on the student's cumulative undergraduate GPA 
x 200 plus the GRE score for a minimum of 1400. Provisional acceptance is 
between 1300 and 1400. 

5 . Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree. Other 
prerequisites may apply to the specific emphases. 

6. A non-refundable commitment deposit of $100 per class, applicable to tuition. 

7. Upon request, a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based)/250 (computer- 
based), for students for whom English is not the first language. 

8. International graduate students with TOEFL scores between 550 and 599 will 
be required to study English as a Second Language (ESL). If they maintain ESL 
grades of B or above for two semesters or when their TOEFL scores reach 600, 
they will be permitted to take a full course-load of graduate classes. 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . File a completed graduate application with the Records and Advisement Office 
two months before the expected graduation date. 

2. Finish all coursework with a minimum grade point average of 3.00, including 
no more than two classes with a minimum grade of C. 

3. Pass a written comprehensive examination taken no earlier then three months 
and no later then twelve months after completion of the last period of the 
student's last course in the program. Specific examination dates will be posted 
by the School of Religion. 

a. The examination is expected to last four and a half hours. 

b. The candidate for graduation will need to give comprehensive answers to 
several questions drawn from a larger list of questions available for research 
and review at the end of his or her coursework. 

c. A score of 80% or above will constitute a passing grade. 

d. In case of failure, the examination maybe repeated only once. A second 
failure will disqualify the student for graduation from the MA program. 



84 



Emphasis in CHURCH LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT 

This emphasis is not intended for basic theological training but as graduate education for the 
continued development of pastoral leadership. 

Objectives: 

1. To develop a sound Christian leadership philosophy. 

2. To provide a broad knowledge of leadership and management theory skills. 

3. To provide the student with quality training required for new responsibilities in 
the church and ministry. 

Additional Prerequisites for Admission: 

1. A minimum of six years of pastoral experience or as approved for admission by 
the School of Religion. 

2. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree 
program indicating successful completion of: (a) at least 12 semester hours in 
biblical and theological studies (18 quarter hours); (b) at least one introductory 
course in biblical preaching. Students lacking preaching credits must take RELP 
401, Fundamentals of Biblical Preaching, or an equivalent course to meet the 
necessary requirement. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A candidate must: 

1 . Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and no more 
than two courses with C grades. 

3. Pass a written or oral comprehensive exam designed by the faculty of the 
School. 

The CORE Courses are as follows: 

Ministry courses: 12 

RELP 513 Effective Church Leadership 3 

RELP 521 Time and Life Management 3 

RELT 520 Spirituality in Ministry 3 

RELP 515 Equipping Laity for Ministry OR 3 
RELT 581 Biblical Ethics and Contemporary Society 

Management courses: 9 

BUAD 505 Management in a Changing World 3 

BHRM510 Human Resource Management 3 

BUAD 555 Leadership and Change OR 3 
ACCT 505 Financial Accounting 

Research course: 3 

RELG 600 Research Methods and Writing 3 

TOTAL 24 



85 



ELECTIVES: 

Select twelve (12) semester hours from graduate courses offered by the following: 12 

Select nine (9) hours from the School of Religion 9 

Select three (3) hours from the School of Business and Management 3 

Total Hours Required for Church Leadership and Management Emphasis 36 

Emphasis in EVANGELISM 

This emphasis is not intended for basic theological training but as graduate education for the 
continue development of evangelistic skills. 

Objectives: 

1 . To enhance skills in personal soul winning and public evangelism. 

2. To introduce new methods of evangelism and mission outreach for a rapidly 
changing, post-modern society in North America and the world. 

3. To increase the ability to exegete the Bible in harmony with principles of biblical 
hermeneutics. 

4. To communicate the gospel in the context of the Three Angels' Message of 
Revelation 14. 

5. To develop skills for societal analysis and interpersonal interaction. 

Additional Prerequisites for Admission: 

1, A written list of church offices which the applicant has held (e.g.; elder, 
deaconess, Sabbath School teacher, etc.) and outreach activities in which the 
applicant has engaged (e.g.: conducted Bible studies, work in Revelation 
seminars, assisted with Health Education seminars). 

2. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree 
program indicating successful completion of: (a) at least 12 semester hours in 
biblical and theological studies (18 quarter hours); (b) at least one introductory 
course in biblical preaching. Students lacking preaching credits must take RELP 
401, Fundamentals of Biblical Preaching or an equivalent course to meet the 
necessary requirement. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A candidate must: 

1. Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and no more 
than two courses with C grades. 

3 . Pass a written or oral comprehensive exam designed by the faculty of the School. 

The CORE Courses are as follows: 

Evangelism courses: 9 

RELP 532 Principles and Strategies for Church Growth OR 3 

RELP 537 Church Planting Strategies 

RELP 534 Personal Soul-Winning Skills OR 3 

RELP 542 Urban Ministry and Evangelism 

RELT 552 Theology of Mission and Evangelism OR 3 

RELT 568 World Religions 



86 

Evangelistic Preaching course: 3 

RELP 524 Evangelistic Preaching OR 3 

RELP 591 Preaching Practicum 

Biblical courses: 9 

RELB 540 Old Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 550 New Testament Themes 

RELB 555 Studies in Daniel OR 3 

RELB 556 Studies in Revelation 

RELB 553 Studies in Romans OR 3 

RELT 546 Doctrine of Salvation 

Research course (3): 3 

RELG 600 Research Methods and Writing 3 

TOTAL 24 

ELECTIVES: 

Select twelve (12) semester hours from graduate courses offered by 12 

the School of Religion. 

Total Hours Required for Evangelism Emphasis 36 

Emphasis in HOMILETICS 

This emphasis is not intended for basic theological training but as graduate education for the 
continued development of preaching skills. 

Objectives: 

1 . To enhance skills in the preparation and delivery of sermons. 

2. To introduce new methods of homiletical speech. 

3. To increase the ability to exegete the Bible in harmony with principles of biblical 
hermeneutics. 

4. To broaden biblical and theological knowledge for richer biblical messages. 

5. To develop analytical thinking skills. 

Additional Prerequisites for Admission: 

1 . A minimum of six years of pastoral experience or as approved for admission by 
the School of Religion. 

2. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree 
indicating successful completion of: (a) at least 30 semester hours (45 quarter 
hours) in religion; (b) at least one year of a biblical language, and (c) at least three 
semester hours of homiletics. Persons who entered the ministry later in life may 
be granted special consideration with regard to the above prerequisites. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A candidate must: 

1. Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 andnomore 
than two courses with C grades. 

3. Pass a written or oral comprehensive exam designed bythe faculty of the School. 



87 



The CORE Courses are as follows: 



Homiletics courses: 9 

RELP 501 Advanced Preaching Methods OR 3 

RELP 508 Expository Preaching 

RELP 524 Evangelistic Preaching OR 3 

RELP 591 Preaching Practicum 

RELP 561 Preaching to the Secular Mind OR 3 

RELP 569 Sermon Designs for Biblical Preaching 

Homiletics Exegesis course: 3 

RELB 54 1 Preaching from the Old Testament Text OR 3 

RELB 551 Preaching from the New Testament Text 

Foundational Biblical course: 3 

RELB 540 Old Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 550 New Testament Themes 

Ministry courses: 6 

RELP 521 Time and Life Management OR 3 

RELT 520 Spirituality in Ministry 

RELP 532 Principles and Strategies for Church Growth OR 3 

RELT 571 Renewal and Mission of the Church 

Research course: 3 

RELG 600 Research Methods and Writing 3 

TOTAL 24 

ELECTIVES: 

Select twelve (12) semester hours from graduate courses offered by the 12 

School of Religion: 

Total Hours Required for Homiletics Emphasis 36 

Emphasis in RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

(Joint degree between the School of Religion and the School of Education and Psychology) 

Prerequisites for Admission 

In addition to the general application and application fee requirements for graduate 
study, the candidate will comply with the following requirements: 

1. Two recommendations. If the applicant works for the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church, a recommendation from the applicant's employing organization is 
required. 

2. If applicable, a record of denominational employment indicating the places and 
dates of service, and the capacity in which the applicant was employed. 

3. Completion of 16 Personality Factor Profile concurrently with the first course 
taken in residence at Southern Adventist University or submit results from a 
16PF taken within the year preceding registration for the first course. 



88 

4. Upon request, the student will need to take the Graduate Record 
Examination(GRE) and submit a score based on the entrance criteria of GPA 
x 200 and GRE for a minimum of 1400. Provisional acceptance is between 
1300 and 1400. 

5. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree. 

6. A non-refundable commitment deposit of $100 per class, applicable to tuition. 

7. Upon request, a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based)/250 (computer- 
based), for students for whom English is not the first language. 

8. International graduate students with TOEFL scores between 550 and 599 will 
be required to study English as a Second Language (ESL). If they maintain ESL 
grades of B or above for two semesters or when their TOEFL scores reach 600, 
they will be permitted to take a full course-load of graduate classes. 

Objectives: 

1 . To develop a biblical philosophy of education. 

2. To broaden the knowledge base in religion and education. 

3. To enhance competency in teaching and preaching. 

4. To develop analytical thinking skills. 

5. To consider and evaluate new theological and educational trends. 

Additional Prerequisites for Admission: 

1 . A record of educational ministry and other ministries indicating the places and 
dates of service, and the capacity in which the applicant was employed. 

2. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree 
program with 12 hours of undergraduate religion courses and teaching 
certification. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A candidate must: 

1 . Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and no more 
than two courses with C grades. 

3. Pass a written or oral comprehensive exam designed by the faculty of the School 
of Religion. 

The CORE Courses are as follows: 

Biblical courses: 6 

RELB 540 Old Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 555 Studies in Daniel 

RELB 550 New Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 556 Studies in Revelation 

Theological courses: 6 

RELT 531 Hermeneutics and Biblical Interpretation 3 

RELT 581 Biblical Ethics in Contemporary Society 3 

Ministry courses: 6 

RELP 521 Time and Life Management 3 

RELT 520 Spirituality in Ministry 3 



89 



Research course: 3 

RELG 600 Research Methods and Writing 3 

TOTAL 21 

ELECTIVES: 

Select fifteen (15) semester hours from the graduate courses offered 15 

by the following: 

Select three (3) hours from the School of Religion. 3 

Select twelve (12) hours from the School of Education and Psychology 12 

listed below: 

COUN 502 Foundations of School Counseling 2 

COUN 506 Developmental Psychology — Growth Years 3 

COUN 510 Advanced Lifespan Development 3 

COUN 514 Drugs and Addictions 3 

COUN 522 Theories and Personality 3 

ED AD 524 Foundations of Educational Administration 3 

EDCI 535 Philosophy of Education 3 

EDCI 546 Improving Instruction 3 

EDIE 512 Counseling and Psychology of Exceptional Individuals and 

Their Families 3 

EDIE 531 Behavior Management of Exceptional Individuals 3 

EDOE 543 Environmental Ministries for Teachers and Youth Leaders 2 

EDOE 563 Wilderness Stewardship 2 

EDOE 593 Adventure-based Counseling 2 

EDUC 520 Theories of Learning 2 

EDUC 541 Principles of Counseling 3 

Total Hours Required for Religious Education 36 

Emphasis in RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Prerequisites for Admission 

In addition to the general application and application fee requirements for graduate 
study, the candidate will comply with the following requirements: 

1. Two recommendations. If the applicant works for the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church, a recommendation from the applicant's employing organization is 
required. 

2. If applicable, a record of denominational employment indicating the places and 
dates of service, and the capacity in which the applicant was employed. 

3. Completion of 16 Personality Factor Profile concurrently with the first course 
taken in residence at Southern Adventist University or submit results from a 1 6PF 
taken within the year preceding registration for the first course. 

4. Upon request, the student will need to take the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) and submit a score based on the entrance criteria of GPA x 200 and GRE 
for a minimum of 1400. Provisional acceptance is between 1300 and 1400. 

5. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree. 

6. A non-refundable commitment deposit of $100 per class, applicable to tuition. 

7. Upon request, a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based)/250 (computer- 
based), for students for whom English is not the first language. 



90 

8. International graduate students with TOEFL scores between 550 and 599 will be 
required to study English as a Second Language (ESL). If they maintain ESL 
grades of B or above for two semesters or when their TOEFL scores reach 600, 
they will be permitted to take a full course-load of graduate classes. 

Objectives: 

1 . To acquire knowledge for further academic training in religion. 

2. To provide resources for developing and implementing a biblical philosophy of 
life. 

3. To establish a sound theological foundation for Christian faith and practice. 

4. To introduce sound methods for effective Christian service. 

Additional Prerequisites for Admission: 

1, A written list of church offices which the applicant has held (e.g., elder, 
deaconess, Sabbath School teacher, etc.) and church activities in which the 
applicant has engaged (e.g., conducted Bible studies, work in Revelation 
seminars, assisted with Health Education seminars). 

2. Presentation of an official transcript from an accredited bachelor's degree 
program with 12 hours of undergraduate religion courses. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A candidate must: 

1. Complete an application to graduate, which must be filed with the Records and 
Advisement Office two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

2. Complete the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and no more 
than two courses with C grades. 

3. Pass a written or oral comprehensive exam designed by the faculty of the School. 

The CORE Courses are as follows: 

Theological courses (9): 

RELT 520 Spirituality in Ministry 3 

RELT 53 1 Hermeneutics and Biblical Interpretation 3 

RELT 581 Biblical Ethics and Contemporary Society 3 

Biblical courses (6): 

RELB 540 Old Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 555 Studies in Daniel 

RELB 550 New Testament Themes OR 3 

RELB 556 Studies in Revelation 

Professional course from the follow ing (3): 

RELP 515 Equipping Laity for Ministry OR 3 

RELP 534 Personal Soul- Winning Skills OR 

RELP 542 Urban Ministry and Evangelism 

Research course (3): 

RELG 600 Research Methods and Writing 3 

TOTAL 21 



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ELECTIVES: 

Select fifteen (15) semester hours from graduate courses offered by the 15 

School of Religion. 

Total Hours Required for Religious Studies Emphasis 36 

Biblical Studies 

RELB 500. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Directed study designed to make up deficiencies in a student's undergraduate degree. 

RELB 510. Archaeology and Bible Interpretation 3 hours 

A study of cultures, customs, languages, and religious practices that throw light on the understanding 
of Scriptures based on archaeological and other ancient material culture found throughout the lands 
of the Bible. 

RELB 520. Middle East Study Tour 1-3 hours 

Sponsored by the School of Religion, the Middle East Study Tour focuses on the archaeological, 
historical, and geographical study of the region with an emphasis on the comparative study of 
cultures, locations, and events as they relate to the Bible. Students are responsible for tuition and 
trip expenses. 

RELB 530. Archaeological Fieldwork 1-6 hours 

In conjunction with the archaeological expeditions, sponsored by Southern Adventist University, 
qualified students obtain practical experience and training in archaeological fieldwork by assisting 
on the supervising of excavations, drawing, registering, reading of pottery, and related work. 
Students are responsible for tuition and trip expenses. 

RELB 540. Old Testament Themes 3 hours 

An introduction to the major theological concepts and themes of the Old Testament from the 
perspective of the Christian faith, through the study of selected passages of the Old Testament text. 
The course will also discuss the history of the discipline of Old Testament Theology. 

RELB 541. Preaching from the Old Testament Text 3 hours 

An examination of the presentation and development of the major theological concepts and themes 
of the Old Testament from the perspective of the Christian faith. Course requirements will include 
the preparation of both thematic and expository sermons based on the Old Testament. 

RELB 545. General Epistles 3 hours 

A general background of New Testament history and the Book of Acts, plus exposition of Hebrews, 
James, 1 and 2 Peter, Jude, and 1, 2, and 3 John. A significant research assignment is required. 

RELB 546. Pauline Epistles 3 hours 

A study of Paul's epistles, including Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, 

Philippians, Colossians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, and Philemon. A 
significant research assignment is required. 

RELB 550. New Testament Themes 3 hours 

An introduction to and study of the major themes of the New Testament as expressed in its various 
literature types. Emphasis will be given to understanding these themes within the context of the 
significance of the life, death, resurrection, and high priestly ministry of Jesus Christ for 
contemporary society. 

RELB 551. Preaching from the New Testament Text 3 hours 

This course will engage the student in either a detailed study of selected New Testament themes or 
exegesis/interpretation of selected book(s) or passages of the New Testament. Emphasis will be 
given to the preparation/preaching of sermons based on the New Testament themes or passages 
contained within the material under study. 



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RELB 553. Studies in Romans 3 hours 

This course provides an in-depth study of Romans. It covers core issues regarding the righteousness 
of God, salvation in Christ, and the role of the Holy Spirit. Key topics will be studied, such as the 
nature of the gospel, the identity of the believers in Christ, and the election of Israel in the plan of 
God. 

RELB 555. Studies in Daniel 3 hours 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of Daniel to discover their meaning and relevance for 
today. A research paper will be required. 

RELB 556. Studies in Revelation 3 hours 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of Revelation with their historical fulfillments. Special 
attention will be given to discovering its special message for our day. A research paper will be 
required. 

RELB 565. Topics in Biblical Studies 3 hours 

This course will cover selected topics of interest in the area of biblical studies. 

RELB 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research under the supervision of the graduate faculty. 

General Studies 



RELG 564. Early and Medieval Church History 3 hours 

A study of the history of western Christianity from the end of the apostolic period through the 15" 1 
century, paying particular attention to institutional and theological development. A significant 
research assignment is required. 

RELG 565. Reformation and Post-Reformation Church History 3 hours 

A study of the Protestant Reformation, the Counterreformation, and religion in America, 
culminating with contemporary religious trends. A significant research assignment is required. 

RELG 600. Research Methods and Writing 3 hours 

A course dealing with techniques and tools including library and on-line sources available for 
theological research for the construction and practice of writing research papers. Emphasis is given 
to expository and persuasive writing skills, documentation styles, and bibliography in various 
religious disciplines. A research paper is required. 

Professional Studies 

RELP 401. Fundamentals of Biblical Preaching 3 hours 

This introductory course focuses on the preparation and delivery of expository sermons. The student 
will learn and implement a ten-step method in preparing an expository sermon. This sermon will 
be preached and analyzed in a peer-review setting. Only available to students with no formal 
preaching training. Credit will not be given towards a master's degree. 

RELP 500. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Directed study designed to make up deficiencies in a student's undergraduate degree. 

RELP 501. Advanced Preaching Methods 3 hours 

An exploration of various models of Biblical preaching with an emphasis on inductive method and 
extemporaneous delivery. Course requirements will include preparation, delivery, and evaluation of 
sermons in a peer-review setting. 



93 



RELP 508. Expository Preaching 3 hours 

An advanced course on the theology and construction of expository sermons. Attention will be given 
to exegetical procedure, homiletical form, relevant illustration, and accurate application. The student 
will learn strategies for developing exegetical outlines of biblical books or chapter and transforming 
these outlines into fresh, contemporary sermons for today's audience. Course requirements will 
include preparation, delivery, and evaluation of sermons in a peer-review setting. 

RELP 513. Effective Church Leadership 3 hours 

Church leadership viewed from the perspective of character and effectiveness. Issues covered will 
include visioning, local mission development, mentoring, effective administration, and decision 
making. Case studies and group interaction will be used for learning purposes. 

RELP 515. Equipping Laity for Ministry 3 hours 

A biblical approach to the effective accomplishment of church ministry with an emphasis on the 
discovery, development, and discipleship of lay ministry. The role of the pastor as facilitator of 
ministry in this paradigm will be carefully examined. 

RELP 517. Pastoral Counseling 3 hours 

Counseling theory and practice in church related settings. Mental health programs and follow-up are 
studied. 

RELP 519. Church and Community Health Education 3 hours 

Based on principles outlined in the Bible and the Spirit of Prophecy, this course will deal with 
specific methods and programs designed to reach both church and community in areas of felt needs 
not ordinarily emphasized in the traditional evangelistic approach. A significant research 
assignment is required. 

RELP 521. Time and Life Management 3 hours 

This course is a comprehensive study of time and life management. It explores the fundamentals 
of time and its management within a theological and pastoral context. Special consideration will be 
given to articulating personal values, achieving goals, evaluating and implementing a time- 
management system, overcoming personal time- management weaknesses, and applying strategies 
of efficiency and effectiveness to everyday life. 

RELP 524. Evangelistic Preaching 3 hours 

This course concentrates on the development and delivery of Christ-centered, distinctive Adventist 
messages with emphasis on soul-winning decisions and the use of multi-media. Instruction includes 
sermon preparation for an evangelistic series. 

RELP 525. Youth Ministry in the Local Church 3 hours 

This course will emphasize the understanding of the various youth groups in the local church and 
how each age level grows spiritually. The purpose of the course is to demonstrate how to develop 
effective youth leaders and to enable them to minister to, retain, and engage youth in the mission of 
the church. 

RELP 532. Principles and Strategies for Church Growth 3 hours 

This course will focus on the application of biblical principles of church growth to the North 
American church, as well as practical evangelistic strategies for the local Adventist congregation. 
These will include year-long planning for community outreach, church planting, evangelistic 
preparation, and membership training. 

RELP 534. Personal Soul-Winning Skills 3 hours 

A study of the importance, principles, and methods of personal evangelism. The course focuses on 
the development of skills to help individuals make f avorab le decisions for Jesus Christ through one- 
on-one small group evangelism. Practical experience will be gained in laboratory exercises and in 
the field. 



94 



RELP 537. Church Planting Strategies 3 hours 

The course will focus on planting churches in a Seventh-day Adventist context. Biblical and 
historical models, various methods of church planting, and the current state of Adventist church 
planting will be surveyed. Students will learn how to develop a strategy for starting and multiplying 
congregations, how to integrate discipleship with church planning, and how to protect the personal 
life of the church pastor. 

RELP 542. Urban Ministry and Evangelism 3 hours 

A study of the city as the locus of mission and ministry. The course considers the forces which 
create cities, their development, and their ethos, with emphasis on the process of secularization and 
the church's holistic approach to the urban setting. Special attention is given to evangelism and 
church planting in the urban context. Students are exposed to various ministries dealing with the 
hungry, homeless, addicted, and the alienated. 

RELP 561. Preaching to the Secular Mind 3 hours 

The understanding of post-modern society and how to communicate the character of God and the 
truths of Scripture through effective sermons. Course requirements will include preparation, 
delivery, and evaluation of sermons in a peer -review setting. 

RELP 565. Topics in Professional Studies 3 hours 

This course will deal with selected topics of interest in the area of pastoral studies. 

RELP 569. Sermon Designs for Biblical Preaching 3 hours 

The student will explore a variety of sermon designs such as inductive, narrative plots, and other 
audience-centered preaching forms. Delivery focus will be on youth, secular people, and various 
ethnic congregations. Course requirements will include preparation, delivery, and evaluation of 
sermons in a peer-review setting. 

RELP 591. Preaching Practicum 3 hours 

The course is offered in connection with a field school of evangelism in which students will 
participate in supervised evangelistic preaching. Students must demonstrate adequate preparation 
in order to be considered for this course. Class requirements include preparation of a theoretical 
framework to be done, field supervision, and a final report. 

RELP 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research under the supervision of the graduate faculty. 

Theological Studies 

RELT 500. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Directed study designed to make up deficiencies in a student's undergraduate degree. 

RELT 520. Spirituality in Ministry 3 hours 

An examination of a biblical model for spiritual leadership and its implications for personal spiritual 
life and development. The objective of this course is to discover how to experience life and ministry 
that is "full of God's grace and power." 

RELT 525. Theology of Ministry 3 hours 

An in-depth study of the theology of ministry in the context of the church, clergy-laity roles, and the 
mission of the local congregation. A significant research assignment or project is required. 

RELT 531. Hermeneutics and Biblical Interpretation 3 hours 

An investigation into fundamental hermeneutical presuppositions and the formulation of both sound 
principles of biblical interpretation and proper methods of interpreting the writings of Ellen G 
White, for use in preaching and ministry. Particular attention will be paid to contemporary methods 
of interpretation and their impact on the authority and trustworthiness of Scripture. 



95 



RELT 538. Prophetic Guidance in the Adventist Church 3 hours 

An in-depth study of the gift of prophecy as seen in the life and ministry of Ellen G White. 
Controversial issues in revelation and inspiration are explored. A significant assignment answering 
objections is required. 

RELT 542. Studies in Biblical Doctrines 3 hours 

An in-depth study of key biblical doctrines such as salvation, the nature of God and man, the Great 
Controversy, and the final destiny of God's people. A significant research assignment is required. 

RELT 546. Doctrine of Salvation 3 hours 

The central purpose of this class will be to study the plan of salvation/righteousness by faith. It will 
focus on building a biblically based understanding of salvation through the sanctuary and key 
soteriological books like Romans, Galatians, and John. Some time will also be spend in examining 
and critiquing varying views of salvation from theologians such as Abelard, Calvin, Arminius and 
Wesley. The significance of these views for Seventh-day Adventism will also be explored. 

RELT 552. Theology of Mission and Evangelism 3 hours 

The biblical foundation for evangelism. A theological reflection of its essence, goals, motives, and 
strategies, with special emphasis on the mission of the SDA Church. The course provides a 
theological foundation for all courses in the area of evangelism, ministry, and missions. 

RELT 563. Contemporary Theological Issues 3 hours 

A study of contemporary theological issues that impact the Seventh-day Adventist Church with a 
view to assisting inquirers to respond appropriately. A significant research assignment is required. 

RELT 565. Topics in Theological Studies 3 hours 

This course will cover selected topics of interest in the area of theological studies. 

RELT 568. World Religions 3 hours 

A study of several major representative Christian and non-Christian religions, including a survey 
of the history and the distinctive characteristics of each. This course will also compare and contrast 
these religions, consider areas of commonality between these religions and biblical Christianity, and 
provide insights as to how to share Christianity with practitioners of these religions. A research 
paper will be required. 

RELT 571. Renewal and Mission of the Church 3 hours 

A biblical study of ecclesiology as it relates to the mission of the church. Emphasis will be placed 
on church renewal through worship, small groups, missional focus, and the empowering baptism of 
the Holy Spirit. 

RELT 573. Biblical Eschatology 3 hours 

A biblical evaluation of end-time movements, teachings, and events to prepare the church for 
Christ's soon return. 

RELT 581. Biblical Ethics and Contemporary Society 3 hours 

An examination of the major ethical teachings of the Bible in light of their cultural and historical 
setting and in relation to contemporary moral issues. This course will deal with how to approach 
ethical problems in ministry, as well as Christian strategies dealing with basic matters such as 
confidentiality, church-state relations, racism, sexual vulnerability, and marriage/divorce/remarriage. 

RELT 595. Independent Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study and research under the supervision of the graduate faculty. 



96 



The Registry 



b 



OARD OF 1 RUSTEES 



Gordon Retzer, Chair 
Gordon Bietz 
Michael Cauley 
Richard Center 
Arnold Cochran 
Joan Coggin 
Ken Coonley 
Mel Eisele 
Julius Garner 
Conrad Gill 
Melanie Graves 
R. R. Hallock 
Scott Hodges 
Dan Houghton 
Bill Hulsey 
Don Jernigan 
A. David Jimenez 
Joseph McCoy 



Jay McElroy 
Bill McGhinnis 
Ellsworth McKee 
James Ray McKinney 
Denzil McNeilus 
V. J. Mendinghall 
Georgia O'Brien 
Frank Potts 
Mark Schiefer 
Volker Schmidt 
Ward Sumpter 
Joan Taylor 
Willie Taylor 
Dale Twomley 
Tom Werner 
Jeff White 
Greg Willett 
Ed Wright 



■ Members of the Executive Board 



Administrators 

Gordon Bietz, D.Min. (1997) President 

Dale J. Bidwell, B.S. (1989) Senior Vice President, Financial Administration 

Cristopher Carey, B.S. (2005) Vice President, Advancement 

Helen Durichek, B.A., (1986) Associate Vice President, Financial Administration 

Katie Lamb, Ph.D. (1972) Associate Vice President, Academic Administration 

Dean, Graduate Studies 

Steve Pawluk, Ed.D (2002) Senior Vice President, Academic Administration 

Vinita Sauder, M.B.A. (1983) Vice President, Marketing and Enrollment Services 

William Wohlers, Ph.D. (1973) Vice President, Student Services 

Other Officials 

Eddie Avant, B.S. (1998) Director, Campus Safety 

Helen Bledsoe, B.S. (1984) Thatcher South Manager and Assistant Dean 

Marc Grundy, M.B.A. (1996) Director, Enrollment Services 

Henry Hicks, B.S. (1998) Executive Director, Information Systems 

Genevieve Cottrell, MInf (2001) Director, Library 

Ed Wright, D.Min. (1985) Senior Pastor, University Church 

Joni Zier, M.S.Ed. (1993) Director, Records and Advisement 



(Dates in parentheses indicate the beginning year of employment at Southern Adventist University.) 



97 



Graduate Council 

Katie A. Lamb, Chair Associate Vice President, Academic Administration 

Dean, Graduate Studies 

Ron Clouzet Dean, School of Religion 

Genevieve Cottrell Director, Library 

Alberto dos Santos Dean, School of Education and Psychology 

Marc Grundy Director, Enrollment Services 

Phil Hunt Dean, School of Nursing 

Steve Pawluk Senior Vice President, Academic Administration 

Vinita Sauder Vice President, Marketing and Enrollment Services 

Don Van Ornam Dean, School of Business and Management 

Joni Zier Director, Records and Advisement 

Graduate Instructional Faculty 

(Dates in parentheses indicate the beginning year of employment at Southern Adventist University.) 

Desiree Batson — Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., University of 
Tennessee, Knoxville. (1997) 

Krystal Bishop — Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.A., University of South Florida-Tampa; Ed.D., University of 
South Florida, Tampa. (1996) 

Charles D. Burks — Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Evangel College; M.S., University of Nebraska — Omaha; Ph.D., Florida State University. (1998) 

Ron E. M. Clouzet — D.Min., Dean and Professor of Ministry 

B.A., Loma Linda University — La Sierra; M.Div., Andrews University; D.Min., Fuller Theological 
Seminary. Th.D. Candidate, University of South Africa. (1993) 

Myrna Colon — Ph.D., Professor of Education 

BA. and M. A., University of Puerto Rico; Ed.S. and Ph.D., Andrews University. (2001) 

Robert Coombs — Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, D.Min., The 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The University of Tennessee. (2004 ) 

Alberto dos Santos — Ed.D., Dean and Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A., University of South Africa; M.A and Ed.D., Andrews University. (1995) 

Denise Dunzweiler — Ph.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Loma Linda University-La Sierra; M.A., Sonoma State University; Ph.D., Andrews University. 
(1996) 

Holly Gadd— Ph.D., F.N.P., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S.N., Loma Linda University; F.N. P., Midwestern State University, Ph.D., 
Texas Woman's University. (2000) 

H. Robert Gadd — Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Business and Management 

B.S., Southern AdventistUniversity; M. B. A., University ofMaryland at College Park; Ph.D. University 
of Texas at Arlington. (2000) 

David Gerstle — Ph.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S.N. University of Texas, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (1994) 



98 



Norman Gulley — Ph.D., Research Professor of Systematic Theology 

Diploma in Theology, Newbold College; B.A., Southern Adventist University; MA. and M.Div., 
Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. (1978) 

Jan Haluska — Ph.D., Professor of English 

B.S., Pacific Union College, M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
(1981) 

Michael G Hasel — Ph.D., Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Archaeology 

BA. and MA. , Andrews University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Arizona. (1998) 

J. Douglas Jacobs — D.Min., Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div. And D.Min., Andrews University. (2002) 

Barbara James — D.S.N., Dean and Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M. S.N. , University of Texas at Arlington; D.S.N., University 
of Alabama at Birmingham. (1 99 1 ) 

Greg A. King — Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary. 
(2004) 

Jud Lake — DJMin., Th.D., Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div., Andrews University; D.Min., Reformed Theological 
Seminary. Th.D. , University of South Africa. (1997) 

Donn W. Leatherman — Ph.D., Professor of Old Testament Studies 

B.Th., Canadian Union College; M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., McGill University. (1992) 

Carlos G Martin — Ph.D., Professor of Missions and Evangelism 

B.Div., River Plate College; M.A., Andrews University; M.Div. and Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist 
Seminary. (2001) 

Robert Montague — Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.B.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Iowa. (1999) 

Cliff Olson — Ph.D., Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Colorado State 
University. (1989) 

Edwin Reynolds — Ph.D., Professor of New Testament Studies 

B.A., B.S., and M.A., Pacific Union College; M.A. and Ph.D., Andrews University. (2004) 

Mary Ann Roberts — D.Sc.N., Professor of Nursing 

B.S. and M.S.N., Andrews University; D.Sc.N., Universityof Alabama, Birmingham. (1992) 

Philip G Samaan — D.Min., Professor of Applied Theology and Evangelism 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.Div., Andrews University; M.S.P.H., Loma Linda University; D.Min., 
Andrews University. (1998) 

Mark Smith — J.D., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.S., Union College; J.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (2005) 

Carleton L. Swafford — Ph.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (1992) 

John Wesley Taylor, V — Ph.D., Ed.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A. and B.S., Weimar College; M.A. and Ph.D., Andrews University; Ed.D., University of Virginia. 
(2003) 



99 



Don Van Ornam — Ph.D., C.P.A., Dean and Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., La Sierra College; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate 
University. (1997) 

Neville Webster — D. Commerce, Professor of Business and Management 

B. Comm, M.Comm., and D.Comm, University of South Africa. (2002) 

Penelope Webster — Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A. and M.A., University of South Africa; Ph.D., Andrews University. (2002) 

Jon Wentworth — M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.B.A., University of Tennessee, Nashville. (1996) 

Ruth Williams Morris — Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Oakwood College; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (2000) 

Adjunct Faculty 

Gordon Bietz — D.Min., President, Southern Adventist University 

B.A., Loma Linda University-La Sierra; M.Div. and D.Min, Andrews University; Merrill Fellow at 
Harvard University Divinity School. (1997) 

Jack J. Blanco — Th.D., Adjunct Professor of Theology, Southern Adventist University 

B.A., Union College; M. A and M.Div, Andrews University; M.Th., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., University of South Africa. 

Gerald Colvin — Ed.D., Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Education and Psychology, Southern 
Adventist University 

B.A., Union College; M.Ed, and Ed.D. University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Herbert Coolidge — Ph.D., C.P.A., Adjunct Professor of Business and Management, 
Southern Adventist University 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.B.A. and Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Ganoune Diop — Ph.D., Professor of Religion, Oakwood College 

B.A. and M.A., Saleve University; Diploma, Maitrise en Philologie et Histoire de L'Orient Ancien, 
Institut Catholique De Paris; Ph.D., Andrews University. 

Letitia Erdmann — Ed.D., Consultant 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University; M.E.D., Vanderbilt University; Ed.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

David Gerstle — Ph.D., Professor of Nursing, Southern Adventist University 

B.S., Union College; M.S.N., University of Texas, Artlington; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 
Knoxville. 

Josef Ghosn — Ed.D., Professor of Business, Florida Hospital 

B. A., Middle East College; M.B.A., Andrews University; Ed. D., University of Massachusetts — Lowell. 

Leona Gulley — Ed.D., Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Southern Adventist University 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.A., Far East Theological Seminary; M.H.S., Philippine Union 
College; M.S., Andrews University; Ed.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Derek Morris — D.Min., Pastor, Forest Lake Seventh-day Adventist Church 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.Div. and D. Min., Andrews University; D. Min., Gordon-Conwell 
Theological Seminary. 

Ralph Trecartin — Ph.D., Assistant Professor, State University of New York 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.B.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 



100 



Greg Willett — J.D., Attorney 

B.B.A., Southern Adventist University; J.D., Washington and Lee University. 

Ben Wygal — Ph.D., Assistant to the President, Southern Adventist University 

B.A., Texas Tech University, Lubbock; MA. and Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin.