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Full text of "Graduate Catalog / the University of Maryland, College Park"

The Graduate Catalog 

University of Maryland Fall 201 1 - Spring 201 2 



Charles Caramello, Dean of the Graduate School 
Joe Williams, General Editor 



Table of Contents 

Chapter 1: The Graduate School and The Graduate Council 8 

Functions of the Graduate School and Graduate Council 8 

Chapter 2: Introduction 10 

Introduction to the University of Maryland 10 

Campus Libraries 10 

Accreditation 13 

Non-Discrimination Statement 13 

Disclaimer 13 

Chapter 3: Admissions 14 

Admission to Graduate School 14 

Criteria for Admission 14 

The Admission Process 15 

Admissions Records and Disposition 15 

Admission to Degree Programs 15 

Full Graduate Student Status 15 

Provisional Graduate Student Status 16 

Offer of Admission 16 

Admission Semester Changes 16 

Non-Degree Admission: Advanced Special Student Status 16 

Non-Degree Admission: Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Status - College of 

Education 17 

Visiting Graduate Student Status 18 

Golden Identification Card for Senior Citizens of Maryland 18 

Change of Status or Program 18 

Admission of Members of the Faculty 18 

Admission to An Institute 19 

Immunization 19 

Residency Classification 19 

Regents' Policy on Residency 19 

Chapter 4: Registration 20 

Registration and Credit Information 20 

Designation of Full-Time and Part-Time Status 20 

Continuous Registration Requirements 21 

Waiver of Registration for Certificate, Master's, and Pre-Candidacy Doctoral Students 21 



Waiver of Registration for Doctoral Candidates 21 

Waiver of Mandatory Fees 21 

Leave of Absence for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care 22 

Academic Calendar 23 

Course and Credit Changes 23 

Withdrawal from Classes 23 

Resignation from the University 24 

Grading Systems 24 

Graduate Credit for Undergraduates 24 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Courses 25 

Partial Credit for Students With Disabilities 25 

Inter-Institutional Registration, University System of Maryland 25 

The Washington Consortium Arrangement 25 

Chapter 5: Financial Policies - Tuition and Fees 27 

Payment of Tuition and Fees 27 

Forms of Financial Aid 27 

Emergency Loans 27 

Refunds 27 

University Refund Statement 27 

Refunds for Withdrawal from All Classes 28 

Refunds for Dropping Individual Courses 28 

Fellowships, Assistantships, and Financial Assistance 28 

Graduate Fellowships 29 

Graduate Assistantships 29 

Overload Payments for Graduate Students 29 

Travel Grants 29 

Chapter 6: Policies for Graduate Assistantships 30 

Introduction 30 

General Policies 30 

Appointments 31 

Duties and Time Commitments 33 

Compensation 35 

Tuition Remission and Benefits 37 

Codes of Conduct 38 

Grievance Procedure 40 

Chapter 7: Financial Policies - Fellowships and Scholarships 45 

3 



Graduate Fellowships and Scholarships 45 

Status 45 

Qualifications 46 

Funding for Fellowships 46 

Offer Letters 46 

Duties 46 

Supplementation of Support 47 

Additional On-Campus and Outside Employment 47 

Additional On-Campus and Outside Employment 47 

Deferral or Duplication of Support 47 

Overload Payments for Graduate Fellows 47 

Stipends 48 

Residency Classification 50 

Tax Status 50 

Health Insurance 50 

Vacation and Sick Leave 51 

Facilities 51 

Chapter 8: Academic Policies - General Policies and The Academic Record 52 

Developing a Program 52 

Academic Integrity 52 

Honor Pledge 52 

Penalties for Violations of Academic Integrity 52 

Academic Record (Transcript) 53 

Grade Point Average Computation 53 

Criteria for Courses to be Accepted for Graduate Credit 53 

Credit by Examination 53 

Incomplete Grades 54 

Transfer of Credit 54 

Satisfactory Progress 55 

Good Standing 55 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 55 

Time Limitations for Master's Degrees and Certificates 55 

Time Limitations for Doctoral Degrees 55 

Time Extensions Master's Degree and Certificate Students 56 

Chapter 9: Academic Policies - Doctoral Students 56 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Doctoral Degrees 58 

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Credit Requirements 58 

Advancement to Candidacy 58 

Research Assurances 58 

The Doctoral Dissertation and Examination 59 

Open Dissertation Examination 60 

Procedures for the Oral Dissertation Examination 60 

Submission and Publication of the Dissertation 62 

Inclusion of One's Own Previously Published Materials in a Dissertation 63 

Inclusion of Copyrighted Materials in a Dissertation 64 

Additional Requirements 64 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 64 

Foreign Language Requirement 64 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 65 

Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees 65 

Chapter 10: Academic Policies - Master's Degrees 66 

Approved Program 66 

Credit Hours 66 

Coursework Level 66 

Prerequisites and Inclusion of Credit 66 

Single Credit Application 66 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science 66 

Thesis Requirement 66 

Research Assurances 66 

The Master's Thesis Examination 67 

Procedures for the Oral Examination: 68 

Submission and Publication of the Thesis 70 

Inclusion of One's Own Previously Published Materials in a Thesis or Dissertation 71 

Inclusion of Copyrighted Materials in a Thesis or Dissertation 71 

Non-Thesis Option 72 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 72 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Engineering 72 

Requirements Applicable to Other Master's Degrees 73 

Professional Master's Degrees 73 

Chapter 11: Academic Policies - Certificate Programs 74 

Chapter 12: Academic Policies for Combined Bachelor's-Master's Programs 75 

Individual Student Bachelor's/Master's Program 75 

5 



Structured Bachelor's/Master's Program 75 

Chaper 13: Academic Policies - Dual Graduate Degree Programs 77 

Existing Dual Degree Programs 77 

Chapter 14: Academic Policies - Field Committees 78 

Requirements for Formal Recognition 78 

Requirements for Offering Courses and Advising Students: 78 

Available Resources for Field Committees 79 

Chapter 15: The Graduate Faculty 80 

Minimum Qualification 80 

Membership - Graduate Faculty Categories 80 

Appointment procedures 80 

Full Members 80 

Adjunct Members 80 

Special Members 81 

Exceptional Appointments 81 

Faculty of Multi-Campus Graduate Degree Programs 81 

Prerogatives of Membership by Category 82 

Full Members 82 

Adjunct Members 82 

Special Members 82 

Membership of Former University of Maryland Faculty 82 

Exceptions to Policy 82 

Chapter 16: Other Graduate School Policies 83 

Waiver of a Regulation 83 

Application for Graduation 83 

Arbitrary and Capricious Grading Policies 83 

Policy and Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading in 

Courses 83 

Policy and Procedures for Appeals of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading 

of Doctoral Qualifying Examinations 84 

Chapter 17: Graduate School Services 

Ombudsperson for Graduate Students 90 

Graduate Legal Aid Office 90 

English Editing for International Graduate Students 90 

Health Insurance 91 

Promise 91 

6 



Chapter 18: Other University Services 92 

Chapter 19: University Publications 93 

Chapter 20: Academic Resources in the College Park, MD Area 94 

Appendices 101 

Chapter 21: Graduate Programs 107 

Chapter 22: Graduate Courses 292 

Chapter 23: Graduate Courses 531 



Chapter 1: The Graduate School and The Graduate Council 
Functions of the Graduate School and Graduate Council 

The University of Maryland Board of Regents mandates that a Graduate Faculty and a Graduate Council 
provide the organization by which the Graduate Faculty discharges its responsibilities for graduate 
education. The Graduate Council, appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School, includes faculty 
representatives elected by the Graduate Faculty, and graduate students. The Graduate Council recommends to 
the Dean, the Provost and the President policies that affect all aspects of graduate education at the University. 

The Graduate School, under the leadership of its Dean, establishes and oversees procedures to enact these 
policies and serves as an advocate for excellence in all aspects of graduate education. The Graduate School, on 
behalf of its Dean, officially admits all students into graduate degree programs and acts as the conferring body 
for all graduate degrees. 

In conjunction with the Graduate Council, the Graduate School: 

Administers all University policies that affect graduate education. 

Sets academic and admissions standards for graduate programs. 

Reviews applications for admission to the Graduate School for compliance with academic standards. 

Admits graduate students to all programs. 

Administers the processes for graduate students' grievances 

Admits and oversees the academic progress of non-degree seeking students. 

Reviews and approves all new graduate programs. 

Allocates annual fellowship funding to the colleges, sets minimum stipend levels, and monitors the 

application and academic impact of awards. 

Recommends annual minimum stipend levels for fellowships and teaching and research assistantships. 

Sets policy for and awards tuition remission as a component of University fellowship awards, external 

fellowships, and training grants. 

Establishes qualifications for and approves membership in the Graduate Faculty. 

Establishes qualifications necessary for graduate faculty to serve on and to chair thesis and dissertation 

examining committees. 

Sets policy that governs the composition of the thesis and dissertation examining committees and the 

conduct of the examinations. 

By appointment of a Dean's representative, oversees dissertation examinations to assure quality and 

uniformity of standards across academic units. 

Oversees the process of submitting approved dissertations and theses preservation of and access to the 

documents are the responsibilities of the University Library. 

Sets University-wide requirements for awarding graduate degrees. 

Recommends to the President that students who meet established requirements be awarded graduate 

degrees. 

Reviews and approves as appropriate requests for exceptions to University policies on graduate 

matters. 

Ensures that the University maintains official graduate student records are kept in the Office of the 

Registrar. 

Approves and oversees programs created by interdisciplinary Field Committees. 

Approves the programs for the Master's degree and graduate certificate in Professional Studies. 

Prepares and disseminates an annual report on graduate education. 

Administers the General Research Board, the Creative and Performing Arts Awards, the Goldhaber 

Travel Grants, and other programs. 

Assumes leadership in the recruitment and retention of graduate students with special emphasis on 

students from under-represented groups. 

Provides orientation programs, advising, and other support services that contribute to the successful 

matriculation, retention, and graduation of a diverse population of graduate students. 



■ Supports the Graduate Student Government, graduate student groups, and the Office of Graduate 
Student Life. 

The policies and procedures that are found in this document have been approved by the Graduate Council, the 
Dean of the Graduate School, the Provost, and the President. 



Chapter 2: Introduction 

Introduction to the University of Maryland 

Location of Campus and Nearby Academic Resources 

Situated on 1,300 acres in the suburban town of College Park, the University is centrally located in the 
Baltimore-Washington corridor. This unique location, just nine miles from downtown Washington, D.C., and 
approximately 30 miles from both Baltimore and Annapolis, enhances research opportunities for faculty and 
students by providing access to some of the finest libraries and research centers in the country. A map of the 
campus's location in relation to available academic resources is available at 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/prospective students/map of academic resources near college park.html. 

Below is a map showing some of the numerous academic resources in the vicinity of the University of Maryland. The 
Graduate School also has put together maps specifically showing the available resources in Science & Engineering and in 
the Humanities, Education, & Social Sciences, as well as one listing foundations, agencies, museums, and laboratories in the 
District of Columbia. For the Graduate School's most complete listing of academic resources in the Baltimore -Washington 
area, please see the Master List of Academic Resources. If you have an additional resource to add to the list, please send it 
to gradschool @ umd.edu . 



The National institutes of Health ^^^ College Par* \ nasa Goddard Space Flight Center 




to U.S. Army AbsroJsM Test Dotal 

ftthaf U.S. Aurfiy RjSourcss 



la Johne Hapkina UnrivBraty 
■Johns Hapkra Applied Physics Lab 



National Security Agency 
Ft. Meade 



B*IMvillt 

USDA Beliss/ille Research Center 



lAtoif Trap Farm Park 

Federal Theatre Project Archive's 

1-95 South fa Virginia 



U£ RLHhto Ampuls 

1 io U.S. Naval Academy {Annapolis) 

LC-ltn- tor tt.. K.frwminrj Jrh^ ClftBf U.S. NaW RSBCIUBM 

mill Gal erf 
kespesre Theatre 
aliens) Theatre 
afjporan Gallery 



Baltimore- Washington Area Universities 



Campus Libraries 

The University houses seven separate libraries. Together they contain 3 million books, 5,000 journal titles, and 
2.3 million microforms. The University's main library is the Theodore R. McKeldin Library. Its collection of 
books, reference materials, newspapers, journals, and electronic resources is especially strong in the life 



10 



sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Among its 1.2 million volumes is one of the best collections of 
Judaica in the region. 

In addition to the general collection, the University of Maryland is home to several archives: the Gordon W. 
Prange Collection is one of the world's largest repositories of published and unpublished Japanese-language 
materials from the period of the Allied Occupation. It contains Japanese newspapers, monographs, periodicals, 
pamphlets and newsletters, textbooks, maps, news photographs, and political posters produced primarily 
between 1945 and 1949, a time of Allied civil censorship controls. The collection is especially rich in fiction 
and poetry, including reprints and first editions. These rare manuscript materials have attracted scholars from 
around the world and have been utilized frequently in recent Japanese and Western scholarship on post-World 
War II Japan. They are complementary to the American government documents that are housed in National 
Archives II, immediately adjacent to the College Park campus. 

The East Asia Collection, available since the mid-1960s, includes Japanese, Korean, and Chinese language 
monographs, periodicals, and newspapers. It currently contains about 74,000 catalogued items, and is 
particularly strong in scholarly works in the humanities, in the behavioral and social sciences and in reference 
and serial publications. With the exception of the Japanese Division of the Library of Congress, this is the 
largest East Asian language collection to be found in any academic institution in the tri-state region of 
Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. 

The University' collection of Government Documents and Maps is the Regional Federal Depository Library 

for Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia. This collection includes more than one million 

government publications from 1789 to the present, spanning virtually all subjects from arts to 

zoology. Congressional documents and laws, census data, and consumer guides are among the most popular 

items. The map collection contains nearly one-half million topographic and thematic maps from federal 

agencies as well as some produced by foreign governments, including a collection of World War II 

maps. Accompanying the paper maps are GIS workstations with gigabytes of map files and geo -referenced 

statistical data. 

The UM Libraries system includes six branch libraries in addition to McKeldin: 

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Library (EPSL) contains materials in physics, engineering, 
mathematics, and geology with other significant collections in computer science, environmental sciences, water 
resources, and aerospace science. EPSL is also a U.S. patent and trademark depository library, and its large 
Technical Reports Center contains collections from NASA, ERDA, Rand Corporation, and other agencies and 
organizations. 

The Charles E. White Memorial Library (Chemistry) is a collection of 80,000 volumes covering chemistry, 
biochemistry, cell biology, enzymology, immunology, microbiology, and molecular genetics. Materials include 
books, periodicals, major indexes, and comprehensive spectra collections. 

The Architecture Library contains materials on architectural design, theory and history, urban design, 
landscape architecture, and building technology. This library's special collections include rare architecture 
books dating as far back as the 17th century, with materials on world expositions from 1851 to 1937. 

The Art Library collects materials in art history, studio art, art education, photography, graphic arts, interior 
design, and textiles. Special collections include art reproductions and art exhibition catalogs. 

Opened in 2000 as part of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the Michelle Smith Performing Arts 

Library is the central location on the College Park campus for music, theatre, and dance materials. Included in 
the Performing Arts Library is the International Piano Archives at Maryland (IP AM), which houses one of the 
world's most extensive concentrations of piano recordings, books, scores, and related materials, including the 
personal papers of many great classical pianists. Special Collections in Performing Arts houses research 
collections maintained through joint agreements with national and international performing arts organizations, 
as well as collections donated by individuals, such as the Charles Fowler Papers and the Howe Collection of 
Musical Instrument Literature. 

11 



Hornbake Library is home to the bulk of the University's special collections. 

The Maryland Collection represents a variety of materials, including more than 60,000 books and periodicals 
about Maryland, current and historical. A fine collection of rare Maryland items includes scarce copies of the 
almanac published by Benjamin Banneker, early American imprints, and strong holdings in literature by and 
about Marylanders. The Baltimore News American Photograph Archive of over 1.5 million images dating 
from 1920 to 1986 is part of the Maryland Collection, which also features broad holdings in Maryland 
newspapers both on microfilm and in original form. 

The Rare Books Collection in Hornbake contains books and pamphlets from the 15th to 20th 
centuries. Approximately 17,000 volumes represent all areas of the humanities and sciences, with strong 
holdings in natural history, especially in botany and agriculture. Other notable rare book collections include 
French political pamphlets published during the civil war of 1649-1652 and the French Revolution, pamphlets 
documenting slavery and African-American life in America, and works by and about William Morris. 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation Library Collection in Hornbake Library includes 13,000 
volumes covering preservation topics from the technical to the aesthetic and more than 300 periodical titles on 
international, national, state, and local historic preservation issues. 

The Archives and Manuscripts Department is also located in Hornbake Library. Historical Manuscripts 
collections include holdings pertaining to the Maryland region, labor union history, women's history, and 
University of Maryland faculty and administrators. Highlights of the historical manuscripts collection include 
the papers of political leaders from Maryland, such as U. S. Senator Milliard E. Tydings, Governor Theodore R. 
McKeldin, State Treasurer Lucille Maurer, and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew. Significant holdings 
documenting women's history include the papers of the League of Women Voters of Maryland, the Association 
for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, and the Association for Childhood Education International. The details 
of day-to-day life throughout Maryland history are recorded in the personal and family papers collections, 
which include diaries, correspondence, and photographs. The literary manuscript collections center on the 
papers of two prominent twentieth-century women writers: Katherine Anne Porter and Djuna Barnes. The 
Katherine Anne Porter Room is a permanent installation in Hornbake Library that houses Porter's library, art, 
and artifacts. On display are photographs, furnishings, decorative arts, and books that belonged to Porter. The 
University Archives is the repository for a broad range of materials, including official office records, printed 
publications, photographs, and memorabilia, documenting the history and present activities of the University of 
Maryland. The University Archives' photograph collection features campus views and scenes, individual and 
group portraits, and University of Maryland events. 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1990, the National Public Broadcasting Archives serves as the 
official archival repository for the primary national agencies of noncommercial broadcasting in the United 
States. Organizations represented include the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Public Broadcasting 
Service, National Public Radio, and the Children's Television Workshop. The Library of American 
Broadcasting holds a wide-ranging collection of materials devoted exclusively to the history of radio and 
television broadcasting in the United States. Representative collections include material from the papers of 
broadcasting giant Arthur Godfrey and the papers of Edythe Meserand, radio executive and first woman 
president of the American Women in Radio and Television. 

Nonprint Media Services is the central audiovisual department for the University of Maryland Libraries. In 
addition to American movies and documentaries, its holdings include the complete BBC Shakespeare Plays, the 
JVC/Smithsonian Video Anthology of World Music and Dance, and the Library of African Cinema. 

Research is supported in the UM Libraries with a variety of technological tools. The online catalog identifies 
library materials from the collections of libraries on all campuses in the University of Maryland System. Access 
to this information is available through public terminals located throughout the library systems and can be 
accessed through internet connections in homes, offices, and libraries around the country. Research Port allows 
students, faculty, and others connected with the University of Maryland to access databases and e-journals from 

12 



on and off campus. Patrons can search for journal articles and books in databases, e-journals, and library 
catalogs; access databases and e-journals from on and off campus; search an individual database OR several 
databases simultaneously; search databases and the UM Libraries' catalog simultaneously; and find full -text 
articles. They can save lists of databases, e-journals, searches, and articles in My Research Port, as well as e- 
mail and save citations. 

The Digital Repository at the University of Maryland (DRUM) provides digital repository services for the 
University. Currently three types of materials are being collected: faculty deposited documents, a Library 
managed collection of UM doctoral dissertations and master's theses, and a collection of technical 
reports. DRUM provides a distribution service by making files available via the Internet. As a repository, 
DRUM maintains files for the long term. Unlike the web, where pages come and go and addresses to resources 
can change overnight, DRUM items have a permanent URL. 

Borrowing library materials is aided by several services in addition to basic circulation assistance. Direct 
borrowing privileges at the other University of Maryland System libraries are available for registered 
UMCP graduate students. Through Inter-Library Loan, one can obtain loans or photocopies of materials from 
other libraries that are not available at the University. All of the University libraries are equipped with study 
carrels and group study areas, wireless internet access, and computer terminals. 

Accreditation 

The University of Maryland is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
and is a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. Individual graduate programs may be 
accredited by their appropriate agencies. Students should check with their graduate program of interest for 
particular accreditations. 

Non-Discrimination Statement 

The University of Maryland is committed to the elimination of discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, 
sex, sexual orientation, marital status, personal appearance, age, national origin, political affiliation, physical or 
mental disability, or on the basis of the exercise of rights secured by the First Amendment of the United States 
Constitution. The Human Relations Code is established to prevent or eradicate such discrimination in 
accordance with due process within the University community. In doing so, the University recognizes that it 
must strive actively and creatively to build a community in which opportunity is equalized. 

Every effort will be made to make students and potential students, employees and potential employees, faculty 
members and potential faculty members aware of the opportunities that the University provides for every 
individual to develop and utilize his or her talents and skills. It is the intent of the University to observe and 
promote respect for each member of the community's own race, ethnic background, sex, or sexual orientation. 
The Human Relations Code is accessible in its entirety at http://www.ohrp.umd.edu/compliance/hrc/intro.html . 

Under advice of the Maryland Attorney General's Office, the University may interpret the Code to include both 
gender identity and gender expression. 

Disclaimer 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time to time in the general regulations and in the academic 
requirements. There are established procedures for making changes that protect the institution's integrity and the 
individual student's interest and welfare. A curriculum or graduation requirement, when altered, is not normally 
made retroactive unless the alterations are to the student's advantage and can be accommodated within the span 
of years normally required for graduation. When a competent authority judges the actions of a student, using 
established procedures, to be detrimental to the interests of the University community, that person may be 
required to withdraw from the university. 

13 



Chapter 3: Admissions 

Admission to Graduate School 

Responsibility for admitting applicants to graduate programs rests with the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Academic department and program offices review admissions applications and credentials and make admissions 
recommendations to the Graduate Dean. In cases where credentials were earned abroad, the staff of the 
International Education Services Office is consulted. The standards maintained by the Graduate School and 
individual departments and programs are applied to ensure that applicants admitted to the University are well 
qualified and trained to study at this institution and have a reasonable expectation of successfully completing a 
graduate program. Standards for admission to doctoral degree programs are frequently higher than those for 
admission to master's degree programs. In many degree programs, the number of applications received from 
individuals qualified for graduate study regularly exceeds the number of applicants who can be accommodated. 
In such cases, only the most highly qualified are offered admission. The number of spaces available in various 
departments is limited according to the availability of faculty, special resources, and funds for students 
requiring financial assistance. 

Criteria for Admission 

Those applicants who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited college or 
university in the United States (or the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree in another country) are eligible to be 
considered for admission to the Graduate School at the University of Maryland. With the exception of 
established dual -degree programs, an applicant can matriculate in only one graduate program at a time. 

Admission to graduate programs is highly competitive, and space is limited. The decision to admit an applicant 
to a program is based primarily on a combination of the following criteria, evaluated from a complete 
application: 

■ Quality of previous undergraduate and graduate work. The Graduate School requires as a 
minimum standard a B average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale in all undergraduate courses taken at a regionally 
accredited college or university). Adequate performance in prerequisite courses is required. Applicants 
with international credentials must submit in the original language those academic records that are not 
written in English. Such credentials must be accompanied by a literal English translation. Both must be 
submitted at least six months prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which the applicant 
seeks admission. 

■ Strength of letters of recommendation from persons competent to judge the applicant's probable 
success in graduate school. These letters are usually from the applicant's former professors who are 
able to give an in-depth evaluation of the applicant's strengths and weaknesses with respect to 
academic work. Additional recommendations may come from employers or supervisors who are 
familiar with the applicant's work experience. 

■ Scores on a nationally standardized examination. The three most widely used standardized 
examinations are the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Graduate Management Admissions 
Test (GMAT) and the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Because the predictive utility of these test scores 
may vary from one group of applicants to another, a discriminating use of all relevant materials will be 
made in each applicant's case. The TOEFL is required of international applicants who are not native 
speakers of English. 

■ Applicant's statement of his or her academic career objectives and their relation to the intended 
program of study. These statements help the program to identify students whose goals are consonant 
with the program's objectives and expertise. 

■ Other evidence of potential success in graduate studies. Some programs require other evidence of 
potential for success in graduate study, such as a portfolio of creative work, completion of specialized 
examinations, personal interviews, or an example of scholarly work. 

■ Availability of an advisor in the applicant's specific field, available space in the program, and 
competitive rating within the applicant pool for the given term of entry. 

14 



Prospective students may apply for admission to the University of Maryland during or after their final year of 
undergraduate study but must furnish proof of graduation before the end of their first semester of enrollment at 
the University. Students applying for admission to a graduate degree program in a field of specialization in 
which they already hold that same degree or its equivalent may do so only if the previous degree program was 
of substantially different character or was not accredited. Summer-only students applying for entrance in either 
of the two summer sessions should check the Summer Sessions Bulletin to determine if the courses they wish to 
take will be offered. To obtain this publication, write to the Office of Continuing Education, Summer and 
Special Programs, 2103 Reckord Armory, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 - 5321. This 
information may also be accessed online at http://www.summer.umd.edu. 

The Admission Process 

To be considered for admission to the Graduate School, each applicant must follow the Graduate School 

application procedures, currently available 

at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/welcome/before_you_apply.html. The process requires the following: 

Completion of the University of Maryland Graduate Application (online); 

Payment of the non-refundable application fee; 

Submission of all relevant transcripts and supplementary application materials; 

Providing appropriate visa and financial documentation (for international applicants only); 

Fulfillment of all graduate program admissions requirements; 

Adherence to published application deadlines. 

Should the application and fee arrive after the stated deadline; the application will automatically be considered 
for the next admissible semester. 

Admissions Records and Disposition 

All records, including both standardized test scores and academic records from other institutions, become part 
of the official file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any purpose. Students should retain an 
additional copy of their official credentials to keep in their possession for advisory purposes and for other 
personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application data of applicants are retained from the date of receipt for 12 
months only and then destroyed in the following cases: 1) Applicants who do not register for courses at the time 
for which they have been admitted; 2) Applicants whose applications have been disapproved; 3) Applicants 
who do not respond to graduate program requests for additional information; and 4) Applicants whose 
applications are not complete with respect to the inclusion of all transcripts or test results. 

Admission to Degree Programs 

Graduate students are admitted to a particular program for a specific degree objective (M.A., Ph.D., Ed.D, etc.). 
With the exception of established dual degree programs, joint-degree programs, and certificate programs, 
graduate students are permitted to matriculate into only one graduate degree program at a time. Graduate 
students are admitted to either full or provisional status as outlined below: 

Full Graduate Student Status 

Students may be admitted to full graduate status if they have submitted official documents indicating a 
completed baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution or have earned a degree equivalent to a 
baccalaureate degree from another country, and are fully qualified in the judgment of the individual program 
and the Graduate School. 



15 



Provisional Graduate Student Status 

Students may be admitted to provisional status if: 

■ The previous academic record is not outstanding; or 

■ The prerequisite course work in the chosen field is insufficient; or 

■ The applicant has majored in another field with a creditable record but has not yet clearly demonstrated 
abilities in the proposed new field; or 

■ The applicant has not provided official verification of information required by the graduate program or 
the Graduate School, such as the last semester's work or receipt of a degree. 

Official transcripts indicating receipt of the degree must be submitted before the end of the first semester. 
Registration for a second semester will not be permitted unless these documents are received by the Graduate 
School. 

Offer of Admission 

All completed applications will be reviewed by the Graduate School, the graduate program to which the 
applicant applied, and, if necessary, the Office of International Education Services. Applicants may receive 
correspondence from each of these offices requesting clarification or additional information or documents. 
Responses should be directed to the inquiring office directly. 

Formal admission to The University of Maryland is offered only by the Graduate School. Applicants admitted 
to the Graduate School will receive a written offer of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. To 
accept or decline the offer, applicants must notify the Graduate School by the first day of classes of the semester 
for which the applicant was accepted or the offer becomes void. Immediately following written acceptance, 
applicants should contact the graduate program for registration information. Applicants are allowed a one-time 
only deferral of the admission of up to one year, subject to approval by the graduate program. Applicants who 
are unsuccessful in gaining admission to a graduate program are also notified in writing by the Graduate School. 

Admission Semester Changes 

The Offer of Admission is extended to the applicant only for a specified semester. If an admitted student or a 
Graduate Program wishes to change the semester of entry, they must petition the Graduate School in writing. 
The Graduate School will allow one (1) semester change requested by the program, and one (1) requested by 
the admitted student, contingent upon the approval of the program's Director of Graduate Studies. Any further 
changes will require a new application to the Graduate School. 

Non-Degree Admission: Advanced Special Student Status 

Although the primary mission of the Graduate School is to conduct programs of graduate instruction leading to 
advanced degrees, the Graduate Faculty will admit qualified students without degree objectives as advanced 
special students, to the extent that resources allow. Unofficial transcripts or photocopies of diplomas will be 
accepted with the application for evaluation purposes, but the student must submit official copies of all required 
documents before the end of the first semester of enrollment. Official transcripts must be submitted from all 
institutions except the University of Maryland, College Park. 

The Advanced Special Student status is not available to students in F-l or J-l status. These students should 
consult with the Office of International Education Services at (301) 314-7740 if they have questions about 
exceptions in this category. 

Applicants for admission to Advanced Special Student status must hold a baccalaureate degree from a 
regionally accredited institution, with a cumulative 3.0 grade point average, and: 

16 



■ Submit official transcripts covering all credits used in satisfying the baccalaureate degree 
requirements, or 

■ If the applicant holds a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited institution, submit an 
official transcript showing the award of a master's or doctoral degree, or 

■ Achieve a score that places the applicant in the upper 50th percentile of appropriate national 
standardized aptitude examinations, including the Graduate Record Examination, the Miller Analogies 
Test, and the Graduate Management Admissions Test, (where different percentiles are possible, the 
Graduate School will determine which score is acceptable), or 

■ Provide a strong letter of support from the Graduate Director of the program in which the applicant 
plans to take a course. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status will continue for five years. If there is no registration in two 
consecutive academic semesters (Fall and Spring), the admitted status will lapse and a new application will be 
required. 

Advanced Special Students must maintain a 2.75 grade point average. Advanced Special Students whose grade 
point average falls below 2.75 will not be permitted to register. 

Advanced Special Students must pay all standard graduate fees. Students in this status are not eligible to hold 
appointments as Graduate Teaching or Research Assistants or Fellows, or to receive other forms of financial 
aid. All other services available to them (e.g., parking, library privileges) are the same as those accorded to 
other graduate students. 

Successful completion of courses taken as an Advanced Special Student does not guarantee admission to a 
graduate degree or certificate program. Each program may accept such courses in satisfaction of program 
requirements to a maximum of twelve (12) credits, contingent on admission to the degree or certificate program 
and on the approval of the faculty in the program. For consideration of admission to a degree program at a later 
time, the student must submit a new application. 

Non-Degree Admission: Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Status - College of Education 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Program is designed to promote a high level of professional 
competence in an area of specialization in the field of education. The candidate must be able to demonstrate that 
he or she can operate as an effective counselor, administrator, teacher, or skilled person in a major field of 
professional endeavor. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate is offered through most of the programs in 
the College of Education. This Certificate is awarded only by the College of Education. Requirements are as 
follows: 

■ The same general criteria for admission to degree programs are applicable to Graduate Specialist 
Certificate applicants. Additionally, the applicant must have completed a master's degree or the 
equivalent in credits earned either at the University of Maryland or at another regionally accredited 
institution. Entrance exams are required at the time of application and vary for each department. 
Examinations that may be required are the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller 
Analogies Test. 

■ Course work totaling not more than 30 credits with grades of at least a "B" from an accredited 
institution may be transferred to the program at the University. 

■ The program must be developed in cooperation with an advisor and filed with the Graduate Studies 
Office in the College of Education. 

■ The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of 
credit with no fewer than 30 semester hours of credit completed at the University of Maryland. At least 
one half of the credits earned either at other institutions or at the University of Maryland must be in 
courses comparable to those in the 600-800 series. The student may be required to take a substantial 
portion of the program in departments other than those in the College of Education. Registration in 
certain kinds of field study, field experience, apprenticeship, or internship may also be required. 

17 



■ The Certificate requires completion of 60 hours of graduate credit with a 3.0 grade point average and 
no grades of "D" or "F". There will be a written examination of not less than six hours. For additional 
details see "A Guide for Student Advisors," issued by the College of Education Graduate Studies 
Office, Room 1204, Benjamin Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-1121 or 
visit the website at http://www.education.umd.edu/studentinfo/graduate info/gradhandbook.html/. 

Visiting Graduate Student Status 

A graduate student matriculated in another graduate school who wishes to enroll in the Graduate School of the 
University of Maryland and who intends to return to the graduate school in which he or she is matriculated, may 
be admitted as a Visiting Graduate Student. 

To apply, the applicant must submit a completed application 

( http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/welcome/apply now. html ) and pay the current application fee. Transcripts, 
letters of recommendation, and test scores are not required. In lieu of transcripts, the applicant must submit a 
letter from the Graduate Dean at the applicant's institution confirming that the applicant is in good academic 
standing and that courses taken at the University of Maryland will be transferred to the home institution. 

Golden Identification Card for Senior Citizens of Maryland 

The University's services and courses are available without charge to citizens who are residents of the State of 
Maryland, 60 years of age or older, and retired (retired persons will be considered those who affirm that they 
are not engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours per week). Individuals who meet these 
requirements may apply for graduate admission, either as degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking students, and 
must meet all admissions criteria. Once admitted and issued the Golden Identification Card, senior citizens may 
register for courses in any session on a space-available basis, and may use the library and other University 
facilities during the time they are enrolled in courses. Tuition will be waived for Golden Identification Card 
holders, but mandatory fees must be paid. Golden ID card holders may register during the first week of classes 
for up to 3 courses; they may not pre-register. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for more information on 
the Golden ID registration procedures. 

Change of Status or Program 

Students are admitted with a particular status to a specified program for a specified objective. A new application 
is required if: 

■ The student wishes to change programs (students may be admitted to only one graduate program at any 
one time); or 

■ The student wishes to change status (from non-degree to degree); or 

■ The student wishes to pursue a new degree objective (e.g., change from master's to doctoral degree). 

■ Admission to a new program and/or status is not granted automatically. Each application is subject to 
review and approval. 

Admission of Members of the Faculty 

No member of the faculty who is employed by the University of Maryland with the position of assistant 
professor or higher is permitted to enroll in a program leading to an advanced degree in his or her academic 
college or school. A faculty member who wishes to take course work for personal enrichment in his or her 
academic college or school may choose to investigate the Advanced Special Student status. A faculty member 
who wishes to pursue an advanced degree in a graduate program outside his or her academic college or school 
may do so by obtaining written consent from the Deans of both the academic college/school in which he or she 
is employed and that from which he or she seeks a degree, and, subsequently, from the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



18 



Admission to An Institute 

Application for admission to an institute should be made directly to the director of the institute. If admission to 
the Graduate School is also necessary, the decision will be based on the same criteria for admitting other degree 
applicants. Admission to an institute does not imply that the individual will be automatically admitted in any 
other status at the University of Maryland at a later date. The status terminates upon completion of the institute 
in which the student is enrolled. A new application and fee must be submitted for admission to any other 
graduate status or program. 

Students already admitted to a regular graduate degree or non- degree status may also qualify for participation 
in an institute. 

Immunization 

The University of Maryland requires all freshmen, new graduate students, and transfer students to provide 
documentation of measles, mumps, rubella, and tetanus / diphtheria immunizations. It is a student's 
responsibility to provide this information to the Health Center before school begins. This requirement will not 
be waived. 

Residency Classification 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission and tuition charges will be made by the University at 
the time a student's application for admission is under consideration. The determination made at that time and 
any determination made thereafter will prevail in each semester unless the determination is successfully 
challenged in a timely manner. Please be advised that all students who are originally classified as nonresident 
students when they begin their studies at the University retain that classification unless they file a petition for 
resident status with the University's Residency Classification Office. The deadline for meeting all requirements 
for resident status and for submitting all documents for reclassification is the last day of late registration for the 
semester for which the student wishes to be classified as a resident student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in completing the review process. It is hoped 
that a decision in each case will be made within ninety (90) days of a request for determination. During this 
period of time, or any further period of time required by the University, fees and charges based on the previous 
determination must be paid. If the determination is changed, excess charges will be refunded. 

All Graduate Assistants and Graduate Fellows are responsible for the status of their own residency 
classification. Classification does not officially change when the student begins his or her appointment. 
Assistants and Fellows should be familiar with the policies regarding tuition remission and residency 
classification. The fact that Fellows and Teaching Assistants are billed at the In-State rate does not change their 
residency status. 

Regents' Policy on Residency 

The University of Maryland Board of Regents have developed a policy and procedure that define a Maryland 
Resident for tuition and charge-differential purposes. This information, and all relevant procedures, is 
maintained on the Residency Classification Office's website: http://www.testudo.umd.edu/rco/policv.html . 



19 



Chapter 4: Registration 

Registration and Credit Information 

Information concerning registration procedures, deadlines, late fees, and current tuition and expenses is found in 
the Schedule of Classes, published regularly by the Office of the Registrar. Students interested in summer 
session courses should obtain the Summer Guide and address any questions to the Office of Student Services 
( summer@umd.edu ; 301-314-8240) Registration information for all academic sessions is also available on the 
University's web page ( http://www.umd.edu ). 

Designation of Full-Time and Part-Time Status 

The Graduate School uses a unit system in making calculations to determine full-time or part-time student 
status. Please note that graduate units are different from credit hours. The number of graduate units per credit 
hour is calculated in the following manner: 



Courses in the series: 000-399 carry 2 units per credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 units per credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 500-599 carry 5 units per credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 600-897 carry 6 units per credit hour. 

Master's Research course: 799 carry 12 units per credit hour. 

Pre-candidacy Doctoral Research courses: 898 carry 18 units per credit hour. 

Doctoral Dissertation Research: 899 carry 18 units per credit hour. All doctoral candidates must pay 

candidacy tuition for which they will be registered for six (6) credit hours of 899; this defines all 

currently registered doctoral candidates as full-time. 



All doctoral candidates must pay the flat candidacy tuition for which they will be registered for six (6) credit 
hours of 899; this defines all currently registered doctoral candidates as full-time. 

To be certified as full time, a graduate student must be officially registered for a combination of courses 
equivalent to 48 units per semester. Graduate assistants holding regular appointments have full-time status if 
they are registered for at least 24 units in addition to the assistantship; holders of half-time assistantships are 
considered full-time if registered for 36 units. Audited courses do not generate graduate units and cannot be 
used in calculating full-time or part-time status. 

Course Numbering System 

Courses are designated as follows: 



000-099 


Non-credit courses. 


100-199 


Primarily first-year courses (not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees). 


200-299 


Primarily sophomore courses (not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees). 


300-399 


Junior and senior courses (not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees). 


400-499 


Junior and senior courses acceptable for credit toward some graduate degrees. The number of such 
credits is limited by policies of the Graduate School and by the graduate program. 


500-599 


Professional school courses (Dentistry, Law, Medicine) and post-baccalaureate courses not for 
graduate degree credit. 


600-898 


Courses restricted to graduate students (see above for exceptions). 


799 


Master's thesis credit. 


899 


Doctoral dissertation credit. 



20 



The first character of the numeric position of the course number determines the level of the course and the last 
two digits are used for course identification. Courses ending with the numeral 8 or 9 are the only courses that 
are repeatable for credit. 



Continuous Registration Requirements 

All graduate students must register for courses and pay associated tuition and fees each semester, not including 
summer and winter sessions, until the degree is awarded. 

A student who fails to register and who has not requested and received a waiver of registration or "Leave of 
Absence for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care" will be notified by the Graduate School after 
the first day of classes that he or she must register for the current semester. The Graduate School will also 
inform the Graduate Director of the graduate program that the student is in jeopardy of termination. If the 
student does not register, he or she will be dismissed from the Graduate School at the end of the semester for 
failure to comply with the continuous registration requirement. 

A student who is dismissed for non-registration may appeal dismissal during a 30-day period following the end 
of the semester of non-registration. If the student does not appeal, or if the appeal is denied, and the student 
wishes to continue in the Graduate School, the student must apply for readmission. In this case, readmission 
does not alter the initial requirements for time to complete the degree or advance to candidacy. 

Waiver of Registration for Certificate, Master's, and Pre -Candidacy Doctoral Students 

Certificate, Master's, and pre-candidacy Doctoral students who will be away from the University for a semester 
or a year may request a waiver of continuous registration and its associated tuition for the semester or year. 
Waivers of registration will be granted only if the student is making satisfactory progress toward the degree and 
can complete the degree requirements within the required time limits. Interruption of registration cannot be used 
to justify a time extension. 

Permission for non-registration is obtained from the Graduate Director of the student's program and the waiver 
must be filed with the Graduate School. Students who are not registered may not use any University facilities, 
including the library, and should expect to consult with members of the Graduate Faculty seldom or not at all. 

A request for a waiver of registration should be filed 30 days before the beginning of the semester or year for 
which the waiver is sought. Tuition waiver requests will be granted only when the student affirms in writing 
that he or she will not be using any University resources, including the time of faculty members, during the 
waiver period. 

Waiver of Registration for Doctoral Candidates 

Doctoral Candidates are not eligible for Waivers of Continuous Registration. Each doctoral Candidate must 
maintain continuous registration in 899 (Doctoral Dissertation Research) until the degree is awarded. Waivers 
of Registration may be granted only under the University's policy for Leave of Absence for Graduate Students 
for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care (see below). 

Waiver of Mandatory Fees 

A waiver of Mandatory Fees may be granted to any graduate student, including Doctoral Candidates, if the 
student will be away from the University for a semester or a year. An application for waiver of Mandatory Fees 



21 



must be submitted to the Graduate School 30 days before the beginning of the semester for which the waiver is 
sought. The waiver may be granted for a semester or a year. 

Leave of Absence for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care 

In recognition of the effects that childbirth, adoption, illness, and caring for incapacitated dependents (such as 
children, ill or injured partners, or aging parents) may have on the time and energy that graduate students have 
to devote to their educational programs, the University allows students in such circumstances to apply for a 
leave of absence of up to two semesters during which time they do not intend to make academic progress 
toward the completion of their degree. The time taken on an approved leave of absence is not included in the 
time limitations for degree completion and advancement to candidacy. 

Length of Leaves 

Application for a leave of absence may be made on a one- or two-semester basis. A leave of absence ordinarily 
will not be granted for more than one academic year. Leaves requested for a longer period are approved only in 
exceptional circumstances. An approved leave for one semester will be extended to two semesters as needed, if 
so requested by the applicant prior to the expiration of the approved one- semester leave of absence. 

Application Procedures 

A leave of absence for childbearing, adoption, illness, or dependent care normally must be requested and 
approved prior to the beginning of the academic term for which it is being requested. A letter of request should 
be addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School and should provide a detailed explanation of the circumstances 
leading to the request and a justification of the time requested (one semester or one year). The request must be 
approved by the student's faculty advisor and Graduate Director prior to submission to the Graduate Dean. The 
faculty advisor, Graduate Director, and/or Graduate Dean may request a doctor's statement. Approved leaves 
will stop the student's "time-to-degree clock." 

Special Considerations 

• Registration Requirements. Students on approved leaves of absence are not registered at the University and, 
therefore, do not have the rights and privileges of registered students. Students must be registered during a 
semester in which they fulfill a University or departmental degree requirement, such as taking qualifying exams 
or submitting a dissertation/thesis. In addition, students must also be registered in order to be eligible for any 
form of University financial aid (e.g., a teaching or research assistantship) and to be certified as full-time 
students. 

• Impact on Funding. When contemplating a leave of absence, graduate students are advised to consult with 
the sources of their funding to determine whether a leave might involve a long-term financial loss. Because 
academic programs and financial aid packages may be constructed and sequenced over a period of years, 
individual interruptions to the normal sequence of academic progress and scheduled employment may result in 
a loss of future funding and a slower time to completion of degree. In some programs, a leave of absence may 
mean that students may have to join a new project upon return, with the likelihood that their research may take 
longer to complete. Whenever a leave of absence is being considered, a student should meet with the advisor to 
develop a plan for resumption of study and gain a clear understanding of future funding opportunities. Some 
outside funding agencies frown on interruptions to a degree program. Some only allow leaves for medical 
reasons or military service. Others require prior approval of the fellowship agency. 

• Students with outstanding educational loans need to consider the effect of taking a leave of absence on their 
loan status. For some student loans, a grace period for repaying the loan begins once the student stops 
registering. If the leave period is longer than the grace period, then the student may have to begin repaying the 
loan while on a leave of absence. Prior to taking a leave, students should arrange to meet with a Student 
Financial Aid officer, and/or contact their lenders. 

22 



• International students. Non-immigrant F-l and J-l students and their dependents must maintain legal 
immigration status at all times. Students with F-l or J-l visas must be enrolled full-time every semester at the 
University while they remain in the United States. The only possible exception that might allow a student to 
remain in the United States while on an approved leave of absence might be a serious illness or medical 
condition. Students are advised to consult with the staff of the Office of International Educational Services for 
more information when considering a leave of absence. 

• Student Accounts. Students are advised to check with the Bursar's Office prior to taking an approved leave of 
absence in order to determine the status of their student accounts. Students are advised that accounts that are 
overdue will be subject to regular procedures in accordance with University guidelines, notwithstanding any 
approved leave of absence: specifically, late fees and finance charges will continue to accrue, students will be 
blocked from future registration upon their return, and accounts will be referred to the State Central Collection 
Unit, with the imposition of additional collection charges, for non-payment in accordance with regular 
timeframes. 

• University Housing. The University's general policy is that students must be registered to be eligible for 
University housing. For specific information about continued eligibility for University housing during an 
approved leave of absence, students are advised to contact the Department of Resident Life. Additional 
restrictions may apply to students leasing housing through Southern Management Corporation. For specific 
information, students should contact the appropriate rental agent. 

• Access to University Resources. Students who are on a leave of absence do not have a valid University of 
Maryland Identification card and therefore are not entitled to use University resources, such as the libraries, 
recreational centers, shuttle buses, and other services covered by mandatory fees. Students seeking information 
on use of the libraries while on an official leave of absence may find it 

at http://www. lib. umd.edu/PUBSERV/spcmck. html , or they may contact the McKeldin Library Circulation 
Department, Special Borrowers Office, Monday -Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Academic Calendar 

The Academic Calendar is printed in the Schedule of Classes each semester. This Calendar contains key 
deadlines for all graduate students. Graduate students preparing to graduate must consult the Academic 
Calendar during the first week of the semester in which they plan to graduate. 

Course and Credit Changes 

A graduate student may drop a course, add a course, change between audit and credit status, change the number 
of credits for a course within the listed range, cancel registration, or withdraw from the University without 
special approval until the tenth class day each semester. No credit level changes or grading option changes are 
permitted after the tenth week of classes. The deadlines are published each semester in the Schedule of Classes; 
the procedures governing each of these transactions are listed below. Drop/ Add and other changes may be done 
in person at the Registrar's Office or online at http://www.testudo.umd.edu . Full refunds are not available for 
reductions in total credits after the first day of classes. For more information, please see the Refunds 
section of this Catalog. 

Exceptions to the published deadlines require a petition to the Graduate School which must include the written 
approval of the instructor and the Graduate Director of the program. Petitions should be submitted to the 
Graduate School, 2123 Lee Building. The graduate program stamp must be placed on the change of grading 
option/credit level form. 

Withdrawal from Classes 

The term "withdrawal" means termination of enrollment in all classes for a given semester. The date of the 
withdrawal is indicated on a graduate student's academic record. To withdraw from a semester on or before the 

23 



last day of classes a graduate student must notify the Office of the Registrar, 1113 Mitchell Building, in writing 
or in person. Withdrawal becomes effective on the date notification is received in the Records Office. The 
University Refund Policy applies to withdrawals after the first day of classes. Students who withdraw may be in 
violation of the University's continuous registration requirement, unless they have received a waiver of 
registration from the Graduate School. 

If the time limitation in a master's or pre-candidacy student's program has not lapsed (5 years to obtain a 
master's degree and 5 years to reach doctoral candidacy), the graduate student is eligible to re-enroll without 
readmission provided he or she has received a waiver of registration from the graduate program or has received 
an approved Leave of Absence from the Graduate School; withdrawal by a doctoral candidate without an 
approved Leave of Absence or Waiver of Registration will officially end the student's status as a graduate 
student. 

Resignation from the University 

A graduate student wishing to withdraw from the University and terminate his or her graduate student standing 
may do so by submitting a letter to the Graduate School. The Graduate School will then cancel the student's 
admission status, effective the date the letter is received. If the student is registered for classes at the time of his 
or her resignation, the Graduate School will ask the Office of the Registrar to withdraw the student effective the 
date of the resignation. The University Refund Policy applies for resignation after the first day of classes. A 
graduate student seeking to return to the University of Maryland after resigning must reapply for admission and 
is subject to all graduate program and Graduate School requirements. He or she may be required to repeat 
previously elected courses (see time limits for relevant degree or certificate programs). 

Grading Systems 

The conventional A through F grading system is used in graduate level courses. A "Satisfactory or Failure" (S- 
F) grading system may be used for certain types of graduate study at the discretion of the graduate program. 
These include courses that require independent fieldwork, special projects, or independent study. Graduate 
program seminars, workshops, and graduate program courses in instructional methods may also be appropriate 
for the S-F grading system. The "Pass-Fail" grading system is not available for graduate students. However, a 
graduate program may allow, in certain cases, a graduate student to use the Pass-Fail option for 100-300 level 
courses. Graduate credit may not be earned for these courses. Either the A-F or the S-F grading system may be 
used for master's thesis (799), and pre-candidacy (898) and doctoral dissertation (899) research, as well as for 
courses labeled "Independent Study" or "Special Problems." Only one grading system may be used per course 
in a particular semester except for thesis and dissertation credits. The grading system will be designated by the 
student's graduate program or the graduate program offering the course. 



Graduate Credit for Undergraduates 

An undergraduate degree-seeking student at the University of Maryland may register for graduate-level courses 
(600-897) with the approval of the Dean of his or her academic college, the chair of the department, the 
instructor offering the course, and the Dean of the Graduate School. These courses will be recorded as "for 
graduate credit only" and may ONLY be applied toward an advanced degree at this university or elsewhere. 
Students eligible for this option normally will have achieved Junior standing, will have a GPA of at least 3.0, 
and will have successfully completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of "B" or better. The student must 
submit a plan of study showing that taking graduate courses will not unduly delay completion of the 
requirements for the bachelor's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate credits attempted in any 
semester may not be more than eighteen. The graduate credits so earned will not count toward any requirements 
for the bachelor's degree. A maximum of 12 credits may be taken for graduate credit by a student during his or 
her tenure as an undergraduate at the University. 



24 



Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the Graduate Faculty of the department or program offering the course, 
undergraduate degree-seeking students may register for graduate level courses, (those numbered from 600 to 
897) with the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit. The student must obtain the prior approval of the 
department and instructor offering the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate-level course does not in any way imply subsequent departmental or Graduate School 
approval for admission into a graduate program. The course may not be used as credit for a graduate degree at 
the University of Maryland except as part of an approved Bachelor's/Master's program into which the student 
has been admitted. 

Partial Credit for Students With Disabilities 

The Graduate School recognizes that students with documented disabilities may be prevented from participating 
courses that include laboratories, studio work, or other non- classroom activities in which the student is 
prevented from participating because of the disability. Therefore, it is the Graduate School's policy to allow 
students with disabilities to enroll in such courses, complete only those parts of the course that their capabilities 
permit, and receive credit for the course proportionate to their levels of participation. Students with disabilities 
should contact Disability Support Services (DSS) for information and assistance with any disability related 
issue. Phone (301) 314-7682 (V/TTY). Graduate students with disabilities who wish to enroll under this policy 
should consult the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the Graduate School. The Dean, in consultation with 
DSS, will assist the student in making the necessary arrangements with the graduate program offering the 
course, the graduate program in which the student is enrolled, and the Office of Registrar. The final agreement 
as to the student's level of participation and the amount of credit to be awarded will be specified in an agreement 
to be drawn up by the Associate Dean of the Graduate School for Student Affairs and signed by all parties 
concerned. 

Inter-Institutional Registration, University System of Maryland 

A student admitted to the Graduate School in any institution of the University System of Maryland is eligible to 
take courses at any other institution of the University System of Maryland subject to the approval of the 
Graduate Directors and the Graduate Deans of the home and host institutions. Credits earned at a host institution 
are considered resident credit at the home institution, and, following normal procedures for graduate program 
approval, these credits may be used to meet University of Maryland graduation requirements. Transcripts of 
courses taken at another institution will be maintained at the home institution and fees will be paid to the home 
institution. Forms for registration as an inter-institutional student may be obtained from the Office of the 
Registrar. 

The Washington Consortium Arrangement 

The University of Maryland is a member of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan 
Area . Other institutions currently associated with the consortium include American University, The Catholic 
University of America, the University of the District of Columbia, Gallaudet University, George Mason 
University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, Howard University, Marymount 
University, Trinity University, the National Defense University, The Joint Military Intelligence College, and 
Southeastern University. Students enrolled in any one of these institutions are able to attend certain classes at 
the other institutions and have the credit considered "residence" credits at their own institutions. Grades in these 
courses are calculated into the student's GPA. Tuition remission awarded to graduate assistants and fellows may 
not be used to pay for courses at other consortium universities. Graduate assistants and fellows must pay for any 
courses that they take under the consortium arrangement. Students from schools in the Consortium of 
Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area may register for University of Maryland courses on a space- 
available basis beginning with the first day of classes. 



25 



The policies governing registration through the Consortium Arrangement are listed below. 

• Courses for majors in graduate programs at the University of Maryland that have restricted enrollment will not 
be available to students from other consortium schools. Similar rules may apply at other consortium 
universities. 

• Students from consortium schools are expected to meet all prerequisites for University of Maryland courses 
for which they wish to enroll. Similar rules may apply at other consortium universities. 

• Students from consortium schools will not be permitted to register for practice, workshops, internships, and 
other experiential courses at the University of Maryland. Similar rules may apply at other consortium 
universities. 

• Students from consortium schools who have previously applied for admission to a University of Maryland 
graduate degree program and have been denied admission will be permitted to register for graduate courses in 
that program only with the specific approval of the Director of Graduate Studies of the program. 

• Students from consortium schools who have been dismissed from the University of Maryland for disciplinary 
or financial reasons will not be permitted to enroll in courses at the University of Maryland under the 
consortium arrangement. 



26 



Chapter 5: Financial Policies - Tuition and Fees 

Payment of Tuition and Fees 

Tuition rates and fees are posted on the University's web site at http://www.umd.edu/bursar/Tuitionfees.html . 

Tuition, fees, and other University charges may be paid by mail, online ( http://www.umd.edu/bursar ) or in 
person at the Cashier's Window of the Bursar's Office, 1135 Lee Building, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. The University accepts checks and Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover cards 
for payment. Checks should be made payable to "The University of Maryland." Students can also obtain their 
account balances through TESTUDO ( http://www.testudo.umd.edu ). 

It is the policy of the University not to allow deferment of payment pending the result of an application for 
financial assistance to an outside agency, including Veterans Administration benefits, bank loans, or guaranteed 
student loan programs. 

Each student is individually responsible for his or her bill and for meeting payment deadlines. Failure to meet 
these deadlines may result in late charges or cancellation of registration. The University will suspend services to 
students for delinquent indebtedness and failure to pay bills. The University will also transfer delinquent 
accounts to the State Central Collections Unit, which will levy further late fees and take necessary steps to 
obtain payment. 

See the most recent Schedule of Classes for more detailed information about payment, fees, and delinquent 
accounts. All payment deadlines are published in the Schedule of Classes. 

Forms of Financial Aid 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers a number of programs to assist graduate students (e.g. loans 
and federal work study). Please see http://www.financialaid.umd.edu for more information. 

Emergency Loans 

Students may receive up to $500 as an interest-free loan that must be repaid in 60 days. If the loan is not repaid 
within 60 days, the amount will be charged against the student's account and late fees may be incurred. These 
loans are available from the Office of Student Financial Aid, 1 135 Lee Building. Applicants should bring 
documentation of their need. They will then be asked to complete a short loan application form. They will 
subsequently meet briefly with a loan counselor who will review their need. The loan counselor will either 
approve or deny funds. 

Refunds 

University Refund Statement 

Tuition, fees, and refundable deposits are authorized for refund only if the student completes the prescribed 
withdrawal procedures or is dismissed from the University. Residence Hall and Dining Services charges are 
authorized for refund only if the student completes the prescribed residence hall and dining services contract 
release procedures. Please refer to the current Schedule of Classes for complete refund information and 
procedures. 



27 



Refunds for Withdrawal from All Classes 

A Cancellation of Registration submitted to the Registrar's Office before the first day of classes entitles the 
student to a full credit or refund of semester tuition and fees. 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate their registration and withdraw from all classes must follow 
the withdrawal procedures specified in the Schedule of Classes. Students will find the necessary forms for 
withdrawal in 1101 Mitchell Building. The effective date used in computing refunds is the date the withdrawal 
form is filed with the Registrar's Office. Stopping payment on a check, failure to pay the semester bill, or 
failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal. 

Students withdrawing from the University will be credited for tuition in accordance with the following 
schedule: 



Period from date instruction begins 


Refundable tuition * 


Two weeks or less 


80% 


Two to three weeks 


60% 


Three to four weeks 


40% 


Four to five weeks 


20% 


Over five weeks 


no refund 



* Fees are non-refundable after the first day of classes. 

Withdrawal from all classes may be a violation of the Graduate School's Continuous Registration policy. 
Students withdrawing from classes who intend to continue in their graduate degree or certificate program 
should secure a Waiver of Continuous Registration or Leave of Absence from the Graduate School before 
withdrawing. 

Refunds for Dropping Individual Courses 

Graduate students may obtain refunds for courses that are dropped {if dropping a course results in the overall 
number of registered credits) during the first ten days of classes. Students may drop and add courses without 
penalty provided that the changes are made on the same day and that the total number of credits does not 
change. Graduate students are charged by the credit hour. A percentage charge and/or complete charge will be 
imposed according to the schedule below: 



Prior to the first day of classes -- no charge 


100% refund. 


During the first ten days of classes - 20% charge. 


80% refund. 


After the first ten days of classes. -- 100% charge. 


0% refund. 



For funds to be returned, students must file a request for a refund with the Office of the Bursar. If a request for 
refund is not filed, credit on the student account will automatically be carried over to the next semester. Refund 
requests may be made by addressing a letter to the Office of The Bursar, Lee Building, University of Maryland, 
College Park, 20742, visiting the Student Financial Service Center, Lee Building, Room 1135, between 8:30 am 
to 4:30 pm, Monday-Friday, or requesting a refund online through Testudo . A credit balance is not 
automatically refunded. 

Fellowships, Assistantships, and Financial Assistance 

The University of Maryland recognizes the high cost of education today and makes every effort to offer 
financial assistance to qualified students through a variety of programs. Approximately seventy percent (70%) 
of all full-time graduate students receive financial support, which may include remission of tuition, teaching and 



28 



research assistantships, work-study support, and University and other fellowships. Referrals for University or 
area employment opportunities for students and students' spouses are also available in various graduate 
programs and in specific student service centers at the University. 

Admission to a graduate degree program is a prerequisite for the award of a teaching or research assistantship, a 
fellowship, a traineeship, a loan, or a work-study award. 

Graduate Fellowships 

Graduate Fellowships are funded by the Graduate School through grants allocated to the academic colleges 
specifically for this purpose. Applicants and current students must apply directly to their Graduate Programs for 
fellowship funding. The Graduate School offers a limited number of dissertation fellowships. Applications are 
solicited annually. More information may be obtained from the Graduate 

School, http://www. gradschool.umd.edu/prospective students/gs fellowships.html . For more information, also 
please see the Fellowships chapter of this Catalog. 

Graduate Assistantships 

A graduate assistantship is an academic appointment not involving academic tenure. Such assistantships take 
the form of teachings assistantships, research assistantships or, in a few cases, administrative assistantships. 
Offers of these positions are made to graduate students directly by the programs and departments. 

The assigned duties of a graduate assistant are consistent with the aims and objectives of the teaching and 
research missions of the University. An appointment of 20 hours per week is considered a full-time 
assistantship. An appointment of 10 hours per week is considered a half-time assistantship. The responsibilities 
assigned to a graduate assistant should take into account what may be reasonably expected given the graduate 
assistant's education and experience. 

For more information, please see the Assistantships chapter of this Catalog . 

Overload Payments for Graduate Students 

Under certain circumstances, fellows and graduate assistants may be offered employment in addition to their 
normal appointments. As outlined in Chapter 15: Graduate Assistants and Chapter 16: Graduate Fellows, 
approval for such overload payments must be obtained from the Graduate School in advance of the 
appointment. The required request form can be found 
at http://www. gradschool.umd.edu/images/uploads/overload.pdf . 

Travel Grants 

The Graduate School administers the Jacob K. Goldhaber travel grants for graduate students. Goldhaber grants 
are available to support part of the cost of attending conferences at which graduate students will present the 
results of their research. Because funding is limited, students are urged to apply as soon as their presentations 
have been accepted. More information is available 
at http://www. gradschool.umd.edu/current students/travel awards.html . 



29 



Chapter 6: Policies for Graduate Assistantships 

Introduction 

Graduate Assistants are, first and foremost, graduate students pursuing an education. The opportunity to work 
closely with faculty members and undergraduate students in teaching, research, or administrative environments 
is an integral part of that education. 

Graduate students who hold assistantships benefit educationally and professionally. They gain further 
expertise in their field; enhance their research skills and develop pedagogical skills; acquire experience in 
leadership, interpersonal effectiveness, and performance evaluation; acquire academic administrative 
experience; and enjoy collegial collaborations with advisors that may result in joint publications and other 
professional activities. Skills learned in assistantships prepare students not only for the academy, but also for 
corporate, government, and nonprofit organizations. 

Assistantships also provide graduate students with the financial resources necessary to pursue their degrees. 
This financial support — stipend, tuition remission, and benefits — is part of the University's commitment to the 
success of our graduate students. 

The University is committed to ensuring that graduate assistant assignments are productive, enhance student 
qualifications, meet funding support and workload goals, and are consistent with the educational objectives of 
the student and his or her program. 



I. General Policies 

Categories 

The official title of Graduate Assistant (GA) is used in all university documents, but, in general practice, 
Graduate Assistants are referred to either as Graduate Teaching Assistants (TAs), Graduate Research Assistants 
(RAs), or Graduate Administrative Assistants (AAs). Additionally, a small number of Graduate Assistants serve 
as resident life counselors. Qualified graduate students often move between these kinds of appointments during 
their graduate education. 

Administration 

Graduate Assistants at the University of Maryland, College Park are under the direct supervision of the 
department, program, or unit that offers the appointment. The department determines the GA's assignment, 
supervises his or her work, and recommends him or her for reappointment and promotion to various stipend or 
compensation levels. The department is the primary source of information for the details of the assistantship. 
Within the department, the GA's work assignment is determined by the Department Chair, the Director of 
Graduate Studies, any duly appointed executive committees and assistants to the chair, and/or the faculty 
member assigned to supervise the GA's particular course, laboratory session, or research project. Graduate 
Administrative Assistants are under the supervision of the heads of the academic or non-academic units in 
which they work. 

Student Status 

A Graduate Assistant is on an academic appointment not involving academic tenure. The appointment may be 
full-time (20 hours per week) or half-time (10 hours per week). 

GAs holding regular 20-hour appointments are considered full-time students by the University if they are 
registered for at least 24 units. GAs who hold half-time (10 hour) assistantships are considered full-time 

30 



students if they are registered for 36 units. Audited courses do not generate units and cannot be used in 
calculating registration status. Individual departments or graduate programs may have higher registration 
requirements for their GAs. 

Qualifications 

A Graduate Assistant must be a registered graduate student in good standing enrolled in a degree program at the 
University of Maryland, College Park and must be making satisfactory progress toward the degree. 
Appointments are normally given to those students who have shown superior aptitude in their field of study and 
who appear likely to render a high quality of service to the university by their teaching or research activities or 
their administrative work in a unit. Advanced Special Students are not eligible to hold Graduate Assistantships. 
In rare instances, an appointment of a Graduate Research Assistantship (RA) may be made for a graduate 
student who has been admitted into a graduate degree program at another campus within the University System 
of Maryland. In this exceptional case, the student will be supported by a Principal Investigator whose research 
contract or grant is administered by the College Park campus. The student's tuition, benefits, etc. will also be 
paid from research funds. 

English Proficiency Requirements for International Students 

International Teaching Assistants (IT As) who are non-native speakers of English are required to undergo an 
evaluation of their spoken English abilities by the Maryland English Institute (MEI). The ITA Evaluation is not 
required of students who serve only as graders or researchers, or whose entire education has been in the U.S, 
United Kingdom, Ireland, English-speaking Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Anglophone Africa, or 
Commonwealth Caribbean. Students must pass the ITA Evaluation prior to being assigned teaching duties, 
including duties in labs. This requirement may not be waived. 

The Graduate School pays the fee for the ITA Evaluation for students who have been formally appointed as 
TAs. All other students are responsible for paying this fee. If the department wishes to cover the cost of the 
evaluation for those students, the Graduate Director must indicate this in writing on the referral form. 

Students who fail the ITA Evaluation are required to take an English course. On the basis of the evaluation 
results, MEI will place the student into either UMEI 006 (pronunciation) or UMEI 008 (broader communication 
patterns). If the student has been formally appointed as a TA, the department is responsible for the tuition of the 
course and may not pass the cost of this instruction on to the student. If the student fails the ITA evaluation and 
is not an ITA, the student is responsible for paying tuition for the course. Tuition remission cannot be used for 
UMEI courses. 

Full details regarding the ITA Evaluation can be found 

at http://www.education.umd.edu/institutesandcenters/MEI/ELTs/ITAE.htm . 



II. Appointments 

Appointment, Reappointment, Duration of Appointment 

Most Graduate Assistants are appointed either for a regular academic year (9.5 months) or for 12 months. Some 
appointments may be for a shorter period. The academic-year appointment begins in mid-August and ends in 
May. Students may be reappointed one or more times at the discretion of the department in which they serve. 
To allow a larger number of qualified students to benefit from assistantships, many departments limit the 
number of years that a graduate student may serve as an assistant in any capacity. 

Each department is responsible for determining and communicating its own specific criteria, within the limits of 
university policy, for assessing student qualification for appointment and reappointment to a graduate 

31 



assistantship. In general, reappointment is dependent upon satisfactory performance and normal progress toward 
a graduate degree. As with all university faculty and staff positions, appointment and reappointment are 
contingent upon the availability of funds. 

Letters of Appointment 

It is the responsibility of the department to notify the graduate student in an official letter of the final offer of 
appointment. These letters provide information on the terms of the assistantship and should be explicit and clear 
with respect to workload expectations. A template can be found at the following 
link: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/images/uploads/GA%20Appointment%20Letter%20Template.doc . 

Performance Reviews 

Each department is responsible for determining procedures for review and evaluation of Graduate Assistants 
and for informing GAs of these procedures. The process of evaluation will vary by departments, and may 
include written assessment of work by an individual faculty member, classroom visitation by designated faculty 
members, and written student evaluations. The results of reviews and evaluations should be discussed with the 
GA concerned. 

Termination or Loss of Support 

A Graduate Assistant's appointment may be terminated before the expiration of its designated term for loss of 
funding, for cause, for academic delinquency, by written notice, and by voluntary mutual agreement. 

A. Loss of Funding. A graduate assistantship may be terminated on account of a loss, reduction, or reallocation 
in appropriation, grant, contract, gift, or other funds with which to support the appointment. Subject to the 
fiscal priorities of the unit, programs will make a good faith effort to find alternative funding for the full term of 
the appointment for a GA who is in good standing and making satisfactory progress to degree. The University 
will give the GA 30 calendar days written notice of termination for loss of funding. 

B. Cause. An appointment may be terminated immediately for cause. The following are examples of sufficient 
cause for removal: incompetence, inefficiency, wanton carelessness or neglect of duty, insubordination, 
repeated or extended absence, and misconduct related to the GA's suitability or capacity to continue to perform 
assignments. A GA may be suspended from responsibilities without pay pending the investigation of cause for 
termination of the appointment. 

C. Academic Delinquency. An appointment may be terminated if the GA is not making satisfactory academic 
progress to a degree or is otherwise not in good academic standing. The termination shall be in writing and may 
be immediate or with such notice as the University believes compatible with the GA's academic situation, not to 
exceed 30 calendar days. 

D. Written Notice. An appointment may be terminated by delivery of 30 days written notice to the GA. 

E. Voluntary Agreement. With the agreement of the University, an appointment may be terminated by the 
voluntary written resignation of the GA. 

Special Appeals Procedures 

A Graduate Assistant, whose appointment shall be terminated for the reasons A., B., C., or D., above, may 
obtain a review by the Chair of the Department under the Informal Consultation procedure in Section VII, 
below. Thereafter, if desired, the GA may obtain a special review by the Dean of the unit where the 
assistantship is located. 7 The GA shall initiate the formal review by sending a letter to the Dean with copies to 



32 



the faculty member and the Department Chair. To be considered, the letter must be received by the Dean within 
15 calendar days from the date the GA is first informed of the intent to terminate the assistantship. 

The grounds for appeal in terminations based on Loss of Funding, Academic Delinquency, and Written 
Notice shall be prejudicial procedural error and/or a violation of substantive due process. 2 The burden of proof 
in these types of termination shall be upon the GA. The burden of proof in terminations for Cause shall be on 
the faculty member to demonstrate that cause exists and warrants termination. 

Upon receipt of the letter requesting formal review, the Dean will: 

1. Solicit a written response from the faculty member; and, 

2. Offer to meet with the GA and the faculty member, either individually or together, before reaching a 
decision. The Dean shall consult with the Department Chair and such other persons as the Dean believes may be 
knowledgeable about the matter. The Dean shall endeavor to convey a written decision and, where appropriate, 
the remedy, to the GA and the faculty member within 10 calendar days of receipt of the letter requesting formal 
review. 

3. The decision of the Dean shall be final in all matters pertaining to the review. 

Renewal and Non-Renewal of Appointment 

The University does not guarantee an appointment as a Graduate Assistant will be renewed at the end of its 
designated term. Although appointments are often renewed, the University cannot promise and there can be no 
expectancy that a graduate assistantship will be continued over an extended period of time. 

1 For assistantships in non-academic units, "Dean" shall mean the Vice President of the division. 

2 A termination would violate substantive due process if it is arbitrary or capricious or if it were based on an illegal or unconstitutional 
consideration. 



III. Duties and Time Commitments 

The assigned duties of a Graduate Assistant are consistent with the objectives of the teaching and research 
missions of the university, including the objective that assistantships are to be educationally productive for 
graduate students. Workload expectations of the department, and of the student's advisor/supervisor, should be 
explicit and clear. The appointment may be full-time (20 hours per week) or half-time (10 hours per week). 
Departments are to provide work assignments that GAs receiving full stipends can satisfactorily complete in no 
more than a 20-hour average work week, and are to ensure that GAs spend no more than 20 hours per week on 
average throughout the term of appointment on work unrelated to their research. The actual number of hours 
required to complete assignments in any given week may vary. 

Graduate Teaching Assistants 

The specific duties of Graduate Teaching Assistants (TAs) vary across disciplines and departments. For the 
majority of teaching assistants, however, assignments and responsibilities fall into four categories: 

■ Assuming teaching responsibility for a laboratory or discussion session of a course; 

■ Assuming teaching responsibility for a classroom section of a multi-sectional course, under the close 
supervision of the director(s) of the course; 

33 



■ Assisting a faculty member in the grading, advising, and administrative duties necessary for a 
course(s); 

■ Assisting in general departmental administrative duties, such as advising or the administration of 
community programs, workshops, etc. 

Within a department, the particular assignment depends on the department's needs and the experience and 
academic qualifications of the TA. All graduate TAs serving in any capacity are under the direction and close 
supervision of a member of the faculty. 

Time Commitment: For TAs, the 20-hour average should include the time spent in faculty lectures, class 

preparation, classroom or laboratory teaching, reading and commenting on student papers or examinations, 

office consultation, and other duties required to carry out the teaching role. 

The time that TAs devote to their assignments varies. The proportion of hours spent in preparation, classroom 

or laboratory time, and grading, for example, differs from one discipline to another. In some disciplines, a new 

TA may find that a task such as grading initially requires more time than the usual 20-hour weekly average 

allows. 

TAs may be required to come to campus prior to the actual beginning of classes to participate in orientation and 
class-preparation duties. TAs usually complete their formal duties when examinations have been graded. 

Graduate Research Assistants 

The specific duties of Graduate Research Assistants (RAs) vary according to the nature of the research project 
in which they participate and the source of the funding. RAs may occasionally be asked to conduct some work 
at home or to do their research at times when classes are not officially in session. The duties of RAs are also 
performed under the close direction and supervision of a member of the faculty. 

Time Commitment: For RAs, the 20-hour average should include the time spent in library and/or laboratory, and 
on all other research tasks providing assistance to the assigned project. 

Graduate students working on research projects funded by grants are often also working on material directly 
related to their theses or dissertations. It is not unusual in such cases for grant work and personal work to merge 
and for the work time to consume far more than the usual 20-hour weekly average. 
Graduate RAs usually follow the project director's instructions regarding work when classes are not in session. 

Graduate Administrative Assistants 

A number of academic and non-academic units employ Graduate Administrative Assistants (AAs), generally to 
perform administrative support functions in an office setting. Such positions are expected to have a research or 
professional development component. Some administrative appointments are for less than one academic year. 

Time Commitment: For AAs, the 20-hour weekly average should include all time spent on assigned duties, 
including mandatory training sessions. Unless explicitly stated in writing, AAs are expected to work no more 
than the 20-hour average workweek. If greater amounts of time are periodically required, the unit must provide 
the AA with an offer letter that includes a statement of expected duties, approximate dates when extra hours 
might be necessary, and maximum work hours required. If the AA is required to work more than 20 hours in a 
given week, the time should be deducted from another week. 

Just as the unit may require the AA to work more than 20 hours in a given week to meet peak work periods, the 
AA may request that he or she be allowed to reduce time in a given week to finish a paper or study for an exam 
and make up the hours later. Such arrangements are allowed and encouraged and should be made between the 
student and the student's supervisor within the unit. 



34 



AAs follow the staff holiday and vacation schedule. Consequently, if the campus is closed (for any reason) for 
regular staff, AAs who normally would work those days will receive the appropriate compensation and will not 
be required to make up the hours missed. 

Conflict Resolution 

A GA who experiences problems related to workload should address them without delay through the process 
indicated in Section VII, below. 



IV. Compensation 

Compensation and Stipends 

Three categories (called Steps) are currently used for the classification of graduate assistantships. These steps, 
based on a student's experience and progress toward the degree, determine compensation levels. Graduate 
Assistants fall into one of the three steps: Step I is only for first-year GAs; Step II is for second-year GAs, as 
well as for those students, new or continuing, holding a master's degree; and Step III is reserved for doctoral 
candidates. 

The Graduate School sets the minimum stipend level for Step I. Departments and programs determine their own 
increments for Step II and Step III within guidelines set annually by the Graduate School. All GAs working 
within a particular step, in a particular unit, should be paid the same assistantship stipend. 

TAs must be offered a 9.5-month or 12-month assistantship due to duties and responsibilities occurring after the 
last day of classes. 

Additional Employment: On-Campus 

Graduate Assistants may be employed on campus for an additional 10 hours per week beyond their assistantship 
duties, with an overload approval. No individual may be employed in two capacities in the same department 
without an overload approval. International students may be limited to a certain number of hours of 
employment according to their visa status; these students should check with the International Education 
Services Office, 3117 Mitchell Building, phone 301-314-7740. 

Domestic students who are GAs and who wish to hold more than one position on campus may do so only if the 
second position is paid on an hourly basis with Labor & Assistants funds (sub code 2075). This policy is 
necessary to avoid complications concerning benefits. For such individuals, the only benefits allowed are those 
associated with the graduate assistantship. 

Additional Employment: Off-Campus 

It is expected that the combined responsibilities of graduate studies and assistantship duties will fully occupy a 
student during the academic year. The University, however, does not prohibit Graduate Assistants from 
accepting outside employment in addition to their assistantship appointment. It is up to the GA to determine 
how much time, if any, he or she can devote to additional activities while still maintaining satisfactory progress 
toward the degree and satisfactory fulfillment of the assistantship responsibilities. Departments and programs 
have the discretionary right, however, to make appointments to students whose commitment suggests that they 
are most likely to attain their educational goals and maintain their assistantship responsibilities expeditiously 
and effectively. 



35 



Overload Payments for Graduate Students 

Overload requests are for temporary, short-term arrangements only. They must be limited to one semester per 
request and must be received and approved prior to the beginning of the appointment. No graduate student may 
be employed in two capacities within the same department without an overload approval. 

9.5-month Appointments 

A full-time GA (20 hours per week) on a 9.5-month appointment must have an overload approval for any on- 
campus employment above the assistantship assignment while classes are in session for the Fall and Spring 
semesters. 

An overload request must be submitted for Winter Term only if the student is teaching a Winter Term course, as 
a TA or lecturer, in addition to his or her normal assistantship assignment. 

An overload request must be submitted for Summer terms only if a student (a) is paid in the home unit over four 
equal pays for summer or is paid hourly for 20 hours per week and (b) also will be paid in a second unit or in 
Summer Programs. (The overload form should be completed for the second unit or Summer Programs.) 

12-month Appointments 

A full-time GA (20 hours per week) on a 12-month appointment must have an overload approval for any 
employment above the assistantship assignment when classes are in session during Fall and Spring semesters. 

During Winter Term and Summer terms, an overload request must be submitted only if the student is teaching a 
class, either as a TA or lecturer, in addition to the assistantship appointment. 

International Students 

Federal Law prohibits international students from working more than 20 hours per week while classes are in 
session; international students holding full-time assistantships (20 hours) are therefore ineligible for overload 
assignments during the Fall and Spring semesters. 

Sources of Funding 

GAs may not be employed in more than one position eligible for benefits; their percentage on payroll may not 
exceed 50%. Hours over and above the assistantship must be paid with Labor & Assistants funds (sub code 
2075). 

Retirement and Social Security (FICA) 

Retirement benefits are not withheld from the salaries of Graduate Assistants. GAs are exempt from Federal 
Insurance Contribution Act (FICA) taxes provided that they maintain enrollment and are registered with at least 
half-time status. 

Tax Status 

Pursuant to U.S. federal tax code revisions effective January 1, 1987, all graduate students are liable to pay 
income tax on compensation received for Graduate Assistantships. The amount remitted for tuition is a benefit 
and is not taxed. A GA with questions about tax obligations should consult a tax counsel or the Internal 
Revenue Service (1-800-829-1040). 



36 



V. Tuition Remission and Benefits 

Tuition Remission and Mandatory Fees 

Graduate Assistants on a full-time appointment (20 hours per week) are eligible for 10 credits of tuition 
remission in the Fall and Spring semesters and 4 credits in Winter Term. GAs on a half-time appointment (10 
hours per week) are eligible for 5 credits of tuition remission in the Fall and Spring semesters and 2 credits in 
Winter Term. GAs on a full-time 12-month appointment are also eligible for up to 8 credits of tuition remission 
during Summer; and GAs on a half-time 12-month appointment are eligible for up to 4 credits during Summer. 

Tuition remission is credited at the prevailing standard in-state credit hour rate at the time the class is taken. 
Some programs, such as the MBA, have higher credit hour rates or flat fee pricing. The tuition remission benefit 
does not cover the difference, which remains the responsibility of the GA. 

Tuition remission does not cover Mandatory Fees. Please see the Schedule of Classes for a current schedule of 
Mandatory Fees. 

Residency Classification 

All Graduate Assistants on a full-time or half-time appointment are billed at the in-state rate for credits taken 
during their appointment, including any credits taken over the tuition remission allowance. Official residency 
classification, however, does not change. Consequently, at any time when a graduate student is no longer 
supported by an assistantship — including summer months if the student is on a 9.5-month assistantship — he or 
she will be billed according to the official residency status that was assigned upon admission. Thus, a student 
may pay in-state rates during the academic year but out-of-state rates during the summer if the student is 
classified as out-of-state. Graduate students are urged to be aware of their official residency classification status 
and to address any problems immediately. 

Questions about residency classification and about changing residency status should be addressed to the 
Residency Classification Office, Room 1118 Mitchell Building, phone 301-405-2030. 

Health Insurance 

Graduate Assistants on a full-time or half-time appointment may enroll in the university employee health 
benefits program. The personnel coordinator in the student's department should be able to provide appropriate 
forms. GAs must enroll within 60 days of their initial employment to be eligible for a health care program. GAs 
may enroll their spouses and children under this program. 

Any graduate student who is ineligible for the employee health care program may enroll in the student health 
insurance program offered by the University Health Center. For more information, call the University Health 
Center Insurance Office at 301-314-8165. 

Facilities and Parking 

It is the expectation that departments will provide Graduate Assistants with suitable workspace, laboratory 
space, and, when necessary, office space. GAs also generally have access to desks, file space, mailboxes, 
computers, telephones, and duplicating machines or services. 

Vehicles must display a valid UMCP parking permit or be parked in metered spaces. While GAs are not 
assigned to faculty parking lots, the Department of Transportation Services endeavors to assign GAs to a 
student lot close to the building where they work. Students who register early have the best choice of parking 

37 



assignments. The Department of Transportation Services is located on the ground floor of Regents Parking 
Garage, phone 301-314-PARK. Parking for GAs is not subsidized; each GA is responsible for the cost of his or 
her parking permit. 

Time Away from Duties 

The objective of graduate assistantships is education. They are a component of learning and, as practicum, 
advance understanding through application. Stipends are an acknowledgment both of the expense and need for 
support during graduate education and of the contribution made by the Graduate Assistant to the mission of the 
University. The relation between the GA and a professor is academic, partaking of the traditions and practices 
of the academy. While an appointment as graduate assistant shares some attributes of employment, these are 
secondary. Time away from duties is foremost time away from class, not time away from the office. The 
following "Time Away" policies reflect these principles. 

A. Accrued Leave. Graduate Assistants do not earn paid annual, personal, or sick leave. 

B. Time-Away from Duty. Graduate Assistants working full-time on 12-month appointments may have time- 
away from their duties. A full time (20 hours per week), 12-month assistantship carries the expectation that the 
GA will be allowed ten workdays (40 hours) of collegially supported absence. This time away from duties must 
be taken during the current appointment. It may not be accumulated or transferred. It does not include time 
when the University is closed. Because colleagues must perform the GA's responsibilities during an absence, 
reasonable notice and prior approval by the GA's supervisor are required. 

Time-away from duty may be used for such purpose as the GA elects and is, therefore, distinct and separate 
from allowable absences for illness, maternity, or adoption. 

C. Absence due to Illness. If a Graduate Assistant becomes ill, time away from duties should initially be 
supported collegially. Occasional, short-term absences on account of illness generally will not require the use of 
the allowable "time-away from duty" days. 

In the event an absence due to illness extends for a period longer than two weeks, support for time away from 
duties must be requested by the GA and lies in the discretion of the head of the funding unit (in the case of a 
State supported assistantship) or of the Principal Investigator or other grant administrator (in the case of an 
externally funded assistantship). The GA's request must be accompanied by supporting medical documentation 
satisfactory to the University, including a letter from a physician or other licensed heath-care professional that 
provides (1) the nature of the illness; (2) a statement that the GA should not return to work for health reasons; 
and (3) the duration of the required absence. The University may require the GA to have a fitness for duty 
examination prior to resuming duties. 

D. Absence due to Maternity or Adoption. Graduate Assistants seeking time away from duties for reasons of 
childbirth or adoption must discuss this with their graduate director or supervisor as soon as possible. The 
duration and nature of support lie in the discretion of the head of the funding unit or the Principle 
Investigator/grant administrator. 



VI. Codes of Conduct 

Conduct and Professional Behavior 

A Graduate Assistant's teaching, research, and administrative activities are subject to the ethical precepts and 
codes of the academic profession, to the laws of the State of Maryland regarding its employees, and to 
University policies governing institutional obligations. Violation of any of these regulations constitutes a basis 
for disciplinary action in accordance with procedures set forth in the University's policies. 

38 



In their interactions with students, faculty, and all other members of the university community, GAs are 
expected to conduct themselves with the same sensitivity and thoughtfulness that they expect to receive from 
others. The University Human Relations Code states that the University of Maryland affirms its commitment to 
a policy of eliminating discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, 
marital status, personal appearance, age, physical or mental disability, political affiliation, or on the basis of the 
exercise of rights secured by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. 

The precepts stated above apply equally to GAs and to supervisors of GAs. 

Equal Opportunity Statement 

The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. 
The university does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age, national origin, sex, or disability 
in admission to or access to, or treatment of employment in, its programs and activities, as required by federal 
law (Title VI, Title IX, Section 504) and state laws and regulations. Inquiries regarding compliance with Title 
VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related legal requirements should be directed to: 

Director, Human Relations Program 
Office of Human Relations 
1130 Shriver Lab 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: 301-405-2838 

Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and Part 34 of C.F.R. to the University of Maryland may be 
directed to: 

Director, Disability Support Services 
0126 Shoemaker Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 204742 
Telephone: 301-314-7682 (V/TTY) 

Scholarly Misconduct 

Scholarly misconduct means fabrication, falsification, plagiarism or other misconduct in proposing, performing, 
reviewing, or reporting research and/or in connection with other scholarly or creative activities. 

Other terms such as research fraud, scientific misconduct, or research misconduct are subsumed within the term 
scholarly misconduct. Scholarly misconduct does not include honest error or honest differences of opinion. A 
finding of scholarly misconduct requires that there be a significant departure from accepted practices of the 
scholarly community for maintaining the integrity of the research or scholarly record; the misconduct must be 
committed intentionally, or knowingly, or in reckless disregard of accepted practices; and the allegation must be 
proven by a preponderance of relevant evidence. 

The full text of the University of Maryland Procedures for Scholarly Misconduct can be found 
at http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/docs/III-110A.pdf . 

Sexual Harassment 

The University of Maryland is committed to maintaining a learning and work environment in which students, 
faculty, and staff can develop intellectually, professionally, personally, and socially. Such an environment must 

39 



be free of intimidation, fear, coercion, and reprisal. The University prohibits sexual harassment. Sexual 
harassment may cause others unjustifiable offense, anxiety, and injury. Sexual harassment threatens the 
legitimate expectations of all members of the campus community. Academic progress or progress in 
employment is determined by the publicly stated requirements of classroom and job performance, and the 
campus environment will not unreasonably impede study or work. 

Sexual harassment by university faculty, staff, and students is prohibited and constitutes violation of campus 
policy. Sexual harassment may also constitute violations of the criminal and civil laws of the State of Maryland 
and the United States. For the purpose of campus policy, sexual harassment is defined as follows: 1) unwelcome 
sexual advances; or 2) unwelcome requests for sexual favors; and 3) other behavior of a sexual nature where: 

■ Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's 
employment or participation in a university-sponsored educational program or activity; or 

■ Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or 
employment decisions affecting that individual; or 

■ Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with the individual's academic or 
work performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational or working 
environment. 

The full text of the University of Maryland Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment can be found at . 

Statement on Sexual Relationships and Professional Conduct 

While sexual relationships between instructors and the students in their classes are not prohibited in the sense 
that penalties are attached to such conduct, all members of the campus community are urged to consider the 
ethical concerns that may arise as a result of such relationships. 

All members of the campus community should understand that sexual relationships that occur in the context of 
educational evaluation are generally deemed very unwise because they present serious ethical concerns. Many 
professional codes of conduct prohibit sexual relationships that occur within the context of one's profession. 
Accordingly, faculty, supervisors, and Teaching Assistants are warned about the possible costs of even an 
apparently consenting relationship. The element of power implicit in sexual relationships occurring in the 
academic -evaluation context can diminish a student's actual freedom of choice. There is doubt whether any such 
relationship can truly be consensual. In addition, sexual relationships between a faculty member or Teaching 
Assistant and a student create an environment charged with potential conflicts of interest. Questions of 
favoritism frequently arise. As a result, such conduct may subvert the normal structure of incentives that spur 
work and learning and interjects attitudes and pressures that are not consonant with the education policies and 
principles to which the campus is committed. 

The full text of the University's Statement on Sexual Relationships and Professional Conduct can be found at 
the end of the University of Maryland Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment 
at http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vil20a.html 



VII. Grievance Procedure 

The University is an academic and collegial community. Regular and clear communication between Graduate 
Assistants and their advisors and supervisors is essential to maintaining an effective educational environment. 
GAs who believe their workload is not in conformity with these Policies for Graduate Assistantships may seek 
a review in accordance with this Section. 



40 



In addition to workload, a GA may also seek review under this Section of whether the GA is receiving Overload 
Payments, Tuition Remission, and Time Away from Duties in accordance with these Policies. 

For the purpose of this Section, "workload" shall mean the greater of (a) the average number of hours assigned 
to the GA throughout the term of an appointment (e.g., 20 hours per week), or (b) the average number of hours 
throughout the term reasonably required for an experienced GA in the GA's department to complete the GA's 
assigned work. 

In all instances noted above, the GA should attempt to resolve these matters locally, collegially, and 
informally. If the difficulty has not been resolved to the GA's satisfaction through informal means, then he or 
she may elect to file a formal grievance. 

Informal Consultation 

The Graduate Assistant should first attempt to resolve the difficulty by discussing the situation with his or her 
faculty advisor/supervisor as expeditiously as possible. 7 In the case of a TA, this usually would be the professor 
in charge of the course; in the case of an RA, the director of the research project on which the student is 
working; in the case of an AA, the immediate supervisor of the student in the unit in which the student is 
working. 

The GA should provide the reasons for complaint and a suggested resolution/remedy. 

If a satisfactory resolution is not reached, the GA should next discuss the situation with the Chair of the 
Department. 2 

Either before or after such discussions, the GA may wish to seek advice from another academic advisor, the 
Director of Graduate Studies of the GA's program, an associate dean of the Graduate School, or the Ombuds 
Officer for Graduate Students. The GA is strongly encouraged to consult with the Ombuds Officer early in the 
informal discussion process, and must consult with the Ombuds Officer before initiating a formal grievance. 

Ombuds Officer for Graduate Students 

The Ombuds Officer is available to all graduate students with questions or concerns related to their graduate 
experience, including their roles as GAs. The Ombuds Officer provides informal assistance in resolving 
conflicts and works to promote fair and equitable treatment within the University. The Ombuds Officer works 
confidentially within the scope of the law. The purpose of the Ombuds Officer is to ensure that the graduate 
student's voice is heard and that problems receive prompt and impartial attention. The Ombuds Officer does 
not advocate for an individual; rather, the Ombuds Officer advocates for a fair process that promotes the 
University's commitment to excellence in graduate education and in the graduate student experience. Queries 
may be directed to Ombuds Officer for Graduate Students, The Graduate School, 2103 Lee Building, phone 
(301)405-3132. 

Formal Grievance 

Most problems related to assistantships are resolved through informal consultation. If a problem pertaining to 
Workload, Overload Payment, Tuition Remission, or Time Away for Duties has not been solved informally to 
the GA's satisfaction, he or she may initiate a formal grievance. The formal procedures outlined below are 
intended to provide a mechanism through which grievances related to assistantships can be formally made and 
decided. 

The Grievance Procedure . The process of formal consideration offers the GA a review by the Dean of the 
Graduate School or by a panel appointed to make a recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School. The 
steps are as follows: 

41 



If a satisfactory resolution has not been achieved following informal consideration by the Chair of the 
Department, the GA may initiate a formal grievance by sending a letter to the Dean of the Graduate School. To 
be considered, it must be received by the Graduate Dean within 30 calendar days from the action involved or 
from the GA having reasonable knowledge of it. Under exceptional circumstances, that deadline may be 
extended at the discretion of the Graduate Dean. 

A. The letter must be signed and: 

1. Contain a clear description of the facts giving rise to the grievance; and, 

2. Identify the provision(s) of these Policies for Graduate Assistantships which have been violated; and, 

3. Set forth the desired remedy; and, 

4. Be copied to the faculty member and the Chair of the Department. 

5. Elect to have the Graduate Dean decide the grievance either: 

(a) In the manner described in Paragraph B.3., below; or, 

(b) Following receipt of a recommendation from a three-person panel appointed by the Graduate Dean to 
consider the matter. 

B. Upon receipt of a letter of formal grievance, the Graduate Dean will: 

1. Share the letter with the Dean of the appropriate college or school.?; and, 

2. Solicit a written response from the Department Chair. 

3. Offer to meet with the GA and the faculty member, either individually or together, before reaching a 
decision. The Graduate Dean shall consult with the Academic Dean and such other persons as the Graduate 
Dean believes may be knowledgeable about the policies and practices involved. The Graduate Dean shall 
endeavor to convey a written decision and, where appropriate, the remedy, to the GA and the faculty member 
within 15 calendar days of receipt of the letter of grievance. 

4. If the GA elects to have a panel, the Graduate Dean will appoint two graduate faculty (one of whom shall 
chair the panel) and one graduate student, each familiar with the GA's discipline but not from the GA's 
program or department, to review the matter and make a recommendation. The Graduate Dean will provide the 
panel with the letter of formal grievance and the written response of the Department Chair. The panel shall offer 
to meet with the GA and the faculty member and proceed in the manner described in Paragraph B.3, above. 

The Panel shall provide the Graduate Dean a written report containing a statement of the issues, the panel's 
findings of fact, the controlling policy provisions, the panel's conclusions regarding the merits of the grievance, 
and a recommended disposition of the grievance, including any suggested remedy. 

The Graduate Dean shall decide the grievance and fashion any necessary remedy, giving substantial weight to 
the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the panel. 

5. The decision of the Graduate Dean regarding the merits of a grievance and, where appropriate, the remedy, 
shall be final. 



42 



General Principles Controlling Formal Grievance Procedures . These Section VII procedures are not intended to 
mimic a courtroom and be adversarial in nature. Rather, they are formal in the meaning of offering a structured 
method to investigate, weigh and remedy differences. They are designed to preserve collegiality and minimize 
injury to the student-faculty relationship. Because grievances, if not made known or not considered 
expeditiously, threaten the learning experience, GAs, faculty, and administrators share responsibility alike to 
deal with them promptly. Experience has shown that the following rules promote the orderly and efficient 
disposition of grievances. Accordingly, they shall be observed: 

A. There is a burden of proof. The GA has the responsibility of convincing the Graduate Dean or panel of three 
things: a) that the Policies of Graduate Assistantships has not been followed; b) that the GA has been adversely 
affected; and c) and that the requested remedy is appropriate. 

B. All matters to be considered in support or defense of a grievance should be made known as early in the 
informal process as possible. Absent extenuating circumstances, matters not raised in the informal process 
should not be considered in the formal process. In both the informal and formal process, it is the responsibility 
of the GA and faculty member, respectively, to produce in a timely way the evidence they each wish 
considered, including any documents and witnesses. 

C. The Grievance Procedure is not a trial. Formal rules of evidence commonly associated with criminal and 
civil trials may be counterproductive in an academic investigatory process and shall not be applied. The Dean, 
Graduate Dean, and three-member panel shall give effect to the rules of confidentiality and privilege, but shall 
otherwise accept for consideration all matters which reasonable persons would accept as having probative value 
in the conduct of their affairs, giving it such weight as they consider proper. Unduly repetitive, irrelevant, or 
personally abusive material, however, should be excluded. They may also consider matters within the common 
knowledge and experience of University faculty, including published policies of the University System of 
Maryland and the University of Maryland. 

D. The GA may be assisted at any meeting by an advisor, who must be a registered, degree -seeking graduate 
student at the University. Although the GA is expected to take an active role in all meetings, the advisor may 
help with the presentation of arguments and evidence. 

E. The University has in place other grievance procedures and administrative processes designed to address 
specific types of claims. 4 These are meant to be the exclusive avenue for review and redress. Grievances that 
by their subject matter may be considered under other established institutional procedures must be brought 
under those procedures and may not be considered under this these Section VII formal procedures. Matters 
pertaining to the general level of wages, wage patterns, fringe benefits, or to other broad areas of financial 
management and staffing are not grievable. Matters expressly excluded from consideration under other 
procedures may not be grieved under these Section VII formal procedures. These procedures also may not be 
used to challenge faculty judgment about a GA's academic performance (including, for example, test scores, 
grades, waivers, dissertation defenses and other indicia of mastery of subject matter and taught skills). 

F. The filing of a grievance does not relieve the GA of the obligation to perform all duties as assigned unless 
and until otherwise decided pursuant to a decision under these procedures. All remedies will operate 
prospectively. 5 Financial awards (e.g., "back pay," "damages," "compensation," and "raises") may not be 
awarded. The acceptance of a proposed remedy by the GA shall terminate the grievance process. The matter 
may not then be further considered or additional remedies sought under other campus procedures. 

G. A decision may not be made at any step that conflicts with or modifies a policy, regulation, or grant of 
authority approved by the Board of Regents, the Chancellor, the President, the Provost, or the University Senate 
or with any applicable Federal or State of Maryland law. 

H. Only currently enrolled University of Maryland graduate students may initiate a formal grievance. The 
grievance must pertain to the GA's personal services, not those of another GA. Group grievances are not 
permitted, although similar grievances may be consolidated and processed together as a single issue. As a 

43 



general matter, where a number of individual grievances have been reduced into a single grievance, not more 
than three GAs selected by the group may be excused from their duties to attend. 

I. Because it is critical to address potentially corrosive grievances sooner than later, and because the remedies 
available are prospective, the time requirement established for initiating a formal grievance is necessary to the 
effective administration of the graduate program. Unless otherwise agreed in advance among the GA, the 
faculty member, and the Graduate Dean, strict adherence to them is a condition of review and appeal under 
these Section VII procedures. Time requirements are measured from the first occurrence of an event; 
"continuing" wrongs are not recognized for the purpose of satisfying time requirements. 

J. The Graduate Dean may delegate such parts of his responsibilities as he deems reasonable and efficient, 
provided the final decision and any remedy must be reviewed and approved by the Dean personally. 



1 In this Section VII, the term "faculty member" designates the individual directing and supervising the GA. Depending on the 
circumstances of the GA's appointment, this person may, in fact, be a University staff employee, and not on the faculty. It is the design of 
these procedures that the GA first raise the matter of concern with the individual whose direction or decision has given rise to complaint. 

2 In this Section VII, the term "Chair of the Department" shall also mean, as appropriate to the GA's appointment, the Program Director or 
the unit head in non-departmental colleges and schools and in administrative departments. 

3 For the purpose of this Section VII, "Dean of the appropriate college or school" or "Dean of the unit" means the academic dean of the unit 
where the assistantship is located. For assistantships in non-academic units, "Dean" shall mean the Vice President of the division. 

4 These include, for example, the Code of Academic Integrity, the Policy on Arbitrary and Capricious Grading, the Code of Student 
Conduct, the Procedures for Scholarly Misconduct, the Human Relations Code, the Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment, 

the Policy on Student Classification for Admission and Tuition Purposes, the University of Maryland Policy on Intellectual Property and 
the Policy on Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources. 

5 The resolution of a "workload" grievance, for example, may entail a reduction in work hours, future overload pay when approved and 
budgeted, time management training, and referral to the Center for Teaching Excellence. 

(December 2008) 



44 



Chapter 7: Financial Policies - Fellowships and Scholarships 
Graduate Fellowships and Scholarships 

Graduate fellowships are merit-based awards that enable the recipient to focus on graduate study, that do not 
have to be repaid, and that generally include both a stipend and tuition remission. Fellowships differ from 
Graduate Assistantships, which carry an obligation to teach classes, to work on a research project, or to perform 
administrative tasks. 

Fellowship offers generally are made by graduate programs to incoming students as part of a recruitment 
package; some are made to current students through competitive awards processes. Applicants to graduate 
programs and current students should contact the relevant program for more information on available 
fellowships. 

The University of Maryland is committed to diversity and encourages programs to offer support to a diverse 
range of students consistent with campus principles of equal opportunity. 

Recruitment and retention fellowships are funded either internally, through the Graduate School's University 
and Dean's Fellowships to colleges, or externally, through a variety of outside funding agencies. In addition, the 
Graduate School has instituted three major fellowships competitions: 

Flagship Fellowships are intended to help graduate programs to recruit and retain truly exceptional students. 
Flagship Fellowships are multi-year enhancement awards to be added to fellowship/assistantship offers made by 
graduate programs. Flagship Fellowship enhancements may total $40,000 per student over the duration of the 
award. The goal is to award ten Flagship Fellowships per year, reaching a steady state of approximately forty 
Flagship Fellows. 

Graduate Student Summer Research Fellowships provide support to outstanding doctoral students at "mid- 
career," that is, in the period approximately before, during, or after achievement of candidacy, and are intended 
to enable students to prepare for or complete a key benchmark in their program's requirements. Summer 
Research Fellowships carry stipends of $5,000. 

Ann G. Wylie Dissertation Fellowships are one-semester awards intended to support outstanding doctoral 
students who are in the final stages of writing their dissertation and whose primary source of support is 
unrelated to their dissertation. Wylie Dissertation Fellowships carry a stipend of $10,000 plus candidacy tuition 
remission and $800 toward the cost of health insurance. The Graduate School awards approximately 40 Wylie 
Dissertation Fellowships per year. 

In addition, the Graduate School administers competitions for four endowed awards: The Mabel S. Spencer 
Award for Excellence in Graduate Education, The James W. Longest Memorial Award for Social Science 
Research, The Michael J. Pelczar Award for Excellence in Graduate Study, and The Phi Delta Gamma Graduate 
Fellowship. 

Finally, the Graduate School administers the Jacob K. Goldhaber Travel Grants and the International 
Conference Student Support Award, which both provide funding for graduate students presenting academic 
work at conferences and professional meetings. 

Status 

Fellowships and scholarships are offered only to graduate students admitted to or enrolled in graduate degree 
programs at the University of Maryland. Fellows and scholars are expected to devote themselves full time to 
graduate study and to register full time as defined by the unit system. Students on fellowships and assistantships 
must be registered for 48 units. Audited courses do not generate units and cannot be used to determine full-time 
status. Fellows who also hold half-time assistantships need only register for 36 units to maintain full-time status. 

45 



Doctoral Candidates are automatically registered for Candidacy Tuition (899) each semester. This will satisfy 
the unit requirement for full-time status. 

Qualifications 

Students whose records indicate superior academic achievement and promise and who will increase diversity in 
their graduate program may be nominated for fellowships and scholarships. The determination of academic 
merit is based on undergraduate and graduate Grade Point Averages (GPA); scores on such national tests as 
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), and the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT); the judgment of academic professionals in letters of recommendation; the nominee's 
Statement of Goals and Research Interests; and the nominee's Statement of Experiences. Individual departments 
and graduate programs administer fellowships and scholarships funded by the Graduate School, designated 
departmental funds, or external sources such as government agencies and private foundations. 

Funding for Fellowships 

External Graduate Fellowships are fellowships sponsored and funded by organizations outside the university. 
Corporations, charitable foundations, and numerous other groups fund graduate fellowships. 

Private and Non-University Sponsored Fellowships. UMCP has several government and privately funded 
fellowships that are handled through the graduate programs and colleges. Some of these fellowships are won 
independently by students in national competitions; others are awarded directly to the colleges or programs, 
which then select student recipients. Students submitting applications for admission to graduate programs will 
be considered for such awards as appropriate; no additional application forms are required. Our graduate 
students are supported on fellowships from the Department of Defense, Ford Foundation, National Science 
Foundation, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, to name just a few. In addition, several 
graduate programs sponsor fellowship programs jointly with federal agencies, such as the National Institutes of 
Health, NASA, and the National Institute of Standards in Technology. 

Matching Tuition Scholarships for External Fellowships. These scholarships are awarded, subject to the 
availability of funding, to students who have received external fellowships that provide a stipend, but do not 
provide separate funds to cover the cost of tuition. The Graduate School policy on External Fellowship Tuition 
Remission is listed here. 

If the external fellowship also provides an institutional allowance, this allowance will be used to pay the 
fellow's tuition. If the tuition cost is in excess of the institutional allowance amount, the University will pay the 
excess tuition amount. If the tuition is less than the amount of the institutional allowance and, if the policy of 
the institution that awards the external fellowship permits, any institutional allowance funds remaining after 
tuition has been paid will be given to the fellow as a supplement to his/her stipend. 

Offer Letters 

A formal offer letter specifying the award of a Graduate School fellowship is sent to the student from the Dean 
of the Graduate School in the spring semester. This letter specifies the stipend level, the duration of the 
commitment, the amount of tuition remitted, and the details of the fellowship or scholarship. 

Duties 

No service of any kind, either during the tenure of a scholarship or fellowship or in the future, is to be required 
of a fellow or scholar by their mentor or their graduate program. Fellows and scholars will carry out 
independent research under the supervision and guidance of-and sometimes in collaboration with-their mentors. 
Typically, at the start of their tenure as fellows or scholars, inexperienced students will require more supervision 
and guidance. Eventually, however, fellows in particular, should be treated as junior research associates. Under 

46 



no circumstances are they to be assigned routine technical or administrative duties or given teaching 
assignments during the years in which they are supported by fellowships or scholarships. 

Supplementation of Support 

Students are generally not allowed to hold two full fellowships ($15,000 or higher each) concurrently. Please 
contact the graduate school if this situation occurs. 

Departmental fellowships or other special funds may provide additional support. A fellowship or scholarship 
may be supplemented by an appointment to a position such as a half-time assistantship or by hourly 
employment not to exceed 10 hours per week. International fellows should consult the Office of International 
Education Services by phone at 301-314-7740, regarding supplementary employment. 

Gifts, departmental fellowships, or other special funds may provide additional support, in an amount not to 
exceed half the stipend of the fellowship or scholarship. A fellowship or scholarship may be supplemented by 
an appointment to a position such as a half-time or quarter-time graduate assistantship, or by hourly 
employment not to exceed 10 hours per week. International fellows should consult the Office of International 
Education Services by phone at 301-314-7740, regarding supplementary employment. 

Additional On-Campus and Outside Employment 

According to university policy, full time fellows and scholars may work on-campus or off-campus for a 
maximum of 10 hours per week in addition to holding the fellowship or scholarship. In other words, fellows 
may be hired on a half-assistantship (which requires 10 hours per week) or work 10 hours per week on an 
hourly basis. This restriction on employment is intended to assure that students make rapid progress toward 
their degrees. 



Additional On-Campus and Outside Employment 

According to university policy, full time fellows and scholars may work on-campus or off-campus for a 
maximum of 10 hours per week in addition to holding the fellowship or scholarship. In other words, fellows 
may be hired on a half-assistantship (which requires 10 hours per week) or work 10 hours per week on an 
hourly basis. This restriction on employment is intended to assure that students make rapid progress toward 
their degrees. International fellows should consult the Office of International Education Services by phone at 
301-314-7740, regarding supplementary employment. 

Deferral or Duplication of Support 

Students are not allowed to hold two full fellowships or scholarships, either internal or external awards, or a 
combination of both, simultaneously. Fellows or scholars who receive offers of external fellowships, such 
as National Science Foundation , Ford Foundation Fellowships , or any other private or university-administered 
fellowships may defer their Graduate School fellowship or scholarship offer until such time as their other 
fellowship expires. Assuming satisfactory academic progress at that time, the student may again resume the 
Graduate School fellowship or scholarship. 



Overload Payments for Graduate Fellows 

If a circumstance arises that a fellow must work over the 10 hours per week, an overload form is 

necessary. This includes the winter term. Overload requests should be for temporary, short-term arrangements 

47 



only. The request must be limited to one semester per request and must be received and approved by the 
Graduate School prior to the beginning of the appointment. 

Stipends 

Fellowships are awarded for the academic year only. Stipend disbursements for US citizens and Permanent 
Residents may be given in lump sums at the start of each semester or spread out monthly. This disbursement is 
processed through the student award system. For international students, those on a Jl or Fl visas, the 
disbursement must be processed through payroll. Fellows must receive stipends within the ranges below in 
order to qualify for associated benefits. Step I is for students in their first year of support who have no advanced 
degrees; Step II, for students in a second year of support at UMCP or for students in their first year of support 
who possess a master's degree; and Step III, for students who have been advanced to candidacy for the doctoral 
degree. 

Tuition Remission and Mandatory Fees 

The Graduate School provides tuition remission and health insurance subsidies to graduate fellowship recipients 
who are paid from University and Dean's Fellowship funds, or from external fellowship funds meeting the 
criteria specified below. Tuition remission and health insurance subsidies are subject to continued availability of 
resources. Tuition remission will be provided only for credits that are degree applicable. 



I. GRADUATE FELLOWS HOLDING UNIVERSITY OR DEAN'S FELLOWSHIPS 
the Student Award System found onwww.ares.umd.edu) 



(entered through 



A. A University Fellow may be eligible for up to 12 credits of fellowship tuition remission per 
semester (Spring and Fall only). A University Fellowship (UF) must supplement a standard support package 
(assistantship, external fellowship, Dean's Fellowship, and/or other internal fellowship). Tuition remission 
credits deriving from that support package will be applied first and augmented by fellowship tuition remission 
up to the maximum remission indicated below: 



TYPE 


UF 

FUNDING 

PER 

YEAR 




TOTAL 
ANNUAL CREDITS 


FALL 


SPRING 


University 
Fellowship (paid in lyr) 


$20,000 


Maximum 
fellowship credits: 


24 


12 


12 


University Fellowship (paid 

over 2 yrs) 


$10,000 


Maximum 
fellowship credits: 


10 


5 


5 


University Fellowship (paid 

over 4 yrs) 


$5,000 


Maximum 
fellowship credits: 












B. A Dean's Fellow maybe eligible for up to 12 credits of fellowship tuition remission per semester (Spring and 
Fall only). A Dean's Fellowship (DF) may be combined with a University Fellowship, additional Dean's 
Fellowships, and/or other funding (assistantship, external fellowship, and/or other internal fellowship) to create 
the support package. Tuition remission credits deriving from other funding will be applied first. Tuition 
remission credits for Dean's Fellowships will be provided up to the maximum remission indicated below: 



48 



TYPE 


DF 
FUNDING 
PER YEAR 




TOTAL 
ANNUAL 
CREDITS 


FALL 


SPRING 


Three Dean's Fellowships 


>$15,000 


Maximum fellowship 
credits: 


24 


12 


12 


Two Dean's Fellowships 


>$10,000 


Maximum fellowship 
credits: 


10 


5 


5 


One Dean's Fellowship 


$5,000 


Maximum fellowship 
credits: 












II. GRADUATE FELLOWS HOLDING PRESTIGIOUS EXTERNAL FELLOWSHIPS 

(use the Request for Tuition Remission for External Fellowships and Scholarships form 

at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu, select Current Students-General Forms for Graduate Students) 

Graduate students holding prestigious external fellowships may be eligible for fellowship tuition remission. A 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or contractual agreement must be filed with the Graduate School. 
Unless otherwise specified in the MOU or contract, fellowship tuition remission credits up to 10 credits will be 
awarded as follows: 

• A prestigious external fellowship carrying an annual stipend of at least $15,000 may be awarded up 
to 10 credits of tuition remission per semester. 

• A prestigious external fellowship carrying an annual stipend of at least $7,500 may be awarded up to 5 
credits of tuition remission per semester. 

• A prestigious external fellowship carrying an annual stipend of less than $7,500 is not eligible for 
tuition remission. 

III. GRADUATE FELLOWS ON FEDERAL TRAINING GRANTS 

(use the Training Grant Fellowship Matching Tuition Remission Request form 

at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu, select Current Students-General Forms for Graduate Students) 

Federal Training Grants covering only partial tuition for fellows may be eligible for an institutional match of 
fellowship tuition remission. Upon written agreement with the Graduate School, tuition remission may be 
awarded to Training Grants on a 60% (grant) / 40% (GS) matching basis. 

IV. GRADUATE FELLOWS HOLDING INTERNAL FELLOWSHIPS OTHER THAN UNIVERSITY 
OR DEAN'S FELLOWSHIPS 

Fellowship tuition remission is not awarded to fellowships funded from department or college sources; state 
monies from any source, including DRIF, UM, and UMCP Foundations, unless formal agreements have been 
made with the Graduate School. Tuition for these fellowships should be charged to the account to which the 
stipend is being charged. 

V. TUITION REMISSION FOR SUMMER SESSIONS AND WINTERTERM 

Fellowship tuition remission is not awarded for Summer Sessions or Winter term. 

VI. TUITION REMISSION FOR PROGRAMS WITH NON-STANDARD TUITION 



49 



Fellows enrolled in graduate programs with non-standard tuition rates (whether by course or by flat-fee pricing) 
will be responsible for tuition costs above the standard rate covered by fellowship tuition remission. 

VII. OTHER 

The Graduate School's Wylie Dissertation Fellowships, Spencer Award, and Longest Award are eligible for 
fellowship tuition remission. Flagship Fellowships and Graduate Student Summer Research Fellowships do not 
earn fellowship tuition 
remission. See http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/prospective_students/gs_fellowships.html. 



Residency Classification 

The official residency classification of students holding fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships does not 
change as result of their awards, but remain resident or non-resident as indicated in the original admissions 
offer. Fellows and scholars who also hold a half-time graduate assistantship will be billed in-state tuition as a 
benefit of their status only while they hold that assistantship. When/if the graduate student is no longer 
supported by the assistantship-including summer months if the student is on a 9.5-month assistantship-he or she 
will be billed according to their official residency status determined at the time of their admission. 

Students are expected to be aware of their official residency classification status, how their assistantship, 
scholarship, or fellowship may affect their billing for each semester, and to address any problems immediately 
to avoid incurring unexpected tuition charges. 

Questions about residency classification and changing status for those who intend to become residents of the 
State of Maryland for tuition and billing purposes under the University System of Maryland Board of Regents 
policy should be addressed to: 

Residency Classification Office 
Room 1 130 Mitchell Building 
Phone 301-314-9596 
Web: http://www.testudo.umd.edu/rco 
Email: resclass@umd.edu 



Tax Status 

Fellows and scholars must pay tax on the stipends they receive to cover living and general expenses, but may 
deduct certain educational expenses. Amounts awarded in payment of tuition are not taxable for fellows. Taxes 
are not withheld from stipends disbursed through student financial aid so you may choose to file an estimated 
tax payment. Please refer to the Internal Revenue Service Tax Publication 970, Benefits for Education , for more 
information regarding the tax status of fellowship and scholarship stipends or call 1-800-829-1040. 

Health Insurance 

Graduate fellows supported by University Fellowships, Dean's Fellowships, or prestigious external 

fellowships are eligible to receive a reimbursement of one -half of the annual United Health Care (UHC) 
insurance premium for individual coverage. 

The UHC plan must be purchased prior to submitting a request for reimbursement to the Graduate School. The 

Health Insurance Reimbursement Request Form can be found 

athttp://www. gradschool.umd.edu/images/uploads/Health%20Insurance%20Form%20Fillable.pdf. 

50 



University or Dean's Fellows must provide a Health Insurance Reimbursement Request Form, proof of 
payment, and copy of insurance card. Holders of prestigious external fellowships must present, in addition, a 
copy of the fellowship MOU or contract. 

Wylie Dissertation Fellows are entitled to a sum of $800.00 in addition to their stipend for the cost of the 
health insurance premium for one semester of coverage. The sum is automatic and need not be requested. 

The following graduate fellows are not eligible for this subsidy: fellows holding internal fellowships other than 

University or Dean's Fellowships; fellows holding half or full-time assistantships entitling them to employee 

health insurance benefits; and fellows who are part-time students. 

For information on the United Health Care plan, please visit the University Health Center website 

athttp://www. health. umd.edu/about/insuranceandfees. United Health Care offers online enrollment 

at http://www.firststudent.com/. 



Vacation and Sick Leave 

There is no policy on vacation and sick leave for fellows or scholars. Fellows and scholars are required to 
maintain satisfactory academic performance in order to retain their support. A fellow or scholar may request 
deferment of a semester or year of fellowship tenure if documented personal illness prevents him or her from 
satisfactorily completing academic requirements. 



Facilities 

Fellows are fully integrated into departmental activities and are to be provided with the same facilities as other 
graduate students, such as mailboxes, office space, access to a telephone and computer, and email and internet 
access. 



51 



Chapter 8: Academic Policies - General Policies and The Academic Record 

Developing a Program 

The student is responsible for ascertaining and complying with the policies and procedures of the Graduate 
School and all applicable graduate program requirements that govern the individual program of study. 
Registration for the newly admitted graduate student seeking a certificate or degree begins with a visit to the 
student's academic advisor in the graduate program to which the student has been admitted. There the student 
will obtain information about specific certificate or degree requirements for satisfactory progress that 
supplement those of the Graduate School . The student should consult the Schedule of Classes , and should 
develop an individual program of study and research in consultation with his or her graduate advisor. Students 
admitted as Advanced Special Students may seek advice from the Graduate School , Graduate Directors, or 
from appropriate faculty members. Petitions for waivers of regulations of graduate degree requirements or for 
appeals of decisions of graduate program faculty or administrators should be directed to the Dean of the 
Graduate School, 2125 Lee Building. 

Academic Integrity 

The University is an intellectual community. Its fundamental purpose is the creation and dissemination of 
knowledge. Like all other communities, the University can function properly only if its members adhere to 
clearly established goals and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of the University is the commitment 
to the principles of truth and academic honesty. The Code of Academic Integrity is designed to ensure that the 
principle of academic honesty is upheld. While all members of the University community share this 
responsibility, The Code of Academic Integrity is designed so that special responsibility for upholding the 
principle of academic honesty lies with students. 

Honor Pledge 

On every examination, paper or other academic exercise not specifically exempted by the instructor, the student 
will write by hand and sign the following pledge: 

I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this examination. 

Failure to sign the pledge is not an honors offense, but neither is it a defense in case of violation of this Code. 
Students who do not sign the pledge will be given the opportunity to do so. Refusal to sign must be explained to 
the instructor. Signing or non-signing of the pledge will not be considered in grading or judicial procedures. 
Material submitted electronically should contain the pledge; submission implies signing the pledge. 

On examinations, no assistance is authorized unless given by or expressly allowed by the instructor. On other 
assignments, the pledge means that the assignment has been done without academic dishonesty, as defined in 
the Code of Academic Integrity, available at http://www. studenthonorcouncil.umd.edu/code. html . 

The pledge is a reminder that at the University of Maryland students carry primary responsibility for academic 
integrity because the meaningfulness of their degrees depends on it. Faculty are urged to emphasize the 
importance of academic honesty and of the pledge as its symbol. 

Penalties for Violations of Academic Integrity 

Students who are found to have falsified, fabricated, or plagiarized in any context, such as course work, 
laboratory research, archival research, or thesis / dissertation writing— will be referred to the Office of Student 
Conduct. The Office of Student Conduct has some discretion in determining penalties for violations of the 
University's standards of academic integrity, but the normal sanction for a graduate student found responsible 
for a violation of academic integrity will be dismissal (suspension or expulsion) from the University. 

52 



To review the whole policy on academic integrity, see the University of Maryland Code of Academic Integrity 
at http://www. studenthonorcouncil.umd.edu or http://www.osc.umd.edu . The Code was amended on May 5, 
2005. 

Academic Record (Transcript) 

A graduate student's academic record (transcript) is intended to serve as a complete history of the student's 
academic progress at the University of Maryland. Under no circumstances will academic records be altered 
because of dissatisfaction with a grade or other academic accomplishment. 

Grade Point Average Computation 

The A is calculated at 4 quality points, B at 3 quality points and C at 2 quality points. The grades of D, F and I 
receive no quality points. Students do not earn credit toward the degree for courses in which they receive a 
grade of D or F. For graduate students, all courses taken that are numbered 400 and above (except 500-level 
courses, those numbered 799, 898, or 899, and those graded with an S) will be used in the calculation of the 
grade point average. A student may repeat a course in an effort to earn a better grade. Whether higher or lower, 
the most recent grade will be used in computing the grade point average. Grades for graduate students remain as 
part of the student's permanent record. Changes in previously recorded grades may be made if timely (within 
one semester) and if the original instructor certifies that an actual mistake was made in determining or recording 
the grade. The change must be approved by the department chair and the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Graduate credit transferred from another institution will not be included in the calculation of the grade point 
average. 

Criteria for Courses to be Accepted for Graduate Credit 

Any courses, workshops or seminars that take place in a span of time less than a normal academic semester or 
summer session and offering graduate credit to the participants must meet the following criteria: 

■ There must be 15 "contact hours" per graduate credit. 

• Lectures: 50 minutes of lecture are equivalent to 1 contact hour. 

• Non-lecture contact (laboratories, workshops, discussion and problem-working sessions, etc.): 
One two-hour or three-hour session is equivalent to one contact hour. 

■ No more than three "contact hours" per day will be permitted. (Three "contact hours" are equivalent to 
0.2 credits). 

■ Credit may be accumulated at the rate of no more than one credit per week. 

■ Courses numbered at the 100-, 200-, 300, and 500-level are ineligible for graduate credit. 400 level 
classes are eligible for graduate credit provided they were not used in fulfillment of an undergraduate 
degree requirement. 

Credit by Examination 

Credit by examination will be awarded upon successful completion of a formal examination (typically written) 
at a normal standard for examinations within the department/program. The examination must be approved by a 
committee composed of the examiner plus two Full Members of the Graduate Faculty. A copy of the 
examination, the student's answers, and the names of the examiner and the approving faculty member must be 
placed in the student's file in the department/program. 



53 



Normally, credit by examination is not available for 600 level and higher courses. The maximum number of 
credits by examination that can be applied to a master's degree is 12 for a non-thesis master's degree and six for 
the thesis option. The graduate program in which the student is enrolled may establish a limit on the number of 
credits that may be earned in this manner. Information on fees for Credit by Examination is available from the 
Registrar. 

Incomplete Grades 

An incomplete is a mark that an instructor may award to a student whose work in a course has been 
qualitatively satisfactory, but who is unable to complete some portion of the work required because of illness or 
other circumstance beyond the student's control. In awarding the mark of "I" for graduate courses other than 
799 and 899, instructors must fill out an "Incomplete Contract for Graduate Students." The contract will specify 
the work remaining to be completed. It must be signed by the instructor and the student and maintained by the 
department offering the course. The student is responsible for providing a copy of the contract to the director of 
graduate studies in his or her program. 

The mark of incomplete in 500-, 600-, 700-, and 800-level courses will not automatically roll-over to letter 
grades. Normally, students are expected to complete courses in which they have received an "I" by a date no 
more than twelve months from the beginning of the semester in which the course was taken. The mark of 
incomplete in 400-level courses will be governed by the rules for awarding incompletes to undergraduate 
students, including the provision of automatically converting an "I" to a letter grade. 

Advisors should stay current with their students in urging completion of incomplete grades, and programs 
should review the status of incompletes in their annual reviews of students' progress toward their degrees. 
Students will remain in good standing despite marks of incomplete if the courses are not required for their 
degrees. For courses required for graduation, students will be considered to be making satisfactory progress 
only if they fulfill the conditions of any outstanding incomplete contracts in a timely manner. An "I" can remain 
in place on a student's transcript for a maximum of one year. 

Departments and programs may specify the maximum number of incomplete credits students may carry, 
exclusive of credits in 799 and 899. 

Transfer of Credit 

All graduate study credits offered as transfer credit must meet the following criteria: 

■ No more than six credit hours of graduate work may be transferred from another institution, unless the 
program has special approval by the Graduate Council. When changing programs within the University 
of Maryland, the student may request inclusion of credits earned at the University of Maryland. When 
moving from non-degree to degree-seeking status, Advanced Special Students may transfer up to 
twelve (12) graduate credits to the degree program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Program. 

■ The advisor and Graduate Director will need to certify that transfer courses are applicable to the 
student's program and, for non-University of Maryland courses, that the courses have been revalidated. 

■ Credit must have been granted by a regionally accredited U.S. institution or foreign university. If the 
latter, evaluation by the staff of the International Education Services and the Graduate School is 
required. 

The courses must be graduate level and have been taken for graduate credit at the original institution. 
The student must have earned a grade of "B" or better in the course. 
The credit must not have been used to satisfy the requirements for any other degree. 
The student must furnish an official transcript to the Graduate School. 

Transfer work satisfies only the 400-level requirements for the master's degree and does not apply to 
the upper-level requirements. 



54 



■ The transfer course work must have been taken within seven years of the award of a University of 
Maryland master's degree for which the student is currently enrolled (all other course work must be 
taken within five years of the award of master's degree.) 

A student seeking acceptance of transfer credit is advised to submit the necessary transcripts and certification of 
program approval to the Graduate School as promptly as possible for its review and decision. It should be noted 
that programs may impose more stringent requirements and time limitations concerning the transfer of credits. 
In such cases the Graduate School must be notified accordingly. A form for Transfer or Inclusion of Credit is 
available online on the Graduate School's 
webpage: http://www. gradschool.umd.edu/images/uploads/Transfer of Inclusion Form.pdf 

Satisfactory Progress 

The admission of all graduate students is continued at the discretion of the Graduate Director of the program 
and the Dean of the Graduate School, consistent with the policies and practices of the Graduate School and 
graduate program. A student must make satisfactory progress in meeting programmatic requirements, must 
demonstrate the ability to succeed in his or her course of studies or research, and must attain performance 
minima specified by the graduate program in all or in particular courses; otherwise his or her enrollment will be 
terminated. Determinations of satisfactory progress occur at the graduate program level. Please contact the 
Graduate Director for conditions for satisfactory progress. 

Good Standing 

In order to maintain good academic standing, every graduate student must maintain a cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of 3.0 for all courses taken at the University. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation by the 
Graduate School. When a student is placed on probation, the Graduate School will notify both the student and 
the Graduate Director of the student's program. Permission of the academic advisor and the Graduate Director 
will be required for a student on probation to register for courses. Probation will be lifted when the student 
achieves a cumulative GPA of 3.0. 

A student on probation who has completed fewer than 15 credits must raise the GPA to 3.0 or above by the end 
of the semester in which the student completes 15 credit hours or be dismissed from the Graduate School. A 
student who has completed 16 or more hours of course work and whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will be 
placed on probation and will have one semester in which to raise his or her GPA to a 3.0 or be dismissed from 
the Graduate School. 

Time Limitations for Master's Degrees and Certificates 

With the exception of the six semester hours of graduate level course credits applicable for possible transfer to 
the master's degree and certificate programs, all requirements for the master's degree or graduate certificate 
must be completed within a five-year period. Time taken for an approved Leave of Absence for Childbearing, 
Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care does not count toward this five-year limit. 

Time Limitations for Doctoral Degrees 

Students must complete the entire program for the doctoral degree, including the dissertation and final 
examination, during a four-year period after admission to candidacy, but no later than nine years after admission 
to the doctoral program. Students must be advanced to candidacy within five years of admission to the doctoral 
program. Under certain circumstances, time extensions may be granted by the Graduate School as outlined 

55 



below. Admission to the degree program terminates if the requirements are not completed in the time specified. 
Time taken for an approved Leave of Absence for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or Dependent Care is not 
counted in these time limitations. 

Time Extensions 

Master's Degree and Certificate Students 

A student who has failed to complete all requirements by the prescribed deadlines may petition his or her 
graduate program for a one-year extension of time in which to complete the outstanding requirements. This 
extension may be granted by the graduate program, which must then notify the Graduate School in writing of its 
decision. The Graduate School will confirm this decision in writing to the student. 

A student who has failed to complete all requirements for the degree following the granting of an initial time 
extension by his or her graduate program, and who wishes to pursue the degree, must seek an additional 
extension by petitioning the graduate program. If the graduate program supports the request, the request must be 
forwarded to the Graduate School for review with a letter of support from the Graduate Director that includes a 
statement that the graduate program has approved the request. Departmental approval may be either a vote of 
the department as a whole or of a committee designated to deal with such matters, such as the Graduate 
Committee. The letter must include a time table listing specific goals to be accomplished at various points 
during the extension period. The letter should also include a request for revalidation of courses that will be more 
than five years old at the time of graduation. Typically, this extension will be for a maximum of one year. The 
Graduate School's decision will be communicated in writing to the petitioner and a copy will be sent to the 
student's graduate program. 

Doctoral Students 

Extensions of time for doctoral students must be requested from the Graduate School by the doctoral program. 
The first request for an extension of the deadline for admission to candidacy or completion of the doctoral 
dissertation requires a letter of support from the Graduate Director. The letter must include a timetable listing 
specific goals to be accomplished at various points during the extension period. Normally, the extension will be 
for a maximum of one year. 

The request for a second extension requires a letter of support from the Graduate Director that includes a 
statement that the graduate program has approved the request. Departmental approval may be either a vote of 
the department as a whole or of a committee designated to deal with such matters, such as the Graduate 
Committee. The letter must include a timetable that lists specific goals to be accomplished at various points 
during the extension period. Typically this extension will be for a maximum of one year. 

Requests for a third extension will be honored only in rare instances when serious and unforeseen 
circumstances that are not covered under the Leave of Absence for Childbearing, Adoption, Illness or 
Dependent Care policy have interfered with the student's normal progress toward the degree. The request for a 
third extension requires a letter of support from the Graduate Director that includes a statement that the program 
has approved the request. The letter must include a timetable listing specific goals to be accomplished at various 
times during the extension period. Typically, this extension will be for a maximum of one year. The third 
extension is the final extension. Additional extensions will not be approved by the Graduate School. 

In the event that a graduate program wishes to continue a student in the program beyond a third extension, the 
following procedures must be followed: 

■ The student must apply to be readmitted to the graduate program. The application must be 

accompanied by a letter of support from the Graduate Director, which indicates the approval of the 
program for the readmission. 



56 



The Graduate Director's letter must include a timetable listing specific goals to be accomplished at 
various points during the re-admission period. 

Doctoral students must be advanced to candidacy within one year of re-admission. No extensions will 
be given for this deadline. 

Doctoral students who have previously advanced to candidacy and who apply for readmission and re- 
advancement to candidacy must demonstrate that their knowledge is current and consistent with those 
standards that are in effect in the graduate program at the time that the re-advancement to candidacy is 
made. The program will determine what constitutes an acceptable level of current knowledge on a 
case-by-case basis and must include this determination in its recommendation for readmission. This 
could mean that the student will be required to retake the comprehensive examination or otherwise 
demonstrate that the student's knowledge is consistent with current standards of the graduate program. 
Re-admitted students who have been advanced to candidacy will be allowed four years to complete the 
dissertation. No extensions will be given after this deadline. 



57 



Chapter 9: Academic Policies - Doctoral Degrees 



Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Doctoral Degrees 
Credit Requirements 

The Graduate School requires that every student seeking the Ph.D. or D.M.A. satisfactorily complete a 
minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation credits (899); a student seeking an Ed.D. must satisfactorily 
complete a minimum of six semester hours of dissertation credits (899). The number of research and other 
credit hours required in the program varies with the degree and program in question. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Preliminary examinations, or such other substantial tests as the graduate programs may elect, are prerequisites 
for advancement to candidacy. A student must be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate within five years after 
admission to the doctoral program and at least six months before the date on which the degree will be conferred. 
It is the responsibility of the student to submit an application for admission to candidacy when all the 
requirements for candidacy have been fulfilled. Applications for admission to candidacy are made in duplicate 
by the student and submitted to the graduate program for further action and transmission to the Graduate 
School. Application forms may be obtained at the Graduate School, Room 2123, Lee Building, or on the web. 
Paperwork must be received by the Graduate School prior to the 25th of the month in order for the advancement 
to become effective the first day of the following month. 

Doctoral candidates are automatically registered for six (6) credits of Doctoral Dissertation Research (899), for 
which they pay the flat candidacy tuition. 

Research Assurances 

Human Subject Research 

Everyone at the University of Maryland who is conducting research that involves human subjects must obtain 
approval in advance from the Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB is charged with approving the 
initiation of research involving human subjects and conducts periodic reviews of that research to ensure that all 
projects comply with Federal regulations. These regulations are strict, and the Graduate School urges all 
graduate students to consult with the IRB before beginning any research involving living subjects. For 
application forms and guidelines on such issues as research involving minors or prisoners, surveys, and the use 
of audio taping, videotaping, digital recordings, and photographs, please see the Institutional Review Board's 
website ( http://www.umresearch.umd.edu/IRB/ ). 

Other Research 

If the dissertation research involves the use of vertebrate animals, animal use protocols must be approved in 
advance by the Animal Care and Use Committee. If the dissertation research involves hazardous materials, 
either biological or chemical, or recombinant RNA/DNA, the research must be approved by the appropriate 
University committee. These research assurances must be approved prior to the initiation of any dissertation- 
related research, and the approvals must be provided to the Graduate School at the time the student submits the 
Nomination of Examining Committee form. 



58 



The Doctoral Dissertation and Examination 

A dissertation is required of all candidates for a doctoral degree. The Graduate School has established the 
following procedures for the conduct of the doctoral dissertation examination. 

■ The Dissertation. The ability to do independent research must be demonstrated by an original 
dissertation on a topic approved by the graduate program in which the student is earning the degree. 

■ Eligibility. A student is eligible to defend a dissertation if the student (a) has advanced to candidacy, 
(b) has met all program requirements for a dissertation examination, (c) is in good standing as a 
graduate student at the University, (d) is registered for at least one credit, (e) has a valid Graduate 
School-approved Dissertation Examining Committee, and (f) if this is the second examination, the 
examination has been approved by the Graduate School. 

■ Dissertation Examining Committee Membership. The Committee must include a minimum of five 
members of the Graduate Faculty, at least three of whom must be Full Members. The Chair of the 
Committee normally will be the student's advisor, who will be a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty, 
or who has been granted an exception to the policy by the Dean of the Graduate School. Each 
Committee will have appointed to it a representative of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

■ Nomination of the Dissertation Examining Committee. Membership on a Dissertation Examining 
Committee requires nomination by the student's advisor and the Graduate Director of the student's 
graduate program, and approval by the Dean of the Graduate School. The nomination of a Dissertation 
Examining Committee should be provided to the Graduate School at least six weeks before the date of 
the expected dissertation examination. The dissertation examination cannot be held until the Graduate 
School approves the composition of the Dissertation Examining Committee. Furthermore, if the 
Graduate Faculty status of any member of an approved Dissertation Examining Committee changes, 
the approval of the Dissertation Examining Committee may be void, and a new Dissertation 
Examining Committee nomination form may be required to be approved by the Graduate School. 

■ Chair. Each Dissertation Examining Committee will have a chair, who must be a Full Member of the 
Graduate Faculty or, by special permission, has been otherwise appointed by the Dean of the Graduate 
School . Dissertation Examining Committees may be co-chaired upon written recommendation of the 
program's Graduate Director and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School; at least one of 
the co-chairs must be a Full Member of the University of Maryland Graduate Faculty. 

■ Representative of the Dean of the Graduate School. Each Dissertation Examining Committee will 
have appointed to it a representative of the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean's Representative 
should have some background or interest related to the student's research. The Dean's Representative 
must be a tenured member of the Graduate Faculty at the University of Maryland and must be from a 
graduate program other than the home program of the chair and co-chair (if one exists) of the 
examination committee. In cases where a student is in an interdisciplinary graduate program, the 
Dean's Representative must be from a unit other than the home unit(s) of the chair of the committee 
and student's advisor. 

■ Special Members. Individuals from outside the University of Maryland who have been approved for 
Special Membership in the Graduate Faculty may serve on Dissertation Examining Committees. These 
Special Members must be in addition to the required three Full Members of the University of Maryland 
Graduate Faculty. For procedures to nominate an individual for Special Membership, please refer to 
the section below on Graduate Faculty. 

■ Service of former University of Maryland faculty members. Graduate Faculty who terminate 
employment at University of Maryland (and who do not have emeritus status) retain their status as 
members of the Graduate Faculty for a twelve- month period following their termination. Thus, they 
may serve as members and chairs (but not as Dean's Representatives) of Dissertation Examining 

59 



Committees during this twelve-month period if they are otherwise eligible. After that time, they may 
no longer serve as chairs of Dissertation Examining Committees, although, if granted the status of 
Special Members of the Graduate Faculty, they may serve as co-chairs. 

■ Professors Emeriti and Associate Professors Emeriti may serve on Dissertation Examining 
Committees provided they are members of the Graduate Faculty. 

Open Dissertation Examination 

The dissertation examination will consist of two parts: 

■ Part 1 will be a public presentation by the candidate on the main aspects of the research reported in 
the dissertation. During Part 1, questions from the audience to the candidate will be permitted. For 
questions from persons who are not members of the Dissertation Examining Committee, the Chair of 
the Dissertation Examining Committee will have discretion to decide whether such questions are 
germane to the topic of the dissertation and how much time will be allotted for the answers. 

■ Part 2 will be a formal examination of the candidate by the Dissertation Examination Committee. 
This part will be open only to the Dissertation Examination Committee, other members of the Graduate 
Faculty, and graduate students from the candidate's graduate program. During Part 2, only members of 
the Dissertation Examination Committee will be permitted to ask questions. Programs may vote to 
establish a policy to have Part 2 be open only to members of the Dissertation Examining Committee 
and members of the Graduate Faculty. 

■ Attendance at the final discussion and vote will be limited to the members of the Dissertation 
Examining Committee. 

■ Announcements of the date, time, and location of the examination, as well as the candidate's name 
and the dissertation title, will be disseminated five working days in advance to all members of the 
Graduate Faculty and graduate students within the graduate program in which the candidate's degree is 
to be awarded. Mass-distribution methods, such as e-mail, a faculty/student newsletter, or individual 
announcements are acceptable. Merely posting a paper notice on a corridor bulletin board will not 
constitute a sufficient announcement. 

■ Departments and graduate programs may petition the Dean of the Graduate School for exceptions to 
these policies. 

Procedures for the Oral Dissertation Examination 

■ Oral Examination Requirement. Each doctoral candidate is required to defend orally his or her 
doctoral dissertation as a requirement in partial fulfillment of the doctoral degree. 

■ Committee Preparation. The members of the Dissertation Examining Committee must receive the 
dissertation at least ten working days before the scheduled examination. Should the Dissertation 
Examining Committee deem it reasonable and appropriate, it may require submission of the 
dissertation more than ten working days in advance of the examination. 

■ Attendance at the Examination. Oral examinations must be attended by all members of the student's 
officially established Dissertation Examining Committee as approved by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. All examinations must be open to all members of the University of Maryland Graduate 
Faculty. Programs may wish routinely to open dissertation examinations to a broader audience. In such 
cases, program policies must be established, recorded, and made available to all doctoral students. 
Should a last-minute change in the constitution of the Dissertation Examining Committee be required, 
the change must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School in consultation with the Graduate 
Director of the student's graduate program and the chair of the student's Dissertation Examining 
Committee. 

■ Location of the Examination. Oral examinations must be held in University facilities that are readily 
accessible to all members of the Dissertation Examining Committee and others attending the 
examination. The chair of the dissertation examining committee selects the time and place for the 
examination. 



60 



The Dean's Representative. The Dean's Representative must be identified at the beginning of the 

examination. The responsibilities of the Dean's Representative include the following: ensuring that the 

procedures of the oral examination comply with those of the Graduate School (as described herein) and 

reporting to the Dean of the Graduate School any unusual problems experienced in the conduct of the 

examination. 

Invalidation of the Examination. The Dean of the Graduate School may void any examination not 

carried out in accordance with the procedures and policies of the Graduate School. In addition, upon 

recommendation of the Dean's Representative, the Dean may rule an oral examination to be null and 

void. 

Emergency Substitution Procedure. The Graduate School is aware that last-minute emergencies can 

prevent a committee member from attending a scheduled dissertation examination and will work with 

the chair of the examining committee and/or Graduate Director to make last-minute substitutions in 

committee membership to allow the examination to take place as scheduled. 

• The request must be sent in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. Fax or e-mail 
requests are acceptable. A telephone call to the Graduate School explaining that an emergency 
request is coming will facilitate the process. 

• The proposed substitute must be a member of the Graduate Faculty consistent with the rules 
for committee membership. Thus, if the Dean's Representative (who must be a tenured faculty 
member) could not attend, the substitution of an untenured member of the Graduate Faculty 
would not be acceptable. 

• Once the written request has been received, the substitution will be made, usually within the 
hour, provided that the revised committee meets the requirements for committee membership. 

• When the substitution has been made, a written confirmation, in the same format as the 
request was received (fax or e-mail) will be sent out, along with a telephone confirmation. 
The substitution is not official, however, until the written confirmation has been received in 
the graduate program. 

• An examination that is held with one or more substitute members on the committee, but 
without prior written confirmation from the Graduate School that the substitution(s) have 
been approved, will be voided and the examination will have to be repeated. 

• A copy of the written request and the written confirmation must be placed in the student's file 
for future reference. 

Remote Participation in a Dissertation Defense 

All members of a Dissertation Examining Committee must be physically present in the examination 
room during the entire dissertation defense and during the committee's private deliberations following 
the examination. Participation by telephone is not permitted under any circumstances. Remote 
participation by video teleconferencing is permitted under the following circumstances 

• Permission to conduct a remote-participation defense must be obtained by the dissertation 
chair from the Graduate School in advance. In making this request, the chair must indicate in 
writing that he/she has read the rules for a remote defense listed below. 

• A competent video technician must be present at both the University site and the remote 
location for the entire duration of the defense in the event that technical difficulties arise. 

• Only one remote site may be used during the defense. 

• The candidate, the committee chair, and the Dean's Representative must all be present in the 
examination room. None of them may be at the remote site. 

• The program must pay for all of the costs of the video teleconferencing arrangements. 

Student Presentation. The student is permitted to present briefly a summary of the dissertation, 
emphasizing the important results and giving an explanation of the reasoning that led to the 
conclusions reached. 



61 



■ Opportunity for Questioning by Members of the Dissertation Examining Committee. The chair 
invites questions in turn from each member of the Dissertation Examining Committee. The questioning 
may continue as long as the Dissertation Examining Committee feels that it is necessary and 
reasonable for the proper examination of the student. 

■ Conclusion of the Examination. After questioning has been completed, the student and any others 
who are not members of the Dissertation Examining Committee are asked to leave the room while the 
Dissertation Examining Committee discusses whether or not the dissertation and its defense are 
satisfactory. The Committee has the following options: 

• To accept the dissertation without any recommended changes and sign the Report of 
Examining Committee. 

• To accept the dissertation with recommendations for changes and, except for the chair, sign 
the Report of the Examining Committee. The chair will check that the changes to the 
dissertation have been made, and, upon his or her approval, sign the Report of Examining 
Committee. 

• To recommend revisions to the dissertation and not sign the Report of Examining Committee 
until the student has made the changes and submitted the revised dissertation for the 
Dissertation Examining Committee's approval. The Dissertation Examining Committee 
members sign the Report of Examining Committee if they approve the revised dissertation. 

• To recommend revisions and convene a second meeting of the Dissertation Examining 
Committee to review the dissertation and complete the student's examination. 

• To rule the dissertation (including its examination) unsatisfactory. In that circumstance, the 
student fails. Following the examination, the chair, in the presence of the Dean's 
Representative, must inform the student of the outcome of the examination. The chair and the 
Dean's Representative both sign a Report of the Examining Committee indicating which of 
the above alternatives has been adopted. A copy of this statement is to be included in the 
student's file at the graduate program office, and a copy is given to the student. 

• Passage or failure. The student passes if one member refuses to sign the Report, but the other members of the 
Dissertation Examining Committee agree to sign, before or after the approval of recommended changes. Two or 
more negative votes constitute a failure of the candidate to meet the dissertation requirement. In cases of failure, 
the Dissertation Examining Committee must specify in detail and in writing the nature of the deficiencies in the 
dissertation and/or the oral performance that led to failure. This statement is to be submitted to the program's 
Graduate Director, the Dean of the Graduate School, and the student. A second examination may be permitted if 
the student will be in good standing at the time of the proposed second examination. A second examination 
requires the approval of the program's Graduate Director and the Dean of the Graduate School. If the student 
fails this second examination, or if a second examination is not permitted, the student's admission to the 
graduate program is terminated. 

Submission and Publication of the Dissertation 

Dissertations are to be submitted to the Graduate School in electronic format after final approval of the 
dissertation by the Dissertation Examining Committee. See the University of Maryland Electronic Thesis and 
Dissertation (ETD) website at http://dissertations.umi.com/umdor the University of Maryland Thesis and 
Dissertation Style Guide (http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/current_students/etd_style_guide.html) for the details 
of this process. 

Dissertations submitted to the University through the ETD process will also be deposited in the UM Library's 
online electronic archive, DRUM (Digital Repository at the University of Maryland, available 
at http://drum.lib.umd.edu ). This is a free public archive of academic work by University faculty and graduate 
students. The submission of the thesis to the University in fulfillment of degree requirements grants the 
University the one-time, non-exclusive right to publish the document on DRUM. The students' and University's 
rights regarding dissertation and thesis submission and publication are outlined below. 



62 



The University 's Rights 

The University of Maryland retains non-exclusive distribution, reproduction, and archival rights to doctoral 
dissertations submitted to the Graduate Faculty in fulfillment of requirements for a graduate degree. Such rights 
entitle the University of Maryland to reproduce, archive, and distribute dissertations, in whole or in part, in and 
from an electronic format, as it sees fit. Distribution is subject to a release date stipulated by the student and 
approved by the University. 

The Student's Rights and Responsibilities 

As the owner of copyright in the thesis or dissertation, students have the exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, 
make derivative works based on, publicly perform and display their work, and to authorize others to exercise 
some or all of those rights. As a condition of graduation, each student's thesis or dissertation must be published. 
When the student submits his or her work to the Graduate School, they will be given several options regarding 
access to their document via ProQuest's Digital Dissertations and DRUM, the Digital Repository at the 
University of Maryland. The student's options include: 

■ Making the thesis or dissertation available via ProQuest and DRUM as soon as it is received The 

abstract and full text of your work will be present in ProQuest's Digital Dissertations for purchase, and 
will be both freely available and searchable online via DRUM. 

■ Restrict online publication of the thesis or dissertation for either 1 or 6 years Students may place 
an embargo (a restriction) on electronic access to your document through ProQuest's Digital 
Dissertations and DRUM if there is legitimate reason to do so. Patents or future publication, for 
example, might be jeopardized by providing unrestricted access (see below). Should a student elect to 
restrict online publication of his or her work, a description of the research, including the student's 
name, the document's title, the advisor's name, and the abstract will be available via ProQuest and 
DRUM, but the actual electronic file will be unavailable for viewing or download until the selected 
embargo period has passed. 

■ Restrict online publication of the dissertation indefinitely Students may, in rare circumstances, 
place an indefinite embargo on access to their work. In this case, a description of the thesis or 
dissertation, including the student's name, the work's title, the advisor's name, and the abstract will be 
available via ProQuest's Digital Dissertations and DRUM, but the actual electronic file will be 
embargoed indefinitely. This option requires the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate School . 
This restriction can be lifted at the request of the author at a later date. 

These choices only affect the electronic distribution of the thesis or dissertation document. A non-circulating 
copy of each University of Maryland thesis or dissertation will be available for consultation in Hornbake 
Library's Maryland Room, and print copies of the document will be made available upon request to researchers 
through inter-library loan. 

Inclusion of One's Own Previously Published Materials in a Dissertation 

A graduate student may, upon the recommendation of the dissertation director, and with the endorsement of the 
home graduate program's Graduate Director, include his or her own published works as part of the final 
dissertation. Appropriate citations within the dissertation, including where the work was previously published, 
are required. All such materials must be produced in standard dissertation format. 

It is recognized that a graduate student may co-author work with faculty members and colleagues that should be 
included in a dissertation. In such an event, a letter should be sent to the Dean of the Graduate School certifying 
that the student's examining committee has determined that the student made a substantial contribution to that 
work. This letter should also note that inclusion of the work has the approval of the dissertation advisor and the 
program chair or Graduate Director. The letter should be included with the dissertation at the time of 
submission. The format of such inclusions must conform to the standard dissertation format. A foreword to the 
dissertation, as approved by the Dissertation Committee, must state that the student made substantial 
contributions to the relevant aspects of the jointly authored work included in the dissertation. 

63 



Inclusion of Copyrighted Materials in a Dissertation 

Students are responsible for ensuring that their thesis or dissertation complies with copyright law. Copyright 
law gives the owner of a work exclusive rights to reproduce, distribute, display or perform the work publicly 
and to modify or adapt the work and the exclusive right to grant others permission to exercise any of those 
rights in the work, subject to certain exceptions . Students are responsible for determining if their use of 
another's work requires his or her permission or falls within one of the exceptions. 

Students should consider the following questions and consult the following documents for guidance on 
complying with copyright law: 

Did the work ever qualify for copyright protection? 

■ The work never qualified for copyright because, for example, it lacked originality or was created by Federal 
employees in the scope of employment. 
Copyright in the work has expired. 
The use qualifies as a fair use. 

Copyright Basics http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf 
Idea, Methods, Systems http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ31.pdf 
Works Not Protected by 

Copyright http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ32.pdfand http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ34.pdf 

Has copyright in the work expired? 

■ Library of Congress, Duration of Copyright http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circl5a.pdf 

■ University of North Carolina " When Works Pass Into the Public Domain " http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public- 
d.htm 

■ Cornell University When Works Pass Into the Public Domain in the United States : Copyright Term for 
Archivists, Cornell Institute for Digital 

Collections http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htm 

■ Center for the Public Domain: http://www.law.duke.edu/cspd/ 

Is the proposed use a "fair use"? 

■ Library of Congress, Can I Use Someone Else's Work? http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-fairuse.html 

■ University of Washington Copyright Connection http://depts.washington.edu/uwcopy/Copyright_Law/Fair_Use/ 

Additional Requirements 

In addition to those requirements specified above, each graduate program may impose additional requirements. 
For these requirements, consult the descriptions that appear under the graduate program listings or the special 
publications that can be obtained from the graduate programs or colleges. 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in scholarship and 
the ability to engage in independent research. It is not awarded for the completion of course and seminar 
requirements no matter how successfully completed. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Some graduate programs have a foreign language requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The student 
should inquire in the graduate program about this requirement. Students must satisfy the graduate program 
requirement before they can be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 

64 



Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 

The requirements for the doctoral degrees in education (Ed.D.) parallel those for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in the College of Education. The Ed.D. requires a minimum of six semester hours of dissertation credit 
while the Ph.D. requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation credit. Consult the Graduate Studies 
Office in the College of Education and the individual graduate program for additional details. 

Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts and Doctor of Audiology are given under 
the corresponding program description. Contact the individual graduate programs with specific questions. 



65 



Chapter 10: Academic Policies - Master's Degrees 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Master's Degree Programs 

Approved Program 

The entire course of study undertaken for any master's degree must constitute a unified, coherent program that is 
approved by the student's advisor and Graduate Director and meets Graduate School requirements. 

Credit Hours 

A minimum of thirty semester hours in courses acceptable for credit towards a graduate degree is required 
(some degree programs require more than 30 credits). For a master's degree with the thesis option, six of the 30 
semester hours must be thesis research credits (799). For the master's degree with the non-thesis option, a 
minimum of 18 credit hours in courses numbered 600 and above is required, as well as one or more scholarly 
papers, some portion of which must be written. In many cases, successful completion of comprehensive 
examinations is required by the program. 

Coursework Level 

The graduate program must include at least 12 hours of course work at the 600 level or higher; no fewer than 12 
hours of course work credit must be earned in the major subject approved by the graduate program in which the 
student is enrolled. 

Prerequisites and Inclusion of Credit 

If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, additional courses may be deemed 
necessary; such courses will not be considered part of the student's approved program of study. 

Single Credit Application 

Credits to be applied to a student's program for a master's degree cannot have been used to satisfy any other 
previously earned degrees (see policies governing the applicability of previously taken courses to University of 
Maryland degrees). 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science 
Thesis Requirement 

A thesis must be submitted for the Master of Arts or Master of Science degrees except for those programs for 
which a non-thesis option has been approved by the Graduate Council. Approval of the thesis is the 
responsibility of an Examining Committee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School on the 
recommendation of the student's advisor. The advisor is normally the chairperson of the committee, and the 
remaining members of the committee are members of the graduate faculty who are familiar with the student's 
program of study. The chairperson and the candidate are informed of the membership of the Examining 
Committee by the Graduate School staff on behalf of the Dean of the Graduate School . 



Research Assurances 

Human Subject Research 

66 



Everyone at the University of Maryland who is conducting research that involves human subjects must obtain 
approval in advance from the Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB is charged with approving the 
initiation of research involving human subjects and conducts periodic reviews of that research to ensure that all 
projects comply with Federal regulations. These regulations are strict and the Graduate School urges all 
graduate students to consult with the IRB before beginning any research on living subjects. For application 
forms and guidelines on such issues as research involving minors or prisoners, surveys, and the use of audio 
taping, videotaping, digital recordings and photographs, please see the Institutional Review Board's website 
( http://www.umresearch.umd.edu/IRB/ ). 

Other Research 

If the dissertation research involves the use of vertebrate animals, animal use protocols must be approved in 
advance by the Animal Care and Use Committee. If the dissertation research involves hazardous materials, 
either biological or chemical, or recombinant RNA/DNA, the research must be approved by the appropriate 
University committee. These research assurances must be approved prior to the initiation of any dissertation- 
related research, and the approvals must be provided to the Graduate School at the time the student submits the 
Nomination of Examining Committee form. 

The Master's Thesis Examination 

A final oral examination of the thesis will be held when the student has completed the thesis to the satisfaction 
of the student's advisor, all other requirements for the degree have been completed, and a 3.0 grade point 
average (computed in accordance with the regulations described under "Grades for Graduate students") has 
been earned. 

Establishment of the Thesis Examining Committee. The Thesis Examining Committee is appointed by the 
Dean of the Graduate School, in accordance with the policies listed below: 

• Eligibility. A student is eligible to be examined on a thesis if the studentV (a) has met all program 
requirements for a thesis examination, (b) is in good standing as a graduate student at the University, (c) is 
registered for at least one credit, (d) has a valid Graduate School-approved Thesis Examining Committee, (e) 
has at least a 3.0 grade point average, and (f) if this is the second examination, the examination has been 
approved by the Graduate School. 

• Thesis Examining Committee Membership. The Committee will include a minimum of three members of 
the Graduate Faculty, at least two of whom will be Full Members. The Chair of the Committee normally will be 
the student's advisor, who will be a Full or Adjunct Member of the Graduate Faculty, or who has been granted 
an exception to the policy by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

• Membership on a Thesis Examining Committee. Requires nomination by the student's advisor and 
Graduate Director in the student's graduate program, and approval by the Dean of the Graduate School . The 
nomination of a Thesis Examining Committee should be provided to the Graduate School at least six weeks 
before the date of the expected thesis examination. The thesis examination cannot be held until the Graduate 
School approves the composition of the Thesis Examining Committee. Furthermore, if the Graduate Faculty 
status of any member of an approved Thesis Examining Committee changes, the approval of the Thesis 
Examining Committee may be voided, and a new Committee nomination form will be required for approval by 
the Graduate School. 

• Chair. The Thesis Examining Committee will have as chair the student's advisor, who must be a Full or 
Adjunct Member of the Graduate Faculty or, by special permission, has been otherwise appointed by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. Thesis Examining Committees may have co-chairs upon the written recommendation of 
the Graduate Director and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. 



67 



Procedures for the Oral Examination: 

■ Oral Examination Requirement. Each master's thesis student must defend orally his or her master's 
thesis as a requirement in partial fulfillment of the master's degree (an additional comprehensive 
written examination may be required at the option of the program.) 

■ Committee Preparation. The members of the Thesis Examining Committee must receive the thesis at 
least seven working days before the scheduled examination. Should the Thesis Examining Committee 
deem it reasonable and appropriate, it may require submission of the thesis more than seven working 
days in advance of the examination. 

■ Attendance at the Examination. Oral examinations must be attended by all members of the student's 
officially established Thesis Examining Committee as approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 
All examinations must be open to members of University of Maryland Graduate Faculty . Programs 
may wish routinely to open thesis examinations to a broader audience. In such cases, program policies 
must be established, recorded, and made available to all master's students. Should a last-minute change 
in the constitution of the Thesis Examining Committee be required, the change must be approved by 
the Dean of the Graduate School in consultation with the program's Graduate Director and the chair of 
the student's Thesis Examining Committee. 

■ Remote Participation in Examinations. The Graduate School policy is that all members of a Thesis 
Examining Committee must be physically present in the examination room during the entire defense 
and during the committee's private deliberations following the examination. Participation by telephone 
is not permitted under any circumstances. While re-affirming this policy, the Graduate Council 
approved a policy to permit remote participation by video teleconferencing under the following 
circumstances: 

• Permission to conduct a remote-participation defense must be obtained by the thesis chair 
from the Graduate School in advance. In making this request, the chair must indicate in 
writing that he or she has read the rules for a remote defense listed below. 

• A competent video technician must be present at both the University site and the remote 
location for the entire duration of the defense in the event that technical difficulties arise. 

• Only one remote site may be used during the defense. 

• The candidate and the committee chair must both be present in the examination room. Neither 
may be at the remote site. 

• The department/program must pay for all of the costs of the video teleconferencing 
arrangements. 

□ Location of the Examination. Oral examinations of theses must be held in University facilities that are 
readily accessible to all members of the Thesis Examining Committee and others attending the examination. 
The chair of the Thesis Examining Committee selects the time and place for the examination and notifies the 
other members of the committee and the candidate. 



□ Emergency Substitutions. The Graduate School is aware that last-minute emergencies can prevent a 
committee member from attending a scheduled thesis examination. We are prepared to work with the thesis 
supervisor and/or Graduate Director to make last-minute substitutions in committee membership to allow the 
defense to take place as scheduled. Please follow these steps to assure a smooth substitution. 

■ The request must be sent in writing. Fax or e-mail requests are acceptable. A telephone call to the Dean 
of the Graduate School to alert the Dean that the emergency request is coming will facilitate the 
process. 



68 



■ The proposed substitute must be a member of the Graduate Faculty consistent with the rules for 
committee membership. Thus, if a Full Member could not attend, the substitution of an Adjunct or 
Special Member of the Graduate Faculty would not be acceptable. 

■ Once the written request has been received, the substitution will be made, usually within the hour, 
provided that the revised committee meets the requirements for committee membership. 

■ When the substitution has been made, a written confirmation, in the same format as the request was 
received (fax or e-mail), will be sent out, along with a telephone confirmation. The substitution is not 
official, however, until the written confirmation has been received in the department or program. 

■ A defense that is held with one or more substitute members on the committee, but without prior written 
confirmation from the Graduate School that the substitution(s) have been approved, will be voided and 
the defense will have to be repeated. 

■ A copy of the written request and the written confirmation will be placed in the student's file for future 
reference. 

□ Invalidation of the Examination. The Dean may void any examination not carried out in accordance with 
the procedures and policies of the Graduate School . In addition, upon the recommendation of the Thesis 
Examining Committee or any member thereof, the Dean of the Graduate School may rule an oral examination 
to be null and void. 

□ Conclusion of the Examination. After the oral examination, the student and any others who are not 
members of the Thesis Examining Committee will be asked to leave the room and the Thesis Examining 
Committee will discuss whether or not the thesis (including its examination) has been satisfactory. 

■ The Committee has the following options : 

• To accept the thesis without any recommended changes and sign the Report of Examining 
Committee. 

• To accept the thesis with recommendations for changes and, except for the chair, sign the 
Report of Examining Committee. The chair will check the thesis and, upon his or her 
approval, sign the Report of Examining Committee. 

• To recommend revisions to the thesis and not sign the Report of Examining Committee until 
the student has made the changes and submitted the revised thesis for the Thesis Examining 
Committee's approval. The Thesis Examining Committee members sign the Report of 
Examining Committee when they approve the revised thesis. 

• To recommend revisions and convene a second meeting of the Thesis Examining Committee 
to review the thesis and complete the student's examination. 

• To rule the thesis (including its examination) unsatisfactory. In that circumstance, the student 
fails. 

Following the examination, the chair must inform the student of the outcome of the examination. The 
chair signs the Report of the Examining Committee indicating which of the above alternatives has been 
adopted. A copy of this statement is to be included in the student's file at the graduate program office, 
and a copy is given to the student. 

□ Passage or Failure. The student passes if all members of the Thesis Examining Committee accept the thesis 
(including its examination) as satisfactory. One or more negative votes constitute a failure of the candidate to 
meet the thesis requirement. In cases of failure, the Thesis Examining Committee must specify in detail and in 
writing the nature of the deficiencies in the thesis and/or the oral performance that led to failure. This statement 
is to be submitted to the program's Graduate Director, the Dean of the Graduate School , and the student. A 
second examination may be permitted if the student will be in good standing at the time of the proposed second 
examination. A second examination requires the approval of the program's Graduate Director and the Dean of 



69 



the Graduate School. If the student fails this second examination, or if a second examination is not permitted, 
the student's admission to the graduate program is terminated. 

□ The Decision to Accept the Examination as Satisfactory Must Be Unanimous . Students may present 
themselves for examination only twice. The report of the committee, signed by each member, must be 
submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School no later than the appropriate date listed in the Schedule of 
Classes if the student is to receive a diploma at the Commencement ceremony for the semester in which the 
examination is held. 

Submission and Publication of the Thesis 

Theses are to be submitted to the Graduate School in electronic format after final approval of the document by 
the Thesis Examining Committee. See the University of Maryland Thesis and Dissertation Style Guide 
(http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/current_students/etd_style_guide.html) for the details of this process. 

Theses submitted to the University through the ETD process will also be deposited in the UM Library's online 
electronic archive, DRUM (Digital Repository at the University of Maryland, available 

at http://drum.lib.umd.edu ). This is a free public archive of academic work by University faculty and graduate 
students. The submission of the thesis to the University in fulfillment of degree requirements grants the 
University the one-time, non-exclusive right to publish the document on DRUM. 

The University 's Rights 

The University of Maryland retains non-exclusive distribution, reproduction, and archival rights to doctoral 
dissertations submitted to the Graduate Faculty in fulfillment of requirements for a graduate degree. Such rights 
entitle the University of Maryland to reproduce, archive, and distribute dissertations, in whole or in part, in and 
from an electronic format, as it sees fit. Distribution is subject to a release date stipulated by the student and 
approved by the University. 

The Student's Rights and Responsibilities 

As the owner of copyright in the thesis or dissertation, students have the exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, 
make derivative works based on, publicly perform and display their work, and to authorize others to exercise 
some or all of those rights. As a condition of graduation, each student's thesis or dissertation must be published. 
When the student submits his or her work to the Graduate School, they will be given several options regarding 
access to their document via ProQuest's Digital Dissertations and DRUM , the Digital Repository at the 
University of Maryland . The student's options include: 

Making the thesis or dissertation available via ProQuest and DRUM as soon as it is received 

The abstract and full text of your work will be present in ProQuest's Digital Dissertations for purchase, and will 
be both freely available and searchable online via DRUM. 

Restricting online publication of the thesis or dissertation for either 1 or 6 years 

Students may place an embargo (a restriction) on electronic access to your document through ProQuest's Digital 
Dissertations and DRUM if there is legitimate reason to do so. Patents or future publication, for example, might 
be jeopardized by providing unrestricted access (see below). Should a student elect to restrict online publication 
of his or her work, a description of the research, including the student's name, the document's title, the advisor's 
name, and the abstract will be available via ProQuest and DRUM, but the actual electronic file will be 
unavailable for viewing or download until the selected embargo period has passed. 

Restrict online publication of the thesis or dissertation indefinitely 



70 



Students may, in rare circumstances, place an indefinite embargo on access to their work. In this case, a 
description of the thesis or dissertation, including the student's name, the work's title, the advisor's name, and 
the abstract will be available via ProQuest's Digital Dissertations and DRUM, but the actual electronic file will 
be embargoed indefinitely. This option requires the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. This 
restriction can be lifted at the request of the author at a later date. 

These choices only affect the electronic distribution of the thesis or dissertation document. A non-circulating 
copy of each University of Maryland thesis or dissertation will be available for consultation in Hornbake 
Library's Maryland Room, and print copies of the document will be made available upon request to researchers 
through inter-library loan. 

Inclusion of One's Own Previously Published Materials in a Thesis or Dissertation 

A graduate student may, upon the recommendation of the thesis director, and with the endorsement of the home 
graduate program Graduate Director, include his or her own published works as part of the final thesis. 
Appropriate citations within the thesis, including where the work was previously published, are required. All 
such materials must be produced in standard thesis format. 

It is recognized that a graduate student may co-author work with faculty and colleagues that should be included 
in a thesis. In such an event, a letter should be sent to the Dean of the Graduate School certifying that the 
student's Examining Committee has determined that the student made a substantial contribution to that work. 
This letter should also note that inclusion of the work has the approval of the thesis advisor and the Graduate 
Director. The format of such inclusions must conform to the standard thesis format. A foreword to the thesis, as 
approved by the Examining Committee, must state that the student made substantial contributions to the 
relevant aspects of the jointly authored work included in the thesis. 

Inclusion of Copyrighted Materials in a Thesis or Dissertation 

Students are responsible for ensuring that their thesis or dissertation complies with copyright law. Copyright 
law gives the owner of a work exclusive rights to reproduce, distribute, display or perform the work publicly 
and to modify or adapt the work and the exclusive right to grant others permission to exercise any of those 
rights in the work, subject to certain exceptions . Students are responsible for determining if their use of 
another's work requires his or her permission or falls within one of the exceptions. Permission is not required to 
use a work when: 

Students are responsible for ensuring that their thesis or dissertation complies with copyright law. Copyright 
law gives the owner of a work exclusive rights to reproduce, distribute, display or perform the work publicly 
and to modify or adapt the work and the exclusive right to grant others permission to exercise any of those 
rights in the work, subject to certain exceptions. Students are responsible for determining if their use of 
another's work requires his or her permission or falls within one of the exceptions. Permission is not required to 
use a work when: 

■ The work never qualified for copyright because, for example, it lacked originality or was created by 
Federal employees in the scope of employment. 

■ Copyright in the work has expired. 

■ The use qualifies as a fair use. 

Students should consult the following documents for guidance on complying with copyright law: 
Did the work ever qualify for copyright protection? 

■ Copyright Basics http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf 

■ Idea, Methods, Systems http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ31.pdf 

71 



■ Works Not Protected by 

Copyright http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ32.pdfand http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ34.pdf 

Has copyright in the work expired? 

■ Library of Congress, Duration of Copyright http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circl5a.pdf 

■ University of North Carolina " When Works Pass Into the Public 
Domain " http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm 

■ Cornell University When Works Pass Into the Public Domain in the United States : Copyright Term 
for Archivists, Cornell Institute for Digital 

Collections http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htm 

Is the proposed use a "fair use"? 

■ Library of Congress, Can I Use Someone Else's Work? http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq- 
fairuse.html 

■ University of Washington Copyright 

Connection http://depts.washington.edu/uwcopy/Copyright_Law/Fair_Use/ 

Non-Thesis Option 

The requirements for Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees without thesis vary slightly among graduate 
programs in which this option is available. The quality of the work expected of the student is identical to that 
expected in the thesis programs. 

Generally, the non -thesis program requires: 

■ a minimum of 30 credit hours in courses approved for graduate credit 

■ a minimum of 18 credit hours in courses numbered 600 or above 

■ the submission of one or more scholarly papers 

■ in many cases, successful completion of a comprehensive final examination, at least some portion of 
which must be written. 

A student following a non-thesis master's program will be expected to meet the same deadlines for application 
for a diploma and for final examination reports as those established for all other degree programs. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 

Nearly all graduate programs in The College of Education offer the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree with 
the following requirements: 

■ A minimum of 30 semester hours in course work. 

■ A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600-800 with the remainder in courses numbered 400 or 
higher. Some graduate programs require courses outside the College of Education. 

■ A comprehensive written examination taken at the end of course work. 

■ EDMS 645. 

■ One or two seminar papers as determined by the advisor. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Engineering 

All graduate programs in The Clark School of Engineering offer the Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) degree 
with the following requirements: 



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A minimum of 30 semester hours of approved course work in an engineering option. The student's program 
must be approved by the engineering graduate program that offers the option. 

Requirements Applicable to Other Master's Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Master of Applied Anthropology , Master of 
Architecture , Master of Business Administration , Master of Community Planning, Master of Fine Arts, Master 
of Historic Preservation, Master of information Management, Master of Library Science , Master of Music, 
Master of Public Health, Master of Public Management , Master of Public Policy, and Master of Professional 
Studies are given under the individual graduate program entries in those fields. 

Professional Master's Degrees 

The University of Maryland offers a variety of Professional Master's Degree Programs geared towards working 
adults. For information about any one of the Professional Master's Program, please visit their websites: 

Chemical and Life Sciences 

Engineering 

Arabic Language 

Persian Language 

Real Estate Development 

Geospatial Information Sciences 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and Technology 

Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology 

Landscape Architecture 

Masters of Business Administration 

Masters of Public Management 



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Chapter 11: Academic Policies - Certificate Programs 
Certificate Programs 



A post-baccalaureate certificate is awarded for the successful completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours of 
graduate-level work in a defined subject area under the following conditions: 

•The program must include a minimum core requirement of nine credit hours chosen from a limited list as 
designated by the graduate program. 

•Non-core courses must be chosen from a specific list of acceptable options. 

•No fewer than nine credit hours must be earned at the 600 level and above. 

•In a twelve credit certificate program three credits may be earned at the 400 level; for certificate programs 
requiring more than 12 credits, a maximum of six credit hours may be at the 400 level. 

•All credits for a certificate must be completed at the University of Maryland. 

•A minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required for the award of a graduate certificate. 

•All requirements for the graduate certificate must be completed within a five-year period. 

Information on Graduate Certificates can be found on the program's website: 

Engineering 

Arabic 

Persian 

Real Estate Development 

Geospatial Information Sciences 

Computational Methods in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

General Atmospheric & Oceanic Science 

Air Quality Science & Technology 

Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology 

Literacy Coaching 

Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation 

Psychiatric Vocational Rehab 

Women's Studies 

Urban Design 

Special Education 

Terrorism Analysis 

Computational Harmonic Analysis 

Critical Theory 

Survey Statistics 

Scientific Computation 

Historic Preservation 

Intermediate Survey Methodology 

Jewish Studies 

Museum Scholarship and Material Culture 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences 

Population Studies 

MSDE Administrator I Certification 



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Chapter 12: Academic Policies - Combined Bachelor's-Master's Programs 
Combined Bachelor's-Master's Programs 



In a combined bachelor's/master's program, some graduate level courses initially taken for undergraduate credit 
may also be applied towards the graduate credit requirements for a master's degree program at the University of 
Maryland. A bachelor's/master's program may be developed for an individual student, or it may be a structured 
program. 

Individual Student Bachelor's/Master's Program 

A program may be developed by an individual student in consultation with his/her academic advisor. Such a 
program is available only to students whose academic performance is exceptional. It is to be developed 
according to the individual career interests and goals of the student and should be an integrated learning 
experience rather than merely the completion of a certain number of graduate and undergraduate credits. The 
proposed program requires the approval of the Directors of both the undergraduate and the graduate programs 
involved and of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies and the Dean of the Graduate School. Normally no more 
than nine credits of graduate courses applied to the bachelor's degree may be counted also for graduate credit in 
an individual student's program. Courses to be double-counted must be at the 600 level or above and must be 
passed with at least a "B" grade. Individual study courses, internships, or courses given as credit by examination 
are not eligible. The credits to be double-counted will be designated as applicable to the graduate program of 
study after the student receives the bachelor's degree and matriculates in the Graduate School. 

Structured Bachelor's/Master's Program 

A structured bachelor's/master's program is a clearly defined curriculum combining an existing undergraduate 
program and an existing master's program at the University of Maryland, offered by the same or by different 
departments. It is designed for students whose academic performance is exceptional and should be an integrated 
learning experience rather than merely the completion of a certain number of graduate and undergraduate 
credits. A proposal for such a program should be submitted by the colleges housing the academic programs 
concerned and requires the approval of the Graduate Council, the Dean of the Graduate School, the Senate PCC 
Committee, and the President. 

Necessary features of a structured bachelor's/master's program include the following: 

■ Specific requirements for admission to the combined program that speak to the exceptional 
performance of the students to be admitted. At a minimum, students accepted for the program must be 
clearly admissible to the graduate program portion. 

■ The program should be designed so as not to unduly delay the completion of the bachelor's degree. 
Taking graduate credits should not unduly limit the breadth of the student's experience through 
premature specialization. 

■ All requirements of the bachelor's program and of the master's program must be completed before the 
student may receive both degrees. Where appropriate, graduate courses taken while an undergraduate 
may substitute for courses required in the undergraduate major program. 

■ The students may be offered deferred admission to the Graduate School at the end of the junior year 
program, subject to completion of the senior year program in a timely fashion and with a specified 
level of achievement. Formal admission to the Graduate School will require completion of all 
requirements for the bachelor's degree. 

■ The credits to be double-counted will be designated as applicable to the graduate program after the 
student receives the bachelor's degree and matriculates in the Graduate School. 



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A structured bachelor's/master's program may normally include up to nine credits of graduate level courses that 
are counted both for the bachelor's program and the master's program. More than nine double -counted credits 
may be allowed if both of the following conditions are satisfied: 

■ The additional graduate credits applied to the undergraduate program do not unduly limit the breadth 
of the student's experience through premature specialization. 

■ The master's program requires more than thirty credits. 



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Chapter 13: Academic Policies - Dual Graduate Degree Programs 
Dual Graduate Degree Programs 

Graduate students who are enrolled in a doctoral program in one department/program may enroll concurrently 
for a master's degree in a related area. Examples would be a doctoral student in PHYS enrolling concurrently 
for masters in MATH or a doctoral student in ECON enrolling concurrently for a master's in BGMT. 

The following rules govern the dual -enrollment process: 

• The student must be in good academic standing. 

• Both graduate departments/programs must agree to the dual-degree enrollment. 

• The full degree requirements must be met in both programs. 

• The same course cannot be applied to both programs. 

• A written plan for the dual enrollment must be worked out between the two departments/programs regarding 
credits, advising, semester loads, etc. Copies of this plan must be placed in the student's file in each program 
and a copy sent to the Graduate School to be included in the student's records here. 

Once the written plan is filed with the Graduate School, the student's doctoral program will be designated as the 
primary degree and the master's program will be designated as the secondary degree. Students and advisors 
should bear in mind that our present computer system has no way of knowing towards which degree a given 
course grade should be applied for purposes of computing the GPA. Therefore, students enrolled in dual -degree 
programs will only have an overall GPA, which reflects their combined performance in the two programs. We 
are unable to provide separate GPAs for the masters and doctoral components of the two programs. Students 
therefore should be advised that poor performance in their master's program would affect their overall GPA as 
it is calculated on their transcript. 

Existing Dual Degree Programs 

Find information on the following existing dual degree programs on their websites: 

Architecture and Community Planning (M.Arch and MCP) 

Architecture and Historical Preservation (M.Arch and MHP) 

History/Library Science (MA and MLS) 

Dual MBA/JD Program 

Dual MBA/MS Program 

Dual MBA/Masters of Social Work 

Dual MPP/MBA Program 

Urban Studies and Planning and Law (MCP and JD) 

Community Planning and Historic Preservation (MCP and MHP) 

Masters of Engineering/Public Policy 

Dual MPP/JD Program 

Bioengineering (MS and MP) 



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Chapter 14: Academic Policies - Field Committees 

Field Committees 

Groups of faculty who are engaged in a common research area that crosses disciplinary or sub-disciplinary lines 
may seek formal recognition as a Field Committee from the Graduate School. It is assumed that these 
committees will find ways to sponsor collaborative scholarship by faculty and graduate students through the 
sponsorship of symposia and lectures, the creation of courses, the direction of graduate student research. The 
University of Maryland currently recognizes several official Field Committees: 

The Burgers Program in Fluid Dynamics 

The Field Committee in Nanoscience and Technology 

The Maryland Biophysics Program 

Field Committee in Energy Systems Engineering 

Field Committee in Developmental Science 

Field Committee in Film Studies 

Field Committee in Medieval and Early Modern Studies 

The Graduate School supports and encourages intellectual exchange and collegiality among the academic fields 
and disciplines. These exchanges and interactions distinguish the University from a collection of isolated 
teaching centers and research institutes, produce advancements in knowledge and intellectual synergy, and 
promote a dynamic curriculum that reflects the current development of research and scholarship. To foster these 
activities, the Graduate School encourages the formation of interdisciplinary Field Committees. The purpose of 
these committees is to enhance collaborative research, foster intellectual achievement, use the Graduate School 
's resources to support advanced research, elevate the visibility of the University's expertise in interdisciplinary 
areas, and attract graduate students. 

Requirements for Formal Recognition 

• A minimum of five Full Members of the Graduate Faculty, representing at least two disciplines or sub- 
disciplines, must agree to participate. 

• The Field Committee faculty must commit to meeting at least twice a semester. 

• The Field Committee faculty must keep regular minutes of the meetings. 

• The Field Committee faculty must select a spokesperson or convener for the Committee. 
Requirements for Offering Courses and Advising Students: 

• A set of regularly taught graduate courses must be identified in the Field Committee area. 

• The department chair of each member of the Committee must agree to the faculty member's participation in 
the Committee. 

• Approved graduate programs must be willing to admit qualified students who express a prior interest in the 
Committee, and departments must be willing to consider them for department/University support in an open 
competition. 

• The spokesperson for the Committee must report each semester to the respective Graduate Program Directors 
on the progress of graduate students who are affiliated with the Committee. 



78 



Available Resources for Field Committees 

• The Committee may request financial assistance from the Graduate School for brochures and web site 
development to advertise and promote the field. 

• The Committee may request financial support for speakers, symposia, and other intellectual events from the 
Graduate School . 

• The Committee may request a sum equivalent to the cost of a course buy-out for the development of a new 
course to be offered in the field. Funds will be available for up to two years. In order to receive Graduate School 
funds, a department must be willing to support the course at the end of the two-year period if student demand 
warrants. 

• The Graduate School will list the Field Committee in the Graduate Catalog. 

The Graduate School will recognize Field Committees for an initial period of five years. At the end of that 
period, the activities and accomplishments of the Committee will be reviewed. If the Committee members and 
the Graduate Dean are both satisfied that the Committee is able to foster and enhance intellectual achievements, 
the Committee's recognition by the Graduate School will be extended for another period of five years, at which 
point it will be reviewed again. The criteria for each review will be the Committee's accomplishments in 
enhancing collaborative research and intellectual achievement, and its success in attracting and educating 
graduate students. 

Approved by the Graduate Council on March 15, 2005. 



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Chapter 15: The Graduate Faculty 
University of Maryland Graduate Faculty Members 



The Graduate Faculty are responsible for teaching classes restricted to graduate students, designing the 
academic content of graduate degree programs, and supervising the writing 

Minimum Qualification 

To qualify for appointment to the Graduate Faculty, individuals normally will hold the terminal degree in their 
discipline. 

Membership - Graduate Faculty Categories 

There are three categories of membership of the Graduate Faculty: Full Members; Adjunct Members; and 
Special Members. All members of the Graduate Faculty will be associated with a home unit. For Full Members 
of the Graduate Faculty, the home unit is the primary unit of appointment to rank. For Adjunct and Special 
Members of the Graduate Faculty, the home unit is the academic unit responsible for the particular graduate 
program initiating the request for nomination. Once appointed, members of the Graduate Faculty are available 
to serve across units and within multi-/cross-/interdisciplinary graduate programs. 

Appointment procedures 



Full Members 

Full Members of the Graduate Faculty are tenured or tenure-track faculty at the University of Maryland, 
College Park, with duties in teaching and research (Assistant and Associate Professors, Professors, and 
Distinguished University Professors); and College Park Professors. Appointment to the Graduate Faculty is 
automatic on appointment to the University of Maryland faculty. Faculty awarded Emeritus status continue as 
Full Members of the Graduate Faculty for five years after retirement and may be reappointed for additional 
five-year terms thereafter, subject to nomination by the home unit. The Nomination to the Graduate Faculty 
Form is available here. 

Adjunct Members 

Adjunct Members of the Graduate Faculty normally come from the ranks specified from the following 
categories in the UMCP Policy on Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure of Faculty: faculty with duties 
primarily in research, scholarship, or artistic creativity (Research Assistant Professor, Research Associate 
Professor, and Research Professor; Assistant and Associate Research Scientist, and Senior Research Scientist; 
Assistant and Associate Research Scholar, and Senior Research Scholar; Assistant and Associate Research 
Engineer, and Senior Research Engineer; Assistant and Associate Artist-in-Residence, and Senior Artist-in- 
Residence); field faculty (Agent, Senior and Principal Agent); faculty engaged exclusively or primarily in 
library service (Librarian 3 and 4); and additional faculty ranks (Adjunct Assistant and Associate Professor, and 
Professor; visiting appointments that correspond to eligible ranks listed above; and Professor of the Practice). 
Exceptionally, faculty in other ranks with appropriate terminal qualifications, expertise, and experience may be 
proposed for Adjunct Membership in the Graduate Faculty. 

Appointment is by approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Nomination for appointment to Adjunct 
Member of the Graduate Faculty is made by the Head of the home unit, on the recommendation of the Full 
Members of the Graduate Faculty in the unit. Each nomination will include a letter of support from the Head of 

80 



the home unit, confirmation of approval of the Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the unit, and current 
curriculum vitae. The term of appointment is five years and is renewable upon re-nomination by the Head of the 
home unit after appropriate review within the unit. The appointment is terminated upon resignation or 
retirement. 

The Nomination to the Graduate Faculty Form is available here. 

Special Members 

Special Members of the Graduate Faculty are scholars who have no official affiliation with the University of 
Maryland. 

Appointment is by approval of the Dean of the Graduate School . Nomination for Appointment to Special 
Member of the Graduate Faculty is made by the Head of the home unit, on the recommendation of the Full 
Members of the Graduate Faculty in the unit. Each nomination will include a letter of support from the Head of 
the home unit, confirmation of approval of the Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the unit, and current 
curriculum vitae. The term of appointment is five years and is renewable upon re-nomination by the Head of the 
home unit after appropriate review within the unit. The appointment is terminated upon resignation or 
retirement. 

The Nomination to the Graduate Faculty Form is available here. 

Exceptional Appointments 

Exceptions to the procedures listed above may be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School and will be 
reported to the Graduate Council at its final meeting of each academic year. Each request for an exception will 
include a letter of justification from the Head of the home unit, making a compelling case that the exception is 
necessary to fill a particular need, confirmation of approval of the Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the 
home unit, and current curriculum vitae. All exceptions will be effective for periods of up to five years and may 
be re-approved for periods of up to five years based on a review in the home unit and the recommendation of 
the Head of the home unit. The appointment is terminated upon resignation or retirement. 

Faculty of Multi-Campus Graduate Degree Programs 

Exceptionally, faculty who hold appointments at other institutions of the University System of Maryland and 
who participate in approved multi-campus graduate degree programs may be appointed Full Members of the 
Graduate Faculty at the University of Maryland. Such exceptions will be proposed on an individual basis, be 
subject to approval by the Dean of the Graduate School, and be reported to the Graduate Council at its final 
meeting of each academic year. Each request for an exception will include a letter of justification from the 
Graduate Director of the multi -campus program, confirmation of approval of the Full Members of the Graduate 
Faculty in the program, and current curriculum vitae . All exceptions will be effective for periods up to five 
years, and may be re-approved for periods of up to five years based on a review by the program and the 
recommendation of the Graduate Director of the program. The appointment is terminated upon resignation or 
retirement. 

Resolving Conflicts with Past Practice: Any extant Graduate Faculty appointments that do not meet these 
criteria will terminate by May 2, 2010, five years from the date of implementation of this policy, May 2, 2005. 
Reappointment to the appropriate category will follow the nomination procedure given above for that category. 



81 



Prerogatives of Membership by Category 
Full Members 

Full Members of the Graduate Faculty are eligible to teach courses restricted to graduate student enrollment; 
serve on program graduate committees; direct Master's thesis research and chair Master's thesis examining 
committees; direct doctoral dissertation research and chair doctoral dissertation examining committees; and vote 
for and serve on the Graduate Council and its committees. 

Adjunct Members 

Adjunct Members of the Graduate Faculty are eligible to teach courses restricted to graduate student enrollment, 
serve on program graduate committees, direct Master's thesis research, chair Master's Thesis Examining 
Committees, and co-direct doctoral dissertation research, but not direct doctoral dissertation research or chair 
Dissertation Examining Committees. 

Special Members 

Special Members of the Graduate Faculty are eligible to serve on program graduate committees and co -direct 
Master's thesis research, but may not direct or co-direct doctoral dissertation research or chair Master's Thesis or 
Doctoral Dissertation Examination Committees. 

Membership of Former University of Maryland Faculty 

Full Members of the Graduate Faculty who terminate their employment at the University of Maryland under 
honorable circumstances (and who do not have emeritus status) may for a 12-month period following their 
termination serve as members and Chairs of Dissertation examination committees. They may not serve as 
Dean's representatives. 

Exceptions to Policy 

Exceptions to the prerogatives listed above must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School and will be 
reported to the Graduate Council at its final meeting of each academic year. In particular, the Dean of the 
Graduate School may authorize Adjunct and Special Members of the Graduate Faculty to chair a doctoral 
Dissertation or master's Thesis Examining Committee on the recommendation of the home unit that the member 
possesses the requisite skills and scholarly expertise. Each request for an exception will include a letter of 
justification from the Head of the home unit, making a compelling case that the exception is necessary to fill a 
particular need, confirmation of the approval of the Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the home unit, and 
current curriculum vitae. 



82 



Chapter 16: Academic Policies - Other Graduate School Policies 

Other Graduate School Policies 
Waiver of a Regulation 

All policies of the Graduate School have been formulated by the Graduate Council with the goal of ensuring 
academic quality and approved by the Provost. These policies are to be equitably and uniformly enforced. 
Circumstances occasionally occur that warrant individual consideration. A graduate student who believes that 
there are compelling reasons for a specific regulation to be waived or modified, the student should submit a 
written petition to the Dean of the Graduate School , Room 2125, Lee Building, explaining the facts and issues 
that bear on the case. In all instances, the petition must be signed by the student's Graduate Director and, if the 
petition involves a course, by the course instructor. If these individuals recommend approval, in writing, the 
petition is then forwarded to the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School for consideration. Forms for 
Petitions for Waivers of Regulation are available 
at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/current students/general forms for gradaute students.html . 

Application for Graduation 

During the academic year, applications for graduation must be filed with the Office of the Registrar within the 
first ten days of the semester in which the candidate expects to obtain a degree. During the summer session, the 
application must be filed during the first week of the second summer session. Exact dates are noted for each 
semester and the summer sessions in the Schedule of Classes. Failure to meet specific deadlines may result in a 
delay of one or more semesters before graduation. In addition, the Thesis and Dissertation Manual contains a 
time line for completion of the master's or doctoral degree. If for any reason students do not graduate at the end 
of the semester in which they have applied for the diploma, the application will automatically transfer to the 
following semester. 

Academic regalia are required of all candidates at commencement exercises. Those who so desire may purchase 
or rent caps and gowns at the University of Maryland student supply store. Orders must typically be filed eight 
weeks before the date of Commencement at the University Book Center in the Stamp Student Union. 



Arbitrary and Capricious Grading Policies 

Policy and Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading in Courses 

Arbitrary and capricious grading is constituted by the assignment of a course grade to a student on some basis 
other than performance in the course, or the assignment of a course grade to a student by unreasonable 
application of standards different from standards that were applied to other students in that course, or the 
assignment of a course grade by a substantial and unreasonable departure from the instructor's initially 
articulated standards. 

A student who believes he or she has received an improper final grade in a course should inform the instructor 
promptly. The instructor will meet with the student at a mutually convenient time and place within ten working 
days of receipt of the information. The purpose of the meeting is to attempt to reach a resolution. 

If the instructor has left the University, is on approved leave, or cannot be reached by the student, the student 
should contact the Department Chairperson. The Department Chairperson, or a designee, will meet with the 
student as described above to attempt to resolve the problem. 

If these meetings (known as the informal process) do not resolve the problem, the student may initiate a formal 
appeal. This appeal must be made in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School and must contain: the course 
title and number; the instructor's name; and a statement detailing why the grade is believed to be arbitrary and 
capricious as defined in this policy, and providing all relevant supporting evidence. The appeal must be received 



83 



in the Dean's Office within twenty (20) days of the first day of instruction of the next semester (excluding 
summer.) If these criteria are met, the Dean will institute a formal procedure. 

Formal Procedures 

Each academic unit will have a standing committee of two tenured professors and two graduate level students to 
hear appeals of arbitrary and capricious grading. The appeal will be heard within the academic unit offering the 
course. If the instructor of the course is a member of the committee, that instructor will be replaced by an 
alternate designated by the Department Chairperson. 

Each written appeal is to be reviewed by the entire committee for a decision by the majority. The committee 
will either dismiss the appeal, or move it forward. Grounds for dismissal are: the student has submitted the same 
complaint to any other grievance procedure; the allegations, if true, would not constitute arbitrary and 
capricious grading; the appeal was not timely; or the informal process has not been exhausted. If the appeal is 
dismissed, the committee will notify the student in writing within ten days of the decision, and will include the 
reason or reasons for the dismissal. 

If the appeal is not dismissed, the committee will submit a copy of the appeal to the instructor. The instructor 
must reply in writing to the committee within ten days. If, based on the instructor's reply, the committee feels 
there is a viable solution, that solution should be pursued with the student and the instructor. If no solution is 
reached, the committee shall hold a fact-finding meeting with the student and the instructor. It is to be non- 
adversarial and informal, with neither party represented by an advocate. 

Witnesses may be asked to make statements to the committee if the committee is informed prior to the meeting. 
The meeting will not be open to the public. The committee will meet privately at the close of the fact-finding 
meeting to decide whether a majority believes the evidence supports the allegation of arbitrary and capricious 
grading beyond a reasonable doubt. The committee will notify the student, the instructor, and the Dean of the 
Graduate School of the decision in writing within five days of the meeting. 

The committee has the authority to take any action that it believes will bring about substantial justice, including 
but not limited to directing the instructor to grade the student's work anew, directing the instructor to administer 
a new final exam or paper, directing the cancellation of the student's registration in the course, and directing the 
award of a grade of "pass" in the course. The committee does not have the authority to assign a letter grade for 
the course or reprimand or take disciplinary action against the instructor. 

The decision of the committee is final, and binding on both parties. The decision may not be appealed to any 
other body within the University of Maryland or the University of Maryland System . 

The Dean of the Graduate School will be responsible for implementing the decision of the committee. 

Policy and Procedures for Appeals of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading of Doctoral Qualifying 
Examinations 

The University procedures for reviewing alleged arbitrary and capricious grading of doctoral qualifying 
examinations envision a multi-step process. (Qualifying examinations are defined as any examinations, oral or 
written, that are necessary, but not sufficient, for admission to candidacy for a graduate degree.) Prior to filing a 
formal written appeal, the student must engage in an informal attempt to resolve the problem directly with the 
Chair of the Examination Committee. The Graduate School's Ombudsperson may be called upon to facilitate 
resolution if both parties agree. If these informal efforts fail, then the student may file a formal appeal to the 
Dean of the Graduate School. When such an appeal is received by the Graduate School, the Program will be 
notified and will receive a copy of the appeal letter. An Appeal Committee of faculty and students established 
by the Department/Program will then meet to conduct the formal appeal process. 



84 



The formal appeal process consists of four phases. In the first phase, the Committee evaluates the student's 
written appeal and determines, according to certain established criteria, whether it should be dismissed on 
procedural grounds or whether the process should move forward to the next phase. In the second phase, the 
appeal is sent to the Chair of the Examination Committee for a written response. 

In the third phase, the Appeal Committee decides if there may be a viable informal solution and if so, pursues it 
with both the student and the graduate program. If the Appeal Committee does not feel that such an attempt 
would be feasible or if the effort is unsuccessful, the process moves to phase four, which is the fact-finding 
phase. 

In the fact-finding phase, the student, the graduate director, and a member of the examination committee meet 
with the Appeal Committee. Each party may make statements to the Appeal Committee and may call 
witnesses. This phase, however, is both informal and non-adversarial, and neither side may be represented by 
an advocate. After hearing both sides, the Appeal Committee meets privately to consider the evidence and 
decide whether the evidence offered in support of the allegation of arbitrary and capricious grading is clear and 
convincing. If the Appeal Committee supports the allegation, it then has several options for resolving the 
issue. Whatever the decision of the Appeal Committee, it is binding on both parties and is final; i.e., it may not 
be appealed elsewhere in the University of Maryland or elsewhere within the University System of Maryland. 

Qualifying examinations are defined as any examinations, oral or written, that are necessary, but not sufficient, 
for admission to candidacy for a graduate degree. Arbitrary and capricious grading applies only to the grade 
assigned in a doctoral qualifying examination. Arbitrary and capricious grading is defined as any of the 
following: a) The assignment of a grade to a student on some basis other than performance in the qualifying 
examination; or b) the assignment of a qualifying examination grade to a student by an unreasonable application 
of standards different from standards that were applied to other doctoral students, where an objective 
comparison of students is possible; or c) the assignment of an examination grade by a substantial and 
unreasonable departure from the graduate program's or the Examination Committee's initially articulated 
standards or requirements for the doctoral qualifying examination. 

The Informal Appeal Process 

Before proceeding to a formal appeal, the student should contact the Chair of the Examination Committee and 
meet, at least once, at some mutually convenient time and place in an attempt to resolve the issue or issues. This 
meeting should take place within 10 campus business days of the Examination Committee Chair receiving the 
informal appeal from the student. Campus business days do not include Saturdays, Sundays, and official 
campus holidays. 

If the Examination Committee Chair has left the university, is on approved leave, or cannot be reached by the 
student, the student should contact the Department/Program Chair. The Department/Program Chair, or a faculty 
member designated by the Chair, will to attempt to resolve the issue. 

The Ombudsperson for Graduate Students and/or the Graduate Director may be called upon to facilitate 
resolution if both parties agree. 

The Formal Appeals Process 

If the informal process does not resolve the issue, the student must file a written appeal. The written appeal 
must be received by the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School within 20 campus business days after the 
first day of instruction of the following semester. 

The deadline for appeals of a spring-semester examination, or an examination taken during either semester of 
summer session, is the 20th campus business day after the first day of instruction of the following fall 
semester. Appeals of a fall semester examination or a winter term examination must be made by the 20th 
campus business day after the first day of instruction of the following spring semester. 

85 



The letter of appeal should contain the Examination Committee Chair(s) name, the Graduate Director(s) name, 
the date(s) of the examination, and an explanation of why the student believes the examination result was 
arbitrary and capricious, as defined by the policy. Any relevant supporting evidence should be included with 
the letter. 

Each Program should have a standing committee to hear appeals of arbitrary and capricious grading of doctoral 
qualifying examinations. The Appeal Committee may be the same committee formed within the Program to 
hear appeals of arbitrary and capricious course grades. This committee should generally be formed specifically 
for the purpose of hearing appeals of arbitrary and capricious grading and not a subcommittee of any other 
committee. The Appeal Committee should normally be appointed at the start of the academic year. The terms of 
its members should be for at least one academic year. 

The Appeal Committee should be composed of two tenured faculty and two graduate students appointed by the 
Graduate Director of the Program offering the course. In addition, the Dean of the College will appoint one 
additional member to the Appeal Committee who is a member of the Dean's Office staff and who is also a 
member of the Graduate Faculty. If no such person is available from the Dean's Office staff, the Dean will 
appoint a committee member from a Department/Program other than that of the appellant's 
Department/Program within the college. 

No member of the student(s Examination Committee may also be a member of the Appeal Committee. In such a 
situation, a substitute member should be appointed by the Graduate Director. 

All actions of the Appeal Committee are by majority vote. In the event that the Appeal Committee, at any stage 
of the process, is unable to reach a majority decision, the Dean of the College or his/her designee, should cast 
the deciding vote. In the case of inter-college programs, the participating deans may decide which of them will 
have responsibility for casting the deciding vote. 

The Initial Evaluation Phase.. In this phase, the only task of the Appeal Committee is to review the letter of 
appeal to determine whether the appeal should be dismissed on procedural grounds or moved forward to the 
next phase. If any of the specified procedural grounds for dismissal are met, the appeal must be dismissed. The 
procedural grounds for dismissal are as follows: a) The student did not meet with the Examination Committee 
Chair to resolve the issue informally; or b) the appeal was not timely (i.e., it arrived later than the 20th campus 
business day after the first day of instruction of the following semester, as specified above); or c) the student has 
already submitted the same complaint through another grievance procedure; or d) the allegations, if true, would 
not constitute arbitrary and capricious grading of a qualifying examination. 

During this initial evaluation phase, the Appeal Committee should consider only the student's letter of appeal; it 
should not seek or consider comments or responses from the Examination Committee, or other faculty or 
students. During this initial evaluation phase, the Appeal Committee is not to decide the truth of the student's 
allegation(s); it should accept the student's allegations at face value (i.e., assume for the moment the allegations 
are true.) If, based on its evaluation of the student's letter of appeal, the Appeal Committee decides that one or 
more of the four procedural grounds for dismissal have been met, the Appeal Committee must dismiss the 
appeal and the process ends. The Appeal Committee Chair should notify the student, the Examination 
Committee Chair, the Graduate Director, and the Dean of the Graduate School in writing within 10 campus 
business days if the appeal is dismissed. The Appeal Committee Chair's letter should include the reasons for the 
dismissal. 

The Examination Committee's Response Phase. If the appeal is not dismissed, the Appeal Committee Chair 
should promptly submit a copy of the student's written appeal to the Chair of the Examination Committee with a 
copy to the Dean of the Graduate School . The Chair of the Examination Committee should submit a written 
response to the Appeal Committee Chair within 10 campus business days of receiving the appeal. 

The Dispute Resolution Phase. If, after reviewing the Examination Committee's response, the Appeal 
Committee feels that a solution may be possible, the Appeal Committee should meet with the student and the 

86 



Examination Committee, separately and/or jointly, to attempt to resolve the dispute. The dispute resolution 
phase should not generally have a duration longer than 30 calendar days from receipt of the Examination 
Committee's written response, unless both Committee Chairs agree in writing to continue for a further, brief, 
specified period. If the Appeal Committee's resolution efforts are successful, both Committee Chairs should 
sign a memorandum that states the agreed-upon solution. A copy of this memorandum should be placed in the 
student's file in the Department/Program and a copy should be sent to the Graduate School and to the student. If 
resolution by the Appeal Committee either is not attempted or is unsuccessful, the Department/Program Chair, 
the Graduate Director, the Examination Committee Chair, and the Dean of the Graduate School should be 
promptly notified, and the process advances to the fact-finding phase. 

The Fact-Finding Phase. If a solution is not attempted or is not reached through dispute resolution, the fact- 
finding meeting should be held promptly thereafter. In addition to the Appeal Committee members, the 
student and the Chair of the Examining Committee should be in attendance. Either party may invite witnesses to 
give evidence if the Appeal Committee Chair is notified prior to the meeting. The Chair of the Appeal 
Committee should generally be given at least 24 hours advance notice of the intention to call witnesses. During 
the fact-finding meeting, both the student and the Examining Committee Chair may present statements, oral or 
written, to the Appeal Committee as well as other documentation to support their positions. Neither party may 
be represented by an advocate of any kind. The meeting will not be open to the public. The Graduate School 
may send an administrator to observe the proceedings, but this observer should not participate substantively in 
the proceedings themselves. The meeting is to be both informal and non-adversarial; its purpose is to 
determine the relevant facts in the matter. At the close of the fact-finding meeting, the Appeal Committee will 
meet privately to consider the evidence presented. If the majority of the Appeal Committee believes that the 
student has not provided clear and convincing evidence of the allegation of arbitrary and capricious grading of a 
qualifying examination as defined above, the appeal must be denied. If the majority of the Appeal Committee 
believes that there is clear and convincing evidence that supports the allegation of arbitrary and capricious 
grading, the Appeal Committee will decide which of the various actions within its authority (see below) should 
be taken. The Appeal Committee Chair should notify the student, the Department/Program Chair, the 
Examining Committee Chair, the Graduate Director, and the Dean of the Graduate School in writing of the 
Appeal Committee's decision on the appeal within five campus business days after conclusion of the fact- 
finding meeting. 

The Authority of the Appeal Committee. The Appeal Committee generally has the authority to take any 
action it believes will bring about substantial justice, except a) it may not direct that a passing grade for the 
qualifying examination be assigned for the student; and b) it may not reprimand or take disciplinary action 
against the Examination Committee or any of its members. 

The following is a list of possible actions that the Appeal Committee may take. The list is not exhaustive; the 
Appeal Committee may take other appropriate actions in order to achieve what it believes to be substantial 
justice, a) The Appeal Committee may direct the Department/Program that the examination be re-graded by a 
new Examination Committee from within the Program, b) The Appeal Committee may direct the Program that 
the examination be re-graded by a new Examination Committee from outside the Program, c) The Examination 
Committee may be directed to administer a new examination, d) The Appeal Committee may direct that a new 
Examination Committee be formed from within the Department/Program which will administer and grade an 
entirely new examination, e) The composition of the new Examination Committee will be determined by the 
Appeal Committee in accordance with the prevailing rules of the Program. At the discretion of the Appeal 
Committee, the new Examination Committee may have one of its members from outside of the University of 
Maryland . f) In the event that the qualifying examination was an oral examination, a new oral examination 
must be administered. In the event of a combined written/oral qualifying examination, a new oral portion must 
be administered. The Appeal Committee may direct that this new examination be administered by an 
Examination Committee that consists of some or all members of the original Examination Committee or an 
entirely new committee. 

The Appeal Committee's Decision. The decision of the Appeal Committee is final and binding on both 
parties. The decision may not be appealed to any other body within the University of Maryland or within the 
University System of Maryland. If, as a result of this appeals process, the student's advisor no longer wishes to 

87 



advise the student, the Graduate Director will act as the student's temporary advisor for a period of not more 
than six months to allow the student time to find a new advisor. If the Graduate Director is a member of the 
Examination Committee, this assignment will be carried out by the Department/Program Chair. 

Implementation of the Appeal Committee's Decision. The Director of Graduate Studies and the 
Department/Program Chair will be responsible to the Dean of the Graduate School for implementing the 
decision of the Appeal Committee. 

Graduate Student Parental Accommodation Policy 

The University of Maryland Graduate Student Parental Accommodation Policy provides a period of up to six 
(6) weeks during which new parents may postpone completion of academic requirements. It is intended to 
provide graduate students with an opportunity to integrate the challenges of new parenthood with the demands 
of graduate-level training, scholarship, and research. In addition to providing support to young families, this 
policy seeks to reduce attrition and improve time to degree for students who become parents. 

The Parental Accommodation Policy is not a leave of absence. This policy allows students to maintain status as 
full-time, registered graduate students, and thus be eligible for the rights and privileges of registered students 
(e.g., access to University resources) while adjusting to their new familial obligations. 

During this parental accommodation period, eligible students will continue to be enrolled as fulltime graduate 
students and will continue to pay tuition and fees. Students also will be expected to keep the lines of 
communication with their departments open and demonstrate to their advisors that they are academically 
engaged and making progress in coursework and research, though perhaps at a slower pace. 

ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible to apply for the benefits of the Parental Accommodation Policy, a new parent 
must (1) have been enrolled full-time for at least one full semester in a graduate program at the University, (2) 
be enrolled full-time at the time of application, (3) be in good academic standing, and (4) be making satisfactory 
progress toward degree. Any parent (regardless of gender) is eligible to apply. 

In the event that both parents are eligible, each is individually entitled to a Parental Accommodation period of 
up to six (6) weeks. This Parental Accommodation period may be taken concurrently with or consecutively to 
the Parental Accommodation period taken by the other parent, with or without some overlap. The total 
combined Parental Accommodation period for both parents, however, may not exceed 12 weeks and must 
conclude 12 weeks following the child's birth or adoption. 

ACCOMMODATION: Approval of a student's application for a period of Parental Accommodation allows the 
student, assuming the prior agreement of instructors, advisor, and academic program, to modify deadlines and 
academic expectations to accommodate the student's new parental responsibilities. Students may be able to 
postpone completion of course assignments, examinations, and other academic requirements for a period of up 
to six (6) weeks. Students who will be enrolled in courses during the accommodation period must meet with 
their instructors to develop a written plan as to how they will satisfactorily complete the course(s). These plans 
must be approved and signed by the instructor(s) and submitted as part of the Parental Accommodation 
Application form. At the end of the accommodation period, students are expected to return to graduate study 
and resume progress toward completion of their degree. Deadlines with regard to time to degree, time to 
candidacy, time to comprehensive or qualifying exams, etc. will be extended one semester per childbirth or 
adoption, upon the request of the student. The total additional time granted for the extension of any deadlines as 
a result of the student's use of the Parental Accommodation Policy, however, cannot exceed a maximum period 
of one (1) year, regardless of the number of births or adoptions, or the number of times the student invokes the 
Parental Accommodation Policy. 

The period of Parental Accommodation begins immediately upon the birth or adoption; must be taken in a 
consecutive block of time; and cannot extend beyond six (6) weeks. The student may not divide the 
accommodation period into separate periods or defer the accommodation period beyond this time limit. In the 

88 



event of simultaneous multiple births or adoptions, the maximum Parental Accommodation period for which a 
student is eligible with respect to that event remains six (6) weeks. 

APPLICATION: At least eight (8) weeks prior to the anticipated birth or adoption, students must submit a 
written application for Parental Accommodation signed by the Faculty Advisor, Director of Graduate Studies, 
and the Chair of their academic department, to the Graduate School. (In unusual or extraordinary circumstances, 
the Graduate School may accept applications with less than eight weeks notice.) 

Written plans to complete coursework, signed by the student and the instructor, must be provided for each 
course in which the student will be enrolled during the accommodation period. The discretion to provide an 
accommodation that allows a student to be away from the classroom for six weeks rests with the individual 
course instructor. Faculty are strongly encouraged to work with students to develop an accommodation that 
permits the student to fulfill academic coursework requirements while benefitting from a period of parental 
accommodation, and that also maintains fairness with regard to other students. In some cases such an 
accommodation may not be feasible. In such cases, faculty should provide a written explanation to the 
department's Director of Graduate Studies as to why the accommodation is not possible, and students should 
adjust their class schedules accordingly. 

The Dean of the Graduate School will review the request and notify the student and the student's academic 
program if the request for a period of Parental Accommodation has been approved. The Graduate School will 
coordinate with academic programs to make appropriate adjustments to the student's deadlines and records. 
Retroactive requests will not be considered. A copy of the application form is attached. 

International students should discuss plans with the Office of International Services as soon as possible in order 
to identify and address proactively any individual or unique visa issues and/or to consider the latest applicable 
regulations. The intent of this policy is to permit all students to maintain their status as full-time, enrolled 
students during this period of accommodation. Medical complications, prior to or following the birth, are not 
covered by this policy. If a student is not able to return at the end of the period of accommodation, s/he should 
consider applying for a Leave of Absence. See the Graduate School's registration policy for more information. 



89 



Chapter 17: Graduate School Services 

Ombudsperson for Graduate Students 

The Ombuds Office for Graduate Students seeks to ensure that the graduate student voice is heard and that 
problems receive impartial attention. The Ombuds Office is available to all graduate students with questions or 
concerns related to their graduate experience. The Ombuds Office provides confidential, informal, and 
independent assistance to resolve conflicts, and promotes fair and equitable treatment within the University. The 
office can be reached at 2103 Lee Building , 301-405-3132, http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/ombuds. 

The Office of Graduate Recruitment, Retention, and Diversity (OGRRD) 

The Office of Graduate Recruitment, Retention and Diversity (OGRRD) is dedicated to fostering a supportive 
University environment for graduate students from under-represented minority groups, for graduate students 
who are women, and for graduate students with disabilities. The Office's programs and services serve to attract 
new students, to build a collaborative and cooperative community, and to promote professional development 
among graduate students to ensure academic success. Its initiatives include, but are not limited to: conducting 
student recruitment activities, including a campus visitation weekend, summer undergraduate research 
programs, and faculty partner programs; building a supportive community by providing an arena for 
discussion groups on a variety of relevant topics, conducting research symposia, sponsoring an annual team- 
building retreat, supporting a viable one-on-one peer mentoring program, and supporting graduate student 
organizations; sponsoring programs and activities designed to foster professional development, including 
workshops and seminars on academic and research skills, participation at scientific meetings, preparing for the 
professoriate and other careers, and hosting on-campus scientific presentations and a minority professional 
seminar series. In addition to its own initiatives, the Office works with the University's various colleges and 
departments to serve the needs of a diverse student body. 

Graduate Legal Aid Office 

The Graduate Legal Aid Office provides free legal advice, referrals, and assistance to currently registered 
University of Maryland graduate students. Staff members give general legal advice on a wide variety of matters, 
including landlord-tenant issues, consumer problems, traffic accidents, uncontested divorces, and University- 
related matters. The Office provides direct legal assistance in routine matters, but cannot sue on behalf of 
students or represent them in court. The Office is staffed eight hours a week for student interviews; staff 
members see students on a walk -in basis and by appointment. Walk-in and appointment schedules are posted on 
the Office door. The Office cannot handle disputes between graduate students (though the Ombudsperson for 
Graduate Students may be consulted for assistance in these disputes) and does not provide emergency services. 

English Editing for International Graduate Students 

The English Editing for International Graduate Students (EEIGS) program, operating under the aegis of the 
Graduate School 's Office of Recruitment, Retention, and Diversity, offers editing services for international 
graduate students who must present required seminar papers, theses and dissertations in English. This program 
is staffed by volunteers from the University's "Retired Volunteer Service Corps" and the Golden I. D. Group, 
and by volunteers from other University and non-University sources. These services are free. 



The EEIGS program operates as follows: 

• The names and telephone numbers of volunteer editors on whom students may call may be obtained by 
calling the Graduate School at 301-405-4183. 

• The student will be responsible for contacting a volunteer editor to arrange for the editing services. If 

90 



an arrangement does not work out satisfactorily, either the student or the volunteer editor may 
discontinue it. The student may then seek another volunteer editor. 

• The student should allow a reasonable amount of time for the editing services. Documents cannot be 
edited on very short notice. 

• Editing services are expected to take place on the University of Maryland campus. The student will be 
responsible for finding working space (for example, an empty classroom or office in the student's 
department). 

• The student is expected to inform the Director of Graduate Studies of the department in which he or 
she is majoring about the aid being received through this program. 

Graduate students and other members of the University of Maryland community may also offer English 
language services for a fee. Graduate students in the Department of English who are available for this service, 
for example, can be contacted through the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of English, 3101 
Susquehanna Hall. 

Health Insurance 

Because the service provided by the Health Center is limited and many students do not have adequate health 
insurance coverage, a voluntary group insurance policy (MAMSI) is available to graduate students. This policy 
provides benefits at reasonable rates for hospital, surgery, emergency, laboratory, and x-ray services; some 
coverage for mental health; and contains a major hospital provision. Students may elect to have family 
coverage. For additional information and application forms, visit the following website: 
http://www.mamsi.eom/d/m/umd/index.isp . 



Teaching, research, and graduate assistants are also eligible for the State Employee Insurance Plan options. 
Further information can be obtained from the student's graduate program payroll and benefits coordinator or the 
University Human Relations' Benefits Office: http://www.uhr.umd.edu/benefits/benefits2001/benefits2001.htm 

Graduate fellows can apply for health insurance coverage through MAMSI. Effective Fall Semester 2005, the 
Graduate School will provide a reimbursement of 50% of the MAMSI insurance premium for individual 
coverage to full-time graduate students who are supported on full fellowships funded by the Graduate School 
through the block grant program. Subsidy of coverage for dependents will not be available. Funding for fellows' 
health insurance reimbursement is limited and will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. To obtain 
more information, go to the following website: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/Fellowship/insurance.htm . 

Promise 

Promise - Maryland's Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate: This office supports activities and 
programming to enhance community and provide preparation for the professoriate in science, technology, 
engineering and mathematics (STEM) and all other University programs. 



91 



Chapter 18: Other University Services 



Bursar : Student account information. 

Career Center : On and off -campus employment, assistantships, career information, TERP Online database. 

Commuter Affairs , Office of: Commuter information, off-campus housing, community service, Shuttle UM 

Dining Services: Dining rooms, restaurants, and eateries can be found in over 35 different locations across 
campus. 

Disability Support Services : provides and coordinates direct services and assistance for students, faculty, staff, 
and University visitors with disabilities. 

Graduate Student Housing : administered by the Vice President for Student Affairs. For information about 
graduate housing in close proximity to the University, write or call the Office of Resident Life, or e-mail grad- 
housing@smc-grad-housing.com , or refer to the website at www.smc-grad-housing.com . 

Human Relations Programs, Office of : Provides leadership on issues dealing with sexual harassment, 
affirmative action, recruitment, retention, race relations, conflict management, teaching effectiveness and 
organizational development to the entire University community. 

Information Technology, Office of (OIT): E-mail accounts, dial-in access, helpdesk, other computer-related 
information. 

Libraries , University of Maryland: General library information, including online catalogs, electronic databases, 
and collection information. 

Ombudsperson for Graduate Students : Provides confidential support for the solution of problems facing 
graduate students. 

Department of Campus Parking ,: Permits, regulations, ticketing, meter, and lot information. 

Recreation Services , Campus: Intramurals, non-credit instruction, facilities, University programs. 

Residency Classification Office : Information on in-state / out of state tuition, obtaining Maryland residency, 
petitions, problems. 

Resident Life : On-campus housing information. 

Technology Commercialization, Office of: Office responsible for the protection, marketing, and licensing of 
University intellectual property. 

Terrapin Trader : University warehouse of surplus goods - computers, furniture, other equipment. 

Travel Services : Provides travel policy clarification and information about service providers and discounts; 
facilitates procurement of travel and expense reconciliation processing. 

University Book Center : Textbook information, hours, location. 



92 



Chapter 19: University Publications 

The Graduate Catalog: This document lists the policies of the University of Maryland on all aspects of 
graduate education; it also lists graduate program information, courses approved for graduate credit, and all 
current members of the graduate faculty. It is available at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog . 

Departmental Brochures: Small brochures describing many of the departments and programs at the 
University of Maryland are available free of charge. 

Schedule of Classes: The Schedule of Classes lists course offerings, class times, and room assignments, 
registration dates and procedures, deadlines, fees, and general information. The schedule is published four 
times a year, twice each semester. The first edition is available prior to early registration for the spring and fall 
semesters. The second edition, published a few weeks before the beginning of each semester, updates course 
offerings and registration procedures. The schedule is available to all students free of charge and can be picked 
up at the Mitchell Building, Stamp Student Union, Hornbake Library and McKeldin Library. An online version 
is available at http://www.testudo.umd.edu/ . 

Graduate Application Booklet: For those unable to complete the Online Graduate Application 
( http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/admissions) , a PDF version of the Application and Instructions is available 
from the Graduate School. 

Thesis and Dissertation Style Guide: This manual contains the instructions for preparation of theses and 
dissertations. It is available on the web at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/etd. 

World Wide Web: Visit the University of Maryland homepage, located at http://www.umd.edu . A vast 
amount of information is available on-line from websites maintained by University offices. Most resources can 
be accessed or linked through: The Graduate School: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu or through Testudo 
(Administrative Services): http://www.testudo.umd.edu. 



93 



Chapter 20: Academic Resources in the College Park, MD Area 



American Association of University Women 
1111 Sixteenth St. N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.aauw.org/ 

American Council on Education's 

Office of Women in Higher Education 

One Dupont Circle NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

http://www.acenet.edu/programs/owhe/home.cfm 

American Psychological Association 
750 First Street, NE, 
Washington, DC 20002-4242 
http://www.apa.org 

American Psychological Society 

1010 Vermont Avenue, NW 

Suite 1 100 

Washington, DC 20005-4907 

http://www.psvchologicalscience.org/ 

American Visionary Art Museum 
800 Key Highway 
Baltimore, MD 21230-3940 
http://www.avam.org 

Arena Stage 1 101 
Sixth Street, SW 
Washington, DC 20024 
http://www.arenastage.org/ 

Air Force Office of Scientific Research 
4015 Wilson Boulevard, Room 713 
Arlington, VA 22203-1954 
http://www.afosr.af.mil/ 

Army Aberdeen Test Center 

STECS-AC 

Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5059 

http://www.atc.army.mil 

Army Center for Environmental Health Research 

568 Doughten Drive 

Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5010 

http://usacehr.detrick.armv.mil/deptox/default.htm 

Army CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors 

10211 BurbeckRoad 

Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5806 

http://www.nvl.army.mil/ 

Army Edgewood CB Center 

AMSSB-RAS-C 

5183 Blackhawk Road 

Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5424 

http://www.federallabs.org/servlet/FLCltemDisplavServlct7wItemI 

D=2003-09- 10- 11-27-41 -890-ltem 

Army Institute for Water Resources 
7701 Telegraph Road 
Alexandria, VA 22315 
http://www.iwr.usace.army.mil/ 

Army Medical Research and Development 

MCMR-JA, Building 525 

Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5012 

http://www.federallabs.org/servlet/FLCLPRODisplayServlet7wLPR 

OlD=1052 

Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical 
USAMRICD 



ATTN MCMR-UV-ZM 

3 100 Ricketts Point Road 

Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5400 

https://ccc.apgea.army.mil/contact us.htm 

Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases 

MCMR-UIZ-D 

1425 Porter Street 

Frederick, MD 21702-501 1 

http://www.usamriid.army.mil/ 

Army Research Institute for Behavioral and Social Sciences 
2511 Jefferson Davis Highway 
Arlington, VA 22202-3926 
http://www.hqda.army.mil/ari/ 

Army Research Laboratory — APG Site 

AMSRL-CS-TT 

Building 433 

Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5425 

http://www.arl.army.mil/main/Main/default.cfm 

Army Research Laboratory — Weapons and Materials 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5059 
http://www.arl.army.mil/wmrd/ 

Army Research Laboratory - Sensors, Signal 

AMSRL-CS-TT 

2800 Powder Mill Road 

Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 

Army Test & Evaluation Command 

Public Affairs Office 

US Army Test and Evaluation Command 

4501 Ford Ave. 

Alexandria, VA 22302-1458 

http://www.atec.army.mil/index.htm 

Audacity Laboratories 

Central Intelligence Agency 

13055 Park Crescent Circle 

Herndon, VA 20171 

http://www.federallabs.org/servlet/FLCLPRODisplavServlet7wLPR 

OID=1107 

Baltimore Museum of Art 
1 Art Museum Drive 
Baltimore, MD 21218-3898 
http://artbma.org/home.html 

The Brookings Institution 
1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.brook.edu/ 

Business and Professional Women's Foundation 
1900 M Street, NW, Suite 310 
Washington, D.C. 20036 
http://www.bpwusa.org/ 

Central Intelligence Agency 
Directorate of Science and Technology 
http://www.cia.gov/cia/dst/home.html 

Center for Hellenic Studies 
3 100 Whitehaven Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20008 
http://www.chs.harvard.edu/ 

Center for Policy Alternatives 

1875 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 710 



94 



Washington, DC 20009 
http://www.cfpa.org/ 

Center for Women's Policy Studies 
1211 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 312 
Washington, D.C. 20036 
http://www.centerwomenpolicy.org/ 

Centers for Commercial Development of Space 
300 E Street, S.W. Code CU 
Washington, DC 20546 
http://www.nasa.gov 

The Contemporary Museum 
100 W.Centre Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
http://www.contemporary.org 

Corcoran Gallery 
500 17th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20006 
http://www.corcoran.org/ 

Council on Foreign Relations 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.cfr.org/ 

David Taylor Research Center 
2013 Admiral Melville Circle 
Annapolis, MD 21402 

Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) 
3701 North Fairfax Drive 
Arlington, VA 22203-1714 
http://www.daipa.mil/index.html 

Defense Technical Information Center 
8725 John J. Kingman Road 
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 
http://www.dtic.mil/ 

Dumbarton Oaks Library 
1703 32nd Street, NW 
Washington, D.C. 20007 
http://www.doaks.org/ 

Federal Bureau of Investigation, FSRTC 
Building 12 FBI Academy 
Quantico, VA 22135 

http://www.fbi.gov 

Federal Theatre Project Archives 

C-201 Fenwick Library at George Mason University 

Fairfax, Virginia Campus 

http://www.gmu.edu/library/specialcollections/federal.html 

Feminist Majority Foundation 
1600 Wilson Blvd. Suite 801 
Arlington, VA 22209 
http://www.feminist.org/ 

Folger Institute 

201 East Capitol Street, SE 

Washington, DC 20003-1094 

http://www.folger.edu/institute/ 

Folger Shakespeare Library 
201 East Capitol Street, SE 
Washington, DC 20003-1094 
http://www.folger.edu/Home_02B.html 

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 
5600 Fishers Lane 



Rockville, Maryland 20857 
http://Zwww.fda.gov 

Beltsville Agriculture Research Center (BARC) 
10300 Baltimore Avenue 
Beltsville, Maryland 20705 
http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/ 

FDA Center for Biologies Evaluation and Research 
1401 Rockville Pike 
Suite 200 N (HFM-40) 
Rockville, MD 20852-1448 
http://www.fda.gov/cber/ 

FDA Center for Devices & Radiological Health 

FDA/CDRH/OCER/DSMICA (HFZ-220) 

1350 Piccard Drive 

Rockville, MD 20850-4307 U.S.A. 

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ 

FDA Life Sciences Laboratory 
5600 Fishers Lane 
Rockville, MD 20857 

FDA Center for Biologies Evaluation and Research 

HSM-44 

11400 Rockville Pike 

Rockville, MD 20852 

FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine 

Communications Staff 

7519 Standish Place, HFV-12 

Rockville, Maryland 20855 

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/default.html 

FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition 
5 100 Paint Branch Parkway 
College Park, MD 20740 
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/list.html 

Ford's Theatre 

511 10th Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20004 

http://www.fordstheatre.org/ 

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery 
Smithsonian Institution 
P.O. Box 37012, MRC 707 
Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 
http://www.asia.si.edu/ 

General Federation of Women's Clubs 
1734 N Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.gfwc.org/ 

George Meany Center for Labor Studies 
10000 New Hampshire Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20903 
http://www.georgemeany.org/ 

Hirshhorn Gallery and Sculpture Garden 
PO Box 37012 
Washington, DC 20013-7012 
http://hirshhorn.si.edu/ 

Institute for Women's Policy Research 
1707 L Street, NW, Suite 750 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.iwpr.org/ 

International Center for Research on Women 
1717 Massachusetts Ave. NW 
Suite 302 



95 



Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.icrw.org/ 

International Monetary Fund 
700 19 th St. NW 
Washington, DC 20431 
http://www.imf.org 

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 
2700 F Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20566 
http://www.kennedy-center.org/ 

Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory 
1 1 100 Johns Hopkins Road 
Laurel, MD 20723-6099 
http://www.jhuapl.edu/ 

Library of Congress 
101 Independence Ave, SE 
Washington, DC 20540 
http://www.loc.gov 

Marine Corps System Commands 
2008 Elliot Road 
Quantico,VA 22134-5030 
http://www.hqmc.usmc.mil/hqmcmain.nsf/frontpage 

The Maryland Science Center 
601 Light Street 
Baltimore, MD 21230 
http://www.mdsci.org 

Museum of African Art 
Smithsonian Institution 
MRC 708, P.O. Box 37012 
Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 
http://www.nmafa.si.edu/default.htm 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
Goddard Space Flight Center 
Code 130, Office of Public Affairs 
Greenbelt,MD 20771 
http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/ 

The National Aquarium in Baltimore 
501 E.Pratt St. 
Baltimore, MD 21202 
http://www.aqua.org 

National Archives and Records Administration 
700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20408 
http://www.archives.gov/ 

National Archives at College Park (Archives II) 

8601 Adelphi Road 

College Park, MD 20740-6001 

http://www.archives.gov/facilities/md/archives_2.html 

National Defense University 
Fort Lesley J. McNair 
Washington, DC 20319-5066 
http://www.ndu.edu/ 

National Endowment for the Arts 
1 100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW 
Washington, DC 20506 
http://www.nea.gov 

National Endowment for the Humanities 
1 100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW 
Washington, DC 20506 
http://www.neh.gov 



National Gallery of Art 

National Mall between Third and Seventh Streets at Constitution 

Avenue, NW 

http://www.nga.gov/ 

National Gallery's Center for the Advanced Study of Visual Arts 
http://www.nga.gov/resources/casva.htm 

National Geographic Society 
1145 17th St. N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
http://www.nationalgeographic.com 

National Geospatial Intelligence Agency 
National Imaging and Mapping Agency 
4600 Sangamore Road 
Bethesda,MD 20816-5003 
http://www.nima.mil/portal/site/nga01/ 

National Institutes of Health 
9000 Rockville Pike 
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 
http://www.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 
National Eye Institute 
31 Center Drive MSC 2510 
Bethesda, MD 20892-2510 
http://www.nei.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 

Building 31, Room 5 A52 

31 Center Drive MSC 2486 

Bethesda, MD 20892 

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/index.htm 

National Institutes of Health 

John E. Fogarty International Center 

Building 31, Rm B2C29 

31 Center Drive MSC 2220 

Bethesda, MD 20892-2220 

http://www.fic.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 
National Cancer Institute 
6116 Executive Blvd., Ste. 3036A 
Bethesda, MD 20892-8322 
http://www.nci.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine 

NCCAM Clearinghouse 

P.O. Box 7923 

Gaithersburg, MD 20898 

http://nccam.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Center for Research Resources 

One Democracy Plaza, 9th Floor 

6701 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 4874 

Bethesda, MD 20892-4874 

http://www.ncrr.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Center on Minority Health & Health 

6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800 

MSC-5465 

Bethesda, MD 20892-5465 

http://www.ncmhd.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Human Genome Research Institute 

Building 31, Room 4B09 

31 Center Drive, MSC 2152 



96 



9000 Rockville Pike 
Bethesda, MD 20892-2152 
http://www.genome.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases 

NIAID Office of Communications & Public Liaison 

6610 Rockledge Drive, MSC 6612 

Bethesda, MD 20892-6612 

http://www.niaid.nih.gov/default.htm 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Allergy Arthritis & Musculosketal & Skin 

Diseases 

Information Clearinghouse 

National Institutes of Health 

1 AMS Circle 

Bethesda, Maryland 20892-3675 

http://www.niams.nih.gov/index.htm 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering 

6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 202 

Bethesda, MD 20892-5477 

http://www.nibib.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Child Health & Human Development 

P.O. Box 3006 

Rockville, MD 20847 

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/default.htm 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research 

Bethesda, MD 20892-2190 

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases 

Office of Communications and Public Liaison 

NIDDK, NIH, Building 31, room 9A04 

Center Drive, MSC 2560 

Bethesda, MD 20892-2560 

http://www.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute of General Medical Sciences 

45 Center Drive MSC 6200 

Bethesda, MD 20892-6200 

http://www.nigms.nih.gov/ 

National Institute of Mental Health 

Office of Communications 

6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 8184, MSC 9663 

Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/nimhhome/index.cfm 

National Institutes of Health 
National Institute of Nursing Research 
31 Center Drive, Room 5B-10 
Bethesda, MD 20892-2178 
http://ninr.nih.gov/ninr/index.html 

National Institutes of Health 
National Institute on Aging 
Building 31, Room 5C27 
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292 
Bethesda, MD 20892 
http://www.nia.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism 

5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304 

Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9304 

http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/ 



National Institutes of Health 

National Institute on Deafness & Other Communication Disorders 

3 1 Center Drive, MSC 2320 

Bethesda, MD USA 20892-2320 

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 
National Institute on Drug Abuse 
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213 
Bethesda, MD 20892-9561 
http://www.drugabuse.gov/NIDAHome.html 

National Institutes of Health 

National Institute on Environmental Health Sciences 

Building 31, Room B1C02 

31 Center Drive MSC 2256 

Bethesda, MD USA 20892 

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/home.htm 

National Institutes of Health 
National Library of Medicine 
8600 Rockville Pike 
Bethesda, MD 20894 
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 
Center for Information Technology 
10401 Fern wood Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20817 
http://www.cit.nih.gOv/home.asp# 

National Institutes of Health 
Center for Scientific Review 
6701 Rockledge Drive 
Bethesda, MD 20892 
http://www.drg.nih.gov/ 

National Institutes of Health 
Office of AIDS Research 
Building 2, Room 4W13 
Bethesda, MD 20892 
http://www.nih.gov/od/oar/ 

National Institutes of Health 

Office of Research on Women's Health 

http://www4.od.nih.gov/orwh/ 

National Institutes of Health 

Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center 

6100 Executive Boulevard, Suite 3001 

Bethesda, MD 20892-7511 

http://www.nih.gov/about/almanac/organization/CC.htm 

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 3460 
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-3460 
http://www.nist.gov/ 

Building and Fire Research Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8600 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8600 

http://www.bfrl.nist.gov/ 

Chemical Science & Technology Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8300 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8300 

http://www.cstl.nist.gov/ 

Electronics & Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8100 



97 



Gaithersburg, MD 20899-81 10 
http://www.eeel.nist.gov/ 

Fire Research Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8600 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8600 

http://www.bfrl.nist.gov/866/frd.htm 

Information Technology Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8900 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8900 

http://www.itl.nist.gov/ 

Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8200 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8200 

http://www.mel.nist.gov/ 

Materials Science & Engineering Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8500 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8500 

http://www.msel.nist.gov/ 

NIST Technology Service 
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 200 
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2000 
http://ts.nist.gov/ 

Physics Laboratory 

NIST 

100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8400 

Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8400 

http://physics.nist.gov/ 

National Museum of Women in the Arts 
1250 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20005-3970 
http://www.nmwa.org/ 

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 

14th Street & Constitution Avenue, NW 

Room 6217 

Washington, DC 20230 

http://www.noaa.gov 

NOAA 

Center for Coastal Monitoring & Assessment 

1305 East-West Highway, Room 10110 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

http://ccma.nos.noaa.gov/welcome.html 

NOAA 

Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services 

1305 East-West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3281 

http://co-ops.nos.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

Chesapeake Bay Office 

410 Severn Ave, Suite 107 

Annapolis, MD 21403 

http://noaa.chesapeakebay.net/ 

NOAA 

Cooperative Oxford Laboratory 

904 South Morris Street 

Oxford, MD 21654-1323 

http://www.chbr.noaa.gov/CooperativeOxfordLaboratorv.html 

NOAA 

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science 



1305 East-West Highway, Room 13501 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
http://www.nccos.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

National Centers for Environmental Prediction 

5200 Auth Road 

Camp Springs, MD 20746 

http://www.ncep.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service 

1335 East-West Highway, SSMC1, Room 7216 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

National Weather Service 

1325 East- West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

Office of Global Programs 

14th and Constitution Avenue N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20230 

http://www.ogp.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

Undersea Research Program 

1315 East- West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

http://www.nurp.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

Office of Coast Survey 

1315 East- West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 

http://chartmaker.ncd.noaa.gov/ 

NOAA 

Office of Research and Technology Applications 
1335 East-West Highway, SSMC-1, Room 106 
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3284 
http://www.oarhq.noaa.gov/OSS ORTA.html 

NOAA 

Air Resources Laboratory 
1315 East- West Highway 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ 

National Organization for Women 
1 100 H St NW, 3rd floor 
Washington, D.C. 20005 
http://www.now.org/index.html 

National Reconnaissance Office 
14675 Lee Road 
Chantilly, V A 20151-1715 
http://www.nro.gov/ 

National Science Foundation 
4201 Wilson Boulevard 
Arlington, VA 22230 
http://www.nsf.gov/ 

National Theatre 

The National Theatre 

1321 Pennsylvania Ave NW 

Washington DC 20004 

http://www.nationaltheatre.org/ 

National Women's Law Center 
1 1 Dupont Circle, NW, #800 



98 



Washington, D.C. 20036 

http://www.nwlc.org/ 

The Nature Conservancy 

4245 North Fairfax Drive, Suite 100 

Arlington, VA 22203-1606 

http://www.nature.org 

Naval Air Warfare Center — Aircraft Division 

Business Development Team 

Bldg 304, Unit 10 

22541 Millstone Road 

Patuxent River, MD 20670-5304 

http://www.nawcad.navy.mil/index.cfm 

Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology 

Code 50 

2008 Stump Neck Road 

Indian Head, MD 20640-5070 

https://naveodtechdiv.navsea.navy.mil/ 

Science, Engineering 

Naval Information Warfare Activity (NIWA) 

Fort Meade, MD 

http://www.fas.org/iip/agency/navsecgru/niwa/ 

Naval Medical Research Center 
503 Robert Grant Avenue 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 

http://www.nmrc.navy.mil/ 

Naval Research Laboratory 
4555 Overlook Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20375 
http://www.nrl.navy.mil/ 

Naval Sea Systems Command 
1333 Isaac Hull Avenue, SE 
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20376 
http://www.navsea.navy.mil/ 

Naval Surface Warfare Center — Carderock Division 

9500 MacArthur Blvd. 

West Bethesda, MD 20817-5700 

http://www.dt.navy.mil/ 

Naval Surface Warfare Center — Indian Head 

101 Strauss Avenue 

Indian Head, MD 20640-5035 

http://www.ih.navy.mil/ 

Naval Surface Warfare Center — Dahlgren Laboratory 
17320 Dahlgren Road 
Dahlgren, VA 22448-5100 

http://www.nswc.navy.mil/ 

Nuclear Regulatory Commission 

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Public Affairs 

Washington, D.C. 20555 

http://www.nrc.gov/ 

Office of Naval Research 
800 North Quincy Street 
Arlington, VA 22217-5660 
http://www.onr.navy.mil/default.asp 

Olney Theatre Center 

2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road 

Olney, MD 20832 

http://www.olnevtheatre.org/ 

Phillips Collection 
1600 21st Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20009 
http://www.phillipscollection.org/ 



The Rand Corporation 
Washington Office 
Bruce Hoffman, Director 
1200 South Hayes Street 
Arlington VA 22202-5050 
http://www.rand.org 

Shakespeare Theatre at the Lansburgh 

450 7th Street NW 
Washington, DC 20004-2207 
http://www.shakespearedc.org/ 

Smithsonian Institution 

PO Box 37012 

SI Building, Room 153, MRC 010 

Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 

http://www.si.edu 

Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences 
4301 Jones Bridge Road 
Bethesda, MD 20814 
http://www.usuhs.mil/ 

U.S. Bureau of the Census 
4700 Silver Hill Road 
Washington DC 20233-0001 
http://www.census.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Agriculture 
1400 Independence Avenue 
S.W. Washington, D.C. 20250 
http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usdahome 

USDA - -Extension Service 
6707 Groveton Drive 
Clinton, MD 20735 
http://www.csrees.usda.gov/qlinks/extension/html 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
14th and Constitution Avenue N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20230 
http://www.commerce.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Defense 
1400 Defense Pentagon 
Washington, DC 20301-1400 
http://www.defenselink.mil/ 

U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20202 
http://www.ed.gov/index.jhtml 

U.S. Department of Energy 
1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20585 
http://www.energy.gov/engine/content.do 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
200 Independence Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20201 
http://www.hhs.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Homeland Security 
Washington, D.C. 20528 
http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/ 

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 

451 7th Street S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20410 

http://www.hud.gov/ 

U.S. Department of the Interior 
1849 C Street, N.W. 



99 



Washington, D.C. 20240 
http://www.doi.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Justice 
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20530-0001 
http://www.usdoj.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Labor 
Frances Perkins Building 
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20210 
http://www.dol.gov/ 

U.S. Department of State 
2201 C Street, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20520 
http://www.state.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Transportation 
400 7th Street, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20590 
http://www.dot.gov/ 

U.S. Department of the Treasury 
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20220 
http://www.ustreas.gov/ 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs 
810 Vermont Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20420 
http://www.va.gov/ 

U.S. Geological Survey 
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive 
Reston, VA 20192 
http://www.usgs.gov/ 

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum 
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW 
Washington, DC 20024-2126 
http://www.ushmm.org/ 

United States Naval Academy 
121 Blake Road 
Annapolis, MD 21402-5000 
http://www.usna.edu/ 

U.S. Naval Observatory 
Massachusetts Avenue at 34th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 
http://www.usno.navy.mil/ 

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research 
503 Robert Grant Ave 
Silver Spring, MD. 20910 
http://wrair-www.army.mil/default.asp 

Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
6900 Georgia Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20307 
http://www.wramc.amedd.army.mil 

Walter's Art Museum 
600 North Charles Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
http://www.thewalters.org/html/home.asp 

Wolf Trap Farm Park 
1645 Trap Road 
Vienna, Virginia 22182 
http://www.wolf-trap.org/ 



Women's Research and Education Institute 
1750 New York Avenue, NW 
Suite 350 

Washington, DC 20006 
http://www.wrei.org/ 

World Wildlife Fund 
1250 24th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20037 
http://www.worldwildlife.org/ 

World Bank 

1818 H Street, N.W. 

Washington, DC 20433 U.S.A. 

http://www.worldbank.org 

Colleges and Universities in the Baltimore-Washington 
Metropolitan Area 



American University 

Bowie State University 

Catholic University of America 

College of Notre Dame of Maryland 

Coppin State College 

Frostburg State University 

Gallaudet University 

George Mason University 

George Washington University 

Georgetown University 

Goucher College 

Hood College 

Howard University 

Johns Hopkins University 

Joint Military Intelligence College 

Lo yola College 

Maryland Institute College of Art 

Marymount University 

Morgan State University 

Mount St. Mary's College 

National Defense University 

Southeastern University 

St. John's College 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 

Towson University 

Trinity University 

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences 

United States Naval Academy 

University of Baltimore 

University of the District of Columbia 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

University of Maryland Baltimore County 

University of Maryland Eastern Shore 

University of Maryland University College 



100 



Appendices 

In addition to the policies included within the Graduate Catalog, information about the following 
topics can be found using the URL's included in the list below. 

Policy for Student Residency Classification for Admission, Tuition and Charge-Differential Purposes 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/admssions policies.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 
Residency Classification Office 
http://www.testudo.umd.edU/rco/policy.html#policv 
Academic Integrity 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/academic record. htm#2 

UM Policy is found at: 

III-1.00 POLICY ON FACULTY, STUDENT AND INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 
FOR ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIII/III100.html 

III- 1.00(A) UMCP CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 
http://president.umd.edu/policies/iiilOOa.html 

Code of Student Conduct and Annotations 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/academic record.htm#4 

UM Policy is found at: 

University of Maryland Policies and Procedures, Office of Legal Affairs 
V-l. 00(B) UMCP CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vlOOb.html 



Human Relations Code 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edU/catalog/introduction.htm#5 

University of Maryland Policies and Procedures, Office of Legal Affairs 
http://www.ohrp.umd.edu/compliance/hrc/intro.html . 

UM Policy is found at: 

VI- 1.00(B) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HUMAN RELATIONS CODE 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vilOOb.html 

Campus Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/assistantship policies.htm 



UM Policy is found at: 

VI- 1.20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionVI/VI120.html 

VI- 1. 20(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT 
http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vil20a.html 

VI-1.30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM POLICY ON SEXUAL ASSAULT 
http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionVI/VI130.html 

VI- 1. 30(A) UMCP PROCEDURES ON SEXUAL ASSAULT 
http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vil30a.html 



102 



UMCP Graduate Policy and Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/other academic policies.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 
III- 1.20 POLICY FOR REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIII/III120.html 

III- 1.20(A) UMCP PROCEDURES FOR REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND CAPRICIOUS 
GRADING-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iiil20a.html 

PROCEDURE GUIDE FOR CONDUCTING APPEALS OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND CAPRICIOUS 
GRADING OF DOCTORAL QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS 

http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/other academic policies.htm 

University of Maryland at College Park Policy on Copyrights and Patents 

Graduate Catalog reference: 

http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/masters degree policies.htm 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/doctoral degree policies. htm#7 

UM Policy is found at: 

IV-2.20 POLICY ON CLASSIFIED AND PROPRIETARY WORK 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIV/IV220.html 

IV-3.00 POLICY ON PATENTS 
http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIV/IV300.html 

IV-3. 00(A) UMCP PROCEDURES ON PATENT AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iv300a.html 



103 



IV-3.10 POLICY ON COPYRIGHTS 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIV/IV310.html 

Class Exercises That Involve Animals 

http://www.testudo.umd.edu/soc/animal.html 

UM Policy is found at: 
www.umresearch.umd.edu/IACUC 

Animal Care and Use Program 

UM Policy is found at: 
www.umresearch.umd.edu/IACUC 

Research Involving Human Subjects 

Graduate Catalog reference: 

http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/masters degree policies. htm#9 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/doctoral degree policies.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 

IV-2.10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM POLICY ON HUMAN SUBJECTS OF RESEARCH 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIV/IV210.html 

Guidelines for Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/combined programs.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 
http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iii220a.html 



104 



III-2.20(A) UMCP POLICY AND GUIDELINES FOR COMBINED BACHELOR'S/MASTERS PROGRAMS 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws/SectionIII/III220.html 

Inter-Institutional Registration 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/registration policies.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 
III-2.41 POLICY ON GRADUATE STUDENT INTER-INSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

http://www.usmh.usmd.edu/regents/bvlaws/SectionIII/III241.html 

University Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 

UM Policy is found at: 

III-6.30 POLICY ON CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STUDENT RECORDS 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iii630.html 



III-6.30(A) UMCP POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON THE DISCLOSURE OF STUDENT EDUCATION 
RECORDS 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iii630a.html 



Immunization Policy 

Graduate Catalog reference: 
http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/admssions policies.htm 

UM Policy is found at: 

V- 1.00(H) UMCP IMMUNIZATION POLICY 
http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vlOOh.html 



105 



Policy on Student Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse 

UM Policy is found at: 

VI-8.00(B) UMCP POLICY ON STUDENT ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/vi800b.html 

Smoking Policy and Guidelines 

UM Policy is found at: 

X-5. 00(A) UMCP SMOKING POLICY AND GUIDELINE 

http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/x500a.html 



106 



Chapter 21: Graduate Programs 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) 

Abstract 

The Department offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from one of the nation's premier graduate programs in agricultural 
and resource economics. Both programs focus on the application of advanced microeconomic theory and econometrics 
to issues in agricultural economics, environmental and resource economics, and development economics. Courses are 
taught by leading researchers in those fields, who combine rigorous scholarship with extensive policy experience. The 
Department's faculty includes internationally prominent scholars in agricultural, environmental and resource, and 
development economics. In recognition of their research, Department faculty members have received such international 
awards as Germany's Alexander von Humboldt Prize, the American Economic Association's John Bates Clark Medal, 
and the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association's Quality of Research Discovery and Publication of Enduring 
Quality Awards, among others. Several have been elected fellows of such professional associations as the Agricultural 
and Applied Economics Association (formerly the American Agricultural Economics Association), the Association of 
Environmental and Resource Economics, the Econometric Society, and the American Statistical Association. 
Department faculty members have served as presidents of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and 
Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and as editors/associate editors of the American Journal of 
Agricultural Economics, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, the Journal of Public Economics, 
and Environment and Development Economics, among others. One faculty member is currently a research fellow of the 
National Bureau of Economic Research. For additional Department highlights, please visit 
http://www.agnr.umd.edu/Academics/departments/AREC/Academics/index.cfm. The policy experience of the 
Department's faculty equals its scholarship in both quality and extent. Three have served on the staff of the President's 
Council of Economic Advisers. Other policy experience includes service as consultants to agencies and organizations 
like the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, the 
World Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank. The University's location in the Washington, D.C., area 
provides numerous opportunities for interaction with the World Bank, International Food Policy Research Institute, 
Resources for the Future, International Monetary Fund, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency, U.S. Agency for International Development, Food and Drug Administration, Inter-American Development Bank, 
Census Bureau, and a host of other such institutions and organizations. Questions about the Department's graduate 
programs should be directed to the Graduate Coordinator at graduateprogram@arec.umd.edu or 301 -405-1293. 
Admissions Information 
At a minimum, students entering either our M.S. or Ph.D. program are expected to have the following preparation: 

• Knowledge of macroeconomic theory at the intermediate level and microeconomic theory at the advanced level. 

• Knowledge of multivariate calculus and linear algebra. 

• Knowledge of elementary statistical methods. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, transcripts for all 
higher education, and three letters of recommendation are required with the application for admission. Part-time 
graduate study is not encouraged because no courses are taught in the evenings. Transfer from M.S. to Ph.D. Program 
Students enrolled in the Department's M.S. program may apply for admission to the Department's Ph.D. program by 
submitting a new Graduate School application, supplemental transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. The 
Graduate School application fee is waived if the student applies for the Ph.D. program in or before the semester in 
which the M.S. degree will be completed. Students within the Department's M.S. program need not submit GRE's when 
applying for the Ph.D. program. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 





Application Requirements 

We normally admit M.S. and Ph.D. students for the fall semester only, since the first-year program consists of course 
sequences that begin only in the fall. Application for admission to both the Department's M.S. and Ph.D. programs is 
made through the Graduate School. In addition to the completed application form, the Graduate School requires and 
admission decisions depend on: 

• Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores; 

• One copy of the transcript of record from all institutions attended since high school 

• Three letters of recommendation; and 

• Statement of purpose. Students from non-English-speaking countries are required to demonstrate English proficiency 
by providing scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Written English (TWE). 



107 



Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. program trains students to conduct economic research in the fields of agricultural economics, environmental 
and resource economics, and development economics. It provides rigorous training in microeconomic theory and 
econometrics and in the application of microeconomics and econometrics to policy issues. Students completing their 
MS degrees go on to work in U.S. government agencies, international organizations, and consulting firms. The M.S. 
program requires a minimum of 33 credits of coursework (i.e., 16 credits of electives in addition to the 17 credits of 
required coursework) and defense of a scholarly paper. No M.S. thesis is required. Required courses for the M.S. 
program consist of basic coursework in microeconomic theory and econometrics: 

• The first semester of the sequence in microeconomic theory (ECON 603). 

• A two-semester sequence in applied econometrics (AREC 623 and 624). 

• A one-semester course on mathematical methods (AREC 620). 

• A one-semester course on applications of microeconomic theory to agricultural and resource economics (AREC 610). 
The first-year coursework normally includes these 17 credits (3 credits each for ECON 603, AREC 620, AREC 610 plus 
4 credits each for AREC 623 and AREC 624). M.S. students fulfill additional coursework requirements by taking 
electives to suit their own interests during their second year. Elective courses are normally selected from M.S. level 
courses (600 level or above) in AREC or ECON but may be taken in other disciplines with adviser approval. For 
detailed information on the scholarly paper, see "Doctor of Philosophy" section below. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program trains students as professional research economists in the fields of agricultural economics, 
environmental and resource economics, and development economics. Students learn to disseminate research results in 
major professional media including journals, reports, conferences, and seminars. Rigorous training is provided in 
microeconomic theory, econometrics, and their application to policy issues. Students completing their Ph.D. degrees 
find employment in academia, U.S. government agencies, international organizations, and consulting firms. 
Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a minimum of 42 credits of coursework, completion of a two-course field in 
one of the Department's three major areas, completion of a research paper requirement, development and defense of a 
dissertation prospectus, 12 credits of Ph.D. dissertation research (AREC 899), and successful defense of a Ph.D. 
dissertation. The first year of the program consists of the following core courses in microeconomic theory, 
econometrics, and mathematical methods: AREC 610, AREC 620, AREC 623, AREC 624, ECON 603, and ECON 604. 
The second year of the program consists mainly of elective field coursework. All Ph.D. students are required to 
complete one two-course field out of the following: Agricultural Policy (AREC 825, AREC 832), Development 
Economics (AREC 845, AREC 846), Environmental and Resource Economics (AREC 785, ECON 781). Four additional 
3-credit PhD-level field courses are required; at least two from courses offered by the Department with the remainder 
from courses offered by Economics or another supporting department on campus with adviser approval. During the 
spring semester of their second year, students also take a 1 -credit course intended to help them develop a written 
dissertation proposal (AREC 869K). The final course requirement is AREC 869P, Advanced Topics in Agricultural 
Economics (3 credits), which consists of more intensive preparation for writing a dissertation prospectus. It is normally 
taken during the fall semester of the third year. This requirement is waived for any student who has completed a 
dissertation prospectus and passed a prospectus examination before the fall semester of the third year. The writing of a 
research paper is required during the first year and a half of the graduate program. The paper allows students to 
engage in original research early in their graduate education. Students who do not pass following the initial submission 
may revise and resubmit their papers in response to comments they receive. A student who is unable to achieve a 
Ph.D. pass on the paper requirement after two attempts is not permitted to continue in the Ph.D. program. For more 
information about the research paper, see 

http://www.arec.umd.edu/Academics/Graduate/PhDProgram/ResearchPaper.cfm. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
degree requires: 

• A "B" or better (including "B-") in each of the first-year courses. 

• A B (3.0) average or better in graduate coursework, 

• Passing the research paper requirement, and 

• Having an approved Ph.D. dissertation prospectus. The prospectus presents the student's dissertation proposal, 
including a topic, background, literature review, and proposed methodology. It is prepared under the guidance of and 
must be approved by a three-person core committee headed by the thesis advisor and appointed by the Director of 
Graduate Studies. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The AREC Department provides a 1 5-seat computer lab for the exclusive use of our graduate students. The lab is 
available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Another 25-seat lab is available by reservation for classes, presentations, 
and research (e.g., experimental economics sessions). These labs are equipped with Pano Logic zero (aka thin) client 
devices that connect end users to desktop virtual machines. This solution allows graduate students the ability to 
remotely access a virtual desktop with all the applications listed below, as well as their files stored on the network 
servers. The following applications are available at this time: Arclnfo, Filezilla (FTP Client), Fortran, Google Earth, 
Limdep, Maple, Mathematica, Matlab, Mozilla Firefox, MS Office 2007, Nlogit, Perl, R, SAS, Scientific Word, Stata, 
TextPad, and WinEdt. Graduate students can access the AREC network and Internet from home via several remote 

108 



access methods. A multifunction printer/scanner/copier is available in the graduate student computer lab. Wireless 
access is available to the campus network. The Department offers close proximity to an incomparable array of 
government agencies, international institutions, and non-governmental organizations devoted to environmental issues, 
agricultural policy, natural resource management, and international development. Opportunities for attending 
stimulating seminars abound. Many students find useful work experience, access to data, and cutting-edge thesis 
topics as well as future employment through these organizations. These include (all within approximately 10 miles) the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Economic Research Service, the 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Resources for the Future, the Joint Institute for Food Science and Nutrition, the 
Joint Global Change Research Institute, the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education, the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the International 
Food Policy Research Institute, the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center with its National Agricultural Library, as well 
as the U.S. Capitol, Senate, and House of Representatives. 
Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are offered to qualified applicants on the basis of past academic performance, research 
potential, and availability of funds. Many full-time students in the Department hold assistantships or some other form of 
financial aid. Part- time and summer work are sometimes available for students who do not have assistantships. 
Graduate fellowships are also available on a competitive basis. The Department offers financial assistance in the form 
of graduate assistantships and fellowships. To apply, use the form for requesting financial assistance included in the 
Graduate School application packet. Graduate Assistantships Many of our students are supported by graduate 
assistantships with responsibilities for either research or teaching. Graduate assistants are expected to work an 
average of 20 hours a week on their research or teaching duties. They must maintain at least a B average. They are 
considered employees of the University and are thus covered by health insurance. In addition to a competitive salary, 
graduate assistants receive tuition remission for up to 10 credits in the fall and spring semesters and up to 4 credits 
each summer semester. Fellowships The Department awards a limited number of fellowships each year to highly 
qualified applicants. Annual fellowship stipends are highly competitive. Fellowship awards also include tuition remission 
of up to twelve credits per semester. Fellowships are awarded to Ph.D. students for two (2) years and M.S. students for 
one (1 ) year. After the expiration of the fellowship, the Department expects to provide Ph.D. fellowship recipients with 
an additional two years of support (and M.S. fellowship recipients with an additional year of support) as a graduate 
assistant subject to satisfactory academic progress. All applicants for financial aid are automatically considered for 
fellowships as well as assistantships. Financial assistance in the form of loans and work study may also be available. 
Interested students should contact the University's Office of Student Financial Aid. 
Contact Information 

The AREC Graduate Program website at http://www.arec.umd.edu/academics/graduate/index.cfm provides course 
requirements, examination procedures, and descriptive material for the M.S. and Ph.D. programs. 
Graduate Program 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 2200 Symons Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-1293 
graduateprogram@arec.umd.edu 

http://www.arec.umd.edu/ 
Courses: AREC AREC 

American Studies (AMST) 

Abstract 

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary program of study leading to the Masters of Arts and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Research and teaching in the Department focus on two intellectual themes: the cultures of 
everyday life, and cultural constructions of identity and difference. These themes drive our examinations of multiple 
cultures within the U.S., across the Americas, and transnational^. They also embrace multiple cultural studies interests, 
including material and visual culture, ethnography and life history, popular culture and media studies, queer studies, 
body and sexualities, gender studies, food studies, digital cultures, critical race studies, and cultural landscapes and 
geography. Students develop expertise in multiple methodologies and take courses in many departments across the 
University. The Department benefits from a large and diverse affiliate faculty, strong relationships with cultural 
institutions such as the Smithsonian museums, and ready access to many other museums in the Baltimore-Washington 
corridor, government agencies, archives and historical societies, and multiple local communities. Students may also 
take advantage of multiple graduate certificate programs for which our courses apply, including Museum Scholarship 
and Material Culture, Critical Theory, Historic Preservation, and Womens Studies. The program in U.S. Latina/o Studies 
is contained within the Department, and we have a leadership role in developing Native American Studies. 
Admissions Information 

Many admitted students have previously majored in American Studies, History, English, Ethnic Studies, Women's 
Studies, Anthropology, Art or Architectural History, Journalism, and Communications. However, applicants with broad 
backgrounds in arts and humanities and/or the behavioral and social sciences are also given serious consideration if 

109 



American subject matter or cultural theory has been emphasized. Application requirements for both M.A. and Ph.D. 
programs include: 1) Graduate School application, 2) statement of purpose (including research interests), 3) three 
letters of recommendation, 4) official academic transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work, 5) GRE scores, 6) 
a writing sample, and 7) a resume or Curriculum Vitae. International applicants must also submit TOEFL scores. 
Applicants who do not yet have M.A. degrees and who desire to obtain the Ph. D. degree at Maryland should apply 
directly to the Ph.D. program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . Graduate School application 

2. Statement of purpose, including research interests 

3. 3 letters of recommendation 

4. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work 

5. GRE scores 

6. Writing sample 

7. Resume or Curriculum Vitae 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Students take a total of 30 credits of course work in American Studies and related disciplines and demonstrate the 

ability to conduct independent research by submitting an acceptable thesis or a scholarly paper in lieu of a thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Ph. D. students complete at least 30 credit hours that are organized around two areas of specialization. Students must 

also pass three comprehensive examinations, and, after submitting a detailed prospectus, write and defend an 

interdisciplinary dissertation that answers significant questions about Americans' culture(s) and experiences, past or 

present. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington, D.C. and Baltimore areas offer extraordinary research facilities for the study of past and present 

Americans' experiences and culture, including the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Smithsonian's many 

institutions, the National Park Service, the Maryland Historical Society, and the Walters Art Museum and National 

Gallery, and other cultural institutions. The National Archives II, National Trust Library and Library of American 

Broadcasting are all located on the College Park campus. There are also numerous local and regional-focused 

museums, collections, archives, libraries, and "think tanks" that can support students' interests in issues and topics 

related to identity and difference and the cultures of everyday life. Through consortia arrangements with universities in 

the area, including George Washington University and Georgetown University, students may augment their programs 

with courses otherwise unavailable at the University of Maryland. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of teaching assistantships are available in addition to graduate fellowships. Students who hold 

assistantships typically teach two sections of AMST 201 , Introduction to American Studies, or AMST 205, Material 

Aspects of American Life. 

Contact Information 

Additional information on program offerings, degree requirements and financial aid can be obtained on the department's 

Web site ( http://www.amst.umd.edu ) and by writing to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

1 102 Holzapfel Hall Department of American Studies 

MD 20742-5620 

Telephone: (301) 405-1354 

Fax:(301)314-9453 

amst-dgs@umd.edu 

http://www.amst.umd.edu 

Psyche Williams-Forson, Ph.D 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-6931 

Courses: AMST 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development 



110 



Animal Sciences (ANSC) 



Note: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the Statement on Animal Care and Use 
and the Policy Statement for Students. 

Abstract 

The Graduate Program in the Animal Sciences offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. The master's degree program does not offer the non-thesis option. Faculty research interests 
include: 1) Cell, molecular and developmental biology studies on the synthesis and secretion of milk constituents in the 
mammary gland, gene expression of the neuroendocrine system during growth and development, molecular genetics of 
metal and heme homeostasis in animals, maintenance of pluripotency and cell lineage determination in early embryos 
and embryonic stem cells, regulation of gene expression during embryonic patterning, neuro- and reproductive 
endocrinology in avian and fish species, and virology, immunology and microbial pathogenesis of significance to animal 
agriculture; 2) Nutrition and intermediary metabolism of ruminants and non-ruminants, regulation of milk fat production 
in dairy cattle, modeling for nutrient management, nutrient management in avian and other monogastric species, 
including forage utilization in horses; nutritional immunology, nutrient sensing, metabolic homeostasis, companion and 
exotic animal nutrition; 3) Aquaculture related fish physiology, cryopreservation of germ cells, neuroendocrine control of 
reproduction and reproductive dysfunction induced by stress, or endocrine disrupting chemicals, and; 4) Application of 
computational and systems biology to quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, selection theory and breeding for 
the improvement of domestic animals and conservation genetics. 
Admissions Information 

The Program requires applicants to submit an application online, and to submit official academic transcripts, statement 
of goals and research interests, at least three letters of recommendation, and official Graduate Record Examination 
scores to the Enrollment Services Operations Office. Applicants with degrees from non-English speaking countries and 
who have not received a degree from the list of approved English-speaking universities must also submit results of the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 15 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: October 1 
Preferred: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . GRE (Verbal; Quantitative; Analytical/Writing) 

2. TOEFL (if required) 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. An application 

5. Official academic transcripts 

6. Statement of goals and research interests 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

During the first semester, the student selects an Adviser and an Advisory Committee (AC) with the approval of the 
Program Graduate Education Committee. By the end of the second semester, with the AC'S advice, students file a 
proposed schedule of courses (plan of study). Committees may require that students take remedial courses if they 
enter with inadequate prerequisites or deficiencies in undergraduate programs. Also, by the end of the second 
semester a thesis research proposal must be approved by the student's AC. Course requirements comprise at least 
one semester of Biochemistry (3 credits; typically BCHM 463), one semester of Biometrics (4 credits; typically BIOM 
601), one credit of seminar (ANSC 698) and a course in Research Ethics. Additional credits of graduate coursework 
should result in a total of 24 credits, of which no more than 12 credits can be at the 400 level. Furthermore, a minimum 
of six hours of thesis research credit (ANSC 799) is required. Towards the end of their graduate studies, students must 
present the results and conclusions of their research in a public seminar and successfully defend their written thesis in 
a final oral examination, which is given by the AC. A final copy of the thesis must be submitted to the Program Office. 
Students with adequate undergraduate training usually complete the master's degree within two years. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Ph.D. students with Master's degrees from other institutions are expected to meet the requirements indicated above for 
the ANSC M.S. degree. The M.S. degree is not a prerequisite but is advantageous for admission to the Ph.D. program. 
At least two credits of Seminar (with at least one in ANSC 698) and one semester of teaching experience (8-10 hours 
per week) are required during study for the Ph.D. degree. In addition, a minimum of 12 research credits is required. A 
plan of study and a research proposal must be filed with the approval of the student's Adviser and Advisory Committee 
(AC) by the end of the second semester. After no more than five semesters, the student must pass the Admission to 
Candidacy Examination, which consists of both written and oral components and is administered by the AC. Towards 



111 



the end of their studies, the candidates present the results and conclusions of their graduate research in a public 
seminar and defend their research in an oral examination, which is adjudicated by the student's AC. In addition to 
successful defense of the dissertation, it is expected that the student will publish at least one paper in a refereed 
scientific journal, based on the dissertation research. A final bound copy of the dissertation must be submitted to the 
Program Office. The Ph.D. degree is usually completed within three to four years after the M.S. degree. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department of Animal and Avian Sciences and the nearby Gudelsky Veterinary Center housing the Virginia- 
Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, have extensive facilities consisting of faculty research laboratories, 
animal holding areas, a campus farm, aquaculture facility and outlying research farms. Additionally, the department 
maintains two computer laboratories with 30 workstations in the teaching laboratory, and a smaller laboratory 
exclusively for the use of graduate students on a 24 hour basis. The research laboratories comprise nearly 28,000 
square feet for bench work, averaging over 1000 square feet per faculty member. Over 2800 square feet of cold room 
and 2000 square feet of freezer rooms are integral components of the research laboratories. The laboratories are fully 
equipped with state-of-the-art modern instrumentation and equipment for the entire range of research carried out by the 
faculty, e.g. research in biochemistry, cell-molecular biology, physiology, nutrition, behavior, virology, immunology, 
microbial pathogenesis etc. Individual laboratories are fully self-standing units, yet there is free exchange between 
laboratories having shared and collaborative interests. All the laboratories and offices are networked to the campus 
server for direct Internet access. Nearly 15,000 square feet of space is dedicated for animal holding in the Animal Wing 
of the Animal Sciences Center. This facility is capable of handling all kinds of animals such as rodents, birds, fish and 
large animals for research in separate rooms. A new aquaculture facility, adjoining the Gudelsky Center, is also 
available. The Animal Wing is under the care of trained staff and is supervised by a professional veterinarian. Other 
facilities, such as the Laboratory for Biological Ultrastructure, the Visual Imaging Center, the DNA Sequencing 
Laboratory ,the Proteomics Core Facility, etc., are available to the faculty and students as part of the Central Core 
Facilities on the campus. Off Campus Research Facilities include:- 1. University of Maryland/USDA-Beltsville Animal 
Biotechnology Facility An 1 1 ,000 square foot cooperative facility for research in animal biotechnology at the Beltsville 
Agricultural Research Center. This Center includes laboratories specifically designed for research in cloning and 
transgenic biology. ANSC faculty engaged in nuclear cloning, stem cell and transgenic biotechnology may use this 
facility to investigate genes of significance for the growth, development and physiology of domestic animals. 2. Central 
Maryland Research and Education Center, Clarksville, MD This 925-acre dairy research center, located -25 miles from 
the campus, houses 200 head of Holstein dairy cattle including 110 milking cows and 90 head of young stock. ANSC 
faculty engaged in nutrition, reproduction, physiology, herd health, behavior and management research, conduct their 
experiments at this facility. 3. Applied Poultry Research Laboratory, Upper Marlboro, MD This 202-acre facility is 
located approximately 20 miles from the campus. It is used for conducting research in nutrition, physiology and 
behavior. 4. Wye Beef Cattle Research Center This 450-acre facility is located on Maryland's Eastern Shore near 
Queenstown. It has 250 registered Angus beef cows plus young stock and bulls which are direct descendants of the 
Wye Angus herd. The facility is used to support research associated with beef cow-calf management, pasture 
management and growth physiology. 
Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate combined research/teaching assistantships are available and awarded to students who present 
strong academic records and a capability and motivation to perform well in teaching or in research assignments. These 
assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis. Appointments are on an annual basis, with reappointment 
contingent on demonstration of successful progress towards the degree. Assistantships are available for up to two 
years for the M.S. degree and four years for the Ph.D. degree. 
Contact Information 

For specific information on the Program, admission procedures, or financial aid, contact either: Dr. Carol L. Keefer, 
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Graduate Program in Animal Sciences, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742, E-mail: ckeefer@umd.edu or Andrea Junek, Administrative Assistant II, Graduate 
Program in Animal Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Email: ajunek@umd.edu 
Dr. Carol L. Keefer, Associate Professor and Director 
Graduate Program in Animal Sciences 
Room 2129 Animal Sciences Center 
Department of Animal and Avian Sciences 
Univ. of Maryland 
College Park 
MD 20742-2311 
Telephone: 1-301-405-5781 
Fax: 1-301-314-9059 
ckeefer@umd.edu 

http://ansc.umd.edu/Graduate 

Andrea Junek, Administrative Assistant II 

Room 21 15 Animal Sciences Center Department of Animal and Avian Sciences Univ. of Maryland College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-5781 



112 



Fax:301-314-9059 

ajunek@umd.edu 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Nutrition 

Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology 
Livestock & Poultry Sciences Institute 
Reproductive Physiology, National Zoological Park 
Wye Research and Education Center 

Biological Sciences Program 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Anthropology (ANTH) 

Abstract 

The Department of Anthropology offers graduate study leading to the Master of Applied Anthropology (MAA) and the 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. Both degrees reflect the department's special interest and expertise in the 
applications of anthropology. Current faculty members represent the subfields of the discipline (archaeology, cultural 
and social anthropology, and anthropological linguistics). Drawing their intellectual and applied orientations from 
training and application of the above subdisciplines, the department's faculty also recognize the need to identify topics 
or problems where the expertise of individual faculty members can be applied in a manner that integrates the 
subdisciplines. In this ongoing effort, the faculty has identified three areas of research concentration: Anthropology of 
Health, Anthropology of Environment, and Anthropology of Heritage. The areas can be thought to contain and generate 
research problems of interest to the faculty's experience and expertise within the subdisciplines. These problems can 
be addressed individually through cultural and social anthropology, anthropological linguistics and archaeology. 
However, the anthropological contribution to addressing these problems is enhanced by collaboration across 
subdiscipline interests and expertise. The Master of Applied Anthropology (MAA) is a program designed both for 
students interested in an anthropology career outside of academia and for those who plan on continuing to a Ph.D. The 
program has been offered at the University of Maryland since 1984, and graduates have successfully secured 
employment or pursued doctoral work in a variety of fields, such as working in the areas of medical and health practice, 
urban and regional planning and development, community development, conservation and heritage resource 
development, cultural resource management, and historical archaeology. The focus of the MAA program has been to 
participate in the building of anthropological practice. A major focus of the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program is to 
direct research scholarship and to encourage theoretical and methodological advancement in such a way as to reflect 
upon the specific practices of anthropology, with the aim of improving those practices and thereby increasing the value 
and usefulness of the discipline. Doctoral students are typically prepared for research and development careers outside 
of academic settings, as well as for academic careers in anthropology departments and other disciplinary settings. 
Admissions Information 

Students are required to submit Graduate Record Examination scores and fulfill the Graduate School admission 
requirements. Application deadline for all applicants, domestic and international, is December 15th. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1. Graduate School requirements 

2. GRE General 

3. Statement of Intent and Experience 

4. Three (3) Letters of Recommendation 

5. Writing sample (Ph.D. only) 



113 



Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) 

Students entering the Ph.D. from a Bachelor's degree must normally complete all the requirements for the MAA 

degree indicated above, although the internship sequence can be substituted with additional coursework 

under approved circumstances. An additional minimum of 30 credit hours of advanced coursework is required, 

to include at least 12 credit hours of dissertation research. For students entering the Ph.D. program from the 

MAA, an additional minimum of 30 credit hours of advanced coursework is required, to include at least 12 

credit hours of dissertation research. Students entering the Ph.D. program with a master's degree from another 

institution are minimally required to complete the 18 credit-hour core sequence of the MAA program and an 

additional minimum of 30 credit hours of advanced coursework, to include at least 12 credit hours of 

dissertation research. These students are not normally required to complete the internship sequence, although 

in some cases their doctoral committee may decide that an internship may be appropriate to enhance a 

student's professional experience prior to graduation. Additional supportive coursework may be required on a 

case-by-case basis depending on the qualifications of the student. In such cases, these expectations will be 

specified upon admission to the Ph.D. program. Substitutions for courses in the MAA core sequence are rarely 

permitted and must be approved by the Graduate Committee and the Department Chair. Students admitted to 

the Ph.D. program advance to candidacy upon completion of a written comprehensive examination and an oral 

defense of their dissertation proposal. An oral defense upon completion of the dissertation is also required. 

Master of Applied Anthropology (M.A.A.) 

The program requires 42 credit hours of coursework, including a core sequence (18 credit hours), an 

internship sequence (12 semester hours), and a sequence of individually approved courses that are related to 

a chosen domain of application (12 semester hours). MAA students must satisfactorily complete an internship 

proposal review with their advisory committee before beginning the internship, which is normally completed 

during the summer term between the first and second years of the program. Students are also required to 

present the results of their internship in a departmental colloquium prior to graduation. There is no thesis 

requirement. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department of Anthropology has three laboratory spaces: the Archaeological Heritage Lab; a lab related to 

the Archaeology in Annapolis project and a lab related to Irish Rural Lifeways. Additional research facilities 

include the Cultural Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), which focuses on applied research in health and 

community development issues, the Center for Heritage Resource Studies (CHRS), which conducts and 

supports basic and applied research in heritage resource studies, and the Immigrant Life course Research 

Program. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of Departmental Fellowships and Teaching Assistantships are available to qualified graduate 

students. Part-time employment related to department research is occasionally available. 

Contact Information 

For additional information please contact: 

Dr. Michael Paolisso, Graduate Director 

1111 Woods Hall 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-1433 

Fax: 301-314-8305 

mpaolisso@anth.umd.edu 

http://www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 

Courses: ANTH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Nutrition 

Historic Preservation Certificate 

Historic Preservation 

Center for Heritage Resource Studies (ANTH) 

Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation (AMSC) 

Abstract 

The interdisciplinary program in Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation (AMSC) offers graduate 
study leading to Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with concentrations in applied mathematics, 
applied statistics, or scientific computation. It also offers a Certificate in Scientific Computation to graduate students 
enrolled in other university Ph.D. programs. The faculty is drawn from departments throughout the university. Possible 
areas of application include the physical, chemical, biological, and social sciences, and engineering. The program 

114 



receives substantial support from the Department of Mathematics (MATH), the Center for Scientific Computation and 

Mathematical Modeling (CSCAMM), and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology (IPST). AMSC offers a 

spectrum of courses at the forefront of computation and applications, as well as state-of-the-art computational, 

visualization and networking facilities. 

The Concentration in Applied Mathematics trains individuals who are able to enhance their understanding of a wide 

spectrum of scientific phenomena through the application of rigorous mathematical analysis. At least half of the required 

work is expected to be in courses with primarily mathematical content; the remaining courses must apply to a field 

outside of the usual mathematics curriculum. Graduate students currently pursue studies in the applications areas such 

as meteorology, algorithm development, pattern recognition, operations research, mathematical finance, computational 

dynamics, structural mechanics, mathematical biology, and systems and control theory. Other areas of study are 

available through participating departments. All students must include numerical analysis or scientific computing 

courses in their programs. 

The Concentration in Applied Statistics emphasizes acquisition of advanced training in the area of statistical application 

along with statistical topics and development of mathematical and computing skills necessary for the modern applied 

statistician. Students are required to take a series of core statistical and computational courses with more emphasis on 

data analytics and presentation skills. In addition, students will take a minimum of six credits in an outside application 

area. 

The Concentration in Scientific Computation emphasizes the application of computation to the physical sciences, life 

sciences, engineering, business, and social sciences. Students will receive training in the use of computational 

techniques and associated information technology with correspondingly less emphasis on formal mathematical 

methods in comparison to the Concentration in Applied Mathematics. Every Scientific Computation student is required 

to apply the training in computation to a problem in a specific scientific discipline. 

A master's degree program in all concentrations with an emphasis on numerical analysis, computational methods, 

probability and statistics is excellent preparation for industrial or government employment. 

Admissions Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, applicants are required to take the GRE general examination. The 

applicants are encouraged to take the GRE subject examination in either mathematics or some other scientific topic. 

Applicants should have at least a "B" average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) and should have completed an undergraduate 

program of study that includes a strong emphasis on rigorous mathematics, preferably through the level of advanced 

calculus and matrix theory. 

Admission will be based on the applicant's capability to do graduate work in either applied mathematics, applied 

statistics, or scientific computation as demonstrated by the letters of recommendation, grades in coursework, and 

program of study. In some circumstances, a provisional admission may be given to applicants whose mathematical 

training is not sufficiently advanced. Previous education in an application area such as physics, biology, economics or 

one of the engineering disciplines, and a basic competence in computational techniques will be favorably considered in 

a student's application, although this is not a prerequisite. 

When a student has decided upon an area of specialization, an advisory committee is formed and approved by the 

AMSC Graduate Committee. The advisory committee is responsible for formulating with the student a course of study 

that leads toward the degree sought. This course of study must constitute a unified, coherent program in an acceptable 

field of specialization of applied mathematics, applied statistics, or scientific computation. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 10 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 10 





Application Requirements 

1 . GRE General, (GRE Subject-Optional) 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

For the Ph.D. degree, the student must fulfill the coursework requirement of the corresponding concentration and pass 
a set of comprehensive written examinations at the Ph.D. level. In addition, the student must pass the Oral Candidacy 
Examination, which tests the student on advanced material to determine if he or she is prepared to do the research for 
a doctoral dissertation. At least 12 credits of dissertation work are required. The doctoral student must also participate 
in at least two semesters in the Applied Mathematics Seminar. 

All M.S. and Ph.D. students must take at least one semester of numerical analysis. Details on the level and distribution 
of coursework and examinations in mathematics and in the applications area are given on the program web 
site: http://www.amsc.umd.edu/ . 



115 



Master of Science (M.S.) 

For the master's degree, the program offers a thesis and non-thesis option. For Applied Mathematics and Scientific 
Computation concentrations, in the thesis option, 24 credits of coursework are required with at least 6 more credits of 
thesis work. In the non-thesis option for these two concentrations, 30 credits of coursework are required and the 
student must pass a set of comprehensive examinations. A scholarly paper is also required. In both options, the student 
must participate at least one semester in the Applied Mathematics seminar. For Applied Statistics concentration, in the 
thesis option, 25 credits of coursework are required including one seminar credit, with at least 6 more credits of thesis 
work. In the non-thesis option, 33 credits of coursework are required including two seminar credits and the student must 
pass a set of comprehensive examinations. A scholarly paper is also required. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

There are over 25 participating departments and institutes on the College Park campus, including units in the College of 
Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences and the School of Engineering. The university has an engineering 
technical library as well as a network of high performance workstations for faculty and graduate students. In addition, 
there are collaborations with various area research institutes such as NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, National 
Institutes of Health, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, and National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration. 
Financial Assistance 

The program offers teaching assistantships in the Department of Mathematics as a source of support for graduate 
students. These assistantships carry a stipend with remission of tuition of up to 10 credit hours each semester. 
Research assistantships are also available through participating departments and other sources, especially for students 
that have acquired advanced training. Assistantships are usually available only to students entering in the fall; 
applications including letters of recommendation should be completed by January 10 for full consideration. 
Contact Information 

For more specific information, contact: 

Alverda McCoy, Program Coordinator 

3103 Mathematics Building, 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-0924 

Fax:(301)314-1308 

amsc @ amsc .umd.edu 

http://www.amsc.umd.edu/ 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Mathematics 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling 

Mathematical Statistics 



116 



Architecture (ARCH) 

Abstract 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a graduate program leading to the NAAB accredited Master of 

Architecture degree. The mission of the Architecture Program (ARCH) at the University of Maryland is to engage in teaching 

and learning imbued with critical thinking; to foster critical inquiry through research, scholarship, and creative academic and 

professional activity; and to encourage participation in community service that enhances the quality of built and natural 

environments. The Program offers a rich and demanding mix of architectural and urban design studios, architectural history 

and theory, and architectural science and technology. Electives in architecture and related fields are available in the 

curriculum. 

The Master of Architecture degree is accredited by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB). In the United 

States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for 

licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. 

professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of 

Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, 

depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. 

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree 

and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. 

However, the pre-professional degree is not by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. 

The University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation offers the following NAAB-accredited degree 

programs: 

M.Arch (pre-professional degree + 60 graduate credits) 

M.Arch (non-pre-professional degree + 109 credits) 

Next accreditation visit for both programs: 2017 

The School is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA). 

Admissions Information 

Admission to the graduate program is competitive. In addition to the Graduate School requirements, candidates must submit 

a portfolio. The portfolio should show evidence of creative ability in the form of a portfolio containing reproductions of 

creative work, which may include drawings, paintings, photographs, sculpture, sketches, and/or architectural designs. 

Details concerning format and content may be obtained from the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation website 

at http://www.arch.umd.edu. 

Applications from three categories will be considered for admission: 1) candidates with a four-year baccalaureate (B.S.) 

degree in architecture or equivalent major; 2) candidates with four-year baccalaureate (B.A. in architecture or other major or 

B.S. in a major other than architecture) degree who have successfully completed specified undergraduate prerequisites 

outlined by the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation*; and 3) candidates with an accredited professional 

degree in architecture. Students are expected to enroll on a full-time basis. For complete information on curricula 

requirements for these categories, visit the the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation website at 

http://www.arch.umd.edu. 

'Additional requirements include: one (1) semester of college level calculus or sucessful high school advanced placement 

(AP) calculus; one (1) semester of college level physics with lab, or successful high school advanced placement (AP) in 

physics, and one (1) course in college level freehand drawing. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1. Complete Application Form (On-line version - www.gradschool.umd.edu) (due December 15) 

2. Online Application Supplemental Form (due by January 15) 

3. Transcripts: 

4. Standardized test scores: Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

5. Letters of Recommendation: Three confidential letters submitted by professors or others who can assess the quality of the applicant's 
potential to succeed in the graduate program. 

6. Statement of Goals, Experiences, and Research Interests: 1000-2000 word statement of goals and objectives in pursuing graduate study in 
architecture at the University of Maryland. 

7. Portfolio: Bound and not exceeding 9" x 12", containing reproductions of creative work including drawings, paintings, photographs, 
sculpture, sketches, and architectural designs. Creative writing and original papers and research may also be submitted within the portfolio, 
but the emphasis should be on visual creativity. 

8. Resume 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) 

117 



Students entering the program with a four-year Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture from an accredited college or 

university normally require two years of graduate study to complete the requirements for the professional Master of 

Architecture degree. The established curriculum requires four semesters of academic work encompassing a total of 60 

credits. Additional credits may be required depending upon the admissions committee's evaluation of the individual's 

academic and architectural experience. Information on required courses and curriculum may be obtained from the School of 

Architecture, Planning, and Preservation website at http://www.arch.umd.edu. 

Students who enter the professional program with a B.A. or B.S. in a discipline other than architecture will normally require 

seven semesters of design studio and other prerequisite courses encompassing a total of 109 credits. Students may be 

granted advanced standing if they have completed the appropriate prerequisites. Information on required courses and 

curriculum may be obtained from the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation website at 

http://www.arch.umd.edu. 

A program leading to a Master's Certificate in Historic Preservation is available to M. Arch and M.S. in Arch candidates. The 

course of study includes 24 credits and an approved thesis, which may satisfy requirements of both the Architecture and 

Preservation curricula. 

A program leading to a Masters Certificate in Urban Design is available to M. Arch and M.S. in Arch candidates. The course 

of study includes 24 credits and an approved thesis. 

Master of Architecture and Real Estate Development (dual degree) (ARDV) 

The dual degree combines course work from the Architecture and Real Estate Development programs to enable a student to 

complete both the Master of Architecture and Master of Real Estate Development degrees with fewer credits than it would 

take to complete the two separately. For more information on the Master of Real Estate Development degree program go to 

the catalog entry for RDEV. Also be advised that that there may be a differential tuition established for this program which 

will be applied to any courses taken after approval of such differential if and when approved by the University. 

Master of Science in Architecture (M.S. Arch) 

A special option leading to the Master of Science in Architecture degree is available for those students who already possess 

an accredited NAAB professional degree in architecture (B.Arch. or M. Arch.) or its equivalent. This option is designed to 

accommodate the needs of students who wish to do advanced work beyond that required for the professional degree. 

Applicants must specify in detail the nature of the proposed course of study for review and approval by the admissions 

committee prior to their admission. The School currently provides resources for advanced work in international studies in 

architecture, urban design, and housing. 

Master of Architecture and Community Planning (dual degree) (ARCP) 

The dual degree combines course work from the Architecture and Urban Studies and Planning programs to enable a student 

to complete both the Master of Architecture and Master of Community Planning degrees with fewer credits than it would take 

to complete the two separately. Students of the dual-degree program acquire specialized knowledge tailored to 

understanding the urban environment from several perspectives. Students learn how social, economic, and political forces 

have led to the development of human habitats. The emphasis on urban design in the dual-degree program yields an 

education that is particularly applicable for persons interested in the revitalization of metropolitan areas and their center 

cities. 

Master of Architecture and Historic Preservation (dual degree) (ARHP) 

The dual degree combines course work from the Architecture and Historic Preservation programs to enable a student to 

complete both the Master of Architecture and Master of Historic Preservation degrees with fewer credits than it would take to 

complete the two separately. 

Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design (Ph.D.) 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a Doctoral Program, the Ph.D. in Urban and Regional 

Planning and Design. Participating programs include Urban Studies and Planning, Architecture, Historic Preservation, 

Landscape Architecture, and The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education. The program prepares 

students to teach at the university level in departments of Urban Planning, Architecture, Historic Preservation, or Landscape 

Architecture, as well as qualifies graduates to conduct research and participate in high-level decision-making in the public, 

private, and nonprofit sectors. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation is ideally located between Washington, DC, and Baltimore and 

surrounded by a number of historic communities and a varied physical environment. The resulting opportunity for 

environmental design study is unsurpassed. The School's resources include design workstations for each student, a model 

shop, a digital fabrication lab, and computer labs. The School's library contains some 57,000 monographs and 6,000 current 

periodicals, making it one of the major architectural libraries in the nation. The National Trust Library for Historic 

Preservation, housed in McKeldin Library, contains 11,000 volumes and 450 periodical titles. The slide collection includes 

approximately 430,000 slides on architecture, landscape architecture, planning, and technical subjects. The interdisciplinary 

National Center for Smart Growth Education and Research is based in the School offering perspectives and opportunities to 

engage important issues facing urban and regional planning. 

The Architecture Program benefits from the strong support of the professional community, including practitioners who bring 

expertise into the architectural design studios as instructors, consultants, and critics. Many alumni are leaders in regional 

firms, while others practice as far afield as New York, Los Angeles, Puerto Rico, Vancouver, London, and Shanghai. 

The University of Maryland's LEAFHouse took first place in the nation and third place in the world at the 2007 Solar 

Decathlon, gaining the Architecture Program its reputation as a leader in sustainability. In 201 1 , the University of Maryland 

competes in the Solar Decathlon for the fourth time with its Solar House, Watershed. 



118 



The award-winning Comprehensive Design Studio and Advanced Technology sequence (an integral component of the M. 

Arch curriculum) offers an innovative teaching-learning environment where students work with an array of consultants from 

practice, exploring relationships between conceptual and technical aspects of architectural form and its assembly. 

Embracing the importance of context as an integral component of the design process and advocating urban design as an 

essential component of architectural education, the Program has gained national and international recognition for its work in 

urban design, through awards and competition performance. Interdisciplinary competitions like the Urban Land Institute 

(ULI) Hines Urban Design Competition give architecture students opportunities to team up with fellow graduate students in 

planning, historic preservation, and real estate development to address urban issues in a work environment that prepares 

them for the collaborative experience of professional practice. The Advanced Urban Design Studio explores relationships 

between individual buildings, urban spaces, and the contexts in which they reside. Studios engage projects ranging from 

conceptual urban interventions to projects that help communities to envision future growth. 

Study abroad opportunities augment the course of study offered in College Park. Summer and Winter study abroad 

programs are offered to a variety of locations including Rome, Paris, Scandinavia, Great Britain, Turkey, St. Petersburg, 

Egypt, Peru, and Sri Lanka. Summer and winter study opportunities are also available in conjunction with the Historic 

Preservation, Urban Studies & Planning, and Real Estate Development programs. A Spring Semester study abroad program 

is based at Kiplin Hall in Great Britain. 

Financial Assistance 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a limited and varying number of teaching and research 

assistantships, scholarships, fellowships, and internships. Applicants should apply for financial assistance when submitting 

the application for admission. 

Contact Information 

Find additional information on program offerings, degree requirements, admissions, and financial aid on the School's Web 

site (www.arch.umd.edu). 

Schedule a visit and tour online at: http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/advising/ 

Sign up to receive an invitation to our Graduate Open House online at: 

http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/admissions/information_request.cfm 

For further information on admissions, degree requirements, and advising, please contact Jaime Oliver, Coordinator of 

Academic Affairs, jloliver@umd.edu, 301-405-8000. 

For further information about the Architecture Program, please contact Madlen Simon AIA, Associate Professor and 

Architecture Program Director, grarchadvise@umd.edu, 301-405-8000. 

Jaime Oliver, Coordinator of Academic Affairs 

University of Maryland - School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 

- College Park 
MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8000 
jloliver@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu 

Madlen Simon AIA, Associate Professor & Architecture Program Director 

University of Maryland - School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 

- College Park 
MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8000 
archadvise@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu 

Courses: RDEV ARCH HISP URSP ARCH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Urban Studies and Planning 

Smart Growth Research and Education, National Center for 

Historic Preservation 

Urban and Regional Planning and Design 

Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture 

Real Estate Development 

Landscape Architecture 

Architecture and Real Estate Development (ARDV) 

Dual degree programs, such as Architecture and Real Estate Development, can have complicated requirements and 
applications. It is recommended that you consult with the Program Directors of each program before proceeding to apply. 
Application deadline for the program is December 15 for part I of the application and January 15 for the Supplemental Part II 
of the application. If you miss the deadline, you may apply and be considered for the real estate development program for 
August, but would have to apply for the Architecture part of the dual degree program in the year following. 



119 



The School has requested a differential tuition for in-state students in order to defray the higher cost of offering the dual 
degree program. The tuition differential, if approved, will be announced to all enrolled students, and will only be applied 
going forward for the semester following the announcement. 
Abstract 

There are several paths, depending on prior education and experience for applicants to consider for Architecture as well as 
for Real Estate Development. Students applying for the dual degree program will complete fewer courses (permitted overlap 
of courses) than if they took each degree program sequentially. The total number of credits for the dual degree is 75 credits 
for Path A architecture/real estate development dual degree students (those with undergraduate degree credits fully 
accepted), and is 127 credits for Path B architecture/real estate development dual degree students (those without an 
undergraduate degree in architecture). For the most complete information on the architecture program, also consult the 
catalogue entry for ARCH. For the most complete information on the real estate development program, also consult the 
catalogue entry for RDEV. 
Admissions Information 

The application process consists of four steps. First, fill out the on-line application for the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. The administrative code for the dual degree in Master of Historic Preservation degree and Master of Real Estate 
Development is "HPDV." Second respond and attach all elements requested when the Admissions office of the University 
notifies you to do so by email. Third, send (or have sent by third parties, GRE, Transcripts) the other elements of the 
application package (see below) to Enrollment Services Office-Graduate Admissions, Room 0130 Mitchell Building, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD20742. Fourth, send any portfolio items directly to the Program at the contact 
address shown below. All applicants must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, and a minimum grade- 
point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. There is no restriction on the applicants' previous field of study, and indeed we 
encourage diversity in all senses. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . Complete Application Form: Use the On-line version (www.gradschool.umd.edu), click on program ARDV to apply for the dual degree. 

2. Online Application Supplemental Form (send to you directly by email from the Admissions office of the University) 

3. Transcripts: (Official paper transcripts submitted in sealed envelopes or mailed to Admissions office directly by your degree granting 
institutions, unless your undergraduate work was done at UMCP, in which case no transcript submission required.) 

4. Standardized test scores: Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

5. Letters of Recommendation: Three confidential letters submitted by professors or others who can assess the quality of the applicant's 
potential to succeed in the graduate program. 

6. Statement of Goals, Experiences, and Research Interests: 1000-2000 word statement of goals and objectives in pursuing graduate study in 
architecture and real estate development at the University of Maryland. Also include a statement of your skill level with excel modeling 
using a scale of (non-existent, limited, moderate, skilled, and very skilled) 

7. Portfolio: Bound and not exceeding 9" x 12", containing reproductions of creative work including drawings, paintings, photographs, 
sculpture, sketches, and architectural designs. Creative writing and original papers and research may also be submitted within the portfolio, 
but the emphasis should be on visual creativity. 

8. Resume: use a standard business style listing education and work experience. 

Degree Requirements 

Architecture and Real Estate Development (Dual Degree) (M. Arch) 

Students entering the program with a four-year Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture from an accredited college or 
university normally require two years of graduate study to complete the requirements for the professional Master of 
Architecture degree (Path A). The dual degree curriculum requires 75 credits which can be completed in five semesters plus 
one Summer and one Winter term course. Additional credits may be required depending upon the architectural admissions 
committee's evaluation of the individual's academic and architectural experience. Information on required courses and 
curriculum may be found on the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation website at http://www.arch.umd.edu. 
Students who enter the professional program with a B.A. or B.S. in a discipline other than architecture (Path B) will normally 
require eight semesters plus course work in 2 summer and two winter terms in order to complete the 127 credits required for 
the dual degree in architecture and real estate development. . Students may be granted advanced standing if they have 
completed certain of the required architecture prerequisites. Information on required courses and curriculum may be found 
on the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation website at http://www.arch.umd.edu. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation and the Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development are ideally 
located between Washington, DC, and Baltimore and surrounded by a number of historic communities and a varied physical 
environment. The resulting opportunity for real estate development and environmental design study is unsurpassed. 
The School's resources include design workstations for each architecture student, a model shop, a digital fabrication lab, 
and both PC and MAC computer labs with REVIT, ARGUS, GIS, Maptitude and other design programs available. The 

120 



School's library contains some 57,000 monographs and 6,000 current periodicals, making it one of the major architectural 

libraries in the nation. The National Trust Library for Historic Preservation, housed in McKeldin Library, contains 1 1 ,000 

volumes and 450 periodical titles. The Colvin Institute holds the entire library offerings of the Urban Land Institute and 

access to all the case studies published by ULI. The slide collection includes approximately 430,000 slides on architecture, 

landscape architecture, planning, and technical subjects. The interdisciplinary National Center for Smart Growth Education 

and Research is based in the School offering perspectives and opportunities to engage important issues facing urban and 

regional planning. 

Both the Real Estate Development and Architecture Programs benefit from the strong support of the professional 

community, including practitioners who bring expertise into the architectural design studios as instructors, consultants, and 

critics. The RDEV courses are all taught by working or retired real estate professionals giving unparalleled access for 

students to making connections with current practice in the industry. Many architecture alumni are leaders in regional firms, 

while others practice as far afield as New York, Los Angeles, Puerto Rico, Vancouver, London, and Shanghai. The over 150 

alumni of the real estate program have a very active and passionate group of grads in the area who meet regularly and 

share practice tips, connections and future job opportunities. 

The University of Maryland's LEAFHouse took first place in the nation and second place in the world at the 2007 Solar 

Decathlon, gaining the Architecture Program its reputation as a leader in sustainability. In 201 1 , the University of Maryland 

competes in the Solar Decathlon for the fourth time with its Solar House, Watershed. 

The award-winning Comprehensive Design Studio and Advanced Technology sequence (an integral component of the M. 

Arch curriculum) offers an innovative teaching-learning environment where students work with an array of consultants from 

practice, exploring relationships between conceptual and technical aspects of architectural form and its assembly. 

Embracing the importance of context as an integral component of the design process and advocating urban design as an 

essential component of architectural education, the Program has gained national and international recognition for its work in 

urban design, through awards and competition performance. Dual degree candidates are prime candidates for selection to 

participate in the interdisciplinary competitions supported by the School, including the national ULI Hines (where the 

School's teams have placed in the Final Four twice, and top ten in the preceding year), the regional REIDO development 

competition, and the local capital area competition sponsored by NAIOP which gives the team the opportunity to present a 

urban (re)development solution to a large professional audience of real estate and design professions. 

Study abroad opportunities augment the course of study offered in College Park. Summer and Winter study abroad 

programs are offered to a variety of locations including Rome, Paris, Scandinavia, Great Britain, Turkey, St. Petersburg, 

Egypt, Peru, and Sri Lanka. Summer and winter study opportunities are also available in conjunction with the Historic 

Preservation, Urban Studies & Planning, and Real Estate Development programs. A Spring Semester study abroad program 

is based at Kiplin Hall in Great Britain. 

Dual degree students have the option to do their MArch thesis and MRED Capstone project in a combined fashion, with a 

design and development proposition supported by a committee of design and development instructors and professional 

advisors. These are very challenging and rewarding for students and faculty alike, but require a fair amount of advance 

planning on the part of both the student and faculty. 

Financial Assistance 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a limited and varying number of teaching and research 

assistantships, scholarships, fellowships, and internships. Applicants should apply for financial assistance when submitting 

the application for admission. 

The Colvin Institute provides scholarship funds to a number of highly qualified students, who may be dual degree students 

each term. Scholarship determinations are made at the time of application and admission. Scholarships are generally 

awarded on a per course basis and commitments are made at the time of admission and apply to the entire program, 

subject to academic performance. Periodically there are named scholarships provided by various real estate organizations 

or development companies. 

In addition, there are work opportunities both on, and off campus, and they are relatively plentiful. However, students in the 

dual degree program may find it impossible to complete their degree requirements timely if they are working off campus, or 

more than 10 hours per week. However, the MRED student listserv posts openings periodically as they are brought to the 

attention of the Program by alumni, friends, faculty and sponsors. 

Applicants should inquire as to the availability of funding for the term they are starting. Colvin Institute scholarships are 

typically for a portion of tuition only, and are paid on a per course basis as students progress through the program. 

Contact Information 

Find additional information on program offerings, degree requirements, admissions, and financial aid on the School's Web 

site (www.arch.umd.edu). 

Schedule a visit and tour online at: http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/advising/. Be sure to contact the Program Director for 

real estate development (mmcf@Umd.edu) if you wish to attend a sampling of classes while here. 

Sign up to receive an invitation to our Graduate Open House online at: 

http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/admissions/information_request.cfm 

For further information about the Architecture Program, please contact Madlen Simon AIA, Associate Professor and 

Architecture Program Director, grarchadvise@umd.edu, 301-405-8000. 

For further information about the Real Estate Development Program and the Colvin Institute, please contact Margaret 

McFarland, JD, Director of Graduate programs in Real Estate Development and the Colvin Institute of Real Estate 

Development, mmcf@Umd.edu. 

Additional information on Case competitions, samples of student work, as well as syllabi and adjunct faculty can be found at 

the School's web site (www.arch.umd.edu. You will also find the Colvin Institute offering outreach and information at the 

121 



ICSC in Las Vegas each May, at the ULI National Conference each October, and at many local events of Bisnow, ICSC, 

ULI, CREW, WIRRE and HAND. 

Madlen Simon, AIA, Director, Architecture Program 

University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation Building 145, Faculty Suite 

College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301.405.8000 

mgsimon@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu 

Margaret McFarland, JD, Director, Graduate Programs in Real Estate Development 

University of Maryland School of Architecture Planning and Preservation Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development 

ARC 145, Suite 1243 College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301 .405.8000 or 301 .405.6790 (no voice mail messages) 

mmcf@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Urban Studies and Planning 

Historic Preservation 

National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education 

Art History and Archaeology (ARTH) 

Abstract 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in Art History. The Program is committed to the advanced study and scholarly interpretation of works of art from the 
prehistoric era to the present and is grounded in the concept of art as a humanistic experience. The faculty offers expertise 
in all phases of the history of Western art as well as the arts of Africa, the Americas, and East Asia. 
Admissions Information 

For admission to the Master's program, students should have an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or 
university, or its equivalent. Although the applicant must demonstrate a general knowledge of art history, an undergraduate 
major in art history is not required. Students are required to submit the Graduate Record Examination scores for admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 12 
Preferred: December 12 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 12 
Preferred: December 12 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. Transcripts 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Statement of Goals & Research 

5. Writing Sample 

6. Hard copy mailed Deborah Down 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For the Master's degree, the student will: complete 30 credit hours at the 600 and 700 levels (at least 9 of these credits must 

be 700 level seminars; 6 are for thesis research; and one course must be ARTH 692, Methods of Art History); maintain a 

grade of B or better in coursework; pass the departmental language examination in French or German, or in a language 

appropriate to the area studied (such as Japanese); complete a thesis that demonstrates competency in research and in 

original investigation; and successfully defend the thesis. Please contact the Graduate Secretary for information regarding 

course distributional requirements. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

A total of thirty-three credit hours, after the M.A. degree, is required for the Ph.D. program. This involves seven courses (21 

credit hours), including Methods of Research (ARTH 692) if not previously taken; the final twelve credit hours will be 

Dissertation Research (ARTH 899). For the direct Ph.D. --in which the M.A. degree is bypassed-the student must complete 



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a total of fifty-seven credit hours, including Methods of Research (ARTH 692) and fourteen other courses, in at least five of 
the eleven areas specified above in the description of the Master's program; the final twelve credit hours will be Dissertation 
Research (ARTH 899). 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Art Library houses approximately 92,000 volumes as well as a vast body of auxiliary material, including about 70,000 
sheets of microfiche. The Department's Visual Resources Center contains approximately 300,000 slides and digitized 
images. The University Art Gallery, also located in the Art/Sociology Building, maintains a lively and varied exhibition 
schedule and has a permanent collection of twentieth-century American prints, drawings and paintings, collections of 
Japanese prints, and African objects. The Department maintains its own Lloyd and Jeanne Raport study collection of some 
130 objects from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the Ancient Americas. 

The Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture, part of the Art History Department, is designed to foster innovation in 
teaching and research by combining cutting-edge visual technology with an environment that encourages collaboration 
among faculty, students, and external scholars. The Collaboratory combines space for work and for meetings with advanced 
technology and helpful staff to provide a venue in which teachers and students can gather to work, share ideas, and find the 
resources necessary to explore new technologies and pursue intellectual interests. 

The University of Maryland is located in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., and is 30 minutes from the National Gallery of Art 
and the National Gallery's Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, the Corcoran Gallery, the Phillips Collection, the 
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Museum of African Art, the Freer 
and Arthur M. Sackler Galleries, which are devoted to the art of East Asia, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and 
many other major art museums. The campus is a 40-minute drive from such Baltimore institutions as the Walters Art Gallery 
and the Baltimore Museum of Art. In addition to the University's library resources, graduate students have access to the 
Library of Congress, the Archives of American Art, the libraries of Dumbarton Oaks, and other research facilities. In order to 
enhance the student's curricular choices, the Department maintains an arrangement for course exchange with the Art 
History department of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. To similar effect, the Department is a member of the 
Washington Area Art History Consortium, which unites the graduate art history departments of the greater Washington area. 
The Department organizes a variety of liaison activities with leading cultural institutions in the Washington-Baltimore area. 
The Middle Atlantic Symposium in the History of Art is sponsored jointly by the Department and the National Gallery of Art; 
this annual event provides the opportunity for advanced graduate students from universities in the Middle Atlantic region to 
present their research at a professional forum. Special seminars are frequently given by curators of such local collections as 
the National Gallery of Art, the Freer Gallery, or the Department of Prints and Photographs at the Library of Congress. A 
program has been initiated whereby CASVA Fellows will meet with our students for informal colloquia. The department also 
co-sponsors international symposia such as Van Dyck 350 with the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts and other 
local institutions. 
Financial Assistance 

Fellowships are awarded on the basis of merit by the College of Arts and Humanities and by the Graduate School. Several 
graduate assistantships are awarded by the Department. Also, four Museum Fellowships are awarded each semester by the 
Department of Art History for research at major museums in the Washington-Baltimore area. Approximately thirty graduate 
students are fully supported with stipends and tuition each semester. The Department's Frank Di Federico Fellowship, in 
memory of the late Professor Di Federico, is for work on the doctoral dissertation. In honor of its former chairman, the 
Department has established the George Levitine Art History Endowment, in support of research activities of graduate 
students as well as faculty. The Jenny Rhee Fellowship supports research, travel, and other educational expenses. The 
Department has recently received a generous gift from the Robert H. Smith family which includes three graduate 
fellowships. Graduate students in arts of the United States may apply for Department-administered Luce American Art 
Dissertation Research Awards. 
Contact Information 

For more information on Departmental requirements and any other information, please view the Department's web-site, or 
contact the Graduate Secretary. 
Deborah Down, Graduate Secretary 
1 21 1 B Art/Sociology Building 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-1487 
Fax:(301)314-9652 
ddo wn @ umd.edu 

http://www.arthistory-archaeology.umd.edu 
Courses: ARTH 



Art Studio (ARTT) 

Abstract 

The Department of Art offers a program of graduate study leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. The program's 
Graduate Faculty consists of over 15 active professional artists specializing in the traditional studio areas of painting, 



123 



sculpture, printmaking, drawing and digital media. Additional interests are reflected in the program's course offerings, 

including areas such as new genre and installation i.e. computer based work. 

Admissions Information 

To apply to the MFA Program applicants are encouraged to complete the Graduate School application available online at 

www.gradschool.umd.edu/admission. Applicants are also required to pay the requisite application fee. 

For admission to the graduate program, The Department of Art requires an undergraduate degree with a major in art from an 

accredited college or university, or its equivalent. A minimum of 30 credit hours of undergraduate work in studio courses and 

12 credit hours in art history courses is recommended. 

The MFA Degree is the final degree in studio art. Only the highest level of undergraduate artistic achievement is appropriate 

for graduate application. The Department of Art seeks students who have developed coherent bodies of work that are 

personal and focused. This body of art work, as professionally documented on CD's, Videos or websites is the primary basis 

for admittance.-i 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

• No Tests 

• 3 Letters of Recommendation 

• 1 set of complete transcripts reflecting undergraduate and graduate work 

• 20 Digital Images, website/software or videos/videos documentation 

(Information on preparing Digital images, websites or videos/videos documentation please visit the Department of Art website at 
www.art.umd.edu) 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) 

Candidates for the Master of Fine Arts Degree must complete a program that consists of 60 credit hours. These 60 credit 

hours are distributed as follows: 30-33 credits in Studio, 0-3creditsDesign Practicum and/or Teaching Internships, 6 credits in 

Art History/Art Theory, 12 credits in Graduate Colloquium and 9 credits in Master's Thesis Research. Graduate Reviews, 

with committees made up of Graduate faculty members take place at the end of each semester. Each MFA candidate in 

his/her final semester must select a thesis advisor with a thesis committee. Students must present their artwork in a Thesis 

Exhibition, usually installed in the Art Gallery at a designated time near the end of the spring semester. Students must also 

develop a written component to the Thesis (These have varied in length from five to 50 pages), and present an oral defense 

of the Thesis to the Thesis committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Studio facilities are spacious and well-equipped. Painting students are able to work in oils, acrylic, watercolor, fresco and 

encaustic. The sculpture area includes a woodshop, a welding and forging area, a stone and related materials area, and an 

active foundry. Printmakers can choose to work in intaglio, lithography, photo-etching, silkscreen or woodcuts. Drawing 

facilities are also available as well as special project rooms. Each graduate student is provided with a studio and access to 

models and classroom facilities. Sculptural installations may be built both indoors and outside on the grounds. 

Within the building housing the Department of Art, there are two galleries and two libraries. The University of Maryland Art 

Gallery, an independent unit that works closely with the Department of Art, features national and international contemporary 

and historical exhibitions as well as faculty and annual MFA Thesis shows. The Herman Maril Gallery is a student organized 

gallery that features student exhibitions, lectures, special projects and a space for social activities. The Art Library, separate 

from the large research libraries on campus, has an outstanding collection of books, catalogues, periodicals and 

reproductions, all indexed on computer and CD ROM systems. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers eight teaching assistantships and one fellowship. A number of Graduate School Fellowships are also 

available. Applications should be submitted by January 15 for consideration for a graduate assistantship or fellowship. 

Contact Information 

For further information, contact: 

Danielle M. Curtis/MFA Administrative Assistant 

University of Maryland College Park Department of Art 

rm. 1 21 1 E Art/Sociology Building #1 46 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-1445 

Fax:301-314-9740 

DCurtis2@umd.edu 



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http://www.art.umd.edu 

Prof. Brandon Morse, Graduate Director 

Rm.1 21 1 E Art-Sociology Bldg #146 

MD 207421311 

Telephone: 301-405-1462 

Fax:301-314-9740 

bmorse1@umd.edu 

Courses: 



Astronomy (ASTR) 

Abstract 

The Department of Astronomy offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

The M.S. program includes both thesis and non-thesis options. 

A full schedule of courses covering most fields of astronomy is offered. Some areas in which the faculty focus their research 

efforts are comets, interplanetary dust, planetary dynamics, extrasolar planets, mm wavelength astronomy, the interstellar 

medium, active galaxies, plasma astrophysics, high energy astrophysics, theoretical and computational astrophysics, and 

cosmology. 

Admissions Information 

No formal undergraduate course work in astronomy is required. However, an entering student should have a basic, working 

knowledge of the subject, which could be obtained from any one of many elementary textbooks. A more advanced 

knowledge will of course enable a student to progress more rapidly during the first year of graduate work. 

Note that the Department of Astronomy accepts applications for the Ph.D. program only. (You do not need an M.S. degree 

to apply for the Ph.D. program.) 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . GRE General and GRE Physics Subject Test is required (University of Maryland institution code is 581 4). 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation. 

3. Statement of Purpose or Essay. 

4. One copy of your official transcripts (translated in English). You must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0. 

5. International applicants must submit the Certification of Finances form. 

6. TOEFL or IELTS test scores required for international students if English is not your native language. 

7. Other materials such as curriculum vitae, resume, or other papers are accepted. 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Course requirements for the PhD in Astronomy currently consist of eight courses, at least six of which must come from the 
nine principal Astronomy graduate courses 601 , 606, 61 0, 61 5, 620, 622, 630, 670, and 680. A qualifying exam based on 
these courses is given in the summer after the second year. A research project is required of all students in the second year 
of graduate study. Admission to the PhD program is based on course work, the research project and the qualifier. 
Students choose a research stream depending on their interest within the field. Courses beyond the required eight are often necessary for 
advanced research. This will be assessed by the student's thesis committee. 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Candidates for the non-thesis option of the M.S. degree are required to complete 30 credits, including six of the nine 
principal Astronomy graduate courses (18 credits), with the remaining 12 credits consisting of classroom courses or 
research credits in Astronomy or supporting fields. One or more scholarly papers are required, usually fulfilled by the 2nd- 
year project report. The student must also pass a written examination, normally consisting of the written part of the Ph.D. 
qualifying examination with appropriately chosen passing requirements. 

Candidates for the thesis option of the M.S. degree (less common) are required to complete 30 credits, including eight of the 
nine principal Astronomy graduate courses (24 credits) and 6 credits of thesis research (ASTR 699). A written thesis is 
required and must be successfully defended in an oral examination. The student must also pass a written examination, 
normally consisting of the written part of the Ph.D. qualifying examination with appropriately chosen passing requirements. 



125 



Facilities and Special Resources 

In collaboration with four other excellent astronomy departments, the University of Maryland operates CARMA (Combined 
Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy), the most powerful millimeter-wave telescope in the northern hemisphere. 
Located in the Inyo Mountains of eastern California, CARMA is an array of 23 linked radio dishes. Astronomers use CARMA 
primarily to study radio waves emitted by molecules and dust in the coldest parts of the universe. CARMA saw "first light" in 
late 2005, and it is used by students and other researchers for a wide range of projects. It is ideally suited for the study of 
planetary and star formation, the birth and evolution of galaxies, and the feeding of supermassive black holes that power 
active galactic nuclei. Maryland astronomers receive guaranteed observing time on CARMA. 

A number of our students conduct research with distinguished scientists at the nearby NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. 
The university's scientific partnership with Goddard has recently been further strengthened via the creation of the Join Space 
Science Institute (JSI) in 2010. The first component of JSI is a black hole center, a close collaboration between the 
Departments of Astronomy and Physics and Goddard scientists that is unique in addressing all observational and theoretical 
aspects of black hole research. 

The department has also recently established a partnership with Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (PUC). PUC, one 
of the top two institutions for astronomy in Chile, signed an agreement with UMD in 2010 that enables astronomy graduate 
students at both institutions to participate in a joint Ph.D. program starting in their third year. These students split their time 
between both locations and conduct their thesis research under the supervision of UMD and PUC co-advisors. UMD 
students gain improved access to Chilean observatories, which include many of the best telescopes in the world. 
The department anticipates completion of a partnership in a 4m-class optical telescope by Fall 201 1 . It also has strong 
interaction with national astronomy observatories, where many students and faculty maintain observing programs, and also 
with neighboring scientific institutes, including the Naval Observatory, the Naval Research Lab, and other government 
agencies. The planetary science team is heavily involved with space missions visiting solar system bodies, such as NASA's 
Deep Impact and EPOXI missions to study comets. 

There is an extensive network of workstations available for use in the department. The network provides seamless access to 
software and hardware on a variety of UNIX and LINUX platforms. The computational astrophysics group maintains and 
upgrades a Beowulf cluster for computation-intensive science projects and has additional access to a larger cluster 
maintained by the university. 
This Department is associated with the following research units and facilities: 

• Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) 

• Laboratory for Millimeter Wave Astronomy 

• Center for Theory and Computation (CTC) : Astronomy Dept. center for theory- and computation-related research programs. 

• Joint Space Science Institute (JSI) : Partnership between Astronomy, Physics, and NASA/Goddard, with an initial emphasis on high energy 
astrophysics, especially black holes. Established 2010. 

• Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) : Partnership between UMCP, UMBC, USRA, and NASA/Goddard, 
with an emphasis on high-energy astrophysics. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department of Astronomy offers both teaching and research assistantships. Essentially all full-time graduate students 

receive full financial support. Most students receive assistantships to cover the summer period. These are either with faculty 

in the department or with staff members at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Some summer teaching assistantships 

are also available. The deadline for financial support applications is January 15th for assistantships and fellowships. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information, contact: 

Graduate Entrance Committee 

Dept of Astronomy Univ of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742-2421 

Telephone: (301)405-3001 

Fax:(301)314-9067 

astr-grad @ deans .umd.edu 

http://www.astro.umd.edu/ 

Courses: ASTR 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Physics 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science (AOSC) 

Abstract 

Abstract The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science offers graduate study leading to the Master of Professional 
Studies, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Course work in atmospheric and oceanic sciences is also 
offered at the upper division and graduate level as a service to other campus graduate programs. The educational program 
is broadly based and involves many applications of the mathematical, physical and applied sciences that characterize 
modern atmospheric sciences and physical oceanography, including climate and earth system science, and multidisciplinary 
studies of the interrelationship among the atmosphere, the oceans, the land, and the biota. The Department's advanced 

126 



degree programs are designed to prepare students for participation in contemporary research in the atmospheric and 
oceanic science. Research specializations include: atmospheric dynamics; atmospheric chemistry; physical oceanography; 
air pollution; atmospheric radiative transfer; remote sensing of the atmosphere, ocean, and land; climate variability and 
change; data assimilation; numerical weather prediction; severe storms; surface-atmosphere, ocean-atmosphere and 
biosphere-atmosphere interactions; and earth system modeling. The curriculum includes a set of Core courses to provide a 
fundamental background in atmospheric and oceanic dynamics, physical meteorology and atmospheric chemistry, earth 
system science and climate, as well as advanced specialized courses. Supervised research using state-of-the-art facilities 
then prepares the students for future contributions in their chosen field. 

The Department's close association with federal agencies in the Washington area provides graduate students with good 
training and opportunities in atmospheric and oceanic science. As a research assistant, the student has the opportunity to 
develop a close working relationship with one or more of the scientific agencies. 
Admissions Information 

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, the department requires a Bachelors or higher degree in 
meteorology, oceanography, physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, engineering or other program with suitable emphasis 
in the sciences. We welcome applications from those with no background in atmospheric sciences. The Core courses 
offered in the first year of study present students with the necessary background in atmospheric and oceanic science for the 
more advanced courses. The minimum undergraduate background includes 3 semesters of calculus, differential equations, 
linear algebra, 3 semesters of calculus-based physics, and 2 semesters of chemistry, one semester of computer 
programming. Scores from the GRE General Examination are also required. 

The application deadline for domestic students is January 15 if applicants are competing for funding. Otherwise, if applicants 
are self-funded, applications can be submitted through May 15. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 15 





Application Requirements 

• Application 

• Research Interests/Statement of Goals 

• GRE Scores 

• TOEFL Scores (International Only) 

• Official Transcripts 

• Three Letters of Recommendation 

• Resume/Publications (Optional) 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department offers a non-thesis program leading to the Master of Science Degree. 
The requirements include course work, a scholarly paper and presentation, and a comprehensive examination. This 
program provides fundamental training to prepare students for research and operational work in the atmospheric and 
oceanic sciences. 

Each new student will be assigned to a faculty advisor whose interests parallel those of the student. The faculty advisor will 
assist in the development of the student's course program and will follow the student's progress thereafter. The student may 
select an alternate advisor at any time, although financial support is dependent upon the availability of funds. 
The student must submit an M.S. degree course plan and a tentative schedule for completion by the end of the first nine 
credit hours. A minimum of 30 semester hours of coursework is required for the degree program. This must include 24 hours 
of 600-level AOSC courses, including core courses listed below. The remaining 6 semester-hours can come from additional 
600-level courses, AOSC 81 1 (department seminars) or equivalent (pending approval by the Graduate Director), and AOSC 
798 (Directed Graduate Research). For AOSC 81 1 or AOSC798, a maximum of 3 credit hours is acceptable toward the 
degree. The purpose of the scholarly paper is to demonstrate the ability to conduct original or literature research. The paper 
will become part of the permanent archive of the Department. A Ph.D. dissertation prospectus will satisfy this requirement. 
The Comprehensive Examination consists of written and oral portions. The written portion is composed of questions 
covering the subject areas of the following Core courses: AOSC 61 0, 61 1 , 620, 621 , 61 7 and 680. AOSC 61 1 can be 
replaced by AOSC 600 for those students with a specialization in Chemistry who get approval from their advisor, the AOSC 
Graduate Director, and Department Chair. 

All requirements for the M.S. degree must be completed within a five-year period. This time limit applies to any transfer work 
from other institutions to be included in the student's program. A full-time student can easily complete the M.S. degree in two 
years. 



127 



Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.) 

in atmospheric and oceanic science. This program is designed to furnish the student with the background necessary to carry 

out independent and original scientific research. To earn the Ph.D., the student must complete a course work requirement, 

pass the Candidacy Examinations, and prepare and defend a dissertation. 

A student seeking a Ph.D. degree will be assigned to a faculty advisor whose interests parallel those of the student. The 

academic advisor will establish and chair an advising committee which will oversee the student's degree program. 

The course work requirement is 30 semester hours of 600-level or above AOSC Department courses. In addition, the 

student must take 12 credits of AOSC 899 (Doctoral Dissertation Research). Students may wish to take a number of the 

core courses in order to prepare for the Qualifying Examination. In addition, there is a Minor course requirement of six 

semester hours of ancillary courses taken beyond the bachelor's degree in a related scientific area at the 600-level or above. 

These credits must have a unified or coherent theme. Students may petition the Department for a waiver of a portion of 

these requirements based on credits earned at another institution at the graduate level. 

A student seeking the Ph.D. degree in atmospheric and oceanic science must pass the Candidacy Examinations, which are 

divided into two parts - The Qualifying Examination and the Specialty Examination. During the Specialty Examination, the 

student must present and defend a dissertation prospectus to the examination committee. Following successful defense, the 

student advances to candidacy. Ability to perform independent research must be demonstrated by a written dissertation. The 

dissertation should be an original contribution to knowledge and demonstrate the ability to present the subject matter in a 

scholarly style. Upon completion of the dissertation the candidate is required to present the research results at an 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department seminar and to defend the material to the satisfaction of a Final Examining 

Committee appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

Full-time students are expected to complete the Qualifying Examination by the end of the second year of graduate study and 

be admitted to candidacy by the end of the third year. Students must be admitted to candidacy within three years after 

admission to the doctoral program and at least six months before the date on which the degree will be conferred. The 

student must complete the entire program for the degree, including the dissertation and final examination, during a four-year 

period after admission to candidacy. 

Graduate Track for Accomplished Scientists 

Graduate students with exceptional scientific achievements may, through written petition to the Graduate Director, replace 

the written portion of the Comprehensive Exam with a seminar followed by an oral examination. To qualify for this track, the 

candidate needs to meet the following requirements: 

1) have an earned MS degree in atmospheric or oceanic science, or a related field, ordinarily from an accredited American 

university, and receive approval from the five-member Departmental Examination Committee. 2) have published at least 

five, peer-reviewed, Science Citation Index (SCI) journal articles in atmospheric, oceanic, or a closely related science. He or 

she must be the lead or corresponding author of at least three of those papers. 

The candidate must present an open seminar on his/her past research followed by a closed oral exam by the Examination 

Committee of at least three faculty plus the Graduate Director, and the Admissions Committee Chair. Two or more negative 

votes constitutes failure. The final decision will be subject to review by the committee of the whole. 

Masters of Professional Studies (M.P.A.O.) 

Master of Professional Studies (MPAO) The Master of Professional Studies in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science is 

designed for meteorologists, oceanographers and environmental scientists who need cutting-edge skills and knowledge in 

atmospheric and oceanic science, in the computational methods used in our field, and in air quality science. The Director of 

Professional Studies will advise students in planning his or her course of study, and will provide career advice and The 

degree is earned by successful completion of ten 3-credit courses. Students must complete two out of the following three 

Certificate programs, each of which consists of four courses, plus two courses from the remaining Certificate Program. 

Certificate #1, in Computational Methods in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, develops computer skills needed to 

understand weather and climate analysis and prediction technologies. It is earned by successful completion of AOSC 630, 

AOSC 650, AOSC 684, and one of AOSC 614 or AOSC 615. Certificate #2, in General Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, 

provides a broad phenomenological understanding of weather and climate, and the dynamical, thermodynamical and 

radiative processes that drive them. It is earned by successful completion of AOSC 431 , AOSC 617, AOSC632 and AOSC 

670. Finally, Certificate #3, in Air Quality Science and Technology teaches the physical and chemical principles that govern 

air quality and allow for analysis and prediction of extreme weather. It is earned by successful completion of AOSC 424, 

AOSC 600, AOSC 637, and either AOSC 624 or AOSC 625. The MPAO program is designed with the needs of working 

professionals in mind, and can be completed on a part-time basis over no more than 5 years, or on a full-time basis in 1 year 

and one semester. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department participates in the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and the Cooperative Institute for 

Climate Studies (CICS). These institutions conduct research, and offer opportunities for graduate research beyond those 

offered by the department faculty. In addition, the Department maintains close research and teaching associations with 

Departments of Mathematics and Chemistry, as well as the Institute for Physical Science and Technology (IPST), Center for 

Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling (CSCAMM), and nearby government agencies including NOAA, NASA, 

ONR, USDA, NIST, and Marylands Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources. 

Special facilities that support the Department's teaching and research activities include sophisticated computing facilities 

allowing access to a variety of atmospheric and oceanographic datasets, a laboratory for atmospheric chemistry, a mobile 

air pollution laboratory, access to research aircraft, a variety of supercomputers, radar, windprofiler at Fort Meade, historical 



128 



data. Most importantly the students are encouraged to exploit the resources of the nearby government laboratories: NASA 

Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction. 

The Department maintains a specialized library with several hundred text and reference books in meteorology and allied 

sciences, specialized series of research reports, and many journals. The campus provides a main library as well as 

specialized libraries in chemistry, astronomy, and engineering. Several excellent government libraries in the area, including 

the Library of Congress, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the National Archives, and the NOAA libraries provide 

unsurpassed resources. 

The University of Maryland is located in an area of unparalleled professional resources. Because of its proximity to the 

nation's capital, The University of Maryland is able to interact closely with the many governmental groups interested in 

various aspects of the atmospheric, oceanic and earth system sciences. Scientists from government laboratories participate 

in many aspects of graduate education, such as giving lectures in classes, presenting research results in seminars, and 

serving on dissertation committees. Likewise, the Department faculty often attend and participate in the seminars, colloquia 

and scientific workshops being held at these neighboring institutions. 

The Washington, D.C. chapter of the American Meteorological Society consists of about 400 members who hold 

professional meetings each month. The Washington, D.C. area is frequently the site of national and international 

conferences, most notably of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American geophysical 

Union. In addition to the various government and academic institutions, the Washington metropolitan area contains 

numerous well-known private contractors and consulting companies involved in meteorology and oceanography, which 

provide employment opportunities for students both before and after graduation. 

As a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the department enjoys the common facilities offered 

by the National Center for Atmospheric Research such as research aircraft and supercomputers. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are available to qualified graduate students. Research assistants carry out research in the areas of 

physical and dynamic meteorology, physical oceanography, data assimilation, remote sensing, atmospheric chemistry, air 

pollution, climate dynamics, atmospheric radiation, severe storms, global climate change, and ocean-atmosphere and 

atmosphere-biosphere interactions. Fellowships are also awarded by the Graduate School to the most qualified applicants. 

In addition, hourly employment is available in the Department and off campus. Stipends are maintained at a competitive 

level. 

Contact Information 

Tamara Hendershot 

3409 Computer and Space Science Building 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5389 

Fax: (301 )-31 4-9482 

tammy@atmos.umd.edu 

http://www.atmos.umd.edu/ 
Courses: AOSC 



Biochemistry (BCHM) 

Abstract 

The Graduate Program in Biochemistry offers study leading to Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees. 

Research specialization is available in drug metabolism, metabolomics, enzyme mechanisms, bio-organic chemistry, 

membrane structure and function, metabolic regulation, nucleic acid biochemistry, macromolecular folding, nuclear magnetic 

resonance, and X-ray crystallography. 

Admissions Information 

Admission to graduate study at the University of Maryland requires a minimum of a Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of 

Arts (B.A.) or equivalent degree. While the area in which the degree has been earned need not be chemistry or 

biochemistry, previous coursework must normally include a minimum of 30 semester or 40 quarter hours of chemistry, with 

at least 1 year of physical chemistry, 1 year of organic chemistry and 1 semester of biochemistry, as well as laboratory 

courses in organic chemistry and biochemistry. A laboratory course in analytical chemistry is also preferred. Typical overall 

grade point averages for successful applicants are 3.0 or greater (on a scale where the average grade is 2.0), and averages 

in science and math courses are generally higher than this. Three letters of reference indicating a potential for independent, 

creative scientific research are also required.. 

The general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required of all applicants. Applicants from non-English 

speaking countries must also present the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of 

Spoken English (TSE). 

The above requirements represent minimum requirements and the competition for available space may limit admissions to 

persons with credentials above these minimum requirements. 

Application Deadlines 

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Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General required 

2. GRE Subject recommended 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation (sent electronically) 

4. TOEFL scores for international students 

5. Transcripts (Originals must be sent to Enrollment Services Operations, Room 01 30 Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742 

6. "Statement of Goals & Research Interests" and "Statement of Experiences". (These can be submitted separately or as a single document.) 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. degree program offers both the thesis and non-thesis options. Twenty-four course credits and six research credits 

are required for either option. The thesis option requires one seminar presentation and an oral defense of the thesis. 

Specific regulations are available from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry or on the internet at: 

www.chem.umd.edu. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Twenty-one course credit hours, with twelve credits of research, two seminar presentations, an oral exam for advancement 

to candidacy, preparation and defense of an independent research proposal, and a final dissertation defense are required 

for the doctoral degree. Specific regulations are available from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry or on the 

internet at: www.chem.umd.edu. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Biochemistry research is conducted in well-equipped research laboratories. The following central facilities are also available: 

analytical and preparative ultracentrifuges, phosphorimager, CD spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass 

spectrometers, X-ray diffractometer, animal colony, fermentation pilot plant, and a chemistry-biochemistry library. 

Financial Assistance 

Ph.D. candidates are normally supported on graduate teaching assistantships during their first year as graduate students. 

Teaching assistants usually instruct undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes and receive in return a tuition waiver of 

ten credits each semester, salary, and health care benefits. Ph.D. candidates are normally supported in subsequent years 

on graduate research assistantships. Financial support is not generally available to M.S. candidates. 

Contact Information 

Information on requirements and research interests of the faculty may be obtained at www.chem.umd.edu or from: 

Graduate Programs Office 

0129 Chemistry Building, 

University of Maryland- College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301 ) 405-7022 or 301 -405-1 028 

Fax:301-314-9121 

chembchmadm @ umd.edu 

http://www.chem.umd.edu/ 

Courses: BCHM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biological Sciences 
Biophysics 
Chemistry 
Chemical Physics 

Biological Sciences (BISI) 

Abstract 

The Biological Sciences (BISI) Graduate Program offers a wide range of training opportunities for students interested in 
pursuing doctoral level research in exciting, diverse areas across the biological sciences. BISI is an umbrella program 
comprised of four Concentration Areas: 
Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics (BEES) 



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Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, and Genomics (CBBG) 

Molecular and Cell Biology (MOCB) 

Physiological Systems (PSYS) 

Please indicate your interest on the Application Supplemental Form or send questions via email 

to biologicalsciences@umd.edu. 

Graduate students join a Concentration Area, but they may switch once on campus and may develop innovative research 

projects across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Descriptions of each Concentration Area, faculty research interests, and 

more detailed programmatic information are available at bisi.umd.edu. 

Although the BISI Program is administered within the College of Chemical and Life Sciences, it involves distinguished 

graduate faculty from many departments and several colleges at the University of Maryland as well as outstanding adjunct 

faculty from nearby research institutions. Students may have opportunities to work with participating scientists from - as 

examples - the National Institutes of Health; Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History, National Zoo, and Molecular 

Systematics Laboratory; the Food and Drug Administration; United States Department of Agriculture; and the Institute for 

Genomic Research. Thus, BISI students have an incomparable wealth of potential research options and collaborations that 

extend from Maryland's College Park campus throughout the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. 

Admissions Information 

All students applying to the Biological Sciences Graduate Program must have a Bachelor's degree from a recognized 
undergraduate institution. Applicants are expected to have a strong academic record, including coursework in advanced 
areas of biology as well as at least one year of calculus, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. Able students 
with deficiencies in a particular area may be admitted and the deficiency corrected after enrollment. The Graduate Record 
Examination General Test is required; the Subject Test in Biology is recommended. On the Application Supplemental 
Form (ASF) part of the online application, applicants should indicate one, or at most two, Concentration Areas of 
interest within BISI. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . University of Maryland application for graduate studies 

2. Academic transcript(s) 

3. Statement of purpose/research interests and professional objectives (can be reasonably broad; 1 -2 pages in length) 

4. 3 letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant's abilities and aptitude for graduate work 

5. Scores of the Graduate Record Exam General Aptitude Test (institutional code is 5814; departmental code not required) 

6. Scores of the Graduate Record Exam Advanced Biology Test (optional, but recommended) 

7. International students must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL, internet based exam, 
iBT). Maryland's institutional code is 5814; no departmental code is needed. 

8. Applicants in BEES and PSYS are encouraged to contact BISI faculty with shared research interests. To explore matches 
of your interests with those of BISI faculty, see the BISI website, bisi.umd.edu . 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program in Biological Sciences is a research program providing opportunities for students to develop scholarly, 
innovative, and independent work. Courses are designed to strengthen and complement the student's research. An advisory 
committee helps guide each student in selecting classes and other learning experiences. Students are encouraged to 
present their research at national and international meetings and to publish in peer reviewed journals. Seminar series 
featuring prominent scientists expose students to exciting topics and help students develop collaborative contacts. During 
the course of their studies, each student must pass a qualifying exam, complete and defend an original dissertation, and 
present their thesis work in a seminar. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The campus and local area provide students access to a vast array of instrumentation, equipment, facilities, and 
technologies to advance biological research. As examples, the college has state of the art facilities for research in all 
aspects of cell and molecular biology including cell and organism culturing, protein and nucleic acid analyses, peptide 
sequencing, oligonucleotide synthesis and sequencing, fluorescence, confocal microscopy, scanning and transmission 
electron microscopy, computer graphics for molecular modeling, NMR, mass-spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Students 
have access to a laboratory for evolutionary molecular sequence analysis; gas source stable isotope mass 
spectrophotometer; bioacoustic lab; flume lab; GIS (graphic information systems) lab; and high-speed network access to a 
wide range of desktop and super-computing facilities. Greenhouses and animal care facilities are available. 



131 



We also have several state-of the-art shared instrumentation laboratories. Two center around biological imaging for both 
electron and light microscopy, including a field-emission scanner and an image reconstruction/deconvolution microscope. 
Another shared laboratory augments existing sequencing facilities on campus, enabling large-scale processing and 
sequencing of nucleic acids, with multiple robotic sequenators and real time PCR. Other core facilities provide 
instrumentation for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), NMR, mass spectrometry, and microarray technology. 
Equipment and analytical instruments are available in both faculty and core laboratories for the maintenance of animal and 
plant tissue cultures, for the production of monoclonal antibodies, for the synthesis and micro-analysis of proteins, for large- 
scale fermentation and cultivation of microorganisms, and for computer assisted molecular modeling. Support staffing in 
shared instrumentation facilities is provided by the college, and maintenance costs have been subsidized by the college, 
thereby providing even occasional users with appropriate training and access, and simultaneously keeping instrument use 
costs low. This strategy provides exceptional opportunities for research and training, and enables graduate students to 
perform experiments with instrumentation that is at the leading edge of biological technology. 

Students have access to the Smithsonian National Museum and USDA collections of living and preserved organisms. 
Library Facilities: The library facilities on campus, as well as their online accessibility, are outstanding. In addition, there are 
libraries in the local area with specialized collections. The most important are the National Agricultural Library, the Library of 
Congress, the National Library of Medicine, and the Smithsonian Institution Library. Thus, the University of Maryland's 
region contains perhaps the most comprehensive collections of books and journals in the world. 
Financial Assistance 

Students are supported through fellowships, research assistantships, and/or teaching assistantships. Each type of funding 
provides a stipend, tuition remission, and access to health and dental insurance and a prescription drug plan. Historically, all 
students have been supported throughout their graduate careers. 

Fellowships are offered on a competitive basis. Students who apply by the December 1 5 deadline are automatically 
considered for fellowships. There are no separate financial disclosure forms to fill out as part of the graduate application 
process. 

Teaching assistantships require students to assist a faculty member in teaching a course or lab section(s). Benefits of 
teaching assistantships include building communication and organizational skills as well as resume enhancement for 
academic, government, or private sector jobs. It is also delightfully rewarding to explain concepts to students and then 
witness their excitement as ideas "click" and their questions are resolved. 
Contact Information 

Students are strongly encouraged to communicate directly with faculty in the area of their interest. Additional general 
information may be obtained by emailing biologicalsciences@umd.edu or by calling the Biological Sciences Graduate Office at 
301-405-6991. 

Please visit the Biological Sciences Graduate Program website, featuring a search engine to match research interests with 
faculty and links to all Concentration Areas: bisi.umd.edu 

International students with questions about the application process should visit the University of Maryland's Office of 
International Services website at http://www.international.umd.edu/ies/97 or email iesadv@deans.umd.edu 
Sarah Biancardi, Program Management Specialist 
2101 Bioscience Research Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-6991 
Fax:301-314-9921 
biologicalsciences@umd.edu 

http://bisi.umd.edu 

Dr. Michelle Brooks, Associate Director 

2112 Bioscience Research Building 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-3273 

biologicalsciences@umd.edu 

Courses: BEES CBMG BIOL MOCB BIOM BSCI ENTM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Biophysics 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology 

Center for Comparative and Evolutional Biology of Hearing (LFSC/BSOS) 

Center for Comparative Neuroscience (BSOS/LFSC) 

Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 



132 



Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology 

Biophysics (BIPH) 

Abstract 

The Biophysics Program in the Institute for Physical Science and Technology offers Ph.D. degrees in Biophysics. It is 
affiliated with the College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, and the College of Engineering. Doctoral 
degrees are offered. 

The Maryland Biophysics Program aims to train graduate students in the use of theoretical, computational, and experimental 
methods to gain quantitative insights into biological systems. The post genomic era is bringing tools for unprecedented 
characterization and control of living systems. To fully harness these tools for quantitative insights in biology, biomedicine, 
and bioengineering requires expertise from a number of disciplines. Thus our program includes faculty from Chemistry, 
Physics, Biology, Materials Science and Bioengineering. The Biophysics Program is open to students with undergraduate 
degrees in chemistry, physics or biology as well as students with majors in mathematics, computational science or 
engineering. Because student backgrounds are diverse, we tailor the curriculum to suit the needs of the individual. The 
online application is located at apra@umd.edu. 

Research areas include Membranes and channels, Theory of molecular machines and motors, Cell mechanics, Motility and 
the cytoskeleton, Theoretical studies of protein and RNA folding and aggregation, Single molecule biophysics, Theory of 
hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions Scattering Techniques in RNA and Polymers Protein Structure, Nonlinear 
dynamics and biophysics of biological regulation, Mechanisms of allostery and protein assembly. The core courses that 
include but are not limited to Statistical Mechanics, Chemical Thermodynamics, Biophysical Chemistry, Membrane 
Biophysics and Cell Biology, constitute the basis for further specialization. 
Admissions Information 

Students dedicated to a career in experimental or theoretical biophysics are sought. General GREs are required and a 
Subject GRE (Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry or Physics) is also required but may be waived under certain circumstances. 
For international individuals acceptable TOEFL scores are required. A resume or curriculum vitae and official transcripts are 
required. A personal statement of 500-1000 words which covers (1) life experiences and research, and (2) goals for 
research in biophysics is an integral part of the admissions process. Prior research experience is highly desirable. Three or 
more letters of recommendation must be included. The electronic admission process is through the link: apra.umd.edu. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 





Application Requirements 

See Admissions Information above 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

One course, Research in Biophysics, which consists of three eight week rotations through three experimental or theoretical 

research groups, is required of all students. Students must meet and report their progress to a three-person mentoring 

committee starting with the first semester. A written report must be filed each semester. A qualifier exam must be passed. 

Admission to candidacy is granted after the successful presentation of a research proposal to the Program Director and the 

three-member committee. A dissertation must be written and defended before a committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Ten of the fourteen faculty run experimental laboratories. Multiple experiments are conducted at the same time with 

graduate students working on the experiments. A Biophysics Seminar is run on the average of once a week, generally given 

by visiting scholars. For those students electing to take the Seminar for credit, one credit is offered, and these students must 

sign in each week. Faculty form three-person committees to mentor students, as mentioned above. Symposia consisting of 

about six nationally and internationally known scholars are conducted once a semester on various topics. These are well 

attended by students, postdocs, faculty and visitors from local institutions such as NIH and Johns Hopkins. 

Financial Assistance 

TAships, RAships, Fellowships, arrangements for support from the National Institutes of Health. 

Contact Information 

www.marylandbiophysics.umd.edu 

Caricia J. Fisher, Program Coordinator 

Biophysics Program, 2112 IPST Bldg 085 Institute for Physical Science and Technology 



133 



University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301)405-9307 

Fax:(301)314-9404 

cjfisher@umd.edu 

marylandbiophysics.umd.edu 

Professor Wolfgang Losert, Director, Biophysics Program 

Biophysics Program 3341 AV Williams (Bldg 1 1 5) 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301)405-0629 

Fax:(301)314-9404 

wlosert@umd.edu 

marylandbiophysics.umd.edu 

Courses: CHEM BCHM BIOL BSCI BIOE PHYS ENMA BIPH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Chemical Physics 

Chemistry 

Engineering: Materials Science and Engineering 

Physics 

Biological Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Business and Management (BMGT) 

Abstract 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Business 

Administration (M.B.A.), Masters of Science in Business (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). The school's M.B.A. 

program is accredited nationally by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International). Only 

about 607 programs in the world are accredited by the AACSB, a reflection of the quality of the faculty, students, curriculum, 

and career management. 

The Smith School of Business faculty has been recruited from the graduate programs of leading universities nationwide. 

They are dedicated scholars, teachers, and researchers with a strong commitment to academic excellence and the 

education of the professional manager and researcher. The Smith School of Business is dedicated to preparing graduates to 

lead organizations in an economy driven by technology, globalization, and rapid change. The Smith School curriculum 

integrates an in-depth education in core business functions - accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, information technology, 

logistics, management, and marketing - with cross-functional e-business areas - electronic commerce, financial 

engineering, services marketing, and supply chain management. 

Admissions Information 

Admission criteria for the Ph.D. program are based on: (1) quality of undergraduate and graduate coursework; (2) score on 

the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE); (3) letters of recommendation; 

(4) other relevant information and professional experience; and (5) a written essay of objectives/statement of goals. 

Prospective applicants may call (301) 405-2214 for information regarding the Ph.D. program. 

Admission criteria for the MBA program are based on: quality of undergraduate and graduate coursework; score on the 

GMAT or GRE; 2 letters of recommendation; professional experience; and written essays of objectives. Prospective 

applicants may contact the program at (301 ) 405-2559 for information regarding the MBA program. 

Admission criteria for the EMBA program are based on: quality of undergraduate and graduate coursework; 2 letters of 

recommendation; professional experience; and written essays of objectives. Prospective applicants may contact the 

program at (301) 405-2559 for information regarding the EMBA program. 

Admission criteria for the MS program focusing in accounting are based on: quality of undergraduate and graduate 

coursework; 2 letters of recommendation; professional experience; and written essay of objectives. Prospective applicants 

may contact the program at (301) 405-2559 for information regarding the MS program. 

Admission criteria for the MS programs focusing in finance are based on: quality of undergraduate and graduate 

coursework; GMAT or GRE score, 2 letters of recommendation; professional experience; and written essay of objectives. 

Prospective applicants may contact the program at (301) 405-2559 for information regarding this MS program. 

Admission criteria for the MS program focusing in information systems are based on: quality of undergraduate and graduate 

coursework; GMAT or GRE score, 2 letters of recommendation; professional experience; and written essay of objectives. 

Prospective applicants may contact the program at (301) 405-2559 for information regarding the MS program. 

Admission criteria for the MS program focusing in supply chain management are based on: quality of undergraduate and 

graduate coursework; GMAT or GRE score, 2 letters of recommendation; professional experience; and written essay of 

objectives. Prospective applicants may contact the program at (301 ) 405-2559 for information regarding the MS program. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant Fall Spring 



134 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

PhD Program: 

• GMATorGRE 

• 3 letters of recommendation 

• Official Undergraduate/Graduate transcripts 

• Written essay of Objectives/Statement of Goals 

• TOEFL (for international applicants) 
MBA Program 

. GMATorGRE 

• 2 letters of recommendation for all applicants 

• Essays 

• Undergraduate/Graduate transcripts 

• Resume 

• TOEFL (for international applicants) 

Degree Requirements 

MBA/MPP Joint Program Degree (MBA/MPP) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business and the School of Public Policy offer a joint program of studies leading to the MBA 

and MPP degrees. Under the terms of the joint program, a student may earn both degrees in approximately five semesters. 

The accelerated program is possible because some courses can be credited toward both degrees. Candidates must be 

admitted to both programs. 

Under the joint program, 66 credits are required for graduation, split about equally between the programs. Grade point 

averages in each program will be computed separately and students must maintain minimum standards in each school to 

continue in the program. A student must complete both programs satisfactorily in order to receive both degrees. A student 

whose enrollment in either program is terminated may elect to complete work for the degree in which he or she remains 

enrolled, but such completion must be upon the same conditions as required of regular (nonjoint program) degree 

candidates. Student programs must be approved by the Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and the Associate 

Dean for Masters Programs. For further discussion of admission and degree requirements, students should see the general 

admission requirements for each program. 

Master of Science in Business: Accounting (M.S.) 

Participants in the Master of Science in Business: Accounting program gain the leading-edge knowledge and skills they 

need to bring exceptional value to their firms in today's high-stakes accounting arena - and earn an advanced accounting 

degree from one of the world's leading business schools. The curriculum is relevant, practical and applicable from day one, 

focusing on such key issues as: internal audit application and practice, current trends in corporate governance, the role of 

managerial accounting in overall management planning and control structure, fraud prevention, deterrence, detection, and 

control, and IT security, IT controls and IT auditing. 

Master of Science in Business: Information Systems (MS) 

The MS in Business: Information Systems program is ideal for those who understand the value of technology and are 

interested in gaining the knowledge to manage it. You will learn how information is captured, organized, managed and 

analyzed, preparing you to lead in the ongoing technology revolution. Get ready to harness the power of information and 

help move your organization to the next level. 

Master of Science in Business: Finance (MS) 

The MS in Business: Finance program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in the complex 

and networked world of finance. 

Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Nursing (MBA/MSN) 

Students are eligible to pursue a joint degree through the Robert H. Smith School of Business and the University of 

Maryland School of Nursing, located in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program is a full-time program designed to produce outstanding scholars in management-related disciplines. 

Thus, a strong research philosophy pervades the entire program. The low student-to-faculty ratio fosters a high degree of 

interaction between faculty and students on research projects of mutual interest, frequently culminating in journal articles. 

Students whose career aspirations are congruent with the program's research orientation can look forward to a learning 

experience that is not only demanding but also stimulating and enriching. Graduates of the program have accepted positions 

at various academic institutions including: Boston College, College of William and Mary, Cornell University, Columbia 

University, Georgetown University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 

135 



Indiana University, Instituto de Empresa (Madrid), Lehigh University, McGill University, National Taiwan University, National 

University of Singapore, Notre Dame, Penn State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Southern Methodist 

University, Syracuse University, Texas A & M University, University of Houston, University of California (Davis), University of 

California (Los Angeles), University of Southern California, University of Texas, University of Washington, University of 

Wisconsin, and Vanderbilt University. 

All Ph.D. students are provisionally admitted and must achieve at least a 3.25 GPA in each of their first two semesters. 

Failure to do so results in being placed on probation for one semester. The student will then be dismissed unless a 3.25 

overall GPA is obtained. Ph.D. course requirements depend on the amount of relevant prior study. Preparation in calculus is 

required for admission. 

The Ph.D. student may select a single major (18 credits), one minor (12 credits), and a set of research tools courses (12 

credits). Every Ph.D. student must register for a minimum of 12 dissertation research credits during the program. Major 

areas of research may be chosen from among such fields as accounting and information assurance, finance, human 

resource management, organizational behavior, strategic management, information systems, operations management and 

management science, marketing, and logistics and transportation. 

Minors and second majors may include areas inside or outside the Smith School of Business. Typical outside minors include 

computer science, economics, engineering, government and politics, mathematics, psychology, and sociology. 

Students are required to take a written comprehensive examination in their major area. Additional exam(s) may be required. 

Upon successful completion of all departmental requirements, including (though not limited to) coursework and 

comprehensive exam(s), the student is advanced to candidacy. 

Each Ph.D. candidate prepares a formal dissertation proposal and presents it at an open meeting of faculty and students. 

The proposal should clearly indicate how the dissertation will make a contribution to the literature of the field. Ultimately, 

each Ph.D. candidate is required to prepare and formally defend the completed dissertation at an open meeting of faculty 

and students before officially graduating from the Ph.D. Program. 

Master of Business Administration/Master of Science (M.B.A/M.S.) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business is a global leader in integrating business management and technology. Smith 

MBAs can take advantage of this strength in the joint MBA/MS degree program and leverage their managerial skills with 

studies that develop research and technological skills in finance, accounting, information systems, or supply chain 

management. Students may apply for admission to the MBA/MS degree program at the beginning of the application process 

or at the end of their first year in the MBA program. Students must complete all required courses for both programs and 

reach a total of 66 credits. 

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business offers an MBA program designed to provide the educational foundation for those 

students with the potential to exhibit the highest degree of excellence in future careers as professional managers. The MBA 

program requires 54 credits of coursework, which is normally four semesters for a full-time student. There is no thesis 

requirement. Successful students in the program are expected to demonstrate the following: (1) a thorough and integrated 

knowledge of the basic tools, concepts, and theories relating to professional management; (2) behavioral and analytical 

skills necessary to deal creatively and effectively with organizations and management problems; (3) an understanding of the 

economic, political, technological, and social environments in which organizations operate; (4) a sense of professional and 

personal integrity and social responsibility in the conduct of managerial affairs both internal and external to the organization. 

Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation and will be given a specified 

amount of time to raise the average to a 3.0. Failure to do so will result in academic dismissal from the program. 

Maryland MBA graduates obtain employment in a wide spectrum of organizations at highly competitive starting salaries. 

MBA/JD Joint Program Degree (MBA/JD) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business and the University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore offer a joint program of 

studies leading to MBA and JD degrees. Under the terms of the joint program, a student may earn both degrees in four 

academic years. The accelerated program is possible because some courses can be credited toward both degrees. 

Candidates must apply for admission to the Law School as well as to the MBA program at College Park and must be 

admitted to both programs. 

Twenty-one credits of law will be substituted for MBA elective coursework. Grade point averages in each program will be 

computed separately and students must maintain minimum standards in each school to continue in the program. The 

Graduate School will not accept transfer credit from coursework taken outside the joint program. A student must complete 

both programs satisfactorily in order to receive both degrees. The MBA and the JD degrees must be awarded 

simultaneously. A student whose enrollment is terminated in one program may elect to complete work for the degree in 

which he or she remains enrolled, but such completion must be upon the same conditions as required of regular (nonjoint 

program) degree candidates. Student programs must be approved by the law school adviser for the joint program and the 

Associate Dean for Masters Programs. For further discussion of admission and degree requirements, students should see 

the above and consult the entry in the University of Maryland School of Law catalog. 

Master of Business Administration/Master of Social Work (M.B.A./M.S.W.) 

This program provides a unique combination of skills for those who wish to become managers of social service agencies. 

Elective courses can be taken at either the School of Social Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore, or at the Robert H. 

Smith School of Business. This program requires 90 total credit hours for graduation and can be completed in three years. 

• For more information: School of Social Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 410.706.7922 or http://www.ssw.umaryland.edu 

Executive Master of Business Administration (MBA) 

The EMBA program is designed for mid-career professionals to high-level executives who desire a systemic approach to 

managing and leading corporate functions. Admission to the EMBA program is highly competitive and is based on significant 

and relevant professional and managerial work experience, prior academic performance, and personal attributes. The 

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Robert H. Smith School of Business seeks to attract an internationally and professionally rich student population, diverse 

across industry and functional expertise. 

Master of Science in Business: Supply Chain Management (MS) 

The MS in Business: Supply Chain Management program will prepare you to discover emerging opportunities and lead 

innovation on a global scale. Whether you're a recent graduate with an interest in how goods move around the world or a 

manager who would like to broaden your understanding of the global supply chain, our curriculum will prepare you for new 

and growing career options in this dynamic industry. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Office of Career Services (OCS) provides dedicated, professional support to help students launch their careers. The 

center links students directly to recruiters through a variety of services, including on- and off-campus recruitment and the 

online resume database, which matches a Smith MBA to the right industry position. The OCS also participates in regional 

and national career forums and job fairs, such as the National MBA Consortium, the National Black MBA Conference, the 

National Hispanic MBA Conference, the International MBA Conference, the Graduate Women in Business Conference, the 

Career Services Council, and the Chazen Conference. 

The Smith School is located in the Baltimore/Washington, D.C./Northern Virginia corridor. This region offers one of the 

highest concentrations of culture, diversity, and career opportunities in the country. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to qualified full-time and Executive MBA students in the form of fellowships, graduate 

assistantships, and scholarships. 

Contact Information 

The Smith School of Business has available brochures that give specific degree requirements for the MBA, EMBA, and MS 

Programs. The Ph.D. Program information is available online at http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/doctoral. Initial inquiries should 

be directed to: 

MBA/MS Admissions 

2303 Van Munching Hall, College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-2559 

Fax:301-314-9862 

mba_info@rhsmith.umd.edu 

http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business Ph.D. Program Office 

3330 Van Munching Hall, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-2214 

Fax:301-314-9611 

businessphd@rhsmith.umd.edu 

http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/doctoral 

Courses: BMGT BUFN BUAC BUDT BULM BUMK BUMO BUSI 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Real Estate Development 

Chemical Physics (CHPH) 

Abstract 

The Chemical Physics Program is a program of study and research leading to Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees for students who wish to enter professional careers requiring an in-depth knowledge of both physics and chemistry. 
Students can choose research topics in biophysics, chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, 
materials and nuclear engineering, mechanical engineering or meteorology. 

The Chemical Physics Program is designed for students with undergraduate degrees in physics, chemistry, or engineering 
who are sufficiently well prepared in mathematics and the physical sciences to undertake graduate training in physics and 
physical chemistry. Formal course offerings in quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, thermodynamics, 
electricity and magnetism, statistical mechanics and biophysics prepare a student to explore the broad range of research 
topics at the University of Maryland. Research areas of the Chemical Physics faculty include: the study of single molecules 
as well as gases, surfaces, solids and polymers by means of laser-light and electron scattering, and nanomicroscopies; the 
study of dynamic phenomena from atom-molecule collisions to protein-folding and hydrodynamics; thermodynamics from 
phase transitions and critical phenomena to combustion; the statistical mechanical theory of phase transitions, fluid 
dynamics and non-equilibrium phenomena; the quantum mechanical theory of molecules and molecular dynamics; 
atmospheric physics and chemistry; and biophysics. 

The Chemical Physics Program is sponsored by the Institute for Physical Science and Technology and seven academic 
departments: Chemistry and Biochemistry, Physics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Materials 
and Nuclear Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Meteorology. The Chemical Physics Committee oversees the 

137 



program and is made up of representatives from the sponsoring units with the Program Director as chair. The Chemical 

Physics Program Office administers the program and is affiliated with the Institute for Physical Science and Technology. A 

booklet describing Chemical Physics at Maryland, College Park, can be obtained from the Chemical Physics office upon 

request. 

Admissions Information 

The program is for students with undergraduate degrees in chemistry, physics or engineering. For those students with 

degrees in other disciplines, knowledge of calculus, differential equations, and vector algebra, as well as introductory 

mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and quantum mechanics is ordinarily expected. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. GRE Subject (in Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics) 

3. Three Letters of Recommendation 

4. Test of Spoken English (TSE), required for international applicants 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Admission to the program is generally limited to Ph.D. students. Students can earn a thesis or a non-thesis M.S. degree 

while working towards the Ph.D. degree. In order to earn a non-thesis M.S. degree in Chemical Physics, a student must 

complete: Written Qualifying Examination passed at the M.S. level Scholarly paper 30 graduate course credits of which 24 

must be course credits including: Advanced laboratory course, Two credits of seminar, can be included in the non-course 

credits Advanced course at the 600 level or above B average In order to earn a non-thesis M.S. degree in Chemical 

Physics, a student must complete: 30 graduate credits including: Six credits of CHPH799 - (M.S. thesis research) 21 course 

credits Two credits of seminar, can be included in the non-course credits Advanced laboratory course Advanced course at 

the 600 level or above B average Written Master's Thesis 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Written Qualifying Examination passed at the Ph.D. level and normally taken at the beginning of the second year 24 

graduate course credits including: Two credits of seminar Advanced laboratory course Advanced course outside of the 

student's main field of study Research presentation with faculty present Scholarly paper in an area of intended thesis 

research 12 credits of CHPH899 (Ph.D. dissertation research, only available after advancement to Ph.D. candidacy) B 

average Written Ph.D. dissertation Students must also satisfy all general requirements of the Graduate School. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Incoming students are provided with private desk space and up to date computer facilities. There is a wide array of 

advanced equipment associated with the various research groups in the Program including scanning probe microscopes, 

high resolution spectrographs, ultra-short high-power lasers, multi-coincidence electron scattering spectrometers, and a fully 

equipped light-scattering laboratory. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students. There are also University and Chemical Physics 

Fellowships and fellowships in Biophysics (in cooperation with the National Institutes of Health) and Atomic, Molecular and 

Optical Science (in cooperation with the National Institute of Standards and Technology). 

Contact Information 

Requests for further information concerning the Chemical Physics Program can be obtained by writing to: 

Professor Michael A. Coplan, Director 

4203 Computer & Space Sciences Building 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4780 

Fax:(301)314-9363 

coplan@umd.edu 

http://www.chemicalphysics.umd.edu/ 

Courses: CHPH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biophysics 
Chemistry 
Biochemistry 



138 



Chemistry (CHEM) 

Abstract 

The Department of Chemistry offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees 

with specialization in the fields of analytical chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, chemical physics (in 

cooperation with the Institute of Physical Sciences & Technology and the Department of Physics), environmental chemistry, 

inorganic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry and physical chemistry. 

Admissions Information 

Admission to graduate study at the University of Maryland requires a minimum of a Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of 

Arts (B.A.) or equivalent degree. While the area in which the degree has been earned need not be chemistry or 

biochemistry, previous coursework must normally include a minimum of 30 semester or 40 quarter hours of chemistry, with 

at least 1 year of physical chemistry, 1 year of organic chemistry and 1 semester of inorganic chemistry, as well as 

laboratory courses in organic chemistry and physical chemistry. A laboratory course in analytical chemistry is also preferred. 

Typical overall grade point averages for successful applicants are 3.0 or greater (on a scale where the average grade is 

2.0), and averages in science and math courses are generally higher than this. Three letters of reference indicating a 

potential for independent, creative scientific research are also required. 

The general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required of all applicants. Applicants from non-English 

speaking countries must also present the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of 

Spoken English (TSE). 

The above requirements represent minimum requirements and the competition for available space may limit admissions to 

persons with credentials above these minimum requirements. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General required 

2. GRE Subject recommended 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation (sent electronically) 

4. TOEFL scores for international students 

5. Transcripts (Originals must be sent to Enrollment Services Operations, Room 0130 Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742 

6. "Statement of Goals & Research Interests" and "Statement of Experiences". (These can be submitted separately or as a single document.) 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Twenty-one course credit hours, with twelve credits of research, two seminar presentations, an oral exam for advancement 

to candidacy, and a dissertation defense are required for the doctoral degree. 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. degree program offers both the thesis and non-thesis options. Twenty-four course credits, including 2 seminar 

credits and six research credits are required for either option. The thesis option requires one seminar presentation and an 

oral defense of the thesis. Copies of specific regulations are available from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 

or on the internet at: www.chem.umd.edu. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has many state-of-the-art research facilities to support research in the fields listed above. Facilities include 

"clean" rooms for environmental sample analysis, X-ray crystallographic instrumentation, five mass spectrometers, five NMR 

spectrometers including 400 (3), 500 (1), 600 (1) MHz Fourier-transform NMR spectrometers; an XPS spectrometer, Atomic 

Force Microscopes, ultracentrifuges, analytical optical spectrometers, and a state-of-the-art computer graphics facility. 

Departmental research is supported by a departmental server and many individual faculty work stations. The Department 

has an electronics shop, a student-faculty machine shop and access to other campus machine shops. The Chemistry 

Library has an extensive collection in chemistry, biochemistry and other fields. A computer terminal is located in the 

Chemistry Library for literature searching. A Macintosh workstation facility (25 units) is available in the Department for 

student/faculty use. 

Financial Assistance 

Ph.D. candidates are normally supported on graduate teaching assistantships during their first year in graduate school. 

Teaching assistants usually instruct undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes and receive in return a tuition waiver of 

ten credits each semester, a salary and health care benefits. In subsequent years, Ph.D. candidates are typically supported 

on graduate research assistantships. Financial assistance is not generally available to M.S. candidates. 



139 



Contact Information 

Information on requirements and research interests of the faculty may be obtained at www.chem.umd.edu or from: 

Graduate Programs Office 

0129 Chemistry Building, 

University of Maryland- College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-7022 and (301)405-1028 

Fax:(301)314-9121 

chembchmadm @ umd.edu 

http://www.chem.umd.edu/ 

Courses: CHEM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biophysics 
Biological Sciences 
Biochemistry 
Chemical Physics 

Classics (CLAS) 

Abstract 

The Department of Classics offers a graduate program of study with specializations in Latin or Latin and Greek, leading to 
the Master of Arts degree. The program provides students with advanced study of the Latin and/or Greek languages and 
literatures in the context of a broader and deeper knowledge and understanding of Greek and Roman culture and 
civilization. In addition to advanced courses in language, each student will be required to take coursework in related 
disciplines outside of the Classics Department. Some individual programs may require more than 30 hours. Students may 
choose one of two tracks toward the degree: Latin or Latin and Greek. 
Admissions Information 

In addition to the general requirements for admission established by the Graduate School (see "General Information" section 
in this catalog), applicants must demonstrate a proficiency in translating the ancient language(s) at the advanced 
undergraduate level. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: August 15 


Deadline: December 15 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . No Test 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Writing Sample 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The Latin program requires a minimum of 30 hours of approved coursework, which can include six credit hours of thesis 
research. Six credits of Latin may be taken at the 400 or 600 level. An additional twelve credits of Latin must be in courses 
at the 600 level or higher. Six credits must be from courses in a related field such as classical civilization, Latin pedagogy, 
art and archaeology, history, linguistics, philosophy, or any other approved allied course. These courses must be taken at 
the 400 level or higher. The final six credits may be taken as thesis credits or as two additional 600 level Latin courses. 
Students must take LATN 4/672 (Historical Development of the Latin Language) and any two of the following: LATN 4/620, 
4/622,4/623,4/624,4/630. 

The Latin and Greek program requires a minimum of 33 hours of approved coursework, which can include six credits of 
thesis research. Three credits in the major language, e.g. Latin, may be taken at the 400 or 600 level. Fifteen additional 
hours in the major language must be at the 600 level or higher. Six credits in the minor language, e.g. Greek, may be at the 
400 or 600 level. Six additional hours in the minor language must at the 600 level or higher. Three credits must be from a 
course in a related field such as classical civilization, Latin pedagogy, art and archaeology, history, linguistics, philosophy, or 
any other approved allied course. This course must be taken at the 400 level or higher. The final six credits may be taken as 
thesis credits or as two additional 600 level courses in the major language. Students choosing Latin as their major language 
must take LATN 4/672 (Historical Development of the Latin Language) and any two of the following: LATN 4/620, 4/622, 
4/623, 4/624, 4/630. 



140 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The Baltimore-Washington, D.C., area boasts of several outstanding classical libraries. Located in Washington, D.C., are the 

Center for Hellenic Studies, the Byzantine Library of Dumbarton Oaks, and the Library of Congress. Students may also use 

the Eisenhower Library on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching assistantships are available for outstanding applicants. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information on the program, please call or write: 

Prof. Judith P. Hallett, Director of Graduate Studies 

1210 Marie Mount Hall, University of Maryland, 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2024 

Fax:301-314-9084 

jeph@umd.edu 

http://www.classics.umd.edu/ 
Courses: CLAS GREK LATN 



Clinical Audiology (CAUD) 

Abstract 

(Note: Applicants for the M.A. program in Speech-Language Pathology, please see SPLA; Applications for the Hearing and 
Speech Sciences Ph.D., please see HESP). Advanced graduate study in clinical audiology available through the 
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences includes the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) program and the Doctor of 
Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Clinical Audiology. Either of these doctoral programs is available to post-baccalaureate or post- 
masters students. A "fast-track" Au.D. option is available to post-masters students meeting certain criteria specified below. 
Both of these graduate programs provide curricula designed to meet the educational and clinical experiences required to 
obtain the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A) of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association 
and Board Certification in Audiology by the American Board of Audiology (ABA). A dual degree program is available to 
CAUD students. Those students in the program who wish to pursue the Ph.D. in Clinical Audiology will earn the Au.D. at the 
point in doctoral training when they have completed all of the academic, clinical, and research requirements for this first 
professional degree. 
Admissions Information 

Admissions to the graduate program in Clinical Audiology is on a very competitive basis. Students admitted to the Au.D. or 
Clinical Ph.D. program in Audiology must have a minimum grade point average of 3.2 from a master's degree program, or 
3.4 from a baccalaureate program in hearing and speech sciences, or related discipline. In addition to the Graduate School 
requirements, the Department requires all applicants to furnish scores on the Graduate Record Examination. Admission to 
both programs is primarily confined to fall matriculation, although students may enter the program in the summer session to 
complete undergraduate pre-requisites. Prospective applicants should note that decisions on summer and fall admissions 
are made in early March. Students must submit application materials for the fall semester by January 15. Applicants with an 
undergraduate degree in the hearing and speech sciences or a related field are considered for admission to the Au.D. and 
Dual Degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) programs, which usually require four and six years of graduate study, respectively. Individuals 
without a background in the hearing and speech sciences typically require an additional year to complete the degree 
requirements. Only full-time students are admitted to these post-BA programs. A "fast track" of the Doctor of Audiology 
(Au.D.) program is available to practicing audiologists. Applicants to this fast track must have a graduate degree in 
Audiology with a minimum grade point average of 3.2 in graduate work, and either the ASHA Certificate of Clinical 
Competence in Audiology (CCC-A) or a valid state license to practice audiology. Admissions requirements further include a 
minimum of two years of full time (32 hrs/week) post-masters professional audiological experience during the two years 
immediately preceding the application to the program and three letters of recommendation supporting these experiences. 
Students may enroll in the post-M.A. Au.D. program on a part-time basis. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





141 



Application Requirements 

All applicants to the CAUD graduate program are required to furnish GRE scores taken within the last five years, three 
letters of recommendation, and official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate studies. Additionally, professional 
audiologists applying to the post-MA program must also submit evidence of ASHA certification or state licensure, and 
evidence of two years of full-time professional work as a clinical audiologist. 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) 

The Au.D. program for post-BA students requires 57 credit hours of graduate coursework, 4 credit hours for a doctoral 
capstone research project, 14 credit hours of clinical practicum registration, and 18 credit hours of full-time clinical internship 
registration, for a total of 93 credit hours. PLEASE NOTE that beginning in Spring, 2009, Au.D. students are no longer 
required to complete a dissertation for the Au.D. Degree. The Au.D. curriculum meets requirements specified in the 
Standards for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 
as well as those required for Board Certification in Audiology from the American Board of Audiology. Au.D. students must 
pass comprehensive examinations and complete a capstone research project. Full-time students are expected to complete 
the program in four years. The Au.D. program for returning students who already possess an M.A. degree in Audiology 
requires 30 credit hours of graduate coursework and 4 credit hours for a capstone research project. There is no minimum 
requirement of supervised clinical practicum experience, although clinical practicum will be available to students as needed. 
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Audiology (Ph.D.) 

The Dual-degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) program requires 60 credit hours of graduate coursework, 6 credit hours of pre-candidacy 
research, 12 credit hours of dissertation research, 12 credit hours of clinical practicum registration, and 18 credit hours of 
full-time clinical internship registration, for a total of 108 credit hours. The Dual-degree program is designed to meet 
requirements specified in the Standards for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology of the American Speech- 
Language-Hearing Association and in the Handbook for Board Certification in Audiology of the American Board of 
Audiology. The program also meets all requirements of the Graduate School. Ph.D. students must develop an individual 
study plan with the approval of a faculty Program Planning Committee, pass comprehensive examinations, and complete a 
dissertation and oral defense. Full-time students are expected to complete the program in approximately 6 years. Students 
will earn an Au.D. degree on the way to the Ph.D. degree after they have successfully completed academic coursework, pre- 
candidacy research, clinical practicum, the 4th-year clinical externship, and comprehensive examinations. The Department 
of Hearing and Speech Sciences also offers the traditional Doctor of Philosophy degree, with major emphasis in either 
speech, language or hearing, for those students seeking careers in research or higher education without clinical training. For 
information about the Ph.D. in Hearing and Speech Sciences, please see HESP. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's facilities include (1) numerous modern research laboratories equipped to support research in the areas of: 
acoustic phonetics, psychoacoustics, cochlear implants, hearing aids, infant and adult speech perception, neuropsychology, 
language, voice, fluency and electrophysiology. There are five sound-attenuating chambers, one semi-anechoic chamber, 
and one electrically-shielded chamber, devoted to research with humans, which are all integrated with computers and 
peripheral equipment for acoustic signal development, signal analysis, presentation and on-line data collection; (2) a 
Departmental library; (3) the Hearing and Speech Clinic at UMCP: this clinic serves as the initial practicum site for all 
students pursuing clinical training. The Clinic includes multiple audiological test suites equipped for diagnostic testing, a 
complete hearing aid dispensary, a group rehabilitation room, and state-of-the-art equipment for behavioral and 
electrophysiological diagnostic testing, as well as hearing aid selection and fitting. Ten speech and language diagnostic and 
therapy rooms are integrated with observation areas; and (4) an on-site language pre-school (LEAP, the Language-Learning 
Early Advantage Program), also equipped for observation. Students pursuing clinical training in Audiology will also have 
access to the Audiology Service, Division of Audiology-Head and Neck Surgery, of the University of Maryland and University 
Hospital in Baltimore (UMB), for part-time clinical rotations or full-time clinical externships. This Service provides a full range 
of auditory and vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative services in a large metropolitan hospital setting. Students also 
engage in clinical activities in the Audiology Section of the Clinical Center as well as intramural research programs of the 
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health. All of the clinical and 
research facilities are potentially available for the conduct of student-directed research projects, or for student participation in 
faculty-initiated research projects. Additional research and clinical opportunities are available at Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and at other facilities in the Washington and Baltimore 
metropolitan areas. The Library of Congress, the National Library of Medicine and the libraries of various medical schools in 
the Washington-Baltimore area supplement the University's extensive libraries at College Park. The Department of Hearing 
and Speech Sciences participates in the Center for the Comparative and Evolutionary Biology of Hearing Training 
Program(C-CEBH), and the Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences graduate program (see NACS), which afford students the 
opportunity to work with faculty in other departments at the University of Maryland, College Park, or at UMB. 
Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available through the Department. Assistantships that carry teaching, 
research or clinical responsibilities are awarded on a competitive basis. The Department recommends outstanding students 
for Graduate School Fellowships. Students may also seek assistantships or doctoral fellowships sponsored by Federal 
agencies (e.g., NIDCD) or private foundations (e.g., American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation; American Academy 
of Audiology Foundation). Students are encouraged to apply for assistantships by January 15. 



142 



Contact Information 

Additional information about the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology (Au.D. or Ph.D.) may be obtained by contacting 

Sandra Gordon-Salant, Ph.D., Director of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology, or by e-mailing the program at 

admissions@hesp.umd.edu; extensive information about the program and faculty are available at the Department's web 

site: http://www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp 

Sandra Gordon-Salant, Ph.D., Director, Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology 

0100 Lefrak Hall 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-4214 

Fax:301-314-2023 

admissions@hesp.umd.edu 

http://www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp 

Courses: HESP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Communication 

Linguistics 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Center for Comparative and Evolutional Biology of Hearing (LFSC/BSOS) 



Communication (COMM) 

Abstract 

The department takes as its intellectual focus the strategic use of discourse in the public sphere. Departmental research 
focuses in feminist studies; health communication; intercultural communication; media studies; persuasion and social 
influence; public relations; and rhetoric and political culture. The Department encourages applications for graduate study 
from students wishing to pursue interests identified with one or more of these foci. The graduate program in Communication 
is designed for students whose educational objective is the Ph.D. degree (currently the program does not admit students 
whose degree objective is the M.A.) Most graduates of the doctoral program pursue academic careers; however, some work 
in public policy research and other professions requiring highly developed research skills. 
Admissions Information 

Students must hold a Bachelor's or Master's degree (or the equivalent) prior to enrollment in the Ph.D. program. Although 
most applicants to the program will have earned a degree in the communication field, others with an interest in studying 
communication may be admitted (with the possibility of additional courses assigned to remedy deficiencies). Admission to 
the Ph.D. program is based on the student's prior academic record, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, statement of 
goals and research interests, sample of scholarly writing, and other information relevant to the applicant's likelihood of 
completing the program. TOEFL is required of all international applicants (except applicants from the United Kingdom, 
Commonwealth Caribbean, Ireland, Canada, Australia, or New Zealand whose first language is English). 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . Official Transcripts from all Colleges attended 

2. GRE General 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Sample of Scholarly Writing 

5. Submit statement of goals and experiences 

6. TOEFL for all international applicants (except applicants from the United Kingdom, Commonwealth Caribbean, Ireland, Canada, Australia, 
or New Zealand whose first language is English). The Test of Written English (TWE) is required for those not completing the IBT TOEFL. 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The Department of Communication is not currently admitting students whose terminal degree objective is the 
M.A. A minimum of 30 hours is required for the master's degree. Students who select the thesis option must complete and 
successfully defend an original research project that contributes to knowledge of communication. Those who select the non- 
thesis option must complete a comprehensive examination and a research paper in their area of interest. All students, 



143 



regardless of option, are required to master the fundamentals of communication inquiry, including knowledge of 
communication research methods. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. requires (1) course work to prepare the student for a research program in communication, including work in a 
cognate discipline, and research methods; (2) a comprehensive examination that certifies mastery of disciplinary knowledge 
and preparation for independent research; and (3) completion and successful defense of a dissertation that advances 
knowledge of communication. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The campus provides extensive mainframe and personal computer resources and excellent library collections in 

communication. In addition, the Washington metropolitan area provides research and laboratory facilities for studying 

communication unmatched by other departments in the discipline. 

Financial Assistance 

Most departmental financial aid is in the form of graduate assistantships. However, a limited number of fellowships are 

available. The application deadline for financial aid is December 1 for best consideration. 

Contact Information 

For additional information on graduate study in Communication, contact: 

Professor James F. Klumpp, Interim Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Communication 2130 Skinner Building 

College Park, MD 20742-7635 

Telephone: (301) 405-6520 

Fax:(301)314-9471 

commgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.comm.umd.edu 
Program Management Specialist 
2130 Skinner Building 
College Park, MD 20742-7635 
Telephone: (301) 405-0870 
Fax:(301)314-9471 
commgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.comm.umd.edu 

Courses: COMM COMM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

English Language and Literature 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Clinical Audiology 

Community Planning and Historic Preservation (CPHP) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Requirements 

Degree Requirements 

Financial Assistance 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Real Estate Development 

Comparative Literature (CMLT) 

Abstract 

A separate degree program in the English Department, the Comparative Literature Program is committed to the comparative 
and transnational study of literature and other media. Combining its own dynamic resources with the particular strengths of 
the English Department and other units in the College of Arts and Humanities, the Program focuses especially on Western 
Hemispheric and Transatlantic Studies and on Diasporic and Postcolonial Studies. Students in the Program work in at least 
two languages and national literatures, one of them Anglophone. The Comparative Literature PhD Program complements 
the current PhD Program in English, giving students a place to pursue true comparative studies. Students seeking 
admission to the PhD Program in Comparative Literature must demonstrate advanced language proficiency before entry into 
the Program, and commit themselves to achieving a high degree of intellectual expertise in two or more languages and 
national literatures. Graduates are as likely to find academic positions in departments of foreign languages as they are to 
find them in English. A doctoral degree in Comparative Literature can uniquely prepare them for a profession that more and 
more studies literatures and cultures within a globalized, transnational context. Students entering this small, elite PhD 

144 



program will already hold an MA degree either in English or in another language/literature; students seeking admission with 
the BA should contact the Director of the Comparative Literature Program to discuss alternative possibilities for achieving 
the MA in preparation for the PhD program. Applicants interested in the Program should apply directly to Comparative 
Literature, not English. 
Admissions Information 

Applicants should have a strong background in arts and humanities. Students will not be admitted to the program without 
demonstrated proficiency in English and at least one other language. Each student must submit a critical writing sample (in 
English), three letters of recommendation, evidence of language proficiency, and GRE scores. International applicants must 
also submit TOEFL scores. Applicants will no longer be admitted to the Master of Arts program in Comparative 
Literature as of Fall 2006; admission is available to the Ph.D. Students with a BA should contact the director of the 
Comparative Literature program to discuss alternative possibilities for achieving an MA in preparation for the PhD 
program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Critical Writing Sample 

4. Language requirement 

5. Personal Statement 

6. Statement of Intellectual and Academic Goals 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. degree normally entails at least 18 credits of course work (beyond M.A. courses) and 12 credits of 

dissertation research. Students take one course in Methodology (3 credits); one course in Theory (3 credits); two 

courses in Early Modern Literature (6 credits); and two courses in Modern Literature (6 credits). The designations 

early modern and modern remain flexible to accommodate different literary histories. In each of the two general 

periods, at least one course must be taken in the English Department in Anglophone or Comparative Literature and 

at least one course outside of the English Department in another language/literature. Students can use six credits 

of MA work to satisfy distribution requirements (though not total credit number requirements). Advising will 

address the depth, breadth, and coherence of each students course plan and, if necessary, coordination among 

different histories of the early modern and modern. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Comparative Literature Program combines the benefits of a small department with the opportunities available 

at a large research university located in suburban Washington, D.C. Students have access to such University 

resources as the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies, the rare books and special collections of McKeldin 

Library, the Program for Africa and Africa in the Americas, and the Women's Studies Graduate Certificate program. 

Area resources include the extensive archival collections of the Library of Congress, the U.S. Archives, and the 

Folger Institute, as well as museums, galleries, embassies and cultural institutions in the Washington area and in 

the Baltimore-Philadelphia-New York corridor. 

Financial Assistance 

Comparative Literature students are eligible for graduate assistantships and university fellowships. Depending on 

available resources and the student's own expertise, teaching and research assistantships may be available either 

in Comparative Literature or in an affiliated department. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information about the program, contact: 

Zita Nunes, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature Director, Comparative Literature Program 

2116 Tawes Hall, University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3839 

Fax:(301)314-7539 

cmltgrad @ deans.umd.edu 

http://www.cmlt.umd.edu 



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Courses: CMLT 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Computer Science (CMSC) 

Abstract 

The Computer Science Department's graduate program is ranked among the top in the nation and in the top ten among 

public universities. Both M.S. and Ph.D degrees are offered, and almost all full-time students receive financial aid in the form 

of assistantships, fellowships, and grants. The Department has strong research programs in the following areas: artificial 

intelligence, computer systems and networking, database systems, programming languages, software engineering, scientific 

computing, algorithms and computation theory, computer vision, geometric computing, graphics, and human-computer 

interaction. 

Admissions Information 

Admission and degree requirements specific to the graduate programs in computer science are described on our 

website, http://www.cs.umd.edu/Grad/catalog.html . A strong background in mathematics and theoretical computer science is 

necessary. The general Graduate Record Examinations (GRE's) are required. The subject GRE is recommended, but not 

required. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 


Deadline: October 1 
Preferred: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. GRE Subject highly recommended 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The master's program offers two options: 1) 24 hours of coursework and completion of a thesis, or 2) 30 hours of 

coursework, comprehensive examinations, and completion of a scholarly paper. 

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 

The program milestones include a nine-course qualifying sequence, a preliminary oral examination on a proposal for a 

dissertation and reading list in three related areas, and the dissertation defense. The number and variety of courses offered 

each semester enable students and their advisors to plan individualized programs. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The department is located in the A.V. Williams building. Each office has one or more wall plates, which contain ethernet, 

fiber optic, and telephone outlets. Most larger offices and labs have dedicated ethernet switches installed in the room, with 

two or more ethernet cables to each desk. Ethernet and fiber outlets are connected to ethernet switches running at 100 Mbit 

and Gigabit ethernet speeds, and running on a gigabit ethernet backbone. Cisco routers connect the building switches to the 

campus network and the internet via gigabit ethernet. 

The campus has a wireless ethernet network covering the entire building and much of campus, allowing mobile computing 

users to remain connected to the network while in meetings, conference rooms, hallways, visiting other offices, or roaming 

certain parts of the University of Maryland campus. The wireless network supports the 802.1 1a, 802.1 1b, and 802.1 1g 

standards. 

Current research facilities include workstations running Sun Solaris, Redhat Linux, Apple OSX, and Microsoft Windows. 

There are over 100 terminals on graduate student desks that provide a choice of Redhat Linux, Microsoft Windows, or Sun 

Solaris as their native desktop operating system. Four public laser postscript printers with integrated black and white 

scanners, a color scanner, and a color laser printer are available for use. A public workstation is available for burning CD 

and DVD discs. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid, in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships, is offered to qualified 

applicants. Almost all full-time students receive some type of financial aid. 

Contact Information 

For information on degree programs and graduate assistantships contact: 

Graduate Office 

1151 A.V. Williams Building 



146 



MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2664 

csgradof@cs.umd.edu 

http://www.cs.umd.edu/Grad 

Courses: CMSC 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 



Couple and Family Therapy (FCFT) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Creative Writing (CRWR) 

Abstract 

The MFA in Creative Writing provides a professional course of study for graduate students seeking to perfect their ability to 
compose poems, stories, and novels. While primarily affording students intensive studio or practical work within their chosen 
genre, the MFA in Creative Writing requires that students incorporate such work with a traditional study of literature. The 
goal of the MFA in Creative Writing is to provide an atmosphere in which students can both hone their skills as writers and 
gain a theoretical and historical understanding of their craft. 
Admissions Information 

In addition to fulfilling Graduate School requirements, applicants to the M.F.A. degree program should present a 3.0 GPA. 
Applicants should submit a writing sample, for fiction, 25 pages, or for poetry, 10 poems, to the Office of the Creative Writing 
Program. Applications must be received by January 15. Admission is for the Fall semester only. 
Application Deadlines 



I 

Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General recommended 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Writing Sample 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) 



147 



The M.F.A. degree program requires 36 credit hours of graduate work. The program balances courses in literature with 

writing workshops (30 hours), and requires a creative thesis (six hours). It offers concentrations in fiction and in poetry. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Resources for research in the College Park and Washington, D.C. area are unsurpassed. The university's libraries hold over 

2,000,000 volumes. In addition to the outstanding holdings of the Library of Congress, the area also offers the specialized 

resources of the Folger Shakespeare Library, Dumbarton Oaks, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, and the 

National Center for the Study of the Visual Arts. 

UMCP is a member of the Consortium of Institutions in the Washington area, which permits graduate students at College 

Park to enroll in courses at other universities for graduate credit at UMCP. Graduate students in English also may take 

courses for graduate credit at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, which runs a series of 

seminars by distinguished scholars each year. 

Financial Assistance 

The Graduate School awards a small number of fellowships to candidates nominated by the various departments. In 

conjunction with the Graduate School, the English Department also awards teaching assistantships, the primary form of 

financial aid. Currently, about 85 teaching assistantships are awarded each year, and about 25 of these go to incoming 

students or to enrolled students who have not previously held them. 

Contact Information 

Additional information on admission, degree requirements, and financial aid can be obtained from: 

Lindsay Bernal, Academic Coordinator 

Creative Writing Program, 211 6D Taws Hall, Department of English, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-3820 

Fax:301-314-7539 

lbernal@umd.edu 



http://www.english.umd.edu/creativewriting 
Courses: ENGL 

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CRIM) 

Abstract 

The program of graduate study leading to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the area of Criminology and 

Criminal Justice is intended to prepare students for research, teaching and professional employment in operational agencies 

within the field of criminal justice. This program combines an intensive background in a social science discipline such as 

criminology, criminal justice, sociology, psychology and public policy with graduate-level study of selected aspects of crime 

and criminal justice. 

In addition, the Department offers a joint J.D./M.A. degree with the School of Law of the University of Maryland, located in 

Baltimore, and a Traditional M.A. in Criminal Justice. 

A recent study of Department M.A. and Ph.D. alumni reveals that master's degree graduates have found employment in 

both public and private institutions in virtually every kind of activity associated with the criminal justice system: research; 

teaching; federal, state and local law enforcement; courts; corrections; private security; and funded programs. Ph.D. 

graduates have found employment mostly in teaching, research, and government agency administration. 

Admissions Information 

In addition to the general Graduate School rules, special admission requirements include the Graduate Record Examination, 

a major in a social science discipline and nine hours of coursework in appropriate areas of criminal justice. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General Exam 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Personal Statement of Goals/Purpose 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts and Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.A./J.D.) 

Please contact the program for more information. 



148 



Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. applicant who has already earned an MA/MS degree must have completed two statistics, two research methods, 

and two theory courses, one of each being at the Master's level. At the discretion of the Graduate Admission Committee of 

the Department, deficiencies in some of the above areas may be made up by non-credit work at the beginning of the 

program. Students whose highest degree is a BA/BS may choose to apply for entry either into the Traditional Master's 

program or directly into the Ph.D. program. Students admitted directly into the Ph.D. program will complete the requirements 

of the Traditional Master's program before beginning Ph.D. -level work. 

In addition to the general Graduate School requirements, competence in research methodology and in quantitative 

techniques is expected for the completion of the Ph.D. degree, as well as competence in theory and the criminal justice field. 

The necessary coursework is determined on the basis of the student's previous preparation, needs and interests. The 

candidate is also required to pass comprehensive examinations. 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

For the M.A. applicant, the undergraduate major must have included at least one course each in theory, statistics and 

research methods. M.A. students may choose either a Traditional M.A. or Professional M.A. option, but the Professional 

M.A. option is offered only in the China location at this time. The general plan of study for the Traditional M.A. is as follows: 

30 semester hours of courses consisting of: 1) five required courses that must be passed with a "B" or better (including two 

statistics courses); 2) six hours of thesis credit; and 3) three elective courses. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department houses the Maryland Justice Analysis Center. In addition, faculty maintain ongoing, funded research 

programs. These resources provide numerous opportunities for students to engage in policy development, research, and 

professional activities. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate research and teaching assistantships and fellowships are available. Only those students whose applications are 

received by December 1st will be considered for funding. In addition to the application for admission, students must 

complete the application for departmental funding found on the department's website (see below). 

Contact Information 

A brochure describing the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice and its programs is available upon request. 

Inquiries should be directed to: 

Graduate Program Coordinator 

2220 LeFrak Hall 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4699 

Fax: (301 ) 405-4733 

crimgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.ccjs.umd.edu 
Courses: 



Dance (DANC) 

Abstract 

The School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in Dance, focusing on 
developing highly skilled teaching artists with concentrations in either performance or choreography. It is designed to give 
outstanding students advanced training, experience in teaching, and opportunities for creative growth. The School also 
offers MA, MFA, and PhD degrees in theatre. For more information visit the School website at www.tdps.umd.edu. 
Aimed primarily at modern or contemporary dancers with a high skill level and background in creating and performing at a 
professional level, the MFA Dance program integrates studio, theory, and pedagogical practices, culminating in the third 
year in both a shared concert of original work(s) and an off-campus internship in a professional agency, company, or school. 
The competencies that students learn during the program will allow them to teach a broad range of dance and dance-related 
subjects after they graduate. They should be able to produce and present dance in a number of contexts and modalities 
both on the campus and in the community. 

The program provides many performance opportunities, some of which are directed by faculty members, visiting artists and 
students in the choreographic emphasis. Important emphasis will be given to dance theory and practices in western and 
world dance and the study of current concerns. We wish our graduates to exhibit a high degree of insight into the cultural 
contexts in which dance has developed in the past and continues to develop today. 

Students in both the performance and choreography emphases will be expected to spend a significant amount of time 
learning about technical aspects of dance as well as promotion and house management and the myriad of other 
organizational details that go into producing a dance performance. They will be actively involved in the practical application 
of this knowledge as part of their training. 

The program is highly selective (four students per year) and auditions are required. The MFA is a fulltime three-year 
program, with financial support for each student selected. 



149 



Admissions Information 

Applicants should have a strong undergraduate preparation in technique and dance composition. They should have 
completed the following undergraduate courses or their equivalent: improvisation, kinesiology, dance teaching methods, 
dance production, Laban Movement Analysis, and two semesters of dance history or one semester of history and one of 
dance philosophy, ethnology or aesthetics. Undergraduate deficiencies will be considered on an individual basis. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . No entrance exams required (GRE or similar) 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation addressed (can be submitted online) 

3. Audition/Interview 

4. Writing Sample (submitted online with application) 

5. DVD to be mailed to department 

6. NOTE: Audition Date for Fall 201 2 Admission is February 25, 201 2 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) 

Students enrolled in the program must complete a total of 60 credit hours of study with a minimum cumulative grade point 

average of 3.0 to graduate and will be assessed on a regular basis to determine their progress. Graduation from the 

program requires the successful completion of a final project demonstrating a synthesis of craft and artistic understanding as 

well as professional competence in the area of concentration. Final projects consist of: (1) the thesis project consisting of the 

public presentation of a body of dance works choreographed by the candidate, along with written documentation of the 

project as agreed upon with the thesis adviser; (2) the presentation of an online portfolio of selected indicators of artistry and 

pedagogy. The thesis project work may be presented in one or more publicly attended events, in a shared capacity with 

another MFA candidate. Candidates are responsible for the organization of all production elements involved in the 

presentation of the project. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The location of campus, eight miles away from Washington D.C., places the School a half hour away from America's second 

city of dance where one may study and enjoy a wide variety of offerings of ballet, modern and ethnic dance. Washington 

D.C. is also a center for policy and participation in the public discourse about the arts. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of teaching assistantships that include partial or full tuition remission are available. All qualified applicants may be 

nominated for Graduate School fellowships; the deadline for all applications is posted on the TPDS website annually. For 

more information, visit www.tdps.umd.edu or call 301-405-6675. 

Contact Information 

The Guidelines for the Graduate Program provide course requirements, examination procedures and descriptive materials 

for the M.F.A. program. For specific information, contact: 

Karen K. Bradley, Director of Graduate Studies 

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742-1615 

Telephone: (301) 405-0387 

Fax:(301)314-9599 

kbradley@umd.edu 

www.tdps.umd.edu 

Ms. Stephanie Bergwall, graduate secretary 

School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies 2809 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20742-1615 

Telephone: 301-405-6675 

Fax:301-314-9599 

tdps@umd.edu 

www.tdps.umd.edu 



150 



Courses: DANC 



Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) Program (VMED) 

Abstract 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine offers a four-year full-time program (curriculum) leading to 
the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree. The first three years are taught at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, 
VA in a case-based and traditional lecture/laboratory format. At the end of the first year, students choose a track - small 
animal, food animal, equine, mixed species and public/corporate veterinary medicine. Considerable flexibility exists for a 
student to tailor their curriculum to meet individual needs and interests. The senior year (clinical) is 12 months in length. For 
detailed information on the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, please visit the Virginia-Maryland Regional 
College of Veterinary Medicine at: http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/ 
Admissions Information 

For information on applying to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, please visit the Virginia-Maryland Regional 
College of Veterinary Medicine website at: http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/acad/dvm/index.asp 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

Please visit the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine website at: 

http://www.vetmed.vt.edU/acad/dvm/req.asp#adm 

Degree Requirements 



Please visit the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine website at: 
http://www.vetmed.vt.edU/acad/dvm/req.asp#adm 
Financial Assistance 
Contact Information 

Joyce Bohr Massie DVM Program Admissions Coordinator 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine DVM Admissions Office (0442) Blacksburg, VA 24061 

VA 24061 

Telephone: (540) 231-4699 

Fax:(540)231-9290 

dvmadmit@vt.edu 

http://www.vetmed.vt.edU/acad/dvm/req.asp#adm 
Courses: 



Economics (ECON) 

Abstract 

The Economics Program offers graduate study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. During the course of study 
toward the Ph.D., doctoral students also have the opportunity to obtain a Master of Arts degree. Areas of specialization 
include: advanced macroeconomics, advanced microeconomic theory, comparative institutional economics, econometrics, 
economic development, economic history, environmental and natural resource economics, industrial organization, 
international finance, international trade, labor economics, political economy, and public economics. 
Admissions Information 

By the application deadline, applicants should have completed advanced undergraduate courses in microeconomics, 
macroeconomics, and econometrics. Applicants are also expected to have completed the equivalent of three semesters of 
calculus, a semester of linear algebra, and a semester of differential equations. The majority of admitted students have also 
completed course work in real analysis or other upper-level mathematics. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
Aptitude test is required. Submitted GRE scores must be valid through January 15, 2012. All of the Department's graduate 
students are full-time students. 



151 



Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

GRE General; TOEFL where applicable; Official Transcripts; 3 Letters of Recommendation; Statement of Goals, Research 
and Experiences; Domestic Applicants-Fall Grades; Resume or Curriculum Vitae; 
Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The graduate program in the Department of Economics is designed for Ph.D. students. We do not offer a terminal Master's 
program and we will not accept or enroll students for the single purpose of acquiring a Master's degree. Doctoral students 
may obtain a Master of Arts Degree during their course of doctoral study, requirements of which (30 hours of coursework, 
including an econometrics sequence, written examinations in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, and a research 
paper) are met automatically in the course of the Ph.D. program in economics. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Department of Economics at the University of Maryland prepares graduate students for careers in teaching, research, 
and government service. The course of study provides a solid foundation in economic theory, econometrics and applied 
fields. The Ph.D. program requires: (1) written examinations in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, taken during the 
summer after the first year of study, (2) completion of a three-course sequence and a written examination or field paper in a 
major field, (3) completion of a two-course sequence in a minor field, (3) completion of an econometrics sequence, (4) an 
additional supporting course in a theoretical or applied field, and (5) a dissertation. In the third year, students begin directed 
research by participating in workshops appropriate to their dissertation research. 
Financial Assistance 

Many students entering our graduate program receive financial aid. Some students receive graduate assistantships, 
requiring about 15 hours of teaching or research service per week. Graduate assistantships provide a stipend and a very 
attractive package of fringe benefits that include medical insurance and full tuition remission. Other students receive first- 
year fellowships. These fellowships also include a stipend, medical insurance and tuition remission, but do not require 
students to work as a teaching or research assistant. In most cases, fellowships convert to assistantships beginning in the 
second year. Students who enter our program with financial aid are guaranteed financial aid for two years in all cases, and 
for four years conditional on satisfactory progress in the program. While not guaranteed, a fifth year of financial aid is usually 
available for students making satisfactory progress. 
Contact Information 

For more information on our program, please go to our website at http://www.econ.umd.edu/graduate/overview 
Director of Graduate Studies in Economics 
3127DTydingsHall 
MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3544 
Fax: (301 ) 405-3542 
econgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.econ.umd.edu/graduate/overview 

Courses: ECON ECON ECON ECON ECON ECON 

Related Programs and Campus Units 



Education: Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) 

Abstract 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the following degrees and certificates: Master of Arts (thesis and non- 
thesis), Master of Education, Advanced Graduate Specialist, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. The 
Department offers a variety of programs individually designed to meet graduate students' personal and professional goals 
which may include educational research, teaching, supervising, providing leadership as curriculum specialists within the 
disciplines, teacher education or consulting at all levels of instruction: elementary, secondary and higher education. Full-time 
study is preferred for those pursuing the Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction. 

Areas of concentration include art education (M.Ed, only), elementary education (see teacher education/professional 
development), history/social studies education, English education, Second Language Education (SLEC) - foreign language 



152 



education and teaching English as a second language (TESOL), mathematics education, minority and urban education, 

music education (doctoral only), teacher education/professional development (doctoral only), reading education, and science 

education. The Department also supports three master's degree programs for candidates who have a bachelor's degree in 

fields other than education and wish to become certified teachers. In addition, there is a six-course Post- Baccalaureate 

Certificate in literacy coaching designed to prepare experienced, highly qualified middle and high school teachers to serve 

as literacy coaches in low performing middle and high schools. 

NOTE: Admission to the Ed.D. program has been temporarily suspended. At the doctoral level, we are currently 

admitting to the Ph.D. program only. All things being equal, preference will be given to full-time applicants who 

apply by November 15, 2011. 

Admissions Information 

Applicants must have a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average. Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) 

are required of applicants to all EDCI doctoral and MA programs but are not required for M.Ed, programs. Certification -track 

programs may require passing Praxis scores-visit program website for details. Also required are letters of recommendation 

from three persons competent to judge the applicant's probable success in graduate school, transcripts from all previously 

attended institutions and statement of goals, interests and experiences. Doctoral applicants may also be required to submit 

a professional writing sample. 

Graduate programs leading to initial teacher certification require some parts of the Praxis exam. 

Please see the EDCI website for more specific information about admission requirements. 

Admission to an A.G.S. or doctoral program requires a 3.5 grade point average in previous graduate study as well as a 3.0 

undergraduate grade point average and at least a 40th percentile on the Graduate Record Examination. 

EDCI has limited doctoral admissions; therefore, candidates are encouraged to apply by the High Priority Deadline 

of November 15th for best consideration. Spaces may be filled prior to Final Deadline, please note the decisions 

may take several months. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: November 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Preferred: November 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . GRE General (Required for the AGS, Ph.D. and MA programs. GRE is NOT required for M.Ed, programs in EDCI. Please check the EDCI 
website for specific requirement) 

2. Official transcript from all previously attended institutions 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation from persons competent to judge the applicant's probable success in graduate school 

4. Statement of Goals, Experiences, and Research Interests 

Degree Requirements 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate (A.G.S. Certificate) 

Please contact the program for more information. 

Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Education (Ph.D. or Ed.D.) 

The doctorate requires a planned sequence of approximately 60 credit hours beyond the master's degree. Doctoral students 

are required to take a comprehensive examination prior to approval of their doctoral dissertation committee. An oral 

examination in defense of the dissertation is required. 

NOTE: Admission to the Ed.D. program has been temporarily suspended. At the doctoral level, we are currently 

admitting to the Ph.D. program only. All things being equal, preference will be given to full-time applicants who 

apply by November 15, 2011. 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Literacy Coaching (PBC) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Literacy Coaching is a six week program designed to prepare experienced, 

highly qualified middle and high school teachers to serve as literacy coaches in low performing middle and high 

schools. It is a joint program between the University of Maryland (UM)/Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPS City 

Schools)/Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS)/Prince George's County Public Schools (PGCPS) serving 

cohorts of selected middle and high school teachers. Website: http://www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/info/litcoach/ 

Master of Arts or Master of Education (M.A. or M.Ed.) 

Master's degree requirements vary according to the area of concentration and the type of degree. Typically, 

programs require 30 to 33 credit hours, which includes a core research requirement; a three to six-hour 

comprehensive examination or professional portfolio (requirement varies by specialization) and a seminar paper. 

Certification-track M.Ed, programs typically require 42 credit hours. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Facilities that support graduate study include the Center for Mathematics Education, the Reading Center, and the 

Science Teaching Center. Additional facilities in the College of Education include the Educational Technology 

Services Center, Teacher Education Centers in local schools, and the Center for Young Children. 

153 



Financial Assistance 

Teaching assistantships and a smaller number of research assistantships are available for outstanding doctoral 

candidates who are enrolled full-time. For best consideration apply early. 

Once a completed admissions application is received by the department for review, applicants should expect to 

receive an email confirmation as well as a copy of the assistantship application. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site at: www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/ 

Joy Jones, Coordinator for EDCI Graduate Admissions and Student Services 

Room 2311 Benjamin Building 

MD 20742-1175 

Telephone: (301) 405-3118 

Fax:(301)314-9055 

edcigrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 
Courses: 



Education: Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation (EDMS) 

Abstract 

Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
for students with strong interests in research methods and their applications. Students pursuing Doctoral degrees in other 
departments may enroll in a dual degree program leading to the Master's degree in Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation, 
or there is also a 24-credit certificate program for doctoral students. For select undergraduates, there is a five-year 
Bachelor's/Master's program in Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation. In addition, a 15-credit Post-Baccalaureate 
Certificate in Assessment and Evaluation is available for students with strong interests in classroom assessment and 
evaluation. 

Admissions Information 

In addition to Graduate School requirements, admission decisions are based on the quality of previous undergraduate and 
graduate work, strength of letters of recommendation from persons competent to judge the applicant's likelihood of success 
in graduate school, scores on the Graduate Record Examination, and the applicant's statement of academic and career 
objectives in relation to the program of study to be pursued. Students who seek admission should display strong evidence of 
aptitude and interest in quantitative methods. Programs of study may be designed to meet the individual needs of both full- 
time and part-time students since many courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 15 
Preferred: November 15 


Deadline: October 1 
Preferred: September 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: November 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General Test 

2. Three Letters of Recommendation 

3. Statement of Goals and Research Interests 

4. Previous College Transcripts 

Degree Requirements 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Assessment and Evaluation () 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Assessment and Evaluation is designed for students with strong interests in 

classroom assessment and evaluation. The certificate requires a minimum of 15 graduate credit hours. 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation M.A. degree program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. Both thesis and 

non-thesis options are available. A written comprehensive examination is required for both options and a research paper is 

required for the non-thesis option. No M.Ed, degree option is currently offered. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program requires both preliminary and comprehensive examinations; the comprehensive examination is designed 

to assess broad, integrated understanding as well as the student's specialization. A minimum of 30 credit hours, including 

dissertation credit, must be taken following admission. All students are expected to engage in research. Measurement, 

Statistics and Evaluation does not currently offer the Ed.D. degree. 



154 



Certificate in Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation () 

The Certificate in Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation is designed to provide advanced training in quantitative methods 

for graduate students majoring in other doctoral programs. The certificate requires a minimum of 24 graduate credit hours. In 

addition, an advisor must be selected from members of the Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation faculty. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains computer equipment with up-to-date statistical software packages. The faculty are actively 

engaged in a large variety of basic and applied research projects and students are encouraged to become involved in these 

activities. The Washington and Baltimore areas have numerous organizations that provide opportunities to become involved 

in projects that have national importance. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships are available. The Department can usually aid 

students in locating part-time employment opportunities, both on and off campus, as well as providing funding from its own 

contracts and grants. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDMS/ 

Eileen Kramer, Graduate Coordinator 

1230 Benjamin Building University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8432 

Fax:(301)314-9245 

EDMS 

www.education.umd.edu/EDMS/ 
Courses: EDMS 



Education: Policy Studies (EDPS) 

Abstract 

The Department of Education Policy Studies (EDPS) in the College of Education promotes critical and discipline-based 
studies of education policies and practices; encourages thoughtful and responsive explorations of education and related 
social issues; and fosters innovative and collaborative efforts to inform education policy at all levels of government. 

Graduates pursue professional roles in university teaching and research, fill policy and leadership positions in public and 
private educational institutions, and work as specialists and advocates in governmental and non -governmental agencies. 

The Department offers graduate programs of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. Although EDPS is primarily a graduate 
program, it also offers a series of undergraduate courses that fulfill specific University and College requirements. Examples 
include: EDPL 201 , Education in Contemporary Society, an elective course approved to meet the campus diversity 
requirement; EDPL 210, Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education, a course that meets the university general 
core requirement in the social sciences; and EDPL 301, Social Foundations of Education, a required course for education 
majors. 

Our three areas of specialization (Curriculum Theory and Development, Socio-cultural Foundations of Education, and 
Education Policy) offer graduate students an intellectually engaging array of courses to develop programs tailored to their 
interests and faculty expertise. When completing applications for admission to graduate study, you must indicate the specific 
program area to which you are seeking admission. In addition we will be adding a specialization of Organizational 
Leadership and Policy Studies (OLPS). Please check the department website for more updated information. 

1 . Curriculum Theory and Development provides grounding in a broad range of theoretical perspectives that guide the work of curriculum 
deliberation, policymaking, and practice in schools, colleges, and other organizations. 

2. Socio-cultural Foundations of Education provides an opportunity to develop a multidisciplinary program that examines education issues 
from the perspectives of economics, history, philosophy, political science, cultural studies, anthropology, and sociology. 

3. Education Policy provides an opportunity to examine the processes of policymaking, implementation, and evaluation, from multiple 
perspectives, particularly as they are related to enduring social and education issues. 

The faculty in the Department of Education Policy Studies bring the disciplines of economics, political science, history, philosophy, sociology, 
cultural studies, and curriculum theory to the study of education. They are committed to the preparation of professionals who are able to 
apply a range of theories and disciplinary perspectives to the enterprise of education in governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

Admissions Information 

To be recommended for full admission to a doctoral or master's program, a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 
3.0 is required. A minimum graduate grade point average of 3.5 is required for doctoral programs. Of the three scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantitative, analytic), at least one should be at the 70th percentile or higher for PhD 
applicants (50th percentile or higher for master's applicants) and none should be under the 50th percentile for PhD 
applicants. If the Miller Analogies Test is used, the score should be at least at the 70th percentile for PhD applicants (50th 
percentile for master's applicants). Students who do not meet one of these requirements, but show other evidence of 

155 



outstanding potential, may be considered for provisional admission. Admission of qualified applicants is based on their 
competitive ranking to limit enrollments to available faculty resources. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: November 15 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: November 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

• 3 Letters of Recommendation 

• Official transcripts from each college or university previously attended 

• Statement of Goals, Research Interests and Experiences 

• Scholarly writing sample for all doctoral applicants 

• GRE or Miller Analogy Test 

It is strongly recommended that prospective students talk with program coordinators and faculty, and visit the Department and classes, to 
help determine if the Department's programs are appropriate to their academic interests and professional goals 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. degree requires 90 credits beyond a Bachelor's level degree, some of which may be satisfied by prior study. In 
addition to major and elective courses, this includes 12 to 18 credits in research methods and 12 credits of dissertation 
research. After students have completed most of their course work, the equivalent of 12 hours of comprehensive 
examination is required. The comprehensive exam may take a variety of forms, such as take-home conceptual essays, 
literature reviews, or research papers. Your faculty advisor will help you develop a program of study that will help you fulfill 
your degree requirements, both coursework and examinations, that are consistent with University guidelines. The Doctoral 
program integrates theory, research, and practice, and students are expected to demonstrate high standards of scholarship 
and the ability to engage in independent research. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The Department offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree at the Master's level. The M.A. degree requires 30 credits beyond a 
Bachelor's level degree. Beyond the successful completion of coursework, students must also complete six hours of 
comprehensive examination and a seminar paper or thesis. In addition, the Department currently offers a Master of Arts 
degree in conjunction with the faculty in Jewish Studies. Students interested in this cross-departmental option should 
discuss it with your faculty advisor. All degree programs have expectations that the student demonstrate high standards of 
scholarship and the ability to engage in independent research. Students must either write and defend a thesis, or complete 
at least one seminar paper (non-thesis option). The College of Education requires that all master's candidates take the 
research course EDMS 645. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

Faculty and students in the Department work closely with area schools, colleges, universities, associations and other 
education-related organizations. Extensive resources in the Washington, D.C., area, including embassies and other 
international organizations, provide exceptional opportunities for internships and field experiences, research, and materials 
to enhance formal course experiences. Associated with the Department are the Center for Education Policy and Leadership 
(CEPAL) and the International Center for Transcultural Education. 
Financial Assistance 

The Department has a very limited number of merit-based fellowships and graduate assistantships available to students. 
Fellowships are awarded to doctoral students in February only for the following fall semester. Assistantships are also 
awarded in the spring for the following fall semester, but occasionally an assistantship may become available at another 
time of year. Both fellowships and assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis. It is unrealistic to expect that all 
applicants who apply for financial aid will receive such assistance even if they are recommended for admission to the 
Graduate School. It is to the student's advantage to submit a complete application package well before the published 
application deadline if they intend to be considered for a fellowship, assistantship, or other form of financial aid. It is a 
requirement that a student be admitted as a condition of eligibility. International students' applications are not considered 
complete and may not be reviewed by the Department until they have received International Education Services (IES) 
clearance which can take additional time. If you need information about IES clearance visit the IES website at 
www.umd.edu/ies. 
Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDPS/ 

Department of Education Policy Studies 

Room 2110 Benjamin Building, University of Maryland, 

College Park 

156 



MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-3570 

Fax:301-405-3573 

www.education.umd.edu/EDPS 

Courses: 



Education: Policy and Leadership (EDPL) 

Education Policy and Leadership (EDPL) 
Abstract 

As of July 1 , 2007, the department of Education Policy and Leadership (EDPL) was reorganized into Education Leadership, 
Higher Education and International Education (EDHI) and Education Policy Studies (EDPS), as described below. The 
purpose of this reorganization was to provide greater focus and opportunity for each of the two units to fulfill their missions. 

During the transition period, while some areas of the two new department sites are still under construction, the archived 
content of EDPL will remain posted at the EDPL web site location (www.education.umd.edu/EDPL). Once the transition is 
complete, all relevant information should be available at the two new sites: 

Education Leadership, Higher Education and International Education (EDHI) will include the following areas of 
specialization: 

• Higher Education 

• International Education Policy 

• Organizational Leadership and Policy Studies 

Education Policy Studies (EDPS) will include the following areas of specialization: 

• Curriculum Theory and Development 

• Socio-cultural Foundations of Education 

• Education Policy 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 



Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Education: Certificate of Advanced Study: Measurement, Statistics, and 
Evaluation (Z904) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 



157 



Degree Requirements 

Financial Assistance 

Contact Information 

Dr. Gregory R. Hancock, EDMS Department Chair 

EDMS, Benjamin Building, Room 1 230D University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742-1 1 1 5 

MD 20742-1115 

Telephone: 301 .405.3621 

Fax: 301 .31 4.9245 

ghancock@umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/EDMS/program/EDMScertificate.htm 
Courses: 

Education: Certificate of Advanced Study: Special Education (Z905) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Education: Counseling and Personnel Services (EDCP) 

Abstract 

The Department of Counseling and Personnel Services offers graduate programs that are designed to provide the 
knowledge and skills needed for practice and scholarship in counseling and related human service professions. These fields 
are concerned with assisting people individually, in groups and in organizations to attain their optimal level of personal, 
social, educational and career functioning. Graduates are employed in a variety of settings including schools, colleges and 
universities, mental health agencies, rehabilitation agencies, correctional facilities, business and industry, government 
agencies, other community service facilities and private practices. These professionals may serve any of several roles either 
at the practitioner's level or at an advanced level as researchers, educators, supervisors, psychologists, counselors, or 
program administrators. 

Master's level professional entry-level programs are offered in four areas of specialization: 1) The School Counseling 
program prepares students to become school counselors in elementary, middle and high school settings. School counselors 
provide individual and group counseling to school-aged children, coordinate pupil services in schools and function as 
consultants to classroom teachers, school administrators and parents. 2) The Specialist-level School Psychology program is 
a combined Masters/Advanced Graduate Specialist program that leads to State (MSDE) and National (NCSP) certification 
as a school psychologist. The Program stresses the application of psychological knowledge from a variety of theoretical 
orientations to address school-related issues and problems. (The Specialist-level School Psychology Program is NOT 
accepting applications for Fall 2010.) 3) The College Student Personnel program prepares specialists for service in higher 
education settings as counselors and as administrators of student affairs services. 4) The Rehabilitation Counseling program 
prepares counselors to work with persons who have mental, emotional, or physical disabilities. 

The Ph.D. degree in Counseling and Personnel Services is offered in four areas of specialization: 1) Counseling Psychology 
(in collaboration with the Psychology Department), 2) School Psychology, 3) College Student Personnel Administration, and 
4) Counselor Education. Doctoral studies prepare students to achieve exceptional competence in the theory and practice of 
their field; to develop a high level of skills as researchers, educators and administrators; and to assume positions of 
leadership in various relevant settings. Students in the specialization of Counseling Psychology are prepared to work as 
educators, psychologists, and supervisors in such settings as academic departments, college and university counseling 
centers, and community mental health agencies. Doctoral -level school psychologists serve as advanced level practitioners, 

158 



supervisors, administrators, researchers and school psychology faculty. Students in College Student Personnel 

Administration are prepared to assume leadership positions as administrators of college or university student personnel 

services or as faculty and researchers of college student personnel work. Doctoral students in Counselor Education are 

prepared to assume roles as educators, supervisors, or researchers in school counselor or rehabilitation counselor 

education programs. Program accreditation within CAPS include: The School Psychology and Counseling Psychology 

doctoral programs, which are accredited by the American Psychological Association. The Rehabilitation Counseling Masters 

(M.A. or M.Ed.) Program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education. The Masters (M.A. or M. Ed.) Program in 

School Counseling and the Ph.D. Program in Counselor Education are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of 

Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Both the Specialist Program in School Psychology and the 

Master's (M.A. or M.Ed.) Program in School Counseling are approved for certification by the Maryland State Department of 

Education and are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. The Specialist School 

Psychology Program is approved also by NASP. 

Admissions Information 

Applicants for regular admission to master's degree programs must have an undergraduate GPA of at least B (3.0 on a 4.0 

scale) and must submit their scores on either the Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination (required for 

School Psychology M.A./A.G.S. program). Applicants should check with their area of concentration to determine which test 

is required. 

Applicants for M.A. and M.Ed, programs in Rehabilitation Counseling is not accepting admission application for the fall 2012- 

2013. 

Applicants' undergraduate programs must include at least 15 semester hours of coursework in behavioral science fields 

(anthropology, education, psychology, sociology and/or statistics). 

Applicants for admission to A.G.S. and Ph.D. programs in Counselor Education and College Student Personnel must have a 

master's degree in school counseling or rehabilitation counseling or in college student personnel, respectively. A grade point 

average of 3.5 in prior graduate work is required with an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination. Selective 

screening of qualified applicants is necessary in order to limit enrollment. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . GRE required for College Student Personnel, School Psychology, Counseling Psychology, School Counseling, and Counselor Education. 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Statement of Goals 

Degree Requirements 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate (A.G.S. Certificate) 

The A.G.S. certificate is offered in some of the Department's areas of specialization. For individuals who hold a master's 

degree in counseling or a closely related field, this certificate program may serve: 1) to provide the additional education 

required for professional certification or licensure in those specialty areas that require a program of two year's length, and/or 

2) to provide the academic background for an advanced level of professional practice within a specialty area. 

Master of Arts or Master of Education (M.A. or M.Ed.) 

Professional entry-level programs of two types are offered, depending on the area of specialization: 1 ) a master's degree 

program (M.A., thesis required; M.A. non-thesis with Master's paper required; or M.Ed., thesis not required), or 2) an 

integrated Master's/Advanced Graduate Specialist (M.A./A.G.S.) program. The applicant should contact the Department for 

further information concerning the entry-level requirements and curriculum of each area of specialization. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Ph.D. students are expected to attain advanced skills as both practitioners and researchers in their area of specialization. All 

doctoral students are required to take advanced courses in statistics and research design. Because of the highly specialized 

nature of each of the doctoral programs, applicants should contact the Department or consult the program web page for 

program of interest. The brochure describes specific course and fieldwork requirements, the nature of the examination 

required for completion of the program, and the dissertation requirements. This same information can also be found at each 

program's website (see below). 

Facilities and Special Resources 

All master's, A.G.S., and doctoral students are required to include supervised fieldwork experiences in their degree 

programs. The Department has excellent cooperative relationships with the Division of Student Affairs (including such offices 

as the Career Development, Counseling Center, Campus Activities, the Student Union, Resident Life and Commuter 

Affairs), with units in Academic Affairs (such as Advising, Admissions, and Orientation) and with units in University College. 

Fieldwork may also be done at a wide variety of school systems, colleges and universities, counseling services and mental 

health agencies in the Baltimore/Washington metropolitan area, or nationally. 

159 



In addition to campus and Department resources, students also utilize the many major research and professional institutions 

that are easily accessible to the campus. These include the Library of Congress, the National Library of Medicine, the 

National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Education Sciences, professional associations such as the American Counseling 

Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Association of School Psychologists. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department, and its faculty, offers graduate research, teaching and administrative assistantships on a selective basis to 

both masters and doctoral students. The Department also assists its students in finding assistantship placements with a 

variety of on-campus and off-campus units, in addition, a small number of new Ph.D. students are offered highly selective 

fellowships funded jointly by the Department and the University. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDCP/ 

Counseling and Personnel Services Dept. 

3214 Benjamin Building Counseling & Personnel Services 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2858 

Fax:(301)405-9995 

caps@umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/EDCP/ 

Courses: EDCP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Psychology 

Psychology 

Student Affairs 

Counseling Center 

Education: Human Development 

Human Development (Institute for Child Study) 

Education: Human Development (EDHD) 

Abstract 

The purposes of the Human Development graduate programs are to contribute to basic knowledge about human 
development and learning and apply this knowledge in various settings. The general areas of human development covered 
in courses and research include infant and early childhood development, child development, adolescent development, 
developmental science, and educational psychology. Specific faculty areas of expertise include achievement motivation, 
cognitive development, language development, peer relationships, teacher-student relationships, moral development, social 
development, temperament, parenting, developmental neuroscience, civic education, prejudice and discrimination, early 
childhood policy, and the role of culture on development. 

Graduate programs in Human Development lead to the Master of Education, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. The research-oriented M. A. (with thesis)and the Ph.D. degree programs in human development are designed to 
develop studentsscientific knowledge of human development and ability to carry out original research projects. The M.Ed, 
and M.A. without thesis programs are designed to develop competencies in identifying implications of the scientific 
knowledge of human development for specific situations and contexts, particularly elementary and secondary schools. 
Human Development offers two specialization areas of study at the doctoral level, Educational Psychology, and 
Developmental Sciences. The graduate programs and specializations prepare graduates for faculty positions at universities 
or research positions at institutions where research in developmental science and educational psychology is conducted. 
Graduates of our program have obtained positions as university professors, research scientists, program analysts, and other 
research-oriented occupations including research-oriented professionals in private, policy, or advocacy organizations. 
Admissions Information 

The College of Education and Graduate School require a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) at the undergraduate level. 
At the master's level, a minimum GPA of 3.5 is required by the College of Education. The general Graduate Record Exam 
(GRE) is required by the Department. Three letters of recommendation including evidence of academic potential from 
university faculty references are required. In addition, students must write a statement of purpose which indicates a match 
between student research interests and faculty expertise. Students should indicate their research interests, describe any 
relevant research experience, and how their experience and interests can be met by our program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 15 
Preferred: December 15 


Deadline: October 1 



160 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: November 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Statement of Goals 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. program requires 30 credit hours and offers both a thesis option (24 hours of courses plus 6 hours of thesis) and a 

non-thesis option (24 hours of courses plus 6 hours of supervised placement in an organization and accompanying 

papers). Courses in biological, social, cognitive, and personality development and in quantitative methods and a written 

comprehensive examination are required for all master's degrees. 

Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education degree in Human Development has the following requirements: Minimum of 30 semesters of 

coursework, including EDMS 645. A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600-800, with the remainder in the 400 

series or above. Required courses focus on biological, social, cognitive, and personality development and in quantitative 

methods. A written comprehensive examination and seminar paper are required to be taken at the end of the coursework. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D. ) 

The Ph.D. degree requires 72 hours of credit which includes 12 dissertation credits. Courses in biological, social, and 

cognitive development and in intermediate statistics and research methods are required. Students also receive credit for 

research experiences. Slight modifications of these requirements characterize the Specializations in Educational Psychology 

and Developmental Sciences. Students are also required to complete a comprehensive examination portfolio prior to 

advancement to candidacy. 

Master of Education in Partnership with MCPS (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education in Partnership with MCPS is restricted to middle and high school educators who teach in 

Montgomery County Public Schools. Applicants must be certified to teach. This is not a certification program. This Human 

Development Master of Education Program is unique in that its curriculum is designed to respond to developmental and 

motivational challenges faced by secondary teachers working with adolescents. The program uses a cohort model. Each fall 

a new cohort of students begins the program and the program runs for five continuous semesters. To graduate students 

must successfully complete 30 credits of study, a comprehensive exam, and a seminar paper. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington, D.C. area and the University of Maryland are rich in resources for graduate study in human development. 

The faculty of the Department is multi-disciplinary, representing the broad range of developmental sciences, educational 

psychology, and related fields. There are programs of funded research, field service programs, and internship experiences 

available in cooperation with agencies and schools. The Department sponsors the Center for the Study of Children, 

Relationships, and Culture, the Maryland Literacy Research Center, and manages the on-campus Center for Young 

Children. Students in the College of Education have access to the latest technology through Educational Technology 

Services. 

Financial Assistance 

Students requesting consideration for Financial Aid, in addition to completing the financial aid form found in the Graduate 

Admissions application, must submit their application by the priority deadline. All students who submit their application by 

December 15 will automatically be reviewed for any departmental aid. University fellowships, NIH traineeships, and 

Departmental assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis - more students are admitted than can be awarded 

funding. In recent years, only students with undergraduate GPA's of 3.6, GRE scores above the 70th percentile, and strong 

letters of recommendation from academic references have been successful in obtaining Recruitment Fellowships sponsored 

by the Graduate School and graduate assistantships in the Department. 

First priority for Departmental assistantships goes to students already admitted to the Department who have been assured 

financial assistance for the full course of their study. Almost all awards of fellowships and assistantships are based on 

previous academic performance, with little attention to need. In addition, some faculty have external grants which provide 

support for graduate students. Students who do not receive a fellowship or assistantship from the Department may contact 

the University Financial Aid office at 301 -31 4-9000 for information about other sources of financial support. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDHD/ 

Graduate Coordinator 

Department of Human Development 3304 Benjamin Building 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8432 

Fax:(301)405-2891 

humande v @ umd.edu 



161 



http://www.education.umd.edu/EDHD 

Courses: EDHD EDUC 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Maryland Literacy Research Center 

Center for Children, Relationships, and Culture 

Young Children, Center for 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Education: Counseling and Personnel Services 

Education: Special Education (EDSP) 

Abstract 

Graduate programs in special education are designed to prepare highly qualified teachers, to provide graduate level content, 
and to prepare researchers, teacher educators, and leaders in the field of special education. We offer the following graduate 
program options: 

* M.Ed, in Special Education with generic age based certification 

* M.Ed, in Special Education with generic age based and severe disabilities certification 

* M.Ed, in Special Education with severe disabilities certification only 

* M.Ed, in Specialty Program (30 credits) 

* M.A. in Special Education (36 credits) 

* Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate (30 credits beyond the master's degree) 

* Ph.D. program 
Admissions Information 

For the M.Ed, programs, students must submit scores on the PRAXIS I test (meeting the state of Maryland passing scores) 
prior to admission into the department and have an undergraduate 3.0 GPA. The Masters of Arts program requires a 3.0 
undergraduate GPA and the submission of the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination test scores at or 
above the 40th percentile rank. The AGS program requires a 3.0 undergraduate GPA, a master's GPA of 3.5, and 
submission of scores on the MAT, GRE, or Praxis 1 test. Admission to the doctoral program requires a 3.5 grade point 
average in previous graduate studies, a 3.0 undergraduate GPA, and at least a 50 percentile on the Graduate Record 
Examination. Students pursuing teacher certification in special education are required to take courses required by the 
Maryland State Department of Education which lead to certification in the State of Maryland. Programs for the Master's 
specialty program, the AGS, and the Ph.D. are planned individually by the students and advisor to reflect each student's 
background and goals. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 1 


Deadline: September 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . GRE for Ph.D., Miller Analogies or GRE General for M.A., Praxis I for M.Ed, or A.G.S. (at State of Maryland cut scores) 2. 

Three Letters of Recommendation 3. Statement of Goals 4. Transcripts from all previously attended colleges and 

universities 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) (Ph.D. ) 

The Ph.D. in special education is targeted primarily toward research and educational leadership. The selection of a major 

concentration in learning disabilities, behavior disorders, severe disabilities, early childhood special education, 

secondary/transition special education, and policy studies for individuals with disabilities achieves these goals. A variety of 

minor specializations taken outside the Department is also possible. Content course work in the areas of administration and 

policy studies is developed in collaboration with other departments in the college and university. 

Students pursuing the doctoral program in special education must have completed the Master of Arts degree or the Master 

of Education degree in special education or a related area. A student in the doctoral program will generally complete a 

minimum of 90 hours of graduate study (including up to 30 credits from a student's master's program) of which 30 to 40 

hours will be in the major field. Candidates must meet doctoral competencies in research, teaching, and professional 

practice and in an area of concentration listed above that fulfill their professional goals. A one year residency requirement is 

necessary for graduation. Students should consult the Department website on Graduate Programs for more information. 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate (A.G.S.) 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist certificate in special education is available to students who wish to take graduate 

162 



courses beyond the master's degree. The minimum number of graduate hours is 60 (of which no more than 30 credits can 

be applied from another institution). The core of the program consists of special education courses in addition to other 

coursework within the university as approved by the student's adviser and the special education graduate faculty. The 

College of Education awards the certificate. 

Masters of Education or Masters of Arts (M.Ed, or M.A.) (M.Ed, or M.A.) 

Students enrolled in the master's program in special education may earn the Master of Arts degree or the Master of 

Education degree. For students who do not wish to obtain teacher certification, basic course requirements are similar for 

either program except for M.A. thesis requirements (6 credits of EDSP 799). The student determines with his or her adviser 

the specific program and coursework required according to the student's background and career plans. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Special Education program provides an unparalleled setting for graduate study. The program's proximity to outstanding 

public schools in Maryland provides students who wish to pursue teacher certification the chance to gain experience with a 

culturally and linguistically diverse student population in urban, suburban, and rural settings. 

Additionally,, students pursuing a doctoral degree can have experiences in advocacy and professional organizations, 

government agencies, including the US Department of Education in addition to the coursework they take at the University. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of fellowships, assistantships and/or grants are available to qualified applicants. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDSP/ 

Dr. Joan Lieber 

1308 Benjamin Building 

Department of Special Education University of Maryland College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-6467 

edspgrad @ deans.umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/EDSP/ 
Courses: EDSP 



Engineering: Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 

Abstract 

The Aerospace Engineering Department offers a broad program in graduate studies leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science (thesis and non-thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate students can choose from the following areas of 
specialization: aerodynamics and propulsion; structural mechanics and composites; rotorcraft; space systems; and flight 
dynamics, stability and control. Within these disciplines, the student can tailor programs in areas such as computational fluid 
dynamics, aeroelasticity, hypersonics, composites, smart structures, finite elements, space propulsion, robotics, and human 
factors. 

Admissions Information 

Applicants should have a B.S. degree in Aerospace Engineering (or in a closely related field) with a minimum GPA of 3.2/4.0 
from an accredited institution. Applicants with a marginal academic record may be conditionally approved for admission to 
the M.S. program if other evidence of accomplishment is provided (i.e. publications or exceptional letters of 
recommendation). Admission to the Ph.D. program requires an academic record indicating promise of the high level of 
accomplishment required for the degree. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is strongly recommended for admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 15 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: October 31 
Preferred: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General highly recommended 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S. ) 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. Both options require 30 credits. At least 12 credits 
are to be in the main discipline. No more than 9 credits may be at the 400 level of which no more than 6 credits may be from 



163 



department courses. For the thesis option, 6 credits of ENAE 799 (Master's Thesis Research) are required as well as the 

successful defense of the M.S. thesis. For the non-thesis option, students must write a scholarly paper. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the department requires a minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework beyond the 

B.S. which should include: (1) not less than 18 hours within one departmental area of specialization, (2) at least 6 hours from 

among the other areas of specialization in the Department, and (3) not less than nine hours in courses that emphasize the 

physical sciences or mathematics. At least 12 semester hours of credits taken to satisfy (2) and (3) must be 600 level or 

higher. The student must pass a written qualifying and an oral comprehensive examination and take 12 hours of dissertation 

credits. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The departmental facilities for experimental research include the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel, the Composites Research 

Laboratory, the Space Systems Laboratory, and the facilities of the Center for Rotorcraft Education and Research. The 

Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel, with its 8-foot high by 1 1 -foot wide test section, has a maximum operating speed of 330 feet 

per second. It is used extensively for development testing by industry as well as for research. There are also two smaller 

subsonic tunnels and a supersonic tunnel that are used in support of departmental research programs. 

The Composites Research Laboratory is located in the newly constructed Manufacturing Center. Its facilities include a 

microprocessor-controlled autoclave, a vacuum hot press, a two-axis filament winding machine, an MTS 220 Kip uniaxial 

testing machine, an x-ray machine and an environmental conditioning chamber. The laboratory provides for a full spectrum 

of specimen and component manufacture, preparation and instrumentation, inspection, and testing. 

The Space Systems Laboratory performs world-class research on space operations, with particular emphasis on neutral 

buoyancy simulation of space robotics and human factors. The recently completed Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility is a 

multi-million dollar laboratory built around a 50-foot diameter by 25-foot deep water tank for simulating the microgravity 

environment of space. Six different telerobotic systems are currently under test in this facility, which is one of only two 

operating in the United States and the only neutral buoyancy facility in the world to be located at a university. 

The facilities of the Center for Rotorcraft Education and Research include two experimental rotor rigs to test articulated and 

bearingless rotors in hovering and in forward flight. The hover test facility can accommodate up to a 6-foot diameter rotor. In 

addition, the facilities include a 10-foot diameter vacuum chamber to study the structural dynamic characteristics of spinning 

rotors in the absence of aerodynamic loads and a three-component laser Doppler anemometer for flowfield measurements. 

A new 20-foot by 20-foot by 30-foot anechoic acoustic test chamber is currently under construction for impulsive noise 

studies of rotorcraft 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships and fellowships are available for financial assistance. Graduate teaching and research 

assistantships are available beginning at $20,000 per year plus tuition and health benefits. In addition, a number of 

fellowships are available, such as Minta Martin Fellowships, Rotorcraft Fellowships, the Hokenson Fellowship, ARCS 

Fellowships, and various departmental fellowships and scholarships. These fellowships cover tuition in addition to a stipend. 

All full-time applicants are automatically considered for these fellowships. 

Contact Information 

For more information, please contact the program. 

Director of Graduate Studies 

3181 Martin Hall 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2376 

Fax:(301)314-9001 

aerograd @ umd.edu 

http://www.aero.umd.edu 

Courses: ENAE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 

Engineering: Bioengineering (BIOE) 

Abstract 

The Fischell Department of Bioengineering offers research and education opportunities leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree and to the MS/MD Masters of Science as a Dual Degree program with the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. It is housed in and administered by the Fischell Department of Bioengineering. The Bioegineering Graduate 
Program faculty includes all faculty holding a tenured or tenure-track appointment in the Fischell Department of 
Bioengineering, as well as faculty holding Affiliate and Adjunct appointments with the Department. The research interests of 
the program faculty are extensive and include biomaterials, bioMEMS, biomechanics, cardiovascular mechanics, cellular 
and metabolic engineering, imaging, systems biology, nanobiotechnology, and tissue engineering. Academic departments 
participating in the program include, but are not limited to: the Fischell Department of Bioengineering, Biology, Cell Biology 
and Molecular Genetics, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Computer Science, 

164 



Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, the University of 
Maryland Biotechnology Institute, and the University of Maryland Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy. 
Admissions Information 

Admission to the Graduate Program in Bioengineering requires a bachelor of science degree in an engineering discipline 
from a recognized undergraduate institution. Admission also may be granted to students with a degree in another scientific 
discipline, such as biology, chemistry, physics, or mathematics. In some cases, students may be required to take 
undergraduate courses to rectify deficiencies in their background before they will be given permission to enroll in the 
required core graduate courses. Because of the structure of the first year curriculum, students seldom are admitted to begin 
the Ph.D. program in the spring semester. In addition, students are rarely admitted that only wish to pursue a master's 
degree. Therefore, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply for fall admission to the Ph.D. program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 1 
Preferred: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 1 
Preferred: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1. Online Application 

2. Statement of Goals, Research Interests and Experiences (on-line submission required) 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation (on-line submission required) 

4. Complete set of official transcripts reflecting all undergraduate and graduate work completed or in progress 

5. Official GRE General Exam score report 

6. Official TOEFL score report (if applicable) 

7. Maryland In-State Status Form (if wish to apply for Maryland resident status) 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science/Doctor of Medicine (M.S./M.D.) 

This is a dual degree program with the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Medicine. Students applying to the M.S. 

Program in Bioengineering must first be admitted to the M.D. program in the School of Medicine. The objective of this 

program is to broaden to educational and research scope of medical doctors in significant fields of bioengineering. Thus, the 

program should be attractive to those clinicians interested in areas including clinical research, biomaterials, biomedical 

imaging, medical device innovation, medical device development, and drug development. Graduates of the combined 

program will receive a Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine as well as a Master of 

Science degree from the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program consists of 45 credits including required, restricted, and unrestricted elective courses, a research 

aptitude examination (RAE), an oral defense of a written dissertation research proposal, and a preparation and oral defense 

of a publication-quality dissertation that advances the field. All students must take the following three Bioengineering 

courses (9 credits): BIOE 601 Rate Processes in Biological Systems, BIOE 604 Transport Phenomena in Bioengineering 

Systems, and BIOE 612 Physiological Evaluation of Bioengineering Designs. Students are also required to take two 

restricted electives (6 credits) and 3 unrestricted electives (9 credits) in order to fulfill course requirements. A complete list of 

acceptable electives may be obtained from the BIOE Graduate Program website. The laboratory rotation courses BIOE 

605/606 (2credits) and the Bioengineering Seminar Series BIOE 608 (1 credit) are also required. Attendance at all 

Bioengineering seminars is expected throughout the graduate student's career, irrespective of whether the course is taken 

for credit or not. Additionally, a total of 18 credit hours of Dissertation Research credits must be taken (BIOE 899). 

Qualification for advancement to candidacy requires that students earn a GPA of 3.0 or better in each of the core courses 

and pass the Research Aptitude Examination. If a student receives a C in a core course, then it must be repeated. All 

students entering the Ph.D. program must take the Research Aptitude Examination held in January, prior to the second 

semester of their first year. The date and time of the examination will be announced by the graduate program before the end 

of the Fall semester. The dissertation proposal, with oral presentation, must be completed by the end of the third year. 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

Students who have been accepted into the PhD program and are unable to satisfy the PhD requirements may complete a 

M.S. degree. There is no direct admission into the M.S. program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has access to well-equipped bioengineering research laboratories and associated departmental facilities of 

its faculty. In addition, there are core facilities available for bioengineering research. Animal facilities are available if 

necessary. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate research assistantships typically support qualified Ph.D. students. Graduate fellowships also are available on a 

competitive basis to both entering and continuing Ph.D. students. Typically only those Ph.D. students who enter the program 



165 



in the fall semester are eligible for fellowships. We are unable to provide financial support to students in our master's degree 

program. 

Contact Information 

Please contact the program directly for program description, admission requirements, and financial aid information. 

Graduate Program in Bioengineering 

2330 Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-7426 

Fax:(301)405-9953 

bioe-grad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.bioe.umd.edu 

Courses: BIOE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Chemical Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Graduate Studies and Research 
Biological Resources Engineering 
Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 
Engineering: Materials Science and Engineering 

Engineering: Chemical Engineering (ENCH) 

Abstract 

The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department offers educational opportunities leading to a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree or Masters of Science degree in Chemical Engineering. Both degrees require a written thesis and an oral 
examination on the thesis. Our faculty research interests cover a wide array of subject matter and is well-equipped for 
graduate research in; aerosol science and engineering, biochemical engineering, computational modeling, fluid mechanics 
and mixing, fuel cell technology, metabolic engineering and systems biology, nanoparticle technology, polymer processing 
and characterization, polymer reaction engineering, process control, thermodynamics and transport phenomena, and 
systems research. The Department maintains a distributed computing network consisting of research laboratories and a PC 
laboratory. Major research facilities including electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and 
NMR are coordinated through a variety of laboratories. 
Admissions Information 

The programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are open to qualified students holding the 
Bachelor of Science degree. Admission may be granted to students with degrees in other engineering and science areas 
from accredited programs, and it may be necessary in some cases to require courses to establish an undergraduate 
Chemical Engineering background. The general regulations of the Graduate School apply in reviewing applications. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Preferred: February 1 


Preferred: May 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . Completed Application Form 

2. Statement of Purpose 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. One complete set of official transcripts reflecting all undergraduate and graduate work completed or in progress 

5. Official GRE Score for General Exam 

6. Official TOEFL Score (if applicable) 

7. Application Fee 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science or Master of Engineering (M.S. or M.E.) 

A minimum of 30 credit hours of course work in technical areas relating directly to chemical engineering is required for the 
M.S. degree, 6 of which are devoted to thesis research. All students seeking graduate degrees in Chemical Engineering 
must enroll in ENCH 610, 620, 630, and 640 if they have not completed equivalent courses. In addition to Graduate School 
regulations, special degree requirements (including core course GPA requirements) are described at the Chemical 
Engineering Department website: www.ench.umd.edu. 



166 



Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in scholarship and the ability to 

engage in independent research. The Chemical Engineering Department requires minimum of 45 semester hours of course 

work beyond the B.S. degree. A minimum of 18 credit hours of Thesis Research is required; students in the PhD program 

can register only for ENCH 899 Thesis Research. In addition to Graduate School regulations, special degree requirements 

include a research aptitude Ph.D. qualifying examination and a research proposal including an oral presentation covering 

the projected Ph.D. dissertation. All Ph.D. graduate students are required to serve as Teaching Assistants for two 

semesters. Other requirements, including CORE course GPA requirements are found on the Department website: 

www.ench.umd.edu. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A number of special facilities are available for graduate study and research and are coordinated through the Polymer 

Reaction Engineering Laboratory, the Chemical Process Systems Laboratory, the Laboratory for Mixing Studies, the 

Thermophysical Properties Laboratory, the Laboratory for Biochemical Engineering and the Biochemical Reactor Scale Up 

Facility. These laboratories contain advanced process control computers, polymer processing equipment and polymerization 

reactors, polymer characterization instrumentation, fermentors, a laser Doppler anemometry facility, and an aerosol 

characterization facility. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate research assistantships typically support qualified Ph.D. students. Graduate fellowships are available on a 

competitive basis to both entering and continuing Ph.D. students. Typically only those Ph.D. students who enter the program 

in the Fall semester are eligible for fellowships. We are unable to provide financial support to students in our masters degree 

program. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information on the graduate program, contact: 

Graduate Coordinator 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5888 

Fax:(301)405-0523 

enchgrad @ deans.umd.edu 

http://www.chbe.umd.edu/ 

Courses: ENCH ENCH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 



Engineering: Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENCE) 

Abstract 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers graduate courses leading to the Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. All programs are planned on an individual basis by the student and an adviser taking into 
consideration the student's background and special interests. Areas of concentration at both the master's and doctoral levels 
include: transportation engineering, environmental engineering, water resources engineering, structural engineering, 
geotechnical engineering, and project management. 
Admissions Information 

Applicants for admission should hold a B.S. degree in civil engineering. However, applicants with undergraduate degrees in 
other disciplines may be accepted with the stipulation that deficiencies in prerequisite undergraduate coursework be 
corrected before enrolling in graduate courses. In addition to the requirements set forth by the Graduate School, applicants 
must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 to apply to the Master's Program, and a minimum GPA of 3.5 to apply to the Doctoral 
Program. Applicants with lower GPA's may be considered and accepted in a provisional basis if other indicators of ability are 
exceptional (letters of recommendation, GRE scores, prior experience ...). Applicants are also required to submit results 
from the Graduate Record Examination. There are no entrance examinations required for the program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 1 
Preferred: December 1 


Deadline: October 15 
Preferred: September 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



167 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Official Transcripts 

4. Statement of Purpose 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science or Master of Engineering (M.S. or M.E.) 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. In addition to an M.S. degree, the department also 

offers a Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree. The Department's policies and requirements are the same as those of the 

Graduate School. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree are also the same as those of the Graduate School. The student will work closely 

with an adviser to develop an approved program of study suited to his or her individual needs. Before admission to 

candidacy, the student must pass a qualifying examination, which is normally taken after the coursework is at least 75 

percent completed. There is no language requirement for the Ph.D. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Departmental research facilities include laboratories in the following areas: transportation, systems analysis, environmental 

engineering, hydraulics, remote sensing, structures, and soil mechanics. Graduate students have convenient access to a 

spectrum of computer facilities, including networked personal computers and workstations, specialized computer-aided 

design, graphics, and visualization laboratories, campus mainframe computers, and remote supercomputer facilities. 

The Washington and Baltimore metropolitan areas are easily accessible for data, field studies, library access, contacts with 

national organizations, and attendance at national meetings. The location of the University of Maryland offers a unique 

opportunity to obtain an advanced degree in civil engineering. 

Financial Assistance 

Research assistantships are available from individual faculty members. Only a limited number of teaching assistantships are 

available. Part-time work as grading assistants is available as well. 

Contact Information 

Graduate Office 

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1 1 73 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

University of Maryland 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (240) 988-6708 

Fax:(301)405-2585 

ence-admissions@umd.edu 

http://www.ence.umd.edu/grad/index.php 

Courses: ENCE ENCE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 

Engineering: Electrical & Computer Engineering (ENEE) 

Abstract 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Maryland, College Park offers one of the 
strongest and most highly-ranked programs in the nation. Led by 89 full-time and affiliate faculty members and 50 research 
faculty and postdocs, the research programs of the department cover a wide spectrum of activities in the areas of: 

* Communications and Networking 

* Signal Processing 

* Control, Robotics, and Dynamical Systems 

* Computer Engineering 

* Optics and Photonics 

* Circuits and Systems 

* Electronic Materials and Devices 

* Bioelectronics and Systems 

* Applied Electromagnetics 

Our close affiliation with a number of research institutes such as the Institute for Systems Research, the Institute for 
Advanced Computer Studies, the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, the Institute for Physical Science 
and Technology, and the Maryland Center for Integrated Nano Science and Engineering provides to our students and 
researchers the opportunity for team-oriented, cross-disciplinary research and access to the institutes' state-of-the-art 
laboratories. 



168 



ECE is a large department that offers a broad range of programs and research opportunities. Its research innovations are 

aimed at helping government and industry face today's most difficult global challenges. Employers and peer institutions 

recognize the prestige of Maryland's engineering programs. 

Maryland's proximity to Washington, DC, offers unique research opportunities with national and government laboratories 

such as NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Standards and 

Technology, and the Army and Navy Research Labs. No other top Engineering program in the U.S. can provide such close 

proximity and access to national laboratories, federal government, and the Department of Defense. 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 

Philosophy degrees. 

For additional information about the department's programs and research, please visit ece.umd.edu . 

Admissions Information 

For the most current and detailed information regarding ECE graduate admissions and deadlines, please refer to our ECE 

Graduate Admissions web page. Applicants must follow all instructions detailed on this web page. 

For admission to the graduate programs in electrical and computer engineering, students must hold an undergraduate 

degree in electrical or computer engineering or related field (math, computer science, physics, or other areas of engineering) 

and have an overall grade point average of B+ or better. In exceptional cases, students with a lower GPA may also be 

admitted. Other criteria include overall academic record, strength of recommendations, GRE score, and adequacy of 

preparation. Applicants are competitively judged by a faculty committee. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 1 
Preferred: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . Online Web Application and Supplemental Form (ASF) 

2. GRE General 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Official Transcripts 

5. Statement of Goals 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. program offers the thesis and non-thesis options. Students must satisfy a course requirement and complete either 

a Thesis or Scholarly Paper. For complete details, see the ECE Graduate Handbook . 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Students in the Ph.D. program must complete a course requirement, satisfy a Ph.D. Qualifying Requirement, pass an oral 

Ph.D. Research Proposal Examination, and write and successfully defend a Ph.D. dissertation. For complete details, see 

the ECE Graduate Handbook . 

Facilities and Special Resources 

For detailed information on the department's research institutes and laboratories, please see the ECE Research Overview . 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and 

fellowships. Details are available in the ECE Graduate Handbook . Applicants for admission are automatically considered for 

these packages provided they mark "yes" for financial assistance on the application form and submit their materials by the 

preferred deadline. 

Contact Information 

Graduate Studies Office 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

2434 A.V. Williams Bldg. 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3681 

Fax:(301)405-8728 

ecegradstudies@umd.edu 

http://www.ece.umd.edu/ 



169 



Courses: ENEE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 
Engineering: Telecommunications 

Engineering: Fire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 

Abstract 

The Fire Protection Engineering Department offers a diversified program of graduate studies leading to the Master of 
Science or the Master of Engineering (Professional Master's) degree. An individual study plan compatible with the student's 
interest and background is developed between the student and adviser. Several specialized areas of graduate study are 
available. One possible area focuses on engineering principles concerned with fire modeling and combustion behavior, i.e. 
the scientific fundamentals of diffusion flame combustion, the mechanics of flame propagation, and the techniques of field or 
zone simulation for the prediction of fire development and smoke movement. Another example area of study involves the 
application of risk analysis techniques, using predictive and analytical procedures for the quantitative assessment of the 
magnitude of fire hazards and the probabilities of potential fire incidents. Related and additional areas of study include 
"smart" fire detection, structural fire protection, contents and furnishings flammability, fire and indoor air pollution, regulatory 
effectiveness analysis, and performance based codes. These and other topics are available to graduate students on an 
individual basis. 
Admissions Information 

The M.S. and M.Eng. programs are open to qualified students holding the B.S. degree. Full admission may be granted to 
students with degrees in any of the engineering and physical science areas from accredited programs. In some cases it may 
be necessary to require undergraduate courses to fulfill the student's background. In addition to the Graduate School 
requirements, the Graduate Record Examination may be required. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 31 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: October 31 
Preferred: September 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science or Master of Engineering (M.S. or M.E.) 

The M.S. degree program requires a thesis and completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours. Individual programs of study 
are determined by the student and his or her advisor and the department. In addition to a M.S. degree, the department also 
offers a Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) degree which requires 30 credit hours of approved courses in major and minor core 
areas. The department's degree requirements are given in detail in its publications. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The department provides laboratory facilities for graduate research. The laboratories contain several standard test 
apparatus such as the cone calorimeter and LIFT apparatus, smoke measurement and particle obscuration apparatus, salt 
water modeling tank, and advanced data acquisition systems. Additional facilities are available through our collaboration 
with the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute (MFRI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The 
departmental computer laboratory contains personal computers and an extensive library of fire modeling software for 
research related activities. Sun workstations and a DEC-based CAD facility are provided by the Clark School of Engineering. 
A mainframe computer in the Computer Science Building is available by remote access from the Department Computer 
Laboratory. The university libraries have an extensive fire protection engineering collection. The department has 
computerized access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Fire Research Library through FIREDOC. 
Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available in the form of fellowships and teaching and research assistantships. Research assistantships are 
awarded in conjunction with the availability of research funds. Professional firms and governmental agencies in the area 
have work-study programs available to graduate students. 
Contact Information 

Brochures and publications offered by the Department may be obtained by writing to us below. Further information is readily 
available via our Internet homepage and world wide web site at http://www. fpe.umd.edu . 



170 



James A. Milke, Chair 

3106 J. M. Patterson Bldg.- 

Fire Protection Engineering Department 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3992 

Fax:(301)405-9383 

enfpgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.fpe.umd.edu/ 

Courses: ENFP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 



University of Maryland - College Park 



Engineering: Materials Science and Engineering (ENMA) 

Abstract 

Materials Science and Engineering is an interdisciplinary program. Students from engineering and science disciplines 
receive a solid foundation in the physics and chemistry of materials, thermodynamics and structure of materials, as well as 
the latest technological aspects of materials in today's manufacturing environment. Faculty research areas are mainly 
concentrated in the development of novel materials for today's electronics, energy, biomedical and high tech industries. 
These materials may be bulk or thin film format and range from ceramics, semiconductors, metals, polymer and biomaterials 
. Departmental faculty members are major participants in the University of Maryland Materials Research Science and Engineering 
Center , the Maryland NanoCenter and the University of Maryland Energy Research Center . For an overview of the Materials 
Science and Engineering Department, please visit Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Maryland . 

Admissions Information 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science (thesis or non-thesis options) and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. In addition, students enrolled in the Professional Master of Engineering program may choose Materials 
Science and Engineering as a program option. Graduate study is open to qualified students holding a bachelor's degree 
from accredited programs in any of the engineering and science areas. For detailed admissions and program information, 
please visit Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Programs . 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Supplemental Application (APRA) 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. degree program offers thesis and non-thesis options. The thesis option requires 24 credit hours of course work 

plus a thesis. The non-thesis option requires 30 credit hours of course work and a scholarly research paper. All students 

must complete the Program Core requirements as well as all Graduate School requirements. The University of Maryland's 

Office of Advanced Engineering Education also offers a Professional Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree with a materials 

science and engineering option which requires 30 credits of graduate coursework and does not require a thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Students wishing to pursue a Ph.D. must complete 45 credits of core and specialized coursework and a dissertation based 

on original research. After the completion of the second semester of coursework, the student will take the Ph.D. qualifying 

examination. Advancement to candidacy occurs after the completion of the core courses with a 3.5 GPA and successful 

completion of the Ph.D. qualifying examination. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special equipment includes scanning and transmission electron microscopes; X-ray diffraction devices; image analysis and 

mechanical testing facilities; crystal growing, thin film deposition and analysis equipment; HPLC, GC, IR and other sample 

preparation and analytical apparatus. 

The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing (LAMP) in JM Patterson 2225 includes a class 1000 clean room for 

various kinds of thin film processing, particularly things difficult to accomplish in the NanoCenter's new FabLab clean room in 



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the Kim Building. LAMP also features custom-designed ultraclean chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and atomic layer 

deposition (ALD) equipment as the basis for research in nano applications and manufacturing process prototyping, 

particularly with real-time chemical sensing for metrology and process control. A custom wafer-scanning electrical 

characterization facility enables resistance and capacitance mapping. 

The Nano-Bio Systems Laboratory (NBSL) in JM Patterson 2229 adjoins LAMP and provides capability for biotech research, 

specifically in biomaterials processing and biomicrosystems development. It includes a Zeiss 310 laser 

confocal/fluorescence microscope, microfluidic chip testing for biomolecular reaction and cellular response experiments, 

biomaterials deposition, a Zyvex L200 nanomanipulator system for life science studies, and mass spectrometry and ICP 

optical emission equipment. 

The W. M. Keck Laboratory for Combinatorial Nanosynthesis and Multiscale Characterization in 1 141 Kim Building houses 

several thin film deposition chambers for rapid exploration of novel functional materials. The combinatorial approach allows 

simultaneous investigation of large numbers of different samples. The combinatorial laser molecular beam epitaxy is used to 

perform atomic layer controlled combinatorial synthesis of functional materials. Atomically controlled growth of unitcells are 

monitored in-situ using electron diffraction. 

The Nanoscale Imaging, Spectroscopy and Properties (NISP) lab, located in the Jeong H. Kim Building, houses the most 

electron powerful microscopes within any university in the Washington, DC metro area. The facility has a Field-emission 

Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) with 1.4 angstrom resolution and can generate chemical-composition maps of 

materials using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) or Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). Also housed 

in the lab are a thermionic TEM with 2.0 angstrom resolution (capable of in-situ electrical measurements and in-situ 

observations between -183 C and 1000C) and an electron microprobe with five Wavelength-Dispersion X-Ray 

Spectrometers (WDS). 

Equipment available at other facilities include a Lakeshore vibrating scanning magnetometer and a scanning Auger 

spectrometer. 

For additional information about the department's research facilities, please visit the following webpage: Materials Science and 

Engineering Research . 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance in the form of teaching and research assistantships and sponsored fellowships are available to qualified 

students. Requests for financial assistance will be considered for Fall admission only. 

Contact Information 

Information is available from: 

Dr. Kathleen C. Hart, Assistant Director, Student Services 

1113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Bldg. 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5989 

enmagrad @ deans .umd.edu 

http://www.mse.umd.edu/grad/index.html 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 

Engineering: Bioengineering 
Biophysics 



Engineering: Mechanical Engineering (ENME) 

Abstract 

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. In addition, students may pursue a Master of Engineering degree through the Professional Master's Program of the 
Office of Advanced Engineering Education. The Department's instruction and research are carried out through the following 
four divisions: i) Design and Reliability Systems; ii) Electronic Products and Systems; iii) Mechanics and Materials; and iv) 
Thermal, Fluid and Energy Sciences. 

Design and Reliability Of Systems (Formerly known as Design, Risk Assessment and Manufacturing) - The focus of this 
area of concentration is the study of: Product and process design and decision making; Manufacturing system modeling and 
automation; Manufacturing process modeling and control; Reliability and failure modes associated with specific 
semiconductor devices; Manufacturing technology designed specifically to meet high standards for yield and quality; 
Reliability test methods for various electronic or mechanical devices; Test screening of parts or systems to eliminate latent 
defects; Reliability and safety assessment tools for complex aerospace, nuclear, or chemical process systems. 
Electronic Products and Systems - This area of concentration addresses the fundamental methods to attain more cost- 
effective and reliable electronic packaging. Areas of specialization include: Electronic packaging; Materials characterization; 
Acceleration testing; Condition monitoring; Computer aided life cycle engineering (CALCE). 

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Mechanics and Materials - This division concentrates on the study of analytical and experimental fundamentals of 

mechanics and materials. Areas of specialization include: Computational modeling; Control systems; Design, 

characterization, and manufacturing of materials; Elasticity; Experimental mechanics; Fracture mechanics; Linear and 

nonlinear mechanics; Micro-nano-bio systems; Noise and vibration control; Nonlinear dynamics; Robotics and intelligent 

machines; Smart structures. 

Thermal Fluid Sciences - This division encompasses two broad disciplines: thermal science and fluid mechanics. Areas of 

specialization include: Heat transfer; Combustion; Energy systems analysis; Hydrodynamics; Turbulence; Computational 

fluid dynamics (CFD). 

Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum - A University of Maryland Field Committee has developed the ESE curriculum. 

It will provide a coherent approach to energy engineering by equipping its students with the tools needed to conceptualize, 

analyze, design and integrate advanced energy systems. This approach is informed by a broad perspective on energy 

production, transmission and utilization technology options and trade-offs, and an appreciation for public policy and 

regulatory issues. 

Reliability and Risk Engineering - This program covers aspects of engineering related to reliability and risk assessment. 

The primary areas of specialization include: Microelectronic reliability; Reliability analysis; Risk analysis; Software reliability 

Admissions Information 

The programs leading to the M.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. degrees are open to qualified students holding a B.S. degree in 

mechanical engineering. Admission may also be granted to students with degrees from other areas of engineering, 

mathematics, and sciences. In some cases, students may be required to take undergraduate courses to fill gaps in their 

background. In addition to the requirements set forth by the Graduate School, the applicant is also required to submit scores 

from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and, for all international applicants, scores from the TOEFL exam is also 

required. Applicants are required to submit at least three letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 15 
Preferred: January 14 


Deadline: October 15 
Preferred: August 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

The minimum requirements of the Department of Mechanical Engineering for acceptance into the Graduate program are: 

1 . Bachelor's degree from regionally accredited college or university (or equivalent from a foreign institution). 

2. At least a 3.0 G.P.A. (on a 4.0 scale). 

3. At least 3 letters of recommendation strongly supporting the applicant's admission into the Graduate Program. 

4. An essay or statement of goals and experiences. 

5. A total score greater than 1 200 combined on the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the General GRE and greater than 4.5 on the 
Analytical Writing section. 

6. International applicants: at least a 577 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) score on the TOEFL exam. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science (Mechanical Engineering) (M.S.) 

Students enrolled in the M.S. program in Mechanical Engineering must complete at least 30 credits for graduation. This 
includes 24 credits of approved coursework and 6 credits of M.S. Thesis Research. The M.S. Coursework Plan sets forth the 
courses required to be taken by the student in partial fulfillment of the M.S. degree requirements. The coursework plan must 
be prepared in consultation with a faculty advisor in the student's technical area of interest, and submitted to the Graduate 
Office (2180 Glenn L. Martin Hall) for approval by the Director of Graduate Studies at the beginning of the first semester of 
study. Changes to the plan are permitted, but must be approved by the student's advisor and the Director of Graduate 
Studies prior to their implementation. A new coursework plan reflecting the changes must be filed with the ME Graduate 
Office every time changes are made. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Reliability Engineering) (Ph.D) 

Students in the Ph.D. program must take a minimum of 36 credits of approved graduate coursework beyond the B.S. degree 
(a minimum of 12 credits of coursework at the University of Maryland) and 12 credits of dissertation research. Students 
currently holding an M.S. from an approved engineering, math, or science program may apply up to 24 credits from their 
previous degree towards their doctoral coursework requirement. In addition, students must pass a qualifying examination, 
propose and have an approved Ph.D. dissertation topic (within two semesters of passing the qualifying exam), and 
successfully produce and defend a Ph.D. dissertation on an original research topic. 
(See http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad/phd-req.html for details) EDIT THIS 
Doctor of Philosophy (Mechanical Engineering) (Ph.D.) 

Students in the Ph.D. program must take a minimum of 36 credits of approved graduate coursework beyond the B.S. degree 
(a minimum of 12 credits of coursework at the University of Maryland) and 12 credits of dissertation research. Students 
currently holding an M.S. from an approved engineering, math, or science program may apply up to 24 credits from their 
previous degree towards their doctoral coursework requirement. In addition, students must pass a qualifying examination, 
propose and have an approved Ph.D. dissertation topic (within two semesters of passing the qualifying exam), and 

173 



successfully produce and defend a Ph.D. dissertation on an original research topic. 

(See http://www.enre.umd.edu/grad/phd-req.html for details) 

Master of Science (Reliability Engineering) (M.S.) 

Two options exist to earn the M.S. degree in Reliability Engineering: 

Non-thesis option 

Complete 30 credits with at least 18 at the 600-level or above. Complete the required 6 credits of core courses (see below). 

Maintain an average grade of B or better. Submit at least one scholarly paper addressing reliability within his/her field of 

engineering for approval by two faculty members. The topic must be selected and an advisor located by the second 

semester of study. The paper can be completed by registering for ENRE648, an independent study course with selected 

advisor and approved through Graduate Committee. Complete a set of approved technical elective courses to satisfy the 

balance of the course requirements (a minimum of 24 credits). 

Thesis option 

Complete 24 credits with at least 12 at the 600-level or above. Complete the required 6 credits of core courses. Maintain an 

average grade of B or better. Take an additional 6 credits of ENRE 799 (thesis research). Write a satisfactory thesis and 

defend the thesis in an oral examination. Complete a set of approved technical elective courses to satisfy the balance of the 

course requirements (a minimum of 18 credits). 

(See http://www.enme.umd.edU/grad/ms-req-reliability.html#courseReq for details) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The department and college of engineering provide access to a wide variety of experimental and computing facilities. 

Selected department computer resources include approximately 100 networked PC systems and 100 UNIX workstations. In 

addition, an enriched CAD computing environment is provided through a large number of third-party software products, 

including computer aided design applications. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available to highly qualified students in the form of research and teaching assistantships. The most 

outstanding applicants are offered fellowships. Students seeking financial assistance should submit with their applications a 

current resume or CV as well as a statement regarding their qualifications and/or past research or teaching experience. 

Financial assistance is sought for all worthy students. The following fellowships are available for Ph.D students; Dean's 

Fellowships (supplements to Teaching Assistantships and Research Assistanships)-Managed by School of Engineering; 

University Fellowships from the Graduate School (supplements to Teaching Assistantships and Research Assistantships); 

Future Faculty Fellows Program from the Clark School; Dissertation Fellowship from the Graduate School; Litton Fellowship 

(ME&ECE); LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship; ARCS Fellowship. 

Contact Information 

Detailed information regarding our graduate programs may be found on our website. 

Coordinator of Graduate Studies/Amarildo C. DaMata 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2180 Glenn L. Martin Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-4216 
Fax:(301)314-8015 
amata@umd.edu 

http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad/ 

Assistant Director of Graduate Studies/Lee Ellen Harper 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2178 Glenn L. Martin Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301)405-8601 
Fax:(301)314-8015 
leharper@umd.edu 

http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad 

Director of Graduate Studies/Prof. Hugh A. Bruck 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2174 Glenn L. Martin Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: 301-405-8711 
Fax:301-314-9477 
bruck@umd.edu 

http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad 

Co-Director of Reliability Engineering Graduate Program/Prof. Mohammad Modarres 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

174 



0151 Glenn L. Martin Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-5226 
Fax:(301)314-9601 
modarres@umd.edu 

http://www.enre.umd.edu/ 

Courses: ENME ENRE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

19th Century Music, Center for Studies in 
Engineering: Systems Engineering 
Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 



Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering (ENPM) 

Abstract 

The Professional Master of Engineering program is a practice-oriented part-time graduate program designed to assist 

engineers and technical professionals in the development of their careers and to provide the expertise needed in the rapidly 

changing business, government, and industrial environments. Late afternoon and evening classes are taught by the College 

Park faculty and experienced adjunct faculty at the College Park campus and designated learning centers in Maryland. 

PLEASE NOTE: DO NOT use program code ENPM when applying for this program. Please use the codes for each 

academic option listed below. 

Options are available in the following engineering disciplines: 

Aerospace Engineering (PMAE) 

Bioengineering (PMBI) 

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (PMCH) 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (PMCE) 

Electrical and Computer Engineering (PMEE) 

Energetic Concepts* (PMME) 

Environmental Engineering (PMEN) 

Fire Protection Engineering* (PMFP on campus, ENGF online) 

Materials Science and Engineering (PMMS) 

Mechanical Engineering (PMME) 

Nuclear Engineering* (PMNU on campus, MENU online) 

Project Management* (PMPM on campus, MEPM online) 

Reliability Engineering* (PMRE on campus, MERE online) 

Sustainable Energy Engineering* (PMSU on campus, MEEE online) 

Systems Engineering (PMSE) 

* available 100% online 

Admissions Information 

The program is open to qualified applicants holding a regionally accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering or a related 

field. 

Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may be admitted on a provisional basis if they have demonstrated 

satisfactory performance in another graduate program and/or their work has been salutary. 

Applicants with foreign credentials must submit academic records in the original language with literal English translations. 

Allow at least three months for evaluation of foreign credentials. 

We trust that you will find this 30 credit-hour program to be an affordable, convenient way to earn an engineering graduate 

degree, to "retool" and keep current with the latest technological developments in your field, or perhaps to develop a new 

area of expertise so as to further your career. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 



175 



1 . Bachelor's degree in engineering or a related field 

2. GRE not required 

3. College Transcripts 

4. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

5. Graduate School admission application and fee 

6. In online application, select the appropriate program option as the major from the list above 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) 

The student chooses an area of concentration offered by an engineering department and completes 30 credit hours of 

approved coursework with an average grade of B. The coursework, which allows up to 12 credits at the 400-level, must be 

approved by the program's departmental faculty advisor. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Courses in the Professional Master of Engineering program are currently offered on the College Park campus, are available 

at off-campus centers, via Distance Education Technology and Services (DETS), which is a live interactive distance 

education system, and 100% online. Courses are available via DETS at the University of Maryland System Shady Grove 

Center in Montgomery County, the Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT) Center in Harford County, the 

Southern Maryland Higher Education Center in St. Mary's County, Frostburg State University in Allegany County, and 

University System of Maryland at Hagerstown in Washington County. 

Financial Assistance 

There are no assistantships or fellowships available in this program. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information, contact: 

Dr. George Syrmos, Executive Director 

2123 J. M. Patterson Building, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-0362 

Fax:(301)405-3305 

oaee@umd.edu 

http://www.oaee.umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Easterling, Director 

2123 J. M. Patterson Building, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-0362 

Fax:(301)405-3305 

oaee@umd.edu 

http://www.oaee.umd.edu 

Courses: ENPM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Aerospace Engineering 
Engineering: Chemical Engineering 
Engineering: Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Engineering: Electrical & Computer Engineering 
Engineering: Fire Protection Engineering 
Engineering: Materials Science and Engineering 
Engineering: Mechanical Engineering 
Engineering: Reliability Engineering 
Engineering: Systems Engineering 

Engineering: Reliability Engineering (ENRE) 

Abstract 

Reliability Engineering is an interdisciplinary program of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The academic and 
research programs are based upon the recognition that the performance of a complex system is affected by engineering 
inputs that begin at conception and extend throughout its lifetime. Students may specialize in Assessment (Root-Cause 
Failure Analysis, Probabilistic Risk Assessment, Common-Cause Failures); Testing and Operation (Operator Advisory 
Systems, Human Reliability, Software Reliability); Manufacturing (Statistical Process Control, Improved Manufacturing 
Methods); Component and Structures Reliability (Microelectronics and Materials); or Electronic Packaging Reliability. 
Admissions Information 

The Program offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science, Professional Master of Engineering, and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees and is open to students who have a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, physics, or 
mathematics and obtained a GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale from accredited programs. An individual plan of graduate 
study compatible with the student's interest and background is established by the student in consultation with an advisor. In 

176 



some cases, it may be necessary to require background courses to fulfill prerequisites. In addition to Graduate School 
admission requirements, the Department posts specific degree requirements. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 15 
Preferred: January 14 


Deadline: October 15 
Preferred: August 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General (Required) 

2. 3 Letters of recommendation 

3. Statement of purpose(lf you are planning to be a distance student, please indicate so in your statement) 

4. TOEFL (all international students) 

5. Resume or CV 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S. ) 

The M.S. degree program offers thesis and non-thesis options. The thesis option requires 24 credit hours of coursework and 

6 credits of thesis research. Students who enroll directly in the Ph.D. program or students who transfer into the Ph.D. 

program from the M.S. program by passing the Ph.D. qualifying examination may obtain a non-thesis M.S. degree upon 

advancing to doctoral candidacy. The non-thesis option requires 30 credit hours of coursework, a scholarly paper, and 

presentation. All students must complete the Program Core requirements as well as all of the Graduate School 

requirements. 

The Professional Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) program in Reliability Engineering is offered through the Office of 

Advanced Engineering Education. The M.Eng. degree does not require a thesis, but students must complete at least 30 

credits of approved coursework. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

For the Ph.D. degree, students must complete a minimum of 36 credits of approved graduate courses (a minimum of 1 8 

credits of coursework at the University of Maryland) and 12 credits of dissertation research, with a minimum 3.0 GPA overall. 

In addition, students must pass the Ph.D. qualifying examination and successfully produce and defend a Ph.D. dissertation 

on an original research topic after the core courses and at least two additional ENRE elective courses are taken. The GPA 

for these four courses must be 3.5 or higher. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Students and faculty have access to a host of special facilities in the College of Engineering, including the nuclear reactor, 

an 8-MeV electron linear accelerator; environmental chambers; mechanical testing, SEM, X-ray and imaging facilities; and 

extensive computer resources. The program also has a complete failure analysis laboratory. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available to highly qualified students in the form of research and teaching assistantships. The most 

outstanding applicants are offered fellowships. Students seeking financial assistance are asked to submit with their 

applications a current resume or CV as well as a statement regarding their qualifications and/or past research or teaching 

experience. Financial assistance is sought for all worthy students. 

Contact Information 

Detailed information regarding our graduate programs may be found on our website. 

Co-Director of Reliability Engineering Graduate Program/Prof. Mohammad Modarres 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

0151 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5226 

Fax:(301)405-9601 

modarres@umd.edu 

http://enre.umd.edu/ 

Coordinator of Graduate Studies/Amarildo C. DaMata 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2180 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4216 

Fax: (30) 314-8015 

amata@umd.edu 

http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad 



177 



Assistant Director of Graduate Studies/Lee Ellen Harper 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2178 Glenn L.Martin Hall 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8601 

Fax:(301)314-8015 

leharper@umd.edu 

http://enme.umd.edu/grad 

Director of Graduate Studies/Prof. Hugh A. Bruck 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

2174 Glenn L.Martin Hall 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8711 

Fax:(301)314-8711 

bruck@umd.edu 

http://www.enme.umd.edu/grad 

Courses: ENRE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 
Center for Superconductivity Research 

Engineering: Systems Engineering (ENSE) 

Abstract 

Students in the broadly-based, cross-disciplinary Master of Science in Systems Engineering (ENSE) program at ISR benefit 
both academically and professionally by: 

- Being exposed to a wide range of systems engineering principles and software tools tailored toward support for visual 
modeling of systems, requirements engineering, system-level modeling, optimization and trade-off analysis, and human 
factors engineering. 

- Becoming familiar with the financial and management issues associated with complex engineering systems. 

- Acquiring a deep understanding of one particular application area. 

- Becoming familiar for opportunities for leadership within the systems engineering profession. 

Designed with substantial industry input, the ENSE curriculum represents the University of Maryland's first multi-college 
graduate degree program involving the A. James Clark School of Engineering. 

In addition to the technical management of systems projects, the ENSE program covers a wide range of topics, from 
systems definition, requirements and specifications, to systems design, implementation, and operation. Students specialize 
in one technical area, selected from computer and software systems, communication and networking systems, signal 
processing systems, control systems, manufacturing systems, operations research, transportation systems, and robotics. 
The ENSE program draws upon the extensive engineering, computer science and management experience of the of 
University of Maryland faculty. The program makes optimum use of the university's advanced facilities, including extensive 
libraries of numerical, symbolic, and visualization software, engineering workstations, and wireless communication networks. 
Admissions Information 

Admission to the ENSE program is competitive. The program looks for strong evidence of motivation and achievement 
and/or significant professional experience in engineering and/or the sciences. At a minimum, all applicants must meet the 
general admission requirements of the Graduate School, graduation from a regionally accredited college or university with a 
B average (or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale). Also key are three (3) strongly positive letters of recommendation, usually from current or 
recent instructors, employers, or supervisors; competitive scores on standardized tests (the GRE general test with writing 
assessment is required); and an articulate statement of appropriate goals and interests. Applicants should have a solid 
background in engineering, math or science. Prospective and current students may seek support for their studies through 
graduate research assistantships or graduate fellowships. Students currently working in industry, the military, or the 
government, who plan to pursue their graduate studies part-time, might ask their employers about tuition assistance. All 
applicants are encouraged to explore sources of external funding; a number of comprehensive Internet sites, such as 
fastweb.com, offer detailed information and application instructions. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 


Deadline: February 1 





178 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

• GRE. Official GRE scores should be sent directly to the University of Maryland (institution code 5814) through ETS. 

• TOEFL. Official TOEFL scores should be sent directly to the University of Maryland (institution code 5814) through ETS. 

• Official transcripts (original hard copy required) 

• Residency information form (U.S. citizens and permanent residents only) 

• Certification of Finances form (international applicants only) 

• International applicants who are already in the U.S. must provide copies of the I-20, I-94, and passport visa stamp 

• 3 Letters of recommendation 

• Statement of Goals 

• All other supporting documents should be sent to: University of Maryland College Park, Enrollment Services Operations, Application for 
Graduate Admission, Rm 0130 Mitchell Building, College Park, MD 20742 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

General requirements for the master's thesis and non-thesis options are those of the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. All requirements must be completed within 5 years. The thesis option requires each student to obtain a total of 30 
credit hours: 24 hours of coursework and six (6) hours for the thesis project to complete the program. The coursework 
includes 1 8 credits for the six core courses (four courses from the systems engineering core and two courses from the 
management core), and two (2) elective courses. The elective courses must be taken from one specialization area. The 
master's thesis project demonstrates the practical implications of systems engineering principles. The thesis project may be 
related to a practical industrial system, and must be supervised by the academic advisor. 

The non-thesis option requires each student to obtain a total of 30 credit hours of coursework to complete the program (four 
courses from the systems engineering core, two courses from the management core, and four elective courses). The 
elective courses must be taken from not more than two specialization areas. In addition, students must complete a scholarly 
paper. Expectations of the scholarly paper: While less detailed and complex than the thesis, the scholarly paper also 
contributes to systems engineering research. For example, a student might chose to write a literature review, identify and 
propose a solution to a systems problem encountered on the job, or prepare a systems case study. The scholarly paper is 
prepared under the supervision of the student's academic advisor. It also must be read by at least one additional ISR faculty 
member, and approved by the ENSE graduate director. No specific format is required by the Graduate School. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

Modern laboratory, computation, and networking environments play an indispensable role in both the development and day- 
to-day operation of the research and education programs at the Institute for Systems Research. In all of the ISR 
laboratories, real-life experiments and associated research studies are enabled through the integrated design of automation 
and information engineering systems. Computational environments support advanced numerical simulation, sensing and 
control, and automated design of complex heterogeneous engineering systems. Networking environments play an 
indispensible role in enabling of interdisciplinary teams of faculty and students to work together. Prototype designs in both 
hardware and software have led to technological discoveries and patentable inventions. 

ISR was established in 1985 as one of the first six National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers (ERCs). 
Now a self-sustaining ERC, it is a permanent state-supported institute of the University of Maryland, within the A. James 
Clark School of Engineering. ISR faculty and graduate students perform basic and applied research with an emphasis on six 
major research directions: systems engineering methodologies and tools, global communications systems, sensor-actuated 
networks, next generation product-realization systems, societal infrastructure systems, and cross-disciplinary systems 
engineering education. ISR seeks a cohesive and balanced approach to the modeling, design, and control of large 
heterogeneous systems, bringing together a diversified team of outstanding engineers, scientists, and students to research, 
develop, and implement advances in systems engineering. 
Financial Assistance 

Prospective and current students may seek support for their studies through graduate research assistantships with ISR 
faculty or graduate fellowships. Students currently working in industry, the military, or the government, who plan to pursue 
their graduate studies part-time, might ask their employers about tuition assistance. All applicants are encouraged to explore 
sources of external funding; a number of comprehensive Internet sites, such as fastweb.com, offer detailed information and 
application instructions. 
Contact Information 

Information regarding the program may be obtained by writing to: 
Master of Science in Systems Engineering (ENSE) Program 
Institute for Systems Research 
2175 A.V. Williams Building (115) 
University of Maryland College Park 
MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4419 
Fax:(301)314-9920 

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ensegrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.isr.umd.edu/students/MSSE.htm 

Courses: ENSE 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Chemical Engineering 

Engineering: Electrical & Computer Engineering 

Computer Science 

Engineering: Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Business and Management 

Engineering: Materials Science and Engineering 

Engineering: Aerospace Engineering 

Mathematics 

Engineering: Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering: Professional Master of Engineering 

Engineering: Telecommunications (ENTS) 

Abstract 

The Master's in Telecommunications Program offers students a unique opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary 
coursework from both the A. James Clark School of Engineering and the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the 
University of Maryland. This extraordinary combination culminates in a degree that prepares students for the broad range of 
rigors and issues that encompass the dynamic telecommunications industry. 

The program covers several different areas including Information System Security, Wireless Communications, Networking, 
and Business and Management for the telecommunications industry. The program may be pursued either full-time or part- 
time. All courses are scheduled in the evening to suit working professionals, while some courses additionally offer daytime 
sections. 

The program is designed around a core curriculum that provides a solid technical foundation and management background. 
The Master's in Telecommunications degree requires successful completion of 30 credits and a scholarly paper. Please visit 
our Degree Requirements page for detailed information. 

Students may choose from a wide range of electives to develop their interests and complement their career goals. Please 
visit our Course Descriptions page for a detailed listing of our courses. In addition to the courses listed there, special topics 
electives are regularly offered. As our program keeps up with industrial trends, these courses focus on emerging, cutting- 
edge topics. 

Please see our website, www.telecom.umd.edu , for the most current information. 
Admissions Information 

For the most current and detailed information regarding admissions and deadlines for the Master's in Telecommunications, 

please refer to our Admissions page. 

The program is open to applicants holding a regionally accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering, computer science, 

math, physics or related technical fields with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of slightly less 

than 3.0 may be considered if they have demonstrated strong performance in prior graduate study and/or professional 

experience. 

Because of the program's rigorous technical core, applicants must have sufficient mathematical backgrounds (e.g. 

successful completion of Calculus I, Calculus II, and Differential Equations). The GRE will be strongly considered; however, 

it is not required for admission. 

This program is professional in nature and has a non-standard tuition. Tuition for the 201 1 -1 2 academic year is $950.00 per 

credit. The tuition rate is the same for all students, regardless of residency or citizenship. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 1 


Deadline: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

• Official College Transcripts 

• 3 Letters of Recommendation 

• Statement of Purpose 

• Resume 



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Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Requirements to earn the Master's in Telecommunications degree include completing 30 credit hours of course work, 

achieving a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0, and submitting a satisfactory scholarly paper. The 30 

credits include eight required courses and two elective courses. All graduate students at the University of Maryland are 

required to maintain a 3.0 GPA each semester to remain in good standing. 

Additional courses beyond the required courses must be approved by the Program Office and should not impede the 

student's progress towards degree completion. ALL courses taken at the University of Maryland count towards the student's 

cumulative GPA. 

Please visit our Degree Requirements page for detailed information. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Students enrolled in the Program are allowed exclusive access to the Telecommunications PC Lab. 

Financial Assistance 

Since the Master's in Telecommunications Program does not normally offer financial support in the form of graduate 

assistantships, many of our students find assistantships in other units, especially non-academic units, which do not have 

graduate students. 

Contact Information 

Master's in Telecommunications Program Office 

2433 A.V. Williams Building, University of Maryland, 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-3682 

Fax:301-314-9324 

telecomprogram@umd.edu 

www.telecom.umd.edu 

Courses: ENTS 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Electrical & Computer Engineering 
R.H. Smith School of Business 

English Language and Literature (ENGL) 

Abstract 

The Department of English offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees; particular 
strengths of the department include early British literature, especially that of the Renaissance; American literature; literature 
of the African diaspora; postcolonial and transnational literary studies; digital humanities; feminist theory and gender studies; 
and composition and rhetoric. The Department also offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing (See listing for 
Creative Writing). Most students enrolled in graduate programs in English Language and Literature seek employment in 
higher education, but many also seek non-academic employment in publishing, business and technical writing, 
administration, and personnel management. To assist with placement, the department has a Placement Director and the 
university has a Career Development Center. 
Admissions Information 

In addition to fulfilling Graduate School requirements, applicants to the M.A. degree program should present a 3.5 GPA in 
English and 24 hours of upper-level English courses. Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program should present at least a 3.7 
GPA and an B.A. degree, normally in English Language and Literature. All M.A. and Ph.D applicants should submit a single 
critical writing sample of 12-20 pages as indicated on the application guidelines. For best consideration, complete 
applications for all degree programs should be submitted by December 8. Applications are not accepted after December 15. 
The Admissions Committee will begin reviewing applications immediately. Admission is for the Fall semester only. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 8 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 8 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General required 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation from current or former teachers 



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3. Unofficial list of relevant coursework 

4. Official transcripts from all schools attended 

5. A single critical writing sample (1 2-20 pages) 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. degree program requires a total of 36 credit hours of graduate work. PhD students must also 1) pass a qualifying 
examination in their areas of specialization; 2) demonstrate, through examination or coursework, evidence of reading 
competence in a foreign language related to their areas of specialization; and 3) complete a dissertation. Applicants to the 
Ph.D. program normally must have a B.A in English Language and Literature. Applicants who wish to pursue a Ph.D. but 
who do not have a B.A. in English Language and Literature may apply to the M.A. program. In exceptional cases the 
Admissions Committee may decide to admit a student with a B.A. degree other than in English Language and Literature with 
the requirement that the student complete extra course work as deemed necessary. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. degree program requires 30 credit hours of graduate work distributed to assure coverage of major historical fields. 
The student either may take 24 hours of coursework and write a thesis for the other six hours, or may take 30 hours of 
coursework and do a capstone writing project. The department also offers a special M.A. with a Concentration in 
Composition and Rhetoric; this degree program requires 30 credit hours of graduate work, provides thesis and non-thesis 
options, and balances courses in literature with courses in the theory of composition and rhetoric. 

The department is in the process of reviewing the MA degree requirements. Students applying for academic year 2012-13 will be enrolled in 
the existing program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Resources for research in the College Park and Washington, D.C. area are unsurpassed. The university's libraries hold over 

2,000,000 volumes. In addition to the outstanding holdings of the Library of Congress, the area also offers the specialized 

resources of the Folger Shakespeare Library, Dumbarton Oaks, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, and the 

National Center for the Study of the Visual Arts. 

UMCP is a member of the Consortium of Institutions in the Washington area, which permits graduate students at College 

Park to enroll in courses at other universities for graduate credit at UMCP. Graduate students in English also may take 

courses for graduate credit at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, which runs a series of 

seminars by distinguished scholars each year. 

Financial Assistance 

The English Department, in conjunction with the College of Arts and Humanities, awards a small number of fellowships to 

exceptional PhD candidates. The English Department also awards teaching assistantships, the primary form of financial aid. 

Currently, about 8-10 teaching assistantships are available each year to incoming students. 

Contact Information 

Additional information on admission, degree requirements, and financial aid can be obtained from: 

Manju Suri, Academic Coordinator 

21 1 6 Tawes Hall University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3798 

engl-grad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.english.umd.edu 

Courses: ENGL 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Communication 

Entomology (ENTM) 

Abstract 

The Department of Entomology offers both the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees. Graduate students 

may specialize in a range of topics in both basic and applied insect science. Topics include insect ecology and behavior, 

physiology and morphology, insect pathology, toxicology and environmental risk assessment, evolution and biosystematics, 

and pest management. 

Employment opportunities for graduates exist in industry, academia, federal, state and local governments, and in 

international and national spheres. 

Admissions Information 

Students applying for graduate work in entomology are expected to have strong backgrounds in the biological or agricultural 
sciences, chemistry, and mathematics. An undergraduate degree in entomology is not required, but a strong basic 
preparation is preferred for admission to the program. 

Admission is granted on the basis of the following criteria by the Graduate Affairs Committee: Analysis of transcripts, 
including course selection and GPA, letters of recommendation, statement of purpose for pursuing the degree, GRE scores, 
and acceptance by a graduate faculty advisor. International applicants must also submit proof of English proficiency 

182 



(TOEFL, iBT or IELTS scores). Acceptance by an advisor is absolutely required; thus, it helps to make contact with faculty 

when applying. 

Upon admission to the M.S. or Ph.D. program, the student's study committee suggests a program of course work and 

approves a detailed research proposal. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . University of Maryland application for graduate studies 

2. Academic transchpt(s) 

3. Scores of the Graduate Record Exam General Aptitude Test (institutional code is 5814; departmental code not required) 

4. Scores of the Graduate Record Exam Advanced Biology Test (optional but include if available) 

5. 3 letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant's abilities and aptitude for graduate work 

6. Statement of purpose/research interests and professional objectives (can be reasonably broad; 1 -2 pages in length) 

7. International students must submit scores from the TOEFL, iBT or IELTS. Maryland's institutional code is 5814; no departmental code is 
needed. Students who take the iBT or IELTS exams do not need to take the TSE 

8. Applicants are encouraged to contact ENTM faculty with shared research interests. To explore matches of your interests with those of 
ENTM faculty, see the ENTM website, entm.umd.edu. 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

In the M.S. program, the student is given latitude in the selection of the advisory study committee, the choice of a study 
area, and the selection of a research program. The student must take several core courses and specific courses required by 
the study area. The M.S. degree is awarded following the successful completion of course work (24 credits), thesis research 
(6 credits) and thesis defense. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program provides diverse opportunities for the selection of a dissertation question, composition of advisory 
committee, and selection of an area of specialization. In addition to core course requirements, course work targeting an area 
of specialization is determined by the advisory study committee. Following completion of most course work, the Ph.D. 
student is given an oral qualifying examination for advancement to candidacy, and the degree is awarded after successful 
completion of the dissertation defense exam. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The department is housed in a modern research facility on campus, where state-of-the-art offices, laboratories, 
environmental growth chambers, multimedia classrooms, and lecture halls provide an excellent environment for research 
and teaching. Students have individual work stations and access to sophisticated computer graphic facilities. The 
department also shares extensive technical expertise and scientific equipment with other departments on campus. The 
university's strategic location in the Washington, DC area provides many opportunities for students to conduct research and 
gain hands-on experience in federal facilities, such as the Smithsonian Institution, USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural 
Research Center, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and NIH. Vast resources are available in the university's library 
system and nearby federal libraries. The USDA's National Agriculture Library at Beltsville is only four miles from the campus, 
and the Library of Congress is in nearby Washington, DC. Besides the main campus, the Maryland Experiment Station has 
Research and Education Centers in the state where field and laboratory work is carried out on urban and agricultural 
insects. Land use and technical services at these Centers are available to faculty and students. 
Financial Assistance 

Graduate students are supported primarily in two ways. Many students are supported by extramural funding sources, usually 
obtained by the student's faculty advisor for research on a specific topic. The second type of support is provided by the 
department from internal funds via university and departmental fellowships, and teaching and research assistantships. 
Teaching and research assistantships are available on a competitive basis. Teaching assistants usually instruct 
undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes and receive in return a tuition waiver of ten credits each semester. Those 
students with grade point averages greater than 3.5 and GRE scores over 1400 (combined verbal and quantitative) may 
also be competitive for university and departmental fellowships. Several part-time employment opportunities are also 
available in governmental and private research and developmental laboratories in the area. Regardless of the initial source 
of funding, the department makes a financial commitment to each graduate student. In the case of master's students, 
support is provided for the first three years of the program only. In the case of doctoral students, five years of support is 
provided but must be used during the first six years of the student's program. Support is usually for the full 12 months. 
Contact Information 

The departmental website, www.entm.umd.edu, describes the mission and administrative organization of the department, 
the faculty and staff, the teaching, research, and extension programs, and the facilities. The website also gives additional 

183 



information on the graduate program, including requirements for admission, course requirements, examinations, seminars, 

and research areas and facilities. 

Graduate Director, Dr. David Hawthorne 

Department of Entomology, 41 1 2 Plant Sciences Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 

MD 20742-4454 

Telephone: (301) 405-3912 

Fax:301-314-9290 

djh@umd.edu 

http://www.entm.umd.edu/ 

Courses: ENTM 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biological Sciences 

Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology 
Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences 
Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology 

Environmental Science and Technology (ENST) 

Abstract 

The Department of Environmental Science and Technology (ENST) offers graduate programs leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. ENST students can choose to work within one of three specializations: Soil and 
Watershed Sciences, Ecological Technology Design, or Wetland Science. 
Admissions Information 

Students seeking admission should have strong training in the basic sciences and mathematics. To be admitted with full 
admission status, a student must have completed a minimum of one semester of Calculus and a total of at least 16 credits in 
some combination of Chemistry, Physics or Mathematics (beyond Calculus I). It is also helpful for applicants to have 
completed courses in Biology, Ecology, Soil Science, Geology, or related sciences and engineering. Applicants to the M.S. 
program must have earned a B.S. degree in a related field with an undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. 
Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program must have earned an M.S. Degree in a closely related field. In special cases 
students may be admitted to a Ph.D. program without first completing an M.S. degree provided these students have: 1) an 
exceptional academic record and test scores; and 2) have demonstrated significant research experience during their B.S. 
program (such as completion of a research based honors thesis.) Graduate Record Examination scores (GRE - General 
Test) are required of all applicants. International applicants must also submit TOEFL scores. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 




Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 1 


Deadline: August 15 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General Test 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

Graduate School Requirements: To earn an M.S. degree, the University of Maryland Graduate School requires that a student to complete a 
minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate level classes (400 lever or above) beyond the B.S. degree, plus an additional six hours of thesis 
research credit (799). Of the 24 hours required in graduate courses, at least 12 must be earned in a major area and a minimum of 12 credit 
hours must be 600 level or above. Defense of a thesis based on the student's research is required for the degree. 

ENST Departmental Core Requirements: All ENST M.S. students are required to complete ENST 602 and 702, two semesters of Graduate 
Seminar (ENST 798), and one graduate level statistics course. 

Specialization Requirements: The Soil and Watershed Sciences specialization requires that M.S. students complete a total of twelve credits 
of graduate level soil science courses among any four of the following five areas: soil chemistry, soil physics, pedology, soil biology, soil 
fertility. The Ecological Technology Design specialization requires that M.S. students complete a total of twelve credits of graduate level 
courses that have been approved by the student's advisory committee. Six credits must be in ecology and six credits must be in ecological 
design or related engineering courses. The Wetland Science specialization requires that M.S. students complete a total of twelve credits 
from a list of approved graduate level courses . A minimum of three credits must be earned from each of these groups: Ecology, Soil 
Science, Hydrology. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 



184 



Graduate School Requirements: To earn an Ph.D. degree, the University of Maryland Graduate School requires that the student complete a 
minimum of 12 credits of dissertation research (899) and complete and successfully defend a dissertation based on original research. 
ENST Departmental Core Requirements: All ENST Ph.D. students are expected to complete a minimum of 50 credits beyond the B.S. 
degree (in addition to research credits 898 and 899) and are required to complete ENST 602, 702 and two graduate level statistics courses 
(these can be taken during either the M.S. or Ph.D. program), and two semesters of Graduate Seminar (ENST 798). 
Specialization Requirements: ENST Ph.D. students are expected to have completed all of the M.S. requirements for the particular 
specialization chosen. In addition to having met the M.S. requirements, the Soil and Watershed Sciences specialization requires that Ph.D. 
students complete one semester of graduate level physical chemistry or biochemistry and one additional graduate level course in 
chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, or computer science; the Ecological Technology Design specialization requires 
that Ph.D. students complete one semester of graduate level systems modeling, and one additional graduate level course in ecology, 
ecological design or ecological engineering; the Wetland Science specialization requires that Ph.D. students complete one graduate level 
course in modeling, and two additional graduate level courses from within the areas of Ecology, Soil Science, or Hydrology. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has many well-equipped laboratories designed to carry out basic and applied research in Soil and 

Watershed Sciences, Ecological Technology Design and Wetland Science. Laboratories are located on the College Park 

campus in H.J. Patterson Hall and the ANSC/AGEN Building. New state-of-the-art greenhouse facilities on campus and a 

statewide network of research and education centers as well as our proximity to Chesapeake Bay provide access to a wide 

range of environmental conditions for research. Students have access to computer resources in the department and a 

comprehensive computer center located on campus. The University Libraries on campus and the National Agricultural 

Library located nearby, supplemented by the Library of Congress, make the library resources accessible to students among 

the best in the nation. Many ENST projects are conducted in cooperation with other departments on campus and with 

professionals at various scientific centers in the area. Scientists at the USDA-ARS, US Geological Survey, the National 

Academy of Sciences, NASA, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Smithsonian, and National Park Service, 

as well as other agencies, have cooperated with ENST faculty on various projects. Scientists from some of these agencies 

have adjunct appointments in the Department, have taught special courses at the University, and participate on graduate 

committees. 

Financial Assistance 

ENST offers a number of graduate assistantships to qualified applicants that are awarded on a competitive basis. To apply, 

use the form for requesting financial assistance included in the Graduate School application packet. In addition to a 

competitive stipend, graduate assistants receive tuition remission and are offered excellent health benefits by the University 

of Maryland. 

Contact Information 

ENST Grad. Pgm. Admin. Asst./Tina Scites 

Dept. Environmental Science and Technology, 1426 An.Sci./Ag.Eng. Bldg., 

University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-1198 

Fax:301-314-9023 

tscites@umd.edu 

http://www.enst.umd.edu/graduate/index.cfm 

ENST Director of Graduate Studies/Dr. Martin C. Rabenhorst 

Dept. Environmental Science and Technology, 1 1 09 H.J. Patterson Hall, 

University of Maryland, College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-1343 

Fax:301-314-2763 

gradstudies-enst@umd.edu 

http://agnr.umd.edu/departments/enst/graduate/ 

Courses: ENST 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Landscape Architecture 

Family Science (FMSC) 

Abstract 

The Department of Family Science prepares students to describe, explain, and improve the quality of family life through 
applied research, education, therapy, human service program management, policy analysis, and advocacy. The approach is 
interdisciplinary, emphasizing individual, interpersonal, and social change. The program of study is based on a systems or 
ecological paradigm, combining the perspectives of interrelated professional fields including family science, couple and 
family therapy, maternal and child health, family policy, behavioral science, and human service program management. 
Graduates are prepared for careers in the public, non-profit and private sectors, including university teaching, research, 
family policy analysis, and administrative positions in human service and public health programs. 

185 



The Department offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) in Couple and Family Therapy, Doctor of 
Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Family Science, and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) degrees. 
Students applying the PhD program in Family Science should have a Master's degree in Family Science or a related 
behavioral or social science. It is possible for a limited number of students to be accepted into the Family Science Ph.D. 
program with only a Bachelor's degree, but they must complete a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Couple and Family 
Therapy in route to the Ph.D. Most Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. applicants have a Master's Degree in Public Health 
(MPH), or an applied behavioral or biologicalonly science. Prior to entry, MCH students must also have completed at least 
one semester of a university-supervised, graduate level professional experience in a public health or mental health setting. 
MCH students without the five MPH core courses must complete missing courses (biostatistics, epidemiology, 
environmental health sciences, health services administration, and health behavior) within one academic year of their entry 
into the program. 

The M.S. program in Couple and Family Therapy is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family 
Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). The program provides students 
with the counseling work and supervised clinical training typically required in states with Marriage and Family Therapy 
Licensure. The curriculum is based on an integrative approach to family therapy. From a general systems perspective, 
students acquire a broad knowledge of family therapy approaches and related theory. Didactic course material is 
continuously applied in supervised clinical practice in order to integrate theory and practice into a total learning experience. 
The Ph.D. in Family Science is a research-oriented program examining internal family processes, as well as the dynamic 
interaction of families with the biological, psychological, social, political, and economic aspects of their environment. The 
integrated program of study focuses on family theory, research methodology, family policy, family programs, ethnic families, 
and major issues confronting contemporary families. Students learn to design, implement, and evaluate culturally-sensitive 
interventions addressing family needs and to analyze the consequences of public/private policies on family well-being. 
The Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. program provides interdisciplinary training in research, practice, and policy relevant to 
health problems and services for women, infants, children, adolescents, and their families (including men). The MCH 
program prepares students to advance research, policy and practice to improve the health, safety, and well-being of these 
groups, with a particular emphasis on low income and ethnic minority populations. 
Admissions Information 

Admission standards for the M.S. in Couple and Family Therapy include: a minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point 
average, a score of 1000 or better on the GRE for the verbal and quantitative combined, three strong letters of 
recommendation, and a statement of personal and professional objectives. 

Students applying to the Couple and Family Therapy program must apply by January 15 (International students must apply 
by January 1). Applicants must also download and complete the additional "Couple and Family Therapy Application Form," 
available on our website, http://www.sph.umd.edu/fmsc/graduate/ms/admission.html. Students are only admitted to the 
Couple and Family Therapy program for the Fall semester. 

The Family Science Ph.D. program considers applications from students with a Master's or Bachelor's degree in family 
science, public health, or a related discipline. Students admitted to the Ph.D. program in Family Science with a 
baccalaureate degree must complete the M.S. in Couple and Family Therapy with a thesis en route to the Ph.D. 
The Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. program considers applications from students with a Master's degree in Public Health 
(M.PH.) or a social/behavioral/biological sciences Master's degree that focuses on family, maternal, and/or child health 
issues (including mental health). Prior to entry, students must also have completed at least one semester of a university- 
supervised, graduate level professional experience in a public health or mental health setting. Applicants with a Master's 
degree other than an MPH degree must complete the required 5 public health core courses (biostatistics, epidemiology, 
environmental health, health services administration, and social and behavioral sciences) within one academic year of their 
entry into the program. 

In addition to meeting Graduate School requirements, students are selected for the Ph.D. program based on: the quality of 
previous undergraduate and/or graduate coursework, the strength of GRE scores (minimum of 1000 required), letters of 
recommendation from three persons competent to judge the applicant's probable success in a doctoral program, research 
and/or relevant work experience, and professional goals congruent with those of the program. The deadline for applications 
to both Ph.D. programs is December 15. 

The Department encourages applications from members of racial/ethnic minority groups for both its M.S. and Ph.D. 
programs. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . GRE Scores 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 



186 



3. Statement of Goals 

4. Transcripts 

5. Master's thesis or other research sample (for those entering Ph.D. program with a Master's degree) 

6. Couple and Family Therapy Application Form (M.S. only) 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The Couple and Family Therapy M.S. program requires 48 credits for the non-thesis option and 51 credits for the thesis 

option, which includes a two-year internship sequence. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program in Family Science requires 51 graduate credit hours beyond the Master's degree, including 30 core 

credits (theory, issues, research methodology, statistics), 6 elective credits, 3 research internship credits, and 12 dissertation 

credits. 

The Ph.D. program in Maternal and Child Health requires 48 graduate credit hours beyond the Master's degree, including 21 

core credits (theory, issues) 12 research methods and statistics credits, 3 elective credits, and 12 dissertation credits. 

Students in both Ph.D. programs must also submit an individual study plan, pass a comprehensive examination, and 

complete a dissertation and oral defense. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University's close proximity to the nation's capital, the state capital in Annapolis, federal executive departments, and 

headquarters of national professional and public interest associations provide research and internship placements for 

studying family policy unmatched by any other graduate program in the discipline. The Washington-Baltimore metropolitan 

area offers rich opportunities for research on culturally and socioeconomically diverse families. The campus and department 

have excellent computer facilities. Students have ready access to the University's extensive library systems, as well as 

holdings from the Library of Congress, the National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, National Archives, and 

many other library collections. 

Family Research Center: This departmental Center promotes family research by securing extramural funding and 

encouraging cooperative research ventures within the University and with other institutions. The Center also hosts 

international scholars engaged in cross-cultural studies of the family and serves as a resource of family information for 

citizens of Maryland and the nation. 

Center for Healthy Families: This Center is the training and research arm of the Couple and Family Therapy Program in the 

Department of Family Science. Departmental graduate students and faculty provide clinical and educational services to 

families from surrounding communities in this new, state-of-the-art facility. Master's and doctoral students use data collected 

at the Center for research projects. 

Center for Young Adult Health and Development (CYAHD): In December 2009, the Center on Young Adult Health and 

Development was established as part of the Department of Family Science. This research center is the first such center in 

the United States specifically dedicated to understanding the health and development of young adults. As Director, Amelia 

Arria plans to use her experience with the College Life Study (CLS) studying adolescent and young adult health-risk 

behaviors, to further our knowledge regarding a broad spectrum of issues affecting young adult health and development. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance for Ph.D. students is available through university fellowships and departmental teaching and research 

assistantships. Some assistantships may be available for M.S. students depending on departmental funding and faculty 

grants. Students may also seek assistantships in other campus units and/or apply for doctoral fellowships sponsored by 

federal agencies (e.g., NIH, DHHS). 

Contact Information 

For further information, contact: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

1 142 School of Public Health 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-3672 

Fax:(301)314-9161 

fmsc@umd.edu 

http://www.sph.umd.edu/fmsc/ 
Courses: EPIB EDMS PUAF FMSC 
Related Programs and Campus Units 

Nutrition 

Public Health: Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. 

Family Service Center 

Public Health: Epidemiology Ph.D. 

Psychology 
Sociology 
Health Education 



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Epidemiology and Biostatistics 

Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC) 

Food Science (FDSC) 

The Department of Nutrition and Food Science offers courses that may involve the use of animals. Students who are 

concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, 

to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or 

required, and what alternatives, if any, are available. 

Abstract 

The Food Science Graduate Program is an interdepartmental program administered by the Department of Nutrition and 

Food Science (NFSC). The program offers graduate study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in food science. Both M.S. 

and Ph.D. programs require completion of a research project either a thesis for the master's degree or a dissertation for the 

doctoral degree. A graduate faculty is responsible for graduate admission and curriculum maintenance. Currently, there are 

approximately 27 graduate students enrolled in the Graduate Program in Food Science and there are 12 graduate faculty 

members. 

Admissions Information 

A strong background in food science, physical, chemical or biological sciences, or engineering is highly desirable. 
Acceptance is based upon academic transcripts with a minimum undergraduate grade point average of a 3.0 (on a 4.0 
scale) requirement, three letters of recommendation, and a statement of objectives and professional experience. All 
applicants must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE-General Test). A minimum score of 500 is required in each of 
the Verbal and Quantitative sections and a score of 3.5-6.0 is required in the Analytical Writing section. If the GRE General 
test was taken prior to October 2002, the minimum score required in each section of the GRE is 500, for a total of 1500. 
International students must take the TOEFL, a minimum score of 100(IBT)is required. International applicants must also 
submit documentation of adequate financial support for their studies. An additional requirement for admission is identification 
of a research advisor prepared to accept the applicant as an advisee. Offers of admission (or rejection) are made by the 
Graduate School based upon the recommendation of the Director of the Graduate Program in Food Science and the 
Graduate Faculty Education Committee. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. TOEFL scores for international applicants 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

During their second semester, a faculty advisory committee will be formed and chaired by the student's faculty advisor. 
His/her faculty advisory committee will develop an approved program of study for each graduate student. 
M.S. Degree - Thesis Option 

1 . A minimum of 30 graduate credits of course work including a minimum of 12 credits of 600 level courses and a minimum 
of 6 graduate credits of master's thesis research (NFSC 799). 

2. A research thesis must be submitted and defended before a faculty examining committee approved by the Graduate 
School. 

3. A manuscript, i.e. one or more research papers based upon the thesis, will be submitted to a referred journal for review 
and publication. 

An average duration of a Master's project is 2-3 years depending upon prior education and experience. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

1 . An equivalent of a thesis option M.S. degree is required. 

2. Completion of the program of study established by the student's faculty advisory committee. A minimum GPA of 3.0 is 
required to maintain good academic progress for graduation. 

3. A minimum of 27 credit hours of graduate study is required to graduate (including courses, seminars, and a requirement 
of 12 credits of Doctoral Dissertation Research-NFSC 899). A dissertation proposal must be presented to the faculty 
advisory committee for approval no later than the end of the third semester of study. 

4. A comprehensive oral examination conducted by the faculty advisory committee preferably before the end of the 4th 
semester of study must be taken. Based upon the results of the oral examination, the student shall: 1) be admitted to 



188 



candidacy for the Ph.D. degree; 2) be required to undertake additional study; 3) not be allowed to continue in graduate 
school. 

5. The candidate will prepare and defend a dissertation before a faculty advisory committee. 

6. The candidate will prepare one or more research papers(manuscripts) based upon the dissertation for submittal to a 
referred journal. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Program maintains equipment for conducting both basic an applied research through the individual participating faculty 
members. The facilities are located in the Departments of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Animal and Avian Sciences, Cell 
Biology & Molecular Genetics, and Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture. There are also collaborative 
arrangements with the National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, and the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The library facilities are extensive. The resources of several national libraries; the National Archives, the 
National Agriculture Library, the Library of Congress, and the National Library of Medicine, which are within ten miles from 
the campus. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial support for graduate students is available on a competitive basis. The Department of Nutrition and Food Science 
offers a limited number of graduate teaching assistantships. Applicants interested in a teaching assistant position should 
complete the Merit-Base Award Form and submit to the Graduate Program in Food Science office by the stated graduate 
application deadline. International teaching assistants who are not native speakers of English are required by the University 
of Maryland to take part in the International Teaching Assistant evaluation. This includes international teaching assistants 
who may have been educated entirely in English and those with Bachelor and Master's degrees from universities in English- 
speaking countries. A limited number of research assistantships are available from grant funds with the student assisting in 
the research supported under the grant. The research often may be applicable to the thesis or dissertation. The University of 
Maryland emphasizes diversity in its recruitment and support of graduate students. Other types of financial aid are also 
available, including a work-study program, grants, fellowships, and loans. 
Contact Information 

Additional information concerning admission requirements, courses, faculty, and facilities are available from: 

Sara Kao, Coordinator, Student Programs 

01 12 Skinner Building 

College Park 

MD 20742-7640 

Telephone: (301) 405-8980 

Fax:(301)314-3313 

sarakao@umd.edu 

http://www.agnr.umd.edu/users/nfsc/staff.htm 

Dr. Y. Martin Lo, Program Director 

3102 Marie Mount Hall 

College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-4509 

Fax:301-314-3313 

ymlo@umd.edu 

www.agnr.umd.edu/lo 

Courses: NFSC 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Animal and Avian Sciences 

Biological Resources Engineering 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine 

Nutrition 

French Language and Literature (FRIT) 

Abstract 

The Department of French and Italian prepares students for the Master of Arts (FRIT) and Doctor of Philosophy (FRMS) 

degrees in French language, literature and culture. The research interests of the graduate faculty span the Renaissance to 

the present. For the doctoral program, consult the graduate catalog under "Modern French Studies." 

Admissions Information 

The M.A. program, which offers both a thesis and non-thesis option, is open to students who have a solid grounding in 

French language and literature. An overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.00 (on a four-point scale) at the undergraduate 

level is required. Further application requirements include: 1) Graduate School application, 2) statement of purpose 

189 



(including research interests), 3) three letters of recommendation, 4) official academic transcripts for all undergraduate work, 

5) GRE scores, 6) a writing sample, and 7) a resume or Curriculum Vitae. International applicants must also submit TOEFL 

scores. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 





Application Requirements 

• Graduate School Application 

• GRE Scores 

• Letters of Recommendation 

• Writing Sample 

• Sample Writing 

• Resume or Curriculum Vitae 

• Statement of Purpose 

• TOEFL Scores (for International Applicants> 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy (see FRMS under "Modern French Studies") (Ph.D.) 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. without thesis requires a minimum of 30 credits, of which at least 18 must be selected from courses numbered 600 

or above. In lieu of a thesis, students must present a Qualifying Paper of between 25 and 30 pages in length as evidence of 

their ability to do independent research. The M.A. with thesis requires a minimum of 24 credits, of which not less than 12 

must be selected from courses numbered 600 or above. A further six credits (thesis research/French 799) are required. The 

M.A. thesis committee consists of 2 faculty members in addition to the student's thesis director, who serves as chairperson. 

There is an oral examination on the thesis, which should be a minimum of 80 pages in length. (See Department Website for 

complete information) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

With a total student enrollment of over 35,000, the University of Maryland is supported in its academic endeavors by the 

University Libraries, a system of eight libraries and more than three million volumes. Other area research facilities include 

two of the world's outstanding libraries: the Library of Congress and the Folger Library, both of which have extensive 

holdings in French. The School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, the Women's Studies Program, and the David C. 

Driskell Center For The Study of The Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and The African Diaspora, among other 

campus units, offer seminars, lectures, and symposia on a wide variety of topics relevant to graduate students in French. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate applicants can request to be considered for Teaching Assistantships and Graduate Fellowships. Graduate 

Teaching Assistantships carry ten-month stipends, plus remission of all fees (10 credits) other than those for registration and 

health facilities. 

Contact Information 

Additional information on program offerings, degree requirements and financial aid can be obtained on the department's 

Web site (http://www.languages.umd.edu/Frenchltalian) and by writing to: 

Director of Graduate Studies in French/Dr. Caroline Eades 

3215 Jimenez Hall 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4024 

http://www.languages.umd.edu/Frenchltalian 

Courses: FREN 



Geography (GEOG) 

Abstract 

The Department of Geography offers graduate study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Professional Studies 

in Geospatial Information Sciences. 

The specific research specializations represented by the faculty include: 



190 



Human Dimensions of Global Change: Demographic, social, cultural, and economic aspects of human systems with 
particular emphasis on integration with physical systems. Population, minorities (African-American), women, transportation, 
health, urban and regional systems, geographical education. Global, regional (Africa and Latin America), mid-Atlantic, 
southern portion of Megalopolis, and Chesapeake Bay. 

Environmental and Biological Aspects of Global Change: Biogeographical, biophysical, hydrological, and geomorphological 
aspects of Earth System Science with particular emphasis on integration with human systems. Land-use and land-cover 
change, vegetation and ecosystem dynamics, carbon disturbance, fire, sea level rise, climate variability, biodiversity, and 
biospheric processes in global climate modeling. Special attention is given to issues of scaling, with foci from local to global 
scale, and regionally to North America, Africa, Boreal Forests, Eurasia, and Latin America. The Department specializes in 
the remote sensing and modeling of land-surface dynamics, and carbon 

Geospatial Information Sciences: Observation, processing, and analysis of geographic data. Remote sensing, geographic 
information systems, digital cartography, spatial analysis, and numerical modeling. Particular emphasis is on remote sensing 
(e.g. Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS) including active remote sensing techniques (lidar and radar), regional to global scale data 
systems, scaling theory, and spatial variance. Applications to human and physical aspects of Geography. 
The Department contains several specialized groups, including the Global Land Cover Facility, as well as several smaller 
groupings of research interests. The Department also has close ties with cross-campus research initiatives, including the 
Earth Systems Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI). ESSIC is 
an initiative that brings together the Departments of Geography, Geology and Atmosphere and Ocean Science in a 
Research Institute to further encourage interdisciplinary studies to address contemporary questions in Earth Systems 
Science. JCGRI is a collaboration between the University of Maryland and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and is 
dedicated to understanding the problems of global climate change and their potential solutions. 
Admissions Information 

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. degree and the MPS (masters in professional studies). The 
MPS program is administered separately and has different admission deadlines and requirements than the Ph.D. program. 
The Department no longer offers an M.A. option. All students are admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. 
Ph.D. Program 

Admission into the program is strongly competitive. Students may be admitted with either an undergraduate or masters level 
degree. Minimum requirements are: GPA B (3.0) average in junior and senior year; GRE verbal 600 and quantitative 600; 
three letters of recommendation, preferably from academic reviewers. For international students, the following additional 
minimum test scores apply: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) [paper test 600, written portion 5; computer- 
based test 250; internet-based test 100]. International students who are applicants for teaching assistantships must also 
pass an International Teaching Assistant Oral Evaluation by the University's Maryland English Institute (MEI). 
The Department admits students to our doctoral program that have already completed a master's degree and exceptionally 
well qualified students who have only completed a bachelor's degree. Admitted students are required to either possess or 
shall develop a strong foundation in the discipline of Geography. Admission to the Ph.D. program is not limited to students 
with a Geography degree. Those with degrees in related disciplines such as environmental, physical or biological sciences, 
anthropology, economics, history and social science are encouraged to apply but may be required to undertake additional 
background study. Some knowledge of data processing and statistics is necessary for all applicants. 
Applicants proposed program of study must clearly draw on the research strengths of existing faculty members. All 
applicants are strongly encouraged to contact individual faculty members (in person, by phone, or by email) to discuss their 
research interests and to identify potential advisors. Admission to the doctoral program is dependent on the support of two 
tenured/tenure-track faculty. 

In general, the Department admits between 10-15 students each year into the Ph.D. program. Virtually all students accepted 
are fully-funded through assistantships and fellowships. While there is no longer a formal M.A. program, a terminal master's 
degree may be received for qualified students who are unable to complete the Ph.D. program. 

Closing date for applications into the Ph.D. program is January 15. Applications are reviewed from December to February 
for Fall entry; there is no Spring entry. The Graduate School will accept applications up to May 1 for certain visa categories 
(see below). However, applications received by the Department after January 15 have a reduced chance of being 
considered for Fall entry and financial aid. The following are required for application into the program: 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Statement of Goals and Research Interests and Statement of Experiences 

4. International applicants: TOEFL (also MEI oral exam for TAs) 

In addition we strongly encourage the following: evidence of contact with faculty members, an example of writing or 

scholarship, and a current CV. 

Masters of Professional Studies in Geospatial Information Sciences 

The Master's Degree and Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Sciences offers comprehensive training in the key 

areas of GIS. Applicants can choose between a 31 -credit Master's Degree and a 12-credit Graduate Certificate in 

Professional Studies. See Degree and Certificate requirements below, as well as on the MPS GIS Web Site . 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 12 





191 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 12 





Application Requirements 

See admissions information. 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The study program is individually designed by the student and a faculty committee. Two introductory courses (6 cr) (unless 
taken in Master's program), Research Tutorial (3 cr) (or equivalent credits of Independent Readings when more 
appropriate), attendance at Departmental Seminars (3 cr), optional elective courses, a dissertation proposal defense, a 
minimum of 1 2 dissertation credits after advancement to candidacy, and a dissertation. For those entering with a master's 
degree in geography, the PhD should be completed within 4 years; For those entering with bachelors or without a geography 
background, the PhD should be completed within 5 years. Part-time study takes longer, but at least 1 year full-time 
attendance is required. Students entering with a B.A. or without a Geography background will take one course each in the 
following areas: Human, Physical, and Methods. 

Master of Professional Studies in Geospatial Information Sciences (M.P.S.G.I.S.) 

The Master's Degree and Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Sciences offers comprehensive training in the key 
areas of GIS, including geographic information sciences, remote sensing techniques, spatial analytical methods, modeling 
and specialized computer programming tailored to GIS needs. Applicants can choose between a 31 -credit Master's Degree 
and a 12-credit Graduate Certificate in Professional Studies. See more detailed Degree and Certificate requirements, as well 
as admission requirements and application forms, on the MPS GIS Web Site . 

In the MPS program, lectures are delivered across the Internet using advanced audio and video technology. Students are 
not required to be physically present except for orientation and a final capstone class. Thus, applications are accepted 
nationally. 

A GPA of 3.0 is normally required for admission into this program while rare exceptions can be made. GRE is not required. 
Students can be admitted into the program with various backgrounds, however, there are some prerequisite requirements 
that generally must be met. Students with an MPS degree are eligible to apply for admission into Ph.D. programs world- 
wide, including ours. 

Students are admitted to the program only for the Fall Term. The deadline for applications for International students is 
January 15. and for U.S. citizens and permanent residents it is March 15. U.S. citizens and permanent residents who have 
completed the prerequisites, may apply as late as August 1 and will be considered as long as there is room in the program. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

NOTE: The Department of Geography do not offer a terminal Master of Arts program and will not accept or enroll students 
for the single purpose of acquiring a Master of Arts degree. Doctoral students may obtain a Master of Arts degree during 
their course of doctoral study, requirements of which are set by the department. Award of this degree is granted only upon 
demonstration of a high level of scholastic achievement, not simply for completion of course requirements. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area is an exceptional location in which to pursue geographic research. Many national 
and international agencies are within a short distance of the campus, including the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the 
USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, the National Archives, Bureau of the Census, National Institutes of Health, 
USGS, National Geospatial Imaging Agency, Smithsonian Institution, and NOAA. International and non-governmental 
agencies are located within easy reach, including the National Geographic Society, the Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife 
Fund, World Bank, and many others. Corporations, businesses and nonprofit organizations that use geographical 
applications are also well represented. Libraries on campus and nearby are unrivaled elsewhere in the world. The University 
is also located in a region of extraordinary geographic diversity, including two major urban centers (Baltimore and 
Washington, D.C), and the superb, continuous section from the Appalachian mountains, through the Piedmont, Coastal 
Plain, and Chesapeake Bay to the Atlantic Coast. 

Many opportunities exist for students to participate in externally funded research projects. Graduate students find these 
research programs a rich source of ideas for dissertations as well as providing opportunities to join projects as paid research 
assistants and, often, identifying openings for employment on completion of their studies. 

The Department is housed in over 35,000 sq. ft. on the main College Park campus. Teaching laboratories include facilities 
for cartography, GIS, and the Turner laboratories dedicated to computer-based instruction, while other facilities needed for 
virtually any type of investigation are available through collaborations with other departments. There are two primary 
computer environments, namely PC and UNIX, with over 100 machines dedicated to teaching and graduate research. The 
research laboratories support UNIX, Linux, and high-end PC machines, including very high performance processors and 
peripherals and large volume RAID arrays. There are a large number of printers, magnetic disk farms, tape carrousels, etc. 
An extensive range of software is available, including satellite data processing, image analysis, and ESRI GIS packages. 
Field research, remote sensing, global positioning systems, and other types of equipment are available. 
Financial Assistance 

Teaching Assistantships, Research Assistantships, and various Fellowships are available. Salary is for 9.5 months per year. 
Assistants work 20 hours per week. Fellowship recipients have no work assignment. Depending upon resources, the 
department will provide up to four years of funding, provided the student meets the department's benchmarks (see the PhD 

192 



Handbook ). Applications are made on the University Graduate Admission Application and further information about Financial 

Aid is given in the Application. Note, residents of certain Southern States without equivalent Geography graduate programs 

may be eligible to receive tuition at the lower, in-state fee rates. 

Contact Information 

More detailed information on the MPS and Ph.D. programs can be obtained by reviewing the Department's Doctoral Program 

Web Site or the MPS GIS Web Site . Call or e-mail Assistant Director of Academic Programs for more information. To arrange 

consultations with the Graduate Director and individual faculty, call the Department at (301) -405-8085. 

Assistant Director of Academic Programs 

2181 LeFrakHall 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8085 or (301 ) 405-4050 

Fax:(301)314-9299 

crossgro@umd.edu 

http://www.geog.umd.edu/ 

Courses: GEOG 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Environmental Science and Policy 
Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center 
Joint Global Change Research Institute 
Geospatial Information Sciences 

Geography/Library & Information Systems (GELS) 

Abstract 

This dual degree program is no longer accepting applications. 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 



Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: LBSC GEOG 

Geology (GEOL) 

Abstract 

The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. On a full time basis, the M.S. normally 
requires two to three years of work, which includes courses, the completion of an M.S. research thesis, and an oral defense 
of the thesis. On a full time basis, the Ph.D. commonly requires three to four years of work, if conducted after the completion 
of an M.S. program, or four to five years from the time of admission if pursued directly from the Bachelor level. The Ph.D. 
program normally includes course work, a qualifying examination and proposal defense, a dissertation, and an oral defense 
and examination of the dissertation. 

Our students are required to engage in independent and original research under a mentoring program that promotes 
creative thinking. This is most commonly achieved via the collaboration between students and faculty in ongoing research 
programs. Geology is concerned with the Earth, its origin and evolution and the origin of life, and the processes by which 
Earth's atmosphere, surface and interior have been and continue to be modified. To pursue these topics we have developed 
research strengths in four themes: Geochemistry, which involves investigations of low- to high-temperature processes 
operating from Earth's surface to its core and within the Solar System; Solid Earth Science, which is the study of the 
minerals, rocks, and structures that constitute Earth, and the tectonic and other processes by which they are formed and 
altered; Surficial Processes and Environments, which involves the study of active and past fluxes (and reservoirs) of water, 
dissolved components, and sediment on Earth's surface and the interactions of these fluxes with the biosphere and 
atmosphere; and, Geophysics, which includes investigations of Earth's interior structure and dynamics, as well as planetary 
physics. These areas are not mutually exclusive, and students are encouraged to develop a program that suits their 
interests. Developing areas within the Department include planetary geology and forensics. 

Although students will choose an advisor within the Department of Geology, they may also wish to take advantage of 
research opportunities provided by collaboration with other departments on campus, such as Mathematics, particularly the 
Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program (AMSC), Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Physics, Geography, 
and Chemistry, as well as other institutions in the area including the Smithsonian Institution, United States Geological 
Survey, NASA, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Geophysical Lab and National Institute of Standards and Technology. 
The Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center is a collaborative venture between the Departments of Geography, 

193 



Geology and Atmospheric and Ocean Science on Campus, and the Earth Sciences Directorate at NASA Goddard. This 
wealth of in-house and collaborative resources positions our graduate students with an unmatched spectrum of opportunities 
and gives them access to a strong multi-disciplinary program of international stature. 

Our current student demographics are diverse, with an approximate 50:50 mix of male and female students of which 10-20% 
are minority students. Approximately 60% of our graduate students are Ph.D. candidates (the remaining are M.S. students), 
and some of the M.S. students will petition to become Ph.D. candidates following the successful completion of their M.S. 
degree program. Other M.S. candidates are focused solely on the M.S. degree, which is the commonly held degree for 
practicing professionals in government and industry. 

Our graduate students benefit from the opportunities of working within an advanced graduate program. Our graduates go on 
to distinguished post-doc, research and applied positions in academic, government and industrial settings. We proudly 
acknowledge having placed our students into prestigious post-doc positions and government laboratories and we highlight 
their publications (see http://www. geol.umd.edu/pages/graduates/gradpubs. htm ), presentations at national and international 
meetings (see http://www.geol.umd.edu/pages/graduates/gradpresentations.htm ) and awards 
(see http://www. geol.umd.edu/graduates/gradfunding.htm ) . 

Admissions Information 

Qualified students with a B.S. degree in geology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, engineering or other related 
sciences are invited to apply for admission to the graduate programs. Our graduate degree program in geophysics 
welcomes students with undergraduate degrees in physics and or astronomy having little to no background in geology. 
Coursework expectations for students applying to the program is at least a year of calculus, a semester of physics for 
science majors, and for those in the in geology and geochemistry track a year of chemistry or its equivalent. All students 
must submit the Graduate Record Examination scores to be considered for admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: March 15 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: October 15 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 15 


I 
Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE-general highly recommended 

2. Three letters of recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

The Department of Geology offers a Master of Science degree. There is no single prescribed curriculum. Although 24 credit 
hours of course work and 6 credit hours of thesis research are required, the entire course of study is individually developed 
for each student by his/her graduate program committee as approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The M.S. degree 
is awarded following the successful completion of the course requirements, defense of a proposal, submission of a 
satisfactory thesis, and an oral defense of the thesis. The M.S. normally requires two years of work. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Students who have an M.S. degree must normally complete a minimum of 12 credits of coursework applicable to a graduate 
degree with at least 9 credits at the 600 level or above. Coursework requirements for students who do not hold an M.S. 
degree will be established by the Director of Graduate Studies after discussion with the student's advisor but normally will be 
30 credits of coursework applicable to a graduate degree, 21 of which must be at the 600 level or above, and normally 24 
credits must be from the Department of Geology, or in the case of an interdisciplinary study, an appropriate program 
approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The Ph.D. degree requirements include satisfactory completion of course 
work, defense of a research proposal, an oral candidacy and research proposal examination, and a successful dissertation 
defense. The Ph.D. commonly requires three to four years of work, if conducted after the completion of an M.S. program, or 
four to five years from the time of admission if pursued directly from the bachelor level. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains a suite of state-of-the-art facilities and equipment for research, including: three solid source mass 
spectrometers, six gas source mass spectrometers, with inlet devices for inorganic and organic isotope analyses, single and 
multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICP-MS), three UV lasers for in situ analyses with gas- 
source and plasma mass spectrometer, two chemical clean labs, with ion chromatographic facilities, JEOL 8900 superprobe 
with an Oxford instrument mini-cathodoluminescence detector, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes, color 
image analysis system, fluid inclusion stage, high temperature and high pressure equipment for dry or hydrothermal 
experiments, diamond anvil cell facilities, including laser heating and external heating, two triaxial deformation apparatii with 
flow through capacity and acoustic emission recording, flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption equipment, 
spectrophotometers, HPLC with fluorescence detector, UV lamps and monochronometer for photochemistry, anoxic 
chamber, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) computational laboratory, electromagnetic and acoustic doppler velocity 
meters, laboratory and field hydrogeology equipment, campus drill rig, microstructures and fabrics analysis instruments, 
research microscopes with reflectance capabilities, rock preparation and mineral separation laboratories, computer network 



194 



with direct access to supercomputer facilities, nitrogen Permeameter 400, helium Porosimeter 300, Solaris Impedance 

Meters. 

Further information is found at the following URL http://www.geol.umd.edu/labs.htm 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate students are eligible for Departmental teaching assistantships, Graduate School fellowships and grant-supported 

fellowships and research assistantships. In addition, some curatorial, library and other part-time work is sometimes 

available. 

Contact Information 

See the Department of Geology Web page at URL http://www.. geol.umd.edu for additional information. The Department's 

Graduate Studies in Geological Sciences also provides additional information on the requirements, examinations, faculty 

research interests and publications, research facilities and financial aid. Copies are available from: 

Graduate Coordinator 

1118 Geology Building, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4065 

geolgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.geol.umd.edu/ 

Courses: GEOL 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Geospatial Information Sciences (MPSG) 

Abstract 

The Master of Professional Studies and Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Sciences Program is dedicated to 

providing the most up-to-date training on geospatial technology, theory and applications. The courses cover spatial analysis, 

remote sensing, spatial statistics, modeling, programming, spatial databases, and Internet GIS. Students in this program can 

pursue either a Master degree or Graduate Certificate. 

In the program, lectures are delivered across the Internet using advanced audio and video technology. Students use 

webcams and headsets with microphones to attend lectures in real time. The entire online lectures (lecture slides, 

presentation, and Q&A interactions) are video-archived for reviewing. Students also have the option to come to campus to 

meet fellow students and the Teaching Assistant in the lab during lecture hours. All courses are scheduled in the evenings to 

accommodate working professionals. 

Our program is one of the ESRI Development Centers (EDCs). 

Admissions Information 

The Graduate School requires all admitted graduate students to have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited 

college or university in the United States, or the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree in another country. A GPA of 3.0 is 

normally required for admission into this program. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may be admitted 

on a provisional basis. 

Applicants with foreign credentials must submit academic records in the original language with literal English translations. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: March 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Preferred: January 31 





Application Requirements 

1 . Graduate Application form 

2. Transcripts from all universities/colleges attended 

3. Cover letter or personal statement 

4. C.V. 

5. A list of three references (the recommendation letters are not required at the time of application) 

6. GRE is not required 

7. International students are required to submit TOEFL scores. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) 

Students choosing the Master of Professional Studies degree track need to complete 31 credit hours of approved 
coursework with an average grade of B. 



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Graduate Certificate (GC) 

Students choosing the Graduate Certificate track need to complete 12 credit hours of approved coursework with an average 

grade of B. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Even though this is an online program, all registered students have full access to the facilities and resources (e.g. libraries, 

gym, computer labs) on campus just like any other traditional student. Students also have full access to the resources (e.g. 

computer labs, software applications, seminars, etc.) in the Geography Department as regular graduate students. The 

program has a dedicated lab for its students as well where they can study or take lectures in a real environment if they want 

to. 

Financial Assistance 

There are no fellowships available in this program. However, there are potential Teaching Assistantships available 

depending on the student's qualification. 

Contact Information 

Email: geog-gis@umd.edu Phone: 301-405-3861 

Dr. Jianguo (Jack) Ma, Program Director 

University of Maryland Department of Geography 1 133 LeFrak Hall 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301.405.3861 

Fax: 301 .31 4.9299 

jma3@umd.edu 

http://www.geog.umd.edu/gis 

Courses: GEOG 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Geography 

German Literature and Language (GERM) 

Abstract 

The German Program of the Department of Germanic Studies offers graduate study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The main focus is on Modern German Studies combining both discipline-based and interdisciplinary courses. The 

intellectual focus of the degrees is German-speaking Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, as represented in 

literary and non-literary texts, and other cultural productivity. 

The degrees reflect the paradigm shift within the field of German language and literature expanding the focus of Germanistik 

to a broader concentration on cultural studies which include gender studies, film studies, and postcolonial theory. 

A concentration in Medieval Studies is also offered on an interdepartmental basis. 

Admissions Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, candidates should have a bachelor's degree with a major in German 

language and literature or the equivalent, and fluency in the written and spoken language. Candidates for the doctorate must 

have a master's degree in German or in a related discipline such as Germanic studies, Scandinavian studies, language 

education, and Medieval studies. The Program is seeking approval to allow candidates with a BA to enter the Ph.D. Program 

earning the M.A. on the way. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: October 15 
Preferred: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . No Tests 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Writing Sample 

4. Oral Interview (in person or by phone) with Graduate Director 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. For the thesis option, the student must complete 24 
hours of coursework, the thesis with oral defense and a written comprehensive examination. The non-thesis option requires 



196 



30 hours of coursework, a mini-thesis with oral defense and a written comprehensive examination. For both options the 

comprehensives consist of two three-hour examinations based on the coursework and the M.A. reading list. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows: 1 ) completion of at least 24 hours of coursework beyond the master's 

degree over a period of at least one year at the University of Maryland and a further 12 hours of dissertation research; 2) a 

reading skill examination in a language other than English or German, which may be another Germanic language or a 

language related to the candidate's research; 3) comprehensive written examinations; 4) presentation of the dissertation, an 

original study in the field of specialization on a topic approved by the advisor and the examining committee; and 5) the oral 

defense of the dissertation (one to two hours). 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to its course offerings listed below, the German Program of the Department of Germanic Studies sponsors the 

German Club, the University of Maryland Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha (the national German language honors society). The 

department participates in the University Honors Programs and has a departmental honors program. Distinguished scholars 

and lecturers as well as visiting professors visit the metropolitan area and campus regularly. College Park's proximity to 

Washington, D.C., facilitates participation in the many cultural functions of the capital with its wealth of German and 

Scandinavian social groups and national societies: the Embassies of Austria, Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden, 

Switzerland; the German Historical Institute, and the Goethe Institute. 

Financial Assistance 

The German Program offers graduate fellowships and teaching assistantships, and the Graduate School offers, on a 

competitive basis, fellowships, and grants. 

Contact Information 

For further information write to: 

Professor Peter Beicken, Director of Graduate Studies 

3215 Jimenez Hall 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4091 

germanicstudies @ .umd.edu 

http://www.languages.umd.edu/German/ 
Courses: GERM 



Government and Politics (GVPT) 

Abstract 

The Department of Government and Politics offers a Ph.D. degree in political science, intended primarily for those planning 
academic careers. Students can specialize in American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political 
economy and political theory (either formal or normative). In addition, students can study in depth more specialized fields 
such as public law, national security, public policy, political psychology, international and inter-ethnic conflict, international 
political economy, urban politics, post-Soviet and post-communist studies, East-Asian studies, environmental politics, and 
the politics of advanced industrial societies. 
Admissions Information 

The Department recruits highly qualified students, and admits only a limited number of the strongest applicants. The 
Admissions Committee rarely grants provisional or conditional admission to the graduate program. The Department does not 
usually admit M.A. applicants. Only students whose ultimate objective is the Ph.D. should apply for direct admission to that 
program. Admission is granted only for the Fall Semester. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Writing Sample 

4. statement of purpose 

5. transcripts 



197 



Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The doctoral program is intended to provide students with the knowledge, methodological skills and research experience 

appropriate for persons who intend to enter the discipline of political science. Students must complete 42 hours of graduate 

work including courses in political theory and research methods and pass written comprehensive examinations in two fields. 

Although formal coursework and field examinations are important components of the doctoral program, the research 

component, especially in the form of the dissertation is paramount. Consequently students who are able to demonstrate an 

interest in quality research activities and desire to become creators as well as consumers of knowledge are appropriate for 

the doctoral program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Graduate students in the department participate in the activities of the Public Service Intern Program, Project ICONS, the 

Center for International Development and Conflict Management, the Maryland Collective Choice Center, the Center for 

International Security Studies at Maryland, the Center for the Study of Post-Communist Societies, The Committee on the 

Political Economy of the Good Society, the Center for the Study of American Politics and Citizenship, and the Harrison 

Program on the Future Global Agenda. 

Financial Assistance 

In addition to fellowships and teaching assistantships, the Department also has a public service intern program for students 

interested in State government. There are also a limited and variable number of research positions available. 

Contact Information 

Further information, including a manual on graduate study, please contact: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

3140 Tydings Hall 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4161 

g vptgrad @ deans.umd.edu 

http://www.bsos.umd.edu/gvpt/ 
Courses: GVPT 



Graduate Certificate: Computational Harmonic Analysis (Z023) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies - Real Estate Development 
(Z029) 

Abstract 

The Graduate Certificate in Real Estate Development is a 4 to 7 course sequence, depending on the work experience and 
academic preparation of the applicant. The Certificate is generally the first 4 courses of the Master of Real Estate 
Development degree, and those courses may be counted toward the MRED degree upon completion of the certificate if the 
student applies and is accepted into the MRED degree program. Successful completion of the 4 courses is a good indicator 
that a student will be admitted, if they apply, to the MRED program. Up to three additional leveling courses may be required 
before moving on to the 4 core certificate courses, depending on the background and experience of the applicant. 

198 



Like the MRED degree program, there is more information about all the graduate programs, as well as dual degrees 

available with historic preservation and architecture at the web site www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development. 

The Certificate is designed for obtaining the introductory basics of real estate development, for those who may not yet have 

determined to make their career in the field. 

Generally students take 1 (or at most 2) courses per term, and can finish within a year if no additional leveling courses are 

required. 

Like the MRED degree program, there is more information about all the graduate programs, as well as dual degrees 

available with historic preservation and architecture at the web site www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development. 

Admissions Information 

Acceptance to the Certificate program is competitive. Applicants are required to have a minimum undergraduate grade point 

average (GPA) of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale from an accredited University. Applicants who demonstrate a strong interest and 

aptitude with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered on a case by case basis if they show a strong aptitude and/or experience 

in the field. Such applicants are admitted provisionally based on meeting grade expectations in the program and often may 

require additional courses to be taken. 

A GRE, LSAT or GMAT score is required, unless the applicant has work experience post undergraduate school of 5 years or 

more. 

No transfer credits from graduate work in other programs at the University of Maryland, or other academic institutions, are 

accepted towards the Certificate. 

Incoming students are required to take a non-credit Saturday Executive Skill writing and presentation course during their first 

semester. This is generally 5 half-days and cannot be waived. There may be a small fee for the course, and is required to 

proceed with the Certificate on a pass/fail basis, but is a non-credit coaching course. 

Application Requirements 

1. Complete application form on line (select code GCPS-RED) 

2. Have all academic institutions send paper official transcripts to the admissions office. 

3. Provide standardized GRE, GMAT or LSAT scores unless you earned your undergraduate degree more than 5 years prior 
to the date of application in which case scores may be waived depending on other qualifications. 

FOR THE REMAINING REQUIREMENTS SUBMIT BY EMAIL to mmcf@umd.edu 

4. Have two references send in a letter of recommendation from either academic or professional perspective 

5. Submit a resume of your work experience and educational background 

6. Submit a statement of your reasons for seeking real estate education and how you plan to use your knowledge; include 
an assessment of your skill with Excel spread sheets and financial calculator(s) (use scale of: none, some, moderately skills, 
highly skilled). 

7. You may request a telephone or on-campus interview, but it is not required. 
Degree Requirements 

Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies -- Real Estate Development (GCPS) 

A 12 - 21 credit introductory program to real estate development. Recommended for those considering whether to move into 

the real estate development field full time. Courses may be applied to the Master of Real Estate Development Program, if a 

student determines to go on. 

The 4 core courses of the Certificate are Development Law, Process and Ethics; Fundamentals of Development Finance, 

and two of the following: Principles of Urban Design, Essentials of Property Management, Planning Policy, Principles and 

Politics, and Construction Management. For students without academic preparation in finance, accounting and economics 

additional leveling courses are required in those areas before proceeding to the 4 core courses. 

Students may begin the Certificate program in either the Fall or Spring terms. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis, 

but admission decisions are primarily made in March to May (Fall admissions) and September to November (Spring 

admissions. 

Applications for Fall should be in by July 1 ; Applications for Spring term should be in by November 1 . 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Facilities and Special Resources available to MRED (Master of Real Estate Development students) are generally 

available to Graduate Certificate students. Although, certificate students may not participate in supported competitions, and 

financial aid may be more limited. To read about the extent of the facilities and special resources available please check the 

catalogue of the RDEV program. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial Assistance is generally not available for Certificate students taking less than 3 courses, but you should check with 

the University's financial aid office about the availability and applications for loans. Contact the Program Director after 

application as to any available scholarship assistance, which depending on the term may or may not be available for 

Certificate students. 

Contact Information 

You will find more information about the Graduate Programs in Real Estate Development at the University of Maryland at 

www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development 

Margaret McFarland, JD, Director, Graduate Programs in Real Estate Development 

Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development, ARC Building 145, Room 1243 

MD 20742 

mmcf@umd.edu 



199 



www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (Z037) 

Abstract 

The Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) Program offers a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate for students pursuing 
graduate degrees in related departmental programs. This certificate program allows students to obtain significant 
interdisciplinary training that complements their graduate degree in a NACS-related discipline. The NACS Certificate serves 
to acknowledge this training. 
Admissions Information 

Only students enrolled in a Ph.D. degree program at the University of Maryland, College Park will be eligible for the NACS 
Certificate. Students enrolled in the NACS Ph.D. program are not eligible. Interested students are encouraged to contact the 
NACS office for advisement on coordinating the NACS Certificate requirements with their Ph.D. requirements. Admission will 
be at the discretion of the NACS Graduate Director, with the advice and consent of the NACS Executive Committee. 
Students must submit a letter to the NACS Graduate Director requesting admission to the Certificate Program and outlining 
their plan of study for the NACS Certificate. Students must also identify a NACS faculty member to serve as their Certificate 
advisor. In many cases this may be the student's existing departmental Ph.D. advisor. Study for the Certificate must be 
completed by the end of the fifth year after admission to the program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

1) Completed application to the NACS Certificate program. 2) PDF copy of unofficial UM transcript. 3) Letter from primary 

advisor endorsing the application to the NACS Certificate program. All files should be submitted electronically, with a strong 

preference for PDF files. Please use transparent file names that start with your name, i.e., smith_application.pdf, 

smith_transcript.pdf, smith_endorsement.pdf. Send files together in ONE email message to Pam Komarek, NACS Assistant 

Director, at pkomarek@umd.edu. 

Degree Requirements 

Certificate () 

Students must earn a minimum of 16 credits through completing the following courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better in 

each class. 1) Students must complete a core of 10 credits, in addition to their Ph.D. course requirements, comprising at 

least two of the courses within the NACS core curriculum (NACS641 , NACS642, NACS643, NACS644, NACS728Y, all 4 

credit courses) and two semesters of NACS 608, Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Seminar, one credit per semester. 2) 

Students must complete at least 6 additional credits from graduate courses approved by the NACS program. The student's 

NACS advisor and the NACS Graduate Director must approve the courses taken to fulfill these credits. Courses taken at the 

400-level require the approval of the NACS Graduate Director. 

Financial Assistance 

Contact Information 

Assistant Director, Pam Komarek 

University of Maryland, 2131 Biology-Psychology Building, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8910 

Fax:301-314-9566 

pkomarek@umd.edu 

http://www.nacs.umd.edu/program/certificate.html 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Scientific Computation (Z014) 



200 



Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Terrorism Analysis (Z039) 

Abstract 

The National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) is dedicated to training and 
mentoring a new generation of scholars and analysts capable of examining questions related to the behavior of terrorists 
and terrorist groups and to the issue of how societies can best prepare for dealing with a terrorist threat or responding to a 
terrorist attack. START'S Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Analysis provides participants with advanced education on the 
causes, dynamics and impacts of international and domestic terrorism. Participants also develop the methodological skills 
necessary to pursue advanced research on and analysis of terrorism. The program consists of four required courses. Each 
course is offered once per calendar year, in an online, synchronous learning environment. The program can be completed in 
12 months. 

The Program is appropriate for Individuals interested in (and/or currently) working in fields related to intelligence analysis, 

homeland security analysis, or analysis of other relevant topic areas; and Individuals interested in (and/or currently) 

conducting scholarly research on terrorism and responses to terrorism. 

Admissions Information 

Students may enter the program at three points throughout the year. 

Term 1 - apply by Jan. 15, 2011 (International applicants, November 15) 

Term 2 - apply by April 1 5, 201 1 (International applicants, February 1 5) 

Term 3 - apply by July 15, 2011 (International applicants, May 15) 

All application materials must be received by the deadlines as described above. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

Eligible applicants must have earned a 4-year baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited U.S. institution, or an 
equivalent degree at a foreign university. A 3.0 GPA is preferred, but experience may substitute. GRE scores are not 
required. All applications must be submitted via the online application available at: 
www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/admission.html 

Applicants ARE required to complete the Application Supplemental Form. All applicants must provide: 

1 . Transcripts for all university-level coursework 



201 



2. A personal statement 

3. A resume 

4. Two recommendations 

5. One-time application fee of $75 to University of Maryland 

Degree Requirements 

Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Analysis () 

The Certificate is earned by successful completion of all four of Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Analysis courses. These 
courses may be taken in any order although students must have successfully completed one other class before enrolling in 
BSOS 633 Research Methods in Terrorism Studies. 

Graduate Certificate Courses 

Terrorist Motivations and Behaviors (BSOS 630) 

(Term 1 : March 1 , 201 - May 21 , 201 0) 

Focuses on theories explaining the formation of terrorist groups and the motivations behind terrorist behavior. 

Societal Impact of and Responses to Terrorism (BSOS 631) 

(Term 2: June 1 , 201 - Aug. 21 , 201 0) 

Examines ways in which different actors respond to both terrorist incidents and to the threat of terrorism. 

Development of Counterterrorism Policy and Programs (BSOS 632) 

(Term 3: Sept. 1 , 201 - Nov. 21 , 201 0) 

Explores counterterrorism policies and policy making processes and actors since 2001. 

Research Methods in Terrorism and Counterterrorism (BSOS 633) 

(Term 4: Dec. 1 , 201 - Feb. 21 , 201 1 ) 

Provides students with a basic understanding of the methods of quantitative research available to social scientists studying 

terrorism and counterterrorism. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The START center at UMD has pulled from its extensive experience in the field of terrorism research and analysis in order to 

formulated the Graduate Certificate curriculum with the intention of providing a well-rounded and sophisticated approach to 

the subject matter. Students are drawn from both the academic and professional worlds bringing a range of perspectives to 

the virtual classroom helping to cultivate a stimulating learning environment. 

Financial Assistance 

START does not currently provide financial assistance to Graduate Certificate students. 

Tuition 

Initial application fee: $75 

Tuition and fees per course: $2,100 

Please note: Students are responsible for purchasing their own books, software, and other supplies as required by each 

instructor. Students may be required to pay additional UMD student fees. 

Contact Information 

Education Coordinator Sarah Fishering 

National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism 

University of Maryland 

College Park 
MD, 20742 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-8504 

Fax:301-314-1980 

education@start.umd.edu 

http://www.start.umd.edu/start/education/graduate_certificate/ 
Courses: BSOS 



Graduate Certificate: Engineering (Z013) 

Abstract 

The Graduate Certificate in Engineering (GCEN) Program is a highly-focused practice oriented, part-time graduate program 
designed to assist engineers and technical professionals in the development of their careers and to provide the technical 

202 



expertise needed in the rapidly changing business, government, and industrial environments. The program is intended for 
individuals who may already have an advanced degree (e.g. a master's or doctoral degree) and do not find a full master's 
degree program an appropriate option, and it offers integrated sets of core/elective courses from all of the engineering 
departments. Late afternoon, evening, and online classes are taught by full-time faculty and experienced adjunct faculty at 
the campus in College Park and at designated learning centers throughout Maryland. 

Options are available in the following engineering disciplines: 
Aerospace Engineering 
Bioengineering 

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Energetic Concepts* 
Environmental Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering* 
Materials Science and Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering* 
Project Management* 
Reliability Engineering* 
Software Engineering 
Systems Engineering 
Technology Ventures and Entrepreneurship 



* available 100% online 

Admissions Information 

The Graduate Certificate in Engineering (GCEN) Program is open to qualified applicants holding a regionally 
accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering or a related field. In addition to submitting a Graduate School 
admission application with fee, a copy of the applicant's college transcripts is required for evaluation. Applicants 
with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may be admitted on a provisional basis if they have demonstrated a 
satisfactory experience in another graduate program and/or their work experience has been salutary. In that case, 
two recommendation letters are required as well. Applicants with foreign credentials must submit academic records 
in the original language with literal English translations. Please allow at least three months for evaluation of these 
credentials. We trust that you will find this 12 credit-hour program to be an affordable, convenient way to "retool" 
and keep current with the latest technological developments in your field, or perhaps to develop a new area of 
expertise so as to further your career. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

1 . Bachelor's degree in engineering or a related field 2. GRE not required 3. College transcripts 4. If GPA is below 

3.0, two recommendation letters are required 5. Graduate school admission application fee 6. In online application, 

select Graduate Certificate in Engineering as the major. 

Degree Requirements 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Courses in the Graduate Certificate in Engineering program are currently offered on the College Park campus, are 

available at off-campus centers, via Distance Education Technology and Services (DETS), which is a live 

interactive distance education system, and 100% online. Courses are available via DETS at the University of 

Maryland System Shady Grove Center in Montgomery County, the Higher Education and Applied Technology 

(HEAT) Center in Harford County, the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center in St. Mary's County, Frostburg 

State University in Allegany County, and University System of Maryland at Hagerstown in Washington County. 

Financial Assistance 

There are no assistantships or fellowships available in this program. 



203 



Contact Information 

For more specific information, contact: 

Dr. George Syrmos, Executive Director 

2123 J.M. Patterson Building, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-0362 

Fax:301-405-3305 

syrmos@umd.edu 

www.oaee.umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Easterling, Director 

2123 J.M. Patterson Building, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-0362 

Fax:301-405-3305 

kjames3@umd.edu 

www.oaee.umd.edu 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Historical Preservation (Z005) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Intermediate Survey Methodology (Z011) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 



204 



Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Jewish Studies (Z018) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



I 

Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Large Scale Assessment (Z015) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Literacy Coaching (Z038) 

Abstract 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction's (EDCI) literacy coach post-baccalaureate graduate certificate program is 
designed to prepare experienced, highly qualified middle and high school teachers to serve as literacy coaches in low 
performing middle and high schools. Literacy coaches are skilled content area collaborators who function effectively in 
middle school and/or high school settings for secondary teachers in the core content areas of English language arts, 
mathematics, science, and social studies. They are skilled evaluators of literacy needs within various subject areas and are 
able to collaborate with secondary school leadership teams and teachers to interpret and use literacy assessment data to 
inform instruction. Finally, literacy coaches are accomplished middle and high school teachers who are skilled in developing 
and implementing instructional strategies to improve academic literacy in the four targeted content areas. The program 
courses focus on a) reading, cognition, and instruction across content areas, b) diagnostic reading assessment and 
instruction, c) teaching ESOL reading and writing in secondary content areas, d) assessing, diagnosing, and teaching writing 



205 



across content areas, e) TESOL, special education, and assistive technology, and f) coaching and mentoring teachers. In 
addition, literacy coach candidates participate in school district professional development workshops mapped onto the 
literacy coach coursework. The EDCI literacy coach program addresses the Standards for Middle and High School Literacy 
Coaches (International Reading Association, 2006). Upon successful completion of the literacy coach program, candidates 
receive a graduate literacy coach certificate from the University of Maryland. 

EDCI Literacy Coaching Program Courses 

EDCI 763: Reading, Cognition, and Instruction: Reading Across Content Areas (3 cr.) 
EDCI 662: Diagnostic Reading Assessment and Instruction (3 cr.) 
EDCI 646: Coaching and Mentoring Teachers: Literacy Across Content Areas (3 cr.) 
EDCI 638: Teaching ESOL Reading and Writing in Secondary Content Areas (3 cr.) 
EDCI 673: Assessing, Diagnosing, and Teaching Writing Across Content Areas (3 cr.) 
EDCI 632: Special Education, TESOL, Assistive Technology: Reading and Writing (3 cr.) 

Admissions Information 

Application Requirements 

• Applicants should be highly qualified middle or high school teachers. 

• Typically, the application deadline is March 15. 

• Contact Elizabeth Johnson and/or Wayne Slater in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) for additional information. Refer to 
their contact information included below for email addresses and phone numbers. Email or phone contacts preferred. Please do not fax 
inquiries. 

Degree Requirements 

Graduate Certificate () 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Please refer to the "EDCI Literacy Coaching OnLine Resources" available at 
http://www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/info/litcoach/. 
Financial Assistance 
Contact Information 

Elizabeth E. Johnson, Program Management Specialist II 

University of Maryland Department of Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) 231 1 Benjamin Building 

College Park 

MD 20742-1175 

Telephone: (301) 405-3153 

Fax:(301)314-9055 

ejohnson@umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/info/litcoach/index.htm 

Dr. Wayne Slater 

University of Maryland Department of Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) 231 1 Benjamin Building 

College Park 

MD 20742-1175 

Telephone: (301) 405-3128 

Fax:(301)314-9055 

wslater@umd.edu 

Courses: EDCI 



Graduate Certificate: Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology 
(Z022) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







206 



Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Survey Statistics (Z010) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Graduate Certificate: Urban Design (Z012) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP) 

Abstract 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences provides the opportunity for advanced graduate study in the 
communication sciences and disorders. At the M.A. level, a degree with a concentration in Speech-Language Pathology is 
offered (Applicants should see SPLA and use this code when applying for admission to study). A clinical doctorate in 
Audiology is also offered (Applicants should see CAUD and use this code when applying for admission to study). At the 
doctoral level, the Ph.D. is offered in Hearing and Speech Sciences, with concentrations in Hearing, Speech or Language. 
Students applying to the Ph.D. program can opt to receive an MA in Speech-Language Pathology en route to the final 
degree. 



207 



Admissions Information 

Admission to the M.A. and doctoral programs is on a very competitive basis. Each year, the Department receives 
approximately 250 applications for 25 anticipated spaces in the M.A. program in Speech-Language Pathology. Successful 
M.A. applicants typically have earned at least a 3.5 undergraduate GPA, and have strong GRE scores and letters of 
recommendation. Students admitted to the Au.D. or Clinical Ph.D. programs in Audiology must have a minimum grade point 
average of 3.2 from a master's degree program or 3.4 from a baccalaureate program in hearing and speech sciences or a 
related discipline. Candidates admitted to the Ph.D. program satisfy even more competitive criteria. In addition to the 
Graduate School requirements, the Department requires applicants to furnish scores on the Graduate Record Examination. 
Admission to the M.A. and CAUD programs is primarily confined to fall matriculation, although students may enter the 
program in the summer session to complete undergraduate pre-requisites. Prospective applicants should note that decisions 
on summer and fall admissions are made in early March. Early application is encouraged. 

Applicants with an undergraduate degree in the hearing and speech sciences or a related field are considered for admission 
to the M.A., Au.D. and Clinical Ph.D. programs, which usually require two, four and five-six years of graduate study, 
respectively. Individuals without a background in the hearing and speech sciences who are pursuing a clinical degree (Au.D. 
or M.A.) typically require an additional year to complete degree and clinical certification requirements. Only full-time students 
are admitted to these post-BA programs. A "fast track" of the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) program is available to practicing 
audiologists. Applicants to this fast track must have a graduate degree in Audiology with a minimum grade point average of 
3.2 in graduate work, and either the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A) or a valid state license 
to practice audiology. Admissions requirements further include a minimum of two years of full-time (32 hours/week) post- 
masters professional audiological experience during the two years immediately preceding the application to the program and 
three letters of recommendation supporting these experiences. Students may enroll in the post-M.A. Au.D. program on a 
part-time basis. 

Admission to the Ph.D. degree program may be offered to applicants with either a Bachelor's or Master's degree, although a 
clinical graduate degree is often required in addition to the Ph.D. degree for employment in some university settings. 
Students who wish to receive both degrees can apply to the Ph.D. program and receive a clinical MA while working towards 
the doctoral degree. Requirements for completion of a program of doctoral study are dependent on a student's prior 
background in the communication sciences and disorders. 

Students who wish to focus primarily on research in communication sciences may apply either to the department directly, or 
may apply to the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) and select HESP as the home department. 
Students who apply to HESP directly may work towards receiving a certificate in NACS in addition to the HESP Ph.D. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate study 

4. statement of purpose 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Department also offers the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major emphasis in speech, language or hearing. 
Students with a B.A. or M.A. are considered for admission to the doctoral program. Matriculated doctoral students will 
choose within their major a special interest area, which may focus on the normal aspects of their major or disorders related 
to the major. A student must also select a minor area of study either from within or outside departmental offerings. There are 
no foreign language requirements, but advanced courses in statistics and experimental research design are required for the 
degree. Course programs are planned by the student and a committee of at least four faculty members. All doctoral students 
are expected to participate in varied research activities within the Department for academic credit. Students must take 
written and oral comprehensive examinations for admission to candidacy after completing formal academic course work. 
Doctoral students must register for at least 12 semester hours of dissertation research credit before completing the degree. 
A full description of the Doctoral program, as well as listings of faculty research expertise, can be found at the Departmental 
web site, listed below. 
Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences offers two doctoral degree options for individuals seeking a clinical 
doctorate in Audiology. See CAUD for more details. The Au.D. curriculum meets requirements specified in the Standards for 
the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A) of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The 
CCC-A is the minimum qualification for practice in Audiology required by most states and jurisdictions. The Au.D. program 
for post-BA students requires 57 hours of graduate coursework, 6 credit hours for a doctoral research project, 14 hours of 
clinical practicum registration and 18 credit hours of full-time clinical internship registration, for a total of 95 credit hours. 

208 



Au.D. students must pass comprehensive examinations and complete a research project. Full-time students are expected to 
complete the program in 4 years. The Au.D. "fast-track" program for returning students who already hold an M.A. degree in 
Audiology and Clinical Certification requires 30 credit hours of graduate coursework and 6 credit hours for a doctoral 
research project. There is no minimum requirement of supervised clinical practicum experience, although clinical practicum 
will be available to students as needed. The Clinical Ph.D. track in Audiology is designed for students wishing to be trained 
as scientist-practitioners. The Clinical Ph.D. program requires 60 credits of graduate coursework, 6 credit hours of pre- 
candidacy research, 12 credit hours of dissertation research, 12 credit hours of clinical practicum registration, and 18 credit 
hours of full-time clinical internship registration, for a total of 1 08 credit hours. The Clinical Ph.D. curriculum is designed to 
meet requirements specified in the Standards for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A) of the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and by the Graduate School. Ph.D. students must develop an individual 
study plan with the approval of a faculty Program Planning Committee, pass comprehensive examinations, and complete a 
dissertation and oral defense. Full-time students are expected to complete the program in approximately 5-6 years. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences offers the Master of Arts degree with major emphasis in Speech- 
Language Pathology with either the thesis or the non-thesis option. The Master's degree is required by national credentialing 
standards for individuals intending to practice as speech pathologists in schools, hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, hearing 
and speech centers or in other clinical settings. Academic course work, which includes a minimum of 36 credits, is 
supplemented by additional credit registrations in supervised clinical practice in the University Speech and Hearing Clinic 
and in selected outside clinical facilities so that the graduate will meet the academic and practicum requirements for the 
Certificate of Clinical Competence (C.C.C.) issued by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and be eligible 
for licensure in the State of Maryland and other jurisdictions. The Master's degree program is accredited by the Council on 
Academic Accreditation, the national accrediting agency which oversees graduate programs in Speech-Language Pathology 
and Audiology. A full description of the Master's degree program is available at our web site, listed below. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's facilities include (1) numerous modern research laboratories equipped to support research in the areas of: 
acoustic phonetics, psychoacoustics, infant and adult speech perception, neuropsychology, language and language 
development, voice, fluency and electrophysiology. There are four sound-attenuating chambers, one semi-anechoic 
chamber, and one electrically-shielded chamber, devoted to research with humans, which are all integrated with computers 
and peripheral equipment for acoustic signal development, signal analysis, presentation and on-line data collection; (2) a 
Departmental library; (3) the Hearing and Speech Clinic at UMCP: this clinic serves as the initial practicum site for all 
students pursuing clinical training. The Clinic includes multiple audiological test suites equipped for diagnostic testing, a 
complete hearing aid dispensary, a group rehabilitation room, and state-of-the-art equipment for behavioral and 
electrophysiological diagnostic testing, as well as hearing aid selection and fitting. Ten speech and language diagnostic and 
therapy rooms are integrated with observation areas; and (4) an on-site language pre-school (LEAP, the Language-Learning 
Early Advantage Program), also equipped for observation. Students pursuing clinical training in Audiology will also have 
access to the Audiology Service, Division of Audiology-Head and Neck Surgery, of the University of Maryland and University 
Hospital in Baltimore (UMB), for part-time clinical rotations or full-time clinical externships. This Service provides a full range 
of auditory and vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative services in a large metropolitan hospital setting. Externally-funded 
research projects are an integral part of the activities at UMB. All of the clinical and research facilities are potentially 
available for the conduct of student-directed research projects, or for student participation in faculty-initiated research 
projects. Additional research and clinical facilities are available in the Washington and Baltimore metropolitan areas. The 
Library of Congress, the National Library of Medicine and the libraries of various medical schools in the Washington - 
Baltimore area supplement the University's extensive libraries at College Park. 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences participates in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences graduate 
program (see NACS), the Comparative and Evolutionary Biology of Hearing Training Grant, the Biological and 
Computational Foundations of Language IGERT Training Grant, and has ties to the Center for Advanced Study of Language 
(CASL); these connections afford students the opportunity to work with faculty in other departments at the University of 
Maryland, College Park, or at UMB. 
Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships and fellowships are available through the Department. Assistantships that carry 
teaching, research or clinical responsibilities are awarded on a competitive basis. The Department recommends outstanding 
students for Graduate School Fellowships; many of these fellowships have early deadlines for recommendations, so 
students are encouraged to submit their applications to the department early to ensure full consideration. Students may also 
seek assistantships or doctoral fellowships sponsored by Federal agencies (e.g., NIH or NSF) or private foundations (e.g., 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation). Students are encouraged to apply for assistantships by January 15. 
Contact Information 

Additional information about the M.A. and Ph.D. programs may be obtained by contacting Dr. Rochelle Newman, Ph.D., 
Graduate Director, or by e-mailing the program at admissions@hesp.umd.edu; extensive information about the 
Department's programs, its faculty, research and facilities may be found at our web site: http://www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp 
Director of Graduate Studies: Rochelle Newman, Ph.D. 
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 
0100 LeFrak Hall, College Park 
MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-4214 
Fax:301-314-2023 

209 



admissions@hesp.umd.edu 

http://www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp 

Courses: HESP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Communication 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Linguistics 

Higher Education and International Education (EDHI) 

Abstract 

The mission of Higher Education and International Education (EDHI) program is to prepare leaders, policy analysts, 
scholars, and researchers to improve education within a wide range of settings, formal and non-formal, public and private, 
and across local, state, regional, national, and international contexts. The program is comprised of faculty who have defined 
and informed areas of research and practice in higher education, comparative and international education. Faculty are 
scholars, and scholar practitioners, who have held leadership positions in key organizations and are committed to equity, 
diversity and social justice. The program is a collaborative community that develops theory, conducts research and 
translates these to practice, to engage students, educators, and professionals in the advancement of education. 
The program of Higher Education and International Education (EDHI) consists of the following: 
Graduate Degrees Offered: 

Higher Education: M.A., Ph.D. International Education Policy: M.A., Ph.D. 

Only one area of specialization must be included on the application. Before applying students should familiarize themselves 
with each program area and choose the one that most closely fits their own particular needs and aspirations. The 
Department web site (www.education.umd.edu/EDHI) offers descriptions of all the programs, faculty profiles and contact 
information, and is an essential resource for all applicants. 
Admissions Information 

To be recommended for full admission to a doctoral or master's program, a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 
3.0 is required. A minimum graduate grade point average of 3.5 is required for doctoral programs. Of the three scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantitative, analytic), at least one should be at the 70th percentile or higher for PhD 
applicants (40th percentile or higher for master's applicants) and none should be under the 40th percentile for PhD 
applicants. If the Miller Analogies Test is used, the score should be at least at the 70th percentile for PhD applicants (40th 
percentile for master's applicants). Students who do not meet one of these requirements, but show other evidence of 
outstanding potential, may be considered for provisional admission. Admission of qualified applicants is based on their 
competitive ranking to limit enrollments to available faculty resources. For more information on admissions please refer to 
our website at www.education.umd.edu/edhi and click on prospective students. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 
Preferred: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . Official transcripts from each college or university previously attended 2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 3. Statement of 
Goals, Research Interests and Experiences 4. Scholarly writing sample for ALL doctoral applicants and both master's and 
doctoral applicants to the Higher Education and International Education Policy areas 5. Resume/vita for all applicants to the 
Higher Education and International Education Policy specializations 6. GRE or Miller Analogy Test 7. It is strongly 
recommended that prospective students talk with program coordinators and faculty, and visit the Department and classes, to 
help determine if the Department's programs are appropriate to their academic interests and professional goals. For detailed 
information about our programs please visit our website at www.education.umd.edu/edhi and click on academics. 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) 

Ph.D. students are required to take a minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor's degree, some of which may be satisfied 
by prior study. In addition to major and elective courses, this includes 12 to 15 credits in research methods, an internship, 
and 12 credits of dissertation research. After students have completed most of their course work, a 12-hour comprehensive 
examination is required. The comprehensive exam may take a variety of forms, such as take-home conceptual essays, 
literature reviews, research papers, or "in-house" closed book responses. 


210 



Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The minimum number of credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree required of master's degree students is 36 credit hours 

in Higher Education. The minimum number of credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree for International Education is 30. In 

addition to major and elective courses, this includes 6 to 9 credits in research methods. Field experience is required for all 

specializations except International Education Policy. Master's students preparing a thesis must orally defend the thesis and 

take a 3 hour written comprehensive examination. Students under the non-thesis option must submit one to two seminar 

papers and write a 6 hour comprehensive examination. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Faculty and students in the Department work closely with area schools, colleges, universities, associations and other 

education-related organizations. Extensive resources in the Washington, D.C., area, including embassies and other 

international organizations, provide exceptional opportunities for internships and field experiences, research, and materials 

to enhance formal course experiences. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department has a very limited number of merit-based fellowships and graduate assistantships available to students. 

Fellowships are awarded to doctoral students in March only for the following fall semester. Assistantships are also awarded 

in the spring for the following fall semester, but occasionally an assistantship may become available at another time of year. 

Both fellowships and assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis. It is unrealistic to expect that all applicants who 

apply for financial aid will receive such assistance even if they are recommended for admission to the Graduate School. It is 

to the student's advantage to apply well before the published application deadlines and to submit a complete application 

package if they intend to be considered for a fellowship, assistantship, or other form of financial aid. It is a requirement that a 

student be admitted as a condition of eligibility. International students' applications are not considered complete and are not 

reviewed by the Department until they have received International Education Services (IES) clearance which can take 

additional time. If you need information about IES clearance visit the IES website at www.umd.edu/ies. For more information 

on financial assistance, see the department web site: http://www.education.umd.edu/EDHI/. 

Contact Information 

For Additional information and application procedures, please visit our web site: www.education.umd.edu/EDHI/ 

Carol Ordiales Scott, Graduate Coordinator 

Higher Education and International Education University of Maryland 3214 Benjamin Building 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8384 

Fax:301-405-9995 

cscott18@umd.edu 

http://www.education.umd.edu/edhi 
Courses: EDPL 



Historic Preservation (HISP) 

Abstract 

Based in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, the Historic Preservation Program is a collaboration of 
faculty from across the University-from the departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, History, 
Landscape Architecture, and Urban Studies and Planning, as well as the National Trust Library. Our shared goal is 
educating professionals for work in a wide range of preservation organizations. Research on historic preservation issues is 
also a focus of the Program, pursued through faculty and student projects, in partnership with preservation organizations 
and University partners. 

The Historic Preservation Program offers a Master of Historic Preservation (MHP)degree, a graduate Certificate, and several 
dual degrees (with Architecture, Planning, and Real Estate Development. The MHP is designed as a full-time, two-year 
curriculum leading to a professional degree. The 45-credit MHP curriculum includes core courses, an internship, an 
interdisciplinary studio course, a final project, and a large selection of electives to stimulate each student's particular 
interests. Students will be admitted to the program with a variety of backgrounds but with a demonstrated prior interest in the 
preservation field. (In some exceptional cases, students may be admitted to the program on a part-time basis.) 
Admissions Information 

The application process consists of two steps. First, fill out the on-line application for the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. The administrative code for the Master of Historic Preservation degree is "HISP." Second, send the other elements 
of the application package (see below) to Enrollment Services Office-Graduate Admissions, Room 0130 Mitchell Building, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD20742. 

All applicants must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, and a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 on a 
4.0 scale. There is no restriction on the applicants' previous field of study, and indeed we encourage diversity in all senses. 
Applications and information on applying to the Master of Historic Preservation degree are available by contacting the 
Director, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, or email to hisp-grad@deans.umd.edu. 

211 



Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1 . Complete application form:(On-line version) 

2. Academic credentials (unofficial to academic unit): 

3. Standardized test scores: Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

4. Letters of Recommendation: Three confidential letters from individuals familiar with the applicant's work (at least one of them a previous 
professor) 

5. Statement of Goals, Research Interests, and Experiences: 1 ,000-2,000 word statement of graduate goals, research interests, and 
experiences. 

6. Writing sample (this can be previous academic work or professional work; it does not necessarily have to be related to historic preservation; 
it must be individual work). In addition, applicants may submit samples of graphic work. Please submit copies, as this material is not 
returnable 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Historic Preservation (M.H.P.) 

The Master of Historic Preservation (MHP) requires completion of 45 credits. Required courses cover history and theory of 

preservation, preservation law, historical research methods, documentation, conservation, preservation economics, 

preservation planning & policy, group studio/workshop, internship, and independent final project. Elective courses may be 

taken from all contributing HISP units, and other departments with prior approval from the HISP Director. A description of the 

full MHP curriculum is available on the program web site at http://www.arch.umd.edu. 

Dual Degree Program in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development (HPDV) 

This is a dual degree program in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development with course requirements overlapping 

such that a student can qualify for both degrees with some careful planning with an extra semester of course work. I is 

recommended that applicants consult with the program directors of both HISP and RDEV before proceeding with the 

application. Differential tuition rates are likely to be instituted at some point after which all courses taken will be subject to the 

adjusted rate. The dual degree does allow for students to obtain both degrees with fewer credits than would be required 

taking the two degrees independently. 

Dual Degree Program in Architecture and Historic Preservation (ARHP) 

The dual degree combines course work from the Architecture and Historic Preservation programs to enable a student to 

complete both the Master of Architecture and Master of Historic Preservation degrees with fewer credits than it would take to 

complete the two separately. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University of Maryland's Historic Preservation Program is privileged to be part of a dynamic, successful preservation 

community that has long thrived throughout the state and in the District of Columbia. Opportunities to study and work 

abound in the incredibly diverse cities, towns, and landscapes across Maryland. In addition, the Program enjoys close 

relationships with many state, local, national, international and federal-government organizations working in historic 

preservation, as well as non-profit groups and private firms. 

The HISP program is directly related to and substantially enhanced by the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library, 

housed on the College Park campus since 1986 [http://www.lib.umd.edu/NTL/ntl.html]. This Library is one of the leading 

scholarly resources for preservation in the country. The program is further strengthened by close working relationships with 

the Maryland Historical Trust, the National Park Service, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Maryland National 

Capital Park and Planning Commission, Historic Annapolis, Inc., Preservation Maryland, Prince George's Heritage, the 

Anacostia Trails Heritage Area, and others. Practical experience can be gained through a variety of internship opportunities 

with these organizations and many others. 

Financial Assistance 

HISP's principal form of financial aid consists of graduate assistantships related to research and outreach activities. The 

assistantships consist of tuition remission as well as a stipend. In addition, the Program awards-in conjunction with local 

non-profit Prince George's Heritage-the Prince George's Heritage Preservation Fellowship, an annual competitive award for 

a HISP student or students whose Prince George's County related project is judged to be especially outstanding. 

Additionally, there are possibilities for paid internships and paid part-time work with a variety of national and local 

organizations and governmental agencies. 

Contact Information 

Contact the program at the following address: 

HISP Graduate Admissions 

School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 



212 



University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

Or at the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation web site: http://www.arch.umd.edu 

Prof. Donald Linebaugh, Director 

School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 

University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-6309 

Fax:(301)314-9583 

hisp-grad@deans.umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu 

Courses: RDEV HISP ARCH URSP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Urban Studies and Planning 

Historic Preservation Certificate 

Architecture 

Urban and Regional Planning and Design 

Anthropology 

Architecture 

Real Estate Development 

Landscape Architecture 

Architecture and Real Estate Development 

Historic Preservation Certificate (HISP) 

Abstract 

The Historic Preservation Graduate Certificate program augments the degree work of Master of Architecture, Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy students in the seven cooperating academic units: American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, 
Geography, History, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, and Urban Studies and Planning. 
Admissions Information 

This 24-credit interdisciplinary program is designed to help prepare students for a range of careers in the planning, 

management and conservation of significant cultural, natural and historical resources. Through courses, seminars and 

internships, students develop the basic expertise to become researchers, interpreters, curators, restorationists, 

archaeologists, planners, conservators and administrators in the multi-faceted field of historic preservation. 

Students who seek the Certificate must meet general Graduate School requirements and normally they must have been 

admitted into one of the participating degree programs. Application is in the form of a letter to the Committee on Historic 

Preservation. In making its evaluation, the Committee will review relevant material in the Graduate School application. If 

appropriate, the applicant's record as a graduate student or resume generated through professional experience will be 

considered. Interested persons are advised to consult in advance with the chair of the Committee. 

Application Requirements 

Degree Requirements 

Historic Preservation Graduate Certificate (Certificate) 

Certificate students, in conjunction with their degree programs, complete the required introductory seminar (HISP 600), a 

survey of preservation law, 15 credit hours of core courses, and the final seminar (HISP 700). The total number of semester 

credit hours will vary according to the particular requirements of the specific degree program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Certificate program is directly related to and substantially enhanced by the National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Library housed on the College Park campus since 1986. The program is further strengthened by close working relationships 

with the National Park Service, the Maryland Historical Trust, the Maryland Hall of Records, the Maryland National Capital 

Park and Planning Commission, Historic Annapolis, Inc., Preservation Maryland, the Baltimore Commission for Historical 

and Architectural Preservation, the Maryland Heritage Alliance, the Maryland Historical Society, and the Montgomery and 

Prince George's County Historic Preservation Commissions. Practical experience can be gained through ongoing summer 

projects at the Chalfonte Hotel in Cape May, New Jersey and at Kiplin hall in North Yorkshire, England. 

Financial Assistance 

HISP's principal form of financial aid is the Prince George's Heritage Preservation Fellowship, an annual competitive award 

which provides a matching tuition waiver and stipend for a Certificate student whose Prince George's County related project 

is judged by the faculty and the sponsor to be especially outstanding and promising. Additionally, there are possibilities of 

paid internships with the National Park Service and the Historic American Building Survey/Historic American Engineering 

Record. Certificate students may be teaching assistants in related academic units. Also, students in the Certificate Program 

are specially eligible for the annual Prince George's County specific Margaret Cook Award, a cash prize endowed by the 

Historical and Cultural Trust of Prince George's County. The St. Clair Wright Historic Preservation Award is a cash award 

213 



given to a HISP student who demonstrates the principles of preservation activism exemplified by Mrs. Wright, founder and 

leader of Historic Annapolis. The Historic Preservation Faculty Prize is given to a student in a historic preservation course 

who has submitted a paper or project of outstanding quality on a topic in historic preservation. 

Contact Information 

Prof. Randall Mason, Director 

1298 School of Architecture College Park, MD 20742 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-6309 

Fax:(301)314-9583 

hisp-grad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.arch.umd.edu 

Courses: HISP 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Urban Studies and Planning 
Historic Preservation 
Anthropology 



Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development (HPDV) 

Dual degree programs, such as Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development, can have complicated requirements 

and applications. It is recommended that you consult with the Program Directors of each program before proceeding to 

apply. See contact information below. Application deadline for the program is December 15 for part I of the application and 

January 15 for the Supplemental Part II of the application. If you miss the deadline, you may apply and be considered for the 

real estate development program up until August 1st, but would have to apply for the Historic Preservation part of the dual 

degree program in the year following. The School has requested a differential tuition for in-state students in order to defray 

the higher cost of offering the dual degree program. The tuition differential, if approved, will be announced to all enrolled 

students, and will only be applied going forward for the semester following the announcement. 

Abstract 

Based in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, the Historic Preservation Program is a collaboration of 

faculty from across the University-from the departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, History, 

Landscape Architecture, and Urban Studies and Planning, as well as the National Trust Library. Our shared goal is 

educating professionals for work in a wide range of preservation organizations. Research on historic preservation issues is 

also a focus of the Program, pursued through faculty and student projects, in partnership with preservation organizations 

and University partners. 

The dual degree program in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development is a 60 credit program that can be 

completed, by taking courses full time over 5 semesters (2 1/2 years), including at least one winter and summer term 

course. While not preferred students may be admitted to the program on a part-time basis. Consult with the HISP Program 

Director. 

The final project for the HISP portion of the degree will also have to meet the requirements for a Capstone Project in real 

estate development and should be discussed early on with each Program Director to be sure it will meet the requirements of 

both. 

Admissions Information 

The application process consists of three steps. 

First, fill out the on-line application for the University of Maryland Graduate School. The administrative code for the dual 

degree in Master of Historic Preservation degree and Master of Real Estate Development is "HPDV." 

Second respond and attach all elements requested when the Admissions office of the University notifies you to do so by 

email. 

Third, send (or have sent by third parties, GRE, Transcripts) the other elements of the application package (see below) to 

Enrollment Services Office-Graduate Admissions, Room 0130 Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 

MD20742. 

All applicants must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, and a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 on a 

4.0 scale. There is no restriction on the applicants' previous field of study, and indeed we encourage diversity in all senses. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





214 



Application Requirements 

1. Complete application form:(On-line version) (Part I and Supplemental) 

2. Academic credentials (Send official sealed transcript to the admissions office; unofficial copy to academic unit)(UMCP 
undergrads no submission required 

3. Graduate Record Exam Scores (GRE) 

4. Letters of Recommendation: Three confidential letters from individuals familiar with the applicant's work (at least one of 
them a previous pro 

5. Statement of Goals, Research Interests, and Experiences: 1,000-2,000 word statement of graduate goals, research 
interests, and experiences and career aspirations upon completion of the dual degree. Include an assessment of your skill 
level and experience with Excel or financial calculators (HP12c or HP 17b). Provide your assessment as follows: no 
functional knowledge or experience, some/minimal, moderate/workable; extensive/experienced. 

6. Writing sample (this can be previous academic work or professional work; it does not necessarily have to be related to 
historic preservation; it must be individual work). In addition, applicants may submit samples of graphic work. Please submit 
copies, as this material is not returnable 

7. Resume: Business style listing prior academic credentials and work experience (related or unrelated) 
Degree Requirements 

Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development (HPDV) 

The dual degree for a Master of Historic Preservation (MHP) and a Master of Real Estate Development (MRED) requires 

completion of 60 credits. Required courses cover history and theory of preservation, preservation law, historical research 

methods, documentation, conservation, preservation economics, preservation planning & policy, group studio/workshop, and 

independent final project. 

Real Estate requirements address real estate economics, finance, planning and entitlements, design and construction 

management and asset and property management. 

The final project must not only address historic preservation or adaptive reuse issues, but must meet the requirements of an 

MRED Capstone project with real estate feasibility and pro forma modeling. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation and the Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development are ideally 

located between Washington, DC, and Baltimore and surrounded by a number of historic communities and a varied physical 

environment. The resulting opportunity for real estate development and historic preservation study is unsurpassed. 

Close by the University are key historically important and interesting places in the development of U.S. communities, 

including the 4th settlement in America at Historic St. Mary's City in Southern Maryland, which was the first planned city in 

America. Just 10 minutes from campus is the 1930s new town of Greenbelt, Maryland, and within 45 minutes are the 1960's 

new towns of Columbia, Maryland, St. Charles, Maryland and Reston, Virginia. One of the best examples of new urbanism is 

the Kentlands development less than 30 minutes away. And not to be missed are the major redevelopment and urban living 

revivals in the Port City of Baltimore and the historic neighborhoods of Anacostia and Columbia Heights in the District of 

Columbia. 

The University of Maryland's Historic Preservation Program is privileged to be part of a dynamic, successful preservation 

community that has long thrived throughout the state and in the District of Columbia. Opportunities to study and work 

abound in the incredibly diverse cities, towns, and landscapes across Maryland. In addition, the Program enjoys close 

relationships with many state, local, national, international and federal-government organizations working in historic 

preservation, as well as non-profit groups and private firms. 

The HISP program is directly related to and substantially enhanced by the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library, 

housed on the College Park campus since 1986 [http://www.lib.umd.edu/NTL/ntl.html]. This Library is one of the leading 

scholarly resources for preservation in the country. The program is further strengthened by close working relationships with 

the Maryland Historical Trust, the National Park Service, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Maryland National 

Capital Park and Planning Commission, Historic Annapolis, Inc., Preservation Maryland, Prince George's Heritage, the 

Anacostia Trails Heritage Area, and others. Practical experience can be gained through a variety of internship opportunities 

with these organizations and many others. 

The School's resources include a model shop, a digital fabrication lab, and both PC and MAC computer labs with REVIT, 

ARGUS, GIS, Maptitude and other design programs available. The School's library contains some 57,000 monographs and 

6,000 current periodicals, making it one of the major architectural libraries in the nation. The National Trust Library for 

Historic Preservation, housed in McKeldin Library, contains 1 1 ,000 volumes and 450 periodical titles. The Colvin Institute 

holds the entire library offerings of the Urban Land Institute and access to all the case studies published by ULI. The slide 

collection includes approximately 430,000 slides on architecture, landscape architecture, planning, and technical subjects. 

The interdisciplinary National Center for Smart Growth Education and Research is based in the School offering perspectives 

and opportunities to engage important issues facing urban and regional planning. 

Both the Real Estate Development and Historic Preservation Programs benefit from the strong support of the professional 

community, including practitioners who bring expertise into the class room and project courses as instructors and advisors. 

The RDEV courses are all taught by working or retired real estate professionals giving unparalleled access for students to 

making connections with current practice in the industry. 

Job placement for HISP graduates has been outstanding with graduates sought out by national, local and regional firms and 

agencies. The over 150 alumni of the real estate program have a very active and passionate group of grads in the area who 

meet regularly and share practice tips, connections and future job opportunities. 



215 



Financial Assistance 

HISP's principal form of financial aid consists of graduate assistantships related to research and outreach activities. The 

assistantships consist of tuition remission as well as a stipend. In addition, the Program awards--in conjunction with local 

non-profit Prince George's Heritage-the Prince George's Heritage Preservation Fellowship, an annual competitive award for 

a HISP student or students whose Prince George's County related project is judged to be especially outstanding. 

Additionally, there are possibilities for paid internships and paid part-time work with a variety of national and local 

organizations and governmental agencies. 

The Colvin Institute provides scholarship funds to a number of highly qualified students each term. Scholarship 

determinations are made at the time of application and admission. Scholarships are generally awarded on a per course 

basis and commitments are made at the time of admission and apply for the duration of the entire program, subject to 

academic performance. 

The MRED Program offers a limited number of administrative graduate assistantships to full time MRED students. Contact 

the Program Director to apply. Periodically there are named scholarships provided by various real estate organizations or 

development companies. 

In addition, there are work opportunities both on, and off campus, and they are relatively plentiful. Students in the past have 

been successful in finding part time internships and full time work with local real estate companies. The MRED student 

listserv posts openings periodically as they are brought to the attention of the Program by alumni, friends, faculty and 

sponsors. 

Applicants should inquire as to the availability of scholarship funding for the term they are starting. Scholarships are typically 

for a portion of tuition only, and are paid on a per course basis as students progress through the program. Scholarships are 

available to part time, full time, and dual degree students. 

Contact Information 

Contact the programs at the following address: HISP/RDEV Graduate Admissions School of Architecture, Planning, and 

Preservation Building 145, Faculty Suite University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 

Find additional information on program offerings, degree requirements, admissions, and financial aid on the School's Web 

site (www.arch.umd.edu). 

Schedule a visit and tour online at: http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/advising/. Be sure to contact the Program Director for 

real estate development (mmcf@Umd.edu) if you wish to attend a sampling of classes while here. 

Sign up to receive an invitation to our Graduate Open Houses in Fall or Spring online at: 

http://www.arch.umd.edu/students/admissions/information_request.cfm 

For further information about the Preservation Program, please contact Don Linebaugh, grarchadvise@umd.edu, 301 -405- 

8000. 

For further information about the Real Estate Development Program and the Colvin Institute, please contact Margaret 

McFarland, JD, Director of Graduate programs in Real Estate Development and the Colvin Institute of Real Estate 

Development, mmcf@Umd.edu. 

Additional information on Case competitions, samples of student work, as well as syllabi and adjunct faculty can be found at 

the School's web site (www.arch.umd.edu. You will also find the Colvin Institute offering outreach and information at the 

ICSC in Las Vegas each May, at the ULI National Conference each October, and at many local events of Bisnow, ICSC, 

ULI, CREW, WIRRE and HAND. 

Donald Linebaugh, PhD, Associate Professor and Director, Historic Preservation Programs 

University of Maryland, School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development, 

ARC Building 145, Faculty Suite, College Park, 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301.405-8000 

dwline@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu 

Margaret McFarland, JD, Director, Graduate Programs in Real Estate Development and The Colvin Institute of Real Estate 

Development 

University of Maryland, ARC Building 145, Suite 1243 

College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301 .405.8000, or 301 .405-6790 (Do not leave voice messages!) 301 .405.8000 

mmcf@umd.edu 

www.arch.umd.edu/real_estate_development 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Urban Studies and Planning 

Architecture 

National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education 

American Studies 

Art History and Archaeology 

R.H. Smith School of Business 

216 



History (HIST) 

Abstract 

The Department of History offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. In conjunction 

with the College of Information Studies, the Department of History also offers a dual-degree Master of Arts in History and 

Library Science. 

Major fields of concentration for the MA and PhD programs are: Ancient Mediterranean, Early Modern Europe, East Asia, 

Global Interaction and Exchange, International & Diplomacy, Jewish, Latin America, Medieval Europe, Middle East, Modern 

Economic, Modern Europe, Russia & the Former Soviet Union, Technology, Science, & Environment, the United States, and 

Women & Gender. MA-only fields are: Africa and Military. 

The graduate program, which includes fifty regular faculty members and approximately 132 degree-seeking students, has 

been nationally-ranked in the following subfields: African American, Latin America, US Colonial, and US Cultural. Other 

areas of established strength are Central/Eastern European/Russian history, the history of Western Europe, and women & 

gender. More recently, the following fields have emerged as centers of growing faculty strength and are attracting increasing 

numbers of students and faculty: Atlantic history, the African diaspora, Global Interaction and Exchange, and Middle 

Eastern/Islamic history. 

The students in our three degree programs come from across the nation, from small liberal arts colleges and major research 

institutions, as well as from the Balkans, Canada, East Asia, Eurasia, the European Union, and Latin America. History 

students have won a number of major external fellowships, including the ACLS/Mellon Early Career Fellowship, the Berlin 

Program for Advanced German and European Studies Dissertation Fellowship, the Foundation for the Research and Study 

of the East German Dictatorship Fellowship, the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Research Fellowship, the Fulbright-IIE Student 

Grant, the International Research & Exchanges Board Fellowship, the Mary Savage Snouffer Dissertation Fellowship, the 

Maryland Historical Society Lord Baltimore Research Fellowship, the Massachusetts Historical Society Research 

Fellowship, and the Mellon Fellowship for Dissertation Research in Original Sources, and the Nathan and Jeanette Miller 

Center for Historical Studies Dissertation Award. 

Recent graduates have started postdoctoral fellowships or tenure-track jobs at institutions that include Case Western 

University, Christopher Newport University, Elizabeth City State University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the 

Federal Judicial Center, John Carroll University, King's College London, Loras College, the Maryland Historical Society, 

Montclair State University, Morgan State University, Ohio University, Rhode Island College, Sage Colleges, Southern 

Methodist University, SUNY Purchase, the United States Naval Academy, the University of South Florida, the University of 

Southern Mississippi, and Western Washington University. The members of our extended alumni community, numbering 

more than 300 master of arts and doctoral recipients, work as professional historians throughout the State of Maryland, in a 

number of United States Government agencies, and at institutions of higher education and historical research across the 

United States and the globe. 

Admissions Information 

As a demonstration of our commitment to excellence in historical scholarship and education, admission to our degree 

programs is highly competitive. It is important that each applicant clearly articulate his/her academic preparation and 

qualifications for graduate study at Maryland. All prospective applicants are encouraged to make contact with the faculty in 

the area(s) of interest. Faculty play an important role in the admissions decision. Prospective applicants are also 

encouraged to make contact with current graduate students to learn more about their experiences. The History Graduate 

Student Association can facilitate communications with current students. 

Applicants are required to submit a sample of written work of historical scholarship, such as a research paper or thesis, as 

well as a statement of purpose, a personal statement, transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and GRE scores. 

Additional materials may be requested. 

Although there are exceptions, the minimum overall grade point average is 3.25 for admission to a master's degree program 

and 3.50 for admission to the doctoral program. The admissions committee would typically expect a higher grade point 

average in past coursework in history and related disciplines. Successful applicants usually score above the 80th percentile 

in the analytical writing and verbal reasoning portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. The 

Department does not require a GRE Subject Test. 

There are no general language or special skill requirements for admission, but the command of one or more relevant 

languages may bear upon an applicant's chances for admission in certain fields of study. 

The admissions process is sensitive to variations in GRE scores among applicants whose primary language is not English. 

However, the University requires that all admitted students demonstrate proficiency in written and spoken English. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





217 



Application Requirements 

1 . Statements of Goals & Research Interests and Experiences 

2. Three (3) Letters of Recommendation 

3. A Writing Sample that demonstrates historical analysis, such as a research paper or master's thesis 

4. Resume or Curriculum Vitae 

5. Transcripts 

6. GRE General 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Organized in the 1920s, the Master of Arts in History program at the University of Maryland provides broad and intensive 

instruction in bibliography, research, and writing in various fields of historical study. The MA degree may constitute a step 

toward doctoral research or preparation for a variety of other fields, such as archives administration, museum scholarship 

and exhibitions, public history, primary or secondary school teaching, law, or international relations. 

Admission to the Master of Arts program is offered to highly qualified applicants holding at least a bachelor's degree, 

normally in history or a related discipline. Application and admissions procedures are described on the Department's 

website. 

The MA degree program requires a total of thirty (30) semester hours of course work and research credits and the 

submission of two original research papers. In addition, MA students must successfully defend a thesis (the Degree-by- 

Thesis option) or pass a written examination (the Degree-by-Examination or "non-thesis" option). 

The anticipated period for completion is two (2) years of full-time study. The degree must be completed within five (5) years. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

First awarded in 1937, the Doctorate in History at the University of Maryland is conferred for superior achievement in 

historical study and research. The major portion of the degree is the dissertation, an original and noteworthy contribution to 

historical knowledge. In anticipation of this research, students must master bibliographic tools, research and writing 

methods, and general, minor, and special (or dissertation) fields of study. Competence in these preliminary steps will be 

measured by successful completion of course work and by examinations. 

Unless they have taken comparable courses elsewhere, students must complete the general seminar(s) in their major field, 

History 601 (History and Contemporary Theory), a minimum of nine hours of reading courses, six hours of research 

seminars, and nine hours in a minor field. 

Depending on the field of study, doctoral students may be required to demonstrate competence in one or more foreign 

languages and/or special skills. 

Students who enter with a master's degree in history or a related field are expected to sit for a set of written and oral 

comprehensive examinations within four semesters (five semesters for those who enter with a bachelor's degree). Upon 

successful completion of all examinations, doctoral students are expected to prepare a dissertation prospectus and advance 

to doctoral candidacy within one or two semesters. Upon completion of the dissertation research and writing, candidates 

defend the dissertation in an oral examination. 

The requirements for the doctoral degree are intended to be completed in five to six years. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the field concentrations described above, the Department of History offers several forms of specialized 

training, including certificate programs in Museum Scholarship & Material Culture, co-sponsored by the Department of 

American Studies, and Historic Preservation, co-sponsored by the School of Architecture. 

The Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies, housed within the Department, promotes both research and 

graduate training by sponsoring seminars and colloquia, major scholarly conferences, and visiting professors who teach 

graduate courses. Typically, the Center's activities each year concentrate on a historical theme of surpassing interests that 

cuts across the usual chronological and cultural boundaries. 

The University of Maryland is home to a number of important archives, special collections, and historical editing projects, 

including the Freedmen and Southern Society Project and the Samuel Gompers Papers, the Library of American 

Broadcasting, the Gordon W. Prange Collection, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library. The Combined 

Caesarea Expeditions, an amphibious research project that joins excavation of the terrestrial remains of Caesarea Maritima 

with underwater investigation of the site's ancient harbor, are coordinated at Maryland. 

The University sponsors a number of significant scholarly publications of interest to historians, including the Hispanic 

American Historical Review, the flagship English-language journal in Latin American history; Kritika, a journal dedicated to 

critical inquiry into the history and culture of Russia and Eurasia; and Feminist Studies, a pioneer in women's history and 

gender studies. 

The College Park campus is located within the Washington-Baltimore corridor, one of the nation's most dynamic regions for 

historical research. Francis Scott Key Hall, home to the Department of History, sits less than ten minutes from Archives II, 

the U.S. government's largest repository, and less than thirty minutes from downtown Washington, D.C., a city of 

unparalleled cultural resources and unique opportunities for historical research. Annapolis and Baltimore, home to significant 

archival holdings related to the history and cultures of the State of Maryland, the greater Chesapeake Bay region, and the 

Atlantic world, can be reached in less than forty-five minutes. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department of History administers several forms of financial assistance for graduate students, including fellowships, 

teaching assistantships, graduate assistantships, research assistantships, and research grants. All fellowships, 

assistantships, and grants are awarded on the basis of merit, as determined by the Graduate Committee, upon the 

recommendation of faculty and the Director of Graduate Studies. 

218 



A multiyear guarantee of continuous funding is standard among newly matriculating PhD students. Limited exceptions apply 
for PhD students who enter the program with external support and self-financing. Guaranteed funding is not standard for 
students entering the MA and HiLS programs. 

Funding packages typically include a multiyear guarantee of tuition remission and a health benefits option, subject to 
satisfactory progress towards the fulfillment of program requirements. 

For FY201 2 (201 1-12 academic year), the pay scale for 9.5-month teaching, graduate, and research assistantships range 
between $16,467 and $17,139. Fellowships follow a similar pay scale. Assistantships and fellowships include tuition 
remission and a health benefits option. Variations in stipend amounts are due to a number of factors, including the type of 
appointment, international student status, previous appointments, and advancement to candidacy. 

Additional funding is available through the semiannual Research and Travel Grant competition, the summer term Prospectus 
Development Grant competition, matching funds for travel to academic conferences, and various cross -campus funding 
competitions. All doctoral students are expected to seek outside funding for pre-dissertation and dissertation field research, 
as appropriate. 

History graduate students may seek grants and fellowships, assistantships, hourly employment, and other forms of self- 
support offered by non-departmental sources. 
Contact Information 

For complete description of programs and requirements, please contact: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
2131 Francis Scott Key Hall 
Department of History 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-7315 USA 
TEL: (301) 405-4268 
FAX: (301) 314-9399 
see also: 

Studies Leading to the Certificate in Historic Preservation 
(See entry under Certificate Programs ) 

History/Library & Information Systems (HILS) dual degree program resulting in an M.A. in History and an M.L.S. in Library 
Science. 

Dr. Julie Greene, Director of Graduate Studies; Dr. David Sicilia, Associate Director of Graduate Studies 
21 15 Francis Scott Key Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park 20742-7315 
Telephone: (301) 405-4268 
Fax:(301)314-9399 
hist-grad @ deans .umd.edu 

http://www.history.umd.edu/graduate.html 

Courses: HIST 



History/Library Science (HILS) 

Abstract 

The Department of History and the College of Information Studies (the iSchool) coordinate a dual -degree master's degree 

program to meet the need for multidisciplinary graduate training for archivists, records managers, manuscript curators, rare 

book librarians, bibliographers, conservation administrators and those wishing to become subject and research specialists in 

academic, special and research libraries. Because of the proximity of the College Park campus to a variety of immensely 

rich research collections, students are able to gain first-hand experiences through internships that reinforce their classroom 

instruction. 

The sequence of courses leading to the two degrees prepares students to understand the intellectual approach of the 

research scholar through historic training and to meet those research needs through the information services offered in the 

College of Information Studies. The program prepares students for careers in archives and records management, 

curatorship of historical collections, scholarly editing and publishing and reference research and bibliographic services, 

among others. 

The 54 credit hours required for the degrees combine 24 hours in each component plus six elective hours. Since many of 

the iSchool courses are offered in sequence, it is important for students to work closely with their advisor. 

The MA and the MLS are awarded simultaneously, and a student who fails to complete the special requirements for the 

coordinated degree programs may not receive either degree. When a student admitted to the HILS program subsequently 

wishes to receive only one degree, he/she must transfer from HILS either to the graduate program in History or to the 

College of Information Studies and fulfill the normal requirements for the separate master's degree. The dual-degree History 

and Library Science offers the option of a degree-by-thesis as well as a degree-by-examination. 



219 



Admissions Information 

Students must apply for admission to both the Department of History and the College of Information Studies under the rubric 
HILS (History and Library Science). There is one, consolidated application, but two, independent admission decisions. An 
offer of admission from both, the Department of History and the College of Information Studies is required in order to be 
admitted to the dual-degree program. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

(Send all required materials to both departments) 

1 . Statement of Goals, Experiences, and Research Interests 

2. Three Letters of Recommendation 

3. CV/Resume 

4. Transcripts 

5. GRE General 

6. Writing Sample 

Degree Requirements 

History and Library Science Joint Degree (M.A. M.L.S) 

Financial Assistance 

The College of Information Studies and the Department of History make available a limited number of teaching and/or 

graduate assistantships for master's students, including students in the HILS dual-degree program. These assistantships are 

awarded on the basis of merit, staffing needs, and budget. Neither academic unit extends guaranteed awards. 

Contact Information 

College of Information Studies 

Admissions and Student Affairs Office 

Room 4110 Hornbake Library Building, South Wing 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742-4345 

(301)405-2038 

ischool.umd.edu 

ischooladmission@umd.edu 

Dr. David Sicilia 

Associate Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of History 

2131 Francis Scott Key Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742-7315 USA 

(301)405-4268 

http://www.history.umd.edu/graduate.html 

Courses: HIST LBSC 

Human-Computer Interaction (HCIM) 

Abstract 

As the world grows increasingly more dependent on new technologies, the need has never been greater to create easy-to- 
use, meaningful technologies for diverse populations. Today, technology is an integral part of the lives of individuals 
everywhere; it touches every aspect of the ways in which people learn, work and play. The Master of Science in Human - 
Computer Interaction degree integrates information studies, computer science, education, psychology and engineering to 
prepare HCI leaders of the future. 

Through coursework and research experiences, students in this program will develop skills in: 
Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction 
Advanced research methods 
Usability analysis and testing 
Social computing strategies and technologies 
Technology design 
Electives, individual research experiences and projects will allow students to develop their own specialties within HCI. 

220 



Admissions Information 

Admission to the Master of Science in Human-Computer Interaction (HCIM) is competitive. Applicants must have a 

baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum "B" or 3.0 average on a 4.0 scale on 

all academic work attempted for consideration. 

The Admissions Portfolio 

Applications for admission are evaluated on the basis of these criteria: 

• strength of academic record 

• strength of the three recommendations/evaluations submitted on one's behalf from persons competent to judge probable success in 
graduate school 

• acceptable scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (Scores must be no older than five years at the time of 
application.) 

• Response to admissions question: "What artifact do you regularly use that you like or you really don't like?" Answers to this question must 
include a visual representation and a text description explaining the reason behind your selection, totaling no more than 5 pages. 

• Admissions Statement: Please address how the HCIM will support your educational and career goals. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . strength of academic record 

2. strength of the three recommendations/evaluations submitted on one's behalf from persons competent to judge probable success in 
graduate school 

3. acceptable scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (Scores must be no older than five years at the time of 
application.) For more information on the GRE waiver please visit the College of Information Studies website at ischool.umd.ed. 

4. Response to admissions question: "What artifact do you regularly use that you like or you really don't like?" Answers to this question must 
include a visual representation and a text description explaining the reason behind your selection, totaling no more than 5 pages. 

5. Admissions Statement: Please address how the HCIM will support your educational and career goals. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Science in Human-Computer Interaction (HCIM) 

The Master of Science in Human Computer Interaction (HCIM) is a unique cross disciplinary degree program that integrates 

information studies, computer science, education, psychology and engineering to prepare future HCI leaders in industry, 

government, education and other sectors. Through coursework and research experiences, students in this program will 

develop skills in the fundamentals of HCI, advanced research methods, usability analysis and testing, social computing 

strategies and technologies, and technology design. 

With the aid on an advisor, the HCIM student devises a plan of study to meet graduation requirements: three core courses, a 

required internship, a thesis or capstone project, and elective courses for a total of 30 credit hours. 

Core Courses 

The core courses introduce a broad range of concepts related to HCI and provide the necessary background for more 

specialized courses and the completion of the thesis or capstone project. 

LBSC795 Principles of Human-Computer Communication (3 credits) 

LBSC708N Special Topics in Information Studies: Human-Computer Interaction 

Design Methods (3 credits) 

LBSC 701 Research Methods in Library and Information Studies (3 credits) 

Required Courses 

In addition to the core courses, students must complete the following: 

Required Internship (3 credits) 

Thesis or capstone project (6 credits) 

Elective Courses 

Students will take 12 credits of elective courses in the following areas: Information Policy, Information Ethics, Users and Use 

Context, Information and Universal Usability, Information Environments. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The College operates four research centers and labs: the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL), the Information Policy 

and Access Center (iPAC), the Cloud Computing Center (CCC), and the Center for Advanced Study of Communities and 

Information (CASCI). 

Financial Assistance 

Courses: 



221 



Information Management (INFM) 

Abstract 

The Master of Information Management (MIM) is an innovative program that addresses the growing need of organizations 
for skilled information professionals who know how to strategically manage information and technology. Every cutting -edge 
organization needs people with the skills the MIM degree program offers. 

The MIM program prepares information professionals who understand the issues of business management, computer 
science, and information services and systems. The MIM program fills an empty space among these disciplines. 
The MIM program excels at teaching future information professionals what they need to understand to manage issues 
related to users of information, the organization, the content, the technology, and the global environment. 
The Master of Information Management is a unique cross-disciplinary degree program that combines theory and problem- 
based learning. It requires the completion of 36-credit hours, which can be taken as a part-time or full-time student. The 
program is designed to provide both structure and flexibility. The courses are integrated into four main blocks: 

- Core courses form the foundation of the program and build a common platform among a diverse group of students who 
bring different professions, perspectives, cultures, and experiences to the classroom. 

- Specialized courses in Management and Information Technology enable students to build advanced skills and knowledge 
and to develop the expertise required in the information field. 

- Applied courses allow students to connect theory from their learning experience to real-world settings through projects 
carried out in partner organizations. 

- Elective courses provide flexibility to the program and allow students to pursue their own interests and specific needs in 
greater depth. 

HOW IS THE PROGRAM STRUCTURED? 

The Master of Information Management program offers an Individual Program Plan and two concentrations: the Strategic 

Management of Information Concentration and the Socio-Tech Information Systems Concentration. Each is specifically 

designed to satisfy different career paths: 

The Individual Program Plan: Intended for students who want to follow the internal advancement path. Successful 

professionals need a general knowledge in management and information technology. The plan of study is customized to the 

student's particular circumstances, to advance within his/her current profession and organization. 

The Strategic Management of Information Concentration: Intended for those students who want to follow the CIO (Chief 

Information Officer) or general management path. 

The Socio-Tech Information Systems Concentration: Intended for those students who want to follow the CTO (Chief 

Technology Officer) or director of technology development path. 

The Master of Information Management degree program is available at the College Park campus and at the Universities at 

Shady Grove in Rockville, Maryland. Space and resources are limited at the College Park campus; applicants are 

encouraged to apply to the MIM program at Shady Grove. Please contact the Admissions and Student Affairs Office for 

more information concerning the option to enroll at the Shady Grove campus. 

Admissions Information 

Applicants to the MIM program must submit these documents: 

• Graduate School application 

• Official transcripts from each college or university attended 

• Targeted applicant essay 

• Current resume 

• Three (3) recommendations/evaluations 

• Score report on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Please visit the College of Information Studies website at 
ischool.umd.edu for GRE waiver requirements. 

The deadline for applications are as follows: 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: February 1 


Preferred: November 1 


Preferred: February 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 


Deadline: February 1 



Application Requirements 

Applications for admission to MIM program are evaluated on the basis of the following criteria: 

• a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum "B" or 3.0 average on a 4.0 scale on all 
academic work attempted for consideration 

• strength of the three (3) recommendations/evaluations submitted on one's behalf from persons competent to judge probable success in 
graduate school 



222 



• strength of targeted applicant essay 

• acceptable scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

• Other factors such as previously earned graduate degrees and work experience are considered as well. 

Degree Requirements 

Masters of Information Management (M.S.) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The College operates four research centers and labs: the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL), the Information Policy 

and Access Center (iPAC), the Cloud Computing Center (CCC), and the Center for Advanced Study of Communities and 

Information (CASCI). The College also operates a student computer lab for currently enrolled students. 

Financial Assistance 

For more information on merit-based aid, please visit the College of Information Studies website at ischool.umd.edu. 

Contact Information 

Please contact the Admissions and Student Affairs Office for more information on the admissions process at 

ischooladmission@umd.edu. Please visit the College of Information Studies website at ischool.umd.edu for details on 

upcoming Information Sessions or Open House programs. 

Office of Admissions and Student Affairs 

College of Information Studies Room 41 10 Hornbake Building, South Wing University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2038 

Fax:(301)314-9145 

ischooladmission@umd.edu 

http://ischool.umd.edu 
Courses: INFM 



Information Studies (INFS) 

Abstract 

Graduates of the Ph.D. in Information Studies program will help to shape the future of information. At the College of 

Information Studies, Maryland's iSchool, our renowned faculty and inquisitive and passionate doctoral students are exploring 

how information profoundly touches our lives: in government, education, health care, employment, and more. 

Building upon our strong foundation in library and information science, the iSchool has grown into an education and 

research powerhouse in human-computer interaction, information retrieval, cloud computing, information policy, e- 

government, digital archives, information ethics, and social media. Our tight-knit learning community is driven by the pursuit 

of big ideas and new discoveries to imagine how we can empower citizens, inspire communities, energize economies, and 

sustain democracies. 

We recognize that technology and public policy play critical roles in this evolving field: Maryland's iSchool takes full 

advantage of the university's location right outside Washington, D.C., the information capital of the world. We forge strategic 

partnerships and provide unmatched research, internship, and career opportunities with the government agencies, 

nonprofits, and businesses that shape information studies. 

We also believe that information goes hand-in-hand with inclusion. We offer one of the only programs of its kind designed to 

train the next generation of information professionals in working with diverse populations. 

U.S. News & World Report recognizes Maryland's iSchool as one of the top information schools in the country, ranking it 

10th in the nation. Five of our specializations are listed in the Top 10. 

Maryland's iSchool is a gateway for transforming how people find, assess, and provide information to the world. We're 

imagining the exciting changes ahead. 

Admissions Information 

When the completed application forms; resume; statement of goals, research interests, and experiences; transcripts of all 

academic work attempted; the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores; and the three letters of recommendation have 

been received by the College, we will review your application. If the Doctoral Committee needs further information, we will 

contact you to arrange for a personal interview. 

Detailed Application Requirements 

Transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work. Official transcripts must be sent directly from all of your undergraduate 

and graduate institution(s). 

Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Scores must be sent directly from ETS. Our institution code is 5814 and our department 

code for all programs is 4701 . The GRE is required, and must have been taken within five years of the application deadline. 

Absolutely no waivers are possible. 

Three Letters of Recommendation. Three recommenders must submit their recommendations directly to the Graduate 

School. It is preferable to request at least one letter from a former professor who is able to give an in-depth evaluation of the 

strengths and weaknesses of your academic work. 



223 



Statement of Goals, Research Interests, and Experiences. Your statement of goals, research interests, and experiences 

should describe your research background, your plans for future research, your career goals, and a list of iSchool faculty 

with expertise relevant to your research interests. 

Current Resume. Your resume or CV should list your educational and work experience as well as any publications, awards, 

or other notable accomplishments. 

Relevant Master's Degree. If you have already received a master's degree in Information Studies or a field related to your 

research interests, you may advance directly to the Ph.D. program. Otherwise, you will need to enroll in a dual degree 

program including the Ph.D. and one of the master's degrees offered by the College of Information Studies (Master of 

Library Science, Master of Information Management, or the Master of Science in Human-Computer Interaction). 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: November 1 





Application Requirements 

1 . Transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work 

2. Graduate Record Exam (GRE)- Scores must be no older than five years. No waivers granted. 

3. Three Letters of Recommendation 

4. Statement of Goals, Research Interests, and Experiences 

5. Current Resume 

6. Relevant Master's Degree (Please see Admissions Information section above for details.) 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 25 graduate credit hours at the University of Maryland (or 28 hours if basic 

statistics is taken as a graduate course). Course work will be taken in three areas of study: Information Studies (6 credit 

hours), Research Methods and Design (10 credit hours), and specialized area(s) (9 credit hours). Milestones within the 

program include a first year review, an integrative paper, and a dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The College operates four research centers and labs: the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL), the Information Policy 

and Access Center (iPAC), the Cloud Computing Center (CCC), and the Center for Advanced Study of Communities and 

Information (CASCI). iSchool faculty and doctoral students also participate in or have affiliations with the University of 

Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS), the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities 

(MITH), and the Computational Linguistics and Information Processing Laboratory (CLIP), as well as the Departments of 

Computer Science, English, and Sociology, the Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the College of Education. 

Financial Assistance 

Information on the availability of financial assistance is available on the College of Information Studies website at 

http://www.ischool.umd.edu. The College seeks to offer funding to entering doctoral students throughout their study in the 

doctoral program, contingent on factors such as successful progress through the doctoral program, likelihood of timely 

completion of the doctoral program, qualifications, and the availability of funding. 

Contact Information 

For specific information on the academic programs available in the College of Information Studies, admission procedures, or 

financial aid, contact: 

Office of Admissions and Student Affairs 

41 1 Hornbake Building 

South Wing 

University of Maryland 

College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-2038 

Fax:301-314-9145 

ischooladmission@umd.edu 

http://www.ischool.umd.edu 

Dr. Kenneth R. Fleischmann, Associate Professor 

4105 Hornbake Building South Wing 

MD 20742 

kfleisch@umd.edu 

Courses: 



224 



Jewish Studies (JWST) 

Abstract 

The Jewish Studies Program offers both a Master's Degree in Jewish Studies, and a Graduate Certificate in Jewish Studies. 
The Master's Program in Jewish Studies is designed to offer students broad, interdisciplinary, graduate-level training in 
Jewish Studies, as well as in-depth focus on some aspect of the Jewish experience. The curriculum draws on the strengths 
of the Jewish Studies Program at Maryland, especially Jewish History, Bible, Jewish Literature and Cultural Studies 
(particularly in the ancient and modern periods), Yiddish, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Israel Studies. In addition, 
students take courses in cognate fields outside of Jewish Studies in consultation with their advisors. The extremely strong, 
and still growing, library collection (rivaled in the mid-Atlantic region only by the Library of Congress), and our proximity to 
the National Archives, the Library of Congress, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, and other museums and institutions 
make the University a prime location for graduate Jewish Studies. 

The Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Jewish Studies offers students already enrolled in graduate programs at the University 
to receive training in Jewish Studies. The program draws on faculty in History, English, Philosophy, Hebrew, and other 
Departments and Programs. 
Admissions Information 



Application Deadlines 






Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 





Application Requirements 

• GRE 

• 3 Letters of Recommendation 

• Academic Writing Sample 

• Personal Statement 

• Transcripts 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

1. Hebrew Language. As a prerequisite for admission, students must have achieved the proficiency-level corresponding to 
four semesters of university-level Hebrew, and must achieve the level of six semesters of university-level Hebrew by the 
time they have completed the program. Courses in Hebrew language will not count toward the 30 credits needed for the 
degree. Students will be asked to demonstrate their knowledge of modern academic Hebrew by examination, or through a 
research project making extensive use of Hebrew-language materials. 

2. Course of Study. 

Core Distribution: (a) JWST 600, General Seminar in Jewish Studies (3 credits), which introduces students to the fields, 

methods, and problems of Jewish Studies as a cluster of disciplines; (b) one course each in the general areas of Jewish 

History, Jewish Thought or Religion, and Jewish Literature, normally by enrolling in JWST 648, Readings in Jewish history; 

JWST 658, Readings in Jewish Thought; and JWST 678, Readings in Jewish Literature (9 credits total). 

Specialization: 4 courses (12 credits) in consultation with the advisor. Students may opt to write an MA Thesis (6 credits). 

Non-thesis students prepare a dossier of 2 major research papers or their equivalent to be evaluated by an examining 

committee. 

Cognate Studies: Two courses (6 credits) from outside Jewish Studies in the discipline(s) related to the student's area of 

specialization. 

Graduate Certificate in Jewish Studies () 

In order to be eligible for the Jewish Studies Certificate Program a student must be accepted into or currently enrolled in a 

master's or doctoral degree program at the University of Maryland. 

Students must take four graduate level courses (12 credits) in Jewish Studies. At least six of the 12 credits must be in a 

different discipline than the student's home department. All students take JWST 600, General Seminar in Jewish Studies, 

plus at least two other graduate readings or research courses at the 600-800 level. Only one 400-level course can count 

toward the certificate. Students must work with an advisor to determine which courses best suit their particular needs. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University's libraries hold over 3,000,000 volumes and house among the strongest holdings in Judaic Studies in the 

Mid-Atlantic region. In addition to the outstanding holdings of the Library of Congress, the area also offers the specialized 

resources of the Dumbarton Oaks, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, 



225 



and numerous other scholarly, cultural, and political resources. Through the Consortium of Institutions in the Washington 

D.C. area, University of Maryland graduate students may enroll in courses at other universities for graduate credit. 

Financial Assistance 

MA applicants are eligible for University-wide fellowships. In addition, the Jewish Studies program may award up to two 

fellowships per year to outstanding Masters students. 

Limited funds may be available for outstanding certificate students. 

Contact Information 

For more information, please contact the Jewish Studies Program. 

The Jewish Studies Program 

0142 Holzapfel Hall College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301 405 4975 

Fax: 301 405 8232 

jwst@arhu.umd.edu 

http://www.jewishstudies.umd.edu 
Courses: J WST 



Journalism (JOUR) 

Abstract 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism offers a Master of Journalism (JOMJ), a Master of Arts in Journalism (JOUR) and a 

Doctor of Philosophy in Journalism Studies (JOST). 

The College accepts full-time students to the master's program, which is designed to be completed in one year. There are 

specialized tracks in multi-platform journalism and broadcast journalism available to students. The College also offers a 

highly individualized program for veteran journalists, which may be completed on a part-time basis. 

Students admitted to the standard master's program in multi-platform or broadcast journalism are not required to possess 

prior training or experience in the field. Students admitted to the returning journalist program, however, must have at least 5- 

8 years of professional experience. 

The Ph.D. in Journalism is a full-time research-oriented program that prepares students for careers in university teaching, 

academic and industry research and media consulting. Doctoral students are expected to have some professional 

experience in journalism. 

For more information, visit: http://www.merrill.umd.edu/ 

Admissions Information 

Applicants seeking admission to the master's program must hold a bachelor's degree from a recognized institution of higher 

learning. Undergraduate study of journalism and professional experience in journalistic fields are not required. Completion of 

the general aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination is required and three letters of recommendation must be 

submitted. 

Applications for the master's program are considered for admission in the Summer or Fall semesters. Students beginning 

the master's program in the summer can graduate within 12 months, whereas students beginning in the fall can graduate in 

15 months. The program does not accept applications for admission in the Spring semester. The deadline to apply for 

admission to the master's program for the Summer or Fall semesters is February 1 . Please note that applications submitted 

after the deadline will not be considered until the following year, and all supporting application materials must be received by 

February 1 . 

Applications for the doctoral program are considered only for Fall semester enrollment. The deadline to apply to the doctoral 

program is January 15, and all supporting application materials must be received by this date. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 








International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 









Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Personal Statement of Goals and Experiences 

4. Official Transcripts 

5. Resume or Curriculum Vitae (recommended) 



226 



Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Maryland's Ph.D. in Journalism Studies is designed to prepare students for careers in university teaching, academic and 

industry research, and media consulting. The first two years of the program consist of coursework in theory, research 

methods, journalism and an outside area of interest. At the end of coursework, students take comprehensive examinations 

(in theory, cognate area, methodology, and in their areas of specialization). Students then conduct research and write the 

dissertation. Most successful candidates enter the program with a master's degree, but that requirement can be waived for 

people with extensive professional news experience. 

For more information on the doctoral program, see: http://www.merrill.umd.edu/phd/about 

Master of Journalism/Master of Arts (M.J./M.A.) 

The master's degree is typically a 36-credit program (30 credits are required for students in the Returning Journalists 

specialization). The MJ is a non-thesis degree. Students pursuing an MA take six credits preparing a thesis. 

Students who enter the program with significant professional newsroom experience can request to opt out of the two 

required 500-level courses. Students on the 12-month track begin in the summer and take six credits each in summer 

session one and two, and 12 credits each in fall and spring. Students who start in the fall semester take their coursework 

fall, spring, and the following fall. The program's capstone experience is the Capital News Service, where students serve as 

full-time reporters in news bureaus in Washington and Annapolis; at the college's TV station, UMTV; or for our online news 

magazine, Maryland Newsline, which is produced in College Park from our state-of-the-art facilities in Knight Hall. 

For more information on our programs, visit: http://merrill.umd.edu/masters 

For more information on the Returning Journalist program, see: http://www.merrill.umd.edu/masters/programs/returning- 

journalists 

Detailed information on the requirements of our programs can be found in the master's program handbook, available online 

at: http://www.merrill.umd.edu/masters. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University of Maryland is located just a few miles from Washington, the media capital of the world. Students and 

researchers have access to The Washington Post, USA Today and hundreds of Washington bureaus for newspapers and 

TV news outlets from around the world. 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism operates a daily news bureau in the National Press Club, a few blocks from the 

White House, and in Annapolis, less than a block from the Maryland State House. On campus, the college operates a 

multimedia news bureau, Maryland Newsline. In addition, the college runs UMTV, a cable TV station that reaches more than 

600,000 homes throughout suburban Washington and Baltimore. Equipped with state-of-the-art digital editing systems, 

students produce a 30-minute nightly newscast and a professional staff produces original programming. In 2010, the College 

opened Knight Hall, our new state-of-the-art building with multiple news labs and opportunities for multiplatform 

experimentation. Knight Hall brings all of the College's affiliated centers under one roof. 

Centers 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism is home to a number of centers and programs designed to help professionals 

improve various aspects of journalism. 

The Hubert H. Humphrey Journalism Fellowships: The Humphrey fellowship is a special one-year program that brings 

international journalists to the University of Maryland to study. Fellows seek to strengthen their management and leadership 

skills and make professional contacts. The fellowship program is led by former Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Lucinda 

Fleeson. http://www.journalism.umd.edu/Humphrey 

The Journalism Center on Children and Families: Launched in 1993 as the Casey Journalism Center, the Journalism Center 

on Children and Families is a national resource for journalists who cover children and family issues. Its mission is to 

enhance reporting about the issues and institutions affecting disadvantaged children and their families and to increase public 

awareness about the concerns facing at-risk children. The center provides journalists with information on issues affecting 

children and families, such as health, education, child care, child welfare, human services, foster care and mental health. It 

holds an annual conference for journalists and conducts a contest that awards prizes to the best print and broadcast 

reporting on children and family issues, http://www.cjc.umd.edu 

The Society for Features Journalism: Founded in 1947, the Society for Features Journalism (formerly the American 

Association of Sunday and Features Editors, or AASFE) is "dedicated to the quality of features in newspapers." The 

independently operated group sponsors an annual convention, a writing contest, regional workshops and a fellowship 

program designed to develop minority feature writers. It also publishes two magazines, "Style" and "Feedback." SFJ's 

membership of nearly 200 is limited to newspaper feature editors and Sunday section editors, http://featuresjournalism.org 

The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ): NABJ is an organization of journalists, students, and media-related 

professionals that provides quality programs and services to and advocates on behalf of black journalists worldwide. 

Founded in 1 975, NABJ is the largest organization of journalists of color in the nation. 

Publications 

American Journalism Review\s a national bimonthly magazine that monitors press performance and standards. It was 

ranked highest among publications in its field for readership, quality, and usefulness in a national survey by the American 

Society of Newspaper Editors. The magazine, started as Washington Journalism Review in 1977, was acquired by the 

College of Journalism in 1987. The dean of the College is president of AJR. 

Financial Assistance 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism offers a number of merit-based fellowships and scholarships. These include: 

Howard Simons Fellowship. Funded by The Washington Post in honor of the late Howard Simons, this fellowship goes to a 

promising student of color who has demonstrated an interest in a career in newspapers. To be considered for the Simons 

227 



Fellowship, applicants to the College's master's program must submit a letter of interest and samples of their work. The 

fellow receives 20 credits of tuition remission and a stipend of $15,000. 

Eleanor Merrill Graduate Fellowships. Named in honor of Ellie Merrill, the chairwoman emerita of the College's Board of 

Visitors and the widow of College benefactor Philip Merrill, these awards typically include stipends of $7,500 and 1 credits 

of tuition remission for the academic year. 

Lillie Z. Goldberg / Hodding Carter III Scholarship. This $2,000 scholarship is awarded to an outstanding applicant to the 

Multi-Platform Journalism program who has exhibited a commitment to Public Affairs Reporting. 

Mary Anne and Frank A. Kennedy Scholarship. A $5,000 award plus limited tuition remission is given to an outstanding 

graduate applicant. 

The Hiebert Journalism International Travel Award. An endowed fund established by and named for College founding dean 

and Professor Emeritus Ray E. Hiebert. Provides reimbursement of travel expenses of up to $2,500 (or more, depending on 

endowment investment growth) for one student annually for travel outside the United States for a seminar, conference or on 

a journalism-related itinerary. Initial application is to the dean of the College of Journalism; it will be considered by a faculty 

scholarship/awards committee. 

Assistantships. Teaching, research and administrative assistantships are available and include tuition remission of up to 10 

credits per semester and stipends starting at $16,000. Master's students interested in assistantships must apply to individual 

units. 

For more information, see: http://www.merrill.umd.edu/masters/fellowships-aid 

Contact Information 

Specific information about the Journalism Program is available on request from: 

Caryn Taylor-Fiebig, Assistant Director of Graduate Studies 

11 00 Knight Hall, 

University of Maryland-College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2380 

Fax:(301)314-9166 

jourgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.merrill.umd.edu 
Courses: JOUR 



Kinesiology (KNES) 

Abstract 

A vital part of the School of Public Health, the Department of Kinesiology offers programs leading to the Master of Arts 
(thesis and non-thesis options) and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Research emphases within the three broadly defined 
areas of exercise physiology, cognitive motor neuroscience, and physical cultural studies are offered. Within each of these 
cognate areas, students develop specialized programs with faculty guidance and consistent with faculty expertise. Details of 
faculty research interests and additional information can be found at the department website http://www. sph.umd.edu/iasfES/ 
Admissions Information 

Students may qualify for admission with a 3.0 GPA for M.A. or 3.5 GPA for Ph.D. programs, satisfactory GREs, and a 
focused letter detailing academic and research goals as well as previous research experiences. In addition, each applicant 
should submit a minimum of three strong recommendations from people knowledgeable about the applicant's prior academic 
achievements and research potential. Appropriate background course work closely aligned with the intended research 
specialization is expected. Graduate faculty sponsorship is also necessary for admission; each faculty member has only a 
limited number of openings and only the most highly qualified applicants are selected. Faculty review of applications does 
not occur until all required parts of the application are received. This review is done in early January; therefore applicants 
are encouraged to have all their application materials submitted by January 1 for best consideration for admission and 
financial support. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 


Deadline: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. Three Letters of Recommendation (Research/Academic) 

3. Statement of Goals, Research Experiences and Interests 



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Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Completion of the master's degree with thesis requires a minimum of 24 semester hours and six thesis credits. The M.A. 
non-thesis option requires a minimum of 27 semester hours, a three-credit project based on an independent scholarly 
investigation, and a final comprehensive examination. Students in both options work under the direction of a graduate faculty 
advisor and must complete, as a minimum, six semester hours in a cognate area, six semester hours in research processes, 
and twelve semester hours in supporting courses either in or outside of the department. If internships are selected as part of 
the individual program, the total credits will exceed the minimum 30 credits. 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The doctoral program is designed to prepare outstanding scholars in a research domain in Kinesiology. To complete the 
program, a student must provide substantial evidence of his or her ability to frame and complete original research. 
A Ph.D. student's program is tailored to meet his or her academic goals, but all students will produce and follow a research 
plan and complete a minimum of 90 credit hours relevant to Kinesiology (including dissertation) beyond the bachelor's 
degree. The program of study includes research experiences, as well as courses in the cognate area, other supportive 
courses outside of the department that broaden or deepen one's knowledge, and courses in research and analytic 
processes. Students also are expected to engage in the culture of Kinesiology through active participation in seminars and 
other departmental activities and to develop teaching expertise in the subdiscipline. All Ph.D. students are expected to 
complete a dissertation, which is the culminating research experience and contributes to knowledge in kinesiology. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has three areas of specialization: Cognitive Motor Neuroscience, Exercise Physiology, and Physical 
Cultural Studies. Laboratories are maintained, which support original investigations in each of the three areas. Laboratories 
include equipment for measuring metabolic parameters, strength, body composition, postural sway, ground reaction forces, 
amount of physical activity in daily life, as well as muscle biopsies and movement analysis. The response of the human body 
to physical activity/exercise can be viewed through ECG, EEG, EMG and systematic behavior observation systems. Each of 
the three research areas has interfaced computer hardware and software to support data collection and analysis. 
Collaborations with the School of Medicine at the Baltimore campus and with NIH often result in the availability of other 
facilities and equipment. All graduate students have access to computers and other forms of technology. Details and 
pictures of current facilities and equipment are available at our website www.sph.umd.edu/KNES/ Cognitive Motor 
Neuroscience Lab - Various tools provide students with opportunities to measure, postural sway, ground reaction forces, 
multi-digit pressing and moments in 3-D, and movement analysis. These tools include: (1) A three wall rear-projected 
monoscopic CAVE display system with three XGA digital projectors. The system is designed for standing humans to be 
immersed in a visual world to test questions about how the nervous system processes visual information to maintain upright 
stance. (2) A hydraulically-controlled moveable force platform for recording center of pressure and ground reaction forces 
inside the CAVE. (3) An Optotrak motion analysis system, capable of tracking up to 24 LEDs simultaneously for whole body 
analysis. (4) A touch plate consisting of a miniature force plate capable of resolving .01 N of force in three directions. (5) A 
Logitech 6D ultrasonic tracking system consisting of a control unit, two triangular receivers and one triangular transmitter. 
Each receiver provides three components of translation (x, y, z) and three components of rotation (yaw, pitch, roll) with a 
resolution of .006 cm. (6) A 16 channel EMG Neuraxon system for recording muscle activity. Because responses of the 
human body can be viewed through Electrocardiographic (ECG), Electroencephalic (EEG), and Electromyographic (EMG), 
we collaborate with the University of Maryland, School of Medicine at Baltimore and the National Institutes of Health. This 
results in the availability of other facilities and equipment whereby students may join forces on projects involving 
neuroimaging and virtual reality environments. Exercise Physiology Lab The Exercise Physiology group has various 
laboratories capable of supporting a wide-range of exercise-related studies, including metabolic testing, muscular strength 
and power testing, and various clinical blood-based assays. Moreover, the group collaborates with various nearby facilities 
for high-quality measurement of body composition, including muscle size, bone density, and visceral adiposity. A 6,000 sq. 
ft. training facility is fully equipped with aerobic exercise training equipment and 20+ Keiser strength training machines for all 
major muscle groups. In addition to these general facilities, the group maintains other specialized laboratories. The Exercise 
Epidemiology Lab utilizes tools to broaden our understanding of the public health benefits of physical activity. With a special 
emphasis on community-based interventions, students examine the effect of levels of physical activity on health outcomes, 
predictors of physical activity levels, physical activity measurement and assessment issues, and the conduct of clinical and 
community trials. The Functional Genomics Lab studies the role of genetic variation in disease susceptibility and the 
responses and adaptations of different individuals to various exercise programs. The lab has state of the art equipment for 
genetic analysis, including extensive computer resources. The Molecular Biology Lab has extensive scientific resources for 
examining the effects of exercise and inactivity on muscle, adipose, and other cell types utilizing both in vivo and in vitro 
approaches. Physical Cultural Studies (PCS) advances the critically and theoretically-driven analysis of physical culture, in 
all its myriad forms. These include sport, exercise, health, dance, and movement related practices, which PCS research 
locates and analyzes within the broader social, political, economic, and technological contexts in which they are situated. 
More specifically, PCS is dedicated to the contextually based understanding of the corporeal practices, discourses, and 
subjectivities through which active bodies become organized, represented, and experienced in relation to the operations of 
social power. PCS thus identifies the role played by physical culture in reproducing, and sometimes challenging, particular 
class, ethnic, gender, ability, generational, national, racial, and/or sexual norms and differences. 
Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research graduate assistantships are offered each academic year. The Department also has an NIH-funded 
pre-doctoral training grant in exercise and aging. At the present time, over two-thirds of the graduate students are financially 
supported. Teaching assistants work as discussion leaders and laboratory assistants as well as instructors in physical 

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activity classes. Many research assistants are supported by grants. The department is proactive in seeking University 

fellowships for its outstanding applicants; David H. Clarke Fellowships have been awarded recently to the top applicants. 

Sally J. Phillips Dissertation Fellowship is also awarded to support the dissertation research of doctoral students. Currently 

the department provides partial financial support for all graduate students who are selected to present their research at 

scholarly meetings. 

Contact Information 

For additional information and an application, contact: 

Polly R. Sebastian, Academic Coordinator Department of Kinesiology 

2351 SPH Building School of Public Health (Valley Drive) 

College Park 

MD 20740-2611 

Telephone: (301)405-2453 

Fax: (301 ) 405-5578 

knes-grad@umd.edu 



http://www.sph.umd.edu/knes 

Courses: KNES 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Aging, Center on 

Nutrition 

Landscape Architecture (LARC) 

Abstract 

The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is a professional degree program that prepares students for work as 
academicians and practitioners. The three-year first professional degree curriculum is for students who have a bachelor 
degree in a non-design field. The two-year post-professional degree curriculum is for students who have a bachelor degree 
in landscape architecture or a related design field. Through the required courses, concentration electives, and individual 
research, each student will acquire a thorough theoretical basis, grounding in methods and practices, and exposure to 
contemporary local and global issues. The required studio courses and the thesis or creative project, conducted with faculty 
and community partners, advances the knowledge base of landscape architecture through research and community 
outreach activities. 

The MLA program is interdisciplinary in its philosophy and its operation. Individual courses convey concepts and tools from 
diverse disciplines and studio, research, and outreach projects have a multi-discipline association. Project and research 
advisors come from faculty in Landscape Architecture, Plant Science, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, 
American Studies, Architecture, Urban Studies and Planning, Historic Preservation, Real Estate Development, and other 
academic disciplines and professional partnerships. 
Admissions Information 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: October 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . 3.0 GPA and Undergraduate transcripts 

2. GRE test scores 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Portfolio of Creative Work* 

5. Letter of Interest 

'Portfolio: The portfolio is a compilation of graphic, written or scored work that you have created or observed and recorded. This collection 
should show your interest and aptitude for the visual language of design. Expertise in design is welcomed but not required. The portfolio 
should illustrate your interests in a variety of areas related to landscape architecture. This can be sent in a portfolio case or binder (any size). 
CD-ROM, DVD or web-accessible portfolio compilations will also be accepted in lieu of printed material. Portfolios are due no later than 
the application deadline. Send portfolio to: Jack Sullivan, MLA Program, 2142 Plant Sciences Building, University of Maryland, 
College Park, MD 20742. 



230 



Degree Requirements 

Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) 

Three- Year First Professional Degree Curriculum (71 Credits + 6 credits @ 200-level, if required). 

Students will be advised to take remedial Woody Plant Identification courses prior to arrival. The MLA Program requires 
these courses in order to meet accreditation standards. Requirements (contact department for detailed curriculum): 

Courses in Theory and History (12 Credits) 

Courses in Studio Design and Planning (26 Credits) 

Courses in Graphic Communication and Practice Technology (15 Credits) 

Courses in Ecology and Plant and Soil Sciences (3 Credits + 6 credits of remedial courses) 

Courses in Independent Study and Research, with Thesis or Creative Design project(15 Credits) 

Two-Year Post-Professional Degree Curriculum (40 credits) 

This curriculum is for those students with a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture or other approved environmental design 
degree. Requirements (please contact department for detailed curriculum): 

Courses in Theory and History (6 Credits) 

Courses in Studio Design and Planning (16 Credits) 

Courses in Independent Study and Research, with Thesis or Creative Design project(18 Credits) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Master of Landscape Architecture program maintains a balance between design theory and application in a professional 

degree curriculum. The MLA program builds upon the strengths of the Department of Plant Science and Landscape 

Architecture (PSLA) and the Landscape Architecture Program (LARC). The PSLA Department is composed of faculty 

members who specialize in landscape architecture, landscape history, ecology, plant science, urban forestry, turf and golf 

course management, and landscape management. It provides a strong, comprehensive grounding for landscape design, 

planning and preservation, landscape assessment, site and ecological systems analysis, plant identification, plant 

conservation, and plant pathology. Other environmental programs in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources offer 

knowledge and practical insight into the science of ecology, ecological restoration, water and soil conservation, and forest 

management. The MLA builds on this collaboration through advanced courses, student advising, and the contribution of 

non-teaching programs such as lectures, symposia and research projects. 

The MLA complements the undergraduate curriculum leading to the professional Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) 

degree. The BLA is an accredited program that is strongly supported by our constituents in professional design, engineering 

and planning firms throughout Maryland and the Mid-Atlantic Region. The MLA 3-year First-professional degree curriculum 

distinguishes itself from the BLA by the advanced theory, research and design requirements and expectations of students 

with a prior bachelor degree. 

The Master of Landscape Architecture Program is located in the Plant Sciences Building on the College Park campus. 

Advanced individual computing facilities, personal drafting stations, scanning and printing facilities, and a model-making 

workshop are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to every student in the MLA program. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of Graduate Assistantships are available to qualified students. These include Teaching, Research, and 

Administration Assistantships. Assistantships can be 9-month or 12-month appointments and include tuition remission (5 to 

10 credits each semester, commensurate with GA appointment), an annual salary, health benefits, and in-state tuition, in 

exchange for 10 to 20 hours of work per week. Scholarships, fellowships, and other funding sources are available through a 

variety of external agents, such as the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF), the Garden Club of America (GCA), and 

others, including the following: 

• Steven G. King Play Environments Scholarship: undergraduate or graduate students enrolled at LAAB-accredited schools. Award: $5,000. 

• The Dangermond Fellowship: graduate students in the United States. Award: Up to three (3) $10,000 fellowships. 

• Peridian International, Inc./Rae L. Price, FASLA Scholarship. Award: $5,000. 

• The Douglas Dockery Thomas Fellowship in Garden History and Design: graduate student in the United States. Award: $4,000. 
Go to http://www.laprofession.org/financial/scholarships.htm for more information. 

Contact Information 

Jack Sullivan, Associate Professor and Coordinator 

2142 Plant Sciences Building 

College Park 

MD 20740-4452 

Telephone: 301-405-0106 

Fax:301-314-9308 

jack@umd.edu 

http://www.larch.umd.edu 



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Courses: LARC 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Real Estate Development 

Architecture 

Urban Studies and Planning 

Historic Preservation 

Environmental Science and Technology 

Library Science (LBSC) 

Abstract 

The Masters of Library Science (MLS) is a fully American Library Association (ALA) accredited program that focuses on 

areas central to research and practice in information science. It emphasizes the theoretical and conceptual foundations of 

the field. The application of the results of scholarly research are related to current practices and are analyzed with the goal 

of advancing the quality and scope of services in a variety of information settings. The program provides a comprehensive 

foundation for professional careers in all libraries, information centers, and other agencies engaged in information activities. 

The MLS program is available at the College Park campus; the Universities at Shady Grove campus in Rockville, Maryland; 

and online. Space is limited at the College Park campus, therefore, applicants are encourage to apply to the Shady Grove 

campus or the online program. 

For more information about courses available at the Shady Grove campus, admissions deadlines, or to schedule an 

informational interview, please contact the Program Director of the MLS at Shady Grove, Dr. Vedat Diker, at 

vdiker@umd.edu. 

For more information about the MLS Online please contact an advisor at ischooladmission@umd.edu. 

Admissions Information 

Admission decisions are based upon a thorough review of the applicant's undergraduate record, scores on the Graduate 

Record Exam General Test, letters of recommendation, and statement of purpose. Other factors, such as other graduate 

degrees and work experience, may be considered as well. 

New students are admitted to the MLS program at the College Park campus for the Summer and Fall terms. 

Summer, Fall, and Spring admission for the MLS program is available at the Shady Grove campus in Rockville, Maryland 

only. Applicants interested in spring admission for the MLS at Shady Grove should contact the Admissions and Student 

Affairs Office at ischooladmission@umd.edu or (301) 405-2038 for assistance with the application process. 

The MLS Online is cohort based and new students are admitted for the Fall term each year. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: November 1 


Deadline: February 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 


Deadline: February 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . Transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work 

2. GRE General (see the College's website for information on GRE waiver requirements) 

3. Three Letters of Recommendation 

4. 500 word targeted essay 

5. Resume 

Degree Requirements 

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies (Ph.D.) 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies is no longer coded under 'LBSC. Please look under Information Studies 

(INFS) in the Graduate Catalog for more information on this program and its requirements. 

Master of Library Science (M.L.S.) 

The MLS degree requires 36 credit hours of academic work to be completed with a B minimum average within five calendar 

years from the first semester of registration. In the nonthesis option, all credits are course work. The thesis option requires 

30 credits of course work and 6 credits of thesis research. A full-time MLS student usually completes the program in two 

years. 

Students in the College have flexibility in completing the program. Students may take courses in the daytime and evening 

and may change from part-time to full-time and vice versa, as their circumstances permit. Most MLS courses are offered 

both day and evening on a regular rotation; however, there are a few courses that are only offered during the day or 

evening. 

The History/Library Science (HILS) dual degree program requires 54 credit hours for the MLS and MA in History. The time 

limit for completion of all degree requirements for this dual degree program is five years. 



232 



Each student works with an advisor to design a suitable course of study. All MLS students must successfully complete five 
courses in their first 18 credits: 

* LBSC 601 Users and Information Context, OR LBSC 605 Archival Principles, Practices and Programs (for students in the 
Archives, Records, and Information Management specialization), OR LBSC 640 Library Media Specialists as Information 
Professionals (for students in the School Library Media specialization) 

* LBSC 635 Management and Administration for the Information Professional (not required for School Library Media 
students, who take a specialized management course later in their program) 

* LBSC 650 Information Access Services 

* LBSC 670 Organization of Information 

* LBSC 690 Information Technology 

The remaining seven courses are electives selected by the student and a professional academic advisor in the iSchool. 

Advisor approval is required before registering for courses. 

At least 24 credits of the 36 required must be LBSC courses taken at the College. A student may take courses in other 

UMCP departments or through the Consortium at other area institutions (limit of nine credits). Six credits may be transferred 

from another accredited graduate program and from Advanced Special Student status at UMCP. Information about policies 

and procedures governing degree requirements and courses taken outside the College is available from the College's 

Admissions and Student Affairs Office and on the College's website at www.ischool.umd.edu. 

Specializations and Concentrations 

Students may choose to specialize in one of two areas: 

* Archives, Records, and Information Management 

* School Library Media 

Alternatively, students may choose one of these three concentrations: 

* E-Government Concentration 

* Information and Diverse Populations Concentration 

* Lifelong Access 

MLS students may work with their advisors to define their own course plans, and are certainly not required to pursue a 

specialization, concentration, or dual degree. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special computing labs with a variety of general purpose and specialized hardware and software are operated by the 

College; in addition, students use numerous other labs on campus. The Instructional Development and Support Center is a 

nonprint media facility with equipment, materials, instruction, and individual assistance in all phases of audiovisual 

production and use. 

Faculty and students participate in cooperative research with staff of the University Libraries, the Human-Computer 

Interaction Laboratory, and other campus units. Students have access through cooperative arrangements and programs to 

the resources of Archives II, the National Agricultural Library, the Library of Congress, and other prominent research 

facilities. 

Financial Assistance 

The College offers a very limited number of scholarships and assistantships. For more information please visit the College 

website at www.ischool.umd.edu. In-state tuition fees for the MLS program may be available for students from states that 

are members of the Academic Common Market of the Southern Regional Educational Board. For more information about 

the Academic Common Market and to check eligibility please visit 

http://www.sreb.org/page/1304/academic_common_market.html. 

Contact Information 

For specific information on the academic programs available in the College of Information Studies, admission procedures, or 

financial aid, contact: 

Office of Admissions and Student Affairs 

4110 Hornbake Building, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-2038 

Fax:(301)314-9145 

ischooladmission@umd.edu 

http://www.ischool.umd.edu 
Courses: LBSC 



Linguistics (LING) 

Abstract 

Research on language has proven to be one of the most fruitful means to cast light on the nature of the human mind and 
general cognitive capacity and has taken on a new momentum in the last 30 years. The Maryland Linguistics program builds 
on these recent developments and trains students thoroughly in a research enterprise which tries to develop a detailed 
answer to these questions: How is a person's linguistic capacity represented in the mind, how does that representation 
reflect properties which are encoded genetically, how is language acquired by young children, how can language be 



233 



encoded as a computational, psychological or neurological system, and how can linguistic knowledge be used to improve 
human language technology? 

The Department of Linguistics at the University of Maryland has an internationally recognized Ph.D. program. The Department combines 
current theoretical research in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics with state-of-the-art experimental research in psycholinguistics, 
first language acquisition, language processing, neurolinguistics, and computational linguistics. An interdisciplinary background enables 
students to evaluate proposals critically and make a lasting contribution to the field. Many students choose to split their major and minor 
areas between theoretical and experimental linguistics. Many students also choose to concurrently pursue the Certificate Program in 
Neuroscience and Cognitive Science . The department also hosts an NSF-supported interdisciplinary training program on "Biological and 
Computational Foundations of Language Diversity" (see web site for more information). 

The Department encourages applications from students with an interest in the Department's areas of expertise. Students with a primary 
interest in Neurolinguistics and Cognitive Science may also want to consider applying to the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) Ph.D. 
program. See the Cognitive Neuroscience of Language Laboratory for more details on alternative programs of study for psycholinguistics. 
Students seeking a Ph.D. in other areas of linguistics may want to consider a range of other strong programs at the University of Maryland. 
The PhD program in Second Language Acquisition , based in the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, has a strong cognitive science 
and research focus. Students with a focus on TESOL should consider the Curriculum and instruction Program , based in the College of 
Education. Students with a clinical focus should also consider the Hearing and Speech Sciences Program . Students interested in human 
language technology should also consider the PhD programs in the iSchool (CLIS) or the Department of Computer Science . 

Admissions Information 

All students must hold a Bachelors or Master's degree (or international equivalent) prior to starting the Ph.D. program. 
Although the student's previous degrees may be in a field other than linguistics, it is essential that a student have some 
previous experience in linguistics. 

Applicants should check the University's admission requirements and the department's web site for the most up-to-date information on graduate 
applications. Electronic submission of application materials is strongly preferred. Applicants are encouraged to submit the initial on-line 
application form well before the application deadline, preferably by mid-December, since this form must be processed before an applicant is 
able to submit other electronic materials. Note that the January 5th target date applies to all applicants, domestic and international. 
Applications normally require: 

1. Application Form & Application Fee: See the Graduate School web site. Early submission of the initial on-line application is strongly 
encouraged. 

2. Statement of Purpose: This should provide a clear explanation of what your objectives are in pursuing an advanced degree in Linguistics, 
and at Maryland in particular. Mention specific interests or relevant experience where applicable. The Statement of Purpose is not a literary 
contest or an invitation to flatter members of the department; there is no 'recipe' for a strong Statement. The Statement of Purpose allows 
the Department to better understand an applicant's goals, interests, and how well the applicant will be served by the department's areas of 
expertise. 

3. Writing Sample(s): This should preferably represent original work done in linguistics, but work in other fields showing evidence of careful 
analysis and independent thought is also acceptable. Writing samples should be in English. 

4. Letters of Recommendation: These should come from at least three people who know your work well, and who can offer a detailed, honest 
assessment of your abilities and experience, and your suitability for an advanced degree in Linguistics. 

5. GRE General Test: Although this test is not absolutely required for admission, all applicants who hope to receive financial aid are strongly 
advised to take the GRE test. A wider range of sources of financial aid are open to students who have taken the GRE test. 

6. TOEFL Test (or TOEFL), for international students. See the Graduate School web site for exceptions. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 15 
Preferred: January 5 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 5 





Application Requirements 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Under exceptional circumstances, students are awarded an MA degree on completion of the core coursework requirements 

(six courses, see PhD requirements), four further classes, and writing either an MA thesis which is defended publicly (LING 

799) or two comprehensive papers in different areas of language study (LING 798). Two of the post core-level class 

requirements should be taken in the Department of Linguistics, with the rest being taken either in Linguistics or in other 

departments satisfying a secondary area of specialization and complementing the student's work. Note that the 

Department of Linguistics does not normally admit students whose objective is a terminal M.A. degree. The M.A. 

degree primarily serves students who withdraw from the Ph.D. program. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Students pursuing the Ph.D. take at least 33 graduate-level credits of course-work, of which at least 9 credits are at the 800- 

level (seminars) and 6 credits correspond to the Minor area of specialization, possibly in another department. These 

minimum requirements are usually fulfilled by formal classes and not by independent studies, although the latter may be 

used to supplement a student's program of study. The student's first year is normally devoted to the "core", foundational 



234 



coursework in the department's three primary research areas: (i) theoretical linguistics (syntax, semantics, phonology), (ii) 
psycholinguistics/neurolinguistics/language acquisition, (iii) computational linguistics. Students must take at least 6 core 
courses, comprising at least two 2-semester core course sequences. At least one of these core course sequences must be 
in an area of theoretical linguistics. The core courses are the 600 level LING courses and LING 723, 773. The core 
sequences are: 

1. LING 61 0,611 Syntax 

2. LING 620, 621 Phonology 

3. LING 640, 641 Psycholinguistics 

4. LING 723, 773 Computational Linguistics 

5. LING 660, 661 Semantics 

In addition to satisfying (part of) the 9 credit requirement for seminars, the next two years are devoted to satisfying 6 credits (beyond any 

core courses) in the Minor, as approved by the Graduate Director. Some students choose to pursue the Certificate in Neuroscience and 

Cognitive Science, which may count as the minor area. 

By their fifth semester, students write a substantial paper (LING 895), under the supervision of a faculty member. This paper enables 

students to demonstrate a capacity for productive research and to make an original contribution to the literature, often forming the basis for 

the dissertation research. It is submitted to a three member examining committee, is defended publicly two weeks later, and must be 

approved by the committee after the defense. The student must then upload the completed 895 paper to the 895 folder in the department 

PDF locker, and inform the Graduate Director that this has been done. 

In addition, by their seventh semester students must also write a paper in their Minor area of specialization (or some other area that is not 

their major area). The paper must be prepared under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Once the paper is completed to the 

satisfaction of the supervising faculty member, it must be uploaded to the 896 folder in the department PDF locker, and the Minor Area Paper 

approval form presented to the Graduate Director. [Under special circumstances, upon the written recommendation of the student's advisor 

and with the approval of the faculty of the department, a student may satisfy the Minor area paper requirement by instead taking a third 

course in the Minor area.] 

LING 895 and the Minor area paper replace the "comprehensive examinations" held in some departments. 

To help ensure satisfactory progress towards the degree, students are required to submit to the Graduate Director a Ph.D. Roadmap once 

each semester, completed in consultation with their advisor. 

After satisfactory completion of the 895 paper, students are admitted to candidacy and write a proposal for a dissertation, which a faculty 

member agrees to supervise. Students enroll in LING 899 while working on the dissertation, and must take at least 12 credits of this course. 

The dissertation must make a substantial and original contribution to knowledge. The supervisor, in consultation with other committee 

members (selected by the student and the supervisor), determines when there is a draft which will be defended publicly at an oral 

examination. The dissertation is approved by a five member examining committee. On completion of the approved dissertation, a hard copy 

will be submitted to the department, along with a 2nd hard copy or else an electronic version for the department web page. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to university and departmental library facilities, linguists at Maryland have ample office and meeting spaces. The 
department has outstanding resources for interdisciplinary research that bridges theoretical, experimental, and 
computational linguistics. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Language (CNL) Laboratory has the specific purpose of bridging the 
gap between theoretical/computational models of human language and the brain-level mechanisms that support language. 
The research in the CNL Lab combines the study of linguistics, cognitive neuroscience, language acquisition and 
psycholinguistics, genetic disorders and computational modeling. The CNL Lab is housed in around 5000 sf. of labs and 
offices and includes the following: 

1 . Event-Related Potentials (ERP) Lab: 1 28-channel Neuroscan ERP facility for recording electrical signals originating in the brain by 
measuring electrical activity at the scalp. 

2. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) Lab: a 1 60-channel whole-head MEG facility that is used for non-invasive measurements of the magnetic 
fields associated with neuronal activity in the brain. 

3. Head-mounted Eye Tracking Lab: lightweight eye-tracker suitable for use with children and adults. 

4. Fixed Eye Tracking Lab: eye-tracker suitable for on-line studies of reading. 

5. Center for Young Children: state-of-the-art on-campus preschool for 3-6 year olds, with testing rooms suitable for study of language 
acquisition. 

6. Infant Language Lab: for testing infants and young children. 

7. Phonetic/Speech Analysis facilities: equipment for generation, recording, manipulation and analysis of speech sounds. 

In addition to the facilities available at the CNL Lab itself, Maryland linguists have taken advantage of the many additional research 

opportunities in closely affiliated departments and institutions, in particular at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), located in nearby 

Bethesda, Maryland. These include fMRI brain imaging, PET brain imaging and TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) at NIH, and aphasia 

research in collaboration with NIH researchers. 

Computational Linguistics 

The department also runs two computational linguistics laboratories housing state-of-the art facilities funded by the NSF and DARPA. 

The Computational Linguistics and Information Processing (CLIP) laboratories contain state of the art computing facilities and data resources. 

Financial Assistance 

Initial offers of admission and financial aid are normally made in February-April. Further offers are sometimes made at a 
later date, if additional funds become available. In recent years, around 6-8 new students have started the Ph.D. program 
each year. 

Financial aid (tuition + stipend) is available on a competitive basis. The department aims to provide graduate students with financial aid 
(stipend + tuition) during their full course of study (5 years), provided that the student makes satisfactory academic progress. Graduate 
funding comes from a number of sources. The Department offers Graduate Assistantships (GAs) and Research Assistantships (RAs). GAs 
typically involve teaching service in undergraduate linguistics courses. RA positions typically involve research associated with a grant- 
supported faculty research project. Also available are Graduate Fellowships. The University offers a number of these to outstanding 

235 



applicants, which release the student from GA or RA responsibilities for 1-2 years of study. Other sources of funding are occasionally 
available through the Department or University. Also, a number of students come to the Department with funding of their own from external 
fellowships. 

Fellowships and GAs provide 1 2 and 1 credits of tuition remission respectively per semester. In additions to tuition remission, the Graduate 
Assistantship comes with Health benefits. The student is responsible for approximately $340.00 in mandatory student fees per semester. 
The Department sets aside a portion of its operating budget to support travel by faculty and graduate students to present papers at 
conferences. Any member of the Department can request support for this purpose. Graduate students may also apply for university travel 
awards for this purpose. 

Contact Information 

The Department's web site, Maryland Linguistics , contains a good deal of information on the program, but if you have further 

questions about Graduate Study in the Department, you should contact Dr. Jeffrey Lids (jlidz@umd.edu). Alternatively, if you 

have a particular interest in the research of an individual faculty member, you may want to contact that person directly via 

email. 

Dr. Jeffrey Lids 

Linguistics Dept, University of Maryland, 

1401 Marie Mount Hall, College Park, 

MD 20742-7505 

Telephone: (301) 405-7002 (301) 405-8220 

Fax:(301)405-7104 

jlidz@umd.edu 

http://www.ling.umd.edu 

Courses: LING 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biology 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Computer Science 

Second Language Acquisition-Ph.D. 

College of Information Studies 

Philosophy 



Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences (MEES) 

Abstract 

The specific objective of the university-wide Graduate Program in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences (MEES) is the 
training of qualified graduate students, working toward the M.S. or Ph.D. degree, which have research interests in fields of 
study that involve interactions between biological, physical and chemical systems in the marine, estuarine, freshwater or 
terrestrial environments. The program comprises six areas of specialization: Ecology, Environmental Chemistry, 
Environmental Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Environmental Science, Fisheries Science, and Oceanography. 
Students work with their Research Advisory Committee to develop a customized course of study based on research 
interests and previous experience. 
Admissions Information 

Applications for admission in the fall semester must be filed by February 1 ; if financial assistance is needed, it is better to 
apply by December 1 . Students may also be admitted for the semester starting in January, for which the deadline is 
September 1 , with July 1 as the preferred deadline for assistance and June 1 as the international applicant deadline. 
Applicants must submit an official application to the University of Maryland, along with official transcripts of all previous 
collegiate work, three letters of recommendation, and scores on the General Test (aptitude) of the Graduate Record 
Examinations. It is particularly important that a student articulate clearly, in the application, a statement of goals and 
objectives for future work in the field. Because of the interdisciplinary and interdepartmental nature of the program, only 
students for whom a specific advisor is identified in advance can be admitted. Prior communication with the faculty in your 
choice area of specialization is highly encouraged. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: December 1 


Deadline: September 1 
Preferred: July 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: December 1 


Deadline: June 1 



236 



Application Requirements 

1 . GRE General 2. Official transcripts of all college work 3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Course Work: The student must complete a minimum of 36 credits, with at least 24 credits of course work and 12 credits of 

dissertation research. Twelve credits of course work must be at the 600 level or above. Course work completed to fulfill a 

Master's degree can be applied against this requirement; a) One seminar course (MEES 608 or equivalent) is required for 

each year in residence (on average); b) One approved Statistics course (600 level or higher); c) One graduate course 

representing significant interdisciplinary breadth, outside the student's specialization; d) One course or seminar in 

management, ethics or philosophy of science. 

Examinations: Formal applications for advancement to candidacy for the doctoral degree requires successful completion of 

both a Comprehensive Examination written and oral components and an oral Defense of the Dissertation Proposal. The 

Comprehensive Examination must be passed before the student can defend the Dissertation Proposal. An Oral Defense of 

the Dissertation will be conducted by the Research Advisory Committee and will be administered once all other degree 

requirements have been fulfilled. 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

Course Work: A minimum of 30 credits with 24 credits of course work and 6 credits of graduate research. Of the 24 course 

credits, 12 of them must be at the 600 level or higher; including, a) One seminar course (MEES 608 or equivalent) must be 

taken for each year in residence (on average); b) One approved Statistics course (400 level or higher); c) One graduate 

course representing significant interdisciplinary breadth, outside the student's specialization; d) One course or seminar in 

management, ethics or philosophy of science. 

Thesis Defense: An Oral Defense of the Thesis, administered according to Graduate School regulations, will take place at 

the completion of the research project. This defense will be conducted by the Research Advisory Committee and will be 

administered once all other degree requirements have been fulfilled. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Students may conduct their research in the laboratories and facilities of the College Park (UMCP), Baltimore (UMB), 

Baltimore County (UMBC), or Eastern Shore (UMES) campuses, in one of the laboratories of the University's Center for 

Environmental Studies (UMCES): the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory (CBL) at Solomons, Maryland; the Horn Point 

Laboratory (HPL) near Cambridge, Maryland; and the Appalachian Laboratory (AL) in Frostburg, Maryland; or at the Institute 

of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET) in Baltimore. CBL and HPL are located on the Chesapeake Bay. They 

include excellent facilities for the culture of marine and estuarine organisms. Berthed at CBL are the University's research 

vessels. At HPL there are extensive marshes, intertidal areas, oyster shoals, tidal creeks, and rock jetties. AL, located in the 

mountains of western Maryland, specializes in terrestrial and freshwater ecology. On the campuses and at IMET are 

specialized laboratory facilities for environmental research, including microbiology; biotechnology; water chemistry; cellular, 

molecular, and organismal biology; and specialized facilities for remote sensing of the environment. Extensive field sites for 

environmental research are available through the University's agricultural programs and through cooperation with many 

other organizations in the state. 

Financial Assistance 

University fellowships, research assistantships and traineeships, and teaching assistantships are available. In general, aid 

provides for full living and educational expenses. Some partial assistance may also be available. Research support from 

federal, state, and private sources often provides opportunities for additional student support through either research 

assistantships or part-time employment on research projects. 

Contact Information 

Dr. Kennedy T. Paynter, Jr., Director 

0105 Cole Student Activities Building, 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-6938 

Fax:(301)314-4139 

mees@umd.edu 

http://www.mees.umd.edu/ 

Courses: MEES 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biological Sciences 

Entomology 

Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology 

Masters of Chemical and Life Sciences (CLFS) 



237 



Abstract 

The Master of Chemical and Life Sciences is an online content-based master's program for high school science teachers 
that provides in depth knowledge of current research areas in the biological, biochemical and biomedical sciences. The 
courses cover subject matter as diverse as genetic engineering and gene therapy to chemistry, ecology and the concepts of 
biocomplexity. University faculty who are experts in the field will lead discussion sessions on topics of current interest with 
significant social impact. Topic examples include the positive and negative aspects of genetically engineered foods and their 
safety , the development of new energy sources and the ethical and moral issues involved in cloning and the handling of 
genetic information. The program also provides a set of laboratory experiences that facilitates the presentation of many of 
these concepts in the classroom. Aside from the laboratory experiences, all courses will be offered exclusively through 
distance education as online courses. Our infrastructure provides a web based asynchronous program. Teachers who 
desire to update and advance their knowledge or who must complete an advanced degree or graduate courses, will find that 
this program meets their needs. In addition to our general program we offer focused Areas of Concentration in Biology and 
in Chemistry. During the course of studies towards a degree students may earn Credentials by taking a series of focused 
courses. 

Admissions Information 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

In addition to a suitable undergraduate education and experience admission to the degree program requires the successful 
completion of either CLFS 510, Concepts of Modern Biology, or CLFS 520, Concepts in Modern Chemistry, gateway review 
classes; or a passing grade of B or better on either of the admissions exams based on CLFS 510 and CLFS 520. Suitable 
GRE scores will also be accepted to satisfy admission requirements (GRE scores are not required!). Upon application and 
the submission of documentation all applicants will be granted Provisional Admission to the program while they satisfy other 
admission requirements 
Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF CHEMICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES (MCLFS) 

Students with a thorough and up to date understanding of biology or chemistry, and who are admitted without condition*, 
may elect to take the appropriate Admission Exam. The Admission Exams are generally based on the content of CLFS 510, 
Concepts in Modern Biology or CLFS 520, Concepts in Modern Chemistry. Students who feel that they can benefit from a 
review may take CLFS 510, Concepts in Modern Biology or CLFS 520, Concepts in Modern Chemistry. A passing grade (B) 
on either the Admission Exam or CLFS 51 0/520 is sufficient for admission to the MCLFS program as a degree-seeking 
student. *Students with undergraduate grade point averages below 3.0, who have not previously demonstrated superior 
performance in graduate courses, will be required to take CLFS 510 or CLFS 520. (Note: as a 500-level course this cannot 
be used to meet the credit requirements of the MCLFS program.) Students may take individual courses in the MCLFS 
program as Advanced Students. Up to 12 credits may be taken in this way. A maximum of six credits from other institutions 
may be transferred in with approval of the Director. (See: Transfer Form) The program's curriculum consists of 30 credit 
hours selected from the list below (not including CLFS 51 or CLFS 520). Included in the 30 hours are 6 credits of CLFS 
710, Experimental Biology, or CLFS 720, Experimental Chemistry, or the equivalent, and the completion of a scholarly 
paper. No more than six hours of CLFS 608 Seminar credits may be counted towards the required 30 credits. 
Financial Assistance 

FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE 

Dr. Paul Mazzocchi Professor Emeritus, 

pmazzocc@umd.edu 



Director, Master of Chemical and Life Sciences 



http://www.clfs.umd.edu/grad/mlfsc/ 
Courses: 

Mathematical Statistics (STAT) 

Abstract 

The Statistics Program offers the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees for graduate study and research in 
statistics and probability. Areas of faculty research activity include statistical decision and estimation theory, biostatistics, 
stochastic modeling, robust and nonparametric inference, semiparametric inference, categorical data analysis, theory and 
inference for stochastic processes, stochastic analysis, time series and spatial statistics. Students may concentrate in 
applied or theoretical statistics by selecting an appropriate sequence of courses and a research area to form an individual 



238 



plan of study. The Program has been designed with sufficient flexibility to accommodate the student's background and 
interests. The Program also offers students from other disciplines an opportunity to select a variety of statistics courses to 
supplement their own study. 

The Program is administratively affiliated with the Department of Mathematics, which maintains the records of all students in 
the Mathematical Statistics Program and handles correspondence with those applying for admission. However, any 
application for admission must indicate clearly that the student wishes to enter the Statistics (STAT) Program. 
Employment prospects for statisticians are very good. All recent M.A. and Ph.D. graduates of Maryland's Statistics Program 
have found jobs in academia and government. 
Admissions Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, applicants with at least a B average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) should have 
completed an undergraduate program of study that included a strong emphasis on rigorous mathematics or statistics. 
Mathematical preparation at least through the level of advanced calculus will normally be considered sufficient 
demonstration of the expected mathematical background. In special cases, students may be provisionally admitted without 
having fulfilled the general admission requirements if they can demonstrate potential success in the Program through other 
criteria. The General Graduate Record Examination is required for admission, and the applicants must supply the scores. 
The GRE subject examination in Mathematics is recommended. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 1 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: October 1 
Preferred: September 15 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General (required) 

2. GRE Math (recommended) 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The M.A. degree is not required for admission to the Ph.D. program. A doctoral student must complete a minimum of 36 
hours of formal courses (at least 27 at the 600/700 level) with an average of B or better; at least 18 of the graduate credits 
must be taken in Statistics. In addition, the university requires at least 12 hours of STAT 899 (Doctoral Research). The Ph.D. 
student must take written examinations in Probability, Mathematical Statistics, and a third exam in Applied Statistics or any 
field of mathematics. These examinations are given by the Mathematics Department twice a year in January and August. A 
student may take one or more examinations at a time. The student must pass two examinations by the end of his or her third 
year in the graduate program, and must pass all three by the end of the fourth year. Most full-time students pass all three 
examinations by the end of the second year or middle of the third year. If successful in the written examinations, the student 
must pass an oral examination. Administered by the Statistics faculty, the oral examination usually takes place a year after 
the student passes the written examination. This examination serves as a test of the student's in-depth preparation in the 
area of specialization and the student's research potential. Successful completion of the oral exam indicates that the student 
is ready to begin writing the doctoral dissertation. In addition, the Department requires a reading competence in one foreign 
language for the Ph.D. The student may select one of three languages: French, German or Russian. Administered and 
graded by the Mathematics Department, the language examination consists of translating foreign mathematical texts into 
competent English. To be admitted to candidacy, the Ph.D. student must pass the written examinations and the oral 
examination and the language examination must be completed before the candidate's final oral examination on the 
dissertation. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. degree program offers both thesis and non-thesis options; the students are encouraged to choose the latter. For 
the non-thesis option, a student must complete 30 credit hours with at least a B average; at least 18 of these credits must be 
at the graduate level (600/700 level) and at least 12 of the graduate credits must be in Statistics (STAT). The student must 
also pass the Mathematics Department written examinations in Probability, Mathematical Statistics and one more area, such 
as Applied Statistics or any field of mathematics. The student may take either the separate M.A. written examinations or the 
Ph.D. written examinations, which require a lower score to pass. In order to earn the M.A. degree with the non-thesis option, 
the student must pass two examinations by the end of his or her third year in the graduate program, and must pass all three 
at the M. A. level or two at the Ph. D. level by the end of the fourth year. A student may take one or more examinations at a 
time. Most full-time students pass all three examinations by the end of the second year or middle of the third year. The 
student must also submit a satisfactory short scholarly paper. 

For the thesis option, a student must: (1) complete 24 credit hours with at least 15 at the 600/700 level (of these 15 hours, at 
least 12 hours must be in Statistics); (2) maintain an average grade of B or better; (3) take six hours of STAT 799 
(Research) in addition to (1); (4) write a satisfactory thesis; and (5) pass a final oral examination. There is no foreign 
language requirement for M.A. students. 



239 



The applicants should have in mind that no financial aid is offered to M. A. students. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The STAT Program cooperates closely with the Mathematics Department and the Applied Mathematics and Scientific 

Computation (AMSC) Program. The Program's faculty are actively involved in research in applied and theoretical areas of 

statistics and maintain close ties with applied scientists in several federal agencies. 

The Program sponsors a weekly statistics seminar. In addition, faculty-student workshops cover topics of current statistical 

interest. 

Computing is integrated into the applied courses, and the Program also offers a course "Computational Methods in 

Statistics" 

By scheduling many of its applied and Master's level courses in late-afternoon time slots, the Program facilitates and invites 

part-time graduate study. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are awarded to Ph. D. students in the Statistics Program through the Mathematics Department. At 

present, the teaching load is six hours each semester, in addition to the duties of meeting with students and grading papers. 

There are 15 graduate students in statistics with financial support. These are mostly teaching assistantships, but there are 

also a few research assistantships and fellowships. From time to time advanced students are placed into research 

assistantships as data analysts or statistical consultants with other campus units such as the Statistics Laboratory, run jointly 

by the Statistics Program and the Computer Science Center. Applications for financial aid are only processed once a year, 

for admission for the fall semester. 

Contact Information 

In addition to brochures and publications of the Mathematics Department, which include information about statistics faculty 
and graduate courses, the Statistics Program offers a brochure, "Educational Policies of the Mathematical Statistics Program" . 
Prof. Abram Kagan, Director 
Mathematical Statistics Program 
1107 Mathematics Building 

University of Maryland 
College Park 
MD 20742-4015 
Telephone: (301) 405-5061 
Fax:(301)314-0827 
statgrad@deans.umd.edu 

www . stat . umd . edu 

Courses: STAT 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Mathematics 

Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation 

Mathematics (MATH) 

Abstract 

Three programs are currently closely affiliated with the Mathematics Department: the Mathematics Program (MATH), the 

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program (AMSC), and the Mathematical Statistics Program (STAT). 

Students applying for admission should use the appropriate symbol to indicate their program of interest. The interdisciplinary 

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program offers two concentrations, one in applied mathematics and one in 

scientific computation. The Statistics Program is concerned with mathematical statistics and probability. The AMSC and 

STAT programs are described in detail elsewhere in this catalog. 

Students can earn Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the Mathematics Program. The master's degree is 

not required for entrance to the Ph.D. program. 

The Mathematics Program offers graduate programs in algebra and algebraic geometry, complex analysis, dynamical 

systems and chaos, geometry, harmonic analysis, mathematical logic, number theory, numerical analysis, ordinary 

differential equations, partial differential equations, probability, real and functional analysis, representation theory, statistics 

and topology. 

Admissions Information 

Admission is granted to applicants who show promise in mathematics as demonstrated by their undergraduate record. 

Unless courses in advanced calculus and (undergraduate) abstract and linear algebra have been taken, admission may be 

on a provisional basis (conditioned on passing MATH 410, 403, and/or 405 with a grade of B). Both the Subject Test and the 

General Test of the Graduate Record Examination are required for admission. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 


Deadline: May 1 


Deadline: October 1 



240 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: January 15 


Preferred: September 15 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: January 15 


Deadline: June 1 
Preferred: June 1 



Application Requirements 

GRE General, GRE Mathematics, 3 letters of recommendation, and advanced courses form 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The Ph.D. program does not require an M.A. degree, but applicants who are accepted should show, on the basis of their 
undergraduate record and recommendations, that they possess not only marked promise in mathematical activities but the 
potential to perform on a creative level. Like the M.A. program, admission may be granted on a provisional basis. 
Students in the Ph.D. program must complete a minimum of 36 hours of formal coursework (at least 27 at the 600/700 level) 
with an average grade of B or better; at least 18 hours must be taken in the Department of Mathematics. In addition, the 
university requires at least 12 hours of MATH 899 (Doctoral Research). Ph.D. students must pass Departmental written 
examinations in three subfields of mathematics. The purpose of the written qualifying exams is to indicate that the student 
has the basic knowledge and mathematical ability to begin advanced study. Passing the exams is thus supposed to certify 
understanding of (selected) first-year graduate material. These examinations are given twice a year, in January and August. 
A student may take one or more examinations at a time. All three examinations must be passed by January of the student's 
third year in the graduate program. If successful in these written examinations, students must do advanced reading and 
coursework in their special area of interest before they can be admitted to candidacy and begin dissertation research. The 
dissertation must represent an original contribution to mathematical knowledge and is usually published in a mathematical 
journal. 

Generally Ph.D. students spend about six years before obtaining the degree. The combined programs of mathematics, 
applied mathematics and statistics award an average of 18 Ph.D.'s each year. The Ph.D. program has a foreign language 
requirement. Before a student can schedule the Final Oral Examination, he or she must pass a written examination in either 
French, German or Russian. The language examinations are composed and graded within the Department and involve 
translating a passage from a mathematical text into competent English. 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option; most students choose the latter. The non-thesis option 
requires students to take 30 credit hours with an average of at least a B. At least 1 8 credits must be at the 600/700 level, 
including at least 12 hours in mathematics. Additionally, students must complete two full-year sequences at the 600/700 
level; either pass Departmental written examinations in three different mathematical fields at the Master's level, or pass two 
exams in different mathematical fields at the PhD level; and write a scholarly paper. 

The thesis option requires a total of 24 hours of courses carrying graduate credit of which at least 15 are at the 600/700 
level. Of these 15 hours at least 12 must be in mathematics. Of these 12 hours, at least 3 hours must be in each of two 
fields of mathematics distinct from the one in which the thesis is written, and must be passed with a grade of B or better. The 
student must also take 6 hours of thesis research, write a satisfactory thesis, and pass a final oral examination. 
The M.A. degree includes no foreign language requirement. Generally it takes two to three years to earn the M.A., and 
approximately 20 degrees are granted each year in mathematics (MATH, STAT, and AMSC combined). 
The department also has a 5-year program to earn a combined M.A./B.S. degree. The requirements for this program include 
the requirements for both the B.S. degree and the M.A. degree, with 9 hours of overlapping credits. Either the thesis or non- 
thesis option for the M.A. degree is available in this program. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department is actively involved in research in a number of areas, strengthened further by a complement of 
mathematicians from the Institute for Physical Science and Technology. The Department fosters a lively program of 
seminars and colloquia; about half of these talks are given by outside specialists. In addition the department has a tradition 
of hosting distinguished long term visitors who give series of seminar talks or teach semester long courses. 
The Engineering and Physical Sciences Library is located on the ground floor of the Mathematics Building and contains 
more than 95,000 volumes in mathematics, physics and engineering, and more than 280 journals in pure and applied 
mathematics. The Library of Congress, with its extensive collection of books and technical reports, is only a half hour from 
campus. 

The Department has a large network of computers mostly running Linux. The Department houses a computer classroom 
and a Mathematical Visualization Lab, and similar labs are scattered across campus. There are computers in almost all 
graduate student offices, and many of the other computers on campus are available for student use. 
The Department cooperates closely with the Institute for Physical Science and Technology and with the Department of 
Computer Science. Faculty members of both groups offer courses in the Department, and the facilities of the computer 
center are available to serve the research needs of both faculty and graduate students. Members of the Department 
participate actively in the interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program, and they also staff the 
Mathematical Statistics Program. 

241 



Financial Assistance 

The MATH program is expecting to support between 15 and 20 new doctoral students each Fall. Offers of support are 

generally made for up to five years, contingent on the student making satisfactory academic progress. Except for unusual 

circumstances, offers of financial aid will not be made to applicants seeking a Master's degree. The normal teaching load is 

four to six hours per week of classroom teaching in addition to the duties of meeting with students and grading papers. 

Sometimes fellowships and research assistantships are also available. 

Contact Information 

More information about the Mathematics Graduate Program is available at www.math.umd. edu/graduate/ , and 

information about admissions is available at www .math, umd. edu/graduate /prospective/ . 

For questions regarding Departmental programs, admission procedures, and financial aid, contact: 

Ms. Celeste Regalado, Program Coordinator 

1112 Mathematics Building 

University of Maryland 
College Park 
MD 20742-4015 
Telephone: (301) 405-5058 
mathgrad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.math.umd.edu/graduate/ 

Courses: MATH 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Engineering: Systems Engineering 

Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation 

Mathematical Statistics 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology (IPST) 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling 

Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology (MAIT) 

Abstract 

The Norbert Wiener Center, a research and educational unit in the Department of Mathematics at the University of 

Maryland, College Park, offers a professional Master's degree focusing on the modern mathematical methods and 

algorithms that underlie today's cutting-edge engineering: The Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology (MAIT). 

Our program is designed for individuals working in mathematical engineering who are looking for a fast track to 

understanding and applying the most up-to-date ideas in their current and future projects. Undergraduate degree holders 

can advance to the Masters level, and Master's degree holders can advance their applicable skills. 

In addition to the professional Master's degree, we also offer two certificate programs. For students wishing to enhance their 

career skills in specific subject matter, the Center also offers a Graduate Certificate in Mathematics of Advanced Industrial 

Technology to students completing 4 courses (12 credits) within the program. The Norbert Wiener Center also offers a 

specific Graduate Certificate concentration in Computational Harmonic Analysis. This 12-credit program is tailored to 

working engineers and scientists wishing to advance their understanding of the latest Fourier, Wavelet, and Time-Frequency 

Harmonic Analysis methods and algorithms. 

Fields including RF and Optical Communications, Signal and Image Processing, Sensor Networks, RADAR and SONAR, 

Navigations and Avionics, Medical Imaging and Diagnostics, Control Systems, and Robotics, increasingly rely on fast, 

embedded mathematical algorithms executing on the latest microprocessors, micro-controllers, and DSP cores. Budding 

fields such as Bioinformatics, Nanotechnology, Data Mining, and Quantum Computing are likewise being built from the 

ground up around modern mathematical methods. Engineers and scientists that understand advanced mathematical 

toolsets will have the edge in creating tomorrow's technologies. 

The Norbert Wiener Center's educational mission is to teach the mathematics of modern engineering in an accessible and 

applicable manner. Our faculty is drawn from both academia and industry in order to balance theoretical and "hands on" 

approaches in the most constructive way. Our courses offer the latest information while tying modern theory directly to 

application by incorporating industry standard tools. Graduates of the Norbert Wiener Center will be well equipped to apply 

the latest mathematical tools to advance both their projects and their careers. 

The most up-to-date information about the MAIT program can be found on our website at www.mait.umd.edu 

Admissions Information 

THIS PROGRAM IS NOT ACCEPTING NEW STUDENTS AT THIS TIME. 

Students entering the program should hold a regionally accredited baccalaureate degree in Mathematics, Engineering, 

Physics, or a related technical field. Mathematical background should include Calculus, Differential Equations, and Linear 

Algebra, as well as experience and/or coursework in one or more of the following areas: Scientific Computing, Digital Signal 

Processing, Numerical Analysis, Boundary Value Problems, Fourier methods, Complex Variables. MAIT also offers 

preadmission classes to help interested students fulfill these requirements. 

Application Deadlines 

242 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 






International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 







Application Requirements 

THIS PROGRAM IS NOT ACCEPTING NEW STUDENTS AT THIS TIME 

Students entering the program should hold a regionally accredited baccalaureate degree in Mathematics, Engineering, 

Physics, or a related technical field. Mathematical background should include Calculus, Differential Equations, and Linear 

Algebra, as well as experience and/or coursework in one or more of the following areas: Scientific Computing, Digital Signal 

Processing, Numerical Analysis, Boundary Value Problems, Fourier methods, Complex Variables. MAIT also offers 

preadmission classes to help interested students fulfill these requirements. 

Degree Requirements 

Certificate in Computational Harmonic Analysis (Certificate) 

The Norbert Wiener Center offers a specific Graduate Certificate concentration in Computational Harmonic Analysis. This 

12-credit program is tailored to working engineers and scientists wishing to advance their understanding of the latest 

Fourier, Wavelet, and Time-Frequency Harmonic Analysis methods and algorithms. The program will include the following 

courses: MAIT 633 Applied Fourier Analysis; MAIT 623-624 Modern Mathematical Methods of Signal and Image Processing; 

and a fourth elective selected with the approval of the student's advisor. Coursework must be completed with a GPA of 3.0 

or higher. 

Master of Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology (MS) 

The Master of Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology (MAIT) degree requires 10 classes (30 credits) to be 

completed with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Coursework must include 3 core subjects (MAIT 613 Advanced Applied Linear 

Algebra, MAIT 623 Modern Mathematical Methods of Signal and Image Processing I, and MAIT 633 Applied Fourier 

Analysis), as well as electives chosen from a host of options. Coursework also must include a one or two-semester practical 

project course under the guidance of a faculty member. The project course may be employer-work related. The student's 

faculty advisor must approve program coursework. 

Certificate in Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology (Certificate) 

For students wishing to enhance their career skills in specific subject matter, the Center also offers a Graduate Certificate in 

Mathematics of Advanced Industrial Technology to students completing 4 courses (12 credits) within the program. 

Coursework will include at least 2 of the core subjects and 2 listed electives to be completed with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Courses for the MAIT program will be taught in the evening at the College Park Campus and also at sites in northern 

Virginia. The MAIT program is administered by the Norbert Wiener Center for Harmonic Analysis and Applications which is 

located within the Mathematics department on the second floor of the Mathematics building on Campus Drive in College 

Park. 

Financial Assistance 

Contact Information 

Additional information can be found on the MAIT web site at www.mait.umd.edu A brochure describing the program is 

available from the program office or from the web site in electronic form (*.pdf). 

Program Coordinator 

Suite 221 1 , Department of Mathematics, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20740 

Telephone: (301) 405-5158 

Fax:(301)314-6710 

mait@math.umd.edu 

http://www.mait.umd.edu 

Courses: 

Modern French Studies (FRMS) 

Abstract 

The Ph.D. in Modern French Studies encompasses the Renaissance to the present. The diversity of the Graduate Faculty 
makes it possible for students to specialize in a wide variety of areas in French language, literature, and culture. The 
department is part of a larger School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures that encourages and facilitates interdisciplinary 
scholarship, particularly in Film Studies and in Cultural Studies. Through consortia arrangements with universities in the 
area, including George Washington University and Georgetown University, students may augment their programs with 
courses otherwise unavailable at the University of Maryland. 

243 



Admissions Information 

Application requirements for the Ph.D. program include: 1) Graduate School application, 2) statement of purpose (including 
research interests), 3) three letters of recommendation, 4) official academic transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate 
work, 5) GRE scores, 6) a writing sample, and 7) a resume or Curriculum Vitae. International applicants must also submit 
TOEFL scores. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Preferred: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 
Preferred: February 1 





Application Requirements 

• Graduate School Application 

• GRE Scores 

• 3 Letters of Recommendation 

• Writing Sample 

• Statement of Purpose 

• Resume or Curriculum Vitae 

• Official Transcripts 

• TOEFL Scores (for International Applicants> 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Ph.D. students are required to take for credit a minimum of 8 courses beyond the M.A. at the 600-level or above. Before 

being advanced to candidacy, they must take a two-part comprehensive exam (written and oral), and submit a written 

dissertation prospectus in which they demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the relevant scholarship and outline their 

research. This prospectus is defended in front of a committee comprised of three faculty members from the department. 

Ph.D. candidates then go on to write and defend a dissertation that explores significant questions about French literature 

and culture, past or present. All Ph.D. students are required to demonstrate a sound reading knowledge of one other foreign 

language in addition to French. A student having a recognized degree or diploma in a subsidiary area such as Music, 

Economics, Political Science, etc., and who plans to make substantial use of this body of knowledge for the dissertation may 

be permitted, with the approval of the Graduate Programs Committee, to substitute such degree or diploma for the additional 

foreign language requirement. All requirements for the Ph.D. degree, except the dissertation, must be completed within five 

years of admission to the program. The dissertation must be completed no more than four years after advancement to 

candidacy. (See Department Website for additional information) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

With a total student enrollment of over 35,000, the University of Maryland is supported in its academic endeavors by the 

University Libraries, a system of eight libraries and more than three million volumes. Other area research facilities include 

two of the world's outstanding libraries: the Library of Congress and the Folger Library, both of which have extensive 

holdings in French. The School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, the Women's Studies Program, and the David C. 

Driskell Center For The Study of The Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and The African Diaspora, among other 

campus units, offer seminars, lectures, and symposia on a wide variety of topics relevant to graduate students in French. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate applicants can request to be considered for Teaching Assistantships and Graduate Fellowships. Graduate 

Teaching Assistantships carry ten-month stipends, plus remission of all fees (10 credits) other than those for registration and 

health facilities. 

Contact Information 

Additional information on program offerings, degree requirements and financial aid can be obtained on the department's 

Web site (http://www.languages.umd.edu/Frenchltalian) and by writing to: 

Director of Graduate Studies in French 

3215 Jimenez Hall 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-4024 

http://www.languages.umd.edu/Frenchltalian 

Courses: FREN 



244 



Music (MUSC) 

Abstract 

The UM School of Music offers programs of study leading to the Master of Music degree with areas of specialization in 
performance, composition, conducting and music education; the Master of Arts degree with areas in ethnomusicology, music 
history and literature (musicology), music education, and music theory; the Doctor of Philosophy degree with areas of 
specialization in ethnomusicology, musicology, and music theory; and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree with areas of 
specialization in composition, performance, and conducting. A Doctor of Philosophy degree in Curriculum and Instruction is 
offered by the College of Education in cooperation with the Music Education Division of the School of Music. 
Admissions Information 

Admission to graduate degree programs in music is highly selective. It is determined primarily by a performance audition, 
tapes and scores of original compositions, scholarly research papers, letters of recommendation, and/or successful teaching 
experience; additionally, in some academic areas, the general GRE scores are considered. All non-native English-speaking 
students (including students with prior United States degrees) must achieve a score of 575/233/100 on the TOEFL to be 
invited for audition/admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General for Ethnomusicology and Historical Musicology 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Audition/Interview 

4. Repertoire/List of Performances 

5. Research paper for Ethnomusicology and Historical Musicology 

6. Scores for Composition 

7. Pre-screen recordings for flute, collaborative piano, trumpet, vocal, and applicants. Please see our website, www.music.umd.edu, for 
further information. 

8. We require a passing TOEFL score (minimum 100 IBT, 233 CBT, 575 PBT) for all international applicants before we will process your 
application or consider you for a live audition. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Music or Master of Arts (M.M.; M.A.) 

The Master of Music Degree (Non-Thesis Option in Composition, Conducting, Music Education, or Performance) requires a 
minimum of between 31 and 36 credit hours depending on the specific program. Required coursework is distributed among 
three areas of study: Major studies, Studies in Areas Supporting the Major, and Other Studies in Music. In addition, a grade 
of B or better is required in all courses used to fulfill requirements for the degree; a scholarly research paper must be written 
as part of MUSC 648 Seminar in Music Research or MUED 690 Research Methods; a Final Project must be completed 
satisfactorily; and an oral comprehensive examination of courses required in Major Studies and in Studies in Areas 
Supportive of the Major must be passed. Specific courses are required in each area of specialization. 
The Master of Arts Degree (Thesis Option in Ethnomusicology, Music Education, Music History and Literature [Musicology], 
or Music Theory; Non-Thesis Option in Ethnomusicology) requires a minimum of 30 credit hours (35 for Ethnomusicology), 
with a minimum of 12 credit hours in Major Studies, 9 credit hours in Studies in Areas Supportive of the Major (14 for 
Ethnomusicology), and 9 credit hours in Other Studies in Music. In addition, a grade of B or better is required in all courses 
used to fulfill requirements for the degree; a Thesis must be written (Ethnomusicology Non-Thesis Option requires two 
scholarly research papers), an oral defense of the Thesis (or research papers) must be passed; and a written 
comprehensive examination must be passed. Specific courses are required in each area of specialization. 
Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Musical Arts (Ph.D.; D.M.A.; Ed.D.) 

The Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Musical Arts degrees require the satisfactory completion of a significant body of 
coursework that, in the student's and Graduate Advisor's judgment, prepares the student for the preliminary examination that 
leads to admission to candidacy, as well as certain specific courses required in each area of specialization. A dissertation 
(whether written, or in project form) is required for all doctoral degrees in music. A Principal Advisor for the dissertation will 
be chosen by the student and the academic advisor; the Principal Advisor and the student will then nominate the remaining 
members of the dissertation committee. The student must submit a detailed Prospectus of the dissertation to the members 
of the dissertation committee and the Graduate Director, and must be admitted to candidacy prior to the approval of the 
dissertation committee by the Graduate School. The dissertation must be successfully defended before the entire 
dissertation committee. The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires a Written Dissertation; the Doctor of Musical Arts degree 
requires a Written Dissertation, a Recording Project, a Performance Project, or a Musical Composition. 



245 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The music library in Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center ranks among the top twenty university music libraries in the United 
States, and it offers a variety of archives, special collections, and other research resources which give it international stature 
among scholars in a broad spectrum of music disciplines. The total music collection includes approximately 50,000 books, 
150,000 scores, 140,000 recordings, and 4,500 linear feet of archival materials. 

The International Piano Archives at Maryland (IPAM) is the only institutional collection in existence devoted to historic piano 
performance. IPAM contains 40,000 recordings, 8,500 music scores, 2,500 books, and a collection of reproducing pianos 
with 8,000 piano rolls. To date IPAM has acquired the collections of more than 40 eminent pianists. The Special Collections 
in Music embrace a growing number of national and international music organization archives representing music education, 
band history, solo and ensemble instrumental performance, music librarianship, and ethnomusicology. Materials in these 
archives include papers, music scores, recordings, books, magazines, photographs, and oral histories. The library also 
features important archival and manuscript collections on music criticism and American music, the Charles Fowler Papers 
supporting the study of arts education, a significant Leopold Stokowski Collection, the Jacob Coopersmith Collection of 
Handeliana, the Radio Station WOR/Alfred Wallen stein Collection of 26,000 orchestral scores, and the performance parts of 
the Andre Kostelanetz Orchestra. Also located at The University of Maryland is The Center for Studies in Nineteenth- 
Century Music. Other research activities of the School of Music include the C. P. E. Bach Edition and the American Handel 
Society. Within a few miles of the College Park campus are research opportunities offered by Dumbarton Oaks, the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library of Baltimore, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the 
Smithsonian Institution, and about 500 specialized libraries. 

The School of Music presents a wide variety of student and faculty solo and ensemble recitals and concerts, including those 
of the internationally recognized Guarneri String Quartet, which is in residence at College Park and whose members hold 
professorial rank. The School of Music also cooperates with the Concert Society at Maryland which presents a series of 
concerts throughout the academic year and, during the summer, The University of Maryland International Competitions 
honoring Marian Anderson (Vocal Arts), William Kapell (Piano), and Leonard Rose (Cello), as well as the National 
Orchestral Institute. The University sponsors a Handel Festival featuring the University of Maryland Chorus and scholars 
and performers from around the world. The musical environment of the entire Washington-Baltimore area is unusually varied 
and rich with performances at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Constitution Hall, the National Gallery of 
Art, the Phillips Collection, the Library of Congress, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Smithsonian Institution, the Corcoran Gallery of 
Art, and the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore. 
Financial Assistance 

A number of competitive fellowships, graduate assistantships, teaching assistantships, operatic assistantships, and 
orchestral assistantships are available. Preference for financial assistance will be given to those who have filed an 
application for admission to the University and the School of Music Supplemental Application by December 1 (for 
performance programs) and January 15 (for Music Education only) and have been officially admitted. 
Contact Information 

School of Music: Graduate Programs handbook (available online at: 

http://www.music.umd.edu/current_students/handbooks) provides descriptive information, details of course requirements, 
examination procedures, and graduation requirements for the M. A., M. M., D. M. A., and Ph. D. degree programs. 
International students should read the information contained in the International Applicants section of the Graduate 
Admission Application. Specific information may also be obtained from: 
Deborah Kuckuda, Graduate Student Services or 

Ms. Jenny Lang, Assistant Director for Admissions and External Relations, or 
Mr. David Powell, Admissions Coordinator 
21 1 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center 
College Park 
MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-8435 
Fax:(301)314-7966 
musicadmissions@umd.edu 

http://www.music.umd.edu 

Courses: MUSC MUSP MUED MUET 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center 
College of Arts and Humanities 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) 

Abstract 

The NACS program offers a wide range of research and training opportunities for students who are interested in pursuing 
doctoral-level research in a variety of areas within neuroscience and cognitive science. Faculty research interests extend 
from molecular and cellular neuroscience to studies of language and cognition. Research approaches include both the 
theoretical and experimental, with several laboratories doing both. The experimental work includes cutting-edge 
methodologies; the theoretical includes mathematical, computer, and engineering studies. Research and training activities of 

246 



NACS take place within the laboratories of faculty in 20 participating departments and units: Aerospace Engineering, Animal 
and Avian Sciences, Bioengineering, Biology, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, English, 
Entomology, Hearing and Speech Sciences, Human Development, Kinesiology, Linguistics, Nutrition and Food Science, 
Philosophy, Psychology, and Public & Community Health, as well as the Center for Advanced Study of Language, the 
Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, the Institute for Systems Research, and the Second Language Acquisition 
program. The NACS program requires the completion of two required core courses and three out of four core courses, 
including cognitive neuroscience, computational neuroscience, cellular and molecular neuroscience, and cognitive science. 
The goal of the Program is to bring together the diverse perspectives and strengths of all the included disciplines in order to 
understand the working of the nervous system, the mind, and behavior. For more information, please visit our web 
site: http://www.nacs.umd.edu . 

Admissions Information 

Admission to the NACS Program requires a bachelor's degree from a recognized undergraduate institution. Course work in 
calculus is strongly recommended, as is some background in neuroscience, computational science, or cognitive science. 
Students with strong academic records but missing relevant coursework will be allowed to make up deficiencies. The 
Program requires the Graduate Record Examination scores; transcripts; statement of goals, research interests, and 
experiences; and three letters of recommendation. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. Statement of goals, research interests, and experiences 

3. Transcripts 

4. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The NACS Program emphasizes research training and thus requires only 27 credits of course work over the first two years. 

Specific requirements include two core courses-a scientific ethics course and an introduction to neurosciences course--and 

three out of four core courses from among cognitive neuroscience, computational neuroscience, cellular and molecular 

neuroscience, and cognitive science. A formal qualifying examination is given at the beginning of the third year to ensure 

that all students have a core knowledge of basic neuroscience and cognitive science, and that each student has the 

knowledge and skills necessary to develop a dissertation proposal. By the end of their fourth year, students formally present 

their dissertation proposal and are admitted to candidacy. The dissertation is normally completed within two years of the 

proposal defense. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Program, by virtue of its breadth, has access to the facilities of all the departments, institutes, and centers of its faculty 

members. These include the Institute for Systems Research, the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, the Center for 

Advanced Study of Language, and the various well-equipped research laboratories and department facilities of the faculty. 

Animal facilities are available where necessary. NACS has developed a very close collaboration with the National Institute of 

Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) of the NIH. NACS students can conduct research in cellular and 

molecular neurobiology and imaging of the human CNS with mentors at NIDCD, most of whom are NACS adjunct faculty. 

Thus, the NIDCD-NACS relationship extends research and training opportunities for students while they get their degrees 

from the NACS program. NACS has also developed a similar joint research program with researchers at the Children's 

National Medical Center (CNMC). 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate fellowships are available on a competitive basis to both entering and continuing students, while qualified students 

may also receive teaching assistantships. In addition, some faculty have graduate research assistantships for their students. 

There are also NIH graduate training grant fellowships for students interested in studying auditory neuroscience. 

Contact Information 

Program Director - Robert J. Dooling 

2123D Biology/Psychology Building, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5925 

Fax:(301)314-9566 

dooling@psyc.umd.edu 

Graduate Director - Bill Idsardi 

1417 Marie Mount Hall, College Park 

247 



MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8376 

idsardi@umd.edu 

Assistant Director - Pam Komarek 

2131 Biology-Psychology Building, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-8910 

Fax:301-314-9566 

pkomarek@umd.edu 

http://www.nacs.umd.edu 

Courses: NACS 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Kinesiology 

Animal Sciences 

Nutrition 

Linguistics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Clinical Audiology 

Psychology 

Human Development (Institute for Child Study) 

Engineering: Electrical & Computer Engineering 

Engineering: Bioengineering 

Computer Science 

Education: Human Development 

Biological Sciences 



Nutrition (NUTR) 

The Department of Nutrition and Food Science offers courses that may involve the use of animals. Students who are 
concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, 
to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or 
required, and what alternatives, if any, are available. 
Abstract 

The Graduate Program in Nutrition is an interdepartmental program administered by the Department of Nutrition and Food 
Science (NFSC). It involves faculty from the Departments of Animal and Avian Sciences, Anthropology, Chemistry and 
Biochemistry, Nutrition and Food Science, and Pediatrics (UMAB Campus), and scientists in nearby research institutions. 
The program offers graduate study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nutrition. Both M.S. and Ph.D. programs 
require completion of a research project either a thesis for the master's degree or a dissertation for the doctoral degree. A 
graduate faculty is responsible for graduate admission and curriculum maintenance. Currently, there are approximately 17 
graduate students enrolled in the Graduate Program in Nutrition and there are 18 graduate faculty members. Research 
interests of the faculty include; the genetic and metabolic basis for dietary requirements of animals and humans; nutritional 
biochemistry; nutritional aspects of chronic disease; international nutrition, community nutrition, food and nutrition policy; and 
nutrition, neuroscience and behavior. Programs of research are individually planned with the student and an appropriate 
Graduate Faculty Advisory Committee. 
Admissions Information 

Completion of a four-year Bachelor's Degree from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 
4.0 scale) is required. Preference is given to students having a Bachelor's degree in nutrition, chemistry, biology, food 
science, animal science or related fields. However, consideration will be given to others having adequate background 
courses and who demonstrate potential for a research career. A faculty member of the Graduate Program in Nutrition must 
agree to serve as an advisor or a prospective graduate student may not be admitted to the Program. Required background 
courses in order to be eligible to apply include: Mathematics sufficient to undertake upper level statistic courses- UMCP's 
equivalent of Math 1 15-Precalculus or better, one semester of the equivalent of UMCP's Chem 233-Organic Chemistry I 
(with lab), and one semester of the equivalent of UMCP's Chem 243-Organic Chemistry II (with lab). Preferred courses 
include(students admitted without the following courses may be required to take the equivalent), as part of their graduate 
program: one semester of the equivalent of UMCP's BCHM 461 -Biochemistry I, one semester of the equivalent of UMCP's 
BCHM 462-Biochemistry II, one semester of the equivalent of UMCP's BSCI 440-Mammalian Physiology, and one semester 
of the equivalent of UMCP's NFSC 440-Advanced Human Nutrition. Offers of admission (or rejection) are made by the 
Graduate School based upon the recommendation of the Director of the Graduate Program in Nutrition and the Graduate 
Faculty Admissions Committee. 
Application Deadlines 



248 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 15 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 15 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1 . GRE General Test. A minimum score of 500 is required in each of the Verbal and Quantitative sections and a score of 3.5 - 6 is required in 
the Analytical Writing section. If the GRE general test was taken prior to October 2002, the minimum score required in each section of the 
GRE is 500, for a total of 1 500. 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. TOEFL-Test of English as a Foreign Language for International Applicants, a minimum score of 100(IBT) is required. 

4. TSE-Test of Spoken English for International Students who wish to be considered for a Teaching Assistant Position is required. 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Requirements for the M.S. degree in Nutrition are a minimum of 30 graduate credits of course work including a minimum of 

12 credits of 600 level courses and a minimum of 6 graduate credits of master's thesis research (NFSC 799). A minimum 

g.p.a. of 3.0 is required to maintain good academic progress for graduation. The student must complete a thesis and 

successfully defend their research before a graduate faculty examining committee approved by the Graduate School. In 

addition the student must write a manuscript, i.e. one or more research papers based upon the thesis and be submitted to a 

refereed journal for review and publication. An average duration of a Master's project is 2-3 years depending upon prior 

education and experience. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree in nutrition include a mastery of the broad fundamentals of nutrition as a science, as well 

as the demonstrated ability to conduct independent research. Course requirements include: a minimum of 27 graduate 

credits of course work including 9 credits of advanced nutrition course work, beyond the M.S. degree and 12 credits of 

NFSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. A minimum g.p.a. of 3.0 is required to maintain good academic progress for 

graduation. Students are admitted to full candidacy for the Ph.D. upon passing a comprehensive written and oral exam on 

basic core knowledge of nutrition science and submittal of a research proposal. In addition the student must prepare and 

successfully defend a dissertation before their faculty advisory committee. The average duration of a Ph.D. degree program 

is 4 years, depending upon prior education and experience. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The program maintains equipment for conducting both basic and applied research through the individual participating faculty 

members. The facilities are located in the Departments of Nutrition and Food Science, Animal and Avian Sciences, 

Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Pediatrics (UMAB). There are also collaborative arrangements with the NIH, 

FDA, and USDA. The library facilities are extensive. In addition to our excellent campus libraries, we are a few miles from 

the National Archives, the National Agricultural Library, the Library of Congress, and the National Library of Medicine. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial support for graduate students is available on a competitive basis. The Department of Nutrition and Food Science 

offers a limited number of graduate teaching assistantships. Applicants interested in a teaching assistant position should 

complete the Merit-Base Award Form and submit to the Graduate Program in Nutrition office by the stated graduate 

application deadline. International students who wish to be considered for a teaching assistant position must take the TSE 

test (Test of Spoken English). In addition international teaching assistants who are not native speakers of English are 

required by the University of Maryland to take part in the International Teaching Assistant evaluation. This includes 

international teaching assistants who may have been educated entirely in English and those with Bachelor and Master's 

degrees from universities in English-speaking countries. A limited number of research assistantships are available from 

grant funds with the student assisting in the research supported under the grant. The research often may be applicable to 

the thesis or dissertation. Research assistantships generally are not awarded until after students have attended classes and 

are known to faculty. The University of Maryland emphasizes diversity in its recruitment and support of graduate students. 

Other types of financial aid are also available, including a work-study program, grants, fellowships, and loans. 

Contact Information 

Additional information concerning admission requirements, courses, faculty, and facilities are available from: 

Sara Kao, Coordinator, Student Programs 

0112 Skinner Building College Park 

MD 20742-7640 

Telephone: (301) 405-8980 

Fax:(301)314-3313 

sarakao@umd.edu 

http://www.agnr.umd.edu/users/nfsc/staff.htm 



249 



Dr. Liangli Yu, Director of the Graduate Program in Nutrition 

3303 Marie Mount Hall College Park State: MD 

MD 20742-7640 

Telephone: (301) 405-0761 

Fax:(301)314-3313 

Iyu5@umd.edu 

http://www.agnr.umd.edu/users/nfsc/ 

Courses: 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Animal Sciences 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Anthropology 

Kinesiology 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Food Science 

Family Science 

Philosophy (PHIL) 

Abstract 

The Department of Philosophy offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with 
emphasis on contemporary Anglo-American philosophy and the interaction of philosophy with other disciplines. Students 
often enter the doctorate program without an M.A. degree, but the M.A. may be earned on the way to the Ph.D. While the 
Ph.D. program is suitable primarily for students who wish to enter a career in teaching and research at the college or 
university level, the M.A. program is appropriate for those who want to deepen and expand the knowledge they gained as 
undergraduates or who wish to develop competence in philosophy to apply to some other professional field. 
Admissions Information 

The Department requires for admission the results of the Graduate Record Examination, three letters of recommendation 
from previous instructors, and a sample of the student's written work on a philosophical topic (normally an essay, no more 
than twenty to twenty-five pages). The same supporting documents must be provided for admission to the master's program. 
Candidates should normally have completed at least six courses of philosophy (logic, ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, 
philosophy of mind, and the history of philosophy). 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 5 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 5 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Writing Sample (Philosophy Paper) 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

Students must complete ten three-hour courses, or a total of thirty hours of course work. Two of these courses must be Core 

Courses, the remaining eight graduate seminars offered by the Department. Additional details may be found in the Graduate 

Handbook on the Department's www site. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Students who seek admission to the Ph.D. program normally should intend to pursue only full-time study toward that degree. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, students must complete twelve three-hour courses, or a total of thirty-six 

hours of course work. Two of these courses must be Core Courses, the remaining ten graduate seminars offered by the 

Department. Additional details may be found in the Graduate Handbook on the Department's www site. Foreign language 

skills are required only as demanded by the individual student's research. 

Partial credit toward the Ph.D. requirements may be awarded for relevant work done at other graduate institutions. The 

Director of Graduate Studies will make a specific determination in each case. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A number of other departments and programs at the University offer graduate students additional opportunities for 
coursework and research. 



250 



In addition to the excellent libraries on campus, students may use other libraries in the Washington/Baltimore metropolitan 

area, such as the Library of Congress, the Center for Hellenic Studies, and the Eisenhower Library on the campus of Johns 

Hopkins University. 

The Department sponsors a series of colloquia by visiting and local speakers throughout the academic year. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department administers a number of graduate assistantships and fellowships. Virtually all applicants admitted to the 

doctoral program are offered support, typically a combination of teaching assistantships and fellowships. 

Contact Information 

For further information about the program, please consult the Department's www site: http://www.philosophy.umd.edu or 

contact the Director of Graduate Studies. 

Professor Peter Carruthers, Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Philosophy, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405 5705 

Fax:(301)405 5690 

pcarruth@umd.edu 

http://www.philosophy.umd.edu/ 

Professor Georges Rey, Director of Graduate Admissions 

Department of Philosophy, University of Maryland, College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405 5707 

Fax: (301 ) 405 5690 

georey2@gmail.com 

http://www.philosophy.umd.edu 

Courses: PHIL 

Related Programs and Campus Units 



Physics (PHYS) 

Abstract 

The Department of Physics includes programs in many areas of current research interest. These include: astrophysics, 

atomic molecular and optical physics, biophysics, condensed matter physics, cosmic ray & particle astrophysics, dynamical 

systems, elementary particle theory, fluid dynamics, general relativity, high energy physics, many-body theory, materials 

research, non-linear dynamics and chaos, nuclear physics, particle accelerator research, plasma physics, quantum 

computing, quantum electronics and optics, quantum field theory, space physics, statistical mechanics and 

superconductivity. 

Admissions Information 

Because of the large number of qualified applicants, the Department of Physics has had to restrict formal admission to the 

Graduate School to those who have shown particularly outstanding work in their undergraduate records or who have already 

done satisfactory work in key senior-level courses at the University of Maryland. Students who have less outstanding 

records but who show special promise may be given provisional admission under special circumstances. Regular admission 

will then depend on the satisfactory completion of existing deficiencies. A faculty adviser will inform each of these students 

what background he or she lacks and what he or she must accomplish to achieve regular admission. Thus, the Department 

hopes to offer an opportunity for advanced study in physics to all qualified students. 

Students who enter the graduate program are normally expected to have strong backgrounds in physics, including 

intermediate-level courses in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, physical optics, and modern physics. 

A student with deficiencies in one or more of these areas may be admitted but will be expected to remedy such deficiencies 

as soon as possible. 

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), including the Advanced Physics test, is required for admission. In rare instances, 

this requirement may be waived. The average GRE Advanced Physics test score is 785. The average gpa for students 

educated in U.S. institutions is 3.7. A minimum overall score of 575 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language is 

required of applicants from non-English speaking countries. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 





251 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General 

2. GRE Physics 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Transcript from all institutions where you have taken 9 or more credits 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

The requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in physics are set in general terms to allow the individual student as 

much freedom as possible to prepare a course of study suited to individual needs. These requirements are: competence in 

basic physics indicated by a satisfactory performance on a qualifying examination and in a graduate laboratory; attendance 

in a departmental research seminar; the giving of an oral Preliminary Research Presentation to demonstrate the ability to 

organize and orally present a topic of current research interest in physics; a paper as evidence of the ability to organize and 

present a written scholarly report on contemporary research prior to candidacy; advanced course study outside the student's 

field of specialization consisting of two advanced courses (six credits), at least one of which must be a physics course at the 

700 level or above; PHYS 624 or 625 for students with theoretical theses; and research competence through active 

participation in at least two hours of seminar, 12 hours of thesis research, and the presentation and defense of an original 

dissertation. 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

The Department offers both thesis and non-thesis options in its Master of Science program. The Departmental requirements 

for the non-thesis option include: a total of 30 credits excluding research credits; at least four courses of the general physics 

sequence; a graduate laboratory unless specially exempted; a paper as evidence of ability to organize and present a written 

scholarly report on contemporary research; and the passing at the master's level of one section of the Ph.D. qualifying 

exam. The thesis option's requirements include at least four courses of the general physics sequence, a graduate laboratory 

unless specially exempted, and the passing of an oral examination including a defense of thesis. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Current research in the Department spans an immense range of theoretical and experimental work on the forefront of 

knowledge, far too large to describe here. Details of the work in the various fields, and the faculty and facilities involved can 

be found at the Departmental web site, www.physics.umd.edu. 

Out of the 70 professorial faculty members, approximately 60 engage in separately budgeted research; 90 faculty members 

at other ranks also engage in research. In 2005-06, approximately 160 graduate students also participated in research under 

stipends. The current federal support for research amounts to approximately 19 million dollars annually, attesting to both the 

size and the quality of the program. 

There are close academic ties with the Institute of Physical Science and Technology on the campus; members of the 

Institute supervise graduate research and also teach physics courses. Faculty members in the departments of Astronomy 

and Electrical Engineering also frequently direct thesis research. 

In addition to using College Park campus facilities, graduate students can utilize resources of nearby federal laboratories 

under certain conditions. 

The University of Maryland is located within the metropolitan area of Washington, D.C., where it enjoys the proximity of a 

large number of outstanding institutions, such as NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, the 

National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the Department of Energy, 

the National Institute of Health, the Library of Congress, and other federal institutions. The Department works closely with 

certain research groups at some of these institutions. In order to facilitate graduate study in the Washington area, the 

Department of Physics has adjunct professors in certain government laboratories. 

Students who desire to do graduate work in physics at a government agency should contact a member of the graduate 

faculty in the Department. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers both teaching and research assistantships. In 2005-2006 approximately 50 teaching assistants and 

160 research assistants worked in the Department. Summer research stipends for advanced graduate students are 

customary, and a few summer teaching assistantships are available. 

The deadline for all applications is February 1 . 

Graduate students also can seek full-time or part-time employment in the many government and industry laboratories 

located within a few miles of the campus. 

Contact Information 

A booklet is available regarding the graduate program in physics. Graduate Study in Physics is a guidebook to procedural 

requirements and rules concerning the acquisition of higher degrees. Various brochures are available which describe the 

program's research activities and personnel. For more information, contact: 

Mrs. Linda O'Hara, Secretary 

Graduate Entrance Committee 

1 120 Physics Building Department of Physics University of Maryland 

College Park 

252 



MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 405-5982 

Fax:(301)405-4061 

lohara@physics.umd.edu 

http://www.physics.umd.edu/ 

Courses: PHYS 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Biophysics 
Astronomy 

Plant Science (PLSC) 

Abstract 

The Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture (PSLA) directs the graduate program in Plant Science 
(PLSC). The PLSC graduate program is focused on plant based sciences and management along with the application of 
research to advance a basic understanding of plants and to help solve pressing problems in agriculture, horticulture and 
natural resources. The program advances graduate training and research at all levels of plant organization; from the 
genomic and molecular level to the whole organism, to agricultural systems and to natural and designed ecosystems. The 
Plant Science faculty include world-class experts in a wide range of plant science related disciplines. In addition to faculty 
within the program, faculty from various departments across campus also contribute to the PLSC program. Scientists from 
governmental agencies including USDA, EPA, FDA, NASA and various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) also 
participate in the program. Faculty research is funded through a number of federal agencies including NSF, DoD, USDA and 
EPA. Graduate students play a central role in the research activities of the program. Research includes a wide variety of 
plant science related disciplines including Functional Genomics and Molecular Physiology, Plant Conservation Biology and 
Ecology, Plant Protection and Management and Landscape Management. Research in the Program includes: Functional 
Genomics, Molecular Physiology, Molecular Genetics, Plant Breeding, Ecophysiology, Ecology, Conservation Biology, Plant 
Pathology, Plant Management and Protection, Landscape Management, Sustainability, and Green-roofs. 
Admissions Information 

Admission to the program requires a baccalaureate from an accredited college or university in the United States or the 
equivalent in a foreign country. Applicants are expected to have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (4.0 scale) in all 
previous academic work. In addition, applicants should have at least 16 credit-hours of prior course work in calculus, 
physics, organic chemistry, biochemistry, biology, genetics or statistics. Promising students lacking this general preparation 
may be provisionally admitted to the program and may be required to correct course work deficiencies within one year of 
enrollment. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of all applicants to the Plant Science Program. 
International students must submit the results of the TOEFL English exam. The program's admission committee, chaired by 
the graduate coordinator, reviews all applications to the Plant Science graduate program. The committee will assess the 
credentials (academic transcripts, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and statement of personal goals) of each 
applicant and determine if the applicant is acceptable for full admission, acceptable for provisional admission or 
unacceptable for admission. For applicants acceptable for provisional admission the committee will recommend the 
deficiencies or requirements that the student must meet upon subsequent enrollment. The graduate coordinator will report to 
the faculty the recommendations of the admission committee and identify potential faculty to serve as research advisors. 
Admission is dependent on the availability of a faculty member in the proposed area of study who is willing to assume the 
responsibility or advising. Once a suitable research advisor is identified the graduate coordinator notifies the Graduate 
School of the Departments recommendation on admission status. Only the Graduate School can extend an offer of 
admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: May 1 
Preferred: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 


International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: February 1 


Deadline: June 1 



Application Requirements 

1. GRE General(required) 

2. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

3. Statement of Research Interest 

4. Academic Transcripts 

Degree Requirements 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

A program of study approved by the Advisor must be completed prior to the second semester of enrollment. This plan must 



253 



be filed with the Graduate Director. The program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work beyond the B.S. 
degree, including 6 hours of thesis research credits (799). A minimum of 12 credits hours must be earned in course-work at 
the 600 level or higher. Students are also required to complete 2 semester hours of PLSC 608, Research Methods and 2 
semester hours of PLSC 789, Advances in Research. Students must also complete one semester each of 400-level (or 
higher) biochemistry, plant physiology, and statistics which may be completed as part of a B.S. or M.S. degree program. 
A thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School. This thesis is approved by the Thesis Examining Committee appointed 
by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the student's advisor. The advisor serves as the 
chairperson of the examining committee and the student's advisory committee typically serves as members of the examining 
committee. Committee membership must comply with Graduate School requirements for membership. The submitted thesis 
must comply with the University of Maryland Thesis and Dissertation Style Guide. 

It is the responsibility of the Advisor and Student to ensure that all University Research Assurances are followed. Research 
involving human subjects must be approved in advance by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Research involving the use 
of vertebrate animals must be approved in advance by the Animal Care and Use Committee. Research using hazardous 
materials (chemical or biological), recombinant RNA/DNA must be approved in advance by the appropriate University 
committee 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

A program of study approved by the Advisor must be completed by the end of the third semester of enrollment. This plan 
must be filed with the Graduate Director. The Graduate School requires that every student seeking the Ph.D. satisfactorily 
complete a minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation credits (899). Students are also required to complete 2 semester 
hours of PLSC 608, Research Methods and 2 semester hours of PLSC 789, Advances in Research. In addition students 
admitted to the PhD program that lack the MS degree must complete the course requirements of the MS degree (24 credit 
hours of coursework). Students must also complete one semester each of 400-level (or higher) biochemistry, plant 
physiology, and statistics which may be completed as part of a B.S. or M.S. degree program and an additional graduate 
level course in biochemistry or statistics. 

An oral qualifying examination must be completed satisfactorily before a student is admitted to candidacy. At the discretion 
of the advisor and advisory/examining committee a written exam may also be conducted. The examination must be 
attempted by the end of the fifth semester of study. Under extenuating circumstances and with written permission of the 
Program Director, this time frame may be extended. The examining committee corresponds to the student's Advisory 
committee. To be eligible to take the candidacy examination, the student must have submitted a research proposal that has 
been approved by the student's advisor and Advisory Committee prior to the formal qualifying examination. The completed 
proposal must be given to the committee at least two weeks before the scheduled date for the qualifying examination. The 
qualifying examination focuses principally on the written proposal. However, the student's mastery of general knowledge of 
Plant Science may also be examined. At the end of the examination, all members of the committee vote on the student's 
performance. Two negative votes constitute failure. Upon successful completion of the examination, the committee 
recommends to the Director that the student by admitted to candidacy based on satisfactory performance during the 
examination. It is the responsibility of the student to submit an application for admission to candidacy when all the 
requirements for candidacy have been fulfilled. Students failing the qualifying examination may be re-examined once within 
6 months of the first examination date. Students may be re-examined only once. Failure to pass the qualifying examination a 
second time will result in termination of the student's program. 

A dissertation based on independent, original research must be submitted to the Program and the Graduate School. This 
dissertation is approved by the Dissertation Examining Committee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the 
recommendation of the student's advisor. The advisor serves as the chairperson of the examining committee and the 
student's advisory committee typically serves as members of the examining committee. Committee membership must 
comply with Graduate School requirements for membership. The submitted dissertation must comply with the University of 
Maryland Thesis and Dissertation Style Guide. 

It is the responsibility of the Advisor and Student to ensure that all University Research Assurances are followed. Research 
involving human subjects must be approved in advance by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Research involving the use 
of vertebrate animals must be approved in advance by the Animal Care and Use Committee. Research using hazardous 
materials (chemical or biological), recombinant RNA/DNA must be approved in advance by the appropriate University 
committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The majority of laboratory space and offices for faculty in the Department are located at the College Park Campus in the 
Plant Science Building and H. J. Patterson Hall. Laboratories are equipped for chemical, biochemical, molecular, genomic 
and physiological research in plant science. Extensive controlled-environment facilities, a state-of-the-art greenhouse and a 
network of commodity-oriented field research farms (Western Maryland Research and Education Center, Sharpsburg MD; 
Central Maryland Research and Education Center, Clarksville MD; Turfgrass Research and Education Center, Beltsville MD; 
Southern Maryland Research and Education Facility, Upper Marlboro MD; Wye Research and Education Center, 
Queenstown MD; Lower Eastern Shore Research and Education Center, Salisbury MD) further enhance the facilities and 
resources available to the program 

Students have access to a computer laboratory in the department and a comprehensive computer center located on 
campus. The University Libraries on campus and the National Agriculture Library located nearby, supplemented by the 
Library of Congress, make the library resources accessible to students among the best in the nation. Many of the 
Department's projects are conducted in cooperation with other departments on campus and with professionals at the 
headquarters of the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture located three miles from 
campus in Beltsville. Scientists at the Geologic Survey, the National Academy of Sciences, NASA, National Institutes of 

254 



Health, Department of Energy, Smithsonian, and National Park Service, as well as other agencies, have cooperated with the 

Department's faculty on various projects. Scientists from some of these agencies have adjunct appointments in the 

Department, have taught special courses at the University, and participate on graduate committees. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available for qualified applicants. There is 

strong competition for these awards, and candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as early as possible in the 

semester preceding anticipated enrollment in the Department. 

Contact Information 

For more specific information on the program, contact: 

Dr. Gary D. Coleman 

Department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, 2102 Plant Sciences Building 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-4371 

Fax:301-314-9308 

gcoleman@umd.edu 

http://www.psla.umd.edu/GradPL/index.cfm 

Ms. Susan Burk 

Department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, 2102 Plant Sciences Building 

MD 20740 

Telephone: 301-405-6244 

Fax:301-314-9308 

sburk@umd.edu 

http://www.psla.umd.edu/GradPL/index.cfm 
Courses: NRSC HORT PLSC 
Related Programs and Campus Units 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Biology 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

College of Life Sciences 

Entomology 

Maryland Cooperative Extension & Agricultural Experiment Station 

Turfgrass Research Unit - College Park 

Professional Master of Arabic Language (MPAR) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 
Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Professional Master of Persian Language (MPPE) 

Abstract 

Admissions Information 
Application Requirements 
Degree Requirements 
Financial Assistance 
Courses: 



Psychology (PSYC) 

255 



Abstract 

Psychology is a remarkably broad field that studies mind and behavior at all levels of analysis ranging from the micro to the 
macro; from single cells to complex systems; from individuals to groups and cultures; and from invertebrates to humans. 
Some of these endeavors connect with the biological sciences and others with the social sciences. As analytical, 
methodological, and theoretical advances in one domain increasingly influence developments in another, psychologists 
collaborate in ever greater numbers with scientists in neighboring disciplines, resulting in new subfields that blend the 
biological and social sciences. 

Our department reflects well this combined diversity of and collaborations among approaches. In recognition of this fact, we 
organized our training structure into 5 Ph.D. program areas: 

- Clinical 

- Cognitive and Neural Systems (CNS) 

- Counseling 

- Developmental 

- Social, Decision, and Organizational Science (SDOS) 

Research collaborations across areas are common and we encourage students to consider training across areas as well. 

The Department's doctoral programs in both Clinical and Counseling Psychology have been approved by the American 

Psychological Association. School Psychology, also an APA approved program, is offered in the College of Education. 

Admissions Information 

The Department accepts only those applicants who have demonstrated competence for completing the requirements of the 

doctoral degree. The typical student admitted to the graduate program has an overall undergraduate grade point average of 

3.5 or above, a psychology grade point average over 3.5, Verbal and Quantitative GRE scores above 600, appropriate 

background experiences, outstanding letters of recommendation, research experience and/or previous relevant work 

experience, and goals congruent with the program. The Department of Psychology encourages applications from members 

of racial/ethnic minority groups. 

All of the programs offer doctoral level programs and do not accept students who are interested in terminal Master of 

Science degrees. To be considered for admission for the fall semester, all application materials must be submitted by 

December 1 st of the prior year. 

Students admitted to the graduate program often earn the M.S. en route to the Ph.D., however, this varies across specialty 

areas and the specific requirements within a given specialty area should be consulted. All students must be full-time until 

completion of all requirements of the doctoral program other than the dissertation have been met. 

Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: December 1 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: December 1 





Application Requirements 

1. GRE General required 

2. GRE Subject recommended 

3. 3 Letters of Recommendation 

4. Transcripts 

5. Statement of Goals and Research Experiences 

Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

In addition to a quantitative core consisting of three courses, all students are required to take three core courses in areas 

outside their specialty program. These core courses are designed to provide a breadth of knowledge in psychology. 

Additionally, each program has requisite coursework and comprehensive examinations. A minimum of 12 credit hours for the 

dissertation is required for a doctoral degree. In addition to attending classes, students are expected to take part in research. 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

The M.S. degree requirements are a research thesis (6 credit hours) and 24 credit hours including two courses in statistics. 

The department does not offer a terminal M.S. Rather, students admitted to the graduate program often earn the M.S. en 

route to the Ph.D. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department shares a building with the Biology Department and is centrally situated on campus near three libraries and 

the student union. The Department has state-of-the-art laboratories, computer facilities, and video equipment. The 

geographic location in a suburb of Washington, D.C. provides access to a wide variety of laboratory and training facilities in 

governmental and other agencies. In addition, we are near the national headquarters for The American Psychological 

Association and The American Psychological Society. 

The Department follows all regulations involved in the use of human subjects and animals. 



256 



Financial Assistance 

The Department attempts to provide financial aid for all incoming students, although aid is not guaranteed. The different 

possible types of financial support include fellowships (nominated by the department), teaching assistantships, research 

assistantships, work on campus, and funded externships. 

Contact Information 

Additional information concerning the graduate program including specific specialty area information may be obtained by 

accessing our website at http://www.psychology.umd.edu 

Carol Gorham 

Room 1141 Biology-Psychology Bldg. 

MD 20742-4411 

Telephone: (301) 405-5865 

Fax:(301)314-9566 

psyc-grad@deans.umd.edu 

http://www.psychology.umd.edu 

Courses: PSYC PSYC 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Neuroscience and Cognitive Science 

Advanced Computer Studies, UM Institute for (UMIACS) 

Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCIL) 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

Education: Counseling and Personnel Services 

Family Science 



Public Health: Health Services Ph.D. (PHHS) 

Abstract 

The Department of Health Services Administration offers a Ph.D. program in Health Services. The goal of this program is to 
provide interdisciplinary training in research, practice, and policy analysis relevant to the planning, administration, 
management, and evaluation of health and public health programs. The degree program prepares students to advance 
research, policy, and practice to improve access, cost, and quality of health services, with a particular emphasis on federal 
and state health policy. 

In recent years there has been increasing national interest in the field of health services, driven by an aging population, 
nearly 47 million uninsured Americans, rising health care costs, growing health disparities, and the increase in manmade 
and natural disasters such as 9-1 1 and Hurricane Katrina. Amelioration of any of these problems will require professionals 
with a strong knowledge base and research expertise in health services delivery systems and health care management. The 
Ph.D. program in Health Services will provide this training, addressing local, state, and national issues in health care 
services, health care delivery and management, health services policy, disparities in access to care, long term care, chronic 
disease and disability care, and financing and economics in public health services delivery. 
Admissions Information 

To apply to the doctoral program in Health Services, applicants must complete the University of Maryland Graduate School 
application and provide additional information as described below under "Application Requirements". The Graduate School 
application and instructions can be found online at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/admission.htm . All applications are 
considered for Fall enrollment only; this program does not accept applications for Spring semester admission. 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, I and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

Applications for the doctoral program in Health Services are reviewed with consideration to the following criteria: 

1 . Minimum 3.0 undergraduate GPA 

2. Undergraduate and graduate transcripts (if applicable 

3. GRE scores taken within the past 5 years 

4. 3 letters of recommendation that address the applicant's academic capabilities and probability of success in graduate school 

257 



5. Statement of professional goals and interests and their congruence with those of the program 

6. Relevant academic and work experience 

7. Admission prerequisites: A Master's degree in Health Administration, Health Services, Health Policy, Health Care Economics, Business 
Administration, or a related field 

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in Health Services should be sure to use the PHHS major code when selecting the 
program on the Graduate School application. 
Degree Requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy in Health Services (Ph.D.) 

Students entering the Ph.D. program in Health Services must have completed a master's degree in Health Administration, 
Health Services, Health Policy, Health Care Economics, Business Administration, or a related field. If the student's 
completed master's degree does not include public health content in the five core areas of health services administration, 
epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health sciences, and social and behavioral sciences, these courses will need to 
be completed in addition to a minimum of 42 credit hours of advanced course work required in the Ph.D. program. 
The 42 credit hours of advanced course work includes a minimum of 21 credit hours in methods for health services 
research, a minimum of 9 hours of credits in a cognate area (approved by the faculty advisor), and 12 credit hours of 
dissertation research. Doctoral students advance to candidacy by completing a written comprehensive exam and an oral 
defense of their dissertation proposal. In addition to the 42 credit hours of coursework, the written comprehensive exam, and 
the proposal defense, students must successfully complete a doctoral dissertation and an oral dissertation defense. 
We are focused primarily on admitting full-time students. We do admit a limited number of outstanding part-time students who are able 
maintain a high level of commitment and determination to obtain their degree through all phases of their program including the dissertation 
phase. All students must complete their degree in nine (9) years in accordance with University of Maryland Graduate School policy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department of Health Services Administration is home to the Center on Aging, established in 1974. In addition, the 

department houses the Gliner Center for Humor Communication and Health, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and 

RSVP International. Current external funding comes from a wide variety of federal, foundation, state, local and private donor 

sources. 

The proximity of the University of Maryland, College Park to the nation's capital offers prospective students unparalleled 

opportunities for internships and research experiences in public health, including placements at the National Institutes of 

Health, the CDC Washington Office, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Childrens National Medical 

Center, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and many other national, state, and local health agencies. 

The diversity of cultural and socioeconomic groups, communities, industries, and health organizations provides a rich 

environment for learning, research, public policy analysis, and service. 

Financial Assistance 

Contact Information 

Lori Simon-Rusinowitz, Ph.D. 

Department of Health Services Administration 331 Od SPH Building (#255) University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-2548 

Fax:301-405-2542 

lasr@umd.edu 

http://www.sph.umd.edu/hlsa/ 

Courses: HLSA 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Aging, Center on 

Public Health: Master of Public Health-Biostatistics 

Public Health: Master of Health Administration 

Public Health: Master of Public Health-Community Health Education 

Public Health: Master of Public Health-Environmental Health Sciences 

Public Health: Master of Public Health-Epidemiology 

Public Health: Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. 

Public Health: Epidemiology Ph.D. 

Public Health: Behavioral and Community Health Ph.D. 

Family Studies 

Kinesiology 

Health Education 

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health 

Epidemiology and Biostatistics 

Public Health: Master of Public Health-Biostatistics (BIOS) 



258 



Abstract 

The Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics is pleased to offer a Master of Public Health program with a concentration 
in Biostatistics. Biostatistics is a science that addresses theory and techniques for describing, analyzing, and interpreting 
health data. Although biostatistics draws on quantitative methods from fields such as statistics, operations research, 
economics, and mathematics, the discipline is primarily focused on their applications to problems in the biological, health, 
and medical sciences. 

The proximity of the University of Maryland, College Park to the nation's capital offers prospective students unparalleled 
opportunities for internships and research experiences in public health, including placements at the National Institutes of 
Health, the CDC Washington Office, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children's National Medical 
Center, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and many other national, state, and local health agencies. 
The diversity of cultural and socioeconomic groups, communities, industries, and health organizations provides a rich 
environment for learning, research, public policy analysis, and service. 
Admissions Information 

To apply to the MPH program with a concentration in Biostatistics, applicants must complete the University of Maryland 
Graduate School application and provide additional information as described below under "Application Requirements". The 
Graduate School application and instructions can be found online at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/admission.htm . 
Application Deadlines 



Type of Applicant 


Fall 


Spring 


Domestic Applicants; US Citizens and 
Permanent Residents with foreign credentials; 
International Applicants seeking admissions 
under A, E, G, H, 1 and L visas and immigrants 


Deadline: January 15 




International Applicants seeking admission 
under F (student) or J (exchange visitor) visas 


Deadline: January 15 





Application Requirements 

Applications for the MPH program with concentration in Biostatistics are reviewed with consideration to the following criteria: 

1 . Minimum 3.0 undergraduate GPA 

2. Undergraduate transcripts 

3. GRE scores taken within the past 5 years 

4. 3 letters of recommendation that address the applicant's academic capabilities and probability of success in graduate school 

5. Statement of goals and interests and their congruence with those of the program 

6. Relevant academic/work experience, including previous coursework in mathematics, statistical methods, and/or statistical software 
packages. 

Applicants to the MPH program with concentration in Biostatistics should be sure to use the major code BIOS when 

selecting the program on the Graduate School Application. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Public Health with concentration in Biostatistics (M.P.H.) 

The Master of Public Health degree with a concentration in Biostatistics is a 43-credit professional degree, administered by 

the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. All MPH students with concentration in Biostatistics will complete 5 public 

health core courses, 8 courses in the biostatistics cognate area, an internship, and a capstone project or thesis. Students 

completing the project take 2 elective courses and students completing a thesis take 1 elective course (using the other 3 

elective credits toward the thesis). 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has research specializations in a variety of areas including: 

1 . Social determinants of health, with emphasis on the determinants of cardiovascular disease, obesity, sexually transmitted diseases, and 
health behaviors 

2. Health disparities 

3. Cultural competency in health care 

4. Community-based physical activity interventions in adults and adolescents 

5. Survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, computational statistics, statistical genetics 

Financial Assistance 

Contact Information 

Graduate Director, Brit I. Saksvig, PhD 

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics School of Public Health 2234 School of Public Health Bldg.(#255) 

University of Maryland College Park 

MD 20742 

Telephone: 301-405-2491 

bsaksvig@umd.edu 

http://sph.umd.edu/epib/ 



259 



Courses: EPIB 

Related Programs and Campus Units 

Public Health: Epidemiology Ph.D. 

Public Health: Master of Public Health 

Public Health: Master of Public Health 

Public Health: Master of Public Health 

Public Health: Health Services Ph.D. 

Public Health: Maternal and Child Health Ph.D. 

Public Health: Master of Health Administration 

Public Health: Behavioral and Community Health Ph.D 

Family Studies 

Kinesiology 

Health Education 

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health 



Epidemiology 

Environmental Health Sciences 

Community Health Education 



Master of Public Health-Community Health Education 



Public Health 
(CHED) 

Abstract 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the Master Public Health (MPH) in Community Health Education, and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Behavioral and Community Health. The graduate programs are designed to prepare 
professional health educators with specific skills and the ability to implement theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. 
The mission of the MPH program is to promote the development of professional community health educators who 
understand the science, theory, and practice of public health and can apply this knowledge toward the enhancement of 
health status of communities. The MPH program is designed as a professional degree to prepare community health 
educators working in public health service as practitioners, administrators, supervisors, educators, consultants and 
researchers. Students will participate in both academic and applied training in program planning and implementation, 
program evaluation, public policy analysis, research, and management. 

Degree programs may be completed either full-time or part-time. Faculty support coursework, research and practice 
experiences in many areas, including: public health; health behavio