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Full text of "Grand Duchy of Luxembourg Memorial"

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Alsz-r , ri/sra/l 1 -i 



Grand Duchy of 



LUXEMBOURG 

Memorial 




^W^ CUFF COli. 
W LIBRARY "^ 

Remseri^^fcWa, U.S.A 

1946 



'V^ 



DEDICATION 

To Her Royal Highness Charlotte, Grand 
Duchess of Luxembourg and to her royal family; 
to her people who were so sorely wounded by the 
oppressor; to those who bore arms and otherwise 
sacrificed so that the cherished Four Freedoms 
might live, and to those who are carrying on to 
restore the stricken country and the principles for 
which she stands, this book is respectfully 
dedicated. 



*5 4 X ■'^ 



This souvenir book indirectly had its beginning with the visit to 
Remsen, m September, 1940, by His Rayol Highness Prince John of 
Luxembourg and Pierre Dupong, Luxembourg prime minister and his staff. 

The distinguished visitors, on tour of such locahties in which dwell 
Luxembourgers and their descendents m appreciable number, plead for 
material support of their countrymen who w^ere sorely stricken by the 
German invader and were left m dire distress. 

Immediately after this memorable visit, officers and members of 
Section 14, Luxembourger Brotherhood of America of Remsen, assembled 
and organi2,ed a local Luxembourg Relief committee. 

The committee started immediately the collection of funds which 
were placed on bank deposit, but because of the fact that the Grand 
Duchy was temporarily under German occupation and it was clear that 
funds or material sent abroad at the time were sure to fall into enemy 
hands, further soliciting was postponed to an expected more opportune 
time. 

That time arrived with the end of the war and the restoration 
of the Grand Duchy to its rightful rulers. 

The Remsen Luxembourg Relief committee then renewed its efforts 
and immediately gained the almost unanimous support of the people of 
the Remsen community. 

Additional volunteer committee help was obtained for the asking 
and a house-to-house canvass for funds was made. Some of the solicitors 
ventured into neighboring towns and cities and everywhere were met with 
encouragement and substantial support wdiich far exceeded expectations. 

The results were of such magnitude that the committee members, 
feehna that a word of mere thanks was insufficient, decided to issue this 
souvenir book, which includes advertising on behalf of all patrons who 
contributed a certain fixed minimum, or n:iore. 

All contributed funds, together with profits derived through the 
.ale of the souvenir boc^k will, upon completion of the sale of books and 
the payment of expenses incident to its publication, be sent by the local 
committee directly to the government of the Grand Duchy ot Luxembourg. 

GUSTAVE ALESCH, 
Chairman. 



Members of the Remsen 
Luxembourg Relief Committee 



Gustave Alesch, Chairman 
John Keffeler, Treasurer 
E. F. Kieffer, Secretary 

J. P. Beck 

Fred G. Eichhorn 
Geo. D. Hagar 
Michael Klein 
J. P. Ludwig 
Martin Ludwig 
Jim Mathey 
Al. Roder 
Wm. Roder 
Peter Thill 
Nick Treinen 
Jos. G. Wilberding 



The Luxembourgers in America 



Natives of the grand duchy of Luxembourg 

suing in this country, as well as their descend- 

s, have demonstrated conclusively their deep 

.^ of patriotism and allegiance to the land of 

ar adoption. Down through the years they have 

ren a shining example of patriotism and loyalty 

' sacrifice, at the same time retaining their 

. and esteem for the land of their birth where 

first principles of liberty, freedom and mde- 
mce were implanted in their mmds and 

Luxembourgers fully reahze that the new 
ot their choice has been very good to them, 
._ they ascribe fully to the American concept 
liberty as proclaimed in this country's Declara- 
of Independence. They have shown that m 
_- loyalty they are ready to fight, and if need 
die for their adopted land. At the same time 
ir undaunted spirit, enslaved by a savage op- 
ssor but unconquerable and courageous in the 
js of death itself displayed by their kin in the 
ly homeland, fills our hearts with pride. It is 
a-efor but natural that those in this country 
Ao call it the land of their birth are great- 
interested and concerned in the future welfare 
their mother country. 

LUXEMBOURG IMMIGRANTS 

It is approximately 100 years since the first 
Luxembourg immigrants settled m the various 
parts of the United States and here transplanted 
tiieir inherited traditions, traits and characteristics. 
They very readily adjusted themselves to the 
American way of life and it is today estimated 
that there are some 300,000 Americanized Luxem- 
bourgers and descendents, residing m the United 
States of America. 

It is a proven fact that the Luxembourgers 
have contributed their share in the building and 
development of America— of its government, its 
institutions; its cultural, educational and economic 
structure. Whenever Uncle Sam called on his 
dtirens for a service, the Luxembourg people re- 
sponded readily, always eager to do something 
for the land which gave them the opportunity of 
rearing their families as free and independent 
American citi2,ens. 

But four score years ago the Indian, the 
buffalo and the elk roamed the prairie where 
Remsen stands today. The nearest railway station 
was Fort Dodge. About that time a caravan of 



Luxembourgers started from Dubuque and Jack- 
son county with ox teams for Vv^estern Iowa. They 
homesteaded between Remsen and Alton and 
were the pioneers who laid the groundwork in 
dveloping Northwestern Iowa into what it is to- 
day. 

EARLY SETTLERS 

The period between 1880 and 1900 brought 
a large number of Luxembourgers directly from 
the grand duchy to settle around Remsen. These 
early settlers with their German neighbors and a 
sprinkling of Irish and Scandenavians ultimately 
developed this territory into one of the most 
beautilui and prosperous in the state of Iowa. The 
mode of living, the promises for the future and 
the cosmopohtan spirit that prevailed gave to 
these early Luxembourgers a fraternal inspiration 
and a feeling of neighborly and brotherly love for 
the country and for their new neighbors. 

In their new field of activity with its problem 
of establishing and developing homes for then 
famihes among a varied people m a strange but 
promising land made their social contacts events 
of real happiness and joy. Naturally, those of a 
common homeland found great pleasure m mm- 
ghng frequently with their friends from that coun- 
try,\nd in time the idea of forming a society of 
Luxembourgers found a ready acceptance. 

LIKE ATTRACTS LIKE 

The many Luxembourgers m Chicago led the 
way and organised the National Brotherhood of 
America, which spread throughout the country 

Section No. 14 of the Remsen Brotherhood 
of America was organised on May 14, 1905, 
through the energetic efforts of John P. Kietfer 
and Michael Treinen. It soon won a substantial 
membership and has flourished ever smce. Im- 
bued with a true spirit of Luxembourg Iraternai- 
ism the members have always been enthusiastic 
m upholding Luxembourg traditions; they have 
been loyal citizens, steadfast m their reHgious du- 
ties and substantial members of the commumty. 
The outstanding social events promoted by Sec- 
tion 14 are their annual Maifest (May Feast) On 
the first Sunday in that month, and their annual 
picnic m August, both of which attract hundreds 
of people from over the surrounding countryside, 
and beyond. 



t 



VISIT FROM H. R. H. JEAN 
GROWN PRINCE 

In September 1940 the Luxembourgers of 
Remsen were host to His Royal Highness, John, 
Grown Prince of the Grand Duchy of Luxem' 
bourg. The royal visitor was accompanied by 
Prime Minister Pierre DuPong and members of 
his stafl. They were on a tour of Midwestern 
locahties in which dwelt numerous people oi 
Luxembourg nativity and descent. 

The visiting group were given a fitting web 
come in which the Luxembourgers were joined by 
their friends and in which the town officials 
cooperated wholeheartedly. A pubHc reception in 
the municipal auditorium was attended by hun- 
dreds in the immediate territory and many from 
surrounding communities. Grown Prince Jean and 
Prime Minister DuPong told their friends of the 
plight of the httle grand duchy which they were 
obHged to flee when the Germans entered and 
took over the government and the country as a 
whole. They related about the crimes committed 
by the opressor; the starving condition of the 
people and the wrecking of the country's govern- 
mental, social and economic structure, and pleaded 
for help to the Luxembourg people, who were 
sorely in distress. 

BROTHERS IN NEED 

Responding to the requests of Prince Jean 
and Mr. DuPong a local committee was appointed 
with the aim of collecting funds with which to 



afford the peo^ of Luxembourg as mm 
nomic relief as possible in this manner 

time no one dreamed that the atrocities co: 
by Hitler" s henchmen would reach the 

tions that w^ere later reported: that hall 
try would be destroyed. 

The Remsen cortimittee set M w:rk 
diately, gathering funds by degrees nr_i£ lai 
man surrender in August, 1945, arter vihi 
work was pressed forward vigoroudy. Sid 
mittees were appointed and a housed 
canvas was made both in Remsen and in i 
surrounding territory as well as in neaitv 
and Sioux Gity. The result was ascoundii 
few declined to give while 99 percent rES| 
some with amounts never anticipated. 

THE HELPING H.\NT) 

This souvenir book is a result of tfa 
paign for funds for Luxembourg Relie:. Ti 
this medium a major portion of the rcik 
was collected and the w^ork has not 
pleted. It IS now estimated that when 
promised money is turned in the total 
surprising and will be a help to many 2 
family in the grand duchy during the appfl 
winter and which is but another tes*i 
of the spirit of patriotism and gei^ercsi 
prevails among the Luxembourgers ars 
friends m the United States of i\merica. 

Speaking for those w^ho will thus be b< 
we say, to the supporters of this project 
endless thanks, and may God bless yc^u alT 




10 



^'Better to me the poor mans crusty 

Better the blessing of the poor, 

Though I turn me empty from his door; 

That IS no true alms which the hand can hold: 

He gives nothing hut worthless gold 

Who gives from a sense of duty; 
But he who gives but a slender mite, 
And gives to that which is out of sight, 

That thread of all-sustaining Beauty 
Which runs through all and doth all unite— 
The hand cannot clasp the whole of his alms, 
The heart outstretches its eager palms, 
Tor a god goes with it and makes it store 
To the soul that rvas starving in darkness before/^ 



JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, 

The Vision Lif Sir Launfal. 




He. Roya! Highness, Grand-Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg 



dariottG, Grand-Duchess of Luxembourg 
.^- '^3 1896 d^iughler of William, Grand 
^boure and Marie Anne, P""f^^„°^ 
e of Portugal. On January 9, 1919, 
[^ her sister, Marie Adelaide, lo the 
sure takins; the oath on January lo 
- Colmar Berg. She was., married on 
crrf in the City of Luxembourg, to IL L. H. 
rmeent. prince of Bourbon de Parme, wlio 
«^-.temher 28 189S, at Sehwarzau. To this 
hm the following children: H. R. H Prmce 
=> IQ-n- Princess EUzal:elh, Decemlier AZ, 
Marie Adelaide; May 21, 1924; Pnncess 
4u<^ust 2 1925; Prince Charles, August i, 
'^ JUix, August 24, 1929. 



' \pril 14, 1945, H. R. H. Grand-Luchess 

LSembourg relurnod to the countiT alter 

exile. Arriving at 4:15 P. M. m General 



Eisenhower', personal P^-^ ^ Sanjj^l^ Airp^i^^^ 
Grand-Duchess was we comedy 

Dupong and ether ^™^^'"^%j!": pi^tt Waller, Charge 
ment accompanied by Mi. ^.';;^,^S^ JT^-^^^ Brigadier 

d- Affaires of the United Statues oi Am e„c g^.|^^^^^ 
General Lewis, i^^Pre.enting Generai bra j , ^^^^ 

Deputy Chief of the Military Mission. 

5Xi^?y^l:S'4dS^epre.;nnig^e^al Eis^ 

^^-^t^TJiSn^lir^STe^^ie^SSv^ 
Ducl^nide^r fi-t official v^t to the Consultative 
Assembly on Monday, April U, 1945. 



11 




PRINCE JOHN 





PRINCE FELIX 



PIERRE DUPONG 



12 



Our War Presidents 




FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT 




PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN 



13 



Your Business 



Is Appreciated by the 



FARMERS SAVINGS BANK 



REMSEN. IOWA 




14 



Luxembourg In Peace and War 



^•\s Germany sank into the night of Fascism, 
as the talons of murderous reaction stretched out 
Berhn into every corner of the world, every 
ent of liberty became valuable and signifi- 
cant. Luxembourg constituted such a fragment of 
liberty. 

Thus Luxembourg, the smallest of the Euro- 
pean democracies, became the fountain-head of the 
greatest of constructive ideas — the international 
sc-lidarity of all working men and wcmien. 

Passionately independent, the Luxembourger 
ats tight to his rights. The land is 
like the people. The Grand-Duchy 
has an area of 999 square miles, 
lightly larger than Plymouth 
OLVunty, and a population which is 
a Kttle under 300,000. 

The Grand-Duchy is an inde- 
pendent and sovereign state with a 
cc-nstirutional monarchy which is 
l^reditary in the House of Nassau 
and can be handed down to the female Hne 



PRESENT RULER 

The present ruler is the Grand-Duchess 
Charlotte, born January 23rd, 1896, the daughter 
of the Grand-Duke William IV of the elder 
branch of the Nassau family. She married Prince 
felix de Bourbon-Parme. The royal couple have 
six children- — two boys and four girls. 

The heir to the throne is Prince Jean who 
ijeas bom in the chateau oi Colmar-Berg on the 
5th of January, 1921. 

No capital in the world is quite like Luxem- 
bourg Cit3^ It has the pose and poise of Gibraltar; 
it has a historic charm surpassed by no other city 
in Europe. After centuries of careful and patient 
building, its beauty emerges triumphant. 

Luxembourg's fighting days are but a mem- 
ory. What is left of the fortress only remains as a 
monumental tribute to the military genius ol 
Luxembourg. 

The fortress of Luxembourg for centuries 
was recogni2;ed as the most strategic military point 
in northern Europe. The fortress was built on a 
solid rock, called the Bock. There exist inside 
t±U5 rock on which Luxembourg is built approxi- 
mately 18 miles of galleries, tunnels and twisting 
passages named with the Spanish word, casements. 
It was impossible to dislodge even a small army of 
t-?.ir_ed soldiers from these casements except by 




starvation. During the air raids this stronghold 
proved a safe shelter even against modern bombs. 

BLESSED LAND 

Luxembourg is blessed by nature with much 
beauty. When the country was under the French 
rule, it w^as called the Department of Forests. 
Even today the mountain chain of the Arden aes is 
covered with many miles of dense forests. The 
banks of the Moselle are rich with vineyards 
which have brought fame to their 
cultivators. Neat white -washed 
cottages brighten the long valleys 
with their lovely variegated gar' 
dens, knovs-'n especially for the 
beauty and color of their roses. It 
seems as though the Creator had 
decided to produce a pocket edition 
of all the earth can yield, for near^- 
by lie the iron ore mines which are 
Luxembourg's main scources of employment and 
income. Hundreds of acres are covered with 
orchards; every square inch of soil is cultivated; 
every kind of agriculture thrives. 

It is, indeed, a blessed land. The mountains 
of Luxembourg, too, with their deep valleys and 
rushing torrents, their picturesque scenery, are 
second to no place in Europe. During the second 
half ot the last century Luxembourg changed from 
a sleepy provincial country to a moderni2,ed state. 

The people of Luxembourg are a peace-loving 
people. They're broad-minded, good natured, de- 
liberate, thorough and frank, almost curt in their 
manner. They enjoy heaped platters and full 
glasses. Luxembourgers could even teach a Hitler 
how much richer, more attractive and contructive 
are men who embrace the cultural and material 
achievements of their neighbors, instead of witV 
drawing into the seclusion of racial purity. 

In the course of history Luxembourg has 
been ruled by Burgundy, Austria, France, Spain 
and Holland. All these have left traces on the 
face of the country and on the culture of its 
people. 

LUXEMBOURG, SELF-SUFFICIENT 
AND INDEPENDENT 

But one thing above all — the people of 
Luxembourg have learned through all of their 
history and that is; never to bow their heads. 
They stubbornly love their democracy, their 



15 






\ 



BEST WISHES TO THE GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG 



AND FRIENDS EVERYWHERE 



from 



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Lumber, Coal, Building Material 
Cement, Fencing, Paints 









PETER J. HO MAN, MGR. 

REMSEN, IOWA 



GREETINGS FROM 



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Repairing 

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WM. REINERS, PROP. 
Remsen, Iowa 



16 



and their freedom. Yet these people of the 
European democracy love their democ-' 
less than their native soil and its beauty. 
jaxeinbourg"s particularly close relationship 
: suriDunding countries is due to three fact- 
geographical position, the smallness or the 
ry and its wealth. 

Wjsh industrial technique and organi2,ation 
present stage, no state of its siz^e could exist 
day ii it tried to be selt 'sufficient. This is 
aalady true of Luxembourg which lies be 
as age-old enemies, France and Germany, 
"Ittve ^j often turned Europe into a battle- 
die world were ruled by reason instead of 
g interests oi large powers, ii the 
tiie many, instead ol the wealth ot a tew 
Qsive, this corner of Europe would long 
enjoyed peace under a non-profit- making 
^nal administration. 
there is one song in the world that has 
the symbol of a nation, representing all 
meant by Freedom and progress it is 
on" or ''The Chariot of Fire", the im- 
song of Luxembourg. It is better known 
refrain, the country's slogan — ''Mir welle 
what mir sin'' — "We want to remain what 
fr€« and independent, but a member of an 
g brotherhood of nations." 
Luxembourg is stolidly conservative. How 
those words be interpreted? 
to agriculture, the greatest industry 
extraction and smelting of iron ore. Li spite 
anall extent of its iron ore territory Lux- 
ranked 7th in 1937 in the steel producing 
of the world. In that year it produced 
n tons of steel. 

Luxembourg is one of the most inter- 
stations in the world for it broadcasts 
ady in nine different languages. It is the 
id most powerful station in Europe, with 
Moscow exceeding it in power. Inside the 
as well as the transmitting station, every- 
is of the most modern style for the station 
came into being in 1934. All of the equipment 
drawn from the best that is produced in 
and. xVmerica, Germany and France. 

E HRST WORLD CONFLAGRATION 

Luxembourg, although it has had to ac- 
iiedge foreign overlordship many times in its 
Ky, had never been under German rule. After 
Prussian War of 1870, Berlin specifically 
g«i itself not to make use of the Luxembourg 
^ system for war purposes. In those days 



So 



oal 



the diplomatic treaties had not lost all value. By a 
Hague Convention, neutral territory was declared 
invulnerable. 

Then came the summer of 1914. On June 
29th, the Austrian heir and his wife were murder- 
ed in Sarajevo. Prussian high officials appeared in 
Luxembourg, steadily growing troop concentra- 
tions assembled on the right bank of the Moselle. 

The people of tiny Luxembourg looked 
across their frontiers with increasing anxiety. 
They knew that they were powerless. They only 
had a few police officers and about 150 policemen 
to defend their country against the strongest 
armed power of the continent. 

'^DEUTCHLAND UBER ALLES'' 

During the night of July 31st, German 
troops occupied the railway station of Ulflingen in 
the north of Luxembourg. Just 24 hours later 
Germ.an troop trains stood in the main station of 
Luxembourg. On August 2nd, Luxembourg was 
completely occupied by the German Army and 
their Commander-in-Chief published the following 
proclamation : 

"France has infringed Luxembourg's 
neutrality and has begun hostihties 
against Germany on Luxembourg soil. 
This has been proven conclusively. In 
view of this emergency, His Majesty, 
the Kaiser, has ordered German front- 
line troops, the Ninth Army Corps, to 
march into Luxembourg." 

The last sentence, only, accorded with the 
facts. 

The dream of peaceful progress had been 
rudely shattered. Europe was m flames. The 
people of Luxembourg were at a fever's pitch. The 
General Staff with the Kaiser, m person, and the 
highest dignitaries of the Reich established them- 
selves in Luxembourg. The thunder of guns roared 
continuously across the frontier. All of the large 
factories came under the German War Service 
Act. All kinds of goods were commandeered and 
draught animals were requisitioned. The people of 
Luxembourg clenched their fists in their pockets. 

On August 27th, the main German Army 
headquarters was moved to Luxembourg. No one 
in Europe, not even the highest staff officers or 
army commanders, had any idea that the outcome 
of the war was decided m the week including 
September 5th to 9th, 1914. Those days saw the 
battle of the Marne. It was directed from the city 
of Luxembourg and it was lost. 



W 



Greetings and Best Wishes from 

THE DeKALB ORGANIZATION 

High Test, High Yielding Hybrid Seed Com 




CLARENCE KEFFELER 

Dealer, Remsen, Iowa 





COMPLIMENTS OF 


o. 


H. HUFWF 




Insurance 




and 




Farm Loans 




■ 




REMSEN, row A 



GREETINGS FROM 

A. J. ERNSTER 

Automobile, Truck 

and Tractor 

Mechanics 



REMSEN, IOWA 



is 



T> hen just a few weeks earlier the Kaiser 
irdered his troops to cross the Moselle, he 
tted a crime far exceeding in import- 
tiny country of Luxembourg, whose 
alky he had violated. The German Kaiser 
rft the domain of Right and had stacked his 
ly on IS'hght. Sooner than anyone could have 
d. Right liad avenged itself on Might. The 

t sword failed on the Marne. 
hi those days the conihct seemed endless and 
iortunes of war favored Germany. The eco- 

CJondition of Luxembourg could not keep 
'Wtth the ever growing demands of the High 
fiiand. Shortages of raw materials and of 
ftial food products and the rising prices made 
tseh^es more increasingly noticeable. 

THE WORKERS REBEL 

In Luxembourg the agitation grew. The 
Knbjurger rebelled. Opposition became more 
Here and there small strikes took place. In 
lember, 1916, 600 metal workers went on 

; in December, 1916, locomotive workshop 
■s went on a strike; on June 5th the foundry 
ETS w^ent on a strike. Soon ten thousand 
were striking. The storm was brewing, 
peasants everywhere ralUed to help the 
sers by furnishing food products for them. 

strike spread rapidly and became general. 

The workers of Luxembourg, citizens of the 
5^ democracy, defied the bristling German 

ly and the foreign oppressor recognised the 

■rtance of this rebellion. 

The strike was mercilessly crushed, and the 
^ders were deported to Germany. Many 

5 were given heavy prison terms. The rulers 
laged to save face. But Germany could no 
»er afford to incur the resentment of the Lux- 

>urgers, so Germany changed her ruthless 

C5 and became far more lenient with Luxem- 



Now Luxembourg has the honor of being the 
country to have a successful general strike in 
middle of a World War. From then on the 

tman Army deteriorated rapidly. The Big Four, 
i-MIies, got stronger day by day, and finally 

rmany had to withdraw her mighty armies, to 

ait defeat and to sue for peace. 

ITLCOME THE STARS AND STRIPES 

After the Armistice in 1918, the American 
editionary Forces were moved forward from 
Meuse towards the Rhine. They entered the 
and'Duchy on the heels of the retreating 



German Armies. On the 20th of November, 
General Dickson arrived, followed on the 21st by 
General Pershing and the 18th Infantry of the 
First Division of the American Third Army. Be' 
fore crossing the frontier the Commander-in-Chief 
sent to the people the folowing proclamation: 

"After four years of violation, the 
territory of the Grand-Duchy of Luxem- 
bourg is now happily liberated. The 
termination of the German occupation 
has been effected by the American and 
Allied Armies as one of the conditions 
of the present Armistice. It is now 
necessary for American troops to pass 
through the Grand-Duchy and accord- 
ing to the stage of advance lor their 
columns to be quartered in the country 
for a certain period of time. 

''The American troops have come 
into Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg as 
friends and will act strictly in accord- 
ance with international law. Their 
presence will not be prolonged for long- 
er than is absolutely necessary, and will 
not be a burden to you. The functions 
of your government and of your institu- 
tions will be in no way encumbered. 
Your daily life and business will not 
suffer interference and your personal 
welfare will be respected. 

"It will be necessary for the Ameri- 
can Army to have at its disposal certain 
services such as railroads, telegraphs and 
telephones as well as perhaps pubHc 
services to meet the needs of accomoda- 
tions and transports. In addition, the 
supplies of materials used will be paid 
for after a fair assessement has been 
made. It is understood that you will not 
commit any act of aggression against the 
American Army nor give information or 
assistance to its enemies. You will act 
always in accordance with the instruc- 
tions given by the American Command- 
er for the security of his troops and lor 
your own protection. 

John J. Pershing 

General Commander-in-Chief 

American Expeditionary Force'' 

The Commander and his suite were received 
in the grand ducal palace. It was a picturesque 
meeting of the new and the old order when the 
tall American general and the young Grand- 
Duchess stood on the palace balcony watching the 



W 



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NORGE APPLIANCES 



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Remsen, Iowa 



ings 



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20 



step to the time of their Yankee airs. Luxem' 
purg liad turned for a time into a fairyland for 
t Yankee troops. 

MESSAGE OF GRATITUDE 

The following telegram was sent to President 
'iUon in Washington, D. C, "Citi2,ens of Lux- 
imbourg desire to express to you the gratitude of 
fisembourg for having given us Liberty. We 
to further express our admiration for the 
lean soldiers who have come to our relief." 
1^ lean while Americans of the 2nd army were 
amping over the Graiid--Duchy on their way to 
Rhine without touching the Capital and 
re ever>"where cordially and enthusiastically re- 
^ed. 
The European situation was very unstable 
the peace treaties had not yet been signed. 
t Big i"our, Lloyd George, Vviison, Clemenceau 
od Orlando held the future of Luxembourg m 
idr hands. 

-MIR WELLE BLEIVE VAT MIR SIN^^ 

A Luxembourg delegation met with the 
Ipuncil of Four, and by an impressive demonstra' 
m a>nveyed the desire of the Luxembourgers to 
d:imtely remain an independent state. Luxem- 
burg for the Luxembourgers was their slogan. 
hey meant by this, not isolation, but that tiiey 
ki not wish to be incorporated into any foreign 



On September 28 th, in a referendum the Big 
!bur decided that Luxembourg should remain an 
odependent state with an economic union wdth 
■aiice and Belgium. Many details had to be 
ttled between these countries. 

The treaty w^as finally concluded for fifty 
■5. Relations between Luxembourg, France 
sad Belgium could not have been better. During 
critical times, Luxembourg had put forward 
right of self' determination and had won. Last- 
g peace, contentment, and prosperity were in 
ight for Luxembourg. 

THE WOLF PROWLS 

Things were not going so well in the rest 
at the world, however. Right was losing ground 
y by day. Leaders of nations failed to reali2;e 
■fbat was brewing in central Europe. Hitler ruled 
■^.-"■ianv and with his blustering talk intimidated 
I ^^^nd and France. Those who held peace and 
freedom dear were almost in despair. The Treaty 
of \"er5aille was ignored. Fascism gained ground 
by leaps and bounds. Hitler took back the Saar 
district. Austria w^as next taken over; then 



Czechoslovakia. The ruler of Germany became 
cra2,y wath power. Other nations objected and' 
warned Hitler, but with him Might was Right, 
so his armies marched into Poland. Poland defend- 
ed itself and begem begging for help from other 
nations. At last, England took heart and France 
soon foUow^ed. 

For the second time in a c;uarter of ? century 
a world v/ar had broken out. In the west for 
almost a year both sides waited. Then in May, 
1940, all hell was let loose. On one side by crimin' 
als and on the other side by the short-sighted. 

IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING 
The people of Luxembourg, like the Belgians, 
the Hollanders, the Danes and the Norwegians, 
did not reali2,e the seriousness of their danger. But 
on May 9th, the blow fell. The Germans invaded 
Luxembourg for the second time in twenty-five 
years. The same excuse was used by Hitler that 
was used by the Kaiser in 1914, that British and 
French troops were ready to invade Luxembourg 
and that the Germans had to march in to protect 
the country. 

But this invasion was considerably more 
terrible than the first one. Parachutists feh from 
the sky, motor troops clattered madly through 
villages and towns, bombing planes spread fire 
from above, dead and wounded lay on the stones 
beneath smoking ruins in many villages. It was 
the day of doom and not only in Luxembourg. 

DEATH, DESTRUCTION, MISERY 

In no time Hitler's troops had occupied all 
important points. Enormous masses of troops 
swarmed across the country. Almost a third of the 
people had left house and home and had fled. 
Many succeeded in reaching French soil. Every 
car and motorcycle was snatched by the Germans. 
Everything that was not riveted or chained was 
taken. The soldiers cleaned out everything of value 
to them in return for which they gave worthless 
German paper money. 

Behind them came the civil authorities, the 
SS, the Gestapo, corruption and the Gauleiter 
Simon. The picture changed. Parliament was dis- 
solved, the Constitution was declared null and 
void, use of the French language was forbidden, 
the Gestapo was in control. The groans and 
shrieks of the tortured could be heard every- 
where. The horrible details of oppression, the 
stubborn resistance of the Luxembourger is his- 
tory. The most determined resistance came from 
the workers. Their humor and ready wit never 
left them. They were controlled, impoverished, 



21 




AV AD E -TO - A/VE AS4J R E 
CLOT H E S . 



There's nothing so satisfying 
as a 

Well Tailored Suit 
or Overcoat 

Made to Your Own Measure 



Keith Hats E 8^ W Shirts 

Star Brand Shoes 

Servus Rubber Footwear 

Hanes Underwear 

Golden Fleece Leather Coats 

North Country Wool Jackets and Mackinaws 

Baker's Work Clothing 

Holeproof or Cannon Hosiery Gloves by Sendra 

Western Maid Undergarments 

Purrey Blankets Gilbrae Fabrics 

Quadriga Prints Butterick Patterns 



FRANK'S 



'THE STORE THAT APPRECIATES YOUR BUSINESS' 



22 



ed bv ^pies and agents. Their struggle 
opdess but Hitler and all ot his agents 
le able to kill the spirit of the Luxem- 



LUXEMBOURG IS TRIED 

i was proven beyond any doubt when 
reed a census in October oi 1941. Every 

had to give his or her nationality but 
_mks of the questionnaire only Luxem- 
15 excluded as an answer. 
Germans were blind enough to imagme 
•nty of the people would put their 
f down as German. But 96 per cent m 

and 99 per cent m the villages put m 
m spite of intimidation and prohibit 

small country valued freedom more 
«ai aU the advantages which might have 
by belonging to the German Reich. But 
ms did not give up. 

Gauleiter Simon declared clumsily in a 

rch. 'Trom this day the Grand-Duchy 

^ourg is a Province of the German "Reich 

'one of its inhabitants is a German citizen 

ct to mihtary service. The youths be- 

the ages of 18 and 22 will be called 

Btely". 

THE MASSES RESIST 

to the next day the world learned of a 

[ strike in Luxembourg. 
L£member, the German Armies were not 
I the defensive on the East and South, ihe 
I dictator had not yet fallen and the German 
f was not yet trembling. The workers ol 
febourg dared to take up the fight against 
any s military and economic might, ihey 
%S5 not merely for bread, but tor Freedom. 
their mass protest against compulsory an- 



tbs^ efforts of the Na^is to belittle these 
and to ascribe them to foreign agents were 
■u. It was useless to hush the matter, bacto- 
t,cre at a stand-stiU. Peasants refused to make 
tries The students joined in and so did the 
%r A whole nation, led by its workers, 
p m> asainst domination by a foreign power 
movQmeni spread into the mining district ot 
khiftlingen and m a few hours over the 

z country. . . . , 

Th& Xa-i^ declared a state oi siege througlv 
the countr>^ They began military courts, 
led out '^O executions, confiscated property. 



deprived many men of their citizenship and 
organized mass deportation to Germany. Hie 
terror machine was in full swing. _ 

On September Sth, the state oi siege was 
ended The court martials ceased their activities. 
The strike had been trampled down, crushed even 
more brutally than it had been tweiitydive years 
earlier. But crushed also was the Gauleiters he 
that the people of Luxembourg wanted to bebng 
to the German Reich or to be part ot the New 
Order. 

HORROR UPON HORROR 

Up to now the occupying authorities had 
tried outwardly, at least, to keep up some pretense 
of decency. They now vented their wfth a^f^ 
their vengeance on the rebellious people. With 
every refinement of terronzation they started a 
transfer of population. About fifty tamihes were 
visited by the Gestapo each week. 1 he nead of tiat 
house was ?iven three hours to bring his hou.e 
fnto order and to say farewell to his anuly, his 
house and his home. All behaved like heroes. No 
tears betrayed their despair. 

Families which were spared deportation were 
over-whelmed with other cal^nnities Chidlren 

were torn from their parents^ ^''?i'^°" undren 
Gauleiter they had failed to bring their ch d.n 
up in the spirit of National Socialism. The second- 
a^ schools were sifted out and the young boys 
were sent to German training camps. Theic thc> 
were drilled into obedient German subjects. 

Perhaps even worse was the fate of d.e yoiu, 
airls They were forcibly taken from the sheitei 
^ftheir families and driven beyond the confine ;, 
not ly of their country, bat of their womanly 
d°aiX The mothers in Luxembourg read with 
hoC'inthc official newspaper that it w^ an 
honor for their daughters to share in Geiman 
national service and to return to their homes as 
German mothers. 

In such a country it is comparatively easy to 
organize united acts of resistance but leguU. 
uX-around was more difficult because ot its 
^e The young women and the young men ot 
Luxembourg dJed evei-ythuig to ^^ ^^ 
rules and the German uniform. They found it 
extremely difficult to hide. Many of them we, e 
ca™sooner or later. And yet they kept ahve 
the spirit of resistance, 

THE RED LION 
Anyone who helped patriots to escape or 
provided civil clothes or food for prisoners ot war, 



23 



Greetings and Good Wishes 

from 

THE JOHNSON CAFE 

ALT JOHNSON 

and 

LUXEMBOURGER CAFE 

MRS. CLARA JOHNSON 



Remsen, Iowa 



Compliments of 

FRANK'S SERVICE STATION 

The Motorist's Friend 

D-X GAS, GREASES, OILS 



CLARENCE FRANK 

Remsen, Iowa 

24 



refugees the secret frontier paths, or 
to tile new organization called the Red 
Loxembourg, did it with the full know- 
dK faa that if he were caught lie would 
po Hintzert, a concentration camp twenty 
KXth-east of Trier and that frightful 
awaited him there. 

z proudest men of Luxembourg met in 
barracks of Hint2;ert. There were work- 
jHOtessors, intellectuals and industrialists, 
axidents and officers, iheir head jailer, 
J Leader George Schaaf, who had been 
ed Ivan, the lerrible, and their senior 
lie W ippe, henchman of Barbarism, would 
a nightmare memory to his victims, long 
:r's Reich had crumbled into dirt and 
>ng after he and his hkes have received 
^ "reward" for their crimes. 

nds have passed through the hell of 

S^ y^Kis of the fortunate ones who was able 

sent a report to the world. He finished 

lines, "My words are written in blood. 

strengthen our arms and our hearts for 

ot judgement. It will come, the day when 

call them to account. Till then. Brothers 

! RXX.. strike and strike hard." 



THEN CAME THE DAWN 

iDd the day did come. The Americans and 
landed in Northern France and in a re- 
jfy short time had chased the Na2,is back 
^ France, Holland, Belgium and through 
bourg. They made a stand on the Moselle 
the" border of Luxembourg and their 

enerai von Runstedt with his crack troops 
a desperate counter-attack and for a little 
■succeeded in driving the American troops 
^ Luxembourg and back into Belgium. Ev- 



ery inch of ground was bitterly contested, but Ger- 
many was doomed. With heavy reinforcements 
and unhmited supplies the American Army defeat- 
ed the Germans. They retreated through Luxemr 
bourg once more, destroying everything by tire 
and bombs. Fully one-half oi Luxembourg was de- 
stroyed, but Luxembourg was free and the people 
thanked God and the Americans for their free- 
dom. 

The Nazis fighting spirit was broken. They 
finally had to surrender to the Allies, uncondition- 
ally. Now the Nazi ringleaders who caused such 
tremendous destruction and such terrible suffer- 
ing have to stand trial m a world court, and will 
be punished for their crimes. 

Thousands of Luxembourgers had volunteer- 
ed for the French and Belgium Armies and had 
fought on the side of the Allies in both World 
Wa^s. Many of them made the Supreme Sacri- 
fice. The people of Luxembourg had to submit 
to mighty Germany, but never did any one of 
them line up with Germany to wm the war for 
them. 

THAT IS LUXEMBOURG 

That IS Luxembourg, only a dot on the 
World Adas. Its inhabitants are only a drop in 
the sea of humanity that is Europe. Its workers 
are a mere battaHon m the mihion strong army 
of their class. These people are Europeans in the 
best sense of the word, as they have shown in 
this testing time. This country, so tiny in size, is 
great m the power of dignity of its conviction. 

Luxembourg emerges from this war as a 
small country which the Nazis could not break. 
Will it receive the rew^ard to which it is entitled? 

Humbly they ask Almighty God to permit 
their homeland to live in a state of peace and 
harmony as Christian Civilization provides. 




25 



/" 



Our Best Wishes to the People 

of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 

and Friends Everywhere 

OLE'S MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Bakery Goods, Fruits, Vegetables 

FEATURING 

Del Monte, Richeliue and Monarch Canned Foods; Swift 8C Co., 
Armour 8C Co. and Cudahy Meats; Bunte Bros. Candies 



ELMER C OHLENDORF, ROBERT H. SCHNIEDERS 



Greetings and Good Wishes 



from 



Dr. Frank J. Hussey 



D. V. M. 



Remsen, Iowa 



26 



fraud Duchy Has Impressive Religious Customs 



f 



Luxembourg is definitely Cath' 

; Cm inhabitants there are about 

-■. '^c;. the remaining 5,000 being 

- .: Jews. Nevertheless the minority 

- . _■ jm of worship without the least 

nv form. 

1^ shc.w that the first Catholic church 
-chy was established at Weimer- 
^£^ ,car'3S4, A. D. 

m\) most important rehgious celebra' 
%t Octave during the first week in May, 
.. -; Procession at Echternach on the 
-- . C _:-.:oc( )St. The Dancing Procession 
.: .-__^ iJr :jrigin 700 years ago when the 
^ienced a serious epidemic of epilepsy, 
dance. All known medical resources 
ss to check the disease and as a last re- 
jple implored the intercession of St. 
Ihe appeal was not in vain: the disease 
tsly stayed. 

jrord was a bishop of the diocese of 

lany, to which Luxembourg be^ 

It time. St. Willibrord rebuilt the 

_ Echternach after its destruction dur^ 

t, and his remains rest under the high 

cathedral. 

LNACH DANCE PROCESSION 

an act of atonement and penance on 
those afflicted with epilepsy, St. Vitus 
j convulsions, the Luxembourgers maug- 
- - -. : :ity of Echternach, what is known 
...ch Dance Procession. Contrary to 
:--. :-. ihat might be gained from the ti- 
iC£ procession is a dignified, solemn 
__^dure, the true nature of which is 
^ describe because of its rehgious sig- 
Religious functions begin at nine o'- 
^_2e morning with High Mass and ser- 
Jc Bishop of Luxembourg, the Abbot c)f 
i and other prelates always attend this 

Fdance itself is used as the means of ad' 
_ m the procession to the religious cere" 
: consists of three steps forward and two 
_rd so that five steps are required to 
. distance of one step, and the entire 
pilgrimage in this manner is slightly 
one mile. It usually requires about 



three hours to complete the distance. During this 
time several bands play continuously, all using 
the same music. Faithful as the people have been 
in chnging to this unique custom for 700 years, it 
is interesting to know that for the Dance Pro- 
cession the musical score used today is the same 
that was used in the original celebration, and 
more remarkable still is the fact that m the grand 
duchy this music, apparently held sacred to this 
ceremony, has never been used on any other pub' 
lie occasion. 

The major portion, by far, of all pilgrims in 
the Dance Procession, are Luxembourgers. How- 
ever, many persons come from across the bord-- 
ers to take part, bringing the total number of 
pilgrims to as high as 18,000, with as high as 
40^000 spectators lining the path of those taking 
active part. Only once in these many years, and 
admittedly for no justifiable reason, has the 
Dance Procession not been held, and history re- 
cords that immediately after this failure there 
was a noticeable increase in the number of cases 
of epilepsy and St. Vitus dance. 

So much for the dance here described. The 
spirit in which it is performed is for the visitor 
an abiding memory; it expresses a sincere Catho' 
he faith, an inahenable reflection of gratitude and 
simplicity of truth. 

EARLY TRIALS 

Luxembourg the unkncjwn, the tiny grand 
duchy hedged in by France, Belgium and Ger- 
many, with an almost impregnable rock as its 
capital, has been attacked again and again, has 
known all the horrors of successive sieges which 
have been bravely resisted and has time and a- 
gam been the victim of maurauders as its cities 
and hamlets were captured and sacked. 

In 1666 at the end of 30 years of war in 
which England, Spam, France, Holland and Ger- 
many were the principals and during which the 
grand duchy was time and again used as a battle- 
ground, the misery of its people was intensified 
by starvation and pestilence which threatened to 
depopulate the country. In their agony and dis- 
tress the people, led by the civil and clerical au- 
thorities turned to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the 
Comforter of the Afflicted as their patron saint 
and in an elaborate ceremony a statue of the 



27 



Greetings^ Kind Wishes 



Dr. J. E. McGOVERN, M. D 



Remsen, Iowa 



With Hopes for a Bright Future 
Greetings 

from 

The HATZ MARKET 

Meats, Groceries, Vegetables, Fruits 
Bakery and Dairy Products 

N. H. HATZ MATHEW HATZ 

Retnsen, Iowa 



28 







Mother was enthroned in the principal 
of Luxembourg City. Here the populace 
;ly offered special prayers of petition 
Pestilence and its consequent deaths 
a sudden halt and enormous _ 
were reaped soon thereafter, 
-. _- the faithful that their 
■_i been heard. 

gratitude of the people in^ 
:_:.eir devotion to the Mother 
and ever since, almost 300 
tbey have continued their devo^ 
her at the shrine of the church 
>tre Dame in the city of Luxem' 
;. Each year on the first Sunday 
ly the solemn octave of the i^„ 

\'irgin is begun in the Gathe- 

if Luxembourg where the statue 

\liraculous Madonna is ex' 

CHI the beautiful votive altar 

three centuries ago. 

g the first week in May 
s from the grand duchy, Ah 
jum and the Rhine province 
,to the city singly, in pairs, in 
and in processions, continuing 
the week to worship at the shrine of Mary, 
wend their ways from then- outlying 
s the pilgrims lift their voices in song and 
to the Blessed Mother, invoking her aid 
Icrcession for physical ailments or other forms 
fetress or for some worthy benefit desired, 



Comforter of the 
Afflicted .... 

Statue in St. Mary's 
chux'ch, Remsen, imported 
from the Grand Duchy 
and donated by Mrs. 
Catherine Scharff, 
Anna Kieffer and 
Cornelius WoUwert 



and many are the cases on record, supported by 
sworn statements, that the desired aid was granted. 
On the second Sunday the city pays its trib- 
ute to the Miraculous Patroness. Solemn High 
Mass is celebrated by the Bishop of 
Luxembourg in the forenoon. In th^ 
afternoon there is a solemn procession 
through the streets of the city. In this 
the CathoUc grand duchess and hei^ 
family, the principal officials of the; 
duchy and of the capital city, all 
societies, schools and churches are 
^ represented, as are the mechanics^ 

J and artists' guilds, the clergy and the 

I public, forming a magnificent proces- 

sion through the principal thorough- 
fares, ending at an improvised altar in 
the public marketplace. Here the 
bishop, on behalf of the city and the 
country, renews the people's dedica- 
tion to the heavenly Mother and im- 
plores her continued protection, after 
which the procession returns to the 
cathedral, the Madonna's statue is 
replaced on the votive altar and the 
solemn Te Deum ends the festival 



I J ^^ftgaft^^t. 



Miss 
Mrs. 



octave. 



The celebration, carried on with profound 
solemnity and dignity, is beautiful to behold as is 
its purpose, and those who have been privileged 
to take part m this religious festivity declare that 
its full significance cannot be otherwise realiz,ed. 




29 




Symbol of Service to the American Farmers 
We have a Complete Line of Machinery and Parts 



Peters Implement Co. 

PHONE 91 REMSEN, IOWA 



The 

Progressive Farmers Cooperative 

Commission 

is happy to contribute to the 

LUXEMBOURG RELIEF 



We are happy also to receive shipments of 
livestock consigned to 

THE SIOUX CITY MARKET 



30 



I 



The Real Luxembourg 

BY GEORGE D. HAGAK 



THE REAL LUXEMBOURG had its he- 
^omng in the 10th century under the Luxem- 
g Counts of the Ardennes, and remained 
nee and independent as a country until 144S 
rhen it was united with Burgundy. In 1482 it 
5 regained by the Hapsburgs, but passed to the 
jpan^rdf in 1555. 

In 1684 the French conquered Luxembourg 
Dftress, but were forced to return it to Spain in 
698. It came under Austrian sovereignty in 1714 
ixi remained so until 1795 when it was annexed 
r France for the second time. 

In 1815 at the Vienna Congress Luxembourg 
35 created a Grand Duchy and was united with 
£ Netherlands through the bonds of the same 
jrnasD,', in what was termed a personal union. In 
year of 1839 its independence was again re- 
tored, so from 1890 until 1940 the 300,000 
people who comprised the Grand Duchy lived 
>eaceable and Christian Hves. It was m 1939 
bey celebrated their 100 years of independence, 
■Jy to be driven to strife and desperation when 
y invaded their country in 1940 and with 
disregard for all treaties or rights of justice, 
md against a nation that was unable to defend it- 
kM against aggression, and Germany's second of- 
fence in 25 years. 

Many lives were lost and homes destroyed in 
underground warfare for the freedom in which 
iiey believed. Their land was pillaged and citizens 
were taken as hostages to serve the interests of 
jennany in any way she chose. Luxembourg never 
akered in her efforts of underground resistance, 
md this Godd'eanng people had their prayer of 
Idiverance answered on the 10th day of Septem' 
, 1944 when American troops finally drove the 
_.st from Its prey. This reborn freedom has a- 
gain welded Luxembourg even more closely than 
n?er before, and the love of freedom is personified 
the character of their people who have ever 
Been known as peaceful, prosperous and ambit' 



ious, and a visit to the flowering vineyards in the 
Sauer and Moselle valley is convincing evidence 
that this sturdy race of people once called merry 
folk have toiled to make their nation fertile. Long 
hours of toil in the iron ore district in the south 
and intensive farming in the fertile fields of the 
Gutland have built character and their behef in 
God has built the formation of their morale. 

Let us hope that the historic flag, The Red 
Lion, will waft in the breeze henceforth from the 
historic walls of the old fortress to the width and 
breadth of the nation. So be. 



THE REAL REMSEN 

Written for the Luxembourg May Feast 
by Geo. D. Hagar 

We've gathered here to celebrate, 

you're all on friendly ground; 
Cause everybody's luxembourg, 

when picnic day rolls around. 

It does not matter who is king, 

or queen or prince that day; 
Cause everybody's luxembourg, 

and all are out to play. 

The feast is on, the beer is cool, 

and everyone is gay; 
They're out to greet their neighbors, 

cause we're luxembourg that day. 

We'll welcome guests from far and wide, 

we'll kneel v.dth you to pray; 
Come, be a Luxembourger, wnth us 

just for a day. 

And when the boys return from war 

and battles all have ceased, 
We will all, be Luxembourgers for a day of 

prayer and feast. 

So-be. 



31 



Best Wishes and 
Our Continued Good Will 

WICTOR HARDWARE STORE 

SINCE 1886 

Jos. T. Wictor - Frank R. Wictor - Gilbert Wictor 
REMSEN, IOWA 



Compliments of 

THE VOGUE THEATRE 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan Banks 



The All-year Parade of the Best in Motion Pictures 



32 



He Gave Remsen Its Name 




Dr. William Remsen Smith 



Remsen was named for Dr. William Remsen 

idi, a pioneer Sioux City physician who be- 
an extensive landowner in this territory. Dr. 

ikii was a close friend of John I. Blair, the man 
had charge of construction here for the 

rf?uque ci Sioux City railway company. Mr. 

first suggested the name Smithville but Dr. 

a, thinking there were so many Smiths in 

: world, chose to name the town after his own 

[idk name — hence Remsen. 



Dr. Smith came to Iowa from Red Bank' 
N. J., in 1856. He walked from Council Bluffs 
to Sioux City since there were no railroads. He 
became receiver in the U. S. Land Office at Sioux 
City and became well acquainted with the people 
settling around the Remsen site where he owned 
640 acres of land. In later years he was wont to 
tell his children of the beauty of the virgin prairie 
m this area. Dr. Smith left $300 to the town fo|- 
the establishment of a library. ;] 



^^^ 



. V^ CUFF COLl^. 
> LIBRARY V 

smi un, w*^ 



33 



The Pioneer General Store 

I P. BECK COMPANY 

Established in 1882 

By Michael Beck, Native of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 

In Continuous Operation by Four Family Generations 
- Present Firm Members - 

J. p. Beck, entered business with his father, Michael Beck, in 1882 
A. M. Beck, Since 1920 H. J. Beck, Since 1939 

Incorporated in 1922 

Member of the Grocers' Wholesale Co. (Briardale Foods) Des Moines 
J. P. Beck, senior member of the J. P. Beck Co., is a charter member 

and member of board of directors. j 

Member of the Northern Jobbing Co. of St. Paul, of which the 

senior Mr. Beck was an original organizer in 1914. J 

Nationally Advertised Brand for More Than 50 Years 

BRIARDALE, G. W. C, TALL CORN FOODS 
MARX-HAAS CLOTHING FOR MEN 

HART SCHAFFNER dc MARX CLOTHING FOR MEN 
SHIRTCRAFT SHIRTS 
BOTANY TIES 

MUNSINGWEAR FOR MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN 
GEORGIANA DRESSES 
ARMOUR 8C CO. MEATS 

THE BEST IN DRESS SHOES 
WOLVERINE WORK SHOES 
ROSWELLE HATS 



The J. P. Beck Company 

nsr 
REMSEN - GRANVILLE - POCAHONTAS 



34 



'■w I tn 't f 



u 



REMSEN 

PLATTED IN 1876— INCORPORATED IN 1889 



NICK 
First 



.-■/ai platted by the Iowa Falls ^ 
Railroad and Town Lot and Land 
. August 28, 1876, but little was accom- 
i-a-ay of business until 1881, when Frank 
in a general store. The same season 
R. Blake, who erected the Blake House, 
as the Monhoven House. 
[■fira: to deal in farm implements at Rem' 
".: :':nn of Rathmann fe? 
T_M first hardware was 
.".r. H. Rathmann, The 
was started by Samuel 
1882 a furniture store 
by Hubert Notheni. 
)re Wrede opened the 
'of drugs: "Doctor'' Ba' 
\v patent medicines one 
that. 
Klonner, who is said to 
the first residence, now 
Charles Peters and occu' 
I, \i, Myers, also gave the 
first saloon which he 
the thirsty in 188L 

rev ^ Company were the first real grain 
Is: Remsen. Townsend Brothers, of Le^ 
trted the first lumber business in the place. 
Klartin Seba kindled the first fire in a 
; forge at Remsen and wielded the 
his glowing forge many years. John 
started the first wagon-repair shop 
L The Bank of Remsen w^as started in 
local newspapers were published there 
-Die Remsen Glocke and The Remsen 



INCORPORATED 

spring of 1889, Remsen was incor^ 

le "History of Plymouth County" re- 

"The place was incorporated in order 

to numerous riots and rough houses 

I teen uncontrollable without a municipal 

^-•rh the case, but hastily adds, "A good 

- r m 1889 and the beginning of good 

;. all that makes a town desirable soon 



rporation necessarily went the first 

A-hich resulted as follows: Mayor, 

g: recorder, Edward S. Lloyd; treasurer. 




r 



Z. Oilman and councilmen, Michael Scheel, Ham 
Atkinson, John Fisch, Hubert Nothem, Peter 
Brucher and George Ebrecht. The postmaster at 
the time was A. C. Morgan. 

BUSINESS HOUSES 

The first general merchandise store in Rem- 
sen was opened by Frank Miller m 1882, who 
later disposed of his holdings to 
Michael Beck, and moved to CaU- 
fornia. The extensive store of the 
John P. Beck Co. is the offspring of 
Remsen's original store. A little 
later, stores were opened by Nich- 
olas Kass and Sam Wentz;. Stephen 
Ellsworth was the first grain buyer. 
Remsen's first amusement place 
was known as the Remsen opera 
house, built m 1885 by Carson 
Witt and liberally patroni2,ed for 
L4NG ^ number of years. 

Mayor 

JUSTICE OF PEACE 

The first justice of the peace was C. R. 
Baker, and among his successors may be named 
' L. B. Page, Asmus Enckson, H. Jost, J. P. Kieff- 
er, Ed S. Lloyd, Frank Wengler and B. Bunkers. 
Crime and misdemeanors are and always have 
been at a very low mark in Remsen and no- 
where m the state is there to be found a more 
law-abiding community. 

The first bank in Remsen was opened in 
1885 by W. D. Creglow, and two years later the 
Farmers Loan & Trust Co. was organised. It lat- 
er became known as the German Savings Bank. 
In 1902, M. R. Faber founded the Farmers &? 
Merchants bank, which was merged with the 
First National bank in 1904. 

Present banks are the Farmers Savings bank 
and the First Trust ^ Savings bank. 

Remsen today, in 1945, has 75 substantial 
business enterprises and professional people, and 
with its population of 1,200 has nearly 300 fine 
homes. The business and residential property are 
well-kept and for its neat and substantial appear- 
ance the town has a widespread reputation. 

Besides its neat and substantial homes and 
business places, its well-kept lawns and the clean- 
liness of its streets which have made Remsen 
''talked about", the general appearance of the 



35 



Compliments of 

G. G. HUEWE 

JEWELRY 
OUTOMETRIST 



Remsen, Iowa 



GOOD CHEER 



from 



THE 



REMSEN 

DRY 
CLEANERS 



Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Elving 
Joseph G. Elving 



GREETINGS FROM 



I 



DUNN'S 
CAFE 



MR. AND MRS. F. T. DUNIIi 



Remsen, Iowa 



Here's to a 
Happy Future 

M 

lohn M.Kennec 

Bfeedef of 

SHETLAND PONIEI 

and " 

PALOMINA HORSE 



REMSEN, IO>X\4 



36 




JOHN KEFFELER 
Present Mayor 



I If enhanced by its paved streets. With the 

tic-n or a few blocks in the outskirts, all 

5 in Remsen are concrete paved, with as-- 

covering in the business district. There are 

miles of paving. 

The modern water system extends through' 
tiie town as does its sewage system, with the 
ti of a few outlying blocks which will be 
improved in 1946. 

Remsen is one of the few Iowa small towns 
ring its own electric plant. The magnificent 
tat, built in 1933 and enlarged later ior a total 
t of $125,000, serves the entire town. In spite 
0^' electric rates the plant paid for itself in 11 
Is. Its operation is supervised by a board of 
sfcees appointed by the mayor and approved by 
; council, whose direct management is under 
H. Holtgrewe and a crew" ol assistants — -all 
tD'wn men. 



The $50,000 municipal building which in- 
des a gymnasium-auditorium used by the pub- 
and the two schools, kitchen, council chamb- 
^derk's office and public library, was built in 

The Remsen postoffice, with Elmer T. Trei- 
as postmaster, went into second class two 
rs ago and according to stamp sales, on the ba- 
of which postoffices are classified, it will re- 
there for years to come. Clerk in the post- 
re is Marcel W. Matgen; sub-clerk is Miss 



THE MAYORS 
OF REMSEN 

1889-1891— Nick Lang 
189M892— F. J. Jost 
1892-1893— Sam Went;; 
1893-1896— M. Scheel 
1896-1898— Frank Reichmann 
L898-1899— Nick Miller 
1899-1903— E. Jorgensen 
1903-1907— John Fisch 
1907-1909- Fred Rubie 
1909-1920— J. H. Ahmann 
1920-1930— Barney Bunkers 
1930-1934— J. F. Gamerdmger 
1934-1937— G. M. Myers 
1937-????— lohn Keffeler 



LaVonne Beelner and the four rural mail carriers 
are Harm Dirks, Albert J. Haverkamp, S. M. Fid- 
eler and John G. Schnieders. 

Remsen has a businessmen's organi2,ation 
known as the Commercial Club, active in civic 
work. 

TOWN OFFICERS 

Present officials for the town of Remsen 
are: 

John Keffeler, Mayor 

Councilmen — Chfford A. Dorr, Frank R. 
Wictor, N. H. Hat^, C. M. Myers and A. D. 
Ohlendorf. 

Clerk — George Wess. 

Treasurer — S. R. Nothem. 

Assessor- — N. B. Homan. 

Jos. C. Wilberding is the duly elected con- 
stable; justice of the peace is Barney Bunkers, 
former councilman and mayor. 

POLICE 

The history of Remsen discloses a long Hst 
of faithful police officers, notably the late Henry 
Niggeling who served for many years, and J. P. 
Muller, still residing here, but retired. 

The present force consists of three trust- 
worthy men: Leonard Wevik, who came to Rem- 
sen in 1929, has been on the force for 10 years 
and is on duty during the day. Ross Harnack, 
member of a well-known local family, returned to 



37 



y 



Our Heartiest Good Wishes to 
THE ROYAL FAMILY 

AND 

THE BRAVE AND VICTORIOUS 
GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG 



Our Compliments to 
THE LUXEMBOURG RELIEF COMMITTEE 



Our Pledge of Continued Loyalty 



TO 



OUR COUNTRY, OUR TOWN, OUR FRIENDS 



McGregor bros« & compa> 



Edw. L. Uoyd, Manager 

Building Material and Coal 



38 




MUNICIPAL AUDITOPaUM, GYMNASIUM, OFFICIAL OFFICES 



in 1940 after having been on the police 
Santa Cruz,, Cahf., for eight years. He 
f&i since 1940 with the exception of from 
942, until October, 1943, when he was 
[V€ of absence to do his bit for Uncle 
the army and saw much active service in 
tican campaign. He is on night duty. Sec- 
. on night duty is Peter Schuver, who has 
the force since 1942 but who during the 
- ^^^as off duty for several months because 
ss and w^ho is now back on duty. 
'. police force serves also in a custodial 
for the municipal building. 

FIRE PROTECTION 

idequate fire protection is provided by the 
Remsen. Atop the town's foremost ele- 
■^ a 75,000'gallon steel reservoir which 
ample water for all homes and w4iich 
ss water in case of fire and which is sup' 
fced by twro deep wells with three electric 
located on tow^nowned land north of the 
mits. 

tire department, a welborgani2,ed and 
aic group of volunteers, is equipped with 
dem motor fire trucks with all accessor" 
liding a chemical fire-fighting unit. 
>th trucks are used for fire calls within the 
is used in answering country calls with' 
of six miles. This track was purchased 
(olar subscription, wqth nearly 100 per 
the farmers subscribing. 
l&e department has been able to cope with 
with one exception, the catastrophe of 
1956, which will be retained in the mem- 
c\-eryone hving here at the time. The fire 



broke out in mid'afternoon of the nation's birth" 
day, with a brisk wind fanning the flames and in 
the midst of a drouth period. The fire, starting 
in the business section, wiped out more than a 
half milhon dollars in property withm five hours. 
The fire departments from Alton and Remsen 
came to the town's assistance but the combined 
forces of the three departments were of little a' 
vail until the bla2,e met with brick and concrete 
and steel'Sided walls. Simultaneously, a fire di' 
saster was under way in the town of Oyens, four 
miles to the w^est, and the Remsen firemen were 
unable to be of assistance there. 

The fire department is the proud possessor 
of some of the anticjuated fire-fighting equip" 
ment used a half century ago, most cherished of 
which is a hook-and-ladder vehicle, fully equip" 
ped, hand made many years ago by Theodore 
Fideler, local blacksmith. This vehicle at the time 
equalled many a factory "made product in every 
way. 

Present officers of the fire department are: 

Chief — Peter Treinen. 

Rural Service Chief — Jack Zimmerman. 

Assistant Chief — Leslie Peters. 

Secretary- — James P. Muller. 

Treasurer — O. N. Frank. 

Other members — Roman Groff, Andy 
Schmitz;, Robert Schnieders, O. H. Nit2;schke, 
Frank Schefstad, Harry Trit^, Jos. V. Fisch, E. 
H. Holtgrewe, John H. Wiebersch and Elmer 
Nit2,schke. 

All members are faithful in attendance of 
meetings, held once each month in winter and 
twice monthly in summer when one practice 
meeting is held each month. 



/ 



Compliments of 
F. B. WILBERDING 



DEKALB 

SEED CORN 
— and — 

GRASS SEEDS 



Marcus, Iowa 



REMSEN 

320 East 4th St. 
Phone 95 



N, B. HOMAN 



REALTOR 



At Your Service 



Burton Parrioti 



Attorney 



Remsen, Iowa 



Look to the Future 
and Trade with 

JACK THIEL 

Welding and Car Ser\i 

New and Used Parts 

Wrecker Service 



PHONE 180 
REMSEN, IOWA 



40 



The Illinois Central Railroad 
Guided the March of Progress 



^ the story of a railroad — the lUinois 
■and its coming to a virgin land — north^ 

the time of the first settlement in the 
0*5 until the arrival of the first Illinois 
in 1870, there was little development 
Jley of the Big Sioux, although there 
Itered settlements. This in spite of the 
my and the richness of its soil. Beauty 
however, did not make up for the 
outlet to market, and there was nothing 
the natural aversion to the fierce 
the prairie country. 
the first train chugged and snorted 
Sioux City from the east in July, 
tiiat was changed. Now there was a 
the abundant crops of the valleys of 
the Floyd and the Little Sioux. 
hy open to the markets of the east, and 
county, which had attracted only 
sons in the fourteen years since 1856, 
quadrupled its population in the ten 
tween 1870 and 1880 and doubled it 
tn 1880 to 1890. 

DUBUQUE & PACIFIC 
RAILROAD CO. 

back to the coming of the railroad, 
grant made to the state of Iowa to 
construction of railroads was approved 
Bgton on May 15, 1856, and one of the 
lines was designated to run from 
across the state to Sioux City. This 
made to a company called the Dubuque 
c Railroad Co., most railroads at that 
for many years thereafter including the 
i^acific" in their name to indicate their 
to reach the Pacific coast. The line was 
oostructed by the Iowa Falls ^ Sioux 
HOQpany, later becoming a part of the 
^ Sioux City Railroad and eventually 
?€at lUinois Central System, stretching 
Missouri river to the Gulf of Mexico. 

ring railroad custom, the line from 
b to Sioux City was begun at both ends 
ame time, although it was necessary to 
fls from St. Louis up the Missouri river 
to Sioux City. Rails for the eastern 
work could, of course, be brought out 
ikago on trains to the end of track at 
k. By October, 1869, the line from Sioux 




City had reached Meriden, while the line from 
the east had arrived at Webster City — just over 
a hundred miles apart. When work began again 
in the spring of 1870, stimulated by the flood of 
immigration stirred up by news of the line's 
progress, construction went forward rapidly, and 
on July 27th of that year the eastern and western 
sections of the line met at a point near Storm 
Lake. 

As soon as it could be accomplished, stations 
were established all along the line. LeMars, Rem- 
sen, Oyens, Merrill, Hinton and James were 
established in Plymouth county, Remsen itself 
being platted m 1876 by the railroad company 
and named after Dr. William Remsen Smith, a 
prominent physician of Sioux City. 

With an outlet for their crops assured, set' 
tiers flocked into northwest Iowa, and the popula- 
tion of Remsen township alone grew from 645 
to 1,271 in five years. 

LIFE-SAVER IN GRASSHOPPER YEARS 

The railroad soon showed that it was not 
alone a mover of goods, but that it had other func- 
tions almost equally important. The years between 
1873 and 1879 are still known in Plymouth coun- 
ty as the "grasshopper years", and it was during 
those years that the Illinois Central played its 
new role— that of the Hfe-saver. Driven to des- 
peration by the annual stripping of their crops by 
hordes of grasshoppers, many of the farmers of 
Plymouth county and northwestern Iowa literally 
lost everything and made plans to leave in search 
of a new home in a location not plagued by the 
winged destroyers. Realising what this would 
mean, the lUinois Central shipped feed, grain and 
supplies into the atflicted section and in addition 
inaugurated land excursions to Iowa from the east. 
These measures, taken in combination, infused 
new hfe into western Iowa and carried the settlers 
through the hard times. 

In those days it was grasshoppers in summer 
and bli2.2ards in winter. Here apin the railroad 
shone — this time as the life-line for fuel and food 
for communities isolated by snow-drifted roads. 
It might be pointed out in passing that the Illinois 
Central had still not given up this role entirely, 
as in the terrible winter of 1935-36 when for many 
days during January and February, 1936, Ply- 
mouth county depended entirely upon the "iron 
horse'' for its food and fuel. 



41 



Compliments of 

ALUS CHALMER 
Manufacturing Co. 

TRACTOR DIVISION BRANCH 

Sioux City, Iowa 

■ 

Manufacturers of 

Modem Farm Equipment 

— sold by — 

FALKE MOTOR CO. 



Compliments of 

Empire Memorials 



MELROSE, MINN. 



JOS. C. WILBERDING 

Local Representative 

Telephone 249 
REMSEN, IOWA 



Compliments of 

BELLMYER 

Clirysler and Plymoul 

Used Car Exchange 



SEE US FOR A SQUARE DI 

Office Phone 57 
Residence Phone 93 



C. J. BELLMYER 

REMSEN, lO^ A 



OFFERMAN' 

REMSEN, lO^ A 

— for — 

DRUGS, TOILETRI 

GIFTS 
TOBACCOS, SODi^ 



Livestock and Poultr 
Remedies 



Hoc^ Cholera Serum ana 



42 



mention has been made of the land 
Is of the Illinois Central. These excur- 
Evi^jped originally to stimulate growth in 
feem states, were extended to the western 
the railroad with such successful results 
<pK>te from a book published in Dubuque 
'The people of the Northwest, and ol 
particular, owe the Ilhnois Central a hist- 
Ol gratitude/' 

s bcjok, entitled ''Through Iowa via 
Ikntral Railroad from Dubu. ue to Sioux 
a veritable treasure house of information 
lem Iowa of sixty years ago, written in 
^ery st\*le of Victorian dnys. There follows 
ion frcm the introduction to the work: 

OLDEST— RELIABLE 
AND SAFE 

pe Illinois Central Railroad, with its 2874 

Itzac^, is not only the oldest, but one of 

ft thorcughly reliable and safe hnes in the 

^ striking characteristic of this company is 

(■; determination to develop the towns 

y adjacent to their lines, and the efforts 

ird by them to accomphsh this result. 

iBmple. a few years ago when grasshoppers 

istated the country tributary to the west 

Centrars system, and the farmers, dis' 

and disheartened, were beginning to 

emigrating to some more favored locality, 

yis Central promptly came to their aid, 

ished fuel and feed at low prices, and the 

year inaugurated a system of land seek- 

5ns that advertised far and wide the 

Br ot the soil and the future possibilities of 

Northwest. People began to visit the 

and in less than two years the price of 

:d from 300 to 500 per cent." 

tA^nLIAR TO NORTHWEST 

le x^Titer of the book enthusiastically pro' 
the names ol General Manager E. T. 
eral Passenger Agent A. H. Hanson 
t General Passenger Agent J. F. Mer- 
^ as familiar to the Northwest as Wash- 
jlincoln and Grant to the world at large. 
ath the completion of the line from Iowa 
I ^yux City, and later from Cherokee to 
alls, division head juarters were established 
bkee and remained there until shortly after 
pfcen the Cherokee division ceased to exist 
t hnes included became a part of the Iowa 
b embracing all Illinois Central lines west 
berioo. Division headquarters were again 
in 1931, this time to Waterloo, and the 



present division includes all of the 1,000 miles of 
railroad stretching west of Ghicago^ — a territory 
larger in itself than the total mileage of many 
good'si^ed raih'oads. 

REACH HIGH PLACES 

The names of the men who have served as 
superintendents, chief dispatchers or train masters 
on the west end of the Illinois Central include 
many who reached a high place m the service 
of the railroad. They include such men as W. 
Atwill, formerly chief train dispatcher at CherO' 
road; L. A. Downs, once superintendent at Fort 
kee, who later became vice president of the rail' 
Dodge and in after years president of the IlHnois 
Central, and C. F. Duggan, whose rise to the vice- 
presidency included five years as superintendent 
at Waterloo. They know western Iowa from per' 
sonal experience. 

Lying like an arm and hand across northern 
Illinois and Iowa, with fingers reaching into Min- 
nesota, South Dakota and Nebraska, the Iowa 
Division of the Illinois Central taps the richest 
food-producing area of the world. No railroad in 
the United States passes through a territory pro- 
ducing a greater variety of the necessities of life 
than does the Illinois Central System. Beginning 
with the fisheries and rice fields of southern 
Louisiana, traversing the great cotton-growing 
area of the Mississippi Delta, through the coal 
fields of w^estern Kentucky and southern Illinois, 
to the great steel mills of Chicago and west 
through the "bread-basket of the nation" with its 
corn, hogs and dairy products to terminate at the 
great meat packing cities along the Missouri river, 
th,; Illinois Central truly "has everything." 



SERVES FINE COMMUNITIES 

There are no cleaner, more prosperous com- 
munities on the lines of the Illinois Central than 
the towns of western Iowa. Sioux City, gateway 
to the gram fields of the Dakotas: Remsen, live- 
stock selling and feechng center, with its fine 
municipal auditorium; Cherokee, retail hub of a 
rich farming district; Storm Lake, beautiful city 
on one of Iowa's finest lakes — these and many 
more create a steady flow of rail traffic that places 
Iowa high as a revenue producing state. 

The lUinois Central is proud to serve west- 
ern Iowa, proud of its record of 75 years as the 
route to market to the "cattle and hog belt" and 
proud of the thrifty, progressive Americans who 
have provided the traffic that has made the service 
possible. 



43 



Our Best Wishes 



KRAMER'S 

COMPLETE 

FOOD STORE 



Meats, Groceries, 



Bakery and Dairy Products 



GEORGE W. KRAMER 
CYRIL KRAMER 

Remsen, Iowa 



44 



Oldest Luxembourger Resident 
of Remsen 



n fi'-~*-fW»!?^stW<W^WAJfc«S^*Sftiw5I^ 




FETEK. THILL 

Having settled on a farm m the Remsen vicinity 65 
rears aao Mr. Thill is the oldest Luxembourger, m point 
of residence, m the community. A charter member o 
Section 14, Luxembourger Brotherhood of America, he has 
akvavs been faithful in attendance of meetings, is an ottice 
holder and one of the section's loyal members. 



OUR CONTINUED GOOD WILL 
AND COMPLIMENTS TO 

THE GRAND DUCHY 
OF LUXEMBOURG 

and 
the Luxembourgers of Remsen 



We thank the many who showed their 

good will toward us while operating the 

Myers Cafe, before and since. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Myers 



GOOD WISHES 



from 



RAY BAACK 

Painting 
Decorating 
Paper Hanging 



LeMars, Iowa 



Greetings 



from 

THE 

LANG ^ 

SERVICE STATION 

STANDARD OIL 
PRODUCTS 



Joe Lang, Prop. 

Remsen 



OUR COMPLIMENT* 



to 



LUXEMBOURG 

and 

REMSEN 



Clara Owen's 

Style Shop 

and 

Tots & Teens Shop 

LeMars, Iowa 



( 






46 



The Remsen Public School 



^Some of the early records of the Remsen 

It school district apparently were lost 

atinuous records on hand at present in the 

Secretary O. H. Huewe date back only 

). However, there is a record of the first 

to graduate. This was m 1897 when four 

received diplomas — Henry Lindemann, 

B. Noethe, Edward Hoeck and Lucy E. 

ice then many have received their hon' 

gone forth into the worlds of commerce, 

re and the professions. 

first school building was a small frame 

which was wrecked by the tornado of 

Another frame building took its place, but 

pi the present brick structure, modern in 

i- respect, was erected. 

1900 the officers were; Theodore P. 
president; Nicholas Kass, secretary, and 
Spiecker, treasurer. Teachers that year in- 
i: John Vanderwicken as principal, and 
Kc»enig. Dell Conner, Anna Donahoe and 
Johnning. 

1902, Hubert Huewe was the new treas' 

the school district, and R. T. Scott joined 

ig staff as principal. The next school 

brought in Katie Neumann and Rosa 

as teachers and three school directors: 

Scott, John Groth and Charles Rosburg. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS 

1904, John Groth became president of the 
and new teachers added to the staff were 
Hays, principal, Emma Cook, Anna Kieffer. 
Drd was kept of 1905, but in 1906 the new 
C5 were William H. Branch, Mane Berg- 
and Dot Earnest. 

Ife-ectors of the school district in 1907 were 
\ GrC'Ch, Henry Ahmann, Theo. P. Scott, 
^ Rosburg and Peter Lauters. The teaching 
comprised of J. H. Wescoat, principal, 

i4ar>- Harnack, Anna Kieffer, Annie Dona- 

lid Dot L. Earnest. 

PRESIDENT SCOTT 

Dieodore P. Scott was president of the 
i district in 1908, and the rest of the staff 
ptd the same. In 1909, Theodore Moeller 
)r- Jastram joined the force of directors and 
Kth Schneider, Emma Lang, Eli2;abeth Kass 
iary Cocklin became the new teachers. 
laima Atkinson was added to the teaching 



staif in 1910, and 1911 brought several changes. 
Peter Arens and Frank Wengler were elected" di- 
rectors and Prof. F. E. Stamper, Maria Wiese, 
Emma Harms, Regina Wenner and Janet Grieve 
replaced the old teaching staff. New teachers in 
1911 were: Eva Wagner, Elizabeth Kass, Clara 
Homan, Mae Cocklin, Margueritte Ulrich and 
Alice Minten. 

NEW TEACHERS 

In the school year of 1912, Elsie Wilhges, 
May me McCoy, Lily Stort^ and Ahce Minten 
were new teachers. In 1913, C. J. Ahmann was 
elected new secretary of the district, and M. A 
Mieras elected treasurer. Directors that year were 
L. H^Harnack, Frank Wengler, Charles Rosburg 
and Peter Lauters. New teachers were fustice 
Georges and Flora Hewicker. 

George Ki-amer and Henry Feller began ser- 
vices as directors of the school board in 1914 
and the next year LiUian C. Kramer was added to 
the teaching staff. In 1916, M. H. NiggeHng was 
appointed treasurer of the school district to fill 
the resignation of M. A. Mieras. New teachers 
that year were Eleanor Niggehng, Marion Cool- 
ey and T. B. Ryan. 

1917 STAFF 

President of the school district in 1917 was 
F. A. Sievers, wliile Henry Feller became one of 
the directors. The teaching staff that year includ- 
ed: Gregory Edres, T. B. Ryan, LiUian C. Kram- 
er, Marian C. Cooley, I. K. Sweeney, Justine 
Georges, Mayme McCoy, Frances Hoffman. 

George W. Schroeder was elected president 
in 1918, and John A. Johnson was added to the 
staff of directors. The next year M. H. Niggehng 
resigned as treasurer and Frank Spiecker was ap- 
pointed to the position. U. J. Barbel served as 
superintendent that year, and Elsie Williges as 
principal. New teachers were Mattie Kollman- 
sperger, Mae E. Monnett, Catherine Whalen, 
Sylvia LukenbiUe, Edna Sorenson and Frances 
Hoffman. 

NEWCOMERS TO STAFF 

M. H. Niggehng continued to serve as treas- 
urer m 1920, and new teachers were Belle B. An- 
drews, Charline Shelp, Henriette C. Stemer, Ma- 
bel Schroder and Elta Santner. In 1921, B. R. 
Haroff, Irene Mathis, Delia Mulder, Ethel Schro- 



47 



FIRST TRUST 8c SAVINGS BANK 



Established 1887 



REMSEN. IOWA 




Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



48 



Mi5. Florence Keeton and Marcelinda Alesch 
t Bewcomers to the teaching staff. 
Dsectors in 1922 were: G. W. Schroder, L, 
Oman, Henry Feller, Peter Lauters and Chas. 
ben. Teachers included: E. W. Reading, sup- 
tendent: James W. Burns, Eli2,abeth Speidel, 
rf Schroder, Nelle CuUen, Marcelinda Alesch, 
I Schroder and Ruth Reily, teachers. 

PRESIDENT IN 1923 
Preadent of the school district m 1923 was 
.. "^iftram. New director was Frank Weng' 
- - . : -^Ilne Kramer, Adelaide Lloyd and Oliv^ 

- were amono the new teachers. In 1924 
ACS ''A\ Burns became superintendent of the 
"tZ-:- school, and Frank Whaley, Lillian Mc^ 

- d Edna Martini were newcomers to the 
. staff. 

7,--:ee new teachers — Elsie Knapp, Olivia 

Iter? and Helen Ocker — came to the Remsen 

1925, and were followed the next year 

- n Arnold and Grace Williams. A new 

:n 1927 was M. M. Griepenburg, while 

itr. .\nderson, Ella Moeller and Wilma Gun^ 

Iueere newcomers to sign teaching contracts. 
STAFF OF 1928 
Eh:. A. H. Jastram continued as president of 
district school board in 1928, and C. J. Ah' 
and M. H. Niggeling continued to perform 
duties as secretary and treasurer, respective- 
_-ectors that year were Dr. A. H. Jastram, 
_ Lauters, L. S. Homan, Henry Feller and M. 
Griepenburg. The teaching staff w^as com- 
of: J. W. Burns, superintendent; Lena 
iler.' Edith Anderson, Nelson Arnold, Ella 
, Olivia Lauters, Adelaide Lloyd and Wib 
Gunsell, teachers. 
f The staff remained the same m 1929, but m 
\0 two new directors— F. C. Stearns and Ed- 
td liovd came in, as did four new teachers: 
H^aret' Goodwin, Elizabeth AmHe, Ine2, Hauff 
lUiith Eichhorn. O. H. Huewe was elected 
retard' of the board in 19S1, and George C. 
lultz was appointed new principal. 
FURTHER CHANGES 
In 1932, Genevieve Ferris, Helen Hunter 
I Gladys Willenburg were added to the teach' 
r staff. No other changes were made until 1934 
len Dr. J. E. McGovern became a new director 
i Melva Zeller and Elizabeth Melson began 
ching. The next change came m 1936, when 
is^lia >vlansheim and Theda Jane Childs signed 
ar teaching contracts. 

In the school year of 1936''37, Principal Paul 
L Grier was added to the staff, as were Irene M. 

r "■ '"" "■ "■ 



Last school year Anne Bechtelheimer began 
teaching here and the rest of the staff remained 
the same. 

Dr. Jastram remained as president in 1938' 
39, O. H. Huewe as secretary and M. H. Nig- 
geling, treasurer. The teaching staff was: Super- 
intendent J. W. Burns, Principal Paul Grier and 
teachers RosaHa Mansheim, Dora Nykvist, Robert 
Mecklenburg, Irene Blount, Gladys Willenburg, 
Adelaide Lloyd and Anne Bechtelheimer. 

] 
PRESENT STAFF j 

After 23 consecutive years Dr. Jastram re 
mains president of the board of education; Mr. 
Huewe still is secretary and Mr. Niggling is the 
treasurer. All have given long and faithful set' 
vice. With Dr. Jastram as chairman are the the 
following board members; Edw. L. Lloyd, L. S. 
Homan, Harry Duggan and Elmer H. Holtgrewe. 
Present instructors are; Supt. Earl R. Steph- 
enson, Mrs. Thelma Walker, Paul Deist and Miss 
Marjorie Lang in the high school, and Mrs. 
Stephenson, Miss Eva Myers, Miss Dorothea 
Becker and Miss Mary Frances Murphy in the 
grades. 

Dora Boers, Mary Rose McCartan and Edna 
Landseidel joined the staif in 1940. The follow- 
ing year Mrs. Clifford Dorr taught to filL a va- 
cancy as she has done several times, always de- 
pendable and willing to help in an emergency. 
That year also brought Mr. and Mrs. Earl R. 
Stephenson to the school, the former as super- 
intendent. Others to join the staff in 1941 were 
Norma Jean Fuesler and M. A. Sargent. 

In 1942 the new teachers were Ginevra 
Mathey, Martha Seymour, Eva Myers, Dorothea 
Becker and Mrs. Stephenson, and in 1943 five 
new names appeared in the list as successors to 
as many who resigned — Pearl Simms, Lester Jen- 
kins, Mrs. Joe Hey, Jr., Tra F. Vail and Mrs. Omar 
Schmidt. 

In 1944 Miss Marge Lang accepted a high 
school position, as did Mrs. Thelma Walker, who 
formerly resided here and who returned to fill a 
vacancy while her husband served overseas in the 
army medical corps. This year, 1945, as successors 
to two of the 1944 stafF, Miss Mary Frances Mur^ 
phy and Paul Deist are included m the corps of 
instructors. 

The district has a modern brick school build- 
ing, is well equipped with up-to-date Home 
Economics and Science departments and a valuable 
library. The athletic department uses the muni- 
cipal gymnasium and boasts strong boys' and girls' 
basketball teams coached by Mr. Deist and Miss 
Myers, respectively. 



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50 



Saint Marfs School 



In 1887, even before the town of Remsen 

s mcorporated, St. Mary's was established. The 

isb. had been orgamz^ed six years earlier under 

leadership of Kev. J. Gilchrist, who Uved at 

rai5 and came to Remsen to take care of the 

irual needs of the people. Despite the fact that 

._ pioneer CathoUcs met with frequent revers- 

they tenaciously clung to their faith. Their 

church, three years after it was built, was 

_yed by a tornado. 

Undaunted, the parishioners immediately 

a new church under the direction of Rev. 

F. X. Schulte, who had succeeded Father 

;st and who became the first resident pastor. 

1887, one year after the dedication of this 

.^d church, which was somewhat larger than 

first, the first parochial school was opened. 

Thi? school consisted of one room directly 

the choir loft in the newly dedicated 

^■diurch. Drop doors, so devised that they might 
hooked up on Sunday, separated the body of 
__ church from the improvised school. Ingenuous 
carpenters contrived to turn church pews into 
de^ by attaching drop leaves to the hacks of 
^.^5. A table served as a teacher\s desk. Herman 
B.„jthe was engaged as teacher, and St. Mary's, 
Remsen 5 Cathohc school, had begun. The interest 
and enthusiam of the Catholics m the religious 
education of their children is evident from the fact 
that the enrollment for the first year was forty. 

FIRST SCHOOL BUILDING 

One year later, in 1888, a $4,000 school was 
erected. This building, which was 36x62x20 feet, 
stood north of the 
ste of the present 
sdiool. It consisted 
of two stories, four 
rooms on first floor, 
and four rooms on 
the second floor. 

The education of 
the children was 
then entrusted to 
the Sisters of Saint 
Francis, Dubuque, 
Iow*a. In September 
of that year three 
Sisters, Sister Mary 
Cc'lette, later the 
\fother General of 
the Order, Sister 
Mary AngeHna, and 




Sister Mary HumiHana took up their residence 
in the unoccupied rooms of the new school. Of 
these, the first two were the teachers, and the 
latter did the domestic work. Because of the large 
enrollment a third teacher, Sister Mary Blondina, 
was added to the staff after the Christmas holi- 
days. The course of study at this time included 
Religion, English, German, reading, arithmetic, 
civil government and drawing. Geography and 
United States history were soon added. 

The school was not graded. According to 
the prevailing ograniz^ation, a pupil remained in 
the first room until he had arrived at a certain 
age. He then automatically was promoted to the 
next room, where again he spent a specified time. 
When the pupil had attained the age of twelve 
or thirteen, the age at which he also received his 
first Holy Communion, he was graduated. 

CONVENT HOME 

The enrolknent of the school steadily in- 
creased and it soon became necessary to open more 
school rooms and to add to the faculty. This coiv 
dition necessitated the building of a home for the 
Sisters. Accordingly a nine-room convent was 
built south of the school This was connected to 
the school by a small passage way so that the 
Sisters could go to and from school without going 
out of doors. On the second floor a small chapel 
was provided for the Sisters. 

Then all the rooms in the school building 
were used for classes except two rooms on the 
second floor vv^hich were retained as dormitories 
for boarders. In September of the year 1902, 

Sister Mary Petro- 
n e 11 a ( Wienieke) 
introduced the ninth 
grade with a view 
of having pupils 
quahfy for a teach- 
er's certificate. The 
next year another 
grade was added. In 
the spring of 1904, 
three pupils, Elizia- 
beth Kass, Laura 
Bruecher, and Clem 
Ahmann,were grad- 
uated from the two' 
year high school 
course. 

In the fall of 1905 
another year was ad' 



ST. MARY'S CONVENT HOME 



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REMSEN, IOWA 



52 



|li£ school course and consequently in 1906 
e oo graduates. The firat class to be grad- 
(rom the three-year course were Regina 
pr, Dorothy Meinert, and Albert Kass. 

Mary De Chantal took charge of the 
dbool in September of 1907. Though there 
ftSi only twelve pupils and but one room 
teacher for the high school, she, never- 
15, introduced second year algebra and 
ry. It was not until 1910 that another 
\ and then only a part-time teacher, was 
d for high school. 

NEW BUILDING 

liter the original school had served the 
for twenty years, it was condemned as a 
3^. And again tlie people gave generously 
possible the erection of the present 
building, which occupies the south-west 
of the St. Mary's Church block. This build- 
a two'Stor)^ brick structure with, originally, 
SQms and a large hall on the second floor; 
5 and connecting wardrobes on the first 
and tw^o class rooms, a large dining room 
a^cben, boys' and girls' toilet rooms, and a 
boiler room in the basement. Not all the 
in the building were at once used ior school 
. but additional space was provided for the 
able growth of the enrollment. Two of the 
cm the second floor were used as dormi- 
for boarders. 
ai^tember of 1910 marked the opening of 
in the new building. This was a definite 
it»ward in the history of St. Mary's school. 
oew building provided book-cases for in- 
iti|; librar}^ and a science room was construct- 
the newly purchased $200 worth of 
be equipment. Previous to this, science equip- 
exisced practically only in name for the sum 
of such apparatus was a tall jar and an ex- 
^pump- — and these were the property of the 



» 



est was immediately aro;.ised in the ex- 
of the hbrary. The pupils took an active 
m the campaign for more books. Programs 
^x>nsored to raise funds, and one year the 
sdK)ol alone succeeded in collecting more 
$500 for book purchases. 
The course of study was again enlarged 
this memorable year. Physiology, botany, 
GJimomics were included. Since the fourth 
s added at this time, the class which would 
beoi graduated in 1910 was retained and 
iass of 1911 was the first to be graduated 
the neMt' schooL There were seven members 
dass: Mae Kelley, Elisabeth Nothem, 



Blanche Sudtelgte, Ida Sudtelgte, Justine Georges, 
Edward Brucher, and Henry Kass. 

Four years later, in 1915, home economics 
v^^as introduced. The following year bookkeeping 
and solid geometry were added. In 1918, through 
the influence of L. S. Ho man, one of the first 
parochial school graduates, arrangements were 
made with the Remsen public school for the 
junior boys of St. Mary's to enroll in manual 
training class at the public school, thus saving the 
expense ot dulpication of equipment and of 
teachers. 

A third teacher was added to the regular 
staff in 1920. The next year, Mr. Stephen Foster, 
State Superintendent and Inspector of Schools, 
visited the school with a view to accrediting. 
E.jUipment and classes were found satisfactory. 
The accrediting was delayed until the fourth year 
was added the follow- in g year. Mr. Foster urged 
parents as well as pupils who were finally con- 
vinced that all pupils must attend four years in 
order successfully to complete the high school 



course. 



AN ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOL 

The class of 1922 was the first, then, to be 
graduated by receiving credits which entitled them 
to enter any state institution of higher learning. 
Members of this privileged class were: Margaret 
Wictor, Gallista Ahmann, Monica Dalhoff, 
Ceceha Dickmann, Horence Greenen, Sybella 
Wellendorf, George Foxen, Clarence Groff, 
Clarence Offermann, and Edmund Treinen. 

By 1924 the enrollment had increased to 
such an extent that all the rooms in the building 
had been converted into school rooms. Each 
grade was taught in a separate room. Even the 
basement class room and the large hall had to be 
turned into school rooms. 

As the enrollment increased, and as the 
teaching load was also proportionally increased, 
an arrangement was made for the junior girls to 
enroll for home economics at the Remsen pubHc 
school. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In 1934 the first glee club was organiz^ed; the 
following year uniforms for the high school girls 
were introduced. 

The fourth high school teacher was employ- 
ed in 1933. Each year more equipment in the var- 
ious departments and more books were added. In 
1936 the libi-ary was reorganized. The same year 
the senior class of the high school pubHshed the 
first volume of St. Mary's Hi-Lite, the school 



53 



Greetings from 



DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

Distributors of . . 

OLD STYLE LAGER BEER 
Sioux City, Iowa 



Best Wishes from 

DON DISTRIBUTING CO, 

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218 Douglas St. 

Sioux City, Iowa 



54 



iL it was also during this year that the high 
|2 for the first time entered the diocesan 
li CGCtests in the declamatory and extenipc 
■£ divisions. 

In 1959 the high school was received into the 
y amd became a member of the DUCAM, 
union of all Catholic Action groups un- 
§aay. The first president of the High School 
ity was Ethel Kestel '39. hi 1941 the Sodab 
as best to the DUCAM m the annual spring 
Entacm which brought about 2000 sodalists 
EfliseD for a gathering in honor of the Blessed 

In 1940 crowded conditions made it nec' 
f to convert the school auditorium into class 
Is. Rt. Kev. Msgr. M. A. Scheme! planned 
directed the partitioning of the auditorium 
five rooms, two on the west and three on the 
I, with a corridor between. The north rooms 
ided a science laboratory, a classroom, and a 
iercial room furnished with fifteen type- 
S&, Remington and Royal; the west room, 
iw homeroom and a library. 
'With the introducticjn of commercial courses 
^40. a fifth teacher was added to the faculty. 

ATHLETICS 

. The athletic program of St. Mary's had ab 
fe been Hmited by lack of gym facihties. In 
JD the new Remsen Municipal Hall was made 
pable for St. Mary's pupils on alternate days 
week, and from then on basketball teams 
<kfiiute practice schedules. Rev. Father Fried^ 
present coach, Clarence Bunkers '26, Elmer 



Tremen "26, and Harold Weis are to be commend- 
ed for their efforts to build character through 
sports. 

The launching of a new project, the SM.H. 
Reporter, the school paper, was a marked achieve- 
s-ient of the year 1944-45. The girls enthusiasticab 
ly approved the change from the one-piece blue 
u-iiforrn to white blouses and jumpers. 

WHEN WAR CAME 

St. Mary's School took an active part in the 
war effort. The pupils sold bonds and stamps m 
school, the total sales purchasing a jeep and an 
ambulance. Eighty-seven of her graduates are 
enrolled in the armed forces. Richard Treinen '40, 
ube first St. Mary's alumnus to lose his life for 
his country, was killed in an air plane crash. The 
unly St. Mary's boy to die on a foreign battle 
front was Roman Kosse '42, who was killed m 
action February 1, 1945. The third causality was 
Walter Ruden '39, who was killed in an air 
plane crash before an assignment overseas. 

THE RECORD 

The record of the achievement of the people 
of St. Mary's parish in providing a CathoUc edu- 
cation for their children from the humble begin- 
ning m 1887 to the present day notes the gradua- 
tion of forty classes, the first being the class of 
1904. There have been 564 graduate, 359 girls 
and 205 boys, among whom are priests, sisters, 
an.d men and women in the various professions, 
each working in his own field for the greater 
honor and glory of God. 




55 



Greetings and Good Wishes from 

HENRY FALKE 

POWER FARM IMPLEMENTS 

THE ALUS-CHALMERS LINE 

FORD MOTOR CAR AGENCY 

REPAIRING AND OVERHAULING 



Member Town Council 22 Years 

During these years the town built its 

- — Municipal Electric System, Paved All 

Streets, Installed Water System and 

Sewage Disposal System 

Director Farmers Savings Bank 
32 Years 



Manager Remsen Tank Line 

Company 32 Years 

Present Office Headquarters 

Member Christ Lutheran Church 
41 Years 

Present Chairman of Board 



IN BUSINESS HERE 41 YEARS AND STILL OPERATING, AT 

Remsen, Iowa 



BEST WISHES 
FROM YOUR CO-OP 




56 




Remsen and Oyens 

SMilitary Honor Roll 



Alimann, Casmir 
i^hmann, Donald 
Alimann, LeRoy 
Arens, Melvin 
Arens, Oswald 

Baack, Ray 
Baker, Clarence 
Baker, Roscoe 
Baker, Victor 
Barthole, Jack 
Barthole, Ray 
Baime, Joe 
Beck, James 
Beck, Harry 
Beck, Herbert 
Beckman, Wm. 
Beelner, Roman 
Bellmyer, Milo 
BenUj Darrel 
Bents;, Floyd 
Bent2;, Kenneth 
Bent^;, Lester 
Bentiz;, Wm. 
Bloom, Gilbert 
Bock, Harold E. 
Bode, Carl 
Boever, Donald 
Boever, Maurice 
Bogh, Elmer 
Bohlke, Milo 
Bohnenkamp, Francis 
Bornhorst, Clarence 
Bornhorst, Sylvester 
Bottjen, Carl 
Brandes, Henry 
Bunkers, Cletus 



Bunkers, Roman 
Bunkers, U. H. 
Burns, James 
Busch, John 

Chancellor, Earl 
Christoffel, Henry 
Christoffel, Ray 
Christophersen, 

Henry 
Christophersen, D, 
Clark, Mike 
Colling, Carl 
Collins, Glen 
Cook, Clark 
Cronin, Lloyd 

De Lay, J. J. 
Delperdang, AL 
Delperdang, Cletus 
Delperdang, Kenneth 
Delperdang, Marion 
Delperdang, Merland 
Delperdang, Milton 
Delperdang, Wm. 
Diederich, Francis 
Diederich, Joe 
Diederich, Norman 
Diekman, Ralph 
Dominick, Joe 
Dorr, Eugene 
Dorr, Lewis 
Dorr, Martin 

Eisenbraun, Arnold 
Elvnig, J. G. 



Faber, Bob 
Faber, Lester 
Faber, Matthew 
Feller, Arnold 
Feller, Ray 
Foss, Dr. Robert 
Frank, E. H. 
Frank, Leander 
Frank, Valerius 
Frasch, Filmore 
Frederes, George 

Galigan, Wm. 
Galles, Louis 
Gapp, Robert 
Gengler, Al. 
Gengler, Chas. 
Gengler, Joe 
Gordon, John J. 
Gralf, Kenneth 
Grage, Raymond 
Gramke, Melvin 
Groepper, Harry 
Groff, Frank 
Guttner, Ray 

Haack, Chas. 
Haack, Donald 
Haack, Earl 
Haack, Ray 
Hagar, George Jr. 
Hames, LuVern 
Hanno, Loren 
Hansen, Leonard 
Hansen, Ray- 
Hanson, Ambrose 
Hanson, Roy 



Harnack, Bob 
Harnack, Kenneth 
Harnack, Ross 
Harvey, Floyd 
Hat2„ Paul 
Hat2;, Vernon 
Haverkamp, Albert 
Ha2;en, Robert 
Ha2,en, Vernon 
Hermes, Lester 
Holton, Emmet 
Homan, Bob 
Ho man, Gordon 
Horkey, Joe 
Hughes, Richard 
Hussey, Frank Jr. 

Jasper, Ray 
Jastram, Cecil 
Johnson, Harold 
Johnson, Robert 
Johnson, Walter 
[ohnston, Roy 
Juhl, Glen 
Juhl, Irvin 
Juhl, Lyle 
Junkers, Joe 

Kass, Joe 
Kahl, Edward 
Kahl, Henry 
Keene, Robert 
Kellen, Raymond 
Kellen, Robert 
Kellen, Victor 
Kelly, Eldon 
Kemp, Harold 



•*•*•*••***** 



I 




Remsen and Oyens 

iMilitary Honor Roll 



Kennedy, Wayne 
Kestel, Herald 
Kichoff, Levurne 
Kiefer, Eugene Jr. 
Kipp, Melvin 
Klein, Melvin 
Klein, Ray 
Kloster, Jack 
Kloster, Norman 
Kluvar, Marvin 
Koob, Fidelis 
Kramer, Wm. Jr. 
Kroeger, Elmer 
Krogmann, Ambrose 
Krogmann, Joe 
Kunkel, Richard 

Lang, Edward 
Lang, Paul 
Lang, Robert 
Lang, Wayne 
Langel, Clarence 
Lamberto, Donald 
Lamberto, Roman 
Larson, Nelson 
Lehnertz, Wally 
Letsche, Lee 
Letsche, LeRoy 
Loutsch, Elmer 
Louts ch, Vernon 
Ludwig, Alplionse 
Ludwig, Francis 
Ludwig, Gordon 
Ludwig, Roland 
Lund, Donald 

Mai, Donald 



Mai, Marvin 
Marquis, Vance 
Matgen, Richard 
VIcGovern, John 
McKay, Melvin 
Meyer, Milton 
Milfs, Merle 
Milts, Richard 
Miller, Leander 
Mitchell, Howard E. 
Moeller, Alfred Jr. 
Mortensen, Melvin 
MuUer, Bud 

Niehoff , PhilHp 
Niehus, Ed. 
Neihus, E. 
Neuenschwander, 

Bob 
Neuenschwander, 

Elmer 
Niggeling, Jim 
Niggeling, Tom 
Nit2,schke, Donald 
Nit2ischke, Elmer 
Nitzschke, Lloyd 
Nitzschke, Lester 
Nit^schke, Lyle 
Nit2,schke, Richard 
Nit^schke, Warren 
No them, Hubert 

Oberman, Lawrence 
Offer man, Donald 
Offerman, Francis 
Ohlendorf, 
Gleiiwood 



Ohlendorf, Don 
Opbroek, Arnold 
Ortmann, Joe 
Ortman, Roman 
Ott, Donald 

Parriott, Burton 
Parry, Marvin 
Paulson, Alfred 
Paulson, Paul 
Peters, Ralph 
Petersen, Alvin 
Peterson, Burwin 
Peterson, Farley 
Peterson, Woodrow 
Pfeifer, Ohver 
Phillips, Wallace 
Phillips, Wendell 
PhiUips, F. H. 
Pick, James 
Plathe, Jos. 
Porter, Dan 
Porter, D wight 
Presuhn, Chas. 
Petersen, Paul 

Raker, Paschel 
Raveling, Orville 
Recknagel, Orville 
Reichling, Leonard 
Richter, Elmer 
Ricke, Robert 
Roder, Jerome 
Rodesch, George 
Rosburg, Lyle 
Rub a, Mathias 
Roden, Sylvester 



Ruba, Norbert 
Reinholdt, Clarence 

Sanow, Harlan 
Sanow, Wayne 
Schefstad, Frank 
Schilt2;, Elmer 
Schilt^, Richard 
Schmidt, Omar 
Schmidt, Robert 
Schmidt, Richard 
Schmidt, Peter 
Schmit^,, Earl 
Schnepf, Ralph 
Schnieders, Bob 
Scholer, Anslem 
Schorg, Kenneth 
Schorg, Weldon 
Schorg, Lyle 
Schult2;, Leander 
Schult^, Robert 
Schumacher, Don 
Schut, John 
Schut, Ray 
Schuver, John 
Schroeder, L'vin 
Schwart2,, Chas. 
Shea, Gerald 
Schields, Ray 
Sievers, Linden 
Sievers, Ray 
Sit^mann, Kenneth 
Smith, James 
Staab, Andrew 
Staab, Irvin 
Staab, Richard 
Staab, Ralph 



••**•******* 




Remseii and Oyens 

^Military Honor Roll 



Steffen, C. C. 
Sl]eichen, Arnold 
Stdchen, Arthur 
Steichen, Francis 
S<:ellingwerf, Ed. 
Stoftel, Florian 
&offel, John 
Stoftel, Wm. 
Sroos, Jack 
Stoos, Jerome 
&OOS, Nick 
Sudtelgte, Earl 

Taylor, Clarence 
Theisen, Raphael 



Theisen, Elmer 
Thiel, Urban 
Thill, Leland 
Thill, Vernon 
Tiedemann, Eldon 
Treinen, Charles N. 
Treinen, Claude 
Treinen, Elmer 
Treinen, Francis 
Treinen, Henry 
Treinen, LeRoy 
Treinen, Louis 
Trit2,, Francis 
Trit5;, Joe 
Twenstrup, Dr. 



Vaske, Al. 

Waldschmitt, 

Raymond 
Walker, Dr. L. W. 
Weber, Leonard 
Weichbrodt, Ray 
Weiler, Duane 
Weiler, Gilbert 
Weiler, Stanley 
Weiler, Walter 
Wersinger, Art. 
Wersinger, Jos. 
Wess, Vernon 
Wictor, Gilbert 



Wiederholdt, Ray 
Wiederholdt, Vitus 
Wilberdnig, Emil 
Wilberding;, Joe 
Wilberdmg, Julian 
Wilberding, Vincent 
Willenburg, Arnold 
Witt, Leonard 
Witt, Ray 
Wolf, James 
Wurth', C. 
Wurth, Wm. 

Zimmer, Louis 



Oyens Military Honor Roll 



Bortscheller, Edward Hames, Orville 

Bornna, Roy Hames, Raphael 

Brandenburg, C. Hansen, Alfred 

Brandenburg, Hansen, Lawrence 

Lawrence Heuert^, Wilbur 



Delperdang, Ralph 
Doud, Vernon 

Gengler, John 
Goetzinger, Ray 



Kelly, Eldon 
Kelly, Ronald 

Lan2;endorf, John 
Larson, Niels 



Ludwig, Clarence 
Ludwig, Herbert 
Lutton, Dean 

Mohning, Arnold 
Mob n in g. Me rl an d 
Mulder, Magnus 
Niehus, Doyle 

Peppersack, Henry 
Perry, Clifford 



Petersen, Alvin 
Reistroffer, Donald 
Rollins, Virgil 
Ruden, Silvius 

Scheitler, Ray 
Seglem, Robert 
Sheehan, Leo 

Wagner, Donald 
Wurth, Louis 



NOTE- Tho foregoing list of World War II service men furnished through the cooperation of Picper 
Post No. 220 American Legion and Diekraann Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, of Remsen, Iowa 



■••*•*••*•••* 




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- from - 



THE FARMERS 
CO-OPERATIVE COMPANY 



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Remsen, Iowa 




ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 

Built in 1903-1903 



i \ 1H 




ST. 3IAKY'S PAROCHIAL SCHOOL 
Built in 1910 



57 



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Sioux City's Leading 
Distributors of 

HAY AND FEEDS 



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58 



St. Mary^s Church 



cne hi.mderd years after the close ol 
kV/anr.nar)^ war, St. Mary's church. Rem- 
present pastor is Rt. Rev. Msgr. M. A. 
vn^th Rev. Leander Friedman as assistant, 
beginnings under the leadership of the 
L J- Gildirist of Marcus, Iowa. The land, com-- 
a block, was purchased from the Iowa 
Company for $700, and the first church, 
building, was built in the spring oi 1882. 
dorch was destroyed by a cyclc/ne on June 
5. After its destruction work was almost 
:ely begun on a new church. 
. F. X. Schulte, assistant at St. Mary's 
Dubuque, Iowa, was appointed the iirst 
pastor of the struggling- St. Mary's parish 
fall of 1885. Services on Christmas of that 
e the first to be held in the newly-con- 
Kted but unfinished church. When the church 
fTDally completed the next spring, it was dedi- 
xL By that time the parish had increased to 
(Hie hundred famihes. 
An addition to the church, cc^nsisting o\ 
isepcs and sacristy, was built in 1891. In 1895, 
aeumatic pipe organ, having fourteen stops and 
pipes, was purchased from and installed by 
fem Schuelke and Company, Milwaukee, 
sa>nsin. This year, 1946, the organ will have 
red the parish fifty years. 

Since the parish grew rapidly, the lamilies 
obering about 200 at the turn ot the century, 
were considered for the building of a new 
ch, the present one. The following men were 
scanted members of the biLilding committee: 
F. X. Schulte, chairman; F. G. Meinert, 
surer; J. F. Kass, secretary; W. J. Kass, assist^ 
5ecretar>^ and Anton Wintx, G. H. Bunkers, 
Ep-h Reker, Peter Arens, Albert Mens en and 
ri Staab. 

Tlie architect, Guido Beck of Dubuque, sub- 
atEd the plans, which were approved by the 
negation. Work of the construction was be- 
in the summer of 1902 under the contractor, 
Tappendorf of Rock Island, Illinois. Rt. Rev. 
flip J. Garrigan, bishop of Sioux City, assisted 
many priests of the diocese, laid the corner- 
on April 21, 1903. 

The dedicaticin ceremony w^as held Septem- 
9, 1904. A Pontifical High Mass opened the 
emonies; Rev. Hoppmann of Ottumwa, Iowa, 
re the sermon. In the afternoon, Rt. Rev. J. 
iweback, bishop of LaCrosse, Wisconsin, per- 
med the dedication ceremony; Rev. W. Halpin 
Algona, Iowa, deHvered the sermon. 



The total cost of the church approached 
$56,000. The church, of brick construction, is 
152 feet long; 62 feet wide; 50 feet high with a 
tower 156 feet high. The transepts are 79 leet 
wide; the winter chapel is 60 by 70 by 12. 

Rev. F. X. Schuhe, the first resident pastor, 
resigned in 1923; Rev. A. A. Bausch, during 
whose pastorate St. Mary's convent w^as built, 
was administrator until 1925, when Rev. H. J. 
Schleier w^as appointed pastor. He served until his 
death on December 18, 1936. During his ministry, 
the present rectory was built, and the church was 
redecorated at a cost of $6,000. Rev. J. A. Roder 
was the next pastor, residing until November 17, 
1938. Rev. M. A. Schemel succeeded Father 
Koder. 

On September 17, 1940, St. Mary\s parish 
was honored by having its pastor raised to the 
rank of domestic prelate with the title of monsig- 
nor. Rt. Rev. Msgr. M. A. Schemel wnis one of 
the nine priests invested on the occasion. Monsig- 
nor Schemel continued the program of parish im- 
provement begun by his predecessors. The out- 
standin'7 improvement was made in the school, 
which was remodeled to accommodate the intro- 
duction of commercial courses in the CLirriciilum. 
The High School Sodality was established under 
the direction of Monsignor Schemel. 

The assistants to the pastor w4io have served 
here include: Father John Hein^elmeier, 1898- 
1903; Father Herman f. Dries, 1903-1904; Father 
Christopher Huelshorst, 1904-1907; Father Jo- 
seph D. Fisch, 1907-1913; Father John Thoenis- 
sen, 1913-1916; Father B. Loeffelhoh, 1916; Fa- 
ther George Theobald, 1916-1919; Father Joseph 
Underberg, 1919-1920; Father James B. Grete- 
man, 1920-1925; Father John Hausmann, 1925- 
1928; Father P. J. Mattes, 1928-1931; Father 
Wilham Bucholt^, 1931-1934: Father Edward 
Fandel, 1934-1940: and the present assistant. 
Father Leander Friedman, 1940- 

The present congregation, consisting of about 
400 families, includes approximately 2000 souls. 

The achievements of the Cathob'c people of 
Remsen can be expressed adequately in the woixls 
of Rev. Edward L. Curran, author of "Great 
Moments in Catholic History." He says, in part, 
diat the w^ealth of the Catholic church consists 
of items w^e should never forget — buildings erect- 
ed for the honor and glory of God; Catholic 
schools erected for the service of humanity; the 
voluntary donations and sacrifices of all individual 
Catholics. 



m 



Compliments of 



JOHN DEERE 
PLOW CO. 



Compliments of 



SHERMAN BROS 



SIOUX CITY 
IOWA 



L 



INSULATION 

Eagle Mineral Wool 



WEATHER STRIPPING 



The Gerkin Co. 

2100 - 4th Street 

Sioux City, Iowa 



THE 
SANITARY 
BAKERIES 

Furnish You the Finest 

Bakery Products 

Obtainable 



REMSEN 
ALTON, ORANGE CD 



60 



istory of Su PauVs Evangelical Lutheran Church 




ST. PAtX'S E\ ANGKT.IOAL LTJTHEKAN CHTTKCH 
REM SEN, IOWA 




REV. PAUL WTJEBBEN 



tol's Evangelical Lutheran congregation 
October 19, 1884, and was given 
Dk Deutsche Evangelische Lutherische 
Semeinde zu Remsen, Iowa. 

was the first Protestant organi2,ation in 



BUnaries for the organiz^ation had been 
rivals homes and in the old public school 
early as June 8, 1881. 

ter members of St. Paul's congregation 
ID Herbst, George Beck, John Stobeb 

Hekns, Frank Rave, Karl Schumacher, 
X, H. Morits, Fred Schmidt, Fred Stob- 
enr.- Thompson, Robert Jolefs, Harm 
pigen Bock, Glaus Sievers, Michael Schu- 
Waiiam Beck, Willram Thiesen, John 

George Roepke, George Tangeman, 
iruest," Jacob Wullstein, G. D. Morit^, 
Bfeaber, Henry Gaden, Peter Geiser, Carl 
;, Robert Bornstein, Glaus Ruehnen, H. 
, H. Harms, M. To2,ynka, and Carl 
L 

following pastors have sei'\'^ed the con- 
:Rev. Heinrich Bender, Rev. Drechsler, 



Rev. George Kredi, Rev. Hoepner, Rev. Dett- 
mann, Rev. Vehe, Rev. Dallmann, Rev. Ernst 
Birkner, Rev. E. H. Eilers, Rev. H. Jurgens, Rev. 
H. Reifschneider, Rev. Weichelt and the present 
pastor, Rev. Paul Wuebben. 

The first church building was erected in 
1888 and the present one in 1930. 

At the present time the congregation has a 
membership of 140 families, and for a number of 
years has been free of debt. 

St. PauFs congregation has four organi^a^ 
tions active in church affairs. The oldest is the 
Ladies Aid, organized in 1890. Then there are the 
Young People's League, the Senior choir and the 
Junior choir. 

St. Paul's celebrated its sixtieth anniversary 
on October 22, 1944. 

The present pastor, Rev. Wuebben, has been 
a minister of the church for the past 13 years. 

After 50 years of its existence the congrega-- 
tion was reincorporated under the name of St. 
Paubs Evangelical Lutheran Ghurch of Remsen. 



61 



Hearty Greetings and 

Best Wishes 

from 



REMSEN RECREATION CENTER 

—AND— 

THE AERO CLUB 



BOWLING -BAR SERVICE -GOOD FOOD 
Ray M. Tritz, Prop. 



Compliments of 

DR. W. P. KELSEY 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

GENERAL PRACTICE 
X-RAY — SURGERY 



REMSEN, IOWA 

Telephone^Offlce, 32-R2 — Residence, 32.R3 



62 



History of Christ Lutheran Church 



Ijodteran church services were conducted 
before the town was incorporated. 
years ago Trinity Lutheran Church, Ani' 
p, Cherokee county, was organi2;ed 
fewr years later its pastor, Rev. J. D. Hesse, 
to preach in Remsen. hi 1886, services were 
St t£e old Remsen public school house. Ah 
tibe old records now on hand are inccnn- 
ooe of the earliest documents of the church 
■ed which shows that on March 27, 1887 
_ -Ration was organi2,ed. For several years 
Hese continued to minister unto the people 
;benig assisted at times by the Lutheran pas-- 
LeKlars. In 1895, the congregation decided 
a church and to call a pastor of their own. 
one was laid in the fall of that year. 
the last Sunday in April, 1896, the church was 
licaced. The pastors conducting the dedication 
vices were Rev. J. D. Hesse, of Cherokee coun- 
and Rev. J. Horn of Germantown. 

INCORPORATED 

Incorporation papers were recorded by the 
agregation on May 1, 1896. The signers of the 

F ration were Messrs. John Harnack, Sr., 
Detlefs, George Ebrecht and Henry Sievers. 
PASTORS 

On the same day the first church building 
; dedicated, the first resident pastor, Rev. Mar- 
Brueggemann was installed. He continued his 
rorate here for two and one 'half years. Alter 
r. Brueggemann moved to Alma, hnva, the 
.gregation was without a pastor for a period 
years, but were again provided when, on 
10, 1902, Rev. Paul Brammer was instab 




Pastor Brammer remained here for tour years. 
then accepted a call to St. Ansgar, Iowa, 
ikh congregation he has been serving the 
St thirt>^'nine years. His successor here was Rev. 
A- Brauer who served the congregation 1906- 
>10. Other pastors were Rev. E. Kallsen, 1910- 
1; Rev. E. Starck, 19114913; Rev. I. P. Guen- 
1913-1919; Rev. F. Wahlers, 1919-1922. 
present pastor is Rev. A. Noack, who has 
been serving the congregation since October, 



22. 

A NEW CHURCH 

In 1927 the interior of the congregation's 
rst church building was greatly improved with 
Dew altar, pulpit and pipe organ, but as time 



went on the members of the congregation realised 
that It would need to be replaced with a new 
luulding. In July, 1941, the congregation decided 
Co build a new church. The building committee 
consisted of Rev. A. Noack and Messrs. Henry 
Falke, Fred Seel, Wm. G. Sievers, August Lricb- 
sen, A. D. Ohlendorf. Mr. Thorwald Thorson of 
Forest City was the architect. The last service held 
in the old church was on March 13, 1942. Three 
days later the building had been dismantled. 
The new church is'of brick, the roof is cov-^ 
ered with asbestos shingles of a combination of 
red colors. The seating capacity is 250. The 
church is 94 feet long, the nave is 29 feet and the 
rear 40 feet wide. The social room, kitchen, class 
ruom, and restrooms are all finished with glared 
tile. The church has a loud-speaker system, with 
microphones at the altar, pulpit, and lectern; two 
loud-speakers are in the nave and four in the 
basement. The cost of the building with furnish- 
ings is $25,000, which sum was paid in full shortly 
after the church was dedicated. The general con- 
tractor for the building was Mr. John Nemmers 
of LeMars, whose excellent workmanship is great- 
ly appreciated by the whole congregation. 

PARISH EDUCATION 

Since the very beginning the congregation 
has had a flourishing Sunday school, taught by 
teachers of many years of experience. The teaclv 
ers meet bi-monthly for lesson preparation and 
teacher training. All the children receive weekly 
or monthly magazines which give them Christ- 
ian reading in the homes. The Sunday school also 
has its own library with books for the various 
ages. The pastor gives a two-year course in Cate- 
chism and Bible study for the children, preparing 
them for communicant membership in the church. 
A junior and senior Bible class meets each Sunday 
morning making a more thorough study of the 
sacred Scriptures. Bible quizzes and Bible topic 
study are conducted in each meeting. Every home 
in the congregation receives the official paper of 
the Lutheran Church, the Lutheran Witness. 

SOCIETIES 

Sixty-five women of the congregation are the 
active membership of the Ladies' Aid. This organ- 
ization has doubled in size since the meetings are 
being held in the social room of the new church. 
The Ladies Aid, is true to its name, aiding not 
only its own members and the congregation, but 
also the work of the church at large by supporting 



6i 



Greetings from 

IOWA 

BAKING 

COMPANY 



SIOUX en Y 

IOWA 



Compliments of 

AUis-Chalmers 
Manufacturing 

Company 

■ 
SIOUX crry 

IOWA 



FALKE MOTOR CO., DEALER 
Remsen» Iowa 



Compliments of 



MEINERT PHARMACY 

1889-1945 
Third Generation in the Family 



Prescnpttons 
Fountain . • • Sundries 

m 

ANNA MEINERT, PROPRIETOR 

Registered Pharmacist 



64 



■«,«^ and institutions of charity and contrib' 
r to tbe Red Cross and other national welfare 

Thirty young people are members of the 
th League. They meet monthly for their topic 
JES, business, and recreation. 
A group of the young folks sing as a choir 
;«ry 5er\-ice. The robed choir members sing a 
Esssc^ial hymn and a selection at every worship 
linss do their part to beautify the church 
ices. 

S\lS'ODIGAL MEMBERSHIP 

The congregation has always been affiliated 
k the Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and 
r States. During its first years it received 
idy from the mission treasury of the Iowa 
net. The congregation supports very liberally 
work of the Church at large. During the first 

of this year it has remitted over $3,300 for 
various Missions of the Lutheran Church. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
DURING THE WAR 

\lany homes were directly affected by the 
. Thirt>^'eight members of the congregation 
Ttd the service of the nation. A military 



funeral and a memorial service were held for the 
two members who made the supreme sacrifice. At 
different times the congregation remembered 
their beloved absent ones with gift boxes. Each 
month the soldiers are receiving some message 
from the pastor's study. All changed addresses 
are reported weekly in the Sunday Bulletin. The 
soldiers' birthdays are made known in advance so 
that the membership may send greetings. Our 
Church's motto is, "They shall not march alone!" 
Many articles have been sent to veterans' 
hospitals. Baked goods were sent to service 
centers. Boxes of books were sent to prisoners of 
war camps. Hundreds of dollars were contributed 
to the Army and Navy Commission of the 
Lutheran Church for its work among the armed 
forces. Truck loads of salvaged paper have been 
gathered. These and many other special efforts 
were gladly rendered by the membership out of 
thankfulness for the priceless blessing of religious 
freedom in our beloved country. 

STATISTICS 

The present membership is S25 bapti2;ed 
persons, 200 of these are communicant members. 
The church record shouts that 668 were baptized, 
458 confirmed, 134 marriages were performed and 
216 persons buried. 




Our Hearty Good Wishes to 

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 

and Friends Everywhere 



DEALERS IN 



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FEEDS, MASHES, REMEDIES 
ARTIFICIAL ICE 



BUYERS OF 

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■ 

KELLEN PRODUCE 

Remsen 



66 



Christ Lutheran Church 




REV. A. NOACK 

Pastor Since 19^2 




THE INTERIOR 




B^JILT IN 1941 — 42 AT A COST OF $25,(HH».0(> 



m 



Compliments of 

DEDE BEVERAGE COMPANY 



BLUE RIBBON BEER 

AND 

GRAIN BELT BEER 



Sioux City, Iowa 

313 Jennings St. 



GREETINGS FROM 



RAY MITCHELL 



Distributor of Beer 



HAMM'S - SCHLITZ - FALSTAFF 



300 Court St. 

SIOUX CITY, IOWA 



68 



Court Joan of Arc- Catholic Daughters of America 




The national order ot the Catholic 
Daughters of America was founded in 
190^ by the Knights of Columbus, at 
Utica, N.Y. with a membership ol 60, 
From this nucleus we have grown to a mem-- 
bership of more than 200,000, established in 45 
states, Panama, Puerto Rico, Canada and Alaska. 
Our aim is the propagation and preservation 
of cur Holy Faith; the intensification of patrio- 
tism; the material, moral and intellectual develop- 
ment of Catholic womanhood, and the protection 
and well-being of our Catholic girls. We are also 
pledged to the dispensation of charity and the 
furtherance of Catholic charitable projects. 

Each unit maps out its own work, coiiimen- 
surate with the needs of the community in accord- 
ance with the scope outhned and the wishes ol the 
Reverend clergy. 

Court Joan of Arc, No. 3 31 3, of Remsen, 
Iowa, was organised in May, 1918, by a group ol 
26 members of the t)rder. The first reception was 
held on June 2 of that year, at which the 26 new 
members were admitted. The exemplification ol 
the ritual was carried out by the degree team ol 
Court Santa Maria, 179, of LeMars, Iowa, in 
which court the organi2,ers of the new court 
originally were members. 

Charter members are; Mrs. C. J. Ahmann, El- 
vira Alesch, Marcelinda Alesch, Matilda Alesch, 
Margaret Arens, Ceha Ahmann, Mrs. A. M. 
Beck, Olga Brucher, Mrs. Wm. Determan, Mrs. 
J. j. Determan, Mrs. F. B. Duster, Mrs. J. C. Esser, 
Lauretta Foxen, Justine Georges, Mrs. M. Goebel, 
Margaret Galles, Mrs. F. Lorge, Mrs. W. H. 
Hombach, Mrs. Frank J. Homan, Mrs. P. J. Ro- 
man, Mae Kelly, Mrs. M. Kennedy, Mrs. Orrin 
M. Kelly, Mrs. E. F. Kieffer, Mrs. John Keffeler, 
Elizabeth Lotz, Lillian Levins, Edith Lloyd, Mrs. J. 
Lot^, Mrs. T. S. List, Anna Meinert, Hildegard 
Meinert, Hedwig Meinert, Mrs. John McCoy, 
May me McCoy, Regina Nothem, Katherine No- 
them, Mrs. J. Nothem, Katherine Niggeling, Ber- 
tha Singer, Carrie Schnepl, Josephine Staab, 
Blanche Sudtelgte, Mrs. Nic Treinen, Mrs. C. 
Treinen, Marie Wagner, Gertrude Wagner, Susan 
Weiler, Leonora Wagner, Isabel Wendt, Lillian 
Wendt. 

Of these charter members the following still 
letain their membership: Margaret Arens, Mrs. J. 
Flynn, Mrs. A. M. Beck, Mrs. F. Duster, Mrs. J. 
C. Esser, Lauretta Foxen, Mrs. M. Goebel, Mrs, 
Gordon Garvin, Mrs. F. Lorge, Mrs. P. J. Homan 
Mrs. M. Kennedy, Mrs. E. F. Kieffer, Mrs. John 
Keffeler, Edith Lloyd, Anna Meinert, Mrs. May- 



me Polar, Mrs. M. Peters, Katherine Nothem, 
Mrs. j. Nothem, Carrie Schnepf, Mrs. L. Alilers, 
Mi-s. N. Treinen, Marie Wagner, Mrs. O. H. 
Huewe and Mrs. E. Lloyd. 

Since organi2,ation approximately $10,000 
has been contributed to charity and benevolences. 
Ol this amount $3,000 was contributed to St. 
Mary's parish of Remsen. Our project was the 
complete furnishing of the convent chapel. The 
sum of $5,176 was paid in aid to young men 
studying for the priesthood. Other recipients in- 
clude local needy families, victnns of national 
disasters, home and foreign missions, the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, cancer and tuberculosis institu- 
tions, the March of Dimes, war funds, chaplain 
funds, orphanages, schools and colleges. 

Breakfast is served to approximately 250 
children of St. Mary's parochial school on the first 
Friday of each month. 

Members have been active in national de- 
fense and other war activities, namely: Home 
nursing and first aid courses, assisting in Red 
Cross and U. S. O. drives, serving on the Emerg- 
ency Food and Housing conunittee, Emergency 
Drivers committee, ration boards, and Red Cross 
sewing and knitting. 

Cord rosaries were made for men in the serv- 
ice, and prayer books, medals and cash lor chap- 
lains" aid were contributed. 

The members, now numbering 278, may be 
counted on as leaders in community affairs 
whether merely local or in cooperation with 
national projects. 

Two members of Court Joan of Arc, Mrs. 
A. M. Beck and Mrs. Orrin M. Kelly, have rep- 
resented the court in national conventions of the 
order, the former at Atlantic City, N. J., the lat- 
ter at Washington, D. C, and Marie Dalhoff 
represented the court at the Eucharistic Congress 
in New Orleans. 

Although primarily a charitable organi2,ation, 
the order pays a mortuary benefit of $25 to $100, 
according to the length of membership. 

Present officers of Court Joan of Arc are: 
Grand regent, Mrs. A. M. Beck: vice grand reg- 
ent, Mrs. S. M. Fideler; prophetess, Mrs. Ben 
Sudtelgte; lecturer, Joan Ludwig; financial secre- 
tary, Mrs. John Ritz, Sr.; treasurer, Lauretta 
Foxen; historian, Mrs. Louis Zimmer; monitor, 
Caroline Zigrang; organist, Mrs. Edw. L. Lloyd; 
sentinel, Mrs. J. Schiltz,; trustees, Mrs. Anna Fa- 
ber, Mrs. J. T. Schultz, Mrs. J. Watgen, Marie 
Wagner, Mrs. O. H. Huewe, Mrs. E. F. Kieffer; 
chaplain, the Rt. Rev. Msgr. M. A. Schemel. 



69 



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SEEDS 

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BABY CHICKS 



314 Fourth Street 

SIOUX CITY, IOWA 




Piiley's Prices Please Producers 

■ 

Sell Your 
Cream, Eggs and Poultry 



_TO— 



Verne Kellen, Remsen, Iowa 
Farmers Elevator, Remsen, Iowa 



70 



Pieper Post No. 220— The American Legion 



p^' 



Pieper Post, No. 220, of Rem- 
sen was formally organi2,ed Oct. 
4. 1919. 

The leadership of Gapt. Ed' 
ward J. Brucher was largely re- 
sponsible for the organisation of 
the local post at that time, and 
in recognition of his valued serv 
ices, the members unanimously 
chose Gapt. Brucher as their 
first commander. 

Pieper Post was named after 
W'iUiam Pieper, member of a 
pioneer Remsen family and one 
of the first lads to enlist after 
America's entrance in the World 
War. He was a member of the 
168th Infantry, 42nd (Rain- 
bow) Division, and fell in action 
before the terrible barrage at 
Chateau-Thierry, on July 19, 
1918. 

One of the outstanding achievements was the 

building of their Legion Home in 19^1 at a cost 
of $5000. The building is a handsome, one-story 
structure with full basement. 

Among the public enterprises that the post 
has taken part in, was the organisation and main- 




WILLIAM 

For whom Pieper 



tenance of Junior Baseball clubs 
up to World War II, a juvenile 
drill corps under the captaincy 
of Dave Gook, an Americanism 
school for ahens, actively sup- 
porting Boys' State by sending 
boys to camp annually and vari- 
ous community service activities. 

In 1935, 1938 and in 1941, 
the post was ht)st to the Ninth 
District Convention here. 

The present membership of 
Pieper Post is 98, and it is one of 
the most active posts in the 
state for its si2,e. Officers elected 
in June were: Aloy Pick, com- 
mander; Joe Bohnenkamp, vice 
commander; Joe N. Beck, ad- 
jutant. 

John Harnack, finance officer; 
John Theisen, chaplain; Anth- 
ony Strehl, historian; Nick Mai, 
sergeant-at-arms. Members of the executive com- 

mittee are: V. N. Delperckng;, Nick Hatz, S. M. 
Fideler, Ted Kobberman and Richard Staab . 
Charles Wilberding is chairman of the graves 
registration committee and O. H. Huewe is the 
service officer. 



PIEPER 

Post was named 



MEMBERS 



World War I 

Lawrence Ahlers 
Fred Arens 
John T. Arens 
Joe N. Beck 
Wm. Bcnjegerde.s 
Joe Bohnenkamp 
Herman Bo ever 
Wm. Dawson 
Math Diederieh 
Gene Diers 
V. X. Delpcrdang 
Harm Dirks 
John Engelbrecht 
A. J. Emstei' 
Gus Feller 
S. M. Fideler 
Nick Frank 
John P. Gengler 
Adolph Haack 



Claus Haack 
John Harnack 
Jim Harm an 
Nick Hatz 
Claire Haye 
Frank He wicker 
O. H. Plucwe 
F, J. Hussey 
F. W. Horkey 
Enoch Johnson 
Herman Johnson 
Walter Lang 
Frank Lcnertz 
F. L. Lloyd 
Jolin Long 
John Maass 
Nick Mai 
Carl Marquard 
Marcel MaLgen 
M. M. Milfs 
Ferd Moeller 
Niels Mortensen 




F. A. Mylan 
C. M. Myers 
M. II. Niggeling 
Otto Nitzschke 
Elmer Ohlendorl 
Walter Ortmann 
Aloy Pick 
Albert Rciners 
John Ro den hour 
Henry Rolfes 
Anthony Strehl 
John Sanny 
Frank Scholer 
Lawrence Shea 
Charles Siefke 
John L. Scharff 
Emil Staab 
Fred A. Steffen 
John Sehuctiard 
E. R. Stephenson 
Emil Schermer 
John Theisen 



Pieper Post No, 220 



Oscar Tregoning 
Frank Thiel 
Ben Vcldhuis 
Charles Wilberding 
Charles Wulf 
Victor Wolff 
E. E. Wilson 
John Wenthold 



World War 1 8C 11 



Dave Cook 
Wm. F. Pratt 



World War H 

Friedland Bohlke 
Roy L. Bentz 
Ray P. Baack 



Thomas E. Davv.son 
Frank Grelen 
Cletus Hansen 
Henry H. A. Hansen 
Roy H. G. Hansen 
Ross Harnack 
Ted Kobberman 
Al Kenkel 
Joe J. Kelly 
Roland LctsciiG 
Chas. E. Manning 
Aloy.-rius Masuen 
Wm. H. Milfs 
Elmer T. NitzscJike 
Burton Parriott 
Wallace H. Phillips 
Wendell F. Phillips 
Earl G. Peters 
John Rodesch 
Ricliard Staab 
Henry A. Treinen 
JohnWaldschmitt 



Why You Should Be a Member of 




The American Legion can and will do many things for you. You will be represent- 
ed by the Legion's National Rehabilitation, Employment, Legislative and Veterans' Pre- 
ference committee at Washington, D. C. You will be kept informed of your rights and 
privileges under all federal legislation of benefit to the veteran. You will be able to turn 
to your local post for help at any time. 

All through the years the Legion has battled for proper legislation to take care 
of veterans and their dependents. 

The American Legion is the largest Veterans' Organization in 

the history of the world. 

In connection with World War 11 veterans' legislation, the Legislative committee 
has worked on almost every congressional bill affecting them. We have seen our efforts 
rewarded with the enactment of the following laws providing benefits for them: 

The Xational Service liile Insurance Act of 1940 and beneficial amentlments thereto. 

The Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act of 1940. 

Six Months' Gratuity benefits for dependents of all officers and enlisted men. 

The pajTiient of compensation at various wartime rates for the disabled in line of duty. 

Free postage to members in the armed forces while on active duty. 

The pay readjustment act of 1.943. 

The family alIo\\ance act for dependents of enlisted men of the armed forces. 

Hospitalization, domiciliary care and burial benefits for World War II veterans. 

Vocational rehabilitation for veterans of World War II who incur permanent 

disabilities. 

AKD MANY OTHEKS , 

The legislative program of the American Legion will continue to 
be geared to the needs of the Veterans of World War II. 

CHILD WELFARE. The American Le^on has had a progfram of Child Welfare 
since 1935. Since its establishment, 5,900,00 children have been rendered aid and 
service at a cost of $50,000,000.00. Ninety per cent of the children were \^ith 
their own mothers in their own family homes. The Legion also has a .'^5,000,000.00 
endowment fund, interest of which is used to i>ay a portion of the cost of the CliiUl 
and Kehabilitation work. 

Throuffhout the nation the physical properties and investments, such as 
buildings, furnishings, equipment, investments in govermuent War Bonds represent 
more than ,1>65,000,000.00. 

PIEPEK POST owns its own well equipped home. Plans for enlarging the pres- 
ent facilities will wait until returning AVorht War II veteranis can present their ideas 
for a larger and better Legion home. 

Pieper Post No. 220 The American Legion 



72 



American Legion Auxiliary 




Pieper Post No. 220, American Legion Auxiliary, was organi2;ed 
May 9, 1921, with Mrs. Lucie A. Lloyd as the first president. When the 
charter was granted May 8, 1922, there were 49 charter members. 

Present membership is 108. Of these, twenty 'two are Twenty 'Five 
Year members, ehgible for the Twenty-Five Year service pin. 

The unit conducts an annual health program in the community. 
In addition, members engage in Red Cross work and in the sale of Christ' 
mas seals and bonds and stamps. 

Present officers are: 

President, Mrs. Enoch Johnson 

First Vice President, Mrs. A. H. Jastram 

Second Vice President, Mrs. O. H. Nit^schke 

Secretary, Mrs. Edwin Holtgrewe 

Treasurer, Mrs. S. B. Johnson 

Chaplain, Mrs. O. H. Huewe 

Historian, Mrs. M. R. Faber 

Sergeant'at-Arms, Mrs. John Engelbrecht 

Music Chairman, Mrs. S. M. Fideler 

Plymouth County President, Mrs. Edwin Holtgrewe 



7^ 



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i 



74 



Veterans of Foreign Wars Have Active Organizations 




Diekmann Post V. F. W. 

Among the civic and fraternal organi2;ations 
that flourish in Remsen is that of the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, which has an active history. 

Joseph B. Diekmann Post, No. 3328, 
\'. F. W., of Remsen, was organised here by 
Dept. Commander E. R. Crane during the winter 
of 1954'35. 

On June 11, 1935, the post was instituted 
with the^ttendance of members from posts in 
various towns throughout the Eighth district. 

The first commander. Marcel Matgen, Sr., 
vvas chosen unanimously because of his part in 
organizing the post, which flourished from the 
%'ery beginning. 

The post was named after Joseph B. Diek- 
mann, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Diek- 
mann, pioneers in the farming community adja' 
cent to Remsen. Joseph Diekmann passed away 
while in the service and during the influensia 
epidemic that raged through the country during 
World War I. He was a member of the 88th di- 
vision, with service in England and France. 

Diekmann post takes a lead in all patriotic 
celebrations and anniversaries and several times 
has been host to county and district conventions. 
Its members are particularly interested in welfare 
work, veterans' rehabilitation and works for the 
benefit of disabled veterans in the government 
hospitals of Iowa. 

Present officers of Diekmann post are: 

Commander, E. E. Nelson (LeMars) . 
Senior Yice Commander, John Sanny. 
Junior Vice Commander, joe Bohnenkamp. 
Quartermaster, Milo C. Bellmyer. 
Adjutant, Aloy S. Pick. 
Chaplain, C. Langendorfer (LeMars). 
Officer of the Day, Carl Baertling (Marcus). 
Service Officer, Math. Diederich. 
Trustees — Herman Boever, John Sanny, 
Nick H. Hats;. 




Diekmann Post Auxiliary 

The auxiliary to Diekmann post was organ- 
ised September 10, 1935, under authority issued 
to Mrs. Gus. Brosalis of Cherokee, by the national 
president. 

First officers were: President, Mrs. ^Enoch 
Johnson; senior vice president, Mrs. Aloy S. Pick; 
junior vice president, Mrs. Gene Diers; chaplain, 
Mrs. Otto H. Nitzischke; guard, Mrs. Math. Died- 
erich and conductress, Mrs. Earl Hanno. 

The organij;ation is active in all projects 
helpful to Diekmann post, sponsors the essay con- 
test each year, works for the comfort and rehabili- 
tation of veterans and has taken an active part in 
many local civic projects. 

Present officers of Diekmann post Auxiliary 

President, Mrs. S. M. Fideler. 

Senior Vice President, Mrs. Wm. Colling. 

Junior Vice President, Mrs. O. H. Nit^schke. 

Treasurer, Mrs. A. S. Pick. 

Secretary, Miss Mary Ann Gramke. 

Chaplain, Mrs. Clara Bjork. 

Patriotic Instructor, Mrs. John M. Kennedy. 

Guard, Mrs. Math. Diederich. 

Musician, Miss Edna Mae Fideler. 

Conductress, Miss Margaret Diederich. 

Flag Bearer, Mrs. Earl L. Hanno. 

Banner Bearer, Mrs. Herman Boever. 

Color Bearers— Mrs. Anton Schilts, Mrs. 

John Haack, Mrs. Gilbert Blum and 

Miss Sally Theisen. 



are: 



75 



Our Kindest Wishes 

for the Future Welfare of 

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 



SIOUX CITY STOCK YARDS 

THE GREAT MIDWEST MARKET 

Sioux City, Iowa 



4 



76 



Remsen Municipal Utilities 



Any accomplish' 
ment that requires 
skill, unceasing 
labor, and a devo-- 
tion to community 
welfare, is usually 
pri2;ed very highly 
when the objective 
is reached. This can 
be said of the muu' 
icipal electric light 
and power plant in 
Remsen. 




MUNICIPAL ELECTRIC PLAJST 



had town officials 
like J. F. Gamerdin' 
tTer, Nicholas Hats, 
Mic h a e 1 Brucher, 
Henry Falke, John 
Ahmann, and Fred 
T. Philhps, who, 
w^hen they believed 
they were right, had 
the determination 
and courage to fight 
until the last obsta' 
cle was overcome. 



Some difference of opinicjn exists as to what 
brought about the agitation for a municipally 
owned plant. Apparently it was due primarily to 
the expenditure of over $2,500 annually for light- 
ing the streets of Remsen and the unsuccessful 
attempt of the council to obtain a reduction in 
rates. 

The matter was frequently discussed at board 
meetings; the council obtained information from 
various towns and it appeared that the only 
solution to a reduced cost of maintaining an 
adequate all-night street lighting system was the 
installation of a municipal plant. Data from 
municipally owned plants was obtained and the 
mayor and councilmen personally inspected many 
of these plants, interviewed town officials, ascer- 
tainmg the costs of plants, operating expenses, 
income and profits. 

After fully satisfying themselves of the advi' 
sability of such a move, they discussed the propc 
sition with many of the citizens of Remsen and re- 
ceived almost unanimous endorsement of their 
proposed plans. Legal counsel and an engineer 
were employed and a special election was held 
on Sept. 3, 19M, at which the electors voted 
upon a proposition to establish and erect a munici- 
pal electric light and power plant and the issuing 
of $75,000 in bonds to cover the cost of same. 

The power company then serving Remsen 
vigorously opposed the plans of the town council 
and until the Supreme Court of Iowa approved 
the legality of the election and the bond issue, 
left no stone unturned to obstruct every move 
made by the council and in every way hinder and 
delay the construction of the plant. The electors 
endorsed the judgment of the council by carry 
ing the election by a vote of 456 to 130. It was 
an accomplishment during the depression period 
for any municipaHty to vote a bond issue. 

It was very fortunate for Remsen to have 



The plant was constructed in 1933 and the 
lines were energised at Christmas time of that 
year. Originally the power units consisted of a 
three and four cylinder Diesel engine of a rated 
H. P. of 240 and 320 respectively. R. W. Stroh- 
meier, the foreman of the construction work for 
the contractor, w^as employed by the council as 
superintendent of the plant, with E. H. Holtgrewe 
and Norbert Ahmann as operators. The plant was 
a success from the start and during the first year 
of operation generated 418,660 K.W. The load 
has shown a consistent increase and since the fiscal 
year of 1940 has exceeded an annual output of 
over 1,000,000 K.W. 

THEN EXPAND 

As the load of the plant increased it soon 
became apparent that additional standby power 
was necessary and in 1938 the building was ah 
tered, and improved equipment and an additional 
SIX cylinder Diesel engine of a rated H. P. of 450 
were installed. Revenue bonds to the extent of 
$30,800 were sold to match a 45 pet. WPA grant. 

In 1935 a special election was held placing 
the light plant and the w^ater system under the 
direct management of a board of trustees op-- 
crating as provided under a sectic^n of the Code of 
low^a. Upon placing the municipal utilities under 
trusteeship it was deemed advisable to employ 
an all-time clerk. George Wess has served in this 
capacity continuously, acting not only as clerk 
for the council and also for the board of trustees, 
but efficiently has rendered a varied municipal 
service to the public in general. 
PERSONNEL 

Personnel of the Municipal Utilities are: 
Trustees — Nicholas Hatz, chair m. an, Otmar H. 
Huewe, and W. G. Sievers. E. H. Holtgrewe is 
plant superintendent, with John Wiebersch, Al 
Zeimen, John Zimmerman and Frederick Schmidt 
as operators, and George Wess, clerk of the board. 



COUNCIL OAK STORE 

LeMars, Iowa 



"Your Friend at Mealtime" 



A SAFE WAY TO SAVE 



Farmers Lumber 8C Supply Co 



STOCKYARDS DISTRICT 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Phone 5-7601 



LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL 
STOCK RACKS AND TRAILERS 

GENERAL FARM STORE 
FEEDS AND RIVERSIDE TIRES 



78 



LIONS CLUB 




Affiliated with Lions International is the Remsen Lions Club, 
organised six years ago and which meets the first and third Tuesdays of 
each month. 

Meetings are held in the evening with dinner followed by a 
business session. The Lions are interested in civic improvement and deve- 
lopment and, to the extent of their abiHty as a group, support all worthy 
enterprises that tend toward the betterment of the community. 

An annual project sponsored by this active group is an ice skat- 
ing rink, using the baseball diamond, and besides an excellent skating surface 
the Lions supply a warming shack, electric lighting and chaperonage. In the 
project they are supported by the town council which grants them the use 
of the ball park; donates the water and the lighting. 

Throughout the war the Lions have had as their dinner guests, 
servicemen home on leave or furlough, also those recently discharged. 

Present officers of the Remsen Lions club are: 

President, Clifford A. Dorr. 

First Vice President, E. H. Holtgrewe 

Second Vice President, W. P. Kelsey. 

Third Vice President, E. R. Stephenson. 

Immediate Past President, Burton Parriott. 

Past President, A. M. Beck. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Marcel W. Matgen. 

Lion Tamer, Jos. V. Fisch. 

Tail Twister, Roman Groff . 

Directors — J. W. Zimmerman, E. F. Kieffer, Robert Schumacher. 



m 



AMERICAN RED CROSS 




Assisting in all emergency relief work for the American Red 
Gross Society is the Remsen branch of the Plymouth county chapter, or- 
iTanized in 1918. 

The Remsen branch has given aid to numerous local families 
in financial distress but its major project to date came along with the fire 
uf July 4, 19?i6, when property in the amount of a half million dollars was 
destroyed. A number of local families were left homeless and in need of 
clothing. The national organisation sent a representative to direct the 
emergency relief work and the local branch footed the emergency bills. 

The branch maintains a sewing and a knitting department head- 
ed by Mrs. Edwin lioltgrewe and Mrs. Clarence Frank, respectively. 

Among the half do^en branches in Plymouth county, the Remsen 
branch has always been, and still is, the strongest, financially. 

Officers are; 

President, Dr. A. H. Jastram. 
Vice President, E. F. Kieffer. 
Secretary, John A. Ulveling. 
Treasurer, M. H. Niggehng. 
Home Service Officer, N. B. Homan. 

Directors— Mrs. Holtgrewe, E. H. Spiecker, John Keffeler, 
M. M. Griepenburg, Burton Parriott. 



m 



We Write All Kinds of Insurance 

More than thirty years in business in 
Remsen is your guarantee that we can 
give you the best at lowest rates and 
can handle your losses efficiently. 

M. M. GRIEPENBURG 

NOTHING BUT INSURANCE 

RemseUj Iowa 

Office Telephone, 62 Residence Telephone, 295 



GET EXTRA ENERGY 

—with— 

Energy - Charged 

WONDER BREAD 

No Big Holes, Ever 



80 



Greetings from 



SIOUX CITY BOTTLING WORKS 



HIRES ROOT BEER 
BLATZ BEER 
CLICQUOT CLUB 
ORANGE CRUSH 
DR. PEPPER 



1501 East Fourth Street 



SIOUX CITY, IOWA 



82 



in Ml^tnotmm 




Sgt. John W. Lanzenaoff, USMCR 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. George Lan2;endorf of 

Ovens 

Born at Oyens Nov. 22, 1923 

Killed in action July 7, 1944, on Saipan 

Sgt. Alp hone T. Ludwig, Infantry 
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Ludwig 
Born at Remsen, April 12, 1916 
Killed in action, Sept. 12, 1944, in France 

Lieut. Richard J. Treinen, Army Air Force 
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Treinen 
Born at Remsen March 31, 1923 
Killed in plane crash January 20, 1945, at 
Redmond Army Air Base, Oregon 

Pvt. Roman Leo Kosse, Army 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kosse 
Born at Remsen, April 28, 1924 

Killed in action February 1, 1945, in France 

Pfc. Leland P. Letsche, Infantry 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Letsche 

Born on Farm in Cherokee County March 5, 

1918 

Killed in action April 28, 1944, 

An2;io Beachhead, Italy 

Eilert Seggermann, Navy 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Harm Seggermann 

Born at Remsen Febiaiary 8, 1918 

Lost in action March 3, 1943, in Greenland 



Donald Harnack, Army Air Force 
Son of Mr. and Mrs, John Harnack 
Born at Remsen, December 13, 1921 
Killed m plane crash March 10, 1943, 
at Thunderbird Field, Phoenix, Arisiona 

T/Sgt. Laurence J. Brandenburg, Army Air Force 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. George Brandenburg 

Age 25 Years 

Lost in aerial action over Germany, April, 1943 

Sgt. Vernon E. Miller, Army Air Force 
Son of Mrs. Tina Miller 
Born at Remsen May 29, 1920 
Killed in plane crash in California, 
January 19, 1944 

Second Lieut. Edmund Rohde, Army Air Force 
Son of Mrs. Alma Rohde 
Born at Remsen September 30, 1921 
Lost in aerial action over Germany 
October 6, 1944 

Pfc. Frank P. Lanners, Army 

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lanners 

Born at Remsen January 6, 1918 

Killed in action July 12, 1943, in North Africa 

T /Sgt. Raymond Kohnke, Army 
Son of Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Kohnke 
Born at Remsen January 20, 1914 
Killed in action at Corregidor March 26, 1943 



Pfc. John Stoos, Jr., Coast Artillery 
Son of John Stoos, Sr. 
Born at Remsen, June 16, 1912 
Killed in action on Corregidor, May 6, 



1942 




m 



Twenty-Seven Years of Service 

Volume is the Key to the Success of Any Business 



The nearly ^1,000,000 in dividends paid in the past twenty -six years 
to members, speaks for our volume. 

We have a highly specialized sales force. Each class of every 
species of livestock is sold by men of long experience. 

Farmers Union Live Stock Commission 

SIOUX CITY 11, IOWA 

8-2292 




84 



— "°" 



^Bt^^BBS 




War Veterans 
Buried in Remsen Cemeteries 



'% 




CIVIL WAR 

Wilhelm Long 
Wilhelm Sievers 
Nicholas Becker 
Theodore Paskert 



SPANISH 
AMERICAN WAR 

Louis Schmit2; 
Albert Moser 



WORLD WAR I 

William Pieper 
Albert Fromme 
Charles Schnepf 
Peter Osip 
Peter Kirpes 
Nick Glemmens 
Joseph Wagner 
Joseph Fideler 
Fred Thiel 
Carl Bock 
Albert Koerner 
Louis Reinholdt 
Aloys Nothem 
Roland Went2, 
Joseph Diekman 



WORLD WAR n 

Silas Rit^ 
Donald Harnack 
Vernon Miller 
Richard Treinen 



85 



] 

Our Best Wishes 

SIOUX CITY 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

Distributors of 

Storz Gold Crest Beer 

Sioux City, Iowa 



Compliments of 

TRITZ CATTLE COMPANY 

RAY M. TRITZ GORDON TRITZ 

Remsen, Iowa 

Dealers in 

LIVE STOCK 



Weekly Auction Sales 

Tuesday Nights, Thursday Afternoons 

A WESTERN MARKET IN THE CORN BELT 



86 



OyenS"'A Good Neighbor 



Closely linked with the history of Remsen is 
the town of Oyens, population 100, located four 
miles to the west. For numerous former Remsen 
people now make up the population of that thriv 
ing httle town, and always there has existed a 
friendly spirit between the two. 

The town of Oyens is considerably older 
than Remsen in years, although not as old as an 
incorporated unit. The first settlers of that conv 
munit)^ appeared there in the late sixties when the 
present site of Remsen still was an unbroken 
prairie. 

The settlement of Oyens thrived for years 
without town caxlinances, the movements of its 
people guided by federal, state and county town- 
ship laws and regulations. Not until 1909 was the 
town incorporated. The first settlers were govern- 
ed in their location under the Homestead laws en- 
acted during Abraham Lincoln's presidency, 

EARLY SETTLERS OF OYENS 

Among those recalled as early settlers around 
Oyens are David Baldwin, who settled in now 
Fredonia township, one mile west and three miles 
north of Oyens. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin were the 
parents of Fred, Walter, Herbert and Laura, all 
well known among present day residents. Mr. and 
Mrs. John Tovey came also in the late 60's, set- 
tling one mile west and two rniles north of the 
village. 

The only original homestead house to be 
found today in Oyens territory is that erected in 
ihe early 60's by E. P. Tovv'ns, on his homestead 
Dnc mile west of town 

Among the old-time business men of the 
town recalled are John Meis, Nick Freymann, 
Henry Wisser, Steve Ellin gsworth, Mike Reard, 
Paul Wanderscheid, John Kaiser, Jos. J. Kemp, 



C. Liidwig, Jolm Galles, Jacob Fiedler, Henry 
Mas Lien, Nick Feller, Paul Peterson, Charles Mas- 
ucn, J. L. Doud, Joe Strohbeen, Harry Kemp, 
Charles Kuster, Jens Kk)ster, Charles Peebles, J. 
M. Hentges and hosts of others, and some of these 
are still in business there. 

Mrs. J. L. Doud is the Oyens postmistress 
and according to postal inspectors is "doing a 
swell job."" Less than $50 more business was rc- 
LAiired in 1944 to put the office in third class. 

The town was incorporated in 1909. With 
but one ticket in the field the first elected results 
as follows: 

Mayor, Nicholas Fi^eymann. 

Clerk, John Meis. 

Councilmen — Paul Peterson, Mike Reard, 

Jacob Fiedler, Henry Masuen and Nick 

Feller. 
Town Marshal, John Galles. 

Oyens has two churches, St. Catherine's 
Catholic of which the Rev. H. B. Karhoff is 
pastor, and Gethsemane Lutheran, served by the 
llev. John Christensen of Marcus. 

There are numerous business places, substan- 
tial dwellings and 100 good citizens. 

PRESENT OFFICERS 

The "official fami^ of Oyens, "the biggest 
little town in Iowa," today is as follows: 

Mayor, Paul Peterson. 
Clerk, Jos. J. Kemp. 
Treasurer, Mike Weber. 

Councilmen — J. L. Doud, J. A. Kloster, 
Thorvald Kloster, and J. M. Hentges. There is a 
vacancy on the council at this time through death 
of Charles Kuster. 



87 



GREETINGS 
AND BEST WISHES 



to 



The Luxembourgers 

and their friends 

of 

Remsen and Vicinity 

-from- 

TRINITY COUNCIL 

(1466) 




KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 

LeMars, Iowa 



B3 




Schaafs Hardware Store was founded in 1885 by Henry Schaafs, born in the Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg, who, after serving an enlistment in the French army, migrated 
from Paris to America at the age of 21 years. 

He arrived with but little capital and embarked in his business career by buying and sell- 
ing pocket knives, buying one or two knives at a time, and, as his business grew, added 
more items of hardware, finally opening his store and adding buggies, wagons, and the 
usual farm implements to his line. 

Shortly thereafter, he married Susan Lucas of Luxemburg, Iowa, to which union were 
born nine children, one of whom, Catherine (Mrs. Fred T. Phillips), is still living. 

Henry Schaafs died in September, 1928. 

In 1910 Fred T. Phillips entered into the active management of the Schaafs Hardware 
Store, at which time additional lines of farm machinery, tractors and trucks, w^ere add- 
ed and continued in the active management of the business until his death, on August 
10, 1944. 

The business is now being carried on by Mrs. Phillips, with the help of her three sons, 
Frederick, now in the Navy, Wallace and Wendell, both of whom were recently dis- 
charged from the Army. 

Prior to the present war there were a total of 22 employees, exclusive of the Phillips 
family, six of whom average 18 years of service. The oldest employee in point of service 
is Henry Foxen with 40 years, next being Gene Diers with 25 years of continuous service. 
In the past sixty years this business has grown from pocket knives to the modern farm 
equipment of today and covers more than 25,000 square feet of floor space under roof. 

We, the management and the entire staff of the Schaafs Hardware Store, wish to ex- 
tend our thanks to our customers in Remscn and the surrounding trade territory for 
their loyal support in making this business what it is today. 



89 



Compliments of 



PALMER FRUIT COMPANY 



Sioux City, Iowa 



Compliments of 

J. L. SCHARFF 

AUTOMOBILES 



Remsen, Iowa 



NU-ART 
BEAUTY SALON 



MACHINE AND MACHINELESS 

PERMANENTS 
Wella Cold Wave 



ELNORA KELSEY 



90 




WEST IOWA 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 



(A Service Institution) 



In retrospect one can only visualize the desire of the 
founders of Remscn and her early farm settlers. They were 
seeking a land offering an abundance, both matetially and 
spiritually, that compared with fair Luxembourg which they 
left behind. Each passing year, and each succeeding genera- 
tion, gives attest to the wisdom of their choice. 

This company is proud that its general offices are locat- 
ed in Remsen, and we are glad to be part of her communal 
life. We admire the enterprise of her business, the industry 
of her farms and her well groomed homes. We congratulate 
those who have made this book possible. 

The Employees and Management 



m 




BOTTIID UHCIR AUTHORITY Of tHI coCA-cfiLA COMPANY BY 



Chesterman 8C Co., Sioux City, Iowa 



Greetings to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 
and to Remsen 

CITY CLUB 
BEVERAGE CO., INC. 

Distributors of 

SCHMIDT'S CITY CLUB BEERS 

306 S. W. Ninth St. 

Des Moines, Iowa 



92 



i^hi< /< fnP Ivl /in Y^ t ... 

J. li.i'j A J tf*t xrxi^ff- ^^f^^ And here are some of the things he says it is wise 

^^^P^^^ to remember m making a sound investment. 

First The REALTOR who refuses to sell you something he believes you will be un- 
able to pay for, or that has no actual resale value. 

That the pocketbook is a family affair, when it comes to making an investment, and is 
one of many lessons still unlearned by those who think themselves infallible, and their 
judgment above reproach. 

Never expect more for anything than you would pay for it yourself. 
A wise investment is based upon what each dollar will earn for you in actual returns, in 
comparison to the earning power of your dollar invested in any safe security, providing 
the investment you wish to make is as safe as the security you held while making the 
dollar you wish to invest. 

Before you buy or sell your home, or realty of any kind, if you do not feel competent 
to make the decision, ask the advice of many. For great foundations are layed, and sub' 
stantial institutions are builded by and through accepting the advice ot many. 
For a safe investment or dependable loan, at money market value, write or consult — 

GEORGE D. HAGAR, Realtor 

Remsen, Iowa, Phone 215, P. O. Box 246 



BEST WISHES FOR THE SUCCESS OF THE LUXEMBOURG 
RELIEF COMMITTEE AND ITS HUMANITARIAN ACTIVITIES. 

Corn Belt Supply Company, Inc. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

■ 
JOBBERS AND WHOLESALERS 

Linseed Meal and Pellets Soybean Meal and Pellets 

Cottonseed Meal, Cake and Screenings 

■ 

Archer's, Sargent's, Hubbard's 
Feeds for Livestock and Poultry 



93 







Compliments of 




The 


Kay 


1 )ee Feed 


Company 






1825 Grand Avenue 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Manufacturers of 




Worth-Mo) 


^ and K-D Feeds and Minerals 



Compliments of 



HI-WAY 

on No. 5 

Remsen, Iowa 

ENOCH JOHNSON 

TAVERN 



Jobbers of ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

SOCONY- VACUUM TIRES AND 

PRODUCTS ACCESSORIES 



94 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND GREETINGS 

-to the- 

LUXEMBOUGERS 
of Remsen, Iowa 
and their friends 



Sioux City Live Stock Exchange 



m 



Greetings and Best Wishes 



from 

FLOYD A. MYLAN, D.V.M. 

IN REMSEN SINCE 1918 

For permanent independence and 

a bright future for 

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 

— and — 

PEACE AND GOOD WILL ON EARTH 

I THANK THE PEOPLE OF REMSEN AND VICINITY FOR THEIR 
GOODWILL AND FAVORS THESE TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS 



Breeder of 

REGISTERED ABERDEEN ANGUS CATTLE 

ALWAYS SOME CHOICE INDIVIDUALS FOR SALE 
Your Inspection of Our Herd Invited 



Best Wishes from 



RITZ SUPER SERVICE 

(YOUR MOTOR CAR HOSPITAL) 

■ 

Complete Service in Repairing, Overhauling 

BATTERIES 

TIRES AND TUBES 



JOHN E, RITZ, Proprietor 



96 



McQuirk 8C Taylor Seed Store 

ALFALFAS, CLOVERS 

GRASS SEEDS 

BULK GARDEN SEEDS 

HYBRID SEED CORN 



305 Pearl St. 

Sioux City (14,) Iowa 



L. S. HOMAN HENRY DALDRUP 

t 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOMAN 8C DALDRUP 

J. I. CASE FARM IMPLEMENTS 
PUMPS, WINDMILLS 

GRASS SEEDS 
■ 

Retnsen, Iowa 





One of 
Americans 
^t^MBM ^^^^^ Regional 

PILSNER-TYPE BEER BEERS! 



Choice golden-ripe grain, ihe finest 
malt, and tastiest hops ore alf com- 
bined b/ the latest brewing methods to 
produce HEIDEL-BRAU Beer. 

Drink a refreshing bottle of smooth, 
mellow, futly-aged HEIDEL-BRAU after 
ct hard day's work— enjoy it with your 
friends or with a home-cooked meal. 

Whatever the occasion ~ HEIDEL- 
BRAU will make it a bit more pleasant! 



BREWED AND BOTTLED BY THE 

SrOUX CITY BREWING CO. 



Greetings from 
Goetz Country Club Beer Distributing Co., Inc, 



Distributors of 



Goetz Country Club Beer 

Lager Pilsener Blue and Silver 

Green Label Red Label Label 



515 Pearl St. 

SIOUX CITY, IOWA 



99 



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