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Full text of "Grow Smart Northampton"

Grow Smart Northampton 



Executive Order 418 Northampton Community Development Plan 

Adopted by the Northampton Planning Board December 2, 2003 (unanimous vote) 
Accepted by City Council Industry Committee, December 8, 2003 (unanimous vote) 

Northampton Housing Partnership, Resolution December 16, 2003 (unanimous 

vote): 'The Northampton Housing Partnership commends the Commonwealth for 

recognizing the importance of comprehensive planning and the important issues 

facing cities in the Commonwealth; and further applauds the inclusion of the 

assessment of housing needs as part of that process and the Grow Smart 

Northampton report that the E0418 funding enabled. We look forward to using the 

valuable tool in our planning process/' 

Adoption and acceptance of the plan does not imply endorsement of the 
consultants recommendations in the Appendices. Grow Smart Northampton is part 

of the information gathering phase for an upcoming Northampton Vision 2020 

Comprehensive Plan. As such it is a work in progress. The plan will be revised and 

fully endorsed after the public input portion of the city's comprehensive planning 

process. 




^\A1ERINg 



EST. 



1654 



NORfHANPTON 





This plan was developed using funds provided pursuant to Massachusetts Executive Order 418 
program. While all the funds for the plan and consultants were provided by the Commonwealth 
and the format of the planning was partially determined by the E0418 guidelines, all of the 
conclusions are those of the City of Northampton. 



Grow Smart Northampton Project Team 



Consultants 

Pioneer Valley Planning Commission— Community indicators and community profile 
Karl F. Seidman— Northampton Retail MarketAnalysis 

Open Space Development and Large Building Design Standards Zoning-J oel Russel 
King Street Corridor Study-- VHB 



Proiect coordinated by the Northampton Office of Planning and Development 

Wayne Feiden, Director of Planning and Development Project Coordinator 

Peg Keller, Housing and Community Development Senior Planner, Housing Element 

J ames Thompson, CIS Coordinator, CIS map production 

Carolyn Misch, Land Use Senior Planner 

Gloria McPherson, Conservation and Land Use Planner 

Michael Owens, CDBG Administrator 



Assistance from the Mayor's Office 

Mary Clare Higgins, Mayor 

Teri Anderson, Economic Development Coordinator, Retail analysis and economic 

development 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 2 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Executive Order 418 NorthamptDn Community Development Plan 

December 2003 



Table of Contents 

Executive Summary and Putting itall Together Element 4 

A Vision forthe Future Identified in Vision 2020 8 

Goals and Objectives Identified in Vision 2020 11 

Open Space and Resource Protection Elennent 16 

Housing Elennent 24 

Economic Development Elennent 48 

Transportation Element 60 

APPENDIX-Community Health Indicators (PVPC) 62 



Grow Smart Northampton work products available at www.NorthamDtonP lanninci.orci : 

Grow Smart Northampton 

Northampton Community Indicators (Pioneer Valley Planning Commission,] anuary 

2003). 
Northampton Retail l^arlcet Analysis (Karl F. Seidman, December 2003) 
King Street Corridor Study (yHB, December 2003) 
Possible Zoning Amendments— Large Scale Residential Development and Open 

Space Development (\ oel Russel, December 2003) 
Possible Zoning Amendments— Large Building Design Standards (J oel Russel, 

December 2003) 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 3 



Executive Summary and Putting it all Together Element 

Grow Smart Northampton generates some of the data and tools necessary to support 
the upcoming city-wide comprehensive plan. Grow Smart Northampton is an outgrowth 
of the City's comprehensive planning process, which began in 1999 with Vision 2020: 
Vision and Consistency Analysis. 

In 2004 and 2005, the City will go back to the community for a series of workshops to 
understand how the community's vision has evolved and how best to implement that 
vision. With extensive citizen and board participation, Vision 2020: Vision and 
Consistency, Grow Smart Northampton, and other existing city plans will be updated 
and linked together to create a single comprehensive plan. Ultimately, Vision 2020 will be 
designed to reflect our community's vision and commitment. 

The most important aspect of Vision 2020 is that Northampton's planning is an on-going 
process, not a onetime effort. The City will always work with our residents to ensure a 
future we all can embrace. The table below summarizes the implementation plan to create 
a city-wide comprehensive plan, and thereby implement this plan. 

Current and Planned Vision 2020 Comprehensive Plan Elements 



Plan Element 


Purpose and Status 


When 


Vision 2020: Vision and 
Consistency Analysis 


Identify community vision. Create a blueprint for the 
comprehensive plan 


1999 


Open Space and Recreation and 
the Environment 


To be revised in 2004-2005 and expanded into full 
environmental element 


2000 
2005 


Consolidated Plan 


For support public services and housing elements of 
comprehensive plan 


2000 & 
2005 


Grow Smart Northampton 


Develop the data to support a comprehensive plan 


2003 


Land Use Plan 


Downtown, Florence, State Hospital (1993-1997), Pleasant 
Street (2001). Other area plans underway. 


2005 


Housing 


Consolidated plan revision will complete housing element 


2005 


Economic Development 


Economic Development Strategy, to be revised into 
comprehensive plan element 


1999 
2005 


Public Services 


Consolidated plan revision will complete public services 
element 


2005 


Comprehensive Plan 


Merge elements into seamless plan 


2006 



Grow Smart Northampton is designed as part of the data collection phase necessary to 
support the creation of a comprehensive plan for the city. Some of the data in Grow 
Smart Northampton will soon be out-of-date and will be updated as the comprehensive 
planning process progresses. Over the coming months the Planning Board and other city 
boards and agencies will work to update the data, consider some of the preliminary 
findings, and move forward strategically on specific implementation steps, such as 
amending zoning and planning a CDBG Action Plan for FY2005, to implement elements of 
the plan. 

Grow Smart Northampton is part of the information gathering and option identification 
that is necessary to support a comprehensive plan. It is NOT the primary participatory part 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 4 



of the process. Members of City boards and the public, however, were invited to 
participate in the planning process (see table below). 



Grow Smart Northampton Board and Publ c Participation 


V\tork5hops and V\fc>rking Sessions 


Participants 


Planning for Grow Smart Northampton Scope 
(multiple meetings at different board sessions) 


Planning Board, Mayor, Economic Development 
Coordinator (ED), Office of Planning and 
Development(OPD) 


On-Going Grow Smart Working Sessions 


Planning Board with limited public involvement 


Economic Development Retail Analysis 


Chamber of Commerce, ED, OPD, Retail Focus 
Group 


Land Use and Transportation-- King Street Design 
Charrette 


Planning Board, Board of Public Works, Mayor's 
Office, City Councillors, bicycle advocacy groups, 
citizens 


Housing Working Sessions 


Housing Partnership 


Open Space and Resource Protection Working 
Sessions 


Conservation Commission 


Final Grow Smart Northampton review 


Planning Board 


Final Grow Smart Northampton review 


City Council Industry Committee 


Final Grow Smart Northampton review 


Mayor's Office 


Final Grow Smart Northampton review 


Northampton Housing Partnership 



Grow Smart and Vision 2020 Next Steps 






What 


Who 


When 


Update Grow Smart with revised data as data becomes 
available 


Staff 


Spring-Summer 2004 


Build analysis sections to Grow Smart Northampton 


Staff 


Spring-Summer 2004 


Plan public forums and outreach for Vision 2020 comp plan 


Planning Board 


Spring-Summer 2004 


Develop more sophisticated environmental suitability analysis 
and build-out analysis for Northampton reflecting different 
development and regulatory scenarios 


Staff working 
with boards 


Winter-Fall 2004 


Hold public forums and outreach for Vision 2020 comp plan 


Planning Board 


Fall 2004- Spring 2005 


Merge Vision 2020 Vision and Consistency, Grow Smart, 
Downtown and its Gateways and other land use elements into 
single cohesive plan 


Staff 


Spring-Fall 2004 


Consultwith planning process— Housing Partnership, 
Conservation Commission, City Council Committee on 
Economic Development, Land Use and Housing 


Planning Board 
and staff 


On-going 



The DRAFT: 2020 Land Use - Norttiampton Vision 2020 map is the land use map for 
this plan. This map will be modified in the next couple of years based on data collected 
from the environmental suitability map contained in this plan, the more sophisticated 
environmental suitability analysis and build-out analysis that the City is working on, and 
public input during the Vision 2020 comprehensive planning process. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 5 



Community Profile 

The City of Northampton 
is situated between the 
Connecticut River and the 
foothills of the Berkshires 
20 miles north of 
Springfield. It is bordered 
by Easthampton on the 
south, Westhampton on 
the west Williamsburg 
and Hatfield on the north, 
separated by the 
Connecticut River from 
Hadley on the east. 
Northampton is 43 miles 



eastof Pittsfield; 93 miles west of Boston; and 151 miles from New York 




Northampton offers a sophisticated rural lifestyle rich in cultural, artistic, academic, and 
business resources. Northampton features one of the most vibrant downtown centers in 
New England and was named "Number One Best Small Arts Town in America" by author 
J ohn Villani and is recognized as one of the top 25 Arts Destinations in the nation by 
AmericanStyle magazine. Itwas also named as one of the Dozen Destinations of 
Distinction by the National Trustfor Historic Preservation. 

Residents see Northampton as both traditional and innovative. Several village centers 
provide focal points for outlying residential areas while the downtown is alive days and 
evenings with a wide 
selection of retail, services, 
restaurants, coffee and ice- 
cream shops, theaters 
including the only 
municipally owned theater 
in the state, clubs featuring 
an array of music, street 
musicians and a Center for 
the Arts. All of this activity 
provides a perfect 
atmosphere for strolling. 
The city also offers strong 
municipal programs in 
education, recreation, 
public safety and public 
works. It is known for its 
energy conservation 
program and its initiative to improve handicap access to downtown establishments. 




Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 6 



The community has a strong and diverse economic base consisting of a mixture of 
traditional operations (wire protrusion, plastic molding) and innovative ones (production of 
heat sensing devises) and a large institutional base which includes county services and 
two hospitals. Northampton is also home to Smith College and is strongly influenced by 
Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College and the University of 
Massachusetts as part of the five-college system in the region. The superb quality of life in 
Northampton contributes to its strong economic base with growing manufacturing, 
technology and service sectors. The local labor force is diverse, well educated and highly 
skilled. 

The vibrant small city atmosphere of the community is enhanced by rich natural resources, 
which include the Connecticut River, agricultural and conservation lands and the Acadia 
Wildlife Sanctuary. Residents believe Northampton has a rich history and are confident 
that it's future will be built on its diverse population base, solid economy and abundant 
resources. 

(Information from Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development and the City of Northampton) 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 7 



A Vision for the Future Identified in Vision 2020 

tfn 1999, the City of Northampton, though a series of public worl<shops, developed the following Vision, 
which guides the Planning Board and serves as the vision statement for this plan. As part of an eventual 
Comprehensive Plan, this document will be revisited, and revised as necessary.} 

WE, the residents of the City of Northampton, including the villages of Florence, Leeds, 
and Bay State, want to retain all that makes this place we call home so attractive. We 
know that our community represents a special union between a slowed-down rural life and 
a vibrant urban one. We also know that this place could be a more perfect union, a city 
where differences are more warmly embraced, all are educated well and both natives and 
newcomers can find a home. 

Today, after more than a century, the phrases on our city seal remain helpful directives: 
caritas (charity,) educatio (education,) and justitia (justice.) 

With those larger ideas in mind, we envision a city of distinct places, which are at once 
separate in geography and connected as part of a larger community. We care about this 
city precisely because it has what so many other communities' lack: a sense of place. The 
physical characterof our buildings, the beauty of the landscape, and the passion for 
community we citizens hold dear makes this city livable and worth planning for. 

In too many cities and towns across this country, one strip mall looks like any other. No 
one should mistake this city for another. We aim to keep it that way. 

At the commercial center of this city is our vibrant downtown, a place distinct from the 
smaller villages of Florence center, Leeds or Bay State. Downtown should be treated 
differently than the villages. We invite commercial enterprises to fill in the nooks and 
crannies that remain vacant downtown. We also welcome expansion that adds to a 
walking-friendly, bustling atmosphere that is a region-wide destination spot for shoppers 
and tourists. 

We also realize that by achieving a narrow, albeit necessary, market niche, downtown has 
lost some dear qualities. Few stores cater to local needs (no one can buy a hammer 
downtown.) The rental cost of apartments and business space has risen steeply, pushing 
out those of low and moderate incomes. Some feel that success has stolen our downtown. 

While many of us see downtown as a commercial engine, we view our villages as our 
keepsakes, places to be saved and cherished. Florence center and Leeds remind us that 
while Northampton is a city, we have town roots. If Florence center grows, it should do so 
within already existing boundaries. The commercial center should not push into and 
threaten the bordering residential neighborhoods. 

Because we admire village life, where small stores sell to local customers and neighbors 
frequently see each other walking in town, we look to extend that pattern. As much as 
possible, we want to avoid sprawling neighborhoods that have no center. We want to 
encourage small stores to open within and near the entrances to our villages, and there 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 8 



also we should encourage connnnunity and civic centers, where senior citizens and our 
youth can gather. 

We want compact development patterns that are pleasant and safe for pedestrians and 
bicyclists, while not restricting public choice for a variety of housing and development 
styles. Compact development provides job opportunities and encourages people to build 
retail stores and homes close together. That sort of development binds together a 
neighborhood and reduces automobile use by making public transportation, walking and 
bicycling more practical. 

While, at present, prosperity reigns in our community, work remains. We want to improve 
the availability and diversity of well-paying jobs for our residents, so many of whom have 
difficulty finding work that pays enough to raise a family on. Helping to create jobs from 
different sectors of the economy— technology, the arts, industry, education and service — 
allows for people of different economic levels to live here. 

To allow a more diverse population to live here, we need to increase housing opportunities 
in every city neighborhood for families of all incomes. We must do this out of a sense of 
justice, and because democracy and pluralism depends on the creativity inspired by 
diverse ideas and points of view. 

The quality of life in Northampton remains the envy of many. To maintain it, we will ensure 
that any future housing growth or industrial development, improves, rather than 
compromises the quality of life. G rowth should be at a human scale and sustainable in the 
long run. 

Partof the job of maintaining the quality of life here is recognizing why this city succeeds. 
While many of the building blocks for success have been here for years, some credit must 
also go to the legions of artists who have made homes here and who have created a 
community honoring creativity. The prosperous economy here, in part, reflects the good 
works of many artists. As a city, let us not take this artist-economy for granted. 

Education is one of the foundations of our community, both as an economic force and a 
moral guidepost. The university and colleges in the area give many of us work, and we 
desperately believe that our public schools must imbue in our children a love of learning. 
And yet, education is one of our greatest frustrations. While we push for one of the best 
public education systems in the state, our financial means restrict us. We are a city of 
moderate incomes with high educational ambitions. We want to build better schools, 
provide more teachers and buy more books. Too often, we miss those targets. We want to 
ensure that youth services go beyond our schools and involve youth in the essential 
aspects of our community life that applies to them. 

j ust as we value our children, we realize and respect how much our senior citizens mean 
to our community. One way we can honor them is to ensure they remain independent, 
active, and able to contribute to the community for as long as possible. Community 
centers provide places for seniors and others to gather and share in community life. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 9 



Many of us depend on and love our automobiles. Atthe sanne time, many of us identify car 
and truck traffic as the biggest factor eroding our quality of life. Throughout the city, in rich 
and poor neighborhoods, speeding car and truck traffic frightens us and forces us back 
into our homes and off the streets. We want our traffic laws obeyed. We also want our city 
engineered in such a manner that vehicles must slow down while driving through 
Northampton. More than forcing vehicles to slow down, though, we want this city to 
become more friendly to those using alternative forms of transportation. We want safe and 
direct walking paths, lanes that allow bicycle commuting and shortcuts that allow people 
on foot or bicycle to get places directly. We do not see this issue as one of ancillary 
importance, rather one of paramount concern. 

While there is much to celebrate here — our standing as a premier arts community, our 
villages that retain enduring character and the beauty of the undeveloped countryside — 
work remains to be done. Let's get to it. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 10 



Goals and Objectives Identified in Vision 2020 

tfn 1999, through extensive public worl<shops, the City of Northampton adopted the following goals and 
objectives, which still guide the Planning Board and serves as the goal statement for this plan. Additional 
economic development goals are discussed in the economic development section of this plan. As part of an 
eventual Comprehensive Plan, these goals and objectives will be revisited and revised as necessary. A 
more detailed analysis, along with identified inconsistencies and recommended actions, is included in Vision 
2020: Vision and Consistency Analysis, available at www.NorthamptonPlanninQ.orQ . } 

GOAL 1: MAINTAIN VIBRANT URBAN AND VILLAGE CENTERS 

• Enhance pedestrian-friendliness of comnnercia! areas. 

• E nhance downtown's standing as commercial, civic and cultural center of region. 

• Maintain Florence center and satellite commercial areas and villages as local-serving 
commercial areas. 

• Improve commercial buffers of urban and village centers. 

• Help locally-based retail stores and services. 

• Redevelop former Northampton State Hospital as a vibrant village center. 

Policies and objectives 

Help create more commercial buildings in village or urban vacant spaces. Make sure no historically or 
architecturally significant building is lost. 

Increase the number of official walking routes downtown and in villages. Make those routes are obvious, 
direct and interesting, making downtown and the villages walking friendly. 

Bring more civic and cultural events to the city. 

Convert commercial strips at the edge of downtown so that they look more like the central business district. 

Retain and expand traditional village amenities downtown by giving tax breaks and extending zoning 

privileges. 

Make sure that retail commercial growth occurs downtown, Florence center. State Hospital and pedestrian- 
scale areas. Guide land- and truck-extensive businesses to new Business Park, King Streetand industrial 

areas. 

Create a satellite commercial area near Florence Road and Route 66. It should provide local needs as 
needed (see map). Commercial entranceways to Florence, downtown or Leeds should have a village look, 

not resemble commercial strips. 

Lobby state and county politicians to keep government offices downtown. 

Minimize losses of historical building downtown. Increase the pedestrian-scale commercial design. 

Increase visibility of public road signs. Make sure private signs conform with downtown aesthetic. 

Make sure that Florence business district grows within already existing boundaries. No residential or 

greenspace should be lost to commercial growth. 

Provide more public benches, cigarette disposal receptacles, trash cans, telephones, restrooms, and garden 
spaces downtown and in village centers. 

Parks and greenspace should be used to keep urban and village centers attractive for pedestrian traffic, 

without creating dead spots that impede pedestrian flow. 

Encourage redevelopment of Round Housing Parking Lot downtown to create mixed use development while 

preserving or expanding the number of parking spaces. 

Increase landscaping along King Street to make it more appealing. 

GOAL 2: ENCOURAGE ECONOMIC EXPANSION AND J OB CREATION: 

• Expand local economy by creating and retaining jobs. 

• Diversify economy. 

• Promote and grow local businesses when possible. 

• Retain and enhance education, amenities, housing, and character that make city 
ati:ractive to businesses and customers. 

• E nsure development is sustainable over long-term and is low-polluting. 

Grow Smart Northampton Page 11 



• E nsure economic growth does not interfere with community goals or vision and 
conforms to Vision 2020. 

• Leverage private capital to finance long term investment create jobs, generate taxes 
and create marketplace opportunities. 

• P rovide strong focus on sectors of the local economy where investment is lagging. 

Policies and objectives 

Increase by 50 percent small businesses in city, with emphasis on small business development, retention of 

locally-grown businesses, and providing incubator opportunities for new local businesses. 

Make sure that existing commercial and industrial land parcels are filled in next 20 years, especially old mill 

buildings, with sensitivity to surrounding residential areas. 

Increase downtown commercial development by 50 percent, especially those enterprises supplying goods 
serving local needs and those businesses which bring new export dollars into the community. Best areas to 

develop are those with good access to parking. 

Double industrial opportunities in commercial, industrial, and business park areas 

Rewrite city regulatory and non-regulatory objectives to encourage sustainable development friendly to the 
environment. 

City economic development efforts should focus on improving job opportunities for all, especially living wage 
jobs and job opportunities for people who are underserved. 

Make sure that in developable areas commercial development occurs before housing. 

Reinvigorate the manufacturing base— support the expansion of existing manufacturers and industry clusters 
in the City, including traditional and technology manufacturers. 



GOAL 3: ENHANCE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS AND HOUSING: 

Preserve vital neighborhoods near downtown, Florence center and throughout the city. 

Maintain high and medium density housing downtown. 

Retain affordable housing and encourage new dispersed affordable housing in every 

neighborhood. 

Resist gentrification and the income stratification that it brings. 

Allow housing growth to meet demand without creating stress on municipal services or 

sense of community 

Encourage common ground between neighborhood groups across the city. 

Help build neighborhood cohesion and self-identity. 

Preserve ability of consumers to have a choice of housing types. 

Policies and objectives 

Make available low-interest loans for more homeowners to preserve the vitality and density of residential 
neighborhoods in and around downtown, Florence center and other village centers. 

Increase the amount of affordable housing, so well above 10 percent of the housing units are affordable. 
P reserve a range of housing types and costs throughout the city. Including these options in all appropriate 
areas avoids neighborhood conflicts about certain areas receiving an inappropriately high concentration of 
any housing type. 



Allow no commercial development threatening the integrity of residential neighborhoods. 

Increase the amount of new mixed residential/commercial/ industrial development in business and industrial 



areas when that it will not displace commercial, industrial or artists' space. 

Limit housing development in city's outlying areas, where it will stress municipal services and alter the 
character of the community. 

City should become a participant in linking community groups 

E nhance the beauty of neighborhoods and the livability of them. 

Encourage the growth of neighborhood projects and organizations 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 12 



GOAL 4: IMPROVE MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION, PARKING 
AND COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 

• Ensure clear flow of people, goods, services and infornnation (roads, paths, connputer 
networks). 

• Change traffic circulation systems to allow for bicyclists and pedestrians. 

• E ncourage more mass transit that people will use. 

• Improve accessibility and affordability of parking without adding parking that detracts 
from pedestrian scale. 

• Require compact development patterns that encourage walking and biking. 

• Reduce traffic congestion downtown, near Coolidge Bridge, on King Street and on 
Damon Road. 



Policies and objectives 



Business development should generally be encouraged build in the urban core and redeveloped areas that 
are most suited to providing pedestrian, bicycle traffic, or transit access. 



Create multi-modal transportation system with the pedestrian and bicycle circulation and and alternative 
transportation systems that allow residents to find alternatives to automobiles for many of their trips. 



Do a citywide analysis of existing major intersections and traffic flow throughout the city. Determine how 
intersections enhance or harm the character of the community, not just the immediate intersection area. 
Evaluate these tradeoffs. 



Buy new land to expand public parking off Main Street, downtown, without creating dead areas in pedestrian 
traffic flow. Meet parking demands by building new lots, using existing lots more intensely, encouraging non- 
car transportation alternatives, and using walking routes to shorten walking distances so that existing parking 

can serve new needs. 

Retain the tradition of free parking in Florence center. 



Encourage commercial development in areas with access to public or private parking, especially on the edge 
of downtown, while preserving downtown's pedestrian nature. 



Increase by 10 percent the density of housing in and within walking distance of downtown. E ncourage new 
downtown mixed residential development to minimize the need for driving downtown. 



The final comprehensive plan needs an overview of existing traffic patterns 



Use the {Transportation and Parking Commission}to help coordinate non-motor vehicle transportation 
improvements 



Make sure downtown is pedestrian friendly, and explore possibility of re-routing some of Route 9 traffic from 
Main Street to Damon Road and Bridge Road, if that can be done without harming neighborhoods. 



GOAL 5: CALM TRAFFIC TO PRESERVE NEIGHBORHOODS AND VILLAGES 

• Slow automobile traffic to retain safe, livable, child-friendly neighborhoods. 

• Slow automobile traffic to retain pedestrian-friendly villages and urban centers. 



Policies and objectives 



Enforcement regulations to calm traffic. 



Educate citizens to calm traffic. 

Engineer roads to calm traffic and reduce speeds. Engineer traffic calming in whenever roads are 
reconstructed and for high priority retrofits to improve traffic safety, retain pedestrian-scale and child-friendly 
neighborhoods and streets. Improve safety of pedestrian crosswalks and intersections. 



Create safe roads committee to consider multi-department effort at calming traffic. 



Minimize pedestrian "dead-spaces" at intersections, crosswalks and parking lots. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 13 



GOAL 6: EXPAND OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

• .Preserve and expand city holdings of open space, wild lands and small pieces of 

open land in developed areas. 

• Use open space and recreation to ensure that the urban and village centers are 

attractive places to live, work and visit. 

• Make more natural areas available for public use. 

• Provide recreation opportunities for individuals of all ages and physical abilities now 

and for future generations. 

• Preserve the character of rural areas, farms, forests, and rivers 

Policies and objectives 

Make sure all appropriate recreation areas are accessible to those with physical disabilities. 

Upgrade all parks in urban and developed areas. 

Increase the number of ball fields by at least 10 to serve burgeoning recreation needs. 

Link all the city's conservation districts to each other with greenways so that hikers and walkers can traverse 

the city. Create a citywide trail system that is marked. 

Add to the city's conservation land holdings by acquiring small green areas downtown and in villages of Bay 

State, Leeds and Florence. 

Provide recreation, conservation and open space opportunities. 

Acquire land with vistas and interesting landscapes, especially in western edge of city. 

Make sure that no city farm goes out of business. Farm land should not be lost to housing. 

Acquire land that serves as gateway between urban, suburban or rural landscapes. 



GOAL 7: PRESERVE TRADITIONAL LAND USE PATTERNS WTTHOUT CREATING 
SPRAWL 

• Redevelop vacant land in built-up areas, guarding against sprawl. 

• Promote new villages (commerciaL residential areas) where feasible. 

• Foster continued mixture of uses in villages: Florence, Leeds, Bay State. 

• Discourage development damaging village character of urban/residential 

neighborhoods. 

• Ensure new downtown development meshes with architectural heritage. 

• Maintain clear distinction between rural, suburban and urban areas. 

• Promote traditional neighborhood development patterns. 

Policies and objectives 

New development should be accompanied by open space preservation so that at least one acre of open 

space is preserved for each acre of land developed. 

Suburban style development should be matched by an equal or greater amount of compact development. 
Ensure that new housing development will not outstrip school, public works, public safety services, and 

ability of downtown roads to handle suburban traffic. 

Implement detailed 2020 Land Use Plan (early draft attached) 



Build satellite commercial areas/community centers to create sense of place in less urban areas 

Create land zoned for new economic development opportunities where it will not harm neighborhoods. 

Encourage development patterns that contribute to, and do not sap, the strength of their neighborhoods. 

Make sure that all existing buildings are reused and rehabilitated. 

Cluster all housing developments in rural areas, leaving more open land, with designs that still allow for 

housing choices. 

P rotect historic buildings defining visual character of downtown 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 14 



GOAL 8: ENHANCE SERVICES AND FACILITIES FOR QUALITY OF LIFE 

Allow for more public gathering spots. 

Ensure public buildings accessible to physically disabled. 

Plan for nnore community centers. 

Build community by improving communication between groups. 

Better involve public in planning and city government. 

Improve climate of tolerance for differences. 

Build the sense of connectivity between people and their neighborhoods. 

Policies and objectives 

Integrate social services and affordable housing progranns with neighborhood concerns. City broker dialogue 

between social service agencies and neighborhoods. 

Improve education and recreation for all age groups, including multigenerational activities. 

Provide more progranns for young people and involve youth in decision making. 

Increase cooperation and collaboration among social service agencies 



Improve sense of neighborhood identify 



Open schools and municipal buildings for public gathering. 



Preserve existing entertainment and recreation complexes without harming neighborhoods. 



GOAL 9: PRESERVE NATURAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES AND THE 
ENVIRONMENT 

• Protect important ecological resources, including surface and groundwater 

resources, plant communities and wildlife habitat. 

• City should take lead in protecting architectural and cultural history. 

• Preserve ecological and wildlife linkages, especially water-based linkages. 



Policies and objectives 

Improve quality of storm water discharges 



Discourage development in environmentally sensitive areas and encourage environmentally sound 
development 



Protect valuable ecological resources 



Reuse brownfields sites 

Provide performance standards to preserve the environment 



Preserve cultural and architectural history 



Maintain clean sidewalks and parks and encourage individuals to clean after themselves and pets. 
New acquisitions to city vehicle fleet should include alternative fuel vehicles. 



Provide for quality street trees and streetscape 



Provide parking spaces and refueling places for electric vehicles. 



Reduce city dependence on disposable items. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 15 



Open Space and Resource Protection Element 

{The Northampton Open Space and Recreation Plan 2000-2004 and Vision 2020: Vision and 
Consistency Analysis were approved by the Commonwealth as equivalent open space and resource 
protection plan elements underE0418. Equivalent Plan Items: 1) GIS-based land suitability map showing 
location, type, and quantity of open space and land suitable for development and protected properties and 
water resources. (Vision 2020, Pages IB and 50, Open Space Plan page 113); and 2) Detailed findings and 
recommendations related to open space, environmental and resource protection (Vision 2020, Pages 1-20, 
Open Space Plan, Pages 49-59). This element was designed to fill in gaps that the Planning Board, and to a 
lesser extent, the Conservation Commission, have identified in our existing knowledge base and 
understanding of options.} 

Water Quality Analysis 



The Water Quality Map shows theoretical water quality impacts from current Northampton 
land uses. Land uses were derived from the Massachusetts land use analysis (MassGIS 
data) and the E0418 methodology. The map shows the effective composite impervious 
cover from different land uses. 




Impervious Surface 



Date: 04pDec-2003 

Author: jt 

Revision: 

Fiie: z:\projects\pubiic\development\ 

eo418\eo418.apr 



The Northampton Departmentof Public Works is currently preparing a stormwater plan 
consistent with EPA requirements to comply with a stormwater National Pollution 
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. As this information is prepared, the water 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 16 



quality analysis will be updated. Implementation of the DPW Stormwater plan and other 
potential public policies can help Northampton address the following water quality needs: 

• The City's stormwater system needs to be updated so that water quality provisions are 
included at initial points of entry into the system (e.g. catch basins) and at discharge 
points (e.g. artificial wetlands between the discharge point and receiving waters. 

• Private development must remove total suspended solids (TSS) and other 
contaminants before stormwater enters the stormwater systems or receiving waters. 

• Public and private systems must be maintained to reduce initial contamination and to 
ensure proper operation. 

Environmental Land Suitability 

The Habitat Open Space and Scenic, and Water Resources maps, and the resulting 
composite Environmental Land Suitability map, show environmental limitations that do or, 
depending on the City's regulatory policies, could limit development. The City plans to 
revise these maps in the near future to reflect: 

• Environmental information that will soon be compiled. 

• The unique value of undisturbed resources in pristine areas. 

• City goals for infill and development in urbanized areas, existing commercial/industrial 
areas, and in areas identified for new growth. 





Environmental Land Suitability Legend 




Unbuildable 


^^^^^^1 




Extremely Sensitive Environmental Receptors 






Sensitive Environmental Receptors 






Limited (or unknown) 


Environmenta 


Receptors 




Resource Areas 


Within 
Resource 


Resource Buffer 


50' 


100' 


150' 


200' 


Wetlands (only known wetlands are shown) ^^^^^^^^^| 






Rivers (only major rivers are shown) 










Streams (many streams should be listed as rivers) 








Lakes/Ponds 








Certified Vernal Pools 


^^1 




Vernal Pools ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




Floodplain (as mapped by FEMA) 










Protected Open Space, Conservation and Parks i 










Very Scenic (As identified by the state) 












Bio-Core (As identified by the state) 












Est. Habitat (As identified by the state) 












Potential Habitat (As identified by the state) 












Priority Habitat (As identified by the state) 












Aquifer Zone 1 (Buffer around well) ^^^^^^^ 








Aquifer Zone 2 (Primary recharge area of well) 












Aquifer Zone 3 (Additional watershed of well) 













Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 17 




unbuildable 

extremely sensitive 
environmental receptors 
sensitive environmental receptors 



Habitat 



Open Space 
and Scenic 



Water 
Resources 



Date: 04pDec-2003 

Author: jt 

Revision: 

Fiie: z:\projects\pubiic\development\ 

eo418\eo418.apr 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 18 



The Environmental Suitability Map created for this plan will inform an effort to 
Map environmental limitations in more detail. 
More accurately determine limits to growth. 
Conduct a more sophisticated buildout analysis. 
Model different regulatory and public policy actions. 
Protect the most sensitive environmental receptors. 
E ncourage development consistent with 

Vision 2020: Vision and Consistency Analysis and other current plans. 

The upcoming Comprehensive Planning process. 



unbuildable 

extremely sensitive 
environmental receptors 
sensitive environmental receptors 




(J) 



Environmental Suitability 



Date: 04pDec-2003 

Author: jt 

Revision: 

Fiie: z:\projects\pubiic\development\ 

eo418\eo418.apr 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 19 



Water Budget Analysis 

All water supply areas (emergency reservoirs' watershed in Northampton, primary 
reservoir watersheds in Hatfield, Whately, Conway, and Williamsburg, aquifer in 
Northampton) are zoned with some type of water supply protection zoning. 

The total safe yields from all of Northampton's water supplies exceed demand and 
expected demand for the foreseeable future. In addition, the City has acquired a large 
watershed to hold in reserve as a future reservoir or well site should additional water 
supply development be needed at some point in the distant future. With a flat population 
and increasing conservation measures (especially focused on leak detection within the 
city's water system), the Northampton Departmentof Public Works is not expecting a 
significant change in water usage for the medium term future. The water system could, 
however, accommodate some increases in demand. 



Water Budget Analysis 




Safe Yield Spring Street Municipal Well 


1.0 million gallons per day 


Safe Yield Clark Street M unicipal Well 


1.0 million gallons per day 


Safe Yield Prinnary Reservoir System (2 reservoirs) 


4.2 million gallons per day 


Roberts Meadow Reservoir System (2 reservoirs) 


E mergency water use only, no safe yield calculated 


Water Mill River watershed lands 


Land owned for future supply, no yield without 
development 


Total Safe Yield 


6.2 million gallons per day (on sustained basis) 


C urrent P ermit for Authorized Withdraws 


4.77 million gallons per day (on sustained basis) 


Average Daily Water Usage (2002) 


3.37 million gallons per day 


Maximum Daily Water Usage (2002) 


4.83 million gallons persay 


Projected increase (decrease)— medium term 


Water increases roughly balance improved water 
conservation in the system 



Source: Northampton Dept of Public Works, Paulette Kuzdeba, Senior Environmental Planner 

Smart Growth and Urbanism/New Urbanism 

Northampton has had increasing discussions about how to promote healthy urban centers 
that contribute to the quality of life of the residents of those centers. The Planning Board 
and a many of the participants in Vision 2020 embrace the concept of urban centers 
similar to that defined by the Congress for the New Urbanism (1998). The concept is a 
combination of neighborhood design elements, including: 

1. Compact walkable neighborhoods with clearly defined edges; 

2. Clearly defined centers with public space, public buildings, a transit stop, and retail 
businesses; 

3. An interconnected street network, forming coherent blocks and lined with building fronts 
rather than parking lots; 

4. A diverse mix of activities and housing options; 

5. Civic spaces in prominent places; and 

6. Open spaces in convenient locations throughout the neighborhoods. 

Northampton has three significant commercial centers. Two of them, downtown 
Northampton, including the Pleasant Street, and Florence, clearly have these defining 
elements. The third. King Street, contains more of these elements than most strip 
commercial areas, but as it currently is, does not meet this definition. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 20 



Northampton Smart Growth Zoning and Regulatory Options 

Northampton has already adopted many models of smart growth that other communities 
are only beginning to discuss. Among these are measures and standards that encourage: 

1. Densities necessary to support pedestrian activities and transit services in 
commercial areas. 

2. Evolution from one use to another in existing buildings in urban core areas. 

3. Housing above commercial space in commercial areas. 

4. Shared parking in all areas, especially in the downtown. 

5. Payment in-lieu of providing parking (with a relatively small payment) 

6. Parking that does not dominate the landscape. 

7. Attractive designs in commercial buildings 

8. Cluster development 

9. Affordable housing inclusionary provisions 

10. Infill commercial and residential projects. 

During the development of this plan, the Planning Board, and to a lesser extent the 
Housing Partnership, the Conservation Commission, and the City Council Ordinance 
Committee, had extensive discussions on options to encourage smart growth within the 
City. The goal of this plan is not to create detailed recommendations, but to identify the 
options thatthe Planning Board has discussed. No decision has been made on which 
options to pursue. A full community discussion is critical before any decisions are made. 

1. Improve the quality of residential subdivision development and preserve 
sensitive lands and valuable open space. As a result of C ity policies and 
incentives, most new residential subdivisions are open space residential 
developments (cluster). While "cluster" development has preserved hundreds of 
acres of open space and created more walkable neighborhoods, there are 
opportunities and the need for improvements to create smart growth patterns. As 
part of this study, the Planning Board requested an analysis of how the ordinance 
could be improved. A draft of one possible zoning approach, written by J oel Russel, 
a planning consultant, is available atwww.NorthamptonPlanning.org. The draft: 

a. Improves the incentives for developers to use open space residential 
development when developing residential properties. 

b. Improves the quality of open space residential development and planned unit 
developments (PUDs). 

In addition, the City could consider revising the City's Wetlands Protection 
Ordinance to ensure the ordinance preserves the most important wetlands habitat in 
the city, especially those associated with vernal pools. 

2. Preserve especially sensitive lands and valuable open space from 
development that would damage these resources. The City has the opportunity 
to encourage the transfer of development rights (TDR) from sensitive land that 
should be preserved as open space to land that is more appropriate for 
development. Northampton has an existing TDR program on the books, in areas 
zoned Farms Forests and Rivers (FFR), but it is in such limited areas that no TDR 
will ever be used. Northampton could use TDRs more extensively by: 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 21 



a. Making sensitive ecological resources and rural areas (for example, areas 
shown in Vision 2020: Vision as future FFR) "sending zones" where, in return 
for property owners permanently preserving those areas, development rights 
could be transferred out and used elsewhere. 

b. Making existing urban areas and areas desirable for future development (areas 
zoned commercial, industrial, urban residential or planned village) "receiving 
zones" where development rights could be transferred into, from the sending 
zones, to allow additional density. It would be critical, however, to ensure that 
any extra density allowed is consistent with the City's goals and to ensure that 
the character of "receiving" zones would be preserved. 

3. Encourage development in urban areas that will contribute to the walkability 
of the city and maintenance of density in the urban core. Over the past ten 
years, the City has made numerous zoning changes to increase allowable density 
of dwelling units in urban areas, which has resulted in significant infill and infill 
opportunities. This infill has been in keeping with the existing pedestrian-scale 
character of the areas where it has occurred. Given the drop in average family size, 
and the conversion of some multifamily units into single family homes, however, 
density (persons per square mile) continues to drop in urban neighborhoods. There 
are additional infill opportunities that can help maintain vibrant neighborhoods, 
provide room for growth that doesn't consume open space and minimize future 
traffic impacts: 

a. To allow more commercial, industrial and institutional uses and denser 
commercial uses, through increasing the maximum heights in some commercial 
districts and for college structures and making small expansions of existing 
commercial zoning districts. 

b. The TDR discussed above could be used to allow additional residential units that 
will contribute to the walkability of the City. 

c. Certain areas could be rezoned to denser zoning districts and/or dimensional 
requirements can be reduced. 

d. Require pedestrian and vehicle connections between existing neighborhoods 
and new development. 

e. Adopt an adequate facilities ordinance to ensure that development not occur 
until infrastructure is provided which is adequate to support that development 
and desired densities. 

4. Encourage development patterns and appearances that contribute to the 
vitality and desirability of the City. Through a combination of actions, 
Northampton has helped preserve and create attractive development. Committed 
businesses, institutional, and residential property owners, city investment, and city 
regulations (zoning, historic districts, and architectural design) have all helped make 
this happen. Additional regulatory options include: 

a. Adopt a demolition delay ordinance to require a waiting or due diligence period 
for demolition of historic buildings. 

b. Create design standards to cover all uses, buildings, and developments over 
10,000 square feet (currently such standards apply only to retail projects). As 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 22 



partof Grow Smart Northampton, the Planning Board requested an analysis of 
how the city's large building design standards could be improved. A draft of 
possible zoning changes is available at www.NorthamDtonPlanninci.orci . 

King Street Planning 

The Planning Board identified the need to focus planning on King Street for this study. 
Downtown, the Village at Hospital Hill and Pleasant Street are models of smart growth or 
are moving in that direction and existing public and private investment planning and 
regulatory efforts are improving those areas every day. 

King Street is one of the critical economic engines that keeps Northampton healthy, but it 
has not been as carefully planned. P lanning King Street is critical to enhance its role as an 
economic engine, while improving how it functions. A planning effort with extensive City 
Council, Planning Board, Mayor's Office, and public involvement has already resulted in a 
series of zoning changes and several public forums focusing on private land uses. 

The Planning Board and the City are working on additional King Street planning efforts: 

1. A land use plan of King Street is currently underway. It will examine: 

a. The appropriate vision and zoning for the area from the edge of the Central 
Business District to the strip commercial area that begins at Stop and Shop. 

b. The appropriate vision and zoning for the area adjacent to Hatfield Street. 

2. City Council committed to continually reexamine and tweak recently passed zoning 
as the City better understands how the market reacts to these ordinances and as a 
result of economic niche analysis (see economic development section of this plan). 

3. Newly visualization tools are being used to allow the public to understand the 
consequences of development options. As part of this plan, an electronic three- 
dimensional model of King Street was created and integrated into the Northampton 
Geographic Information System (Community Viz/ArcG IS flight files). This allows 
users to understand existing development patterns and model potential changes in 
a way that is easily understandable to the public and decision makers. 

At the start of the Smart Growth Northampton planning process, the Planning Board and 
several City Councillors sponsored a design workshop on the future of King Street. That 
workshop helped define the work program for this planning process. 

As part of SmaitGroivth Woitfiampton, the City commissioned a consultant team to hold 
a design workshop on King Street. The consultant team consisted of a transportation 
planner with expertise in bicycle and pedestrian accommodation, a traffic engineer with 
expertise in signal systems, a highway designer and a landscape architect,. The workshop 
focused on the public right-of-way and possible improvements. It drew representatives of 
the Planning Board, the Office of Planning and Development, City Councillors, the Mayor's 
Office, the Board of Public Works, bicycle advocacy groups and members of the public. 
The workshop was held to identify possible options, not to reach a consensus on a 
solution. This workshop also informed a King Street Corridor Study, developed under the 
transportation component of Groi/i^ Smart Woithampton. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 23 



Housing Element 

{The Community Development Block Grant Program, Consolidated Plan & Annual Action Plan (May 
2000), Northampton's Housing Inventory Gap Assessment (March 2000) and the Vision 2020: Vision 

and Consistency Analysis were approved by the Commonwealth as equivalent Housing plan elements 
under E0418. Equivalent Plan Items: Consolidated Plan's partial housing inventory (Pages 9-41) and 
Housing Inventory Gap (entire document) discuss financial constraints; and Consolidated Plan (Pages 42- 
58) and Vision 2020 (Pages 10-11) discuss housing goals and objectives. This element fills in some of the 
gaps that the Housing Partnership and the Planning Board identified in our knowledge base and 
understanding. The analysis is adapted from Mass. Housing Partner ship's Housing 
Needs Workbook: Assessing Community Housing Needs May 2003.} 



unbuildable 
extremely sensitive 
environmental receptors 
sensitive environmental receptors 



I I potential housing suitability 



The Housing Suitability |V|ap shows areas suitable for 
additional housing (hatched areas without environmental 
limitations. Northampton is committed to: 

• Preserving all existing affordable housing. Northampton has large affordable housing 
projects and large numbers of other affordable units scattered around the community. 

• Developing approximately 120 new units of affordable housing at the Village at Hospital 
Hill (the former state hospital). 

• Developing scattered site afforda^.^^.^-^^-^'-TT^ 1 housing in all appropriate 
areas. 




(t 



Potential Housing Suitability 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 24 



HOUSING INVENTORY 

Rental Housing 

How much rental housing already exists ? The 2000 Census indicates that there are 12,405 
total units; 11,880 of which are occupied. Of that universe, 5,525 are rental units, 46% of 
the total. The report states that 9,885 people comprise the rental population, with an 
average household size of 1.79. (Census Table H7 'Tenure") 

Statewide, 38.3 % of all housing in Massachusetts was renter occupied (35% for 
communities other than Boston). 

How much of Northampton's rental housing is subsidized ? 

The inventory of subsidized housing compiled by the MA. Department of Housing and 

Community Development indicates a total of 12,282 year round housing units, 1,393 of 

which are considered Chapter 40B units, or 11.34% of the total inventory. 

( www. state. ma. us/dhcd/components/hac/H si nvRev.pdf ) 

What kind of housing is rented? A breakdown of unit type and associated resident 
population is located in the table below. 



Rental Unit Type and Population 




Unit Type 


Total Units 


Total Residents 


Single Family Detached 


564 


1,258 


Single Family Attached 


168 


370 


Two Family 


939 


1,802 


Three or Four Family 


1,231 


2,032 


Five to Nine Units 


1,079 


1,819 


Ten to Nineteen Units 


623 


894 


Twenty to Forty Nine Units 


416 


578 


Fifty or More Units 


496 


562 


Mobile Homes 


9 


16 



Census table H32 'Tenure by Units in Structure 

For comparison, in 2000, 9.6% of all rental housing in Massachusetts was located in single 
family homes. In Northampton, it is 13%. (564+168=732 divided by 5,525 =13%) 



Age of Northampton Rental Housing Stock 


Renter Occupied 


Total 5,525 


Year Built: 1999 to March 2000 


8 


1995 to 1998 


20 


1990 to 1994 


79 


1980 tol989 


392 


1970 to 1979 


825 


1960 to 1969 


645 


1950 to 1959 


578 


1940 to 1949 


551 


1939 or earlier 


2,427 



US 2000 Census: Census Table H36 'Tenure by Year Structure Built" 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 25 



Age of Massachusetts Rental Housing Stock 






1990-3/2000 


1980-1989 


1970-1979 


1960-1969 


1950-1959 


Pre-1950 


4% 


9% 


15% 


12% 


11% 


49% 



Profile of Renters and Rental Demand 

The Census table indicating household income in 1999 by gross rent as a percentage of 
inconne is shown below. A local supply of rental units available at a variety of rental rates 
allows for choice within the housing nnarket. This table shows the percentage of renters 
who are paying more that 30% of their income for rent. 30-45% of gross income is 
considered the maximum reasonable expenditure for housing costs. 



Rent as % of Gross 


ncome 




Gross Rentas % of Household income 
for the City of Northampton. 


in 1999 


Total: 


5,518 


Less than $10,000: 


1,027 


Less than 20 percent 


30 


20 to 24 percent 


92 


25 to 29 percent 


182 


30 to 34 percent 


64 


35 percent ormore 


548 


Not computed 


111 


|$10,000 to $19,999: 


916 


Less than 20 percent 


119 


20 to 24 percent 


55 


25 to 29 percent 


62 


30 to 34 percent 


84 


35 percent or more 


532 


Not computed 


64 


|$20,000 to $34,999: 


1,352 


Less than 20 percent 


260 


20 to 24 percent 


198 


25 to 29 percent 


360 


30 to 34 percent 


121 


35 percent or more 


365 


Not computed 


48 


$35,000 to $49,999: 


944 


Less than 20 percent 


344 


20 to 24 percent 


303 


25 to 29 percent 


198 


30 to 34 percent 


50 


35 percent or more 


41 


Not computed 


8 


$50,000 to $74,999: 


905 


Less than 20 percent 


702 


20 to 24 percent 


123 


25 to 29 percent 


35 


30 to 34 percent 


13 


35 percent or more 






Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 26 



Not computed 


32 


$75,000 to $99,999: 


'218 


Less than 20 percent 


,205 


20 to 24 percent 


|o 


25 to 29 percent 


|7 


30 to 34 percent 


|o 


35 percent or more 


|o 


Not computed 


|6 


$100,000 or more: 


'156 


Less than 20 percent 


148 


20 to 24 percent 





25 to 29 percent 





30 to 35 % + 





Not computed 


8 



In summary, of 3,072 (3,295 - those not computed) Northampton renters earning less than 
$35,000 = 1,714 or 56% paid at least 30% of their gross income for rent and utilities. 1,445 
of tiie 3,072 or 47% of tiiose households paid 35% or more for housing costs. 

For comparison, in 2000, 36.4% of Massachusetts' renters and 58.5% of all renters 
earning less tiian $35,000 paid at least 30% of tiieir gross household income for rent and 
utilities. 

Anotiier 2000 Census chart indicates a figure of 1,818 households paying more tiian 30% 
of tiieir income for gross rent, 33% of tiie total. 



Gross Rent as a % of Household Income For Northampton 


Gross Rent% of Househc 
RenterOccupied units 


)ld Income/ 


Northampton 


rotal: 


5,518 


Less than 10 percent 


241 


10 to 14 percent 


648 


15 to 19 percent 


919 


20 to 24 percent 


771 


25 to 29 percent 


844 


30 to 34 percent 


332 


35 to 39 percent 


273 


40 to 49 percent 


403 


50 percent or more 


810 


Notconnputed 


277 



Census Table H69 'Tenure Gross Rent% of Household Inconne" 

How much do renters pay? The census information is provided below; however, getting 
accurate rental rate information in Northampton is difficult. Due to the high number of 
rental units located in one and two unit structures, landlords, particularly owner occupants 
have been reluctant in past survey efforts to reveal such information. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 27 



Gross Rents of Occupied Units in Northampton 



Northampton Median Gross Rent 


$647 


Total number of units: 


5,518 units 


With cash rent: 


5,320 units 


Less than $100 


41 units 


$100 to $149 


90 units 


$150 to $199 


349 units 


$200 to $249 


158 units 


$250 to $299 


160 units 


$300 to $349 


222 units 


$350 to $399 


130 units 


$400 to $449 


200 units 


$450 to $499 


234 units 


$500 to $549 


290 units 


$550 to $599 


386 units 


$600 to $649 


428 units 


$650 to $699 


457 units 


$700 to $749 


397 units 


$750 to $799 


446 units 


$800 to $899 


523 units 


$900 to $999 


355 units 


$1,000 to $1,249 


318 units 


$1,250 to $1,499 


113 units 


$1,500 to $1,999 


23 units 


$2,000 or more 


units 


No cash rent 


198 units 



U.S. Census Bureau, Cens 
Census Table H63 "Median 



us 2000 Table H62 "Gross Rent" 
Gross Rent (dollars)" 



Northampton Gross Rent by Bedroom 



Total: 


5,518 


No bedroom: 


285 


jWith cash rent: 


285 


Less than $200 


42 


$200 to $299 


52 


$300 to $499 


131 


$500 to $749 


51 


$750 to $999 


9 


$1,000 or more 





No cash rent 





1 bedroom: 


2,188 


With cash rent: 


2,134 


Less than $200 


326 


$200 to $299 


204 


$300 to $499 


373 


$500 to $749 


1,005 


$750 to $999 


181 


$1,000 or more 


45 


No cash rent 


54 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 28 



2 bedrooms: 


2,121 


With cash rent: 


2,063 


Less than $200 


92 


$200 to $299 


43 


$300 to $499 


143 


$500 to $749 


770 


$750 to $999 


848 


$1,000 or more 


167 


No cash rent 


58 


3 or more bedrooms: 


924 


With cash rent: 


838 


Less than $200 


20 


$200 to $299 


19 


$300 to $499 


139 


$500 to $749 


132 


$750 to $999 


286 


$1,000 or more 


242 


No cash rent 


86 



U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Table H67 "Bedroonns by Gross Rent" 

For comparison, the median gross rent in Massachusetts in 2000 was $684/month, with 
the following median rents: 



Median Rent by Bedroom Size 






studio 


1 bedroom 


2 bedrooms 


3+ bedrooms 


$567 


$578 


$745 


$760 



Current market rents are typically significantly higher than the census data, due to price 
escalation overtime and the fact that census rents also include subsidized rentals. 
(*According to the MHP Housing Needs Assessment Workbook, pg. 6.) 

What is the distribution of renter household size? 

Household Size 



[Total 


1990 


2000 


Renter occupied: 


5,501 


5,525 


1-person household 


2,509 


2,944 


2-person household 


1,751 


1,611 


3-person household 


616 


606 


4-person household 


335 


250 


l5-person household 


139 


79 


|6-person household 


79 


17 


7-or-more-person household 


72 


18 



Census Table H17 'Tenure by Household Size" 

This chart indicates the mix of bedrooms in rental units, indicating a range of housing 
options for different sized households. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 29 



Distribution of Units By Number of Bedrooms 



total: 


Northampton 


Renter occupied: 


|5,525 


No bedroom 


|285 


1 bedroom 


|2,188 


2 bedrooms 


|2,128 


3 bedrooms 


|674 


4 bedrooms 


179 


5 or more bedrooms'71 



U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Table H42 'Tenure by Bedrooms" 

The following chart shows how much turnover occurs in the rental inventory. A low 
turnover rate would indicate that the market could support additional rental housing in tiie 
community. 

How long have Northampton renters lived at their current address 

■Renter occupied: |5,525 



iMoved in 1999 to March 2000f"l,898 
Moved in 1995 to 1998 2,166 



Moved in 1990 to 1994 



716 



IMoved in 1980 to 1989 519_ 

JMoved in 1970 to 1979 80 

[Moved in 1969 or earlier 146 

Census Table H38 'Tenure by Year Householder Moved Into Unit" 

For comparison, in Massachusetts, 29.5% of renters had moved in tiie past year. In 
Northampton, 34% of all renters moved in 1999-2000. 



How old are Northampton renters? 
Malceup of Renter Population By Age 



Renteroccupled: 5,525 


Householder 15 to 24 years 531 
Householder 25 to 34 years 1,685 


Householder 35 to 44 years 1,253 


Householder 45 to 54 years 882 


Householder 55 to 59 years 227 


Householder 60 to 64 years 151 


Householder 65 to 74 years 267 


Householder 75 to 84 years '356 
Householder 85 years and overl73 



Census H14 'Tenure by Age of Householder" 

In Northampton, 14% of tiie rental units are occupied by householders 65 and over. 

In Massachusetts, 19% of all rental housing is rented by householders 65 and over. 
Statewide 31.8% of all householders 65 and over live in rental housing. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 30 



Indicators of Need 

What is the rental vacancy rate? 

The following table provides a figure for the total number of vacant units in April 2000, the 
date the census was collected. The suggested fornnula for calculating the "Rental Vacancy 
Rate/' is to add the 'Vacant for Rent" figure Census Table H8 to Occupied Rental Units 
Census Table H7, then divide the Vacantfor Rent Units by the total Occupied and Vacant 
for Rent Units. 



Northampton Vacant Units 






Total: 


|525 


For rent 


|208 


For sale only 


154 


Rented or sold, not occupied 


169 


For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 


1135 


For migrant workers 


|o 


Other vacant 


|59 


Renter and Owner Occupied Uni 


ts 




fNorthampton 




tfotal: 11,880 






Owner occupied |6,355 




Renter occupied l5,525 





Census Table H7 'Tenure" 

Based on the formula above, Northampton's vacancy rate would be 3.6%. Most advocates 
and housing providers, however, would allege that number to be much lower. 

For comparison, in 2000 the overall vacancy rate in Massachusetts was 3.7%. A vacancy 
rate below 5% is an indicator that renters are experiencing limited choices and increasing 
costs and points to the need for additional units. 

How long is the local waiting list for existing subsidized housing? 

There are 324 families on the Section 8 waiting list (as of November 2003) at the 
Northampton Housing Authority. These numbers are 2 years old, as the list has not been 
opened for new applicants since 2001. 



Waiting List Requests 






One bedroom 


2 bedrooms 


3 bedrooms 


4 bedrooms 


91 


136 


87 


10 



Public Housing (Florence Heights, Hampshire Heights and 705's ) 



1 bdrm. 



2 bdrms. 



3 bdrms. 



4 bdrms. 



Total 



State/Federal (combined list) 



37 



16 



66 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 31 



Only households with completed applications are placed on the waiting list. There are 
approximately 100 additional applications pending with incomplete submissions. There are 
also 20 units off line at Hampshire Heights, undergoing kitchen and bathroom renovations. 

Information gathered from Housing Search workers at the Hampshire Community Action 
Commission yields a need for affordable, subsidized 2 and 3 bedroom units. Families with 
low and moderate incomes cannot afford market rate units. 

HCAC's Housing Services Program began tracking placement of the DTA referred families 
they work with in 2002. 



TOWN OF ORIGIN 



Town 


County 


# 


% 


Amherst 


Hampshire 


26 


24% 


Belchertown 


Hampshire 


4 


4% 


Cummington 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Easthampton 


Hampshire 


21 


19% 


Hatfield 


Hampshire 


3 


3% 


Holyoke 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Leeds 


Hampshire 


3 


3% 


Northampton 


Hampshire 


37 


34% 


Florence 


Hampshire 


8 


7% 


South Hadley 


Hampshire 


2 


2% 


West Hatfield 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Williamsburg 


Hampshire 


2 


2% 


Southamptopn 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 






no 




PLACEMEm- 


Town 


County 


# 


% 


Greenfield 


Franklin 


5 


5% 


South Deerfield 


Franklin 


1 


1% 


Sunderland 


Franklin 


2 


2% 


Turners Falls 


Franklin 


1 


1% 


Subtotal 


Franklin 


9 


9% 


Chicopee 


Hampden 


2 


25 


East Otis 


Hampden 


1 


1% 


Holyoke 


Hampden 


8 


8% 


Palmer 


Hampden 


1 


1% 


West Springfield 


Hampden 


4 


4% 


Westfield 


Hampden 


2 


2% 


Springfield 


Hampden 


4 


4% 


Subtotal 


Hampden 


22 


22% 


Amherst 


Hampshire 


18 


18% 


Belchertown 


Hampshire 


4 


4% 


Chesterfield 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Cummington 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Easthampton 


Hampshire 


10 


10% 


Hadley 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Hatfield 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Leeds 


Hampshire 


3 


3% 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 32 



Northampton 


Hampshire 


14 


14% 


Florence 


Hampshire 


2 


2% 


South Hadley 


Hampshire 


3 


3% 


Ware 


Hampshire 


2 


2% 


West Hatfield 


Hampshire 


2 


2% 


Williamsburg 


Hampshire 


1 


1% 


Subtotal 


Hampshire 


63 


64% 




Out of area 


5 


5% 




Total 


99 






Not reported 


11 





This data indicates that a low percentage of families find housing in the Northampton area 
and it is reported that when the few Section 8 vouchers that are still circulating are used, 
tiiose numbers will drop significantiy, as no new vouchers are being issued. 

Currentiy, obstacles include tiie lack of Section 8 vouchers for use by clients. The 
Northampton Housing Autiiority can re-issue a voucher if one gets 'turned in" but no new 
ones are being issued. The data on housing placement being kept by HCAC indicating 
success in finding housing for families, will significantiy drop from tiiis point forward, as tiie 
Section 8 freeze takes hold. 



How many renters pay in excess of tiieir income for rent? Census table H71 "Age of 
Householder by Gross Rent as % of Household Income in 1999" 



Northampton 1 


Total: 


5,518 


Householder 15 to 24 years: 


531 


Less than 20 percent 


112 


20 to 24 percent 


69 


25 to 29 percent 


64 


30 to 34 percent 


6 


35 percent or more 


253 


Not computed 


27 


Householder 25 to 34 years: 


1,678 


Less than 20 percent 


609 


20 to 24 percent 


281 


25 to 29 percent 


252 


30 to 34 percent 


62 


35 percent or more 


443 


Not computed 


31 


Householder 35 to 44 years: 


1,253 


Less than 20 percent 


524 


20 to 24 percent 


189 


25 to 29 percent 


147 


30 to 34 percent 


89 


35 percent or more 


290 


Not computed 


14 


Householder 45 to 54 years: 


882 


Less than 20 percent 


315 


20 to 24 percent 


82 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 33 



25 to 29 percent 


167 


30 to 34 percent 


44 


35 percent or more 


223 


Not computed 


51 


Householder 55 to 64 years: 


378 


Less than 20 percent 


116 


20 to 24 percent 


47 


25 to 29 percent 


71 


30 to 34 percent 


50 


35 percent or more 


60 


Not computed 


34 


Householder 65 to 74 years: 


267 


Less than 20 percent 


49 


20 to 24 percent 


15 


25 to 29 percent 


59 


30 to 34 percent 


39 


35 percent or more 


66 


Not computed 


39 


Householder 75 years and over: 


529 


Less than 20 percent 


83 


20 to 24 percent 


88 


25 to 29 percent 


84 


30 to 34 percent 


42 


35 percent or more 


151 


Not computed 


81 



When compared to H73, which shows the rent burden related to household income, it is 
possible to estimate the number of households that would be income-eligible for 
subsidized, were it available. 

For comparison, 36.3% of all renter households in Massachusetts paid 30% or more of 
gross household income for rent in 2000. This included 44.4% of renters over 65 years old 
and 34% of renters under 65. 

What is the relationship of rent to local wages? 

Department of E mployment and Training data indicates the average wage earned by all 
workers and by typical jobs in the area. A fornnula is suggested for determining the 
following: 

What could a typical worker (teacher, nurse, retail clerk) in Northampton afford to pay for 

rent? 

How much would they have to earn to afford the median rent? 

Formula: 

divide an average annual wage by 12= average monthly income 

multiply that monthly income x .30 (30%) = max. affordable rent 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 34 



look at current rental rates and compute how nnuch a worker would have to earn to rent the 
nnedian priced units 

The nnedian income for a family of 4 in Northampton is $41,808 
(Census Table DP-3. Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000) 

$41,808 divided by 12= $3,484 (monthly income) 

$3,484 X 30% = $1,045 (amount available for monthly housing costs) 
$1,045 - $300 = $745 (monthly amount for rent after utility costs/ estimate) 

$745 is an affordable rent amount for a family of 4 earning the median income. 

Assuming a family of 4 requires at least a 2 bedroom unit, few of the options listed below 
would be considered affordable for a family of that size. 

*Sampling of Current Market Rate Rental Rents 

1.) Hampton Court 1 bdm. (586 sq.ft.) = $ 900+ 

2 bdm. (906 sq.ft.) = $1,200+ 

3 bdm. (1,285 sq.ft.) =$1,500+ 

Downtown/77 units/on-site parking/range refrig. d. washer 
heat and hot water included 
2.) Gables/ 491 Bridge Rd. 1 bdm. (590 sq.ft.) =$800 

2 bdm. (1,900 sq.ft.) =$1,000 

3 bdm. = $1,200 

Garden and townhouse/50 units/on-site parking/heat and hot water included 
3.) 67WestStreet /lbdm. (no utes) $650-$800 
Garden style/21 units/on-site parking/ range, refrig. 
12 F ruit Street 1 bdm. (no utes) $630-$750 
2 bdm. (no utes) $825 

Garden style/ 12 units/ on-site parking/ range, refrig. 
5.) 70 Riverside Street 2 bdm. (no utes) $700 
3 bdm. (no utes.) $810 

Townhouse/6 units/on-site parking/ range, refrig. d. washer 
6.) Damon Road 1 bdm. (no utes) $575-675 

2 bdm. (no utes) $750-850 

Garden Style/16 units/on-site parking/ range, refrig. 
7.) Hampton Gardens 1 bdm. (no utes.) $765+ 
73 Barrett Street 2 bdms. (no utes.) $ 950+ 

3 bdms. (no utes.) $ 1,175 

4 bdms. (no utes). $1,225 

Garden and townhouse/ 207 units/ on-site parking/ range, refrig. d. washer 
8.) 312 Hatfield Street 1 bdm. $825+ 
2 bdm. $925+ 
Garden and townhouse/72 units heat and hot water incl. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 35 



On-site parking, range, refrig. dishwasher 
9.) 69-81 Prospect Street 1 bdnn. $800+ 
2 bdm. $900+ 
Garden/ 33 units/ no parl<ing, range refrig. heat/hot water included 

Sample Rental Rates in Homes and Condominiums 



Apartment Unit 


Monthly rental rate, w/out utilities 


1 bedroom 


$ 650 - $ 900 


2 bedroom 


$800 -$1,300 


3 bedroom 


$ 900 - $ 1,400 



Current Rental Inventory Assessment 

A variety of apartment property types exist in Northampton. Included are apartment 
buildings with numbers of units, as well as two, three and four-family homes and single 
family homes made available for rent. 

The majority of the units described above, tend to be more affordable than others in the 
inventory. This is due to the fact that most were either constructed or renovated between 
the early 1970's and the early 1990's. Many landlords have rented to the same tenant(s) 
over a long period of time and have not increased rents. This would account for many of 
the units having lower rents than they could have. 

(Market data described above taken from the Appraisal conducted by Bennett Franklin 
Real Estate Services forthe Community Builders, developers of the Northampton State 
Hospital, in August 2003.) 

Normally, there are few apartments available at any one time in Northampton. The 
presence of approximately 1,500 University of Massachusetts students, in addition to 
faculty, graduate and Ada Comstock students from Smith College usually impacts the 
availability of local inventory. Families used to be able to access the inventory at the end of 
the school years, when the students left for the summer. In the past five years, however, 
students passed their units along to other students during the summer, to guarantee their 
availability when they return for the fall sessions. 

However, anecdotal information from local rental property managers yields a very different 

picture. (Telephone interviews 11/24/03). 

Robinson Real Estate manager of 1500 units in Northampton reports that the rental market 

is presently extremely slow. Having worked at this agency for 7 years, this is the slowest 

activity level the partner interviewed has ever seen. He attributes this to the following 

factors: 

• Uncertain economy/war 

• Lack of job opportunities 

• Northampton rents have gotten too high 

• Low interest rates are providing choices for people to purchase homes rather than 
paying high rents 

• UMass students are reluctant to travel across the Coolidge Bridge which is under 
construction and causes long traffic delays 

Grow Smart Northampton Page 36 



The company currently has an advertisement running in the local newspaper describing 9 
units for rent and no calls are being received. The manager spoke of time in the late 
1990's until this past spring where activity was "crazy" with constant phone calls and 
appointments. He said they currently have 40 units available, where they would have had 

5 last year. He also has 15 houses available for rent when the inventory is usually 2 or 3. 
He described the current situation as "unheard of". 

The manager depicted his usual client base as professionals including some Smith faculty 
and people looking to be close to the 1-91 corridor. He said that for a time, people were 
coming up from New York and purchasing properties at a level that necessitated their 
having to charge high rents, which they are notable to get. He said he has landlords 
calling him daily asking why their properties are not rented. He said people have reached 
the limit of what they can pay for rent, and when the amount gets too high, they are 
choosing to purchase homes instead. The low interest rates for home purchase have been 
a big factor allowing people to refuse to pay high rents. 

Suzanne of Suzanne and Company , overseers of 500 local rental units since 1997, 
corroborates these observations. She indicates that the market has stabilized over the past 

6 months attributing this to the low interest rates for purchase, the lack of job opportunities 
and units being converted to condos. She said rents are coming down and landlords are 
making concessions in order to find tenants, such as allowing pets. She confirmed not 
seeing as many University of Massachusetts students, noting that with the tuition and fee 
increases at the Campus, more students are opting to commute from home. She said rents 
in Northampton have peaked and people are saying no to the higher rates. She also 
observed that people from New York (used to paying higher rates) are no longer coming 
due to the lack of job opportunities. She said that effects of the economy take longer to 
reach Northampton than in other locations, but that it is having an impact. Suzanne 
anticipates that the vacancy rate is increasing and she has an unprecedented 50 
apartments available. 

Hampshire Property Management Group rents the units they manage, totaling 
approximately 75-100 units. The person interviewed there also reports slow activity. She 
attributed low interest rates, pricing too high and lack of tenant movement. 



Property Management Co. 


1998 (avgs.) 


2003 


Robinson Realty 


1 bdm. $ 550 


$ 600-650 


- rates do not include utes. 


2 bdm. $ 700 


$ 800-850 




3 bdm. $ 800 


$ 1,000 




4 $1,100 


few/ $ 1,400 


Hampshire Property 


1 bdm. $ 550 


$ 750-900 


Management 


2 bdm. $ 650 


$ 950-1,050 




3 bdm. $ 850 


$ 975 ( old bidg. no pkng. 




4 bdm. None 


Usually 1,400 

4bdm./SF houses only $1,700-2,000 


Suzanne & Company 


1 bdm. 550-700 


$ 550-1- 




2 bdm. 750-1,000 


$750-1- 




3 bdm. few 


few 




4 bdm. none 


none 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 37 



Despite the current lull (11/03) all personnel interviewed expected the market to revitalize 
next spring, if not before. All agreed thatEasthampton is the area where activity is 
boonning, as at least for awhile, it remains more affordable than Northampton. 

Area realtors and housing search workers agree, few low income families and individuals 
are able to find housing in Northampton. Hopefully, with the Housing Authority units 
coming back on line, the unfreezing of the Section 8 vouchers and new production, that 
situation will improve. 

With the exception of Valley Community Development's Millbank 2 Project ( see Projects 
Underway section), there has been no multi-family rental construction. In fact, many units 
have been converted to condominium ownership. The other complicating factor is the 
(planned) removal of 62 units of market rate affordable rental housing from the West Street 
neighborhood to accommodate Smith College's campus expansion for a Science and 
Engineering Complex. 

Smith has recently made a commitment, however, to replace those units and assist with 
the relocation of those tenants that will be displaced by the demolition of those buildings. 

The demand, as observed by housing search workers assisting low income people, is for 2 
and 3 bedroom units. According to market rate rental agents, the demand is for 2 bedroom 
units. It was noted however, that often people unable to afford one bedroom units will opt 
for a two bedroom and a roommate to help cover expenses. 

Expiring Use 

The City continues to work diligently to maintain the affordability of Country Lane Estates 
(formerly Meadowbrook). The 252 unit apartment was purchased 2 years ago by Aspen 
Square Management from W. Springfield. After expressing their intention to pre-pay the 
mortgage and convert the complex to market rate, the Mayor lobbied and secured State 
resources that the new owners could apply to keeping the units affordable. At this time, 
negotiations continue. 

The other expiring use property in the City, Hampton Gardens, contains 207 units. In order 
to compensate for the owners mortgage prepayment and conversion to market rate in 
1999, the Northampton Affordable Housing Trust fund was created. The fund, now 
approaching its second year of operation, is assisting 22 families with rental subsidies that 
enable them to live affordably at the complex. 

NewProiects Underway/ Rental Opportunities Planned 

The Northampton Housing Partnership, the Office of Planning and Development, Valley 
Community Development Corporation and HAP, have been working continuously to bring 
new affordable housing to the City. Many of those efforts are finally coming to fruition. 

Paradise Pond Apartments : It has always been a dream for those administering J essie's 
House, the City's only homeless shelter for families, to create transitional and permanent 
housing for formerly homeless families. J essie's House is located on a parcel owned by 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 38 



the Northampton Housing Authority. Directly behind that parcel is land abutting Snnith 
College and the Northampton State Hospital property. The parcel is one of four that were 
deeded to the Housing Authority through the disposition legislation associated with the 
transfer and redevelopment of the State hospital. 

In the spring of 2003, the NHA issued a Request for Proposals to develop the parcel. HAP 
(previously the Hampden Hampshire Housing Partnership, a regional housing agency 
based in Springfield) responded, in conjunction with the Center for Human Development 
(program administrators of J essie's House). The proposal is to create 12 units of family 
subsidized rental housing with support services provided by the J essie's House program. 
Funding proposals are pending from the Federal McKinney Program through the Three 
County Continuum of Care, the Mass. Dept. of Housing and Community Development and 
Smith College. A local Community Development Block grant contribution has been 
earmarked. (Local CDBG of $75,000 committed. (143 West Street) 

Millbank 2 : The Valley CDC has worked many years towards creating new downtown 
affordable housing. Construction is underway on the rehabilitation of 6 existing rowhouse 
units, the upgrade of 4 condominium in an adjacent building (bringing the Valley's 
ownership to 8 of 12 condo units/ the Housing Authority owns the other 4) and new 
construction of 10 additional family units. These 24 new and improved units should be on 
line nextspring. (79 Michelman Ave. & Millbank Condominiums) 

3.) Special Needs Housing/ 689 Allocation: The Northampton Housing Authority is 
moving ahead with the second State Hospital parcel on Grove Street. The Authority 
received an allocation of nine 689 units in the late 1980's. It was always the hope that they 
could be utilized in conjunction with the State hospital redevelopment. The 6 one story 
units are being designed by an Architect selected by the Mass. Department of Housing 
and Community Development. These units should be under construction in 2004, possible 
available late in the year, or early in 2005. 

4.) Ice Pond Parcels : The first residential sub-division being created through the State 
hospital redevelopment process by The Community Builders is underway. The 26 lot 
subdivision has been permitted and funding sources secured. Affordable housing will be 
constructed on six of the lots and sold to First Time Homebuyers. The lottery was 
conducted by the Valley CDC, who has contracted with TCB to do the income qualification 
and marketing. 2 of those homes will contain accessory apartments which will be available 
for rent (total of 8 affordable units/ 6 homeownership, 2 rental). The parcel is located in the 
beautiful rural southwest section of the City, with commanding views. It is a wonderful 
example of mixed income housing that hopefully will become a model for future 
development. ($35,000 local CDBG commitment) 

SRO Preservation : The retention and improvement of local single room occupancy units 
has been a long term City goal. This past summer, the Go West building in Florence, was 
acquired by the Valley CDC. The proposal is to renovate the building into an enhanced 
SRO, with kitchens and baths in each unit. The commercial space on the first floor shall be 
retained. The building sits prominently on the corner of this secondary commercial district 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 39 



and is deteriorated in condition. The 23 units will be reduced to 19, in order to 
accommodate the new unit layouts. Unfortunately, the permit from the Planning Board to 
allow a handicapped unit to be installed in the first floor, has been appealed by some local 
merchants. The appeal is pending. ( CDBG commitment $170,000) 

Green Street SRO : Smith College has been negotiating with HER, Inc. to replace an 
existing SRO building that Smith wishes to purchase to accommodate campus expansion. 
The existing 14 unit building has been there for years. Smith has offered to build a new 
enhanced SRO to house those tenants, on a parcel across from J essie's House. Although 
the units will be the same in number, therefore, no net gain to the community, we will gain 
quality enhanced units with on-site parking. The new location is still a walkable distance 
to downtown. (Local CDBG commitment was provided early on for the Green Street 
location.) 

Village at Hospital / Northampton State Hospital Re-development: Phase One: which is 
fully funded includes the rehabilitation of 2 existing buildings into 33 apartments. The 
bedroom composition consists of 16 one bedroom units, 16 two bedroom units and 1 three 
bedroom units. Work will begin next spring, units to be available in 2004-2005. Total 
project cost/ $7,095,953/ $215,029 per unit. ($75,000 local CDBG commitment). 
Phase Two: 31 new construction townhouse units for families and individuals. There will 
be 6 one bedroom units, and 25 three bedroom units. 19 will be reserved for at or below 
50% of area median income. Of these, 10 units will have project-based Section 8 
vouchers. 3 units will be reserved for households at or below 30% area median income. 12 
units will be reserved for households between 51% and 60% of area median income. Of 
the 31 units, 6 will be reserved for clients of the Department of Mental Health. Total project 
cost/ $7,313,000/ $235,903 per unit. (Local CDBG commitment $75,000). 

Northampton Independent Living The Community Builders have purchased 6 units in the 
River Run condominium complex for housing for clients of the Dept. of Mental Health. 
Funding sources are being sought to cover project costs, as HUD denied the extension of 
an earlier 811 award given to ServiceNet, Inc. TCB had purchased the units on the 
understanding the 811 would be re-activated, then the request was denied. Currently, one 
of the units is housing a DMH client, as they slowing become available through attrition. 

Laurel Street Parcel This is another Housing Authority parcel deeded through the State 
Hospital disposition. It is around the corner from Grove Street. This project is in the 
planning stages. The proposal at this stage is for 6 duplexes for a total of 12 units, 
although this may change as the site design evolves. The time table for this would be 
2004-2005. No funding sources have been requested as of yet. 

Smith Northampton Affordabilitv Partnership Atthe October (2003) meeting of the Trustees 
of Smith College, a proposal was approved to create a fund in order to develop 
replacement housing for the market rate affordable housing that will be demolished to 
accommodate campus expansion. Currently, Smith owns 66 units in the West Street 
neighborhood and as many as 36 may be displaced by the first phase of new 
construction. A committee will be established to solicit and evaluate development 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 40 



proposals that request funding. This effort was a collaboration between the City, the 
College and area housing advocates. Now that the framework has been endorsed by the 
Trustees, efforts can begin to focus on specific projects. 

Home Ownership 

What does ownership housing cost in Northampton? 

[Lower value quartile.$115J00 



Median value |$144,600 



Census Table H75 and H76 " Lower Value Quartile (dollars) for Specified Owner-Occupied 
Housing Units" and 'Median Value (dollars) for Specified Owner-Occupied Housing Units" 

These figures provide a distribution of ownership housing prices for Northampton in 2000. 
According to the Northampton Assessor's Office, median sales prices for single family 
homes for the past 5 years were as follows: 

Median Sales Prices 



Year 


Median Sales Price 


1999 


$144,000 


2000 


$166,200 (revaluation year) 


2001 


$168,100 


2002 


$169,400 


2003 


$220,300 (revaluation year) 



Revisiting Census Table H73, the median renter household income, the buying power of 
local renter households can be determined: 

Median renter household income divided by 12 months = monthly income 

Monthly income x .30 =the total income available for paying principal, interest property 
taxes, insurance and condo fees where applicable 

Deduct for monthly insurance, condo fees, property taxes= amount available for mortgage 
payment 

Maximum amount of Mortgage given current interest rates can be determined at: 
www,fmcalcs.com/tools-tcc/fanniemae/calculatDr,html) 

Assessment concludes after assumption of a 10% down payment on a home (after closing 
costs of 3-5% of the purchase price). 

The FirstTime Homebuyer Counselor at Valley Community Development Corporation 
reports that households in Northampton earning 80% of median income can purchase 
homes in the range of $132,000. 

Data such as this is then compared to the asking prices for the homes in that range in 
Northampton. Data shown on the Sears Real Estate Service for the month of October 
2003 indicate the following single family and condo properties for sale in Northampton. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 41 



$179,900 Single Family Ranch 


$189,900 Single Family Cape 


$229,000 Single Family 'Farmhouse 


$245,000 Single Family Ranch 


$259,900 Single Family Other) 


$279,900 Single Family Cape 


$285,000 Single Family Colonial 


$375,000 Single Family Colonial 


$620,000 


Single Family Cape 


$99,000 Condo Garden j 


$113,900 Condo Garden 


$119,900 Condo Hi-Rise _, 


$129,900 Condo Garden 


$137,500 Condo Townhouse 


$159,000 Condo Townhouse 


$250,000 


Condo Townhouse 


$250,000 


Condo Townhouse 


$250,000 


Condo Townhouse 


$250,000 


Condo Garden 


$259,900 'Condo Garden 


$295,000 Condo Garden 




$318,900 Condo Hi-Rise 




$339,900 Condo Hi-Rise 




$417,900 Condo Hi-Rise 




$270,000 


Multi Family 






$950,000 


Multi Family 





Another current set from Goggins Realty's website for Northam 


pton. 


6 bedroom, 3 bed, 1 bath 


$129900 


5 room, 2 bed, 1 bath cottage 


$139900 


6 room, 3 bed, 1 bath ranch 


$162500 


5 room, 2 bed, 2 bath ranch 


$179900 


6 room, 3 bed, 1 bath farmhouse 


$179900 


5 room, 2 bed, 1 bath cape 


$189900 


7 room, 3 bed, 1 bath farmhouse 


$204900 


6 room, 3 bed, 1.5 bath cape 


$209900 


6 room, 4 bed, 1 bath cape 


$219000 


5 room, 2 bed, 1 bath farmhouse 


$229000 


4 room, 2 bed, 1 bath ranch 


$245000 


6 room, 3 bed, 1.5 bath colonial 


$248000 


7 room, 3 bed, 1 bath ranch 


$249900 


5 room, 3 bed, 1.5 bath other 


$259900 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 42 



6 room, 3 bed, 2 bath cape 


$260000 


8 room, 5 bed, 2 bath farmhouse 


$275000 


7 room, 3 bed, 1 bath colonial 


$275000 


4 room, 2 bed, 1.5 bath ranch 


$279900 


6 room, 3 bed, 3 bath cape 


$279900 


5 room, 2 bed, 1 bath ranch 


$282500 


8 room, 3 bed, 2 bath colonial 


$285000 


7 room, 5 bed, 3 bath raised ranch 


$299000 


8 room, 4 bed, 2.5 bath ranch 


$330000 


8 room, 4 bed, 1.5 bath antique home 


$349900 


6 room, 3 bed, 1 bath farmhouse 


$349900 


8 room, 4 bed, 2.5 bath colonial 


$375000 


8 room, 3 bed, 2.5 bath farmhouse 


$425000 


7 room, 3 bed, 2.5 bath contemporary 


$440000 


8 room, 4 bed, 2.5 bath other 


$449000 


7 room, 4 bed, 2 bath cape 


$475000 


7 room, 4 bed, 3 bath cottage 


$489900 


13 room, 7 bed, 2.5 bath Victorian 


$500000 


10 room, 4 bed, 3 bath cape contemporary 


$540000 


9 room, 4 bed, 2 bath Victorian 


$575000 


10 room, 4 bed, 2.5 bath tudor 


$619000 


9 room, 4 bed, 3 bath cape 


$620000 


14 room, 5 bed, 4.5 bath Victorian 


$650000 


15 room, 6 bed, 4.5 bath contemporary 


$669900 



. (11/23/03 ©2003 MLS Property Information Network, Inc) 

Based on this sample, it can be determined that no single family homes would be 
affordable for purchase by a low or moderate income individual or family. A few of the 
condominium units are within the range, however, condo fees added to the monthly 
housing expenditures often make these units unaffordable. 

New Projects Underway/ Homeownership Opportunities Planned 

Ice Pond as described above, 6 of the lots in this 27 lot subdivision will be available to low 
and moderate income FirstTime Homebuyers. The lottery to select the income eligible 
families was held November 17, 2003. The Community Builders, having secured 
$1,809,000 ($226,125 cost per unit) will build the homes next spring. The specifications for 
these homes include 1,586-1,606 sq. ft, 2 story structures with 3 bedrooms, 2-2 V2 baths. 
This project is included in the overall project scope for the redevelopment of the State 
Hospital property, although not located on the primary campus parcel. (CDBG $35,000) 

Village at Hospital Hill The overall master plan calls for a mixed-use community consisting 
of affordable and market rate housing, live-work studios, a child care center, a 60-80 unit 
assisted living facility for seniors, as well as 476,000 sq. ft. of space accommodating office, 
retail, light industrial, research and development uses. Full build out is estimated to take 
place over 10-15 years. 

A total of 207 residential units are planned. 100 of those will be single family homes. (107 
rental units). Overall, fifty percent of the residential units will be affordable. Seventy five 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 43 



percent of the rental units and 25% of the homeownership units will be reserved for low 
and nnoderate income households, leaving the balance of the units to be sold or rented at 
nnarket rates. Therefore, 25 affordable honneownership units will be developed. This 
number includes the 6 on the Ice Pond parcel; 21 lots will be available on the Campus site. 
It remains to be determined if The Community Builders will build the affordable units 
themselves. 

The Oaks This is a privately developed subdivision that received waivers from the 
Planning Board for various components in the permitting process. As a result the Board 
attached a condition that the development includes affordable units. Of the 70 units 
planned, 8-10 will be sold as affordable FirstTime Homebuyer units. 

The City's subdivision regulations allow for the creation of affordable housing in exchange 
for waivers. The guideline for unit creation is 11% of the total number, to reflect what 
currently exists in the community. This project will get underway in the spring, and Valley 
CDC has applied for State HOME funds that would allow them to purchase the affordable 
lots and construct the homes. They will also identify eligible purchasers and conduct the 
lottery. They will negotiate a contract with the developer to provide those services. (This 
will assist Valley with agency operating costs, which have suffered greatly with the 
elimination of the State's CEED program.) 

Westhampton Road/Comprehensive Permit The City utilized CDBG and other sources to 
purchase a track of land to achieve multiple goals: 1) A neighborhood housing buffer from 
a planned landfill expansion; 2) Tot/lot recreation space; 3) Walking trails; and 4) 
Affordable housing. The parcel was offered through an RFP and the Pioneer Valley 
Habitatfor Humanity was selected. Construction is underway for 3 duplex units; affordable 
homeownership opportunities for families earning 50% or below of area median income. 

The City applied for a Comprehensive Permit on behalf of Habitat. The only other comp 
permit application put forth in Northampton was in 1990 (Pines Edge, HOP Project). 
($160,000 CDBG commitment) One lot will be sold as a market rate lot. The program 
income from this transaction will allow the City to pursue additional mixed income limited 
development projects that tend to be too small for larger developers, yet they satisfy a City 
goal of creating scattered site affordable housing. 

Verona Garfield Housing Proiect This program was included in the same RFP as the 
project described above. Habitatfor Humanity will be developing this parcel also and will 
be applying in J anuary 2004 to the Zoning Board for a comprehensive permit. This parcel, 
purchased by the City will contain 3 duplex units to be built by Habitat in conjunction with 
the Smith Vocational High School Building Program, and one market rate lot. The City will 
sell the market rate lotto finance other limited development endeavors. (CDBG $110,000) 

Turkey Hill Affordable Housing The Housing Partnership worked successfully with a local 
private developer to create one affordable duplex unit on a rural parcel. Plans are moving 
ahead; construction will start in November and be completed next spring. Valley CDC is 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 44 



involved in identifying eligible households and conducting a lottery. (CDBG commitment 
$37,500) 

Currently, the City contracts with Valley Community Development Corporation to 
administer a FirstTime Homebuyer program. It has been frustrating to counsel families 
who then end up buying homes outside of Northampton. Seeing these home ownership 
opportunities here in our community is very exciting! 

Ongoing City Commitment 

Research and data analysis will continue. With a number of projects in the pipeline, it is 
prudent to revisit the analysis once they have been built and occupied. At that point, it can 
be determined which gaps have been filled and which remain. 

A specific senior housing needs assessment will be undertaken. 

Additionally, the Office of P lanning and Development is in the process of updating its 
Impediments to Fair Housing Analysis, which addresses housing discrimination issues and 
removing barriers to accessing affordable housing. 

The Northampton Housing Partnership has recently revised its Goals and Objectives to 
guide its work for the coming year and has met monthly since 1990. The Planning and 
Implementation Sub-Committees of the Partnership continue to move those efforts ahead 
with extensive volunteer dedication and commitment. 

The Northampton Affordable Housing Trust Fund Trustees involve another group of 
dedicated volunteers that oversee the operation of the fund. They also participate in on- 
going discussion with the owners of Hampton Gardens to insure that complex remains 
affordable and accessible to low income residents. 

The Next Step Collaborative will continue to meet to address homelessness in 
Northampton. This group of housing and homeless service providers has met monthly 
since 1994, to create and maintain individual emergency shelter programs and support 
services. 

The City will continue to be the lead agent for the Three County Continuum of Care that 
oversees a regional consortium to address homelessness in Franklin, Hampshire and 
Hampden counties. The City's Housing Planner works 2 days each week administering 
that grant (since 1997). The average annual award is $1,300,000, providing funding to 8- 
12 area agencies. In excess of 7 million dollars has been secured for the region through 
this collaborative effort. 

Conclusion 

When this document is viewed in conjunction with the City's Consolidated Plan (2000) and 
the Annual Performance Report for this year's Community Development Block Grant 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 45 



Program, a complete picture of Northampton's efforts to preserve existing and create new 
housing opportunities for all income levels in the community is documented. 



Housing Indicators: Northampton has 46.5% renter occupied dwellings where the State 
has only 38.3%. The housing cost burden, which is determined by the median household 
income as a percent of median home value, was slightly higher for Northampton. 
Affordable housing consisted of 11.3% of the total number of housing units whereas the 
State only has 8.5%. Both vacancy rates for homeownership and rental are below State 
levels. 



J' 



Housing Indicators 



t 



50.00% 
45.00% 
40.00% 
35.00% 
30.00% 
25.00% 
20.00% 
15.00% 
10.00% 
5.00% 
0.00% 



^ 



^ 



fffc 



Northampton 
MA 



J^ 



I I I 



Renter 
occupied 
dwellings 



Housing 
cost burden 



Affordable 
housing 

Rate 



Homeowner Rental 

vacancy rate \acancy rate 



Poverty IndicatDrs: Northampton's poverty rate is 8.7%, which is lower than that of the 
State. The child poverty rate is also lower but the elderly poverty rate is slightly higher 
than the State's. The percent of school children eligible for free or reduced price lunch and 
the number of participants in the WIC Programs were lower for Northampton. In general, 
Northampton's poverty rates are very similar to State levels. 



Poverty Indicators 



1 Northampton 
iMA 



30.00% 
25.00% 
20.00% 
15.00% 
10.00% 
5.00% 
0.00% 



^o\o 



^ 



^ 



^ 



%■ 



J^ 





.o\o i^° 



or 



Poverty 
Rate 



Child 

Poverty 

Rate 



Elderly 

P overty 

Rate 



% children 
eligible for 

lunch 
program 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 46 



Social IndicatDrs: The percentage of individuals over 16 who are not employed is 33.9% 
versus 36.8% in the State. The homicide rate per 100,000 persons (average of 1996 
through 2000) was less for Northampton. The suicide rate per 100,000 persons (average 
of 1996 through 2000) was 9.7, which is higher than the State's rate of 7.2. The number of 
child abuse cases (both alleged and verified) is less than State levels. Moreover, 
Northampton's crime rate decreased 10.04 percent from 1998 to 1999. In 1998, 763 total 
crimes occurred at a rate of 26.6 incidents per 1,000 residents versus 680 total crimes at a 
rate of 23.93 in 1999. 



12 
§ 10 

1 s 

a 
I 6 



Social indicators 



D Northampton 

■ MA 



9.7 10 






7 2 




7.8 
























3.4 


1^ 


















" 














Homicide Rate Suicide Rate Elderly Suicide Teen Suicide 

Rate Rate 

Average rate for the years 1996-2000 



Crime statistics 




1998 


1999 


Total crimes: 


763 


680 


l^urders: 


1 


1 


Rapes: 


6 


16 


Robberies: 


10 


9 


Aggravated 
assaults: 


99 


73 


Burglaries: 


110 


73 


Larcenies: 


478 


456 


Motor vehicle 
thefts: 


59 


52 


Crime rate: per 

1,000 residents 


26.6 


23.93 



Town reported crime stats for 12 months of the year in 
1998 and 12 months of the year in 1999. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 47 



Economic Development Element 

{The 1998 Northampton-Easthampton Economic Development Strategy (Strategy) and the Vision 

2020: Vision and Consistency Analysis were approved by the Commonwealth as equivalent Economic 
Development plan elements under E0418, Equivalent Plan Items: 1) The Strategy's current and future 
economic profile (Pages 3-25); 2) Goals statements (Strategy, Pages 53-66, Vision 2020, Pages 2-4 & 8); 
and 3) GIS maps of economic development suitability (Vision 2020 PagelB and 50). The retail analysis 
portion of this element was designed to fill in gaps that the Chamber of Commerce, the Economic 
Development Coordinator, and the Planning Board identified in our knowledge base. Some of the data in the 
inventory is current, and some is needs to be updated in the near future.} 

Economic Inventory— Economic and Education Indicators 

Economic Profile Summary 

The City of Northampton is situated between the Connecticut River and the foothills of the 
Berkshires 20 miles north of Springfield. Northampton offers a sophisticated rural lifestyle 
rich in cultural, artistic, academic, and business resources. Northampton features one of 
the most vibrant downtown centers in New England and was named "NumberOne Best 
Small Arts Town in America" by author] ohn Villani and is recognized as one of the top 25 
Arts Destinations in the nation by AmericanStyle magazine. Northampton is home to 
Smith College and is strongly influenced by Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount 
Holyoke College and the University of Massachusetts as part of the five-college system in 
the region. The superb quality of life in Northampton contributes to its strong economic 
base with growing manufacturing, technology and service sectors. The local labor force is 
diverse, well educated and highly skilled. 

Northampton has a population of approximately 30,000 (28,978 people US. Census, 
30,000 City Census), which has been stable for many years. The population density is 
850 people per square mile and is denser than 230 out of 351 communities in 
Massachusetts. Northampton has a comparable, yet slightly lower, population density 
than the Town of G reenfield. The community is 90% white which is a slight decrease from 
the 1990 figure. On the other hand, all other race categories saw a slight increase in 
population during this time. Lastly, Northampton has a total of 15,081 registered voters of 
which there are 48.5% Democrats, 7.4% Republicans, and 0.2% other parties. 



Demographics 




Population 


28,978 


Total Households 


11,880 


Median Age 


37 


Median Household Income 


$41,808 


Average Annual Wage 


$32,651 


Per Capita Income 


$24,022 



Source: 2000 US Census. Massachusetts Division of Employments Training average annual wage 2002 
data 

Educational Attainment 

High school graduate or higher 88.7% 

Bachelor's degree or higher 46.1% 

Source: 2000 U.S. Census for population 25 years and older 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 48 



Property Tax Rate 

The City has a single tax rate of 16.25. Estimated Fiscal Year 04 rate is $13 
2003. 



to be set December 



General 
Population 


1990 


2000 


Total 
population 


29,289 


28,978 


% of state 
total 


0.49% 


0.46% 


Decrease in 
last decade 




-311 


% change in 
last decade 




-1.06% 


Total under 
age 18 


5,079 


4,917 


% underage 
18 


17.34% 


16.97% 



Racial characteristics 


1990 


2000 


Total white 


26,693 


26,083 


White % of population 


91.14% 


90.01% 


Total black 


490 


602 


Black % of population 


1.67% 


2.08% 


Total Asian 


827* 


906 


Asian % of population 


2.82% * 


3.13% 


Total Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 


.. 


15 


Hawaiian/PI % of population 


— 


0.05% 


Total American Indian/Eskimo 


49 


86 


Am. Indian/Eskimo % of 
population 


0.17% 


0.30% 


Total Other 


29 


697 


Other % of population 


0.10% 


2.41% 


Total multi-racial 


~ 


589 


Multi-racial % of population 


- 


2.03% 



^ Includes Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander 



Hispanic/Latino (of 
any race) 


1990 


2000 


Total Hispanic/Latino 


1,201 


1,518 


Hispanic/Latino % of population 


4.10% 


5.24% 



Residents were asked to identify whether they are Hispanic or Latino in a 
Employment: According to May 2001 question separate from that which asked their race. 

figures, Northampton has an unemployment rate of 2.1%, which is a lower rate than 289 of 
the 351 towns in Massachusetts and is lower than the unemployment rate of the State of 
Massachusetts at 5.3%. Simultaneously, the total labor force and the number of people 
employed in Northampton have grown. The sector with the highest number of employees 
is the service sector which includes health care and education. It also employs a higher 
percentage than the State. The next highest is retail/whole trade at 23.3%. Northampton 
has seen a decline in the number of employed in government transportation, 
communications, utilities, and tirade where tiiese sectors have positive percent changes 
tiiroughout Massachusetts. Only agriculture, forestry, fishing, and mining saw a higher 
percent change compared to tiie Commonwealtii. Massachusetts has had a significantiy 
larger percent change in employment in tiie construction sector versus Northampton. 
Furthermore, tiie percentage of people who are self-employed, work from home, and are 
part time is greater tiian of tiie State. 

*AII information compiled from Commonwealth of Massachusetts sources 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 49 



Employment 




1999 


2000 


May 2001 


Total labor 
force: 


15,430 


15,212 


15,655 


Number 
employed: 


14,972 


14,924 


15,326 


Number 
unemployed: 


458 


288 


329 


Unemployment 
rate 


3% 


1.90% 


2.10% 



Note: Unemployment rates are based on person's place of residence 



Employment bv Sector 


EMPLOYEES 


PERCENT 


Services (Includes Health Care & Education) 


7,868 


44.5 


Retail/Wholesale Trade 


4,133 


23.3 


Government 


3,161 


18 


Manufacturing 


1,422 


8 


Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 


476 


2.7 


Construction 


321 


1.8 


Transportation, Communication, Public Utilities 


213 


1.2 


Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing 


104 


.6 


Average Annual Wage 


$32,651 


Total Annual Payroll 


$519,350,706 



Massachusetts Division of Employment & Training 2000 data, average annual wage 2002 data 



9) 



50.0% 
45.0% 
40.0% 
35.0% 
30.0% 
25.0% 
20.0% 
15.0% 
10.0% 
5.0% 
0.0% 



&^\'^ 



^5^ 



en 

c 

< ^ 

o 



Percent of Total Employment in 2000 



Krr 



<#- 



Ai 






^ 



-y 



ao\P 



I Northampton % of 
total employment 

I MA % of total 
employment 



^ 



^ 



c 
o 

u 



c 
o 
u 



s - S 



c 

(U 

E 
E 

o 
(J 



en 

c 

B 
u 

C 



(U 
I/) 



Employment Type 



>•' 



(D 
•D 

I- 



-^\° 



O 
Q. 

c 

I- 



- I/) 
c c 
o o 

(^ f^ m 

if u OJ 

E 
o 
u 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 50 



Employ merit Type Percentages 



70.0% n 



60.0% 



50.0% 



40.0% 



^ 30.0% 
0. 



20.0% 



10.0% 



0.0% 



I Northampton 
IMA 



58.9% 




















49.8% 
































32.2% 






















24.2% 














10.5% 3 go/. 


8.8% 

r ->n/ 






















V.D/0 




4.4% . 10/ 




1 ' 


















^m 


1 



% notprofessional or % self-employed % self-employed and % workfrom home 
managerial unincorporated 



Part-time 



Employment 



50.0% n 

40.0% 
30.0% 



i 20.0% 
u 

* 10.0% 



0.0% 
-10.0% 
-20.0% J 



Percent Change in Employment for 1996-2000 






D 

— y- 



S. (^ 



^ ^■ 



Ff 



c 
o 



O 
U 



(15 
(U 

(0 c 



D1 



45 



CD 



Employment Type 



I/) 



11 Northampton 
% Change 

1996-2000 

hMA% Change 

1996-2000 






n r S 



-nr-g- 
g E i 
(5 E 

^5 



Groiv Smart Northampton 



Page 51 



Labor Force Data 



Labor Force (MA DET June 2002) 


16,000 


Workforce Pull Within 45 mins. Travel Time 


414,115 


Residents working in Northampton 


61% 


Unemployment Rate (MA DET J une 2002) 


2.7% 



Massachusetts Division of Employment & Training 



Northampton J ob Losses from Business Closings 



Mass. DET 1996-2000 



Rapid Response Teann 2000-2003 



191 



221 



Wages: The average annual wage in Northampton is $29,345 whereas for the state it is 
$44,329. The percent change from 1996 to 2000 in the average annual wage was 30.7% 
for the state and only 17.4% for Northampton. In Northampton there are slightly more jobs 
per member of the labor force compared with the state. 



$50,000 n 
$45,000 
$40,000 
$35,000 
(U $30,000 
S $25,000 
> $20,000 
$15,000 - 
$10,000 
$5,000 
$0 ^ 








Wage Indicator 




n Northampton 
■ MA 










$44,329 $4b,0^ 


^9 








■ 


s 












$29,345 


$28 


204 


















































Average annual wage Average annual wages 
in private sector 







35.0% 
30.0% 
25.0% 
20.0% 
15.0% 
10.0% 
5.0% 
0.0% 



Economic Indicators for Northampton 



D Northampton 

■ MA 







0.70% 




























i/.4U7d 




















5.3% 5.3% 
























1.16% 1.02% 

►:: 1 '^1 



Unemployement rate Average annual wage, J obs/member of labor 
(ten-year average % change 1996-2000 force 

1991-2000) 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 52 



Average Hourly Earnings 




Manufacturing 


$14.44 


Durable Goods 


$14.48 


Fabricated ivietal Products 


$14.95 


Nondurable Goods 


$14.39 


Paper & Allied Products 


$14.35 


Printing & Publishing 


$13.49 


Customer Service Call Center (Northampton/Hadley) 


$8.50-$9 



Massachusetts Division of Employment & Training, October 2001 

Commercial/Industrial Base 

Industrial: 2,212,942 square feet 

Commercial: 4,120,267 square feet 

Total C/l Building Space: 6,333,209 square feet 

Average Office/Industrial Rental Rates 

Class A Industrial Park $6-8/sf 

Class A Downtown Main Street (Upper Floors) $14-16/sf 

Class A Downtown Off Main Street $12/sf 

Hospital Hill Business Park Negotiable- discounts for pioneer tenants 

Main St. Florence Class A Office $18/sf 

Main St. Florence Class B & C Office $8.80-$12/sf 



Average Retail Rental Rates 

First Floor Downtown Main Street 

First Floor Downtown Off Main Street 

Pleasant Street 

King Street 

Main Street Florence 



$22-$30/sf 
$16-$18/sf 
$12-$18/sf 
$14-$20/sf 
$10-$15/sf 



Retail Trade: Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers employ the second highest number of employees 
and have the highest total sales with $122 million. Food and Beverage employs that greatest 
number of employees (693) and has the second highesttotal sales in Northampton. The largest 
number of retail businesses in the City is in the category of Clothing & Accessories with 33 
businesses. Retail sales per capita were higher for Northampton with $13,112 compared to $9,226 
for the State. A more detailed retail analysis is included as an appendix to this plan. 



$14,000 

$12,000 

$10,000 

$8,000 

$6,000 

$4,000 

$2,000 

$0 



Retail Sales Indicator 

$13,112- 



n Northampton 

■ MA 



$1,844 $2^235 



$9,226 



Retail Sales per retail 
establishment 



Retail sales per capita 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 53 



Property Tax Rate & Assessed Value: The City has a single tax rate of $13.90 
(estimated). The average FY2003 single-family property tax bill is $2,589 and has 
increased by 44 percent since 1995. The average tax bill for a single-family property was 
$1,792 in FY 1995 and $2,589 in FY 2001. Home values have appreciated 28 percent 
since 1995, from $129,490 in FY 1995 to $166,173 in FY 2001 (based on average 
assessed values of single-family properties in Northampton). The total value of all single- 
family property was assessed at $892,848,400. 

Education Indicators: Northampton has a wide variety of libraries and museums 
available to its residents. They include the Botanic Garden of Smith College, Lyman Plant 
House, Calvin Coolidge Memorial Room, Forbes Library, Historic Northampton, and Smith 
College Museum of Art. Furthermore, school enrollment has increased 27.9 percent since 
1993 at an average of 4.65 percent per year. Furthermore, the Northampton school district 
spends about $6,513 per student (data from FY 1999) and $21,508,558 out of 
$47,898,868 per year goes towards school spending. Northampton ranks in the upper 
50% of towns in Massachusetts in its spending per student. 

Northampton-Smith - Public School District (grades 9-12) 

^^H Dropout/Attendance/Exclusions Plans of High School Graduates - 1999 * | 

District State Plan % of District % of State 

Dropout Rate (%)- 1999 3.1 3.6 Four Year College 0.9 52.8 

Attendance Rate (%)- 2001 92.1 94 Two Year College 28.0 20.6 

Student Exclusion (Count) - 2000 1,412 Work 50.0 16.0 _^^ 

^^^^^^echnology- 2001 — ^^ 

District State 
Students per Computer 4.5 5.1 

Classrooms on the Internet (%) 8.6 82.8 



Northampton - Public School District (grades PK-12) District 

^^B Dropout/Attendance/Exclusions Plans of High School Graduates - 1999 

District State Plan % of District % of State 

Dropout Rate (%)- 1999 2.8 3.6 Four Year College 56.7 52.8 

Attendance Rate (%)- 2001 95.3 94 Two Year College 22.5 20.6 

Student Exclusion (Count) -2000 1,412 Work ^^ 3.9 16.0 

^W I I'll I I iiiii 

District 
Students per Computer 6.1 

Classroonns on the Internet (%) 100 

*Many of the programs at Smith Vocational Agricultural High School provide a focus so 
that students who enter the workforce directly after high school do so with job and 
employment skills that academic high school students do not have. 




Grow Smart Northampton Page 54 



The high school completion rate in Northampton is 88.7% and the high school drop out is 
2.8%. 46.1% of the population 25 years and older have completed a Bachelor's degree or 
higher. Both the college (BA) completion rate and Post-graduate completion rate are 
higher for Northampton compared to the State. Northampton fairs better than the State of 
Massachusetts in all education indicator categories. 



I 

\i 

Q. 



100.0 
90.0 
80.0 
70.0 
60.0 
50.0 
40.0 
30.0 
20.0 
10.0 
0.0 



% 








Education Indicators 




D Northampton 

■ MA 


0/n 


'''Sa.s% L 


/o 










% 






/o 

% 




/o 








% 


46.1% 










% 






33.2% 














25.0% 


% 














% 






13.7% 


% 


2,8% 3.6% 








/u 










i 


% - 


L^i 1 1^1 


8 — 1 



High school High school College (BA) Post-graduate 
completion rate dropoutrate completion rate completion rate 

Education Completion Rate 



2000 U.S. Census for population 25 years and older 

Economic Profile/Retail Market Analysis 

As part of Groi/i^ Smart Woitfiampton, an economic development consultant prepared a 
retail market analysis for Northampton to better understand this critical part of 
Northampton's economy. The full analysis is available as a separate document (available 
at www.NorthdmptonPldnninci.orci ). 

Goals 

{The City developed detailed goals as part of the Vision 2020 process (discussed earlier). Additional 
economic development goals and policies/objectives have been updated to reflect additional findings from 
the Northampton-Easthampton Economic Development Strategy Plan (1998), the Economic Target Area 
Goals (August2002), and the Mayor's Economic Development P rogram (May 2001- Based in part on 
interviews with businesses and key city/business leaders/entities conducted by the Mayor's Economic 
Development Coordinator and approved by City Council).} 

Additional Economic Development Goals - Mayor's Economic Development Plan 

• Expand business and job retention and attraction. 

• Promote a diversified economic base and labor force. 

• Facilitate economic development that contributes to a sense of community and long- 
term sustainability. 

• Expand the commercial and industrial land inventory and tax base. 

• Create an environment conducive to business investment. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 55 



• Form and participate in regional economic development collaborations. 
Additional Policies and Objectives 



Reinvigorate the manufacturing base— support the expansion of existing manufacturers and industry clusters 
in the City, including traditional and technology manufacturers. 



Position the City to fully participate in the creative economy- recruit new businesses in new 
media/information technology, arts/entertainment, and other creative sectors. 



Focus on business development that supports job creation and a range of job opportunities/advancement for 

all populations in the City. 

Develop a marketing program to promote the city for business development and increase visibility in regional 
marketing programs. 



Support redevelopment of key parcels in the City with significant economic benefits - Northampton State 
Hospital, Rt. 10 Business Park, and the Three County Fairgrounds (to maintain the viability of the 
fairgrounds for traditional uses while upgrading the facility and diversifying with complementary uses). 



Support redevelopment of Brownfield and underutilized commercial/industrial sites. 



Upgrade transportation and public utilities to facilitate expansion of the site inventory in identified growth 
areas, support priority development projects, and provide adequate telecommunications service throughout 
the City. Seek state/federal funding sources where appropriate to leverage private investment. 



Facilitate problem-solving, permit streamlining and regulatory simplification where appropriate. 



Support enhancement of the Downtown Business District- i.e. adequate parking facilities. Business 
Improvement District, infill development. 



Incorporate an evaluation of economic benefits in the adoption of all City policies, programs, and regulations. 



Use targeted tax incentives and other state programs to support the City's economic development goals. 



Northampton/Easthampton Economic Development Strategy Elements 

{These recommendations were excerpted from the 1998 Northampton-Easthampton Economic Development 
Strategy, available at www.NorthamptonPlanninQ.orQ, and are now almost five years old. Many of these 
elements are currently being implemented. All of the elements and an updated and revised economic 
development strategy will be developed as part of the comprehensive planning process with broad input and 
discussion between the business community, the public, and City officials, boards and departments.} 

Initiate a "business calling" program to identify and respond to the needs of at-risk and 
growing firms. 

Participate in regional workforce development efforts and create a Workforce Task 
Force to help businesses meet their immediate and longer-term needs for trained 
employees. 

Initiate a campaign to support and expand the "new media" sector. 

Work with local banks to establish a long term facilities loan pool or special program. 

Explore orderly development along the Route 10 corridor, particularly as the 
Northampton State Hospital site is developed. 

Look into the feasibility of establishing a business improvement districts (BID) in the 
central business district. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 56 



Review recomnnended improvements to the local permitting processes with planning 
boards and other relevant entities. Timing is an issue. Areas for permitting process 
improvements include communications, coordination, speed and reduced permitting 
requirements. Areas for zoning change include simplification and clarification. 

Northampton has few available development sites and no substantial vacant building 
space on the market. P rimary opportunities for expanding its supply of commercial and 
industrial sites are the reuse of Northampton State Hospital and developmentof the four 
parcel Northampton Business Park site on Route 10. Move forward on both sites 
concurrently. The State Hospital site is especially desirable as a model of smart growth 
and as a site where a proportion of the housing and employment will be targeted to 
those most in need. 

Northampton's best available development sites are likely to be absorbed without any 
city support or intervention. 

Northampton will need to use creative means to generate development options at other 
sites. 

Maintain a comprehensive inventory of available sites and buildings. 

Maintain a mechanism for maintaining a complete and up-to-date inventory of "market- 
ready" buildings and sites available to support business growth. 

Establish a volunteer site location network to assist businesses needing additional 
space. 

Expand outreach efforts to help identify businesses facing facility needs and problems. 

Initiate a campaign to support and expand the "new media" sector (the convergence of 
video, audio, graphics, and text in a digital rather than analog mode). 

Establish a Northampton/Easthampton Economic Development Partnership. 

Consider an economic priority-setting session with the community. 

Economic Target Area 

In 2002, the City of Northampton joined the Greater Franklin County Economic Target 
Area. Northampton and Franklin County share some economic commonalities including a 
shared labor force, a cross border tourism industry, proximity to the 1-91 interstate 
transportation corridor, telecommunications infrastructure needs, and a declining 
manufacturing sector. We share many similar economic development goals and work 
collaboratively with Franklin County organizations on regional economic development 
initiatives. By joining the ETA, Northampton is now able to offer tax incentives available 
under the Massachusetts Economic Development incentive Program to stimulate job 
creation and business investment in the City. 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 57 



The City Council designated four Econonnic Opportunity Areas under the ETA to facilitate 
investment in these targeted areas. Additional Econonnic Opportunity Areas will be 
design ated on an as needed basis. 



EOA 


Date Designated 


Northampton Industrial Park 


April 2002 


Village at Hospital Hill 


April 2002 


Spring and Pine Street (Florence) 


September 2002 


TechAlloy (Federal St., Bay State) 


September 2002 



Economic Development Target Areas 

Over the past decade, in Vision 2020: Vision, the Northampton-Easthampton 

Economic Development Strategy, and the downtown, Florence, and State Hospital 
plans, the Planning Board, working with the community and City Council, identified specific 
areas for economic development and development activities. As part of a comprehensive 
plan, as well as other City planning efforts, these recommendations should be reexamined 
to see if they should still represent city policy and to see if other areas should be added. 
These areas are, in no particular order: 

The Central Business District and its commercial gateways. 

The King Street Corridor and Damon Road 

Florence Center and its commercial and industrial gateways. 

The Northampton Industrial Park 

The Northampton State Hospital. 

A Route 10 Business Park. 

Existing industrial and commercial zoning districts and existing businesses. 

Additional home occupations and home offices in residential areas. 

Economic Development Environmental Suitability Map 

The map below shows most of the target areas discussed above, overlain over the 
Environmental Suitability Map created in this plan. It does not show existing businesses 
outside of business districts nor home occupations. 

Using existing regulatory and planning criteria, several of the land-use related City boards 
(Planning Board, Zoning Board, and Conservation Commission) have permitted 
development closer to environmental resources in redevelopment areas than in pristine 
areas. During the Comprehensive Planning process and other City planning efforts, there 
needs to be more discussion about appropriate buffer zones from environmental resources 
in different parts of the city and for different environmental resources. 

Future map revisions should include a more detailed assessment of environmental 
suitability for commercial/industrial development and redevelopment areas. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 58 



unbuildable 

extremely sensitive 
environmental receptors 
sensitive environmental receptors 

economic suitability 




d) 



Economic Suitability 



Date: 04-Dec-2003 

Author: jt 

Revision: 

File: z:\project5\public\development\ 

eo418\eo418.apr 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 59 



Transportation Element 

{The Northampton Transportation Plan (May 2002) was approved by the Commonwealth as equivalent 
Transportation Plan elements under E0418. Equivalent plan elements: Regional transportation plan (entire 
plan), with series of CIS maps and text showing transportation improvements that can be implemented in the 
next 5 years. This element was designed to fill in gaps that the Planning Board identified in our existing 
knowledge base and understanding of options.} 

As part ofGroi/i^ Smart Northampton, a multidiscipline transportation consultant team 
prepared a corridor study King Street (Route 5 and 10) from the King Street/North Street 
intersection to the King Street/Damon Road/Bridge Road intersection. The team consisted 
of a transportation planner with expertise in bicycle and pedestrian accommodation, a 
traffic engineer with expertise in signal systems, a highway designer, and a landscape 
architect,. 

The King Street Corridor Study \s available as a separate document at 
www.NorthdmDtonPldnninci.orci . 



Grow Smart Northampton Page 60 



Transportation Indicators: Northampton is located in the Pioneer Valley, known as the 
crossroads of New England because of its strategic position along the Connecticut River 
and its excellent transportation facilities. The Massachusetts Turnpike connects the region 
to Boston and to Albany, New York. Interstate 91 provides direct access to Hartford, 
Connecticut and to Brattleboro and points north in Vermont. 

The principal highways are U.S. Route 5 and Interstate Route 91, which runs N-S across 
the state, the State Route 9 running E-W. Amtrak offers daily bus service between 
Burlington, Vermont, and Springfield, Massachusetts, that connects up to its Springfield- 
Washington rail service. Freight rail service is available from the Springfield Terminal 
Railway. 

Northampton is a member of the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority (PVTA), which provides 
fixed route service, and offers paratransit service to Springfield, Worcester, Boston, and 
Hartford. VermontTransit Lines connects to Greenfield, Brattleboro, VT and points north, 
and to Holyoke, Springfield and Hartford, CT. 

LaFleur Airport, a General Aviation (GA) facility located 1 mile northeast of Northampton, 
has a 3,506-foot by 50-foot asphalt runway. Peter Pan Bus Lines offers transportation to 
Logan Airport from Northampton 7 days a week, and connects from Springfield to Hartford 
and Bradley Airport, and to Kennedy and Laguardia Airports in New York City. 



Transportation Indicators 



16.0% 
14.0% 
12.0% 



10.0% 




I Northampton 
I MA 





r 






































































1 — — J 1 1 — 



% ofoccupied % ofworkers using % ofworkers 
dwelling units witti public transporation walking to work 
no caravailable 



% ofworkers using 

means otherthan 

vehicles, transit, or 

walking 



The percent of workers walking to work for Northampton was 13.7%, which is significantly 
greater than the percentage for the State of Massachusetts. On the other hand, less 
people use public transportation to get to work and the percent of occupied dwelling units 
with no caravailable is less than the State percentage. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 61 



APPENDIX- Community Health Indicators (PVPC) 



Community HMtth Indicators Northampton MA -t/- Data as of 


Economic Indicators 










Percentage of workers not employed in 
professional or managerial jobs 


49.8% 


58.9% 


+ 


2000 


Unemployment rate (ten-year average 
1991-2000) 


5.3% 


5.3% 


= 


1991-2000 


Average annual wage 


$29,345 


$44,32 
9 


- 


2000 


Average annual wages in the private 
sector 


$28,204 


$45,04 
9 


- 


2000 


Retail sales per retail establishment ($000) 


$1,844 


$2,235 


- 


1997 


Retail payroll as a percent of retail sales 


10.9% 


10.1% 


+ 


1997 


Retail sales per capita 


$13,112 


$9,226 


+ 


1997 


Commercial percent of the total tax base 


16.3% 


20.7% 


- 


2002 


Industrial percent of the total tax base 


3.9% 


6.0% 


■ 


2002 


Average annual wage, percent change 
1996-2000 


+17.4% 


+30.7% 


■ 


1996 to 2000 


Part-time employment as a percent of total 
employment (less than 35 hours per week) 


32.2% 


24.2% 


7 


2000 


Percent of workers self-employed 


10.5% 


8.9% 


+ 


2000 


Percent of workers self-employed and 
unincorporated 


8.8% 


6.3% 


+ 


2000 


Percent of persons working from home 


4.4% 


3.1% 


7 


2000 


J obs per member of the labor force 


1.16 


1.02 


+ 


2000 


Percent change in number of firms, 1996- 
2000 


■K).8% 


+4.5% 


- 


1996-2000 


Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, and Mining 
employment (% change 1996-2000/% of 
total employment in 2000) 


+33.3% 
0.6% 


+22.0% 
0.7% 


+ 


1996-2000 


Construction employment (% change 
1996-2000 / % of total employment in 
2000) 


+11.8% 
1.8% 


+38.4% 
4.0% 




1996-2000 


Finance, insurance, and real estate 
employment (% change 1996-2000 / % of 
total employment in 2000) 


+5.3% 
2.7% 


49.6% 
6.8% 




1996-2000 


Government employment (% change 
1996-2000 / % of total employment in 


■13.0% 
17.9% 


+7.4% 
12.5% 


- 


1996-2000 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 62 



Community Health Indicators 


Northampton 


MA ■!/- Data as of 


2000) 










Manufacturing employment (% change 
1996-2000 / % of total employment in 
2000) 


-2.4% 
8.0% 


-1.8% 
13.3% 




1996-2000 


Services employment (% change 1996- 
2000/% of total employment in 2000) 


46.6% 
44.5% 


+14.8% 
35.4% 


- 


1996-2000 


Trade employment (% change 1996-2000/ 
% of total employment in 2000) 


■5.3% 
23.4% 


+7.7% 
22.9% 


- 


1996-2000 


Transportation, communications, and 
utilities employment (% change 1996-2000 
/% of total employment in 2000) 


■10.9% 

1.2% 


+12.0% 

4.3% 




1996-2000 


Education Indicators 










High school completion rate 


88.7% 


84.8% 


+ 


2000 


High school dropout rate 


2.8% 


3.6% 


+ 


1999 


College (BA) completion rate 


46.1% 


33.2 


+ 


2000 


Post-graduate completion rate 


25.0% 


13.7% 


+ 


2000 


Environmental Indicators 










Size of wildlife habitat areas (acres per 
capita) 


2243 acres 


7 




2000 


Open Space and Recreation Plan in 
place? 


Yes 


varies 


= 


2000 


Percentage capacity of landfills 


Adequate tc 
2007 


Need 2 

million 

tons 

capacit 

yby 

2005 


+ 


2000 


Health Indicators 










Percent of mothers with adequate prenatal 
care 


84.8% 


79.1% 


+ 


2000 


Total chronic disease-related deaths per 
100,000 population 


921.9 


814.0 


■ 


2000 


Alcohol related hospital discharges per 
100,000 people 


564.0 


324.3 


■ 


2000 


Infant mortality, deaths per 1,000 births 
(five-year average of 1996-2000) 


2.5 


5.0 


+ 


1996 - 2000 


Housing Indicators 










Percentage of renter occupied dwellings 


46.5% 


38.3% 


- 


2000 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 63 



Community Health Indicators Northampton ma -i/- Data as of 












Housing cost burden (median fiousehold 
income as a percent of median iiome 
value) 


28.9% 


27.2% 




2000 


Affordable housing (Chapter 40B) as a 
percent of housing units 


11.3% 


8.5% 


+ 


2002 


Homeowner vacancy rate 


0.4% 


0.7% 


- 


2000 


Rental vacancy rate 


3.4% 


3.5% 


- 


2000 


Poverty Indicators 










Poverty rate 


8.7% 


9.3% 


+ 


2000 


Child poverty rate 


8.4% 


11.6% 


+ 


2000 


Elder poverty rate 


9.1% 


8.9% 


- 


2000 


WIC Program Participation per 1,000 
population 


1.1 


1.9 


+ 


2001 


Percent of school children eligible for free 
or reduced price lunch 


23.0% 


24.0% 


+ 


2000 


Social Indicators 










Percentage of households that are headed 
by a woman 


10.1% 


11.9% 


? 


2000 


Percentage of individuals over 16 who are 
not employed 


33.9% 


36.8% 


+ 


2000 


Homicide rate per 100,000 persons 
(average of 1996 through 2000) 


1.4 


2.2 


+ 


1996 - 2000 


E Iderly (over 64) suicide rate per 100,000 
elders (average of 1996 through 2000) 


10.0 


7.8 


- 


1996 - 2000 


Teen suicide rate (10-19) per 100,000 
teens (average of 1996 through 2000) 


0.0 


3.4 


+ 


1996 - 2000 


Suicide rate per 100,000 persons (average 
of 1996 through 2000) 


9.7 


7.2 


- 


1996 - 2000 


Alleged cases of child abuse per 1,000 
children 


61.2 


63.5 


+ 


1997 


Verified cases of child abuse per 1,000 
children 


14.4 


18.3 


+ 


1997 


Dependant children per family 


1.68 


1.85 


7 


2000 


Number of arts or cultural 
events/performances at public sites 


500/yr 


7 


7 


2002 


Number of public recreational events 


200 progs/ 
yr 


? 


? 


2002 


Transportation Indicators 











Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 64 



Community Health Indicators NoraiamBton ma v- Data as of 



Percentage of occupied dwelling units with 
no car available 



11.3% 



12.7% 



Road conditions-level of service (average 
of pavement conditions index) 



2000 



73 



Percent of worl<ers using public 
transportation 



3.2% 



8.7% 



2000 



Percent of workers wall<ing to work 



13.7% 



4.3% 



2000 



Percent of workers using means other than 
vehicles, transit, or walking 



1.6% 



1.0% 



2000 



Source: Community Indicators (PVPC, 1/2003), using US. Census, DET, PVPC, City, and otiier 
Commonwealth sources. See Community Indicator R eport (at www.NorUiamptonPianning.ora) for full 
citations. 



Grow Smart Northampton 



Page 65