(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Hammond Organ T-series Owner's Manual"

i 



I 



L 



YOU'VE SELECTED 

THE WORLD'S MOST 

POPULAR ORGAN 



Welcome to the exclusive circle of Hammond organ 
owners. We're proud you recognize the distinctive 
quality that has made it the overvirhelming choice 
of beginners, "buffs," and professionals since 
Hammond first introduced the electric organ in 1935. 




Send Your Warranty Card in Now! 

Your instrument is valuable. Please 
take a minute to complete the en- 
closed warranty card and return 
promptly to Mammon d Organ Com- 
pany. Only if this card is received 
will your organ be under warranty 
protection. It protects your organ 
for the life of the warranty. 

Receipt of Your Warranty Card 
Entitles You to The Hammond Times 

Once we receive your warranty 
certificate, we'll add your name to 
the Hammond Times mailing list. 
This 16-page, Z-color magazine is 
published every other month. It 
contains instructional articles to 
make your playing more enjoyable. 



It reviews all levels of organ mu- 
sic. It comments on current organ 
records. It informs you about the 
latest Hammond developments and 
events. And it contains a host of 
colorful feature articles on a vari- 
ety of organ topics. The Hammond 
Times is the finest publication of 
its kind in the industry. Make cer- 
tain you send in your warranty cer- 
tificate so that we can reserve a 
Hammond Times subscription for 
you. 

Take The Hammond Organ Course 

Play while you learn. This easy- 
to-take Hammond Organ Course is 
a proven success. And it's a nat- 
ural for you and the family. It 



starts with easy tunes in Part I, 
and continues in Parts II and III to 
progressively more challenging 
pieces ending with Part IV. de- 
signed to bring you to a high peak 
of organ proficiency. You'll be ex- 
posed to 100 solo arrangements in 
all! A student manual, keyboard 
guides, pedal markers, and "flash 
card" games are included. Ask your 
local dealer about obtaining this 
enjoyable and highly successful 
course today, 




Have Fun With Your Hammond 

You own one of the world's great 
sounding instruments. Play it. Dis- 
cover the exciting effects you can 
gel. Let the Hammond Organ 
Course expose you to the fun of 
learning new arrangements. Ask 
your local deafer about the Ham- 
mond Organ concerts in your area. 
And join the Hammond Organ So- 
ciety. You'll learn new tips and 
techniques, see instructional films, 
and meet new friends. You'll 
achieve new levels of satisfac- ■■■■ 
tton through your Hammond. |mI 



PLAYING INTRODUCTION 

How to Start the Organ Page 2 

The Pedal Keyboard Page 2 

The Expression Pedal Page 3 

Meet Your New Hammond Organ Page 4 

Beginners Tune "Merrily We Roll Along" Page 6 

YOUR HAMMOND ORGAN 

Features Page 8 

The T-lOO, T-200 Series (Diagram Illustration) Page 9 

The Keyboard and Controls Page 10 

Upper and Lower Preset Page 12 

Vibrato Variations Page 13 

Reverberation Page 13 

Organ Volume and Brilliance Page 13 

Percussion Voices Page 14 

Cymbal and Brush Page 15 

Pedal Tones Page 16 

Two-speed Leslie T-200 Series Page 16 

THE HARMONIC DRAWBARS Page 17 

Colors of the Drawbars Page 18 

Registering the Tone Families Page 20 

The Flute and Reed Family Page 21 

The Diapason and String Family Page 22 

Using Correct Volume and Range Page 23 

Drawbar Registrations on Published Music Page 24 

Listings of Drawbar Registrations Page 25 

MUSIC SECTION 

"Silent Night" Page 27 

"Long, Long Ago" Page 28 

"Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" Page 29 

"Good-Night, Ladies" Page 29 

"Home Sweet Home" Page 30 

Chimes "Sweet Hour of Prayer" Page 31 

Celesta "Brahms Lullaby" Page 32 

Hawaiian Guitar "Aloha Oe" Page 33 

Marimba "Celito Lindo" Page 34 

Xylophone "Skaters Waltz" Page35 

Rhythm Effects "Du, Du, Liegst Mil Im Herzen" Page 36 

Banjo "Oh Susanna" Page 37 

String Bass Effects Page 38 

HOW TO PRACTICE Page 39 

LANGUAGE OF MUSIC (CHART) Page 40 

MUSIC GLOSSARY Page 42 

FACTS YOU SHOULD KNOW 

Care and Maintenance .' Page 44 

Accessories Page 44 

HI HAMMOND ORGAN COMPANY 

Page 1 nil DIVISrON OF HAMMOND CORPORATION 

COPYRIGHT 1867 



PLAYING INTRODUCTION 



TURN THE ORGAN ON 

At the top right hand comer of the organ, above the upper 
manual, you will find a single toggle switch. Push the switch 
up into the "ON" position. To shut off the organ simply push 
the switch down to the "OFF" position. A small pilot light is 
located to the left of the switch, letting you know at a glance 
whether the organ is ON or OFF. For the moment, let's leave 
the organ running so you can try out the various suggestions 
that follow. 




THE PEDAL KEYBOARD 

To the left of the front panel, and close to the floor, you wiU 
find the pedal keyboard, consisting of thirteen bass notes, 
which correspond exactly to the same thirteen notes on the 
manuals, except that they are lower in pitch. The pedal notes 
provide 16' and 8' pitches and are designed to provide a deep, 
rich background for the tonal colors of the manuals. These 
pedals have been especially designed to simplify pedal play- 
ing; where the foot plays the bass notes, the left hand then 
is free to play the harmony, and the pedal note will blend 
in smoothly since the foot can sustain the bass note as long 
as desired. 



Page 2 



THE EXPRESSION PEDAL 
(SWELL PEDAL) 



To the right and just above the pedal keyboard is the expression pedal, which 
you operate with your right foot, and with which you vary the volume of the 
organ to create "expression." One reason it is so easy to play the organ is that, 
unlike other keyboard instruments, you do not need to vary your touch nor 
learn a difficult linger technique in order to provide expression for your music. 
You play the manuals and pedals with a minimum of pressure (famous organ- 
ists tell us that the Hammond Organ requires less physical effort than any 
other instrument) and you use the expression pedal to let your music swell to 
grand effects, die away to a thrilling whisper, and for all the many variations 
of expression in between. Pressing forward with the front of your foot increases 
the volume; pressing back with your heel decreases it. 




KEYBOARD CONTROLS 

The illustration above pictures the playing controls 
as they will appear to you while seated at the instru- 
ment. Each group of controls is labeled for simplicity 
and convenience of operation. The function of each 
tab is explained in detail in another section of this 
guide. 

For the moment, put all tablets in their "off" 
or up position. Run your fingers across the bottoms 
of each group of tablets making sure they are "off", 
(up position). Also depress the rear of the tabs 
located at the left end of the lower keyboard. On 
the T-200 Series, depress the rear of the tabs lo- 
cated at the right end of the lower keyboard 
(Cymbal and Brush). Now, depress those tabs indi- 
cated by an arrow in the illustration above. In the 
case of tabs located at either end of the lower key- 
board, depress the front of the tab or that end 
•nearest the player. 



To the left of the upper keyboard are three 
groups of drawbars, the left group controlling tones 
for the lower keyboard, the center, single drawbar 
controlling pedal tones and the right hand group 
controlling tones on the upper keyboard. 

Hammond Harmonic Drawbars are moved in 
and out as opposed to the tabs which move up and 
down. You will notice that each drawbar has num- 
bers on it (1 through 8 ) . Later you will learn how 
to use these numbers to set up literally thousands 
of different tones. At this point, however, push all 
the drawbars in or to their "off" position. Now pull 
the center drawbar out to 6 as shown in the ilJus- 
stration. 

Position yourself comfortably on the organ 
bench at about the center of the instrument. Your 
left foot should be able to reach the pedals. Put 
your right foot on the expression or volume pedal. 



BEGINNERS — Follow the outline on the next four pages and discover how truly easy and enjoyable 
it is to play a tune on the Hammond Organ. 

OTHERS — Those who have played an organ before may experiment with their favorite song, as the 
instrument is ready to be played. 



Page 3 



It's easy to play the 
Hammond orga/n 



V" for two simp le reasons! 





Sustained tone 



By just pressing a key you sound a beautiful 
ORGAN tone tinat continues to sound as long as 
the key is down. A professional organist can not 
make that one note sound any better than you 
can. This permits the beginner to sound 
professional from the very start. 




'ess ion (loud and soft) 



On the organ it is not necessary to 
strike keys lightly or heavily to 
produce changes in volume. All keys 
may be played w/ith a light touch 
because the volume or expression 
pedal controls the loudness. 



~r. «-• , 






^'ih 







Page 4 



^ Why two keyboards'^ (caned manuals) 



\ 



\ 



The inelodjj 

is played on the upper keyboard 
using a solo tone of one color- 
just as a solo instrument plays 
the melody in an orchestra. 





The accoitipaid/ifeif f 



or background is played on the 

lower keyboard using a softer 

tone of a contrasting color -just 

as the orchestra plays a soft 

background for the solo instrument. 



The bass 



is played on another keyboard 

called the pedal keyboard. These 

low tones add depth and body and 

rhythm to the music— just as 

the bass violin adds these qualities 

to the orchestra. 



Page 5 



Ho IV (JO (I do it I 

r 




w 



"iiustnaBW^BBIO^r indicati 
those tablets you are using (from 
instructions on previous page). 




■-■■■■'■"'-I 



Qo 



UPPER: Theater Brass 16' 

PEDAL DRAWBAR: 6' 

PEDAL TABS: Pedat Sustain, 
16', Pedal Mute 

VIBRATO: On (Nonnal) 



LOWER: Ensembre 8' 
LESLIE (T-200): On, Fast 
PERCUSSION: Off 
REVERBERATION: II 



11 o 



T-lOO 



PLACE YOUR RIGHT HAND on the upper keyboard with your 
thumb on middle C, index finger on D, middle finger on E, ring finger 
on F, little finger on G. If you wish you may use the keyboard guide 
'A" for the upper manual (Located inside the back cover of this book). 
Keep your right hand in this position and play the melody notes of 
"Merrily We Roll Along". Start with the middle finger. 



Fingering 




NOW... on the lower 
keyboard we add the 
chords, (you may use 
keyboard guide 'B")- 



Place little finger on G, 
index finger on C and 
thumb on E. 



Keep little finger on G, move 
index finger and thumb from C 
and E to B and D (one note 
to the left). 



The first chord is 





The next chord is 



Mffll 



THE PEDALS are next 
. . . press either "C pedal 
with the f C ; chord and 
the "6" pedal with the 
chord. 





Fingering 



togeth 

"MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG" 

5 




©IBM 



3 3 



2 2 3 2 



m — m — o 



E E E 

Easy. . . 
and fun too- 
wasn't it? 



D D 



D 



The difference between the organ and 

all other instruments lies in the fact that 

the organist can vary the tones of his instrument. 

He can have the sound of flutes, violins, trumpets, 

theater organ sounds or church organ sounds 

and all at virtually the touch of a finger. 

Changing tones is called registration. For your 

convenience there are three pre-set registrations 

available on the upper keyboard. Press the tab 

marked "Full Tibias 16' " and play 

"Merrily We Roll Along" with a deep throated 

theater organ sound. You may even wish 

to try the "String 8'". Further on, you will discover 

how easy it is to change registration 

with the famous Hammond Harmonic Drawbars. 



Page 7 




Here is a capsule list of the features of your Hammond 
Organ. These playing features will provide you with a 
lifetime of musical pleasure, satisfaction and challenge. 
The instrument's rugged construction will provide you 
with a lifetime of trouble-free service. 



Two 44 Note Manuals 
Overhanging Keys 

• 13-Note Pedalboard 

• Exclusive Hammond Tone Wheel Generator 

• Reverberation 

• Four Preset Tabs 

• Six Pre-Voiced Percussion Tones 
Chimes Marimba 
Celesta Xylophone 
Guitar Banjo 

• Percussion Reiteration 

• Twin Mallet Reiteration on Xylophone — Marimba 

• Vibrato, Vibrato Chorus & Celeste 

• Pedal Legato 

• String Bass (Pedal Sustain) 

• Pedal Mute 

• Cymbal & Brush (Rhythm Effects) 

• Earphone Jack 

• Two-Speed Leslie Speaker*^ 

• Built-in Tone Cabinet Connection 

• 34 Watts of Music Power Output 

•T-200 Series only 



Page 8 




T-100 SERIES -Left End Block Rocker Tabs 



■STRING BASS- 





PH^^^^H^H 


















11 PEDAL 
n LEGATO 


PEDAL 16' 
SUSTAIN PEDAL 
8' 


PEDAL 
MUTE 


CYMBAL 
PEDAL 


BRUSH 
LOWER 














^^B^^^^^B^^M 


^^■^^^■■i^^H 





o 



CYMBAL-BRUSH 
VOLUME 



Page 10 




The illustrations picture the keyboard and the control tabs found on both the T-lOO and T-200 Series 
Hammond Organs. All groups of controls as well as individual finger tabs (above the keyboards) and rocker 
tabs located at either the left end or both ends of the lower keyboard are clearly marked for quick and 
easy visual identification. 

The control tabs are simple to operate and allow you to add great expression and variety of color to 
your music at the touch of a finger. 

You win notice that the difference between the T-lOO and the T-200 instruments is in the area of the 
rocker tabs at the left end of the lower keyboard. 

The T-200 pictured in the large illustration has the Cymbal and Brush controls located at the right 
end of the lower keyboard to allow room for the two Leslie speaker controls located in the rocker tab 
group at the left end of the lower keyboard. 

The T-lOO Series instrument which does not have a built-in Leslie speaker houses the Cymbal and 
Bfosfa rocker tabs in the lower left hand group of tabs. 

On the following pages is a complete explanation of these controls. It will be to your advantage to 
thoroughly familiarize yourself with their various uses and efEects. 



Page 11 




DRA>VBARS & PERCUSSION . . . This tab when depressed renders the tones set up on the 

harmonic drawbars effective for the upper manual. It also serves to "Turn on" any percussion tab 
depressed in the Percussion section. In its "up" position it renders the drawbar registration 
sOent permitting only percussion voices to sound. Depressed, it permits a combination of draw- 
bars plus percussion. 



STRINGS 8' . . . Heavy upper harmonic development, organ string quality. Same as drawbar setting 
of 00 8888 666. 

FULL TIBIAS 16' . . . Produces a beautiful theatrical quality. Drawbar setting of 80 6808 006. 

THEATER BRASS 16'... Combination of the more powerful tones available on the organ. 
Drawbar setting of 84 8868 666. 




DRA>VBARS . . . This tab when used renders the tone set up on the harmonic drawbars effective for 
the lower manual. 

ENSEMBLE 8'... A general purpose accompaniment tone used by most organists to balance with 
upper presets or "full" drawbar combinations. Its voice is a combination of strings and orchestral 
tones. Drawbar setting of 00 8666 444. 

*One of these tabs must be depressed in order for the lower manual to sound. They 
are always used one at a time and cannot be used in combination. Depressing 
one tab releases the other. 



Page 12 



VI BR A" 
VARIATIONS 

The ejjects produced by the 
Hammond Vibrato make your music 
richer and fuller, and add greater 
depth. Tones containing vibrato are 
mvch more pleasing and less tiring 
to the ear than even the most 
beautiful tone without vibrato. 



VIBRATO 
ON 



VIBRATO 
SMALL 


VIBRATO 
CHORUS 


VIBRATO 
CELESTE 

X 


VIBRATO 

CELESTE 

It 







This group of tabs controls the degree of Vibrato on both manuals. Only when you have the "VIBRATO 
ON" tab depressed will any of the controls in this group be effective. 



VIBRATO SMALL . 

is "normal." 



Pressing this tablet reduces the degree of vibrato. When it is up, the vibrato 



wigp^l-Q CHORUS . . . The chorus eiTect (Sound of many voices) is a combination of vibrato 
signal with direct signal. When used with the "Vibrato Small" tab the vibrato chorus effect will 
become "small." 

VIBRATO CELESTE I and II . . These tabs give a more theatrical effect similar to a blend 
of several vibratos. The two tabs give different degrees of celeste, and the two can be used together 
to give the maximum effect. Pressing the "vibrato small" tab will reduce the amount of celeste. 



REVERBERATION 

Reverberation, or "echo", is present in some degree 
when listening to any music. Natural reverberation is 
that part of any sound which reaches the ear by reflection 
from walls, ceilings and floor, as distinguished from 
the part which reaches the ear by a direct path through 
the air from the source of the sound, 

REVERBERATION I & II... These may be used 
separately or in combination to give three degrees of 
reverberation. You can set them to provide the cor- 
rect amount of reverberation to compensate for the 
lack of reflective sound which would be normally 
present in an acoustically treated room. 



ORGAN 



VOLUME SOFT This tab is a volume control which 

allows you to play either at normal or at "soft" vol- 
ume. While you can also play the organ softly by 
keeping the expression pedal partly closed, depressing 
this tab reduces volume while giving you the entire 
range of the expression pedal. 



BRILLIANCE... Normally the organ produces a mellow 
combination of voices. However, when extra brilliance 
is desired on such families of tone as brass, reeds and 
strings, the briUiance tab substantially brightens the 
sound of the entire instrument. 



Page 13 




PERCUSSION VOICES 



CHIMES 


CELESTA 


GUITAR 


TWirj MALLET 
MARIMBA 


TWIN MALLET 
XYLOPHONf 


BANJO 







REITERATE 



Organ tones are nonnally "sustained" in that they 
are steady in their loudness. The opposite of this is 
"percussion," which refers to a tone that is not 
steady and fades away gradually — like a piano, 
chimes or a plucked string. 

The addition of pre-set percussion voices to the 
Hammond Organ opens the door to an entirely new 
world of fascinating effects hke chimes, banjo, 
marimba, xylophone, and others. The percussion 
voices pictured above may be used individually, 
combined with other percussion voices or combined 
with drawbar tones. You'll find many hours of addi- 
tional enjoyment with your Hammond Organ 
through exploring the percussion possibilities. 

All the voices of the percussion division are 
made playable through the upper manual "draw- 
bar" tab. It is marked "Drawbars and Percussion." 
For instance, if you are playing a melody on the 



upper manual using "Theater Brass 16' " and add 
the preset "Banjo" tab, the "banjo" will not sound. 

To hear the percussion voice either the tab 
marked "Drawbars and Percussion" must be de- 
pressed or the "Theater Brass 16' " tab must be 
moved to its oiT position. In the latter case only the 
percussion voice will sound. If the "Drawbars and 
Percussion" tab is depressed you will hear the per- 
cussion voice as well as the combination set up on 
the upper manual drawbars. 

Try the percussion voices one at a time. First, 
however, turn oS or lift all four upper manual pre- 
set tabs including "Drawbars and Percussion." As 
you press each key you will notice that the tones 
fade away while you are holding the key. This is a 
true percussion efiect. For a pure percussion tone it 
is suggested that the Leslie speaker, on the T-200 
Series Model, not be used. 



CHIMES . . . Provides a beautiful chime-like tone. Play in single note style, preferably in the range of 
tubular chimes, from G below Middle C to the second G above Middle C. 

CELESTA ... A beautiful 4 ft. celesta quality which may be used by itself or with a soft drawbar 
setting such as 006000 000. 

GUITAR . . . May be played in several ways. Played in single note fashion it has the characteristics of 
the Spanish Guitar. It may be used to create the effect of the Flamenco Guitar by pressing the 
Reiterate tab and adjusting the rate control to suit your taste. The Hawaiian Guitar effect may 
also be created, an example of which is included in the music section. 

MARIMBA ... An excellent choice for fast moving music using single notes or chords. When used 
with reiteration a twin mallet effect is heard which lends greater authenticity to the sound. 

XYLOPHONE . . . Also an excellent choice for fast moving music. May be used in single notes or 
chords. As with the Marimba and Reiteration, produces a most authentic alternating twin mallet 
effect. 

BANJO . . . Debghtful for fast moving melodies in single notes or chords. With the Reiteration tab 
down and the rate adjusted to suit your personal taste an exceptionally realistic banjo sound is 
created. 

REITERATE . . . Depressing this tab produces a repeating or reiterating effect on Chimes, Celesta, 
Guitar and Banjo. In the case of Marimba and Xylophone, the effect is that of twin mallets 
alternating between two notes. The rate of reiteration or alternation is controlled by the "Reit- 
eration Rate" control located just to the left of the organs on/off switch. Experimentation is the 
best gmde to where it should be set (slow to ffist). 



Page 14 




CYMBAL/PEDAI This valuable, new rhythm effect is playable through the pedal division. 

The crash of a cymbal is heard each time a pedal is depressed. When the pedal drawbar is used, 
the cymbal sound is superimposed over the pedal tone. Cymbal/Pedal is especially useful m 
rhythmic music. 

BRUSH/LOVS^ER . . .Invaluable in the playing of rhythmic music. Latin American tunes are given 
a new lite and spice. Pox trots and waltzes seem to come to life. May be used alone, with a 
drawbar registration or the lower manual preset ensemble. This effect simulates the sound of a 
drummer's brush striking or brushing the head of a snare drum. 

CYMBAL-BRUSH VOLUME . . . may be regulated by the Cymbal-Brush Volume control which 
is continuously variable . . . (soft to loud). 





PEDAL LEGATO . . . provides the longest decay time permitting the beginner to play a pedal, 
remove his foot, look for the next pedal and play it without a noticeable break in tonal continuity. 

PEDAL SUSTAIN — provides a short decay time similar to a string bass. The best string bass 
effect is created by using Pedal 8', Pedal Mute and Pedal Sustain. 

Remember that these pedal controls. Pedal Legato and Pedal Sustain determine the time it 
takes for the pedal tone to die away after the pedal is released. 

16'/PEDAL/8'... The most important tab control is the one marked 16'/pedal/8'. This tab deter- 
mines the pitch at which the pedal will sound. Depressing the back (16') produces a deep or low 
tone when the pedal is played. Depressing the front of the tab (8') produces a higher pitched 
tone when the pedai is played. 

PEDAL MUTE . . . determines the relative brightness of the pedal tone. In its "OFF" position (back 
depressed) both 16' and 8' pedal tones will be crisp and bright. In its "ON" position (front 
depressed) both 16' and 8' pedal tones will be mellow in character. Therefore you have four 
pedal tones to choose from: 



1. 16' Mute off (bright) 



16' Mute on (mellow) 3. 3' Mute off (bright) 
Normal usage will be 16', Mute on. 



4. 8' Mute on (mellow) 





TWO-SPEED LESLIE 



Lfshe may be used by itself or in conjunction with Vibrato. 
Vibrato chorus or Celeste I, II, or III. It is not advisable to 
use Leslie when using any of the percussion voices as the 
percussion voice tends to lose its authenticity. 

There arc no hard-and-fast rules governing the use of Vibrato, 
Vibrato Chorus, Celeste I, II, and Leslie. By helping to carry the 
tone colors the.se various forms of animation substantially enhance 
the flexibility of the instrument. Your own ear is the best guide 
to the sound you like best. 



OFF/LESLIE/ON... The rocker tabs controlling the Leslie are to the left of the lower manual. 
Leslie ON/OFF when turned "On" will introduce the sound created by the Leslie in its fast or 
slow position. 

SLO W/LESLIE/FAST . . .The built-in two-speed Leslie speaker is another form of sound anima- 
tion similar to Vibrato and Vibrato Chorus but produced mechanically. It is actually a built-in 
rotating diffuser which when on FAST lends an exciting, lush theatrical quality to organ tones. 
When on SLOW the effect is that of the undulating sound of a church organ. 

The speed (Slow or Fast) may be preset by the Slow/Fast rocker tab and brought into 
play instantly by pressing Leslie ON. 



Page 16 



THE HARMONIC DRAWBARS 



-m 



How the Harmonic Drawbars Provide You 
Many Thousands of Beautiful Tones 

To take the fullest advantage of the wonderful harmonic drawbars of 
the Hammond Organ, it is necessary to understand what "music" 
really is. All sounds — musical or otherwise, are created by sending 
impulses or vibrations through the air. These are "felt" in the sensi- 
tive mechanism of our ears — a process we call "hearing." While you 
may think that you hear a single individual sound, actually each 
sound, or musical note, consists of a "fundamental" or basic tone, 
and a number of "harmonics" or overtones — the latter being difierent 
when the same note is played on difierent instruments. 

For instance, when you play "A" above middle "C" on any 
instrument — organ, piano, violin or any other — you are creating a 
vibration at the rate of 440 impulses per second, provided of course 
that the instrument is in tune. This is known as the "fundamental" 
of this "A." However, the harmonics or overtones which accompany 
this fundamental of "A" on the piano would be quite different from 
those you would hear if you played the same note, on say, a violin 
or any other instrument. These different harmonics are created by a 
combination of differences in the materials and shape of the instru- 
ment, and the manner of playing. 

Now it is apparent that if you have available a source of sound 
which will provide the fundamental sound of each note on the key- 
board, plus a source of a large number of harmonics, you are in a 
position to combine these fimdamentak and harmonics into musical 
tones similar to those of almost any instrument you can name. And 
that is just what the harmonic drawbars of the Hammond Organ do 
for you. The first white drawbar in any group of Hammond drawbars 
provides the fundamental of every note on the manual controlled by 
that set of drawbars. The rest of the drawbars provide harmonics, or 
"overtones," and in some cases, sub-octave tones, in such a way that 
you can instantly combine the drawbars into many thousands of 
beautiful tone colors. 

The drawbars make the Hammond Organ the only instrument in 
the world on which you can mix beautiful tone colors as an artist mixes 
the paints on his palette. Instead of giving you a limited number of 
already-fixed tones which would be all you could ever play on the 
organ, the Hammond Organ gives you the ingredients for creating 
any of the standard tone effects you may want, plus thousands of 
other interesting tone colors which may be variations of the standard 
tones, or entirely difierent. 



Page 17 



UPPER DRAWBARS 




THE COLORS OF THE DRAWBARS 

In the illustration above you will notice that there are a number of drawbars on the "T" Series 
Hanunond Spinet Organ, and that these are located to the left of the upper manual The first seven draw- 
bars are the harmonic drawbars which set up tone colors for the lower manual. Next is a single brown 
drawbar (set slightly apart from the other drawbars) which controls the volume of the pedals; finally, 
there is a set of nine harmonic drawbars which set up tone colors for the upper manual. 



WHITE DRAWBARS 

As you know, the first white drawbar for each 
manual represents the fundamental tone. All the 
other white drawbars are octave intervals or har- 
monics of the fundamental tone — when you play 
the organ first with the fundamental drawbar 
alone and then, one by one, add the white draw- 
bars in sequence you will hear the addition of the 
same note an octave higher in each case. The tonal 
brilliance is greatly increased by adding white 
drawbars but the harmonics added are always in 
"consonance" or harmony. 



BLACK DRAWBARS 

The black drawbars on the Hammond Organ 
represents the dissonant (discordant) harmonics 
which are also necessary in building rich tone 
colors. It must not be assumed that the dissonant 
harmonics are unmusical — you will find them 
present in varying degrees in many organ and 
orchestral voices. For instance, the mellowness of 
a horn, the pungency of strings, and the brilliance 
of reeds all owe much of their character to the 
presence of these harmonics in different degrees. 

In general, however, the black drawbars should 
not be emphasized strongly above the white draw- 
bars. If a black drawbar is to be emphasized, it is 
a good rule to use adjacent white drawbars to 
strengths within two steps of the black drawbar. 
A combination such as 00 1282 882, for instance, 
contains so much of the dissonant harmonics that 
it will sound off key. 

BROWN DRAWBARS 




ONE OCTAVE 

BELOW 
FUNDAMENTAL 



LISTEN TO DISSONANT HARMONICS 




FinH 1 


ONE OCTAVE 


ABOVE 1 


AND A finH 


FUNDAMENTAL 1 


ABOVE 




FUNDAMENTAL 



ftNO A THIRD 

ABOVE 
FUNDAMENTAL 



TWO OCTAVES 
AND A FIFTH 

ASOVE 
FUNDAMENTAL 



In addition to the white and black drawbars, there are two brown drawbars in the group controlling the 
upper manual on your Spinet Model of the Hammond Organ. These two drawbars produce "sub-octave" 
effects. The first brown drawbar is the sub-octave of the fundamental and the second brown drawbar is the 
sub-octave of the third harmonic. These are used to add depth and richness to many combinations. They 
also increase the range of the keyboard by one octave, since a solo registration for "8 foot" or normal pitch 
can be set up using the first brown drawbar as the fundamental, and played one octave higher. 

Page IS 




reason a Hammond Orgsa sociks « rcz: ino m-i n^.e^ .^ :i-t jl. u^^il -i:ta i 
on the keyboard as many as nine s ep arat e tones or {Rtcbes can be b^ird smultaneously. As an aid in 
identifjing the nine pitches available each dravbar 15 marked with the pitch at which it sounds. 

You will note that the fundamental drawbar is marked 8' and the sub-fundamental (one octave 
below) is marked 16'. This is pipe organ terminology and means that the pipe used to produce the funda- 
mental tone on a pipe organ is actually eight feet high (for the lowest key on the manual) while that used 
for the octave belotc is sixteen feet high. The pipe length or footage for the octave above the 8' fundamental 
is only half the size or four feet high. The next higher octave is marked 2' and finally the third octave 
above the 8' fundamental is marked 1'. 

The remaining drawbars marked BY/, 2%', 1%', and V/^' produce harmonics or pitches that fall be- 
tween the octaves. 

Assuming you were holding Middle "C" on the upper manual and, one by one, from left to right drew 
each drawbar all the way out. You would hear the note or pitche.s indicated in the illustration below. The 
same is true of the lower manual with the exception of the first two brown drawbars. 



SUB- 



POUNDATION 



BRIULIANCE- 




PIPE PITCH 16' S'/j' 8' 4' Z'h' 2' P/s' I'/s' 1' 



SCALE PITCH SUB 5th UNISON 8th 12th 15th 17th 19th 22nd 

OCTAVE I 1 



STOP NAME BOURDON QUINT PRINCIPAL OCTAVE NAZARD BLOCK TIERCE LARIGOT SIFFLOTE 

FLOTE 




COE FQABCDEFSABCOEFGABC DE FQABC 



Page 19 



REGISTERING TONE FAMILIES BY SHAPE 

Regardless of the size of a pipe organ or its number of stops, aU of its voices are related to four basic families 
of tones. For instance, the string family includes such voices as Violin, CeUo, Viola, Aeoline, etc. The reed 
family includes such voices as Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Enghsh Horn, etc. 

Tone famiUea may be quickly set-up on the harmonic drawbars by relating a pattern or shape to each 
family. The four families of organ tone axe: 



1. Flute family 
2. Reed family 



3. Foundation or Diapason family 

4. String family 



The iUustration below pictures the shapes or patterns related to each of the four tone families. 




These are the generalities which apply to the tonal 
resources of the organ, and in themselves produce 
pleasant and usable effects. However, real beauty 
of tone ia secured in two ways — the first is the use 
of registrations which have been worked out by 
fine organists, such as those published on much 
organ music. The second— and eventually the one 
that best expresses your own feeling for the music 



^is to create your own tonal effects, trying out 
and perfecting the tones with which you play your 
favorite selections and marking your music with 
those you like best. Don't always play the same 
selection with the same registration, explore other 
new tones, because you can play each piece in hun- 
dreds of difierent ways on the Hammond Organ. 



GETTING THE EXACT TONES YOU WANT 



It might happen that a trumpet quality registra- 
tion suggested in a musical selection is not exactly 
the tone you have in mind. If you were playing on 
an organ on which all the "stops" had been set up 
at the factory, you would have to be satisfied with 
one or a few trumpet tones. 

The Hammond Organ, however, allows you not 
only to set up any tonal effect you want, but also 
to make many fine variations of the tone. Only 
on the Hammond Organ can you play exactly the 
shade of tone you want for every selection and, 
perhaps even more important, for every size and 
type of room in which you play. 



The matter of the right shade of tone for every 
enclosure is very important, because the acoustics 
of the room in which you play have much to do 
with the beauty of your music. So important is 
this matter of acoustics that expensive custom- 
built organs are "voiced" after they are installed in 
order to adapt the tone of the pipes to the acous- 
tics of the church or hall. 

With the Hammond Organ, a touch of a finger 
is all that is needed to make the tone quality softer 
or more brilliant, richer in one harmonic or an- 
other, in fact, exactly right. Great musicians de- 
clare this to be one of the most wonderful of the 
many exclusive features of the Hammond Organ. 



Page 20 



THE FLUTE FArVllLY (TWO STEP PATTERN) 




\y TRY THESE EIGHT 
. (OR TRY SOME SIMILAR} 



/ 



Chorus of flutes 
8' flute 

4' flute 
2' flute 
Soft flutes 
Stopped flutes 
Tibia (Theater) 

T-200 add Leslie/Fast 

Light Concert flute 



80 8605 002 
00 6201 000 
00 0602 001 
00 0106 004 
00 4000 000 
00 5020 000 
80 8605 004 

00 3700 000 



Of the four families of tones, the flute tones represent the simplest harmonic 
development, using chiefly the fundamental (first white drawbar) and the 
octave harmonic (second white drawbar) with occasional use of a very small 
amount of the first black drawbar. The relative proportions of these haimonica 
vary for the different kinds of flutes. 

There are literally hundreds of flute tones available on the Hammond 
Organ, in contrast to any other type of organ on which you can play only 
the one or perhaps two or three which are set up at the factory. By simply 
changing the relative positions of the 3rd and 4th drawbars to 00 3700 000 
you can create a light concert type of flute. Or by closing the 4th drawbar 
altogether and adding a little of the 5th drawbar plus a heavier fundamental, 
you can get a solo type tibia — 00 0820 00. This should be used with Normal 
Vibrato on the T-lOO and Leslie/Fast on the T-200. Using any combination 
of white drawbars provides a variety of flute tones. Add the first brown 
drawbar to give depth to any flute combination. 



THE REED FAMILY (TRIANGLE PATTERN) 




TRY ANY OF THESE v^ 
REED TONES )j A J 



Chorus Reed 

(Trumpet type) 
English Horn 
Oboe 
Clarinet 

Trumpet 
Bassoon 8' 
Bassoon 16' 
French Horn 
Bass Horn 



00 6876 540 
00 3678 660 
00 4764 210 
00 6260 210 
00 6070 540 
00 6777 770 
08 7500 000 
04 7400 000 
00 7654 321 
06 7888 800 



The reeds are more brilliant and more numerous than any other group, and 
many are used as solo stops rather than as accompaniments because of their 
strong personalities. 

While, as you have seen, the flutes concentrate their harmonic development 
chiefly on the fundamental and second white drawbars, the reeds are char- 
acterized by heavy upper harmonic development. In fact, reed tones often 
have upper harmonic development as great as that of the fundamental and 
second white drawbar. 

The reed tones of the organ are numerous. They include the brasses and 
woodwinds, the tones of the latter instruments being created by vibrating 
reeds. The oboe is a typical reed, with emphasis on the drawbars in the middle 
of the group and with nearly as much of the first black drawbar as of the 
fundamental itself. In fact, use of this first black drawbar is characteristic 
of many reed registrations and creates a "triangle" pattern that is very easy 
to remember. Used in a less powerful registration, 00 2333 200, this triangle 
pattern is a useful accompaniment tone on the lower manual. 

Page 21 



THE DIAPASON FAMILY (RIGHT ANGLE PATTERN) 




I 



SOME OF THE 
MAGNIFICENT 
• DIAPASON TONES 

Diapason Chorus 00 5756 254 

Full Organ 54 7878 766 

Bright Diapason 00 8777 666 
Foil Organ (Theater Type) 

TlOO Vib. Normal 
T-200Vib. Normal Leslie/Fast 



All diapason tones are characterized by a strong fundamental and second 
harmonic with relatively weak upper harmonics. There is much disagreement 
among professional organists as to what constitutes a "good diapason," per- 
haps because of the fact that diapason tones are more affected by good or 
bad acoustics than are the tones of more pronounced character, and the regis- 
tration that is good in one location may not be satisfactory in another. The 
"Phonon" type of diapason, for which a suggested registration is given above, 
was developed on pipe organs by designers who wanted to produce a soft 
fluty type of diapason or foundation tone. 

In discussing tone as a stracture, it may be said that the diapason tones 
lie between the flute tones, which are almost devoid of upper harmonics, 
and the string tones which are characterized by strong upper harmonic 
development. 



THE STRING FAMILY (BOW PATTERN) 




SOME OF THE HUN- 
DREDS OF POSSIBLE 
COMBINATIONS FOR 
STRINGS 



String Chorus 
Salicional 
Aeoline 
Gamba 
Violin type 
Vox Celeste 
Vox Humana 
Soft Strings 



12 3333 444 
00 2343 332 
00 1222 221 
00 3484 443 
00 4345 554 
00 2434 432 
00 1300 400 
00 1324 321 



You have seen how the harmonic drawbars of the Hammond Organ make it 
possible for you to produce thousands of beautiful tones which belong to three 
of the tonal families of the organ — flute, reed and foundation. The fourth 
and last of these "organ family" groups is the string tones, both organ and 
orchestral. 

String tone qualities are characterized by especially strong upper harmonic 
development. The fundamental and second harmonic may be relatively weak, 
which is the exact opposite of the harmonic structure of the flutes, as you 
will remember. 

There are many hundreds of possible string tone registrations, and every 
string tone can be made either "dull" or "bright" by varying the amount of 
the upper harmonics. In fact, the string tones are considered the most versatile 
of the four tone families of the organ. They can be soft or loud, single strings 
or groups, and are used both as solo registrations and as accompaniments. 



Page 22 



ADDING REGISTRATIONS 



Just as the full organ effect is achieved by adding the "voices" of the organ together, you can very easily 
combine any tones you wish on the Hammond Organ. It is simpler than arithmetic. Let's say that you want 
to combine the following: 



01 6788 540 
00 82 10 000 
00 1354 321 



In. order to get a registration which 
will sound as if all three of these tones 
are being played together, you take 
the largest figure for each drawbar, 
making the result 



01 8788 541 




or take another example 



^^ r/B/A 8' 
vox HUMANA 8' 

THE TWO 


00 
00 


8240 
2423 


000 ^^^ 

321 


00 


8443 


321 



USING CORRECT VOLUME AND RANGE 



It is well to keep in mind that aU organ tones are 
characterized not only by their individual har- 
monics but by the loudness with which they are 
played and the range in which they are used. 
String tones, for instance, should be played softly. 
You cannot open the expression pedal .so that a 
string registration sounds as loud as a tuba and 



expect it to sound like a stringl If you play a violin 
registration low on the keyboard it may be beauti- 
ful but it will not sound like a violin. Here are 
some suggestions for the range in which to play 
various instrumental effects, counting the lowest 
octave on the keyboard (F to F) as 1, the .second 
octave as 2, etc.: 




Clarinet 1st and 2nd octaves 

French horn 1st and 2nd octaves 

Muted horn 1st octave 

Trumpet 1st and 2nd octaves 

Orchestral oboe 1st and 2nd octaves 

English horn 1st and 2nd octaves 

Flute Entire Range 



Tibia 2nd. Srd and -Ith octaves 

Orchestral flute 2nd, 3rd and 4th octaves 

Grosse flute 2nd and Srd octaves 

Flute 8' & strings Entire Range 

Flute 16' & strings 2nd. Srd and 4th octaves 

Oriental tone lat and Srd octaves 




\}}\\}\}m}}\}}}m\\}} 



Page 23 




PUBLISHED MUSI 

When buv-iug organ music, choose those folios or 
selections which are arranged for Hammond Organs. 
Almost all organ music carries Hammond Organ 
registrations. The purpose of registering music for 
the Hammond Organ is to indicate to the player: 
(1) Hammond Drawbar settings, (2) amount of 
vibrato, (3) use of percussion, if called for. Regis- 
tration suggested are just that — suggestions. In the 
final analysis, the players "ear" determines which 
tones or combinations of tones he or she likes best. 

Because your instrument represents a new 
series incorporating new features, the music you 
buy won't indicate exactly how to set the controls. 
However, basic drawbar settings remain the same, 
making it relatively simple to adapt any Haramond 
Organ registration to your "T" Series instrument. 

Registrations for console Hammond Organs are 
indicated by letters within circles and squares. A 
circle always means upper manual while a square 
always meajis the lower manual For example, you 

00 6544 333. On 



#) 86 5544 333 a# „.. 

iries, you would seT86 5544 333 on the 
upper manual drawbars and 00 6544 333. on the 
lower manual drawbars. When using lower manual 
drawbar registrations indicated in nine digits al- 



will see 
the "T 



ways disregard the first two digits. Often you will 
s^a circle or square with other letters such fc^ 

Gy ^£3" ^^'^' "^^^^ ^^^^^ t° 'he preset keys 
on console models. The drawbar registration equiv- 
alent of each of the console preset tones appears in 
the "Standard Voices" preset chart below. The 
"Theater Organ" presets found on the H-lOO Series 
Hammond Organ are listed on the other chart. 

Use of Vibrato, Leslie, Percussion and Cymbal- 
Brush are a matter of personal taste. 

However, if vibrato #1 or #2 is called for in a 
registration, uae Small Vibrato on your "T" Series. 
If Vibrato #3 or "Full Vibrato" is called for, use 
Normal Vibrato on your T-lOO or Normal Vibrato 
and Leslie, fast, on your T-200 Series. 

The important thing to strive for in registra- 
tion is good tonal balance between the manuals and 
pedals. If the accompfuiiment overpowers the mel- 
ody either soften the accompaniment or make the 
melody registration louder. 

A wealth of beautiful tones are at your finger- 
tips through drawbars and preset tabs. Explore your 
instruments' vast tonal resources and use those 
tones that appeal to your personal taste and mood. 



HAMMOND ORGAN PRESET CHART (STANDARD VOICES) 

UPPER MANUAL 



PRESET 
KEYS 



c# 



D# 



F# 



G# 



B 



PRESET 
KEYS 



c# 



Di+ 



F# 



G# 



fl# 



LOWER MANUAL 



DRAWBAR 
SETTING 



TONE QUALITY 
Cancel 



PRESET 
KEYS 



DRAWBAR 
SETTING 



TONE QUALITY 



00 4432 000 



00 5320 000 



Stopped Flute 
Dulciana 



00 8740 000 



French Horn 



00 4544 222 



Salicionsl 



00 5403 



00 4675 300 



Flutes 8' &4' 
Oboe Horn 



5644 320 



Swell Diapasoit 



6876 540 ■' 



Trumpet 



32 7645 222 



Full Swell 



Adjust drawbars in 1st Group, Upper Manual 



c 




Cancel 


c# 


00 4545 440 


Cello 


D 


00 4423 220 


Flute & String 


D# 


00 7373 430 


Clarinet 


E 


00 4544 220 


Diapason, Gamba& Flute 


F 


00 6B44 322 


Great, no reeds 


F# 


00 5642 200 


Open Diapason 


G 


00 6845 433 


Full Great 


S# 


00 8O30 000 


Tibia Clausa 


A 


42 7866 244 


Full Great with 16' 


A# 


Adjust drawbars in 


Ist GrauD. invip.r IVIanrial 



Adjust drawbars in 2nd Group, Upper Manual 



Adjust drawbars in 2nd Group, Lower Manual 



H-100 PRESET VOICES (THEATER ORGAN) 



UPPER MANUAL 



DRAWBAR 
SETTING 



TONE QUALITY 



PRESET 

KEYS 



LOWER MANUAL 

TONE QUALITY 



DRAWBAR 
SETTING 



Cancel 



00 8740 000 00 



Cancel 



French Horn 8' 



00 8408 004 00 



00 4545 442 1 



Cello i 



Tibras 8' & 2' 



00 8080 840 60 



00 4432 000 



Dulciana 8' 



Clarinet i 



08 8800 880 04 



D# 



00 4800 000 



Novel Solo 8' 



Vibraharpi 



60 8088 000 00 



3800 345 8 



Ttieafer Solo 16' 



VoK 8' & Tibia 4' 



00 4685 300 



6554 322 2 



Oboe Horn 8' 



F# 



60 8807 005 00 



00 5642 200 



Siring Accomp. 8' 



Full Tibias 16' 



6888 654 44 



Trumpets' 



76 8878 667 66 



J 



43 5434 334 3 



Open Diapason 8' 



00 8030 000 



Full Accomp. 16' 
Tibia 8' 



Full Theater Brass 16' 



Adjust drawbars in 1st Group, Upper Manual 



84 7767 666 4 



Ait 



Bombarde 16' 



Adjust drawbars in 2nd Group, Upper Manual 



Adjust drawbars in 1st Croup, Lower Manual 
Adjust drawbars in 2nj Group, Lower Manual 



Page 24 



A TYPICAL THEATER ORGAN STOP LIST 



Tibia 16' 

Bourdon 16' . . 
Diapason 16' . 
Solo Strings 16' 
Contra Viol 16' 
Contra Celeste 16 
Vox Humana 16' 
Oboe Horn 16' . , 
Saxopiione 16' . 
Clarinet 16' ... 
English Horn 16' 
Ophicleide 16' . 



.72 0020 000 
,54 3100 000 
.64 3322 000 
.25 4421 000 
.24 3210 000 
.23 4321 000 
.14 3110 000 
47 5430 000 
,27 3210 000 
.35 2000 000 
.25 3442 100 
.47 7600 000 



Tibia 8' 

Concert Flute 8 
Diapason 8' . 
Solo Strings 8' 
Viol d'Orchestre 8 
Viole Celeste 8' 
Vox Humana 8' 
Oboe Horn 8' . . 
Saxophone 8' . 
Clarinet 8' . . . 
English Horn 8' 
Tuba 8' 



,00 8240 000 
,00 6421 000 
,00 5642 110 
.00 2366 542 
■ 00 2444 322 
,00 2323 211 
,00 3400 332 
.00 4763 000 
.00 2478 500 
.00 8382 700 
.00 3577 540 
.00 5680 400 



Flute 4' 00 0803 030 

Piccolo 4' 00 0600 000 

Octave 4' 00 0545 321 

Solo Strings 4' . . .00 0436 555 

Viol 4' 00 0344 232 

Octave Celeste 4' . . 00 0324 220 
Vox Humana 4' ... 00 0433 042 

Oboe Horn 4' 00 0606 310 

Clarion 4' 00 0515 230 

Tibia 2' 00 0006 001 

Piccolo 2' 00 0005 111 

Twelfth 00 0060 020 



SOME OTHER DISTINCTIVE TONE QUALITIES 



Melodies (single or double-note) 



00 4680 006 
00 3460 704 
00 5070 052 
00 3558 808 
00 6005 700 
00 2268 888 
00 4678 333 



00 5288 822 
00 1478 630 
00 6080 808 
00 8005 005 
36 0000 008 
08 6000 808 
07 5646 006 



Ensembles and accompaniments 



04 3508 863 

05 7800 006 
20 3004 845 
46 8080 008 
00 5006 006 
00 5000 345 
00 5505 403 



00 5334 003 
00 6654 321 
00 2353 221 
35 8857 004 
00 1377 865 
00 3500 420 
52 4660 055 (8va.) 



Melody 

Tibia 8' 00 8240 000 

Oboe Horn 8' 00 4763 000 

Saxophone 8' 00 2478 500 

Krumet 8' 00 0185 786 

English Horn 8' 00 3577 540 

Solo Strings 8' 00 2366 542 

Vox Humana 8' 00 3400 332 

Oboe Horn 16' 47 5430 000 



Accompaniment 

Vox Humana 8' 3400 332 

Viole Ceieste 8' 2323 211 

Soft Tibia 6130 000 

Soft Tibia 5120 000 

Concert Flute 8' 6421 000 

Concert Flute 8' 6421 000 

Soft Concert Flute 4210 000 

Viole Celeste 2323 211 



Page 25 



TRY Y< 



ROWN DRAWBAR REGISTRATIONS 



Part of the fun of playing your Hammond Organ 
is to experiment with your own drawbar arrange- 
ments. It is not essential that you use the regis- 
trations set up on any music you may have. These 
registrations merely represent the preference of 
the composer or arranger and may not be your 
choice of tonal color at all. You may also find that 
the acoustics of the room in which you are play- 
ing may make it desirable to vary slightly the 



registrations used. You may especially wish to 
supply a little more or a little less "brillance" by 
varying the amount of the upper drawbars used. 
Do not hesitate to experiment with tonal colors on 
your Hammond Organ— there are many thousands 
of beautiful tones in the instrument and part of 
the enjoyment of the organ lies in creating new 
and lovely tones to make your music more in- 
teresting. 



CHANGING DRAWBAR REGISTRATIONS 



Sometimes music that carries registration for the 
Hammond Organ shows the liking of the arranger 
for a great many changes of tonal colors in a selec- 
tion; sometimes, changes suggested are very "con- 
tiasty" in character and occasionally they come at 
places in the music where it is difficult to make 
them while continuing to play without a break in 
your music. Here, again, these suggested changes 
or registrations are a matter of taste and need not 
be made. In fact, many fine organists point out 
that it is usually undesirable to make drastic 
changes of tonal color. Ordinarily, changes of tone 
on big pipe organs are made by "bringing in" or 
dropping out one or more pipes so that the changes 
of tonal color represents an addition or subtraction 
from the basic tone. This method of changing 
tonal colors gives you a very smooth and natural 
flow of music. It is therefore suggested that you 
practice making very simple drawbar changes- 
one drawbar or two, at most, which you can do in 
a split second, and which will give you a noticeable 
change of tone yet one that is a natural transition 
from the tone you have been using. 



You will enjoy creating tonal colors yourself, and 
will want to keep your favorites in a little note- 
book or mark them on your music. 




PLAYING THE ORGAN 

Now that you have acquainted yourself with the various controls and have proven to your own satisfaction 

combmataons as they are often called) are indicated by number, it is not nece^^ to set E Zblr^ 

nr^oHn t'"'''""'^' '°"*"^' •'^*"^^" '^' ""'"'^"^ ^ ^«U - on the num^eS. In hel"i"n on 
^^Tv U^"^' "I^''^' '"'''^'"^ °^ '^^^^'''S *«"^ ^^"'■"'^^ by pattern instead of ty numbers was ex 

tyou ^anT "°" '""^" "'' ''"^ continuous-contact drawbars make it simple to g^rthe dTrent 

notttS": '"" '" *"'^/''" '^^* "'^^ '"'^^'^ ^"-Id fl°- -enly'from note tonol The nSe"^^ 
not struck as on a p.ano. A very slight finger pressure is sufficient to depress the key 



Page 26 



The following musical selections have been specif- 
ically arranged for your immediate musical pleasure. 
All are in the key of C (no sharps or flats) and use 
only three chords. The C, F and G chords are 
plainly marked on the lower manual keyboard gruide 
attached to the back cover of this book. The melody 
notes in the music are named for your playing con- 
venience. As you progress with your lessons you will 
learn to read notes quickly and easily. For now, 
however, you may use the handy keyboard charts 
to help you find the melody notes and accompany- 
ing chords. 

When playing the pedals, use the chord name 
to determine the proper accompanying pedal note. 



Play the C pedal with the (cj chord, G pedal with the 
chord and the F pedal with the /f\ chord. 




After you have played these easy-to-leam selections, 
experiment with different drawbar and tab settings. You 
will soon develop your own favorite tone combinations. 



SILENT NIGHT 



lOWER UPPER I 

IDCDDD '- 

■rojir ™ 

Andante 



-PEflCUSSiON- 



— VIBRflTQ.-- 1 RtvtHB ORGiSN 



- DQ 



LOWER: ENSEMBLE 8' 
VIBRATO: ON, NORMAL 
PEDAL DRAWBAR: 6 

PEDAL TABS: 16', 
PEDAL LEGATO 

ORGAN: BRILLIANCE 



m 



© 



s 



^ 



UPPER: FULL TIBIAS 16' 
PERCUSSION: OFF 
REVERBERATION; I, II 
CYMBAL/PEDAL: OFF 
BRUSH/LOWER: OFF 
LESLIE (T-200): ON, SLOW 

F. Gruber 



G7 



© 



A 



J- I J J 



D 

© 



J I J. J' J 



^^ 



m 



c c 



A A 



B A G A G 



A 



© 



G7 



n 



S3= 



^¥f 



© 



G7 



m 



m 



-r 





G F 



Page 27 




Alokxx 




HAWAIIAN 6UITAR 

This fascinating effect is made possible by combining 

the pre-voiced guitar tab with a drawbar registration. The guitar 

percussion voice will sound and decay without vibrato 

over a sustained vibrato drawbar combination. This creates 

the illusion of the singing tones of the Hawaiian Guitar. 

Where wavy vertical lines appear next to melody notes 

"roll" those notes. Play the bottom one first, 

very quickly followed by the top note. 



UPPER: 00 8888 000 
PERCUSSION: GUITAR 
REVERBERATION: I, M 
CYMBAL/PEDAL: OFF 
BRUSH/LOWER: OFF 
LESLIE (T-200): OFF 



LOWER: 8606 000 
VIBRATO: ON, NORMAL 
PEDAL DRAWBAR: 4 
PEDAL TABS: 16', 

PEDAL LEGATO, 

PEDAL MUTE 
ORGAN: BRILLIANCE 



© 



Lower 



G 

E 



C 

E 



Pedal 




Page 33 



CELITO LINDO 




without reiteration. As an alternate registration 
set up the upper manual drawbars as indicated and 
press the upper manual drawbars tab as indicated 
in measure 8. 




UPPER: 40 0000 OOO 
PERCUSSION: MARIMBA. 

REITERATION 
REVERBERATION: I, II 
CYMBAL/PEDAL: ON 
BRUSH/LOWER: ON 
LESLIE (T-200): OFF 




XYLOPHONE 

The xylophone sounds similar to the 
marimba but the tone is brighter. The play- 
ing technique remains the same. You 

may wish to use the cymbal and brush for a light rhythmic effect. Of course, the xylophone is also 
an excellent solo voice without reiteration. Remember, you may add drawbars at any time by 
simply pressing the upper manual "drawbars and percussion" tab and adding those drawbars of 
your choice. 

LOWER UPPER 



LUWtK UPPER r PtKCUSSIDN 1 | 

r iTTmnnDli 

Dl 

DIDIDC 

© 





f 



'HM EFFECTS 

(Cymbal &. Brush) 

Your T- Series Hammond Organ fea- 
tures rhythm effects which lend excit- 
ing color and sparkle to your music. 

The cymbal effect is playable 
through the pedals while the brush 
effect is playable through the lower 
manual. They may be used .separately 
or together. 



fLIEGST MIR IM H 



Following is an easy waltz which 
demonstrates the flexibility of the 
cymbal and brush. Experiment by 
using the brush only or the cymbal 
only. Of course, these effects may be 
applied to any type of music. Set the 
tabs and drawbars as indicated below 
and listen to how music comes alive 
with these sparkling rhythm effects. 




lOWIfi LIPF>ER 



tttuina ORC 



LOWER; 6433 321 
VIBRATO: ON. NORMAL 
PEDAL DRAWBAR: 7 
PEDAL TABS: 8', 

PEDAL SUSTAIN, 

PEDAL MUTE 
ORGAN: BRILLIANCE 



UPPER: 00 4000 000 
PERCUSSION: BANJO, 

REITERATION 
REVERBERATION: I, II 
CYMBAL/PEDAL: ON 
BRUSH/LOWER: ON 
LESLIE (T-200): OFF 




Page 36 



BANJO 

Here is a "fun" sound enjoyed by one 
Eind all. The banjo voice may be played 
in several ways. First of all, by itself it 
produces the sound of a plucked banjo 
string. With reiteration any note will 



keep repeating as long as the note is held. 
It may also be used to accent upper man- 
ual drawbar combinations. Adding cym- 
bal and brush lends a toe tapping rhythm 
accompaniment. 



i.tjwrfi ufJf'EH 



I HERCUS5IDN 1 i VIBHftTf^' — 



■LHB ORGAN 



LOWER: 7655 443 
VIBRATO: ON, NORMAL 
PEDAL DRAWBAR: 7 
PEDAL TABS: 16', 

PEDAL SUSTAIN, 

PEDAL MUTE 
ORGAN: BRILLIANCE 



UPPER: 00 0000 000 
PERCUSSION: BANJO 
REVERBERATION: I. II 
CYMBAL/PEDAL: ON 

(ADJUST VOLUME) 
BRUSH/LOWER: ON 

(ADJUST VOLUME) 
LESLIE (T-200): ON, FAST 




Page 37 




Exciting, professional String Bass efiects 
are made possible in your T-lOO or T-200 
Series instrument through the use of the 
rocker tab marked "Pedal Sustain". 

Here is a musical example of the String 
Bass effect. Set the tabs and drawbars as 
indicated below. Play the pedals in a de- 
tached or staccato manner. 




VO'/JtW UPPER I PEHCU ^SlO.-j , , viBRftTQ , RfJEas ORGAN 

c cm Enim i rnrr n ci 

DinDD ■•■• 

Qinnn -• ..... do 



LOWER: 6544 221 
VIBRATO: ON, NORMAL 
PEDAL DRAWBAR: 8 
PEDAL TABS: 8', 

PEDAL SUSTAIN, 
PEDAL MUTE 
ORGAN: BRILLIANCE 



UPPER: 80 OOOO 000 
PERCUSSION: MARIMBA 
REVERBERATION: I, II 
CYMBAL/PEDAL 

(OPTIONAL) 
BRUSH/LOWER: 

(OPTIONAL) 
LESLIE {T-200): OFF 



Upper I 



Lower 



Pedal 



S 



^ 



Play staccato or detached. 



''"- J H J I Jii - I I iJi J I ^^ 



J5 

BiP 



C6 



^ 



^ 



^^ 



E7 



F6 



G7 



^ 



^ 



=8= 



i |J H i 



* •^ 



^ 



Jj ^ 1^ ^'^ 



^^ 



^ tfJ u 



Am 



D9 3 




Page 38 



How wonderful it would be if every organist could 
study with a truly great teacher. It's a remarkable 
experience. A great teacher will inspire his students 
to strive for perfection and be content with nothing 
less. Music will assume a new dimension. It wiU 
begin to be more than just notes on paper. The 
student will begin to take seriously his responsi- 



bility, as the middle man in the Composer-Per- 
former-Listener relationship. He will try to project 
to the listener the qualities which he, himself, feek 
in the music. 

The organist who has the time and inclination to 
practice, and who wishes to do a meticulously per- 
fect performance, should remember four things. 



The choice of registrations, a.ssuming that the notes are played correctly, is 
what makes one organist sound different from another. Two organists cam 
play the same piece of music, one will sound thrilling, the other will be a 
perfect bore. Choice of registrations makes the difference. Therefore, spend 
plenty of time selecting registrations to fit the type of music you are playing. 
Many professional organists spend hours on one number, trying this, trying 
that, until they finally arrive at precisely the best registration possible. 



Probably the greatest single factor in good organ playing is correct fingering. 
Figure out your fingering before you start to practice. Write it in the music, 
then stick to the fingering you've chosen. Keep in mind the necessity for a 
smooth legato, and in order to preserve this legato use finger substitutiwi 
and the thumb glissando. Remember that an organist plays with his fingers; 
arm and hand motion should be kept to a minimum. Develop precise finger 
motion, press the keys firmly. 



SLOW, CORRECT, PRECISE, THOUGHTFUL practice is the way to 
really learn a piece of music. Basically the process of learning is this. We 
impress upon the muscles of the fingers a PATTERN — the order in which 
the fingers are used. If then, every time the music is practiced, the same 
fingers will be used on the same keys, constant repetition will impress this 
pattern so thoroughly that the fingers will give back, automatically, exactly 
what they've learned. It's a question of FINGER MEMORY. That's why, 
once the music has been thoroughly learned, the player can be thinking of 
something eke, and the fingers will go right on playing by themselves. Thaf s 
why we start practicing SLOWLY and THOUGHTFULLY so that every 
time the music is played it wiU be done perfectly. Gradually the tempo will 
increase, and at the same time perfection of playing will be maintained. 
Learning music by this method will actually take no longer than learning 
by hit-and-miss methods, and the results will be far superior. 



Every organist should LISTEN TO HIMSELF PLAY. He should listen 
in a detached manner as though hearing someone else. You'd be surprised 
how many players do not listen to what they are doing. Once a teacher was 
^^ giving a lesson to a pupil. After a particularly horrible performance, the 

teacher paused a moment, then asked the student, "How did that sound to 
you?" The reply was, "I don't know. I wasn't listening!" Finger memory 
was doing the work, and the poor fingers didn't have much to remember. 



Page 39 



THE LANGU 



THE GRAND STAFF 




BKACE' 



CLEF 



-fy^. 



SL 



^ 



^Wl' 




i?^ 



if:^ 



sx^ 



a^ 



C DE FaABCDE F 



MIDDLE. -Q- D ■= 
— xm O < l ^ T^ 



GABCOEFaABCD 



E F Q A B C 



TREBLE CLEF 
SION 




KEY SIGNATURE 
yTIME SIGN A TURE 



BAR LINES 



MEASURE MEASURE 

TIME SIGNATURES 

Upper number determines counts per measure. 

Lower number determines value of note 
getting one count. 

The letter "C" (or (jj) following the clef sign means 'common time' or ^ 

KEY SIGNATURES 

The sharps (#) or flats (!,) appearing at the 
I beginning of each staff indicate the key of 
the composition. For example; 



NOTE VALUES 

o J J i'n 

WHOLE NOTE . HALF NOTE . QUARTER NOTE . EIGHTH NOTE 



SIXTEENTH NOTE THIRTYSECOND NOTE SIXTYfOURTH NOTE 
A dot J. foHowIng a note augments its value by one-hall. 




RESTS 

^ 7 

WHOLE REST . HALF BEST . QUARTER REST . DGHTH R£ST 

SIXTEENTH BEST ' SIXPr-FOURTH REST 

THIRTYSECOND REST 

Page 40 



GE OF MUSIC 




THE KEYBOARD 



F QABCD E F 3 ABC DC F OABCD E 



AUCMtNTFD >m 



iUCMENIED 4TH 



INTERVAL: the difference in pitch 
between two notes 
(here shown relative 
to middle C). 



UNISOH 



F e A B d 

■ en ■■■■ m 

■la »H I memma m i j 

bo iji ji o ^n^» ; i> ^ =^ I 



i 



I MINH 3I<D I DIMIHtSIED SM I M« tn I 

THE MAJOR (Diatonic) SCALE 

(Example shown in C major) 



^ ?f 



WHOLE WHOLE 
STEP STEP 



PATTERN 

ALPHABET C O E F 

SOLFEGOIO DO RE Ml FA 

NUMBEI^S 1 2 a 4l 

(Denoiing degrees of scale] 

Nuw'yJiAtS I 31 nr DC 

[Denoiing chard, Nifmofijr} 



NAMES OF DEGREES 
OF THE SCALE 



HALF WHOLE WHOLE WHOLE 
STEP STEP STEP STEP 



HALF 
STEP 



6 
SOL 

S 



A 
LA 

e 

SI 



B 
T( 

7 



n HL is: 1 TO. TyiT 



T 
O 
N 
I 
C 



s 
u 
P 

E 

R 

T 

O 

N 

I 

C 



M 
E 

D 
I 

A 



S 

u 

B 
D 
O 



N M 
T I 
N 
A 
N 
T 



D 
O 

M 

I 

N 
A 

N 

T 



S 
U 
B 
M 
E 
D 
I 

A 
N 
T 



L 
E 
A 
D 
I 
N 

e 

T 
O 
N 

E 



TRIADS 

MAJOR: 1-3- 
MINORrl-i-a-S 
AUGMENTED: 1-3-^5 
DIMINISHED: l-^S-fS 

MOST COMMONL 
USED CHORDS 

I car TONIC 

I3Z: or SUBDOMINANT 

3Z: or DOMINANT 



Page 41 



^g^^m 



A cappella — Choral music without instrumental ac- 
companiment. 

Accelerando - Becoming faster. 

Accidental — Sign of chromatic alteration, momen- 
tarily introduced for single notes or measures. 

Adagio — Slow, tranquil. 

Agogjc — Denoting all the subtleties of performance 
achieved by modification of tempo. 

Alia marcia — In march style. 

Allegretto — Quite lively, moderately fast (faster than 
Andante, slower than Allegro). 

Allegro — Lively, rapid. 

Andante — Moving, moderately slow. 

Andantino - A little faster than Andante. 

Appoggiatura — Note of embellishment, grace note. 

Attack — The speed with which an organ speaks: 
time between the playing of a note and the 
resulting tone. 

Augmented Interval— Interval increased by a half step. 

Aria — An elaborate solo song. 

Arpeggio — Notes of a chord when played one after 
another. 

A tempo — Return to the original rate of speed. 

Cantabile — In a singing style. 

Chromatic scale — Composed of successive half 
steps. 

Coda — A concluding section added to a composition. 

Con brio — With vigor and spirit. 

Con moto — With movement. 

Consonance — A combination of tones in agreement 
of sound. 

Counterpoint —A study of melodies and their inter- 
relationships. 

Da capo ai fine — Repeat from the beginning to the 
end (D.C.). 

Dal Segno al fine — Repeat from the sign ( 8 ) to 
the end (D.S.). 

Decay — The time during which one or more sus- 
tained notes die away. 

Diminished Interval — Interval decreased by a half 
step. 

Diapason — A flue-pipe work of the organ which forms 
the backbone of each manual; the characteristic 
full (foundation) sound of the organ. 

Diatonic — Denoting the natural scale consisting of 
five whole steps and two half steps, e.g. as it is 
produced on the white keys of the keyboard. 

Dissonance — A combination of tones in disagree- 
ment, unrestful, needing a consonance to follow 
for completeness. 

Dolce — Sweet, soft. 

Duet — Composition for or rendition by two per- 
formers. 

Dynamic marks — Words, signs, etc., indicating de- 
gree of sound volume. 

Etude — A study, primarily designed to aid the stu- 
dent in the development of his mechanical and 
technical ability. 

Fine — Close, end. 




MUSIC GLOSSARY 



Some useful musical terms and their definitions 



Flat - Sign (b) which indicates lowering the pitch of 
a note by a half step. 

Forte (f) - Loud. 

Fortissimo (ff) — Very loud. 

Glissando — The execution of rapid scales by a slid- 
ing movement of the hand or finger over the keys. 

Half Step — Next adjacent key up or down. 

Harmonics — Overtones (or integral multiples of fun- 
damental frequency) that make up tone color. 

II canto ben marcato — The melody played very dis- 
tinctly, 

Largo — Extremely slow, broad. 

Lento — Slow 

Legato — Connected, smooth. 

Ledger lines — Lines added above or below the staff 
for those notes too high or low to be represented 
on the staff. 

Meno — Less. 

Mezzo — Half. 

Mezzo forte (mf) — Moderately loud. 

Mezzo piano (mp) - Moderately soft. 

Misterioso — In a style suggestive of mystery. 

Moderate — Moderate rate of speed. 

Molto — Much. 

Non tanlo — Not so much. 

Octave — Interval embracing eight diatonic tones; e.g. 
C to C, up or down. 

Percussion — Pertaining to those instruments which 
are sounded by striking or shaking. 

Perdendo — Gradually dying away. 

Perfect Interval — The unison, 4th, 5th, and octave 
which retain the same character when inverted. 

Pesante — Heavy. 

Piano (p) - Soft. 

Pianissimo (pp) — Very soft. 

Poco a poco — Little by little 

Presto — Very quick. 

Prestissimo — As fast as possible. 

Primo — First. 

Rallentando — Gradually growing slower (rail.). 

Rinforzando — A sudden stress applied to a single 
note or chord. 

Ritardando — Gradually growing slower (rit.). 

Ritenuto -- Immediate reduction of speed. 

Root — That note on which a chord is built. 

Secondo — Second. 

Semplice — Simple. 

Sempre — Always. 

Senza — Without. 

Sforzando (sfz) — A sudden and strong accent on a 
single note or chord. 

Sharp — The sign {=) which indicates a raising of a 
note by a half step. 

Smorzando — Dying away. 

Solfeggio — Singing the degrees of the scale by 
syllables (usually DO, RE, IVll, etc.). 



Page 42 



Sopra — Above. 
Sotto — Under. 
Strepitoso — Noisy. 
Stringendo — Quickening. 
Subito — Suddenly. 
Syncopation — Any deliberate upsetting of the nor- 
mal pulse of meter, accent, and rhythm. 

Tacet — Is silent. 

Tanto — Much, so much. 

Tempo — Rate of speed of a composition. 

Teneramente — Tenderly. 

Tenuto ~ Hold, sustain. 

Timbre — The color or quality of tone. 

Timorese — Timid, fearful. 

Triad — Three-toned chord: root, third, and fifth. 

Troppo — Too much. 



Turn — An embellishment consisting of four or five 

notes (usually a principal note played in alter- 
nation with its higher and lower auxiliary). 
Tremolo — A continuous fluctuation of loudness pro- 
ducing a tremulous effect. Sometimes combined 
with a pitch variation. 

Tremulant — A mechanical organ device which pro- 
duces pulsations of tone. 

Una corda — In piano, a direction to use the left (soft) 
pedal. 

Unison — The pseudo-interval formed by a tone and 

its duplication. 
Veloce — Quick. 

Vibrato — A continuous fluctuation of pitch used to 

increase the emotional quality of tone. 
Vivace — Lively, brisk. 
Vivo — Lively, 
Whole step — Two half steps. 




—-—-;. i.~.=:- r ?in-;«f2;rjS '«S4***iB*« 



Some Musical Symbols and what they mean 



^ 



I 

I 

% 

\ 
t 

jTj 



Crescendo — Increasing in loudness. 

Decrescendo or DimJnuendo — Decreasing in loudness. 

Slur — Curved line spanning two or more different notes to show 
they are played legato. 

Tie — Hold for total count of notes. ( Curved line spanning same notes) 

Hold — Prolong time value of note or rest at performer's discretion. 

Time signature 

Treble clef sign 

Bas9 clef sign 

Sharp sign 

Flat sign 

Natural sign 

Staccato — Played detached. 

Triplet — Three notes played in the count of one note of the next higher 
value. 

Grace Note — Short appogiatura. 
Repeat Signs — See "Dal Segno al fine". 



Page 43 



I 



SOME FACTS YOU SHOULD KNO>V 
ABOUT YOUR HAMMOND ORGAN 




CARE AND MAINTENANCE 



You may place a Hammond Organ anywhere in your home, knowing that 
this sturdy instrument shrugs off all tone problems. It is impervious to too 
much or too little heat, too much dampness and sudden changes in tempera- 
ture. 

Connect only to power supply of voltage and frequency shown on the 
name plate. Place console at least two inches from the wall for best acoustical 
results and for ventilation. 



PLASTIC KEYS AND STOP TABLETS 

Clean lightly with a soft, damp cloth or chamois. Wiping with a dry cloth 
builds up an electrostatic charge which will attract dust particles from the air. 

If cleaning agents are necessary, use pure facia] soap and lukewarm water. 
Dry without excessive rubbing. 

Do not use boiling water, strong solvents, such a.s alcohol, dry cleaning fluids 
or window cleaning fluids which contain such solvents. 

WOODWORK 

Dust with a soft damp cloth or chamois. If cleaning agents are necessary, 
use a .soft cloth lightly dampened with a solution of mild soap and lukewarm 
water. Remove solution, using soft cloth dampened with clean water. Dry 
thoroughly, rubbing with the grain. 

Use a good grade furniture wax or polish. Avoid use of paste waxes or oil-type 
polishes. 

Excessive rubbing in one spot or at edges may result in damage to the finish. 

PACKING FOR MOVING OR SHIPPING 

If the organ is to be shipped by a carrier other than a regular furniture 
mover, arrange with your local Hammond Organ dealer to have it properly 
packed. 



ACCESSORIES 



BUILT-IN EARPHONE JACK 

Earphones can be hooked into the Hammond T-Series quickly and easily 
using Hammond's Built-in Earphone Jack. They are a very useful accessory 
which you may want to purchase since they permit you to practice at any 
hour without disturbing others. Dynamic-type earphones will give best results, 
although other types can be used. Your dealer can supply earphones just right 
for your Hammond Organ. 

BUn.T-IN TONE CABINET RECEPTACLE 

If greater volume is wanted to boost the sound of your Hammond T-Series for 
playing in large auditoriums or churches, a tone cabinet can be easily attached 
through Hammond's Built-in Tone Cabinet Receptacle. Your dealer can 
supply you with a suitable tone cabinet. 



Page 44 



b47031365 
HO-294 



Printed in U.SA 



Hammond Organ T-lOO, T-200 Series Owner's Manual 
Scanned July 29, 2008 by John Phillips