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Full text of "Hazelton Stationary Boiler"

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THE HAZEbTON BOILER 60., 



PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS OF PATENT 



Stationary, Portable and Marine Boilers, 



NEW YORK, U. S. A. 



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SOLE PROPRIETORS 
of that Type of IWater-Tube Boiler frequently called 

THE PORCUPINE BOILER. 



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Patented in the United States and Foreign Countries. 



General Office :-No. 716 EAST THIRTEENTH STREET, NEW YORK. 

Branch Office :-ROOM 28-No. 145 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
Works:— Nos. 716 to 732 EAST THIRTEENTH STREET, NEW YORK 



address all communications to the company. 



RANKIN, BRAYTON & CO., 

PROPRIETORS OF 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 
no, 127 first st., san francisco, cal. 

sole manufacturers for the 
Pacific Coast, British Columbia 

AND 

West Coast of Mexico. 



BARTLETT, HAYWARD & CO., 
General Agents, 

OFFICE, 

Cor. German and Calvert Streets, 
Baltimore, Mo. 



THE JHAZEbTOJvJ BOILER (20. 







GEORGE M. NEWHALL & BRO., 

General Agents, 

office at 

SOUTHWARK FOUNDRY, 

Fifth and Washington Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa, 



J. J. DE KINDER, 

SOLE AGENT FOR PHILADELPHIA, 
OFFICE, 

No. 51 North Seventh Street, 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



THE HAZELTON BOILER CO., 

No- 716 EAST 13th STREET, 
NEW YORK CITY, 



WE BEG TO PRESENT TO THOSE INTERESTED IN THE PRODUCTION OF 
STEAM, THIS ENLARGED CIRCULAR OF 

THE HAZELdTON STATIONARY BOIbER, 

WITH NEW WOOD ENGRAVINGS, AND FULL DESCRIPTIVE MATTER, EMBODYING IN 
AS BRIEF FORM AS IS CONSISTENT WITH AN INTELLIGENT EXPLANATION, ALL 
THE MERITS OF THIS WONDERFUL STEAM PRODUCER. We OPERATED OUR 

experimental boiler of two hundred and seventy-five horse-power 
for nearly four years prior to establishing our works, and now, 
after a practical experience covering over seven years, we are 
prepared to defend its merits against all adverse criticism. many 
able men in matters pertaining to steam, have examined it, and given 
it their unqualified endorsement. our business is daily increasing, 
and we have recently extended our manufacturing plant. 

we would be pleased to have all those interested visit our 
works, and examine the boiler, 

Very respectfully yours, 



THE HAZELTON BOILER CO. 



NEW YORK CITY, NOVEMBER, 1887. 



TJHE JHAZEbTOJM IBOIbER 60. 

New York, U. S. A. 




Elevation of Standard 215 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler complete, 
STATIONARY BOILERS. 



TJHE JHAZEbTOJM BOIbER (BO. 



New York, U. S. A. 




Standard 215 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler, witb one-half of Brickwork, 
Smoke-Hood, and Smoke-Stack removed. 

STATIONARY BOILERS. 



THE jHAZEbTON IBOIbER CO. 



New York, U. S. A. 




Plan of * 

Standard 215 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler, 

Showing Brickwork at level of top of Deflecting Furnace 

Stand Pipe with part of two rows of Radial 

Tubes. Furnace Door, Sill Plate, 

Grate Bars, etc., etc. 




Plan of 

215 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler, 

with Smoke Hood and Smoke Stack removed, showing Stand 

Pipe complete, with Radial Tubes, and Section of 

Brickwork just above Grate Bars. 



T;.E JHAZEbTOJN BOILER CO, 



New York, U. S. A. 




Sectional Elevation of Standard 215 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler, 
STATIONARY BOILERS, 



THE JHAZELTOJsl BOILER CO. 



New York, U. S. A. 




Flan of Standard 25 Horse-Power Stationary Boiler. 

Showing Grate Bars extending one half around the Stand Pipe and terminating at Bridge 

Walls, top of Deflecting Furnace eccentric to Stand Pipe, for the purpose of 

directing the proper proportion of the currents of heat to those 

tubes which do not come directly over the Grate Bars, 

etc., etc. T etc. 



THE HAZELTON STATIONARY BOILER. 



DESCRIPTION. 



This is an improvement in that type of steam generator, known as 
the Water Tube Boiler, as will appear in the following descrip- 
tion, reference being had to the accompanying wood engravings. 

STAND PIPE. — The Stand Pipe is the central vertical cylin- 
der, and varies in diameter, height and thickness, with the power 
required. It rests upon a circular cast iron foundation plate, placed 
upon a supplementary foundation of brick, raised one course above 
level of foundation, so as to prevent water in ash pit, from coming in 
contact with the boiler. It is not fastened to foundation, and can 



expand and contract freely. The lower section is made of the best 
Solid Fire Box Iron, and the remaining sections, into which the 
radial horizontal tubes are expanded, of the best C. H. No. i Flange 
Iron, while the heads of this boiler are of Extra Flange Iron, and 
properly dished and flanged. Every plate of iron used, is stamped 
with the name of the maker, and 50,000 lbs. tensile strength, and 
great care is exercised in the manufacture of this boiler, the best of 
rivets are used, and well driven, the edges of the plates planed, all 
seams thoroughly caulked, tube holes drilled to gauge, and every 
attention given to secure thorough workmanship. 

That portion of the stand pipe below the grate bars, forms the 
mud drum, into which a man-hole with plate is placed affording 
ready facility for entering the boiler and examining every portion of 
its interior surface. Owing to the very rapid circulation of water in 
this boiler the extraneous matter contained in the water is deposited 
in the lower end of the stand pipe and either blown off or removed 
through the manhole. 

F^DIAls TUBES. — The diameter, length and number depend 
upon the size of the boiler. They are of full standard gauge. One 
end of each tube is open, the other is closed upon itself, forming a 
hemispherical or round end, and in the process of closing, the end is 
thickened, thereby adding strength and producing a homogeneous 
tube. The open end of each tube is expanded into the stand pipe, 
the tube extending outward horizontally, its closed end being about 
one inch distant from the inner surface of the brickwork enclosure 
of the boiler. Thus the radial tubes being secured at one end only, 
and clear of the brickwork at the other end, can expand and con- 
tract without strain. 

STEAM fIPE AND STEAJVl DRYING TUBES.— A 
wrought iron flange is riveted to the under side of the top head of 
stand pipe, and abundant thread-hold secured by cutting a thread, 
through both head and flange. A nipple is screwed in from the 
outside, the lower end with a long thread extending below the head 
two or three inches. At upper end of this nipple, a malleable iron 
tee is connected, and from one outlet of this tee the steam pipe 
extends horizontally to outer line of brickwork to receive Steam 
Valve, and in like manner another pipe in the opposite direction, 
connects with the Pop Safety Valve. 



At the lower end of the nipple, and inside of the stand pipe, 
connected to it by a pair of flanges bolted together, is a vertical 
pipe, open at upper end and closed at lower end. Into this vertical 
pipe are screwed a series of horizontal wrought iron pipes, of small 
diameter, and open at both ends, which extend outward and into 
the uppermost steam drying tubes in stand pipe, almost to their 
outer ends, and the steam as it becomes disengaged from the surface 
of the water, must enter the steam drying tubes, pass to their outer 
ends, before entering these small pipes, which convey the dry steam 
into the steam pipe. 

For convenience of removal, these small wrought iron pipes are 
in two pieces, connected by a coupling. 

SMOKE jHOOD.— This is made of best materials, and in 
form as shown in wood engravings. A door is placed in each, for 
ready access to exterior of upper part of stand pipe. A dormer is 
built on each side of hood. The pop safety valve rests freely on 
the roof of one, and the steam pipe passes out through a movable 
slide in the front of the other, which permits the stand pipe to 
expand and contract without straining the joints of steam, or safety 
valve pipes. 

SMOKE ST/cCK. — The diameter varies with the area oi 
grate surface. The Brickwork enclosure, from level of grate bars 
upwards, forms the largest portion of necessary stack, and a single 
iron stack having a damper, and of sufficient length to extend about 
two feet above the ridge of roof, over boiler room, or an adjoining 
loftier building, to meet the requirements of natural draft, would be 
all the boiler demands. 

STE/cM/r^lD Vy/VTEf^G/fUGE eObUMJM.— The Water 
Columns are of different lengths, to suit the various sizes of boilers. 
They are made of extra heavy, lap welded, wrought iron pipe, into 
which three spring gauge cocks are tapped, and a water gauge 
is attached, having automatic self-closing valves to meet the 
contingency of a broken gauge glass. In the longest water 
columns, wherein excessive length of glass would be undesirable, it 
is in two equal pieces, joined at centre by a bracket attached to 
column. The steam pipe of column is connected to top head of 
stand pipe, and the water pipe connected to stand pipe beneath, 
and as close to grate bars as is possible, so as not to interfere with 



the easy removal oi ashes from ash pit. A three-way valve is 
placed on water pipe of column to blow it down when necessary, 
and also to free horizontal water pipe connecting it to stand pipe, 
and the water discharged into ash pit. 

The steam and water pipes, respectively, have a brass union, 
for the ready connection of water column to boiler. 

The Steam Gauge is connected to a branch outlet in steam pipe 
of water column. 

FEED pMPE. — This is screwed into the stand pipe beneath 
grate bars, and extends outward through brickwork enclosure of 
boiler a sufficient distance to receive a globe valve, to which is 
connected a check valve. 

BLOW OFF flPE. — This pipe is also connected to stand 
pipe, same as feed pipe, but having an extension pipe within stand 
pipe, which reaches nearly to bottom head. The other end receives 
a blow-off cock, outside of brickwork. 

DOOf^ F I^ONTS.— The door fronts are of heavy cast 
iron, complete with furnace and ash pit doors. The furnace 
doors have liner and sill plates. Each boiler has one or more 
door fronts, according to the size and location of the boiler. 
The Sill Plates, or, as they are often called, dead plates, are 
made in right and left halves. The edges of the plates are 
embedded in the brickwork on each side about two inches, the 
weight in the centre being supported by two T iron bars, which 
extend across the opening under the sill plates, and are built into 
the brickwork on each side. The sill plates have a lip projecting 
horizontally from the under side, which supports one end of the 
grate bars at this part of the circle. 

(BRjftTE Bj^cRS. — The grate surface is circular in form, and 
in the larger boilers extends entirely around the stand pipe. The 
smaller boilers require less, and the grate surface extends only a 
portion of the distance. The grate bars at their inner ends rest 
upon a wrought iron ring, supported by wrought iron brackets 
riveted to stand pipe, and the outer ends are supported by cast iron 
plates resting upon a projection of brickwork. 

SI©HT DOOPyS. — The sight doors are of cast iron, hinged 
to a cast iron frame. They are placed at frequent intervals in 



13 



brickwork enclosure of boiler, and serve for the inspection of the 
exterior of stand pipe and radial tubes, as well as for the introduction 
of a steam hose, having a rose-head nozzle, for the purpose of blow- 
ing off any dust deposits from the fire. 

DEFLECT IJSJ© f L^cTES.— The deflecting plates are of 
wrought iron, and vary in width, with the length of the radial tubes. 
They are placed horizontally around the inside circle of brickwork, 
close to same, and serve to direct the currents of heat toward the 
stand pipe, where the radial tubes present less free draft space than 
at their outer ends. 

BF^ICKWOF^K. — The brickwork enclosure of this boiler 
should be built of a good quality of common red brick, and laid 
''Flemish Bond." That portion of brickwork, from top of foundation 
to level of grate surface, to be laid in mortar, composed of one part 
fresh hydraulic cement, and two parts clean, sharp sand, to be 
mixed only as used, and all above that level, in mortar composed 
of three parts good lime mortar, mixed as used with one part cement 
mortar, of same quality as hereinbefore described. 

The furnace of boiler is lined with fire brick laid in fire mortar, 
the first two courses above grate bars, placed close to red brick, and 
above that point to top of furnace, an air space is provided, with an 
occasional header to tie the red brick and fire brick walls together. 

E»Ef LE6TIN© F URN ACE.— This furnace is formed by 
corbelling the fire brick inward toward stand pipe, as shown in 
wood engravings. 



THE HAZELTON STATIONARY BOILER. 



ITS COMMENDABLE FEATURES. 

The materials used in its construction are of the best quality, 
and the workmanship unsurpassed. The wrought iron pipe, fittings, 
valves, etc., are extra heavy to withstand the pressures of one 
hundred pounds per square inch, and upwards at which this boiler 



l 






may be worked with perfect safety. It can be used at low, or very 
high pressure. It requires limited floor space, and its weight renders 
it economical in transportation. 

It is simple in construction, and easily repaired if necessary, 
and with an expander, extra radial tubes, and gauge glasses, 
complete independence of all outside assistance is the result. 

It is absolutely safe on account of the small diameter of its 
parts; rapidly produces an abundance of perfectly dry steam, and 
is very economical in fuel, consuming any refuse combustible 
material with excellent results, on account of the large combustion 
chamber formed by the brickwork enclosure. Perfect circulation. 
Great variations of water line will not endanger its safety. 

There is very slight radiation of heat from the brickwork 
enclosure, which is simple in construction, and requires no more 
brick than for other types of boilers. All the heating surfac'e is 
effective. No priming. It is made entirely of wrought iron, except 
the manhole plate, grate bars, and door fronts, and is placed in 
brickwork enclosure in such a manner that it can freely expand 
and contract in every part without strain; therefore there can be no 
leakage due to unequal expansion and contraction. It can be 
entered through manhole in lower end of stand pipe, and every 
square inch of its interior examined, and all dust deposits from the 
fire, removed from its exterior, by introducing a steam hose, having 
a rose-head nozzle, through sight doors in brickwork enclosure. 

No brick chimneys required, as the brickwork of boiler from 
level of grate bars upwards, forms the largest portion of necessary 
stack and a single iron stack of sufficient length to extend about two 
feet above highest point in roof over boiler room, or an adjoining 
loftier building, to meet the requirements of natural draft, is all this 
boiler demands. 

The radial tubes being at a right angle to the currents of heat, 
and placed in stand pipe in such a manner as to cause these currents 
to take a tortuous lateral course in their exit from combustion 
chamber, the heat is very thoroughly utilized and the temperature 
of the escaping gases reduced to the minimum. 

Owing to the peculiar construction of the deflecting furnace, 
the gases are ignited and consumed, and the calorific value of the 
fuel very thoroughly utilized, and this furnace serves to direct the 
currents of heat toward the stand pipe, where the radial tubes are 



H 

nearer to each other than at their outer ends, and the deflecting 
plates above assist in maintaining this direct upward draft, thereby 
bringing the heat in contact with the large volume of water in the 
stand pipe and greatly accelerating the circulation in the radial 
tubes. 

It is very durable. Our first or experimental boiler, which was 
started on August 8th, 1880, although worked clay and night, is still 
in active service, and has not as yet required repair. 

We refer to the testimonials to be found upon the succeeding 
pages of this circular. 



The Hazelton Boiler Co. 



BUILD THE FOLLOWING 



STANDARD SIZES OF STATIONARY BOILERS. 



25 Horse Power, 

30 

35 

40 

48 

SO " " 

60 

75 



100 Horse Power, 

125 " " 

150 " 

175 

215 

250 " " 

300 

350 



This includes all the Wrought and Cast Iron work, Trimmings. 
etc., as follows : — 



*- 



15 
Stand Pipe complete. All necessary Radial Tubes. Smoke 
Hood. ^Twelve line? ' ' muie^ladcp mtteDainpor.- Circular 

Cast Iron Foundation Plate for Stand Pipe. One set of Grate 
Bars, with Bearer Bars. One or more Cast Iron Door Fronts 
depending upon size and location of boiler, with Furnace Doors, 
Door Liners, Door Sills, and Ash Pit Doors, complete. All 
necessary Cast Iron Sight Doors. Deflecting Plates. Steam and 
Water Gauge Column, with pipe and fittings to connect it to stand 
pipe. Steam Pipe with Steam and Pop Safety Valves, as shown on 
wood engravings. Feed Pipe, with Globe and Check Valves. 
Blow Off Pipe with Cock. All suitably packed for shipment. 

We furnish the services of a competent man to superintend the 
erection of the work, expand the radial tubes, and apply a wafer 
pressure test, fifty per cent, in excess of the steam pressure to be 
carried on boiler. If the place of erection exceeds one hundred 
miles distant from this city, purchaser to defray time and expenses 
of our man until his return to our works. 

Purchaser to furnish at his expense the following : all necessary 
assisting labor required by our man, and lumber for scaffolding ; 
also foundation, and brickwork {the latter as per our blue-print and 
instructions), and defray the freight. 

Our regular boiler setters will furnish price for the erection of 
brickwork of any plant of boilers, if desired. 

In ordering boilers, please state kind of fuel to be used, and 
steam pressure desired to carry. 

The horse power of this boiler is based upon the evaporation 
of 30 lbs. of water, per horse power, per hour, from 212 Fahrenheit, i 
with ordinary firing. 

We are prepared to furnish plants of boilers of any desired 
capacity, solicit inspection of those now in operation, and will 
forward proposals and any further information on application. 

THE HAZELTON BOILER CO. 



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17 



The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

No. 716 EAST 13th STREET, 
New York City. 



Evaporation Test of 75 H. P. Hazelton Boiler at Works 
of The New Howe Manufacturing Co., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Duration of test, -...__ n hours. 

Total amount of water evaporated, - - - 13,470 lbs. 

Buckwheat coal burned, ----- 1,400 lbs. 

Coal burned per square foot of grate per hour, 7.33 lbs. 

Percentage of ash, - 15 per cent. 

Temperature of feed water, - - - 200 deg. 
Water evaporated at 65 lbs. pressure, per lb. of 

buckwheat coal, actual conditions, - - 9.62 lbs. 
Water evaporated per lb. of buckwheat coal from 

and at 2 [ 2 degrees, - 10.04 lbs. 
Water evaporated at 65 lbs. pressure, per lb. of 

combustible, actual conditions, - - - n. 31 lbs. 
Water evaporated per lb. of combustible, from and 

at 212 degrees, - n.81 lbs. 
Heating efficiency of the steam, as compared with 

dry or saturated steam (7 tests), - - - .986 

August 16th, 1887. 



iS 



STATIONARY BOILERS 

SOLD BY 

THE HAZELTON BOILER CO. 



H. P. The New York Mutual Gas Light Co., New York, 

" eacli " ,( " " " << 

" " " k a k tt it 

The Hygeia Sparkling Distilled Water Co., " 
Lambertville Rubber Co., Lambertville, N. J. 

" " Messrs. Henry Disston & Sons, Tacony, Pa. 

" H t( ri (i t, ,, 

National Tube Works Co., McKeesport, " 



" The Jersey City Steel Co., Jersey Cjty, N. J. 

' ' The Hudson County Gas LightCo., Hoboken, N.J, 

" St. Cloud Hotel, New York. 

" Consolidated Gas Co., Baltimore, Md. 

" The Municipal Gas Light Co., Albany, N. Y. 
The St. Paul Gas Light Co., St. Paul, Minn. 

" Castile Salt Co., Castile, Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

" Citizens' Gas Light Co., Rye, Westchester Co. ,N.Y. 

" North Branch Steel Co., Danville, Pa. 

" The Meridian Water Works Co., Meridian, Miss. 

" The Phoenix Iron Co., Phoenixville, Pa. 

<< II It U | | 

Messrs. Alden Sampson & Sons, New York. 



The Bull River Phosphate Co., Ltd., Sheldon, S.C. 
The Bergner & Engel Brewing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
The Spaeth, Krautter & Hess Brewing Co. " " 

Weymouth Paper Mills, Elwood, N. J. 
Hadley Co., Holyoke, Mass. 
The New Howe Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
The Mexican Artificial Stone Co., City of Mexico. 
Howard Patent Metallic Brush Co., Reading, Mass. 
Mr. William Molier, Planing Mill, N. Y. 
The Cohoes Patent Lumber Co., Cohoes, N. Y. 
The Jackson & Woodin Mfg. Co., Berwick, Pa. 
And many others. 



I Boiler 


of 30 


2 Boilers of 60 


4 " 


275 


1 Boiler 


of 120 


1 " 


100 


2 Boilers of 150 


4 


40 


1 Boiler 


of 65 


1 " 


50 


I " 


100 


2 Boilers 


of 215 


1 a 


250 


2 " 


120 


2 " 


75 


2 " 


So 


2 " 


215 


2 " 


175 


i Boiler 


of 215 


2 Boilers 


of 215 


2 " 


40 


4 " 


215 


2 " 


75 


2 " 


250 


t Boiler 


of 75 


1 " 


40 


I " 


200 


1 (< 


35° 


1 " 


100 


1 " 


150 


1 " 


100 


I " 


100 


1 ' ' 


150 


1 " 


75 


1 " 


215 


1 " 


65 


1 " 


100 


1 ■' 


50 


1 * ( 


50 



The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

TESTIMONIALS. 
From THE LA LUZ MILLING COMPANY. 

St. Louis, January 15th, 1887. 
Pacific Iron Works, San Francisco, Cal. 

Gentlemen :— At your request I herewith give you a statement of my 
experience with a 70 Horse Power Hazleton Boiler, purchased a year ago for 
use in my Mill in Mexico. Although I had never seen one, found no difficulty 
with directions given, in setting it up without the aid of a Boiler maker or other 
skilled mechanic. 

Neither have I had any difficulty whatever in running it with the worst water 
lever saw put into a Boiler: so bad that it ruined a g^od Tubular Boiler in 
about three months. Though getting a large sedimentary deposit in the bottom 
of the column, which was easily got rid of through the blow off pipe, the tubes 
were always clean and entirely free from scale. Every part is accessible (or 
cleaning out or repair, when necessary, which cannot be said of any other style 
of Boiler. The setting was made of adobes, which answered the purposejust 
as well as brick. 

In the matter of economy nothing can equal it. Before putting in the 
Hazelton, we used four cords of wood in twenty-four hours in an ordinary 25 
Horse Power Tubular Boiler, while the 70 H. P. Hazelton required only two 
cords, one-half the amount, developing more than twice the power. After a 
year's use, I see nothing to indicate that it will not be the most durable, as I 
believe it is the safest and most economical Boiler now made. 

I have had nearly twenty years' experience with all kinds of Boilers, and 
give the Hazelton preference against all competitors. In fact, I told my Com- 
pany that we could not afford to run the ordinary tubular or any other kind of a 
Boiler, if they were put up in our Mill free of cost. 

You have my order for three more of 75 H. P. each for the Mill of the La 
Luz Company, which I represent, now being erected at Guanajuato, Mexico. 
Yours truly, H. C. HARRISON, Superintendent. 

From CONSOLIDATED GAS COMPANY. 

Baltimore, Md,, October 5th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen :— Replying to your inquiries, as to the working of the two 215 
H. P. Hazelton Boilers, which you furnished us something over a year since, 
I have to say that they are doing their work admirably. One of them has furnished 
all the steam used in the works, for making 1,300,000 ft. of caiburelted water 
gas per day. We carry a very uniform pressure and have dry steam. We have 
mn them 3 months without cleaning, 24 hours per day, and when they were 
opened, there was but little scale, and that such as could be removed with the 
finger nail. When I want more boilers, I shall use the same kind. 

Yery truly yours, F. H. HAMBLETON, Engineer. 



T 



From HOWARD PATENT METALLIC BRUSH CO, 

Boston, December 30th, 1886. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen:— In answer to your inquiries as to the working of the Hazel- 
ton Boiler, which we bought of you and placed in our factory last February, and 
have run constantly ever since, we would simply say that it is all we could 
desire. The difference in the cost of fuel as between our old and your new 
boiler is very great, for instance : our old boiler was rated nominally twenty (20) 
H. P., and yours is sixty (60). We would say further that we do not consume 
any more fuel with the new boiler than we did with the old one we have dis- 
carded, and we would also add that we are taxing it to its fullest capacity, as we 
are using at the present time twice the power, and heating more than twice the 
surface, than we did before having yours put in. 
Yours respectfully, 

WILLIAM PROCTOR, 

Agent, 

From MESSRS, ALDEN SAMPSON k SONS. 

-.„«.„ „ „ New York, January 7th, 1 88 7. 

I he Hazelton Boiler Co. ,/ 

Dear Sirs :— The forty horse power boiler which we have had in use at Hallo- 
well, Me., and the two Hazelton boilers of 200 and 350 horse power respect- 
ively which we have at our works at Newtown, L. I., have given good satis- 
faction. We consider them very economical in fuel, easily kept clean, rapid 
producers of an abundance of dry steam and perfectly safe. 
Yours very truly, 

ALDEN SAMPSON & SONS. 



From THE HUDSON COUNTY GAS LIGHT CO. 

Hobokkn, N. J., February 6th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

Gentlemen:— We have now had in constant use in these works two ot 
your boilers, of eighty (80) horse power each, for a period of two (2) years and 
are pleased to say that they are in as good shape and repair as the day they 
were completed. They are quick steamers, and economical in fuel, and, above 
all, produce very dry steam, that being, of course, very necessary in the pro- 
duction of water gas. 

We work our boilers alternately for a period of six weeks, and at their full- 
est capacity, running never under one hundred pounds pressure. We examine 
the inside of the boilers only once in six weeks, and then thoroughly clean down 
the outside with steam hose, and it is done in less than a day. One man, in 
conjunction with many other duties, runs our boiler handily. 
Yours most sincerely, 

C B. SEWARD, 

Superintendent, 



From THE HYGEIA SPARKLING DISTILLED WATER CO. 

New York, January 31st, 1887. 
Messrs. The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen:— Your letter inquiring about the Hazelton Boiler, came duly 
to hand. We have been so pressed for time that until now it has not been 
answered. About all that we have to say with regard to the Hazelton Boiler is 
that like the healthy functions of the human system, we are not aware of its 
existence. Our coal bills are much reduced and it costs us nothing for repairs. 
We have recently examined its interior and found all the tubes clean on the 
inside. Our experience now covers a period of nearly a year and has been 
favorable. Respectfully, 

F. T. KING, 
President. 

From WEYMOUTH PAPER MILLS. 

New York, February 8th, 1887. 
1 he Hazelton Boiler Co. 

Gentlemen: — The one hundred horse power boiler erected by you at our 

mill in Elwood, New Jersey, last spring, gives perfect satisfaction. It is very 

economical in fuel, and the steam is very dry. It tested one hundred and fifty 

horse power. We recommend it to any one in want of boilers and would be 

pleased to have any one see it. We consider it the best boiler made. 

Yery truly yours, 

ROBERT FULTON. 




From THE COHOES PATENT LUMBER CO. 

Cohoes, N. Y., July 13th, 1885. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen: — I have the pleasure of informing you that the 40 horse 
power Hazelton Boiler erected by you for the Patent Straw Lumber Co., has 
in every appointment justified your representations. 

In point of economy in fuel, rapid steaming, safety, and ease with which it 
carries the 150 pounds pressure, which we require, without apparent strain, 
surpasses any boiler with which I have had experience. 

I have come to regard it, after seven months' use, as being one of the safest, 
most economical, and best constructed Boilers ; especially so for heating pur- 
poses, abrogating the necessity and expense of a superheater where a high 
degree of heat is required. i 
I am, gentlemen, respectfully yours, 
J. N. BUNNELL, 
General Manager, 

From THE NEW YORK MUTUAL GAS LIGHT CO. 

New York, February 23d, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

Dear Sirs:— As you know, the first Hazelton Boiler ever erected, is in these 
works; it is of 275 horse power, and has been at work day and night since it 
was completed on August 8th, 1880, except for a few hours every four to six 



T 



weeks, when it is examined and cleaned. This Company has seven of your 
boilers, or a total of 1,250 horse power, uses them exclusively and they have not 
required any repair. They are rapid producers of dry steam, containing less 
than two per cent, of moisture, very saving in fuel, consuming with natural 
draft about II pounds of pea coal per square foot of grate surface per hour, and 
about two and one-half pounds of pea coal per horse power per hour. They are 
easily managed, perfectly safe, and I consider them the best boilers extant. 
Yours very truly, 

HENRY F. ALLEN, 
Superintendent. 

From THE ST. CLOUD HOTEL. 

New York, January 6th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen : — I take pleasure in slating that the two boilers of your 
make located in this Hotel, are giving perfect satisfaction, and I consider them 
very saving in fuel; quick producers of perfectly dry steam, easily kept clean, 
and thoroughly safe against accident of any kind. These boilers, as per con- 
tract, were to be of 50 horse power each, and a recent evaporation test having 
been made, in which I represented the purchaser, they developed an aggregate 
of 150 horse power; with easy firing, that is, carrying our usual fire, and using 
the ordinary run of coal, as supplied to this house, which is anthracite coal; egg 
size. I can cheerfully recommend these boilers as the best I have ever seen 
after many years of experience, with all the various types of boilers. 
Yours very respectfully, 

GEORGE A. PURDY, 
Engineer, 

From THE BULL RIVER PHOSPHATE CO,, Limited. 

Sheldon, Beaufort Co., S. C, February 23d, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen : — In reply to your favor of the nthinst., I have much pleasure 
in stating that the 100 horse power boiler that you supplied, gives me entire 
satisfaction. It makes dry steam rapidly, and is extremely easy on the fuel, 
which is surprising, as this consists entirely of green slabs. I find I can use 
any sort of water in it, for, during the long drought which prevailed last fall, I 
ran it for three weeks with salt water entirely, and yet the iron did not scale. 
Up to the present, the boiler has cost nothing for repairs, so, altogether, I con- 
sider it the handiest, most economical, and satisfactory boiler I have ever had 
anything to do with. Yours respectfully, 

A. G. NICHOLS, 
Engineer and Manager, 

From THE JERSEY CITY STEEL CO. 

Jersey City, N. J., February 26th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen : — In February, 1885, we placed one of your boilers in our 
works to utilize the waste heat from our melting furnaces, after the same had 
passed through a flue boiler over thirty feet in length, using your boiler as a 






23 

stack, and found that for several hours during the day your boiler was giving us 
equal to 100 horse power, and was so satisfactory that six months later we 
ordered a duplicate for our other melting furnaces. There have been, so far, 
no repairs, and the boilers are in every way satisfactory. We cheerfully recom- 
mend your boilers to any one requiring steam. 

J. R. THOMPSON, 

Pi ~e side) 1 1, 

From MESSRS. HENRY D1SST0N & SONS, IRON AND STEEL CO. 

Tacony, Pa., February 25th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Dear Sirs: — In reply to yours asking how we like the working of your 
boilers, beg leave to say that they are working to our entire satisfaction. The 
first one we put in has now been in constant use fourteen months, and has not 
given one particle of trouble. 

The tubes have kept perfectly clean ; all the dirt we have taken from it has 
been a very small amount that was deposited in the bottom of the stand pipe. 

The water we use is such that we have to keep up the constant use of scale 
purgative in all our other boilers, excepting those of your make. We expected 
to have had some trouble with scale deposit in your boilers, as well as in our 
others, but we have been agreeably disappointed. 

I consider your boiler the best boiler made for utilizing the waste heat from 
heating, puddling, or other furnaces. When we are in the market again for 
boilers, we shall communicate with you. 

Yours truly, 

S. T. WILLIAMS, 

Genera/ Manager. 

From LAMBERTVILLE RUBBER CO, 

Lambertville, N. J., September 7th, 1886. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

Gentlemen : — The 100 H. P. Boiler purchased of you last February has 
been in use for six months, and so far, has given us unqualified satisfaction. It 
generates steam rapidly, is easily kept clean, and for economy of space and ease 
o access in case of necessary repairs, is equal to any boiler we have ever seen. 
Yours truly, 

LAMBERTVILLE RUBBER CO. 



From MUNICIPAL GAS CO. 

Albany, N. Y., July 30th, 1887. j 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. 

Gentlemen ; — We have had your boilers, in constant use since their erec- 
tion last fall, and they give the best of satisfaction. With them we are enabled 
to burn, all of our fine coke breeze and cinders, thus showing a large saving in 
fuel. Since starting boilers, we have not spent one dollar for repairs, and our 
insurance inspector reports them, as in first»class condition, in every respect. 
Yours truly, 

W. A. ALLEN, 

Eng'r and Sup'/. 



24 

From MR. WILLIAM MOLLER. 

No. 325 East Sixty-Fourth Street, 
New York, June 4th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co, 

Gentlemen: — Your statements in regard to the good qualities oi your 
boiler, concerning economy of fuel, safety, facility for cleaning, dry steam pro- 
duced, and all other points that constitute a good boiler, have been more than 
fulfilled, in the 100 H. P. boiler, which you erected for me, in my factory last 
winter. It replaced a tubular boiler. It is a great success, especially in burn- 
ing shavings j producing about double the power with the same quantity of 
shavings, that the tubular did, and burning them with very little smoke. From 
my experience with your boiler, I can cheerfully recommend it, and if it were 
necessary to increase the power of my factory, I would not hesitate to give you 
the order, for the necessary boilers. 

Respectfully yours, 

WILLIAM MOLLER. 



From THE NEW HOWE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Bridgeport, Conn., August 17th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co., New York. ., 

Gentlemen : — We have had in constant use, day and night, the 75 horse 
power boiler you placed in our factory last January. We find it easy to man- 
age, and it produces dry steam very rapidly, and economically. We have made 
several tests, which have proved very satisfactory; one of which we enclose for 
publication, if you desire. 

Yery truly yours, 

E. PARMLV, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



From THE CITIZENS GAS LIGHT CO. 

Port Chester, N. Y., July 30th, 1887. 
The Hazelton Boiler Co. 

Dear Sirs: — The two 40 H. P. boilers, which we have at our works have 
given the most perfect satisfaction. They have been in constant use for nearly 
a year, and as yet show no need of repair. As we are compelled to use exceed- 
ingly dirty water, we naturally expected to have trouble from deposit in the 
tubes, but we have been most agreeably surprised, in that, all sediment deposits 
in the bottom of the stand pipes, whence it is very easily removed. We do this 
about once a month, and always find the tubes perfectly clean. In our business, 
which is the manufacture of water gas ; very dry steam, and plenty of it are 
essential, we consider your boilers unequalled ; and they burn less coal, than 
might be reasonably expected, from the results obtained. 
Yours very truly, 

A. B. EILBECK, 

Sup' 7 and Gen 1 / Manager.