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Full text of "Journeys In Persia And Kurdistan ( Vol.Ii)."

LETTER sxrv    THE FAITH HUBBAED SCHOOL              161

the influence of the girls who have teen trained in it,
but chiefly by the influence of love.

The respect with which the office of a teacher is
regarded in the East allows of much more apparent
familiarity than would be possible with us. Out of
school hours the ladies are accessible at all times even
to the youngest children. Many a little childish trouble
finds its way to their maternal sympathies, and they are
just as ready to give advice about the colour and making
of dolls' clothes as about more important matters. The
loving, cheerful atmosphere of an English home pervades
the school. I write English rather than American because
the ladies are Prince Edward Islanders and British subjects.

Some of the girls who have been trained here are
well married and make* good wives, and the school bids
fair to be resorted to in the future by young men who
desire companionship as well as domestic accomplish-
ments in their wives. The ordinary uneducated Armenian
woman is a very stupid lump, very inferior to the Persian
woman. Of the effect of the simple, loving, practical,
Christian training given, and enforced by the beauty of
example it is easy to write, for not only some of the girls
who have left the school, but many who are now in it
show by the purity, gentleness, lovingness, and self-denial
of their lives that they have learned to follow the Master,
a lesson the wise teaching of which is, or should be, I
think, the raison d'etre of every mission school. Chris-
tianity thus translated into homely lives may come to be
the disinfectant which will purify in time the deep cor-
ruption of Persian life.

The cost of this school under its capable and liberal
management is surprising—only £3 :15s. per head per
annum! Its weak point (but at present it seems an
inevitable blemish) is, that the board and education are
gratuitous.

VOL. II                                                                             M