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LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 




When Lindenhurst was Breslau. See Writing Aboui Writing Page 80. 



TABLE of CONTENTS 

SOUlii SHORE SHOOTING 

GOWNS AND TEA AND NEW DISCOVERIES 

NATHANIEL NORTON- 



JAMES AND SARAH SPROUTT — PART III 
PROSSER'S CATHEDRAL PINES 



WRECK OF THE "MARTHA P. TUCKER" 
WRITING ABOUT WRITING 



Joseph W. DeBragga 

Kate W. Strong 

Paul Olin 



Chester G. Osborne 
_ Thomas R. Bayles 
Lou Pearsall 



READERS' FORUM 



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APRIL 1962 



$3.00 a year if paid in Advance; Single Copies 35(* VOL. XXV NO. 4 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum - Library 
of the Suffolk County Historical 
Society, at Riverhead, is open 
daily (except Sundays and Holi- 
days) from one to five P.M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



The Bridgehampion 
National Bank 

The Bank of 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

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Bridgehampion, N. Y. 






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on Passenger Cars and Trucks 

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\|P>) — 

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E. PATCHOGUE. LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

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Wreck of the Bark 
"Martha P. Tucker" 

The bark "Martha P. Tucker" 
was driven ashore on the Long 
Island coast about one mile west 
of the Point Lookout Life Saving 
Station, southerly of Freeport, 
N. Y. on the morning of August 
29, 1893. This was three days 
before the opening of the Long 
Island Life Saving Stations, in- 
active during the months of May, 
June, July, and August. 

The "Tucker," a bark of 603 
tons built at Bath, Maine, in 1874, 
hailed from New York. She was 
commanded by Capt. George Mit- 
chell of Brooklyn and bound from 
Port Tampa, Florida, to Carteret, 
New Jersey, with a cargo of 856 
tons of phosphate rock. When lost 
she was nineteen days out from 
the port of departure. 

There were twelve men on 
board. Eleven were landed in the 
breeches buoy by the keepers of 
the Point Lookout and Long 
Beach stations, assisted by a vol- 
unteer crew, while the twelfth 
was unfortunately carried over- 
board and drowned by the fall- 
ing of the mizzenmast before the 
life savers could reach the scene 
with the beach apparatus. 

The vessel had been involved 
in the extraordinary gale of 
August 24 in about the latitude 
(Continued on page 74) 




FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Established 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. GReenport 7-0154 



Westhampton Beach 
Liquor Store 

TOMMY LAVELLE 

Free Delivery WE 4-1240 

Montauk Highway 

Opp. Ballentine Beer & Ale 



Swezey Fuel Co. 

Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue and Port Jefferson 
GRover 3-0270 HR 3-5500 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 
172 Main St. Tel. 1085 blip 



Jerome Wimpfheimer 

Fine Wines and Liquors 

FREE DELIVERY 

Tel. OLd Quogue 3-4575 

License L76 
Quogue, Long Island 



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Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 
Parts and Accessories 

Merrick & County Line Roads 
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70 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



South Shore Shooting 



Joseph W. De Bragga 

Joseph W. DeBragga who lives 
in Islip is associated with CBS- 
International and is Sales Man- 
ager of Broadcasting Equipment. 
Much of his business is with 
South America. Mrs. DeBragga 
tells us that he has done very lit- 
tle writing for publication in the 
past — we hope he does more 
in the future. 

For those of our readers who 
are new to the Forum and who 
are interested in the subject of 
this article we call attention to 
"Birth of a South Bay Scooter" 
by Captain Wilbur A. Corwin of 
Bellport in the January 1957 
issue. 

THIRTY YEARS ago the 
twenty-five mile strip of Long 
Island's south shore extend- 
ing from Lindenhurst to Say- 
ville offered some of the finest 
broadbill shooting of the East- 
ern seaboard. What may be 
the final chapter is now being 
written by a diminishing num- 
ber of gunners known as 
scooter shooters. 

In the past ten years this 
area has been completely 
transformed from rural to 
suburban. Precious little nat- 
ural shore front has not been 
ravaged of its thatch grass, 
huckleberry, holly, and wild 
beach plum which had once 
been abundant. With frighten- 
ing efficiency marshes have 
been drained and pot holes 
filled. As a result point shoot- 
ing is virtually unknown and 
the only remaining place from 
which to gun is the open bay. 

Aquatic mobility and a cer- 
tain degree of comfort are 
prerequisites of open bay gun- 
ning. A scooter rig must be 
moved about depending on the 
direction of the wind, the 
movement of ice in the bay, 
and where the birds happen 
to be feeding. In the sturdy 
power boats that are used as 
bases pot-belly stoves are pre- 
ferred over horsepower and 
the hallmark of the really 
well-equipped is copper 
sheathing to withstand the 



effects of skim ice. The actual 
shooting is done from the 
scooter and a skiff with an 
outboard is used to set out 
the stool, retrieve birds, and 
ferry the gunners between 
the scooter and power boat. 

The scooters, lying low in 
the water to hide well, have 
ample decking both fore and 
aft for protection from spray 
and the waves. Light weight 
is a distinct disadvantage. A 
cockleshell will make the birds 
wary because it will toss too 
much. As an effective hiding 
color dull gray is preferred 
because it is suitable all 
through the season. 

The scooters are directly 
descended from the ice scoot- 
ers of the early 1900's. Many 
of them still have two parallel 
steel runners along their bot- 
toms as well as mast steps, 



for they were originally built 
for running over bay ice as 
well as through open water. 
Ideally suited for winter 
gunning conditions when 
power boats are frozen in, 
scooters can be seen skimming 
over the ice to open water 
where broadbill are sure to be 
found. 

To scooter men decoys are 
known as stool. In these days 
there is little chance of filling 
out a rig by stumbling onto 
an old time battery shooter 
whose barn may hold a dusty 
treasure of broadbill stool. 
Long ago this lode was ex- 
hausted by tweedy antique 
dealers and lady decorators. 
Today's scooter gunner must 
make his own stool or buy 
them and good store-bought 
stool are not cheap. 

By present day standards 




71 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

an ample rig consists of some 
sixty -odd broadbill and a 
dozen brant. Some redheads, 
whistlers, and sheldrake are 
useful in filling out an ef- 
fective rig. One - pound lead 
anchors and ten-foot lines are 
recommended. 

Although there is universal 
agreement among scooter men 
that many excellent stool are 
better than a few battered 
relics, there are many differ- 
ing ideas as to how and when 
the rig should be set. All 
scooter gunners would agree 
it is well to be under way be- 
fore dawn, but beyond this 
there is little agreement on the 
best time for rigging out. 

Adherents of RFMF (rig 
for morning flight) are im- 
patient with those holding for 
the alternative system, WLTR 
(wait, locate, then rig). 

In the HTR (how to rig) 
department, however, more 
tolerance is evidenced. The 
trend is away from the cres- 
cent type formation which is 
thought by some to funnel the 
birds towards a scooter an- 
chored midway and upwind of 
the stool. Most often used now 
is the pipehorn rig with the 
bowl to the right or left, de- 
pending whether the gunner 
is right or left handed. 

A few scooter men rig long 
strings of decoys that extend 
a hundred yards downwind. 
In any event, changing tides 
and shifting winds make it 
necessary to move decoys or 
the scooter often. Setting out 
and tending sixty or more 
stool is certainly no small 
task. At least three exper- 
ienced scooter men are needed 
to handle the various duties — 
two for setting out and pick- 
ing up, the third and some- 
times a fourth man stand by 
with the power boat to lend 
their needed assistance should 
the weather suddenly kick up. 
Late December brings the 
stirring sight of hundreds of 
broadbill working their way 
southward. The tedious pre- 
parations of scooter men are 
happily endured for those 
moments when the smaller 
flights break off, swing down, 
then cup their wings and spill 

(Continued on next page) 



APRIL 1962 




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72 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Qowns and ^ea and J\[elv "Discoveries 



A True Tale By 
Kate W. Strong 

WHAT DO men think of 
women's dresses? Here's what 
my father thought of those in 
his early years : 

"You have been seen pic- 
tures of the hoop skirt show- 
ing: a woman in full dress 
looking like a bell with the 
upper part of her body for a 
handle, but you cannot, from 
them, see a woman attempt- 
ing to get into a Fifth Aven- 
ue bus or go between narrow 
seats. 

This extreme was followed 
by a narrower skirt, with steel 
instead of reeds. It was apt to 
be quite lively. I remember 
calling on a lady one day who 
sat down quite quickly and I 
felt it kinder to turn my head 
away as she made frantic ef- 
forts to get down the rising 
steel ribs. 

"Then came the Grecian 
Bend, said to have been in- 
vented by one of the Royal 
Family who was a hunch- 
back. I can shut my eyes and 
see a woman walking along 
the street on her toes and 
carrying what seemed to be 
a bundle strapped on behind !" 
As to my own experiences 
in the line of fashion when I 
was at boarding school big 
sleeves were the fashion and 2 
of the girls had waists each 
sleeve of which was about as 
big as their body. For day- 
time we had sailor suits of 
dark blue serge made by a 
local dressmaker. The waists 
were lined and, by actual 
count, there were eighteen 
hooks and eyes in all. Which 
of us girls was going to 
hook all those when the break- 
fast gong might ring short- 
ly? We'd found that a hook 
at the neck of the dickey, one 
at the waist line, and one at 
the sailor collar did the job 
nicely. Why worry with more? 
Talking of big sleeves, a 
friend told me that when her 
brother was married in an old 
church in Philadelphia the 
bridesmaids had to march 




buy for a quarter, and one of 
them was for years one of my 
most cherished possessions. 

This tale is certainly a mix- 
ture but of such is life made. 



single file because their sleev- 
es would not allow them to 
go side by side. Incidentally 
there was a curious thing 
about that old church which 
had nothing to do with styles. 
There was no vestry and the 
groom and his best man had 
to stay in the yard among the 
tombstones until summoned. 

We've all heard over the 
radio an advertisement of the 
wonderful tea that is made 
from those "tiny little tea 
leaves." Surprising as it may 
seem to some people, there is 
nothing new in this. In 1817 
my great - grandfather wrote 
to his son in New York, ask- 
ing him to get him some 'sus- 
hong' tea, that he could not 
buy at that time around here. 
The dictionary says that this 
tea is made from tiny little 
tea leaves. 

To the modern child a new 
discovery means little because 
there are so many being made 
all the time. But I remember 
two, one of which may not 
have been new to the scientists 
but was new to me. I was 
standing outside a friend's 
house with a group of young 
people when a boy came up 
and piled something on the 
window sill, poured water on 
it, and it sprang into flame 
at once. That was my first 
introduction to acetylene gas. 
One discovery came when I 
was quite small. It was of a 
new metal, lighter than any 
that had ever been heard of. 
called aluminum. I remember 
how excited I was when I 
found I could actually possess 
something made of this won- 
derful metal. Darling's store 
in Port Jefferson had thimb- 
les made of it, that one could 



Shooting 

(Continued from page 72) 

into the rig. 

Now, for the first time, 
there is a glimmer of encour- 
agement for the future of 
scooter shooting. Recent state 
legislation holds a faint pro- 
mise that dock builders may 
yet be forestalled from bulk- 
heading the remaining shore 
area. The legislation provides 
for financial aid to townships 
wishing to retain their wet- 
lands. Another good sugges- 
tion is to establish a number 
of man-made islands from bay 
bottom. 

This could be easily ac- 
complished by dredging to 
widen and deepen the existing 
boat channels and making is- 
lands along the large expanse 
of shoal water adjacent to the 
major waterways. These new- 
ly created islands would then 
offer shelter from the prevail- 
ing southwest winds which 
presently deter large flights 
of birds from setting in. Nat- 
ural feed plantings would also 
attract and accommodate larg- 
er numbers of black duck, 
broadbill, and brant. If acted 
upon without delay, scooter 
shooting may be preserved in 
the very area where it reach- 
ed its highest proficiency 
thirty years ago. 



Genealogy Department 

The articles on my many times 
grandparents, Thomas Powell and 
Henry Whitson, interested me 
very much. Please give us more. 
I do wish you would run a 
genealogy department! 

If Mr. Van Santvoord publish- 
es the North Shore cemetery in- 
scriptions, do please report it in 
the Forum. 

MRS. A. W. BRUCE 
1820 Pandora Avenue, 
Los Angeles 25, Cal. 



73 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



leaders ^orum 



(Continued from page 70) 
of Savannah, Georgia, but by 
skillful management successfully 
weathered the blow. When the 
second storm struck after mid- 
night of August 28, the captain 
supposed he was off Barnegat, 
New Jersey but land was not 
then visible owing to the dark- 
ness and impenetrable mist. 

A strong and growing wind was 
blowing from the southward. At 
three o'clock, the master fearing 
that he was getting near the Jer- 
sey coast, hauled off to the east- 
ward. The ocean shores of New 
Jersey and Long Island, extending 
southward and eastward, respec- 
tively, form two sides of a tri- 
angle having its apex at the mouth 
of the Hudson River (New York 
Harbor). On the western side lies 
Staten Island, and across a nar- 
row channel still further west, 
the town of Carteret, the port to 
which the "Tucker" was bound. 

She was, therefore, between the 
converging shores above mention- 
ed, either of which is a dreaded 
lee in southeasterly gales, and 
so located that vessels making an 
effort to avoid one are often 
thrown upon the other. 

The stiff breeze soon attained 
dangerous velocity, producing a 
raging sea, and by these adverse 
influences the bark was driven 
much farther to the leeward than 
had been estimated. She was in 
this critical situation early in the 
morning of August 29, when a 
furious squall swept over her, 
and brought so sudden and in- 
tense a strain on the canvas that 
the foretopsail sheets instantly 
parted, and the sail was torn 
from the bolt ropes. Prompt meas- 
ures were taken to repair the 
damage, but the sailors were 
scarcely aloft to cast off the tat- 
tered remnants, preparatory to 
bending on a new topsail, when, 
in a temporary clearing of the 
rain and mist, all on board saw 
a low beach trending east and 
west, backed by a range of small 
sandhills, just under the lee to 
the northward. The danger was 
clear, and the master, realizing 
that stranding was inevitable, 
called the men down from the 
yards, ordered the helm up, and 



beached the vessel head on. The 
tide was almost at the flood mark, 
so that the bark fetched up with 
her bows only about two hundred 
yards from the shore. 

The waves were white-crested 
as far as the eye could see, and 
the seas tumbled in over the 
stern like a cataract, flooding the 
decks fore and aft and compell- 
ing seamen and officers to climb 
the rigging. The repeated seas 
weakened the rock-laden craft, 
and the swaying of the mizzen- 
mast, where the crew had taken 
refuge, warned them that the spar 
would fall before long. All hands, 
therefore, excepting a sailor nam- 
ed Andrew Anderson, left the 
shrouds and struggled forward to 
the bowsprit and jib boom, which 
were less exposed to the waves. 
Seaman Anderson refused to fol- 
low his companions and lost his 
life in consequence. 

At about six o'clock in the 
morning the vessel was discover- 
ed from the tower of the Point 
Lookout Station by Riley Ray- 
nor, a member of a party includ- 
ing three ladies, from Freeport, 
N. Y. who had spent the night at 
the station visiting the keeper's 
daughter. Raynor reported to 



APRIL 1962 

Keeper Andrew Rhodes. The 
keeper at once ascended the look- 
out, where he was at first unable 
to see anything on account of the 
rain. In a few moments, a brief -— ' 
lull giving a better prospect to 
seaward, he made out the bark 
lying to, not far offshore, bending 
to the blast and laboring heavily 
in the powerful sea. 

Descending the stairs to the 
station below, he notified Keeper 
Richard Van Wicklen of the Long 
Beach Station by telephone of the 
proximity of the vessel, then went 
outside to the barn, where the 
change in her bearing could be 
determined by ranges, and there 

(Continued on page 76) 



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74 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Nathaniel Norton^ 



Paul Olin 

(Paul Olin teacher of History 
in the Great Neck School System 
lives in Little Neck and has a 
summer home in Miller Place. 

His extra-curricular activity in- 
cludes his interest in Long Island 
research and plans for a a forth- 
coming book dealing with the 
Revolui : o~ary period on the Is- 
land.) 

NATHANIEL NORTON was 
born in the Town of Brook- 
haven, near Coram, in 1742. 
Not much is known of his 
early life except that he work- 
ed the land on his father 
Nathaniel's farm. He appar- 
ently was a restless sort for 
he enlisted as a private in 
the Provincial Army at the 
age of 14 in 1756. He served 
throughout the French and 
Indian War in the forces un- 
der Major General Bradstreet 
and participated in the Ticon- 
deroga and Crown Point cam- 
paigns in 1759. 

In 1760, he was mustered 
out at Fort Oswego and re- 
turned to Coram. He married 
and settled down on the farm 
and by 1776 had a substantial 
family of four sons and two 
daughters. His domestic life 
was interrupted by the trouble 
with England. He quickly 
signed the Association in June 
of 1775 and before the end of 
the month had accepted a 
Congressional commission as 
2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd New 
York Regiment (June 28, 
1775). In the meantime, be- 
fore he could assume his post, 
he was elected a Lieutenant 
in the Suffolk County Militia 
(August 7, 1775). 

After the disastrous Battle 
of Long Island, he packed up 
his family and belongings and 
fled to Connecticut where he 
made off to join his Regiment. 
In November of 1776, he was 
commissioned a 1st Lieuten- 
ant and transferred to the 4th 
New York Regiment under 
command of Colonel Henry 
- "- Beekman Livingston. He par- 
ticipated in the Saratoga 
campaign but sickness pre- 




vented his being on the battle 
field at Bemis Heights. After 
the tortuous winter at Mor- 
ristown, he was appointed a 
Captain on April 23, 1778 and 
assumed command of a de- 
tachment of artillery with 
which he distinguished him- 
self at the battle of Monmouth 
Courthouse. After a long and 
weary campaign against the 
Indians with Generals Sulli- 
van and Clinton in 1779, his 
Regiment was detached to the 
Hudson Highlands. 

The orderly books of the 
4th New York tell us that 
Captain Norton was consider- 
ed an able officer. He was 
appointed president of num- 
erous court martials and it is 
evident he was a stern task- 
master. At Warwick in No- 
vember of 1779, it was his 
opinion as president of the 
court martial that a certain 
soldier with an unclean mus- 
ket should be sentenced to 15 
lashes. Said sentence was car- 
ried out. Another time, in De- 
cember of 1780 at Fort Schuy- 
ler, a Corporal John Howe 
was courtmartialed for "call- 
ing Captain Norton a Dam'd 
Rascall." 

Near the beginning of 1780, 
Lieutenant Colonel Frederick 
Weisenfels appointed Norton 
to enlist men within the west- 
ern frontiers of New York 
State. On August 15th he 
wrote to Governor Clinton to 
say he had enlisted some men 
but was handicapped by a 
lack of funds. He added that 
he would like to go with his 
friend and fellow officer, 
Major John Davis of East 
Hampton, to Long Island for 
money to pay bounties to the 
newly enlisted men. It was 
his idea that they visit cer- 
tain Whigs on the Island 



whom he considered "our 
staunch friends who have a 
considerable quantity of hard 
cash." 

Governor Clinton agreed 
that this was a fine plan but 
was unable to enter into such 
a venture without the consent 
of the Legislature. Norton 
then resorted to his friend 
Ezra L'Hommedieu to inter- 
cede in his behalf for permis- 
sion to accomplish this pro- 
ject. On January 1, 1781, he 
retired his commission and a- 
waited his orders to go to 
Long Island. In the meantime, 
he had become a widower, and 
met and married his second 
wife by whom he had a son 
Samuel. He also became active 
in the Baptist Church and 
frequently journeyed to Bait- 
ing Hollow to lead religious 
meetings there. Through his 
efforts, the Congregational 
Church of Baiting Hollow was 
organized. 

Finally on May 2, 1781, 
L'Hommedieu was able to 
persuade Clinton to commis- 
sion Norton to cruise Long 
Island Sound in an armed 
boat with the possibility in 
mind of bringing off some of 
the loyal inhabitants and tak- 
ing them to the interior of 
New York State. He did this 
for a few months until the 
end of 1781 when he was 




Ezra L'Hommedieu 



75 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



APRIL 1962 



secretly commissioned by Gov- 
ernor Clinton to obtain the 
money on Long Island ; and to 
conceal the object at hand, he 
was placed in command of an 
armed gunboat, the "Suffolk," 
in which he cruised the length 
and width of Long Island 
Sound. 

In the meantime, his friend 
Major Davis was commission- 
ed to purchase supplies for the 
State and was captured with 
Captain John Grinnel at Sag 
Harbor. Both were conveyed 
to the Provost in New York 
where they were imprisoned. 
Davis died as a result, so they 
say, of poisoned chocolates 
given to him. 

At the close of the war, 
Norton returned to Long Is- 
land. In July of 1783, he was 
involved in a fight with Elisha 
Brown of North Hampton. 
Brown was killed and Norton 
escaped. The next we hear of 
him was that he was in Herk- 
imer, New York, where he 
became first an Elder and 
then a minister in the Baptist 
Church. After joining the So- 
ciety of the Cincinnati, he 
went to Connecticut where he 
assumed another pastorate. 
He retired this post in 1805 
and went to live in New York 
City with his third wife. He 
did some preaching there and 
was influential in the Cincin- 
nati. 

He died at that city at the 
age of 95 on October 7, 1837, 
being the oldest living mem- 
ber of the Cincinnati Society. 
His funeral was attended by 
almost all of his surviving fel- 
low officers and his body was 
conveyed to a plot near the 
Baptist Church in Coram 
where it was interred on Oc- 
tober 10th. He had lived a life 
of adventure and action yet 
was a man of taste and refine- 
ment. A brave man and a re- 
spected clergyman, he ended 
his life far more modestly 
than he had lived it. 



f\eader6 ' ^jrc 



orum 



Praise 

Words of praise and apprecia- 
tion for each new issue of this 
unusual magazine. 

IRENE A. Mac ROBBIE 
East Patchogue, N. Y. 



(Continued from page 74) 
found she was drifting inshore. 

The Long Beach Station was 
again called by telephone, and 
Keeper Van Wicklen set out im- 
mediately with M. J. Carter, tele- 
phone lineman of District No. 3, 
U.S. Life Saving Service. Their 
journey of more than four miles 
on foot over the uneven surface 
of a sandy beach and througli a 
storm of unusual severity ended 
by their arrival at a quarter past 
eight o'clock, having taken only 
a little more than one hour. 

Keeper Rhodes had also called 
to his aid the only available man 
in that vicinity, an Italian named 
Michael Alianello, watchman at 



the Point Lookout Hotel, and to- 
gether they ran down the beach 
abreast of the wreck, where they 
saw the crew in the after rigging 
and the waves pouring in over 
the vessel's hull. When the two 
men from the Long Beach Sta- 
tion arrived, all four and the boy, 
Raynor, ran the apparatus cart 
out of the boat room, but the 
load proved too heavy. The wheels 
sank so deeply into the sand on 
the hillside that the utmost exer- 
tions of the little band could not 
move it. 

It was at this juncture that the 
three women, Mrs. Celia Raynor, 
Mrs. Rene Southard, and Miss 
Jennie Rhodes, arrived. They had 
witnessed the efforts of the man 
to drag the apparatus cart. They 
rushed out into the storm and 

(Continued on page 78) 




76 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



James and 5^rah Sproutt -H'art III 



Chester G. Osborne 

THE "CONNUBIAL affairs" 
of Judge William Smith come 
in for some discussion in the 
second letter of Reverend 
James Sproutt. The Judge's 
wife, the former Mary Smith 
of Smithtown, had died on 
April 23, 1758, at the age of 
twenty-three, and his search 
for another "first lady" for 
his Manor was of great con- 
cern, if not outright worry, 
to the family in general. One 
can only guess at the "Vil- 
lanies" which needed to be 
"exercised" — Sproutt meant 
"exorcised !" 

Reverend Caleb Smith was 
also a widower when he wrote 
to his brother the Judge on 
May 29, 1759 about his own 
quest : 

"I suppose you are now 
ready to say, am I to know 
nothing of the Success of the 

Journey into N — E d, 

yes you shall, I found Things 
^~ mainly as I could wish. The 
Person amicable, my soft Af- 
fections won, and my judge- 
ment approving. I shall cease 
all other views of that Nature, 
until I see where this Affair 
will end. — I have as much 
Encouragement as Modesty 
can grant, or Wisdom desire. 
— I heartily wish you may 
find as agreeable a Sister for 
me, as I hope to find for you. 
On the whole I wish you Suc- 
cess where I believe your 
heart inclines to seek it. I feel 
a Reluctance to begin the 
World anew as it were when 
I have got so far on in the 
Journey of Life. You remem- 
ber those striking Lines of 
Doctor Young, 
Our Heads are gray, our 

Thoughts & Aims are green. 
Like damaged Clocks, whose 

Hand & Bell dissent, 
Folly sings Six while Nature 
points at Twelve. 
The record of James' and 
Sarah's family as of 1759 is 
not complete, but the Septem- 
,^s ber 1752 letter had mention- 
ed the birth of Olive. There 
was also a daughter, Clarissa, 



and a son, William, who was 
to serve in the Revolution as 
a Captain in a Pennsylvania 
regiment. (A nephew, Ebe- 
nezer, became a Colonel in a 
Massachusetts group.) 

"Mr. Floyd's family" was 
that of Nicoll Floyd (1705- 
1755) of Mastic. "Master Bil- 
ly" was William Floyd, destin- 
ed to sign the Declaration of 
Independence. 

"Mr. Dungan" was Walter 
Dongan; he was a nephew of 
Col. Thomas Dongan, who was 
Second Earl of Limerick in 
Ireland, and Governor of New 
York Province from 1683 to 
1688. Walter married Ruth 
Floyd, sister of Nicoll, above. 
On October 9, 1733, Walter 
"of the Mannor of Castle- 
town" (on Staten Island) 
bought from the Smiths an 
immense tract which had been 
part of the Manor of St. 
George; it included "five 
necks of land" reaching from 
the bay to a line between Mas- 
tic and Seatuck Rivers ; these 
were "Orchard Neck, Aro- 
skunk & Skyes, hogneck, and 
pine neck with a small point 
or Neck called Little worth." 



This tract contained much of 
what is now Center Moriches, 
and Walter Dongan paid four 
hundred and twenty pounds 
for it — in installments ! 

Another deed for the same 
land is on record, dated Oc- 
tober 5, 1734, and it is sub- 
stantially the same; the rea- 
son why there were two is not 
clear, unless the Smiths held 
up the transaction until all 
the installments were paid. 
"For 

Mr. William Smith 
at Manr St Georges 
on Long Island 
pr Miss Brown 

Guilford July 29 1759 
"Brothr Billy 
Sr 

Thruogh the Goodness of 
God, I with my Family have 
injoyed, an uninterrupted Ser- 
ies of outward Prosperity, 
ever since I parted with you 
last, may it suitable affect 
our minds with Gratitude to 
our great Benefactor. — I 
trust this Letter if you recive 
it seasonably will find Brothr 
Caleb Smith at Your House 
On his Journey to Boston. I 
(Continued on page 86) 




This may be the oldest Photograph of the Manor of St. George at 
Smith's Point; taken in September, 1890. 

77 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



APRIL 1962 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



For outstanding places to dine 
—see the back page of the Forum 
every month. 



S. C. N. B. 

Your Local 
Community Bank 

Suffolk County National Bank 
Riverhead, N. Y. 

Complete Banking Service 
Member F.D.I.C. PArk 7-2700 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lois - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main, by Lake MO 9-0644 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Est. 1915 

Realtor - Insurance 

Appraisals 

148 Mineola Blvd. PI 6-7200 



Hicks ville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
167 Broadway Tel. WElls 1-0600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 

PArk 7-2135 

Places along Ocean, Sound, 

Peconic, Shinnecock Bays 



INSURANCE 



Francis Garvey, Robert Snyder 

Babylon MOhawk 1-2(100 



Savings Accounts Opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

THE UNION 
SAVINGS BANK 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 
Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 



/\eader '5 ~jtl 



orum, 



(Continued from page 76) 
resolutely lifted with the men, 
until by their combined efforts 
the cart was moved over the 
sandhill to the harder surface of 
the beach. By this time their 
clothing was so bedraggled and 
water-soaked, and the exposure 
was so severe, that they were 
sent to the station for dry gar- 
ments and to make preparations 
for any of the shipwrecked that 
might be rescued. 

The rescue party found travers- 
ing the beach so difficult that 
when about halfway to the wreck, 
they decided to divide the gear. 
They had just finished unload- 
ing the cart to carry out the 
plan when the reeling masts of 
the bark went by the board, and 
the crew, who when last seen 
were in the rigging, had, it was 
believed, all been thrown into 
the water. 

The life savers abandoned the 
apparatus cart and hurried to- 
ward the wreck to aid the sailors. 
They found none, and soon dis- 
covered them clinging to the bow- 
sprit and jib boom which, with 
a little of the bow, were the only 
visible portions of the vessel. 

There was still hope that the 
men might be saved. The party 
thereupon returned to the ap- 
paratus cart, placed upon it the 
Lyle gun, the cartridge box, two 
projectiles, a No. 9 shot line, and 
the whip, and then resumed 
their efforts to drag it near the 
wreck. 

But even with the reduced 
weight, their progress along the 
slushy beach was slow, half the 
time covered with water and 
then exposed to the wind which 
send sharp particles of sand fly- 
ing into their eyes. From the 
stern to the forward mast the 
vessel was already ruined and 
broken up. 

At last they reached a suitable 
place. Gathering some pieces of 
wreckage, they laid a rude plat- 
form upon which the gun was 
fixed, and fired with five ounces 
of powder and a No. 9 line. The 



shot landed the line directly over 
the jib boom where the sailors 
were lying, and they seized it. 

They were liable to be dashed 
from their precarious perch at 
any moment. The shot line was 



QUOGUE 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

RUSSELL V. CARMAN 

Established 1910 
Phone OLd Quogue 3-4177 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 

N. Country & N. Wading River Roads 

Real Estate & Insurance 
Appraisals 

Established 1912 

Phone: WAding River 9-4000 

If No Answer WA 9-432S 

Port Washington 

Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 
POrt Wash. 7-3124 185 Main St. 



Commack 



Established 1925 
JOHN W. NOTT 

Listings Wanted, Farms, Acreage, 
Water frontage Eastern L. I. Jeri- 
cho Turnpike at Commack, L. I 
FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY. Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy 

HA 7-7310 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 3-7755 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Phone: ORiole 6-0491 

Agency Estab. Over 50 Years 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 4-6317 

Central Islip 

Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



78 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



cut in two and the shore end at 
once made fast to the tail block 
of the whip line, when a signal 
was made to haul out on it. The 
traveller block was removed from 
the breeches buoy, and the slings 
of the buoy made fast to the lee 
part of the whip, and hauled off 
to the vessel, without the loss of 
time that would have been neces- 
sary to set up a hawser. 

When all was ready to take the 
men ashore, the women who had 
so materially aided in getting the 
apparatus over the sand hills 
again appeared, and heartily join- 
ed in the work of hauling the 
buoy to and from the wreck. 
When the third sailor had been 



SALTAIRE, FIRE ISLAND, 
NEW YORK 

LOUISE CERVENY 

Real Estate 

Lighthouse Walk 

JUniper 3-5393 



Patchogue 



Realtors - Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. GR 5-4000 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 

Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen St. Tel. ORiole 6-1500 

And 15 Forest Ave., Locust Valley 

Westbury 

HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

For Westbury and Vicinity 

EDgewood 3-0108 249 Post Ave. 



WILLIAM H. WINTERS 

AGENCY 

Real Estate & Insurance 

Weslhampton Beach, N. Y. 



ESTABLISHED 1909 



REAL ESTATE & 



i/flflMCU' 



WiTCMK 



\>\> •» 



■>=> 



* \> 



L& 



THE 
THAMPTON Al 

INC. 



landed, four men who had seen 
the stranded vessel reached the 
beach and relieved the women. 

While the rescue operations 
were going on a message came 
from the Long Beach Station re- 
porting a schooner ashore one- 
half mile west of that place with 
seven persons in the rigging. 

The state of affairs on the 
"Tucker" was, however, too crit- 
ical for any alteration of work 
going forward there, and the force 
too limited to detach one of the 
rescuing party. But the moment 
the duty in hand was completed 
and all the seamen had been sent 
to the Point Lookout Station, the 
life savers started westward to 
the second wreck. 

When about a mile on the way 
they learned that the schooner, 
which proved to be the C. Henry 
Kirk, without cargo, had been 
driven well up on the beach at 
high water and the crew had 
been safely landed. 

The rescue of the eleven out 
of twelve men on the "Tucker" 
was a creditable piece of work 
on the part of Keeper Rhodes 
and his assistants, and it is a pity 
that Anderson did not follow his 
companions to the forward part 
of the vessel, where he would 
have been saved with the others. 
So far as is known, his body was 
not recovered. Much credit is due, 
certainly, to Mrs. Raynor, Mrs. 
Southard, and Miss Rhodes. The 
shipwrecked crew, who were al- 
most destitute of clothing when 
landed, were supplied with suit- 
able garments, and after resting 
a day at the station departed for 
their homes. 

The district inspector of the 
Third District, U.S. Life Saving 
Service, concludes his report 
upon the casualty in the follow- 

(Continued on page 83) 



East Quogue 



r t 

Patio Building 

Wesihampton Beach 



RIVERHEAD 

SEAT COVER CO. 

ROBERT FUTTERMAN 

ANTIQUE & MODERN CARS 

CUSTOM INTERIORS 

AUTOS - BOATS - BUSES ■ TRUCKS 

CUSTOM MADE 

CONVERTABLE TOPS COVERS 

SEAT COVERS CUSHIONS 

160 FLANDERS ROAD 
Riverhead. Long Island, N. Y. 

PARK 7-2240 



GEORGE H. JONES 

REAL ESTATE 

Squires Ave., East Quogue 
Tel. HAmpton Bays 2-0190 



Hubbell & Klapper, Inc. 

Long Island Real Estate 

65 HILTON AVENUE 
GARDEN CITY, N. Y. 



Benj. G. Huskisson 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 
Phone: HR 3-0372 

208 East Main St. Port Jefferson 



0&fef? 



Long Island 
Real Estate 



INSURANCE 
for more than 40 years 

Main office on Main Road at 
Mattituck. Tel. MAttituck 9-8434. 
Nassau County office at 1699, 
Northern Blvd., Manhasset. Tel. 
MAnhasset 7-3646. 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



SOUTHOLD 
SAVINGS BANK 

'Home For Savings Since" 
1858 

Suffolk County's 
Oldest Savings Bank 



Saving Accounts 
Banking-By-Mail 

Dividends are paid from 
Day of Deposit 

Compounded Quarterly 
"Member of F.D.I.C." 



79 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 




A MAJOR contribution to Long 
Islandiana is Vincent F. Seyfried's 
recently published first volume 
of "The Long Island Rail Road: 
A Comprehensive History" sub- 
titled "Part One. South Side R.R. 
of L.I." 

Mr. Seyfried has combined a 
lucid style with intensive re- 
search to give us an account of 
the beginnings of the South Side 
Rail Road in Civil War Times 
until October 1889 when it was 
taken over by the Long Island 
Rail Road. The difficulties faced 
by Charles Fox of Baldwin who 
"was the leading spirit behind 
the organization of the new road," 



The 
Sou'wester Book Shop 

BELLPORT LANE, BELLPORT, L. I. 

Unusual Greeting Cards 

General Juvenile 

Paperbacked Books 

AT 6-0777 



Lumber — Mason Supplies 
Free Delivery & Estimating 

MID-ISLAND LUMBER 

& SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

415 Roanoke Ave. 
Riverhead, N. Y. 

PArk 7-2430 




Suffolk Museum and 

Carriage House at 

Stony Brook 

Open 10 to 5:30 
Wednesdays thru Sundays 




which included a severe injury 
when he "attempted to board a 
Long Island train hurriedly" at 
Mineola before it stopped — "his 
foot slipped and he fell between 
the car and the station platform, 
the motion of the cars rolling him 
over and over in a space of seven 
or eight inches, causing severe 
internal injuries and breaking an 
arm." He recovered but the South 
Side line had to face sabotage, 
injunctions and other roadblocks, 
literal and figurative as it sought 
rights of way to Brooklyn and 
L. I. Communities. 

Descriptions of the welcomes 
to the construction and first pas- 
senger trains received in Bald- 
win, Freeport, etc., with brass 
bands and refreshments and 
speeches, provide a great deal of 
interesting local community his- 
tory. A paragraph or two are de- 
voted to the development of 
"Breslau" renamed Lindenhurst 
in 1891. We quote: 

"One of the greatest stimuli to 



APRIL 1962 

both passenger and freight traf- 
fic was the new city of Breslau. 
During 1869 a Mr. Wellwood 
bought up 5,000 acres of farmland 
near Babylon and laid out the 
tract in 25 x 100 foot lots." Mr. 
Wellwood "formed a partnership 
with Charles S. Schleier of Brook- 
lyn and formerly of Breslau in 
Silesia. By 1872 there were about 
400 houses and a population of 
about 3,500." 
A helpful summary of the 



Sag Harbor 
Savings Bank 

Established 1860 

Serving all of 
Long Island 

Savings Accounts 
Mortgages 

Member F.D.I.C. 

SAg Harbor 5-0012 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS. 
Insured up to $10,000 by the 
Federal S. & L. I. C. 

BONUS SAVINGS ACCTS. 
(1% extra earnings) 
LOW COST FHA HOME 
IMPROVEMENT LOANS 



G SERVICES 

FAST, FRIENDLY, 
MORTGAGE LOANS 
PERSONAL MONEY ORDERS 
FREE SAVE-BY MAIL KITS. 
(Postage-paid both ways) 
TRAVELERS' CHECKS. 
PASSBOOK LOANS, etc. 



at the wonderful place to save. 

, W W WV / 



SUFFOLK COUNTY 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 



A NO LOAN 



BABYLON 

Mam 0lt.ee 



SMITHTOWN 



CENTEREACH 



1 West Main Street 
Smithtown, New York 
Fri. Eves.: 6 to 8 P.M 



180 West Main Street 

Babylon. New York 

Mon. Eves: 5 to 8 P.M. 

Resources $100,000,000 

LARGEST MUTUAL SAVINGS INSTITUTION IN SUFFOLK 

DAVID P. SEAMAN. President 



Jericho Turnpike 
Centereach, New York 
Fri. Eves.: 6 to 8 P.M. 



80 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



causes of the eventual collapse of 
the South Side is included at the 
end of the book as well as a 
Roster of Equipment. There is a 
twelve page insert of pictures, 
some taken almost a 100 years 
ago, which were supplied by Wil- 
liam Rugen. Mr. Seyfried's sources 
were two previous works, Elizur 
Hinsdale's brief history published 
in 1898 and Felix Reifischneider's 
longer and much fuller work of 
1922. Mr. Reifschneider, who has 
written many fine articles for the 
Forum, arranged for the publica- 
tion of the book. 

Mr. Seyfried states in his Fore- 
word that "Although the Long 
Island traces its history back to 
1836 and is the third oldest line 
in the country, only two previous 
accounts of it have appeared": 
May we call his attention to Mrs. 
Mildred H. Smith's "Early His- 
tory of the Long Island Railroad, 
1834-1900" published in 1958? Mrs. 
Smith's book is not only an ac- 
count — it's a good one. 



LEON R. EDELSTEIN 

Babylon Town Real Estale 

Wanted to Purchase old L. I. 
Maps, Documents. 



630 Sunrise Highway 

Tel. MOhawk 9- 



Babylon 



Long Island 

Books — Maps — Prints 
Painlings — Documents 

Bought and Sold 

Ira J. Friedman 

INC. 

215 Main Street 

Port Washington 

Tel. PO 7-3547 



EAST END 
TYPEWRITER CO. 

For all your office needs. New 
and used typewriters and add- 
ing machines, desks, files, etc. 

Sales, Service 
and Supplies 

Distributors for ROYAL type- 
writers and VICTOR adding 
machines. 

East Main St. & Fishel Ave. 

RIVERHEAD, N. Y. 

Call PArk 7-2695 



We hope that in future volumes 
Mr. Seyfried will include some 
sort of simplified maps, not neces- 
sarily to scale, of various Rail 
Road routes. The book may be 
obtained from Ira J. Friedman, 
Inc., Port Washington, N. Y. 

THANKS TO Mrs. John Potter 
of Southampton for sending us 
"Treasure Hunters" a fascinating 
soft cover book of some 144 pages 
authored by Robert I. Nesmith 
and John S. Potter, Jr. both ex- 
pert treasure hunters themselves 
and authors of other like publica- 
tions. Mr. Potter, Jr. formerly 
of Southampton and now of Hong 
Kong is a famous scuba-diver. 

There are sections devoted to 
such intriguing topics as "Ghost 
Towns and Lost Mines," "Money 
Digging," "Beachcombing," etc. 
One part of the book titles "Where 



to Find It," has a section devoted 
to New York and New Jersey 
wrecks containing treasure. 

All you need is strength, ability 
to scuba dive, a chartered ship, 
some electronic devices and you're 
rich, maybe. The book makes 
great reading and it's interesting 
to note that quotes from Forum 
articles are used. Publishers are 
Fawcett Publications, Greenwich, 
Conn. 

WE OFFER apologies for unusual 
tardiness in answering letters. This 
Department was out of commis- 
sion for a while. Thanks indeed 
to Chester Osborne, Mrs. Frederic 
Williams, Mrs. Russell B. Liver- 
more, members of the East Hamp- 
ton Star staff, our efficient print- 
ers, and to our far better half, for 
helping so much. — C.J.M. 



Yesteryears Magazine 

A QUARTERLY 
FOR THE STUDY 

AND APPRECIATION OF 
NEW YORK STATE 

REGIONAL HISTORY 

SAMPLE COPY SI.OO 
ONE YEAR, 93.00 

ADDRESS 

Ed. Office, Scipio Center, 
New York 

History, Genealogy, Archaeology 
Folklore 



BARBARA FALK 

THE BOOKCASE 
Sayville. L. I. 

Old & Out of Print Books 
Book-Finding Service 

LT 9-1500 



your savings earn interest 
from day of deposit 

AT THE 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



88 years of service to 
savers and homeowners 



RIVERHEAD, N. Y. 



PArk 7-3600 



81 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



APRIL 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



(Rates: 10c per word, minimum 
20 words or $2. Additional con- 
secutive insertions, same copy, 5c 
per word. Copy must be received 
with cash or check by 10th. of 
month preceding following issue. 
Charges accepted from subscrib- 
ers but 15c billing charge will be 
made.) 

WANTED — By Southampton 
Colonial Society Historical Mu- 
seum, complete file of copies of 
The Long Island Forum for 1938-9 
as donations or to purchase. Ad- 
vise Mrs. John Potter, P. O. Box 
1334, Southampton, N. Y. 



FOR SALE — 1698 Colonial Ten 
Rooms. Five Bedrooms, Two 
Baths, l'/2 acres. Sosa, Realtor, 
Farmingdale, Long Island, New 
York. 

TOOKER, William W., "Indian 
Place Names On Long Island." 
1962 reprint. $7.50. "Long Island's 
Story," with Supplement to 1961, 
Overton and Marshall. "History of 
Long Island," Thompson, Third 
Edition, Three Vols. $47.50. 1962 
Reprint. Ira J. Friedman, Inc. Port 
Washington, New York. 



FOR SALE. Long Island, August 
1776. Proclamation of General 
Howe Directed To The People of 
Long Island. Faithfully Reproduc- 
ed on Parchment Paper. Suitable 
for framing, Size 9 x 13. An ideal 
gift. $1.00. John Olin. Long Island 
Historical Research. Box 435, 
Great Neck, New York. 

FOR SALE. Thompson's History 
of Long Island, Original Third 
Edition, 1918, Three Volumes, 
1864 pages, Excellent Condition. 
$39.50. Ernest Hawkins, 4 Steele 
Avenue, Annapolis, Maryland. 

L. I. FORUM INDEX 

The Queens Borough Public 
Library sells a complete index of 
the Long Island Forum for the 
years 1938-1947 inclusive, at $1 
postpaid. Also for the years 1948- 
1952 inclusive, at 50 cents post- 
paid. They may be obtained by 
writing to the Long Island Col- 
lection, Queens Borough Public 
Library, 89-14 Parsons Boulevard, 
Jamaica 32, New York. 
WANTED TO BUY. Old Stamps, 
stamp collections, old envelopes, 
old correspondence. High prices 
paid. Immediate spot cash. Box 
341, Huntington. 



EAST HAMPTON HISTORY — 
with genealogies of 47 early East 
Hampton families. 619 pages, pro- 
fusely illustrated. 

The families: Baker, Barns or 
Barnes, Bennett, Chatfield, Conk- 
lin or Conkling, Davis, Dayton, 
Dibble, Dimon, Dominy, Edwards, 
Field, Filer, Fithian, Gann, Gard- 
iner, Gould, Hand, Hedges, Hicks, 
Homan, Hopping, Huntting, Isa- 
acs, Jones, King, Leek, Lester, 
Loper, Miller, Mulford, Murdock, 
Osborn or Osborne, Parsons, 
Payne, Schellinger, Shaw, Sher- 
rill, Simons, Squires, Stratton, 
Strong, Talmage, Tillinghast, Top- 
ping, Vail, Van Scoy. 

$10 the copy 
EAST HAMPTON STAR 
EAST HAMPTON, L. I. 

WANTED— wooden duck decoys. 
$1.50 each. I will pay Express or 
Parcel Post. Must be in good 
condition. 

The OX Yoke Antiques 
Napanoch, N. Y. 

GUNS 

WANTED — for my collection. 
Old guns, pistols, powder horns, 
bullet moulds, swords or cannon 
barrels. Indian arrow heads. Li- 
censed dealer for modern guns 
and ammunition. RICHARD G. 
HENDRICKSON, Lumber Lane, 
Bridgehampton, N. Y. Telephone 
BRidgehampton 2-0893. tf 

DOLLS — CLOCKS 

We would like to buy old dolls 
and clocks for our collections. 

Write— Ann & Jack Reid, 19 
S ylvan Ct. West Islip, L. I. 

WANTED: old carriage letter- 
heads, billheads, broadsides, for 
information about L. I. Carriage 
makers. Jane des Grange, Suffolk 
Museum, Stony Brook, L. I. 

COMPLETE NEWS of Sayville 
and vicinity and provocative com- 
ment is found in The Suffolk 
County News, national and state 
award - winning newspaper. 23 
Candee Avenue, Sayville. SAy- 
ville 4-6200. 

Property on Long Island is be- 
coming increasingly sought after 
by almost everybody, it seems. 
If you are interested why not 
consult the real estate brokers 
advertising in the Forum? 



"IS YOUR HOME ATTRACTIVE? 
Let us sketch it from your photo- 
graph and put it on stationery for 
you. Can be also used on match 
covers, playing cards, napkins, etc. 
Write to CROOKER 
Cold Spring H arbor, New York" 

THE SMITHTOWN^ NEWS for 
many years has featured Long 
Island History in its columns. 
"News of Long Ago," by Virginia 
Eckels Malone. Write for sample 
c opy. Box 51 5, Smithtown, N. Y. 

FOR ALL the News of Hunting- 
ton Township subscribe to the 
Long Islander, New York State's 
leading weekly newspaper. 313 
Main Street, Huntington, L. I. 
Hamilton 7-4000. 

From the famous Richard H. 
Handley Collection of Long Island 
Americana: "Place Names in the 
Town of Smithtown," also "A 
History of Smithtown, 1663-1845"; 
Rufus B. Langhans, Smithtown 
Library, Smithtown, Long Island. 
Price $1.00 each. 

For local year 'round news of 
your friends and activities on the 
South Fork of Long Island, Sub- 
scribe to: The Hampton Chronicle, 
Westhampton Beach 
$4.00 per year 
The Hampton Bays News, 
Hampton Bays, $3.50 per year 
The Southampton Press, 
Southampton, N. Y. $4.00 per year 

FOR SALE "Guide to Historic 
Markers." $1.50 Illustrated pub- 
lication by Southold Historical 
Society, about old structures and 
sites in Southold, Peconic and 
Arshamomaque, 64 markers so far, 
placed by the Society. Write Mrs. 
Edgar Baumgartner, Southold, 
Long Island. 

FOR ALL THE NEWS of Eastern 
Long Island read the NEWS-RE- 
VIEW. Subscribe Today P. O. Box 
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82 



APRIL 1962 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f\eaders ' ^J~i 



orum 



(Continued from page 79) 
ing words: "The vessel as I found 
her is a total wreck. The hull 
from a short distance abaft the 
foremast is broken off, the wood- 
work smashed into small pieces 
and strewn along the beach. The 
cargo cannot be recovered and 
nothing of value has been found. 
I consider it fortunate that eleven 
persons out of the twelve on 
board the bark were rescued, and 
believe that if Seaman Anderson 
had followed the crew when they 
left the mizzen rigging and gone 
to the jib boom, he too would 
have been saved." 

The estimated value of the 
"Tucker" was $15,000 and the 
cargo value was estimated at $8,- 
000; both a total loss. 

In reference to the schooner 
that went ashore the same day 
near the Long Beach Life Saving 
Station, the "C. Henry Kirk" 
from New York City, bound 
from New York to Virginia, the 
value of the vessel was estimated 
at $3,500. It became a total loss. 
Of the seven-man crew that got 
ashore safely, two of the sailors 
remained for four days at the 
Long Beach Life Saving Station. 
LOU PEARSALL 



Correclion 

I would like to correct some 
mistakes in the article in my 
name in the January number of 
the Forum. Perhaps I may have 
made them myself as I have now 
reached the age where I am prone 
to make mistakes. 

In making mention of the two 
(Continued on page 85) 

The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Miss Margaret I. Carman 
President 

presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 
FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religious Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays Tuesdays and Saturdays 

3 to 5 P.M. 



A Gilt For Yourself or For a Friend! 

Why not subscribe to the Long Island Forum? 
Twelve issues of local historical articles. 

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BASED ON CURRENT EARNINGS WE ANTICIPATE PAYING 

THE FOLLOWING DIVIDEND RATES FOR THE SIX MONTH 

PERIOD BEGINNING JANUARY 1st, 1962 

INSTALLMENT 



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earn dividends as of 
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REGULAR 
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at prevailing 
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Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. — 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 



83 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



APRIL 1962 



Trossers Qathedral "Tines 



Thomas R. Bayles 

IT WAS back in 1812 that 
"Uncle Billy Dayton" set the 
first white pine seedlings on 
his farm in Middle Island on 
the Yaphank road which was 
purchased by George Prosser 
years later. As the years pass- 
ed the trees grew and seeded 
themselves over the land 
which surrounded the first 
planting until they covered 
over twenty acres and be- 
came the most beautiful white 
pine forest on Long Island. 
As one walked through the 
quiet solitude of these "Cathe- 
dral Pines," covered with a 
soft carpet of pine needles, 
and gazed up into their loft 
heights, the rush of our mod- 
ern world seemed far away. 

Several years ago a hurri- 
cane blew down over fifty of 
the original trees that had 
grown to a height of nearly 
one hundred feet. A neighbor- 
ing farmer, Charles Szuster, 
who owns a saw mill, cleared 
them out and sawed the logs 
into boards. 

Mr. Prosser took great pride 
in keeping the forest in first 
class condition during his life 
time. He built roads running 
all around the park and it was 
enjoyed by the public for 
years until careless people 
picniced there and left rub- 
bish all around. Finally con- 
ditions got so bad that for 
several years the white pine 
forest has been closed to the 
public. 

Across the road lies the 
Connecticut (now called Car- 
man's) river, which was so 
important in the early life of 
the settlers in this area, as it 
furnished water power to run 
their saw and grist mills. This 
is part of the acreage adjoin- 
ing the river from Brook- 
haven to Middle Island that 
is supposed to be taken over 
by the county for a wild life 
refuge. 

On the west side of the 
river lies a large tract of land 

84 





Prosser's Cathedral Pines from a photo of 1908. Courtesy of Thomas 
R. Bayles. - 



consisting of several hundred 
acres that has been purchased 
by the Suffolk County Boy 
Scouts for a camping area. 
This will be left as it is and 
the only improvements will be 
some barracks and wells put 
down for water. At various 
times over 2,000 Scouts camp 
here. 

The following poem was 
written especially for the 
Cathedral Pines by Walter 
Beverly Crane several years 
ago. 

"Of Prosser's dreamy woods 

I sing, 
Each tree a harp, each branch 

a string. 

The cadence soft and low is 
balm, 



In Prosser's woods a hallow- 
ing calm. 

'Tis God's cathedral, minister- 
choir, 

The singing pines are harp 
and lyre; 

In Prosser's woods I voice a 

prayer, 
And worship God and nature 

there." 

The sentiments in Mr. 
Crane's poem were also those 
of a great Long Island poet, 
William Cullen Bryant when 
he wrote in 1910 : "The groves 
were God's first temples. In 
the darkling wood, amid the 
cool and silence, Man knelt 
down, and offered to the 
mightiest, solemn thanks and 
supplication." 



Inter -County Title Guaranty 

AND MORTGAGE COMPANY 

127 West Main Street 

Riverhead, New York 

PArk 7-4140 



THOMAS H. QUINN 
President 



WILLIAM E. PFEFFERLE 
Vice President 



_ 



APRIL 1962 



l\eadefS ' -st 



ofu-in 



(Continued from page 83) 
Bakers at Point - o - Woods Life 
Saving Station, the names are 
transposed, they should be Capt. 
Charles Baker, who was in charge 
of Point-o-Woods station, and his 
son Edward Baker who was serv- 
ing as a surfman under his father. 
There is also a comma just 
before the name Frederick Saun- 
ders that should be a period. 
Frederick Saunders was a brother 
to my step - mother's first hus- 
band, Charles Saunders. He was 
drowned from the sloop. W. W. 
Hulse which was bound to New 
York from Great River. 

She was loaded with bivalves 
and capsized on Jones Inlet bar 
on November 20, 1876. On board 
besides Charles Saunders, were 
his brother John Saunders and 
Joseph Monsell, both owners of 
the vessel. Monsell and Charles 
Saunders were drowned. The 
sloop Hamlet, Capt. Blydenburgh 
in charge, passed out through the 
inlet later and saw the drifting, 
capsized vessel. 

He went to it and found John 
Saunders in the mainsail. He was 
revived and taken to New York 
and sent home by train. I knew 
him in later years, and worked 
at one time with his brother, Ells- 
worth Saunders, who was then 
on the farm at Deer Range, Great 
River. 

John Saunders had three broth- 
ers, Frederick, Charles and Ells- 
worth. My step - mother had a 
daughter. In February, 1882 she 
was married to my father as his 
second wife. She was the daugh- 
ter of Buel and Elza Albin of 
Port Jefferson. Her father was 
captain of a coasting schooner. 
In the Civil War he was at one 



time in the James River where 
he witnessed the battle of Harri- 
son's Landing from the masthead 
of his vessel. 

Frederick Saunders worked on 
the farm of William Nicoll at Islip 
with my father and was there 
during the Blizzard of 1888. He 
went into the Life Saving Service 
after that. He retired from it and 
lived to be almost 94 years of 
age. He and his wife celebrated 
60 years of married life. 

Dr. King of Bay Shore and a 
diver whose name I do not re- 
member now both mention Fred- 
erick Saunders in their accounts 
of the wreck of the Louis V. Place 
on February 8, 1895. 

JOHN TOOKER 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Kind Words Departmenl 
Thanks to Charles D. Cordes, 
Olin S. Raynor, and to D. Nelson 
Raynor who writes "Every issue 
is interesting to an old L. I. news- 
paper man who started at Hunt- 
ington February, 1892 — 70 years." 



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MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



85 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Sprout! 

(Continued from page 77) 

would suggest to you, wether 
it may not be a proper Thing 
for you to accompany him as 
far as Guilford, and so just 
once give a look Upon Your 
Brothr Sproutt & Family, 
after telling you sincerely; 
that twould be exquisitly 
Agreabl unto me — I leave 
it with you for to — Deter- 
mine the Affair. — As to your 
connubial Affairs, I can say 
Nothing new — but I trust, 
that if Appollo dont deceive 
me — when you are sufficient- 
ly exercised for your past Vil- 
lanies in such Affairs, the 
Gods will be propitious to 
Your warmest Desires, and 
grant you, your most pas- 
sionate Wishes. — 
if you please, and can find 
out the Female Object that 
you love most, you may pre- 
sent Her with my best Re- 
gards My Wife joyns in Suit- 
able Salutations to You all — 
From Your assured Friend & 
Br. 

Jms Sproutt 
PS: 

Commend me to — 
Mr Floyds Family- 
Master Billy & Mr Dungan in 
particular" 

(to be continued) 



APRIL 1962 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

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115 East Main Street 
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Sunrise Highway Office 

100 East Sunrise Highway 
North Patchogue, New York 

Mid-Island Office 

Route 25 — Selden, New York 

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Insurance Corp. 



LONG ISLAND BOOKS 

By PAUL BAILEY 

"Physical Long Island" 

Its Geology, Archaeology, Beaches, Plains and 

Historic Storms 

More Than 100 Illustrations 

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"Colonial Long Island" 

A brief history of the Island's first 250 years 

More Than 50 Illustrations 

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"Long Island Whalers" 

The history of whaling by L. I. ships and men for more 
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"The Thirteen Tribes" 

Revised and Greatly Enlarged 

A brief account of the names, 

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Well Illustrated, $1 Postpaid 



Address : 

PAUL BAILEY 

BOX 805, AMlTYVILLE, N. Y. 

Nole: Bailey's 2-volume Island History and Historic Long Island 
in Pictures. Prose and Poetry are out of print. 



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_ 



86 



You pay one part of your taxes 

directly every April 15th. 

Another share when 

you get a LILCO bill. 

It's a fact— 24 cents out 

of every dollar you pay 

for gas and electricity 

goes for taxes! The biggest 

portion is turned over to 

local communities and the State 

of New York . . . millions of 

dollars every year. For 

instance: We're the largest 

single contributor to school 

taxes in Nassau and Suffolk 

Counties. Additional tax money 

helps pay for roads, police and other 

essential services. Of course, if taxes 

were lower, your bill would be too. 

But thanks to an investor-owned enterprise, 

you still get the best public utility 

service possible. At LILCO, we're always 

working to keep our service a bargain. 

LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 

An Investor-Owned, Taxpaying Company 



-<=7 _:rr 






a. feg 
f t^^h^w i n't 



i 



r 




^.zjsct&Sju^ ,J^ 









f\eadi 



er 6 ^jrofum 



Powell Descendant 

Enclosed please find check for 
the first year's subscription to 
the Long Island Forum. 

I can't begin to tell you how 
delighted I was when my hostess 
of this past weekend handed me 
your wonderful magazine. With 
the knowledge that I am a de- 
scendant of Thomas Powell, I was 
loaned the October, 1961, issue 
containing the article, "The Beth- 
page Purchase, III." 

Would it be at all possible to 
get the back numbers for Septem- 
ber and October 1961? 

Sincerely, 
Your future reader, 
MRS. MILDRED LUNDEWALL 



? mi $ 

* • * 

The ultimate in American 
cuisine in authentic colonial 

setting 
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In Historical Surroundings 

The North Shore's 

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Overnight Accommodations 
Private Parties — Cocktails 

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Reservations Advised 

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ZIKOLL'S 

A place to relax — 
To dine at leisure in an 
atmosphere of yesteryear 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Closed Mondays 
845 Merrick Road Copiague 

Tels. AMityville 4-1383-9815 



Postmarked Jamaica 

Long Island Forum — How 
come in the January Forum pages 
9-10 and 15-16 were missing? Has 
no one else noticed this? From a 
long time subscriber who enjoys 
every issue and often passes them 
along for others to enjoy. 

L. C. K 
(Editor's Note. — We're not sure 
we've read your initials correctly 
because they don't jibe with our 
circulation records. Please send 
us your full name and address so 
we can send you another Janu- 
ary Forum. Other readers didn't 
"notice this" because the other 
January issues were O.K. Some- 



CARMAN - DUNNE, Inc. 

Civil Engineers — Surveyors 

Grayview Building 

2 Lakeview Avenue, Lynbrook 

Tel. LYnbrook 9-5563 



BILL JACOBS' 

THE WAGON WHEEL 

recommended by 

Duncan Hines 
Gourmet & Cue 

Luncheon Dinner 

Cocktails 

HR 3-0583 

Patchogue Road 

Port Jefferson Station 



On The North Shore It's The 

CHINA ISLAND 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Air Conditioned 

Serving Exotic Chinese Food 

Open Daily Orders to take out 

FOrest 8-3990 

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at 

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Member Diner's Club and 

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GIL CLARK'S 

Maple Avenue Fish House 

L. L's FAMOUS 

OYSTER and CLAM 

BAR 

Maple Ave. Dock. Bay Shore 

Margaret E. Clark Gilbert M. Clark 

Tels. MOhawk 5-1550 and 1551 



times in going through the fold- 
ing machine pages do get mixed 
up. Apologies and thanks for your 
nice comments.) 



Property on Long Island is be- 
coming increasingly sought after 
by almost everybody, it seems. 
If you are interested why not 
consult the real estate brokers 
advertising in the Forum? 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 
INN 

on Connelquoi River 
OAKDALE 

Phone LT 9-0248 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



Harbor Light 
Restaurant 

BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCHEONS 
WEDDINGS. BANQUETS AND 
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AMityville 4-5868 and 4-9704 

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AMITYVILLE (East) 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Hiehway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. MOhawk 9-9800 



STERN'S 

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CHapel 9-0248 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 
Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries. Quality Since 1890 

Factory Conveniently Located at 

Farmingdale 



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