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Full text of "Linguistic Survey Of India Vol V Part I Indo Aryan Family Eastern Group"

402

ASSAMESE SKELETON GRAMMAR.

I.-NOTTNS.-Thus declined in the singular—

A man.
(manuh

A son.

Norn,

Ace.    < *

{manuh-ake

T   ,
In8tr-

<putra-y
\putr-ere

C pwtra-ldi

~ ,      fm&nida'ldi

Brt'   [*&Md*Mfo   IpttfwZ&fo

Gen    53W»nttA"ar         fj>ttfr*-r

'****                 tputra-t

A boat.

<nao
(. nawe

Inw-aldike
C n&to-ar
I naw-are
f nawat
Inaw-ale

^The second form of the nomina,
tire is the one generally n»ed
before % transitive verb. The
accusative in Jc is not naed with
inanimate nouns. The terminal
tions in e are more emphatic than
the others, Further emphasis is
indicated by the addition of t or
Ad, the latter being the stronger.

The plural is formed by the
addition of bUsk, for, or A& to
the nominative singular. The
nd thus formed is then
like the singular of mdnvK,
s more honorific than the
other two.

In nouns of relationship, four different forms are used, according as the relation is mine; yaurt, non-honorific; yours, honorific; or
Aw.   A full list is given in Brown's grammar, pages 27 and ff.   The following are examples—

Your, honorific.                    His.                 Adjectives, as a rule, do not  change

lapera                                 lapek               for gender, but a few ending in », such as

&«f5, old, form the feminine  in f, as in

Father

Mother

Son

Daughter

Husband

Wife

bopai

ai

po

2t

pai
Shaint

YMXT, non-honorific.
taper
mar
pvter
siyer
patyr
ghatmyer

t ctrjpvtera
^

paiya or patyera
ghainiyS or gfainiyera

,

Hindi. Comparison is usually expressed by
suffixing kai or Jew i to the locative of the
nonn with which comparison is made. Some-
times the locative alone is used.

II- -PBOHOITl!TS.—In the following the Dative and the Locative are formed on the model of the Accusative.  Thus, Dat., mo-fai; loc., mo-t*—

Siig.

Nom.

Ace.

Instr.

Gen.
Plnr.

Nom.

Ace.

Instr.

Gen.

I.

vto-k, mo-ke
may-e, mo ft

Thon, honorific.

wyt ttuy-o

to-k, to-ke
tay-e} to-re
to~r, to-re

ami, dmi-ye
ktdmd-ke

and so on.

ama-r. Sma-re

toma-k, tomfrke
tumi'$e, tomd-re
toma-r, toma-re

tornolak, tomolak*1
tomoldk-ak, tomolak-ake
tomoldk-e, tomol&k-ere
rt totnoldk-are

Your Honour, Self.

dpuni, apuni-y'e
dpond'k, dpond-ke
dpuni-ye, dpond-re

dpond-bildk, etc.

SM-Q, all without
exception, JB thus
declined—

, hakalowe.
'lo-k*Qt hakalo-kt,
fo-w, Kakato-re.
. _ t*a/o-r«.
tfWtfa2,etc.
«-o,   even   one, ii
similiirly declined.

1 Or tomalok, tomalolc-e, and so throughout.

This, com. geit., Sing.                   non-honorific. Nom.               *, tye, e-ye Ace.                 iyd-k, iyd-ke Instr.              i-yet iya-re Gen.                tya-r, iy&+e Plur. Nom.               i'hSt etc.
	That, he, com. gen., non-honorific. hit hi*ye, he*ye td'ky td-ke   , hi-yet td*rc
 hi'hStt etc.
	This, com. gtn.t honorific*
 «5, &tw
 e6"-r, e5*/e ^-6^5*, etc.
	^That, he, com. gen.t honorific*
 te^l^HM
 teo-fc, teo-ke fiice, tie-were teo-r, tdo-re
	She, won-honorific, tai, tay-e tdi-k, tdi-ke taye, tdi-re tai-r, tai-re
 tdi-hat, etc*
	The    adverbs,    sdr, whence, tdr, thence, and kdr, whence P are thns declined.  In all three the d is pronounced long as in 'all.'   Gen. kdrt kdr-e,   from whence? Dat. kd-lai, kd-laike, whither?    Loc. *<K kd-ta, where P
 lathis and that, has an Ice. dk-tdk,   and a Gen. ar-tar.
 Ei, this, and Aet, that, are adjectives.

Who, which.     Which, inanimate,
 Skf
 Ace.   zd-k,sd-ke ziha-k, silxn-ke Instr. s?a-re          %ihe, zlUe-re Gen* §£•)*) %5-rt $tha*rt ziha^rs Plur. Nom. si-bildk, etc. si-bildk, etc.
	Who P        "What P          Anybody.
 kon> kon-e    it, ki-he         keot k$w
 ka-k>ka-ke ki,Jciha-ke      kS-k-o kfrre          kihe-re            ka-re, kS-re-o kd*r, kd-re kiha*rtkiha*re kd-r-o
		Somebody.
 g
 kdr-o-bti'k, etc. M*-o»55-re, etc. kawbfcr, etc.
	JKi-ba,    some* thing is declined like ki, thus— Ace. kiha-bd-k. Similarly, fcon-q, some-like Icon.
	
III.-VEBBS.—These are usually quoted under the form of the First Verbal Noun, which is the same in form as the Past Participle. In
Bronson's dictionary they are quoted under the form of the Conjunct!ve Participle. The plural is the same as the singular, but the suffix hob is some-
times added when it is necessary to emphasise the plural signification. There are two forms of the second person, a non-honorific and an honorific.
These will be numbered 2a and 25, respectively.

f, I am.

2a. $&
25. a,a
8. £f*

In th* third
exception ii that if
"

I was.

A,-AtixiUary Verb and Verb Substantive.       B.—Pinite Verbs —These Brown divides into three conjugations.
The first includes nearly all the verbs whose roots end in vowels (the only
important exceptions are the roots di, give, 2?, live, and set cut in lengths). It
forms its First verbal Noun by changing the final vowel of the root to otw*, or,_ if
the root ends in tetoa, the wed is changed to uuwd, or if it ends in otco, the owd is
changed to oowd. Also, some verbs whose roots end in d change the d to uwa.
In the second conjugation, the First- Vorbe-i Noun is formed by pimply adding
d. If the vowel of the root, which in this wn^agation always ends in a consonant,
is a, it is shortened in the First Verbal Noun, and if it is o it is changed to «
whenever the following syllable contains the letter t.
the First Verbal Noun is formed by adding d to the root, the root-vowel always remaining unchanged.  The only
ing syllable contains the letter *. and if the root-vowel is a, the root-vowel Is pronounced long, like the a in 'all.'
by t, it is pronounced as usual like the o in ' hot*