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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

n 



LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 



-•itfe 



n 




A Field of Famous Long Island Potatoes in Southold Town 
(From Bailey's L. I. History, 1949). 

Promoting All Long Island, Agriculturally, Industrially, and Commercially 

LONG ISLAND INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION and THE MINEOLA FAIR 

Roosevelt Raceway, Westbury October 9th to 17th, 1954 



r^ 



1 


TABLE of CONTENTS 




PREHISTORIC LONG ISLAND 


Robert R. Coles 


AN OWL AND TWO HAWKS 


Julian Denton Smith 


BOY'S TRIP TO NEW YORK IN 1891 


Capt. Eugene S. Griffing 


A VERY PERSISTENT SUITOR 


Kate Wheeler Strong 


A DEPLORABLE OMISSION 


The Editor 


LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 




1 



OCTOBER 1954 



.00 a year by Mail; Smgle Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 10 



H. E. Sweiey ft Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eartport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 




Louden-Knickerbock«r 
HaU 

A PriTate Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental DiseaaeB 

II Louden Ay*. AmityTilU 

AMityville 4-0053 



THE 

LcNe Island 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as iccond-clasi matter May U. 1947, at the 
post office at AmityviUe. New York, under the Act of 
March !. 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editir 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden. Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



NICHOLS 
RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. SunrUe Highway Tel. 8-1J12 

RuK and Furniture Cleanine 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 

Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jefferson ^ob 




Farmingdale 

Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 

Rug Cleaning 

Bro>d Hollow Road Farmiii«dal. 

Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 




Chrysler - Plymouth 

Sales and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Tructoa 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Establiihed 18S2) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 




SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

AmityviUe Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurat 
178 



A Deplorable Omission 

Your warmhearted and thought- 
ful appraisal of the signiiicance 
of Bowne House and our efforts 
in connection with it are most en- 
couraging. ^^^^^^^ g ^^i^^„ 

Editorial Note: As president of 
the Bowne House Association, 
Supreme Court Justice Golden 
and associates deserve the whole- 
hearted support of a" Lo?^/ 
Islanders who appreciate the sig- 
nificance of Flushing s nationally 
known "Shrine to Religious Free- 

"it" seems to us deplorable that 

those who had the arrangement 

of things at the recent annual 

meeting of the State Historical 

Association at Stony Brook failed 

to include this important place m 

its several pilgrimages about the 

island, or mention it among the 

points of interest in its pnnted 

program. This despite scheduled 

or suggested visits to a duck 

farm, Levittown and some other 

spots whose dominant interests 

would seem to be rather more com- 

mercial than historic. 

Certainly the omission of ine 
Bowne House could not have been 
due to distance as included were 
the Brooklyn Museum and also 
Sylvester Manorhouse on far-off 
Shelter Island which, like the 
Sunken Forest on Fire Island 
Beach, likewise included, entailed 
a boat or plane ride. 

Somehow when an appraisal o± 
things to see on liOng Island is 
placed in the hands of upstaters, 
well meaning though they may be, 
the result seldom if ever seems to 
do justice to this insular realm 
wherein are the State's two oldest 
towns, its oldest English church, 
its oldest farm and other "Famous 
Firsts" of State and Nation. 

Riches From the Sea 

Eva Gordon Slaterbeck's "Grand- 
pa Did Some Beachcombing" (Sept. 
issue) reminded me of a spring va- 
cation at Watermill years ago 
when our principal diet was cocoa- 
nuts gathered alongshore some 
months before. 

H. C. Kane 
Hempstead 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. T«1. 1086 Islip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

DapoalU Accapted by Mall 
First National Bank of Islip 

HambcT Fed. Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapequa (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 
Storage Warehouse 

Your Fumitura and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP. L. I. 
Established 1919 



1> 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle AmityviUe 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 

WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busees For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near AmityviUe Depot 



182 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND PORUM 



'prehistoric L,ong Island 



r 



■p VERY square yard of 
^^ Long Island reveals clues 
to its own exciting past — a 
long and eventful past that 
reaches across the more than 
three centuries that the white 
man has dwelt here, through 
the forgotten centuries of In- 
dian occupation, and into that 
ancient geologic time before 
the age of the dinosaurs. 

Although whole chapters of 
the story have been lost and 
some evidence is too confus- 
ing to permit of a full inter- 
pretation at present, it is 
hoped that in time many of 
the missing details will be 
filled in with a fair degree of 
certainty. 

The next time you visit 
your service station pick up a 
road map of the island, and 
study it carefully at the first 
opportunity. From the Nar- 
rows, at the extreme western 
end, to the tip of the Mon- 
tauk peninsula, which lies al- 
most directly south of the 
eastern boundary of Connecti- 
cut, its length is about 118 
miles, and its greatest width 
is some twenty miles. It is 
separated from the mainland 
on the north by Long Island 
Sound, which is approximately 
20 miles in width at its widest 
point, south of New Haven, 
Ct. The East River and New 
York harbor lie to the west, 
the Atlantic ocean to the 
south and east, and Block Is- 
land Sound is beyond the 
peninsulas to the northeast. 

Among the outstanding fea- 
tures revealed by such a map 
are the numerous irregularly 
shaped promontories along 
the north shore, west of Port 
Jefferson, enclosing many 
harbors and bays, the long 
barrier beaches that parallel 
the south shore, and the two 
"flukes" at the east end, ter- 
minating in Orient and Mon- 
tauk Points. 

No one with the least spark 
of curiosity can study such a 
map without wondering how 



Robert R. Coles 

the island acquired its unique 
form. Has it always existed as 
it is today? If not, when and 
how was it formed, and what 
changes have occurred during 
the many centuries of geo- 
logic time ? What is the reason 
for the striking contrast be- 
tween the north and south 
shores? What produced the 
long, narrow peninsulas at the 
east end? These are a few of 
the questions that come to 
mind when we peruse a road 
map of Long Island. Then, 
when we study a large scale 
topographical map and note 
the contour lines representing 
the double chain of hills that 
extends lengthwise of the is- 
land, many other questions 
occur. Discovering the an- 
swers to these is a fascinating 
pastime that opens many in- 
teresting avenues of thought. 

One thing that becomes im- 
mediately apparent to all who 
investigate the mystery of 
Long Island's ancient past is 
that it has been unbelievably 
complex. Many factors have 
combined to fashion it to its 
present form. Among these 
have been tremendous dis- 
turbances that have buckled 



the earth's crust to produce 
mountain chains, the alter- 
nate advance and retreat of 
the sea, which has at times 
drowned this region and again 
left it high and dry, erosion 
by winds, rains and rivers, the 
alternation of freezing and 
thav/ing, the irresistible 
pounding of ocean waves, the 
ceaseless influences of off- 
shore currents, and the effect 
of glaciers, carrying enormous 
quantities of sand, gravel and 
boulders, picked up to the 
north. Add to all this the in- 
gredient of time, measured in 
nundreds of millions of years, 
and you may begin to appre- 
ciate the complexity of the 
task confronting anyone who 
attempts to solve the problem 
of Long Island's geologic 
story. 

Here we shall merely con- 
sider some of the interesting 
highlights of that story, leav- 
ing out all details and some- 
times skipping over vast mil- 
lions of years. The present 
theme has to do with the so- 
called embryonic development 
of Long Island, before the 
coming of the Ice Age. 

The prologue to our story 
begins nearly 200-mil!ion 
years ago, a respectable span 



/. stAV^*?'»'!f'-''''''«^"™**^^'*^-';»!«" ' i^Yi''*::^:^^^^ ^^f,0^«!^*t*>*v"'S:?^'^^^ W^^'W^^^ i 




Bluff on Hempstead Harbor at the foot of which 200-inillion- 
year Sandstone Outcroppings are Found. (Photo, by author). 



18.^ 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

even to the geologist. We are 

Sid it was that long .-f ' ;/. 
4-r.ward the close of tne geo 
oTic time ^-"«d the Paleozoic 
Fra that great changes oe- 
furred in the earth's crust 
whTch marked the first ma 
long series of events that 
would ultimately result in 
Sie formation of Long Island 
This was before the age ot 
the dinosaurs and preceded 
he appearance of birds and 
mammals on the earth It an 
tedated by many millions ol 
years the appearance of man 
or any of his primate ances 

tors. , 

For untold millions of years 
before that time much of our 
nresent continent of Nortn 
SSca, including the region 
fhat is now I^ng Island lay 
beneath the sea. inen tre 
mendous forces in the crunt of 
the earth caused an upheaval 
of land in what is now the 
eastern part of North Amer- 
ica to produce a great moun 
lain range that extended ma 

north-south direction, with 
peaks three or more miles in 

height. At the same time the 
seT retreated to expo^e vast 
areas of land that had form 
erly been drowned. 

The present Appalachians, 
south of New England, are 
the remnants of this once 
ffreat mountain range and 
that which is now Long is- 
land lay in their eastern foot- 
S as part of the mainland 
TOh the staging of this event 

the long Paleozoic Era ended 
and the so-called Mesozoic Era 
commenced. 

In a geologic sense Long is- 
land, as a separate entity, is 
very young. Yet, events that 
occurred hundreds of millions 
of years ago were mstnimen- 
tal in laying its foundation. 
The lowest layer of rock, 
called bedrock, dates back to a 
time long before the Prologue 
of our story. We are told that 
this rock, which is predomin- 
antly Fordam gneiss, was 
formed in pre-Cambrian times 
or approximately 500-million 
years ago. It is a so-called 
metamorphic rock — a ^ype 
that has been altered to its 
present form by the agencies 

Continued on page 192 
18+ 



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BAY SHORE 



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Member Federal Reserve System 



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Designers and Manufacturers of the 

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Airplanes for the U.S. Navy, the Air Force 
and Commercial Users 





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Brookville, L. I. 
BRookviUe 5-0020 



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OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



cAn Owl and ^wo ^\}£aluks 



T N December (1953) and 
■■■ January (1954) the mat- 
ter of my inability to find a 
Snowy Owl gradually assumed 
the proportions of a joke to 
members of the bird-watching 
fraternity. Everyone seemed 
to see Snowy Owls on Jones 
Beach — everyone but me! 
One owl steadily appeared 
just west of Gilgo. Another 
frequented Short Beach. No 
matter at what time of the day 
I bird-hunted, the Snowy Owl 
never obliged with an appear- 
ance. 

It seemed that February 
would be as barren of Snowy 
Owls for me as December and 
January had been when, lo 
and behold, a new 'post' stuck 
out of a dune on the ocean 
side of the parkway nearly up 
to Gilgo. I had watched that 
landscape so frequently and 
knew every roll in the dunes 
so well that the new 'post' 
stuck out like a fellow in a 
two-piece swim suit. The 
'post' appeared weather-beat- 
en, whitened by age, and 
rather the worse for wear. 
The 'post' marked the end of 
a winter's hunt — it was my 
Snowy Owl. 

No particular reason why I 
should waste time putting" mv 
car in the Gilgo parking field 
and hiking back to see my 
bird — he might disappear — 
so I took the car off the 
cement and worked my field 
glasses. The owl stood mo- 
tionless back to me. He was 
white for the most part with 
indistinct outline markings at 
the ends of many feathers. 
He had no earpuffs (horns) 
and his head sunk solidly be- 
tween his shoulders. He rose 
out of the dune like an old 
tree stump. 

I left the car beside the 
parkway and walked thru the 
beach grass toward the Snowy 
Owl. He seemed to know all 
about my curiosity and 
twisted his head almost all the 
way around to return my 



Ju/ian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 

Society 

interest. The head did not 
turn suddenly or with a jerk 
but in such a way that I felt 
I was being scrutinized before 
I realized the position of the 
head had altered. He must 
have stood all of two feet tall, 
a difficult measurement to 
calculate as there was noth- 
ing to provide comparison — 
beach grass everywhere. 

I looked down to step over 
some debris and, when I 
raised my head again, the owl 
had taken to the air. And 
wings! Each one reached out 
farther than the owl was tall. 
He must have been every inch 
of five feet from wing tip to 
wing tip. He flew off without 
apparent effort toward the 
bay and settled out of sight 
beyond the plume grass. 

I had seen my 'Showy Owl! 

Maybe it is a secret of the 
Snowy Owl why he happens 
down our way in the winter, 



his natural home being away 
up in the north. One opinion 
holds he is sensitive to cold 
and drops down this way dur- 
ing exceptionally low temper- 
atures up north. Another is 
that he is hungry due to a 
lack of food in the north 
lands. It is strange if he feels 
the cold as his feathers are 
thicker and more protective 
than almost any bird's and in 
addition he has a tremend- 
ously thick hide and plenty of 
fat beneath it. 

The Snowy Owl hunts by 
day plus the twilight hours ^f 
the morning and evening. He 
likes mice, rats, shrews, 
minks, weasels and rabbits as 
well as a few fish, gulls, duck, 
grouse, an occasional domes- 
tic fowl, and some small birds. 
His northern food is princi- 
pally lemming which some 
years are very scarce. 

The ability of the Snowy 
Owl to see during the day 
costs many a crow his life. 
The crow identifies the Snowy 
Owl as an owl and assuming 




Hemlock Beach Through Which Jones Beach Parkway Now 
Runs. (From 1904 Photo by Marshal] Woodman). 



185 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



OCTOBER, 1954 



it like the other owls, cannot 
see well by day, lues m coo 
close and that is iatai. 

m trying to und tne Snowy 
Ow^ o" ce more ove. beyond 
tZ piume grass i saw two 
oid-tiiners wiio are aiso mtex- 
pctiue iliese two — tne 
SS Hawk and tne Spaxrow 

HawK — are always with us. 
'rhey seem to hKe oar beacne^. 
meadows and open councry 
eiiouo-h to stay all year, ihe 
sparrow Hawk even ii.esNe^^^ 
York City sutncientiy to live 

*?:e Marsh Hawk is most 
graceful on the wing His 
tiight appears entirely eff oit 
tics even floating as tno 
dni'ting The wing stroKes 
are unhurried and deliberate. 
It\?mes\is flight will appear 

-brokm and rough as ^^ v|^J^ 
and tilts from side to siae 
while scanning the ground f oi 

/'usually the Marsh Ha^^k 
flies below the horizon at low 
levels when gauged by other 
Ss' flight. He is searchmg 
fir food - little scampering 

animals such as «^^^f ' .J'^^^' 
sQuirrels, shrew and frogs. 
S Marsh Hawk is not too 
good at catching his food 
liter he sees it. He loses the 
Scurrying creatures about as 
often as he holds one. They 
get under a bush, in a grass 
hummock, or under a piece of 

wood a little bit too fast for 
the hawk. 

Seldom do we see a Marsh 
Hawk resting silhouetted 
against the sky. He likes to 
stand on a mound of grass 
an old log, a large stone a 
small bush, and occasionally 
a fence rail — always some- 
thing low. The nests are care- 
fully concealed on the ground 
of marsh and meadowland, 
always extremely hard to 
find The male bird helps 
build the nest, helps incubate 
the eggs, and helps care for 
and feed the young. These 
are jobs which few male birds 
even know exist let alone hit 
a foot in doing. 

The Marsh Hawks have a 
peculiar stunt in courtship. 
The pair will be sailing around 
in small circles high up when 
suddenly the male folds his 



wings and drops headlong for 
a few hundred feet, levels oft 
and slants up to rejom the 
other bird, 'ihen he repeats 
the plunge and in wide spirals 
climbs back to the female. 
When the high level is re- 
gained the two sail arou.^ 
each other in widenmg cucies 
until they disappear. In tne 
wild plunge the boy must be 
proving to the girl vyh-i. a 
son-of-a-gun he can be. 

Everyone rather wonders 
how the Sparrow Hawk got 
its name for there is surely 
no resemblance between the 
hawk and the sparrow, in 
the winter the hawk may eat 
a sparrow or two but not 
enough to distinguish it as 
Secfilizihg in a sparrow 
menu I imagine the name. IS 
Stended to refer to^ the size 

of the hawk m re ation to 
other hawks for the Spainrow 

Contitmecl on pape l''^ 



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Great Blue Heron, as sketched 
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201 Bway., AMityville 4-0033 



186 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^oy's ^rip to J\(e<w york in 1897 



r 



cr 



■pARLY in the fall of 1891, 
'-^ the writer of this story, 
then a boy of twelve years of 
age, received an invitation 
from his uncle, Captain 
Charles W. Mallison, to visit 
the city of New York. 

To Captain John Griff ing, 
my second cousin, (who in 
later years was Captain of the 
Fishers Island making two 
round trips daily from the 
Island to New London) was 
given the position of piloting 
the Partland, a fishing 
steamer to New York, where 
a new boiler was to be in- 
stalled to replace the old one 
which did not pass inspection 
by the U. S. Government 
inspectors. 

Captain Griffing selected 
my Uncle Charlie to pilot the 
Amagansett, a sister ship, to 
New York, for the same pur- 
pose. The Captain had as his 
guests his sisters, Cora Grif- 
fing, and Lina Griffing who 
now resides in Colorado 
Springs. 

Both vessels carried skele- 
ton crews, with a cook on the 
Portland, We left Greenport 
at three A. M., as the condi- 
tion of the boilers would not 
permit of anything but a slow 
passage of over eleven hours. 
In later years the passenger 
steamer Shinnecock used to 
make the same run in seven 
to- eight hours. 

When we had cleared Plum 
Gut and were just off Hor- 
ton's Point, at the sound of 
four blasts from the Portland 
(which was the breakfast 
signal) we pulled up along- 
side and made fast with our 
lines. 

Oh boy, it was a sfood break- 
ff'st. While we were eatin<?, 
the cook took over in the pilot- 
house and kept both vessels 
steadily on their course. In 
this way no time was lost. 
After breakfast we ser)arated, 
the Portland taking the lead. 

The weather held good, so 
at ten o'clock we repeated the 
performance for dinner. I 



CapL Eugene S. Griffing 

have often wondered what 
would have happened had it 
been too rough to make these 
contacts for meals. This 
would have been a sad experi- 
ence for any healthy boy, 
especially this one. 

As we approached the East 
River we passed several ex- 
cursion barges loaded with 
holiday crowds, off for an 
afternoon outing at the ex- 
pense of Tammany Hall. A 
few years prior to this time a 
good five cent cigar used to 
do the trick of perpetuating 
Tammany in power, but at 
the time of this story it took 
a trip down the river and out 
on Long Island Sound with 
plenty to eat, and beer to 
drink, and dancing on the way 
home. 

My uncle said "Just look 
at those crowds leaving the 
city, it is too bad, for now the 
streets and buildings will be 
deserted and no one at home." 
I was disappointed for a while, 
until I saw the twinkle in his 
eye, as he said, "Well, maybe 
a few have stayed at home." 

When we came to Blackwell 
Island the Portland left the 
Island on the port hand while 
we left it on the starboard 



and a short race was on as to 
which steamer would beat the 
other. I will not say my 
opinion was correct in passing 
judgment, for you must re- 
member that I was the guest 
of my Uncle Charlie, and be- 
sides, he was quite a hero in 
my eyes, so this is how I saw 
it. The Amagansett won out; 
in fact we had to slow down 
and let the Portland pass us. 

Captain Griffing was the 
Senior Captain and had the 
docking instructions from the 
owners, so we took our posi- 
tion in his wake again, follow- 
ing him to a pier just south of 
the Brooklyn Bridge, where 
the boiler factory was located. 

In the evening we attended 
the service at the Jerry Mc- 
Auley Mission in Water 
Street. On the following day 
we visited the O'Neals De- 
partment Store which covered 
a whole city block. This was 
one of the attractions at that 
time. 

I saw crowds of folks every- 
where we went so, as Uncle 
Charlie had said, perhaps a 
few remained in the city who 
were not welcome on the ex- 
cursion barges. Republicans, 
no doubt. 

Captain Griffing and his 

Continued en page 189 




Execution Rock Lighthouse on L. L Sound, Established in 1850. 
(From watercolor by Cyril A. Lewis, Noted L. I. Artist). 



187 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. BARTH 

U4A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityviUe 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



E. CLAYTON SMITH 

Established 1913 

Jobber-Replacement Parts 

Tools - Equipment 

218-220 East Main St 

Babylon ^^'• 

Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
"except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 

. Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Populf 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losis 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



Whaleship William Tell 

I would very much miss any 
issue as there is always some 
mention of more or less personal 
interest to me, as a former Long 
Islander. Take for instance the ar- 
ticle in the August issue by Wilson 
Glover about the whaleship Wil- 
liam Tell. It is a subject dear to my 
heart due to the part my father 
played in making its harpoons and 
the other appliances used in the 
Long Island whaling industry. 

The article also mentioned hjtn- 
mett and Louis Austin who were 
classmates of mine in the Sag 
Harbor Union School, and Captain 
Nathan Hand who served as jani- 
tor of this same school— and more 
than one nickle's worth of peanuts 
he gave me for helping him sweep 
and dust Hannah Hedges' room. 
Howard N. Fordham 
905 Brown Street 
Santa Ana, California 

Editorial Note: Mr. Fordham, a 
native of Sag Harbor who became 
a schoolteacher on the west coast, 
has long been retired, but his mem- 
ory still keeps working. 



AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



OCTOBER, 1954 

Daminy Genealogy 

A complete history of the 
Dominy and allied families will be 
available about January 1, 1955. 
Representing a labor of more than 
twenty years, it covers the period 
from 1630 to the cresent day, as 
well as the three branches of the 
Dominy family, namely: the ori- 
ginal Long Island; the Beekman- 
town of Clinton County, N. \., 
and the Ohio, an offshoot of the 
two ment.cned. 

The comprehensive, illustrated 
volume, a unique achievement in 
photo-engraving and typography, 
will sell at $25 postpaid. No re- 
mittance need accompany orders 
at this time. 

Address: Newton J. Dominy, 
Historian, 29 South High, Dublin, 
Ohio. 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

N ASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 05 




Ketcham Data Wanted 

Would like name and branch of 
family of father of Zebulon Ket- 
cham of Amityville, born October 
21, 1782, died February 18, 1858. 
Zebulon's children and dates of 
birth were John, June 12, 1803; 
Nelson, June 23, 1805; Othene, 
March 16, 1807; Harvey, March 
18, 1809; Mary, March 12, 1811; 
Eliza, December 22, 1812; Charles, 
January 2,5, 18L5; David, May 20, 
1817; Charity, December 15, 1819; 
Mary 2d, April 1, 1825. Please 
address Alanson Ketcham, 884 
South Main Street, Farmingdale. 
Phone FArmingdale 2-0522. 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 

GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. 1. 



Nichols Genealogy 
We would like to purchase a 
Nichols (Nicolls) Genealogy. 
Please address the Long Island 
Forum, Amityville. 



r 



The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Golden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Rpligion Freedom 

ADMISSIOM FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors Flushing NY. 



STILL B. CALSO 

GASOLINE -FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 
Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15% Of* 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityviUe 4-1348 

Dixon Avenue Copiafue 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 



Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



188 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



(^ 



cA ^ery T^ersistent juitor 



eiNCE the late Miss Eu- 
•^ genie Smith's recent leg- 
acy oi: land and manorhouse 
for a town park, I expect 
many people have visited the 
old graveyard and perhaps 
have noticed the grave of a 
young wife who had died at 
the age of 17 years. 

Many years ago Col. Wil- 
liam (Tangier) Smith left the 
northern part of his Manor of 
St. George to his eldest son 
Henry and on that land above 
the shore on the Little Neck 
where I now live he directed 
that his body be laid to rest. 
There the Colonel lies with his 
wife beside him, and son 
Henry and his descendants 
nearby. William of course had 
his own burying ground near 
his home on the south side. 

Just a short time ago Mrs. 
Frederick Berg gave me a 
small notebook found among 
her father's papers to whom 
^fTk it had been given by some 
^ friend. On the envelope is 
written: "A little history 
about the Tangier Smiths I 
found in my scrapbook. You 
need not return." In this note- 
book mention is made of the 
young wife's grave and the 
following story which I will 
teU in my own words. 

It happened one day that a 
neighbor came to talk over 
with Judge William Smith, 
grandson of Tangier, the 
question of how much money 
it was wise to entrust to the 
hands of young ladies, adding 
that he intended to leave his 
daughters a thousand dollars 
each, which was a large sum 
in those days. 

Judge Smith did not ap- 
prove of such a large sum, 
sa-^dng "Women know not the 
value of money." One of the 
young people overheard the 
remark and it was soon noised 
around among the young 
ladies. Which is hkely why 
^.-j. Miss Betsev Woodhull, daugh- 
({(| ter of General Nathaniel 
Woodhull, is said to have re- 
fused Judge Smith's son John 



I^te Wheeler (§trong 

(later known as General 
John) when he came a court- 
ing. 

So John picked another — 
Lydia Fanning, daughter of 
Thomas and Lydia (Horton) 
Fanning of Occum-bum-ack 
(now Bellport) . 'She was only 
16 so was pretty sure to look 
up to her young husband. 
Alas! She died a year later 
and was buried in the family 
graveyard, as I have already 
mentioned, leaving an infant 
son William who became the 
late Miss Eugenie Smith's 
grandfather. 

Of course General John had 
to find another wife to rear 
his infant son and went again, 
so the tale goes, to seek Miss 
Betsey Woodhull's hand. 
Again she said no, after which 
she married Henry Nicoll of 
Mastic, and in 1785 General 
John married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Zephaniah Piatt, 
but she died soon thereafter. 

In 1792 the General re- 
turned to his first love, now 
the Widow Nicolls, and this 
time Betsey did not say him 
nay. They were wed in Oc- 
tober 1792 and she bore him 
two sons — E.pcbert Tangier 
and Charles Jeffrey, and a 
daughter Sarah Augusta. So 
the course of true love ran 
smooth at last, but I imagine 
Madame Betsey had her say 



in the household as well as 
with the persistent General 
John. 

(My thanks to Mr. Osbom 
Shaw for names and dates 
which added much to my note- 
book tale.) 



Boy's Trip 

Continued from page 187 

sisters decided to stay a few 
days for some shopping, while 
we took passage for home on 
the Shelter Island. 

We had cabin accommoda- 
tions, my berth being directly 
over my uncle's, so I slept 
soundly until we had docked 
in Greenport. All of my boy 
friends, who were not deaf, 
heard in detail about my won- 
derful trip to the great 
metropolis. 



The Tiebaut Store 

Inquiry was made in the April 
Forum of a photo showing a cor- 
ner store and beside it a low stone 
building bearing the name "North 
Side Bank 1888". There was a 
note written on the photo reading 
"store C. H. T. Sons— Ex W. Tie- 
bcut." 

Mrs. J. C. White of Sagaponack 
writes that Mr. C. H. Tiebout in 
the 1880's owned a hardware store 
on Grand street, Brooklyn, and 
used to drive through the island 
selling his wares. 

At that time Mrs. White's grand- 
father had a store and used to buy 
from Mr. Tiebout who usually 
spent the night at his home. 

Perhaps some other reader could 
add to this information. 




Another Setauket Home, The Old Parsonage. (Sketched by 
Carol Davis Petty from Photo). 



18 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



OCTOBER, 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 

Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

1G9 \V. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



I. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
to Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhcad 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

EaBtern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



LIRR Presidents 

Since I wrote the story of Oliver 
Charlick for the Forum I have 
picked up a few more items Re- 
reading Judge E B. Hmsdales 
History of the LIRR, I find that 
he was present, at the meeting ot 
Charlick and the South Side KK 
people when the latter requested 
permission to run their cars from 
Jamaica to the western terminal. 
Hinsdale described Charlick as 
"very ob urate." John Charlick, a 
younger brother of Oliver, died at 
Roslyn in 1879. He was a popular 
landlord there, so must have had 
a different disposition than Oliver. 
James H. Weeks, named in my 
story as an early LIRR president 
for three years, died at Yaphank, 
was born there, went to Oyster Bay 
at ten, married a Cold Spring Har- 
bor girl and eventually moved 
back to Yaphank. _ 

I spent two months in 1896 at 
Yaphank and attended St. An- 
drews Episcopal Church while 
working there. The Weeks family 
were very active in the affairs of 
that church at that time and no 
doubt the mainspring of it. My 
story calls him a Quaker but that 
may not mean anything, as some 
years ago when I was a boy the 
congregation of Emmanuel Episco- 
pal Church at Great River was 
composed mostly of Methodists. 
People in those days often at- 
tended the nearest church even if 
its creed wr.' not theirs. 

I read an old item the other day 
Continued next pagfe 

Farmirgdale 



Port Washington 



__ |!^. 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

21/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

laeurance Corporation 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 

Tel. POrt Washington T-ol24 



Commack 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 

Broadway waA Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insui'ance, MoriKag* 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steainship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hum. 176 



GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 

LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 

65 Hilton Avenue 

Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 

Insurance Mortgages 

JOHN T. PULIS 

101 Richmond Ave , Amityville 

AMityville 4-1489 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street EAstport 5-«l«4 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insuror 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWKLL 

Real Estate - Insuran. a 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4 0491 

Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

83 E.Main,BayShcr e 7-0 876 & 0877 
Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Cpntral Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 



Tel. BAbylon 6-0256 

W. E. MAGEE, Inc. 

APPRAISER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Brokers 

Babylon, N. T. 



l^U 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ __ 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 

Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 



Lake Ronkonkoma 



CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 



East Norwich 



RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0592 



■BEHJ.T.WLrr' 

Real Estate -Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond island. New York 
i Tel. 101 Selauket ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mcr. 

199-A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



that General Judson Kilpatrick 
was to deliver a lecture on Sher- 
man's March to the Sea at Port 
Jefferson in Dec. 1879. He was a 
noted cavalry leader of the Civil 
War. 

John Tooker, 

Babylon. 

Huntington Academy, 1793 

One of Long Island's several 
early academies was the one at 
lluntmgton, erected in 1793 from 
funds raised by some fifty local 
citizens. It was a two-story build- 
mg and stood on the hill now oc- 
cupied by the high school. It had a 
sufficiently large student body 
many from out-of-town, whose tui- 
tion fees kept it going until 1844 
seven years before the State's free 

wwt '^^iT .^^^ established 
which sounded the death knell for 
many such private institutions 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Wading River 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Miller Place 



ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 



Massap 



equa 



TOM ABBOTT 

Massapequa 

193 Ocean Avenue 

Tel. PYramid 8-1892 

BELLPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street BEllport 7-(H43 



Robert A. Dodd 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

RAYMOND A. SWEENEY 

66 Meriick Rd.. Copiasuc AMityville 4-1961 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



Q/j /X!ivof^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 



Garden City 



BpiLEY^HpSTONfO. 



I "7 <m'i--i<:j":m) 






^'Brooklyn and Long Island's Largest 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



Save at Southold 



Latest Dividend 



2\ 



Plus V4% extra per annum 

Bank by Mail 

WE PAY POSTAGE 
BOTH WAYS 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



191 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Prehistoric Long Island 

C'ontinued from page 184 

of heat, pressure and chemical 
action. This is found at the 
surface only on the western 
part of the island, in the vicin- 
ity of the East River. In other 
sections well borings have re- 
vealed its presence several 
hundred feet beneath the sur- 
face. 

Overlying- this formation of 
bedrock are many deposits of 
more recent origin, exhibiting 
a complexity of arrangement 
that often baffles our most 
experienced geologists. One of 
these, the Cretaceous forma- 
tion, was deposited in the 
form of sediment during the 
Mesozoic Era, which, as we 
have previously noted, was 
the next great geologic era 
after the Paleozoic. 

This was the age of the 
dmosaurs, those terrifying 
reptiles that specialized in 
bulk rather than brains. Dur- 
ing much of this era the clim- 



ate in our part of the world 
was warmer than it is today — 
a fact determined by the 
presence of the fossils of 
many forms of tropical vege- 
tation in the rocks formed 
from the sediments deposited 
in those days. 

During much of this era 
winds, rains and flowing 
streams attacked the eastern 
mountains until, after thou- 
sands of centuries, they re- 
duced them to rolling hills. 
Unfortunately most of the de- 
tails of this period of geologic 
history are lost, although one 
episode, near the very end, is 
known to have had an impor- 
tant bearing on the future of 
Long Island. This was another 
great disturbance of the 
earth's crust that resulted in 
the uplifting of a mountain 
cham extending from the Arc- 
tic to the Antarctic and in- 
cluding the Rockies of west- 
ern North America. This 
event also had renercussions 
in the east, where it caused a 



OCTOBER, 1954 

tilting of the land along the 
coast to such an extent that 
the region now occupied by 
Long Island became drowned 
under the off-shore waters. 
At the same time, this tilting 
of the Atlantic seaboard 
caused the core of t"he old, 
worn down Appalachians to be 
elevated again, although not 
r early to the extent that it 
was raised at the close of the 
Paleozoic Era. 

_ It is unwise to be too spe- 
cific in assigning exact pe- 
riods of time to the extent of 
past geologic eras. Yet, it 
seems reasonably safe to as- 
sume that from the time of 
the first uplifting of the Ap- 
palachians, near the close of 
the Paleozoic Era, to the sec- 
ond, lesser uplift of their old 
worn down core, toward the 
eid of the Mesozoic, was con- 
siderably more than 100-mil- 
hon years. 

Following this second bow- 
ing up of the eastern moun- 
tains another long period of 



MORTGAGE MONEY 

HOME OWNERS 



Mortgage Loans to refi 



inance existing mortgages 



or to purchase and/ or renovate h 



omes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD. N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



fS^ 



^ 



192 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



■^ 



rh 



erosion commenced, the re- 
sults of which are evide.i-t in 
the presence of conspicuous 
outcroppings of clays aid 
sandstones at Port Washing- 
tton, Glen Cove, Centre Is- 
land and other places along 
the north shore, and by the 
study of well borings else- 
where on the island. These are 
called Cretaceous deposits be- 
cause they were laid down as 
sediments during the last pe- 
riod of the Mesozoic Era, 
called the Cretaceous Period. 

During this period streams 
and rivers cut valleys through 
the mountains and carried 
enormous tons of earth ma- 
terial toward the east to de- 
posit it beneath the off-shore 
waters of the Atlantic, in the 
angle between the shores of 
Connecticut and New Jersey. 

It must be emphasized that 
this tilting of the land did not 
occur suddenly, but was a 
very gradual process, requir- 
ing thousands of centuries for 
its completion. During this 
time the sea crept slowly but 
steadily westward, to claim 
more and more of the region 
now occupied by Long Island 

In these days the land was 
clothed with a luxuriant 
growth of tropical vegetation, 
as indicated by the fossils of 
leaf forms, the woody 
branches of trees and other 
impressions found today in 
the outcroppings of Cretaceous 
sandstone on the island. This 
sandstone and clay is particu- 
larly evident at the foot of the 
bluffs on the east shore of 
Hempstead Harbor at Glen 
Cove. The author has found 
many fossil plant impressions 
in that area, where there are 
also specimens of lignite, a 
carbonized material of vege- 
table origin, which appears 
perfectly black and represents 
an intermediate form between 
peat and coal. 

In "The Book Of The Sea- 
shore," Howard J. Shannon 
describes the fossils of mag- 
nolia, fig and lotus leaves — 
tropical species that grew in 
this region during Cretaceous 
times. He tells us that primi- 
tive ancestral types of many 
of our modern trees were also 
present, including the maple 



and oak, as revealed by the 
fossil impressions of their 
leaves. 

The deposition of these 
sediments continued beyond 
the end of the Mesozoic Era 
and into the next era, called 
the Ceiiozoic. With the closing 
of the Mesozoic Era the dino- 
saurs vanished from the 
earth, leaving only fossil re- 
mains to tell the story of their 
reign of terror. 

While small, primitive mam- 



mals appeared during the 
Mesozoic Era, these were not 
destined to become really im- 
portant until during the Ceno- 
zoic. Birds, too, had made 
their debut and shyly com- 
peted with the flying reptiles. 
Early in the Cenozoic Era 
there was another uplifting of 
the land, and once more the 
region that would become 
Long Island was raised above 
the sea. But this time some- 
thing new had been added. 



Fort Tyler's Ruins Were Once on Gardiner's Island, but Action 

of the Sea Had Cut Off Site When this Photo was Taken by 

LeRoy Wilcox. 



Long Island's Greatest and Biggest Civic Event 

MINEOLA FAIR 

and 

Industrial Exposition 

at the 

ROOSEVELT RACEWAY 

WESTBURY, L. I., N. Y. 

Oct. 9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16 & 17, 1954 

with 

The George A. Hamid BIG CIRCUS 

Grand Stand Seats Included in Admission 

Adults 50c — Children UNDER 12 Years 25c 

The Miracles of Industry Blended with all the Picturesque 
Features of New York's Oldest County Fair 



193 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

The region was covered with 
tons of loosely consolidated 
material that had become dis- 
lodged from the core of the 
old Appalachians by the forces 
of subaerial erosion, and 
transported to the sea to be- 
come a new layer in the foun- 
dation of the future Long 
Island. 

The rivers that had carried 
these materials continued to 
flow through their old valleys 
which now extended across 
the recently exposed land. 
One of these drained in an 
easterly direction south of 
New England, and in time 
sculptured out a wide valley, 
to the south of which lay a 
ridge of low hills. These hills 
were to eventually become 
Long Island, and the broad 
river valley to the north would 
enclose the waters of Long Is- 
land Sound. That event, how- 
ever, was not to occur for 
many millions of years and in 
the meantime the glaciers of 
the great Ice Age were to play 
an important role in sculptur- 
mg the land into a form 
roughly similar to that which 
we recognize today. 

I hope to tell about this in 
the near future. 



Mrs. Hetzel's letter on Pat- 
chogue in 1812 (Sept. issue) men- 
tions the Mulford family. I recall 
Jeremiah Mulford whose tall tales 
were a feature of Patchogue back 
in the 1890's. Grace B. Owens, 
Newark. 



rgNiTH 



STOP In and let us 
demonstrate the 

NEW ZENITH / -^^ \ 
ROYAL \^tx) 

HEARING AID 

In Stock: Batteries for all 
Types of Aids 

PICKUP & BROWN 

GUILD OPTICIANS 
18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. Babylon 927 



L. I. Forums Wanted 

We are desirous of obtaining 
old Forums to fill special orders 
for collectors. We are in special 
need of copies from volume 13, 
year 1950. Please notify L. I. 
Forum if you can help us out. 



OCTOBEE, 1954 
Eighty, But My! 

Being an octogenarian certainly 
does not affect Dr. Wood's trench- 
ant pen as evidenced by "He Knew 
Peconic Mill" in September issue. 
R. P. G., Upton 



<^ 



iSanfe of amttpbtlle 

Incorporated 1891 

2% on Special Interest Accounts Compounded Quarterly 

Hours: 9.00 to3:00 except Saturdays 

Friday Evenings 6:00 to 8:00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Blomquist Laundry 

COMPLETE 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 

11 Cottage Row Glen Cove 

Tel. Glen Cove 4-1105 

Serving the Community 
Since 1900 



The New 

Glen Delicatessen 

Oldest on the North Shore 

High Class Delicatessen 
and Groceries 

24 Glen St., Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Alex Eugene Glen Cove 4-3176 



«^, 



RECORDS 

RCA -Columbia- Dec ca 

Wide Selection of 

POPULAR 

CLASSICAL 

CHILDREN'S 

in all the speeds 

AMITY RADIO 

For Quality Service on TV 

Onthe Triangle AMityville4-1177 



Village House 

Arts, Crafts, Americana 

Museum of the 
Oysterponds Historical 
Society at Orient, L. I. 

Open July 1 to October 31 

Tuesdays. Thursdays, 

Saturdays and Sundays 

2 to 5 P. M. Free Admission 



'The Long Island Indian" 

By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civiiizatoin 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Inlanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



194 



^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



OCTOBER, 1954 



^ 



# 



r 



Owl and Two Hawks 

Continued from Page 186 

Hawk is the smallest of the 
hawks, not much larger than 
a robin, whereas hawks are 
ge^.eralJy good size birds. 

The call of the Sparrow' 
Hawk leads to a second name 
which is rapidly becoming 
popular — Killy Hawk. The 
call is a clear unmistakable 
"killy - killy - killy". Another 
tell tale characteristic of the 
Sparrow Hawk is its hovering 
ability. While in flight, it will 
suddenly stop dead and with 
(jfreat wing flutterings stay 
in the same spot a minute or 
so. The bird is scrutinizing 
the ground searching for food 
during the hovering. It will 
fly along about a hundred feet 
and hover again. This action 
is distinctive with the Spar- 
row Hawk. The wings are 
long, pointed and crescent 
shaped. The tail is perhaps a 
bit long, certainly nothing 
stubby. 

The Sparrow Hawk is a 
trusting bird in that it is 
without suspicion of observ- 
ers. It permits people to come 
real close before flying away. 
This is due to the places it 
takes for perches, perhaps — 
the topmost twig of a tree, 
top of a telephone pole, te'e- 
phone and electric wires — 
places easy to leave in a 
hurry. When alighting, the 
Sparrow Hawk is likely to 
pump its tail several times 
ii^ve a Phoebe, and often folds 
and refolds its wings with 
painstaking care and consid- 
eration. 

A Sriarrow Hawk eats what- 
ever" is available at the time, 
f ^~d is not at all choosy. The 
diet differs with the season. 
In summer it is insects like 
beetles, crickets and grass- 
borspers. The menu shifts to 
mice and small rodents in the 
fall. If enough mice are 
around in winter the hawk is 



FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 
least 50 stories on island history. 
Sent postpaid for $1.50. Address 
L. I. FORUM, AMITYVILLE 



very happy to concentrate on 
them; otherwise it broadens 
out to small birds such as 
sparrows, starlings, juncoes, 
chickadees and woodpeckers. 
The Marsh Hawk aiii tha 



Sparrow Hawk are always 
active around our beaches 
and meadows, and the Snowy 
Owl enlivened the oceajofroxi*- 
during tj^e,.ic^-'^«^ths of 




Young Screech Owls. (Photo by Noted L. I. Naturalist, Edwin 
Way Teale). 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 

BRENTWOOD BAY SHORE 

Suffolk €f 4tli Main 6- Bay Shore Av. 

Phone BR 3-A5 1 I Phone BA 7-7 1 00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



The Historical Sketch 
of The Incorporated Village of 

Westhampton Beach 

by Beatrice G. Rogers, Village Historian 

is still available from 

MRS. E. H. ROGERS, SR. 
Westhampton Beach, N. Y. 

An Illustrated Volume in Limited Edition $3.00 Postpaid 



195 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

College Degree Not Necessary In 
Fashion Says Ethel Traphagen 

"Many have attained successful, 
sau^iyi^^g,. as well as happy careers 
m their chosen^phJ„n fields with- 
out attending college— or even 
finishing high school," says EtheL 
Traphagen, founder and^-^rrector 
^.^*he TrapEagen School of 
Fashion, at 1680 Broadway (52d 
St.) New York. "In these days of 
the high cost of living, it is im- 
portant for many to specialize and 
obtain properly planned maximum 
instruction in minimum t^me " 

As examples Miss Traphagen 
cites but a few of the many Trap- 
hagen students achieving quick 
success. Dorothy Ventre, designer 
for Jerry Coat Co., is the only 
feminine member of the Designers 
Oruild who creates coats and suits, 
hhe attended Traphagen, '48 to '50 
started work, continued evening 
classes and has now been designing 
^.'" //^e years. Theresa Scicluna, 
Highlander Coats' designer, is still 
taking evening art classes at Trap- 
te''' i"?«"while, her designs are 
featured m leading magazines. 

Annette Canepa at 23 heads her 
own business, St. Paul OrSals 
selling her sportswear to stores 



Autumn Anniversaries 

IN CHINA 

M.nton Bone, Spode, Doulton 

Syracuse, Lenox 

IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Fosloria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 



253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 




Over 100 Years 

of 

DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 




AMITYVILLE ROSLYN 

WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 



all over the country. Two 1954 
graduates are Carol Kent, sports- 
wear designer for Artbro, Inc.; 
and Mary Fishwick of Lee Kaplan 
Sportswear who gave up an excel- 
lent business position to start all 
oyer because she wanted more crea- 
tive work. A.uictts) Bigraa now 21 
Completed her two year course this 
spring and has started her career 
m the famous house of Maurice 
Rentner as sketcher and assistant 
to designer Fred Wilkens, another 
fcrmer Traphagenite. 



OCTOBER, 1954 

Enrollments in the Art Depart- 
ment for courses in Costume De- 
sign and Illustration and in In- 
terior Decoration and Window Dis- 
play are being accepted through- 
out October at Traphagen School. 
Clothing Construction Classes may 
be entered at any time throughout 
the year since instruction is indi- 
vidual in these subjects— draping: 
and design, dressmaking, pattern- 
""^J'^u^.?"'' drafting. Day classes 
and both evening and Saturday- 
courses are scheduled. 



^ 




# 




COLUMBIA SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

93-32 JAMAICA AVENUE 
WOODHAVEN 21, N. Y. 

VIRGINIA 7-7041 

FOREST HILLS OFFICE 

15 Station Square - at Forest Hills Inn 



C HARTEF ED 1869 



SAVINGS JCCOUNTS 
MORTGAGE LOANS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

Safely of your Savings insured up to S 10,000 



1% 



OCTOBER, 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



r 



Al Smith and Derby 

The photo by Hal B. Fullerton 
taken in 1900 and showing Shinne- 
cock Canal also shows a derby- 
topped man on the bulkhead who, 
I'll bet a new one, was none other 
than the late Alfred E. Smith of 
brown derby fame who spent many 
a summer's day fishing in the 
canal back in those days when he 
was a frequent guest at Tammany 
Leader Charles F. Murphy's Hamp- 
ton Bays (then Good Ground) 
summer home. 

Ford H. Clancy 

Jamaica 



Forum Articles Cited 

In the list of outstanding his- 
torical articles published through- 
out the State during the second 
quarter of 1954, compiled by 
James Taylor Dunn, Librarian of 
the State Historical Association at 
Cooperstown, appear the following 
from the Long Island Forum: 

Clinton Academy, East Hamp- 
ton, by Mary E. Bell. 

Peconic's Old Gristmill, by Clar- 
ence Russell Comes. 

Corchaug Indian Fort, by Drs. 
John C. Huden and Arthur F. Tut- 
hilL 

General Emory Upton, by Dr. 
Charles A. Huguenin. 

Historic Dosoris, Glen Cove, by 
Carl Kohler. 

Paul Cuffee at Wading River, by 
Evelyn Rowley Meier. 

Glorious Fourth in 1809, and An 
Old Slave's Fiddle, by Kate 
Wheeler Strong. 

General Nathaniel Woodhull's 
Death, and Melancton Smith — 
Naval Hero, by John Tooker. 

Bunkers and Other Fish, and 
Southold's Versatile Physician, by 
Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood. 



"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
ing and all other services 

Phone Nearest Office 

PAtchoKUG 3-2100 HUntington 4-2304 
RIverhead 8-2943 HEmpstead 2-3966 
BAbylon 6-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
Bfillport 7-0604 STony Brook 7-0917 

Robert Troup 
Vice-President 



F. Kenneth Harder 
President 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merriclc and County Line Rosds 

Tel. AMityville 4-0909-4-091* 



State University of New York 

Long Island Agricultural and 
Technical Institute 

Farming-dale, L. I., New York 



Registration 

EVENINGS 

September 13 - 14 - 15 

7 - 9:30 P.M. 

MORNING 

September 18 

9:00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon 



Fall Term 

EVENING 
COURSES 

Classes begin week 
October 4th. 1954 



Courses In: 



Aeronautical Technology 

Agricultural Courses 

Air Conditioning, Heating, 

& Refrigeration 
Art Courses 

Automotive Technology 
Business Courses 



Chemistry and Physics 
Construction Technology 
Electrical Technology 
Horticultural Courses 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Technology 



Courses of General Interest 

IN ADDITION — many special courses to fill the 
needs of Agriculture and Industry 

Telephone or Wriie to: 
Director of Evening and Extension Division 

520 Conklin Street Farmingdale, New York 

FArmingdale 2-2506 



J. C. DODGE & SON, Inc. 

Glen Cove's Oldest Furniture House 

Established in 1835 when Andrew Jackson was President. 
99 GLEN STREET GLen Cove 4-0242 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



197 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Benjamin F. Thompson 

Your picture of Silas Wood, 
"Long Island's First Historian" in 
the September issue, prompts this 
reader to ask if you could run a 
picture of the later historian Ben- 
jamin F. Thompson. Both of these 
historians of the 1800's were, I 
understand, members of the New 
York State Bar and both, like the 
present day compiler of Bailey's 
History, served in the State 
Assembly. 

Franklin P. Dawson 

East Meadow 

Editorial comment: Wood also 
was Congressman and Thompson 
was both a lawyer and a medical 
doctor. 



OCTOBER, igS't 



As a Birthday Gift 

More and more readers of the 
Forum are finding a yearly sub- 
scription, at $2 a year, a well ap- 
preciated birthday gift for some 
relative or other friend. The 
Foruni attends to notifying the 
recipient of the subscription on a 
suitable birthday card with the 
giver's complments. 



Attic Treasure 

Enjoyed reading the letter in 
September issue entitled "Another 
Attic Treasure" by Wilbur F. 
Howell. Maybe it will inspire some 
others of us to do a little hunting 
m the old trunks and seachests 
slumbering beneath the eaves, and 
to tell the Forum what we fiud. 
(Mrs.) Harriet Reaves 

Far Rockaway 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



Telephone AMityville 4-2126 



FIRESTONE 

Motor Sales, Inc. 

De Soto Plymouth Austin 

Sales and Service 



Martin Firestone Merrick Road 
Just West of Amityville 





# 



ixA 



*. ^ 



Benjamin F. Thompson, Doctor, Lawyer and Historian (From 
pencil sketch made by Shepard A. Mount in 1838). 



DRY CLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



<JniitlfviMeJkMi^ 



RUG CLEANING 



AMITYVILLE 4-3200 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

AMITYVILLE BATTERY & IGNITION SERVICE, Inc. 

Broadway and Avon Place Phones 1174 - 20W Amitrville 



Cfje 1801 House 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 

The naming of Babylon, first called Huntington South, is 

credited to Nat Conklin who in 1803 built the house which now 

stands on the west side of Deer Park Avenue, and is occupied 

by the Red Cross. 



# 



198 



^- 



r 



y 




i > ' 




'S^ 





%P wW 





<.<«*„ '■•■*' 



You Can : You Can 

BUY 

on automatic 

lA! 

WATER HEATER 

for as litile as ' 












for as little as 

$200 



th 



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a mon 



wilh option to buy any time 
within 35 montlis 







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on your old equipment 

*30 6allon Size 



VV" 



I'/i^ 



JOIN THE SWING TO CAREFREE, ECONOMICAL 

AUTOMATIC 6AS WATER HEATING 

Get details at our nearest office without cost or obligation. 

LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 



For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally locared on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

anil oiher functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Ph'^n^s Patchogue 1234 and SflO 



Wining and Dining 

ill tile Continental Tradition, 
suptrl), leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merrick Rd. Amityville 
Phone AMityville 4-9768 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 



STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

TeU. 248 : Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1800 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farmingdale 



The Culluloo Monument 

Always enjoy reading the Forum 
and naturally the July issue 
pleased me because of the article 
and photograph of our Woods- 
burgh Culluloo monument. It is 
my personal opinion that this pho- 
tograph of the monument was 
taken in its original location on 
the northeast corner of Broadway 
and Linden street, im, Woodmere, 
since it does not show a pedestal. 
It was reiedieated at its present 
location en a small triangle in the 
center of Wood lane, a block off 
Broadway to the south in the in- 
corporated village Woodsburgh, 
in. 1910 or thereabouts by the 
famous Sioux Indian, Mr. Charles 
Eastman. 

Robert B. Kullman, 
Historian, Woodsburgh. 



Liked Canal Story 

That was an informative article 
on the building of the Shinnecock 
Canal, by Mr. John Sutter. I am 
wondering if he is Police Chief 
John Sutter of Hampton Bays, 
courteous real estate broker and 
editor of the same attractive com- 
munity. If so, he is a former per- 
former on the legitimate stage and 
one of Hampton Bays' leading civic 
workers. 

(Mrs.) Cora P. Sheid 
Providence, R. I. 

Editorial reply: Yes to every 
question. 



Congratulations, Mr. Coles 

Through your office I wish to 
send my congratulations to Author 
Robert R. Coles for his well told 
account of "A Nassau County 
Landmark" in the September nun^- 
ber. I had frequently wondered as 
to the story behind that landmark 
in tiie City of Glen Cove. 

F. S. Hartung 
Long Island City 



Here's hoping Miss Strong's his- 
toric tales remain a regular part 
of the Forum. Elizabeth K. West- 
inghouse, New London, Ct. 



The Forum is a grand regional 
and historical publication. (Miss) 
Anne Rolicheck, East Islip. 



We all enjoy the Forum so 
much. Mrs. David McCutcheon, 
East Moriches. 



''Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauli Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Kabylon 4X0 



Enroute to the Hamptons 
on Montauk Highway 

1151! CAS A BASSOS 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon ar d Dinner 

Westhampion 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 



HARBOR LIGHT 
RESTAURANT 

EXCELLENT CUISINE 
Catering to Small Parties 

M SWANSON 

AMityville 4-5868 and 4-9704 

Dawes Avenue 

and George Brown Plaza 

Amityville (East) 



PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amityville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort of 

^he hospitality Shoppe 

where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 Amityville, L. I. 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT"