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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 



p" ; ■■/" 'i""X\f 




Capt. John Underbill Monument, Mill Neck, Oyster Bay 
(Story on Page 207) 





TABLE of CONTENTS 




HURRICANES I HAVE KNOWN 


Dorothy Quick 


SOME MATINECOCK PLACE-NAMES 


Robert R. Coles 


TALES OF ST. GEORGE'S MANOR 


Kate Wheeler Strong 


POET OF PAUMANOK 


William Wrigg 


LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 




■ 



NOVEMBER 1954 



52.00 a year by Mailj Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 11 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Mirfdle Country Rd., Eaatport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



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Farmingdale 
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Dry Cleaning - Laundering 
Rug Cleaning 

Braad Hollunr Koad FarmincdaU 

Phone FArmingcdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

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Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-J028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 
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FURNITURE 
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Tel. 154 



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SUNRISE 

Oiviiion Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 

178 



THE 

Long Island 

fcCUM 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as iecond-clasa matter May H, 1947. at the 
post office at Amityville. New York, under the Act of 
March J. 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Robert R. Coles 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Congratulations, Dr. Wood 

Among the congratulatory mes- 
sages received by our senior con- 
tributing editor Dr. Clarence Ash- 
ton Wood on the anniversary of 
his birth at Setauket, L. I., Sep- 
tember 16, 1873, was the follow- 
ing: 

"The Oysterponds Historical So- 
ciety (of Orient, L. I.) tenders its 
felicitations on the occasion of 
your 81st anniversary and congrat- 
ulates you upon arriving on this 
day in such strong physical and 
mental health. This organization 
recognizes the valuable contribu- 
tion you have made to posterity in 
recording through the columns of 




Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

the Long Island Forum your many 
articles on People and Events of 
the Past." 

As honor guest for thi? occasion 
at his winter home, Florallure, 
Brooktondale, N. Y. Dr. Wood en- 
tertained Col. Thatcher Taylor 
Payne Luquer of Rockmeadow. 
Bedford Fills, N. Y., the last sur- 
viving relative of John Howard 
Payne, author of "Home, Sweet 
Continued on page 208 



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Freeport 

86 E. Sunriie Highway Tel. 8-1212 

Rug and Furniture Cleaning 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 
Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jefferson 555 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 108S Islip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoelu Aecaptad by Mall 

First National Bank of Islip 

Member Fed. Depoeit Insurance Cjrp. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapcqua (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

181 Haple St. Phone 31 ISLIP. L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 

WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hirs 

AMityville 4-0225 

Near Amityville Depot 



202 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 






urncanes 



I oCave K 



nown 



/^ 



IF these hurricanes keep up 
on Long Island and con- 
tinue to take toll of our lovely 
trees we had better make up 
our minds to plant palms and 
other tropical trees that grow 
quickly. 

I have now been through 
five hurricanes. In 1938 we 
were marooned in our East 
Hampton house, "Mostly 
Dune" with no way of getting 
out, but of that experience I 
have written fully for these 
pages. In the one that fol- 
lowed we were ordered out bv 
the Coast Guard. That time I 
had house guests, a^d by the 
time they were put on the 
train with the maids and the 
baggao-e checked we were late 
in getting off, and drove up to 
New York through the worst 
of it. The road by LaGuardia 
Airport was under water, and 
so wo had to go through 
Long Island City. By the 
time we got to Manhattan I 
didn't even recognize Park 
Avenue. Even the do«rs were 
exhausted and the bird hadn't 
a peep left in him. 

But tired as I was I recog- 
nized the magnificence of my 
chauffeur's driving. I be'^eve 
it was a major miracle in view 
of the hundreds of cars we 
saw parked and deserted on 
the sides of the road. 

It was good to get home to 
the safety of heavy windows 
and steel buildings, but later 
when I returned to "Mostly 
Dune" it was so beautiful that 
one forgot the troubles that 
had preceded our leaving. 
This time the hurricane hit 
only the land side and avoided 
the shore. 

Not so the next one, wh'ch 
came whipping along in 1953. 
That one started at night, 
and it felt as though some 
prehistoric monster had the 
house in its jaws and was 
shaking it. 

No one could sleep so we 
gathered in my room and 
talked. Each time the bouse 
rejected the advances of the 



Dorothy ^ick 

waves and quivered so tre- 
mendously my poodle cried 
out and clung closer to me. 
When daylight came and we 
could see the ocean we knew 
we were in serious trouble. 
It was a "sweeping" sea — 
running sideways like a river 
in full flood, and it was even 
with our p'orch, that sundeck 
where I had spent much time 
on a chaise longue watching 
an ocean a full city block 
away. 

Now that selfsame distant 
ocean was battering our doors, 
and as it receded taking great 
portions of our dune with it. 
They looked like giant powder 
puffs floating by with the 



Editor's Note 

The Forum was almost born in 
a hurricane. Before its first year 
ended came the infamous hurri- 
cane of September 21, 1938. But 
it brought us a blessing. We in- 
duced Miss Dorothy Quick, nation- 
ally known novelist and poetess 
who had barely lived through the 
holocaust at her country home at 
East Hampton, to describe the 
experience. The story is still re- 
called by our earlier readers as the 
high spot in The Forum's first 
year of publication. 

Now Miss Quick tells of subse- 
quent hurricanes from first hand 
observations made at what might 
be called the front line of battle. 
It is not, only another classic but a 
chapter of island history that will 
have lasting value. 

dune grass still shining silver 
upon them, tremendous tufts 




Dorothy Quick, Poet and Author 



203 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

going to sea, leaving our 
beach naked and forlorn. 

This time we called the 
Coast Guard at Montauk and 
he said it wouldn't be high 
tide for three hours yet, and 
we'd better leave. Down came 
the bags and once again we 
went through the agony of 
deciding what to take. Our 
choice was limited so we only 
had four bags for three 
people. I took what little 
jewelry I had, some sweaters 
I was sure were irreplacable, 
a few blouses about which I 
felt likewise, my work and 
one or two dresses. We also 
had those wonderful Italian 
straw baskets which we filled 
to the brim. 

The 1770 House, our fine 
local inn, took us in, and tlie 
maids found refuge in a near- 
by boarding house. When I 
left "Mostly Dune" I put it 
in the Lord's care with a 
prayer that it would still be 
there for me to return to. At 
that moment it didn't look as 
though it would be — but it 
was! 

The next morring Lincoln, 
the chauffeur I've been prais- 
ing, arrived early with the 
car, said it was safe to go 
back. So return we did to a 
"Mostly Dune" strangely un- 
disturbed, not even a window 
broken, all my clothes hang- 
ing undisturbed in the closets. 
But there was only three feet 
of lawn left in front of the 
house, with a sheer drop of 
about forty feet to the beach 
below which seemed much 
lower, and the ocean, calm 
and beautiful, was farther 
away than ever. It was hard 
to think that it had been that 
broiling, sweeping, demented 
thing twenty-four hours ago. 
I was grateful to be back and 
certainly hoped I'd been 
through my last hurricane. 

We set about rebuilding the 
dune, — snow fence, brush, 
tires, more snow fence, then 
sand thrown up and the dune 
grass planted — a most expen- 
sive job, but anything to save 
the house I love so much. 

When I came down this 
summer the new dune looked 
wonderful. I had a thirteen 



NOVEMBER 1954 



Continued on page 206 



Bank and Borrow 



AT 



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BAY SHORE 



OF 



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Bethpage, Long Island, N. Y. 



Designers and Manufacturers of the 



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WILLIAM A. NICHOLSON 
Vice President 



JOHN E. NICHOLSON 
President 



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Established 1849 
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Difficult commissions accepted to correct wall and roof 
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426 East 11 0th Street 

New York City 

LEhigh 4-2076 



Cedar Swamp Road 
Brookville, L. I, 
BRookville 5-0020 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y. 



-^■' 



204 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



i oet of i aumanok 



AFTER reading the first 
edition of Walt Whit- 
man's "Leaves of Grass," 
Emerson is reported to have 
commented, "the book must 
have had a long foreground 
somewhere for such a start." 
An investigation into this 
"long foreground" leads one 
back to Whitman's early life 
on Long Island, and the count- 
less sights, sounds ard experi- 
ences that became part of his 
very being: "The early lilacs 
became part of this child, And 
grass and white and red 
morning-glories, and white 
and red clover, and the song 
of the phoebe-bird." 

Paumanok, the Indian 
name for Long Island which 
Whitman adopted at an early 
age, meant much more to the 
poet than mere geography. It 
was for him a place to ramble, 
to teach in country schools 
and to experiment with coun- 
try journalism; later it be- 
came a symbolic word that 
stood for the happy years of 
his childhood and young man- 
hood; but most of all it was 
the nucleus around which his 
greatest work, "Leaves of 
Grass," took shape. 

Born on May 31, 1819, in 
West Hills, a few miles south 
of Huntington village, Walt 
Whitman's early years were 
spent amid surroundings that 
made a lasting imprint on his 
sensitive mind. One can al- 
most visualize him as a small 
boy, scampering across the 
rolling meadows to the 
wooded summits of West 
Hills. It was here that he first 
became acquainted with the 
early lilacs and the song of 
the phoebe-bird. 

Closely associated with 
these early childhood experi- 
ences at West Hills were the 
frequent visits to his mater- 
nal grandparents', the Van 
Velsors near Cold Spring 
Harbor. After a span of al- 
most fifty years. Whitman 
was able to recall with re- 
markable clarity, "The ramb- 



William Wrigg 

Editor's Note 

The author is chairman of the 
Department of Social Studies, of 
the Elmont Public Schools, Nassau 
County. He is recagnized in the 
county's school system as an 
authority on the life and works of 
Huntington town's world famous 
native poet, having made a special 
study of the subject for a number 
of years. 

ling gray, shingle-sided house, 
the vast kitchen and ample 
fireplace and sitting room ad- 
joining, my grandmother 
Amy's sweet old face in her 
Quaker cap and my grand- 
father, the Major, red-faced, 
jovial, with a sonorous voice 
and accompanying physiog- 
nomy." Nor did the country- 
side about Cold Spring Har- 
bor, with its picturesque 
inlets and coves, make any 
less impression on the small 
boy than the environs of his 
birthplace : 

"The village on the high- 
land seen from afar at sun- 
set .. . The schooner nearby 
sleepily dropping down the 
tide, the little boat slack- 
tow'd astern . . . These be- 
came part of the child." 
The Whitman family moved 



to Brooklyn in 1823, where 
Walt attended public school 
for a few short years. His 
formal education was abrupt- 
ly ended at the age of twelve, 
and during the years that 
immediately followed he 
worked as a printer's devil in 
several Brooklyn printshops. 
From what can be learned of 
these years, it would appear 
that he held a job just long 
enough to save money for 
Paumanok vacations. One bio- 
grapher, writing about this 
period of the poet's life, com- 
plains that "it is hard to keep 
one's finger on this youth be- 
cause he is always skipping 
off from a job, or between, 
jobs, to rural Long Island." 

By 1836, this nostalgia for 
Paumanok had gotten the 
better of him, and he secured 
a teaching position in a coun- 
try school just west of Baby- 
lon. He moved about a great 
deal during the next three 
years, teaching school in no 
less than seven Long Island 
communities. 

It was the long spaces be- 
tween school terms that af- 
forded him the opportunity 
to indulge in the favorite pas- 
time of "exploring" eastern 

Continued on page 215 




Birthplace of Walt Whitman, West Hills, Huntington, With 
Roadside Well (1904 Photo by Hal B. Fullerton) 



205 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Hurricanes 

Continued from page 204 

foot lawn, and a gently slop- 
ing dune, upon which dune 
grass waved benignly, though 
looking somewhat the worse 
for the lack of rain. How- 
ever, after the horror of last 
fall and the steep cliff that 
had been there when I left, 
this looked magnificent. I was 
quite content until hurricane 
Carol made her appearance. 
The only good thing I can say 
about Carol was she came in 
the daytime. 

Once again I stood in the 
window and watched the dune 
go — again the sweeping sea 
swept away all the work that 
had been done. Great sheets 
of water blew across the 
house and my property, burn- 
ing my trees. And this time 
there were leaks, for a good 
number of shingles as well as 
the rido-epole and a part of 
the roof had gone in the fir<5t 
blow and the rain came in 'til 
we had several feet of water 
in the kitchen, pantry and 
cellar, not to mention various 
other leaks. 

Tt was a hard experience, 
difficult to face, looking out 
at the dune that wasn't there 
—all the srow fence gone and 
the lovely terrace a thing of 
the past, about four feet of 
lawn left, sa'v-toothed and 
ragged, and then the news 
that again we must leave as 
even though the worst of 
Carol was over the tides that 
night would be very hio-h and 
might undermine the house. 
Once again we Dacked — 
only the cherished irrep'ac- 
able things, and once ao-ain 
we left and t^>e 1770 House 
took us in. This time the 
poodles were at the vet's so 
we left them there, knov/ing 
they'd be safe. My cook took 
the bird and fish with her. By 
this time T was quite profi- 
cient at knowing ^vhat to 
pack, but it is difficult to 
leave all your best clothes 
and things you have accumu- 
lated for years. The eleuhant 
from Persia, for instance, 
and the saucy one from the 
Austrian Tyrol, not to men- 
tion the lovely furniture and 



NOVEMBER 1954 



pictures that would be impos- 
sible to replace. 

It was a heart-breaking 
business but we did it and set 
off. Once again in the morn- 
ing Lincoln came for us. Once 
again Mostly Dune was safe 
in the sunlight, though slight- 
ly battered. Again we were 
on a steep cliff, the new steps 
down to the beach were gone, 
the awnings and their sup- 
ports rent and torn, but it was 
the loss of our dune that af- 
fected us the most — twice in 
less than ten months seemed 
hard to bear. 

Carol had been no lady. 
All through town was a 
shambles. No matter what 
road one took there were fal- 
len trees and broken branches. 

We started on the dune 
again — another snow fenco 
and brush, brush, brush, until 
it seemed as though a whole 
forest was supporting what 
was left of the dune. Gradu- 
ally we unpacked and were 
just about back to normal 
when Edna announced she 
was on her way. 

We decided to sit Edna out. 
After all, the house ha-^ sur- 
vi'-'ed four hurricanes. I had 
faitTi in it. We put on some 
storm doors and windows in 
strategic spots and bedded 
down. 

A friend arrived in the 
morning to invite us to her 
house in case we should have 
to leave, which I thorght one 
of the nicest things that had 
ever happened to me. But I 
didn't want to take advantage 
of her good nature. After all, 
there were three of us. For- 
tunately the dogs were again 
at the vet's. We were glad 
of that as being far inland 
they were in no danger. 

At eiffht o'clock we were 
still decided to sit it out. 
After all, Edna wasn't due 'til 
morning, but someone from 
the Fire Department arrived 
and said we had to go. All 
coast houses were being evac- 
uated. 

So the nightmare repeated 
ttself. The hasty packing, 
the leaving of thino-s most 
dear. Again the Italian bas- 
kets were the greatest help. 

Continued on page 213 



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206 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Some (fW.atinecoc\ Tloce- Names 



m 



THERE is something about 
Long Island's ancient 
place-names that appeals to 
one's sense of propriety. They 
are as much part of the land 
as its rolling hills and wea- 
ther-beaten oaks, and we 
view them today as a welcome 
heritage from its historic 
past. 

This is particularly true of 
many of those encountered on 
the north shore between Glen 
Cove and Oyster Bay ; one of 
the Quaintest and most his- 
torically interesting sections 
of Nassau County. 

In colonial times much of 
this region was called Matine- 
cock, a name that applies to 
only a small part of it today. 
It is a descriptive term, de- 
rived from the Indian chief- 
taincy that once occupied the 
lard, and is said to mean "the 
hill country," or "land that 
overlooks". All familiar Avith 
the topogranhy of the region 
will agree that this ram.e is 
perfectly suited. At the same 
time, it is most anpropriate 
that the name of those origi- 
nal lords of the soil be perpet- 
uated, since they played a 
very important role in ^*ts 
early colonial history and the 
remains of their ancient canin 
and village sites are still 
abundantly evident. 

It was at old MatiTie"ock 
that the famous Indian 
fighter. Captain John Urder- 
hill, spent the sunset of his 
life and in those mellow years 
became their friend: often 
interceding for them in their 
dealings with the settlers. 
His grave in the TTr^derhill 
cemeterv. at Mill Neck, is 
marked by a tall obelisk, at 
t^e base of which are metal 
nlaques denicting scenes from 
his colorful career. 

Many who use these old 
place-names today are com- 
pletely unfamiliar with their 
meaning and in some in- 
stances even the local histori- 
an finds it difficult to trace 
their origin witTi certainty. 



Robert R, Coles 

This is the case with the name 
of Factory Pond Road, a pic- 
turesque, wooded lane that 
winds along the slope west of 
Mill Neck Bay and connects 
Feeks Lane with the Locust 
Va'ley-Bayville Road. 

There is a stream passing 
under the Factory Pond Road 
a short distance nortli of the 
old Underbill cemetery, that 
was formerly known as Corn 
Creek. About the year 1820 
this w?s dammed on the west 
side of the road to provide 
water power for a woolen 




Capt. John Underbill 

factory, and the pond that 
resulted was called Factory 
Pond, which name was ap- 
plied to the road. Although 
the factory has long since dis- 
appeared, the pond remains 
and is ore of the most attrac- 
tive spots in the vicinity. 

Nearly everyone is familiar 
today with the name of Saga- 
more Hill, the home of the 
late President Theodore Roose- 
velt, at Cove Neck. Many 
would be surprised, however, 
to learn that the hill east of 



the railroad station at Mill 
Neck was called Sagamore 
Hill many years before "Ted- 
dy" named his home. This is 
clearly indicated on a map in 
Vol. I of the Oyster Bay Town 
Records, as are many other 
place-names around old Mat- 
inecock. 

The region once known as 
Matinecock included within 
its bounds all that land now 
comprising the Village of 
Locust Valley. This commun- 
ity had previously been called 
Buckram, a name of disputed 
origin. 

In a paper read before the 
Matinecock Neighborhood As- 
sociation, in 1910, Mr. George 
W. Cocks made the following 
obse'*'vation: 

"Buckram as a designation 
of the territory now known as 
Locust Valley, first appears 
of record in 1730 — and per- 
sisted until 1856, in which 
year a neighborhood meeting 
called for the nurpose, 
changed the name of the Post 
Office to Locust Valley. . . 
Not haviror learned of any 
more credible theory of the 
oT-io-in of the use of the name 
Bnckram in this localitv I 
will venture to suggest that 
it was a modification of 
'Buckerham', a town in the 
County of Norfolk, Ensrland, 
where it is shown in Blome- 
field's Hi<5torv that sundry 
members of the Cock familv 
hpid landed estates and offi- 
cial positions in the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. 
Now about 1730 there were 
resident in this vicinity Heze- 
kiah Cock — and John Cock 

and they being grar»dsons 

of our immio-rant a^c*^stor, 
Jam-es Cock, it is within the 
bounds of probability that 
^-hey may bave used the name 
in remembrance of an ancest- 
ral home in Old Ensrland." 

A few years later Halstead 
H. Frost mentioned a very 
different origin for the name 
in an editorial that appeared 

Continued From Page ^18 

207 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



NOVEMBER 1954 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. BARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



E. CLAYTON SMITH 

Established 1913 

Jobber-Replacement Parts 

Tools - Equipment 

218-220 East Main St. 

Babylon Tel. 6-0551 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



€t)an0 

AMITYVILLE DAIRY. INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



STILL B. CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 

Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15 9^ Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dix«n Avenue Copia^ue 



Congratulations 

Continued from Page 202 

Home". Col. Luquer, himself in his 
89th year, has been official his- 
torian of the town of Bedford, 
president of the Bedford Historical 
Society and president, of the West- 
chester County Historical Society. 

Col. Luquer, on this occasion, 
presented Dr. Wood with two rare 
books in appreciation of the Doc- 
tor's having conclusively proved 
through the columns of the Forum 
that John Howard Payne was a 
native, not of East Hampton, but 
of New York City, a fact now uni- 
versally recognized in historical 
circles. 

Dr. Wood, since becoming asso- 
ciated with the Forum more than a 
decade ago, has undoubtedly led 
the field in debunking island his- 
tory of its legends, hoaxes and 
pure fabrications, and the Forum 
is proud to have cooperated in his 
tireless efforts towards keeping 
the records straight. 



Derbies Were Common 

Mr. Clancy's letter in the Oc- 
tober Forum suggesting that the 
derby-hatted man on the Shin- 
necock Canal railroad bridge, as 
pictured in the previous issue, was 
the late Alfred E. Smith, is in- 
correct. Mr. Smith, I am advised by 
those who claim to know, had not 
then become a visitor to his be- 
loved Good Ground. 

The late Col. Rowland, who 
supplied much of the material for 
my story, "Shinnecock Canal of 
1886", served as watchman on the 
bridge during its construction and 
shortly ailir. Standing on the 
bridge, it was his duty to slow 
all trains down to at least five 
miles an hour while crossing. 

Now as to derby hats, those were 
the days when they were in com- 
mon use and my late friend the 
Colcnel, who wore one on the job, 
once told me that he was the man 
on the bridge when that photo was 
taken, 

John H. Sutter 
Hampton Bays 
(formerly Good Ground) 



Dominy Genealogy 

A complete history of the 
Dominy and allied families vdll be 
available about January 1, 1955. 
Representing a labor of more than 
twenty years, it covers the period 
from 1630 to the present day, as 
well as the three branches of the 
Dominy family, namely: the ori- 
ginal Long Island; the Beekman- 
town of Clinton County, N. Y., 
and the Ohio, an offshoot of the 
two mentioned. 

The comprehensive, illustrated 
volume, a uinque achievement in 
photo-engraving and typography, 
will sell at $25 postpaid. No re- 
mittance need accompany orders 
at this time. 

Address: Newton J. Dominy, 
Historian, 29 South High, Dublin, 
Ohio. 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road. West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions , , . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 

GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. I. 

The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

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and Loan Association 

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First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

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Phone FArmingdaie 2-2000 FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



208 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



(Sales of jt Qeorge^s (fJtianor 



"W/- HEN Col. William (Tan- 
^^ gier) Smith died his 
oldest son Henry received 
that part of the vast estate 
on the north side of the 
island which he called St. 
George's Manor while the por- 
tion on the south side, retain- 
ing the old name of the 
Manor of St. George, went to 
son William. It was the north 
side house and land that my 
great-grandfather purchased 
from the Smiths. 

When my grandfather 
Judge Selah B. Strong mar- 
ried Cornelia Udall of Islip in 
1823 she was only 17 and her 
family insisted that she re- 
main with them until after 
her first child was born. Al- 
though my grandfather was 
very much her senior he had 
loved her, the story goes, 
since she was a little girl. 

Following the birth of their 
first child, they settled in the 
old house on the Neck once 
owned by the Smiths. Here 
were born three daughters 
and four or five of their seven 
sons. In 1839 my grand- 
father's first cousin, Anna 
Smith Strong, daughter of 
Joseph, married Frederick 
Diaper, who had studied ar- 
chitecture in England under 
Sir Robert Smirke. So when 
Grandfather decided to build 
a new home he naturally 
asked Diaper to draw the 
plans. 

It was completed some 
time in 1844 and still stands, 
an imposing structure with a 
wide hall in which a beauti- 
fully hand carved staircase 
rises from just insMe the 
front door. This haU runs 
through the house, with draw- 
ing room and library or» one 
side and sitting and dining 
rooms on the other. Tn the 
wing, there are pantries and 
cuoboards which leads me to 
think that my grandmother 
had a hand in the planning as 
on both floors are nlenty of 
closets. Also in the wing 
was located the big sunny 



I^te Wheeler t^trong 

nursery in v/hose brick oven 
my grandmother baked her 
famous pies. 

The kitchen itself was in 
the basement but much of the 
cooking was done in the wash- 
house, so called, which had 
been the wing of the old house 
until moved and rebuilt. It, 
too(, has a large fireplace. 
The second floor of the main 
house has seven rooms and 
there are three in the wing. 
The stairs to the third floor 
with its two bedrooms rise in 
a graceful curve on one side, 
leaving the hall clear. 



There were gay times, too, 
when the young people enter- 
tained friends. One summer 
at least 18 ate at the large 
dinner table throughout the 
season. Once a group of 17 
young folks from a becalmed 
sloop were taken in, the boys 
sleeping in the third floor hall 
while the girls bunked with 
the household's womenfolk. 

Among the weddings held 
here was that of a grand- 
daughter who was awaiting 
the train bringing the groom 
and bridal party when it be- 
came snowbound. The only 
thing to eat were the fancy 
cakes being brought to the 




St. George's Manor, on the North Shore 



The house was built to face 
the souths as was Grand- 
father's boyhood home so he 
could gaze from the third 
floor of his 7"ew home into 
the home of his childhood. 
The new home was indeed a 
house for a growing family — 
a stately ma^^sion well called 
St. George's Manor. 

This house of 1844 has had 
its sad times as well as gay. 
There were solemn proces- 
sions to the Strong family 
graveyard where, my father 
told me, the Episcopal rector 
usually presided following the 
Presbyterian minister's fun- 
eral service at the house. That 
is why so many Strongs are 
listed in the burial records of 
Caroline Church. 



wedding. But everything 
turned out alright and the 
knot was tied on schedule. 

Through sunshine and sha- 
dow the house stands today 
as sturdy as when its founda- 
tion was laid beck in 1844. 



Stimulates Interest in History 

My interest in the Forum is as 
deep as ever, and I read it from 
cover to cover — including the ad- 
vertisements. It is really unique, 
and I know it plays a significant 
role in stimulating a real interest 
in history, past and present, on 
Long Island. 

Malcolm M. Willey 

Minneapolis 

Note: Dr. Willey, one of our con- 
tributing editors and a real student 
of island history, is administra- 
tive vice-president of the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. 



209 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



NOVEMBER 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. L Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

8393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

to Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2'/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Iniurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



General Woodhull's Patriotism 

Felix E. Reifschneider (of Or- 
lando, Fla.) refers to the old 
Woodhull Park station on the 
Long Island Railway, now called 
Hillside station. 

This change was made because 
it was brought to the knowledge 
of the management of the railway 
that the Woodhull for whom Wood- 
hull Park was projected had not 
been a consistent patriot. 
Stanley R. Borcherding 
605 East 14th Street 
New York, N. Y. 

Editorial Opinion: Mr. Borcherd- 
ing has evidently read the recent 
book purporting to present the 
"inside story" of General Nathan- 
iel Woodhull, Long Island's first 
high ranking Revolutionary mar- 
tyr. We are not among those who 
take seriously the attempt to dis- 
credit General Woodhull's good 
name. The evidence submitted may 
be interpreted quite differently 
than was done by the author. We 
still believe that Woodhull was a 
real patriot and we doubt very 
much that his alleged inconsist- 
ency had anything to do with the 
LIRR's changing the name of its 
station. 



The Name, "Lake Success" 

People have asked me frequently 
to give them the history of Lake 
Success. They are always inter- 
ested in the derivation of its name. 
Some wonder if it was an Indian 
name that must have sounded like 
the word success. 

I have believed that the lake was 
in the bounds of the settlement 
known as Great Success, in Hemp- 
stead for John Robinson mentions 
s»me in his sale of his right to the 
Old Purchase of Oyster Bay to 
Thomas Miller of Lusum. The 
Oyster Bay Town Records Vol. 1 
gives the following information on 
Page 568; 

"To All Christian People to 
whom this p'sent writing Shall 
come or in any wise Apptaine; Be 
it known yt I John Robinson of 
Great Suckcess in ye Bounds of 
Hempstead in Queens County on 
Long Island in ye Pvince of New 
York. . . ." 

I'd like to hear from other 
Forum readers who might have 
the correct information on Lake 
Success. 

Harriet G. Valentine 
Cold Spring Harbor 



Edna's Rep Went Far 
Of all the pictures which must 
have been available, this is the 
only one carried in the Long Beach 
(Cal.) Press-Telegram Sunday in 
connection with the news items of 
Continued next page 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHT 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wvandanch 

Tel. Midland "7755 



Mastic 



Real tor — Ins ur or 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay .Shore 



Auio and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

83 E.Main,BayShore 7-0876 «& 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Centra! Islip. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. Babylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 

APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. Y. 





210 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



^ 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors^Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 

Glen Cove 

HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 

Westbury 

HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8S59 



East Norwich 



RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0592 



'BenjIWe/t' 

Real Estate Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond Island. New York 
■ Tel. 101 Solaukek ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER. Mgr. 
199-A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



the havoc created by the hurricane 
Edna. 

I read every word in my copy of 
the Long Island Forum, as soon as 
I receive it with great interest and 
untold pleasure. 

Horace K. T. Sherwood 
Long- Beach, California 

Editorialism: The picture showed 
Ryan's Restaurant, Bridgehamp- 
tcn, toppled by high seas. Mr. 
Sherwood is a former mayor of 
Glen Cove. The Long Beach Press- 
Telegram was owned until re- 
cently by another former Long 
Islander, S. S. Conklin, also a 
Forum subscriber. Either the 
world is small or our circulation 
Is not. 



STATEMENT 



required by the Act of August 24, 
1912, as amended by the Acts of 
March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946, 
showing the ownership and man- 
agement of the Long Island Forum 
published monthly at Amityville, 
N. Y., for October, 1954. 

The name and address of the 
publisher and editor is Paul 
Bailey, Amityville, N. Y. 

The owner is Paul Bailey, Amity- 
ville. N. Y. 

The known bondholders, mort- 
gatrees, and other security holders 
owning 1 percent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or 
ether securities are: none. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher. 

Sworn to and subscribed before 
ne this 27th day of September, 
1954. 

Hugo C. Waldau, Jr. 
Notary Public. 

(My commission expires March 
30, 1955.) 



Author's Correction 

Inadvertently, the caption to the 
photograph with my article on 
Prehistoric Long Island, in the 
October issue, gave the age of the 
sandstone outcroppings at Hemp- 
stead Harbor as 200-million years 
instead of 100-million. The latter 
figure is more nearly correct. 
Robei-t R. Coles 



Storm of 1854 



Paul Bailey's article in the Riv- 
erhead News-Review of September 
16 mentioning the storm of April 
1854 reminded me of the epitaph 
on a stone in the Waterford (Ct.) 
cemetery which I saw many years 
ago, as follows: "In memory of 
Lester Beebe lost with the 
schooner Gazelle in a gale on Nan- 
tucket shoales April 1854, aged 
21 years." 

In the old days it was quite a 
common custom to erect stones in 

Continued on next page 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



Q?^%£^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



RlJLKLEYgHpRTONfO. 

l_/ (i:ST. l«7T r-| VJJJ CHK.M.T<.l7in \ 1 

"Brooklyn and Long Island's Largest 
Real Estate Organisation'" 

721 Franklin Ave. PI 6-5400 



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Latest Dividend 



2\ 



Plus Vi% extra per annum 

Bank by Mail 

WE PAY POSTAGE 
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The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



211 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



NOVEMBER 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers 



Miller Place 



ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFUB 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street E Astport 5-0164 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



INSURANCE 

Ask 

EDWARDS 

The Oldest Agency 
for Miles Around 

Phones 
SAyville 4-2107 - 4-2108 



GLEN FLOORS 

FRED CAPOBIANCO 

Broadloom - Linoleum 

Tile 

Shades and Blinds 

BABYLON GLEN COVE 
HICKSVILLE 



Robert A. 


Dodd 


General Insurance 


Real Estate 


RAYMOND A. 


SWEENEY 


66 Merrick Rd.. Copiasue 


AMityville 4-1961 



memory of men lost at sea though 
the bodies were not recovered. 

These nautical matters interest 
me, as my great-grandfather John 
S. Billings, was a captain in the 
West Indies and South American 
trade for many years. I have the 
sextant which he carried, also some 
of his log books. He had a son 
drowned in the English Channel by 
falling from the bowsprit while 
reefing the jib. 

A. B. Roberts, 
Windham, Conn. 



Christmas Gift Subscriptions 

Every year more and more Long 
Islanders are using yearly sub- 
scriptions of the Long Island 
Forum as Christmas gifts. They 
simply send us the names and 
addresses of the recipients, to- 
gether with a check (at $2 each) 
to cover the list and we do the 
rest. 

Our special Christmas card 
mailed to each recipient in time 
for the holiday bears the giver's 
Yuletide Greetings. The important 
thing, however, is to place these 
orders early to insure our card 
being received just prior to Christ- 
mas Day. 



That geology story was the best 
I've read. Horace J. Campbell, 
Far Rockaway. (Referring to Pre- 
historic Long Island by Robert R. 
Coles in October issue). 



Tales of Old Long Island 

The sixteenth series of True 
Tales from Early Days of Long Is- 
land has just been issued and cop- 
ies may be obtained by addressing 
the author. Miss Kate Wheeler 
Strong, "The Cedars", Setauket, 
N. Y. "The price is $1.25 postpaid. 

Miss Strong's historical stories, 
which have appeared in the Long 
Island Forum as a regular feature 
since the November 1939 number, 
would certainly "fill a book, and 
a good size book at that", as one 
reader has written. Instead, she 
has preferred to have them reprint- 
ed in pamphlet form at about the 
rate of one each year, in time usu- 
ally for the Holiday season, for 
they have been used quite exten- 
sively as Christmas gifts. 

They have also become collectors' 
items and those who possess the 
complete set of pamphlets are for- 
tunate. To preserve this phase, 
the pamphlets are limited to 200 
copies in each edition, so that those 
who wish to obtain them should 
write without delay. 

The author, who has been called 
"Brookhaven Town's gift to local 
history," has given a folklore touch 
Continued on back cover 



Farmingdale 



GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper €*■ Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 


Insurance 


Mortgages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave 


, Amityville 


AMiiyville 4-1489 



BELLPORT 

Ed^vard B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street BEIIport 7-0143 



Over 100 Years 



of 



DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 



Everything for Building 



Tlal^au SuUolk 

LUMBER i SU PPLY t't/ COt?P 



AMITYVILLE ROSLYN 

HUNTINCTON SMIl HTOWN 
WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 



FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 

least 50 stories on island history. (^ 
Sent postpaid for ^1.50. Address 

L. I. forom, amityville 



212 



NOVEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FOIMJM 



Hurricanes 

Continued from page 206 

This time I didn't take the 
sweaters, blouses, or clothes 
— only the necessaries and 
two dresses just in case I 
never saw it again. Once 
more I put it in the Lord's 
care and the special protection 
of a Madonna from Sicily a 
friend had brought me, who 
was the Madonna of the Sea 
to whom the sailors brought 
chains of shells before they 
set out on voyages. 

At quarter of ten we left 
for my friend's house, I hav- 
ing alerted her we were com- 
ing. Her house was a good 
distance from the sea. One 
great elm was down across 
the terrace — Carol's work 
— but otherwise it was serene 
and lovely with the most per- 
fectly appointed guest rooms 
into which we settled so 
gratefully. 

The night was wild but 
Edna didn't really arrive until 



mid-morning. Then the wind 
blew with terrific force, the 
barometer dropped and we 
watched huge sheets of rain 
sweeping across the land- 
scape. It was frightening in 
its way, especially when a 



favorite tree of my hostess 
went down, but by four o'clock 
the barometer had risen and 
my host and hostess went out 
to view the damage. 

Edna had worked differ- 
ently from Carol. She had 




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HOME OWNERS 



Mortgage Loans to refinance existing mortgages 
or to purchase and/ or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

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RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



213 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



NOVEMBER 1954 



gore around in gusts. My 
garden was under four feet of 
: water — and one of my pre^i- 
jous pines was riven in half. 
Two others were down but 
they can be salvaged. The 
brush had held, all except for 
one deep hole where the 
water had poured from a 
broken leader pipe. But again 
high tides were expected that 
night, so we very gratefully 
stayed where we were for 
another night. 

The next morning at eleven 
we tried to thank our friends 
for taking us in. But it's im- 
possible to really express ap- 
preciation for a^'y'^hing so 
thoughtful, but it does cer- 
tainly restore one's faith in 
human beings. 

Hom.e with the sun shining: 
just as though Edna had 
never been — the ocean far 
out, the sand gleaming wher- 
ever it wasn't covered with 
debris. 

Long Island had been lucky 
where Edna was concerned. 
She wreaked her fury on New 
England more than our 
shores, but she treated us 
badly enough. If, as they 
said, we only got the fringe, 
I should have hated to be in 
the middle of it. 
I _ An article in the New York 
Times says hurricanes go in 
cycles, that Florida used to 
get the full force of them and 
now if is New England. The 
last severe one in Florida was 
in 1933, with winds over two 



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hundred miles an hour. They 
have had heavy storms since. 
Miami last had a hurricane in 
1950. So perhaps their cycle 
is ending and Long Island 
and New England are their 
targets now, with California 
being exempt. 

Navy pilots study the 
storms and a good deal of 
what we know of them comes 
from this source. Why thev 
call them by female names I 
cannot see. Ore paper said it 
was because "Women were so 
unpredictable." This is all 
nonsense ard it see^ns awful 
to take a nice name like Card 
to label a hurricane. 

Personally I favor naming 
them after battles or wars. 
Carol could have been the 
Battle of Bull Run. She wm 
bul'ish enough and how she 
did run. Edna might have 
been the Troian War — she 
was that deceitful. But by 
whatever name they are 
called they are certai- iy not 
welcome on Long Island — or 
anywhere else for that mat- 
ter. The old-timers here who 
are weather-wise shake their 
heads. "Used to be we had an 
equinoctial storm every year. 



Now we get hurricanes ajid 
it don't make sense." 

It really doesn't. Carol took 
down all the trees that were 
straightened up after the ori- 
ginal hurricane in 1938, Two 
that had been salvaged^ at The 
Hedges, for instance, are no 
more. You can add many 
others to the list, for there 
wasn't a road or lane in East 
Hampton that hadn't suffered 
trpe loss and wasn't filled 
with boughs and branches. 
Everyone agreed Carol did 
more damage than 1938. 

If it's true that hurricanes 
go in cycles, then I hope 
they'll cycle themselves to 
some other part of the world. 
Long Island would be glad to 
see the end of them — not 
to mention the owner of 
"Mostly Dune." 



L. I. Books For Sale 
Memorial of the Late Hon. David 
S. Jones, containing data on 
Jones Family rf Massapequa. By 
W. A. Jcnes. 1849. 
Social History of Flathush. Ger- 
trude L. Vanderbilt. HIus. 12mo. 
cloth. 1900. 
History of Town of Flathush. 
Thf^mas M. Strong. Illus. 12mo. 
cloth. 1842. Reprinting of 1938. 

Long Island Forum 



•T 



Clje 

iianfe of amitpbtUe 

Incorporated 1891 

2fc on Special Interest Accounts Compounded Quarterly 

Hours: 9:00 to 3:00 except Saturdays 

Friday Evenings 6:00 to 8:00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



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Serving the Community 
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214 



t 



"i 



NOVEMBER 1954 

Poet of Paumanok 

Continued from page 205 

Long Island, the Greenport 
and Montauk regions, and the 
shores of the great bays. 
These, of course, were not the 
scenes of his early childhood, 
but they were the enchanting, 
faraway places of which he 
had heard constantly as a 
small boy. In summer he 
would often gather sea gulls' 
eggs on the sands of Peconic 
Bay, or wander aimlessly 
across the wide Hempstead 
plains which never ceased to 
hold for him a particular fas- 
cination : 

"I have often been out on 
the edges of these plains to- 
ward sundown and can yet re- 
call the interminable cow 
processions, and hear the 
music of the tin copper bells 
clanking far or near, and 
breathe the cool of the sweet 
and slightly aromatic air, and 
note the Sunset." Winter 
would find him out on the 
Great South Bay fishing 
through the ice for eeKs, and 
filling up his basket with the 
"great, fat, sweet, white- 
meated fellows." Recalling 
this scene many years later 
he wrote, "The shores of this 
bay, winter and summer, and 
my doings there in earlv life, 
are woven all through Leaves 
of Grass." 

Perhaps, however, an even 
greater influence on Whit- 
man's poetrv was his visits to 
Montauk, with i"ts atmosnhere 
of storm and shinwreck. Occa- 
sionally the poet would go 
there and sit by the old light- 
house for hours on end, 
watching and listening to the 
Dounding of the waves as they 
beat ap-ainst the rorkv shore- 
line. It is not surprising that 
many literary critics have 
compared the metre of Whit- 
man's verse with the recur- 
rence of lesser and larger 
wa^'p«( on the seashore, rolling 
in without intermission and 
fitfully rising and falling. 
Such an internretation seems 
to be borne out by the poet's 
own words: 

"Once at Montauk. (by the 
old lighthouse, nothing but 
sea tossing in sight in every 
direction as far as the eye 



coud reach), I remember 
well I felt that I must one day 
write a book expressing this 
liquid, mystic theme. After- 
ward I recollect, how it came 
to me that instead of any 
special lyrical or epical or lit- 
erary attempt, the seashore 
should be an invisible influ- 
ence, a pervading gauge and 
tally for me in my composi- 
tion. ' 

»rr?® *^®" ^o®s on to state: 
,,^here is a dream, a picture, 
that for years at intervals 
has come up before me, and I 
really believe has entered 
largely into my practical life 
— certainly into my writing 
and color'd and shaped them.' 
It IS nothing more or less 
than a stretch of intermin- 
able white-brown sand with 
the ocean perpetually, grand- 
ly, rolling in upon it, with 
rustle, hiss and foam. . . This 
scene, this picture, I say, has 
risen before me at times for 
years. Sometimes I wake up 
at night and can hear and see 
it plainly before me." 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

From this account it be- 
comes quite evident that the 
countless hours Whitman 
spent roaming along the 
beaches of Long Island were 
not wasted in idle loafing, as 
many of his family and 
friends seemed to have 
thought at the time; on the 
contrary, his keen receptive 
mind was absorbing the very 
tempo of the waves as they 
rushed in against the shore. 
If the surf pounding 
against the Long Island 
coast provided Whitman with 
the metre and rhythm of his 
poetry, it was as a rural 
schoolteacher and country 
journalist that he first be- 
came aware of the American 
character, which was to be- 
come the central theme of 
Leaves of Grass. "Ameri- 
canos! conquerors! marches 
humanitarian! Foremost' 
century marches! Liberated 
masses! For you a programme 
01 chants." 
As a country schoolteacher 

Continued on page 2 1 7 




^^^^^^*^^^^^^^^ 



ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 

BRENTWOOD BAY SHORE 




Suffolk &> 4th 
Phone BR 3-45 1 1 



Main 6. Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



Member Federal Depo.it Insurance Corpor.Hon 



215 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Japanese Versus Western Fashions 

Many former students from 
Japan, launched on tlieir careers 
by the Traphagen School of Fash- 
ion, returned and found success 
in their homeland. From there, in- 
spired by their own good fortune, 
they have recommended other 
young people to study at their 
alma mater. New students not 
only from the United States but 
from Europe and the Orient are 
now entering Traphagen at 1680 
Broadway (52nd St.), New York, 
where their celebrated courses in 
costume design, illustration, cloth- 
ing construction, draping, pattern- 
making, grading, dressmaking, and 
interior decoration are now start- 
ing. 

One of these students, Teruko 
Hirota (above) says that while 
most Japanese girls now favor 
Western costume for everyday 
life, the traditional wedding cos- 
tume of old Japan, which she mod- 
els here, is a beautiful survivor. 
Miss Hirota came to Traphagen 
from faraway Nishinomiya City, 
Japan. She is one of the hundreds 
of girls and young men who, dur- 
ing the past quarter century and 
more, have come from forty-six 
foreign countries to attend this 
world-famous school. They are 
carrying home the know-how of 
designing and making the Am- 
erican-style fashions which have 
captivated women the world over. 
Black is the background color 
of the Japanese wedding kimona, 
a color usually worn only by 
brides and older women. The 
length of the sleeves and the spread 
of the pedded hem on the floor 
mark this as a costume of much 
formality. The centuries-old style 
of coiffure in the wig comes into 
its own, too, on the wedding day. 
Teruko demonstrated the use of 
the wedding veil. The wig of the 
bride is draped before and dur- 
ing the ceremony with a pink silk 
nbbon "veil" (see iluustration in- 
set) which is removed after the 
marriage. This costume is an au- 
thentic one from the Museum Col- 
lection of the Traphagen School, 
secured in Japan by Ethel Trap- 
hagen and her husband, W. R. 
Leigh, for use by their students in 
living research" and modern de- 
sign inspiration. 



NOVEMBER 1954 



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216 



^ 



NOVEMBER 1954 

Poet of Paumanok 

Continued from Page 215 

"boarding around" he became 
intimately acquainted with 
the resolute farmers and vil- 
lagers of rural Lonsr Island. 
Throughout his entire life 
the memory of these people 
was always close to his heart, 
and he often referred to his 
teaching days as "one of my 
best experiences and deepest 
lessons in human nature be- 
hind the scenes and in the 
masses." 

When, in 1839, Whitman 
left teaching to try his hand 
at country journalism, he con- 
tinued his close relationship 
with the rural folk of Long 
Island. Although his connec- 




Walt Whitman 

tion with the weekly news- 
paper which he founded was 
desti .ed to be shortlived, it 
proved to be an experience 
that greatly enriched and 
broadened his understanding 
of human nature. Perhaps he 
never was again so happy or 
content as when he started 
out each v/eek to deliver his 
paper to the nearby communi- 
ties : 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityviUe 4-0909-4-0910 



"I never had happier jaunts 
— going over the south side 
to Babylon, down the south 
road across to Smithtown and 
Commack, and back home. 
The experience of those 
jaunts, the dear old fashion'd 
farmers and their wives, the 
stops by the hayfields, the 
hospitality, nice dinners, oc- 
casional evenings, the girls, 
the rides through the brush, 
come to my memory to this 
day." Here, then, was that 
lust of life, that deUght in 
human nature, that capacity 
for sensation which was gath- 
ering material for Leaves of 
Grass. 

When Whitman left Hunt- 
ington, it marked the end of 
his formative years. He had 
just turned twenty-one and 
was restless to experiment — 
"Life immense in passion, 
pulse and power." 

The years ahead were to be 
spent, for the most part, in 
cities — New York, Washing- 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

ton, Camden; all too often, 
however, this later associa- 
tion with the teeming life of 
the city obscured the great 
importance of his earlier 
years on Long Island. The 
truth of the matter is that a 
large part of Whitman's poet- 
ical imagery was inspired by 
the beauty he perceived in 
the natural surroundings of 
his beloved Paumanok, and 
that he found in the sturdy 
inhabitants of its countryside 
and villages the democratic 
spirit his poetry extolled. 



This Old Long Island 

Robert R. Coles' story on the 
geology of L. I. (Oct. issue) is 
very interesting to me as I have 
read some of that before, but am 
glad to know that our island is 
really older than I thought, even 
though I was willing to give it a 
few million years. 

John Tooker 
Babylon 



(( 



Long Island Whalers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whaling by L. I. ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
ring, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 

Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



J. C. DODGE & SON, Inc. 

Glen Cove's Oldest Furniture House 

Established in 1835 when Andrew Jackson was President. 
99 GLEN STREET GLen Cove 4-0242 



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The Long Island Indian" 



By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civilization 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Islanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



217 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Place-Names 

Continued from page 207 

in the East Norwich Enter- 
prise. This reads in part as 
follows : 

"—there was a Mill, or 
Factory, located in the east- 
erly, or 'old Kaintuck Mill 
Pond' section of what is now 
known as Locust Valley, the 
motor power of which was 
derived from a beautiful 
small lake. The owner of this 
mill manufactured a fabric, 
presumably of flaxen mater- 
ial, known as 'Buckram'. 

"The fabric manufactured 
in the quaint old mill was 
well-known, and highly val- 
ued, and at that time was an 
attractive class of 'dry goods,' 
and its name, 'Buckram', was 
a familiar one to all the coun- 
try round-about, and in this 
way the locality became 
known as Buckram". 

The pond to which Mr. 
Frost referred exists today 
north of the railroad tracks 
and west of Beaver Lake, at 
Mill Neck. 

It is very difficult today 
for anyone to determine with 
certainty which of these sug- 
gestions is correct. I am in- 
clined to favor the one offered 
by Mr. Frost, although I do 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 

Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



Telephone AMityville 4-2126 

FIRESTONE 

Motor Sales, Inc. 

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Martin Firestone Merrick Road 
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not have much evidence to 
support my choice. 

Apparently there had been 
considerable opposition by 
local residents to both the 
names of Buckram and Lo- 
cust Valley. Many preferred 
that of Matinecock, which is 
the name of the old Quaker 
Meeting House built in 1725 
and still standing on the north 



NOVEMBER 1954 

side of Duck Pond Road on 
the boundary between the 
City of Glen Cove and the |^ 
Village of Matinecock. ^^ 

These are only a few of the 
many quaint and interesting 
place-names found in the 
vicinity of old Matinecock. Let 
us hope they will survive 
many centuries more to keep 
fresh the memory of long ago. 



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Bailey's Long Island History 



A limited number of sets of 
the Long Island History, com- 
piled by Paul Bailey and pub- 
lished last year by the Lewis 
Historical Publishing Com- 
pany of New York, has been 
made available through the 
Long Island Forum at one- 
third off the publishers' price. 

This drastic reduction from 
the original price of $46.50 is 
made possible by eliminating 
volume 3 which consists en- 
tirely of biographical sketches. 

Volumes 1 and 2 comprise 
the complete History as com- 
piled by Editor Bailey and 
written by leading authorities 
in every field, consisting of 
more than 1000 pages. 43 
chapters and 200 illustrations. 

These handsomely printed 
and bound deluxe books (size 
8x10% inches) will be sent, 
while they last, in the same 
order that anplications are re- 
ceived. Price $30. 

Besides the complete history 
of the island, from its discov- 
ery, including chapters on geo- 
Address: LONG 
Amityville, N. Y. 



# 



logy and archaeology, there 
are separate chapters on each 
of the towns in Nassau and 
Suffolk Counties, the history 
of the leading church denom- 
inations, whaling, fishing, 
sheU fisheries, agriculture, 
medicine, banking, education, 
aviation and many other sub- 
jects. 

Long Island Birdlife is com- 
piled by Edwin Way Teale, 
nationally known authority ; 
the island's mammals, by Dr. 
W. J. Hamilton, Corned zoolo- 
gist. The most extensive cov- 
erage of the island's Indians 
ever printed was prepared by 
John H. Morice. Among th(i 
authors represented are J. 
Russel Sprague, Dr. Oscar G. 
Darlinpfton, Dr. C'arence Ash- 
ton Wood, Miss Jacoueline 
Overton, Re'^ John K. Sharp, 
Chester T?. Blake'ock, Osbom 
Shaw, Herbert F. Ricard, 
Preston R. Bassett. Robert R. 
Coles. Halpev B. Knapn, 
Nancy Boyd Willev. Mary E. ^^ 
Bell — in all more than forty Hfc; 
such authorities. ' 

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Alex Eugene Glen Cove 4-3176 



Tales of Old Long Island 

Continued from page 212 

to many of her stories with some 
very intimate revelations of the 
past, gleaned from her own large 
collection of documents, journals, 
letters and other data. This 16th 
pamphlet is well illustrated, con- 
tains an even dozen stories and 
is the largest one issued. 



How do you keep on making the 
Forum better each issue? (Mrs.) 
Agnes Vitale, Jamaica. 



Hurricane Heroine 

Asked about her experience 
while postmistress at Westhamp- 
ton Beach in the hurricane of Sep- 
tember 21, 1938, Mrs. Mabel B. 
Williams, now retired, wrote: 

When I started for the post 
office that morning I took a rain- 
coat as the weather looked bad. 
Upon arriving I asked the clerks 
to sack all mail and place on the 
top shelves of the parcel post rack. 
When, a short time later I looked 
out the window and saw the water 
crossing Main street and only the 
tops of cars showing, I told all 
hands to go home and that I 
would stand by. 

Then I saw parts of houses from 
the beach floating along and de- 
cided to go home. Going outside I 
stepped into water up to my arm- 
pits. By dodging debris, and hang- 
ing on to fences and other objects, 
I reached a woods road and made 
my way to the air base a mile and 
a half away. 

Meanwhile the firemen had en- 
tered the post office and, not find- 
ing me, concluded that I had been 
drowned. However, finding my 
daughter and dog at the base, we 
managed to get home from there 
and took in 14 people for food and 
beds. I returned to the post office 
about 11 p. m. and had the fire- 
men pump out the basement, 
started cleaning up the next morn- 
ing and had the office functioning 
again two days later. 

Mabel B. Williams 
Westhampton Beach 

Editorial addition: Mrs. William 
does not mention her personal 
heroism and the many services 
she rendered the community dur- 
ing the post-flood period. 



I don't know of anywhere else 
to get as much for so little money 
(as the Forum). Osman C. Lane, 
Southampton Chief of Police, Re- 
tired. 



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