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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

o. 



LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 




r 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



HRANDFATHER'S CHRISTMAS PUDDING 
THOMAS MORAN, PAINTER, ETCHER 
SCULPTURING OF LONG ISLAND 
THE BARK MARY AND LOUISE 
ISLAND'S FRENCH MILLER 
REMEMBERS "T. R." 



Alonzo Gibbs 

Dr, Charles A. Hug^uenin 

Robert R. Coles 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Wilson L. Glover 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



DECEMBER 1954 



1. 00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 2Sc 



VOL. XVIL No. 12 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Ea«tport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



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Rug Cleaning 

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Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

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Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
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Lindenhurat 

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THE 

Publiahed Monthly at 

AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as aecond-claai matter May Jl, 1947, at the 
post office at Amityville, New York, under the Act of 
March !. 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden. Ph.D. 

Robert R. Coles 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Island's French Miller 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Pierre Rene Villefeu was bom 
in Prance July 25, 1828 and came 
to Southampton, L. I., about 1860. 
His wife Margaret was a second 
cousin of Gen. Nathaniel Green 
of American Revolutionary fame. 

Villefeu conducted gristmills at 
several places in Suffolk County, 
served as a Republican deputy 
sheriff at one time and died at 
Babylon in 1915 at the ripe old 
age of 87. 

From Southampton he went to 
Ashamomoque (between Greenport 
and Southold) where he acquired 
on a purchase money mortgage 
the tidewater mill of Charles C. 
and George W. White of New York 
City. He turned the mill back on a 
quit claim deed Dec. 16, 1863. 

Next we find him running the 
Great Western mill which stood 
near the juncture of the roads 
from Peconic, Hog Neck and Pine 
Neck. 

During this period of his life 
Villefeu lived in a cottage which 
he owned situated a half-mile from 
the mill, just north of the grocery 
store, familiar to this writer in 
his youth, then conducted by J. B. 
Fanning on the easterly side of 
Main street about opposite the 
now silent blacksmith shop of 
Cleveland and Glover. 

The mill was burned during the 
summer of 1870. Thereafter Ville- 
feu conducted similar mills at 
Islip, Amityville and Babylon. His 
lease of Southards' mill in the 
westerly part of Babylon expired 
Dec. 1, 1877. He was then solicit- 
ing continuance of favors at the 
Oakley Mills. 

He retained title to his South- 
old cottage for some years after 
he left there. In 1902 he sold it to 
Ernest Leieht who had moved his 
family there from Mattituck in 
September 1900. Villefeu was then 
living at Babylon where he died 
in 1915. Margaret Villefeu had 
died there the previous year. They 
left four daughters: 
Eugenie, Zilpha, Helene and Rene. 



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Rue and Furniture Cleaning 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 

Goal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jeflferson 555 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel, 1086 lalip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoilta Accepted by Mall 
First National Bank of Islip 

Member Fed. Depoiit Insurance Corp. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapequa (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP. L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop, 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 

WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near Amityville Depot 



222 



DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



# 



Ghomas C^TKoran, Painter, etcher 



V\7'HEN Thomas "Yellow- 
' ' stone" Moran died in 
Santa Barbara, California, in 
his ninetieth year on August 
25, 1926, he closed his eyes on 
a long life of creative work, 
rich in achievement. With 
brush and palette he worked 
to the end, and like Corot, ly- 
ing supine in bed in his last 
hours, he envisioned and dis- 
cussed still-to-be -painted land- 
scapes on the ceiling. 

At his death Thomas Moran 
was the oldest member of the 
National Academy of Design, 
and he was acknowledged as 
the "Dean of American Ar- 
tists." Two giant landscapes 
from his brush, The Grand 
Canyon of the Yellowstone 
and The Chasm of the Colo- 
rado, had been purchased by 
Congress for $10,000 apiece 
a-rd adorned the gallery of the 
Senate wing in the Capitol at 
Washington. His Mountain of 
the Holy Cross, inspired by 
the mysterious peak crested 
with the glittering cross in 



Editorial Note 

Guild Hall, East Hampton, dedi- 
cated in 1931, contains the Thomas 
Moran Gallery. Here one may view 
some of his originals and his own 
large portrait. 

The Hall, to quote Miss Dorothy 
Quick, author and poet, writing in 
the Forum in 1940, "is a long low 
building with great depth, of white 
painted brick. It has an artis'iic 
entrance above which the dome of 
the theatre rises impressively. It is 
called the John Drew Theatre in 
honor of the distinguished thespian 
who summered in East Hampton 
for many years." 

Thomas Moran's earliest so- 
journ at East Hampton was at 
"Rowdy Hall" which received its 
name back in the 1880's because it 
served as the summer habitation of 
fi, numb'-r of artists, some of 
whom with true Bohemian taste 
kept late hours, played a bit of 
stud-poker and indulged to some 
cxfent in spirituous beverages. 

The ancient salt-box cottage 
which then stood beside the Pres- 
byterian Church has since been 
restored and moved to the corner 
of David and Egypt lanes, on the 
Hamlin estate. It is still affection- 
atelv known to villagers as "Rowdy 
Hall." 



Dr. Charles A. Huguenin 

central Colorado, had won for 
him a gold medal and diploma 
at the Centennial Exposition 
in 1876, and other works 
earned prizes at the Colum- 
bian Exposition in Chicago in 
1893, at the Pan-American 
Exposition in 1901, and at the 
Convention of the American 
Art Society of Philadelphia in 
1902. 

As an etcher he had reaped 
a fame second only to that as 
a painter, and to the end he 
retained his supremacy among 
artist-etchers of America. The 
English art critic John Rus- 
kin, whose reputation as a 
close observer of nature was 
internatianal, had pronounced 
one of Moran's plates, a 
marire depicting a wave beat- 
ing on a shore, not only the 
best that had come from 
America, but the best that 
modern art had produced. 
Moran's Gate of Venice was 
declared one of the largest 
and most complete drawings 
upon copper ever executed 
with a needle and acid. 




Thomas Moran, East Hampton 
Artist 

Winning popularity as an 
illustrator of books and maga- 
zines, he produced several 
thousands of dravv'ings, in one 
year turning out as many as 
250 book illustrations. Among 
the best of these are his pic- 
torial elucidations for Long- 
fellow's "Hiawatha" and 
Whittier's "Mabel Martin." 



Other less noteworthy ac- 
complishments included his 
founding of the New York 
Etching Club and his ad- 
vocacy for a national art gal- 
lery, which impelled Mr. Rog- 
ers of Paterson in New Jersey 
to donate $6,000,000 to the 
Metropolitan Art Museum of 
New York for this purpose. 

But the achievement that 
overshadowed all others was 
to awaken the American 
people to a consciousness of 
the wide expanses of wilder- 
ness and the natural resources 
of beauty that lay in the 
Great West. In 1871 when he 
was thirty-four he provided 
himself with a six-shooter, a 
holster, and an army canteen 
and joined Professor F. V. 
Hayden's U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey Expedition to the Yellow- 
stone as guest-illustrator. 
This region, shunned by In- 
dians as a sink of infernal 
vapors and a haunt for buga- 
boos, was then unexplored ter- 
ritory. In 1806 ove of Lewis 
and Clark's soldiers, John Col- 
ter, had returned with strange 
reports of hot fountains and 
pools of yellow, rink, and 
green mud too fantastitc for 
belief, Jim Bridger, a colorful 
old fontiersman, had made his 
reputation as a liar largely 
with his descriptions of the 
weirdness of Yellowstone. 

Moran's accurate, first- 
hand, topographical land- 
scapes of the Yellowstone Re- 
gion offered indisputable 
proof of its uncanny attrac- 
tion and imposing grandeur. 
They made the American 
people aware of their own 
heritage of landscape, to be 
priced and conserved, Yellow- 
stone National Park, the first 
of our national parks, was 
created the followinor year, in 
1 872, as a result of the public 
interest in the natural won- 
ders of the West, stimulated 
by Moran's canvasses. As the 
National Park Movement 
grew in scope, Moran came to 



22i 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



be regarded as the "Father of 
the National Parks." 

The first journey deter- 
mined Moran's future career. 
Again and again the wild, ma- 
jestic scenery of the West 
drew him like a magnet for 
many subsequent trips. Years 
later, his daughter was im- 
pelled to write in an impres- 
sion of her father: "He 
seemed always to be starting 
off or coming back from 
strange, beautiful places, wild 
countries." 

In the summer of 1873 he 
accompanied another geologi- 
cal expedition under Major J. 
W. Powell down the then 
little-known Colorado River. 
He maintained that of all 
places on earth the Canyon of 
Arizona was the most inspir- 
ing in its pictorial possibili- 
ties. Companions of these ter- 
ritorial surveys called him 
"Yellowstone Moran," a sou- 
briquet that stuck. 

Because of his attempts to 
transpose on canvas the magic 
of the Western Wonderland, 
his name is linked, beside Yel- 
lowstone and the Grand Can- 
yon, with Yosemite, Zion, and 
Grand Teton national parks 
and with the following na- 
tional monuments: the Moun- 
tain of the Holy Cross, Devil's 
Tower in Wyoming, and the 
Petrified Forest in Arizona. 
Mount Moran in the Teton 
Range perpetuates his name, 
and there are Moran points in 
the Grand Canyon, Yellow- 
stone, and Yosemite national 
parks. Only poor health in his 
eighty-eighth year prevented 
his accompanying Stephen 
Tyng Mather, Director of the 
National Park Service of the 
Department of Interior, to 
Bryce Canyon to capture on 
more canvas the elusive 
beauty of the newest of our 
national parks. 

"Go West, young man!" 
was Moran's admonition to 
the tyro in painting who 
might be tempted to imitate 
the artists of the Hudson 
River School. To the tourist 
he was the most persuasive 
herald of that movement 
which has become popular un- 

Continued on page 233 



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224 



DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



0he jculpturing of L>ong Island 



T ONG ISLAND provides an 
•■^ ideal opportunity for 
the backyard explorer who 
would investigate the riddle 
of its geologic past. Every 
feature of its landscape is the 
product of natural forces that 
have sculptured it to its pres- 
ent form, and many of these 
are still at work, with the re- 
sult that it is continually 
changing. 

Although the work of de- 
positing the sediments to 
form its lower strata, and the 
chiseling out of the valley 
that would contain the waters 
of Long Island Sound was ac- 
complished much earlier, the 
events that fashioned the is- 
land to the form we know to- 
day occurred within the last 
million years. These included 
the advance of at least four 
glaciers during the Ice Age, 
and the subsequent action of 
rain, wind, waves and off- 
shore currents. In this article 
I shall deal mainly with the 
events of the Ice Age. 

While the broad picture 
seems fairly well established, 
many details are not clear, 
and it is certain that further 
study will indicate some re- 
visions. 

The Ice Age commenced to- 
ward the close of that long 
span of geologic time calleid 
the Cenozoic Era, or just be- 
fore the be<i:inning of the so- 
called Pleistocene Period. For 
centuries the cUmate had 
been getting colder. This was 
not a local condition, but was 
felt throughout the northern 
hemisphere. The ice of the 
Labrador peninsula and north- 
ern Canada began advancing 
south. Although gradual at 
first, this movement persisted 
through thousands of years, 
and with the lowerinnf tem- 
peratures the depth of the ice 
increased as it slowly pushed 
forward, sweeping up vast 
ouantities of earth materials 
that lay in its path. 

There was no one on hand 
at the time to observe and 



Tio^ert 1^ Coles 

Editor's Note 

Introduced as contributing edi- 
tor of the L. I. Forum, Mr. Coles 
was interviewed by Martha Deane 
on station WOR on October 30 in 
reference to his geologic articles 
in the Forum and other phases of 
the island's distant past. He is 
indeed a recognized authority on 
these subjects as well as on astron- 
omy, having served some years as 
head of the Hayden Planitarium of 
the American Museum of Natural 
History. 



record the story of the many 
conflicting forces involved, 
and the problem of recon- 
structing it today from the 
evidence contained in the com- 
plex arrangement of sands, 
gravels and clays is extremely 
difficult. This is particularly 
true of the effects of the two 
earlier glacial stages, many 
of which have been covered 
up or destroyed by the later 
ones. 

The last comprehensive 
work on the subject, "The 
Geology Of Long Island", by 
Myron L. Fuller, was pub- 
lished by the U. S. Geological 
Survey in 1914. In this he 



names the glacial stages as 
follows, beginning with the 
earliest: the Mannetto, the 
Jameco, the Manhasset and 
the Wisconsin. Between these 
were times of relatively milder 
climate, called interglacial 
periods, during which the ice 
melted and the action of 
streams caused extensive ero- 
sion with much shifting about 
of the earth materials. 

The debris associated with 
these glacial stages and in- 
terglacial periods is distin- 
guished by the type of sand, 
gravel, boulders and clays 
they contain, their relation to 
nearby deposits, and other 
features recognized by the 
geologist. Due to its involved 
nature such identification is 
very difficult and often prob- 
lematical. 

The first, or Mannetto 
glacial stage, was so named 
because of a prominent ex- 
posure of its gravels at Man- 
netto Hill, west of Melville. 
While later events have re- 
moved much of the material 
deposited by this glacier, it is 
exposed today at a few places 
on the island and has been 




MONTAUK SHOWS SCULPTURING 



225 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



identified elsewhere in well 
borings. 

It is not known exactly 
where the advancing front of 
this glacier stopped, although 
Fuller suggests that " — it 
may have halted in the Sound 
trough a little north of the 
present edge of the island." If 
this was the case, the gravels 
and sands were probably 
exuded from its leading edge 
and spread south as it melted. 

During the post-Mannetto 
interglacial period the climate 
moderated for a long time, 
streams flowed out from the 
glacier and large quantities of 
debris were shifted from their 
former position. 

The second glacial advance 
was named the Jameco stage 
because its gravels were first 
discovered in deep wells at the 
Jameco pumping station, near 
Jamaica. Although no sur- 
face deposits of this material 
have been recognized on the 
island, its gravels have been 
identified in many well bor- 
ings and are particularly no- 
ticeable in a broad depression 
beneath the surface between 
Jamaica and Whitestone. 
They have also been found in 
exposures on Block Island, 
Marthas Vineyard and Cape 
Cod. Geologists seem to be of 
the opinion that this glacier 
did not invade Long Island, 
but probably halted in the 
Sound valley to the north. 

During the warmer period 
following the Jameco glacial 
stage there occurred much 
erosion and shifting of earlier 
deposits, due to lively stream 
action, with the deposition of 
large quantities of clay and 
sand in many parts of the is- 
land. These deposits are 
known to geologists as Gard- 
iners clay and Jacob sand. As 
in the case of the materials 
associated with the first in- 
terglacial period, they add 
greatly to the complexity of 
the picture and are too in- 
volved for discussion here. 

To the casual observer the 
first two glacial stages — the 
Mannetto and the Jameco — 
are of little more than aca- 
demic interest since they do 
not add greatly to the more 



conspicuous features of the 
island's topography, as we 
know it today. The last two, 
however, have played an im- 
portant part in molding it to 
its present form. It is to the 
work of these that we are in- 
debted for our extensive pla- 
teaus, rolling hills, pictur- 
esque valleys and broad plains. 

The third glacial stage was 
named the Manhasset because 
its sands and gravels are 
prominently exposed in the 
extensive gravel banks at 
Port Washington, on the east- 
em or Hempstead Harbor side 
of Manhasset Neck. 

The materials deposited by 
this glacier are of different 
nature at various levels, in- 
dicating that they were prob- 
ably laid down during suc- 
ceeding stages of its advance. 

The most outstanding ef- 
fect of the Manhasset glacier 
is the great plateau along the 
north shore of the island from 
the western end to Orient 
Point, with steep bluffs that 
face the Sound throughout 
much of its extent. Other 
plateaus of the same deposit 
are evident on the South 
Fluke of Long Island and on 
Robbins, Shelter, Plum, Fish- 
ers and Gardiners islands. 

There is no doubt that the 
Manhasset glacier invaded 
Long Island in many places 
and was of long duration. By 
far the larger part of the 
glacial material above sea 
level on the island was de- 
posited by this p-lacier, much 
of which underlies the later 
debris of the Wisconsin ad- 
vance. 

There was another modera- 
tion of climate following the 
Manhasset glacial stage that 
resulted in extensive erosion 
of existing materials and the 
deposition of sands bearing 
various types of marine fos- 
sils. These are called the Vine- 
yard deposits by geologists. 

The name of the last, or 
Wisconsin glacial stage, which 
shows evidence of having cov- 
ered much of the northern 
portion of the continent, is 
derived from extensive de- 

Continued on pag-e 229 



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326 



DECEMBEE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Qrandfather's (^ hristmas indding 



# 



# 



lUfY Uncle Crowell had 
^^'^ been a drummer boy 
with Colonel Rush Hawkins' 
New York Zouaves. In after 
years he sometimes wore his 
battered red fez when he came 
to visit Father's sister, and 
the girls of the family would 
try it on to feel chic, and the 
boys would try it on to feel 
brave. 

It was about this time, 
1874, that Grandfather first 
conceived of the Christmas 
pudding. 

He had recently moved his 
family, a wife, three boys and 
three girls, to a dowdy old 
house, rectangular in shape, 
high and massive, with gaunt 
locust trees thrusting limbs 
over the mansard roof to the 
cobwebbed windows of the 
cupola. Out front, the picket 
fence had been breached by 
dogs and decay, the wintering 
grasses blew rustily along the 
brick paths, the drain pipes 
from the gutters on the roof 
had lost their rain barrels and 
before their unretained flow 
small areas of the yard had 
gone to gravel. 

With my father's room 
went a hook in the lintel and 
the legend of a suicide in some 
unhappy long ago. To a boy of 
six, rather wispy of body and 
romantic of mind, the hook 
and the whispering winds 
along the eaves, the jungle 
of peach trees entangling 
branches below near the back- 
yard's white-washed fence, 
were dreadfully impressive. 

What saved the household 
from gloom altogether were 
the antics of my Grandfather, 
who was a somewhat senti- 
me^ttal scholar, a reader of 
ancient history and Ralph 
Waldo Emerson, a naturalist 
with regard for every uncom- 
mon tree or flower. At home 
or on the job he talked well 
and freely. It was said of him 
that he had read the Bible 
twenty-seven times, which 
was probably no exaggeration, 
for the syntax and poetics of 



Alonzo Gibbs 



-I ^ i 




English Renaissance style 
flavored his speech. 

Such a man, grave yet 
childlike, could easily fix his 
mind on a Christmas pudding. 
And to Uncle Crowell sitting 
under his fez in the kitchen 
with his feet against the glow- 
ing station agent stove. 
Grandfather, one November 
evening, first mentioned it. 

You see. Great-great-grand- 
father had come from Eng- 
land and had been an itinerant 
preacher in Brooklyn, Bell- 
port, and Patchogue. Out of 
this English background came 
a robust spirit, an intemper- 
ate liking for food, a desire to 
keep the Christmas season, 
and a wish to do no thing by 
halves. 

So Grandfather, on that 
November night, saw in his 
lively imagination the dining 
room table stretched to take 
its last leaf; the much-laun- 
dered white linen cloth glis- 
tening upon it; a fragrant 
turkey, golden brown and 
crispy beside cranberries 
ruby-red in cut-glass dishes; 
the soft candlelight shadow- 
ing expectant faces of invited 
and uninvited relatives; the 
ironing board bridging the 
gap between two chairs and 
sagging under a bouncing 
overload of eager children 
awaiting the pudding's flam- 
ing entrance. 

Unc'e Crowell, a soft- 
spoken, practical, Toms River 
man, saw none of this magic 
or little of it. He heard the 



talismanic word which so 
stirred Grandfather, regarded 
it momentarily, and let it slip 
away without disproportion- 
ate contemplation. His pipe 
went out and he left for home, 
not knowing as he followed 
the path through the back- 
yard where the icy limbs of 
the wild peach trees clacked 
together, that his intended 
father-in-law, still rosy with 
the warmth of dream and fire 
in the hot kitchen, was cele- 
brating Christmas a month 
before it was due. 

Next night at dinner Grand- 
father told Grandmother of 
his plan for a small pudding. 
"It won't be an extravagance," 
he said. "I'll bring home a lit- 
tle of this and a little of that 
from time to time and by 
Christmas we'll have all the 
ingredients." 

And true to his word he 
brought the pudding home in 
parts : a pound of walnuts one 
week, a pound of currents an- 
other, suet, raisins, cherries, 
cinnamon, cloves, all spice, 
flour, each examined lovingly 
by Grandfather for quality 
or tenderness, sampled for 
taste, and stowed away in the 
bulging cupboard. 

At length, a week before 
Christmas, Grandfather took 
from his coat pocket a small 
bottle of brandy, assured 
Grandmother it would only be 
lit, not drunk, and poured the 
contents into a glass-stop- 
pered decanter. He held the 
brandy then above the kero- 
sene lamplight to see that it 
was pure and to watch the 
yellow rays penetrate its am- 
ber depths. "Tomorrow," he 
said, "the pudding shall be 
made!" 

But Grandmother was 
shocked on the morrow to 
find that Grandfather in 
his childish delight had car- 
ried home pound after pound 
of ingredients, so gradually 
over so long a period of time. 

Continued on page 237 



227 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. EARTH 
134 A Broadway, next to Post Office 
AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



E. CLAYTON SMITH 

Established 1913 

Jobber-Replacement Parts 

Tools - Equipment 

218-220 East Main St. 
Babylon Tel. 6-0551 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 
Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



STILL B. CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 

Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15 f" Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixan Avenue Copiague 



Gay Nineties on the Sound 

I have some comments to make 
on Capt. Eugene Griffing's story 
of his trip up the Sound to New 
York in 1891 (Oct. Forum). I 
arrived in Greenport; two years 
later and for the next three years 
I saw the steamers Portland and 
Amagansett almost every week 
during the fishing seasons. Late 
Friday afternoons and all day 
Saturdays they would come into 
Greenport and the dock would be 
lined with fishing steamers, some- 
times in double rows. It was not 
necessary to go to the dock to 
see them for any good nose in 
the village could detect their pres- 
ence. 

I have boarded many of the 
steamers and no doubt the two 
named were among them. I have 
also seen the cook come out of 
the galley many a time and grasp 
the whistle cord to summon the 
crew to meals. The fleet left 
Greenport about 1896 or 1897 to 
make its headquarters at Tiverton, 
Rhode Island. 

The Shinnecock was built after 
I left Greenport but I have had 
more than one sail on her, once in 
1903 to an International Yacht 
Race off Sandy Hook. I wonder if 
Capt. Mark Griffing of Shelter 
Island, who sailed the steamer 
Long Island between Sag Harbor 
and New London, belonged to Capt. 
Eugene's family. 

John Tooker 

Babylon 



Each issue the Forum grows 
better. James F. Merriwell, 
Jamaica. 



L. I. FORUM INDEX 

The Queens Borough Public Li- 
brary, 89-14 Parsons Blvd., Ja- 
maica, sells a complete index of 
the Long Island Forum for the 
years 1938-1947 inclusive, at $1 
postpaid. Also for the years 1948- 
1952 inclusive, at 50 cents post- 
paid. They were compiled by Miss 
Marguerite V. Doggett, Librarian 
L. I. Collection, and may be ob- 
tained by addressing her at the 
Library. 



Dominy Genealogy 

A complete history of the 
Dominy and allied families will be 
available about January 1, 1955. 
Representing a labor of more than 
twenty years, it covers the period 
from 1630 to the present day, as 
well as the three branches of the 
Dominy family, namely: the ori- 
ginal Long Island; the Beekman- 
town of Clinton County, N. Y., 
and the Ohio, an offshoot of the 
two mentioned. 

The comprehensive, illustrated 
volume, a unique achievement in 
photo-engraving and typography, 
will sell at $25 postpaid. No re- 
mittance need accompany orders 
at this time. 

Address: Newton J. Dominy, 
Historian, 29 South High, Dublin, 
Ohio. 



Schraf el Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

Start someone on their Family 
History with our Simplified Work- 
sheets and Directions. 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 

GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. I. 

The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Keligion Frtedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtor* Flushing, N. Y 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 

Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



r 



t^ 



228 



DECEMBER 1954 



Sculpturing 

Continued From Page 226 



-^ posits in the state of that 
f name. 

It is this glacier that has 
produced the most outstand- 
ing effects on Long Island, m- 
cluding the double cham of 
hills that form its so-called 
"backbone" and the broad 
plains that have witnessed 
such great advances in the de- 
velopment of aviation. 

There is abundant evidence 
that the ice of the Wisconsm 
glacier spread over the region 
that is now Long Island, 
where its front extended from 
the western end, more or less 
laterally through the center 
of the island, then along the 
Southern Fluke and beyond. 
It has been estimated that at 
the time of its maximum cov- 
erage its ice was perhaps 
1,000 feet thick and that the 
climate in the vicinity of its 
front was extremely severe. 
This part of the world was 
locked in a deep freeze that 
would make the famous bhz- 
2ard of eighty-eight seem like 
(fM a summer squall. 

Along that line it deposited 
vast quantities of debris, in 
the form of sand, gravel and 
boulders, to form the cham of 
hills that we know today as 
the Ronkonkoma moraine. As 
the glacier melted more sand 
and gravel spread out before 
it to the south, to produce the 
great outwash plain that ex- 
tends to the south shore, upon 
which many of our modern 
housing developments are 
built and where Roosevelt ard 
Mitchel Fields are located. 

After several thousand 
ye^rs the weather moderated 
and the front of the glac'er 
retreated throughout its ex- 
tent, east of Lake Success. It 
receded some distance to the 
north, beyond the present 
North Shore of Long Island. 
Later, however, there was an- 
other drop in temnerature and 
the front again advanced, but 
this time carre to rest pre^- 
erallv somewhat north of the 
position reached by the first 
advance. There it rested for a 
long time and deposited the 



earth materials to build up 
the chain of hills known today 
as the Harbor Hill moraine. 
These run lengthwise of the 
island and are only a few 
miles inland from the Sound 
to the west, but appear near 
the north shore farther east 
and continue out the North 
Fluke to Orient Point. Sands 
and gravels exuded from the 
advancing edge of this glacier 
spread to the south to form 
an outwash plain very similar 
in nature to that of the Ron- 
konkoma moraine. 

Again the climate mode- 
rated and the Wisconsin gla- 
cier retreated to the north, 
bringing the Ice Age to a 
close. Although no one knows 
exactly how long ago the ice 
of the last glacier retreated, 
it has been estimated at some- 
where around twenty-five 
thousand years ago. 

This is the story in barest 
outline. In addition to the 
events mentioned there were 
many others. It is believed, 
for example, that great 
changes occurred in the ele- 
vation of the land at various 
times during the Ice Age. 
Often it was considerably 
higher than today and at 
other times it lay beneath the 
sea. 

There are numerous small 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

ridges and hills between the 
Ronkonkoma and Harbor HiU 
moraines, composed of mate- 
rials deposited when the re- 
treating front of the Wiscon- 
sin glacier lingered tempo- 
rarily. 

Many of the picturesque 
hollows that add so greatly to 
the natural beauty of the is- 
land were produced when 
enormous chunks of ice broke 
away from the glacier and be- 
came buried in the surround- 
ing sands and gravels. When 
these finally melted they left 
depressions that the geolo- 
gist calls kettle holes, many 
of which are easily recognized 
today throughout the island. 
Some of the larger ones are 
filled with water, such as 
Lake Success, Artist Lake and 
Lake Ronkonkoma. 

Although many of the har- 
bors and bays that indent the 
North Shore, west of Port 
Jefferson, are believed to 
have been originally formed 
by the erosion of rivers that 
preceded the Ice Age, there is 
evidence that they were wid- 
ened and much altered by the 
work of the glaciers. 

At the close of the Ice Age 
vast quantities of moisture 
that had been locked in the 
glaciers was released and re- 



Cf)ntin\iefl on paffe 2'?7 




ROCKS ALONG THE NORTH SHORE 



229 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Ck)ttages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

•0 Broadway Tel. Hicksvilla 600 



Rirerhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnacock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2V2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Depoait 

Insurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Golyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

Georire S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadwiy and Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Remembers T. R. 

At the turn of the century we 
lived on Skunk's Lane (today Bay 
Avenue), Peconic, scarcely a 
stone's-throw from the Davis Tut- 
hill General Store and sub-post 
office. The grand old establish- 
ment still flourishes under the 
able owner-management of Mrs. 
Mabel Richmond, a niece. One 
early Autumn noon I accompanied 
my father on his daily call for 
the mail. In front of the store a 
group of men seemed to be in 
serious discussion, all talking at 
one time. Though only a child of 
six, I sensed something wrong in 
the charged atmosphere. 

In response to my fat.her's query, 
a voice rose above the babel: 
"They've shot President McKinley! 
— yesterday afternoon!" Yes, a 
dastardly attempt upon the Presi- 
dent's life had been made at the 
Buffalo exposition Friday, Sept. 
6, 1901. Days later, the martyred 
President succumbed, murmuring 
at the last: "It is God's will." I 
remember hearing my elders say, 




Theodore Rootevell I st 

"Now Teddy Roosevelt is our 
President!" From that time I 
heard nothing but fulsome praise 
for this man Teddy Roosevelt, and 
vowed some day I must see him. 

Forty-four years ago Suffolk 
County Fair was not only a gala 
event, but a veritable way of life. 
On Fair Week all roads led to 
Riverhead. There many an old ac- 
quaintance "was renewed, friend- 
ship watered or long-lost cousins 
reunited as families gathered te 
eat box lunches under the spread- 
ing trees. Such was the general 
atmosphere on the day designated 
as "Teddy Roosevelt Day," in 1910. 

Ex-President Theodore Roose- 
velt, fresh from his triumphal 
European tour and African big 
game hunt, was to speak at 3 
o'clock Wednesday afternoon. His 
magic name drew a gate of about 
ten thousand, an unheard of rec- 
ord until then. I had waited nine 
years and lo, here was my oppor- 
tunity! 

Needless to say, I was aboard 
Continued on next pag;e 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 

Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wvandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. 0. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

83 E.Main,BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 6317 Central leltp 

Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 
APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon, N. Y. 





23U 



DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 £. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 

Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0592 



Real Estate Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond island. New York 
■ Tel. 101 Selatiket ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199-A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



the first crowded excursion train 
out on the great day. As always 
on Fair Week, Riverhead railroad 
station was the scene of great 
activity, hustle and bustle as ex- 
cursion trains pulled in from 
Southampton, Patchogue, Hunting- 
ton and New York — not to mention 
the main line trains from Green- 
port and way-stations. 

Huge throngs were gathered 
around the speaker's stand on the 
Fair Grounds that afternoon. The 
platform was decorated in colors 
of red, white and blue and the 
band had switched from "In the 
Shade of the Old Apple Tree" to 
the lively "Alexander's Ragtime 
Band." Just at the appointed 
time for the magic appearance, 
the milling crowd set up a roar! 
The great man was here. 

Immediately the band struck up 
"There'll Be a Hot Time in the 
Old Town Tonight!" This was it. 
He had arrived in a big black, open 
chauffeur-driven car with his 
bosom friend, Dean York, brilliant 
young priest of Huntington, beside 
him. Now the din was deafening 
amidst yells of "Good Old Teddy!" 
All the while, T.R., now standing, 
gleefully smiled and waved his 
acknowledgement. 

Once on the platform and form- 
alities dispensed with, Theodore 
Roosevelt, characteristically, lost 
no time going into action. Sur- 
rounded by various dignitaries and 
members of the N.Y. press, T.R, 
clutched his soft black campaign 
hat in one fist while he spoke. With 
his other arm he gestured force- 
fully as he vehemently tore into 
"vested interests . . . and male- 
factors of great wealth . . ." 

At one point I gathered he was 
offering a bit of advice to t.hen 
President William Howard Taft. 
With jutting jaw and teeth gleam- 
ing 'neath his sandy mustache, the 
redoubtable T.R. thunderingly ad- 
monished: "You'll be damned if 
you do; but you'll be damned if 
you don't!" The surging crowd 
went wild. 

Immediately on conclusion of the 
address, a mass of humanity 
scrambled for the line now form- 
ing to shake the ex-President's 
hand. In the melee, I had my coat 
pocket torn and brand new cap 
trampled under the feet of the 
stampeding mob. But I didn't 
mind — ^hadn't I made the line! 
Pushed, shoved and jostled I fin- 
ally found myself vidthin sight and 
earshot of Teddy. 

Tousle-headed, smiling he exud- 
ed his famous charm. Upon grasp- 
ing each hand he would joyfully 
exclaim: "DEE-light-ed!" From 
his tone and radiant countenance 
it was plain he meant it, too. My 
turn came. What a moment it was 
— indeed, the thrill of a lifetime! 

Now the barkers were ballyhoo- 
ing intrepid Prof, Hutchinson's 
Continued on next page 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wanta«h 2210 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



o/./l> _^ LONG ISLAND 

^=^^^%SS REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



U (l!Ki. iM7t-i~| (£) I I riTF: AlTroTTSI \ 1* 
1 . 7 ln--l--l<:Ks) ^— ' 

"Brooklyn and Long Island^! Largest 

Real Estate Organixaiion" 

721 Franklin Ave. PI 6-5400 



Save at Southold 



Latest Dividend 



2\ 



Plus 14% extra per annum 

Bank by Mail 

WE PAY POSTAGE 
BOTH WAYS 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



231 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers 



Miller Place 



ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Street EAstport 5-0164 




Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



INSURANCE 

Ask 

EDWARDS 

The Oldest Agency 
for Miles Around 

Phones 
SAyville 4-2107 - 4-2108 



GLEN FLOORS 

FRED CAPOBIANCO 

Broadloom - Linoleum 

Tile 

Shades and Blinds 

BABYLON GLEN COVE 
HICKSVILLE 



balloon ascension "into those vast, 
upper reaches of unknown space." 
Already he was inflating the big 
gas bag. Then would be the "spec- 
tac-u-lar" plunges of "King" and 
"Queen," the beautiful white div- 
ing horses, into a huge tank of 
water. Suddenly I felt, "Oh, hang 
the Professor!" He could go fly a 
kite now. The horses? They could 
jump in the lake if they liked. 
Who eared? These diversions 
somehow seemed rather childish 
and anti-climax to a boy who'd 
just shaken hands with a former 
President of the United States, 
and Theodore Roosevelt, no less. 

On Oct. 31, 1917, I was again 
privileged to hear the great Amer- 
ican speak at Camp Upton. It. was 
an impassioned address that stir- 
red all •who heard. Now a young 
man of 23, I was deeply impressed, 
of course, but not half as thrilled 
as that day at Riverhead in 1910. 
For I was fifteen at the County 
Fair. In December, ex-president 
William Howard Taft spoke at 
Camp Upton in dedication of the 
new YMCA building. Barely one 
year later, the world learned of 
Col. Roosevelt's sudden death early 
on the morning of Jan. 5, 1919. 
Paradoxically, Theodore Roosevelt, 
ardent advocate of the strenuous 
life which he himself lived, died 
peacefully in his sleep. "Put out 
the light, please," he requested the 
old butler, and his voice was never 
heard again. 

Wilson L. Glover 

Southold 



Christmas Gift Subscriptions 

Every year more and more Long 
Islanders are using yearly sub- 
scriptions of the Long Island 
Forum as Christmas gifts. They 
simply send us the names and 
addresses of the recipients, to- 
gether with a check (at $2 each) 
to cover the list and we do the 
rest. 

Our special Christmas card 
mailed to each recipient in time 
for the holiday bears the giver's 
Yuletide Greetings. The important 
thing, however, is to place these 
orders early to insure our card 
being received just prior to Christ- 
mas Day. 



An Exciting Biography- 
Ed Kilman and Theon Wright 
have written an outstanding story 
of American opportunity in their 
book entitled "Hugh Roy Cullen", 
the fabulous tale of a poor youth 
who became known as "the king 
of the Texas wildcatters". Through 
the Cullen Foundation he has given 
away $160,000,000 for philan- 
thropic purposes. The book is an 
inspiration to American youth. 
Published by Prentice-Hall Inc. at 



Farmingdale 



GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321 — 2-1286 



Mubbell, Klapper &- Nubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 


Insurance 


Mortgages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


1«1 Richmond Ave 


, Amityville 


AMityville 4-1489 



BELLPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
M»in Street BEllport 7-0143 



Over 100 Years 



of 



DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 



E'veryMng for Building 



TlaA^au Sutiolk 

LUMBER h. SUPPLyvUcORP 



AMITYVILLE ROSLYN 

HUNTINGTON SMITHTOWN 
WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 



FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 
least 50 stories on island history. 
Sent postpaid for $1.50. Address 

L. 1. FORUM, AMITYVILLE 



^ 



232 



DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Thomas Moran 

Continued from page 224 

der the title of "See America 
First!" 

I'hough he had traveled ex- 
tensively in Europe, copying 
and interpreting Turners in 
the National Gallery in Lon- 
don and studying the Old 
Masters in France, Germany, 
and Italy as a neophyte 
painter, Moran finally found 
himself when he turned to 
American subjects. Convinced 
that "there is no phase of 
landscape in which we are not 
richer, more varied and inter- 
esting than any country in the 
world," he vigorously main- 
tained as the principal tenet 
of his artistic credo that an 
artist "should paint his own 
land." 

The range of Moran's sub- 
jects embraced skillful and 
faithful artistic impressions 
of the rugged majesty of the 
Rockies and the grotesque 
buttes of Idaho, the subtropi- 



cal scenery of Florida and Old 
Mexico, the quiet canals and 
fairy-like palaces of Venice, 
the peaceful meadows of Kent 
and Sussex, and the restful 
stretches and storm-swept 
promontories of Eastern Long 
Island. It is these last impres- 
sions that particularly inter- 
est us. For more than forty 



years he maintained a sum- 
mer studio in East Hampton 
in a house that fronted the 
Town Pond on the main street, 
not far from "Home Sweet 
Home." Failing health in his 
last years did not prevent his 
making an annual trip to his 
Long Island home, where in 
his forty-foot studio during 




An East Mampton Landscape From Watercolor by Cyril A. Lewis 



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INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

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RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



233 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

the months of May through 
November much of his work 
was done. 

For diversion he summoned 
his hanoy-man, an Indian 
named George Fowler, to pilot 
him around Hook Pond, a 
quarter of a mile east of his 
home, in the gondola which 
in 1888 floated Robert and 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 
through the Venetian canals. 
This he had purchased on a 
romantic impulse for 750 lire 
during his sojourn in Venice 
in 1890 and had it shipped to 
East Hampton. Upon his 
death Moran's relatives pre- 
sented the gondola to the East 
Hampton Public Library, and 
it finally came to rest in the 
Mariners' Museum at New- 
port News, Virginia. 

In a more practical mood he 

studied the pastoral scenery 

in and about East Hampton— 

the woods, the meadows, the 

winding roads, the windmills, 

and the blue summer sky— to 

transmute to canvas. He 

painted Long Island scenery 

under all kinds of weather 

conditions at all times of the 

day. In a Misty Morning, Ap- 

paquogue it is bathed in dull, 

morning light; in Sunset, 

Long Island, priced at $1,700 

in 1924, the brow of a rocky, 

tree-studded hill stands 

against a glowing west. In 

Five-Mile River, Long Island, 

a bare-legged boy fishes in the 

gray, placid river from a 

small, private pier on a typical 



"fisherman's day" under a sky 
mottled with hght and dark 
gray clouds. Nimbus clouds 
gather in paintings like Near 
Southampton, ticketed for sale 
in 1936 for $1,200, and East- 
hampton. Long Island, depict- 
ing a view of undulating green 
countiyside with houses and 
windmills. The storm spends 
itself in landscapes Uke A 
Summer Storm, Easthampton, 
depicting one of the windmills 
that typify a Long Island 
landscape, and in seascapes 
like Blowing a Gale, East- 
hampton Beach, delineating 
the breaking of a heavy sea. 

With the passing of sum- 
mer when the autumnal winds 
raged and the surf ran high, 
Moran draped his lithe, active 
figure in a cape coat, donned 
a beaver cap, and sallied forth, 
avid for pictorial subject mat- 
ter. A wreck on the boulder- 
strewn shore off Montauk 
Point that became the subject 
of The Cliffs of Montauk tes- 
tifies the success of his search 
if he turned seaward ; a wom- 
an following a path through 
green, sandy country beside 
wind-blown russet and green 
trees in Autumn Winds, East- 
hampton, with a windmill sil- 



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DECEMBER 1954 

houetted against dark clouds 
testifies the success of his 
search if he turned landward. 

Among a plethora of oils ^^ 
and water-colors like Montauk 
Ponds, A Glimpse of Georgica 
Pond, and A Windy Day, 
Three Mile Harbor and a mul- 
titude of etchings like An Old 
Apple Orchard, Easthampton; 
The Beach, Fresh Ponds ; and 
Looking Over the Sand Dunes, 
even the most ethnocentric 
Long Islander will find grati- 
fication and "God's plenty." 



Rare L. I. Books 

"Antiquities of Long Island", 
Gabriel Furman, 1875, with Bib- 
liography by Henry Onderdonk, Jr. 

"Loafing Down Long Island, 
Charles Hanson Towne, with draw- 
ings by Thomas Fogarty, 1921. 

"Select Patents and Manors, 
Frederick Van Wyck, 1938. 

"Stony Brook Secrets," Edward 
A. Lapham, beautifully illustrated, 

1942. ^ , ^„ . , 

"History of Long Island m four 

large illustrated volumes, Henry 

Isham Hazelton, 192:5. 

Denton's "Description" 1670. 

Gowan's reprint 1845. Contains 

listing of "Early Printed American 

Books". , , ,T, ^ 

Historic Long Island (RuEus |^ 
Rockwell Wilson) 1902. f ' ' 

For particulars write L. I. For- 
um or 'phone AMityville 4-0554. 



Jianfe of amitpbtUe 

Incorporated 1891 

lio on Special Interest Accounts Compounded Quarterly 

Hours: 9:00 to 3:00 except Saturdays 

Friday Evenings 6:00 to 8:00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



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Serving the Community 
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DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



• 



^he ^ark e5%ary and L,ouise 



• 



# 



VX/' HEN I was a little girl I 
loved to be taken to 
call at a house in East Se- 
tauket full of fascinating 
things — ivory balls, ball with- 
in ball, eight of them intri- 
cately carved from one solid 
piece; a big grinning idol 
head, and best of all, the chess 
men, kings, queens, knights, 
bishops and pawns carved like 
people in costumes of two 
tribes. 

The castle was on an ele- 
phant like the two-tailed beast 
Natty Bumpo gave the In- 
dian in Cooper's "Deerslayer." 
Later I found the tale that 
lay behind these pieces — the 
voyage of the bark Mary and 
Louise. 

Back in the days when East 
Setauket rang with the sound 
of hammers, and little boys 
were welcome at launchings 
because, should the ship stick, 
they were set running races 
on her deck to work her free, 
there was built by Boss Bacon 
the bark Mary and Louise. 
When in 1858 she sailed for 
China, Captain Benjamin 
Jones took his wife with him, 
and among the crew was a 12- 
year old cabin-boy named Eg- 
bert Bull Smith who after- 
wards told about it in a book, 
"The Two Sisters." 

A trip to China was a long 
and hazardous voyage in those 
days and the bark e'icountered 
much headwind and two hur- 
ricanes before she reached the 
pirate infested waters of the 
Malay Straits. There they 
were hailed by a ca^oe full of 
natives whose chief wore a 
high hat, frock coat and over- 
alls. They came on board to 
barter, all but one man. a 
prisoner, who thev wanted to 
trade for a o-un. That offer be- 
ing refused, thev left after 
making sure that the bark 
had no cannon. 

At sunset, the bark lying 



f^te Wheeler (§trong 

becalmed, the lookout spotted 
20 war canoes in the distance. 
Fortunately the pirates waited 
until dark to attack and by 
then a breeze had sprung up 
and the bark could be driven 
between the canoes. Many 
canoes were cut in two and 
thirty men including the chief 
were killed while the bark did 
not lose a man. The pirates' 
prisoner, however, escaped 
and was pulled aboard the 
bark. Captain Jones treated 
him kindly, and named him 
Sunday, and Mrs. Jones 
taught him English and 
Christianity. 

Reaching China, they found 
that Commodore Perry had 
opened the doors of trade with 
Japan, so for two years the 
Mary and Louise traveled be- 
tween China and Japan. In 
Shanghai, the man Sunday 
was transferred to a British 
battleship to serve as guide 
against the pirates. 

As he planned to carry 
valuable cargo Capt. Jones 
had cannon placed on deck and 
engaged a former gunner in 
the British Navy to handle 
them. On one trip, carrying 
275,000 Mexican silver dol- 
lars, the bark was chased by 
four junks. Her cannon sank 
two of them, killing thirty 
men, and the Chinese gun- 
boat Confucius coming to the 



rescue, captured the other 
two. 

Captain Jones had the 
honor to take the first mis- 
sionaries into Japan. While in 
China there was a revolution 
going on in Pekin so two of 
his sailors went inland to see 
the fun. Upon their return 
they presented the mate with 
some of the loot. He gave 
three embroidered chair-seats 
to Mrs. Jones, one of which 
hangs in a Setauket home. As 
it has an embroidered dragon 
with three toes, a royal de- 
sign, it probably came from 
the imperial palace. 

During its second year the 
bark had many adventures, 
once surviving a typhoon. At 
last clearing for home, when 
46 days out of Shanghai it 
^''as hailed by a British Gun- 
boat whose small boat brought 
Capt. Jones word that the 
pirates they had encountered 
two years before had been 
wiped out, thanks to the guid- 
ance of the man Sunday who, 
now an officer, was in charge 
of the boat that brought this 
message. He was delighted to 
see his rescuers once more. 

The voyage home was a 
race with death as Mrs. Jones 
was very ill. However, they 
reached New York in time for 
her to see her family before 
she passed away. As for the 
cabin-boy, he was a hero to 
all the Setauket youngsters. 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 



BRENTWOOD 

Suffolk ^ 4th 
Phone BR 3-4511 



BAY SHORE 

Main Cf Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



Member Federal Depoiit Insurance Corporation 



235 



LONGISLAI^D FORUM 

Original Designs Featured 
in Fashion Show 

Two coats and a jacket dress 
shown here are part of a group 
of original designs, created, made 
and modeled by students of Trap- 
hagen School of Fashion, 1680 
Broadway, New York. They were 
seen in a fashion show given by 
the school at the Hotel One Fifth 
Avenue. 

Sherry Brake (top left) wears 
her coat of copper wool and there 
is a matching sheath dress be- 
neath. The short- jacket costume of 




green-checked wool with white 
collar (top right) is Barbara 
Simke's own design. The cocktail 
and theatre coat (at bottom) is 
uniquely beautiful for its fabric 
as well as cut. It is of a tapestry 
upholstery cloth, an original de- 
sign by Carol Brandt who wears 
it here. 

These three girls, all 1954 grad- 
uates who majored in design and 
clothing construction, are now es- 
tablished in positions obtained 
through the Placement. Bureau at 
Traphagen . . . and through the 
smartness of their designs. They 
joined with current pupils in pre- 
senting the showing. Most of these 
young people studying fashion at 
Traphagen plan to make it a ca- 
reer. However, the school looks 
just as proudly on its alumnae 
who make up a "best-dressed" 
group of young matrons with big 
savings in their pockets. The 
girls have an ace in the hole, too, 
if they want to return to the busi- 
ness of fashion as a profession at 
any later date. 

Patchoguc Centenarian 

In the September issue of the 
Forum on page 173 I see an article 
in reference to Patchogue in 1812. 
What you published, I believe, is a 
part of an article written by An- 
drew Jackson Smith and sent to 
you by the former Geraldine 
Newins of Sanford, Florid-J. 

T remember Andrew Jackson 
Smith very well and was very 
much interested in the article. Be- 
fore Andrew Jackson Smith died 
he erected a monument to himself 
in Cedar Grove Cemetery (Patch- 
ogue). This monument shows that 
he was born February 6, 1813 and 
died January 19, 1913. 

He had inscribed on his monu- 
ment the following: "The noblest 
work of God is an honest man." 

Sometime I would like to read 
the complete article. 

Joseph T. Losee 

Patchogue 

Note: Counselor at Law Losee 
could himself write some interest- 
ing things of Patchogue of a later 



DECEMBER 1954 

era. His father was the proprietor 
of historic Losee's Hotel, now no 
more, and he is a brother-in-law 
of the late Justice Walter H. Jay- 
cox of the Appellate Division of 
the Supreme Court. 

Lake Success Name 

I have heard it said by an old 
resident that the name of Lake 
Success came from the Quakers 
in that vicinity before 1700 because 
they had so many converts there. 
Is this right? K. V. B. (Our an- 
swer: we doubt it very much.) 




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BAbylon 6-2(2" Southampton 1-0346 
Bt!;i port 7-0604 STony Brook 7 0917 



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DECEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Sculpturing 

Continued from Page 229 

turned to the oceans. This 
raised their general level and 
drowned great areas of land. 
This event in combination, 
perhaps, with the changing 
elevation of the land, caused 
the sea to invade the Sound 
valley to the north and en- 
croach between the ridges to 
the east to form Peconic Bay 
between the North and South 
Flukes. Thus Long Island 
emerged as a separate entity. 

Recent discoveries seem to 
indicate that sometime before 
this the Sound valley was en- 
closed by land to the east and 
existed as a lake. 

During the thousands of 
years since the island was 
born its features have been 
greatly altered by the action 
of the wind, rain, waves and 
other natural forces to the 
form we know today. But this 
is another chapter of the 
story that I hope to tell in a 
future issue of the Forum. 



Christmas Pudding 

Continued from pag-e 227 

that neither she nor, one sup- 
poses, he had any idea of the 
quantity. It mounded upward 
on the kitchen table, purple, 
yellow, and carmine, higher 
than the lazy susan center- 
piece, a load seemingly heavier 
than the deeply lathed table 
legs meant to bear. The chil- 
dren shouted for joy at its 
size, but Grandmother cried 
at what she called "the waste 
of it" and sobbed that no- 
where could she ever borrow a 
pot to hold it all. 

Grandfather was upset, of 
course, but only Grand- 
mother's attitude distressed 
him. He stamped out of the 
house throwing on his coat 
and muffler against the De- 
cember day. In half an hour 
he was back and under his 



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Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityville 4-0909-4-0910 



arm was a small, new wash 
boiler, partly filled with snow 
ly the blustering wind. 

Immediately, in his stiff- 
bosomed shirt with his sleeves 
rolled up. Grandfather turned 
cook. He seated Grandmother 
to one side and refused to 
hear her pleadings. Then 
such mixing and ladling and 
steaming as was ever known 
began. The house at first 
smelled pleasantly of spice, 
then it reeked of it, and the 
sickened children took their 
sleds and went out into the 
snow to be rid of it. 

But when bedtime came the 
pudding was lifted out of the 
boiler in a bulging pillowcase, 
and Grandfather, although 
exhausted, saluted its plump 
goodness with an appropriate 
quotation. Moreover, Grand- 
mother, through her tolerant 
love for this impractical man, 
had now become a partner in 
his holiday venture, which. 



while excessive, transcended 
prudence in the spirit of the 
merriest season. 

Christmas Eve came and 
the pudding blazed up so 
fiercely as Grandfather ap- 
phed the taper that the jamb 
of th;e door between the 
kitchen and the dining room 
was almost scorched. Even 
the drafty house fingered the 
blue-burning glory and Grand- 
father's precious beard was 
momentarily jeopardized. The 
children ate pudding that 
night and every night 
through New Year's Eve yet 
no one grumbled — in fact, 
the week became memorable 
to them all. 



A Household "Must" 

The Forum is a "Must" in our 
household, and then we send it 
on to Kansas City, Missouri, to a 
former Long Islander, who also 
enjoys re-treading familiar terri- 
tory. 

(Mrs.) Florence M. Schwarting 
West Hampton 



"Long Island Whalers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whaling by L. I. ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
ning, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 

Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



J. C. DODGE & SON, Inc. 

Glen Cove's Oldest Furniture House 

Established in 1835 when Andrew Jackson was President. 
99 GLEN STREET GLen Cove 4-0242 



a 



The Long Island Indian" 



By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civilization 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Islanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



237 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



DECEMBER 1954 



An Old Bay Shore Mill 

The Forum's frequent references 
to old time mills reminds me that 
to the north of where the South- 
side Hospital at Bay Shore now 
stands, en the north side of Mon- 
tauk highway there was within my 
memory a rather large pond, the 
outflow from which ran Edwards' 
gristmill. The mill, as I recall it, 
was to the west of the hospital 
property. The brook continued on 
across the highway which was 
spanned by a wooden bridge. To 
the side of the bridge, however, 
was a shallow ford through which 
teams with special heavy loads 
were driven in preference to using 
the bridge. Also it was a handy 
place to give the animals a drink 
of clear, cold spring water. 

(Mrs.) Carrie Owens 

Kings Park 



Third Avenue Railway 

Vincent P. Seyfried has added to 
his list of pamphlets on the old 
trolley lines of the metropolitan 
area with a 112-page account of 
Manhattan's Third Avenue Rail- 
way System from 1853 to 1953. 
The work includes an outline his- 
tory of this system, together with 
accounts of equipment, and is well 
illustrated with old time photo- 
graphs. The publisher is Felix 
Reifsehneider, Box 774 Orlando, 
Florida. 

It is perhaps not generally 
known that the Third Avenue 
System extended from Queens and 
Kings Counties on Long Island, 
through Manhattan, the Bronx and 
into Westchester as far north as 
White Plains. 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



Telephone AMityville 4-2126 

FIRESTONE 

Motor Sales, Inc. 

De Soto Plymouth Austin 

Sales and Service 

Martin Firestone' Merrick Road 
Just West of Amityville 



"Mostly Dune" It Is 

The name of Miss Dorothy 
Quick's country home on the ocean 
at East Hampton is not "Only 
Dune" as mentioned in photo title, 
but "Mostly Dune," as mentioned 
by Miss Quick in her very interest- 
ing article in the November 
Forum. I_ guess to err is still 
human. 

(Mrs.) Marilyn Hanley 

New York 



Cover to Cover 

The Forum is the most interest- 
ing periodical which I receive. I 
read each copy from cover to cov- 
er and have learned much of in- 
terest about our Long Island. 
Horace K. T. Sherwood, Long 
Beach, Cal. (former Mayor of 
Glen Cove, L. I.) 



Liked Mr. Coles' "Some Matine- 
cock Place-Names" in November 
Forum. F. A. Frey, Forest Hills. 



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Bailey's Long Island History 



A limited number of sets of 
the Long Island History, com- 
piled by Paul Bailey and pub- 
lished last year by the Lewis 
Historical Publishing Com- 
pany of New York, has been 
made available through the 
Long Island Forum at one- 
third off the publishers' price. 

This drastic reduction from 
the original price of $46.50 is 
made possible by eliminating 
volume 3 which consists en- 
tirely of biographical sketches. 

Volumes 1 and 2 comprise 
the complete History as com- 
piled by Editor Bailey and 
written by leading authorities 
in every field, consisting of 
more than 1000 pages, 43 
chapters and 200 illustrations. 

These handsomely printed 
and bound deluxe books (size 
8x10% inches) will be sent, 
while they last, in the same 
order that anplications are re- 
ceived. Price $30. 

Besides the complete history 
of the island, from its discov- 
ery, including chapters on geo- 

Address: LONG 
Amityville, N. Y. 



logy and archaeology, there 4% 
are separate chapters on each ^ 
of the towns in Nassau and 
Suffolk Counties, the history 
of the leading church denom- 
inations, whaling, fishing, 
shell fisheries, agriculture, 
medicine, banking, education, 
aviation and many other sub- 
jects. 

Long Island Birdlife is com- 
piled by Edwin Way Teale, 
rationally known authority; 
the island's mammals, by Dr. 
W. J. Hamilton, Cornell zoolo- 
gist. The most extensive cov- 
erage of the island's Indians 
ever printed was prepared by 
John H. Morice. Among the; 
authors represented are J. 
Rus'^el Spran^ue, Dr. Oscar G. 
Darlinpfton, Dr. Clarence Ash- 
ton Wood, Miss Jacoueline 
Overton, Rev. John K. Sharp, 
Chester R. Blakelock, Osbom 
Shaw, Herbert F. Ricard, 
Preston R. Bassett. Robert R. 
Coles. Halsey B. Knapn, 
Nancy Boyd Willey. Mary E. 
Bell — in all more than forty ^^ 
such authorities. ^^ 

ISLAND FORUM 

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For Luncheons and Dinners 



The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchoerue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merrick Rd. Amityvillo 
Phone AMi^ille 4-9768 



STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Tela. 248: Niicht 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 
Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since ISHO 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farmtngdale 



THE NEW 

Glen Delicatessen 

Oldest on the North Shore 

Hig-h Class Delicatessen 
and Groceries 

24 Glen St., Glen Gove, N. Y. 

Alex Eugene Glen Cove 4-33 76 



Tangier Smith Heirlooms 

I was greatly interested in Miss 
Strong's article (November For- 
um) about the Tangier Smiths, as 
members of that family were very 
good friends of my husband, the 
late Maurice French. He was in 
the U. S. Life Saving Service for 
some years at Smith's Point and 
when we were married in 1904 the 
"girls" — Miss Eugenie and Miss 
Martha Smith — gave us a present 
of six very lovely china cups and 
saucers. 

I still have five of them after 
fifty years — one for each of our 
daughters as keepsakes. My late 
husband loved the Forum and I 
read every word of it. 

Mrs. Maurice S. French 

Islip 



Well Told History 

What our family and friends 
like most about the Forum is the 
way history is so well told by your 
various writers. You must admit 
that history can be very dry and 
perhaps that is why many young 
people are driven away from it. 

I think the great obstacle to 
making local history popular is the 
ultra serious-minded local his- 
torian who can take a good human 
interest story from Out the records 
and make it read like a sorrowful 
epitaph on a time-pitted grave 
stone in a very dismal cemetery. 

All of the Forum's writers seem 
to have a rich appreciation of the 
human interest to be found in his- 
tory and to make the most of it. 
0. F. Whalen, 
Bridgeport, Ct. 



Expert Opinion 

Mr. Hall and I always read the 
Forum with great interest and you 
are to be congratulated on a unique 
publication. I realize more and 
more its importance in the preser- 
vation of local history which would 
not otherwise come to light. 
Martha K. Hall 

Note: Mrs. Hall, who is librarian 
of the Huntington Historical Soci- 
ety, collaborated with other trus- 
tees of the Walt Whitman Birth- 
place Association in compiling the 
interesting pamphlet issued in 
honor of the poet's 135th birthday, 
May 31, 1954. 



November issue very interest- 
ing. I liked Miss Quick's hurricane 
story. So, true! Mrs. Frederick H. 
Schluter, 160 Columbia Heights, 
Brooklyn. 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. MOhawk 9-9800 



For the Sea Food 
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where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

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