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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

LONG I SLAND 

FCRUM 




Gerritsen's Tide Mill Dam^ Kings County. (See next page) 



c 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



OLIVER CHARLICK, R. R. PRESIDENT 
SETAUKET'S CAROLINE CHURCH 
ANDRE AT EAST HAMPTON 
BEACHCOMBING'S AN ART 
SOME LETTERS FROM LONG AGO 



John Tooker 

Albert G. Rapp, M. D. 

Dr. Clarence Asliton Wootl 

Julian Denton Smith 

Kate Wheeler Strong 



LETTERS, REVIEWS, Etc. 



JANUARY 1954 



$2.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVI L No. I 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eastport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



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A Private Sanitarium for 
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Rug Cleaning 

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Power Brake Sales Service 

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FURNITURE 
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321 Main St. Greenport 

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Texaco Products 
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(formerly Barker's) 

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SUNRISE 

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'Blue Coal' 

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Lindenhurat 
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THE 

LcNG Island 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERI 
Entered as second-class matter May H, 1947, at the 
post office at Amityville. New York, under the Act of 
March }. 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Puhlishr- Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Dutch Built Tide Mills 

The Dutch who settled the west 
end of the island built very few 
if any windmills. Those at the east 
end are all of English design. 

The Dutch built tide mills, the 
last one of which to stand, we be- 
lieve, was in Kings County on the 
westerly bank of Gerritsen's Creek, 
also known as the Strom Kill. It 
was destroyed by fire, supposedly 
started by vandals, in 1934. 

This old structure was built some 
time before 1756 and was equipped 




Gerritsen's Mill 

with wooden machinery, beltings 
of leather and very large revolv- 
ing millstones used to grind grain. 

The basin beside which it stood 
would fill up at high tide to be 
confined behind a dam which 
spanned the narrowest part of the 
creek. A gate equipped with rat- 
chet wheel, could be opened by hand 
to cause the water to flow out and 
turn the millwheel which turned 
the millstones. 

Gerritsen's Creek was named for 
Hugh Gerretsen (Gerritsen) who 
prior to 1645 owned the land that 
included the site of the mill. He 
built the first mill there before 

Continued on Page 8 



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Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 
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Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

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MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

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AMityville 4-0212 



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Kear Amityville Depot 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Oliver Charlick, R. R. T^resident 



It is very difficult from the 
little material available to form 
a correct list of the men who 
served as presidents or receiv- 
ers of The Long Island Rail- 
road from the time of incor- 
poration in 1834 until it be- 
came a part of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad System in 1900. 
It is still more difficult to find 
out what years some of the 
earlier ones served. One ac- 
count names John A. King, son 
of Rufus King and Governor 
of New York State in 1856-7, 
as president of the Brooklyn 
& Jamaica Railroad Co., but 
gives no dates. The facilities 
of that railroad were leased by 
the L. I. R. R. Co., in 1834 for 
a term of years. 

The first three names on our 
list are George B. Fisk {or 
Fiske), Isaac Haviland and 
James H. Weeks, the latter 
described as a Quaker. Oliver 
^_ Charlick followed him and was 
^^ one of two presidents who 
served long terms. Henry 0. 
Havemeyer was elected presi- 
dent early in 1875 but held 
office for only about a year 
when the Poppenhusen family, 
consisting of Conrad, Adolph 
and Herman C, secured a con- 
trolling interest in the L.I.R.R. 
Co., by paying $1,750,000. 

The railroad went bankrupt 
in the fall of 1877 and Col. 
Thomas R. Sharp was ap- 
pointed receiver, and was also 
called president. Austin Cor- 
bin bought the stock of the 
railroad from Drexel, Morgan 
& Co., in December 1880 and 
on Jan. 1, 1881 he replaced Col. 
Sharp as receiver and presi- 
dent. The four years between 
the death of Austin Corbin in 
June 4, 1896 and the taking 
over of control by The Penn- 
sylvania R. R. in 1900 were 
covered by two presidents, 
William H. Baldwin and Wil- 
liam F. Potter. 

rThe career of Austin Cor- 
bin particularly as it affected 
the L. I. R. R. was briefly 
sketched by me in the August 
1951 number of the Forum, 



Jo/in Tooker 

and we propose at this time 
to tell of another president 
whose traits of character were 
entirely different from those 
of Corbin. That man was Oli- 
ver Charlick whose imperious 
ways won for him from the 
newspapers of his time the 
title of "King Oliver." 

Oliver Charlick was bom 
near Hempstead in 1813 as 
stated by one source, but since 
that date does not agree with 
the age given at his death, and 
also hardly allows time for the 
many activities he was en- 
gaged in, it is more likely that 
his birth year was either 1809 
or 1810. His business experi- 



York, built the Eighth Avenue 
street car line and operated it 
for seven years. He had it 
paying 12% dividends. He re- 
entered politics and became a 
member of the Board of 
Police Commissioners of New 
York City. It was said of him 
that his career as a politician 
did not add to his personal rep- 
utation nor did it win for his 
memory the regard paid to a 
respectable mechanic. 

He gave up his interests in 
street cars in 1860 and took up 
steam railroading particularly 
on Long Island and was presi- 
dent of one of the roads run- 
ning between Hunters Point 
and Flushing. Once while in 
charge of that road he reduced 




'Old Menry RuggUs" 



ence was acquired in the 
wholesale grocery firm of Gar- 
diner & Howell in New York 
City, and when that firm failed 
he went into business for him- 
self only to lose everything in 
the great fire of 1885 which 
destroyed the greater part of 
downtown New York. He 
started up again as a grocer 
and ship chandler. 

In 1843 he entered the 
stormy political field of New 
York City, was elected alder- 
man, and sometimes acted as 
mayor during the absence of 
Mayor Havemeyer. He went 
to California in 1849 and was 
in business there for 18 
months, then returned to New 



the fare between Huiiters 
Point and Flushing from 25 
cents to 8 cents. 

On April 14, 1863 Oliver 
Charlick and his associates 
were elected to the Board of 
Directors of the L.I.R.R. Co., 
and he became its President. 
It was said at the time that 
their sole policy was to make 
money. 

Several different branches 
of the railroad were built while 
Charlick was president, the 
longest one from Manor (Man- 
orville) to Sag Harbor which 
was begun in 1869. In many 
of the road building operations 
Charlick clashed with the pub- 
lic and always managed to 



S 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JANUARY 1954 



have his way. The people of 
Huntington offered to donate 
land in the village for a rail- 
road station but Oliver Char- 
lick refused the offer and that 
is why Huntington railroad 
station is a mile and a half or 
more from the village. 

When the South Side R. R. 
Go., was building its road from 
Patchogue to Jamaica in 1867 
it asked the L.I.R.R. Co., to 
receive its cars at Jamaica and 
take them to the western ter- 
minal but Charlick with char- 
acteristic stubborness refused, 
so the South Side built its own 
station at Beaver St., Jamaica 
and continued its tracks to 
Bushwick where its passen- 
gers were ferried to New York 
from South 8th St., Brooklyn. 
There were many more such 
cases where Charlick opposed 
the popular will. 

In the fall of 1874 Oliver 
Charlick was suffering from 
dropsy and an incurable dis- 
ease of the kidneys and was 
growing steadily worse. The 
following taken from a South 
Shore paper is a sample of the 
grim editorial humor of those 
days. For two weeks in suc- 
cession the paper reported the 
progress of Charlick's illness 
and the third week nrinted 
this item: "Oliver Charlick 
buys two quarts of strawber- 
ries, not dead yet!" 

Early in 1875, because of 
Charlick's serious illness and 
the death while in office of 
Mayor Havemeyer who held 
the largest block of L.I.R.R. 
stock, the directors met and 
decided it was time for a 
change so they elected Henry 
0. Hayemeyer president. 

Oliver Charlick died at his 
Flushing home on Friday April 
30, 1875, and we quote his 
obituary in full as it appeared 
in the same paper that printed 
the item about the straw- 
berries. 

"Oliver Charlick, late presi- 
dent of the L.I.R.R. died at his 
Flushing home on Friday 
morning last at the age of 66. 
Mr. Charlick was a self made 
man of indomitable will and 
energy. In all his business 
dealings he never allowed his 

Continued on (lagfe 1 2 



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President 



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BRookville 5-11020 



-^ 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



jetauket's (^aroline Qhurch 



The Caroline Church of 
Setauket, in Brookhaven 
Town, which ranks high 
among- Colonial churches in 
beauty and historic interest, 
was built in 1729 and has been 
in continuous use since. Its 
founders were descendants of a 
small group of Church of 
England people who came to 
Long Island from Massachu- 
setts in 1655. These early set- 
tlers had established an inde- 
pendent religious organization 
and for nearly thirty years 
had followed the Anglican 
Service. Then, for reasons 
unknown, the first Church of 
England congregation on Long 
Island went out of existence. 

The movement did not die 
out, however. In 1723 a new 
Episcopal parish was organ- 
ized at Setauket. Its first rec- 
tor was James Wetmore, a 
graduate of Yale, formerly 
ordained as a Congregational 
minister. In 1722, he and three 
other instructors at Yale, 
having voiced doubts of the 
validity of their ordination, 
sailed to England and were 
there ordained as priests in the 
Church of England. While at 
Setauket, Wetmore introduced 
Dr. Samuel Johnson to the 
parish. This man was one of 
the four "converts" from Yale 
and later became President of 
King's College, now Columbia. 

Rev. Thomas Standard, of 
Taunton, England, a former 
physican, was the next rector. 
In 1725 he began gathering 
funds for the erection of a 
church building. By 1729 a 
sufficient sum had been col- 
lected and the Rev. Alexander 
Campbell, the new rector, sup- 
ervised the building of the 
church which has served the 
town for 225 years. Since the 
original parish had been called 
Christ's Church, the new 
building was given that name, 
but a year later the name was 
changed. Wilhelmina Karoline, 
Queen of George II of Eng- 



^/^ert G. Rapp, M. D. 

land, sent the new church 
some fine altar cloths and a 
Communion Service consisting 
of a chalice, paten and alms- 
basin, which are still used on 
special occasions. In her 
honor, the parish became the 
Caroline Church. 

During the Revolutionary 
War, the "Battle of Setauket" 
was fought under the walls of 
this church, Aug. 22, 1777. The 
building still bears the marks 
of bullets fired on that day. It 
is said that some of the 
wounded were cared for in the 
church while the battle went 
on outside. 

In 1814, the Rev. Charles 
Eeabury, son of Samuel Sea- 
bury, the first Episcopal 
Bishop in America, became 



rector and served for thirty 
years. It has been assumed 
that his father visited him in 
Setauket and preached in 
Carohne Church during his 
son's pastorate. This is in 
error, since Bishop Seabury 
died in New London, Connecti- 
cut Feb. 25, 1796. However, 
Bishop Seabury (before his 
consecration) served parishes 
in Jamaica, Flushing, New- 
town and Huntington, and did 
preach at Setauket at an 
earlier date. His own father, 
also Samuel, served at Hemp- 
stead and Setauket while the 
future Bishop was his student 
and they sometimes journeyed 
together from one church to 
the other. 

During Charles Seabury's 
last years, a young priest 
named William Adams served 




Historic Caroline Church 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

as acting- rector. He had been 
a missionary in Wisconsin and 
returned there later to help 
settle the town of Nashotah 
Samuel Seabury 3rd also lived 
at Setauket and followed in the 
footsteps of his father, 
Charles, being ordained in the 
Episcopal Church in 1826. He 
was a frequent visitor at Caro- 
line Church and his early 
training- and background pre- 
pared him for a distinguished 
career on Long Island. 

The Church building has 
undergone many alterations 
in the course of its existence. 
In 1937, through generous 
gifts by Mrs. Frank Melville 
and Mr. Ward Melville, the 
Caroline Church was restored 
to its original Colonial beauty, 
with added service facilities. 

The restoration revealed 
many facts about the old build- 
ing, hitherto unknown to the 
present generation. A false 
ceiling and walls were re- 
moved. These had been added 
a hundred years ago to make 
it easier to heat the church. 
Lunettes of wall plaster were 
found at each end, above the 
hung ceiling, demonstrating 
the existence of a previous 
"Barrel Ceiling." The present 
ceiling is a copy of this. 

The restoration also exposed 
huge hand-hewn timbers of 
oak with white-wash still on 
them, as solid as the day they 
were put in place. More col- 
umns and beams were uncov- 
ered in the vestibule and ship's 
knees in the upper comers. 
The latter show the influence 
of the old ship's carpenters in 
the days when Setauket was a 
fishing village. The floors are 
covered with wide pine boards, 
up to 16 inches in width. The 
gallery at the rear was added 
in 1744 and furnished pews 
for the slaves. It is still called 
"the slave gallery". The nar- 
row benches with their for- 
ward slanting backs prove that 
the slaves were not expected 
to go to sleep during the ser- 
vice! The supporting beams 
of the gallery are arched like 
a ship's deck, also reflecting 
the ship-building influence. 

In the interior, the lower 
half of the east wall, behind 



JANUARY 1954 



the altar, is panelled in Colon- 
ial style. The altar, pews and 
pulpit are of similar design. 
The inner walls and ceilings 
and panels are painted off- 
white in color while the old 
beams and columns are painted 
to simulate white-washing. 
The old oil lamps have been 
restored, but cleverly wired 
for electricity. 

The old organ, now in the 
parish house, was probably 
imported from England prior 
to the Revolution. It first 
served in St. Ann's Church in 
Brooklyn, the oldest Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church in 
King's County. It was brought 
to Setauket about a hundred 
years ago. Two antique (Shera- 
ton chairs in the sanctuary 
were gifts of the Rev. Charles 
Seabury. 

The exterior of the church 
IS practically unchanged. The 
warped walls and the bullet 
holes in the belfry can still be 
seen. The weather-vane atop 
the steeple has the British 
Union Jack as part of its de- 
sign. 

The simplicity of architec- 
ture and beauty of line of this 
grand old church attract many 
visitors. The Duke of Windsor 
attended service there a few 
years ago and in 1942, after 
his consecration. Bishop De 
Wolfe made one of his first 
official visitations to Setauket. 
He preached and confirmed at 
Caroline Church in the morn- 
ing, then proceeded to St. 
John's Church in Oakdale, 
where he preached and con- 
firmed in the afternoon. Since 
this was the exact route often 
taken by earlier Bishops, the 
day was crowded with mem- 
ories of early American 
Church historv. 



Mr. Ernest Clowes' reference to 
a "Circus of 1846" at the east end 
may have something- new there, but 
It was old stuff in Queens County 
even before the Revolution. 
George P. Grant, 
Jamaica. 



At Great Ppnd, north of South- 
old village, S. M. Jewell in 1899 
caught a torup (Indian for snap- 
pmg turtle) that weighed 25 
pounds. Dr. Clarence Ashton 
Wood, Largo, Florida. 



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JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



cAndre ciAt Sdst \}\ampton 



r\ ESTINY decreed that 
•*-^ Major John Andre whose 
life the inexorable rules of 
war summarily terminated in 
1780 should be attended dur- 
ing his last days by a young 
medic of East Hampton line- 
age whom under the strict ap- 
plication of the same harsh 
code the brilliant young Eng- 
lish officer had in his power 
to have arrested in the home 
of his father where Andre was 
then quartered. 

It was a strange coincidence 
also that in an earlier phase of 
the Revolution Andre should 
have once shared a bed ard 
joined during much of the 
night in mutual discussion of 
subjects alien to war with 
another young American who 
later in the performance of 
military duty voted the hanpc- 
man's noose around Andre's 
neck. 

Especially intriguing is the 
fact that neither of the chance 
bedfellows knew until dawn 
that the one was a prisoner on 
his way south to personal re- 
straint under parole and that 
the other was an American 
officer en route to the north 
to move artillery cantured 
from the British in the Cham- 
pla'n valley for subsequent use 
at the siege of Boston. 

At the surrender of the 
British at Fort Chamblv on 
Oct. 18. 1775 and the fall of 
Fort St. John on Nov. 3 fol- 
lowing, Major Andre was cap- 
tured and stripped of every- 
thing except the picture of his 
sweetheart Honora Sneyd, 
which he concealed in his 
mouth. 

Under orders of the Contin- 
ental Congress Andre with 
the men of his company were 
sent under guard to Pennsyl- 
vania by Major James Livings- 
ton, the same officer who a 
few years later was indirect) v 
the cause of Andre's final and 
fatal arrest. 

As Major Andre came down 



Dr. 0arence zAshton "Wood 

the Hudson Valley he encoun- 
tered near Haverstraw an 
American officer named Knox. 
Both young men were about 
the same age. Both had given 
up the pursuits of trade for 
the profession of arms and 
both had made a study of his 
new occupation. 

Both were acquainted with 
the French language, Andre's 
father being a Frenchman. 



and to hold no correspondence 
on American affairs. 

He established friendly re- 
lations with the people within 
his bounds that were long af- 
terwards perpetuated in the 
memory of their descendants. 
He taught some of their child- 
ren to draw, his favorite de- 
signs being studies of the 
human figure. In some circles 
he became a welcome guest 
and frequently shared in their 
pleasure parties. 




Old Gardiner Manorhouse, Destroyed By Fire 



Early in life the American had 
been a bookseller. At eighteen 
Knox was chosen captain of a 
volunteer company of grena- 
diers. His talents were early 
discovered in the American 
army. 

The respective military sta- 
tus of the two bedfellows was 
not revealed by either until 
they were about to part in the 
morning. 

The intelligence and refine- 
ment of Andre left an impres- 
sion on the mind of Knox and 
the memory of their nocturnal 
intercourse gave additional 
bitterness to the later painful 
duty of the American officer. 

As an enemy officer Major 
Andre was paroled in Pennsyl- 
vania, first at Lancaster and 
then at CarUsle, he to keep 
within six miles of his abode 



Towards the end of 1775 
most of the prisoners taken 
by each side in Canada were 
exchanged. Among them was 
Andre. Thereafter the chang- 
ing scenes of the war took 
Andre to Boston and later to 
Long Island. 

At East Hampton Andre 
was quartered in the home of 
Col. Abraham Gardiner. All 
Long Island was then in the 
undisputed control of the 
British. While Andre was 
there Dr. Nathaniel Gardiner, 
son of Col. Gardiner, made a 
secret visit to his father's 
house. 

Andre did not tell his host 
until afterwards that he knew 
at the time of the physician's 
presence. He explained that 
as he had not actually met the 

C'ontinued on Page 14 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JANUARY 1954 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 
GEORGE C. BARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 
E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babylon. Tel. 551. 



Imperial Washable Wallpapers 

Moore's Paints and Varnishes, Duco 
and Nu-Enamel, Artists' Materials. 
Gus Schmidt, 74 East Main St., 
Patchogue. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural .sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



Dodge- Plymouth Sales-Service 
Distributors for Firestone Products 

TERRY BROTHERS 
430 W. Main St. Tel. 109 Patchogue 



A L. I. Pamphlet 

N. Y. and Long Island Traction, 
55 photos, large map insert; excel- 
lent trolley history. $1.25 postpaid. 
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Wanted to Buy 

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Pearsall Family in England and 
America, by Clarence E. Pearsall 
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Mrs. Wm. C. Voehl, 1463 Hewlett 
Av., Hewlett, L. I., N. Y. (I) 



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AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiayue 



Letters From Our Readers 

Continued From Page 2 

1685 in which year it was referred 
to in the Dongan Patent. Just how 
long it stood, we do not know, but 
a long line of his descendants 
owned the site and served as mil- 
lers. 

During the Revolution one Sam- 
uel Garretsen was the miller and 
was forced by British troops, bil- 
leted nearby, to grind grain for 
their horses. One night however 
his millstones disappeared and 
although he was suspected of sabo- 
tage they were not recovered until 
after the war when the stones 
were dragged up from the bottom 
of the creek where Samuel had 
dumped them. 



Tappen Data Wanted 

Who was the father of Jeremiah 
Tappen, late of Sheepshead Bay, 
born about 1809, died October 14, 
1864. Buried in a Quaker Cemetery 
in Jericho, L. I. Reinterred Novem- 
ber 9, 1883 in Greenwood Cemetery, 
Brooklyn. Also seek names of 
father's brothers and sisters, if any. 
George C. Stephen, (Descendant), 
87 Dartmouth Road, Manhasset, 
L. L (2). 



Enjoy the Forum very much. 
W. A. Mobius, East Meadow, L. I. 



Bound Forums for 1952-53 

Volumes of the Long Island 
Forum for 1953. and also for the 
two years 1952-53, in permanent, 
hard cover, cloth binding with gilt 
lettering should be ordered as early 
as possible from now en. Single 
year 1953, $5 postpaid. Two year 
books, $8. 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. I. 



The Thirteen Tribes 

A second printing of The Thir- 
teen Tribes is now ready for mail- 
ing. Price per copy postpaid. One 
Dollar. 

This brief sketch of the customs, 
habits, characteristics and history 
of the Long Island Indians by the 
Forum editor is being used in social 
study courses in a number of pub- 
lic schools. The pamphlet is well 
illustrated and has heavy durable 
covers. 

Address Long Island Forum, 
Amityville, N. Y. 



Miss Quick's Poems 

"Interludes" is the title of an- 
other book of poems by Dorothy 
Quick, published by Farrar, Straus 
& Young. Like her previously pub- 
lished collections, many of these 
have appeared in various national 
publications. But to have them in 
one compact volume, handily classi- 
fied as to subject, is indeed a treat. 
We like especially Miss Quick's 
poems on nature, dealing with her 
own observations, but this collec- 
tion includes such a wide variety of 

Continued on page 1 



Topping Family Data 

After 18 years' work, my Topp- 
ing Genealogy is nearing comple- 
tion. Would appreciate hearing 
from anyone having Bible or other 
record of Topping birth, death, 
marriage, etc., not yet sent in, for 
use ir pame. Charles E. Topping, 
1423 Mill Av., Brooklyn 34, N.Y. (I) 

The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judee Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne Sf. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N.Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FRBE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors F1u»hing. N. Y 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

Interest 2%% Dividend 

Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



f 



^ 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^eackcomhing^s c^n cArt 



■DEACHCOMBING has al- 
■■-' ways held considerable 
attraction for me since one 
high school day when I saw a 
man pick up an elegant dia- 
mond ring from close by a 
spile at Roche's Bathing Pavi- 
lion in Far Rockaway, He was 
a total stranger and surely not 
given to beachcombing as a 
profession, in fact he was very 
well dressed and wore a derby 
jauntily. He carried a cane 
with a silver head and poked 
around aimlessly. Suddenly in 
simply scratching the wet 
sand around a pile he uncov- 
ered the ring. I have never 
again seen such a find nor 
have I ever lost the impetus 
the find gave me. 

Beachcombing, the word 
itself, always bothers me. It 
seems to have the hint of dis- 
honorable occupation, not on 
a par with bank robbing but 
/(?•> certainly equal to pilfering 
" tomatoes from a neighbor's 

garden or snitching water- 
melons. It seems a form of 
self-employment to be in- 
dulged in when all other forms 
of livelihood had become ex- 
tremely unbearable and unde- 
sirable. It smacks of highly 
questionable company. 

I tried a turn at beachcomb- 
ing after I saw that rinqr come 
to light but in the first five 
minutes my take amounted to 
exactly nothing and I tired 
and gave up. I have never been 
discouraged in hunting un- 
claimed items elsewhere. Pen- 
nies, nicknacks, trinkets in 
gutters have continually daz- 
zled me and I have never come 
to look upon streetcombing 
with as much eyebrow raising 
as beachcombing. Streetcomb- 
ing seems a more acceptable 
sport. 

I wish I had kept a list of 
the things I have picked out 

#of gutters. At the top of the 
list would be a silver cuff link 
with an ornamented S en- 
graved on it. I never came 
upon the mate and so had the 



Julian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 

Society 

link made into a tieclasp when 
those things were very popu- 
lar. It had teeth added on the 
under side which stabbed into 
the tie held by a spring 
against other teeth on a lower, 
matching piece. I felt very 
proud of that clasp but it was 
not long before another street- 
comber found it — the spring 
lost its tension rapidly. 

Streetcombing flourished 
with my gang in the very earl- 



to me as a source of off-the- 
record gain. Perhaps it hap- 
pened when I came upon a 
fifty-cent piece poised atop a 
little tee of sand just waiting 
to be picked up. That was 
down on Jones Beach one cold 
winter Sunday with the wind 
howling out of the northwest. 
I pressed along head down and 
body braced against the wind. 
My cap came close to my eyes 
to ward off the sand as it 
whisked across the beach. I 
watched more where my next 
step would be than anything 
else. Shells, broken pieces of 








iest days of moving pictures. 
Our weekly allowances could 
stand nothing nearer the 
screen than seats in the back 
three rows. Occasionally Lady 
Luck smiled up from the gut- 
ter and by pooling our allow- 
ances and gleanings we could 
get in the back row of the 
other playhouse in town and 
watch some vaudeville along 
with the pictures. I wonder 
now if a fond parent did not 
plant those gleanings for at 
times their appearance could 
have been a bit suspicious. 

I cannot put my finger on 
the exact date that beach- 
combing again presented itself 



glass, bits of metal rested on 
tight mounds of sand perhaps 
half an inch above the level of 
the beach — the weight of the 
objects being enough to com- 
press the sand beneath and 
hold it in place against the 
wind while surrounding sands 
blew away. On one such tee the 
half dollar lay, tails up, and a 
bit greenish from the action 
of the salt water. Before com- 
ing away that Sunday I found 
a nickel and a penny. The pen- 
ny had waited a long time to 
be found — it had turned 
black. 
A few winters ago I came 

Continued on page 1 5 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JANUARY 1954 



Leading Real Estate Broki^rs of 



Sayville 

Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

1(59 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1930 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
90 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinntcock Bays. 



North port 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2'/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 
, The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

Georee S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Paris Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Letters From Our Readers 

Continued from page 8 

subjects that anyone who likes 
poetry at all is pretty sure to find 
some of special appeal. 

The author, a native of western 
Long Island and a summer resident 
since childhood of East Hampton, 
has the rare gift of being also a 
writer of novels, a columnist and a 
critic. She will be remembered by 
many long-time Forum readers for 
her eye-witness account shortly 
after the Hurricane of 1938 through 
which she passed at her summer 
home amid East Hampton's ocean- 
front sand-dunes. James Branch 
Cabell refers to Miss Quick as "a 
true poet, in addition to being a 
superb critic," while John Hall 
Wheelock says of her poetry that 
"it reveals fresh depths of insight 
as well as technical maturity." 

"Interludes" is listed at $3 and 
may be obtained from the pub- 
lishers or by addressing the Forum. 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 

Commack 



Peperidge Chopping Blocks 

I for one am glad that Julian 
Smith identified Long Island's own 
native holly as the grand old peper- 
idge tree. Anyone whoever used a 
section of peperidge trunk for a 
chopping block knows how useful 
the wood is for that purpose. Not 
so awfully hard, but the twisted 
grain, running in every direction, 
made splitting it almost impossible. 
Harold F. Dickinson, 
Jamaica. 



Deacon Elisha Ackerly 

Some time ago I read an inter- 
estmg story in the Forum by your 
Nature Editor, Julian Denton 
Smith, of an old-time melodian 
used by the Freeport Methodists. 

It was just about a century ago, 
during the pastorate of Rev. 
Theodore Hunt (1849-1858), that 
t h e Patchogue Congregational 
Church installed a "modem, up-to- 
date melodian." It was installed in 
the gallery of the church and a 
choir was organized under the 
Continued on next page 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 

LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 

65 Hilton Avenue 

Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 

Insurance Mortgages 

JOHN T. PULIS 

101 Richmond Ave., Amityville 
AMiiyville 4-1489 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 

Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 

Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wvandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

Realtor - Insurer - Appraiser 

Montauk Highway 

Phone Center Moriches 86 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShor e 7-0876 & 0877 
Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 



Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 

W. E. MAGEE, Inc. 

APPRAISER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Brokers 

Babylon. N. T. 



^. 



lU 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



# 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurers 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales • Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

Richard Downing & Sons 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Tel. Oyster Bay 592 
North Hempstead Turnpike 



■BEIU.T.WE/T 

Real Estate -Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond Island, New York 
■ Tel. 101 Sotauket | 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199- A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



Letters From Our Readers 

Continued from Page 1 

direction of Elisha Ackerly who 
was also deacon of the church. 

Deacon Ackerly was also among 
those who labored for a new church 




Deacon Ackerly 

building, the third, which was dedi- 
cated November 27, 1855. I believe 
that it stood at the comer of Ocean 
avenue and Main street. 

G. F. Booth. 

Far Rockaway 



Mr. Alonzo Gibbs certainly rang 
the bell with his Gold Piece Tree 
in the December Forum. (Miss) 
Katherine R. Dumper, Levittown. 



I'm delighted Dr. Wood put his 
finger of authority on the rascality 
of John Scott of Southampton, 
"leading colonial swindler". Every 
once in a while some so-called 
scholar pays tribute to that old ras- 
cal. (Mrs.) Grace W. Axtmann, 
Hicks ville. 



Miller Place 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 



]Vfass«pequa 



TOM ABBOTT 
Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y, 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Kstate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



n///> _=« LONG ISLAND 

^^^^^SS£b REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 



Garden City 



"Brooklyn and Long Island's Largest 

Real Estate Organization'"'' 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-5400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

2^2% 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



u 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JANUARY 1954 



Oliver Charlick 

Continued from page 4 

regard for the welfare or con- 
venience of others to interfere 
with his own. His policy to- 
wards Long Island and its 
people was never a liberal one, 
nor calculated to make him 
popular with the patrons of 
the road. Now that he is gone 
we would not indulge a harsh 
word towards a man whom few 
of our people regarded kindly. 
Whatever his faults or mis- 
takes, they are better buried 
with him. Long Island has 
outlived Oliver Charlick and 
under the new management of 
the railroad he so long con- 
trolled we may confidently 
expect far better and greater 
results." 

The will of Oliver Charlick 
dated November 25, 1874 was 
admitted to probate in June 
1875. He must have had a 
little human kindness in his 
nature for a codicil dated 



March 30, 1875 was attached 
to the will making provision 
for two faithful employees, 
one of them being his coach- 
man. His estate was estimated 
to be worth between two and 
three million dollars. 

When the Poppenhusens 
vere trying to get control of 
the L.I.R.R. stock they had 
considerable difficulty in per- 
suading Mrs. Charlick to dis- 
pose of her shares. She also 
threatened to sue the L.I.R.R. 
for salary due her husband, 
claiming that he had not 
drawn any from the treasury 
of the railroad in several 
years. 

The hope for better man- 
agement of the L.I.R.R. as 
expressed in Charlick's obitu- 
ary had to wait six years for 
fulfillment when on January 1, 
1881 a new and different type 
of railroad president appeared 
on the scene whose name was 
Austin Corbin. 



Forum Stories Cited 

New York State History, quar- 
terly of the State Historical Asso- 
ciation, includes a number of 
Forum articles in a list compiled 
by James Taylor Dunn, Associa- 
tion Librarian, as of special inter- 
est to mem,bers. 

The articles cited, from the Jun«, 
July, August and September issues 
of the Forum are Rural L. I.'s 
Oldest Bank, and Whaling's Ex- 
panding Years, by Paul Bailey; 
Trap Fishing 1860 to 1950, by 
Eugene S. Griffing; Grist Mill at 
Wading River, by Evelyn Rowley 
Meier; Rufus King, Patriot, by 
Marion F. Overton; Hello Girb of 
Long Ago, by John Tooker; South- 
oM's John Ledyard, and Amagan- 
sett's Judge Conkling, by Dr. Clar- 
ence Ashton Wood. 



Likes Mrs. Steffens' Writings 

I wish Mrs. Emily B. Steffens 
would write oftener. Her style is 
delightful and she always has 
something worthwhile to report. 
(Mrs.) Clarabelle Hoskins, Long 
Beach, L. L 



We hope you get out your arti- 
cles on L. L whaling in pamphlet 
form. Gus Wessel, Whitestone, L.I. 



MORTGAGE MONEY 

HOME OWNERS 



Mortgage Loans to refinance existing mortgages 
or to purchase and/ or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD, N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



^. 



12 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Some Letters ^rom Long (SAgo 



AT a meeting of Mayflower 
Chapter, Daughters of 
the Revolution, on September 
24, 1831, Miss Corinne Tyler 
read some letters which her 
great - great - grandfather in 
England had written to his son 
William Bacon in Patchogue. 
The latter became Patchogue's 
postmaster in 1807 and for the 
first quarter his oflftee showed 
earnings amounting to the 
large sum of $1,061 The second 
quarter, however, it did de- 
cidedly better— $3.50. 

On February 9, 1803, four 
years before he became post- 
master. Bacon received a let- 
ter from his father in Englard 
containing some good advice 
-which 1 imagine stood him in 
good stead. His father wrote: 

"Dear Bill — I sincerely beg 
you will be very industrious 
and inform yourself in spell- 
ing. Surely you have a dic- 
tionary. Spend every leisure 
minute and you will find much 
pleasure when accomplished in 
that desirable art, to spell well. 
We beg you to write us by first 
opportunity and inform us of 
your intention, whether you 
expect to come next summer 
and stop awhile. We are very 
sorry for the loss of your 
watch; hope it will be recov- 
ered by your name being en- 
graved upon it. I find you have 
robbers as well as we have in 
this country." 

In a letter dated November 
28, 1808, the father speaks of 
Napoleon as "this Corsican 
tyrant," and adds "So this 
gentleman is off for Spain. It 
appears strange that no one 
can put a ball through him. 
Am fearful (we) shall have no 
peace while he lives. Am ap- 
prehensive much blood will be 
shed before the war is at an 
end." 

I have previously quoted 
from the letters of the Lloyd 
family of the Manor of Queens 
Village (Lloyd's Neck in Hunt- 
ington Town) who like many 



K^te "U heeler S^^oyig 

other families of the early 
days owned slaves. One Pas- 
chel Nelson wrote Henry Lloyd 
in February 1725 that his 



(Nelson's) sister was much 
worried about her negroes who 
had been hired out to the 
Dutch. It seems that these 
slaves were spending so much 
on their clothes that there was 




Lloyd Harbor Lighthouse of Old 




iii;;i^ji&il4;i;^^ 



\\ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

hardly any money left of their 
wages to be paid the owner. 
Also, that they were being 
treated so well there was dan- 
ger of them being completely 
spoiled. However, one slave 
named Jack, a butcher, was 
paying his owner 12 lbs. a year 
and still taking care of him- 
self. 

The Lloyds had a slave 
named Obium vi^ho must have 
given them trouble for they 
had to pay the sheriff for re- 
covering a horse which Obium 
had run away with. Evidently 
they also got Obium back as 
well as the horse, for his name 
appears subsequently in the 
Lloyd papers. Obium lived for 
a time in Boston where he had 
been hired from the Lloyds by 
one John Nelson. When the 
slave was returned to Henry 
Lloyd on Lloyd's Neck, Nelson 
sent a hst of the clothes he 
wore and carried for fear he 
might sell some of them on the 
way back. The list, still pre- 
served, included a great coat, 
a double-breasted jacket, and 
a new coat all lined ; also two 
pairs of cloth britches, five 
shirts ("which may need 
mending"), and two pairs of 
stockings. Nelson added that 
he found Obium did best when 
given plenty of praise. 



Some two years later the 
tables were turned. Andre was 
then again a prisoner and the 
termination of his confine- 
ment was not parole but death. 
At Tappan Dr. Gardiner was 
detailed by General Washing- 
ton to attend the unfortunate 
British officer during his last 
days of life. 

On a beautiful October af- 
ternoon in 1780 Andre suf- 
fered the fate of a spy. A tory 
of the Ramapo Valley then a 
prisoner in the hands of the 



JANUARY 1954 

Revolutionists purchased his 
freedom by clumsily perform- 
mg the task of hangman. 

As early as 1778 patches of 
wild growth pockmarked many 
areas of Long Island where 
lay buried the body of a soldier 
who had been slain in battle. 

So laid undisturbed by the 
plough for forty years, u-der 
but three feet of earth the 
body of Major Andre. In 1821 
his remains were removed to 
England's Hall of Fame — 
Westminster Abbey. 



DRY CLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



cMnfifiMej^Mii^ 



RUG CLEANING 



AMiTYVILLE 4-3200 



Bailey's Long Island History 



Andre at East Hampton 

Continued from page 7 

son of his host he had re- 
frained from arresting Dr. 
Gardiner. 

On leaving East Hampton 
Major Andre and Col. Gardiner 
exchanged wine glasses. 
Andre's glass was long pre- 
served in the Manor House on 
Gardiner's Island. 



New Year Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minion Bone, Spode, Douiton 

Syracuse 

IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Fostorla Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 

253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 



A limited number of sets of 
the Long Island History, com- 
piled by Paul Bailey and pub- 
hshed last year by the Lewis 
Historical Publishing Com- 
pany of New York, has been 
made available through the 
Long Island Forum at one- 
third off the publishers' price. 

This drastic reduction from 
the original price of $46.50 is 
made possible by eliminating 
volume 3 which consists en- 
tirely of biographical sketches. 

Volumes 1 and 2 comprise 
the complete History as com- 
piled by Editor Bailey and 
written by leading authorities 
m every field, consisting of 
more than 1000 pages, 43 
chapters and 200 illustrations. 

These handsomely printed 
and board deluxe books (size 
8x10-% inches) will be sent, 
while they last, in the same 
order that applications are re- 
ceived. Price $30. 

Besides the complete history 
of the island, from its discov- 
ery, including chapters on geo- 



logy and archaeology, there 
are separate chapters on each 
of the towns in Nassau and 
Suffolk Counties, the history 
of the leading church denom- 
inations, whahng, fishing, 
shell fisheries, agriculture, 
medicine, banking, education, 
aviation and many other sub- 
jects. 

Long Island Birdlife is com- 
piled by Edwin Way Teale, 
nationally known authority; 
the island's mammals, by Dr. 
W- J- Hamilton, Cornell zoolo- 
gist. The most extensive cov- 
erage of the island's Indians 
ever printed was prepared by 
John H. Morice. Among th«» 
authors represented are J. 
Russel Sprague, Dr. Oscar G. 
Darlington, Dr. Clarence Ash- 
ton Wood. Miss Jacaueline 
Overton, Rev. John K. Sharp, 
Chester R. Blakelock, Osbom 
Shaw, Herbert F. Ricard, 
Preston R. Bassett, Robert R. 
Coles. Halsey B. Knapp, 
Nancy Boyd Willey, Mary E. 
Bell— in all more than forty 
such authorities. 



14 



Convenient Payments Arranged 

Address: LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Amityville, N. Y. Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



<f> 



§^ 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



.<s^^^ 



#* 



Beachcombing's An Art 

L Continued from page 9 

ftpon a souvenir spoon from 
the World's Fair. I had not 
bought one at the Fair and 
always regretted it. Upon 
cleaning the spoon I found it 
to be of reasonably good silver 
and with typical World's Fair 
symbols on the handle. I am 
delighted with that find. 

Beach sands shift around 
and bring to light all sorts of 
things. The most common 
articles are children's toys — 
pails, shovels, rattles, trains, 
cars and balls. Grown-ups, 
too, lose things in the sand — 
necklace chains, rings, pocket 
knives, eye glasses, picnic 
utensils, wrist, watches, keys, 
bottle openers, jigger sets, and 
a great assortment of coins, 
charms and pocket keepsakes. 

One of the beneficial aspects 
of beachcombing is a by-pro- 
duct — a force for slimming. 
No one can do any beachcomb- 
ing without assuming an angle 
of 90° much of the time. The 
angle folds the stomach in 
with every bend until it be- 
comes sore and its owner pro- 
ceeds to squat and stoop. This 
change in posture calls into 
play further muscles to con- 
tinue the folding. Amateur 
beachcombers can usually be 
spotted by the more or less 
constant caressing they be- 
stow on their bellies. That 
gesture makes a good trade 
mark or sign of the avocation. 

Beachcombing is fast be- 



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coming an art, at least on 
Jones Beach where it is prac- 
ticed with mathematical pre- 
cision and the aid of allied 
sciences. I am greatly handi- 
capped right at the start by 
bifocals. The lower part is 
good for reading and the upper 
for distance. The footage from 
eyes to sand is not good thru 
either upper or lower. The 
upper part is better, but I need 
to bring my head forward 
more than a right angle or I 
am looking against the divi- 
sion lines. 

Before good beachcombers 
enter upon the sand they con- 
template and consider the con- 
tours and rolls of the beach, 
the windage, the angle of sun- 
light, and the top wash of the 
tide. This can be done from 
the boardwalk or a dune. There 
he lays out his routing, men- 
tally calculating drift, backing 
and fillings, and compensation 
for optical allusions. 

The good beachcomber starts 
off on a straight line scrutin- 
izing the sand five or six feet 
on either side. He will come 
back on a line ten or twelve 
feet away and parallel to the 
first track. This working back 
and forth adding distance with 
every trip continues over the 
beach limited only by time and 



the will to do. Often on espe- 
cially productive ground the 
beachcomber will crisscross 
the lines by traveling back and 
forth at right angles. When a 
highly technical beachcomber 
finishes with an expanse of 
beach his tracks in the sand 
resemble the geometric stitch- 
ings on an old patchwork 
quilt. 

Some combers believe in 
confusing competitors and on- 
lookers. They stoop and 
appear to pick things up in 
rapid succession only to very 
obviously toss them away as 
though pieces of shell, bottle 
caps or fruit pits. They never 
pick up anything without 
throwing something away. It 
is very difficult to determine 
when a good comber actually 
makes a profitable lift as he 
will always toss something off 
as he straightens up. The am- 
ateur upon finding a single 
cent will make a big show of 
getting it into his pocket. The 
practiced beachcomber never 
discloses how good the pick- 
ings are and thus he discour- 
ages competition in the im- 
mediate area. If by any slip of 
the tongue he should divulere 
a figure as being his profit for 
the day, move the decimal 
point two places to the right 



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15 



LONG ISLATTD FORUM 

for a more accurate account- 
ing. 

Late this last summer 
(1953) a brand new object 
appeared in the 'lost and 
found'. The city subways were 
about to up the fare to 15c 
and had begun to sell slugs 
which would work the turn- 
stiles. A day or two after the 
slugs went on sale they turned 
up in the beachcombers' take. 
Personally I have enjoyed a 
couple of free rides on the 
subway via Jones Beach sands. 
Occasionally efficiency 
shines forth among beach- 
combers. The first Saturday 
after the beach closed last 
summer a man appeared on the 
beach with an old wooden- 
toothed garden rake. All day 
long he patiently raked and 
combed the sand. He had an 
easy motion and a steady gait 
which I never saw him alter. 
It must have been a profitable 
day for him because he came 
back again Sunday and I saw 
him carefully raking as long as 
there was any light. 

If any reader considers the 
sideline of beachcombing he 
might figure that as a begin- 
ner he should pick up his toll 
gate fee in two hours of mear^- 
dering on Jones Beach sand. 
Older artists will sneer at that 
as poor chicken feed. Then 
again a reader might trip on 
a diamond ring! 



JANUARY 1954 




Plan For A Double Career 

It unfolds like the dream of a 
girl who wants both home and a 
career in business, this romantic 
story of Ruth Waddill Combs who 
attributes her success to the in- 
struction she received at her alma 
mater, the Traphagen School of 
Fashion, 1680 Broadway, New 
York. 

Sugar and spice are the stock in 
trade of Mrs. Combs. Her "Little 
Gal Glamour" clothes for 3-to-12 
year olds are made by her own 
thriving company in Henderson- 
ville, North Carolina, and it is a 
business with more than one unus- 
ual feature. It is a "hometown 
industry" and many families con- 
sider it a blessing to the commun- 
ity. 

When Ruth Waddill graduated 
from Traphagen after a course 
maioring in draping, design and 
clothing construction, the school's 
Placement Bureau immediately 
started her off in her first position. 
But it was not long before she was 
a bride, and soon, taking care of 
her own little girl, now 14, was a 



16 



full-time job. But she practised on 
this lifesize doll and began taking 
a special interest in children's 
clothes. 

Three years ago, with time on 
her capable hands again, the idea 
for Ruth Originals Corporation be- 
gan to take shape. She again 
became a designer and also a busi- 
ness woman, and she worked out 
an original plan of operation. The 
know-how, gained in her school 
training and brief trade experience 
was all she needed to carry through. 
She made a unique departure from 
other manufacturers methods for 
she gave the farmers' wives in her 
community a real "break." The 
children's dresses Mrs. Combs 
manufactures are cut and seams 
stitched in her plant. Then, about 
70 rural women take over, all ac- 
complished seamstresses. They are 
housewive,? and farmwives, many 
are the mothers of half a dozen 
children, with chickens and barn- 
yard animals to tend in addition. 
They give as much or as little time 
as they can spare for sewing. They 
augment the family income, at go- 
ing rates of pay without leaving 
home, and at the same time do the 
finishing and put in the band 
touches which make these little 
dresses the kind mothers and small 
girls treasure. It keeps the gar- 
ments selling briskly in the nation's 
lepr'ing stores. 

Mrs. Combs was in New York a 
short time ago to visit her show- 
room and buy fabrics, and she re- 
turned to Traphagen School for a 
brief refresher course in the latest 
clothing construction techniques. 
Coming to the city is always won- 
derful, she says, but she is even 
hapmer when she heads South 
again, back to the dual creative 
career of home ar'd business she 
has made for herself. 



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Monumental Work 



JANUARY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



-^ 



♦ 



Deplores Hercules' Remoyal 

To those interested in the pres- 
ervation of old landmarks, old 
names and historical treasures I 
think the most discouraging perpe- 
tration in a lifetime was the re- 
moval of that good old salt Her- 
<cules from his 66-year lookout 
beside the road where the races of 
men go by, and where, at Canoe 
Place, he could hear old ocean roar, 
to that quiet inland village green 
«f far-off Stony Brook. 

Reading the anniversary edition 
of the News-Review of Riverhead, 
I note on the history of Canoe 
Place and Good Ground, settled 
about 1653, the following item: 
"Across the road in front of the 
liostelry was the figurehead Her- 
cules from the U. S. frigate Ohio, 
dismantled in Greenport in 1884. 
It originally belonged to a man 
named Aldrich in Aquebogue, then 
was sold to the inn or its proprie- 
tor. It has been lately removed to 
Stony Brook." 

Of course no history of Good 
Ground (Hampton Bays) could be 
complete without an item on Her- 
cules. John Elliott Aldrich of 
Aquebogue was a very prominent 
builder on the east end and built 
many of the early summer homes 
in the Hamptons, including in 1879 
the John Henry Young homestead 
now owned by Supreme Court Jus- 
tice Henry J. Wenzel Jr. of the 
Appellate Division. 

A daughter of John Elliott 
Aldrich, Mrs. Wesley Warner of 
Aquebogue, remembers well when 
her father brought Hercules from 
Greenport and had him in the 
"shop" all winter where he was 
entirely coated with real gold-leaf 
and later taken to Canoe Place. 

So many people have been inter- 
ested in Hercules, I wish we could 
hear more about him through the 
Forum, so beloved by Long 
Islanders. I noted the letter you 
ran from Charles J. McDermott of 
Madison, N. J. who wrote: I would 
like to see him back at Good 
Ground." Good Ground indeed! 
Where did that "Hampton Bays" 
stuff ever come from? I suppose 



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from "the commercials" who even 
took away our old wind mill at 
Orient to make a Roman Holiday 
at the Glen Island Amusement 
Park. 

While I was at Glpversville last 
May at the Congregational Confer- 
ence I met a Mr. Moffat, a former 
pastor of the Aquebogue (Steeple) 
Church. He now has a larger 
church at Watertown, N. Y. While 
at Aquebogue he made an inten- 



sive study of the history of eastern 
Long Island. When the subject of 
Hercules came up I found a kindred 
soul and many were the legends 
we exchanged about Hercules dur- 
ing his long vigil at Canoe Place 
where he served as a wishing well 
and was often consulted by young 
lovers seeking approval of their 
matrimonial plans. 

Ezra Hallock Young 

Orient 



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17 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

South Bay Can Be Tough 

A number of readers have made 
reference to hurricanes, tornadoes 
and twisters, but I wonder how 
many of them ever went through 
one out on the water. Some years 
ago I was at Fire Island with a 
party of friends, having crossed 
Great South Bay in a cabin cruiser. 
We noticed that the breakers in the 
ocean, were particularly heavy, and 
the inlet looked pretty ominous 
although the day was clear. 

About four o'clock a very dark 
cloud fairly rushed in from the 
northwest and sent us scurrying 
back to our boat. As we began the 
passage across the bay we saw 
considerable lightning to the north- 
west and heard some heavy thun- 
der. After passing West Island we 
were approaching buoy eight when 
the ferry to Ocean Beach sped past 
us. A few minutes later torrential 
ram came down. It became so dark 
that those in the stern of the cruiser 
could not see the bow except when 
lightning illuminated the turbu- 
lent bay all around us. 

One high wave came in under the 
stern and swept the boat along al- 
most beyond control. About then 
everyone put on life belts. I went 
below to find one for the man at 
the wheel when I smelled smoke. 
We opened the hatch above the en- 
gine and found it had become over- 
heated and was beginning to burn 
the wood nearby. Someone grab- 
bed an extinguisher and doused 
what might have become a real fire. 
Unfortunately, however, either 
the extinguisher's fluid or the sea- 
water that sprayed in through the 



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hatchway stopped the engine. After 
trying for some time to start it, we 
threw out an anchor, then another, 
and, believe it or not, the cruiser 
dragged both. How far we would 
have drifted, God only knows. But 
suddenly the wind subsided, the 
waves went down, the rain stopped 
and before long we were continu- 
ing homeward in a rather calm sea. 
_ It's really surprising how a good 
sized cabin cruiser can be tossed 
around on the Great South Bay. 
Oscar 0. Hart 
Brooklyn. 

Father Crawford's Second Volume 

Volume two of "The Daughters 
of Dominic on Long Island", by the 
Rev. Eugene Crawford, continues 
the history of the order in this, the 
Brooklyn Diocese, from 1938, the 
end of Volume One, to the present 
day. Whereas the first volume 
published in 1939, covers early 
Dominican history here (its birth- 
place in America in 1853), the 
latest work shows the increase in 
parochial schools, convents, hospi- 
tals, summer camps, and foreign 
missions. 

As with the first volume, this 
one is published by Benziger 
Brothers, Inc., of New York, from 
whom copies may be ordered. 

The author is the Spiritual Direc- 
tor of the Sisters of St. Dominic, 
with headquarters at Amityville. 
He IS also Assistant Visitor General 
for Religious Communities of the 
Brooklyn Diocese, and is well- 
known as a retreat master. 



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JANUARY 1954 

Historic Spoon 

In July 1895 following the un- 
veiling in the old Southold cemetery 
of the granite memorial in honor 
of Fanny Ledyard Peters by the 
Mystic (Ct.) DAR concerning 
which Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 
wrote in the November Forum 
there was presented to the same 
organization a spoon memorializ- 
?"^„*il^ marriage 130 years earlier 
m 1765 of Southold's Abigail Hemp- 
stead Ledyard, mother of John 
Ledyard the Traveler, and her sec- 
ond husband Dr. Micah Moore the 
village physician. 

T^nT^f A?°°" ^"'■^ t^e monogram 
MAM (Micah and Abigail Moore) 
and had been taken during the tur- 
bulent Revolutionary days by a 
British soldier from Widow Moore's 
Continued on back cover 



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1953 
LONG ISLAND FORUMS 

(Vol. 16) 
Permanently Bound in 1 Book 
Postpaid ^5. 
1952-53 in 1 Volume, 

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176 Paris Ave. Amityville 



Letters From Our Readers 

Continued from page 18 

tavern. The spoon had come into 
the possession of their daughter 
Phebe Moore Wickham Smith Deni- 
son of Stoning-ton, Ct., and was 
presented to the Mystic DAR by her 
grandson Chandler Smith. 

While the Traveler's half-sister 
Phebe was living with her third 
husband Deacon Ebenezer Denison 
in his ancient house at Mystic 
Bridge after "the table was one 
day cleared" the spoon again came 
up missing. For another thirty 
years the spoon for the second 
time remained lost. 

One day a tree which Phebe had 
assisted in planting at her Con- 
necticut home was struck by light- 
ning. As the damaged tree was 
being cut down the axe of the 
workman struck a shining object 
buried in the tree. 

It was the twice lost spoon 
marked MAM. It had been unwit- 
tingly tossed out with table crumbs 
so that it became lodged within the 
bark of the tree. During three de- 
cades the tree had grown around 
the spoon hiding it deeper and 
deeper. 

Embedded in a piece of oak 
taken from the 17th century Moore- 
Case house at Southold from 
whence it had been purloined by an 
enemy soldier so long ago, the 
spoon is still preserved in the his- 
torical archives at Mystic. 

Upton Downs 



Aids Church History 

My file of Forums has been very 
helpful complementing my church 
history work and tracing old fami- 
lies. Every number is so good. 
Irene (Mrs. Leslie H.) MacRobbie, 
Patchogue. 



Am enjoying the Forum very 
much. (Miss) Rose Kirk, Patchogue. 



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