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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

n 



LONG ISLAND 

FORUM 




WHEN LINDENHURST WAS BRESLAU 
Buildings of the I870's When the Village Slogan Was "Like London and Paris, Breslau Will Surely Be." 

Now the County's Largest Municipality. 



n, 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



JOHN LED YARD THE TRAVELER 
BEACH PLANTS DO SURVIVE 
"GOOD OLD TIMES" FARMING 
"BIG MANUEL," WHALING CAPTAIN 
WHO WAS FANNY BARTLETT? 



Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Julian Denton Smith 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Andnis T. Valentine 

Ralph C. Atkinson 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



MARCH 1954 



.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. ^ 



H. E. Swezejr ft Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
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Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eaatport 250 



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A Prirate Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseases 

II Louden Ave. AmityTilU 

AMityville 4-0053 



Farmingdale 

Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 

Rug Cleaning 

Bromd Hollow Road Farmincdalc 

Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



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Salfs and Service 

MULLER 
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Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Truck* 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Establislied 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 



Texaco Products 
ARTHUR F. HOWE 

(formerly Barker's) 

262 Broadway AMityville 4-9830 



SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 

178 



THE 

LcNe Island 

fcCLM 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as second-class matter May 31, 1947, at the 
post office at Amityville, New York, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL,M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

.lohn C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Wyandanch's Daughter 

In your newspaper article on the 
daughter of Chief Wyanidanch you 
called her Quashawwam. 

I believe this event must have 
happened prior to the marriage 
of Wyandanch's daughter, then 
called Cantoneras, who is said to 
have married one Jan Cornelius 
Van, Texel (later called Van Tas- 
sel). In our story Wyandanch died 
in 1659 and this daughter is said 
to be the one that Lion Gardiner 
had ransomed. 

If our record is right, my G. G. 
G. Grandmother Rebecca Van Tas- 
sel, who married Peter Yerks, is a 
descendant of Cantoneras. and I 
have wondered how a Dutchman 
ever won an Indian Princess. 

In the book "Historical Sketches 
of the Romer, Van Tassel and 
Allied Families", by John Lock- 
wood Romer, 1917, printed by W. 
C. Gay Printing Co. Inc. of Buf- 
falo, N. Y., will be found quite a 
record that I have every reason to 
believe is correct. Pages 38, 39, 
40, and pages 128 to 136 give a 
record of deeds that may have con- 
veyed the land mentioned in the 
article. 

The Van Tassel's were a great 
family, and I am proud to have 
some of that blood in my veins. 
I. S. Stivers, 
Samoset, Florida 



Slave Ship Wanderer 

Some months ago you were kind 
enough to send to Mr. George G. 
Brainerd for me, a copy of the 
Forum of May 1945, (by H. P. Hor- 
ton) and I want to thank you. The 
Wanderer landed its last cargo 
of slaves here in this county, at 
Jekyll Island. The article is not 
only well written, but is of great 
interest, Mrs, K. G. Berrie, Secre- 
tary, Brunswick (Georgia) Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 



In his Yankees Liked L. I. Tur- 
nips, in the December Forum, Capt. 
Eugene S. Griffing deals with an 
era which is not so far off but that 
some of your readers remember it, 
including the undersigned. Arthur 
R. Rossman, West Hempstead. 



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RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. Sunriae Hichway Tel. 8-1212 

Rue and Furniture Cleaning 



Our Specialty 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

POLSKY'S PHARMACY 
197 Broadway AMityville 4-0515 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St, Tel, 1086 Ulip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoalta Accepted by Mail 
First National Bank of Islip 

Hambcr Fed, Depoait Inauranee Corp, 



PHONOGRAPHS 

SUFFOLK AND NASSAU 

AMUSEMENT CO, 

Tel. 2393 Patchogue 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIF. L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 
WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near Amityville Depot 



42 



MAECH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



John L:,edyard the traveler 



J OHN LEDYARD the Trav- 
** eler, of whom I have 
previously written, was the 
son of Captain John Ledyard 
and Abigail Hempstead L-ed- 
yard, of Southold lineage and 
birth. He was born at their 
Groton, Ct. home in 1751, the 
first child after their runaway 
marriage at Setauket. His 
mother was the daughter of 
Squire Robert Hempstead, 
SouthoM's first schoolteacher 
and his father a son of the 
one-time mayor of Hartford, 
Ct. 

After the death at sea of 
her husband in 1762, Abigail 
and her four children remcved 
to Southold where she there- 
after lived, first on her father's 
farm but after her marriage 
to Dr. Micah Moore, South- 
old's village physician, at his 
home which stood half a mile 
east of the Hempstead home- 
stead. 

Shortly after the death of 
Dr. Moore, young John went 
to live with his Grandfather 
Ledyard at Hartford. Follow- 
ing the latter' s death he was 
taken into the Hartford home 
C'l his guardian, Thomas 
Seymour, a lawyer and a 
brother-in-law of the elder 
Ledyard. 

During his stay at Southold 
John attended school there, 
later in Hartford and still later 
he read law in the office of his 
guardian. In the spring of 
1772 he entered Dartmouth 
College, recently established 
chiefly as an Indian school, at 
Hanover, N. H., by the Rev. 
Eleazer Wheelock. Within a 
few months, however, he left 
that instituticjTi and journeyed 
many miles through the wild- 
erness, as far as Canada, liv- 
ing among the Indians and 
learning their language, man- 
ners and customs which infat- 
uated him. Among other 
things, he learned how to 
make a dugout from the trunk 
of a tree using fire and sharp 
stones. 



Dr. Qlarence zAshto7i 'Wood 

Upon returning to college 
after an absence of several 
months he and some Indian 
students built such a dugout 
fifty feet long and three feet 
in width. As late as 1836 the 
stump of the tree from which 
the crude craft was shaped 
stood on Dartmouth's campus. 
After completing the dugout, 
John again pushed off down 
the winding river, carrying 
among other things provi- 
sions, a bearskin, a Greek test- 
ament and a copy of Ovid's 
Latin classic. 

Reaching Preston, Ct., John 
took up residence with his 
cousin young Dr. Isaac Led- 
yard and there decided to be- 
gin preparing for the ministry. 
He was encouraged in this by 
the village pastor, a Rev. 
Hart, possibly the same 
Joshua Hart who later 
preached on Long Island and 
ran a boys' school at Fort 
Salonga during the Revolu- 
tion. On Hart's advice, Led- 



yard returned to Long Island 
and at Southold suddenly sur- 
prised his mother, brothers 
and sisters whom he had not 
seen for several years. Ap- 
proving of his plans to be- 
come a preacher, his mother 
sent him to her local pastor, 
the Rev. John Storrs from 
whom he received a letter of 
recommendation. (Thirteen 
years later John was to write 
from Paris to his mother, who 
later sponsored Methodism at 
Southold, severely criticizing 
her for carrying her religious 
notions "to the most ridicu- 
lous and absurd lengths"). 

On this visit to the scenes 
of his boyhood, John tarried 
but a day, then crossed Bois- 
seau's ferry from Conklin's 
Point at Ashamomoque to 
Shelter Island, traversed that 
island to the South ferry and 
thence reached Sag Harbor. 
At East Hampton, he pre- 
sented his recommendations 
to Dr. Samuel Buell, modera- 
tor of the Long Island iSynod, 
with whom he spent a month 




Ledyard Knew the Sound Shore at Southold 

Pholo 1890 by Marshall Woodman 



4i 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



in intense study of theology. 
Dr. Buell it was who advised 
John to seek a teaching post 
while continuing his theologi- 
cal preparations. 

Fortified with another 
"goc-d letter" from the Rev- 
erend Doctor, Ledyard rode 
westward astride his horse 
Rosinante, stopping at Bridge- 
hampton, Soathampton and 
Fireplace (Scuthaven) , thence 
to Setauket where his parents 
had plighted their troth two 
decades earlier. Later he 
passed through Smlthtown, 
reached Huntington and there 
"feasted" for about twelve 
days in the library of the Rev. 
Ebenezer Prime who had 
taken as his second wife Ex- 
perience Youngs of Southold, 
a sister of John's Grand- 
mother Hempstead. 

From Huntington Ledyard 
returned to East Hampton 
where he again spent a short 
time with Dr. Buell before re- 
turning to his cousin's home 
at Preston, Ct. Here, having 
received no encouragement 
from President Wheelock of 
Dartmouth or others to whom 
he wrote, he abandoned all 
thought of becoming a minis- 
ter. A few weeks later he 
signed up at New London, Ct. 
with a Capt. Deshon and sailed 
as common seaman on a ves- 
sel bound for the Mediter- 
ranean. 

At Gibralter he enlisted in 
a British regiment but was 
released at the request of 
Capt. Deshon on whose ship 
he returned to New London, 
a year later. Thus at twenty- 
two John Ledyard, who was 
later to win fame as a traveler, 
had tried the law and the pul- 
pit without success. Soon 
bidding farewell to local 
friends and relatives, he jour- 
neyed to New York and from 
there worked his way to Ply- 
mouth, England. Reaching 
London on foot, he there met 
Captain James Cook, the navi- 
gator who was about to set 
sail on his third and final voy- 
age of exploration. 

Ledyard signed up as a cor- 
poral of marines and sailed 
July 12, 1776, with Cook who 

Continued on page 52 



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BAY SHORE 



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Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



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Designers and Manufacturers of the 

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Airplanes for the U. S. Navy, the Air Force 
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U I C 

SALES SERVICE PARTS 

Suffolk County's Largest Selection of 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

Ande-McEwan Motors, Inc. 

Tel: Bay Shore 2 228 East Main St., Bay Shore 

WE BUY USED CARS FOR CASH 



WALTER A. SAXTON 
Vice President 



JOHN E. NICHOLSON 
President 



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Established 1849 
Roofing and Waterproofing 

Difficult commissions accepted to correct wail and roof 
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New York City 

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Brookville, L. I. 
BRookville 5-0020 



44 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^each 'T^hxnts IDo jurviipe^ 



TfROM a quick glance at our 
^ beach vegetation one 
might have the impression 
that the old law about the 
"survival of the fittest to sur- 
vive" did not apply. In the 
quick glance we would see 
plenty of space unoccupied by 
any plants and each living 
plant apparently having 
plenty of space to grow in. 
It would seem that an ideal 
situation existed and had 
existed forever. 

The quick glance is not 
enough; we need an extended 
view. By an extended view I do 
not mean one encompassing 
all plant life on the beach but 
rather a view of all the plant 
life of the beach over a period 
of years for a cycle is at work 
due to the instability of the 
beach itself. 

The difficult fact to be kept 
in mind is that the beach is 
alive and by no means dead. 
It moves, grows, a.id shrinks. 
Even on the most windless day 
little cascades of sand slip 
down the sides of sand dunes. 
On a windy day the sand blows 
and rides in the air. Both 
motions alter the contours of 
the dunes and, as the sand 
settles elsewhere, it changes 
the outlines of that place. 

Moving sands tend to gather 
in protected places, and thick- 
ets offer ideal, high-percent 
protection. It is no wonder, 
then, that many sand dunes 
turn out to have a great foun- 
dation of dead brush and roots 
in the exact position and 
growth characteristics a s 
when alive. Sand had blown 
into the thicket until it com- 
pletely submerged the growth 
and then continued to build 
up and assumed the propor- 
tions of a dune. 

The newly located sand soon 
became protected by the ever- 
present beach grass growing 
up from beneath and the roots 
matting thickly below the sur- 
face. Other beach plants 
would establish themselves 



Julian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 
Society 

promptly on the newly set 
sand except for one thing — 
the lack of nutrients in the 
sand, the sand of itself being 
nearly pure quartz. 

Have you ever noticed the 
quantity of small, insignifi- 
cant plants that can exist on 
obviously dry, crystal-clean 
beach sand ; not only can exist 
but manage to flower and pro- 
duce seed ? These small plants 
die and the decayed parts 
gather to constitute humus 
for a little larger plant. Be- 
fore long enough humus is be- 
ing produced by decaying ve^f- 
etation to support such tough 
beach plants as golden rod, 
beach pea, and some vines. 

As additional nutriment is 
available mainly through tho 
accumulation of humus, the 
woody vegetation appears — 
bayberry, poison ivy, beach 
plum, cedars, wild cherry, 
huckleberry, pepperidge, sas- 
safras, oak, holly, and a few 
more. 

The "survival of the fittest" 
is going on all the time for as 
soon as enough nutriment is 
present a higher form of plant 
enters and crowds out the 
lesser. Perhaps the verb push 
is better than crotvd for push- 
ing is what actually happens. 



Frequently it is very plain at 
the edge of a mass of beach 
vegetation which was the first 
plant to arrive and which 
came last. The first one, the 
very minor form, will be grow- 
ing on the outer fringe of the 
mass and the last arrival will 
be in the center where the 
hu^us and nourishment are 
most abundant. The last arri- 
val will be the highest grow- 
ing plant form of the group. 
In more or less regular con- 
centric circles the various 
kinds of plants will appear in 
the order of their arrival ; the 
forms being pushed out from 
the center somewhat like the 
annual rings on a tree. The 
lesser forms had been unable 
to survive the competition of 
the higher forms and were 
forced into a location where 
they could survive. 

I am not exactly sure when 
the center of the mass gives 
way to the woody plants for 
the advent of the hardier 
plants varies somewhat. Usu- 
ally the bayberry is the first 
woody plant to appear in the 
center of a growth of beach 
vegetation but sometimes it 
is poison ivy and less fre- 
quently it is beach plum. 
These three are almost evenly 
matched and no one of them 
seems entirely capable of 
pushing out the other two 









t^,". 





A Jones Beach Dune 



Photo by Author 



45 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

and holding- the center of the 
thicket alone. 

By the time the bayberry, 
ivy and beach plum have 
agreed to live peaceably to- 
gether a huckleberry seed or 
a wild cherry pit or perhaps an 
acorn is dropped in the thicket 
and the squeeze is on all over 
again. The larger plant takes 
over the center of the thicket 
and all lesser types push out 
still farther in their effort to 



MARCH 1954 



survive 

The plants need sunlight, 
moisture and nourishment, 
and a beach plant will not sur- 
vive if any one of the three 
factors is missing. Therefore 
when a large type plant ap- 
pears in the certer of a mass 
of beach vegetation, the lesser 
forms have to move outward 
or shade from the larger will 
kill them, or the roots of the 
larger will take all the mois- 
ture and nutrient, starving 
the lesser forms. 

When you find bare sand in 
wide areas between beach 
dunes and get the general im- 
pression that all is well with 
the vegetation, bear in mind 
that a tremendous struggle 
for survival is constantly go- 
ing on wherever a beach plant 
grows, for each plant is be- 
ing pressed by a plant a little 
bit bigger to give up its water 
supply, food depot, and place 
in the sun. 

NATURE NOTES 

From time to time Forum 
readers have referred to items 
m earlier issues. Some of 
these should be noted and 
mentioned. 

Many requests come for in- 
formation on Tom, the Black- 
snake. I have been unable to 
locate Tom this past summer 
(1953). He did not appear in 
his last year's haunts nor did 
I see or hear of a b^acksnake 
anywhere along the beach be- 
tween the Tower and Gilgo. 
I saw two beach "adders" a 
little west of Tobay. Before 
the State Park came, there 
were quantities of these 
snakes in the dunes. Beach 
"adders" are not poisonous 
although their battle "act" 
would indicate otherwise. 



Some people ask about My 
Sand Dune. That dune had 
been 'planted' and grew before 
Parking Field 1 was built. It 
stood off to the southwest of 
the field. It has entirely dis- 
appeared under trampling by 
the people from the parking 
field. Many newly formed 
dunes are growing rapidly on 
the ocean side of the old dune 
hne about half a mile west of 
Field 1. It is remarkable how 
rapidly they do grow! 

Several readers ask for an 
article on the swallows along 
the shore. That is in the 
works. The last week in Sep- 
tember (1953) I came upon an 
enormous flock of swallows 
resting on the flat level area 
betv/een dunes in front of the 
southern end of Meadowbrook 
Parkway. Fortunately I had 
my camera slung over my 
shoulder and it was loaded 
with color film. Those pic- 
tures have been added to my 
collection of beach transpar- 
encies. 

Another reader asked if I 
had ever seen an albino Bine 
Heron. Not that I know of. 
If one should cross my path. I 
am not certain I'd be able to 
distinguish it from the less- 
than-two-year-old Blue Heron 
which are also white. 

Artesian wells continue to 
be opened in Great South Bay. 
I saw two men driving a well 
on Oliver Island south of Wan- 
taqrh. They hit fresh water 
while pounding the pipe at a 
height of seven feet above the 
meadow and at that the wafer 
gushed a foot above the pipe 
end. The water was plentiful, 
good, cold and without hint of 
odor or salt. 



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46 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f" 



# 



^^Qood Old ^imes" farming 



\TI7 E are all, I think, inter- 
' ' ested in what was paid 
in wages in the days when 
food prices were low. Here is 
an agreement made to work 
as farmer for my great-grand- 
father Thomas Strong, for a 
whole year: 

"An Agreement made this 
22d day of March 1836 be- 
tween Thomas S. Strong of the 
Town of Brookhaven in the 
County of Suffolk, in the first 
part, and John Hallock of the 
same place, of the second part. 

"The said John Hallock 
agrees to work as a laborer for 
the said Thomas S. Strong and 
to superintend his farming 
business under the direction 
of the said Thomas S. Strong 
for one year from the day and 
year above mentioned." 

"The said John Hallock shall 
find his own axes, scythes, 
cradles, hoes and forks. The 
said John Hallock shall board 
himself at his own expence. 
The said John Hallock is to 
have the privilege of keeping 
one hog at his own expence, 
and shall devote his whole 



I^fe Wheeler (§trong 

time to the business of the 
said Thomas S. Strong. 

"The said Thomas S. Strong 
shall pay to the said John Hal- 
lock for his services the sum 
of two hundred and fifteen 
dollars, shall let him occupy 
the house at foot of the lane 
and so much of the cellar as 
he may need (I wonder who 
used the rest of it), shall let 
him have the milk of one cow 
to run with the other cows of 
the said Thomas S. Strong, to 
be milked by the said John 
Hallock's family, and to find 
him firewood which shall be 
cut where the said Thomas 
Strong shall direct, and a team 
to get it." 

"But the said John Hallock 
shall lose the time when he is 
cutting it and carting it. And 
shall also find him a garden 
spot but the said John Hal- 
lock shall lose his time when 
working in his garden." 

This sounds like a tough 
proposition, but I suppose it 



was the usual thing, or no one 
would have agreed to it. 

As to a grain cradle, it had 
one scythe blade and three 
wooden fingers the length of 
the blade so that the grain 
when cut would fall to the 
ground in bundles ready to be 
tied into sheaths. As I under- 
stood from my father, each 
man had a lane, one cutting a 
little behind the other. If one 
man overtook another it was 
corsidered a great honor. 

One of my father's law part- 
ners came from an upstate 
farm where he had always led 
his father's cradlers. When 
he came back from college the 
men looked for an easy vic- 
tory, but it so happened that 
he had not tieglected the gym 
and, much to their disgust, 
beat them as usual. 

Just time for one more note 
for I must get this in the mail 
before the railroad goes back 
on us. Right after the Revolu- 
tion, prices were higher than 
in later times. August 28th, 
1789, 28 lbs. of sugar cost one 
lb. 18 shillings and 8 pence. 






^* «r ^-' -* -?-- 




LON6 ISLAND CORNFIELD 



Sketched and Etched by Joseph P. Di Gemma 



47 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



Reminders 

Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. EARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 
E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babvlon. Tel. 551. 



Imperial Washable Wallpapers 

Moore's Paints and Varnishes, Duco 
and Nu-Enamel, Artists' Materials. ' 
Gus Schmidt, 74 East Main St., 
Patchogue. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



Dodge- Plymouth Sales-Service 
Distributors for Firestone Products 

TERRY BROTHERS 
430 W. Main St. Tel. 109 Patchogue 

The Thirteen Tribes 

A second printing of The Thir- 
teen Tribes is now ready for mail- 
ing. Price per copy postpaid. One 
Dollar. 

This brief sketch of the customs, 
habits, characteristics and history 
of the Long Island Indians by the 
Forum editor is being used in social 
study courses in a number of pub- 
lic schools. The pamphlet is well 
illustrated and has heavy durable 
covers. 

Address Long Island Forum, 
Amityville, N. Y. 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15% Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiejrue 



The Fosdick Family 

Annals of the Fosdick Family is 
the title of a volume recently re- 
leased and in our hands. The com- 
prehensive work, well printed and 
permanently bound, is a credit to 
the author, Raymond B. Fosdick of 
Newtown. Ct., and to the pub- 
lishers. The American Histories;! 
Company, Inc. 

The first of this ancient English 
clan to settle on Long Island, we 
learn, was Samuel Fosdick 2d who 
settled at Oyster Bay before 1732 
and there ran a blacksmith shop 
and a tavern as well as farming. 
He later disposed of his consider- 
able property there and returned 
to Charlestown in Massachusetts. 

His son Samuel 3rd remained in 
Oyster Bay. Here he married 
Deborah Shadbolt upon whose 
parly demise he wed Mary Wright 
by whom he h'^d nine children. Thus 
the Fosdick family became deenly 
rooted here on Long Island. The 
book carries a good deal of the 
general history of Oyster Bay. 



pass it on to others so they can too. 
Mrs. J. B. Ketcham, 161 Lefferts 
Ave., Brooklyn. 



"Jamaica Trolleys" 

The above caption is the title of 
a large pamphlet containing the 
history, well illustrated, of the eld 
trolley lines of Jamaica. But it is 
much more than that. It goes into 
the story of the highways of the 
west end, especially Jamaica aven- 
ue, "the oldest continuously used 
road on the island" and the one 
with "the most complicated legal 
background." The author of the 
pamphlet is Vincent F. Seyfried 
and it may be obtained at $1.50 by 
addressing Felix Reifschneider, 
Box 774, Orlando, Florida. 



I enjoy the Forum very much and 

L. I. Forum Index 
Complete Index of the L. I. 

Forum, 1948-1952 (five years), 50 

cents, postpaid. 

Also complete Index for 1938-47 

(10 years), $1. 
Send check with order to Queens 

Borough Public Library, 89-14 

Parsons Blvd., Jamaica 32, N. Y. 

Atten. L. I. Collection. tf 



I am enjoying the Forum very 
much. Mary F. L'Hommedieu, 
Norwalk, Ct. 



Now Available 

Meigs, editor "Private and Fam- 
ily Cemeteries in the Borough of 
Queens". 1932. Postpaid $2. 
Queens Borough Public Library, 
89 14 Parsons Boulevard, Jamaica 
32,N.Y. Attention L.I.Collection.(3) 



Unbound Forums, By Year 

Complete yearly sets of the Long 
Island Forum, unbound, $3 post- 
paid. Address L. I. Forum, Amity- 
ville. 



Etchings By Robert Shaw 

"Home Sweet Home" 

"Nathan Hale Schoolhouse" 
UNFRAMED, 8"xl2", $15 
Box X, L. I. Forum 

FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. 1. 

The Bow^ne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bow^ne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors Flushing N. Y. 



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and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 



Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 



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(T 



48 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



"®ig oManmi;' ^haUng Qaptain^ 



jyiANUEL ENOS, whale- 
man, first stood on 
the wharf at Cold Spring in 
the summer of 1849 and 
watched the whaleship Shef- 
field, 579 tons, being outfitted 
for her second voyage for the 
CoM Spring Whaling Com- 
pany. He was well over six feet 
in height and weighed about 
225 pounds; a splendidly pro- 
portioned young man topped 
with a mop of tightly curled 
black hair. 

Big Manuel was an able sea- 
nian, a Portugese from Fayal 
in the Azores, who had orig- 
inally shipped from that port 
on a whaler hailing from Saj 
Harbor. He had now come 
dc'wn to Cold Spring to join 
the Sheffield, Captain Royce, 
primarily because her new 
comniander's recent notoriety 
promised an adventurous voy- 
age in the offing. 

Captain Royce, "an intelli- 
gent whaling master and a 
very correct and close obser- 
ver of the habits of whales", 
had lately returned to Sag 
Harbor in the bark Superior, 
having been the first whaler 
to pass through the Bering 
Strait to open up that most 
important artic ground to the 
industry. Now, to take full 
advantage of his new discov- 
ery, he was to take the largest 
and best vessel he could find 
back to these rew grounds. 
He had chosen the Sheffield 
of Cold Spring. 

This probably accounts for 
the fact that so many Cold 
Spring sailo-s shipped for the 
voyage and became Manuel's 
shipmates. UsuaHv the entire 
crews of the CoJd Soring ships 
were recruited from other 
ports, but on this voyage 
George Barrett was one of the 
mates; his brother DeWitt, 
who later becarne master of 
the Sunbeam, New Bedford, 
shipped before the mast. Able 
seamen Warren Gardiner and 
John Lysle and shin's car- 
penter William McGar had 
also signed articles. 



zAndrus T. Valentine 

Enos found the little port of 
Cold Spring (now Cold Spring 
Harbor) humming from day- 
hght to dark, getting the Shef- 
field readied for an August 
sailing. She lay at anchor well 
outside the sand spit, being 
too large to enter the inner 
harbor where the sail-lofts, 
smithys, cooper-shops, repair 
yards, gristmills and general 
stores were located. From 
Bungtown's cooper-shops and 
factories to Bedlam (Street's 
boarding houses and bars, the 
noisy hustle enveloped the 
village. The outlying farms 
replenished the shelves, bins 
and casks of the local stores 



that were being emptied to 
victual the ship. 

The Sheffied sailed on 
schedule, August 1849; but 
with a most unusual deck 
cargo consigned for San Fran- 
cisco. There were nine 
knocked-down prefabricated 
houses built by Cold Spring 
carpenters, lashed to the 
decks. These were gold-fever 
days, and the Jones Brothers 
of Cold Spring were taking 
advantage of the booming 
market inside the Golden 
Gate. 

After discharging their car- 
go and refitting the ship, Big 
Manuel and his shipmates 
sailed on into the Arctic. 

Continued on pa^e 56 




Old Time Lighthouse, Lloyd's Harbor 

From Loweree Collection 



44 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
90 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2'/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffollc County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Iniurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Who Was Fanny Bartlett? 

I find something of interest in 
every issue of the Forum. It has 
provided the reason for many fam- 
ily jaunts and made others more 
enjoyable. 

A special tip of the hat to Julian 
Denton Smith for his articles of 
genuine interest to all Long Island- 
ers and those who love the Island. 
A frown on articles which emulate 
the "begats" of the Bible and 
depend only on name-dropping for 
their popularity. 

A roar of risrhteous wrath for 
the cut of the "Old Henry Ruggles" 
which was used in Dr. Clarence A. 
Wood's pamphlet "First Train to 
Greenport 1844" and more recently 
in the January Forum to illustrate 
the article on Oliver Charlick by 
John Tooker. This is a reproduc- 
tion of a lithograph of "The Gen- 
eral" which was distributed at 
least until recently by the Nash- 
ville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 
Railway. It shows the locomotive 
on permanent display in Chatta- 
nooga station. The General was 
built by Rogers Locomotive Works 
in Patterson, N. J. in 1856 for the 
Western and Atlantic Railroad 
(whose initials can be plainly seen 
in your cut) and had an exciting- 
Civil War career. The W & A later 
became part of the N C & StL and 
the General never strayed north of 
the Mason Dixon Line to serve the 
LIRR as "The Old Henry Ruggles" 
but was displayed at the Century 
of Progress in Chicago in 1933. 

May I suggest you contact Mr. 
Paul Blauvelt, Publicity Director, 
LIRR if you do not already have 
copies of "The Long Island Rail- 
roader" in which he has been run- 
ning a history of the LIRR with 
many old photos from private col- 
Continued on next page 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hflton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE | 


Insurance 


Mortgages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave 


, Amityville 


AMiiyville 


4-1489 



Por t Washington 

Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 

Commack 



# 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 

Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 

Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



f^' 



Glen Head 



M. 0. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main Bay Shore 7-0876 & 0877 
Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 

Hampton Bays 

JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 
APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. Y. 





50 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 
Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 
Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

Richard Downing & Sons 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Tel. Oyster Bay 592 
North Hempstead Turnpike 



'BENJlWEn' 

Real Estate • Insurance 
East ykTAUKET 

Len^ Island. N«w York 
■ Tel. 101 Sotauket | 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199- A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



lections of Long Island railroad 
scenes and old locomotives. I en- 
close a recent sample from the 
December issue. Previous photos 
of old engines have been clearer. 
Perhaps you might obtain copies 
for more authentic illustration of 
LJRR articles. I think this is im- 
portant because I feel the use of 
photographs and illustrations is 
one of the main features of your 
publication. 

After this unsolicited critique, 
may I request a favor and inquire 
who was Fanny Bartlett? I find 
the name "Fanny Bartlett's" as a 
station east of Amasansett in old 
LIRR timetables. My mother-in- 
law walked from Brooklyn to Mon- 
tauk about 1912 and recalls local 
people referred to "Fanny Bart- 
lett's Railroad." 

Keep up the good work. You 
are really filling a need in keeping 
alive Long Island history and tra- 
dition. 

Ralph G. Atkinson, 

Freeport. 



Concurs With Wood on Scott 

(To Dr. Wood, Con. Edi.) 
You were perfectly justified in 
calling Capt. John Scott a "pictur- 
esque scoundrel" and "swindler 
extraordinary". If you were wrong, 
so was I, for I described him in 
terms just as bad in my Brook- 
haven article in Bailey's "Long 
Island — Nassau and Suffolk" 
(1949), Vol. I, beginning on page 
256. If Harry A. Odell thinks we 
are wrong, I will show him what 
the Brookhaven Town records have 
to say about him. I ured one or 
two quotes from them but had to 
omit others because of the word 
limit Bailey put on me for my 
article. One can hardly dispute 
the town records of any town as 
they are accepted by the courts as 
competent evidence. 

I am always interested in your 

Forum stories as you "speak of 

one having authority and not as a 

scribe" — to quote from the Bible. 

Osborn Shaw, 

Town Historian, 

Town of Brookhaven. 

Miller Place _^ 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 
Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — AppraisaU 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 

Great Neck 



Ofj Mwi^^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



RLLKLEYpH ORTON fO. 

^'^ Brooklyn and Long Island's Largest 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



51 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

John Ledyard 

Continued From Page 44 

on February 14, 1779 was 
killed by cannibals in the 
Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands. 
After an absence of four years 
and three months, the one- 
time Southold youth reached 
London October 6, 1780. 

During the next two years 
Ledyard served in the British 
navy, never reaching America 
until the closing months of 
the Revolution when in De- 
cember 1782 his ship came to 
anchor at Huntington which 
was then held by the British. 
From there on a seven-day 
leave he visited Southold and 
his mother, brothers and sis- 
ters whom he had not seen for 
eight years. This was the last 
time he ever saw any of them. 
Nevertheless, he was eulo- 
gized at Soathold's 200th An- 
niversary celebration in 1850 
as "the fearless and world 
famed Traveler who almost 



put a girdle around the earth 
on foot." 

Deserting the British at 
Huntington, John Ledyard 
spent the first four months of 
1783 at Thomas Seymour's 
home in Hartford and there 
wrote his recollections of 
Cook's last voyage — the first 



MARCH 1954 

great travel story by an 
American to be published in 
the United States. Its pub- 
lisher was Nathaniel Patton, 
a Hartford printer who dedi- 
cated the book to Governor 
Jonathan Trumbull, George 
Washington's "Brother Jona- 

Continued next page 



^ 




Southold Methodist Church 



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HOME OWNERS 



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or to purchase and/ or renovate homes 



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i Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

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RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



1^ 



52 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



than" of Revolutionary fame. 

• Ledyard next planned to 

lead an expedition into Ameri- 
ca's unexplored Northwest 
but although Robert Morris, 
the "Signer" offered to outfit 
a ship, none was found avail- 
able. On June 1, 1784, the 
frustrated adventurer wrote 
his mother at" Southold that he 
was about to sail for Europe 
and contemplated a voyage 
around the world. Soon there- 
after he embarked for Spain, 
finally reached Paris and there 
became the friend of Thomas 
Jefferson, then minister; La- 
fayette and Commodore John 
Paul Jones, all of whom off- 
ered aid for such a journey. 

After several disappoint- 
ments, however, Ledyard made 
his famous journey through 
northern Europe on foot, even- 
tually reaching St. Petersburg 
March 20, 1787, then going on 
to Siberia and Irkutsh where 
he was suddenly arrested and 
banished from Empress Cath- 
erine's dominiors, possiWy on 
suspicion of being a French 

• spy. 
Ledyard returned to London 
early in May 1788, a penniless 
and disappointed man. Two 
months later, financed by a 
society interested in learning 
more than the wor]d yet krew 
of darkest Africa's interior, 
he sailed for that continent, 
reaching Cairo August 19, 
1788. There he was successful 
in joining a caravan about to 
start for the interior. Before 
it did so. John wrote what 
proved to be his final message 
to his mother at Southold. 
Widow Abigail Hempstead 
Ledyard Moore was then sixty 
years old but she survived her 
famous son sixteen years. 

Ledyard wrote that he ex- 
pescted to be absent three 
years and hoped then to see 
them all again. He reported 
that he was in "full and per- 
fect health" although he had 
"trampled the world under his 
feet, laughed at fear and de- 
rided danger". Before the 
t caravan left Cairo, however, 
John Ledyard was taken iU 
and died there January 17, 
1789 in his 38th year. He was 
buried in some unknown spot 




Stirling Creek, Southold 

Drawn by Wm. O. Stevens for His Book "Discovering Long Island" 



in the yellow sand where the 
desert meets the Nile river. 

James Seymour, the Hart- 
ford lawyer who had been 
Ledyard's early guardian, 
described him as above middle 
stature, not tall nor corpulent ; 
athletic, firm and robust ; with 
light eyes and hair, equiline 
nose, broad shoulders and full 
chest. "For capacity, endur- 
ance, resolution and physical 
vigor," says the Encyclopedia 
Brittanica, "he was one of the 
most remarkable of travel- 
ers." 

For many years there was a 
penciled hkeness of the South- 
old adventurer on a wall of the 
old chapel at Dartmouth. A 
portrait of Ledyard, v/ho has 
been called "the American 
Marco Polo", was painted by 
the celebrated English artist 
Brenda who had met him in 



London. The original was 
last heard of in Sweden. There 
were some poorly executed 
copies of the painting, one of 
which Ledyard sent to his cou- 
sin Dr. Isaac Ledyard, then a 
resident of Newtown, L. L, 
and another made by Dr. Led- 
yard to his mother at South- 
old. 

This Dr. Ledyard planned 
to publish a life of his cousin. 
When the Doctor died in 1803 
the task was assumed by Dr. 
Jared Sparks, president of 
Harvard College from 1849 to 
1853. It was first published at 
Cambridge, Mass., in 1823 
ar.d was reprinted during the 
first ha!f of the 19th century 
in a number of editions. 

The New York Mirror of 
October 1, 1836, declared thnt 
Ledyard added another to the 

Continued on page 55 




ZII^SiI^WJi^ilA^^ 



53 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 




Designer To The Small Fry 

One of the highest honors the 
fashion world can pay went to Helen 
Lee, a former student of Traphagen 
School of Fashion, when she 
received a silver plaque as a special 
citation of merit when the Ccty 
American Fashion Critics' Awards 
were recently presented. Helen 
Lee's special gift is creating child- 
ren's clothes which she says she 
designs from "the children's point 
of view," following the grown-up 
trends but adapting the ideas to 
small scale in a fresh manner, and 
both parents and youngsters are 
happy about them. 

Traphagen has been proud of her 
from the first. While she was still 
in school, some of her designs were 
sold to a manufacturer of child- 
ren's dresses, and that apparently 
sealed her professional fate. Mar- 
riage and three little daughters as 
design inspiration merely pointed 
up her already floaarishing career 
as designer to the small fry. 

A group of children's dresses 
created by Helen Lee for Young- 
land, Inc., are currently on view in 
the "Diversity of Fashion Careers" 
exhibit at the Traphagen School, 
1680 Broadway (at 52nd St.), New 
York. The show will continue 
through the month of March and 
visitors are welcome to attend 
without charge. 



From Brookhaven, Miss. 

Some time ago you published an 
article in the Forum on Brook- 
haven, Mississippi (named for 
Brookhaven, L. I.) * * * We found 
the town even more prosperous 
locking than two years ago. The 
banks in this part of the U. S. are 
apt to close on the birthdays of 
George Washington, Abraham Lin- 
coln, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson 
Davis. 

George E. Brainerd, 
Home Address: Setauket. 



Part of L. I. 

I always look for the Forum for 
I'm a part of L. I. from one end to 
the other and some day I'll get my 
book (original paintings of old L. I. 
mills) out. 

Brewster Terry, 
West Palm Beach, 
Florida (and Patchogue). 



Brentwood's "After-piece" 

Man-of-ideas Verne Dyson, who 
compiled "A Century of Brentwood" 
which was published in 1950, has 
now issued a reprint of this inter- 
esting community story, together 
with a supplement containing a 
chronology, bibliography and in- 
dex. This makes a more complete 
historical recap of Brentwood-in- 
the- Pines which dates its origin as 
a village back to post-Rebellion 
days. 

The 150-page booklet may be ob- 
tained for $1.50 by addressing The 
Brentwood Village Press, Box 413, 
Brentwood, N. Y. 



O. Hart's account of Great 
South Bay being tough reminds me 
that I've seen it rougher than he 
described, more than once. Bob 
Dressen, L. I. City. 



Choicest Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minton Bone, Spode, Doulton 

Syracuse 

IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Fosloria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 
53 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 



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54 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



m 



John Ledyard 

Continued from Page 53 

catalogue of those whose lives 
have been sacrificed to extend 
the boundaries of human 
knowledge, and that no ordin- 
ary man would traverse burn- 
ing deserts, frozen lakes and 
regions of eternal snows un- 
less animated by some high 
principles. 

Ledyard's "Eulogy on 
Women", recorded in his pri- 
vate journal and first pub- 
lished after his death, has 
been reprinted time and again. 
Of it Griffing's Journal de- 
clared that it "has given Led- 
yard an imperishable name in 
the estimation of all the sex 
throughout the civilized 
world." 

"I have observed among all 
nations," wrote the one-time 
Southold schoolboy, "that 
women, wherever found, are 
the same kind, civil, obliging, 
humane, tender beings; that 
they are ever inclined to be 
gay and cheerful, timerous and 
modest. They do not hesitate, 
like men, to perform a hos- 
pitable or generous action ; not 
haughty, ncfr arrogant, nor 
supercilious, but full of cour- 
tesy and fond of society; in- 
dustrious, economical, ingen- 
uous; more liable in general 
to err than man, but in general 
also more virtuous, and per- 
forming more good actions 
than he. 

"I never addressed myself 
in the language of decency and 
friendship to a woman, 
whether civilized oz* savage, 
without receiving a decent and 
friendly arswer. With man it 
has often been otherwise. In 
wandering over the barren 
plains of inhospitable Den- 
mark, through honest Sweden, 
frozen Lapland, rude and 
churlish Finland, unprincipled 
Russia, and the wide-spread 
regions of the wandering Tar- 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunri£« H'way, Massapequa <E««t) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



tar, if hungry, dry, cold, wet, 
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55 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



"Big Manuel" 

Continued from page 49 

Captain Royce found the 
whales still in great numbers 
and easy to strike. Because of 
the long arctic days, the boats 
could be lowered at any hour, 
day or night, and it took a 
firstclass boat-crew to stand 
the pace. 

Enos' boat had such a crew. 
It was said that it was the 
heaviest ever lowered in pur- 
suit of the "Royal Fish". 
They were Manuel Enos, De- 
Witt Barrett, William McGar, 
a Montauk Indian, a Kanaka 
boatsteerer, and mate George 
Barrett. Not one of them 
weighed less than 225 pounds. 

Big Manuel did net long re- 
main in the for'castle ; he was 
soon made boatsteerer, one of 
the most important and skilled 
berths aboard a whaler. Each 
whaleboat, and there were 
usually 4 to 6 that a ship 
could lower, was manned by a 
crew of 4 oarsmen, a boat- 
steerer or harpooner, and one 
of the mates. 

The boatsteerer's station was 
in the bow of the boat while 
pursuing the whale, and until 
he had hurled his harpoons. 
He then quickly changed 
places with the mate who went 
forward to the lances to make 
the kill. Much depe-^ded now 
upon the boatsteerer's skill in 
escaping destruction by the 
whale, and getting into posi- 
tion to enable the mate to use 
his lance. 

When Enos returned on the 
Sheffield to Cold Sipring early 
in 1854, he was well on his way 
to a mate's berth. There was 
no Cold Spring ship about to 



sail when he was ready to ship 
out again, so he went down to 
GreenpoTt and signed on the 
Philip I, Captain Sisson. While 
on this ship and cruising in 
the Indian Ocean, he experi- 
enced one of the many adven- 
tures that filled his life. 

The Philip I sighted a dis- 
abled Chinese junk in a sink- 
ing condition and Enos direc- 
ted the rescue operations. He 
succeeded in taking off all the 
passengers and crew together 
v/ith a large quantity of rich 
cargo of silks, nankeen and 
other oriental products. Enos 
and his shipmates were show- 
ered with valuable gifts in 
appreciation of their aid. 

Manuel later had a summer 
suit made from some of tha 
nankeen he brought home. 
The Misses Bertha and Eliza- 
beth Pedrick of Cold Sprintr 
Harbor still recall the excite- 
ment of Uncle Enos' return 
and the thrilhng stories of his 
adventures. As children they 
sat, one on each of his knees, 
admiring the strange shells 
and coins he had brought them 
from the Orient, and listened 
to his yams. 

Manuel Enos' return found 
the whaling industry on the 
decline at Cold Spring. A 
number of the Company's 
whaleships had been lost in 
the Arctic; the proud ship 
Sheffield had gone aground on 
Rocky Point that runs out 
from the west shore of her 
home harbor, and had broken 
her back. She had been burned 
for what metal could be sal- 
vaged. 

Manuel decided to "swallow 
the anchor" and stay on shore 

Continued on next pagfe 



"THE THIRTEEN TRIBES" 

By Paul Bailey 
Second Printing Now Reaf?y. $1 Postpaid 

A brief account of the names, locations, customs, 
characteristics and history of the Long Island Indians. 
To which has been added the author's descriptive 
rhyme on the 13 tribal domains. 

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5^. 



MARCH 1954 

"Big Manuel" 

^^^ Continued from page 56 

1^ for awhile after he met, and 
later wed, Susan Brush. His 
sea-going career was pushed 
aside for a try at store-keep- 
ing; but he was too generous 
to his friends, and his money, 
wG-n by hard knocks in the 
Arctic and Southern Seas, 
slipped away from him. One 
year behind the counter was 
all he could stand; he had to 
sell his store. 

Big Manuel said good-bye to 
his wife and baby daughter 
Melna and started looking for 
a ship. He found it at New 
Bedford where the industry 
still flourished and good men 
were at a premium. He took 
a first mate's berth and "lay", 
with an added bonus of $250, 
to sail on the bark Java with 
Captain Finney. The Java 
sailed in 1860 and made a 
"greasy" voyage, returning at 
the end of three years. 

Manuel then became Cap- 
tain Enos and he was given 
^^^ the Java's command for her 
'^P next voyage. He was proud 
of his first command, sure of 
his ability as a whaleman, and 
he resolved to make a voyage 
that would be the greatest 
effort of his life. 

In order to spur him on, 
his owners offered him a 
bonus of $1000 if he could 
make them $100,000 in two 
seasons! So Susan Enos and 
her little four-year-old daugh- 
ter waved goodbye once again 
to the Java and her big new 
commander. 

Captain Enos' efforts suc- 
ceeded. His cruises covered 
the Pacific and Indian Oceans ; 
the try-pots boiled in the Arc- 



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tic and in tropical waters. 
After two years Enos put in 
at Honolulu and sent his oil 
and bone home as freight. He 
refitted and went on another 
two-year voyage that was 
equally successful. He re- 
turned to New Bedford with 
smoke-sooted sails and a full 
cargo. 

A wonderful welcome 
awaited the big captain, and 
everything possible was done 
by his owners to show their 
high esteem for his ability. 
But in a few days Enos started 
home to his family at Cold 
Spring rather than wait at 
New Bedford until his ac- 
counts for the four years were 
settled. 

In his seabag he carried a 
pair of walrus' tusks artistic- 
ally worked in scrimshaw ; the 
labor of many an hour in a 
lonesome captain's cabin. The 
figures carved on the tusks 
and lined in with india ink 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

were those of a woman and 
little child, the former holding 
a scroll upon which was 
etched, 'IShip Java, Captain 
Enos." 

A pathetic incident occurred 
upon the Captain's arrival. 
Shortly after he had sailed on 
his last voyage, his little girl 
Melna, aged 4 years, had died 
and a baby, Ella Nora, was 
born, who was now nearly four 
years old. Captain Enos did 
not realize the difference until 
he was told. 

A letter came to Cold Spring 
from the owners of the Java, 
informing the Captain that 
his accounts of the 4 years 
voyage were made up and that 
the Java had cleared $96,200, 
just $3,800 short of the 
amount necessary to secure 
the $1,000 bonus but, said the 
owners, as the sum came so 
close to the fixed amount, 
they had concluded to send 

Continued on next pag-e 



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Capt. Joseph Ketcham of Babylon in 1857 built a small 
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Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
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57 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



him the $1,000 check which 
was enclosed. 

This was a nice httle addi- 
tion to the Captain's large 
profits on the voyage. He 
built a comfortable house on 
Main street (the attractive 
home now owned by the Rev. 
Edgar Jackson), purchased a 
coasting vessel, and settled 
down again to a period of local 
endeavour. 

But, as frequently happened 
to non-coasting skippers, he 
lest money in this unfamiliar 
venture. So he returned to 
whaling, again out of New 
Bedford on the John Winth- 
rop. After making one cr two 
seasons as mate in the New 
Bedford whaler, he joined the 
Matilda Sears at Talcahuano, 
a whaling port on the west 
coast of South America and 
as Captain sailed for the whal- 
ing grounds. 

From this point in Captain 
Enos' life few authentic facts 
are known for he departed on 
a voyage from which he never 
returned. His granddaughter, 
Mrs. Alfred L. West, now liv- 
ing in New Jersey, after 
again examining her family 
records, recently wrote, "In 
spite of conjectures, knowing 
grandfather to be a man de- 
voted to his family, and the 
fact that all the crew and the 
ship just disappeared, the only 
reasonable conclusion is that 
like many others, they were 
all lost at sea." 

The one mystery that still 
remains is what caused the 
Matilda Sears and her entire 
crew to vanish without trace 
from the seas of the world? 
Was it typhoon, fire, crush- 
ing ice, or another "Moby 
Dick"? 



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Longest Haired Lady 

I read with interest the article by- 
Miss Elizabeth Hawl?ins concern- 
ing the world's longest haired lady, 
Mrs. Ellen Swezey Petty of Brook- 
haven. As Mrs. Petty was my 
grandfather's cousin (his name was 
Wallace Swezey), I can add a little 

Ellen's mother's maiden name 
to the story. 

was Hulse, and Ellen was bom in 
1853 and died in 1932. She is buried 
in Woodland Cemetery in Bellport 
(LI). Her husband, Captain Petty, 
was drowned off Cape Hatteras on 
December 20, 1888. 

Mrs. Harold W. Sylvester 

Brookhaven 



We have enjoyed every issue so 
very much. Mrs. Charles Vander- 
veer Jr., Hempstead. 



Balloon Over Cold Spring Harbor 

Your reference from time to 
time of old time balloons that put 
the fear of something or other into 
the hearts of Long Islanders 
prompts me to tell you that when 
the shore road at "Coldspring" in 
Huntington town was opened 
August 28, 1860, there was a bal- 
loon ascer,sion in connection with 
the celebration. 

H. I. Ramm, 
Bridgeport, Ct 



We eagerly look forward to each 
issue of the Forum. Mrs. Wm. 
Preston Tuthill, Cutchcgue. 



STILL g| CALSO 

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DISTRIBUTOR 
Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Mending, Restoring, 
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and Personal Files, Etc. 
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Tel. AMityville 4-0680 



Schooldays in Patchogue 

I was thrilled to read Grace 
King's (Mrs. Wilkins') letter in 
the Forum. It brought back old 
times in her class at Patchogue 
High School. Fred A. Payne, San 
Diego, California. 



Just a line to let you know how 
much I enjoy receiving the Long 
Island Forum. I'm almost begin- 
ning to feel like an expert on Long 
Island history — it's so informa- 
tive. Benn Hall, Hampton Bays. 



Books For Sale 



Historic New York (1st Series cf 
the Half Moon papers). Fully illu- 
strated. 1897. 

A Loiterer in New York. Helen 
W. Henderson. Many photographs. 
1917. 

Southold Town Records. Vols. 1 
and 2. Large map. Introduction by 
Epher Whitaker. Printed 1882-84. 

History of New York During the 
Revolutionary War. By Judge 
Thomas Jones of Massapequa 
(1730-1792), Leading Tory. Two 
volumes. Steel engravings. Edited 
by Edward Floyd DeLancey, 1879. 

Journal of a Voyage to New 
York and a Tour in Several of the 
American Colonies in 1679-80. By 
Jaspar Bankers and Peter Sluyter. 
Translated from the Dutch and 
edited by Henry C. Murphy 1867. 
Maps. 

For particulars write — Long 
Island Forum, Amityville. 



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This is Gratifying 

I am grateful to the Forum for 
Mrs. Bigelow's sake, since she 
found pleasure in it right to the 
end, long after all other magazines 
had ceased to interest her. The pub- 
lication of a letter she wrote you a 
few years ago, about some old L. I. 
lore, gave her very keen satisfac- 
tion, too. She was then in her 
middle 80's. 

G. A. Peterson, 
Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



"Long Island Whalers" 

The history of Long Island whal- 
ing, boiled down but with all salient 
facts, well illustrated, compiled by 
Paul Bailey, has just come off the 
press in a limited edition. A com- 
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postpaid. Address L. I. Forum, 
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Desk from the Cadmus 

Have just finished reading the 
February Forum, always so in- 
teresting to we Long Islanders. 
And in the first article, "Decline 
of Whaling", in reading of different 
ships I thought it might be in- 
teresting to note that the desk in 
the office of "The Sag Harbor Cus- 
tom House" was from the ship 
Cadmus, and is used constantly by 
visitors who buy our cards and mail 
them in the old letter-box or hang 
them near the desk. 

M. L. Beebe Taylor 
Brooklyn 
(Curator 1951-53) 



Corrections, Hurricane Story 

Please correct two errors in my 
story "A Hurricane at Sea" in the 
February Forum. My father re- 
ceived a gold watch, not a gold 
medal, for bringing the Bergen 
safely into port. Also he was not 
buried in the present Hampton Bays 
cemetery (although his mother 
Charry Lane Squires was) but rests 
near his first wife, Carrie A. Peters 
arid their two daughters in the 
Richard Peters plot in the ancient 
cemetery west of Southold's Old 
First Church. 

Harry B. Squires 
Hampton Bays 



Likes Dr. Wood's Work 

You're doing some fine good old 
things. Get Dr. Wood started on 
anything. It will be good. 

David M. Griswold 
Silver Springs, Md. 



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Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

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Large New Banquet Hall 

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LONG ISLAND 

FORUM 




WHEN LINDENHURST WAS BRESLAU 
Buildings of the I870's When the Village Slogan Was "Like London and Paris, Breslau Will Surely Be." 

Now the County's Largest Municipality. 



n, 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



JOHN LED YARD THE TRAVELER 
BEACH PLANTS DO SURVIVE 
"GOOD OLD TIMES" FARMING 
"BIG MANUEL," WHALING CAPTAIN 
WHO WAS FANNY BARTLETT? 



Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Julian Denton Smith 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Andnis T. Valentine 

Ralph C. Atkinson 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



MARCH 1954 



.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. ^ 



H. E. Swezejr ft Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
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Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eaatport 250 



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Farmingdale 

Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 

Rug Cleaning 

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Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

Salfs and Service 

MULLER 
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Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Truck* 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

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Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Establislied 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 



Texaco Products 
ARTHUR F. HOWE 

(formerly Barker's) 

262 Broadway AMityville 4-9830 



SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 

178 



THE 

LcNe Island 

fcCLM 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as second-class matter May 31, 1947, at the 
post office at Amityville, New York, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL,M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

.lohn C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Wyandanch's Daughter 

In your newspaper article on the 
daughter of Chief Wyanidanch you 
called her Quashawwam. 

I believe this event must have 
happened prior to the marriage 
of Wyandanch's daughter, then 
called Cantoneras, who is said to 
have married one Jan Cornelius 
Van, Texel (later called Van Tas- 
sel). In our story Wyandanch died 
in 1659 and this daughter is said 
to be the one that Lion Gardiner 
had ransomed. 

If our record is right, my G. G. 
G. Grandmother Rebecca Van Tas- 
sel, who married Peter Yerks, is a 
descendant of Cantoneras. and I 
have wondered how a Dutchman 
ever won an Indian Princess. 

In the book "Historical Sketches 
of the Romer, Van Tassel and 
Allied Families", by John Lock- 
wood Romer, 1917, printed by W. 
C. Gay Printing Co. Inc. of Buf- 
falo, N. Y., will be found quite a 
record that I have every reason to 
believe is correct. Pages 38, 39, 
40, and pages 128 to 136 give a 
record of deeds that may have con- 
veyed the land mentioned in the 
article. 

The Van Tassel's were a great 
family, and I am proud to have 
some of that blood in my veins. 
I. S. Stivers, 
Samoset, Florida 



Slave Ship Wanderer 

Some months ago you were kind 
enough to send to Mr. George G. 
Brainerd for me, a copy of the 
Forum of May 1945, (by H. P. Hor- 
ton) and I want to thank you. The 
Wanderer landed its last cargo 
of slaves here in this county, at 
Jekyll Island. The article is not 
only well written, but is of great 
interest, Mrs, K. G. Berrie, Secre- 
tary, Brunswick (Georgia) Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 



In his Yankees Liked L. I. Tur- 
nips, in the December Forum, Capt. 
Eugene S. Griffing deals with an 
era which is not so far off but that 
some of your readers remember it, 
including the undersigned. Arthur 
R. Rossman, West Hempstead. 



NICHOLS 
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Our Specialty 
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197 Broadway AMityville 4-0515 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St, Tel, 1086 Ulip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoalta Accepted by Mail 
First National Bank of Islip 

Hambcr Fed, Depoait Inauranee Corp, 



PHONOGRAPHS 

SUFFOLK AND NASSAU 

AMUSEMENT CO, 

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FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

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186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIF. L. I. 
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MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

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Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

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42 



MAECH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



John L:,edyard the traveler 



J OHN LEDYARD the Trav- 
** eler, of whom I have 
previously written, was the 
son of Captain John Ledyard 
and Abigail Hempstead L-ed- 
yard, of Southold lineage and 
birth. He was born at their 
Groton, Ct. home in 1751, the 
first child after their runaway 
marriage at Setauket. His 
mother was the daughter of 
Squire Robert Hempstead, 
SouthoM's first schoolteacher 
and his father a son of the 
one-time mayor of Hartford, 
Ct. 

After the death at sea of 
her husband in 1762, Abigail 
and her four children remcved 
to Southold where she there- 
after lived, first on her father's 
farm but after her marriage 
to Dr. Micah Moore, South- 
old's village physician, at his 
home which stood half a mile 
east of the Hempstead home- 
stead. 

Shortly after the death of 
Dr. Moore, young John went 
to live with his Grandfather 
Ledyard at Hartford. Follow- 
ing the latter' s death he was 
taken into the Hartford home 
C'l his guardian, Thomas 
Seymour, a lawyer and a 
brother-in-law of the elder 
Ledyard. 

During his stay at Southold 
John attended school there, 
later in Hartford and still later 
he read law in the office of his 
guardian. In the spring of 
1772 he entered Dartmouth 
College, recently established 
chiefly as an Indian school, at 
Hanover, N. H., by the Rev. 
Eleazer Wheelock. Within a 
few months, however, he left 
that instituticjTi and journeyed 
many miles through the wild- 
erness, as far as Canada, liv- 
ing among the Indians and 
learning their language, man- 
ners and customs which infat- 
uated him. Among other 
things, he learned how to 
make a dugout from the trunk 
of a tree using fire and sharp 
stones. 



Dr. Qlarence zAshto7i 'Wood 

Upon returning to college 
after an absence of several 
months he and some Indian 
students built such a dugout 
fifty feet long and three feet 
in width. As late as 1836 the 
stump of the tree from which 
the crude craft was shaped 
stood on Dartmouth's campus. 
After completing the dugout, 
John again pushed off down 
the winding river, carrying 
among other things provi- 
sions, a bearskin, a Greek test- 
ament and a copy of Ovid's 
Latin classic. 

Reaching Preston, Ct., John 
took up residence with his 
cousin young Dr. Isaac Led- 
yard and there decided to be- 
gin preparing for the ministry. 
He was encouraged in this by 
the village pastor, a Rev. 
Hart, possibly the same 
Joshua Hart who later 
preached on Long Island and 
ran a boys' school at Fort 
Salonga during the Revolu- 
tion. On Hart's advice, Led- 



yard returned to Long Island 
and at Southold suddenly sur- 
prised his mother, brothers 
and sisters whom he had not 
seen for several years. Ap- 
proving of his plans to be- 
come a preacher, his mother 
sent him to her local pastor, 
the Rev. John Storrs from 
whom he received a letter of 
recommendation. (Thirteen 
years later John was to write 
from Paris to his mother, who 
later sponsored Methodism at 
Southold, severely criticizing 
her for carrying her religious 
notions "to the most ridicu- 
lous and absurd lengths"). 

On this visit to the scenes 
of his boyhood, John tarried 
but a day, then crossed Bois- 
seau's ferry from Conklin's 
Point at Ashamomoque to 
Shelter Island, traversed that 
island to the South ferry and 
thence reached Sag Harbor. 
At East Hampton, he pre- 
sented his recommendations 
to Dr. Samuel Buell, modera- 
tor of the Long Island iSynod, 
with whom he spent a month 




Ledyard Knew the Sound Shore at Southold 

Pholo 1890 by Marshall Woodman 



4i 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



in intense study of theology. 
Dr. Buell it was who advised 
John to seek a teaching post 
while continuing his theologi- 
cal preparations. 

Fortified with another 
"goc-d letter" from the Rev- 
erend Doctor, Ledyard rode 
westward astride his horse 
Rosinante, stopping at Bridge- 
hampton, Soathampton and 
Fireplace (Scuthaven) , thence 
to Setauket where his parents 
had plighted their troth two 
decades earlier. Later he 
passed through Smlthtown, 
reached Huntington and there 
"feasted" for about twelve 
days in the library of the Rev. 
Ebenezer Prime who had 
taken as his second wife Ex- 
perience Youngs of Southold, 
a sister of John's Grand- 
mother Hempstead. 

From Huntington Ledyard 
returned to East Hampton 
where he again spent a short 
time with Dr. Buell before re- 
turning to his cousin's home 
at Preston, Ct. Here, having 
received no encouragement 
from President Wheelock of 
Dartmouth or others to whom 
he wrote, he abandoned all 
thought of becoming a minis- 
ter. A few weeks later he 
signed up at New London, Ct. 
with a Capt. Deshon and sailed 
as common seaman on a ves- 
sel bound for the Mediter- 
ranean. 

At Gibralter he enlisted in 
a British regiment but was 
released at the request of 
Capt. Deshon on whose ship 
he returned to New London, 
a year later. Thus at twenty- 
two John Ledyard, who was 
later to win fame as a traveler, 
had tried the law and the pul- 
pit without success. Soon 
bidding farewell to local 
friends and relatives, he jour- 
neyed to New York and from 
there worked his way to Ply- 
mouth, England. Reaching 
London on foot, he there met 
Captain James Cook, the navi- 
gator who was about to set 
sail on his third and final voy- 
age of exploration. 

Ledyard signed up as a cor- 
poral of marines and sailed 
July 12, 1776, with Cook who 

Continued on page 52 



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44 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^each 'T^hxnts IDo jurviipe^ 



TfROM a quick glance at our 
^ beach vegetation one 
might have the impression 
that the old law about the 
"survival of the fittest to sur- 
vive" did not apply. In the 
quick glance we would see 
plenty of space unoccupied by 
any plants and each living 
plant apparently having 
plenty of space to grow in. 
It would seem that an ideal 
situation existed and had 
existed forever. 

The quick glance is not 
enough; we need an extended 
view. By an extended view I do 
not mean one encompassing 
all plant life on the beach but 
rather a view of all the plant 
life of the beach over a period 
of years for a cycle is at work 
due to the instability of the 
beach itself. 

The difficult fact to be kept 
in mind is that the beach is 
alive and by no means dead. 
It moves, grows, a.id shrinks. 
Even on the most windless day 
little cascades of sand slip 
down the sides of sand dunes. 
On a windy day the sand blows 
and rides in the air. Both 
motions alter the contours of 
the dunes and, as the sand 
settles elsewhere, it changes 
the outlines of that place. 

Moving sands tend to gather 
in protected places, and thick- 
ets offer ideal, high-percent 
protection. It is no wonder, 
then, that many sand dunes 
turn out to have a great foun- 
dation of dead brush and roots 
in the exact position and 
growth characteristics a s 
when alive. Sand had blown 
into the thicket until it com- 
pletely submerged the growth 
and then continued to build 
up and assumed the propor- 
tions of a dune. 

The newly located sand soon 
became protected by the ever- 
present beach grass growing 
up from beneath and the roots 
matting thickly below the sur- 
face. Other beach plants 
would establish themselves 



Julian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 
Society 

promptly on the newly set 
sand except for one thing — 
the lack of nutrients in the 
sand, the sand of itself being 
nearly pure quartz. 

Have you ever noticed the 
quantity of small, insignifi- 
cant plants that can exist on 
obviously dry, crystal-clean 
beach sand ; not only can exist 
but manage to flower and pro- 
duce seed ? These small plants 
die and the decayed parts 
gather to constitute humus 
for a little larger plant. Be- 
fore long enough humus is be- 
ing produced by decaying ve^f- 
etation to support such tough 
beach plants as golden rod, 
beach pea, and some vines. 

As additional nutriment is 
available mainly through tho 
accumulation of humus, the 
woody vegetation appears — 
bayberry, poison ivy, beach 
plum, cedars, wild cherry, 
huckleberry, pepperidge, sas- 
safras, oak, holly, and a few 
more. 

The "survival of the fittest" 
is going on all the time for as 
soon as enough nutriment is 
present a higher form of plant 
enters and crowds out the 
lesser. Perhaps the verb push 
is better than crotvd for push- 
ing is what actually happens. 



Frequently it is very plain at 
the edge of a mass of beach 
vegetation which was the first 
plant to arrive and which 
came last. The first one, the 
very minor form, will be grow- 
ing on the outer fringe of the 
mass and the last arrival will 
be in the center where the 
hu^us and nourishment are 
most abundant. The last arri- 
val will be the highest grow- 
ing plant form of the group. 
In more or less regular con- 
centric circles the various 
kinds of plants will appear in 
the order of their arrival ; the 
forms being pushed out from 
the center somewhat like the 
annual rings on a tree. The 
lesser forms had been unable 
to survive the competition of 
the higher forms and were 
forced into a location where 
they could survive. 

I am not exactly sure when 
the center of the mass gives 
way to the woody plants for 
the advent of the hardier 
plants varies somewhat. Usu- 
ally the bayberry is the first 
woody plant to appear in the 
center of a growth of beach 
vegetation but sometimes it 
is poison ivy and less fre- 
quently it is beach plum. 
These three are almost evenly 
matched and no one of them 
seems entirely capable of 
pushing out the other two 









t^,". 





A Jones Beach Dune 



Photo by Author 



45 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

and holding- the center of the 
thicket alone. 

By the time the bayberry, 
ivy and beach plum have 
agreed to live peaceably to- 
gether a huckleberry seed or 
a wild cherry pit or perhaps an 
acorn is dropped in the thicket 
and the squeeze is on all over 
again. The larger plant takes 
over the center of the thicket 
and all lesser types push out 
still farther in their effort to 



MARCH 1954 



survive 

The plants need sunlight, 
moisture and nourishment, 
and a beach plant will not sur- 
vive if any one of the three 
factors is missing. Therefore 
when a large type plant ap- 
pears in the certer of a mass 
of beach vegetation, the lesser 
forms have to move outward 
or shade from the larger will 
kill them, or the roots of the 
larger will take all the mois- 
ture and nutrient, starving 
the lesser forms. 

When you find bare sand in 
wide areas between beach 
dunes and get the general im- 
pression that all is well with 
the vegetation, bear in mind 
that a tremendous struggle 
for survival is constantly go- 
ing on wherever a beach plant 
grows, for each plant is be- 
ing pressed by a plant a little 
bit bigger to give up its water 
supply, food depot, and place 
in the sun. 

NATURE NOTES 

From time to time Forum 
readers have referred to items 
m earlier issues. Some of 
these should be noted and 
mentioned. 

Many requests come for in- 
formation on Tom, the Black- 
snake. I have been unable to 
locate Tom this past summer 
(1953). He did not appear in 
his last year's haunts nor did 
I see or hear of a b^acksnake 
anywhere along the beach be- 
tween the Tower and Gilgo. 
I saw two beach "adders" a 
little west of Tobay. Before 
the State Park came, there 
were quantities of these 
snakes in the dunes. Beach 
"adders" are not poisonous 
although their battle "act" 
would indicate otherwise. 



Some people ask about My 
Sand Dune. That dune had 
been 'planted' and grew before 
Parking Field 1 was built. It 
stood off to the southwest of 
the field. It has entirely dis- 
appeared under trampling by 
the people from the parking 
field. Many newly formed 
dunes are growing rapidly on 
the ocean side of the old dune 
hne about half a mile west of 
Field 1. It is remarkable how 
rapidly they do grow! 

Several readers ask for an 
article on the swallows along 
the shore. That is in the 
works. The last week in Sep- 
tember (1953) I came upon an 
enormous flock of swallows 
resting on the flat level area 
betv/een dunes in front of the 
southern end of Meadowbrook 
Parkway. Fortunately I had 
my camera slung over my 
shoulder and it was loaded 
with color film. Those pic- 
tures have been added to my 
collection of beach transpar- 
encies. 

Another reader asked if I 
had ever seen an albino Bine 
Heron. Not that I know of. 
If one should cross my path. I 
am not certain I'd be able to 
distinguish it from the less- 
than-two-year-old Blue Heron 
which are also white. 

Artesian wells continue to 
be opened in Great South Bay. 
I saw two men driving a well 
on Oliver Island south of Wan- 
taqrh. They hit fresh water 
while pounding the pipe at a 
height of seven feet above the 
meadow and at that the wafer 
gushed a foot above the pipe 
end. The water was plentiful, 
good, cold and without hint of 
odor or salt. 



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46 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f" 



# 



^^Qood Old ^imes" farming 



\TI7 E are all, I think, inter- 
' ' ested in what was paid 
in wages in the days when 
food prices were low. Here is 
an agreement made to work 
as farmer for my great-grand- 
father Thomas Strong, for a 
whole year: 

"An Agreement made this 
22d day of March 1836 be- 
tween Thomas S. Strong of the 
Town of Brookhaven in the 
County of Suffolk, in the first 
part, and John Hallock of the 
same place, of the second part. 

"The said John Hallock 
agrees to work as a laborer for 
the said Thomas S. Strong and 
to superintend his farming 
business under the direction 
of the said Thomas S. Strong 
for one year from the day and 
year above mentioned." 

"The said John Hallock shall 
find his own axes, scythes, 
cradles, hoes and forks. The 
said John Hallock shall board 
himself at his own expence. 
The said John Hallock is to 
have the privilege of keeping 
one hog at his own expence, 
and shall devote his whole 



I^fe Wheeler (§trong 

time to the business of the 
said Thomas S. Strong. 

"The said Thomas S. Strong 
shall pay to the said John Hal- 
lock for his services the sum 
of two hundred and fifteen 
dollars, shall let him occupy 
the house at foot of the lane 
and so much of the cellar as 
he may need (I wonder who 
used the rest of it), shall let 
him have the milk of one cow 
to run with the other cows of 
the said Thomas S. Strong, to 
be milked by the said John 
Hallock's family, and to find 
him firewood which shall be 
cut where the said Thomas 
Strong shall direct, and a team 
to get it." 

"But the said John Hallock 
shall lose the time when he is 
cutting it and carting it. And 
shall also find him a garden 
spot but the said John Hal- 
lock shall lose his time when 
working in his garden." 

This sounds like a tough 
proposition, but I suppose it 



was the usual thing, or no one 
would have agreed to it. 

As to a grain cradle, it had 
one scythe blade and three 
wooden fingers the length of 
the blade so that the grain 
when cut would fall to the 
ground in bundles ready to be 
tied into sheaths. As I under- 
stood from my father, each 
man had a lane, one cutting a 
little behind the other. If one 
man overtook another it was 
corsidered a great honor. 

One of my father's law part- 
ners came from an upstate 
farm where he had always led 
his father's cradlers. When 
he came back from college the 
men looked for an easy vic- 
tory, but it so happened that 
he had not tieglected the gym 
and, much to their disgust, 
beat them as usual. 

Just time for one more note 
for I must get this in the mail 
before the railroad goes back 
on us. Right after the Revolu- 
tion, prices were higher than 
in later times. August 28th, 
1789, 28 lbs. of sugar cost one 
lb. 18 shillings and 8 pence. 






^* «r ^-' -* -?-- 




LON6 ISLAND CORNFIELD 



Sketched and Etched by Joseph P. Di Gemma 



47 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



Reminders 

Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. EARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 
E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babvlon. Tel. 551. 



Imperial Washable Wallpapers 

Moore's Paints and Varnishes, Duco 
and Nu-Enamel, Artists' Materials. ' 
Gus Schmidt, 74 East Main St., 
Patchogue. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



Dodge- Plymouth Sales-Service 
Distributors for Firestone Products 

TERRY BROTHERS 
430 W. Main St. Tel. 109 Patchogue 

The Thirteen Tribes 

A second printing of The Thir- 
teen Tribes is now ready for mail- 
ing. Price per copy postpaid. One 
Dollar. 

This brief sketch of the customs, 
habits, characteristics and history 
of the Long Island Indians by the 
Forum editor is being used in social 
study courses in a number of pub- 
lic schools. The pamphlet is well 
illustrated and has heavy durable 
covers. 

Address Long Island Forum, 
Amityville, N. Y. 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15% Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiejrue 



The Fosdick Family 

Annals of the Fosdick Family is 
the title of a volume recently re- 
leased and in our hands. The com- 
prehensive work, well printed and 
permanently bound, is a credit to 
the author, Raymond B. Fosdick of 
Newtown. Ct., and to the pub- 
lishers. The American Histories;! 
Company, Inc. 

The first of this ancient English 
clan to settle on Long Island, we 
learn, was Samuel Fosdick 2d who 
settled at Oyster Bay before 1732 
and there ran a blacksmith shop 
and a tavern as well as farming. 
He later disposed of his consider- 
able property there and returned 
to Charlestown in Massachusetts. 

His son Samuel 3rd remained in 
Oyster Bay. Here he married 
Deborah Shadbolt upon whose 
parly demise he wed Mary Wright 
by whom he h'^d nine children. Thus 
the Fosdick family became deenly 
rooted here on Long Island. The 
book carries a good deal of the 
general history of Oyster Bay. 



pass it on to others so they can too. 
Mrs. J. B. Ketcham, 161 Lefferts 
Ave., Brooklyn. 



"Jamaica Trolleys" 

The above caption is the title of 
a large pamphlet containing the 
history, well illustrated, of the eld 
trolley lines of Jamaica. But it is 
much more than that. It goes into 
the story of the highways of the 
west end, especially Jamaica aven- 
ue, "the oldest continuously used 
road on the island" and the one 
with "the most complicated legal 
background." The author of the 
pamphlet is Vincent F. Seyfried 
and it may be obtained at $1.50 by 
addressing Felix Reifschneider, 
Box 774, Orlando, Florida. 



I enjoy the Forum very much and 

L. I. Forum Index 
Complete Index of the L. I. 

Forum, 1948-1952 (five years), 50 

cents, postpaid. 

Also complete Index for 1938-47 

(10 years), $1. 
Send check with order to Queens 

Borough Public Library, 89-14 

Parsons Blvd., Jamaica 32, N. Y. 

Atten. L. I. Collection. tf 



I am enjoying the Forum very 
much. Mary F. L'Hommedieu, 
Norwalk, Ct. 



Now Available 

Meigs, editor "Private and Fam- 
ily Cemeteries in the Borough of 
Queens". 1932. Postpaid $2. 
Queens Borough Public Library, 
89 14 Parsons Boulevard, Jamaica 
32,N.Y. Attention L.I.Collection.(3) 



Unbound Forums, By Year 

Complete yearly sets of the Long 
Island Forum, unbound, $3 post- 
paid. Address L. I. Forum, Amity- 
ville. 



Etchings By Robert Shaw 

"Home Sweet Home" 

"Nathan Hale Schoolhouse" 
UNFRAMED, 8"xl2", $15 
Box X, L. I. Forum 

FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. 1. 

The Bow^ne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bow^ne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

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Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

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Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



(T 



48 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



"®ig oManmi;' ^haUng Qaptain^ 



jyiANUEL ENOS, whale- 
man, first stood on 
the wharf at Cold Spring in 
the summer of 1849 and 
watched the whaleship Shef- 
field, 579 tons, being outfitted 
for her second voyage for the 
CoM Spring Whaling Com- 
pany. He was well over six feet 
in height and weighed about 
225 pounds; a splendidly pro- 
portioned young man topped 
with a mop of tightly curled 
black hair. 

Big Manuel was an able sea- 
nian, a Portugese from Fayal 
in the Azores, who had orig- 
inally shipped from that port 
on a whaler hailing from Saj 
Harbor. He had now come 
dc'wn to Cold Spring to join 
the Sheffield, Captain Royce, 
primarily because her new 
comniander's recent notoriety 
promised an adventurous voy- 
age in the offing. 

Captain Royce, "an intelli- 
gent whaling master and a 
very correct and close obser- 
ver of the habits of whales", 
had lately returned to Sag 
Harbor in the bark Superior, 
having been the first whaler 
to pass through the Bering 
Strait to open up that most 
important artic ground to the 
industry. Now, to take full 
advantage of his new discov- 
ery, he was to take the largest 
and best vessel he could find 
back to these rew grounds. 
He had chosen the Sheffield 
of Cold Spring. 

This probably accounts for 
the fact that so many Cold 
Spring sailo-s shipped for the 
voyage and became Manuel's 
shipmates. UsuaHv the entire 
crews of the CoJd Soring ships 
were recruited from other 
ports, but on this voyage 
George Barrett was one of the 
mates; his brother DeWitt, 
who later becarne master of 
the Sunbeam, New Bedford, 
shipped before the mast. Able 
seamen Warren Gardiner and 
John Lysle and shin's car- 
penter William McGar had 
also signed articles. 



zAndrus T. Valentine 

Enos found the little port of 
Cold Spring (now Cold Spring 
Harbor) humming from day- 
hght to dark, getting the Shef- 
field readied for an August 
sailing. She lay at anchor well 
outside the sand spit, being 
too large to enter the inner 
harbor where the sail-lofts, 
smithys, cooper-shops, repair 
yards, gristmills and general 
stores were located. From 
Bungtown's cooper-shops and 
factories to Bedlam (Street's 
boarding houses and bars, the 
noisy hustle enveloped the 
village. The outlying farms 
replenished the shelves, bins 
and casks of the local stores 



that were being emptied to 
victual the ship. 

The Sheffied sailed on 
schedule, August 1849; but 
with a most unusual deck 
cargo consigned for San Fran- 
cisco. There were nine 
knocked-down prefabricated 
houses built by Cold Spring 
carpenters, lashed to the 
decks. These were gold-fever 
days, and the Jones Brothers 
of Cold Spring were taking 
advantage of the booming 
market inside the Golden 
Gate. 

After discharging their car- 
go and refitting the ship, Big 
Manuel and his shipmates 
sailed on into the Arctic. 

Continued on pa^e 56 




Old Time Lighthouse, Lloyd's Harbor 

From Loweree Collection 



44 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
90 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2'/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffollc County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Iniurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Who Was Fanny Bartlett? 

I find something of interest in 
every issue of the Forum. It has 
provided the reason for many fam- 
ily jaunts and made others more 
enjoyable. 

A special tip of the hat to Julian 
Denton Smith for his articles of 
genuine interest to all Long Island- 
ers and those who love the Island. 
A frown on articles which emulate 
the "begats" of the Bible and 
depend only on name-dropping for 
their popularity. 

A roar of risrhteous wrath for 
the cut of the "Old Henry Ruggles" 
which was used in Dr. Clarence A. 
Wood's pamphlet "First Train to 
Greenport 1844" and more recently 
in the January Forum to illustrate 
the article on Oliver Charlick by 
John Tooker. This is a reproduc- 
tion of a lithograph of "The Gen- 
eral" which was distributed at 
least until recently by the Nash- 
ville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 
Railway. It shows the locomotive 
on permanent display in Chatta- 
nooga station. The General was 
built by Rogers Locomotive Works 
in Patterson, N. J. in 1856 for the 
Western and Atlantic Railroad 
(whose initials can be plainly seen 
in your cut) and had an exciting- 
Civil War career. The W & A later 
became part of the N C & StL and 
the General never strayed north of 
the Mason Dixon Line to serve the 
LIRR as "The Old Henry Ruggles" 
but was displayed at the Century 
of Progress in Chicago in 1933. 

May I suggest you contact Mr. 
Paul Blauvelt, Publicity Director, 
LIRR if you do not already have 
copies of "The Long Island Rail- 
roader" in which he has been run- 
ning a history of the LIRR with 
many old photos from private col- 
Continued on next page 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hflton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE | 


Insurance 


Mortgages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave 


, Amityville 


AMiiyville 


4-1489 



Por t Washington 

Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 

Commack 



# 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 

Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 

Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



f^' 



Glen Head 



M. 0. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main Bay Shore 7-0876 & 0877 
Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 

Hampton Bays 

JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
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w. 


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50 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 
Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 
Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

Richard Downing & Sons 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Tel. Oyster Bay 592 
North Hempstead Turnpike 



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Real Estate • Insurance 
East ykTAUKET 

Len^ Island. N«w York 
■ Tel. 101 Sotauket | 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199- A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



lections of Long Island railroad 
scenes and old locomotives. I en- 
close a recent sample from the 
December issue. Previous photos 
of old engines have been clearer. 
Perhaps you might obtain copies 
for more authentic illustration of 
LJRR articles. I think this is im- 
portant because I feel the use of 
photographs and illustrations is 
one of the main features of your 
publication. 

After this unsolicited critique, 
may I request a favor and inquire 
who was Fanny Bartlett? I find 
the name "Fanny Bartlett's" as a 
station east of Amasansett in old 
LIRR timetables. My mother-in- 
law walked from Brooklyn to Mon- 
tauk about 1912 and recalls local 
people referred to "Fanny Bart- 
lett's Railroad." 

Keep up the good work. You 
are really filling a need in keeping 
alive Long Island history and tra- 
dition. 

Ralph G. Atkinson, 

Freeport. 



Concurs With Wood on Scott 

(To Dr. Wood, Con. Edi.) 
You were perfectly justified in 
calling Capt. John Scott a "pictur- 
esque scoundrel" and "swindler 
extraordinary". If you were wrong, 
so was I, for I described him in 
terms just as bad in my Brook- 
haven article in Bailey's "Long 
Island — Nassau and Suffolk" 
(1949), Vol. I, beginning on page 
256. If Harry A. Odell thinks we 
are wrong, I will show him what 
the Brookhaven Town records have 
to say about him. I ured one or 
two quotes from them but had to 
omit others because of the word 
limit Bailey put on me for my 
article. One can hardly dispute 
the town records of any town as 
they are accepted by the courts as 
competent evidence. 

I am always interested in your 

Forum stories as you "speak of 

one having authority and not as a 

scribe" — to quote from the Bible. 

Osborn Shaw, 

Town Historian, 

Town of Brookhaven. 

Miller Place _^ 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 
Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — AppraisaU 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 

Great Neck 



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REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
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721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



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51 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

John Ledyard 

Continued From Page 44 

on February 14, 1779 was 
killed by cannibals in the 
Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands. 
After an absence of four years 
and three months, the one- 
time Southold youth reached 
London October 6, 1780. 

During the next two years 
Ledyard served in the British 
navy, never reaching America 
until the closing months of 
the Revolution when in De- 
cember 1782 his ship came to 
anchor at Huntington which 
was then held by the British. 
From there on a seven-day 
leave he visited Southold and 
his mother, brothers and sis- 
ters whom he had not seen for 
eight years. This was the last 
time he ever saw any of them. 
Nevertheless, he was eulo- 
gized at Soathold's 200th An- 
niversary celebration in 1850 
as "the fearless and world 
famed Traveler who almost 



put a girdle around the earth 
on foot." 

Deserting the British at 
Huntington, John Ledyard 
spent the first four months of 
1783 at Thomas Seymour's 
home in Hartford and there 
wrote his recollections of 
Cook's last voyage — the first 



MARCH 1954 

great travel story by an 
American to be published in 
the United States. Its pub- 
lisher was Nathaniel Patton, 
a Hartford printer who dedi- 
cated the book to Governor 
Jonathan Trumbull, George 
Washington's "Brother Jona- 

Continued next page 



^ 




Southold Methodist Church 



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52 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



than" of Revolutionary fame. 

• Ledyard next planned to 

lead an expedition into Ameri- 
ca's unexplored Northwest 
but although Robert Morris, 
the "Signer" offered to outfit 
a ship, none was found avail- 
able. On June 1, 1784, the 
frustrated adventurer wrote 
his mother at" Southold that he 
was about to sail for Europe 
and contemplated a voyage 
around the world. Soon there- 
after he embarked for Spain, 
finally reached Paris and there 
became the friend of Thomas 
Jefferson, then minister; La- 
fayette and Commodore John 
Paul Jones, all of whom off- 
ered aid for such a journey. 

After several disappoint- 
ments, however, Ledyard made 
his famous journey through 
northern Europe on foot, even- 
tually reaching St. Petersburg 
March 20, 1787, then going on 
to Siberia and Irkutsh where 
he was suddenly arrested and 
banished from Empress Cath- 
erine's dominiors, possiWy on 
suspicion of being a French 

• spy. 
Ledyard returned to London 
early in May 1788, a penniless 
and disappointed man. Two 
months later, financed by a 
society interested in learning 
more than the wor]d yet krew 
of darkest Africa's interior, 
he sailed for that continent, 
reaching Cairo August 19, 
1788. There he was successful 
in joining a caravan about to 
start for the interior. Before 
it did so. John wrote what 
proved to be his final message 
to his mother at Southold. 
Widow Abigail Hempstead 
Ledyard Moore was then sixty 
years old but she survived her 
famous son sixteen years. 

Ledyard wrote that he ex- 
pescted to be absent three 
years and hoped then to see 
them all again. He reported 
that he was in "full and per- 
fect health" although he had 
"trampled the world under his 
feet, laughed at fear and de- 
rided danger". Before the 
t caravan left Cairo, however, 
John Ledyard was taken iU 
and died there January 17, 
1789 in his 38th year. He was 
buried in some unknown spot 




Stirling Creek, Southold 

Drawn by Wm. O. Stevens for His Book "Discovering Long Island" 



in the yellow sand where the 
desert meets the Nile river. 

James Seymour, the Hart- 
ford lawyer who had been 
Ledyard's early guardian, 
described him as above middle 
stature, not tall nor corpulent ; 
athletic, firm and robust ; with 
light eyes and hair, equiline 
nose, broad shoulders and full 
chest. "For capacity, endur- 
ance, resolution and physical 
vigor," says the Encyclopedia 
Brittanica, "he was one of the 
most remarkable of travel- 
ers." 

For many years there was a 
penciled hkeness of the South- 
old adventurer on a wall of the 
old chapel at Dartmouth. A 
portrait of Ledyard, v/ho has 
been called "the American 
Marco Polo", was painted by 
the celebrated English artist 
Brenda who had met him in 



London. The original was 
last heard of in Sweden. There 
were some poorly executed 
copies of the painting, one of 
which Ledyard sent to his cou- 
sin Dr. Isaac Ledyard, then a 
resident of Newtown, L. L, 
and another made by Dr. Led- 
yard to his mother at South- 
old. 

This Dr. Ledyard planned 
to publish a life of his cousin. 
When the Doctor died in 1803 
the task was assumed by Dr. 
Jared Sparks, president of 
Harvard College from 1849 to 
1853. It was first published at 
Cambridge, Mass., in 1823 
ar.d was reprinted during the 
first ha!f of the 19th century 
in a number of editions. 

The New York Mirror of 
October 1, 1836, declared thnt 
Ledyard added another to the 

Continued on page 55 




ZII^SiI^WJi^ilA^^ 



53 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 




Designer To The Small Fry 

One of the highest honors the 
fashion world can pay went to Helen 
Lee, a former student of Traphagen 
School of Fashion, when she 
received a silver plaque as a special 
citation of merit when the Ccty 
American Fashion Critics' Awards 
were recently presented. Helen 
Lee's special gift is creating child- 
ren's clothes which she says she 
designs from "the children's point 
of view," following the grown-up 
trends but adapting the ideas to 
small scale in a fresh manner, and 
both parents and youngsters are 
happy about them. 

Traphagen has been proud of her 
from the first. While she was still 
in school, some of her designs were 
sold to a manufacturer of child- 
ren's dresses, and that apparently 
sealed her professional fate. Mar- 
riage and three little daughters as 
design inspiration merely pointed 
up her already floaarishing career 
as designer to the small fry. 

A group of children's dresses 
created by Helen Lee for Young- 
land, Inc., are currently on view in 
the "Diversity of Fashion Careers" 
exhibit at the Traphagen School, 
1680 Broadway (at 52nd St.), New 
York. The show will continue 
through the month of March and 
visitors are welcome to attend 
without charge. 



From Brookhaven, Miss. 

Some time ago you published an 
article in the Forum on Brook- 
haven, Mississippi (named for 
Brookhaven, L. I.) * * * We found 
the town even more prosperous 
locking than two years ago. The 
banks in this part of the U. S. are 
apt to close on the birthdays of 
George Washington, Abraham Lin- 
coln, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson 
Davis. 

George E. Brainerd, 
Home Address: Setauket. 



Part of L. I. 

I always look for the Forum for 
I'm a part of L. I. from one end to 
the other and some day I'll get my 
book (original paintings of old L. I. 
mills) out. 

Brewster Terry, 
West Palm Beach, 
Florida (and Patchogue). 



Brentwood's "After-piece" 

Man-of-ideas Verne Dyson, who 
compiled "A Century of Brentwood" 
which was published in 1950, has 
now issued a reprint of this inter- 
esting community story, together 
with a supplement containing a 
chronology, bibliography and in- 
dex. This makes a more complete 
historical recap of Brentwood-in- 
the- Pines which dates its origin as 
a village back to post-Rebellion 
days. 

The 150-page booklet may be ob- 
tained for $1.50 by addressing The 
Brentwood Village Press, Box 413, 
Brentwood, N. Y. 



O. Hart's account of Great 
South Bay being tough reminds me 
that I've seen it rougher than he 
described, more than once. Bob 
Dressen, L. I. City. 



Choicest Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minton Bone, Spode, Doulton 

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IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

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54 



MARCH 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



m 



John Ledyard 

Continued from Page 53 

catalogue of those whose lives 
have been sacrificed to extend 
the boundaries of human 
knowledge, and that no ordin- 
ary man would traverse burn- 
ing deserts, frozen lakes and 
regions of eternal snows un- 
less animated by some high 
principles. 

Ledyard's "Eulogy on 
Women", recorded in his pri- 
vate journal and first pub- 
lished after his death, has 
been reprinted time and again. 
Of it Griffing's Journal de- 
clared that it "has given Led- 
yard an imperishable name in 
the estimation of all the sex 
throughout the civilized 
world." 

"I have observed among all 
nations," wrote the one-time 
Southold schoolboy, "that 
women, wherever found, are 
the same kind, civil, obliging, 
humane, tender beings; that 
they are ever inclined to be 
gay and cheerful, timerous and 
modest. They do not hesitate, 
like men, to perform a hos- 
pitable or generous action ; not 
haughty, ncfr arrogant, nor 
supercilious, but full of cour- 
tesy and fond of society; in- 
dustrious, economical, ingen- 
uous; more liable in general 
to err than man, but in general 
also more virtuous, and per- 
forming more good actions 
than he. 

"I never addressed myself 
in the language of decency and 
friendship to a woman, 
whether civilized oz* savage, 
without receiving a decent and 
friendly arswer. With man it 
has often been otherwise. In 
wandering over the barren 
plains of inhospitable Den- 
mark, through honest Sweden, 
frozen Lapland, rude and 
churlish Finland, unprincipled 
Russia, and the wide-spread 
regions of the wandering Tar- 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunri£« H'way, Massapequa <E««t) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



tar, if hungry, dry, cold, wet, 
or sick, woman has ever been 
friendly to me, and uniformly 
so; and to add to this virtue, 
so worthy of the appellation of 
benevolence, these actions 



have been performed in so free 
and so kind a manner, that, if 
I was dry, I drank a sweet 
draught, and, if hungry, ate 
the coarse morsel, with a 
double relish." 




Cold spring Harbor Lighthouse 
From Loweree Co'lection 




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•Big Dividends compounded semi-annually. 
•Your savings are insured up to ;$10,000. 

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MEMBER FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK 



55 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



"Big Manuel" 

Continued from page 49 

Captain Royce found the 
whales still in great numbers 
and easy to strike. Because of 
the long arctic days, the boats 
could be lowered at any hour, 
day or night, and it took a 
firstclass boat-crew to stand 
the pace. 

Enos' boat had such a crew. 
It was said that it was the 
heaviest ever lowered in pur- 
suit of the "Royal Fish". 
They were Manuel Enos, De- 
Witt Barrett, William McGar, 
a Montauk Indian, a Kanaka 
boatsteerer, and mate George 
Barrett. Not one of them 
weighed less than 225 pounds. 

Big Manuel did net long re- 
main in the for'castle ; he was 
soon made boatsteerer, one of 
the most important and skilled 
berths aboard a whaler. Each 
whaleboat, and there were 
usually 4 to 6 that a ship 
could lower, was manned by a 
crew of 4 oarsmen, a boat- 
steerer or harpooner, and one 
of the mates. 

The boatsteerer's station was 
in the bow of the boat while 
pursuing the whale, and until 
he had hurled his harpoons. 
He then quickly changed 
places with the mate who went 
forward to the lances to make 
the kill. Much depe-^ded now 
upon the boatsteerer's skill in 
escaping destruction by the 
whale, and getting into posi- 
tion to enable the mate to use 
his lance. 

When Enos returned on the 
Sheffield to Cold Sipring early 
in 1854, he was well on his way 
to a mate's berth. There was 
no Cold Spring ship about to 



sail when he was ready to ship 
out again, so he went down to 
GreenpoTt and signed on the 
Philip I, Captain Sisson. While 
on this ship and cruising in 
the Indian Ocean, he experi- 
enced one of the many adven- 
tures that filled his life. 

The Philip I sighted a dis- 
abled Chinese junk in a sink- 
ing condition and Enos direc- 
ted the rescue operations. He 
succeeded in taking off all the 
passengers and crew together 
v/ith a large quantity of rich 
cargo of silks, nankeen and 
other oriental products. Enos 
and his shipmates were show- 
ered with valuable gifts in 
appreciation of their aid. 

Manuel later had a summer 
suit made from some of tha 
nankeen he brought home. 
The Misses Bertha and Eliza- 
beth Pedrick of Cold Sprintr 
Harbor still recall the excite- 
ment of Uncle Enos' return 
and the thrilhng stories of his 
adventures. As children they 
sat, one on each of his knees, 
admiring the strange shells 
and coins he had brought them 
from the Orient, and listened 
to his yams. 

Manuel Enos' return found 
the whaling industry on the 
decline at Cold Spring. A 
number of the Company's 
whaleships had been lost in 
the Arctic; the proud ship 
Sheffield had gone aground on 
Rocky Point that runs out 
from the west shore of her 
home harbor, and had broken 
her back. She had been burned 
for what metal could be sal- 
vaged. 

Manuel decided to "swallow 
the anchor" and stay on shore 

Continued on next pagfe 



"THE THIRTEEN TRIBES" 

By Paul Bailey 
Second Printing Now Reaf?y. $1 Postpaid 

A brief account of the names, locations, customs, 
characteristics and history of the Long Island Indians. 
To which has been added the author's descriptive 
rhyme on the 13 tribal domains. 

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Monumental Work 



5^. 



MARCH 1954 

"Big Manuel" 

^^^ Continued from page 56 

1^ for awhile after he met, and 
later wed, Susan Brush. His 
sea-going career was pushed 
aside for a try at store-keep- 
ing; but he was too generous 
to his friends, and his money, 
wG-n by hard knocks in the 
Arctic and Southern Seas, 
slipped away from him. One 
year behind the counter was 
all he could stand; he had to 
sell his store. 

Big Manuel said good-bye to 
his wife and baby daughter 
Melna and started looking for 
a ship. He found it at New 
Bedford where the industry 
still flourished and good men 
were at a premium. He took 
a first mate's berth and "lay", 
with an added bonus of $250, 
to sail on the bark Java with 
Captain Finney. The Java 
sailed in 1860 and made a 
"greasy" voyage, returning at 
the end of three years. 

Manuel then became Cap- 
tain Enos and he was given 
^^^ the Java's command for her 
'^P next voyage. He was proud 
of his first command, sure of 
his ability as a whaleman, and 
he resolved to make a voyage 
that would be the greatest 
effort of his life. 

In order to spur him on, 
his owners offered him a 
bonus of $1000 if he could 
make them $100,000 in two 
seasons! So Susan Enos and 
her little four-year-old daugh- 
ter waved goodbye once again 
to the Java and her big new 
commander. 

Captain Enos' efforts suc- 
ceeded. His cruises covered 
the Pacific and Indian Oceans ; 
the try-pots boiled in the Arc- 



# 



IBank of amitptoflle 

Incorporated 1891 

2% on Special Interest 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 

Hours: 9 to 3 except Saturday 
Friday Evening, 6:30 to 8:30 

Member Federal Deposit 
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tic and in tropical waters. 
After two years Enos put in 
at Honolulu and sent his oil 
and bone home as freight. He 
refitted and went on another 
two-year voyage that was 
equally successful. He re- 
turned to New Bedford with 
smoke-sooted sails and a full 
cargo. 

A wonderful welcome 
awaited the big captain, and 
everything possible was done 
by his owners to show their 
high esteem for his ability. 
But in a few days Enos started 
home to his family at Cold 
Spring rather than wait at 
New Bedford until his ac- 
counts for the four years were 
settled. 

In his seabag he carried a 
pair of walrus' tusks artistic- 
ally worked in scrimshaw ; the 
labor of many an hour in a 
lonesome captain's cabin. The 
figures carved on the tusks 
and lined in with india ink 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

were those of a woman and 
little child, the former holding 
a scroll upon which was 
etched, 'IShip Java, Captain 
Enos." 

A pathetic incident occurred 
upon the Captain's arrival. 
Shortly after he had sailed on 
his last voyage, his little girl 
Melna, aged 4 years, had died 
and a baby, Ella Nora, was 
born, who was now nearly four 
years old. Captain Enos did 
not realize the difference until 
he was told. 

A letter came to Cold Spring 
from the owners of the Java, 
informing the Captain that 
his accounts of the 4 years 
voyage were made up and that 
the Java had cleared $96,200, 
just $3,800 short of the 
amount necessary to secure 
the $1,000 bonus but, said the 
owners, as the sum came so 
close to the fixed amount, 
they had concluded to send 

Continued on next pag-e 



€J)e 1801 I|ou0e 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 

Capt. Joseph Ketcham of Babylon in 1857 built a small 
submarine which he tried out in the bay with some success. 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y. 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

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57 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 1954 



him the $1,000 check which 
was enclosed. 

This was a nice httle addi- 
tion to the Captain's large 
profits on the voyage. He 
built a comfortable house on 
Main street (the attractive 
home now owned by the Rev. 
Edgar Jackson), purchased a 
coasting vessel, and settled 
down again to a period of local 
endeavour. 

But, as frequently happened 
to non-coasting skippers, he 
lest money in this unfamiliar 
venture. So he returned to 
whaling, again out of New 
Bedford on the John Winth- 
rop. After making one cr two 
seasons as mate in the New 
Bedford whaler, he joined the 
Matilda Sears at Talcahuano, 
a whaling port on the west 
coast of South America and 
as Captain sailed for the whal- 
ing grounds. 

From this point in Captain 
Enos' life few authentic facts 
are known for he departed on 
a voyage from which he never 
returned. His granddaughter, 
Mrs. Alfred L. West, now liv- 
ing in New Jersey, after 
again examining her family 
records, recently wrote, "In 
spite of conjectures, knowing 
grandfather to be a man de- 
voted to his family, and the 
fact that all the crew and the 
ship just disappeared, the only 
reasonable conclusion is that 
like many others, they were 
all lost at sea." 

The one mystery that still 
remains is what caused the 
Matilda Sears and her entire 
crew to vanish without trace 
from the seas of the world? 
Was it typhoon, fire, crush- 
ing ice, or another "Moby 
Dick"? 



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Longest Haired Lady 

I read with interest the article by- 
Miss Elizabeth Hawl?ins concern- 
ing the world's longest haired lady, 
Mrs. Ellen Swezey Petty of Brook- 
haven. As Mrs. Petty was my 
grandfather's cousin (his name was 
Wallace Swezey), I can add a little 

Ellen's mother's maiden name 
to the story. 

was Hulse, and Ellen was bom in 
1853 and died in 1932. She is buried 
in Woodland Cemetery in Bellport 
(LI). Her husband, Captain Petty, 
was drowned off Cape Hatteras on 
December 20, 1888. 

Mrs. Harold W. Sylvester 

Brookhaven 



We have enjoyed every issue so 
very much. Mrs. Charles Vander- 
veer Jr., Hempstead. 



Balloon Over Cold Spring Harbor 

Your reference from time to 
time of old time balloons that put 
the fear of something or other into 
the hearts of Long Islanders 
prompts me to tell you that when 
the shore road at "Coldspring" in 
Huntington town was opened 
August 28, 1860, there was a bal- 
loon ascer,sion in connection with 
the celebration. 

H. I. Ramm, 
Bridgeport, Ct 



We eagerly look forward to each 
issue of the Forum. Mrs. Wm. 
Preston Tuthill, Cutchcgue. 



STILL g| CALSO 

GASOLINE - FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 
Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Mending, Restoring, 
Rebinding Books 

and Personal Files, Etc. 
K. R. C. 

Dewey Lane Amityville 

Tel. AMityville 4-0680 



Schooldays in Patchogue 

I was thrilled to read Grace 
King's (Mrs. Wilkins') letter in 
the Forum. It brought back old 
times in her class at Patchogue 
High School. Fred A. Payne, San 
Diego, California. 



Just a line to let you know how 
much I enjoy receiving the Long 
Island Forum. I'm almost begin- 
ning to feel like an expert on Long 
Island history — it's so informa- 
tive. Benn Hall, Hampton Bays. 



Books For Sale 



Historic New York (1st Series cf 
the Half Moon papers). Fully illu- 
strated. 1897. 

A Loiterer in New York. Helen 
W. Henderson. Many photographs. 
1917. 

Southold Town Records. Vols. 1 
and 2. Large map. Introduction by 
Epher Whitaker. Printed 1882-84. 

History of New York During the 
Revolutionary War. By Judge 
Thomas Jones of Massapequa 
(1730-1792), Leading Tory. Two 
volumes. Steel engravings. Edited 
by Edward Floyd DeLancey, 1879. 

Journal of a Voyage to New 
York and a Tour in Several of the 
American Colonies in 1679-80. By 
Jaspar Bankers and Peter Sluyter. 
Translated from the Dutch and 
edited by Henry C. Murphy 1867. 
Maps. 

For particulars write — Long 
Island Forum, Amityville. 



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SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 



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Suffolk &- 4th 
Phone BR 3-451 1 



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Main &• Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



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58 




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For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchoeue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
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PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amity ville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



This is Gratifying 

I am grateful to the Forum for 
Mrs. Bigelow's sake, since she 
found pleasure in it right to the 
end, long after all other magazines 
had ceased to interest her. The pub- 
lication of a letter she wrote you a 
few years ago, about some old L. I. 
lore, gave her very keen satisfac- 
tion, too. She was then in her 
middle 80's. 

G. A. Peterson, 
Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



"Long Island Whalers" 

The history of Long Island whal- 
ing, boiled down but with all salient 
facts, well illustrated, compiled by 
Paul Bailey, has just come off the 
press in a limited edition. A com- 
plete history of the island's whal- 
ing ships and men, briefly told. $1 
postpaid. Address L. I. Forum, 
Amityville. 



Desk from the Cadmus 

Have just finished reading the 
February Forum, always so in- 
teresting to we Long Islanders. 
And in the first article, "Decline 
of Whaling", in reading of different 
ships I thought it might be in- 
teresting to note that the desk in 
the office of "The Sag Harbor Cus- 
tom House" was from the ship 
Cadmus, and is used constantly by 
visitors who buy our cards and mail 
them in the old letter-box or hang 
them near the desk. 

M. L. Beebe Taylor 
Brooklyn 
(Curator 1951-53) 



Corrections, Hurricane Story 

Please correct two errors in my 
story "A Hurricane at Sea" in the 
February Forum. My father re- 
ceived a gold watch, not a gold 
medal, for bringing the Bergen 
safely into port. Also he was not 
buried in the present Hampton Bays 
cemetery (although his mother 
Charry Lane Squires was) but rests 
near his first wife, Carrie A. Peters 
arid their two daughters in the 
Richard Peters plot in the ancient 
cemetery west of Southold's Old 
First Church. 

Harry B. Squires 
Hampton Bays 



Likes Dr. Wood's Work 

You're doing some fine good old 
things. Get Dr. Wood started on 
anything. It will be good. 

David M. Griswold 
Silver Springs, Md. 



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Table d'Hote and a la Carte 

On Jericho Turnpike 
Route 25 

SMITHTOWN. L. I., N. Y. 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



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Tela. 248; Night 891 

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Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

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where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

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