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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

o 



LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 







Thurston H. Raynor Homestead, Westhampton 
(See s^ory next Page) 



TABLE of CONTENTS 




'MELANCTON SMITH, NAVAL HERO 


John Tooker 


SEAGULLS AND SPEARING 


Julian Denton Smith 


AN OLD SLAVE'S FIDDLE 


Kate Wheeler Strong 


BUNKERS AND OTHER FISH 


Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 


FANNY BARTLETT'S STATION 


Jeannette Edwards Rattray 


BALLYHOO AT COLD SPRING 


Esteile Valentine Newman 


LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 





MAY 1954 



$2.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 5 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eastport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



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Louden-Knickerbocker 
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A Private Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseases 

81 Louden Are. AmitjrTillc 

AMityville 4-0053 



THE 

LcNG Island 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. . 

POR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as second-clast matter May U, 1947 at the 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., PhD 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



NICHOLS 
RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. Sunriae Highway Tel. 8-1212 

Rug and Furniture CleaninK 



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Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Farmingdale 
Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 
Rug Cleaning 

Broad Hnlluw Road Farmingdale 

Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

Sal. s and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Truclm 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Bntabliahed 1862) 

321 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 



Texaco Products 
ARTHUR F. HOWE 

(formerly Barker's) 

262 Broadway AMityville 4-9830 



SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 



Amityville 
1060 



Farmingdale 
12 



Lindenhurst 
178 



Apaucuck Homestead, 
Westhampton 

From a description supplied by 
the present occupant-owner, Mr. 
Ihurston H. Raynor, at our re- 
quest, we learn that Apaucuck 
Homestead, located at Westhamp- 
ton, IS one of the few century-old 
houses in that vicinity still in the 
possession of a member of its orig-i- 
nal owner-family. It has withstood 
Doth the erosions of 159 years and 
any drastic modernizations; is beau- 
tifully proportioned, and has a well- 
weathered charm. The quoted por- 
"ons below are from Mr. Raynor's 

"In reply to your request, I am 
sending you a short sketch of mv 
house and a little of the history 
leading up to it. The Raynors trace 
back to Thurston Raynor who set- 
a!xi.^", Southhampton (in 1640). 
At the land drawing of IVl^ (mead- 
T^ '°ts, divided among Proprie- 
tors), the Raynors drew a sizable 
tract on Apaucuck Neck. This was 
extended, in 1748, to include the en- 
tire Neck from Old North Country 
Koad to Moriches Bay, bounded on 
the east and west by t-dal creeks, 
"wu™ '^ acreage was over 750. 
When this drawing was made 
two acres were sold to Nathan Ray- 
nor. There is (still) evidence where 
the hrst house was built. The 
pound is very black, and old coins 
have been found here. Also tansy 
has been growing nearby unt=l re- 
cent years. This house, which had 
a long roof in the rear, was de- 
stroyed by fire. The house I now 
owTi was built bv my great-grand- 
fat.vier, Elihu Riynor, in 1795 " 
Suocess've generations of this 
branch of the Raynor family lived 
here: John Raynor (age six when 
t^^e house was buHt). Herrick J 
Raynor, and today, Thurston H. 
Raynor. 

"This now brings me to a dercrip- 
Xa\°\ the house, which is about 
.^6 ft. lr.ng by 28 ft. wide". During 
the 1860's, several interior altera- 
tions were made. Regrettably from 
an architectural viewpoint, "'f-e old 
chimney, with the big fireplaces, 
three on the first floor and probably 
two on the second floor, was taken 
down. The exterior remains about 
the same, (with) a small kitchen 
Continued on Page 88 



Our Specialty 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

POLSKY'S PHARMACY 
197 Broadway AMityville 4-0615 




Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 1086 lelip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Daposiu Accepted by Mail 
First National Bank of Isllp 

Member Fed. Deposit Insurance Corp. 



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SUFFOLK AND NASSAU 
AMUSEMENT CO. 
Tel. 2393 Patchogue ^ 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWNS 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP, L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 




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MOTOR VANS - STORING 
WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near Amityville Depot 



I 



82 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



oMelancton Smith, J\(aipal ^ero 



^lU HEN those of us who are 
native Long Islanders 
learn of the great number of 
people prominent in the busi- 
nss or financial world, in the 
public service, or the arts and 
professions, who have visited 
or resided on L. I., we may 
well wooider if we properly 
appreciate our heritage. Pres- 
idents, governors, generals 
and admirals have visited or 
lived on the Island at some 
time in their lives. 

General Grant and "Fight- 
ing Joe Hooker" both vaca- 
tioned on the Island, the lat- 
ter spending nearly the whole 
summer of 1879 at the Garden 
City Hotel. Rear Admiral 
Aaron Ward lived at Roslyn 
and was noted in civil life as 
a great rosarian. A beautiful 
yellow rose has been named 
after him. Rear-Admiral Joel 
Davis lived at West Islip. 
Rear-Admiral Nicoll Ludlow 
and his brother Major Gen- 
eral William Ludlow were 
born on L. L, direct descend- 
ants through their mother of 
Mathias Nicoll, and both 
fought in the Civil and Span- 
ish-American Wars. Theodore 
Roosevelt, Governor of New 
York State and President of the 
United States had his home 
at Oyster Bay. Governor John 
Alsop King's home was in 
Jamaica, and Governor John 
A. Dix had a year-round home 
in the Hamptons. Governor 
Roswell P. Flower died at 
Eastport in the 1890s. Ma^y 
more names could be added to 
this list. 

One officer of the United 
States Navy who married a 
Long Island girl and lived on 
the Island for several years, 
led such an exciting life espe- 
cially during the Civil War, 
that it makes an interesting 
story. He was not born on 
L. I. but had his roots in its ■ 
soil for his grandfather, who 
was prominent in business and 
in the political affairs of the 
Colonies, was born at Jamaica 



Jo/in Tooker 

in 1744, and the maiden name 
of his grandmother was that 
of an old L. I. family (Bayles). 
Melancton Smith, having 
the same Christian name as 
his father and grandfather, 
was bom in New York City on 
May 24, 1810. His father was 
a Colonel in the War of 1812, 
and his mother was Cornelia 
Haring Jones. He entered the 
U. S. Navy on March 1, 1826, 
spent three years in the Paci- 
fic Ocean, and three years in 
the New York Naval School 
where he was made a Passed 
Midshipman in April 1832. 
The next ten years were spent 
in sea duty part of the time, 
and the rest in shore duty at 
New York. He was promoted 
to Lieutenant in 1837, and 
from June 1839 to March 
1840 he was active in the Sem- 
inole War. From 1841 to 1843 
he was in the Mediterranean 
Sea, and on the ship Vandalia 
in the home squadron from 
1844 to 1846. During the 



Mexican War he was execu- 
tive of the Pensacola Navy 
Yard until 1848 when he was 
again sent to the Mediter- 
ranean where he remained un- 
til 1851. He became a com- 
mander va 1855, and except for 
a few months service as execu- 
tive of the ship Potomac, he 
saw no further sea service 
until the outbreak of the Civil 
War. 

In 1861 he was sent to the 
mouth of the Mississippi River 
with the Massachusetts and 
on July 9th he engaged in a 
long range cannonade with a 
Confederate battery on Ship 
Island, and also engaged the 
Florida on October 19th of 
that year. The Navy Dept. 
commended him for efficient 
service and sent him north at 
the end of 1861. 

He was soon sent back with 
the side-wheeler Mississippi 
to join the Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron com- 
manded by Flag Officer David 
Glasgow Farragut. Many of 
Farragut's vessels were erf too 







Massapequa's on* lime Tryon Hall, near which Smith lived. 

Etching by George R. Avery 



8J 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MAY 1954 



deep draft to cross the bar at 
the mouth of the Mississippi 
unless they were lightened of 
all heavy material. This tedi- 
ous job of unloading and load- 
ing again was dc-ne to all ex- 
cept the Colorado which was 
of deeper draft than the 
others so had to be left out- 
side. 

From April 18th to April 
22d, 1862 FcTts Jackson and 
St. Phillip, thirty miles up the 
Mississippi River from the 
Gulf, were bombarded by Far- 
ragut's fleet, with Porter's 
mortar vessels firing 1500 
shells at them. Farragut de- 
cided to run past the forts and 
very early in the morning of 
April 23rd he started up the 
river for New Orleans, with 
the Flagship Hartford lead- 
ing and the Mississippi the 
third vessel in line of the first 
division. The Mississippi was 
heavily engaged, but in spite 
of a seven-foot gash made in 
her side by the ram Manassas 
she drove the ram ashore and 
riddled it with two heavy 
broadsides. 

When the fleet started up 
the river Capt. Smith in- 
structed his executive officer, 
a young lieutenant, to keep 
the ship in her station which 
he did. Thirty-six years later 
that same officer, by that 
time a Commodore, entered 
Manila Bay early in the morn- 
irg of May 1, 1898, destroyed 
the Spanish fleet, and cabled 
the news to Washington. Ad- 
miral Dewey always highly 
regarded Capt. Smith and 
praised him in his Autobiog- 
raphy. 

On May 14, 1863, a little 
more than a year after the 
passage of the river forts, 
Farragut went above New 
Orleans and attempted to run 
past the batteries at Port 
Hudson. The Mississippi, still 
under the command of Capt. 
Smith, followed him but ran 
aground, and was subjected to 
such a heavy fire that Capt. 
Smith was forced to abandon 
her, so he set her on fire and 
he and his men drifted down- 
river in small boats to join the 
rest of the Union fleet. 

Continued on page 97 



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AT 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

AND TRUST COMPANY 



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Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



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Meniber Federal Reserve System 



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Bethpage, Long Island, N. Y. 



Designers and Manufacturers of the 



Panther Albatross 



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Airplanes for the U. S. Navy, the Air Force 
and Commercial Users 



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Suffolk County's Largest Selection of 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

Ande-McEwan Motors, Inc. 

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LEhig-h 4-2076 BRookville 5-0020 



84 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Seagulls and jpearing 



"X/i Y uncle, Charles P. Smith, 
*^^ retired druggist of 
Freeport, tells of going blue- 
fishing with his father, J. Gil- 
bert Smith, in the ocean off 
Jones Inlet. That was when my 
uncle was in his teens and be- 
fore powerboats. They used a 
sailboat and on the ocean 
watched constantly for 
changes of wind and condi- 
tions of the sea which might 
make trouble in getting back 
through the inlet. Even with 
our powerboats we do the 
same thing now. 

In bluefishing they kept a 
lookout for massing of sea 
gulls. We do likewise, for the 
gathering of the gulls at any 
spot may signal the location 
of the bluefish and we try to 
reach the spot while the gulls 
are still busy. What has hap- 
pened is that the large fish in 
feeding on the small ones have 
chased them up to the sur- 
face where the gulls take ad- 
vantage of the situation and 
dire on them, also. The re- 
sulting churning! of the water 
by the gulls and the fish usu- 
ally indicates a most desirable 
fishing ground. 

Many times I have seen 
gulls work these fish-infested 
spots. Frequently we have 
been miles off shore when sud- 
denly the gulls will begin to 
congregate. I am always puz- 
zled at where they all come 
from. They fly in close to the 
water and from all directions. 
As the fishing boats swing in 
to cross and recross the loca- 
tion, the gulls simply swim 
aside. They seem to show no 
fear, their attention center- 
ing on the tremendous feast 
within bill's reach. 

Until Saturday, October 3, 
1953, I had never seen this ac- 
tion from the shore nor had 
found what kind of small fish 
the gulls were taking. You will 
recall that this year the 3rd of 
October came on the last sum- 
mer weekend before fall over- 
took us. The day was delight- 



Julian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 
Society 

ful with a bright, warm beach 
and the ocean smooth, clean 
and comfortable with slow, 
lov^ waves. I had been swim- 
ming and lay up on the dunes 
sunning and napping. 

In a lazy sort of way I be- 
came conscious of an extra 
amount of gull noises. I raised 
myself enough to look over 
the beach grass on top of the 
dune. The gulls were flying 
in from all directions and con- 
verging on the water directly 
in front of me and scarcely 
fifty feet off shore. They ar- 
rived from both up and down 
the beach as well as from the 
bay side. They flew in low, 
just clearing the beach and 
the dunes. The gulls made no 
talk as they flew, all intent 
upon arriving as quickly as 
possible. They flew with pow- 
erful wing beats and without 
any deviation from the short- 
est route to the gathering 
spot. 

As soon as the gulls reached 



the feeding place they started 
to squawk and scream, an- 
gered that the birds were so 
thick they could not settle on 
the water. They collided, side- 
swiped, locked wings, and 
dropped on top of each other. 
None seemed to light on the 
water but all fell into it. The 
chatter became tremendous, 
something like the uproar at a 
boxing bout but with more in- 
dividual cries. They dropped 
helter-skelter and so densely 
that none could swim. The 
area of frenzied, flapping, 
floundering birds widened. 
They gulped fish in between 
fighting and bickering. The 
water whitened with the activ- 
ities of birds and fish. The 
noise attracted more gulls and 
they came from as far as the 
eye could see. The bedlam in- 
creased as new arrivals hit the 
water. 

I suppose twelve to fifteen 
hundred seagulls had appeared 
before the noise subsided and 
the birds began to spread out 
on the water. Some were full, 
some injured, and some hunted 
more food. Each seemed com- 
pletely occupied in contem- 




Sketched and Etched by Joseph P. Di Gemma 



85 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

plating his own ccndition. The 
area ot resting birds fanned 
out to cover many acres where- 
as m the fray they had 
squeezed into a few hundred 
square feet. 

Two fishing boats had been 
attracted by the noise and 
splashing and they idled in 
deeper water beyond the bar. 
All the excitement had been 
inside the bar and in fairly 
shallow water - anywhere 
from the surf Hne to five feet 
of water. 

Before long several seagulls 
about two hundred feet along 
the beach started to squawk 
once more and to thrash the 
water. Immediately nearby 
giulls closed in and those far- 
ther away got up out of the 
water^nd flew to the new 
spot The screaming, yelling, 
fighting and feeding began all 
c-ver again. I decided to see 
what kind of fish were the 
great attraction. 

As I came from the dunes I 
noticed many of the gulls held 
an irregular line at the crest 
of the beach and all watched 
the proceedings. They hardly 
looked my way as I crossed 
their line, just gave way a bit 

so I could go by. Some of these 
birds carried one wing hang- 
ing out of place ; some stood on 
one foot dangling the other- 
some hobbled around, and a 
few stretched and twisted 
li^ "f ks as though some- 
thing had caught in the 
throat. Apparently the crip- 
ples had taken to the shore. 

I reached the water and 
none of the gulls in the rum- 



pus appeared to notice me I 
dove in and, swimming under 
water, came up among the 
birds They shoved apart ex- 
citedly, making room for me 
but paid slight attention to me 
otherwise. I put my feet on 
the bottom and my shoulders 
were out of the water. I 
caught spearing— silversides 
—by the handful and could 
teel them slide against my 
body and legs. Some halves 
and parts of spearing floated 
m the water and were quickly 
gobbled up by the gulls. Noth- 
ing larger than spearing 
nozzled me. 

I could have done very we'l 
with a pair of ear plugs for 
the screeching of the gulls was 
both deafening and terrifying 
At any time in the few min- 
utes I stood in the feedinj? 
area I might easily have 
reached out and caught sev- 
eral gulls. They seemed to ac- 
cept me about as completely 
asthey would have a piece of 
driftwood OT a spile. 
I sunk down into the water 

Continued on page 93 



MORRELL'S 

AUTO - MARINE 
ESSO SERVICENTER 

Engine Tune-up 

Carburalron and 

Ignition Work 

Merrick Road, opp. Richmond Ave. 
Phone AMityville 4-3442 



MAY 1954 



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'S,T^f™f'" ''y Ernest S. Clowes 

of EiSr S; LS ^Z"^ Pj^^?» °" *e history 
19th centuries ' """""""y during- the 18th and 

fun : thei? homes ;' theSS " ™"''' ' "^ "'«>' >"«i 

of f^mi^Sr^'A^^r '''/"'='=-»' it- Stories 
Great HurricmL ^ ^"""'^ "^ the day of the 

Copies are still available from ^^'^' ^^'^^ Postpaid. 
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• Massapequa to Hampton Bays 

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86 



Wines & Liquors 

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The Oldest Agency 
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Phones 

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I 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



# 



<r 



oAn Old Slave's ^iMe 



TN THE old slave burying 
^ ground back ci the Mount 
House, Stony Brook, there 
stood until a few years ago 
when it was removed for saie- 
keeping, an interesting tomb- 
stone. At the top was carved 
a violin with the bridge let 
down. Underneath was the in- 
scription: "Utterly toneless. 
Anthony Hannibal Clapp of 
African descent. Born at Horse 
Neck, Conn., July 14th, 1799. 
Died in Stony Brook, Oct., 
1816." 

"Tony" was not only a fine 
fiddler but also must have been 
double jointed, if the tale told 
of him is true, for it is said 
that if you placed a sixpence 
behind him, he could bend over 
backwards and pick it up with 
his tongue! 

Though William S. Mount, 
the artist, was a little boy 
when Tony died, he never for- 
got the Negro and kept the 
nddle fresh painted as long as 
he lived. Mr. Mount was a fine 
player himself and also made 
violins. He invented one with 
a hollow back which he had 
patented. Once, for a stunt, he 
played a whole tune on a vio- 
lin with a door key. 

While he painted many por- 
traits, he was best loved for 
the painting of things going 
on around him. "The Horse 
Trade," "Raffling the Goose," 
"Power of Music" (dancing to 
the music of a colored fiddler), 
"Fair Exchange, No Robbery" 
(tramp trading hats with a 
scarecrow), and many others. 
Often the boys from the vil- 
lage were his models and their 
descendants can tell their 
names to this day. 

Though Mr. Mount was 
born in Setauket he spent most 
of his life in Stony Brook. He 
did live in New York for a 
spell, but found it very expen- 
sive. He was charged $4 a 
week for room and board. He 
was a member of the Acad- 
emy, and many of his pictures 



K^fe Wheeler ^trong 

were shown at the exhibitions 
in New York. He was said to 
be jolly and full of fun. An 
expert on the tin whistle, he 
often played it as he walked 
along the street. 

He would not let himself be 
imposed upon. Once when 
painting a portrait for a very 
rich man, he stayed at his 
house while painting his pic- 



ture. When the time came to 
pay for the portrait, the man 
said he thought the painter 
had been entertained in such 
luxury he ought to deduct $50 
from the fee. Mr. Mount re- 
plied he would give him the 
picture, if he could not afford 
the price. The man paid. 

Mr. Mount had a studio on 
wheels with plate glass win- 
dows and a stove. This was 

Continued on Page 95 











~/^- 



J i< «<^ 



Mount'* Own Sketch of His Studio on Wheels 



87 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Reminders 

Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. BARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



MAY 1954 



Automotive Supplies 
E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babylon. Tel. 551. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



Morton Books Wanted 

The Forum is desirous of acquir- 
ing books on the Horton family for 
a reader. In writing please state 
price and condition. 



Kilma Data Wanted 

Wanted, any information about 
William Sawtelle Kilmer, born 
1883. living on Long Island in 1916 
when his father. Rev. Charles Kil- 
mer, died at Binghampton, N. Y. 
Write Emily Weiss, 1032 North 
Dearborn St., Chicago 10, Illinois. 
(5) 



STILL ,t CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 

TeLSEIden 2-3512 



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Service 15% Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiafue 



Apaucuck 

Continued trom i'age 82 
built on the east end." (Sketch 
shows this.) 

"The old well, with sweep and 
bucket, has been abandoned for 26 
years." When necessary to replace 
any of the original shmgles anu i;ne 
handmaoe wrought nails, care was 
taken to do so with "previously used 
ones, shortened ana naileo (per- 
force) with cut nails." 

Flanking the north side and west 
end of the house, ana greatly prized 
by the owner, is '"the (magnJicent 
stand of) boxwood, 100 years ola." 
Many persons may recall "the little 
Osage orange tree, north of the 
house, which was uestroyed by the 
Hurricane of 1938." 

This staunch old homestead re- 
tains a dignity that will dwarf any 
modern housing development which 
may someday encroach. 

That Name, Shodack 

In the February 1954 issue you 
ask who can tell the origin of the 
name Shodack. I would suggest that 
Mr. Higgins of Hillsdale, N. Y. look 
up the records of Shodack's Land- 
ing, N. Y. which is located on the 
Hudson River near him. I assume 
that Shodack is a Dutch family 
name. 

As you will note I have returned 
to California from New Orleans. 
The Forum is so extremely inter- 
estirg, I did not want to miss re- 
ceiving a copy while I was away 
from California. 

Horace K. T. Sherwood 

Long Beach, Cal. 



AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



We enjoy the Forum very much. 
Mrs. Henry D. Mills, Patchogue. 

L. I. Forum Index 

Complete Index of the L. I. 
Forum, 1948-1952 (five years), 50 
cents, postpaid. 

Also complete Index for 1938-47 
(10 years), $1. 

Send check with order to Queens 
Borough Public Library, 89-14 
Parsons Blvd., Jamaica 32, N. Y. 
Atten. L. I. Collection. tf 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

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NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



Authentic Colonial Etchings 

(United States) 
8"xl5"— UNFRAMED— $15 
Write: (Miss) G. A. Sanders 

107 Sea Cliff Ave. Glen Cove, N. Y. 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. 1. 



The Bow^ne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bow^ne House 

Built 1661 

I wne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Relieion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors Flushing, N. Y, 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 



Phone FArmingdale 2-2009 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



|>^ 



88 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



(^ 



junkers and &ther ^ish 



# 



T N May 1876 Peconic Bay 
■'■ was full of menhaden 
(bunkers) . The seiners of Mat- 
tituck known as the Coots 
landed 700,000 of that species 
of shad with a delectable fla- 
vor and a multitude of bones. 
Richmond and Tuthill caught 
100,000 and George Vail of 
Peconic one morning found as 
many in his pound at the 
Sound. Thirteen years later 
during the season of 1889 the 
steamer Falcon caught over 
9,000,000, with Capt. John 
Burns of Greenport in com- 
mand of a double gang of men. 

In May 1901 Town Harbor 
at Southold was again full of 
bunkers. Oldtimers vowed 
they had never seen so many. 
The pound fishermen unfor- 
tunately had not put out their 
sets. In June the Indian Neck 
seiners, however, gathered 
1,600,000 and hoped to exceed 
the two-million mark. 

In the summer of 1911 the 
Triton Oil and Fertilizer Com- 
pany in a period of 115 days 
erected and put into operation 
a mammoth rew factory at 
Promised Land which had the 
capacity to convert 1,250,000 
bunkers into oil and -■'Scrap 
every 24 hours with each 
press. For its erection fifty 
carloads of lumber was de- 
livered by the LIRR during 
one week in July. 

In August 1875 Capt. 
George Vail caught 94 Span- 
ish mackerel off Montaulc. 
However, Howard Huntting, 
Henry Howell, A. F. Loweree, 
Charles Tuthill and William H. 
Terry of Southold during the 
next month went to the same 
fishing ground in the Queen of 
the West and caught one fish. 

During June 1876 George 
Vail of Peconic caught a 60- 
pound striped bass and James 
Cassidy caught a 100-pound 
silver fish in his pound. In 
June 1890 Albertus and Leroy 



Dr. Qlarence <iAshton Wood 

Raynor of Greenport within a 
few minutes on a Saturday 
afternoon hooked half a hun- 
dred bass ranging in weight 
from four to eight pounds. 

In September of that year 
Capt. Jason Scherr of the 
smack Woolsey brought in 1,- 
000 bluefish and 180 bushe's 
of seabass which he sold in 
Fulton Market for eight cents 
a pound. During September 
1898 there was a heavy run of 
bluefish in the bay and 1,600 
were taken in one set of net. 
It was estimated that over 
5,000 were taken in one week. 

In October 1899 George 
Richmond of Southold caught 
six wagon! cads of chub mack- 
eral in a draw seine at the 
Sound. In May of the next 
year there was a large run of 
blackfish and seabass in the 
bay and Sound. The latter part 
of that month William H. Bee- 
be of Southold caught a four- 
teen-pound weakfish. 

In 1900 Robert Raynor 
caught two wagonloads of 



snappers in one haul of his 
draw seine west of Horton's 
Point, Southold. F. W. Carpen- 
ter landed 73 bluefish while 
trolling in the bay. The fish 
weighed from 31/2 to 41/2 
pounds, a catch which had not 
been excelled in many years. 
In January of that year A. W. 
Silkworth caught a bushel of 
pickerel fishing through the 
ice of Marratooka Lake, Mat- 
tituck. Several were over two 
feet long. 

In the summer of 1910 blue- 
fish were more plentiful in 
Greenport harbor than for 
many years. The water just 
off the main street wharf at 
that village one day in June 
was alive with fish. They were 
also biting in Plum Gut be- 
tween Orient Point and Plum 
Island. During the first week 
of August John J. Bartlett, 
Frederick L. Terry and Rus- 
sell Fish caught 22 ; Irving L. 
Price and party 30; Capt. 
Jason Hilton and party 50; 
Drew Brothers 94; Maurel 
Claudio and party 50 and 

Continued on page 95 




Sketched and Etched by Joseph P. Di Gemma 



89 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MAY 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wil» for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 

Hicksville 

SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

»0 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 

Riverhead 

DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 

Northport 

EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2V2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banklng-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Iniuraoce Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ava, 

AMityville 4-0198 



Ballyhoo at Coldspring 

Estelle V. Newman 

In the March Forum's Letters-to- 
the-Editor, R. H. Ramm of Bridge- 
port, Conn, speaks about a balloon 
ascension at Cold Spring Harbor in 
August 1860. I am curious to kn<yw 
the source of this information be- 
cause until a cople of years ago 
few if any people here knew any- 
th'ng about the affair where the 
ascension took place. 

When Burrwood, the large coun- 
try home on the estate of the late 
Walter Jennings, Standard Oil 
magnate, was being dismantled (it 
is now the Industrial Home for the 
Blind), the executors sent to the 
C.S.H. Fire Department a large 
broad-ide advertising the celebra- 
tion of August 28, 1860. 

The broadside is the size and ma- 
terial of a window-shade and rolls 
up into a cornice-shaped wooden 
box. Tbe printing is clear and legi- 
ible and the whole in an excellent 
state of preservation although 
nearly 100 years old. The Fire De- 
partment gave it to the Village 
Improvement Society and it may be 
viewed on request at the Library 
here. 

As an example of the bombastic 
style of advertising used then, al- 
tho to my taste it carries more 
conviction and appeal than the 
present-day Hollywood style, the 
celebration was ballyhooed as fol- 
lows: 

Fun! Fun! Fun! 

Fair Extraordinary 

Grand Instrumental Concert 

Unique Races 

The directors of the new road im- 
provement at Cold Sprins: would 
resnectfully inform the public that 
a Grand Fair and Festival of very 
extraordinary and wonderful at- 
tractions will take place at Cold 
Spring, Long Island, en 

Tuesday— August 28, 1860 

for the benefit of the new Shore 

Continued on ne^xt paffe 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE | 


Insurance 


Mcr gages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave , Amityville 
AMiiyville 4-1489 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wvandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic — 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. 0. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 

APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. Y. 





^ 



90 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



■^ 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

Richard Downing & Sons 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Tel. Oyster Bay 592 
North Hempstead Turnpike 



"BENJlWE/r" 

Real Estate Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond Island, New York 
■ Tel. 101 Setauket i 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199-A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



Ballyhoo at Cold Spring 

Continued from page 90 
Road leading to the Steamboat 
Dock. The Fair will be conducted 
after the manner of the famous 
Rural Fetes of France, together 
with the amusing attractions of the 
popular English Fairs, never before 
introduced to this continent. 

The festival department will be 
under the supervision of the ladies 
of Cold Spring. The grounds will 
open at 10 o'clock A. M. by a dis- 
charge of artillery and the ascent 
of a 

Beautiful Balloon 
when the various field sports will 
commence. Grand Climbing Match 
for various prizes. At 3 o'clock the 
Famous Sack Race of England be- 
tween Cold Spring, Huntington and 
Oyster Bay, all the contestants be- 
ing tied up in linen sacks. At 4 
o'clock a Grand Tri-Color 
Balloon Race 

The ascension of three Balloons 
representing the three great nations 
of t^e earth — America, England 
and France, or the Red, White and 
Blue, which will be announced by 
a discharge of artillery. May the 
best man win. 

Visitors will also have an oppor- 
tunity of paying their respects to 
the world -renowned Mr. Punch who 
came out in the Great Eastern ex- 
pressly for this occasion, being his 
first appearance in the U. S. 

Also the Great Pig Race of York- 
shire. He who catches wins. Mon. 
Le Grand from the Fetes de St. 
Cloud of Paris, has been engaged 
with his laughable figures where 
can be seen the famous Marshal 
Winterstractish, who will go 
through the wonderful performance 
of dancing cfF his legs and arms 
and then swallowing his head. 

The Instrumental Concert by the 
celebrated City Band during the 
afternoon and evening. The whole 
to conclude at dark by a grand dis- 
play of fireworks by Lilliandal of 
New York City. Admission to the 
grounds only ten cents. 

The Long Islander of Huntington 
carried an account of this celebra- 
tion in its next issue as follows : 

"The Fair at Cold Spring on Tues- 
day last, for the benefit of the new 
Shore Road, passed off very well 
indeed. Notwithstanding the uopro- 
pitious appearance of the weather 
Continued on next pag-e 

Miller Place 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 

Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



Of/Muw^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



^''Brooklyn and Long Island'' s Largest 

Real Estate Organization'" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-5400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

21/2% 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, Nev^r York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



91 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MAY 1954 



Ballyhoo at Cold Spring 

Continued from page 9l 

during the day there was a large 
number of persons present and 
judging from their smiling coun- 
tenances all were well pleased with 
the proceedings. 

"The balloon ascensions were 
beautiful, the climbing matches 
amusing, the sack and pig races 
ludicrous and Mr. Punch's perform- 
ance enough to make a Puritan 
split his sides with laugnter. Per- 
fect order was observed (in which 
we were agreeably disappointed) 
and all things considered, it was a 
complete success." 



Dr. Wood Corrects 

I hasten to correct a mistake 
which you made in my story on 
"John Ledyard the Traveler" in 
the March Forum. Robert Hemp- 
stead, John's grandfather, was not 
Southold's first schoolteacher. As I 
stated in my chapter on Southold 
Town in "Bailey's History," pub- 
lished in 1949: "Nicholas Eades 
was an early schoolmaster in 
Southold, coming from Southamp- 
ton. John Ledyard, afterwards 
mayor of Hartford, ran a Latin 
school at Southold shortly after 
1717." 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Largo, Florida 




C^ 



J 



"The Tomb" Is Now No. More 

The above structure, which was mentioned in the April 
issue's story on the Long Island Country Club at Eastport, 
stood on its grounds for many years. 



MORTGAGE MONEY 

HOME OWNERS 



Mortgage Loans to refinance existing mortgages 
or to purchase and/ or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD, N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



^, 



^ 



,os 



92 



^ 



MAY 1954 

Seagulls 

Continued trom page 86 

and swam back to shore. I 
wear glasses and not having 
them while swimming 1 couiU 
see nothing under water. For 
all I know I might have 
grabbed a dinner-on-the-f in as 
the bluefish were probabiy 
keeping close company with 
me. 

As I seated myself on a 
water- soaked log aoove the 
tide line, the noises of the 
gulls began to fade. Again the 
mass of birds thinned as they 
swam off, spread apart and 
quieted. They seemed to wait 
around as though ready to 
close in for another banquet 
if the spearing broke water 
again. Finally they realized 
their luck had run out and 
one by one raised up out of 
the water and scattered on 
the beach for perhaps a mile 
in each direction. Many flew 
across to the bay. 

Most of the gulls near me 
settled in the sand, heading 
into the southwest as the 
breeze came from that quar- 
ter. I thought, if gulls could 
chew their cud Uke cows, they 
would all be extremely busy. 
As it was, many bird stomachs 
must have been tickled as, for 
the most part, the spearing 
had gone down whole ! 

It seemed to me that no 
other birds than seagulls had 
been at all interested in the 
feeding. At that time of the 
year the dunes are full of vari- 
ous kinds of birds passing 
along toward the south. These 
seemed to keep strictly to 
their business back in the 
grasses and underbrush. If 
other water birds were in the 
vicinity, I did not see them. 
The whole affair seemed to be 
of the gulls, by the gulls, and 
for the gulls. 



"t 



Endorsement Indeed 

I have received my copy of Long 
Island Whalers by Paul Bailey, and 
have read it with great interest. It 
is an excellent work. I would please 
like to have six more copies and am 
enclosing my check for same. 

I noticed three small errors, 
namely: "Nantucket in Rhode Is- 
land" should be Massachusetts; 
"Brlndley D. Sleight" should be 
Brinley; "The Barbadoes" should be 
Barbados. It is a single island, not 
a group like the Bahamas. 

Cornelius R. Sleight 
501 North Street 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Note: Mr. Sleight is a recognized 
authority on the history of LI whal- 
ing, as were other members of this 
Sag Harbor family. Edi. 



Books For Sale 

Life and Writings of Frank 
Forester (H. W. Herbert), two 
vols. Gunning, fishing, etc. 1882. 
Deluxe binding, fine condition. 

Brooklyn Villao-e (Ralph Foster 
Weld) Columbia University Press. 

1938- . .„ 

Address L. I. Forum, Amityville. 



LONG'ISLAND FORUM 

Miss Strong's Weather Service 

In a commumication from the 
U. S. Weather Bureau with refer- 
ence to weather stations on Long 
Island, I find the following which 
will be of interest to your readers. 

"The cooperative station at Se- 
tauket has the longest recording, 
beginning on August 1, 1885 with 
Seian B. Stroing, observer. His 
daughter, Mis3 Kate W. Strong, is 
the present observer, having taken 
over the work on her father's death 
in the autumn of 1931. This is near- 
ly 70 years of record contr.buted by 
one family, the greatest in the 
State of New York." 

Miss Strong, who has written so 
many interesting articles for the 
Forum, is truly a Long Islander. 
Meade C. Dobson 
L. I. Association 

Garden Ci.y 




■"".-.1. ..jr. 
Sketched and Etched by Joseph Di Gemma 




S^^ut^^ffllJi^w^ 



93 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MAY 1954 




Young America in Fashion 

News to many may be the fact 
that the Traphagen School of 
Fashion in New York publishes a 
magazine to sponsor young Ameri- 
can artists and designers for the 
future glory of the big and eco- 
nomically important fashion indus- 
try. Celebrating its coming of age, 
femininely speaking — it is 18 this 
year — is Fashion Digest, this maga- 
zine of fashion with a difference. 
It is current and up to date on 
fashions of the minute, but the 
editors are always scanning the 
bypaths looking for youngsters 
who will be the big-name designers 
of tomorrow. Now internationally 
known, it is read by enthusiasts 
from Iceland to South Africa as well 
as all over the United States. 



Annette Bigras, above, who both 
designed and made, and models 
these two gowns for big and little 
evenings is one of the latest of the 
ycung women, and men, in whom 
Fashion Digest puts 'ts faith. A re- 
cent graduate of Traphagen School, 
Miss Bigras is now successfully 
trying her wings in her first job as 
designer of wedding and formal 



gowns for a well-known manufac- 
turer. 

To honor its birthday, the Digest 
is offering to fashion-minded read- 
ers cf the Long Island Forum a 
special introductory subscription at 
just half the regular rate — $1 for 2 
years (4 issues published semi- 
annually) — in other words you save 
$1 and get a 2-year subscription for 
the price cf one. Write before July 
1 to Fashion Digest. 1680 Broad- 
way, New York 19. N. Y. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapequa (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



Mother's Day Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minion Bone, 5pode,.Doulton 

Syracuse, Lenox 

IN STERLING 

TowIe Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Foitoria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 
253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 



reNJTH 



STOP in and let us 
demonstrate the 



ROYAL V model/ 

HEARING AID 

In Stock: Batteries for all 
Types of Aids 



PICKUP & BROWN 

GUILD OPTICIANS 
18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. Babylon 927 



DRY CLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



JniMHeJkMii/' 



RUG CLEANING 



AMITYVILLE 4-3200 



94 



MAY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



Bunkers 

Continued From Page 89 

Frank Hempstead and party 
78. In July 1919 Frank C. 
Brainward of Greenport in 
company with Capt. T. E. 
Burns, Charles B. Crane and 
Frank Jeffrey broke the bass 
record when he hooked one 
while fishing for chequit off 
Albertson's Reef. It lacked 
only cne ounce of weighing 
seven pounds. 

In 1925 WilUam Bond and 
William Clark of Southold had 
good luck with their draw 
seine. In June they took 1,500 
weakfish in one haul a,nd al- 
most 1,400 the next night. In 
August Carl Lien, a chef at 
the Nassau Point Hotel, 
caught a four-pound weakfish 
with his hands while in swim- 
ming. 

In early July 1889 a rare 
fish was caught in the vicin- 
ity of Greenport. It had an 
oval sucking disk at' the top 
of its head and was said to be 
a Remora which was fabled 
to stop ships by attaching it- 
self to them. It was caught by 
Joseph Maynard. During the 
following month cf that sum- 
mer a sunfish about 400 
pounds in weight was brought 
to that village by Capt. Wil- 
liam H. Conklin and Matt Cor- 
win, which they had caught in 
their net. Several varieties of 
tropical fish were caught quite 
often during that season by 
East Marion fishermen in 
their traps. Capt. Frank 
Rackett reported catching an- 
gelfish and pilctfish. 

In August, 1940, a 75-pound 
tarpon was caught in the nets 
of Oliver Case in the Sound at 
Ashamomoque. During De- 
cem 1909 passengers on the 
Prospect ferryboat, when half 
way between Greenport and 
Shelter Island, reported seeing 
a sea-serpent at least 75 feet 
in length. They said it swam 
past the boat faster than the 
speed of a steamboat. They 
claimed that its three coils, 
larger arcund than a barrel, 
were clearly visible. 




i^iiS 



^■i 



Slave's Fiddle 

Continued from Page 87 

drawn by horses wherever he 
wished to paint, but near some 
house where he could lodge. 
In this way he could paint in 
comfort in the coldest weather. 
This studio is now the sum- 
mer kitchen of a house in 
Setauket. 

At one time Mr. Mount 
hoped to get a commission to 
paint one of the murals in the 
capitol at Washington. For 
this he submitted a sketch in 
oils on wood of two boys on a 
raft crossing the Alleghany 
river. He called it "Washing- 
ton Crossing the Alleghany" 



Ml 



(as a young surveyor) . He did 
not get the commission. 

Mr. Mount's brothers were 
all artists and they must have 
had fine times in the old house 
with its big studio in the attic. 
William died in 1868. His pic- 
tures hang in many homes and 
museums, and the world will, 
not soon forget Stony Brook's 
famous son, William Sydney 
Mount. 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 
Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port JeflFerson 555 




Save at Bay Shore Federal Savings 

•Big Dividends compounded semi-annually. 
•Your savings are insured up to $10,000. 

BAY SHORE FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 
300 East Main St. Bay Shore, N. Y. 

MEMBER FEDKRAL HOME LOAN BANK 



95 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MAY 1954 



Over 100 Years 

of 

DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 

E'verything for Building 



Tla^^au Suiiolh 

LUMBER i SUPPLY i/Z/cORP.' 



AMITYVILLE ROSLYN 
HUNTINGTON SMITHTOWN 
WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 



RECORDS 

RCA - Columbia - Decca 

Wide Selection of 

POPULAR 

CLASSICAL 

CHILDREN'S 

in all the speeds 

AMITY RADIO 

For Quality Service on TV 

On the Triangle AMityville4-1177 




SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 
PHONE 

'^ r« ~ i.o» ?-^ FArmingdale 2-0816 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merriclc and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityville 4-0909-4-0910 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 
Monumental Work 



"Fanny Bartlett's Station" 

In the March issue of the Forum 
is a letter from Ralph C. Atkinson 
of Freeport, whicii inquires about 
the LIKR station "fanny Bart- 
lett's" on old time tables. 

That stop was carried on the 
time table for about thirty years 
and few passengers had any idea 
what it meant. The stop was be- 
tween the Amagansett and Mon- 
tauk stations. 

The name came from a ship- 
wreck. The three-masted schooner, 
Fannie J. Bartlett, bound from 
Philadelphia to Boston, became a 
total wreck on the beach at 
Napeague on January 16, 1894. 
Her crew of ten were saved. 

The LIRR, which ended on the 
south shbre at Bridgehampton up 
to that time, was being extended 
to Montauk in 1894. The first pas- 
senger train ran through to the 
Montauk station on Fort Pond Bay 
in 1895. There never was a village 
at the stop marked "Fanny Bart- 
lett's." 

It was simply a flag-station with 
a platform for the convenience of 
fishermen who shipped fish from 
there, and for the Life Saving Sta- 
tion men at Napeague who would 
walk from there to the station. 
Nathaniel Dominy Sr. of East 
Hampton had a fishing shanty at 
Napeague for years, and kept an 
eye out for wrecks. It was doubt- 
les.s he who first nailed up the 
wrecked ship's name-plate and 
christened the new flag-stop. Capt. 
Samuel S. Edwards of Amagansett 
says: "The Long Island Rail Road 
really used to run accommodation 
trains. There were two other flag 



stops between Amagansett and 
Montauk. One of them nad a regu- 
lar platform like Bartlett's; fish 
were also shipped from there. That 
was where ttie automobile road to- 
day crosses the tracks east of 
George's Inn; and another stop was 
where the track went into a branch 
at Promised Lane. The Bartlett stop 
was at the east end of what we caiJ 
The Pines. 

The East Hampton Star for 
January 26, 1894, said of the Fan- 
nie J. Bartlett: "Seas are now run- 
ning over her whole length and 
she is filled with water. She is 
loaded with 1250 tons of coal, and 
was worth when she struck about 
$50,000. Capt. Hutch ns owned a 
half-interest in the boat, which he 
has well covered with insurance." 
Jeannette Edwards Rattray 

East Hampton 

More On Fanny Bartlett 

From Amagansett and Montauk 
oldtimers I have the following in- 
formation which, if not 100 per- 
cent correct, may lead anyone in- 
terested to dig deeper. 

Some time in the 1870s or 80s a 
small schooner named Fanny 
Bartlett came ashore on Napeague 
Beach. Later its hull was towed 
around Montauk Point and beached 
so that at low tide one could walk 
out to it. When the LIRR was ex- 
tended to Montauk in 1895 two 
flag-stops were made; one named 
Fanny Bartlett to the west end of 
Napeague Beach, and one called 
Napeague Beach, to the east end. 

These stops were raised plat- 
forms level with an express car 
door. A ramp ran from ground 



^ 



"Long Island Whalers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whaling by L. L ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
ning, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 

Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



"THE THIRTEEN TRIBES" 

By Paul Bailey 

Second Printing Now Ready. $1 Postpaid 

A brief account of the names, locations, customs, 
characteristics and history of the Long Island Indians. 
To which has been added the author's descriptive 
rhyme on the 13 tribal domains. 

ADDRESS LONG ISLAND FORUM, BOX 805 AMITYVILLE 







96 



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MAY 1954 

level to top of platform. A train 
stopped only when flagged. The 
Fanny Bartlett stop was used by 
employees of the Promised Land 
fish factories and for expressing 
fresh fish. The Napeague Beach 
stop was used for receiving 
wagonloads of fish from the fisher- 
men. 

In those times of deep sand 
roads, the two stops were much 
nearer than Amagansett or Mon- 
tauk, and meant a shorter and 
quicker road haul. 

H. F. Hendrickson 
Hill View Farm 
Bridgehampton 



Melancton Smith 

Continued from page 84 

Captain Smith went North 
in June 1863, saw some ser- 
vice on the Mcmongahela, and 
a year later was placed in 
command of a half-dozen 
wooden gunboats in Alber- 
marle Sound. He had a severe 
fight with the ram Albermarle 
and finally drove the ram back 
up the Soxmd. He was warmly 
commended by the Navy Dept. 
for that work. His next com- 
mand was the Wabash under 
Porter at the bombardment of 
Fort Fisher in Dec. and Jan. 
1864-65, and he was com- 
mended by Porter. 

Melancton Smith was made 
a Captain in 1862. Commodore 
in 1866, and a Rear- Admiral 
in 1870. He was Chief of the 
Bureau of Equipment and 
Recruiting at Washington 
from 1866 to 1870, and was at 
the New York Navy Yard 
until just before his retire- 
ment on his sixty-first birth- 
day May 24, 1871. He was 
governor of the Philadelphia 
Naval Asylum from 1871 to 
1872. 

Melancton Smith was a very 



Cfte 
TBanb of amltptJille 

Incorporitl^d 1891 

2% on Special Interest 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 

Hours: 9 to 3 except Saturday 
Friday Evening, 6:30 to 8:30 

Member Federal Deposit 
... , Insurance Corp. 



courageous man with some- 
thing of the grim determina- 
tion of Farragut about him. 
He was deeply religious, and 
temperate in all things except 
the use of cigars which he 
would smoke constantly in the 
excitement of battle, Kghting 
each one from the butt of the 
other. 

He married Mary Jackson, 
daughter of Thomas Jones of 
Massapequa, in 1837 and she 
died there on April 4, 1885. 
He lived eight years longer 
and died at Green Bay, Wis- 
consin, on July 19, 1893 in the 
84th year of his age. His 
Long Island residence is con- 
firmed by the notice of his 
death which appeared in the 
South Side Signal of July 22, 
1893 as follows; "Rear Ad- 
miral Melancton Smith, a well 
known resident of Massape- 
qua, died at Green Bay, Wis- 
consin, in his 84th year. He 
entered the United States 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Navy in 1826, and played an 
important part in the Civil 
War, commanded the ship 
Mississippi with Lieutenant 
George Dewey, afterwards 
Admiral Dewey, as his execu- 
tive officer, and was in Farra- 
gut's fleet when he opened the 
Mississippi River to New Or- 
leans in April 1862." A truly 
remarkable career in the ser- 
vice of his country. 



David Edwards, Hero 

There is a m«dal in our family, 
presented to my great-grandfa1;her, 
David Edwards of Calverton. On 
it now is only engraved a brig, but 
at one time it carried a date of the 
1840's, the exact year being long 
since worn away. 

He received this medal, $50 cash 
reward, and a certificate describ- 
ing his daring rescue of several 
men from the brig while he was 
gathering salt-hay on Bellport 
beach. 

A storm broke and the brig. 



Cf)e 1801 House 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 

Fire Island was the site of Long Island's first State Park, 
established in 1908. It was revived in 1936 and, following the 
hurricane of 1938, relocated where it now exists. 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y, 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

AMITYVILLE BATTERY & IGNITION SERVICE, Inc. 

Broadway and Avon Ptace Phones 1174 - 2095 AmityviUe 



97 



LONG ISLAND EORUM 



MAY 1954 



loaded with calico, began to break 
up on the bar. He swam out and 
carried in the crew, one at a time. 
A spike from a loose timber went 
through his foot, but he got the last 
man ashore. 

My great-grandfather took home 
some of the calico as it washed up, 
and when he received notice to be 
at the Manor R. R. depot on a 
subsequent day to meet a Govern- 
ment man, he went there in fear 
he would be fined for taking the 
cloth. 

The award was a welcome relief, 
and the Government man said he 
was proud to shake his hand. David 
Edwards and Cap'n Wes Petty 
were the two strongest men for 
miles around. David would have 
been in his thirties at the time. He 
came from the Calverton and Bait- 
ing Hollow Edwards family. 

Perhaps some Forum reader can 
identify the vessel and know the 
exact date and further details of 
the wreck. 

Emma Schmersal 

Riverhead 



Merrimac Was Virginia 

In reference to the Forum edi- 
tor's syndicated article on the bat- 
tle between the Merrimac and the 
Long Island-built Monitor on March 
9, 1862, Mr. John J. Klaber of Hunt- 
ington writes as follows: 

The Merrimac was originally a 
wooden vessel of the U. S. Navy. 
She was sunk by the U. S. forces, to 
prevenc her use by the Confeder- 
ates, when they captured the navy 
yard at Norfolk, where she was 
stationed. She was later raised, 
most of her superstructure re- 
moved, and she was converted into 
an ironclad, and renamed the Vir- 
ginia. Aceordiorig to my recollection 
(rather undependable) the iron 
consisted of railroad ties from the 
Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond. 

The Monitor was generally called 
a "Cheesebox on a Raft," a very 
apt description. She was the proto- 
type of a series of larger monitors, 
which remained in use for several 
decades. This type of vessel has 
now been abandoned, though the 
revolving gun turrets, of which it 
was the first example, are still an 
important feature of naval vessels 
throughout the world. 



Population Survey, 1954 

Under the above title, the Long 
Island Lighting Company has is- 
sued a most informative brochure, 



prepared by the Rate and Research 
Division of its Commercial Depart- 
ment. From its pages we learn that 
more than l,10O,0'0O people have 
streamed into Nassau and Suffolk 
Counties since 1920 in a continuing 
march to the comforts and conven- 
iences of this suburban area. 

This influx, which brought con- 
tinuing population increases from 
126,120 in 192'0 to 672,765 in 1950 in 
Nassau County; according to the 
U. S. Census Bureau, had its most 
spectacular rise after the last cen- 
sus. The 1954 LILCO estimates 
show that an increase of 136,206 in 
Nassau since the most recent U. S. 
Census to make a population total 
of 966,841 at the start of this year. 

Meanwhile, in Suffolk County a 
similar, but somewhat less spec- 
tacular population rise, was also 
taking place. With a population of 
110,246 in 1920, Suffolk moved up 
to 276,129 in 1950 and was esti- 



mated by LILCO to have risen to 
379,573 on January 1, 1954. 

Today, the combined total popu- 
lations of these two counties has 
risen well pasi; the 1,000,000 mark 
wjth the estimated total at the first 
of the year at 1,346,414, more than 
five and a half times the two-county 
population in 1920. 

The Fifth Ward of Queens Coun- 
ty, which takes in the Rockaway 
Peninsula and is also served by 
Long Island Lighting Company, 
showed a healthy increase too de- 
spite its comparatively dense popu- 
lation, with a rise from 51,103 in 
1950 to 55,708 at the first of this 
year. 

According to LILCO's report, its 
method of using residential elec- 
tric meters as an index to current 
population was shown by an inde- 
pendent Hofstra College Research 
Bureau test in 1952 to provide not- 
ably accurate results. With the use 
of new adjusted population factors, 
the Company believes that the mar- 
gin of error in its current report 
is reduced even more. 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 



BRENTWOOD 

Suffolk &■ 4th 

Phone BR 3-4511 



BAY SHORE 

Main &• Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



Member Federal Depoctt Insurance Corporation 



(« 



The Trees of Long Island" 

By George H. Peters 

This pamphlet, well illustrated, listing and describ- 
ing' the island's biggest trees of the various species, and 
covering all phases of the subject, was compiled by 
George H. Peters, president of the L. I. Horticultural 
Society, the sponsoring organization. 

It is useful not CTily for schools and libraries, but for 
every Long Islander who appreciates our many and 
varied native trees. Sold at $1. postpaid. Address : 

Long Island Forum, Amityville 



Amityville Cold Fur Storage Co. 

100% all risk insurance. 18 degrees maintained to kill moths and keep 

coats fresh and flexible 
134 Bway. AMityville 4-0535 Sam Bendersky, Prop, storage Vauit Built hy General Electric 



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98 



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With an Automatic GAS Dryer you're on 
"permanent vacation" from those washday 
woes. It does the job so much better, so much 
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GAS DOES IT BESri 



LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 



For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 
South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchog-ue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merrick Rd. Amilyville 
Phone AMItyvllle 4-9768 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyvlUe 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 

PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amityville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



Smithtawn Lands 

There is mention in the March 
Forum of the daughter of Wyan- 
danee, who was a prisoner of the 
Connecticut Indians asnd was later 
released through the good offices 
of Lion Gardiner. This young lady 
caused a controversy between 
Richard Smith and the Huntington 
authorities which lasted many 
years. To show his gratitude to 
Gardiner, Wyandamce, who was 
Chief and Grand Sachem of all the 
Suffolk County Indians, deeded a 
large tract of land to Gardiner. 
The deed to this tract, still in exis- 
tence, I believe (the Long Island 
Island Historical Society has the 
original), describes the land to be 
coinveyed as follows: 

"Now that it may be known how 
and where this land lyeth on Long 
Island, we say it lyeth between 
Huntington and Setauket, the west- 
ern bound being Cow Harbour, 
Easterly Aeatomunk, and Souther- 
ly cross the island to the end of the 
Great Hollow or Valley." 

Gardiner thus acquired title to 
all the land between Nissequogue 
River and Northport, south to 
about the middle of the Island, and 
embracing all the northeast part of 
the subsequent Huntington (Ni- 
colls) Patent. 

Gardiner in turn conveyed the 
tract to Richard Smith, who took 
possession, and to fortify his title 
obtamed a patent from the Colonial 
governor. As some Indian chiefs 
complained to the royal authorities 
at Hartford that Smith had taken 
their land, and there was also the 
claim of Huntington that their pat- 
ent covered the laaid held by Smith, 
the Hartford authorities sent com- 
missioners to look into and adjust 
these matters, which dragged on 
until 1675, when the decision was 
that the land belonged to Smith. 

At the same time, the easterly 
boundary of the Huntington Patent 
was fixed at the west bank of the 
Fresh Pond, still known by that 
name, near the Sound, and empty- 
ing into it, about five or six miles 
west of the Nissequogue River. 
That is the boundary line between 
Huntington and Smithtown today. 
James E. Tooker 
Babylon Town Historian 



DINE AT 

FRANK FRIEDE'S 

Riverside Inn 

Table d'Hote and a la Carte 

On Jericho Turnpike 
Route 25 

SMITHTOWN, L. I., N. Y 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



Enroute to the Hamptons 
on Montauk Highway 

xi?i* C ASA BASSO isd 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon and Dinner 

Westhampton 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 




STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Tela. 248; Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farmingdale 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort of 

^he hospitality Shoppe 

where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served 
IS primed to meet the better taste. ' 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 * Amityville L I 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT" ^^'"^' ^- ^-