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LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 



r. 




The Ireland Gristmill, Amityville, About 1900 Photo by Marshall Woodman 

(See next Page) 



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TABLE of CONTENTS 



GENERAL EMORY UPTON 

SUFFOLK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

PECONIC'S OLD MILL 

THOMAS HODGKINS'S ADVENTURES 

"AUNT" FANNY HOMAN 

MAP OF LONG ISLAND 



Dr. Charles A. Huguenin 

David Price Jenning-s 

Clarence Russell Comes 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Capt. Eugene S. Griffing 

Cyril A. Lewis 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



JUNE 19S4 



$2.Q0 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVIL No. 6 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eavtport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



Louden-Knickerbocker 
Hall 

A Priyate Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseases 

«1 Louden Ave. AmitrTilIt 

A Mi ty villa 4-0053 



Farmingdale 

Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 

Rug Cleaning 

Broad Hnllow Koad Farmincdalc 

Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

Sales and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMltyville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Trucka 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Batabliched 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 




SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 

PHONE 

FArmingdale 2-0816 



SUNRISE 

Divieion Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 
178 



THE 

LcNG Island 
fccuM 

Published Monthly at 

AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

POR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 
Entered as «econd-clasi matter May U, 1947 at the 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editer 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



The Ireland Gristmill 

Amityville, like other island com- 
munities with a very few excep- 
tions, has been without a gristmill 
for niany years. On the west side 
of what IS now the village-owned 
lake, north of Montauk highwav 

«f"n A^u^^'t'*^, °^^^n ^^e""e, once 
stood the Ireland Mill. 

It was established by one Sam- 
uel Ireland, who moved to Amity- 
ville from the north side during the 
mid-years of the 19th century. In 
tame it descended to his son Ed- 

T!^ ?• ^I^^^"^ ^"<^ was last oper- 
ated by the latter's son Rufus J. 
Ireland until the early ID^O's 

The reproduction shown on our 
cove^is from a photograph taken 
by Marshall Woodman when the 
mill was in operation, about fifty 
years ago. " 

. The site of the mill is now occu- 

^llt ^ ""'''^T" ^^™^^' facing the 
lake. We understand that part of 
the mill building is still preserved 
m a remodeled structure in the 

nf M .*^', ^°:c?"ed Haight House 
on Montauk highway. 



Last Month's Cover Artist 

The Forum failed to name the 

ll^iX ^^ i*' '*'* '"""th's cover 
sketch of Apaucuck Homestead at 
Westhampton Beach. The name is 
Miss Lois Kimball of Remsenburg 
It was indeed a very fine sketch by 
an accomplished artist. 



Thanks, Congressman 

The other day I happened to pick 
up a copy of the Long Island Forum 
for February and found the articles 
most mteiresting. I would like to 
ask you to send me a year's sub- 
scription. 

vi^^f ffreat-grandfather. Captain 
i^lbert Latham, sailed ships out of 
bag Harbor years ago. 

Henry J. Latham 

TvT i r^ Jama ca 

Note: Congressman Latham who 
represents the Fourth District 
(Queens County) has rendered ex- 
cellent service for all Long Island. 
Hidi, 



102 



„,^.^ ^joy the Forum very much. 
Phihp G. Smith, Glejis Falls, N. Y. 



NICHOLS 
RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. Sunrise Hitchway Tel. 8-1212 

Rug and Furniture Cleaning 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 

Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jefferson S.-^fi 



^ 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 1085 Uljp 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoaiu Accepted by Mall 

First National Bank of Islip 

Uamber Fed. Depoait Insurance Corp. 



PHONOGRAPHS 

SUFFOLK AND NASSAU 
AMUSEMENT CO. 



Tel. 2393 



Patchogue 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 
Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

18t Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP, L. I. 
Eitablished 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 

WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near Amityvillt Depot 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



r 



Qeneral Smory Upton 



/-J AMP Upton at Yaphank 
^^ was named after an of- 
ficer whose dash and cool- 
ness in the excitement and 
turmoil of battle finally won 
him a glorious page in the an- 
nals of the Federal Army dur- 
ing the Civil War. 

Emory Upton rose from the 
rank of a second lieutenant to 
that of a brevet major-general 
and the command of a divi- 
sion when he was only twenty- 
five years of age. His success 
did not stop with the close of 
the Civil War. He subse- 
quently held the position of 
commandant cf cadets at the 
U. S. Military Academy at 
West Point for five years. He 
was then sent by the Govern- 
ment to Europe and Asia to 
make a study of the organiza- 
tion, equipment, and adminis- 
tration of armies. Upon his 
return he was assigned to the 
Artillery School for Practice 
as instructor in the art of war 
with the rank of colonel. 

His annual income from sal- 
ary, investments, and royal- 
ties on the copyrights of his 
military texts was about ten 
thousand dollars. Perhaps no 
man in the Service was more 
widely known for his "New 
System of Infaritry Tactics. 
Double and Single Rank" and 
other publications, nor better 
liked for his blameless, noble, 
and manly qualities. It was 
scarcely possible to enjoy a 
more delightful position or to 
entertain brighter prospects. 
Yet, on the morning of March 
15, 1881, in the forty-second 
year of his age, he was found 
by his three Chinese servants 
dead in bed, with a bul'et 
wound through his mouth into 
his brain, a victim of his own 
hand. 

Though he was reared an a 
farm in Batavia, N. Y., Emory 
Upton was a bom soldier. 
After a freshman year at 



Dr. Charles A. Huguenin 

Oberlin College, he secured an 
appointment to the U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy. From the mo- 
meat of his matriculation, Up- 
ton became a marked man. 
Not only had he come from a 
college that was despised for 
its opposition to slavery and 
its admission of negroes as 
students, but Upton had 
squarely placed himself in the 
ranks of the unpopular, lib- 
erty-loving dreamers by frank- 
ly declaring that he was an 
abolitionist. 

The father of one of the 
cadets at West Point had been 
captured with others by John 
Brown, a fanatical Puritan 
with a conviction that he was 
commissioned by God to free 
the slaves. Moreover, Brown's 
ruthless murder of five Kan- 
san slaveholders and his cap- 



ture of the arsenal at Harper's 
Ferry naturally violated the 
cadets' respect for law. In the 
course of a heated discussion 
with his chums. Cadet Wade 
Hampton Gibbes of South 
Carolina passed offensive, un- 
justifiable remarks on Upton's 
intimate association with ne- 
groes. The insulting remarks 
were repeated to Upton, who 
promptly called in vain for an 
explanation. Word soon passed 
through the cadet companies 
that Gibbes and Upton were 
to settle the matter with fists. 
Because more than personal 
differences were involved, a 
crowd packed the hall on the 
campus selected for the en- 
gagement. 

At the end of the encounter 
that was remembered by one 
of Upton's classmates nearly 
fifty years ]a+:er, Upton 
emerged from the hall victori- 




Gamp Upton was Named for Hii 



10.^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

ous, his resolute face bleeding 
freely. Retiring to their rooms 
that night, the cadets little 
dreamed that the fight was 
but the prelude to a mightier 
collision in which Upton for- 
tuitously was given full scope 
to his genius for war, and 
Gibbes was accorded the re- 
spect of all Southerners in an 
old age of engaging sweetness 
for his gallant services to the 
Confederacy in a defeated 
cause. 

Upon graduation from the 
Academy, eighth in a class of 
forty-five, Emory Upton was 
at once appointed a second 
lieutenant of artillery at the 
age of twenty-two. He subse- 
quently fought in nearly every 
major engagement of the 
Civil War, including Gettys- 
burg, the greatest, and An- 
tietam, the bloodiest. His 
career was one of the most 
notable in the annals of the 
army, comprising service in all 
three branches — artillery, 
infantry, and cavalry. By the 
valor of his own right arm, he 
continued to rise by successive 
promotions. After his sensa- 
tional conduct under fire at 
the Battle of Spottsylvania 
Court House, Ulysses S. Grant 
himself promoted him from 
colonel to brigadier-general on 
the field. General James Har- 
rison Wilson, his last com- 
mander in the field when Up- 
ton led a division of cavalry, 
prcnounced him the equal of 
Custer in dash and enterprise 
and the most accomplished 
soldier in the Service. 

Upton was a genuine mili- 
tary enthusiast, absorbed in 
dreams of military glory and 
grimly determined to win it as 
the opportunity offered. Early 
convinced that the first requi- 
site to success in the profes- 
sion of arms was unflinching 
and unhesitating courage, and 
yet with full knowledge from 
bitter experience as the war 
dragged on that the most 
courageous were frequently 
the first to fall, there was no 

Contimied on page 112 



JUNE 1954 



Bank and Borrow ^ 



AT 



™= FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



AND TRUST COMPANY 



OF 



BAY SHORE 



OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS 6:30 TO 8 



128 West Main Street 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Member FederaJ Reserve System 



Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp n 

Bethpage, Long Island, N. Y. 



Designers and Manufacturers of the 

Panther Albatross Mallard 



Airplanes for the U. S. Navy, the Air Force 
and Commercial Users 



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B 



K 



U I C 

SALES SERVICE PARTS 

Suffolk County's Largest Selection of 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

Ande-McEwan Motors, Inc. 

Tel. Bay Shore 2 228 East Main St., Bay Shore 

WE BUY USED CARS FOR CASH 



WALTER A. SAXTON 
Vice President 



JOHN E. NICHOLSON 
President 



Nicholson & Galloway 

Established 1849 
Roofing and Waterproofing 

Difficult commissions accepted to correct wall and roof 
leaks in schools, churches, banks, public buildings, etc. 



426 East 110th Street 

New York City 

LEhigh 4-2076 



Cedar Swamp Road 
Brookville, L. I. 
BRookville 5-0020 



104 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Suffolk Qounty \Jiistorical Society 



'y HE Museum of the Suffolk 
■*• County Historical Society 
at Riverhead, is one of the 
largest and most complete 
such institutions in any rural 
county ox the State. The 
Society was founded in 1886 
and has maintained its own 
Museum building' since 1892. 
The two large wmgs, more 
than doubling the building's 
space, were dedicated in 1951 
during the presidency of John 
D. Hallock. 

The various collections now 
en display cover every phase 
of the county's past and that 
of the island prior to the 
county's erection in 1683. The 
array of Indian artifacts 
which includes all sorts of 
utensils, weapons, tools and 
other reminders of the thir- 
teen tribes which once inha- 
bited the island, is on loan 
from the Long Island Chapter 
of the State Archaeological 
Society. Near at hand is the 
A. Paul Benatre collection of 
small lamps, presented by 
Mrs, Isabel Henderson cf 
Southold. 

In the collection of china 
and glassware given the 
Museum by Mrs. F. Delancy 
Robinson of Greenport, a 
descendant of General Wil- 
liam Floyd, the island's only 
native Signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, will be 
found items of Staffordshire- 
ware, Ironstone, Wedgwood, 
Sandwich Glass, Cantonware, 



David T'rice Jennings 

Stone Glaze, Salt Glaze; sil- 
ver, gold, pink and orange 
Lustreware; Lowstoft, Spode 
and Dresden China, and 
Majolicaware. 

Also in this collection are 
numerous cup-plates and the 
map-desk of General Richard 
De»afield, commander at West 
Point between 1838 and 1861, 
which map - desk, together 
with its contents, was the gift 
of his granddaughter, Mrs. 
Grace Floyd Delafield Robin- 
son. There are old Delafield 
dishes, some that belonged to 
Governor DeWitt Clinton, a 
gravy-boat presented to 
George Washington, dishes 
used by Martha Washington 
and many others of historical 
significance. 

Other items to be seen at 
the Museum are wedding 
dresses of bygone years 
loaned by the Misses Hulse of 
Wading River and Mrs. R. C. 
Brown and Miss Alice Perkins 
of Riverhead. Here too is a 
collection of pewter and one 
of stuffed birds presented by 
the late William D. Halsey of 
Bridgehampton. Numerous 
other items and collections are 
on every hand throughout the 
main floor of the large build- 
ing. 

Ihe basement likewise con- 
tains a wealth of ancient ob- 
jects, including boat models, 
an old time blacksmith shop 
and a country store of many 



years ago, complete in every 
detail. The boat models were 
presented by Miss Alma Smith 
of Patchogue, granddaughter 
of one-time Boatbuilder Gil 
Smith of that village. The 
country store came from that 
of Samuel T. Green of West 
Sayville and was presented by 
Col. John P. G. Bates, a 
descendant. 

Also in the basement is a 
very complete collection of 
tools, utensils and implements 
from colonial farms, whaling 
and other activities of long 
ago. Five official copper dry 
measures used by Riverhead 
Town in 1833 were presented 
by Matthias N. Ammann. 
There is likewise a very ex- 
tensive collection of flintlocks 
and other colonial weapons, a 
weaving exhibit from flaxseed 
to fabric, nautical instru- 
ments and a large number of 
horse drawn vehicles once 
used by island farmers. 

Among the dioramas is one 
of Gov. Thomas Dongan pre- 
senting the Charter of Liber- 
ties and Privileges in 1684; 
another of the Barnabas Mor- 
ton house, Southold, in 1640; 
still another of Washington's 
stop at Roe's Tavern i i 
Setauket in 1790, and one of 
Conscience Point where the 
founders o f Southampton 
Town landed in 1640. Early 
Indian life, a 1700 farmstead 
and an episode of the Battle 
of Long Island in 1776 are a^so 




Enlarged Museum at Riverhead, Frcm Architect's Drawing 



105 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JUNE 1954 



represented in dioramas. 

The Museum's library is 
especially complete with sev- 
eral thousand volumes deal- 
ing with local, State and 
national history, newspaper 
and other files, maps, alman- 
acs, town and country records, 
genealogies and other items 
too numerous to mention. 

The present officers of the 
Society are: Paul Bailey, 
president ; Roswell Corwin 
and Mrs. Mary F. Brown, vice- 
presidents; Miss Rose P. 
Terry, treasurer; Mrs. Mar- 
.iorie W. Sawyer and Miss 
Ruth Ackerly, secretaries ; 
Ernest M. Robinson, custo- 
dian, and the following town 
councilors — Mrs. Helen W. 
Ammann and George W. Hil- 
dreth, Riverhead ; Mrs. Martha 
K. Hall, Huntington; Ernest 
S. Clowes and Mrs. Beatrice 
G. Rogers, Southampton ; Mrs. 
Naomi Griffiths and Mrs. 
Frances R. Howell, Babylon; 
Miss Louise E. Ockers and 
John A. Wilbur, Islip; Robert 
H. Pelletreau and Mrs. Helen 
Brown West, Brookhaven ; 
Morton Pennypacker and Ed- 



"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
ing and all other services 

Phone Nearest Office 

PAtchogue 3-2100 HUntington 4-2304 
Riverhead 8-2943 HEmpstead 2-3966 
BAbylon 6-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
BEllport 7-0604 STony Brook 7-0917 



F. Kenneth Harder 
President 



Robert Troup 
Vice-President 



v/ard M. S. Strong, East 
Hampton; Mrs. Katherine W. 
Reeve and Mrs. Grace Floyd 
Delaf:e!d Robinson, Southold; 
Col. and Mrs. Verne LaSalle 
Rockwell, Smithtown, and Syl- 
vester Gardiner Prime, Shel- 
ter Island. 

There is no charge of ad- 
mission to the Museum which 
is open daily except Sundays 
and holidays from one to five 
p. m. It is partly supported by 
the dues of its members who 
include not alone residents of 
the county but others who 
appreciate the splendid ser- 
vice tlie institution is render- 
ing in its field. There is a con- 
stant need for more members 
and applications may be ob- 
tained by addressing the Soci- 
ety at Riverhead. 

The dues are as follows: 
annual, $5; group, $5; life, 
$100, and benefactor, $500. 
Also by the payment of $500 
or mere a person becomes a 
benefactor as well as life 
member. Anyone under 21 
years of age may become a 
non-voting member for $1 
annually. 



MORRELL'S 

AUTO - MARINE 
ESSO SERVICENTER 

Engine Tune-up 

Carburation and 

Ignition Work 

Merrick Road, opp. Richmond Ave. 
Phone AMityville 4-3442 



«t 



Wayfarings" by Ernest S. Clowes 



A collection of more than 100 pieces on the history 
of Eastern Long Island, especially during the 18th and 
19th centuries. 

About shipwrecks, old buildings, notable people. 
How people lived ; what crops they raised ; how they had 
fun ; their homes ; their food . 

Long Island weather and how to forecast it. Stories 
of famoois storms. A long account of the day of the 
Great Hurricane . 

This is the best book of its kind now in print. Dur- 
able cloth binding ; 340 pages ; Indexed ; $4.20 postpaid. 
Copies are still available from 

THE HAMPTON PRESS, Bridgehampton, N. Y. 



TRAPHAGEN SCHOOL 

ti OF FflSHlOW For Results 

[j^ TKAINING HfSC PAYS LlFl DIVIDENDS 

•X^L/ Summer, Fall aod Winter Courses 

'"^^H^ Professional methods day or eve. Alt 
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4^PL advanced students. Regents' Credits. 

DAY, EVENINQ & SATURDAY COURSES 

Now forming for Design, Illustration, Cloth- 
ing Construction and all branches of Fashion 

INTERIOR DECOR, and DISPLAY 

Conrses here prepare students for the fasci- 
nating and remunerative fielHs of commercial 
art. Maximum instruction in minimum time. 
Active Free Placement Bureau 
Send for Circular F or Phone CO. 6-2077. 
RE6ISTER NOW! Our 6raduates in Demandt 
Traphagen, 1680 B'way (52 St.) N. Y. 19 



The First National 

of 

Amityville 

ORGANIZED 1907 

Complete Deposit and 
Loan Facilities 

Open Friday Evenines 6:30 to 8:30 



INSURANCE 

Ask 

EDWARDS 

The Oldest Agency 
for Miles Around 

Phones 
SAyville 4-2107 - 4-21C8 



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• Massapequa to Hampton Bays 

• Cold Spring Harbor to 

Greenport 

OVER 3Q YEARS! 

LAUNDERING* DRY CLEANING 



Xllai mmu 



BLUE POINT 

Telephone BLue Poitit 4-0420 



Wines & Liquors 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 

Delves Liquor Store 

LICENSE L-1382 

201 Bway., AMityville 4-0033 



# 



106 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f' 



T^econic^s &ld Qristmill 



^ 



m 



I N 1836 a plan to build a 
■'■ tidewater mill at Gold- 
smith's Inlet in Peconic was 
consummated and an agree- 
ment to take stock in and 
support the undertaking was 
signed by about eighty men 
of Southold town. Expert mill 
builders had carefully exam- 
ined the proposed site and had 
given their approval of the 
project. The shares appear to 
have been sold at ten dollars 
each. 

The following names are 
signed in the same order on 
the original document dated 
December 29, 1838, which is 
owned and treasured by Mrs. 
Julia Overton Bell of Peconic. 
What a representative list of 
old Long Island families ! 

H. Case Hutchinson, Asahel 
Palmer, William H. Overton, 
J. H. Goldsmith, James W. 
Davids, S. H. Landon, William 
B. Horton, Ira B. Tuthill, 
Henry Landon, William D. 
Cochran, Ephraham Overton, 
William Booth, David D. Webb, 
William Wells, Benjamin 
Goldsmith Jr., Evertus Hal- 
lock, Barnabas Wells, John A. 
Landon, Daniel Caso, I. M. 
Case. 

Elisha G. Case, Israel C. 
Jennirgs. Daniel H. Gold- 
smith, Martin Goldsmith, 
Israel Case, Joseph Terry, 
Wessel Woodhull, Benjamin 
Case, Benjamin L. Penny, 
Benjamin H. Palmer, S. H. 
Haines, Youngs Billard, Clau- 
dius Woodhull, Daniel H. 
Goldsmith Jr., Charles Glover 
Jr., William Terry, Jonah 
Halsey, Charles Glover, Al- 
bert P. Terry, A. G. Case. 

Rensselaer Goldsmith, Moses 
Case, Tra Corwin, Josiah Al- 
bertson, Benjamin P. Tuthill, 
James Overton, Ezra C. Terry, 
John Wells, John Wickham, 
David Carpenter, Rensselaer 
Horton, William H. Wells, 
Benjamin Wells, Daniel Webb, 
James Dorony(?), Asa Mapes, 
Isaac Swezy, Barnabas Howell 



C/are?2ce Russe// Comes 

Augustus Conkling, William 
Wines. 

Henry Jennings, David Mil- 
ler, Silas Moore, Joseph H. 
shorn, Piatt G. Gould, John 
C. Wells Jr., John Clark (3rd) , 
Alanson Hallock, Joshua Hor- 
ton, William Vail, Warren 
Richmond Jr., Reuben Smith, 
Jr., Joseph P. Wickham, John 
S. Howell, Barnabas Terry, 
Jonah H. Tuthill, David Gold- 
smith, John Buckingham, 
Barnabas Osborn. 

The mill, erected in 1843, 
stood on the west bank of 
Goldsmith's Inlet, north of 
Peconic and within a stone's 
throw of the Sound. A sturdy 
bridge crossed from the mill 
to the east bank but all has 
long since disappeared except 
for foundation stones and a 
few piles. The tidewater 
rushed in through the inlet as 
it still does today, filling the 
pond. When the water had 
reached its greatest height it 
was held in the pond by means 
of a lock and diverted to the 
millrace. It has been said the 
occasional closing of the inlet 
on the beach due to shifting 
sands interfered with the op- 
eration of the mill. This tem- 
porary blocking of the tide- 



water still occurs at times. 

The mill was operated by 
Gilbert Terry and must have 
been flourishing in the 1890s 
as in addition to the wheel 
moved by tidewater a large 
windmill was erected on top of 
the structure. The latter is 
said to have been one of the 
largest of its type in the state. 
In a winter storm in 1898 the 
windmill with its supporting 
timbers crashed to the ground. 

It is probable that it was in 
the same storm that three 
barges broke loose from their 
tow and were blown ashore, 
one at Greenport, one near 
Cutchogue and one at Gold- 
smith's Inlet. The latter had 
evidently been a large three- 
masted schooner in former 
days. Its hulk interfered 
somewhat with the action of 
the tide at the mouth of the 
inlet. 

It must be nearly a hundred 
years ago that the steam- 
boat Commodore, which plied 
the waters of the Sound, 
struck a reef and was disabled 
and drifted ashore near Gold- 
smith's Inlet. Fortunately 
men, women and children were 
able to get to land and were 
taken into the homes of citi- 

Continiied on page 116 




■fiK»*™*»p--.— « 



The Old Mill, Photo by Author 



107 



liOMG ISLAND FORUM 



JUNE 1954 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. BARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 

E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babylon. Tel. 551. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items conhected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 
Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



€tians 

AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



STILL B| CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 
Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Cash and Carry 

Service 1596 Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiafue 



Ernest S. Clowes's Fine Book 

Anyone who wishes to know 
more about Long Island and to 
obtain much entertainment in ac- 
quiring such knowledge would do 
well to purchase the book "Way- 
farings" by Ernest S. Clowes of 
Bridgehampton, now 'being sold at 
$4-20 postpaid by The Hampton 
Press, Bridgehampton. 

The 340-page volume contains 
more than a hundred essays on 
eastern Long Island history, de- 
scribing shipwrecks, old homes, 
people and how they lived, old time 
crops, notable storms, etc. Mr. 
Clowes is a former journalist, 
chemist and weather prophet, and 
brings to bear the combined knowl- 
edge gleaned from these profes- 
sions in interpreting the source 
material that he has collected dur- 
ing his years of retirement. It is 
truly an outstanding work. 

After watching some of the TV 
programs, reading the Forum is a 
great relief. (Miss) Isabel Strang, 
East Meadow. 



Wanted to Buy 

A copy of the Hal lock Family 
Genealogy. In replying please state 
condition and lowest cash price. 
Mrs. Willard J. Davies, 290 Hemp- 
stead Avenue, Rockville Centre. 
Telephone R.C. 6-0646. (Jy) 

Pioneer Peach Grower 

Enclosed is my renewal for the 
Forum which I first received 
through the Union Savings Bank 
of Patchogue. Enjoy it very much 
and hope some day to see some- 
thing in it about Holtsville. Have 
been here over fifty years and 
when most families were Terry or 
Dare. My husband who passed 
away in 1941 was the first to grow 
peaches in these parts. I have been 
to quite a few of the places men- 
tioned in the Forum, and it is nice 
to read about; them. 

Mrs. M. L. Bussing, Holtsville 

Old Picture Postcards 

Will buy picture postcards over 
25 years old, used or unused. 
Please write Felix Reifschneider, 
Box 774, Orlando, Florida 



The Golden Years 

We have enjoyed every copy of 
the Forum and would miss it ter- 
ribly now. Have been going to 
write you to tell how much we en- 
joy it. We feel as though we be- 
long to the same era that the 
Forum often tells about, as we 
celebrated our 55th wedding anni- 
versary on April 5. 

Rose and Sidney Gerrodette 
Patchogue 



Wanted 

Lineage of Jonathan Smith 
(born 1718, came to Orange 
County 1770), and wife Deborah. 
Harry Hawkins Smith, 184 North 
Church St., Goshen, N. Y. 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 

GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. L 



The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Golden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays. Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors Flushing, N. Y. 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 

Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



# 



# 



108 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FOEUM 



^Dhx)mas ^tJfodg/cins's cAdventures 



^ 



# 



COME years ago I wrote of 
^ the later years of Mr. 
Thomas Hodgkins who gave 
the Emma S. Clarke Memorial 
Library to Setauket in mem- 
ory of his niece. I have just 
found in Miss Emily's scrap 
book a most interesting ac- 
count of his early life written 
for The Times at the time of 
his death in 1893. 

I had been told that he 
started life as a poor boy and 
so stated, but from this ac- 
count that evidently was not 
the case. He was born in Lon- 
don in 1803 and was three 
years old when his mother 
died. Later his father mar- 
ried again and this new wife 
found his sea a strong willed 
youngster with whom she 
could not get along. 

His father therefore sent 
him to school in France where 
he received what was known 
as a gentleman's education in 
the classics and arts. (That 
does not sound like a poor 
family). He did not return 
home until he was fifteen. 

His stepmother had no 
more use for the fine French 
gentleman than she had had 
for the willful boy. He simply 
could not stand her and 
against his fathers wishes he 
shipped before the mast on a 
merchant vessel bound for 
India. 

The vessel was wrecked at 
the mouth of the Ganges and 
young Thomas landed in Cal- 
cutta, shoeless and penniless, 
a poor boy indeed. 

Taken sick, he was carried 
to a hospital where the doctor 
told him he had only six 
months to live. However, as 
soon as he was out of the 
hospital, he began to make 
plans to get back to England. 
He prepared a petition to the 
Governor General of India, 
the Marquis of Hastings. 

The fact that the Marquis 
was at his country seat 20 



I(^te Ti'heeler (§trong 

miles away, did not alter his 
determination to present the 
petition in person. With two 
of his sailor comrades he set 
out but these two soon found 
the long walk too hard and 
dropped out. 

Thomas kept on alone, how- 
ever, and finally reached his 
goal. There, ragged and bare- 
foot, he was refused permis- 
sion to see the governor but 
persuaded an attendant to 
present the petition. Even 
with all his education, that 
must have been a remarkable 
petition for a boy of sixteen 
to have written for it gained 
him audience at once. What is 
more he was offered a posi- 
tion in the governor's house- 
hold. 

Young Thomas refused the 
honor saying that if they 
filled his cap every morning 
with gold pieces, he would not 
stay in India. Shortly after- 
wards he returned to England 
and from there went to Spain 
in order to learn that langu- 
age. 

Again returning to Eng- 
land he married and came to 
New York about 1830. Here 
he started a small candy store 
on Greenwich Street which in 



time grew into a million dol- 
lar business. 

His wife, however, did not 
live long to enjoy their pros- 
perity. 

About 1875 he bought a 
place in Old Field, Setauket, 
which he called Bramblety 
Farm (now the home of Mrs. 
Brown). Two nieces came to 
live with him. One married, 
the other died and in memory 
of the latter he founded and 
endowed the Emma S. Clarke 
Library. 

Mr. Hodgkins, having seen 
many wills miscarry, decided 
to give away most of his 
money in his lifetime. He gave 
$200,000 to the Smithsonian 
Institute, half to be used as 
they saw fit; the other half 
to be used for "the diffusion 
of knowledge in the properties 
of air and its relation to the 
physical and cultural welfare 
of mankind." 

To the Royal Institute of 
Great Britain he gave $100.- 
000 to be used in scientific 
research. He died in 1893, and 
his funeral was attended by 
the heads of many of the in- 
stitutions and charities he had 
helped. The Emma S. Clarke 
Library trustees acted as pall- 
bearers. 



■rf.',', -fe^5i>ww J»^srf . >t>' -Si"- "-i ;" 




109 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JUNE 1954 



^^^4i?^^^^iEstate_Brokers Of 



Sayville 

Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4 190O 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
•0 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Rirerhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 

Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC 

Real Estate — Insurance " 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2V2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 



The Eastport Tomb 

I was mterested in the story of 
the Long Island Country Club at 
Eastport as the club site was my 
son s great-grandfather Jayne's 
farm. 

"The Tomb" which stood on the 
grounds of the Long Island Coun- 
try Club at Eastport was taken 
down and the bodies buried, with a 
fence around the plot. I th^nk there 
were three or four bodies down- 
stairs and one upstairs. 

Mrs. Fred L. Swanson 

Patchogue 

Major Andre's Saddle 

A Peekskill item of several years 
^^?, tolfi of Major John Andre's 
saddle, taken by one of his captors 
on September 23, 1780, as he was 
enroute from Raynham Hall in 
Oyster Bay to meet Benedict Ar- 
nold to arrange for the betrayal of 
West Point to the British The Ma- 
jor s captors were John Paulding, 
David Willams and Isaac Van 
Wort who took him into custody 
at Tarrytown and turned him over 
to General Washington's force-, 

Nathan Hale had been hanged by 
the British some time before. 
.V, ji*;®"^ ^" question describes 
the saddle as having a wood frame 
covered with reddish-brown leather 
but without padding for either 
horse or rider. Wooden stirrups 
SIX inches long and four inches 
wide, hang from inch-wide black 
straps, with six-inch leather disks 
Continued on next pag-e 



The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Iniurance Corporation 



= 



Port Washington 

Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc 

Real Estate and Insurance 
185 Main Street 
^I. POrt Washington 7-3124 

Commack 



^' 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 

Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 

age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 

Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 

Huntington 



^ HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

tteaj instate. Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Mur phy Tel. Hunt. 176 

. Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 
Real Estate 
Straight Path, Wyandanch 
Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insuror 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



Farmingdale 



GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 

LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 

65 Hilton Avenue 

Garden City, N. Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

Insurance Mongages 

JOHN T. PULIS 

101 Richmond Ave , Amity ville 
AMilyviile 4-1489 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Central I.lip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Ctolyer. Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ave. 

AMitj^ille 4-0198 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Street EAstport 5-0164 




JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 

Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 

W. E. MAGEE, Inc. 

APPRAISER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Brokers 

Babylon, N. Y. 



r 



no 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurers 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 £. Main St. Patchogue 2300 

Glen Cove 

HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 



Lake Ronkonkoma 



CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 



East Norwich 



Richard Downing & Sons 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 
Tel. Oyster Bay 592 

North Hempstead Turnpike 



■BEHJ.T.WE/r' 

lieaJ Estate -Insurance 
East yfeTAUKET 

Long Island. New York 
■ miOl Setaukel ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199-A Brokdway AMityvilU 4-0376 



Andre's Saddle 

Continued from Page 110 

to prevent the stirrups from chaf- 
ing the horses flanks. 

Carrie Lucas 
' Quogue 

Note: Major Andre's watch was 
another souvenir retained by one 
of his captors. In 1885 it was pur- 
chased at an auction in New York 
for |510. Following his capture, 
Andre was put in the custody of 
Major Benjamin Tallmadge of 
Satauket. Although a fence still 
surrounds the plot where Andre 
was buried at Tappan, his remains 
were taken to England in 1821 and 
placed in Westminster Abbey. He 
was a courageous and loyal subject 
of the King. Editor. 



Pepperidge Trees 

The article "Beetlebung Trees" 
in your April issue is well written. 
I liked the cover picture of your 
December 1953 issue also. Here, I 
miss the pepperidge trees, but the 
fall coloring of the maples is 
matchless. 

Dr. Lewis A. Eldridge, Jr. 
Rensselaerville, N. Y. 
Note: The Beetlebung article 
(about pepperidge trees) was by 
Meade C. Dobson. The Forum's 
December 1953 cover showed road- 
side trees at Hauppauge. Dr. El- 
dridge was a long time resident of 
Great Neck. Edi. 

Miller Place 



ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

^^^^^ Massapequa 



TOM ABBOTT 

Ma»sapequa 

Cor, Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



BELLPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Street BEllport 7-0143 



Robert A. Dodd 


General Insurance 


Real Estate 


RAYMOND A. SWEENEY 


66 Merrick Rd., Copiague AMityville 4-1961 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



C^/i' .-.^ I^ONG ISLAND 

^-^kS^ REAL ESTATB 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



'^Brooklyn and Long Island'' s Largest 

Real Estate Organisation" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-B400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

2^/2% 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



111 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

General Upton 

Continued from page 104 

enterprise too perilous for him 
to undertake. 

Emory Upton's conduct un- 
der shot and shell reads like 
fiction. In the successful 
charge against the enemy's 
position in the early Battle of 
Bull Run, he displayed great 
coolness and dash. His horse 
was shot from under him, and 
a musket ball ripped through 
his left side and arm. Instead 
of quitting the field, Upton re- 
mained at his post of duty and 
later won the commendation 
of his general for his gallan- 
try. Upton was thus gloriously 
launched on a career in which 
he reveled. 

It was at Antietam that the 
valor of Upton, now an experi- 
enced soldier of some half- 
dozen engagements and com- 
mander c-f an artillery bri- 
gade of twenty-six guns, stood 



the most crucial test under a 
literal baptism of fire. "It is 
no exaggeration to say," he 
wrote later in a letter to his 
sister, "that I was fired at a 
dozen times during the day." 
In the assault of the rebel 
intrenchments at Rappahan- 
nock Station, Upton's rare in- 
genuity and cool courage are 
best illustrated. With orders 
to take a rifle pit that directed 
an enfilading fire upon strate- 
gic redoubts held by the Fed- 
eral forces, Upton led two 
regiments within thirty yards 
of the target in the dusk be- 
fore he gave the order to 
charge. The intrenchment was 
carried at the point of the 
bayonet. 

Ulysses S. Grant's "Per- 
sonal Memoirs" recounts vivid- 
ly how Upton, put in command 
of a storming party of twelve 
regiments at Spottsylvania 
Court House, crossed the en- 
emy's intrenchments in an 



JUNE 1954 

almost impenetrable ravine 
and captured several guns and 
some hundreds of prisoners. 
He was forced to abandon the 
advantageous position and the 
guns because of "a lack in 
others of the spirit and dash 
possessed by him." Upton's 
gratifying promotion to briga- 
dier-general by Grant as- 
suaged somewhat the pain of 
a bad wound. 

Opequcn and the capture of 
Winchester climaxed and 
closed Upton's career as a 
leader of infantry in the Union 
Army. It was Upton's brigade 
that finally pierced the en- 
emy's left center in the final 
rush of both infantry and cav- 
alry to make victory certain. 
Upon the death of the com- 
mander of the division, Upton 
promptly took charge. He 
pressed the division forward 
with conspicuous ability and 
energy. In the full tide of suc- 
cess, the gallant young com- 



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112 



JUNE 1954 

mander was severely wounded 
on the inside of the right thigh 
^ by a fragment of a bursting 
^ shell. The muscle was fright- 
fully lacerated, and the ±em- 
oral artery was laid bare. In- 
stead of retiring, as he was 
ordered to do by General 
Sheridan in person, he called 
his staff -surgeon and directed 
him to staunch the bleeding 
wound with a tourniquet. 
Thereupon he called for a 
stretcher and commanded its 
bearers to carry him about on 
the field. He continued to di- 
rect the movements of his vic- 
torious division and did not re- 
linquish his command until 
night closed in on the pursuit. 

In the engagements of Mon- 
tevallo and Ebenezer Church 
and in the capture of Selma 
and Columbus, Upton com- 
manded a cavalry division. At 
Selma in Alabama dismounted 
Federal cavalry; of which Up- 
ton led a detachment, broke 
through and surmounted 

• stockaded fortifications de- 
fended by sheltered infantry 
and superior artillery, captur- 
ing the city and arsenal. By a 
night attack in the last con- 
siderable action of the Civil 
War at Columbus in Georgia, 
Upton's skillful leadership re- 
su'ted in the capture of nearly 
aU of the rebel defenders and, 
more si^rnificantlv, of the 
bridges across the Chatta- 
hoochee River. In securing the 
City of Columbus Upton's 
forces ultimately opened the 
way for the speedy conquest of 
the entire State of Georgia. 

The suicide of one widely 
beloved and honored at a 
period of life when rich har- 
vests might be reaped is al- 
ways astounding. Why did Up- 
ton, who had been un- 
equivocally pronounced in his 
condemnation of suicide, be- 
come the victim of his own 
hand? Grief over the loss of 
his beloved wife of consump- 
"^ tion is hardly a plausible ex- 
^ planation ; she had died eleven 
years before and was but a 
treasured memory. Money, 



likewise, must be eliminated as 
a cause; Upton was in com- 
fortable circumstances. Un- 
happiness in his work, also, is 
invalid; as a colonel of the 
Fourth Artillery he belonged 
to what was perhaps the most 
agreeable arm of the Service, 
reaching the highest rank ob- 
tainable in it without selection, 
seven years sooner than any 
other colonel. 

Among Upton's papers after 
the inquest were found two 
letters, one to his sister and 
the other to the Adjutant Gen- 
eral of the United States 
Army. The first expressed 
concern over the loss of his 
reputation if his newly-devised 
system of infantry tactics 
were impractical. The second, 
which was unfinished, was a 
frank avowal that his system 
was inapplicable to the move- 
ments of companies containing 
two hundred or more men. The 
distress caused by the im- 
pending failure of the tactics 
may have been a contributing 
factor. 

The major contributing fac- 
tor was probably the unbear- 
able frontal headaches, pro- 
duced by what his physicians 
pronounced nasal catarrh. One 
of Unton's physicians wrote 
the foUowine: diagnostic ex- 
planation of his patient's sui- 
cide: 

"I think it probable that the 
catarrh was a symptom ex- 
cited by a slowly-growing 
tumor, or slowly-extending in- 
flammation, which involved 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

the remote recesses of the 
face, and, by a sudden change 
in its character, the mem- 
branes of the brain as well, or 
so excited the brain to mor- 
bid activity as to explain the 
suicidal mania." 

The disorder that clouded 
his mind and confused his 
thoughts explains the depar- 
ture in terminology from well- 
established forms in which his 
military resignation, dated the 
night before he blew himself 
into eternity, was couched. 



Informative and Educational 

One year ago I was presented 
w'th a ffift subscription to the 
Pcrum (by the Union Savings 
Bank, as an anniversary token). I 
find it such an informative and 
educational magazine that you will 
please renew it for another year. 

You perhaps may recall when 
we were together on the staff of 
the Patchogue Argus (now no 
more). 

Henry J. Bishop 

Patchogue 



Yes, Our Writers Are Good 

As I figure it the Forum has 
come out now close to 200 times 
(since January 1938) and your 
corps of historical writers never 
seems to run out of material. Con- 
gratulations to John Tooker on his 
story, "Melancton Smith, Naval 
Hero." in the May issue. 

Alfred Fitch Corson 

Garden City 



Bailey's L. I. History 

Bailey's two volume history of 
Long Island is grand. You did a 
very excellent job. Everyone who 
sees the books thinks they are 
wonderful. Robert M. Smith, Stony 
Brook. 




SIX^^^^^I^u^wI^^ 



113 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JUNE 1954 




Canadian Stadent 

From Traphagen School of Fash- 
ion comes another successful young 
designer and custom dressmaker, 
this time a Canadian, who chose 
his hometown as the best career 
locale. "If I can make good with 
people who 'knew me when,' I can 
make good any place," he says, and 
he is doing just that. 

Billie Burke was a recent cust- 
omer of Louis Berai in tets St. 



DRY CLEANING 



Catherines, Ontario, salon. She or- 
dered dresses for herself and took 
along some sketches to show her 
daughter. So now, in addition to 
the prominent women of his own 
community whose confidence he 
has won, his reputation is spread- 
ing. His designs are featured in 
magazines and newspapers, and 
he is in demand as a speaker at 
women's clubs and forums. Berai 
aims to express in clothes each 
customer's personality as well as 
flat+er and to do something for her 
type. Also, he creates to please her 
personal taste and meet the re- 
quirements of her daily life. 

This brilliant young designer 
graduated in 1950 from Traphagen, 
the internationally known School 
of Fashion at 16&6 Broadway, New 
York. At the termination of his 
studies, he opened his own salon 
immediately. It was then that he 
changed his name for business pur- 
poses from Lewis Aiken to Louis. 
Berai. Although he moved to larger 
quarters over a year ago, the new 
establishment is already, again, 
straining at the seams. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapequa (Eait) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



^EHiza. 



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•IG u V Ml OM 

STOP in and let us 
demonstrate the 

NEW ZENITH / -^ 

ROYAL \ model 

HEARING AID 

In Stock: Batteries for all 
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114 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLtAND forum 



• 



t 




Old Westbury, who has long sum- 
mered at Orient where his family 
tree is deeply rooted, will likewise 
contribute greatly to the success 
of the Museum as its curator. 

Village House is worth a visit 
by every Long Islander who appre- 
ciates the interesting background 
of eastern Suffolk County and 
would attain a broader understand- 
ing of the subject. The Museum 
will open for the season this year 
as usual the first of July- 



Village Mouse, Orient 



Whaling Museum Report 

Tlie 11th report of the Whaling 
Museum Society Inc. of Cold 
Spring Harbor, of which Mr. Hoyt 
Ammidon is the newly elected 
president and Walter K. Earle the 
continuing vice-president and cura- 
tor, shows the institution to be 
performing the same fine service 
as always since its founding in 
1942. 



See Historic Village House 

The one time home of Historian 
Augustus Griffin at Orient, near 
the easterly end of Southold town, 
is among Long Island's outstand- 
ing points of cultural interest. Now 
the home of the Oysterponds His- 
torical Society and open as a 
museum during the summer 
months, it has become widely 
known under the simple name of 
Village House. 

It was in this two-story, rectang- 
ular homestead that Augustus 
Griffin, schoolmaster, auctioneer 
and philosopher, wrote the now 
frequently quoted history which 
was published in 1856 as Griffin's 
Journal when he had passed his 
ninetieth birthday. According to 
this Journal, Orient was then 
known as Lower Oysterponds while 
today's East Marion was Upper 
Oysterponds and present Orient 
Point was generally referred to 
simply as Oysterponds. During 
colonial times much of the area 
was town-owned and used as com- 
mon pasturage grounds by Southold 
town farmers. 

The Oysterponds Historical Soci- 
ety is one of the most successful 
such organizations in Suffolk 
County. In 1954 under the presi- 
dency of George R. Latham, the 
present curator, the Society dedi- 
cated the homestead and opened it 
to the public since when each sum- 
mer, from July 1 through October, 
on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 
and Sundays, from two to five 
p. m., visitors are admitted free to 
view the many fine collections there 
assembled. , 

Since the death last January of 
Tabea Hofman, assistant curator 
and one of the country's leading 
painters of wild flowers, many of 
her paintings, each notably true in 
color and character to its botani- 
cal subject, have remained at the 
Museum and will continue to be 



exhibited there. Among other 
items are antiquities and historical 
data, ledgers of the old village 
store, a replica of the Orient wind- 
mill, relics of whaling days, arrow- 
heads and pottery, primitive farm- 
ing implements and articles repre- 
sentative of local Americana gen- 
erally. 

Since George R. Latham gave up 
the presidency, the office has been 
ably administered by Howard L. 
Young whose knowledge of toWn 
history makes him well fitted to 
guide the destiny of the Society. 
Former President Latham, Mine- 
ola businessman and resident of 



Father's Day Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minton Bone, Spode, Doulton 

Syracuse, Lenox 

IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Fostoria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 

253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 




Save at Bay Shore Federal Savings 

•Big Dividends compounded semi-annually. 
•Your savings are insured up to ^10,000. 

BAY SHORE FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 
300 East Main St. Bay Shore, N. Y. 

MEMBER FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK 



115 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JUNE 1954 




Peconic's Mill 

Continued from page 107 

zens living in the neighbor- 
hood. Some of the fine furn- 
ishings of the vessel came 
ashore, too, in one way or an- 
other, and are said to have 
adorned the parlor of many an 
old home. The engines of the 
Commodore are believed to 
be still embedded in the sands 
offshore. 

Shortly after the faH of the 
windmill the watermill was 
abandoned and it slowly dis- 
integrated down the years. It 
became a favorite playground 
for neighborhood children 
who liked to amuse themselves 
among its timbers and on the 
heavy stones. It was also in- 
teresting to watch men catch- 
ing blackfish, sea-robins and 
snappers from the remains of 
tho bridge. Many a grandpar- 
ent remembers those days 
with pleasure. 

An Artistic Map 

The map of Long Island in this 
issue is reproduced from the 
original watercolor by the well 
known artist Cyril A. Lewis, 
A. W S. whose paintings have 
been awarded numerous national 
citations. 

Readers of the Forum are fami- 
liar with Mr. Lewis's watercolors 
and sketches of Long Island's 
colonial homes, churches and other 
subjects of historic interest as 
shown from time to time on its 
cover and to illustrate various 
articles. 

The original map was painted by 
Mr. Lewis for Mr. Harry L. R. 
Clapp, president of the Columbia 
Savings and Loan Association, of 
Woodhaven, Queens County, and 
will be displayed in its bank at 
93-22 Jamaica Avenue. 

Mr. Lewis is a member of the 
Allied Artists of Amerrlca, tihe 
Audubon Artists, the Salmagundi 
Club and secretary of the Ameri- 
can Watercolor Society. 



m 



Village House 

Arts, Crafts, Americana 

Museum of the 
Oysterponds Historical 
Society at Orient, L. L 

Open July 1 to October 31 

Tuesdays. Thursdays, 

Saturdays and Sundays 

2 to 5 P. M. Free Admission 



^m 



116 



JUNE 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



That Fanny Bartlett Station 

Aunt Fanny Homan was an un- 
usual and unique character, as 
was her husband, Frank Homan. 
They lived in a low, one-stoiy cot- 
tage located on the east side of 
Napeague Harbor. Their house was 
built on a sand dune very near the 
bay, about twenty feet above high 
water mark. A great deal of drift- 
wood was used in its construction. 
There was also a barn and chicken 
house built in the same manner. A 
typical home for a bayman. 

Frank Homan was a native of 
Greenport; his brother was a well- 
digger. He dug a well for my 
father when I was a small inquisi- 
tive boy and no doubt hindered 
more than I helped. This was a 
good well and is at the present 
time. 

Aunt Fanny was a native of 
New Haven or had lived there at 
one time. I imagine Bartlett was 
her maiden name of which she was 
very proud. She gave the impres- 
sion that she had enjoyed wonder- 
ful educational advantages, even 
college. To prove this, she was fond 
of using very long words with 
plenty of adjectives. I cannot sub- 
scribe to this boast of her educa- 
tion, but I will say she was a well- 
read woman and gave very good 
advice to everyone in a very bossy 
manner. 

She could well have been called 
the "Harbor Master". Fanny was 
the "head of the house" and not 
Frank. She saw to it that Frank 
was kept busy clamming and fish- 
ing. They sat up very late at n:ght 
and as a result found it difficult to 
get up before ten a.m. 



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The clams in front of their place 
were the largest and best I ever 
saw. She took it upon herself to 
chase all other baymen from dig- 
ging clams in front of her prem- 
ises. Sometimes this caused a bit- 
ter warfare but Aunt Fanny al- 
ways won the day. 

There was a fleet of fishing 
smacks that made Napeague their 
usual harbor for the night, espe- 
cially when there was a gale of 
wind, among them the smack 



Louise (Captain W. H. Tuthill), 
the Loretta (Captain Charles 
Brown), the Cora L. Griffing 
(Capt;ain F. J. Tuthill), and the 
William T. Seward (Captain Frank 
Rackett). Many other vessels used 
this harbor as being the safest lit- 
tle harbor on the whole coast. In- 
cluded among those who used it 
was the writer of this article. 

In the late fall, the fishermen 
and all of Fanny's neighbors re- 
turned to their homes leaving her 




Celebrating Our 

65th ANNIVERSARY 

with the opening of 

Our 

New and Modern 

Building 

JUNE 26, 1954 



Columbia Savings and Loan Association 

93-22 JAMAICA AVENUE, WOODHAVEN 21, N. Y. 



%\)t 1801 House 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 



Walt Whitman as a youth in the 1830's lived west of Baby- 
lon where his father owned a farm, later the Gilmore estate. 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y. 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

AMITYVILLE BATTERY & IGNITION SERVICE. Inc. 
Broadway and Avon Place Phones 1174 - 2095 AmityviUe 



117 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

and Prank to the tender mercies 
of the fish-hawKs and. the winter 
season. When their provisions ran 
out, they hitched up old uobbin 
ana drove to Amagansett for sup- 
plies. Upon their return in tne 
late evening, the fire was started 
and a regular feast was prepared. 
Sometimes she would invite her 
fishermen friends to have dinner 
with them. They always came back 
witft glowing accounts of what a 
wonderful cook she was. I cannot 
vouch for this for I was not on 
Fanny's list. 

She was informed of all that 
went on from Amagansett to Mon- 
tauk Point amd she never kept the 
news and scandal to herself. On 
one occasion in helping her hus- 
band tar the fishing nets, she got 
quite a bit of coal-tar in her hair 
which, of coHrse, did not improve 
her appearance for the time being. 
I will say she was aai inde- 
pendent and fearless woman; she 
helped her husband to eke out a 
living in that most barren place. 
When the LIRE decided to lay its 
tracks from Amagansett to Fort 
Pond Bay, they made no provision 
for way-stations. The fishing 
smacks could run into Port Pond 
Bay and ship direct to Fulton Fish 
Market in New York City, but 
there was no provision for the 
little fellow who fished off the 
beach using only a small flat-bot- 
tom rowboat. 

This is where Aunt Fanny 
stepped into the picture. She inter- 
viewed the R. R. officials and re- 
ceived very little encouragement, 
but she persisted and finally she 
was promised they would build a 
siding platform for the fish and a 
shelter for passengers who wished 
to take the train. This was dur- 
ing the years 1894-95.' Her inter- 
est was much appreciated by all 
the baymen. 

Captain Eugene S. Griffing 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 



PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amityville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



Smith Knows the Beaches 

Julian Denton Smith's articles on 
"Seagulls and Spearing" in the 
May issue sustains his standing as 



JUNE 1954 

a true observer of the great out- 
doors beside the ocean. 

Peter F. Jefferson 
Huntington 



''The Long Island Indian" 

By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civilizatoin 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Islanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityville 4-09«9-4-091« 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



Over 100 Years 

of 

DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 




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HUNTIN(;tON SMITHTOWN 
WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 



BRENTWOOD 

Suffolk & 4th 
Phone BR 3-4511 



BAY SHORE 

Main 6f Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Amityville Cold Fur Storage Co. 

100% all risk insurance. 18 degrees maintained to kill moths and keep 

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134 Bway. AMityville 4-0535 Sam Bendersky, Prop, storage Vault Built by General Electric 



•i 



118 



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Get full facts today at tmy of our local business offices 



• LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 



For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

PhoneB Patchogue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merrick Rd. Amifcyville 
Phone AMJtyvMIe 4-9768 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 



The Shoreham 

"0« The Great South Bay" 

Since 1903 

Specializing, in SEA FOOD 

Special Luncheons Daily 

Foot of Fostei- Ave. Sayville 

Tel. SAyville 4-«050 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



Water Mill Hotel 

In July 1950 you published an 
article entitled "Famous Fummer 
Hotels". Whether the eld Nowedo- 
nah House at Water Mill, owned by 
the Benedict family, would come 
under that heading, I am not sure, 
but to me, a veiy small child, it 
was a hotel of hu^e proportions. 
This was about 1885. 

In the dining-room the guests, 
usually between twenty-five and 
thirty in numher, were seated at 
one long table and were served by 
colored waitresses imported from 
New York. 

A very important person in the 
kitchen, along with Hannah, the 
cook, was an Indian woman from 
the Shinnecock Reservation. Her 
name was Mary Ann Cuffee. She 
helped grandmother with the carv- 
ing, and always addressed her as 
"Old Mitt"— short for Mistress, I 
suppose. Mary Ann was a great 
favorite with us children and many 
a choice tid-'bit came our way ac- 
countable to her generosity. 

My uncle had a sailboat in Mecox 
Bay and was in the habit of taking 
the guests over to the Ocean bath- 
ing beach every morning. A num- 
ber were always late in getting to 
the dock and one morning, upon 
arrival, they were surprised to be 
greeted by a large sign reading, 
"This boat starts at 9 o'elcek — 
ready or not." 

The old water mill which be- 
longed to the place was an intrigu- 
ing feature with all. Uncle Frank 
made ice cream in the basement 
and sold it in the adjoining villages 
both on the North and South Forks. 
(Ir, fnct, Benedict's ice cream was 
quite famous on the eastern end of 
Long Island.) In the floor of the 
mill was a trap-door around which 
we youngsters sat to fish for ale- 
wives in the water below. I wonder 
that we weren't drowned. 

Both the house and the mill have 
passed out of the possession of the 
family. Very few changes have 
been made in either, except that 
the maehineiy for grinding the 
grist is gone, as are the old mill- 
stones which now stand as war 
memorial monuments on the village 
green. The old boarding house is 
a private summer home and the 
New York State Association for 
the Blind now uses the mill in the 
summer as a tearoom and sales- 
room for articles made by the 
blind. 

(Mrs.) Eunice B. Smith 

Southampton 



DINE AT 

FRANK FRIEDE'S 

Riverside Inn 

Table d'Hote and a la Carte 

On Jericho Turnpike 
Route 25 

SIMITHTOWN, L. I., N. Y 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Baby Ion 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



Enroute to the Hamptons 

on Montauk Highway 
lisiiCASABASSO-^ 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon and Dinner 

Westhampton 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 



STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

TelB. 248 ; Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

FarminKdale 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort of 

^Ine hospitality Shoppe 

where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 Amityville, L. I. 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT"